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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT For the Year ended December 31st 1947 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1949

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL   REPORT
For the Year ended December 31st
1947
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiaemid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1948.  To His Honour C. A. BANKS,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1947
is herewith respectfully submitted.
GORDON S. WISMER, K.C.,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
August, 19i8. The Honourable Gordon S. Wismer, K.C.,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Thirtieth Annual Report on the
work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1947.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
JAMES THOMSON,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., August, 194-8. Summary of Contents.
Page.
List of Acts affecting Labour Inside front cover
Report of Deputy Minister  7
Statistics of Trades and Industries  7
Employers' Returns  7
Pay-roll  8
Previous Provincial Pay-rolls  8
Comparison of Pay-rolls  9
Industrial Divisions  10
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries  11
Industrial Wage  12
Employment  14
Firms with Large Pay-rolls  19
Statistical Tables  20
Summary of all Tables  33
" Hours of Work Act "  35
Average Weekly Hours  35
Statistics of Civil and Municipal Workers  37
Summary of New Laws affecting Labour  39
" Apprenticeship Act Amendment Act, 1948 "  39
" Coal-mines Regulation Act, 1948 "  39
" Female Minimum Wage Act Amendment Act, 1948 "  40
" Hours of Work Act Amendment Act, 1948 "  40
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act, 1947, Amendment Act, 1948 "__ 41
" Male Minimum Wage Act Amendment Act, 1948 "  43
" Mechanics' Lien Act Amendment Act, 1948 "  44
" Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act, 1948 "  44
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act Amendment Act, 1948 "  44
" Shops Regulation and Weekly Holiday Act Amendment Act, 1948 "  45
"Woodmen's Lien for Wages Act Amendment Act, 1948 "  45
"Workmen's Compensation Act Amendment Act, 1948 "  45
Board of Industrial Relations  46
Meeting and Delegations  47
Orders made during 1947  48
Regulations made during 1947  49
Statistics covering Women and Girl Employees  50
Summary of all Occupations  55
Comparison of 1947 Earnings to Legal Minimum  56
Inspections and Wage Adjustments  56
Court Cases  57
Special Licences  60
Statistics for Male Employees  60
Summary of Orders  63
List of Orders in Effect  99
Hours of Work Regulations  100
Control of Employment of Children ,  108
Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch  110
Work of the British Columbia Board  110
Summary of Cases dealt with  111 J 6 SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch—Continued. Page.
Conciliation Procedure under the " Wartime Labour Relations Regulations
Act"  111
Table of Conciliation Proceedings  113
Boards of Conciliation  119
Strikes and Lockouts, 1947 ,  125
Summary of Disputes  125
Time-loss through Industrial Disputes ,  127
Analysis of Strikes by Industries, 1947  127
Organizations of Employers and Employees  128
Inspection of Factories ,  147
Inspections -  147
Accident-prevention  147
Lighting for Safety  151
t'■'     Factory Conditions  152
Employees' Welfare  153
'     Personal Hygiene and Sanitation  153
Child Employment  154
Industrial Home-work  155
Elevator Inspections  156
Apprenticeship Branch  159
Trade-schools Regulation Branch  161
Safety Branch  164 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1947.
This annual report for the year 1947, being the thirtieth issued by the Department, records a peak year of industrial development within our Province.
With the strength and stability of normal progress in industry no longer seriously
hampered by problems of reconversion, as in the early post-war years, fulfilment of the
promised era of industrial prosperity was rapidly taking effect.
The industrial wealth of the Province is reflected in the rising Provincial estimated pay-roll, which in 1947 totalled some $490,000,000, an apparent increase of
$57,080,273 over the final estimated total of $432,919,727 for 1946.
Heavy demands for primary products, the necessity for increased production, and
a rapid growth in population brought large-scale development programmes in the
lumber industries, public utilities, and construction industries.
Earnings continued their uninterrupted rise throughout the year, with increases
recorded in the average in twenty-two of the twenty-five tables in this report.
The average weekly industrial wage figure for all male wage-earners rose to $43.49,
the highest level yet recorded, and an increase of $3.62 over the preceding year.
Twenty-three of the twenty-five tables relating to the industrial group showed
increases in the pay-roll totals for 1947.
Greatest increase was in the lumber industries (up $30,000,000). With improvement in material supplies, the construction industry moved ahead to exceed all previous
pay-roll records (up $17,000,000). Public utilities gained by $8,000,000. For others
in order of increase see " Comparison of Pay-rolls " in Report data.
Ship-building pay-rolls, which had declined sharply in the post-war years, dropped
a further $1,400,000 to constitute the only major decrease recorded.
Employment levels, with few exceptions, surpassed all previous records during
1947. Extensive expansion and development programmes brought added employment
in the lumber industries, construction, public utilities, and the metal trades. The high
monthly employment figure for wage-earners in 1947 was recorded at 153,994 in
August of that year, compared with a high of 130,631 in the same month of 1946.
Continued decrease was again noted in the average weekly hours of work, which
further declined in most industries. The average weekly working-hours for all wage-
earners decreased to 42.24 from 43.63 noted for the previous year.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
With extensive peace-time expansion of industry, reorganized to pace the rapid
development of the post-war era, and an ever-increasing labour force, the statistical
section for 1947 records a year of activity and progress unprecedented in the industrial
history of the Province.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 8,410.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 8,410,
as compared with 7,326 in 1946, an increase of 1,084. J 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Continued growth in the number of establishments reporting in the survey is
largely due to the added coverage of unusual numbers of new industries and business
enterprises, coupled with increasing co-operation of employers in reporting separate
branches of their business as to industry and location.
Inasmuch as many firms file reports in more than one industrial classification, the
" number of firms reporting " may be considered as representing the actual number
of reports tabulated.
PAY-ROLL.
The total 1947 pay-roll reported by the 8,410 firms filing returns in time for
classification in the tables was $366,197,154. Inasmuch as this total, however, represents a summary of industrial pay-rolls only, it should not be considered as the over-all
Provincial pay-roll unless further augmented by additional figures which follow, to show
an estimated accumulative total of $490,000,000, an apparent increase of $57,080,273
over final estimates for 1946.
Pay-rolls of 8,410 firms making returns to Department of Labour  $366,197,154
Returns received too late to be included in above summary  452,822
Transcontinental railways  (ascertained pay-roll)       24,880,804
Estimated additional pay-rolls, including employers covered by the survey, but not filing
returns, and additional services not included in the tables ; namely, Governmental
workers, wholesale and retail firms, ocean services, miscellaneous (estimated
pay-roll)          98,469,220
Total  $490,000,000
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS.
Provincial pay-roll totals since 1928 have been estimated as follows:—
1928  $183,097,781
1929  192,092,249
1930  167,133,813
1931  131,941,008
1932  102,957,074
1933  99,126,663
1934  113,567,953
1935  125,812,140
1936  142,349,591
1937  162,654,234
1938  $168,026,375
1939  165,683.460
1940  188,325,766
1941  239,525,459
1942  321,981,489
1943  394,953,031
1944  388,100,000
1945  383,700,000
1946  432,919,727*
1947  490,000,000t
* 1946 total revised since 1946 report.
t 1947 preliminary total subject to revision.
In estimating the Provincial pay-roll total for the current year, consideration is
given to the increasing numbers of firms reporting in the industrial section and due
allowance made for continued expansion and development in those additional services
not included in the coverage of the tables.
Revision of preliminary estimated totals is now being made from year to year,
based on additional information not available at the time of publication.
The percentage distribution of the total pay-roll covering each class of worker
included in the survey is shown in the following table:—
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Per Cent.
6.57
9.18
84.25
Per Cent.
7.26
10.72
82.02
Per Cent.
7.95
11.62
80.43
Per Cent.
9.07
12.14
78.79
Per Cent.
8.75
11.37
79.88
Totals	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 9
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
With productive capacity in many industries expanding rapidly under the continued
stimulus of foreign and domestic demand, pay-roll totals soared to new highs in
most instances, registering increases in twenty-three of the twenty-five industrial
classifications included in the survey for 1947.
Greatest development was recorded in the lumber industries, where pay-rolls
increased by $30,405,165 over the previous year, followed by the construction industry,
up $17,410,564, and public utilities, with an increase of $8,257,567; metal trades
increased by $7,192,704, followed by metal-mining, up $4,750,140, and miscellaneous
trades and industries with a gain of $4,367,493; pulp and paper manufacturing, an
increase of $3,653,439; coast shipping, a gain of $3,240,314; food products, up $2,871,-
932; printing and publishing, up $2,075,761; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), increased
by $2,074,842; smelting and concentrating, up $1,745,159; builders' materials, up
$1,294,678; oil refining and distribution, an increase of $1,242,852; explosives and
chemicals up $903,290; garment-manufacturing, up $688,949; laundries, cleaning, and
dyeing, up $686,132; house furnishings, $587,503; breweries and distilleries, $455,368;
coal-mining, $302,770; paint-manufacturing, $194,001; leather and fur goods, $151,-
729;  and jewellery-manufacturing, up $105,916.
Decreases were noted in only two industrial classifications, the ship-building
industry, and cigar and tobacco manufacturing. The ship-building industry, which had
suffered most serious losses during the immediate post-war period, continued to decline,
showing a further decrease of $1,411,667, while cigar and tobacco manufacturing was
down $5,951 from the total for the previous year.
Comparison of Pay-rolls.
Industry.
1945.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1946.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1947.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries and distilleries	
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Construction	
Explosives and chemicals	
Food products	
Garment-making	
House furnishings	
Jewellery-manufacturing	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining '.	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper mills	
Ship-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc.
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
Totals	
34
88
3
23
106
1,116
28
617
68
99
19
123
75
1,174
957
111
496
67
9
143
9
56
5
114
147
$2,789
2,883.
12.
4,904.
12,040.
24,604,
4,047,
23,114,
1,644,
2,480,
419,
3,107,
1,168,
49,074,
22,746,
9,580.
18,467.
3,941.
507,
5,356,
9,880,
42,370,
6,596,
16,657,
7,942,
.221.00
098.00
325.00
871.00
142.00
052.00
719.00
617.00
656.00
693.00
776.00
163.00
011.00
693.00
651.00
047.00
.001.00
.603.00
,707.00
.035.00
380.00
186.00
.640.00
.271.00
.314.00
32
92
3
25
112
1,732
36
649
81
135
21
130
91
1.549
1,209
142
691
73
10
130
8
79
4
111
181
$2,966
3,764
12
4,891
12.995
32,175
4,240
26,943
1,931
3,240
523
3,546
1,402
54,341
23,200
10,173
13,785
4,313
592
6,106
11,158
14,750
7,978
19,027
8,893
691.00
574.00
798.00
840.00
233.00
198.00
590.00
097.00
621.00
740.00
584.00
564.00
221.00
002.00
.677.00
958.00
,795.00
349.00
730.00
,790.00
,690.00
103.00
041.00
371.00
247.00
37
120
3
26
131
1,978
93
138
30
156
96
1,869
1,351
167
849
75
12
159
11
73
5
111
194
5,687 $276,336,872.00
7,326 $272,956,504.00
$3,422.
5,059,
6,
5,194.
16,235
49,585.
5,143,
29,815
2,620
3,828.
629,
4,232
1,553
84,746
30,393
14,924
18,153
5,556
786
8,182,
14,812
13,338
9,723
27,284
10,968
059.00
252.00
847.00
610.00
,547.00
762.00
880.00
029.00
570.00
243.00
500.00
696.00
950.00
,167.00
,381.00
,098.00
288.00
201.00
,731.00
551.00
129.00
,436.00
,200.00
,938.00
089.00
$366,197,154.00 J 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
In order that comparative statistical records may be maintained on a yearly basis,
industrial advancement within the Province is segregated into three main divisions,
including Greater Vancouver, Rest of Mainland, and Vancouver Island.
With the redistribution of the labour force which had concentrated in the Greater
Vancouver area during the war years, the percentage of the total pay-roll attributable
to this division decreased slightly to 40.17 per cent, from 44.23 per cent, recorded in the
previous year. Industrial expansion in other sections of the Province brought a corresponding increase in the Mainland percentage, which accordingly rose to 39.48 per
cent, from 36.50 per cent, recorded in 1946, while the Vancouver Island totals also
gained slightly, the percentage represented in this section rising from 19.27 to 20.35
per cent, for the year under review.
A divisional breakdown of the 1947 total estimated pay-roll is obtained by the
application of the above percentages, the resultant figures appearing in the following
table, together with comparative data for previous years:—
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.*
1947.T
$185,153,980.93
139,655,391.76
70,143,658.31
$171,190,910.00
148,758,730.00
68,150,360.00
$189,662,910.00
121,210,830.00
72,826,260.00
$191,480,395.00
158,015,700.00
83,423,632.00
$196,833,000.00
193,452,000.00
99,715,000.00
Totals	
$394,953,031.00
$388,100,000.00
$383,700,000.00
$432,919,727.00
$490,000,000.00
* 1946 total revised since publication of 1946 report.
t 1947 preliminary total subject to revision.
The percentages of male wage-earners remaining in the lower wage brackets continued to decrease in seven of the twenty-five industrial classifications covered.
The following list of industries has been arranged in order of diminishing percentages to show the total male wage-earners employed in each industry, together with
the percentage of that number earning less than $19 per week.
Number Per Cent.
Industry.                                                                                                                          employed. Less than $19.
Jewellery-manufacturing            143 11.89
Garment-manufacturing            376 11.17
Printing and publishing      1,896 10.97
Leather and fur goods          543 9.76
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing        708 8.90
Miscellaneous  trades   and   industries     8,698 7.11
Coast shipping  ,     6,596 7.02
Food products    14,934 6.37
House   furnishings        1,721 6.28
Metal trades   12,695 5.55
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc     6,634 3.71
Builders'  materials      2,475 3.47
Ship-building       6,715 3.35
Pulp and paper manufacturing      4,528 3.22
Wood-manufacturing   (N.E.S.)        5,497 3.22
Construction      29,077 2.88
Smelting and concentrating       3,251 1.94
Metal-mining       6,395 1.85
Oil refining and distribution      1,319 1.74
Explosives and chemicals  _     1,757 1.59
Lumber industries  .  42,049 1.56
Paint-manufacturing            194 ^55
Breweries and distilleries      1,336 1.27
Coal-mining        2,373 0.51
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing              6 0.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 11
AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS BY INDUSTRIES.
Average weekly earnings for male wage-earners increased in twenty-two of the
twenty-five industrial classifications included in the survey, with decreases recorded
in the remaining three.
Due to changes in the questionnaire dealing with weekly earnings, no segregation
of employees has been made according to age, as in previous years. While prior to
1947 the figures representing average weekly earnings in each industry were based on
adult male wage-earners only, it should be noted that the 1947 earnings as shown in the
following table are based on the totals of all male wage-earners, regardless of age.
Although strict comparability is not possible under these circumstances, it is considered
that little change in the averages is effected by the inclusion of the minority group.
Based on the week of employment of the greatest number, the table shows the
average weekly earnings for male wage-earners in each industry from 1940 to 1947.
Average Weekly Earnings in each Industry (Male Wage-earners).
Industry.
1942.
1943.
1945.
1947.1
Breweries and distilleries...	
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining-	
Coast shipping	
Construction	
Explosives and chemicals	
Food products, manufacture of	
Garment-making	
House furnishings	
Jewellery, manufacture of	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of.
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing.	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc	
Wood, manufacturing of (N.E.S.)	
$28.23
24. IB
17.70
28.04
30.34
27.52
31.67
23.59
25.22
23.59
43.44
24.00
21.72
28.83
26.18
31.77
24.36
29.17
23.15
34.34
29.84
31.74
32.75
28.57 .
24.88
$29.29
26.26
14.50
31.84
30.03
30.21
33.39
25.65
26.51
25.74
38.72
24.76
26.07
31.01
29.90
33.72
26.97
30.97
24.95
36.78
32.13
35.27
37.07
30.93
27.01
$31.85
30.78
15.83
34.56
31.24
36.41
36.45
30.52
27.72
27.76
38.59
28.20
27.80
33.94
34.00
37.19
33.58
33.40
28.73
37.10
33.92
40.32
38.49
32.28
30.24
$33.46
31.61
15.10
39.00
33.97
39.60
37.54
32.66
32.03
28.13
41.14
30.39
30.18
37.09
36.37
35.82
34.92
35.52
30.71
38.39
36.41
40.08
38.47
35.01
33.34
$34.72
33.17
23.61
42.38
35.86
38.47
36.50
35.06
34.42
31.28
44.64
33.05
32.47
41.28
39.07
39.40
37.21
37.99
33.42
39.47
37.71
40.36
36.74
37.29
34.75
$33.73
34.12
20.90
42.11
36.54
37.50
40.43
35.62
36.11
31.39
41.38
31.34
31.63
41.24
38.41
39.99
35.31
38.71
33.42
41.63
37.88
39.96
41.19
37.21
34.70
$37.09
37.02
28.94
43.53
37.27
39.17
38.87
38.00
36.50
33.27
43.00
33.06
34.72
43.20
37.83
42.31
35.23
39.05
33.31
42.12
43.43
40.28
38.70
39.45
37.88
$41.25
40.50
28.50
45.54
38.84
43.08
44.30
40.09
37.03
35.02
40.90
33.51
32.77
47.28
39.90
47.98
37.41
43.80
35.56
43.70
48.10
47.10
45.55
45.04
39.32
* While previous figures represent average weekly earnings for adult male wage-earners only, 1947 averages are
based on earnings of male wage-earners, all-inclusive.
The increases and decreases in the average weekly earnings for male wage-earners
are as follows:—
Breweries  and distilleries    $4.16
Builders' materials    3.48
Coal-mining     2.01
Coast shipping   1-57
Construction    3.91
Explosives and chemicals   5.43
Food products, manufacture of   2.09
Garment-making   0.53
House furnishings   L75
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing   0.45
Lumber industries   4.08
Metal trades   2-07
Increase.
Metal-mining    $5.67
Miscellaneous trades and industries  2.18
Oil refining and distributing   4.75
Paint-manufacturing   2.25
Printing and publishing   1.58
Pulp and paper manufacturing   4.67
Ship-building    6.82
Smelting and concentrating   6.85
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones,  etc  5.59
Wood, manufacturing of  (N.E.S.)     1.44
Decrease.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing   $0.44
Jewellery, manufacture of     2.10
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of $1.95 J 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
Since 1918 the recorded average earnings of the wage-earner group has been used
to indicate the trend of wages paid from year to year in all industrial occupations.
The year 1947 was marked by an inflationary movement in wage structures, largely
due to the combined effect of greater operating costs, steadily increasing prices, and the
resulting demands of labour for commensurate advancement in existing wage-levels.
During the year the computed average weekly wage for all male workers in the
wage-earner group rose to $43.49, representing the highest average per capita weekly
earnings yet recorded for all industrial workers in the Province.
Average industrial weekly earnings from 1918 to 1947 are as follows:—
1918  $27.97
1919  29.11
1920  31.51
1921  27.62
1922  27.29
1923  28.05
1924  28.39
1925  27.82
1926  27.99
1927  28.29
1928  28.96
1929  29.20
1930  28.64
1931  26.17
1932  23.62
1933  $22.30
1934  23.57
1935  24.09
1936  26.36
1937  26.64
1938  26.70
1939  26.80
1940  28.11
1941  30.67
1942  35.24
1943  37.19
1944  38.70
1945  38.50
1946  39.87
1947  43.49
Based on the above average figures, the following chart shows the trend of average
weekly earnings for male wage-earners from 1918 to 1947.
Average Weekly Earnings of Male Wage-earners, 1918 to 1947.
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WAGES
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
mo
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
43.00
42.00
•41.00
40.00
39.00
33.00
37 00
36 00
35 00
34 00
33 00
32 00
31 00
30.00
29 00
28.00
27.00
26.00
25 00
24 00
23.00
22.00
i
1
/
/
/'
_/
/
/
/
/
/
;
A
/
'\
/
\
>
/
/'
\
 s
\
1
—y
y
\
/
/
\
\
/'
V
/
\
V
(1947 figure—$43.49.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 13
Percentage
Weekly of
Wages. Employees.
Under $15  1.66
$15 to   20  2.99
20 to   25  9.20
25 to   30  17.62
30 to   35  17.12
35 to   40  18.32
40 to   45  12.42
45 to   50  9.34
50 and over  11.33
Under $15     1.99
$15 to   20     1.82
20 to   25     4.83
25 to   30  12.08
30 to   35  19.33
35 to   40  18.91
40 to   45  14.21
45 to   50  11.90
50 and over  14.93
Under $15  1.97
$15 to   20  1.72
20 to   25  3.53
25 to   30  9.90
30 to   35  22.06
35 to   40  19.48
40 to   45  17.38
45 to   50  11.53
50 and over  12.43
Under $15     1.81
$15 to   20     1.62
20 to   25     3.85
25 to    30     9.89
30 to   35  22.38
35 to   40  19.70
40 to   45  18.97
45 to   50     9.59
50 and over   12.19
Under $15  2.03
$15 to   20  1.45
20 to   25  3.22
25 to   30  7.43
30 to   35  17.52
35 to   40  22.43
40 to   45  19.53
45 to   50  10.69
50 and over  15.70
Under $15     2.34
$15 to   20     1.60
20 to   25     2.52
25 to   30     4.53
30 to   35  10.32
35 to   40  17.94
40 to   45  19.05
45 to   50  13.78
50 and over  27.92
Ol                 o                 u
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The above bar diagrams show the relative percentages of male wage-earners in the
various wage classifications from 1942 to 1947. J 14                                                DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
EMPLOYMENT.
Coverage of the questionnaire dealing with industrial employment was extended
during 1947 to include clerical and sales staff, in addition to wage-earners only, as
previously reported.    Inasmuch as the inquiry has in the past been restricted to the
wage-earner group, the inclusion of the figures representing clerks, stenographers, and
salesmen in the 1947 employment totals should be considered as a contributing factor
in the increases which are generally apparent.
Strict comparability of the 1947 figures with those of previous years is not feasible,
the current totals being based on the number of employees reported on the pay-rolls
as of the last day of each month, or nearest working-day, while the figures for previous
years were based on the average number of employees at work during each month.
Employment op Clerical Workers in Industry, 1947.*
22,000
21,500
21,000
20,500
20,000
19,500
19,000
18,500
18,000
17,500
17,000
1,500
1,000
500
■
^
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
.
* Emp
salaried of
loyment as at the last day of e_
icials, executives, or manageria
c
  18.144            M
ch month.    Figures include cle
staff.
Clerical Workers, 194'
(Male and Female.)
ay    19,3
rks, stenographers, salesmen, etc., but not
J.
February   18,208           J
une   19.8
30
Octoher                                             20 3fiS
March   18,602            J
aly  20.340
Novemb
Decemb
er   20
457
April  	
18,919
A
ugust
20,5
36
;r    20,
436 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 15
January   123,312
February     124,215
March   130,210
April     133,557
1947.
May   138,922
June    143,343
July   151,636
August     153,994
September   152,990
October     151,421
November     144,039
December   135,581 J 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Total Employment in Industry, 1947.*
190,000
185,000
180,000
175,000
170,000
165,000
160,000
155,000
150,000
145,000
140,000
135,000
130,000
125,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
* Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
Employment, 1947.
(Male and Female.)
May   158,285
June   163,173
July   171,976
August   174,580
January   141,456
February   142,423
March   148,812
April    152,476
September   173,404
October   171,786
November  164,496
December    156,017 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 17
Number
employed.
190,000
180,000
170,000
160,000
150,000
140,000
130,000
120,000
110,000
100,000
95.000
90,000
85,000
80,000
75,000
70,000
65,000
60,000
55,000
50,000
35,000
Monthly Variation in the Number op Wage-earners, Clerical Workers,
and Total Employment in Industry, 1947.*
25,000
20,000
15,000
i
Total
zmpby
merits
^\
|	
"■"\
X
•Wage
Eorner
s
-^""
Cleric
7/  WOI
kers
m     ■*"
* Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff. J 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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©      © REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 19
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-EOLLS.
Substantial increase is noted in the numbers of larger firms reporting pay-rolls in
excess of $100,000, the 1947 total of those reporting in this higher pay-roll bracket
increasing to 622 as against 475 recorded for the previous year.
Pay-rolls excluded from the coverage of this survey are those of public authorities
(Dominion, Provincial, or municipal), wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental railways, and vessels engaged in deep-sea transportation.
The lumber industry is again credited with the greatest number of firms in the
larger pay-roll group, a total of 178 showing in this industry—increased from 117
reported for the previous year; followed by the construction industry with 74, an
increase of 21; metal trades, 68, up 20; food products, 67, an increase of 13; miscellaneous trades and industries, 35, an increase of 3; coast shipping, 27, increased by
6; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), 22, up 2; metal-mining, 20, an increase of 5; public
utilities, 18, up 1; ship-building, 16, a decrease of 1; builders' materials, 15, an
increase of 6; printing and publishing, 14, up 3; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 11,
up 2; oil-refining, 9, unchanged; coal-mining, 8, increased by 1; pulp and paper manufacturing, 8, unchanged; breweries and distilleries, 7, unchanged; garment-making,
6, up 1; explosives and chemicals, 5, up 1; house furnishings, 5, up 1; leather and fur
goods, 3, unchanged; smelting and concentrating, 3, up 1; paint-manufacturing, 2, and
jewellery-manufacturing, 1, both unchanged from the previous year.
Of the 622 firms reporting in the higher brackets, seven had pay-rolls in excess of
$5,000,000, one between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, four between $3,000,000 and $4,000,-
000, ten between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and twenty-seven between $1,000,000 and
$2,000,000. J 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries and Distilleries.—Comprises firms engaged
in these industries,  and carbonated-water manufacturers.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc.—Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick; also
stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation
of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general and
towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include the
operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction.—Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-metal
works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel
fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves, dredging,
pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic sprinklers.
Firms making returns as building contractors, constructors of dry-
kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces, electrical contractors,
hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc.—Includes the manufacture of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacturing of.—-This table includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, flsh, fruit and vegetable canneries, packing-houses,
curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers
of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces, coffee, catsup,
and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' out-fitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacturing of.—Includes the repair as
well as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical instruments   (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.-—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacturing of.—Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills, and
lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine black-
smithing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops, galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of handsaws, nuts
and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and repairs to
same.
No.  16.   Metal-mining.—Includes  all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, cartage and warehousing, motor and aerial transportation,
ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil Refining and Distributing.—Includes also the
manufacture nf fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-ruling,
bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of
rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only firms
engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-
ship building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
engaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial gases, operation of street-railways, and waterworks.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings, barrels,
boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes and tanks,
wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins, and undertakers'
supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERIES, and AERATED-
WATER MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 37 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers,   Superintendents,   and  Managers       $347,542
Clerks,   Stenographers,   Salesmen,   etc         412,547
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     2,661,970
Total  $3,422,059
Employment.
Clerks,
Wage-earners.
Stenographers,
Month.
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
1,061
302
124
46
February	
1,029
237
123
45
March	
1,044
241
123
47
April	
1,140
220
125
46
May	
1,173
202
125
46
June	
1,224
203
127
50
July	
1,257
218
126
49
1,225
228
125
50
September	
1,151
221
122
55
1,126
411
121
55
November	
1,136
425
121
54
December	
1,192
345
123
55
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to    8.99..
9.00 to    9.99..
10.00 to 10.99-
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99-
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99..
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99-
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99-
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
3
2
19
9
30
3
110
205
567
227
83
18
6
4
5
2
6
3
3
9
1
52
279
17
3
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
11
20 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 21
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 120 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $489,859
Clerks,  Stenographers,  Salesmen, etc        519,425
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     4,049,968
Total   $5,059,252
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
1,835
1,861
1,893
1,950
1.973
2.032
2,099
2,115
2,157
2,145
2,108
2,012
24
23
19
17
18
22
27
23
25
29
29
24
139
140
142
140
149
148
151
157
158
158
155
155
92
February	
March	
April	
May	
93
91
89
92
99
97
100
100
97
November	
December	
100
102
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99...
9.00 to    9.99...
10.00 to  10.99...
11.00 to 11.99...
12.00 to  12.99...
13.00 to 13.99...
14.00 to 14.99...
15.00 to 15.99...
16.00 to 16.99...
17.00 to 17.99...
18.00 to 18.99...
19.00 to 19.99...
20.00 to 20.99...
21.00 to 21.99...
22.00 to 22.99...
23.00 to 23.99...
24.00 to 24.99...
25.00 to 25.99...
26.00 to 26.99...
27.00 to 27.99...
28.00 to 28.99...
29.00 to 29.99...
30.00 to 34.99...
35.00 to 39.99...
40.00 to 44.99...
45.00 to 49.99-
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99...
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
26
2
4
4
1
7
6
5
5
2
11
2
7
5
3
6
11
18
4
9
12
14
34
23
80>
441
592
399
271
217
121
59
31
44
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
1
2
2
1
4
1
1
1
4
19
25
23
16
11
4
4
2
9
4
3
4
4
6
7
3
17
1
6
8
1
10
6
5
2
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 3 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers	
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      $172
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     6,675
Total  $6,847
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
7
7
5
5
3
3
4
3
3
4
6
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
1
November	
December	
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99..
9.00 to    9.99...
10.00 to 10.99...
11.00 to 11.99...
12.00 to 12.99...
13.00 to  13.99...
14.00 to 14.99...
15.00 to  15.99...
16.00 to 16.99-.
17.00 to 17.99...
18.00 to  18.99...
19.00 to 19.99...
20.00 to 20.99...
21.00 to 21.99...
22.00 to 22.99...
23.00 to 23.99...
24.00 to 24.99...
25.00 to 25.99...
26.00 to  26.99-
27.00 to 27.99...
28.00 to 28.99...
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99...
35.00 to 39.99...
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99-
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females. J 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 26 Firms.
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 131 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments
, 1947.
$495,176
111,057
1,588,377
.,194,610
Salary and Wage Payments
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers
Clerks,  Stenographers,  Salesmen, etc.
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)
Total	
, 1947.
     $1,315,678
Clerks,  Stenographers,  Salesmen
Wage-earners   (including   piece-
Total 	
       1,067,707
workers)	
   $
13,852,162
  $16,235,547
Employment.
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
2,315
2,309
2,297
2,267
2,159
2,075
2,056
2,023
1,957
2,012
2,071
2,088
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
10
10
10
10
10
10
9
9
9
9
9
10
6,099
6,059
6,107
6,191
6,238
6,859
6,446
6,854
6,367
6,728
6,309
6,282
106
101
108
103
124
138
143
138
135
117
95
94
339
339
342
344
342
351
355
354
357
356
354
358
131
131
March	
125
128
May	
134
139
144
147
144
136
November	
December	
139
143
Classified Weekly Earnings.
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00	
1
3
1
3
3
1
1
3
1
2
2
12
6
4
2
15
9
104
317
686
634
304
86
148
11
14
3
6
4
1
1
1
3
4
5
1
2
2
5
4
1
4
Under $6.00	
48
16
42
44
57
14
26
18
33
42
17
35
23
48
41
43
51
56
94
95
59
145
272
184
148
720
1,331
948
764
397
300
261
72
152
1
1
1
1
1
6
6
2
8
2
1
2
1
1
6
92
5
6
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
2
7
4
2
3
4
1
54
39
68
43
21
19
12
4
10
1
$6.00 to $6.99	
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to  10.99	
10.00 to  10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99	
12.00  to 12.99	
1
13.00 to 13.99	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99
14.00 to 14.99..
16.00  to 15.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
17.00 to 17.99...
18.00 to  18.99	
18.00 to  18.99	
1
19.00 to 19.99	
19.00 to 19.99	
2
20.00 to 20.99	
20.00 to 20.99	
21.00 to 21.99	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
22.00 to 22.99..
2
23.00 to 23.99	
23.00 to 23.99
12
24.00 to 24.99	
24.00 to 24.99
5
25.00 to 25.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99
15
26.00 to 26.99	
10
27.00 to 27.99	
27.00 to 27.99...
5
28.00 to 28.99	
28.00 to 28.99.   .
16
29.00 to 29.99	
29.00 to 29.99    .
3
30.00 to 34.99	
30.00 to 34.99...
23
35.00 to 39.99	
35.00 to 39.99	
3
40.00 to 44.99	
40.00 to 44.99
2
45.00 to 49.99	
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99	
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99	
55.00  to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99	
60.90 to 64.99
65.00 to 69.99	
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over	
70.00 and over	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.                                   J 23
Table No. 6.
CONSTRUCTION.
Returns covering 1,978 Firms.
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 38 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments
1947.
    $
1,004,073
5,778,316
1,803,373
.,585,762
Salary and Wage Payments
, 1947.
$286,132
Clerks,  Stenographers,  Salesmen
Clerks,  Stenographers,  Salesmen
1,239,434
4
..618.314
Total	
  $4
Total	
  $5,143,880
Employment.
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
15,635
16,722
18,714
19,966
21,492
22,316
23,867
23,612
23,130
21,927
20,822
18,481
66
69
69
83
109
136
145
140
104
92
85
68
1,056
1,066
1,239
1,246
1,310
1,383
1,457
1,438
1,445
1,399
1,394
1,335
587
605
618
636
644
666
682
685
681
693
683
683
1
1.632              31
286
285
279
286
286
298
310
312
306
313
313
314
109
109
112
114
116
119
122
119
119
120
114
111
1,617
1,636
1,647
1,643
1,646
1,717
1,668
1,632
1,645
1,626
1,625
36
47
49
40
33
31
37
38
37
35
32
March	
May	
July	
November	
November	
Classified Weekly Earni
ngs.
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00
103
67
25
33
46
62
53
74
58
47
62
75
59
73
104
173
74
159
113
222
199
210
237
449
319
5,099
4,841
3,863
2,305
5,119
2,283
1,095
487
889
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
4
4
3
2
3
3
8
4
1
1
17
52
7
1
1
1
1
7
1
1
2
2
5
1
2
3
10
11
2
5
13
4
8
16
8
24
8
17
39
7
237
271
209
158
157
123
113
43
84
14
4
4
1
5
8
12
3
3
11
8
16
32
17
39
17
32
46
21
61
20
34
34
11
146
59
47
6
5
2
1
Under $6.00	
7
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
4
5
6
11
3
6
9
9
17
8
11
17
3
109
268
430
356
244
132
57
18
15
1
1
1
3
2
6
3
14
1
1
10
4
7
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
4
4
4
2
2
5
6
1
23
17
18
35
42
45
50
20
35
2
1
1
2
6
11
4
7
8
3
11
7
9
7
21
10
4
4
1
$6.00  to $6.99	
$6.00  to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99
17.00 to  17.99	
18.00 to 18.99	
19 00 to 19.99
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to 20.99	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99	
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over	 J 24                                                DEPARTMENT
OF LABOUR.
Table No. 8.
FOOD  PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 688 Firms.
Table No. 9i
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 93 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers
Clerks,  Stenographers,  Salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)
Total          	
, 1947.
    $
3,118,746
4,010,598
2,685,685
9.815.029
Salary and Wage Payments
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)
Total	
, 1947.
 ,      $341,785
     2
        371,893
     1.906.892
  $2
  $
2,620,570
Employment.
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, _rrc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
1
8.193      4.088
1,175
1,162
1,181
1,210
1,234
1,256
1,287
1,272
1,268
1,275
1,278
1,270
802
791
808
819
821
854
887
878
875
828
832
810
1
299        1.074
51     1     128
6,933
7,430
7,797
8,422
9,334
10,744
11,408
11,166
10,756
8,964
8,066
2,440
2,424
2,601
2,758
4,310
7,072
8,727
9,170
8,070
5,000
3,401
303
314
320
322
334
313
323
322
340
339
337
1,164
1,215
1,250
1,255
1,167
882
943
1,100
1,156
1,223
1,208
48
50
52
55
54
56
58
55
55
57
59
128
March	
April	
May -	
June -	
March	
129
136
May	
132
136
July	
August	
September	
145
August	
September	
144
146
153
November	
December	
162
December	
177
Classified Weekly Earnings.
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99	
155
78
55
46
37
45
35
56
49
51
101
63
76
104
56
96
56
99
77
103
149
156
131
244
172
2,372
2,917
2,973
1,683
1,035
567
373
249
475
493
106
104
108
133
148
127
143
166
184
200
273
284
419
375
453
310
522
347
593
480
462
472
657
425
2,379
1,162
514
345
92
38
29
10
25
4
4
8
1
2
4
1
4
1
3
9
10
20
2
3
15
10
13
7
26
15
24
330
261
235
118
85
47
46
20
52
7
1
1
2
4
7
5
6
7
4
16
6
14
45
41
83
39
57
56
37
77
53
62
41
21
116
60
14
9
4
1
1
Under $6.00     	
2
2
1
1
5
5
2
7
3
14
6
10
6
10
4
9
14
4
8
10
5
50
50
39
42
22
12
16
4
13
31
7
6
8
8
6
9
29
23
20
31
70
68
118
50
126
50
120
70
86
87
64
45
44
20
128
60
28
10
6
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
7
9
6
7
8
2
1
6
$6.00 to $6.99 	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99 	
9.00 to    9.99	
9.00 to    9.99 	
10.00 to  10.99	
10.00 to  10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
11.00 to 11.99  	
12.00 to 12.99	
12.00  to  12.99	
2
13.00 to 13.99....
13.00 to 13.99  	
14.00 to 14.99
14.00 to 14.99 	
15.00 to  15.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99
16.00 to 16.99  	
17.00 to  17.99 	
18.00 to 18.99   ..
19.00 to 19.99	
19.00 to 19.99  	
4
20.00 to 20.99	
20.00 to 20.99 	
21.00 to 21.99	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
13
23.00 to 23.99	
23.00 to 23.99   .
24.00 to 24.99	
24.00 to 24.99   	
25.00 to 25.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99   	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99	
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99   	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99	
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99	
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99   	
10
45.00 to 49.99	
45.00 to 49.99
5
50.00 to 54.99	
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99	
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99	
60.00 to 64.99 -
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over	
70.00 and over	
1 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 25
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 138 Firms.
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 30 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Salary and Wage P
Officers, Superintendents, and _t
ayments
, 1947.
$81,373
$466,056
383,809
2,978,378
263,566
284,561
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)
Total	
Total  $
3,828,243
    $b_;9,»UU
Employment.
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January...	
1,452
1,452
1,475
1,413
1.380
547
538
547
517
485
96
96
96
96
106
108
105
112
116
127
131
130
110
109
111
108
108
107
105
108
113
104
116
120
January	
February	
March	
April	
124
121
126
128
127
126
125
123
128
125
129
129
10
10
10
9
10
11
11
11
9
9
9
9
49
49
47
48
49
55
53
57
55
53
56
58
130
120
115
113
117
120
126
121
123
128
160
139
March	
1,384    S     489
1.394    1     508
1  4..9              532
July	
August	
September	
October- -
November	
July	
1,348
1,099
1,459
1,465
561
497
573
579
September	
November	
December	
1
1
Classified Weekly Earnings.
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00
15
6
5
2
2
7
3
7
7
4
14
8
9
19
9
45
21
38
10
40
5
1
1
4
1
3
1
4
3
6
7
18
23
28
40
60
57
56
30
75
1
1
6
5
2
1
1
4
3
1
2
16
25
17
14
10
5
4
1
7
1
1
1
1
1
2
6
8
4
10
4
9
5
6
14
2
6
3
6
18
10
4
2
1
1
1
1
Under $6.00	
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
6
4
7
10
4
5
2
5
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
....-
11
19
45
12
3
23
2
10
5
7
5
1
5
2
1
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
2    '         2
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
2
1
1
12.00 to 12.99
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99	
13.00 to 13.89	
14 00 to 14.99 	
15.00  to 15.99	
14.00 to 14.99       	
15 00 to 15 99
4     ]
1 1
2 !           1
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to  18 99
18.00 to 18.99	
3
7
2
1
2
2
3
1
13
21
25
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to 20.99	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99	
29     1        34
41     1        42
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
55
58
30
39:9
26
29
18
84
27 00 to 27.99	
28.0.   to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99	
455               23
35.00 to 39.99	
237
75
79
26
17
15
4
11
2
4
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99	
10    1     	
50.00 to 54.99	
10
7
4
2
16
55.00  to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over	 J 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 12
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING.
Returns covering 156 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $355,686
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        730,808
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     3,146,202
Total  $4,232,696
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
574
582
586
600
611
623
645
643
635
622
630
624
1,960
1,968
1,958
1,973
2,003
2,001
2,112
2,095
2,063
1,988
1,939
1,929
218
226
228
232
227
229
225
236
240
230
242
242
222
218
March	
216
219
222
218
218
222
220
217
216
214
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS-
MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 96 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $214,561
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        280,367
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     1,059,022
Total  $1,553,950
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
464
481
490
473
477
459
454
454
447
470
463
456
256
279
277
289
288
274
284
281
269
266
262
236
81
82
83
86
90
91
92
90
92
96
91
90
64
63
March	
63
66
70
67
61
August	
67
70
69
71
71
Classified Weekly Earnings.
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, Era
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00	
11
4
1
2
3
2
2
2
3
2
17
11
8
13
4
14
6
16
33
20
65
21
14
30
13
38
28
26
34
37
57
60
200
215
156
167
165
254
165
170
89
106
1
1
2
1
8
5
5
2
36
32
44
28
35
22
14
8
8
4
2
1
3
3
1
3
2
29
11
25
13
48
4
11
18
8
8
8
1
12
3
1
2
1
1
1
Under $6.00
fi                 9
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
3
5
1
2
1
6
7
12
14
4
4
6
7
$6.00 to $6.99	
1
2
1
3
1
2
5
2
1
4
6
9
10
5
18
5
20
17
10
28
17
8
14
6
82
134
82
23
15
1
3
4
1
2
3
1
5
2
3
8
6
16
24
28
21
19
44
10
37
16
16
5
7
1
49
7
7.00 to    7.99	
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to    8.99	
8.00 to    8.99
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to  10.99	
10.00 to  10.99
1
11.00 to 11.99	
11.00 to 11 99
12.00 to 12.99	
12.00 to 12.99
2
13.00 to 13.99	
13 00 to 13.99
14.00 to 14.99—	
14.00 to 14.99
15.00  to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
16.00 to 16.99
4
17.00 to  17.99	
18.00 to  18.99	
19.00 to 19.99	
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99	
20.00 to 20.99
21.00 to 21.99	
21.00 to 21.99
5
22.00 to 22.99	
22.00 to 22.99
4
23.00 to 23.99	
23.00 to 23.99
4
24.00 to 24.99	
24.00 to 24.99
25.00 to 25.99	
13
26.00 to 26.99	
26.00 to 26 99
27.00 to 27.99	
16            36
27.00 to 27.99
28.00 to 28.99 -
22
17
163
149
101
30
10
6
8
2
7
35
11
66
22
8
6
8
2
1
28.00 to 28.99
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99	
6
2
40.00 to 44.99	
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99	
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99	
50 00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99	
65.00 to 69 99 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 27
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 1,869 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers,  Superintendents,  and Managers     $5,016,884
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       2,703,903
Wage-earners  (including Piece-workers)     77,025,380
Total  $84,746,167
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
26,336
28,407
30,391
31,291
32,638
32,196
34,300
34,317
35,909
36,435
35,634
31,751
291
333
358
351
405
443
467
463
475
483
439
379
565
576
591
592
616
629
658
675
682
681
682
680
324
321
342
354
359
361
375
372
September	
376
382
379
371
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99...
9.00 to 9.99...
10.00 to 10.99...
11.00 to 11.99...
12.00 to 12.99...
13.00 to 13.99...
14.00 to 14.99...
15.00 to 15.99...
16.00 to 16.99...
17.00 to 17.99...
18.00 to 18.99...
19.00 to 19.99...
20.00 to 20.99...
21.00 to 21.99...
22.00 to 22.99...
23.00 to 23.99...
24.00 to 24.99...
25.00 to 25.99...
26.00 to 26.99...
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99...
30.00 to 34.99...
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.    Females.
102
5
4
41
4
1
64
1
37
3
1
25
37
3
17
5
1
36
12
2
36
2
36
5
60
10
2
65
13
1
49
10
2
52
7
1
72
13
113
13
2
73
8
2
80
15
2
85
5
7
110
18
1
125
30
7
102
30
3
90
4
2
180
21
5
165
28
1,722
64
36
7,838
112
47
10,225
45
80
6,022
29
103
4,168
29
62
2,845
19
72
2,104
4
66
1,320
3
38
3,953
4
53
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Table No. 15.
Males.     Females.
4
2
2
2
4
1
6
4
4
13
11
3
26
13
29
13
23
18
14
102
39
22
14
8
1
2
1
2
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 1,351 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers, Superintendents,  and Managers     $5,202,727
Clerks,  Stenographers,   Salesmen,  etc       5,795,104
Wage-earners   (including  Piece-workers)     19,395,550
Total  $30,393,381
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
9,184
9,287
9,368
9,525
9,788
10,017
10,120
9,804
9,697
9,826
10,001
-   9,959
315
324
352
329
326
337
316
292
303
333
328
322
1,724
1,735
1,769
1,838
1,894
1,966
2,012
2,028
2,040
2,065
2,089
2,087
868
870
875
912
936
951
July	
1,000
1,000
September	
October	
997
999
1,013
1,018
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99...
7.00 to 7.99...
8.00 to 8.99...
9.00 to 9.99...
10.00 to 10.99...
11.00 to 11.99...
12.00 to 12.99...
13.00 to 13.99...
14.00 to 14.99...
15.00  to 15.99...
16.00 to 16.99...
17.00  to 17.99...
18.00 to 18.99...
19.00 to 19.99...
20.00 to 20.99...
21.00 to 21.99...
22.00 to 22.99...
23.00 to 23.99...
24.00 to 24.99...
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99-
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males. Females.
78
23
27
19
32
39
35
48
35
48
101
54
71
94
45
158
47
140
111
127
283
167
186
232
142
,681
,265
,260
,861
,157
480
223
127
299
I.
4
1
10
1
6
6
2
14
27
9
34
10
18
6
37
9
82
58
8
5
10
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males. Females.
12
1
13
6
7
13
20
25
20
14
41
21
54
28
43
61
27
313
276
283
233
163
113
73
54
147
1
2
4
B
10
3
4
11
9
47
38
75
40
59
80
35
105
53
84
56
31
182
64 J 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 167 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers,  Superintendents, and Managers     $1,211,701
Clerks,   Stenographers,   Salesmen,  etc       1,850,150
Wage-earners   (including Piece-workers)     11,862,247
Total  $14,924,098
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
4,214
4,309
4,409
4,413
4,850
5,146
5,349
5,319
5,237
5,372
5,516
5,486
80
88
89
94
103
101
116
119
122
115
116
118
428
438
446
444
451
470
485
481
468
479
473
492
134
132
134
135
137
142
154
147
September	
125
128
November	
December	
137
136
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to    8.99-
9.00 to    9.99..
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to  11.99..
12.00 to  12.99..
13.00 to 13.99-
14.00 to  14.99..
15.00 to  15.99..
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to  18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99-
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99-
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99-
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to  64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
25
5
6
4
7
2
11
11
7
5
4
3
10
12
20
13
21
10
11
24
22
186
554
1,077
1,879
1,258
480
259
138
296
24
12
41
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
1
12
37
48
63
74
78
70
46
63
4
14
1
32
27
11
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 8U9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers,  Superintendents, and Managers     $2,300,842
Clerks,   Stenographers,   Salesmen,  etc       3,228,637
Wage-earners   (including  Piece-workers)     12,623,809
Total  $18,153,288
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clesks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
5,255
5,501
5,814
5,742
5,875
6,351
6,562
7,111
6.382
6.204
6,096
5,924
1,049
998
1.02S
1,051
1,100
1,329
1,288
1,558
1,061
1,076
1,078
1,023
843
843
860
872
902
932
957
1,124
984
989
984
683
690
March	
694
693
May	
717
744
August	
September	
October	
792
766
762
774
1.005      I       767
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
S6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to    8.99..
9.00 to 9.99-
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99-
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99-
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 64.99..
55.00 to 59 99-
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
128
49
9
10
51
21
6
28
16
24
15
1
36
13
3
36
19
1
7
33
10
	
1
30
21
3
5
35
18
4
29
49
1
1
46
30
5
8
40
33
4
6
47
76
8
12
55
55
10
49
58
54
7
16
92
87
18
77
46
57
10
30
86
103
4
43
68
62
19
85
85
60
9
34
142
127
45
82
167
115
12
49
160
51
27
49
201
92
46
44
145
86
41
16
413
211
223
143
203
480
189
55
245
42
131
13
879
13
101
10
515
6
78
4
250
5
56
118
4
30
40
3
31
167
7
53
2 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 29
Table No. 18.
OIL REFINING AND DISTRIBUTING.
Returns covering 75 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers,  Superintendents,  and Managers      $671,667
Clerks,  Stenographers,   Salesmen,  etc     2,797,432
Wage-earners   (including  Piece-workers)     2,087,102
Total  $5,556,201
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
985
933
865
841
887
931
980
964
926
1,057
1,151
1,073
27
25
20
18
14
22
28
33
23
36
30
30
989
989
983
979
998
1,000
1,036
1,039
1,048
1,044
1,011
1,000
243
241
March	
245
238
May -	
241
247
July....	
August	
September	
October	
November	
250
266
265
270
268
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to    8.99-
9.00 to    9.99-
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to  11.99..
12.00 to  12.99..
13.00 to  13.99..
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to  15.99..
16.00 to  16.99..
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to  19.99..
20.00 to 20.99-
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99-
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99-
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99.
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99-
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females.
18
9
155
284
292
206
141
62
47
20
46
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males. Females.
2
1
10
6
1
7
1
2
5
1
9
9
8
10
1
94
155
236
209
137
66
45
18
26
10
1
11
2
102
34
16
16
2
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers,  Superintendents,  and Managers  $189,158
Clerks,  Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     246,128
Wage-earners   (including Piece-workers)     351,445
Total  $786,731
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
164
165
171
162
160
169
169
176
171
171
168
166
44
45
44
44
46
48
46
46
44
41
39
37
70
71
73
73
73
77
76
76
79
80
80
80
29
30
March	
30
31
32
31
32
August	
September	
32
33
34
November	
December	
36
38
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to 7.99..
8.00 to 8.99..
9.00 to 9.99..
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99-
12.00 to 12.99...
13.00 to 13.99-
14.00  to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99-
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99-
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99-
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99-
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.    Females
3
1
3
6
3
5
1
7
2
3
6
9
32
67
27
10
5
3
1
3
7
1
13
1
6
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
7
14
9
15
4
1
2 J 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 159 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers,  Superintendents, and Managers  $1,126,094
Clerks,   Stenographers,   Salesmen,  etc     2,575,759
Wage-earners   (including  Piece-workers)     4,480,698
Total  $8,182,551
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
1,674
1,684
1,699
1,704
1,705
1,707
1.725
1,728
1.759
1,785
1.801
1,810
353
376
371
352
353
352
348
382
381
373
366
368
745
747
761
763
785
781
796
803
835
788
808
812
549
661
March	
565
566
May	
577
596
605
604
September	
October..__	
November	
581
624
628
645
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to    8.99-
9.00 to    9.99..
10.00 to  10.99..
11.00 to  11.99..
12.00 to  12.99..
13.00 to  13.99..
14.00 to  14.99..
15.00 to  15.99-
16.00 to  16.99-
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to  18.99-
19.00 to  19.99..
20.00 to  20.99-
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99-
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99-
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to  28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to  54.99..
55.00 to 59.99-
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
Males.  Females.
23
3
4
5
5
19
9
19
14
11
24
36
19
17
13
46
21
27
10
6
32
14
17
24
9
97
160
148
167
448
219
82
40
108
22
11
7
4
6
3
10
8
10
13
17
27
26
23
12
23
12
23
9
11
9
17
13
62
5
45
19
11
1
2
2
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.    Females.
4
1
2
2
6
11
3
13
4
7
17
5
7
33
17
11
15
7
100
101
112
85
76
39
44
22
60
1
1
6
1
6
5
7
16
3
20
47
18
42
16
50
30
35
58
27
28
24
21
36
6
11
5
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 11 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers,  Superintendents, and Managers     $1,538,191
Clerks,  Stenographers,   Salesmen,  etc  934,283
Wage-earners   (including  Piece-workers)     12,339,655
Total  $14,812,129
Employment.
Month.
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November.
December..
Wage-earners.
Males.     Females
4,338
4,302
4,332
4,420
4,454
4,526
4,611
4,577
4,526
4,616
4.610
4,564
267
269
298
297
323
344
346
340
318
328
327
333
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.     Females.
300
306
313
321
337
351
362
368
356
357
164
164
169
168
174
179
176
184
185
185
181
185
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to    8.99-
9.00 to    9.99..
10.00 to  10.99..
11.00 to  11.99-
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99-
14.00 to  14.99..
15.00 to  15.99..
16.00 to 16.99..
17.00 to  17.99..
18.00 to  18.99..
19.00 to  19.99..
20.00 to  20.99..
21.00 to  21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99-
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 64.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over
Wage-earners.
62
8
5
12
7
3
4
7
7
9
8
3
7
4
5
5
5
8
12
10
14
10
13
16
20
112
575
1,081
737
437
435
307
179
401
18
2
2
1
1
1
2
3
3
2
1
4
2
5
9
9
9
14
17
125
60
36
7
6
2
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
2
2
1
14
17
47
57
47
54
30
15
38
4
2
2
10
3
6
2
3
23
18
48
34
16 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.                                     J 31
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering 73 Firms.
Table No. 23.
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING.
Returns covering 5 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments
Officers,  Superintendents,  and Managers
Clerks,   Stenographers,   Salesmen,  etc.
Wage-earners   {including  Piece-workers)
1947.
$616,794
1,198,449
11,523,193
Salary and Wage Payments, 1947.
Officers,  Superintendents, and Managers	
Clerks,   Stenographers,   Salesmen,   etc	
Wage-earners   (including  Piece-workers)	
Total  $
$415,391
2,061,730
7,246,079
Total	
$13,338,436
3,723,200
Employment.
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females
Males.
Females.
!
4.579               23
379
378
367
374
388
376
367
357
348
350
351
346
159
162
163
149
147
146
142
134
136
132
133
132
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
i
2,898    I       57
2.885    I       56
2.873    ]        53
2,792    1        53
2,953     !        55
3,026    j       56
3,096     !        60
3,053     1        61
3.140     t        57
3.187     1        61
511
516
518
517
534
541
551
550
546
547
150
153
152
149
154
153
156
155
153
161
154
155
February	
March	
April	
4,853
5.249
5,433
5.665
20
20
19
18
4.842     1        18
4,505     |        18
4.049     [        18
3,926     |        19
4.013              18
July	
August	
September	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
November	
4.315
4,107
18
3.203     1        62     [      547
3.280     i        59     1      548
|
1
Classified Weekly Earnings.
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00 	
55
10
10
17
5
7
23
2
8
21
30
8
29
15
33
8
15
12
22
36
14
41
43
29
427
776
892
1,479
1.241
433
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
2
1
4
2
3
16
2
20
4
13
9
7
42
2
6
2
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99	
15
2
3
2
1
5
2
3
5
7
3
1
6
8
15
8
7
11
10
13
6
7
5
10
10
135
281
880
828
599
249
1
1
3
2
20
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
3
2
4
5
1
2
1
10
18
30
55
84
100
101
62
81
1
1
3
1
2
5
2
3
3
8
5
2
7
30
58
13
8
1
2
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99    	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to  12.99	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to  14.99	
15.00 to  15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to  18.99	
1       I             9.
19.00 to 19.99	
2
1
1
2
1
20.00 to 20.99 -	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
24 00 to 24.99       	
     1          2
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
1
1
2
1
1
4
10
54
37
45
43
25
23
30
21
61
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99	
30 00 to 34.99    	
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99 -	
40 00 to 44.99        	
45.00  to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
60    1
26    1
28    1
162    [
527    I
1
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over	
70.00 and over	 J 32                                             DEPARTMENT
OP LABOUR.
Table No. 24.
STREET-RAILWAYS,  GAS, WATER,  LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 111 Firms.
Table No. 25.
WOOD MANUFACTURING (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 19U Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments
Officers,  Superintendents,  and Managers
Clerks,  Stenographers, Salesmen, etc
Wage-earners   (including  Piece-workers)
Total	
Salary and Wage Payments
Officers,  Superintendents, and Managers
Clerks,  Stenographers,  Salesmen, etc.
Wage-earners   (including  Piece-workers)
Total	
, 1947.
$1,383,870
        4,467,682
21,433,386
  $27,284,938
, 1947.
$857,208
          587,095
       9,523,786
  $10,968,089
Employment.
Employment.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
January	
5,835
5,787
5,973
6,049
6,169
6,097
6,232
6,160
6,028
5,890
4,724
5.881
2,260
2,284
2,300
2,332
2,400
2,476
2,468
2,409
2,388
2,387
2,338
9 344
1,020
1,027
1,046
1,145
1,156
1,164
1,175
1,182
1,180
1,143
1,143
1.143
1,002
1,002
1,027
1,036
1,047
1,068
1,100
1,104
1,105
1,112
1,107
1.126
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
4,083
4,084
4,214
4,323
4,414
4,637
4,873
4,975
4,956
4.968
5,004
4.957
846
855
886
864
909
973
1,000
995
1,004
975
938
904
108
108
112
114
116
124
124
134
136
140
145
150
88
86
88
84
89
93
91
95
98
98
97
101
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
1
1
j
Classified Weekly Earni
ogs.
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00... .
1
1
3
2
1
3
5
1
4
3
4
5
10
13
8
39
126
162
113
146
222
71
52
81
129
1
1
3
2
3
2
3
12
6
22
42
23
91
37
124
58
95
91
62
189
162
56
40
20
12
2
3
1
Under  $6.00	
18
20
18
7
2
11
8
9
14
9
16
14
24
12
15
7
66
16
46
45
45
39
64
43
579
1,885
1,436
510
260
147
43
18
44
1
4
4
1
1
5
4
4
3
2
4
6
5
12
21
9
17
15
52
38
34
11
5
9
406
330
48
6
1
4
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
17
13
16
17
12
9
14
25
20
2
2
2
4
4
1
1
7
3
8
4
6
3
$6.00 to $6.99	
40
6
5
20
10
9
19
5
20
15
21
54
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to  10.99	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to  11.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99	
13    ]        26
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99	
13.00 to  13.99-
14.00 to  14.99	
14
18
24
20
20
16
31
23
50
17
28
38
33
60
166
126
147
13K
14.00 to  14.99	
15.00 to 15.99-  .
15.00 to 15.99
16.00 to 16.99	
16.00 to  16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
17.00 to 17.99
18.00 to  18.99	
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to  19.99	
19.00 to  19.99	
20.00 to 20.99	
20.00 to  20.99	
21.00 to 21.99     .
21.00 to 21.99
22.00 to 22.99
22.00 to 22.99
23.00 to 23.99.
27     |      144
37     |      194
51    !      149
40     1      113
23.00 to 23.99
24.00 to 24.99	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99	
46
97
34
583
877
114
98
75
301
124
28.00 to 28.99	
28.00 to 28.99
29.00 to 29.99	
29.00 to 29.99.
2
30.00 to 34.99	
30.00 to 34.99	
28
35.00 to 39.99	
35.00 to 39.99
18
40.00 to 44.99    .
929    I        24
1,311    I       44
945    !
525    1
300    [
148     ]
318    I
40.00 to 44.99
.?
46.00 to 49.99	
45.00 to 49.99
1
1
1
50.00 to 54.99	
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99	
55.00 to 59.99
60.00  to 64.99	
60.00 to 64.99
65.00 to 69.99 .
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over	 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 33
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 8,410 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st,' 1947.
Officers,  Superintendents, and Managers  $32,047,194
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc     41,616,051
Wage-earners   (including Piece-workers)  292,533,909
  $366,197,154
Returns received too late to be included in above summary        $452,822
Transcontinental railways   (ascertained pay-roll)     24,880,804
Estimated additional pay-rolls, including employers covered by the survey but not filing
returns, and additional services not included in the tables; namely, Governmental
workers, wholesale and retail firms, ocean services, miscellaneous   (estimated pay-roll)    98,469,220
 123,802,846
Total..
$490,000,000
Employment-
Month.
Wage-earners.
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
109,235
111,676
117,475
120,642
125,578
128,060
133,703
134,123
133,100
132,523
128,285
121,721
14,077
12,539
12,735
12,915
13,344
15,283
17,933
19,871
19,890
18,898
15,754
13,860
11,319
11,373
11,672
11,920
12,241
12,534
12,839
13,051
12,939
12,869
12,894
12,864
6,825
6,835
6,930
6,999
7,122
7,296
7,501
7,535
September	
7,475
7,496
7,563
7,572 J 34
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Classified Weekly Earnings.
For Week of Employment of Greatest Number.
Wage-earners.
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Under $6.00	
916
370
310
264
311
319
263
367
331
334
524
483
465
608
502
941
485
927
717
1,017
1,325
1,232
1,397
1,959
1,429
16,714
29,047
30,842
22,309
18,709
9,687
5,876
3,114
7,822
754
205
162
200
198
262
255
297
281
371
406
557
777
993
952
1,143
872
1,358
895
1,366
1,096
1,094
802
1,150
716
4,295
2,647
844
491
163
80
42
20
39
48
5
13
12
3
19
17
24
12
15
48
33
54
51
70
121
52
61
133
73
236
105
176
236
163
1,750
1,776
1,810
1,609
1,379
966
819
521
964
62
$6.00 to $6.99	
18
7.00 to    7.99	
8
8.00 to    8.99	
7
9.00 to    9.99	
14
10.00 to 10.99	
33
11.00 to 11.99	
29
12.00 to 12.99	
52
13.00 to 13.99	
33
14.00 to 14.99	
31
15.00 to 15.99	
71
16.00 to 16.99                     	
53
17.00 to 17.99	
102
18.00 to 18.99	
317
19.00 to 19.99	
201
20.00 to 20.99                	
499
21.00 to 21.99	
251
22.00 to 22.99	
375
23.00 to 23.99	
541
24.00 to 24.99	
301
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99	
499
28.00 to 28.99	
449
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99	
1,355
707
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99.               	
Totals	
161,916
25,783
13,374
7,886 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 35
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Since the " Hours of Work Act" became effective, the Board has shown the average
weekly working-hours of wage-earners by industries, and the accompanying table sets
out comparative figures for the years 1930 to 1947, inclusive.
Comparative Figures, 1930 to 1947 (Wage-earners).
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Wage-
earners
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 54 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
54 Hours.
1930	
4,704
4,088
3,529
3,530
3,956
4,153
4,357
4,711
4,895
4,829
4,971
5,115
4,845
4,727
5,044
5,687
7,326
8,410
87,821
84,791
68,468
71,185
75,435
81,329
90,871
102,235
96,188
94,045
103,636
118,160
154,191
151,420
143,640
141,182
140,865
159,300
Per Cent.
77.60
83.77
80.36
77.95
85.18
88.78
87.12
89.31
88.67
88.68
88.93
89.61
84.70
89.10
92.42
93.46
94.87
92.67
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
5.76
5.26
6.42
4.57
5.29
5.42
5.13
4.49
7.51
4.57
4.59
4.20
2.98
5.49
Per Cent.
9.04
1931	
9.44
1932	
11.92
1933	
11.12
1934	
9.06
1935	
5.96
1936	
6.46
1937             	
6.12
1938            	
6.04
1939              	
5.90
1940             	
5.94
1941            	
5.90
1942	
7.79
1943    . ..                                  	
6.33
1944               	
2.99
1945	
2.34
1946	
2.15
1947                         	
1.84
1947                	
  42.24
1946 	
  43.63
1945            	
  45.59
1944                	
  46.02
1943    	
  47.19
1942                	
  48.12
1941        	
  46.90
1940            	
  46.91
1939	
  47.80
The average weekly working-hours for all employees in the wage-earner section
for the same years are as follows:—
1938  46.84
1937  47.25
1936  47.63
1935  47.17
1934  47.32
1933  47.35
1932  47.69
1931  47.37
1930  48.62
Information regarding hours of work, as submitted by the 8,410 firms reporting to
the Department of Labour, covered some 159,300 male and female wage-earners for
1947. Of this number, 92.67 per cent, were shown as working 48 hours or less per week,
5.49 per cent, working from 48 to 54 hours per week, and 1.84 per cent, working in
excess of 54 hours per week.
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES.
With additional data now available due to increased coverage in the 1947 survey,
information has also been recorded regarding the hours worked by clerical workers.
In addition to the wage-earners reported below, the firms replying to the questionnaire
submitted information covering some 21,627 male and female clerical worker for 1947,
this total being inclusive of clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc., but excluding salaried
officials, executive and managerial staff.
The following tables show by industry the 1947 average weekly hours worked, as
recorded for both the wage-earner section and clerical workers:— J 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Wage-earners.
Industry.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
45.05
47.43
44.80
47.90
51.69
51.14
46.75
47.59
43.30
44.00
43.88
44.99
43.79
48.67
53.00
45.23
49.27
48.47
46.42
45.02
49.35
47.68
45.83
43.95
42.13
48.27
43.92
49.72
45.77
46.28
45.37
46.20
41.80
47.96
51.48
44.09
45.31
47.72
42.72
43.55
43.47
43.37
43.25
48.46
52.50
44.79
47.83
47.98
46.28
45.18
48.82
47.36
46.57
43.75
41.45
48.04
43.07
47.73
45.40
45.61
44.64
45.12
43.27
47.91
51.13
42.79
44.18
47.36
41.45
43.40
43.09
44.09
43.03
48.13
51.69
44.39
47.72
47.46
45.90
43.26
48.57
46.30
43.93
43.63
41.46
47.97
43.10
48.02
45.18
45.61
43.19
43.87
38.50
40.09
50.05
41.58
42.20
45.90
41.13
42.32
42.83
42.77
41.89
43.21
45.88
43.72
44.63
44.02
43.83
42.47
45.31
44.46
43.63
43.51
40.74
44.17
42.02
42.28
44.50
43.32
41.23
42.65
41.50
40.11
47.38
41.36
42.59
44.33
39.43
39.94
41.93
41.60
40.85
Lumber industries—
41.55
47.55
42.38
41.24
41.25
40.40
42.01
45.19
43.10
44.06
41.59
39.42
44.73
39.46
42.30
43 36
39.78
Clerical Workers, 1947.
Industry.
Breweries and distilleries	
Builders' materials 	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining 	
Coast shipping 	
Construction 	
Explosives, chemicals, etc	
Food products, manufacture of	
Garment-making 	
House furnishings 	
Jewellery, manufacture of	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of.
Lumber industries—
Logging 	
Logging-railways 	
Lumber-dealers  	
39.33
40.25
40.00
39.61
41.06
39.69
40.48
42.60
39.62
39.83
36.71
43.44
40.49
42.89
Industry.
Lumber industries—Continued.
Planing-mills    42.07
Sawmills   40.66
Shingle-mills   38.31
Metal trades   41.23
Metal-mining   42.96
Miscellaneous trades and industries  40.59
Oil refining and distributing  39.20
Paint-manufacturing   38.40
Printing and publishing  37.35
Pulp and paper manufacturing  38.80
Ship-building   39.98
Smelting and concentrating  42.36
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc.. 39.80
Wood-manufacturing    (not   elsewhere
specified)     38.96
40.55 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 37
STATISTICS OF CIVIL AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS.
Information contained in the statistical tables to follow has been compiled from
annual returns submitted to the Department of Labour by the various cities and
municipalities throughout the Province, reporting on pay-roll and employment totals
of civic and municipal workers for the year 1947.
While the totals shown in this section are here set aside for separate study, it
should be noted that the figures have already been incorporated in other tables as a
part of the total industrial pay-roll. They should therefore not be considered as in
addition to totals quoted elsewhere in this report.
Represented in the figures are workers engaged in public works, the construction
and maintenance of roads, the operation and maintenance of waterworks, generation
and distribution of light and power, and similar operations owned and operated by the
city or municipality making the return.
Based on 120 returns submitted by civic and municipal administrations, the total
reported pay-roll was $9,182,413, an increase of $1,617,439 over the reported total
for 1946.
Pay-roll totals of civic and municipal workers are shown in the following table,
which sets out comparative figures as reported for each class of worker covered in the
survey, for the years 1945, 1946, and 1947:—
1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers
Clerks, Stenographers, etc	
Wage-earners	
Totals	
692,741
4,176,837
$706,418
1,050,627
5,807,929
$986,080
900,120
7,296,213
$5,438,424
$7,564,974
9,182,413
A substantial increase in municipal employment was again evident in 1947, the
increases occurring particularly in the wage-earner section. The monthly totals
reported for 1947 represent the numbers on municipal pay-rolls as of the last day of
each month, or nearest working-day, compared with average monthly employment
submitted in previous years.
The following- table shows the 1947 municipal employment totals by sex and
occupational group, together with average monthly employment figures for the
preceding years 1945 and 1946:—
1945.
1946.
1947.*
Month.
Monthly Average
Employment.
Monthly Average
Employment.
Wage-earners.
Clerks, Stenographers, etc.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
2,268
2,249
2,286
2,322
2,443
2,590
2,666
2,733
2,677
2,707
2,759
2,741
60
69
99
126
186
216
257
243
134
86
99
66
3,020
3,065
3,317
3,502
3,826
3,845
3,856
3,831
3,470
3,368
3,387
3,291
47
55
74
99
193
252
278
254
127
85
79
64
3,518
3,618
3,938
4,097
4,457
4,529
4,790
4,691
4,337
4,267
4,235
4,121
16
16
16
16
41
60
64
59
18
16
16
16
271
270
282
280
281
285
285
283
287
291
288
295
120
120
121
124
131
135
136
137
133
131
* 1947 employment figures based on numbers reported on pay-roll on the last day of each month, or nearest
working-day, and totals segregated to show occupational groups. J 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Indicating the distribution of civic and municipal employment with relation to
earnings, the following table shows the percentages of male wage-earners in the various
wage classifications as noted, for the comparative years 1945, 1946, and 1947:—
Weekly Earnings.
Percentage of Employees.
1945.
1946.
1947.
Under $15	
2.28
2.25
9.64
18.09
47.26
12.67
5.18
1.98
0.65
2.58
1.23
5.28
12.99
54.88
14.32
4.74
2.53
1.45
2.38
$15 to   20	
1.20
20 to    25	
2.40
25 to   30	
9.27
30 to   35	
39.49
35 to   40	
30.24
40 to    45	
7.85
45 to   50	
3.71
3.46
Average weekly earnings for male wage-earners on civic and municipal pay-rolls
was $34.89 for 1947, increased from $32.57 recorded for the previous year.
A survey of male and female civic employees in clerical occupations showed average
weekly earnings in this section of $37.45 for male and $25.26 for female workers.
Included in this classification were clerks, stenographers, and general office employees,
exclusive of salaried officials, executives, and managerial staff.
The average weekly hours of work for municipal and civic employees in the
wage-earner section decreased to 41.28 from 41.99 previously reported, while for the
clerical workers the average weekly figure was 38.49 hours for the year under review. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 39
SUMMARY OF NEW LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR.
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1948.)
"APPRENTICESHIP ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1948."
This amendment gives the Minister of Labour authority to exempt a minor from
the necessity of entering into a contract of apprenticeship where the minor is to be
employed at specialized or repetitive work within a designated trade. Previously, the
Minister of Labour could exercise this authority only when a minor was performing
specialized or repetitive work within a designated trade in or incidental to the production or manufacture of war supplies.
" COAL-MINES REGULATION ACT, 1948."
The " Coal-mines Regulation Act " has been completely revised. Chapter 188 has
been repealed and chapter 54 of the Statutes of 1948 has taken its place.
The old Act was divided into thirteen parts—two of these parts have been combined
into one in the new Act, making twelve parts instead of thirteen. These twelve parts
have been rearranged so that they follow in better sequence.
Part I, Inspection of Mines, sections 4 to 13, has been revised, allowing for
appointment of Electrical and Mechanical Inspectors of Mines and the powers and
duties of Inspectors have been more clearly defined.
Part II, Employment of Managers, Overseers and Coal-miners, sections 14 to 16,
has been changed very little, but a new subsection (6) of section 15 has been added to
make certain that no person other than the holder of a first-class certificate of
competency or a graduate mining engineer can take part in the technical management
of a mine.
Part III, Examination and Inquiries as to Competency, sections 17 to 29: This
part of the Act has been revised to clarify the duties of the Board of Examiners, and
also gives graduate mining engineers an opportunity to take the examinations for
coal-mine officials with one or two years less practical experience than that of other
candidates. Another new provision in Part III, section 24 (2), is an Inspector may
grant a permit to a person not holding a coal-miner's certificate to work at the coal-face
under the supervision of a coal-miner under certain conditions, but the permit is good
only for one year or less if that person obtains a coal-miner's certificate before the
year expires.
Part IV, Regulation of Employment and Wages, sections 30 to 42: There has been
very little change in the meaning of any of the sections in this Part, but the phrasing
has been improved.
Part V, Outlets, Water-covered Areas, and Divisions of Mines, sections 42 to 52:
This Part has been revised for better phrasing, but the meaning changed very little.
Part VI, Protection of Abandoned Mines, Plans of Mines, sections 53 to 57: The
principal change.in this Part is that now the owner or manager must send the Chief
Inspector an accurate plan of the mine within six weeks after abandonment of the mine.
The old Act gave the owner or manager three months to prepare this plan.
Part VII, Returns and Notices, sections 58 to 62: This Part has been rewritten,
cutting out unnecessary sections in regard to returns which were already dealt with
in other Departmental Acts.
Part VIII, Arbitration, section 63: This Part has been revised for better phrasing,
but very little change in meaning.
Part IX, Inquests, section 64:  Practically similar to the old Act.
Part X, General Rules, Regulations, and Special Rules, sections 65 to 81: The
General Rules governing safety in different phases of underground operations have J 40 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
been completely revised, bringing them in line with modern mine practice. In section
65 there are ninety-eight rules; these rules have been classified under various headings
dealing with particular subjects, such as ventilation, inspection of workings and
machinery, explosives and blasting, machinery and haulage, timbering, etc.
In section 66 there are thirteen rules dealing exclusively with precautions against
coal-dust in mines. These rules have been brought in line with recent research into
this subject in Great Britain.
In section 67 there are seven rules dealing with precautions against coal-dust in
dry-coal cleaning plants.   This is an entirely new section.
In section 68 there are thirteen rules governing surface coal-stripping operations.
This is an entirely new section.
In section 69 there are twenty-seven rules governing electrical installations on the
surface and underground at coal mines. These rules have been completely revised,
bringing them in line with the requirements of the Electrical Code of the Canadian
Standards Association.
Sections 70 to 81 deal with the methods of drawing up special rules at the various
mining operations. Several improvements have been made in these sections over the
old Act.
Part XI, Rescue-work, sections 82 and 83: This Part is very similar to the old Act.
Part XII, Supplemental, sections 84 to 93: This Part deals with offences and
penalties.   This has been revised and clarified.
A Schedule giving an abstract from the British Table of Distances for magazines
and a complete index have been added.
" FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1948."
Prior to this amendment, the Board of Industrial Relations was restricted in its
power to issue licences to female employees. The licences, providing for the payment
of minimum wage-rates lower than those payable to experienced employees, could be
issued only with respect to female employees who were inexperienced and who were
over 18 years of age. The amendment deletes the reference to age, it being considered
that experience rather than age should be the deciding factor, and accordingly the
Board may now issue licences for inexperienced female employees without regard to
the age factor.
The Act was further amended by requiring an employer to keep a record of the
occupations of all of his employees. It is thought that a record showing the occupational classifications of the employees will facilitate the work of Inspectors when
determining the appropriate minimum wage-rate that should apply in any instance.
Also, certain occupations in various industries are exempt from the limitation of
working-hours provided in section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act," and a record of the
employee's occupation will clarify the situation for the management and the Inspectors.
The employer is no longer required to keep a record of the nationality of the employee,
as this information was useful only for statistical purposes.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1948."
Persons holding positions of supervision or management or employed in a
confidential capacity were not restricted to the hours of work provided in section 3 of
the Act so long as the duties performed by them were entirely of a supervisory or
managerial character and did not comprise any work or duty customarily performed
by the employees. In case of dispute the Board could determine whether or not the
position held by any person was such as to bring him within the scope of this provision.
To overcome the problem of having to determine whether or not a dispute existed, the
words " case of dispute " were deleted, and the words " any such case " substituted, REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 41
so that regardless of any difference of opinion in connection with the application of this
section the Board would have the right to finally decide whether or not the employee's
duties were such as to bring him within the scope of the provisions of section 4.
Provision is made in section 11 (3) of the Act for a variance of the employee's
working-hours over a period of time if an agreement between the employees and the
employer is confirmed by the Board. The average hours of work over the period shall
not exceed forty-four per week. As this section was worded, the only variance that
could be agreed to was with respect to the daily limit of work. The amendment provides
for the Board's confirmation of a variance with respect to the daily or weekly, or both
the daily and weekly, limit of hours of work, as experience had shown that in order to
average a forty-four-hour week over a stated period of time it is often necessary to
exceed the weekly hours as well as the daily hours for a part of that averaging period.
A further amendment substituted the word " occupations " for the word " nationalities " in connection with the keeping of records for reasons similar to those outlined
in connection with the amendment to the " Female Minimum Wage Act."
" INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT, 1947,
AMENDMENT ACT, 1948."
Under the original Act the Minister of Labour was charged with the performance
of many duties which have now been delegated to the Labour Relations Board (British
Columbia). The appointment of Conciliation Officers and Conciliation Boards, the
determination of certain questions of fact, the granting of permission to prosecute for
infractions of the Statute are among the duties of the Labour Relations Board. The
Minister of Labour remains responsible for the administration of the Act and retains
authority to appoint Industrial Inquiry Commissions.
Where previously a certificate of bargaining authority was issued to bargaining
representatives elected by a majority vote of the employees affected, or to a trade-union
which had as its members the majority of the employees in a unit appropriate for
collective bargaining, such a certificate may now be issued to a " labour organization,"
which may be either a trade-union or an association of employees.
Decisions regarding such questions as to whether a person is an employee within
the meaning of the Act, or if a labour organization is dominated or influenced by an
employer, are the conclusive responsibility of the Labour Relations Board.
The Act, in addition to other sections concerning unfair labour practices, now
provides that if an employer illegally discharges an employee because of participation
in the activities of a labour organization, he shall reinstate the employee and pay to
him the wages lost by reason of the discharge; if the employer is found guilty of such
an illegal discharge by a Magistrate or Justice, he may be directed to pay the employee
the wages lost by reason of the discharge in addition to any other penalty imposed;
if an agreement is reached as a result of collective bargaining and the parties refuse
to sign or execute the agreement, they may be charged with an offence against the Act.
Following a complaint that an employer, labour organization, or person acting on their
behalf is committing any act of unfair labour practice, the Labour Relations Board may
serve notice on the parties concerned that an inquiry will be made, and if, as a result of
the inquiry, the parties are found to be committing the prohibited act, the Labour
Relations Board may order that it cease. A refusal of the parties to obey this order
is an offence against the Act, and a conviction thereof will not prevent prosecution
in respect of any offence committed by reason of doing the prohibited act.
The section dealing with the payment of union dues has been changed so that
a check-off of dues must only be paid to a labour organization which is certified as a
bargaining authority. J 42 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
It is provided that where an application for certification is made by a labour
organization for a bargaining unit in which the employees are employed by two or more
employers, the Labour Relations Board shall not certify the bargaining authority unless
the unit is appropriate for collective .bargaining in respect to all the employers and
unless the majority of the employers has consented to representation by one bargaining
authority.
The amendments provide that at any time after a labour organization has been
certified as bargaining agent for a unit of employees, the Labour Relations Board may
cancel the certification if investigation discloses that the labour organization has ceased
to be a labour organization, or that the employer has ceased to be the employer of the
employees in the unit, or if ten months have elapsed since the certification of the labour
organization and that it has ceased to represent the employees in the unit.
Where an employer has separate operations in progress in different parts of the
Province and an application for certification of a bargaining authority for the employees
in any trade is made, the Labour Relations Board may certify a bargaining authority
for all the employees in that trade in all the operations of the employer throughout
the Province.
The time in which certain things are to be done pursuant to the Act has been
reduced. An employer must commence collective bargaining with the bargaining
authority within five days after receipt of a notice from the bargaining authority
instead of the ten days previously allowed. A Conciliation Officer may be appointed
after collective bargaining has taken place for ten days instead of fourteen, and only
by consent of the Labour Relations Board or upon consent of the parties concerned
may his commission be extended beyond ten days, whereas this period had been fourteen
days. Similarly, the time-limits concerning the appointment, functioning, and report
of Conciliation Boards, and the period following the report of the Conciliation Board
which must be observed before a strike or lockout can be legally called, are reduced.
The amendments provide that the Labour Relations Board may authorize an
employer, who has been notified to commence collective bargaining by a bargaining
authority, or who has been a party to a collective agreement, to make an increase or
decrease in wages or an alteration in any term or condition of employment. The
regulations may be of general or restricted application and may prescribe the conditions
to be observed by the employer to whom the authority was granted.
Where previously it was provided that the report of the decision of a majority
of the members of a Conciliation Board was the report of the Board and as such was
sent to the interested parties, amendments now state that if the Conciliation Board's
decision is not unanimous, then copies of the reports of all the members must be sent
to the interested parties and may be published by the direction of the Labour Relations
Board.
The amendments provide that in the event of a strike or lockout and where an
offer of settlement is made by either employer or employees, the Labour Relations
Board may direct that the offer be submitted to a vote of the employers or employees
affected, and it may make arrangements for the conduct and supervision of the vote.
Sections in the original Act which provided for the appointment, duties, and
powers of a Referee regarding investigations concerning unfair labour practices have
been deleted.
Provisions regarding the term of collective agreements have been amended. It is
now provided that if a collective agreement is for a term of more than one year, then,
notwithstanding any provisions contained in the agreement, either party may, after
the agreement has been in operation for eight months, apply to the Labour Relations
Board for permission to terminate the agreement on its next anniversary date. If the
Labour Relations Board gives this consent and if the notice of termination is served REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 43
on the party at least two months before the anniversary date, then the agreement will
be terminated on that date. However, should the parties desire that the term of a
collective agreement be for more than one year, they may by agreement specifically
exclude the operation of the foregoing provisions, and in that event they would not be
applicable.
The section dealing with the qualifications of members of a Conciliation Board
has been amended. No person shall be appointed to act as a chairman of a Conciliation
Board who has, either directly or indirectly, any pecuniary interest in the matters
referred to it or who is or has within a six-month period preceding the date of his
appointment acted in the capacity of solicitor, legal adviser, counsel, or paid agent of
either of the parties concerned in the dispute.
It is provided in the amendments that the members of the Labour Relations Board
are appointed to office for a term of five years but may be dismissed for cause. Should
the chairman not be present at a meeting of the Board, the remaining members of the
Board may appoint one of their number to act as chairman, and in order that routine
matters may be promptly disposed of, the Board may delegate any of its functions
or duties to one or more of its members.
The section dealing with the powers of the Labour Relations Board has been
amended so that the Board's decision is final and conclusive for the purposes of the Act
in regard to certain questions arising under the Act, except in respect of any matter
that is before a Court.
Amendments to the miscellaneous provisions of the Act now make it obligatory
for an extra-provincial company to appoint a person resident in the Province to bargain
collectively with the bargaining authority and to conclude and sign a collective agreement on behalf of the company which shall be binding on it, and failure to comply with
these provisions is an offence against the Act.
It is provided that if employees have gone on strike contrary to any of the
provisions of the Act, the Labour Relations Board may cancel the certificate of
bargaining authority for these employees and may establish a procedure for negotiating
a settlement of the strike.
The amended Act provides that where it is necessary to serve an unincorporated
organization with a summons or other Court process, service may be effected on the
secretary, if available, or otherwise on any officer of the organization.
It is provided in the amendments that pre-strike and pre-lockout votes will be by
secret ballot and that the Labour Relations Board or its representative will supervise
the taking and counting of the ballots and may make such regulations as it deems
proper for supervision of the vote. The Labour Relations Board may also direct that
any other vote, under the provisions of the Act, shall be by secret ballot and may
exercise full power of supervision over the taking and counting of the ballots.
Under amendments to the Act, the Labour Relations Board is to make an annual
report to the Minister of Labour for submission to the next meeting of the Legislature.
The report is to comprise statements and summaries of the work accomplished by the
Board and such other information as may be requested by the Minister of Labour.
For the purpose of dealing with labour relations on a Dominion or interprovincial
basis in the meat-packing and coal-mining industries, the amendments provide that
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may make regulations providing for co-operation
with the Dominion or any other Province, and to the extent that they are necessary
to be effective these regulations will supersede the provisions of the Act.
" MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1948."
This amendment to the " Male Minimum Wage Act" provides for the members
of the Board of Industrial Relations to elect one of its members to be vice-chairman
of the Board, who shall have all the powers of the chairman during his absence. J 44 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
A further amendment requires the employer to keep a record of the occupations
of his employees instead of the nationalities, for reasons similar to those outlined in
connection with the amendment to the " Female Minimum Wage Act."
"MECHANICS' LIEN ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1948."
This amendment provides that all sums received by a contractor or a sub-contractor
on account of the contract price shall be a trust fund in the hands of the contractor
or the sub-contractor for the benefit of the owner, contractor, sub-contractor, Workmen's Compensation Board, labourers, and persons who have supplied material on
account of the contract. Neither the contractor nor the sub-contractor shall appropriate any part of such sum to his own use until all labourers and persons who have
supplied material on the contract are paid for work done or material supplied, and the
Workmen's Compensation Board is paid any assessment.
"METALLIFEROUS MINES REGULATION ACT, 1948."
The " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" has been completely revised. Chapter
189 has been repealed and chapter 55 of the 1948 Statutes has been substituted.
The new Act is headed by three preliminary sections followed by five parts.
The preliminary part includes the title, definitions, and application of the Act.
Part I, Administration, sections 4 to 19: This makes provision for the appointment
of Electrical, Metallurgical, and Mechanical Inspectors and defines the powers and
duties of Inspectors and the duties of owners, agents, and managers.
Part II, General Rules, section 20: This Part consists of 256 general rules which
apply to mines, quarries, and metallurgical works. These rules have been completely
rewritten to bring about a better arrangement and conform with modern mining
practices. They are grouped under various headings dealing with particular subjects,
such as surface arrangements, fire-protection, explosives, hoisting, haulage, ventilation,
etc. Rules covering mills and metallurgical works have been amplified and additions
made to cover cranes, elevators, hoistways, etc., on the surface.
Part III, Special Rules, sections 21 to 31: This Part deals with the method of
drawing up special rules to make provision for covering special conditions found at
any mine.
Part IV, Electrical Installations, sections 32 to 37: This Part defines the extent
to which the Canadian Electrical Code applies to surface and underground electrical
installations at metal mines, quarries, and metallurgical works, and the powers of the
Electrical Inspector and duties of owners, agents, or managers in this respect.
Part V, Supplemental, sections 38 to 48: This Part deals with offences and
penalties, and has been revised and clarified. It also gives the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council power to make regulations for carrying out the provisions of the Act in the
interests of safety.
A Schedule giving an abstract from the British Table of Distances for magazines
and a complete index have been added.
" SEMI-MONTHLY PAYMENT OF WAGES ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1948."
Certain difficulties had been present in connection with the enforcement of this
Act by reason of the fact that a " wage " had not been defined. This amendment defines
" wage " or " wages " as " any compensation for labour or services, measured by time,
piece, or otherwise," and is similar to that provided in the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
Prior to this amendment, employees who had been engaged under a bona-fide
contract, where the yearly salary or wages was $2,000 or over, were exempt from the
application of the Act.    The increases in wages that have taken place during the last REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 45
seven years have added substantially to the number of employees who might be exempt
from the provisions of the Act by reason of the fact that they were engaged under
a bona-fide contract and were paid $2,000 or over. In order that the Act would apply
to the majority of employees who worked for wages, the amendment requires that the
bona-fide contract shall be in writing and that the wages of the employees shall be
$4,000 or over.
" SHOPS REGULATION AND WEEKLY HOLIDAY ACT
AMENDMENT ACT, 1948."
In Part II of the Act regarding Regulations relating to a Weekly Holiday, the
definition of a " shop " is clarified by the inclusion of, with the present definition, any
building or portion of a building, booth, stall, or place where goods are exposed or
offered for sale by retail, or where the business of a barber or a hairdresser or the
business of a shoe-shine stand is carried on, but not where the only trade or business
carried on is that of a tobacconist, news-agent, hotel, inn, tavern, victualling-house,
or refreshment-house, and the exclusion of pawnbrokers' shops or shops in which only
second-hand goods or wares are bought, sold, or offered for sale, or premises where
a barber or hairdresser is attending a customer in the customer's residence.
A routine amendment is made in section 3 by substituting the word " holiday "
for the word " half-holiday."
" WOODMEN'S LIEN FOR WAGES ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1948."
This amendment provides that a plaintiff, on filing his statement of claim in any
suit brought to enforce a lien under the " Woodmen's Lien for Wages Act," shall pay
in stamps $1 on every $100 or fraction of $100 of the amount of his claim up to $1,000.
"WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1948."
The most important amendments to the Act, from the worker's point of view, are
those that provide increased compensation to dependents. The death benefits payable
to dependents were increased from $40 to $50 per month, and the allowance for each
child under the age of 16 years was increased from $10 to $12.50 per month, without
any limitation on the total amount that might be paid pursuant to the provisions of this
section of the Act.
A further amendment increases from $2.50 to $3 50 the per diem allowance the
Board may make to an injured workman for his subsistence when, under its direction,
he is undergoing treatment at a place other than the place wherein he resides.
Still another amendment increases from $125 to $150 the amount the Board may
allow to cover the necessary expenses of the burial or cremation of a deceased workman. J 46 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. James Thomson, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell 1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton  789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
4. J. A. Ward Bell 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. H.   Douglas 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
Mabel A. Cameron, to July 31st, 1947 Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
C E. Margison, September 1st, 1947 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Head Office Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch Office 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Regional Offices.. 17 Bastion Street, Nanaimo.
Capital News Building, Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
560 Baker Street, Nelson.
220 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Department of Labour, Prince George.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
SIR,—We have the honour to present the fourteenth annual report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1947.
When the " Male Minimum Wage Act" of 1934 was passed by the Legislature,
provision was made in that Statute for the establishment of a board consisting of
five members, to be known as the " Board of Industrial Relations." The Board was
established in April, 1934, and was charged with the duties and responsibilities
formerly connected with three separate boards—namely, the Minimum Wage Board,
the Board of Adjustment, and the Male Minimum Wage Board.
The first Minimum Wage Board of the Province, consisting of three members,
had been set up in July, 1918, to administer the provisions of the " Women's Minimum
Wage Act." This Board dealt with minimum wages and conditions of employment
with respect to female employees. It was not until the year 1925 that legislation was
passed relating to the establishment of minimum wages applying to male employees.
Prior to the year 1934 the " Hours of Work Act," a Statute passed in December,
1923, had been administered by the three-member Board of Adjustment which was
established in January, 1925. The Board of Adjustment also, until the "Male Minimum
Wage Act" of 1925 was repealed and a new " Male Minimum Wage Act " was passed
by the Legislature on March 20th, 1929, had jurisdiction over the matter of minimum
wages for male employees. With the enactment of the " Male Minimum Wage Act"
of 1929, a Male Minimum Wage Board was established to exercise control over the
matter of minimum wages for male employees. The Male Minimum Wage Board
consisted of three members and functioned during the years 1929 to 1934, when the
present Board of Industrial Relations was established.
The brief historical outline in the preceding paragraphs is provided to indicate
that for more than a quarter of a century legislation has been in effect to protect female
employees from possible exploitation by a minority of employers who, but for that
legislation, may not have had any interest in the welfare of the women and girls
employed by them, and that for twenty-three years legislation has been in effect giving
benefits to male employees.
Although this is the fourteenth annual report of the Board, it is actually the
thirtieth annual record of the Department with respect to female employees. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 47
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS.
During the year 1947 the Board held eighty-five sessions on forty-three different
days. It convened in Victoria on thirty-one of those days and in Vancouver on twelve
days.
Thirty-five delegations appeared before the Board during the year under review.
Certain of the delegations requested the Board to establish minimum wages and
conditions of employment with respect to employees who were not at that time receiving
the benefits of a minimum wage Order. Other delegations made submissions to the
Board regarding proposed revisions of Orders in effect, and still other parties made
representations requesting temporary amendments to certain Orders to provide time
to make provision for increased personnel so that the industry would not be penalized
for non-compliance with certain provisions of the Orders due to reasons which were
beyond its control. In this connection representations were made by employers in the
logging industry regarding the hours worked by the timekeepers in logging camps.
It was claimed that during the war it had been impossible to provide accommodation
for future requirements and that it would need several months before changes in
personnel, etc., could be made so that the working-hours of the timekeepers could be
confined within the limits provided in the " Hours of Work Act." After a complete
investigation of the matter the Board made Orders Nos. Ia (1947) and lc (1947),
referred to in the following section of this Report. Similar representations were made
by the pulp and paper industry. It was claimed that lack of accommodation resulted
in shortage of labour and made it impossible to fully comply with the weekly limit of
forty-four hours. The result of this submission is outlined under the heading " Orders
made during 1947."
Public hearings were held in connection with the carpentry industry, automotive
maintenance workers, radio technicians, sheet-metal workers, theatrical workers, and
bakery salesmen.
Following these hearings the Board made Order No. 58 (1947) and Regulation
17b, referred to in the following sections of this Report.   ■
It has not yet been possible to complete the revision of all the Orders to which
reference was made in the Annual Report for 1946, and this is due in part to the time
the Board has had to devote to the preparation of proposed Orders covering employees
who up to this time have not come within the application of any minimum wage Order
of the Board, or who, at the present time, are covered by an industrial Order rather
than an occupational Order.
On July 31st, 1947, Miss Mabel A. Cameron, secretary of the Board of Industrial
Relations, who had completed twenty-eight years' service with the Provincial Government, retired from the Civil Service. She had joined the Department of Labour as
secretary of the Minimum Wage Board in 1919. During her twenty-eight years as
a public servant Miss Cameron had taken an active part in drawing up the many
Orders and regulations that are now in effect, and on her retirement the Department
lost an employee whose experience and ability were recognized both by her associates
in the Department and the general public.
C. R. Margison, who had for the previous six months been acting as administrative
assistant to the chairman of the Board, was appointed secretary to the Board oh
September 1st, 1947. He had been on leave from the Department of Labour from
January, 1942, to February, 1947, during which period he had been working with the
British Columbia Regional War Labour Board in the administration of the Dominion
Government's War-time Wages Control Order. J 48 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ORDERS MADE DURING 1947.
During the year 1947 the Board completely revised ten of its Orders, resulting in
the promulgation of the following:-—
Order No. 1,1947, with respect to the logging industry.
Order No. 5,1947, with respect to the personal service occupation.
Order No. 25,1947, with respect to the manufacturing industry.
Order No. 49,1947, with respect to the woodworking industry.
Order No. 50,1947, with respect to the sawmill industry.
Order No. 51,1947, with respect to the household-furniture manufacturing
industry.
Order No. 55,1947, with respect to the box-manufacturing industry.
Order No. 58,1947, with respect to the carpentry trade.
Order No. 62,1947, with respect to the shingle industry.
Order No. 68, 1947, with respect to the Christmas-tree industry.
In addition, an entirely new Order was made with respect to the occupation of
hairdressing, Order No. 27, 1947, which occupation had previously been included in
the Personal Service Order.
The wage-rates and working conditions provided in the above-mentioned revised
Orders substantially improved the employees' conditions of employment, but perhaps
the major change made in connection with most of these Orders was the broadening
of the application of all but four of them to include in their coverage both male and
female employees. Previously Order No. 5 and Order No. 25 had applied only to
female employees, and Order No. 49, Order No. 51, Order No. 55, and Order No. 68
had applied only to male employees.
In connection with the carpentry trade, after holding a public hearing regarding
the revision of the applicable Orders, the Board decided to make one Order governing
this trade to apply throughout the Province instead of restricting its application to
only five areas of the Province as previously.
Order No. IA, 1947, and Order No. lc, 1947—Logging Industry.—Order No. Ia,
1947, amended Male Minimum Wage Order No. 1, 1947, with respect to the logging
industry by removing male office employees in logging camps from the overtime provisions of that Order for the period May 29th, 1947, to December 31st, 1947. This
amendment was further extended by Order No. lc, 1947, for the period January 1st,
1948, to and including April 30th, 1948.
Order No. IB, 1947—Logging Industry. — This Order amended Male Minimum
Wage Order No. 1, 1947, by removing employees engaged as trainees in topographic
mapping in connection with the logging industry from the overtime provisions of that
Order for the period June 5th, 1947, to and including September 30th, 1947.
Order No. 2A, 1947—Apprentices indentured under the "Apprenticeship Act."—
This Order of the Board amended Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 2, 1946,
with respect to apprentices indentured under the "Apprenticeship Act" by deleting
therefrom^ the provision that the rates of pay under the contract of apprenticeship
would constitute the minimum wage payable by the employer to the apprentice. This
amendment was made as the matter of the wage-rates to be paid to apprentices indentured pursuant to the provisions of the "Apprenticeship Act " is covered by the provisions of that Statute.
Order No. 24A, 1947—Mercantile Industry.—This Order amended Female Minimum Wage Order No. 24, 1946, with respect to the mercantile industry by giving the
Board of Industrial Relations authority to vary the daily guarantee provision in connection with experienced female employees working less than thirty-nine hours per
week.
I REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 49
Order No. 25A, 1947—Manufacturing Industry.—This Order amended Male and
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 25, 1947, with respect to the manufacturing industry
by deleting from the application of the overtime provisions those employees in that
section of the pulp and paper industry that is exempted from the provisions of the
" Hours of Work Act" pursuant to the provisions of section 12 of the said Act. The
Order was effective for the period August 1st, 1947, to and including April 30th, 1948.
Order No. 28a, 1947—Logging and Sawmill Industries.—This Order of the Board
rescinded Order No. 28, which Order had fixed the maximum price to be charged for
board and lodging in the logging and sawmill industries in certain parts of the
Province as set out in the said Order No. 28.
Order No. 34a, 1947-—Office Occupation.—This Order amended Female Minimum
Wage Order No. 34, 1946, with respect to the office occupation by giving the Board of
Industrial Relations authority to vary the daily guarantee provision in connection with
experienced female employees working less than thirty-six hours per week.
Order No. 47a, 1946—Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—This Order amended Male
Minimum Wage Order No. 47, 1946, with respect to the fruit and vegetable industry
by deleting from its coverage persons holding positions of supervision or management
as defined by section 4 of the " Hours of Work Act."
Order No. 52a, 1947—Hotel and Catering Industry.—This Order amended Male
and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52, 1946, with respect to the hotel and catering
industry by applying the minimum wage-rates provided therein to bell-boys.
Orders No. 59 and 24—Mercantile Supplementary, 1947.—These Orders took care
of male and female employees in the mercantile industry for the Christmas period.
Temporary workers employed between December 4th and December 31st were required
to be paid not less than 45 cents per hour, except that female employees working
thirty-nine hours or more per week were required to be paid not less than $17 for that
week.
REGULATIONS MADE DURING 1947.
Regulation No. 5A—Shipping Staff.—This regulation of the Board cancelled Regulation No. 5 which had permitted persons employed as members of the shipping staff
in industrial undertakings, where shipping operations were of an intermittent nature,
to work such hours in addition to the working-hours limited by section 3 of the
" Hours of Work Act " as were necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions.
In view of the cancellation of Regulation No. 5, the hours of work of the shipping
staff in industrial undertakings are limited to those provided in section 3 of the
" Hours of Work Act."
Regulation No. 17b—Baking Industry.—This regulation cancelled Regulation No.
17a and reduced from fifty to forty-eight the number of hours per week that persons
employed in the baking industry as deliverymen might work. It also limited the daily
working-hours of these employees to ten.
Regulation No. 32—Construction Industry.—This regulation of the Board permitted persons employed in the construction of the project known as the Pine Pass
Highway to work nine hours per day and fifty-four hours per week for the period
May 22nd, 1947, to and including November 15th, 1947.
Regulation No. 32a—Construction Industry.—This regulation permitted persons
employed in the construction of the project known as the Hope-Princeton Highway to
work nine hours per day and fifty-four hours per week for the period May 22nd, 1947,
to and including November 15th, 1947.
Regulation No. 32b—Construction Industry.—This regulation permitted persons
employed in the construction of the project known as the Princeton-Kaleden Highway
to work ten hours per day and fifty hours per week for the period May 22nd, 1947, to
and including November 15th, 1947. J 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The regulations with respect to the construction industry were made by the Board
to facilitate the completion of the respective highways.
Regulation No. 33—Occupations of Stationary Steam Engineer and Special Engineer.—This regulation of the Board added to the Schedule of the " Hours of Work
Act " the occupation of stationary steam engineer and the occupation of special engineer
as defined in the regulation.
At the time this regulation was made, after due inquiry, pursuant to the provisions of section 12 of the " Hours of Work Act," the Board exempted stationary
steam engineers and special engineers, as defined in Regulation No. 33 employed as
janitor-engineers in apartment blocks covered by an Order of the Board establishing
a minimum wage in the occupation of janitor, from the operation of the " Hours of
Work Act."
Regulation No. 34—Occupations of Bartender, Waiter, and Utility Man.—This
regulation of the Board added to the Schedule of the " Hours of Work Act " the occupations of bartender, waiter, and utility man within premises covered by beer licences
issued pursuant to the provisions of section 28 of the " Government Liquor Act."
At the time this regulation was made, after due inquiry, pursuant to the provisions
of section 12 of the " Hours of Work Act," the Board exempted the occupations of
bartender, waiter, and utility man within premises covered by beer licences issued
pursuant to the provisions of section 28 of the " Government Liquor Act" from the
operations of the " Hours of Work Act " in the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities: Greenwood, Kaslo, Salmon Arm.
Districts:   Glenmore, Oak Bay, Peachland, Kent, Penticton, Spallumcheen,
Matsqui, Sumas, Summerland, Surrey, Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages:   Chapman Camp, Cranberry Lake, Tofino.
Mercantile Industry—Christmas, 1947 (Temporary).—This regulation of the Board
authorized certain employees in retail establishments in the mercantile industry to
exceed on certain days during the Christmas season the limit of hours of work provided in section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(Summaries of the above-mentioned Orders and regulations, together with other
existing and new Orders and regulations made prior to this Report going to press, may
be found in the Appendix to this section of the Report.)
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
A separate section has again been set aside to present for 1947 the annual statistical survey of women workers in the business and industrial life of the Province.
Returns were received in time for tabulation from some 7,850 employers of women
and girjs, who reported a total of 61,442 female workers for the year under review.
This total represents a substantial increase over the 55,332 reported for the previous
year and, it is gratifying to note, exceeds the previous high of 60,410 established in
1944.
With the simplification of the 1947 questionnaires, some detail has necessarily been
eliminated from the information here presented. The tables which follow, however,
have been rearranged to give a comparative picture for the past five years relating to
employment, earnings, and hours of work in those occupations and industries covered
by Orders of the Board.
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
1,747
11.493
$228,446.00
$19.88
36.48
1,696
10,808
$197,691.08
$18.29
38.46
1,650
11,039
$184,838.18
$16.74
38.02
1,515
10,618
$173,346.41
$16.33
37.99
1,330
9.929
$144,067.59
$14.51
37.76
Average hours worked per week	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 51
Firms reporting in the mercantile industry increased to 1,747 during 1947, compared with a total of 1,696 recorded in the previous year. With the increased coverage,
the over-all employment total rose to 11,493, as against 10,808 reported for 1946.
Total amount of salaries and wages paid to the 11,493 female employees for the
week under review was $228,446, up from $197,691 reported for 1946 and representing
average per capita weekly earnings of $19.88 in this industry, increased from $18.29
noted for the previous year.
Due to many employers reporting the highest volume of employment during the
Christmas week, in which the total working-hours were considerably less than normal,
the average weekly hours of work was recorded at 36.48, as against 38.46 for this
industry in 1946.
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries (Female).
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
Number of firms reporting	
206
2,881
$57,784.00
$20.06
38.23
176
2,285
$40,417.75
$17.69
39.01
181
2,332
$37,965.94
$16.28
39.88
161
2,151
$33,228.64
$15.45
38.90
138
1,830
$27,096.61
$14.81
40.49
With a total of 206 firms reporting in this section, the number of female employees
engaged in laundry, cleaning and dyeing occupations was reported as 2,881 for 1947,
a substantial increase over the 1946 total of 2,285.
Total earnings for the week reviewed was $57,784, the 2,881 employees earning an
average weekly amount of $20.06. Compared with a 1946 figure of $17.69, and $16.28
in 1945, this represents a marked increase in earnings for females employed in this
industry.
With the increase in employment in this section, average weekly hours for
employees in laundry, cleaning and dyeing occupations decreased slightly in 1947 to
show an average figure of 38.23, as against 39.01 recorded in 1946.
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
1943.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
1,222
10,879
$216,965.00
$19.94
38.54
1,174
9,492
$175,484.81
$18.49
38.93
1,271
9,553
$162,384.74
$17.00
40.56
1,137
1,137
9,078  I 8,879
$151,575.26 $142,331.93
$16.70 $16.03
41.01  I 41.50
I
Increasing numbers of firms reporting in the hotel and catering group were
responsible for rising employment totals in this section, the 1,222 firms replying to the
questionnaire reporting a total of 10,879 females, increased from 9,492 reported in 1946.
With a weekly pay-roll of $216,965 for the period reported, average per capita
weekly earnings for the employees shown in this classification rose to $19.94 in 1947,
increased from an average weekly figure of $18.49 recorded for the previous year.
Average weekly working-hours for employees in hotel and catering occupations
decreased fractionally to 38.54 in 1947, as against 38.93 noted for 1946. J 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Office Occupation (Female).
1945.
1944.
1943.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week.
3,349
15,368
$423,571.00
$27.56
39.09
3,261
14,296
$346,234.83
$24.22
39.46
3,274
13,790
$318,788.40
$23.12
40.43
2,984
13,251
$301,981.54
$22.79
40.82
2,766
12,172
$245,706.64
$20.19
40.69
I
I
Highest employment for female workers continues to appear in the office occupation.
With increasing numbers of firms reporting females engaged in clerical occupations, employment totals in this section reached a new high, the 1947 figure rising to
15,368 from 14,296 recorded for the previous year. This represents the highest
recorded employment figure for females in any of the occupations included in the survey.
With a total of $423,571 paid in salaries and wages for the week reported, average
weekly earnings for office workers increased substantially over the previous year, the
1947 figure advancing to $27.56 from $24.22 previously reported.
Little change was noted in the average weekly hours of work in this occupation,
the 1947 figure decreasing fractionally to 39.09 from 39.46 noted in 1946.
Personal Service Occupation (Female).
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
152
524
$11,830.00
$22.58
39.48
144
542
$11,435.30
$21.10
40.16
149
535
$10,350.57
$19.35
39.88
134
476
$9,054.25
$19.02
40.50
134
453
$7,543.50
$16.65
39.94
The above table covering the personal service occupation includes females employed
as beauty-parlour operators, chiropodists, and those engaged in similar occupations.
The firms reporting in the above table are limited to those employing staff, as many
firms in this business are operated by the owners without outside help, and consequently
are omitted in the coverage of the survey for this reason.
Although there was a slight increase in the number of firms reporting in 1947, the
employment total registered little change, decreasing fractionally to 524 from 542
listed in 1946.
In line with the upward trend of wages in general during the year, the total weekly
amount of salaries and wages paid in this occupation increased to $11,830 in 1947, to
show an average per capita weekly earnings of $22.58, compared with $21.10 reported
for 1946.
Average weekly hours worked in personal service occupations decreased slightly
for the period reviewed, the 1947 figure declining to 39.48 from 40.16 noted for the
previous year.
Fishing Industry (Female).
1947.*
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week.
22
2,129
$58,775.00
$27.61
37.84
20
774
$18,194.97
$23.51
37.49
17
441
1,307.73
$21.11
35.22
19
656
$12,214.60
$18.62
36.28
I
16
372
$7,385.73
$20.16
39.58
* 1947 figures inclusive of all cannery occupations not previously included in the tabulations. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 53
Due to changes in the questionnaire, omitting the detailed listing of all employees,
it was not possible to segregate piece-workers and employees engaged in heading and
filling occupations from the totals submitted by the firms reporting. Inasmuch as these
occupations were previously omitted from the tables, being outside the governing Order
of the Board, no direct comparison should be made in the preceding table between 1947
figures and those for previous years. The 1947 figures, however, serve to show details
of the over-all picture of females engaged in this industry.
With twenty-two firms reporting females in all cannery occupations, the total
employment figure was 2,129 for 1947. Total amount of salaries and wages paid for
the week under review was $58,775, representing an average per capita earnings of
$27.61 for the period reported.
Little change was noted in the weekly hours of work in this industry, the average
increasing fractionally to 37.84 during 1947, as against 37.49 previously reported.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female).
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
154
2,679
1,205.00
$25.46
40.08
230
2,720
$61,895.57
$22.76
40.61
221
2,096
$44,409.74
$21.19
37.78
194
2,353
$54,232.36
$23.05
40.52
I
186
2,185
$39,480.72
$18.07
40.54
I
In recording the number of firms employing females in occupations relating to the
telephone and telegraph section, the inclusion of offices, establishments, hotels, hospitals,
etc. (wherein the operation of a switchboard places the firm in the above category) has
been responsible for fluctuations in the totals of reporting firms.
It is evident from the 1947 returns that many employers, particularly in office
establishments, have in some cases included switchboard operators in the general totals
relating to office employees, as the number of supplementing firms reporting telephone
and telegraph occupations was somewhat less than in previous years.
Employment totals, however, remain high in the sample obtained, a total of 2,679
female employees being reported in this occupation by the firms filing returns, as
against 2,720 noted for 1946.
Pay-roll for the week reported climbed to $68,205, compared with total salaries and
wages of $61,895 paid for a similar weekly period in 1946.
Based on the employment represented, the average weekly earnings for females
employed in telephone and telegraph occupations was $25.46 in 1947, substantially
increased from $22.76 reported for the previous year and $21.19 in 1945.
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
794
8,983
$216,668.00
$24.12
38.19
948
8,757
$189,535.49
$21.64
39.32
1,036
14,016
$321,983.90
$22.97
40.33
849
16,221
$415,945.94
$25.64
42.35
873
14,869
$299,685.37
Total weekly earnings	
Although the number of firms reporting in this section was less than in the
previous year, the over-all employment total gained in strength, with 8,983 females
reported in manufacturing occupations for 1947, increased from 8,757 in 1946. J 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Total amount of salaries and wages paid to the 8,983 employees for the weekly
period was $216,668, representing an average per capita weekly earnings of $24.12 for
females employed in this group, compared with $21.64 previously recorded.
In line with the general downward trend established in the post-war years, further
decrease was noted in the weekly working-hours in manufacturing industries, the 1947
average declining to 38.19 from 39.32 reported for 1946.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female) .
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
1947.
5,940
$154,875.00
$26.07
40.20
72
5,245
$119,587.20
$22.80
42.97
I
1945.
4,836
$100,909.15
$20.87
43.01
[
1944.
72
4,941
$106,997.85
$21.66
44.64
1943.
69
3,539
$66,004.77
$18.65
45.04
Increased earnings and shorter hours of work were noted in this section.
With eighty-five firms reporting in the fruit and vegetable industry as compared
with seventy-two in 1946, the employment total rose to 5,940, a record high figure in
this industry and a substantial increase from 5,245 female employees reported for the
previous year.
With a pay-roll of $154,875 in salaries and wages for the week under review, the
average weekly earnings per employee increased to $26.07, up from $22.80 in 1946 and
$20.87 reported for 1945.
Continued decrease was noted in weekly hours of work in this industry, the 1947
average again registering a further decline to 40.20, as against 42.97 recorded in 1946.
Transportation Industry (Female).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week.
1947.
1946.
27
76
66
130
$1,272.00
$2,065.96
$19.27
$15.89
40.74
36.96
1945.
102
227
$3,785.70
$16.68
37.79
138
235
1,397.05
$18.71
42.2.9
1943.
160
400
$7,307.20
$18.27
43.43
Included in this section are female workers engaged in delivery, truck-driving,
messenger-work, etc. With most jobs in this classification now almost totally occupied
by male workers, only twenty-seven firms reported in the above table, the averages
being computed on the basis of returns covering sixty-six employees.
Female workers remaining in occupations of this nature worked longer hours, but
received higher wages in 1947, the average weekly earnings rising to $19.27, compared
with $15.89 noted for 1946.
Average weekly hours worked for the period reported was 40.74, increased from
an average figure of 36.96 for workers in this occupation during the previous year.
Public Places of Amusement (Female) .
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
1946.
92
500
$6,788.00  |
$13.58 |
25.47 [
85
283
$2,960.63
$10.46
24.76
1945.
91
311
1,164.58
$10.18
26.12
1944.
86
430
$4,728.41
$11.00
25.16
85
277
$2,782.63
$10.05
26.95 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 55
This classification includes workers employed as theatre ushers, check-room attendants, and in occupations of a similar nature in connection with swimming-pools,
bowling-alleys, and all such public places of amusement.
With an increase in the number of firms reporting for 1947, employment in
occupations of this kind rose to 500 from 283 reported for the previous year. Inasmuch
as the nature of the work is such that employment in this occupation is necessarily
on a part-time basis, hours of work and earnings are relatively lower than in other
occupations and should not be considered as representative of a full week's work.
Based on the hours worked, the average weekly earnings in this section increased
to $13.58, as against $10.46 reported for the previous year.
Average hours worked in this classification for the week reported was 25.47,
compared with 24.76 recorded for the previous year.
Summary of all Occupations (" Female Minimum Wage Act ").
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
7,850
61,442
$1,445,179.00
$23.52
38.33
7,882
55,332
$1,165,503.65
$21.06
39.42
8,061
59,176
$1,197,888.63
$20.24
39.94
7,289
60,410
$1,267,702.31
$20.98
40.84
6,894
Total number of employees	
54,905
$989,392.74
$18.02
41.03
Summarized in the above table are returns from some 7,850 firms reporting actual
figures concerning 61,442 women and girl employees for the year 1947.
Aggregate salaries and wages totalled for one week during 1947 amounted to
$1,445,179, an increase of $279,675.35 over the reported total for a similar weekly
period in 1946.
Average weekly earnings for all occupations as shown in the summary table
increased to $23.52 from $21.06 previously reported, to set a new high in the record of
earnings for all females included in the survey.
It is again evident from the summary that the average earnings of female workers
continues to exceed the highest minimum set by law. While for the period reported
the legal minimum rates fixed by Orders of the Board ranged from $17, the lowest, as
set for the mercantile industry, to $20.16 for a forty-eight-hour week in the telephone
and telegraph occupation, it can be seen that the average earnings for female employees
are well above this level.
With increased employment, higher wages, and better working conditions, improvement is also noted in the average weekly hours of work. As shown in the summary
table, the average figure covering the 61,442 employees reported further declined from
39.42 in 1946 to 38.33 for the year under review.
Figures contained in the summary are not inclusive of domestic workers, farm-
labourers, or fruit-pickers, these occupations being excluded from coverage by the
provisions of the " Female Minimum Wage Act." The total 61,442 females reported
is inclusive only of those workers engaged in industries or occupations for which
minimum wage Orders have been set by the Board. Federal workers and bank
employees are also excluded from the coverage of the Provincial legislation. J 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table showing Comparative Relation of 1947 Earnings to Legal Minimum.
Industry or Occupation.
Number of
Firms
reporting.
Number of
Employees
reported.
Total
Weekly
Pay-roll.
Legal
Minimum
Weekly
Wage for
Full-time
Employees.
Actual
Average
Weekly
Earnings.
Percentage
by which
1947
Average
Earnings
exceed
Legal
Minimum.
1,747
206
1,222
3,349
152
22
154
794
85
27
92
11,493
2,881
10,879
15,368
524
2,129**
2,679
8,983
5,940
66
500
$228,446
57,784
216,965
423,571
11,830
58,775**
68,205
216,668
154,875
1,272
6,788
$17.00*
17.60t
18.00$
18.00§
20.00$
19.20||
20.16||
17.60T
17.60t
 J
17.10||
$19.88
20.06
19.94
27.56
22.58
27.61**
25.46
24.12
26.07
19.27
13.58tt
Per Cent.
16.94
13.98
10.78
Office	
53.11
12.90
Fishing	
38.05
26.29
37.05
48.13
 11
 ft
7,850
61,442
$1,445,179
$23.52
38.35
* Thirty-nine to forty-four hours per week.
t Forty-four hours per week.
t Forty to forty-four hours per week.
I Thirty-six to forty-four hours per week.
|| Forty-eight hours per week.
H In the transportation industry, it is impracticable to set a weekly rate owing to the variation of minimum
wages in the Order, depending on whether the work is done on foot, on bicycles, by motor-cycles, or other types of
motor-vehicles.
** Figures for 1947 inclusive of all cannery occupations not previously included in the tabulation.
ft Earnings represent partial week only.
The above table includes comparative data relating to female workers in the
various occupational classifications covered, showing the number of firms reporting
and employment represented in each classification, together with the average weekly
earnings. A comparison is presented between the legal minimum weekly wage set in
each instance and the actual average weekly earnings recorded for the year 1947. The
actual earnings are also expressed as percentages in excess of the legal minimum which
applies in each occupation. It will be noted that the average weekly earnings for
females in all the occupations covered ($23.52) was 38.35 per cent, in excess of the
lowest legal minimum shown in the table.
INSPECTIONS AND WAGE ADJUSTMENTS.
During the year 1947 several Inspectors were added to the staff of. the Board in
order that greater attention could be paid to the matter of routine inspections of
pay-rolls, etc. The increase in new businesses and the high degree of employment in
the Province had made it impossible for a few Inspectors in every instance to give the
required attention to enforcement of the Board's Orders and regulations and at the
same time keep the employers and employees advised of their responsibilities in
connection with the legislation administered by the Department.
Due no doubt to the increase in the inspection staff and also to the increase in the
number of businesses operating in the Province, the number of investigations made
during the year 1947 showed a substantial increase over those made in 1946. A summary of investigations and collections of arrears of wages owed to employees is outlined
hereunder. It should be noted that during the year 1947, through the efforts of the
Inspectors of the Department and with the co-operation of the employers, employees
were paid in arrears of wages approximately eight times the amount paid during the
year 1946.
J REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 57
Comparison of Inspections and Wage Adjustments, 1946 and 1947.
1946.
Number of investigations  8,113
Number of Inspectors        13
Collections.
" Male Minimum Wage Act,"  101
firms paid 184 employees     $7,615.52
" Female   Minimum   Wage   Act,"
129 firms paid 249 employees...      3,051.72
"Annual   Holidays   Act,"   1   firm
paid 51 employees  573.05
1947.
Number of investigations  13,912
Number of Inspectors  17*
Collections.
" Male Minimum Wage Act,"  240
firms paid 477 employees  $34,334.31
" Female   Minimum   Wage   Act,"
294 firms paid 538 employees...    10,923.81
"Annual Holidays Act," 949 firms
paid 5,362 employees     39,649.24
Total collections   $11,240.29
Total collections   $84,907.36
* Average.
COURT CASES.
Occasions arise when employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the
matter of compliance with the provisions of the Orders and regulations of the Board.
In such cases it is necessary to resort to the Courts in order that the necessary
compliance with the legislation will be obtained. A summary of Court cases during
the year 1947 follows.
Court Cases, 1947.
Statute.
Cases.
Convictions.
Dismissed.
Withdrawn.
3
11
14
17
2
3
11
13
14
2
1
1
2
Totals	
47
43
2
2
" Female Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1. Lux Cafe   (C. K., A., C, and Mrs. K.
Pristos), 616 Robson Street, Vancouver
2. Lux Cafe   (C.  K., A.,  C, and Mrs. K.
Pristos), 616 Robson Street, Vancouver
3. Lux Cafe   (C.  K., A.,  C, and Mrs. K.
Pristos), 616 Robson Street, Vancouver
Working in excess of forty-four
hours weekly
Keeping false records	
Failure to pay time and one-half
for hours worked in excess of
forty-four hours weekly
Fined $25.
Fined $100.
Fined $25.
" Control of Employment of Children Act."
1. Bay Theatre, Ltd., 935 Denman Street,
Employment   of   child   under   15
Fined $25 and $5 costs.
Vancouver
years of age
2. Gibson's   Bowladrome,   Ltd.,   914   Yates
Employment of child age 14 with
Fined $10.
Street, Victoria
out permit J 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1. B. & N. Construction Co. (Messrs. Bilo-
deau and Norton) Victoria
2. Cafe 99  (W. R. Overend), 4008 Kings-
way, Burnaby
3. Cafe 99  (W. R. Overend), 4008 Kings-
way, Burnaby
4. Cafe 99  (W. R. Overend), 4008 Kings-
way, Burnaby
5. Cafe 99  (W. R. Overend), 4008 Kings-
way, Burnaby
6. William E. Ford, Shawnigan Lake.	
7. R. J. Leighton, Victoria	
8. Lim Fay, 1724 Government Street, Vic
toria
9. Lim Fay, 1724 Government Street, Vic
toria
10. Pacific Coast Contractors Co., Ltd., 1063
Seymour Street, Vancouver
11. Pacific Coast Contractors Co., Ltd., 1063
Seymour Street, Vancouver
12. Pacific Coast Contractors Co., Ltd., 1063
Seymour Street, Vancouver
13. Vancouver Electrical Construction Co.,
Ltd., 1679 Third Avenue West, Vancouver
14. Vancouver Electrical Construction Co.,
Ltd., 1679 Third Avenue West, Vancouver
15. Vancouver Electrical Construction Co.,
Ltd., 1679 Third Avenue West, Vancouver
16. Vancouver Electrical Construction Co.,
Ltd., 1679 Third Avenue West, Vancouver
17. Marvyn Walters, Duncan	
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
and annual holiday pay
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
and annual holiday pay
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
and annual holiday pay
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
and annual holiday pay
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Conviction and suspended sentence ;
arrears of $66.15 ordered—wages
paid up.
Conviction and suspended sentence ;
required to sign $100 recognizance
bond and pay $10 costs.
Conviction and suspended sentence;
required to sign $100 recognizance
bond and pay $10 costs.
Conviction and suspended sentence;
required to sign $100 recognizance
bond and pay $10 costs.
Conviction and suspended sentence;
required to sign $100 recognizance
bond and pay $10 costs.
Fined $10 and $3.75 costs; arrears
ordered—$73.78.
Dismissed.
Withdrawn ;  all wages paid in full.
Withdrawn ;  all wages paid in full.
Fined   $25   and   $5   costs;   arrears
ordered—$50.24 ; in default, thirty
days in gaol.
Fined   $25   and   $5   costs;   arrears
ordered—$49.62 ; in default, thirty
days in gaol.
Fined   $25   and   $5   costs;   arrears
ordered—$48.37 ; in default, thirty
days in gaol.
Fined $25 ; arrears ordered—$165.17.
Fined $20 ; arrears ordered—$113.
Fined $15 ; arrears ordered—$89.70.
Fined $10 ; arrears ordered—$38.71.
Fined $20 and $3.75 costs ; arrears
ordered—$69.81. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 59
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1. Halcyon Hot Springs Hotel (Gen. F. W.
E. Burnham), Halcyon
2. Halcyon Hot Springs Hotel (Gen. F. W.
E. Burnham), Halcyon
3. Halcyon Hot Springs Hotel (Gen. F. W.
E. Burnham), Halcyon
4. Halcyon Hot Springs Hotel (Gen. F. W.
E. Burnham), Halcyon
5. Halcyon Hot Springs Hotel (Gen. F. W.
E. Burnham), Halcyon
6. Sam   Kee   Laundry    (Sam   Kee),   611
Chatham Street, Victoria
7. Sam   Kee   Laundry    (Sam   Kee),   611
Chatham Street, Victoria
8. Sam   Kee   Laundry    (Sam   Kee),   611
Chatham Street, Victoria
9. Sam   Kee   Laundry, (Sam   Kee),   611
Chatham Street, Victoria
10. Sam   Kee   Laundry    (Sam   Kee),   611
Chatham Street, Victoria
11. Sam   Kee   Laundry    (Sam   Kee),   611
Chatham Street, Victoria
Failure to pay minimum wage to
an employee
Failure to pay minimum wage to
an employee
Failure to pay minimum wage to
an employee
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to pay time and one-half
for all hours worked in excess
of forty-four (Order No. 74)
Failure to pay time and one-half
for all hours worked in excess
of forty-four (Order No. 74)
Failure to pay time and one-half
for all hours worked in excess
of forty-four (Order No. 74)
Failure to pay time and one-half
for all hours worked in excess
of forty-four (Order No. 74)
Failure to pay time and one-half
for all hours worked in excess
of forty-four (Order No. 74)
Failure to pay time and one-half
for all hours worked in excess
of forty-four (Order No. 74)
Fined   $50   and   arrears   of   $29.60
ordered.
Fined   $25   and   arrears   of   $39.79
ordered.
Fined   $25   and   arrears   of   $39.79
ordered.
Fined $10.
Fined $10.
Fined $50 ; in default, two months.
Fined $50; in default, two months.
Fined $50; in default, two months.
Fined $50 ; in default, two months.
Fined $50 ; in default, two months.
Fined $50; in default, two months.
** Hours of Work Act."
1.
M. H. Barry, 1786 Fort Street, Victoria
Failure to  post schedule of employees' hours of work
Fined $25.
2,
Failure to keep  record of hours
Fined $100 and $3.75 costs.
worked daily
3.
Kehar Singh Gill, Honeymoon Bay, Lake
Failed to report all hours worked
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs.
Cowichan
in   excess   of   eight  in   day  or
forty-four in week as required
by Regulation 12a
4.
Lam  Kee  Laundry,   346   Sixth  Avenue
Failure to keep  true and correct
Dismissed.
West, Vancouver
record of hours and post schedule of hours
"5.
Montreal   Bakery,   800   Keefer   Street,
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $25 and $5 costs.
Vancouver
record   of   hours   worked   each
day by each employee
6.
Rattan & Sons Lumber Co., Ltd., Dun
Failure to produce time records....
Fined $50 and $3.75 costs ; in default,
can
distress.
7.
Sam   Kee   Laundry    (Sam   Kee),   611
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $10 ; in default, three days.
Chatham Street, Victoria
record   of   hours   worked   each
day by each of his employees
8.
Shangri-La  Cafe   (Chester  D.   Amos),
Excess hours  (section 3  (1) )	
Fined $50, $2.50 costs, one week to
Cloverdale
pay and fifteen days hard labour
on each charge as alternative.
9.
Shangri-La  Cafe   (Chester  D.   Amos),
Failure to post schedule  (section
Fined $50, $2.50 costs, one week to
Cloverdale
11 (4))
pay and fifteen days hard labour
on each charge as alternative.
10
Fined $25 and $5 costs.
2925 Granville Street, Vancouver
ii.
Shaughnessy Market   (Tommy Hong),
2925 Granville Street, Vancouver
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $25 and $5 costs.
records   in   principal   place   of
business
12.
Shone  Dry   Cleaners,   1122   Kingsway,
Failure to post notice of hours of
Fined $25.
Vancouver
work
13.
Shone   Dry   Cleaners,   1122   Kingsway,
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $25.
Vancouver
record of hours worked by employees
14.
Shorthouse Butcherteria   (T. S. Short-
Working employees outside sched
Fined $25.
house), Nelson
ule J 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SPECIAL LICENCES.
Provision is made in the majority of the Orders of the Board for a graduated scale
of wages that apply to inexperienced employees for whose employment permits in
writing have been obtained from the Board. In the majority of cases there is a six
months' learning period for inexperienced employees, during which period they receive
periodic increases until at the expiration of the learning period they are qualified for
the minimum wage payable to experienced employees. During the year 1947 there was
a slight decrease in the number of special licences issued by the Department compared
with those issued during 1946, but those issued in 1947 were still considerably in
excess of the licences issued in 1945. During the year 1945 only 217 special licences
were issued, and it is possible that one of the reasons for the substantial increase in
the licences issued has been the upward revision of minimum wage-rates provided in
the Board's Orders. The following table shows the number of licences issued in the
various lines of work in 1947, 1946, and 1945:—
1947.
Telephone and telegraph 	
Personal service 	
Hairdressing     6
Laundry           34
Mercantile         245
Office    -.     173
Hotel and catering       231
Manufacturing         357
Household furniture         21
Totals  1,067
1946.
1945.
1
218
6
272
16
270
26
345
43
153
125
1,258
217
STATISTICS FOR MALE EMPLOYEES.
Information reported in that section of the statistical tables dealing with the
employment and earnings of female workers is based on a questionnaire restricted
to female employees only.
From industrial classifications dealt with elsewhere in this report, however, a
segregation has been made to isolate male employees in occupations included in the
coverage of the "Male Minimum Wage Act" for the purpose of presenting the following
tables.
While it has not been possible to obtain from this source separate information for
all occupations covered by the male minimum wage Orders, the tables serve to show the
trend of wages and employment in some of the more important occupations covered.
The information presented in the tables is based on industrial returns covering
wage-earners only, as reported for the week of employment of the greatest number.
Baking Industry (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
1947.
203
1,443
$54,730.50
$37.93
40.91
1946.
189
1,478
$54,214.00
$36.68
41.53
1945.
182
1,469
$51,174.50
$34.84
45.04
1944.
169
1,167
$41,031.00
$35.16
45.60
Construction (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
1,978
29,077
$1,252,717.00
$43.08
41.36
1,732
22,040
$852,297.50
$38.67
41.58
1,116
16,712
$617,345.50
$36.94
42.79
916
17,808
$676,180.00
$37.97
44.09
! REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 61
Fr
uit and Vegetable (Male).
1947.
1946.
1945.
1944.
97
3,528
$133,229.50
$37.76
46 41
94
3,223
$111,684.50
$34.65
48 34
94
2,758
$84,880.00
$30.78
49.96
88
Total number of male wage-earners	
2,807
$82,688.50
$29.46
51.87
House Furnishings (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners.
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
99
1,198
$34,177.00
$28.53
43.40
77
829
$23,660.50
$28.54
43.55
Logging (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners.
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
952
19,712
$1,029,238.00
$52.21
41.55
816
15,273
$708,840.50
$46.41
43.21
13,249
$608,209.50
$45.91
48.13
546
12,768
$595,607.50
$46.65
48.46
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male) .
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners.
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings.....	
Average hours worked per week	
190
1,297
$55,232.50
$42.58
40.27
185
1,083
$40,262.00
$37.18
41.01
125
800
$28,130.00
$35.16
42.15
101
704
$25,609.50
$36.38
40.91
Sawmills (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week	
744
18,690
$794,594.50
$42.51
41.25
585
15,421
$610,169.50
$39.57
44.02
412
13.394
$491,406.50
$36.69
47.46
372
12,895
$463,514.00
$35.95
47.98
Shingle-mills (Male).
Number of firms reporting  58
Total number of male wage-earners  2,198
Total weekly earnings -  $105,050.50
Average weekly earnings  $47.79
Average hours worked per week  40.40
45
1,956
$86,380.00
$44.16
43.83
40
1,677
$64,506.00
$38.47
46.28
Ship-building (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
73
6,715
$316,254.00
$47.10
39.46
79
9,217
$369,262.00
$40.06
42.02
56
21,668
$858,836.00
$39.64
43.10
46
26,357
$1,053,057.00
$39.95
43.07 J 62
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Wood (N.E.S.)  (Male).
1944.
Number of firms reporting ,
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week ,
194
5,497
$216,164.50
$39.32
39.78
181
4,552
$167,409.00
$36.78
43.32
147
3,818
$127,076.50
$33.28
45.61
121
3,434
$114,736.50
$33.41
45.61
CONCLUSION.
The Board at this time would like to acknowledge its appreciation of the co-operation extended during the year 1947 to its officials in the administration of the various
labour laws by the employers and employees of the Province.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
James Thomson, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
J. A. Ward Bell.
H. Douglas.
The statistics of trades and industries provided in the preceding pages were compiled by Harold V. Bassett, Bureau of Economics and Statistics. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 63
APPENDIX.
(Compiled August 31st, 1948.)
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO " MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
APPRENTICES INDENTURED UNDER THE "APPRENTICESHIP ACT."
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 2 (1946).*
Effective July 1st, 1946.
Minimum wages fixed by any Order of the Board shall not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act."
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 2a (1947).
AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND GASOLINE SERVICE-STATION INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 6 (1948).
Effective May 1st, 1948.
"Automotive repair and gasoline service-station industry " means all operations in the
construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, overhaul, painting, or reconditioning of any
vehicle powered by an internal-combustion engine, or any part thereof, and the business of
operating retail gasoline service-stations, gasoline-pumps, or outlets where gasoline is offered
for sale at retail, including services and undertakings incidental thereto.
"Automotive mechanic " means any employee doing the work usually done by journeymen, and without restricting the generality of the foregoing, the work of mechanics, machinists, metal-men, painters, electricians, radiator-men, battery-men, body-men, forgers, vulcan-
izers, trimmers, and welders.
" Other employees" means all other employees, except automobile salesmen, office
employees, watchmen, and janitors.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every employee in the automotive
repair and gasoline service-station industry, except automobile salesmen, office employees,
watchmen, and janitors.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
90c.
55c.
{See note  (6) re
Daily Guarantee.)
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half of
the   employee's
regular   rate   of
pay.
44
Other employees _.._ ....
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act" or section 5 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for
whose employment permits in writing have been issued by the
Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work
overtime)
44
44
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(i)   Employees working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to section
5 or section 11   (3) or section 11  (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the employee has completed
the hours so established:
(ii)   Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the "Hours of Work Act" pursuant to
the provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
Note.— (1)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with a register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials. J 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
(6) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(7) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(8) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(9) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
BAKING INDUSTRY  (MALE).*
Order No. 17 (1942).
Effective July 20th, 1942, superseding Order No. 17.
" Baking industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of bread,
biscuits, cakes, doughnuts, pies, and similar products.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—
48c.
24c.
30c.
36c.
42c.
48c.
44
44
44
44
20 years and under 21 years	
44
44
Note.—(a)  Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
(b) Delivery salesmen (see Transportation Order).
(c) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
BARBERING   (MALE).
Minimum Wage Order No. 42 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 42.
" Occupation of barbering " means the work of persons engaged in the shaving of the
face or cutting or trimming or singeing of the hair or beard for hire, gain, or hope of reward,
or in connection with any of the foregoing the shampooing or massaging or the treating of
the head or face.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
Rate.
Hours.
$25.00 a week
65c. per hour
(Daily guarantee
of 4 hours' pay)
As prescribed in
the permit
See Order No. 2
(1946)
40-44 per week.
Less than 40 per
week.
Not more than 44
per week.
Employees classified under section 6 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
working under permit
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay.
Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates
of Class B employees.
Note.— (1)  Copy of Order to be posted.
(2) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(3) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(5) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 65
BOX-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 55 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 55 (1943).
" Box-manufacturing industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the
purpose of making wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel staves and heads, kegs, casks,
tierces, pails, and other wooden containers.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the
box-manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
50c
44
Rate payable to balance,  20%   (inclusive of employees  in respect of
40c.
44
Employees  classified under section  6  of the " Male Minimum Wage
Rate as prescribed
44
Act "  and section  5  of the  " Female Minimum Wage Act "  for
in permit
whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
One   and   one-half
or 44 hours in week   (permits to be obtained from the Board to
times  regular   rate
work such overtime)
of pay.
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to: —
(i)   Persons holding  positions of supervision  or management as defined in section  4 of the  " Hours of
Work Act ":
(ii)   Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of sections 5 and 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " until the employee has completed the
hours so established.
Note.— (1)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Every employer shall post and keep posted in a conspicuous place in his establishment:—
(a) Copy of this Order:
(b) A schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of
his employees.
(3) Records of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English language of
names, ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(5) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
BUS-DRIVERS  (MALE).*
Order No. 70.
Effective March 18th, 1940, superseding Order No. 31.
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which
service a charge is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
60c.
.     66c.
90c.
40 to 50.
Less than 40.
In excess of 9 hours
in any one day or
50 hours in any one
week.
Note.—"Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. J 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BUS-DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 70a.
Effective June 27th, 1940.
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of
a bus-driver while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by
a bus-driver from the time he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty
until he returns again to his employer's headquarters or garage where he originally reported
for duty; and shall include the time occupied by a bus-driver in dead-heading from his
employer's headquarters or garage to the place where he is to take charge of the bus and
vice versa; but the minimum wage shall not apply to waiting-time of a bus-driver when
occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads.
BUS-DRIVERS  (FEMALE).*
Order No. 76.
Effective September 28th, 1942.
" Bus-driver " means every female employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with
seating accommodation for more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the
public, for which service a charge is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point Grey
which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City of
Vancouver;   the City of New Westminster ;   the Corporation of
The Township of Richmond ;   the Municipality of the District of
Burnaby ;   Municipality of the District of West Vancouver ;   the
City of North Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver
60c.
66c.
40 to 48.
Less than 40.
Note.— (1) If bus-drivers are required to wear uniforms or special articles of wearing-apparel, no deduction
shall be made from bus-drivers' wages for such uniforms or special apparel, except under terms with regard to
cost duly approved in writing by the Board as being fair and reasonable.
(2) Employees required by employer to wait on call shall be paid for waiting time.
(3) Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of payment.
(4) Rest period of 24 consecutive hours from midnight to midnight in each calendar week shall be given to
employees.
(5) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wag-e Order (1946), July 1st, 1943.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 58 (1947).
Effective August Uh, 194-7, superseding Orders Nos. 58, 65, 66, 72, 73.
" Carpentry trade " means and includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of any new building or structure or part thereof,
and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any existing building or structure or part
thereof.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Employees in carpentry trade-.
44
Note.— (a)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act"  (see Order No. 2  (1946)).
(b) Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work, or employees covered by another
Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(c) " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages to be paid as often as semi-monthly.
(d) Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay after 8 hours per day and 44 hours per week.    Permits
to be obtained from the Board to work such overtime.
(e) Copy of Order to be posted.
(/)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(fir)  Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(h)  Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(i)   "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 67
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 68 (1947).
Effective May 15th, 1947, superseding Order No. 68 (1943).
" Christmas-tree industry " means all operations in or incidental to the cutting, gathering,
hauling, and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Male and female employees	
50c.
44           ...
This Order shall not apply to:—
(a)  Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work:
(6)  Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act " or section 5 of the " Female
Minimum Wage Act" for whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board:
(c)   Employees whose employment is determined by the Board to come under the provisions of section 4 of
the " Hours of Work Act."
Note.— (1)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted in the establishment.
(3) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each of his employees to be posted in
establishment.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English language'of
names, ages, occupations, and residential addresses of employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY (MALE).*
Order No. 12 (1940).
Effective November 28th, 1940, superseding Order No. 12, Order No. 12A,
Order No. 12b, Order No. 45, Order No. 45A, and Order No. 48.
" Construction industry" includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or
demolition of any building, railway, tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway,
road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well, telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of any such work or structure.
Area.
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate,
under 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
The City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point
Grey which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the
City of Vancouver ;   the City of Victoria ;   the City of New
Westminster;    the   City   of   Nanaimo;     the   City   of   Prince
Rupert;   the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt;   the
Municipality of the District of Oak Bay;   the Municipality of
the District of Saanich ;   Municipality of the District of West
Vancouver;    the   Municipality   of   the   District  of   Burnaby;
54c.
48c.
42c.
36c.
44
44
Note-—(a)  Does not apply to indentured apprentices under
(6)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
(c)   "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
Apprenticeship Act " (see Order No. 2 (1946)).
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. J 68 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COOK- AND BUNK-HOUSE OCCUPATION.
(In Unorganized Territory.)
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 4 (1946).
Effective July 8th, 1946.
" Cook- and bunk-house occupation " means any work performed by any male or female
employee in or incidental to operation of any kitchen, dining-room, cook-house, bunk-house, or
recreation-room operated in connection with any industrial undertaking in unorganized territory, and without limiting the generality of the foregoing description means the work of cooks,
dish-washers, waiters, bunk-house and recreation-room attendants, and others employed in a
similar capacity.
Hourly rate:   50c, except to employees working under permit under section 6 of "Male Minimum
Wage Act" or section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage Act," wage prescribed by permit.
Hours:   Unlimited.
(1) Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
(2) No charge or deductions for accidental breakages.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
Note.— (a)  This Order is not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities.—Alberni,   Armstrong,   Chilliwack,   Courtenay,   Cranbrook,   Cumberland,   Duncan,   Enderby,   Fernie,
Grand Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson,
New Westminster, North Vancouver, Port Alberni, Port Coauitlam, Port Moody, Prince George, Prince
Rupert, Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm, Slocan, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby,  Chilliwhack,  Coldstream,  Coauitlam, Delta,  Esquimalt,  Fraser Mills,  Glenmore,  Kent,
Langley,  Maple  Ridge,   Matsqui,   Mission,   North  Cowichan,  North  Vancouver,   Oak  Bay,   Peachland,
Penticton, Pitt Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Sumas, Summerland, Surrey,
Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry Lake, Creston, Dawson
Creek,   Gibsons   Landing,   Hope,   Lake   Cowichan,   Lytton,   McBride,   Mission,   New   Denver,   Oliver,
Osoyoos,   Parksville,   Pouce  Coupe,   Qualicum  Beach,   Quesnel,   Silverton,   Smithers,   Stewart,   Terrace,
Tofino, Vanderhoof, Westview, Williams Lake.
(6)  "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 69
DRIVERS, SWAMPERS OR HELPERS IN THE TRANSPORTATION
INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 9 (1948).
Effective September 13th, 1948, superseding Parts of Transportation Orders.
" Transportation industry " means:—
(ct) The carrying or transporting for reward by motor-vehicle of any goods, wares,
merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the
carrier, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of
goods for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other
than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates;
and
(6)  The carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor
thereof, or dealer therein, but shall not include the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by any wholesale, retail,
private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, by any motor-vehicle of
factory rating of 1,000 lb. or less.
This Order applies to every employer and every male and female employee in the transportation industry, as defined herein,  employed as  drivers, swampers or helpers, except
drivers of vehicles employed in the:—
(i) Retail delivery of milk:
(ii) Retail delivery of bread:
(iii)  Laundry, cleaning and dyeing industries:
(iv)  Delivery of His Majesty's mail.
Hourly Rate.
75c
Overtime.
the employee's regular rate of pay for
the first %% hours,
or part thereof.
regular rate of pay.
the employee's regular rate of pay.
Note.— (1)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with a register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(5) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(6) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime provisions.
(7) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's behalf
shall be in addition to above rates.
(8) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS (FEMALE).*
Order No. 53.
Effective March 3rd, 1938, superseding Order No. 30 and Order No. 5.
Includes every female operator and starter.
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$16.80 per week.
45c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.80.
Note.— (a) As for male elevator operators see Order No. 54.
(6)  "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. J 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ELEVATOR   OPERATORS AND STARTERS (MALE).*
Order No. 54.
Effective March 3rd, 1938, superseding Order No. 32.
Includes every male operator and starter.
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$16.80 per week.
45c per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.80.
Note.—(a)  Full week's board of 21 meals, $4 per week.
(6)  Individual meals, 20c. each.
(c) Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d) Full week's lodging of 7 days, $2 per week.
(e) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/)   Uniforms or special wearing-apparel, required by the employer, must be supplied and laundered without
cost to the employee.
(g)  The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(ft.) Employees must be given 24 consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(«)   Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted.
(j)   "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM  (MALE).*
Order No. 18 (1942).
Effective September 21st, 1942, superseding Orders Nos. 18, 18A, 18B, and 18c.
" Stationary steam engineer " means every employee engaged in producing steam in a
steam plant under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or
responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while under steam-pressure or in motion.
" Special engineer " means holder of a special or temporary certificate. (See " Boiler Inspection Act," section 28 (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
60c.
48ci
44
44
Note.— (a)  Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the "Hours of Work Act," 44 hours per
week may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(o)  For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(c) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 48 cents
per hour.
(d) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 71
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 39 (1948).
Effective May 31st, 1948.
" First-aid attendant" means every employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid
attendant who is in possession of an industrial first-aid certificate and is designated by his
employer as the first-aid attendant in charge, pursuant to the provisions of the " Workmen's
Compensation Act" of British Columbia.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
75c.
(See note (6) re
daily guarantee.)
Time and one-half of
the    employee's
regular rate of pay.
44
Overtime,—First-aid attendants working in excess of 8 hours in any
one day and 44 hours in week  (permits required from the Board
to work overtime)
Overtime rates of pay shall not apply to:—
(i)   First-aid attendants working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant
to section  5  or  section  11   (3)   or  section  11   (4)   of the  "Hours  of  Work  Act"   until the  first-aid
attendant has completed the hours so established:
(ii)   Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act " pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act:
(iii)   First-aid attendants while employed making shingle-bolts, or as emergency fire-fighters, or regularly
employed  as  boom-men  or  boat-men;    and  first-aid  attendants   covered  by  the  Order  of  the   Board
establishing a minimum wage in the cook- and bunk-house occupation in unorganized territory.
Note.— (1)  Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with a register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) Employees reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(7) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(8) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any other occupation in which the first-aid attendant is
employed in addition to his first-aid duties, such first-aid attendant shall be paid the higher minimum wage so fixed.
(9) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the office of a medical practitioner, hospital, or other
destination.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
FISHING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).*
Order No. 78.
Effective May 3rd, 19J+3, superseding Order in Effect since February 28th, 1920.
" Fishing industry" means the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing,
preserving, canning, drying, curing, smoking, packing, labelling and reconditioning of containers, or otherwise adapting for sale or use or for shipment any kind of fish or shell-fish.
Hourly Rate.
Experienced employees-
Learners of any age	
34c. for first 200 hours of employment in the industry;
40 c. thereafter.
Note.— (1)  Above rates do not apply to employees engaged in heading and filling.
(2) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age below 40c.
per hour.
(3) Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(4) Employees shall not be employed more than 8 hours a day or 44 hours a week except under permit from
the Board.
(5) Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. J 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 46 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 46 (1942).
" Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the
purpose of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Hours.
June 1st to November 30th, inclusive.
40c.
(Daily minimum, $1.20)
35c.
(Daily minimum, $1.05)
Time and one-half regular rate
Up to 9.
Up to 9.
9 to 11, inclusive.
Over 11.
December 1st to May Slst, inclusive.
40c.
(Daily minimum, $1.20)
35c.
(Daily minimum, $1.05)
Time and one-half regular rate
8.
8.
In excess of 8 daily or
44 weekly.
Note.— (1)  After 5 hours' continuous employment, employees shall have 1 hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2) Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 47 (1942).
" Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the
purpose of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Hours.
June 1st to November 30th, inclusive.
48c.
(Daily minimum, $1.44)
38c.
(Daily minimum, $1.14)
Time and one-half regular rate
Up to 9.
Up to 9.
Over 11.
December 1st to May Slst, inclusive.
48c.
(Daily minimum, $1.44)
38c.
(Daily minimum, $1.14)
Time and one-half regular rate
Up to 8.
Up to 8.
In excess of 8 daily or
44 weekly.
Note.— (1)  After 5 hours' continuous employment, employees shall have 1 hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2) Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 73
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47a (1946).
Effective April 24th, 1947, amending Order No. 47 (1946).
This Order amends Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47 (1946) by exempting from the
provisions of Order No. 47 (1946) " persons holding positions of supervision or management
as defined in section 4 of the ' Hours of Work Act.' "
OCCUPATION OF HAIRDRESSING.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 27 (1947).
Effective May 12th, 1947, superseding Order No. 27, partially, etc.
" Occupation of hairdressing " means the work of persons engaged in cutting, dressing,
dyeing, tinting, curling, waving, permanent waving, cleansing, bleaching, or other work upon
the hair of any person, the removal of superfluous hair, and all work in connection with the
giving of facials and scalp treatments, manicuring, and other work in hairdressing as denned
and interpreted in the " Hairdressers Act." It shall not include the work of any person the
duties of whose occupation or profession require any act of hairdressing to be performed as
incidental thereto, nor the work of barbers as defined in the " Barbers Act."
" Class A employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of
40 hours or more.
" Class B employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of
less than 40 hours.
" Learner " means only a male or female employee of any age for whose employment a
permit in writing has been issued by the Board who becomes employed in the occupation of
hairdressing at a time when the employee has had less than six months' experience in that
occupation.
Rate.
Hours.
$20.00 per week
50c. per hour
(Daily guarantee of
4 hours)
per week.
Learners
(any age) .
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$15.00 per week 1st 3 months.
17.50 per week 2nd 3 months.
STV2C. per hour 1st 3 months.
44c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
(Permits to be obtained from the Board for learners to be employed at above rates.)
Rate.
Hours.
Employees  classified under section  6 of the  " Male Minimum Wage
Wage-rate as set
40-44 per week.
Act"  or  section  5  of  the  " Female  Minimum  Wage Act"  for
out in permit
whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 9 hours in one day and
Time and one-half of
44 hours in week
the regular rate of
pay.
Note.— (1)   Employees if called to work by the employer shall be paid not less in any one day than an amount
equal to 2 hours' pay if called to work and not put to work, nor less than 4 hours* pay if put to work.
(2) Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
(3) Employees  to get one-half  hour free from  duty between  the hours  of  11   o'clock   in  the forenoon  and
2 o'clock in the afternoon, to commence not later than 1.30 p.m.
(4) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of employees to be posted.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. J 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY.*
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 52 (1938).
" Hotel and catering industry " means the work of male and female employees employed
in:—
(a)  Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for
which a charge is made:
(6) Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets,
banquet-halls, ice-cream parlours, soda-fountains, hospitals, sanatoriums, nursing homes, clubs,  dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or
commercial establishments or office buildings or schools, or any similar place
where food is cooked, prepared, or served, for which a charge is made,—
whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or in connection with any other business.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry,
working under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
Class A employees-
Class B employees..
$18.00 per week
45c. per hour
(Daily guarantee of
4 hours' pay)
40-44 per week.
Less than 40
per week.
Learners (any age) .
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$12.00 per week for  1st 2 months.
30c. per hour for 1st 2 months.
14.00 per week for 2nd 2 months.
35c. per hour for 2nd 2 months.
16.00 per week for 3rd 2 months.
40c. per hour for 3rd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter
45c. per hour thereafter.
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay at respective
hourly rate3 as set out above.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Rate.
Hours.
Employees classified under section 6 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
or section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage Act " working under
permit
Wage set in
permit
Not more than 44
per week.
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week except:—
(a)  When authorized by the Board or by section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act ":
(6) In cases of emergency which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome:—
Not more than 10 in the day or 48 in the week.
Split shifts to be confined within 12 hours of commencing work.    ("Hours of Work Act" provision.)
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section
5 or 11 of "Hours of Work Act" until he has completed hours so established.
Night-work.—Employment between 1.30 a.m. and 6 a.m. to be continuous. Working shifts not to start or finish
between these hours.
This does not apply to employees:—
(a) In hospitals, sanatoriums, and nursing homes residing on the premises:
(b) In catering where exemption has been granted in writing by the Board:
(c) On Christmas Day and New Year's Day and any other days declared to be exempt by the Board.
Rest Period.—32 consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved by
the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a
call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52a (1947). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 75
Board or Lodging.—For meals partaken of or accommodation used by employee, not more than the following
deductions to be made from employee's wages:—
(a)  Full week's board of 21 meals, $4 per week:
(6)  Individual meals, 20c. each:
(c)   Full week's lodging for 7 days, $2 per week.
Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
Uniforms.—See Order No. 3  (1946) relating to uniforms.
Rest-rooms, Toilet and Wash-room Facilities.—To be provided by employers for use of employees.
Note.— (1)   Order does not apply to:—
(a) Graduate nurses with certificate of completed training:
(b) Student-nurses   in   training   in   approved   school   of   nursing,   as   defined   by   sections   22   and   23   of
" Registered Nurses Act " :
(c) Students employed in a school where enrolled:
(d) Pages as far as wages are concerned:
(e) Employees covered by another specific Order of the Board.
(2) Copy of Order to be posted.
(3) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
RESORT HOTELS IN HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY IN UNORGANIZED
TERRITORY DURING THE SUMMER SEASON.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52a (1946).
Effective June 15th to September 15th, inclusive, each Year.
" Resort hotel " means any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or
lodging are furnished to the general public for which a charge is made.
" Summer season," that part of each year from June 15th to September 15th, inclusive.
Hours.—Not more than 10 in any one day nor 52 in any one week.
Overtime.—One and one-half times regular rate of pay for all hours in excess of 44 in any one week.
Rest Period.—24 consecutive hours each calendar week, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by the Board on joint application of employer and employee.
Variation of Order No. 52 (1946).—All provisions of Order No. 52 (1946) apply except those relating to hours
of work and rest period.
Note.— (1)  Order to be posted.
(2) Order not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities.—Alberni, Armstrong, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Fernie,
Grand Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson,
New Westminster, North Vancouver, Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Prince George, Prince
Rupert, Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm, Slocan, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby, Chilliwhack, Coldstream, Coquitlam, Delta, Esquimalt, Fraser Mills, Glenmore, Kent,
Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Mission, North Cowichan, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Peachland,
Penticton, Pitt Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Sumas, Summerland,
Surrey, Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry Lake, Creston, Dawson
Creek, Gibsons Landing, Hope, Lake Cowichan, Lytton, McBride, Mission, New Denver, Oliver,
Osoyoos, Parksville, Pouce Coupe, Qualicum Beach, Quesnel, Silverton, Smithers, Stewart, Terrace,
Tofino, Vanderhoof, Westview, Williams Lake.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. J 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 51 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 51 (1937).
" Household-furniture manufacturing" means the manufacture of kitchen furniture,
dining-room furniture, bedroom furniture, living-room furniture, hall furniture, and other
articles of household furniture customarily manufactured in a furniture factory.
" Learner " means, only, a male or female employee of any age for whose employment a
permit in writing has been issued by the Board who becomes employed in the household-
furniture manufacturing industry at a time when the employee has had less than 6 months'
experience as an employee in that industry.
This Order shall apply to every employer and every male and female employee in the
household-furniture manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of
the Board specifically defining their work.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
50c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
50c.
44
Rate payable to balance of employees—
Learners (any age), not inclusive of apprentices (under section 5
of " Female Minimum Wage Act " or section 6 of " Male
Minimum Wage Act ")—
44
44
Third 2 months           	
44
44
(Permits to be obtained from the Board for employees working at learners' rates.)
Employees classified under section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage
Act" and section 6 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in one day or 44
hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
such overtime)
Wage prescribed in
permit
One  and   one-half
times  regular  rate
of pay.
44
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of
work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or 11 of the "Hours of Work Act" until the employee has
completed the hours so established.
Note.— (1)  Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted in the establishment.
(3) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his
employees.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 77
JANITORS (MALE).*
Order No. 43 (1942).
Effective September 21st, 1942, superseding Orders Nos. 43, 43A, and 43b.
1. "Janitor" means and includes  every person  employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner,
janitor-fireman, or janitor-engineer.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, 45c. per hour.
3. (a) Resident janitor in apartment buildings of 4 residential suites and under, 45c.
per hour.
(6) Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $32.40 per month
6 residential suites, $36.00 per month
7 residential suites, $39.60 per month
8 residential suites, $43.20 per month
9 residential suites, $46.80 per month
10 residential suites, $50.40 per month
11 residential suites, $54.00 per month
12 residential suites, $57.60 per month
13 residential suites, $61.20 per month
14 residential suites, $64.80 per month
15 residential suites, $68.64 per month
16 residential suites, $72.60 per month
17 residential suites, $76.56 per month
18 residential suites, $80.52 per month
19 residential suites, $84.48 per month
20 residential suites, $88.44 per month
21 residential suites, $92.40 per month
22 residential suites, $96.36 per month
23 residential suites, $99.00 per month
24 residential suites, $101.64 per month;
25 residential suites, $104.28 per month;
26 residential suites, $106.92 per month;
27 residential suites, $109.56 per month;
29 residential suites, $114.84 per month
30 residential suites, $117.48 per month
31 residential suites, $120.12 per month
32 residential suites, $122.76 per month
33 residential suites, $125.40 per month
34 residential suites, $128.04 per month
35 residential suites, $130.68 per month
36 residential suites, $133.32 per month
37 residential suites, $135.96 per month
38 residential suites, $138.60 per month
39 residential suites, $141.24 per month
40 residential suites, $143.88 per month
41 residential suites, $146.52 per month
42 residential suites, $149.16 per month
43 residential suites, $151.80 per month
44 residential suites, $154.44 per month
45 residential suites, $157.08 per month
46 residential suites, $159.72 per month
47 residential suites, $162.36 per month
48 residential suites, $165.00 per month
49 residential suites, $165.00 per month
50 residential suites, $165.00 per month
over 50 residential suites, $165.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $112.20 per month;
(c) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one
shall be designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll,
and shall be paid according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident
janitors, each janitor so designated and recorded must be paid at the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid 45c. per hour for each hour
worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for 2 rooms
and bathroom, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted
exceed $25 per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a) In any apartment building containing 20 residential suites and over, every janitor
shall be given 24 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(b) In any apartment building containing not more than 19 and not less than 12 residential suites, every janitor shall be given 8 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar
week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's
family) shall be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the
provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the
tenants, the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this
Order.
Note.— (1)  In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building, the suite occupied by the
janitor shall not be included.
(2) Order does not apply to janitors employed in one-room school-houses.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946). July 1st, 1946. J 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
JANITRESSES  (FEMALE).*
Order No. 44 (1942).
Effective September 21st, 1942, superseding Orders Nos. .4-4, -MA, and .Mb.
1. " Janitress " means and includes every person employed as janitress, janitress-cleaner,
or jani tress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, 45c. per hour.
3. (a)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings of 4 residential suites and under, 45c.
per hour.
(b)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:-
5 residential suites, $32.40 per month;
6 residential suites, $36.00 per month;
7 residential suites, $39.60 per month;
8 residential suites, $43.20 per month;
9 residential suites, $46.80 per month;
10 residential suites, $50.40 per month;
11 residential suites, $54.00 per month;
12 residential suites, $57.60 per month;
13 residential suites, $61.20 per month;
14 residential suites, $64.80 per month;
15 residential suites, $68.64 per month;
16 residential suites, $72.60 per month;
17 residential suites, $76.56 per month;
18 residential suites, $80.52 per month;
19 residential suites, $84.48 per month;
20 residential suites, $88.44 per month;
21 residential suites, $92.40 per month;
22 residential suites, $96.36 per month;
23 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
24 residential suites, $101.64 per month;
25 residential suites, $104.28 per month;
26 residential suites, $106.92 per month;
27 residential suites, $109.56 per month;
29 residential suites, $114.84 per month
30 residential suites, $117.48 per month
31 residential suites, $120.12 per month
32 residential suites, $122.76 per month
33 residential suites, $125.40 per month
34 residential suites, $128.04 per month
35 residential suites, $130.68 per month
36 residential suites, $133.32 per month
37 residential suites, $135.96 per month
38 residential suites, $138.60 per month
39 residential suites, $141.24 per month
40 residential suites, $143.88 per month
41 residential suites, $146.52 per month
42 residential suites, $149.16 per month
43 residential suites, $151.80 per month
44 residential suites, $154.44 per month
45 residential suites, $157.08 per month
46 residential suites, $159.72 per month
47 residential suites, $162.36 per month
48 residential suites, $165.00 per month
49 residential suites, $165.00 per month
50 residential suites, $165.00 per month
over 50 residential suites, $165.00 per month
28 residential suites, $112.20 per month;
(c) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one
shall be designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll,
and shall be paid according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident
janitresses, each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in
clause (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid 45c. per hour for each
hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for 2 rooms and
bathroom, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted
exceed $25 per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a) In any apartment building containing 20 residential suites and over, every
janitress shall be given 24 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6) In any apartment building containing not more than 19 and not less than 12 residential suites, every janitress shall be given 8 consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's
family) shall be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the
provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the
tenants, the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this
Order.
Note.— (1)  In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building, the suite occupied by the
janitress shall not be included.
(2) Order does not apply to janitresses employed in one-room school-houses.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 79
LAUNDRY, CLEANING AND DYEING INDUSTRIES.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 74 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 194-6, superseding Order No. 74.
" Learner " means an employee of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the
industry, working under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
Employees, any age	
Daily guarantee except Saturday.
Daily guarantee Saturday	
Learners, any age—
First 2 months	
Second 2 months 	
Third 2 months	
Thereafter	
40c. per hour
4 hours' pay
3 hours' pay
31c. per hour
34e. per hour
37c. per hour
40c. per hour
8 per day.
44 per week.
8 per day.
44 per week.
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 6 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
or section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage Act " working under
permit
Wage set in permit
Not more than 44
per week.
Hours.—Not move than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5
of the " Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section
5 or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
Rest Period.—32 consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved by
the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a
call, 4-hour daily guarantee, except on Saturday when 3-hour daily guarantee applies.
Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
Note.—-(1)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(2) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(3) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(5) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. J 80
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
LOGGING INDUSTRY.*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 1 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 1 (1943).
" Logging industry " means all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging;
pole, tie, shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to
hauling, driving, fluming, rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props,
and piles.
This Order shall apply to every employer and every male employee in the logging industry
except:—
(a) Employees covered by another  Order of the Board specifically defining their
work.
(6) Watchmen or caretakers employed in logging camps in which operations are
suspended.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
60c.
$2.00 per cord
Rate as set in permit
Time   and    one-half
of   the   employee's
regular rate of pay.
44
According to official scale of measurement, and such rate or price
shall be paid pro rata, according to the hours worked, to each and
every person so engaged under a contract or agreement for
making shingle-bolts ;   that is, felling, bucking, splitting, and piling
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " in respect of whom permits in writing have been issued by
the Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week (permits must be obtained from the Board
to work such overtime)
44
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(1) Persons  holding positions of supervision  or management as  defined  in  section  4  of the  " Hours of
Work Act."
Persons making shingle-bolts.
Employees engaged exclusively in the transportation of men and supplies.
Persons regularly employed as boom-men and boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
Persons engaged in operating light plants in logging camps   (Order Id   (1948)).
(2) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " until the employee has completed the hours
so established.
Note.— (1)  Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of Order to be posted.
(3) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his employees.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by Male Minimum Wage Order No. Id  (1948).
LOGGING INDUSTRY.
Charge for Board and Lodging—Male Minimum Wage Order No. 28a (1947).
Effective July 24th, 1947, superseding Order No. 28.
This Order rescinds Order No. 28 of the Board fixing a maximum price to be charged
for board and lodging in the logging and sawmill industry in certain parts of the Province
of British Columbia, as set out in the said Order No. 28. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 81
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 25 (1948).
Effective August 12th, 1948, superseding Order No. 25 (1947).
" Manufacturing industry " means the work of employees engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts
of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity.
" Learner" means employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the
industry working under permit from the Board.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the
manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically
defining their work.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
31c.
34c.
37c.
40c.
(Daily guarantee of
4 hours' pay at employee's regular rate.)
44
Learners (any age) —
44
44
Third 2 months               	
44
44
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act" or section 5 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for
whose employment permits in writing have been issued by the
Board
Overtime.-—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work
overtime)
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half
of the employee's
regular rate of pay.
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of
work established pursuant to section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act" until the employee has completed the
hours so established; or to persons exempted from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act " pursuant to the provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
Note.— (1)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his
employees to be posted in his establishment.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with a register in English of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent
at place of work with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call,
4-hour daily guarantee at employee's regular rate of pay.
(7) Under certain conditions, Board may vary daily guarantee and overtime provisions.
(8) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. J 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY (MALE).*
Order No. 59.
Effective October 20th, 1938, superseding Order No. 38.
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
21 years of age and over..
21 years of age and over-
Minimum rate per day	
$18.00 per week
48c. per hour
$1.92 per day.
37% to 44 hours per week.
If less than 37% hours.
Males under 21 Years op Age.
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate. Daily Minimum.
$7.20 per week.
9.00 per week.
10.80 per week.
3 3.20 per week.
15.60 per week.
18.00 per week.
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
19 and under 20
20 and under 21
Thereafter
18c.
24c.
30c.
36c.
42c.
48c.
72c.
96c.
$1.20
1.44
1.68
1.92
Beginners and those recommencing, 18 Years and under 21, to whom Permits have been
issued by the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate. Daily Minimum.
$9.60 per week, 1st 12 months...
12.00 per week, 2nd 12 months..
15.60 per week, 3rd 12 months...
Thereafter $18.00 per week.
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
24c.
30c.
42c.
96c.
$1.20
1.68
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed 5
days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at not
36c.
$1.44
Males 21 Years and under 24.
Inexperienced and partly inexperienced, to whom Permits have been granted, under
Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
30c.
36c.
42c.
$1.20
1.44
1.68
Thereafter $18.00 per week.
Note.— (a)   Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers, employed in wholesale and   (or)   retail establishments, shall be
paid at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26.
(b) Employees must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(c) Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every 7 days.
(d) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 83
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 24 (1946).
Effective August 5th, 1946, superseding Order No. 24.
" Mercantile industry " means the work carried on in establishments operated for the
purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
" Class A employees," those working from 39 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 39 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry,
working under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
Class A employees..
Class B employees..
$17.00 a week
45c. an hour
(Daily guarantee of
4 hours' pay.)
39-44 per week.
Less than 39 per week.
Learners (any Age).
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$11.00 per week 1st 2 months.
30c. per hour 1st 2 months.
13.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
35c. per hour 2nd 2 months.
15.00 per week 3rd 2 months.
40c. per hour 3rd 2 months.
17.00 per week thereafter.
45c. per hour thereafter.
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours* pay at respective hourly
rates as set out above.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5
of the " Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5
or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until she has completed hours so established.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent
at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call,
4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Uniforms.—See Special Order No. 3  (1946) relating to uniforms.
Note.—"Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
OFFICE OCCUPATION.
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 34 (1948).
Effective September 13th, 1948, superseding Order No. 34 (1946).
" Office occupation" means the work of females employed as stenographers; bookkeepers; typists; billing clerks; filing-clerks; cashiers; cash-girls; checkers; invoicers;
comptometer operators; auditors; attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other
offices, and the work of females employed in all kinds of clerical work.
" Class A employees," those working from 36 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 36 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 4 months' experience in the industry,
working under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
$18.00 a week
50c. an hour
(Daily guarantee of
4    hours'    pay    at
employee's regular
rate.)
36-44 per week.
Less than 36 per week. J 84                                                DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Learners (any Age).
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$14.00 per week 1st 2 months.
16.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
40c. per hour 1st 2 months.
45c. per hour 2nd 2 months.
50c. per hour thereafter.
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay at employee's
regular rate.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Order does not apply to employees who hold positions of supervision or management, so long as the duties
performed by them are of a supervisory or managerial character.
Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the daily guarantee and overtime provisions.
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5
of the " Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week, or in excess of hours authorized by the Board.
Reporting on Call.—Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at
place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay.    Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour
daily guarantee at employee's regular rate.
Rest Period.—Thirty-two  consecutive  hours   weekly,   unless   in  exceptional   cases   a   different  arrangement  is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Uniforms.—See Special Order No. 3   (1946)  relating to uniforms.
Note.—"Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.*
Order No. 71.
Effective June 1st, 1940.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging" means all work usually done by painters,
decorators,   and   paper-hangers   in   connection   with  the   construction,   erection,   alteration,
remodelling, or renovation of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
Rate per Hour.
City of Vancouver, including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby,  Municipality of the District of West Vancouver,  City of North
90c
Note.— (a)  Does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act"   (see Order No. 2   (1946) ).
(6)  Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(c) All wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(d) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 85
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.*
Order No. 75.
Effective June 2nd, 1941.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters,
decorators, and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration,
remodelling, or renovation of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Rate per Hour.
Land  Districts   of  Victoria,   Lake,   North   Saanich,   South   Saanich,   Esquimalt,   Highland,
Metchosin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew	
90c.
Note.— (a) Does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act"   (see Order No. 2   (1946)).
(6) Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(c) All wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(d) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
PATROLMEN   (MALE).*
Order No. 69.
Effective February 5th, 1940.
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes
to watch or patrol the premises of more than one person for the purpose of guarding or
protecting persons or property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman" means an employee (not covered by any other Order of the Board)
employed by a private patrol agency.
Hourly rate  42c.
Note.— (a) Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(6)  Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(c) Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(d) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. J 86
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (MALE AND FEMALE).
Order No. 5 (1947).
Effective August 25th, 1947, superseding Orders Nos. 27, 27a, 27b, 27D.
" Personal service occupation " means the work of persons engaged in massaging and
physiotherapy as defined in the " Physiotherapists' and Massage Practitioners' Act," chiropody, chiropractic, osteopathy, electrical treatments, general and specialized therapeutics, and
all work of a like nature.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
$20.00 per week
50c. per hour
$2.00 per day.
The wage or rate of
pay  prescribed  in
the permit.
per week.
Employees  classified under section  6 of the  " Male Minimum Wage
Act"  or  section   5  of the   " Female Minimum  Wage Act"  for
whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Note.— (a) If called to work and not put to work employee shall be paid for not less than 2 hours at the
employee's regular rate of pay.
(5) Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 8 in a day or 44 in
a week, or hours authorized by the Board.
(c) This Order does not apply to:—
(i)  Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work:
(ii)  A graduate nurse who is in possession of a certificate showing she has completed a course of training
in general nursing provided in a hospital and who is employed as a nurse:
(iii)  A student-nurse in training in an approved school of nursing as defined by sections 22 and 23 of the
" Registered Nurses Act " of British Columbia.
(d) Copy of Order to be posted.
(e) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(/)  Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(g)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(h)  Regarding uniforms, see Order No. 3 (1946).
(i)   "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT, ETC.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 67 (1948).
Effective September 13th, 1948, superseding Public Places of Amusement Order.
" Class A employee " means an employee whose working-week consists of 40 hours or
more.
" Class B employee " means an employee whose working-week consists of less than 40
hours.
" Learner " means an employee for whose employment a permit in writing has been
issued by the Board.
This Order applies to all persons employed in or about the following places to which
a charge for admission or service is made to the public:—
(a) Indoor or outdoor theatres and dance-halls or dance-pavilions, music-halls,
concert-rooms, lecture-halls (excluding in every instance players and artists);
and
(b) Shooting-galleries, bowling-alleys, billiard-parlours and pool-rooms, ice-rinks,
roller-rinks, amusement parks, golf-courses, sports grounds and arenas; and
(c) Swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions and dressing-rooms, bathing-beaches, steam
baths; and
(d) Veterinary hospitals and establishments or offices where general and special
therapeutics is performed:
(e) Parking-lots, auto camps, shoe-shine establishments, and boat liveries. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 87
This Order does not apply to:—
(a)  Employees included in any other Order of the Board:
(6)  Persons employed as caddies on or about golf-courses; and
(c)  Persons employed exclusively as watchmen.
Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Class A employees-
Class B employees..
$18.00 a week
45c. per hour
(See note   (6)   re
daily guarantee.)
40 to 44.
Less than 40.
Learners.
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$14.00 per week 1st 2 months
16.00 per week 2nd 2 months
18.00 per week thereafter
35c. per hour during 1st 2 months.
40c. per hour during 2nd 2 months.
45c. per hour thereafter.
(See note (6) re daily guarantee.)
Hourly Rate.
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act" or section 5 of the
" Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose employment permits in writing have been
issued by the Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and 44 hours in week
(permits required from the Board to work overtime)
Rate as set in permit.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(i)   Employees working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 6  (a) of this Order until the employee has completed the hours so established:
(ii)  Persons holding positions of supervision or management or employed in a confidential capacity, so long
as the duties performed by him are of a supervisory or managerial character.    The Board may determine whether or not the position held by any person or the capacity in which he is employed is such
as to bring him within the scope of this paragraph.
Note.— (1) Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with a register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 3-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(7) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(8) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
RADIO-BROADCAST TECHNICIANS.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 8 (1948).
Effective September 13th, 1948.
" Radio-broadcast technician " means any employee engaged in the installation, operation,
or maintenance of radio-broadcast equipment, including television, voice and facsimile, or
any rebroadcast apparatus by means of which electricity is applied in the transmission or
transference, production, or reproduction of voice and sound, including records, transcriptions, wire or tape recording, and vision, with or without ethereal aid, including the cutting
or processing, or both the cutting and processing, of records and transcription.
This Order applies to all radio-broadcast technicians and their employers, except operators of record-playing or transmitting and receiving communications equipment in establishments other than radio-broadcast stations.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
80c.
(See note  (6)   re
daily guarantee.)
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act" or section 5 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act " for
whose employment permits in writing have been issued by the
Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work
overtime)
44
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(i) Radio-broadcast technicians working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established
pursuant to the provisions of section 5 (a) of this Order until the radio-broadcast technician has
completed the hours so established:
(ii) Radio-broadcast technicians holding positions of supervision or management or employed in a confidential capacity, so long as the duties performed by them are of a supervisory or managerial character.
The Board may determine whether or not the position held by any person or the capacity in which he
is employed is such as to bring him within the scope of this paragraph.
Note.— (1)  Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with a register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(7) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 89
RADIO TECHNICIANS.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 7 (1948).
Effective May Slst, 1948.
" Radio technician " means any employee engaged in:—
(a)  The   designing,   repairing,   adjusting,   and  installing  of  radio   and  electronic
equipment,  including home  radio  receivers,  record-playing apparatus, public-
address and audio-amplifier systems, and industrial electronic equipment; and
(6)  The designing, repairing, and maintenance of long- and short-wave and ultrahigh frequency receiving and transmitting equipment.
This  Order shall apply to all radio  technicians  and their employers, except persons
employed as radio technicians in radio-broadcast stations.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Radio technicians
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act" or section 5 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for
whose employment permits in writing have been issued by the
Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work
overtime)
80c.
(See note   (6)   re
daily guarantee.)
Rate of pay prescribed in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
44
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(i)   Radio technicians working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to
section 5 or section 11   (3)  or section 11   (4)  of the " Hours of Work Act " until the radio technician
has completed the hours so established:
(ii)  Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act" pursuant to
the provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
Note.— (1)  Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with a register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(7) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(8) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. J 90
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SAWMILL INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 50 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 50 (1943).
" Sawmill industry " means all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills,
veneer-mills, lath-mills, and (or) planing-mills.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male employee in the sawmill
industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their
work.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
50c.
44
Rate   payable   to  balance   of   employees    (inclusive   of   employees   in
respect of whom a permit has been obtained under section 5 of
"Male Minimum Wage Act")  not less than	
40c.
44
Employees  classified under section  6 of the " Male Minimum  Wage
Rate as set out in
44
Act " for whose employment permits in writing have been issued
permit
by the Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or
Time    and    one-half
44 hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
of   the   employee's
such overtime)
regular rate of pay.
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(i)  Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of Work
Act."
Persons regularly employed as boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
(ii)  Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the "Hours of Work Act" or Regulation No. 2 made under the said
Act until the employee has completed the hours so established.
Note.— (1)  Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted in establishment.
(3) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of employees
to be posted.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of ages, names,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 91
SHEET-METAL TRADE.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 10 (1948).
Effective September 13th, 1948.
" Sheet-metal trade " means and includes all work usually done by journeymen in connection with:—
(ct) The fabrication or installation, or both the fabrication and installation, of
gravity or forced air heating, or conditioned-air installation;   or
(6) The fabrication or erection, or both the fabrication and erection, or installation
of any sheet-metal work in connection with any residential, commercial, or
industrial building, plant, or establishment, or ship, boat, or barge.
This Order applies to every employer and every employee in the sheet-metal trade, except
employees employed in the production-line  or  assembly-line manufacture  of  sheet-metal
products for resale.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Employees in sheet-metal trade-
Employees  classified under section  6 of the  " Male Minimum Wage
Act " for whose employment permits in writing have been issued
by the Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week  (permits required from the Board to work
overtime)
$1.00
(See note  (6)   re
daily guarantee.)
Rate as set in permit.
Time and one-half
of the employee's
regular rate of pay.
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(i)   Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act" pursuant to
the provisions of section 4 of the said Act:
(ii)  Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or section 11   (3)   or section 11   (4)   of the "Hours of Work Act" until the
employee has completed the hours so established.
Note.— (1)  Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with a register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(7) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(8) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. J 92
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SHINGLE INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 62 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 62 (1943) and Order No. 77 (1943).
" Shingle industry" means all operations in or incidental to the manufacturing of
wooden shingles or shakes.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles of shingles, understood and accepted
as a standard by the industry, and according to specification N.R.C 5—1936 issued by the
National Research Council of Canada.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the
shingle industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining
their work.
Per Square.
Guaranteed
Hourly Kate.
Weekly Hours.
Sawyers—
30c.
24c.
18c.
50c.
50c.
50c.
50c.
44
44
Packers, all grades	
Other   employees   not   included   in   any   other
44
44
(Employees packing or sawing shingles on any other basis than by the square shall be paid on the
same proportionate basis.)
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act" or section 5 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for
whose employment permits in writing have been issued by the
Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board
to work such overtime)
Rate as set out in
permit
Time and one-half
of the employee's
regular rate of pay.
44
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(i)   Persons holding positions of supervision  or management as defined in  section  4  of the  " Hours of
Work Act."
Persons regularly employed as boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
(ii)   Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " or Regulation No. 2 made under the said
Act until the employee has completed the hours so established.
Note.— (1)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted in establishment.
(3) Schedule setting  out the  daily  shifts  and  intervals  free  from  duty  of  each  occupational  group  of his
employees to be posted.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations,
and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 93
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 20 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 20.
" Ship-building industry " means all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, painting, cleaning, preserving, reconditioning, putting on or taking
off the ways, or dry-docking of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Rate.
Hours.
Employees doing the work usually done by journeymen, and without
restricting   the   generality  of   the   foregoing,   the  work   of  shipwrights, joiners,  boat-builders,  caulkers,  painters,  fitters, electricians, machinists, boilermakers, plumbers and steam-fitters, blacksmiths, sheet-metal workers, welders, hoistmen, engineers, riggers,
90c. per hour
60c. per hour
45c. per hour
Rate set in permit
£   8 per day.
} 44 per week.
J"   8 per day.
When  90%   of total number  of  employees   (exclusive  of  indentured
apprentices)  are paid not less than the 90c. or 60c. per hour rate,
) 44 per week.
^   8 per day.
Employees classified under section 6 of the Act working under permits
) 44 per week,
j"   8 per day.
) 44 per week.
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5 of
the " Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5
or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment.
Note.— (1)  Copy of Order to be posted.
(2) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(3) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(5) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
TAXICAB-DRIVERS   (MALE).*
Order No. 33 (1940).
Effective October 10th, 1940, superseding Order No. 33, Order No. 33k, and
Order No. 33s.
" Taxicab-driver " means every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with
seating accommodation for seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Wo rki ng-hou rs.
Vancouver	
All ages
$3.30
9 per day.
54 per week.
Note.— (a)  Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly.
(6)  "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. J 94
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TAXICAB-DRIVERS  (MALE).*
Order No. 60.
Effective November 17th, 1938.
" Taxicab-driver " means every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with
seating accommodation for seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Less than 10
Hours per Day.
Daily
Minimum.
Working-
hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich...
All ages.
$3.60
42c. per hour
$1.68 per day
10 per day.
Note.— (a)  Permits shall be obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours
can be paid 42c. per hour.
(6)   Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 54c. per hour.
(c) Drivers shall be paid at least semi-monthly.
(d) Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every 7 days.
(e) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).*
Order No. 79.
Effective April 16th, 1945, superseding Order effective April 5th, 1920.
" Telephone and telegraph occupation " means the work of all persons employed in connection with the operating of the various instruments, switch-boards, and other mechanical
appliances used in connection with telephony and telegraphy.
Rate.
Maximum Hours.
Employees, any age—■
$1.80 per day
2.52 per day
2.76 per day
3.00 per day
3.36 per day
■
8 per day.
48 per week.
Note.— (a)  Part-time employees' wages shall be prorated.
(b) Employees required to report for work to receive at least 3 hours' pay per day.
(c) In emergencies employees may work up to 56 hours per week, with one and one-half times their regular
rate of pay for hours in excess of 48.
(d) Where employees reside on employers' premises, an arrangement may be made for employees to answer
emergency calls between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m., subject to approval in writing by the Board.
(e) Working-hours shall be confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of work.
(/)   Every employee shall have a rest period of 24 consecutive hours in each calendar week.
(g)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(A) Where hours of work in bone-fide trade-union agreements differ from those prescribed by the Order, the
Board may, in its discretion, exempt in writing the union and the employer from sections in the Order pertaining
to hours, to the extent mentioned in the exemption.
(i)   "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.                                     J 95
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY  (MALE).*
Order No. 26 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
Order No. 26a (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
Superseding Order No. 26, Order No. 26b, and Order No. 26c.
(This Order does not apply to employees covered by Order No. 9 (1948) of the Board.)
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or
transporting for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods,
wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the
carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than
the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1)  Operators  of motor-vehicles of 2,000  lb. net weight or over,  as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Less than 40
54c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
36c.
Less than 40
24c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
54c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
40 and not more
than 48
30c.
40 and not more
than 48
20c.
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
(2)  Operators of motor-vehicles of less than 2,000 lb. net weight, as
specified  on  the motor-vehicle  licence,   and  operators   of motorcycles with wheeled attachments,  exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
(3)  Operators  of motor-cycles with  not more  than  two wheels  and
without wheeled attachment
(4)  Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery
or messenger work  (e)
(6)  Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than those covered by section 7 hereof
(7)  Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in
the retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
Note.— (a)   This Order does not apply to drivers, swampers or helpers covered by Order No. 9   (1948)  of the
Board (see Order No. 26c (1948)).
(ft)  Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's behalf
shall be in addition to above rates.
(c) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d) Milk-delivery men may work  15 hours in excess of 44 per week,  provided not more than  10 hours are
worked in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(e) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 59.
(/)  Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly.
(g)   "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. J 96
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY (FEMALE).*
Order No. 26b.
Effective August 18th, 1941.
(This Order does not apply to employees covered by Order No. 9 (1948) of the Board.)
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or
transporting for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods,
wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the
carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than
the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net weight or over, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Hourly rate 	
(2) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than 2,000 lb. net weight, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in sections 3 and 7 hereof
Hourly rate 	
(3) Operators of motor-cycles with not more than two wheels and
without wheeled attachment
Hourly rate 	
(4) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery
or messenger work
Hourly rate	
(5) Swampers and helpers	
Hourly rate 	
(6) Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than those covered by section 7 hereof
Hourly rate 	
(7) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in
the retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
Less than 40
54c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
36c.
Less than 40
24c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
54c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
40 and not more
than 48
30c.
40 and not more
than 48
20c.
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
Note.— (a) This Order does not apply to drivers, swampers or helpers covered by Order No. 9 (1948) of the
Board  (see Order No. 26c (1948)).
(6) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's behalf
shall be in addition to above rates.
(c) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d) Milk-delivery employees may work 15 hours in excess of 44 per week, provided not more than 10 hours are
worked in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(e) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/)   "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY.
Order No. 26c (1948).
Effective September 13th, 1948.
This Order amends Orders Nos. 26  (1940)  and 26b by deleting from the application of
those Orders employees in the transportation industry to whom Order No. 9 (1948) applies. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 97
COST AND UPKEEP OF UNIFORMS.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 3 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946.
1. Applies to every employer and to every male and female employee in every industry,
business, trade, and occupation to which the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts apply.
2. (1) Subject to the provisions of subsection (2), when an employee is required to wear
a uniform or special article of wearing-apparel, it shall be furnished, cleaned, laundered, or
repaired free of cost to employee by employer.
(2) Where employer and employee make written application to the Board, the Board
may give written approval to a different arrangement regarding uniforms.
WOOD-WORKING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 49 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 49 (1943).
" Wood-working industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of manufacturing sash and doors, cabinets, show-cases, office and store furniture and
fixtures, wood furnishings, plywood, veneer products, and general mill-work products.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the
wood-working industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically
defining their work.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Rate payable to at least 85% of total	
Rate payable to balance of employees (inclusive of employees in respect
of whom a permit has been obtained under section 6 of " Male
Minimum Wage Act " or section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage
Act ") not less than	
Employees classified under section 6 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
and section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime.—-Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or
44 hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
such overtime)
50c.
40c.
Rate as set out in
permit
Time and one-half
of the employee's
regular rate of pay.
44
44
44
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:
(i)
management as defined  in  section  4  of the  " Hours of
Persons holding positions  of supervision
Work Act."
(ii)   Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act" until the employee has completed the hours
so established.
Note.— (1)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted in establishment.
(3) Schedule  setting  out  the  daily  shifts  and  intervals  free  from   duty  of  each  occupational  group  of his
employees.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations,
and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
GENERAL INTERIM MINIMUM WAGE ORDER  (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946.
1. That this Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee
in every industry, business, trade, or occupation covered by the following orders, namely:—■
Order
No.
Industry.
Date of Order.
Minimum
Wage
Act.
17 (1942)
*B5 (1943)
70
76
*58
*65
*66
*72
*73
*68
12 (1940)
53
B4
18 (1942)
*39 (1940)
78
*51
43 (1942)
44 (1942)
» 1 (1943)
•25 (1942)
*24
59
75
71
69
«27
•67
*50 (1943)
*62 (1943)
*77 (1943)
33 (1940)
60
79
f26 (1940)
t26B
•49 (1943)
Baking	
Box-manufacture	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Saltspring Island)	
Bus-drivers	
Carpentry (Vancouver and District)	
Carpentry (Kootenay Area)	
Carpentry (Victoria and District)	
Carpentry (Alberni)	
Carpentry (Nanaimo)	
Christmas-trees	
Construction	
Elevator Operators	
Elevator Operators	
Engineers, Stationary Steam	
First-aid Attendants	
Fishing	
Household Furniture	
Janitors	
Janitresses	
Logging	
Manufacturing	
Mercantile	
Mercantile	
Painters,  Decorators,  and Paper-hangers   (southerly portion of
Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers (Vancouver and District)
Patrolmen	
Personal Service	
Public Places of Amusement	
Sawmills	
Shingle	
Shingle	
Taxicab-drivers	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)	
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Wood-working	
July 15, 1942	
July 14, 1943	
March 12, 1940	
September 21, 1942.
September 15, 1938
June 23, 1939	
August 16, 1939	
May 14, 1940	
May 14, 1940	
August 31, 1939	
November 26, 1940.
February 28, 1938...
February 28, 1938...
September 9, 1942..
October 8, 1940	
April 14, 1943	
November 17, 1937.
September 9, 1942..
September 9, 1942..
July 14, 1943	
October 15, 1942	
May 29, 1935	
October 12, 1938	
April 22, 1941	
April 26, 1940	
January 19, 1940....
August 29, 1935	
August 31, 1939	
June 25, 1943	
July 23, 1943	
July 23, 1943	
October 8, 1940	
November 15, 1938.
March 13, 1945	
October 8, 1940	
August 12, 1941	
July 14, 1943	
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
2. That on and after the 1st day of July, 1946, all minimum wage-rates fixed by the
orders of the Board, as set out in section 1 of this Order, are hereby increased by adding
thereto 20 per cent, of such minimum wage-rates.
3. That the orders as set out in section 1 of this Order are varied accordingly.
4. That this Order, made by the Board at Victoria, B.C., on the 25th day of June, 1946,
and published in The British Columbia Gazette on the 27th day of June, 1946, shall take
effect on the 1st day of July, 1946.
* Orders revised after July 1st, 1946.
t Orders Nos. 26 (1940) and 26b have been revised in part.    See Order No. 26c (1948) and Order No. 9 (1948).
Note.—The minimum wage-rates provided in the Summary of Orders include the 20% increase wherever it
applies. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 99
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders in effect at August 31st, 1948 :-
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum Wage
Act.
41
2 (1946)
2a (1947)
6 (1948)
17 (1942)
42 (1946)
55 (1947)
76
70
70A
58 (1947)
68 (1947)
12 (1940)
4 (1946)
9 (1948)
53
54
18 (1942)
39 (1948)
78
46 (1946)
47 (1946)
47a (1946)
27 (1947)
52 (1946)
52a (1946)
52A(1947)
52B (1948)
51 (1947)
43 (1942)
44 (1942)
74 (1946)
1 (1947)
ID (1948)
28a (1947)
25 (1948)
24 (1946)
24a (1947)
59
34 (1948)
75
71
69
5 (1947)
67 (1948)
8 (1948)
7 (1948)
50 (1947)
10 (1948)
62 (1947)
20 (1946)
33 (1940)
Apprentices, Indentured	
Apprentices, Indentured	
Apprentices, Indentured	
Automotive Repair and Gasoline Service-
station
Baking	
Barbering	
Box-manufacturing	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver and Vicinity)	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Carpentry	
Christmas-tree	
Construction	
Cook- and Bunk-house Occupation (in
Unorganized Territory)
Drivers, Swampers, or Helpers in Transportation Industry as denned
Elevator Operators	
Elevator Operators	
Engineers, Stationary Steam	
First-aid Attendants	
Fishing	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
General Interim Minimum Wage Order
(1946)
Hairdressing	
Hotel and Catering	
Hotel and Catering (Resort Hotels) (Unorganized Territory)
Hotel and Catering	
Hotel and Catering	
Household Furniture	
Janitors	
Janitresses	
Laundry, Cleaning, and Dyeing	
Logging	
Logging	
Logging (Board)	
Manufacturing	
Mercantile	
Mercantile	
Mercantile	
Office Occupation	
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(southerly portion of Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(Vancouver and District)
Patrolmen	
Personal Service	
Public Places of Amusement, etc	
Radio-broadcast Technicians	
Radio Technicians	
Sawmills	
Sheet-metal Trade	
Shingle	
Ship-building	
Taxicab-drivers	
Feb. 3/37	
June 19/46..
Nov. 24/47..
Apr. 16/48..
July 15/42...
June 19/46..
Jan. 16/47...
Sept. 21/42.
Mar. 12/40..
June 21/40.
July 29/47...
May 9/47	
Nov. 26/40..
June 26/46..
Aug. 3/48....
Feb. 28/38...
Feb. 28/38...
Sept. 9/42...
May 20/48...
Apr. 14/43..
June 25/46..
June 25/46..
Apr. 18/47..
June 25/46..
May 2/47	
June 19/46..
June 26/46..
Nov. 24/47..
Apr. 26/48..
Jan. 16/47...
Sept. 9/42...
Sept. 9/42...
June 25/46..
Jan. 16/47...
June 4/48....
July 15/47...
Aug. 3/48....
July 11/46...
May 1/47	
Oct. 12/38...
Aug. 3/48....
Apr. 22/41..
Apr. 26/40-
Jan. 19/40...
Aug. 15/47..
Aug. 3/48....
Aug. 3/48....
May 20/48...
Jan. 16/47...
Aug. 3/48....
Jan. 16/47..
June 19/46
Oct. 8/40	
Feb. 11/37	
June 27/46	
Nov. 27/47	
Apr. 22/48	
July 16/42	
June 27/46	
Jan. 23/47	
Sept. 24/42	
Mar. 14/40	
June 27/40	
July 31/47	
May 15/47	
Nov. 28/40	
July 4/46	
Aug. 12/48	
Mar. 3/38	
Mar. 3/38	
Sept. 17/42	
May 27/48	
Apr. 22/43	
June 27/46	
June 27/46	
Apr. 24/47	
June 27/46	
May 8/47	
June 27/46	
July 4/46	
Nov. 27/47	
Apr. 29/48	
Jan. 23/47	
Sept. 17/42	
Sept. 17/42	
June 27/46	
Jan. 23/47	
June 10/48	
July 24, 31/47
Aug. 12/48	
July 18/46	
May 8/47	
Oct. 20/38	
Aug. 12/48	
Apr. 24/41	
May 2/40	
Jan.25/40	
Aug. 21/47	
Aug. 12/48	
Aug. 12/48	
May 27/48	
Jan.23/47	
Aug. 12/48	
Jan. 23/47	
June 27/46	
Oct. 10/40	
Feb. 11/37	
July 1/46	
Dec. 1/47	
May 1/48	
July 20/42	
July 1/46	
Feb. 1/47	
Sept. 28/42	
Mar. 18/40	
June 27/40	
Aug. 4/47	
May 15/47	
Nov. 28/40	
July 8/46	
Sept. 13/48	
Mar. 3/38	
Mar. 3/38	
Sept. 21/42	
May 31/48	
May 3/43	
July 1/46	
July 1/46	
Apr. 24/47	
July 1/46	
May 12/47	
July 1/46	
Julyl5 to Sept
15 each year
Dec. 1/47	
Apr. 29/48	
Feb. 1/47	
Sept. 21/42	
Sept. 21/42	
July 1/46	
Feb. 1/47	
June 10/48	
July 24/47	
Aug. 12/48	
Aug. 5/46	
May 8/47	
Oct. 20/38	
Sept. 13/48	
June 2/41	
June 1/40	
Feb. 5/40	
Aug. 25/47	
Sept. 13/48	
Sept. 13/48	
May 31/48	
Feb. 1/47	
Sept.13/48	
Feb. 1/47	
July 1/46	
Oct. 10/40	
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male. J 100
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS—
Continued.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum Wage
Act.
60
60a
79
26 (1940)
26a (1940)
26B
26c (1948)
3 (1946)
49 (1947)
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Uniforms, Cost and Upkeep of	
Wood-working	
Nov. 15/38.
Oct. 8/40....
Mar. 13/45.
Oct. 8/40....
Nov. 26/40.
Aug. 12/41.
Aug. 3/48...
June 19/46.
Jan.16/47
Nov. 17/38.
Oct. 10/40..
Mar. 15/45.
Oct. 10/40..
Nov. 28/40.
Aug. 14/41.
Aug. 12/48.
June 27/46.
Jan. 23/47.
Nov. 17/38.
Oct. 10/40..
Apr. 16/45.
Oct. 10/40..
Nov. 28/40.
Aug. 18/41.
Sept. 13/48
July 1/46....
Feb. 1/47....
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
B
SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
"HOURS OF WORK ACT."
(AND AS AMENDED BY INTERIM AMENDMENTS (1946), EFFECTIVE JULY 1ST, 1946.)
Section 3.—" Subject to the exceptions provided by or under this Act,
the working-hours of an employee in any industrial undertaking shall not
exceed eight in the day and forty-four in the week."
E IT KNOWN that the Board of Industrial Relations has made the following regulations,
namely:—
Note.—-Regulation 1 cancelled by Regulation 30.    Cancellation effective October 31st, 1945.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may
work a total of 44 hours each week in five nights, in lieu of 44 hours each week in six nights,
but the number of hours worked in any night must not exceed 9.
Logging.
3. Persons employed in:—
(1) The logging industry in:—
(a)  Booming operations;   or
(6)   Transporting logs by logging-railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or river-
driving; or
(c) Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d) The occupation of boatman;
(e) The occupation of emergency fire-fighters:
Fish-canning.
(2) Canning fish or manufacturing by-products from fish, but not those engaged in
salting fish;  and in
Cook- and Bunk-houses.
(3) Cook- and bunk-houses in connection with any industrial undertaking in unorganized
territory,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed by section 3 of the said Act.
Engineers, Operators, Firemen, and Oilers or Greasers.
4a. In all industrial undertakings which use steam, gasoline, or diesel engines, or electric
energy as motive power, and which are operated with a single shift of engineers or operators,
firemen, and oilers or greasers, the engineers or operators, firemen, and oilers or greasers
may work overtime to the extent of one hour per day to perform preparatory or complementary work, in addition to the maximum hours of work prescribed by section 3 of the Act,
with effect from the 22nd day of April, 1948.    (Published in B.C. Gazette, April 22nd, 1948.)
Note.—Regulation 5 cancelled by 5a, October 9th, 1947.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons employed
in shipyards, engineering-works, machine-shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal works,
belt-works, saw-works, and plants of a like nature may work such hours in addition to the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the said Act as (but not more than) may be necessary
to prevent serious loss to, or interruption in the operation of, the industrial undertaking for
which the repairs are being made. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 101
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture of wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables may work during the months of June, July,
August, and September in each year such hours in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3
of the said Act as may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent orders.
Note.—Regulation 8 cancelled by 8a, February 13th, 1936.
Note.—Regulation 9 cancelled by 9a, September 26th, 1940.
Seasonal Lithographing.
10. During the months of May, June, July, August, September, and October in each year
persons employed in the lithographing industry may work such hours in excess of the hours
prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent
orders.    This exemption shall only apply when sufficient competent help is not available.
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by the Board by the granting of written temporary exemption permits limiting by their terms the extent thereof, but only upon being
satisfied by application in writing, signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly
authorized, of the urgency and necessity for the exception, that it is of a temporary nature,
and that no other means of adequately overcoming such temporary urgent condition is, or
has been, reasonably available, and that the additional working-hours applied for will not be
more than will suffice for the extra pressure of work requiring the same.
Overtime Record.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in the manner required by subsection (1) of
section 9 of the said Act of all additional hours worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said
Act or in pursuance of any regulation.
12a. Every employer shall furnish the Board with a copy of his pay-roll, or record in
such form prescribed by the Board, showing the hours worked and the nature of the work
performed by his employees in respect of section 6 of the Act, or Regulations Nos. 6 and 11
of the Board, not later than 15 days after such hours have been worked. (Effective
December 12th, 1940.)
13. Every employer shall notify, by means of the posting of notices in conspicuous places
in the works or other suitable place, where the same may readily be seen by all persons
employed by him, the hours at which work begins and ends, and, where work is carried on
by shifts, the hours at which each shift begins and ends; also such rest intervals accorded
during the period of work as are not reckoned as part of the working-hours; these hours
shall be so fixed that the duration of the work shall not exceed the limits prescribed by the
" Hours of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made thereunder, and when so notified
they shall not be changed except upon 24 hours' notice of such change posted as hereinbefore
specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the Act or Regulation 11 above, a like notice of
the change in working-hours shall be posted, which notice shall also state the grounds on
which the exemption was granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia, this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th, 1934.    Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 14.
Occupation of Barbering.
The occupation of barbering is hereby added to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 24th day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd, 1934.    Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15.
Mercantile Industry.
The mercantile industry is hereby added to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained
by Order in Council dated the 7th day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th, 1934.    Effective August 9th, 1934.) J 102
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Regulations Nos. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e.
Mercantile Industry.
Note.—Regulation 15e cancelled by Regulation 29, September 30th, 1939.
Regulations Nos. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, and 16e cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f.
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores.
I. Persons employed in drug-stores as registered apprentices, certified clerks, or licentiates
of pharmacy may work not more than 88 hours in any two successive weeks, but in no case
shall the hours of work of any such registered apprentice, certified clerk, or licentiate of
pharmacy exceed 48 hours in any one week, or 9 hours in any one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of
August, 1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th, 1939.    Effective April 6th, 1939.)
REGULATION No. 17.
Baking Industry.
The baking industry, by which expression is meant all operations in or incidental to the
manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or cakes, is hereby added to the Schedule of the
said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said
Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the 6th day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd, 1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 17b.
Baking Industry.
Be it known that, pursuant to and by virtue of the powers and authority vested in the
Board of Industrial Relations by the " Hours of Work Act," the said Board (1) hereby cancels
Regulation No. 17a of the Board, dated the 22nd day of November, 1934, such cancellation
being effective as and from the 24th day of November, 1947, and (2) hereby makes the following regulation, to be known as Regulation No. 17b:—■
Persons employed in the baking industry as deliverymen may work two (2) hours per day
in excess of the daily limit and four (4) hours per week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the said Act, with effect from the 24th day of November, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 13th day of November, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 20th, 1947.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 103
REGULATION No. 18.
Catering Industry.
The catering industry, which includes all operations in or incidental to the preparation or
to the serving, or to both preparation and serving, of meals or refreshments where the meals
or refreshments are served or intended to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-house,
dance-hall, cabaret, banquet-hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunch-room, lunch-counter, ice-cream
parlour, soda-fountain, or in any other place where food is served and a charge is made for the
same either directly or indirectly, whether such charge is made against the persons who
partake of the meals or refreshments or against some other person, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition
to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the 9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on the 1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th, 1934.    Effective December 1st, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 19.
Retail Florists.
Persons employed in the establishments of retail florists may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of the said Act as (but only so many as) shall
be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise
overcome: Provided that the working-hours of such persons shall not exceed 88 hours on the
average in any two successive weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions the decision of the Board shall be final, and
where the Board is of the opinion that, under the provisions of this regulation, the working-
hours limited by section 3 of the Act are being unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written
notification to the management, exclude the employer's establishment from the provisions of
this regulation for such period of time as the Board considers advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th, 1934.    Effective November 15th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 20.
Occupation of Elevator Operator.
The occupation of elevator operator is hereby added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the 15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 28th day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 28th, 1935.    Effective February 28th, 1935.)
Regulations Nos. 21, 21b, 21c, 21d, 21e, 21f, 21g, 21h, 2lJ, and 21k cancelled by
REGULATION No. 21m.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The fruit and vegetable industry, which means all operations in establishments operated
for the purpose of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable, is hereby exempt from the operation of the " Hours of Work Act" from June 1st to
November 30th, inclusive, in each year. J 104 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REGULATION No. 22.
Baking Industry.
The transportation industry, which includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the
carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than
the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates, is hereby added to
the Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council
dated the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.    Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 23.
Transportation Industry.
1. That where»used in this regulation the expression " transportation industry " includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles,
or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public
vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any
other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or road transport, for the purpose of being further
transported to some destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage
or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation industry, other than those employed as (a)
operators of motor-cycles, (6) bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on
delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of
milk, are hereby permitted to work 6 hours per week in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934," in accordance with the provisions of Order
No. 26 of the said Board of Industrial Relations dated the 19th day of June, 1935, fixing
minimum wages in the transportation industry: Provided that no such employee in the
transportation industry shall work more than 10 hours in any one day.
3. That employees in the transportation industry employed as drivers of vehicles in the
retail delivery of milk are hereby permitted to work 15 hours per week in excess of the hours
prescribed by section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934 ": Provided that over a period
of seven weeks no such employee shall work more than 350 hours, nor more than 10 hours in
any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.    Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24.
Occupation of Hotel Clerk.
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes the work of all persons engaged as room
clerks (day or night), mail clerks, information clerks, cashiers, book-keepers, accountants,
telephone operators, and any other persons employed in clerical work in hotels, is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in
Council dated the 20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 26th, 1935.    Effective September 26th, 1935.)
Note.—Regulation 26 cancelled by Regulation 30.    Cancellation effective October 31st
1945. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 105
REGULATION No. 28.
Taxicab Industry.
The taxicab industry, which includes the work of all employees in charge of or driving
a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for 7 passengers or less than 7 passengers, used for
the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or operated for hire, is hereby added as
item No. 12 to the Schedule of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in
Council dated the 3rd day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st, 1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 28a.
Taxicab Industry.
Persons employed in the taxicab industry, which includes the work of all employees in
charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for 7 passengers or less than 7
passengers, used for the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or operated for hire,
may work 6 hours per week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act,
but in no case shall the daily hours worked by any such employee in the taxicab industry
exceed 9 in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st, 1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.)
Note.—The taxicab industry, having been brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is
now subject to the following provision of that Statute:—
" The working-hours of employees working on a split shift shall be confined within 12
hours immediately following commencement of work."
REGULATION No. 29.
Mercantile Industry.
Persons employed in the mercantile industry, which includes all establishments operated
for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade in the Province of British Columbia, with
the exception of the City of Vancouver, the City of North Vancouver, Municipality of the
District of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the District of Burnaby, the City of Victoria,
the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt, the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay,
and the Municipality of the District of Saanich, may work 3 hours per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the said Act, on Saturday of each week and on the day preceding a statutory holiday, when such statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but the total
hours worked in any one week shall not exceed 44.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 8th day of November, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 9th, 1939.    Effective November 9th, 1939.)
REGULATION No. 30.
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
Be it known that, pursuant to and by virtue of the powers and authority vested in the
Board of Industrial Relations by the " Hours of Work Act," the said Board hereby cancels
Regulation No. 1 of the Board, dated the 14th day of June, 1934, and Regulation No. 26 of
the Board, dated the 23rd day of March, 1938, such cancellation to be effective as and from
the 31st day of October, 1945.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th day of September, 1945.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 27th, 1945.) J 106 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REGULATION No. 31.
Occupation of Cemetery-workers.
The occupation of cemetery-workers is hereby added to the Schedule to the " Hours of
Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said
Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the 6th day of December, 1946.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 11th day of December, 1946.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 23rd, 1947.)
REGULATION No. 33.
Occupations of Stationary Steam Engineer and Special Engineer.
The occupation of stationary steam engineer, by which expression is meant every
employee engaged in the occupation of producing steam in a steam plant under the authority
of a certificate of competency, as defined by the " Boiler Inspection Act" of the Province of
British Columbia, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while
under steam-pressure or in motion, and the occupation of special engineer, by which expression is meant every employee operating under the authority of a special certificate or a
temporary certificate, as defined by the said " Boiler Inspection Act," are hereby added to the
Schedule to the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the
10th day of October, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 21st day of October, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, October 23rd, 1947.)
REGULATION No. 34.
Occupation of Bartender, Waiter, and Utility Man, within Premises covered by Beer
Licences issued pursuant to the Provisions of Section 28 of the " Government
Liquor Act."
The occupations of bartender, waiter, and utility man, within premises covered by beer
licences issued pursuant to the provisions of section 28 of the " Government Liquor Act," are
hereby added to the Schedule of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in
Council dated the 16th day of September, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 16th day of September, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 18th, 1947.)
" HOURS OF WORK ACT," " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT," AND
" MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
The Board authorizes the following persons, namely:-—
The Chairman of the Board of Industrial Relations,
The Chief Administrative Officer,
The Supervisor of the Vancouver office,
The Supervisor of Inspectors in the Interior,—
to issue temporary exemptions to industrial undertakings to deal with exceptional cases of
pressure of work, and to issue permission in writing allowing the working-hours of any
employee in an industrial undertaking in such exceptional cases to exceed the limit of 8 hours
a day or 44 hours a week.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 9th, 1947.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 107
INTERIM AMENDMENTS  (1946).
Regulation 2 (lumbering, night shift) is hereby amended by striking out " 48 " and " 10,"
and substituting therefor " 44 " and " 9."
Regulation 3 (1) (logging) is hereby amended by striking out the present clause (d),
and substituting the following therefor:—
"(d) The occupation of boatman;  or " and by adding the following as clause (e) :—
"(e)  The occupation of emergency fire-fighters."
Regulation 3 (3) (cook and bunk nouses) is hereby amended by inserting after the word
" undertaking " the words " in unorganized territory," and by striking out all the words after
the word "Act."
Regulation 16f (mercantile industry—drug-stores) is amended by striking out " 96 " and
" 52 " and substituting therefor " 88 " and " 48."
Regulation 18a (catering industry) is hereby rescinded.
Regulation 19 (retail florists) is hereby amended by striking out " 96 " and substituting
therefor " 88."
Regulation 21m (fruit and vegetable industry). The fruit and vegetable industry, which
means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable, is hereby exempt from the operation of
the " Hours of Work Act" from June 1st to November 30th, inclusive, in each year.
Regulation 23, section 3 (transportation industry), is hereby amended by striking out
" 378," and substituting therefor " 350."
Regulation 28b (taxicab industry) is hereby rescinded.
Regulation 29 (mercantile industry) is hereby amended by striking out " 48," and substituting therefor " 44."
The above regulations made and given at Vancouver, B.C., on the 19th day of June, 1946,
shall become effective as and from the 1st day of July, 1946.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 27th, 1946.) J 108 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN.
Unless a permit has been granted to the employer by the Minister of Labour or a
person duly authorized by him to issue such permits, the employment of children under
15 years of age in certain designated occupations or industries is prohibited by the
" Control of Employment of Children Act."
In order that the health and the scholastic standing of the children will not be
adversely affected by their work in industry or business, the Department works in close
co-operation with the school authorities and the parents or guardians of the children.
Permits are issued only when it has been established that the child's health will not
suffer, that the work will not expose the boy or girl to unsafe conditions or interfere
with their standing at school.
The Schedule to the Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries for
which permits are required.
These include:—
(1) Manufacturing industry.
(2) Ship-building industry.
(3) Generation of electricity or motor-power of any kind.
(4) Logging industry.
(5) Construction industry.
(6) Catering industry.
(7) Public places of amusement.
(8) Mercantile industry.
(9) Shoe-shine stands.
(10) Automobile service-stations.
(11) Transportation industry.
The following table contains a summary of permits issued and cancelled from
January 1st to December 31st, 1947, inclusive. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 109
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.si J 110 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION BRANCH.
Head Office Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Chief Executive Officer B. H. E. Goult.
Registrar N. deW. Lyons.
Branch Office 570 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Senior Conciliation Officer W. Fraser.
Assistant Registrar R.  G.  Clements.
James Thomson, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the ninth annual report of the Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1947.
On May 15th, 1947, the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act, 1947,"
became law; the agreement between the Dominion of Canada and this Province, in
effect since April 18th, 1944, concerning the administration of the Wartime Labour
Relations Regulations (P.C. 1003) terminated, and the " Wartime Labour Relations
Regulations Act, 1944," was repealed.*
Thus ended a four-year association with the Federal authorities, during which
time the staff of the Wartime Labour Relations Board (British Columbia), under the
direction of the Honourable George Pearson, Minister of Labour (who discharged the
functions of the Board), handled a total of 3,083 cases, which exceeded the total
number of cases dealt with by all other Provinces, t
This report is therefore descriptive of the activities of this Branch under the
provisions of the " Wartime Labour Relations Regulations Act" from January 1st to
May 15th, and under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act, 1947," from that date to December 31st.
The Minister of Labour discharged the functions of the Labour Relations Board
under the provisions of the new legislation. (For principal features of this legislation, see Annual Report, Department of Labour, 1946, pages 36 to 38.)
WORK OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD.
The number of cases dealt with during the year is but two less than the total for
1946 (1946, 1,207 cases; 1947, 1,205 cases). There were 945 applications for certification dealt with, as compared to 1,014 in 1946. However, 672 certificates of bargaining
authority were granted, as compared with 670 the preceding year.
Of the total of 945 applications for certification, 672 were granted, 135 rejected,
78 withdrawn, and 60 were being investigated at the year's end.
Additionally, there were 28 representative votes conducted, 163 investigations by
Conciliation Officers, 30 Conciliation Boards established, 4 strike votes supervised, 8
appointments of Referees, 3 grievance procedures provided, 3 Industrial Inquiry
Commissions established, and 21 prosecutions instituted.
* The " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act, 1947," was amended in April, 1948.    A summary of these
amendments appears upon page 41 of this Report.
tin 1944, 922 cases;   in 1945, 686 cases;   in 1946, 1,064 cases;   and in 1947, 411 cases. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 111
Table I. Summary of Cases dealt with.
Number of applications dealt with      945
Certifications granted   672
Applications—
Rejected    f  135
Withdrawn        78
Being investigated as at December 31st     60
Representative votes conducted         28
Investigations by Conciliation Officers       163
Conciliation Boards established         30
Strike votes supervised   4
Referee appointments   8
Grievance procedures provided   3
Industrial Inquiry Commissions   3
Prosecutions instituted by Department        21
1,205
CONCILIATION PROCEDURE, 1947.
Both the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations and the " Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Act, 1947," provided for the utilization of conciliation machinery
whereby an attempt might be made to settle disputes arising out of negotiations for
a collective agreement, or negotiations for the renewal of a collective agreement.
Both Statutes provided that the employer or bargaining representatives could
apply to the Minister for the services of a Conciliation Officer if the interested parties
had negotiated for a collective agreement, and believed that such an agreement could
not be concluded within a reasonable time. A Conciliation Officer was thereupon
instructed to assist the parties. If he failed, it was his duty to report to the Minister,
and he could state that, in his opinion, an agreement might be facilitated by the
appointment of a Board of Conciliation.
Each of the disputant parties was thereupon required to nominate one person to
membership upon the Board. These two nominees were asked to select a third member
and chairman. If they were unable to agree, the appointment was made by the
Minister. The Board, when constituted, was provided with a statement of the matters
in dispute, and endeavoured to bring the parties together. Under the provisions of
P.C. 1003, the Board reported its findings to the Federal Minister of Labour. In conformity with the provisions of the Provincial legislation, the Board reported to the
Minister of Labour for British Columbia. Thereafter, these reports we_% transmitted
to the interested parties.
Under the provisions of both Statutes, strikes and lockouts were prohibited until
the parties were given an opportunity of accepting or rejecting the report of the Board.
Provision was made in the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act, 1947," for a
pre-strike vote in the case of employees, and a pre-lockout vote in instances where
more than one employer was affected, and that such votes were to be under the supervision of the Minister or his appointee.
During the year there were 106 conciliation cases, involving approximately 48,894
employees and 434 employers. Fifty-eight cases were settled by Conciliation Officers,
thirty-five were referred to Boards of Conciliation, and four were withdrawn. Other
cases were terminated by strike action, or negotiations were discontinued at the request
of the parties.
In considering these figures and reading Table II following, it should be noted :—
(1) A group of employers in an industry, negotiating with the same labour
organization, and with the assistance of one Conciliation Officer, are
listed together for convenience. J 112 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
(2) An organization or association of employers, negotiating on behalf of
more than one employer with one labour organization, is listed as one
employer. The figures in parentheses indicate the number of employers
represented in each instance. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 113
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BOARDS OF CONCILIATION, 1947.
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J 125
STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 1947.
The record for 1947 shows that though there were four more strikes than in 1946
(1946, 21; 1947, 25), the number of man-days lost, employers and employees affected
sharply diminished.
During the year under review there were 25 strikes, involving approximately 6,386
employees, 65 employers, and causing a loss of 153,168 working-days.
In the preceding year there were 21 strikes, involving approximately 40,014
employees, 524 employers, and causing a loss of 1,294,174 working-days.
Table IV. Summary of Disputes commencing in 1947.
Industry or
Occupation.
No. of
No. of
Time-loss
Particulars.
Employers
affected.
Employees
affected.
in Man-
days.
Food-products factory
Commenced January 14 ;   for a union agreement provid
1
15
430   •
workers, Vancouver
ing for increased wages, union security, vacations with
pay, etc.; terminated February 20 ; negotiations ; compromise
Sawmill-workers,
Commenced February 18 ; for a signed union agreement
1
20
480
Penticton
providing   for   increased   wages,   hours   of   work   and
other changes, under negotiations since July 14, 1946 ;
terminated March 15 ; return of workers; in favour of
employer
Fishermen,  Gulf of
Commenced February 22 ; for increased prices for fish,
17
250
6,000
Georgia
with   a   fixed   minimum   rate,   terminated   March   22;
return of workers; in favour of employers
Machinists,  Vancou
Commenced March 11; against alleged discrimination in
1
18
54
ver
lay-off  of   thirty-one  workers;   for   union   recognition
and a signed agreement; terminated March 13 ; negotiations ; in favour of workers
Food-products factory
Commenced March 28; against alleged discrimination in
1
25
730
workers, Vancouver
lay-off of ten workers; for union recognition, increased
wages, and other changes ; employment conditions no
longer seriously affected by March 31; indefinite
Shipyard-workers,
Commenced April 10 ; inter-union dispute over dismissal
1
140
2,360
Victoria
of eight steel checkers and handlers because they were
not   members   of   union   holding   bargaining   rights;
terminated April 30 ; negotiations and return of workers pending reference to arbitration ; indefinite
Tailors, Vancouver  ....
Commenced   April   19 ;   for  a  union   agreement providing
for   increased  wages   and   other   changes;   terminated
April   23;   conciliation    (Provincial)    and   return   of
workers pending further negotiations
10
36
115
Gold-miners, Bralorne.
Commenced May 13 ; against dismissal of union  official
for absenteeism; terminated May 13; return of workers ; in favour of employer
1
295
295
Laundry-workers,
Commenced  June 9 ;  against dismissal  of two  workers
1
28
1,512
Nanaimo
for being absent without leave; terminated August 9 ;
negotiations ; in favour of workers
Civic labourers,
Commenced  June  12;  for  increased wages;  terminated
1
7
10
Duncan
June 13 ; return of workers and replacement; in favour
of employer
Coal-miners,
Commenced July 2 ; in sympathy with strike of laundry-
3
360
360
Nanaimo
workers  at  Nanaimo,  commenced  June  9 ;  terminated
July 2 ; return of workers; in favour of employers
Sawmill-workers,
Commenced July 2 ; in sympathy with strike of laundry-
3
150
150
Nanaimo
workers at Nanaimo, commenced June 9 ; terminated
July 2 ; return of workers; in favour of employers
Waitresses, Kelowna....
Commenced   July  2;  for  a  union   agreement  providing
for increased wages,  reduced  hours,  etc.;  terminated
July 8 ; replacement; in favour of employer
1
10
50
Ship yard-workers,
Commenced   August   18;   in   sympathy  with   pickets   of
1
41
60
North Vancouver
seamen's   union;   terminated   August   20;   return   of
workers ; in favour of employer
Carried forward	
43
1,395
12,606 J 126
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table IV. Summary of Disputes commencing in 1947—Continued.
Industry or
Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employers
affected.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time-loss
in Man-
days.
43
1,395
12,606
Iron and steel work
Commenced August 21 ; for a new agreement providing
5
325
21,212*
ers, Vancouver
for   increased   wages,   additional   union   security,   and
other   changes;   work    resumed    at    four   operations
October   23;   strike   at   fifth   operation   unterminated,
December 31
Meat-packing plant
Commenced August 27 ; for a master agreement provid
5
500
13,398
workers, Vancouver
ing for increased wages and other changes ; terminated
and New Westmin
by October 24; negotiations and conciliation   (Provin
ster
cial) ; compromise
Sawmill-workers,
Commenced    September   4;    against   dismissal   of   one
1
160
160
Duncan
worker   for   absenteeism;   terminated   September   4;
arbitration ; in favour of worker
Furniture-factory
Commenced September 10 ; for a new agreement provid
4
409
13,497
workers, Vancou
ing for increased wages and reduced hours ; terminated
ver, Victoria, and
by October 30 ; negotiations; compromise
New Westminster
S tru ctu r al-s teel
Commenced September 15 ; for a new agreement provid
1
297
7,425
factory workers,
ing for increased wages and union shop ; terminated
Vancouver
October 20 ; negotiations ; compromise
Sawmill-workers,
Commenced September 29 ; against closing down a shift
1
118
472
Tahsis
allegedly in contravention of seniority clause in agreement ; terminated October 3
Elevator operators
Commenced October 15 ; for a union agreement provid
1
18
270
and janitors,
ing   for   increased   wages;   terminated   October   31 ;
Vancouver
negotiations; in favour of workers
Street-railway work
Commenced October 20 ; for increased wages and reduced
1
2,850
82,650
ers, Vancouver, Vic
hours; terminated November 17; conciliation   (Provin
toria, and New
cial) ; compromise
Westminster
Sawmill-workers,
Commenced   October  29 ;   for  a  signed  union   agreement
1
95
760
Merritt
under   negotiation   since   July   12,   1946;   terminated
November 6 ; negotiations ; in favour of workers
Gold-miners,
Commenced   November   13 ;   for   general   assessment   for
1
199
398
Premier
check-off    without    signed    individual    authorization ;
terminated    November    14;    return    of   workers;    in
favour of employer
Bakery-workers,
Commenced   December  8 ;   for  implementation   of  award
1
20
320
Vancouver
of   Conciliation   Board   providing   for   increased   wages
and   other  changes   in   new  agreement  under  negotiations ; unterminated as of December 31
Totals	
65
6,386
153,168
* Total man-days lost in 1947.
A lockout, or an industrial condition that is undeniably a lockout, is rarely
encountered, and lockouts and strikes are therefore recorded together in the statistical
tables.   The term " dispute " refers to either strike or lockout.
The figures shown are inclusive of all disputes which have come to the attention
of the Department. While methods taken to procure this information preclude the
possibility of serious omission, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later
information.
Estimates of time lost are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute
lasts by the number of employees directly affected and not replaced. The summaries
include only the record of time lost by workers directly involved.
The following table shows the trend of industrial disputes from 1937 to 1947. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 127
Table V. Number of Disputes, Number of Employees affected, and
Time lost in Working-days, 1937-47.
Year.
Number of
Disputes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1937	
16
11
4
1
8
50
43
15
18
21
25
1,188
837
822
204
1,408
18,804
21,704
6,379
6,810
40,014
6,386
30,022
1938	
8,236
1939                	
13,803
1940                      	
8,510
1941	
7,594
1942                      	
35,024
1943	
75,129
1944	
4,510
1945	
69,595
1946	
1,294,202
1947...                    	
153,168
TIME-LOSS BY INDUSTRY.
An analysis of disputes by industry shows that the greatest loss of time occurred
in the transportation industry.    Manufacturing was next seriously affected.
Table VI.
Analysis of Strikes by
Industries in British Columbia, 1947.
Industry.
Number of
Employers
affected.
Number of
Employees
affected.
Time-loss in
Man-days.
1
17
8
7
250
560
10
Fishing	
6,000
14 878
2,022
44,608
13
3
2
13
1
1,230
360
494
92
2,850
360
693
1,947
82,650
Totals	
65
6,386
153,168 J 128                                              DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
EMPLOYERS' AND EMPLOYEES' ORGANIZATIONS.
Certain information has been required of associations of employees or trade-union
locals pursuant to section 5a of the " Department of Labour Act." This return requires
the name and address of the organization, its affiliation (if any), and its total paid-up
membership to the date of return. Members over three months in arrears are not
included in this figure.
The inclusion of the name of any organization does not constitute its recognition
as a " labour organization " within the meaning of the " Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Act, 1947." Such a determination lies to the Labour Relations Board
(British Columbia).
Every care is taken to ensure accuracy in all returns by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics working in conjunction with this Branch in this compilation. Revisions
may be made, however, in the light of later information.
Table VII. Number of Employees' Organizations making Returns
and Membership thereof, 1939-47.
Year.
Number of
Organizations.
Total
Membership.
1939	
380
404
402
415
473
617
636
642
715
44,867
50,360
61,292
91,618
107,402
110,045
108,125
119,258
135,320
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
1947	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 129
Organizations of Employees.
The list is arranged by cities and towns in alphabetical order. The names and
addresses of the presidents and secretaries have been revised to the date of publication
in all cases where this information could be obtained.
Post-office addresses of the officers are the same as the heading under which they
appear, unless otherwise stated.
The list of employers' organizations follows that of the employees'. Returns in
this category numbered twenty-five in 1939 and 1940, twenty-seven in 1941, thirty-two
in 1942, thirty-four in 1943, thirty-six in 1944, and thirty-seven in 1945, 1946, and 1947.
The listings have been compiled by George Bishop, of the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics, in co-operation with this Branch of the Department.
Abbotsford.
Brick and Clay Workers' Federal Union, No. 136—
President, Ivor A. Davies; Secretary, S. W.
Jeffery, R.R. 1, Matsqui.
Alberni.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Percy Trill; Secretary, R. Mac-
gregor, P.O. Box 100, Alberni.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Ashcroft.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of. — General
Secretary, D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue Building,
Winnipeg, Man.
Bamberton.
Cement Workers' Union, B.C., No. 166. — President, R. Dale; Secretary-Treasurer, J. A. Mc-
Callum, Bamberton, Tod Inlet.
Barrett Lake.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 340.—President, J. D. Denicola; Secretary,
J. E. Middleton, Barrett Lake.
Blubber Bay.
Quarry Workers' Union, No. 882.—President, J. C.
Billingsley; Financial Secretary, C. Simpson,
Blubber Bay, Texada Island.
Blue River.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 143.—President,
T. Barron; Financial Secretary, J. F. Parkin,
Blue River.
Bralorne.
Miners' Union, Bralorne, No. 271. — President,
R. R. Black; Financial Secretary, W. G. Osborne, Bralorne.
Britannia Beach.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Britannia, No.
663.—President, J. H. Balderson; Secretary,
K. A. Smith, Britannia Beach.
Burnaby.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 23.—President, J. 0. Murton; Secretary, J. E. Wilson,
Box 214, White Rock.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Pacific Coast Packers, Ltd., Employees' Association.— President, R. A. Mullen; Secretary-
Treasurer, Miss Christina Davie, 733 Thirteenth
Street, New Westminster.
School Janitors' Federal Union, Burnaby, No.
224.—President, C. A. Breeden; Secretary, J. M.
Don, 3119 Spruce Street, New Westminster.
Campbell River.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 1882.—President, Kenneth Creehnan; Secretary, A. W. Davidson, Campbell River.
Chilliwack.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1843.—President, J. W.
Elliott; Recording Secretary, James R. Johnson, 368 Cedar Street, Cultus Lake P.O.
Clearwater.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 15.—President, H. Stuz; Secretary, J. Paw-
son,  Clearwater.
Cloverdale.
Municipal Employees' Association, Surrey, No. 6.—
President, E. Clegg; Secretary, G. Patterson,
Siddons Road, Cloverdale.
Colquitz
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Earle Dye; Secretary, Harry
Durham, c/o Provincial Mental Home (Staff),
Colquitz.
Comox.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, F. D. Stapely; Secretary, A. H.
Turner, 325 Menzies Avenue, Comox.
Copper Mountain.
Miners' Union, Copper Mountain, No. 649.—President, A. Irish; Secretary, George W. Anderson,
Copper Mountain.
Coquitlam.
Municipal Employee's Union, Coquitlam, No. 16.—
President, David J. Blacklock; Secretary, Frederick Boyd, Gatensbury and Winslow Roads,
R.R. 2, New Westminster. J 130
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Courtenay.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1638.—President, L. V. Steeves;
Financial Secretary, George Bailey, Box 431,
Courtenay.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 156.—President, W. B. Fairclough; Secretary, H. K. Bennett, Courtenay.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-363.—President, E. F. Anderson; Secretary,
J. Higgin, Box 458, Courtenay.
Cranbrook.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 563.—
Secretary-Treasurer, F. R. McDaniel, Box 878,
Cranbrook.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 559.—President, R. Bartholomew; Recording Secretary, M. H. John, Cranbrook.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Eric W. Winch; Secretary,
Miss Margot van Braam, Office of Government
Agent, Court-house, Cranbrook.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 588.
—President, A. A. Bouchard; Secretary, R. J.
Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 585.—
President, H. A. Bradley; Secretary-Treasurer,
H. J. Conroy, P.O. Box 817, Cranbrook.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, No. 173.—President, C. Romano; Recording Secretary, N. L.
Smith, P.O. Box 1, Cranbrook.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 407.—President, Charles LaFIeur; Secretary, H. J. Hux-
table, P.O. Box 262, Cranbrook.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1292.—President, B. A. Cameron; Secretary-Treasurer, H. Andrews, P.O. Box 17,
Cranbrook.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-405.—President, Mark B. Kennedy; Secretary, Nels Strom, Box 364, Cranbrook.
Cumberland.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
John H. Vaughan;    Secretary, Alfred G. Jones,
Cumberland.
Mine  Workers  of  America,   United,  No.   7293.—
President, J. H.Cameron;   Secretary-Treasurer,
John Bond, Cumberland.
Duncan.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, William R. Chester; Secretary,
David H. Barr, 182 Ypres Street, Duncan.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 2824.—President, G. Warenko; Secretary,
C. Archer, Duncan.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-80.—President, Owen G. Brown; Financial
Secretary,  Fred Wilson, Lake  Cowichan.
Esquimalt.
Fire-fighters' Association, Canadian Naval.—President, E. R. Holt; Secretary-Treasurer, P. W.
Rawlyck, 410 Walter Avenue, Victoria.
Essondale.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, D. J. L. Wright; Secretary,
James R. Tait, Box 70, New Westminster.
Fernie.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of United, No.
308. — President, Thomas Shaw; Secretary,
Joseph J. Serek, P.O. Box 1071, Fernie.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Thomas Biggs; Secretary, R. A.
Damstrom, P.O. Box 697, Fernie.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7310.—
President, Mike Nee; Secretary, W. Martin,
Fernie.
Field.
Miners'   Union,   Field   and   District,   No.   807.—
President,   Thomas   J.   Alton;     Secretary,   J.
Dobush, Field.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1454.—President, J. A. Gunn;   Secretary, W. M.
Brown, Box 943, Field.
Fraser Valley.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, S. F. Deans; Secretary, J. M.
Oliver, Stayte Road, R.R. 2, White Rock.
Golden.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, P. Milum; Secretary, Hugh B.
Sutton,  Golden.
Grand Forks.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President, John Roylance; Secretary,
L. J. Price, P.O. Box 620, Grand Forks.
Hedley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Hedley Mascot,
No. 655.—President, J. W. McLaren; Financial
Secretary, Robert W. Maddison, Hedley.
Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers' Union, Nickel
Plate, No. 656.—President, Arnold Stensrud;
Financial Secretary, Gordon Morrison, Nickel
Plate Mine, Hedley.
Ioco.
Oil Workers, United, No. 11.—President, F. N.
Bowering; Secretary, H. N. Bedingfield, Port
Moody.
Kaleden.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 4.—
President, Roy Findlay; Secretary, George
King, Okanagan Falls.
Kamloops.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1540.—President, C. W. Woolley;
Recording Secretary, M. P. WalsofF, 1292 Nicola
Street, Kamloops. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 131
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 821.—
President, C. Spencer; Secretary, W. A. Harris,
727 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 855.—
President, F. C. Fuller; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. J. Millward, 753 Dominion Street, Kamloops.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
913.—President, E. Murray; Secretary-Treasurer, M. L. Murphy, 125 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 258.—President, J. 0. Richmond; Secretary, Douglas Osborne, 3 Leigh Road, North
Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 930.—President, T. B. Caswell; Recording Secretary, D. H. C. Wilson, 625 Pleasant Street, Kamloops.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, John Pinder-Moss; Secretary,
M. C. McKay, c/o Forestry Department, 515
Columbia Street, Kamloops.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance and Bartenders' International League
of America, No. 685.—President, Leslie Buckingham; Secretary-Treasurer, AI March, Leland
Hotel, Kamloops.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. T. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 80.
—President, A. R. McKay; Secretary, Joseph
H. Abear, 266 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 748.—
President, J. Parkin; Secretary, L. E. Crowder,
359 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, Gordon A. Cahill; Secretary,
James P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 31.—President, R. McMillan; Secretary,
G. R. Mills, 422 Third Avenue, New Westminster.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 519.—
President, G. A. Neil; Secretary-Treasurer,
Vernon H. Mott, 521 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
148.—President, H. C. Cowles; Secretary, R.
Lapsley, 907 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, No. 611.
—President, E. R. Chapman; Secretary, H. P.
Battison, 36 Nicola Street West, Kamloops.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 150.—President,
J. D. S. Robertson; Secretary, R. W. Hunt,
Box 402, Kamloops.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 30.—
General Secretary, D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue
Building, Winnipeg, Man.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No.
15.—President, Miss Jacqueline Baillie; Secretary, Miss Shirley Goble, 564 Nicola Street,
Kamloops.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-417.—President, H. C. Hickling; Secretary,
W. S. Lynch, 234 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Kaslo.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 173.—Secretary, T. H. Horner, Crescent
Road, Kaslo.
Kelowna.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1370.—President, Vincent Varney;
Financial Secretary, V. A. Giesinger, 1228
Richter Street, Kelowna.
Civic Employees' Union.—President, Alec Rud-
dick; Secretary-Treasurer, Rupert Brown, 901
Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 1409.—President, James M. Law; Secretary, Lloyd A. McLure, 582 Osprey Avenue,
Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 5.—■
President, W. Darroch; Secretary, Mrs. G.
Boyer, 558 Roanoke Avenue, Kelowna.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, F. A. Martin; Secretary, J.
Feist, 772 Martin Avenue, Kelowna.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 2768.—
President, Andrew Mclnroy; Recording Secretary, H. E. Hemstreet, Box 257, R.R. 3, Kelowna.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
339.—President, William Appleton; Recording
Secretary, Agnes Harrison, Box 1557, Kelowna.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 217.—President,
James Fleck; Secretary, Albert Marsden, 3052
Pendozi Street Kelowna.
Telephone Operators' Union No. 1. — President,
Miss Nellie Forbes; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
Nellie Ashworth, 807 Bay Avenue, Kelowna.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1—
423.—President, George E. Walker; Secretary,
Miss Marion R. Holtom, Box 1557, Kelowna.
Keremeos.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 9. —
President, A. J. Reimche; Secretary, Mrs. A.
Miller, Box 85, Keremeos.
Kimberley.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1719.—President, David Harvey;
Financial Secretary, Lars Paulson, Box 280,
Kimberley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 651.—President, James A. Byrne; Secretary, James R. Mc-
Farlane,  Kimberley.
Ladysmith.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
Fred Bell; Secretary-Treasurer, Fred Johnston,
119 Baden-Powell Street, Ladysmith.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 508. — President, Robert Rae;
Secretary, Peter Hawryluk, Box 142, Ladysmith.
Lake Cowichan.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1812.—President, Arthur Lovett;
Secretary, H. J. White, Sunset Park, Lake
Cowichan. J 132
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Langford.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial. — President,   H.   E.   Thornett;    Secretary,
W. H. Sluggett, 3477 Saanich Road, Victoria.
Lillooet.
Maintenance-of-way  Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No.  215.—President,  J.  K.  Purdie;    Secretary,
G. Tinker, Birken.
McBride.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian  Brotherhood of, No. 247.—President,
R. T.  Clay;    Secretary-Treasurer,  G.  T.  Hold-
way, P.O. Box 26, McBride.
Merritt.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President,   Howard   McLean;     Secretary,
P. C. Currie, P.O. Box 65, Merritt.
Mission.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2213.—President, W. E. Deckard;
Secretary, J. H. Fraser, R.R. 2, Mission City.
Woodworkers of America, International No. 1-
367.—President, A. H. Hill; Secretary, Rudy
Wilson,  Dewdney.
Murrayville.
Municipal   Employees'   Association,   Langley,   No.
10.—President, J. Jones;   Secretary, R. W. Teri-
chow, 919 Hunter Road, Langley Prairie.
Nanaimo.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189.—President,
T. J. Johnston; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 527.—President, Arthur Clark;
Recording Secretary, F. T. W. Bolton, 95 Wallace Street, Nanaimo.
Civic Employees' Association, No. 14.—President,
T. M. Numberson; Secretary-Treasurer, F.
Hedley, 264 Machleary Street, Nanaimo.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, Joseph Bradwell; Secretary-Treasurer,
H. W. Spencer, 433 Fourth Street, Nanaimo.
Fire-fighters'   Association,   No.   905. — President,
F. English;     Secretary-Treasurer,   F.   Hedley,
264 Machleary  Street, Nanaimo.
Garage Workers, Nanaimo and District, No. 1.—
President, Joseph Ashton;   Secretary-Treasurer,
G. Agnew, Box 13, Nanaimo.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, A. R. Lane; Secretary, Miss
M. E. Booth, c/o Court-house, Nanaimo.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' Union, Nanaimo Dry Cleaning,
No. 1.—President, Mrs. Eula Patterson; Secretary, Miss Violet Dewhurst, 115 Haliburton
Street,  Nanaimo.
Machine Shop and Foundry Industrial Workers'
Union, No. 1.—President, Robert Alexander;
Recording Secretary, Archie Semple, 227 Kennedy Street, Nanaimo.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, Gordon A. Cahill; Secretary,
James P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7355.—
President, Thomas E. Webb; Secretary-Treasurer,  George  Bryce,  Robins  Street,  Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No.
3.—President, W. McDougall; Secretary, C. L.
Tallman, 507 Bradley Street, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No.
12. — President Miss M. Sprenkle; Secretary,
Miss Ruby Houston, 673 Machleary Street,
Nanaimo.
Typographical Union, Nanaimo, No. 337.—President, Alex Grieve; Secretary-Treasurer, L. C.
Gilbert, P.O. Box 166, Nanaimo.
Naramata.
Fruit  and  Vegetable  Workers'  Union,  No.  11.—
President, W. Lethbridge;   Secretary-Treasurer,
K. Hickson, Naramata.
Natal.
Mine  Workers  of America,  United,  No.  7292. —
President, Samuel English; Secretary-Treasurer,
Simeon Weaver, Natal.
Nelson.
Automotive Employees' Association. — President,
Verne Irwin; Secretary-Treasurer, R. C. Couch,
208 Nelson Avenue, Nelson.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
196.—President, Frank Defoe; Secretary, George
Clerihew, 636 Josephine Street, Nelson.
Civic Employees' Federation, Nelson, No. 8. —
President, S. T. Lewis; Secretary-Treasurer,
D. R. Grahame, 104 Chatham Street, Nelson.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, H. E. Thane; Secretary-Treasurer, F. C.
Collins, 911 Edgewood Avenue, Nelson.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 1003.—President, A. A. Pagdin; Secretary,
J. H. Whitfield, 414 Falls Street, Nelson.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 579.—
President, J. A. MacMillan; Secretary-Treasurer, Gordon Allen, 1115 Ward Street, Nelson.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 18.—
President, R. F. Wallace; Secretary-Treasurer,
B. J. Monteleone, 312 Third Street, Nelson.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No.
945.—President, Peter Leslie; Secretary-Treasurer, George F. Fox, 68 Douglas Road, Nelson.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 631.—President, J. C. Young; Recording Secretary, M. E. Swanson, 622 Victoria
Street, Nelson.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 1141.—President, A. H. Sinclair; Financial
Secretary, William E. Rusnack, P.O. Box 71,
Nelson.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, L. A. McPhail; Secretary, Miss
Florence Jeffreys, P.O. Box 510, Nelson.
Hospital Employees' Federal Union, Nelson, No.
296.—President, Rolfe Brock; Secretary-Treasurer, M. A. Stockell, 922 Front Street, Nelson.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders'
International Union, No. 707.—President, A. G.
Bush; Secretary, J. F. Brinley, 402 Victoria
Street, Nelson.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 133
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No.
75.—President, A. S. Homersham; Secretary-
Treasurer, George C. Massey, 306 Third Street,
Nelson.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 663.—
President, T. Swinden; Recording Secretary,
J. E. Baldock, Kerr Block, Nelson.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association, Nelson.—President, Gordon A .Cahill; Secretary, James P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New Westminster.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 558.—
President, H. Stewart; Secretary-Treasurer,
C. H. Sewell, 41 High Street, Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
98. — President, Alan Smith; Recording Secretary, Alex G. Ioanin, 512 Third Street, Nelson.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 460.—President, W. E. Marquis; Secretary, A. Kirby, 820
Carbonate Street, Nelson.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1291.—President, R. F. Parker; Recording Secretary, R. R. McCandlish, 516 Fell Street,
Nelson.
Telephone Workers of British Columbia, Federation of (Plant Division), No. 4.—President, W.
Woodall; Secretary, A. Ruzicka, 422 First
Street, Nelson.
Telephone Workers of British Columbia, Federation of (Traffic Division), No. 13.—President,
Miss Isabell Kay; Secretary, Miss Tilla Smith,
713 Baker Street, Nelson.
Typographical Union, International, No. 340. ■—
President, Joseph A. Boletti; Secretary, George
W. Priest, 706 Richards Street, Nelson.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-
425. — President, Allen F. Dunn; Secretary,
Frank F. Day, P.O. Box 149, Nelson.
New Denver.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, M. Nicholson; Secretary, Miss
Florence A. Moss, c/o Department of Public
Works, New Denver.
New Westminster.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189. — President,
T. J. Johnston; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers' and Culinary Workers'
Union, No. 835.—President, John G. Flowers;
Financial Secretary, T. R. Dougherty, 228 Sand-
ringham Avenue, New Westminster.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers of America, International Brotherhood of, No. 151. ■—
President, A. J. Rowson; Secretary, Peter
Mitchell, 1703 Dublin Street, New Westminster.
Boilermakers, Iron-ship Builders and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, No. 194.
—President, C. A. Bailey; Secretary-Treasurer,
P. Moore, P.O. Box 422, New Westminster.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1251.—President, Stanley Durance; Recording Secretary, Robert Groves, 727
Fifth Avenue, New Westminster.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2534.—President, Charles Hayes;
Secretary, Mrs. Betty Burton, 2560 Dow Road,
New Westminster.
Civic Employees' Union, Burnaby, No. 12.—
President, Harry Walsh; Secretary, Ray Mercer,
232 Third Street, New Westminster.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, R. V. Cheale; Secretary-Treasurer, Fred
McGrath, 316 Strand Avenue, New Westminster.
Cordage Industrial Rope and Twine Workers'
Union, No. 1.—President, William Eakin; Recording Secretary, K. Frost, 1027 Austin Road,
New Westminster.
Distillery, Rectifying, and Wine Workers' International, No. 69.—President, L. H. Beckett;
Financial Secretary, H. F. Redman, 460 Campbell Avenue, New Westminster.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No.
256.—President, T. J. Wisheart; Recording Secretary, David W. Anderson, 1823 Hamilton
Street, New Westminster.
Fire-fighters' Association, Burnaby, No. 323.—
President, Ernest A. Moss; Secretary-Treasurer, B. J. Pontifex, 4006 Douglas Road, New
Westminster.
Gypsum Workers' Union, No. 578.—President,
Louis Dietz; Financial Secretary, John William
Beattie, 1355 Second Street, New Westminster.
Hod Carriers, Building and Common Labourers of
America, No. 1070. — President, Ernest Neil
Goodridge; Secretary, Thomas Porter, 1505
Sixth Street, New Westminster.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 502.—President, W. H. Lawrence; Secretary-Treasurer, C. P. Latham, 71
Tenth Street, New Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 131.
—President, Ivan Clitheroe; Recording Secretary, A. A. Dacre, Raleigh Street, Port Coquitlam.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 151.
—President, T. Kenyon; Secretary, W. Green-
slade, 3307 Marine Drive, New Westminster.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, Gordon A. Cahill; Secretary,
James P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
Mine Workers of America, United, District 50
(Canadian Chemical Division), No. 13156.—
President, Lome D. Sims; Secretary, F. Amor,
1274 Eleventh Avenue, New Westminster.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union, International, No. 281.—President, David B. MacCor-
mack; Secretary, John Smith, 1012 Queens Avenue, New Westminster.
Newspaper Guild, New Westminster, No. 3.—
President, Rolf T. Macey; Secretary, M. E.
Stevenson, 1905 Seventh Avenue, New Westminster.
Oil Workers of Canada, United, No. 2.—President, Alex McKenzie; Recording Secretary,
Arthur A. Anderson, 3699 Maitland Street, New
Westminster.
Pacific Coast Terminals Independent Employees'
Union, No. 76.—President, T. R. Cosh; Secretary-Treasurer, J. Walker, 116 Mclnnes Street,
New Westminster. J 134
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
180.—President, James McKnight; Secretary,
George Baxter, 375 Keary Street, New Westminster.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
456. — President, William Field; Secretary,
George Colquhaun, 2801 Chatham Avenue, New
Westminster.
Policemen's Association, The New Westminster,
No. 294.—President, Constable Peter McGregor
Meehan; Secretary-Treasurer, Edwin John Kel-
lock, 339 Cumberland Street, New Westminster.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
280.—President, W. G. Wright; Recording Secretary, W. J. Jackson, 1266 Thirteenth Avenue,
New Westminster.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 226.—President,
B. Fennings; Recording Secretary, A. Spick,
1422 Hamilton Street, New Westminster.
School Maintenance Union, No. 14.—President, J.
Gowans; Secretary-Treasurer, E. Grasby, 412
Eleventh Street, New Westminster.
Sheet-metal Workers, International Association
of, No. 314.—President, George Watson; Recording Secretary, J. A. Smith, 201 Agnes
Street, New Westminster.
Stone Cutters of North America, Journeymen.—
President, F. H. Lowe; Secretary-Treasurer,
Frank Hall, 2146 Randolf Avenue, New Westminster.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees of America, The Amalgamated Association of, No. 134.—President, Kenneth Mclntyre
Armstrong; Secretary, Samuel Thomas Dare,
318 Third Street, New Westminster.
Typographical Union, New Westminster, No. 632.
—President, A. R. McDonald; Secretary-Treasurer, R. A. Stoney, Box 754, New Westminster.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-357.—President, J. Stewart Alsbury; Recording Secretary, Rae Eddie, 656 Eleventh Avenue,
New Westminster.
Oakalla.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, T. P. Owens; Recording Secretary, E. Dinsdale, P.O. Drawer O, New Westminster.
Ocean Falls.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
360.—President, Newman H. Compton; Secretary, George L. Weldridge, Drawer R, Ocean
Falls.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 312.—President,
W. S. Holgate; Secretary, C. A. Sweet, Ocean
Falls.
Oliver.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 2.—
President, E. J. Perry; Secretary, Bert Potter,
R.R. 1, Oliver.
Sawmills Employees' Association, Oliver.—President, Raymond Baker; Secretary-Treasurer,
Clifford Miles Caverly, Oliver.
Osoyoos.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 3. ■—
President, R. Schmunk; Secretary, Donald Anderson, Osoyoos.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
344. — President, Howard Beacon; Recording
Secretary, A. F. James, Osoyoos.
Oyama.
Fruit  and Vegetable  Workers'  Union, No.  8. •—■
President,  R.  Brown;    Secretary,  E. O.  Rems-
bery, Oyama.
Parson.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 165.—Secretary, C. Collins, Parson.
Peace River.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. Martin; Secretary, G. P.
Tyrrell, Pouce Coupe.
Penticton.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1696.—President, Roy Kerr; Recording Secretary, C. L. Beagle, 372 Van Home
Street, Box 552, Penticton.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 866.—
President, R. T. Johnson; Secretary-Treasurer,
W. Osborne, 898 Argyle Street, Penticton.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
10.—President, James D. Crawford; Secretary,
W. T. Mattock, Cambie Street, Penticton.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No.
953.—President, William W. Gray; Secretary-
Treasurer, W. T. Mattock, Cambie Street, Penticton.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 884. — President, Percy H. Coulter;
Secretary, Dawson Raincock, 448 Orchard Avenue, Penticton.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, J. W. Blogg; Secretary-Treasurer,
Mrs. Emily Cockell, Fairfort Avenue, Penticton.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President, W. Edge; Secretary, G. H.
Fewtrell, P.O.  Box 296, Penticton.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, Gordon A. Cahill; Secretary,
James P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New
Westminster.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1025. — Secretary, W. M. Thompson, 194
Edna Avenue, Penticton.
Municipal Employees' Union, No. 1. — President,
H. Abrams; Secretary, A. A. Snyder, Box 64a,
Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 914.—
President, N. E. McCallum; Secretary-Treasurer, G. M. Clack, 341 Scott Avenue, Penticton.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, No.
179. — President, A. G. Peterson; Secretary-
Treasurer, H. Johnston, P.O. Box 413, Penticton.
Typographical Union, Vernon, No. 541.—President, A. F. Mason; Secretary-Treasurer, W. B.
Hilliard, Box 272, Penticton.
Pioneer.
Miners' Union, Pioneer, No. 693. — President,
George Miller; Recording Secretary, H. A. Cos-
man, Pioneer. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 135
Port Alberni.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 513.—President, P. Orhiem; Recording Secretary, Clark M. Tassis, Box 908,
Port Alberni.
Hospital Employees' Union, West Coast General,
No. 91.—President, Ernie Walker; Secretary-
Treasurer, Mrs. D. Goddard, Box 1138, Port
Alberni.
Hotel, Restaurant, and Beverage Employees' Union,
No. 697.—President, H. Rosberg; Financial Secretary, Robert Holland, Box 809, Port Alberni.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 503. — President, A. LeBlanc;
Secretary-Treasurer, C. Cook, Box 804, 100
Ninth Avenue South, Port Alberni.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-
85. — President, Walter S. Yates; Secretary,
Mark F. Mosher, Box 569, Port Alberni.
Port Alice.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 514.—President,
K. R. Sturdy; Recording Secretary, K. A.
Monkhouse,  Port  Alice.
Port Mellon.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 297.—President,
Chris. H. Wood; Recording Secretary, Roy R.
Nordman, Box 97, Port Mellon.
Port Moody.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, (Shingle Weavers), No. 2819.—
President, Roland Parks; Secretary, E. Faw-
drey, Port Coquitlam.
Powell River.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2068.—President E. S. Scott; Recording Secretary, J. N. Heavenor, Box 700,
Powell River.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
8. — President, Neil Clark; Secretary, F. J.
Fishleigh, Westview.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. F. Otto; Secretary, Miss
Ethel Cook, Powell River.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
142.—President, A. L. Allan; Recording Secretary, H. B. Moore, Box 55, Westview.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 76.—President,
C. M. Mouat; Secretary, J. S. Mabell, Box 810,
Powell River.
Premier.
Mine, Mill, and Tramway Workers' Union, Sil-
back Premier, No. 694.—President, N. T. Hansen; Secretary, B. J. Smithson, Box 1478,
Premier.
Prince George.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1998.—President, W. T. Wright;
Recording Secretary, Ernest S. Shaw, Box 727,
Prince  George.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 843.—
President, Chief Engineer L. McNeil; Secretary-
Treasurer, George A. Hodson, 794 Winnipeg
Street, P.O. Box 951, Prince George.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 827.—President, R. R. Anderson;
Secretary, F. Armstrong, Box 294, Prince George.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial,—President, R. B. Carter; Secretary, Miss
Clara Wieland, P.O. Box 115, Prince George.
Hotel, Restaurant, and Beverage Dispensers' International Union, No. 690.—President, Harvey
Hurd; Secretary, J. R. Allen, Box 685, Prince
George.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 202.—President, C. Adcock; Secretary, H.
Haws, Hansard.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 620. — President, J. Williams; Secretary Treasurer, D.Ross,
Box 224, Prince George.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 28.—President,
Peter Annan; Secretary, R. E. Lonsdale, Box
56, Prince George.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of. — General
Secretary, D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue Building,
Winnipeg, Man.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-
424.—President, James Cunningham; Secretary,
C. H. Webb, Box 819, Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 636.—President,
Frank Montesano; Secretary-Treasurer, A. J.
Turcotte, General Delivery, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1549.—President, John McLeod;
Secretary, Harold McKay, Box 694, Prince
Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1735.—President, August Wallin;
Secretary, J. S. Black, Box 694, Prince Rupert.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 5.—President, William Moorehouse; Secretary, Mrs.
Diane Blair, Box 307, Prince Rupert.
Construction and General Labourers' Union, No.
1427.—President, H. Hamilton; Secretary, J. S.
Black, Carpenters Hall, Prince Rupert.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. B 344.—President, George Phillipson; Financial Secretary, J. N. Forman, Box 457,
Prince Rupert.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
510.—President, Lloyd Stevens; Recording Secretary, S. L. Peachey, 733 Tatlow Street, Prince
Rupert.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No.
559.—President, J. C. Ewart; Secretary, A. H.
Iveson, Box 506, 218 Sixth Avenue East, Prince
Rupert.
Fishermen's Federal Union of B.C., Deep Sea, No.
80.—President, J. Synes; Secretary-Treasurer,
George Anderson, P.O. Box 249, Prince Rupert.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President, W. H. Murray; Secretary,
C. V. Smith, Box 759, Prince Rupert.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance and Bartenders' International League
of America, No. 331. — President, Miss Rose
Stanley; Recording Secretary, Elizabeth A.
Oliver, General Delivery, Prince Rupert. J 136
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Industrial Workers' Union.—President, H. E. E.
Faure; Recording Secretary, Miss Jean Clark,
Box 264, Prince Rupert.
Laundry Workers' International Union, No. 336.—
President, Esther Wardale; Secretary-Treasurer, William C. Scherk, 1324 Overlook Street,
Prince Rupert.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 505. — President, Tror Moe;
Secretary, William A. Pilfold, Box 531, Prince
Rupert.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 335.—President, H. Long; Secretary, P.
LeRoss, Box 1191, Prince Rupert.
Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial
Union, No. 2. — President, William Murphy;
Secretary, J. W. Prusky, Box 1403, Prince
Rupert.
Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of the United
States and Canada, United Association of Journeymen, No. 180. — President, Robert Wilson;
Secretary-Treasurer, George S. Weatherly, Box
1296, 419 Sixth Avenue East, Prince Rupert.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
426. — President, M. Chyzyk; Financial Secretary, R. Pollock, P.O. Box 496, 211 Third
Street,  Prince Rupert.
Railway Employees and other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 154.—President,
Donald R. Creed; Recording Secretary, P. G.
Jones, Box 676, Prince Rupert.
Typographical Union, Prince Rupert, No. 413.—
President, Donald McKay McCorkindale; Secretary, Charles H. Collins, Box 552, Prince
Rupert.
Princeton.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of, No. 367.—
President, E. Plecash; Secretary, Miss Evelyn
Richardson, Box 280, Princeton.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President. P. J. Bottaro; Secretary, T. H.
Cunliffe, c/o Department of Public Works,
Princeton.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7875. —
President, A. Samuel; Secretary-Treasurer,
John Howarth, Princeton.
Quesnel.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 407.—President, A.
Robinson; Secretary, A. Olsson, Box 141, Revelstoke.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 657.—
Chief Engineer, H. W. Keegan; Secretary-Treasurer, G. L. Ingram, Box 485, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 341.—President, E. M. Lloyd; Financial Secretary, G. Hobbs, Box 746, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood
of, No. 381.—President, L. Wiedemman; Secretary-Treasurer, D. A. Rix, Revelstoke.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 10.—
President, H. J. Crich; Secretary-Treasurer,
I. Clough, Box 536, Revelstoke.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, E. L. Scott; Secretary, Cecil
G. Graham, Office of Provincial Assessor, Revelstoke.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 258.
—President, William Sinfield; Secretary, O. B.
Peters, Revelstoke.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 208.—Secretary, R. H. Wyman, Box 521,
Revelstoke.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 51.—
President, H. A. Mulholland; Secretary, G. H.
Patrick, Revelstoke.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
481.—President, A. E. Parker; Recording Secretary, F. L. Henderson, P.O. Box 572, Revelstoke.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 487.—President, B. C. Calder; Secretary-Treasurer, D. L.
Hooley, P.O. Box 434, Revelstoke.
Rossland.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. B. Wallace; Secretary, Miss
May Kennedy, P.O. Box 310, Rossland.
Salmon Arm.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, William A. Webb; Secretary,
W. J. Bird, P.O. Box 331, Salmon Arm.
Skeena-Omineca.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. O. Clarkston; Secretary,
T. C. Chapman, Smithers.
Smithers.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 111.—
President, F. W. Powers;   Secretary-Treasurer,
C. A. Thurston, Box 240, Smithers.
Railroad   Trainmen,   Brotherhood   of,   No.   868.—
President,   E.   V.   Glass;     Secretary-Treasurer,
S. W. Gould, Box 86, Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415.—President, J. H. True, Box 129, Smithers.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian   Brotherhood  of,   No.   93.—President,
J. F. Newton;    Secretary, P. B. Emerson,  Box
51, Smithers.
South Slocan.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. B 999.—President, C. G. MacKay; Recording Secretary, J. B. Bodgener, South Slocan.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1419.—President, L. A. Moule, Secretary, Alexander Fraser,  Squamish.
Steveston.
Municipal Employees' Union, Richmond, No. 19.—
President, Ernest Turner; Secretary, Alexander
R. Riddell, 1042 No. 2 Road, R.R. 1, Steveston.
Terrace.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-
469.—President, J. K. Haynes; Financial Secretary, A. E. Earl, Box 143, Terrace. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 137
Trail.
Bus Drivers' Association of Trail. — President,
George Donish; Secretary, Walter Mohs, 1455
Third Avenue, Trail.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. NB 287.—President, E. J. Wright; Recording Secretary, H. J. McAlpine, 1230 Fourth
Avenue, Trail.
Fire-fighters' Association, Tadanac, No. 871.—
President, J. A. G. Denis; Secretary-Treasurer,
R. Houdle, 2024 Topping Street, Trail.
Fire-fighters', International Association of (Trail-
Rossland), No. 941.—President, Charles Cowlin;
Secretary-Treasurer, W. 0. Jones, 1309b Tama-
rac Avenue, Trail.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 76.
—President, John Barnes; Secretary-Treasurer.
T. Spooner, 2017 Second Avenue, Trail.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association, Trail. — President, Gordon A. Cahill;
Secretary, James P. Watts, 4100 Grandview
Highway,  New Westminster.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 181.—Secretary, P. Shankaruk, 1932 Third
Avenue, Trail.
Smelter Workers' Union, Independent, No. 38.—
President, C. W. McLean; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. A. Saunders, 53 Bingay Road, Trail.
Smelter Workers' Union, Trail and District, No.
480.—President, R. C. Billingsley; Secretary,
W. J. Melvin, 1903 Columbia Avenue, Trail.
Tranquille.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, George Grey; Secretary, Miss
Hilda Slack, c/o Sanatorium (Staff), Tranquille.
Tulsequah.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 858.—President, J. Barrett; Financial Secretary, R. P.
Moore,  Tulsequah.
Vananda.
Quarry and Mine Workers' Union, Texada Island,
No. 816. — President, E. W. Olson; Financial
Secretary, J. K. Johnson, Vananda.
Vancouver.
Acme Asbestos Cement, Ltd., Employees' Organization.—President, H. Parker; Secretary, Joseph
Smith, 338 Thirty-ninth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Allianceware Employees' Association.—President,
P. Grieve; Secretary-Treasurer, R. Battle,
2355%  Third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Auto Workers' Lodge, No. 1857. — President, F.
Maltby; Secretary, R. Thompson, 423 Sixth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, No. 468.—President, Wilmer
A. Bell; Secretary, Melvin J. Kemmis, 2010
Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189. — President,
T. J. Johnston; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529
Beatty  Street, Vancouver.
Barber Association of British Columbia.—President, N. M. Comba; Secretary, T. Mcintosh,
3355 Manor Street, New Westminster.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
120.—President, R. H. Parliament; Secretary-
Treasurer, C. E. Herrett, Room 304, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Battery and Chemical Workers' Union, No. 891.—
President, Daniel Bratko; Secretary, Sam Chad-
derton, 3503 Commercial Drive, Vancouver.
B.C. Electric Office Employees'Association.—President, A. J. Sutton; Secretary, Miss E. Hill,
2946  St.  Catherine  Street, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 676.—President,
William Lindsay; Secretary, F. W. Mills, 4502
Williams  Street, Vancouver.
Blacksmiths' and Helpers' Union of Canada, No.
1. — President, John Moffat; Secretary-Treasurer, Gilbert Cavill, 849 Churchill Crescent,
North Vancouver.
Boilermakers, Iron-ship Builders, and Helpers of
America, No. 359.—President, James Downie;
Secretary, Charles McMillan, 1121 Twenty-
seventh Avenue  West, Vancouver.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
104. — President, Frank Roberts; Secretary-
Treasurer, Francis J. Milne, 977 Broughton
Street, Vancouver.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of United, No.
300.—President, A. LeNobel; Recording Secretary, H. G. Bennett, 4014 Seventeenth Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Bricklayers' and Masons' International Union, No.
1.—President, J. Baker; Secretary-Treasurer,
G. Padgett, 3393 Thirty-first Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers,
International Association of, No. 97.'—President, J. E. Fitzpatrick; Business Representative, E. G. Cook, Room 216, 193 Hastings Street
East, Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers,
International Association of, No. 712.—President, A. McD. Cameron; Secretary, Miss Vivian
Steers, 559 Nineteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Building and Construction Workers of Canada,
Industrial Amalgamated, No. 1. — President,
Malcolm Bruce; Secretary-Treasurer, J. C. Barrett, 583 Seventeenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Building Material, Construction, and Fuel Truck
Drivers, No. 213. — President, John A. King;
Secretary, H. I. Bonnell, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
Building Service Employees' Union, International,
No. 244. — President, Victor Galbraith; Secretary, A. J. Wybrew, 434 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 452. — President, Robert E.
Guthrie; Secretary, John M. Nicholson, 2356
Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of (Floorlayers), No. 1541.—President,
Oscar Soderman; Secretary, Axel Johnson, 2454
Twenty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of (Shinglers and Roofers Union), No.
2346.—President, J. C. Atherton; Recording
Secretary, J. A. Gildermeester, 1974 Seventh
Avenue West, Vancouver. J 138
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of (Furniture Workers and Millworkers),
No. 2533. — President, Thomas Harry Sillery;
Secretary, Miss Hazel Hart, 1670 Beach Avenue,
Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of (Lumber and Sawmill Workers), No.
2968.—President, Alfred A. Taylor; Financial
Secretary, H. Wood, 3255 Norfolk Street, via
New Westminster.
Cemco Employees' Association, No. 72.—President,
Alfred E. Cousins; Secretary, Erick W. Stall-
berg, P.O. Box 41, Vancouver.
Cement Finishers' Section, International Hod Carriers', Building and General Labourers' Union,
No. 602.—President, William Whyte; Secretary,
W. J. Baskerville, 2931 McGill Street, Vancouver.
Checkers' and Weighers' Association, The Marine,
No. 506.—President, William Wright; Secretary,
John F. Laurillard, 3841 Twenty-fourth Avenue
West, Vancouver.
City Hall Employees' Association, Vancouver City,
No. 15.—President, Robert Skinner; Secretary,
Thomas H. Lewis, 5823 St. George Street, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Association, North Vancouver,
No. 3.—President, A. C. Dimock; Secretary,
N.E. Woodard, 136 Seventeenth Street West,
North Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Union, Vancouver, No. 28. —
President, Edwin Larson; Secretary, Donald
Guise, 1229 Franklin Street, Vancouver.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, R. J. Riley; Secretary, Harold Baker,
3680   Collingwood  Street,  Vancouver.
Clerks' Union, Retail, No. 279.—President, George
A. Wilkinson; Secretary-Treasurer, A. S. Thompson, 406 Province Building, 198 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Clerks' and Warehousemen's Union, No. 10.—
President, L. M. Congdon; Secretary-Treasurer,
Douglas J. Davis, 3549 Eighth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Communications Association, Canadian, No. 4.—
President, John A. Holmes; Secretary-Treasurer,
John O. Livesey, 7, 712 Robson Street, Vancouver.
Distillery, Rectifying, and Wine Workers' International Union of America, No. 92.—President,
William Shearer; Secretary, George Guy, 545
Forty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Divers' and Tenders' Union of Canada, Submarine
(Western Division).—President, L. T. Shorter,
139 Sixth Street, North Vancouver.
Electrical Trades Union, No. 1.—President, J. H.
Bushfield; Secretary, Robert Adair, 35, 163
Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 213.—President, T. B. Smith; Secretary,
W. D. Daley, 2121 Charles Street, Vancouver.
Elevator Constructors, International Union of,
No. 82.—President, R. Holmes; Recording Secretary, H. C. MacKichan, 2057 Seventh Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Embalmers and Undertakers Assistants' Union,
No. 23374.—President, William Scott; Secretary, John A. Dougall, 1334 Nicola Street,
Vancouver.
Enamel Workers' Federal Union, Vancouver, No.
291.—President, P. Grieve; Secretary, A. Hannah, 4406 Ravine Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 320;—
President, C. J. Greer; Secretary-Treasurer,
E. J. Wise, 6438 Victoria Drive, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 907.—
President, Charles Glibbery; Secretary-Treasurer, A. F. McGuire, 3533 Eighteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Engineers of Canada, Inc., National Association
of Marine, No. 7.—President, J. G. Pearce;
Secretary, R. W. Pyne, 828 Seventeenth Street,
West Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
115.—President, F. L. Hunt; Secretary, A. W.
Scott, Room 217, 193 Hastings Street East,
Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
882.— President, James Holliday; Secretary,
H. W. Whistler, 4117 Twelfth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
963.—President, William Reid; Secretary, Leonard A. Roach, 2932 Sophia Street, Vancouver.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 15.—
President, J. Henderson; Recording Secretary,
J. E. Battye, 760 Sixty-third Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Federal Union, Vancouver, No. 278.—President,
E. H. Hudson; Secretary, J. K. Millar, 774
Nineteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees' Union, No. B 71.—
President, M. G. Proudlock; Secretary-Treasurer, Charles W. Backus, 1928 Fourth Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees' Union, No. F 71.—
President W. Grant; Secretary-Treasurer, V.
Yates 1435 Cypress Street Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, Vancouver, No. 18.—President, Hugh S. Bird; Secretary-Treasurer,
Harry G. Foster, 4469 Gladstone Street, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, No. 914.—President, W. G.
Miller; Secretary, T. Cumming, 152 Twelfth
Street East, North Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 656.—President, W. R. O'Neill; Secretary, G. G. Toombs, 4831 Windsor Street, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 939.—President, J. A. Rennie; Secretary, J. Livingstone, 1111 Barclay Street, Vancouver.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood
of, No. 289.—President, W. R. Chapman, 1165
Beach Avenue, Vancouver.
First-aid Attendants' Association of B.C., Industrial.—President, W. A. Cowley; Secretary,
H. W. Mahler, Room 101, 603 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United.—
President, George Miller; Secretary-Treasurer,
William Rigby, 138 Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
Fur Workers' Union, Vancouver, No. 197.—President, Mrs. Marjorie Dodd; Secretary, Mrs.
Elizabeth Zlotnik, Suite 404, 504 Hastings Street
East, Vancouver.
Garment Workers' of America, United, No. 190.—
President, George Munro; Secretary, Walter W.
Shaw, 3435 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 139
Garment Workers' of America, United, No. 232.—
President, Ada Hallonan; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Lydia Wier, 1496 Nanaimo Street, Vancouver.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies'
(Cloakmakers' Union), No. 276. — President,
George W. Manton; Secretary, Colin Carr, 119
Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Gas Workers' Federal Union, Vancouver and
Victoria, No. 225.—President, W. A. Smith;
Secretary-Treasurer, F. Russell, 8278 Fremlin
Street, Vancouver.
Glaziers' and Glass Workers' Union, No. 1527.—
President, William A. Brown; Recording Secretary, Arthur James Allen, 5215 Culloden Street,
Vancouver.
Glove Workers' Union of America, International,
No. 104.—President, Miss E. McKnight; Secretary, Mrs. P. Horn, 14 Second Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. J. McCall; Secretary,
Miss J. Alexena Bruce, Room 212, 825 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America.—President, Alex Simpson; Secretary-
Treasurer, William S. Morrice, 4535 Rupert
Street,  Vancouver.
Grocery and Food Clerks' Union, Retail, No.
1518.—President, Jack Ladling; Secretary-
Treasurer, Alton S. Thompson, 406 Province
Building, 198 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Harbour Employees' Association, Vancouver.—
President, James D. Kennedy; Secretary,
Cyril M. Hampton, 1011 Richelieu Avenue,
Vancouver.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers'
Union, No. 602.—President, S. Burnley; Finan-
Secretary, W. J. Baskerville, 2931 McGill Street,
Vancouver.
Hospital Employees' Federal Union, Vancouver,
No. 180.—President, C. Jenkinson; Secretary-
Treasurer, Alex Paterson, 192 Eighteenth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Hotel and Retaurant Employees' Union, No. 28.—
President, R. E. Williams; Secretary, Jack
Price, 304, 413 Granville  Street, Vancouver.
Jewelry Workers' Union, International, No. 42.—
President, E. Roy Hawken; Recording Secretary, W. L. Routley, 2747 Eighteenth Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire, and
Metal, No. 207.—President, A. M. Ross; Secretary, M. G. Finlayson, 4848 Dumfries Street,
Vancouver.
Laucks Employees' Union. — President, L. H.
McConnell; Secretary, D. E. Janzen, 2267
Twenty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' International Union, No. 292.—
President, Vincent Fahlman; Secretary, J. H.
Irving, 2812 Eighteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No.
12. — President, W. H. Lauder; Secretary-
Treasurer, John Cass, 426 Seventeenth Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Library Staff Association, Vancouver Public, No.
7.—President, Eric Thorpe; Secretary, Miss
Aileen Tufts, 1975 Thirteenth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Lithographers of America, No. 44.—President,
Frank Phipps; Secretary, George Tennant,
2539   Twenty-fourth  Avenue   East,  Vancouver.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
38/163.—President, J. O. Donnell; Secretary-
Treasurer, James Darwood, 2049 Kitchener
Street, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union,
International, No. 501.—President, J. Boyes;
Secretary-Treasurer, R. H. Clewley, 660 Jackson
Avenue, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union,
International, No. 507.—President, William
Foster; Secretary, D. C. Mackenzie, 101 Tenth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Lumber Inspectors' Union, British Columbia
Division.—President, S. C. Dowling; Secretary-
Treasurer, B. G. Lane, 5889 Ormidale Street,
Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No.
182.—President, H. A. Miller; Recording Secretary, J. Bygate, 1784 Seventh Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No.
692.—President, H. D. Foster; Recording Secretary, H. Fishman, 2633 Fourth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Mailers' Union, Vancouver, No. 70.—President,
William E. Campbell; Secretary-Treasurer,
R. Gordon Taylor, 1176 Duchess Avenue, Holly-
burn  P.O.,  West Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 167.—Secretary, P. J. Doyle, 3631 Trafalgar
Street, Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 210.—Secretary, R. Halliday, 3383 Pender
Street  East,  Vancouver.
Malkin, W. H., Co., Ltd., Warehousemen's and
Truck Drivers' Association.—President, F. H.
Calhoun; Secretary-Treasurer, James E. Fowler,
1923 Waterloo Road, Vancouver.
Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial
Union, No. 1.—President, William L. White;
Secretary-Treasurer, Malcolm MacLeod, 3518
. Fraser Street, Vancouver.
Marshall-Wells Employees' Association. — Vice-
President, B. B. Parker; Secretary, Miss I.
Rudd, 3520 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Meat Employees' Federal Union, Retail, No. 222.—
President, Frank Rutledge; Secretary-Treasurer, A. S. Thompson, 406 Province Building,
198 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Merchant Service Guild, Incorporated, Canadian.—■
President, Capt. W. A. Gosse; Secretary, G. F.
Bullock, 675 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Metal and Chemical Workers' Union, No. 289.—
President, J. L. Irvine; Secretary, C. G. Woods,
3995 Dundas  Street, Burnaby.
Milk Wagon Drivers' and Dairy Employees'
Union, No. 464.—President, R. McCulloch; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Municipal Employees' Association, West Vancouver, No. 13.—President, F. H. Bonar; Secretary, H. T. Thomas, 1508 Duchess Avenue,
Hollyburn  P.O. J 140
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 145.—
President, William Pilling; Secretary, Edward
A. Jamieson, Suite 51, 553 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association, Vancouver. — President, Gordon A.
Cahill; Secretary, James P. Watts, 4100 Grand-
view Highway, New Westminster.
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Ltd., Employees'
Association.—President, K. H. Burnet; Secretary, Frank Taylor, 99 Cordova Street East,
Vancouver.
*Native Brotherhood of British Columbia (Incorporated).—President, William D. Scow; Secretary, Herbert Cook, Alert Bay.
Nelson's Sales and Service Club.—President,
Charles Arthur James; Secretary, H. V. Nis-
bett, 3594 Thirty-eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, No. 1.—President,
Douglas H. Fell; Secretary, Miss Eva Tomich,
1656 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, No. 2.—President,
Edward C. Martin; Secretary, Ronald C.
Thornber, 2980 Waterloo Street, Vancouver.
Office Employees' International Union, No. 15.—
President, Mrs. Ann Bengough; Secretary-
Treasurer, Miss Bernadette Geuthro, 200, 529
Beatty  Street,  Vancouver.
Office and Professional Workers' Organizing Committee, No. 8.—President, Thomas Simington;
Secretary, Mrs. Vera MacKenzie, 2323 Heather
Street, Vancouver.
Office and Professional Workers of America,
United, No. 173.—President, Bertram L. Deve-
son; Secretary, F. Stearn Bennett, 2433 Twenty-
second Avenue East, Vancouver.
Office and Professional Workers of America,
United, No. 229.—President, Kayla Culhane;
Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Ellen Borden, 580
Sixteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Oil Workers' Union, United, No. 7.—President,
A. A. McLeod; Secretary-Treasurer, S. McLeod,
247 Fourth Street West, North Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
162.—President, R. Johnson; Recording Secretary, J. Longmuir, 3727 Douglas Road, New
Westminster.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
249.—President, M. F. Dean; Recording Secretary, G. Krause, 34, 1368 Robson Street, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
283.—President, Thomas Marshall; Secretary,
May Harvey, 4245 Beatrice  Street, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
341.—President, R. Ferguson; Secretary, W.
Cholowski, 2236 St. George Street, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
350.—President, Louis F. Shaw; Recording Secretary, June Grieve, 4303 Main Street, Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, No. 138.—President, W. G.
Williams; Secretary, W. E. Eaton, 39 Fortieth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
* There are fifty-seven branches of the Native Brotherhood in British Columbia.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, No. 1550.—President, Mrs.
J. Mulligan; Recording Secretary, Miss A.
Lenius, 1340 Howe Street, Vancouver.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
528.—President, R. H. Dalzell; Recording Secretary, Caroline Whitfield, 813 Hornby Street,
Vancouver.
Photo-engravers' Union, Vancouver, No. 54. —
President, J. Hinke; Secretary, Edwin Davis,
58 Lancaster  Crescent,  Sea  Island, Vancouver.
Pile Drivers', Bridge, Wharf, and Dock Builders'
Union, No. 2404. — President, C. Anderson;
Secretary, S. C. Allan, P.O. Box 369, Vancouver.
Plasterers' and Cement Finishers' International
Association, Operative, No. 779.—President, G.
Harding; Secretary-Treasurer, Harry West,
3419 Twenty-third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United
States and Canada, United Association of
Journeymen and Apprentices, No. 170.—President, Jack A. Dillabough; Secretary, F. Carlisle, 426 Fifty-fourth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United
States and Canada, United Association of
Journeymen and Apprentices, No. 571.—President, Thomas H. Poulton; Financial Secretary,
Lloyd Elrick, 302, 1877 Haro Street, Vancouver.
Policemen's Federal Labour Union, No. 12.—President, Fred Dougherty; Secretary-Treasurer,
T. Collishaw, 236 Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Vancouver, No. 69. — President, Max Erenberg;
Secretary-Treasurer, Thomas S. Ezart, 1807
Thirty-eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 443.—President,
H. O'Hara; Secretary, F. F. McKinnon, 2486
Third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144.—
President, J. A. Montgomery; Secretary, Edwin
S. West, 4197 Eleventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 987.—
President, E. F. Marsden; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. B. A. Peladeau, 6129 St. Catherine Street,
Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 1040.-—
President, J. P. O'Brien; Secretary-Treasurer,
R. E. Casey, 1541 Twelfth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 46.—President, James Water; Secretary-
Treasurer, Edward Bell, 2855 Twentieth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 626.—President, G. H. Stubbs; Secretary,
A. T. Padgham, 5013 Payne Street, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 630.— President, A. Farrow; Recording
Secretary, T. W. Kirby, 3566 Triumph Street,
Vancouver.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
58.—President, John Alexander Jeal; Secretary,
Samuel Smith Shearer, 2256 Twenty-second
Avenue West, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 141
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
773.—President, C. Masur; Recording Secretary, F. Wood, 434 Twentieth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 267.—President, A. S. Emms; Secretary, J. B. Physick,
4153 Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 59.—President,
H. Strange; Secretary, C. M. Robertson, 4764
Moss Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 82.—President,
F. Skinner; Secretary, A. P. Smith, 206 Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 162.—President,
E. H. Vance; Secretary, B. Cavanaugh, Suite 6,
2466 Ninth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 220.—Secretary,
A. E. Fraser, 625 Nineteenth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 221.—President,
Percival Jones; Secretary, Arthur Pearce, 1275
Ninth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 223.—President,
K. Duck; Secretary, Simon Cowieson, 4348
St. Catherine Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 275.—President,
William Wilde; Secretary, Miss A. Cyr, 1827
Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway    Mail    Clerks'   Association. — President,
C. W. Sabourin; Secretary-Treasurer, J. G. H.
Pound, 3750 Twenty-sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 74.—
President, Charles Beattie;    General Secretary,
D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue Building, Winnipeg,
Man.
Refrigeration Workers' Union, No. 516.—President, D. D. Forrister; Secretary-Treasurer,
L. R. Wintle, 137 Fortieth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union,
No. 535.—President, A. W. Parrish; Secretary,
Robert Hannah, 2817 Euclid Street, Vancouver.
St. Paul's Hospital Employees' Organization.—
President, J. S. Johnston; Secretary, Miss M.
Falasconi, 3045 Grant Street, Vancouver.
Seafarers' Association, Canadian, No. 1.—President, H. H. Taylor; Secretary, G. Smillie, 139
Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver.
Seafarers' International Union of North America,
Canadian District.— President, Harry Lunde-
berg; Secretary-Treasurer, David Joyce, 95
Nineteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Seamen's Union, Canadian (Pacific Coast District), No. 7.—President, James S. Thompson;
Secretary, J. M. Smith, 53 Powell Street, Vancouver.
Sewerage and Drainage Board Employees' Union,
Greater Vancouver Water District and Joint,
No. 2.—President, P. D. Stewart; Secretary,
J. M. Morrison, 4573 First Avenue West, Vancouver.
Sheet-metal Workers' International Association,
No. 280.—President, Fred Cocker; Financial
Secretary, James Walker, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
Shingle Weavers' Union, No. 2802.—President,
Louis Cummings; Secretary, Alex Low, 1184
Seventy-third  Avenue  West,  Vancouver.
Shoe, Leather, and Tannery Workers' Union,
No. 505.—President, George Wood; Secretary,
James A. Plumridge, 2439 Trinity Street, Vancouver.
Shoe Workers' Union of Vancouver, No. 510.—
President, J. Turner; Secretary-Treasurer,
G. Clerihew, 2918 Thirty-fourth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Sign and Pictorial Painters' Union, No. 726.—
President, J. B. Collin; Recording Secretary,
J. A. Middleton, 5881 Dundas Street, Vancouver.
Slade, A. P. & Co., Ltd., and Associated Companies
Employees' Association. — President, Robert
Frank McLure; Secretary, William N. Scott,
3206  Commercial  Drive,  Vancouver.
Spear & Jackson's Employees' Club.—President,
M. Wilson; Secretary-Treasurer, D. R. Alexander, 4055 Dundas  Street, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2655.—
President, E. C. Cockriell; Secretary, P. Baskin,
905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2765.—
President, C. Kemp; Secretary, N. Harford,
905  Dominion  Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2821.—
President, Joe Blownski; Secretary, G. Emary,
434  Glen Drive, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2952.—
President, B. Christie; Secretary, J. Stephenson,  905  Dominion  Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3229.—
President, F. Rowland; Secretary, Glen Murray,  905  Dominion  Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3253.—
President, F. Douglas; Secretary, George Curly,
905  Dominion  Bank  Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3302.—
President, C. Campbell; -Secretary, F. Horton,
905   Dominion   Bank   Building,   Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3376.—
President, Guy Cosh; Secretary, D. Reid, 905
Dominion  Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3452.—
President, J. Kilby; Secretary, R. Symonds,
905  Dominion   Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3495.—
President, A. Nordenmark; Secretary, J. Bosak,
905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United. No. 3546.—
President, E. M. Orr; Secretary, W. Elder,
905  Dominion  Bank  Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3910.—
President, J. Kinnear; Secretary, F. Carroll,
905 Dominion  Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Stereotypers and Electrotypers Union, International, No. 88.—President, Robert N. Myles;
Secretary-Treasurer, Raymond Bayley, 4520
Burke Street, Burnaby.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, No. 101.—President, Lloyd Easier; Recording Secretary, A. Jennings, 4274 Sophia Street,
Vancouver. J 142
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Sugar Workers, Industrial Union of, No. 517.—
President, H. M. Webster; Financial Secretary,
C. H.  Burke, 3925 Pandora  Street, Vancouver.
Switchmen's Union of North America, No. 111.—
President, A. B. Kerr; Secretary, A. S. Crosson,
3925 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Tailors of America, Journeymen, No. 178.—President, H. Clausner; Secretary, Mrs. MacDonald,
2549  York,  Vancouver.
Taxicab, Stage, and Bus Drivers' Union, No.
151.—President, Albert Blais; Secretary-Treasurer, Charles A. Gower, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
"'Teachers' Federation, British Columbia.—President, F. P. Lightbody; General Secretary, C. D.
Ovans, 1300 Robson Street, Vancouver.
Telegraphers' Union, Commercial, Canadian Pacific Division No. 1.—President, A. Dettman;
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Phyllis M. Cline,
Box 432, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 1.—President, D. B. McLennan;
Secretary, F. L. Leiper, 3475 Ash Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 1-30. — President, A. Pollard;
Secretary, C. Card, 1569 Graveley Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic
Division), No. 10.—President, Miss Elvine Benson; Secretary, Helen Johnston, 1835 Fifth
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic
Division), No. 14.—President, Mrs. M. Beattie;
Secretary, Lorena Asher, 326 Fifty-sixth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Clerical Division), No. 20.—President, W. Docharty;
Secretary, Miss Margaret Blair, 3794 Thirtieth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Textile Workers, Federal, No. 12.—President,
Mrs. Betty Hayman; Secretary, Miss Betty
Mellis, 3228 Vanness Avenue, Vancouver.
Theatre Employees' Union, No. B 72.—President,
J. R. Foster, 1075 Fifty-fourth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees of the United States
and Canada, International Alliance of, No.
118.—President, Sydney A. Summers; Secretary,  Walter  Blake,  P.O.  Box  711,  Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture
Machine Operators of the United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, No. 348.—
President, D. Calladine; Secretary, J. H. Leslie, 271, Twentieth Street, Hollyburn, West
Vancouver.
Tile and Marble Setters' Helpers and Terraza
Helpers, Marble, Stone, and Slate Polishers,
Rubbers, and Sawyers, International Association of, No. 78.—President, F. Stroud; Recording Secretary, W. Newbury, 1347 Seventy-first
Avenue  West, Vancouver.
Tile Setters' Union, B.C. No. 3.—President, T.
Anderson; Secretary, W. Richards, Pleasantside P.O.
Truck Drivers and Helpers, General, No. 31.—
President, William M. Brown; Secretary, R. D.
Atkinson,  4313  Perry  Street,  Vancouver.
* There are seventy-eight branches of the Federation
in British Columbia.
Trunk and Bag Industrial Workers' Union,
No. 1.—President, Phil Balden; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. Petrie, 749 Sixteenth Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Typographical Union, Vancouver, No. 226.—
President, A. Bevis; Secretary-Treasurer, R. H.
Neelands,  529  Beatty  Street, Vancouver.
University of British Columbia Employees' Federal Union, No. 116.—President, H. G. Smith;
Recording Secretary, W. B. Wilsher, 2260
Tenth Avenue, Vancouver.
Upholsterers' Industrial Union, Vancouver, No. 1.
—President, Thomas Scott Paterson; Secretary-Treasurer, Earl Alexander McCuaig, 726
Fifty-ninth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Woodworkers' Union, British Columbia, No. 2.—
President, L. A. Macintosh; Secretary-Treasurer, Charles E. Roughsedge, 501, 736 Granville
Street, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1—71.
—President, Niels C. Madsen; Secretary, John
McCuish, 204 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1—217. — President, Vern Carlyle; Financial
Secretary, Gladys Hilland, 408, 16 Hastings
Street East, Vancouver.
Vanderhoof.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1870.—President, F. Galati; Secretary, J.
Wall, McCall, via Vanderhoof.
Vernon.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1346.—President, B. Sauder;
Recording Secretary, W. J. Forsyth, P.O. Box
1095, Vernon.
Civic Employees' Union, Vernon, No. 1.—President, John R. Stroud; Secretary, H. W. Picken,
3309 Thirty-fifth Avenue, Vernon.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 821.—President, A. W. Smith; Secretary,
John East, 114 Langille Street East, Vernon.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
953.—President, W. W. Gray; Secretary, N. J.
Redman, Box 842, Vernon.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Federation
of, No. 6.—President, J. E. Gray; Recording
Secretary, M. M. Atwood, Box 1231, Vernon.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Thomas J. Marrion; Secretary,
Miss Nancy L. Bowen, Vernon.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 2861.—
President, L. F. Gallichan; Secretary, Michael
Sherba, P.O. Box 2013, Vernon.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, Gordon A. Cahill; Secretary, James P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway,
New Westminster.
Mechanics' and Associated Workers' Union, Interior General, No. 1.—
Victoria.
Automotive Workers' Federal Union, No. 151.—
President, Thomas F. Pickell; Secretary-Treasurer, W. J. Frampton, 1 Maddock Avenue,
Victoria. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 143
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, No. 267.—President, John F.
Litster; Secretary-Treasurer, Sven V. Jensen,
1006 Wollaston Street, Victoria.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189.— President,
T. J. Johnston; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
372. — President, George Turner; Secretary-
Treasurer, B. G. Frankling, 1217 Broad Street,
Victoria.
Barbers' Union, Canadian, No. 2.—President, S.
Temple; Secretary, J. C. Macrimmon, 2006 Oak
Bay Avenue, Victoria.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association (Victoria and Island Branch).— President, J. W.
Casey; Secretary, Miss M. Cavin, 241 Montreal
Street, Victoria.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 520.—President,
Thomas Hammond; Recording Secretary, Percy
J. Haime, 732 Canterbury Road, Victoria.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
147.—President, A. R. Barnes; Secretary-Treasurer, R. Foster, 1431 Richardson Street, Victoria.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink, and Distillery
Workers of America, International Union of
United, No. 280.—President, G. Wilson; Corresponding Secretary, H. J. Nowotniak, 628 Manchester Road, Victoria.
Bricklayers', Masons', and Plasterers' International Union, No. 2.—President, W. E. Mertton;
Secretary-Treasurer, J. Beckerley, 3965 Saanich
Road, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1598.—President, R. E. Hill;
Financial Secretary, Alex Sims, 1158 May
Street, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2415.— President, S. Berrow;
Secretary, E. Hovey, 2511 Empire Street, Victoria.
Chemical and Explosive Workers' Industrial Federal Union, Canadian, No. 128. — President,
Robert Barrie; Secretary-Treasurer, William J.
Sanders, 1131 Reynolds Road, Victoria.
City Hall Employees' Association, No. 4.—President, C. M. Parrott; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
Katherine Rowe, 2323 Wark Street, Victoria.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, No. 50.—
President, F. Bourke; Secretary, G. A. Fletcher,
1035 Hillside Avenue, Victoria.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, A. E. Pendray; Secretary-Treasurer, G. K.
Beeston, 314 Post-office Building, Victoria.
Construction and General Labourers' Union, No.
1093.—President, Frank Williams; Secretary,
Harry Church, 822 Lampson Street, Victoria.
Cooperage Workers' Union (Lumber and Sawmill
Division), No. 3003.—President, W. A. James
Wadden; Recording Secretary, Miss Phyllis
Marwick, 2520 Rock Bay Avenue, Victoria.
Defence Civilian Workers' Union, National, No.
129.—President, Joseph D. Marshall; Secretary-
Treasurer, George S. Portingale, 810 Hereward
Road, Victoria.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. B 230.—President, C. A. Peck; Secretary,
A. S. Bailey, 3601 Saanich Road, Victoria.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
918.—President Martin W. Dawson; Secretary,
L. E. Nelson, 1015 Empress Avenue, Victoria.
Engineers of Canada, Inc., National Association
of Marine, No. 6.—President, P. A. Trowsdale;
Secretary-Treasurer, G. W. Brown, Room 402,
612 View Street, Victoria.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20.—
President, Frank E. Whale; Financial Secretary, Donald E. Gillis, 705 Cook Street, Victoria.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, Greater
Victoria, No. 730.—President, John A. Easton;
Secretary, Robert J. Coates, 2609 Avebury Avenue, Victoria.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 690.—President, E. O. Sommerville;
Secretary, A. T. Thompsett, 1161 Burdett Avenue, Victoria.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United.—
President, Elgin Neish; Secretary, Thomas A.
Carrington, 451 Chester Street, Victoria.
Garage Employees' Association, Vancouver Island
Coach Lines.— President, Henry Woodford;
Secretary, W. McAdams, 413 Obed Avenue,
Victoria.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. S. Oliver; Secretary,
Hiram A. Carney, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Government Employees, American Federation of,
No. 59.—President, Thomas F. Monaghan, 205
Campbell Building, Victoria.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance and Bartenders' International League
of America, No. 459.—President, Mrs. M. Bur-
goyne; Secretary-Treasurer, Emily M. Aitken,
331  Huntingdon  Place,  Victoria.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance and Bartenders' International League
of America, No. 513.—President, G. John N.
FKnn; Secretary-Treasurer, James Thirlwall,
1044  Burdett Avenue, Victoria.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees'
Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West  Vancouver.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire, and
Metal, No. 332.—President, E. C. Day; Secretary, A. J. Ferguson, 2751 Roseberry Avenue,
Victoria.
Laundry Workers' Union, No. 1.—President, D.
Newell; Recording Secretary, W. G. Edwards,
1409 Taunton Street, Victoria.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No.
11.—President, H. W. Rivers; Secretary, Fred
C.  Hurry,  898  Front Street,  Victoria.
Library Staff Association, Victoria Public.—President, Mrs. Isobel Robinson; Secretary, Miss
Catherine Firth, 22 Howe Street, Victoria.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
38/162.—President, G. C. Richards; Secretary,
W. N.  Scott, 121  Government  Street, Victoria.
Machinists, International Association of, No.
456.—President, H. E. Thayer; Recording Secretary, C. H. Lester, 1286 Pandora Avenue,
Victoria.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—President, Gordon A. Cahill; Secretary, James P. Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway,  New  Westminster. J 144
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Mailers' Union, No. 121.—President, James A.
McCague; Secretary-Treasurer, Christopher H.
Miller, 577 Michigan Street, Victoria.
Marine Workers', Machinists', and Boilermakers'
Industrial Union, No. 3.—President, S. W. Daly.;
Secretary-Treasurer, W. A. S. Ashworth, 1389
Vista Heights, Victoria.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union, International, No. 144.—President, William Bohne;
Secretary, S. Emery, 864 Old Esquimalt Road,
Victoria.
Municipal Employees' Association, Saanich, No.
5.—President, Roy H. Wootten; Secretary, Miss
Myra Hodgson, Colquitz P.O.
Municipal Employees' Association, Oak Bay, No.
17.—President, R. Gordon; Secretary, T. Johnstone, 2707 Foul Bay Road, Oak Bay, Victoria.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 247.—
President, Charles W. Hunt; Secretary, William F. Tickle, 628 Harbinger Avenue, Victoria.
Newspaper Guild Federal Union, No. 219.—President, L. M. Salaway; Recording Secretary,
David Driver, c/o Victoria Daily Times, Victoria.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers, Brotherhood of, No. 1163.—President, F. Dewhurst;
Recording Secretary, W. B. Brigden, 213
Helmcken Road, Victoria.
Pantorium Employees' Association. — President,
Lawrence Arthur Wooster; Secretary, Hugo
Braden, 809  Linden  Avenue, Victoria.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
367.—President, Ernest W. Parsons; Recording
Secretary, B. L. Baldwin, 2651 Forbes Street,
Victoria.
Plasterers' and Cement Finishers' Union, Operative, No. 450.—President, L. H. Calvert; Secretary, M. Gwynne, 1315 Vining Street, Victoria.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United
States and Canada, United Association of
Journeymen and Apprentices, No. 324.—President, J. C. Woodend; Secretary, George Pyper,
1139 Balmoral Road, Victoria.
Police Federal Union, City of Victoria, No. 251.—
President, Walter Andrews; Recording Secretary, William Andrews, 705 Pandora Avenue,
Victoria.
Police Mutual Benefit Association.—President,
Stanley T. Holmes; Secretary, David P. Donaldson, 2537 Vancouver  Street, Victoria.
Postal Employees, Canadian.—President, S. R.
Webb; Secretary-Treasurer, John H. Hedley,
1166   Chapman   Street,  Victoria.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of
North America, No. 79.—President, F. Humphries; Secretary, F. H. Larsen, 1236 McKenzie
Street, Victoria.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 613.—
President, H. C. Horner; Secretary, J. A. Stone,
1320 Burleith Drive, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 526.—President, A. R. Davie; Secretary-
Treasurer, H. S. Hughes, 1022 Chamberlain
Street, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1137.—President, James A. Miller;
Secretary-Treasurer, Charles H. Ormiston, 1883
Taylor Street, Victoria.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
No. 50.—President, H. Willey; Financial Secretary, H. Greaves, 638 Victoria Avenue, Victoria.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 289.—President, James W. Thomson; Secretary, James N.
Forde, 707 Wilson  Street, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 222.—President,
Roy E. Tebo; Secretary, C. A. Erwin, 336
Catherine  Street, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of (Drivers' Division),
No. 234.—President, Richard Jones; Secretary-
Treasurer, J. S. Ready, 1512 Jubilee Avenue,
Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 276.—President,
Oliver Day; Secretary, Mrs. D. Bean, 541
Dupplin Road, Victoria.
School Board Employees' Association, Greater
Victoria, No. 11.—President, Leonard Clarks;
Secretary-Treasurer, Shirley J. Ross, 1036 Burdett Avenue, Victoria.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association,
No. 276. — President, Lome W. Creighton;
Recording Secretary, J. W. Quissy, 744 Hill
Street, Victoria.
Shipwrights', Joiners', and Wood Caulkers' Industrial Union, No. 9.—President, R. Thordarson;
Secretary-Treasurer, Donald Douglas, 710 Cormorant Street, Victoria.
Shipyard Riggers, Benchmen, and Helpers, No..
643.—President, A. G. Sainsbury; Secretary-
Treasurer, H. L. Ritchie, 2620 Quadra Street,
Victoria.
Shipyard Workers' Federal Union, No. 238.—
President, R. D. Patterson; Secretary-Treasurer, P. Ross, Craigflower P.O., Victoria.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, No. 109.—President, F. P. French; Recording Secretary, W. Turner, 3060 Carrol Street,
Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 2.—President, F. Pomeroy; Secretary, A. H. Barry, 1048 Topaz Avenue,
Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 2-31.—President, G. T. Noble;
Secretary, Miss M. Dickson, 202 Raynor Street,
Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic
Division), No. 11.—President, K. Goodall; Secretary, Doris Brownhill, c/o 611 Toronto Building, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Clerical Division), No. 36.—President, D. Howell;
Secretary, Miss R. Rodger, 1331 Arm Street,
Victoria.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture
Machine Operators, No. 168.—President, S. V.
Henn; Corresponding Secretary, R. E. Baiss,
1989 Crescent Road, Victoria.
Typographical Union, No. 201.—President, V. J.
Baines; Secretary-Treasurer, H. Warren, 2218
Beach Drive, Victoria.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-118.—President, R. Simmons; Financial Secretary, J. M. Wainscott, 24, 1116 Broad Street,
Victoria. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 145
Wardner.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 229.—Secretary-Treasurer, G. Marra, Wardner.
Wells.
Mine,. Mill, and Smelter Workers, International
Union of, No. 685. — President, J. Teleske;
Financial Secretary, W. Schneider, Wells.
West Summerland.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of (Lumber and Sawmill Workers'
Union), No. 2742.—President, Charles R. Morgan; Secretary, Claude D. Haddrell, General
Delivery, West Summerland.
White Rock.
Fibre Flax Workers' Union, No. 1.— President,
Harry Maxfield; Secretary, Dan Lawson, White
Rock.
Williams Lake.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, H. G. Windt; Secretary, J. V.
Gaspard, Williams Lake.
Woodfibre.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 494.—President,
Stanley G. Green; Recording Secretary, Andrew
S. Knowles, Jr., Woodfibre.
Wright.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 221.—President, F. Hinsche; Secretary, H.
Robinson, Marguerite.
Zeballos.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 851.—President, Bruce Agnew; Financial Secretary, Harry
Clement, Zeballos.
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
Calgary.
Bituminous Coal Operators' Association, The
Western Canada.—President, J. J. Mclntyre;
Secretary, W. C. Whittaker, 520 Lougheed
Building, Calgary, Alta.
Kelowna.
Shippers, Association, Inc., Okanagan Federated.—
President, F. L. Fitzpatrick; Secretary, L. R.
Stephens, 1485 Water Street, Kelowna.
Penticton.
Co-operative Growers, Penticton.—President, John
Coe; Secretary, D. G. Penny, Suite 2, Erickson
Block, 249 Main Street, Penticton.
Prince Rupert.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of B.C., Canadian Halibut.—President, Barny Roald; Secretary, Ole Stegavig, P.O. Box 1025, Station B,
Prince Rupert.
Vancouver.
Automotive Transport Association of B.C.—President, G. C. Parrott; Secretary, G. L. Buckman,
810 Dominion Building, Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, B.C.—President, B.M. Col-
well; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, Master.—President, B. M.
Colwell; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Box Manufacturers' Section, Interior (C.M.A.).—
Chairman, J. G. Strother; Secretary, Hugh
Dalton, 608 Marine Building, 355 Burrard
Street,  Vancouver.
Building and Construction Industries Exchange
of British Columbia.—President, F. W. Welsh;
Secretary, R. J. Lecky, 342 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Contractors' Association, General. — President,
R. C. Pybus; Secretary, R. J. Lecky, 342 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of B.C.—
President, W. J. Pitre; Secretary, L. T. Wylie,
995 Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
10
Hotels' Association, British Columbia.—President,
Adam Paterson; Secretary, Eric Ely, 5910
Willingdon  Place, Vancouver.
Industrial Association of British Columbia.—
President, W. L. Macken; Secretary, Miss
Margaret M. Riley, 1024 Marine Building, Vancouver.
Jewellers'Association, Canadian (B.C. Section).—
President, Bruce Allan; Secretary, R. B. Deacon, 510, 119 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Laundry, Dry Cleaning, and Linen Supply Club,
Vancouver.—President, Andrew Bernard; Secretary-Treasurer, John R. Taylor, 600 Hall
Building,  789  Pender  Street  West,  Vancouver.
Loggers' Association, Inc., British Columbia.—
Chairman, R. J. Fillberg; Secretary, John N.
Burke, 1518, 510 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, Interior
(C.M.A.).—Chairman, C. G. McMynn; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 608 Marine Building, 355
Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Lumbermen's Association, Northern Interior
(Prince George) (C.M.A.).—Chairman, C. T.
Claire; Secretary, J. Ruddock, 608 Marine
Building, Vancouver.
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association,
B.C.—President, B. L. Pendleton; Secretary,
L. R. Andrews, 718, 837 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver.
Metal Trades' Section (C.M.A.). — Chairman,
M. M. Frazer; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 608
Marine Building, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Milk Distributors' Association, Vancouver.—President, D. F. Farris; Secretary, F. A. Wilson,
199 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Milk Producers' Association, Fraser Valley.—
President, W. L. Macken; Secretary, J. J.
Brown,  Surrey  Centre.
Morticians, B.C. Society of.—President, John T.
Edwards; Secretary, F. J. Harding, 2216 Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Pacific Coast Fishermen's Mutual Marine Insurance Co.—President, S. W. Brown; Secretary,
L. T. Wylie, 995 Cordova Street East, Vancouver. J 146
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Plastering and Lathing Contractor's Association,
Greater Vancouver.—President, George Whil-
lans; Secretary-Treasurer, George A. Skinner,
4865 Fairmont  Street, Vancouver.
Printers' and Stationers' Guild of British Columbia.—Chairman, James M. Forsyth; Secretary,
Audrey Parkinson, 608, 355 Burrard Street,
Vancouver.
Red Cedar Shingle Association of B.C., Consolidated.—President, J. Earl McNair; Secretary,
Gordon S. Raphael, 509 Metropolitan Building,
837 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Restaurant Association, Canadian. — President,
Earl R. Nichols; Secretary, C. H. Millbourn,
Room 609, 156 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ont.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.,
B.C. Division. — President, W. S. Charlton;
Secretary-Manager, George R. Matthews, 218
Pacific Building, Vancouver.
Shipping Federation of British Columbia.—President, P. V. 0. Evans; Secretary, A. Scott,
c/o Terminal Dock & Warehouse Co., Ltd., P.O.
40, Vancouver.
Respectfully submitted.
Truck Loggers' Association.—President, Clair C.
Smith; Secretary-Treasurer, F. H. Adames,
410 Dominion Building, Vancouver.
Upholstered Furniture Manufacturing Association, B.C.—President, Henry Ernest Tynan;
Secretary, John M. Richardson, 626 Pender
Street   West,   Vancouver.
Victoria.
Bakers' Association, Victoria Master.—President,
J. P. Land; Secretary, T. P. McConnell, 123
Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Beer Licensees Employers' Association.—President, A. Mawer; Secretary, R. S. Yates, 613
Central  Building,  Victoria.
Builders' Exchange, Ltd., Victoria.—President,
George H. Wheaton; Secretary, Roy T. Lougheed,
1119 Government Street, P.O. Box 608, Victoria.
Electrical Association, Victoria (B.C.).—President, Archie Whiteman; Secretary, A. R. Colby,
645 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Taxi Operators' Association of Greater Victoria.—
President, A. E. McMullen; Secretary, Darhl
K. Errett, c/o Island Taxi, 1306 Broad Street,
Victoria.
B. H. E. GOULT,
Chief Executive Officer. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 147
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., June 14th, 1948.
Mr. James Thomson,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection Branch for
the year 1947.
The decline in heavy production, from record heights established during the war
years, while still in effect in some degree, was rapidly being overcome by increasing
industrial activity, stimulated by the demand of a peace-time economy.
The many large expansion programmes designed by large industrial concerns, to
overcome the demands created by war-time shortages, brought added employment in the
construction, food-products manufacturing, and lumber industries.
While these production demands had necessitated an unprecedented volume of
employment in many essential industries during 1947, a gradual decrease in both male
and female employment was evident, particularly in the heavy construction industries,
ship-building, metal trades, and industries of a like nature.
Aside from these temporary adjustments, the outlook was promising for 1948, and
optimism was reported to prevail amongst business-men in general, who did not foresee
any recession in 1948 according to the most recent survey, although a general shortage
of labour and skilled mechanics at least as great as that during 1947 was expected
to prevail.
The department of factory inspection is charged with the inspection of all factories
as defined in Schedule A of the " Factories Act," all passenger and freight elevators
wherever located, and all laundries operated for profit regardless of whether anyone is
employed or not.
When we visit a plant, it is not usually by appointment, as we desire to observe the
average working conditions. Whether our visits will prove beneficial to both employer
and employees will depend largely on the amount of interest shown in the adoption
of our recommendations.
The knowledge acquired through interviews with the employees and executives
respecting the causes leading to an accident enables us to explain to the management
of a plant of a like nature just how an injury was received by a workman in another
plant, in order that corrective measures may be taken to prevent a similar accident.
It should be remembered that the workmen in industrial occupations have no voice
in the location of a plant, the sort of machinery to be used, the tools they are supplied
with, the form of lighting, etc. These matters are controlled by the management.
It is only reasonable then to expect the management to discharge its responsibilities
to its employees by seeing that the equipment installed is properly protected before
being placed in operation.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1947, 1,481 inspections and reinspections of factories were made.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
The increase in industrial activity has led to corresponding increase in the interest
taken in industrial accident-prevention.
Adjustments of the labour market to a peace-time basis continued during the year,
as married women in large number withdrew from the labour force, and many single
women, upon the completion of demobilization, finding themselves being replaced by
ex-service men, married and turned to the establishment of homes. J 148 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Confidence prevails, but lack of equipment has been the major delaying factor in
launching many additional expansions which had been contemplated in the field of
industrial activity. As this equipment becomes available, much of the out-of-date or
worn-out equipment, including buildings, will be replaced, which will mean additional
employment in factories, mills, and workshops.
The prevention of factory accidents has very properly focused attention on their
principal causes — ignorance, carelessness, unsuitable clothing, insufficient lighting,
defective machinery and structure, absence of safeguards, etc.
Ignorance can never be entirely overcome, and this applies with equal force to
carelessness, which, of course, can never be wholly eradicated from human behaviour.
At the same time the ill results of both ignorance and carelessness can be largely
diminished by means suggested if they are consistently and persistently applied. The
old saying that " familiarity breeds contempt " nowhere finds greater proof than in the
carelessness arising from daily proximity to machines, or conditions involving risk.
A man working in a factory day after day places himself unconsciously in numerous
situations involving chances of accident, which he would take pains to avoid except
that he has become so used to his environment that he hardly gives it a thought. The
evil effects of this condition of mind can be held to the lowest limits, largely through
the action of the employer, in furnishing rules and caution signs, and also in supplying,
in many instances, simple protective arrangements, which may serve chiefly to call
attention to the existence of danger. Such an arrangement may not prevent the
careless workman from ever going to the danger spot, but its presence there is apt to
reawaken his mind to the danger every time he approaches, with the result that he is
more careful than he otherwise would be to avoid an accident.
Although there are parts of working machinery that cannot be safeguarded by any
known appliance and though the employees engaged in operating machinery know of
these unguarded parts, some of them will nevertheless perform their labours in a way
that borders on criminal negligence. To place a ladder upon a revolving shaft and
mount thereon to adjust a belt, to crawl under machinery in motion, to reach across
dangerous parts of machinery in motion, to work in baggy sleeves or with flying tresses
of hair about dangerous gearing and shafting, to adjust belts upon rapidly revolving
wheels, to carelessly hook up or bend weighty objects about to be lifted, to speed
overhead cranes, giving no danger signal to their fellow workmen, are fair samples
of oft-repeated acts of negligence upon the part of employees.
Rings, bracelets, and wrist-watches also worn by workers are a source of danger
and should be discouraged, particularly around electric or mechanical equipment, as
many minor accidents have resulted in severe injury when these adornments have
prevented a quick release of the hands.
The wearing of unsuitable clothing is a matter which is largely within the control
of the employer, and to which he should give his serious attention. This is particularly
essential in the case of female employees. Regulations re female factory employees
became law in this Province on the 11th day of May, 1945; with the great increase in
the number of women employed in manufacturing plants during the war, the real need
for appropriate female apparel became apparent. Although basically similar in
materials, to the protective clothing for men, full safety and comfort for women in
industry demanded that clothes be designed for their physical characteristics and
requirements.
The end of the abnormal war-time conditions has resulted in an exodus of the
feminine contingent from war-credited jobs. However, there still remains in industry
the great number of women who have traditionally formed a part of manufacturing
personnel, and those who have demonstrated during the war years their special
aptitudes  for  certain  types  of  work.    For  these  working-women  the  war-borne REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 149
awareness of their needs remains, and with it the readily available equipment which
can better protect them from injury, discomfort, and fatigue.
One of the most significant developments is protective head-gear. Women's hair,
because of its length and the fullness of hair-do styles, is especially susceptible to
becoming entangled in rotating machinery or moving belts and to being ignited by
stray sparks or flames. Women's caps consequently should be designed to enclose the
hair completely and hold it compact. The head-gear should not interfere with the
wearing of shields, goggles, respirators, or other safety equipment, and should be
tightly woven to exclude dust and dirt. In cases other than handling of explosive
materials, a wider mesh net may be satisfactory if the air is not contaminated by
particular matter.
Other equipment which has been devised for the protection of women, or specially
adopted from men's styles of clothing, include breast-protectors, hard hats, gloves and
mittens, foot-guards, safety-clothing, and safety-shoes.
Accidents due to defects of machinery and structure cannot be entirely prevented,
for things will wear out or give way unexpectedly, but they can be reduced very much
by frequent inspection and prompt repairs whenever such are necessary.
Insufficient lighting, insufficient room, and uncleanly conditions or bad housekeeping are all important essentials for a well-regulated factory, as accidents are far
more frequent in crowded factories than those which are roomy; especially should
there be plenty of room around machinery notoriously dangerous, and around vats,
pans, etc., containing dangerous material such as is used in chemical and many other
works. The practice of allowing waste material or tools to litter the floor where there
is danger of employees tripping over them or being injured by a fall or being thereby
precipitated into dangerous spots, which otherwise he could have avoided, when floors
must necessarily be slippery, firm footing should be secured to employees by means of
sand or suitable mats.
It is perhaps needless to lay stress on the advisability of an abundant supply of
good air in an industrial plant; not only is this necessary from the standpoint of the
employee's health, but it is essential to the prevention of accidents. Workmen who
labour in an unhealthful atmosphere cannot help thereby suffering a loss of the
alertness, both mental and physical, which would be an invaluable aid to them in
avoiding accidents or lessening its ill results.
The loss is similar, and in only less degree, to that caused by the fatigue due to
overwork, which statistics have proved to be a cause of accidents; every effort should
be made by systems of ventilation as well as by methods of construction to ensure the
presence of plenty of pure air in all places where industrial operations are carried on.
We now come to perhaps the most important thing which an employer can do to
make his workmen as safe as possible—the providing of adequate safeguards for
specific operations and conditions which are dangerous. As all machinery is to a
greater or less degree dangerous, so long as machinery is used, which will be to the
end of time, accidents will occur in connection with it. The employer is the custodian
of the person of his employ during such time as the latter is engaged in his service,
and it is the employer's duty to protect his employees from injury as far as possible
and by all reasonable means. It must be taken for granted that the employee will
become careless at times. No one is infallible. But the number of accidents due to
carelessness can be very materially diminished if the machinery and surroundings are
made safe.
The best time to provide safeguards for a machine is while the machine is being
manufactured or built, and in this regard, we are pleased to note, with the increasing
appreciation of the need for safeguarding operators, many machine-builders have
incorporated safety devices as integral parts of their products.    There is an ever- J 150 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
increasing trend in this direction. Where machinery is not so guarded, it falls upon
the user to make it safe by patented devices or by home-made safeguards; the case
is rare where some home-made guard cannot be devised which will be thoroughly
effective. The important thing is, does the protector protect? If it does, the requirement is filled.
For these reasons there can be no relaxation of safety precautions. Instead,
there should be an increase in safety measures—better education of all workers on this
important subject and an increase in the use of adequate safeguards on machines.
The furnishing of safeguards will not assure the prevention of accidents unless the
employees co-operate fully, willingly, or otherwise in the effort to protect them.
Employees should feel that whatever is done in the way of providing safeguards is
designed for their benefit, and they should not be permitted to remove or wilfully
destroy them, nor should they consider that the provision of safeguards for machines
which they have been accustomed to operate unguarded is a reflection on their ability
or skill, or is an interference with their work.
A great number of safeguards must necessarily be removed for the purposes of
adjusting, cleaning, or oiling, and it should be insisted that they be replaced immediately after the completion of such work. If a safeguard is provided for a dangerous
machine and work is then done without the safeguard in place, there might just as
well be no safeguard. It is not sufficient to provide guards. Their proper use must
be enforced, and all workers should be educated in matters relating to industrial safety.
New workmen should be taught how to do this work efficiently and safely, and all
workmen should be kept constantly aware of the accident-prevention regulations applicable to their particular work. Instructing workmen how to do their work safely is
part of the work of the superintendent, supervisor, foreman, or other person in charge
of each group of workmen; by virtue of their knowledge, their position as leaders, and
their close contact with their workmen, they can give each workman direct instruction
and supervision in everyday safety practice that apply to individual tools, machines,
and processes, and should be responsible by the employer for the enforcement of the
regulations and the elimination of dangerous practice.
The person in charge of work should be chosen with regard to his ability to
organize, supervise, and educate his workmen in the principles of safety, and individual
workmen should be assigned to jobs to which they are physically and mentally suited.
By following a policy of rigid adherence to safety rules and safe practices, you will
reduce the number of accidents, which means a reduction in cost of compensation,
medical aid, material, and damaged equipment.
The development of a safety consciousness amongst workmen is one of the most
important factors in accident-prevention in employment, in which an accident-
prevention committee is required, and the members of that committee should be given
every encouragement to foster safety in industry.
As few accidents result from faulty equipment, greater stress should be placed on
safe working methods and the inculcation of safe working practices. Successful
accident-prevention work in industry depends on the interest created in safety by the
supervising personnel.
Information on safety matters can be imparted effectively to workmen, and this is
important if maximum effectiveness is to be secured, by safety-signs, inserts in pay-roll
envelopes, articles in plant publications, short addresses, and greater use of the
bulletin-board, and by using visual aid in promoting safety education by the use of
moving pictures and slide films.
" Seeing is believing ": to see something makes a much more direct impression
than to hear about it or to read about it; if the two senses " seeing " and " hearing "
are used to supplement each other, greater attention and understanding are secured. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 151
The use of moving pictures and sound slide films for the imparting of knowledge and
instructing is to show safe and proper methods of procedure in various industries and
occupations, adequate measures for safeguarding machinery, and in general to impart
knowledge of the principles governing safe methods of work.
Facts and figures, including information as to the causes of the accidents in any
plant, are useful in bringing home to workmen how accidents occur, and how they can
be avoided.
An interested management, co-operating with a live accident-prevention committee
or with the persons charged with accident-prevention matters in the plant, can do much
to stimulate constant vigilance on the part of every workman.
The Inspectors of the Factories Inspection Branch, Department of Labour, who
inspect plants from time to time, should be regarded as friendly advisers, endeavouring
to assist employers and workmen in curtailing the needless human suffering and waste
resulting from industrial accidents.
LIGHTING FOR SAFETY.
Industrial operations are now performed at closer tolerance than ever before,
imposing a greater visual task upon the eyes, with the result that much more illumination is necessary for a job if good quality and quantity is to be safely achieved.
Blindfold even the most skilled mechanic and he is practically helpless. Any piece
of work he attempts to do will doubtless be spoiled, and furthermore he may injure
himself or some other worker.
Workers in poorly lighted factories are, in effect, practically blindfolded. Many
manufacturers who supply their employees with the best of tools and equipment fail
to consider the importance of the worker's eyes and the handicap of poor lighting.
The efficiency of the worker determines the efficiency of the machine, and adequate
illumination is an essential factor both in high operating efficiency and preventing
accidents.
Eye-strain, ease and speed of vision are important, and poor illumination influences
production more than illness.
Good lighting not only increases production efficiency and decreases the hazard of
accidents, but also has a great deal to do with the worker's health, comfort, and
happiness.
There are definite factors of health to be considered in the problem of illumination.
Too little light or too much light both lead to eye-strain and fatigue. Many chronic
headaches may be due to working under poor lighting conditions. The relation of
poor illumination to fatigue and ill-health is best appreciated by analysing strain and
initiative caused by work under glare or insufficient light.
The cost of poor lighting is significant too. It appears in the form of slowed
production, excessive spoilage, poor and uncertain inspections, and an increased
accident-frequency. Adequate daylight illumination properly applied is the ideal light.
Diagonal light from above is generally better than from side windows only. Skylights
and monitor windows should be provided whenever possible. Saw-tooth roofs with
window areas facing the north are usually less glaring than flat sklights if processes
are arranged so the workers do not face window area. Large window areas equipped,
where necessary, with awnings, window shades or blinds, and diffusive or reflective
glass, when not in direct line of vision, together with light-coloured interiors, are
desirable in every work-place.
Artificial light is required in factories and shops about 20 to 50 per cent, of the
total working-hours, not including overtime or night-work. When night-work is
carried on, the artificial lighting problem must receive added consideration, and with
the many new improvements and developments in illumination, it is now possible to J 152 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
obtain satisfactory lighting in any industry with equipment that is economical, reliable,
and safe.
The basic requirements are adequate illumination for every man in the shop, with
lighting equipment selected and installed to avoid eye-strain, with lights placed to
avoid sharp shadows on important parts of work, and lamps equipped with reflecting
and diffusing devices to soften shadows and avoid glare. An installation giving a
general distribution of illumination throughout the area wherever possible thereby
avoids the use of individual lights, except where the severity of the visual task dictates
their use.
Industrial lights must fit the particular job; fixtures installed here and there by
maintenance-men without knowledge of illumination factors may defeat their own
purpose by producing glare or sharp contrasting zones. The evenness of illumination
from an overhead system is governed almost entirely by the relation of the spacing
between units to their height above the floor. The location of outlets determines how
uniformly the light will be distributed over an area. Laying out of outlets should
be governed by the arrangements of columns, beams, and other construction details,
always keeping within the limits of spacing as dictated by the ceiling-height or height
at which the lamps may be mounted.
Since the walls and ceilings receive a great amount of light from reflectors, it is
important that these surfaces be finished in a light flat colour, so that the illumination
is diffused and reflected where it will reach the working area in the shop.
Dark colours, such as dark green, reds, or oak shades, absorb a large percentage
of light. Where such finishes exist, faulty designing of lighting system is frequently
and unjustly blamed for insufficient illumination. To get most of the useful light from
a system, the surface above eye-level should be covered with a good flat white paint.
One should avoid the use of high glosses or enamels, as they produce glare and
eye-strain.
To renew the painted surface, the walls should be washed with a sponge, using
plenty of cold water and soft soap; starting at the top and working downward, the
surface should be washed evenly and thoroughly to avoid streaking. This also applies
to windows and skylights in factories and shops, as these in time become covered with
dirt and dust, and the natural light is often decreased below the level needed for safety
and efficiency. Thus regular window-cleaning should be a part of the routine of every
establishment.
FACTORY CONDITIONS.
Outstanding progress has been made during the past year in providing many fine
factory buildings to house some of the industries of this Province. The modern trend
developed in these new factories is a credit to management, from not only a production
standpoint, but a milestone has been reached in providing excellent working conditions
for the employees.
Some of the features that constitute definite improvement in modern factory
design are worth noting. You find a flood of natural light, and sunshine at times,
pouring through ample, well-placed windows. Between this and improved ventilation,
which is also receiving scientific attention in modern factories' architecture, an outside
atmosphere is being introduced into the working area of factories.
It is to be noted that the washing facilities for workmen are also showing marked
improvement in design. Household wash-basins are being replaced with modern industrial spray trough-basins. Consequently employees need not wait in line for a wash
before lunch and before leaving the plant in the afternoon. Where large crews are
employed, necessary speed-up has long last been made possible by practical designing
of the factory. Time will no doubt see these and many other new features that could
be mentioned introduced into our factories.   But in the meantime if continued progress REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 153
is made in introducing the methods already available for ventilation, sanitation, heating, and catering in more plants, better working conditions will abound for the benefit
of all concerned.
EMPLOYEES' WELFARE.
As industries are very often located a considerable distance from the homes of
workmen, and as shorter lunch-hour periods are becoming more prevalent, the lunch-
carrying container is much in evidence. Not long ago it was not unusual to see the
workmen eating their lunch beside the machines they operated and in an environment
anything but appealing. The progressive employer of to-day has, at considerable
expense, constructed dining-rooms for both male and female employees, where hot
meals are served at a nominal charge for those who desire them. The worker who
brings his or her lunch is privileged to use the dining-room and consume the homemade lunch to the accompaniment of music or news broadcasts.
Morning and afternoon rest periods throughout many industries have now become
the general practice.
The Factories Inspection Branch of the Department of Labour has, over the years,
been instrumental in securing improved conditions for the employees, and we note
with pleasure, between inspection visits, each succeeding year has witnessed voluntary
(employer) improvement in connection with their welfare activities, as it is now
generally recognized that good working conditions increase efficiency and do much to
improve employer and employee relations.
PERSONAL HYGIENE AND SANITATION.
Wash-room Sanitation.
Adequate sanitary facilities are a primary requisite for all industrial establishments and also for all types of buildings where people work or live for any length of
time. These facilities help maintain high health standards and may counteract to a
large degree the unhealthful or hazardous working conditions to which personnel may
be exposed.
Equally important is the lift to morale produced by this demonstrated awareness
of management responsibility for the welfare of the employees. This Department is
vitally concerned with those facilities which should be provided for the workers during
their non-productive time spent at the place of employment; it includes not only those
items necessary for biological or sanitary reasons, such as toilets and lavatory devices,
but also those facilities which add to the comfort and convenience of workers which
are deemed essential by the nature of the occupation, such as lockers and shower-room
equipment. It should be noted that persons exposed to toxic, caustic, or explosive
materials should be supplied with double lockers, and that in addition to the above
group, persons exposed to heat should have adequate shower facilities. If, however,
wash-, locker-, and shower-room facilities are not maintained in a clean attractive
manner, employees will be discouraged from taking advantage of them, and the very
purpose of the installation will have been defeated. Equipment and supplies for the
maintenance of these areas should also attract the attention of progressive management.
Plant and Building Maintenance.
Unclean and insanitary conditions in any part of a building are much more serious
than being simply disagreeable. Wash and toilet rooms offer an excellent opportunity
for the spread of infectious diseases among personnel. Ordinary dust also contains an
abundance of germs and can aggravate pulmonary diseases.
Health and morale maintenance are not the only considerations which demand good
building maintenance. Dust and grime constitute a serious fire-hazard, especially in
the presence of electrical machinery.    In hazardous locations the mere presence of a J 154 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
dangerous atmosphere may be the cause of an explosion. Plant-maintenance materials
are not adequate measures alone for the control of explosive dusts, but neither should
the necessity for using these materials be overlooked in providing safe protection.
Aside from the deteriorating effects of dust in machinery, the psychological factor
involved in plant cleanliness must not be disregarded. Clean surroundings encourage
similar good housekeeping in the use of tools and equipment and care in the actual
working operation.
On the negative side, neglect of thorough cleaning may lead to the employees also
disregarding their responsibilities, resulting in a loss of production and increase in the
accident-rate.
Floor-maintenance materials and equipment are used for the preservation of sound,
clean, and safe underfoot conditions.
The advantages of scientific and thorough maintenance are reflected in increased
efficiency, economy, production, and serviceableness of the plant or building. No less
important factors are those concerned with personal and general safety.
Most maintenance equipment, such as brooms, brushes, mop, sweeping or maintenance machine, cleaner, resurfacer, sealer, etc., is intended as a means of keeping floor
surfaces clean. They thereby contribute to the physical well-being of personnel by
eliminating breeding-places for germs and vermin by removing unhealthful or nuisance
dusts, by providing a lighter working area, and by removing harmful materials. Of
still greater importance is the reduction in accidents, which the use of these materials
promotes. Floor maintenance prevents the falls caused by broken, worn, slippery, wet,
or oily surfaces. It eliminates the possibility of bodily injury from contact with sharp
or caustic materials hidden in dust, dirt, or litter, and it reduces the hazard of truck-
loaded materials being jarred loose by uneven flooring surfaces. The general maintenance equipment, and also the specialized materials like oil absorbents and conductive
coatings, contributes to the reduction of fire-hazards by removing unnecessary inflammable substances or the means of igniting necessary inflammable materials. Finally,
lane-marking machines promote safety by clearly defining the working, storage, and
traffic areas.
CHILD EMPLOYMENT.
War-time conditions that may have shown a trend toward the development of child
employment have now subsided, it would appear, to a negligible number of authorized
children working during the year. Before a child's employment in a factory is authorized, the conditions of employment are investigated in order that the child's safety and
health will not be endangered. In the cases investigated during 1947, it has been
gratifying to note the genuine interest taken by employers to ensure that young
applicants are well placed, and their safety has, in all cases dealt with, been given
primary importance by this Department. It is not a matter of the actual job being
safe, but ensuring that the operation as a whole does not present any hazards that may
affect the child's safety or health.
As our " Public Schools Act " requires boys and girls to remain at school until they
become 15 years of age, we work in close co-operation with the educational authorities
in checking applications for employment of children, especially when they are seeking
jobs while school is in session. Some are usually for a few hours after school and on
Saturday, although the odd request is received for full-time work. It is in the latter
case that a most searching inquiry is made. In some very few instances, where it is
deemed by the school officials that the child would be better off at work than at school,
employment permits have been issued. When parents and children are interviewed,
every effort is made to induce them to have the boy or girl carry on with his or her
education to, or beyond, the compulsory school age. Fortunately, most parents realize
the advantage of giving their children this important start in life. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 155
Employers appear in no way prone to take advantage of child labour, but take
considerable pains to fully acquaint the applicant with his or her assignment by personal interest and instruction. This, to a good degree, ensures not only the likelihood
of building up the requisites of good workmanship, but also goes a long way in providing the child with the prospects of longer service, thereby decreasing the possibility
of becoming an industrial casualty at a young age.
We desire to record our appreciation of the generous co-operation extended by
industry in general, parents and children, the school authorities, the Unemployment
Insurance Commission, the interested public, and all those who have assisted in the
enforcement of an Act to control the employment of children.
INDUSTRIAL HOME-WORK.
Since legislation was drawn up covering home-work pertaining to industry, generally employer and home-worker make application to our Department for authorization
before engaging in this. In addition to making yearly reinspections in connection
with renewal applications (employer and home-work permits expire each calendar
year), we also make additional inspections and investigations as requests are received.
In most cases when making a home investigation and inspection, we are questioned
as to the necessity of our regulations. We explain that if this work were permitted
without approval and permission, there would be no control over hours, wages, conditions, etc. In this way the home-worker could easily be exploited, unfair business
competition would result, and the public would not have the same protection as if an
article were made in our modern up-to-date factories where healthy working conditions
are known to prevail. When the hourly factory wage was recently increased, the home-
workers received the benefit accordingly. In order to be sure, we contacted each
employer and received definite assurance of this.
During the year 1947, as materials became more plentiful for drapery and loose-
cover work, it became increasingly difficult for employers to procure skilled operators,
and we then received several requests to employ home-workers. In view of this shortage, which was general, a number of permits were issued, after thorough investigation,
to women who had previously done this work in factories, and who for some special
reason could not leave their homes. One woman who could not leave her home, and
to whom we issued a permit, had learned this work when well along in years and was
able to augment the small income of the family in this manner.
We sometimes receive a request for permission to have work performed in a home
which cannot very well be done in the factory, such as some types of hand-sewing,
painting, etc. In this connection we have issued several permits, and a young artist
to whom we issued a permit to paint on china, glassware, etc., managed to further her
musical career through her earnings.
One woman who could not leave the home for a special reason was issued a permit
to carry on until such time as arrangements could be made whereby she might return
to work. We understand that she has now returned to the factory, and, strange to
say, it is the factory which was developed by reason of our refusal several years ago
to issue an employer's permit together with our suggestion that the work be performed
in a factory. This is now one of the largest and most up-to-date of its kind in the
Province, and the brand name has become famous all over America.
In practically every instance during the past year, investigation revealed the home
to be clean, bright, and airy, and the worker a healthy person. There is usually a
particular room in the home set aside for this work, fitted up with the necessary equipment, etc.
The fullest co-operation is always extended by employer and home-worker, and the
necessary information gladly given. J 156 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
During the year 1947 seven employer and twenty-two home-worker permits were
issued.
ELEVATORS.
Inspection of Freight and Passenger Elevators.
There is probably no vehicle of conveyance so indispensable as the elevator. In
high public buildings and large mercantile and manufacturing establishments it may
be considered an absolute necessity for the transportation of both passengers and
freight. An elevator, briefly defined, is a hoisting and lowering mechanism, equipped
with a car or platform which moves in guides in a substantially vertical direction.
The "Factories Act" being entitled "An Act for the Protection of Persons employed
in Factories," the titular expression would indicate that its provisions extend only to
persons employed in and around factories. I do not think the public, generally, realize
that certain sections are embodied therein delegating to the Department of Labour,
through the Factories Inspection Branch, the responsibility of subjecting all passenger-
and freight-elevator equipment to a very rigid inspection in order to safeguard the
many thousands of persons using this form of conveyance daily, and the enormous
amount of freight which must be moved from one level to another.
As the rapid skyward growth continues, the importance of the elevator in comparison with other features of the building equipment will become even more marked.
Many thousands of persons use elevators every day, and they have a right to assume
that all necessary provisions have been made for ensuring safety.
Under proper conditions an elevator is safe and reliable for the transfer of freight
and passengers, and it does its work with dispatch and smoothness. Serious accidents
are frequent, however; some of these result from breakage of defective parts, some
from poor or inadequate equipment, some from negligence in the supervision and
operation, and some from carelessness on the part of those who ride or who handle the
material that is transported. The majority of these accidents may be avoided by the
exercising of a reasonable amount of care by the builder, the owner, and the public, as
many of those who own and operate elevators, as well as the persons who use them,
show a noticeable lack of attention to the things that tend to ensure safety.
Once installed, an elevator becomes a fixed feature of the building, and remains in
service for a long term of years, usually until the building itself is removed. When a
poorly arranged installation has to be considered, much can be accomplished by eliminating its hazardous features and improving the existing appliances before approval is
granted, as before new freight elevators, passenger elevators, escalators, or dumbwaiters are installed, or extensive alterations are made to present installations, plans
and detailed information shall be submitted to the Chief Inspector of Factories. The
plan shall show the following:—
(1) Street address of building where elevator is to be installed.
(2) Type of elevator.
(3) Speed, both " rated " and " maximum."
(4) Capacity.
(5) Size of car platform.
(6) Distance between edge of car platform and landing threshold.
(7) Type and manufacture of car-holding safety device.
(8) Type and manufacture of governor.
(9) Rise of elevator in feet and number of landings or floors.
(10) Distance from top landing to under-side of overhead structure.
(11) Size and height of pent-house.
(12) Size and weight per foot of overhead beams.
(13) Distance between supports of overhead beams. (14) Diameter of sheaves and drums.
(15) Number, size, and material of cables.
(16) Method of roping.
(17) Depth of pit.
(18) Type of bumper.
From this information, specifications are made and placed on file for further reference pending final inspection when installation is complete, if approved. When contemplating the erection of a new building, the elevator problem should be considered at
the very outset, even before the first plans are drawn, as it is obviously far more
satisfactory and economical to provide suitable standard parts when new equipment is
being arranged for. We would strongly urge that owners and architects give careful
attention to the subject of security and safety before installing the elevator.
The number of persons that will probably have to be served should be estimated
on a liberal basis, and the elevator capacity determined with a view of taking care of
the full traffic, without undue crowding, and without having to run the elevator at a
higher speed than good practice would suggest. The possibility of increasing the
height of the building at some future time should also be considered, and provisions
should be made in advance for any reasonable change of this kind. It is not easy, as
a rule, to put additional elevators in a building that was not designed or constructed
with reference to such additions; experience has shown that elevators of moderate
speed, sufficient in number to take care of the traffic without crowding, afford the best
solution of the problem, and that accidents are more likely to occur when elevators are
run too fast.
It is only by avoiding errors and defects (that have proved disastrous in the past)
that the elevator equipment of the future can be ultimately perfected, and in this connection we wish to state that the adoption of high-grade machinery and shaft-way
construction is advisable from every point of view. It is, of course, safer, and it will
also result in a saving ultimately, because of the reduced cost of maintenance and
repairs.
While passenger-elevators are operated by licensed operators, required to first pass
a written examination as to their competency, the manner of performing certain operations in connection with the elevator depends to a large extent upon the human element,
such as to closing the hoist-way doors and car-gates. Before the licence is issued, we
endeavour to make the candidate realize the responsibility of the position and the
hazards in connection with the operation of elevators. In order to prevent accidents
attributable to many of the unsafe practices which in past years proved a prolific cause
of persons receiving major and fatal injuries, mechanical devices in the form of interlocking equipment have now been installed on all hoist-way doors and car-gates of
passenger-cars and the hoist-way door or gates of freight-elevators, in compliance with
rules and regulations issued under Order in Council, February, 1935.
This mechanical device has eliminated at least 80 per cent, of the causes of elevator
accidents, and will continue to function as an effective accident-preventive device, as it
prevents the operator from moving the car unless the hoist-way doors or gates are
closed and in the locked position; if properly maintained and not purposely rendered
inoperative, this device has contributed largely to making vertical transportation one
of the safest forms of travel.
Each succeeding year, additional modern passenger- and freight-elevator equipment is being installed throughout the Province. This is almost exclusively of the
traction type, which has safety features not possessed by the drum-type machine which
they replace.
All elevator installations are required to comply with the standards as specified
in the regulations governing installation, operation, and maintenance of freight and J 158 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
passenger elevators in this Province. It is one of the responsibilities of this Department to periodically inspect this equipment in the interest of the safety of the large
number of persons using this form of conveyance. While mechanical safety devices
are provided in connection with the installation of any elevator, they are effective only
if properly maintained. Inspections reveal at times that very important safety devices
have been deliberately rendered ineffective by persons with limited knowledge as to
the importance of this safety equipment. However, freedom from accidents in connection with both old and new equipment depends largely on proper maintenance and
operation after installation. Inspections at regular intervals have long been recognized
as essential to safe operation, and this service is valuable, not only in connection with
accident-prevention, but also in providing economy of operation.
During the year under review we have, because of the installation of additional
passenger-elevator safety provisions, willingly installed by the agent or owners of the
building, been able to assist disabled veterans in obtaining employment as licensed
elevator operators.
We are pleased to report that no fatal or serious injuries were received by any
person while being transported on passenger or freight elevators during the year.
Elevator Operators' Licences.
During the year 1,136 renewal operators' licences were issued and 680 temporary
and 539 permanent licences.
New Elevator Installations.
During the year forty-six plans and specifications relating to the installation of
modern elevator equipment were approved.
Elevator Inspections.
During the year 1,406 inspections and reinspections of freight and passenger
elevators were made.
CONCLUSION.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all officials and employees connected
with industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
R. D. LEMMAX,
Chief Inspector of Factories. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947.
J 159
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE APPRENTICESHIP
BRANCH, 1947.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
J. A. Ward Bell, Chairman.
James Thomson.
J. F. Keen.
H. Douglas.
Administrative Officials of the Branch.
Hamilton Crisford Director of Apprenticeship.
Arthur H. Dugdale Assistant Director.
Mr. James Thomson,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit annual report on the development of apprenticeship in
British Columbia for the calendar year 1947.
On December 31st, 1947, the standing and distribution of apprentices in the various
trades and occupations was as follows:—
Trade or Occupation.
Year of Apprenticeship
BEING served.
Total
Number
First.
Second.
Third.
Fourth.
Fifth.
Apprentices.
69
60
6
10
2
113
2
27
2
30
2
13
1
52
1
4
3
6
2
88
11
18
20
26
1
4
4
105
11
9
30
7
132
1
9
41
14
27
17
2
73
1
5
2
25
8
9
18
24
49
17
46
3
6
4
8
35
5
8
25
5
41
12
56
12
2
1
3
8
4
10
28
26
2
1
4
1
16
11
4
14
13
1
4
4
35
15
6
1
2
9
7
5
13
3
2
16
3
88
2
8
1
12
13
225
71
31
52
9
284
1
16
138
17
57
2
49
7
304
2
36
13
35
23
114
33
60
114
124
8
g
14
13
577
703
289
165
143
1,877 J 160 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The occupational distribution of those who have successfully completed their
apprenticeship under our present form of regulation stood at the end of the year
approximately as follows:—
Number fully
Occupation covered. trained to Date.
Automobile maintenance   192
Boiler-makers    49
Barbers    143
Carpenters     164
Electricians   132
Hairdressers    169
Machinists and fitters   373
Moulders    89
Pharmacists   127
Plumbers   86
Sheet-metal workers   85
Miscellaneous   trades  329
1,938
Now that the training of ex-service men under apprenticeship contract is coming
to an end and a new system of vocational schools has been approved under which selected
lads will obtain pre-apprenticeship training, it will be possible to pay a great deal more
attention to trade standards and tests, and it is hoped by this method, with the
co-operation of all parties concerned, to raise the standard of competency at the end
of a completed period of apprenticeship. It is also hoped that a more careful selection
can be maintained of those entering the trades, as considerable difficulty has been
encountered in the past in trade training owing to a lack of sufficient basic education.
It is anticipated that a number of vocational schools will be in operation in the
Province in the year 1949 and that these will be adequately equipped to co-operate in
the apprenticeship programme. In this regard and in the general apprenticeship
training programme we are receiving strong support from the various industries
concerned and from organized labour, and it is fully recognized that the shortage in
most trades is the skilled craftsman and that the only way in which these can
be produced in sufficient numbers is in the industries themselves under adequate
apprenticeship training programme.
Hamilton Crisford,
Director of Apprenticeship. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1947. J 161
TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH.
Administrative Offices:  789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Administrative Officers.
3. A. Ward Bell Chief Administrative Officer.
Mrs. Rex Eaton.
Hamilton Crisford Secretary.
Mr. James Thomson,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit annual report of the Trade-schools Regulation Branch for
the calendar year 1947.
The year passed without any major complaint in regard to the operation of registered schools, and all schools have complied with the general regulations under which
they are allowed to operate.
The following is the list of registered schools:—■
Alexander Hamilton Institute, Ltd., 54 Wellington Street West, Toronto, Ont.:
Business training.
Canadian Institute of Science and Technology, Ltd., 219 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont.:
Civil, architectural, and mining engineering; hydraulics, hydraulic machinery,
sanitary engineering, municipal and county engineers' course, building-construction, heating and ventilating, mechanical and electrical engineering,
business and accountants' course, salesmanship, advertising, wireless, television, aeronautical engineering, aeroplane courses; other courses as per
prospectus.
Canadian Writers' Service, 817 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.: short-story
writing.
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, Inc., 3224 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington,
D.C.:   Radio engineering.
Chicago Vocational Training Corporation, Ltd., 12520—102nd Avenue, Edmonton,
Alta.:   Diesel, auto, aero mechanics;   refrigeration, air-conditioning, welding.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian, Limited, 1517 Mountain Street,
Montreal, Que.: Agriculture, air-conditioning, applied art, architecture, aviation engineering, business education, chemistry, civil engineering, domestic
science, electrical engineering, general education, mining and mechanical engineering, navigation, paper-manufacture, plumbing and heating, railroad operation, textile-manufacture;   other courses as per prospectus.
International Accountants S