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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL Provincial Game Commission REPORT For the… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1949

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Provincial Game Commission
REPORT
For the Year ended December 31st,
1947
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Don McDiabmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1948.  To His Honour C. A. BANKS,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game
Commission for the year ended December 31st, 1947.
G. S. WISMER,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1948. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., July 1st, 1948.
Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir, — We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1947.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
JAMES G. CUNNINGHAM,
Game Commissioners. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Reports— Page
Game Commission  7
Game Wardens, "A" Division  13
Officer Commanding " B " Division  14
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson, "B" Division  18
Officer Commanding "C" Division—Game  31
Officer Commanding " D " Division  38
Game Wardens, "E" Division  41
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-47, inclusive  43
Summary of Total Revenue derived from Sale of Various Licences, Collections,
etc., during Year 1947  44
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences  45
Revenue—Sale of Deer and Moose (Game) Tags  46
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences  47
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Anglers' Licences and Outfitters'
Licences  48
Revenue — Sale of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers'   (Minor)
Licences  49
Revenue—Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalty on Fur 50
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-47, inclusive  51
Comparative  Statement  showing  Pelts  of  Fur-bearing  Animals  on which
Royalty has been collected, 1921-47, inclusive  52
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty was
collected during Year 1947  53
List of Confiscated Fur, 1947, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur  54
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1947, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated
Firearms  55
Bounties paid, 1947  56
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1947, inclusive  57
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1947  58
Prosecutions, 1947  59
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1947  61
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1947  62
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special (Trapping) Firearms Licences,
Season 1946-47  75
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1947  75
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1947  76
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1947 „  77
Statement—Miscellaneous Receipts  77
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1947  78
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1947  88  Report of the Provincial Game Commission, 1947.
There was a very substantial increase in revenue over the previous year, as in 1946
a total of $609,912.97 was collected, while in 1947 the sum of $696,873.44 was the total
revenue, an increase of $86,960.47. This increased revenue was due to increased sale
of resident and non-resident licences and in trophy-fee collections. The number of nonresident hunting licences issued was 4,090, an increase of 1,104 over the previous year.
There were 15,468 non-resident anglers' licences issued, an increase of 3,352 over 1946.
Non-residents paid trophy fees on 3,805 big-game animals, which resulted in a collection of $96,350, an increase of $21,830 over the 1946 collection. It is interesting to
note that the total sum collected from non-resident hunters and fishermen was $292,777
out of a total revenue of $696,873.44. Examination of these figures shows very clearly
that revenue from non-residents forms a substantial portion of the revenue collected
under the " Game Act."
Some of our resident sportsmen are complaining that there is or has been too great
an annual influx of outside sportsmen, and some are questioning the wisdom of allowing
this increase to continue, but it would seem at the moment that there should be no great
concern, as the situation is being very closely watched and can be controlled by the
imposition of larger fees, whether for licences or trophies. It seems only right to point
out that in any game-management programme a great deal depends on the money available for this purpose, and it is suggested that this probably can only be obtained
through revenue derived annually under the " Game Act." In other words, any reduction in game revenue may be a serious drawback to our planned conservation set-up.
We are very much concerned over the future in respect to the possibilities of being
able to maintain a sufficient game and fish population so as to supply the ever-increasing
demand of both resident and non-resident sportsmen, but all our investigations are
based on the matter of increasing our game and fish resources. It is of interest to note
that in 1944 the total number of hunting and fishing licences issued was 76,971, while
in 1947 the over-all figure of 130,583 was reached.
The supply of big game and sport fish in the Province is good, but there are areas
that have been receiving too great a concentration of hunters and fishermen. In the
Cariboo, Lillooet, Kamloops, and East Kootenay Districts the heaviest hunting took
place. Some alarm has been expressed by resident sportsmen over the apparent
decrease of moose in certain parts of the Cariboo District, but we anticipate this
decrease to continue in spite of any efforts that we might be able to put forward. In
many parts of the Province, moose have overbrowsed their winter range to such an
extent that a great number of these animals, due to malnutrition, are unable to survive
the winters. This is borne out through scientific investigations which are being conducted throughout the principal districts in which moose are to be found in the Central
Interior sections of the Province. James Hatter, scientific investigator, is carrying
out these investigations under the supervision of the Department of Zoology of the
University of British Columbia and your Game Commission. It is proposed, from time
to time, to publish reports dealing with not only the moose investigation, but other
similar investigations as well.
The " Game Act" was amended during the 1947 Session of the Legislature to
provide for the appointment of scientifically trained men as advisers to your Commission, and subsequently Drs. W. A. Clemens and Ian McTaggart Cowan, Department of
Zoology, University of British Columbia, were appointed. Both of these scientists are
experts in their various fields, and their views on game and fish problems are most
highly respected throughout North America.    One of the greatest steps ever taken L 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
toward the conservation of game in British Columbia was taken in the appointment of
these two scientists. Many important scientific investigations are now being carried
out under the supervision of Drs. Clemens and Cowan.
In 1947 we again established a checking-station at Cache Creek, which is on the
Cariboo Highway. Very valuable information was obtained through this station, and
it is proposed to continue the operation of this important detachment each year. A total
of 2,826 animals were checked through this station between September 23rd and
December 15th. In 1946 and during the same period 2,377 big-game animals were
checked in possession of hunters passing through this station. During the 1947 season,
hunters brought out through this station the following big-game animals:—
Bear       114 Mountain-sheep         21
Mountain-goat         43 Game birds  2,173
Wapiti (Elk)          2 Deer  1,272
Caribou         10 Moose  1,364
A great deal of scientific information was obtained through careful examination
of the trophies brought through this station, and it might be mentioned that a representative of the Department of Zoology of the University of British Columbia was
stationed at Cache Creek during most of the checking period, and this representative
was enabled to secure scientific data which he might otherwise have been unable to
obtain. Some seventy-six prosecutions resulted through this check, and a conviction
was secured in every case.   The total amount of fines collected was $820.
Your attention is respectfully drawn to the statement appearing later on in this
report of the big-game animals taken by non-resident hunters. It is unfortunate that
a statement cannot be supplied showing the game taken by resident hunters, but it
might be mentioned that an effort was made to obtain this information in a voluntary
way by providing game-return forms to each resident hunter and requesting him to
submit same at the end of the hunting season. It is to be very much regretted that the
returns received were only a very small proportion of the total number of big-game
licences issued, and, as a matter of fact, 400 returns were sent in out of approximately
60,000 licences issued. Another effort will be made during the coming year to obtain a
more complete return, but should we not be successful in securing a voluntary return
from licensed hunters, then in order to carry out our scientific investigations, it may be
necessary to require that each licensed hunter must submit a return of the game taken.
In accordance with your request, a Provincial-wide game convention, at which
elected representatives of game associations were present, was convened at Harrison
Hot Springs on May 29th and 30th. This convention proved, without doubt, a milestone in the history of game-protection in British Columbia, as the views of sportsmen
from every section of the Province were presented along with very excellent and valuable papers prepared by game scientists. This two-day conference resulted in clearing
up many issues that have confronted the sportsmen of the Province for some time, and
it is felt that no greater conservation step could have been taken than the holding of
this convention, and it is respectfully recommended that these conventions be held
annually.
REGISTRATION OF TRAP-LINES.
We are confident that through our system of trap-line registration, which now has
been in force some twenty-one years, the fur resources of the Province are, and will be,
preserved. It is probably of interest to note that this system of trap-line registration,
which was first started in the Province of British Columbia, is now being wholly, or
partially, established in many of the other Provinces of Canada.
The purchase of land within the boundaries of registered trap-lines which have
been protected is causing some dissatisfaction, as generally the land is purchased or REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1947. L 9
acquired for the purpose of trapping the fur-bearing animals thereon which have been
afforded protection by the registered trappers. Under existing legislation, however,
there would seem to be nothing that we can do to protect the registered trapper in
cases of this nature.
The British Columbia Registered Trappers' Association, under the leadership of
Eric Collier and E. W. Bobb, held meetings several times during 1947. This association
has been operating for three years, and while the executive officers have been putting
forward every effort to increase their membership to a point where they might have a
fair representation of trappers from all parts of the Province, unfortunately the
average trapper does not appear interested enough in his own problems to organize in
the same manner and strength as accomplished by the sportsmen of the Province. We
are most anxious that a strong association of trappers as well as guides be organized
in the Province.
Mr. Collier is president of the organization referred to, and he has been agitating
for the passing of regulations prohibiting the taking of beaver, muskrats, and squirrels
by the means of firearms, but with the facts at our disposal, we hesitate to introduce
such a regulation. It might be mentioned that only recently a communication was
received from one of the other Game Departments in Canada requesting our co-operation in having legislation passed that would prohibit the taking of beaver by any other
means than by the use of firearms. We know that the recommendation put forward by
the British Columbia Trappers' Association would not meet with the full approval of
registered trappers in the northern part of British Columbia.
After some years' experience in the tagging of beaver-pelts, we realize that there is
need for changes to be made in the existing regulations, and we are carefully studying
the problem with the object in view of putting forward recommendations for new
regulations in the not too distant future.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES.
As in 1946, the demand for the services of big-game guides this year far exceeded
the number of experienced available guides that were in the business, and consequently it
was necessary, against our better judgment, to issue guides' licences to persons who did
not have any great amount of previous experience in this line of work. In 1944, 237
guides' licences were issued, but in 1947 this number increased to 1,131. To control
this unfortunate situation, new and more drastic regulations must be put into effect,
but we feel that we must proceed very slowly and cautiously before asking for the
passing of any drastic regulations. New plans of control, however, are in the making,
and we hope in a few years' time to have in this Province as good a big-game guide
service as is to be found in any other portion of the continent.
BOUNTIES.
In 1947 bounty was paid on 1,102 wolves, 2,976 coyotes, and 519 cougars. We have
had a large number of requests for higher wolf bounty, especially in the Cariboo
District and throughout the cattle-grazing areas of the Province. Reports from cattlemen would seem to indicate a decided increase in wolves. During 1947, in view of an
increased appropriation, the bounty on wolves was increased from $10 to $25 per
animal, but this increased bounty did not result in any more wolves being killed in the
Cariboo District, in spite of the reported increased wolf population. In 1946 bounty
was paid on 108 wolves through the Government Agencies at Clinton, Williams Lake,
and Quesnel, and in 1947, under the increased bounty, the same number of pelts were
presented. The question of payment of bounties is a most contentious one, and it would
seem to be very difficult to convince those suffering damage to stock that the payment L 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of bounties is not the answer to the problem of predation. Higher bounty might
encourage a more vigorous campaign against predators, but we feel, as do scientific men
who have studied this problem, that the best method to employ in the control of
predators is the employment of specially trained and properly equipped predatory-
animal hunters. Unfortunately, however, trained hunters are not available, and it will
be necessary for us to build up a staff of these trained hunters so that they might be
dispatched to any area in the Province where the question of damage by predators is
one that requires special attention.
With the object in view of training a number of predatory-animal hunters employed
by the Department, a new branch was formed, and a number of hunters were engaged
and placed under the supervision of Chief Predatory-animal Hunter James Dewar.
Trained cougar dogs were purchased and imported; the necessary kennels were built
for these dogs at Extension on Vancouver Island, and our predatory-animal hunters
are being thoroughly trained in the art of hunting not only cougars, but other
predatory animals as well, and it is hoped that in the not too distant future we will have
sufficiently trained hunters to enable us to send these men into districts in which it is
necessary to cut down the predatory-animal population. It might be mentioned that
the establishing of cougar-dog kennels on Vancouver Island was deemed advisable in
order that we might raise and train cougar dogs so that eventually each Game Warden
in the Province in charge of a district in which cougar are to be found might be
supplied with trained dogs.
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
We have not, during the past few years, embarked on any large-scale advertising
programme because we felt from the decided increase in non-resident hunters and
fishermen, coupled with the shortage of experienced guides, that this did not warrant
any great amount of advertising of our game resources. However, at every opportunity we have accepted invitations to exhibit our game and fish films and to lecture to
schools, service clubs, game associations, and other organizations interested in our
wild life.
GAME PROPAGATION.
During the month of August a number of blue grouse were liberated on Texada
Island, with the object in view of establishing this wonderful native game bird on this
island. The birds liberated were obtained from the logged-off land in the Campbell
River district on Vancouver Island, where they were trapped by Game Warden R. S.
Hayes. From reports received, the work we have been doing in respect to the restocking of game-bird coverts has been most successful. During the year 13,200 pheasants
were purchased from resident licensed game-bird farmers and were liberated in
districts on Vancouver Island, the Lower Mainland, and the Southern Interior. As
usual, the bulk of the birds purchased were liberated in the Lower Mainland area, due
to the tremendous concentration of licensed hunters in this very confined and small
district.
UPLAND GAME BIRDS.
Generally, the condition respecting native upland game birds was very favourable,
but the grouse population in the Cariboo and other sections of the Interior was such
that warranted the continuance of closed hunting seasons, which have been in effect
during the last few years. Reports indicate that throughout the Cariboo and Chilcotin
Districts, where grouse were seriously reduced in numbers a few seasons past, they are
now coming back through enforced closed seasons. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 11
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS.
The stand of migratory game birds showed some improvement over the previous
year, but the improvement was not as good as was anticipated, and it was necessary
that open hunting seasons be drastically curtailed and reduced bag-limits put into
effect. So far as British Columbia is concerned, however, it is felt that the reduction
in the seasons and bag-limits in effect in this Province means very little as compared to
the over-all picture presented in other sections of the Pacific flyway, where the number
of hunters and the total kill is so much greater than in British Columbia.
The duck-feeding programme and controlled game reserves or sanctuaries, which
was put into effect in 1946, was again carried on in the Lower Mainland with a view to
providing food to entice the birds to remain in the area. This programme was conducted under the supervision of the Duck Stamp Committee appointed by the organized
sportsmen, and financed through the sale of duck stamps and from voluntary contributions. While the efforts of the Duck Stamp Committee and members of the privately
owned hunting clubs who allowed certain portions of their property to be set aside as
game reserves were appreciated by the majority of the sportsmen on the Lower Mainland, still a certain amount of dissatisfaction was apparent, and it is more than likely
that this duck-feeding programme will be discontinued next year.
GAME-LAW ENFORCEMENT.
Later on in this report will be found a statement showing prosecutions conducted
during the year, and it might be mentioned that some 895 violations were brought
before the Courts, resulting in 878 convictions and the imposition of fines in the
amount of $11,837.50.
GAME-FISH CULTURE.
Our game-fish cultural programme is proceeding very successfully. Trout-fishing
was reported to be above the average in most sections of the Province. The number of
anglers' licences issued exceeded any previous year—15,468 non-resident and 47,117
resident anglers' licences were issued, making a total of 62,585, or 7,820 over the 1946
figure. The total revenue from the sale of resident and non-resident anglers' licences
was $143,255.50.
With so many people interested and depending upon angling as a means of recreation and sport, increased efforts must be made to maintain our supply of sport fish.
The residents in the northern part of the Province do not now require to obtain fishing
licences in order to fish in waters north of the 52nd parallel of north latitude. Some
residents are of the opinion that they should pay for a licence, as they are anxious to
have more work done in their districts in order to improve the sport fisheries of the
areas. There would seem to be a very great need of erecting and operating an up-to-
date hatchery in the Cariboo District so that trout distributions may be increased in
that area and in the northern sections of the Province.
As anticipated in our previous report, we made provision for the expansion in our
activities by commencing the construction of two very modern trout-hatcheries—one on
the Puntledge River near Courtenay, Vancouver Island, and the other at Summerland,
Okanagan Lake. Suitable sites were obtained for these hatcheries, which will be of
a size that will provide for increased production for some years to come, and the buildings will be constructed artistically of log-cabin siding and in a style suitable for the
very beautiful surroundings in which they will be situated. We anticipate some difficulty in securing the necessary building materials, and with the ever-rising prices of
these commodities it is probable that the cost of these hatchery buildings will exceed
the amount provided for in our 1947-48 estimates. L 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
During the year a battery of four cement trout-retaining tanks were constructed
at Smiths Falls Hatchery, Cultus Lake, in order to be prepared for keeping a supply of
brood stock of cut-throat trout, if such stock can be obtained. It might be mentioned
that cut-throat eggs are very difficult to obtain, and consequently we are endeavouring
to secure a brood stock of these trout so that we may take our own eggs from them.
In the meantime these retaining-tanks are being used for the rearing of Kamloops
trout, and we are very pleased to be able to state that the results have been most
satisfactory, and would indicate that the type of retaining-tanks that we have constructed are very suitable for the raising of trout.
A problem that has been facing us for many years is now being investigated in
the matter of the destruction of coarse fish for the purpose of finding out in our
experiments the relationship between coarse fish and trout. The results of our investigation and experiment will not be available for printing and distribution for two years
at least. Dr. W. A. Clemens and his staff have been experimenting with the problem
of coarse fish in a chain of lakes in the Princeton district. Two of the lakes in the
chain—namely, Borgeson and Dry Lakes—were infested with several species of undesirable fish, and it was decided to poison these lakes for the purpose of destroying all
fish life found therein, and then replanting the lakes with trout in order to watch their
growth. More complete information concerning these experiments will be recorded at
a later date.
Through our expanding operations in game-fish culture-work, it is becoming more
necessary to have the services of a scientifically trained fish culturist, and we are
endeavouring to appoint someone to this position. There is no doubt that the appointment of a fish culturist will meet with strong approval from the organized sportsmen
of the Province.
Further on in this Report will be found a statement showing the collections and
liberations from our various hatcheries during 1947.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The very valuable assistance and friendly co-operation extended to this Department
by all other Governmental Departments is very much appreciated. Commissioner
John Shirras and all the officers of the British Columbia Police Force have been most
co-operative. The very valuable work being undertaken by Drs. W. A. Clemens and
Ian McTaggart Cowan, of the Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia,
is not only appreciated by your Commission, but we are satisfied that the sportsmen in
the Province are very fortunate in having the advice and knowledge of these trained
scientists in their game and fisheries problems. The Federal Department of Fisheries;
J. A. Munro, Dominion Wild-life Officer for British Columbia; game associations;
farmers' institutes; and many other organizations and individuals have been very
co-operative with your Commission, and we wish to extend to all these organizations
and individuals our most heart-felt thanks for their splendid co-operation.
It is with considerable regret that we have to report the passing of an old
and trusted member of the Department, the late Inspector T. Van Dyk, who for
many years very capably supervised " D " Game Division. Our sincere sympathy is extended to Mrs. Van Dyk and her family in the loss they have
sustained. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 13
"A" DIVISION (VANCOUVER ISLAND, THE GULF ISLANDS, AND THE MAINLAND COAST FROM TOBA INLET NORTH TO CAPE CAUTION, INCLUDING THE ISLANDS ADJACENT TO THE EAST COAST OF VANCOUVER
ISLAND NORTH OF CAMPBELL RIVER).
"A" Game Division is supervised from the headquarters office at Vancouver, and
therefore the following consists of excerpts taken from reports of Game and Fishery
Officers attached to the Division, along with observations made by the members of
the Game Commission.
Bear (Black).—The continuous open season should not be changed, as these animals are far too numerous and in many sections are the cause for considerable complaint of damage to private property and domestic stock.
Bear (Grizzly).—In the Phillips Arm and Knight Inlet sectors are fairly numerous, but are not to be found anywhere on Vancouver Island.
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—In spite of heavy hunting, deer continue to be
numerous in most sections of the Division. The heaviest kill, during the hunting
season, has taken place in the past during the final two weeks in November, consequently Game Wardens and game associations have strongly recommended that the
hunting season on Vancouver Island especially be terminated by November 15th in
each year.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti are to be found in scattered bands in many parts of Vancouver Island, but over a period of years they do not appear to have increased to any
extent, and for the purpose of endeavouring to find out why this should be the case, a
scientific investigation will be launched in the not too distant future.
FUR-BEARING ANIMALS.
Beaver, on Vancouver Island, are to be found in fair numbers. The season for the
trapping of these animals has been closed for many years, but in cases where, after
investigation, it has been found that registered trappers have protected their trapping
areas and the stand of beaver thereon warrants trapping, permits have been granted
authorizing the trapping of a limited number. This form of control seems to have
adequately taken care of reducing beaver in overpopulated areas without resorting
to an open season throughout Vancouver Island.
Other fur-bearing animals, especially racoon, are fairly plentiful throughout the
Division.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—Blue grouse have continued to be plentiful in many sections of
Vancouver Island, and this has been responsible for large numbers of hunters partaking of the grouse-shooting each hunting season. In spite of the concentration of
hunters in the best-known areas, such as Campbell River, limit bags were common
during the open season. Bad weather during the first part of the open season
undoubtedly permitted grouse to escape into the mountains, and there would seem to
be every assurance of a good brood stock remaining that, with good breeding conditions,
will be able to produce a good crop of birds for next year.
Grouse (Ruffed or Willow).—As in most districts of the Province, willow grouse
appear to be scarce in some sections while in others they are in good numbers. These
birds, however, cannot be considered as being overabundant in any section of the
Division.
Pheasants.—Conditions in most portions of Vancouver Island and adjacent islands
are not conducive to the natural propagation of pheasants. Some areas can support
a few pheasants, but in such areas farming prevents any large-scale restocking of
pheasants. Partridge.—Coveys of partridge have been observed in the Cedar District near
Nanaimo where they were planted by the Game Department a few years ago. Like
pheasants, partridge must of necessity live in districts where there are plenty of grain-
fields, and Vancouver Island is lacking in this respect.
California Quail.—Reported as being fairly plentiful in the Victoria district, but
elsewhere this assuredly is not the case.
Migratory Game Birds.
Due to the need for curtailing the length of the open hunting seasons, good hunting was impossible to secure in every district of Vancouver Island. Hunters in this
Division must necessarily be provided with fairly long seasons for shooting if any
number of birds are to be brought to the bag. Migratory birds, however, could not
be considered as being plentiful in any portion of the Division during the year.
Predatory Animals.
In 1947 bounties were increased on predatory animals—the wolf bounty from $10
to $25 and on cougar from $15 to $20. However, in spite of constant reports of
increased activity by predators and the increase in bounty rates, only one more wolf and
six more cougar were destroyed over the 1946 totals. Of the twelve wolf-pelts turned
in for bounty, only eight were secured on Vancouver Island, the balance being taken
on the Mainland Coast.
Game associations, other organizations, and individuals continually report an
increased wolf population on Vancouver Island, but these claims are not substantiated
by past reports of the Department, as on perusal of these reports one will find that in
1910 and 1911 bounty of $5 each was paid on 218 wolves while in 1947 bounty was
paid on eight wolves only.
Registration of Trap-lines.
There would seem to be no question that the system of trap-line registration has
been responsible for the healthy position of fur-bearing animals in "A" Game Division.
"B" DIVISION  (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding.
I beg to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions in " B " Division for the year ended December 31st, 1947. Annual report covering fish conditions
in this Division submitted by Fishery Supervisor Robinson is appended hereto.
Big Game.
Moose.—Are well established in the East Kootenay area and are occasional in the
West Kootenay and Arrow Lakes. A moose was seen during the summer of 1947 in
the Christian Valley portion of the Kettle River, near Penticton. These have presumably migrated southward, but those reported from Arrow and Kootenay Lakes districts
likely arrived from, eastward through the Selkirk Mountain passes from the East
Kootenay. A herd of five moose—a bull, two cows, and two calves—was observed during
the summer in the vicinity of Creston at the lower end of Kootenay Lake. The heavy
kill of the past three years had given concern, and the adverse weather of the last
winter, 1946-47, was hard on all game, including moose. In addition, two cases of
diseased liver in moose have been noted and have been diagnosed by J. Hatter of the
University of British Columbia as "giant liver fluke." The animals from which the
specimens were taken appeared to be in a healthy condition.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals, although a large bag was taken during the open
season, are still in good numbers in the East Kootenay and have extended their range REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1947. L 15
to the Selkirk Mountains as previously reported, being present in the areas immediately
north of Creston in fair numbers. Small bands in the Princeton and Okanagan areas
appear to be holding their own. Several complaints were received during the early
spring and late winter months of damage to fences and haystacks.
Sheep (Rocky Mountain Big Horn).—Are still suffering from the epidemic of 1941
and have not yet regained their former numbers. Very few were taken by hunters in
the East Kootenay, but the short open season in the Similkameen resulted in a fair bag
of mature rams.
Caribou.—Are thinly distributed throughout the Division and are not greatly
hunted, although several good specimens were taken during the season.
Mountain-goat.—Are well distributed in the East and West Kootenays but are
only occasional in the Boundary District and with a somewhat confined range in the
Similkameen.
Mule-deer.—Generally abundant throughout the Division. The termination of the
open season on November 30th met with general approval, as it was felt that an undue
bag had been taken during the past two seasons.
White-tailed Deer.—Well distributed throughout the Division, and increasing in
the Similkameen, where they are as yet not as plentiful as in other sections.
Bear (Black, Brown, and Grizzly).—Black or brown bear are well distributed
throughout the Division. Grizzly are fairly plentiful in the East and West Kootenays
but are scarce to occasional in the Boundary-Similkameen.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Due to the registered trap-line system there is very little new to report other than
the annual catch of fur does not seem to vary from its present satisfactory condition.
Trap-lines are natural fur-farms and for the most part are being administered as such.
There is a persistent demand for trap-lines which we are unable to satisfy, as very few
trappers give up a line unless it is for ill-health, etc., and any such lines are promptly
arranged for so that there is no vacant trapping territory in the Division.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue Grouse.—Are scarce in the Similkameen-Boundary Districts and are not
reported plentiful anywhere in the Division. It is quite possible they are suffering
from a cyclic decline similar to the willow grouse, as this lack of birds is noticeable in
the high areas which are not hunted.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—Are generally scarce, with the exception of the Winder-
mere-Golden area, where they are still in good numbers. Closed seasons in most of the
Division last year will no doubt be of benefit, and should be continued.
Franklin (Fool-hen) Grouse.—Reported scarce throughout the Division.
Sharp-tailed Grouse.—In small numbers in the Cranbrook vicinity and a few still
exist in the Boundary-Similkameen, but in no case are their numbers sufficient to warrant an open season.
Ptarmigan.—Throughout the Division at the high altitudes but are little hunted.
Hungarian Partridge.—Apparently quite scarce in the Boundary District and only
a few in evidence at Creston. It would not appear advisable to have an open season on
these birds this year.
California Quail.—In fair numbers in the Similkameen District along the United
States boundary, but are not hunted to any extent.
Pheasants.—Unusually scarce in the Similkameen-Grand Forks areas, to which is
attributed (without definite proof) the use of the newer sprays in the orchard districts.
This condition did not prevail at Creston, but the extremely wet weather during the
short season prevented much hunting.    Most concern is felt as to the future of pheas- L 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ants in the fruit-growing areas, as numerous people have reported dead birds being
seen before the opening of the season.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—The local hatch appeared to be normal, but the shortened season did not
permit the taking of the usual northern flight which arrives as a rule in late November.
A fair number of ducks remained all winter in the Kootenay Lake section (2,000 at
Nelson) and approximately the same number at Kootenay Flats, and were fed during
the icy conditions along the shore-line. Apparently these permanent ducks have lost
the urge to migrate southward.
Geese.—Nested in suitable areas at Columbia Valley and Beacon Districts and
provided fair sport there as well as in the Creston area.
Wilson Snipe.—Plentiful on the sloughs at times in migration, but are not sought
as game birds.
Coots.—Plentiful.
Swan.—Several small bands were reported in migration at Duck Lake near Creston
and in the vicinity of Nelson.
Vermin.
Seventy-six cougars, 73 coyotes, 16 eagles, 27 bighorn owls, 308 crows, 65 noxious
hawks, 115 magpies, 30 ownerless dogs, and a number of wild house-cats were destroyed
by game personnel during the year.
Game-protection.
There were 146 convictions and 1 dismissal during the year under the " Game Act "
and regulations thereto.    Fourteen prosecutions were initiated by the Provincial Police.
Game Propagation.
The Penticton Rod and Gun Club, Grand Forks Rod and Gun Club, Castlegar and
Salmo Rod and Gun Clubs all experimented with the raising of pheasants locally, and
a fair number of birds were released prior to the season. The usual quota of shipments
forwarded by the Game Commission were received and distributed at Creston, Grand
Forks, Nakusp, and the Similkameen.
Game Reserves.
The Elk River Reserve, comprising the upper watershed of the Elk and Bull Rivers,
also White River, is the most important one as it is situated in the heart of the big-
game country.
Game-bird sanctuaries at Nelson and Vaseaux Lake, south of Penticton, are also
beneficial, and their establishment continues to meet with general approval.
Deer sanctuaries exist at Elko, Canal Flats, and the Kettle River. These are
located on winter yarding-grounds, and serve as a haven should unusual conditions
occur during the open season when deer might be too easily taken.
Fur Trade.
Most of the fur of this Division is handled by local resident fur-traders in Vancouver.    Very little fur is being exported locally from the Province trappers.
Fur-farming.
This now comes under the Department of Agriculture and is a well-established
industry.    The raising of marten in captivity is now well past the experimental stage. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 17
Registration of Trap-lines.
This is a good system, and there would seem to be no criticism of its operations, as
the trappers who hold the lines are well satisfied.
Registration of Guides.
This is a very cogent question throughout the Division at the present time due to
the influx of non-resident hunters, mostly from the United States. It is apparent that
we must drastically revise the regulations governing guides and the hunters they
take out.
This condition was mentioned in last year's report, but it accelerated rapidly last
season, and it is trusted that the regulations may be amended to cope with the expected
non-resident hunter influx during 1948.
Special Patrols.
Routine patrols were carried on as in the past by car, launch, rowboat, horseback,
and on foot. Practically all Game Wardens made trips to the headwaters of streams
in connection with fish-cultural work and also patrolled the back areas extensively
during the winter on snowshoes while hunting predators.
Hunting Accidents.
David Warren Nasadyk, age 8 years, was hit on the side of the head by a rifle bullet
(presumably .22) near his home at Invermere. The bullet came from the direction of
a near-by farm. Immediate investigation by Game Warden H. Tyler did not disclose
the person who fired the shot. The wound was superficial and no after-effects were
suffered.
Alan Tegart, Invermere, B.C., was about to shoot a deer when both feet slipped on
the icy ground. The rifle fired as he fell and shot the middle finger of his left hand
completely off.    Mr. Tegart has since completely recovered.
On December 1st, 1947, Alan McAlpine, of Creston, was wounded in the right hand
by the accidental discharge of his rifle (a .22 Savage high power). He leaned his rifle
against a stump and, after climbing the stump, reached down to pull the rifle up when
it discharged, giving him a flesh wound in the right hand at the base of the thumb.
The wound was not serious.
Summary and General Remarks.
Observations under this heading last year are still pertinent, particularly with
regard to the non-resident hunters. The influx of non-residents meant that most of
the Game Wardens spent their time trying to find guides for them to hunt with, and it
also meant that we issued licences for guiding to certain men whose qualifications were
not of the standard that we expect a guide to be.
To cope with this situation, we must do either one or all of several things. The
first is to raise the trophy fees, or, if not, to reduce the bag-limits and shorten the
seasons.
The situation may not be so drastic in other portions of the Province, but in the
relatively small area of the East Kootenay where so many species of big-game animals
are concentrated in easily accessible localities, it is absolutely necessary that we adopt
some method immediately to regulate the number of hunters. They are everywhere,
from the valleys to the mountain-tops during the open season, and, save for closed areas,
the game is given no respite.
At the present time when a non-resident buys his licence he is not confined to any
particular section of the Province, and most of them come to the East Kootenay because L 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
they can drive almost to the hunting-grounds; in many cases actually to the places
where they intend to hunt. There is room in the East Kootenay for a reasonable
number of non-residents, but last year the number was in excess of what the district
will stand.
Modern transportation being what it is, we must amend our regulations to cope
with it, bearing in mind there is no accessible part of North America that has the
variety of game animals that South-western British Columbia has.
Some concern was expressed a year ago regarding the number of deer that were
killed due to the heavy early snow last fall. It is pleasant to note that winter conditions in the fall of 1947 were normal, with only a moderate amount of snow, and that
the hunting throughout the Division, while very fair, was not as easy as it has been in
other years.    Shortening of the season by two weeks was a very beneficial step.
The present winter has been a good one for all animals of the deer family. The
snowfall has been light and the weather at the time of writing (January 31st, 1948)
quite moderate.
Report of C. H. Robinson, Fishery Supervisor, covering Game-fish
Conditions in " B " Game Division.
Herewith I beg to submit report covering a review and trend of the sport fisheries
of " B " Game Division for the year ended 1947.
Reports and personal contact with the organized and individual sportsmen indicated that the inclement weather affected surface feed and fishing generally. Otherwise the increased precipitation was beneficial toward ova collections in some instances
and in streams affected with drought.
Most waters accessible to auto travel were fished extensively by the increasing
numbers of resident and non-resident anglers. Consequently, it is very doubtful if the
productive capacity of most waters will continue to supply the desired catches of trout
for all that desire to fish unless further restrictions are placed on the catch-limits,
together with possible shorter fishing seasons, etc.
In contrast to accessible lakes and streams, some of the distant alpine lakes are
still overpopulated with trout, and unless reasonably cropped to balance natural reproduction and food-supplies, poor-conditioned fish will continue. A more generous daily
catch-limit could be permitted in waters mentioned, provided a suitable regulation could
be drawn up for proper enforcement.
The construction of trout-rearing ponds slackened due to the scarcity of cement in
some instances. Preliminary investigations were carried out at Osoyoos Lake in view
of pond constructions by the organized sportsmen, also experimental plantings of trout
were made in semi-natural ponds leased by the organized sportsmen of Princeton.
To conform with the adopted policy of reducing or eliminating coarse fish in
certain lakes by the Game Commission, experimental tests were carried out under the
direction of Dr.W. A. Clemens, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia,
which is referred to later in this Report.
In connection with the Columbia River Basin surveys and possible development
later, for sport-fish interests, a preliminary survey was carried out by Dr. R. E. Forrester, Director, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, on behalf of the Fisheries
Research of Canada and the Game Commission, from July 7th to 16th, 1947.
Trout distributions are covered elsewhere in the report of the Game Commission.
Review of Conditions.
Similkameen and South Okanagan Waters.—Apparently it was an off-season for
trout-fishing in certain lakes of Princeton and Merritt districts. This might be attributed to weather conditions.    However, to relieve the heavy drain on the present trout REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 19
populations and to prevent serious depletions, three quite productive barren lakes were
stocked—namely, Burns, Harvey-Hall, and Robertson Lakes—immediately accessible to
secondary auto roads.
Alleyne, Crater, Boss, Davis, Hornet, Murphy (Bear), Thalia, Otter, Missezula,
and Osprey Lakes produced the average catches of trout taken by fly and troll, etc.
Wolfe, Lome, Fremyd, and Thynne Lakes failed to produce many trout, possibly due
to the increasing numbers of coarse fish.
There was no improvement in the catches of trout from Blue (McCaffery), Mac-
Kenzie, Dry, Borgeson, and Allison Lakes where scientific experiments were conducted
by the biologists in connection with the coarse-fish problem.
■ Trapper Lake and others situated in the Ashnola region via the Princeton-Hope
Highway were studied by the biologists, as apparently the trout planted in the year
1940 and their progeny were in poor condition, due probably to the diminishing food-
supplies, which is not uncommon in high-altitude lakes. Hence poor fishing and the
deferment of stocking other barren lakes.
Clearwater Lake, Hedley.—It is of interest to mention the improved condition and
growth of the Kamloops trout in this lake (elevation, 6,000 feet). Whereas four years
ago the largest trout weighed around 1*4 lb., last fall well-proportioned specimens were
taken on the fly and troll up to SV2 lb. The improvement is probably attributed to the
splendid co-operation received from the organized sportsmen at the Nickel Plate Mine
and five other elements, namely: Use of commercial fertilizers, introduction of weed-
growth, fresh-water shrimps, kokanee, and deferred restocking for four years, etc.
Twin, Horn, or Nipit Lakes.—The expense of restocking these lakes with rainbow
and some Eastern brook trout has been partly borne by the property-owners, which to
some extent has controlled the fishing. However, on referring the matter to the authorities as to the ownership of the lakes, it is now apparent the lakes are public waters,
and provision will be made for public access by road, etc.
Cathedral Lakes.—Situated in the eastern section of the Ashnola Range, were not
fished to any extent, hence poor-conditioned fish.
Osoyoos Lake.—Under reciprocal arrangement with the Washington State Game
Department and the organized sportsmen of Oroville, 25,000 Kamloops trout fry were
allotted to them for their rearing-ponds, and the resultant fingerlings raised will be
liberated in the lake next spring. In addition to this arrangement, the sportsmen of
Oroville arranged for the liberation of 30,000 rainbow trout fingerlings 5 to 7 inches
in length, plus the resultant fingerlings raised in a semi-natural pond, which were
liberated in Osoyoos Lake in 1947.
Skaha (Dog) Lake.—This large, important, and accessible body of water is not
producing the desired catches of Kamloops trout considering the substantial yearly fry
liberations, and in view of the alleged serious depletion of trout, conditions will be
scientifically investigated to determine this cause and further plans made for replenishment.
Okanagan Lake (South End).—During the spring and fall, catches of Kamloops
trout improved, mostly taken on the troll and varying in weight to 15 lb. and less.
With the operation of the new hatchery at Summerland and rearing-ponds, in due
course the planting of fingerlings in place of fry should bring fruitful results.
The numerous small alpine lakes situate in the Oliver-Osoyoos, Okanagan Falls,
Penticton, Summerland, Peachland, and Naramata regions continued to produce average
catches of rainbow trout, mostly from the results of fry liberations from the Summer-
land Hatchery. Probably the two most outstanding lakes were Munro Lake, which
supplied excellent fly-fishing resulting from the 1944 fry planting, and Richter Lake,
which supplied good trolling for rainbow trout weighing 10 lb. and less from fry
planted 1944-1945. L 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Boundary District Waters.
All fairly accessible waters to auto travel were fished extensively by non-resident
anglers from across the Border; even with the sacrifice made by the resident sportsmen
in support of the regulations of reducing the fishing season governing the Kettle River
and West Fork for twelve weeks, it still remains a complex problem to produce sufficient legal-sized trout for all who desire to fish.
Conkle (Fish), Arlington, Bull, Copper, Collier, and Williamson Lakes, etc., provided fair fly fishing, and as these lakes are not readily accessible, except Arlington
Lakes, the supplies remain fairly good.
Boundary Creek.—This typical productive mountain stream, flowing through the
Greenwood Valley, has become sadly depleted of trout, and in consequence a closure was
recommended. This was not practical, and in place thereof, fry and eyed-egg plantings
will be increased; strict enforcement of the fishery regulations and an educational
campaign will be carried on amongst the juveniles to conserve the small fish.
To offset the heavy drain on the trout-supplies in accessible waters, the organized
sportsmen of Beaverdell will attempt to open up trails and construct a road leading to
Clarke, Cup, Muloney, Lassie, Luke, and Buck Lakes situated near the headwaters of
Beaver Creek. Subsequently the potential supplies will be investigated for transfer
or otherwise.
Jewel Lake.—Was well patronized by the non-resident anglers, with some improvement in the catches of Kamloops trout, mostly under 8 lb. With the fair showing of
immature trout it would indicate that the yearly fry plantings have been fairly successful in spite of the presence of shiners, which appear to be not too plentiful.
Wilgress (Loon) Lake.—A very productive body of water and has for several years
yielded good catches of Kamloops trout taken by fly and troll. The lake is now teeming
with quite large shiners, illegally introduced and discovered in the lake in July, 1945.
It is quite possible the voracious shiner will seriously deplete the plankton-food supplies
of the small trout.
Granby River (North Fork). — With continued closure of tributary streams to
Burrell Creek and the West Fork of the river, small trout are plentiful toward the
upper reaches. The drainage of Smelter Lake will undoubtedly affect the future supply
of trout in the lower reaches of the river.
Exenia Lake (Little Christina).—(Barren of fish life.) Was stocked with rainbow
trout fry. Due to the possible difficulty of reaching the lake with pack-horses, the
organized sportsmen of Grand Forks hired an aeroplane to convey the fry to the lake,
which apparently was successfully accomplished.
Lake Christina.—Similarly, as during the year 1946, reports indicated improved
catches of Kamloops trout, varying in weight 20 lb. and less. Apparently excellent
specimens of trout were taken mostly by deep trolling. Also the catches of immature
trout showed some improvement, indicating that possibly the yearly planting of eyed
eggs in tributary streams has been successful.
Small-mouthed Black Bass.—Few bass now inhabit the south end of the lake, but
fair catches are obtainable toward the head of the lake which provides good summer
fishing when the Kamloops are not biting so freely.
West Kootenay Waters.
Big Sheep, Little Sheep, and Beaver Creeks.—Continued to produce fair catches of
Eastern brook trout for the numerous anglers of Fruitvale, Trail, and Rossland.
Natural reproduction assisted by early closure and yearly plantings of fry is proving
effective. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 21
Champion Lakes.—The yearly small allotments of Kamloops trout fingerlings
(Gerrard stock) in the lake are providing fair angling and trolling, varying 10 lb. in
weight and less.
Columbia River.—The stretch of river flowing between Castlegar and Waneta
yielded fair catches of rainbow trout, taken mostly by fly, bait, and spinner. The
formation of Roosevelt (Coulee) Lake on the river in the United States has not materially improved the supply of trout, but instead, so far, coarse fish continue to increase.
Lower Arrow Lakes.—Yielded fair catches of Kamloops and Dolly Varden trout for
the increasing numbers of people from Trail. The planting of trout fingerlings is now
desired in place of fry, planted yearly in the lower reaches of Pass Creek with good
results.
Upper Arrow Lakes.—Similarly as during the year 1946, reports indicated
improved trolling and fly-fishing for the Kamloops and Dolly Varden trout, mostly
under 10 lb. in weight. Some of the trout were in poor condition, due to slow reeovery
from spawning and possibly owing to glacial conditions.
Whatshan Lakes.—These popular lakes were well patronized and continue to supply
good fly fishing and trolling. So far natural reproduction and yearly plantings of eyed
eggs have maintained the supply of Kamloops trout, also fair numbers of Dolly Varden
trout were taken on trolls.
The sixth substantial shipment of cut-throat eyed eggs were hatched out, and the
resultant free-swimming fry were liberated in Summit, Victor, Three Valley, and
Griffin Lakes from the Revelstoke Hatchery. The possibility of the cut-throat trout
replacing the Kamloops trout suspected of outward migration to Shuswap Lake remains
in doubt, as so far the reports are not very encouraging.
Moreover, an allotment of Kamloops trout was hatched out in the Revelstoke
Hatchery, and the resultant free-swimming fry were liberated in the above-mentioned
lakes, together with Begbie, Beaver, and Butter Ball Lakes, and Greely Creek. The
Kamloops-trout fishing was fair and very good in Echo Lake, first stocked with fry in
1945.    Prior to that the lake contained no fish.
Trout Lake.—Although this lake is not very accessible, it was well patronized by
non-resident anglers, and excellent catches of Kamloops trout and Dolly Varden trout
were taken, 25 lb. and less. Over quite a long period natural spawning in Trout Creek
and in the Lardeau River (Gerrard) has maintained a reasonable supply of Kamloops
trout in this lake.
Wilson and Box Lakes.—Authentic reports indicated improvement in the catches of
Kamloops trout, mostly under 5 lb., taken by fly and troll. In spite of yearly plantings
of Kamloops trout fry in Summit Lake adjacent to the highway, not much interest is
shown in the lake.    Possibly the increasing number of coarse fish is the drawback.
Slocan Lake.—This accessible and quite large body of water produced fair catches
of Kamloops trout, mostly under 10 lb., by trolling. Also fly-fishing for the smaller
trout was good at the mouths of several inlet creeks, except Carpenter Creek, which
remains seriously polluted from the operations of the Zincton Mines, Limited.
Evans, Cahill, and Beatrice Lakes.—Continued to yield fair catches of Kamloops
trout taken on fly and troll. The condition of the trout has improved in the two latter
lakes, and now natural reproduction appears sufficient to balance with the food-
supplies, hence the deferred planting of eyed eggs since the year 1939.
Slocan and Kootenay Rivers.—The first-named stream supplied fair fly-fishing,
with an improvement toward the early fall; also the famous Slocan Pool, in Kootenay
River, yielded average catches of rainbow trout, mostly taken on fly, baited spinners,
etc. As the Brilliant hydro dam affects the up-stream migration of trout, all possible
consideration is being given to the restocking of the streams mentioned. L 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
West Arm, Kootenay Lake.—This important stretch of water, some 28 miles
throughout to the Corra Linn Dam, showed some improvement in the catches of Kamloops trout. No doubt the improvement can be credited to the liberation of fingerlings
(Gerrard stock), and to determine the migration of circulation of the fish, a percentage
of fingerlings were marked by the removal of the adipose and one ventral fin—1945-
46-47. The representative marked specimens taken support the policy adopted of
replenishment and explodes the theory that there is a 99-per-cent. outward migration of
fish planted in local and American waters.
Kootenay Lake.—Produced fair catches of fairly large Kamloops trout, although
spotty at times, but toward the late fall the catches showed considerable improvement
taken by trolling. At times, according to reports, never in the history of Kootenay
Lake was fly-fishing and trolling for the immature trout better, which indicates natural
reproduction and artificial replenishment is proving effective, making allowance for the
changed conditions in the last twenty-five years with an increase from three fishing
camps to twenty-five, plus improved equipment and some 90 miles of fine roads running
parallel to the lake. One creel census was kept at a little fishing camp on the lake
where 144 Dolly Varden and 2,290 Kamloops trout were recorded, 16 lb. and less.
The Nelson Gyro Club conducted their eighth annual Kootenay Lake Rainbow
Trout Derby from May 1st to November 16th for resident and non-resident anglers.
A total of 242 trout of 5 lb. and over were recorded and weighed in; total weight,
2,689 lb. The largest fish, winner of the competition, was 22 lb. 8 oz. In comparison,
the derby results in 1946 were 374 trout recorded, weighing 4,151 lb., and the largest
fish caught weighed 23 lb. 6 oz. Most trout were caught during the months of May
and November.
The numerous, somewhat small alpine lakes—namely, Six Mile, Cottonwood, Koka-
nee, Barrett, Porto Rico, Panther, Wolfe, Redfish Creek, Wheeler, Sunset, Loon, Leviathan, Milford, Tarn O'Shanter, Baker, Arkansaw, and Devil's Hole Lakes—and the
numerous mountain streams continued to produce fair catches of rainbow, cut-throat,
and Eastern brook trout, mostly from natural reproduction.
Goat River.—The possibility of increasing the numbers of migratory Kamloops
trout (steelhead) in the lower reaches of the river is receiving attention in planting
fry and eyed eggs. However, it is doubtful whether the extreme muddy and cloudy
water in the Kootenay River will offer much inducement to the spawning Kamloops
trout from the south end of Kootenay Lake and River, although prior to the pollution
of Summit Creek, good numbers used the stream. The upper reaches of Goat River
above Kitchener and onward to the West Fork, etc., continued to yield limit-catches of
cut-throat trout from natural spawning and planting of eyed eggs.
West Kootenay Waters.
The waters of Cranbrook district were fished extensively where convenient to
reach. Some lakes did not produce the desired catches of trout, others showed
improvement.
Moyie River.—Flowing parallel to the main highway, was fished steadily and fair
catches of cut-throat, hybrid, and Kamloops trout were taken. The abundant fall rains
and increased waterflow aided conservation.
Moyie Lakes. — Yield varied considerably relative to the catches of cut-throat,
hybrid, and Kamloops trout taken from these accessible lakes. While the fishing was
spotty and in numerous instances average catches were taken, we have reason to
believe the trout are fairly plentiful from yearly plantings. With the establishment of
kokanee, the growth and condition of the Kamloops trout should improve.
Mineral Lake.—Prior to sawmill operations at this lake in 1945, excellent angling
was enjoyed for cut-throat and Kamloops trout;   apparently due to unsuitable water REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 23
conditions the trout have gradually disappeared, and it is doubtful whether recent
plantings of trout fry survived.
Monroe Lake.—This popular lake continued to produce the average catches of cutthroat trout from yearly plantings of fry.
Smith Lake.—Last season there was some doubt regarding the supply of large
trout in the lake. However, a noted improvement in the catches of this season with
a good showing of smaller Kamloops trout indicate the plantings of fingerlings were
successful, with no serious loss of parent trout from entering Jimsmith Creek, the
outlet.
New Lake.—This somewhat small land-locked and weedy lake provided excellent
trolling for the Kamloops trout from small allotments of fingerlings planted.
Premier Lake.—This popular and ideally situated lake was fished extensively and
continued to supply fair catches of Kamloops trout ranging from 14 lb. and less.
St. Mary Lake and Tributaries.—Produced fair catches of cut-throat trout considering the amount of angling carried on. Also fair specimens of Kamloops trout
were taken, ranging from 4 lb. and less. Logging operations in the area may have
some bearing on fishing conditions, etc.
Skookumchuck River.—Supplied fair catches of cut-throat trout, ranging from
3% lb. and less, including Dolly Varden trout, which in each case are more or less
migratory to the Kootenay River. Moreover, the cut-throat are now well established
in the river above the falls.
Kootenay River.—Is subject to severe glacial conditions during the summer. However, toward the early fall, when the waterflow cleared, good catches of cut-throat and
Dolly Varden trout were taken by fly, spinners, and bait.
Bull River and Tributaries.—From natural reproduction above the falls, angling
for cut-throat trout continued to be good; also fishing improved in the stretch of river
between the falls and dam, wherein cut-throat trout are planted seasonally.
Ta Ta and Lost Dog Lakes.—Produced good specimens of Eastern brook trout,
ranging from 3 lb. and less. The speckled trout has apparently entered the lakes on
its own accord as no plantings were effected. The results of planting Eastern brook
trout in Echo Lake remains obscure.
The several lakes—namely, Horseshoe, Peckham's, Garbutt's, Twin, and Copper—
and the small mountain streams provided average fishing for cut-throat and rainbow
trout.
Fernie District Waters.
While there was an improvement in the catches of trout in the Elk River system,
apparently some of the lakes did not produce the desired catches of trout; in some
instances possibly the waters are affected through the illegal introduction of undesirable fish.
Manistee and Loon Lakes.—Subject to seasonal conditions, these waters continued
to produce fair catches of Kamloops trout, 20 lb. in weight and less, from yearly plantings of fry.
McBain's Lake (Rosen).—A popular summer resort. Angling for Kamloops and
some cut-throat trout showed an improvement. This is gratifying considering the
amount of fishing carried on.
Silver Springs Lakes.—These small lakes failed to produce the expected catches of
Kamloops trout. This might be attributed to overfishing, presence of shiners, and
insufficient protection afforded to the parent trout.    This matter is receiving attention.
Edward's Lake.—With favourable water conditions, this lake has produced excellent
catches of Kamloops trout, but apparently the lake did not supply limit-catches and the
trout are decreasing in size. L 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
North Star, Tie, and Burton Lakes did not produce many trout, and these lakes are
being investigated.
Grave (Emerald) Lake.—For recreational purposes, the organized sportsmen are
continuing their programme of improvements, and in our co-operation with them every
consideration is being given because of maintaining the supplies of Kamloops trout and
kokanee, fry and fingerlings, for the purpose of improving fishing conditions.
Elk River and Tributaries.—Although it is estimated that some 2,000 resident and
non-resident anglers fish these waters steadily through the season, it is gratifying to
mention an improvement in the catches of cut-throat trout, and some quite large Dolly
Varden from the Wigwam, south fork of the river. No doubt the synthetic planting
of eyed eggs in nursery waters, plus natural reproduction and closure of tributary
streams, has contributed to the improvement.
Barnes, Hart, Snowshoe, Cherry Lakes, and several mountain streams continued
to supply the average catches of cut-throat trout, mostly maintained from natural
spawning.
Columbia District Waters.
Columbia Lake.—Supplied fair catches of Kamloops and occasional cut-throat trout
for those who fished the lake, but due to accommodation and lack of boats this restricted
fishing generally.
Windermere Lake.—During the first part of the season trolling for Kamloops trout
was only fair. However, toward the early fall there was a marked improvement in the
catches, indicating that trout populations are being successfully maintained from eyed
eggs planted, etc.
Paddy Ryan Lakes.—Unfortunately, since the illegal introduction of shiners in this
chain of ideal cut-throat trout waters, fishing has gradually declined in spite of the
usual yearly plantings of fry. Attention will be given to these lakes for the purpose
of endeavouring to improve fishing conditions therein.
Lillian Lake.—Contributed good catches of Kamloops trout and some Eastern brook
trout during the spring and fall. Due to the unusual spring waterflow in Sparkling
Creek, a tributary, good numbers of spawning trout were attracted to the creek, which
were salvaged and returned to the lake owing to an anticipated unreliable waterflow.
Dunbar, Twin, Bott, Lead, Queen, Holgrave, Hall, Jeffrey, and Baptiste Lakes, etc.,
produced the average catches of cut-throat trout, mostly from artificial replenishment.
Cartwright and Deer (Whitetail) Lakes.—Provided fairly good trolling for introduced Kamloops trout.
Although glacial-water conditions affect certain waters of the Windermere area
and thereby restrict angling generally, the trout-supply has increased from stocking
efforts, which is essential for the increasing numbers of resident and non-resident
anglers.
Magog, Cerulean, and Sunburst Lakes.— Ideally situated in Mount Assiniboine
Provincial Park, supplied fly-fishing for cut-throat trout during the somewhat short
season, mostly for non-resident visitors to the park via Banff, Alta.
Golden District.—Extreme glacial conditions restrict the expansion of sport fishing
in this particular area.
Blackwater Lakes.—Immediately adjacent to the Trans-Canada Highway, supplied
good fly-fishing for the somewhat small rainbow trout for the resident and numerous
non-residents travelling through the area.
Bush Lakes. — Provided fair trolling and some fly-fishing for Kamloops trout,
mostly weighing under 3 lb. from the yearly plantings of eyed eggs and fry. There is
some doubt whether or not fishing conditions can be improved upon, due to feed conditions and some outward migration of trout to the adjacent Columbia River. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 25
Wiseman and Cedar Lakes. — Produced fair catches of cut-throat and Kamloops
trout from yearly restocking. Also there was fair angling for cut-throat trout at the
mouths of streams flowing into the Columbia River, possibly resulting from plantings
of eyed eggs in Cedar and Wiseman Creeks.
Kokanee (Little Redfish).—Each year the kokanee are becoming more important
as a forage and game fish, and due to their edible qualities they are often preferred to
trout.    In addition to waters which the kokanee already inhabit, they have been successfully introduced primarily for forage purposes in the following waters:—■
Cahill Lake, Slocan:   The size and growth, etc., is to be determined.
Clearwater Lake, Hedley:   Consumed by the trout, also providing fly-fishing
and trolling, average weight 12 oz.
Cottonwood Lake, Nelson:  Forage and angling, average weight 8 oz.
Buch Lakes, Golden:   Forage purposes for further investigation.
Grave (Emerald) Lake:   Forage purposes, average 8 oz.
Moyie Lakes:  Consumed by the trout, also taken on the troll;  average weight
8 oz. and less.
Premier  Lake:    Consumed  by the trout,  and  affords  good  fly-fishing and
trolling, weight 1 lb. and more.
St. Mary Lake:  Consumed mostly by the trout;  weight about four to 1 lb.
Wilson Lakes:   Consumed by the trout;   also provide good fly-fishing and
trolling;   weight, three to 1 lb.    Some kokanee from original planting
weighed 3 lb.
Windermere Lake: Results of six yearly plantings to be determined.
Whatshan Lakes:   Taken on fly and troll, average weight 8 oz.; also consumed
by the trout.
Large-mouthed Black Bass.—These non-native fish that now inhabit the sloughs
and channels off Kootenay River, Creston area, did not appear to be so plentiful nor
were many observed, except in the close vicinity of the south end of Kootenay Lake.
The bass provide early fishing for the resident anglers.
Summary of Hatchery Operations.
Summerland Hatchery.—Seasonal operations from May 15th to August 31st for
South Okanagan and Similkameen waters. As preparations were under way to construct a new hatchery, a temporary set-up was operated successfully, and the following
Kamloops trout eyed eggs were received from Beaver Lake Hatchery, 776,000, and from
Penask Lake Hatchery, 200,000; total, 976,000. Resultant fry liberated, 917,775, in
thirty-six lakes and streams and one set of rearing-ponds.
Revelstoke Hatchery.—Seasonal operations from June 1st to July 31st in co-operation with the Revelstoke Rod and Gun Club and subsidized by the Game Department.
Cut-throat trout eyed eggs received from the Cranbrook Hatchery, 201,435; resultant
fry liberated, 195,708, in four lakes. Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Beaver
Lake Hatchery, 100,000; resultant fry liberated, 96,115, in seven lakes and one stream.
Nelson Hatchery.—Year-round operations for waters of East and West Kootenay,
Boundary, and Okanagan Districts, etc. Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from
Penask Lake Hatchery, 1,200,000; resultant eyed eggs and fry planted, 1,165,000, in
forty-three lakes and streams and one private sale of 1,000 fry. Kamloops trout eyed
eggs received from Gerrard Hatchery, 100,000; resultant fry liberated, 96,550, in
Nelson Hatchery Rearing-ponds Nos. 3, 4, and 5. Kamloops trout eggs collected at
Snowshoe Lake, 40,000; resultant fry, 22,250, released in Nelson Rearing-pond No. 2.
Eastern brook trout eggs collected at Boundary Lake, Nelway, 173,000; resultant fry
and fingerlings liberated, 131,050, in nine lakes and streams. Cut-throat trout eyed
eggs received from the Cranbrook Hatchery, 45,875;   resultant  eyed eggs and fry L 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
planted, 45,025, in one lake and two streams. Kokanee eggs received from Meadow
Creek, Lardeau operations, 1,800,000; resultant eyed eggs planted, 1,315,000, in twenty
lakes or streams, plus 356,000 eggs retained in hatchery for fry plantings.
Gerrard Hatchery.—Seasonal operations from April 1st to July 15th. Kamloops
trout eggs collected, 456,500. Disposal of eyed eggs: Cranbrook Hatchery, 100,000;
Kaslo Hatchery, 100,000; retained in Gerrard Hatchery, 96,500; Nelson Hatchery,
100,000; Staubert Lake, 20,000; total, 416,500. Resultant fry liberated, 93,000, in
nursery waters in the upper reaches of Lardeau River.
Kaslo Hatchery.—Year-round operations. Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from
Gerrard Hatchery, 100,000; resultant fry released in Kaslo and Bjerkness Rearing-
ponds, 98,884. Cut-throat trout eyed eggs received from Cranbrook Hatchery, 34,425;
resultant fry liberated, 33,806, in two streams. Kokanee eggs received from Meadow
Creek, Lardeau operations, 226,000; resultant eyed eggs and fry to be planted in four
streams flowing into Kootenay Lake.
Cranbrook Hatchery.—Seasonal operations from April 1st to August 31st. Cutthroat trout eggs collected at Fish Lakes, 1,637,000; resultant eyed eggs and fry,
1,553,625—thirty-eight plantings and allotments to other hatcheries. Kamloops trout
eyed eggs received from Gerrard Hatchery, 100,000; resultant fingerlings liberated,
91,063, in thirteen lakes. Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Lloyds Creek
Hatchery, 200,000, and Penask Lake Hatchery, 350,000; resultant eyed eggs, fry and
advanced fry, and fingerlings liberated, 527,471, in thirty-seven lakes.
Summary of Rearing-ponds operated, etc.
Summerland Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—Operations temporarily suspended during
construction of new hatchery.
Princeton Rearing-ponds.—Two semi-natural ponds or small lakes, leased and
operated by the Princeton Fish and Game Protective Association—10,000 Kamloops
trout fry released in lower pond in 1947 for experimental purposes.
Nelson Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—1946: Fingerlings liberated from No. 5 to No. 1
circular pond, 5,027. Liberations, 1947: 4,190 fingerlings from 5-7-10% inches in
length during May and June in West Arm of Kootenay Lake between Crescent and
Sunshine Bays (fish marked by removal of adipose and left ventral fins).
Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Gerrard Hatchery, 120,000, June, 1946.
Liberations of resultant fingerlings, June-July, 1947: From Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5 ponds,
84,997 (4 to 6 inches in length), in West Arm, Kootenay Lake, between Crescent and
Sunshine Bays; Lardeau River, near Gerrard, 16,000; Champion Lakes, 2,443.
Transferred to No. 1 circular pond and retained, 6,089.   Total distributions, 109,529.
Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Gerrard Hatchery, June 4th, 1947—
100,000.    Resultant fry, 96,550, released in Nos. 3, 4, and 5 ponds.
Kamloops trout eyed eggs collected at Snowshoe Lake, 40,000. Resultant fry,
22,250, released in No. 2 pond.
Kaslo Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—January 1st, 1947: Recorded number of Kamloops trout fingerlings, 157,286, carried over in the hatchery from 1946. Resultant
fingerlings liberated, 22,000 (3 to 4 inches in length), in the Lardeau River near
Gerrard, July 2nd and 12th. Remainder of fingerlings liberated, 102,000 (3 to 4 inches
in length), Kootenay Lake (Kaslo Bay, etc.), June-July; also 1,890 fingerlings (3 to 6
inches in length) in Kootenay Lake, October 9th.
Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Gerrard, June 4th, 1947—100,000; resultant fry, 2,000, released in Bjerkness No. 1 pond August 4th; retrieved from pond
October 12th, 1,700 fingerlings, from 2 to 3 inches in length, transferred back to
hatchery troughs; total number of fingerlings retained in the hatchery troughs as at
December 31st, 1947—96,848 (from 2 to 4 inches in length). REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 27
Bjerkness Rearing-ponds.—Used temporarily, pending increased water-supply, etc.
New Denver Rearing-ponds.—Operations suspended due to the serious pollution
of Carpenter Creek from concentrator operations of the Zincton Mines, Limited.
Matthew Creek Natural Rearing-ponds.—Twenty-five thousand cut-throat trout
fry released therein, which gradually enter the St. Mary River.
Fernie City Rearing-ponds.—Due to unfavourable conditions of Nos. 2 and 3 ponds,
considered advisable not to use the ponds in 1947.
Ova Collections.
As the Nelson Hatchery is dependent on the supplies of Kamloops trout eyed eggs
from Penask and Lloyds Creek Hatcheries, and in view of the increasing demand of
these eggs, the possibility of obtaining eggs at Snowshoe and Whatshan Lakes was
investigated, and a small number of eggs were collected at Snowshoe Lake (40,000).
Male trout for fertilization were extremely scarce.
Approximately 325,000 Eastern Brook trout eggs were collected at Boundary
Lake, Nelway, under more favourable conditions than the season 1946, when 173,000
eggs were taken.
Early extreme high water in the Lardeau River again seriously affected the collection of Kamloops trout eggs, when 456,000 were taken, in comparison with the
season 1946 when 554,000 eggs were taken.
For waters of the Interior, 2,026,000 kokanee (redfish) eggs were collected at
Meadow Creek, Lardeau, in comparison to 2,000,000 eggs in 1946.
The annual collection of cut-throat trout eggs at Kiahko (Fish) Lakes, Cranbrook
district, amounted to 1,637,000;   1,823,500 eggs were collected in 1946.
Hatcheries.
Cranbrook Hatchery.—Since the inception of cut-throat trout ova collections in
1923, the Cranbrook District Rod and Gun Club constructed and operated a hatchery
for fish-cultural purposes, under concessions granted by the Corporation of the City
of Cranbrook and grants from the Federal Fisheries and Game Department. However,
at an executive meeting held by the club in Cranbrook, April 8th last, it was mutually
agreed by the members present and under terms of agreement subsequently submitted
for the Game Department to take over and operate the Cranbrook Hatchery as from
April 1st, 1947.
Further, with the possibility of the Cranbrook water-supply being affected by
chlorination under consideration by the City of Cranbrook after August 31st, 1948,
close contact is being kept with the situation in view of any possible change-over to
a new hatchery-site and suitable water-supply.
Summerland Hatchery.—The construction of a new modern and spacious building
at Summerland in readiness for spring operations in 1948 should prove a valuable
asset toward maintaining the supply of trout for waters of the Okanagan and Similkameen Districts.
Meadow Creek Station.—For the convenience of the staff whilst engaged on the
yearly collections of kokanee eggs and for storage of equipment, the original building
was enlarged by an addition of 10 by 12 feet.
Miscellaneous Subjects.
Fertilization of Lakes.—Pending the conclusion of scientific experiments conducted
at Paul Lake, Kamloops, relative to the use of commercial fertilizers to increase the
productivity of certain lakes, no further attempts or applications have been considered.
Salvage and Transfer of Trout.—With favourable climatic conditions and abundant
fall rain, there was no loss of trout in streams at times affected with drought and L 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
scanty waterflow, nor was it necessary to salvage and transfer any trout to more
favourable water conditions.
For the conservation of the natural food-supplies in Fish Lakes, Cranbrook district, and to prevent similar overcrowding during the season 1946, 346 surplus male
cut-throat trout were transferred from the traps to Monroe Lake for the benefit of
resident anglers.
Destruction of Coarse Fish.—In view of the interest and steps taken by the organized sportsmen of Princeton and vicinity during the season of 1946 and the attempts
made to reduce the numbers of coarse fish in certain lakes, on behalf of the Game
Commission and under the direction of Dr. W. A. Clemens, Department of Zoology,
University of British Columbia, scientific experiments were conducted at Dry and
Borgeson Lakes, Princeton, with satisfactory results. However, it is possible the cost
of surveys and chemicals used will restrict such operations; that is, to eliminate
entirely the coarse fish from numerous lakes where considered detrimental to sport fish.
Toward the latter part of the summer considerable numbers of coarse fish congregated below the power dam on Kootenay River, and the following fish were taken by
two licensees and fur-farmers:—
Kootenay River  Number. Weight (Lb.).
Rocky Mountain whitefish   4,000 2,400
Suckers   3,400 4,500
Squawfish   33 66
Upper Arrow Lakes (Nakusp Creek) —
Squawfish   891 1,200
Suckers   22 30
Columbia River and Sloughs—
Squawfish   260 247
Suckers   23 23
Windermere Lake and Sloughs—
Squawfish   260 248
Suckers   22 27
Okanagan River, Penticton*      	
Christina Lake—
European tench  960 2,000
Carp   1 5
Squawfish   216 650
Suckers   132 400
Lardeau River, Gerrard—
Rocky Mountain whitefish   390 200
Suckers  22 40
Ling  1 14
* Due to prevailing high water during spawning period of coarse fish, no fish were taken in the traps.
Obstructions.
Duncan River.—Confirming remarks of 1946 relative to the formation of a logjam on the lower reaches of the river, approximately 1 mile north of the confluence of
Meadow Creek, tentative arrangements were made by the Dominion Department of
Public Works to remove same to facilitate navigation, and a 40-foot channel was
opened up through the obstruction, thus affording free passage to the spawning
migratory trout from Kootenay Lake.
Whatshan Lakes.—Hydro-electric power development is under consideration by
the British Columbia Power Commission. For sport-fisheries interests, due and careful attention is being given to this proposed development by all concerned. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 29
Fishways.—The five small fishways installed in dams under 10 feet in height
situated on the outlet of Okanagan Lake, Eholt Creek, McBain's Lake, Alexander Creek,
and Paddy Ryan Lakes are in fair working condition, except at the latter lakes, which
matter is receiving attention.
Smith Lake.—For fish-cultural purposes, conditions investigated as to maintaining
the natural food-supplies and water-levels of the lake. A water licence has been
granted in that respect, and with the co-operation of the organized sportsmen of
Cranbrook, improvements to the outlet and the proposed construction of a small
concrete dam will receive attention when climatic conditions permit.
Meadow Creek, Lardeau.—During the early fall, improvements were made to the
site of the kokanee ova collection set-up by widening out the creek channel and protecting the banks to prevent any possible flooding of the highway and the private land
adjacent.
Lardeau River.—In keeping with the policy of affording free passage to parent
Kamloops trout from Kootenay Lake in reaching their respective spawning areas
adjacent to Gerrard Hatchery, during the fall all minor obstructions were completely
removed from the north channel of the river adjacent to the Handy Log-jam. The
channel in question now carries the normal waterflow. Further, the boom-sticks used
seasonally across the mouth of the river during spawning operations were repaired.
An attempt will be made to move the boom, logs, and debris, etc., instead of permitting
such materials, when collected, to enter the river to form additional obstructions.
Pollutions (Mining Industries, etc.).
Renewed mining activities have again brought to our attention the pollution of
waters frequented by fish. However, it is of interest to report that with the exception
of a few operators, splendid co-operation is being received for the benefit of fish life,
water-fowl, and fur-bearing animals.
Similkameen River.—The Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited, of Copper Mountain, has, at considerable expense, created storage-ponds
to take care of ash discharged from their electric steam plant, and from a mining standpoint the river is free from substances that might affect fish life, and similar action has
been taken by the Kelowna Exploration Company and the Mascot Mining Company at
Hedley and the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited,
at Copper Mountain.
The Atkinson Dredging Company, of Princeton and Vancouver, commenced dragline and dredging operations on the Similkameen River, November 7th, 1947, to recover
gold and platinum. There was some concern as to how the disturbance and handling
of 2,500 to 3,500 yards of gravel, etc., daily would affect fish life in the river. So far,
from investigations conducted, the suspended earth in the waterflow and cloudiness
has not seriously affected fish life.
Columbia River.—A certain amount of pollution occurs, resulting from the operation of plants by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, at Trail.
Salmon River and Sheep Creek.—The pollutions continue unabated, resulting from
mining and concentrator operations by the Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Limited. No
attempt has been made by the management to stop or reduce the pollution from the
discharge of tailings direct into Wolfe Creek, flowing into Sheep Creek, etc.
Salmon River.—The Canadian Exploration Company, Salmo, B.C., purchased the
Emerald tungsten mine and commenced concentrator operations last spring, but before
doing so the management, at considerable expense, created impounding areas or
settling-ponds on land originally purchased for that purpose to prevent the escape of
concentrator refuse and the pollution of the Salmon River.
Pend d'Oreille River.—The management of the Reeves-MacDonald Mines, Limited,
Salmo, B.C., will, in due course, construct and operate a concentrator to treat a con- L 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
siderable daily tonnage of silver, lead, and zinc ores. In order to prevent the serious
pollution of the river, provision is being made to store or impound the resultant
tailings on bench land adjacent to the stream.
Jewel Lake.—During the month of October the Dentonia Mines, Limited, 572 Howe
Street, Vancouver, B.C., commenced concentrator operations to treat gold-bearing ore
from its mine. Prior to resumption of operations, arrangements were made with the
management to impound the refuse, similarly as carried out several years ago, to
prevent the serious pollution of Jewel Lake.
Kootenay River.—The Kenville Gold Mines, Ltd., purchased some mining property
known as the Granite Poorman mine, etc., and in view of treating gold-bearing ores,
a plot of land on the shore-line of Kootenay River, Taghum, was leased from the West
Kootenay Power and Light Company, Trail. At considerable expense a storage area
was created for the concentrator refuse to prevent any serious pollution of the river.
The arrangement so far has functioned satisfactorily.
Sitkum Creek.—Last spring operations were resumed by the Alpine Gold Mines,
Limited, and precautionary measures were taken by the management to impound the
concentrator refuse, which is a difficult matter due to the precipitous nature of the
ground. As the treatment of ores is straight flotation, the escape of small quantities
of tailings or sand does not seriously affect fish life in the West Arm of Kootenay Lake.
Woodbury Creek.—At some future date there is a prospect of the management of
the Pontiac-Scranton mine, situated 11 miles up the creek, constructing a concentrator
to treat ores from the mine. Should this occur, the operators have already been
approached regarding the control of refuse to prevent the pollution of the creek and
Kootenay Lake, and the management has signified its intention to do this.
Kaslo Creek.—Intermittent operations were carried on by the management of the
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Limited, at the Whitewater mine and ore-dumps. In the
course of ores treated, the concentrator refuse and impoundment of same received all
possible attention to avoid the serious pollution of the creek flowing into Kootenay Lake,
except when the machinery was out of order.
Seaton and Carpenter Creeks.—The management of the Zincton Mines, Limited,
made some attempt to overcome the escape of concentrator refuse into Seaton Creek,
thence into Slocan Lake. As conditions will permit the storage of tailings, the matter
was again referred to the management of the Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Limited, who
is responsible.
Summit Creek.—The Bayonne Consolidated Mines, Limited, suspended operations
in 1946.
St. Mary River.—The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company takes all possible
precautionary measures to prevent the serious pollution of the river mentioned by the
efficient impoundment of concentrator refuse in connection with the treatment of ores
from the Sullivan mine.
Elk River.—The Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Fernie, B.C., continues to divert
and impound coal sludge from their washing plants on Coal Creek and Michel to avoid
the serious pollution of Elk River and Michel Creek.
Okanagan River.—The escape of fuel-oil into Okanagan River, thence into Skaha
Lake, is receiving attention by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company at Penticton,
and it is expected shortly that standardized concrete sumps will be in operation, but in
the meantime close attention is being given to the replacement of earth sumps.
Lumber Industries.—The operators of stationary and portable sawmills have complied with the fishery regulations to prevent pollution of waters frequented by fish.
Diseases.—During the year no mortality occurred amongst the sport fish in waters
of " B " Game Division from observations made and reports received. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1947. L 31
Co-operation. — Excellent co-operation was received from the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company, Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company, Water Rights and
Forestry Branches, organized sportsmen, and individual municipalities for the advancement of game-fish culture, and the scientific information supplied by Dr. W. A. Clemens
and Dr. G. Clifford Carl is gratefully acknowledged.
" C " DIVISION  (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO,
CHILCOTIN, AND SQUAMISH DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in
"C " Game Division during the year ended December 31st, 1947.
Big Game.
Moose.—As usual the Bridge Lake and Horsefly areas were heavily hunted by large
numbers of non-resident and resident hunters. From the known figures taken from
the Cache Creek checking-station, plus the known number of combined licences sold in
the Cariboo, largely to residents and the number of Indian families, which run into the
hundreds, the approximate figure stands at 3,000 moose killed in the Cariboo during
the eighty-three-day open season. It would be safe to assume, if we take unknown
factors into consideration, that the total kill would be more in the neighbourhood of
3,500 animals.
Related to this situation are the heavy concentrations of registered guides,
particularly in the Bridge Lake and Horsefly districts. Sketches of guiding locations
submitted by most of the 670 guides operating over the entire Division, showing areas
over which hunting parties are ordinarily conducted, reveal an unbalanced situation.
In one locality in the Cariboo at least twenty-five guides are operating in an area of
100 square miles. The sale of guides' licences has been very wisely stopped in the
Cariboo, and new applications for guiding privileges are closely scrutinized to prevent
chaotic conditions. Distribution of guides and hunters over a wider expanse of
territory is most essential.
Winter feeding-grounds for moose have in many cases been largely stripped because
of snow-depth, which hampered movement. Under favourable conditions, moose were
easy prey to predators. From McLure to Upper Clearwater moose very largely
disappeared during the last half of the open season. Heavy hunting pressure and
milling around of wolves were to some extent responsible. It stands to reason when
hundreds of guides and hunters are everywhere in the search for moose that there must
be a continual movement of big game. A scarcity for several days or even weeks in
some localities was reported, along with heavy concentrations in other areas. Reports
coming from various places, especially in the Cariboo, confirmed this belief. Moose are
moving south from the Cariboo rather than east and are showing up around the
Mamette and Penask Lake areas. During the open season many of the exits for moose
to the east were blocked by concentrations of guides and hunters.
Under existing, and one might say temporary, conditions, record big moose-heads
are not sought, but the meat is more in demand. In the Bridge River and Yalakom
areas an increase in moose is reported. By far the most important factor befoi'e us is
the unbalanced hunter-guide combination in portions of the lower Cariboo. These
concentrations of guides will have to be eliminated by diverting the non-resident hunter
to northern centres through a form of increased trophy fees. Once a thinning-out
of the unwieldly guide situation is expected, a more equitable distribution of guides
could be organized. I have for some considerable time favoured the idea of group
registration of guides.    The proposed plan, if the moose-crop is to be scientifically L 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
regulated and a maximum kill allowed to each guide, would, it is suggested, be well
worth a trial.
In the Red Pass district it is reported that a considerable number of moose were
killed on the Canadian National Railway tracks between Red Pass and Grant Brook.
The report puts the number at sixteen moose and nine wapiti. The snow along the
track is banked so high that big game have no chance to escape from oncoming trains.
The momentary extinguishing of engine lights in places considered safe is not a solution
to the problem. Perhaps some form of protected exit along the railway may provide
the answer.   The matter is being investigated.
Mountain-sheep.—Like the moose, this species will require watching during the
next few years. Some consideration will have to be given to the number of hunters
invading mountain-sheep areas. R. H. Church, of Big Creek, a registered guide of
thirty years' experience, has drawn this to our attention. If the pressure is increased,
he adds, and more guides and hunters continue to hunt the Churn Creek area and one
area to the north, there will be no sheep left. A patrol will be made by the writer on
June 15th next to investigate the above possibility. This view-point is not that of a lone
guide only, but reflects the opinions of other guides who know the above sheep country
better than many others who visit and hunt the areas only once a year. In the Grouse
Mountain district near Bear Creek, west of Kelowna, five ewes were seen with young.
These came from the Shorts Creek district to the north.
In the Yalakom Game Reserve mountain-sheep are reported to be increasing.
Wolves are reported there, but as to what actual effect they have on the sheep is not
definitely known.
Squilax area reports a fair-sized band of sheep. However, between the trains,
which knock over a few, and a few Indians who have acquired a liking to this type of
meat, this band will be lucky if its numbers increase. In future we should never
liberate sheep adjacent to Indian reserves. No disease was reported in mountain-sheep
bands. However, they are easy prey in deep snow and on occasions they have been
approached by humans without any attempt to escape. Mountain-sheep are reported
plentiful west of the Fraser River and on the Limestone Range, but this information
has not been fully confirmed.
Caribou.—There should be a continued closed season on caribou in this Division,
and while this is in operation, a thorough investigation should be made by competent
observers as to the reason for their scarcity. It is not due to hunters that a decrease
is reported everywhere. The actual kill by hunters is negligible. There are two
possibilities: One is disease and the other is predator action. In the upper Clearwater
one wolf was killed and its stomach examined, in which caribou hair and meat were
found. Caribou have moved from the Battle Mountain-Philip Mountain area. A patrol
made two years ago by the writer proved this. To the east of this and more to the
south fifteen caribou were seen in December, 1947. I am inclined to believe that wolves
travel continually over a wider expanse of territory than any other predator and in
large numbers. It obviously stands to reason that a greater percentage of big-game
animals will be in many cases driven from their temporary or permanent habitat.
If winter conditions, as in the case of moose, are responsible for a deterioration in
food-supply, big game will move or be driven to new localities. Reports from many
trappers and guides seem to so indicate. Caribou are not in prolific numbers, and it is
quite within reason that the food-supply or lack of it is not the contributing cause of
their disappearance from many areas where they were previously numerous.
Fear expressed by guides and trappers and Wardens as to what extent big game
can stand in the way of hunting pressure is prompted because of their disappearance
from winter yarding-grounds where they have been seen daily for years past on their
trap-lines  and even  around  the  farmyards  and  on  open  range  and  meadow-lands. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 33
Guides from time to time report big game more difficult to locate. The sum total of
these complaints means that there is a situation demanding close scrutiny, and we
should take cognizance of these reports from men of the hills. Caribou have been seen
west of Ahbau Lake, Beaver Pass, Upper Swift River, and the Itcha Mountains.
Approximately eight caribou were killed in the Itcha Mountains, according to reports.
The Williams Lake Detachment reports no increase.
Wapiti.—In the Adams Lake area to the north very few were taken, largely due to
lack of transportation facilities. In the Red Pass district wapiti are on the increase.
They are also spreading to the east of the north end of Adams Lake. Sixteen wapiti
were reported in the Hurley River areas on June 6th, 1947.
Grizzlies.—Reported numerous in the Bowron Lake area and in the eastern portion
of Williams Lake Detachment. In the Quesnel Detachment approximately four were
killed. They are reported to be still quite numerous in the Itcha Mountain district.
Due to lack of proper trail facilities, no hunting parties visited the Texas, Whitecap,
and Bear Creek areas in the Lillooet Detachment. In the Upper Shuswap and Cherry
Creek basins in the Vernon Detachment, grizzlies are seldom hunted.
Deer.—In the Empire and Churn Creek areas deer are numerous. Coast deer are
apparently decreasing in the Squamish district. In the Bridge River and Moha
districts they were quite scarce, due, perhaps, to increased mining population. Elsewhere, with the possible exception of Kelowna, deer are numerous. I do not think we
need ever worry about the deer population. Deer will be here long after other species.
With a greatly increased hunting population, Ontario has no scarcity.
Fur-bearing Animals.
After checking the brief reports from various detachments, the basic fur-bearer,
the beaver, should receive attention, as it is responsible for water-storage, growth of
aquatic insect and plant life, in fact, a drawing-card in itself in that through its
prodigious efforts it can change the entire face of a countryside. If we as a Department afford adequate protection to this fur-bearer, and when I say adequate protection
I mean supervision from beaver-dam to fur-buyer, there would be little to worry about
on the rest of our fur resources or big game and water-fowl for that matter. Writers
through the various magazines have and are doing their share in trying to enlighten
the trapper relative to the conservation of beaver. Fur prices play a big part in the
regulations of the fur-catch. Notifying trappers that their lines will be inspected
during the open season also plays a big part in restraining the overzealous trapper,
but we have not a big enough staff to handle this section of our resources, which run
into the millions of dollars. The price of fur has slowed up the fur-catch up to the
time of writing. There are sections where fur-bearers have increased and others
again where the trapper needs some checking and educating. We have the framework
of a very adequate system of beaver-protection, but it requires the efforts of all concerned to make it what we would like to plan.
Upland Game Birds.
Pheasants.—These birds are scarce in Kamloops, Merritt, Kelowna, and in some
sections of Salmon Arm. There is a suspicion that grasshopper poison used around
Merritt was responsible for the destruction of young birds. I doubt this very much,
as no birds have been turned in for examination. If poison of this kind is left around
in lumps, it might take effect. In certain sections of the Kamloops area there are
more pheasants than at first reported. In Kelowna there appears to be a lack of
suitable cover.    Primary reasons for scarcity may be due to:—
(1) Reduced liberations in spring.
(2) Poor nesting seasons. L 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(3) The two-bird-per-day bag-limit drove most of the birds to the benches,
where adequate protection in the form of sage-brush and cactus was
afforded.
(4) Concerning the liberation of pheasants, We are checking up on the use of
D.D.T. and its effect on bird life. Some control in the use of D.D.T.
seems necessary.    It is not a safe poison.
Blue Grouse, Willows, Franklins, Prairie-chicken, Quail. — Blue grouse are still
scarce in the Cariboo, but there is an improvement in the general situation. Kelowna
reports a very encouraging increase in blues, but willows and Franklins should remain
closed. In the Vernon district, optimistic reports come to hand of a general increase
in upland game birds. Kamloops reports a mediocre increase in blues. Salmon Arm
reports a steady increase in ruffed grouse, but no increase in blues. In the Interior,
European partridge are continually on the move. There is no report to hand of a
resident population increase.
Migratory Game Birds.
Geese have not been reduced in numbers to the same extent as ducks. There are
hundreds all over this Division in places such as Pemberton Valley, Canim Lake, Williams Lake, and Kamloops.    Bowron Lake is a stop-over on migration.
Whistler swans wintered, as they have in previous years, along the Thompson
River from Kamloops east for a distance of 6 miles. Several hundred ducks also wintered along the same stretch of water. The total kill of ducks taken by sportsmen
visiting the Cariboo was very low. Cold-storage facilities have saved a great deal of
game, but it also reflects to some extent the amount of game killed and is a reminder
that future generations of hunters will have to be considered. The principle of large
bag-limits during these days of heavy hunting pressure should be thrown to one side.
There is a growing dislike everywhere, except perhaps in the larger cities, at the sight
of hunters leaving and arriving back with heavily loaded trucks and cars containing
game. While this does not apply to migratory game birds to-day, it does apply in a
general sense, and the principle of killing game, more than the average hunter and his
family will ever need, is rapidly gaining widespread disapproval.
Vermin.—Eleven Game Wardens killed the following: Crows, 490; magpies, 497;
wolves, 1; coyotes, 138; eagles, 15; cats, 91; dogs, 41; cougars, 1; hawks, 125;
bears, 12;   owls, 45;  and ravens, 151.
In addition, two full-time predatory-animal hunters and one part-time man accounted for the following: Crows, 376; magpies, 344; wolves, 2; coyotes, 162; eagles,
25; cats, 78; dogs, 20; cougars, 28; hawks, 101; bears, 38: owls, 65; ravens, 24;
crow eggs, 180;   and magpie eggs, 151.
Thomas Squinas, during the winter of 1946-47, killed seventeen wolves and one
cougar in the Anahim Lake area.
Game-protection .
Since we have had many reports of wolf predation both from cattle-raisers and
trappers alike, the problem of dealing with matters of this kind requires more extensive
organization than appears on the surface.
When we realize that some of the wolf-damage complaints come from localities well
back in the hills, it would seem that suitable cabins, well stocked with provisions, would
have to be built. In addition to this, the services of thoroughly experienced trappers
in the the use of poison could be utilized.
Trapping of wolves during the winter months, or any other time for that matter,
is an exceptionally difficult problem. It is necessary, therefore, that poison in the
hands of trained predatory-animal hunters be used until the wolf is no longer a menace,
J REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 35
especially in the stock-raising districts.    In areas apart from stock-raising the predator
has a very important part to play in maintaining a proper balance.
Game Propagation.
Pheasants were liberated as follows:— „    ,
Number
Date. Detachment. liberated.
March 21st, 1947—Kamloops  30
June 28th, 1947—Vernon  96
June 28th, 1947—Kelowna  48
July 4th, 1947—Kamloops  96
August 8th, 1947—Kelowna  80
August 8th, 1947—Kamloops  80
August 27th, 1947—Kamloops  98
August 27th, 1947—Salmon Arm  100
August 29th, 1947—Salmon Arm  11
September 12th, 1947—Salmon Arm  100
Total  739
The pheasant-shooting was fair in some places and poor in others. This subject
is dealt with under the game-bird heading. More birds are required in some places
before the nesting season takes place. In one small area alone in the North Thompson,
Wardens counted roughly 400 birds.    Little or no damage to crops was reported.
Game Reserves.
Bowron Lake and Yalakom are the main game reserves. There should be a game
reserve established somewhere in the mountain-sheep country to the south of Big
Creek.    There is far too large an invasion by guides and hunters of the above areas.
Fur Trade.
Most of the fur trapped in the Interior is sent to the Coast. There is considerable
need for closer co-operation between trappers, fur-buyer, and Government. I would
like to see a convention of trappers covering or representing all of British Columbia,
at which a goodly gathering of fur-buyers could be invited. Co-operation on one side
only is of limited duration. On the part of the fur-buyer there should be something
more than the dollar sign. The trappers have from time to time discussed their problems, and at these meetings only two representatives of prominent fur-houses have
attended. It is an industry worth millions of dollars, but it lacks an over-all plan and
more co-operation from the fur-buyer.
Fur-farming.
Suggestions were made years ago that a fur-farming research station be established in British Columbia as a post-war measure. It was felt that something of this
kind was necessary in view of the impending foreign competition from abroad. As the
Department of Agriculture has now assumed control of this industry, further suggestion is apparently unnecessary.
Registration of Trap-lines.
A checking system on beaver conservation could possibly be established over the
entire Province. We have carried this out in " C " Division for several years, but it
requires the interest and industry of all concerned. Up to the present this effort, it is
felt, provides the basis for greater expansion. L 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Guides.
Guides have jumped in numbers in this Division from a mere handful in 1931 to
670 in 1947, most of whom are located in the Cariboo. To get some idea of where
these guides and hunters were operating, each guide was asked for a sketch of the area
over which he ordinarily conducted hunting-parties. Up to December 31st we received
450 sketches, and when recorded on our maps, it revealed a badly balanced situation,
showing a great concentration of guides and hunters in the Bridge Lake and Horsefly
districts. It is evident from this survey that a more equitable distribution of guides
is required.
It is obvious that the situation in these districts cannot be allowed to continue.
The general trend and possible adverse results accruing from these trends can only be
observed by a general survey and tabulation at each Divisional headquarters office of
what is happening in the field. Very few of the guides who accommodate non-resident
hunters have taken resort-owners' licences. More stringent guides' regulations are
necessary. Inspection of equipment and- examination of guides and the prevention of
invasion by guides in areas already overcrowded is very necessary.
A recent survey conducted over 100 square miles of the heavily hunted Cariboo
showed the following:—
Twenty-four known guides operating.
Number of moose taken by non-resident hunters (according to returns) during eighty-three days open season, 114.
Number of square miles per guide, 4.2.
Average kill of moose per guide, 4.71.
The actual total of non-resident hunters operating in this area is unknown. We
must allow that there were more there than stated above because some undoubtedly had
no success, and guides have a habit of neglecting to report on unsuccessful trips. If
we add to the above total 25 moose as an estimate of the kill of resident hunters and
then add a further 24 as a reasonable estimate of the kill of the guides themselves,
there would be a grand total of 163 moose from 100 square miles.
Special Patrols.
A special patrol was made by Game Warden Welsman and the late Game Warden
J. S. Hodgson to the headwaters of the North Thompson River. This patrol, of a most
strenuous nature, was carried out in deep snow, with heavy packs, and was executed in
response to a complaint of illegal trapping. While no prosecutions were obtained, it
nevertheless demonstrated that there are few places in this Division out of reach of
game enforcement. In future I believe it would be far more economical to use an
aeroplane and it would be less exhausting.
Incidentally the question of life insurance of Game Wardens engaged in dangerous
flights is one for serious consideration of the Government.
A special patrol was made by J. Hatter, biologist, and Game Warden Hillen to the
Batnuni Lake country in a survey of the moose situation and conditions affecting their
welfare.    Other Departmental matters were carried out while there.
Half of the waterways of the Bowron Game Reserve were patrolled by Inspector
Robertson and Game Warden Holmes. General conditions were observed and studied.
This area has a variety of scenery from the lower glaciated areas to mountain peaks,
untouched and untravelled. Water-levels would require to be adjusted to make travel
safer. Colour photographs were taken of this patrol. A short patrol was made to
Murtle River and Pyramid Mountain by Inspector Robertson, Predatory-animal Hunter
Shuttleworth, and Game Warden Cherry in an effort to ascertain the cause of moose
disappearance from the upper Clearwater.    Ample moose-feed was evident everywhere. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 37
Innumerable hunting-parties visited this district, as in former years, without even
sighting a bull moose. A band of twelve wolves was found to be operating there, but
only one deer kill was reported from a previous patrol. No kills were observed on this
occasion. I feel that, with so many hunting-parties and wolves milling around,
moose were, as they were in the Cariboo to the west, continually kept on the move
during the whole of the hunting season. The scarcity of moose extended from Clearwater to McLure.
Hunting Accidents.
October 14th: Taking his loaded rifle from a tree during a cattle-drive near
Quesnel, Carl A. Thompson, Ocean Falls, shot himself. The bullet passed through the
groin.    He recovered.    The weapon was a .35 Remington pump.
October 19th:   Eleven-year-old Arnold Odiorne was cocking his .22 rifle to shoot
at a squirrel on October 19th, 1947, near Quesnel, when the rifle discharged.    The
bullet entered the heart of his brother, Jimmie, who died instantaneously.    The boys
lived at Strathnaver.
Summary.
There is no one particular section of our game resources which holds priority of
importance over the other. All sections, from fur-bearer to big game and from insect
to fish, are very much in the limelight. The increased population of non-resident
hunters and anglers, coming here to enjoy what we have, merely stressed the need for
further reflection. The question asked by so many is "Are we wise in our deliberations
over the expenditure of our greatest and most sought-after attraction? "
Some doubt exists in the minds of our most conservation-minded citizens, and these
doubts are in many cases well founded. We can gauge by cold calculation just how far
we should go, but the irresistible impression seems to prevail that something should be
done now to prevent out-of-hand increases in non-resident hunters and anglers and the
advent of the aeroplane in a threatened " operations unlimited " schedule, the outcome
of which we may live to regret for many long years to come.
I can go on year after year sending in reports on game conditions, and I doubt if
1 per cent, of the hunting population ever reads these reports. The facts given are
taken from Wardens, guides, trappers, hunters, anglers, and personal observation, and,
if they are published within reasonable time-limits, should act as a compendium of
information for those wanting to know the facts.
Improvements in guns, ammunition, and the ever-increasing long arm of the modern aeroplane in unlimited numbers should set even the dullest mind to thinking, and
thinking seriously. Unlimited use of D.D.T. and other insect destroyers, which have
brought forth protest from entomologist and scientist alike, should be noted.
Our big-game resources, if capitalized within reason, are a major attraction.
Heavy intrusions by hunters and guides without some semblance of balance is possibly
bound to react unfavourably.
I would like at this point to express, on behalf of the officers of this Division and
myself, thanks for the invaluable advice, co-operation, and assistance rendered by
Colonel Parlow and his staff of the Kamloops District Forestry Office and others in the
field. The Provincial Police, under the supervision of Inspector Mansell, were also
co-operative. The Public Works Department, under Mr. Ramsay, District Engineer,
and the Water Rights Department, under A. G. Hatton, gladly rendered assistance at
all times. The various game associations were instrumental in helping out in many
ways. The co-operative efforts of all concerned gave us that feeling of assurance so
necessary in the execution of our duties.
This Division and the Game Department as a whole suffered a grievous loss with
the untimely death of Game Warden J. Stuart Hodgson, one of our most promising
younger men. L 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Although only 24, Hodgson had shown his calibre on many occasions, and it was a
sad blow to all who knew him when, in a characteristically daring parachute jump from
an aeroplane at Kamloops, he fell to his death in the South Thompson River.
The new Wardens, all of whom were overseas, veterans of World War II, did well
considering the short time they have been so engaged, and to these and senior Wardens
my thanks are extended.
" D " DIVISION   (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, PRINCE RUPERT, FORT
GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By W. A. H. Gill, Officer Commanding.
Big-game Animals.
Moose.—There has been a great increase in the number of resident and nonresident hunters in this area. From reports received, there is a very noticeable
decline in the moose population in this Division, except in the Burns Lake area where
there is perhaps an overpopulation, but this winter several reports have been received
of moose dying in that area. This, I feel, is due largely to disease, as these animals
are found to have large pus-pockets on them, similar to samples which were sent in for
investigation.
Deer.—These animals are decreasing throughout the whole Division, except the
Prince Rupert area, where it is reported they are increasing.
Caribou.—These animals are very scarce in this Division. There are still a good
number in the Tweedsmuir Park area and at Fort St. John, but I believe the season
should be closed for at least two or three years.
Sheep.—These animals are also on the decline, and I would strongly recommend
that only one sheep be allowed each hunter.
Elk.—There are no elk in any great number in this Division, except on the Queen
Charlotte Islands, where they are reported to be increasing each year.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are still increasing.
Grizzly Bear.—These animals are also on the increase, and are being reported more
plentiful each year.
Black and Broion Bear.—These animals are very plentiful and are causing considerable complaints from settlers.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Fur prices have again dropped to normal. This has resulted in the trappers not
spending as much time on their lines as in previous years. Beaver were trapped
heavily, but as the white trappers are now learning to conserve their breeding stock,
these animals are steadily increasing.
I would suggest that the Department of Indian Affairs be encouraged to establish
more beaver preserves. Indians were permitted to take twenty beaver each off one
preserve last year (Parsnip Beaver Preserve), but I do not consider that there is
sufficient supervision. If the Department of Indian Affairs would appoint men to
supervise and make periodic inspections of these preserves, I am certain they would
be a great success.
I might say the majority of Indian trap-lines in this Division have been practically
depleted of beaver, owing to the Indian practice of taking all the beaver possible. I
might add that there are very few exceptions to this rule.
All other fur-bearing animals, except fox, are increasing generally. It is felt that
foxes will not be harmed by the few that have been taken during their low cycle. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 39
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Grouse are increasing very slowly. If the season is opened in the
Cariboo on grouse, I would recommend an open season in the Fort George District.
Grouse are fairly plentiful around the Fort St. John and Dawson Creek area, and I
believe a short open season would be in order there.
Prairie-chicken.—Prairie-chicken are increasing steadily in the same area. A
short open season is also recommended. In the coast area of this Division, grouse are
very scarce.
Pheasants.—The birds at Fort St. John are still surviving, but there has been
no noticeable increase. I believe there is a far better chance of pheasants surviving
and doing well in the Vanderhoof area. Winter conditions are not as severe and there
is a great deal of grain left out each year for feed.
Migratory Game Birds.
From reports received, ducks are seen in and about the same numbers as in the
past two years.    Geese are increasing slightly.
Vermin.
Timber-ivolves.—Timber-wolves are very plentiful throughout the whole Division.
These predators are considered a far greater menace to the game population than
disease, hunters, and other predators combined. The increase in bounty is responsible
for a lot more wolves being taken, but they are increasing so rapidly, it is doubtful if
they are not still gaining in numbers. Several head of cattle have been destroyed by
wolves during 1947.
Cougar.—A few are found in this Division, but to no great extent.
Coyotes.—Are plentiful but are no menace to game compared to the wolves.
Game-protection.
A far greater number of Game Wardens are urgently needed in this Division, as
are predatory-animal hunters. Each Warden in this Division has far too large an
area to cover and properly enforce the Act. This area takes in two-thirds of the
Province and is covered by eleven Wardens and a few police officers, who have plenty
of work of their own to look after.
Game Propagation.
No work of this nature carried out in this Division.
Game Reserves.
Kaien Island, Alaska Highway, Prince George, Nechako Bird Sanctuary, Lake
Kathlyn—of those only Kaien Island and the Vanderhoof and Nechako Bird Sanctuaries
give any protection to game. A large number of geese inhabit the Nechako Sanctuary
during the season, and this is certainly a benefit to the geese, as it is their only safe
resting-place in the district.
Fur Trade.
A great deal of the fur-take in this Division is sold directly to buyers in Vancouver; therefore, we are unable to estimate the numbers of fur-bearers taken. Indications are that a smaller catch of fur is being made. I believe this is due to the drop
in prices and the high wages being paid to employees.
Fur-farming.
This business has dropped off considerably, as prices have dropped too low for fur-
farming to pay good returns in this area. L 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Considerable difficulty in getting all lines registered is caused in this Division, due
to the Wardens having too great an area to cover and the maps of the northern section
of British Columbia being very poor in regard to detail. A lot of time is spent trying
to straighten out registrations in the Telegraph Creek area, as we have no Warden at
that point and have to rely on the police to do this work for us.
Registration of Guides.
This is one of our greatest difficulties. We have a great deal of trouble securing
proper reports from guides in the remote areas. This past season we have had a great
deal of extra work, writing guides many times before obtaining proper reports. If
the " Game Act" stated a Class "A" guide must be the holder for three years previous
of a British Columbia guide's licence, considerable confusion would be cleared up in
regard to classes of guides. Class " B " or "A" guides' licences should be issued so
that they are allowed to guide only in certain districts, not all over the Province.
Guides who have not forwarded their reports in accordance with the regulations are
being warned that they will be refused guides' licences.
Special Patrols.
No special patrols were made in this Division during 1947. Routine patrols were
made as often as possible by Game Wardens and assisting British Columbia Police
constables, who are of great assistance in some of the remote areas where no Game
Wardens are stationed.
Hunting Accidents.
Frank S. Reid, Vanderhoof, B.C., on December 7th, 1947, while hunting in the
Chilco area, was removing snow from the front sight of his .30 Remington pump-action
rifle, when he accidentally discharged it, wounding himself in the lower left leg. He
has fully recovered from the accident.
Allan Baxter, a juvenile, of Prince George, B.C., on August 7th, 1947, accidentally
shot himself in the upper right arm when he was removing his .22 rifle from a boat on
Cluculz Lake.    He has fully recovered from the accident.
Game-fish Culture.
One hundred and ten thousand eyed Kamloops trout eggs were supplied to the
Prince George Rod and Gun Club hatchery, which resulted in a good hatch. These
were distributed to various lakes in the district.
Fifty thousand eyed kokanee eggs were planted in Cluculz Creek; a few of these
eggs were hatching on last inspection, when creek was freezing over on surface.
Fifty thousand Kamloops trout eggs supplied to the McBride Rod and Gun Club
hatched well, but the fry were destroyed when the water-supply failed.
Fifty thousand Kamloops trout eggs were supplied to the Prince Rupert Rod and
Gun Club, but have no report as to the success of this planting.
Twenty thousand Kamloops trout eyed eggs were supplied to the North Peace Rod
and Gun Club. These were a total loss, due to the water-supply being contaminated.
A special arrangement has been made with the power company for a continuous flow
of water so that this will not occur again.
I will personally attempt to supervise the planting of all eyed eggs in this Division
this coming year.
Summary and General Remarks.
There has been a large increase in the number of non-resident and local hunters in
this Division. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1947. L 41
The wolf situation is very grave. I believe if we had three or four permanent
predatory-animal hunters in this Division, with the bounty as it is now, we could
control this situation.
The moose have nearly all migrated from the northern portion of the Province.
This has to be studied very closely when we are considering the moose-take of the
Province. In the past years the moose have been steadily moving south, replacing
those taken by sportsmen.
I wish to thank all Wardens and British Columbia Police constables of " D "
Division for their fine co-operation and assistance; their assistance has been most
gratefully received.
All the men of this Division join me in sympathy regarding the passing of Inspector T. Van Dyk, who supervised this Division so efficiently for a great number of
years.    His passing away so suddenly, just as he reached retirement age, was tragic.
" E " DIVISION   (MAINLAND COAST NORTH TO TOBA INLET AND
LOWER MAINLAND AS FAR INLAND AS NORTH BEND).
" E " Game Division is supervised from Headquarters at Vancouver. The following are excerpts taken from the reports of Game Wardens and Fishery Officers in the
Division:—
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—The increase in population and the cutting-up of
large land-holdings during the past few years has made deer-hunting, especially on the
Lower Mainland, a great deal more difficult. Logging has also been responsible for
curtailed deer-hunting, as the areas that have been logged off are now just a dense
growth of trees unsuitable for deer. In some sections, however, deer have become
numerous and have been the cause of damage complaints, especially in the more settled
portions of the Lower Mainland.
Fur-bearing Animals.
" E " Division cannot be considered as a good fur-producing district, but along the
coastal shore-line fair numbers of mink are trapped each year, while the dyked lands
of the Fraser River delta support a fairly large population of muskrats.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—Logged-off lands provide the most suitable cover for blue grouse,
but these birds are not plentiful in any section of the Division. The mountainous
country on the north side of the Fraser River and in the Chilliwack and Harrison
districts will always provide some birds.
Grouse (Willow or Ruffed).—These birds are not plentiful, and with the encroachment of civilization into their natural feeding areas it is very doubtful if there ever
will be any more birds than those that are to be found to-day.
Quail (California).—While many birds have been liberated in the Division over a
period of years, they never have been overabundant at any time.
Pheasants.—During the past season a slight improvement in the number of pheasants was noticeable, but as large farms are being constantly broken up into smaller
holdings and as the crops being raised are not suitable for pheasants, we may safely
expect an annual reduction in the pheasant population. This means that increased
artificial plantings must be made yearly if the large number of hunters on the Lower
Mainland are to be provided with pheasant-shooting.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—There was a slight improvement in the number of ducks observed during
the past year throughout the Lower Mainland.    No doubt the efforts of the Duck Stamp L 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Committee were responsible in holding a large number of ducks in the district. At all
times, during the hunting season, ducks could be seen in flight to and from the game
reserves, where feeding was permitted. This would seem to indicate that if sufficient
natural or artificial food is available, larger numbers of ducks will remain throughout
the winter.
Ducks were observed in much larger numbers after the end of a forty-five-day
hunting season than during the same period in the past few years. The fields of the
Lower Mainland were well populated with ducks and later with wild fowl on the
northern migration. This resulted in many complaints being received of damage by
ducks, and it was necessary, in some cases, to issue permits to shoot the birds doing
damage.    Especially was this the case on Lulu Island and in the Delta district.
Off the Fraser River delta, the usual number of lesser snow-geese were to be
observed throughout the winter months. Experienced goose-hunters were successful
in bagging some of these birds during the open season.
Except in isolated small sections of the Division, band-tailed pigeons have not been
very numerous. These birds, however, do afford the sportsman an opportunity to start
his annual hunting operations early in September. It is felt that the number of birds
bagged has had no material effect upon the supply.
Registration of Trap-lines.
In those portions of the Division wherein the regulations respecting the registration of trap-lines is operative, the register holders are religiously looking after their
trapping areas.
Predatory Animals.
The predator that is and has been giving the Department a great deal of concern
is the red fox. This predator is fairly numerous on the south side of the Fraser River.
Some Game Wardens keep foxhounds, and by the use of these trained animals goodly
numbers of red fox are destroyed each year. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 43
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.
Comparative Statistics, 1913 to 1947, inclusive.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences
and Fees.
Revenue
Calendar Year.
Informations
laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
454
451
585
613
547
440
446
409
356
379
652
819
895
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
436
552
574
526
419
430
392
342
372
632
798
878
7
21
21
17
14
17
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
23
16
15
33
39
21
21
16
17
14
7
20
21
17
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
19
14
20
42
21
18
9
27
18
8
30
39
56
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,758.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
4,399.50
3,965.00
5,332.50
5,729.50
4,776.50
5,197.00
4,977.50
5,079.50
5,554.50
5,570.50
8,381.50
10,921.00
11,837.50
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
126,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148,689.64
157,647.30
177,771.33
192,024.07
193,170.53
188,605.20
213,267.67
205,451.71
207,661.72
238,902.36
352,228.85
502,555.25
597,529.30
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
$5,291.39
1921	
24,595.80
1922	
51,093.89
1923	
60,594.18
1924	
56,356.68
1925	
56,287.78
1926	
62,535.13
1927	
71,324.96
1928	
58,823.07
1929	
47,329.89
1930	
45,161.11
1931	
1932	
46,091.08
40,363.79
1933	
1934	
44,167.48
47,102.81
1935	
1936	
1937	
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
1938.	
44,963.87
1939	
1940	
49,187.00
68,466.33
1941	
63,125.30
1942	
68,475.07
1943	
1944	
68,354.03
70,363 23
1945	
1946	
1947	
104,250.95
107,357.72
99,344.14
Totals	
15,318
14,423
875
922
$211,224.57
$5,988,501.53
$1,606,732.61 L 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary of Total Revenue derived from Sale of Various Licences, Collections,
etc., January 1st to December 31st, 1947.
Revenue derived from— Total.
Sale of resident firearms licences, deer and moose tags_.__ $249,034.25
Sale of resident anglers', guides', free farmers', and prospectors' firearms licences  53,972.00
Sale of non-resident firearms and anglers' licences and
outfitters' licences  195,027.00
Sale   of   non-resident   ordinary   firearms   and   anglers'
(minors) licences   1,400.00
Sale of fur-traders', taxidermists', and tanners' licences,
and royalty on fur  99,344.14
Sale of confiscated and surrendered fur  737.55
Sale of confiscated firearms  181.00
Collection of big-game trophy fees from non-residents _ 96,350.00
Miscellaneous revenue  827.50
Total  $696,873.44 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 45
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Moose and Deer Tags, January 1st
to December 31st, 1947.
Government Agency.
Moose-tags.
Deer-tags.
Totals.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
16
28
19
399
496
39
18
142
152
120
2
467
1
192
32
23
38
27
1
732
21
101
453
5
731
116
10
261
49
19
81
135
763
147
40
273
$16.00
28.00
19.00
399.00
496.00
39.00
3,369
293
1,140
2,844
1,153
7,076
3,519
1,307
235
1,091
587
513
3,570
248
3,069
625
444
5,243
1,510
453
7,797
1,014
3,214
1,362
757
1,449
1,584
1,194
941
257
1,944
1,305
255
8,446
2.962
$842.25
73.25
$858.25
101.25
Atlin	
19.00
285.00
711.00
288.25
1,769.00
879.75
326.75
58.75
272.75
146.75
128.25
892.50
62.00
767.25
156.25
111.00
1,310.75
377.50
113.25
1,949.25
253.50
803.50
340.50
189.25
362.25
396.00
298.50
235.25
64.25
486.00
326.25
63.75
2,111.50
740.50
684.00
1,207.00
327.25
1,769.00
18.00
142.00
152.00
120.00
897.75
468.75
Fort Fraser	
Golden	
210.75
392.75
146.75
2.00
467.00
1.00
192.00
32.00
23.00
38.00
27.00
1.00
732.00
21.00
101.00
453.00
5.00
731.00
116.00
10.00
261.00
49.00
19.00
81.00
135.00
763.00
147.00
40.00
273.00
130.25
1,359.50
63.00
959.25
188.25
134.00
1,348.75
404.50
114.25
2,681.25
274.50
904.50
793.50
194.25
Prince George	
1,093.25
512.00
308.50
496.25
113.25
505.00
407.25
198.75
2,874.50
887.50
6,893                 1,723.25
1,074       j            268.50
1,763.25
541.50
Totals	
6,149               $6,149.00
1
80,737       |     $20,184.25
1
$26,333.26 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 47
Revenue derived from Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and
Prospectors' Firearms Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1947.
Anglers.
Guides.
FreE
Farmers
Prospectors.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
1,158
208
$1,158.00
208.00
4
193
23
6
12
3
52
74
88
31
99
3
21
	
19
12
94
48
13
9
56
11
18
16
12
42
6
166
9
5
3
23
5
39
52
1
22
31
44
33
142
6
73
10
12
13
39
6
123
6
15
29
14
41
9
1
57
9
1
83
45
3
151
62
26
12
9
8
7
24
3
2
30
7
7
16
11
13
9
87
1
8
22
2
27
1
2
20
39
29
52
65
11
25
5
40
155
33
15
35
$4.00
$1,162.00
$25.00
233.00
Atlin
696
1,708
822
2,063
1,048
967
696.00
1,708.00
822.00
2,063.00
1,048.00
967.00
1,130.00
133.00
24.00
60.00
15.00
305.00
399.00
566.00
155.00
1,826.00
1,841.00
846.00
2,123.00
1,063.00
1,272.00
1.00
400.00
Golden	
494
367
286
2,417
261
2,096
415
436
1,714
2,282
543
8,026
372
1,837
494.00
367.00
286.00
2,417.00
261.00
2,096.00
415.00
436.00
1,714.00
2,282.00
543.00
8,026.00
372.00
1,837.00
1,060.00
1.00
523.00
286.00
674.00
3.00
3,094.00
261.00
20.00
108.00
6.00
1.00
1.00
2,122.00
524.00
437.00
1,714.00
108.00
1.00
2,391.00
543.00
7.00
	
8,033.00
372.00
80.00
623.00
1,917.00
4.00
627.00
772
9
772.00
9.00
772.00
323.00
83.00
50.00
378.00
80.00
3.00
2.00
4.00
2.00
335.00
85.00
Princeton	
Quesnel	
908
1
420
1,704
1,048
908.00
1.00
420.00
1,704.00
1,048.00
962.00
■381.00
500.00
1,704.00
Salmon Arm	
101.00
95.00
90.00
211.00
24.00
1,149.00
95.00
90.00
7,959
1,720
2,297
63
7,959.00
1,720.00
2,297.00
63.00
8.00
8,178.00
Vernon	
1,744.00
1.00
1.00
2,298.00
945.00
1,009.00
47,117
$47,117.00
1,131
$6,805.00
1,243
839
$50.00
$53,972.00 L 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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felf REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 49
Statement of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers' (Minors) Licences,
January 1st to December 31st, 1947.
Non-resident Ordinary
Firearms Licences.
Anglers' Licences
(Minors).
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
3
1
4
1
2
3
5
2
1                        $1.00
$1.00
3
60
14
56
41
35
3
20
28
86
8
165
2
3
10
33
515
63
15
1
9
6
6
18
41
50
17
28
3.00
60.00
14.00
56.00
41.00
35.00
3.00
20.00
28.00
86.00
8.00
165.00
2.00
3.00
10.00
33.00
-      515.00
63.00
15.00
3.00
60.00
$9.00
23.00
56.00
41.00
3.00
38.00
3.00
Golden	
20.00
28.00
12.00
98.00
8.00
165.00
2.00
3.00
3.00
13.00
33.00
515 00
63.00
15.00
6.00
6.00
1.00
9.00
6.00
6.00
18.00
41.00
50.00
17.00
28.00
1.00
9.00
6.00
6.00
18.00
9.00
15.00
Vancouver	
65.00
6.00
34 00
Totals	
21
$63.00
1,337
$1,337.00
$1,400.00 L 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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o REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 51
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1947, inclusive.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-traders',
Tanners', and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
1921	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
39,423.87
44,238.00
62,745.33
56,755.30
63,176.07
52,122.03
63,412.23
93,793.40
98,766.72
92,637.14
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
5,540.00
4,949.00
5,721.00
6,370.00
5,299.00
6,232.00
6,951.00
10,559.00
8,591.00
6,707.00
$30,790.80
1922	
57,458.89
1923    	
67,524.18
1924	
62,446.68
1925	
56,287.78
1926	
62,535.13
1927	
71,324.96
1928	
58,823.07
1929	
47,329.89
1930 ;	
45,161.11
1931	
45,981.08
1932	
40,363.79
1933	
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
58,354.03
70,363.23
104,352.40
107,357.72
99,344.14
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
1947	
Totals	
$170,094.00
$1,627,012.67 L 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1947.
Confiscated from
Confiscated at
Kind of Fur confiscated.
Date of
Confiscation.
fc<
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OS
$
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3
1
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1
1
9
i
1
3
4
1
19
8
1
3
1
22
2
1
10
13
18
1
1
2
1
4
1
„     13	
...
2
„     13	
„      14	
„      15	
„      15	
15
„      15	
„     27	
David R. Alex	
Telkwa	
1
Feb.     8	
K. D. Kichier	
„      18	
24
„     20	
Pat McLelland	
„     21	
W. Stooshinoff	
Mar.    4	
Prince George	
2
4	
420
4	
Apr.  14	
Ed. Harris	
New Westminster	
„      15	
May     6	
V. Bennett	
23
July    8	
Aug.    5	
Chief Billie Johnson, Young Billie
H. Bloomfield	
7	
7	
Dec.   11	
„      11	
1
„      20	
Totals	
15
2
i
108
2
7   1471
Note.—The sum of $737.55 was received during 1947 from the sale of confiscated and surrendered fur REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 55
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1947.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind op Firearms
confiscated.
Rifles.
Shotguns.
„     10	
10    	
„     14	
„     27	
Stanley Mitchell	
Feb.     3	
3	
5	
5	
8	
G. R. Jolliffe	
1
19    	
Apr. 11	
„     12	
„     21	
„     23	
„     26	
„     26	
Fred Snaltz	
„     30	
17	
17	
July     9	
9	
9	
Roy Wolfe   "   	
„     10	
1
„     11	
11	
11	
11   	
„     11	
„     11	
„     14	
Queensborough...	
5
5
Oct.      2	
F. R. Hillhouse	
15
„     15 	
Vancouver	
15	
„     15	
„     15	
„     15	
Vancouver	
J. C. Medcalf	
17    . ..
1
17
17
20
20
1
20
North Vancouver	
29
11
Jack Gerbrant	
Carl Klink	
11
11
Steveston	
19
Vancouver	
31
Victoria	
1
Totals ;	
52
4
Note.—-The sum of $181 was received during 1947 from the sale of confiscated firearms. L 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1947.
Government Agency.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Total.
$10
$20
$25
$15
$20
1
7
1
11
4
3
17
85
14
2
8
5
2
12
7
2
1
105
5
2
98
189
27
18
25
143
63
2
1
4
25
4
1
2
56
56
24
3
9
38
7
13
8
6
23
13
14
1
1
3
3
32
5
7
16
6
35
4
4
6
2
2
16
7
34
2
1
8
11
19
41
7
7
3
15
16
6
2
4
2
26
1
4
4
13
7
3
7
3
1
4
2
3
1
2
5
3
18
11
9
3
8
174
254
23
304
90
74
215
2
33
34
107
35
7
154
79
105
16*
23
130
6
9
72
65
52t
14
107
781
$270.00
Atlin              	
456.00
66.00
638.00
1,153.00
590.00
450.00
61.00
3,498.00
305.00
233.00
1,670.00
24.00
221.00
348.00
454.00
400.00
735.00
134.00
508.00
3,778.00
90.00
6,290.00
1,635.00
191.00
1,285.00
62 00
73 00
1,049.00
310 00
4,000 00
728 00
3,962 00
Totals	
160
697
245
330
189
2,976:.
$36,386.00
* 15 at $2 and 1 at $5.
t 40 at $2 and 12 at $5.
t 2,963 at $2 and 13 at $5. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 57
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1947, inclusive.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
285
196
261
265
301
472
461
519
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
2,487
3,427
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
1923	
14,840.00
1924	
172
20,398.40
1925	
24,397.00
1926	
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
1927	
65,377.95
1928	
1,025
1,389
403
1
50,709.25
1929	
42,122.00
1930	
36,090.25
1931	
42,036.16
1932	
80.00
1933	
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
1,002
1,039
1,017
1,321
1,202
932
1,102
6,285.00
1934 .
6,825.00
1935	
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
2,038
1,924
1,546
1,221
1,259
5,506
2,720
2,976
12,374.00
1936	
20,350.00
1937	
19,540.00
1938..         	
21,018.00
1939	
26,399.00
1940	
23,131.00
1941	
16,868.00
1942	
17,397.00
1943	
16,587.00
1944                           	
20,243.00
1945              	
46,627.00
1946             	
22,392.00
1947..                            	
36,386.00
16,912
9,768
87,935
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$710,044.80 L 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1947.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
jj
N
X
O
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a
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s
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o
$
a
h
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fi .
o g
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3   .
fi fi<
*. [_
2
s
'3
Amount.
i
4
16
22
3
5
2
2
11
37
8
3
4
2
14
4
6
4
	
18
10
1
2
30
8
27
7
1
4
22
10
48
15
2
4
8
6
1
12
10
6
4
58
2
8
3
17
3
22
177
97
3
1
37
3
101
39
24
5
1
308
202
8
4
7
9
11
3
36
2
1
15
15
2
12
1
14
53
47
12
66
7
1
2
6
23
15
61
2
1
3
3
10
4
35
2
335
26
54
23
66
39
490
154
34
44
3
36
1
28
9
10
3
59
1
10
6
17
1
5
1
10
10
73
2
19
1
5
68
1
86
70
$1,815.00
Atlin	
80.00
16,710.00
5,590.00
75.00
180.00
35.00
6,700.00
1,510.00
7,180.00
585.00
Golden	
2,390.00
120 00
115.00
90.00
25,285.00
9,755.00
6,835.00
2,225.00
1,610.00
Smithers	
1,255.00
1,790.00
120.00
60.00
2,995.00
Totals	
144
240
106
1,059
86
333
1,451
161
225
$96,350.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 59
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1947.
Divisions (See Foot-note).
cn
cn
1
in
s
CO
fi
O
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a
0
o
<w —
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H
ri   »
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Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Description of Offence.
c
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<>
a
5
: a
fi
_o
_    w
wl
: a
fi
o
£    cn
a !E
: a
c
o
_   .;
_ 0
Game Animals.
1
7
3
1
15
4
2
10
1
25
8
1
2
2
5
3
1
6
25
1
8
1
1
1
4
1
6
21
23
1
5
4
10
14
4
1
6
80
8
4
10
1
4
2
5
2
53
17
1
4
5
8
5
1
2
l
3
1
14
2
1
3
6
1
4
1
2
1
6
21
1
5
l
i
12
17
6
1
6
10
35
1
4
3
2
2
49
64
6
1
2
7
6
4
19
3
4
4
1
2
2
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
30
10
2
13
1
12
151
21
1
12
10
63
1
3
1
9
1
10
8
2
7
14
10
169
112
6
2
4
12
16
6
36
5
5
15
4
1
4
i
i
i
32
10
2
13
1
12
151
21
1
12
10
63
1
3
1
12
1
11
10
2
7
14
10
170
113
6
2
4
13
16
6
38
5
5
15
4
1
4
1
$10.00
10.00
150.00
1,370.00
385.00
60.00
205.00
Killing, hunting, or in possession of game animals during
Possession of deer from which evidence (sex) removed	
Firearms.
Carrying firearms or discharging same in or from auto-
180.00
1,727.00
205.00
10.00
170.00
130.00
258.25
15.00
150.00
10.00
550.00
10.00
370.00
95.00
Carrying  or  in  possession  of  unplugged  or  repeating
Carrying firearms in launch during close season	
Discharging firearms on or across highway in munici-
Discharging firearms in closed areas (Burrard Inlet)	
Fur Trade and Trapping.
Fur-trader buying without a licence or failing to keep
Giving false information as to location of trap-line	
Making  false  statement  in   application   for   permit  to
Licences.
225.00
380.00
110.00
1,701.00
1,054,50
75.00
12.50
20.00
115.00
105.00
50.00
205.00
25.00
57.50
123.00
27.50
5.00
24.00
Migratory Game Birds.
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours	
Hunting or in possession of migratory game birds during
Special Fishery Regulations.
Possession or use of salmon-roe in prohibited area	
Using gear designed to catch more than one fish	 L 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1947—Continued.
Divisions (See Foot-note),
n
*3
09
1
s
cn
a
0
|
*>
fi
o
O
r*ji
O   _j
513
■SI
8°
Description of Offence.
c
<£
a
.2
-    tn
m!E
: 0
fi
_    co
o!E
: a
d
o
q!E
e
_     'r.
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Fines or
Penalties,
imposed.
Upland Game Birds.
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds during nesting season	
1
8
1
2
4
1
1
6
1
3
1
6
1
12
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
4
5
2
1
1
2
1
1
15
1
6
30
4
2
1
2
1
1
10
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
17
1
6
31
4
2
1
3
1
1
10
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
$155.00
10.00
90.00
Hunting, killing, or in possession of upland game birds
545.00
Miscellaneous.
32.50
60.00
Guide failing to report violations of the " Game Act "	
Guide failing to report before going on a hunting-trip	
Indians killing game for other than the purpose of food	
25.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
480.00
Obstructing a Game Warden in discharge of his duties	
Possession of game on premises of logging camp, etc	
15.00
10.00
Gaol Sentences.
$11,837.50
Totals	
94
144
263
81
296
17
878
895
Note.—"A" Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. "C" Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. "D" Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas.
Gaol sentences ranged from eight to sixty days. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 61
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary of Game-fish Distributions, showing Eggs, Pry, and
Fingerlings, 1947.
Kind of Game Fish.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fingerlings.
1,126,710
422,446
131,050
3,920,660
1,656,061
4,434,000
185,000
525,714
Totals	
5,745,710
6,130,217
525,714
Summary of Game-fish Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings at Departmental
Hatcheries, December 31st, 1947.
Hatchery.
Eastern
Brook.
Kamloops.
Kokanee.
Eggs or Fry.
Fingerlings
or Fry.
Eggs or Fry.
109,630
96.848
156.730
309,574
1 23 145          i              359(117
107,355
117,946
117,866
Smiths Falls	
	
Totals	
309,574
1
672,790                     515,747
Eggs
Fry __
Fingerlings
Summary.
5,745,710
6,130,217
525,714
Total distributions  12,401,641
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1947     1,288,537
Total  13,690,178 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 63
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L 65
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L 67
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L 69
©
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50,000
400,000
9
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Kelowna rearing-ponds	
Revelstoke rearing-ponds	
Lloyds Creek Hatchery	
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Aeneas Lake _	
Augur Lake	
Allendale Lake	
Bear Lake.         	
Burns Lake	
Chute Lake	
Deer Lake         	
Divide Lake	
Glen Lake	
Island Lake	
Little Aeneas Lake         	
Murphy Lake	
Norman Lake	
Osoyoos Lake	
Peach Creek	
Peach Lake	
Peachland reservoir	
Ratnip Lake	
Taylor Lake	 L 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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<ffl«BBBBBM(.OOOUOOOOOfciPci| REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 71
30,000
150,000
110,000
50,000
25,000
100,000
100,000
20,000
100,000
200,000
1 ©    i    i    i    i    i    :    i    i    i    !    i    :    i    i    i    i    i    :    !    i    :    :    :    :    i     j    i    1    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    :    i    i    :    :    1    :    i
16,000
20,000
23,000
27,500
5,000
5,000
89,190
45,000
2,500
5,000
45,000
5,000
35,000
10,000
10,000
	
5,000
12,000
45,000
40,000
4,000
20,000
: o ©
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20,000
25,000
25,000
10,000
80,000
45,000
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15,000
21,050
t    :    :    :    : o    :    :    : io    :    :    l    t    l         :    :    i    t    1    :    :    :    :    :    l    i    :    :    !    :    :    i    :    i    :    l    :    t    :    :    ;    :  :i
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Grave Lake          	
Horseshoe Lake	
Inlet Creek	
Kemball Lake	
Kettle River (Westbridge)	
Kettle River (West Fork)	
Kokanee Creek	
Kootenay Lake (West Arm)	
Kootenay River	
La France Creek	
Lockhart Creek         	
Lower Moyie Lake                                  	
Madden Lake	
Mill Creek	
MacDonald Creek	
Okanagan Lake (South End)	
Porcupine Creek	
Redfish Creek	
Rock Creek    	
Rosebud Lake            	
Salmon River	
Salmon River (North Fork)	
Salmon River (South Fork)	
Shuswap Lake	
Silver Lake	
Six Mile Lakes	
Summit Lake	 L 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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50,000
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Kootenay District—Continued.
Nelson Hatchery—Continued.
Sunshine and Big Cavuse Creeks	
Whatshan Lakes          	
Wilgress or Loon Lake	
Wilkinson Creek	
Wilson Lake	
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Kaslo Creek (South Fork)	
Kootenay Lake              	
Kootenay Lake (Kaslo Bay)	
Lardeau River	
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Stanhert Lake	
Nursery waters (Lardeau River)	
Cranbrook Hatchery	
Nelson Hatchery	
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L 73
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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Kootenay District—Continued.
Cranbrook Hatchery—Continued.
Paddy Ryan Lakes	
Peavine Creek	
Perry Creek	
Quartz Lake	
Rock (Stevens) Lake	
Rothel Creek	
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H REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 75
Eeturns from 2,753 Holders op Special Firearms Licences, showing Big Game,
Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1946-47.
Bear _____
Caribou
Big Game.
643 Mountain-goat
44
Deer      1,178
Moose        619
Mountain-sheep
Wapiti (elk) ______
Beaver
Fisher
Fox _____
Lynx	
Marten ___.
Mink	
Muskrats
Fur-bearing Animals.
._    9,095 Otter __
504
.    1,634
977
._ 8,019
- 5,176
_ 46,321
104
20
31
246
Eacoon        1,474
Skunk (_         278
Squirrels    223,373
Weasel      36,059
Wildcat          313
Wolverine
155
Cougar .
Coyotes
338
Predatory Animals.
       128 Wolves	
     2,558
FUR-FARMING.
No statement concerning fur-farming in the Province during the year 1947 can be
supplied, as, under new legislation, control of fur-farming is now under the supervision
of the Provincial Department of Agriculture, although the Game Department still has
jurisdiction in respect to the farming of beaver and muskrats.
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1947.
Kind of Animals or Birds destroyed.
Gams Divisions.
" A."
"B."
" C."
" D."
" E."
Animals.
2
14
222
90
251
39
103
25
45
3
4
2
60
75
32
57
30
2
329
24
81
115
28
13
37
6
46
318
146
226
88
25
1,279
67
285
498
172
166
4
1
88
2
3
2
24
215
8
24
104
10
34
1
3
3
59
374
49
1
1,232
37
108
8
23
27
10
44
9
123
484
59
2
178
922
259
52
Birds.
3,306
175
601
725
Owls        	
258
285
17 L 76 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary of Liberation of Game Birds, 1947.
Area.
Vancouver Island— Pheasants
Alberni     100
Courtenay  196
Cowichan  104
Nanaimo-Parksville   76
Victoria (North and South Saanich)  346
Total         822
Lower Mainland—
Agassiz  300
Chilliwack  352
Delta  775
Lulu Island (east end)  2,059
Matsqui   331
Mission (Hatzic and Nicomen Island)  1,524
Pitt Meadows   2,086
Sumas Prairie   1,275
Surrey   1,963
Total   10,665
Interior—
Creston   180
Fort St. John  24
Grand Forks  294
Kamloops   311
Kelowna   128
Lillooet  100
Nakusp   24
Penticton    276
Salmon Arm   200
Vernon     176
Total      1,713
Summary.
District.
Vancouver Island       822
Lower Mainland  10,665
Interior  1,713
Total   13,200 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 77
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1947.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1947.
Pheasants    2,895 Ducks    30
Quail          22 Partridge     22
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 1947.
Pheasants  17,439 Ducks   100
Quail        173 Partridge     28
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1947.
Pheasants        609 Quail        22
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 1947.
Pheasants  14,565 Ducks       6
Quail          28 Partridge      18
Number and Kind of Birds killed or died, 1947.
Pheasants     2,836 Partridge        5
Ducks   8
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1947.
Pheasants    3,548 Ducks  116
Quail         183 Partridge      27
Note.—During the year 1947 there were 109 licensed game-bird farmers in the
Province, but during the year 1947 twenty-two of these farmers discontinued operations. There were two nil returns. One game-bird farmer has not submitted returns.
Game-bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during the year 1947 amounted to
$111 (1,110 bands at 10 cents each).
Miscellaneous Revenue, 1947.
Sale of Lists of Various Licence-holders, etc.
11 fur-farmers' at $3.50 per copy  $38.50
6 trappers' at $15 per copy  90.00
114 game-convention minutes at 75 cents per copy  85.50
1,110 game-bird bands at 10 cents each _'  111.00
201 trap-line transfer fees at $2.50 each  502.50
Total  $827.50 L 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF GUIDES AND NON-RESIDENT OUTFITTERS, 1947.
Definitions of Guide Licence Grades.
Grade "A " Guide is one who has been acting as a guide for at least three years,
and who has suitable equipment for outfitting any person desiring to hunt game.
Grade " B " Guide is a person who cannot qualify as a Grade "A" Guide, but who
acts as an assistant to a Grade "A" Guide, or whose activities as a guide are confined
to guiding in areas where, by reason of local conditions, there is no necessity to use
extensive equipment.
Grade " C " Guide is one who guides a person hunting, taking, or killing game birds
or angling for trout.
East Kootenay "A" (Cranbrook-Invermere-Golden Districts).
Licence
Name and Address of Guide. Grade.
Aismont, Horst, Invermere B
Anderson, C. Dickson, Windermere A
Annis, George, Invermere B
Appleby, Gordon, Invermere A
Baldry, Charles, Windermere B
Ball, James, Invermere  B
Barbour, George, Wilmer  A
Benny, Glen E., Creston C
Bergenham, Peter, Beavermouth A
Bjorn, Henry Manning, Fort Steele B
Bond, Allan Kennard, Kimberley  B
Bourden, Francis W., Creston  C
Boyle, James, Edgewater  B
Brewer, Carl S., Invermere  B
Brogan, Alex., Canal Plats B
Canning, Lester, Skookumchuck B
Capilo, Louie, Athalmer  B
Clarkin, Martin, Athalmer B
Cloarec, Leon, Kimberley B
Cooper, Albert, Invermere B
Cretney, Edward, Penticton  A
Dilworth, James, Athalmer A
Dobbie, Alexander, Invermere  B
DuBois, Vaughn, Windermere  B
Eady, Clark, Golden        ______ B
Engstrom, Sven E., Canal Flats B
Eugene, Louis, Bull River B
Feuz, Ronald, Golden  B
Feuz, Sidney, Golden  _■_ B
Feuz, Walter, Golden   A
Fisher, Anthony Neass, Fairmont  B
Pransen, Leslie, Invermere   B
Gabry, Michael, Brisco     B
Galbraith, Edward, Spillimacheen  B
Gilbert, Prank, Golden  B
Goodwin, Cecil, Invermere  B
Goodwin, Elwood, Edgewater   .__ B
Gould, Percy, Canal Flats  A
Hamilton, Tom Joseph, Ta Ta Creek B
Hammer, Andy, Bull River  B
Hammond, Lyie. Golden B
Hansen, Trygvert, Wilmer  1 B
Hansen, Walter, Edgewater B
Harrison, William 0., Edgewater  A
Hart, Clayton John, Kimberley B
Hellmen, Ernest F., Fort Steele  B
Hodgson, John Goldie, Marysville
Hogan, Charles A., Spillimacheen
Hogan, Charles M., Spillimacheen
Hogan, Frank, Wynndel	
Hornseth, J. H., Sirdar	
Jinkins, Ross, Spillimacheen
B
B
B
B
B
B
Name and Address of Guide.
Licence
Grade.
Johnston, Alexander, Invermere  B
Joseph, Camille, Fairmont
Joseph, Jerome, Fairmont	
Kain, Isider, Wilmer   _ ____ 	
Keer, Warren E., Marysville __.
King, Norman, Golden        	
King, Samuel Ronald, Golden .
B
B
B
B
B
B
Lawrence, Charles, Golden A
Lindborg, Axel, Golden A
bum, Peter, Fort Steele A
McClain, Jess I., Spillimacheen  A
McKay, Gordon, Invermere  A
Markuson, Levi, Canal Plats A
Michael, David C, Invermere A
Mitchell, Robert, Brisco  B
Morigeau, Martin, Fairmont A
Nasadyk, George, Invermere B
Nicol, Arthur Henry, Fort Steele A
Nixon, John H., Invermere B
Nixon, Leigh, Invermere A
Nixon,  Wilbert, Parson  A
O'Neil, Richard, Sanca B
Pagliard, Dante, Golden B
Palmer, Howard, Fort Steele B
Pelton, Robert Benjamin, Cranbrook B
Petrie, Robert Marshall, Cranbrook B
Phillips, Eclus C, Windermere B
Phillips,   Frank   A.,   1551   St.   Andrews
Street, North Vancouver A
Pommier, Emile, Cranbrook B
Reay, Doyle, Jaffray  B
Richer, Lionel J., Windermere B
Richter, Frank, Invermere  A
Riddell, Harry Scott, Wardner B
Robison, Arthur Edwin, Canal Flats B
Romane, William H., Golden B
Rutherford, Melvin, Invermere B
Schofield, Bernard, Canal Flats  B
Seward, Arvid, Golden B
Sheek, W. P., Spillimacheen A
Slaton, Jack, Wilmer B
Sparrow, Jack, Windermere B
Strain, George, Spillimacheen B
Sykes, Harry, Spillimacheen A
Tegart, George, Edgewater A
Tegart, Hiram W., Brisco B
Tegart, James, Brisco A
Thomas, Robert G., Parson B
Thompson, James C., Brisco A
Thompson, John, Edgewater B
Thompson, Lionel, Edgewater A
Thornton, Sidney, Invermere B REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 79
East Kootenay "A" (Cranbrook-Invermere-Golden Districts)—Continued.
Name and Address of Guide.
Tyler, Graham, Invermere	
Vernon-Wood, N., Brisco A
Licence
Grade.
 B
Warren, Eugene, Marysville..
Webber, Sidney, Golden 	
Weeden, Frederick, Wilmer_
Wehrli, Robert, Brisco	
B
B
B
B
Name and Address of Guide.
White, James Freeman, Fort Steele..
Wiedeman, Otto, Parson	
Wilson, John, Spillimacheen	
Wolfenden, Winston, Brisco-
Licence
Grade.
 A
 A
 B
 B
Zinkan, Edward J., Invermere C
East Kootenay "B" (Fernie-Natal Districts).
Aberts, Max, Natal 	
Anderson, Fred, Wardner B
Arbuckle, John, Fernie
Ashman. Levi, Waterton
Baher, Brian, Natal	
Baher, Mathias, Natal __.
Baher, Martin C, Fernie 	
Baher, William, Natal	
Barnes, Alfred, Fernie 	
Barnes, J. N., Fernie A
Bassio, Gene, Fernie  B
Billy, Andrew, Natal  B
Curry, Aubrey, Fernie B
Dvorak, Frank, Fernie B
Dvorak, Wenzel, Fernie B
Eftoda, Gordon, Natal B
Fisher, Frank, Natal   B
Gorrie (Sr.), Meth., Flagstone  B
Gorrie, Methnen, Grasmere  '.— B
Gravelle, Alexander, Flagstone  B
Gravelle. Nicholas, Flagstone  B
Hicks, Frank, Fernie A
Hicks, Philip, Fernie B
Holley, Charles, Michel  B
Hutman, John, Natal  B
B Hyttsten, John, Natal  B
Kaisner, George, Natal  B
B Kaisner (Jr.), Harry, Natal B
B Kubinec, John, Fernie  B
B Kubinec, Pete, Fernie  B
A McGinnis, Earl C, Natal  A
A Philips, Douglas J., Flagstone  B
A Philips, Frank C, Elko B
B Philips, George L., Flagstone B
Porco, Albert, Natal  B
Porco, Ralph, Natal  B
Ratcliffe, L. C, Fernie  B
Rodnev, Sylvester, Natal B
Rosicky, Andrew W., Wardner  B
Rosicky, Anton, Wardner B
Rothel, Malcolm, Natal B
Sinclair, James, Flagstone  B
Siple, Alfred, Jaffray B
Smolik, Rudolph, Fernie B
Travis, Frank, Natal  B
Volpatti, B. J., Natal A
Washburn, L. F., Fernie A
Whiting, Renal, Natal A
Wise, Charlie, Fernie  B
West Kootenay (Nelson-Slocan-Kootenay-Arrow and Trout Lakes Districts).
Armstrong, George, Kaslo B
Berard, Louis Daniel, Nakusp B
Carpenter, Claude L., Kaslo B
Clark, W. F., Howser B
Cummings, Arnold, Boswell B
Cummings, R., Boswell C
Gates, E. B., St. Leon, via Nakusp A
Hawkins, Fred S., Crawford Bay B
Kachuk, John, Trout Lake B
Law, Ian W., Nakusp B
Lewis, J. D., Nelson B
McGregor, R. D., Port Crawford B
Newbrand, Emil, Box 109, Edgewood B
Oliver, G. L., Gray Creek B
Rorick, Clifford C, Upper Arrow Lakes A
Small, Roy G., Beaton B
Stenberg, John 0., Kaslo A
Revelstoke-Salmon Arm and Okanagan District.
Becker, Johnny, Sorrento B
Bischoff, Fred J., Magna Bay B
Boychuck, John, Douglas Lake B
Churchill, Roy Thomas, Falkland B
Coles, Henry, Revelstoke B
Daney, Seldon, Ferguson A
DeSimons, Samuel Harry, Revelstoke A
Esswein, Phillip B., Magna Bay B
Fowler, G. C, Trout Lake B
Gee, Harold, Tappen B
Hanson, Charles E., Cherryville B
Henry, Gordon Kenneth, Peachland B
Henry, Walter James, Peachland A
Laforme, George W., Revelstoke _ A
Leslie, John Francis, Eagle Bay B
McBee, Melvin Francis, Sorrento B
Martin, Peter, Sicamous
B
Mobley, Howard, Salmon Arm A
Nelson, A. S., Revelstoke B
Nelson, E. A., Revelstoke  B
Nelson, Howard, Revelstoke A
Newman, Jack, Sorrento B
Oben, Frank, Eagle Bay A
Potts, William, Sorrento B
Raymer, Tom, Box 946, Kelowna B
Reese, Edward James, Sorrento B
Softing, Birger, (Sugar Lake) Lumby B
Stewart, Edwin Leroy, R.R. 3, Armstrong B
Swanson, Ralph A., Mara B
Temple, Glory, Seymour Arm A
Truswell, Harold A., Kelowna  B
Gardiner, Harry R., Anglemont B L 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Similkameen (Penticton-Princeton-Keremeos) .
Licence
Name and Address of Guide. Grade.
Armstrong, Allan Carew, Keremeos A
Armstrong, Arthur C, Keremeos B
Armstrong, Henry C, Keremeos B
Bombard, Ray Clarke, Princeton B
Clark, Herbert, Keremeos B
Fletcher, Eli H., Oliver B
Gawne, John E. (Mac), Naramata B
Gold, Robie B., Mazama B
Haddrell, George, West Summerland B
Holding, Richard, Bankier B
Hugo, Ambrose Mark, Penticton B
Johnson, Edward, Princeton B
Licence
Grade.
 A
Name and Address of Guide.
LeLievre, L. J., Penticton	
Lewis, James W., Princeton A
Logan, James Albert, Tulameen B
Lyons, George Henry, Brookmere B
Manion, William Bartlett, Tulameen B
Marsel, Frank, Keremeos B
Reece, Richard, Penticton A
Richter, John, Keremeos A
Richter, Josephine Freda, Keremeos B
Willis, Abe Ernest, Princeton B
Wright, Brian " Pat," Hedley B
Yiringblut, Joseph, Penticton B
Vancouver Island.
Anderson, 0. V., Quathiaski Cove B
Drummond, John, Campbell River B
Flesher, Eric Reed, Phillips Arm B
Hall, Frank Alex, 435 Fifth Street, Courtenay  B
Hancock, Arthur, Lake Cowichan B
Hancock, Joseph A., Lake Cowichan B
Holcombe, Chris. C, Alberni C
Howie, Leslie, Campbell River B
Jones, Thomas B., Comox B
Loyd, Givin Allan, Alberni C
Magnusson, Ingvar, Alberni C
Marshall, Donald, Campbell River B
Marshall, Duncan, Campbell River B
Nichols, Caser K., Sayward B
Oakes, George, Saanichton B
Palliser, W., Lake Cowichan B
Parkin, Alvin, Campbell River  B
Stickland, Percy P., Stuart Island B
Welch, Phil, Box 99, Port Alberni C
Whittaker, Gordon, Upper Campbell B
Wilson, Jack, Box 314, Alberni C
Kamloops District.
Albrecht, C. W., Quilchena B
Allan, Howard, Savona B
Anderson, Hans, Kamloops B
Archibald, David A., Clearwater B
Archibald, David C, Clearwater B
Bagg, John, Savona B
Bardett, Loretta, Savona A
Bentley, John L., Valemont B
Blair, Clarence V., Kamloops C
Blair, Percy, Kamloops B
Boule, James E., Savona B
Bowden, Lloyd M., Darfield B
Boyd, Kenneth, Kamloops C
Brousseau, Clifford E., Savona A
Brown, Willard C, Clearwater B
Burdett, George, Savona A
Bustin, Anthony Bryon S., McLure C
Cahoon, Charles R., Kamloops B
Cameron, James B., Savona B
Campbell, William George, Barriere B
Caywood, Phillip, Clearwater B
Chester, Bertrand, Red Lake B
Clearwaters, Ralph W., Kamloops B
Cochran, William P., Darfield B
Cooper, Norman T., Savona B
Cooper, Philip T., Westsyde B
Cornwall, Gilbert E., Kamloops B
Deaver, H. James, Savona B
DeLisle, Henry George, Louis Creek B
Dever, Dolly, Savona B
Dexheimer, John, Savona B
Donald, William J., Savona A
Douthwaite, P. C. L., McLure B
Dunlop, James M., Barriere B
Eakin, James, Little Fort B
Ellis, Douglas K., Kamloops B
Fennell, John Alexander, Chu Chua B
Genier, Wilfrid, Barriere B
Gourlay, James R., Barriere B
Grant, Charles, McLure..
Grant, Gordon, McLure.
 B
 A
Hagen, Harry O., Barriere B
Halset, Torbjorn, R.R. 1, Clearwater_ A
Hanson, Robert Lee, Salmon Arm (R.R. 3) A
 B
 B
 B
 A
 B
 A
 B
Hanson, Howard G., Little Fort-
Heyworth, Ted, Red Lake..
Hines, Deuey, Kamloops_—
Hoover, Eldred, McLure	
Johnson, Jack, Savona .
Johnson, Stewart, Criss Creek	
King, Bernard E., Savona	
Kipling, John R., Black Pines B
LaFave, George E., Louis Creek B
LaFave, John W., R.R. 1, Louis Creek A
Latremouille, Agnes, Little Fort C
Latremouille, Joseph, Little Fort A
Lean, Theodore B., Clearwater     — B
Lloyd, William, Red Lake B
Loveway, Thomas, Little Fort B
Ludtke, Charles D., Clearwater B
Ludtke, Laurence A., Clearwater A
Lyman, Arthur, Louis Creek B
McConnell, Kenneth R., Barriere B
McDiarmid, Garfield, Clearwater A
MacDougall, Alan G., Darfield B
MacDougall, Harold, Darfield B
MacDougall, Roy K., Barriere B
MacDougall, Wallace, Darfield    ___ B
McElroy, T. D., Clearwater C
McGarrigle, John Francis, Little Fort   ___ B
McGarrigle, W. J., Little Fort B
McLean, C. W., McLure A
McLure, Frank H, McLure B
Meeks, Clark, Darfield B
Miller, Robert G., Blue River B
Mitchell, John, Barriere B
Morris, Ian deB. M., Red Lake B
Morton, Alfred, McLure A REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 81
Kamloops District—Continued.
Name and Address of Guide.
Murray, George E., Savona___
Nelson, Gerald, Black Pines_
Nelson, William L., Savona..
Licence
Grade.
 B
 B
B
Licence
Grade.
 B
Palmer, William F., Darfield B
Paris, J. Davie, Barriere B
Peel, Murrill A., Pritchard B
Perry, G. B_, Kamloops B
Rainer, Karl J., Darfield B
Ranson, John C, Squilax B
Reaugh, Howard, Savona B
Schmidt, Ernest, Barriere B
Schreiber, Charles Patrick, Darfield B
Scott, Duncan, Barriere A
Shook, Charles, Clearwater B
Sleeth, Edward, Savona B
Small, Reginald, Clearwater B
Name and Address of Guide.
Smith, Allen, Savona	
Smith, John W., Red Lake         .__ B
Smith, William, Kamloops. B
Threlkeld, Harold, Savona__
Threlkeld, Richard, Savona	
Tupper, James J., Savona	
Turner, Harold, Criss Creek__.
Tuson, Clifford. Savona	
Uppenborn, Donald, Darfield
Vinnie, Alexander, Pinantan..
Walters, Jack, Sorrento	
Welland, John, Red Lake.
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
Woodward, Ernest A. J., Little Fort _ _____ B
Woodward, Frank E., Little Fort B
Welland, Thomas Edgar, Red Lake.
Wilson, Thomas, Falkland
Grand Forks-Greenwood (including Kettle Valley) .
Ackerman, Alfred William, Westbridge_
Anschetz, Chris, Rock Creek..
Bohnett, James, Rock Creek
Bradshaw, George A., Westbridge	
Carey, Bertram Charles, Westbridge.
Carey, Joe, Westbridge	
Carpenter, Walter Ervin, Westbridge B
Cochran, Flynn, Westbridge B
Cochran, F. M., Westbridge B
Cummine, Abel, Kettle Valley B
Fernstrom, Frederick, Kettle Valley B
Fernstrom, John, Kettle Valley B
From, Gust W., Westbridge B
From, Helage, Westbridge B
From, Ingvall Nels, Westbridge B
From, Oliver G., Westbridge	
Hall, David Elmer, Westbridge..
Lockhart, Fred, Beaverdell.—
Lovett, Robert, Cascade .
 B
 B
 B
 B
Lutner, E. C, Beaverdell B
Noren, C. F., Westbridge B
Noren, Carl S., Westbridge B
Peterson, Frank Oscar, Westbridge B
Peterson, Morris, Westbridge B
Purcello, Michael M., Cascade B
Ritco, Charles, Westbridge B
Smith, Howard J., Westbridge B
Stringer, Len, Cascade       B
Wells, Kenneth, Beaverdell B
Wolstenholme, Ronald, Westbridge B
Lower Mainland Coast and Fraser Valley.
Stanton,  James  Robert,   Glendale   Cove,
Knight Inlet  _____ _      A
Wells, Gordon E., Sardis A
Wells, Ray E., Cultus Lake A
Wilson,  Carl,  Vedder  Crossing C
Bourelle, Walter A., Mission A
Boyd, Laurence S., c/o W. W. Boyd,
Wright Shipyards,  Vancouver B
Jancowski, Richard W., Alert Bay B
Siebert, John,  Cultus  Lake B
Sing, Isaac, 1795 Beach Avenue, Vancouver  B
Cariboo District "A" (100-Mile House South to Ashcroft and
including Canim Lake and Lillooet) .
Allaire, Roily J., Gold Bridge B Bowden, R. L., Clinton   B
Archie, Charlie, Buffalo Creek B Boyd, Jules, 100-Mile House B
Archie, George, Buffalo Creek A Bradford, A. N., R.R. 1, Fawn B
Archie, Jacob, Forest Grove A Bradford, H. J., R.R. 1, Fawn B
Archie, Sam, Buffalo Creek B Brooke, Harold A., Cache Creek B
Baker, F., Ashcroft  B Burgess, Ted, Deka Lake  A
Baker, J. A., 20-Mile House B Cadsand, A. F., Loon Lake B
Baker, John Charles, Clinton B Camille, Francis, c/o 83-Mile P.O B
Baker, Roger M., Loon Lake B Casseon, Archie, Canim Lake B
Bates, Murray F., Clinton B Chabara, A., 70-Mile House B
Bell, T. D., 70-Mile House B Charlie, Jimmy, Forest Grove B
Birdsell, Sam, Clinton B Christopher, P., Forest Grove B
Bishop, J. A., Clinton A Christy, F. R., Moha B
Bob, E., Forest Grove A Cleman, P., Minto    B
Bones, Alex, Clinton   A Cleveland, J. G., Eagan Lake B
Bones, Mrs. Alex, Clinton B Cleveland, L. G., Eagan Lake A
Bones, Frank, Clinton B Cleveland, R. C, Eagan Lake B
Bones, Peter, Clinton B Cleveland, W. J., Eagan Lake B
Borthwick, Hector, Forest Grove B Coldwell, H. W., Jesmond A
Bowden, G. R., Clinton B Collin, Charles A., Lytton B L 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Cariboo District "A" (100-Mile House South to Ashcroft and
including Canim Lake and Lillooet)—Continued.
Licence
Grade.
 A
 B
 B
Name and Address of Guide.
Collins, E. M., Cache Creek	
Collins, Milton, Cache Creek	
Conroy, J. S., 83-Mile House	
Cunningham, Charles B., Gold Bridge B
Dahlgren, Earl, Bridge Lake B
Daniels, George, Forest Grove B
Davidson, Warren, Minto B
Day, William, 100-Mile House B
Deane, J. C, R.R. 1, Fawn B
Decker, English, Forest Grove B
Dodd, J. Ellsworth, Minto Mines B
Dorman, G. L., Fawn P.O B
Dougall, A. T., Bridge Lake B
Dougherty, C, Ashcroft B
Dougherty, C. A., Maiden Creek A
Dougherty, Edward G., Clinton A
Dougherty, J. J., 70-Mile House B
Dyer, G. H., 70-Mile House B
Edall, I. K., Fawn B
Edall, L. S., Fawn B
Eden, D. D., 70-Mile House B
Eden, R. B., 70-Mile House B
Erickson, S. W., Canim Lake —— B
Faessler, C. J., Bridge Lake B
Fenton, Charlie, Big Bar B
Fenton, Walter, Big Bar Creek A
Flaherty. R. J., Fawn A
Fowler, N. A., Loon Lake B
Froste, Freeman, Ashcroft -   . B
Gaines, Clinton, Fawn    B
George, Henry, Cache Creek B
Graf, Michael, Fawn    B
Greenlee, E., Canim Lake A
Grice, T. P., 70-Mile House B
Grinder, Albert, Clinton B
Grinder, Bill, Jesmond A
Grinder, E., Jesmond B
Grinder, Isadore, Clinton A
Grinder, John, Big Bar A
Grinder. Mrs. Louise, Clinton B
Grinder, Walter, Big Bar B
Hall, M.. Bridge Lake B
Haller, Clarence, Clinton  B
Hansen, Emil Alfred, Gold Bridge B
Hansen, J. F., Bridge Lake A
Heggie, A. Y., Tobe Lake B
Hendricks. Ike, Loon Lake B
Henry, Bob, Canim Lake B
Hicks, U. E., Lytton B
Higginbottom, Alfred, Jesmond B
Higgins, Cecil L., Fawn B
Higgins, Ed, Canim Lake B
Higeins, Marion, Bridge Lake A
Higgins, Ronald, Bridge Lake  A
Hodges, E. W.. R.R. 1,' Fawn B
Hodgson, R.. Clinton B
Hohllebin, Werner, Loon Lake B
Horn, Walter August, Fawn B
Houseman, J. J., Buffalo Creek B
Huckvale, A. J., Fawn B
Hunter, W. T., Ashcroft B
Illingworth, J. W., Clinton B
Johnson, Claude, Bridge Lake A
Johnson, James E., Bridge Lake B
Name and Address of Guide.
Johnson, J. M. S., Lytton	
Johnson, 0. M., 70-Mile House .
Johnson, Z. A., Bridge Lake.
Licence
Grade.
 B
 A
 B
Johnston, V. J. H., Bridge Lake B
Julsrud, E. E., Fawn B
Keary, C, Tyan Lake B
Kent, Arthur G., Lytton B
Kerr, A. H., Clinton B
King, C. J., Bridge Lake B
King, Gordon, Bridge Lake B
Knauf, H. G., Fawn B
Koster, Henry A., Clinton B
Kostering, Charles, Clinton B
Kundtson, William H, Lytton B
Labordie, Eddie, Clinton A
Labordie, Joe, Clinton B
Land, R. R., Moha  : A
Larson, J. O., Bridge Lake A
Larson, K. T., Roe Lake B
Larson, L. L., R.R. 1, Fawn A
Larum, S., Fawn B
Leavitt, F. W., Fawn B
Lehman, Albert, Lillooet B
Levick, J. S., Fawn B
Livingston, Neil, 70-Mile House B
Lord, Edward, Buffalo Creek B
Loring, Edwin, Clinton B
Louie, Fred, Jesmond B
Louis, G. B., Canoe Creek B
Louis, Victor, Gang Ranch B
Lowe, F. J., Loon Lake     _     A
McKay, John V., Lytton B
MacLean, Donald, Fawn B
McNab, Petrie Donald, Bridge Lake B
McNeil, B. H., Canim Lake B
McNeil, B. Spencer, Fawn A
McNeil, Herbert M., Fawn A
Mackie, Josh, Fawn  B
Madden, E. E., Cache Creek B
Maddocks, Frank, 70-Mile House B
Marriott, Ron, Jesmond      _ B
Martin, R. W., Bridge Lake  B
Matier, J. H., Clinton    __    B
Matier, Mrs. Muriel. Ashcroft B
Mayfield, R., Minto Mine B
Michel, Thomas, Moha B
Miller, D. T., Fawn B
Miller, Wayne, Fawn ____ B
Mobbs, A. H., 70-Mile House _.     . _ B
Mobbs, B. H., Watch Lake      _ B
Mobbs, W. E., 70-Mile House B
Mooring, A. R., Strawn Lake B
Morris, D. L., Forest Grove B
Murray, George, Ashcroft  B
Nath, C. J., Fawn B
Nelson, R., Clinton B
Nicholson, J., Fawn B
Nicholson, Vince, Ashcroft B
Odian, Ernest J., Fawn B
O'Keeffe, Hugh, Gold Bridge      = B
O'Keeffe, Wally, Gold Bridge B
Olafson, H. J., Fawn  B
Olafson, F. 0., Fawn B
Osterlund, Edwin, Moha B
Parent, S. J., Fawn B
. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 83
Cariboo District "A" (100-Mile House South to Ashcroft and
including Canim Lake and Lillooet) —Continued.
Licence
Name and Address of Guide. Grade.
Park, A. H., 70-Mile House B
Park, J. P., 70-Mile House B
Parkes, L., 70-Mile House B
Paul, Louis, Canoe Creek B
Perrault, Joseph, Jesmond B
Peters,  Michel, Clinton B
Pierro, John, Cache Creek B
Pigeon, C. L., Clinton B
Pigeon, P. F., Clinton B
Pigeon, Percy, Clinton B
Pigeon, R., Clinton B
Pinkney, R. 0.. Canim Lake B
Pollard, John Harold, Clinton A
Pollard, John, Clinton B
Powell, H. J., Sheridan Lake B
Powell. T. G., Sheridan Lake A
Prydatok, Steve, 70-Mile House B
Reichmuth, M., Fawn B
Reinertson, J. A., Clinton B
Reynolds, A. J., Big Bar Creek A
Reynolds, H. D., Big Bar Creek B
Ridenhour, R., Bridge Lake B
Roberts, R. V.. Canim Lake B
Roper, A. H., Forest Grove B
Rosette, Augustine. Gang Ranch A
Russell, L. J., Lillooet B
Scheephouwer, J. A., 70-Mile House B
Licence
Name and Address of Guide. Grade.
Seheepbouwer, J. C, 70-Mile House A
Scheepbouwer, W., 70-Mile House B
Scott, D., 100-Mile House A
Scotton, Norman, Big Bar Creek B
Sharpe, Cecil, Clinton B
Sidman, J. E., Fawn B
Sisson, R., Clinton B
Spencer, L. C. P., Box 1800, Ashcroft B
Taylor, Richard C, Bridge Lake B
Thomason, D. M., Bridge Lake A
Thorsteinson (Jr.), Charles, Fawn B
Tom, W., Moha B
Tompkins, Earl, Clinton B
Turney, R. J., Lone Butte A
Umphrey, S. T., Fawn  B
Vanderburg, W., Gold Bridge C
Van Horlick, B., 89-Mile House B
Vecqueray, A. E., Clinton B
Vecqueray, R. J., Clinton B
Walsh, F. C, 70-Mile House B
Watkinson, Bob R., Lillooet B
Watt, James D., Kelly Lake B
Whitely, W. P., 70-Mile House B
Wilkinson, Charles, Green Lake B
Wilkinson, T. H., Fawn B
Wrigley, E. W., 70-Mile House 1 B
Young, William, Clinton B
Cariboo District " B
(from 100-Mile House North to Marguerite,
including Chilcotin).
Abram, A., Lac la Hache B
Adams, Gus, Big Lake B
Alexander, Jack, Lac la Hache B
Ash, C, Big Lake  B
Asserlind, H. C, Keithley Creek B
Atkins, Dan, Horsefly B
Atson, James A., Horsefly B
Barker, Peter, Big Lake B
Barrett, S. N., Likely B
Barton, Thomas, Lac la Hache A
Bathgate, John S., Lac la Hache B
Belleau, Jimmie, Alkali Lake  B
Bestwick, Albert Moore, Lac la Hache B
Blacknose, Chell, Alexis Creek B
Bliss, William, Alexis Creek B
Bourelle, Philip, Williams Lake B
Boyle, Frank C, Likely B
Branch, Edward, Miocene B
Bryant, Alfred Lord, Anahim Lake A
Bryce, John, Big Lake B
Bulluion, Sammy, Redstone B
Carson, John, Horsefly B
Christensen, Andy, Anahim Lake B
Church, Dick, Big Creek A
Clayton, John, Anahim Lake B
Colin, A., Lac la Hache B
Collier, Erick, Riske Creek B
Cropley, R. H., Ochiltree B
Curtis, Rae, Williams Lake B
Dester, Baptiste, Kleena Kleene B
Dick, Mathews, Alkali Lake B
Dixon, E. F., Lac la Hache B
Dorsey, Lester, Pelican Lake B
Eagle, C. B., Lac la Hache A
Easson, James 0., Likely B
Elkins, Joe, Alexis Creek B
Elkins, Thomas, Alexis Creek B
Eop, Louis, Likely B
Ewart, Dan, Lac la Hache B
Felker, W. R., 150-Mile House B
Ford, Clair, Horsefly B
Forster, H. H., Likely A
Gaugh, A. H., Likely A
Gibbons, M. L., Horsefly A
Goetjen, C. E., Horsefly B
Graham, James, Horsefly B
Graham, John, Horsefly B
Graham, Robert, Likely B
Gunn, John M., Horsefly B
Haller, August, Lac la Hache B
Hamilton, G. G., Williams Lake B
Hamilton, H. M., Lac la Hache A
Hamilton, John, Horsefly B
Hamilton, Peter, Williams Lake B
Hamilton, Roy M., Williams Lake B
Hamilton, Thomas, Williams Lake B
Hamilton, T., Lac la Hache A
Hance, Grover, Hanceville B
Hansen, Wesley B., Bridge Lake B
Hanson, Fred, Tatla Lake B
Henderson, John, Tatlayoko B
Henny, A. C, Big Creek A
Henry, Eagle Lake, Redstone B
Herber, Archie, 150-Mile House B
Hinsche, Fred, Lac la Hache B
Hockley, George, Horsefly A
Hole, W. H., Keithley Creek B
Hooker, F. C., Horsefly A L 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Cariboo District " B " (from 100-Mile House North to Marguerite,
including Chilcotin)—Continued.
Name and Address of Guide.
Hooker, S. B., Horsefly	
Hooker, Thomas, Horsefly..
Hubbard, I., Horsefly	
Hulme, Albert W., Likely	
Hunison, J. H., Ochiltree_.
Hutchinson, William, Big Creek	
Jacobson, Alfred, Williams Lake	
Jacobson, John, Williams Lake	
Jasper, J., Riske Creek 	
Jasper, W. N., Riske Creek B
Jefferson, Jesse, Big Lake B
Licence
Grade.
 A
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
Name and Address of Guide.
Jefferson, Lawrence, Big Lake..
Jefferson, Theodore, Big Lake__
Jenner, Ernest, Horsefly	
Jensen, Pete, Likely	
Johanson, E., Big Creek_.
Johnny, Setah, Redstone	
Johnson, Floyd, Williams Lake	
Johnson, J. A., 100-Mile House	
Johnson, William T., Riske Creek_
Jones, Fred E., Horsefly _
B
B
A
B
B
B
B
A
B
A
B
Jones, Lawrence, Horsefly
Jones, Walter H., Williams Lake  B
Junek, Adolph 0., Horsefly..
Kelly, James A., Soda Creek
Kennedy, W. H., Horsefly	
King, E. S., Horsefly .
B
B
B
B
Krebs, L., Williams Lake  ___ B
Lee, Thomas C. W., Alexis Creek B
B
B
B
B
B
Lulua, Felix, Redstone..
Lulua, Henry, Redstone
Lulua, Tommy, Redstone
McDougall, Archie, Lac la Hache	
McDougall, Robert D., Big Creek	
McKenzie, K. J., Big Lake   B
MacKenzie, William, 150-Mile House B
B
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
Moore, G. W., Williams Lake B
Moore, John Smith, Hanceville. B
Moore, T. A., Ochiltree B
Morgan, Fallas, Likely B
Mulvahill, R., Chezacut A
McMinds, B., Likely
Mackill, Clarence, Kleena Kleene_
Manley, D. V., Horsefly 	
Maxtead, William, Big Creek	
Michell, Sam, Williams Lake	
Mikkelsen, Claus, Horsefly	
Mills, Thomas, Horsefly	
Moore, E. John, Ochiltree
Neilsen, Herman, Likely..
Nicol, Alex, Horsefly	
Nicol, Shelly, Horsefly
Nixon, Morris, Lac la Hache_
Oak, Ernest, Horsefly	
Patton, Henry, Big Lake	
Paxton, H. E., Macalister	
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
Petrowitz, Arthur, Williams Lake-
Prior, Joe, Hydraulic.
Pulver, George, 150-Mile House	
Pulver, William George, 150-Mile House..
Purjue, Oliver, Hanceville	
Quilt, Jack, Hanceville	
Quilt, Louis, Hanceville.
Racher, Wilfred, Horsefly	
Rankin, F. R., Soda Creek	
Rankin, G. E., Soda Creek	
Roberts, Charles F., Riske Creek..
Licence
Grade.
 B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
Robertson, Alexander, Macalister
Robertson, A. H., Macalister
Robertson, Mrs. Irene, Miocene B
Robertson, Johnny, Pelican Lake B
Robertson, K., Miocene B
Ronner, Jim, Big Creek-
Sammy, Eugene, Redstone	
Sammy, Francis, Redstone	
Sandy, Frank, Williams Lake_.
Scotty, Frank, Pelican Lake...
Sharp, William, Ochiltree-
Stephenson, Donald, Alexis Creek..
Sulin, Sam, Kleena Kleene	
Sulin, Willie, Kleena Kleene	
Taggart, Jack, Hanceville	
Thygesen, Julius, Horsefly	
Turner, George, Kleena Kleene	
Underwood, Albert E., Horsefly.	
Vaness, John, Horsefly	
Walters, Glen, Horsefly	
Walters, L. G., Likely	
Walters, Leonard, Horsefly	
Walters, R. I., Likely	
Watson, S. W., Lac la Hache	
Weber, James L., Williams Lake_.
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
A
B
B
B
B
B
Webster, Alfred, Horsefly B
Webster, Alister, Horsefly B
Webster, Rae, Horsefly B
Weir, James Donald, Redstone A
Westwick, Burton, 150-Mile House B
Westwick, Fred, 150-Mile House B
Westwick, Lawrence, 150-Mile House B
Wiggins, W., Miocene B
Williams, Aubrey, Horsefly B
Williams, Rex, Lac la Hache B
Witte, Frank, Big Creek A
Witte, Juan E., Big Creek A
Woods, William Frederick, Hanceville       A
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
Wotzke, Herbert, Big Lake..
Wright, J. F., Lac la Hache____
Wright, John B., Enterprise	
Wycotte, James, Williams Lake
Wynstra, J. E., Horsefly	
Youngren, A., Big Creek	
Zirnl, John, Lac la Hache	 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 85
Cariboo District "C" (Quesnel-Barkerville from Marguerite North).
Licence
Name and Address of Guide. Grade.
Aitken, George F., Quesnel B
Allen, George Herbert, Quesnel A
Armstrong, Brazier, Quesnel A
Armstrong, Wilfred, Quesnel A
Becker, Fred W., Wells A
Booth, Payton, Quesnel B
Brewster, Lester, Quesnel B
Cochran, James Dean, Barkerville A
Coldwell, Harry, Punchaw  B
Coldwell, Reg., Punchaw B
Cooper, Thomas, Quesnel B
Dolvin, Edward, Nazko  A
Evans, Charles, Quesnel B
Fluery, Alfred, Wells B
Greig, Ian, Quesnel A
Harrington, Alexander G., Quesnel B
Hartness, Sigurd, Quesnel B
Hoffman, Peter, Cinema A
Hunter, Fraser G., Quesnel B
Hunter, Lome C, Quesnel B
Lavington, Arthur C, Nazko B
Lavington, Harold A., Quesnel B
Lyngos, Hans, Quesnel B
McKenzie, Frank, Cinema A
McKenzie, James, Cinema A
McKitrick, Arnold A., Wells B
Name and Address of Guide.
Licence
Grade.
McKitrick, Roy D., Wells B
McKort, Clarence, Alexandria A
Marsh, Ruric Leon, Quesnel B
Miller, Isaac Edward, Quesnel B
Moffat, Ronald Henry, Alexandria A
Monkman, Erastus N., Narcosli Creek B
Monkman, Floyd G., Narcosli Creek B
Morris, Micke, Cinema B
Mulvihill, Michael, Quesnel A
O'Leary, Arthur, Quesnel B
Paley, Bob R., Quesnel B
Paley, Wallace, Quesnel B
Pease, Clarence A., Quesnel B
Phillips, Floyd E., Anahim Lake B
Quanstrom, Carl, Quesnel A
Quanstrom, Harry, Quesnel B
Quanstrom, Julius, Quesnel A
Rawling, Arden L., Quesnel A
Rawling, Arnold B., Quesnel B
Scott, Henry, Quesnel B
Simrose, Martin E., Quesnel B
Tibbies, Fred, Quesnel A
Tibbies, James, Quesnel....    A
Twan, Clarence Edward, Marguerite B
Twan, David, Marguerite A
Webster, Jim, Narcosli Creek A
Prince George District "A" (East to Mount Robson).
Abbe, Albert, Prince George B
Armstrong, Glen R., Prince George B
Blackman, Frank, Tete Jaune B
Bowie, Alex G., Prince George B
Braaton, Edwin, South Bank B
Bricker, William, South Fort George B
Brooks, George, South Fort George A
Carr, Stanley J., Tete Jaune A
Chesser, Charles, Mount Robson B
Corless (Jr.), Richard F., Prince George  A
Felton, Daryl R., Dunster B
Fraser, Gordon W., Prince George B
Gray, Jack, Prince George B
Hale, Stanley, Dome Creek A
Hale, Wilson, Dome Creek B
Hansen (Sr.), Anund, Hansard A
Hargreayes, Roy F., Mount Robson A
Hooker, Glen B., Dome Creek B
Hooker, James B., Dome Creek A
Hooker, Kenneth W., Dome Creek B
Jensen, Arne, Dome Creek A
Jensen, Einer W., Dome Creek A
Jensen, Ernest H., Dome Creek A
Johnson, Howard F., South Fort George _ B
Mahon, Mike J., Prince George B
Miller, Delmer N., Ware A
Mills, Marshall, Tete Jaune B
Mintz, Arthur, Tete Jaune B
Mintz, Carl, Tete Jaune B
Mostrom, George, Prince George B
Neighbor, Hersch, Tete Jaune A
Prather, Oliver, Longworth B
Sande, Walter J., Sinclair Mills A
Simmons, Herbert D., Upper Fraser B
Smith, James M., Loos ___  A
Smith, Roy W., Box 12, Prince George..... A
VanSomer, James R., Prince George B
VanTine, Charles W., Southbank B
Ylotucba, Antoni, Prince George B
Prince George District " B " (West to Hazelton) .
Abbott, Edward Walter, Vanderhoof B
Anderson, Harry, Houston B
Bellock, Henry H., Nithi River B
Bennett, Albert J., Ootsa Lake B
Bennett, Vernon, Southbank B
Benson, A., Hazelton B
Brain, Leslie Albion, Vanderhoof B
Brash, Richard L., Telkwa B
Campbell, Ronald B., Vanderhoof B
Carey, Ayliffe, Ft. St. James B
Clark (Jr.), James E., Ootsa Lake A
Conlan, Henry Rupert, Topley B
Conlan, Mary Lita, Topley B
Cooke, Ted, Vanderhoof B
Craig, Norval F., Vanderhoof B
Darby, Linzy E.  (Joe), Isle Pierre B
Davidson, Charlie B., Vanderhoof A
Dawson, C. W., Hazelton B
Delage, Clifford George, Smithers B
Ferguson, Alex, Noralee B
Fisher, Edward, Mapes B
Foote, Charles H., Fraser Lake B
Fuller, Stanley, Vanderhoof B
Gaylord, Roy, Vanderhoof B
George, Thomas S., Telkwa B
Grainier. Barry H., Noralee B
Griffith, Glynn, Oootsa Lake B
Hamilton, George Ernest, Fort St. James C
Harding,   Clifford   R.,   Germansen   Land
ing  B
Harrison, Alford J., Wistaria B
Harrison, Byron R., Wistaria A L 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prince George District " B " (West of Hazelton)—Continued.
Licence
Name and Address of Guide. Grade.
Harrison, Clifford V., Wistaria B
Harrison, Ernie, Wistaria B
Harrison, Robert O., Wistaria B
Haugen, Karl, Manson Creek B
Henson, Frank Edward, Marilla A
Heurey, Stanley, Ootsa Lake B
Hindmarch, Floyd Ellis, Vanderhoof B
Holland, Julian, Telkwa B
Howlett,  Ernest,  Southbank B
Hoy, David H, Fort St. James C
Hunt, Amos, Telkwa B
Irving, Anthony C, Vanderhoof B
Jananecke, John, Ootsa Lake B
Johnson, George M., Vanderhoof B
Johnson, John H., Isle Pierre B
Johnson, John Kornelius, Fort St. James _ B
Knox, Jack, Ootsa Lake A
Lace, Basil K., Fort St. James B
Lamb, James W., Ootsa Lake B
Larson, Axel, Hazelton B
Lee, Jack, Hazelton A
Leon, Paddy, Topley B
Lord, Walter H., Tchesinkut Lake B
McNeill. Clifford, Ootsa Lake A
McNeill, John W., Ootsa Lake A
Martin, Betty, Smithers B
Martin, Eric S., Smithers B
Michell, Jack, Ootsa Lake . B
Michell, Patrick, Fraser Lake B
Miller, Sam Louis, Isle Pierre B
Morgan, James Edward, Wistaria  B
Munger, F. W. Roy, Walcott B
Licence
Name and Address of Guide. Grade.
Nelson, George William, Vanderhoof B
Nelson, John N., Clemretta A
Nobles, Evan, Francois Lake B
Plowman, Clarence, Endako B
Plowman, Enid Alice, Endako B
Plowman, William C, Endako B
Prince, Alex, Fort St. James B
 B
 A
Prince, Archie, Fort St. James_.
Prince, John, Fort St. James
Prince, Robert B., Fort St. James B
Rasmussen, Peter, Vanderhoof B
Reynolds, Jack, Hazelton B
Roos, Nels Arthur, Marilla B
Roy, Jack, Marilla B
Schordes, Ray L., Francois Lake B
Schordes, Ray W., Francois Lake B
Schultz, Albert Louis, Vanderhoof B
Seyforth, J. N., Fort St. James B
Shea, J. B., Telkwa A
Skin, Robert, Ootsa Lake B
Smedley, John Dexter, Fort St. James C
Smith, Craig, Fort St. James B
Smith, George A., Vanderhoof B
Smith, Richard, Fort St. James C
Start, Percival Edward, Fort St. James.— C
Sundin, Harold, Southbank B
Titcomb, William Leslie, Francois Lake B
VanTine, Charles W., Southbank B
VanTine, Edward, Ootsa Lake A
VanTine, George, Ootsa Lake B
Winsor, William J., Isle Pierre A
Peace River (including Fort Nelson and Lower Post) .
Anderson, Stewart B., Dawson Creek A
Beattie, Donald, Hudson Hope B
Bedell, Percy, Arras B
Bedell, Richard I., Rolla B
Belcourt, Adolphus,  Mount Valley P.O.,
Alta.  (Big Slough, B.C.) A
Belcourt,   Clarence,   Mount   Valley   P.O.,
Alta.  (Big Slough, B.C.) B
Belcourt,    Daniel,    Mount    Valley    P.O.,
Alta.  (Big Slough, B.C.) _' B
Belcourt, Francis, Lymburn P.O., Alta B
Belcourt, George, Lymburn P.O., Alta B
Belcourt,   Magloire,   Mount  Valley   P.O.,
Alta. (Big Slough, B.C.) B
Blakis, George, Arras B
Brady, Otto, Fort St. John B
Brady, Willis Hugh, Fort St. John B
Bremer, John H, Mile 147, Alaska Highway B
Brown, Richard B., Fort St. John B
Brown, Wesley J., Mile 175, Alaska Highway  A
Calliou, John. Goodfare P.O., Alta. (Kelly
Lake, B.C.)   A
Calliou, Joe, Little Prairie B
Calliou,    Joseph,    Goodfare    P.O.,    Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.) B
Calliou, Pete, Little Prairie A
Calliou, Sam, Moberly Lake B
Callison, Dennis W., Fort Nelson A
Callison, Elisha 0., Fort Nelson A
Callison, Lynch, Rose Prairie A
Cameron, Patrick, Moberly Lake A
Campbell, Alfred, Lymburn P.O., Alta. __ B
Campbell, Alec, Lymburn P.O., Alta B
Campbell, Harry, Goodfare P.O., Alta. .____ B
Cardinal, Alex, Moberly Lake B
Carlson, Albert, Little Prairie B
Cottom, Clarence A., Hudson Hope B
Courtepatte, Alfred, Lymburn P.O., Alta.
(Kelly Lake,  B.C.) B
Courvoisier, Henry, Fort Nelson A
Dahl, Joel Olaf, Dawson Creek B
Davidson, J. O., Lower Post A
Davies, Albert, Moberly Lake B
Desterlais, Joe, Moberly Lake B
Dhenin, Rene, Fort St. John A
Durney, Milo, East Pine A
Edzerza, George, Lower Post B
Fellers, Harold L., Fellers Heights B
Garbitt, Theophile, Moberly Lake A
Gauthier, Alexie, Moberly Lake B
Gauthier, Daniel, Lymburn P.O., Alta. „__. B
Gladu, Fred, Lymburn P.O., Alta B
Gladu, Isadore, Kelly Lake A
Golata, Frank, Dawson Creek A
Gray,  George  D.,   Goodfare  P.O.,  Alta.
(Kelly Lake,  B.C.) B
Groat. A. H., Sunset Prairie  B
Hambler, George, Goodfare P.O., Alta A
Hambler, Joe, Goodfare P.O., Alta. A
Haney, Guy, Arras    B
Haralson, Lome M., M. 363, Fort Nelson _ A
Harrold, John, Fort Nelson B
Jardine, L. J., East Pine B
Jensen, Charlie, Fort Nelson B REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947.
L 87
Peace River (including Fort Nelson and Lower Post)—Continued.
Name and Address of Guide.
Kruger, William, Hudson Hope.
Larson, Albin, Fort Nelson
Licence
Grade.
 B
 A
B
Letendre, James, Lymburn P.O., Alta	
Letendre,   Rolland,   Mount  Valley  P.O.,
Alta. (Big Slough, B.C.) A
Logan, Eric R., Moberly Lake B
Longhurst, William J., Fort St. John A
McDonald, Charlie, M. 456, Muncho Lake B
Licence
Name and Address of Guide. . Grade.
Peck, 0. Keith, Hudson Hope B
Peterson, Adolf, Mile 162, Alaska Highway  A
Pitts, Ray W., Fort St. John B
Powell, Gary J., Hudson Hope B
MacDonald, Joseph, Fort St. John.
MacDonald, Peter, Lower Post.
McGarvey, Morris, Taylor Flat	
McGuire, Colum, Rolla	
McLean, Arthur James, Bear Flat	
McLean, William, East Pine	
Mould, Tom, Mile 496, Alaska Highway...
Ross, James A., Dawson Creek.
Rutledge, Leo, Hudson Hope _
Selsey, Fred J., Fort St. John-
Sheffield, Bert, Fort St. John
Sheffield, Callie A., Fort St. John ...
Smith, Jacob, East Pine	
Sowden, Wilfred L., Fort St. John_
St. Pierre, J. B., Fort St. John ______
Stubley, Claude E., Dawson Creek
.A
A
B
A
A
B
B
B
B
Napoleon, Tommy, Moberly Lake
Neilson, Gordon, Fort St. John
Noskey,  Narcisse,  Goodfare  P.O.,  Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.) A
Paquette, Morris, Moberly Lake A
Peck, Bruce, Hudson Hope B
Peck, Donald R., Hudson Hope B
Supranent, John, Goodfare P.O., Alta B
Wanandie, Paul, Goodfare P.O., Alta~
Warn, William F., Groundbirch	
Watson, Donald H., Bear Flat —
Watson, James, Bear Flat
A
B
B
B
Young, Andrew, Dawson Creek ___        B
Young, Louis, Dawson Creek B
Cassiar (Telegraph Creek-Atlin District) .
Ball, George B., Telegraph Creek B
Beloud, B., 125 Haines Road, Whitehorse,
Y.T.  B
Bob, Johnny, Telegraph Creek B
Campbell, Richard S., Telegraph Creek.— A
Carlick, Loudecker, Telegraph Creek A
Carlick, Tom, Telegraph Creek B
Day, Alfred, Telegraph Creek A
Dennis, Alec, Telegraph Creek B
Dennis, Andy, Telegraph Creek B
Dennis, John Creyke, Telegraph Creek____. A
Dennis, Thomas, Telegraph Creek B
Etzerza, Charlie, Telegraph Creek B
Fann, Bill, Telegraph Creek A
Fraser, Johnnie, 125 Haines Road, Whitehorse, Y.T.  B
Jack, Henry Taku, Atlin A
Jack, Lee Taku, Atlin B
Jackson, Dick, Telegraph Creek B
James, Cyril, Atlin B
Kane,   Bobby,  125  Haines  Road,  Whitehorse, Y.T.  B
Loudecker, Walter, Telegraph Creek B
Munchster,   William,   Squaw   Creek,   via
Haines, Alaska  B
Ouock, Nelson, Telegraph Creek B
Williams, Stephen, Atlin B
Coastal Mainland to Prince Rupert.
Courbould, Gordon Charles, Bella Coola__ C
Gordon, Hjolmos, Bella Coola B
Nygaard, Martin, Bella Coola B
Saxton-White, Frank, Bella Coola B
Squinas, Harry, Anahim B
Squinas, Thomas, Anahim Lake A
Walker, Thomas R., Bella Coola A
Widsten, A., Bella Bella B
Wright, William C, Hagensborg A
Non-resident Outfitters.
Atkinson, Charles G., Halcourt, Alta.
Brewster, C. B., Seebe, Alta.
Harrison, George H., Banff, Alta.
Phillips, Frank,  1551  St. Andrews,  North
Vancouver, B.C.
Ray, Jack, Beaverlodge, Alta.
Russell, Andy, Twin Butte, Alta.
Sunderman, Kelly, Hythe, Alta. L 88
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PERSONNEL OF GAME COMMISSION AS AT DECEMBER 31st, 1947.
Attorney-General (Minister) Hon. Gordon S. Wismer, K.C Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Frank R. Butler Vancouver.
James G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Senior Clerk	
Senior Clerk-Stenographer_
Intermediate Clerk	
Senior Stenographer	
Senior Stenographer	
Clerk-Stenographer 	
Clerk	
Headquarters.
_H. D. Simpson	
..Miss I. Lawson	
,F. R. Lobb	
JVliss W. Cooper—
.Miss J. Smith	
JMiss D. Voldsnes-
J. McLellan	
..Vancouver.
-Vancouver.
-Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
Fishery Supervisor-
Fishery Officer	
Fishery Officer	
Fishery Officer	
Hatchery Officer	
Hatchery Officer	
Hatchery Officer	
Hatchery Officer	
Hatchery Officer	
Game-fish Culture Branch.
_.C. H. Robinson.
_E. Hunter	
_R. A. McRae_.
_F. Pells 	
...A. S. Frisby-
._ A. Higgs
_ J. D. S. Inverarity_
_C. O. Mellor	
_F. H. Martin	
..Nelson.
..Nelson.
..Kaslo.
Cultus Lake.
-Nelson.
-Qualicum Beach.
Victoria.
..Cultus Lake.
-Cultus Lake.
"A" Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Lower Mainland) .
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson.-
Game Warden S. H. McCall	
Clerk D. Keirs	
Game Warden J. W. Jones	
Game Warden W. A. R. Lawley_.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield-
Game Warden R. S. Hayes	
Game Warden A. L. Frost	
Corporal Game Warden..
Game Warden	
__0. Mottishaw_
_.F. P. Weir	
-Victoria.
-Victoria.
..Victoria.
-Victoria.
.Alberni.
-Nanaimo.
..Courtenay.
..Courtenay.
-Alert Bay.
.Duncan.
Inspector	
Clerk-Stenographer-
Game Warden	
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts) .
-C. F. Kearns Nelson.
Corporal Game Warden
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
.Mrs. E. H. Edgar Nelson.
_.R. A. Rutherglen Nelson.
.A. F. Sinclair .Grand Forks.
„J. W. Bayley Cranbrook.
_B. Rauch Cranbrook.
_N. Cameron Golden.
_.P. D. Ewart Castlegar.
_A. F. Gill-
_A. Monks
.Princeton.
..Penticton.
 J. J. Osman Fernie.
 H. Tyler Jnvermere.
Game Warden G. A. Lines Creston.
Game Warden E. D. Cameron .Revelstoke.
Inspector.
R. M. Robertson..
C" Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts).
Kamloops.
-Kamloops.
..Kamloops.
-Kamloops.
Clerk-Stenographer Miss H. Swadling-
Game Warden R. Cherry._
Game Warden M. Gardiner	
Game Warden H. J. Lorance Kamloops.
Game Warden W. T. Ward Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Ellis Kamloops.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Vernon.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden E. Holmes Wells.
Game Warden L. Jobin  Williams Lake.
Game Warden E. M. Martin Merritt.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden R. S. Welsman Lillooet.
Game Warden W. J. Hillen Quesnel.
Game Warden W. I. Fenton Clinton. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1947. L 89
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River,
and Yukon Boundary Districts) .
Inspector W. A. H. Gill Prince George.
Clerk R. J. Guay Prince George.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
Game Warden J. A. McCabe Prince George.
Corporal Game Warden K. O. Alexander Fort Nelson.
Corporal Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game Warden W. 0. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
Game Warden J. W. Stewart Lower Post.
Game Warden A. W. Vinson Smithers.
Game Warden J. D. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden R. O. Anderson Vanderhoof.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
" E " Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts) .
Inspector R. E. Allan Vancouver.
Game Warden H. L. Rose Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden H. D. Mulligan Vancouver.
Game Warden C. E. Stevens Vancouver.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe Mission.
Game Warden H. P. Hughes Cloverdale.
Game Warden _F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Predatory-animal Hunters.
Chief Predatory-animal Hunter I. Dewar Extension.
Predatory-animal Hunter K. Moores Extension.
Predatory-animal Hunter C. E. Shuttleworth Kamloops.
Predatory-animal Hunter C. G. Ellis Kamloops.
Predatory-animal Hunter G. Haskell .Nelson.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiabmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1048.
1,295-1148-5669   

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