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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Civil Service Commission REPORT FROM JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 31ST 1947 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1948

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Civil Service Commission
REPORT
FROM JANUARY 1ST TO  DECEMBER 31st
1947
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1948.  To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits the Report of the Civil Service Commission,
Province of British Columbia, from January 1st to December 31st, 1947.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1948. The Honourable Geo. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—In conformity with the provisions of section 7 of the " Civil Service Act,
1945 " (chapter 11, British Columbia Statutes of 1945), we have the honour to submit
herewith the report of the proceedings and work of the Civil Service Commission from
January 1st to December 31st, 1947.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.
J. V. Fisher,
Member.
E. W. Griffith,
Member.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1948. INDEX.
Page.
Report of Civil Service Commission  7
Report of Chief Personnel Officer  8
Appendix A.—New Position Classifications  13
Appendix B.—Order in Council—Cost-of-living Bonus  15
Appendix C.—Order in Council—Salary Consolidation   16
Appendix D.—Order in Council—Amending Sick-leave Regulations for Veterans  17
Appendix E.—Order in Council—Regulations re Overtime   18
Appendix F.—Statistics   19
Address by Dr. H. M. Morrison, Chief Personnel Officer  22  Report of the Civil Service Commission
Pursuant to Section 7 of the " Civil Service Act, 1945," from
January 1st to December 31st, 1947.
During the year 1947 the deliberations of the Civil Service Commission were concerned mainly with position-classification salary surveys, investigated and reported
upon by its Personnel Division. In all, the Commission had thirty-nine formal meetings, many of which were attended by Departmental and Branch heads and Employees'
Association representatives, semi-weekly meetings being the general rule for extended
periods of time.
Two obvious factors made concentration upon salaries necessary. First, there was
the unstable economic living base throughout Canada with which to contend. Wage
and salary gains made, in an uneven pattern, by various organized and unorganized
Provincial occupational groups resulted in a distorting pressure upon the Civil Service
classification structure. This distortion, of course, affected the structural relationships
effected in the classification of 1944. In the second place, there was the general rise in
the cost of living, as reflected by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics Index. This, from
a salary-classification view-point coupled with the rather unsatisfactory cost-of-living
bonus system in effect, caused another problem upon which the Executive Council called
upon the Commission for advice.
In addition to reviewing the entire Civil Service salary structure, the Commission,
upon the request of the departments of the Government concerned, reviewed salaries of
the Provincial Police, Game Commission, Oakalla Prison Farm, outside staff of the
Department of Public Works, and employees administered under the " Provincial Elections Act." As a result of these reviews of Civil Service and non-Civil Service positions,
upward revisions were granted by the Executive Council.
The report of the Chief Personnel Officer outlines in more detail the work accomplished during the year. In addition, in the Appendix to this Keport we reproduce an
address delivered by the Chief Personnel Officer to the convention of the Employees'
Association. This address presents in brief outline the progress of the Commission to
date, and also gives an insight into the nature of the work and problems of the Personnel
Division.
A reading of this Report will indicate that, in respect to its tasks, this Commission
still is in a transitory period. The objective of achieving a settled classification structure was impeded by a fluctuating economic base. However, we have reason to believe
that this now has been effected. As a result, the coming year should witness greater
forward steps. Classification definitions should be completed, and a beginning should
be made toward a more scientific system of recruitment.
Some progress was achieved regarding the recommendations made by the Commission in its 1940 Report. Order in Council No. 2409, 1947, resulting from recommendations from the Commission to the Executive Council, established a definite and uniform
policy in respect to compensation for overtime.
Investigation, including the seeking of advice from all Departments of Government,
has been completed in connection with the problem of effecting a uniform policy in
respect to payment of transportation and living costs to employees when transferred
within the Province.
No great advance was made in respect to the formal recognition of Departmental
Personnel Officers. The Departments of Finance, Public Works, and Forests have
Assistant Deputy Ministers or leading officials acting as such. In the other Departments, the Deputy Ministers manage personnel matters in the course of their duties.
The recognized Departmental Personnel Officers, besides handling competently their
own personnel problems, at times have been of assistance to the Commission on special
problems.
7 HH 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
No progress can be reported this year in regard to in-service training. A good
start in the expansion of this field would be the establishment of a small stenographic
and typist pool in the offices of the Commission under the supervision of a female personnel assistant or an experienced senior stenographer. Such a pool should consist
of trainees and experienced stenographers. As far as practicable, requisitions for
stenographers and typists would be filled from this pool.
As with all employment, pay-rolls are at present on a rising curve. The Civil
Service is no exception to this trend. Under such circumstances we feel that the
greatest care should be taken against the ever-present danger of overstaffing and
duplication of duties, as well as ensuring that each Government servant gives adequate
service for the adequate remuneration he is receiving. Deputy Ministers should exercise the greatest caution in enlarging their staffs, even if their estimates might permit
them to do so. It is respectfully suggested that consideration might be given to having
each Department file with the Commission before or on July 1st, 1948, a detailed list of
its establishment, including all sundry positions paid from bulk votes. After that date,
additions, even if provided in the estimates, should be effected only through Order in
Council.
It is with profound and sincere regret that the Commission has to report the death
in September last of its Chairman, Mr. A. Norman Baker. The late Mr. Baker has
left his mark on the public service of the Province. He was well known throughout the
Province, chiefly for his achievements in the superannuation field. The " Civil Service
Superannuation Act," the " Teachers' Pensions Act," and the " Municipal Superannuation Act " were nursed and administered by him. Being also Civil Service Commissioner for many years, he was Chairman of the Civil Service Reorganization Committee
of 1942, and from 1945 until his death was Chairman of this Commission. In October,
1946, he was elevated to the position of Deputy Provincial Secretary.
A noteworthy event involving a recognition of the advance in Civil Service
research was the selection of Victoria by the Western Region of the Civil Service
Assembly of the United States and Canada for its final-day session of its annual conference held in July last. The staff of this Commission, with the co-operation of the
British Columbia representatives of the Dominion Civil Service Commission, arranged
a programme dealing with Canadian procedures and problems. The results were
highly successful. This was the first time the Western Region met on Canadian soil—
a fact to be taken as a recognition that our Civil Service administration is being
conducted along scientific and modern lines of endeavour.
REPORT OF THE CHIEF PERSONNEL OFFICER,
HUGH M. MORRISON, M.A., Ph.D.
I. General.
As at December 31st, 1947, there were 5,425 temporary and permanent employees
enrolled in the Civil Service. Compared to 4,664 reported as at December 31st, 1946,
the former figure indicates an increase of 760 employees. Part of this expansion is
accounted for by the transfer of some 300 employees from the outside staff of the
Department of Public Works into the Civil Service. A further increase of approximately 225 employees was accounted for by the adoption of the forty-four-hour week
in institutions. Further, the new Jericho Unit under the Division of Tuberculosis
Control was opened in 1947, and two new 100-bed units attached to the Essondale
institution were opened in the same period. The expansion of public health nursing
services involved the establishment of several new positions for public health and
travelling clinic nurses.
Table 1 in the Statistical Appendix to this Report presents a Departmental analysis
of the 1947 enrolment. The national transition from a war-time economy to a peace-time economy was
reflected in turnover in personnel of the Civil Service. During the year 2,048 appointments of a temporary and probationary nature were made to the Civil Service. In the
same period 815 employees were brought into the permanent staff of the Civil Service.
This figure of 2,048 new and temporary appointments amounted to 37 per cent, of the
total Civil Service enrolment. Of this number, there were actually 459 new appointments. Table 2 in the Statistical Appendix gives the number of temporary and permanent appointments made during the year. Of this number, 740 or 31 per cent, were
appointees with military service. •
During the year five employees were reinstated after service in World War II.
For the year 1947 the number of separations from the Civil Service in all categories
amounted to 1,589. Of this number, 58 were retired in accordance with section 69 of
the " Civil Service Act.". In accordance with the " Civil Service Act Amendment Act,
1946," 43 retiring-leave payments amounting to $21,922.28 were granted. A total of
1,499 persons resigned, and there were 23 dismissals, and 11 deaths.
As at December 31st, 1947, there were 877 Provincial Government employees
covered by fidelity schedule bond for a total amount of $1,602,650.
II. Recruitment.
Recruitment was governed strictly by the principles of merit and open competition.
After consultation with the Department of Government concerned, all appointments
were approved and made by the Civil Service Commission. Wherever possible, examination of applicants took the form of an interview, checking of references through
confidential channels, weighing of qualifications and experience, and oral and (or)
written examinations when desirable. Strict attention was exercised in effecting section 79 (1) of the " Civil Service Act," which extends preferential selection to applicants with service in His Majesty's Forces to their credit. Vacancies were extensively
advertised in the metropolitan daily press and in local newspapers for positions outside
the Victoria and Vancouver areas. In only a few occupations, for example, medical,
library, and engineering, was it necessary to seek recruits in other Provinces.
All vacancies in institutions not involving direct promotion within the establishment were openly advertised in the institution concerned. The Inspector of Institutions assisted in the recruitment of personnel for the various sundry institutional
positions. As the filling of these sundry positions, to some extent, is of a transitional
nature, definite Civil Service probationary appointment is not extended until after a
month of continuous service.
As the demand during the past few years generally has been greater than the
immediately available supply, no eligibility lists in accordance with section 48 of the
" Civil Service Act " were maintained. However, there are indications that in some
classifications, especially in the steno-clerical group, the improving supply will make
it advisable to reintroduce written examinations for establishing eligibility lists.
The Personnel Division has exercised a high degree of selection in its screening
of applicants, with the result that, upon the whole, a good grade of employee is being
recruited into the service. In this respect, all Departments have been of great assistance, especially in connection with the technical and professional vacancies, their
knowledge and evaluation of the source of supply at the training institutions being
comprehensive in their respective fields of endeavour.
Promotions were effected upon Departmental recommendation, but care was exercised by all Departments and the Commission that seniority within the service was
respected where the employee possessed the necessary qualifications, satisfactory service
record, and was deemed capable of adequately filling the position. In one case, that of
a promotion to chief clerk, when doubt arose as to the merits of several experienced
applicants, a written examination was conducted by the Commission. HH 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
III. Investigations.
By far the greater part of the time of the technical staff was taken up with work
of an investigational nature, particularly in respect to salary schedules, pay plans,
questions of individual employee classifications, and the classification of new positions.
Investigation of Salary Schedules.
In consequence, with the rise of union rates of pay for skilled tradesmen throughout the Province, an investigation into the adequacy of similar trades positions in the
Civil Service became necessary. In order to achieve a comparable monthly salary basis,
a year's gross salary arrived at by hourly rate was reduced by 14 per cent. The benefits
justifying this reduction are:—
(1) Sick-leave (up to eighteen days per year and cumulative to six months).
(2) Vacation leave (up to two weeks in excess of the legal one week for hourly
rate tradesmen).
(3) Government contributions to Civil Service Superannuation Fund.
(4) Government coverage of all civil servants in Workmen's Compensation
Fund.
(5) Security of tenure.
The application of the above formula resulted in salary increases for the majority
of tradesmen in the Civil Service.
A survey also was conducted of the so-called sundry male positions in the institutions. As a result, such personnel as orderlies, cleaners, cooks, and kitchen help
received salary increases. Janitorial positions throughout the Service were resurveyed
and a basic increase of $10 per month granted. Shortly afterwards, definite classifications were established for chief janitors performing supervisory duties.
A survey which took a great deal of consultation and investigation was one covering administrative and professional positions in all Departments. The rising national
demand for this type of personnel threw our salary ranges out of line. This was
evidenced by (1) the difficulty of recruiting for such vacancies, (2) the migration of
qualified Canadians to the United States, and (3) the findings of the Federal Royal
Commission on Administrative and Professional Positions in the Dominion Civil Service. As a result of this survey, increases in the majority of these classifications,
roughly averaging $300 per annum, were effected. Some of the larger groups receiving
increases were Education Department officials, nurses, social workers, engineers, foresters, Agriculture Department officials, Attorney-General's Department officials,
Finance Department officials, officials of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
Other groups, such as teachers, Labour Department officials, Land Registry officials,
medical personnel, and Deputy Ministers, had received increases in 1946.
Toward the latter part of 1946 and the beginning of 1947, recruitment difficulties
reflected that the Civil Service typist, stenographer, and lower clerical classifications
needed revision. As well as the difficulty in recruiting, resignations from these positions began to rise. A common complaint received by Commission officials was that
there was a tendency for the Civil Service to be used as a training-ground of junior
personnel for private industry and other Civil Service systems. Hence a survey was
conducted, with the result that some increases were made and some ranges were
reduced, so as to effect a quicker promotional progression. The basic beginning salary
for stenographers was raised by $5 per month, and a new Grade 2 stenographer classification was established, promotion to which would be achieved through certification by
the Chief Personnel Officer.
A survey resulting in increased salaries also was conducted for stationary engineer
and firemen positions. Qualifications were revised in line with the 1947 amendment to
the " Boiler Inspection Act." Farm positions also were surveyed. In addition, as the
result of a survey, adjustments were made in salary ranges and training requirements
for attendants at the mental institutions. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT. HH 11
In addition to surveys of regularly constituted Civil Service positions, surveys also
were conducted for non-Civil Service establishments. Upon the request of the Department of the Attorney-General, all positions in the establishments of Provincial Police,
Game Commission, and Oakalla Prison Farm were surveyed. General salary increases
were granted to the Police and Game Commission staffs, and improved promotional
channels were established with respect to the Oakalla staff. The extensive survey of
the outside staff of the Department of Public Works also was completed, and a definite
classification system with improved salaries and certain Civil Service benefits came into
effect on May 1st. Over 300 positions were transferred into the Service, coming under
the jurisdiction of the Civil Service Commission. Promotion, but not selection, of
employees in the outside staff requires the approval of the Civil Service Commission.
During the year, investigations were conducted which resulted in the establishment
of the new position classifications shown in Appendix A attached to this report.
Numerous investigations resulted from individual employee or Departmental representations requesting revision of classifications on the grounds of increased responsibilities or prior error in classification. In addition, revision of certain steno-clerical
classifications required some investigations of individual cases.
Upon the whole, the reclassifications with consequent salary increases effected
during 1947 did not keep pace with the accelerated rise in the national cost-of-living
index. As a result, the Commission was called upon by the Executive Council for
advice in view of representations from the Employees' Association. The Personnel
Division, with assistance from Treasury officials, conducted the necessary investigation
into the cost-of-living bonus system. After investigations and study by the Commission, the Government was pleased to adopt the following measures, effective November
1st, for all Government employees:—
(1) The 1947 bonus system was incorporated, with certain additions, into
basic salaries, thus effecting new basic salaries of approximately 125 per
cent, of 1939 levels.
(2) A new bonus of 10 per cent, of salary up to $16 per month was granted.
(3) Distinction between householders and non-householders was eliminated.
(Copies of Orders in Council effecting these changes are shown as Appendices B
and C to this Report.)
It may be asserted that a sound classification basis now has been established,
and that henceforth only reclassifications of a minor nature should be necessary.
The immediate classification tasks in the future should be the completion of all
position-classification definitions, the charting-of Departmental establishments, and a
re-examination of our system of classification coding.
IV. Records and Implementations.
The application of a scientific system of classification and pay plan naturally has
imposed a heavy load on the clerical staff of the Commission. In addition to the necessity for issuing new classification notices to the hundreds of civil servants affected by
reclassification, the staff also was engaged in completing the transfer of employee
records, which for years the institutions had been handling themselves. Furthermore,
in co-operation with the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, a beginning was made to
put such records, including the issuing of notices, on a modernized key-punch and
I.B.M. system. This has not yet been completed, as the checking for accuracy and the
securing of the proper forms involves a great deal of time and effort. However, when
it is accomplished, future operations will be greatly simplified and economy of time and
labour will be effected. Also much additional information concerning the Civil Service
will be more readily available.
The following figures on the number of official notices issued during 1947 gives an
idea of the load placed upon the staff because of salary revisions and reclassifications: HH 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
815 notices of permanent appointment, 2,048 notices of temporary appointment, 2,400
notices of change in position for permanent employees, 788 notices of change in position for temporary employees, totalling 6,051 notices of various categories. This figure
does not include the many instances where two or three change notices were given to
an individual employee.
It is opportune to express keen appreciation to the various officials at the institutions for their ready co-operation in supplying the requested information on their staffs,
which was essential in centralizing Civil Service records.
V. Sick and Special Leave.
During the year the number of days sick-leave granted was 29,679, which involved
3,770 civil servants, making an average of 7.6 days per employee drawing leave, and an
average of 4.9 days per civil servant enrolled on December 31st, 1947. Of this sick-
leave, 26,805% days were with pay and 2,873% days were Without pay.
Special leave for the purpose of training and study was granted to twenty-one
civil servants.
Upon the recommendation of the Civil Service Commission, the Executive Council
was pleased to amend section 9 of the Civil Service Regulations, governing sick-leave,
in order to distinguish between non-pensionable and pensionable disabilities in respect
to war veterans receiving sick-leave with pay. A copy of the Order in Council pertaining
to this change is shown as Appendix D to this Report.
VI. Grievances.
During the year one grievance presented by the Employees' Association on behalf
of an employee was heard by the Board of Reference. The Board upheld the classification decision of the Commission with a recommendation that an upward adjustment of
$300 per annum should be made within the established salary range because of claimed
retardation of salary advances prior to the general reclassification of 1944, the
Executive Council being pleased to accept the recommendation.
Experience with this ease, the only one to reach the Board of Reference, revealed
that earnest consideration should be given to revising appeal procedure. The fact that
under present regulations the Board is forced to follow a de novo procedure, with full
legal conventions, tends to duplicate the work already accomplished by the Commission
at a hearing. In addition, the use of court procedure endangers the consideration of
true classification principles. It is felt that the Board of Review first should sit in
camera and examine all written material dealing with the case, including the transcript
of the Commission hearing. Failing to arrive at a decision, an open hearing then
should be called, at which the Board, in order to secure the additional information
needed, should call and question upon oath all the witnesses it needs.
VII. Overtime.
A definite and uniform policy relating to overtime was formulated, and as a result
of recommendations to the Executive Council the Order in Council shown as Appendix
E to this Report was approved.
One addition was made to the technical staff during the year. After a very
thorough open-competition examination, involving an oral examination, Mr. Joseph
Roberts, M.A., was appointed a Personnel Officer—Grade 1. Mr. Roberts served eight
years as a high school teacher in the Province, four years in the Navy, and, prior to
entering our service, was Personnel Officer with the Dominion Civil Service at the
Esquimalt Dockyard.
In concluding this report I wish to express appreciation for the loyal support
received from the staff and for the co-operation received from all Departments of
Government throughout the year. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT.
HH 13
APPENDICES.
APPENDIX A.
Position Classifications established during 1947.
Position.
Department, Branch, Group, etc.
Salary Range.
Assistant to Deputy Minister of Railways	
Field Representative, Regional Development
Division :	
Elevator Operator and Part-time Janitor, Government Agent, New Westminster	
Chief Orderly	
Steward's Clerk—Grade 1	
Driver and Assistant Technician	
Home Supervisor	
General Mechanic, Essondale	
Home Economics Teacher	
Attendant, Museum and Library	
Window-cleaner	
Director of Regional Development Division	
Senior Nurse Aide	
Public Health Educator—Grade 1	
Public Health Educator—Grade 2—.	
Public Health Educator—Grade 3	
Director of Public Health Education	
Public Health Nutritionist—Grade 1	
Consultant, Public Health Nutrition	
Cabinetmaker	
Public Utilities Investigator	
Clerk—Stores	
Clerk—Stores	
Secretary, Industrial Relations Board	
Maintenance Engineer	
.Maintenance Engineer	
Fireman (Fire-fighter)	
Kitchen Help—male	
Gardener—Assistant Head	
Herdsman—Assistant	
Repairman ..._	
Farm and Garden Labourer	
Farm and Garden Labourer	
Farm Foreman—Assistant	
Feeder	
Gardener—Head	
Departmental Comptroller	
Business Manager, T.B. Control	
Live Stock Inspector	
Supervising District Agriculturist	
Audit Accountant—Grade 1	
Audit Accountant—Grade 2	
Audit Accountant—Grade 3	
Senior Analyst—Grade 2	
Superintendent, Public Works, Essondale	
Audit Accountant—Grade 4	
Director of Welfare.	
Assistant Director of Welfare	
Chief Draughtsman	
Instructor, Travelling Instructional Unit	
Seamstress	
Cleaner 1	
Specialized Assistant (Occupational Therapy)—.
Intermediate Library Assistant	
Assistant Director	
Air Camera Technician	
Air Survey Flying Assistant	
Supervisor	
Administrative	
Investigational and inspectional	
Labour, unskilled _	
T.B. Unit, Vancouver ,
All institutions	
T.B. Unit, Jericho	
New Westminster	
Essondale and New Westminster	
Educational	
Labour, unskilled ,
T.B. Unit, Vancouver	
Administrative	
Tranquille	
Medical and Nursing	
Medical and Nursing...	
Medical and Nursing	
Medical and Nursing	
Medical and Nursing	
Medical and Nursing	
Labour, skilled	
Professional	
T.B. Unit, Jericho	
T.B. Unit, Vancouver _	
Administrative _	
Essondale	
Essondale, Colony Farm	
Department    of    Public    Works—T.B.    Unit
Jericho	
New Westminster	
Essondale, Colony Farm	
Essondale, Colony Farm	
Essondale, Colony Farm	
Essondale, Colony Farm,.	
Mental Hospital, Colquitz	
Tranquille Farm 	
Tranquille Farm	
Tranquille Farm	
Administrative (Department of Health)	
Administrative	
Agriculture _	
Agriculture	
Clerical _	
Clerical	
Clerical	
Engineering	
Engineering	
Professional	
Social Welfare	
Social Welfare	
Engineering 	
Investigational and inspectional	
T.B. Unit, Jericho	
T.B. Unit, Jericho	
Marpole Infirmary	
Educational	
Medical and nursing	
Engineering	
Engineering __	
New Vista Home, Vancouver	
$4,800-5,400
2,400-3,000
1,560
170-195
150-175
125
110
150
1,680-2,280
1,440
120
3,540-4,140.
90-110
1,440-1,740
1,620-1,980
2,100-2,400
3,000-3,600
1,560-1,860
1,800-2,280
2,340
3,000-3,600
1,500-1,800
1,500-1,800
3,300-3,900
185
185
125
100
145
140
125     -
95
95
150
100
150
3,600-4,200
3,000-3,600
2,700-3,180
3,300-3,900
2,100-2,700
2,400-3,000
2,700-3,300
3,000-3,480
3,600-4,080
3,300-3,900
4,200-4,800
3,300-3,900
2,400-3,000
2,280-2,880
75-80
95
95
1,680-1,980
2,580-3,180
2,100-2,700
1,800-2,100
130-155 HH 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX A—Continued.
Position.
Department, Branch, Group, etc.
Salary Range.
Housekeeper	
Cleaner and Relief Fireman—Boiler-house	
Cleaner and Relief Fireman—Boiler-house	
Warehouseman ...
Engineer-Operator—Launch	
Assistant Royalty Inspector	
Chief Engineer, Water Rights	
Aircraft Pilot	
Inspector of Licensed Scalers	
Assistant Director of Radio School Broadcasts	
Seamstress	
Hospital Housekeeper—Grade 1	
Forester-in-training	
Assistant Director of Recreation	
Electrician, Workmen's Compensation Board
Building	
Storekeeper	
Truck-driver (Relief) and Power Lawn-mower
Operator	
Assistant to Land Surveyor	
Right-of-way and Claims Agent	
Mechanical Supervisor	
Deputy Minister of Fisheries	
Studio Helper	
Administrative Assistant (Civil Service Commission)	
Research Officer, Department of Labour	
Building Labourer	
Director, Division of Tests and Standards....:	
Assistant Director, Land Utilization Research....
Research Supervisor	
Mechanical Superintendent	
Safety Supervisor.....	
Junior Ship's Carpenter	
Junior Mechanic (Marine)	
Registered Nurse in Public Health Field	
Plumber, Assistant Head (New "Westminster)	
Physiotherapist	
Hospital Housekeeper	
Chauffeur and Assistant Mechanic	
Recreational Instructor (Male)	
Swineman and Farm-hand	
Record Clerk	
Janitor—Foreman (Night)	
Janitor—Foreman (Day)	
Assistant Truck-driver and Relief Watchman	
Inspector of Motor Carriers—Grade 2	
Inspector of Motor Carriers—Grade 3	
Assistant Director, Museum	
Administrative Assistant to Chairman, Board
of Industrial Relations	
Milk Board Inspector—Grade 1	
Milk Board Inspector—Grade 2	
Assessor—Grade 1	
Assessor—Grade 2	
Assistant Supervisor of Scalers	
Inspector, Fuel, Oil, and Gasoline Taxes	
Departmental Appraiser — Timber-land Appraiser	
Departmental Appraiser—Building and Industrial Appraiser	
Utilities Investigations Auditor	
Assistant Surveyor of Taxes	
Administrative Assistant (Departmental)	
New Vista Home, Vancouver	
Essondale	
New Westminster	
Labour, unskilled	
Labour, skilled	
Investigational and inspectional.
Engineering	
Engineering	
Forest	
Education	
Tranquille Sanatorium	
T.B. Unit, Jericho	
Forest	
Essondale	
Department of Puolic Works	
T.B. Unit, Jericho	
Essondale	
Engineering	
Engineering	
Engineering	
Executive	
Labour, skilled	
Administrative..	
Investigational and inspectional
Department of Public Works	
Educational	
Agricultural	
Economics and Statistics	
Engineering	
Investigational and inspectional
Labour, skilled	
Labour, skilled	
Medical and nursing	
Department of Public Works	
Essondale	
Essondale	
Essondale	
New Westminster	
Colquitz	
Marpole Infirmary	
Department of Public Works	
Department of Public Works	
Department of Public Works	
Investigational and inspectional
Investigational arid inspectional
Educational	
Administrative	
Agricultural	
Agricultural	
Clerical	
Clerical	
Forest	
Investigational and inspectional
Professional	
Professional	
Professional	
Administrative	
Administrative	
115
115
1,320
1,800-2,100
2,400-3,000
4,200-4,980
3,600-4,200
2,400-3,000
2,040-2,640
85
110-135
1,920-2,280
120
185
125-160
125
1,080-1,620
3,000-3,600
2,100-2,700
5,400-6,300
900-1,200
3,000-3,600
3,300-3,900
1,320
3,600-4,200
3,300-3,900
3,300-3,900
2,400-3,000
2,700-3,300
1,500-1,740
1,500-1,740
1,440-1,740
200
155
125-150
130
155-180
125
80-100
150
140
120
2,160-2,760
2,520-3,120
2,400-3,000
3,000-3,600
1,860-2,220
2,400-3,000
2,220-2,820
2,520-3,120
3,300-3,600
3,000-3,600
3,000-3,600
3,000-3,600
4,500-5,280
3,300-3,900
3,300-3,900 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT. HH 15
APPENDIX B.
Ordee in Council—Cost-op-living Bonus.
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
The undersigned has the honour to report that a revision of salaries of employees of the
Provincial Government has been made, having the effect of raising salaries substantially to
the 125-per-cent. level of the Cost-of-Living Index as prepared by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics and that the latest official announcement concerning the Index places the cost of
living at 139.4:
And to recommend that to compensate for the rise of 12.5 points above the 125-point
level, there be granted to the employees of the Provincial Government a bonus of 10 per cent,
of their salaries as revised; provided, however, that in no instance a bonus greater than
sixteen dollars per month shall be paid:
And to recommend further that the following regulations be adopted:—
(1) Where the bonus formerly payable has been included in the daily wage rate for
sundry employees of the Provincial Government, an equitable Table of Rates
shall be prepared, such table to be consistent with salaries as consolidated and
additional bonus payable.
(2) Employees to whom the bonus is payable, whose compensation in any pay period
is less than the usual full-time compensation, shall receive that proportion of
the flat rate which the compensation received bears to their ordinary full-time
total compensation for the pay period. &$&
(3) The bonus shall not be considered as " salary " for the purposes of the " Civil
Service Superannuation Act."
(4) Where, upon retirement, an employee is entitled to a payment under section 69
of the " Civil Service Act, 1945," such payment shall include the bonus as
received immediately prior to retirement.
(5) The bonus shall be payable for the full month in which death occurs, if the
salary is paid for the full month.
(6) The gratuity on death, provided under section 76 of the " Civil Service Act,
1945," shall not include bonus.
(7) The Civil Service Commission shall be charged with the administration of these
regulations, and if any dispute should arise as to whether or not an employee is
entitled to receive the bonus, the matter shall be decided by the Civil Service
Commission.
And that the payment of the bonus as above defined shall become effective as and from
the first day of November, 1947.
Dated this 24th day of October, a.d. 1947.
Approved this 24th day of October, a.d. 1947.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
JOHN HART,
Presiding Member of the Executive
Council. HH 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX C.
Order in Council—Salary Consolidation.
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
The undersigned has the honour to report that owing to economic conditions and the
depreciation in the purchasing value of the dollar, it is considered desirable and expedient to
increase the salaries presently payable to the employees of the Provincial Government:
And to recommend that for employees occupying positions with salary ranges, the following shall apply throughout the respective salary ranges, effective November 1st, 1947:—
That an increase of $300 per annum be granted to the said employees in receipt of
salaries up to and including a minimum of $2,280 in their respective salary ranges:
That an increase of $240 per annum be granted to the employees in receipt of salaries
where the minimum of the respective salary range is not less than $2,340 per
annum nor the minimum greater than $2,460:
That an increase of $180 per annum be granted to the employees in receipt of salaries
where the minimum of the respective salary range is not less than $2,520 per
annum nor the minimum greater than $2,700:
That an increase of $120 per annum be granted to the employees in receipt of salaries
where the minimum of the respective salary range is not less than $2,760 per
annum nor the minimum greater than $3,000:
That an increase of $60 per annum be granted to the employees in receipt of salaries
where the minimum of the respective salary range is not less than $3,060 per
annum nor the minimum greater than $3,300:
And to recommend that, effective November 1st, 1947, an additional amount be added to
the salaries of employees occupying positions not having salary ranges in accordance with the
following scale:
Present Monthly Salary. Additional Amount.
$65 and under $200  $25 per month
200 and under   225 :     20 per month
225 and under   250     15 per month
250 and under   275     10 per month
275 and under   300       5 per month
And to recommend that  Orders  in  Council providing for  a cost-of-living bonus,  and
numbered 1166, 1613, 875, and 228, approved respectively on the 17th day of August, 1943;
the 4th day of December, 1943;  the 12th day of June, 1944;   and the 11th day of February,
1947, be rescinded as of the 1st day of November, 1947.
Dated this 24th day of October, a.d. 1947.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Approved this 24th day of October, a.d. 1947.
JOHN HART,
Presiding Member of the Execiitive
Council. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT. HH 17
APPENDIX D.
Order in Council—Amending Sick-leave Regulations.
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
The undersigned has the honour to report that pursuant to the provisions of section 59 of
the " Civil Service Act, 1945," Sick-leave Regulations were approved on the 11th day of
December, 1945, by Order in Council No. 2151:
And to recommend that the said regulations, as amended by Order in Council No. 1693,
approved July 27th, 1946, be further amended by deleting section 9, and substituting the
following:—
" 9. Where an employee who has served in His Majesty's Forces in the Great War of
1914-18 or the Great War of 1939-45 is granted sick-leave for the purpose of attending a
medical board or receiving diagnosis or treatment for a non-pensionable disability in a
military hospital or other authorized hospital, such sick-leave may be granted in accordance
with the preceding sections.
" 9a. Where an employee who has served in His Majesty's Forces in the Great War of
1914-18 or the Great War of 1939-45 is granted sick-leave for the purpose of attending a
medical board, or receiving diagnosis or treatment for a pensionable disability in a military
hospital or other authorized hospital, sick-leave with full pay may be granted to a total of
twenty-six weeks, no deduction from accumulated sick-leave credit to be made for such sick-
leave; provided, however, that all pay and allowances received in excess of his permanent
disability pension or allowances shall be credited to the particular vote concerned. Any
additional sick-leave required under this section may be granted in accordance with the
preceding sections."
Dated this 4th day of November, A.D. 1947.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Approved this 4th day of November, A.D. 1947.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Presiding Member of the Executive
Council. HH 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX E.
Order in Council—Regulations re Overtime.
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
The undersigned has the honour to recommend that, pursuant to the provisions of the
" Civil Service Act, 1945," the following regulations relative to overtime services be made:—
" 1. That where an office is required to be kept open to the public beyond the normal
working-hours, or where, due to excessive pressure of Government business, shortage of staff,
or other exceptional circumstances, an employee is required to work beyond the normal
working-hours, and where such overtime services have been approved by the Deputy Minister
or an official authorized by him, compensatory time-off in the proportion of one hour for each
hour's overtime may be sanctioned.
" 2. That where payment for overtime services is warranted by virtue of the overtime
services to be performed being unrelated to the regular duties of the employee, or because, in
the opinion of the Commission, compensatory time off would interfere with staff requirements,
payment shall be made, provided such payment first has been approved by the Deputy Minister
of the Department concerned and the Civil Service Commission.
" 3. That where payments for overtime are authorized, the hourly rates shall be as set
out in the attached table of rates or such table of rates as hereafter may be prescribed by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
" 4. That records of compensatory time off be kept in a manner satisfactory to the
Commission." *
The undersigned has the honour to recommend further that the permanent monthly-rate
personnel of the Department of Public Works (other than those employed in a supervisory
capacity, to be defined) who are employed on a forty-four-hour week basis and who are called
upon to perform emergency duties as defined in Order in Council No. 594, approved March
28th, 1947, shall be entitled to additional overtime payment on the basis of straight time only,
such overtime payment to be calculated on the wage rates as classified for daily-rate employees
performing similar types of work.
Dated this 2nd day of December, a.d. 1947.
• GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Approved this 2nd day of December, a.d. 1947.
JOHN HART,
Presiding Member of the Executive
Council.
Schedule of Overtime Allowances.
Table showing Hourly Rates of Overtime, computed on a Thirty-eight-hour Week.
Monthly
Salary.
Overtime Rate
per Hour worked.
Monthly
Salary.
Overtime Rate
per Hour worked
$90 	
  $0.55
$130 	
              $0.79
95 	
       .58
135 	
          .82
100    	
       .61
140 	
               .85
105    	
       .64
       .67
145 	
.88
110 	
150 	
       .91
115 	
         .70
155 	
       .94
120 	
       .73
-160 	
       .97
125 	
       .76
165 and over 	
     1.00 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT.
HH 19
APPENDIX F.
Statistical Section.
Table 1.—(a) Enrolments in Civil Service.
(b) Appointments.
Temporary.
Permanent.
Total.
Year.
(a)
Staff.
(ft)
Appointments.
(a)
Staff.
(6)
Appointments.
(a)
Staff.
(ft)
Appointments.
1933 34	
115
188
233
252
235
261
271
320
362
•  420
492
585
'   1,506
1,833
170
248
258
279
297
328
342
356
352
474
491
547
2,058
2,048
1,309
1,296
1,308
1,355
1,483
1,628
1,670
1,631
1,489
1,402
1,526
1,574
3,158
3,592
98
85
78
104
185
133
146
121
88
173
184
155
1,245
815
1,424
1,484
1,541
1,607
1,718
1,889
1,941
1,951
1,851
1,822
2,018
2,159
4,664
5,425
268
1934 35      	
333
1935 36            	
336
1936  37           	
383
1937-38	
482
1938-39	
461
1939  40           	
488
1940-41	
477
1941-42  	
440
1942 43          	
647
1943-44   	
675
1944-45  	
702
April 1, 1945, to Dec. 31,
1946	
3,303
1947	
2,863
Table 2.—Number of Permanent Civil Servants, according to Sex, enrolled in
Departments of Government as at December 31st, 1947.
Department.
Male.
Female.
Total.
69
209
117
247
2
208
42
390
43
9
386
28
483
6
29
3
29
113
108
131
1
477
25
118
17
3
178
33
64
2
22
3
98
322
225
378
3
685
67
508
60
12
564
Public Utilities Commission :	
61
547
8
Trade and Industry.....	
51
2,268
1,324
3,592
In this table the figures for the Bureau of Reconstruction are included with those of the Department of Trade
and Industry. HH 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 3.—Sick-leave granted with Pay from October 1st, 1946, to September 30th, 1947,
according to Departments of Government.
Department. Number of Days.
Premier's Office   	
Agriculture   282%
Attorney-General   2,066%
Education :  1,312%
Finance  2,030 %
Fisheries  _  23
Health and Welfare  5,977
Labour  189
Lands and Forests   2,315
Mines   251
Municipal Affairs   30
Public Utilities Commission  422%
Public Utilities Commission   422%
Public Works   1,513
Railways   34
Trade and Industry   170
Bureau of Reconstruction  ... 32%
Total   26,805%
Average per civil servant enrolled, 4.9 days.
Table 4-—Number of Temporary and Permanent Appointments in 1947, according to
Department of Government.
Department. Temporary. Permanent.
Premier's Office	
Agriculture 	
Attorney-General 	
Education 	
Finance 	
Fisheries 	
Health and Welfare 	
Labour	
Lands and Forests 	
Mines 	
Municipal Affairs 	
Provincial Secretary 	
Public Utilities Commission
Public Works 	
Railways 	
Trade and Industry	
Bureau of Reconstruction ____
56
21
144
73
113
50
173
73
2
700
247
50
18
141
96
21
10
5
5
406
122
32
17
169
71
4
2
28
' 10
4
Totals   2,048 815 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT.
HH 21
Table 5.—Number of Retirements in 1947; according to Department of Government.
Department.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
6
1
12
7
1
11
13
1
1
2
1
2
6
2
12
1
2
7
1
11
14
Totals                                                      	
53
5
58 HH 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CLASSIFICATION OF THE PROVINCIAL CIVIL SERVICE OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(An Address delivered by Dr. H. M. Morrison, Chief Personnel Officer, to the Convention of the
British Columbia Provincial Government Employees' Association,
November 15th, 1947.)
When your executive invited me to speak to you this morning, I must confess that I gladly
accepted the invitation. Although I feel greatly honoured to be permitted to take up part of
your valuable time, the acceptance is not because of personal vanity, but rather the earnest
wish to give you a greater understanding of the classification programme of the Civil Service
Commission.
Your executive requested that I address you on classification and job analysis. Because
of our common interest in rendering service to the Government and the people of British
Columbia, no more fitting topic could have been requested. Classification and job analysis
is—to use an analogy—the hub around which our Civil Service personnel programme revolves.
If this table before which I am standing were a pulpit, this room a church, my audience a
congregation, and to-day the Sabbath, I am sure my text would be from " The Gospel according to Saint Luke "—chapter 10, verse 7, in part—" the labourer is worthy of his hire."
May I assure you that the achievement of this principle is the overriding aim of the Civil
Service Commission, as it is of your own association. It also is agreed that a scientific system
of position classification is the best method evolved to date by which this principle may be, at
least, approximated.
In both the public service and private industry, the employee's compensation is roughly
determined by two important factors, namely: (1) The general law of supply and demand;
and (2) the duties, qualifications, and experience required of the incumbent in the job.
It is probably true to assert that in the past the first factor predominated over the second
factor. In recent times, however, in both private industry and public service, the second
factor is receiving greater recognition. This emphasis requires a system of classification
in order to assure that " the labourer is worthy of his hire," which means that he should
receive adequate remuneration commensurate with his duties, and also give adequate service
commensurate with his remuneration.
As most of you may be aware, prior to 1944 the system of classification of our Civil
Service was quite general and crude. There were six or seven rough clerical grades, a so-
called " Technical Grade " and " Special Grade." This sparsity of classifications may be
explained by the fact that the Civil Service grew up from small beginnings and was predominantly concerned with clerical and senior clerical-administrative duties. For example,
the total strength of the Civil Service in certain decade intervals was as follows: 1872, 30;
1881,34;   1891,93;   1901,220;   1911,463;   1921,1,335;   1931,1,617;   1941, 1,951; 1946, 4,664.
As Government services expanded to include more professional and technical work in
numerous departments, the Civil Service not only was enlarged in strength, but also it became
more diversified in respect to duties. The result was that the simple classification of the past
was found to be inadequate.    An entirely new system had to be devised.
Most of you are aware of recent developments which met this challenge. The Government appointed a special committee—commonly known as the " Baker Committee "—to prepare a report with recommendations. It is significant that the report, published in 1944, was
called a " Progress Report "—an indication that the new classification system was not static.
However, enough work had been done to lay a foundation upon which to build and to enable
the Legislature to pass the amended " Civil Service Act " of 1945.
How was the classification as outlined in the Baker Report achieved? Before I answer
this rhetorical question, we should have clear in our minds the meaning of position classification and position analysis. Position classification means the setting of the position in correct
relationship to all other positions in the employing agency's structure. This operation, for
the time being, has nothing to do with what should be paid for the position. The operation
may be compared to a system of cataloguing in a library. Position analysis entails a study
of the pertinent duties entailed in the position, together with the experience and qualifications
required of an incumbent to satisfactorily perform these duties. As position classification
involves relationships of positions in the structure and as position analysis involves examination of each position, it is obvious that the latter must precede the former before a sound CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT. HH 23
classification structure can be established. It also is obvious that no position can be soundly
evaluated in regard to adequate remuneration until the classification structure is established.
The amount of remuneration—that is, the salary payable for a position—is not only
directly related to the classification structure, but also indirectly to the amount in the Provincial Treasury to be spent on operating the Civil Service. This amount is geared to cope as
much as possible with the general law of supply and demand. However, as this law does not
always operate uniformly, there are at times tugs on the Civil Service classification structure,
which, I might say, bring about not only a few more grey hairs in the heads of administrative
officials, but also may be disturbing to members of your own executive.
In summary, then, when thinking of a classification system, there are three significant
and distinct operations to bear in mind:—
(1) Position analysis;   that is, the duties involved in a position.
(2) Position classification;   that is, the relationship of the various positions in a
structure.
(3) Position evaluation;   that is, the appropriate salary to be attached to a position.
Let us now return to our rhetoric question, " How was the classification as outlined in
the Baker Report achieved? " We may say, and we make take pride in the fact, that the
achievement is a good co-operative product of our own Civil Service. To be sure, the Committee, composed of Civil Servants who were in positions having an all-embracing knowledge
of Civil Service positions, directed the work, but they had the assistance of all employees and
the full support of your own association.
The first necessity—position analysis—was accomplished through the means of employee
and supervisory questionnaires, conferences with the various departments and branches concerned, personal visits of the Committee itself, and a Province-wide trip of its personnel
official, Mr. Cole. The framing of the second necessity — position classification — was done
largely with the Dominion Civil Service system as a starting guide. The third — position
evaluation—was governed by two factors: (1) The amount for salaries available before
reclassification, plus (2) the extra amount allocated for reclassification purposes. I think it
is agreed that the foundations of the classification system as laid down by the Committee are
good, and worth building upon and improving.
Having granted the soundness of the foundational work achieved up until 1945, you may
well inquire as to what has been since accomplished. Embarked upon a programme demanding continuous and live administration of a scientific classification system, it became obvious
that the Commission would need a much enlarged staff with a properly qualified Personnel
Division. In the summer of 1945 the first appointment to this Personnel Division was made,
when Mr. R. L. W. Ritchie assumed his present duties. The Chief Personnel Officer assumed
his duties in December of that year. Since then two more Personnel Officers, Messrs. Richardson and Roberts, have joined the staff, the former in September, 1946, and the latter in May
of this year. During the past two years the clerical staff has increased from around thirteen
to around twenty-six. Let me hasten to assure you each member of this staff is busy every
moment of the day, and that cheerful and full service is being rendered by this group of
co-operative and pleasant civil servants.
In assessing the Commission's achievements since 1945, several important factors should
be borne in mind. First, we were and still are in a period of transition from the old to the
new. The Commission is faced with the building and administering of a classification system
which the Dominion Civil Service has been doing since 1919. This necessitated the building-up
of staff, the training of new staff, the revision and expansion of records, and the formalizing
and completion of classification definitions and Departmental establishments. Simultaneously,
the Civil Service itself was expanded through the inclusion of thousands of employees engaged
in various Government institutions. The institutional records of these employees had to be
centralized. In addition, from time to time, the Commission and its staff was called upon by
the Government to assist in the classification of non-Civil Service branches, such as the
outside services of the Department of Public Works and Provincial Police.
The picking-up of the lag and the endeavour to keep abreast with current administration
took place when the economic living base was in an extremely fluctuating and disjointed condition. As a result, the Commission was forced to expend its greatest efforts on position
evaluation. Up until October of this year more than 85 per cent, of Civil Service positions
had been again reviewed, and new salary scales had been struck in the great majority of them. HH 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Since then, as a result of a reference from the Government, the Commission made certain
studies and submitted data and recommendations which led to the consolidation into the basic
salaries of certain emoluments that were being paid. In addition, recommendations were
made for some benefits to be added to the consolidated salary. These the Government was
pleased to adopt, with the result that a good basic pattern now exists. Many new positions
have been classified, and it may be stated with confidence that by the end of this year all Civil
Service position classifications will have been restudied. At this point it should be emphasized
that the Commission, at all times, will carry out fully its functions so as to ensure the application of revisions, and it also will hear and appraise individual or group representations.
I am quite free to admit that this necessary attention to classification administration and
building-up of staff has, of necessity, greatly hindered the development of a full personnel
programme. It is my hope, however, that we shall soon be in a position to gradually expand
so as to carry on other aspects of personnel-work in addition to classification administration.
Our present necessary restriction to classification administration is another reason why
I eagerly seized upon this opportunity of addressing you.
I think you will agree that during the past two years first things have been put first—w.e
have been concentrating on the hub. For more specific knowledge of part of this work,
I would refer you to the first printed Report of the Civil Service Commission, briefly outlining
the work accomplished until December 31st, 1946. We have not started to prepare the next
Annual Report as yet, but I know it will reveal marked progress.
Off-hand, during the past year some of the groups and establishments reassessed are as
follows: Janitors, tradesmen, medical personnel, male institutional employees, administrative
and professional personnel in all Departments, stenographers and junior intermediate clerical
personnel, stationary engineers, nurses, teachers, farm personnel, foresters, draughtsmen,
Provincial Police, Game Commission, Oakalla staff.
In addition to this, there has been a large number of investigations and adjustments in
respect to individual positions where duties have expanded or were believed to have expanded
sufficiently to warrant reclassification.
In our work the assistance of your executive, especially your general and assistant general
secretaries, has been of immense and constructive value. Although we are not always in full
agreement, the representations and opinions of your two able officials are always sought and
respected as sound and reasonable. I think it may be stated that we have agreed to agree
more than we have agreed to disagree.
Now that I have given you a brief account of the development of our classification
system, I feel that many of you may be interested in the guiding principles used by a
Personnel Officer in analysing a position.
Let us imagine that the Commission has been requested to classify a new position, or an
investigation is to be made into the claims of an employee to a higher classification. The
five chief and ultimate factors to be considered in some form or other are as follows:—
(1) A study of the subject-matter, function, profession or occupation with which the
work deals.
(2) A study of the difficulties and complexities of the duties involved.
(3) A study of the non-supervisory responsibility entailed.
(4) A study of the supervisory and administrative responsibilities entailed.
(5). A study of the qualification requirements of the position.
The first factor—a study of subject-matter, function, or profession—presents no great
difficulty, especially in our Service. Our classification system is divided into quite distinct
groups and classes, partly upon a Departmental or institutional basis, which, to date, has
operated quite satisfactorily. For example, there is no great difficulty in deciding that a
doctor will be classified in the " MN " or Medical Group, or an assistant forester in the
Forestry Group.
The second factor—namely, difficulty and complexity of duties—is a challenging one.
Here distinctions must be made in the same field of work; for example, what factors cause
a position to be graded as a Stenographer—Grade 1 instead of a Stenographer—Grade 2, or
a Government Agent—Grade 3 instead of a Government Agent—Grade 1? In the first case
it is difficulty and complexity of duties, and this factor also plays an important part in the
latter case.    How does an analyst determine the difficulty and complexity of duties performed? CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT. HH 25
He looks at the work before the employee gets it.    He observes what the employee does with
the work, and he checks to see what is done to the work after the employee completes it.
Let us say that Miss Jones, a stenographer in a large Government office, graded as a
Stenographer—Grade 1, feels she should be graded as a Stenographer—Grade 2. After
studying the definition of both gradings, and receiving general statements from various
sources as to the work she does, the Personnel Officer will endeavour, by observation and other
methods, to note the following:—
(1) He will study the stage of the office-work at which it is when Miss Jones receives
it. How much preparation has been done on the work to increase or decrease
Miss Jones' work?
(2) Has Miss Jones any great decisions to make?
(3) He will endeavour to study the entire work in the office to see if there is a
segregation of selection of assignments for each employee. This will give a clue
as to whether or not Miss Jones' work is routine or whether it involves greater
responsibilities than others in the same office.
(4) The next step he will pursue is to study the definite procedures or skills involved
in the work.
Miss Jones, as a stenographer, of course, will be making large use of the typewriter. The
Personnel Officer will want to know whether the work Miss Jones is doing involves a great
deal of repetition or is she faced with framing her own letters or typing a great deal of varied
content. In short, is her work reducible to mechanical routine or does she have to be a great
deal on her toes because of the variety involved? Another way to put it.is to ask the question
whether her actions are obvious or does she have to develop quite frequently new ways and
means in her work.
Another factor to be considered is the amount of control Miss Jones receives from
supervisory officials. Does she receive instructions before a task or during the task, or is her
work entirely free from technical control, except for the final review after she lays the letters
on her boss's desk?
The third factor relates to non-supervisory responsibilities. This factor is largely one
that applies to positions similar to that of intermediate or senior clerks and also to senior
administrative officials.
Let us imagine the position of senior clerk in_ any Government office. The Personnel
Officer will want to know what responsibility is involved in this senior clerk's review of the
work, action, or decision of others. Is this review mainly based on abstract or concrete work?
By abstract I mean decisions of other clerks, and by concrete I mean the checking of such
things as typewritten copy. Does the chief clerk have authority to make changes, and does
his work of review actually approach supervision? Has he the responsibility of making
decisions or taking independent action? The Personnel Officer will also look at the office over
which the senior clerk has charge. How important is his position within the organization
structure? If he makes an error, how seriously does it affect the branch? How important
is his position as to its functions in regard to the branch or office as a whole? Has he any
responsibility for making recommendations or decisions, determining plans, programmes,
or policy? Has he a responsibility for the safety of the lives of others? Does he have
responsibility for the custody of money or valuable or confidential documents? Does his
position involve a good degree of public contact, wherein a good personality is imperative?
The fourth guiding factor—supervisory and administrative responsibility—also assists in
determining the grade and group. This factor would be largely applicable to administrative
officials such as a Government Agent. In the use of this factor, I should like to point out one
great fallacy against which the Personnel Officer must be on his guard. This fallacy is the
tendency to think that the size of the staff under supervision indicates the importance of the
supervisory position. If this factor were taken alone as a guide, a senior clerk-stenographer
in charge of a large pool of stenographers could be graded higher than a professional scientist
with a small staff. There are, upon the whole, five basic groups of responsibilities which
largely determine the importance of a supervisory position,   They are as follows:—.
(a) To what degree does the official plan a programme in view of policy objectives
already laid down?
(6) How much organization is he called upon to perform in order to achieve this,
programme? HH 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(c) How far is he called upon to control and direct the work in the organization?
(d) To what degree is he in touch with staff in the organization?
(e) To what degree is he responsible in serving the public?
It is especially in the last four items where the Personnel Officer will find the difference
between Government Agent—Grade 1 and Government Agent—Grade 3. In other words, the
size of the office and the district served will serve as a good clue.
There are other considerations, however. For example, to what extent is the supervisory
official assisted by the level of responsibility of those he supervises? The Personnel Officer,
in order to find the correct relationship in the Civil Service structure, will have to study the
importance and variety of the functions and the complexity of the office or organization
supervised. Some points of view in this problem will entail the importance of the organization
to the Government as an operating agency, or to the Province at large.
The fifth guiding factor—namely, qualification requirements of the position—in the truest
sense does not directly enter the question of classification. This guiding factor actually
reflects the difficulty or complexity of the duties to be performed. If it is a minimum
requirement that a Ph.D. degree or twenty years' Government service is required to fill a
certain position, then it is obvious that this position is more important than one which requires
the incumbent to have high school graduation with perhaps a minimum of two years' Civil
Service experience.
These are good general guides. They are not, in themselves, however, all-sufficient.
A good Personnel Officer will use them in part or in whole to arrive at a recommendation
when assessing a position. He will make use of all contacts which have a bearing or knowledge of the position. He will consult with the employee, weigh the work, consult with
supervisory officers, check similar organizations either in or without the Government service.
In short, he will gather all the opinions and data that he can which bear on the problem and
which have significant relationship to it.
It is obvious, however, despite the fact that he is dealing with positions and continually
thinking of positions, that personal opinions are for ever intruding themselves into the
situation. He is not dealing with concrete things such as books or lumber. In essence, he is
dealing with human and abstract relationships. As a result, in the last analysis, there must
be some adjudication. The aim, professional pride, and integrity of the Personnel Officer
demands that this adjudication be made as objective and as fair as possible. Attempts have
been and are being made to obviate subjective conclusions as much as possible. Point systems
of classification have been developed. A point system is nothing but a weighing of the various
factors and reviewing of the guiding principles I have already mentioned, and the summing-up
of these weights to determine relationships. However, subjective judgment will enter the
picture even in the use of a point system. The assessment of various points to certain factors
involves subjective allocation. For example, on what basis can it be said that responsibility
for the safety of others may be weighed twice as important as the responsibility for making
important decisions which may strain the nervous system and lead the incumbent to an earlier
grave than might be expected? Let me repeat, I feel there always will be subjective
adjudication involved. In the last analysis, it is the integrity of the Personnel Officers and
the Commission which count. However, that integrity will be greatly assisted by the use of
some such system of guiding factors such as I have described, together with a comparison
of positions within the structure. The personal factor of the incumbent in the position, as
I have stated, is always inclined to intrude into the situation, and the Personnel Officer must
be continually on his guard. He must be careful to get all the information he can, and not
discourage it by becoming impatient with exalted and enthusiastic opinions. It is natural
at times for people to overassess the work in which they or their branch or department are
engaged. It is natural and desirable, because that enthusiasm is the motivation which makes
a good civil servant. Natural ego also enters the picture. Who wants to feel that their job
is of minor importance? Yet it is the difficult task of the Personnel Officer to advise the
Commission so that the final decision may be fair to both employee and, in the last analysis,
to the people who pay the taxes.
As a final word, I may say that the Commission must be careful that position classifications do not become too refined in order to avoid the danger that differences become superficial.
In their report of 1946, the Royal Commission on Administrative Classifications in the Public
Service (of Canada) was inclined to be critical of this trend. VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1948.
565-348-9285 

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