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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Department of Trade and Industry REPORT For the Year ended December 31st… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1949

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Trade
and Industry
REPORT
For the Year ended December 31st
1948
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Kind's Most Excellent Majesty.
1940.  To His Honour C. A. Banks, C.M.G.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended December 31st, 1948.
LESLIE HARVEY EYRES,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Office of the Minister,
Department of Trade and Industry,
Victoria, British Columbia. Honourable Leslie Harvey Eyres,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended December 31st, 1948.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
EDWIN G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
For the Year ended December 31st, 1948.
The year 1948 was marked by very satisfactory gains in industrial development
and by increased business activity in practically all branches of trade. A total of 1,242
new companies were incorporated, with a total capitalization of $67,913,212. Industrial pay-rolls for 1948 are estimated to total $625,000,000, reflecting increased production values. The gross value of manufacturing production is estimated at $832,000,000
for 1948.
The construction industry particularly has been active, and many projects are
now at the survey stage, in addition to warehouses, mills, and plants on which construction has started. Contracts granted for new structures are estimated to total
$71,000,000 in 1948, setting a new record.
An important contributor to this impressive total is the pulp and paper industry.
The growth of this industry indicates a definite trend in the utilization of our natural
resources, and it is worthy of note that in addition to mills now in operation, three new
pulp and paper mills are assured, with a combined capital investment in plant and
equipment of around $65,000,000.
Hydro-power is an important factor in these new developments. Unlike other sections of Canada, handicapped by a shortage of electrical energy, British Columbia has
power in abundance for existing industry and ample reserve for new industries. The
total potential hydro-power capacity of this Province is estimated at 13,000,000 horsepower. Recent developments at Bridge River by the British Columbia Electric Company, Limited, and at Campbell River and Whatshan Lake by the British Columbia
Power Commission will provide ample power for requirements of the immediate future.
This power potential is attracting attention. Recent surveys indicate there is
a strong possibility that an aluminium plant will be established in British Columbia.
Another large Canadian company is considering the prospects for a chemicals plant.
A number of new manufacturing industries were started during the year, and
several new British Columbia products are on the market for the first time. These
new enterprises are outlined in more detail in the body of this Report. British Columbia continued to forge ahead in manufacturing, due not only to an abundance of many
raw materials and ideal living conditions, but to its strategic position for export trade.
Much interest is being shown in the prospects for steel-manufacture. It is apparent that all the essentials for successful production are at hand in quantities to justify
at least a small operation.
During the year the Department has carried out an extensive programme of
industrial and tourist promotion advertising in media enjoying world-wide circulation.
As a result, many inquiries have been received, indicating interest in business, industry,
travel, and settlement.
In the primary industries—forestry, agriculture, mining, and fishing—substantial
gains in production have occurred. Higher prices have contributed in some measure
to the increase in dollar values, but actual production has increased, particularly in
forestry and mining.
The body of this Report outlines the activities of the various divisions of the
Department of Trade and Industry—namely, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics,
the Office of Trade Commissioner, the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau,
and the Regional Development Division.
5 DD 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Increased activity is noted in all these branches, statistical services have been
augmented by the publication of a monthly business activity report, industrial and
trade surveys were in demand by interests outside the Province, and important legislation concerning tourist accommodation was implemented.
An index of pertinent information from an industrial, social, and trade point of
view was compiled on the more important rural communities throughout British
Columbia; this index is now ready for distribution and will be of great assistance to
those desiring economic information on the centres concerned.
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Prepared by British Columbia Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT.
Interdepartmental Industrial Advisory Committee.
This Committee meets at the call of the Chair to consider industrial problems
which affect various departments of the Government service.    The Committee has been
extremely helpful in furthering industrial development throughout the Province.
The following is the personnel of this Committee:-—
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry (Chairman).
J. V. Fisher, Deputy Minister of Finance (Vice-Chairman). DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 7
H. Anderson, Chief Engineer, Public Works Department.
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
J.  T.  Gawthrop,  Director,  Regional  Development  Division,  Department of
Trade and Industry.
C. Hopper, Superintendent of Lands.
R. Bowering, Public Health Engineer, Branch of Public Health.
James Thomson, Deputy Minister of Labour.
J. E. Lane, Deputy Comptroller of Water Rights, Water Rights Branch.
Dr. C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests.
G. Melrose, Deputy Minister of Lands.
Dr. J. B. Munro, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
W. H. Robertson, Provincial Horticulturist, Department of Agriculture.
E. MacGinnis, Marketing Commissioner, Department of Agriculture.
R. S. O'Meara, Trade Commissioner, Department of Trade and Industry.
T. L. Sturgess, Administrative Assistant, Department of Trade and Industry.
W. A. Carrothers, Chairman, Public Utilities Commission.
G. T. Hatcher, Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of Trade and
Industry.
H. Sargent, Chief Mining Engineer, Department of Mines.
G. Alexander, Deputy Minister of Fisheries.
A. G. Graham, Director, Regional Planning Division.
Col. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister of Education.
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL.
Under the chairmanship of the Minister of Trade and Industry the Research
Council held monthly meetings at which were considered many scientific problems of
vital interest to industrial advancement within the Province.
Dr. S. E. Maddigan, honour graduate in physics of the University of British
Columbia, is Director of the Research Council.
Industrial advancement is contingent upon scientific research, and it is the hope
of the Government and the Council that industry will take full advantage of the services
which the Council can render and which are available to all branches of industry
within the Province.
The Council was organized in order to perform the following functions:—
(1) To co-ordinate the work of existing and prospective research units within
the Province of British Columbia.
(2) To initiate and undertake research-work in any field of particular interest
to the Province; to apply the results of research toward the development
of new products, the improvement of industrial processes, and the establishment of new industries based on the resources of the Province.
(3) To assist in the development of the technical status of the industries in
the Province of British Columbia through a fuller utilization of scientific
methods and technical personnel.
(4) To provide fellowships, scholarships, bursaries, and rewards and pecuniary and other aids in order to facilitate and encourage original scientific
and industrial research.
(5) To provide for the publication of the results of the research-work and to
enter into such arrangements as may be necessary with regard to patents
arising out of the work done by or for the Council.
The present board of management consists of the following personnel:—
Chairman—Hon. L. H. Eyres, Minister of Railways, Trade and Industry, and
Fisheries of the Province of British Columbia. DD 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Provincial Government—
G. Melrose, Deputy Minister of Lands.
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests.
Dominion Government—
Dr. W. E. Cockfield, Bureau of Geology and Topography.
Dr. Neal Carter, Fisheries Experimental Station, Vancouver, B.C.
National Research Council—Dr. G. M. Shrum, University of British Columbia.
University of British Columbia—
Dr. R. H. Clark, professor and head of Department of Chemistry.
Dr. B. Eagles, head of Department of Dairying.
Prof. F. A. Forward, Department of Metallurgy.
Industry—
G. A. Barrat, British Columbia Fruit Board.
S. H. Hammitt, manager, Morrison Steel & Wire Company, Limited, Vancouver, B.C.
Prentice Bloedel, president, Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Limited, Vancouver, B.C.
Labour—Birt Showier, president, Vancouver, New Westminster, and District
Trades and Labour Council.
BRITISH COLUMBIA BUYERS' DELEGATION TO UNITED KINGDOM,
APRIL 27th TO JUNE 2ND, 1948.
The delegates, comprising twenty-five prominent British Columbia business-men,
were most enthusiastic regarding the success of the trip, and actual purchases exceeded
all expectations; a check-up has revealed that orders placed in the United Kingdom by
members of the delegation totalled the sum of $8,310,000.
The delegation made 763 business contacts, and many of these contacts will produce a large volume of business in the future.
The Minister of Trade and Industry and his deputy were successful in making
many valuable contacts with various textile plants, metal-trade industries, leather-
tanning plants, carpet-manufacturers, pulp and paper plants, and steel-manufacturers,
with a view to establishing branch plants in British Columbia.
Several of these contacts have already been responsible for personal surveys—these
include the Birmingham Small Arms, Bradford Woollen and Worsted Mills, Bradford
Garment Factory, and Leeds Leather Tannery—and from results of these surveys it is
expected that several new industries will be established in the Province in the near
future.
The Government representatives were also able to contact a number of British
industrialists regarding possibilities of manufacturing British products under
" licence " in British Columbia and are pleased to report progress in this connection.
Through contacts made in the United Kingdom, a twelve-man delegation representing United Kingdom engineering groups arrived in British Columbia on September
26th, 1948. Their objective in securing information regarding the development of the
engineering trade with Canada in general and the Province of British Columbia in
particular was highly successful.
In October, 1948, a seven-man delegation representing the United Kingdom wool
industry arrived in British Columbia to study the changing features of the Canadian
wool markets. This survey was made following representations made by the Government delegates.
On returning from the United Kingdom, the delegates attended the splendid
International Trade Fair in Toronto, and the Government representatives were able DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 9
to meet and further negotiations with several firms who were interested in opening
manufacturing plants in British Columbia.
Among the many expressions of good-will extended to the delegates was the following statement made by R. F. Hanks, managing director of the Morris Motors, Limited,
of Cowley:—
" It is heartening and encouraging to know that your Government saw fit to send
a Buyers Mission to this country. We feel that we have a strong bond of affection
for you as representatives of British Columbia. It is everybody's sincere wish that
your visit will lead not only to increased business between Britain and British Columbia, but will also result in giving a much needed impetus to reciprocal trade between
Britain and the whole of Canada, in this way you are making a notable contribution
towards Britain's economic recovery and at the same time enhancing your own
prosperity."
Every delegate expressed himself with a feeling that, based on the splendid
co-operation received from British Government officials, civic bodies, Chambers of Commerce, and industrial leaders throughout the United Kingdom, the British Columbia
buyers' mission had been a huge success in actual results and a real effort to increase
trade between the United Kingdom and British Columbia.
All members of the buyers' delegation were most appreciative of the excellent
co-operation extended to them by W. A. McAdam, C.M.G., Agent-General for British
Columbia in London, and his splendid staff.
INDUSTRIAL ADVERTISING.
As in 1947 the Department continued to advertise the opportunities for new
industrial enterprise in the Province. This advertising stressed the natural resources
of the Province and their relation to secondary production.
The advertisements were placed by our advertising counsellors in selected publications in Britain, Canada, and United States.
This advertising was supported by an industrial brochure illustrating the possibilities for new industries in British Columbia. The results of this campaign have
been most gratifying, and from the thousands of inquiries received, it is evident that
world-wide attention was drawn to the advantages of British Columbia.
NEW INDUSTRIES.
During 1948 a consistent effort has been made by the Department to encourage
and foster new industries in the Province. That this effort has borne fruit is evidenced
by the fact that several new industries have been established through the direct
assistance of the Department.
Continued effort is being made to increase the range of textile products manufactured in this Province. The manufacture of common glassware is a possibility,
in which keen interest is now being shown.
There is definite interest in the possibilities for the expansion of the steel industry
in British Columbia, and the Department is co-operating with interests who are now
exploring the feasibility of producing iron and steel from British Columbia ores.
Adequate supplies of steel would make possible many new items of production and
assure prosperity of existing industries now handicapped by the over-all steel shortage.
Among the many important new industries started in British Columbia in the
period covered by this Report is the plant of Felt and Textiles of Canada, Limited, at
Victoria, manufacturing for the first time in Canada a high-quality all-wool floor-
covering. DD 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Another major industry is the plant of the Vancouver Rolling Mills, Ltd., producing rods and bars from scrap. The billets for this mill's operation are supplied by
the new Vancouver Steel, Limited, Burnaby.
This year saw the start of construction of the $25,000,000 plant at Port Edward,
near Prince Rupert, of the Columbia Cellulose Co., Ltd.; this plant will produce cellulose acetate.
At Duncan Bay, 8 miles north of Campbell River on Vancouver Island, the Canadian Western Timber Co., Ltd., has made definite arrangements for the building of a
pulp-mill at a reported cost of $25,000,000. Still another mill, Nanaimo Sulphate Pulp
Company, Ltd., is now being erected on Northumberland Strait, a few miles south of
Nanaimo, at a cost of $12,000,000. All these are in addition to the pulp and paper mills
now operating and the new mill of Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd., which commenced
production this year. A further development in pulp products is the new cellulose-
sponge plant in Vancouver producing artificial sponges from first-grade white pulp.
Development is not confined to the Coastal areas, as evidenced by new plywood
developments at Quesnel. Dispersal of secondary production from the crowded centres
to outlying areas is steadily proceeding.
An encouraging development is the preliminary survey of the Aluminum Company
of Canada, Ltd., to determine power potential necessary for the establishment of a
$300,000,000 plant for the production of aluminium. Recently two other aluminium
companies have signified interest in the facilities for manufacture here. Canadian
Industries, Limited, with two producing plants in British Columbia, is considering the
value of a third plant to produce chemicals.
Not only Canadian capital is interested in the vast resources of this Province.
European interests have recently entered the lumber industry, and others have signified
more than passing interest in the possibilities here for textile production in all its
branches.
The same is true of United Kingdom industrialists seeking to establish branch
factories in the Province. In this category, a factory producing men's outer wear is
assured, while production of textile, pulp and paper, leather, and metal manufactures
are pending final decisions.
New additions to our range of manufactured articles include hard-board building
material, mechanical pencils, and electrical fixtures.
Interest continues to be shown by Eastern Canadian and United Kingdom industrialists in the possibilities for investment in British Columbia.
The Department has revised a condensed pamphlet containing data on the primary
and secondary industrial production of British Columbia. This pamphlet points out
the advantages of this Province for industrial development.
CO-OPERATIVE CONTACTS.
The Department has consistently co-operated with the Boards of Trade, Chambers
of Commerce, and the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers'
Association, and is grateful for the assistance which these organizations have so
willingly and cheerfully provided.
All branches of the Department have continued their constructive contact with the
Agent-General for British Columbia in London, England.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE REPRESENTATIVE, LONDON.
The Department of Trade and Industry's representative in British Columbia House
has interviewed many United Kingdom business-men on the possibility of establishing
branch plants in British Columbia during the year. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 11
It is to be borne in mind that the difficulty of sterling transfer and the dollar crisis
mitigates against many of the branch-plant inquiries being brought to fruition. However, in some cases exploratory parties have made surveys by visits to the Province.
The Department in Victoria rendered every assistance possible to further these surveys.
There have been many inquiries from the smaller type of business-man, tradesman,
craftsman, engineer, research chemist, etc. Many of these cases have proceeded beyond
the inquiry stage and are either making arrangements to emigrate or have already
arrived in the Province.
Many inquiries have been received of a diverse nature, for information on not only
trade and industry, but on other aspects of life in British Columbia.
To immigrants or visitors, letters of introduction have been supplied, not only to
Department of Trade and Industry officials, but to Boards of Trade, business associations, etc.
It has been found that these introductions are very much appreciated by the
recipients and have had the result of saving them time and assuring them of the best
possible contacts.
Contact with the commercial counsellors at Canada House, Ontario House, and
with other Canadian Government offices in London has been well established.
Relations have been well established with British Government ministeries, and
the assistance given by the Export Trade Promotion Department of the Board of
Trade is most appreciated.
The co-operation of the London Chamber of Commerce, the Federation of British
Industries, the Birmingham Chamber of Commerce, Canadian Trade Commissioners in
Liverpool, Glasgow, and Belfast has been a great help in furthering the interests of
our Province.
Many exhibitions or fairs held in London or in other centres, such as Birmingham,
Manchester, Lincoln, were attended by the Industrial and Trade Representative.
One of the most pleasant duties falling to the lot of the office has been the assistance rendered to British Columbia business-men. Visits to trade fairs, introductions
to Canada House and United Kingdom Government departments, itineraries suggested,
and in some cases hotel accommodation and transportation space have been secured.
The office is now well organized to cater to the requirements of any British Columbia buyers, salesmen, etc., who might visit Great Britain or the adjacent Continent.
Since many people in this country wish to emigrate, it will be realized that it is
comparatively easy to convince them that they should settle in British Columbia.
However, the system adopted, not only by the Industrial and Trade Representative, but
by others concerned at British Columbia House, is to tell such applicants that they must
make up their own minds, and when they do, assistance in the way of advice and letters
of introduction will be given to help them become established in their new environment.
It has been established that the majority of business and trade inquiries stem from
an individual's desire to emigrate to British Columbia. For this reason the line of
demarcation between an emigration inquiry and an industrial or trade inquiry is sometimes hard to define.
This office assisted the Agent-General in arranging the itinerary, accommodation,
and transportation for the British Columbia buyers' delegation in the United Kingdom.
Many interviews were arranged at British Columbia House during the delegation's
stay in London. The Department's representative accompanied the delegation throughout their tour of industrial centres and assisted in every way possible to further their
interests.
To sum up, it is the pleasure of the Industrial and Trade Representative to report
that this office is now firmly established and is known as an integral part of official
Canadian life in the United Kingdom. DD 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The volume of inquiries and the sometimes overwhelming amount of work entailed
have fully justified the need for this office.
STATEMENT OF LOANS OUTSTANDING, DECEMBER 31ST, 1948,
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
Loans. Interest.
B.C. Livestock Producers Co-operative Association $6,000.00        $137.84
Charles Cormack         178.47 13.34 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 13
OFFICE OF TRADE COMMISSIONER.
HISTORY OF OFFICE.
This Report covers the third full year of operation of the Office, which was created
by amendment to the " Department of Trade and Industry Act," effective April 1st,
1945.
The new unit replaced the Bureau of Industrial and Trade Extension, and is
charged with the administrative functions formerly allotted to that Bureau. It carried
into a peace-time pattern the Ottawa liaison responsibilities of the war years for
effective use of local administrative machinery to serve the industries of the Province.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT.
For the outlying areas the industrial development functions of the Office have now
been co-ordinated to the work of the Regional Development Division of the Department
for surveys and directives to the field representatives in the Interior and northern
areas. Increasingly effective use has been made of this liaison for contacts with
industry, market problems, import surveys, itineraries, and related public relations
endeavours, referred to elsewhere in this report.
PATTERN OF CONTACTS.
The Office continued its direct contact with industrial organizations and production
units in the Province. It has been a clearing-house for industrial application of
research results.
It co-ordinates the work of the Federal Foreign Trade Service and Federal Trade
Commissioners abroad, so that special emphasis can be placed on selected problems
affecting British Columbia. To this end it undertakes to collect and present factual
data after intimate surveys of the local situation. In this phase of the work, close and
effective liaison is maintained with the Vancouver representative of the Foreign Trade
Service.    His office was established April 1st, 1947.
DOMINION DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE.
Liaison has been maintained, direct and through the clearing-house of the Vancouver office, Foreign Trade Service, to accomplish these main objectives:—
(1) Local planning in production and industrial surveys.
(2) Surveys of plant capacities.
(3) Surveys of overseas markets, in direct co-operation with the firms or
industries concerned and the Federal Trade Commissioner service.
(4) Co-ordinated effort with commodity divisions at Ottawa to indicate
sources of supply in British Columbia.
(5) Co-ordinated planning in two-way trade, in co-operation with Import
Division, Foreign Trade Service; United Kingdom Trade Commissioner
service; consulates; banks; transportation companies; and importers in
the Province.
(6) Intimate assistance for procurement and routing problems of the foreign
purchasing missions, direct and through the Canadian Commercial Corporation.
(7) Surveys and interpretative assistance to the import control units at
Ottawa. Their relation to the Department of Trade and Commerce is
referred to elsewhere in this Report. DD 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Other Ottawa Contacts.
Effective liaison has been maintained with:—
(1) Industrial Development Bank, direct and through its regional organization in the Province.
(2) Export Credits Insurance Corporation.
(3) War Assets Corporation.
(4) Canadian Standards Association.
(5) Residual timber and steel controls.
(6) National   Research   Council   and   Federal   departments   concerned   with
industrial research.
(7) British Food Mission and purchasing agencies of foreign governments,
to which reference is made elsewhere in this Report.
The Trade Commissioner has organized and maintained this liaison by personal
contacts in Eastern Canada, and by assistance to officials and representatives who have
been encouraged to visit the Province.
In visits to Ottawa, March and September, 1948, the Trade Commissioner renewed
contacts and established new points of liaison and planned co-operation with the reorganized Department of Trade and Commerce. In particular, he studied the methods
under which the residual commodity controls and import controls have been passed
to the administrative jurisdiction of Trade and Commerce from Reconstruction and
Supply.
Special developments in the United Kingdom are dealt with elsewhere in the
report.    These have been co-ordinated to over-all planning and policy at Ottawa.
IMPORT RESTRICTIONS.
The last Annual Report noted that the imposition of these controls had placed a
new responsibility on the Trade Commissioner's Office. It was felt from the outset
that local assistance to Ottawa and local interpretation and help to firms in the Province
would be increasingly necessary. That has proved true. The sweeping changes in
production and tariff policy have had a serious impact in the Province. The Office of
Trade Commissioner has:—
(1) Given assistance to Ottawa in public relations phases.
(2) Helped   small  firms  to   secure   urgently  needed   supplies   of   restricted
materials and parts.
(3) Surveyed assembly and new production plans directly related to the new
controls.
UNITED KINGDOM SURVEY.
The office of Industrial and Trade Representative was established at British
Columbia House in London, February, 1947. The work of the office has fully justified
the decision that a liaison would be effective in London to place emphasis on the
problems of the Province in its United Kingdom trading structure.
During 1948 effective use was made of this liaison in the troubled trade conditions
referred to elsewhere in this Report.
The overseas office has been increasingly useful in planning for itineraries of
visitors from British Columbia and in arranging for visits of United Kingdom industrialists and missions.
The Industrial and Trade Representative is attached to the executive staff of the
Agent-General. He reports directly to the Trade Commissioner in many phases of
his work.
The surveys and contacts in London are co-ordinated to the over-all planning at
Canada House.  The work of the Trade Commissioner at Victoria is welded to the over-all '
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 15
planning at Ottawa. Effective plans of co-operation have also been worked out with
the Commercial Relations and Exports Department of the British Board of Trade and
the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner service in Canada.
Further outline of London activities is contained in the general section of this
Report. Following is a summary of those activities directly related to the Office of
Trade Commissioner:—
(1) United Kingdom furtherance of production and other surveys initiated
in British Columbia under wood products, foodstuffs, metals, and other
headings. In particular, this called for active liaison with agricultural
and timber specialists at Canada House.
(2) Licence manufacture where contacts are initiated in the United Kingdom,
entailing surveys in the engineering industry there and placement surveys
in British Columbia.
(3) Licence manufacture in the United Kingdom of British Columbia products.
(4) Furtherance of exports from British Columbia for world markets through
United Kingdom export houses.
(5) Itineraries and survey contacts for visiting representatives from British
Columbia.
(6) Itineraries, introductions, and survey plans for industrial visitors from
the United Kingdom.
(7) Inquiries for export from the United Kingdom.
The directive calls for close association in the related work of transportation companies, Canadian and overseas banks, and trade organizations here and in the United
Kingdom. This effective formula has prevented duplication, has resulted in exchange
of information, and has strengthened the Department's position with the organizations concerned.
EXPORT SURVEYS.
While there was a decline in total export movement through British Columbia
ports in 1948, as compared with the all-time high recorded for the previous year, the
charting of the total does not tell the whole story.
The large-value movement does reflect increased prices of commodities. It does
reflect the larger increased movement of primary agricultural and other products to
the United States. It does not reflect the difficulties faced by the average exporting
firm.
The dollar crisis has overshadowed all export movement, with particular reference
to secondary-industry production. It has closed out traditional overseas markets one
by one to a point of serious impact on the trading economy of the Province.
Balked at almost every turn in its exploration of new overseas outlets, the Trade
Commissioner's Office has, however, served a useful function in the collection of factual
data and in organized effort to meet a series of crises during the year.
It has helped in the interpretation of new restrictions. It has made surveys
under selected headings when the European Recovery Plan presented possibility for
financial formula that would aid our industries. These surveys have included lumber,
ties, shooks, poles, handles, fruits, canned salmon, metals, fertilizers, and industrial
machinery items.
Further attention and survey has also been directed to the Japanese trade structure
and to the uncertain Far Eastern position referred to in last year's Report. Co-ordinated effort with Vancouver interests has resulted in some volume movements to
Venezuela, one of the few Central or South American markets left with dollars to pay
for anything but essential items. DD 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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360
320
280
240
200
160
120
80
40
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CUMULATIVE MONTHLY EXPORTS
..iy      i
194
5, 19
46, 19
47, 19
>48
J947
1946
1948
1945
JAN.   FEB.   MAR.   APR.   MAY   JUNE  JULY   AU6.    SEPT.   OCT    NOV.     DEC.
Source: British Columbia Bureau of Economics and Statistics. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 17
350
EXPORTS
Passing Through British Columbia Customs Ports
1930-1948
300
Dollars
rs>
o
H-
0
II ions
8
5
150
100
50
1930
1932
1934
1936
1930        1940        1942        1944        1946       1948
Source: British Columbia Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
In co-operation with the Canadian Commercial Counsellor in Stockholm, the office
was able to secure resumption of import quotas for battery separators to Sweden.
The loss or curtailment of United Kingdom markets has been one of the most
serious trading developments in the Province during the year. At Ottawa, and from
Victoria, the Trade Commissioner has been intimately concerned in presenting the
factual position to the authorities. He has also assisted local organizations and
selected industries to prepare material under the same heading.
INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH DEVELOPMENTS.
The Office continued its active association with the work of the British Columbia
Research Council, to which reference is made elsewhere in this Report.
The Trade Commissioner has continued as member ex officio of the board of
management of the Council. He is chairman of the Industries Advisory Committee.
The Administrative Assistant, Office of Trade Commissioner, is secretary of the
Industries Advisory Committee.
Industries Advisory Committee.
Secondary industry has again been provided with clearly defined channels to
present its research problems.    The Industries Advisory Committee itself was reor- DD 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ganized and strengthened in personnel as from April 1st, 1947, with addition of
representatives from transportation companies, power companies, banks, and other
organizations interested in industrial development. Heretofore they had not been
directly represented in the application phases of the work of the Council.
The Committee now presents an effective cross-section of industrial advice to
assist in passing on results of industrial research which can be applied to industrial
development. It serves as a public relations advisory unit for the Council. It provides
machinery to refer secondary-industry research problems to the Council, in supplement
to contacts of Council staff themselves.
With representation from the Regional Development Division of the Department,
it helps to give all parts of the Province access to the facilities provided by the Council.
It encourages the closest contact between industry itself and the staff of the Council
by personal plant visits and by personal contacts with production units in the Province.
The five chairmen of the primary-industry advisory committees of the Council
have continued as members of the Trade Commissioner's Committee. The Director
of the Council is ex officio a member of the Committee. In addition, as in previous
years, Committee members have been nominated by the Canadian Manufacturers'
Association, principal Boards of Trade, and the Regional Committee of the Canadian
Chamber of Commerce.
Well-known industrial men have accepted nominations to the Industries Committee.
In addition to the five chairmen of the primary-industries committee and Council staff
or ex officio  members, the  Committee personnel at  December 31st,  1948, was  as
follows:—
Chairman—R. S. O'Meara, Trade Commissioner.
Secretary—T. L. Sturgess, Administrative Assistant, Office of Trade Commissioner.
R. E. Strain (Alliance Ware, Ltd.).
A. E. Bell-Irving (Western Bridge and Steel Fabricators).
J. Buchanan (B.C. Packers, Ltd.).
A. C. Findlay (Nelson Bros. Fisheries, Ltd.).
J. K. Melville (Home Oil Distributors, Ltd.).
J. Malkin (W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd.).
L. V. Clegg (Canadian Industries, Ltd., New Westminster).
A. W. Mclntyre (B.C. Paint, Ltd., Victoria).
A. Saunders  (Sidney Roofing, Ltd., Victoria).
G. F. Harkness (Industrial Agent, Canadian National Railways).
J. E. Underhill (Director of Industrial Development, B.C. Electric, Ltd.).
H. A. Francis  (Industrial Agent, Canadian Pacific Railway).
N. C. Tompkins (Industrial Development Bank).
D. F. Manders (National Research Council).
J. T. Gawthrop  (Regional Development Division, Department of Trade and
Industry).
John Kerr (British Ropes, Ltd.).
W. G. Lambert (Mohawk Handle Co.).
N. Terry (Canadian Sumner Iron Works).
F. W. Smelts (Department of Labour).
Everard Clarke (Shuswap Okanagan Dairy Industries Co-operative Association, Vernon).
Prof. Ellis Morrow (Department of Commerce, University of British
Columbia).
E. M. Herb (Westminster Paper Co., New Westminster).
W. M. Sellens (Chairman, Pacific Subsection, Bankers' Association).
Dr. S. E. Maddigan (ex officio). DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 19
FOREIGN TRADE BUREAU, VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE.
The Trade Commissioner is a member of the executive of the Bureau. Co-ordinated effort here has been a feature of the period under review:—
(1) World Trade Week, June, 1948.
(2) Joint efforts in connection with Educational Luncheon Series during the
year—documentation, export practice, import and foreign exchange regulations, Geneva Trade Agreements, marine insurance, ships and shipping.
(3) United efforts in particular with Latin-American Committee for surveys
of South American trade.
(4) Co-operation with the University in regard to fellowships for foreign
students, and arrangement for plant visits, etc., for students from foreign
countries.
(5) Co-ordinated efforts in connection with International Trade Fair for 1948
and 1949.
(6) Co-operation in visits of Federal Trade Commissioners, and introductions,
surveys, etc., for visiting foreign representatives and buyers.
(7) Leadership by Vancouver Board of Trade, which helped the Department
to give outlying areas adequate access to information and regulations.
(8) Co-operation in arrangements for the Canadian Chamber of Commerce
Annual Convention, Vancouver, October 26th, 27th, and 28th.
WORLD TRADE WEEK.
The Trade Commissioner was chairman of the Provincial Committee for World
Trade Week, May 30th to June 5th, 1948. There was active co-operation from industrial organizations in the Province, with local committees in charge of arrangements
in the urban centres. The Regional Development Division assisted in covering the
Interior and northern areas for the Province.
With the slogan " More trade, more jobs," World Trade Week was an effort to
bring to the attention of every Canadian the necessity of maintaining and increasing
our trade with other countries. The Provincial observance was welded to the work
of the National Committee in Toronto. Sponsoring organizations included the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Canadian Exporters'
Association, Canadian Section of the International Chamber of Commerce, and the
Canadian Importers' and Traders' Association.
The Foreign Trade Service at Ottawa co-operated through its Trade Publicity
Division. Provincial Department of Trade and Industry assistance included advertising in the daily and weekly papers of the Province.
The British Columbia Committee for World Trade Week is as follows: Chairman,
R. S. O'Meara (Trade Commissioner) ; M. W. Berridge; W. J. Barrie; H. W. Brighton; E. A. G. Colls; F. W. Dodson; J. T. Gawthrop; Roger Hager; H. C. Holmes;
F. D. Mathers; H. P. Menzies; A. E. McMaster; R. V. Robinson; R. M. Winslow;
L. T. Wood;  secretary, T. L. Sturgess;  associate secretary, E. T. Orr.
INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR.
The Office co-operated effectively with local organizations and with the National
Committee in arrangements for the First International Trade Fair at Toronto, June,
1948.
In co-operation with all the plywood manufacturers, arrangements were made to
panel the interior of the directors' room at Toronto with material from British
Columbia. A plaque suitably inscribed bears witness to the co-operation, and the
room is a permanent feature at the Exhibition Grounds. DD 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
For 1949 the Trade Commissioner's Office has set up a co-ordinating committee
in Vancouver to survey the position for adequate representation of buyers and exhibitors from British Columbia at the Second International Trade Fair scheduled May 30th
to June 10th, 1949.
In this the Trade Commissioner is working in direct co-operation with the office
of the Foreign Trade Service, Vancouver; the Boards of Trade; and the British
Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association.
SPECIAL PRODUCTS BOARD.
The Trade Commissioner has continued as agent of the Special Products Board,
Ottawa, for movement of fruit-pulps and S02 fruits to the United Kingdom Ministry
of Food.
The Office has handled all local procurement, contractual, warehousing, shipping,
and payment arrangements covering more than 10,000 net tons of S02 fruits and
fruit-pulps.
The dollar crisis precluded United Kingdom contracts during the year under
review.
A record total of 18,956 barrels was shipped during 1947 in all processed-fruit
varieties, compared with 13,512 barrels in 1946, 7,721 barrels in 1945, and 4,050 barrels
in 1944.
A comparative net fruit tonnage (short tons, 2,000 lb. net fruit content) for the
four years is as follows:—
1945.
1947.
SO2 raspberries...
SO2 strawberries
Greengage-pulp...
Tons.
700
100
Tons.
1,345
Tons.
2,341
374
Tons.
2,910
450
403
Surplus Inventory.
In spite of flood loss, the suppliers found themselves with surplus small-fruit
inventory at the close of the 1948 processing season. Raspberries presented the main
problem. The suppliers were warned early in the year that United Kingdom orders
might not be forthcoming. There was a move to limit S02 stocks by throwing more
into custom freezing, in line with the industry's desire to reduce to a minimum the
impact effect of losing the United Kingdom market. Unsold frozen stocks have added
to the inventory problem.
A very complex position was created for the co-operative managements, their
growers, and the banks concerned. Departmental responsibility centered in phases
affecting or affected by the United Kingdom contracts.
Special S02 Fruit Surveys.
Unfortunately, the United Kingdom market has presented the main outlet for
overseas volume sales of S02 fruits. However, the Trade Commissioner has made
intensive surveys to find alternate overseas markets. Trial shipment was made to
South Africa, and special surveys were made for possibilities in Venezuela, Newfoundland, and Palestine.
At the close of the year a new and promising opportunity was presented in Ireland.
It is hoped that European Recovery Plan funds may be made available for considerable
tonnage movement to that country. Every effort will be made to direct this business
to British Columbia, to ease the present inventory position.   A special survey has been DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 21
undertaken by the Trade Commissioner's Office in co-operation with the Food Section,
Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, and the Canadian Commercial Secretary
in Dublin.
OPEN HOUSE WEEK.
A special committee for Open House Week, May 16th to 22nd, was set up in
Vancouver under the chairmanship of Alex Eastwood. The Trade Commissioner was
Departmental representative on this committee, which arranged Province-wide observance of " open house for industries."
The Vancouver Board of Trade enlisted the co-operation of the Board of Trade
movement in British Columbia and of various industrial organizations in the Province.
The Regional Development Division of the Department of Trade and Industry gave
effective assistance for the outlying areas. Departmental co-operation included advertising in weekly and daily newspapers throughout the Province.
The immediate objective was a timed observance to give to employees' relatives
and interested people an opportunity of viewing the industries in their localities. By
conducted tours they were able to obtain an appreciation of what industry is doing in
support of the community and living standards in British Columbia. The long-term
objective was a principle of public relations to co-ordinate all interests in the operations
and problems of industry.
The response from industry was gratifying; this concept and timed planning has
roused interest in other parts of Canada and overseas.
TRANSPORTATION.
Mention must be made of the effective basis of co-operation maintained in transportation problems:—
(1) With the Transportation and Customs Bureau of the Vancouver Board of
Trade, including financial assistance for Provincial cover in car-loading
regulations, rate structures, and other problems.
(2) With industry in the preparation of briefs and data for freight-rate hearings. As in 1947, the main Departmental burden under this heading was
carried by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
(3) With steamship companies, railroad companies, and air lines on routing
and other matters.
(4) With industrial departments of the railways, through head offices and
regional organizations.
(5) With the air lines in the development of air cargo movement, domestic
and overseas.
(6) With the newly created Canadian Maritime Commission, Ottawa.
PUBLIC RELATIONS,  ITINERARIES AND  INTRODUCTIONS.
This important field of work has developed greatly during the year. The Trade
Commissioner has been able to give assistance under six main headings:—
(1) Itineraries and other arrangements for business visitors from Eastern
Canada and overseas.
(2) Arrangements for visits of officials from Ottawa, and for tours of Federal
Trade Commissioners.
(3) Co-operation in connection with United Kingdom and other trade missions. Outstanding among these items was the visit during the year of
the United Kingdom engineering mission.
(4) Arrangements for visits of diplomatic representatives and High Commissioners of Commonwealth countries. DD 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(5) Co-operation with local consular corps and with offices of commonwealth
and foreign governments. Special reference is made to the happy and
effective basis of co-operation maintained with the Vancouver office of the
United Kingdom Trade Commissioner and the Vancouver office of the
Australian Government Trade Commissioner.
(6) Attendance at annual and special meetings of Provincial and National
trade organizations. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 23
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND
STATISTICS.
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics during 1948, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is, as its name
implies, a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is
to provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into
economic questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and compile economic statistics of interest to the Province.
In order to carry out these objectives, the Bureau is divided into several sections
dealing with statistical services and one section dealing with economic research. To
ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the policy of building
up a small corps of professionally trained persons who could be relied upon to perform
a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been the policy to make the services
of the technical personnel continuously available to all other departments of the
Government.
Since other Governmental agencies are also concerned with the collection of statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication
has been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, and
Provincial Secretary. During 1948 the essential statistical services performed for the
other Provincial departments, as well as for the Department of Trade and Industry,
were maintained. A brief description of the research and statistical services performed
during the year has been provided under the appropriate divisions which follow. DD 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1938-48.
production
(in Millions of Dollars)
AGRICULTURE FORESTRY
.
200
100
0
RETAIL PRICES
1936 1940 19.42 1944 1946
CONTRACTS AWARDED
1938 1940
1942 1944
YEARS
400
ioo
0
1938 1940 1942 1944 1946 1948
1938 J940 1942 1944 1946 1948
400
500
MINING
0
PRODUCTION
(in Millions of Dollars)
FISHERIES
1938 1940 1942 1944 1946 1948
-too
500
100
0
1938 1940 1942 1944 1946 1948
PRICES
INDEX  Nos.
WHOLESALE PRICES
1935
1939
■100
1926
-100
1948 1938 1940 I94Z 1944 1946 1948
CONSTRUCTION
(in Millions of Dollars)
VALUE OF WORK  PERFORMED
1946 1948
60
60
20
1938 1940
1942 1944
YEARS
1946 1948
1948 statistics subject to revision. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 25
Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1938-48—Continued.
EMPLOYMENT
<
o
2
z
o
240
220
200
in
180
cr
in
160
DO
>
(40
>
z
120
X
100
III
a
flO
z
1926
-100
1942 1944
YEARS
1948
INTERNAL TRADE
BANK
DEBITS
7
6
5
0
RETAIL
SALES
1/1  3°°
UJ
5
2   200
X
a
z
100
1935
1939
-100
0
1942 1944
YEARS
WHOLESALE SALES
r>
-r  zoo
a
z
1936 1940 1942 1944 1946 1948
YEARS
CONSUMPTION OF ELECTRICAL POWER
1935
■1939
-100
1938 1940 1942 1944
YEARS
SALES OF LIFE  INSURANCE
H
I      3
u.
O       2
in
Z
o
_l
_J
CQ          '
_i
o
a
z
o
1942 1944
YEARS
1942 1944
YEARS
Z
O
h-
z
o
FREIGHT
LOADED
0
1940 1942 1944 194
YEARS
1948 statistics subject to revision. DD 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
While final statistics are not yet available, preliminary statistics indicate that
British Columbia's economy is running at a new all-time high. Business activity in
all phases of British Columbia industry has shown increases, with the value of production in all four basic industries expected to reach new highs in 1948. Pressure of
production continues to dominate the British Columbia scene and productive capacity
is attempting to meet this demand occasioned by a high level of purchasing-power.
Incomplete returns indicate that the net value of production in the primary and
secondary industries amounted to $785,000,000* in 1947, as compared with $591,475,-
855f in 1946 and $535,488,648f in 1945. Practically all of the major business indicators
suggest that the net value of production for 1948 will surpass that recorded in 1947.
* Preliminary estimate, Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
t Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
Table 1-
-Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1946 and 19 U7, with
Preliminary Estimates for 194-8.
'
Unit or
Base
Period.
1948
Preliminary
Estimates. 9
1947.
1946.
Mining—
Total value of production1	
$
Fineoz.
$
$
$
$
Long ton
$
MB.M.
Ton
$
Cases
$
Boxes
Boxes
Boxes
Cwt.
MFt.
Sq.
1935-39=100
1935-39 = 100
1935-39=100
1935-39=100
Barrels*
Tons
000 kwh.
000 $
000$
000 $
000 $
000 $
150,000,000
113,221,254
249,013
4,109,538
8,519,741
41,884,977
30,147,039
1,717,476
282,288,388
4,187,816
410,994
58,764,950
1,527.135
134,508,400
6,792,906
4,838,249
1,954,657
368,143
877,600
2,024,442
314.6
250.6
264.3
229.7
3,389,929
9,904,060
3,011,763
103,104
39,460
148,813
59,070
6.539,916
71,807,951
134,747
5,324,959
2,240,070
23,489,335
21,143,086
1,463,640
Forestry—
360,000,000
4,300,000
173,471,370
3,193,665
342,754
Fisheries—•
70,000,000
1,313,909
145,000,000
43,817,147
1,348,137
Agriculture—
118,588,777
Apple3—
8,500,790
4,634,424
3,866,366
External trade—
479,021
574,649
1,744,158
Internal trade—
338.0
280.0
300.0
258.0
3,765,000
10,000,000
3,430,000
104,200
71,000
Not available
85,000
7,043,620
271.9
221.8
228.3
202.8
2,863,578
8,171,456
2,820,118
92,064
Construction—
58,708
Value of work performed in construction industry^....
54,211
61,233
5,367,594
1 British Columbia Department of Mines.
2 British Columbia Department of Lands and Forests, Forest Service.
3 British Columbia Department of Fisheries.
4 British Columbia Department of Agriculture.
5 British Columbia Tree Fruit Board.
6 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
* Thirty-five imperial gallons per barrel. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 27
Table 1.—Economic Activity
in British Columbia—Continued.
Unit or
Base
Period.
1948
Preliminary
Estimates.9
1947.
1946.
Tourist trade—-
Number
$
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926 = 100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
$
191,572
34,000,000
203.0
205,216
32,389,000
193.7
217.0
309.4
172.5
202.6
231.3
233.0
106.1
199.1
168.2
180.8
158.9
247.1
238.1
557,000,000
178,595
Estimated expenditure of the United States tourist
34,576,000
Employment—6
166.6
195.7
338.2
128.5
181.0
210.6
219.0
89.9
143.0
130.7
161.9
139.0
210.9
Trade .... 	
209.8
625,000,000
403,161,610
6 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
7 Bureau of Economics and Statistics, preliminary estimate ; 1945, 1946, and 1947, Dominion Bureau of Statistics
estimates.
8 Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Labour Division.
9 Subject to revision.
THE RESEARCH DIVISION.
External Trade of British Columbia.
The agreement between this Bureau and the External Trade Branch, Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, consummated in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under
this agreement the Bureau receives monthly a duplicate set of punch-cards showing in
detail the importation and exportation of every commodity normally listed in the
Federal trade reports which has been recorded at customs ports located in this
Province. While these records do not distinguish the exported merchandise originating
in British Columbia, nor the imports destined for consumption in this Province, from
the other goods passing through these customs ports, the records do provide the basis
for a very comprehensive annual report on the foreign trade of British Columbia.
Preliminary statements showing the external trade through British Columbia
customs ports covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over are
now published annually. In addition, statements showing the trade through British
Columbia customs ports are prepared monthly. These reports cover all exports valued
at $25,000 and over and all imports valued at $15,000 and over. A brief insight into
the foreign trade of British Columbia for the period 1939 to 1947 can be secured from
Tables 2 and 3.    Only the main commodity groups have been shown in these tables. ^
DD 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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ii^ZZog DD 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
From Table 2 it may be seen that exports in 1947 reached an all-time high of
$319,480,789, an increase of 185.26 per cent, since 1939. From Table 3 it may be seen
that imports also reached a new high of $189,864,002, an increase of 222.94 per cent,
since 1939.
British Columbia products were exported to ninety-nine different countries during
1947. The principal markets were United States, $118,462,213; United Kingdom,
$93,071,545; Australia, $14,510,895; Union of South Africa, $11,125,521; France,
$11,001,157;   China, $9,267,046;   Netherlands, $9,071,523;   and Palestine, $5,827,339.
In point of value the most important British Columbia products exported during
1947 were planks and boards, lead, newsprint paper, fertilizers, red-cedar shingles,
plywoods, canned salmon, canned herring, apples, copper, and zinc.
Imports were brought into British Columbia from seventy-four different countries
during 1947. The leading sources of supply for British Columbia importers during
1947 were United States, $142,531,526; United Kingdom, $13,413,460; British India,
$6,140,042; Philippine Islands, $5,782,529; Fiji Islands, $4,171,881; Colombia, $2,597,-
748;  Cuba, $2,534,766;  and Australia, $1,543,684.
In point of value the most important products imported for consumption in British
Columbia during 1947 were gasoline, crude petroleum, sugar, coffee, copra, logging
machinery, jute fabrics, gasoline traction engines, tin-coated sheets, and tea.
Preliminary 1948 statistics indicate there will be a decrease in the value of exports,
with the value of imports through British Columbia customs ports remaining about the
same as 1947.
COST OF LIVING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In August of 1947 the Bureau of Economics and Statistics discontinued the collection of material used in, and the compilation of, the cost-of-living index. It was decided
at this time that the cost-of-food index, being a useful measurement, should be maintained.
There were two major reasons for discontinuing the cost-of-living index. Primarily, the index was no longer fulfilling the function for which it was organized—
a basis for relief payments. Also, it was being used as a measure of costs in various
labour arbitrations and adjustments in salaries and wages, for which it was not
designed.
Secondly, the index would not stand up under strong statistical analysis, nor could
it be considered to satisfy the standards of economists. The index was based on
nutrition standards, which have not a direct relationship to actual expenditures. For
its originally designed purpose, the index was adequate. When this purpose no longer
existed, it was decided that the measure should be discontinued and the cost-of-living
figures published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, be the official reference.
The cost-of-food index was continued, and the information is published in the
quarterly report on cost of food in British Columbia.
Table U.—Dominion Bureau of Statistics Index Numbers of the Cost of Living
in Canada, 19S9-U8.
Adjusted
to Base
100.0 for
Auerust,
1939.
On Base of Average Prices 1935-39 as 100.
Month.
Total.
Food.
Rent.
Lifrht and
Fuel.
Clothing.
Home
Furnishings and
Services.
Miscellaneous.
1939, yearly average
January	
|       101.5
100.3              101.1
99.9    :   1        100.7
100.6
99.9
9R.7
103.8
103.4
103.4
103.4
103.4
1
101.2              100.7
101.0              100.2
mi 0                100 9.
i
101.4              101.4
101.7              101.1
March	
99.8      j      100.6                98.5
99.8        i        100.fi        1          98. 3
100.4                99.9              101.2              101.1
--—- DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 31
Table 4.—Dominion Bureau of Statistics Index Numbers of the Cost of Living
in Canada, 1939-48—Continued.
Month.
Adjusted
to Base
100.0 for
August,
1939.
On Base op Average Prices 1935-39 as 100.
Total.
Rent.
Light and
Fuel.
Clothing.
Home
Furnishings and
Services.
Miscellaneous.
1939—Continued.
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1940, yearly average...
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1941, yearly average...
January 	
February	
March	
April	
May —
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1942, yearly average..
January...	
February	
March	
April... .....
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1943, yearly average..
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
99.8
99.7
100.0
100.0
100.0
102.7
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.8
103.8
104.1
104.1
104.8
105.1
105.8
106.2
106.9
107.1
107.4
107.3
107.3
107.7
108.5
109.6
111.0
112.8
113.8
114.6
115.4
114.9
114.5
114.8
115.0
115.0
115.2
115.8
117.0
116.8
116.5
116.9
117.7
117.9
116.2
116.0
116.3
116.7
117.2
117.6
117.9
118.3
118.5
118.4
118.5
118.4
100.6
100.5
100.8
100.8
100.8
103.5
103.8
103.8
105.6
103.8
103.8
104.6
104.6
104.9
104.9
105.6
105.9
106.6
107.0
107.8
108.0
111.7
108.3
108.2
108.2
108.6
109.4
110.5
111.9
113.7
114.7
115.5
116.3
115.8
117.0
115.4
115.7
115.9
115.9
116.1
116.7
117.9
117.7
117.4
117.8
118.6
118.8
118.4
117.1
116.9
117.2
117.6
118.1
118.5
118.8
119.2
119.4
119.3
119.4
119.3
98.2
98.1
99.0
99.3
99.4
106.3
107.1
104.7
105.6
104.5
104.5
104.8
104.8
104.4
103.8
105.3
105.4
105.4
106.1
108.7
109.1
116.1
109.7
108.8
109.0
110.1
109.7
112.5
116.6
121.3
123.3
123.2
125.4
123.8
127.2
122.3
123.1
123.7
123.7
124.3
126.2
130.3
129.6
128.5
129.8
132.4
132.8
130.7
127.3
126.7
127.7
128.7
129.9
130.9
131.8
133.2
133.5
132.9
133.1
132.7
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
104.4
104.4
104.4
106.3
104.4
104.4
104.4
104.4
106.9
106.9
106.9
106.9
106.9
107.7
107.7
107.7
109.4
107.7
107.7
107.7
107.7
109.7
109.7
109.7
109.7
109.7
111.2
111.2
111.2
111.3
111.2
111.2
111.2
111.2
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.5
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.9
111.9
111.9
99.3
99.0
98.9
104.4
105.3
105.4
107.1
105.5
105.8
105.7
105.9
106.1
106.0
107.9
108.4
108.5
108.0
108.5
108.5
110.3
108.6
108.7
108.9
108.9
109.2
110.2
110.5
110.5
110.9
112.1
112.7
112.7
112.8
112.9
112.9
112.9
112.9
112.9
112.6
112.5
112.5
112.5
112.8
112.8
112.8
112.9
112.8
112.7
112.7
112.7
112.7
113.0
113.4
113.4
113.4
113.3
113.3
111.9
99.9
100.1
100.1
100.1
99.6
99.6
99.6
103.3
109.2
103.3
103.3
107.8
107.8
107.8
109.1
109.1
109.1
113.1
113.5
113.5
113.5
116.1
113.7
114.1
114.2
114.3
114.5
114.9
115.1
115.7
117.4
119.6
120.0
119.9
120.0
119.9
119.8
119.8
119.8
119.9
119.9
120.0
120.1
120.1
120.1
120.1
120.2
120.5
120.2
120.1
120.1
120.2
120.2
120.4
120.5
120.6
120.6
121.1
121.1
121.1
101.1
101.0
100.9
100.9
100.8
101.0
101.0
104.1
107.2
104.3
104.3
105.9
106.1
106.2
106.5
106.9
106.9
109.4
109.7
110.0
110.7
113.8
110.8
111.5
111.6
111.7
111.8
112.1
113.0
114.3
115.8
117.3
117.9
117.9
117.9
118.0
118.0
118.0
118.1
118.0
117.9
117.9
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
118.0
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.9
118.2
118.2
118.2
118.8
101.4
101.3
101.3
101.3
101.3
101.7
101.9
102.0
102.3
101.8
101.9
101.9
101.8
101.8
101.8
102.2
103.0
102.8
102.8
102.8
102.8
105.1
103.1
103.1
102.9
102.9
105.1
105.6
105.6
106.1
106.4
106.5
106.7
106.7
107.1
106.8
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.2
108.0
107.5
107.5
107.5
107.7
108.0
108.2
108.2
108.2
108.3
108.3
108.3
108.6 DD 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table U.—Dominion Bureau of Statistics Index Numbers of the Cost of Living
in Canada, 1939-U8—Continued.
Adjusted
to Base
100.0 for
August,
1939.
On
Base of Average Prices 1935-39 as
100.
Month.
Total.
Food.
Rent.
Light and
Fuel.
Clothing.
Home
Furnishings and
Services.
Miscellaneous.
1944, yearly average.. .
January	
118.1
118.0
118.1
118.2
118.3
118.1
118.1
118.0
117.9
117.7
118.0
117.6
117.7
117.7
117.8
117.8
118.1
118.7
119.3
119.5
118.9
118.8
118.9
119.1
118.9
118.9
119.1
119.8
121.0
122.6
124.1
124.6
124.5
125.8
126.1
126.1
126.0
127.9
127.9
129.6
132.1
133.8
134.8
135.5
138.3
141.1
142.5
144.8
147.1
148.9
149.6
150.4
152.1
153.1
155.7
156.3
157.6
158.3
158.3
157.6
118.9
119.0
118.9
119.0
119.1
119.2
119.0
119.0
118.9
118.8
118.6
118.9
118.5
119.5
118.6
118.6
118.7
118.7
119.0
119.6
120.3
120.5 .
119.9
119.7
119.9
120.1
123.6
119.9
119.9
120.1
120.8
122.0
123.6
125.1
125.6
125.5
126.8
127.1
127.1
135.5
127.0
128.9
128.9
130.6
133.1
134.9
135.9
136.6
139.4
142.2
143.6
146.0
155.0
148.3
150.1
150.8
151.6
153.3
154.3
156.9
157.5
158.9
159.6
159.6
158.9
131.3
131.5
130.9
131.1
131.5
131.7
131.1
132.0
131.5
131.2
130.8
131.6
130.3
133.0
130.2
130.6
131.0
131.0
131.7
133.4
135.6
136.2
134.2
133.3
134.0
134.3
140.4
132.8
132.5
133.1
135.1
137.7
142.1
144.2
144.7
143.2
146.5
146.6
146.4
159.6
145.5
148.7
148.7
151.6
154.9
157.7
159.8
160.6
165.3
171.3
173.6
178.7
195.5
182.2
186.1
185.9
186.8
191.2
193.9
201.3
202.6
203.9
205.4
204.7
202.0
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
112.0
112.0
112.0
112.1
112.0
112.0
112.0
112.0
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.3
112.3
112.3
112.7
112.3
112.3
112.3
112.3
112.6
112.6
112.6
112.6
112.6
113.4
113.4
113.4
116.7
113.4
113.4
113.4
113.4
115.4
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
119.9
119.9
119.9
120.7
119.9
119.9
119.9
119.9
120.9
120.9
120.9
120.9
121.0
121.0
121.0
121.7
110.6
112.7
113.0
113.0
113.0
112.5
112.5
108.9
108.7
108.7
108.7
108.1
108.1
107.0
109.1
107.4
107.3
106.7
106.6
106.6
106.5
106.5
106.7
106.7
106.6
107.1
107.4
107.1
107.1
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.3
108.6
109.2
115.9
109.0
109.1
109.1
109.1
116.2
116.7
117.3
118.6
121.1
121.9
122.6
120.3
124.8
120.4
120.1
121.0
121.3
122.7
124.3
124.5
127.7
128.5
128.8
129.0
129.1
121.5
121.1
121.3
121.3
121.4
121.5
121.5
121.5
121.5
121.5
121.6
121.6
121.6
122.1
121.8
121.7
121.7
121.8
122.0
122.1
122.2
122.1
122.2
122.4
122.5
122.5
126.3
122.6
122.7
123.1
123.2
123.7
124.3
126.4
127.6
129.6
130.2
131.1
131.2
143.9
131.5
131.9.
133.1
136.9
140.0
142.4
143.2
145.5
152.0
154.2
157.0
159.3
174.4
161.2
165.1
169.9
172.9
173.6
174.8
175.4
175.9
179.9
181.0
181.5
181.5
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.5
118.4
118.3
118.5
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.4
119.0
118.3
118.4
118.5
118.5
118.9
118.9
119.2
119.3
119.4
119.4
119.4
119.5
124.4
119.5
120.1
120.4
120.7
122.1
122.4
125.1
127.0
128.4
128.8
129.2
129.4
141.6
129.8
130.9
133.6
137.2
138.6
139.8
142.5
143.7
147.4
149.9
151.4
154.9
162.6
158.4
159.9
161.2
161.9
161.9
162.0
162.8
161.4
164.2
165.1
166.0
166.2
108.9
108.9
109.1
March	
109.0
109.0
109.0
June	
109.0
109.0
August	
September	
109.0
109.0
108.9
November	
108.9
108.9
1945, yearly average....
January	
109.4
109.2
109.2
March	
109.2
109.2
109.4
June	
109.4
109.4
August	
September	
109.5
109.5
109.6
109.6
109.6
1946, yearly average	
112.6
110.9
110.9
110.9
111.0
111.5
June	
112.1
113.7
August	
113.8
113.9
113.9
114.1
114.1
1947, yearly average
117.0
114.7
February	
115.5
116.0
116.3
116.8
117.1
July	
117.2
117.2
117.5
117.6
118.2
119.8
1948, yearly average
123.4
122.6
122.8
122.8
122.9
122.9
122.7
123.1
123.4
124.4
124.4
124.6
124.6 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 33
Table 5.—Comparative Food Indexes.
The Dominion Bureau of Statistics food index is given below, adjusted to the base
1936=100, with comparative figures for British Columbia prepared by the Bureau of
Economics and Statistics.
Month.
Canada.*
British
Columbia.
Month.
Canada.*
British
Columbia.
1939—
August	
September	
First
of Month.
101.53
101.64
108.69
111.15
111.55
106.85
106.85
107.16
107.16
106.75
106.13
107.67
107.78
107.77
108.49
111.15
111.55
112.17
111.25
111.45
112.58
112.17
115.03
119.22
124.03
126.07
125.97
128.22
126.58
125.05
125.87
126.48
126.48
127.10
129.04
133.23
132.52
131.39
132.72
135.38
135.79
130.16
129.55
130.57
131.60
132.82
133.84
134.76
136.20
136.50
135.90
136.09
135.69
134.46
133.84
134.05
Fifteenth
of Month.
94.48
103.90
104.38
104.74
101.51
100.43
100.97
101.22
102.53
101.77
101.51
103.47
103.84
103.33
104.92
106.30
107.39
107.03
108.93
109.02
111.42
111.81
116.09
117.07
120.55
121.10
121.24
123.93
121.57
120.99
122.55
123.71
1944—Continued.
April	
May	
June	
First         I
of Month,     j
134.46         [
134.66         |
134.05
134.97
134.46        |
134.15
133.74        |
134.56
133.23         |
133.13         |
133.54         j
133.95
133.95
134.66
136.40
138.65
139.26
137.22
136.30
137.01
137.32
135.79
135.48
136.09
138.14
140.80
145.30
147.44
147.96
146.42
149.80
149.90
144.69
148.77
150.31
152.04
155.01
158.38
161.25
163.39
164.21
169.02
175.15
177.51
182.72
186.30
190.29
190.08
191.00
195.50
198.26
205.83
207.16
208.49
210.02
209.30
206.50
Fifteenth
of Month.
128.42
July.	
August	
128.06
October	
November	
127.95
1945—
January	
February	
128.82
July
March	
August	
September	
129.33
130.96
September	
November	
130.17
December	
1946—
January	
June	
127.87
March	
August	
September	
October	
134.98
138.43
1942—
November	
144.64
1947—
125.12
June
February	
152.43
March	
128.39
April	
159.38
June	
134.63
August	
166.07
1943—
November	
182.36
134.19
December	
1948—
January	
j
135.46
February	
189.10
T 1
March	
A
132.45
198.97
132.05
207.49
1944—
128.28
* Adjusted to base 1936=100. DD 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 6.—Comparisons of a Minimum Food Budget* based on the Respective Average
Prices collected in Seattle, Wash., and Vancouver, B.C., November, 1947; May,
1948;  and November, 1948.
Date.
Total Monthly
Budget*
Cost
in Dollars.
Index of
Average
Prices, f
Comparison of
Budget* Costs
in Dollars.
Comparison of
Budget*
Costs by
Percentages.
Seattle.
Vancouver.
Seattle.
Vancouver.
Seattle.
Vancouver.
Seattle.
Vancouver.
$67.42
67.67
69.90
$50.62
51.94
62.22
100.00
100.37
103.68
100.00
102.61
122.92
+$16.80
+ 15.73
+7.68
+33.19
+30.28
+ 12.34
May, 1948	
* Budget based on monthly " basket of food " used in British Columbia cost-of-food report.
t November, 1947=100.
Source: Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Victoria, B.C.
THE TOURIST TRADE.
The Dominion Bureau of Statistics, in its publication " Canada's International
Tourist Trade, 1946," has presented its latest estimate of the expenditures in Canada
of travellers from the United States as follows: 1941, $107,000,000; 1942, $79,000,000;
1943, $87,000,000; 1944, $116,600,000; 1945, $163,300,000; and 1946, $214,200,000.
In 1941 this Bureau, after a careful investigation, estimated that United States travellers had expended $12,769,000 in British Columbia, and assuming the all-Canada
trend—as shown by the Dominion Bureau figures above—to be also true of British
Columbia, purely tentative estimates have been found for 1942, 1943, and 1944 as
follows: 1942, $9,430,000; 1943, $10,400,000; 1944, $13,026,000. The International
Payments Branch of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics has estimated that United
States travellers expended $22,000,000 in British Columbia during 1945, $34,576,000
in 1946, and $32,389,000 in 1947. This Bureau estimates the comparable 1948 figure
will be approximately $34,000,000.
It is planned in 1949 that this Bureau, in co-operation with the British Columbia
Travel Bureau, and the Department of Trade and Industry, Government of the Province
of Alberta, will undertake a study of tourist traffic through British Columbia-Alberta
ports where information is not now being collected. It is known that there is a considerable movement of tourist traffic through the British Columbia-Alberta Border, but
at present no accurate statistics are available. The measurement of this traffic would,
no doubt, add a considerable amount to the tourist expenditures in British Columbia.
Table 7 shows that during 1948 most types of traffic showed declines from. 1947,
the exception being aeroplane, local and commercial automobile traffic.
Following the practice established in earlier years, American tourists visiting the
Province by automobile in 1947, according to their State origin in the United States,
have been listed in Chart 1. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 35
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DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 37
RAILWAY FREIGHT INVESTIGATION.
Over the years the mountain differential of Pacific scale of freight rates has been
gradually reduced. Prior to 1914 the ratio of rates was as high as 2 miles Prairie for
1 mile Pacific scale. In 1914 this ratio was reduced to 1% to 1 and in 1922 it was
once more reduced to lx4 to 1. Since then twenty-six years have elapsed, and in spite
of tremendous population and economic growth no further reduction in the basic rates
has been made. The Provincial Government, therefore, backed by the Boards of Trade
and other interested parties, applied to the Board of Transport Commissioners for
equalization with the Prairie scale—that is, it applied for the removal of what it felt
to be an unjust discrimination against the people and industries of British Columbia.
Consequently, the Board of Transport Commissioners held hearings in Vancouver
on November 1st to 5th, in Kelowna on November 8th, and in Nelson on November 10th.
As much preparation and organization was necessary, this Bureau was called upon by
the Attorney-General and his legal counsel to assist in this work.
In Vancouver the case was directly assisted by the services of the Director, the
Assistant Director, a senior research assistant, a research assistant, and a secretary.
During the course of the hearings the Director appeared and was cross-examined as a
witness. In Kelowna the Assistant Director and in Nelson the research assistant aided
materially in the organization and preparation of those areas' submissions. The
research assistant accompanied legal counsel in the hearings at Calgary, Edmonton,
and Winnipeg. For the final argument in Ottawa the services of the Assistant
Director and a secretary were made available to the legal counsel.
The considerable time expended on the mountain differential case has been possible
only at the expense of a certain amount of the routine work of the Bureau and through
many hours of overtime by the staff.
Following is a list of the briefs and submissions presented in British Columbia:—
Vancouver.
1. Premier's Speech.
2. Historical Submission.
3. Statistical Submission.
4. Vancouver Board of Trade.
5. Associated Boards of Trade.
6. Vancouver Island Boards of Trade.
7. Chilliwack Board of Trade.
8. Paper Industry.
9. Furniture Industry.
10. United Distillers, Ltd.
1. Kelowna Board of Trade.
2. Revelstoke Board of Trade.
3. Vernon Board of Trade.
4. Kamloops Board of Trade.
5. Interior Feed Dealers' Association
11. Coast Breweries, Ltd.
12. Petroleum Industry.
13. New Westminster Board of Trade.
Wholesale Bureau of Vancouver Board
of Trade.
Paint Industry.
Automobile Dealers' Association.
Tariff Analysis.     (There were  also a
number of charts and statistical submissions made.)
14.
15.
16.
17.
Kelowna.
6. B.C. Fruit Growers' Association.
7. Interior Canning Industry.
8. Interior Vegetable Marketing Board.
9. B.C. Tree Fruits.
1. Nelson Board of Trade.
2. Associated Boards of Trade.
3. McDonald Jam Co., Ltd.
4. Hardware and Building Supply
Dealers.
5. Automobile Dealers' Association.
6. B.C. Chamber of Mines.
Nelson.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Trail Board of Trade.
Trail Board of Trade, Young Men's
Section.
Rossland Board of Trade.
Creston Board of Trade.
Flour and Feed Dealers.
Wholesale and Retail Grocers. DD 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NEW PUBLICATIONS.
Business Activity in British Columbia.
In order that business-men would have a comprehensive current report of British
Columbia business activity under one cover, the Bureau now issues a monthly publication entitled " Business Activity in British Columbia." The first issue was released
in July of 1947. While the first issues have been mostly a tabulation of existing statistics, some articles relating to various phases of business activity have been included.
It is planned to include more articles of current general interest.
British Columbia Trade Index.
A revised edition of the British Columbia Trade Index has been in preparation
during the last few months, and it is expected that the new edition will be published
early in 1949. In addition to providing an alphabetical list of products manufactured
in the Province, the new Trade Index will contain an alphabetical list of firm names
for cross-reference.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.
This publication was issued for the first time in 1948 and is to be issued annually
henceforth. It provides statistics and facts relating to British Columbia under the
following headings: Population, education, government, banking, transportation, communication, agriculture, fisheries, forestry, mining, manufacturing, tourist, and economic activity.
ADVISORY SERVICES.
In addition to the projects previously outlined, the Bureau has prepared numerous
reports and memoranda for officials of other Provincial Government departments.
Members of the research staff were again loaned to many other branches of the
Government, namely: Department of Railways, Freight-rate Mountain Differential
Commission, Regional Development Division, Hospital Insurance Service, and Dominion
Government Regional Statistics Office.
In addition, numerous tabulations and reports have been prepared for corporations, Boards of Trade, and private individuals, covering a wide range of topics.
CO-OPERATIVE STATISTICAL AGREEMENTS.
The two co-operative statistical agreements negotiated in 1945 are now in operation. The Bureau has received most of the 1947 Census of Industry Schedules from
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. The monthly reports covering sawmills' statistics
for the Province are received regularly.
The pay-roll statistics co-operative project is awaiting final arrangements with
Ottawa.    It is hoped that this project will be well under way in 1949.
LABOUR STATISTICS DIVISION.
The annual collection of labour statistics was again conducted for the Department
of Labour by the Labour Division of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics. In
conformance with the co-operative agreement concluded some years ago with the Provincial Department of Labour, the annual survey of wage-earners in British Columbia
trades and industries was completed and summarized for the year 1947 in the statistical
sections of the Annual Report of the Department of Labour for that year.
New projects undertaken by this Division include a series of occupational wage-
rate surveys being conducted with the co-operation of the inspection staff of the
Department of Labour. Valuable data are in this way regularly obtained, dealing with
wage-rates currently in effect in selected occupations in the various industries, and the DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 39
results of the surveys made available to the Department of Labour and other Provincial departments requiring this type of information.
Material collected and compiled by the Division continued to prove of valuable
assistance to the Bureau in dealing with inquiries relative to labour problems and in
the work of maintaining the British Columbia Trade Index. While the greater part
of the work in this section concerns the Department of Labour Report, many special
compilations are prepared for private industry, Boards of Trade, banking institutions,
and various Provincial Government departments.
A regional breakdown of the Provincial industrial pay-roll has again been set out
for comparative years in the attached Table 8, which shows the distribution of the
Provincial industrial pay-roll through the ten census divisions for the years 1943 to
1947. While the industrial totals serve to show the interesting changes occurring from
year to year in the different parts of the Province, as explained in the Department of
Labour Report, they do not, however, represent the total of all salaries and wages paid
in British Columbia, inasmuch as the industrial survey is not inclusive of such pay-roll
sections as Governmental workers, railways, wholesale and retail firms, financial houses,
professional and service trades.
Table 8.—British Columbia Industrial Pay-rolls by Statistical Areas for the
Comparative Years 1943 to 1947.
Regional Area.
Total Pay-rolls (Salaries
\nd Wages).
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
No. 1	
$7,151,250
15,561,173
6,763,085
185,947,943
55,800,769
2,517,767
8,527,530
7,453,342
12,096,884
8,193,263
1,393,314
$8,374,558
14,346,342
7,463,090
182,191,571
50,899,508
2,611,208
8,645,994
3,297,207
10,439,557
1,070,361
460,300
$8,234,954
13,664,192
8,729,129
169,595,070
52,450,178
2,711,859
9,351,432
3,128,665
7,148,057
551,210
772,126
$8,792,650
15,409,997
11,047,243
158,098,206
52,609,451
4,477,339
10,680,963
4,132,464
5,592,647
1,279,858
835,686
$13,089,910
No. 2	
20,065,572
No. 3	
15,407,310
No. 4	
196,814,172
No. 5	
73,305,625
No. 6	
7,068,034
No. 7	
14,091,695
No. 8	
7,287,683
No. 9	
8,260,298
No. 10	
8,385,552
2,421,303
Totals	
$311,406,320
$289,799,678
$276,336,872
$272,956,504
$366,197,154
MINING AND METALLURGICAL DIVISION.
In accordance with the agreement concluded in 1938 between the Provincial
Department of Mines, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics, all mining production statistics, with the exception of coal, are collected
and compiled by this Division. Under this agreement, uniform statistics are compiled
from the one set of returns prepared by operators, and thereby avoids overlapping or
duplication of effort involved on the part of the above-mentioned agencies, which
co-operate in the collection and use of mining statistics. The information, when
collected, is made available for general use in a form which preserves the confidential
aspects of individual company's or operator's returns. Mining statistics in detail will
be found in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines. Numerous special compilations, covering data not readily available in other departmental reports, were compiled
during the period under review by this Division for Governmental departments, banking
and other institutions. Continued close contact with the Department of Mines has
been maintained, and special statistical reports prepared for the internal use of that
Department. Because of the continued interest in regional questions, the Division
has prepared a tabulation of the value of mine production by census divisions covering DD 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
the 1946 and 1947 calendar years (see Table 10). In addition, Table 1 of the Annual
Report of the Minister of Mines for 1947 is also included in this report (see Table 9).
This gives the Provincial quantities and value of the various classes of commodities
produced by the industry.
It should be kept in mind that this Division, in order to maintain continuity of
records in the Department of Mines publications, compiles production statistics according to mining divisions, which in general follow closely the alignment as set forth for
census divisions, but there are a few deviations and difficulty is found in accurately
placing minor quantities or values in the correct location in the approximate census
division;   however, no large amount is involved.
Table 9.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1946 and 1947.
Quantity
1946.
Quantity,
1947.
Value,
1946.
Value,
1947.
Metallics.
$
96,322
327,628
771,698
2,240,070
4,322,241
475,361
23,489,335
$
384,255
560,183
941,266
 lb.
17,500,638
117,612
15,729
347,990,146
41,783,921
243,282
6,969
306,400,709
8,519,741
8,514,870
200,585
 lb.
41,884,977
59
 , oz.
6,365,761
5,707,691
5,324,959
480,802
4,109,538
lb.
517,794
680,792
 lb.
270,718,128
268,450,926
21,143,086
30,147,039
58,671,502
96,461,099
Fuels.
Coal                           	
1,463,640
1,717,476
6,220,470
43,447
71,351
19,917
318,500
2,135
2,310
1,258,576
8,587,380
NON-METALLICS.
52,362
55,372
1,116
102,918
1,156
174,655
19,686
523,298
464
210
126,622
163
157,161
1,793
Sulphur* 	
 tons
Materials.
 No.
 No.
1,503,714
Totals	
1,716,416
2,275,972
Clay Products and other Structural
Clay Products.
Brick—
Common 	
Face, paving, sewer-brick	
3,300,000
2,077,683
4,318,000
1,232,812
94,000
84,353
283,317
8,241
105,194
263,864
2,811
3,611
122,660
64,849
389,899
9,675
158,276
361,975
Drain-tile,  sewer-pine	
 No.
2,068,424
1,962,583
3,476
9,332
Totals	
845,391
1,120,142
Other Structural Materials.
1,739,966
642,912
1,713,138
99,710
158,446
1,896,772
159,493
151,671
714,126
1,828,919
119,971
216,873
4,354
154,164
19,835
222,044
Totals	
4,354,172
4,776,661
71,807,951
113,221,254
* Sulphur content of pyrites shipped, estimated sulphur contained in sulphuric acid made from waste smelter
gases, and elemental sulphur. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 41
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V. DD 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION.
The year 1948 has been the most progressive year since the establishment of the
Mechanical Tabulation Division of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics in 1938.
During this year the staff has been increased from thirteen to ninety-eight, and
the number of mechanical units from seventeen to forty-two. This abnormal growth
has been mainly due to work undertaken for the British Columbia Hospital Insurance
Service, British Columbia Forest Service, Surveyor of Taxes, and Civil Service
Commission.
Considerable difficulty is being experienced at present due to the lack of space, but
this should be eliminated by the move to the new building early in the new year.
British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service.
The work undertaken for the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service required
the coding and punching of some 475,000 registration forms, representing over
2,000,000 punch-cards in the period from October 1st to December 15th. Once this
initial step was completed, 2,000,000 cards had to be processed to print the 475,000
hospital registration cards for issuance to the public. Plans are now progressing to
facilitate the mechanical monthly billing of all firms on pay-roll deduction. At the
same time, punch-card files are being prepared to cover hospital payments and sundry
statistics. To meet our dead-lines on this job, it has been necessary to work the staff
in two shifts continuously from October 1st, 1948.
British Columbia Forest Service.
In July, 1948, a plan was put into operation whereby the mechanical equipment in
this Division was used to prepare the material for entries in the species and scalers
ledgers for the Vancouver Forest District. Approximately 40,000 cards were punched
per month from copies of scaling and royalty accounts. From these cards, daily listings
were run and supplied to the District Forester in Vancouver. The Vancouver office was
equipped with a transfer posting-machine, which permitted the mechanical posting of
these entries into species and scalers ledgers. At the end of each month the 40,000
cards were summarized and monthly totals supplied for posting into the ledgers.
As the year closes, we are in the process of summarizing these files for the preparation
of annual figures.
Surveyor of Taxes.
The 1948 Session of the Legislature passed an amendment to the " Taxation Act "
requiring that an assessment notice be issued to the taxpayer prior to the issuance of
the tax bill. This billing covers all property taxes levied under the Taxation, Public
Schools, and Water Acts, as well as school property taxes in villages and municipalities
throughout the Province.
Approximately 150,000 assessment notices and 150,000 taxation notices and
summaries are involved. Each procedure requires the processing of about 1,500,000
punched cards.
The initial run of the assessment notices was tabulated during the month of
December, and the corresponding tax bills will be prepared during the month of April.
Civil Service Records.
During 1948 the work of placing Civil Service records on punched cards was
completed. All notices of appointment and change notices are being prepared mechanically for the Commission from the card files maintained in this office. The cards are
also available for any statistical studies required by the Commission. Figures for the
Annual Report of the Commission will be tabulated from these files. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 43
In addition to the above new work, our regular jobs for other departments and
our own statistical reports were maintained. Included in this work were the Annual
Reports for the Departments of Labour and Education, personnel records for the Public
Works Department, and monthly motor-accident reports for the Motor-vehicle Branch.
For our own Department, work was done on the trade index and import-export
statistics.
Training Programme.
To meet these additional commitments taken on during 1948, it was necessary to
carry out an extensive training programme. Commencing in July, classes for prospective key-punch operators were established. Due to the lack of available equipment,
these classes had to be held at night, and during the three-month period well over fifty
key-punch operators were trained.
During the year both supervisors were given a two weeks' training course with
the International Business Machines Company at Endicott, New York.
Future Commitments.
The most outstanding future commitment is the preparation of the pay-roll for
the Department of Finance. Early in the year a plan was formulated and several test
runs made to the satisfaction of the officials of the Finance Department. However,
this job has been held in abeyance pending the passing of the peak load created by the
new work covered in this report.
Commencing April 1st, we have been requested to prepare the pay-roll for the
British Columbia Liquor Control Board; it is proposed to use the same plan as
developed for the Civil Service pay-roll.
Also starting in April, we have been asked to present a plan for mechanical
purchase-order control for the Purchasing Commission. Discussions are also being
held of the possibility of establishing a furniture inventory for the same department.
Preliminary discussions have been held with the officials of the Superannuation
Commission, who are interested in utilizing the equipment in this Division for maintaining superannuation records.
In closing, we would like to express our appreciation of the co-operation we have
received from the officials of the various departments for which we have undertaken
new work. In establishing any new system., there are always many obstacles to be
overcome, and due to the patience and perseverance of these officials, we have been able
to succeed in establishing a faster and more accurate record system for them. DD 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
REPORT OF REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIVISION.
The last Annual Report contained a brief announcement of the creation of this new
Division established by Order in Council in October, 1947, to take over all those activities of the former Bureau of Reconstruction related to Trade and Industry.
It will be the purpose of this report to cover the activities of the Division during
the current year, under the Division's general directive of aiding industrial development
and expansion of the Provincial economy, carrying out area surveys, and the preparation
of a Regional Industrial Index to record and make available a flow of current and
economic information of general use to industry in the Province and elsewhere.
ESTABLISHMENT OF FIELD OFFICES.
Divisional field offices have been established at key points strategically located
throughout the Province at the following locations:—
Nelson:  Region 1—East Kootenay;  Region 2—West Kootenay.
Kelowna:   Region  3—Okanagan;   Region  6—Kamloops  and  South  Central
British Columbia.
Prince  George:   Region   8—Central  British  Columbia;   Region   9—North
Coastal Area (Prince Rupert and Queen Charlottes);   Region 10—Peace
River.
Victoria:  Region 4—Lower Mainland;  Region 5—Vancouver Island and Gulf
Islands.
Field representatives have been appointed in charge of these field offices, whose
duties are to thoroughly familiarize themselves with the industrial requirements of
each region, to maintain contacts with industrial concerns in their area (both large and
small), to give particular attention to the smaller industrial operations in need of
assistance and advice in regard to their specific problems and future expansion, to
investigate and report on specific industrial problems of their region, to maintain a
close liaison with the Regional Advisory Committees, Boards of Trade, municipal governments, and all other agencies in their territory.
SURVEYS UNDERTAKEN BY FIELD REPRESENTATIVES.
During the current year the following is a summarization, in brief, of special
surveys undertaken by the field offices of the Division:—
Region One (East Kootenay) and Region Two (West Kootenay).
A survey of raw materials required for the establishment of a pulp-mill in the
Kootenay District.
A survey in connection with the possible establishment of an iron-foundry, utilizing
the Sullivan iron-ore residue pile at Kimberley and iron-ore (hematite) deposits in the
Creston and Kingsgate areas.
Assisting in the cancellation of a township plan, concerning the acquisition of a
townsite for a new mine in the West Kootenay District.
Assistance in obtaining surplus materials, machinery, and equipment through War
Assets Corporation for mining companies in the region.
Arranging contacts for local industries with Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation concerning " industrial housing."
Assisting in arranging contacts for several smaller secondary industries with the
larger industries in the area.
Providing marketing information for a boat-building industry in West Kootenay.
Numerous other inquiries of a similar nature have been undertaken during
the year. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 45
Region Three (Okanagan).
Under direction of the Regional Advisory Committee, our field representative has
been actively engaged in an area survey of the Okanagan District in relation to the
increase in population, during and since the war, of this section of the Province.
Chapter One of the regional brief, under the heading of " Population," has been
completed. The conclusions reached by the Regional Advisory Committee may be
briefly summarized as follows:—
(1) During and since the war the Okanagan region has experienced a considerable influx of new population (stated to be upwards of 17,000 persons)
and private capital (approximately $14,000,000).
(2) Employment has so far been at a high level due to the increased
construction and industrial development of the region, occasioned by the
introduction of this new population and capital into the area.
(3) This period of stimulation is drawing to a close with the completion of
the building boom. It is stated that increased farm revenue will not
alone take up the slack of reduced building construction.
(4) The existing producing lands (irrigated) within the area show a net
increase of only 266 acres for the whole period during and since the war
(eight years).
(5) On the basis of the Committee's figures and computations, the development of additional irrigated acreage amounting to at least 8,000 acres is
considered a minimum to adequately maintain this population increase in
the area.
(6) Such new irrigation-development should be so timed to offset the effect
of the decline of private capital expenditure as building-construction
levels off.
(7) The alternative is increasing unemployment in the region or the draining-
off and dissipation of the new population to more congested areas, particularly to the Coastal regions of the Province.
The next stage of area surveys in Region Three will deal with land use, necessitating personal interviews with farmers, cattlemen, growers, storekeepers, plant
managers, irrigation district secretaries and managers, School Inspectors, District
Agriculturists, Government Agents, loggers and mill operators, secretaries of Boards
of Trade, and Cattle Associations. The whole area of Region Three (Okanagan) will
be covered in detail from Salmon River Valley and Grindrod on the north, Granby River
and Grand Forks on the east, and to Princeton, including Otter Creek and Aspen Grove,
on the west.
For the purpose of this survey the regional area has been divided into four main
districts, namely: (a) North Okanagan, (b) The Tree-fruit Area, (c) Grand Forks-
Boundary Country, and (d) Princeton.
Our field office at Kelowna has rendered assistance to industry as opportunity
occurred, and the following items are listed:—
(a)  Establishment of a bean-sprout operation, Kelowna;  now in operation.
(6)  Assistance given manufacturer of sporting goods in obtaining certain
restricted raw material essential to his operation.
(c) Assistance in re-establishing and securing raw-material supply for a
doughnut-maker, Penticton  (veteran).
(d) Conjointly with the Government Agent, establishing a box-shook plant in
Princeton.
(e) Information and data secured for proposed branch of an American non-
corrosive pipe manufacturer in Kelowna;   sales office now opened.
(/)   Efforts to establish a cannery in Westbank;   operation expected in 1949. DD 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(g)  Investigation regarding development of clay deposits, Vernon.
(h)  Investigation   regarding   development   of   coal   deposits,   White   Lake,
Penticton.
(i)  Assistance to group interested in establishing a winery and amalgamation
with other winery interests;  introductions arranged.
(■?')   Surveys concerning a new laundry for the region.
(k)  Investigation of possibilities for development of the rock-wool industry.
(0   Survey concerning " gift containers " for the fruit industry.
(m)  Various forms of assistance extended to Falkland Brick & Tile Company,
Limited, Falkland.
Many inquiries from outside sources have been given attention, covering general
data of the region and assistance in providing data concerning a proposed ceramic
industry and a housing project for an unincorporated area in this region.
Our field office also arranged itineraries and other details in connection with the
visits of Sir Alexander Clutterbuck, British High Commissioner; Peter H. Bennett,
Deputy Director, United Kingdom Information Office, Ottawa; Sir Francis Wright,
British Columbia Research Council; Dr. R. H. Wright, British Columbia Research
Council.
Region Four (Lower Mainland) and Region Five (Vancouver Island
and Gulf Islands).
Industrial activity in Regions Four and Five during the current year was highlighted by:—
(1) Commencement of operation of additional generating units of the John
Hart Development hydro-electric plant at Campbell River with potential
maximum capacity of 168,000 horse-power.
(2) Commencement of construction-work on the $12,000,000 sulphate pulp-mill
near Nanaimo.
(3) Completion of surveys and plans, etc., for erection of a $25,000,000 pulp-
mill at Duncan Bay, near Campbell River.
(4) Commencement of a rolling-mill, capitalized at $150,000, manufacturing
steel bars, rods, etc.
(5) Commencement of a pulp-products operation on Granville Island, capitalized at $100,000, manufacturing artificial sponges.
(6) $500,000 addition to veneer and plywood division of mill at New Westminster, manufacturing hard-boards of walls, etc.
(7) Commencement of a wool-carpet manufacturing plant in Victoria.
(8) Commencement of operation of a match-factory at Mission.
Special Projects.
Completion of an industrial housing project of 100 houses at Lake Cowichan.
Business Inquiries.
Inquiries handled by the regional office were:—
Inquiry from a veteran in Victoria who sold his cleaning and dyeing business
and desired to locate a cleaning and dyeing business in the Interior.
Inquiry from the Director of Industrial Development, British Columbia Electric Railway, on economic development of Squamish area.
Inquiry from students at University of British Columbia for assistance in
obtaining information on the economic development of regional areas.
Inquiry from a veteran on possibilities of successfully establishing a window-
cleaning business in Chilliwack or Mission district. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 47
Potential Industrial Expansion.
Through personal surveys and several interviews with officials of Boards of Trade
and other agencies, the following potential industries in the region are indicated, and
that such industries are based primarily on the availability of raw material, labour,
rail and water sites:—
Vancouver Island.—Raw material available would indicate that a sawmill, rayon,
or wood-plastic industry could be successfully operated in the vicinity of Ladysmith.
This centre has approximately 40 acres of water-front sites and 10 acres of railway
sites to support any efforts of this nature.
Nanaimo, with excellent water and rail sites available and one of the main shipping
centres on the Island, is ideally suited to support the establishment of a fish-cannery.
Boat-building and a ship-chandler's industry would appear warranted. Due to the
abundance of timber in the immediate vicinity of Parksville and the availability of
improved rail sites, indications are that a sawmill and furniture-factory could be successfully established.
The excellent water and rail sites in the Port Alberni area, combined with an
abundance of raw material, would indicate that a cellulose or newsprint industry would
be a successful venture. Cumberland has the necessary raw material for the establishment of a coal-processing plant. Indications are that a dry-kiln and a lumber-finishing
plant have potential possibilities.
Lower Fraser Valley.—North Vancouver is an excellent deep-sea shipping centre
with a good supply of labour and the necessary machine-shops, welding-shops, etc., to
support and service the establishment of new industries. It was indicated, therefore,
that an aircraft-manufacturing industry would be warranted. The establishment of
a woollen industry was recommended due to the fact that this area has perfect humidity.
Due to its excellent transportation facilities and the Canadian Pacific Railway
freight terminal yards, Port Coquitlam would seem ideally located for expansion of
secondary industries. Among the potential industries mentioned was a cannery for
small fruits.
Chilliwack with its abundance of raw material and very favourable rail and highway facilities, with excellent industrial sites available adjacent to the railway, would
indicate the possibility of establishing- numerous potential industries. Among those
indicated were a box-factory to accommodate the ever-growing fruit industry and a
furniture-factory.
Because of the available labour-supply and raw material, Hope appears to be
ideally located for the establishment of lath-mills, planer-mills, and lumber-finishing
plants. With Hope being a terminus of the newly constructed Hope-Princeton Highway, industrial expansion seems most probable.
In the Mission City area, there are good deposits of clay, which might warrant
the establishment of a brick and tile industry. Indications are that a milk-cannery
might be successfully operated. There are improved industrial sites paralleling the
railway, which would naturally support any industrial expansion.
Region Six (Kamloops and South Central British Columbia).
(Under Kelowna Office.)
Our regional office has been working in conjunction with a special Industries
Committee in securing considerable data required by important financial interests
looking toward the establishment of a beet-sugar industry in the Kamloops district.
Assistance has also been rendered by our regional office in the establishment of a
meat-handling plant in Kamloops. DD 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Regional Advisory Committee of this area has held frequent meetings
throughout the current year and in conjunction with the Industries Committee has
submitted reports on the following questions discussed by the Advisory Committee:—
(a)  Fraser River high-water control.
(6)  North Thompson Valley—power and dairying industry.
(c) Development of Nisconlith Lake and other Veterans' Land Act projects.
(d) Pacific Great Eastern Railway extension to the main lines of the Canadian
Pacific and Canadian National Railways.
(e) Development of South Thompson Valley.
(/)  Meat-processing plant, Kamloops.
(g)  Development of sugar-beet industry, Kamloops region.
Region Eight (North Central British Columbia).
Extensive surveys have been carried out by our regional office on the subject of
mill waste, which have determined that a source of raw waste material, approximating
114 car-loads daily, is available in this area for processing. Utilization of this waste
raw material is one of the problems of this region that is being subjected to further
intensive investigation through the appropriate departments of the Government and
the British Columbia Research Council.
Investigation into the clay deposits of the Prince George area has been undertaken
and brought to the attention of European interests who are interested in establishing
a ceramic industry in this Province.
Our field office has carried out preliminary investigations for the purpose of interesting industry in the limestone and iron-ore deposits of the region.
Surveys have also been carried out on the possibility of establishing a pyrethrum
industry, and these investigations are continuing.
Many industrial inquiries have been handled by our Prince George office during
the current year. One of these has resulted in the introduction of considerable new
capital in a substantial tourist establishment to be located on the new Hart Highway.
The Advisory Committee in this region has reviewed a number of matters relating
to the industrial expansion of the area, particularly in regard to coal deposits, rates of
lumber products in transit, land settlement, ferry improvements, and many other
matters.
Region Nine (North Coastal Area—Prince Rupert and Queen Charlottes).
The chief development in this region to be reported during the current year is the
establishment of a large rayon-pulp industry in the Prince Rupert district, preliminary
construction of which is now under way.
Investigations are being carried out by several other large industrial corporations
in the Coastal section of the region, and our regional office is keeping in close touch
with these developments.
In the Telkwa district, coal production is being substantially stepped up, and discussions have taken place through our regional office regarding increased housing for
additional employees required by this industry.
Close liaison has been maintained by our regional office with the colonization and
industrial departments of the Canadian National Railways in the region, particularly
with regard to increasing land settlement in this section of the Province, which abounds
in large tracts of good agricultural land.
Some new land settlement has been noticeable in the area during the year under
review, and with the anticipated establishment of substantial industrial operations at
key points in Regions Eight and Nine, considerable increase in land settlement can be
forecast in this area in the near future. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 49
Region Ten (Peace River Block).
Very little industrial development has been reported from this region during the
current year, but it may safely be predicted that large-scale developments will ensue on
the completion of the projected road outlet from this section of the Province.
NEW INDUSTRIES.
The following is a partial list of new industrial enterprises which have commenced
operations during the year under review and will indicate the steady growth and
expansion of industry in the Interior centres of the Province:—
Region One (East Kootenay) and Region Two (West Kootenay).
(a) Silver, lead, and zinc mine located on the Pend d'Oreille River, 4% miles west
of Nelway—surface plant constructed;   employs 110 men.
(6) Gold mine located near Nelson—average of 135 employees in construction
stages and now 82 employees.
(c) Custom concentrator mill at Whitewater, and an important factor in successful
operation of several properties in Slocan District.
(d) Work commenced on building of a 50-ton mill at Jack Pine.
(e) Gypsum quarry on Windermere Creek;   extensive deposits to be opened up.
(/) Refrigeration plant constructed at Wynndel—capacity, 36,000 boxes.
(g) Sash and door company—installation of new $20,000 green chain in company's
yard; capacity (eight hours), 100,000 board-feet; located at Cranbrook.
(h) Boat-building concern—employs average of six men;  located at Nelson.
(t)   Freezer locker plant—located at Nelson; capacity, 260 lockers.
Region Three (Okanagan) and Region Six (South Central British Columbia).
(a) Construction company — investment, $20,000; ten employees; located at
Enderby.
(o) Sporting-goods manufacturer and repairs—investment, $10,000; two employees; located at Vernon.
(c) Packing-house—six to twelve employees;   located at Osoyoos.
(d) Furniture-manufacturing concern—investment, $2,000; one employee; located
at Osoyoos.
(e) Lumber-mill—investment, $15,000;  ten employees;  located at Keremeos.
(/) Coal mine—investment, $100,000; twenty to thirty employees; located at
Princeton.
(fit) Coal-dredging concern—investment, $1,250,000; twenty-five employees; located at Princeton.
(h) Sawmill and logging concern—investment, $100,000; twenty-five to fifty
employees; located at Princeton.
(i) Sawmill and logging concern—investment, $75,000; fifteen to twenty employees; located at Princeton.
(?)  Box-factory—investment, $25,000;  ten employees;  located at Princeton.
(fc)  Lumber sawmill—investment, $30,000; fifteen employees; located at Merritt.
(0 Two portable mills—investment, $10,000; twenty employees; located at Clearwater.
(m) Lime production and lime-products concern—investment, $20,000; located at
Clinton; forty-five employees.
(n) Manufacturing beverages—investment, $15,000; five employees; located at
Penticton. DD 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(o) Furniture-manufacturing concern—investment, $10,000; five employees; located at Penticton.
(p) Wholesale fruit-shippers—investment, $100,000; total number of employees,
1,500;   located at Penticton.
(q)  Cannery—investment, $200,000;   500 employees;   located at Penticton.
(r) Furniture-upholstery concern—investment, $1,500; two employees; located
at Kelowna.
(s) Soft-drink concern—investment, approximately, $60,000; four employees;
located at Kelowna.
(t)  Utility-polishes concern—investment, $500;   located at Kelowna.
(w) Bean sprouts—investment, $1,500;  located at Kelowna.
Region Four (Lower Mainland) and Region Five (Vancouver
Island and Gulf Islands).
(a) Coal mine developed at Tsable River, near Cumberland.
(b) Broom-handle manufacturer at Hope—six employees.
(c) Fruit and vegetable cannery at Chilliwack—forty-five employees.
(d) Dehydrated-grass production—fifteen employees;  located at Chilliwack.
(e) Box-factory at Mission—four employees.
(/) Manufacturing sand-cinder-concrete building blocks at Port Coquitlam—four
employees.
(g)  Pole-yard at Port Moody—sixteen employees.
(h)  Manufacture of cement products, tiles, etc., at Haney—five employees.
(i) Woodworking and cabinetmaking concern—five employees;  located at Haney.
(j) Additional plant machinery installed at original cannery to manufacture
raspberry puree seedless pulp at Sardis.
(fc)  Sash and door factory at Abbotsford—three employees.
(I)  Tile-manufacturer at Abbotsford—three employees.
(to)   Banana-box manufacturer at Langley Prairie—five employees.
(n)  Boat-building concern at North Vancouver—seven employees.
(o)   Sash and door company located at North Vancouver—thirteen employees.
(p)  Machinery-manufacturer at North Vancouver—forty-eight employees.
(q)  Lumber concern located at North Vancouver—eight employees.
(r)  Lumber-mill at North Vancouver—eighteen employees.
(s)  Paint-manufacturer at North Vancouver—eight employees.
(t)   Paint-manufacturer at North Vancouver—ten employees.
(u)  Umbrella-manufacturer at North Vancouver—thirty-two employees.
(v)  Sash and door company at Duncan—three employees.
(w)  Ice plant at Port Alberni.
(x)  Sheet-metal works at Courtenay—three employees.
(y)  Sheet-metal works at Courtenay (stove)—three employees.
Region Eight (North Central British Columbia) .
(in.) Cement-block plant at Prince George—equipment includes a Morris block
unit;  capacity, 800 8- by 8- by 16-inch blocks or 4,800 bricks daily.
(b) Steam laundry—new equipment installed at cost of $14,000; eight employees;
located at Prince George.
(c) Ice-cream-making and pasteurization plant—five employees; located at Prince
George.
(d) Kiln-drying equipment installed at planing-mills at cost of $250,000; located
at Prince George. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 51
(e) Dry-kiln addition to mills, 30 miles east of Prince George—capacity (seventy-
two hours), three car-loads of lumber.
(/)   New department store located at Prince George, employing thirty-five persons.
Region Nine (North Central Area).
Rayon-pulp plant located near Prince Rupert.
REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL INDEX OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The first annual edition of this publication was issued in December, 1948, and has
been distributed to business interests in Canada and abroad, to Boards of Trade, to
transportation and banking officials, to Canadian consulates and trade offices throughout
the world, to schools and municipalities in the Province, and others. The Index has
already created considerable interest in the Interior sections of British Columbia as
potential sites for new commercial and industrial enterprises.
The scope of this initial publication has been primarily confined to the non-metropolitan areas of the Province, it being felt that the activities of this Division should be
first directed toward the fostering of industry in the outlying areas. It is the intention, however, to provide more comprehensive and broader coverage in subsequent
issues.
The Regional Industrial Index has located the natural resources, industrial facilities, and pay-rolls by seventy-three districts. By this means, it is possible for potential
industrialists to familiarize themselves with the type and extent of economic activity
prevailing in particular regions of the Province and to ascertain, in general terms,
the opportunities and facilities that are available for industrial expansion.
ANALYSIS OF INDEX.
It will be the task of the Division during the ensuing year to analyse the data
brought to the surface in the Regional Industrial Index as it relates to the respective
areas of British Columbia—to extract and brief information for industrialists seeking
new sites, to discuss with local Boards of Trade and other interested bodies the remedying of deficiencies in industrial facilities of any given area desiring and seeking
industrial expansion.
LIAISON WITH BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL.
The Division has co-operated closely with the Research Council. Through our
field representatives, information has been disseminated to outlying areas concerning
the Council's services and facilities available to industry. Inquiries have been channelled through our field offices to the Research Council during the year on many diversified industry problems.
PUBLICATIONS.
In addition to the publication of the Regional Industrial Index of British Columbia
(1948), the Division, in collaboration with the Departments of Agriculture and Lands,
Geographic Branch, has arranged with the Meteorological Division of the Dominion
Department of Transport to publish a brochure on frost data, covering all sections of
the Province. This publication will be released by the Dominion authorities and distributed by the Division early in 1949, and should be of special interest to fruit, vegetable, and hop growers and the food-processing industries, and fulfills a request
received from many industries for up-to-date frost information of British Columbia. DD 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU.
GENERAL.
Probably never before in the recorded history of the tourist industry did a year
open more inauspiciously than the year 1948.
The motor-vehicle liability insurance card—commonly known as the " pink slip "■—
had just been introduced, and where it is now widely recognized as a wise and protective
measure, there is no doubt that in the initial stages it did give rise to considerable
confusion and quite groundless apprehensions.
Then came the flood conditions, when those two great rivers, the Fraser and the
Columbia, swept aside all man-made barriers and inundated huge areas of British
Columbia, Washington, and Oregon, isolating them, to all intents, for the greater part
of May and June.
To add still further to our difficulties was the threatened railway strike, happily
averted at the eleventh hour, but which caused a great many of our visitors to make
hurried departures.
That this unfortunate combination of circumstances had widespread consequences
and brought distress and ruin to many thousands of people throughout the stricken
areas is fully recognized and deeply deplored, but we are dealing here exclusively with
the tourist industry, and the impact on that industry was heavy indeed.
At the same time the picture is not without its brighter side. Cancellations came
thick and fast to all parts of the Interior, but these were to a great extent taken up by
increased travel from other parts of Canada and by a great many of our own people
who really saw British Columbia for the first time in 1948. On the whole the outcome
for the year was substantially better than we had reason to hope.
In 1947, 205,216 cars entered British Columbia through Border customs ports, as
against 191,637 in 1948, a shrinkage of 13,579. But here it should be pointed out that,
of an estimated expenditure by visitors to Canada in 1947 of $235,000,000, slightly less
than half was credited to travellers by automobile. The balance was spent by travellers
by rail, steamship, bus, and aeroplane. What applies to Canada as a whole may be
taken to apply equally to British Columbia, so that when the final figures are available
for 1948, the results may not be so very disappointing.
It must always be remembered when considering the revenue from the tourist
industry that only a rough approximation is possible. The estimate of $40,000,000 is
based frankly on " rule of thumb." There are too many imponderable factors for even
a close appraisal. Were it possible to follow the tourist dollar through all the intricate
channels of trade, the actual revenue, we know, would be far in excess of that figure—
so far in excess that $75,000,000 would be by no means a fantastic figure to offer.
British Columbia prides itself on what it has to offer, and very properly. Unquestionably it is much the most spectacular of all the Provinces, with an atmosphere
peculiarly its own. But, as pointed out, no single country has a monopoly of the
things that attract the tourist. Every country has them in greater or less degree, and
every country which feels that it has something to offer is out for the tourist dollar,
and America's tourist dollar is prized above all. It has a new and vast significance,
and the struggle for it will be intense and the competition ruthless. We are repeating
ourselves, we know, but we make no apology. We cannot emphasize too strongly that
the day is past for casual assumptions that the tourist dollar is " pennies from heaven."
If we want that dollar, we must work for it. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 53
The essence of the tourist industry is good roads and comfortable accommodations
reasonably priced. Our scenery, our fish and game resources, splendid as they are,
cannot be expected to play the sole sustaining roles. With the programme of public
works actually in hand and planned for the immediate future, we have every reason to
believe that British Columbia will soon have a system of main highways to be counted
among the best on the Pacific Coast. As for our accommodations, the efforts being
made by the Provincial Government to raise the general standards of comfort, cleanliness, and sanitation have already effected substantial improvements. With the
co-operation of the operators, who have shown themselves to be warmly in sympathy
with the Government's aims and objects, it is hoped soon to establish a standard of
excellence which will place British Columbia in the forefront for its interest in the
comfort and convenience of its visitors.
The plan involves the careful inspection of all resorts catering to the tourist, and
the awarding of one-, two-, three-, or four-star grades according to the accommodation
and service which the resort is able to offer.
The plan has been extremely well received, and is being carried out as rapidly as
circumstances will allow. To date, 61 per cent, of the 1,070 resorts in the Province have
been inspected and graded.
It will be appreciated that the work of inspecting and grading tourist resorts must
go on indefinitely; that there can be no point where it can be said to be finished.
Resorts which have been placed in a lower category will naturally wish to improve their
accommodations to qualify for a higher rating, and where such improvements are made,
it is very necessary that the operator be given his higher rating without avoidable
delay. There is also the possibility that operators who are meantime in the higher
brackets may allow their accommodations to deteriorate to where a lower bracket would
be called for. And, of course, new resorts are continually being established, all of
which must be inspected and graded without loss of time.
It is appropriate here to comment upon the excellent co-operation which has been
received from the Health Branch of the Department of Health and Welfare.
PUBLICITY.
Advertising.
The Bureau is pleased again to report an expansion of its newspaper and magazine
campaign in 1948 over 1947. Where, in 1947, $62,000 was at its disposal, in 1948 the
sum was $65,000. As always, the main impact was on the eleven Western States,
including again the State of Texas where the activities of our field representative have
been distinctly productive. Besides the newspapers, a number of widely read national
publications were used.
The policy was continued of placing colourful bulletin-boards at strategic points
on the highways of California, Oregon, and Washington. We were able, too, to conduct
a modest fall campaign in Eastern Canada, with a view to lengthening the season for
our resort-owners.
This year we hope to revert to the practice of direct-mail advertising, with a small
specially prepared folder in full colour, extending a cordial invitation to " Visit British
Columbia." There is a personal flavour to this type of advertising which we believe
has a strong appeal to the recipient, and while the response to our previous efforts was
small, we attribute this very largely, if not entirely, to the restrictions which were in
force at that time. Now that freedom of movement has been restored, the response,
we feel sure, will be commensurate.
Field-work.
This activity was vigorously maintained by our field representative, who has
displayed a marked ability in cultivating the travel market of the Western States. DD 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
There is no doubt that his efforts have already been highly fruitful and that they will
continue to produce substantial and lasting returns.
Motion Pictures.
The Bureau's Photographic Branch continues to function in a highly satisfactory
manner. Its series of travelogues in sound and colour are increasingly popular, notably
in the United States, where they are in steady circulation! The series has been augmented by the addition of films on Ernest Manning Park, the East and West Kootenays,
and the Lower Fraser Valley. At present in hand are films on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, the Coastal trip from Vancouver to Ketchikan, and the highway from
Prince George to Prince Rupert. New projects include a film on British Columbia's
Peace River District and a series of industrial " shorts." Already in circulation are
films on the mining industry and egg production, on both of which the comments have
been highly favourable, and a film on certified seed-potato production will be completed
this year. So excellent is the standard, that several of the Bureau's films have been
televised by American telecasting companies. The Bureau's library now includes 140
films on a wide variety of subjects and many hundreds of " stills."
Literature.
The production of attractive and informative literature has always been one of the
Bureau's main preoccupations, and its booklets and folders are constantly being revised
and brought completely up to date.
Co-operative Activities.
The Bureau has several very successful co-operative efforts to record—among them
the advertising campaign carried out in partnership with the States of Washington and
Oregon for pages in full colour in the popular publication " Holiday." This is a
remarkably well-conceived campaign in which the costs are apportioned on a very
equitable basis, and where each participant is given precisely the same amount of space.
The results accruing from this unique example of international good-fellowship have
been highly satisfactory.
The friendly relations between the Bureau and the Vancouver Tourist Association,
the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau, and the Evergreen Playground Association
continue to be of the best and a source of keen gratification. Mention must be made,
too, of the co-operation given by the Canadian Government Trade Commissioner in
Los Angeles and his staff, who have been extremely helpful.
SETTLEMENT.
While this report is essentially on the tourist industry, it would be incomplete
without brief mention of the Bureau's Settlers' Information Branch. This is an activity
which the Bureau has been at pains to develop over a number of years, to where it has
made itself the recognized authority to which all such inquiries are referred, at least
in their initial stages, and the channel for the dissemination of information to all parts
of the Englsh-speaking world. Unquestionably, of the many thousands of visitors who
enter British Columbia annually, a substantial number come with the idea of making
their homes here and remaining to take part in the development of a country whose
youth and vigour and abundant potentialities have a strong appeal. There is no thought
that its settlement activities will ever claim the leading place, but the Bureau is so
deeply involved in settlement and its competence so widely acknowledged that it must
continue to take a keen and growing interest. Settlement is irrevocably associated
with the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau. VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to tbe Kiug's Most Excellent Majesty.
1949.
1,795-349-8237 

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