Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL Report of the Commissioner of Provincial… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1949]

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0340098.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0340098.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0340098-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0340098-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0340098-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0340098-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0340098-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0340098-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0340098-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0340098.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
department of the attorney-general
Reports of the
Commissioner of Provincial Police
for the Year
1947
and
Inspector of Gaols
for the Year ended
March 31st, 1948
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiaemid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1948.  Colonel the Honourable C. A. Banks, C.M.G.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the reports of the Commissioner of
Provincial Police for the year ended December 31st, 1947, and the Inspector of Gaols
for the year ended March 31st, 1948.
G. S. WISMER,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1948. Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1948.
The Honourable the Attorney-General,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to enclose my annual report for the year ended December
31st, 1947, and also report on the Provincial Gaols for the year ended March 31st, 1948.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. SHIRRAS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police. Girls' softball team, Wells.
intense interest on the
these   Burnaby   school-
; Constable C. Estlin of
Columbia Police High-
l, Burnaby, gives a talk
safety," in conjunction
e film on the same sub-
.1 education and lectures
a   long   way   toward
young-  people  safety-
Constable C. A. Cawdell with the boys'
hockey tsam, Wells,  Report of the Commissioner of Provincial Police, 1947.
The Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General for British Columbia,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my annual report for the year ended December
31st, 1947.
STRENGTH AND DISTRIBUTION.
As at midnight December 31st, 1947, the strength of the Force consisted of 17
officers and 413 non-commissioned officers and men.
Statement of Strength as at Midnight, December 31st, 1947.
Headquarters.
"A"
Division.
"B"
Division.
"C"
Division.
"D"
Division.
"E"
Division.
Fort
George
Subdivision.
Peace
River
Subdivision.
Total.
Commissioner	
Deputy Commissioner	
Inspectors	
Sub-Inspectors	
Personnel Officer	
Staff-Sergeants	
Sergeants	
Corporals	
First-class Constables	
Second-class Constables..
Third-class Constables....
Special Constables	
Chief Clerk	
Assistant Chief Clerks....
Senior Clerks	
First-class Clerks	
Second-class Clerks	
Third-class Clerks	
Third-class Skippers	
First-class Engineers	
Second-class Engineers...
• Third-class Engineers	
Radio Supervisor	
Chief Radio Operators....
Senior Radio Operators..
First-class Radio Operators	
Second-class Radio Operators	
Third-class Radio Operators	
Chief Mechanical Supervisor	
Mechanical Supervisors..
Assistant Mechanical
Supervisors	
Mechanics	
Assistant Supervisor,
Finger-print Bureau-
Senior Finger-print
Operators	
Armourer	
Stenographers (female)
Totals	
1
1
19
1
4
4
38
1
18
3
4
36
1
17
46
70
38
4
14
74
1
2
2
16
1
7
1
41
52
27
5
119
17
14
1
1
7
6
1
5
24
23
200
13
91
10
1
1
1
2
6
1
1
1
1
1
4
13
1
1
24
464 O 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ENGAGEMENTS, DISCHARGES, PROMOTIONS.
Engagements    75
Discharges—
By purchase   30
By invaliding      2
By expiration of engagement     1
By transfer to another branch of the Government service   3
By superannuation     3
Unsuitable      1
— 40
Promotions—
Commissioner      1
Deputy Commissioner     1
Inspectors      1
Sub-Inspectors      6
Staff-Sergeants      1
Detective-Sergeants      1
Sergeants      7
Corporals       4
Detective-Constables     1
Constables, First-class   20
Constables, Second-class  15
The gross strength of the Force increased by fifteen over 1946. Ex-service personnel were at all times given preference, providing they met with the qualifications of
enlistment.
COMMENDATIONS AND AWARDS.
Thirty-seven members of the Provincial Police were commended in General Orders
for outstanding work and devotion to duty. Cash awards from the Police Reward
Fund were given in four instances for exceptional performance of duty.
DISCIPLINE.
The conduct of the Force as a whole was very satisfactory. However, it was
necessary to discipline eight members by way of a reprimand. In nine other instances
two were fined, three punished by reduction in seniority, and four assessed damages
for careless operation of Departmental vehicles.
POLICING OF MUNICIPALITIES.
The Provincial Police continues to police under agreement forty-one municipalities,
with supervision over four areas—Coldstream, Glenmore, Greenwood, and Slocan.
During the course of the year, municipal contracts were reviewed. New contracts
to meet the rising cost of policing will take effect from the beginning of 1948.
Seven municipalities requested and received extra police personnel.
POLICE TRAINING-SCHOOL.
Sub-Inspector C. Ledoux, officer in charge of police training, reports:—
" Due to the man-power situation and consequent difficulties recruiting suitable
personnel, we were unable to operate the training-school as such during the entire
period under review.
" Examinations for promotion to the rank of sergeant were held November 18th,
1947, when ten eligible corporals sat for the examination.    Four papers were written REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947. 0 7
on Federal and Provincial Statutes, Criminal Code, Criminal Investigation, and general
knowledge and English.   The examinations continued until November 21st, and included
an oral examination before a board of officers.    Of the ten candidates, five were
successful in attaining qualifying marks.
" December 8th to 11th a further examination was held for promotion to the rank
of corporal.   Twelve constables sat for this examination.   The four papers included
Provincial and Dominion Statutes, Criminal Investigation, and general knowledge in
police duties.    Oral examinations took place before a board of officers.    Six candidates
were successful."
MARKSMANSHIP.
The usual annual marksmanship course was conducted during the year throughout
the Force, some 191 members qualifying for recognition in the various grades.
Constable R. Walker, Sumas Detachment, was this year's winner in the Master Class,
Constable H. J. Parsley in the Expert Class, and Radio Operator H. C. Patrick in the
Marksman Class.
Constable J. H. Armstrong, Abbotsford, was the winner of the Tyros. The rose-
bowl donated by Lieutenant-Colonel Sandys-Wunsch to encourage competition on Vancouver Island was won by Constable J. M. Ehly, Courtenay.
Competition with other police forces in the Province, and also with visiting American police officers, was more noticeable this year than in previous years.
The following tables of comparison show the relative efficiency of the Force in
this year's course:— Per cent.
Fort George Subdivision  100.00
" D " Division      67.74
Peace River Subdivision     62.50
Headquarters       61.11
" B " Division      50.75
"A" Division      40.54
" C " Division      40.30
" E " Division      39.18
ACCOUNTS BRANCH AND QUARTERMASTER'S STORES.
Inspector D. D. Moses, officer in charge, reports:—
" The report for the calendar year 1947 on Police and Quartermaster's Stores
Accounts show 19,101 expense vouchers, totalling $1,559,571.14, were checked, recorded,
and passed through the Accounts Branch.
" The Quartermaster's Stores received and filled 1,986 requisitions. A serious
shortage of uniform and equipment prevented the regular periodic issue to members
of the Force. Despite this situation, however, the men presented a neat and well-kept
appearance due, in a large measure, to their own efforts, renovating and maintaining
in good repair the well-worn unforms."
TRAFFIC BRANCH.
Sergeant J. G. M. Lock, in his second report on this important Branch, states:-—
" Highway-patrol mileage increased from 165,942 miles in 1946 to 189,096 miles in
1947—a  14-per-cent.  rise.     A total  of 625  accidents were  investigated this year,
in comparison to 479 accidents in 1946—an increase of 30 per cent.    Check-up slips
resulted in revenue of $11,203.86—an increase of 1.5 per cent."
Highway Patrol, 1947.
Total mileage .  189,096
Total check-ups ....  127,245
Accidents investigated  625 O 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Check-ups according to Divisions.
"A"
Division.
"B"
Division.
"C"
Division.
"E"
Division.
Total.
3,341
47
245
1,395
3,340
715
84
3,419
700
47
2,467
1,073
3,341
870
1,066
1,167
5,322
93
1,029
1,673
7,322
496
147
7,325
1,763
1,640
2,378
1,108
7,181
4,530
1,064
746
2,834
47
543
1,780
4,550
1,447
96
5,417
3,502
871
967
644
2,396
712
1,375
16
5,725
2
918
1,280
7,105
95
298
6,529
809
51
522
881
5,453
2,073
595
578
17 222
Motor-vehicle salesmen's licences	
189
2,735
6,128
22,317
2,753
625
22,690
6,774
2,609
6,334
3,706
18,371
8,185
4,100
" Motor Carrier Act " and regulations ,
2,507
Totals	
23,317
43,817
27,197
32,914
127,245
Convictions.
Convictions.
Fines.
Costs.
430
138
79
103
71
39
11
5
$3,496.00
1,157.50
692.50
2,962.50
370.00
294.00
830.00
623.00
$733.65
193.60
141.50
234.00
182.50
51.25
13.00
27.00
876
$10,425.50
$1,576.40
Revenue Result of Check-ups.
Revenue collected as a result of check-ups under the
Motor Carrier Act" amounted to $11,203.86.
Motor-vehicle Act " and the REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947.
0 9
TRANSPORT BRANCH.
(Chief Mechanical Supervisor J. F. McNaught.)
The following report pertaining to British Columbia Provincial Police transportation for the calendar year 1947 is submitted:—
Mileage.
Railway.
Cars.
Launch.
Horse.
Foot.
Miscellaneous.f
Total.
Police.
Other.
Police.
Other.
13,782
5,575
131,186
113,520
9,174
11,175
7,927
18,029
86,010
409,684
425,219
383,168
106,592
71,761
84,268
863.124
10,430
14,801
5,947
13,818
7,923
6,796
1,673
9,491
18,419
67,939
7,685
9,137
49.548
58.398
37,834
65,781
128,641
"A" Division	
" B " Division	
" C " Division	
" D " Division	
21,374
1,038
116
16,090
1,214
11,287
434
10
1,770
293
25
2,006
28
68
1,702
1,518
113,728
78,190
99,397
27,934
22.988
12,097
71,476
644,416
649,767
620,868
220,549
172.625
89
80
143,913
" E " Division	
5,531
1,035,518
Totals	
310.3S8   1  2.429.826
70,879
45,363
15,825
3,485
425,810
314,741
3,616,297
* Including Criminal Investigation Branch.
t Steamship, public conveyances, air, dog, etc.
Comparative Mileage, 1946 and 1947.
1946.
1947.
More.
Less.
Railways	
Cars—
Police	
Other	
Launches—■
Police	
Other	
Horse	
Foot	
Miscellaneous-
Totals
251,696    |       310,368
I
I
2,303,612    |    2,429,826
1,360 70,879
53.285
6,587
4,702
420,261
279,385
45.363
15,825
3,485
425,810
314.741
58,672
126,214
32,519
9,238
5,549
35,356
3,357,888    |    3,616,297
I
267,548*
7,922
1,217
* An increase of 258,409 miles in 1947 over 1946.
Comparative Mileage by Divisions, 1946 and 1947.
1946.
More.
Less.
Headquarters	
"A" Division	
" B " Division	
" C " Division	
" D " Division	
Fort George Subdivision.
Peace River Subdivision.
" E " Division	
Totals	
110,350
639,457
582,254
556,863
219,536
127,800
157,968
963,660
3,357,888
128,641
644,416
649,767
620.868
220,549
172,625
143,913
1,035,518
18,291
4,959
67,513
64,005
1,013
44,825
71,858    |
3,616,297
272,464*
14,055
14,055
* An increase of 258,409 miles in 1947 over 1946. 0 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Comparative Mileage, Police Motor-vehicles, 1946 and 1947.
1946.
1947.
More.
Less.
1947 Additional
Motor-vehicles.
67,594
415,630
383,640
380,384
90,013
57,782
89,665
818.904
86,010
409,684
425,219
383,168
106,592
71,761
84,268
863,124
18,416
1
5,946
NU
41,579
2,784
16,579
13,979
Nil
Nil
2
NU
5,397
Nil
44,220
1
Totals	
2,303,612
2,429,826
137,557*
11,343
t
* An increase of 126,214 miles in 1947 over 1946.
t Plus two jeeps and less two motor-cycles.
Comparative Mileage, Highway Patrol, 1946 and 1947-
1946.
1947.
More.
Less.
38,742
37,463
44,138
41,076
39,520
32,582
48,725
58,460
778
4,881
4,587
17,384
Totals	
161,419
179,287
22,749*
4,881
* An increase of 17,868 miles in 1947 over 1946.
Above mileage included in General Police.
From the foregoing comparative statements it will be seen that the total mileage
travelled in 1947 increased 258,409 miles, of this amount 126,214 miles being accounted
for by Departmental motor-vehicles.
There were 162 pieces of equipment in operation during 1947, being allotted as
follows:—
Cars.
Motor-cycles.
Jeeps.
Total.
7
25
33
29
11
5
6
38
1
5
2
7
26
33
29
11
5
6
45
Totals	
154
6
2
162
During the year it was found necessary to replace thirty-seven motor-vehicles.
Four additional cars were acquired—one in Headquarters, two in " D " Division to
replace car-hire at Queen Charlotte City and Bella Coola, and in " E " Division an
additional highway-patrol car was put in service at New Westminster. Two jeeps were
also added to the fleet in " E " Division—one at Pattullo Bridge, which replaced two
motor-cycles, and the other at Sechelt Detachment, this latter replacing a police car
which was transferred to Westview Detachment. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947.
O 11
Makes of motor-vehicles on charge to this Department are:—
Ford 	
Chevrolet 	
Dodge	
Plymouth __.
Pontiac	
Mercury ____.
G.M.C	
Chrysler .___.
Buick	
Fargo 	
Monarch _._.
47
39
27
15
14
6
2
1
1
1
1
TotaL
  154
Jeeps       2
Harley-Davidson motor-cycles       6
Total.
162
Mechanical inspections carried out during the calendar year 1947
were as follows :—
Police
Cars.
Game
Cars.
School
Buses.
Public
Carriers.
Total.
50
139
100
73
45
10
30
3
2
30
196
66
51
9
50
20
90
415
189
124
56
407        1          45
353
70
874
Marine Section.
Motor launches and boats operated by the Force are as follows:—
Name. Station.
*P.G.D. 1 Alert Bay.
*P.G.D. 2 Powell River.
*P.M.L. 3 Vancouver.
P.M.L. 6 Ganges.
P.M.L. 7 . Ocean Falls.
P.M.L. 9 Campbell River.
P.M.L. 10 Port Alice.
P.M.L. 11 Kootenay Lake (Kaslo).
P.M.L. 15 Prince Rupert.
P.M.L. 16   . Port Alberni.
*R-8 riverboat McDame Creek.
R-13 rowboat and inboard Cowichan Lake.
R-14 riverboat and outboards (2) Fort St. James.
R-15 rowboat and inboard Atlin.
R-16 rowboat and outboard _ Prince George.
R-17 rowboat and inboard, with trailer Kamloops district.
R-18 lifeboat and inboard Ucluelet.
Outboard motor only Fort St. John.
Outboard motor only Stewart.
Outboard motor only Terrace.
* Dual operation—Police and Game Departments. 0 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
During the year P.M.L. 8, Port Alberni; R-3 rowboat and outboard, Sicamous;
R-7 canoe at Squamish; R-10 rowboat and inboard, Ucluelet; and R-12 rowboat and
outboard, Squamish, were sold as unfit for further police service. P.M.L. 8 was
replaced by the P.M.L. 16 at Port Alberni and R-10 by R-18 lifeboat and inboard at
Ucluelet.
The reconversion of the P.M.L. 16 was completed, and the vessel commissioned in
June, 1947. It was necessary during the alterations to comply with the Dominion
Steamship Regulations, which entailed considerable expenditure in overhauling the
main engine and equipping the vessel with necessary life-saving equipment. It is now
classed as a No. 2 vessel and subject to annual inspection by the Dominion Steamship
Inspector's Department.
An appropriation was granted in the 1947-48 vote for the replacing of P.M.L. 7
at Ocean Falls, but a start on the plans was not made until November 5th, 1947, and,
due to various delays, final plans and specifications were not approved until the end
of the year.
Inspections were made by Assistant Mechanical Supervisor Scales of the P.M.L. 11
at Kootenay Lake, and by Assistant Mechanical Supervisor Fiander of the small boats
and motors in " C " and " D " Divisions and Fort George Subdivision. During the
year the Chief Mechanical Supervisor inspected and supervised all overhauls of Coast
craft, both of the Police and Game Departments, as well as the reconversion of the
P.M.L. 16, which took five months to complete.
POLICE RADIO.
(Radio Supervisor W. Conlan.)
In the twelve months past the police radio network handled well over one million
words.    This was the largest volume handled since the inception of the Radio Branch.
With the close co-operation of the Motor-vehicle Branch, a system was developed
which enables the police radio to transmit complete data on a motor-vehicle to any
part of the Province within two minutes.
The hook-up with the Washington State Patrol which was put into effect last
year now enables us to establish a link with practically every State in the Union.
This has proved to be most valuable.
A bank of eight fixed-frequency receivers were installed at the Headquarters
station in Victoria, and there are now a total of 94 tubes in operation at this station.
A total of over 1,800 tubes are in operation throughout the network daily.
During the latter part of 1947 a start was made on the installation of frequency
modulated mobile equipment, with stations at Victoria and Burnaby and two cars at
each point. This will be extended in 1948 to cover the Fraser Valley and lower part of
Vancouver Island.
ASSISTANCE TO FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.
Our friendly associations with the many departments of the Federal Government
have steadily increased. Some of these departments and their branches are Customs
and Excise, Immigration, Transport, Pensions, Health and Welfare, Indian Affairs,
Mines and Resources, Revenue, Wartime Prices and Trade Board, War Assets Corporation, National Defence, Veterans' Affairs, Radio Branch, etc. Many expressions of
appreciation have been received from the above-named departments for the work
accomplished on their behalf.
ASSISTANCE TO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.
"A" Division, Vancouver Island (Inspector R. Owens).—" Close co-operation exists
between the police and all other departments. In particular, I would mention the
Safety Branch of the Department of Labour and also the Workmen's Compensation REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947. O 13
Board; this deals mostly with industrial accidents in our division. Notwithstanding
that the Motor-vehicle Branch was separated from the Provincial Police in 1945, a large
number of our detachments still carry on regular licence-issuance work and considerable revenue is taken in during the year."
"B" Division, South-eastern British Columbia (Sub-Inspector R. S. Nelson).'—
" The Provincial Fire Marshal, Inspector of Municipalities, Motor-vehicle Branch, and
Recorder of Brands were greatly assisted during the year. A total of 138 reports on
fires to buildings and automobiles were made and forwarded to the Fire Marshal at
Vancouver. All fires of suspected incendiary origin were carefully and thoroughly
investigated, and when considered necessary, assistance from the Fire Marshal's office
was requested."
"C" Division, Central British Columbia (Inspector H. H. Mansell).—"Assistance
has been rendered to all Provincial departments when called upon to do so. The most
cordial relations exist between members of this Force and officials of other departments."
" D " Division, Northern British Columbia (Sub-Inspector F. B. Woods-Johnson).—
"Assistance has been rendered to the Department of Health and Welfare, Social Welfare
Branch, Old-age Pensions Department, Superintendent of Child Welfare, Department
of Finance, Official Administrators, Mental Hospital, Inspector of Municipalities,
Superintendent of Motor-vehicles, Game Commission, and others."
"E" Division, Lower Mainland (Inspector C. Clark).—"During the year under
review we have rendered assistance to practically every Provincial Government department and various branches thereof. We have also received the fullest co-operation from
all departments when we have called on them for information or assistance."
Peace River Subdivision (Sub-Inspector G. J. Duncan).—"Investigations and
assistance were rendered to many departments of the Provincial Government."
Fort George Subdivision (Sub-Inspector G. H. Clark).—"The closest co-operation
exists between the Police and Provincial Government departments."
OTHER FORCES.
A deep-rooted and friendly spirit of co-operation exists between the many forces
in the Dominion of Canada, our American counterparts, railroad police of both countries,
and ourselves.
YOUTH AND THE POLICE.
It has been the practice in the past few years to place an insert in our Annual
Report dealing with the above topic. This has now become such an important item
that it deserves its place as a vital part of our Report.
The responsibilities and obligations of our officers have increased tremendously-—
but, notwithstanding, they find time in their limited hours off duty to sponsor youth
organizations, organize social and sports events, Cub packs, Scouts, lecture to youth
organizations, and others too numerous to mention.
Juvenile delinquency, as a result of their faithful and purely voluntary efforts, has
in many areas rapidly declined and in some cases disappeared entirely. Our fine adult
organizations, too, have gone out of their way to supply recreational facilities, sporting
equipment, and other youthful activities with which to combat delinquency on the part
of our young people.
The vital role played by so many of our Provincial Police officers has paid for
itself time and time again—in many cases youthful offenders and would-be offenders
have, with just that little guidance required, been helped on toward the road to good
citizenship. Sports clubs organized by our men have shown our young people the
meaning of " sportsmanship," and it is safe to say, I am sure, that they will remember
this instruction throughout their lives. O 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Reports have been received from, throughout the Province on the activities of our
men in the youth movement, and I am quoting at random from amongst the many
dozens of these reports a few examples of police activities in connection with our
youth:—
Wells Detachment (Constable C. A. Cawdell in Charge).—"Organized boys' and
girls' hockey teams. Elected president of Wells Softball Association for 1948 and
organized boys' and girls' teams, boys' teams winning Cariboo championships. Constable Cawdell has formed a club for youngsters in his basement."
Burnaby Detachment.—" Constables C. E. Estlin, H. E. Klick, and J. E. Clark,
highway patrol, have done much in respect to youth work, and their efforts have been
the subject of very favourable press publicity and letters of appreciation from the
Burnaby School Board.   They have lectured on traffic safety, etc., to the school-children.
" Constable H. Twist, identified with the Lions Club, has promoted extensive
athletic performances among the youth of Burnaby. His boxing instruction has been
responsible for an interexchange of shows throughout the Lower Mainland."
McBride Detachment.—" Constable T. R. Maxwell visits the schools in his area
several times each year and gives talks on fire-prevention, game-preservation, motor-
vehicle regulations, etc., and makes it a point to become acquainted with the children.
He assists in coaching the junior badminton club and the junior hockey team."
PROVINCIAL POLICE LONG SERVICE AND GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL.
Provincial Police long service and good conduct medals were awarded to the following members of the Force: Police Service.
Regimental No. 335—Corporal H. J. Jennings  20 years
Regimental No. 338—Senior Finger-print Operator J. W.
Edwards    20 years
Regimental No. 251—First-class Constable A. Grant  20 years
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION BRANCH.
Inspector R. Harvey, in charge of the Criminal Investigation Branch, reports:—
" Increase in Crime.—Statistics disclose continued increases in violations of the
Criminal Law and Statutes. During the year 18,233 indictable and summary prosecutions were instituted in Provincial Police Courts, as against 13,819 in 1946. Outstanding is the fact that in offences against public order 39 cases of unlawful assembly,
riots, etc., and 98 cases involving offensive weapons were dealt with, an increase of 21
and 34 cases respectively in this type of crime over the previous year's record. Infractions of the ' Government Liquor Act' advanced by 834 cases, while proceedings under
the ' Motor-vehicle Act' and regulations resulted in the prosecution of 2,565 charges,
as against 1,778 last year—a notable increase in violations. Total offences comprise
enforcement of Criminal Code, Dominion and Provincial Statutes, including municipal
by-laws, complete details of which are shown in Appendix I.
" Murders.—During the year 1947 the Force was called upon to investigate twelve
cases of homicide and attempted homicide, two of which were murder and suicide.
Nine persons were charged, resulting in three convictions and four acquittals, leaving
two cases pending. One up to the present remains unsolved. A brief history of cases
of an outstanding nature appears at the end of the report.
" Finger-print and Photographic Section.—Assistant Supervisor A. G. Carmichael,
Finger-print Section, reports the number of finger-prints received for classification and
filing during the year 1947 totalled 3,593, and from these 1,001 were identified as persons with criminal records and previously registered at this Bureau.
" Our Finger-print Section furnished 4,168 sets of prints with criminal records as
shown on our files to the following:   Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 1,988;   Calgary Constable H. Twist, British Columbia Police, Burnaby Detachment, acts as
referee for two of his young club members. The club toured the Lower Mainland
and staged a number of events in 1948.
Plenty of action, but little damage.    Two of Constable Twist's
young club members " battle it out."  REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947. O 15
City Police, 721; Vancouver City Police, 721; New Westminster City Police, 721;
F.B.I., Washington, D.C, 17. One hundred and seventy-six sets of single finger-prints
were forwarded to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for their section and thirty-five
sets were added to our own files.
" For immigration purposes and entry to the United States, 1,028 persons were
furnished certificates on search by name and finger-prints voluntarily supplied. In
addition, 173 applicants for enlistment in the Force were finger-printed and checked.
"At the close of 1947 the number of persons with criminal records registered at
the Finger-print Section of the Criminal Investigation Branch totalled 34,238.
" Finger-print Exhibits.—During the year thirty-three exhibits of various kinds
were received by the finger-print staff for examination, and although some proved to
be of little value for purposes of identification, success was achieved in three important
cases and assisted materially in further police investigation and subsequent prosecution.
" Photographs.—Fourteen thousand six hundred and eighty-three photographs of
convicted persons were printed in the course of the year. From this total we supplied
photographs to those with whom we exchange finger-prints and to the Provincial Gaols
in the Province; the Ticket-of-leave Branch, Ottawa; Immigration Department, Vancouver; Department of Justice, Washington, D.C; Royal Canadian Mounted Police;
Vancouver City Police; our own Modus Operandi Branch; and the police forces of the
municipalities adjacent to Victoria. Included in this total were photographs of 331
discharged prisoners sent out to our police circuit; this required 24 photographs of
each person, making a total of 7,944.
" Miscellaneous photographs supplied amounted to 1,490 prints, including enlargements of all sizes up to 8 by 10. Four hundred and six new negatives were made for this
work. Included were 617 prints and 14 negatives for the Superintendent of Motor-
vehicles, 184 cheques photographed, the balance going to the offices of the Attorney-
General, Commissioner of Police, Court work, Victoria City Police, Provincial Analyst,
Police Training-school, H. B. McLean (examiner of questioned documents), J. H.
Beatty (handwriting expert), Royal Canadian Navy, Royal Canadian Air Force, and
Criminal Investigation Branch of the British Columbia Police.
" Finger-print and Photographic Equipment.—During the year six finger-print
camera kits and six Press-type cameras were purchased for the use of detectives in
field-work. _
" The finger-print camera was designed by members of the staff and incorporates
features not found in the commercial type. The wood bodies were assembled by a
Victoria firm, and the lenses, lighting equipment, and shutters were installed by the
staff. Carrying-cases were also designed and built locally, which accommodate the
camera and provide room for a complete finger-printing outfit and materials for
emergency development of photographs. The carrying-cases for the Press cameras
were also designed by the staff and made in Victoria.
" This equipment will materially aid in the service that can be rendered by the
detectives assigned for duty at the Police Divisions throughout the Province.
" Ballistics.—Detective-Sergeant Young's work throughout the year in the field of
ballistics showed considerable progress and proved invaluable in ten cases involving
firearms identification, all of a serious nature, four being murder and attempted
murder. In each instance the fatal weapon or bullets were identified, expert evidence
given, and, with the exception of one investigation which is yet unconcluded, successful
results were obtained.
" Scientific Examinations.—In the year under review, with the co-operation and
assistance of the Department of Mines, through the services of their Chief Analyst and
staff, forty-three cases of a chemico-legal nature were undertaken, involving a study
of 177 exhibits of various kinds.    These included ten analyses of viscera for poison, O 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
eight of blood for alcohol, and three examinations of liquids and solids for poison
content.   The remaining cases were too varied to mention individually.
" Scientific examinations in medico-legal cases also entailed considerable work, and
services of this nature were expertly rendered by the pathologists of the Vancouver
General, Provincial Jubilee, and St. Joseph's Hospitals at Vancouver and Victoria.
" Firearms Registration.—Assistant Chief Clerk F. E. Grimshaw, in charge Firearms Registration Section of the Criminal Investigation Branch, reports that investigations still continue regarding 1945 provisions re registration of small arms. The
majority of persons delinquent are those who have left the Province and others who
have moved into British Columbia from other Provinces. A great deal of correspondence is necessary, particularly with the Firearms Section of the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police, Ottawa, also city and municipal forces in British Columbia, from
whom we have received the fullest co-operation.
" This Section has had numerous inquiries from persons in the United States
desirous of bringing firearms into the Province for sporting purposes. Operating in
conjunction with Provincial Game Department and the Dominion Customs, alien
permits in Form 76b issued to non-resident aliens totalled 173, while 207 were issued
to resident aliens in British Columbia.
" Other permits issued with respect to concealable weapons and traffic pertaining
thereto were as follows:—
To carry (Form 76)      807
To sell (Form 76c)      822
To purchase or receive (Form 76e)  1,007
Dealers' permits (Forms 76c and 76d)        20
To minors (Form 76f), rifles and and shotguns on production
of game licence        29
"Accidents.—The Force investigated 473 fatal accidents during the year. Of this
number, 158 were classed as miscellaneous brought about by a series of extraordinary
circumstances, 151 by drowning, and the remainder as follows: Automobile, 87;
mining, 7; logging, 70. In addition, 341 sudden deaths were investigated in duties as
Coroners' officers and found to be due to natural causes.
" Missing Persons.—Inquiries as to the whereabouts and welfare of approximately
744 persons were conducted in different parts of the Province during the year on
requests received from relatives and other sources.
" Doukhobors.—During the early part of 1947 there was decided unrest amongst
the Doukhobors, particularly the fanatical sect. The Sons of Freedom at Gilpin and
Glade staged demonstrations by assembling in open-air meetings and burning their
Bibles, and at Krestova they also burned two Russian-language typewriters. In each
instance there was no disturbance, and the gatherings dispersed without further
incident.
" The winter and early spring saw a considerable migration of Mike Veregin's
followers to the new Doukhobor colony at Hilliers on Vancouver Island. They left the
Nelson area singly and in family groups after disposing of their property.
" On May 19th the two concrete anchor-blocks on the south side of the suspension
bridge over the Kootenay River at Brilliant were dynamited. However, the damage
was superficial.
" On July 21st Veregin's tomb at Brilliant was again damaged by a heavy
explosion; a semicircular piece was blown out of the side of the reinforced-concrete
slab covering the sepulchre, leaving a large oval crater some 6 feet deep in the ground
at the side. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947. O 17
" On Sunday, July 13th, a group of fanatics marched to Fred Plotnikoff's store
at Krestova, entered and took a quantity of tobacco and canned meat from the shelves
and burned them in an open bonfire.
" On July 17th about fifty Doukhobors, men and women, marched from Krestova
carrying a banner reading in English and Russian, " The time has come to meet the
groom Jesus Christ and we invite all the people to the marriage feast." I believe this
is the first time they have carried a banner in English, previously they have all been
in the Russian language.
" This group marched through the Doukhobor settlements of Shoreacres, Glade,
Thrums, and Brilliant, and on the 23rd reached the Doukhobor Community Hall at
Ooteschenia, about 3 miles south of Brilliant, which was then being used as a residence
by three Doukhobor families, with the obvious intention of occupying the building
should the persons guarding it relax their vigilance.
" They camped a short distance from the hall, pitching four tents for their
accommodation. Some concern was felt in the Doukhobor community and police patrols
were constantly maintained. The situation remained unchanged until July 29th, when
the head of one of the families in the hall took action, and the committee members
of the fanatics, numbering six women and six men, were summonsed to appear in
Provincial Police Court at Castlegar under the ' Trespass Act.' They were convicted
of trespassing and fined $3 and costs each, in default three days' imprisonment. They
all defaulted and served their imprisonment in the Nelson Gaol.
" Following the Court cases, an order under the Sanitary Regulations from the
Medical Health Officer was served on the remainder encamped near the hall to the effect
that their camp, for want of cleanliness, was a nuisance to the public and ordering them
to vacate the following day. The order was complied with and the campers returned
to their homes.
" On August 6th John L. Lebedoff complained to the police at Crescent Valley that
a group of fanatics had attempted to burn his house, a small dwelling of three rooms,
but he had put the fires out. Constable W. Martin immediately patrolled to Krestova
and found a gathering of some 125 Doukhobors assembled near Lebedoff's house. They
stated Lebedoff was trying to run a parliament and bawdy-house, and they intended
to openly burn it. While the constable was talking with some of the group, about half
of them stripped their clothes off, and, chanting, the whole body then surrounded and
entered the building, which in a few minutes was in flames. They then stood around
chanting while it burned to the ground.
" Lebedoff laid charges of arson against Mike F. Bayoff, George Barisoff, and Tina
Rezansoff as being the instigators of the fire. They were arrested and committed for
trial. On September 9th they were convicted of arson and each sentenced to seven
years' imprisonment.
" The burning of Lebedoff's house marked the beginning of a series of incendiary
fires throughout the Kootenay area, and during the month of August many of the
fanatics burned their own homes after removing the furniture and contents, in protest,
as they stated, against the Third World War; in fact, it would appear the issue became
confused, as, after burning her home, the only reason one Doukhobor woman could give
for her actions was there were other fires in the vicinity. However, these sacrificial
fires would appear to be part of an initiation into the fanatical sect as part of their
creed and which placed those members in good standing. In addition to Doukhobor
property, two schools were burned, attempts made on three more, a warehouse was
burned, an attempt made on a hall, and eleven unoccupied houses in an old Japanese
encampment were burned. The police were finding it increasingly difficult to cope with
the situation. 0 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" On August 19th the fanatics congregated at Shoreacres, and around noon some
150 men and women entered one of the large community houses unopposed, and in a few
minutes the building was on fire. Although police patrols were in the vicinity, they
could obtain little information or assistance from those present, who stood passively
by, many of them in the nude, and watched the building burn. The occupants—some
of whom belonged to the Orthodox Doukhobors, while others belonged to the Sons of
Freedom sect—stated they had been warned and had previously removed all their
furniture and belongings and could identify none of the persons who had burned their
home. The fanatics stated they burned the building to compel those living in it to join
their cause. They wanted all Doukhobors to belong to the Sons of Freedom sect instead
of the many different groups as at present. The building, property of the Land
Settlement Board of British Columbia, was of the old-type two-story brick community
house consisting of some twelve rooms and was completely destroyed by fire.
" On August 22nd two smaller dwellings were burned at Shoreacres without
opposition after the occupants had removed their furniture and belongings. In the
one case a lean-to of three rooms was removed to safety before the house was burned,
as the owner did not belong to the Sons of Freedom sect and did not wish his part
of the house burned.
" On August 23rd the community house in No. 3 village at Shoreacres was burned
by a group of some ninety persons. However, some opposition was encountered here.
Approaching the house they broke through a barricade with a ' No Trespassing' sign,
entered onto the veranda, pushing the defenders away from the door, entered the house
and set it on fire. When some of the defenders attempted to extinguish the fire with
water, they were prevented from doing so.
" Thirteen men and a woman were arrested, and before the Stipendiary Magistrate
at Nelson seven men and a woman were convicted of threats to burn and ordered to
enter into a recognizance to keep the peace for twelve months with sureties of $2,000
and, failing such, to serve twelve months' imprisonment. All failed to enter into their
recognizance. Three men were convicted of assault, occasioning actual bodily harm,
and sentenced to six months' imprisonment, and three men were committed for trial
on charges of arson.
" On the night of August 26th two hay barns and sheds were destroyed at Tarrys
by incendiary fires, and a four-month-old calf was burned to death in one of the barns.
" On Sunday morning, August 31st, a gathering of fanatics at Shoreacres was
broken up by the police and returned to their homes, the majority being from Krestova.
Road-blocks were set up, confining them to their respective areas. Thirty-one Doukhobors were arrested and later, at the Nelson Fall Assize, were convicted on charges
of arson and riotous assembly and sentenced to imprisonment ranging from eighteen
months to twelve years.
" On September 6th the scene shifted to the fanatical Doukhobor colony at Gilpin,
near Grand Forks. Meetings were being held with the idea of compelling all Doukhobors to join the Sons of Freedom sect, with the inference of failing to do so they
would be burned out. Many commenced removing their household belongings from
their residences.
" On September 7th Jack Lazoroff, of Gilpin, burned his barn, and a group of
fanatics from the Gilpin settlement marched on the City of Grand Forks, but were
dispersed by the police, assisted by citizens, and returned to their homes. A curfew
was imposed, confining them to their village during darkness, and police potrols were
strengthened.
" During the next few days some fourteen barns and hay-sheds were burned by
incendiary fires in the Gilpin area. Twenty Doukhobors were arrested and, at the
Vernon Fall Assize, convicted on charges of arson and sentenced to imprisonment from
three to seven years, one youth receiving suspended sentence. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947. O 19
"Altogether thirty-three men and twelve women were arrested and convicted at
Nelson, and eighteen men and two women arrested at Grand Forks and convicted
at Vernon.
" Outstanding Cases.
"Rex vs. Gabriel Williams (Attempted Murder).—Wednesday, February 19th,
1948, the Burns Lake Detachment was advised by telephone that one Lawrence Kylling
had been shot through the face and that a doctor and the police were required immediately.   This message came from Topley, 37 miles east of Burns Lake.
" On arrival of the police at Topley it was ascertained that Lawrence Kylling had
that day been engaged in making ties near his cabin when, at about 4.15 p.m., he had
been shot in the face by some unknown person hidden in the near-by bush. Kylling's
cabin was situated some 100 yards west of the Topley Landing Road, some 9 miles
north of Topley. Kylling had been shot while bending over using his broad axe, the
bullet entering near his left temple, passing down through the roof of his mouth, just
missing his tongue, and emerging just in front of the angle of the lower right jaw.
He had heard or seen no one and was not aware that there was anyone in the vicinity.
"After being shot, Kylling returned to his cabin to find that it had been broken
into and the wires leading to his telephone cut. He then started up his truck with
the intention of proceeding to Topley for assistance. Owing to his wound he was
unable to see clearly and ran off the road after going a few hundred yards. He abandoned the truck and proceeded on foot toward Topley. When he reached a point about
8 miles from Topley, he met two Indians, Gabriel Williams and Albert Michel. The
Indians stated they had met two white men who had fired a shot at them. Kylling
told the Indians how he had been wounded and asked them to go to the Richfield mine
for help. Richfield mine was about 2 miles distant. They proceeded to the mine for
help, followed by Kylling. In response to a telephone call a car was dispatched from
Topley and picked up Kylling and the two Indians about fifteen minutes later. At the
time they were picked up it was noticed by Mr. Mackie, the driver of the car, that one
of the Indians was carrying a .22 rifle. From Topley the wounded man was rushed
to the Burns Lake Hospital, where he subsequently recovered.
" Investigation by the police disclosed that the two Indians had visited the Mackie
Store at Topley and purchased eight bottles of vanilla extract on the morning of
February 19th and then proceeded along the Topley-Babine Road in the direction of
the Kylling cabin. On the road they drank a quantity of the extract. On arrival near
the Kylling cabin Williams had shot Kylling while he was working in the bush, then
broke into his cabin with the intention apparently of stealing some beer, but, on seeing
Kylling coming down the trail, left hurriedly in the direction of the main road.
" Williams was charged with attempted murder and was tried at Prince Rupert
Spring Assize on May 26th, 1947, found guilty, and sentenced to four years' imprisonment in the penitentiary.
"Rex vs. James Robert Alexander {Attempted Murder).—The accused was a half-
breed Indian, 51 years of age, and had lived in the Prince George area since 1915
where he was well known as Jimmie Alexander. He had followed trapping and general
labouring. A few years ago he contracted tuberculosis and was confined to the Tranquille Sanatorium. From the time of his release in June, 1943, until October, 1945, he
remained at the institution to work. During this time he met a young white girl,
named Nan, who was then about 17 years of age and a patient in the institution.
" Some time later, when Jimmie and Nan left Tranquille, they were married and
went to Prince George to live. Jimmie's health and wealth were at a pretty low ebb,
and they took up housekeeping in a small shack out of town. Jimmie was confined to
bed a good deal and for a while his young wife looked after him. O 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Shortly after the bride found a job as a night dispatcher in a taxi office in Prince
George. It was not long until Jimmie noticed she was not coming straight home when
she finished her shift at midnight. On one occasion he became inquisitive about his
wife and, despite his illness, set out in the early morning hours to look for her. He
found her in company with Max McCall, one of the taxi-drivers from where she worked.
She refused to go home with her husband.
"Jimmie became alarmed with the turn of events and borrowed a .30-.30 Savage
rifle on the pretext that he wanted to do some hunting. During the mid-afternoon of
May 27th, 1947, Jimmie saw his wife and McCall together on the main street of Prince
George. He dashed into a store where he had left the rifle and emerged just as his
wife and McCall were crossing the street, going away from him. He fired at McCall,
the bullet striking him on the left side of the neck low down, just missing the jugular
vein but smashing the top of the shoulder. He tried to reload the rifle, which was
faulty and it jammed. He then ran up a side street, and when a short distance away,
he managed to reload the rifle. This time he turned the weapon on himself and fired
into his right breast. The shot shattered the shoulder and arm, and it was necessary to
amputate his arm. Fortunately Dr. E. J. Lyon was close to the scene and he rendered
first aid to McCall and Alexander, which resulted in both lives being saved.
" The bullet which Jimmie fired at himself passed through his body and hit a new
building under construction and ricochetted off and fell at the feet of a workman.
This bullet was recovered and identified as having been fired from the accused's rifle.
"Alexander was charged with attempted murder, and was found guilty and sentenced to two years' imprisonment."
"Rex vs. Thomas Luxton (Murder).—In the early morning hours of Sunday,
August 31st, 1947, Constable R. H. P. Hayward, in charge of Armstrong Detachment,
received the first word of a double murder and a possible suicide. An investigation
revealed that Hylton Lane and Mrs. Marjorie Luxton, middle-aged people, were jointly
operating a small ranch near Armstrong. Thomas Luxton, husband of Mrs. Luxton,
was originally in a three-way partnership with his wife and Lane in the operation of
the ranch. As time went on, Luxton became jealous of the relations between his wife
and Lane, and eventually ceased to take an active part in the ranch workings and left
the place, Mrs. Luxton remaining with Lane. Luxton moved to the coast, where he
commenced a series of letters to his wife in an effort to have her rejoin him, but
without results.
" Luxton finally started out alone from Vancouver by car, armed with a revolver
and an automatic pistol and a quantity of ammunition. He reached the ranch about
11 p.m. on Saturday night, August 30th, and was met in the driveway by Lane. After
a brief exchange of words, he shot Lane, killing him. Mrs. Luxton and her neighbour,
Mrs. Williamson, went immediately to Lane's body. Then Luxton pushed Mrs. Luxton
to the ground, saying " Do you want the same ? " and shot her, killing her as she lay
on the ground. He then pushed Mrs. Williamson to the ground and walked away.
Before leaving the ranch, Luxton fired several shots into each of the already dead
bodies, using both the revolver and the pistol. He then got in his car and drove to
Mrs. Williamson's, who by this time had retired. He entered the house and talked to
Mrs. Williamson for a time while she nervously got up and made him a cup of tea.
He then drove off and parked his car on a lonely side-road, where he was located by
Constable Hayward. Luxton was sitting in his car holding the automatic when
Constable Hayward approached and coolly disarmed him.
" Luxton was charged with the murder of Lane and was tried at the Vernon Fall
Assize, when he was found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to twenty years' in
prison." REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947. 0 21
"Rex vs. Daniel Strilchuk and Margaret Strilchuk (Extortion).-—In the early
morning of December 1st, 1947, while covering his daily milk route in the City of
Kimberley, Stewart B. McClure called at the Strilchuk residence. Mrs. Strilchuk asked
him in the house to purchase some milk tickets. McClure was somewhat reluctant to
dirty the floor as his feet were covered with snow and, furthermore, he anticipated
trouble with Mrs. Strilchuk over a lease. She put a $20 bill on the kitchen table and
asked him to change it. When he walked over to the table to change the bill, she locked
the kitchen door.
" The previous March, McClure had leased a building from her for a pasteurization
plant. He only wanted the building for a matter of two months until he could move
to a new location, but owing to Wartime Prices and Trade Board regulations the lease
had to be made for two years. When he moved out, McClure sublet the property to
another party for a sports shop.
"After locking the door, Mrs. Strilchuk stated the $20 bill was still good if he
would give notice to vacate the building. McClure refused, stating he had sublet the
building. Some words passed between them and she picked up a piece of stove-wood
and threatened to break every bone in his body if he did not comply with her request
and struck him across the shoulder.    He grasped the stick and a struggle ensued.
" Mr. Strilchuk, who had been hiding behind a door leading into the kitchen, now
appeared on the scene and eventually McClure was pushed onto a chair at the kitchen
table. He was given a pen and paper and under threats told to write out a notice of
termination of the lease. McClure again tried to reason with them, and Mrs. Strilchuk
picked up a piece of stove-wood. Seeing that further argument was useless, he wrote
a notice as requested, also a notice of termination of lease to the tenant he had sublet
the building to, together with addressed envelopes, so they could be put through the
mail in his handwriting. As neither of the Strilchuks could read English, Mrs.
Strilchuk took the papers to a neighbour to ascertain if they were in order. On her
return, after being held in the house for almost an hour, McClure was allowed to go.
"After completing his milk route McClure reported the matter to the police. At
this time he was quite upset and visibly bruised. He laid a charge of assault against
the Strilchuks and a summons was issued.
"A search warrant was obtained and executed on the Strilchuk residence by the
police, and all exhibits connected with the case were seized. On December 12th a charge
of extortion was laid;  they were arrested, but later released on bail.
" On December 13th they were committed for trial, and on the 19th, in County
Court, Cranbrook, both accused were found guilty of fraudulently compelling the
execution of a document and each sentenced to imprisonment for three days and fined
$500. The case is unusual in that the Strilchuks are old-time residents of Kimberley
and own considerable property there.
" Rex vs. Morley Beach and Robert Clarence Albright (Breaking, Entering, and
Theft).—On the night of January 15th-16th, 1947, the premises of the Smithers Motors
at Oliver were broken into, entrance being gained through a rear window covered with
building-paper, and a quantity of tools stolen. On the floor of the shop the thief had
stepped in some new cement which had not as yet hardened and left a fairly good print
of his left shoe. A plaster cast was taken of this imprint, which was of an odd pattern,
and extensive investigations were then made throughout the Oliver Detachment area
in an endeavour to locate a similar boot, which included the checking of employees
in the mines, logging camps, sawmills, etc.
"About ten days later, while conducting an investigation at the Oliver Dairy,
impressions were found in the snow and mud around the barns similar to the imprint
found in the cement. With the assistance of the dairy-owner a search was made of the
rooms occupied by his employees, and in the one occupied by Morley Beach a pair of
rubber boots bearing the pattern of the imprint left in the garage was found, together O 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
with a large quantity of confectionery goods, automobile accessories and tools, which
were obviously stolen. It was known that Beach associated with Robert Albright, so
proceeding to the Albright ranch the constables found the two men working on an old
automobile with tools which had been stolen from another garage. Both men were
arrested and placed in the Oliver Lockup.
" On February 3rd Robert Albright, a juvenile ll1^ years of age, appeared before
the Judge of the Juvenile Court and, after inquiring into the circumstances of his
alleged delinquency, His Worship transferred the youth to stand trial in the regular
Courts.
" On February 11th, in County Court, Penticton, both accused pleaded guilty to
three charges of breaking and entering and theft, for which they received sentences of
nine months' imprisonment concurrent, and to five charges of theft, for which they
received sentences of six to nine months concurrent. The arrest and conviction of these
men concluded a number of offences committed in the area and the recovery of stolen
property amounting to approximately $900.
" Rex vs. Arthur David Bindley (Breaking, Entering, and Theft).—On the night
of September 28th, 1947, at 1 a.m., while checking the business premises in Princeton,
Constable W. E. Benton noticed a movement in the rear of Scott's Pharmacy, Ltd.
After watching for a short time and deciding it was not the proprietor or any of his
employees, the constable sent a passing pedestrian to the proprietor's residence requesting him to come down immediately. In the meantime he had another person who was
with him guard the rear of the premises.
" Mr. Scott, the proprietor, arrived shortly after, and entering the store they noticed
a man crouching behind the prescription counter. Constable Benton ordered the man
to come out, but he still remained there, so going behind the counter the constable
confronted him. The man then stood up and submitted to arrest. He was later
identified as Arthur David Bindley, a man with a lengthy criminal record. On his
person was found $10 in cash stolen from the till; the unlocked safe had been opened
and the contents strewn on the floor, and six bottles containing drugs were found placed
before him on the prescription counter.
" On October 1st, 1947, Bindley was committed for trial; on October 3rd, in County
Court, Princeton, he was convicted of breaking, entering, and theft, and sentenced
to three years' imprisonment in the penitentiary."
CONCLUSION.
By Order in Council dated November 1st, 1947, I assumed command of the Force,
succeeding T. W. S. Parsons, O.B.E., who retired after serving thirty-seven years with
the Force, nine years as Commissioner, and during which period the British Columbia
Provincial Police experienced growth in numbers and modern police science.
At this time may I express my appreciation to the Honourable the Attorney-General
for the confidence he has placed in me and for the support and kindness extended to me
during my term of office, sharing with my predecessor my appreciation to the many
departments, branches, and members of the Provincial Government and, if I may
particularize, the Deputy Attorney-General, Col. E. Pepler, who has so willingly
co-operated with us during the past year.
To members of the Force and particularly Deputy Commissioner R. Peachey, M.C,
during this time of heavy and sometimes onerous duties, I tender my thanks for their
excellent service and whole-hearted co-operation.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. SHIRRAS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947.
O 23
Q
Z
w
Pk
P
fa
fa
Ph
Oi
o
P
Q
M
En
<
fa
Q
CQ
fa
O
^
fa
fa
o
fa
«.
fc
Ph
o
fa
o
CQ
l-H
t—.
H
P
■< tt
fa £
frCQ
fa E3
H Q
rt n
o B
Pg
- >
p
:  >
s
3
-  o
p
'Ibuj. SuxqiBMy
*S[B_4__Bjpu-;i^
pUB S[BSSIUiSIQ
-suoi^oiauoo
•pa_1a3.ua sasBQ
■[bijX SupiBAvy
•S[BA\Bjpq^T^\\
PUB StBSSlUiSIQ
■suopoiAuoo
•pajacjua sbsbq
'IBUX 3Uiq.IBAIi.V
■SIBMBJPH'}!^
pUB SIBSSIIUSIQ
■SUOl^OIAUOQ
■paja^ua sssbq
•[BUX SUl^IBAiy
'SIBAlBapiI^Ij^
pUB SJBSSIUISIQ
'SUOrjOlAUO^
•pa_1a3.ua sasBQ
■[BJ^J. 3ui^tBA\y
'S[BA\BJpmi^
pUB SfBSSUUSIQ
■SUOI^OIAUO^
•pa_iai.ua sasBQ
'fspjj SupiBAvy
■S[BA\BjpU^.I^\
PUB S[BSSIIUSIQ
'SUOrpjAUOQ
•pa.1a3.ua sasnj
*IBIJX SUI^IBM-V
'SlBAVBJpUq.!^
PUB S[BSSIUlStQ
•suoi^oiauoo
•pajta^ua sasBQ
*IBIJX SupiBAVy-
•SIBA__B_iptj;i^
PUB SIBSSIUISIQ
•SUOpOtAUOQ
'paja^ua sasBQ
I
IO   ^H   (M
s
o
«        .     o
£ » B=
43   u   0,   Q
£    wo
1 §
■B 1
*1
o
g "a
o
0)
rf
0)
Hi
m
<
fi
1
!
«
in
t-
c
<u
:
p.
r
1
C
0
£
CJ
■§
• 0
c
V
-t->
(E
tt
£
C
f-
u
fc  H
a s
2 1
s °
§ -X
8 ft,
o
rn
c
C       !    w    _1    ~    QJ
0) +j e _2 bo *_2   S
° — a V C B  «
C « S fe •- 6«   h
* I 5 ■" * 11
O S 15 O « £ > O 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
«_
3
s
■*_
a
o
O
t-
o_
o
t-H
OS
Q
W
H
Eh
hH
<
H
Q
o
H
o
►J
<!
2
b
O
CQ
PS 52
U Q
< «
a ;_.
fcm
o Z
£ o
_* 0
k «
o a
fe to
. ia
2    O
[eijx SupiBAvy
"S[B_ABjpq^l^Y
pUU B[BSStlUSlQ
•SUOI^OJAUOQ
•p3J3^U9 SSSBQ
■[bijj, 3ui;iBA_y
•S[T.A_Hjpq^l^_
pUB S[BSSIU__!G
•SUOI^OtAUOQ
*pdJ3^U3 S9SBQ
•[T31JJ. SUI^IBAiy
•_p_A_Bjpq}iA_.
pUB SIBSSIUISIQ
"SUOl^DJAUOQ
•pajo^uo sosbq
•[BUJ, SUI^IBMy
•S[B_AB_:pq?tJ&
pUB S[BSSIUl-IQ
•SUOJ^OJAUO^
og
_ §
p
:  o
•   >
p
._ fc
2
<j W
: E
p
•paaa3.ua S3SBQ
"IBijx 3uj3F^A\v
'S[BA\B_ipq3Ij\i
pUB S[BSSlUISIQ
■SUOJ30IAU0Q
•paaa3ua sasB^
THX 3UJ3JBAVV
'S[BA!i.B_ipq3l^
pUB SIBSSIUISI(J
'SUOJ30JAUOQ
•paja3ua sasBQ
T*HX SU131BAVV
co >* t- ~qT~
;   rH        '.    rH   ia   rH   CD        !   IN    N CO
ia i-i o     : w n        ©        rH
CO   IO   M   H  N  N t- U3
; « 10 o rt -* w        ■>*        ia
«# <n eo 00     : co co
f   I-   IO   H
IO   00   IO   H
wiq-^th     : co «        01        =x>
CM   CO   rt   IN
•S[BA\BJpq3J^
pUB SIBSSItUSJ{J
•SUOT30IAUO3
•paaa^ua sssbq
•jbi^x 3ui3fBA\y
•S(BA\Bjpq3i_AA.
pUB S[Bssiuisiq;
•suojhpjauoq
•p3ja3.Ua S3SBQ
rHCO       !   N   M   rt   N   N SD
CN   rt   «   N
CO  N   rt  10      :   CO
:oioiCDtx>e-,\acociia        ia        go rt n ~
r-t    rH   rH   rH *tf (N
"*   NO   rt
NNCOOrtOCOCOID'
rt   CM    r-t   Ol CD
£
Irt
cd
: 43
*5 ft;
-a =
"3 '£
fl.fi   5
0     O     CS     fe
2 g ^  _i  _« "
£   ...    c_ (fi £
>,£  _ g o
o  fe   tf tfi o
8 -ii .,
see
a o
a O g
■3
o   d
4^  a
M 2
_.  __    p    u
SSiotq
tf
'^aaa^oj^o
<     c_ a <t     c. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947.
0 25
r-t iC   t-   '
tO    t-   r-t    <N
CO   Ci   tr-  N   O
cn        m
<N lO
CO rf tD   r-t   CO CM CO
<n     :     : -^
(C    M   rt    O   IO   W   rt
CO r-t    CO   tD CO Oi
rt   <M  w     :  rji
rt" «D rt
(N       1   rt   rt*   rH   tD
ift       tD       oi    :    :       cn
tD CJ   rt
rt       :   Ci   r-t
ia   rH to IO
tn in
CO    fc-    CN    rt*    CO    CO
CO CO    CO
i   "rt*   CO    tD   rt
CO CO N
rH ia   Ol   rH
CO CO IO
CO   rt   rt
s s
n5 -c
S ^
*+H Q
OJ   <u '
rfl   .fl
C   J5  .—
KJ     W>    tj
M
<_ .3 ^r
S
ft K    Cl      !  --
x * 8 g E
*«>a!
E S E 5 S
ftf
ftf
ftf
ftb
nee
* JS J3  X fci
rt rt rt E-
O
th
ja
x    :
u
bo   I
c    i
to    :
tJ
13
!_
t.
T_
i 1 a 8  1
• g 3 *   ;
»' __ _
i a .
tt   !
fl
-p
fl
rt
-4->
<U
QJ
fl
ft  g
o o
tO ti]
a a ;
E E
EW
*5
8
h K m
S <: n o o
o
8
o   _.
ft H
jg T_ O 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
O
H
•[BJJJ, SUI3IBAiy
-S[BA\Bjpq3|iw
pUB SIBSSIUISIQ
•SUOJ3DIAUOQ
•paja3ua sasBQ
rH
_*-
CO
rt
r*
CO
no
IN
CO
f—
CM
CM
CM
»n
to
tn
,_|
00
rt
on
no
r-
en
M
h«
<N
rH
CM
rt
«S
few
■[BUX SUI3TBA\V
•StBAi.Bjpq3ijVV
puB s[BSsiUis;ci
•SUOJ30IAUOQ
■p3J33U3 S3SBQ
W   N  N   N   N
CM   (N   CM   CO   (N
t.
S
o
O
CT.
rH
a
z
«
p
o
W
H
E-"
J
<!
W
P
t/_
W
O
fc
O
►J
<:
DS
o
fc
o
m
►H
r—I
<:
H
w
P
« O
_<   Q
K M
O 0
bed
= o
H|
:  >
* P
■  fc
£  o
P w
:   >
:   o
P
ISIJX   SUI^IBAiV
-8IBdiB_Tpq3IAY
pUB SIBSSIUISIQ
•SUOI^OIAUOQ
•pDJ03Ua S3SB£)
•[BIJX 3ui3iBii\r
■S[BA\Bjpq3I^
pUB S[B9SIUISIQ
•SUOI30IAUO3
*p3J33U3 S3SBQ
-ppx 3ui3iB_nv
•SIBAVBJpq3l^
pUB SJBSSIUISIQ
•SUOI30IAU0Q
■paja3ua sasBQ
[BIJX 3ui3JB_4iV
-S[BA\.Bjpq3ij*iY
pUB SIBSSIUISIQ
•SUOJ3DIAUO0
■p3J33,U3 S3SBQ
rH       I   OJ   GO   CM
i-t     : co n* eg
a»    : oi    ; a 10
CM    rt   o   CO    (N
t-   rt    O   CO
a     \ ia        co
%
:   o
:  £
P
.  fc
s  o
'I^PX 3ui3!H_v_,y
-S[BAVBjpq3ij\Y
pUB S[BSSIUISIQ
•SUOJ3DIAUO0
•paja^uD sasBQ
•[bux SU131BMV
•S[BA__BJpq3JJ\*1
pUB S[BSSIUISIQ
•SUO|33IAUOQ
•p3J33U3 S3SBQ
CO    O    CM    CM    CO
co 10 m to       rf w    ;co    ! h ** o
CO   O   CM   CM   CM
CD   ITS   CM   tO rf   CM       .   O
< <
00
I
.s
<! n *
to   B
1   *
: a _>'
< 3.
.2 E
<5_
<d __d >_ h
>_    O   rj   TJ
ii,    ^3
cv   J-  +*   3
2 a
P.  c3   ca   o   fl j
f_,(_,fa£54sao««_Hti^
g r
<i B3
.a < ■'
a •« j
tO    c,     J.
si I
tl i
a 5 0
o  o
m £ "H
^j fc   o
3    B    B
T3   1-
BOO
o
_, «j te «i a J
ai _ r- .00 o .
c £ 9 a I < _3
•~ & <_ P _S <,
"a £ X • S £ S
O O QJ .^ .b O tf
o o o fc fc fa o REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE
1947.
0 27
h    :
CD
<n    : oo
to
C-       :   rH
CO
CD    rH    tD    C
rH    rH             t-   rt
rt             W   rt             rtCOOi-trtrHi-t             IOCMC0             rti—
tr
ee
CO             CO
rH    LO
rrt
CO
CO
CM
OJ
t-
CM    rH   rf    CC
rH   rH            CO    rt
00
co
CO
rt             00    CD    00                      rt                               rH    rH
0
CO
•ff           CO
rH    iO
CM
CO
Ol
0J
00
co    : rt
fc-
1-1
O        I    rH
0
00
CO
co     : cm
rj«
t-
Ci
CO
CM
-
CO
en
rf
co     : in
t-
CO       i
CO
rP
0
CO
rf       ;   IO
; rH        t- oo     :     :     : cm     :        rH     t     :          :
O
■**    :
LO
;     :           :  r-t     :     ■     :     :     :           :     :                ;
0
io    : t-
Ol
*"'    i
CM
LO       :   rf
rt
:rf        oojc__>::<Nrt           :lolo           :
0
CM
CM        !    rH
:              l- lo oo     :     :                      :                      ■
CO
LO       ;   rf
rH          :    :                                          ;
to
LO
rf
O        :    rH
:rf        th cd rH     :     : 03 rH           :  ia ie           :
OI
t-
rf        ;    <N
:              t- cd 00     :     :
LO      ;   rt*
j               r"l        i'   j                 j                 1
CO
t-
»-.
i-l      !      >
c»
cm    : t-
rf
CO
co    :
00
co    :
LO
rH
co     : t-
rf
CD
co     :
rf
rH
rH      :   t-
:    :       r
CM
CD
1-1    :
*"*
LO
t~    : to
rH        '.             Cqrf.        Ilrt!                 ItOi-t             rt    rt
rf
CM
CM
t>    ; i-t
;             10    ;    :    :          :          :
CO
O
rf
co     ; o
CO
t>    : oi
:              10     :                      1           :
CO
CM
rjn"
t-
rH        !    i-l
10
CM
CM      j
rt
CM    LO             rt    CO!    rt    rt    CO        I             rt    rt    CM                 .
,-(
O
c-
tO             rH
co     :                      ;                                  :
rH
fc-
Ol
to   r-t   o
cmlo        co t-     : rn rn ta     :        rtrtoi           :
to
CO .O                                            :                               rH
CO             rH
co                            :                                  :
*~1
CM
CM
lo    : cm
:    :       o~
t-    :    :    :    :    :       r-c    :    i          :
CO
CO
CO
rH
:  rH        coco:::::        n*::           ;
CO
O
rf      :   CO
:    :       o
:
:             cm cd    :    :    ;    :    1                    :          j
CM
io     :
:                    co     :     :     :     :     :                :     :           :
OI
; th        colo:::::        to::           :
to
cr
:             oi t-         :    :    :    :                    :          :
lo     :
:                    co     :     ;     :     :     :                :     :           :
co"
-© -©o
< < -o
fl
.2
a
3
i  £
j 3
bo
:   ®
M
fl
.2
•3
<D
to
3
i   fl
:   °
j     03
■   ©
4-
W     OT     fl
h T. d
fco
©
tf
i   T3
i.s
O
:   ft
1   ft
■   fl
CO
s
Dvernment Liquor Ac
ealth Act	
cq O  g
H|-
:   rt
rrj      rt
fl
:  CO
<
u
0
is
o
CQ
tH
?
Industrial School for
Industrial School for
Industrial Conciliati
©
fl
03
£
c
S
D
a
'H-
C
tH
rt
6
a!
fl
3
§
©
ffl     +i
cd    cj
inimum Wage Act
otor   Carrier   Act
otor-vehicle Act an
attullo Bridge regu
©
<
£
5
0
tH
c
V
'c
0
fi
K
0
2
P
c
+
fl
bl
Ol
>
+
S
>,
a
(H
>>
3
B
0
s ♦
©
CQ
<
C
c
CJ
3
+j
0
trt
Ah
P
3
respass Act	
enereal    Diseases
Act _____
c
4
Jh
a
CQ
.a
_s
fi
1
i    0
V
C
W K
X
H
J
M
a s
r%    rt
P-
Ph
rt
CO
oj
EH   >
0 O 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX II.
BRITISH COLUMBIA POLICE NOMINAL ROLL AS AT MIDNIGHT
DECEMBER 31st, 1947.
Headquarters (Victoria).
Commissioner—J. Shirras, Victoria.
Deputy Commissioner—R. Peachey, Victoria.
Commissioner's Office— Regt. No.
Chief Clerk Patterson, E     134
Sr. Clerk Ferguson, W. C  ______    901
Radio Branch—
Radio Supvr. Conlan, W. F     493
Chief Radio Opr. Putland, F     438
Accounts Branch—
Inspector Moses, D. D  	
Sr. Clerk, Embleton, C. V     327
Sr. Clerk Campbell, C. C     812
1/Clerk Excell, L. B    876
2/Clerk Allen, E. E  1026
Miss J. N. Smith (stenographer)	
Miss E. M. Butler (stenographer)... 	
Miss M. Ashby (stenographer)  	
Mrs. P. M. Boyes (stenographer)  	
Quartermaster's Stores—
1/Cst. Forbes, A. C     629
1/Cst. Kirkpatrick, D. C     710
Ordnance Branch—
Armourer Marshall, R     651
Transport Branch—
Chief Mech. Supvr. McNaught, J. F. 	
Mrs. E. Mcintosh (stenographer) ____ 	
Training-school—
Sub-Inspector Ledoux, C   	
Criminal Investigation Branch—
General Office—
Inspector Harvey, R  	
Det. Sergt. Young, J. A     524
Det. Sergt. Butler, W. J     417
Det. Cst. Holm, E     573
Criminal Investigation Branch—      Regt. No.
Continued.
General Office—Continued.
Miss D. P. Neate  (stenographer)  	
Miss   G.   A.   Etheridge    (stenographer)  	
Miss P. F. Norton (stenographer)  	
Miss T. M. Vye (stenographer) ____ 	
Miss M. R. Smith (stenographer) 	
Miss A. G. Homan (stenographer) 	
Miss T. E. Brewer (stenographer)  	
Finger-print Section—
Asst. F.P. Opr. Carmichael, A.     341
Sr.   F.P.   Opr.   J.   W.   Edwards
(Vancouver)      338
1/Cst. Dryden, C. S     779
Miss D. Lancaster (stenographer) 	
Firearms Registration Section—
Asst. Chief Clerk Grimshaw, F.....    445
Miss M. E. Brinn (stenographer) 	
Mrs. J. R. Janis  (stenographer)_ 	
Miss   M.   D.   Rogerson    (stenographer)     	
Miss J. Folbigg (stenographer)  	
Traffic Branch—
Sergt. Lock, J. G. M     453
Miss   M.   G.   R.   Turner    (stenographer)     	
Personnel Branch—
Inspector Mackenzie, C. K  	
Personnel Officer Georgeson, W. A— 	
Miss D. M. Margetts (stenographer)  	 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947.
0 29
"A" Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector R. Owens, Victoria.
Divisional Clerk—Assistant Chief Clerk Kennelly, T., Victoria.
Stenographer—Mrs. W. E. Overy, Victoria.
Regt. No.
... 658
._    665
265
415
437
458
549
578
838
492
1006
709
Motor Traffic Detail—
1/Cst. Lockie, J., Victoria	
1/Cst. Ring, R., Nanaimo	
Victoria District—
Sergt. Jacklin, CC, Victoria	
1/Cst. Winegarden, N. J., Victoria
1/Cst. Daubeny, H. C. C, Victoria
1/Cst. Bond, V. J., Victoria	
1/Cst. Wyman, G., Victoria	
1/Cst. Smyth, H., Victoria	
1/Cst. Sinclair, R. W., Victoria......
3/Cst. Stark, W., Victoria  1046
Spec. Cst. Wilson, G., Victoria  	
Spec. Cst. Gaskell, H. T., Victoria....
3/Skpr. Lockwood, E. W., Ganges.
2/Cst. Whitehead, C. A., Ganges __
1/Cst. Gibault, J. G., Sidney	
3/Cst. Allen, W. F. D., Sidney  1076
1/Cst. Quinn, A. W., Sooke     793
Duncan District—
Corpl. Jeeves, F. L., Duncan     483
1/Cst. Sarsiat, E. G., Duncan     697
1/Cst. McNamara, J. K., Duncan     806
3/Cst. Dick, G. L., Duncan ___      1096
Spec. Cst. Thompson, D. G., Duncan 	
1/Cst. Kelly, T. J., Chemainus     794
1/Cst. Clunk, F. J., Chemainus     852
1/Cst. Phillips, G. A., Cowichan Lake 989
3/Cst. Adams, L., Cowichan Lake ._.._ 1079
1/Cst. Ross, R., Shawnigan Lake _____ 515
1/Cst. Meredith-Jones, J. H., Youbou    834
Nanaimo District—
S/Sergt. Thomson, W. J., Nanaimo_    293
Sgt. Pomeroy, A. J., Nanaimo     372
1/Cst. Martin, M., Nanaimo     282
1/Cst. Wellens, A. S., Nanaimo     385
1/Cst. Vickers, A. E., Nanaimo     605
1/Cst. Colquhoun, D., Nanaimo     637
1/Cst. Stewart, T. A., Nanaimo     639
1/Cst. Healey, W. L., Nanaimo     609
1/Cst. Brassard, G. M., Nanaimo ..... 927
3/Cst. Higginbottom, E. P., Nanaimo 1085
3/Cst. Graham, R. G., Nanaimo  1114
3/Cst. Stephen, N. J. L., Nanaimo ___ 1119
1/Cst. Munkley, B. E., Ladysmith _„. 716
3/Cst. Herrington, H. V., Ladysmith 1111
1/Cst. Hutchison, P. R., Parksville __ 528
1/Cst. Morrison, W. R., Qualicum ...    894
Courtenay District—
Regt. No.
Sergt. Lashmar, A. T., Courtenay....    425
1/Cst. Matheson, M., Courtenay     616
1/Radio Opr. Harrison, R. P., Courtenay      809
1/Cst. Corson, E., Courtenay     858
1/Cst. Cawdell, F. L., Courtenay__.._.    895
1/Cst. Ehly, J. M., Courtenay     960
3/Cst. Fornelli, F. A., Courtenay _____ 1089
1/Cst. Ennals, C. E., Cumberland... 885
Corpl. Dillabough, A. J., Alert Bay_.    558
3/Cst. Pybus, F., Alert Bay  1122
3/Cst. Gardiner, W. C, Alert Bay... 1141
3/Radio Opr. Sterling, R. G., Alert
Bay   1144
Cpl. Norman, H. L., Campbell River 423
3/Skpr. Beaumont, N. A., P.M.L. 9,
Campbell River      628
1/Cst.   Trant,  W.   F.   C,   Campbell
River   ___      622
3/Cst. Kent, G. F., Campbell River.. 1067
3/Cst. Nidle, F., Campbell River._____ 1109
3/Skpr. Bell, E. W., P.M.L. 10, Port
Alice       798
1/Radio Opr. Muskett, A. H., Port
Alice      807
West Coast District—
Sergt. Service, S., Port Alberni     126
Corpl. Howe, J., Port Alberni     365
1/Cst. Green, J. M., Port Alberni ... 321
1/Radio Opr. Ramsay, C. N, Port
Alberni      718
1/Cst. Mann, H., Port Alberni     822
1/Cst. Domay, E. C, Port Alberni __ 933
3/Cst. Cowen, R. F., Port Alberni.    1061
3/Cst. Martin, L., Port Alberni  1127
3/Cst. Roach, W. H., Port Alberni ... 1145
3/Skpr. Brooksbank, F.  H., P.M.L.
16, Port Alberni         675
1/Engnr. Gurney, T. B., P.M.L. 16,
Port Alberni      448
1/Cst.  McVie, W.,  P.M.L.  16, Port
Alberni     815
3/Radio   Opr.    Humphrey,   K.    A.,
P.M.L. 16, Port Alberni  1148
1/Cst. Currie, W. J., Alberni     635
3/Cst. Mcllroy, S. S., Alberni   1147
3/Cst. Dreaper, D. W., Ucluelet  1143
1/Radio   Opr.   Humphreys,   P.   J.,
Zeballos      965 O 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" B " Division.
Officer Commanding—Sub-Inspector R. S. Nelson, Nelson.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Smith, J. L., Nelson, Regt. No. 439.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Kidd, E. G., Nelson, Regt. No. 538.
Detective—Det. Cst. Quigley, J. A., Nelson, Regt. No. 562.
Radio Operator—1/Radio Opr. Patrick, H. C, Nelson, Regt. No. 880.
Stenographer—Miss P. R. Ryan, Nelson.
Motor Traffic Detail— Regt. No.
Asst. Mech. Supvr. Scales, T., Nelson    600
1/Cst. Elphick, N. H., Nelson    735
1/Cst. Gregory, J. F., Yahk     772
1/Cst. Demmon, W. A., Penticton _    951
Boundary District—■
S/Sgt. Halcrow, D., Penticton     440
Corpl. Watt, J. C, Penticton     469
1/Cst. Lemm, W. I., Penticton     555
1/Radio Opr. Fleet, W. G., Penticton    660
1/Cst. Attree, K. A., Penticton     985
3/Cst. Tobiasen, T. R., Penticton.__... 1069
3/Cst. Teskey, N. E., Penticton  1087
3/Cst. Mercer, R. J., Penticton  1098
3/Cst. Howk, H. H., Penticton  1137
1/Cst. Benton, W. E., Hedley     990
1/Cst. Haynes, B. H., Keremeos     682
1/Cst. Nelson, F. E., Oliver    586
3/Cst. Clayton, R. M., Oliver  1040
3/Cst. Marcus, M., Osoyoos  1131
1/Cst. Neff, D. G., Princeton     666
3/Cst. Hare, W. F., Princeton ____ __ 1056
3/Cst. Suais, B. G., Princeton  1132
1/Cst. Thorsteinson, I. G., Summer-
land      987
Grand Forks District—
Sergt. McKay, E. F., Grand Forks... 456
1/Cst. Pelton, G. A., Grand Forks ... 862
1/Cst. Cox, J. E. D., Grand Forks .. 871
3/Cst. Robinson, J. A., Grand Forks 1118
3/Cst. Carlson, R. L., Grand Forks . 1130
1/Cst. Rogers, D. G., Greenwood .....    795
East Kootenay District—
Sergt. McKay, W. J., Cranbrook _____ 337
Corpl. McBrayne, M. B., Cranbrook    486
1/Cst. Shiell, R., Cranbrook     506
1/Cst. Quaite, T. C. S., Cranbrook ...    680
East Kootenay District—Continued. Regt. No.
1/Cst. Bacon, H. F., Cranbrook    904
3/Cst. Macdonald, A., Cranbrook _____ 1082
3/Radio Opr. Withers, W. D., Cranbrook   1115
1/Cst. Howarth, P. W., Invermere___    883
Corpl. Slater, F., Kimberley     507
1/Cst. Spiers, D. A., Kimberley     910
3/Cst. Smith, E. E., Kimberley  1055
3/Cst. McHale, K. M., Kimberley ..... 1138
Fernie District—
Corpl. Brabazon, A. G., Fernie     434
1/Cst. McKim, S. A., Fernie     726
1/Cst. Ivens, R. J., Fernie     952
1/Cst. Pringle, J. B., Fernie      997
2/Cst. Hcvind, G. E., Fernie  1005
1/Cst. Jackson, J. S., Natal      627
3/Cst. McLeod, M. H., Natal  1116
West Kootenay District—
Sergt. White, J., Nelson       402
1/Cst. McLaughlin, W. G., Nelson..._.    418
1/Cst. Blaney, G. S., Nelson     552
3/Cst. Ruggles, W. M., Nelson  1063
1/Cst. Payne, J. R., Castlegar     776
1/Cst. Borodula, A., Castlegar     996
1/Cst. Doree, L. A., Creston     360
3/Cst. Machin, D. R., Creston  1108
1/Cst. Martin, W., Crescent Valley .    786
1/Cst. Smith, A. G., Fruitvale     656
1/Cst. Glaholm, T. W., Kaslo     566
1/Cst. Butler, H. J., Nakusp      571
1/Cst. Roberts, J. A., New Denver..    831
1/Cst. Parsons, M. S., Rossland     713
3/Cst. Wickens, K. H., Rossland  1044
1/Cst. Cline, G. R., Salmo   1002
1/Cst. Pye, D. H., Trail     829 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947.
O 31
" C " Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector H. H. Mansell, Kamloops.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Gunn, A. E. A., Kamloops, Regt. No. 411.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Reith, S., Kamloops, Regt. No. 422.
Detective—Det. Cst. Todd, J. W., Kamloops, Regt. No. 727.
Stenographer—Mrs. M. J. Harris, Kamloops.
Motor Traffic Detail— Regt. No.
Asst. Mech. Supvr. Fiander, T. A.,
Kamloops      447
1/Cst. Gurr, C J., Vernon    523
1/Cst. Bell, J., Kamloops     737
Kamloops District—
S/Sergt. McClinton, J. H., Kamloops    367
1/Cst. Heatley, G. D., Kamloops     559
1/Cst. Teal, W. T., Kamloops      805
3/Clerk Schoening, H. O., Kamloops 1099
1/Cst. Ball, G. D., Blue River     837
1/Cst. Sutherland, A. J., Chase     695
1/Cst. Fraser, T. C, Merritt     706
1/Cst. Roberts, W. P., Red Pass     938
Kamloops City—
Corpl. Jennings, H. J., Kamloops     335
1/Cst. Nelson, N.C.B., Kamloops _.    733
1/Cst. Forrester, R., Kamloops     770
2/Cst. MacColl, D. C, Kamloops  1014
3/Cst. Williams, D. G., Kamloops .... 1027
3/Cst. Hall, I. E„ Kamloops  1034
3/Cst. Parnell, G. A., Kamloops  1073
3/Cst. Pierce, F. G., Kamloops  1100
3/Cst. Service, C H., Kamloops  1106
North-east Kootenay District—
Sergt. Barwis, C. W. A., Revelstoke    352
1/Cst. Macdonald, M., Revelstoke ___.    574
2/Cst. King, J., Revelstoke   1013
3/Cst. Mathews, T. A., Revelstoke _. 1080
3/Radio    Opr.    Richmond,    R.    E.,
Revelstoke       1120
1/Cst. Craig, W. A., Golden     782
Cariboo District—
S/Sergt.    Fairbairn    A.,    Williams
Lake        33
1/Cst. Rosberg, E. L., Williams Lake    902
3/Cst. Jensen, K. J., Williams Lake 1081
3/Radio  Opr. Kyte, R.  E. P., Williams Lake   1086
1/Cst. Wales, E. A., Quesnel     614
3/Cst. Hacking, G. N, Quesnel  1072
1/Cst. Turnbull, R. H., Alexis Creek    955
1/Cst. Buxton, L. P., Barkerville   -__    728
Yale District— Regt. No.
Sergt. Jarvis, E. A., Ashcroft  375
1/Cst. Marsh, T. B., Ashcroft  698
3/Cst. Haugland, H. O., Ashcroft.... 1117
1/Cst. Grahame, M. G., Bralorne  526
3/Radio Opr. Ingram, D. B., Bralorne 1064
1/Cst. Leighton, R. K., Bridge River 610
1/Cst. Millar, A. M., Clinton   575
1/Cst. Thomson, D. S. E., Lillooet... 428
1/Cst. Blakiston-Grey, J., Lytton ___. 652
1/Cst.    Godfrey,    M.    R.,    Spences
Bridge           841
Vernon District—
Sergt. Backler, L., Vernon  470
Corpl. Knox, J. A., Vernon  500
1/Cst. Duncan, A., Vernon  721
1/Cst. Drysdale, P. Q., Vernon   865
1/Cst. Dale, H. M., Vernon   877
1/Cst. Calvert, A., Vernon  861
1/Cst. Gibbon, A. E., Vernon __. 947
1/Cst. Krivenko, A., Vernon   978
2/Cst. Regan, F. X. J., Vernon  1020
3/Cst. Dunk, E. W., Vernon  1039
1/Cst.   Hayward,   R.   H.   P.,   Armstrong   412
3/Cst. Newhouse, A. P., Armstrong 1091
1/Cst. Drysdale, W., Enderby  814
1/Cst. Quesnel, J. A., Lumby   269
1/Cst. Howell, D. H., Salmon Arm _ 826
2/Cst. Payne, P. B., Salmon Arm ._ 1017
1/Cst. Aylward, W. P., Sicamous _____ 738
Kelowna Districts—
Sergt. McKay, R. B., Kelowna _____  474
Corpl. Davidson, W. H., Kelowna  403
1/Cst. Murdoch, J. W., Kelowna  557
1/Cst. Poole, J. G., Kelowna  781
1/Cst. Baker, T. F., Kelowna  905
3/Cst. Jessop, A. J. W., Kelowna  1059
3/Cst. Garbutt, W. G., Kelowna  1083
3/Cst. Drybrough, H. L., Kelowna .... 1112 O 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" D " Division.
Officer Commanding—Sub-Inspector F. B. Woods-Johnson, Prince Rupert.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Mead, G. D., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 201.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Macdonald, G. J. G., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 587.
Radio Operator—1/Radio Opr. Ward, J., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 847.
Prince Rupert District—                    Regt. No.
S/Sergt.   Johnson,    G.    A.,   Prince
Rupert      202
1/Cst.    Anderson,    E.    D.,    Prince
Rupert      625
3/Skpr.   Good,   R.   C,   P.M.L.   15,
Prince Rupert      835
2/Engnr. Moorehouse T., P.M.L. 15,
Prince Rupert      848
3/Radio Opr.  Clark, W. B., P.M.L.
15, Prince Rupert  1121
1/Cst. Nelson, G. S., Stewart     851
1/Cst. Jamieson, H. O., Atlin     962
1/Cst. Brue, T., Terrace      873
3/Cst. Rogers, R. S., Terrace  1134
1/Cst. Dale-Johnson, V. L. E., Mas-
set        712
1/Cst. Walker, F. J., Queen Charlotte 867
1/Cst. Simons, G. L,, Port Edward _ 671
3/Cst. Turner, L. W., Port Edward 1135
1/Cst. Brett, R. A., Telegraph Creek 1004
Hazelton District—
Sergt. Brunton, T. D., Smithers ______    449
1/Cst. Stevens, M., Smithers     930
2/Cst. Zorn, A. E., Smithers  1024
3/Radio Opr. Davis, H. S., Smithers 1140
1/Cst. Richmond, W. H., Burns Lake    919
Hazelton District—Continued. Regt. No.
3/Cst. Anderson, G. W., Burns Lake 1101
1/Cst. West, W. A. A., Hazelton _____ 824
Prince Rupert City—
Sergt. Potterton, L. A.  N., Prince
Rupert   297
Corpl. Taylor, A. H., Prince Rupert 530
1/Cst. White, J. R., Prince Rupert _ 714
1/Cst. Fletcher, J. M.,Prince Rupert 917
1/Cst. Redhead, G., Prince Rupert __ 918
3/Cst. Davidson, A. J., Prince Rupert 1028
3/Cst.   Johnstone,   H.    D.,   Prince
Rupert   1047
3/Cst. Rossiter, A. L., Prince Rupert 1062
3/Cst. DeWitt, K. N, Prince Rupert 1105
Spec.  Cst.  Thorsteinson,  H.  R.,
Prince Rupert   	
Ocean Falls District—
Corpl. McAlpine, M. N., Ocean Falls 533
3/Skpr.   Mason,   W.   J.,   P.M.L.   7,
Ocean Falls   813
1/Radio Opr. Hicks, J. M., P.M.L. 7,
Ocean Falls   588
3/Engnr. Gorrie,  C  D.,  P.M.L. 7,
Ocean Falls   810
1/Cst. Medley, H. E. J., Ocean Falls 975
1/Cst. Bradley, E., Bella Coola  855 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1947.
O 33
" E " Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector C. Clark, Vancouver.
In Charge of Investigation—Inspector F. Swanson, Vancouver.
Criminal Investigation Branch—Det. Corpl. Macdonald, J. A.
Criminal Investigation Branch—Det. Corpl. Kelsberg, P.
Special Constable—Topham, G. R.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Wellings, J. E.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Weld, B. C.
Radio Operator—1/Radio Opr. Bulman-Fleming, S. E.
Stenographer—Miss A. Welch.
Clerk—3/Clerk Ehly, J. J.
Motor Traffic Detail— Regt. No.
Mech.  Supvr. Macdonald, H. D.,
Vancouver     520
Mech. Cave, E. E., Vancouver    702
1/Cst.  Bonner,  H.  C,  New Westminster      864
1/Cst. Estlin, C E., Burnaby    914
1/Cst. James, W., Chilliwack     926
Vancouver District—
Sergt. Hooker, J. W., Vancouver     388
Corpl. Kirkup, J., Vancouver     387
Corpl. Phipps, M. T., Vancouver    446
1/Cst. Cartmell, H., Vancouver     419
1/Cst. Orchard, W. C, Vancouver____ 502
1/Cst. Bradner, F. E., Vancouver____. 567
2/Cst. Johnson, D. B. G., Vancouver 1021
3/Cst. Tabbutt, L. J., Vancouver______ 1053
3/Cst. Millar, F. L., Vancouver  1146
Spec.   Cst.   Peacock,   M.   M.,   Vancouver   	
Miss L. K. Reid  (stenographer),
Vancouver  	
1/Cst. Dowling, J. T. E., University    624
3/Cst. Martin, O. E., University  1093
3/Cst. Humeston, M. C, University 1129
1/Cst. Malins, E. M., Squamish     839
2/Cst. Thompson, A. R., Squamish.... 1015
1/Cst. Purdy, J. W., Sechelt     998
1/Cst.  Cummins,  J.  N.,  Britannia
Beach      853
3/Cst.  Petersen, W.  A.,  Gibsons
Landing  1107
New Westminster District—
Sergt. Hatcher, W. J., New Westminster     210
1/Cst. Vise, R., New Westminster____ 556
Det.   Cst.   Saunders,   F.   G.,   New
Westminster      662
1/Cst.  Causton,  I.  R.,  New Westminster     677
3/Cst.  Jensen,   K.   S.,   New  Westminster   1057
3/Cst. Taylor, G. R., Pattullo Bridge 1102
3/Cst. Stein, W., Pattullo Bridge_..___ 1125
3/Cst. McCowan, J., Pattullo Bridge 1133
3/Cst. Stinson, J., Pattullo Bridge... 1139
1/Cst. Home, A. G., Port Coquitlam    723
New Westminster District—
Continued. Regt. No.
3/Cst. Begley, G. R., Port Coquitlam 1043
1/Cst. McGary, J. D., Coquitlam    825
3/Cst. Cave, R., Coquitlam  1126
Corpl. Baker, T. R., Essondale     135
1/Cst. Irving, W. B., Haney     769
1/Cst. Gibbon, N. D., Haney    931
1/Cst. Johnston, J. A., Langley     541
1/Cst. Thorsteinson, F. C, Langley 1001
1/Cst. Gray, J. D. L., Mission    663
1/Cst. Piers, C. E., Mission    912
1/Cst. Strouts, R. W., Mission     915
Powell River District—
Sergt. Hall, O. L., Powell River     278
1/Cst. Faryon, L. E., Powell River __   823
1/Radio Opr. Dawson, C J., Powell
River     881
3/Cst. Dornan, W. N., P.G.D. 2,
Powell River   1095
1/Cst. Hall, J. O., Westview    582
1/Cst. Crouch, C. P., Westview    986
Chilliwack District—
Sergt. Raybone, S. E., Chilliwack _____   369
1/Radio Opr. Dobell, J. D., Chilliwack      599
1/Cst. Fox, A. E. P., Chilliwack     602
1/Cst. Fleming, B. V., Chilliwack.___.    840
1/Cst.   Cottingham,   W.   L.,   Chilliwack      932
1/Cst. Fielding, J. A., Chilliwack_.__._    970
3/Cst. Milnes, B. B., Chilliwack  1066
3/Cst. Harding, R., Chilliwack  1092
Corpl. McWhirter, D. R., Abbotsford    503
2/Cst. Lamb, J. F., Abbotsford  1011
3/Cst. Armstrong, J. H., Abbotsford 1036
1/Cst. Ferguson, S., Agassiz    856
3/Cst. Tooley, W. A. T., Agassiz  1048
1/Cst. Dodd, W. J., Yale     992
Corpl. Waddell, C. J., Hope     546
3/Cst. Bertram, B. R., Hope  1123
1/Cst. Walker, R., Sumas    704
North Vancouver District—
Sergt.   Herdman,   T.,   North   Vancouver      315
Det.   Cst.   Williams,  J.   A.,   North
Vancouver      59 O 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
; E " Division—Continued.
North Vancouver District—
Continued.                                     Regt. No.
1/Cst. Sharpe, G. C, North Vancouver      153
1/Cst.   Smith,  P.
couver 	
B.,   North  Van-
362
1/Cst. Murphy, E., North Vancouver   443
1/Cst. Fetherstonhaugh, M. R.,
North Vancouver	
1/Cst. Macdonald, D. A., North Vancouver 	
1/Cst. Nott, S. T., North Vancouver
1/Cst. Felker, D. B., North Vancouver     	
2/Cst. Mcintosh, D. A. D., North
Vancouver	
444
683
908
916
908
2/Cst. Knight, D. A., North Vancouver   1023
3/Cst. Wicklow, D. C, North Vancouver   1078
1/Cst. Murdoch, W., Deep Cove	
1/Cst. Payne, D. A. B., Lynn Creek
Burnaby District—
Sub-Inspr. Macdonald, A., Burnaby
Sergt. Williamson, E. C, Burnaby.—
766
640
405
Sergt. Henry, J. A., Burnaby     414
Burnaby District—Continued. Regt. No.
Det.-Corpl. Emsley, G. J., Burnaby..    509
1/Cst. Foote, R. C. B., Burnaby    215
1/Cst. Twist, H., Burnaby     607
1/Cst. Abrahamson, A. A., Burnaby   874
1/Cst. Tuttle, A. J., Burnaby     892
1/Cst. Smith, L. G., Burnaby     909
1/Const. Klick, H. E., Burnaby    923
1/Cst. Turtle, E. M. C, Burnaby.     959
2/Cst. Johannson, B. L., Burnaby.... 1019
3/Cst. Bishop, J. H., Burnaby  1031
3/Cst. McKay, R. G., Burnaby  1071
3/Cst. Mayne, B. C, Burnaby  1136
3/Cst. Clarke, J. E., Burnaby  1142
3/Cst. Brown, D. N, Burnaby  1149
3/Cst. Brown, L., Burnaby  1150
Spec. Cst. Service, S., Burnaby  	
Spec. Cst. St. Pierre, V. H., Burnaby 	
Richmond District—
Sergt. Murray, W. C, Richmond    424
1/Cst. Pearson, G. S., Richmond     579
1/Cst. Secord, I. S., Richmond     759
1/Cst. Spall, A. E., Richmond     801
3/Cst. Stone, R. P., Richmond  1045
3/Cst. Tweedhope, H. O., Richmond 1110
Spec. Cst. Bassett, G. A., Richmond 	
Fort George Subdivision.
Officer Commanding—Sub-Inspector G. H. Clark, Prince George.
Regt. No. ■ Regt. No.
Corpl. DeWitt, N. O., Prince George.... 368          3/Cst. Clark, L., Prince George  1104
1/Cst. Smith, W., Prince George  270          3/Cst. Lake, G. T., Prince George  1113
1/Cst. Olson, L. I., Prince George  511 Spec.   Cst.   Flamank,  J.   D.,   Prince
1/Radio   Opr.   Lennox,   S.  J.,   Prince George   	
George   843           1/Cst. Maxwell, T. R., McBride     921
1/Cst. McKinnon, L. W., Prince George 903           3/Cst. Seaton, A. R., McBride  1051
1/Cst. Cawdell, C. A. B., Prince George 958           1/Cst. Moore, R. C, Vanderhoof     771
1/Cst. Weeks, A. W., Prince George.____ 983 1/Cst. Russell, G. P. W., Vanderhoof __    994
3/Cst. Vandusen, H. M., Prince George 1068 1/Cst. Perry, G. A., Fort St. James _____    920
Peace River Subdivision.
Officer Commanding—Sub-Inspector G. J. Duncan, Pouce Coupe.
Regt. No.
1/Radio Opr. Robson, A., Pouce Coupe
1/Cst. Jobling, D. A., Pouce Coupe	
3/Cst. Netzel, H. H., Pouce Coupe	
1/Cst.  Lumsden,  W. J.  F.,  Fort St.
John 	
1/Cst. Youngberg, G. E., Fort St. John
1/Cst. Betts, J. F., Lower Post	
784
1/Cst.
969
Corpl.
1090
1/Cst.
1/Cst.
731
3/Cst.
964
3/Cst.
820
3/Cst.
Regt. No.
Boulton, P., Fort Nelson     667
MacAndrew, G., Dawson Creek 421
Fletcher, W. D., Dawson Creek 948
Burke, P. N, Dawson Creek...___ 1003
Low, M. G., Dawson Creek  1030
Tanner, E. H., Dawson Creek... 1060
Williams, D. B., Dawson Creek 1065 Report of the Inspector of Gaols, 1947-48.
The Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my annual report on the four Provincial gaols
in the Province for the year ended March 31st, 1948.
OAKALLA PRISON FARM.
Report of Warden J. Millman:—
" General.—In forwarding my annual report I am happy to report that despite
extremely high cost of materials, stock-feed, etc., operation of the various departments
during the year has been accomplished in an economical manner.
" Sheet-metal Plant.—An average of more than eleven prisoners per day have been
usefully employed in this plant. The laundry produced a revenue of $324.99 and
employed an average of seventeen men per diem. In the shoe-shop slightly more than
an average of six prisoners were daily engaged. The instructor in charge of the
tailor-shop reports 4,884 articles of clothing made during the year; thirteen prisoners
were daily engaged in this work. The paint-shop reports the Warden's house, women's
quarters, store-room, hospital, main kitchen, east and west wings of the gaol, boiler-
house, old gaol, piggery, and hen-houses having been painted or redecorated during the
year; the result of this work is best evidenced by the pleasing and sanitary appearance
of both the main buildings and the outbuildings.
" The following table gives the daily average of prisoners employed in the various
types of work carried out at the gaol:—
Clerical        4.0
Bush operations     32.3
Farm and garden  120.2
Land and road improvement       7.2
Interior maintenance      89.7
Bathroom      11.2
Kitchen      32.3
Boiler-house         9.6
Shoe-shop           6.1
Carpenter-shop         8.1
Laundry      17.5
Tailor-shop      13.0
Sheet-metal plant     11.2
Scholastic      50.0
" It will be noted that more than 400 prisoners are employed each day working
under skilled instructors. Those prisoners who exhibit an interest in any particular
branch of skilled labour are given special attention to the end that they may fit themselves for employment after discharge.
"An addition to the Warden's residence, under construction at the time of my last
report, has been completed and has proved a worth-while improvement to this dwelling.
" Installation of the new water-mains has been slow, due to extreme scarcity of
materials, but this work is nevertheless progressing steadily and should be completed
in the near future.
35 O 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Roads within the prison grounds have been greatly improved during the year by
an additional 8,500 square feet of hard-surfacing, edged with concrete shoulders, and
it is hoped further improvements will be continued next year.
" The building instructor reports the following construction work completed: One
bedroom and bathroom to Warden's residence; new siding on old wood-shed; new
doors and enlarged opening to licence-plate shop; new shelves and partitions erected
in bathroom.
" The Chief Gaoler reports sy2 acres of land cleared, 3 acres slashed and burned,
6 culverts repaired, and 2V2 miles of ditching on bottom-land have been cleared.
Sixty-five cords of wood, 150 fence-posts, and 20 cedar poles were cut. Three hundred
and fifty yards of new fence on the east side of the property were erected during the
year. Hay-barn and calf-barn were completed during the year, in addition to many
other alterations to various buildings.
"Field and garden produce grown during the year still continues to show a
splendid increase and a profitable one, as will be seen in the following summary:—
Expenses. Income.
Field and garden ___ $5,867.29 Field and garden.... $10,584.39
Piggery   5,926.92 Piggery   10,206.80
Poultry   1,825.04 Poultry ..  2,085.93
Dairy   5,101.27 Dairy   4,736.84
$18,720.52
Profit (credit)        8,893.44
$27,613.96 $27,613.96
" The behaviour of the inmates of the men's gaol has deteriorated somewhat and
materially improved in the women's gaol. It is difficult to give any specific reason for
this, unless perhaps it is due to more rigidly enforced discipline coupled with the
revised treatment of drug addicts who, generally, are the chief offenders.
" Health of all inmates has been satisfactory. In the matter of escapes we were
faced with a rather serious situation last November when fourteen of the Star class
made their way to freedom on a foggy night by cutting and removing a bar from a
window-grille in the west wing, but otherwise the number of escapes has remained
below the average, no doubt due to the increased staff and consequently improved
preventive measures.
" The population, which is increasing yearly, reached the overflow mark in the
women's gaol last summer, necessitating the opening of a women's gaol at Prince
George. The men's gaol was also filled to capacity last winter, and at times taxed the
staff in their custodial duties.
" The Star class continues to absorb a large percentage of the youthful first
offenders received and is maintaining a very satisfactory record despite the handicaps
with which we are faced. The excellent work turned out in the workshop is particularly worthy of note and has been the subject of many favourable comments."
WOMEN'S SECTION.
Miss Mona Russell, R.N., matron in charge, reports:—
" Some 58,007 well-balanced and appetizing meals were served during the year,
with extra rations served at Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year. During
the year less canning was done, due to our overcrowded condition; however, the following edibles were canned:  376 one-half gallons of pickles, pears, and jelly. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1947-48. 0 37
"A total of 1,209 articles were made by the sewing and needle-work branch of our
institution, and repairs made to 1,751 articles. Rugs and bed-throws were also made
and are now in use in the building. Repairs were also made to 5,420 pairs of men's
socks, 1,049 shirts, 477 undershirts, and 1,165 other articles.
" Health: The gaol physician made regular visits during the year, and I am very
pleased to state that the general health of the inmates is excellent.
" Recreation: We extend our thanks to the Elizabeth Fry Society, who completed
the rock garden in the recreation-yard, thus making a very attractive place for the
inmates to take their outdoor exercise. An occupational therapeutist has been employed
by this society to teach the girls shell-work, etc., once a week for two hours, and the
inmates appear to be very interested.
" Mrs. Major Martin, of the Salvation Army, has been exceptionally helpful with
many of our problems. Miss Weal, of the Sincerity Group, has also extended us valuable assistance over the past few years."
JUVENILE OFFENDERS.
A board comprising S. Rockborough Smith, Director of New Haven, E. G. B.
Stevens, Chief Probation Officer, and Mr. Camm, of our Oakalla staff, was set up in
order to pre-screen prospective candidates for New Haven. This board meets twice
a month and discusses the case of each inmate and eliminates those who could not
possibly be accepted by the clinic.
Senior Guard T. A. Camm, who gathers material from the official records and
interviews candidates selected by the board, reports as follows :•—
" On November 24th last the New Haven School was opened by the transfer of
eleven young inmates from this institution. Since that date a number of young
inmates have been transferred from the Oakalla pool from time to time following
Provincial Clinic psychiatric examination.
" Our Star class carpenter-shop has continued to operate as before. Under the
direction of Guard Berkey over 220 pieces of furniture have been turned out, completely renovated, to the estimated value of $1,252. Other work has been done for use
at Oakalla. It has also been demonstrated that much constructive work can be
accomplished by young inmates if afforded the opportunity.
"An outside working party has been actively employed about the gaol property
under Guard Wilson and has done much useful work.
" Correspondence courses have been promoted, not only with the Star class, but
with all other inmates who are desirous of improving their education. Many are
doing excellent work in their spare time. The courses range from very elementary to
advanced high-school grades, as well as vocational training, such as radio, auto engineering, geology and mineralogy, poultry-keeping, etc.
"As in previous years, contact is maintained with the Chief Probation Officer, and
assistance rendered him in his work among the young offenders. No effort is spared
to assist any inmate who might be in need of legitimate assistance."
NELSON GAOL.
Warden R. S. Nelson reports as follows:—
" This year statistics show an increase in the gaol population, but there is still
extreme difficulty in getting suitable trusties to perform the necessary duties in the
gaol, in particular for culinary purposes. The peak of the inmate population was
89 and the lowest 15.
" The inmates not working with the outside gang are allowed the freedom of the
large-cell block during the day and, when weather permits, one hour in the exercise- O 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
yard daily, except Sunday. For reading material, they have a well-stocked library to
choose from throughout the day. A radio, controlled from the gaol office, provides
them with a two-hour programme each evening from 7 to 9 o'clock and a three-and-a-
half-hour programme on Saturday nights from 5.30 to 9 p.m.
" The Salvation Army holds a service every Sunday morning at 10 o'clock, and
occasionally the Pentecostal Assembly and other denominations arrange for a meeting
on Sunday afternoons at 2.30 p.m.
" The general health of the inmates in the past year has been good, with only two
cases having to be hospitalized on instructions of the gaol surgeon.
" Prisoner labour in the garden produced vegetables to the estimated value of
$627.06, a slight decrease from the previous year; this was mainly on account of
unsatisfactory seed.
"All painted surfaces throughout the interior of the gaol have been washed, and
the kitchen and laundry whitewashed.
" Discipline during the year was very good. There were two escapes during the
year, but in both instances the men were recaptured and sentenced to six months,
consecutive with the term they were serving."
KAMLOOPS GAOL.
Warden H. H. Mansell reports:—
" Conditions respecting the operation and administration of affairs of the gaol
during the past year have been very satisfactory. Gaol rules and regulations, supplemented by order to govern local conditions, were strictly adhered to, and it was not
necessary to reprimand any one prisoner during the year. All inmates, except those
awaiting trial, have been kept regularly employed with janitor-work and other services
required in the police offices, quarters, garden, and ground around the Provincial
Buildings.    All prison clothing was kept clean and in good repair.
" Constable W. T. Teal, employed as gaoler, has carried out his duties in a very
satisfactory manner, especially in view of the considerable increase in the number of
prisoners incarcerated in the gaol during the year 1947. In this regard I might state
that there has been an increase of 141 over and above the number who were admitted
to the gaol in 1946.
" One prisoner, an Indian, escaped during the year but was recaptured within a
few days and sentenced to three months' imprisonment."
PRINCE GEORGE GAOL.
Warden G. H. Clark reports as follows:—
" Facilities of our small gaol for men continue to be severely taxed. There have
been no breaches of gaol regulations and no escapes. Male prisoners have been
employed cutting wood, janitor-work, and in the garden of the women's gaol.
" In August, 1947, the former army detention barracks was opened as a women's
gaol, and twenty-six inmates were flown in from Oakalla Prison to relieve congestion
at that institution, and in March this year a further twenty-five female prisoners from
the same place were admitted. Miss B. Maybee, formerly of Oakalla Prison, is in
charge of this section of the gaol.
" The inmates of the women's gaol are employed in sewing and various activities
concerning the running of the institution. They put an exhibit of handicrafts in the
local fall fair which caused much interest locally, and many favourable comments were
overheard. At the time of the polio epidemic last fall the inmates were of great
assistance to the local hospital; stacks of material were brought into the gaol, which
were returned to the hospital shortly afterwards, in the form of sheets, pillow-cases,
binders, etc. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1947-48. O 39
" The Salvation Army holds regular services in the men's gaol, and the ministers
of all denominations represented locally take turns in holding Sunday services in the
women's gaol. Both gaols have libraries, and Miss Sergeant, librarian of the local
Provincial Library, has been most co-operative in supplying books."
LIBRARIES.
The continued high circulation of books in our gaol libraries is a source of great
satisfaction. At Oakalla Prison the men's library circulated some 23,640 books during
the year, and the women's library, 1,992. At Prince George, Nelson, and Kamloops
the libraries in these institutions are building up their supplies of books.
This service from C. K. Morison, Provincial Librarian, and his assistants, is of
inestimable value in our gaol administration, and their willingness and co-operation in
meeting the many demands for books is appreciated.
CONCLUSION.
In concluding may I extend my deep appreciation to the Salvation Army, the
various denominational churches, the John Howard Society, and the Elizabeth Fry
Society for their keen interest and help toward the spiritual welfare of the inmates in
all our Provincial gaols.
I am also grateful to the Warden of Oakalla Prison Farm, as well as the Wardens
of the other minor Provincial gaols, and their staffs, for their loyalty and interest in
improving conditions in their respective institutions, and also to the Department for
help and guidance in the many matters that arise in the administration of our gaols.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. SHIRRAS,
Inspector of Gaols. O 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX.
ANNUAL REPORT ON GAOLS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1948.
Oakalla.
Nelson. Kamloops.        £*«•
Total.
1. Total number of county gaols in B.C	
2. Total expenditure for gaol maintenance
in B.C.—
Year ended March 31st, 1948	
Year ended March 31st, 1947	
3. Average total maintenance cost per day
per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1948	
Year ended March 31st, 1947	
Average dietary cost per day per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1948	
Year ended March 31st, 1947	
4. Number of prisoners committed—
Year ended March 31st, 1948	
Year ended March 31st, 1947	
411,477.88
$21,138.50
287,388.38
12,810.47
$1.73
$1.64
1.40
1.84
$0.37
$0.34
.29
.37
3,375
229
2,745
120
1,341.15
1,602.07
$1.17
1.03
$0.36
.28
330
262
$25,296.41
1,949.04
$2.73
1.14
0.48
.33
924
495
$464,253.94
306,749.96
$1.75
1.35
1.37
.32
4,858
3,622
I. Movement of Population, Year ended March 31st,
1948.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
634
20
?
13
674
Received—
3,375
5
18
2
502
99
229
41
2
5
3
330
	
924
4,001
280
330
924
5,535
Discharged—
2,597
56
28
20
18
3
101
332
300
502
149
4
2
14
7
101
200
1
43
10
68
176
1
1
325
222
138
32
3,957
277
322
895
5,451
678
23
15
42
758 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1947-48.
0 41
II. Commitments.
1946-47.
1947-48.
10
13
9
12
168
216
896
1,224
178
127
2,071
2,924
351
416
27
15
3,533
4,585
219,374
264,266
18,279
21,913
589.645
719
7
19
9
21
3
4
Decrease.
Increase.
Murder	
Manslaughter	
Crimes—
Against the person	
Against property	
Against public morals and decency	
Against public order and peace	
Other offences not enumerated above	
Insanity	
Number of prisoners sentenced	
Number of days' stay of prisoners	
Average number of prisoners per month.
Average number of prisoners per day	
Escapes	
Escapes and recaptured	
Deaths in gaols	
48
328
853
65
1,052
44,892
3,634
130
12
12
1
III. Sex.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
2,987
388
202
27
296
34
844
80
4,329
529
Totals	
3,375
229
330
924
4,858
IV. Educational Status.
219
2,125
952
79
53
131
42
3
87
186
52
5
110
640
156
18
469
3,082
1,202
105
Totals     	
3,375
229
330
924
4,858
V. Nationality.
(Place of Birth.)
British—
2,513
408
9
155
15
302
17
797
32
3,767
472
9
Totals	
Foreign—
2,930
128
278
31
8
170
54
319
3
8
829
9
7
1
78
4,248
145
347
32
86
3,375
229
330
924
4,858
VI. Habits as to Use of Intoxicants.
Abstainers	
Temperate	
Intemperate	
Totals
192
1.217
1,966        |
I
33
53
143
32
27
271
3,375
229
330
28
473
423
924
285
1,770
2,803
4,858 O 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
VII. Habits as to Use of Drugs.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
3,098
277
229
330
908
16
4,565
293
Totals	
3,375
229
330
924
4,858
VIII. Occupations.
201
648
294
1,311
179
63
102
432
145
43
41
120
18
143
43
5
94
35
3
7
21
31
80
672
81
25
14
408
724
420
2,197
313
91
5
128
432
	
145
Totals	
3,375
229
330
924
4,858
IX. Racial.
X. Civil State.
XI. Ages.
White	
2,907
33
391
36
8
214
112
2
215
1
761
3
158
2
3,994
38
15
779
39
g
Totals	
3,375
229
330
924
4,858
2,079
849
133
314
108
91
3
27
208
58
24
40
683
243
38
60
2,978
1,241
198
441
Totals	
3,375
229
330
924
4,858
440
501
406
692
662
445
229
23
33
31
62
37
22
21
35
41
31
76
78
42
27
121
126
115
191
199
106
66
619
21 to 25	
701
25 to 30	
583
30 to 40	
1,021
40 to 50	
976
50 to 60	
615
Over 60	
343
Totals	
3,375
229
330
924
4,858 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1947-48.
0 43
XII. Creeds.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
64
2
15
18
65
1
5
10
37
11
82
25
729
61
51
10
233
38
488
1,204
321
72
43
61
116
11
17
900
137
4
73
10
14
1
11
74
28
12
4
24
215
19
69
8
59
413
41
147
32
328
51
582
1,906
409
219
	
75
61
Totals	
3,375
229
330
924
4,858
XIII. Duration of Sentence.
981
638
242
439
379
190
83
188
71
11
3
80
28
12
34
14
4
1
39
142
72
28
14
17
1
703
28
49
74
34
12
8
16
1,906
766
331
561
444
207
92
2
4
6
245
75
17
3
43
43
138
17
155
2
10
2
1
11
Totals	
3,375
229
330
924 O 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
XIV. Previous Convictions.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
1,395
483
280
185
143
104
83
70
42
38
47
42
44
43
32
26
25
22
37
150
31
53
159
16
25
14
5
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
170
36
20
14
7
3
7
4
5
3
10
5
6
6
7
7
3
5
13
607
122
79
42
19
26
8
5
4
3
3
2
1
3
1
2,331
1	
656
2	
404
3	
255
4	
174
5	
135
6 :	
100
7	
80
8	
51
9	
44
10	
61
11	
64
12               	
60
13	
49
14	
41
15	
34
16	
32
17	
26
18 and 19	
43
20 to 29	
163
30 to 39             	
40 to 49	
81
60 to 59	
60 to 69	
64
70 to 79	
80 to 99	
Over 100	
Totals	
3,375
229
330
924
4,858
58.6
30.57
48.4
34.3 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1947-48.
0 45
XV. Offences for which Prisoners were committed and sentenced during the Year.
Commitments.
Sentences.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
(a)  Crimes against the person—
147
15
19
23
9
1
156
15
20
23
130
12
17
23
11
3
141
12
17
26
Totals	
204
10
214
182
14
196
(fc)   Crimes against property—
945
110
57
39
37
19
1
982
129
58
39
1,277
81
56
39
62
7
1
16
1,339
88
57
55
Totals	
1,151
57
1,208
1,453
86
1,539
(c)   Crimes against public morals and decency—
Oakalla	
75
4
4
16
19
1
94
5
4
16
76
2
4
16
18
1
8
94
3
4
24
Totals	
99
20
119
98
27
125
(d)   Crimes against public order and peace—
Oakalla...  .   .. .
1,581
98
281
627
316
34
17
1,897
103
315
644
1,670
95
274
627
332
3
33
69
2,002
98
307
696
Totals	
2,587
372
2,959
2,666
437
3,103
482
*
489
509
10
519
Grand  totals   (totals  of   (a),
(6), (c), (<.),and (e) )
4,523
466
4,989
4,908
574
5,482
XVI. Employment of Prisoners.
(Per Cent, of Population.)
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Clerical	
0.630
30.876
2.788
3.012
6.491
13.603
1.111
41.482
20.0
10.0
18.0
52.0
60.0
5.0
28.0
7.0
10 3
Sick	
2.3
Industrial	
7.4
80.0
100.000
100.00
100.00
100.00 O 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
XVII. Number of Officers and Employees on March 31st, 1948.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
1
1
1
2
4
1
7
1     B
3
4
7
43
1
1
3
9
12
2
i
i
i
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
2
103
9
3                        11
i
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year ended March 31st, 1948.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
Expenditure.
Library	
Salaries	
Office supplies	
Travelling expenses	
Uniforms and clothing	
Janitors' supplies	
Farm operations	
Upkeep of grounds	
General equipment	
Laundry operations	
Fuel, water, and light	
Provisions (upkeep of prisoners)	
Medical attendance and hospital supplies	
Good Conduct Fund	
Sheet-metal plant	
Incidentals and contingencies	
Cost-of-living bonus	
Totals	
Public Works expenditure	
Gross expenditure	
Revenue.
Rental of quarters, etc., and maintenance of
prisoners	
Sales and Salary refunds	
Fines and costs paid	
Totals	
$1
167
15
6
16
6
17
37
89
12
13
24,
23:
689.44
.715.26
.020.83
.294.54
.561.07
.463.98
077.53
135.67
.355.27
310.64
.108.70
702.42
415.05
368.30
371.92
900.35
790.96
$51.54
11,802.99
216.08
24.11
800.80
377.36
113.60
299.10
2,450.02
3,792.50
702.98
413.50
82.92
$2,479.89
30.10
1,090.86
76.47
1,246.55
2,074.38
160.35
314.00
$12,551.93
322.69
549.55
605.61
184.10
1,258.92
730.91
171.58
2,697.30
4,476.10
958.29
211.40
2.65
$441
26
.281.93
017.06
$21,127.50
1,179.65
$7,475.15
100.00
$467,298.!
$22,307.15
$7,575.15
$7,894.25
47,926.86
I
$1,168.65
$1,234.00
$25,296.41
$1,740.98
194,550.07
3,589.70
6,868.20
18,058.34
6,101.91
16,191.13
1,394.59
7,385.28
17,482.22
43,502.57
100,045.40
14,236.67
14,307.20
24,371.92
1,563.85
23,790.96
$495,180.99
27,296.71
$25,296.41
$522,477.70
$9,128.25
47,926.86
1,168.65
$55,821.11    |        $1,168.65
$1,234.00
$58,223.76 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1947-48.
O 47
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year ended March 31st, 1948—Cont'd.
Total Gross Expenditure.
Total Revenue.
1947.
1948.
1947.
1948.
Oakalla	
$365,162.35
14,976.47
5,658.16
4,722.04
$467,298.99
22,307.15
7,575.15
25,296.41
$77,773.97
2,166.00
1,106.25
2,773.00
$55,821.11
1,168.65
1,234.00
Totals	
$390,519.02
83,819.22
$522,477.70
58,223.76
$83,819.22
$58,223.76
$306,699.80
$464,253.94
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1948.
610-124S-6371 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0340098/manifest

Comment

Related Items