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RAILWAY DEPARTMENT PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT Year ended December 31st 1948 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1949

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 Railway Department
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
Year ended December 31st
1948
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don jMcDiarmiij, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1949.  To His Honour CHARLES ARTHUR BANKS,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I have the honour to present herewith the Annual Report of the operations and
activities of the Railway Department for the year ended December 31st, 1948, with
Appendices.
L. H. EYRES,
Minister of Railways.
Victoria, B.C., February 15th, 1949. Victoria, B.C., December 31st, 1948.
The Honourable L. H. Eyres,
Minister of Railways, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Thirty-first Annual Report of the Railway
Department, covering the year 1948, together with Appendices.
Your obedient servant,
R. E. SWANSON,
Chief Inspector. Report of the Railway Department.
The Department has supervision of all railways subject to the Provincial Statutes.
The staff of the Department, as of December 31st, 1948, consisted of Chief Inspector, two Inspectors, draughtsman, and a secretarial stenographer—grade 2 and a senior
clerk-stenographer.
The railways supervised by the Department include common carriers, industrial
railways, and electric interurban and street-railways.
The Civil Engineering Branch continued the plans, profiles, and economic studies
of northern extensions of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company, and co-operated
with Government and other agencies in obtaining essential information, including
research-work. Resources data have been correlated into terms of economic values.
Surveys and plans were made to safeguard and improve the existing railway as at
present operated.
The Mechanical Branch has progressively extended its inspection and supervision
pursuant to the " Railway Act," comprising amendment of rules and regulations, educational and safety tests, investigation and prevention of accidents and fires. The
Inspection Bureau assumed extra duties in making an intensive survey of the mechanical operating conditions of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, also reported upon Pine
Valley coal tests and its further utilization.
Both Civil and Mechanical Engineering Branches have worked with other agencies,
notably the Controller of Coal, Petroleum, and Natural Gas, steam railways, heating
and power plants, and research-workers, in surveying and testing the quantity and
quality of Pine River coal. Arrangements have been made for tests in locomotive and
stationary boilers, also such new uses as coal-fired gas-turbines, which require a high-
grade low-ash coal in the prime mover.
Current duties, such as approval of location and construction plans, sanction and
filing of tariffs and operating conditions, have been attended to. Other activities are
described in the several sections of this Report.
COMMON CARRIERS.
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
As outlined above, the Department devotes more attention and energy to the welfare of this Provincially owned railway than prescribed under the terms of the " Railway Act." This Department is the virtual construction department of the railway;
furthermore, it attends to such matters as right-of-way, damage claims, public or
private agreements, improvements, replacements, and unusual undertakings.
Important survey projections were made of a line from Quesnel to Prince George,
with marked improvements, especially elimination of high, expensive trestles. Considering the northern extensions, an intensive study of resources, reports, physical
features, transportation routes, and economic factors has been made to determine the
choice of railway location, utilization of products and markets, potential wealth and
traffic, settlement and industrial opportunities, all directed toward the development of
Central and Northern British Columbia and the physical and economic improvement of
the existing railway.
An instrumental survey party under the direction of the Department carried on
field and office work to prepare plans, profiles, and economic studies of revisions and
betterments, structure replacements, water-supplies, removing dangerous slides, terminal facilities, erosion-prevention, raising embankments, and road revisions. GG 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Operation—General Manager's Report.
The following remarks by the general manager are incorporated in this report:—
Maintenance of Way.—The programme of rehabilitating the properties of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway which was commenced in 1947 has been continued
throughout 1948, and very considerable progress has been made on this extra and necessary work. It will take two more years of intensive effort before it will be possible to
reduce the expenditures for maintenance of way to the amount of a normal expenditure.
It should be borne in mind that we will recover in a period of four years from the nine-
year period of drastically reduced expenditure due to war-time conditions, which have
made necessary these excessive but essential expenditures.
The strengthening of 'track structures, renewal of worn-out bridges (by rebuilding
in some instances and by filling in others), renewal of culverts, of widening cuts, lining
and strengthening tunnels, and other work necessary for the safety of the railway have
been continued during the past year.
This work has enabled us to successfully handle traffic that was 20 per cent, heavier
than the previous year, with only the usual number of minor derailments occurring,
while our car-loading has been at a high point in average weight of loads carried. We
were also able to take from Squamish to Shalalth a very heavy load, consisting of a
transformer for the power installation at Bridge River weighing 127 tons. This could
not have been handled had not our programme been well under way. By moving this
transformer we materially assisted in shortening the time of the opening of the Bridge
River power plant, to the great advantage of Vancouver and Southern British Columbia.
The Pacific Great.Eastern Railway was subject to only minor washout delays during the Fraser Valley floods. Freight traffic from the trans-continental railways and
the highways was diverted via the Pacific Great Eastern Railway to carry essential food
and other supplies to the Coast when all other traffic was interrupted south of Lytton.
The Prince George country also was supplied by this railway during a tie-up on the
Canadian National.
It will be necessary to obtain authority to continue the work in 1949 and in 1950,
after which the expenditures for maintenance-of-way work will, it is hoped, be reduced
to normal annual costs.
Maintenance of Equipment.—The majority of our equipment, both mechanical and
cars, is rapidly becoming obsolete, and the increased business of the past years has
taxed our equipment to the limit. We have been able to handle the increased traffic
only by the recently acquired cars and locomotives, but it has been a difficult task to
move traffic and keep our equipment in condition equal to what it was at the first of the
year. We have received the box cars ordered in 1947, but have still had to rent a
considerable amount of equipment, such as stock-cars, gondolas, and fiat cars, during
the year to keep pace with the increased business.
We have purchased and received during the year the following equipment: Three
sleepers, one cafe car, ten gondolas, one oil-tank car (8,000-gallon capacity).
We have on order, to be delivered in 1949, the following equipment: Fifty new
flat cars, ten second-hand gondola ballast cars, five diesel-electric locomotives.
Operation.—We are still short of equipment of various kinds, which has necessitated renting equipment, thereby raising our costs of operation. The costs of materials
of all kinds show increases, with fuel-oil the greatest. The wages of all employees have
shown a very heavy increase, and without a corresponding increase in freight rates we
will be at a serious disadvantage to produce favourable results in operating.
Our stock business has reached a new high point, and lumber, forest products,
vegetables, and fruit all show increases over 1947. This has resulted in a bottle-neck
in our tug-and-barge service between Squamish and Vancouver, and has necessitated
renting tugs and barges at a high rental charge.    This was essential, but not economic.
, RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1948. GG 7
Our passenger traffic shows a very fine increase as a result of our advertising and
service provided on our passenger trains, and through our personnel. Very many
complimentary comments have been received in reference to our passenger and dining-
Cal" SerYice- J. A. KENNEDY,
General Manager.
Inspecting Engineer's Report.
Inspections of the properties of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway have been made
pursuant to the terms of the " Railway Act," with special regard to maintenance of way
and structures. Items enumerated in subsection (2) section 177 of the Act were
inspected, excepting rolling-stock and floating equipment. These inspections were made
September 21st to 23rd and November 2nd to 4th, 1948.
On both trips the Railway Department's Inspecting Engineer and the Chief Inspector were accompanied by the railway company's engineer of maintenance and the bridge
and building master. Work affecting their departments was also discussed with the
two roadmasters and other officers of the Company.
The 1948 programme of bridge-work, listed as a result of the 1947 inspections, has
been completed. In addition to the usual maintenance repairs, fourteen bridges were
redecked and seven pile bridges were rebuilt. The bridges between Squamish and
Shalalth received a practical test on September 21st, 1948, during the train movement
of a transformer on a six-axle well car, a gross load of 256,000 lb., equivalent to a
Cooper E 50 loading. The inspection following this train disclosed no signs of fracture
or undue compression in the bridge members.
The results of the 1948 work on buildings and structures other than bridges brings
many essential repairs up to date. At Squamish terminals, former army buildings
were rebuilt into offices, residences, and other buildings; improved facilities were
provided for the mechanical and transportation departments. Ten section bunk-houses
will augment the limited accommodation on the northern sections.
Acting upon the insistence of this Department, 165,000 track-ties were renewed in
1948, against an average of 80,000 annually for the previous eight years. Rehabilitation activities have commenced and certain improvements made; for example, increased
visibility and slides removed by daylighting side-hill cuts, eroded banks riprapped, log
cribs replaced by concrete walls, and dangerous rocks removed.
Subject to full precautionary measures with vigilant maintenance-work and observance of safety instructions, the railway-track and its supporting or protecting structures are now in a fair condition for the safe operation of traffic under present train
loadings and schedule running time. To maintain this fair condition and to be reasonably free from danger to the employees and to the public using the railway, also to
operate efficiently, free from unusual interruptions, the programme of works prescribed
by the Railway Department must be adhered to, with special emphasis on bridges,
erosions, and slides. c  R   CRYSDALE,
Inspecting Engineer.
LOCOMOTIVE CRANES.
Inspections of boilers and safety appliances in shipyards and other industrial
plants are continued where cranes and other mobile plants operate on track.
FOREST FIRE PROTECTION.
Inspections for fire-prevention equipment were made on locomotives of all railways,
including those subject to the jurisdiction of the Board of Transport Commissioners
for Canada, this being a requirement of the Forest Service of the Department of Lands
and Forests. GG 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
EQUIPMENT INSPECTION BRANCH.
Chief Inspector's Report.
From the beginning of the year up until the advent of inclement weather of late
December all industrial railways operated to full capacity. Extensive heavy repairs
were made to existing motive power and rolling-stock under the advice and supervision
of the Department during the year. Considerable used railway equipment was imported by the companies operating industrial railways. This equipment was imported
subject to our prior inspection and approval. In many cases approval could not be
granted, as much of the equipment did not come up to required standards; consequently such equipment was condemned and not imported. By taking full advantage
of the service offered by this Department, the operators of the railways were not only
saved considerable inconvenience but, as a result, obtained better and safer equipment
to operate.
All logging, mining, and industrial railways in the Province were inspected during
the year. This inspection covered not only the equipment and rolling-stock, but the
road-bed, bridges, and structures, as well as the dispatch and operating departments of
the railways concerned. In carrying out these inspections, a great amount of detail is
attended to by the Inspectors, and follow-up inspections are necessary to see that the
work required is carried out. I regret to report that in most cases a lack of staff prohibited proper follow-up inspections, and I find it necessary to report at this time that
an extra Inspector must be added to the staff. To aggravate this condition, additional
duties have been taken on by the Inspection Bureau, in that it is now inspecting equipment, such as electric locomotives, technically under the jurisdiction of the Department
of Mines. By arrangements made with the Chief Inspector of Mines, this duty is being
performed by our technically qualified Inspectors rather than have the Department of
Mines employ technically qualified help for that specific purpose.
Nine air locomotives of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company were inspected and
certified during 1948. Copies of these reports were forwarded to the Department of
Mines for their files. The steam and diesel locomotives of this company, as well as its
subsidiary, the Morrissey, Fernie and Michel Railway, were inspected, and the trackage
and bridge structures approved.
The railways and wharves of the Canadian Collieries (D.), Limited, were inspected
on Vancouver Island during 1948, and, as a result, the company was required to rebuild
and rebrace its Nanaimo coal-wharves in order that they could be approved safe for
operation.
Twelve new power rail-cars for the transportation of workmen were built in
British Columbia during the year. Some of these power-cars are diesel-powered.
These units were constructed to the Department's design and were built under the
supervision of Department Inspectors, after which they were certified for operation.
In addition to this, three used steam locomotives were imported by various logging
companies. These locomotives required to be rebuilt under our supervision in order
that they could be approved and certified.
The street-railways and common-carrier railways of the British Columbia Electric
Railway Company under Provincial jurisdiction were inspected during the year. I am
pleased to report the rehabilitation programme of Vancouver street-railways, put in
effect during 1947, was carried forward during 1948, with a resulting improvement in
the condition of the Vancouver street-railways. The equipment, both street-car and
interurban, as well as freight motive power, was periodically inspected, the electric
locomotives being certified and approved. In cases where persons were seriously
injured by street-cars and interurban cars, the rolling-stock was impounded until
inspected and released by our Inspectors. Where fatal accidents occurred, Inspectors
attended inquests, and reports were forwarded to the Deputy Minister.    Where neces- RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1948. GG 9
sary, corrective measures were imposed upon the companies to avoid recurrence of
similar accidents.
The trackage of companies operating locomotive cranes was inspected. Boilers of
cranes and equipment were tested and certified, and engineers examined and certificates
issued. We regret to report one fatal accident on one of these operations, where a
workman walking ahead of an approaching locomotive crane stumbled and fell and was
fatally injured when the crane ran over him.
The boilers of all railways operating under Provincial charter were inspected and
certified during the year by Department Inspectors. In cases where boilers required
to be renewed or repaired, plans and specifications were checked by the Department
for approval.
Four hundred and sixty-eight (468) inspections covering the fire-protective appliances of locomotives were made on the Canadian Pacific Railway, Canadian National
Railways, Great Northern Railway, and Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway. Reports of
these inspections were forwarded to the British Columbia forestry department and the
Board of Transport Commissioners at Ottawa. In order that Inspectors are vested
with the proper authority to make these inspections, each Inspector is appointed by the
Board of Transport Commissioners in Ottawa as Board of Transport Fire Inspectors,
and they act with the full authority of the Board of Transport Commissioners on the
transcontinental railways. In cases where defects were found, the Inspectors ordered
the locomotives out of service. In many cases when defects were reported, the Inspectors made special journeys into the East Kootenay District, so that forest fires caused
by faulty equipment might be prevented.
During the Fraser River flood of June, 1948, the services of the Department were
offered, and arrangements were made so that in case rail-cars (speeders) were required
to evacuate the residents of the Fraser Valley, they were made available from the logging companies to be transported by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company to the
scene of action.
In company with the Inspecting Engineer, two general inspections of the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway were made during the year. These inspections covered the
road-bed, bridges, structures, and general facilities of the railway, as well as its
mechanical facilities. The result of these inspections was covered by separate reports.
During the year the Inspectors made regular inspections of the rolling-stock of this
railway and applied annual hydrostatic tests to certify the boilers in all shops and on
locomotives and other equipment. Internal inspections of the locomotive boilers on
this railway were also made during the year.
In October, 1948, acting in accordance with instructions issued by the Minister of
Railways, a survey was made of the mechanical facilities and mechanical personnel of
the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. In order to conduct this survey, the Inspectors of
the Inspection Bureau were set up as a three-man board and proceeded to the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway property, where a three-week survey was conducted, and a
detailed report with recommendations submitted to the Minister.
In June, 1948, Col. C. C. Stibbard, Director of Operation, Board of Transport
Commissioners, Ottawa, requested that I proceed to Ottawa to discuss matters pertaining to fire-protection on the transcontinental railways operating in British Columbia,
and also to be posted on current improvements with respect to motive power taking
place in Eastern Canada. This exchange of ideas proved beneficial to this Department
and possibly to the Board of Transport Commissioners.
Fullest advantage was taken of the opportunity while in Eastern Canada to visit
the officials of the Canadian Pacific Railway and Canadian National Railways at Montreal, and also to be conducted through their shops, as well as the Montreal Locomotive
Works, so that improved methods of construction and repair might be offered through GG 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
this Department to the industries of British Columbia. Further scope for an extensive
study covering all phases of transportation and motive power was taken advantage of
while in Montreal, in that I took the opportunity of crossing over to England by aeroplane and spending twenty days on the study of English locomotive shop practice.
This afforded an opportunity to witness locomotives, diesel engines, and electrical equipment being constructed for shipment to all parts of the world. With the co-operation
of British railway officials I was afforded the opportunity to study transportation
methods on railways, street-railways, buses, and and the underground system of London, England. I returned by New York and Chicago, where a further study of transportation systems and motive power was continued. Contacts made during this extensive study may prove most valuable to the Government and this Department in particular.
The discovery of a high-grade coal at Hasler Creek, on the proposed Pacific Great
Eastern Railway extension, resulted in a study being made on the use of this coal on
railways, power plants, and domestic use, as well as in gas-turbines. The Inspection
Bureau of this Department participated in this study and submitted a report covering
the potential uses of this coal and recommended further tests in locomotives and power
plants, and a sample of the coal is being forwarded to Batelle Institute, Columbus,
Ohio, for test in a coal-burning gas-turbine. This was arranged while in the East, in
company with Dr. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines; G. Melrose, Deputy Minister of
Lands; and Dr. T. B. Williams, Controller of Coal and Petroleum, which delegation
attended the Dominion Coal Board Conference at Ottawa on December 6th, 1948. At
the conclusion of the conference I was instructed to proceed to Dunkirk, N.Y., and New
York, N.Y., to make further study of coal-burning gas-turbine locomotives at present
being developed by the Bituminous Coal Research, Inc. A separate detailed report was
submitted covering this research.
In order to promote safety on the logging-railways, the regulations were amended
during 1948 so that train-dispatchers were required to be examined and certified as to
their competency. As a result, during the year twelve dispatchers were examined and
certified in the field.
With respect to safety on the industrial railways, the educational programme instituted in 1947 was carried forward by the Inspectors during 1948. While there were
no fatal accidents on industrial railways during 1947, I regret to report one fatal
accident during 1948 on a logging-railway, where a certified trainman, who had been
properly instructed by our Inspectors as to safe working methods, in some unaccountable manner fell from the front of a locomotive and was run over by the train.
Following is a report of the inspection-work performed during the year 1948:—
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers.—.     169
Internal and external inspections of boilers       20
Internal-combustion locomotives inspected and certified      25
Power rail-cars inspected      47
Power rail-car certificates issued       45
Number of car inspections on industrial railways 1,650
Miles of track inspected 1,055
Locomotives inspected other than hydrostatic tests     110
Locomotive engineers examined and certified       10
Conductors examined        20
Certificates issued to conductors       19
Power-car operators examined and certified       13
Locomotive-crane engineers examined and certified       19
Dispatchers examined and certified       12 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1948. GG 11
Internal-combustion  locomotive  engineers  examined  and  certified   1
B.C. Electric Railway street and interurban cars inspected  118
B.C. Electric Railway locomotives inspected and certified  7
Accidents investigated on industrial railways  3
Fatal accidents on industrial railways  1
Fatal accidents on locomotive crane in industrial plant  1
Accidents investigated on B.C. Electric Railway  19
Fatal accidents on B.C. Electric Railway  11
Boiler designs approved by the Department  1
Air-reservoir designs approved by the Department  4
Passenger power rail-car designs approved by the Department.. 2
New passenger power rail-cars built under supervision of the
Department   12
New diesel-electric locomotives imported  1
Second-hand locomotives imported from United States  3
Second-hand locomotive cranes imported from United States.... 2
Number of second-hand locomotives inspected in United States
and approval for operation in British Columbia refused  12
Number of cars inspected in United States for approval to
operate in British Columbia  80
Inspections  made  of  fire-protective  appliances   on   industrial
locomotives   37
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on locomotives of
C.P.R., C.N.R., E. & N. Railway, and National Harbours
Board for Board of Transport Commissioners  468
R. E. Swanson,
Chief Inspector.
LIST OF APPENDICES.
A list of Executive Council certificates issued is given in Appendix A.
Accidents on railways under Provincial jurisdiction are shown in Appendix B.
Industrial railways operating during the year are shown in Appendix C.
A list of locomotive cranes in industrial plants inspected by the Department is
shown in Appendix D.
A summary of the mileage of all railways operating in the Province is shown in
Appendix E. GG 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDICES.
APPENDIX A.
Certificates issued under the Provisions of the " Railway Act."
Certificate No.
Approving a resolution of the British Columbia Electric Railway Co.,
Ltd., authorizing the general freight and passenger agent of the
company to prepare and issue tariffs  732
Approving amendments to the rules and regulations made pursuant to
the " Railway Act," Part II—General Operating Rules  733
Granting leave to construct a highway crossing over the right-of-way
of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway in D.L. 771, N.W.D  734
Giving consent to the issue by the British Columbia Electric Railway
Co., Ltd., of 3 %-per-cent. general mortgage bonds, 1947 series, and
also to the sale of same .  735
Giving consent to the issue by the British Columbia Electric Railway
Co., Ltd., of 394-per-cent. general mortgage bonds, 1948 series, and
also to the sale of same  736
Granting leave to the Municipal  Council of the  Corporation of the
District of Surrey to construct a grade highway crossing over the
tracks of the Vancouver Power Co., Ltd  737
Granting the British Columbia Electric Railway Co., Ltd., leave to construct grade highway crossings at Telford Avenue and Dow Road,
in the Municipality of Burnaby .".  738
Approving the general location of a projected line of mining railway of
the Torbrit Silver Mines, Ltd  739
Approving the standard freight tariffs on the lines of the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway Co., and rates from Vancouver to points on the
above railway     740
Granting the Minister of Public Works leave to construct a highway
crossing under the tracks of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Co. at Mile 171.56, Lillooet Division  741
Approving an agreement entered into by the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway Co. and the British Columbia Electric Railway Co., Ltd.,
in respect of the carriage of certain traffic  742
Granting leave to the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. to construct
a highway along the right-of-way of said company on Lot 471,
Group 1, Lillooet District   743
APPENDIX B.
Accident Report, 1948.
British Columbia Electric Railway Co., Ltd.— injured.      Killed.
Passengers      92 1
Employees      18
Other persons      42 12
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.—
Passengers        1
Employees      60
Other persons   	
Industrial railways—
Employees     1
Other persons  	
Locomotive cranes—Employees     1
Totals   213 15 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1948.
GG 13
APPENDIX B—Continued.
Accident Report, 1948—Continued.
Persons Injured.
Result.
B.C. Electric Railway Co.
1 motor-cyclist	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 car-passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 car-passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger (child)	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger....;	
1 pedestrian	
1  passenger	
1  pedestrian.	
1 pedestrian	
1 car-passenger	
1 car-passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
Injury to left shoulder	
Fatal injuries	
Injury to head, sacrum, hip, and both
elbows ,	
Injury to head	
Facial cuts	
Fatal	
Fatal	
Injury to right knee	
Injury to shoulder	
Injury to left shoulder, elbow, right
knee, and lower back	
Left hip broken	
Fractured ribs and injury to left chest	
Injury to muscles of cervical region	
Injury to head, right side of neck	
Injury to ankle and thumb	
Injury to back	
Injury to shoulder, lower back, right
leg, and headaches	
Injury to wrist and thumb	
Injury to lower jaw	
Injury to forehead, shin, etc	
Injury to neck, headaches	
Injury to left cheek	
Injury to hand	
Injury to arm, neck, knee, and finger	
Injury to eye, wrist, and forearm	
Injury to head, shoulder, and right hand.
Injury to lower back	
Injury to foot and ankle	
Injury to lower spine	
Injury to wrist	
Injury to face and fractured rib	
Injury to hip	
Injury to head, sacrum, and lower back...
Injury to shoulder, elbow, and wrist	
Injury to scalp, headaches	
Injury to rib	
Injury to wrist joint and possibility of
some disability	
Fatal	
General bruising	
Broken nose	
Injury to shoulder	
Injury to abdomen and back	
Injury to left temple region, left
thumb, lower left leg, and headaches	
Injury to left shoulder and chest	
Injury to foot	
Injury to arm	
Injury to right shoulder	
Fractured radius	
Injury to right lumbar and right sacroiliac region	
Injury to right chest	
Fatal	
Fatal	
Fatal	
Injury to right lumbar region	
Fractured two ribs	
Motor-cycle and street-car collided.
Struck by street-car.
Fell alighting.
Struck by street-car.
Auto and street-car collided.
Struck by backing street-car.
Stepped from moving train.
Injured in street-car.
Street-car collision.
Fell alighting.
Fell alighting.
Fell in street-car.
Auto and street-car collided.
Struck by street-car.
Fell alighting.
Fell alighting.
Fell boarding street-car.
Fell alighting.
Fire engine and street-car collided.
Fire engine and street-car collided.
Fire engine and street-car collided.
Fire engine and street-car collided.
Fire engine and street-car collided.
Fell in street-car.
Struck by streetcar.
Fell in street-car.
Fell alighting.
Struck by street-car.
Fell in street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Fell alighting.
Fell in street-car.
Fell alighting.
Struck by street-car.
Fell in street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Jumped in front of street-car.
Auto and street-car collided.
Auto and street-car collided.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Fell in street-car.
Fell alighting.
Fell in street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Fell alighting.
Fell boarding street-car.
Fell in street-car.
Fell alighting.
Struck by street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Struck by interurban train.
Fell in street-car.
Fell in street-car. GG 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX ^—Continued.
Accident Report, 1948—Continued.
Persons Injured.
Result.
Cause.
B.C. Electric Railway Co.—Cont.
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
pedestrian	
passenger	
pedestrian	
passenger	
pedestrian	
pedestrian	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
car-passenger	
car-passenger	
car-passenger	
car-passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
pedestrian	
passenger	
pedestrian	
car-passenger	
car-passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger ,	
car-passenger	
truck-passenger	
truck-passenger	
truck-passenger	
truck-passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
pedestrian	
passenger	
passenger	
pedestrian	
car-passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
passenger	
truck-driver	
passenger	
passenger	
Injury to wrist	
Injury to sacrum and coccyx	
Injury to right forearm and shoulder	
Injury to hip, back, and sacrum	
Injury to sacrum and lumbar muscles	
Injury to hand	
Injury to head	
Injury to knees and chest	
Injury to head	
Injury to ankle	
Injury to foot	
General bruising	
Injury to knee, shoulder, and neck	
Injury to chest	
Injury to knee	
Injury to ribs and knee	
Injury to leg, knees, chest, and shoulder-
Injury to chest	
Injury to leg and hip	
Injury to hand and arm ,	
Concussion	
Injury to neck and shoulder	
Concussion   and   injury   to   neck   and
shoulder	
Broken hip	
Injury to back	
General bruising	
Injury to ankle	
Fatal	
Injury to head ,
Injury to head	
Injury to leg	
Injury to hip and leg	
Injury   to   lower   back,   coccyx,   arm,
and lower leg	
Injury to ribs	
Injury to leg and back	
Injury to scalp, arm, thumbs, and legs....
Injury to cheek	
Injury to head, legs, and sacrum	
Injury to head and upper back	
Injury to forehead, shoulder, etc	
Fractured bone in foot	
Minor injuries	
Minor injuries	
Injured back	
Fractured ribs	
Fractured nose.....	
Fractured ribs	
Injured ankle	
Fatal	
Injury to face and knees	
Fractured ribs	
Fractured rib, injured arm and head	
Injured shoulder, bruised leg	
Fractured leg	
Minor cuts	
Minor facial cuts	
Fatal	
Injured shoulder and chest	
Injured elbow	
Fell in street-car.
Fell in street-car.
Fell in street-car.
Fell in street-car.
Fell alighting.
Fell alighting.
Struck by street-car.
Fell boarding street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Fell alighting.
Struck by street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Fell alighting.
Fell in street-car.
Street-car collision.
Auto and street-car collided.
Auto and street-car collided.
Auto and street-car collided.
Auto and street-car collided.
Fell alighting.
Fell in street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Fell alighting.
Struck by street-car.
Auto and street-car collided.
Auto and street-car collided.
Fell alighting.
Fell alighting.
Fell in street-car.
Auto and street-car collided.
Street-car and truck collided.
Street-car and truck collided.
Street-car and truck collided.
Street-car and truck collided.
Street-car and truck collided.
Street-car collision.
Fell alighting.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Fell in street-car.
Struck by train.
Fell in street-car.
Fell alighting.
Struck by car.
Street-car and taxi collided.
Fell in street-car.
Fell in street-car.
Fell boarding street-car.
Fell alighting.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Truck and train collided.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1948.
GG 15
APPENDIX B—Continued.
Accident Report, 1948—Continued.
Persons Injured.
Result.
Cause.
B.C. Electric Railway Co.—Cont.
1 passenger (child).
1  passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1  passenger	
1  passenger ,
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1  passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 pedestrian ,
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1   passenger	
1  passenger	
1 passenger	
1 car-passenger	
1 car-passenger	
1 car-passenger	
1  car-passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 car-passenger	
1 car-passenger	
1 car-passenger	
1 car-driver	
1 truck-driver	
1 street-car operator..
1   passenger..
1 passenger..
Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
1 sectionman	
1 sectionman	
1 machine apprentice..
1 sectionman „
1 electrician	
1 machine apprentice..
1 bridgeman—	
1 labourer	
1 carman	
1 sectionman..
1 trainman	
1 trainman	
1 trainman	
1 trainman	
1 trainman	
1 trainman	
1 trainman	
1 labourer	
1 sectionman..
Injured pelvic region	
Injured shoulder	
Injured back	
Fractured ribs, injured back	
Bruised nose	
Bruised chest	
Bruised and shaken	
Bruised chest	
Injured hand and knee	
Injured shoulder, hip, and knee	
Fatal injuries	
Injured legs and back	
Injured head, back, and ankle	
Fatal	
Fractured rib	
Bruised and shaken	
Bruised and shaken	
Bruised and shaken	
Bruised and shaken	
General bruising	
Fractured foot	
Fractured rib	
Possible fractured leg	
Face lacerations	
Face lacerations	
Possible fractured jaw	
Fatal	
Slightly injured	
Slightly injured	
Slightly injured	
Injured foot....	
Injury   to   back,   fractured   jaw,
abrasions to face	
Leg   injuries   and   superficial   injuries
to head and face	
Head injuries and shock	
Injuries to right posterior chest	
and
Crushed finger	
Injured shoulder..
Crushed finger	
Injured hip	
General bruising..
General bruising..
Injured shoulder...
Crushed finger..
Cracked rib	
Bruised knee	
Twisted back	
Injured foot	
Injured elbow....
Scalded foot	
Crushed finger..
Bruised back....
Strained back..
Cut foot	
Bruised leg, arm, and back..
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Fell boarding street-car.
Fell in street-car.
Fell boarding street-car.
Injured in street-car.
Fell boarding street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Fell boarding street-car.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Fell in street-car.
Fell alighting.
Fell in street-car.
Auto and street-car collided.
Auto and street-car collided.
Auto and street-car collided.
Auto and street-car collided.
Struck by street-car.
Auto and tram collided.
Auto and tram collided.
Auto and tram collided.
Auto and tram collided.
Truck and street-car collided.
Truck and street-car collided.
Truck and street-car collided.
Fell against crossbar rail.
Fell while carrying tie.
Slipped while unloading icy ties.
Large wrench slipped from hand.
Tie slipped while unloading.
Fell from light-pole.
Fell while handling tools.
Lifting    heavy    bridge    timbers     (recurrence of old injury).
Loading ties ; dropped tie on finger.
Fell off coach roof.
Tie slipped while unloading.
Foot slipped while loading express.
Stepped off car and stepped on nail.
Slipped while climbing on box car.
Steam-hose on engine broke.
Finger caught between two drums when
unloading.
Slipped while climbing on box car.
Lifting heavy gas-drum.
Struck foot with pick.
Unloading ties ; fell from car. GG 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX B—Continued.
Accident Report, 1948—Continued.
Persons Injured.
Result.
Cause.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway-
Continued.
1 boilermaker	
1 carman	
1 coach-cleaner	
1  sectionman	
1  sectionman	
1 shop labourer	
1 sectionman	
1 sectionman	
1  machinist	
1 trucker	
1  bridgeman	
1 sectionman	
1 boilermaker	
1 engine workman	
1 sectionman	
1 apprentice	
1 lineman's helper	
1 sectionman	
1 machinist	
1  sectionman	
1 sectionman	
1  shed foreman	
1 machinist's helper ,
1 sectionman	
1 carman	
1 labourer	
1  patrolman	
1 levelman	
1 brakeman	
1  locomotive engineer	
1 trainman	
1 conductor	
1 trainman	
1 passenger	
Comox Logging and Railway
Co.
1 employee	
Strained arm	
Cracked rib	
Bruised knee	
Crushed toe	
Fractured toe	
Sand in eye	
Sprained back	
Sprained hand	
Foreign body in eye	
Injured finger	
Cut toe	
Bruised hand	
Sprained ankle	
Cut and bruised thumb
Cut instep	
Pinched finger	
Bruised foot	
Broken bone, foot	
Bruised ankle	
Cut hand	
Bruised finger	
Bruised	
Pinched finger	
Bruised ribs	
Injured leg	
Pain in right side	
Injured collar-bone	
General bruising	
Sprained ankle	
Head concussion	
General bruising	
Sprained knee	
Injured back	
Shock ,
Fatal	
Thrown off balance working on engine.
Foot slipped when putting king-pin on car
Tripped over piece of iron.
Piece of freight fell on foot.
Unloading lumber ; dropped plank.
Sand blown from tank under pressure.
Loading rails on top of car.
Tripped and fell down embankment.
Turning coach-wheel with lathe.
Hand caught between side of car and
angle iron.
Struck foot with axe.
Gate slammed on hand.
Slipped when moving machine.
Hand struck by workman's shovel.
Slipped when loading ties.
Removing heavy plate from snow-plough.
Fell when carrying large screen.
Track-jack fell on foot.
Hose fell on foot.
Cut hand with axe.
Caught between rails.
Fell between cars.
Caught hand between main rod and part
of locomotive.
Track-jack slipped.
Twisted rail flew back when cut.
Foot slipped.
Thrown from speeder.
Jumped from speeder.
Slipped on step boarding train.
Head struck scaffold.
Knocked   off   ladder by speeder.
Slipped on snow.
Slipped on snow.
Fell in sleeping-car.
Fell from front of moving locomotive. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1948.
GG 17
APPENDIX C.
List of Railways and Summary of Mileage.
Industrial Railways.
Name.
Operating.
Mileage.
75.0
0.9
3. B.C. Cement Co., Ltd.                                              	
2.2
4. B.C. Forest Products  Ltd.                                                            	
35.0
5. B.C. Forest Products, Ltd.                                       	
24.0
6. B.C. Forest Products Ltd.                                                                ...
32.0
7. B. & D. Logging Co.                                           	
1.0
8. Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd.                                 	
7.5
9. Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd.
1.0
10. Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd.                    	
63.0
11. Bloedel, Stewart & Welch Ltd.                                          	
55.5
4.9
61.1
10.0
13.8
24.3
25.3
18. Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd	
Trail	
20.0
25.9
7.5
2.0
6.0
1.0
50.0
18.0
Paldi	
5.0
27. Morrissey, Fernie and Michel Railway	
7.6
5.1
New Westminster	
5.2
30. Powell River Co., Ltd -	
31. Salmon River Logging Co., Ltd	
17.5
36.0
Chemainus	
57.1
8.5
40.3
22.5
771.7
Common Carriers.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway-
Main line	
Sidings	
Slpurs, wyes, etc..
North Shore line.
349.8
20.3
16.7
3.4
390.2
Tramways.
British Columbia Electric Railway Co.
Ltd.
97.1
109.2
61.3
4.0
271.6 GG 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX C—Continued.
List of Railways and Summary of Mileage—Continued.
Summary of Railway Mileage. Mileage.
Industrial railways   771.7
Common carriers   560.7
Tramways (city)   101.1
Total, all lines .  1,433.5
APPENDIX D.
List of Cranes and Portable Equipment inspected by Railway Department.
Alberni Pacific Lumber Co., Ltd Crane No. 40929 B.C.
Alberta Lumber Co., Ltd Crane No. 42998 B.C.
Anderson Bros. Lumber Co., Ltd Crane No. 11905 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 302.
Arrowhead Wood Preservers, Ltd Crane No. D.R. 293.
Crane No. D.R. 322.
Crane No. 22633 B.C.
Associated Foundry, Ltd Crane No. 21532 B.C.
Baxter, J. H, & Co., Ltd Crane No. D.R. 336.
B.C. Cement Co., Ltd Crane No. 21439 B.C.
B.C. Forest Products, Ltd Crane No. 20742 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 320.
Crane No. D.R. 331.
Crane No. D.R. 319.
Unloader No. 44213.
B.C. Pulp & Paper Co.. Ltd Crane No. D.R. 304.
Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd Crane No. 44666 B.C.
Crane No. 3843.
Crane No. D.R. 340.
Gas   Internal-combustion   Locomotive
No. 50.
Britannia Mining & Smelting Co., Ltd Internal-combustion Locomotive No. 5.
Internal-combustion Locomotive No. 8.
Burrard Dry Dock Co., Ltd Crane No. 50514 B.C.
Crane No. 12370 B.C.
Crane No. 41298 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 292.
Gas Locomotive Crane No. 4.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd Steam-shovel D.R. 301.
Canadian Forest Products, Ltd Crane No. 42722 B.C.
Crane No. 43635 B.C.
Crane No. 43973 B.C.
Internal-combustion Locomotive Crane
No. 97.
Diesel Locomotive Crane No. 2338.
Diesel Switcher No. 96.
Capital Iron & Metals, Ltd Crane No. D.R. 295.
Crane No. D.R. 299.
Crane No. 44386 B.C.
Coast Quarries, Ltd Crane No. D.R. 342. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1948. GG 19
APPENDIX D—Continued.
List of Cranes and Portable Equipment inspected by Railway Department—Continued.
Commox Logging & Railway Co   Unloader D.R.P. No. 2.
Crane No. 41922 B.C.
Internal-combustion   Locomotive   Unloader No. 3.
Gas   Internal-combustion   Locomotive
No. 20.
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd Crane No. 12772 B.C.
Deeks Sand & Gravel Co., Ltd Gas   Internal-combustion   Locomotive
No. 1.
Dominion Bridge Co., Ltd Crane No. 44129 B.C.
Crane No. 44317 B.C.
Dominion Tar & Chemical Co., Ltd .   Crane No. 44441 B.C.
Gas Switcher No. 1.
Elk River Timber Co., Ltd..  Crane No. 21085 B.C.
Gas Switcher No. 7.
Esquimalt Dry Dock Crane No. 22582 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 314.
Evans, Coleman & Evans, Ltd Crane No. D.R. 316.
Hamilton Bridge Co Crane No. 12669 B.C.
Hillcrest Lumber Co., Ltd....  . Crane No. 40049 B.C.
Crane No. 44315 B.C.
Industrial Peat Co Crane No. 1085A.
King, M. B., Lumber Co., Ltd Crane No. 12430 B.C.
Lions Gate Lumber Co., Ltd Gas Locomotive Crane.
Lumby Timber Co., Ltd   Crane No. 21089 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 343.
Mayo Lumber Co. (1943), Ltd Crane No. D.R. 321.
Morrissey, Fernie and Michel Railway Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
Northern Construction Co., Ltd Crane No. 12321 B.C.
Osborn Bay Wharf Co., Ltd . Crane No. 21526 B.C.
Pacific Coast Terminals Co., Ltd  ...Crane No. 44440 B.C.
Auxiliary Boiler No. 03301 B.C.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co Pile-driver No. D.R. 312.
Boiler No. 3, D.R. 49.
Boiler No. D.R. 326.
Power-boiler No. D.R. 341.
Boiler No. 42837 B.C.
Crane No. D.R.P. 8.
Ditcher No. D.R.P. 1.
Steam-shovel.
Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 551.
Point Hope Shipyard Crane No. D.R. 315.
Powell River Co., Ltd. (Kelley Logging Co., Ltd.) Crane No. 44893 B.C.
Diesel   Internal-combustion  Locomotive.
Prince Rupert Drydock & Shipyard Crane No. D.R. 290.
Robertson & Hackett Sawmill Crane No. 44584 B.C.
Crane No. 12545 B.C.
Salmon River Logging Co., Ltd Gas   Internal-combustion   Locomotive
No. 8.
Sooke Lake Lumber Co., Ltd Crane No. 22632 B.C.
Timber Preservers, Ltd Crane No. 43807 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 288.
Timberland Lumber Co., Ltd...    Crane No. 12368 B.C. GG 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX D—Continued.
List of Cranes and Portable Equipment inspected by Railway Department—Continued.
Vancouver Creosoting Co., Ltd Crane No. D.R. 283.
Gas   Internal-combustion   Locomotive
Crane No. 6.
Victoria Lumber Co., Ltd Crane No. D.R. 300.
Victoria Machinery Depot, Ltd Crane No. D.R. 291.
Crane No. D.R. 305.
Western Bridge & Steel Fabricators, Ltd Crane No. D.R. 308.
Crane No. D.R. 309.
Western Forest Industries, Ltd Diesel Locomotive Crane  No.  C.C.C.
142.
Crane No. 41276 B.C.
Yarrows, Ltd  ....Crane No. D.R. 289.
Crane No. 376.
APPENDIX E.
Mileage of all Railways operating in the Province.
Mainland.
Island.
Total.
Main
Line.
Sidings.
Main
Line.
Sidings.
Main
Line.
Sidings.
Under the jurisdiction of the Board of Transport Commissioners for Canada—
1,857.4
1,369.0
140.8
43.4
349.8
179.3
4.0
50.7
502.4
328.6
28.6
17.6
37.0
27.2
210.8
102.0
43.2
24.9
2,068.2
1,461.0
140.8
43.4
349.8
179.3
4.0
621.1
545 6
353 5
V.V. & E. Railway (Great Northern)	
28.6
17.6
Under the jurisdiction of the Provincial  Government—
37.0
27 2
34.5
570.4
116.1
Totals	
3,984.4
975.9
883.2
184.2
4,867.6
1,160.1
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to tlie King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1949.
310-249-7544

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