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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION FOR THE YEAR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1950

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT
 OF THE 	
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
POWER COMMISSION
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST
1949
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1949.  To Lieutenant-Colonel the Honourable Charles Arthur Banks, C.M.G.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the British
Columbia Power Commission for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1949.
BYRON I. JOHNSON,
Premier.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 30th, 19^9. The Honourable Byron I. Johnson, M.B.E.,
Premier, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—The Annual Report of the British Columbia Power Commission, covering the
fiscal year 1948-49, is respectfully submitted herewith in accordance with section 93 of
the " Electric Power Act."
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
W. W. FOSTER,
Commissioner.
F. L. SHAW,
Commissioner.
S. R. WESTON,
Chairman.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 30th, 1949. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Section. Page.
I. General Review  9
II. Legal—
1. Legislation :  17
2. Compensation—Expropriated Properties  17
3. Acquisition of Electrical Properties  17
4. Rights-of-way and Sites  17
5. Contracts  18
6. Water Licences  18
7. Insurance  18
III. Construction—
1. Production Plant  19
2. Transmission Plant  23
3. Distribution Plant  23
IV. Operation—
1. Production  27
2. Transmission  29
3. Distribution 1  30
4. Rate Schedules  33
V. Surveys and Investigations—
1. Power Projects  39
2. Transmission Projects  39
3. Distribution Projects  39
VI. Financial  40
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
John Hart Development—
Ladore Falls dam     7
Wood-stave pipe-line     8
Ladore Falls dam  21
Operator's dwelling  21
Close-up of surge-tanks  22
Power-house  22
Standard diesel power-house—
Exterior, Smithers, B.C  31
Exterior, Golden, B.C  31
Interior, Smithers switchboard  32
Interior, Smithers generators  32
Nanaimo-Duncan Power District—
Laying under-water cable .  46
Pine Street substation, Nanaimo  46
Map of British Columbia, showing Commission's undertakings After 51    Fourth Annual Report of the British Columbia Power
Commission, Fiscal Year ended March 31st, 1949.
I. GENERAL REVIEW.
The British Columbia Power Commission, appointed April 17th, 1945, commenced
actual operations August 1st, 1945, with the acquisition of five electrical properties
having a total of 11,906 customers. During the succeeding 3%-year period to March
31st, 1949, the Commission acquired by purchase or expropriation an additional sixteen
electrical properties serving a further 10,346 customers at the respective dates of
acquisition. A total of 22,252 previously existing services have thus been brought
under the Commission.
Since August, 1945, when operations commenced, 9,367 new services have been
installed, so that the total number of customers is now 31,619. This represents an
increase during the year of 4,149 customers from the total of 27,470 reported at March
31st, 1948. Of this increase, 831 connected services were acquired with the distribution
plant of the Vancouver Island Utilities, Limited, the balance of 3,318 being the number
of new services installed during the year.
This growth has been accompanied by a corresponding increase in generating
plant. At March 31st, 1946, the end of the first fiscal year after the inception of the
Commission, the capacity of acquired plants totalled 10,355 kva. During the next three
years the generating capacity was increased by 59,228 kva, reaching 69,583 kva by
March 31st, 1949. This heavy construction programme has, of course, made the
Commission more self-sufficient in meeting power requirements; hence the amount
purchased has decreased substantially.
There are now nineteen power districts through which power is distributed to the
present 31,619 customers. The distribution facilities in Courtenay and the Comox
district, at present owned by the City of Courtenay, will come under Commission
operation April 1st. Negotiations are also in progress with a view to establishing
power districts in Dawson Creek-Pouce Coupe, Hazelton, the Lake Windermere area,
and other parts of the Province.
Comparative figures for the years ended March 31st, 1948 and 1949, illustrate the
progress made during the year in accomplishing the purpose of the " Electric Power
Act"—"An Act to provide for improving the Availability and Supply of Electrical
Power."
Number of generating units in operation
Generating capacity kva
Transmission-line (over 23 kv) miles
Primary distribution circuits miles
Number of power districts in operation ..
Kwh generated or purchased	
Number of customers—
Residential 	
Commercial	
Power 	
Street-lighting	
Total number of customers	
Year ended
March 31st,
1948.
Year ended
March 31st,
1949.
51
58
68,060
69,583
285
285
1,131
1,389
18
19
82,533,340
132,685,512
22,434
25,991
4,188
4,911
818
677
30
40
27,470
31,619 B   10                                                                " ELECTRIC  POWER
ACT."
Year ended
March 31st,
1948.
Year ended
March 31st,
1949.
Average monthly consumption, residential
customers  kwh
84
96
Average cost per kwh paid by residential
customers	
4.5c.
4.0c.
Average monthly consumption, commer
cial customers  kwh
308
382
Average cost per kwh paid by commer
cial customers 	
4.5c.
3.7c.
Average   monthly   consumption,   power
customers   kwh
2,734
3,294
Average  cost  per kwh  paid  by  power
customers
1.7c.
1.7c.
Revenue—
Power districts—
Electrical-energy sales 	
$2,122,781.04 $2,404,671.87
Miscellaneous 	
23,908.35
26,636.59
$2,146,689.39 $2,431,308.46
Special-contract sales   	
118,954.82
Operating expenses—
$2,146,689.39 $2,550,263.28
Labour                           . 	
$311,646.50
$416,672.97
Fuel 	
165,705.50
216,549.44
Other direct operating expenses	
108,246.41
110,351.41
Customer accounting and collecting
113,671.05
157,311.86
3-per-cent. gross revenue assessment
62,576.80
71,044.90
Administration and general expense
117,856.33
155,928.48
Purchased power 	
293,737.00
35,427.03
$1,173,439.59 $1,163,286.09
Interest on capital in operation	
Direct expenses   	
224,221.13
517,720.32
$1,397,660.72 $1,681,006.41
Operating surplus   (excluding provision
for reserves)                  .
$749,028.67
$869,256.87
Provision for reserves—
Maintenance and renewals	
$265,873.99
$418,323.58
Sinking fund _             	
112,115.08
258,860.74
Contingencies              	
140,545.54
154,769.86
Net operating surplus   (trans
$518,534.61
$831,954.18
ferred to Stabilization.
Reserve)   	
$230,494.06
$37,302.69 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B  11
The average cost per kwh showed a further reduction during the year which,
accompanied by an increased consumption per customer indicates that a greater use of
power—one of the main objectives of the Commission—is being encouraged. The table
" Statistics relating to the Supply of Electrical Energy " sets out the very considerable
progress made in these two factors for each individual power district. In several
instances the consumption per customer has doubled, while the average revenue per
kwh has decreased by as much as 50 per cent., all in a three-year period, significant for
generally rising prices. Rate revisions are now in effect in thirteen of the nineteen
power districts. As the volume of service continues to improve, further reductions in
unit costs will result.
Although labour and most materials are in more active supply, costs are still high,
so that the increased volume of business has not reflected a large net operating surplus.
The net surplus was further lessened owing to highly promotional rate schedules being
adopted in the important Vancouver Island centres of Nanaimo, the Albernis, and
Duncan during the year. This resulted in considerably lower revenues per customer
from these areas, since the revised rates grant substantial reductions to all customers
who make intensive use of their maximum requirements. These revenues will gradually
increase through heavier consumption.
Good progress was made on the Ladore Falls storage-dam, as well as on the
installation of the third and fourth 25,000-kva units at the John Hart power plant.
This work should be completed in 1949.
Work on the Whatshan Development near Needles, Lower Arrow Lake, continued
throughout the year. All designing and construction-work for this project have been
under the direction of the Commission's own staff. The plans call for a generating-
station of initially two, ultimately four, 12,500-kva units to supply the Arrow Lake,
North Okanagan, and Kamloops areas. To this end, rights-of-way have been acquired
and transmission-lines are being constructed from the power-site to Vernon and
Kamloops.
Further improvement in the administrative organization took place during the
year. The engineering and purchasing functions have been centralized. The character
of all major departments is now sufficiently well defined to indicate permanent requirements, and preliminary plans for an administration building in Victoria are under way.
This Fourth Annual Report describes in detail the year's activities under the
functional headings—Legal, Construction, Operation, Surveys and Investigations, and
Financial.  STATISTICS RELATING TO THE SUPPLY OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY.
B 13
Power District.
xs
Residential Service.
■SB
£5
fl
I.
Upfl
fl k
Commercial Service.
II
rS"-*3
^ 5
<3o
<U,fl
2>
Power Service.
<v fl
il
0)^3
fl £
a; W
> tt
Street-lighting Service.
6£
2S
5 fi
Totals.
7S£
il
£5
<u,fl
fl fe
fi»5
>   ri
« ft
The Albernis..
Alert Bay..
Burns Lake..
Campbell River	
Cumberland-Royston..
Golden	
Hope..
Kamloops..
Lillooet..
Nakusp..
1947
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
29,550.13 |
122,940.07 |
136,368.13 |
I
  I
5,858.78 |
6,848.87 |
8,896.85 |
2,567.51
5,917.23
Kwh.
662,644
2,907,171
3,765,710
53,000
96,520
194,099
14,650
32,646
I
1,255.30 |
28,846.60 |
37,677.14 |
I
I
6,275.26
6,855.41
6,846.84
11,103.42
11,470.01
16,558.16
29,586.47
113,315.36
124,136.04
3,643.72
5,782.38
7,952.72
9,347.76
11,278.30
21,247
381,012
521,950
44,200
53,994
102,008
107,300
184,792
349,212
835,165
1,176,827
[,717,417
46,091
83,536
75,000
99,211
203,261
6,543.76 |    91,199 |
I i
2,474
2,938
3,208
110
132
169
66
109
93
837
860
124
141
158
269
342
2,354
2,588
2,778
82
81
217
230
272
Kwh.
90
90
102
43
68
108
48
34
64
76
45
51
31
34
57
37
51
78
118
107
116
68
30
37
66
4.00
3.80
3.70
4.70
4.85
4.95
8.35
6.15
4.60
4.50
3.40
3.70
4.35
4.30
3.80
3.80
3.20
3.70
4.25
3.80
3.85
5.35
5.75
3.20
3.45
3.65
4.5
4.2
3.6
11.0
7.1
4.6
17.5
18.1
7.2
5.9
7.6
7.2
14.2
12.7
6.7
10.3
6.2
4.7
3.6
3.6
3.3
7.9
6.9
10.6
9.4
5.5
18,405.25
77,132.03
81,429.61
9,219.72
10,076.96
10,817.20
2,488.95
7,293.14
4,812.59
9,409.21
11,632.05
7,513.21
8,488.36
8,098.93
10,076.62
12,647.95
15,721.28
34,612.54
13C,4S1.20
157,761.03
3,872.34
6,714.59
3,804.34
5,317.30
5,399.76
Kwh.
530,739
2,010,020
2,901,691
119,000
199,110
356,670
17,195
49,924
75,319
221,106
270,818
74,000
98,407
210,186
141,300
291,137
497,161
656,614
2,647,482
3,034,725
109,177
192,801
48,400
79,093
129,445
427
484
534
55
65
75
75
75
46
54
54
48
84
91
609
650
710
45
40
52
65
65
Kwh.
425
365
472
180
274
409
126
130
295
298
135
162
317
284
316
436
392
335
363
316
358
76
114
167
14.70
14.00
13.25
13.95
13.80
12.40
18.30
19.00
19.90
12.50
12.80
13.75
14.00
12.25
20.20
13.75
13.80
20.60
18.25
18.90
11.20
12.45
6.00
7.70
7.00
3.5
2.8
7.7
5.1
3.0
14.5
14.6
4.3
4.3
10.2
8.6
7.1
4.4
3.2
5.3
5.2
5.2
3.5
3.5
7.9
6.7
4.2
3,456.37
15,913.73
24,387.59
3,734.55
2,610.06
1,547.41
392.85
1,675.04
Kwh.
32,633
431,583
1,028,897
73,700
54,640
54,202
2,803
18,801
944.98 |    26,896
2,021.40
2,547.31
861.04
745.06
417.82
252.60
195.04
1,678.91
11,258.70
72,421.50
70,700.45
781.38
1,696.03
529.68
383.11
361.70
78,362
95,115
8,700
5,914
5,631
4,800
5,437
75,516
452,823
3,473,306
3,164,181
13,545
33,621
7,500
2,440
5,195
40
40
46
25
7
116
120
118
14
14
12
5
10.6
3.7
2.4
5.1
4.8
2.9
14.0
8.9
3.5
(Date of
2.6
2.7
1,732.96
6,776.41
6,376.81
180.00
134.00
169.02
125.00
362.98
77.65
acquisition
1,422.52
2,598.61
9.9
12.6
7.4
5.3
3.6
2.2
2.5
2.1
2.2
954.60
500.45
796.76
286.00
749.00
1,110.00
1,553.75
4,809.85
4,772.75
5.8
5.0
7.1
15.7
7.0
301.79
Kwh.
26,148
134,571
154,383
1,600
300
1,800
3,872
17,544
(Date of
2
2
2
(Date of
1
1
(Date of
1
1
(Date of
1
acquisition:
53,150.71
222,762.24
248,562.14
acquisition:
18,993.05
19,669.89
21,430.48
Ja
Kwh.
1,   1947.)
1,252,164
|    5,483,345
I    7,850,681
I
Aug.
1,   1945.)
249,300
350,570
608,771
acquisition:    Nov   1,   1947.)
5,574.31
15,248.39
38,520
118,915
1,553
Royston, Jan. 1,1947 ;
acquisition:     Jan 1,   1949.)
12,378.98    | 194,967
I
Cumberland,   June 5,   1947.)
40,175
77,731
25,000
33,104
27,676
27,867
52,680
62,870
199,320
197,149
6,314
(Date of
(Date of
1
1
1
(Date of
1
1
1
(Date of
(Date of
1,255.30
41,699.73
54,455.11
acquisition:    Sept.
15,604.11
16,589.28
16,160.35
I
acquisition:    Aug.
21,718.64
25,062.00
35,068.35
21,247
720,655
965,614
1,  1945.)
151,900
158,315
350,929
1,   1945.)
281,076
509,233
974,569
acquisition:     Jan   1,   1947.)
77,011.46
327,027.91
357,370.27
2,007,472
9,496,935
10,113,472
acquisition: Aug.
8,297.44 |
14,193.00 |
I
acquisition: Sept.
12,286.74 |
15,048.17 |
17,341.55 I
1, 1947.)
168,813
309,958
1, 1945.)
130,900
180,744
344,215
2,877
2,943
3,464
3,790
152
191
205
255
99
154
831
837
870
93
916
940
158
177
201
218
190
322
429
494
2,954
3,080
3,359
3,607
135
141
135
250
281
300
346
4.2
4.1
3.2
7.6
5.6
3.5
14.5
12.8
6.3
5.9
5.8
5.6
10.2
10.5
4.6
7.7
4.9
3.6
3.9
3.5
3.5
4.9
4.6
9.4
8.4
5.0
Note.—The average monthly consumption and the average monthly bill are based on the average number of  customers for the whole year rather than on the actual number shown, which is at the end of the fiscal year. STATISTICS RELATING TO THE SUPPLY OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY—Continued.
B 15
Power District.
X§
Residential Service.
CU fl
.O  5
£ fi
<3u
<D,fl
2 >•
gw
« ft
Commercial Service.
0)  fl
15
<m
(Drfl
fl  k>
Power   Service.
CD   fl
-O   fl
£6
a>,fl
3 hH
Street-lighting   Service.
0)   fl
5 to
0)^3
fl £
fl.M
a; hh
> »-,
cu S
« ft
Nanaimo-Duncan..
North Okanagan..
Peachland-Westbank..
Quesnel..
Sechelt..
Smithers..
Vanderhoof..
Williams Lake..
Totals..
1947
1948
1949
I
1947
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
1947
1948
1949
1947 |  299,777.93
1948 |  378,033.10
1949 |  377,682.07
1947 | 173,236.77
1948 I 203,025.85
1949 j 256,731.80
I
5,984.54
11,098.89
15,424.04
9,856.63
11,726.60
15,435.00
15,609.09
20,850.30
30,391.53
10,920.33
10,577.48
15,814.70
2,850.84
4,736.81
9,853.09
4,462.45
4,424.41
5,858.85
7,324.45
7,184.58
9,625.70
621,611.11
957,493.33
1,096,821.61
Kwh.
5,933,381
7,839,393
9,802,055
4,169,895
5,242,519
7,034,583
68,059
180,318
331,954
127,000
172,363
273,872
139,159
255,328
446,248
102,000
158,769
333,809
17,100
52,155
136,816
43,800
64,373
114,864
85,300
126,285
197,675
12,484,250
21,051,771
27,732,914
7,477
8,278
9,102
4,167
4,791
5,660
244
312
360
252
312
403
423
628
763
62
186
261
78
106
125
116
157
202
18,705
22,434
25,991
I
Kwh.
72
83
94
87
97
111
36
53
80
45
51
66
30
40
52
36
49
49
60
84
66
76
90
I
74
84
96
3.65
4.00
3.60
3.60
3.75
4.05
3.15
3.25
3.75
3.50
3.50
3.70
3.40
3.25
3.55
| 3.85
| 3.30
| 3.90
4.30
3.50
3.55
5.00
4.15
4.25
5.70
4.30
4.35
3.70
3.80
3.80
I
5.1
4.8
3.8
4.2
3.9
3.6
6.2
4.6
7.7
6.8
5.6
11.2
8.2
6.8
10.7
6.7
4.7
16.7
9.1
7.2
10.2
6.9
5.1
8.6
5.7
4.9
140,757.69
188,970.81
230,543.15
112,465.09
133,269.83
158,666.22
3,212.77
5,943.78
7,444.17
13,962.69
15,086.51
17,464.16
5,747.09
7,488.11
10,946.95
9,737.67
10,867.63
14,248.84
3,692.31
5,984.98
6,649.24
7,917.34
6,138.75
6,608.10
11,386.30
13,546.73
16,069.72
5.0
4.5
4.0
392,510.63
653,211.43
778,320.73
Kwh.
3,506,220
4,394,887
7,473,774
    !
2,715,790 j
3,107,124 |
3,772,011
41,002
116,398
172,653
171,200
316,178
458,739
70,300
139,777
315,380
75,000
247,854
445,398
33,100
93,072
133,184
70,000
101,171
177,005
150,600
292,938
432,245
8,403,265
14,482,126
21,099,129
I Kwh.
1,048
1,203
1,503
45
55
64
85
101
115
74
94
120
66
102
108
35
56
66
45
52
57
64
86
102
3,494
4,188
4,911
310
320
444
303
306
114
192
245
174
279
358
91
139
235
237
356
80
149
170
129
168
278
207
311
385
278
308
382
$   |   c
(Date of acqu
12.45
13.80
13.70
12.55
13.15
14.10
8.90
9.80
10.55
14.20
13.30
13.60
7.40
7.45
8.15
11.40
10.40
11.40
8.95
9.60
8.50
14.65
10.20
10.35
15.20
14.40
14.30
13.00
13.90
14.10
4.0
4.3
3.1
4.2
4.3
4.2
7.8
5.1
4.3
8.2
4.8
8.2
5.3
3.5
12.9
4.4
3.2
11.1
6.5
5.0
11.3
6.0
3.7
7.6
4.6
3.7
4.7
4.5
3.7
$ |        Kwh.
isition:   Nanaimo-Duncan,
198,306.40
223,901.54
213,174.35
125,087.98
138,914.71
142,438.12
2,841.19
4,372.84
6,594.36
3,451.98
2,315.88
2,533.81
2,228.27
776.33
3,382.78
3,178.94
3,343.17
6,234.69
279.98
1,033.73
1,008.31
621.87
560.09
3,059.51
1,269.63
1,813.19
13,187,560
14,448,894
15,227,253
7,566,512
8,205,735
7,959,110
79,335
297,533
368,399
104,260
102,581
165,523
83,400
11,993
97,746
47,000
154,791
478,732
6,145
30,494
12,200
9,106
9,884
53,000
38,452
64,472
I
etc., Aug
294
307
131
359,255.52
471,260.08
483,722,36
21,713,423
27,343,260
28,909,668
226
244
244
12
15
16
22
13
17
28
15
17
22
10
14
816
818
677
1, 1945;
1.5
1.5
1.4
1.7
1.7
1.8
3.6
1.5
1.8
3.3
2.3
1.5
2.7
6.5
3.5
6.8
2.2
1.3
4.6
3.4
6.8
1.7
1.7
1.7
$ Kwh.
Parksville-Qualicum, Jan. 1, 1947 ;
12,563.58 | 446,398
13,680.38 | 474,242
13,940.97    |     467,616
9,571.83
9,900.79
10,672.98
325.01
660.00
730.00
374.00
518.40
776.80
684.00
707.00
1,078.00
93.00
152.50
497.27
180.00
180.00
446.50
452.00
461.40
792.00
28,950.73
40,816.20
45,807.17
434,708
449,066
489,535
10,952
23,946
27,291
50,808
50,112
40,006
38.50    | 1,500
306.28 11,498
8,758
13,580
33,415
9,000
7,450
20,530
3,285
2,250
16,140
8,400
29,297
4
5
4
(Date of
13
(Date of
2
2
2
(Date of
1
1
1
(Date of
2
2
(Date of
1
1
2
(Date of
1
1
1
(Date of
1
1
1
(Date of
1
1
1
(At resp
1,112,892     |       24
1,436,651    j      30
1,679,586    |      40
 I	
$
Chemainus,   Mar.
651,405.60
804,585.83
835,340.54
acquisition,   Aug
420,361.67
485,111.18
568,509.12
Kwh.
15,   1947.)
23,073,559
27,157,416
32,970,698
1,   1945.)
14,886,905
17,004,444
19,255,239
acquisition:    Aug.   7,   1946.)
12,363.51
22,075.51
30,192.57
acquisition:    Aug.
27,645.30
29,647.39
36,209.77
acquisition:    Sept.
23,584.45
29,153.24
45,027.54
199,348
618,195
900,297
1,   1945.)
453,268
641,234
938,140
1, 1945.)
292,859
408,598
870,872
acquisition:    Sept.   1,  1945.)
24,520.94    |       232,758
25,495.28     |        574,994
37,376.23    |    1,291,354
I
acquisition:   Sept. 20, 1945.)
6,636.15     | 59,200
11,154.27    I        158,822
18,033.33
i
acquisition:    Sept.
13,568.10
11,365.03
13,473.54
321,024
1,  1945.)
129,285
176,900
317,893
acquisition:    Sept.  1,  1945.)
22,222.26
22,462.34
28,300.61
ective dates of
1,402,327.99
2,122,781.04
2,404,671.87
292,589
466,075
723,689
acquisition.)
43,713,830
64,313,808
79,421,297
7,737
8,823
9,793
10,740
4,477
5,196
5,932
6,893
288
303
384
442
' 289
360
427
536
337
501
730
893
293
340
426
496
246
335
106
128
164
189
161
203
254
319
22,252
23,039
27,470
31,619
2.8
3.0
2.5
2.8
2.9
2.9
6.2
3.6
3.4
6.1
4.6
3.9
8.1
7.1
5.2
10.5
4.5
2.9
11.2
7.0
5.6
10.5
6.4
4.2
7.6
4.8
3.9
3.2
3.3
3.0
Note.—The average monthly consumption and the average monthly bill are based on the average number of customers for the whole year rather than on the actual number shown, which is at the end of the fiscal year. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B  17
II. LEGAL.
1. LEGISLATION.
The " Electric Power Act " was amended at the last session of the Legislature
as follows:—
(a)  The borrowing limitation under the Act was raised from $30,000,000 to
$45,000,000.
(6)  The provisions permitting the Commission to borrow moneys directly
were amended.
(c)  The Commission was given authority to expend money for disseminating
information concerning its operations.
2. COMPENSATION FOR THE EXPROPRIATED PROPERTIES OF NANAIMO-
DUNCAN UTILITIES LIMITED, COLUMBIA POWER COMPANY LIMITED,
AND WEST  CANADIAN HYDRO  ELECTRIC  CORPORATION  LIMITED.
The appeals of the Commission and the companies in the above were heard by the
Honourable Mr. Justice Wilson, pursuant to the " Electric Power Act," the " Nanaimo-
Duncan Utilities Compensation Act," and the " West Canadian Hydro Electric Corporation Limited and Columbia Power Company Limited Compensation Act."
The appeal in respect to Nanaimo-Duncan Utilities began on August 16th, 1948,
and the evidence was heard from August 16th to September 16th, and again in conclusion on October 1st. The appeal in respect to Columbia Power began on September
29th, and the evidence was heard until October 26th. The appeal in respect to West
Canadian began on December 1st and, following an adjournment from December 22nd
to March 1st, the evidence was completed on March 24th.
The argument on all three appeals will begin on April 25th, 1949.
3. ACQUISITION OF ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES.
The Commission acquired on January 1st, 1949, by expropriation, the electrical
distribution system of Vancouver Island Utilities, Limited, serving the Village of
Campbell River and adjoining areas. The company supplied 831 customers with
25-cycle power purchased from the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, plant on
Puntledge  River.    Following  expropriation,  the  compensation was mutually agreed
UP°n' 4. RIGHTS-OF-WAY AND SITES.
The 60-kv transmission-line from Vernon to Kamloops required the acquisition
of a right-of-way 90 feet in width over a distance of 69.5 miles. The line crossed 224
parcels of land registered in the names of 114 owners. The acquisition of this right-
of-way was commenced last September, and to date easements over 163 parcels have
been completed with 103 owners, and negotiations with the remaining 11 owners are
in various stages of completion.
In the course of the year 24 of the 52 outstanding right-of-way claims on the
138-kv line from the John Hart plant to Nanaimo and Port Alberni were completed, and
negotiations with the remaining 28 owners are proceeding toward completion. The
right-of-way in connection with this line crossed 414 parcels of land registered in the
names of 115 owners, and to date a total of 87 owners have been settled, involving
238 parcels of land.
An easement was obtained from the Comox Logging & Railway Company covering
a portion of the distribution system of the Vancouver Island Utilities, Limited, which
was expropriated by the Commission on the 1st day of January, 1949.
Surveys of land easements required for the 132-kv transmission-line from the
Whatshan Development to Vernon are nearing completion, and the preliminary work
of contacting the private-property owners was commenced on February 1st, 1949. B 18 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
Surveys and appraisals of seven parcels of privately owned lands containing some
200 acres, which lie within the area to be flooded when the level of Whatshan Lake
is raised, were completed. The purchase of four of these parcels containing 76.76
acres, together with the summer homes located on three of them, have been finalized.
Negotiations for the purchase of the remaining acreage and summer homes are in
various stages of completion. The 1,515.18 acres of vacant Crown lands which also lie
within the area to be flooded were obtained under a licence of occupation from the
Water Rights Branch. A further licence of occupation was obtained from the Water
Rights Branch in this connection covering the occupation of 24.14 acres of vacant
Crown lands required for pipe-line and tunnel right-of-way.
An application was made to the Provincial Department of Lands and Forests for
a reserve on certain portions of foreshore on Lower Arrow Lake, together with an
application to purchase 112.79 acres of upland property for the purpose of constructing
thereon a ramp and other installations required for the Whatshan Development.
An agreement was entered into with the Crown in the right of the Province for
the use of a certain portion of the Cottle Hill radio range site required for radio
communication covering the Commission's Vancouver Island transmission systems.
Substation-sites were acquired at the following places:—
Alberni, by purchase from Alberni Pacific Lumber Company, Limited.
Port Alberni, by purchase from Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Limited.
Duncan,  by purchase  from  British  Columbia  Electric  Railway  Company,
Limited.
Vernon, by purchase from Fred Hoffman.
Surveys were completed for both the Saltspring Island submarine cable crossing of
Stewart Channel and the overhead cable crossing of the Somass River.   The plans have
been deposited with the Dominion Department of Public Works, and applications made
under the provisions of the " Navigable Waters Protection Act " for approval of the
work.
5. CONTRACTS.
Contracts have been drawn and settled covering all major construction projects
undertaken during the year, together with numerous contracts for the supply of plant
and equipment required in connection therewith.
Apart from the ordinary service contracts, agreements were completed for the
supply of industrial power in various power districts and for the supply of street-
lighting service in certain incorporated villages and communities.
6. WATER LICENCES.
Licences have been obtained under the " Water Act " for storage and diversion
of water at Whatshan Lake and Barnes Creek covering the project now under way
in this area.
A licence has been obtained under the " Water Act " covering the diversion of
water from Sproat Lake for domestic use in the Port Alberni substation.
Water licences held by the Commission on Baker Creek, Quesnel district, for
storage and diversion purposes were cancelled at the Commission's request, as of
March 3rd, 1949. ?   INSURANCE.
Comprehensive insurance coverages on all phases of the Commission's operations
were maintained in force. There were certain rearrangements and deletions of some
types of coverage effected in order to meet the needs of the Commission.
There were no major claims under any of the coverages during the course of the
year's operations, with the exception of a fire claim for the approximate sum of $10,000
covering the loss of one 50-horsepower diesel generating unit, which claim is now being
adjusted. However, a number of small claims, under fleet coverage, public liability and
property damages coverages, were reported and satisfactorily settled. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B  19
III. CONSTRUCTION.
1. PRODUCTION PLANT.
Burns Lake.
A third 31-kva portable diesel-electric generating set was added in July, 1948,
making the total plant capacity 93.5 kva.
Campbell River—John Hart Development.
Continued progress was made throughout the year on the John Hart hydro-electric
development. The second 25,000-kva unit was placed in operation on April 5th, 1948.
By the end of the year the power-house, except for some interior finishing, had been
completed for four generating units, each of 25,000-kva capacity. Construction of the
second 12-foot diameter steel and wood-stave pipe-line is nearing completion, and it is
anticipated that the third generating unit will be placed in operation early in June,
1949, to be followed within two months by the fourth unit.
Work on the storage-dam at Ladore Falls, below the outlet of Lower Campbell
Lake, was suspended temporarily early in 1949 due to the exceptionally cold winter.
However, since the end of February good progress has been made. The diversion-tunnel
will be closed during the early summer of 1949, and sufficient water will be impounded
in Lower Campbell Lake to ensure meeting all demands on the generating plant during
the coming year.
Work on the diversion of the existing road on the south side of Lower Campbell
Lake was completed in October, 1948, following which the diverted road was taken over
by the Department of Public Works and gazetted as a public highway. Considerable
progress was also made on the construction of 5y2 miles of secondary road on the north
shore of the lake to replace the existing road to Brewster Lake area, portions of which
will be flooded.
A plan was developed, and will be put into operation in 1949, for clearing the shores
of Lower Campbell Lake and removing floating trash as the water is gradually raised
to meet the demands for storage.
Hope.
The diesel power-house was extended and two 312-kva-capacity diesel-electric
generating units installed, one of which was put into immediate operation. A 62.5-kva
portable diesel unit was removed, leaving a total capacity of 999 kva.
Kamloops.
The steam-electric generating-plant capacity was increased by the addition of a
625-kva unit transferred from Nanaimo where it was no longer required, owing to the
availability of power from the John Hart plant.
Lillooet.
The diesel installation was increased by the addition of a 62.5-kva portable unit
released from Hope, which makes the total installed diesel-electric capacity of the plant
250 kva.
Nakusp.
The dam and most of the pipe-line of the hydro-electric generating plant was
rebuilt, and the 125-kva existing generating unit was replaced with a 250-kva unit
released from Nanaimo No. 2 plant. The reconstructed pipe-line also was taken from
the same plant. B 20 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
SECHELT.
A 125-kva diesel-electric generating unit was transferred to Sechelt plant from
Qualicum. plant, which is now inactive, since power is delivered to the Parksville-
Qualicum area from the John Hart plant. The total installed capacity at Sechelt is
now 700 kva.
Shuswap Falls—Sugar Lake Storage-dam.
The apron at the toe of Sugar Lake storage-dam, which had been considerably
eroded due to discharge of flood-water, was repaired with concrete and placed in good
condition prior to the exceptionally heavy spring flood of May, 1948.
Terrace.
The capacity of Terrace diesel-electric generating plant was increased to 437.5 kva
by the addition of a third unit rated at 187 kva.
Westbank.
The capacity of Westbank diesel-electric generating-station was increased to 664.5
kva by the addition of a 125-kva and a 62.5-kva unit transferred from Williams Lake.
Whatshan.
A contract for construction of the 12,500-foot long by 12-foot diameter tunnel and
for excavation and other works relating thereto was entered into on April 21st, 1948.
After some delay in starting work due to the unusually high 1948 spring flood, good
progress on this work was maintained so that by the end of the year 4,519 feet of tunnel
had been driven. Rock excavation for the power-house was 90 per cent, complete, and
excavation behind a cofferdam at the Whatshan Lake end of the tunnel was also
completed so as to permit work on that portion of the tunnel during the summer of 1949.
A staff house and four operators' dwellings situated near the power-house were
constructed and will be used prior to completion of the plant to house construction crews.
The road to the power-house was widened and improved, and a new road approximately 1% miles long constructed to the tunnel intake.
Orders have been placed for two 12,500-kva generating units, turbines, valves and
other equipment, manufacture of which is proceeding according to schedule.
Williams Lake.
A new 250-kva Vivian 8-cylinder diesel was installed in December, 1948. Two
smaller diesels were transferred to Westbank during the year. The total installed
capacity is now 781.5 kva.
The following is a summary of the additions to the generating plants during the
year '. Generation Capacity. Type of Prime Mover.
Station. Kva.
Burns Lake  (1) 31.0 Diesel
Hope  (1) 312.0 Diesel
Kamloops  (1) 625.0 Steam Turbine*
Lillooet  (1) 62.5 Diesel
Nakusp  (1) 250.0f Hydro-electric*
Sechelt  (1) 125.0 Diesel
Terrace  (1) 187.0 Diesel
Westbank .... J (^  125-° Diesel
}   (1)     62.5 Diesel
Williams Lake       (1)  250.0 Diesel
* Formerly in operation in Nanaimo.
f Replaces one 125-kva hydro-electric set. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49.
B 21
John Hart Development.
,?»
The up-stream face of Ladore Falls dam.
wmmmMs
A typical operator's dwelling on townsite. B 22
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
John Hart Development.
Close-up of Surge-tank No. 2.    Bowl and bottom ring installed.
Power-house and surge-tanks from switching-station. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B  23
2. TRANSMISSION PLANT.
Vancouver Island System.
Nanaimo (T.S. 3) and Alberni (T.S. 2) substations, which were sufficiently advanced
to be placed in operation last year, were completed early in the current fiscal year, and,
following adjustments to the control and protective relay system, were transferred to
the operating division of the Commission.
Due to the load-growth in Nanaimo and vicinity, particularly arising from the
construction of Nanaimo Sulphate, Limited, pulp-mill, it became evident that by 1950
the 15,000 kva of installed capacity would become inadequate. Accordingly, plans were
prepared for duplicating the Nanaimo installation. Orders were also placed during
September for three 4,000-kva 60/13.8-kv transformers, to be installed at the pulp-mill.
Ten miles of 60-kv line of wood-pole construction will connect the mill to the substation,
and orders were placed for materials required for this transmission-line.
The capacity of Nanaimo Pine Street substation was increased by replacing three
1,000-kva 60/23-kv transformers with three 2,500-kva transformers.
In order to meet plans for the future supply of 60-cycle power to the Courtenay
and Cumberland areas, three 5,000-kva 138/13.8-kv transformers were placed on order.
Vernon-Kamloops.
Construction of the 63-kv Vernon-Kamloops transmission-line was commenced in
June, and by the end of the fiscal year the line was 95 per cent, complete. This
transmission-line has a length of 69.5 miles. In addition to providing for interchange
of power between Vernon and Kamloops, the line will deliver power to a distribution
system to be constructed in the Falkland-Westwold-Monte Lake area.
This transmission-line, linked with the existing 63-kv line from Shuswap Falls
near Vernon, terminates at Kamloops in a 6,000-kva 63/12-kv substation with 12-kv
distribution feeders. Construction and installation of the terminal facilities at both
ends was well advanced at the end of the year.
Whatshan-Vernon.
Clearing operations were commenced at both ends of the right-of-way for the
138-kv Whatshan-Vernon transmission-line.
This line is designed as a single circuit of A.C.S.R. conductor to be supported on
twin-pole structures.
At the Whatshan end a galvanized-steel switching structure will be constructed.
Two 12,500-kva 3-phase 6.9/138-kv water-cooled transformers will be installed at this
end of the line. Grading of this switchyard was partially completed during the year.
At the Vernon end, three 8,333-kva 138/63-kv transformers, with a spare unit, will be
installed. The switching structures will be of creosoted timber, such construction being
considered preferable to steel, so that any future extensions and changes which might
ultimately be required at this central point on the system could more easily be made.
3. DISTRIBUTION PLANT.
The expansion of distribution facilities by means of extensions and by the reconstruction of overloaded lines was continued on a vigorous scale. The distribution system
at Quesnel, acquired by the Commission in 1945, was rebuilt.
Street-lighting additions and improvements were made at Alberni, Hope, Lumby,
Lillooet, Nanaimo, North Kamloops, Peachland, Quesnel, Smithers, and Telkwa.
The more significant items of distribution-plant construction are described under
the various power districts. b 24 " electric power act."
The Albernis.
The system expansion included the placing of 328 poles, which added 7.16 miles
of primary circuit and 4.52 miles of secondary circuit, and 326 consumers to the district.
Distribution-transformer capacity was increased by 1,021 kva.
Alert Bay.
The distribution and street-lighting systems, acquired in 1945, were completely
rebuilt with larger distribution transformers and heavier conductors. Forty-seven
customers were added.
Burns Lake.
The system was rebuilt and extended, adding fifty-five customers.
Campbell River.
This system, acquired on January 1st, 1949, is undergoing alterations to substitute
60-cycle service for the existing 25-cycle supply.    Six customers were connected.
Cumberland-Royston.
Fifty-three new poles were set, adding 2.1 miles of 2.3-kv line. An additional
6.1 miles of line was rebuilt to increase capacity.   Twenty-four customers were added.
Golden.
A new street-lighting system consisting of forty-nine modern units was installed.
A half-mile of 2.3-kv line and seventeen customers were added to the district.
Hope.
Forty-four new poles were set, which added 1.45 miles of 2.3-kv primary and 0.2
mile of secondary line. A 300-kva transformer substation was constructed to serve a
sawmill load, and sixty-five customers were connected.
Work was commenced on the construction of a distribution-line from Hope to
serve the Flood-Laidlaw area. Subsequent arrangements made for purchasing power
from, the British Columbia Electric Railway Company at Jones Creek necessitated a
redesign of this line to permit transmitting the power to Hope. This involved heavier
conductors and higher-voltage service transformers. The new line is scheduled for
completion in August.
Kamloops.
Two hundred and ninety-nine new poles were set, adding 3.8 miles of 11.5-kv line,
4.1 miles of 2.3-kv line, and 3.5 miles of secondary line to the district. Two hundred
and forty-eight customers were connected. Preliminary locations were staked and
some pole distribution commenced on the construction of an 11.5-kv feeder from Kamloops to Chase.
Lillooet.
One mile of 2.3-kv line was added.
Nakusp.
Thirty-five poles were set, adding 1.3 miles of 2.3-kv primary line and 0.6 mile of
secondary line to the district.    Forty-six customers were connected.
Nanaimo-Duncan.
Approximately 550 new poles were set, adding 40.1 miles of distribution-line at
various voltages to the system.
The customers added—947—represent about 10 per cent, of the total at April 1st,
1948. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B 25
Work was started on the electrification of the rural areas at Coombs, Errington,
and Hilliers, and customer surveys were made in the Cedar and Bowser areas.
The erection of the new 2/0 copper 23.0-kv ring main around Nanaimo was nearly
completed, and resulted in a material improvement in voltage conditions.
The 23.0-kv line north of Nanaimo was extended from. Craig's Crossing to Qualicum, and construction of lines to supply the Nanaimo sulphate pulp-mill at Cedar was
well advanced.
Preparations were made to extend the 23-kv line to Saltspring Island, and considerable distribution-transformer capacity was added to the district.
North Okanagan.
Substantial progress was made in extending distribution-lines in the rural areas
of the North Okanagan Valley. A total of 104.4 miles of new primary distribution
circuits was built, and existing systems were extended by adding 1.3 miles of primary
line and 1.9 miles of secondary line.
Sixteen miles of distribution-line were converted from 2.3 to 6.9/12 kv.
In many cases, conductor and transformer sizes were increased to meet heavier
demands—notably in the City of Vernon.
A total of 1,029 services were connected, for a net gain of 961 customers for the
year, representing an increase of over 16 per cent, since April 1st, 1948.
Peachland-Westbank.
The primary distribution was increased by 2.5 miles, using eighty-one new poles.
Fifty-eight customers were added.
Quesnel.
The entire distribution system, acquired in 1945, was rebuilt and a new street-
lighting system was constructed.    One hundred and nine customers were connected.
Sechelt.
The distribution system was expanded by the addition of 7.47 miles of 6.9-kv and
6.25 miles of secondary distribution-line.
In addition to this work, 2.61 miles of 2.3-kv line was converted to 6.9-kv distribution, which nearly completes the programme of converting this district to the higher
voltage.
There was a net increase of 163 customers to the district during the year.
Smithers.
The 6.9/12-kv distribution system was extended by the addition of 7.8 miles of
line, and 5.5 miles were added to the 2.3-kv system by the acquisition of the line
formerly operated by the Department of National Defence between the airport and
Smithers.    Seventy customers were connected.
Terrace.
One-half a mile of 2.3-kv line was built and eighty-nine customers were connected.
Vanderhoof.
A street-lighting extension of twelve units was added and twenty-five customers
were connected.
Williams Lake.
One hundred and twenty poles were added, extending the 2.3-kv line to the shore
of Williams Lake, where a municipal pumping plant was constructed and is being
served.    Sixty-five customers were added. B 26
ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
Summary of Circuit Miles of Distribution and Number of Customers
as at March 31st, 1949.
District.
Miles of
Line.
Number of
Customers.
Customers
per Mile.
88.5
3.7
3.0
37.4
27.8
10.0
14.7
70.0
5.8
17.7
550.2
405.7
30.1
22.4
35.6
38.4
12.4
4.5
11.3
3,790
255
154
837
940
218
494
3,607
135
346
10,740
6,893
442
536
893
496
335
189
319
42.8
68.9
51.3
22.3
33.8
Golden	
21.8
33.5
51.5
23.3
19.5
19.5
16.9
14.6
23.9
Sechelt	
25.0
12.9
27.0
42.0
28.2
Totals           	
1,389.2
31,619
22.7 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49.
B 27
IV. OPERATION.
1. PRODUCTION.
The John Hart hydro-electric generating-station, located at Campbell River, was
placed in operation on January 11th, 1948, and has replaced all other generating plants
operated by the Commission on Vancouver Island.
Generating Capacity in Operation, March 31st, 1949.
Active.
Inactive.
Plant Location.
Type.*
Number
of Units.
Capacity
in Kva.
Type.*
Number
of Units.
Capacity
in Kva.
D
H
D
D
D
D
H
S
D
HD
D
HD
H
D
D
D
D
D
3
2
3
4
3
3
2
4
3
2
3
4
2
3
3
6
5
437.5
1,695.0
93.5
1,150.0
562.5
687.0
50,000.0
3,375.0
250.0
375.0
D
D
H
H
SH
H
D
D
D
D
D
3
2
1
::::
i
4
1
4
4
2
1
2
230 0
150.0
Hope	
44.0
	
125.0
1,730.0
62.0
1,335.0
275.0
687.5
700.0
6,500.0
749.0
437.5     .
437.5
664.5
781.5
Sechelt               	
105 0
45.0
Totals            	
58
69,583.0
25
4,201.0
* Note.—D=diesel; H=hydro ; S—steam.
A total of 800 kva additional 25-cycle capacity was purchased from Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, to supply the Cumberland-Royston district and the system
formerly owned by the Vancouver Island Utilities, Limited.
The total system capacity was, therefore:—
ivva.
Commission's active generating capacity  69,583
Purchased power         800
Total '  70,383 B 28
"ELECTRIC  POWER ACT."
Small amounts of power were also obtained at various times from other sources,
as shown ih the following table:—
Power generated and purchased.
I. Generated (Kwh).
Station.
Fiscal Year ended Mar. 31.
Alert Bay	
Barriere  	
Burns Lake	
Golden t	
Hope	
John Hart -	
Kamloops	
Lillooet	
Nakusp - -	
Nanaimo (three plants)	
Peachland and Westbank (two plants)
Port Alberni	
Quesnel	
Sechelt	
Shuswap Falls	
Smithers	
Terrace	
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake	
Totals	
767,044
438,944
328,100
9,346,210
10,041,876
— 695,666
142,792
43,415
99,377
480,662
254,875
225,787
1,358,450
708,010
650,440
82,089,400
8,039,096
74,050,304
3,409,950
2,076,900
1,333,050
452,680
234,455
218,225
456,855
369,400
87,455
262,430
4,984,540
—4,722,110
1,133,462
743,024
390,438
49,048
1,990,224
— 1,91,1,176
1,206,375
841,110
365,265
1,222,261
654,830
567,431
23,903,090
21,019,150
2,883,940
1,403,997
739,677
664,320
422,031
257,667
164,364
456,079
275,297
180,782
901,460
589,140
312,320
129,464,276
54,301,630
75,162,646
II. Purchased (Kwh).
From.
Fiscal Year ended Mar. 31.
Difference.
1949.
1948.
807,250
22,278,000
2,195,780
867,700
1,996,900
889,130
4,200
—21,1,70,750
—2,195,780
Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd	
17,600
28,990
1,470,996
896,400
—850,100
—l,9lr7,910
■    581,866
892,200
Totals	
3,221,236
28,231,710
—25,010,1,71,
Summary.
132,685,512              82,533,340              50,152,172
1,865,162              '1,153,489                   711,673
Totals	
130,820,350              81,379,851              49,440,499 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B  29
Disposition of Poiver.
Kwh.
Net generated and purchased, 1948-49  130,820,350
Transmission and tranformation losses (8.7 per cent.)-—    11,433,435
Delivered, wholesale   119,386,915
Special-contract sales—
West Kootenay Power & Light Co., Ltd.    1,038,000
Construction, John Hart Development—       260,025
B.C. Electric Railway Co., Ltd     1,164,250
Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd  28,585,400
Nanaimo Sulphate Pulp Mill  93,960
     31,141,635
Delivered to power districts and municipalities for distribution     88,245,280
Distribution losses (10 per cent.)       8,823,983
Distribution-system sales     79,421,297
The floods of May, 1948, affected production at several points. The Hope hydro
plant was submerged, production from the Barriere plant was interrupted when flood-
waters washed out sections of the pole-line connecting the plant with the Kamloops
district, and at Lillooet the intake and part of the flume of the hydro-electric plant
owned by the Pacific Great Eastern Railway but operated by the Commission was
destroyed. At Peachland, high water interfered with the operation of the hydroelectric plant.
The diesel plant at Quesnel was threatened by an overflow of the Quesnel River,
but the water did not reach the generator floor level, and for a time there was a threat
to the plant at Nakusp, owing to high water in the Arrow Lakes.
An unprecedented cold spell in January, 1949, caused a frazil jam at Shuswap
Falls, which reduced output seriously for periods varying from two to thirty-nine hours,
during which power was purchased from the West Kootenay Power and Light Company,
Limited.
Icing conditions also affected the output of the hydro-electric plant at Nakusp
during the same period.
The maintenance of production plant included such items as the butt-strapping of
two boilers at the Kamloops steam plant, constant repairs to the flume at the Barriere
plant, and ordinary bearing and other minor repairs to various diesel units.
2. TRANSMISSION.
132-kv System.
The 132-kv transmission-loop system based on the John Hart station was brought
into operation during the year, together with the two step-down transformer terminals
at Port Alberni and near Nanaimo (Jinglepot Road).
An F.M. radiotelephone system was installed to facilitate the operation of the
transmission system, with stations located at the generating-station, at Port Alberni,
and at Nanaimo. In addition to these stations, two portable sets were installed in
motor-vehicles, which will be used for line-operating and maintenance purposes.
Some minor operating difficulties with the 132-kv lines were experienced in November, due to wet snow accumulating on the conductors, accompanied by high winds. It
was noted that the snow-loading was much less severe on the sections carrying the B 30 "ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
greatest electrical load, as would be expected. As the transmitted electrical load
increases, the heating effect is expected to prevent any further difficulties of this nature.
One brief interruption, due to a lightning flash-over, occurred in July.
All high-voltage porcelain at the Port Alberni substation was washed to eliminate
the effect of air contamination from the pulp-mill near by.
60-kv System.
The unusually severe winter storms caused more than ordinary interruptions to
the operation of the 60-kv line between Nanaimo and Duncan. However, at no time
was service disrupted for any long duration, a 40-minute period in February being the
longest.
The capacity of the Pine Street substation, which supplies Nanaimo, was increased
from 3,000 kva to 7,500 kva.
45-kv System.
There were two major transmission interruptions to the Barriere-Kamloops 45-kv
line of thirteen and fifteen hours on May 25th and 27th, due to the displacement of
poles by flood-waters.
Other lines were affected in a minor degree at various times by lightning, falling
trees, collisions with motor-vehicles, and—on one occasion—a conductor was severed by
a rifle bullet.
Transmission-line maintenance included a limited amount of pole stubbing on the
Barriere-Kamloops line, some right-of-way reclearing at several points, and some minor
insulator replacements.
3. DISTRIBUTION.
On January 1st, 1949, the Commission acquired the distribution system operated
by the Vancouver Island Utilities. This acquisition, together with extensions of distribution-lines in various districts and new connections to existing lines, resulted in an
addition of 4,149 services, to bring the total number being supplied on March 31st,
1949, to 31,619 customers.
The various districts received 88,245,280 kwh for distribution, and customers'
meters recorded total sales of 79,421,297 kwh for the year. The resulting distribution
loss is 10 per cent, of energy received by the districts.
As an indication of the effect of the unusually severe winter weather, the distribution-lines of the Nanaimo-Duncan district suffered 41 interruptions—for the most part
of short duration—to the 23-kv system, 76 to the 6.9-kv lines, and 128 to the 2.3-kv
primary circuits.
Sub-normal voltages developed in various sections of the Alberni, Nanaimo-Duncan,
Kamloops, and North Okanagan districts, due to rapid growth of loads. These conditions were corrected by a reinforcement of conductors, by replacing transformers with
those of a larger capacity, and by, in some instances, a more efficient arrangement of
primary lines.
The conversion of the 25-cycle system acquired on January 1st, 1949, from the
Vancouver Island Utilities was commenced.
The Alert Bay system was completely reconstructed, and the replacement of 2,300-
volt primary lines by those rated at 6,900/12,000 volts in the Sechelt district was well
advanced.
The more significant items of maintenance consisted of the following:—
Alberni:   107 poles were replaced, and 14.5 miles of distribution-line along
rural roads were replaced.
Cumberland:   25 poles were replaced, and 6.1 miles of 2.2-kv distribution-line
were reconstructed, partly to increase the conducting capacity. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49.
B 31
Standard Diesel Power-house—Exterior.
Smithers, B.C.
Golden, B.C. B 32
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
Standard Diesel Power-house—Interior.
Switchboard panels, Smithers power-house.
Generating equipment and Vivian prime mover, Smithers power-house. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B  33
Kamloops:   125 poles were replaced, and 15 miles of distribution-line reconstructed, partly to obtain greater capacity.
Nanaimo-Duncan:  252 poles were replaced, and 76.7 miles of distribution-line
along rural roads were recleared by hand methods.
North Okanagan:   A limited amount of pole stubbing, pole replacements, and
reclearing was carried out.
In the other districts, routine maintenance of a minor nature only was required
and performed.
4. RATE SCHEDULES.
As at March 31st, 1949, the Commission's scientifically designed promotional rates
were available to 18,053 customers, or 57 per cent, of the total number then being
served. This compares most favourably with the 3,764 customers, or 14 per cent.,
enjoying such schedules at the end of the preceding fiscal year. The increase was the
result of bringing the Nanaimo-Duncan and Alberni Power Districts under the provisions of Regulation No. 5 (Rate Schedules) during the summer of 1948. Thirteen of
the nineteen power districts controlled by the Commission were operating under promotional schedules at the end of the fiscal year.
Cumberland-Royston Power District, which is on a 25-cycle distribution system
(along with the Courtenay-Comox territory to be acquired April 1st, 1949), is the only
Vancouver Island area where no rate revision has yet taken place. The former customers of Vancouver Island Utilities, Limited, acquired January 1st, 1949, are being
granted temporary rates of a promotional nature when ready to receive 60-cycle current
now available from the John Hart Development. Upon completion of the switch-over
the matter of rates in this recently added power district of Campbell River will be
given further attention.
The remainder of the power districts still operating under the miscellaneous rate
structures in effect when the properties were acquired—comprising four in number—
are situated on the Mainland. The important Kamloops and North Okanagan Power
Districts must await completion of the Whatshan Development before promotional
schedules can be established, since the use of electrical energy in these areas cannot be
encouraged until the present generating capacity is augmented.
The other two districts are Burns Lake and Lillooet. In the former district the
promotional rates will become effective early in the next fiscal year, whilst at Lillooet
an improved method of supplying power remains to be finalized.
The promotional rates now in effect are indicated in the following tables:— B 34
ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
A. Residential Service Rates.
Available for residence lighting, heating, cooking, and single-phase motors individually rated at 2 horse-power or less used for domestic purposes.
Power District and
Rate Zone.
Monthly
Minimum
per Kw of
Demand.
Block I
(First 20 Kwh
per Month per
Kw. of Demand).
Block II
(Next 60 Kwh
per Month per
Kw. of Demand),
Block III
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption).
TheAlbernis (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Alert Bay	
Golden (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Hope	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo-Duncan (Zonel)
(Zone 2)
(Zone 3)
Peachland-Westbank	
Quesnel (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Sechelt	
Smithers	
Terrace (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Vanderhoof (Zonel)	
(Zone 2)	
Williams Lake (Zone 1)	
„     (Zone 2)	
.55
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.50
1.00
1.00
.55
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.25
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.25
1.00
1.25
1.00
1.25
Cents per Kwh.
7
8
12
12
12
10
12
7
10
10
12
12
10
12
12
12
12
10
12
Cents per Kwh.
2
2
2%
2y2
2%
2y2
2V»
2
2
2V2
2%
2y2
2%
2%
2%
2%
2%
2y2
2%
2%
2%
Cents per Kwh.
§io
%0
%0
%0
%0
%0
§io
?io
lio
§io
%o
%o
§io
§io
%0
%0
Minimum demand rating, 2 kw.    Discount for prompt payment, 10 percent. REPORT  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA POWER  COMMISSION,  1948-49.
B 35
B. Summer Service Rates, Residential and Commercial.
Available for summer cottages, hotels, tourist camps, refreshment booths, and
other commercial premises which normally require service during summer months only.
Available May 1st to September 30th.
Power District and
Rate Zone.
Annual
Fixed Charge
per Kw of
Demand.
Block I
(First 50 Kwh
per Season per
Kw. of Demand).
Block II
(Next 150 Kwh
per Season per
Kw. of Demand).
Block III
(Balance of
Consumption
per Season).
TheAlbernis (Zonel)	
(Zone 2)	
Alert Bay	
Golden (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Hope	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo-Duncan (Zone 1)
(Zone 2)
(Zone 3)
Peachland-Westbank	
Quesnel (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Sechelt	
Smithers	
Terrace (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Vanderhoof (Zonel)	
(Zone 2)	
Williams Lake (Zone 1)	
„    (Zone 2)	
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
Cents per Kwh.
8
8
12
12
12
10
12
10
10
12
12
10
12
12
12
12
10
12
Cents per Kwh.
2
2
2%
2y2
2%
2%
2y2
2
2
2%
2%
2%
2y2
2%
2%
2%
2y2
2%
2%
2%
2%
Cents per Kwh.
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
%
%
%
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
%
y2
Minimum demand rating, 2 kw.    Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent. B 36
electric power act.
C. Commercial Service Rates.
Available  for  lighting,  heating,  cooking,   and  single-phase  motors   in  business
premises and any other premises used for commercial purposes.
Power District and
Rate Zone.
Monthly
Minimum
per Kw of
Demand.
Block 1
(First 30 Kwh
per Month per
Kw. of Demand).
Block II
(Next 60 Kwh
per Month per
Kw. of Demand).
Block III
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption).
The Albernis (Zone 1)	
„           „        (Zone 2)	
$
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.50
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.25
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.25
1.00
1.25
1.00
1.25
Cents per Kwh.
8
8
12
12
12
12
12
8
8
10
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
Cents per Kwh.
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Cents per Kwh.
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y„
Golden (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
(Zone 2)
(Zone 3)	
(Zone 2)	
Sechelt	
y2
%
(Zone 2)	
y,
Vanderhoof (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
y,
y,
„    (Zone 2)	
y,
Minimum demand rating, 2 kw.    Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent. REPORT OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B  37
D. Power Service Rates.
(a) Power Service.—Available for motors and other electrical equipment used for
commercial, manufacturing, and processing purposes where the minimum demand is not
less than 3% kw (5 horse-power), single-phase or three-phase, at available secondary
voltages (550/220/110 volts).
(b) Primary Power Service.—Available for industries, commercial establishments,
institutions, and others requiring power at primary distribution voltage (2,300 volts or
higher) in excess of 50 kw at a single point of delivery.
A uniform rate for each of these services is in effect in all zones of each power
district operating under Regulation No. 5, namely: The Albernis, Alert Bay, Golden,
Hope, Nakusp, Nanaimo-Duncan, Peachland-Westbank, Quesnel, Sechelt, Smithers,
Terrace, Vanderhoof, Williams Lake.
The rates are as follows :— Power. Primary Power.
Monthly service charge per kw of billing demand-— $1.00 $0.85
Plus-
First 50 kwh per month per kw of billing demand        3c. per kwh
Next 50 kwh per month perkw of billing demand    l%c. per kwh
Balance of monthly consumption       %c. per kwh
Monthly minimum bill per kw of billing demand._._ $1.00 $0.85
Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent.
Power loads supplied from the John Hart Development are first subject to the
following quantity discounts:— Discount.
Up to 100 kw of billing demand   Nil
From 101 to 200 kw of billing demand  10%
From 201 to 500 kw of billing demand  15%
From 501 to 1,000 kw of billing demand  20% B 38
ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
E.   STREET-LIGHTING SERVICE RATES.
A uniform street-lighting schedule, based upon the capacity of the lamp ratings,
is in effect in all power districts operating under Regulation No. 5. A complete list of
these thirteen power districts has been set out above. Two types of street-lighting
service have been made available:—
(a) Overhead.—Under which the Commission installs, owns, operates, and maintains overhead street-lighting equipment and supplies energy for the operation of
lights daily from one hour after sunset until one hour before sunrise. The customer
municipality pays the actual cost of materials for renewal of lamps and glassware.
(6) Ornamental.—Under which the street-lighting equipment is owned by and
maintained at the expense of the customer municipality. The Commission supplies
energy for the operation daily from one hour after sunset until one hour before sunrise.
The schedule of charges under each of these types of service for various lamp
capacities is as follows:—
System of Wiring.
Capacity Rating of Lamp.
Net Rate per Lamp pee Month.
Overhead.
Ornamental.
$1.50
2.00
2.50
3.50
6.00
1.30
1.75
2.10
2.60
$0.75
200 watts	
1.25
300 watts	
1.75
500 watts	
2.75
1,000 watts	
5.25
0.55
1.00
1.35
1.85 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B  39
V. SURVEYS AND INVESTIGATIONS.
1. POWER PROJECTS.
Surveys for a hydro-electric power-development at Clowhom Falls at the head of
Salmon Arm, Sechelt Inlet, were made during the year. It is possible to develop 10,000
to 12,000 horse-power at this site, which is favourably situated for the supply of power
to the Sechelt Peninsula.
Final surveys, plans, and specifications were made for the proposed hydro-electric
development on Silver Creek, near Hope, in the Fraser Valley. It was decided, however,
not to proceed with this project at the present time, as it was found possible to purchase
power requirements for this community on favourable terms.
A topographical survey and study was made of the Seton Creek hydro-electric
plant, near Lillooet. This small plant had been leased to the Commission by the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway. A considerable length of the flume was destroyed by the 1948
spring flood, and the balance was in a very deteriorated condition. The object of the
survey was to determine whether or not reconstruction of the plant would be economically sound. The conclusion was that reconstruction should not be undertaken and that
other means of supplying power to Lillooet should be adopted.
2. TRANSMISSION PROJECTS.
Final location of the 132-kv transmission-line from Whatshan to Vernon was
completed.
Engineering studies and preliminary planning of equipment requirements for
delivering at Nanaimo a substantial block of power to the British Columbia Electric
Railway for use in Greater Victoria were made. A contract between the company and
the Commission providing for such delivery, to commence in September, 1950, will be
submitted to the Government for approval.
3. DISTRIBUTION PROJECTS.
Surveys were made during the year in connection with the acquisition by the
Commission of distribution-lines in the Courtenay-Comox area and in the territory
between Courtenay and Campbell River.
Surveys were also made between Ucluelet and Tofino, between Hope and Wahleach
Creek, at Blue River, in the Falkland-Westwold-Monte Lake area, and between Kamloops
and Chase.
Studies were undertaken to determine the best method of consolidating distribution
systems in the Coldstream Valley between Lumby and Vernon. B 40 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
VI. FINANCIAL.
In this section, statements are presented showing the financial position of the
undertakings of the Commission as at the close of its fourth fiscal period, the activities
o£ which have been covered in the preceding sections of this Report. The statements
include:—
1. Balance-sheet as at March 31st, 1949.
2. Combined operations, financial summary, for the year ended March 31st,
1949.
3. Power distribution, all districts—combined revenue and expenses for the
year ended March 31st, 1949.
4. Power districts—financial statistics:—
(a) Revenue,   expenses,   customers,   and   consumption,   by  individual
districts, for the year ended March 31st, 1949.
(b) Accumulated stabilization reserves, by districts, as at March 31st,
.'' 1949.
5. Plant and equipment in operation and related maintenance and renewals
and sinking fund reserve balances as at March 31st, 1949.
6. Construction-work in progress as at March 31st, 1949.
Condensed summaries of operating revenues, expenses, provisions for reserves,
and net surplus for the year ended March 31st, 1949, with comparative totals for the
previous operating year, are given in the General Review section at the commencement
of this Annual Report. Further details relative to total operating costs, allocation of
cost of power, distribution expenses by separate power districts, etc., are shown in
Statements 2, 3, and 4, and the district totals in respect to the accumulated stabilization
reserve to March 31st, 1949, are also included with other financial data on Statement 4.
The cost of power charged to individual distribution districts is determined by the
Commission in accordance with the terms of section 26 of the " Electric Power Act,"
separate cost records being maintained for each production and transmission unit
operated. From the total cost of production and transmission thus obtained, special
power sales are deducted (sections 21 and 22), and the combined net cost of power is
determined. This is distributed at a uniform average kwh rate to the several power
districts on the basis of the over-all kwh volume of power made available for distribution. The relative charges for power to each district on this basis are set out in
Statement 4.
The reduction of the net operating surplus for the year ended March 31st, 1949,
compared with the result for the previous year, is due principally to the large increase
in interest and other fixed charges on the considerable capital expenditures for
additional plant and equipment put into operation during the year, and from which
only a lower-than-average revenue can be expected during the present development and
extension stage of the Commission's activities.
The totals for plant and equipment in operation, summarized in the balance-sheet,
include valuations established by the Commission in respect to properties acquired by
expropriation proceedings in August and September, 1945, but for which the compensation is not yet determined. This matter has been the subject of extended hearings
before a Judge of the Supreme Court during the past year under the " Electric Power
Act," but the proceedings had not been concluded at the date of this Report.
Additional funds to finance new construction-work and additions to existing
facilities have been received from the Provincial Government during the year under
review, and total advances in this connection amounted to $28,395,800 as at March 31st,
1949. Interest to that date has been paid on these advances in the amounts determined
and charged by the Department of Finance in accordance with the terms of section 51 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B 41
of the " Electric Power Act," and payments on sinking fund account in relation to
these advances have also been made as at March 31st, 1948, and March 31st, 1949.
Authority was requested and obtained from the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
by the Commission to allow it to commence annual payments on sinking fund account
on a two-year deferment basis. The amounts provided, however, by charges against
operations to March 31st, 1949, have exceeded the minimum requirements of the
deferment plan, and actual deposits to the Minister for sinking fund account have
therefore been made up to the equivalent total of the sinking fund reserve as at
balance-sheet date.
The maintenance and renewals reserve has been increased during the year by
$233,177.11, representing the difference between $460,967.97 provided by charges at
the various percentage rates authorized by the Commission and $227,790.86 actually
expended, leaving a balance of $419,565.53 at credit of this reserve account as at
March 31st, 1949.
Details of the individual amounts of both maintenance and renewals reserve and
sinking fund reserve balances applicable to the capital investments as at March 31st,
1949, at the various locations operated by the Commission are set out in the plant and
equipment expenditure summary included as Statement 5.
The balance in the contributory superannuation fund for the benefit of Commission
employees was $300,191.86 as at March 31st, 1949, according to the records of the
Superannuation Commissioner appointed as administrator of the fund and the trustees
in control of the relative investments.
In accordance with the provisions of the " Electric Power Act," the accounts of the
Commission have been verified by auditors appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council, and their certificate relative to the financial records for the year, balance-sheet
as at March 31st, 1949, and supporting statements, is included in this section. B 42 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
BALANCE-SHEET AS
Assets.
Capital assets—■
Plant and equipment in operation, at values estimated by the Commission
as at dates of acquisition plus subsequent rehabilitations and
additions at cost—
Generation   $10,634,242.29
Transmission        4,733,437.91
Distribution        5,155,691.05
General   456,609.82
$20,979,981.07
Construction-work in progress—
Generation   $6,449,439.45
Transmission        850,791.31
Distribution         451,585.56
General  .  1,021.75
       7,752,838.07
Total plant and equipment  $28,732,819.14
Surveys and investigations  41,513.44
Acquisition costs and adjustments  320,169.81
Total capital assets '.  $29,094,502.39
Current assets—
Cash on hand and in banks .  $941,345.46
Accounts receivable—
Light and power customers  $158,193.21
Miscellaneous        11,479.11
     169,672.32
Inventories of construction and operating stores and supplies    564,447.35
Unexpired insurance  :       29,562.17
       1,705,027.30
Deferred charge—Unamortized organization and preliminary expenses  143,154.25
Sinking fund for retirement of Government advances—Deposits with Minister
of Finance   507,395.60
$31,450,079.54 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B  43
AT MARCH 31st, 1949. Statement 1.
LIABILITIES.
Advances from the Government of the Province of British Columbia  $28,395,800.00
Liability (estimated net) in respect of acquired plant and equipment for which
compensation has not been determined  358,671.44
Current liabilities—
Accounts payable and accrued charges  $252,688.91
Gross revenue taxes in respect of light and power service in
municipal areas (section 62)       51,874.11
Customers' deposits      117,917.38
■  422,480.40
General reserves—
Maintenance and renewals  $419,565.53
Gross revenue assessments, unorganized areas (section 64)       59,783.45
Interest     240,660.17
Contingencies      365,742.64
Stabilization reserve—
Balance at credit March 31st, 1948  $642,677.62
Surplus from operations, year to March 31st, 1949       37,302.69
1,085,751.79
679,980.31
Sinking fund reserve         507,395.60
$31,450,079.54
The Chairman and Commissioners,
British Columbia Power Commission,
Victoria, B.C.
Gentlemen,—We have examined the balance-sheet of the British Columbia Power Commission as at
March 31, 1949, and the attached statement of combined operations for the year ended on that date,
and have obtained all the information and explanations which we required. In connection therewith we
examined or tested accounting records of the Commission and other supporting evidence but we did not
make a detailed audit of the transactions.
As previously reported by us, proceedings are in progress under the terms of the " Electric Power
Act " to determine the compensation to be paid for certain properties expropriated. Until such time as
these proceedings are completed the liability in respect of these properties must be considered as an
estimate only.
Authorization has been obtained from the Lieutenant-Governor in Council for a two-year deferment
of Sinking Fund payments as provided under subsection (2) of section 52 of the " Electric Power Act."
Subject to the foregoing comments, we report that, in our opinion, the attached balance-sheet and
related statement of combined operations have been drawn up so as to exhibit a true and correct view
of the state of the affairs of the British Columbia Power Commission as at March 31, 1949, and the
results of its operations for the year ended on that date, according to the best of our information and
the explanations given to us and as shown by the books of the Commission.
Respectfully submitted,
ISMAY, BOISTON, DUNN & CO.,
Chartered Accountants, Auditors.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 23rd, 191,9. B 44 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
Statement 2.
COMBINED OPERATIONS: FINANCIAL SUMMARY—REVENUE AND EXPENSES—
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1949.
Revenue—
Power districts—■ Total.
Electrical-energy sales     -      $2,404,671.87
Miscellaneous revenue         —   26,636.59
$2,431,308.46
Special-contract sales, under sections 21 and 22, "Electric Power Act "         118,954.82
$2,550,263.28
Expenses— Operating Costs.
Direct—                                                                                          Generation.   Transmission. Distribution.
Labour     $261,243.22      $6,074.59 $149,355.16 $416,672.97
Fuel         216,549.44                   216,549.44
Other operating expenses        65,607.98        3,468.69 41,274.74 110,351.41
Customer accounting                   157,311.86 157,311.86
Gross revenue, 3% assessments   -           - 71,044.90 71,044.90
Administration and general expenses        74,968.80        1,778.65 79,181.03 155,928.48
Purchased power          35,427.03                 35,427.03
$653,796.47    $11,321.93    $498,167.69    $1,163,286.09
Interest on investment in operated plant....    271,753.20    120,393.24      125,573.88 517,720.32
$925,549.67 $131,715.17    $623,741.57    $1,681,006.41
Operating Surplus (excluding provision for reserves)          $869,256.87
Provision for reserves—
Maintenance  and renewals...   $161,152.02 $72,880.07 $184,291.49 $418,323.58
Sinking  fund        135,876.48 60,196.62 62,787.64 258,860.74
Contingencies         66,829.20 16,451.34 71,489.32 154,769.86
$363,857.70 $149,528.03    $318,568.45        $831,954.18
Net Operating Surplus, year ended March 31st, 1949 (transferred to stabilization reserve) $37,302.69 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B 45
Statement 3.
POWER DISTRIBUTION, ALL DISTRICTS:   SUMMARY OF REVENUE AND
EXPENSES FOR THE TWELVE-MONTH PERIOD ENDED MARCH 31st, 1949.
Revenue—
Electrical-energy sales  $2,404,671.87
Miscellaneous revenue   26,636.59
Total power district revenue  $2,431,308.46
Expenses (Detailed on Statement 2) —
Cost of power—
Direct expenses—
Generation   $925,549.67
Transmission       131,715.17
  $1,057,264.84
Provision for reserves—
Generation   $363,857.70
Transmission      149,528.03
        513,385.73
$1,570,650.57
Less  special-contract  sales  under  sections  21  and  22,
" Electric Power Act "        118,954.82
Cost of power delivered to distribution systems  $1,451,695.75
Distribution services—
Direct expenses—
Operating and administrative  $498,167.69
Interest on distribution plant     125,573.88
      $623,741.57
Provision for reserves—
Maintenance and renewals  $184,291.49
Sinking fund       62,787.64
Contingencies        71,489.32
318,568.45
Total distribution services        942,310.02
Total expenses   $2,394,005.77
Net Operating Surplus (transferred to stabilization reserve)        $37,302.69 B 46
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT.'
Nanaimo-Duncan Power District.
:::f4::yS1::::N;::;:i::MM*:;:;;:i
Laying 23,000-volt underwater cable to Saltspring Island.
§■ \ ...... wr- gm
Three 2,500-kva 60,000/23,000-volt transformers, Pine Street Substation, Nanaimo. POWER DISTRIBUTION BY DISTRICTS.
(a) Summary of Revenue and Expenditure for the Twelve-month Period ended March 31st, 1949, and
(6) Accumulated Stabilization Reserve as at that Date.
B 47
Statement 4.
The
Albernis.
Alert Bay.
Burns Lake.
Campbell
River.
Cumberland-
Royston.
Golden.
Eope.
Kamloops.
Lillooet.
Nakusp.
Nanaimo-
Duncan.
North
Okanagan.
Peachland-
Westbank.
Quesnel.
Sechelt.
Smithers.
Terrace.
Vanderhoof.
Williams
Lake.
Totals.
Revenue—
Sales to municipalities...:	
1                           1
•   1                           1
    1       1   	
$6,846.84
8,098.93
	
$16,558.16
15,721.28
	
$37,013.20
377,286.59
230,543.15
395.48
63,379.90
315,814.70
14,248.84
$9,853.09
6,649.24
$37,013.20
j    1,095,725.76
778,320.73
1,095.85
298,719.53
18,482.71
129,506.92
45,807.17
$136,368.13
81,429.61
$8,896.85
10,817.20
	
$5,917.23
7,293.14
$6,543.76
4,812.59
$37,677.14
11,632.05
$124,136.04
157,761.03
$5,782.38
6,714.59
'    $11,278.30
5,399.76
	
$256,731.80
158,666.22
$15,424.04
7,444.17
$15,435.00
17,464.16
$29,691.16
10,946.95
700.37
783.63
$5,858.85
6,608.10
$9,625.70
16,069.72
Summer	
11,592.13
1,547.41
	
1,675.04
944.98
2,547.31
417.82
1,678.91
60,027.38
10,106.59
566.48
4,772.75
1,696.03
361.70
	
135,136.91
7,301.21
5,519.45
1,074.91
1,769.23
6,234.69
1,033.73
560.09
. 1,813.19
Primary power	
12,795.46
6,376.81
	
|
112,781.25
13,940.97
764.58
776.80
2,599.15
306.28
169.02
362.98
77.65
2,598.61
796.76
1,110.00
301.79
	
10,672.98
730.00
1,078.00
497.27
446.50
792.00
Sub-total	
$248,562.14
2,728.57
$21,430.48
247.45
$15,248.39
130.84
$12,378.98
$54,455.11
2,360.86
$16,160.35
326.04
$35,068.35
758.75
$357,370.27
1,773.95
$14,193.00
5.22
$17,341.55
220.83
$835,340.54
9,197.17
$568,509.12
5,526.06
$30,192.57
284.49
$36,209.77
1,181.44
$45,027.54
503.67
337,376.23
523.90
$18,033.33
238.92
$13,473.54
157.91
$28,300.61
470.52
|  $2,404,671.87
26,636.59
$251,290.71
$21,677.93
$15,379.23
$12,378.98
$56,815.97
$16,486.39
$35,827.10
$359,144.22
$14,198.22
$17,562.38
$844,537.71
1  $574,035.18
$30,477.06
$37,391.21
$45,531.21
$37,900.13
$18,272.25
$13,631.45
$28,771.13
$2,431,308.46
Expenses-
$147,294.02
50,369.95
13,311.50
$11,682.79
6,455.51
551.17
$2,328.30
3,108.54
176.40
$4,105.17
1,841.03
664.26
$20,248.55
17,054.15
2,128.93
$7,098.31
6,339.59
1,578.17
$21,344.05
9,071.49
2,262.10
$191,840.81
62,944.80
11,591.84
$7,134.33
6,242.34
217.62
$7,375.58
7,485.41
2,072.72
$610,201.84
164,952.17
45,881.98
$315,979.82
100,428.31
28,920.31
$17,661.28
8,670.14
3,504.14
$18,289.86
8,676.72
1,198.13
$19,346.19
13,230.07
4,306.01
$22,666.58
9,669.89
3,202.27
$6,273.31
7.217.31
1,530.69
$6,556.19
6,660.50
1,212.05
$14,268.77
7,749.77
1,263.59
j  $1,451,695.75
498,167.69
125,573.88
Distribution expenses, direct—
$210,975.47
$18,689.47
$5,613.24
$6,610.46
$39,481.63
$15,016.07
$32,677.64
$266,377.45
$13,594.29
$16,933.71
$821,035.99
$445,328.44
$29,835.56
$28,164.71
$36,882.27
$35,538.74
$15,021.31
$14,428.74
$23,282.13
$2,075,437.32
Operating surplus before provision for distribution
reserves	
$40,315.24
$2,988.46
$9,765.99
$5,768.52
$17,384.34
$1,470.32
$3,149.46
$92,766.77
$603.93
$628.67
$23,501.72
$128,706.74
$641.50
$9,226.50
$8,648.94
32,361.39
$3,250.94
—$797.29
$5,489.00
$355,871.14
Provision for distribution reserves-
$26,305.59
6,655.68
7,389.72
$1,637.12
275.55
267.48
$464.22
88.20
57.24
$564.52
333.13
274.00
$4,212.21
1,064.43
1,051.02
31,717.25
789.08
966.72
$2,535.00
1,131.05
1,314.54
$23,027.30
5,795.87
6,315.00
$638.74
108.84
92.22
$2,272.80
1,036.39
1,246.32
$70,406.48
22,940.95
26,381.04
$32,512.12
14.460.13
16,580.16
$3,752.09
1,752.01
2,162.94
$1,485.03
599.06
588.78
$4,765.74
2,153.00
2,520.90
$3,480.48
1,601.13
1,940.52
$1,724.31
765.32
889.20
$1,335.64
606.02
734.10
$1,454.85
631.80
717.42
$184,291.49
Sinking fund	
62,787.64
71,489.32
$40,350.99
$2,180.15
$609.66
$1,171.65
$6,327.66
$3,473.05
$4,980.59
$35,138.17
$839.80
$4,555.51
$119,728.47
$63,552.41
$7,667.04
$2,672.87
$9,439.64
$7,022.13
$3,378.83
$2,675.76
$2,804.07
$318,568.45
Surplus for year ended Mar. 31, 1949	
— $35.75
40,214.85
9,770.06
$808.31
23,561.39
— 61.06
$9,156.33
3,565.57
— 6.47
$4,596.87
$11,056.68
5,763.59
— 134.42
— $2,002.73
18,175.72
—35.58
— $1,831.13
19,077.43
— 104.75
$57,628.60
94,258.79
—1,664.91
— $235.87
262.92
—33.55
—$3,926.84
4,889.02
—54-92
— $96,226.75
221,178.54
—4,502.76
$65,154.33
101,449.32
— 2,590.29
—$7,025.5k
3,572.29
— 105.81
$6,553.63
27,962.07
— 118.10
— $790.70
11,971.20
—93.62
— $4,660.74
25,355.39
— 108.07
—$127.89
6,292.97
—33.72
—$3,473.05
12,246.10
—36.31
$2,684.93
22,880.46
— 85.72
$37,302.69
Stabilization reserve, April 1, 1948	
642,677.62
Accumulated stabilization reserve, Mar. 31, 1949	
$49,949.16
$24,308.64
$12,715.43
$4,596.87
$16,685.85
$16,137.41
$17,141.55
$150,222.48
— $6.50
$907.26
$120,449.03
$164,013.36
—$3,559.06
$34,397.60
$11,086.88
320,586.58
$6,131.36
$8,736.74
$25,479.67
$679,980.31
Customers—
Residential -	
3,208
534
46
2
169
75
8
3
109
36
8
1
713
120
3
1
860
75
3
2
158
54
5
1
1
398
91
4
1
2,778
710
118
1
81
40
14
272
65
8
1
9,102
1,503
131
4
5,660
976
244
13
360
64
16
2
403
115
17
1
763
120
8
2
369
108
17
2
261
66
7
1
125
57
6
1
202
102
14
1
25,991
Commercial	
4,911
677
Street-lighting..   .                                      	
40
3,790
255
154
837
940
218
494
3,607
135
346
10,740
6,893
442
536
893
496
335
189
319
31,619
Kwh—
Residential	
1
3,765,710
2,901,691
1,028,897
154,383
194,099
356,670
54,202
3,800
32,646
49,924
18,801
17,544
91,199
75,319
26,896
1,553
521,950
270,818
95,115
77,731
1
102,008
210,186
5,631
33,104
1
349,212
497,161
75,516  |
52,680
3,717,417
3,034,725
3,164,181
197,149
83,536
192,801
33,621
203,261
129,445
5,195
6,314
9,802,055
7,473,774
15,227,253
467,616
7,034,583
3,772,011
7,959.110
489,535
331,954
172,653
368,399
27,291
273,872
458,739
165,523
40,006
446,248
315,380
97,746
11,498
333,809
445,398
478,732  |
33,415
136,816
133,184
30,494
20,530
114,864
177,005
9,884
16,140
197,675
432,245
64,472
29,297
27,732,914
Commercial	
21,099,129
Power	
28,909,668
Street-lighting         	
1,679,586
7,850,681
1
608,771
118,915
194,967
965,614
350,929
|
974,569
1
10,113,472
309,958
344,215
32,970,698
1
19,255,239
1
900,297
|
938,140
870,872
1,291,354
321,024
317,893
723,689
79,421,297 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49.
B 49
Statement 5.
PLANT AND EQUIPMENT IN OPERATION AS AT MARCH 31st, 1949.
Undertaking.
Book Values.
Totals
as at
Mar. 81, 1948.
Additions,
Year ended
Mar. 31, 1949.
Totals
as at
Mar. 31, 1949
Maintenance
and Renewals
Reserve as at
Mar. 31, 1949.
Sinking Fund
Reserve as at
Mar. 31, 1949.
Generating Plant.
The Albernis	
Alert Bay	
Barriere	
Burns Lake	
Dawson Creek	
Golden	
Hope	
John Hart..
Kamloops...
Lillooet	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo	
Peachland-Westbank..
Quesnel	
Sechelt	
Shuswap	
Smithers	
Terrace	
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake..
Totals..
Transmission Plant.
Kamloops	
Okanagan	
Vancouver Island	
Totals	
Distribution Plant.
The Albernis	
Alert Bay	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River	
Cumberland-Roys ton..
Golden	
Hope	
Kamloops..
Lillooet	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo-Duncan	
North Okanagan	
Peachland-Westbank..
Quesnel	
Sechelt	
Smithers	
Terrace	
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake..
Meters	
Totals..
$159,212.50
132,263.11
368,380.30
5,170.34
45,118.74
137,480.90
79,561.95
283,048.23
13,887.42
29,234.16
293,797.70
83,347.16
175,158.50
52,246.48
1,052,146.88
128,346.04
72,230.31
142,213.67
72,101.82
$3,324,946.21
$176,837.50
513,598.34
130,746.16
$821,182.00
$367,010.36
13,308.10
2,107.21
49,700.03
48,241.00
65,386.61
308,894.13
4,669.11
61,725.44
1,263,974.43
822,261.19
103,195.74
29,150.45
124,640.89
93,393.30
44,179.63
37,155.90
35,385.58
608,406.52
1,082,785.62
■ ,61,5.25
616.41
1,838.97
181.50
— 1,059.59
39,385.95
7,200,807.91
48,062.25
11,502.21
22,247.95
—83,060.05
16,108.57
—8,026.86
24,773.80
—2,1,02.78
1,607.52
1,277.38
— 7,1,56.59
41,536.88
$7,309,296.08
$653.15
2,767.94
3,908,834.82
!,912,255.91
$48,769.55
5,909.85
26,509.83
82,490.36
18,032.27
792.79
7,264.92
68,011.10
3,043.84
3,059.48
283,137.69
238,769.54
12,808.85
58,537.02
26,172.70
11,801.08
3,420.43
— 1,811.56
3,123.03
173,062.66
$153,567.25
132,879.52
372,219.27
5,351.84
45,118.74
136,421.31
118,947.90
7,200,807.91
331,110.48
25,389.63
51,482.11
210,737.05
99,455.73
172,132.14
77,020.28
1,049,744.10
129,953.56
73,507.69
134,757.08
113,638.70
$10,634,242.29
$177,490.65
516,366.28
4,039,580.98
$4,733,437.91
$415,779.91
19,217.95
28,617.04
82,490.36
67,732.30
49,033.79
72,651.53
376,905.23
7,712.95
64,784.92
1,547,112.12
1,061,030.73
116,004.59
87,687.47
150,813.59
105,194.38
47,600.06
35,344.34
38,508.61
781,469.18
$1,072,905.43 I    $5,155,691.05
  I
$9,351.62
6,218.87
7,187.19
— 113.20
5,937.50
4,275.72
4,512.51
42,488.98
—i,895.58
1,664.44
796.83
8,148.00
— 61,7.21
11,255.70
5,931.85
28,032.81
7,734.00
2,868.68
7,342.21
—536.90
$147,554.02
$8,237.74
39,009.23
22,147.43
$69,394.40
$12,643.08
1,558.66
383.17
414.50
2,046.98
—535.1,8
1,634.35
6,759.16
— 716.11
2,152.98
12,786.78
30,192.55
2,277.19
1,403.07
'    1,463.63
949.88
1,555.37
—283.67
903.17
26,211.34
$103,800.60
$7,670.56
3,332.76
12,097.23
151.15
562.50
3,957.02
3,190.70
85,192.02
12,616.98
400.76
1,295.90
16,697.11
2,540.42
6,654.31
2,553.41
75,082.07
4,306.56
2,401.89
4,436.41
3,344.89
$248,484.65
$4,580.70
25,534.04
61,806.46
$91,921.20
$14,125.51
757.53
61.76
292.00
1,673.38
1,218.51
1,935.60
7,946.48
160.10
1,741.89
60,509.35
47,071.17
2,583.61
1,536.62
4,353.78
2,187.57
911.75
1,011.79
1,067.15
9,084.18
$160,229.73 B 50
ELECTRIC POWER ACT.'
Statement 5—Continued.
PLANT AND  EQUIPMENT IN OPERATION AS AT MARCH 31st, 1949—Continued.
Book Values.
Maintenance
and Renewals
Reserve as at
Mar. 31, 1949.
Sinking Fund
Undertaking.
Totals
as at
Mar. 31, 1948.
Additions,
Year ended
Mar. 31, 1949.
Totals
as at
Mar. 31, 1949
Reserve as at
Mar. 31, 1949.
General Plant.
$187,700.72
124,482.38
58,108.64
$29,785.68
62,328.69
— 5,796.29
$217,486.40
186,811.07
52,312.35
$17,707.22
66,020.43
15,088.86
$6,760.02
Totals	
$370,291.74
$86,318.08
$456,609.82
$98,816.51
$6,760.02
Summary.
$3,324,946.21
821,182.00
4,082,786.62
370,291.74
$7,309,296.08
3,912,255.91
1,072,905.43
86,318.08
$10,634,242.29
4,733,437.91
5,155,691.05
456,609.82
$147,554.02
69,394.40
103,800.60
98,816.51
$248,484.65
91,921.20
160,229.73
6,760.02
Totals	
$8,599,205.57
$12,380,775.50
$20,979,981.07
$419,565.53
$507,395.60
Statement 6.
STATEMENT OP CONSTRUCTION-WORK IN PROGRESS AS AT
MARCH 31st, 1949.
Generating Plant.
Barriere	
Bamfield (survey).
Burns Lake	
Dawson Creek	
Hazelton (survey).
Hope	
John Hart..
Kamloops..
Lillooet	
Nakusp	
  $1,164.76
  552.80
  8,453.54
  258.85
  179.05
  59,018.06
  5,202,989.84
  27,394.43
 :  641.84
  25,315.04
  1,248.80
  661.20
  2,370.03
  15,029.25
  31,560.67
  28,254.24
  450.72
Whatshan...                     1,006,517.31
Williams Lake  456.00
Small surveys unclassified  690.09
Diesel engines not yet placed  36,232.93
Nanaimo	
Peachland-Westbank.
Quesnel	
Sechelt	
Smithers	
Terrace	
Vanderhoof..
Total  $6,449,439.45 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1948-49. B  51
Statement 6—Continued.
STATEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION-WORK IN PROGRESS AS AT
MARCH 31ST, 1949—Continued.
Transmission Plant.
Kamloops-Barriere  $3,860.53
North Okanagan  6,333.27
Vancouver Island  83,628.05
Vernon-Kamloops  617,248.24
Vernon-Whatshan  139,721.22
Total  $850,791.31
Distribution Plant.
The Albernis .-.  $37,528.05
Alert Bay  12,553.78
Burns Lake  344.78
Campbell River  58,018.52
Golden  1,192.41
Hazelton (survey)  27.72
Hope  55,150.86
Kamloops .  65,222.85
Lillooet  3,037.47
Nakusp .  2,211.94
Nanaimo-Duncan ..  96,688.79
North Okanagan .......  44,091.18
Peachland-Westbank  1,471.29
Quesnel  13,320.56
Sechelt .  30,263.16
Smithers  22,399.36
Terrace  597.18
Williams Lake  7,465.66
Total  $451,585.56
General Plant.
Service buildings and equipment  $358.22
Transportation equipment  663.53
Total         $1,021.75
Summary.
Generation plant :  $6,449,439.45
Transmission plant  850,791.31
Distribution plant  451,585.56
General plant  1,021.75
Total  $7,752,838.07 VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1949.
2,295-549-9655 2 9V
H
\r\
v
\
i
LEGEND .-
GENERATING       STAT IONS     -       HYDRO        D
DIESEL. -f
STEAM X
substation
high   voltage:   transmission    line: ■
(under   construction) ...
distribution    system o
X.
V
BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION
GENERATING    STATIONS,
TRANSMISSION    LINES   AND
DISTRIBUTION     CIRCUITS.
date:      3!st   March,
DRWG.   No.
G -98.
G -183
45£  

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