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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Seventy-seventh Annual Report 1947-48 By the Superintendent… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly

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Full Text

 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Seventy-seventh Annual Report
1947-48
By the Superintendent of Education
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don MoDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1049.  To His Honour C. A. BANKS,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Seventy-seventh Annual Report of the Public
Schools of the Province.
W. T. STRAITH,
Minister of Education.
February, 1949.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.
1947-1948.
Minister of Education:
The Honourable W. T. Straith.
Deputy Minister
and Superintendent of Education:
F. T. Fairey, B.A., LL.D.
Assistant Superintendent of Education:
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed.
Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister:
R. C. Grant, B.A.
J. F. K. English, M.A.
Greater Victoria.
C. G. Brown, M.A., Burnaby.
K. B
Municipal Inspectors of Schools :
B.Paed.,
, John Gough, M.A., Greater Victoria.
William Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Surrey.
Inspectors of Schoo
J. E. Brown, M.A., Victoria.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., E.D., Penticton.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver.
Joseph Chell, M.A., Nelson.
C E. Clay, B.A., Grand Forks.
E. G. Daniels, B.A., New Westminster.
C J. Frederickson, B.A., Cranbrook.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Dawson Creek.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Salmon Arm.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed, Prince Rupert
F. A. Jewett, B.A., Vancouver.
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), Telkwa.
Is in School Districts:
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., Trail.
V. Z. Manning, B.A., Vancouver.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
H. McArthur, B.A., Kamloops.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Kamloops.
W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A.,
F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., Nanaimo.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Courtenay.
L. B. Stibbs, B.A., Prince George.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Kimberley.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., M.B.A., Abbotsford.
A. S. Towell, M.A., Vernon.
A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A., Chilliwack.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS.
Vancouver:
A. R. Lord, B.A., LL.D., Principal.
T. R. Hall, B.A., Vice-Principal.
F. C. Boyes, M.A.
H. B. MacLean.
E. B. Broome, M.A., B.Ed.
H. H. Grantham, M.A.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A.
H. 0. English, B.A., B.S.A., Principal.
H. C. Gilliland, B.A., Vice-Principal.
J. F. Hammett, B.A.
D. B. Gaddes, B.Mus.
Miss M. McManus, Mus.Bac, M.A.
Miss M. E. Maynard, B.A.
E. G. Ozard, B.A.
Miss Stella Shopland, B.A., Librarian.
Miss F. I. Burnham.
L. E. Brown.
Victoria:
Miss M. E. Gordon, B.A.
Miss M. E. Perry.
G. A. Brand, B.A.
Miss W. A. Copeland. JJ 6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS.
Registrar: T. F. Robson.
Assistant Registrar:  H. M. Evans, B.A.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education:  H. A. Jones.
Inspector of Technical Classes:  C. J. Strong, M.A.
Director of Home Economics:  Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc, M.A.
Inspector in Home Economics:   Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.Sc.
Director, Educational and Vocational Guidance:  H. P. Johns, M.A.
Director, Recreation and Physical Education:  Ernest Lee, B.A., B.Sc. in P.E.
Director, Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.
Director, School Radio Broadcasts:  Philip J. Kitley, B.A.
Director, Educational Reference and School Service:   Mrs. Muriel Scace, B.A.
Director, Summer School of Education:  H. P. Johns, M.A.
Director, Tests, Standards, and Research:   C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed.
Director, School and Community Drama:  H. S. Hurn, B.A.
Director of High School Correspondence.:  Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence:   Miss Anna B. Miller.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch:  P. G. Barr.
Accountant: S. E. Espley.
Chief Clerk:  R. D. Smith.
Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind: C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Superintendent of Education  9
Report of the Assistant Superintendent of Education  27
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver  30
Victoria  31
Report of the Director of Summer School of Education  33
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  39
Report of the Director of Home Economics  45
Report of the Director of the Division of Educational Reference and School Service 47
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver  49
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria) *  55
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)  63
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)  65
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)  66
School District No. 36 (Surrey) .  68
Reports of District Inspectors  70
Report of the Superintendent, The School for the Deaf and the Blind  97
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  99
Elementary Correspondence School  103
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  106
Reports on Adult Education—
Industrial Education  109
Correspondence Instruction—
High School  116
Elementary School  117
Recreation and Physical Education  117
School and Community Drama  120
Report of the Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance  123
Report of the Director of School Radio Broadcasts  125
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  128
Report of the Director of Visual Education  132
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust  133
Report of the Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act"__ 134 JJ 8
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
STATISTICAL RETURNS.
Number of Pupils enrolled by Type of School-
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex	
Page.
  9
  10
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils according to Different Classes of Schools  10
Teachers' Certificates  11
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  11
Comparison of Enrolment and Cost per Pupil to Provincial Government  12
Cost per Pupil on Various Bases fpr the School-year 1947-48  13
Children of Foreign Parentage  14
Number of School Districts  14
Number of High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each District  15
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each
District	
     16
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each District....    16
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each District     17
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
each District     18
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
each District     19
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each District _____ 19
Number of Schools, Teachers, and Pupils in each Type of School  21
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  21
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  22
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1947-48 by Provincial Government  23
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1947-48 by School Districts  24
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts  137
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades   172
List of Teachers by District and Type of School, showing Salaries  173   Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1947-48.
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1949.
To the Honourable W. T. Straith, K.C.,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Seventy-seventh Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1948.
ENROLMENT.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
137,827 to 146,708, and the average daily attendance increased from 121,334 to 129,859.
The percentage of regular attendance was 88.51.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School.
Number of Pupils enrolled.
Municipal.
Large
Municipal.
Large
Rural.
Rural.
Total.
8,383
6,087
3,481
5,170
12,546
1,390
1,508
4,146
1,402
42,656
358
3,111
13,911
21,744
4,871
1,182
5,087
11
12,636
61
199
2,751
9,432
1,464
35,447
2,877
Elementary schools	
383
91,122
Totals	
54,862
68,818
22,385                     643
1
146,708
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled in the—
High Correspondence School classes, regular students (exclusive of the 2,167 officially registered in high, superior, or
elementary schools) 	
Elementary Correspondence School classes, regular students
Pupils  receiving  instruction   under  section   13   (g)   of  the
" Public Schools Act "	
1,269
1,536
39
2,844
Adult education—
Classes under the Canadian Vocational Training Programme   8,411
Night-schools  13,746
Vancouver School of Art  968
Vancouver School of Navigation  207
High Correspondence School (adults only)  2,078
Elementary Correspondence School (adults only)  1,333
Recreational and Physical Education Classes  19,283
Carried forward   48,870
9 JJ 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
Brought forward	
Adult education—Continued.
Summer School of Education (1947 session) _
Normal School, Vancouver	
Normal School, Victoria	
Victoria College	
  48,870
  1,027
  274
  148
  488*
University of British Columbia  9,374+
60,181
* Includes special winter and spring sessions, and an enrolment of 10 in special evening class for teachers,
t Includes special winter and spring sessions, but does not include enrolment of 1,781 in summer session.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX.
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the year 1947-48:—
Grade.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
508
9,600
8,556
7,647
7,492
7,009
6,429
6,360
5,745
5,015
4,035
3,120
2,397
629
479
8,589
7,569
7,200
7,015
6,580
6,332
6,266
5,756
5,296
4,646
3,478
2,573
387
987
Grade I	
18,189
Grade II	
16,125
Grade III	
14,847
14,507
Grade IV	
Grade V	
13,589
12,761
Grade VI	
Grade VII                 	
12,626
11,501
10,311
8 681
Grade VIII	
Grade IX	
Grade X	
Grade XI            	
6,598
4,970
Grade XII	
Grade XIII	
1,016
Totals	
74,542
72,166
146,708
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO THE
DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS.
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of
pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per teacher
are shown in the following table:—
Type of School.
Number of Teachers.
Grade.
Special
Instructors.
Total.
Total
Pupils
Enrolled.
Percentage
of
Total
Enrolment.
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher.
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools.
Elementary-junior high schools.
Elementary schools	
Unclassified	
Totals	
434
665
143
102
312
89
2,724
4,469
155
212
50
20
18
126
66
589
877
193
102
332
107
2,850
66
13,911
21,744
4,871
2,751
9,432
2,877
91,122
5,116
146,708
9.48
14.82
3.32
1.88
6.43
1.96
62.11
100.00
32.05
32.70
34.06
26.97
30.23
32.32
33.45
32.83 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
JJ 11
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES.
The following table shows the number of teachers employed, also the number with
or without university degrees:—
Number  of  Teachers.
Type of School.
With
University
Degrees.
Without
University
Degrees.
Total.
478
600
134
11
99
37
244
24
Ill
277
59
91
233
70
2,606
42
589
877
193
102
332
107
2,850
66
Totals	
1,627
3,489
5,116
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and
also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year.
No. of
Teachers
employed.
No. of
School
Districts.
Aggregate
Enrolment.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Percentage of
Attendance.
Government
Expenditure
for
Education.
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools.
1877-78 	
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4,833
5,116
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763      '
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,eoS
137,827
146,708
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
$48,411.14*
60,758.75*
113,679.36*
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.28}
3,532,518.95}
3,765,920.69}:
3,743,317.08}
3,834,727.19}
4,015,074.371
2,849,972.02}
2,611,937.80*
2,835,040.74}
2,972,385.04}
3,277,660.23}
3,524,962.69}
3,630,670.781
3,585,769.001:
3,963,848.241
4,028,397.88}
3,924,243.531
4,244,898.821:
5,022,534.591:
5,765,205.501:
9,398,473.46}
12,468,653.181:
1882-83	
1887-88    	
1892-93     	
$215,056.22t
1897-98	
425,555.10
1902-03    	
604,357.86
1907-08 	
1,220,509.85
1912 13     	
4,658,894.97
1913-14 	
4,634,877.56
1917 18        	
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.54}
1927 28	
9,261,094.98}
1928 29              	
11,149,996.271:
10,008,255.66}:
1930 31     	
10,061,387.99}
1931  32      	
9,719,333.811:
8,941,497.341:
8,213,369.04}
1934  35            	
8,458,156.001:
8,775,353.781:
9,593,562.64}:
10,193,367.081:
1938 39         	
10,640,740.471:
1939-40    	
10,521,684.92}
1940 41        	
10,982,364.49}
1941 42            	
11,120,801.94}
1942 43                 	
11,502,291.35}
1943 44            	
12,231,029.35}
1944 45   	
13,683,538.18}
1945 46        	
14,818,625.81}
1946 47          	
20,176,930.53}
25,768,392.09}
* The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
t This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
} This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University. JJ 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL TO
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT.
The following table shows the enrolment during the last fifteen years and also the
cost to the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year.
Total
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance.
1933-34                                    	
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
$19.51
20.40
21.35
22.93
24.05
24.85
24.52
27.82
28.51
28.82
29.81
33.97
36.56
58.24
74.54
$21.85
1934-35                          '..
23.47
1935-36                        .   .
24 46
1936-37	
26.10
1937-38
27.18
1938-39	
27.92
1939-40	
27.14
1940-41	
32.25
1941-42	
33.13
1942-43	
1943-44	
34 46
1944-45	
39 51
1945-46	
1946-47	
1947-48	 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. JJ 13
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE
SCHOOL-YEAR 1947-48.
Grand total cost of education  $25,768,392.09
Less—
Grant re salaries and enrolment, Victoria College  $16,801.00
Special grant to Victoria College     20,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia   .... 957,406.92
Normal School, Vancouver     96,246.93
Normal School, Victoria     57,045.84
Cost of night-schools I     18,672.01
Correspondence schools—
High school   123,759.27
Elementary school      39,775.37
Adult education   202,689.23
Special grant under section 13 (g) of Act         322.00
      1,532,718.57
Net cost for total enrolment of 146,708 pupils  $24,235,673.52
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  165.20
Cost per pupil per school-day (196 days) on total enrolment  .84
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 129,859  186.63
Cost per pupil per school-day (196 days) on average daily attendance ___ .95
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 146,708 pupils
for year ($12,468,653.18—$1,532,718.57)     10,935,934.61
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment __ 74.54
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (196 days) on
total enrolment   .38
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily
attendance   84.21
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (196 days) on
average daily attendance _'_  .43
Cost per capita for year on population of 1,082,000 (1948 estimate)  22.40*
Cost per capita per school-day (196 days) on population of 1,082,000 ___ .11*
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on population of
1,082,000    10.11 +
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (196 days) on
population of 1,082,000 '_  .05+
* Computed on the net total cost of $24,235,673.52.
t Computed on the net total cost to the Provincial Government of $10,935,934.61. JJ 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE.
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the
Province during the year 1947-48 was as follows:—
Type of School.
EQ
c
cd
o
a)
to
OJ
B0
U
o
Xt
0
■S
M
UJ
3
CJ
a
a
c.
fi
aj
3
T3
oj
a
«J
0J
BO
a
a
a
BO
BO*
e
4
oi
B
2
'>
a
0
-3
oj
S
et
O
'3
o
s
J3
■3
O
0
E
fc,
a
w
s
i-.
B.
«
ID
&
O
H
Senior high schools	
211
312
24
51
122
164
26
174
96
162
187
516
220
427
2,692
480
75
75
66
17
13
84
29
284
44
781
40
42
18
343
65
250
3
288
33
434
70
1,030
187
506
100
981
169
5,595
Junior high schools	
912
Superior schools	
78
3
16
26
31
375
3
31
33
40
54
121
42
203
1,056
Elementary-senior high schools..
207
47
256
53
209
369
37
175
300
99
89
499
147
284
2,771
Elementary-junior high schools-
61
15
9
31
17
1
18
3
21
21
129
26
51
403
1,190
888
907
418
1,560
3,267
389
1,013
676
1,001
1,379
3,901
1,672
3,895
22,156
Totals	
2,302
1,406
1,233
670
2,281
5,013
516
1,819
1,361
1,644
2,234
6,383
2,713
6,010
35,585
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1947-48:—
Municipal school districts ,     7
Large municipal school districts  33
Large rural school districts  37 .
Rural school districts (unattached)  16
Total number of districts  93 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
JJ 15
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 13,911; of this
number, 6,720 were boys and 7,191 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1947-48 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
2
2
3
1
12
3
3
2
6
7
5
3
7
212
27
13
3
22
2
2
2
2
68
2
13
13
5
13
3
4
2
9
9
8
5
12
284
37
19
3
23
2
2
2
2
102
2
19
20
7
352
92
93
47
164
230
166
65
34. Abbotsford	
282
6,981
911
491
70
614
46. Sechelt	
46
30
53. Terrace	
54. Smithers	
25
52
2,317
47
387
315
134
Totals	
40
434
589
13,911 JJ 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 21,744;
of this number, 10,710 were boys and 11,034 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1947-48 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
11
16
16
37
15
24
7
28
34
22
35
24
52
10
22
81
27
22
22
17
15
5
15
12
10
8
13
15
10
21
13
fi
15
22
21
49
18
33
10
37
42
31
46
28
66
13
29
112
35
27
27
25
23
7
21
19
16
8
16
16
14
27
17
7
287
438
520
11. Trail	
1,312
468
780
181
22. Vernon	
912
1,259
748
33. Chilliwack	
1,184
745
36. Surrey	
1,850
37. Delta	
261
795
2,775
919
42. Maple Ridge	
726
606
592
506
49. Ocean Falls	
118
480
417
62. Sooke Rural	
234
403
651
159
Totals	
40
665
877
21,744
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 4,871; of this
number, 2,480 were boys and 2,391 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1947-48 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.                                  Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
1
2
3
1
1
12
74
27
17
13
18
100
36
21
18
427
2,577
904
530
433
Totals	
8
143
193
4,871 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
JJ 17
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,751; of this
number, 1,422 were boys and 1,329 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1947-48 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
3
2
1
6
2
3
2
3
2
2
7
25
10
3
3
3
2
7
2
4
7
3
3
2
1
6
2
3
2
3
2
2
7
25
10
3
3
3
2
7
2
4
7
3
59
64
30
13. Kettle Valley	
132
18. Golden	
32
52
50
71
26. Birch Island	
57
27. Williams Lake	
24
30. Ashcroft	
34. Abbotsford	
194
957
46. Sechelt	
272
71
47
66
41
155
51
123
142
61
Totals	
31
102
102
2,751 JJ 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 9,432;
of this number, 4,748 were boys and 4,684 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1947-48 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
12
26
5
7
4
18
6
14
5
6
4
10
10
9
4
7
16
11
6
8
3
11
4
3
4
5
6
9
9
14
16
9
10
4
4
5
8
13
31
5
7
4
19
6
14
5
6
4
10
11
9
4
7
17
11
6
9
3
12
4
3
4
5
6
10
11
16
18
9
10
4
4
5
10
414
937
144
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Vallev	
18. Golden	
73
22. Vernon	
314
27. "Williams Lake	
210
28. Quesnel	
29. Lil-ooet	
30. Ashcroft	
31. Merritt	
145
49. Ocean Falls	
104
50
100
56. Vanderhoof	
58. McBride	
463
491
288
72. Campbell River	
346
73. Alert Bay	
102
87
168
199
Totals	
43
312
332
9,432 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
JJ  19
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 2,877;
of this number, 1,485 were boys and 1,392 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1947-48 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
2
2
1
1
40
35
1
13
49
41
1
16
1,464
1,283
11
119
Totals	
6
- 89
107
2,877
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 91,122; of this
number, 46,977 were boys and 44,145 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1947-48 in each
district are shown in the following table':—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
11
5
6
5
9
7
12
13
13
5
11
5
9
3
3
3
4
5
6
28
8
9
13
27
10
7
22
10
8
5
1
7
15
12
16
28
17
7
24
7
24
7
38
23
25
9
76
8
9
22
30
4
11
6
17
38
20
40
57
48
10
7
23
10
11
5
1
15
61
38
41
84
17
7
25
7
25
7
39
23
26
9
79
8
9
22
31
4
11
17
38
20
42
58
48
10
7
23
10
11
5
1
15
62
39
42
84
472
170
801
168
776
79
7. Nelson	
1,261
652
793
293
11. Trail       	
2,728
12. Grand Forks       ..         ...         	
198
13   Kettle Valey                                 .           	
142
1,127
94
318
18. Golden     	
110
540
989
660
1,499
2,216
1,303
160
130
337
181
227
82
22
463
2,284
1,445
1,502
3,244 JJ 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued.
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
37. Delta	
6
7
50
6
17
8
12
7
2
8
9
4
4
3
2
7
9
8
12
8
25
9
30
15
26
10
10
7
14
5
2
13
5
8
13
12
7
5
13
3
1
14
18
49
668
59
102
32
43
46
24
15
31
6
9
3
2
24
15
14
13
10
42
10
42
18
206
20
27
7
31
11
16
47
7
43
45
13
9
6
26
9
14
19
18
50
757
60
107
32
43
47
25
15
31
6
9
3
2
24
15
14
13
10
42
10
43
18
214
20
27
7
32
11
16
48
7
45
45
13
9
6
26
9
15
19
1,900
24,389
2,168
3,935
1,214
1,574
1,727
892
414
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
129
258
63
36
757
375
49. Ocean Falls	
1,160
58. McBride	
987
320
7,377
570
62. Sooke Rural	
1,546
70. Alberni	
1,553
1,375
73. Alert Bay    	
106
918
522
356
Totals	
797
2,724
■   1
2,850
91,122 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
JJ 21
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, AND PUPILS IN EACH
TYPE OF SCHOOL.
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance
in each type of school in the school-year 1947-48:—
Type of School.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
40
40
8
31
43
6
797
589
877
193
102
332
107
2,850
66
13,911
21,744
4,871
2,751
9,432
2,877
91,122
6,720
10,710
2,480
1,422
4,748
1,485
46,977
7,191
11,034
2,391
1,329
4,684
1,392
44,145
11,648.10
18,920.97
4,368.60
Superior	
Elementary-senior high	
2,405.17
8,402.37
2,602.61
81,511.40
Totals	
965
5,116
146,708
74,542
72,166
129,859.22
* Visiting and relieving teachers.
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL.
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of
Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers showing less than $1,000
are excluded.
Grade Teachers.
Type of School.
Number of
Teachers.
High
Salary.
Low
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools..
Elementary schools	
Visiting and relieving teachers...
435
665
142
102
312
89
2,707
39
$4,200
4,200
3,800
3,550
4,350
3,750
4,500
2,850
$1,500
1,300
1,600
1,100
1,200
1,400
1,080
1,400
$3,192
2,569
2,880
1,965
2,006
2,128
2,065
2,330
Supervising Principals.
Senior high schools..	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools..
Elementary schools	
Visiting and relieving teachers...
39
10
$5,100
5,200
5,200
4,400
4,400
4,800
$2,200
3,100
3,300
2,725
2,760
2,500
$2,330
4,054
4,076
3,566
3,821
4,075
Special Instructors.
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools-
Elementary schools	
Visiting and relieving teachers...
86
169
11
12
74
$4,000
4,000
3,500
2,800
3,200
3,200
$1,300
1,020
1,600
1,000
1,200
1,500
$2,859
2,538
2,704
1,942
2,165
2,504 JJ 22                                     PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
SALARY CLASSIFICATION.
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding part-time teachers and
teachers earning less than $1,000 per annum:—
Number of Number of
Salary Range.                                       Teachers. Salary Range.                                      Teachers.
$1,000-$1,099     3     $3,200-$3,299  68
1,100- 1,199  22      3,300- 3,399  68
1,200- 1,299  17      3,400- 3,499  95
1,300- 1,399  178      3,500- 3,599  89
1,400- 1,499  216      3,600- 3,699  90
1,500- 1,599  200      3,700- 3,799  29
1,600- 1,699  307      3,800- 3,899  23
1,700- 1,799  240      3,900- 3,999  20
1,800- 1,899  270      4,000- 4,099  119
1,900- 1,999  284      4,100- 4,199  20
2,000- 2,099  301      4,200- 4,299  19
2,100- 2,199  ___ 227      4,300- 4,399  20
2,200- 2,299  241      4,400- 4,499  19
2,300- 2,399  242      4,500- 4,599  6
2,400- 2,499  305      4,600- 4,699_   5
2,500- 2,599  212      4,700- 4,799  2
2,600- 2,699  368      4,800- 4,899  1
2,700- 2,799  213      4,900- 4,999  3
2,800- 2,899  129      5,100- 5,199  1
2,900- 2,999  108      5,200- 5,299  3
3,000- 3,099  159      6,100- 6,199___.   1
3,100- 3,199  107      6,300- 6,399  1
Total 5,051 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. JJ 23
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR, 1947-48.
Minister's office  $13,559.52
General office  54,286.85
Text-book Branch  172,537.51
High Correspondence Schools  123,759.27
Elementary Correspondence Schools   39,775.37
Industrial education  49,708.26
Visual education   28,860.04
Inspection of schools   166,994.50
Normal School, Vancouver   96,246.93
Normal School, Victoria  57,045.84
School for the Deaf and the Blind  104,001.76
Basic grants  _'_  7,081,009.76
Special salary grant paid under section 13 (g) of the Act  322.00
Teachers superannuation (7 per cent.)  816,015.81
Special aid to school districts  4,000.00
School buildings and essential new equipment  1,666,625.64
Education of soldiers' dependent children  13,962.25
Examinations    38,246.49
Conveying children to central schools   618,622.39
Summer School  28,358.58
Board of Reference  713.60
Adult education—
Extension and adult education  28,615.80
Recreational and physical education   72,903.78
Urban occupational training   2,972.82
Rural occupational training   6,494.72
Student-aid bursaries   20,993.82
Apprentice-training   4,907.40
Vocational schools assistance agreement  65,800.89
School radio broadcasts  15,191.83
Division of Chief Inspector and Curriculum  6,827.29
Division of Educational Reference and School Service  11,264.47
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  23,440.31
Educational and vocational guidance  6,995.45
Incidentals and contingencies  10,537.95
University of British Columbia—■
General grant  ,  $944,844.45
Teacher-training        12,562.47
  957,406.92
Special grant to Victoria College  20,000.00
Cost-of-living bonus  39,647.36
Total expenditure by Government  $12,468,653.18
Amount expended by districts (including debt charges)     13,299,738.91
Grand total expenditure  $25,768,392.09 JJ 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
No. and Name of School District.
Total
Expenditure.*
Government
Grants.
District
Expenditure.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Creston	
Kootenay Lake	
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan	
Penticton (less District No. 77 for six months).
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong	
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
Ashcroft	
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon	
Chilliwack (less District No. 76 for six months)
Abbotsford	
Langley  	
Surrey	
Delta :	
Richmond-	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte	
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers ,
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
McBride	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
$188
161
173
37
282.
40.
338
87.
104
67
499.
89
52,
737,
305,
59,
82.
40,
112
162
132.
29 G
426
331.
20
23
94
115
70
58.
48,
196,
459,
283,
453,
788,
102,
463,
5,922,
698,
836
211
263.
440
200
100
261.
63
80
15
15.
178
65,
63.
46
57
305
73.
317,
93.
1,801
163,
.200.72
,889.37
,400.28
,158.16
,655.68
.875.44
,131.18
,153.94
,775.30
,245.42
.340.28
,909.84
,788.92
,225.14
,108.06
.378.46
,273.62
,801.41
,904.32
,510.53
,307.46
.669.48
,684.00
,166.76
,085.77
,170.49
,654.75
,124.22
,937.77
,897.00
,251.14
,720.62
,264.18
.908.51
,812.26
,797.83
,196.58
,081.29
,569.04
,865.88
.022.08
,060.67
,378.92
,333.46
.746.65
,399.33
,887.19
,789.48
.635.69
,354.47
,673.11
,735.45
.520.57
,351.91
,563.01
,797.72
,301.62
,306.36
,331.06
.594.84
,081.45
,858.99
$88,551.
78,472.
82,908.
19,401.
136,220.
23,691.
153,205.
44,759.
48,048.
40,877.
195,623.
52,034.
30,732.
356,021.
135,837.
33,781.
44,939.
21,667.
54,525.
94,562.
74,443.
167,766.
232,646.
147,186.
13,143.
11,168.
43,090.
59,811.
35,469.
25,834.
11,720.
92,253.
258,235.
157,267.
240,462.
431,202.
43,901.
224,977.
1,589,039.
258,596.
397,827.
117,484.
121,797.
225,585.
55,216.
42,568.
119,468.
28,500.
34,206.
6,981.
6,254.
65,850.
36,110.
31,686.
26,034.
31,172.
133,085.
38,476.
167,046.
53,844.
623,724.
74,236.
83,
90,
17,
146,
17,
184,
42,
56
26,
303,
37,
22,
381,
169,
25,
37,
19,
58,
67,
57,
128,
194,
183,
6,
12,
51,
55,
35.
33.
36,
104.
201,
126,
213,
357.
58,
238,
4,333,
440,
438,
93.
141,
214,
145,
57,
142,
35,
46.
31.
20.
26.
172,
34,
150,
39,
1,177,
649.25
417.12
492.16
756.30
434.86
183.69
925.69
394.59
,726.93
368.29
716.48
875.09
056,16
203,65
270.66
134.32
378.34
947.74
863.56
903.29
037.51
980.70
942.57
002.42
564.70
313.21
468.48
062.24
530.78
467.04
028.97
640.67
349.39
595,81
295.23
103.98
529.87
268.89
195.08
576.04
581.36
748.44
529.77
830.73
418.33
2S8.49
429.05
373.03
419.01
884.84
409.59
665.46
528.14
625.14
216.45
829.97
284.35
750.39
357.17
622.53
* Includes debt and capital charges. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
JJ 25
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS—Continued.
No. and Name of School District.
Total
Expenditure.*
Government
Grants.
District
Expenditure.
63. Saanich	
64. Saltspring	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum....	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz (six months, Jan. 1 to June 30)	
77. Summerland (six months, Jan. 1 to June 30)
Unattached.
Atlin ;.
Bamfield	
Butedale	
Camp Mile 163	
Camp 300	
Esperanza	
Fort Nelson.,	
Fort Nelson Airport	
Kildonan	
Port Renfrew.	
Sydney Inlet	
Tahsis Rivei' ,
Tofino	
Ucluelet	
University Hill	
Zeballos 	
Totals	
$190
49,
189.
165,
100,
380
121
278
308
142
46
36
173
36
41
,983.19
,577.87
567.65
165.68
365.46
,348.70
,960.85
511.52
,525.06
,313.28
,253.71
,791.55
,359.02
222.39
000.37
575.79
753.74
,789.60
,638.24
601.90
700.00
995.80
393.40
,305.25
,021.27
095.82
,448.50
,876.68
254.50
,348.28
636.50
$86,661.29
32,545.27
91,199.90
61,729.47
55,203.88
162,520.21
57,659.96
121,167.54
137,382.57
61,407.71
17,348.31
10,793.39
74,163.01
19,162.07
23,403.37
1,258.71
9,498.17
564.37
1,509.13
1,514.57
830.88
1,360.95
1,678.03
1,132.27
19,862.61
1,499.95
1,276.95
4,149.29
4,096.98
9,789.17
3,647.23
$22,665,996.70
$9,366,257.79
$104,321.90
17,032.60
98,367.75
103,436.21
45,161.58
217,828.49
64,300.89
157,343.98
171,142.49
80,905.57
28,905.40
25,998.16
99,196.01
17,060.32
17,597.00
1,317.08
10,255.57
1,225.23
129.11
87.33
869.12
634.85
715.37
1,172.98
21,158.66
595.87
1,171.55
1,727.39
4,157.52
26,559.11
2,989.27
$13,299,738.91
* Includes debt and capital charges.
LEGISLATION.
A number of amendments to the " Public Schools Act " were approved by the
Legislature at the 1948 Session, the most important of which dealt with the vexed
question of assessed values.
Because grants to School Boards and the proportion of local costs borne by the
constituent parts of large school districts are calculated upon the assessed values of
land and improvements, it is essential that these values be assessed on a uniform basis.
A number of complaints were made that inequalities existed which imposed an
unfair burden in certain districts. To correct this, an amendment was introduced
which provided for the appointment of an Equalization Board. The Board consists
of three members—one a representative of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities, one a representative of the rural areas, and the third appointed by the Province
as chairman. The legislation provides that any municipality, or twelve or more ratepayers in a rural area, may complain in writing to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
that the assessment of a municipal area is too high in comparison with the assessment
in another municipality or a rural area, or vice versa. The Lieutenant-Governor in
Council will then refer the complaint to the Assessment Equalization Board for investigation and report. The Assessment Equalization Board may, after investigating the
matter, either recommend an adjustment in the assessed values used for the calculation
of the Government grant and the sharing of school costs or dismiss the claim. JJ 26 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
It is to be understood that any adjustment in assessed values made by the Equalization Board is used only for calculation of Government grants and school-cost sharing.
The work of this Board is expected to correct inequalities which existed and
ensure a fair distribution of local costs.
SPECIAL AID.
Rural Districts.
The costs of education have been steadily rising with the general costs of living,
and it was found that rural districts were called upon to meet expenses beyond their
means.
In order to relieve the rural taxpayer, and particularly those whose living is
derived from the land, the Legislature provided a special grant of $1,100,000 which was
to be distributed to rural areas of all school districts in such a way as to reduce the
school levy.
The Department of Education was called upon to present a formula for the equal
distribution of this amount, with the result that all school districts benefited in such a
way as to greatly reduce the mill rate which would have been necessary to meet the
cost of education in every district, not only below the level for the present school-year,
but substantially below that of the year 1946-47.
Municipal Districts.
In order to assist municipalities the Government imposed a 3-per-cent. social
security and municipal aid tax and agreed to pay one-third of the yield of this tax to
the municipalities to aid in their general finances.    It is expected that the sum of
$4,000,000 will be the share of the municipalities, and while this was not specifically
earmarked for education, the distribution was based, in some measure, upon the school
population.
DORMITORIES.
Under existing legislation the Government contributes 50 per cent, of the approved
costs of school buildings. Under an amendment to section 22 of the " Public Schools
Act," dormitories have been classified as school buildings and, therefore, these buildings
benefit by the payment of 50 per cent, of their approved costs.
The School Board of School District No. 57 (Prince George) is now operating a
dormitory in the city of Prince George, and a second has been opened at Fort St. John
in School District No. 60 (Peace River North).
NEW SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
During the school-year 1947-48 the following new school districts were created:
No. 75 (Mission), No. 76 (Agassiz), No. 77 (Summerland), and Butedale (unattached).
RETIREMENTS AND APPOINTMENTS.
On June 30th, 1948, Mr. E. G. Daniels, Inspector of Schools, with headquarters in
New Westminster, and Mr. F. A. Jewett, Inspector of Schools, with headquarters in
Nelson, retired on superannuation. This Department greatly appreciates the fine
service rendered by these officials over a long period of time.
To fill vacancies on the inspectorial staff, we welcome to the Department Mr. H. C.
Ferguson, formerly principal of Campbell River High School, and Mr. Earl Marriott,
formerly principal of Creston Elementary School. Mr. Ferguson makes his headquarters at Telkwa, and Mr. Marriott at Dawson Creek.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. T. FAIREY,
Superintendent of Education. EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION. JJ 27
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION.
REPORT OF H. L. CAMPBELL, B.A., M.Ed., ASSISTANT
SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION.
The school-year 1947-48 was one of continued and steady progress in those aspects
of education which concern curriculum and instructional procedures. The creation of
the large administrative units, with the consequent improvement in school plants and
facilities, is having a most beneficial effect on the types of educational opportunity
which are being made available throughout the Province. There may exist differences
of opinion concerning some of the financial results of implementing the report of
Dr. M. A. Cameron, but any competent and well-informed observer must be impressed
by the vast improvement which has been effected Provincially in the quality and extent
of education.
The people of this Province are interested in education. This is reflected in the
educational vision and policies of their elected representatives, Provincial, municipal,
and School Board. It is obvious that the training qualifications and experience of
teachers are vital factors in the worth of an educational system. No school system can
be good if its teachers are poorly qualified and lack adequate experience.
The following facts from the latest report (1947) of the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics would seem to indicate that British Columbia leads the way in this respect:—
(1) 31.5 per cent, of the teaching force of this Province are university
graduates. The next Province in order has 22.4 per cent., and the lowest
has only 2.1 per cent.
(2) 77 per cent, of the teaching force of this Province has first-class certification or better. The next Province in order has 72 per cent., and the
lowest Province has 39 per cent.
(3) 33.7 per cent, of the teaching force of this Province are men. The next
Province in order has 27.5 per cent, men, and the lowest has 11.4 per cent.
(4) The median teaching experience of British Columbia teachers is for men
15.7 years, for women 10.1 years, and for all teachers 12 years. For the
next Province in order it is 9.9 years, and for the lowest it is 4.8 years.
(5) British Columbia has only 8.2 per cent, of its teachers working in
ungraded rural one-room schools. The next Province in order has 21.3
per cent., and the highest percentage is 57 per cent.
(6) The median annual salary for British Columbia teachers is $2,042. The
next Province in order has a median salary of $1,546 and the lowest is
$816. The comparatively high median salary in British Columbia must
be considered in relation to the following:—
The realization by the public of this Province that teachers have been
underpaid in consideration of the importance of their work to society.
That the teaching force of this Province is the most highly qualified
and most experienced of all the Provinces of Canada.
That there are few one-room rural ungraded schools in British
Columbia and many modern consolidated school units in which a high
type of instruction can be provided.
The following is a brief description of some of the more important professional
aspects of education which have been receiving attention during the year.
Adjustment of the Secondary-school Programme.—Plans are under way for the
necessary curriculum revisions.    Final action will be taken only on receipt of official JJ 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
sanction by the University Senate, which has legal authority in matters of requirements for admission to the University. It is proposed that the adjustment shall come
into effect in September, 1950. The major causal considerations and features of the
adjustment are:—
(1) The secondary school of to-day is no longer a selective institution, and its
curriculum must meet the needs of students of widely varying abilities.
This is socially desirable, but provision must be made that the ablest
students are challenged to their capacity.
(2) Too few of our ablest students come to develop in high school strong
preferences for fields of study. The present curriculum for University
Entrance consists so largely of constants that there is little opportunity
to pursue advanced elective courses in fields of developing interests.
(3) Under the present organization all students wishing to take University
Entrance are required to elect it at the end of Grade VIII. This is too
early for many students, and such election should be possible, if necessary,
as late as the entry into Grade XI.
(4) Many capable students elect in Grades IX and X a considerable number
of courses in Industrial Arts, Home Economics, and Commercial Education.    They are thus barred from securing University Entrance.
(5) There exists on the part of the public a demand for high-school instruction in elementary courses in Forestry, Agriculture, Mineralogy, Commerce, and other subjects. Under the present organization these courses
may not be taken by those desiring University Entrance.
(6) That no elective courses taken in senior high school and numbered below
100 shall carry credit for Senior Matriculation or First Year of University.
(7) That, to encourage interest and scholarship, elective courses be offered in
most secondary-school subjects over and above the basic requirements
for University Entrance. This is now the case in Science and Mathematics, and it is proposed to extend the principle to other subject fields.
(8) That, whereas under the proposed adjustment no student will be able to
complete the required and the elective courses in all subjects, provision
be made in Senior Matriculation and in First Year of University for
courses to be designated as " higher " and " pass " courses, or some such
nomenclature. Both of these should carry full academic credit for the
year. Students showing four years of continuous study of a subject in
high school would enroll in the higher course. Students showing only
the basic requirement for University Entrance in a subject would enroll
in the pass course.
(9) That students seeking University Entrance shall show the basic requirements in all subjects and a specified number of subjects in which they
have completed four years of continuous study.
(10) That the three presently offered courses General Science III, IV, and V
be revised into two courses, which shall meet the basic requirements for
University Entrance, to be followed by the elective courses Physics 91,
Chemistry 91, and Biology 91 as they operate at present.
(11) That in the Languages—Latin, Greek, French, German, and Spanish—
introductory and exploratory courses may be offered in Grade VIII, to
be followed by two further years of language study, which shall meet the
basic requirements for University Entrance, to be followed by two further
years of elective courses for those whose interest is in languages. This
makes a five-year course possible. EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION. JJ 29
(12) That in order to train pupils for happy and effective living more emphasis
must be placed on Health, Physical Education, Guidance, Mental Hygiene,
Home and Family Living. These will be incorporated in a fused course
of " Effective Living " prescribed as a constant for Grades VII through
XI.
Revision of Report Cards (Grades VII to XIII).—These have been revised in
experimental form and are now in use in the schools.
Revision of High School Organization and Time-allotments Report.—A greatly
simplified report form has been evolved. This is to be completed each year by the
principal of each secondary school and shows at a glance the organization of the school.
Curriculum Bulletins completed and distributed to Schools.—Industrial Arts,
Grades VII to XII; Mathematics 91; Kindergarten Manual; Library Manual; List of
Library Books.
Courses currently under Revision.—Social Studies, Grades VII to XII; Effective
Living, Grades VII to XI; Physical Education, Grades I to XII; Foreign Languages;
Science, Grades VII to XII;  Mathematics, Grade XIII.
Text-book Adoptions.—The following adoptions as basal texts were made during
the year: Canadian Parade Readers, Young Explorers (Dent), and Study Arithmetics,
Book VI (Gage).
Summer Workshops for Teachers.—A two weeks' workshop in Home and Family
Living was held in connection with the Summer School of Education, Victoria, and two
workshops in Alcohol Education were held, one at the University and one at the Summer
School of Education.
Departmental Conference.—During the week of July 19th to 23rd the fourth
general Departmental conference was held in Victoria. This conference was attended
by Inspectors of Schools and other officials of the Department of Education. Matters
of both an administrative and a purely educational nature were on the agenda. Special
lectures were given by Dr. Karl Bernhardt, of the University of Toronto, and Dr. Paul
Landis, of the State College of Washington. JJ 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF A. R. LORD, B.A., LL.D., PRINCIPAL.
The forty-seventh session of the Vancouver Normal School opened on September
8th, 1947, and closed on June 18th, 1948.    Attendance and results were as follows:-—
Men.
Women.
Total.
65
53
209
194
274
247
In addition, thirteen men taking training at the Vancouver Technical School for
Industrial Arts certification were in attendance during the second term for courses in
Educational Psychology and Principles of Teaching.
Distinction standing was awarded to nine students: Rozel June Amy, New Westminster; Phyllis May Grantham, Vancouver; Roberta Victoria Hards, Vancouver;
George Lloyd Harvey, M.A., Vancouver; Iris Lorraine Parton, Vancouver; Janet
Bevitt Rochester, Prince Rupert; Robert Milton Scales, Vancouver; Beverley Jean
Sharman, Vancouver;   Anne Veronica Wolfe, B.A., Trail.
The enrolment, which showed an increase of fifty-five over the previous year, was
the largest since 1925 and was very welcome. It seems evident, however, that a greater
increase must be secured if the schools of the Province are to be staffed with qualified
teachers. Even a casual examination of Department of Education records will disclose
a present annual need of approximately 600 teachers to replace those who discontinue
and to provide for newly opened schools and class-rooms. Six hundred graduates could
scarcely be secured with an initial enrolment of less than 675, and the total number
registered in the three teacher-training institutions this year is 460.
It would seem probable that the substantial number of discharged service personnel
who are securing university degrees and entering teaching will remove any secondary-
school shortage, except in such specialized fields as Physical Education. In the elementary schools, however, little relief can be expected from this source, since most candidates for this field are young women, drawn from the previous year's University
Entrance or Senior Matriculation classes. They are, in most cases, seeking some form
of temporary occupation for two or three years, prior to marriage, and their choice will
be determined to a considerable degree by the length and cost of training.
If women teachers were permitted and could be persuaded to remain in teaching
after marriage, the present problem would be solved, though perhaps an equally serious
one of another sort would be created. Since such a policy is not generally possible, it
follows that the large number of young women who resign each year to marry must be
replaced by an equal number who, in their turn, hope to teach for two or three years.
The proportion of girls who, upon graduation from high school, on their own initiative
desire to become teachers is small, despite present relatively high salaries. It would
seem desirable, therefore, that counsellors should endeavour to influence suitable
students in this direction. The co-operation of Department of Education officials
would be necessary as well. Reference has been made in former reports to the need for a major revision of
our entire teacher-training programme. Canada still remains the only part of the
English-speaking world which (a) has a training period of less than two years, (b)
requires a compulsory curriculum without optional subjects, (c) separates academic
education from professional, and (d) charges fees.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VICTORIA.
REPORT OF H. 0. ENGLISH, B.A., B.S.A., PRINCIPAL.
The thirty-fourth session of the Provincial Normal School, Victoria, opened September 8th, 1947, and closed June 18th, 1948. The following table presents a summary
of the enrolment:—
Men.
Women.
Total.
43
0
2
3
89
5
2
4
132
5
4
Failed	
7
Totals	
48
100
148
Four students—Shizuko Arai, Kenneth Edward Burkinshaw, Ruth Evelyn Han-
ington, and Muriel Irene Poulton—received honour standing. Stanley Edward Cains
was the winner of the Dr. V. L. Denton Memorial Award for 1947-48.
The St. John Ambulance Association issued certificates to thirty-seven students
who were successful in the course in First Aid.
Life-saving classes were conducted during the term. Thirteen students were successful on the tests.
At the end of the term, two instructors, Miss Margot Elizabeth Gordon and Miss
Marguerite Eleanor Perry, resigned, and one instructor, Mr. Joseph F. Hammett, was
granted, leave of absence.
Two new instructors, Mr. George Alexander Brand, B.A. (British Columbia), and
Miss Winnett Alberta Copeland (primary specialist), joined the faculty September 1st,
1947. Mr. Brand was appointed to provide instruction in Elementary Science and
Visual Education;   Miss Copeland to provide instruction in Primary Methods.
The health programme at the school was enriched by a series of four lectures on
health topics.    This series was arranged by Dr. J. L. Gayton and Miss Dorothy Tait.
Owing to the increase in the number of students enrolled in September, 1947, the
accommodation provided in the Normal School building was scarcely adequate. The
lack of a laboratory school adjacent to the Normal School was overcome by transporting
the students to elementary schools in the Greater Victoria area. With the co-operation
of the administrative officers and the teachers in these schools, numerous demonstration
lessons were provided. To the Greater Victoria School Board, the Municipal Inspectors,
and to the teachers and pupils who provided these vital demonstration lessons, the
Normal School is deeply indebted. JJ 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
During the 1947-48 session, approximately two months were devoted to observation
and practice-teaching. A total of 286 class-rooms in ninety-five schools were used.
About one-third of these class-rooms (105) were in rural schools on Vancouver Island
and in other parts of Southern British Columbia. While the students were gaining
this valuable experience, members of the faculty visited the various schools and observed
the work of the student-teachers.
In addition to opportunities to observe and to teach occasional lessons, extended
periods of observation and teaching practice were provided during the months of
November (two weeks), February (two weeks), and April (three weeks). The importance of these periods, during which the students had numerous opportunities to translate instruction into practice, cannot He overemphasized.
Toward the end of the term, this Normal School initiated an investigation into the
records of recent graduates. Provincial and Municipal Inspectors were asked to report
on the teaching efficiency of those teachers who graduated from the Victoria Normal
School during the years 1945, 1946, and 1947. The data assembled was extremely
interesting and should prove useful when the British Columbia teacher-training programme is revised. The co-operation of the Inspectors was appreciated, for without
their aid it would not be possible to obtain reliable data in research of this description. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
JJ 33
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, M.A., DIRECTOR.
One thousand one hundred and ninety-seven teachers attended the thirty-fifth
session of the Summer School of Education, held in Victoria and Vancouver from July
5th to August 6th.
Noteworthy among the innovations at the 1948 session of the school was the introduction of courses in High School Art and School Counselling. In both cases, long-felt
professional needs were served, and teachers who in the past had found it extremely
difficult to obtain the type of training desired were able to continue their studies at the
Department of Education's Summer School.
For the first time in some years, Art classes were held at the Victoria section of
the school, thus permitting more general enrolment in these courses, and at the same
time making it possible for teachers specializing in Art to take lectures in courses
outside of their field.
Two special workshops were conducted. One, in Alcohol Education, was under the
direction of Mr. H. L. Campbell, Assistant Superintendent of Education and Director
of the programme of Alcohol Education. The other, the Curriculum Workshop, made
a study of the proposed revisions of the Health and Guidance courses, and the new
programme of Home and Family training. Its final report was a suggested plan by
which the three could be fused into a single course. It should perhaps be noted that
the procedure involved a new and promising technique in curriculum building in British
Columbia.
COURSES AND ENROLMENT.
The enrolment for all courses and the total enrolment are summarized below.
Instructors who taught for less than one week are not included in the tables.
Courses.
Instructors.
Enrolment.
52
29
36
12
1,052
145
81
77
73
64
48
44
43
39
1,197
1,027
Totals for 1946	
888
Totals for 1945	
830
Victoria Section.
Methods and Philosophy of Education:
10.   Visual Education Workshop .
15.
35.
101.
102.
Introduction to Educational Sociology __.
The Enterprise in Elementary School	
Workshop in Alcohol Education	
Curriculum Workshop	
Enrolment.
53
_     107
. 157
32
22
Psychology and Individual Development:
132.   Tests and Measurements in the Improvement of Learning 84
150.   Growth and Development of Children  104
156.   Disciplinary Problems in Elementary School  142
159.   Mental Hygiene and Behaviour  68
180.   Home and Family Living  94 jj 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
Fine and Applied Arts: Enrolment.
357. Creative Expression in Elementary-school Art  65
371. Illustration   36
393. Commercial Art  28
397. Life Drawing  24
398. Industrial Design   48
402. Methods and Materials in Secondary-school Art  19
Counselling and Guidance:
190. Counselling Techniques  52
191. The Individual Inventory in Guidance  50
192. The Use and Interpretation of Tests in Guidance  45
Health and Physical Education:
503. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education  55
512. Junior Red Cross Workshop  30
514. Anatomy and Physiology  28
517. Secondary-school Health Curriculum  24
524. Corrective Physical Education  17
527. Elementary-school Physical Education Laboratory  49
528. Secondary-school Physical Education Curriculum  27
530. Sports Education I  48
531. Sports Education II  43
540. Fundamental Rhythm  52
544. Elementary Folk-dancing  74
Home Economics:
650. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  47
Intermediate Grades:
260. Methods in Arithmetic  128
276. Methods in Science  155
345. Social Studies Workshop  31
Kindergarten-Primary:
584. Fine Art for Kindergarten-Primary Grades  99
586. Kindergarten Music and Rhythms  47
■ 587. Primary Music  59
590. Principles and Practices of Primary Education  116
591. Primary Observation and Laboratory  99
592. Social Studies and Science in the Primary Grades  91
593. Reading in the Primary Grades  101
595. Industrial Arts and Play Materials  79
Library Service:
412. Children's Literature  48
413. Cataloguing and Classification  40
Music:
440. School Music in the Elementary Grades  93
442. Elementary Harmony  25
443. Choral Music and Conducting  40
447. Advanced Music Literature and History  21
448. Instrumental Ensemble  Xg SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
JJ 35
Senior Matriculation:
213.   Senior Matriculation English	
313.   Senior Matriculation World History
Typewriting:
604.   Practical Typewriting	
Enrolment.
67
84
55
Vancouver Section.
Commercial Education:
621.   Stenography (Practice and Speed)	
623.   Typewriting (Teaching Methods)	
628.   General Business and Law	
632.   Accounting	
Industrial
14.
220.
223.
224.
225.
227.
228.
229B.
229C.
231.
232.
234.
235.
236.
238.
241.
242.
243.
245.
246.
247.
248A
248B.
249.
250.
Arts Education:
The Curriculum: Its Objectives and Procedures	
Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Junior High
School	
Plane and Solid Geometric Drawing	
Free-hand Sketching applied to the Industrial Arts	
Draughting applied to Woodwork and Metalwork	
Elementary Woodwork	
Elementary Wood-turning	
Farm Mechanics	
Farm Mechanics	
Elementary Electrical Theory	
Elementary Electrical-shop Work	
Art Metalwork	
Elementary Sheet-metal Work	
Elementary Machine-shop Work	
Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Senior High
School 	
Practical Geometry	
Free-hand Sketching	
Draughting applied to Woodwork and Metalwork ■	
Advanced Woodwork (Bench-work)	
Advanced Wood-turning	
Practice in the Use of Wood-working Machinery;   Care
and Maintenance	
Farm Mechanics	
Farm Mechanics	
Advanced Sheet-metal Work	
Advanced Machine-shop Work	
Student Courses.
14
21
16
10
46
13
4
5
17
16
5
20
6
22
20
9
11
11
18
4
17
10
Total in 1948	
Total in 1947	
Total in 1946  2,613
Total in 1945  2,380
5
13
8
28
9
3,618
3,073
Courses per Student.
Average in 1948 __.
Average in 1947 __.
Average in 1946 ...
Average in 1945 _.
3.0
2.9
2.9
2.9 JJ 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
REGISTRATION.
The following tables give an interesting picture of the classes of teachers served
by the Summer School and the type of training sought by them:—
Table I.—Teaching Experience of those registered.
13 or more years  242 1 to 3 years  505
10 to 12 years     78 Less than 1 year     77
7 to 9 years  105 Unreported     48
4 to 6 years  142
Table II.—Type of School in which Teachers taught in 1947-48*
More than 10 rooms  454 3 rooms     59
7 to 10 rooms  171 2 rooms.-     93
4 to 6 rooms  138 1 room  112
* Certain teachers registered at Summer School had not taught in the year 1947-48;   hence the totals of the
above will not agree with the total enrolment.
Table III.—Grades taught by Teachers enrolled.
Grade XII  130 Grade V  262
Grade XI  159 Grade IV  300
Grade X  178 Grade III  301
Grade IX  211 Grade II  314
Grade VIII  299 Grade I  314
Grade VII  310 Pre-primary       4
Grade VI  252
Table IV.—Types of Certificates sought.
(Candidates for First-class Permanent Certificates are not shown.)
Art      55 Library   38
Commercial      27 Music   54
Counsellor      41 Physical Education  87
Home Economics     43 Primary  168
Industrial Arts  103 Secondary Instructor  17
Intermediate  109
FACULTY.
Adams, Miss May, B.Sc. in P.E., Physical Education Department, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver.
Amess, Fred A., Commercial Art Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Barr, Miss Helen I., B.A., Commercial Specialist, Commercial Instructor, West Vancouver High School, Vancouver.
Bernhardt, Karl S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, University of Toronto, and
Assistant Director, Institute of Child Study, Toronto.
Biddlecombe, George W., Sheet-metal Instructor, Vancouver Technical School,
Vancouver.
Cameron, Miss Catherine D., Registrar, Summer School of Education, Victoria.
Campbell, Miss Mary N. K., B.Sc, Instructor, Lord Byng High School, Vancouver.
Carruthers, Miss Bertha Muriel, B.A., Librarian, Magee High School, Vancouver.
Clarke, Earl W., B.A., formerly Art Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Conway, Clifford B., M.S., D.Pasd., Director, Division of Tests, Standards, and Research,
Department of Education, Victoria. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. JJ 37
Donaldson, J. Stanley, B.A., Magee High School, Vancouver.
Ferguson, Miss Nancy, B.A., Central Junior High School, Victoria.
Fraser, Miss Laura, R.N., Public Health Nurse, Victoria.
Gayton, J. L., M.D., D.P.H., Medical Health Officer, Victoria.
Gibson, W. S., Industrial Arts Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Gilchrist, Miss Vera, B.P.H.E., Y.W.C.A., Vancouver.
Gillespie, Gordon, B.A., B.Sc, Kitsilano Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver.
Hammett, Joseph F., B.A., Instructor, Provincial Normal School, Victoria.
Harwood, Norris, B.A., Commercial Specialist, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Heywood,  Robert  H.,  B.A.,  Head,  Commercial  Department,  Victoria High  School,
Victoria.
Jackson, Miss Dorothea, Ph.B., Director of Kindergarten-Primary Education, Seattle
Public Schools, Seattle, Wash.
Johnson, Miss Muriel A., B.H.Sc, Dietitian, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Johnston, Miss Effie, Primary Teacher, Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
Jones, Miss Cathryn, B.E., Principal, Los Angeles City Schools, Los Angeles, Calif.
Kurth, Burton L., Chief Supervisor of Music, Vancouver Schools, Vancouver.
Landis, Paul H., A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Chairman, Division of Rural Sociology, Professor
of Sociology, State College of Washington.
Lane, Edwin I., B.A., Art Instructor, West Vancouver High School, Vancouver.
Lythgoe, Ernest W., Industrial Arts Instructor, Mount View High School, Victoria.
Meredith, John R., B.A., Research Assistant, Alcohol Education, Department of Education, Victoria.
Miller, Edward F., B.A., Principal, Lonsdale School, North Vancouver.
Moscrop,  Miss  Martha,  Training  Supervisor,  Social  Assistance  Branch,  Provincial
Government.
McKee, Miss Enid M., B.A., Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
McKenzie, J. J., B.A., Principal, South Park School, Victoria.
McKie, A., B.A., B.Ed., Counsellor, Kitsilano Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver.
McLeish, Miss Elizabeth, Supervisor of Art, Brandon Public Schools, Brandon, Man.
Ortmans, Miss Kathleen, School Broadcasts, CBR, Vancouver.
Palmer, Miss Margaret, Provincial Director, Junior Red Cross.
Pollock, J. R., B.A.Sc, Director of Visual Education, Department of Education, Victoria.
Preston, J. H., M.D., D.P.H., Assistant Medical Health Officer, Victoria.
Pritchard,  Vaughan  G.,  B.A.,   Commercial  Specialist,  Central  Junior  High  School,
Victoria.
Quayle, Thomas A., Industrial Arts Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Rannie, Miss Ruth M., B.Sc, Instructor in Foods and Nutrition, Vancouver Technical
School, Vancouver.
Rickard,  V.  C,   Industrial  Arts  Instructor,   Coquitlam  Junior-Senior  High  School,
Coquitlam.
Roberts, Ifor, Assistant Supervisor of Music, Vancouver Schools, Vancouver.
Russell, Albert E., Sheet-metal and Welding Instructor, Vancouver Technical School,
Vancouver.
Schmaelzle, 0. I., B.S., M.A., Director of Guidance and Counselling, San Francisco
Schools, San Francisco, Calif.
Strong, C. J., M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes, Vancouver.
Swainson, Neil A., B.A., Victoria High School, Victoria.
Toder, Mrs. Dorothy M., Primary Specialist, Primary Teacher, Victoria.
Wales, B. E., B.A., B.Ed., Counsellor, Kitsilano Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver.
Wallace, Lawrence J., B.A., M.Ed., Boys' Counsellor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
White, John S., Industrial Arts Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria. JJ 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
Wright, Stanley J., B.Sc, Electrical Instructor, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Zeran, Franklin R., M.A., Ph.D., Dean, School of Education, Oregon State College,
Corvallis, Ore.
STUDENT ACTIVITY SOCIETY.
The following statement deals with the affairs of the preceding or 1947 session,
and is taken from the report of the auditors, Ismay, Boiston, Dunn & Co., chartered
accountants.
Receipts.
Activity fees paid by students (less refunds)  $1,710.00
Additional income (cash receipts, cafeteria, etc)       493.51
Total  $2,203.51
Disbursements.
Fees and expenses of artists, lecturers, etc  $1,126.00
Social affairs, dances, picnics, teas, etc        868.68
Miscellaneous charges, services, rentals, etc        122.23
Excess of receipts over disbursements         86.60
Total  $2,203.51 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. JJ 39
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.
REPORT OF H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION.
This report is for the school-year 1947-48 and covers the work of the following:—
(a) Industrial Arts (Woodwork and Draughting) in elementary schools.
(b) Industrial Arts (Woodwork, Draughting, Metalwork, and Electricity) in
junior and senior high schools.
(c) Industrial Arts Option Courses in high schools—"A" Woodwork and
Draughting, and " B " Metalwork and Draughting — for University
Entrance.
(d) Vancouver Technical School.
(e) High School Commercial and Agricultural Courses.
(/)  Vancouver School of Art.
(g)  Night-schools.
(h)  Teacher-training.
(i) Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
Industrial Arts has expanded this year, and present building plans indicate that
there will be greater expansion next year. More schools are offering a full Industrial
Arts programme than at any time previously, and shops, on the whole, are well planned
and well equipped. Courses of study have been revised during the year, and the new
courses will be used commencing in September, 1948.
Under the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement, vocational courses are being
given in many secondary schools throughout the Province in the following fields of
study: Industrial, commercial, and agriculture. Schools now are being built to extend
the work, particularly in the industrial and agricultural fields. The new vocational
school being built by the Vancouver School Board in the heart of the city of Vancouver
will be an outstanding vocational school and will contribute a great deal to the future
progress of this Province.
The reports upon Industrial Arts which follow have been prepared by Lieut.-Col.
C. J. Strong, who, as Inspector of Technical Classes, has done much to improve the work
of Industrial Arts in this Province.
INDUSTRIAL ARTS.
Elementary Schools and Junior High Schools.
Revision of the Programme of Studies for Industrial Arts in the junior and senior
high schools was completed during the year. Much credit is due the members of the
various committees, who gave freely of their time and effort to prepare the best possible
course in each branch of Industrial Arts. The revised courses will come into effect in
September, 1948.
Boards of School Trustees have been most co-operative in their efforts to provide
additional equipment for the school shops. Industrial Arts continues to expand, with
twenty new teachers accepting positions during the summer of 1947. An additional
twenty instructors will be teaching Industrial Arts when school opens in September,
1948.
Over seventy veterans have been trained under the Canadian Vocational Training
Programme, and all have been placed in teaching positions. It is regretted that this
programme is now completed, as a new training programme must be established
immediately if we are to have trained Industrial Arts teachers ready for the many
positions to be filled in 1949 if the building under way is continued as planned.    Many JJ 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
of the men who started teaching Industrial Arts just after World War I are now
drawing near the retirement age, and provision for their replacement must be made
in our teacher-training programme.
There are forty-five school districts in which Industrial Arts is established, as
follows: Abbotsford, Alberni, Armstrong, Burnaby, Chilliwack, Coquitlam, Courtenay,
Cowichan, Cranbrook, Creston, Delta, Fernie, Fraser Canyon, Kamloops, Kelowna,
Kimberley, Ladysmith, Maple Ridge, Mission, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster,
North Vancouver, Ocean Falls, Peace River South, Penticton, Powell River, Prince
George, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Qualicum, Quesnel, Revelstoke, Richmond, Saanich,
Salmon Arm, Saltspring, Southern Okanagan, Surrey, Trail, University Hill, Vancouver, Vernon, Greater Victoria, and West Vancouver.
Senior High Schools.
It is gratifying to note that an increasing number of students are selecting
Industrial Arts options for their High School Graduation course. Courses for Grades
X, XI, and XII include Woodwork and Draughting, Metalwork and Draughting, and
Farm Mechanics and Draughting. The Grade XII course in Woodwork is centred
around small-bungalow construction with Architectural Draughting. A course in Arts
and Crafts will be offered in September, 1949, as an additional option.
New junior-senior high schools now being planned provide adequate shops with
ideal working conditions. The expansion of Industrial Arts has justified the move
from basement rooms to spacious, well-lighted, well-equipped shops.
Industrial Arts Options for University Entrance.
Many pupils taking the University Entrance course are taking advantage of the
Industrial Arts courses. A three-year course may be taken in Woodwork and Draughting, or Metalwork and Draughting, for which they receive 15 credits. The training
received in these courses is of value in any walk of life, and particularly so for those
who plan to take work in university leading to a degree in Science.
The total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school shops in the Province (of which forty-
seven are general shops) is        175
The total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school instructors is        162
The total number of pupils participating is—
Elementary school   3,141
Junior high school  8,097
Senior high school   4,407
15,645
VANCOUVER TECHNICAL SCHOOL.
The report which follows has been prepared by Mr. E. M. White, B.A.Sc, principal
of the Vancouver Technical School:—
" The work conducted during the year 1947-48 in many respects was similar to
the work of previous years, and I shall emphasize only such points as may require
special mention.
" Placement.—Placement in jobs this year has been very good. In fact, we have
been unable to supply boys for firms seeking apprentices. As I stated in my previous
reports, a greater degree of specialization is offered in Grade XII, and we have been
able to place all our students in one of the following lines: Sheet Metal, Printing,
Building Construction, Draughting, Machine-shop, Automotive, Cooking, Hairdressing,
Ladies' Tailoring, and Food Servicing. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. JJ 41
" New Course for Practical Nurses.—A course for Practical Nurses, or Nurses'
Aides, has also been started and will be continued in September. After four months'
instruction at this school, the students undergo further practical training in the local
hospitals.
" Building Construction.—The bungalow, which was started some two years ago,
was completed and sold.    Another is under construction.
"Foundry.—Our foundry, after much delay in acquiring equipment, was completed, and several runs have been made. We shall be able to produce our own castings
and give instruction in Moulding and Pattern-making.
" Out-of-town Students.—Over the years we have had students come to us from
various parts of the Province either to take our regular technical course or a special
course. These students have almost invariably proved to be very able students, and
I would wish and suggest that many more should attend this school. Student-aid
scholarships and loans do not seem to be widely known, or made use of, by students
from outlying points.
"We have added to our equipment during the year, but still more is required,
especially in the draughting-rooms, machine-shop, and sheet-metal shop."
The total number of students attending the Vancouver Technical School during
the year 1947-48 was as follows :■—
Day-school—
Boys-      735
Girls     308
  1,043
Night-school—■
Vocational   1,396
Non-vocational        92
  1,488
Total  2,531 JJ 42
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
HIGH SCHOOL COMMERCIAL AND AGRICULTURAL COURSES.
Commercial work has expanded in the secondary schools during the past year to
meet the increased demand for office workers.    The placement has been very good.
Some pupils have taken the work as an option to the regular high school course.
Other pupils have spent more than half of their school time on Commercial work, and
therefore these classes have received special vocational grants under the Vocational
Schools' Assistance Agreement. These vocational classes have operated very efficiently
and have received a great deal of help and advice from local advisory committees.
The enrolment in the following school districts was as follows:—
Students.
Abbotsford  86
Alberni   91
Burnaby   479
Chilliwack   193
Coquitlam  107
Courtenay   51
Cowichan .  86
Cranbrook   35
Creston _  125
Delta   81
Fernie  58
Fraser Canyon  31
Kamloops . 130
Kelowna  137
Kimberley   69
Ladysmith  50
Langley  109
Lillooet   15
Maple Ridge  247
Mission   42
Nanaimo  231
Students.
Nelson   94
New Westminster  302
North Vancouver  291
Ocean Falls  38
Peace River South  56
Penticton  142
Powell River  172
Prince George  89
Prince Rupert  88
Princeton  56
Revelstoke   30
Richmond   189
Saanich  70
Southern Okanagan  129
Surrey   438
Trail  98
Vancouver  3,721
Vernon  180
Greater Victoria  576
West Vancouver  147
Total  9,359
Agriculture has been taken as a high school option in many centres, as in previous
years. The following centres now are erecting buildings to offer Vocational Agricultural courses, and the School Boards concerned are working with local advisory
committees made up of farmers and horticulturists: Langley, Creston, Chilliwack,
Kelowna, Oliver, and Penticton.
Agricultural courses were offered during the last school-year in the following
school districts:—
Students.
Burnaby   38
Chilliwack   160
Courtenay  14
Creston   31
Cowichan  40
Grand Forks  22
Kamloops   32
Kelowna  56
Ladysmith  62
Langley  36
Maple Ridge  169
Students.
18
55
26
15
40
25
45
Southern Okanagan      113
Surrey        34
Vernon       28
Mission	
New Westminster
North Vancouver _
Ocean Falls	
Penticton	
Richmond 	
Salmon Arm	
Total  1,059 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. JJ 43
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF ART.
The following is an excerpt from a report prepared by the principal of the school,
Mr. Charles H. Scott, A.R.C.A., F.R.S.A. (Lond.), Dip. G.S.A.:—
" I beg to submit my annual report for the session 1947-48.
" The enrolment was slightly smaller than that of the previous year due to a
falling-off of rehabilitation students who had completed their training entitlement.
It is gratifying to note that the majority of those students found positions in one form
or another of commercial art, where they are giving satisfaction.
" During the session the school was obliged to shift three classes from the Art
School Annex to the Social Services Building close by, owing to the demolition of the
old Central School in April. It is expected that all classes will be housed in the Art
School building during the coming session, 1948-49, which will mean a packed school in
a building not physically suitable for the work to be done.
" The annual school closing was held on Friday, May 28th, when Dr. Dolman, of
the University of British Columbia, gave the graduation address. Twenty-two fourth
year students graduated and received the school diploma. Fifty-three second year
students received their elementary diploma.
" The annual school exhibition was held in the Art Gallery during September,
1947."
The following was the student enrolment during the school-year 1947-48:—
Day-school   213
Night-school and Saturday classes  755
Total :  968
NIGHT-SCHOOLS.
This year has been one of varied expansion in the night-schools in many centres in
the Province. Night-school classes are operated by School Boards, who receive grants
as follows:   (1) For non-vocational classes, and (2) for vocational classes.
The second group receives more assistance by way of grants because of the added
cost of vocational training. This money is provided by the Provincial and Dominion
Governments under the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
Adults are demanding more varied courses in night-schools than ever before.
Academic courses are available for those who wish to further their formal education,
and general courses are provided for those with varied interests. Vocational courses
are provided for those people who wish to improve their knowledge and skill in various
industrial and commercial lines of work. Home-making and leisure-time courses are
offered to those who are interested in this phase of education.
The enrolment during the year 1947-48 was as follows:—
Students.
Non-vocational      9,625
Vocational*      4,121
Total  13,746
TRAINING OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS TEACHERS.
Since the end of the war a most successful rehabilitation training programme has
been conducted by the Dominion and Provincial Governments to enable discharged
personnel from the armed forces to become qualified as Industrial Arts instructors. At
the end of one year of such instruction, veterans who had previously been carefully
selected were given practice-teaching in schools, followed by intensive teacher-training
* Also reported under section dealing with Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement. JJ 44
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
courses in the Summer School operated by the Department of Education. All veterans
have been placed in positions and, so far, have given very satisfactory service.
As rehabilitation training practically has ended, some other training programme
will have to be established to provide trained teachers for future needs.
The enrolment at Summer School numbered 115.
VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS' ASSISTANCE AGREEMENT.
During the past year, construction began on vocational schools, or vocational units
in composite high schools, in the following centres: Chilliwack, Creston, Victoria,
North Vancouver, and Vancouver. The North Vancouver unit has been completed and
is in operation, and the other units will be built and in operation by September, 1949.
Advisory committees, consisting of employers and employees, have been established
for each vocational school, or vocational unit of a composite high school. These committees have done splendid work in advising School Boards on buildings, equipment,
course content, standards of training, and placement.
Additional vocational films have been purchased under this agreement and are
being widely used. They are distributed to schools by the Director of the Visual Education Department, Vancouver.
Many vocational schools have been helped considerably by receiving vocational
equipment owned by the Province but given to the School Boards on indefinite loan.
Expansion is taking place in many centres throughout the Province in vocational
work in the following areas of training:  Industrial, agricultural, and commercial.
The enrolment in day and evening classes operated under the terms of the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement, together with the number of vocational teachers,
is shown below:—
Number of
Pupils.
Number of Teachers.
Part-time.
Full-time.
3,487
4,121
220
56
140
Totals     	
7,608
220
196 HOME ECONOMICS.
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc, M.A., DIRECTOR.
Home Economics is offered in the programmes of 103 public schools and 6 private
schools throughout the Province. Forty-nine of the centres, operating in the public
schools, are outside the urban areas of Greater Victoria, Greater Vancouver, and
Greater New Westminster. It has been found necessary to enlarge some of the existing centres. Plans are under way to open an additional room in the Philip Sheffield
School at Abbotsford and in the junior-senior high school at Mission. This had been
made necessary in order to accommodate the increased enrolment and to allow for the
inclusion of the Grade VII group in the Home Economics programme. A second room
has been equipped for Home Economics in the Thomas Hodgson School at Nanaimo.
This was previously a one-room centre, with equipment for clothing-work only. Foods
equipment has been installed in the second room. The Langley Prairie centre will
also be expanded to include two rooms. This school has been operating on the shift
system for the past year. While two Home Economics teachers were appointed by the
Board, only one room was available for the teaching of Home Economics. This presented difficulties in the organization of the work and in accommodating the classes
eligible for Home Economics.
Unit kitchens are being suggested to the School Boards planning for new centres.
It is felt that these permit greater flexibility in the use of the class-room and also
provide working areas more like that found in the home.
Total number of pupils throughout the Province taking Home Economics  17,638
Total number in elementary schools  3,729
Total number in junior high schools  8,369
Of these, the total number taking—
Home Economics I (Grade VII) was  4,743
Home Economics II (Grade VIII) was  4,983
Home Economics III (Grade IX) was  2,422
Total number in high school  5,316
Of these, the total number taking—
Home Economics III was  1,690
Home Economics A (Foods, Nutrition, and
Home Management)         75
Home Economics B (Clothing, Textiles, and
Related Arts)        431
Home Economics CC II (combined course) *__ 1,360
Home Economics CC III (combined course)*     688
Vancouver Technical       242
Grades V and VI        67
Senior Matriculation          5
Special C courses      789
Vancouver Normal School pupils     200
School for the Deaf and the Blind       24
Number of boys taking Home Economics courses, 187.
Increased enrolment is shown in the number of boys taking Home Economics.
An effort has been made to interest these classes in the different phases of home-
making, rather than in food preparation only.
* Includes different phases of home-making. JJ 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
A small mixed class of Grade XI boys and girls was organized in the Trail High
School.    This was experimental and was scheduled for one term only.
There are now twenty-three graduates in Home Economics from the University of
British Columbia in teaching positions in the schools. The majority of these are
taking advantage of the courses offered in teacher-training at the Summer School of
Education. Two have completed the work required for the diploma in education
offered by the University.
The many new fields open to the home economist continue to attract the graduate
more than do those of the established work of the dietitian and teacher. The shortage
of Home Economics trained teachers is still acute and presents one of the major
problems of this Department.
There are 149 Home Economics teachers on the staffs of the various schools within
the Province. Unfortunately, teachers have not been available to fill the vacancies at
Michel and Wells.    This has resulted in the closing of these centres temporarily.
Forty-seven teachers attended the Home Economics class offered in Curriculum
and Methods in Home Economics at the Summer School in Victoria during July and
August, 1947. Miss Mary Campbell, B.Sc, of the Lord Byng High School, Vancouver,
and Miss Ruth Rannie, B.Sc, of the Technical School, Vancouver, were the instructors.
Miss Muriel Johnson, B.H.Sc, with Miss Corinne Leifer, B.H.Sc, as her assistant,
directed the work of the cafeteria at the Summer School.
Miss Mabel Allen, M.A., supervisor of Home Economics for Vancouver, retired at
the end of the school-year, June, 1948. Her willingness to co-operate and the help and
advice given to the teachers under her supervision have been greatly appreciated. We
wish her good health and happiness.
Miss Isabelle Elliott, M.A., who has been a member of the staff at the Technical
School, Vancouver, has been appointed to succeed Miss Allen.
Miss Beth Ramsay, M.A., of the teaching staff of the Victoria High School, was
appointed, in September, 1947, as supervisor in Home Economics for Victoria, her
teaching programme being arranged to allow for part-time duties in supervision.
The Canadian Home Economics Association held its biennial conference at Calgary
during August, 1948. A pre-conference workshop was arranged and was conducted
by Dr. Clara Brown Amy, of the Home Economics Department of the University of
Minnesota. The theme of the pre-conference course and of the conference was " The
Evaluation of the Home Economics Programme in Canada." Eight of the nine Provinces were represented in the group attending. Miss Mildred Orr, Assistant Inspector
of Home Economics, and I attended both the pre-conference course and the conference
and felt that the contacts made and the opportunity to exchange ideas were worth while. EDUCATIONAL REFERENCE AND SCHOOL SERVICE. JJ 47
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL REFERENCE AND SCHOOL
SERVICE.
REPORT OF MURIEL A. SCACE, B.A., DIRECTOR.
The Division of Educational Reference and School Service is charged with the
responsibility of publishing British Columbia Schools, the official organ of the Department of Education, which is issued quarterly in elementary and secondary editions.
It is also responsible for the library of the Department of Education and for the
preparation of reference materials for Departmental officials, Inspectors of Schools,
teachers, and Curriculum Committees. The activities of this Division for the school-
year 1947-48 may be summarized as follows:—
"BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOLS."
British Columbia Schools, the official publication of the Department of Education,
is sent free of charge eight times during the school-year to all teachers in the Province.
It is designed to provide in-service professional aid, to assist teachers in keeping
abreast of the latest developments in the field of education, to list new teaching aids
and materials, and to acquaint teachers and officials with changes in the Programmes
of Studies and with new regulations of the Department of Education.
The publication of a Departmental magazine for teachers was initiated in September, 1944, with the publication of The Rural School, which was sent to both elementary and secondary teachers in the rural areas. Many requests were made that
this magazine be available to all elementary teachers, and in February, 1946, The
Rural School was replaced by British Columbia Schools, Elementary Edition, which is
currently issued on a quarterly basis to all teachers in the elementary grades. In
October, 1946, the publication of a Secondary Edition of the magazine was also undertaken, with a free distribution, on a quarterly basis, to all teachers in secondary schools.
During the school-year 1947-48, 14,125 copies of the Elementary Edition were published, and 8,650 copies of the Secondary Edition. This issue provided a sufficient
number of magazines to supply all teachers and principals, Inspectors of Schools,
Departmental officials, and School Boards throughout the Province. In addition, copies
were supplied, upon request, to teachers in private schools, Indian schools, and schools
supported by religious denominations. Copies of each issue of the magazine were
supplied to all students of the Victoria Normal School and of the teacher-training
department at the University of British Columbia. Complimentary copies were also
sent to all Provincial Departments of Education throughout Canada, to a number of
State Departments of Education across the Border, and to numerous educators, educational organizations, and libraries in both Canada and the United States. Files of the
magazine were sent, upon request, to Unesco House in Paris for the use of students at
international seminars of education.
REFERENCE AND SCHOOL SERVICE.
Reference Library Services.
A reference library is maintained in the Department of Education under the
Director of this Division. The resources of this library are available to all Inspectors
of Schools, Departmental and Normal School officials, and teachers engaged upon special
research projects. It is stocked with a wide range of professional books in the field of
education, and is kept up to date through careful evaluation and selection of the best
current literature in the field.    During the year 1947-48, 400 new books were added to the collection. In addition, 131 regularly published educational periodicals, pamphlets, and bulletins are received annually. Of these, 91 are secured through subscription and 40 upon a free or exchange basis. The library also contains a wide
selection of text-books supplied by publishing firms.
The Director of this Division is responsible for the selection of books for the
Teachers' Professional Library administered by the Public Library Commission.
Through this library service, teachers in all parts of the Province are provided with
free access to a wide range of the best and most up-to-date professional literature in
the field of education.
Text-books and Teaching Materials.
This Division maintains contacts with all educational publishers and evaluates new
text-books and supplementary books and teaching materials of all kinds. Notable
materials of this type are brought to the attention of teachers and officials through
British Columbia Schools.
Programmes of Studies and Curricular Materials.
The Director of this Division acts also as assistant to the Director of the Division
of Curriculum and as secretary of the Central Curriculum Committee, and in that
capacity is concerned with research in the field of curriculum, with the procuring and
the preparation of professional educational materials for use by members of committees
engaged in curriculum revision, and with the editing, final preparation for printing,
and actual publication of all Programmes of Studies and of numerous Departmental
reports. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER).
JJ 49
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER).
REPORT OF H. N. MacCORKINDALE, B.A., SUPERINTENDENT
OF SCHOOLS.
ENROLMENT.
(October of each Year.)
Year.
Elementary.
Junior High.
Senior High.
Total.
1929	
27,522
4,363
6,012
37,897
1930	
27,663
4,351
6,801
38,815
1931	
27,953
4,382
7,614
39,949
1932	
27,593
4,417
8,051
40,061
1933	
26,723
4,639
8,131
39,493
1934	
26,335
4,635
8,493
39,463
1935	
25,978
4,578
8,772
39,328
1936	
25,833
4,454
9,131
39,418
1937	
25,348
4,266
9,506
39,120
1938	
24,338
4,165
10,016
38,519
1939	
23,556
4,080
9,856
37,492
1940	
23,032
4,149
9,471
36,652
1941	
23,091
4,354
8,741
36,186
1942*	
22,014
4,175
7,166
33,355
1943	
22,383
4,540
7,139
34,062
1944	
22,394
4,396
7,913
34,703
1945	
22,737
4,294
8,295
35,326
35,736
36,221
1946	
23,338
4,113
8,375
1947	
24,217
3,906
8,098
* Withdrawal of Japanese from Pacific Coast area.
Since our city school system is about 40 per cent, reorganized on the six-three-three
plan, the number of junior high school students is small in comparison with the other
groups. The areas organized on the traditional eight-four plan include the pupils of
the seventh and eighth grades in the elementary school.
Because of the relatively small number of births in the early thirties, there is a
considerable drop in the enrolment of the upper grades. Further, the large number of
births in the early forties will produce a big increase in the enrolment of the lower
grades of the elementary school. As time advances, this increase will move along
toward the upper grades. Considerable adjustment of equipment and school plans will
thus be necessary. JJ 50
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
Distribution of Pupils by Grades, September 30th, 1947, Vancouver.
Below is a table which gives the geographical origin of new pupils enrolled in the
city school system between September 2nd, 1947, and November 30th, 1947:—
Origin.
Elementary.
Secondary.
Total.
739
218
220
185
13
154
44
82
7
5
6
1
7
7
334
81
80
65
3
64
37
30
1
2
1
2
1,073
299
300
250
■  16
218
81
112
8
7
7
1
9
7
1,688
700
2,388
Inspector R. Straight, Director of the Bureau of Measurements, has made similar
studies every year since 1936.    The following table gives the comparative figures:—
1936   2,012 1942   3,372
1937   2,249 1943   2,388
1938   1,865 1944   2,420
1939   1,760 1945   2,008
1940   2,294 1946   2,451
1941   2,931 1947   2,388 SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER). JJ 51
Based upon the distribution of pupils by grades (as shown by an earlier graph),
also upon the resident births in the city since 1941, and upon the influx of school population from outside districts, it is a reasonable prediction to make that the enrolment
in the first six grades of the elementary school will increase from approximately 20,000
in September, 1947, to 35,000 in September, 1953.
ACCOMMODATION.
The School Board's ten-year building programme for $9,000,000 endorsed by the
ratepayers March, 1947, should take care of any emergency. This, of necessity, depends
upon the availability of skilled labour and building materials.
New Buildings.
1. Kitchener No. 2 (Trafalgar) (Twenty-fifth Avenue and Trafalgar Street).—
The first unit of this school was completed and occupied by primary classes on October
1st, 1947. The unit consists of four primary class-rooms, an auditorium-gymnasium,
and most of the administrative section required for the school when completed. The
building is of concrete construction with a particularly pleasing stucco finish.
2. Technical-Vocational School (Pender and Hamilton Streets).—Before preparing
plans for this school the Board appointed our architect, Mr. E. D. King, and the principal of the new school, Mr. D. H. Goard, as a delegation to visit centres in the United
States and Canada, in order to study the buildings and operation of vocational schools.
The Department of Education appointed Mr. H. Jones, Director of Technical Education
for the Province, to join Mr. King and Mr. Goard on their tour of investigation. The
delegation visited Toronto, Hamilton, Buffalo, Cleveland, Chicago, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Los Angeles, Oakland, Portland, and Seattle. A report of their observations was
presented to the Board.
Based on the findings of this delegation, the architect's department under Mr.
King, assisted by Mr. Peck, prepared sketch-plans which were then approved by the
Department of Education for the Province.
The firm of architects, Sharpe, Thompson, Berwick, and Pratt, were engaged to
prepare the final working plans and specifications based on the tentative ones prepared
by the School Board's building department. In order to have the plans completed by
February 15th, 1948, all School Board officials were instructed to give every assistance
possible to the architects engaged. The plans were ready according to schedule and
the contract let to the Commonwealth Construction Company, and construction commenced before the end of March. The work is proceeding according to plan and should
be completed by March 31st, 1949.
The Board has approved the incorporation of the following courses into the plans
of this building: Auto Mechanics; Auto Body Repair; Steam, Diesel, Marine, and
Stationary Engineering; Machine-shop; Woodworking trades—Carpentry, Bench-
work; Plumbing, Heating, and Refrigeration; Welding—Electrical and Gas; Bartering; Electrical trades; Commercial courses; Practical-nurse Training; Shoe-repairing;
Food Servicing—Waitress-training, Restaurant Cooking; Navigation; Draughting—
Mechanical and Architectural;  Watch-repairing.
The commencing of such a programme of vocational education is one of the most
progressive and constructive undertaken in this city in a period of almost three decades.
It has the complete and sympathetic support of all our citizens. The Board feel justly
proud of this extension of our educational programme.
3. Tecumseh School (Forty-first Avenue and Commercial Drive).—An auditorium-
gymnasium with lunch-room and auxiliary features was completed soon after the opening of school September, 1947. JJ 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
4. Alexandra School (Broadway East and Clark Drive).—An auditorium-gymnasium with lunch-room and auxiliary features similar to Tecumseh will be ready for use
when school opens next September.
5. Begbie School Addition (Kitchener and Lillooet Streets).—Plans for this addition were completed and the contract awarded to the B.C. Bridge and Dredging Company. This addition consists of ten class-rooms, a library, art-room, auditorium-
gymnasium (450 to 500 seats), showers, dressing-rooms, lunch-room, and alterations
and additions to the administrative section.    It will be completed in the early autumn.
6. Carleton School (Kingsway and Joyce Road).—The construction for this school
of a gymnasium-auditorium, with lunch-room and other necessary features, has been
commenced. The accommodation will be similar to that supplied at the Tecumseh and
Alexandra Schools.    It should be ready for occupancy before the end of the school-year.
7. New Secondary School (Twenty-seventh Avenue and Gladstone Street).—Plans
have been prepared for the first unit of this junior-senior secondary school by our
architect, Mr. E. D. King, assisted by Mr. G. Peck. Some excellent suggestions by the
Secondary-school Building Committee, supervisors, engineers, teachers, and Inspectors
have been incorporated by the architects into these plans.
The first unit provides the following accommodation: Twenty-one class-rooms, six
science laboratories, four shops, four home economics units, two art-rooms, two gymnasium floors with the necessary showers and dressing-rooms, health service rooms, music-
room, cafeteria, library, stores, receiving-room, and a complete administration unit.
It is hoped that tenders will be called and construction commenced within two
months. When completed, this secondary-school plant should compare favourably with
the best to be found anywhere.
8. New Elementary School (Forty-fifth Avenue and Selkirk Street).—The first
unit, consisting of two primary class-rooms, should be completed before the end of the
year.    Architects are Sharpe, Thompson, Berwick, and Pratt.
9. New Elementary School (Fifty-ninth Avenue and Heather Street).—The first
unit, which consists of four primary class-rooms, should be completed (along with No. 8
above) by the end of the year.    The same firm of architects is planning this unit.
10. Addition to John Oliver Secondary School (Forty-first Avenue and Draper
Street).—Plans are being prepared for this addition by the architects, Mercer and
Mercer.
11. Addition to Renfrew School (Twenty-second Avenue and Rupert Street).—
Plans are almost completed by our own architects, and tenders should be called for soon.
This addition involves nine new class-rooms, with lunch-room, dressing-rooms, and
showers.    It should be completed for the opening of school in September, 1949.
12. Other Projects.—The following additions are being planned by our architects'
department (by-laws have been authorized by the ratepayers) :—
(a) First unit of a new administration building.
(6) Addition to King Edward Secondary School.
(c) Addition to Livingstone School (so that it can be used as a secondary
school).
(d) Addition to Lord Byng Secondary School.
(e) Addition to Cecil Rhodes Elementary School.
Changes in the distribution of school population within the city may alter the
priority of some of these proposals.
13. Reconstruction of Macdonald School.—On December 7th, 1947, this school was
very badly damaged by fire. The entire roof of the main building was a complete loss.
Rain, with fire damage, made the entire school unusable (except the auditorium).
Pupils were temporarily housed in adjoining schools and portable shacks on the main
school-grounds. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER). JJ 53
The reconditioning of this school was a tremendous task for our building department. Mr. King, our architect, and Mr. Beechey, our building superintendent, are to
be commended for the fine job done and the rapidity with which it was finished.
I expect it will be ready to be occupied on the opening of school in September next.
TESTING AND OTHER ACTIVITIES OF THE
BUREAU OF MEASUREMENTS.
Number of individual intelligence tests given, 784.
Number of pupils given group intelligence tests, 9,443.
Special individual intelligence tests given to 208 prospective Grade I pupils who
were under 6 years of age prior to December 1st, 1947. Ninety of these were admitted
to Grade I on trial. The others were rejected as being unlikely to succeed in the work
of the first grade.
Detroit Beginning First-grade Intelligence Test (revised) given to all Grade I
pupils in September, 1947 (4,200 approximately).
In June, 1948, achievement tests in the fundamental subjects were given to
approximately 2,800 pupils of Grades VI and VIII. The Grade VI pupils tested were
in the junior high school districts up for promotion to Grade VII (junior high school).
The Grade VIII pupils selected were in senior high school districts up for promotion to
Grade IX (senior high school). These standardized tests assist the principals and
Inspectors in maintaining levels of achievement.
An analysis of the results of the University Entrance and Senior Matriculation
examinations for June, 1947, was made and distributed to all the principals of the
senior high schools.
Outlines of all courses offered in each of the secondary schools (junior and senior)
were distributed to all elementary- and secondary-school principals. This summary is
very valuable to our staff of Guidance teachers and counsellors.
To assist the National Employment Service, all students who desired jobs in the
summer holidays and those students who were withdrawing from school at the end of
the term to enter industry and commerce were registered.
Approximately 35,000 permanent records and medical cards were cleared through
the Bureau during the year.
Inspector Straight and his staff are to be commended on the excellence of the work
accomplished.
NIGHT-SCHOOLS.
Each year sees changes in the night-school programme, new courses being offered
and others being withdrawn temporarily or permanently. During the year 240 classes
were operated, in which instruction was given to over 6,000 adults in ninety-five
different subjects. It is hoped that the field of adult education will be extended still
further. There is no doubt that the more education the adult receives, the greater will
be the home influence on the education of the children.
HEALTH SERVICES.
The usual high standard of school medical health services has been maintained.
This could not have been done without the interest, co-operation, and untiring efforts
on the part of the medical, dental, nursing, and teaching staff.
To Dr. Stewart Murray, Chief Medical Health Officer of the Metropolitan Health
Board, and his efficient staff, I extend my thanks for their magnificent contribution to
the health programme of our school system. JJ 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
INSTRUCTION.
Special supervisors in Music, Art, Handicrafts, Industrial Arts, Home Economics,
Physical Education, and primary grades have assisted the Superintendent, Inspectors,
and principals in teacher growth and development. The standard of class-room instruction has been maintained at a very high level.
Principals of all schools, both primary and secondary, have given a portion of their
time to assist in the supervision of instruction and pupil-teacher growth.
All new appointees to the teaching staff have been given special assistance and
observation by the Inspectors. In-service training classes have been organized for
many teachers desiring help and guidance.
Because of the large number of applicants for employment to the teaching staff
from places outside British Columbia, there has been no great shortage of teachers.
It has been difficult, however, to get a sufficient number of well-qualified teachers in
Physical Education and primary methods.
I am well satisfied with the advances that we have been able to make, in spite of
many interruptions, by activities which originate outside the school system.
The following members of the staff were granted superannuation. All of them
are to be highly commended for their many years of loyal and efficient service:—
Name.
School.
Date of
Appointment.
E. W. Parker 	
August, 1911.
October, 1923.
F. G. Barger  	
Van Home Elementary	
April, 1913.
Miss L. B. Clark	
Miss E  F. Crake   	
Augrust, 1923.
I report with regret the death of the following members of the staff, who have
served our school system so faithfully:—
Name.
School.
Date appointed.
Date of Decease.
E. W. Crawford	
Technical High	
Principal, Charles Dickens	
J. T. Boyes	
September, 1921
May 27, 1948.
July 11, 1948.
July 18, 1948.
J. W. B. Shore	
September, 1925	
CONCLUSION.
In conclusion I should like to thank the Mayor, City Council, Library Board, Park
Board, Fire Department, Police Department, and all officials of these organizations for
their excellent co-operation at all times.
To the press I am particularly indebted for the fair presentation made to the
public concerning many intricate school problems.
Needless to say, this excellent year's work could not have been accomplished without the entire support and co-operation of the Board of School Trustees and entire staff.
To you, sir, and other members of your Education Department, I am most grateful
for your advice, guidance, and support at all times. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 61  (GREATER VICTORIA),
REPORT OF J. F. K. ENGLISH, M.A., B.Paed., SENIOR MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR, AND JOHN GOUGH, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR.
The overwhelming support for the school-building by-law given by the ratepayers
in June, 1947, is proof that the citizens in Greater Victoria are sincerely concerned
with the educational welfare of the children in this district. The general expansion of
the area, with its large increase in school population, amply justifies the policy of the
Board to build for the future. However, notwithstanding the fact that authority was
given by the people to proceed with a carefully planned programme, we have not been
able to make as much progress as we could have wished. The new technical-vocational
unit begun in May will be completed by December, 1948. We expect that the courses
given in this field will be of great value, not only to pupils in school, but also to adults
in evening classes. Labour and materials particularly are still in short supply. Building costs remain high, and at this time the Board of School Trustees faces many difficulties in proceeding with the building programme, although additional school accommodation at both the elementary and high school levels is very urgently needed.
Victoria College.
(John M. Ewing, B.A., D.Paed., Principal.)
In 1947-48, for the first time in its history, the College had its own fully equipped
laboratory facilities in biology, chemistry, and physics. This added very greatly to the
efficiency of the institution.
The warm and grateful thanks of the College are tendered to Principal H. L.
Smith and his staff for co-operation in the matter of laboratories over many years.
New courses were added as follows in 1947-48: Geography 101, Geography 202,
Home Economics 90 and 91, Home Economics 200 and 201, French 203, Philosophy 205,
Psychology 200.
During the College year the following members of the faculty were absent on postgraduate studies: W. Harry Hickman, M.A., to attend the Sorbonne, Paris; Sydney G.
Pettit, M.A., to attend the University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.; Roger J. Bishop,
M.A., to attend the University of Toronto; Phyllis Baxendale, B.A., to attend the
University of California, Berkeley, Calif.; Marjorie Griffin, B.A., to attend the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif.
The annual assembly was held on the evening of October 24th in the auditorium.
The guest speaker was Air Commodore J. L. Plant and the University was most acceptably represented by the Chancellor, the Honourable Eric W. Hamber.
Student activities were varied and many. Some twenty societies and clubs continued to flourish as student enterprises. Special mention should be made of the
Chemical Institute of Canada, which won national recognition for its fine achievements
under the guidance of Prof. L. J. Clark.
Secondary Schools.
(J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Paed., Senior Municipal Inspector of Schools.)
Victoria High School.
Beyond doubt, never before in the history of the Victoria High School has there
been such a measure of student participation in school affairs as was evident in the year just completed.   This was manifest especially in the athletic programme of our
school.
This spirit of co-operation was manifest in the harmony of effort displayed to
provide for a suitable memorial to the graduates and former students of the Victoria
High School who had given their lives in World War II. Under the capable and
enthusiastic leadership of a staff committee comprised of teachers who had served in
the armed forces, an objective of $20,000 was decided upon for this purpose. The fact
that more than $13,000 of this amount has already been raised is in itself adequate
testimony to the initiative, industry, and co-operation of the entire school population,
staff and students alike. It is hoped that within the coming months a beginning will
be made on the actual structure in order that the friends of the school who have contributed so generously will see some tangible evidence of their sacrifice and good-will.
Improved learning situations within the class-room also have not been neglected.
Recently there has been a growing tendency on the part of many University Entrance
students not only to complete the requirements necessary for entering college, but,
in addition, through the facilities available in our excellent Commercial Department,
so to enrich their courses by the choice of Commercial options as to equip themselves
for business positions.
Oak Bay High School.
Enrolment through the year has been remarkably uniform. In September it
totalled 397 and at.April 30th 395 pupils were in attendance at the school. Class-room
accommodation is taxed to provide for the optional subjects.
A broad choice of courses is offered the pupils. In harmony with the modern
philosophy of education, leadership among the pupils and learning by doing are stressed
throughout the school. Most pupils work toward their High School Graduation and
University Entrance. Elective courses in Art, Commercial subjects, Music, Home
Economics and Industrial Arts, Chemistry A, and Physics A are popular. The school
mixed choir has been particularly successful and in demand through the year. For
the first time the Industrial Arts classes have included both Woodwork and Metalwork
for the boys. I must report very favourably on the excellent record of the library.
The key-note of this work is getting the pupils to read, and an excellent selection of
worth-while books of fiction is available for borrowing by the student-body. In addition, there is an adequate reference section and a voluminous file of material on many
vocations that is in constant use.
Mount View High School.
Enrolment for the school-year 1947-48 has continued to tax the capacity of the
building and equipment. The size of this year's graduating class, the largest in
the history of the school, is an indication that extra class-room space will soon be
a necessity.
During the year the programme offered was extended, particularly in the Industrial Arts Department. The new Industrial Arts building, with its equipment and
staff, made it possible to offer courses not hitherto given.
The Commercial divisions continued to attract a large group of students. Graduates
of this department have always been successful in offices and in positions for which
their training had fitted them.
Esquimalt High School.
An additional division was opened in the Esquimalt High School in 1947-48,
making a total of seven divisions. The staff was likewise enlarged to nine full-time
teachers. This lessened the teaching load of all members of the staff, facilitated timetable construction, and increased the openings available in the school. For the first
time it was possible to offer both Biology A and Physics A in the one year. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. JJ 57
Commercial students who had completed Grade X were transferred to Victoria
High School for advanced work. Several boys also went to Victoria High School to
take vocational courses.
Mount Douglas High School.
The enrolment at this school has been about the same for the past ten years, with
five full-time teachers comprising the staff. In addition to the regular academic
courses, Commercial subjects, Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Music, Drama, and
Journalism are available as optional courses. This school can also give optional
sciences in Grade XII as well as Latin throughout, always providing that sufficient
students enrol for these particular subjects.
Mount Douglas High School was accredited for the first time this year in recognition of the fine academic standing which has been maintained for a period of several
years.
Central Junior High School.
The enrolment at this school dropped somewhat this year, largely because of recent
changes in the boundaries between this school and the Margaret Jenkins and Oaklands
Schools. This year we enrolled 136 pupils in Grade IX, compared with an average
enrolment of 156 in this grade during the three previous years. The effect of this
curtailment will be cumulative over the years, unless a new source of supply is found.
This year 175 pupils of Grade IX prepared job-studies based upon original research
dealing with the work carried on in about nine local industries. Formerly all studies
had been made from reading material supplied, largely by the Department of Education. A few Grade VIII pupils, who requested to do so, also participated in the project.
All the pupils of Grades IX and VIII made industrial tours during British Columbia
Industries Open House Week.
Elementary Schools.
(John Gough, M.A., Municipal Inspector of Schools.)
Twenty-seven elementary schools were in operation during the school-year to serve
a total enrolment of 7,287 pupils. Several auditoriums and annexes were utilized to
provide temporary accommodation for the increase of 341 elementary pupils over the
previous year. The co-operative assistance of the 217 teachers associated with these
schools, many of whom had to work under difficult conditions, is greatly appreciated
by trustees and officials.
With reference to the in-service training of teachers, special attention was given
to providing teachers of Grades I to VI with unit outlines relating to the recently
revised programme in Social Studies. In addition to offering practical suggestions
regarding procedure, area of content, pupil activity, and instructional aids, the outlines
served to co-ordinate the work at the various grade-levels. The appreciation of famous
paintings was stimulated by circulating folios of reproductions among the schools.
Helpful guidance was offered in various other subject fields of the curriculum by
supervisors whose reports follow.
Kindergarten-Primary Department.
(Miss Marion D. James, Director.)
During the school-year 1947-48 my work as Director of Kindergarten-Primary
work in the Greater Victoria schools was chiefly concerned with the regular supervision of sixteen (eight centres) kindergarten classes, ninety-three (Grades I to III)
primary classes, three craft classes (primary, junior, and intermediate), and the
administration of the Educational Centre Reference Room. In addition to this regular
work, I assisted several beginning teachers in the intermediate grades.    My work of JJ 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
supervision was done through consultations with the principals, visits to class-rooms,
demonstration teaching, office interviews, attendance at special school functions, conferences with groups of teachers, and regular primary meetings held once a month.
Many teachers and interested visitors from England and other parts were shown
through the primary classes and entertained at teas and school functions.
The popularity of the kindergartens grows each year, as shown by the increased
demand for admittance. Teachers who have received pupils from kindergarten classes
are most enthusiastic about the training these children have received during the kindergarten year. Meetings with parents have been held in all centres and have proved
very valuable.
Primary-Junior-Intermediate-Senior Crafts Department.
(Miss A. Verna Turner, M.A., Director.)
Between fifteen and twenty pupils attended each of the four crafts classes again
this year. The age-groups represented were: Primary, 6 to 9 years; junior, 8 to 10
years; intermediate, 10 to 12 years; senior, 13 to 17 years. In all four classes, handicrafts played an important part in instruction, and the three R's were related to
activities wherever possible.
Primary.—The primary children were given a new start in reading, spelling, writing, and number-work. To promote a higher standard of skill in writing and neatness
in book-work, time was given to art design, using pencil, ruler, crayons, and, later,
paints. Practical art in the form of raffia-work and wool and canvas work was given
to encourage muscular development of fingers and hands.
Junior.—Throughout the year the children had two afternoons a week away from
their regular class-room—one in studying Home Economics at South Park, the other
in Manual Training at Quadra. At Home Economics they had lessons and practice
in cooking, sewing, weaving, and spool knitting. Some very artistic and useful articles
were made at Manual Training; these included bread-boards, book-ends, tea-trays,
and flower-pot stands—interesting results which pleased the children and gave them
confidence.
Mornings and afternoons in the regular class-room were spent on the basic subjects of reading, spelling, writing, arithmetic, science, health, and social studies. The
pupils prepared booklets pertaining to their work. Seat-work was interspersed for
variety with games, songs, painting and colouring, clay modelling, weaving, potato
printing, and making purses and small pictures from felt.
Intermediate.—During the year Manual Training and Home Economics were taken.
The work in Manual Training included woodwork, metalwork, and elementary electricity.
The Home Economics class put on three teas during the year, one of which was for
the members of the I.O.D.E. Chapter who have adopted this class. The entire preparations were done by the children. A great deal of credit is due to the instructors of
these courses for their co-operation and understanding.
Special emphasis was placed on the basic subjects, and there was a greater attempt
this year to introduce Social Studies and Science.
Senior.—During the year twenty boys attended the senior craft class at Central
Junior High School.    The attendance was good.
Department op Physical Education.
(George Grant, B.A., Director.)
Some idea of the extent of the Physical Education programme in this district can
be judged by the number of teachers engaged in teaching it. Including the primary
teachers, the figures are:  Elementary, 184;  junior and senior high, 15.    In the high REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS.
JJ 59
schools, besides this number, another twenty to twenty-five teachers contribute in no
small measure to the success of the intra-mural and inter-school athletic programmes.
Altogether, nearly two-thirds of the teaching-body participate in some way or another.
Besides visits to the schools with accompanying observations, many suggestions
were made to the teachers with respect to the improvement of techniques and the
raising of standards.
More emphasis has been placed on swimming programmes this year, and notable
features have been:—
(1) High school classes for girls in regular physical education periods conducted over a ten-week period by Misses Lifton and Stanley, of Victoria
High School. These classes were arranged so their period came either
last in the morning or last in the afternoon.
A Red Cross instructors' course for high school pupils resulted in thirteen
boys and girls qualifying as instructors. Thirteen others earned Senior
Swimmer and two other Intermediate Swimmer awards.
These thirteen instructors conducted learn-to-swim classes after school-
hours for high school students, sixty-five of whom took all or part of the
training.
A learn-to-swim class for teachers resulted in six teachers taking part.
The Grade V learn-to-swim programme was repeated and was more successful than last year. The chief reason for this was the division of
every class into three levels of ability and giving instruction suitable to
each. Mr. Ed. Kelter, of the Pro-Rec, gave time to every afternoon class
in advanced swimming and diving. Every child who wished had a chance
to try the Red Cross junior test, but more important than this is the fact
that almost 100 per cent, of the 750 children who took the classes learned
to enjoy and make some progress in the water. A summary of the success
of the swimming programme conducted in conjunction with the Red Cross
is shown as follows:—
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
Number
taking
part.
Number tested.
Number successful.
Junior.
Intermediate.
Senior.
Junior.
Intermediate.
Senior.
750
66
55
28
282
28
11
	
18
2
10
11
248
23
11
17
2
9
11
898
321
20
21
282
19
20
Child Study Department.
(Miss Verna Turner, M.A., Director.)
Tests and measurements of various kinds are used in education for a number
of purposes—to measure achievement, scholastic ability, aptitude, and the like. In
Greater Victoria the Child Study Department continues to offer mental measurement
as a major service, but places its chief emphasis on the use of tests to improve instruction and to direct remedial work. Other purposes were served at the same time by the
same tests—purposes relating to educational guidance, placement, promotion, and
programming of individual pupils.
During the fall term of 1947 the Child Study Department directed a testing programme in scholastic aptitude through several grades with class teachers sharing in
administering and scoring the group tests.    Many individual psychometric examina- tions were given and case-studies started in a number of instances. As an aid in
making Provincial surveys, aptitude tests were given in three grades for the Department of Education. In addition, an achievement test in Grade XI reading was given—■
a survey test that will be made each year among all students in Greater Victoria schools
before they enter Grade XII.
Standardized achievement tests, when used along with scholastic aptitude tests,
are invaluable instruments in education to-day—and from January to June, 1948, an
intensive " spring testing programme " of achievement was carried out in various subjects and grades. It has been the policy of the Child Study Department to give all
such achievement tests, to score and analyse them, and to record sheets, error studies,
bulletins, and talks. The major objective of such a testing programme is to improve
instruction and to pick out remedial cases in time to do something for them.
When remedial cases had been identified by the Child Study Department, the
special treatment needed to correct their weaknesses was prescribed by publishing
error studies and supplying remedial work-books in basic subjects like reading and
arithmetic.
Audio-Visual Department.
(Denis W. Brown, B.A., Part-time Director.)
This Department was authorized on January 5th, 1948, to facilitate distribution
of films, train teachers in the use of audio-visual aids, plan a programme of in-service
training, and co-ordinate the various aspects of audio-visual work in the schools of
Greater Victoria.
In the first four months of operation the Audio-Visual Department maintained
the distribution service within the limits permitted by films available from the
Division of Visual Education. In addition, this Department notified weekly each
school of titles, contents, the grades and subjects for which films provided were suitable,
and also supplied evaluation cards which summarized the value of motion pictures
received.
A complete survey was made of all motion-picture requirements for Greater Victoria in 1948-49. This was submitted to the Visual Division of the Department of
Education and will result in films being provided when and as required for the coming
school-year.
School Dental Health Services.
(Hugh Clarke, D.D.S., Director.)
This year the school dental health service was extended to all schools in the
Greater Victoria school system. In September Dr. David Parfitt was added to the
dental staff.
The following is a report for the nine months ended May 31st, 1948:—
Dental inspections made   16,750
Parents interviewed        930
Fillings of all kinds     1,673
Teeth extracted        182
Miscellaneous treatments given       478
Children having teeth cleaned     1,168
Speech Therapy Department.
(Miss Marie C. Crickmay, Director.)
During the school-year September, 1947, to June, 1948, 310 children with speech
difficulties varying from slight to severe were examined in the schools of Greater
Victoria.    This number represents a considerable increase over the 240 children exam- REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. JJ 61
ined during the previous school-year and points to the way in which the work of this
Department is expanding each year.
Of the children examined, eighty have been treated throughout the year, and of
these, 41.5 per cent, now have normal speech and the remainder have all shown varying
degrees of improvement. It is interesting to note that 80 per cent, of the children
receiving help for their speech are boys, which bears out the contention that girls have
a more rugged speech mechanism than boys, and so are less likely to develop speech
difficulties.
Contact with parents has been continuous throughout the year. The parents of
each case are interviewed before treatment is started and at regular intervals throughout the treatment to discuss any problem that may have arisen, and to ensure that
both the home and the clinic are handling the problem along similar lines.
Contact with teachers of children with speech difficulties has been continuous
throughout the year, and thanks are due to them for their co-operation and good-will,
which have contributed immeasurably to the success of the year's work.
Music Department.
(H. J. Bigsby, B.Mus., Acting Director.)
The regular class-room music programme this year was a continuance of the objectives and attainments as set down for last year; that is, standardization of time allotments, materials, and objectives, while still endeavouring to leave a certain latitude
to the individual teacher's special interests.
Supplementary material was made available to the schools and on loan through
the Education Centre. The record library of the Centre supplemented the listening
programme for those teachers who did not use the radio programmes or wished to
introduce additional materials.
Through the Primary Department the rhythm band programme was materially
expanded by demonstrations and panel discussions. More instruments were distributed
to the schools.
The first school music festival for the Greater Victoria School District was held
from November 17th to 28th. November was chosen as the time for the festival to
prevent overintensive preparation for such an event and to leave the spring term free
for other events. This chosen time was an experiment and worked out quite successfully. Approximately 5,000 children in Grades III to VIII participated in the daily
sessions—all these grades from every school. The festival was conducted on a noncompetitive basis, the philosophy being it provided children with an opportunity to
sing to one another and to compare their efforts with those of similar age-groups.
Helpful comments were offered by a " commentator," and it was hoped that these would
help to improve the teaching of music in the schools.
The school instrumental programme continued to advance this year. A group of
forty beginners were enrolled in the two centres. Through the efforts of the Band
Committee a number of new instruments were purchased and sixty uniforms were
secured. The two bands combined frequently this year for public performances to
form a Greater Victoria Schools Band of sixty pieces. A very successful two-night
concert in aid of the Uniform Fund was staged in April.
Home Economics Department.
(Miss B. T. Ramsay, M.A., Part-time Director.)
During the past year the following students have attended the Home Economics
classes: Grade VII, 423; Grade VIII, 414; Grade IX, 247; Grade X, 175; Grade XI,
68;  Grade XII, 26;  craft classes, 52. JJ 62
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
In addition to their teaching duties, several of the teachers managed the school
cafeterias. Numbers eating in the cafeterias have shown a continual increase, and
more accommodation is needed in some schools.
The junior and senior craft classes have been given practical work in foods and
clothing suited to their ability. These classes have proved very satisfactory, and the
students, especially the boys, have shown a great deal of interest.
In the spring, open house was held in a number of schools in conjunction with the
Industrial Arts. In most cases there was a good attendance of parents and friends
who showed a great deal of interest and appreciation of work done.
Monthly meetings of the Home Economics teachers have been held throughout
the year.
Industrial Arts and Vocational Training.
(George Anstey, Director.)
There is an excellent spirit of co-operation and industry shown by all sixteen
instructors. Monthly meetings have been conducted by a chairman other than myself.
Discussions have included the following topics: Courses of study, record cards, marking of students' work, report forms, requisitions, and stock books, etc. Much benefit
is derived from these informal conferences.
While an uncertain attempt was made to introduce the vocational training courses
in the school system last year, it was done so hurriedly that they were not entirely
satisfactory. This year the results were much better and will improve after more
experience has been gained. Four courses were conducted—three at Victoria High
School and one temporarily at Mount View High School.
The four Vocational Trade Committees set up last year have been meeting from
time to time. They have been helpful in planning the layout of the shops and in drawing up lists of the equipment needed. In the future more thought will be given to
course content and to the placement of graduate students.
Evening Classes.
(George Anstey, Director.)
Evening  classes  were   held   at  the   following  centres   during   the   school-year
1947-48:—
Listed.
Closed.
Extra
Classes.
Conducted.
Victoria High School	
Central Junior High School	
Old Oak Bay High School	
Mount View High School	
Quadra Industrial Arts School	
Kings Road Motor Mechanics School
Market Building	
Totals	
33
5
3
5
1
1
5
53
The above numbers represent individual classes. Some subjects, such as dressmaking and woodwork, were held in more than one building. The number of subjects
taught was thirty-three.
During the months of January and February, with the exception of those held at
the Victoria High School, all classes were closed for several weeks. Although the time
lost was made up later, the continuity of instruction was broken and some students did
not return. The enrolment and attendance were a little better than last year, as follows:—
1946-47. 1947-48.
October enrolment  1,295 1,360
March enrolment       960 1,018
Certificates awarded  :      540 518
Attendance requirements to earn a certificate were raised from 70 per cent, to
75 per cent. At one time it was only 60 per cent. Also, teachers were instructed to
be less generous in their recommendations. Final examinations were given in many
of the courses, but not possible in all.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 40  (NEW WESTMINSTER),
REPORT OF ROY S. SHIELDS, B.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS.
The general organization of our school system remained practically the same as
of other years and, with added facilities, served efficiently the educational requirements
of the City of New Westminster. The addition to Lord Tweedsmuir Elementary
School of four class-rooms, an activity-room, lunch-room, etc., equipped with indirect
fluorescent lighting, hot and cold water, library facilities, and modern cloak-space
marks a definite progressive contribution to pupil educational environment.
The Board of School Trustees is to be commended for its progressive attitude in
regard to buildings and equipment.
Old buildings are kept in constant repair and new ones are planned. Outstanding
will be the new junior high school, meeting the requirements of 1,200 students; details
will be given in a later report.
All departments in the school system functioned smoothly and efficiently, especially
are we pleased with the success of the elementary pool library. It was organized in
September, 1947, as a supplementary book collection to augment the basic libraries of
the six elementary schools. Miss Hilda Smith is librarian. Some 2,500 books have
been ordered, covering recreational reading and all curriculum subjects—Grades I toVI.
In the past year three circulations of books have been made to all elementary
schools. This method of distribution has been found very helpful in adding to the
existing supply of books in the basic school libraries; the present success of this new
department augurs well for the future.
Music, as usual, received special attention through the elementary and junior
secondary levels, and we feel justly proud of the work done under the direction of Mr.
Fred Turner. His touring school bands brought credit to himself and to the school
organization.
The Physical Educational Department had its finest year, and too much appreciation cannot be expressed to those teachers who, in spite of heavy academic teaching
loads, find time and take the opportunity to combine good sportsmanship with bodily
training.
In May a most successful interprovincial senior high school baseball tournament
was held and ably supervised and directed by Mr. Ken Wright, of Duke of Connaught
Senior High School. The most notable success of our Physical Education programme
was the success of Miss Pat Jones, T. J. Trapp Technical Senior High, as one of the
Canadian track team representing Canada at the Olympic Games held in London, and her achievement as being one of the first students to represent any high school in
Canada at such a gathering is worthy of great commendation. Two other Trapp
Technical students received Provincial honours—Darryl Rouleau, Grade X, won the
junior Provincial championship in the short track events, while Jack Loretta captured
the championship in the field events at Powell River. Congratulations to Miss L.
McKenzie, Physical Education instructress at Trapp Technical, and to Mr. Rudy Wylie,
Physical Education instructor at Technical, and to the many teachers who assist in
departments other than their own.
The medical and dental departments again played a most important part in the
general welfare of the student-body. All secondary-school pupils were checked for
tuberculosis, with perfect results. Psychiatric clinics were held at regular intervals,
and it is noted that the Health Committee, in conjunction with the Management Committee, has almost completed plans for special classes to care more adequately for those
pupils who find the daily routine of school-work somewhat difficult. The regular work
of both the medical and dental clinic was of a very high standard.
Night-school classes operated successfully at T. J. Trapp Technical Senior High
School under the principalship of Mr. R. B. Vaughan. Plans for broader courses are
now being laid for next year.
Commendable interest has been taken in school journalism in all schools; magazines and school annuals of a very high standard are being produced. Public speaking
and general student participation wherever possible is profitably encouraged.
The use of visual and auditory aids has reached a creditable standard. All schools
are fully equipped and appreciation is here expressed of the assistance given by Mr.
J. Pollock of the Visual Education Department. A very fine public address system
is being installed in the Lord Tweedsmuir Elementary School by the pupils, teachers,
and Parent-Teacher Association, and will be a definite acquisition to the school
equipment.
The number of teachers taking advantage of Summer School and reading courses
offered by educational institutions at home and abroad is gratifying.
Hearty co-operation in the testing field has been received from Dr. Conway at all
times.
In the vocational field Mr. Harold Johns has spared neither time nor effort on our
pupils' behalf.
I am pleased with the development of the drama, under the chairmanship of Mr.
E. H. Lock. This sphere of work has been extended to include all schools of the city,
elementary and secondary. The results have been far reaching in the daily work of
the class-room, as well as stimulating interest in this cultural leisure-time activity.
While cadets were not carried on in the secondary schools this past year, great
interest has been shown by those teachers with military experience in seeing that
student cadet material have full information as to the Sea Cadets and the Army
Cadets.
In July Lieut.-Col. W. J. Williams, of the T. J. Trapp Technical High School staff,
was invited by the Command Cadet Officer to attend a conference to be held on July
27th at Cadet Trades Training Camp at Camp Ipperwash, Ontario. The trades-training courses conducted from June 20th to July 30th were an experiment to test the
feasibility of teaching Canadian Army signals and mechanical transport trades to
Royal Canadian Army Cadets The courses require attendance at camp for a six-week
period for three summers. Upon successful completion of each six-week period a cadet
receives a bonus of $60, and at the end of his third summer he receives, in addition,
a Group 1 army trades qualification in the subject he has taken. This qualification
makes it possible for him to enter the Canadian Army (Active or Reserve Force) and
to receive Group 1 trade's pay after a brief refresher course. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. JJ 65
One hundred and seventy-five cadets from technical schools in Central Command
were attending courses in Signals and Mechanical Transport, and from all appearances
the experiment was a great success. The cadets displayed a remarkable keenness in
learning these subjects, and it was thought by the instructors that many will be able
to obtain their trades' qualifications after only two summers' attendance at camp.
The representative from British Columbia thought cadets should come from all
high schools rather than technical schools, as so few had automotive departments.
Grateful acknowledgment is made herewith for scholarships granted to the senior
high schools by the Canadian Legion, University Women's Club, Kiwanis Club, V.C.
Memorial Scholarship, and the P.E.O. Sisterhood.
I wish to express appreciation to the Department of Education for its hearty
co-operation at all times, to an energetic and constructive Board of School Trustees
conscious of its responsibilities, to a capable and progressive organization of teachers,
and to those groups of Parent-Teacher Associations and service clubs who are keenly
interested in the welfare of our boys and girls.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 44  (NORTH VANCOUVER)  AND
No. 45  (WEST VANCOUVER).
REPORT OF WILLIAM GRAY, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS.
The school-year 1947-48 opened with an enrolment of 4,946 pupils and 159
teachers, an increase in pupils of 249 and in teachers of 6.
North Vancouver.
Until a few years ago most of the schools in this district had rooms available for
music, art, and other special subjects, as well as space for lunch-rooms. Now, with
the demand for class-rooms, these special rooms have disappeared, and progress in
respect of such special subjects has been somewhat retarded in consequence. However,
this district was more fortunate than many others, since in only one school -was it
necessary to employ a double shift.
In the western section of the district, which is developing very rapidly as a residential area, two new class-rooms were added to Capilano School. These are primary
rooms, very well heated and lighted, and they have proved very attractive to the
younger children.
During the past year the School Board has given careful consideration to the
Report on Town Planning, submitted by the firm of Harland Bartholomew, particularly as it affects schools, and planning for future development should thus be more
efficient. The Board is in agreement with the Report, in which it is suggested that
the answer to the present congestion in the schools is the construction of one or more
junior high schools, and efforts of the Board are being directed to this end.
One other major project is in progress—namely, the construction of a gymnasium
and cafeteria adjacent to the high school. If and when completed, this will be the
first unit of a group of buildings which will be made available for community use after
school-hours. Assistance in this project has come from an organization in North
Vancouver known as the Memorial Community Centre, which has made a very definite
contribution to the community life of this district during the past three years. A typical example is the Community College, a programme of night-school classes organized JJ 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
jointly by the Board of School Trustees and the Community Centre group. One course
offered during the year was car-driving. Earlier in the year a similar course was
given extra-murally to a group of high school students with such success that a demand
for a class for adults was made.    It was carried on with excellent results.
The first year of the vocational-technical unit was completed successfully. Classes
in machine-shop practice and in carpentry and cabinetmaking created keen interest
among high school boys. Visits to various industrial plants and demonstration of
technical operations in these plants proved to be of high educational value.
West Vancouver.
Major objectives of the School Board during the year have been (1) planning new
buildings, (2) renovating and extending playgrounds, and (3) proper maintenance of
existing buildings.
New buildings approved by by-law include an elementary school of six rooms with
provision for additions, a high school unit to accommodate Commercial, Home Economics, and Industrial Arts classes, and an auditorium-cafeteria to be added to Pauline
Johnson Elementary School.
With regard to playgrounds, additional acreage has been obtained for the Pauline
Johnson School site to give more playing-space, and extensive alterations are being
made at the high school site to provide suitable playing-fields there.
Future plans provide for an elementary school in the western section of the district
in order to reduce the amount of transportation from that area necessary at the present
time. The number of school-children there is not yet sufficient to warrant construction
of a school.
General.
The work done in the class-rooms of both districts continues to be of a high order,
indicating a large measure of interest and effort on the part of both teachers and
students. Objective evidence of this fact is obtained from the results of the testing
programme arranged by the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research.
Principals are assuming more responsibility in connection with supervision of their
staffs and are giving more assistance to new teachers or those lacking in experience
or showing weaknesses in teaching techniques.
Interest in the schools is displayed by the various Parent-Teacher Associations,
and assistance in various forms is given by a number of service organizations in the
community. In such ways the School Boards are encouraged in their efforts to build
up a sound educational system.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 41  (BURNABY).
REPORT OF C. G. BROWN, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS.
School Enrolment.
The schools opened the new term with 6,647 pupils enrolled, as follows: Elementary, 4,088; junior high, 1,583; senior high, 976. Of this number, 825 were beginners
in the primary department. The instructional staff consisted of 213 teachers. Considerable activity in housing developments indicates that Burnaby's school population,
in the next few years, will reach unprecedented levels, which will require the close
surveillance of the municipal authorities in order that appropriate and adequate provision be made for future accommodation. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. JJ 67
The School Board is well aware of this rapid expansion and has projected a building programme that will, if implemented, meet the minimum requirements of the
prospective school population.
Supervision of Instruction.
To assist in the educational administration, Miss Jean Bailey, B.A., was added to
the staff last year to act as consultant to the teachers of the intermediate grades, as
Miss Kathleen Collins so ably was doing in the primary field. During the year, under
the direction of these two ladies, a number of demonstrations and workshops were
organized to provide opportunities for teachers to acquaint themselves with a number
of new and approved procedures and thus widen their educational horizons. Plans
are under way to extend this programme of in-service training, which has already
shown many commendable results.
To acquaint teachers with educational literature and with new library books and
supplementary readers, a two-day book display was arranged in Burnaby. This proved
a very successful experiment and greatly aided the teachers in their selection of reading materials for the year. Also, under the direction of Miss Bailey and Miss Collins,
a library service was developed in conjunction with the North Burnaby Community
Library and the Vancouver Public Library to extend the reading opportunities of the
pupils on double shift. During their off-periods the pupils were brought to the library
and, under the guidance of their teachers, explored the new books made available for
this purpose.
During the year, by courtesy of the educational associations of Washington State
and the Burnaby School Board, permission was given for our supervisors to attend
conferences in Spokane and Seattle and to exchange views with educators in other
fields. Return visits were arranged whereby educational administrators from Washington had an opportunity to see our schools and to share their experiences with us.
Medical Health Services.
The school health services, under the metropolitan health plan, were conducted
along the lines of the preceding year and with approximately the same staff. The
occurrence of flood conditions in the spring of 1948 necessitated the carrying-out of
preventive health measures and imposed additional duties and obligations upon the
nursing staff. The routine examination continued throughout the school-year; the
students of Grades I, VII, and X were examined by the Medical Health Officer, and the
pupils of all other grades were examined by the school nurses. In addition, all students
participating in major sports were examined in September, and in February 1,202
students from Grades IX to XIII were examined for tuberculosis by the mobile X-ray
survey unit. Later, in March, a special examination was made of 300 pupils in one
of the elementary schools where a case of tuberculosis had been discovered. It is
worthy of note that during the school-year only one case of tuberculosis in a child
was found.
Dental services, through the two clinics, were given to the pupils from Grades
I, II, III, and IV, and to pupils from other grades for emergency treatment. Approximately thirty pupils per month were referred to the eye clinic for examination. Dr.
Gundry conducted monthly mental hygiene clinics at the Health Centre and attended
to a number of cases referred to him. In addition to these services rendered at our
own clinics, about thirty children were referred to the Children's Hospital for orthopaedic service and for the correction of other deformities.
The Health Centre continued with its work in vaccination and immunization
against infectious diseases, particularly among the preschool children. JJ 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
General.
Burnaby is experiencing a period of active expansion similar to that affecting
many other municipalities. During the past two or three years over 1,200 new homes
annually have been under construction. New housing developments have centred in
certain areas and have altered materially the problem of school accommodation. Thus
former plans have had to be constantly changed and extended to meet the new situations
that continue to arise in these areas. The widening of Kingsway, which will result
in greatly increased traffic, has made it desirable that the School Board consider plans
to eliminate the necessity for large numbers of pupils to cross this arterial highway
to reach their schools. Consequently, the Board has been on the alert to secure new
school-sites and to make plans for meeting the problems which will shape up in the
very near future.
In concluding this report, I would like to pay tribute to the energy and foresight
displayed by the Board of School Trustees in their consideration of the many difficult
administrative problems during the year and to the very loyal and active co-operation
of the Burnaby teaching staff.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 36  (SURREY),
REPORT OF K. B. WOODWARD, B.A., B.Paed., MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
In School District No. 36 during the school-year 1947-48 the enrolment continued
to grow steadily until before school-closing the total of 5,000 pupils was reached and
the teaching staff had increased to 150. Early in the year three additions totalling
five class-rooms, which were part of a programme authorized the preceding December,
were completed, and we were able to take ten classes off the double shift and place them
on the regular school-day. After considerable unavoidable delay, work was begun on
three elementary schools, one of two class-rooms, and two of four and one junior-senior
high school of fourteen class-rooms which also had been approved by the by-law. However, delays persisted and the school-year ended before any of them were finished.
Forty-six classes were on the double shift when school closed in June.
When the buildings authorized by the by-law of 1946 are completed, accommodation
will still be far from adequate, so at the present time the School Board is preparing
plans for an addition of two rooms, five four-roomed elementary schools, and another
junior-senior high school of fourteen class-rooms. They also are including in the bylaw a much-needed administration building which will house offices, workshops, and
storerooms. It is expected that a by-law to raise the district's share of this project
will be placed before the ratepayers at the December elections.
The turnover of staff was greater than in any previous year. Eighty-one new
teachers were engaged. This number, out of a total of 150, is far too many for effective
teaching. If the pupils of Surrey are to make the progress they should, ways must be
found of increasing the permanence of the teaching staff.
In June the flooding of the Fraser River forced the evacuation of Barnston Island
and also made attendance difficult, and in some cases impossible, for the pupils of three
other schools.
The public health nurses continued to render very helpful service in the schools.
They now have a well equipped and furnished building as their headquarters. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. JJ 69
In Surrey the school-year just closed was one characterized principally by waiting
and hoping for the future. We hope, early in the next year, to have the buildings under
construction completed and in use, and also that the taxpayers will pass the by-law now
projected so that the Surrey children may again be given the normal educational opportunities which are more necessary to-day than ever before. In the meantime the
teachers working often under serious handicaps carried on faithfully and in almost all
cases achieved as satisfactory results as could be expected.
I would like to express my appreciation of the work done by the Surrey teaching
staff during the year just ended, especially that of those who cheerfully put up with
the inconveniences and difficulties occasioned by the double shift, and of the interest
and co-operation of the members of the Surrey School Board, who gave most freely of
their time and energies. On behalf of the whole school district I would like to thank
Colonel Fairey for his patience and help with our many problems. JJ 70
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 62  (SOOKE), No. 63  (SAANICH),
No. 64  (SALTSPRING), AND No. 65  (COWICHAN).
REPORT OF J. E. BROWN, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The school-year 1947-48 has been marked by considerable progress in this inspectorate. Projects initiated earlier have been completed or at least advanced. Pupil-
teacher and teacher-Board relations have remained friendly and cordial. In spite of
a teacher shortage, all schools have been operating with a full quota, and one or two
new schools have been opened in remote areas. The following shows the increase in
the number of teachers since the school-year 1945-46:—
School District.
1945-46.
1947-48.
Sept., 1949.
No. 62                 	
23
36
16
51
28
43
18
52
33
No. 63	
47
No. 64	
19
No. 65	
56
Totals              	
126
141
155
Pupil enrolment has continued to increase at a rapid rate in all districts. The
providing of adequate accommodation remains one of the chief concerns of School
Boards. Nevertheless, high school facilities have been improved and extended to all
pupils in the inspectorate. Special attention has been given to providing facilities for
Physical and Social Education and for Industrial Arts and Commercial courses.
In District No. 62 (Sooke) considerable progress has been made toward carrying
out the plans of last year, when a building programme was launched and a by-law
passed. New class-rooms have been added to the Langford, Jordan River, and Sooke
Elementary Schools. Industrial Arts shops and other improvements are being completed at the Belmont and Milnes Landing High Schools.
Similar additions have been made in the high schools of District No. 63 (Saanich),
and both schools accredited. Extra class-rooms have been opened in the Sidney and
West Saanich Elementary Schools. Plans are being prepared for a new eight-room
school at Sidney and new schools at West Saanich and Royal Oak.
In District No. 64 (Saltspring) consideration is being given to establishing schools
at Retreat Cove and at Fulford Harbour. An additional class-room has already been
provided at South Galiano. In this district the high school is located at Ganges, which
is also the chief centre of population. This large consolidated school continues to grow
at a fairly rapid rate, and new teachers and facilities are required from time to time.
In District No. 65 (Cowichan) a building by-law was presented to the ratepayers
for approval in November. In spite of considerable opposition the by-law passed, and
plans are being prepared for a junior-senior high school at Duncan and elementary
schools at Shawnigan Lake, Mill Bay, the Bench, and Crofton areas; also additional
class-rooms have been opened at Cobble Hill and Sylvania districts.
The problem of transportation has occasioned a considerable amount of discussion
and study on the Boards' part. Costs have risen at an alarming rate; so much so that
several of the districts have decided to purchase their own buses. It is hoped that with
careful planning and efficient management the cost of this item of the budget may be
kept within bounds. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS.
JJ 71
In spite of the lack of facilities and other handicaps contingent upon a period of
reorganization, progress has been made in all districts toward an enrichment of the
curriculum. A keen interest has been evinced in school sports, in music and drama,
and Junior Red Cross Clubs have been maintained in practically all schools of the
inspectorate.
Some improvement has been noted in community relations. Parent-Teacher Associations have been organized in nearly all attendance areas, and various social projects
and community enterprises have been carried on by the joint efforts of parents and
teachers. Through co-operative effort, school libraries have been improved, moving-
picture projectors and radios purchased, grounds cleared and trees planted in a
number of local school centres. There is undoubtedly a growing appreciation of the
school as a community centre.
Tribute should be paid to the splendid work carried on by our school nurses. It is
probably no accident that the health of the children of school age has been maintained
and that no serious epidemics have developed. I would express the hope that the day
is not far distant when health services may be extended to all sections of the Province.
I wish also to report the appointment of Mr. G. F. Dyson as secretary-treasurer in
District No. 65 (Cowichan). Mr. Dyson succeeds Mr. A. VandeCasteyan, whose duties
as municipal clerk make it impossible for him to continue in this important office.
Finally, I would take this opportunity of expressing sincere appreciation to all
School Boards for many courtesies, to secretaries for continued co-operation, and to
principals, teachers, and caretakers for a year of faithful service.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 14  (SOUTHERN OKANAGAN), No. 15  (PENTICTON), No. 16  (KEREMEOS), AND No. 77  (SUMMERLAND).
REPORT OF J. N. BURNETT, M.A., E.D., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
School District.
Number op Schools.
Number op
Teachers.
1946-47.
1947-48.
1946-47.
1947-48.
4
5
5
2*
4
4
5
2
33
60
16
17
41
No. 15 (Penticton)	
65
18
21
Totals	
16
15
126
145
* Actually in District No. 15 in 1946-47.
During 1946-47 all school buildings (including basement rooms and some outside
halls) were in use, so that in 1947-48, due to further increased enrolment, more classroom space had to be found in community premises and part-time classes had to be
operated in the Oliver Elementary School. To relieve the situation, the following
schools are actually under construction:—
Approximate Date
No. of District and School. of Completion.
14. Southern Okanagan Junior-Senior High November, 1948.
14. Osoyoos Elementary September, 1949.
16. Keremeos Elementary-High September, 1948. JJ 72 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
In School District No. 15 (Penticton) plans have been drawn for an addition to
the high school, a kitchen addition to the auditorium, two elementary-school units of
six rooms each, and a locker-room addition and renovation of the gymnasium—all for
the schools of Penticton. At Naramata the old school hall is to be renovated and
rebuilt to provide a cafeteria-gymnasium and a class-room. The by-laws to provide
funds for 50 per cent, of the total estimate of $430,515 have received the assent of the
ratepayers.
School District No. 77 (Summerland) proposes to reconstruct its elementary school
and add a four-room addition with play-shed at an estimated total cost of $104,000.
As noted last year, plans for consolidation have been proceeded with cautiously.
The bringing of the Cawston and Olalla secondary pupils to Keremeos has been very
successful and has met with public favour.
This year the Allen Grove ungraded school, 10 miles from Penticton, was closed
at the unanimous request of the parents of school-children in that area, and the pupils
(approximately nine) transported daily to Penticton schools. An enriched quality of
education and broader social contacts will thus be made available to these students.
Under the direction of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research, two series
of tests were administered. In the fall term, tests of mental ability were given to
Grades V, VIII, and IX. During the spring, Grade V pupils received tests in reading,
Grade VIII in science, Grade IX in English usage, and Grade XII students taking
Mathematics V or VI in general mathematical ability. For general inspection purposes
throughout the grades the following were used in scattered situations: Buckingham-
Ayres Spelling Scale, the Willing Scale for Written Composition, Gates Primary Reading, Munro Standardized Silent Reading, and the Vancouver Tests of Reasoning in
Arithmetic.
The original School District No. 15 (Penticton) from its organization in 1946 was
beset with difficulties. In 1947 the controversy between the Councils of Penticton and
Summerland over the question of assessments blocked all efforts of the District School
Board to proceed with the construction of much-needed school buildings. A new district
comprising the Municipality of Summerland and the northern rural area of School
District No. 15 (Penticton) was created as from January 1st, 1948, and named School
District No. 77 (Summerland).
Teacher turnover, particularly in the smaller districts, has been fairly high, but
supply has been good and no appreciable difficulty has been experienced in securing
suitable replacements. No class-rooms have been closed because of lack of teachers.
Negotiated salary scales are operative in all districts and teacher-trustee relations
continue to be good.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 69 (QUALICUM), No. 70 (ALBERNI), AND
UNATTACHED SCHOOL DISTRICTS BAMFIELD, CLAYOQUOT,
CLO-OOSE, ESPERANZA, KILDONAN, KYUQUOT, PORT RENFREW,
SYDNEY INLET, TAHSIS RIVER, TOFINO, UCLUELET, AND
ZEBALLOS.
REPORT OF C. L. CAMPBELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
In this inspectorate there were employed 110 teachers, serving in thirty schools.
The latter ranged in size and type from a twenty-seven-teacher junior-senior high
school to an ungraded school of ten pupils who came from only two families.    It is a REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. JJ 73
pleasure to note that the work done and progress made by the pupils in the one-room
school compare very favourably with that in most of the graded schools.
School District No. 69 (Qualicum).
The big problem in this district continues to be one of accommodation. The school
population is growing by leaps and bounds, and as yet no satisfactory programme has
been planned to meet the situation. Various expedients, including the holding of one
class in a school bus, were resorted to until seven new class-rooms were provided about
Christmas time by the building of an addition to the Parksville School and the conversion of an army hut at Qualicum. These rooms were immediately filled, so that the
problem remains to be faced again next year. In spite of these handicaps, test results
indicate that very good work is being done, and pupils in the district are, on the whole,
well up to standard.
School District No. 70 (Alberni).
This district has grown probably as fast or faster than any other in the Province.
About half the school-children are housed in converted army huts or other temporary
quarters. These conditions, added to the great difficulty of procuring satisfactory
living-quarters, have caused a very high teacher turnover, which has not helped the
efficiency of instruction. After several years of preparation and a vast amount of
hard and careful work, the School Board presented a building by-law to the ratepayers
for over $1,250,000. The fact that it passed in all three portions of the district with
substantial majorities indicated that the residents realized the need for adequate school
buildings. One school at least will be ready for occupancy in September, 1948, and it
is to be hoped that the others will be completed by the following year.
The teachers of the district, often working under severe handicaps, have been,
for the most part, enthusiastic and progressive, and the educational progress is very
satisfactory. TT _
Unattached Districts.
Great difficulty was experienced in staffing some of these remote and isolated
schools, with the result that in some cases poorly qualified people had to be appointed.
In two cases these had to be replaced during the first term, and the districts were fortunate indeed to secure competent people at that time. Great credit should be paid to
several teachers who remain year after year in some of these schools, even in the face
of offers of higher salaries in more comfortable surroundings. This type of devotion
is something money cannot buy.
A very fine modern two-room school was opened at Port Renfrew, in addition to
the one at Bamfield mentioned in last year's Report.
The West Coast is developing rapidly, and it is expected that at least two new
schools will open next year and that one or more of the older ones will attain the status
of superior school.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 35 (LANGLEY) AND No. 47 (POWELL RIVER),
UNIVERSITY HILL (UNATTACHED), AND THE SCHOOL FOR
THE DEAF AND THE BLIND.
REPORT OF T. G. CARTER, M.C., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
School District No. 35 (Langley).
New  elementary  schools  were  constructed  at  Aldergrove,   County   Line,   West
Langley, and Willoughby.    In addition, a good beginning was made on the new high JJ 74 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
school at Langley Prairie.    Despite numerous difficulties, a policy of improvement was
continued with benefit to buildings, grounds, and equipment.
School District No. 47 (Powell River).
Here the most important event was the passing, on June 5th, of a by-law with a
favourable vote of 96.3 per cent. This by-law provides for a considerable addition to
the present high school and for new elementary schools at Blubber Bay, Cranberry
Lake, False Bay, Lund, Vananda, and Westview. During the year the physical condition of the existing school buildings was improved and additions made to equipment and
especially to the school libraries.
University Hill.
The new Board of this area has accomplished much since it assumed office little
more than a year ago. Its plans envision elementary and high school facilities in tune
with the rapidly developing university near by. Though a comparatively small school,
one of its students, Charles Patrick Stirling Taylor, led the Province this year in the
Junior Matriculation examinations with an average mark of 94.9 per cent.
The School for the Deaf and the Blind.
This is the first year since near the beginning of the war that all this school
has been together on the one campus. A hut was recently secured from War Assets
Corporation and fitted out as a dormitory. Plans for further building are under
contemplation.
Conclusion.
Throughout my inspectorate the year has been one of progress. The teaching
staffs have been strengthened. The enrolment has continued to increase, and, as a
result, the School Boards have been hard-pressed to find sufficient class-room space.
However, the time is within sight when the pupils will be spending their school-days
in surroundings that are fitting for the important work they are doing.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 9 (CASTLEGAR), No. 12 (GRAND FORKS),
AND No. 13 (KETTLE VALLEY).
REPORT OF C. E. CLAY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.      „
During the past school-year the many small problems arising from the change-over
from the small to the larger administrative unit have been ironed out. As in other
districts, there has been noticeable overcrowding. In District No. 9 (Castlegar) this
was accentuated when three schools were destroyed—one at Glade by bombing, one at
Blueberry by arson, and one at Pass Creek by accidental burning. In District No. 12
(Grand Forks) the situation was alleviated by the erection of a portion of the proposed
junior-senior high school, and the balance is now under construction.
In each district the ratepayers have signified their awareness of the lack of accommodation by endorsing by-laws to raise money for new buildings. In District No. 9
(Castlegar) a by-law was passed authorizing the Board to raise funds to build three
schools and two teacherages—a three-room school at Kinnaird, a four-room school and
a teacherage at Tarry's, and one class-room and a teacherage at Gibson Creek. With
the exception of the teacherage at Tarry's, all the other buildings are under construction
and should be available for September. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. JJ 75
The ratepayers of District No. 13 (Kettle Valley) endorsed the following programme: One-room extensions at Beaverdell and Bridesville, a new two-room school
and teacherage at Kettle Valley, a three-room school and teacherage at Midway, and a
teacherage at Beaverdell.
In District No. 12 (Grand Forks) construction on the balance of the new junior-
senior high school has been started, and the building will be ready for occupancy a
year hence.
The schools in each district were all fully staffed.
Flood conditions in May and June were the cause of five schools in District No. 9
(Castlegar) being closed for several days.
In the Castlegar District the members of the teachers' library committee organized
travelling libraries.    The Board co-operated fully in supplying the books.
The work of the trustees cannot pass unnoticed. They have all given freely of
their time and services. In all matters and at all times they have co-operated fully and
have furthered the cause of education by their work. All have been interested in
raising the standard of education in their districts.
The secretaries all deserve much praise for the long arduous hours they have had
to put in at times and for their co-operation with the Departmental officials.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 42 (MAPLE RIDGE), No. 43 (COQUITLAM),
AND No. 48 (HOWE SOUND).
REPORT OF E. G. DANIELS, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
After twenty-eight years of work as an Inspector in the school districts of the
Province, I am more than ever amazed at the amount of time and effort which members
of School Boards are willing to devote to public service which carries with it no
emolument. This indicates the quality and the attitude of the men and women who
have been elected to promote the cause of education in the three districts of my
inspectorate. Their co-operation, as well as that of three capable and efficient
secretary-treasurers, has made my final year as an Inspector a pleasant memory.
The very excellent work in maintaining and rehabilitating the school buildings,
which was mentioned in my last report, has been continued. Many class-rooms have
been equipped with fluorescent fixtures; in others, indirect or diffuse lighting units
have been installed. Heating has been improved and modernized in a number of
schools, libraries increased in quantity and quality, and sports equipment augmented.
In Coquitlam School District rapidly increasing enrolment has made more double
shifts necessary, but it is expected that a building programme will be referred to the
ratepayers in the next few weeks. This will obviate the need for using temporary
quarters, many of which are very unsatisfactory.
Maple Ridge School District is making plans for further extension of school
facilities in the area. Initiation of an Agriculture course in Maple Ridge High School
this year involved considerable expense for equipment and accommodation, but results
seem to have justified the expenditure.
The Board of Howe Sound School District has made very satisfactory progress in
improving school buildings. In the organization previous to April 1st, 1946, this would
not have been feasible.
In Coquitlam High School a course in Lumber Grading and Theory was given this
year with the co-operation of British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association. JJ 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
Results of the examination set by the association were particularly satisfactory. Very
fine work has been done in this school in Music and Drama.
In only three remote one-room-school sections of this inspectorate is high school
education not available.    The enrolment in these areas totals thirty-four pupils.
The matter of new appointments to the teaching staffs still involves much time and
effort. With a staff of 154 teachers in my area, 50 new appointments were made
during the last year.
Academically, satisfactory progress is evident in some schools, while in others
changes of staff have handicapped principals in developing a modern programme. On
the whole, I am convinced that considerable progress is being made. The new readers
have been well received, and results of improved teaching techniques should soon be
evident in higher grades.
For the second successive year a Royal Institution scholarship of $175 was won by
a student of Port Moody High School. This award was made to Miss Diana Elsdon
for highest marks in her medal district in the University Entrance examinations.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 1 (FERNIE), No. 2 (CRANBROOK),
AND No. 5 (CRESTON).
REPORT OF C. J. FREDERICKSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The school-year saw the establishment of the East Kootenay Health Unit under
the direction of Dr. C. Brockington. The happy relationship which exists between the
teachers of the East Kootenay and those of the neighbouring American States was
continued, with the visit of Mr. John Shaw, Superintendent of the Spokane Schools, to
the annual teachers' convention held in Cranbrook.
Two Boards in the inspectorate granted cost-of-living bonuses of $300, and in one
case an arbitration award granted a flat 16 per cent, on all salaries. Relative isolation
is also recognized in salary scales.
My gratitude and appreciation of the many courtesies extended to me by the
teachers, principals, and secretary-treasurers is again expressed in warmest terms,
and in leaving this inspectorate after six happy and profitable years, I wish once more
to pay tribute to the unselfish devotion to education shown by the three School Boards
and the individual members thereof.
School District No. 1 (Fernie).
The year has shown continued progress in the improvement of the physical condition of the school buildings. Considerable redecoration has been carried out, and the
artificial lighting continues to be improved. Plans are being laid for the addition of
much-needed facilities to the Michel-Natal and to the Fernie Schools. An addition to
the Jaffray School, which will result in the closing of the log school at Galloway, is
under way.    It is planned to submit a by-law for the over-all development in December.
Continued interest is shown in the establishment of a vocational course in coalmining, and there is promise of commencing such a course in the near future.
School District No. 2 (Cranbrook).
High costs continue to interfere with the projected building programme. In the
meantime it has been found necessary to find additional accommodation by fitting and REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. JJ 77
equipping basement rooms in the Cranbrook Elementary School.    Fortunately, modern
materials and the pleasing use of colour has made these rooms attractive and hygienic.
The physical conditions in the rural schools show constant improvement.
School District No. 5 (Creston).
A by-law for the provision of additional accommodation and for the improvement
of the rural schools was passed with a comfortable majority in November, 1947.
Construction was commenced immediately on the erection of a very modern two-room
school at Crawford Bay. These rooms are connected to a very fine community hall,
giving this rural school unusually excellent facilities. It is expected that Crawford
Bay will have a superior school in 1948 and a high school in 1949. Construction was
commenced in Creston of an eight-room elementary school, to which is attached a
vocational agriculture shop. This school is so designed that, with minor alterations,
it will become eventually a junior-senior high school. It is of interest to note that this
school is located on a plot of ground that also holds a swimming-pool, artificial-ice rink,
and athletic field—an ideal community centre.
The Fifth Annual Farmers' Assembly was held in the Creston Junior-Senior High
School in March, with increased attendance and continued success. This assembly is
closely allied to school activities and to vocational agriculture and is concrete evidence
of a community-minded school.
The close of the school-year saw the happy appointment of Mr. Earl Marriott,
supervising principal of the Creston Elementary Schools, as Provincial Inspector of
Schools.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 59  (PEACE RIVER SOUTH)
AND No. 60 (PEACE RIVER NORTH).
REPORT OF S. J. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The most promising development brought about in the Peace River District during
the past year has been the introduction of a modern high school programme.
In School District No. 59 (Peace River South) the first unit of the new central
high school at Dawson Creek was completed and construction commenced on the remaining units. With the provision of this additional class-room accommodation, the high
school programme of studies has been enlarged to include instruction in Agriculture,
Art, Commercial, Home Economics, and Industrial Arts. An excellent dormitory has
been built and now houses over fifty students from the rural areas. With the facilities
available, the response from the area has been encouraging—the high school enrolment
in Peace River South is now 360 students, which is an increase of approximately 400
per cent, in the last three years. Ninety-one youngsters from the rural area are now
receiving high school instruction in Dawson Creek. At Fort St. John, in District
No. 60 (Peace River North), the construction of a new four-room high school and a
dormitory with a capacity for thirty students has resulted in a similar increase in high
school attendance. The increased attendance in high schools in these northern districts
does not result from an increase in the number of pupils leaving elementary schools,
but is the direct result of making high school facilities available to all pupils in the
district. On this count alone the changes in administration and finance brought about
by the Cameron Report have been amply justified.
The majority of the school enrolment in this area is in the one-room rural schools.
The situation existing in these schools is not a happy one.    Notable improvements in
. JJ 78 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
school accommodation and teaching equipment have been brought about by the School
Boards through the increased financial assistance from Provincial funds. However,
despite considerable increases in teachers' salaries, it has not been possible to secure
adequately trained teachers for all the rural schools. The situation with regard to
teacher-supply has grown steadily worse during the past few years. Some schools in
this area have not had a fully trained teacher for the past eight years. An increased
isolation bonus might help to entice teachers into the northern areas but would not
likely solve the problem completely. Greater attention will have to be given to the
advisability of consolidating our rural one-room schools into two- and three-room units.
Through consolidation the number of teachers required for the rural area would be
sharply decreased, the problem of isolation for the individual teacher would be lessened,
and, most important of all, good living accommodation for the teachers would be easier
to supply.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 19 (REVELSTOKE) AND No. 20
(SALMON ARM).
REPORT OF WILLIAM H. GRANT, B.S.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS.
The Salmon Arm inspectorate embraces School District No. 19 (Revelstoke) and
School District No. 20 (Salmon Arm). In the school-year 1947-48 there were twenty-
nine teachers employed in the former district and fifty-three in the latter.
In the field of administration the year has been marked by the following main
developments:—
(1) School Board members have developed a fine ability to work together as
a unit. The various elements drawn from the former school districts
have become merged in the larger school unit, and it is safe to say that,
so far as School Boards are concerned, the period of transition is past.
All members of Boards have a unity of interest in the development of
education for the whole district. That this is so with the general public
of the school district is questionable, and must remain so until some
refinements in assessing costs can be devised to remove the schisms that
exist within a district.
(2) The sharp upward trend in costs during the latter part of 1947, which
has continued into 1948, has taxed the ingenuity of School Boards to
provide adequately for the educational needs of their districts without
unduly raising the tax rates and thereby the disapproval of the taxpayers.
In both school districts, for the first time in many years, yearly estimates
were referred back to School Boards by Municipal Councils for revision.
In the Salmon Arm District an Arbitration Board ruled that the estimates
were fair and reasonable, and that the Board could not very well finance
their requirements with less money. While the major portion of costs
are made up of teachers' salaries, it would be unfair to state that the
entire increase in costs is caused by a rise in teachers' salaries. It is
worth noting that, especially in the Salmon Arm District, a large proportion of the teachers engaged were those of considerable experience who
were placed high on the schedule of salaries. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. JJ 79
(3) Net enrolments in the two districts show some slight changes from those
of the school-year 1946-47, that of No. 19 having decreased by 3.02 per
cent, and that of No. 20 showing an increase of 7.56 per cent. These
changes have had some slight effect upon costs, but the main result has
been felt in the schools of Salmon Arm City and District Municipality
where already overcrowded class-rooms have been taxed to the limit.
Any increase in enrolment in the coming years is going to create a real
hardship, until such time as the proposed building plan can be carried
through.
(4) During the year no extensive building projects have been attempted.
In District No. 19 reconstruction of buildings at Glacier and Arrowhead
has been completed, so that these centres have now good pupil accommodation for several years to come. In Salmon Arm District a small gymnasium was erected at Falkland. This temporarily houses two classes.
In Salmon Arm a bus garage was completed, which now gives class-room
space for three divisions and thus relieves the congestion at that centre.
Except for a one-room school at Beaton to replace a 40-year-old log structure, no building programme is planned in District No. 19, but during
the school-year 1947-48 District No. 20 Board of School Trustees has
done extensive work toward completing plans for the complete rehabilitation of their entire system.
In the educational field, certain activities for the school-year 1947-48 are outstanding :■—■
(1) The introduction of the new basic readers has met with almost universal
approval by elementary teachers, who have been highly gratified with the
progress made by their pupils. They are pleased to find the readers so
well keyed to the reading readiness of their pupils. The main point of
adverse criticism has been in the field of phonics, where it is felt that
insufficient practice is given.
(2) The new Mathematics V course has been introduced without great difficulty. Teachers have expressed approval of the content and arrangement,
but contend that time does not allow for sufficient practice to enable the
student to acquire permanently the principles laid down.
(3) In spite of the many obstacles that presented themselves, particularly
during the flood season, the Provincial testing programme was carried
out with much more despatch and much less inconvenience than in former
years. This year much greater use has been made of the results of this
testing programme, largely because the Division of Tests, Standards, and
Research was able to return the results with greater expedition and in
greater detail, and, in lesser degree, by the fact that teachers are becoming more familiar with the programme and particularly in interpreting
the results of that programme in terms of their own classes. This programme is proving particularly valuable to teachers and to the Inspector
in gauging weaknesses and in applying remedial measures.
Before closing, I wish to bring to your notice the great assistance that has been
given to me by the Boards of School Trustees of Districts No. 19 and No. 20 and their
respective secretary-treasurers. In spite of the pressing emergencies of their private
vocations and the many discouraging features of their public business, they have shown
themselves extremely willing to co-operate with me in all matters pertaining to the
advancement of education in this area.
In closing, I wish to commend the splendid work, keen interest, and unflagging
loyalty of the teachers in maintaining a high educational standard in this inspectorate. JJ 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 49 (OCEAN FALLS), No. 50 (QUEEN CHARLOTTE), No. 51 (PORTLAND CANAL), AND No. 52 (PRINCE
RUPERT). 	
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.Paed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Although it has become increasingly difficult to staff schools in the outlying areas,
all the teaching positions in these districts were filled. Additional teachers were
employed in Masset, Stewart Superior, and Prince Rupert Elementary Schools. A
school was opened in Butedale.
A by-law for new school buildings was passed in District No. 49 (Ocean Falls).
As a result, a new one-teacher school has been completed in Namu, tenders have been
received for a four-teacher school in the Bella Coola Valley, and four class-rooms will
be completed for fall occupancy in Ocean Falls. The School Board is to be commended
on the improvements in school facilities, particularly in the outlying parts of the district. The recognition of the needs of the pre-primary children in Ocean Falls by
making class-rooms available for the 4-year-olds and 5-year-olds is an indication of the
progressive attitude in this district.
The installation of good artificial lighting units where practical in Districts No. 50
and No. 51 has made a marked improvement in the school facilities. Gradual improvement has also been made in the appearance of the school buildings in these areas.
School planning has been of major interest to the School Board of District No. 52
(Prince Rupert). Three projects are in varying degrees of development—the reconstruction of the existing junior-senior high school building as class-room space, the
construction of a first unit of a new building to include administration, library, Home
Economics, Industrial Arts, and gymnasium facilities, and the construction of a ten-
teacher elementary school.
On the whole, the learning situations in the schools of these districts have shown
improvement during the past year. In some schools there is still insufficient recognition
given to the varying learning capacities of the pupils in the tool subjects. Nevertheless,
it has been gratifying to notice the willingness of our teachers to adjust their programmes when they recognize the need.
In some partial recognition of the efforts of the School Boards in these areas, it
should be said that they are fulfilling their duties with fine efficiency. The willingness
of the members to give much of their time, the recognition of the educational needs in
parts of the district remote from their own, and the readiness to co-operate in all
matters for the good of the district are some of the factors bringing this efficiency.
In conclusion, I would like to express my appreciation to the teachers, the School
Boards, and the secretary-treasurers for the many kindnesses and assistance during
the past school-year.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 6 (KOOTENAY LAKE), No. 7 (NELSON),
AND No. 8 (SLOCAN).
REPORT OF J. CHELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
It was my privilege to succeed Inspector F. A. Jewett in this area, for he was held
in very high regard.
In general, all three districts had had those problems common to Boards throughout
the Province. An excellent Board in each district has met the particular problems with
energy and resourcefulness. Kootenay Lake.
This district has a combined elementary-junior-senior high school in the City of
Kaslo and seven one-room rural schools. These rural schools are isolated and of small
enrolment, so that the problem, becomes one of justifiable expenditure. However, the
Board is striving to make these schools as attractive as possible and to provide equipment commensurate to each situation. During the year the school at Howser was
officially opened. This is a log structure and has individual tables and chairs. The
people of the locality provided much of the labour and material gratis and have every
right to be proud of their school. At Riondel the renewed interest in mining will
necessitate the reopening of the school this fall. The school at Meadow Creek is now
to be officially known as the Jewett School; this is a tribute to the untiring efforts of
Inspector Jewett in the area. For the first time the district has had the services of a
public health nurse.
Nelson.
During the year this district lost three schools by fire. In August one room of
the Salmo High School was destroyed. This was a serious loss, as accommodation was
already overtaxed. Plans were being prepared for a junior-senior high school at the
time of the fire. These were completed as quickly as possible, but the by-law was
defeated. As a result of this, the building plans were revised and the by-law resubmitted at the close of the school-year. It was again defeated. The need grows more
acute, and it would seem that some way must be found to provide minimum school
housing. The second fire-loss, also in August, was the one-room school at Sproule
Creek, and the third, on December 7th, the one-room school at Taghum. Plans have
been worked out to transport the pupils from these two schools to Nelson City schools.
This already is in effect for Taghum pupils and has proved very efficient.
Slocan.
In this district the major problems have been administrative. The closing of the
Japanese Commission schools put a severe strain on the accommodation at Slocan City
and New Denver. In fact, the enrolment in these two centres practically doubled overnight. Very temporary housing arrangements have been made, and it would seem
advisable to continue with this until population stabilizes. There was no fire-loss in
this district, though it was found necessary to maintain guards on all schools for a
considerable period. Secondary-school facilities in the middle and south end of the
district are not yet well established. Assistance is given to those pupils who wish to
attend high schools in other centres. At the same time the Board is convinced that
ultimately the solution lies in some form of centralization within the boundaries of
the district.
In all districts a high educational standard has been maintained during the year.
A word of praise is due to those principals and teachers who did such an excellent job.
In addition, the students had an opportunity to participate in a wide range of cocur-
ricular activities; to mention a few, Junior Red Cross, drama festivals, vocational
conferences, athletics.
I express my appreciation for the co-operation of the trustees and secretary-
treasurers in this past year. JJ 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 53 (TERRACE), No. 54 (SMITHERS),
No. 55 (BURNS LAKE), AND No. 56 (VANDERHOOF).
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The school population of the Omineca inspectorate showed a marked increase during
the year. Schools at Danskin and Uncha Valley were reopened, while new divisions
were added at Hazelton, Smithers, Decker Lake, Burns Lake, Fort Fraser, and Vanderhoof. Shifting population, due to the nature of the extensive lumber operations of this
area, has added to the problem, of providing school accommodation.
Two districts submitted building by-laws to the ratepayers, while both of the other
districts have such by-laws in the course of preparation. Both by-laws were passed
with a reasonable margin over the required three-fifths majority, so that plans are
under way for the construction of new buildings at Smithers, Telkwa, Houston, Vanderhoof, Fraser Lake, and Mapes. Quite extensive reconstruction has been carried
out at Endako and Walcott, while a large number of other schools received needed
repairs.
Teaching equipment has been very considerably augmented during the past year,
especially in the one-room schools. District No. 53 took a forward step by installing
a minimum of playground equipment at every school under its jurisdiction.
The Boards are under continuous pressure to institute new and extend old
transportation routes, an expensive proceeding in this sparsely settled area. Three
new routes were established—from New Hazelton to Hazelton to convey high school
pupils, from Fraser Lake North to Fraser Lake for the same purpose, and from Morice
River Sawmills to Houston to provide for a group of elementary-school pupils previously
lacking educational facilities. Tchesinkut Lake School was also closed, and the pupils
conveyed to Burns Lake.
The teacher shortage was even more severe than in the previous year. In order
to keep schools open, Boards were compelled to engage a percentage of untrained or
partially trained personnel, as well as calling on the services of former teachers who
had left the profession for marriage. Despite these measures, three schools remained
closed because no teachers could be found for them.
The extension of secondary-school facilities to pupils from the more isolated areas
received the attention of the Boards. Although transportation has helped those not too
remote from existing secondary schools, the graduate of the one-room rural school has
been largely dependent on correspondence courses. Three Boards this year offered
financial aid to parents whose children were compelled to live away from home in order
to attend high school.
Closely allied to this problem is that of the academic nature of curriculum offerings
in the small high school, unsuited to many of the children of a rural community.
Utilization of correspondence courses by these small schools has helped to widen the
range of courses offered. The first Industrial Arts centre to be established in the
Omineca inspectorate will be established next year at Smithers.
One of the most important advances made in the school-year was the extension
of public health services to Districts No. 54 and No. 56. This leaves one district only,
No. 55, without these facilities, and it will receive them in the fall of 1948.
In addition to the testing done under the direction of the Division of Tests,
Standards, and Research, follow-up tests for diagnostic purposes were administered
to those pupils whose scores on the tests of the previous year had seemed to indicate
the need for remedial work. Analyses of the results were made for the use of the
teachers concerned. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. JJ 83
The Boards of Trustees and their secretary-treasurers have made great progress
in coping with the administrative problems of their districts. They are endeavouring,
to the best of their ability, to give equal educational opportunities to all children in
their areas and have made some progress toward the realization of that aim.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 10 (ARROW LAKES)
AND No. 11 (TRAIL).
REPORT OF W. E. LUCAS, B.A., B.Paed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
In both school districts of this inspectorate the school population has increased
greatly during the past two or three years. As a result, the need for additional and
improved accommodation continues to be the great problem of the Boards of School
Trustees. Temporary class-rooms in basements, community halls, church halls, and an
armoury have had to be used.
In School District No. 11 (Trail) a by-law received the assent of the ratepayers
to provide the district's share of (a) a modern twelve-room elementary school in the
Annable-Warfield area, and (o) the first unit of a new elementary-junior high school
at Fruitvale. It is hoped to have both building projects completed in January, 1949.
The Trail Board is to be commended for the improvements made to the school buildings
at Casino, Columbia Gardens, and Beaver Falls.
In School District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes) the Board of School Trustees presented
two different by-laws designed to provide a school at Arrow Park, where school accommodation is urgently needed. Both by-laws were defeated, and the School Board is
preparing a third by-law for submission in July, 1948. This by-law is aimed to provide
school accommodation for all areas of the school district.
An outstanding feature of the school-year 1947-48 was the partial establishment of
a public health unit in School District No. 11 (Trail). Four public health nurses have
done excellent preventive work in immunization, inoculation, and vaccination. Health
committees were organized in each of the schools, with the result that closer relations
with the home were created and better health conditions prevailed in the schools.
An extensive testing programme was carried out in the elementary schools of this
inspectorate. Intelligence tests were administered to all pupils of Grades I, II, IV,
and VI. A battery achievement test in the fundamentals was given in May to all
pupils in Grades II to VIII, inclusive. The results of these tests will be analysed by
the teachers for use in developmental and remedial teaching.
The Boards of both school districts negotiated new salary schedules with their
teachers, which are appreciably higher, as to minimum salaries, than former scales.
Both salary schedules have the " single scale " feature, that is, salary is determined
by qualifications and experience. Teachers having the same qualifications and years
of teaching experience receive the same salary in an elementary-school position as in
a high school position.
Facilities for visual education have been greatly increased during the school-year.
All graded schools in District No. 11 are now provided with 16-millimetre projectors.
An efficient committee of teachers selects the films for all schools of the district.
Biology A and Canadian History were added to the options offered in the Senior
Matriculation classes of the Trail High School. In the Rossland High School a commendable step was taken by offering the students from Grade IX upwards a choice of
. JJ 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
four complete curricula—Fine Arts, Commercial, University Entrance, or General—
each leading to the required 112 credits for the High School Graduation diploma. New
courses introduced in the Rossland High School were Canadian History and Physics A—
both for Grade XII students.
In conclusion, tribute should be paid to the great work being done by the School
Boards of this inspectorate. The school trustees have unselfishly sacrificed their time
and energy in the interests of education.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 37 (DELTA), No. 38 (RICHMOND),
AND No. 46 (SECHELT).
REPORT OF V. Z. MANNING, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
This inspectorate comprises the two municipal districts of Delta and Richmond
and the large rural school district of Sechelt.
The scarcity of teachers continued to be a problem, and much of the summer was
spent assisting School Boards in filling vacancies. Owing to the nearness of my
districts to the large centres of population, it was possible to fill all positions with
trained teachers, although in a few cases the new teachers had not the full qualifications for the positions they filled. Many married teachers were appointed, as well as
teachers from other parts of Canada.
Delta.
Crowded conditions continued in the Kennedy area, on the border between Delta
and Surrey. Here for several years the two Boards have had an interchange of pupils,
which has been helpful to both districts. At present Delta is accommodating the
elementary pupils and Surrey the secondary. To care for an increased number of
pupils, it was necessary for the Delta Board to provide temporary accommodation for
two classes in the Kennedy School.
For many years there has been an excellent spirit of co-operation between the
Delta School Board and the Delta Municipal Council. While most Councils this year
were turning down School Board estimates, the Delta Council not only approved of
the Board's ordinary estimates, but also of extraordinary estimates for a new two-room
school at Boundary Bay to be paid out of revenue.
Richmond.
Two new elementary schools were opened during the year—a building of seven
rooms on Sea Island and the fourteen-room Lord Byng School at Steveston to replace
the one lost by fire. Two additional elementary schools of ten rooms each are under
construction and will be opened early in the new school-year. With their completion
the trustees hope to do away with conveyance of elementary-school pupils.
The Richmond Kiwanis Club again sponsored a music and drama festival, which
did much to promote an interest in these fields in both elementary and secondary
schools.
A pleasing function at the close of the year was the honouring of Miss Kathleen
McNeely, who was retiring on pension. Miss McNeely had taught in the municipality
for thirty-eight years and had been principal of Bridgeport School for thirty-five years.
During that time many citizens of Richmond and of British Columbia had benefited
from her able instruction and wise counselling. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. JJ 85
Sechelt.
This district is a scattered rural area. School buses convey pupils to central
schools at Sechelt and Gibsons Landing, and water buses convey pupils to Pender
Harbour and Port Mellon. Much of the school accommodation is not good, and the
carrying-out of a projected building programme is necessary to improve facilities,
especially at the secondary-school level. The completion of the road from Gibsons
Landing to Port Mellon would justify a junior-senior high school of reasonable size
at the former centre.
In spite of travelling difficulties the school representatives met three times during
the year. The trustees in this district, as in the others, gave unsparingly of their
time and energy in carrying out their duties.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 17 (PRINCETON) AND No. 23 (KELOWNA).
REPORT OF A. S. MATHESON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The net number of pupils enrolled and the number of teachers employed at the
close of the school-year were as follows: District No. 17 (Princeton), 620 pupils,
26 teachers; District No. 23 (Kelowna), 3,768 pupils, 109 teachers.
These figures, when compared with those of the previous year, show an increase
of 4 per cent, for District No. 17 and 10 per cent, for District No. 23. In the former
case the increase is significant but moderate; in the latter it reveals that the tide of
migration to the district is still strong and that, in the four-year period commencing
September, 1944, there has been a 50-per-cent. increase in enrolment.
No school in either district was closed for lack of a teacher. An analysis of the
qualifications of the teachers employed shows that they held certificates as follows:'—
Secondary Schools.
Academic and specialist certificates  46
First-class certificates  11
Total  57
Elementary Schools.
First-class certificates  61
Second-class certificates  2
Third-class certificates  2
Conditional certificates   8
Temporary certificates—
Over age  2
Incomplete training  3
Total  78
Of the total of 135 teachers, 46 were new appointees to the district and 7 of these
had no previous teaching experience in this Province. The average of the salaries
paid was $2,020.
Almost without exception the attitude of the teachers toward their work has been
praiseworthy and much good work has been done, in spite of serious overcrowding at many points. The continuous inflow of pupils of widely varying educational nurtures
has constituted a persistent problem. Throughout the year sustained emphasis has
been placed on the improvement and maintenance of fundamental skills and basic
knowledge, without sacrificing democratic procedures and the social and civic objectives
of education. Survey and diagnostic tests have been used freely, and, where necessary,
remedial programmes have been devised and carried out with varying degrees of
success. This testing programme has been co-ordinated with that of the Division of
Tests, Standards, and Research, and an effort has been made to employ the findings
to give direction and emphasis to the daily routine of the class-room.
Fair progress has been made in the school building programme. While no actual
construction has got under way in District No. 17, plans have been developed for a
much-needed modernization and expansion of the Princeton schools and for the
reconstruction of the Coalmont school.
In District No. 23 two fine two-division primary schools—one in the City of
Kelowna and one in the rural area adjacent to Kelowna on the south—have been
completed. The 500-pupil senior high building at Kelowna, the 450-pupil junior-senior
high building at Rutland, the 200-pupil junior-senior high building at Westbank, and
the addition to the Okanagan Mission Elementary School have been put under construction. The two-teacher Benvoulin Elementary School was modernized, and an addition
was erected to provide for central heating, a lunch-room, staff-room, and sanitary
facilities. In this project the parent-teacher organization played an important part
and contributed much of the labour.
In District No. 23 a gratifying beginning has been made toward the giving of
vocational education in Farm Mechanics, Automobile Mechanics, Vocational Agriculture, and Commercial. A large and representative general advisory committee was
set up, and, after a general understanding of the problems involved was achieved,
sub-committees were appointed to survey each field and to draft the objectives and
content of suitable courses. The members of these committees undertook their work
with enthusiasm and did an excellent job. The completed drafts of the courses were
submitted to the Director of Vocational Training and approved in due course. It is
planned to launch the courses when the new buildings and their equipment are ready
at Kelowna and Rutland.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 24 (KAMLOOPS), No. 25 (BARRIERE),
AND No. 31 (MERRITT).
REPORT OF H. McARTHUR, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
District No. 24 (Kamloops), by far the most populous of the three districts
comprising this inspectorate, has at least one claim to prominence: it has more closed
schools than any other district in the Province. Yet, during recent years, it has had
a rapid increase in school enrolment—so rapid indeed that the School Board has been
forced to build six class-rooms, four of which are temporary, and to rent as temporary
quarters, at an annual cost of almost $6,000, three halls, two churches, and two private
residences.   Two other temporary buildings are at present under construction.
This anomalous situation, which is a result of a shifting population, seems to point
to the need for a type of prefabricated building which can be taken down, moved to
another site, and reassembled conveniently and cheaply. Such a building, if sufficiently
simple in construction, would, I think, find a ready sale all through the Interior of the
Province. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. JJ 87
The Kamloops School Board is finally almost ready to submit to the ratepayers
a by-law for the construction of a new junior-senior high school building and a
dormitory in Kamloops City, a rural school at Bestwick, and important additions to the
buildings at Westwold and Chase.   All of these appear to be essential.
By the construction of another class-room at Barriere River the Barriere School
Board has made the first attempt to provide a measure of secondary education in the
district. Up until the present time most Barriere pupils of the high school grades have
attended the Kamloops Junior-Senior High School.
The providing of sufficient transportation continues to be a problem in all three
districts. New buses purchased by the Kamloops and Merritt Boards only partly meet
the need. Parents residing in communities which are far from established schools
and which are too sparsely populated to warrant the establishing of new schools are
insistent in their demands that means of pupil conveyance be found—at least until
such time as dormitory facilities are available.
The securing of competent teachers for rural schools is still the Boards' most
pressing problem. Most Normal graduates accomplish little in their first year, except
in schools with a very small enrolment, and even Normal graduates have not been
available for the majority of rural schools. Almost all applications received from such
teachers during the past year have been for particular grades in city schools. Were
it not for newcomers from other Provinces and for married women who are willing
to teach in the districts in which they reside, the teacher situation would be grave
indeed.
A request by the teachers of the Kamloops District for increased salaries to meet
the rising cost of living resulted last February in the awarding by an Arbitration
Board of a flat increase of $300 per teacher. Future increases or decreases are to
depend on the Dominion price index, to which the salary scale is linked. The principle
involved appears to merit wider acceptance.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 26 (BIRCH ISLAND), No. 27 (WILLIAMS
LAKE), No. 29 (LILLOOET), AND No. 30 (ASHCROFT).
REPORT OF F. A. McLELLAN, M.A., B.Paed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
School District No. 26 (Birch Island) .
District No. 26 has to report the feature move by its Board—the away-from-home
board and room allowance. The Department has developed a grant toward this assistance, and now, upon approval, students from this district will receive not only their
tuition fees, but up to $14 toward their cost of room and board. Assistance in the cost
of transportation has been developed in one attendance area to help four pupils attend
school. A third class-room in one attendance area and a second class-room in another
has been developed to aid a teacher in eliminating overcrowded class-rooms and also
to permit more time for instruction for high school students attending these classrooms. General improvement in playground equipment and supplies is the motto of
the Board. Building improvement and new class-rooms are under consideration by
the Board and will become projects as soon as materials and labour are available and
the budget permits. JJ 88 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
School District No. 27 (Williams Lake) .
The main item of interest in District No. 27 is the passing of a by-law on May
18th for the purpose of constructing new schools and teacherages. Since that time one
new two-room modern superior school with a teacherage upstairs has been completed at
Horsefly. One dwelling-house is nearly completed at Williams Lake for the principal,
and construction has commenced on a duplex teacherage intended to house from four
to six teachers. Construction on three schools of the same type as Horsefly has been
delayed due to inability to secure reasonable tenders. Plans are being prepared for a
new four- or five-room elementary school at Williams Lake to take care of anticipated
increased enrolment. The present school will eventually be used for the high school.
The Board does not plan to purchase school buses of its own for at least another year,
but it will be necessary to arrange transportation contracts with local individuals in
several cases.
School District No. 29 (Lillooet).
Pressure of school accommodation in District No. 29 is such that it has been
necessary to initiate a building programme, and it is contemplated new schools will be
built at Bralorne, Gold Bridge, Lillooet, and Pavilion. A by-law will be submitted to
the ratepayers of the district in the fall for their approval. Preliminary approval of
plans and estimates has already been obtained from the Department of Education.
It is difficult to foresee how lasting the present pressure for school facilities in that
area will be, much depending upon gold-mining conditions as well as progress of major
construction in the area. Arrangements for transportation of pupils continues to be
limited, and no necessity has yet arisen for the provision of any school buses. At the
present time, taxi service is used for the transportation of pupils to Bridge River,
Gold Bridge, and Lillooet. Railway facilities are also used for the conveyance of pupils
from Shalalth to Lillooet. Teacher accommodation is particularly acute in Lillooet, and
immediate steps are being taken to rectify this situation by the building of suitable
residences.
School District No. 30 (Ashcroft) .
In District No. 30, during 1946-47, five school buses were operated, covering 176
miles per day and conveying forty pupils. In 1947-48 nine buses were in operation,
covering 414 miles per day and conveying seventy pupils. It will be noted that each
year more and more high school facilities have been provided, and it is hoped that the
school-year 1948-49 will see even a greater advancement. The Ashcroft Board has
found it much more economical and satisfactory to bring pupils into the larger centres
whenever possible, where they are able to avail themselves of a better education, rather
than to operate small one-room schools.
Conclusion.
In conclusion, I wish to express my thanks and appreciation for the generous
co-operation and many courtesies I have received from all the School Boards, secretary-
treasurers, and teachers in my inspectorate. All Board members have been indefatigable in their efforts to promote the educational welfare of the pupils in their respective
districts. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. JJ 89
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 66 (LAKE COWICHAN), No. 67
(LADYSMITH), AND No. 68  (NANAIMO).
REPORT OF W. A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Staff and Enrolment.
During the school-year 27 teachers were employed in District No. 66, 30 teachers in
District No. 67, and 92 teachers in District No. 68, making a total for the inspectorate
of 149. The increased enrolment for 1948-49 will necessitate the provision for at least
fifteen additional teachers.
Buildings.
In all three districts the increased enrolment has resulted in demands for additional
class-room accommodation.
In District No. 66 a by-law has been passed to provide for a ten-room elementary
school, a one-room rural school, and a two-room addition to an existing school. By the
time this Report is printed, these extra rooms should be in operation.
In District No. 67, after much delay, a by-law is ready for submission to the
ratepayers. This by-law, if passed, will provide a fourteen-room junior-senior high
school for the district.
In District No. 68 the first of the three elementary schools approved in 1946 has
been completed and is ready for occupancy. Plans and specifications for a thirty-two-
room district junior-senior high school will be submitted to the Department of
Education for approval before the end of the present year.
Transportation.
In each of the three districts in this inspectorate, where complete junior-senior
high school consolidation is in effect, transportation is a very vital problem. In all
there are twenty-one school buses transporting a total of more than 1,000 students
each school-day. Because transportation costs in recent years have risen considerably,
the gross cost of transportation amounts to an important portion of the school budget.
Teaching Programme.
In Districts No. 66, No. 67, and No. 68 there has been no shortage of qualified and
proficient class-room teachers. For this reason the programme of studies has been
effectively adjusted to suit the needs of the students.
Testing Programme.
All schools in this inspectorate have participated in the Province-wide testing
programme directed by the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research in addition to
the local testing programmes carried out by the various principals. The results of
these programmes indicate that the fundamental skills are well taught.
Audio-Visual Aids.
Every class-room in the inspectorate is equipped with radio receiving apparatus
to enable the pupils to take advantage of the school broadcasts.
A travelling phonograph-record library has been assembled into fifty units, with
ten records in each unit. These units have been circulated to the schools in the
inspectorate under the direction of a teachers' music committee. JJ 90 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
In each of the school districts there is at least one portable projection unit for
visual education purposes. These units have been a real asset to many of the smaller
schools.
School Library Service.
The Vancouver Island Union Library services all rural schools in this inspectorate.
While it has been impossible to give normal service because of insufficient library
staff, the Travelling Library has rendered excellent service to all the outlying areas.
Health Service.
All schools in this inspectorate are serviced by the Central Vancouver Island Public
Health Unit. A very thorough programme of preventive work in immunization,
inoculation, and vaccination has been carried out by the personnel of the health unit.
Conclusion.
In conclusion, I would like to express my appreciation to the principals, teachers,
and School Board members in these districts for the harmonious manner in which
they have worked together to attain the objectives suggested by the Department of
Education.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 71   (COURTENAY), No. 72  (CAMPBELL
RIVER), No. 73 (ALERT BAY), AND No. 74 (QUATSINO).
REPORT OF HAROLD STAFFORD, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
A review of elementary and secondary education in this inspectorate is prefaced
by praise for the school trustees who conscientiously serve their districts. Illustrative
of difficulties in travel, in some districts, is the three-hour boat trip made by Trustee
L. Schibler as he regularly journeys from Sonora Island to Campbell River where
meetings of District No. 72 are convened. He is fortunate if, on the next day, tide
and weather do not delay his return. A Sea-Bee aeroplane is chartered to fly Trustee
E. Guthrie from Cortes Island for attendance at the same meetings.
In 1945 the number of teachers employed in School Districts No. 71 to No. 74 was
89; at present the number is 129. Trustees spend hours in planning to resolve problems created by increases in enrolment. A site for a central high school was purchased
by District No. 71, while in District No. 72 a by-law was passed to provide for construction of new school buildings.
Quadra Island and Manson's Landing have superior schools. Alert Bay High
School has reopened. A kindergarten is in operation at Cumberland. Agriculture is
taught as an elective course at the Courtenay High School, and a teacher of Commercial
subjects added to the staff.
The trustees have increased the appropriation for teaching aids, as well as budgeted
for extensive improvements to buildings. Recommendations made by the Research
Division of Canadian Industries, Limited, have guided the trustees in their selection
of colour schemes for painting of rooms.
In all school districts the establishment of dormitories and aid for senior high
school students are being given consideration.
Conveyance of pupils is an increasingly complicated matter, in the solving of which
two School Boards have adopted a policy of district ownership of buses. Such policy
seemingly should result in more economical operation, permit greater flexibility in
scheduling routes, and provide vehicles for mass movement of pupils. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. JJ 91
Inspection of schools, with noted exceptions, indicated principals and teachers
were apparently giving their best service. Excellent teaching was observed in a
number of schools. The work done by various chairmen and executive groups of
teachers in organizing a drama festival, Junior Red Cross activities, sports, and a
teachers' one-day workshop was commendable.
Class-room instruction showed a need for particular attention to the teaching of
Music, Art, and Physical Education, in order that the objectives for these courses may
be realized.
A competition in which all the students in attendance at high schools in Districts
No. 69 to No. 74 took part was sponsored by Messrs. H. J. Welch, M.L.A.; J. Mowatt,
M.L.A.; and J. Gibson, M.P. The competition culminated in writing an essay, " The
Advantages of Democracy," and the winners were guests of the sponsors at Ottawa
or Victoria. The concept has so great a potentiality for the good of democratic
society that it should be developed, should become an inspiring, challenging experience
for every student attending high school.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 28 (QUESNEL), No. 57 (PRINCE GEORGE),
AND No. 58 (McBRIDE).
REPORT OF L. B. STIBBS, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The practical necessity of providing additional accommodation for the large
increase in school population, the difficult problem of staffing class-rooms, and the
setting of policy for the effective maintenance and operation of schools have been the
major problems which have confronted the three district School Boards in this
inspectorate.
In District No. 28 plans are now completed for a fine area high school, and the
School Board is presently waiting final details from the architect before calling for
tenders. This building will fill a real need in the district. The Wells-Barkerville
school was completed during the year, and a building has been renovated which will
provide accommodation for the School Board, the nursing staff, and the maintenance
department, while the upper floor will be used as a teacherage. Under an effective
sensible maintenance plan the schools were kept in good repair during the year, and
a very workable plan for providing essential teaching supplies and equipment was
established. The problems of consolidated schools on the east and west sides of the
Fraser River, south of Quesnel, have been given serious and thorough study throughout
the year, and some action is expected in this for the new term.
In District No. 57 a noteworthy experiment has been the establishment of a dormitory. The plan has worked out exceedingly well, and about forty students in Grades
IX to XIII have had, at moderate cost, the advantage of secondary education this year.
Considerable time and effort have been given to carrying out the terms of the by-law
which was approved by a large majority at the beginning of the school-year. Well-
planned rural schools are nearing completion at Pilot Mountain, Reid Lake, Upper
Fraser, and at Willow River. In the City of Prince George, army buildings have been
used to provide, with wise planning, accommodation to take care of the overcrowded
elementary and secondary schools. Extensive alterations have been carried out in the
shops, and an army building has been made over to provide a Board office, supply-room,
quarters for the new health unit, and a maintenance workshop. JJ 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
In District No. 58 the School Board has been chiefly concerned with the completion
of the new high school—a four-room modern structure. Unfortunately, the elementary
school in McBride was totally destroyed by fire, which posed a serious problem for the
Board. The matter of accommodation is a serious one in this district, and the School
Board is presently engaged in the initial preparation of a by-law. New schools are
badly needed in a number of rural areas and in McBride Village.
The three School Boards in this inspectorate deserve credit for the sincere and
energetic way in which they have met their problems. It is noted that where a strong,
efficient secretary-treasurer is employed, the actual administrative and routine work
of a School Board is considerably reduced.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 21 (ARMSTRONG) AND No. 22 (VERNON).
REPORT OF A. S. TOWELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
As compared with the previous school-year, the number of schools in the Armstrong District remained unchanged at eleven, while the number of teachers increased
from thirty-five to thirty-nine. In the Vernon District the number of schools increased
from nine to eleven with the reopening of the one-room schools at Medora Creek and
Trinity Valley, and the number of teachers increased from seventy-seven to ninety.
As may be inferred from the above, one of the most difficult problems of the year
was that of providing accommodation for the continuing influx of new pupils. This
problem was particularly serious in the Vernon District, where the net enrolment over
the one-year period increased from 2,467 to 2,725. The Vernon Junior-Senior High
School, originally built to house some 500 students, now enrolled almost double that
number and was compelled to extend the school-day and adopt the shift system. The
Vernon Elementary School, with a net enrolment of 1,259, became one of the largest,
if not the largest, school of its type in the Province.
As a further consequence, it became necessary for the Vernon School Board to
make drastic modifications in the building programme which it had been planning.
Proposals to extend existing buildings were abandoned, and the new plans call for a
new junior high school and a new elementary school at Vernon, a new high school at
Lumby, and additional rural school accommodation. At the time of writing, the necessary by-laws are being prepared.
In the Armstrong District, while the pressure was less severe, available accommodation is now strained to its limit, and new building cannot be much longer delayed.
In one respect this inspectorate was more fortunate than some others—it almost
entirely escaped the floods which caused so much havoc elsewhere. Damage here was
confined to one flooded basement class-room and some temporary interference with
school buses due to flooded roads and washed-out bridges.
This report would not be complete without some word of appreciation to the school
trustees, who have devoted so much time and thought to the problems of their districts,
and to the teachers, who, in spite of overcrowded classes, inconvenient time-tables, and
improvised accommodation, have so well maintained the standards of education. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. JJ 93
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 34 (ABBOTSFORD) AND No. 75 (MISSION).
REPORT OF B. THORSTEINSSON, B.A., M.B.A.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
School enrolments in this area surged forward at an accelerated rate during the
school-year 1947-48. In both School Districts No. 34 (Abbotsford) and No. 75 (Mission), which comprise this inspectorate, increases were large. In order to cope with
the increase, temporary school-quarters were provided. School basements and halls
were pressed into service. In District No. 34 double shifts were operated—one in the
South Poplar Elementary School and the other in the Abbotsford Elementary.
In order to relieve overcrowded class-rooms and in order to accommodate the
additional pupils from newly established homes in the district, sixteen additional
teachers were added to the staff of District No. 34. Under these conditions the current
teacher shortage aggravated the situation, and eight persons with only temporary
teacher qualifications were engaged.
Inspector A Turnbull, who had been carrying on as Official Trustee of the new
District No. 75, and Mr. G. Heppner, who had been serving in a similar capacity in
District No. 34, turned over all school affairs at the end of the year to the newly elected
Boards of School Trustees. Both Boards have done very well indeed in grappling with
the many troublesome problems confronting these areas. The formation of District
No. 75 out of the former District No. 34 has proceeded smoothly, and, as a result, both
new Districts No. 34 and No. 75 are functioning well.
During the year an intensive testing programme was carried on. Results of these
tests showed the pupils in this area to be considerably below the Provincial standard.
These results reflect, in part, the large number of pupils who come from non-English-
speaking homes.   A specific programme is being planned to meet this problem.
During the latter part of the school-year, routine was seriously disrupted by the
flooding waters of the Fraser River. As a precautionary measure prior to the actual
flood, the following schools were closed down: Matsqui, Glenmore, Clayburn, Upper
Sumas, and Kilgard on the south side of the river, and Hatzic Prairie, Nicomen,
Dewdney, and Deroche on the north side of the river. As the flood became more widespread, Glenmore, Matsqui, Clayburn, Nicomen Island, Hatzic Prairie, and Dewdney
were all flooded. Most seriously affected were Hatzic Prairie, which was practically
rendered useless, and Glenmore, which was very seriously affected.
To provide for the pupils who had been attending the schools affected, provision
was made on the north side for the high school pupils of Dewdney to attend school in
Mission. On the south side, many more pupils were affected, and accordingly five
class-rooms were opened in one of the buildings at the Abbotsford Airport. Approximately 150 pupils attended this school. As could be expected, many families temporarily left the area. The teachers who had lost their classes were assigned to special
duties. Some carried on remedial instruction with small groups. Well-qualified
experienced teachers were used to assist other young teachers, while a few were given
opportunities to observe.
Tribute is due the teachers of this district, who contributed their services so
effectively during this trying period.
At the time this report is being written, rehabilitation is well under way, and it
is expected that all the schools, with the exception of Hatzic Prairie, which is beyond
repair and has been condemned, will reopen again. Indications are that the school
population will continue to increase at a rapid rate, and it is expected that several
additional class-rooms will be required next year. JJ 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
Because of the already overcrowded situation, as well as the anticipated increase
in school population, the Boards of School Trustees on both sides of the river are
planning additional new school buildings. It is anticipated that by-laws will soon be
presented to the ratepayers in both districts.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 3 (KIMBERLEY), No. 4 (WINDERMERE),
AND No. 18 (GOLDEN).
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The state of reorganization that characterized these three districts during 1946-47
settled down to conditions of more stable administration during 1947-48. The large
school district became a fact rather than an experiment.
The building programme of the Kimberley District finally materialized. The construction of a new sixteen-room elementary school and an addition to the junior-senior
high school was begun in June. The demolition of the elementary school has caused
temporary housing of six divisions in other quarters. District No. 4 built a new two-
room elementary school, at a cost of $13,500, to replace the rented building formerly
used at Canal Flats. Due to better transportation facilities the Golden Senior High-
Elementary School added another division. This allowed for better organization of
classes in the school and for a more varied secondary programme.
School District No. 3 cancelled the contract with the local bus company and instituted district-owned transportation. The Golden District extended transportation
services south on Highway No. 4 and west on Highway No. 1. The two small unsatisfactory schools of Moberly and Horse Creek were closed.
The staffing of schools improved during 1947-48. The two northern districts were
able to obtain qualified teachers for all but two schools. Improvement in the classroom situation was most noticeable. Salary schedules were successfully negotiated in
the Kimberley and Windermere Districts, the latter district having a schedule for the
first time.
A programme of diagnostic and classification testing was carried out in the rural
schools. The Progressive Achievement Tests were used. There was discussion of
apparent weaknesses as shown by the results, and suggested methods for dealing with
these weaknesses were given.
The establishment of the East Kootenay Health Unit has done much to improve
medical and nursing services in this area. A district health nurse was appointed to
serve Districts No. 4 and No. 18. This will give much-needed public health service to
areas which have never enjoyed it before.
In view of the change of School District No. 3 from large rural to large municipal,
effective January, 1949, the Board was increased from five to seven members, and
elections held in December in conjunction with the civic elections.
No report would be complete without a tribute to the School Boards of this
inspectorate. These men and women give their time, energy, and thought unstintingly
to the problems of education in their areas. SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 32 (FRASER CANYON), No. 33
(CHILLIWACK), AND No. 76 (AGASSIZ).
REPORT OF ALEX. TURNBULL, M.C., M.M., B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
All school districts faced the year 1947-48 with acute accommodation problems on
their hands. Reorganization was complete, and trustees now concentrated on effective
plans to deal with the steady and rapid increase in school population.
District No. 32 had made a substantial start on construction, and in October the
six-room elementary wing of the new school at Hope was ready. The Spuzzum school
was opened at the first of the term, and the new two-room school at Laidlaw was under
construction by the end of June. Plans for the balance of the building programme are
complete, and it is hoped that school accommodation problems will be under control
within the next school-year.
In addition to the schools, a number of homes for teachers were built, and others
purchased, so that now there are teacherages in every part of the district. This
splendid effort on the part of the Board has done much to solve the difficulties in
securing staff. It is significant that qualified teachers were hired for all schools early
in August.    Improved working conditions are, without doubt, the reason.
Using the old buildings at Hope as temporary quarters, a junior-senior high school
is now in operation, to which pupils in Grades VII to XII are transported from
Spuzzum, Yale, and St. Elmo schools. Effective progress has been made in developing
a modern school programme, including Home Economics, Commercial, and Industrial
Arts courses. On a smaller scale, high school facilities are available at North Bend,
where pupils from Boston Bar attend. A very definite increase in educational opportunity has been provided for all pupils in this rural district since its formation.
District No. 33 had plans well advanced to meet the building situation. Many
hours were spent in research and study before a building programme was finally ready.
The by-law received most pleasing support from, all sections of the community and was
given final approval by a substantial majority.of the ratepayers on February 7th.
Although a five-year building plan was prepared, it has been necessary to accelerate
the programme. In consequence, a large portion of the scheme is under way.
Elementary schools at East Chilliwack, Vedder, and Rosedale will be ready in a few
months, while the much-needed high school building should be started in the early fall.
During the year it has been necessary to add several rooms to the school system.
The district is particularly indebted to the co-operation received from the officers and
men at the Vedder Army Camp, where a five-room school is in operation.
Owing to difficulties encountered in the presentation of building by-laws, changes
in the boundaries of District No. 33 were authorized, and the new District No. 76
(Agassiz) was formed. This was administered by an Official Trustee until a School
Board took office on March 1st. The new trustees have problems similar to all districts
and are giving effective study to their solution.
During the term just ended, academic progress has kept pace with other developments, and effective work of the staff is evident in all parts of the inspectorate.
Another successful music festival was held in Chilliwack in April. All specialized fields
show growth of a pleasing nature. At the conclusion of the year Miss Charlotte Froese,
of Chilliwack High School, brought honour to herself and the school by winning a
scholarship in the University Entrance examinations.
The year was completed with difficulty, and some confusion, when the disastrous
floods which struck this valley in May forced the complete closing of Sumas school and
all schools in District No. 76.    Several others were closed temporarily, and at one time JJ 96 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
over 1,000 pupils were cut off from school.   At Agassiz several thousand dollars will
have to be spent before the schools can reopen in September.
In concluding this report, I wish to pay personal tribute to the splendid co-operation shown by school trustees and staff in all districts during the year. It has been
a pleasure to work with them. SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND. JJ 97
THE SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND.
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D.,
SUPERINTENDENT.
ATTENDANCE.
The total enrolment for the past year has been 119 students, including 94 resident
and 25 day pupils, compared with an enrolment of 124 during the preceding year.
Ninety-two students were deaf or hard of hearing, and 27 were blind or partial-sighted.
Of the total enrolment, 7 were admitted as extra-provincial pupils.
ACCOMMODATION.
The need for more adequate and suitable facilities for the care and training of our
children continues to be increasingly urgent. The buildings now in use are neither
modern construction nor adequate for our purposes. In order to expand our services
more efficiently and effectively and provide for an increase in enrolment, it is essential
that early consideration be given to a planned building programme.
Through the co-operation of the Department of Public Works, a part of the grounds
has been cleared of trees and stumps during the past year. It is hoped, however, that
early consideration will be given to the need for a planned programme of clearing and
grading the entire school campus for the subsequent development of suitable playing-
fields, walks, and playing areas.
HEALTH.
The general health condition of the children has been very satisfactory, reflecting
the success of the preventive measures practised by our school nurse and the splendid
co-operation of the metropolitan health services.
TRAINING PROGRAMME.
Instruction was offered this term in Typewriting, Blindcrafts, and Music in
addition to regular periods for Industrial Arts and Home Economics. Through the
co-operation of the Vancouver Junior League, hobby classes in the following activities
were conducted by volunteer instructors:   Art, Leatherwork, Weaving, and Shellcraft.
Five hard-of-hearing students received special auricular training and will be
transferred to public-school classes in their own communities next term. This has been
in line with the practice instituted several years ago of effecting adjustments to public
school wherever possible.
DEPARTMENTAL SURVEY.
Early in March the Assistant Superintendent of Education, Mr. H. L. Campbell,
together with Municipal School Inspectors J. F. K. English and William Gray, spent
a week surveying our school.
The purpose of this Departmental survey was to evaluate the educational philosophy, equipment, facilities, organization, and techniques of instruction now available
to deaf and blind children of the Province and to formulate for the Minister of
Education such recommendations as appeared desirable for the improvement and
expansion of existing services.
In accordance with a recommendation of this survey, a Management Committee
comprising the following members was set up under the chairmanship of Mr. James JJ 98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
Gordon: Mr. C. G. Brown, Mr. H. L. Campbell, Mr. William Gray, and Mr. Owen
Thomas. Before the end of the term Miss Mabel Blake assumed the duties of vice-
principal in charge of library and case records, and Miss Helen Woodward was
appointed to succeed Miss Blake as vice-principal in charge of instruction. The position
of vice-principal in charge of extra-curricular activities was authorized and will be
filled before the beginning of the next term.
STAFF.
In concluding this report, I wish to express my appreciation for the loyal support
received from all members of the staff and to pay tribute to our retiring matron,
Mrs. Annie Tyler, for her many years of faithful and devoted service. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS. JJ 99
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS.
HIGH SCHOOL AND VOCATIONAL COURSES.
REPORT OF EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. Es L., DIRECTOR.
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the year
1947-48 was 5,483, which is a decrease of approximately 3.2 per cent, over the enrolment during the year 1946-47. This decrease is mainly in the number of students
under 18, the drop in that category of students being 172.
Correspondence courses were taken by students in the following classifications:—
Students registered in schools— Per Cent.
1. School-age students registered in high and
superior schools. Such students were permitted to take three courses by correspondence.
(Throughout this report the term " school-
age " refers to students under 18 years of age.) 1,553
2. School-age students registered in elementary
schools         16
Total number of school-age students  1,569
3. Students of 18, 19, and 20 registered in their
local schools      567
4. Students of 21 or over registered in their
local schools         31
Total number of students registered in their
local schools taking one or more correspondence courses  2,167      39.5
Students not registered in schools—
1. School-age students unable to attend school because of physical disability     54
2. School-age students gainfully employed  156
3. School-age students studying courses at home
because of the distance factor  326
4. School-age students in institutions—Girls' Industrial School, Boys' Industrial School, Oakalla
Prison Farm, British Columbia Penitentiary     31
5. School-age students not registered in schools for
other reasons     39
6. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years not registered
in their local schools  663
Total number of students under 21 not registered in their local schools and obtaining
their education by correspondence  1,269     23.1
7. Adult students (21 years and over)  2,047     37.4
Total number of students  5,483    100.0 jj 100 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
The students enrolled may be classified as to age in the following three groups :—
Per Cent.
1. Pupils under 18 years of age  2,175     39.7
2. Pupils of 18, 19, and 20__  1,230      22.4
3. Pupils of 21 years of age and over  2,078      37.9
Total  5,483 100.0
Some of these students took a full year's work in six high school courses. Others
registered for only one or two courses. The number of students who enrolled in each
of the high school subjects during the year was as follows:—
English Literature III, IV, V, VI  819
English Grammar and Composition III, IV, V, VI  934
Social Studies III, IV, V  671
General Science III, IV, V  616
Mathematics III, IV, V, VI  1,439
Latin I, II, III  408
French I, II, III *  430
Spanish I, II, III  170
Health IIIa, IVa, Va  404
Physical Education IIIb, IVb  195
Agriculture I, II    93
Geography I, II  97
Home Economics  393
Art III  239
Junior Business and Introductory Book-keeping  290
Junior Business   133
Book-keeping I, II, III  419
Business Arithmetic   108
Shorthand I, II ______  182
Typewriting I, II  713
Secretarial Practice   4
Business English   48
Journalism     74
Biology A  119
Physics A  80
German A  71
Chemistry A  63
Bible Study .  62
Total  9,274
This figure is, of course, larger than the figure given for the number of students
enrolled, since the majority of the students were registered for more than one course.
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Senior Matriculation courses
was as follows:—
English Literature   114
English Composition  102
Algebra and Trigonometry  127
Geometry   H3
French   94
Latin   41
World History  j-.q CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS. JJ 101
Chemistry I   41
Physics I    30
Home Economics  12
Agriculture   12
Total  756
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Technical-Vocational courses
may also be classified in the following table:—
Mechanical Drawing I, II  327
Sheet-metal Work  8
Steam Engineering Ia, IB, Ha  357
Metal-mining     3
Automotive Engineering I, II  120
Diesel Engineering   28
Practical Electricity  107
Principles of Radio I, II  57
Aviation  9
Elementary Geology and Mineralogy  43
Forestry   64
Commercial Art   60
Building Construction  89
House Painting and Decorating  6
Industrial Mathematics  98
Soils and Field Crops  13
Poultry-keeping   13
Practical Design  35
Glove-making   37
Air Navigation I, II  10
Mathematics for Steam Engineering IIa  36
Fruit-growing   13
Accountancy for Credit Unions    73
Spherical Trigonometry  11
Home Furnishing and Decoration  32
Total    1,649
All students, with the exception of patients in the Solarium, in sanatoria, or in
hospitals, and inmates of public institutions, were required to pay the annual registration fee of $2. Students paying tuition fees were those who have the privilege of
attending a high school having five or more teachers, high school students 18 years of
age or older, employed students over 16 years of age, students enrolled for Senior
Matriculation courses, and students living outside this Province. Discharged service
personnel of World War I and World War II and their unemployed dependents were
charged half the usual fees (such dependents were charged full fees if they lived in
a district having a large high school).
The following is a classification of students who were exempted from tuition
fees:—
1. Public institutions and hospitals—
(1) Hospital cases  249
(2) British Columbia Penitentiary     71
(3) Oakalla Prison Farm     62
(4) Girls' Industrial Home       3
PROVL   '
VICTOR!,. JJ 102 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
1. Public institutions and hospitals—Continued.
(5) Boys' Industrial Home       15
(6) New Haven      6
Sub-total  406
2. On relief or equivalent      4
3. Members of the staff ,      7
4. Students needed at home     14
5. Disabled students at home   120
6. Bible Study  -'-     18
7. Dependents of discharged service personnel    37
8. Discharged service personnel  387
Total  993
All students were asked to indicate their chosen vocations.    The following summary shows the choices of those who gave this information:—
Professional—
Teachers  339
Nurses   276
Medicine  122
Science  149
Law   29
Art   103
Theology      22
Pharmacy  43
Miscellaneous  126
Commercial   540
Skilled labour (mechanics, technicians, steam engineers, etc)__ 250
Aviation   14
His Majesty's Forces   37
Civil Service  12
Agriculture and farming   76
Forestry   61
Mining   10
Journalism   61
Diesel and steam engineering  358
Radio  39
Miscellaneous  219
Not given  2,597
Total  5,483
Completion of Courses.
The school-year showed a slight increase in the number of courses completed.
A total of 81,008 were marked during the year.
Courses sold to Teachers.
Teachers who order courses must state the name of the school in which they teach
and must certify that they are actively engaged in teaching the subject in which they
wish to buy the correspondence course. They are not permitted to make mimeographed
copies of any part of the courses. Many teachers took advantage of the privilege of
purchasing correspondence courses as aids in class-room teaching under the conditions CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS.
JJ 103
previously described.    During the year 1947-48 our sales amounted to approximately
$3,500 for single sets of courses sold to teachers at cost of printing only.
New Courses.
Additional courses offered during the year were German A, Junior Business,
Accountancy for Credit Unions, Spherical Trigonometry, Fruit-growing, and Home
Furnishing and Decoration. We offered also rewritten courses in Mathematics V and
Home Economics III.
ELEMENTARY CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL.
ANNA B. MILLER, DIRECTOR.
The enrolment of the Elementary Correspondence School for the year 1947-48 was
1,536. Of these, 87 were enrolled in the Peace River Branch. There were 180,253
lessons marked at Victoria and 9,045 at Pouce Coupe, Peace River Branch. The total
lessons marked was 189,298. There was a decrease of 61 in the enrolment and an
increase of 4,565 in the number of lessons marked.
The tabulation below shows the enrolment by grade for Victoria and Pouce
Coupe:—
Enrolled at Victoria.
Grade
I.
Grade
II.
Grade
III.
Grade
IV.
Grade
V.
Grade
VI.
Grade
VII.
Grade
VIII.
Total.
169
216
238
249
266
271
281
287
286
277
139
157
173
178
191
205
208
223
231
236
119
144
151
153
169
168
177
177
181
180
Ill
128
142
149
156
164
170
184
185
189
104
120
131
138
143
151
159
164
171
171
87
104
112
121
126
137
139
147
150
151
89
104
111
113
119
129
130
131
138
137
58
73
80
83
85
89
97
102
105
108
876
1,046
1,138
1,184
1,265
1,314
1,361
February	
1,415
1,447
1,449
Enrolled at Pouce Coupe (Peace River Branch)..
6
9
13
15
15
15
15
15
15
16
6
9
9
11
12
12
12
12
12
10
6
9
9
10
10
10
10
10
10
12
8
8
9
10
10
10
11
12
12
12
6
7
8
8
9
9
9
9
9
9
7
8
8
9
10
12
13
13
13
13
3
4
4
5
5
6
7
8
8
8
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
47
59
66
74
77
80
83
86
86
87
It is difficult to evaluate the work accomplished by pupils enrolled in the Elementary Correspondence School. A great deal depends on the parents' ability to supervise
adequately and without giving too much assistance. We do feel that in many cases
very satisfactory supervision is given by the parents and that good progress is being
made. JJ 104 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
The following comments from the parents will give some idea of their attitude to
correspondence instruction:—
" Thanking you all for the splendid work you do in directing the education of
isolated children and particular thanks to Bill's teachers, who took such individual
interest in his work."
" I wonder if you people have any idea what a wonderful tonic you are for the
children. You are really their friends and your encouraging remarks mean so very
much. Taking the course with you has been a happy experience that Dick will never
forget."
" I would like to thank you both for the patient assistance you have given Jean
with her course. Wishing you every success in the wonderful help you are giving
handicapped students."
" Thank you sincerely for your interest in their education thus far. Glad as I will
be to have them in school, I certainly will miss the mail from school and the nice comments that were put on the lessons by the teachers in each grade."
" Colin is settling into his work now and we are both enjoying the lessons. I think
all mothers should have to teach for a while, as it is an experience I would like others
to have too."
"We are very pleased with the course. Tom is now in Grade VI, and we are as
enthusiastic about the course as when he was in Grade I. We feel we are very fortunate
in having such a carefully thought-out course in this Province."
" The whole course seems rather wonderful to me, considering the misgivings I had
before starting in regard to starting a child out in Grade I, and I think those responsible for the development of the system are to be highly commended. I realize a child
misses a great deal by not attending an ordinary school in the way of social and group
activities, but I also think a parent misses a great deal who has not had to help with
correspondence! It gives one a better understanding of the teacher's work. Busy as
I am, I consider it a privilege to give my daughter a year's instruction at home. It forms
a closer and more understanding relationship about many things in a child's make-up,
also the child learns to regard his mother in a different light."
"We find the boys' progress very satisfactory, but on a farm where time is at a
premium the loss of time is felt, but cheerfully given."
An interesting feature of this year's work was the use for the first time of the
basic readers: Curriculum Foundation Series in Grades I, II, and III. It has been
interesting to note the enthusiasm of the parents and pupils for these readers. If the
comments of the parents can be considered reliable, then the primary pupils have made
excellent progress in reading. The following comments will give some idea of their
enthusiastic reaction:—
" I think the whole reading programme for Grade I is 100 per cent, better than the
one that was in use when my other two children were in Grade I. The readers are
much more attractive than the old Jerry and Jane."
" Judy thoroughly enjoys her reading. She reads independently from books beside
her reader. Seems to grasp the meaning quickly. She discusses the stories and asks
many questions about them. She is always using new ideas from the stories. Can
read silently, and reads rapidly. She uses no lip movement and no pointing. Reads
fluently and seems to understand clearly what the characters are saying and doing.
She knows how to find pages and table contents, holds books properly. I am very
pleased with the rapid progress Judy made in her reading. She does enjoy it so much
and has learned how to find so many new words by finding smaller words inside the
other word she is learning."
" Felicity was much interested in finding ' go ' in ' going.' She guessed ' take '
from ' make.'    She enjoyed the playhouse very much.    ' Then ' and ' them ' and ' last' CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS. JJ 105
and ' look' took a bit of time. She loved the rhymes and has been making up ones ever
since. She is getting great enjoyment from the supplementary readers from the
library. They have very much the same vocabulary, and she thinks out the new words
either from the context or phonetically."
" John does not seem to have any particular difficulties. Naturally he doesn't read
as fluently as he will in time, but his accuracy has improved to the point where he
seldom reads incorrectly, even in sight reading with new words involved. He is
acquiring a feeling for words and combinations of various letters."
" Sandford was a very nervous child. He is developing more poise and confidence,
and I feel that these reading lessons are contributing in a large measure to developing
his personality."
A visit was made in October, 1947, to Williams Lake and Prince George and a
number of our pupils and their parents were contacted. It is interesting to see the
pupils in their home environment, and personal contact with someone from the school
is good from the pupils' view-point.
An issue of the school magazine was published and sent to all families. These are
received with great interest by the children.
The majority of our pupils borrow books from the Public Library Commission
and are very adequately served by this branch of the Department.
Information concerning radio programmes is forwarded to all pupils. The
programmes are greatly enjoyed by those who have access to them. The following
excerpt from a letter is interesting:—
" We have derived many useful hints from the school broadcasts. After hearing
' glare' mentioned on our broadcast, we installed venetian-type blinds in the room used
as a school-room.   The results were most gratifying."
The staff for the school-year 1947-48 consisted of the Director, six office staff,
twelve instructors, and three outside markers. JJ 106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH.
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE.
It was with considerable regret that during the year under review I had to ask for,
and obtain, quite a substantial supplementary vote in addition to the generous sum
already in the estimates, in order to cover the expenses involved in the distribution
of free text-books, etc.
It has been pointed out in previous Annual Reports that free text-books are not
really free, for they must be paid for by the Government through taxation. It should,
therefore, be the responsibility of all school officials to see that there is no unnecessary
waste or extravagance in connection with the use of these so-called free books in our
public schools.
It is expected that free books will be properly cared for in the schools, and that
teachers will only requisition for the minimum requirements. The proper requisition
forms must be used. The forms should be properly completed and submitted to the
Text-book Branch by the secretary-treasurer of the school district.
When orders are placed with us for saleable books, the regulations of the Commissioner, Social Security and Municipal Aid Tax, are to be adhered to. Unless
exemption is properly claimed, the Text-book branch is required to charge the sales tax.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies, issued during the school-year 1947-48
to public schools and in connection with correspondence courses, required an expenditure
of $172,930.05;  5,266 free requisitions were received and filled.
Combined orders, free and saleable, reached the large total of 20,293. From these
orders the sum of $473,459.61 was collected by us and deposited in the Treasury.
Many of the report forms, etc., issued by the Department of Education were
distributed by us to the various School Boards, when and where required.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OFFICER IN CHARGE, TEXT-BOOK BRANCH,
FOR THE  FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST, 1948.
In presenting the sixteenth annual report of the Text-book Branch, attention is
drawn to the volume of business, which amounts to approximately $542,000. This
is 15 per cent, more than last year, and is more than twice the volume in 1943—five
years ago.
For years the Text-book Branch has been cramped for space. Unsuitable quarters
have a detrimental effect on efficiency. Conditions are such now that the walls can no
longer contain our stock, and additional space, not convenient to our main stores, was
rented this year. The Branch requires new and more modern quarters. In spite of
these trying conditions, we had a good year—no bad debts and our clients throughout
British Columbia and the Yukon were satisfied.
Stock.
The stock on hand is in proper quantity and is all live stock. Deliveries from the
publishers are improving, but there are still unavoidable delays, which result in added
labour and expense.
Sales.
Our sales for the year amounted to $541,622.23, and the discount to dealers, School
Boards, etc., was $82,820.79. „
Profit.
The net profit, as shown by our profit and loss statement, is $13,760.04. This
amount was turned into the Consolidated Revenue Fund.    It has been customary during TEXT-BOOK BRANCH. JJ 107
the past fifteen years for the Text-book Branch to set aside part of the annual profit as
reserves for bad debts and dead stock. This year we were instructed by the Audit
Branch that this practice must cease, and our reserves, as shown on the 1947 balance-
sheet, of $2,000 for bad debts and $2,000 for dead stock, have been eliminated.
General Remarks.
A perusal of the annual reports of the Text-book Branch over the past decade
or more gives a story in miniature of a growing business well operated. The growth
in volume of business exceeds the increase in school population and can only be
explained by the type of service this Branch is rendering to the Province as a whole.
Our clients, both dealers and School Boards, are satisfied with the service we give them,
and, as a result, they order more and more miscellaneous books from us. They save
themselves work and worry and add to our labours. If satisfied clients is the acme of
success in business, it may truly be said that the Text-book Branch is on its way.
Once again I wish to extend my sincere thanks to a very loyal and efficient staff,
for it is only because of their enthusiasm and co-operation that reports like this are
possible.
I wish also to thank School Boards, school officials, and dealers throughout the
Province for their many acts of kindness, courtesy, and co-operation.
Profit and Loss Statement, Year ended March 31st, 1948.
Gross sales    $541,622.23
Less discount      82,820.79
Net sales   $458,801.44
Stock on hand as at March 31st, 1947  $127,652.98
Purchases for Year—
Cost      422,087.31
Freight and duty      10,068.30
  $559,808.59
Stock on hand as at March 31st, 1948     158,919.04
Net cost of goods sold     400,889.55
Gross profit for year     $57,911.89
Expenses—
Salaries and wages     $35,964.05
Freight and delivery         5,702.26
Packing and general expenses         2,485.54
       44,151.85
Operating profit for year (transferred to Consolidated Revenue Fund)     $13,760.04
Certified correct. Certified correct.
J. F. Meredith, P. G. Barr,
Clerk. Officer in Charge. JJ 108 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1947-48.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1948.
Assess.
Imprest Account—
Cash on hand  $100.00
Cash in bank     350.00
         $450.00
Stock inventory     158,919.04
Obsolete stock on hand       10,661.19
Accounts receivable       52,793.14
$222,823.37
Liabilities.
Treasury advances  $450.00
Capital Investment Account  210,604.45
Accounts payable in suspense  1,107.73
Reserve for obsolete stock  10,661.19
$222,823.37
Certified correct. Certified correct.
J. F. Meredith, P. G. Barr,
Clerk. Officer in Charge. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION. JJ 109
REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION.
H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION.
Under the general heading of "Adult Education," two groups of classes are administered by the Department of Education, as follows: (1) Those that are conducted in
co-operation with the Dominion Government, and (2) those that are the direct responsibility of the Province. The reports of the responsible officers are grouped here for
convenience.
Industrial Education — H. A. Jones, Director of Technical and Vocational
Education.
(1) Canadian Vocational Training Programme — Lieut.-Col.  J. W.  Inglis,
Regional Director.
(a) Classes operated under the Dominion-Provincial Youth Training
Agreement.
(b) Classes operated under the Dominion-Provincial Re-establishment Training Agreement.
(c) Classes operated under the Apprentice Training Agreement.
(2) Night-schools (see Industrial Education Report).
(3) Vancouver School of Navigation.
Correspondence Instruction—
*High School—Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L., Director.
*Elementary School—Miss Anna B. Miller, Director.
*Recreation and Physical Education—Ernest Lee, B.A., B.Sc. in P.E., Director.
*School and Community Drama—H. S. Hum, B.A., Director.
(1)  CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMME.
The report which follows, with the exception of the sections dealing with Schedule
E (Rural Training), Schedule H (Student Aid), and Supervisory Training, has been
prepared by Lieut.-Col. J. W. Inglis, Regional Director, Canadian Vocational Training.
The training given under Schedule L (Rehabilitation) was greatly curtailed, the
enrolment being approximately 50 per cent, of that in March, 1947. Placement of
students was exceedingly good throughout the year, and, in most of the trades, demands
could not be filled. Surveys made by the Department of Veterans' Affairs indicate
that the continuance of employment in the trades in which veterans were trained was
even higher than during the previous year. Due to insufficient enrolment, several
classes were closed during the fiscal year. In the case of veterans desiring training
when the numbers were insufficient to warrant holding a class, arrangements were
made for interprovincial transfers, so that some classes continued in British Columbia
which otherwise would have been closed. In other cases, trainees were transferred to
adjacent Eastern Provinces.
(a) Dominion-Provincial Youth Training Programme.
Schedule C—Urban Occupational Training.
The purpose of this schedule is to provide opportunities for young people within
the age-group of 16 to 30 years to learn basic skills in order to enable them to enter
gainful employment.   Young people leaving school can be