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Minister of Mines PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT For the Year ended 31st December 1948. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1950

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 Minister of Mines
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year ended 31st December
1948
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Don MoDiabmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1949. BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. R. C. MacDonald, Minister.
John F. Walker, Deputy Minister.
James Strang, Chief Inspector of Mines.
G. Cave-Browne-Cave, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
Hartley Sargent, Chief Mining Engineer.
P. J. Mulcahy, Chief Gold Commissioner To His Honour Charles Arthur Banks, C.M.G.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The Annual Report of the Mining Industry of the Province for the year 1948 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
R. C. MacDONALD,
Minister of Mines.
Minister of Mines' Office,
May, 1949.  CONTENTS.
Page.
Review of the Mining Industry  7
Statistics—
Method of computing Production  11
Table I.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1947 and 1948_   13
Table II.—Average Metal Prices, 1901-48  14
Table III.—Total Production to 1948  15
Table IV—Total Production for each Year, 1852-1948  15
Table V.—Quantities and Values of Mine Products, 1939-48  16
Table VI.—Production of Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1887-1948 17
Table VII.—Value of Gold Production to End of 1948  19
Table VIII.—Total Value of Mine Production, by Divisions, 1943, 1944, 1945,
1946, 1947, and 1948  20
Table IXa.—Production in Detail of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper,
Lead, and Zinc, 1947 and 1948  21
Table IXb.—Production Value of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead,
and Zinc, 1943-48  22
Table IXc.—Production and Value of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper,
Lead, and Zinc, 1900-48  23
Table X.—Production in Detail of Structural Materials, 1947 and 1948  24
Table XL—Production in Detail of Miscellaneous Metals, Minerals, and Materials, 1947 and 1948  25
Table XII (Graph).—British Columbia Mine Production, 1895-1948  26
Table XIII (Graph) .—British Columbia Lode Mines Production, 1913-48  27
Table XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date  28
Table XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens from 1895 to 1925  28
Table XVI.—Coke and By-products Production, British Columbia, 1947 and
1948  29
Table XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1948  30
Table XVIII.—Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity, and Process Supplies,
1948  34
Table XIX.—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode Minerals, 1901-48 ■  35
Table XX.—Men employed in the Mining Industry of British Columbia, 1901-
1948 :  36
Table XXI.—Lode Metal Producers in 1948  37
Table XXII.—Lode Metal Mines employing an Average of Ten or more Men
during 1948  40
Departmental Work—
Administrative Branch  41
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)  41
Amalgamation of Mining Divisions  42
Peace River Mining Division  42
Gold Purchasing  42
List of Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-mining Recorders 43
Gold Commissioners' and Mining Recorders' Office Statistics, 1948  45
Chemical Laboratories  46
Inspection Branch—Organization and Staff  47 A 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1948.
Departmental Work—Continued, page.
Mineralogical Branch     48
Grub-staking Prospectors    48
Museums    49
Publications    49
Joint Offices    49
Geological Survey of Canada    50
Metal-mining (Lode)    53
Placer-mining  171
Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals  181
Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries  191
Coal-mining  201
Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations  243
List of Publications  256
List of Libraries  259
Synopses of Mining Laws  261
Prices charged for Acts  270
ILLUSTRATIONS.
Photographs.
(After page 51.)
Plate.
I.—A. Copper Mountain mine.
B. Hedley and the Nickel Plate mill.
II and III. Adjoining air photographs at Trail.
IV.—A. Sullivan mine surface plant, Mark Creek.
B. New slope portal, Tsable River Colliery.
Drawings.
Fig.
1 to 16. Listed on 58-59
17. Sketch-map of gypsum deposits, Windermere  (Columbia Gypsum Products,
Inc.)  186
18. Sketch-map of Bowron River showing distribution of coal formation and older
rocks Facing 233
19. Plan and section of workings on Lot 9593, Bowron River Facing 235 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER
OF MINES, 1948.
Review of the Mining Industry.
By Hartley Sargent.
The value of British Columbia mineral production in 1948 was $152,524,752.
This record value may be compared with $113,221,254, the 1947 value, and with
$60,525,000, the average value for the preceding twenty-five years. There were
moderate increases in the quantities of all the principal metals and of structural
materials in 1948, but the great increase in value can be traced in a great measure
to substantially increased unit prices for copper, lead, zinc, and coal and to a moderate
increase in the price of silver. Quantities and values of the principal products for
1948 and 1947 are given in Table I (p. 13). Metal prices for each year beginning
with 1901 are given in Table II (p. 14). The valuation of coal is the subject of a
paragraph on page 12.
The quantities of the principal products mined in 1948 are considerably greater
than in several recent years when the output was reduced because of war conditions
and strikes. In quantity, placer gold, silver, and copper were considerably less than
the average for the last twenty-five years, while lode gold, lead, and zinc were not very
far from the twenty-five-year average; however, the high prices for silver, copper,
lead, and zinc in 1948 gave the output of these five metals a combined value of approximately $126,500,000, compared with $55,500,000 in 1938, and an average of about
$47,200,000 for the last twenty-five years.
Antimony, bismuth, cadmium, tin, tungsten, and sulphur had a combined value of
$5,190,660 in 1948. The price for tungsten concentrates fell from $30 to $24.50 per
unit of tungstic oxide during 1948. The Emerald mill has been converted to treat
lead-zinc ore, and the production of tungsten concentrates has been suspended.
Coal production in 1948 was 1,809,018 short tons, compared with 1,923,573 short
tons in 1947. The 1948 output was somewhat less in quantity than the average for the
nineteen-forties but was considerably greater than in the nineteen-thirties. Because
of the increased price, the value was the highest for any year since 1929. Production on Vancouver Island has been reduced in recent years because of the declining
output of the Nanaimo field. The Tsable River mine near Comox has been under
development, and when it reaches full production, an increase in the Vancouver Island
output is expected. Since 1940 well over half the output for the Province has come
from the Crowsnest Pass field, and in the past two years production from strip mines
in that field has amounted to an important part of the total output. Strip mining has
also been started in the Princeton field.
Exploratory work has demonstrated that the gypsum deposit, discovered in 1947,
near Windermere is very large. It is proposed to ship crude gypsum from this deposit
to a processing plant to be built near Spokane. Exploratory work was done on a deposit
of asbestos (variety anthophyllite) near Okanagan Falls.
The output of cement, clay products, sand, gravel, and other structural materials
was high in 1948. The loss of the Kilgard plant of the Clayburn Company by fire,
early in 1949, will seriously reduce the output of clay products until a new plant is built. A 8 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1948.
Drag-line dredges accounted for most of the placer gold recovered in 1948. After
construction of 68 miles of road from the Alaska Highway a dredge was built on
McDame Creek and was operated from May until the end of the season. A new dredging operation was begun on Pine Creek. These two new dredges and the dredge of
the Swift River Dredging Company recovered most of the placer gold mined and were
responsible for the considerable increase over the 1947 output. The Atlin placer-
mining area had another very quiet season, and there was less than usual activity in
hydraulic mining in the Cariboo. The Lowhee hydraulic mine, which has been operated
each year since about the beginning of the century, was operated successfully by four
men on a lay;  company operation of the mine ended in 1947.
In 1948 lode-gold mining may have passed the most difficult part of a very unfavourable period, marked first by war-time difficulties in obtaining men, supplies, and equipment, and subsequently by greatly increased prices for materials, greatly increased
wages, shortage of labour, and the loss of the exchange premium. Unit costs are still
high, but more labour is obtainable and some benefit is being received under the
" Emergency Gold Mining Assistance Act."
The Silbak Premier mine was shut down in July and the Privateer was shut down
in November. Production began at the Premier mine in 1918, and continued under
the name of Silbak Premier when the adjoining Premier, B.C. Silver, and Sebakwe
properties were consolidated in 1935. The combined production amounted to about
1,750,000 oz. of gold and 37,000,000 oz. of silver, as well as some copper, lead, and zinc.
Dividends paid amounted to more than $21,000,000. The mine was not eligible for
assistance under the " Emergency Gold Mining Assistance Act " because silver, lead,
and zinc were contributing more than 30 per cent, of the value of the output. The
Polaris-Taku, Cariboo Gold Quartz, Island Mountain, Bralorne, Pioneer, Nickel Plate,
and Hedley Mascot mines were operated throughout the year. Milling was resumed
late in the year at the Sheep Creek mine.
Prevailing high prices stimulated interest in silver and base-metal properties, and
substantial progress was made in development programmes and in provision of plants.
The major copper producers operated continuously. A mill was built at the gold-copper
property of Vananda Mining Company at Vananda, and exploratory work was done on
properties near Nicola and Phoenix.
Silver and silver-lead-zinc properties in widely separated parts of the Province
received much attention. At the Sullivan mine the new main haulage-level was nearly
completed and changes were being made in the mill. Exploratory work and development
were done by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company on properties at Riondel,
near Nakusp, and at Tulsequah. Other companies did work on properties in the
East Kootenay, Slocan-Ainsworth, and Nelson areas, and at Hazelton and Alice Arm.
The Sullivan, Base Metals, Lucky Jim, Whitewater, Western Exploration, and Highland
Bell mines were the principal producers of silver-lead-zinc and silver ore. The Britannia mine, in addition to copper, produced a substantial quantity of zinc concentrates.
Ore from several properties was milled on a customs basis at the Western Exploration
and Whitewater concentrators. A new mill at the Silver Standard mine at Hazelton
came into production in September, a mill for the Torbrit silver mine was essentially
complete by the end of 1948, and preparations for production of lead-zinc ore were well
advanced at the Emerald and the Reeves MacDonald properties.
The high prices for silver, lead, and zinc made it possible to ship ores and concentrates long distances. In 1948 shipments were made to the Trail smelter from Australia, Hong Kong, Peru, and Quebec, as well as from northern Washington.
Late in 1948, production of iron ore for export to a ferro-alloy plant at Wenatchee,
Wash., was begun near Quinsam Lake, Vancouver Island. REVIEW OP THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 9
Production was recorded in 1948 from 99 lode-mining operations, including gold
mines, copper mines, silver and silver-lead-zinc mines, one tungsten mine, and one
producer of siliceous flux. These numbers include properties from which shipments
of a few tons were made as well as the large producers. The total quantity* of ore
mined in 1948 was 5,766,970 tons. The net value of the output of lode mines was
$101,519,910. The quantity of coal mined was 1,809,018 tons. The average number
employed in all branches of the mining industry was 16,397, salaries and wages totalled
$38,813,486, expenditures for fuel and electricity amounted to $6,139,174, and for
process supplies amounted to $11,532,181; Dominion taxes amounted to $16,974,914,
Provincial taxes to $5,141,148, and municipal and other taxes to $475,516; Workmen's
Compensation, silicosis, unemployment insurance, and other levies amounted to
$1,530,238;  dividends paid in 1948 amounted to $37,672,319.
* Including tungsten ore and siliceous flux from lode mines.  Statistics.
Mining statistics are collected and compiled and the statistical tables for this
Report are prepared by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of Trade
and Industry.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION.
The tables of statistics recording the mineral production of the Province for each
year are compiled from certified returns made by the operators of mines, augmented
by some data obtained from the Dominion of Canada assay office and from the operators
of customs smelters. The value of each mineral product, in Canadian funds, is calculated at the average price for the year (see below). The quantities of metals are net
after making deductions for losses in smelting and refining.
In preparing the statistics for the 1925 Annual Report, changes were made in the
procedures for computing the quantities and values of metals produced, but the general
style of the tables was not changed. The procedures adopted for the 1925 Report are
still used essentially unchanged, and the same arrangement of tables has been retained,
but new tables have been added from time to time.
Production figures, given in notes dealing with individual lode-mining operations
on later pages of this Annual Report, are the assay contents of the products shipped
(ore, concentrates, or bullion), no deductions being made for losses in smelting and
refining. In previous Annual Reports the production figures given for individual properties are net, deductions for smelting and refining losses having been made from the
assay contents, in accordance with the procedures adopted by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics and the co-operating Provincial Departments of Mines.
Metals.
Placer Gold.
The data on placer-gold production were very largely obtained from the Gold
Commissioners until 1925. The value of placer gold in dollars is now obtained from
returns received annually from the operators. At the old standard price, $20.67 per
ounce of fine gold, $17 was regarded as a close approximation of the average value per
ounce of crude placer gold produced in British Columbia. Dividing the production
reported in dollars by 17 gave the equivalent in crude ounces. Beginning with 1932
the average value per crude ounce has been based on the same fineness but has recognized the varying price of gold. For the years 1940 to 1945, inclusive, the price per
fine ounce was $38.50 in Canadian funds, and the equivalent average value per crude
ounce was $31.66. The official price for gold in Canada was reduced to $35 per fine
ounce, effective July 5th, 1946; the average price for the year was approximately
$36.75; the equivalent average price per crude ounce was $30.22. The price per fine
ounce in 1947 and 1948 was $35 and the equivalent price per crude ounce was $28.78.
Lode Metals, Net Contents.
From the total assay contents of silver, copper, lead, and zinc, the net contents are
calculated by making deductions for smelting and refining losses at rates agreed upon
with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and co-operating Provincial Departments of
Mines.    For the procedure prior to the year 1925, see foot-note under Table II, page 14.
Average Prices.
In the interests of uniformity the Statistical Bureaus of the Provinces and the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics use the same average metal prices in valuing mineral
production. Up to and including the year 1939 the prices used in evaluating metal and
mineral production were:—
11 A 12 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1948.
Gold and Silver.—The average United States prices for the year, as quoted in
the Engineering and Mining Journal, converted into Canadian funds at
the average exchange rate.
Copper, Lead, and Zinc—The average London Metal Market prices for the
year converted into Canadian funds at the average exchange rate. Until
1932 the New York price for copper was used.
Suspension of trading on the London Metal Exchange in September, 1939, and the
controls of metals during the war years necessitated changes from the procedures
which had been followed.
The method of arriving at the price for gold continued unchanged, but the prices
for the metals controlled were those set by the Canadian Metals Controller. In 1945
the controls were largely removed from sales but not from prices. Control of metal
prices ended on June 6th, 1947. For 1945 and subsequent years the prices are those
computed by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, using information supplied by the
principal Canadian refiners of silver and the base metals.
In the period 1945-47 the prices received for silver, lead, and zinc sold for use in
Canada were substantially less than the prices received for these metals exported to the
United States. The prices for silver in 1945 and 1946 and for copper, lead, and zinc
in 1946 and 1947 are weighted averages, taking into consideration sales in Canada at
the ceiling prices and sales abroad at New York prices converted into Canadian funds.
For the years 1940-45 the price for gold in Canada was $38.50 per ounce. Since
July 5th, 1946, the price has been $35 per ounce. The average price used for 1946 was
$36.75 per ounce.
In computing the average metal prices for 1948, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics
used generally the monthly quotations in the Engineering and Mining Journal and,
where possible, evaluated at the world market. For some metals such as silver, antimony, and tin, Montreal quotations have been used.
In addition to metal sold in Canada, British Columbia silver, lead, and zinc are
exported to the United States, Great Britain, and other markets abroad, and for some
years all British Columbia copper has been sold in the United States. If the United
States prices had been used instead of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics average price,
additional amounts could be credited to the copper production values, as follows: 1943,
$473,845; 1944, $315,815; 1945, $82,728; 1946, $458,513; 1947, $515,614; a total for
the five years of $1,846,515. It is to be noted that 1948 copper production is valued at
the United States average for export f.o.b. refinery.
Fuel.
In 1926 a change was made in computing coal and coke statistics. The practice in
former years had been to list as coke production only the coke made in bee-hive ovens,
the coal used in making it not being listed; coke made in by-product ovens was not
listed as coke, but the coal used in making this coke was credited as coal production.
The result was that both the coal and the coke production figures were incomplete.
Starting with the 1926 Annual Report, the standard practice of the Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, has been adopted. This consists of crediting all coal produced, including that used in making coke, as primary mine production. Coke-making is considered
a manufacturing industry. As it is, however, of interest to the mining industry, a
table included in the Report shows the total coke produced in the Province, together
with by-products, and the values given by the producers. This valuation of coke is not,
of course, included in the total gross mine production of the Province.
Coal production is given in Table XIV. Up to and including the year 1947, production was recorded in long tons (2,240 lb.). Beginning with 1948, production is
given in short tons (2,000 lb.). The quantity of coal produced in the preceding years
has been recalculated in short tons. STATISTICS.
A 13
From 1918 to 1930, coal production was valued at $5 per long ton. In 1931 the
price used was $4.50, and from 1932 to 1946 the price used was $4.25 per long ton.
For 1947 the price used was $5 per long ton. For 1948 the price used was $6 per
short ton.
TABLE I.—British Columbia Mine Production,* 1947 and 1948.
Quantity,
1947.
Quantity,
1948.
Value.
1947.
Value,
1948.
Per Cent.
Increase ( + ) or
Decrease ( —).
Quantity.     Value.
Metallics.
Antimony	
Bismuth	
Cadmium	
Copper  lb.
Gold, lode fine, oz.
Gold, placer crude, oz.
Iron ore	
Lead  lb.
Platinum	
Silver  oz.
Tin  lb.
Tungsten concentrates	
Zinc 	
41,783,921
243,282
6,969
306,400,709
5,707,691
..lb.
268,450,926
Totals..
43,025,388
286,230
20,332
332,996,351
6,718,122
296,012,941
Fuel.
Coal (2,000 lb.).
1,923,573
NON-METALLICS.
Bavites, diatomite, and mica	
Fluxes—limestone, quartz tons
Granules—slate and rock, talc tons
Gypsum and gypsum products	
Iron oxides	
Sodium carbonate tons
Sulphurf  tons
Totals	
102,918
1,156
163
157,161
Clay Products and other Structural
Materials.
Clay Products.
Brick—
Common  No.
Face, paving, and sewer brick No.
Fire-bricks, blocks	
Fire-clay  tons
Structural tile—hollow blocks	
Drain-tile,  sewer-pipe No.
Pottery—glazed or unglazed	
Other clay products:   bentonite	
Totals	
4,318,000
1,232,812
1,809,018
83,389
4,958
144,448
384,255
560,183
941,266
8,519,741
8,514,870
200,585
41,884,977
59
4,109,538
517,794
680,792
30,147,039
113,173
444,000
1,126,437
9,616,174
10,018,050
585,200
3,735
60,072,542
21,175
5,038,592
688,567
1,409,297
41,234,603
96,461,099
130,371,545
8,587,380
10,854,108
52,362
174,655
19,686
523,298
464
1,793
1,503,714
25,734
248,977
68,937
546,707
30,472
1,409,156
2,275,972 I    2,330,877
1,962,583
Other Structural Materials.
Cement	
Lime  tons
Sand and gravel	
Stone tons
Rubble, riprap, crushed rock tons
Totals	
Total value	
19,835
222,044
3,810,000
2,584,752
2,385,470
122,660
64,849
389,899
9,675
158,276
361,975
3,476
9,332
1,120,142
209,453  |
3,579
896,780
1,896,772
714,126
1,828,919
119,971
216,873
4,776,661
113,221,254
111,300
129,268
392,458
32,922
116,513
597,541
5,138
9,611
1,394,751
2,441,304
1,177,632
3,060,535
54,220
839,780
7,573,471
152,524,752
I
+3.0
+ 17.6
+191.7
+8.7
+17.7
-10.!
-19.0
+329.0
— 11.7
+ 109.6
+ 21.5
+ 38.1
— 82.0
+303.9
— 70.6
—20.7
+19.7
+12.9
+17.6
+ 191.7
+43.4
+22.6
+33.0
+107.0
+36.8
+35.2
+ 26.4
— 49.0
+42.6
+250.2
+ 4.5
-100.0
-6.3
-2.4
-9.3
+99.4
+ 0.7
+240.3
— 26.4
+65.1
+47.8
+3.0
+24.5
+28.7
+65.0
+67.3
—54.8
+287.2
+ 58.3
-34.7
* For information on computing and evaluating mine production, see pages 11 and 12.
t Sulphur  content  of  pyrites   shipped  and  estimated  sulphur  contained   in   sulphuric  acid  made  from  waste
smelter-gases. A 14
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1948.
TABLE II.—Average Metal Prices* used in compiling Value of Provincial
Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc.
Year.
Gold.
Fine Ounce.
Silver,
Fine Ounce.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
1901	
$
20.67
Cents.
56.002 N.Y.
49.55
50.78
53.36 „
51.33
63.45  „
62.06  ,,
50.22
48.93
50.812 „
50.64
57.79
56.80
52.10  ,,
47.20
62.38  ,.
77.35
91.93
105.57  „
95.80
59.52
64.14  .,
61.63  „
63.442 „
69.065 „
62.107 „
56.37 „
58.176 ..
52.993 „
38.154 „
28.700 „
31.671 „
37.832 ,,
47.461 „
64.790 ,,
45.127 ,,
44.881 ,.
43.477 ,,
40.488 ,,
38.249 ,,
38.261 .,
41.166 ,,
45.254 „
43.000 „
47.000 ,,
83.650 ,,
72.000 „
75.000 Mont.
Cents.
16.11 N.Y.
1170  „
13.24  „
12.82  „
15.59
19.28
20.00  „
13.20
12.98  „
12.738 „
12.38  „
16.341 „
15.27  „
13.60
17.28
27.202 „
27.18
24.63
18.70
17.45
12.50  ,.
13.38 ,.
14.42
13.02  ,.
14.042 ,,
13.795 ,,
12.92  „
14.570 „
18.107 „
12.982 ..
8.116 „
6.380 Lond.
7.454 ,,
7.419 „
7.795 „
9.477 „
13.078 „
9.972 „
10.092 „
10.086 „
10.086 „
10.086 „
11.75
12.000 .,
12.550 ,,
12.80
20.39 ,.
22.35 U.S.
Cents.
2.577 N.Y.
3.66 .,
3.81
3.88  „
4.24  „
4.81
4.80
3.78
3.85  „
4.00
3.98
4.024 „
3.93
3.50  „
4.17  „
6.172 ,.
7.91
6.67 „
5.19
7.16
4.09
5.16
6.54
7.287 .,
7.848 Lond.
6.751 „
5.256 „
4.575 „
5.050 ,,
3.927 ..
2.710 „
2.113 „
2.391 „
2.436 „
3.133 ,,
3.913 „
5.110 „
3.344 „
3.169 ,,
3.362 „
3.362 „
3.362 „
3.754 „
4.500 „
5.00  ,,
6.75  „
13.67  „
18.04  ,,
Cents.
1902	
1903  	
1904  	
1905  	
1906  	
1907          	
1908          ...      	
1909  	
1910  	
4.60 E. St. L.
1911	
4.90
1912  	
5.90  ..
1913          ... .     	
4.80
1914
4.40  ,.
1916        	
11.25
1916  	
10.88
1917  	
7.566 .,
1918 	
6.94  ..
1919	
6.24
1920         	
6.52
1921	
3.95
1922
4.86
1923
5.62
1924
5.39
1925  	
7.892 Lond.
1926  	
7.409 .,
1927	
6.194 ..
1928	
5.493 „
1929  	
5.385 „
1930   	
3.599 ,.
1931	
2.554 „
1932	
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
36.75
35.00
35.00
2.405 ,.
1933	
3.210 „
1934	
3.044 ,.
1935	
3.099 „
1930	
3.315 „
1937	
4.902 „
1938	
3.073 ,.
1939	
3.069 „
1940	
3 411 ,
1941	
3.411 ,,
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
Average, 1944—48 (inc.)...
30.75
64.130
16.018
9.59
8.75
* Prices are in Canadian funds. The bases for the prices listed are discussed under " Methods of computing:
Production," see pages 11 and 12.
Prior to 1925 the average prices for gold and copper are true average prices, but, as a means of correcting for
losses in smelting and refining, the prices of other metals were taken at the following percentages of the year's average price for the metal: Silver, 95 per cent.; lead, 90 per cent.; and zinc, 85 per cent. For 1925 and subsequent
years the value has been calculated using the true average price and the net metal contents, see pages 11 and 12. STATISTICS.
A 15
TABLE III.—Total Production for all Years up to and including 1948.
Gold, placer	
Gold, lode 	
Silver 	
Copper* 	
Lead 	
Zinc 	
Coal and coke	
Structural materials 	
Miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials.
$93,559,097
355,763,299
174,820,797
358,621,346
483,484,511
333,788,103
455,420,853
116,827,466
62,733,129
Total  $2,435,018,601
* See last paragraph under "Average Prices," page 12.
TABLE IV.—Production for each Year from 1852 to 1948, inclusive.
1852 to 1895  (inclusive)   $94,547,370
1896  7,507,956
1897  10,455,268
1898  10,906,861
1899  12,393,131
1900  16,344,751
1901  19,671,572
1923   $41,304,320
1902,
1903
1904,
1905
1906
  17,486,550
..._.:  17,495,954
  18,977,359
  22,461,325
  24,980,546
1907  25,882,560
1908  23,851,277
1909  24,443,025
1910  26,377,066
1911  23,499,072
1912  32,440,800
1913  30,296,398
1914  26,388,825
1915  29,447,508
1916  42,290,462
1917  37,010,392
1918  41,782,474
1919  33,296,313
1920  35,543,084
1921  28,066,641
1922  35,162,843
1924,
1925.
1926,,
1927,
1928,,
1929
1930.
1931..
1932.
1933
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938,
1939
1940.
1941..
1942.
1943..
1944,
1945,
1946,,
1947,
1948.,
48,704,604
61,492,242
67,188,842
60,729,358
65,372,583
68,245,443
55,391,993
34,883,181
28,798,406
32,602,672
42,305,297
48,821,239
54,081,967
74,475,902
64,485,551
65,681,547
75,701,155
78,479,719
75,551,093
65,892,395
54,923,803
63,343,949
71,807,951
113,221,254
152,524,752
Total  $2,435,018,601 A 16
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1948.
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A 19
TABLE VII.
—Value of Gold Peoduction to Date.
Placer Gold.
Lode Gold.
Total.
Crude
(Ounces).
Value.
Fine
(Ounces).
Value.
1858-1862...
580,680
$9,871,634
$9,871,634
1863-1867	
957,860
16,283,592
16,283,592
1868-1872	
582,080
9,895,318
9,895,318
1873-1877	
530,540
9,019,201
9,019,201
1878-1882	
328.230
5,579,911
5,579,911
1883-1887	
225,970
3,841,515
3,841,515
1888-1892
148.550
2.525.426
2,525,426
1893	
20,960    1            356,131
1,170
$23,404
379,535
1894	
23.850                 405,516
6,252
125,014
530,530
1895	
28,330
481,683
39,270
785,400
1,267,083
1896	
32,000
544,026
62,259
1,244,180
1,788,206
1897	
30,210
513,520
106,141
2,122,820
2,636,340
1898	
37,840
643,346
110,061
2,201,217
2,844,563
1899	
79,110
1,344,900
138,315
2,857,573
4,202,473
1900	
75.220
1.278.724
167.153
3.453.381
4,732,105
1901	
57,060    1            970,100
210,384    I          4,348,605
5,318,705
1902	
63,130    |        1,073,140
236,491
4,888,269
5.961,409
1903	
62,380    I        1,060.420
232,831
4,812,616
5,873,036
1904	
65,610    I        1,115,300
222,042
4,589,608
5,704,908
1905	
57,020     1             969,300
238,660
4,933,102
5,902,402
1906                              	
55,790    1            948,400
224,027
4,630,639
5,579,039
1907	
48,710    1            828.000
196,179
4,055,020
4,883,020
1908	
38,060
647,000
255,582
5,282,880
5,929,880
1909	
28,060
477,000
238,224
4,924,090
5,401,090
1910                    	
31.760
540,000
267,701
5,633,380
6,073,380
1911	
25.060
426,000
228,617
4,725,513
5,151,513
1912	
32,680
555,500
257,496
5,322,442
5,877,942
1913	
30,000
510,000
272,254
5,627,490
6,137,490
1914	
33,240
565,000
247,170
5,109,004
5,674,004
1915	
45,290
770,000
250,021
5,167,934
5,937,934
1916	
34,150
580,500
221,932
4,587,334
5,167,834
1917	
29,180
496,000
114,523
2,367,190
2,863,190
1918	
18,820
320,000
164,674
3,403,812
3,723,812
1919	
16,850
286,500
152,126
3,150,645
3,437,145
1920	
13,040
13,720
221,600
233,200
120,048
135,663
2,481,392
2,804,154
2,702,992
1921	
3,037,354
1922	
21,690
368.800
197,856
4,089,684
4,458,484
1923	
24,710
420,000
179,245
3,704,994
4,124,994
1924	
24,750
420,750
247,716
5,120,535
5,541,285
1925	
16,476
280,092
209,719
4,335,269
4,615,361
1926	
20.912
355,503
201,427
4,163,859
4,519,362
1927	
9,191
156,247
178,001
3,679,601
3,835.848
1928	
8,424
143,208
188,087
3,888,097
4,031,305
1929	
6,983
8,955
118,711
152,235
145.339
3.004.419
3,123.130
1930	
160,778                 3,323.576
3,475,811
1931	
17,176
291,992
146,039
3,018,894
3,310,886
1932	
20,400
23,928
25,181
395.542
562,787
714,431
181,564
223,529
297,130
4,261,307
6,392,929
10,250,985
4,656,849
1933                 	
6.955,716
1934	
10,965,416
1935	
30,929
895,058
365,244
12,852,936
13,747,994
1936	
43,389
1,249,940
404,472
14,168,654
15,418,594
1937	
54,153
1,558,245
460,781
16,122,727
17,680.972
1938	
57.759
1,671,015
557,522
19,613,624
21,284,639
1939	
49,746
1,478,492
587,180
21,221,272
22,699,764
1940	
39.067
1.236,928
583,416
22,461.516
23,698,444
1941	
43,775
1,385,962
571,026
21,984,501
23,370,463
1942	
32.904
1,041.772
444,518
17,113,943
18,155,715
1943	
14,600
462,270
224,403
8,639.516
9,101,786
1944	
11.433
12.589
15,729
6,969
20,332
361,977
398,591
475,361
200.585
585,200
186,632
175,373
117,612
243.282
7,185,332
6,751,860
4,322,241
8.514,870
7,547,309
1945	
7,150,451
1946	
4,797,602
1947	
8,715,455
1948	
286,230    |         10,018,050
10,603,250
5,143,180
$93,559,097
12,881,687     |     $355,763,299
1
$449,322,396 A 20
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1948.
TABLE VIII.—Value of Mine Production by Divisions, 1943, 1944, 1945,
1946, 1947, AND 1948.
Mining Division.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
Ainsworth	
Alberni	
Ashcroft	
Atlin	
Cariboo	
Clinton	
Fort Steele	
Golden	
Greenwood	
Kamloops	
Lardeau	
Lillooet	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster.
Nicola	
Omineca	
Osoyoos	
Peace River	
Portland Canal	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Similkameen	
Skeena	
Slocan	
Stikine	
Trail Creek	
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Totals	
49,405
527,401
9,964
314,005
161,053
5,679
305,963
438,726
361,396
161,820
95
312,574
435,235
892,159
607,133
155,606
357,775
490,888
59,354
100,439
20,360
29,031
497,570
58,309
089,433
2,311
374,132
607,391
2,177
465,011
65,892,395
277,435
9,725
14,809
255,539
979,399
1,803
31,668,064
324,525
275,571
124,130
1,288
3,072,599
3,353,930
544,663
597,569
83,032
1,409,984
1,837,959
58,251
732,087
13,804
19,664
3,242,076
32,211
1,193,092
1,520
1,111,591
2,233,911
3,225
1,450,347
54,923,803
254,429
6,194
1,393
321,227
1,033,181
3,368
42,910,466
825,803
191,767
135,791
2,412,843
2,981,253
516,283
677,220
27,099
142,315
2,069,351
32,342
736,125
14,533
35,904
2,205,091
37,443
954,479
348
1,247,960
2,124,478
1,338
1,443,925
77,057
112,613
10,119
459,965
988,815
2,310
54,256,000
290,143
484,670
300,758
1,394,343
3,038,045
372,005
1,028,101
6,967
70,216
1,057,802
14,586
410,892
43,731
39,658
1,634,831
58,841
628,445
5,954
1,274,603
1,668,492
3,049
2,074,940
242,020
503,699
11,371
868,658
1,486,961
7,124
80,933,067
279,206
593,539
566,001
1,731
2,962,585
3,368,234
1,137,752
1,229,047
15,094
99,622
1,767,818
32,934
786,837
16,078
40,420
4,898,314
47,032
1,300,194
2,650
2,139,817
5,343,934
46,795
2,492,720
565,648
412,872
89,566
1,096,922
1,693,656
2,596
110,156,469
1,155,232
789,523
666,392
600
3,531,186
4,105,205
2,391,739
2,007,835
13,718
204,939
2,287,295
52,124
514,565
18,632
42,364
7,353,503
129,149
2,475,242
250,404
1,525,519
5,916,470
104,867
2,970,520
63,343,949
71,807,951
113,221,254
152,524,752 STATISTICS.
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