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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT For the Year ended December 31st 1948 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1950

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year ended December 31st
1948
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1949.  To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1948
is herewith respectfully submitted.
JOHN H. CATES,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
August, 1949. The Hounourable John H. Cotes,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Thirty-first Annual Report on
the work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1948.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
JAMES THOMSON,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., August, 1949. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
List of Acts affecting Labour Inside front cover
Report of Deputy Minister      7
Statistics of Trades and Industries :       7
Employers' Returns       8
Pay-roll      8
Previous Provincial Pay-rolls       8
Comparison of Pay-rolls      9
Industrial Divisions     10
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries     11
Clerical Workers' Average Weekly Earnings     12
Industrial Wage     12
Employment     15
Firms with Large Pay-rolls     17
Statistical Tables     22
Summary of all Tables     35
" Hours of Work Act "     37
Average Weekly Hours     37
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers    40
Summary of New Laws affecting Labour     43
"Apprenticeship Act Amendment Act, 1949 "     43
" Boiler Inspection Act Amendment Act, 1949 "     43
" Electrical Energy Inspection Act Amendment Act, 1949 "     43
" Mechanics' Lien Act Amendment Act, 1949 "     43
" Municipal Act Amendment Act, 1949 "     43
" Municipal Superannuation Act Amendment Act, 1949 "     43
Board of Industrial Relations     44
Meetings and Delegations    44
Orders made during 1948     45
Regulations made during 1948     45
Statistics covering Women and Girl Employees     46
Summary of all Occupations     51
Comparison of 1948 Earnings to Legal Minimum     52
Statistics for Male Employees     52
Inspections and Wage Adjustments     54
Court Cases     55
Special Licences     58
Summary of Orders     59
List of Orders in Effect     97
Hours of Work Regulations     98
Control of Employment of Children  106
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "—Report of Labour Relations Board
(British Columbia)   107
Summary of Cases dealt with  109
Conciliation Procedure under the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act"  110
Boards of Conciliation, 1948  119
Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards  133 H 6 SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "—Report of Labour Relations Board
(British Columbia)—Continued.
Summary of Disputes  133
Number of Disputes, Employees affected, etc  134
Analysis of Disputes by Industries  134
Summary of Prosecutions  134
Employers' and Employees' (Labour) Organizations  135
Number of Labour Organizations making Returns, etc  136
Inspection of Factories  155
Inspections  156
Accident-prevention  156
Employees' Welfare  156
Lighting  157
Ventilation  157
Temperatures  158
Housekeeping  158
Women in Industry  158
Child Employment  158
Industrial Home-work  158
Elevator Inspections  159
Prosecutions  161
Apprenticeship Branch  162
Trade-schools Regulation Branch  165
Safety Branch  169 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1948.
This Annual Report for the year 1948, being the thirty-first issued by the Department, marks a period of industrial advancement and material prosperity unexceeded in
the past history of our Province.
Successful emergence from the trying years of the post-war era brought freedom
from the difficulties which had threatened to impede the process of reconstruction, and
a high level of productive achievement was maintained throughout the year.
The Provincial estimated pay-roll continued to climb, totalling some $625,000,000
for 1948, an apparent increase of $67,924,492 over the final estimated total of
$557,075,508 recorded for 1947.
Further development of the lumber industries to meet the growing demand for
primary products and continued expansion in the construction industries to cope with
the needs of a growing population proved strong factors in the march of progress
recorded for the year.
The general level of earnings continued to advance, recording increases without
exception in all twenty-five of the industrial classifications noted in this Report.
Exceeding all previous records, the average weekly industrial wage figure for all
male wage-earners rose sharply to $47.30, an increase of $3.81 over the preceding year.
Twenty-three of the twenty-five tables relating to the industrial group showed
increases in the pay-roll totals for 1948.
Greatest increase was again in the lumber industries (up $20,000,000). Building
programmes continued to swell pay-roll totals in the construction industries, which
again increased substantially (up over $9,500,000 from the previous year). Metal-
trades industries gained by $5,000,000. For others in order of increase, see " Comparison of Pay-rolls " in Report data.
Constituting the only major decrease, the ship-building and boat-building industry
dropped a further $1,022,000, following the decline in this industry noted since the
war years. The public utilities group approached, but did not quite attain, the record
high figure established in this section during the previous year.
Over-all employment totals continued to climb during 1948, exceeding the high
levels recorded for the previous year. While in some instances minor fluctuating
decreases were evident, most industrial employment totals increased, with additional
employment especially noted in the lumber industry, construction industries, builders'
materials, metal trades, pulp and paper manufacturing, and smelting and concentrating.
The high monthly employment figure for wage-earners in 1948 was recorded at 160,002
in August of that year, compared with a high of 153,994 in the same month of 1947.
Further decreases in the average weekly hours of work were general in most
industries during the year. Representing the average weekly working-hours for all
wage-earners included in the survey, the figure of 42.24 established in 1947 declined
fractionally to 42.21 for the year under review.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Reflecting in true perspective the distribution and effect of an increasing labour
force at work throughout the entire industrial structure, the 1948 statistical section
reveals an impressive record of achievement, surpassing in some instances even the
rapid development shown in the previous year. H 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 8,736
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 8,736,
as compared with 8,410 in 1947, an increase of 326.
Continued increase in the number of reporting establishments was again largely
due to additional coverage in the survey of new industries and business enterprises,
and the co-operation of employers in reporting separate branches of their business as
to industry and location.
Due to many firms filing reports in more than one industrial classification, the
" number of firms reporting " should be properly considered as representing the actual
number of reports tabulated.
PAY-ROLL.
Representing the total amount of salaries and wages reported by the 8,736 firms
filing returns in time for classification in the tables, the total pay-roll for 1948 was
$426,390,206. This total, however, being a summary of industrial pay-rolls only, should
not be considered as the over-all Provincial pay-roll unless further augmented by additional totals which follow, to give an estimated accumulative total of $625,000,000, an
apparent increase of $67,924,492 over final estimates for 1947.
Pay-rolls of 8,736 firms making returns to Department of Labour  $426,390,206
Returns received too late to be included in above summary  302,655
Transcontinental railways  (ascertained pay-roll)       31,484,347
Estimated additional pay-rolls, including employers covered by the survey, but not
filing returns, and additional services not included in the tables ; namely, Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, ocean services, miscellaneous (estimated pay-roll)     166,822,792
Total  $625,000,000
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS.
Provincial pay-roll totals since 1928 have been estimated as follows:—
1928  $183,097,781
1929  192,092,249
1930  167,133,813
1931  131,941,008
1932  102,957,074
1933  99,126,653
1934  113,567,953
1935  125,812,140
1936  142,349,591
1937  162,654,234
1938  158,026,375
1939  $165,683,460
1940  188,325,766
1941  239,525,459
1942  321,981,489
1943  394,953,031
1944  388,100,000
1945  383,700,000
1946  432,919,727
1947 ,  557,075,508*
1948  625,000,000t
* 1947 total revised since 1947 Report.
11948 preliminary total subject to revision.
In preparing estimates of the Provincial pay-roll total for the current year, due
consideration is given to the increase in the numbers of firms reporting in the industrial section and allowance made for relative expansion and development in other payroll sections and additional services not included in the coverage of the tables.
Based on additional information not available at the time of publication, preliminary estimated totals are subject to revision from year to year.
The percentage distribution of the total pay-roll covering each class of worker
included in the survey is shown in the following table:—
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
Per Cent.
7.26
19.72
82.02
Per Cent.
7.95
11.62
80.43
Per Cent.
9.07
12.14
78.79
Per Cent.
8.75
11.37
79.88
Per Cent.
8.95
11.85
Totals	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 9
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
Continued heavy demand for commodities and services together with the generally
greater availability of labour and supplies were factors largely responsible for increased
productive capacity in most industries. Pay-roll totals which had, with few exceptions,
set record high levels during the previous year continued to climb during 1948, to again
show increases in twenty-three of the twenty-five industrial classifications included in
the survey.
The lumber industries continued in the lead, with pay-rolls increased by $20,406,182
over the previous year, followed by the construction industry, up $9,837,173, and metal
trades, with an increase of $5,327,515; metal-mining increased by $3,577,955, followed
by miscellaneous trades and industries, up $3,328,345, and food-products manufacturing
with a gain of $3,267,776; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) increased by $2,779,148;
smelting and concentrating, up $2,353,389; cartage, trucking, and warehousing, a gain
of $2,269,826; pulp and paper manufacturing, an increase of $1,852,310; builders'
materials, up $1,848,168; printing and publishing, up $1,114,664; oil refining and
distribution, an increase of $773,455; coast shipping, up $765,483; laundries, cleaning
and dyeing, $742,054; house furnishings, $355,309; explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals, $342,007; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, $187,680;
paint-manufacturing, $171,552; garment-manufacturing, $164,639; jewellery manufacturing and repair, $139,677; coal-mining, $94,254; and leather and fur goods
manufacturing, up $43,403.
Only two industrial classifications recorded decreases. The ship-building and
boat-building industry, which had declined steadily during the post-war period, showed
a further decrease of $1,022,496, while the public utilities section was off slightly to
show a drop of $526,416 from the record high established during the previous year.
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
Industry.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers	
Builders' materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing*	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals	
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather and fur goods manufacturing	
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industriesf	
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
Totals	
32
92
276
25
112
1,732
36
649
81
135
21
130
91
1,549
1,209
142 |
418 |
73 |
10 |
130 |
8 |
79 |
" I
111 |
181 j
$2,966.
3,764
1,838:
4,891
12,995
32,175;
4,240,
26,943.
1,931,
3,240.
523
3,546:
1,402
54,341.
23,200.
10,173:
11,959,
4,313
592
6,106
11,158
14,750
7,978
691.00
,574.00
992.00
840.00
233.00
198.00
590.00
097.00
621.00
740.00
584.00
564.00
,221.00
002.00
677.00
958.00
,601.00
349.00
730.00
790.00
690.00
103.00
041.00
19,027,371.00
8,893,247.00
37
120
351
26
131
1,978
38
688
93
138
30
156
96
1,869
1,351
167
501
75
12
159
11
73
5
111
194
$3,422,
5,059,
2,818,
5,194,
16,235,
49,585,
5,143,
29,815,
2,620,
3,828,
629,
4,232,
1,553,
84,746,
30,393,
14,924,
15,341,
5,556,
786,
8,182,
14,812,
13,338,
9,723,
,059.00
,252.00
,491.00
,610.00
.547.00
,762.00
.880.00
029.00
,570.00
,243.00
,500.00
.696.00
,950.00
.167.00
381.00
098.00
644.00
201.00
731.00
551.00
129.00
436.00
200.00
27,284,938.00
10,968,089.00
34
132
435
25
127
2,078
35
658
89
137
40
195
106
1,819
1,488
152
559
67
13
153
9
82
5
109
189
7,326 ($272,956,504.00
1,410 [$366,197,154.00
!,736
$3,609
6,907
5,088
5,288,
17,001,
59,422,
5,485,
33,082,
2,785,
4,183,
769,
4,974,
1,597,
105,152.
35,720,
18,502,
18,669,
6,329,
958,
9,297,
16,664,
12,315,
12,076,
739.00
,420.00
,317.00
,864.00
,030.00
,935.00
,887.00
,805.00
,209.00
,552.00
177.00
,750.00
,353.00
,349.00
.896.00
.053.00
989.00
656.00
283.00
215.00
439.00
940.00
589.00
26,758,522.00
13,747,237.00
$426,390,206.00
* Included with miscellaneous trades and industries in previous Annual Reports.
f Totals adjusted to exclude cartage, trucking, and warehousing  (now shown separately), but including cigar
and tobacco manufacturing, previously shown above. H 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
For purposes of comparative study the industrial development within the Province
has been segregated into three main divisions, including Greater Vancouver, Rest of
Mainland, and Vancouver Island. A yearly record is then maintained to show by
relative percentages the proportion of the total pay-roll attributable to each division.
Some fluctuation in these percentages is noted from year to year, resulting from
the degree of concentration of industrial activity in various sections of the Province.
During 1948 the percentage of the total pay-roll attributable to the Greater Vancouver
area increased to 42.09 per cent, from 40.17 per cent, recorded in the previous year.
A relative decrease was noted in the Mainland percentage, which dropped by 1.31 per
cent, from 39.48 previously shown to 38.17 per cent, in 1948. A fractional decrease
was also evident in the Vancouver Island percentage, which showed at 19.74 per cent,
of total, as against 20.35 per cent, recorded for 1947.
By the application of the above percentages to the 1948 total estimated pay-roll,
a divisional breakdown is obtained, and the resultant figures are shown in the following
table, together with comparative data covering previous years:—
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.*
1948. t
Greater Vancouver	
Rest of Mainland	
Vancouver Island	
$171,190,910.00
148,758,730.00
68,150,369.00
$189,662,910.00
121,210,830.00
72,826,260.00
$191,480,395.00
158,015,700.00
83,423,632.00
$223,777,232.00
219,933,410.00
113,364,866.00
$263,062,500.00
238,562,500.00
123,375,000.00
Totals	
$388,100,000.00
$383,700,000.00
$432,919,727.00
$557,075,508.00
$625,000,000.00
* 1947 total revised since publication of 1947 Report.
t 1948 preliminary total subject to revision.
Reported employment in the lower wage brackets continued to decline, with
decreasing percentages of wage-earners in this section noted in twenty of the twenty-
five industrial classifications covered.
Continued decrease in the numbers of workers remaining in the lower-paid classes
is evidenced in the following table, which shows, in order of diminishing percentages,
the total male wage-earners employed in each industry, together with the percentage
of that number earning less than $19 per week:—
T   ,     ,                                                                                                                                             Nv^Vior per Cent.
Industry.                                                                                                                          employed. less than $19.
Printing and publishing     1,986 9.26
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing         734 8.58
Leather and fur goods manufacturing         526 7.79
Jewellery manufacturing and repair         158 6.96
Coast shipping      7,013 6.35
Miscellaneous trades and industries      7,539 6.34
Garment-manufacturing           334 5.39
Cartage,  trucking, and warehousing       2,715 4.60
Food-products manufacturing   14,264 4.56
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers      1,328 3.99
Metal trades   12,672 3.92
Pulp and paper manufacturing      4,784 3.70
Ship-building and boat-building      6,144 3.66
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc.      6,842 3.51
Paint-manufacturing           202 3.47
Builders' materials       2,691 2.86
House   furnishings        1,635 2.81
Construction     32,315 2.12
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)         5,087 2.10
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals      1,690 1.83
Lumber industries   44,791 1.52
Oil refining and distribution      1,603 1.43
Smelting  and   concentrating        3,375 1.39
Metal-mining        6,716 1.38
Coal-mining         2,262 0.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 11
AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS BY INDUSTRIES.
Increases in the average weekly earnings for male wage-earners were general
throughout the twenty-five industrial classifications included in the survey, no decreases
being recorded for the period under review.
A change in the tables which follow may be noted in the addition of the cartage,
trucking, and warehousing business as a new industrial classification.    While this
industry had previously been included with the miscellaneous group, due to its rapid
growth within the past few years, a segregation has now been made to record details
of this classification in comparison with other industries.
Based on the week of employment of the greatest number, the table shows the
average weekly earnings for male wage-earners in each industry from 1941 to 1948.
Average Weekly Earnings in each Industry (Male Wage-earners)
Industry.
i
1941.     1     1942.     |     1943.     1     1944.
1                    1                    1
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
Breweries,    distilleries,   and   aerated-
$29.29
26.26
31.84
30.03
30.21
33.39
25.65
26.51
25.74
38.72
24.76
26.07
31.01
29.90
33.72
26.97
30.97
24.95
36.78
32.13
35.27
37.07
30.93
$31.85
30.78
34.56
31.24
36.41
36.45
30.52
27.72
27.76
38.59
28.20
27.80
33.94
34.00
37.19
33.58
33.40
28.73
37.10
33.92
40.32
38.49
$33.46
31.61
39.00
33.97
39.60
37.54
32.66
32.03
28.13
41.14
30.39
30.18
37.09
36.37
$34.72
33.17
42.38
35.86
38.47
36.50
35.06
34.42
31.28
44.64
33.05
32.47
41.28
39.07
$33.73
34.12
42.11
36.54
37.50
40.43
35.62
36.11
31.39
41.38
31.34
31.63
41.24
38.41
$37.09
37.02
43.53
37.27
39.17
38.87
38.00
36.50
33.27
43.00
33.06
34.72
43.20
37.83
$41.25
40.50
39.55
45.54
38.84
43.08
44.30
40.09
37.03
35.02
40.90
33.51
32.77
47.28
39.90
47.98
37.41
43.80
35.56
43.70
48.10
47.10
45.55
45.04
39.32
$42.67
44.99
43.50
54.40
40.52
48.23
48.78
44.75
41.40
39.07
45.04
36.50
36.87
49.92
43.65
61.72
40.84
50.38
36.13
47.80
51.25
48.79
52.13
47.67
44.27
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing*....
Coal-mining	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals
Garment-manufacturing	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair
Leather and fur goods manufacturing...
35.82     1     39.40
39.99     1     42.31
Miscellaneous trades and industriesf	
34.92
35.52
30.71
38.39
36.41
40.08
38.47
37.21
37.99
33.42
39.47
37.71
40.36
36.74
37.29
34.75
35.31
38.71
33.42
41.63
37.88
39.96
41.19
37.21
34.70
35.23
39.05
33.31
42.12
43.43
40.28
38.70
39.45
37.88
Street-railways, gas, water, power, tele-
32.28    1    35.01
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
27.01    |    30.24    I    33.34
1
* Previous   yearly   figures   for   cartage,   trucking,   and   warehousing   included   with   miscellaneous   trades   and
industries.
f Miscellaneous  trades  and  industries  now  inclusive  of  cigar  and  tobacco  manufacturing,   previously  shown
separately above.
The  increases  in the  average  weekly  earnings  for male wage-e
follows:-                                                Increase.
arners
are as
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
Lumb
$1.42                Metal
4.49                Metal
trades 	
$2.6
     3.7
i
5
i
3
3
r
)
5
3
3
3
5
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
     3.7
3.95                Miscellaneous t
rades and
industrie
s           3.4
     6.5
Coast shipping 	
1.68                Paint-manufacturing
5.15                Printing and publishing
4.48                Pulp and paper manufac
4.66                Ship-building and boat-bi
4.37                Smelting and concentrat
4.05                Street-railways, gas, watt
4.14                        phones, etc	
0.5
     4.1
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals	
Food-products manufacturing 	
turing
ilding
3.1
1.6
     6.5
r, power,
E.S.)   	
tele-
2.6
     4.9
Jewellery manufacturing and
Laundries, cleaning and dyein
Leather and fur goods manuf
repair ....
acturing..
4.10 H 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CLEEICAL WORKERS' AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS.
Increased earnings were not only common to the wage-earner group, but were also
apparent with few exceptions throughout the clerical section. With the coverage of
the survey extended to include details of the weekly earnings of clerks, stenographers,
and salesmen, interesting note is made in the table following of the comparative
earnings recorded for male and female workers in the various industries whose occupations come within this classification. Due to the inclusion of salesmen in this group,
the average earnings are relatively higher in some industries employing considerable
numbers of skilled sales personnel due to the greater earning-power of this section of
the pay-roll.
It is significant, however, that the average figure representing the weekly earnings
for clerical workers in all industries increased to $48.39 for male employees in 1948,
as against $44.85 recorded for this group in 1947. Average weekly earnings recorded
for female clerical workers in all industries rose to $30, also increased from the
previous year's average of $27.83.
Figures representing average weekly earnings for clerks, stenographers, and sales-
workers (male and female) in each industry, for the comparative years 1947 and 1948,
are as follows:—
Industry.
1947.
1948.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
$49.12
41.49
32.12
50.12
42.17
43.90
51.15
40.09
43.69
39.99
38.70
44.79
41.63
49.62
41.68
53.85
39.66
45.00
39.54
42.04
51.89
48.88
57.43
48.19
51.39
$28.91
27.37
21.24
28.06
28.00
27.10
27.89
25.62
27.74
27.31
22.18
23.13
24.64
30.16
26.74
31.59
26.10
31.77
29.12
26.62
32.27
28.11
34.42
30.81
29.73
$48.84
46.69
39.04
55.54
46.87
47.03
54.52
46.90
43.52
45.37
33.53
46.75
43.27
54.03
43.85
59.26
41.98
60.73
44.54
44.81
54.98
51.98
61.13
51.45
54.84
$31.34
30.21
24.84
28.43
32.47
30.02
29.45
29.46
29.02
29.06
23.31
25.43
Leather and fur goods manufacturing	
27.64
31.81
28.62
33.93
28.17
37.03
31.48
28.60
34.48
29.89
36.88
31.61
35.21
$44.85
$27.83
$48.39
$30.00
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
Higher earnings throughout the entire industrial structure resulted generally from
wage increases, commensurate with the upward movement in the trend of price levels,
and based in most instances on the over-all increase in living costs during the year.
The recorded average earnings of the wage-earner group has for some years served
to indicate the trend of wages paid to workers in all industrial occupations.
During 1948 the computed average figure representing weekly earnings for this
group rose to $47.30, exceeding all previous records to establish an all-time high average for industrial workers within this Province. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
Average industrial weekly earnings from 1918 to 1948 are as follows:—
1918   $27.97                 1934   $23.57
H
11
I
1919
29.11                1935
31.51                1936
27.62                1937
27.29                1938
28.05                1939
28.39                1940
27.82                1941
27.99                1942
28.29                1943
28.96                1944
29.20                 1945
24.09
1920
26.36
1921
1922
	
26.64
26.70
1923
26.80
1924
	
28.11
1925
1926
1927
-
30.67
35.24
37.19
1928
38.70
1929
—
38.50
1930                       28.64                 1946
39.87
1931
26.17                1947
43.49
1932
23.62                1948
22.30
figures, the following
earners from 1918 to
_Y  WAGES   PAID TO   ADULT  MALE
1918 -1948'
47.30
1933 	
Based on the above average
weekly earnings for male wage-<
AVERAGE   WEEK
chart shows the trend of averag€
1948:—
EMPLOYEES
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WAGES
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
mo
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
•4.7.00
46.00
45.00
44.00
43.00
42.00
41.00
40.00
39.00
38 00
37 00
36 00
35 00
34 00
33.00
32 00
31.00
30.00
29 00
28 00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24 00
23.00
22 00
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/"
_/
/
/
/
/
/
1
i\
j
i
l\
j
/
V
1
t
/
\
.^
*^
\
i
.^x
/
v
/
/
\
\
/
\
/
\
\/
(1948 figure—$47.30.) H 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Percentage
Weekly of
Wages. Employees.
Under $15     1.97
$15 to   20     1.72
20 to   25     3.53
25 to   30     9.90
30 to   35  22.06
35 to   40  19.48
40 to   45  17.38
45 to   50  11.53
50 to   55     5.60
55 to   60     2.20
60 to   65     1.70
65 to   70     0.79
70 and over     2.14
Under $15  1.81
$15 to   20  1.62
20 to   25  3.85
25 to   30  9.89
30 to   35  22.38
35 to   40  19.70
40 to   45  18.97
45 to   50  9.59
50 to   55  5.74
55 to   60  2.08
60 to   65  1.62
65 to   70  0.77
70 and over  1-98
Under $15     2.03
$15 to   20     1.45
20 to   25     3.22
25 to   30     7.43
30 to   35  17.52
35 to   40  22.43
40 to   45  19.53
45 to   50  10.69
50 to   55     7.52
55 to   60     2.94
60 to   65     1.77
65 to   70     0.94
70 and over     2.53
Under $15  2.34
$15 to   20  1.60
20 to   25  2.52
25 to   30  4.53
30 to   35  10.32
35 to   40  17.94
40 to   45  19.05
45 to   50  13.78
50 to   55  11.56
55 to   60  5.98
60 to   65  3.63
65 to   70  1.92
70 and over  4.83
Under $15     1.97
$15 to   20     1.20
20 to   25     1.93
25 to   30     2.70
30 to   35     5.61
35 to   40  10.94
40 to   45  18.89
45 to   50   16.62
50 to   55   14.03
55 to   60     9.33
60 to   65     6.74
65 to   70     3.40
70 and over     6.64
—                —               ro               po               l-j
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The above bar diagrams show the relative percentages of male wage-earners in the
various wage classifications from 1944 to 1948. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H  15
EMPLOYMENT.
Prior to 1947 the questionnaire dealing with industrial employment had not been
extended to include clerical and sales staff, the totals referring to wage-earners only.
With the inclusion of clerical employment in the 1947 totals and changes in the basic
information requested in the questionnaire, strict comparability with previous years'
figures was not feasible.
The year 1948, therefore, presents the first in the new series of annual totals
comparable with 1947, and interesting note is made in the charts which follow, showing
the relative increases in the current employment totals over the previous year's figures
for clerical workers, wage-earners, and the total employment section.
The following table shows the variation of employment in each industry during
the past two years:— H 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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hh _ m tri REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
H 17
Increasing numbers of firms reporting pay-rolls in excess of $100,000 was evident
during 1948. Compared with the previous year's total of 622, the number of firms
reporting in this higher pay-roll bracket increased to 713 for the year 1948.
Pay-rolls excluded from the coverage of this survey are those of public authorities
(Dominion, Provincial, or municipal), wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental
railways, and vessels engaged in deep-sea transportation.
Again in the lead, the lumber industry showed the greatest number of firms in
the larger pay-roll group, with a total of 203, increased from 178 reported in this
industry for the previous year. The construction industry was next in line, with a
total of 93, an increase of 19; followed by the metal trades with 76, increased by 8;
food-products manufacturing, 72, up 5; miscellaneous trades and industries, 44, an
increase of 9; coast shipping, 30, increased by 3; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), 25,
an increase of 3; metal-mining, 23, up 3; printing and publishing, 19, an increase of 5;
public utilities, 18, unchanged; builders' materials, 17, increased by 2; ship-building
and boat-building, 15, a decrease of 1; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 12, up 1; oil
refining and distributing, 12, up 3; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, 9, increased by 2; coal-mining, 8, unchanged; garment-manufacturing, 8,
up 2; pulp and paper manufacturing, 8, unchanged; explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals, 5, unchanged; house furnishings, 5, unchanged; leather and fur goods manufacturing, 5, increased by 2; smelting and concentrating, 3; paint-manufacturing, 2;
and jewellery manufacturing and repair, 1—all unchanged from, the previous year.
Of the 713 firms reporting in the higher brackets, seven had pay-rolls in excess
of $5,000,000, three between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, five between $3,000,000 and
$4,000,000, ten between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and twenty-eight between $1,000,000
and $2,000,000. h 18 department of labour.
Employment of Clerical Workers in Industry, 1947 and 1948.*
22,500
22,000
(1948)
21,500
21,000
20,500
20,000
19,500
19,000
18,500
(1947)
18,000
17,500
17,000
1,500
1,000
td
500
0
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3
Dec.
* Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures include clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc., but not
salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
January   20,674
February   20,737
March    20,988
April    21,188
Clerical Workers, 1948.
(Male and Female.)
May    21,610
June   21,989
July   22.273
August   22,563
September   22,167
October   22,216
November   22,115
December  21,937 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 19
January   135,277
February   131,774
March      134,938
April    140,228
1948.
May    144,899
June   147,845
July   156,328
August     160,002
September     158,327
October     152,264
November   145,623
December    127,130 H 20
190,000
185,000
180,000
175,000
170,000
165,000
160,000
155,000
150,000
145,000
140,000
135,000
130,000
125,000
department of labour.
Total Employment in Industry, 1947 and 1948.*
,(1948)
(1947)
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
at
* Employment  as  at the last day  of  each  month,
managerial staff.
.& % S ** R             «
■g s 9 o o         s
>-j <! ra O &          O
Figures do not include salaried officials,   executives,   or
January   155,951
February   152,511
March   155,926
April  161,416
Employment, 1948.
(Male and Female.)
May    166,509
June   169,834
July   178,601
August   182,565
September   180,494
October   174,480
November     167,738
December   149,067 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 21
Monthly Variation in the Number of Wage-earners, Clerical Workers,
and Total Employment in Industry, 1948.*
Number
Employed.
190,000
180.000
170,000
160,000
150,000
140,000
130,000
120,000
110,000
100,000
95,000
90,000
85,000
80,000
75,000
70,000
65,000
60,000
55,000
50,000
45,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
25,000
20,000
15,000
1     1     1
lota/ Employment —
_ ""
"~-~- Wage Earners
CU
'.rical
Worki
>r's^\
ft
<
* Employment  as  at the  last  day  of  each month,
managerial staff.
Figures  do  not  include salaried  officials,   executives,   or H 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades
included under each beading:—
No. 1. Breweries, Distilleries, and Aerated-water Manufacturers.—Also is inclusive of wineries, and comprises firms in or
incidental to the manufacture, bottling, and distribution of
malt liquors, spirits, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and
carbonated water.
No. 2. Builders' Material, Producers of.—Includes manufacturers of brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and
firebrick; also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and
crushed rock.
No. 3. Cartage, Trucking, and Warehousing.—Comprises
firms engaged in the business of freight and baggage hauling,
moving, storage, packing,  shipping,  and transfer services.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation
of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction.—-Here are grouped building trades,
painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-
metal works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-
steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves,
dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic
sprinklers. Firms making returns as building contractors,
constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces,
electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and
bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Fertilizers, and Chemicals.—Includes all
firms engaged in the manufacture of these commodities.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacturing of.—This table includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries and dairies; fish, fruit, and vegetable canneries; packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces,
coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton
goods, shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies'
outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in
the manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery Manufacturing and Repair.—Includes the
repair, as well as the manufacturing of jewellery, watches, and
optical instruments  (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.-—Includes these
industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacturing of.—Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks,
and leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included
logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine black-
smithing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of handsaws,
nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and
repairs to same.
No. 16.   Metal-mining.-—Includes   all   metalliferous   mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, motor and aerial transportation, ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil Refining and Distributing.—Includes also the
manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead cor-
roders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing,
lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building and Boat-building.—Comprises both
wooden- and steel-ship building and repairing, also construction
and repair of small craft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
engaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Light, Power, Telephones, etc.—This group comprises generating and distribution
of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial
gases, operation of street-railways, waterworks, and telephones.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior
finish, water-proof plywood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes
and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins, and
undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERIES, AND
AERATED-WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering SU Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents,  and managers      $413,454
Clerks,  stenographers,  salesmen,  etc        423,925
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     2,772,360
Total  $3,609,739
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females
Males.
Females.
1,001
955
987
1,003
1,091
1,130
1,157
1,143
1,063
1,014
1,066
1,091
310
275
182
230
234
243
231
264
262
319
373
399
118
117
118
122
132
141
141
139
131
125
132
132
54
February	
50
51
April	
51
51
June	
July	
August	
56
57
56
51
October	
November	
December	
51
49
49
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99..
9.00 to    9.99..
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99...
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99...
15.00 to 15.99...
16.00 to 16.99..
17.00 to 17.99-
18.00 to 18.99...
19.00 to 19.99...
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99...
23.00 to 23.99-
24.00 to 24.99...
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99-
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99-
35.00 to 39.99...
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99...
50.00 to 54.99...
55.00 to 59.99-
60.00 to 64.99...
65.00 to 69.99...
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females.
2
2
8
2
3
4
7
4
4
7
10
54
129
537
320
141
21
11
7
4
2
1
8
1
112
10
223
27
2
1
Clekks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
1
"" 4
......
3
4
1
9
34
27
22
12
9
8
17 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 23
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS'  MATERIAL—PRODUCERS  OF.
Returns covering 132 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $688,991
Clerks,  stenographers,  salesmen, etc     1,000,421
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     5,218,008
Total  $6,907,420
Employment.
Month.
January-
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December..
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.     Females.
2,311
2,313
2,278
2,271
2,313
2,276
2.354
2,378
2,385
2,380
2,303
2,258
32
236
32
246
36
240
34
248
36
259
32
271
32
285
35
292
33
292
36
293
34
304
37
306
123
121
126
126
124
128
130
126
130
131
133
135
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99...
9.00 to    9.99...
10.00 to 10.99...
11.00 to 11.99...
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99...
14.00 to 14.99-
15.00 to 15.99...
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99...
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99...
21.00 to 21.99...
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99-
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99...
27.00 to 27.99...
28.00 to 28.99-
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99...
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99-
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99-
70.00 and over.
3
3
6
3
8
10
7
13
13
10
13
12
255
305
665
524
313
197
106
48
103
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
1
7
5
1
5
6
4
12
1
9
31
10
29
1
60
2
38
?.
42
25
1
15
14
16
1
1
7
1
2
6
7
11
11
7
31
15
Table No. 3.
CARTAGE, TRUCKING, AND
WAREHOUSING.
Returns covering 435 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $624,296
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        348,301
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     4,115,720
Total  $5,088,317
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
1,699
1,662
1,702
1,769
1,850
2,042
2,146
2,142
2,172
2,136
2,042
1,941
12
9
8
9
9
22
33
16
22
22
10
10
124
126
124
128
132
136
136
139
137
135
135
132
95
February	
91
92
97
100
104
July	
August	
106
110
109
October	
103
106
105
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99...
9.00 to 9.99...
10.00 to 10.99...
11.00 to 11.99...
12.00 to 12.99...
13.00 to 13.99...
14.00 to 14.99...
15.00 to 15.99...
16.00 to 16.99...
17.00 to 17.99...
18.00 to 18.99...
19.00 to 19.99...
20.00 to 20.99...
21.00 to 21.99...
22.00 to 22.99...
23.00 to 23.99...
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99...
27.00 to 27.99...
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99-
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
24
5
6
4
9
7
7
3
12
13
4
18
13
20
16
9
10
17
19
12
14
22
15
218
347
603
518
407
134
63
59
74
1
10
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc
Males.    Females.
19
16
28
22
11
12
1
7
7
2
4
4
3
21
12
3
4
15
7
1 H 24
Table No. 4.
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 5.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 25 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $505,678
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        116,745
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     4,666,441
Total  $5,288,864
Employment.
Month.
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September.
October	
November.
December..
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
1,202
1,057
1,116
2,096
2,102
2,052
2,119
2,115
2,120
2,142
2,179
2,182
2
54
2
46
1
46
1
55
55
54
1
54
1
54
1
54
1
53
1
53
1
53
14
7
7
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
1
4
16
3
67
184
1,256
460
78
37
156
1
1
5
4
7
7
4
6
6
12
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to  10.99 .
11.00  to  11.99 	
12 00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99 	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00  to 15.99 	
16.00 to 16.99    	
17.00 to 17.99	
1
18.00 to  18.99	
1
19.00 to  19.99	
20.00 to 20.99	
21.00 to 21.99 	
1
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
1
24.00 to  24.99	
1
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
2
27.00 to 27.99 	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29 99  	
1
1
30.00 to 34.99	
3
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00  to 44.99  	
3
45.00 to 49.99 .
50.00  to  54.99	
55.00 to 59.99 	
60.00  to 64.99	
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 127 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,437,426
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       1,392,612
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     14,170,992
Total  $17,001,030
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females
Males.
Females.
6,206
6,188
6,304
6,615
6,577
6,381
6,389
6,620
6,707
6.329
6,537
6,285
90
86
83
91
96
109
126
124
103
97
93
85
395
391
389
390
396
400
409
412
397
389
381
363
138
138
139
138
142
146
July	
August	
156
156
153
October	
147
147
148
C'assified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99-
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99..
9.00 to    9.99...
10.00 to  10.99...
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99...
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99...
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to  18.99..
19.00 to  19.99-
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99-
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99-
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99-
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99-
65.00 to 69.99-
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
55
25
35
43
43
33
30
20
24
23
19
52
23
20
43
57
52
46
47
64
95
74
171
121
159
1,082
1,315
788
867
511
312
223
232
309
11
79
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
27
55
63
72
59
24
21
10
26
1
10
1
10
8
46
30
14
4
2
2 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 25
Table No. 6.
CONSTRUCTION.
Returns covering 2,078 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $4,921,128
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       4,579,886
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     49,921,921
Total  $59,422,935
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females
Males.
Females.
January	
17,423
17,297
18,284
19,753
21,378
23,006
24,805
25,709
24,825
23,901
22,894
18,829
49
42
47
49
95
103
116
126
74
60
46
47
1,247
1,261
1,288
1,291
1,342
1,378
1,400
1,377
1,389
1,390
1,395
1,382
674
675
689
704
718
728
744
758
754
October	
755
753
745
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99...
7.00 to 7.99-
8.00 to 8.99...
9.00 to    9.99...
10.00 to 10.99...
11.00 to 11.99...
12.00 to 12.99...
13.00 to 13.99...
14.00 to 14.99...
15.00 to 15.99...
16.00 to 16.99...
17.00 to 17.99...
18.00 to 18.99...
19.00 to 19.99...
20.00 to 20.99...
21.00 to 21.99...
22.00 to 22.99...
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99-
25.00 to 25.99...
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99-
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99-
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99-
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.goes.oo to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
72
47
31
41
36
51
27
44
41
53
55
75
40
71
50
130
60
126
97
164
167
158
118
173
113
1,943
3,474
7,543
3,586
2,983
3,469
4,017
1,438
1,822
1
7
5
3
1
1
9
4
2
1
2
10
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males. Females.
3
2
2
5
1
5
8
1
12
7
3
7
9
21
"13
23
10
102
161
243
199
147
137
89
50
136
11
4
1
1
....-
2
6
3
6
21
10
51
9
22
25
23
59
23
42
35
9
187
120
60
24
5
2
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, FERTILIZERS, AND
CHEMICALS.
Returns covering 35 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $286,806
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc     1,066,768
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     4,132,313
Total  $5,485,887
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
1,637
1,653
1,686
1,682
1,663
1,659
1,739
1,670
1,592
1,603
1,603
1,633
32
36
38
33
26
29
38
36
32
32
37
35
282
284
288
283
296
300
300
302
299
302
299
307
106
107
107
110
May	
112
108
108
August	
September	
109
102
104
101
101
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99...
9.00 to    9.99...
10.00 to 10.99...
11.00 to 11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to 13.99...
14.00 to 14.99...
15.00 to 15.99...
16.00 to 16.99...
17.00 to  17.99...
18.00 to  18.99..
19.00 to 19.99...
20.00 to 20.99...
21.00 to 21.99-
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99-
24.00 to 24.99-
25.00 to 25.99-
26.00 to 26.99-
27.00 to 27.99-
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99-
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99-
65.00 to 69.99-
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
2
1
1
3
1
2
2
1
3
1
4
1
4
2
6
1
5
4
10
5
5
8
6
14
108
233
286
375
292
125
35
45
1
1
10
....„
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
1
3
6
7
17
14
14
53
17
24
27
60
51
1
5
6
13
2
9
10
"26
15
7
2 H 28
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF,
Returns covering 658 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $3,813,591
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       4,992,881
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     24,276,333
Total  $33,082,805
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 9.
Employment.
Month.
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September.
October	
November-
December..
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
7,883  I
6,949  I
7,133
7,935
8,312
9,503
10,405
10,910
10,721
9,665
8,213
6,807
3,421
2,483
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
1,468
1,473
2,083
1,499
2,305
1,551
2,636
1,619
3,943
1,652
6,883
1,683
7,938
1,699
8,244
1,694
6,660
1,649
4,954
1,629
2,269
1,595
875
887
906
918
939
989
1,013
990
987
972
966
Classified Weekly Earnings.
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 89 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $350,413
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        521,155
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     1,913,641
Total  $2,785,209
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
253
255
248
251
273
263
250
272
281
285
285
277
1,159
1,124
1,113
1,189
1,094
1,001
933
967
1,006
1,029
1,142
1,055
46
46
48
46
48
47
43
47
43
46
47
46
166
164
176
176
178
180
July	
171
172
184
199
203
188
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00	
$6 00  to $6.99
105
57
47
33
32
41
20
32
32
38
68
39
41
66
52
73
80
76
52
52
114
76
67
115
107
1,068
2,156
2,473
2,112
2,311
946
588
330
765
299
101
99
87
92
147
103
96
73
149
153
168
218
309
255
355
251
475
269
333
404
486
319
373
307
2,394
1,463
720
447
185
96
90
36
90
4
1
1
2
2
16
7
2
7
5
8
8
8
Under $6.00	
1
1
1
3
3
9
2
6
2
2
5
14
6
4
7
6
45
51
46
35
23
20
15
7
20
10
4
2
5
3
8
5
12
5
12
18
51
36
59
67
77
69
103
57
81
65
68
61
39
42
130
90
44
22
9
5
7
3
6
1
1
2
1
2
5
6
12
2
10
5
2
2
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99 ...
7.00 to    7.99	
1
8.00 to    8.99	
9 00 to    9.99
9.00 to    9.99	
1
10.00 to 10.99	
2
11.00 to 11.99	
1
12.00 to 12.99	
1
10
13.00 to 13.99	
14 00 to 14.99
1
1
1
1
13
O
5
15
4
22
5
12
11
5
135
193
261
465
183
150
80
63
98
9
6
10
16
42
27
53
60
52
49
30
93
49
69
44
35
239
399
60
17
1
1
2
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
2
17.00 to 17.99
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99	
8
19.00 to 19.99	
2
20.00 to 20.99	
14
21 00 to 21.99 	
21.00 to 21.99	
4
22 00 to 22.99
22.00 to 22.99	
23
23 00 to 23.99
23.00 to 23.99	
8
24.00 to 24.99 	
24.00 to 24.99	
10
25 00 to 25 99
25.00 to 25.99	
33
26.00 to 26.99	
7
27.00 to 27.99	
18
28.00 to 28.99 	
28.00 to 28.99	
4
29.00 to 29.99 	
29.00 to 29.99	
4
30.00 to 34.99 ..
30.00 to 34.99	
32
35.00 to 39.99 ..
35.00 to 39.99	
16
40.00 to 44.99
40.00 to 44.99	
12
45.00 to 49.99 	
45.00 to 49.99	
4
50.00 to 54.99 ...
50.00 to 54.99	
5
55 00 to 59 99
55.00 to 59.99	
60 00  to 64.99  	
60.00 to 64.99	
2
65.00 to 69.99   .
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over	
70.00 and over	
3 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 27
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS-
MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 137 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents,  and managers      $457,307
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        484,172
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     3,242,073
Total  $4,183,552
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
1,371
1,363
1,346
1,268
1,285
1,248
1,263
1,309
1,331
1,355
1,377
1,381
540
529
520
493
513
486
488
508
548
547
565
545
109
111
113
109
107
107
107
110
109
110
107
108
91
90
March	
90
92
95
98
101
August	
September	
October 	
November...	
December	
102
97
100
101
101
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00	
2
3
2
1
2
1
2
3
1
1
3
2
1
7
4
2
1    1     	
$6.00 to $6.99	
1
1
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9 00 to    9.99	
10.00 to  10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
     [     	
12.00 to 12.99	
     I     	
13 00 to 13.99 	
     1     	
14.00 to 14.99	
6     1          4
......    1     	
15.00 to 15.99	
3
13
2
6
9
19
4
20
16
29
3
9
8
18
1
16.00 to 16.99 ...
17.00 to 17.99	
2
18 00 to 18.99	
1
19.00 to 19.99	
16     1      	
2
48
30
42
26
68
1
2
1
1
7
2
1
16
12
11
4
22.00 to 22.99	
3
23.00 to 23.99	
6
24.00 to 24.99	
3
25.00 to 25.99	
21    I       37
31    1       40
17     1        43
15
26.00 to 26.99	
3
27.00 to 27.99	
7
28.00 to 28.99   	
35
35
223
352
412
152
126
47
20
7
14
38
29
132
45
29 00 to 29.99   	
4
30 00 to 34.99
24
35.00 to 39.99	
9
40.00 to 44.99	
14    1       18
2    1         9
2    1       12
6
8
45 00 to 49.99	
50 00 to 54.99	
3
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
6
5
15
65.00 to 69.99	
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING
AND REPAIR.
Returns covering 40 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $93,696
Clerks,  stenographers, salesmen, etc     340,795
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     334,786
Total  $769,177
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
142
142
141
145
142
141
147
143
144
147
151
150
11
11
10
10
10
10
9
9
8
8
9
10
47
49
53
51
51
52
56
63
60
61
68
73
123
122
140
April	
May	
141
145
153
168
August	
September	
October	
167
168
171
217
198
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to    8.99..
9.00 to    9.99..
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99...
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99..
17.00 to  17.99..
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99-
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99-
23.00 to 23.99-
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99-
28.00 to 28.99-
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99-
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
2
2
8
10
35
27
6
17
19
4
6
6
10
2
1
1
2
6
4
5
1
11
2
4
10
8
37
39
7
40
12
26
5
12
9
1
16
2 H 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING.
Returns covering 195 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $512,220
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        850,760
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     3,611,770
Total  $4,974,750
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
644
635
641
642
662
662
687
680
680
670
664
628
1,895
1,864
1,948
1,916
1,958
1,985
2,024
2,022
1,993
1,889
1,862
1,799
250
251
255
255
257
308
263
266
265
267
261
256
223
224
225
229
227
232
July   	
240
August	
238
227
225
219
217
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99-
7.00 to 7.99-
8.00 to 8.99..
9.00 to    9.99..
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00  to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00  to 14.99..
15.00  to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99..
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99-
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99-
28.00 to 28.99-
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00  to 59.99-
60.00 to 64.99-
65.00 to 69.99...
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners.
Males.    Females.
6
4
8
12
9
2
4
7
10
7
2
29
14
14
17
4
125
146
168
58
28
17
11
26
6
10
13
11
11
22
21
16
24
35
32
91
71
142
105
169
211
81
231
159
191
80
92
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.     Females.
47
2
228
22
44
38
29
49
8
33
2
37
1
30
2
17
8
10
1
1
14
4
21
25
25
4
11
39
13
13
13
6
20
9
1
1
1
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS-
MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 106 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $210,421
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        295,436
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     1,091,496
Total  $1,597,353
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, ettc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
457
447
446
414
403
384
391
394
416
452
460
403
249
253
254
254
251
253
251
256
267
290
283
252
80
81
81
80
79
77
79
80
79
84
86
82
65
65
65
64
May	
65
64
67
August	
September	
October	
November	
69
72
74
73
69
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99-
7.00 to 7.99..
8.00 to 8.99-
9.00 to 9.99-
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00  to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99-
15.00  to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00  to 18.99-
19.00 to 19.99-
20.00 to 20.99-
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99-
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99-
25.00 to 25.99-
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99-
28.00 to 28.99-
29.00 to 29.99-
30.00 to 34.99-
35.00 to 39.99-
40.00 to 44.99-
45.00 to 49.99-
50.00 to 54.99...
55.00 to 59.99-
60.00 to 64.99-
65.00 to 69.99...
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners.
Males.    Females.
2
6
2
5
11
3
3
6
12
16
13
19
4
13
4
62
87
104
59
51
7
5
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
3
4
2
6
3
10
13
13
17
23
6
26
8
21
24
26
16
9
6
60
15
7
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
1
5
2
8
9
16
2
1
4
14
5
4
2
1 REPORT OF DEPUr
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 1,819 Firms.
ry MINISTER, 1948.                                           H 29
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 1,488 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers             $6,849,611
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc         3,822,974
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      ..      94,479,764
Salary and Wage F
Officers, superintendents, and
Clerks, stenographers,  salesme
ayments, 1948.
managers             $6,080,285
n.  etc         7.117.659
     22.522.952
Total	
Total  $10
5,152,349
  $35,720,896
Employment.
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
32,021
31,549
33,716
34,635
36,127
34,970
37,039
37,967
37,754
36,896
34,539
9tfi Attn
386
405
426
443
425
436
471
467
453
489
401
316
780
782
793
819
853
869
901
992
968
991
872
859
421
426
444
438
446
449
456
462
461
449
440
426
9,944
9,931
9,981
10,092
10,136
10,014
10,422
10,383
10,201
9,978
10,020
9.813
328
323
312
315
299
308
324
324
311
297
298
259
2,250
2,284
2,308
2,304
2,319
2,340
2,368
2,373
2,374
2,380
2,388
2.384
1,044
1,046
1,068
1,079
1,086
1,086
1,113
1,120
1,097
1,112
1,129
1.130
February	
March	
February	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
June ,	
August	
September	
October	
I
1
1
Classified Weekly Earnings.
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00
i
73              8
3
1
1
3
2
1
4
3
1
1
4
2
4
5
4
2
2
10
1
30
68
5
3
1
1
1
3
4
1
2
3
2
5
5
6
12
9
6
12
9
39
15
22
28
17
116
73
Under $6.00	
35
11
21
21
15
44
27
50
30
21
72
51
47
52
38
109
54
94
70
122
200
101
104
124
67
1,215
1,802
2,405
1.679
1.827
1,027
475
191
471
2
1
2
3
2
1
2
2
2
8
1
7
5
29
2
35
15
21
15
16
13
30
8
90
69
8
4
2
9
1
1
3
6
2
5
4
3
11
3
8
20
17
18
11
18
33
31
62
25
40
52
23
295
279
377
305
235
149
123
89
169
14
2
4
3
1
6
8
6
i
3
11
4
12
20
15
55
24
44
54
30
109
59
87
77
24
269
117
57
13
8
4
1
29
70
72
37
35
42
49
35
38
59
42
50
52
38
56
83
63
61
83
102
106
83
113
109
1,007
4,057
8,866
10,412
5.532
3,858
2,974
1,755
4,750
3
2
4
3
3
4
9
2
2
7
5
8
8
9
10
3
14
16
18
24
28
7
17
15
75
110
76
69
55
10
13
2
9
$6.00 to $6.99	
7 00 to    7.99    	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to  11.99	
12 00 to 12.99
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to  13.99	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to  20.99	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99	
86     1        40
40.00 to 44.99	
100
112
88
77
72
215
26
10
5
2
1
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99	
1                1 H 30
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 152 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,209,219
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       2,149,450
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     15,143,384
Total  $18,502,053
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
5,493
5,423
5,335
5,338
5,626
5,695
5,691
5,622
5,449
5,582
5,528
5,165
121
116
110
104
100
102
100
96
94
84
72
59
512
510
528
534
548
545
551
527
507
495
505
502
118
119
116
120
127
131
136
August	
131
123
131
140
136
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to 7.99-
8.00 to 8.99..
9.00 to 9.99-
10.00 to 10.99-
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99-
14.00 to 14.99-
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99-
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99-
25.00 to 25.99-
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99-
29.00 to 29.99-
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99-
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99-
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners.
Males.
12
4
1
12
10
4
3
3
6
3
7
8
6
14
9
16
9
7
17
13
16
25
13
22
18
108
247
985
1,271
1,499
928
476
339
605
13
15
10
13
7
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
6
18
58
86
74
82
50
165
5
2
12
3
5
35
32
17
4
4
1
1
1
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 559 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $2,593,437
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       3,514,222
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     12,562,330
Total  $18,669,989
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
4,877
4,831
4,894
4,938
5,082
5,336
5,577
5,769
5,613
5,202
5,105
4,992
1,131
1,130
1,091
1,138
1,193
1,224
1,206
1,262
2,051
1,235
1,202
1,067
884
897
916
934
932
968
977
1,124
952
970
993
681
679
684
688
707
731
733
737
720
711
715
973     1       697
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00  to $6.99...
7.00 to 7.99..
8.00 to 8.99-
9.00 to 9.99-
10.00 to 10.99-
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99..
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99-
20.00 to 20.99-
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99...
24.00 to 24.99-
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99-
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99-
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99-
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99-
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99-
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males. Females.
122
32
18
26
16
23
19
32
20
32
34
30
36
38
26
205
42
53
40
77
80
56
65
102
79
857
1,556
1,196
863
634
454
247
139
290
54
17
9
	
15
9
27
1
14
1
13
2
18
23
3
10
4
21
2
30
6
48
8
40
4
213
16
28
4
84
6
46
21
90
9
76
26
146
22
54
22
93
21
121
10
1,183
198
126
171
67
158
21
126
9
80
6
55
5
48
3
25
11
71
26
17
42
11
32
40
35
81
28
43
34
28
167
75
29
10
4 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 31
Table No. 18.
OIL REFINING AND DISTRIBUTING.
Returns covering 67 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $753,863
Clerks,  stenographers,  salesmen,  etc     2,558,569
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     3,017,224
Total  $6,329,656
Employment.
Month.
January	
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December..
Wage-earners.
Males.    Females.
1,234
1,125
1,071
1,003
1,070
1,130
1,123
1,169
1,049
1,224
1,340
1,280
18
20
22
20
23
21
19
20
18
19
18
16
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
807
804
797
793
824
808
799
799
807
804
800
806
251
249
239
246
247
251
255
257
248
265
270
269
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00	
4
2
3
1
1
3
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
     1      	
1          1
     1     	
1
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99.    .
13.00 to 13.99.
1
1
2
14.00 to  14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
*
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99.
20.00 to 20.99	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99.   ..
23.00 to 23.99	
......    [          1
24.00 to 24.99	
1     I
7
9
2
6
42
80
126
140
131
71
53
44
103
1
25.00 to 25.99	
1
3
2
2
2
39
173
290
280
279
189
97
49
170
1
1
3
5
2
1
2
7
26.00 to 26.99.
3
27.00 to 27.99	
14
28.00 to 28.99	
8
29.00 to 29.99	
8
30.00 to 34.99	
90
35.00 to 39.99	
77
40.00 to 44.99	
18
45.00 to 49.99.
44
50.00 to 54.99.
7
55.00 to 59.99	
2
60.00 to 64.99	
2
65.00 to 69.99.
70.00 and over	
1
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 13 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers  $218,080
Clerks,  stenographers, salesmen,  etc     317,734
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     422,469
Total  $958,283
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
174
178
184
188
190
194
196
196
184
177
174
173
34
35
38
40
44
43
49
44
37
36
37
36
85
91
91
93
97
98
102
98
100
99
07
41
February	
40
40
42
45
June	
July	
49
49
August	
50
52
October	
49
50
97      1          59
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00	
1
1
1
4
3
1
6
1
5
2
10
7
1
31
77
31
8
7
1
2
1
5
2
4
1
11
1
1
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
1
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to 20.99	
21.00 to 21.99	
1
22.00 to 22.99	
1
23.00 to 23.99	
     I     ......
24.00 to 24.99	
5     1           2     !            6
25.00 to 25.99	
1     1           2
5     1            1
9
26.00 to 26.99	
5
27.00 to 27.99	
5
6
1
1
2
1
1
11
12
22
20
15
5
28.00 to 28.99	
2
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99	
13
35.00 to 39.99	
8
40.00 to 44.99	
6
45.00 to 49.99	
2
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
6     1
65.00 to 69.99	
2    1
     1     ......
3     1
1     I
1                1                 1 H 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 153 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers  $1,209,597
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc     2,919,273
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     5,168,345
Total  $9,297,215
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
1,788
1,790
1,810
1,793
1,807
1,840
1,881
1,826
1,840
1,844
1,873
1,837
341
348
341
354
340
352
389
364
362
327
342
340
736
721
717
705
720
736
754
748
736
723
734
747
564
February	
565
564
564
May	
June	
July	
August	
581
573
585
578
579
October	
565
578
576
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to  $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to    8.99..
9.00 to 9.99-
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99..
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99-
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99-
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99-
40.00 to 44.99-
45.00 to 49.99-
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99-
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males. Females.
25
2
5
5
1
4
17
11
4
14
15
31
22
28
25
33
11
10
22
19
33
19
13
17
15
110
77
127
166
156
357
320
125
147
11
7
2
.... -
5
2
4
4
4
6
12
20
19
19
50
9
20
10
18
15
16
8
19
6
119
21
21
5
7
3
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, eto.
Males.    Females.
10
4
3
17
1
10
4
13
2
5
65
92
80
80
83
52
40
36
57
1
1
4
4
2
6
9
7
20
11
48
12
38
15
24
59
29
44
46
14
111
43
16
13
12
5
4
1
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER-
MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,203,413
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       1,301,624
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     14,159,402
Total  $16,664,439
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
4,648
4,636
4,624
4,637
4,779
4,918
4,953
4,727
4,671
4,716
4,582
4,537
329
320
312
323
315
319
315
309
291
298
289
280
291
295
299
300
311
315
321
313
301
306
303
303
158
February	
156
158
156
156
165
165
172
September	
168
158
161
159
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to  $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99...
9.00 to    9.99..
10.00 to  10.99-
11.00 to  11.99-
12.00 to  12.99..
13.00 to  13.99..
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00.to 16.99-
17.00 to  17.99..
18.00 to  18.99..
19.00 to  19.99..
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females.
6
28
18
4
4
7
6
5
1
9
6
8
5
5
30
5
16
17
16
7
133
281
513
880
829
567
390
307
583
19
1
2
1
1
5
2
6
3
....-
4
7
5
8
12
138
70
26
5
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
3
11
5
1
10
8
1
8
51
8
38
23
17
46
11
46
1
65
1
43
27
35 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 33
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING AND BOAT-BUILDING.
Returns covering 82 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers        $633,344
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       1,158,137
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     10,524,459
Total  $12,315,940
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
5,372
4,929
4,733
4,899
4,444
4,096
3,675
3,342
3,296
3.264
3,068
2,898
16
16
16
16
12
13
12
12
12
12
13
8
367
361
361
357
345
339
337
326
319
303
303
285
135
February	
136
132
124
119
115
114
August	
September	
October	
112
103
105
104
99
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00	
16
19
52
17
7
15
7
19
12
8
15
11
11
16
20
29
16
22
7
24
33
17
11
29
19
146
474
933
671
1,772
909
309
141
337
2
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
4
3
1
11
19
21
38
31
27
21
38
12
63
1
$6 00 to  $6.99     .
7.00 to    7.99	
8 00 to    8.99    	
9 00 to    9.99	
10 00 to 10.99   	
12 00 to 12.99    .
14 00 to 14.99    	
15 00 to 15.99	
1
1
17 00 to 17.99	
2
19 00 to 19.99	
2
21 00 to 21.99	
1
1
7
24 00 to 24.99    	
2
25 00 to 25.99	
5
26 00 to 26.99	
6
27 00 to 27.99	
8
28 00 to 28.99 	
7
29 00 to 29.99    	
8
30.00 to 34.99	
32
8
4
45 00 to 49.99	
50 00 to 54.99 	
2
55 00 to 59.99	
60 00 to 64.99	
65 00 to 69.99	
Table No. 23.
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING.
Returns covering 5 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers        $539,230
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       2,551,344
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)       8,986,015
Total  $12,076,589
Employment.
January-
February...
March	
April	
May	
Jane	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December..
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
3,250
3,251
3,248
3,275
3,471
3,408
3,471
3,476
3,346
3,368
3.405
3,377
56
52
54
57
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
536
539
543
542
58
566
60
575
61
584
55
580
58
566
59
563
52
561
52
560
154
155
155
179
161
166
164
163
157
156
157
154
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to    8.99-
9.00 to    9.99..
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to  13.99..
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99..
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99...
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99...
23.00 to 23.99...
24.00 to 24.99...
25.00 to 25.99...
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
1
1
2
6
11
4
9
2
8
4
10
9
12
42
114
267
658
919
598
342
138
167
4
13
2
7
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.     Females.
1
1
8
6
167
58
71
113
139
1
24
106
6
2
10 H 34
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 24.
STREET-RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 109 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,473,884
Clerks,  stenographers,  salesmen,  etc      5,837,617
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     19,447,021
Total  $26,758,522
Employment.
Month.
January-
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December..
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
5,809
5,932
6,138
6,227
6,404
6,451
6,377
6,472
6,271
6,207
6,229
6,171
2,319
2,370
2,414
2,420
2,453
2,566
2,593
2,770
2,509
2,433
2,458
2,428
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
1,215
1,202
1,206
1,211
1,235
1,255
1,250
1,278
1,271
1,337
1,247
1,272
1,164
1,199
1,216
1,226
1,241
1,261
1,259
1,257
1,254
1,268
1,271
1,258
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99—
7.00 to 7.99—
8.00 to 8.99—
9.00 to 9.99—
10.00 to 10.99—
11.00 to 11.99—
12.00 to 12.99—
13.00 to 13.99—
14.00 to 14.99—
15.00 to 15.99—
16.00 to 16.99—
17.00 to 17.99—
18.00 to 18.99...
19.00 to 19.99—
20.00 to 20.99—
21.00 to 21.99...
22.00 to 22.99—
23.00 to 23.99—
24.00 to 24.99—
25.00 to 25.99...
26.00 to 26.99...
27.00 to 27.99...
28.00 to 28.99...
29.00 to 29.99—
30.00 to 34.99...
35.00 to 39.99...
40.00 to 44.99...
45.00 to 49.99...
50.00 to 54.99...
55.00 to 59.99—
60.00 to 64.99...
65.00 to 69.99...
70.00 and over..
14
14
17
18
19
8
27
18
28
14
15
16
15
17
11
22
20
35
19
14
37
54
40
28
23
406
597
1,020
1,165
1,326
754
395
309
327
43
10
14
8
10
14
41
30
15
11
10
22
23
32
24
41
127
143
124
169
182
220
207
124
134
457
266
48
9
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
2     4
1
2    ™
2     2
1 2
2 1
6
1     7
4
1
1
4
1
11
128
138
139
117
124
133
91
66
272
Females.
1
3
6
8
16
41
27
37
19
75
83
56
90
121
305
203
68
35
26
7
5
1
1
Table No. 25.
WOOD-MANUFACTURING (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 189 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1948.
Officers,  superintendents,  and managers     $1,056,077
Clerks,  stenographers,  salesmen,  etc  880,561
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)     11,810,599
Total  $13,747,237
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
February	
4,609
4,448
4,466
4,555
4,528
4,395
4,410
4,599
4,528
4,575
4,545
4,346
948
954
967
960
964
991
957
944
899
873
850
821
168
168
167
167
168
173
173
175
182
192
192
203
104
102
110
109
113
117
July	
119
August	
September	
October	
120
121
118
119
December	
118
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99..
9.00 to    9.99..
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99...
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to  15.99..
16.00 to  16.99-
17.00 to 17.99-
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99-
60.00 to  64.99-
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
3
3
24
5
1
2
7
5
9
5
17
5
15
8
15
3
21
12
17
22
24
20
29
6
216
603
1,690
1,379
452
220
109
56
78
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
1
2
1
18
5
17
3
17
9
5
8
30
315
377
47
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
12
18
24
19
17
13
13
67
1
1
2
4
1
1
2
3
33
29
19
1
1
1
2
1
1 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 35
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 8,736 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1948.
Officers, superintendents, and managers  $38,135,367
Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, etc    50,543,021
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)  337,711,818
  $426,390,206
Returns received too late to be included in above summary        $302,655
Transcontinental railways (ascertained pay-roll) _     31,484,347
Estimated additional pay-rolls,  including employers covered by the survey but not filing
returns,   and  additional  services   not  included  in   the  tables;    namely,   Governmental
workers, wholesale and retail firms, ocean services, miscellaneous (estimated pay-roll)... 166,822,792
    198,609,794
Total  $625,000,000
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
121,448
118,939
122,512
127,424
131,715
133,194
138,667
141,033
138,639
135,112
130,182
114,914
13,829
12,835
12,426
12,804
13,184
14,651
17,661
18,969
19,688
17,152
15,441
12,216
13,087
13,136
13,268
13,368
13,691
13,944
14,073
14,313
14,032
14,067
13,892
13,826
7 587
7,601
7 720
7,820
7,919
8,045
July	
8,200
8,250
8,135
8,149
8,223
8,111 H 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of Employment of Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00                    	
658
274
333
364
264
294
253
323
262
315
407
438
344
477
369
842
485
642
524
781
1,045
858
809
1,035
824
9,497
18,541
31,997
28,160
23,763
15,801
11,417
5,760
11,250
497
160
152
140
138
227
212
203
143
256
266
345
480
607
613
985
726
1,190
667
1,080
1,024
1,301
829
983
760
5,327
2,776
1,478
673
328
130
122
46
118
35
6
4
11
6
15
14
16
11
14
31
14
48
59
40
96
41
57
117
74
228
87
144
174
88
1,202
1,434
1,896
1,992
1,693
1,221
963
769
1,737
68
$6.00 to $6.99...                  	
26
7.00 to    7.99...                                  	
12
8.00 to    8.99	
15
9.00 to    9.99	
13
10.00 to 10.99	
36
11.00 to 11.99	
30
12.00 to 12.99	
49
13.00 to 13.99	
32
14.00 to 14.99 :	
34
15.00 to 15.99	
46
16.00 to 16.99	
49
17.00 to 17.99	
71
18.00 to 18.99	
187
19.00 to 19.99	
125
20.00 to 20.99...               	
393
21.00 to 21.99	
256
22.00 to 22.99...           	
299
23.00 to  23.99...            	
348
24.00 to 24.99	
237
25.00 to 25.99	
725
26.00 to 26.99	
366
27.00 to 27.99	
500
28.00 to 28.99	
449
29.00 to 29.99..                            	
310
30.00 to 34.99	
1,924
35.00 to 39.99	
1,445
40.00 to 44.99	
475
45.00 to 49.99                              	
220
50.00 to 54.99	
108
55.00 to 59.99 .-.	
34
60.00 to 64.99	
23
65.00 to 69.99	
6
70.00 and over	
16
Totals	
169,406                24,982
I
14,337
8,927 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 37
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Since the " Hours of Work Act" became effective, the Board has shown the
average weekly working-hours of all wage-earners in industry as computed for each
successive year.
With the exception of some upward movement during the war years, a gradual
decline is noted in the weekly hours reported since 1930. The average weekly working-
hours for all employees in the wage-earner section from 1930 to 1948 are as follows:-—•
1930  48.62
1931  47.37
1932  47.69
1933  47.35
1934  47.82
1935  47.17
1936  47.63
1937  47.25
1938  46.84
1939  47.80
Becoming effective during 1946, an Act to amend the " Hours of Work Act"
reduced the legal working-hours of employees in industry from 48 to 44 hours per week,
subject to certain exceptions.
In the table following, comparative figures are set out for the years 1947 and 1948,
showing the percentage of total wage-earners covered in the survey who were reported
as working up to and including the weekly limit of 44 hours, and the percentage of those
in excess of the legal limit.
Comparative Figures, 1947 and 1948 (Wage-earners).
1940	
  46.91
1941	
  46.90
1942	
  48.12
1943	
  47.19
1944	
  46.02
1945	
  45.59
1946	
  43.63
1947	
  42.24
1948	
  42.21
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Wage-
earners
reported.
44 Hours or
less per
Week.
In excess of
44 Hours.
1947	
8.410
159.300
Per Cent.
80.63
81.59
Per Cent.
19.37
1948	
8.736         1         165.411
18.41
The 8,736 firms reporting to the Department of Labour submitted information
regarding hours worked by some 165,411 male and female wage-earners for the year
1948. Of the total workers reported, 81.59 per cent, were shown as working 44 hours
or less per week, while 18.41 per cent, of total were reported working in excess of 44.
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES.
As in the previous year the coverage of the questionnaire dealing with hours of
work was extended to include clerical workers in addition to wage-earners. In the
section relating to clerical workers, the firms replying to the questionnaire submitted
information covering some 24,155 male and female employees in clerical occupations
for 1948, this total being comprised of clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, etc., but
not including officials, executive or managerial staff.
The table following under heading of " Wage-earners " shows by industry the
1948 average weekly hours worked in comparison with previous yearly averages for
this group, while for the clerical workers the table is based on averages recorded in
this section for the comparative years 1947 and 1948:— H 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Average Weekly Hours of Work.
Wage-earners.
Industry.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers   .
45.37
46.20
47.96
51.48
44.09
45.31
47.72
42.72
43.55
43.47
43.37
43.25
48.46
62.50
44.79
47.83
47.98
46.28
45.18
48.82
47.36
46.57
43.75
41.45
48.04
43.07
47.73
45.40
45.61
44.64
45.12
47.91
51.13
42.79
44.18
47.36
41.45
43.40
43.09
44.09
43.03
48.13
51.69
44.39
47.72
47.46
45.90
43.26
48.57
46.30
43.93
43.63
41.46
47.97
43.10
48.02
45.18
45.61
43.19
43.87
40.09
50.05
41.68
42.20
45.90
41.13
42.32
42.83
42.77
41.89
43.21
45.88
43.72
44.63
44.02
43.83
42.47
45.31
44.46
43.63
43.51
40.74
44.17
42.02
42.28
44.50
43.32
41.23
42.65
44.76
40.11
47.38
41.36
42.59
44.33
39.43
39.94
41.93
41.60
40.85
41.55
47.55
42.38
41.24
41.25
40.40
42.01
45.19
43.10
44.06
41.59
39.42
44.73
39.46
42.30
43.36
39.78
40.23
43.08
43.67
40.08
48.19
41.15
39.82
45.02
38.46
39.59
41.30
41.29
40.72
Lumber industries—■
41.96
44.62
42.48
41.29
41.23
39.69
42.42
44.72
Miscellaneous trades and industries!	
43.04
44.17
41.69
38.78
44.68
39.64
39.99
42.75
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
39.72
* Previous yearly figures for cartage, trucking, and warehousing included with miscellaneous trades and
industries.
t Miscellaneous trades and industries now inclusive of cigar and tobacco manufacturing, previeusly shown
separately above. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 39
Average Weekly Hours of Work—Continued.
Clerical Workers.
Industry.
1947.
1948.
39.33
40.25
39.58
39.61
41.06
39.69
40.48
42.60
39.62
39.83
36.71
43.44
40.49
42.89
40.55
42.07
40.66
38.31
41.23
42.96
40.59
39.20
38.40
37.35
38.80
39.98
42.36
39.80
38.96
38.92
40.09
41.38
39.77
40.84
38.86
40.02
42.53
37.30
39.65
37.36
43.23
39.76
Lumber industries—
41.94
38.85
41.46
40.42
39.04
40.97
43.34
40.60
38.46
37.75
37.74
39.67
40.23
41.38
39.21
38.80 H 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
STATISTICS OF CIVIC AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS.
The statistical tables which follow under this heading have been compiled on the
basis of information submitted to the Department of Labour by the various cities and
municipalities throughout the Province reporting on pay-roll and employment totals
of civic and municipal workers for the year 1948.
Inasmuch as the totals in this section are already incorporated in other tables as
part of the total industrial pay-roll, they should not be considered as in addition to
totals quoted elsewhere in this Report, but rather as having been further segregated
and here set aside for separate study.
Included in the coverage of the tables are workers engaged in public works, the
construction and maintenance of waterworks, generation and distribution of light and
power, and similar operations owned and operated by the city or municipality making
the return.
The total reported pay-roll for 1948, based on 122 returns submitted by civic and
municipal administrations, was $11,248,371, an increase of $2,065,958 over the reported
total for 1947.
Pay-roll totals of civic and municipal workers are shown in the following table,
which sets out comparative figures as reported for each class of worker covered in
the survey, for the years 1946, 1947, and 1948:—
1946.
1947.
1948.
$706,418
1,050,627
8,807,929
$986,080
900,120
7,296,213
$1,074,817
1,254,191
8,919,363
Clerks, stenographers, etc	
Totals 	
$7,564,974
$9,182,413
$11,248,371
A marked increase in municipal employment was again noted in 1948, the increases
occurring in both the wage-earner and clerical sections. While for 1946 the employment figures were reported as monthly averages, the figures reported for 1947 and
1948 represent the numbers on municipal pay-rolls as of the last day of each month
or nearest working-day.
In the table following the 1947 and 1948 municipal employment totals are set out
by sex and occupational group, together with comparative average monthly employment
figures for the preceding year 1946:— REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 41
SS?
S3
oJ
3 a
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<g
•M *
OS
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,-IO<MOrHlOWCOt>i-HOOW
t-t-OOOOOQOOCCOOOOCTiOOCi
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CO   CO   CO   CO   CO   CO   M*  CO   CO   M   COCO H 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
In relation to earnings the distribution of employment in civic and municipal
occupations is indicated in the following table, which shows the percentages of male
wage-earners in the various wage classifications as noted, for the comparative years
1946, 1947, and 1948:—
Weekly Earnings.
Percentage of Employees.
1946.
1947.
1948.
Under $15	
2.58
1.23
5.28
12.99
54.88
14.32
4.74
2.53
1.45
2.38
1.20
2.40
9.27
39.49
30.24
7.85
3.71
3.46
1.57
$15 to   20	
0.57
20 to   25	
1.15
25 to   30	
1.48
30 to   35	
14.63
35 to  40	
19.15
40 to   45	
41.77
45 to   60	
12.49
7.19
The average weekly earnings for male wage-earners on civic and municipal payrolls increased to $40.59 in 1948, as compared with $34.89 recorded for the previous year.
In the section dealing with civic workers in clerical occupations, average weekly
earnings increased to $42.16 for males and $30.09 for female workers, compared
respectively with $37.45 and $25.26 recorded in these classifications for 1947. Included
in the clerical group were clerks, stenographers, and general office employees, exclusive
of salaried officials, executives, and managerial staff.
A fractional increase was noted in the average weekly hours worked by municipal
and civic employees during 1948, the average weekly figure for wage-earners rising
to 41.57 from 41.28 previously reported, while in the clerical section the average weekly
hours were 38.90, as against 38.49 recorded in 1947. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H 43
SUMMARY OF NEW LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR.
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1949.)
"APPRENTICESHIP ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1949."
The "Apprenticeship Act" was amended to provide a more general authority on
the part of the Minister in exempting minors working in designated trades from the
requirement of entering into a contract of apprenticeship when the work available in
a shop does not enable the employee to get the necessary training to become proficient
at the trade. Prior to this amendment the authority of the Minister was restricted
to exempting those employed exclusively on specialized or repetitive work within a
designated trade.
A further amendment permits the Minister to allow a minor to work at his trade
if fully skilled without requiring the minor to enter into a contract of apprenticeship
pursuant to the provisions of section 8 (1) of the Act.
"BOILER INSPECTION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1949."
Amendments were made to this Act to transfer the administration of the Act
from the Workmen's Compensation Board to the Minister of Public Works.
"ELECTRICAL ENERGY INSPECTION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1949."
Amendments were made to this Act to transfer the administration of the Act
from the Workmen's Compensation Board to the Minister of Public Works.
" MECHANICS' LIEN ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1949."
An amendment was made to this Act to correct an error occurring in the revision
of the Statutes.
" MUNICIPAL ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1949."
Of the several amendments made to this Act, two are of particular interest to
labour. New sections have been added to the Act providing that when any arbitration
proceedings are taken respecting salaries, wages, or working conditions, and any
award is made in consequence whereof the municipality is required to expend or
provide any money, such arbitration proceedings shall be concluded and the award
made and published on or before the 15th day of April of the calendar year in which
the award is to come into effect, and where a Conciliation Board has been appointed
under the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" to deal with a dispute
between a municipality or Board of Police Commissioners and the firemen or policemen
employed by the municipality or Board of Police Commissioners, the recommendation
of the Conciliation Board shall be binding in every respect upon the municipality or
Board of Police Commissioners.
"MUNICIPAL SUPERANNUATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1949."
This legislation excludes from the definition of " employee " a person who has not
completed at least ten years' service before reaching the compulsory retirement age.
Except with respect to the Greater Victoria Water District and its permanent
employees, this provision applies only to employees of employers who adopt the Act
on or after January 1st, 1949.
With the approval of the Provincial Secretary an employer may enter into an
agreement with the Commissioner of Municipal Superannuation providing for
increased benefits for the employees. The agreement may make larger benefits conditional on increased contributions from employees but not from the Consolidated
Revenue Fund. H 44 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. James Thomson, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell 1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
3. Fraudena  Eaton   789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
4. J. A. Ward Bell  789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. H.   Douglas    789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
C R.  Margison 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Head Office Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
Branch Office 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Regional Offices 17 Bastion Street, Nanaimo.
Capital News Building, Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
560 Baker Street, Nelson.
220 Third Avenue, Kamloops.
Department of Labour, Prince George.
Department of Labour, Smithers.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
SIR,—We have the honour to present the fifteenth annual report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1948.
As the Annual Report for 1947, page 46, gave a historical outline of the institution
of the Board and its development from the first Minimum Wage Board which had been
established in July, 1918, the reader is referred to that Report for such information.
This is the fifteenth annual report of the Board and the thirty-first annual record
of the Department with respect to female employees.
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS.
During the year 1948 the Board held ninety-five sessions on fifty-one different
days.    It held sixty-five sessions in Victoria and thirty sessions in Vancouver.
During the year numerous delegations representing employers and employees
appeared before the Board for the purpose of making representations to that body
with respect to problems or difficulties confronting the respective industries, trades,
or occupations in connection with hours of work and minimum wages.
Public hearings were held in connection with the occupation of first-aid attendant
and the plumbing and pipe-fitting industry. Following these hearings the Board made
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 39 (1948), which was a complete revision
of the previous Order applying to first-aid attendants that had been in effect for almost
eight years. The matter of making a minimum wage order with respect to plumbers
and pipe-fitters is still pending.
So much of the Board's time has been taken up by consideration of applications
for overtime permits, learners' permits, approvals of arrangements of hours of work
under section 11 (3) of the " Hours of Work Act," and other matters that the Board
has been unable in the time at its disposal to completely revise all of the Orders to
which the General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946) of the Board applied;
however, considerable progress has been made in connection with the revision of these
Orders, and it is anticipated that all of these Orders will have been revised in the
immediate future. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H 45
ORDERS MADE DURING 1948.
During the year 1948 the Board revised five of its Orders, resulting in the
promulgation of the following:—
Order No. 9 (1948) with respect to drivers and swampers or helpers in the
transportation industry.
Order No. 25 (1948) with respect to the manufacturing industry.
Order No. 34 (1948) with respect to the office occupation.
Order No. 39 (1948) with respect to first-aid attendants.
Order No. 67 (1948) with respect to public places of amusement, etc.
In addition to the above, entirely new Orders were made with respect to the
following:—
Order No. 6 (1948)—automotive repair and gasoline service-station industry.
Order No. 7 (1948)—radio technicians.
Order No. 8 (1948)—radio-broadcast technicians.
Order No. 10 (1948)—sheet-metal trade.
With the  exceptions  of Order No.  34   (1948), which  applies  only to  female
employees, and Order No. 10 (1948), which applies only to male employees, all of the
Orders referred to above apply to both male and female employees.
Order No. lo (1948)—Logging Industry.—The Board amended Order No. 1
(1947) by removing from the overtime provisions of the Order "persons engaged in
operating light plants in logging camps."
Order No. 9k (1948)—Drivers and Swampers or Helpers.—This Order amended
Order No. 9 (1948) by clarifying the exemptions from the said Order.
Order No. 26c (1948)—Transportation Industry.—This Order of the Board
amended Order No. 26 (1940) by deleting from its application those employees in the
transportation industry to whom Order No. 9 (1948) of the Board applied.
Order No. 52b (1948)—Hotel and Catering Industry.—This Order amended Order
No. 52 (1946) and provided the Board with the necessary authority to vary the daily
guarantee provisions of the said Order.
Order No. 74A. (1948)—Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industry.—This Order of
the Board amended Order No. 74 (1946) and provided the Board with the authority
to vary the daily guarantee provisions of the said Order.
Orders Nos. 59 and 24—Mercantile Supplementary, 1948.—These Orders took care
of male and female employees in the mercantile industry for the Christmas period.
Temporary workers employed between December 4th and December 31st were required
to be paid not less than 45 cents per hour, except that female employees working
thirty-nine hours or more per week were required to be paid not less than $17 for
that week.
REGULATIONS MADE DURING 1948.
Regulation No. 4h—Engineers, Operators, Firemen, and Oilers or Greasers.-—
This regulation superseded Regulation No. 4 and added to the classifications of
employees that were permitted to work nine hours per day in addition to the maximum
hours of work provided in section 3 of the Act, to perform preparatory or complementary work.
Regulation No. 17c—Baking Industry.—This regulation permitted the delivery-
men in the baking industry to work in excess of eight hours per day, provided the
weekly hours of work did not exceed forty-eight.
Regulation No. 32c—Construction Industry.—This regulation permitted persons
employed on the construction of the Pine Pass Highway to work nine hours per day
and fifty-four hours per week for the period June 16th, 1948, to and including
December 31st, 1948. H 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Regulation No. 32D—Construction Industry.-—This regulation permitted persons
employed on the Hope-Princeton Highway and the Keremeos-Kaleden Highway to
work nine hours per day and forty-eight hours per week for the period June 10th,
1948, to and including November 15th, 1948.
Regulation No. 34a.—Bartenders, Waiters, and Utility Mew.—This regulation permitted bartenders, waiters, and utility men employed within premises covered by beer
licences issued pursuant to the provisions of the " Government Liquor Act" to work
a split shift within thirteen hours instead of within twelve for the period ending
January 31st, 1949. (This regulation was subsequently extended for the period
ending July 31st, 1949.)
Mercantile Industry, Christmas, 1948 (Temporary).—This regulation of the
Board authorized certain employees in the retail establishments in the mercantile
industry to exceed on certain days during the Christmas season the limit of hours of
work provided in section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(Summaries of the above-mentioned Orders and regulations, together with other
existing and new Orders and regulations made prior to this Report going to press,
may be found in the Appendix to this section of the Report.)
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
Presenting the 1948 statistical summary of women workers in business and
industry, the following section is devoted to a comparative study of the employment,
earnings, and hours of work of female workers in those occupations and industries
covered by Orders of the Board.
For the year under review, returns were received in time for tabulation from some
7,984 employers of women and girls, who reported a total of 61,528 female employees.
With an increase in the number of establishments reporting over the previous year, this
figure represents the highest total employment of women workers yet recorded in the
history of the Department.
The tables following show for the past five years the comparative employment,
earnings, and hours of work as recorded for those occupations and industries in which
legal minimum wage rates for females have been set by the Board.
Mercantile Industry (Female).
i
1948.         1         1947.         [         1946.
1                           1
1945.                  1944.
1
1,753
12,054
$275,928.00
$22.89
37.27
1
1,747 |               1,696
11,493  |             10,808
$228,446.00  |   $197,691.08
$19.88  j             $18.29
36.48 |              38.46
1
1,650
11,039
$184,838.18
$16.74
38.02
1,515
10,618
$173,346.41
$16.33
37.99
Total number of employees	
With an increase again noted in the number of firms reporting in the mercantile
industry, over-all employment in this section rose to 12,054 during 1948, as compared
with a total of 11,493 shown for the previous year.
The total amount of salaries and wages paid to the 12,054 female employees for
the week under review was $275,928, representing an average per capita weekly earnings of $22.89 for this industry, as against a previous average figure of $19.88 computed for 1947.
Average weekly hours of work in the mercantile industry was recorded at 37.27
for 1948, increased slightly from a low of 36.48 noted for the previous year. Due to
many employers reporting the highest volume of employment during the Christmas
week, in which the total working-hours are sometimes less than normal, periodic
fluctuation in the figure is not uncommon in this industry. report of deputy minister, 1948.
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries (Female).
H 47
1948.
1947.
T
1946.
1945.
1944.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
211
2,652
1,367.00
$22.01
38.67
206
2,881
$57,784.00
$20.06
38.23
176
2,285
$40,417.75
$17.69
39.01
181
2,332
$37,965.94
$16.28
39.88
161
2,151
$33,228.64
$15.45
38.90
A total of 211 firms completed returns in this section for 1948, reporting a total
of 2,652 female employees engaged in laundry, cleaning and dyeing occupations.
While employment in this industry did not reach the high mark set in 1947,
earnings continued to increase, the total pay-roll amounting to $58,367 for the week
reviewed, as against $57,784 for the weekly period in the previous year. Compared
with a 1947 average weekly figure of $20.06, average weekly earnings increased to
$22.01 for employees in this industry during 1948.
A fractional increase was noted, however, in the average number of hours worked
per week, which increased from 38.23 to 38.67 for the year under review.
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
1948.
1946.
1945.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
1,266
10,865
$236,981.00
$21.81
38.50
I
1,222  |
10,879 |
$216,965.00  |
$19.94
38.54
1,174
9,492
$175,484.81
$18.49
38.93
1,271
9,553
$162,384.74
$17.00
40.56
1,137
9,078
$151,575.26
$16.70
41.01
Firms reporting in the hotel and catering group numbered 1,266 for 1948, as
compared with 1,222 filing returns in the previous year. Little change was noted in
employment, which remained just short of the 1947 level, with 10,865 employees
recorded for 1948, as against a previous total of 10,879.
Earnings for the weekly period reviewed increased from $216,965 to $236,981 for
1948, to give an average per capita weekly earnings figure of $21.81 for employees
shown in this classification, as compared with $19.94 noted for the previous year.
Average weekly working-hours for employees in hotel and catering occupations
continued to decrease fractionally, showing at 38.50 in 1948, as against 38.54 hours
recorded for 1947.
Office Occupation (Female).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked .per week
3,405
15,721
$461,189.00
$29.34
38.47
3,349
15,368
1,571.00
$27.56
39.09
3,261
14,296
$346,234.83
$24.22
39.46
3,274
13,790
$318,788.40
$23.12
40.43
2,984
13,251
$301,981.54
$22.79
40.82
The office occupation continues to lead with the highest employment figures for
female workers.
With clerical occupations noticeably on the increase, employment in this classification climbed to 15,721 during 1948, as compared with 15,368 previously reported.
The number of firms reporting in this section rose from 3,349 to 3,405 for the year
under review. H 48
department of labour.
With a total of $461,189 paid in salaries and wages for the weekly period reported,
average weekly earnings for female office-workers rose to $29.34 to set a new high for
earnings in this occupation.    The previous weekly average noted in 1947 was $27.56.
During the year a fractional decrease was evident in the working-hours of office
employees, the 1948 average weekly figure showing at 38.47 hours, down slightly from
39.09 previously reported.
Personal Service Occupation (Female).
1948.         1         1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
147
446
$10,942.00
$24.53
38.49
152
524
$11,830.00
144
542
$11,435.30
149
535
$10,350.57
$19.35
39.88
134
476
$9,054.25
$22.58  |             $21.10
39.48                  40.16
$19.02
40.50
Included in the above table are females employed as beauty-parlour operators,
chiropodists, and those engaged in similar occupations. Many firms in this business
are owner-operated without outside help, and have consequently been omitted from the
survey for this reason. The coverage of the above table has been restricted to include
only those firms employing staff.
With fewer firms reporting for the period reviewed, employment dropped in this
section from 524 to 446 for 1948.
Substantial increase was noted, however, in the average weekly earnings for
employees in these occupations, the average per capita weekly earnings increasing to
$24.53 in 1948, as against $22.58 recorded for 1947.
The average weekly hours worked in personal service occupations continued to
decrease, down to 38.49 hours for the week reported, from 39.48 for a similar period
in 1947
Fishing Industry (Female).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
1
1948.*
1
1947.*
1946.
1945.
1944.
26
22
20
17
19
1,650
2,129
774
441
656
$49,987.00
$58,775.00
$18,194.97
$9,307.73
$12,214.60
$30.30
$27.61
$23.51
$21.11
$18.62
36.20
37.84
37.49
35.22
36.28
* 1947 and 1948 figures inclusive of all cannery occupations not previously included in the tabulations.
As noted in the previous year's Report, totals subsequent to the 1946 figures were
inclusive of all cannery occupations, some of which had not previously been included.
Due to changes in the questionnaire, the segregation of piece-workers and employees
engaged in heading and filling occupations is not possible from the totals submitted by
the firms reporting. Inasmuch as these occupations have previously been omitted
from the tables, being outside the governing Order of the Board, no direct comparison
should be made in the above table between recent totals and those of earlier years without this consideration. The 1947 and 1948 figures, however, serve to give an over-all
picture of female workers in this industry.
No doubt due to fluctuations in the seasonal activity common to this industry, the
employment reported for the weekly period was somewhat less than in the previous
year, a total of 1,650 employees being reported, as compared with 2,129 shown for 1947.
With a total of $49,987, however, paid in salaries and wages for the week reported,
the average per capita weekly earnings in this industry rose to $30.30, from. $27.61 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 49
noted in 1947, representing the highest recorded figure of average earnings for female
workers in any of the industries or occupations included in the survey.
A further decrease was evident in the average weekly hours worked in this
industry, the 1948 figure decreasing to 36.20, as against 37.84 hours shown for a
similar weekly period in 1947.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female)
1948.
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
179
2,956
$84,007.00
$28.42
40.58
154
2,679
$68,205.00
$25.46
40.08
230
2,720
$61,895.57
$22.76
40.61
221
2,096
$44,409.74
$21.19
37.78
194
2,353
$54,232.36
$23.05
40.52
In recording the number of firms employing females in occupations relating to
the telephone and telegraph section, it is necessary to include all types of establishments wherein the operation of a switchboard automatically places the firm in this
category. Inasmuch as some firms in completing the questionnaire apparently include
the switchboard operators with other office employees, fluctuation in the number of
reporting firms occurs periodically in the above table.
With 179 firms reporting in this section for 1948, an increase was noted in the
total reported employment, which climbed to 2,956 from 2,679 shown in 1947 to set an
all-time record high for employment in this occupation.
Pay-roll for the week reported amounted to $84,007, compared with total salaries
and wages of $68,205 paid for a similar weekly period during 1947.
Average weekly earnings for females employed in telephone and telegraph occupations also reached a new high of $28.42 in 1948, increased from $25.46 recorded for the
previous year.
In line with increases generally noted in this section, the average weekly working-
hours for employees in these occupations moved up fractionally to 40.58, as compared
with 40.08 noted for 1947.
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
772
8,567
$234,410.00
$27.36
37.89
794
8,983
$216,668.00
$24.12
38.19
948
8,757
1,535.49
$21.64
39.32
1,036
14,016
$321,983.90
$22.97
40.33
849
16,221
$415,945.94
$25.64
42.35
I
With fewer firms reporting in the manufacturing group for the period under
review, reported employment in this section dropped to 8,567 for 1948, as against 8,983
employees reported in the previous year.
The total amount of salaries and wages paid for the weekly period was, however,
substantially higher than for the similar period in 1947, resulting in a sharp increase
in the per capita average weekly earnings in this industry.
Average weekly earnings, based on the employment reported, rose to $27.36,
increased from $24.12 set in 1947, and representing a new high mark for this section.
The average weekly hours of work further declined to 37.89 in 1948, down from
38.19 in 1947, and decreasing generally in line with the lower trend in weekly working-
hours noted for manufacturing industries since the early post-war years. H 50
department of labour.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female).
1948.
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
71
5,950
$175,673.00
$29.52
43.59
85
5,940
$154,875.00
$26.07
40.20
72
5,245
$119,587.20
$22.80
42.97
69
4,836
$100,909.15
$20.87
43.01
72
Total number of employees	
4,941
$106,997.85
$21.66
44.64
Some fluctuation in the number of firms reporting in the fruit and vegetable
industry may be noted in the above table, although employment in the sample obtained
remained high at 5,950 reported for 1948, exceeding slightly the previous year's figure
of 5,940.
Earnings for the week under review were substantially up from the previous year,
showing total salaries and wages of $175,673 for the weekly period, as compared with
$154,875 for a similar pay-roll in 1947.
With longer working-hours evident in this seasonal industry during 1948 than in
the previous year, the average weekly earnings for female workers climbed to $29.52,
increased considerably from the 1947 figure of $26.07, and recording a new high level
for earnings in the fruit and vegetable industry.
Average weekly working-hours for employees in this section were higher in 1948,
increasing to 43.59 from a low of 40.20 hours noted for the previous year.
Transportation Industry (Female).
1948.
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
49
124
$3,003.00
$24.22
41.99
27
66
$1,272.00
$19.27
40.74
76
130
$2,065.96
$15.89
36.96
102
227
$3,785.70
$16.68
37.79
138
235
$4,397.05
$18.71
42.29
The above table is inclusive of female workers engaged in delivery, truck-driving,
messenger-work, etc.
Average earnings and hours worked were computed on the basis of returns from
some 49 firms reporting a total of 124 female employees in occupations of this nature.
With longer hours noted as a contributing factor, the average weekly earnings in
this section increased to $24.22 for 1948, up from $19.27 shown for the previous year.
Average working-time for the weekly period under review was 41.99 hours in
1948, as compared with 40.74 recorded for 1947.
Public Places of Amusement (Female).
1948.
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
105
543
$8,129.00
$14.97
26.69
92
500
$6,788.00
$13.58
25.47
85
283
$2,960.63
$10.46
24.76
91
311
$3,164.58
$10.18
26.12
430
$4,728.41
$11.00
25.16
Included in this classification are workers employed as theatre ushers, check-room
attendants, and in occupations of a similar nature in connection with bowling-alleys,
swimming-pools, and other such public places of amusement. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 51
The number of firms reporting female employees in this type of occupation again
increased in 1948, some 105 establishments reporting, as against 92 for 1947.
Employment totals also continued to increase, with the 1947 figure of 500 employees
rising to 543 for the year under review. Due to the nature of the occupation, workers
in this classification are necessarily on a part-time basis. Hours of work and earnings
are therefore relatively lower than those in other occupations, and should not be considered as representative of a full week's work.
On the basis of the actual part-time hours worked, the average weekly earnings
for female employees in this section was $14.97 for 1948, increased from a 1947 figure
of $13.58 for a similar weekly period.
Average weekly hours worked by employees in this classification were recorded at
26.69 for 1948, compared with 25.47 noted for the previous year.
Summary of all Occupations (" Female Minimum Wage Act ").
1948.
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
7,984
61,528
$1,598,616.00
$25.98
38.61
7,850
61,442
$1,445,179.00
$23.52
38.33
7,882
55,332
$1,165,503.65
$21.06
39.42
8,061
59,176
$1,197,888.63
$20.24
39.94
7,289
60,410
$1,267,702.31
$20.98
40.84
The above table summarizes returns from some 7,984 firms reporting actual figures
concerning 61,528 women and girl employees for the year 1948.
For the one week of 1948 under review, total aggregate salaries and wages of
female employees amounted to $1,598,616, representing an increase of $153,437 over
the reported total for a similar weekly period in 1947.
Average weekly earnings for all occupations covered by the survey is shown in the
summary table at $25.98, the highest average yet recorded for all females included in
the tabulations, and an increase of $2.46 over the 1947 figure of $23.52.
During the period reported, the legal minimum rates as fixed for female workers
by Orders of the Board ranged from $17, the lowest, as set for the mercantile industry,
to $20.16 for a 48-hour week in the telephone and telegraph occupation. From the
above summary table it is therefore evident that the average weekly earnings of female
workers continues at a level well above the highest minimum set by law.
The average weekly hours of work for all occupations, which had continued to
decline in 1947, showed a fractional increase in 1948, the average figure covering the
61,528 female employees reported rising to 38.61 from the low mark of 38.33 established for the previous year.
Included in the total 61,528 females reported are only those workers engaged in
industries or occupations for which Minimum Wage Orders have been set by the Board.
Figures contained in the summary are not inclusive of domestic workers, farm-
labourers, or fruit-pickers, these occupations being excluded from coverage by the
provisions of the " Female Minimum Wage Act." Federal workers and bank employees
are also excluded from the coverage of the Provincial legislation. h 52 department of labour.
Table showing Comparative Belation of 1948 Earnings to Legal Minimum.
Industry or Occupation.
Number of
Firms
reporting.
Number of
Employees
reported.
Total
Weekly
Pay-roll.
Legal
Minimum
Weekly
Wage for
Pull-time
Employees.
Actual
Average
Weekly
Earnings.
Percentage
by wbich
1948
Average
Earnings
exceed
Legal
Minimum.
1,753
211
1,266
3,405
147
26
179
772
71
49
105
12,054
2,652
10,865
15,721
446
1,650
2,956
8,567
5,950
124
543
$275,928
58,367
236,981
461,189
10,942
49,987
84,007
234,410
175,673
3,003
8,129
$17.00*
17.60t
18.00$
18.00§
20.00t
19.20H
20.16|j
17.60t
17.60t
I
18.00$
$22.89
22.01
21.81
29 34
Per Cent.
34 65
25 06
21.17
Office	
63 nn
Personal service	
24.53       1       22.65
30.30
28.42
27.36
29.52
24.22
14.97**
57.81
40.97
55.45
67.73
fl
**
7,984
61,528
$1,598,616
$25.98
52.82
* Thirty-nine to forty-four hours per week.
t Forty-four hours per week.
t Forty to forty-four hours per week.
§ Thirty-six to forty-four hours per week.
J| Forty-eight hours per week.
H In the transportation industry it is impracticable to set a weekly rate, owing to the variation of minimum
wages in the Order, depending on whether the work is done on foot, on bicycles, by motor-cycles, or other types of
motor-vehicles.
** Earnings represent partial week only.
The various occupational classifications covered in the annual survey of female
workers are listed in the above table, which sets out comparative data showing the
number of firms reporting in each classification, together with the employment represented, and the average weekly earnings. The legal minimum weekly wage set in each
instance is shown in relation to the actual average weekly earnings recorded for 1948,
the actual earnings being also expressed as percentages in excess of the legal minimum
which applies in each occupation. It is significant that the average weekly earnings
for females in all occupations covered ($25.98) was 52.82 per cent, in excess of the
lowest legal minimum shown in the table.
STATISTICS FOB MALE EMPLOYEES.
In order to show the trend of wages and employment in some of the more important
occupations covered by the Male Minimum Wage Orders, a segregation has been made
from industrial classifications dealt with elsewhere in this Beport to isolate male
employees in various occupations within the coverage of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act." Belevant data resulting from this segregation is presented in the following tables.
While it has not been possible to obtain from this source separate information for
all occupations covered by the Male Minimum Wage Orders, the tables serve to indicate
the general trend of employment and earnings in some of the more important occupations covered.
The tables are based on returns from industrial firms, the totals being representative of wage-earners only, as reported for the week of employment of the greatest
number. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 53
Baking Industry (Male).
1948.
1946.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners.
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
197
1,302
1,987.50
$42.23
40.56
203
1,443
1,730.50
$37.93
40.91
189
1,478
$54,214.00
$36.68
41.53
182
1,469
$51,174.50
$34.84
45.04
Construction (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners.
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
2,078
32,315
51,558,468.50
$48.23
41.15
1,978
29,077
|$1,252,717.00
$43.08
41.36
I
1,732
22,040
$852,297.50
$38.67
41.58
1,116
16,712
$617,345.50
$36.94
42.79
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
97
2,744
$113,192.00
$41.25
47.21
I
97
94
3,528
3,223
229.50
$111,684.50
$37.76
$34.65
46.41
48.34
94
2,758
!,880.00
$30.78
49.96
House Furnishings (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
137
1,635
$63,878.50
$39.07
39.59
138
1,721
$60,269.50
$35.02
39.94
135
1,569
$49,274.50
$31.41
42.32
1,198
$34,177.00
$28.53
43.40
Logging (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
893
18,838
$1,026,033.00
$54.47
41.96
952
19,712
|$1,029,238.00
$52.21
41.55
I
816
15,273
$708,840.50
$46.41
43.21
639
13,249
$608,209.50
$45.91
48.13
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
192
1,151
$53,051.50
$46.09
40.30
190
1,297
$55,232.50
$42.58    j
40.27    |
185
1,083
1,262.00
$37.18
41.01
125
800
$28,130.00
$35.16
42.15
Sawmills (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
726
20,360
$932,133.00
$45.78
41.23
744
18,690
$794,594.50
$42.51
41.25
585
15,421
$610,169.50
$39.57
44.02
412
13,394
$491,406.50
$36.69
47.46 H 54
department of labour.
Shingle-mills (Male).
1948.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
62 58
3,455        2,198
$180,001.00 | $105,050.50
$52.10 |     $47.79
39.69 j      40.40
 I	
45
1,956
$86,380.00
$44.16
43.83
44
1,742
$68,859.00
$39.53
45.90
Ship-building and Boat-building (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners.
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
82
73
6,144
6,715
$299,772.50
$316,254.00
$48.79
$47.10
39.64
39.46
79
56
9,217
21,668
262.00
$858,836.00
$40.06
$39.64
42.02
43.10
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
189
5,087
$225,204.50
$44.27
39.72
194
5,497
$216,164.50
$39,32
39.78
181
4,552
$167,409.00
$36.78
43.32
147
3,818
$127,076.50
$33.28
45.61
INSPECTIONS AND WAGE ADJUSTMENTS.
Several new Inspectors were added to the staff of the Department in 1948, and
it was therefore possible for the inspection staff to devote more time to individual
inspections than previously. With employment continuing at an all-time high, it was
reasonable to expect that during the year 1948 the work of the Inspectors would be
considerably increased, and this is exemplified in the following comparison of inspections and wage adjustments for 1947 and 1948. In 1948 total collections were considerably in excess of those made in 1947 and were approximately ten times greater
than those made in 1946. It should be emphasized that these collections would not
have been possible had it not been for the efforts of the Inspectors of the Department
and the co-operation of the employers.
Comparison of Inspections and Wage Adjustments, 1947 and 1948.
1947.
Number of investigations  13,912
Number of Inspectors  17*
Collections.
" Male Minimum  Wage Act,"  240
firms paid 477 employees  $34,334.31
" Female   Minimum   Wage   Act,"
294 firms paid 538 employees..    10,923.81
"Annual Holidays Act," 949 firms
paid 5,362 employees      39,649.24
1948.
Number of investigations  18,699
Number of Inspectors  20*
Collections.
" Male Minimum Wage Act," 354
Arms paid 871 employees     $45,658.00
" Female   Minimum   Wage   Act,"
175 firms paid 491 employees 7,579.01
"Annual    Holidays    Act,"    1,293
firms paid 7,162 employees      56,152.54
Total collections  $84,907.36
Total collections  $109,389.55
* Average. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
COUBT CASES.
H 55
Occasions arise when employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the
matter of compliance with the provisions of the Orders and regulations of the Board.
In such cases it is necessary to resort to the Courts in order that the necessary compliance with the legislation will be obtained. A summary of Court cases during the
year 1948 follows.
"Annual Holidays with Pay Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1. Burnaby Lath & Band (L. H. Hamulas),
1942 Buller Avenue, Burnaby
2. David   Neon,   Ltd.,   1025   Main   Street,
Vancouver
Failure to pay holiday pay to an
employee
Failure to comply with section 5
(1)  of "Annual Holidays Act "
Fined $25 ; arrears ordered, $13.60.
Fined $25.
Female Minimum Wage Act."
1.
F. W. E. Burnham, Halcyon	
Failure to pay semi-monthly
Failure to pay semi-monthly....
Fined $25 ; arrears ordered, $33.33.
2.
F. W. E. Burnham, Halcyon	
Found guilty;   similarity in nature
of offences, and fined on only one
charge.
3.
F. W. E. Burnham, Halcyon	
Failure to pay minimum wage.
Fined $25 ;   arrears ordered, $51.
4.
Log   Cabin   Inn   (T.   C.   Peters),   D
Cove, North Vancouver
*ep
Failure to produce records	
Fined $25 and costs.
5.
Olympia Cafe   (P. Rapanos), 752 Yates
Failure   to   post   Order   No.
52
Fined $10 or three days.
Street, Victoria
(1946)   and Schedule of Hours
6.
T-Bone Inn   (Henry Rohl), Creston
Failure to pay minimum wage.
Found guilty ; arrears ordered, $105 ;
remanded for ninety days.
7.
T-Bone Inn   (Henry Rohl), Creston..
Failure to pay minimum wage.
Found guilty;   arrears ordered, $96.
8.
T-Bone Inn   (Henry Rohl), Creston..
Failure to pay minimum wage.
Found guilty ;  arrears ordered, $100.
9.
Top Notch Cafe (J. D. Logan and G.
N.
Failure   to   post   Order   No.
52
Fined $10   (each partner).
Stanbrook), Victoria
(1946)   and Schedule of Hours
Hours of Work Act."
1. Fred Hunt & Son, Ltd.  (Trucking), 895
Otter Road, Langley
2. Fred Hunt & Son, Ltd.   (Trucking), 895
Otter Road, Langley
3. Fred Hunt & Son, Ltd.  (Trucking), 895
Otter Road, Langley
4. Millars   Jewellers,   47   Hastings   Street
West, Vancouver
5. National Tire Service  (M. Chinoski and
B.  Kwiatoski),  2820  Kingsway,  Burnaby
6. Plaza   Hotel    (William   S.   White),   806
Richards Street, Vancouver
7. Silver   Fox   Cafe   (Norman   Sum),   424
Pender Street West, Vancouver
8. Silver   Fox   Cafe   (Norman   Sum),   424
Pender Street West, Vancouver
9. Sproat Lake Resorts, Ltd., Sproat Lake..
Failure  to  post  schedule  of  employees' hours of work
Failure to keep records	
Failure to report overtime-
Working    an    employee    outside
scheduled hours
Employing employee outside hours
shown on schedule
Failure to keep true and correct
record of wages paid and hours
worked each day
Failure   to   notify   employees   re
schedule of hours
Failure   to   notify   employees   re
rest periods
Failure   to   notify   employees   re
schedule of hours of work
Guilty; suspended sentence.
Guilty ; suspended sentence.
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs.
Fined $25 and $5.75 costs.
Fined $25 and $2.25 costs.
Fined $20 and costs.
Fined $25 and costs.
Withdrawn.
Fined $25 and $3 costs. H
56                                                         DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1.
W.  J.   Gawne,   1120  Cook   Street,  Vic
Failure to pay minimum wage to
Dismissed.
toria
one employee
2.
J. A. Hall, 3313 Laurel Street, Burnaby
Failure to pay semi-monthly	
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
3.
Harrison Mills, Ltd., 91 Duncan Street,
Failure to  submit records under
Fined $10 ; in default, distress.
New Westminster
oath as required
4.
Fred Hossel, 379 Broadway East, Van
Failure to pay semi-monthly	
Sentence suspended for six months ;
couver
arrears ordered, $613.89.
5.
Keystone Shingles & Lumber,  Ltd., 91
Failure to  submit records  under
Fined $10 ; in default, distress.
Duncan Street, New Westminster
oath as required
6.
Merritt Cafe, Merritt 	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Dismissed.
7.
George Northdrop, 251 Eighteenth Ave
Failure to pay semi-monthly un
Fined   $75   and   costs;    arrears   or
nue East, Vancouver
der Order No. 12
dered, $169.22.
8.
Paulson's Dairy  (Foster Malcolm), 590
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Fined $50 and $2.25 costs;   arrears
Rayside Street, Burnaby
ordered,    $64;     in    default,    two
months' imprisonment.
9.
Shue Yuen Co.   (Buck Sing Chung and
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $20.
Buck    Sang   Chung),    381    Railway
records
Avenue, Vancouver
10.
T-Bone Inn   (Henry Rohl), Creston   ...
Failure to pay minimum wage
Found guilty;   remanded for ninety
days ; arrears ordered, $335.
11.
J.  D.  Trouton,   603   Manchester  Road,
Failure   to   pay  all   wages   semi
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs.
Victoria
monthly   in    contravention   of
Order No. 50
12.
Zacks, Ltd., 2085 Main Street, Vancou
Failure to keep  a true and cor
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs.
ver
rect record of hours
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act."
1.
Acme   Logging   Co.,   Ltc
.,    Cranberry
Failure to
pay
wages
semi-
Fined $50 and $2.50 costs ;   arrears
Lake
monthly
ordered, $432 ;   in default, distress.
9
pay
wages
Fined $25 ; arrears ordered, $22.17 ;
in default, fifteen days in gaol.
monthly
3.
Dumac   Mines,   Ltd.,   507
Royal
Trust
Failure to
pay
wages
semi-
Fined $25 ;   arrears ordered, $23.76 ;
Building,   626   Pender
Street
West,
monthly
in   default,   distress   with   alterna
Vancouver
tive of thirty days in gaol.
4.
Dumac   Mines,   Ltd.,   507
Royal
Trust
Failure to
pay
wages
semi-
Fined $25 ;  arrears ordered, $23.76 ;
Building,    626   Pender
Street
West,
monthly
in  default,  distress with  alterna
Vancouver
tive of thirty days in gaol.
5.
Dumac   Mines,   Ltd.,   507
Royal
Trust
Failure to
pay
wages
semi-
Fined $25 ;   arrears ordered, $290.47 ;
Building,   626   Pender
Street
West,
monthly
in  default,  distress with alterna
Vancouver
tive of thirty days in gaol.
6.
Dumac   Mines,   Ltd.,   507
Royal
Trust
Failure to
pay
wages
semi-
Fined $25 ;   arrears ordered, $93.16 ;
Building,   626   Pender
Street
West,
monthly
in   default,   distress  with  alterna
Vancouver
tive of thirty days in gaol.
7.
H.K.F.  Machines,  Ltd., 336 First Ave
Failure to
pay
wages
semi-
Fined  $25  and  $3.50  costs;   in  de
nue East, Vancouver
monthly
fault, twenty days in gaol.
8.
Joncas   Upholstering   (A.
A.   Joncas),
Failure to
pay
wages
semi-
Fined   $25;   arrears  ordered  to be
2210 Cambie Street, Vancouver
monthly
paid within forty-five days.
9
Failure to
monthly
pay
wages
semi-
Fined $25 ;   arrears ordered, $304.70.
10
pay
Fine waived; arrears ordered,
$152.77;   in  lieu of non-payment
monthly
Magistrate  ordered  goods   and
chattels   seized   to   the   value   of
arrears.
11
Failure to
monthly
pay
wages
semi-
Fine waived; arrears ordered,
$175.89 ;   in lieu of non-payment
Magistrate ordered goods and
chattels   seized   to   the   value   of
arrears.
12.
Lloyd Jordan, Edgewood
Failure to
monthly
pay
wages
semi-
Fine waived; arrears ordered,
$344.27; in lieu of non-payment
Magistrate ordered goods and
chattels seized to the value of
arrears. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "—Continued.
H 57
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
13. Lloyd Jordan, Edgewood .
14. Lloyd Jordan, Edgewood .
15. Lloyd Jordan, Edgewood
16. Lloyd Jordan, Edgewood
17. Lloyd Jordan, Edgewood
18. Lloyd Jordan, Edgewood .
19. Lloyd Jordan, Edgewood .
20. Fred Konkin, Crescent Valley
21. Kitsilano Machine & Tool Co. and Argo
Pins, Ltd. (W. C. Whitherly and
W. J. Mesco), 1867 First Avenue
West, Vancouver
22. Kitsilano Machine & Tool Co. and Argo
Pins, Ltd. (W. C. Whitherly and
W. J. Mesco), 1867 First Avenue
West, Vancouver
23. J.   R.   Morrison    (Superior   Refrigera
tion), 135 First Street West, North
Vancouver
24. Eric   Oldaker,   416   Vancouver   Street,
Victoria
25. Ray Storey  (Logging), Willow Point....
26. Ray Storey  (Logging), Willow Point....
27. Worlcombe Island Co., Ltd., Vancouver
28. Worlcombe Island Co., Ltd., Vancouver
29. Worlcombe Island Co., Ltd., Vancouver
30. Worlcombe Island Co., Ltd., Vancouver
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure  to  pay  wages  semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Fine waived; arrears ordered,
$145.69 ; in lieu of non-payment
Magistrate ordered goods and
chattels seized to the value of
arrears.
Fine waived; arrears ordered,
$275.59 ; in lieu of non-payment
Magistrate ordered goods and
chattels seized to the value of
arrears.
Fine waived; arrears ordered,
$149.18 ; in lieu of non-payment
Magistrate ordered goods and
chattels seized to the value of
arrears.
Fine waived; arrears ordered,
$150 ; in lieu of non-payment
Magistrate ordered goods and
chattels seized to the value of
arrears.
Fine waived; arrears ordered,
$150; in lieu of non-payment
Magistrate ordered goods and
chattels seized to the value of
arrears.
Fine waived; arrears ordered,
$181.10 ; in lieu of non-payment
Magistrate ordered goods and
chattels seized to the value of
arrears.
Fine waived; arrears ordered,
$151.50 ; in lieu of non-payment
Magistrate ordered goods and
chattels seized to the value of
arrears.
Fined $25 ;   arrears ordered, $144.50.
Fined $25 ; arrears ordered, $545.17 ;
given thirty day to pay; in default, distress, three months.
Found guilty; arrears ordered,
$78.92 ; in default, fifteen days in
gaol.
Convicted; suspended sentence for
one year on defendant's own recognizance ; to post $100; bond
forfeited if wages not paid by
May 17th, 1948; arrears ordered,
$30.
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $140.
Fined $25 ;   arrears ordered, $85.
Fined $25 ;   arrears ordered, $58.
Fined  $25 ;   arrears ordered,   $200 ;
in default, one month.
Joint charge;   case dismissed.
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs ; arrears
ordered, $275.63 ; in default, forty
days in gaol.
Suspended sentence; arrears ordered, $275 ; in default, forty days
in gaol. H 58
department of labour.
" Factories Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1. Zacks,  Ltd., 2085 Main Street, Vancou
ver
2. Zacks,  Ltd., 2085 Main Street, Vancou
ver
Operated factory before the hour
of 7 o'clock in the forenoon
Operated factory after the hour
of 7 o'clock in the afternoon
Fined $50 and $3.75 costs; in default, duress.
Fined $50 and $3.75 costs ; in default, duress.
SPECIAL LICENCES.
Provision is made in the majority of the Orders of the Board for a graduated scale
of wages that apply to inexperienced employees for whose employment permits in
writing have been obtained from the Board. In the majority of cases there is a six
months' learning period for inexperienced employees, during which period they receive
periodic increases until at the expiration of the learning period they are qualified for
the minimum wage payable to experienced employees. During the year 1948 there
was a considerable decrease in the number of special licences issued by the Department,
compared with those issued during 1946 and 1947. The following table shows the
number of licences issued in the various lines of work in 1948, 1947, 1946, and 1945:—
1948.
1947.
1946.
1945.
1
10
17
81
66
61
190
2
6
34
245
173
231
357
21
218
272
270
345
153
6
16
Office.         	
26
43
Manufacturing	
125
427
1,067
1,258
CONCLUSION.
Before concluding this report, the Board would like to express its appreciation to
all those persons who have assisted the Board in its work during the year and extend
to the officials of the Department and the employers and employees of the Province
its thanks for their co-operation during the year 1948.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
James Thomson, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
J. A. Ward Bell.
H. Douglas.
The statistics of trades and industries provided in the preceding pages were
compiled by Harold V. Bassett, Bureau of Economics and Statistics. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 59
APPENDIX.
(Compiled August 31st, 1949.)
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO " MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
APPRENTICES INDENTURED UNDER THE "APPRENTICESHIP ACT."
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 2 (1946).*
Effective July 1st, 1946.
Minimum wages fixed by any Order of the Board shall not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act."
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 2A (1947).
AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND GASOLINE SERVICE-STATION INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 6 (1948).
Effective May 1st, 1948.
"Automotive repair and gasoline service-station industry " means all operations in the
construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, overhaul, painting, or reconditioning of any
vehicle powered by an internal-combustion engine, or any part thereof, and the business of
operating retail gasoline service-stations, gasoline-pumps, or outlets where gasoline is offered
for sale at retail, including services and undertakings incidental thereto.
"Automotive mechanic " means any employee doing the work usually done by journeymen,
and without restricting the generality of the foregoing, the work of mechanics, machinists,
metal-men, painters, electricians, radiator-men, battery-men, body-men, forgers, vulcanizers,
trimmers, and welders.
" Other employees" means all other employees, except automobile salesmen, office
employees, watchmen, and janitors.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every employee in the automotive repair
and gasoline service-station industry, except automobile salesmen, office employees, watchmen,
and janitors.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
90c.
44
(See note (7) re
Daily Guarantee.)
Employees classified under  section  7  of the " Male Minimum  Wage
Rate as set in permit
44
Act"  or section  6  of the " Female  Minimum  Wage  Act"  for
whose  employment permits  in  writing have been  issued by the
Board
Overtime:    Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
Time and one-half of
and 44 hours in week  (permits required from the Board to work
the    employee's
overtime)
regular  rate  of
pay.
Note.— (1)  Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Employees working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to section
5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the employee has completed
the hours so established:
(b) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the "Hours of Work Act" pursuant to
the provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay. H 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(10) See Order No. 2  (1946)  re apprentices.
(11) See Order No. 11   (1949)   re rest periods.
(12) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum  Wage Act"  section numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia,  1948."
BAKING INDUSTRY.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 17 (1942).
Effective July 20th, 1942, superseding Order No. 17.
" Baking industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of bread,
biscuits, cakes, doughnuts, pies, and similar products.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—
21 years of age and over	
Under 18 years of age	
18 years and under 19 years	
19 years and under 20 years	
20 years and under 21 years	
At least 85% of employees to get not less than.
48c.
24c.
30c.
36c.
42c.
48c.
44
44
44
44
44
44
Note.— (1)  See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Delivery salesmen (see Transportation Order).
(3) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
BARBERING.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 42 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 194-6, superseding Order No. &2.
" Occupation of barbering " means the work of persons engaged in the shaving of the
face or cutting or trimming or singeing of the hair or beard for hire, gain, or hope of
reward, or in connection with any of the foregoing the shampooing or massaging or the
treating of the head or face.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
Rate.
Hours.
Class A employees	
Class B employees	
Employees classified under section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act
working under permit	
$25.00 a week
65c. per hour
(See note (2) re
daily guarantee.)
As prescribed in
the permit
40-44 per week.
Less than 40 per
week.
Not more than 44
per week.
Note.— (1)   Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to
a call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " section number referred to in this Order is as it appears in the " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 61
BOX-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 55 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 55 (1943).
" Box-manufacturing industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the
purpose of making wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel staves and heads, kegs, casks,
tierces, pails, and other wooden containers.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the
box-manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Rate payable to at least 80% of total employees	
Rate payable to balance,  20%   (inclusive of employees in  respect of
whom a permit in writing has been obtained)	
Employees classified under section  7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act *'  and section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act " for
whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime:    Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
or 44 hours in week   (permits to be obtained from the Board to
work such overtime)
50c.
40c.
Rate as prescribed in
permit
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
44
44
44
Note.— (1)   Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of
Work Act":
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of sections 5 and 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " until the employee has completed the
hours so established.
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Every employer shall post and keep posted in a conspicuous place in his establishment:—
(a) Copy of this Order:
(b) A schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his
employees.
(4) Records of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English language of
names, ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The "Male Minimum Wage Act" and "Female Minimum Wage Act"  section  numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
BUS-DRIVERS.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 70.
Effective March 18th, 1940, superseding Order No. 31.
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which
service a charge is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
60c.
66c.
90c.
40 to 50.
Less than 40.
In excess of 9 hours
in any one day or
50 hours in any one
week.
Note.— (1)  See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(2)   "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order   (1946),  July 1st,  1946. H 62
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
BUS-DRIVERS.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 70a.
Effective June 27th, 1940.
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of
a bus-driver while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by
a bus-driver from the time he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty
until he returns again to his employer's headquarters or garage where he originally reported
for duty; and shall include the time occupied by a bus-driver in dead-heading from his
employer's headquarters or garage to the place where he is to take charge of the bus and
vice versa; but the minimum wage shall not apply to waiting time of a bus-driver when
occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads.
BUS-DRIVERS.*
Female Minimum Wage Order No.
Effective September 28th, 1942.
76.
" Bus-driver " means every female employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with
seating accommodation for more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the
public, for which service a charge is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point Grey
which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City of
Vancouver;   the City of New Westminster;   the Corporation of
The Township of Richmond;   the Municipality of the District of
Burnaby;   Municipality of the District of West Vancouver;   the
City of North Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver . ..
60c.
66c.
40 to 48.
Less than 40.
Note.— (1)   See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(2) Employees required by employer to wait on call shall be paid for waiting time.
(3) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Rest period of 24 consecutive hours from midnight to midnight in each calendar week shall be given to
employees.
(5) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
CARPENTRY TRADE.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 58 (1947).
Effective August 4th, 1947, superseding Orders Nos. 58, 65, 66, 72, 73.
" Carpentry trade " means and includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of any new building or structure or part thereof,
and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any existing building or structure or part
thereof.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
90c.
44
Note.— (1)  See Order No. 2  (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work, or employees covered by another
Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(3) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay after 8 hours per day and 44 hours per week.    Permits
to be obtained from the Board to work such overtime.
(5) Copy of Order to be posted.
(6) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(7) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(8) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 63
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 68 (1947).
Effective May 15th, 1947, superseding Order No. 68 (1943).
"Christmas-tree industry" means all operations in or incidental to the cutting, gathering,
hauling, and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
50c.
44
Note.— (1)  This Order shall not apply to:—
(a)  Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work:
(6)  Employees classified under section 7 of the "Male Minimum Wage Act" or section 6 of the "Female
Minimum Wage Act" for whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board:
(c)  Employees whose employment is determined by the Board to come under the provisions of section 4 of
the " Hours of Work Act."
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each of his employees to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English language of
names, ages, oecupations, and residential addresses of employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" and " Female Minimum Wage Act "  section  numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 12 (1940).
Effective November 28th, 1940, superseding Order No. 12, Order No. 12A,
Order No. 12b, Order No. 45, Order No. 45A, and Order No. 48.
" Construction industry" includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or
demolition of any building, railway, tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway,
road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well, telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of any such work or structure.
Area.
!      !;     ■:
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate,
under 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
The City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point
Grey which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the
City of Vancouver ;   the City of Victoria;   the City of New
Westminster;    the   City   of   Nanaimo;    the   City   of   Prince
Rupert;   the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt;  the
Municipality of the District of Oak Bay;   the Municipality of
the District of Saanich;   Municipality of the District of West
Vancouver;    the   Municipality   of   the   District  of   Burnaby;
54c.
48c.
42c.
36c.
44
44
Note.— (1)  See Order No. 2  (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
♦As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 64 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COOK- AND BUNK-HOUSE OCCUPATION.
(In Unorganized Territory.)
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 4 (1946).
Effective July 8th, 1946.
" Cook- and bunk-house occupation " means any work performed by any male or female
employee in or incidental to operation of any kitchen, dining-room, cook-house, bunk-house, or
recreation-room operated in connection with any industrial undertaking in unorganized territory, and without limiting the generality of the foregoing description means the work of cooks,
dish-washers, waiters, bunk-house and recreation-room attendants, and others employed in a
similar capacity.
Hourly rate:   50c, except to employees working under permit under section 7 of "Male Minimum
Wage Act " or section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act," wage prescribed by permit.
Hours:   Unlimited.
Note.— (1)  Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) No charge or deductions for accidental breakages.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) This Order is not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:-—
Cities.—Alberni, Armstrong, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Fernie,
Grand Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson,
New Westminster, North Vancouver, Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Prince George,
Prince Rupert, Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm, Slocan, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby, Chilliwhack, Coldstream, Coquitlam, Delta, Esquimalt, Fraser Mills, Glenmore, Kent,
Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Mission, North Cowichan, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Peachland,
Penticton, Pitt Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Somas, Summerland, Surrey,
Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry Lake, Creston, Dawson
Creek, Gibsons Landing, Hope, Lake Cowichan, Lytton, McBride, Mission, New Denver, Oliver,
Osoyoos, Parksville, Pouce Coupe, Qualicum Beach, Quesnel, Silverton, Smithers, Stewart, Terrace,
Torino, Vanderhoof, Westview, Williams Lake.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H 65
DRIVERS, SWAMPERS OR HELPERS IN THE TRANSPORTATION
INDUSTRY.*
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 9 (1948).
Effective September 13th, 1948, superseding Parts of Transportation Orders.
" Transportation industry " means:—
(a) The carrying or transporting for reward by motor-vehicle of any goods, wares,
merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the
carrier, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of
goods for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other
than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates;
and
(6) The carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private,  or public vendor
thereof, or dealer therein, but shall not include the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by any wholesale, retail,
private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, by any motor-vehicle of
factory rating of 1,000 lb. or less.
This Order applies to every employer and every male and female employee in the transportation industry, as defined herein, employed as drivers,  swampers or helpers,  except
drivers of vehicles:—
(a) Designed, constructed, and used primarily for transportation therein of passengers ;   and
(6) Employed in the laundry, cleaning, and dyeing industries; the delivery of milk,
bread, non-alcoholic bottled beverages, and His Majesty's mail.
Hourly Rate.
Drivers, swampers or helpers	
Overtime.
Employees working in excess of 8V2 hours in any one day...
Employees working in excess of 11 hours per day	
Employees working in excess of 47 hours in any one week..
75c.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay for
the first 2Vz hours,
or part thereof.
Double the employee's
regular rate of pay.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
Note.— (1)  Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(5) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(6) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime provisions.
(7) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's behalf
shall be in addition to above rates.
(8) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(9) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 9A   (1948). H 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 53 (1949).
Effective January 31st, 1949, superseding Orders Nos. 53 and 54.
Includes every male and female operator and starter.
Ziy2 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 37 H Hours per Week.
$18.00 per week.
50c. per hour.
(See note (5) re daily guarantee.)
Note.— (1)   Full week's board of 21 meals, $4 per week.
(2) Individual meals, 20c. each.
(3) Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(4) Full week's lodging of 7 days, $2 per week.
(5) Employee reporting for work on the call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work,
with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate. Employee commencing work in response
to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at employee's regular rate of pay.
(6) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(9) Employees must be given 32 consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(10) Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted.
(11) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(12) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 18 (1942).
Effective September 21st, 1942, superseding Orders Nos. 18, 18k, 18B, and 18C.
" Stationary steam engineer " means every employee engaged in producing steam in a
steam plant under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of,
or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while under steam-pressure or in motion.
" Special engineer " means holder of a special or temporary certificate. (See " Boiler Inspection Act," section 28 (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
60c.
48c.
44
44
Note.— (1)  Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the "Hours of Work Act,'* 44 hours per
week may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(2) For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(3) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 48 cents
per hour.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 67
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 39 (1948).
Effective May Slst, 1948.
" First-aid attendant" means every employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid
attendant who is in possession of an industrial first-aid certificate and is designated by his
employer as the first-aid attendant in charge, pursuant to the provisions of the " Workmen's
Compensation Act " of British Columbia.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
75 c.
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
Time and one-half of
the    employee's
regular rate of pay.
44
Overtime:   First-aid attendants working in excess of 8 hours in any
one day and 44 hours in week  (permits required from the Board
to work overtime)
Note.— (1)  Overtime rates of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) First-aid attendants working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant
to section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the first-aid
attendant has completed the hours so established:
(b) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act" pursuant to
the provisions of section 4 of the said Act:
(c) First-aid attendants while employed making shingle-bolts, or as emergency fire-fighters, or regularly
employe^ as boom-men or boat-men; and first-aid attendants covered by the Order of the Board
establishing a minimum wage in the cook- and bunk-house occupation in unorganized territory.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employees reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and dai!y guarantee provisions.
(9) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any other occupation in which the first-aid attendant is
employed in addition to his first-aid duties, such first-aid attendant shall be paid the higher minimum wage so fixed.
(10) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
a/ttendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the office of a medical practitioner, hospital, or other
destination.
(11) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(12) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
FISHING INDUSTRY.*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 78.
Effective May 3rd, 194-3, superseding Order in Effect since February 28th, 1920.
" Fishing industry" means the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing,
preserving, canning, drying, curing, smoking, packing, labelling and reconditioning of containers, or otherwise adapting for sale or use or for shipment any kind of fish or shell-fish.
Hourly Rate.
40c.
40c. thereafter.
Note.— (1)  Above rates do not apply to employees engaged in heading and filling.
(2) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age below  40c.
per hour.
(3) Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(4) Employees shall not be employed more than 8 hours a day or 44 hours a week except under permit from
the Board.
(5) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(6) See Order No. 11   (1949)  re rest periods.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 46 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 4-6 (194-2).
11 Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the
purpose of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Hours.
June 1st to November 30th, inclusive.
Rate payable to at least 90% of female employees	
Rate payable to balance of female employees	
Overtime...	
December 1st to May Slat, inclusive.
Rate payable to at least 90% of female employees	
Rate payable to balance of female employees	
Overtime   (permits  required to work  overtime  during  this
period)
40c.
(Daily minimum, $1.20)
35c.
(Daily minimum, $1.05)
Time and one-half regular rate
Double regular rate	
9 to 11, inclusive.
Over 11.
40c.
(Daily minimum, $1.20)
35c.
(Daily minimum, $1.05)
Time and one-half regular rate
In excess of 8 daily
and 44 weekly.
Note.— (1)  After 5 hours' continuous employment, employees shall have 1 hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted during period December 1st to May 31st.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 4,7 (1942).
" Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the
purpose of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Hours.
June 1st to November SOth, inclusive.
Rate payable to at least 85% of male employees	
Rate payable to balance of male employees	
Overtime	
December 1st to May 31st, inclusive.
Rate payable to at least 85% of male employees	
Rate payable to balance of male employees	
Overtime   (permits   required  to  work  overtime  during  this
period)
48c.
(Daily minimum, $1.44)
38c.
(Daily minimum, $1.14)
Time and one-half regular rate
9 to 11 inclusive.
Double regular rate	
Over 11.
48c.
8
(Daily minimum, $1.44)
38c.
8
(Daily minimum, $1.14)
Time and one-half regular rate
In excess of 8
and 44 weekly.
daily
Note.— (1) After 5 hours' continuous employment, employees shall have 1 hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2) Order does not apply to employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their
work or to persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined by section 4 of the " Hours of
Work Act."
(3) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Copy of Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted during period December 1st to May 31st.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47a (1946). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 69
GRASS-DEHYDRATION INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 14 (1949).
Effective June 2nd, 1949.
" Grass-dehydration industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the
purpose of dehydrating or processing grasses, clovers, and alfalfa.
Rate.
All  employees,   except those  classified  under section  7  of the  " Male
Minimum   Wage  Act"  and  section   6  of  the   " Female Minimum
Wage Act "
Employees   classified  under  section   7   of  the   " Male  Minimum   Wage
Act" and section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act "
Overtime  (permits required to work overtime during this period) —
(a)  April 1st to September 30th, inclusive	
60c. per hour.
(See note (1) re daily guarantee.)
The wage or rate of pay
permit.
irescribed in the
(b)  October 1st in each year to March 31st, inclusive, in the following year
Time and one-half the employee's regular
rate of pay for hours worked in excess
of 8 in the day and 48 in the week.
Time and one-half the employee's regular
rate of pay for hours worked in excess
of 8 in the day and 44 in the week.
Note.— (1) Employees reporting for work on the call of the employer to be paid for the entire period spent at
the place of work, with a guarantee of 2 hours* pay at the employee's regular rate if the employee does not commence work and 4 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate if the employee commences work.
(2) Order does not apply to employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(3) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours
of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of
Work Act " until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(4) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(5) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) See Order No. 11  (1949)  re rest periods.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. H 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
OCCUPATION OF HAIRDRESSING.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 27 (1947).
Effective May 12th, 1947, superseding Order No. 27, partially, etc.
" Occupation of hairdressing " means the work of persons engaged in cutting, dressing,
dyeing, tinting, curling, waving, permanent waving, cleansing, bleaching, or other work upon
the hair of any person, the removal of superfluous hair, and all work in connection with the
giving of facials and scalp treatments, manicuring, and other work in hairdressing as defined
and interpreted in the " Hairdressers Act." It shall not include the work of any person the
duties of whose occupation or profession require any act of hairdressing to be performed as
incidental thereto, nor the work of barbers as defined in the " Barbers Act."
" Class A employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of
40 hours or more.
" Class B employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of
less than 40 hours.
" Learner " means only a male or female employee of any age for whose employment a
permit in writing has been issued by the Board who becomes employed in the occupation of
hairdressing at a time when the employee has had less than six months' experience in that
occupation.
Rate.
Hours.
Class A employees-
Class B employees...
$20.00 per week
50c. per hour
(See note (1) re
daily guarantee.)
40-44 per week.
Less than 40
per week.
Learners
any Age) .
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$15.00 per week 1st 3 months.
17,50 per week 2nd 3 months.
37J/2C. per hour  1st 3 months.
44c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
(Permits to be obtained from the Board for learners to be employed at above rates.)
Rate.
Hours.
Employees  classified under section  7 of the  " Male Minimum Wage
Wage-rate as set
40-44 per week.
Act"  or  section  6  of the   " Female Minimum Wage  Act"  for
out in permit
whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime:    Employees working in excess of 9 hours in one day and
Time and one-half of
44 hours in week
the regular rate of
pay.
Note.— (1)   Employees if called to work by the employer shall be paid not less in any one day than an amount
equal to 2 hours' pay if called to work and not put to work, nor less than 4 hours' pay if put to work.
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Employees  to  get  one-half hour  free  from  duty  between  the hours   of   11   o'clock  in   the  forenoon  and
2 o'clock in the afternoon, to commence not later than 1.30 p.m.
(4) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of employees to be posted.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act "  and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 71
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY.*
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 52 (1938).
" Hotel and catering industry " means the work of male and female employees employed
in:—■
(a) Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for
which a charge is made:
(b) Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets,
banquet-halls, ice-cream parlours, soda-fountains, hospitals, sanatoriums, nursing homes, clubs, dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or
commercial establishments or office buildings or schools, or any similar place
where food is cooked, prepared, or served, for which a charge is made,—
whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or in connection with any other business.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 8 months' experience in the industry,
working under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
Class A employees-
Class B employees..
$18.00 per week
45c. per hour
(See note (6) re
daily guarantee.)
40-44 per week.
Less than 40
per week.
Learners (any Age).
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$12.00 per week for 1st 2 months.
14.00 per week for 2nd 2 months.
16.00 per week for 3rd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st 2 months.
35c. per hour for 2nd 2 months.
40c. per hour for 3rd 2 months.
45c. per hour thereafter.
(See note (6) re daily guarantee.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Rate.
Hours.
Employees classified under section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
or section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act " working under
permit
Wage set in
permit
Not more than 44
per week.
Note.— (1)  Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week except:—
(a)  When authorized by the Board or by section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act ":
(6) In cases of emergency which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome:—
Not more than 10 in the day or 48 in the week.
(2) Split shifts to be confined within 12 hours of commencing work.     ("Hours of Work Act" provision.)
(3) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in
the week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to
section 5 or 11 of "Hours of Work Act" until he has completed hours so established.
(4) Night-work.—Employment between 1.30 a.m. and 6 a.m. to be continuous. Working shifts not to start or
finish between these hours.
This does not apply to employees:—
(a) In hospitals, sanatoriums, and nursing homes residing on the premises:
(&)  In catering where exemption has been granted in writing by the Board:
(c)  On Christmas Day and New Year's Day and any other days declared to be exempt by the Board.
(5) Rest Period.—32 consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved
by the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
(6) Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a
call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52a (1947). H 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
(7) Board or Lodging.—For meals partaken of or accommodation used by employee, not more than the following
deductions to be made from employee's wages:—
(a) Full week's board of 21 meals, $4 per week:
(6)  Individual meals, 20c. each:
(c)  Full week's lodging for 7 days, $2 per week.
(8) Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
(9) Uniforms.—See Order No. 3  (1946)  relating to uniforms.
(10) Rest-rooms, Toilet and Wash-room Facilities.—To be provided by employers for use of employees.
(11) Order does not apply to:—
(a) Graduate nurses with certificate of completed training:
(b) Student-nurses in training in approved school of nursing, as defined by sections 22 and 23 of "Registered Nurses Act":
(c) Students employed in a school where enrolled:
(d) Pages as far as wages are concerned:
(e) Employees covered by another specific Order of the Board.
(12) Copy of Order to be posted.
(13) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(14) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(15) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(16) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(17) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act "  section numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
RESORT HOTELS IN HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY IN UNORGANIZED
TERRITORY DURING THE SUMMER SEASON.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52a (1946).
Effective June 15th to September 15th, inclusive, each Year.
" Resort hotel" means  any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or
lodging are furnished to the general public for which a charge is made.
" Summer season," that part of each year from June 15th to September 15th, inclusive.
Hours.—Not more than 10 in any one day nor 52 in any one week.
Overtime.—One and one-half times regular rate of pay for all hours in excess of 44 in any one week.
Rest Period.—24 consecutive hours each calendar week, un.ess in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by the Board on joint application of employer and employee.
Variation of Order No. 52 (1946).—All provisions of Order No. 52 (1946) apply except those relating to hours
of work and rest period.
Note.— (1)   Order to be posted.
(2) Order not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities.—Alberni, Armstrong, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Fernie,
Grand Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson,
New Westminster, North Vancouver, Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Prince George, Prince
Rupert, Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm, Slocan, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby, Chilliwhack, Coldstream, Coquitlam, Delta, Esquimalt, Fraser Mills, Glenmore, Kent,
Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Mission, North Cowichan, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Peachland,
Penticton, Pitt Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Sumas, Summerland,
Surrey, Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry Lake, Creston, Dawson
Creek, Gibsons Landing, Hope, Lake Cowichan, Lytton, McBride, Mission, New Denver, Oliver,
Osoyoos, Parksville, Pouce Coupe, Qualicum Beach, Quesnel, Silverton, Smithers, Stewart, Terrace,
Tofino, Vanderhoof, Westview, Williams Lake.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPOET OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 73
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 51 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 51 (1937).
" Household-furniture manufacturing" means the manufacture of kitchen furniture,
dining-room furniture, bedroom furniture, living-room furniture, hall furniture, and other
articles of household furniture customarily manufactured in a furniture factory.
" Learner " means, only, a male or female employee of any age for whose employment a
permit in writing has been issued by the Board who becomes employed in the household-
furniture manufacturing industry at a time when the employee has had less than 6 months'
experience as an employee in that industry.
This Order shall apply to every employer and every male and female employee in the
household-furniture manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of
the Board specifically defining their work.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
50c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
50c.
44
Rate payable to balance of employees—
Learners  (any age), not inclusive of apprentices  (under section 6
of " Female Minimum Wage Act " or section 7 of " Male
Minimum Wage Act ") —
44
44
Third 2 months	
44
44
(Permits to be obtained from the Board for employees working at learners' rates.)
Employees   classified   under   section   6   of   " Female  Minimum   Wage
Wage   prescribed   in
44
Act " and section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act"
permit
Overtime:   Employees working in excess of 8 hours in one day or 44
One  and  one-half
hours in week   (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
times  regular  rate
such overtime)
of pay.
Note.— (1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to
hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act" until the
employee has completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted in the establishment.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his
employees.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." H 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
JANITORS.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 43 (1942).
Effective September 21st, 1942, superseding Orders Nos. 43, 43k, and 43~&.
_ 1. " Janitor" means and includes every person employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner,
janitor-fireman, or janitor-engineer.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, 45c. per hour.
3. (a)   Resident janitor in apartment buildings of 4 residential suites and under, 45c.
per hour.
(b)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:-
5 residential suites, $32.40 per month
6 residential suites, $36.00 per month
7 residential suites, $39.60 per month
8 residential suites, $43.20 per month
9 residential suites, $46.80 per month
10 residential suites, $50.40 per month
11 residential suites, $54.00 per month
12 residential suites, $57.60 per month
13 residential suites, $61.20 per month
14 residential suites, $64.80 per month
15 residential suites, $68.64 per month
16 residential suites, $72.60 per month
17 residential suites, $76.56 per month
18 residential suites, $80.52 per month
19 residential suites, $84.48 per month
20 residential suites, $88.44 per month
21 residential suites, $92.40 per month
22 residential suites, $96.36 per month
23 residential suites, $99.00 per month
24 residential suites, $101.64 per month;
25 residential suites, $104.28 per month;
26 residential suites, $106.92 per month;
27 residential suites, $109.56 per month;
29 residential suites, $114.84 per month
30 residential suites, $117.48 per month
31 residential suites, $120.12 per month
32 residential suites, $122.76 per month
33 residential suites, $125.40 per month
34 residential suites, $128.04 per month
35 residential suites, $130.68 per month
36 residential suites, $133.32 per month
37 residential suites, $135.96 per month
38 residential suites, $138.60 per month
39 residential suites, $141.24 per month
40 residential suites, $143.88 per month
41 residential suites, $146.52 per month
42 residential suites, $149.16 per month
43 residential suites, $151.80 per month
44 residential suites, $154.44 per month
45 residential suites, $157.08 per month
46 residential suites, $159.72 per month
47 residential suites, $162.36 per month
48 residential suites, $165.00 per month
49 residential suites, $165.00 per month
50 residential suites, $165.00 per month
over 50 residential suites, $165.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $112.20 per month;
(c) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one
shall be designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll,
and shall be paid according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident
janitors, each janitor so designated and recorded must be paid at the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid 45c. per hour for each hour
worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for 2 rooms
and bathroom, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted
exceed $25 per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a) In any apartment building containing 20 residential suites and over, every janitor
shall be given 24 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6) In any apartment building containing not more than 19 and not less than 12 residential suites, every janitor shall be given 8 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar
week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's
family) shall be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the
provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the
tenants, the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this
Order.
Note.— (1)  In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building, the suite occupied by the
janitor shall not be included.
(2) Order does not apply to janitors employed in one-room school-houses.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim1 Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 75
JANITRESSES.*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 44 (1942).
Effective September 21st, 1942, superseding Orders Nos. 44, 44a, and 443.
1. " Janitress " means and includes every person employed as janitress, janitress-cleaner,
or janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, 45c. per hour.
3. (a)   Resident janitress in apartment buildings of 4 residential suites and under, 45c.
per hour.
(6) Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:-
5 residential suites, $32.40 per month
6 residential suites, $36.00 per month
7 residential suites, $39.60 per month
8 residential suites, $43.20 per month
9 residential suites, $46.80 per month
10 residential suites, $50.40 per month
11 residential suites, $54.00 per month
12 residential suites, $57.60 per month
13 residential suites, $61.20 per month
14 residential suites, $64.80 per month
15 residential suites, $68.64 per month
16 residential suites, $72.60 per month
17 residential suites, $76.56 per month
18 residential suites, $80.52 per month
19 residential suites, $84.48 per month
20 residential suites, $88.44 per month
21 residential suites, $92.40 per month
22 residential suites, $96.36 per month
23 residential suites, $99.00 per month
24 residential suites, $101.64 per month;
25 residential suites, $104.28 per month;
26 residential suites, $106.92 per month
27 residential suites, $109.56 per month;
29 residential suites, $114.84 per month
30 residential suites, $117.48 per month
31 residential suites, $120.12 per month
32 residential suites, $122.76 per month
33 residential suites, $125.40 per month
34 residential suites, $128.04 per month
35 residential suites, $130.68 per month
36 residential suites, $133.32 per month
37 residential suites, $135.96 per month
38 residential suites, $138.60 per month
39 residential suites, $141.24 per month
40 residential suites, $143.88 per month
41 residential suites, $146.52 per month
42 residential suites, $149.16 per month
43 residential suites, $151.80 per month
44 residential suites, $154.44 per month
45 residential suites, $157.08 per month
46 residential suites, $159.72 per month
47 residential suites, $162.36 per month
48 residential suites, $165.00 per month
49 residential suites, $165.00 per month
50 residential suites, $165.00 per month
over 50 residential suites, $165.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $112.20 per month;
(c) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one
shall be designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll,
and shall be paid according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident
janitresses, each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in
clause (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid 45c. per hour for each
hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for 2 rooms
and bathroom, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted
exceed $25 per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a) In any apartment building containing 20 residential suites and over, every
janitress shall be given 24 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6) In any apartment building containing not more than 19 and not less than 12 residential suites, every janitress shall be given 8 consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's
family) shall be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the
provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the
tenants, the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this
Order.
Note.— (1)   In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building, the suite occupied by the
janitress shall not be included.
(2) Order does not apply to janitresses employed in one-room school-houses.
(3) See Order No. 11   (1949)   re rest periods.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
LAUNDRY, CLEANING AND DYEING INDUSTRIES.*
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 74 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 74-
" Learner " means an employee of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the
industry, working under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
40c. per hour
(See note (4) re
daily guarantee.)
31c. per hour
34c. per hour
37c. per hour
40c. per hour
Learners, any age—
44 per week.
]
Third 2 months	
44 per wee.
J
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act"
or section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act" working under
permit
Wage set in permit
Not more than 44
per week.
Note.—-(1) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by
section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in
the week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to
section 5 or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
(3) Rest Period.—32 consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved
by the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.    See also Order No. 11   (1949).
(4) Payment of Wages.—-At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a
call, 4-hour daily guarantee, except on Saturday when 3-hour daily guarantee applies. Daily guarantee may be
varied by written permission of the Board.
(5) Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
(6) Copy of Order to be posted.
(7) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(8) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(9) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 74a   (1948). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 77
LOGGING INDUSTRY/11
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 1 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 194-7, superseding Order No. 1 (194.3),
" Logging industry " means all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging;
pole, tie, shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to
hauling, driving, fluming, rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props,
and piles.
This Order shall apply to every employer and every male employee in the logging industry except:—
(a) Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their
work.
(6) Watchmen or caretakers employed in logging camps in which operations are
suspended.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Male employees	
According  to  official  scale of measurement,  and such rate  or  price
shall be paid pro rata, according to the hours worked, to each and
every   person   so   engaged   under   a   contract   or   agreement   for
making shingle-bolts ;   that is, felling, bucking, splitting, and piling
Employees  classified under section  7  of the  " Male Minimum Wage
Act" in respect of whom permits in writing have been issued by
the Board
Overtime:   Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week  (permits must be obtained from the Board
to work such overtime)
60c.
$2.00 per cord
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half
of the employee's
regular rate of pay.
44
44
Note.— (1)   Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a)  Persons holding positions of supervision  or management as defined in  section  4 of the  " Hours  of
Work Act."
Persons making shingle-bolts.
Employees engaged exclusively in the transportation of men and supplies.
Persons regularly employed as boom-men and boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
Persons engaged in operating light plants in logging camps   (Order Id  (1948)).
(o)  Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " until the employee has completed the hours
so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule  setting  out the  daily  shifts  and   intervals   free  from  duty  of  each  occupational group   of  his
employees.
(5) Record   of  wages   and   daily  hours   of  employees   to  be   kept,   together   with   register   in   English   of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " section number referred to in this Order is as it appears in the " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
♦As amended by Male Minimum Wage Order No. Id  (1948).
LOGGING INDUSTRY.
Charge for Board and Lodging—Male Minimum Wage Order No. 28a (1947).
Effective July 24th, 194-7, superseding Order No. 28.
This Order rescinds Order No. 28 of the Board fixing a maximum price to be charged
for board and lodging in the logging and sawmill industry in certain parts of the Province
of British Columbia, as set out in the said Order No. 28. H 78
DEPARTMENT  OF LABOUR.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 25 (1948).
Effective August 12th, 1948, superseding Order No. 25 (1947).
" Manufacturing industry " means the work of employees engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts
of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity.
" Learner" means employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the
industry working under permit from the Board.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the
manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically
defining their work.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Experienced employees	
Learners (any age) —
40c.
31c.
34c.
37c.
40c.
(See    note     (7)     re
Daily Guarantee.)
44
44
44
Third 2 months	
44
44
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 7 of tbe " Male Minimum Wage
Act" or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for
whose employment permits in writing have been issued by the
Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work
overtime)
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half
of the employee's
regular rate of pay.
44
Note.— (1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to
hours of work established pursuant to section 5 or 11 of the "Hours of Work Act" until the employee has
completed the hours so established ; or to persons exempted from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of
Work Act " pursuant to the provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his
employees to be posted in his establishment.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a
call, 4-hour daily guarantee at employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, Board may vary daily guarantee and overtime provisions.
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(10) See Order No. 11   (1949)  re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 79
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 59.
Effective October 20th, 1938, superseding Order No. 38.
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or)  retail trade,
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
21 years of age and over.
21 years of age and over.
Minimum rate per day....
$18.00 per week
48c. per hour
$1.92 per day.
37% to 44 hours per week.
If less than 37% hours.
Males under 21 Years of Age.
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
$7.20 per week	
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
19 and under 20
20 and under 21
Thereafter
18c.
24c.
30c.
36c.
42c.
48c.
72c.
96c.
$1.20
1 44
1.68
1.92
Beginners and those recommencing, 18 Years and under 21, to whom Permits have been
issued by the Board, under Section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
24c.
30c.
42c.
96c.
12.00 per week, 2nd 12 months	
$1.20
1.68
Thereafter $18.00 per week.
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, -whose work does not exceed 6
days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
not less than ,	
36c.
Males 21 Years and under 24.
Inexperienced and partly inexperienced, to whom Permits have been granted, under
Section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37 % Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate. Daily Minimum.
$10.80 per week,  1st 6 months..
13.20 per week, 2nd 6 months..
15.60 per week, 3rd 6 months...
Thereafter $18.00 per week.
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
30c.
36c.
42c.
$1.20
1.44
1.68
Note.— (1)   Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers, employed in wholesale and   (or)   retail establishments, shall be
paid at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26.
(2) Employees must be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every 7 days.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" section number referred to in this Order is as it appears in the " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 80
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 24 (1946).
Effective August 5th, 1946, superseding Order No. 24.
" Mercantile industry " means the work carried on in establishments operated for the
purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
" Class A employees," those working from 39 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 39 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry,
working under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
Class A employees-
Class B employees..
$17.00 a week
45c. an hour
(See note (3) re
daily guarantee.)
39-44 per week.
Less than 39 per week.
Learneks
any Age).
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$11.00 per week  1st 2 months.
13.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
15.00 per week 3rd 2 months.
17.00 per week thereafter.
30c. per hour 1st 2 months.
35c. per hour 2nd 2 months.
40c. per hour 3rd 2 months.
45c. per hour thereafter.
(See note (3) re daily guarantee.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Note.— (1)  Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by
section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in
the week.- This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5 or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until she has completed hours so established.
(3) Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly. Employee reporting for work on call of employer
and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay.
Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of
Class B employees.
(4) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.    See also Order No. 11   (1949).
(5) See Order No. 3  (1946)  re uniforms.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 81
OFFICE OCCUPATION.
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 34 (1948).
Effective September 13th, 1948, superseding Order No. 34 (1946).
" Office occupation " means the work of females employed as stenographers; bookkeepers;
typists; billing clerks; filing-clerks; cashiers; cash-girls; checkers; invoicers; comptometer
operators; auditors; attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices, and
the work of females employed in all kinds of clerical work.
" Class A employees," those working from 36 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 36 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 4 months' experience in the industry,
working under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
Class A employees..
Class B employees..
$18.00 a week
50c. an hour
(See note (4) re
daily guarantee.)
36-44 per week.
Less than 36 per week.
Learners
(any Age).
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$14.00 per week   1st 2 months.
16.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
40c. per hour 1st 2 months.
45c. per hour 2nd 2 months.
50c. per hour thereafter.
(See note (4) re daily guarantee.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Note.— (1)   Order does not apply to employees who hold positions of supervision or management, so long as the
duties performed by them are of a supervisory or managerial character.
(2) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section
5 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(3) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in
the week, or in excess of hours authorized by the Board.
(4) Reporting on Call.—Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at
place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour
daily guarantee at employee's regular rate.
(5) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.    See also Order No. 11   (1949).
(6) Uniforms.—See Order No. 3   (1946).
(7) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the daily guarantee and overtime provisions.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 71.
Effective June 1st, 194-0.
" Painting", decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters,
decorators, and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration,
remodelling, or renovation of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
Rate per Hour.
City of Vancouver, including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, City of North
Vancouver, District of North Vancouver	
90c.
Note.— (1) See Order No. 2  (1946)  re apprentices.
(2) Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(3) All wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order   (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 75.
Effective June 2nd, 194-1.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters,
decorators, and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration,
remodelling, or renovation of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Rate per Hour.
Land  Districts  of  Victoria,   Lake,   North   Saanich,   South   Saanich,   Esquimalt,   Highland,
Metchosin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew	
90c.
Note.— (1)  See Order No. 2  (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(3) All wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
♦As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order   (1946), July 1st, 1946.
PATROLMEN.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 69.
Effective February 5th, 1940.
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes
to watch or patrol the premises of more than one person for the purpose of guarding or
protecting persons or property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman" means an employee (not covered by any other Order of the Board)
employed by a private patrol agency.
Hourly rate  42c.
Note.— (1)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(3) Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.    See also Order No. 3.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
♦As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OP DEPUTY JtlNISTER, 1948.
H 83
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 5 (1947).
Effective August 25th, 1947, superseding Orders Nos. 27, 27A, 27B, 27T>.
" Personal service occupation " means the work of persons engaged in massaging and
physiotherapy as denned in the " Physiotherapists' and Massage Practitioners' Act," chiropody, chiropractic, osteopathy, electrical treatments, general and specialized therapeutics, and
all work of a like nature.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
$20.00 per week
50c. per hour
(See note (1) re
daily guarantee.)
The wage or rate of
pay   prescribed   in
the permit.
40-44
Class B employees	
Employees classified under section  7  of the  " Male Minimum Wage
Act"  or  section   6  of the  "Female  Minimum  Wage Act"  for
whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Less than 40 hours
per week.
Note.— (1)   If called to work and not put to work, employee shall be paid for not less than 2 hours at the
employee's regular rate of pay, and if put to work, for not less than 4 hours at employee's regular rate.
(2) Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 8 in a day or 44 in
a week, or hours authorized by the Board.
(3) This Order does not apply to:—
(a)  Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work:
(6)  A graduate nurse who is in possession of a certificate showing she has completed a course of training
in general nursing provided in a hospital and who is employed as a nurse:
(c)   A student-nurse in training in an approved school of nursing as denned by sections 22 and 23 of the
" Registered Nurses Act " of British Columbia.
(4) Copy of Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) Regarding uniforms, see Order No. 3  (1946).
(9) See Order No. 11   (1949), re rest periods.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." H 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PLUMBING AND PIPE-FITTING TRADE.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 13 (1949).
Effective July 25th, 1949.
" Plumbing  and  pipe-fitting  trade"  means  and  includes  all  work  usually  done  by
plumbers and pipe-fitters.
Rate.
Hours.
$1.00 per hour
(See note (4) re
daily guarantee.)
Rate of pay prescribed in the permit
Employees  classified under section  7 of the
Act"
1 Male Minimum Wage
44 per week.
8 per day.
44 per week.
Note.— (1)   Order does not apply to:-—■
(a)   Employees who are permanently employed on maintenance-work, etc.;   and
(6)  Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half the employee's regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 8 in
the day and 44 in the week.     (Permits shall be obtained from the Board to work such overtime.)
(3) Overtime rate of pay does not apply to:—
(a) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act " pursuant to
the provisions of section 4 of the said Act:
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the
employee has completed the hours so established.
(4) An employee reporting for work on the call of an employer shall be paid bis regular rate of pay for
the entire period spent at the place of work in response to the call, with a minimum of 2 hours' pay at the
employee's regular rate.
(5) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(6) Copy of Order and schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(7) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(8) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(9) See Order No. 2   (1946)  re apprentices.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT, ETC.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 67 (1948).
Effective September 13th, 1948, superseding Public Places of Amusement Order.
" Class A employee " means an employee whose working-week consists of 40 hours or
more.
" Class B employee " means an employee whose working-week consists of less than 40
hours.
" Learner " means an employee for whose employment a permit in writing has been
issued by the Board.
This Order applies to all persons employed in or about the following places to which
a charge for admission or service is made to the public:—
(a) Indoor  Or  outdoor theatres  and  dance-halls  or  dance-pavilions,  music-halls
concert-rooms, lecture-halls  (excluding in every instance players and artists) ;
and
(6)  Shooting-galleries,  bowling-alleys,  billiard-parlours   and  pool-rooms,  ice-rinks,
roller-rinks, amusement parks, golf-courses, sports grounds and arenas;  afid
(c) Swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions and dressing-rooms, bathing-beaches, steam
baths;   and
(d) Veterinary hospitals and establishments or offices where general and special
therapeutics is performed:
(e) Parking-lots, auto camps, shoe-shine establishments, and boat liveries.
This Order does not apply to:—
(a)  Employees included in any other Order of the Board:
(6)  Persons employed as caddies on or about golf-courses;  and
(c)  Persons employed exclusively as watchmen.
Rate.
Weekly Hours.
$18.00 a week
45c. per hour
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
40-44
Less than 40.
Learners.
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$14.00 per week 1st 2 months.
16.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
35c. per hour during 1st 2 months.
40c. per hour during 2nd 2 months.
45c. per hour thereafter.
(See note  (7)   re daily guarantee.)
Hourly Rate.
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act" or section 6 of the
" Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment permits in writing have been
issued by the Board
Overtime:   Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and 44 hours in week
(permits required from the Board to work overtime)
Rate as set in permit.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
Note.— (1)   Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:
(a)  Employees working under arrangements wit
provisions of section 6  (a)  of this Order unt
(6)  Persons holding positions of supervision or m
as the duties performed by him are of a sup
mine whether or not the position held by an:
as to bring him within the scope of this par
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-moi
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employ*
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay.    Employee commenc
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary th
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(10) See Order No. 11   (1949)   re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Mi
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of B
h respect to hours  of work establ
il the employee has completed the h
anagement or employed in a confide
Brvisory or managerial character.
t person or the capacity in which r
igraph.
ithly.
free from duty to be posted.
be kept, together with register in
es.
to be paid for entire period spent i
ing work in response to a call, 3-hc
e overtime and daily guarantee pro
nimum Wage Act" section numbe
ritish Columbia, 1948."
shed pursuant to the
ours so established:
ntial capacity, so long
The Board may deter-
e is employed is such
English of the names,
it place of work, with
ur daily guarantee at
visions.
rs referred to in this H 86
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
RADIO-BROADCAST TECHNICIANS.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 8 (1948).
Effective September 13th, 1948.
" Radio-broadcast technician " means any employee engaged in the installation, operation,
or maintenance of radio-broadcast equipment, including television, voice and facsimile, or
any rebroadcast apparatus by means of which electricity is applied in the transmission or
transference, production, or reproduction of voice and sound, including records, transcriptions, wire or tape recording, and vision, with or without ethereal aid, including the cutting
or processing, or both the cutting and processing, of records and transcription.
This Order applies to all radio-broadcast technicians and their employers, except operators of record-playing or transmitting and receiving communications equipment in establishments other than radio-broadcast stations.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
80c.
(See note (7) re
44
daily guarantee.)
Employees classified under section  7 of the  " Male Minimum Wage
Rate as set in permit
44
Act"  or  section   6   of the  " Female  Minimum  Wage  Act"  for
whose employment permits  in  writing  have been  issued  by the
Board
Overtime:    Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
Time and one-half of
and 44 hours in week   (permits required from the Board to work
the employee's reg
overtime)
ular rate of pay.
Note.— (1)   Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Radio-broadcast technicians working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established
pursuant to the provisions of section 5 (a) of this Order until the radio-broadcast technician has
completed the hours so established:
(b) Radio-broadcast technicians holding positions of supervision or management or employed in a confidential capacity, so long as the duties performed by them are of a supervisory or managerial character.
The Board may determine whether or not the position held by any person or the capacity in which he
is employed is such as to bring him within the scope of this paragraph.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 2 re apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act."
(10) See Order No. 11   (1949)  re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 87
RADIO TECHNICIANS.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 7 (1948).
Effective May 31st, 1948.
" Radio technician " means any employee engaged in:—
(a)  The  designing,  repairing,  adjusting,  and  installing  of  radio  and  electronic
equipment, including  home radio  receivers,  record-playing apparatus,  public-
address and audio-amplifier systems, and industrial electronic equipment;   and
(6)  The designing, repairing, and maintenance of long- and short-wave and ultrahigh frequency receiving and transmitting equipment.
This Order shall apply to all radio technicians and their employers, except persons
employed as radio technicians in radio-broadcast stations.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Radio technicians	
,     80c.
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
44
Employees classified under  section  7 of the  " Male Minimum Wage
Rate of pay pre
44
Act"  or  section   6  of the  " Female  Minimum   Wage  Act"  for
scribed in permit
whose employment  permits  in  writing have been   issued by the
Board
Overtime:    Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
Time and one-half of
and 44 hours in week   (permits required from the Board to work
the employee's reg
overtime)
ular rate of pay.
Note.— (1)   Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to :—
(a)  Radio technicians working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to
section 5 or section 11 (3)   or section 11 (4)  of the "Hours of Work Act" until the radio technician
has completed the hours so established:
(6)  Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the "Hours of Work Act" pursuant to
the provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 2  (1946) re apprentices.
(10) See Order No. 11   (1949)  re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
REST PERIODS.
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 11 (1949).
Effective March 28th, 1949.
This Order applies to every employer and to every female employee in every industry,
business, trade, and occupation to which the " Female Minimum Wage Act" applies.
Every employer shall allow every female employee at least one-half hour period free from
duty after not more than five (5) consecutive hours' employment, provided that if an employee
is given a rest period of not less than ten (10) minutes within the five (5) consecutive hours'
employment, the time within which the one-half hour period free from duty shall be given
may be exceeded by not more than one (1) hour.
Copy of Order to be posted. H 88
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SAWMILL INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 50 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 50 (1943).
" Sawmill industry " means all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills,
veneer-mills, lath-mills, and (or) planing-mills.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male employee in the sawmill
industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their
work.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Rate payable to at least 90% of total	
Rate   payable   to   balance   of   employees    (inclusive   of   employees   in
respect of whom a permit has been obtained under section 7 of
" Male Minimum Wage Act ")   not less than	
Employees classified under  section  7 of the  " Male Minimum Wage
Act " for whose employment permits in writing have been issued
by the Board
Overtime:   Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or
44 hours in week  (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
such overtime)
50c.
40c.
Rate as set out in
permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
44
Note.— (1)   Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of Work
Act."
Persons regularly employed as boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " or Regulation No. 2 made under the said
Act until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of employees
to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of ages, names,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order are as they appear in the " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 89
SHEET-METAL TRADE.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 10 (1948).
Effective September 18th, 19U8.
" Sheet-metal trade " means and includes all work usually done by journeymen in connection with:—
(a) The fabrication or installation, or both the fabrication and installation, of
gravity or forced air heating, or conditioned-air installation;   or
(b) The fabrication or erection, or both the fabrication and erection, or installation
of any sheet-metal work in connection with any residential, commercial, or
industrial building, plant, or establishment, or ship, boat, or barge.
This Order applies to every employer and every employee in the sheet-metal trade, except
employees employed in the production-line or assembly-line manufacture of sheet-metal
products for resale.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Employees in sheet-metal trade-
Employees  classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " for whose employment permits in writing have been issued
by the Board
Overtime:    Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week  (permits required from the Board to work
overtime)
$1.00
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
Rate as set in permit.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
' Hours of Work Act" pursuant to
Note.— (1)   Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the
the provisions of section 4 of the said Act:
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the
employee has completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 2   (1946)  re apprentices.
(10)  "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" section number referred to in this Order is as it appears in the " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." H 90
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SHINGLE INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 62 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 62 (1943) and Order No. 77 (1943).
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacturing of wooden
shingles or shakes.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles of shingles, understood and accepted
as a standard by the industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936 issued by the
National Research Council of Canada.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the
shingle industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining
their work.
Per Square.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Sawyers—
No. 1 shingles ,
Lower grade than No. 1 shingles	
Packers, all grades	
Other employees not included in any other Order
of the Board	
30c.
24c.
18c.
50c.
50c.
50c.
50c.
44
44
44
44
(Employees packing or sawing shingles on any other basis than by the square shall be paid on the
same proportionate basis.)
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Employees  classified under section  7  of the  " Male Minimum Wage
Rate as set out in
44
Act"  or section   6   of the  " Female  Minimum  Wage Act"  for
permit
whose employment permits  in  writing have been  issued  by the
Board
Overtime:    Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
Time and one-half of
and 44 hours in week  (permits to be obtained from the Board to
the employee's reg
work such overtime)
ular rate of pay.
Note.— (1)   Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a)  Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of Work
Act."
Persons regularly employed as boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
(6)  Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the "Hours of Work Act" or Regulation No. 2 made under the said
Act until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule  setting  out  the  daily  shifts   and  intervals   free  from  duty  of  each  occupational  group   of   his
employees to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations,
and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this
Order are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." EEPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 91
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 20 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 20.
" Ship-building industry" means all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, painting, cleaning, preserving, reconditioning, putting on or taking
off the ways, or dry-docking of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Rate.
Hours.
Employees doing the work usually done by journeymen, and without
restricting  the  generality  of the   foregoing,   the  work  of  shipwrights,  joiners, boat-builders,  caulkers, painters,  fitters, electricians, machinists, boilermakers, plumbers and steam-fitters, blacksmiths, sheet-metal workers, welders, hoistmen, engineers, riggers,
90c. per hour
60c. per hour
45c. per hour
Rate set in permit
|   8 per day.
1 44 per week.
{"   8 per day.
When   90%   of total number  of  employees   (exclusive  of  indentured
apprentices) are paid not less than the 90c. or 60c. per hour rate,
1 44 per week.
(   8 per day.
Employees classified under section 6 of the Act working under permits
1 44 per week.
(   8 per day.
1 44 per week.
Note.— (1) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or
by section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in
the week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to
section 5 or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
(3) Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Copy of Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) See Order No. 2   (1946)   re apprentices.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
t,        TAXICAB-DRIVERS.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 33 (1940).
Effective October 10th, 1940, superseding Order No. 33, Order No. 33A, and
Order No. 33B.
" Taxicab-driver " means every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with
seating accommodation for seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Working-hours.
All ages
$3.30
9 per day.
50 per week.
Note.— (1)  Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1046), July 1st, 1946. H 92
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TAXICAB-DRIVERS.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 60.
Effective November 17th, 1938.
" Taxicab-driver " means every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with
seating accommodation for seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or operated for hire.
Area.
D rivers.
Daily Rate.
Less than 10
Hours per Day.
Daily
Minimum.
Working-
hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich..
All ages
$3.60
42c. per hour
$1.68 per day
9 per day.
50 per week.
Note.— (1)   Permits shall be obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours
can be paid 42c. per hour.
(2) Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 54c. per hour.
(3) Drivers shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every 7 days.
(5) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION.*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 79.
Effective April 16th, 1945, superseding Order effective April 5th, 1920.
" Telephone and telegraph occupation " means the work of all persons employed in connection with the operating of the various instruments, switch-boards, and other mechanical
appliances used in connection with telephony and telegraphy.
Rate.
Maximum Hours.
Employees, any age—
$1.80 per day
2.52 per day
2.76 per day
3.00 per day
3.36 per day
]
8 per day.
Note.— (1)   Part-time employees' wages shall be prorated.
(2) Employees required to report for work to receive at least 3 hours' pay per day.
(3) In emergencies employees may work up to 56 hours per week, with one and one-half times their regular
rate of pay for hours in excess of 48.
(4) Where employees reside on employers' premises, an arrangement may be made for employees to answer
emergency calls between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m., subject to approval in writing by the Board.
(5) Working-hours shall be confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of work.
(6) Every employee shall have a rest period of 24 consecutive hours in each calendar week.
(7) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(8) Where hours of work in bona-fide trade-union agreements differ from those prescribed by the Order, the
Board may, in its discretion, exempt in writing the union and the employer from sections in the Order pertaining
to hours, to the extent mentioned in the exemption.
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(10) See Order No. 11   (1949) re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
•As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 93
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 26 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940, and Male
Minimum Wage Order No. 26a (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
Superseding Order No. 26, Order No. 26B, and Order No. 26C.
(This Order does not apply to employees covered by Order No. 9 (1948) of the Board.)
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or
transporting for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods,
wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the
carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than
the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 50
54c.
48c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
42c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 48
36c.
30c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 48
24c.
20c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
42c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 50
54c.
48c.
(1) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net weight or over, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Hourly rate	
(2) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than 2,000 lb. net weight, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, and operators of motorcycles with wheeled attachments, exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
Hourly rate	
(3) Operators of motor-cycles with not more than two wheels and
without wheeled attachment
Hourly rate	
(4) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery
or messenger work (e)
Hourly rate	
(5) Swampers and helpers	
Hourly rate	
(6) Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than those covered by section 7 hereof
Hourly rate	
(7) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in
the retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
Note.— (1)   This Order does not apply to drivers, swampers or helpers covered by Order No. 9   (1948)   of the
Board  (see Order No. 26c  (1948).
(2) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's behalf
shall be in addition to above rates.
(3) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(4) Milk-delivery men may work 15 hours in excess of 44 per week, provided not more than 10 hours are
worked in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(5) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 59.
(6) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 94
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY.*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 26b.
Effective August 18th, 1941.
(This Order does not apply to employees covered by Order No. 9 (1948) of the Board.)
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or
transporting for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods,
wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the
carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than
the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1)
Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000  lb.  net weight or over,  as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Less than 40
54c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
36c.
Less than 40
24c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
54c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
(2)
Operators of motor-vehicles of less than 2,000 lb. net weight, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in sections 3 and 7 hereof
40 and not more
than 50
42c
(3)
Operators  of motor-cycles with not more than  two wheels  and
without wheeled attachment
40 and not more
than 48
30 c.
(4)
Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery
or messenger work
40 and not more
than 48
20c.
(5)
than 50
42c.
(6)
Drivers of horse-drawn  vehicles other than  those covered by section 7 hereof
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
(7)
Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in
the retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
Note.— (1)  This Order does not apply to drivers, swampers or helpers covered by Order No. 9  (1948)   of the
Board   (see Order No. 26c  (1948).
(2) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's behalf
shall be in addition to above rates.
(3) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(4) Milk-delivery employees may work 15 hours in excess of 44 per week, provided not more than 10 hours are
worked in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(5) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(6) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(7) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 26c (1948).
Effective September 13th, 1948.
This Order amends Orders Nos. 26 (1940) and 26b by deleting from the application of
those Orders employees in the transportation industry to whom Order No. 9 (1948) applies. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 95
COST AND UPKEEP OF UNIFORMS.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 3 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946.
1. Applies to every employer and to every male and female employee in every industry,
business, trade, and occupation to which the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts apply.
2. (1) Subject to the provisions of subsection (2), when an employee is required to wear
a uniform or special article of wearing-apparel, it shall be furnished, cleaned, laundered, or
repaired free of cost to employee by employer.
(2) Where employer and employee make written application to the Board, the Board
may give written approval to a different arrangement regarding uniforms.
WOOD-WORKING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 49 (1947),
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 4,9 (1943).
" Wood-working industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of manufacturing sash and doors, cabinets, show-cases, office and store furniture and
fixtures, wood furnishings, plywood, veneer products, and general mill-work products.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the
wood-working industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically
defining their work.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Rate payable to at least 85% of total	
Rate payable to balance of employees (inclusive of employees in respect
of whom a permit has been obtained under section 7 of " Male
Minimum Wage Act " or section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage
Act ")   not less than	
Employees classified under section 7 of "Male Minimum Wage Act"
and section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or
44 hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
such overtime)
40c.
Rate as set out in
permit
Time and one-half
of the employee's
regular rate of pay.
44
44
Note.— (1)   Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a)  Persons  holding positions of supervision  or management as defined in  section  4  of the  " Hours of
Work Act."
(6)  Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " until the employee has completed the hours
so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts  and intervals  free from  duty of each occupational group  of his
employees.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations,
and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act     and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
Note.—The minimum wage-rates provided in the Summary of Orders include the
20-per-cent. increase provided in General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946) wherever it applies. H 96
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
GENERAL INTERIM MINIMUM WAGE ORDER  (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946.
I. That this Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee
in every industry, business, trade, or occupation covered by the following orders, namely:—
Order
No.
Industry.
Date of Order.
Minimum
Wage
Act.
17 (1942)
♦55 (1943)
70
76
*58
•65
•66
*72
*73
*68
12 (1940)
*S3
*54
18 (1942)
•39 (1940)
78
*51
43 (1942)
44 (1942)
* 1 (1943)
*25 (1942)
*24
59
75
71
69
•27
*67
•50 (1943)
*62 (1943)
*77 (1943)
33 (1940)
60
79
t26 (1940)
t26B
•49 (1943)
Baking	
Box-manufacture	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Saltspring Island).
Bus-drivers	
Carpentry (Vancouver and District)	
Carpentry (Kootenay Area)	
Carpentry (Victoria and District)	
Carpentry (Alberni)	
Carpentry (Nanaimo)	
Christmas-trees	
Construction ,
Elevator Operators	
Elevator Operators	
Engineers, Stationary Steam	
First-aid Attendants ,
Fishing	
Household Furniture	
Janitors	
Janitresses	
Logging	
Manufacturing	
Mercantile	
Mercantile	
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers   (southerly portion of
Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers (Vancouver and District)
Patrolmen	
Personal Service	
Public Places of Amusement	
Sawmills .	
Shingle	
July 15, 1942	
July 14, 1943	
March 12, 1940	
September 21, 1942..
September 15, 1938..
June 23, 1939	
August 16, 1939	
May 14, 1940	
May 14, 1940	
August 31, 1939	
November 26, 1940...
February 28, 1938	
February 28, 1938	
September 9, 1942	
October 8, 1940	
April 14, 1943	
November 17, 1937....
September 9, 1942	
September 9, 1942	
July 14, 1943	
October 15, 1942	
May 29, 1935	
October 12, 1938	
April 22, 1941	
Shingle	
Taxicab-drivers	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity).,
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Wood-working	
April 26, 1940	
January 19, 1940	
August 29, 1935	
August 31, 1939	
June 25, 1943	
July 23, 1943	
July 23, 1943	
October 8, 1940	
November 15, 1938..
March 13, 1945	
October 8, 1940	
August 12, 1941	
July 14, 1943	
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female,
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
2. That on and after the 1st day of July, 1946, all minimum wage-rates fixed by the
orders of the Board, as set out in section 1 of this Order, are hereby increased by adding
thereto 20 per cent, of such minimum wage-rates.
3. That the orders as set out in section 1 of this Order are varied accordingly.
4. That this Order, made by the Board at Victoria, B.C., on the 25th day of June, 1946,
and published in The British Columbia Gazette on the 27th day of June, 1946, shall take
effect on the 1st day of July, 1946.
* Orders revised after July 1st, 1946.
t Orders Nos. 26 (1940) and 26b have been revised in part.    See Order No. 26c (1948) and Order No. 9 (1948). REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 194S.
H 97
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders in effect at August 31st, 1949 :—
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
Effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
41
2 (1946)
2a (1947)
6 (1948)
17 (1942)
42 (1946)
55 (1947)
76
70
70a
58 (1947)
68 (1947)
12 (1940)
4 (1946)
9 (1948)
9a (1948)
53 (1949)
18 (1942)
39 (1948)
78
46 (1946)
47 (1946)
47a (1946)
14 (1949)
27 (1947)
52 (1946)
52a (1946)
52a (1947)
52b (1948)
51 (1947)
43 (1942)
44 (1942)
74 (1946)
74a (1948)
1 (1947)
ID (1948)
28a (1947)
25 (1948)
24 (1946)
24a (1947)
59
34 (1948)
75
71
69
5 (1947)
13 (1949)
67 (1948)
8 (1948)
7 (1948)
11 (1949)
50 (1947)
10 (1948)
62 (1947)
20 (1946)
33 (1940)
60
60a
79
26 (1940)
26a (1940)
26b
26c (1948)
3 (1946)
49 (1947)
Apprentices, Indentured	
Apprentices, Indentured	
Apprentices, Indentured	
Automotive Repair and Gasoline Service-
station
Baking	
Barbering	
Box-manufacturing	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver and Vicinity)	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Carpentry...	
Christmas-tree	
Construction	
Cook- and Bunk-house Occupation (in
Unorganized Territory)
Drivers, Swampers, or Helpers in Transportation Industry as denned
Drivers, Swampers, or Helpers in Transportation Industry as denned
Elevator Operators	
Engineers, Stationary Steam	
First-aid Attendants	
Fishing	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
General Interim Minimum Wage Order
(1946)
Grass Dehydration	
Hairdressing	
Hotel and Catering	
Hotel and Catering (Resort Hotels) (Unorganized Territory)
Hotel and Catering	
Hotel and Catering	
Household Furniture	
Janitors	
Janitresses	
Laundry, Cleaning, and Dyeing	
Laundry, Cleaning, and Dyeing	
Logging	
Logging	
Logging (Board)	
Manufacturing	
Mercantile	
Mercantile	
Mercantile	
Office Occupation	
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(Southerly Portion Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(Vancouver and District)
Patrolmen	
Personal Service	
Plumbing and Pipe-fitting	
Public Places of Amusement, etc	
Radio-broadcast Technicians	
Radio Technicians	
Rest Periods	
Sawmills	
Sheet-metal Trade	
Shingle	
Ship-building	
Taxicab-drivers	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity) —
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)....
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Uniforms, Cost and Upkeep of	
Wood-working	
Feb. 3/37—
June 19/46
Nov. 24/47.
Apr. 16/48.
July 15/42-
June 19/46.
Jan. 16/47..
Sept. 21/42
Mar. 12/40.
June 21/40.
July 29/47..
May 9/47—
Nov. 26/40.
June 26/46
Aug. 3/48..
Dec. 3/48...
Jan. 10/49.
Sept. 9/42..
May 20/48..
Apr. 14/43.
June 25/46
June 25/46
Apr. 18/47.
June 25/46
May 26/49..
May 2/47—
June 19/46.
June 26/46
Nov. 24/47.
Apr. 26/48.
Jan. 16/47.
Sept. 9/42..
Sept. 9/42..
June 25/46.
Nov. 25/48.
Jan. 16/47..
June 4/48...
July 15/47.
Aug. 3/48..
July 11/46.
May 1/47...
Oct. 12/38..
Aug. 3/48...
Apr. 22/41.
Apr. 26/40.
Jan. 19/40.
Aug. 15/47.
June 16/49.
Aug. 3/48...
Aug. 3/48...
May 20/48..
Feb. 16/49.
Jan. 16/47.
Aug. 3/48...
Jan. 16/47.
June 19/46.
Oct. 8/40....
Nov. 15/38.
Oct. 8/40—
Mar. 13/45.
Oct. 8/40—
Nov. 26/40.
Aug. 12/41.
Aug. 3/48...
June 19/46.
Jan. 16/47.
Feb. 11/37..
June 27/46.
Nov. 27/47.
Apr. 22/48.
July 16/42..
June 27/46.
Jan. 23/47..
Sept. 24/42
Mar. 14/40.
June 27/40.
July 31/47..
May 15/47..
Nov. 28/40.
July 4/46....
Aug. 12/48.
Dec. 9/48....
Jan. 20/49..
Sept. 17/42
May 27/48..
Apr. 22/43.
June 27/46.
June 27/46.
Apr. 24/47.
June 27/46.
June 2/49...
May 8/47....
June 27/46.
July 4/46—
Nov. 27/47.
Apr. 29/48.
Jan. 23/47..
Sept. 17/42
Sept. 17/42
June 27/46.
Dec. 2/48—
Jan. 23/47..
June 10/48.
July 31/47..
Aug. 12/48.
July 18/46..
May 8/47—
Oct. 20/38-
Aug.12/48-
Apr. 24/41.
May 2/40....
Jan. 25/40..
Aug. 21/47.
June 23/49.
Aug. 12/48.
Aug. 12/48.
May 27/48..
Feb. 24/49..
Jan.23/47-
Aug. 12/48.
Jan. 23/47..
June 27/46.
Oct. 10/40..
Nov. 17/38.
Oct. 10/40..
Mar. 15/45.
Oct. 10/40..
Nov. 28/40.
Aug. 14/41.
Aug. 12/48.
June 27/46.
Jan. 23/47.
Feb. 11/37	
July 1/46	
Dec. 1/47	
May 1/48	
July 20/42	
July 1/46	
Feb. 1/47	
Sept. 28/42	
Mar. 18/40	
June 27/40	
Aug. 4/47	
May 15/47	
Nov. 28/40	
July 8/46	
Sept. 13/48	
Dec. 9/48	
Jan.31/49	
Sept. 21/42	
May 31/48.	
May 3/43	
July 1/46	
July 1/46	
Apr. 24/47	
July 1/46	
June 2/49	
May 12/47	
July 1/46	
July 15 to Sept.
15 each year
Dec. 1/47	
Apr. 29/48	
Feb. 1/47	
Sept. 21/42	
Sept. 21/42	
July 1/46	
Dec. 2/48	
Feb. 1/47	
June 10/48	
July 24/47	
Aug. 12/48	
Aug. 5/46	
May 8/47	
Oct. 20/38	
Sept. 13/48	
June 2/41	
June 1/40	
Feb. 5/40	
Aug. 25/47	
July 25/49	
Sept. 13/48	
Sept. 13/48	
May 31/48	
Mar. 28/49	
Feb. 1/47	
Sept. 13/48	
Feb. 1/47	
July 1/46	
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 17/38	
Oct. 10/40	
Apr. 16/45	
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 28/40	
Aug. 18/41	
Sept. 13/48	
July 1/46	
Feb. 1/47	
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
I Female.
1 Female.
Male and
Male and
Male and
Male.
Female.
Male and
Male and
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Maleand
Male.
Maleand
Maleand
Male and
Female.
Male.
Male.
Maleand
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male and
Maleand
Maleand
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
4 H 98 DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
"HOURS OF WORK ACT."
(AND AS AMENDED BY INTERIM AMENDMENTS  (1946), EFFECTIVE JULY 1ST, 1946.)
Section 3.—" Subject to the exceptions provided by or under this Act,
the working-hours of an employee in any industrial undertaking shall not
exceed eight in the day and forty-four in the week."
B
E IT KNOWN that the Board of Industrial Relations has made the following regulations,
namely:—
Note.—Regulation 1 cancelled by Regulation 30.    Cancellation effective October 31st, 1945.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may
work a total of 44 hours each week in five nights, in lieu of 44 hours each week in six nights,
but the number of hours worked in any night must not exceed 9.
Logging.
3. Persons employed in:—
(1) The logging industry in:—
(a)  Booming operations;   or
(6)  Transporting logs by logging-railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or river-
driving ;  or
(c) Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d) The occupation of boatman;
(e) The occupation of emergency fire-fighters:
Fish-canning.
(2) Canning fish or manufacturing by-products from fish, but not those engaged  in
salting fish;  and in
Cook- and Bunk-houses.
(3) Cook-and bunk-houses in connection with any industrial undertaking in unorganized
territory,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed by section 3 of the said Act.
Engineers, Operators, Firemen, and Oilers or Greasers.
4b. In all industrial undertakings which use steam, gasoline, or diesel engines, or electric
energy as motive power and which are operated with a single shift of engineers or operators,
firemen, and oilers or greasers, the engineers or operators, firemen, and oilers or greasers
may work overtime to the extent of one hour per day to perform preparatory or complementary work in addition to the maximum hours of work prescribed by section 3, or established pursuant to section 5, 11 (3), or 11 (4) of the Act, with effect from the 13th day of
January, 1949.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 11th day of January, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 13th, 1949.)
Note.—Regulation 5 cancelled by 5a, October 9th, 1947.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons employed
in shipyards, engineering-works, machine-shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal works,
belt-works, saw-works, and plants of a like nature may work such hours in addition to the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the said Act as (but not more than) may be necessary
to prevent serious loss to, or interruption in the operation of, the industrial undertaking for
which the repairs are being made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture of wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables may work during the months of June, July,
August, and September in each year such hours in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3
of the said Act as may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent orders.
Note.—Regulation 8 cancelled by 8a, February 13th, 1936.
Note.—Regulation 9 cancelled by 9a, September 26th, 1940.
Seasonal Lithographing.
10. During the months of May, June, July, August, September, and October in each year
persons employed in the lithographing industry may work such hours in excess of the hours
prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent
orders.    This exemption shall only apply when sufficient competent help is not available. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H 99
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by the Board by the granting of written temporary exemption permits limiting by their terms the extent thereof, but only upon being
satisfied by application in writing, signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly
authorized, of the urgency and necessity for the exception, that it is of a temporary nature,
and that no other means of adequately overcoming such temporary urgent condition is, or
has been, reasonably available, and that the additional working-hours applied for will not be
more than will suffice for the extra pressure of work requiring the same.
Overtime Record.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in the manner required by subsection (1) of
section 9 of the said Act of all additional hours worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said
Act or in pursuance of any regulation.
12a. Every employer shall furnish the Board with a copy of his pay-roll, or record in
such form prescribed by the Board, showing the hours worked and the nature of the work
performed by his employees in respect of section 6 of the Act, or Regulations Nos. 6 and 11
of the Board, not later than 15 days after such hours have been worked. (Effective
December 12th, 1940.)
13. Every employer shall notify, by means of the posting of notices in conspicuous places
in the works or other suitable place, where the same may readily be seen by all persons
employed by him, the hours at which work begins and ends, and, where work is carried on
by shifts, the hours at which each shift begins and ends; also such rest intervals accorded
during the period of work as are not reckoned as part of the working-hours; these hours
shall be so fixed that the duration of the work shall not exceed the limits prescribed by the
" Hours of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made thereunder, and when so notified
they shall not be changed except upon 24 hours' notice of such change posted as hereinbefore
specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the Act or Regulation 11 above, a like notice of
the change in working-hours shall be posted, which notice shall also state the grounds on
which the exemption was granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia, this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th, 1934.    Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 14.
Occupation of Barbering.
The occupation of barbering is hereby added to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 24th day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd, 1934.    Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15.
Mercantile Industry.
The mercantile industry is hereby added to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained
by Order in Council dated the 7th day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th, 1934.    Effective August 9th, 1934.)
Regulations Nos. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e.
Mercantile Industry.
Note.—Regulation 15e cancelled by Regulation 29, September 30th, 1939. H  100 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Regulations Nos. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, and 16e cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f.
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores.
1. Persons employed in drug-stores as registered apprentices, certified clerks, or licentiates of pharmacy may work not more than 88 hours in any two successive weeks, but in no
case shall the hours of work of any such registered apprentice, certified clerk, or licentiate of
pharmacy exceed 48 hours in any one week, or 9 hours in any one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of
August, 1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th, 1939.    Effective April 6th, 1939.)
REGULATION No. 17.
Baking Industry.
The baking industry, by which expression is meant all operations in or incidental to the
manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or cakes, is hereby added to the Schedule of the
said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said
Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the 6th day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd, 1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 17c.
Baking Industry.
Be it known that, pursuant to and by virtue of the powers and authority vested in the
Board of Industrial Relations by the " Hours of Work Act," the said Board (1) hereby cancels
Regulation No. 17b of the Board, dated the 13th day of November, 1947, such cancellation
being effective as and from the 29th day of December, 1948, and (2) hereby makes the following regulation, to be known as Regulation No. 17c:—
With effect from the 30th day of December, 1948, the working-hours of persons employed
in the baking industry as deliverymen may exceed eight (8) in the day and forty-four (44)
in the week, but, subject to the exceptions provided by or under the said Act, in no case
shall the weekly limit of hours of work prescribed by section 3 of the said Act be exceeded by
more than four (4) hours.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 15th day of December, 1948.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, December 16th, 1948.)
REGULATION No. 18.
Catering Industry.
The catering industry, which includes all operations in or incidental to the preparation or
to the serving, or to both preparation and serving, of meals or refreshments where the meals
or refreshments are served or intended to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-house,
dance-hall, cabaret, banquet-hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunch-room, lunch-counter, ice-cream
parlour, soda-fountain, or in any other place where food is served and a charge is made for the
same either directly or indirectly, whether such charge is made against the persons who
partake of the meals or refreshments or against some other person, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition
to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the 9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on the 1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th, 1934.    Effective December 1st, 1934.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H 101
REGULATION No. 19.
Retail Florists.
Persons employed in the establishments of retail florists may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of the said Act as (but only so many as) shall
be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise
overcome: Provided that the working-hours of such persons shall not exceed 88 hours on the
average in any two successive weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions the decision of the Board shall be final, and
where the Board is of the opinion that, under the provisions of this regulation, the working-
hours limited by section 3 of the Act are being unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written
notification to the management, exclude the employer's establishment from the provisions of
this regulation for such period of time as the Board considers advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th, 1934.    Effective November 15th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 20.
Occupation of Elevator Operator.
The occupation of elevator operator is hereby added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the 15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 28th day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 28th, 1935.    Effective February 28th, 1935.)
Regulations Nos. 21, 2lB, 21c, 21d, 21e, 21f, 21g, 21h, 21j, and 21k cancelled by
REGULATION No. 21m.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The fruit and vegetable industry, which means all operations in establishments operated
for the purpose of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable, is hereby exempt from the operation of the " Hours of Work Act " from June 1st to
November 30th, inclusive, in each year.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 27th, 1946.    Effective July 1st, 1946.)
REGULATION No. 22.
Transportation Industry.
The transportation industry, which includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the
carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than
the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates, is hereby added to
the Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council
dated the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.    Effective June 20th, 1935.) H 102 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REGULATION No. 23.
Transportation Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation the expression " transportation industry " includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles,
or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public
vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any
other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or road transport, for the purpose of being further
transported to some destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage
or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation industry, other than those employed as (a)
operators of motor-cycles, (6) bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on
delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of
milk, are hereby permitted to work 6 hours per week in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934," in accordance with the provisions of Order
No. 26 of the said Board of Industrial Relations dated the 19th day of June, 1935, fixing
minimum wages in the transportation industry: Provided that no such employee in the
transportation industry shall work more than 10 hours in any one day.
3. That employees in the transportation industry employed as drivers of vehicles in the
retail delivery of milk are hereby permitted to work 15 hours per week in excess of the hours
prescribed by section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934 ": Provided that over a period
of seven weeks no such employee shall work more than 350 hours, nor more than 10 hours in
any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.    Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24.
Occupation of Hotel Clerk.
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes the work of all persons engaged as room
clerks (day or night), mail clerks, information clerks, cashiers, book-keepers, accountants,
telephone operators, and any other persons employed in clerical work in hotels, is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in
Council dated the 20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 26th, 1935.    Effective September 26th, 1935.)
Note.—Regulation 26 cancelled by Regulation 30. Cancellation effective October 31st,
1945.
REGULATION No. 28.
Taxicab Industry.
The taxicab industry, which includes the work of all employees in charge of or driving
a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for 7 passengers or less than 7 passengers, used for
the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or operated for hire, is hereby added as
item No. 12 to the Schedule of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in
Council dated the 3rd day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st, 1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H 103
REGULATION No. 28a.
Taxicab Industry.
Persons employed in the taxicab industry, which includes the work of all employees in
charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for 7 passengers or less than 7
passengers, used for the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or operated for hire,
may work 6 hours per week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act,
but in no case shall the daily hours worked by any such employee in the taxicab industry
exceed 9 in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st, 1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.)
NOTE.—The taxicab industry, having been brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is
now subject to the following provision of that Statute:—
" The working-hours of employees working on a split shift shall be confined within 12
hours immediately following commencement of work."
REGULATION No. 29a.
Mercantile Industry.
With effect from the 28th day of February, 1949, persons employed in the mercantile
industry, which includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or)
retail trade in the Province of British Columbia, with the exception of the City of Vancouver,
the City of North Vancouver, the Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the District of Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the Municipality of the Township of
Esquimalt, the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay, the Municipality of the District of
Saanich, and the City of New Westminster, may work 3 hours per day in excess of the limit
prescribed by section 3 of the said Act on Saturday of each week and on the day preceding a
statutory holiday when such statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but the total hours
worked in any one week shall not exceed 44.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 16th day of February, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 24th, 1949.)
REGULATION No. 30.
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
Be it known that, pursuant to and by virtue of the powers and authority vested in the
Board of Industrial Relations by the " Hours of Work Act," the said Board hereby cancels
Regulation No. 1 of the Board, dated the 14th day of June, 1934, and Regulation No. 26 of
the Board, dated the 23rd day of March, 1938, such cancellation to be effective as and from
the 31st day of October, 1945.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th day of September, 1945.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 27th, 1945.)
REGULATION No. 31.
Occupation of Cemetery-workers.
The occupation of cemetery-workers is hereby added to the Schedule to the " Hours of
Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said
Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the 6th day of December, 1946.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 11th day of December, 1946.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 23rd, 1947.) H 104 department of labour.
REGULATION No. 33.
Occupations of Stationary Steam Engineer and Special Engineer.
The occupation of stationary steam engineer, by which expression is meant every
employee engaged in the occupation of producing steam in a steam plant under the authority
of a certificate of competency, as defined by the " Boiler Inspection Act " of the Province of
British Columbia, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while
under steam-pressure or in motion, and the occupation of special engineer, by which expression is meant every employee operating under the authority of a special certificate or a
temporary certificate, as defined by the said " Boiler Inspection Act," are hereby added to the
Schedule to the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the
10th day of October, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 21st day of October, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, October 23rd, 1947.)
REGULATION No. 34.
Occupation of Bartender, Waiter, and Utility Man, within Premises covered by Beer
Licences issued pursuant to the Provisions of Section 28 of the " Government
Liquor Act."
The occupations of bartender, waiter, and utility man, within premises covered by beer
licences issued pursuant to the provisions of section 28 of the " Government Liquor Act," are
hereby added to the Schedule of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in
Council dated the 16th day of September, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 16th day of September, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 18th, 1947.)
REGULATION No. 34d.
Occupation of Bartender, Waiter, and Utility Man, within Premises covered by Beer
Licences issued pursuant to the Provisions of the " Government Liquor Act."
For the period up to and including June 30th, 1950, the working-hours of persons
employed as bartenders, waiters, and utility men working on a split shift, within premises
covered by beer licences issued pursuant to the provisions of the " Government Liquor Act,"
shall be confined within thirteen hours immediately following commencement of work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 29th day of July, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 11th, 1949.)
REGULATION No. 35.
Grass-dehydration Industry.
Persons other than office employees employed in the grass-dehydration industry, which
means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of dehydrating or processing
grasses, clovers, and alfalfa, are hereby exempt from the operation of the " Hours of Work
Act" from April 1st to September 30th, inclusive, in each year.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 26th day of May, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 2nd, 1949.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H 105
REGULATION No. 36.
Logging Industry—Hostlers.
That effective from the 21st day of July, 1949, the working-hours of persons employed
as hostlers, working on a split shift, in the logging industry shall be confined within sixteen
hours immediately following commencement of work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 18th day of July, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, July 21st, 1949.)
" HOURS OF WORK ACT," " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT," AND
" MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
The Board authorizes the following persons, namely:—
The Chairman of the Board of Industrial Relations,
The Chief Administrative Officer,
The Supervisor of the Vancouver office,
The Supervisor of Inspectors in the Interior,—
to issue temporary exemptions to industrial undertakings to deal with exceptional cases of
pressure of work, and to issue permission  in writing allowing the working-hours of any
-employee in an industrial undertaking in such exceptional cases to exceed the limit of 8 hours
a day or 44 hours a week.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 9th, 1947.) H 106
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN.
For a commentary in connection with the " Control of Employment of Children
Act," the reader is referred to the report of the Factory Inspection Department under
the heading " Child Employment."
The Schedule to the Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries for
which permits are required;  these include:-—
(1) Manufacturing industry.
(2) Ship-building industry.
(3) Generation of electricity or motor-power of any kind.
(4) Logging industry.
(5) Construction industry.
(6) Catering industry.
(7) Public places of amusement.
(8) Mercantile industry.
(9) Shoe-shine stands.
(10) Automobile service-stations.
(11) Transportation industry.
The following table contains a summary of permits issued and cancelled from
January 1st to December 31st, 1948, inclusive.
Summary -of Permits issued and cancelled for Year ended December, 31st, 1948.
District.
CO
o
m
a
la
0
H
0
B.S
G3 u
0
IS'3
b
'5
to
0
i-l
b
3
CO    .
c s
0 0
OS
60
#fi
0
at
O
i
fi qj
a
a
§5
o.S
■BJ3
.So
b
0
»'■§
Pit:
fc 0
Eh 0.
■d
^0
«   O
— t)
a X
O tn
E-I.S2
Permits in effect, January
1st, 1948	
234
88
72
34
35
31
268
123
103
36
16
IB
1
1
3
2
1
9
16
16
21
7
6
185
78
61
2
4
11
3
103
268
123
310
263
33
44
343
307
42
46
2
2
2
2
30
26
6
4
243
204
1
3
5
3
12
17
307
343
2
6
2
6
1
2
3
2
6
2
13
8
1
14
8
1
1
3
3
1
7
4
2
8
14
5
1
4
4
9
5
2
2
3
2
4
1
5
8
9
1
2
9
6
4
3
2
3
1
1
11
9
Totals	
660
359
301
108
81
27
768
440
328
103
68
35
3
3
10
9
1
59
45
14
43
17
26
514
271
243
3
3
9
3
6
24
21
3
440
768
Grand totals, permits in effect
328 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H  107
REPORT OF LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD (BRITISH COLUMBIA).
Head Office Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch Office 570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Members of the Board.
J. Pitcairn Hogg, K.C., Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Lieut.-Col. Macgregor F. Macintosh Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
F. W. Smelts, M.B.E 570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
George A. Wilkinson Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Harry Strange 570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Secretary.
H. W. Maisey (to November 30th, 1948) Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Edward A. Jamieson (December 1st, 1948) 570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Chief Executive Officer.
B. H. E. Goult Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Registrar.
N. deW. Lyons Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Senior Conciliation Officer.
W. Fraser 570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Assistant Registrar.
R. G. Clements 570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the first annual report of the Labour Relations Board (British Columbia) for the year ended December 31st, 1948.
Pursuant to the provisions of section 55 of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" (1947, chapter 44; 1948, chapter 31), the Board was appointed by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council January 13th, 1948.
The Board held its first meeting at Victoria on January 19th, 1948, and during the
year ended December 31st, 1948, has held forty-seven full Board meetings (twenty at
Victoria, twenty-seven at Vancouver) lasting one day and, in many cases, two days.
Members of the Board are in attendance at their offices in Victoria or Vancouver each
business day of the year.
In addition to full Board meetings and in order to further expedite the work of
the Board, it was arranged that there shall be a Vancouver Committee of the Board
(two members) and a Victoria Committee (two members and the chairman). These
committees have held 167 meetings. Six of these meetings were held in Kelowna and
Penticton by the Victoria Committee, while an additional meeting was held by that
committee at Youbou. The Board and committees of the Board have, therefore, held
a total of 214 meetings covering 248 days during the year.
The chairman and members of the Board addressed meetings of the following
organizations: Provincial Convention of the Trades and Labour Congress of Canada
(A.F.L.) ; British Columbia Federation of Labour (C.I.O.) ; Victoria and District
Trades and Labour Council (A.F.L.) ; Vancouver Labour Council (C.I.O.) ; Vancouver,
New Westminster and District Trades and Labour Council (A.F.L.) ; Okanagan Trades
and Labour Council (A.F.L.); Canadian Chemical and Explosive Workers' Industrial
Union, Local No. 128, Victoria; Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, Local No. 267; Automotive Maintenance Workers' Federal Union,
Local No. 151, Victoria;   Retail Clerks' Union, No. 279, Victoria;   Newspaper Guild H 108 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Federal Union, Local 219, Victoria; Saanich Municipal Employees' Association, Local
No. 5; British Columbia Cement Workers' Union (United Cement, Lime and Gypsum
Workers' International Union, Local No. 277), Victoria; Federation of Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Unions, Kelowna and Penticton; Penticton Civic Employees' Union;
Kelowna Fire-fighters' Union (British Columbia Provincial Association of Firefighters) ; Provincial Conference of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners
of America; Executive Board of the Bakery and Confectionery Workers' Union, also
regular union meeting of that organization; Sheet Metal Workers' International Association, Local No. 276; City Council, Kelowna; City Council, Penticton; Gyro Club,
Victoria; Free Enterprise Committee of the Vancouver Board of Trade; Executive
Council of the Canadian Manufacturers Association, Vancouver; fourth-year class in
Commerce at University of British Columbia.
Individual members of the Board have held numerous informal meetings with representatives of both labour and industry where immediate attention appeared a matter
of urgency.
The Board has always kept in mind the objects of the Act, which are the promotion
and maintenance of industrial peace. It has given interested parties every opportunity
to appear before the full Board or its committees. As a result of this policy, it is
interesting to note that 639 delegations were heard during the period under review.
These delegations were, for the most part, separately representative of both management and employees. Spokesmen for all interested parties were given every opportunity of making representations to the Board.
Because of conferences of this nature, on many occasions arranged by the Board,
numerous strikes have been averted. Friction and misunderstandings which had developed were dissipated, and eventually, by mutual consent of the parties, amicable settlements of the differences were negotiated.
The Board is therefore happy to report that during 1948 there were only eight
strikes in the whole of the Province. This is a record unequalled in the past seven
years.
The greatest time-loss was caused by a dispute in the coal-mining industry. This
dispute not only affected British Columbia, but the neighbouring Province of Alberta.
Settlement of this dispute depended in the main upon the findings of an arbitration
board which sat in Alberta.
In one instance intervention of the Board saved the Okanagan fruit-packing
industry from a strike at the time when crops were ready for harvest. Thousands
of dollars daily were saved to the producers and the wage-earners as the result of
the Board's mediation.
The Board's efforts along similar lines in the lumber industry in the Interior of
the Province met with the same signal success and prevented immense potential loss.
Additionally, the intervention of the Board at times when conciliation proceedings had
been exhausted averted strikes in the boat-yard, biscuit and confectionery, welding, and
in the wire-fabricating industries.
It is apparent to the Board that there must be reasonable elasticity in dealing with
the many and diverse problems of labour and management.    Cases cannot be disposed
of by hard and fast rules.    It is the Board's policy that each case be dealt with upon its    •
individual merits, that full consideration be given to all the circumstances surrounding
that particular case, and that the decision of the Board be rendered accordingly.
During the year the Board dealt with a total of 1,266 cases. There were 864
applications for certification, of which 670 were granted, 126 rejected, and 68 withdrawn;   109 others were being dealt with at the year's end.
Additionally, there were 33 representative votes conducted, 212 notices of instruction given Conciliation Officers, 90 Conciliation Boards established, 24 prosecutions
instituted, 34 strike votes supervised, 4 grievance procedures instituted, 2 Industrial
Inquiry Commissions established, and 3 referees appointed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H  109
The 212 notices of instructions given Conciliation Officers represent 175 conciliation cases. Sixty-five of these cases were settled by the Conciliation Officers and 81
were referred to Conciliation Boards. Nine cases were terminated at the request of
the parties and 20 cases were outstanding at December 31st.
It will be noted that ninety Boards of Conciliation were established. The discrepancy between this figure and the eighty-one cases referred to Conciliation Boards is
explained by the fact that in two cases (in which more than one employer was involved)
five Conciliation Boards were constituted. In another instance two references to a
Conciliation Officer resulted in the appointment of but one Conciliation Board.
In three instances where Conciliation Boards had been recommended, these Boards
had not been constituted at the year's end. Additionally, the proceedings of nine
Boards were unterminated on December 31st.
Of eighty-one reports submitted, thirty-seven were unanimous. In six instances
it was reported by the chairman on behalf of the Board that a collective agreement had
been signed, while in seven other cases the Boards were made arbitral tribunals by the
mutual consent of the parties* and the awards thus made were conclusive and binding.
An analysis of disputes before Conciliation Boards by predominant causes will be found
following Table III.
Summaries of (I) Cases dealt with, (II) Conciliation, (III) Boards of Conciliation,
(IV) Industrial Disputes, (V) Comparison of Time lost yearly by Industrial Disputes,
(VI) Time-loss by Industry, and Prosecutions follow.
Table I.—Summary of Cases dealt with.
Number of applications dealt with  864
Certifications granted   670
Applications—
Rejected   126
Withdrawn      68
Representative votes conducted  33
Conciliation Officers appointed  212
Conciliation Boards established  90
Prosecutions instituted by Department  24
Grievance procedures provided  4
Strike votes supervised  34.
Industrial Inquiry Commissions  2
Referee appointments -  3 H 110
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TJ   r^ ^. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
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Unanimous   report.    The  Board  recommended
wage increase of 2% cents per hour.
Unanimous report. The Board recommended
that the Master Bakers' agreement be
adopted by the parties to this dispute, effective January 3, 1948.
Unanimous report. The Board recommended
a wage-scale to be incorporated in an agreement to be signed by the parties.
Unanimous report. The Board recommended
wage increases and adjustments to become
part of existing agreement, and a grievance
procedure to be included therein.
Majority report of the Board, employer's nominee dissenting. The Board recommended
wage increases for certain classifications and
a union shop.
Agreement reached between the parties before
meetings of the Board.
Unanimous report of the Board recommending
retroactive  wage  increase  to  and  including
January 1, 1948.
Unanimous report. The Board made recommendations with respect to union security,
weekly guarantee, wage schedule, and job
classifications.
Majority report of the Board, employees' nominee dissenting. The Board recommended that
the International Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers accept the same agreement as negotiated by the Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill
Workers, but that they be allowed to participate in future negotiations between the
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers'
Union and this employer.
Board
reported.
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(2) Union security
(2) Annual holidays
Retroactive   date   of   an
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(1) Union security	
(2) Weekly guarantee
(3) Wage schedule
(4) Job classifications
All   terms   of   collective
agreement
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February 17.—
February 25..-.
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R. K. Gervin (L.)*
Wm. Nodwell (E.)*
R. K. Gervin (L.)
J. D. Ross (E.)
E. S. H. Winn (C)	
M. Bruce (L.)
J. Keen (E.)
E. S. H. Winn fC.K...	
A. Gordon (L.)
S. Farr (E.)
H. P. Wvness (C.)	
R. K. Gervin (L.)
C. I. Cameron (E.)
F. M. Clement fC.)	
C. I. Cameron (L.)
A. Leighton (E.)
J. E. Eades (C.) 	
M. S.Kennedy (L.)
G.S.Miller (E.)
E. S.H.Winn (C.)	
Alex Gordon (L.)
S. G. Collier (E.)
H. A. Beckwith (C.)	
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Vancouver Engineering Works, Ltd.,
Vancouver, and International Association of Machinists, Lodge 692
Montreal Bakery, Vancouver, and Bakery and Confectionery Workers' Union,
Local No. 468
General Construction Co., Ltd., Vancouver, and Amalgamated Building and
Construction Workers of Canada,
Local No. 1
B.C. Electric Railway Co., Ltd., Vancouver and Victoria, and International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers,
Locals. 213 and 230
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co., Vancouver, and Embalmers and Undertakers Assistants' Union, Local No.
23374
Nanaimo Hospital, Nanaimo, and Registered Nurses* Association of B.C.
Pemberton Realty Corporation, Ltd., for
Granville Estates No. 3, Ltd., Pacific
Building, Vancouver, and Building
Service Employees Union, No. 244
Vancouver Motor Dealers' Association
Labour Relations Committee and Vancouver Auto Workers' Lodge, No. 1857
Bloedel,   Stewart   &   Welch,   Ltd.,   Port
Alberni,    and   International   Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local No.
230
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This was an arbitral tribunal pursuant to section 25 (1) of the Act. The Board awarded
15 cents per hour increase across the board
retroactive to January 1, 1948, and prescribed a grievance procedure to be included
in the agreement.
This was an arbitral tribunal pursuant to section 25 (1) of the Act. The Board awarded
15 cents per hour across-the-board increase
to outside employees and a proportionate
increase to inside employees paid on a weekly
basis, both retroactive until January 1, 1948.
Majority report of the Board, employer's nominee dissenting. The Board recommended a
union shop and a scale of minimum wages
to he retroactive until March 6, 1948.
The chairman of the Board reported that a
collective agreement had been entered into
between the parties, dated July 24, 1948.
Majority report of the Board, employer's nominee dissenting. The Board recommended
continuance of the 1947 form of agreement
with a 12%-per-cent. increase in wages across
the board to all classifications.
Majority report of the Board, employer's nominee dissenting. The Board recommended 10
cents per hour increase for all employees
and that the local union be granted a union
shop.
Unanimous report of the Board recommending
equal division of the Government subsidy
between the company and the employees up
to the amount of their requested wage increase. The Board also recommended adoption of an incentive bonus system as soon as
production warranted it.
Board
reported.
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W. J. Scribbens (L.)
A. S. Duncan (E.)
E. S.H.Winn (C.)	
W. J. Scribbens (L.)
A. S. Duncan (E.)
E. S. H.Winn (C.)	
Mrs. Burgoyne (L.)
J. A. Clarke (E.)
A. M. Harper (C.)	
G. Johnston (L.)
F. Hunter (E.)
E. S. Farr (C.)	
F. V. Valair (L.)
W. E. Adams (E.)
J. Archibald (C.)	
S.Guthrie (L.)
R. M. Blair (E.)
F. M. Clement (C.)	
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Corporation of the District of Burnaby
and   Burnaby   Fire-fighters'   Association, Local No. 323
The Corporation of the District of Burnaby  and  Burnaby  Civic  Employees'
Union, Local No. 23
F.   W.   Woolworth   Co.,   Ltd.,   Victoria,
and  Retail  Clerks'  Union,  Local No.
279
Disher Specialties, Vancouver, and Bakery and Confectionery Workers* International Union, Local No. 468
Industry Labour Negotiating Committee, representing twenty-six packinghouses in the Okanagan Valley, and
Federation of Fruit and Vegetable
Workers' Unions
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co., Ltd.,
Wells, and Wells Miners' Union, No.
685
Privateer   Mines,    Ltd.,    Zeballos,    and
Zeballos District Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 851
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Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards by Predominant Cause.
Wages   74
Union security   31
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All terms of agreement  12
Hours of work  10
Shift differentials      9
H 133
Retroactive date of wage increases
Annual holidays	
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Job classifications, terms of agreement, rate increase to contract
workers, use of employees' cars, employment of spare drivers,
differentials, M.S.A. and hospital insurance, grievance procedure, piece-work rates, show-up guarantee, tool insurance,
cost-of-living bonus, premium rates, payment for meals	
Table IV.—Summary of Disputes.
Industry or
Occupation.
Particulars.
Number of
Employers
affected.
Number of
Employees
affected.
Time-loss
in
Man-days.
Summary of Disputes in Progress prior to
January 1st, 1948.
Iron and steel work
Commenced  August  21st,   1947;   for  a  new agreement
1
183
3,843*
ers, Vancouver
providing for increased wages, additional union security,   and   other   changes;    terminated   February   2nd,
1948 ;   negotiations ;   compromise
Bakery-work ers, Van
Commenced December 8th, 1947;   for implementation of
1
20
120*
couver
award of Conciliation  Board providing for increased
wages   and   other   changes   in   new   agreement   under
negotiation;     terminated   January   10th;    return   of
workers pending further negotiations
Summary of Disputes commencing in 1948.
Coal-miners,   Fernie,
Commenced  January   13th;   for a  new  agreement pro
3
2,087
90,128
Michel,   Princeton,
viding for increased wages and other changes;   work
Nanaimo, and Cum
resumed   at   Fernie   and   Michel   February   19th,   at
berland
Princeton   February  26th;   at Nanaimo and Cumberland April 6th;   following a compromise settlement
Loggers, Carter Bay....
Commenced February 17th ;    protesting increase in rates
for board from $1.50 per day to $2;   terminated March
29th;   return of workers pending reference to arbitra-
tration;   indefinite
1
70
2,200
Loggers, Port Hardy...
Commenced   March   15th;    protesting   increase  in  rates
for board from $1.50 per day to $2 ;  terminated March
29th ;   return of workers pending reference to arbitra-
tration ;   indefinite
1
160
800
Gold-miners, Tulse-
Commenced May 1st;   protesting increased board rates;
1
170
340
quah
terminated May 2nd;   return of workers pending conciliation ;    indefinite
Electricians, Victoria-
Commenced   October   25th,    involving   six   contractors;
extended to eight additional contractors on November
25th;   for  increased wages ;   unterminated as of December 31st
14
65
2,459
Loggers, Iron River	
Commenced   November   15th;    protesting   dismissal   of
three fallers for incompetency;   terminated December
9th;   return of workers pending arbitration
1
55
1,045
Carpenters, Victoria....
Commenced December 6th ;   for increased wages ;   return
of workers December 23rd;   mediation ;   in favour of
workers
39
389
5,057
Cleaners   and   dyers,
Commenced   December   6th;    for   increased   wages   as
1
17
238
Vancouver
recommended by Conciliation Board;   unterminated as
of December 31st
63
3,216
106,230
* Indicates time-loss in man-days during 1948. H 134
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
A lockout, or an industrial condition that is undeniably a lockout, is rarely encountered, and strikes and lockouts are therefore recorded together in these statistical
tables.   The term " dispute " refers to either a strike or a lockout.
The figures shown are inclusive of all disputes which have come to the attention of
the Department. While methods taken to procure this information preclude the
possibility of serious omission, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later
information.
Estimates of time lost are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute
lasts by the number of employees directly affected and not replaced. The summaries
include only the record of time lost by workers directly involved.
Table V.—Number of Disputes, Number op Employees affected, and Time lost
in Working-days, 1938-48.
Year.
Number of
Disputes.
Employees
affected.
Time-loss in
Working-days.
1938            	
11
4
1
8
50
43
15
18
21
25
10
837
822
204
1,408
18,804
21,704
6,379
6,810
40,014
6,386
3,216
8,236
1939	
13,803
1940	
8,510
1941	
7,594
1942	
35,024
1943	
75,129
1944	
4,510
1945	
69,595
1946                                                                	
1,294,202
1947                                          	
153,168
1948                                                        	
106,230
Table VI.—Analysis of Disputes by Industries in British Columbia, 1948.
Industry.
Number of
Employers
affected.
Number of
Employees
affected.
Time-loss in
Man-days.
63
3
1
3
1
2
454
285
183
2,087
170
37
52,516
4,045
3,843
90,128
340
358
Totals	
63
3,216
106,230
Summary of Prosecutions, 1948.
During the year twenty-four charges were laid by the Labour Kelations Board
(British Columbia) for offences contrary to the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," 1947, as amended. Of these, four resulted in convictions, two of which were
subsequently appealed and dismissed in County Court. One other charge was dismissed
in Police Court.    Outcome of the remaining charges is undetermined.
Additionally, the Labour Kelations Board (British Columbia) gave consent to the
laying of fourteen charges.    Pour of these charges were not proceeded with.    Five
charges were dismissed in Police Court.    Five charges have been remanded.
Respectfully submitted. ,  _
J. Pitcairn Hogg,
Chairman.
M. F. Macintosh.
F. W. Smelts.
G. A. Wilkinson.
H. Strange. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H  135
EMPLOYERS' AND EMPLOYEES' (LABOUR) ORGANIZATIONS.
Certain information is required annually from associations of employees or trade-
union locals pursuant to section 5a of the " Department of Labour Act." This return
requires the name and address of the organization, its affiliation (if any), and its total
paid-up membership to December 31st, 1948. Members over three months in arrears
are not included in this figure.
The inclusion of the name of any organization does not constitute its recognition
as a " labour organization " within the meaning of the " Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Act." Such a determination lies to the Labour Relations Board (British
Columbia).
Every care is taken to ensure accuracy in all returns which are compiled by the
Labour Division of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics working in conjunction
with the staff of the Labour Relations Board. Revisions may be made, however, in the
light of later information.
Table VII shows a further gain in organized labour membership during 1948.
This increase is true, both in absolute numbers and in relation to the larger labour
force in the Province. Expressed as a percentage increase, membership has grown by
5.7 per cent, in the last year. This compares to an increase of 13.5 per cent, in 1947
over the 1946 membership. There has been a gain of over 300 per cent, in the reported
membership since December 31st, 1939, with a membership at that date of 44,867,
compared to 142,989 at the end of 1948.
Chart I is an attempt to portray the distribution of trade-unionists by major
industrial groupings. The various locals have been classified into the categories in
which the majority of their members are employed. It indicates what industrial fields
have the greatest number of union members. However, since figures were not available
on the total employment in each category, it does not show which groups are most
highly organized.
The "wood and wood products" group, containing 21.54 per cent, of the total
membership is the largest category. It is composed of unions such as the International
Brotherhood of Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper-
mill Workers, the International Woodworkers of America, and the Woodworkers Industrial Union of Canada.
The " services" group contains 20.99 per cent, of the total number of trade-
unionists. It includes municipal and Provincial employees, such as policemen, firemen,
and letter-carriers. Two of the largest organizations in this group are the British
Columbia Provincial Government Employees' Associations and the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation. Another large body included in the " services" group is the
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union.
The " mining and quarrying " group is composed largely of the United Mine Workers of America and the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers.
The " steam-railway transportation " group includes the four large independent
railway unions, as well as the large membership of the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers.
The largest body in the " construction " group is the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Other unions represented include the International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers; the Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators and
Paperhangers of America; the International Hod Carriers, Building and Common
Labourers' Union of America.
The "metals" group contains such unions as the Sheet Metal Workers' International Association and the Shipyard General Workers Federation of the Province.
The following table shows the number of employees' (labour) organizations making
returns and the membership thereof from 1939 to 1948, inclusive.    In addition, the H 136
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR,
estimated employment as at December 1st each year is shown, and the membership of
the employees' (labour) organizations as a percentage of the total employment.
Table VII.—Number of Labour Organizations making Returns
and Membership thereof, etc., 1939-48.
i
Year.
Employment
as at Dec. 1
(Est.).
Number of
Organizations.
Total
Membership.
Labour
Organization
Membership as
Percentage of
Total
Employment.
1939	
238,920
268,459
313,854
407,032
420,716
396,390
372,498
400,951
440.047
380
404
402
415
473
617
636
642
715
44,867
50,360
61,292
91,618
107,402
110,045
108,125
119,258
135,320
142,989
18.78
1940	
1941	
18.75
19.52
1942	
22 51
1943	
24.52
1944	
27 76
1945	
29.02
1946 	
29 74
1947 	
30 75
1948                	
44R.9KS>                          745
31 85
Chart I.—Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Industrial
Classifications, 1948.
SERVICES
METALS
CONSTRUCTION
PRINTING &
PUBLISHING
ALL OTHERS
CLOTHING &
FOOTWEAR
STEAM RAILWAY
TRANSPORTATION
OTHER TRANSPORTATION
WOOD & WOOD PRODUCTS REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 137
Organizations of Employees (Labour Organizations).
The list is arranged by cities and towns in alphabetical order. The names and
addresses of the presidents and secretaries have been revised to the date of publication
in all cases where this information could be obtained.
Post-office addresses of the offices are the same as the heading under which they
appear, unless otherwise stated.
The list of employers' organizations follows that of the labour organizations.
Returns in the former category numbered 25 in 1939 and 1940, 27 in 1941, 32 in 1942,
34 in 1943, 36 in 1944, and 37 in 1945 to 1948, inclusive.
The listings have been compiled by George Bishop, Senior Research Assistant,
Bureau of Economics and Statistics, in co-operation with this Branch of the Department.
Abbotsfoed.
Brick   and   Clay   Workers'   Federal   Union,   No.
136.—President,  H.  D.  Smith;    Recording  Secretary,  Vernon   Cape,   1128   Campbell   Avenue,
Abbotsford.
Alberni.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, H. Stevenson; Secretary,
W. Reith, B.C. Forest Service, Alberni.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Ashcroft.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of.—General
Secretary, D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue Building,
Winnipeg, Man.
Bamberton.
Cement, Lime and Gypsum Workers, International
United, No. 277.—President, R. Dale; Recording Secretary, D. Duncan, Bamberton, Tod
Inlet P.O., V.I.
BlRKEN.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 215.—President, J. K. Purdy; Secretary-
Treasurer, G. Tinker, Birken.
Blubber Bay.
Quarry Workers' Union, No. 882.—President J. C.
Billingsley; Recording Secretary, R. S. Barr,
Blubber  Bay.
Blue River.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 143.—President,
T. Barron;   Secretary, E. Kirk, Blue River.
Bralorne.
Miners' Union, No. 271.—President, Rod R. Black;
Recording Secretary, J. Allan, Bralorne.
Britannia Beach.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 663.—President, J. H. Balderson; Financial Secretary,
G. A. Bennett, Box 42, Townsite, Britannia
Beach.
Burnaby.
Automobile, Aircraft, Agriculture, Implement
Workers of America, United, No. 432.—President, J. W. Skelton; Recording Secretary, P. T.
Stanley, 5976 Ormidale Street, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 23.—President, J. 0. Murton; Secretary, John P. Simpson, 910 London Street, New Westminster.
Fire Fighters' Association, No. 323—President,
Ernest A. Moss; Secretary-Treasurer, B. J.
Pontifex, 4006 Douglas Road, New Westminster.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
School Janitors' Union, No. 224. — President,
George Thornhill; Recording Secretary, J. M.
Don, 3119 Spruce Street, New Westminster.
Campbell River.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1882.—President, Kenneth Creel-
man; Recording Secretary, A. W. Davidson,
Campbell River.
Chemainus.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union,
International, No. 508. — President, Duncan
Davidson; Secretary-Treasurer, H. E. Irving,
Chemainus.
Chilliwack.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1843. — President, James A.
Sewell; Recording Secretary, J. E. Toews, 224
Lewis Avenue West, Chilliwack.
Clearwater.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 15.—President, C. A. Emery; Secretary,
J. Pawson, Clearwater.
Cloverdale.
Municipal Employees' Association, Surrey, No.
6.—President, E. Clegg; Secretary, G. Patterson, Siddons Road, R.R. 2, Cloverdale.
Colquitz.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Arnold; Secretary, H. Durham, c/o Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz.
Copper Mountain.
Miners' Union, No. 649.—President, A. J. Irish;
Recording Secretary, Lome Salmon, Copper
Mountain. H 138
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Courtenay.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1638. — President, Leslie H.
Clayton; Recording Secretary, George W.
Couper, Box 158, Courtenay.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 156.—President, W. B. Fairclough; Recording Secretary,
H   K. Bennett, Box 71, Courtenay.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, G. Hunden; Secretary, A. H.
Turner, 325 Menzies Avenue, Courtenay.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-363.—President, Sigfrid Wessberg; Financial
Secretary,  Edwin  Lidberg, Box 83,  Courtenay.
Woodworkers, Industrial Union of Canada, No.
363.—President, E. Anderson; Recording Secretary, H. Vogt, Box 458, Courtenay.
Cranbrook.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 563.—
President, E. C. Hawkins; Secretary-Treasurer,
F. R. McDaniel, Box 878, Cranbrook.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 559. — President, R. Bartholomew;
Recording Secretary, M. H. John, P.O. Box 264,
Cranbrook.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, F. Mackinder; Secretary, Miss
M. A. Fyfe, office of Government Agent, Courthouse, Cranbrook.
Hotel and Restaurant Workers' Union.—President, Frank Romano; Secretary-Treasurer,
Dennis Quinn, Queens Hotel, Cranbrook.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, Crows-
nest Lodge No. 588.—President, A. A. Bouchard;
Secretary, R. J. Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Buckley
Lodge No. 585.—President, H. A. Bradley; Secretary-Treasurer, H. J. Conway, P.O. Box 817,
Cranbrook.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Kootenay Lodge No. 173.—President, F. W.
Molander; Recording Secretary, N. L. Smith,
Box  1, Cranbrook.
Railway Conductors, Order of, Elk River Division
407.—President, Charles LaFleur; Secretary,
H. J. Huxtable, Box 262, Cranbrook.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, Baker Mountain Lodge 1292.—President,
B. A Cameron; Secretary-Treasurer, H.
Andrews, Box 17, Cranbrook.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-405.—International Representative, J. Niya-
zawa, 426 Main Street, Vancouver.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No.
405.—President, M. B. Kennedy; Recording
Secretary, Roy C. Kretlow, Box 468, Cranbrook.
Creston.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President,   R.   M.   Chandler;    Secretary,
James Ryley, Box 178, Creston.
Cumberland.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island (Cumberland
Branch).—President,   John   H.   Vaughan;    Recording  Secretary,  Alfred  G.  Jones,  Box  562,
Cumberland.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7293.—
President, J. H. Cameron; Recording Secretary,
George Martyn, Cumberland.
Duncan.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. W. Chaster; Secretary, William R. Chester, Koksilah P.O.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 533.—Secretary, F. W. Coster, Box 460,
Duncan.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 2824.—President, G. Warenko; Secretary-Treasurer, C. S. Archer, R.R. 3, Duncan.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-80.
—President, Joseph Morris; Recording Secretary, Sid Holt, Youbou.
Essondale.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President,    R.    Butcher;     Secretary,    T.
Weeks, Box 74, Port Coquitlam.
Fernie.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery
Workers of America, International Union of,
No. 308.—President, Jack Brown; Secretary,
Joe Wasnock, Box 1071, Fernie.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 921.—President, Harold F. Uphill; Recording Secretary, R. L. Davis, Elko.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, James Clarke; Secretary, R. A.
Damstrom, Box 697, Fernie.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7310.—
President, Mike Nee; Secretary, W. Martin,
Box 212, Fernie.
Field.
Miners' Union, Field and District, No. 807.—
President, Thomas J. Alton; Recording Secretary, C. Linney, Field.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Kicking Horse Lodge 1454.—President, James
Cookson;   Secretary, William M. Brown, Field.
Fraser Valley.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President, M. Christianson; Secretary,
J. M. Oliver, Stayte Road, R.R. 2, White Rock.
Golden.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, D. Piggot; Secretary, H. B.
Sutton, Golden.
Grand Forks.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Raylance; Secretary, L. J.
Price, Box 620, Grand Forks.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 181.—Secretary, C. Holm, Box 503, Grand
Forks.
Haney.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-367.
—President, E. Rayner; Recording Secretary,
L. M. Van Kleek, General Delivery, Haney.
Hazelton.
Mine,   Mill   and   Smelter  Workers,   International
Union   of,   No.  898.—President,   Sidney  Alfred
Tims;  Recording Secretary, John McGee, Hazel-
ton. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 139
Hedley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 655.—President, George Mackus; Recording Secretary,
William A. Lore, Hedley.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, No. 656.
—President, D. Hesketh; Recording Secretary,
R. S. Williams, Nickel Plate Mine, Hedley.
loco.
Oil Workers of Canada, United, No. 11.—President, A. D. Fieshfield; Recording Secretary,
H. M. Bedingfield, 2606 St. John's Street, Port
Moody.
Kaleden.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 4.—
President, Roy Wall; Secretary, Roy R. Van,
Kaleden.
KAMLOOPS.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1540.—President, Roy Mor-
kell; Recording Secretary, Les Edgar, 919 Pine
Street, Kamloops.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 993.—President, D. Sorley; Recording Secretary, F. H. Lanchester, 1285 Battle Street,
Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 821.—-
Recording Secretary, C. H. Faulkner, 112 St.
Paul Street West, Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 855.—
President, F. C. Fuller; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. J. Millward, 753 Dominion Street, Kamloops.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
913.—President, E. Murray; Secretary^Trea-
surer, M. L. Murphy, 125 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Interior Lodge No. 258.—President,
J. 0. Richmond; Recording Secretary, R. J.
Perry, Perry Road, North Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 930.—President, T. E. Tipping;
Recording Secretary, J. H. Worsley, 806 Battle
Street, Kamloops.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. J. Stewart; Secretary, Miss
E. C. Mackay, c/o Forestry Department, 515
Columbia Street, Kamloops.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders'
International Union, No. 685.—President, P. B.
Ashton; Recording Secretary, M. Kyte, Central
Hotel, Kamloops.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording
Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Canadian Postal Employees, Federated Association of, No. 80.—President, A.
Bembridge; Secretary, H. A. Fooks, R.R. 1,
Kamloops.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 748.
— President, J. Parkin; Secretary, L. E.
Crowder, 359 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.— President, G. A. Cahill; Secretary,
J. P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Fraser Valley Lodge No. 31.—President, E. G.
Flann; Secretary-Treasurer, G. R. Mills, Foster, c/o Red Pass Junction.
Municipal Employees' Association, No. 310.—
President, H. A. Roberge; Recording Secretary,
R. C. Vauhear, 636 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, A. E. Elliott
Lodge No. 519.—President, G. A. Neil; Recording Secretary, V. H. Mott, 521 Seymour Street,
Kamloops.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Thompson Lodge No. 148.—President, J. Kit-
son; Recording Secretary, R. Emery, General
Delivery, North Kamloops.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, No.
611.—President, A. R. Field; Secretary, H. P.
Battison, 36 Nicola Street West, Kamloops.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 150.—President,
J. D. S. Robertson; Secretary, J. Peart, Box
402, Kamloops.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 30.—
General Secretary, D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue
Building, Winnipeg, Man.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic
Division), No. 15.—President, Miss H. Wrenko;
Secretary, Miss Evelyn Alexander, 783 Columbia Street, Kamloops.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-417.
—President, H. C. Hickling; Recording Secretary, J. Miyazawa, Box 217, Kamloops.
Kaslo.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 173.—Secretary, T. H. Horner, Crescent Road, Kaslo.
Kelowna.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1370.—President, William
F. Mahoney; Recording Secretary, E. Burley,
Box 254, Kelowna.
Civic Employees' Union.—President, Alec Rud-
dick; Secretary-Treasurer, Rupert Brown, 901
Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 1409.— President, G. Arcuvi; Recording
Secretary, E. Stirgaard, 631 Cawsten Avenue,
Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 5.—
President, W. E. Darroch; Secretary, G. Boyer,
558 Roanoke Avenue, Kelowna.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, A. E. Knooihuizen; Secretary,
C. Gourlie, 526 Doyle Avenue, Kamloops.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
339.—President, Edward Kielbiski; Recording
Secretary, Mrs. Agnes Harrison, 580 Coronation Avenue, Kelowna.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No.
16.—President, Miss R. Cassils; Recording Secretary, Miss L. Giovanni, 557 Van Home Street,
Penticton.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-423.—President, George Walker; Financial
Secretary, H. J. Bruch, Box 663, Kelowna.
Keremeos.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 9.—■
President, Mrs. M. McDonald; Secretary, Mrs.
A. Miller, Box 85, Keremeos.
. H 140
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Kimberley.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 1719.—President, David Harvey; Recording
Secretary, Homer A. Elmore, Kimberley.
Hotel and Restaurant Workers' Union, No. 2.—
President, L. Mackenzie; Recording Secretary,
Miss V. Worthington, Kimberley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 651.—President, James A. Byrne; Recording Secretary,
Douglas A. Gold, General Delivery, Kimberley.
Municipal Employees' Association. — President,
G. A. Sigalet; Recording Secretary, Miss A.
Sims, Kimberley.
Ladysmith.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
Fred Bell; Secretary-Treasurer, Fred Johnston,
119 Baden-Powell Street, Ladysmith.
Lake Cowichan.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1812.—President, Art Lovett;
Recording Secretary, Paul Ross, Lake Cowichan.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No.
80. — President, Owen G. Brown; Recording
Secretary, Nels Olson, Lake Cowichan.
Langford.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, T. Kershaw; Secretary, W. H.
Sluggett, 3477 Saanich Road, Victoria.
Langley Prairie.
Municipal Employees' Association, No. 10.—President, E. Koehler; Secretary, R. W. Terichow,
919  Hunter Road, Langley Prairie.
Marguerite.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 221.—President, J. S. Miller; Secretary-
Treasurer, H. Robinson, Marguerite.
McBRIDE.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 247.—President,
R. T. Clay; Secretary, G. T. Holdway, Box 26,
McBride.
Merritt.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial—President, H. McLean; Secretary, P. C.
Currie, Box 65, Merritt.
Mission City.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 2213.—President, Rodney
Forsythe; Recording Secretary, John J. Anu-
tooshkin, R.R. 1, Mission City.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No.
367.—President, Ray Masse; Recording Secretary, Otto Theiss, R.R. 2, Mission.
Nanaimo.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189.—President,
R. Millar; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 527.—President, Arthur Clark;
Secretary-Treasurer, William Little, 217 Irwin
Street, Nanaimo.
Civic Employees' and School Janitors' Association,
No. 14.—President, Harris Gill; Secretary-
Treasurer, Wilbur Scurr, 14 Machleary Street,
Nanaimo.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, Joseph Bradwell; Secretary-Treasurer,
H. W. Spencer, 433 Fourth Street, Nanaimo.
Fire Fighters, Nanaimo Association of, No. 905.—
President, Gordon Odgers; Secretary-Treasurer,
F. English, 638 Prideaux Street, Nanaimo.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Dr. W. Plenderleith; Secretary, Miss M. E. Booth, c/o Court-house,
Nanaimo.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders'
International Union, No. 619. — President,
Robert Mclntyre; Secretary, Richard Mangles,
330 Robson Street, Nanaimo.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' and Dry Cleaning Union, No.
1.—President, Mrs. E. Patterson; Recording
Secretary, Mrs. V. Dewhurst, 115 Haliburton
Street, Nanaimo.
Machine Shop and Foundry Industrial Workers'
Union, No. 1.—President, Nicholas Foglietta;
Secretary-Treasurer, Archie Semple, 227 Kennedy Street, Nanaimo.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, G. A. Cahill; Secretary,
J. P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7355.—
President, Thomas E. Webb; Recording Secretary, Isaac Aitken, 635 Kennedy Street,
Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 3.—President, J. Neen; Secretary, C. Tallman, 507 Bradley Street, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic
Division) No. 12.—President, Miss M. McDonald;
Secretary, Miss Mabel Gough, 365 Newcastle
Avenue, Nanaimo.
Typographical Union, International, No. 337.—
President, A. R. Glen; Secretary-Treasurer,
L. C. Gilbert, Box 166, Nanaimo.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No.
81.—President, A. Lewis; Financial Secretary,
J. A. Atkinson, Odd Fellows' Hall, Nanaimo.
Naramata.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 11.—
President, W. L. Lethbridge; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. A. C. Young, Naramata.
Natal.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7292.—
President, Sam English; Recording Secretary,
Alec Walker, Natal.
Nelson.
Barbers, Hairdressers, Cosmetologists and Proprietors International Union, Journeymen, No.
196.—President, Frank Defoe; Secretary-Treasurer, George Clerihew, 536 Josephine Street,
Nelson.
Bartenders' Union, International, No. 707.—President, George LaPointe; Secretary, J. Brinley,
402 Victoria Street, Nelson. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 141
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2458.—President, Kristian Naess;
Recording Secretary, Nelson Riddock, 804 Second Street, Nelson.
Civic Employees' Federation, No. 8.—President,
F. W. Cartwright; Secretary-Treasurer, D. R.
Grahame, 104 Chatham Street, Nelson.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, H. Thane; Secretary-Treasurer, F. C.
Collins, 911 Edgewood Avenue, Nelson.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 1003.—President, A. A. Pagdin; Secretary,
J. H. Whitfield, 414 Falls Street, Nelson.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 579.—
President, J. A. McMillan; Secretary-Treasurer,
Eric W. Butler, 203 Victoria Street, Nelson.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 18.—
President, R. F. Wallace; Secretary-Treasurer,
Miss Mary Vulcano, 602 Richards Street, Nelson.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 631.—President, J. C. Young; Recording Secretary, D. V. MacDougall, 411 Carbonate
Street,  Nelson.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
945.—President, C. Cotterill; Secretary-Treasurer, F. B. Jones, 724 Baker Street, Nelson.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 1141.—President, A. H. Sinclair; Financial
Secretary, William E. Rusnack, Box 71, Nelson.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, L. A. McPhail; Secretary, Miss
F. Jeffreys, Box 510, Nelson.
Hospital Employees' Federal Union, General, No.
296.—President, Rolfe Brock; Secretary-Treasurer, Harley Maerz, Occidental Hotel, Nelson.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording
Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No.
75-—President, F. J. Thompson; Secretary-
Treasurer, E. M. Jones, 714 Mill Street, Nelson.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 663.
—President, T. A. Swinden; Recording Secretary, J. E. Baldock, 300 Kerr Block, Nelson.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President,   G.   A.   Cahill;     Secretary,
J.   P.   Watts,  4100   Grandview  Highway,   New
Westminster.
Railroad    Trainmen,    Brotherhood    of,    Kootenay
Lodge  558.—President,  J.   S.  Edwards;    Secretary-Treasurer,   C.  H.  Sewell,  41  High  Street,
Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
98.—President, Alan   Smith;    Recording  Secretary, Harry Talbot, 30 View Street, Nelson.
Railway   Conductors,   Order  of,   No.  460.—President, W. E. Marquis;   Secretary, A. Kirby, 820
Carbonate Street, Nelson.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express   and   Station   Employees,   Brotherhood
of,   No.   1291.—President,   Robert   F.   Parker;
Recording Secretary, Miss Frances Jones, 514
Victoria Street, Box 42, Nelson.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 4.—President, R .Paterson;   Secretary, A. Ruzieka, 422 First Street, Nelson.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic  Division),  No.   13.—President,   Miss   Isabell
Kaye;   Secretary, Miss Jean Brown, 324 Victoria Street, Nelson.
Typographical Union, International, No. 340.—
President, Joseph A. Boletti; Secretary-Treasurer, George W. Priest, 706 Richards Street,
Nelson.
New Denver.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, M. Nicholson; Secretary, Miss
F. Moss, e/o Department of Public Works, New
Denver.
New Westminster.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189.—President, R.
Millar; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers and Culinary Workers, No.
835.—President, Leslie Norman Dale; Recording Secretary, Emilien J. Pare, Crescent Beach.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 151.—President, G.
MacRae; Secretary-Treasurer, Peter Mitchell,
1703 Dublin Street, New Westminster.
Boilermakers, Iron-ship Builders and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, No. 194.
—President, O. H. Porteous; Recording Secretary, P. Magnolo, 660 Prior Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1251.—President, Stanley
Durance; Recording Secretary, Robert Groves,
727 Fifth Avenue, New Westminster.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 2534.—President, Walter
Fedak; Recording Secretary, Stanley Hazel,
356 Sixth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 12.— President,
Harry Walsh; Recording Secretary, Ray Mercer, 202 Blackman Street, New Westminster.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, A. G. Ferguson; Secretary, W. F. Reed,
612 Colborne Street, New Westminster.
Cordage Industrial Rope and Twine Workers'
Union, No. 1.—President, William Eakin; Recording Secretary, Alex Norrie, 348 Marmont
Street, New Westminster.
Distillery Workers Union, No. 69.—President, A.
Kirkbride; Financial Secretary, H. F. Redman,
460 Campbell Avenue, New Westminster.
Fire Fighters, International Association of City,
No. 256.—President, L. J. Wisheart; Recording
Secretary, F. Olund, No. 4 Fire Station, Keary
Street, New Westminster.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, L. W. Fisher; Secretary, E.
Dinsdale, P.O. Drawer O, New Westminster.
Gypsum Workers' Union, No. 578.—President,
Fred Cormier; Financial Secretary, Jack Beat-
tie, 204 Fourteenth Avenue, New Westminster.
Hod Carriers and Common Labourers, No. 1070.—
President, Ernest N. Goodridge; Secretary-
Treasurer, Thomas Porter, 1505 Sixth Street,
New Westminster.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording
Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 502. — President, Frederick
Jackson; Secretary-Treasurer, Roland R. Cope,
1409 Eighth Avenue, New Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, Lodge
No. 131.—President, R. P. Felt; Recording Secretary, Fred M. Bensen, 466 Graham Avenue,
New Westminster. H 142
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Machinists, International Association of, Lodge
No. 151.—President, D. A. Bradley; Recording
Secretary, Alfred K. Lord, 3, 604 Thirteenth
Avenue,  New  Westminster.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, G. A. Cahill; Secretary,
J. P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Limited, Employees'
Association.—President, K. H. Burnet; Secretary, Stanley McDonald, 99 Cordova Street
East, Vancouver, B.C.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 13156.—
President, E. E. Anderson; Recording Secretary, Hugh Hocking, 1664 Pacific Highway, R.R.
4, New Westminster.
Municipal Employees' Union, No. 16.—President,
John Mundreon; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
Helen Gagne, 718 Tupper Avenue, New Westminster.
Newspaper Guild, New Westminster, No. 3.—■
President, James McPhee; Secretary-Treasurer,
Elizabeth Stenstrom, 2351 Inverness Street,
New Westminster.
Oil Workers' International Union, No. 596.—
President, A. McKenzie; Recording Secretary,
G. A. Spicer, 968 Thirteenth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Pacific Coast Packers, Ltd., Employees' Association.— President, Harry Gilhorn; Secretary-
Treasurer, Lois W. Downie, 1608 Seventeenth
Avenue, New Westminster.
Pacific Coast Terminals Independent Employees'
Union, No. 76.—President, T. R. Cosh; Secretary-Treasurer, J. Walker, 116 Mclnnes Street,
New Westminster.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
180.—President, J. McKnight; Recording Secretary, George Baxter, 375 Keary Street, New
Westminster.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
456.—President, Len Cutting; Recording Secretary, Miss Helen Ganton, 227 Sixth Street,
New Westminster.
Policemen's Association, The New Westminster,
No. 294. — President, Rod Keary; Recording
Secretary, Douglas Sandford, 246 Columbia
Street  East, New Westminster.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
280.—President, J. S. Jackson; Recording Secretary, W. J. Jackson, 1266 Thirteenth Avenue,
New Westminster.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 226.—President,
J. A. Spick; Secretary, C. L. Story, 220 Tenth
Avenue,  New Westminster.
School Maintenance Union, No. 14.—President,
J. Gowans; Secretary-Treasurer, E. Grasby,
412 Eleventh Street, New Westminster.
Sheet Metal Workers, International Association
of, No. 314.—President, George Watson; Recording Secretary, J. A. Smith, 201 Agnes Street,
New Westminster.
Stone Cutters of North America, Journeymen.—
President, F. H. Lowe; Secretary-Treasurer,
Frank Hall, 2148 Randolph Avenue, New Westminster.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of America, The Amalgamated Association of, No. 134.—President, K. M. Armstrong;
Recording Secretary, S. T. Dare, 318 Third
Street, New Westminster.
Typographical Union, International, No. 632.—
President, W. J. Calhoun; Secretary-Treasurer,
R. A. Stoney, Box 754, New Westminster.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-357.—President, J. Stewart Alsbury; Recording Secretary, Rae Eddie, 656 Eleventh Avenue,
New Westminster.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No.
357.—President, Teddie Hansen; Recording Secretary, Carl Caspersen, 614 Smith Road, New
Westminster.
Ocean Falls.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
360.—President, Jack Torrance; Recording Secretary, George L. Weldridge, Box 77, Ocean
Palls.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 312. — President,
W. S. Holgate; Recording Secretary, C. A.
Sweet, Box 92, Ocean Falls.
Okanagan Centre.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 8.—
President, R. Brown; Secretary, George Snow-
den, Okanagan Centre.
Oliver.
Fruit   and  Vegetable   Workers'   Union,   No.   2.—
President, E. J. Perry;   Secretary, Bert Potter,
R.R. 1, Oliver.
Sawmill Employees' Association.—President, Cyril
F. Joyce;    Secretary-Treasurer, Noel M. Boult,
Box  261,  Oliver.
OSOYOOS.
Fruit   and   Vegetable   Workers'   Union,   No.   3.—
President, George Kabatoff;    Secretary, D. Mc-
Crae, Osoyoos.
Packinghouse  Workers  of  America,   United,  No.
344.—President, Joe May;   Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Valery G. Baskett, Osoyoos.
Parson.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 165.—Secretary, C. Collins, Parson.
Penticton.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1696.—President, W. H. Tayler;
Recording Secretary, C. L. Beagle, 372 Van
Home  Street, Penticton.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 308.—President, R. J. Dirks; Recording Secretary, M.
Gladish, 598 Van Home Street, Penticton.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 1382.—President, J. W. Robson; Recording
Secretary, P. Pride, General Delivery, Penticton.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 866.—
President, S. J. Cramer; Secretary-Treasurer,
R. Letts, 370 Woodruff Avenue, Penticton.
Fire Fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
10.—President, James D. Crawford; Secretary,
W. T. Mattock, 550 Westminster Avenue East,
Penticton.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
953.—President, W. W. Gray; Secretary, W. T.
Mattock, 550 Westminster Avenue East, Penticton.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 884. — President, P. H. Coulter;
Recording Secretary, Dawson Raincock, 448
Orchard Avenue, Penticton. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 143
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, J. W. Blogg; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Ethel Wilkinson, 96 Nelson Avenue, Penticton.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, G. H. Fewtrell; Secretary,
Miss R. Hayter, 307 White Avenue East, Penticton.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, G. A. Cahill; Secretary,
J. P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1023.—Secretary, W. M. Thompson, 194
Edna Avenue, Penticton.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 179.—President, A. G. Peterson; Secretary-Treasurer, H. Johnston, 469 Woodruff
Avenue,  Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 914.—
President, N. E. McCallum; Secretary-Treasurer, G. M. Clark, 341 Scott Avenue, Penticton.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic Division), No. 16.—President, Miss R. Cas-
sils; Secretary, Miss L. DeGiovanni, 557 Van
Home Street, Penticton.
Typographical Union, Vernon, No. 541.—President, A. F. Mason; Secretary-Treasurer, W. B.
Hilliard, 304  Norton  Street, Penticton.
Pioneer.
Miners' Union, Pioneer, No. 693.—President, Jack
Webster; Recording Secretary, William Parkinson, Pioneer Mines.
Port Alberni.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 513.—President, J. G. Trebett;
Recording Secretary, G. Buick, Box 758, Alberni.
Civic Workers' Union, Alberni and District.—
President, William McDonald; Secretary-Treasurer, R. S. Gray, 513 Fourth Avenue North,
Port Alberni.
Hospital Employees' Union, West Coast General,
No. 91.—President, L. Mumford; Secretary,
Mrs. D. Goddard, 919 Eighth Avenue North,
Port  Alberni.
Hotel, Restaurant and Beverage Employees'
Union, No. 697.—President, Kenneth Wright H.
Rosberg; Financial Secretary, Robert Holland,
Suite 9, 46 Argyle Street, Port Alberni.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 503.—President, A. LeBlanc;
Secretary, Cal. Cook, 100 Ninth Avenue South,
Port Alberni.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of
America, Brotherhood of, No. 1642.—President,
James Stewart; Recording and Financial Secretary, D. Mcintosh, 211 Seventh Avenue North,
Port Alberni.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 592. — President,
Thomas Ferryman; Recording Secretary, Wilfred Hughes, Swans Auto Court, Alberni.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-85.
—President, R. W. Muir; Recording Secretary,
C. Anshelm, 108 Second Avenue North, Port
Alberni.
Port Alice.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 514.—President, K. R.
Sturdy; Recording Secretary, R. Grisack, Box
123, Port Alice.
Port Mellon.
Pulp and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, No. 297.—President, Stanley S.
Cummings; Recording Secretary, Roy Nordman,
Box 97, Port Mellon.
Pouce Coupe.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President,  J.  Barford;    Secretary,  A.  R.
Wilson, Pouce Coupe.
Powell River.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 2068.—President, J. R.
Staniforth; Recording Secretary, J. N. Heave-
nor, Box 700, Powell River.
Fire Fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
8.—President, Neil Clark; Secretary, J. Fish-
leigh, Westview.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. F. Otto; Secretary, Miss
Ethel Cook, Powell River.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
142.—President, A. L. Allan; Recording Secretary, H. B. Moore, Box 55, Westview.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 76.—President,
Charles R. Thompson; Recording Secretary,
James Currie, Box 275, Powell River.
Prince George.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1998.—President, Nels
Brolin; Recording Secretary, Ernest S. Shaw,
Box 727, Prince George.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 242.—President, John Lloyd Poole; Recording Secretary, James Leslie Campbell, c/o Commodore Hotel, Prince George.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 843.—
Chief Engineer, L. McNeil; Secretary-Treasurer, George A. Hodson, Box 941, Prince
George.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 827.—President, R. R. Anderson;
Recording Secretary, H. W. Willis, Box 663,
Prince George.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. B. Carter; Secretary, Miss
C. Wieland, Box 115, Prince George.
Hotel, Restaurant and Beverage Dispensers'
Union, No. 690.—President, Harvey Hurd; Recording Secretary, Harry Dergonzoff, Europe
Hotel, Prince George.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Record-
Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Railway Conductors, Order of, Division No. 620.—
President, J. Williams; Secretary-Treasurer, D.
Ross, Box 224, Prince George.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 28.—President,
Peter Annan; Secretary, R. E. Lonsdale, Box
56, Prince George.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of.—General
Secretary, D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue Building,
Winnipeg, Man. H 144
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-424.
—President, J. C. Farenhurst; Recording Secretary, C. H. Webb, Giscome.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No.
424.—President, P. Edmark; Recording Secretary, J. Baily, Box 566, Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 636.—President,
James McK. Andrew; Recording Secretary,
Henry Montesano, Box 565, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1549.— President, J. N.
McLeod; Recording Secretary, Gordon McKay,
Box 694, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1735.—President, August
Wallen; Recording Secretary, Edward Woodward, Box 694, Prince Rupert.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 5.—President, A. E. Evans; Recording Secretary, Ed.
Keehn, General Delivery, Prince Rupert.
Construction and General Laborers' Union, No.
1427.—President, A. B. Love; Recording Secretary, J. D. Stuart, 1649 Second Avenue West,
Prince Rupert.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 344.—President, George Phillipson; Secretary, F. M. Kempton, Box 457, Prince Rupert.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
510.—President, Lloyd Stevens; Recording Secretary, S. L. Peachey, 733 Tatlow Street, Prince
Rupert.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
559.—President, J. C. Ewart; Secretary-Treasurer, J. S. Furness, Box 506, Prince Rupert.
Fishermen's Federal Union, Deep Sea, No. 80.—
President, John Syness; Recording Secretary,
J. Kilby, Prince Rupert.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President, W. H. Murray; Secretary,
C. V. Smith, Box 759, Prince Rupert.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance, No. 331.—President, Lois Keyes; Recording Secretary, Elizabeth A. Oliver, Box
1545, Prince Rupert.
Industrial Workers' Union.—President, C.Wilson;
Recording Secretary, G. W. Morgan, Box 1580,
Prince Rupert.
Laundry Workers' International Union, No. 336.
—President, Miss Ruby Suden; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Edith Hitchens, General Delivery,
Station B, Prince Rupert.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 505.—President, Ernest Tubb;
Secretary-Treasurer, Terry G. Grimble, 121
Seventh Avenue East, Prince Rupert.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 335.—President, H. Long; Secretary-
Treasurer, P. LeRoss, Prince Rupert.
Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial
Union, No. 2.—President, W. Murphy; Secretary, J. W. Prusky, 1056 Eighth Avenue East,
Prince Rupert.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United
States and Canada, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices, No. 180.—President,
Robert Wilson; Secretary-Treasurer, George S.
Weatherly, 2040 Atlin Avenue, Box 1296, Prince
Rupert.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
426.—President, M. Chyzyk; Recording Secretary, R. Pollock, Suite 1, Vernon Apartments,
Box 496, Prince Rupert.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 154.—President,
Don Creed; Secretary, P. G. Jones, Box 676,
Prince Rupert.
Typographical Union, International, No. 413.—
President, Herbert Morgan; Secretary, C. H.
Collins, Box 552, Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of, No. 367.—
President, E. Plecash; Secretary, A. Kowal,
Box 467, Princeton.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Milne; Secretary, T. H.
Cunliffe, c/o Department of Public Works,
Princeton.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7875.—■
President, A. Samuel; Recording Secretary,
Thomas Foley, Box 38, Princeton.
Quesnel.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording
Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 407.—President, A.
Robinson; Secretary, Alfred Olsson, Box 141,
Revelstoke.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 657.—
Chief Engineer, H. W. Keegan; Recording Secretary, A. McKenzie, Box 563, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 341.—President, E. M. Lloyd; Recording Secretary, G. Hobbs, Box 746, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 381.—President, Leo Wiedenman; Secretary-Treasurer, D. A. Rix, Revelstoke.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 10.—
President, Hugh Crich; Recording Secretary,
Will Leslie, Box 340, Revelstoke.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, E. L. Scott; Secretary, C. G.
Graham, office of Provincial Assessor, Revelstoke.
Machinists, International Association of, Koote-
nay Lodge No. 258.—President, R. Scott Watson; Recording Secretary, J. R. Brown, Box
209, Revelstoke.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 208.—Secretary, J. M. Spence, Box 363,
Revelstoke.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Glacier Lodge
No. 51.—President, H. A. Mulholland; Secretary, G. A. Patrick, Revelstoke.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Mount Begbie Lodge No. 481.—President, A. E.
Parker; Recording Secretary, F. L. Henderson,
503 Fifth Street East, Revelstoke.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 487.—President, B. C. Calder; Secretary, D. L. Hooley,
Revelstoke.
Rossland.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. B. Wallace; Secretary,
G. L. Hamilton, Box 310, Rossland. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 145
Rutland.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 2771.—
President, Roy Materi; Recording Secretary,
G. Keehn, Rutland.
Salmon Arm.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. A. Webb; Secretary,
W. J. Bird, P.O. Box 331, Salmon Arm.
Sinclair Mills.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 202.—President, L. Rawson; Secretary-Treasurer, W. Haws, Sinclair Mills.
Smithers.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Babine
Division No. 111.—President, F. W. Powers;
Secretary-Treasurer, C. A. Thurston, Box 240,
Smithers.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, C. L. Gibson; Secretary,
T. C. Chapman, Smithers.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 93.—President,
J. R. Nicholson; Secretary, P. B. Emerson,
Box 51, Smithers.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 869.—
President, E. V. Glass; Vice-Chairman and
Secretary-Treasurer, S. W. Gould, Box 86,
Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Buckley Lodge No. 1415.—President, E. Abra-
hamson; Recording Secretary, J. H. Trew,
Box 129, Smithers.
Squamish.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 972.—President, E. V. Machin; Recording Secretary, S. F. Laycock, Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1419.—President, R. J. Lamport; Secretary,
A. Fraser,  Squamish.
Stewart.
Mine and Mill Workers, Portland Canal, No.
694.—President, Alec Anderson; Recording Secretary, C. H. Lake, Box 145, Stewart.
Steveston.
Municipal Employees' Union, Richmond, No. 19.—
President, E. Turner; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. R. Riddell, 1042 No. 2 Rd., R.R. 1, Steveston.
Terrace.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President, F. C. Green; Secretary,
A. C. Caulder, Terrace.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-469.—President, J. Stewart Alsbury; Recording Secretary, Mike Sekora, Room 7, 426 Main
Street, Vancouver.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No.
469.—President, J. K. Haynes; Secretary, W. H.
McConnell, Box 135, Terrace.
Trail.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2474.—President, A. E. Collins;
Recording Secretary, Frank Tough, 680 Hendry
Street, Trail.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 287.—President, E. J. Wright; Recording
Secretary, Hugh J. McAlpine, Room 30, Bergeron Block, Trail.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 999.—President, C. G. MacKay; Recording
Secretary, B. Bodgener,  South  Slocan.
Federal Union, No. 302.—President, Isaac Patton;
Recording Secretary, Leslie B. Jones, 2305 Fifth
Avenue, Trail.
Fire Fighters' Association, Tadanac, No. 871.—
President, D. Bisset; Secretary-Treasurer, H.
Breckenridge, 2117  Second Avenue, Trail.
Fire Fighters, International Association of (Trail-
Rossland), No. 941. — President, C. Cowlin;
Secretary-Treasurer, A. L. Blaine, 1390 Pine
Avenue, Trail.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No.
76.—President, R. H. Hilder; Secretary-Treasurer, S. T. Spooner, 2017 Second Avenue, Trail.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, G. A. Cahill; Secretary,
J. P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
Smelter Workers' Union, Trail and District, International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter
Workers, No. 480.—President, R. C. Billingsley;
Recording Secretary, George Fitzer, Rossland.
Tranquille.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, George Grey; Secretary,
W. Thomson, Acting Secretary, c/o Tranquille
Sanatorium   (staff), Tranquille.
Tulsequah.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International
Union of, No. 858.—President, J. Loftus; Recording Secretary, D. H. Turner, Tulsequah.
Vananda.
Mine, Mill, Quarry and Smelter Workers, International Union of, No. 816.—President, E. W.
Olson;  Recording Secretary, F. Leigh, Vananda.
Vancouver.
Acme Asbestos Cement, Ltd., Employees' Organization of.—President, H. Parker; Recording
Secretary, J. E. Henderson, 1030% Harwood
Street,  Vancouver.
Auto Workers' Lodge, Vancouver, No. 1857.—
President, F. H. Maltby; Recording Secretary,
A. R. Thompson, 423 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, No. 468.—President, Wilmer
A. Bell; Secretary, Melvin J. Kemmis, 2010
Burrard  Street,  Vancouver.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, Vancouver, No. 189.—
President, R. Millar; Secretary, Birt Showier,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Barbers' Association of British Columbia.—President, N. Mervyn Comba; Recording Secretary,
Thomas Mcintosh, 3355 Manor Street, Vancouver. H 146
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Barbers', Hairdressers', Cosmetologists' and Proprietors International Union of America, Journeymen, No. 120.—President, Joshua Murray;
Recording Secretary, D. D. Haveruk, 320 Granville Street, Vancouver.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association.—
President, E. J. McLaughlin; Recording Secretary, Miss E. Hill, 2946 St. Catherine Street,
Vancouver.
Blacksmiths' and Helpers' Union of Canada, No.
1.—President, John Moffat; Secretary-Treasurer, Gilbert Cavill, 849 Churchill Crescent,
North Vancouver.
Boilermakers, Iron-ship Builders and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, No.
359. — President, James Downie; Recording
Secretary, F. E. Cardwell, 4657 Slocan Street,
Vancouver.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
105. — President, Frank Roberts; Recording
Secretary, Mrs. W. Leak, 2555 Third Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery
Workers of America, International Union of
United, No. 300.—President, A. LeNobel; Recording Secretary, H. Bennett, 4014 Seventeenth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Bricklayers' and Masons' International Union,
No. 1. — President, J. Baker; Secretary, L.
Padgett, 3393 Thirty-first Avenue West, Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers,
International Association of, No. 97.—President, J. E. Fitzpatrick; Business Agent, E. G.
Cook, 1064 Cortell Street, North Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers,
International Association of, No. 712.—President, John Rabbit; Recording Secretary, Harold
Yates, 160 Clinton Street North, Vancouver.
Building and Construction Workers of Canada,
Amalgamated, No. 1.—President, J. P. Lucas;
Recording Secretary, A. E. Carter, 3452 Euclid
Avenue, Vancouver.
Building and Construction Workers of Canada,
Amalgamated, No. 16. — President, Patrick
Thibault; Secretary-Treasurer, J. C. Barrett,
712 Robson Street, Vancouver.
Building Material, Construction and Fuel Truck
Drivers, No. 213.—President, J. A. King; Recording Secretary, Arnold Jones, 134 Forty-
ninth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Building Service Employees' Union, No. 244.—
President, V. Galbraith; Business Secretary,
A. J. Wybrew, 339 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Cafeteria and Coffee Shop Employees' Association.—President, R. G. Ball; Recording Secretary, Ruby Peckover, 2061 Third Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 452.—President, R. E. Guthrie;
Recording Secretary, H. P. Hamilton, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of (Floorlayers), No. 1541.—President,
Ben B. Sochasky; Recording Secretary, John
Soderman, 5650 Balaclava Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2533.—President, Frank Logan;
Recording Secretary, Mrs. Olive King, c/o Room
4, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Checkers' and Weighers' Association, Marine, No.
506.—President, W. Wright; Recording Secretary, J. L. Chapman, 61 Cordova Street West,
Vancouver.
City Hall Employees' Association, Vancouver City,
No. 15. — President, R. Skinner; Secretary,
Thomas H. Lewis, 5823 St. George Street, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Association, North Vancouver,
No. 3.—President, Hugh Beattie; Secretary,
Norman E. Woodard, 136 Seventeenth Street
West, North Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Federal Labour Union, No. 28.—
President, Thure Anderson; Recording Secretary, Jack Phillips, 1354 Fifteenth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, D. Harding; Secretary, Harold Baker,
3680 Collingwood Street, Vancouver.
CKWX Employees' Association.—Vice-President,
R. E. Misener; Secretary, Helen Robertson,
136 Braemar Road East, North Vancouver.
Clerks' and Warehousemen's Union, No. 10.—
President, L. M. Congdon; Secretary-Treasurer,
S. Nuttall, 1035 Eleventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
Communications Association, No. 4.—President,
Terrance O'Grady; Secretary-Treasurer, Frank
Boxall, 1507 Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Distillery, Rectifying and Wine Workers' International Union of America, No. 92.—President,
L. Marlor; Secretary, George Grey, 545 Forty-
Seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Electrical Trades' Union, No. 1.—President, J. H.
Bushfield; Secretary, R. Adair, 208,16 Hastings
Street East, Vancouver.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 213.—President, T. B. Smith; Recording
Secretary, W. C. Daley, 1055 Victoria Drive,
Vancouver.
Elevator Constructors' International Union, No.
82.—President, R. Holmes; Recording Secretary, H. C. MacKichan, 2057 Seventh Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Embalmers and Undertakers Assistants' Union,
No. 23374.—President, William Scott; Business
Agent, J. A. Dougall, 1334 Nicola Street, Vancouver.
Enamel Workers' Federal Union, Vancouver, No.
291.—President, P. Grieve; Secretary, A. Hannah, 2817 Euclid Avenue, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Division
No. 320.—President, C. J. Greer; Secretary-
Treasurer, E. J. Wise, 3275 Ontario Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Division
No. 907.—President, Charles Glibbery; Recording Secretary, A. F. McGuire, 2931 McKay
Avenue, Burnaby.
Engineers of Canada, Inc., National Association
of Marine, No. 7.— President, J. G. Pearce;
Business Agent, Hamilton B. McKie, 319 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
115.—President, F. L. Hunt; Recording Secretary, J. W. McKay, 6649 Lanark Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
882.—President, Joe Kolbus; Recording Secretary, A. Curran, 2535 Tenth Avenue West, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 147
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
963.—President, William Reid; Recording Secretary, L. A. Roach, 2932 Sophia Street, Vancouver.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 15.—
President, E. Ainsworth; Recording Secretary,
J. E. Battye, 760 Sixty-third Avenue East, Vancouver.
Federal Union, Vancouver, No. 278.—President,
E. H. Hudson; Recording Secretary, J. K.
Miller, 2671 Pandora Street, Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees' Union, No. B 71.—
President, M. Proudlock; Secretary-Treasurer,
G. Hislop, 2549 Charles Street, Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees' Union, No. F 71.—
President, C. W. Backus; Secretary-Treasurer,
Delia Garland, 7, 1940 Arbutus Street, Vancouver.
Fire Fighters' Union, Vancouver, No. 18.—President, Hugh S. Bird; Recording Secretary, Harry
Foster, 4469 Gladstone Street, Vancouver.
Fire Fighters' Union, City, No. 914.—President,
W. G. Miller; Secretary-Treasurer, T. Cumming,
152 Twelfth Street East, North Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 656.—President, B. D. Mortimer;
Recording Secretary, G. H. Munro, 1915 Haro
Street, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Stanley Park Lodge No. 939.—President, J. A. Rennie; Recording Secretary, John
Livingstone, 2721 Twenty-sixth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 289.—President, William F. Sutton; Recording Secretary, K. Bellingham, 1646 Second
Avenue West, Vancouver.
First Aid Attendants' Association of B.C., Industrial.—President, Norman D. Walcroft; Secretary, H. W. Mahler, 101, 603 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United.—
President, George Miller; Secretary-Treasurer,
H. Stevens, 138 Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
Fur Workers' Union, Vancouver, No. 197.—President, Mrs. Elizabeth Zlotnik; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Elizabeth Zlotnik, 405, 504 Hastings
Street East, Vancouver.
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 190.—
President, George Munro; Secretary, Walter
W. Shaw, 3435 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 232.—
President, Mrs. Ada Halloran; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Rose L. Firth, 2426 Yale Street,
Vancouver.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies,
No. 276.—President, P. C. Rivers; Recording
Secretary, Linda Vivian, 4116 Hastings Street
East, Vancouver.
Gasworkers' Union, Vancouver and Victoria, No.
225.—President, Ernest Rees; Recording Secretary, L. Henwood, 1332 Forty-ninth Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Glaziers and Glass Workers, Brotherhood of
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of
America, No. 1527.—President, W. Brown;
Recording Secretary, A. Allen, 5215 Culloden
Street, Vancouver.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. H. Stewart; Secretary,
Miss J. A. Bruce, Room 8, 407 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America.—President, Alex S. Simpson; Secretary-Treasurer, W. T. Ferris, 3293 Matapan
Crescent, Vancouver.
Grocery and Food Clerks' Union, Retail, No. 1518.
—President, Jack Patterson; Recording Secretary, Lucy Slack, 1728 Pendrell Street, Vancouver.
Harbour Employees' Association, Vancouver.—■
President, James D. Kennedy; Secretary, Cyril
M. Hampton, 1011 Richelieu Avenue, Vancouver.
Hod Carriers', Construction and General Laborers' Union, International, No. 602.—President,
Seth Burnley; Recording Secretary, Hans Jor-
genson, 786 Hastings Street East, Vancouver.
Hospital Employees' Federal Union, Vancouver,
No. 180.—President, C. Jenkinson; Recording
Secretary, George Stevenson, 605 Sixteenth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, No. 28.
—President, R. E. Williams; Recording Secretary, I. Beck, 304, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees and Beverage
Dispensers, International Alliance of, No. 676.
—'President, William Lindsay; Financial Secretary, Fred W. Mills, 4502 Williams Street,
Vancouver.
Jewelry Workers' Union, International, No. 42.—
President, E. R. Hawken; Recording Secretary,
W. L. Routley, 2747 Eighteenth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, c/o Kelly Douglas, Box 39, Vancouver.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire and
Metal, No. 207.—President, A. M. Ross; Recording Secretary, H. B. Russell, 4876 Chatham
Street,  Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' International Union, No. 292.—
President, James Field; Recording Secretary,
Mabel O'Connor, 337 Second Street West, North
Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Branch
No. 12.—President, R. Hendrickson; Secretary-
Treasurer, John Cass, 426 Seventeenth Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Library Staff Association, Vancouver Public, No.
7. — President, Elizabeth Madeley; Recording
Secretary, Arabell Peirson, 1249 Devonshire
Crescent, Vancouver.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, No. 44.—
President, Frank Phipps; Recording Secretary,
Ernest Perkins, 1439 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
38-163.—President, George Bryce; Secretary-
Treasurer and Business Agent, James O'Don-
nell, 1836 Third Avenue East, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union,
International No. 501.—President, J. Boyes;
Secretary-Treasurer, R. H. Clewley, 660 Jackson
Avenue, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union,
International, No. 507. — President, Charles
McKendrick; Secretary-Treasurer, D. C. Mackenzie, 217 Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver.
Lumber Inspectors' Union (B.C. Division).—President, T. A. Brown; Recording Secretary, R.
Nellist,  1435  Cypress  Street, Vancouver.
J H 148
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers, No. 2968.—President, A. A. Taylor; Recording Secretary, H.
Bone, 447 Sixth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No.
182.—President, H. L. Thomas; Recording Secretary, J. Bygate, 3167 Kitchener Street, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No.
692.—President, Harold D. Foster; Recording
Secretary, H. Fishman, 2633 Fourth Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, G. A. Cahill; Secretary,
J. P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Limited, Employees'
Association.—President, K. H. Burnet; Secretary, Stanley McDonald, 99 Cordova Street
East, Vancouver.
Mailers' Union, No. 70.—President, William E.
Campbell; Secretary-Treasurer, R. Gordon Taylor, 1176 Duchess Avenue, Hollyburn P.O., West
Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 167—Secretary, P. J. Doyle, 2638 Twenty-
first Avenue West, Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 210.—Secretary, R. Halliday, 3383 Pender
Street East, Vancouver.
Malkin, W. H., Co., Ltd., Warehouse Employees'
and Truck-drivers' Association. — President,
James E. Fowler; Secretary-Treasurer, Frank
H. Calhoun, Hotel Stirling, Vancouver.
Marble, Stone and Slate Polishers, Rubbers and
Sawyers, Tile and Marble Setters' Helpers and
Terrazza Workers' Helpers, International Association of, No. 78. — President, G. Seaton;
Recording Secretary, A. Evans, 763 Sixty-second
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial
Union, No. 1.—President, William L. White;
Recording Secretary, George H. Brown, 1787
Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North
America, Amalgamated, No. 212. — President,
Frank Rutledge; Recording Secretary, Jean
Richardson, 1717 Seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Merchant Service Guild, Canadian. ■— President,
Capt. W. A. Gosse; Secretary, G. F. Bullock,
675 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Metal and Chemical Workers' Union, No. 289.—
President, J. L. Irvine; Recording Secretary,
D. Mackie, 2813 Dundy Street, New Westminster.
Milk Wagon Drivers' and Dairy Employees' Union,
No. 464.—President, R. McCulloch; Secretary,
Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Monsanto (Canada), Ltd., Employees' Committee.
—President, K. J. Tomkins; Secretary, G. B.
Anderson, 1216 Fifty-nine Avenue East, Vancouver.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union, International, No. 281.—President, Melvin O'Brien;
Recording Secretary, Ben McDowell, Horseshoe
Bay.
Municipal Employees' Association, West Vancouver, No. 13.—President, Frank H. Bonar; Secretary, H. T. Thomas, 1508 Duchess Avenue, West
Vancouver.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 145.'—
President, William E. Wyman; Secretary,
George E. Leach, Suite 51, 553 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
Native Brotherhood of B.C.-—President, Chief
William Scow; Recording Secretary, Herbert
Cook, Alert Bay.
Nelson's Sales and Service Club. — President,
Lee G. Head; Secretary, James A. Currie, 1407
Cypress Street, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, No. 1.—President,
Douglas Fell; Recording Secretary, Eva Tomich,
1656 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, No. 2.—President,
Lionel Salt; Secretary, Frank Meade, 1017%
Nelson Street, Vancouver.
Nurses' Association, Registered, of British Columbia.—President, Miss Evelyn Mallory; Recording Secretary, Miss Alberta Creasor, 2127%
Fortieth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Office Employees' International Union, No. 15.—
President, Mrs. Anne Bengough; Recording
Secretary, Miss Claire Jones, 193 Hastings
Street East, Vancouver.
Office and Professional Workers' Organizing Committee, No. 8.—President, Mrs. J. Mohart; Recording Secretary, Miss Marie LeBrun, 905
Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Office and Professional Workers of America,
United, No. 173.—President, Bertram L. Deve-
son; Recording Secretary, A. E. Meyer, 123
Windsor Road East, North Vancouver.
Office and Professional Workers of America,
United, No. 229.—President, M. S. Kennedy;
Recording Secretary, Theresa Chapman, 339
Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Oil Workers of Canada, United, No. 7.—President, Alexander McLeod; Secretary-Treasurer,
Samuel McLeod, 247 Fourth Street West, North
Vancouver.
Oil Workers of Canada, United, No. 12.—President, C. L. Palmer; Recording Secretary, S.
Adamson, 723 Hamilton Street, New Westminster.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
162.—President, R. Johnson; Recording Secretary, J. Longmuir, 3727 Douglas Road, New
Westminster.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
249.—President, M. F. Dean; Recording Secretary, F. Urquhart, 1722 Victoria Drive, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
283.—President, Thomas Marshall; Recording
Secretary, May Harvey, 4245 Beatrice Street,
Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
341.—President, R. Ferguson; Recording Secretary, P. Keller, 931 Thirty-ninth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
350.—President, William Quirk; Recording Secretary, Mrs. F. E. Frost, 1491 Eighth Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, No. 138.—President, Bruce
Mitchell; Recording Secretary, W. E. Eaton,
39 Fortieth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, No. 1550. — President, J.
Mulligan; Recording Secretary, L. Pribyl, 150
Forty-ninth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
528.—President, John Krugar; Corresponding
Secretary, Ethel Jude, 266 Fifty-fourth Avenue
East, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 149
Pattern Makers' Association, No. 1260. — President, Donald A. Merkley; Secretary-Treasurer,
Leo J. Wiles, 3, 1584 Marine Drive, Hollyburn.
Photo-engravers' Union, Vancouver, No. 54.—
President, Joseph Hinke; Corresponding Secretary, Ralph Grantham, 3941 Eleventh Avenue
West, Vancouver.   ■
Pile Drivers', Bridge, Wharf, and Dock Builders'
Union, No. 2404.—■ President, C. Anderson;
Recording Secretary, E. Peladeau, Box 369,
Vancouver.
Plasterers' and Cement Finishers' International
Association, Operative, No. 779. — President,
Glen Harding; Secretary-Treasurer, H. West,
3419  Twenty-third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United
States and Canada, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices, No. 170.—President,
Jack A. Dillabough; Recording Secretary, James
R. Barton, 1148 Thurlow Street, Vancouver.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices, No.
571.—President, Thomas H. Poulton; Secretary,
Lloyd Elrick, 302, 1877 Haro Street, Vancouver.
Policemen's Federal Labour Union, City, No. 12.—
President, F. F. Dougherty; Recording Secretary, Fred Spencer, 2541 Grant Street, Vancouver.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Vancouver, No. 69.—President, Max Erenberg; Recording Secretary, Henry Young, 235 Thirty-
sixth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 433.—President, Karl
Stelp; Corresponding Secretary, Ford MacKinnon, 2486 Third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, No. 655.—
President, Maurice Snelling; Corresponding Secretary, Miss Audrey Yost, 2686 McGill Street,
Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Vancouver
Lodge No. 144.—President, J. A. Montgomery;
Secretary, E. S. West, 4197 Eleventh Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Lions Gate
Lodge No. 987.—President, E. F. Marsden; Secretary-Treasurer, J. B. A. Peladeau, 6129 St.
Catherine Street, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Evergreen
Footboard Lodge No. 1040. — President, J. P.
O'Brien; Secretary-Treasurer, R. E. Casey, 1541
Twelfth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Vancouver Lodge No. 58. — President, Harold
Holmes; Recording Secretary, A. J. Carlson,
1228 Pendrell Street, Vancouver.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 773.—President, R. B. Scribner; Recording Secretary, F. W. Wood, 434 Twentieth
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, No.
267.—President, A. S. Emms; Secretary-Treasurer, J. B. Physick, 4153 Twelfth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 59.—President,
E. R. Morton; Secretary, Miss E. G. Williams,
2055 Forty-second Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 82.—President,
R. Carter; Secretary, A. P. Smith, 2283 Eighth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 162.—President,
E. H. Vance; Secretary, B. Cavanaugh, Suite
6, 2466 Ninth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 220.—President,
R. Anderson; Secretary, R. Heriot, 3521 Eleventh
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 221.—President,
P. Jones; Secretary, A. E. Galbraith, 3537
Thirty-fourth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 223.—President,
R. James Green; Secretary, Harris F. McGee,
819 Third Avenue East, North Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 275.—President,
William Kreut; Secretary, Mrs. Anne Broad-
bent, 3030 Victoria Drive, Vancouver.
Railway   Mail   Clerks'   Association. — President,
F. W. Hitchcock; Secretary-Treasurer, H. I.
Hamilton, 171 Fortieth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway, Canadian Association of, No. 74.—President, J. S. Wilkes; General Secretary, D. B.
Roberts, 216 Avenue  Building, Winnipeg, Man.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, Progress Lodge No. 46.—President, Leonard
Ramsay; Secretary-Treasurer, Edward Bell,
2855 Twentieth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 626.—President, G. H. Stubbs; Secretary-Treasurer, Alfred Padgham, 5013 Payne
Street, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, Pacific Lodge No. 630.—President, A. Farrow; Recording Secretary, T. W. Kirby, 3566
Triumph Street, Vancouver.
Refrigeration Workers' Union, No. 516.—President, D. D. Forrister; Recording Secretary, J.
Johnson, 4862 Ontario  Street, Vancouver.
Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union,
No. 535.—President, A. W. Parrish; Recording
Secretary, H. Wright, 3855 Rupert Street,
Vancouver.
School Service Employees, No. 20.—President, J.
Sinclair; Secretary, A. Wallis, 2753 Adanac
Street, Vancouver.
Seafarers' Association, Canadian, No. 1.—President, II. H. Taylor; Recording Secretary, G.
Smillie, 139 Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver.
Seafarers' International Union of North America
(Canadian District).—President, Harry Lunde-
berg; Secretary-Treasurer, D. Joyce, 95 Nineteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Seamen's Union, Canadian, Branch No. 7. ■—
President, James S. Thompson; Business Agent,
J. M. Smith, 53 Powell Street, Vancouver.
Sewerage and Drainage Board Employees' Union,
Greater Vancouver Water District and Joint,
No. 2.—President, P. D. Stewart; Secretary,
J. M. Morrison, 4573 First Avenue West, Vancouver.
Sheet Metal Workers', International Association
of, No. 280.—President, Fred Cocker; Business
Representative, James Walker, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver. H 150
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Shinglers' and Roofers' Union, No. 2346.—President, George Buckley; Recording Secretary,
J. A. Gildemiester, 2053 Cypress Street, Vancouver.
Shingle Weavers' Union, No. 2802.'—President,
Thomas Dumma; Recording Secretary, A. Low,
1184 Seventy-third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Shoe Leather and Tannery Workers' Union, No.
505.—President, George Wood; Recording Secretary, Joseph O'Connor, 337 Second Avenue West,
North Vancouver.
Shoe Workers' Union of Vancouver, No. 510.—
President, J. Turner; Secretary-Treasurer,
G. Clerihew, 2918 Thirty-fourth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Sign and Pictorial Painters, No. 726.—President,
David Reid; Recording Secretary, J. A. Middle-
ton, 5881 Dundas Street, Vancouver.
Slade, A. P., & Associated Companies Employees'
Association.—President, William Spain; Secretary, Marguerite Cooper, 3530 First Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Spear & Jackson's Employees' Club.—President,
Matthew Wilson; Secretary-Treasurer, D. R.
Alexander, 4055 Dundas Street, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2655.—
President, T. Carter; International Representative, P. Baskin, 905 Dominion Bank Building,
Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2765.—
President, C. Kemp; Recording Secretary, N.
Harford, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2821.—
President, G. Sowden; Recording Secretary, L.
Wilford, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2952.—
President, E. Meglaughlin; Recording Secretary, N. Richardson, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3229.—
President, F. Rowland; Recording Secretary,
E. Good, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3253.—■
President, C. Anderson; Recording Secretary,
G. Stobart, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3302.—■
President, A. Bray; Recording Secretary, P.
Mandzie, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3376.'—■
President, Guy Cosh; Recording Secretary, D.
Reid, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3452.—
President, J. Kilby; Recording Secretary, R.
Symons, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3495.—
President, A. Nordenmark; Recording Secretary, J. Bosak, 905 Dominion Bank Building,
Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3910.—
President, J. Kinnear; Recording Secretary, E.
Daggett, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3546.—
President, E. M. Orr; Recording Secretary,
D. Dunphy, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Van-
Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union, International, No. 88.—President, Robert N. Myles;
Recording Secretary, Stanley Dunlop, c/o Sun
Publishing Co., Stereotyping Department, Vancouver.
St. Paul's Hospital Employees' Organization.—
President, John S. Johnston; Recording Secretary, Miss Mary Kathleen McKay, 1930 Dundas
Street, Vancouver.
Street Railwaymen's Union, No. 101.—President,
Thomas Dunlop; Recording Secretary, Lloyd
Easier, 611 Seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Sugar Workers, Industrial Union of, No. 517.—
President, Harold Webster; Recording Secretary, Ed. Hitchens, 3424 Victory Street, Vancouver.
Switchmen's Union of North America, No. 111.—
President, Stanley O'Brain; Recording Secretary, W. F. L. Sharpe, 726 Fifty-fifth Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Tailors' Union of America, Journeymen, No. 178.—
President, Harry Clausner; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Dorothy Roberts, 606 Forty-seventh
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Taxicab, Stage, and Bus Drivers' Union, No. 151.
—President, Albert Blais; Recording Secretary,
I. L. Cawker, 518 Richards Street, Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation, British Columbia.—President, T. M. Chalmers; General Secretary, C. D.
Ovans, 1300 Robson Street, Vancouver.
Telegraphers' Union, Commercial, No. 1.—President, R. E. O'Brien (Chairman); Secretary-
Treasurer, W. C. Pye, Box 432, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 1.—President, C. Cole; Secretary,
L. Leiper, 3475 Ash Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Clerical Division), No. 20.—President, T. S. Baird;
Secretary, Miss Mary Baird, 2636 Burns Street,
Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 5.—President, A. Pollard; Secretary, C. Card, 1569 Graveley Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic
Division), No. 10.—President, Miss Jean Wilson;
Secretary, Miss Sybil Potter, 1070 Haro Street,
Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic
Division) (Cafeteria), No. 14.—President, Mrs.
J. Lepkey; Secretary, Miss Lorena Asher, 326
Fifty-sixth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Textile Workers' Union, Federal, No. 12.—President, A. J. Laity; Recording Secretary, G. F.
Murphy, 1956 Kingsway, Vancouver.
Theatre Employees' Union, No. B 72.—President,
John R. Foster; Secretary, Margaret Colbourne,
2483 Broadway West, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees of the United States
and Canada, International Alliance of, No. 118.
—President, Earl Sidsworth; Recording Secretary, Walter Blake, 655 Robson Street, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture
Machine Operators of the United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, No. 348.—
President, D. Calladine; Secretary, J. H. Leslie,
271 Twentieth Street, Hollyburn, West Vancouver.
Tile Setters' Union, No. 3. — President, T. W.
Anderson; Recording Secretary, W. Richards,
Pleasantside. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H  151
Truck Drivers and Helpers, General, No. 31.—
President, William M. Brown; Secretary, R. D.
Atkinson, 4313 Perry Street, Vancouver.
Trunk and Bag Industrial Workers' Union, No. 1.
—President, T. Pilling; Recording Secretary,
Miss M. Balentine, 2555 Triumph Street, Vancouver.
Typographical Union, Vancouver, No. 226.—President, A. Bevis; Secretary-Treasurer, H. Nee-
lands, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
University of British Columbia Employees' Federal
Union, No. 116. — President, Norman Smith;
Recording Secretary, George Rogers, 847 Twenty-
eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Upholsterers' Industrial Union, No. 1.—President,
George H. Karleen; Recording Secretary, Mrs.
Alice McMillan, 1110 Bute Street, Vancouver.
Vancouver Ice and Cold Storage, Limited, Association.—President, R. Harvey; Recording Secretary, William Ferbey, 140 Nineteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-71.
—President, James L. McEwen; Financial
Secretary, Leo A. Young, 1127 Barclay Street,
Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-217.
—President, L. Whalen; Recording Secretary,
T. G. MacKenzie, 4785 Chancellor Street, Vancouver.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No. 71.
—President, John McCuish; Recording Secretary, D. M. Barbour, 2541 Nineteenth Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No.
217.—President, Robert Jackson; Recording
Secretary, AI Russell, 2189 Burgess Street,
Burnaby.
Woodworkers' Union, British Columbia, No. 2.—
President, L. Macintosh; Recording Secretary,
Paul Derrick, 277 Seventeenth Street, New
Westminster.
Vanderhoof.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Nechako Lodge No. 1870. —President, G. P.
Whitfield, Vanderhoof; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. Wall, McCall, via Vanderhoof.
Vernon.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1360.—President, H. W. Philps;
Recording Secretary, W. J. Forsyth, 3300 Forty-
second Avenue, Vernon.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 326.—President, N. L. Kozoris; Secretary, R. S. Colley,
3304 Fifteenth Street, Vernon.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 821.—President, W. S. Cawsey; Recording
Secretary, A. John East, 3005 Langille Avenue,
Vernon.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
953.—President, W. W. Gray; Secretary, N. J.
Redman, 3408 Eighteenth Avenue, Vernon.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 6.—
President, J. E. Gray; Secretary, Mrs. M. M.
Atwood, 3105 Thirty-fifth Avenue, Vernon.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. U. Holt; Secretary, Miss
D. Hudson, Vernon.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 2861.'—
President, Lyle F. Gallichan; Recording Secretary, M. Scherba, Vernon.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, G. A. Cahill; Secretary,
J. P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
School Employees' Federal Union, Okanagan Valley, No. 323.—President, Cecil Dodds; Recording
Secretary, George Humphreys, 2907 Thirty-
second Avenue, Vernon.
Victoria.
Automotive Maintenance Workers' Union, No.
151.—President, S. Worboys; Recording Secretary, F. Irvine, 510 Beach Drive, Victoria.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, No. 267.—President, Jack H.
Reid; Recording Secretary, R. C. Leach, 905
Ellery Street, Victoria.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, Victoria, No. 189.—
President, R. Millar; Secretary, Birt Showier,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Barbers', Hairdressers' and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
372.—President, George Turner; Recording Secretary, James Goodman, 806 Cook Street, Victoria.
Barbers' Union, Canadian, No. 2.—President, S.
Temple; Secretary, J. C. Macrimmon, 2006 Oak
Bay Avenue, Victoria.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association (Victoria and Island Branch). — President, H. B.
Gonder; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Cavin,
241 Montreal Street, Victoria.
Beverage Dispensers, No. 513.—President, Vern
Edgelow; Recording Secretary, D. MacRae, 615
Esquimalt Road, Esquimalt.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Sunshine Local No. 520.—■
President, Thomas Hammond; Recording Secretary, Hector N. A. Hatcher, 2607 Scott Street,
Victoria.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
147.—President, A. R. Barnes; Secretary, R.
Foster,  1431 Richardson  Street, Victoria.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery
Workers of America, International Union of
United, No. 280. — President, G. C. Wilson;
Recording Secretary, William Dunaway, 1068
Chamberlain Street, Victoria.
Bricklayers' and Masons' International Union, No.
2.—President, W. Mertton; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. Beckerley, 3965 Saanich Road, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1598. —President, R. E. Hill;
Recording Secretary, Charles Davis, 1056 Am-
phion Street, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2415.—President, Sidney Berrow;
Secretary, E. Hovey, 2511 Empire Street, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 3003.—President, W. Wadden;
Representative, V. Midgley, 3300 Whittier Avenue, Victoria.
Chemical and Explosive Workers' Industrial
Union, Canadian, No. 128.—President, Robert
Barrie; Recording Secretary, William Alexander, James Island.
City Hall Employees' Association, No. 4.—President, J. H. Ozard; Secretary, Katherine Rowe,
c/o Social Welfare Department, 617 Johnson
Street, Victoria. H 152
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, No. 50.—
President, E. Duncan; Secretary, G. A. Fletcher,
1035 Hillside Avenue, Victoria.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, A. E. Pendray; Secretary-Treasurer, W.
Hole, 1228 Johnson Street, Victoria.
Clerks' Union, Retail, No. 279.—President, John
Aubry; Corresponding Secretary, Miss Anna-
belle Murphy, Strathcona Hotel, Victoria.
Construction and General Laborers' Union, No.
1093.—President, F. Williams; Recording Secretary, L. Spiers, 852 Courtenay Street, Victoria.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 230.—President, C. A. Peck; Recording
Secretary, J. A. Driscoll, 1720 Davie Street,
Victoria.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
918.—President, Martin Dawson; Recording Secretary, Edward Callan, 927 Linkleas Avenue,
Victoria.
Engineers of Canada, Inc., National Association
of Marine, No. 6.—President, P. O'Flynn; Secretary, G. W. Brown, 53 Lewis Street, Victoria.
Entertainers' Federal Union, Victoria, No. 329.—
President, Harold E. Ker; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Verna M. Moore, 2990 Rutland Road,
Victoria.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20.—
President, F. E. Whale; Recording Secretary,
D. E. Gillis, 62 Linden Avenue, Victoria.
Fire Fighters' Association, Greater Victoria, No.
730.—President, James C. Lusse; Recording Secretary, R. J. Coates, 2609 Avebury Avenue,
Victoria.
Fire Fighters' Association, Canadian Naval Federal (Western Division).—President, William
H. Boothroyd; Secretary-Treasurer, Peter W.
Rawlyck, 410 Walter Avenue, Victoria.
Fire Fighters' Association, Saanich, No. 967.—
President, Hector McNeill; Secretary, John R.
Mortimer, 3160  Service  Street, Saanich.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 690.—President, Edward 0. Som-
merville; Financial Secretary, E. W. Collins,
730 Connaught Street, Victoria.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United,
Victoria Local.—President, E. Neish; Secretary-
Treasurer, Thomas A. Carrington, 451 Chester
Street, Victoria.
Furniture Workers and Lino Layers, No. 2527.—
President, R. G. Hanley; Recording Secretary,
Francis G. Hall, 203 Menzies Street, Victoria.
Garage Employees, V.I.C.L. Association.—President, W. Bate; Recording Secretary, C. Free-
gard, V.I.C.L. Garage, 615 Courtenay Street,
Victoria.
Government Employees, American Federation of,
No. 59.—President, Thomas F. Monaghan, 205
Campbell Building, Victoria.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. S. Oliver; Secretary, H. A.
Carney, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance and Bartenders' International League
of America, No. 459.—President, Arthur Stacey;
Recording Secretary, Mrs. Margaret Burgoyne,
212 St. Lawrence Street, Victoria.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, T. Clements; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Bidwell, Box 39, Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' Union, No. 1.—President, Don
Newell; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Marie Hatting, 2602 Wark Street, Victoria.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire and
Metal, No. 332.—President, E. C. Day; Secretary, A. J. Ferguson, 2751 Roseberry Avenue,
Victoria.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Branch
No. 11.—President, H. W. Rivers; Secretary,
Fred C. Hurry, 898 Front Street, Victoria.
Library Staff Association, Victoria, Public, No.
9.—President, Miss L. Muriel Laing; Recording
Secretary, Miss Betty Bird, 925 Green Street,
Victoria.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
38/162.—President, Gordon C. Richards; Secretary, W. Norman Scott, 121 Government
Street, Victoria.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 456.
—President, H. E. Thayer; Recording Secretary,
C. H. Lester, 1286 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, G. A. Cahill; Secretary,
J. P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
Mailers' Union, No. 212. — President, James A.
McCague; Recording Secretary, Alan M. Watson, 1520 Davie Street, Victoria.
Marine Workers', Machinists', and Boilermakers'
Industrial Union, No. 3.—President, John Corn-
thwaite; Recording Secretary, Ernest Orchin,
918 Russell Street, Victoria.
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Limited, Employees'
Association.—President, K. H. Burnet; Secretary, Stanley McDonald, 99 Cordova Street
East, Vancouver.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union, International, No. 144. — President, William Bohne;
Corresponding Representative, Sam Emery, 864
Old Esquimalt Road, Victoria.
Municipal Employees' Association, Saanich, No.
5.—President, Roy H. Wootten; Secretary, Teresa
Webb, 3957 Glanford Avenue, Victoria.
Municipal Employees' Association, Oak Bay, No.
17.—President, R. A. Gordon; Secretary, I. M.
Ferguson, 2880 Foul Bay Road, Saanich.
Municipal Employees' Federal Union, Esquimalt,
No. 333.—President, William J. Edgington; Recording Secretary, Mrs. L. Richards, 302 Robert
Street, Victoria.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 247.—
President, Charles W. Hunt; Secretary, William F. Tickle, 1460 Hampshire Road, Victoria.
National Defence Civilian Workers' Union, No.
129.—President, Joseph D. Marshall; Secretary-
Treasurer, George S. Portingale, 810 Hereward
Road, Victoria.
Newspaper Guild Federal Union, No. 219.—President, S. M. Sallaway; Recording Secretary,
David Stock, c/o Victoria Daily Times, Victoria.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, No. 1163.—President, F.
Dewhurst; Recording Secretary, W. B. Brigden,
213 Helmcken Road, Victoria.
Pantorium Employees' Association. — President,
George Allan; Recording Secretary, Mrs. M. I.
Kinley, 2275 Wakefield Road, Victoria.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
367.—President, Art Coates; Recording Secretary, Thomas L. Dickson, 3478 Lovatt Street,
Victoria. REPORT'OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948.
H 153
Plasterers' and Cement Finishers' International
Association, Operative, No. 450.—President, L. H.
Calvert; Recording Secretary, M. Gwynne, 1647
Hampshire Road, Victoria.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices, No. 324.
—President, Edward Irvine; Recording Secretary, W. B. Caird, 215 Kingston Street, Victoria.
Police Federal Union, Victoria City, No. 251.—
President, Walter Andrews; Recording Secretary, Charles J. Webb, 1525 Jubilee Avenue,
Victoria.
Police Mutual Benefit Association, Victoria.—
President, Stanley T. Holmes; Secretary, David
P. Donaldson, 2537 Vancouver Street, Victoria.
Postal Employees, Canadian, Victoria Branch.—
President, D. Green; Recording Secretary, R. J.
Bland, 1700 Earlston Avenue, Victoria.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Victoria, No. 79.—President, G. Langley; Secretary-Treasurer, F. H. Larssen, 1236 McKenzie
Street, Victoria.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 613.—
President, H. C. Horner; Secretary, J. A. Stone,
1320 Burleith Drive, Victoria.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
50.—President, F. Willey; Financial Secretary,
J. W. Jenkins, 381 Walter Avenue, Victoria.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 289.—President, J. W. Thompson; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. N. Forde, 707 Wilson Street, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 222.—President,
H. E. Field; Secretary, F. J. Ritchie, 1158
Kings Road, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 234.—President,
Richard Jones; Secretary, Lindley H. Brook-
bank, 723 Field Street, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 276.—President,
O. Day; Secretary, Mrs. D. Bean, 541 Dupplin
Road, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 526.—President, A. R. Davie; Secretary-
Treasurer, H. S. Hughes, 1022 Chamberlain
Street, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
Island Lodge No. 1137.—President, R.L.Fletcher;
Secretary-Treasurer, C. H. Ormiston, 1883 Taylor Street, Victoria.
School Board Employees' Association, No. 11.—
President, William Reginald Mail; Secretary-
Treasurer, Shirley J. Ross, 1036 Burdett Avenue,
Victoria.
Sheet Metal Workers, International Association
of, No. 276.—President, George Panter; Recording Secretary, J. W. Quissy, 770 Hill Street,
Victoria.
Shipwrights', Joiners' and Caulkers' Industrial
Union, No. 9.—President, J. R. Blakey; Secretary-Treasurer, Don Douglas, 710 Cormorant
Street, Victoria.
Shipyard Riggers, Benchmen, and Helpers, No.
643.—President, Andrew Manson; Secretary-
Treasurer, Harry L. Ritchie, 2620 Quadra Street,
Victoria.
Shipyard Workers' Federal Union, No. 238.—
President, J. G. Meadley; Recording Secretary,
H. W. Grieve, 3550 Thistle Street, Victoria.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, Division 109.—President, A. H. Hart; Recording Secretary, J. W. McNeill, 3082 Balfour
Avenue, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Clerical Division), No. 21.—President, G. Robbins;
Secretary, Miss M. Wood, 1230 Monterey Avenue, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 2.—President, D. Smith; Secretary, K. M. John, 2151 Fair Street, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic
Division), No. 11.—President, Miss N. Williamson; Secretary, Miss Margaret Munn, 8, 2321
Cook Street, Victoria.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Motion Picture
Machine Operators, International Alliance of,
No. 168.—President, S. V. Henn; Recording
Secretary, R. A. Jones, 1020 Empress Avenue,
Victoria.
Typographical Union, No. 201.—President, James
F. Hough; Secretary-Treasurer, Herbert Warren, 2218 Beach Drive, Victoria.
Victoria Bed and Mattress Co., Ltd., and Parkers
Mfg. Co., Ltd., Employees' Association of.—
President, Ronald Wilson; Secretary-Treasurer,
Arthur R. Edwards, 780 Topaz Avenue, Victoria.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-118.
—President, Roy J. Whittle; Recording Secretary, Ernest C. Peters, 1338 Gladstone Avenue,
Victoria.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union, No. 118.—President, J. C. Peace; Recording Secretary, Kuldeep
Singh, 414 Garbally Road, Victoria.
Walcott.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 340.—President, J. D. Denicola; Secretary-
Treasurer, J. E. Middleton, Walcott.
Wardner.
Maintenance-of-way  Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No. 229.—Secretary, G. Marra, Wardner.
Wells.
Mine,   Mill  and   Smelter   Workers,   International
Union of, No. 685.—President, George Robinson;
Recording Secretary, V. Johnson, Wells.
West Summerland.
Fruit  and  Vegetable  Workers'  Union,  No.  12.—
President, L. Burnell;   Secretary, C. B. Hankins,
Summerland.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 2742.—
President, Roy Derosier;    Recording Secretary,
Henry Knippelburg, R.R. 1, Summerland.
White Rock.
Fibre   Flax   Workers'   Union,   No.   1.—President,
Harry Maxfield;   Secretary, Dan Lawson, White
Rock.
Williams Lake.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, H. G. Windt;   Secretary, L. M.
Lunn, Williams Lake.
Woodfibre.
Pulp,   Sulphite  and   Mill   Workers,   International
Brotherhood   of,   No.   494. — President,   James
Davidson;   Recording Secretary, Cyril A. Harding, Woodfibre.
. H 154
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Organizations of Employers.
Calgary.
Bituminous Coal Operators' Association, The
Western Canada.—President, J. J. Mclntyre;
Secretary, W. C. Whittaker, 520 Lougheed Building, Calgary, Alta.
Kelowna.
Shippers' Association, Inc., Okanagan Federated.
—President, F. L. Fitzpatrick; Secretary, L. R.
Stephens, 1485 Water Street, Kelowna.
Penticton.
Co-operative Growers, Penticton.—President, John
Coe; Secretary-Treasurer, D. G. Penny, 249
Main Street, Penticton.
Prince George.
Lumbermen's Association, Northern Interior
(Prince George, C.M.A.). — President, F. W.
Dobson; Secretary, P. E. Robertson, P.O. Box
■486, Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Fishing Vessel Owners'Association of B.C. (Canadian Halibut).—President, Barny Roald; Secretary, Ole Stegavig, Box 1025, Station B., Prince
Rupert.
Vancouver.
Automotive Transport Association of B.C.—President, G. C. Parrott; Secretary-Manager, G. L.
Buckman, 810, 207 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, B.C.—President, B. M. Col-
well; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, Master. — President, B. M.
Colwell; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth
Avenue   East, Vancouver.
Box Manufacturers' Section, Interior (C.M.A.).—
President, J. G. Strother; Secretary, Hugh Dal-
ton, 608 Marine Building, Vancouver.
Building and Construction Industries Exchange.—
President, F. W. Welsh; Secretary, R. J. Lecky,
342 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Contractors' Association, General.—President, L. G.
Murray; Secretary, R. J. Lecky, 342 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of B.C.—President, William J. Pitre; Secretary, Harold A.
Christenson, 2705 Fourth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Hotels' Association, British Columbia.—President,
Adam Paterson; Secretary, Eric V. F. Ely, Ste.
5, 1366 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Industrial Association of British Columbia.—
President, W. L. Macken; Secretary, Miss M. M.
Riley, 1024 Marine Building, Vancouver.
Jewellers' Association, Canadian (B.C. Section).—
President, John Waters; Secretary, Reginald B.
Deacon, 510, 119 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Laundry, Dry Cleaning, and Linen Supply Club,
Vancouver.—President, T. D. O'Brien; Secretary-Treasurer, J. R. Taylor, Room 600, Hall
Building, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Loggers' Association, Inc., British Columbia. —
Chairman, William McMahan; Secretary-Manager, John N. Burke, 1518, 510 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, Interior
(C.M.A.).—Chairman, Jim White; Secretary,
Hugh Dalton, 608 Marine Building, Vancouver.
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association,
B.C.—President, B. L. Pendleton; Secretary,
L. R. Andrews, 718 Metropolitan Building,
Vancouver.
Metal Trades' Section (C.M.A.).—President, M. M.
Frazer; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 608 Marine
Building, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Milk Producers'Association, Fraser Valley.—President, D. R. Nicholson; Secretary, J. J. Brown,
Surrey Centre.
Milk Producers' Association, Vancouver.—President, D. F. Farris; Secretary, F. A. Wilson,
199 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Morticians, B.C. Society of.—President, John T.
Edwards; Secretary, F. J. Harding, 2216 Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Pacific Coast Fishermen's Mutual Marine Insurance Co.—President, H. W. Brown; Secretary-
Manager, L. T. Wylie, 3895 Twenty-first Avenue West, Vancouver.
Plastering and Lathing Contractors' Association,
Greater Vancouver.—President, George S. Whil-
lans; Secretary, George A. Skinner, 4865 Fairmont Street, Vancouver.
Printers' and Stationers' Guild of British Columbia.—President, James M. Forsyth; Secretary-
Treasurer, Mrs. Audrey Andrew, 608, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Red Cedar Shingle Association of B.C., Consolidated.—President, J. E. McNair; Secretary-
Manager, Gordon S. Raphael, 509 Metropolitan
Building, Vancouver.
Restaurant Association, Canadian. — President,
Horace King; Secretary, C. H. Millbourn, Childs
of Canada, 156 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ont.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.,
B.C. Division.—President, W. S. Charlton; Secretary-Manager, George R. Matthews, 217—19
Pacific Building, Vancouver.
Shipping Federation of B.C. — President, J. K.
Cavers; Secretary-Treasurer, R. F. Watts, P.O.
Box 40, Vancouver.
Truck Loggers' Association.—President, G. Harold
Clarke; Secretary, F. H. Adames, 410 Dominion
Building, Vancouver.
Upholstered Furniture Manufacturing Association
of B.C.—President, Henry Ernest Tynan; Secretary, John M. Richardson, 505, 207 Hastings
Street West, Vancouver.
Victoria.
Bakers' Association, Victoria Master.—President,
J. P. Land; Secretary, T. P. McConnell, 123
Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Beer Licensees Employers' Association. — President, J. J. Custock; Secretary, Edward M. Loney,
R.R. 1, Victoria.
Builders' Exchange, Ltd., Victoria. — President,
G. H. Wheaton; Secretary, Roy T. Lougheed,
P.O. Box 608, Victoria.
Electrical Association, Victoria (B.C.). — President, George Langdon; Secretary, R. Gillies,
3031 Jackson Street, Victoria.
Taxi Operators' Association of Greater Victoria.—
President, c/o John D. Carlow; Secretary-Treasurer, Norman A. Westwood, c/o Gray Line,
Victoria. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H  155
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Mr. James Thomson,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present the annual report on the work of the Factory
Inspection Department for the year 1948.
This year has been one in which, with the national call for increased production,
attention has been focused, probably to a greater extent than ever before, on the human
factors in industry. Industry, generally, had some difficulty in obtaining additional
workers, and this has been specially marked in those trades where the work is
particularly arduous, dirty, or unpleasant.
Since workers were in a position to choose the type of work which appealed to
them most, management has been faced with the problem of making their factories
more pleasant and acceptable places in which to work, not merely from the point of view
of physical environment, but also from the wider personal and psychological aspects.
Not only has the safety and health, and even comfort, of the workers attained greater
significance, but there is a more general realization that they are very closely related
to efficiency and production.
Welfare in its widest sense and the establishment of good personnel relationship
has now come to be recognized as of the utmost importance as incentives for increased
production. This technique has been emphasized for many years by the Inspectors
of this Department. We in the Factory Department realize probably more than anyone
the great contrast that can be drawn between the modern factory primarily constructed
and designed for the particular manufacturing process that is carried on, and provided
with all the latest devices for improving working conditions and amenities which
science, engineering, and the industrial psychologist can suggest, and old premises with
small rooms, narrow stairways, poor, restricted natural lighting, obsolete sanitary
arrangements, constantly in need of repair, and overshadowed by neighbouring buildings, which have at one time or another been taken into use with some minor adaptions
for manufacturing purposes. Such are the extremes to which attention is particularly
directed—a situation which has called for a corresponding increase in the activities
of this Department. The opportunity to raise the level of working conditions afforded
by the period of reconstruction after the war is being welcomed generally.
The necessary reconversion of plants to peace-time uses, in many cases to turn out
an entirely different product, permits to some extent the modernization of buildings
and of equipment. Not only workers, but managers and executives, who have had
a taste of working in a well-run and well-equipped modern factory are reluctant to go
back to former conditions in some industries, with few or none of the welfare facilities
and superior amenities of the new establishment, including the lunch-rooms and
canteens which provide a hot meal or a mid-spell snack. Needed, too, are entirely new
premises to replace the legacy of antiquated buildings and the converted domestic
properties, equally unsuitable, which have been used as workshops.
In addition to the many new and modern premises required, the prime need, apart
from matters of safety and health, was a general spring cleaning, tidying-up, repairing,
and refitting to bring factories up to post-war standards and the introduction of more
light and colour to brighten them and take them a step beyond.
Contractors and employers have continued to request special inspections in order
that construction and alterations may be made in accordance with the provisions of the
" Factories Act." Associated with these problems are the problems of better ventilation
(quite apart from the difficult problem of the removal of dust and fumes by localized
ventilation), good lighting, its quality and distribution, and the introduction of
recognized colour schemes in the factory. H  156 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Good housekeeping has been frequently referred to as a means of preventing
accidents. It is even more intimately connected with cleaner conditions. Where
factory management has realized this, the resulting transformations in the appearance
of the premises invariably impress the workers, and they realize the benefit it is to
them, and that co-operation is essential in order to maintain the improved working
conditions.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1948, 2,214 inspections, reinspections, and night inspections of
factories were made. As a result of these inspections, where a violation of the British
Columbia " Factories Act " was indicated, the unsafe condition, or facilities lacking,
was ordered corrected. A written report of each inspection and investigation, along
with a copy of orders, recommendations, etc., sent out to the different plants inspected,
was filed in the office.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
There are very few, if any, industrial plants to-day that are not vitally concerned
with preventing accidents. While it is true that a greater number of new and
inexperienced employees are being brought into our plants each year, the Departmental
supervisor should see that the new employees are made thoroughly familiar with the
safe methods of conducting their work. There should be no more difficulty in including
this in " safety " than in teaching them their productive activities. A new employee
must be properly instructed and supervised; keeping him free from injury is the same
job as for an older employee. When we visit a plant and find safety equipment removed,
and we request that it be produced and installed, we invariably find it to have been
hanging on the wall or under the work-bench. Instances such as these are not
uncommon and would indicate that management and supervision have not, as yet,
learned that the education of their employees to the necessity of using the safety
devices provided is their best hope to combat the hazard of plant operation. Many
serious injuries are received by failure to wear personal protective equipment, such as
goggles, safety-shoes, and proper work-clothing. These dangers are continual, and
power-driven machinery is a very tangible evidence of hazards that must be guarded
against.
More attention is also being given to designating, by means of brightly coloured
factory floor lines, the areas which must at all times be left clear for free passage, and
the scientifically planned use of colour in the marking of machinery to indicate hazards
has contributed largely to reducing personal injuries and eliminating the tripping
hazard.
Recognition by industry of its responsibility in this respect has resulted in the
factories being made a much healthier and safer place in which to earn a livelihood.
The co-operation of employers and employees committees with the Factory Inspectors
has been harmonious throughout the year, resulting in the accomplishment of safety
precautions being taken and the elimination of many hazards which might have
continued to exist. This also applies to the smaller factories and shops where safety
committees are non-existent.
EMPLOYEES' WELFARE.
The general trend of inspection reports reveals an increasing interest being taken
by industrial management in what may be termed their employees' welfare—facilities
that aid personal cleanliness, comfort, and conveniences, that have a beneficial effect
on the attitude of employees as well as on health. This does not apply exclusively to
large industrial undertakings. It is significant to note that the small establishments
are showing an increasing interest in this advancement.    Regardless of the size of the REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H  157
industrial undertaking, the directors are steadily appreciating the fact the welfare of
their workers affects, very materially, the prosperity of their business as a whole.
The failure to provide adequate facilities cannot be said to be confined to any
particular industry, although it must be agreed that some are definitely backward.
We contact this type of employer occasionally and are given various excuses, none of
which as a rule is justifiable. In such instances we specify the necessary requirements,
and a reasonable length of time is given the employer to comply with same. In striking
contrast we visit other industrial plants, both old and new, in which welfare measures
have attained a very high standard. These consist of morning and afternoon rest
periods, which are now general practice throughout many industries, management
being convinced that snacks in the middle of the morning or afternoon make a real
contribution to the productiveness of the working force; the most modern sanitary
conveniences; dining and reading rooms; and well-equipped industrial lockers.
Facilities are also provided for drying the clothes of employees whose duties are such
that they are required to work at unsheltered occupations. Special buildings have been
built for these purposes, and, in others, dining-rooms and reading-rooms have been
provided by either renovating or remodelling existing buildings.
LIGHTING.
Ample light for the job is one of the essentials for a safe, healthy, and comfortable
place to work, also a factor of primary importance which affects environment in every
individual establishment. The beneficial effects of good illumination, both natural and
artificial, have been established in extensive tests over many years. The advantages
to industry are many. One outstanding feature during the year in regards to artificial
lighting has been the marked increase in the installation of the standard type of tubular
fluorescent units. Although these have been readily used in large factories, their
adoption in small works has been particularly noticeable.
Disposal of Fluorescent-lamp Tubes.
A special word of comment or warning should be posted or given to all employees
charged with the disposal of burnt-out fluorescent-lamp tubes. In no circumstances
should tubes be set aside for dustman or salvage collectors, who may not know the
hazards connected with these tubes or the correct method of disposal. This is a subject
which has caused considerable interest, especially since the serious health hazard
of beryllium compound has become better known. The following procedure is
recommended.
The tubes should be broken up under water (as this is the only positive way of
preventing dust of beryllium compound from freeing itself and being inhaled) and the
fragments of glass collected in a mesh basket and buried in waste ground. Breaking
up of tubes in the open air is not considered sufficient, as even the smallest particles
of inhaled dust may be harmful. The above procedure should therefore be taken, unless
it is known for certain that the tubes being disposed of do not contain any harmful
substance.
The worst defects of lighting installations are not deficiency of illumination, but
glare, and the need for proper periodical cleaning of all glazed surfaces, reflectors, and
lamps is emphasized.
VENTILATION.
Particular attention has been paid by Inspectors throughout the year to the
provisions of the " Factories Act" relating to ventilation and the removal of dust and
fumes. Ventilation of garages has received constant attention due to the increase in
the size of the workshops and staff. H 158 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TEMPERATURES.
Special problems have arisen, due to periodic complaints received from workers,
with the need to ensure a maximum amount of heat or a comfortable working temperature in some types of factories. As much attention as possible has therefore been
devoted to it, but there is much to be done if the problem is to be tackled on sound
engineering lines. Investigations made during the year have confirmed the desirability
of using effective temperature scales as an indication of atmospheric conditions in
factories. This affords a very useful index in assessing the relative comfort of an
environment and also in indicating the best method of improving conditions where
various degrees of activity are involved.
HOUSEKEEPING.
Due to the large staffs in some establishments it becomes necessary to recommend
that more toilet and sanitary facilities be provided, and that greater attention be paid
to general housekeeping to attain a higher standard of cleanliness, both by means of
spring cleaning, redecorating, and by daily and weekly cleaning of benches and floors
to ensure a more satisfactory and pleasing result.
WOMEN IN INDUSTRY.
Regulations governing female factory-workers relative to lifting, stacking, protective clothing, etc., received due attention. Also dressing-rooms, individual lockers, and
seats or stools have been provided by the employer when so directed by the Inspector
in writing.
CHILD EMPLOYMENT.
This important Act, " Control of Employment of Children Act," was placed on
the Statute books of the Province at the 1944 Session of the Legislature. It prohibits
the employment of children under the age of 15 years unless permission has been
granted to the employer by the Minister of Labour or any person appointed by him
for that purpose. Before a permit is granted, meticulous care is taken to ensure
that the child will not be exposed to hazards or danger, that the work to be performed
will not interfere with school standing, and that proper supervision will be available
at all times.
As our " Public School Act" requires boys and girls to remain at school until
they become 15 years of age, we work in close co-operation with the school authorities
and the parent or guardian in checking applications for employment, especially when
they are seeking jobs while school is in session. We have, for this reason, with but
few exceptions, confined the issuing of permits authorizing the employment of children
to the duration of the summer school holidays only. If children wish to continue part-
time work and it is considered suitable, permits are reissued. If the child for some
reason or other does not return to school, it has been our policy to consult the school
departments, and not until he or she has been granted a release from school is the
child given full-time employment.
As the problem of juvenile delinquency has brought a great deal of comment from
various sources, this Department will continue strict enforcement of this legislation,
as it is undoubtedly one of the most important contributions of the Government. All
cases of child labour reported and discovered during our regular inspections were
corrected immediately without recourse to prosecution.
INDUSTRIAL HOME-WORK.
During the year under review there was a falling-off in the number of industrial
home-workers, due mainly to the fact that, as materials became more plenticul, back REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1948. H  159
orders were completed and more experienced operators were available. Also, one firm,
where some of the work had been sent out, found that this could practically all be
handled in their new larger quarters.
In two or three cases the employer made room in the factory for a former home-
worker, as it is found easier to supervise the work therein, and then again there is
the matter of having the work delivered and picked up from the home. Also, when
cutting into expensive materials, it is preferable that the workers receive first-hand
particulars as to measurements, etc., as the firm absorbs the spoilage.
Industrial home-work is different to our other inspectional work, in that it embodies
the factory and home and brings us into closer contact with the worker, who considers
our visit more as social rather than inspectional. In view of the fact it is more difficult to keep a home person down to business details and that the home is generally
a distance from transportation, the average home inspection takes longer than the
factory inspection.
One person was issued a home-worker's permit until such time as business
premises were ready, so that she might carry on a specialized work developed through
her own initiative and resourcefulness. This lady was a designer in the Old Country
and came here recently with her family to establish a new home—a fine type of immigrant. Her specialty is wedding ensembles—an innovation—a full account of which
was written up in the local press.
To date we have not found industrial home-work being performed where there
was an infectious or contagious disease. The homes are generally very clean and
modern and the home-workers and families healthy, but where possible we prefer that
the work be done in our modern factories, where conditions, hours, and wages can be
more closely watched. During the year 1948 ten permits were issued to employers
and twenty-five to industrial home-workers.
INSPECTION OF FREIGHT AND PASSENGER ELEVATORS.
As the safety of an elevator, wherever located, is seldom questioned by the persons
using it, it is of paramount importance that the confidence placed in this form of
transportation be retained, as there are few forms of transportation more in general
use to-day by the public than the passenger elevator. One has only to enter a department store, office building, or hotel to realize the large number of persons transported
daily by this means of conveyance, and the enormous amount of freight which must
be moved from one level to another. It is the responsibility of the Factory Inspection
Department to subject all passenger- and freight-elevator equipment to a very rigid
inspection, in the interest of safety, in order to safeguard the thousands using this
form of conveyance daily.
Unlike other forms of transportation, once a car is installed, its path is limited
to a vertical straight line, guarded in its ascent and descent by guide-rails, the length
of which is determined by the height of the building in which the elevator is located.
When entering an elevator, a person is justified in assuming that every precaution has
been taken for safety, and many safety devices are installed for this very purpose.
In order to make the elevator the safest mode of conveyance, the manufacturers have,
t