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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Department of Trade and Industry REPORT For the Years ended December 31st… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1948

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Trade
and Industry
REPORT
For the Years ended December 31st
1946 and 1947
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1948.  To His Honour C. A. Banks, C.M.G.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the years ended December 31st, 1946 and 1947.
LESLIE HARVEY EYRES,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Office of the Minister,
Department of Trade and Industry,
Victoria, British Columbia. Honourable Leslie Harvey Eyres,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the years ended December 31st, 1946 and 1947.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
EDWIN G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
For the Years ended December 31st, 1946 and 1947.
The years 1946 and 1947 were marked by continued industrial growth within the
Province. Estimated Provincial pay-rolls for 1946 totalled $403,161,610, compared with
$371,625,927 for the last war year of 1945.
The housing situation continued to be a problem of first importance, and its effect
on industrial development has been pronounced. In many cases industry has undertaken housing projects to provide accommodation for their employees.
Ship-building remains a major industry, and British Columbia yards have established an enviable world-wide reputation. Foreign contracts for new ships have
accounted for substantial volume, and, in addition, repair and reconversion work have
contributed to the total in no small measure. Shortage of steel has been a handicap.
The number of pleasure- and fishing-boat builders is increased. These types of wooden-
boat construction have proved very acceptable in domestic and foreign markets.
The construction industry still suffered from a shortage of essential materials, but
a high level of production was maintained in spite of difficulties in this direction. Much
new construction is at the blue-print stage, and it is anticipated that this industry will
become increasingly active as material supplies improve.
The four basic industries of British Columbia—forestry, agriculture, mining, and
fisheries—show reassuring gains in production. A fifth basic industry, hydro-power
production, bids fair to increase our industrial wealth by its application to increased
primary output, as well as by its contribution to secondary production.
In the field of secondary industry or, in other words, the further manufacture of
our own or imported raw materials, progress has been most satisfactory and is evi>
denced by the increase in industrial pay-rolls as noted above. This Province is rapidly
becoming an industrial centre to be reckoned with, due to the foresight of those industrial leaders who had faith in the possibilities presented here. Much credit is due their
initiative, and the Department of Trade and Industry is privileged to have played a
small part in this development.
Here it may be said that industry must inevitably expand from the present congested centres to become part of the economic life of many smaller communities
throughout British Columbia.
Industrialists in other countries are becoming increasingly aware of the ideal
living and working conditions to be found here, and the same may be said for prospective workers in industry and those who wish to settle on the land. This trend is
evidenced by the number of inquiries received by this Department. The spotlight is
on British Columbia as a source of eventual supply of goods for many markets, including
those now closed through economic and other difficulties.
Elsewhere in this report is a review of the statistical and advisory services performed during the years covered by this report. Studies in the field of foreign trade
(interprovincial trade), tourist trade, cost of living, and industrial and regional
development have been advanced; statistical co-operative efforts between this Department and other Federal or Provincial agencies have been satisfactorily fulfilled.
Numerous special reports have been prepared and consultative services rendered to
other departments of the Provincial Government and to industry.
This report outlines the activities of the several divisions of the Department of
Trade and Industry;   that is, the Office of Trade Commissioner, the Bureau of Eco- AA 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
nomics and Statistics, the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau, and the newly
formed Regional Development Division.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT.
Interdepartmental Industrial Advisory Committee.
This  Committee  met  frequently  during   1946  and  1947  to  consider  industrial
problems which affected various departments of the Government service.    The Committee was extremely helpful in arriving at solutions of these problems and was of
material assistance in furthering industrial development.
The following is the personnel of this Committee:—
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry (Chairman).
J. V. Fisher, Deputy Minister of Finance (Vice-Chairman).
R. S. O'Meara, Trade Commissioner, Department of Trade and Industry.
T. L. Sturgess, Administrative Assistant, Department of Trade and Industry.
A. L. Carruthers, Deputy Minister of Public Works.
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
J. T. Gawthrop, Director, Regional Development Division, Department of
Trade and Industry.
C. Hopper, Superintendent of Lands.
R. Bowering, Public Health Engineer, Provincial Board of Health.
James Thomson, Deputy Minister of Labour.
J. E. Lane, Deputy Comptroller of Water Rights, Water Rights Branch.
C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests.
G. Melrose, Deputy Minister of Lands.
J. B. Munro, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
W. H. Robertson, Provincial Horticulturist, Department of Agriculture.
E. MacGinnis, Marketing Commissioner, Department of Agriculture.
W. A. Carrothers, Chairman Public Utilities Commission.
J. E. Brown, Senior Research Assistant, Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
H. Sargent, Chief Mining Engineer, Department of Mines.
G. Alexander, Deputy Minister of Fisheries.
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL.
Under the chairmanship of the Minister of Trade and Industry the Research
Council held monthly meetings at which were considered many problems of vital interest
to industrial advancement within the Province.
Dr. S. E. Maddigan, honour graduate in physics of the University of British
Columbia who has made an outstanding record in the American research field, is
Director of the Research Council.
Industrial advancement is contingent upon scientific research, and it is the hope
of the Government and the Council that industry will take full advantage of the services
which the Council can render and which are available to all branches of industry within
the Province.
The Council was organized in order to perform the following functions:—
(1) To co-ordinate the work of existing and prospective research units within
the Province of British Columbia.
(2) To initiate and undertake research-work in any field of particular interest
to the Province; to apply the results of research toward the development
of new products, the improvement of industrial processes, and the establishment of new industries based on the resources of the Province. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA 7
(3) To assist in the development of the technical status of the industries in
the Province of British Columbia through a fuller utilization of scientific
methods and technical personnel.
(4) To provide fellowships, scholarships, bursaries, and rewards and pecuniary
and other aids in order to facilitate and encourage original scientific
and industrial research.
(5) To provide for the publication of the results of the research-work and to
enter into such arrangements as may be necessary with regard to patents
arising out of the work done by or for the Council.
The present board of management consists of the following personnel:—
Chairman—Hon. L. H. Eyres, Minister of Railways, Trade and Industry, and
Fisheries of the Province of British Columbia.
Provincial Government—
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests.
Dominion Government—
Dr. W. E. Cockfield, Bureau of Geology and Topography.
Dr. Neal Carter, Fisheries Experimental Station, Vancouver.
National Research Council—Dr. G. M. Shrum, University of British Columbia.
University of British Columbia—
Dr. R. H. Clark, professor and head of Department of Chemistry.
Dr. B. Eagles, head of Department of Dairying.
Professor F. A. Forward, Department of Metallurgy.
Industry—G. A. Barrat, British Columbia Fruit Board.
S.  H.  Hammitt, manager,  Morrison  Steel  & Wire  Company,  Limited,
Vancouver, B.C.
Prentice Bloedel, president, Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Limited, Vancouver,
B.C.
Labour—Birt Showier, president, Vancouver, New Westminster, and District
Trades and Labour Council.
TIMBER TRADE EXTENSION WORK.
Under the direction of Mr. W. A. McAdam, Agent-General for British Columbia,
London, assisted by Col. Douglas Roe, Canadian Timber Trade Commissioner, a party
of thirty-seven members of the Timber Trades Federation of the United Kingdom
visited British Columbia during the period August 25th to September 13th, 1947.
During this twenty-day tour the delegation followed an itinerary prepared by the
Department in co-operation with the lumber industry of the Province and the Provincial
Department of Forests. Many representative mills and logging operations were visited,
and the delegation gained a complete picture of the industry here. This knowledge will
benefit all concerned in future dealings between British Columbia and the United
Kingdom. Timber importers from England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, and
Eire comprised the delegation.
The following communication was received from Mr. Bryan Latham, leader of the
United Kingdom timber importers delegation and past president of the Timber Trade
Federation of the United Kingdom:— AA 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TIMBER TRADE  FEDERATION OF THE UNITED KINGDOM
69 Cannon Street,
London, E.C. 4.
31st October, 1947.
E. G. Rowebottom, Esq.,
Deputy Minister,
Trade & Industry,
Victoria, B.C.
Dear Mr. Rowebottom,
United Kingdom Timber Delegation, 19U7.
On our return to the Old Country it is my pleasure to convey to you on behalf of myself
and all the members of the United Kingdom Timber Delegation, our grateful thanks for the
very warm welcome, generous hospitality, unfailing courtesy and kindness extended to us
everywhere during our visit to British Columbia and other Provinces in the Dominion of
Canada. We all greatly appreciate the time, thought and untiring efforts made to ensure
our tour being instructive, enjoyable and comfortable. The loyalty of the people of your
great Dominion to the Crown and the Old Country was to us a wonderful and enduring
inspiration.
We have learned much concerning Canada and the Canadians and especially of the
ramifications of the lumber industry. When the story of the tour and also the great kindness
accorded to us everywhere is told by the Delegation to the members of the British Timber
Trade in their respective areas, the effect will be further to strengthen the ties which have
always existed with the Lumber Industry of British Columbia and the Timber Trade of the
United Kingdom.
All this must have a beneficial effect on the development of the Lumber Trade between
our two countries. This was the main purpose of our visit and we feel confident it has been
achieved. I need scarcely assure you that all the Members of our Delegation will cherish the
memory of our tour of your great country, which has now ended so happily.
With kind regards,
Yours sincerely,
(Sgd.)     BRYAN LATHAM,
Leader,
United Kingdom Timber Delegation.
NEW INDUSTRIES.
During 1946 and 1947 a consistent effort has been made by the Department to
encourage and foster new industries in the Province. That this effort has borne fruit
is evidenced by the fact that several new industries have been established through the
direct assistance of the Department.
Continued effort is being made to increase the range of textile products manufactured in this Province. The manufacture of common glassware is a possibility in
which keen interest is now being shown.
Among the many important new industries announced in British Columbia in the
period covered by this report is a celanese plant and a steel-rolling mill. These plants
are now being erected and will be in operation as soon as machinery and equipment
requirements are delivered and installed.
During the past year the Department co-operated with groups interested in establishing new pulp and paper mills, and it is expected that considerable development will
result from these contacts in the near future.
Interest continues to be shown by Eastern Canadian and United Kingdom industrialists in the possibilities for investment in British Columbia. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA 9
The Department has published a condensed pamphlet containing data on the primary and secondary production of British Columbia. This pamphlet points out the
advantages of this Province for industrial development.
CO-OPERATIVE CONTACTS.
The Department has consistently co-operated with the Boards of Trade, Chambers
of Commerce, and the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and is grateful for the assistance which these organizations have so willingly
and cheerfully provided.
All branches of the Department have continued their constructive contact with the
Agent-General for British Columbia in London, England.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE REPRESENTATIVE, LONDON.
The Department of Trade and Industry's office was opened up in British Columbia
House on February 11th, 1947. Up to the end of March the time was spent in making
introductory visits to various offices and officials in London and organizing the office
itself. During this organizing period the Agent-General and the rest of the staff at
British Columbia House gave every co-operation and assistance.
A good proportion of the interviews given to United Kingdom business-men dealt
with the possibility of establishing branch plants in British Columbia. Of the numerous inquiries, a total of seventy-eight have been carried to the extent of correspondence,
visits to the plant, and further discussions.
It is to be borne in mind that the difficulty of sterling transfer and the dollar crisis
mitigates against many of the Branch-plant inquiries being brought to fruition. However, in some cases exploratory parties have made surveys by visits to the Province.
The office of the Trade Commissioner in Victoria was informed of such visits, and the
co-operation received at that end has been much appreciated.
There have been a good number of inquiries from the smaller type of business-man,
tradesman, craftsman, engineer, research chemist, etc. Many of these cases have proceeded beyond the inquiry stage and are either making arrangements to emigrate or
have already arrived in the Province.
Many inquiries have been received of a diverse nature, for information on not only
trade and industry, but on other aspects of life in British Columbia.
To immigrants or visitors, letters of introduction have been supplied, not only
to Department of Trade and Industry officials, but to Boards of Trade, businsss
associations, etc.
It has been found that these introductions are very much appreciated by the
recipients and have had the result of saving them time and assuring them of the best
possible contacts.
Contact with the commercial counsellors at Canada House, Ontario House, and
with other Canadian Government offices in London has been established, and all concerned have been most helpful.
Introductory visits have been made to Canadian banks, transportation companies,
publishing offices, etc., and in many cases throughout the year inquiries have been
passed on to them from this office. This is a two-way traffic, and a good number of
inquiries have, in turn, been directed to British Columbia House.
Relations have been established with British Government ministries, and the
assistance given by the Export Trade Promotion Department of the Board of Trade
is most appreciated.
The co-operation of the London Chamber of Commerce, the Federation of British
Industries, the Birmingham Chamber of Commerce, Canadian Trade Commissioners in AA 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Liverpool, Glasgow, and Belfast has been a great help in furthering the interests of
our Province.
Twelve exhibitions or fairs held in London or in other centres, such as Birmingham,
Manchester, Lincoln, were also attended by the Industrial and Trade Representative.
One of the most pleasant duties falling to the lot of the office has been the assistance rendered to British Columbia business-men. Visits to trade fairs, introductions
to Canada House and United Kingdom Government departments, itineraries suggested,
and in some cases hotel accommodation and transportation space has been secured.
The office is now well organized to cater to the requirements of any British Columbia buyers, salesmen, etc., who might visit Great Britain or the adjacent Continent.
Since many people in this country wish to emigrate, it will be realized that it is
comparatively easy to convince them that they should settle in British Columbia.
However, the system adopted, not only by the Industrial and Trade Representative, but
by others concerned at British Columbia House, is to tell such applicants that they must
make up their own mind, and, when they do, assistance in the way of advice and letters
of introduction will be given to help them become established in their new environment.
It has been established that the majority of business and trade inquiries stem from
an individual's desire to emigrate to British Columbia. For this reason the line of
demarcation between an emigration inquiry and an industrial or trade inquiry is
sometimes hard to define.
To sum up, it is the pleasure of the Industrial and Trade Representative to report
that this office is now firmly established and is known as an integral part of official
Canadian life in the United Kingdom.
The volume of inquiries and the sometimes overwhelming amount of work entailed
have fully justified the need for this office.
It is interesting to note that since the establishment of this office the Provinces of
Saskatchewan and Alberta have followed suit.
STATEMENT OF LOANS OUTSTANDING, DECEMBER 31st, 1947,
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
B.C. Livestock Producers Co-operative Asso- Loans. interest.
ciation   $16,000.00 $3,822.12
Charles Cormack   178.47 4.68
Canadian Western Woodworkers   7,000.00       	
Gordon Campbell Investment Company, Limited   5,928.85 11.12 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
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OFFICE OF TRADE COMMISSIONER.
ORGANIZATION.
The Office of Trade Commissioner was created by amendment to the " Department
of Trade and Industry Act," effective April 1st, 1945. This report accordingly covers
the first full two years of operation.
As noted in the last annual report, the new office replaced the Bureau of Industrial
and Trade Extension and is charged with the administrative functions formerly allotted
to that Bureau.
Plan of Contacts.
As a unit of the Department of Trade and Industry, the office maintains direct
contact with industrial organizations and production units in the Province. It acts as
a clearing-house for industrial application of research results. It maintained industrial
liaison with the work of the Provincial Bureau of Post-war Rehabilitation and Reconstruction until that Bureau was replaced (for industrial functions) by the Regional
Development Division of the Department of Trade and Industry. Reference to the
work of this Division, and its relation to the Office of Trade Commissioner, and to the
field representatives is contained elsewhere in this report.
The Trade Commissioner's Office continued to co-ordinate the work of head office
at Ottawa in the Foreign Trade Service and the Federal Trade Commissioners abroad
for special emphasis on the particular problems of British Columbia. It co-operated
with Ottawa in the establishment of the office of the Representative of the Foreign
Trade Service in Vancouver in April, 1947, and continues close co-ordination with that
office in regard to development of the foreign trade of the Province.
The Office of Trade Commissioner has continued to act directly for and on behalf
of Ottawa boards in relation to export movement for industrial development. It has
provided a direct channel of approach to the British Columbia industrialists in the
over-all planning of Ottawa departments and related boards and organizations under
Federal jurisdiction.
Department of Trade and Commerce.
Liaison has been maintained, direct and through the clearing-house of the
Vancouver office, Foreign Trade Service, to accomplish these main objectives:—
(1) Local planning in production and industrial surveys.
(2) Surveys of plant capacities.
(3) Surveys of overseas markets, in direct co-operation with the firms or
industries concerned and the Federal Trade Commissioner Service.
(4) Co-ordinated effort with commodity divisions at Ottawa to indicate sources
of supply in British Columbia.
(5) Co-ordinated planning in two-way trade, in co-operation with the Import
Division, Foreign Trade Service; United Kingdom Trade Commissioner
Service; consulates; banks; transportation companies; and importers
in the Province.
(6) Intimate assistance for procurement and routing problems of the foreign
purchasing missions, direct and through the Canadian Commercial
Corporation.
Other Ottawa Contacts.
Effective liaison has been maintained:—
(1) Industrial Development Bank, direct and through its regional organization
in the Province. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA IS
(2) Export Credits Insurance Corporation.
(3) War Assets Corporation.
(4) Canadian Standards Association.
(5) Residual timber and other controls, Department of Reconstruction and
Supply.
(6) National Research Council and Federal departments concerned with
industrial research.
(7) British Food Mission and purchasing agencies of foreign governments,
to which reference is made elsewhere in this report.
The Trade Commissioner has organized and maintained this liaison by personal
contacts in Eastern Canada, and by assistance to officials and representatives who have
been encouraged to visit the Province.
Special developments in the United Kingdom are dealt with elsewhere in the report.
These have been co-ordinated to over-all planning and policy at Ottawa.
IMPORT RESTRICTIONS.
The imposition on November 17th, 1947, of sweeping import restrictions by the
Federal authorities has placed a new responsibility on the Trade Commissioner's Office
in its contacts with industries affected by the regulations.
By intimate contact and personal review the office will attempt to serve as a
clearing-house in co-operation with the Emergency Import Control Division and the
Import Division, Foreign Trade Service, Ottawa. It has already assisted in particular
under the following headings in a plan which may be more fully developed as the impact
results of the restrictions are better defined:—
(1) Interpretative assistance, especially to the smaller import firms.
(2) Policy on restrictions as they affect the import of parts, material, etc.,
which go into assembly or production pay-rolls.
(3) Effect of the restrictions on the officially sponsored trading structure with
Japan.
(4) Surveys for Ottawa in collection of data, and review of opportunities to
manufacture machinery, equipment, chemicals, etc., for which the Province
has been dependent on imported supplies. This refers in particular to
the administration of Appendix 9, which concerns import of metal
manufactures.
(5) Development of natural resources, where local industry may provide
alternative sources of supply, or new foodstuffs production, in conservation
of dollar exchange.
(6) The new emphasis which must be placed on industrial research in
additional secondary-industry production.
The impact effect had not been fully realized at the close of the year. The whole
trading structure of the Province will be materially affected. There will be related
effect under main-industry headings in the application of new tariff agreements
resulting from the Geneva Conference.
In co-operation with Ottawa departments, the Foreign Trade Bureau of the
Vancouver Board of Trade, the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and others,
the Department of Trade and Industry has a very definite part to play in market
adjustments which must follow these sweeping changes in production and tariff policies.
UNITED KINGDOM SURVEY.
In the annual report for 1945 reference was made to recommendations arising from
the Trade Commissioner's survey in the United Kingdom during the closing months of
the year.    A number of these recommendations have been implemented, in a pattern AA 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of co-ordinated effort, to place emphasis on the special problems of the Province in its
trading structure with the United Kingdom.
The office of Industrial and Trade Representative in London was established there
on February 11th, 1947.
Lieut.-Col. H. F. E. Smith was appointed to the position on November 1st, 1946.
For two months prior to sailing he was engaged, with the Trade Commissioner, on
intensive cross-section survey of industry in the Province, to establish central points
of contact through industrial organizations and to visit selected plant operations.
With the Trade Commissioner he also made a brief survey of primary and secondary
industry in the Interior, central, and northern parts of the Province. Before leaving
Canada he was introduced to related divisions of the Foreign Trade Service at Ottawa.
Since his arrival in London the inquiries handled have proved the advantage of
the liaison.    They have broken into a number of main headings:—
(1) United Kingdom furtherance of production or other surveys initiated in
British Columbia under wood products, foodstuffs, metals, and other
headings.
. (2) Licence manufacture where contacts are initiated in the United Kingdom,
entailing surveys in the engineering industry there and placement surveys
in British Columbia.
(3) Licence manufacture in the United Kingdom of British Columbia products.
(4) Furtherance of exports from British Columbia for sales in the United
Kingdom, or for world markets through United Kingdom export houses.
(5) Itineraries and survey contacts for visiting representatives from British
Columbia.
(6) Itineraries, introductions, and survey plans for industrial visitors from
the United Kingdom.
(7) Inquiries for export from the United Kingdom.    ■
(8) Settlement inquiries.
The work of the Representative under all headings has been co-ordinated closely
with that of Canada House, to fit in with overall policy, but to emphasize the particular
problems of the Province. The work under item (4) has been specially related to the
functions of the United Kingdom Trade Promotion office of the Department of Overseas
Trade, and the office of the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner at Vancouver.
The directive calls for close association in the related work of transportation
companies, Canadian and overseas banks, and trade organizations here and in the
United Kingdom. This effective formula has prevented duplication, has resulted in
exchange of information, and has strengthened the department's position with the
organizations concerned.
The Representative's work has been welded to the policy of the Agent-General at
British Columbia House. The Representative is attached to the executive staff of the
Agent-General, but reports directly to the Department of Trade and Industry at
Victoria.
Elsewhere in this report is a summary of the activities of the Industrial and Trade
Representative's office in London.
SPECIAL SURVEYS.
Wood Products.
Assistance was given to the United Kingdom Timber Control and Board of Trade
in a special survey for movement of knocked-down furniture to the United Kingdom.
The dollar crisis prevented finality in contracts, but preliminary survey-work of the
Trade Commissioner resulted in visits of overseas officials and complete charting of
plant capacity for alder and softwood requirements in dimension stock.    The Furniture DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA 15
Manufacturers' Section, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, co-operated directly in
the survey, which was extended to lumber associations and other central and mill
contacts for a complete picture of possibilities and a definite offer for early shipment.
It is hoped that this intensive planning may still be used to advantage of the industry.
The office has also been specially concerned in market surveys for transmission-
poles and piling required in the United Kingdom, Italy, and the Far East.
Seed-potatoes.
It has assisted specially in development of market for seed-potatoes from the
Province, in trial and repeat shipments to the Argentine, Peru, and United States, with
exploration of possibilities in Far East markets and in India.
The special work on processed fruits is referred to elsewhere in this report.
South American Markets.
Special attention has been given to South American markets, with particular and
successful survey in the metal-manufacturing industry of the Province, and assistance
to particular firms who sent representatives or explored special opportunities. The
Latin-American Committee of the Foreign Trade Bureau, Vancouver Board of Trade,
has afforded special co-operation.
Trade with Japan.
The general plan for trading with Japan has received attention. Contact has been
maintained with the Asia Section, Foreign Trade Service. The Province has had a
share of the government-to-government trading. On both exports and imports there
has also been a limited resumption of private trading, through the clearing machinery
of the Supreme Control of the Allied Powers at Tokyo. There has been intimate review
and planning for visits of British Columbia business-men under the quota scheme
established in August, 1947. The Trade Commissioner's office is now organized to
assist fully in all future developments.
UNITED KINGDOM FOODSTUFF SHIPMENTS.
During the years under review the Trade Commissioner's Office has been closely
associated with the British Food Mission and the related departments and boards in
Ottawa in regard to movements of foodstuffs from the Province to the United Kingdom.
Total United Kingdom food contracts during 1946 brought approximately
$19,000,000 to the producers and processors of the Province. This approximate total
does not take account of other revenues accruing to related industries which supplied
containers or furnished transportation, terminal or warehousing facilities.
Of the total in contracts for 1946, approximately one-half the dollar value was
accounted for by canned salmon and approximately 2,500,000 boxes of Okanagan apples
were included in the 1946 contracts.
The apple movement presented a series of difficulties, all successfully overcome, in
hazards of box-shook shortage and difficulties in co-ordinating inland transport to
loading of perishable cargo, with provision of adequate vessel space with minimum
delays. The Trade Commissioner's Office received a direct request from the British
Food Mission for assistance in this connection.
Record shipments of shell eggs were reported, and there was substantial tonnage
movement of fruits in S02 solution and fruit-pulp referred to elsewhere in this report.
The contractural and shipping arrangements have varied according to the industry
facilities provided. Canned-salmon contracts were centred with the Salmon Canners
Operating Committee in Vancouver. B.C. Tree Fruits, Limited, in Kelowna handled
the apple movement.    The Dairy Board in Ottawa was responsible for participation AA 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
in evaporated-milk contracts. Egg movement through the Special Products Board
was effected in co-operation with the Poultry Industries Council and the Western
Canada Produce Association. The Department of Trade and Industry appeared as
actual shipper in all S02 fruit movement.
Totals for 1947 were not available as at time this was prepared, but will show
a sharp reduction under all main items. In particular, there was reduced canned-
salmon movement, and the United Kingdom did not contract any fresh apples from
the 1947 pack. Sharp reductions were also noted for 1947 under nearly every fruit and
vegetable heading. The main contract for S02 fruits and fruit-pulp through the
Department of Trade and Industry was completed and paid for in full. It constituted
an all-time record for movement under this heading.
The currency crisis has overshadowed the movement for 1947. It looms over the
prospects for 1948. As at the beginning of December, discussions had not reached
for 1948 the level of decisions under specific foodstuff items, but were concerned in the
main with the machinery which would be available for any or all foodstuff movement
to the United Kingdom. This applies to fruit and fruit-pulps in which the Department
of Trade and Industry is specially concerned.
SPECIAL PRODUCTS BOARD.
The Trade Commissioner again acted as agent for the Special Products Board for
the years under review, and the office was responsible for all local contractural, shipping, storage, and payment arrangements in respect of the movement of S02 fruits and
fruit-pulps to the United Kingdom Ministry of Food.
The Department has acted in this capacity for six years, directing this movement
and increasing the volume to a record tonnage during the last year.
During the year 1947 eight vessels were loaded between July 7th and September
11th, with small residual loadings in October, to a total gross tonnage of approximately
4,500 tons for the season. Nearly all supplies were cleared through New Westminster,
by very effective consolidated arrangements worked out with the Pacific Coast
Terminals there.
Supplies were drawn in the main from the Fraser Valley, with smaller tonnages
from Interior points in the Okanagan and Creston area. Shipments of greengage-tree
fruit-pulp were included, but the main volume was made up of raspberries preserved
in sulphur-dioxide solution, with a small tonnage of strawberries in S02 solution, for
the 1947 shipments.
A record total of 18,956 barrels was shipped during 1947 in all processed-fruit
varieties, compared with 13,512 barrels in 1946, 7,721 barrels in 1945, and 4,050 barrels
in 1944.
A comparative net fruit tonnage (short tons, 2,000 lb. net fruit content) for the
four years is as follows:—
1946.
1947.
SO_ raspberries...
SO2 strawberries.
Greengage-pulp....
Tons.
700
100
Tons.
1,345
Tons.
2,341
Tons.
2,910
450
403
The system of field warehousing devised in 1943 has been continued. All payments
have been effected from the Dominion Treasury through a special account established
with the Provincial Minister of Finance, and more than $3,000,000 has been cleared
to suppliers through this account in the last four years. The Trade Commissioner's
Office payf supp iers direct, pro rata on each vessel's loading against on-board ladings DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA 17
and other documents which are cleared through Ottawa for each vessel loading. The
practice ensures prompt final payment and orderly interim finance, and has been
commended by suppliers, the banks, and others concerned.
INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH DEVELOPMENTS.
The office continued its active association with the work of the British Columbia
Research Council, to which reference is made elsewhere in this report.
The Trade Commissioner has continued as member ex officio of the board of
management and is chairman of the Industries Advisory Committee. The Administrative Assistant, Office of Trade Commissioner, is secretary of the Industries Advisory
Committee.
Industries Advisory Committee.
Secondary industry is now provided with clearly defined channels to present their
research problems. The Industries Advisory Committee itself was reorganized and
strengthened in personnel as from April 1st, 1947, with addition of representations
from transportation companies, power companies, banks, and other organizations interested in industrial development. Heretofore they had not been directly represented in
the application phases of the work of the Council.
The Committee now presents an effective cross-section of industrial advice to assist
in passing on results of industrial research which can be applied to industrial development. It serves as a public relations advisory unit for the Council. It provides
machinery to refer secondary-industry research problems to the Council, in supplement
to contacts of Council staff themselves.
With representation from the newly created Regional Development Division of the
Department, it helps to give all parts of the Province access to the facilities provided
by the Council. It encourages the closest contact between industry itself and the staff
of the Council by personal plant visits and by personal contacts with production units
in the Province.
The five chairmen of the primary-industry advisory committees of the Council have
continued as members of the Trade Commissioner's committee. The Director of the
Council is ex officio a member of the Committee. In addition, as in previous years,
Committee members have been nominated by the Canadian Manufacturers' Association,
principal Boards of Trade, and the Regional Committee of the Canadian Chamber of
Commerce.
. Well-known industrial men accepted nominations to the Industries Committee
during 1947. In addition to the five chairmen of the primary-industries committee
and Council staff or ex officio members, the Committee personnel at December 31st,
1947, was as follows:—
Chairman—R. S. O'Meara, Trade Commissioner.
Secretary—T. L. Sturgess, Administrative Assistant, Office of Trade Commissioner.
Irving Smith (Laucks, Ltd.).
R. E. Strain (Alliance Ware, Ltd.).
A. E. Bell-Irving (Western Bridge and Steel Fabricators).
J. Buchanan (B.C. Packers, Ltd.).
A. C. Findlay (Nelson Bros. Fisheries, Ltd.).
J. K. Melville (Home Oil Distributors, Ltd.)'.
J. Malkin (W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd.).
R. E. Potter (City Engineer, New Westminster).
L. V. Clegg (Canadian Industries, Ltd., New Westminster).
A. W. Mclntyre (B.A. Paint, Ltd., Victoria).
A. Saunders (Sidney Roofing, Ltd., Victoria). AA 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Brig. R. A. Wyman,  C.B.E.,  D.S.O.   (Industrial Agent,  Canadian  National
Railways).
J. E. Underhill (B.C. Electric, Ltd.). '
H. A. Francis (Assistant Industrial Agent, Canadian Pacific Railway).
N. C. Tompkins (Industrial Development Bank).
D. F. Manders (National Research Council).
J. T. Gawthrop (Regional Development Division, Department of Trade and
Industry).
John Kerr (British Ropes, Ltd.).
W. G. Lambert (Mohawk Handle Co.).
N. Terry (Canadian Sumner Iron Works).
F. W. Smelts (Department of Labour).
Everard Clarke (Shuswap Okanagan Dairy Industries Co-operative Association, Vernon).
Prof. Ellis Morrow (Department of Commerce, University of British Columbia).
E. M. Herb (Westminster Paper Co., New Westminster).
W. B. McCririck (Chairman, Pacific Subsection, Canadian Bankers' Association).
Foreign Trade Bureau, Vancouver Board of Trade.
The Trade Commissioner is a member of the executive of the Bureau. Co-ordinated effort here has been a feature of the period under review:—
(1) Co-operation Foreign Trade Week, May 1947.
(2) Joint efforts in connection with Educational Luncheon Series during the
year—documentation, export practice, import and foreign exchange regulations, Geneva Trade Agreements.
(3) United efforts in particular with Latin-American Committee for surveys
of South American trade possibilities;   special results in Venezuela.
(4) Co-operation with the Bureau and the University in regard to fellowships
for foreign students, and arrangement for plant visits, etc., for students
from foreign countries.
(5) Co-ordinated efforts in connection with International Trade Fair and
World Trade Week, 1948.
(6) Co-operation in visits of Federal Trade Commissioners, and introductions,
surveys, etc., for visiting foreign representatives and buyers.
(7) Leadership by Vancouver Board, including Foreign Trade Bureau, in
helping the Department to give outlying areas access to information and
regulations.
British Columbia Products.
Reference is made elsewhere to the Departmental programme to encourage British
Columbia products. The Trade Commissioner is an executive member of the Vancouver Board's British Columbia Products and Industrial Bureau and has consistently
aided in the programme.
NEW INDUSTRIES.
The office has continued assistance to new industries, collecting detailed industrial
data for new enterprise and assisting under many problem headings in raw-material
sources, factory-sites, cost structures, labour and taxation, incorporation procedure,
control and quota formalities, and market surveys.
It has been specially able to indicate channels of information or action to small
industries not fully conversant with procedure. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA 19
FOREIGN TRADE WEEK.
Foreign Trade Week in Vancouver, May 19th to 24th, 1947, was sponsored by the
Vancouver Board of Trade in conjunction with the Department of Trade and Industry,
and the Trade Commissioner's Office was closely identified with all phases of the preliminary organization and the events of the week. Outstanding in the week's events
was the Fifth National Foreign Trade Conference of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. The Trade Commissioner served as a member of the panel of experts at the
special sessions, and both the Trade Commissioner and the Administrative Assistant
acted on main and special committees for the larger planning of the week itself.
The week directed public attention to the important contribution made by foreign
trade in the economy of Canada. It provided outstanding speakers to Vancouver audiences on the subject of foreign trade. It included group discussions and round-table
conferences on foreign trade. It emphasized British Columbia's manufacturing, harbour, and shipping facilities, and the part they play in foreign commerce. It brought
together, in a community effort, all groups and organizations interested in foreign-
trade promotion.    Its concept and conduct were happy examples of co-ordinated effort.
The sessions were attended by 270 delegates, including twenty-seven representatives
of foreign governments, nine from Canadian Government departments, and business
representation from Canada, United States, and countries overseas.
TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS.
Vancouver Board of Trade.
The Department of Trade and Industry, through the Office of Trade Commissioner,
continued its annual grant of $3,500 to the Transportation Bureau of the Vancouver
Board of Trade to assist in the interpretation and application of Transport Control
Regulations, with particular reference to car-loadings. The co-ordinated effort has
ensured a service to all parts of the Province. The Trade Commissioner has continued
as an active member of the executive of the Transportation Bureau of the Vancouver
Board of Trade.
Railroad Companies.
An effective scheme of co-operation has been worked out with the industrial and
foreign freight departments of the Canadian National Railways and the Canadian
Pacific Railway, and this pattern has extended to overseas co-operation with the units
concerned.
The Trade Commissioner has accompanied Canadian National officials in survey
tours of the northern and central parts of the Province, resulting in round-table discussions to explore the mutual interests of railroad and government in problems of
industrial development. From the Canadian Pacific Railway the Trade Commissioner's
Office has secured effective co-operation in routing and industrial placement problems.
Steamship Companies.
Effective contacts have been maintained with operators and agents for new routes,
rate structures, and freight movement. The Vancouver sub-committee of the United
Kingdom Liner Committee worked closely with the office during the year in space allotments.    Close co-operation has been afforded by the Merchants' Exchange in Vancouver.
Air Lines.
To Trans-Canada Air Lines, district and overseas offices, the Trade Commissioner
was able to give effective assistance, and received splendid co-operation from the
company in the matter of on-carrying air priorities for industrial travel.    The office AA 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
has been closely associated with the earlier stages of air-line organization in respect to
air cargoes;  developments may be expected early in the new year.
Freight Rates.
On the freight-rates inquiry the Department continued active assistance in data
collection and industrial advice to the time that the case was placed by the Province in
the hands of counsel for furtherance and presentation to the Board of Transport Commissioners. The Trade Commissioner, with the economic adviser to the Government,
accompanied the Provincial party in its preliminary review of interprovincial phases of
the inquiry, at meetings held in Edmonton in November, 1946. He assisted in review
of industry presentations at the time of the local hearings in Vancouver, but the main
Departmental load was effectively carried by the staff of the Bureau of Economics and
and Statistics.
PUBLIC RELATIONS PHASES.
The office planned tours for delegations, missions, and individuals, including visiting foreign buyers and visiting trade commissioners. Special surveys are dealt with
elsewhere in this report, and planning under this heading for industrial development
included special advice on factory-sites, financial structures, material sources, and
planned itineraries for cover of the Province.
Introductions were given to British Columbia business-men and tours planned for
them in foreign countries. Introductions were received from overseas, with all local
arrangements for visitors centred in the Trade Commissioner's Office. For visiting
trade commissioners an effective scheme of co-operation has been worked out with the
new office of the Foreign Trade Service Representative at Vancouver, and Victoria
arrangements are left with the Department of Trade and Industry at Victoria.
Receptions were accorded to and arrangements made for introductions of the newly
appointed Australian Trade Commissioner, in new career consulate appointments, and
in new banking facilities in the Province. The Department appreciates the fact of
these new appointments and new offices. They serve as an added recognition of the
importance of British Columbia as a trading centre. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
AA 21
Cumulative Monthly Exports
Passing Through British Columbia Customs Ports
«_
o
it
to
O in
> rt
%
__w
5
_3
u
320
1945.1944) 1947
280
240
200
/
160
120
80
40
m?
194-
n
1.4$
JAN.     FEB.     MAR.     APR    MAY     JUNE     JULY     AUG.     SEPT    OCT      NOV     DEC.
SOUBCE:-Bwti-hColumbia,Bumau ..Economics ...Statistics. AA 22                                                     BRITISH COLUMBIA.
EXPORTS
PassingTh'rough British Golumb\aCu5Toms Ports
1930-1946
300
250
£
°            200
Ui
Z
o
ZJ
ISO
100
/
1930              |93t             1954             1936             1938              1940             I94^             1944             19
SOURCE.- BRITISH COLUMBIA, EW..U o» Ecouc»rc_ «_>St«i
-t6
_iitb. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA 23
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS.
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics during 1946 and 1947, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is, as
its name implies, a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the
first being to provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations
into economic questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and
compile economic statistics of interest to the Province.
In order to carry out these objectives, the Bureau is divided into several sections
dealing with statistical services and one section dealing with economic' research. To
ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the policy of building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who could be relied upon to perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been the policy to make the
services of the technical personnel continuously available to all other departments of
the Government. It might be mentioned that at present two members of the research
staff have been granted leave of absence in order to take postgraduate work.
Since other Governmental agencies are also concerned with the collection of .statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication
has been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, and
Provincial Secretary. During 1946 and 1947 the essential statistical services performed for the other Provincial Departments, as well as for the Department of Trade
and Industry, were maintained. A brief description of the research and statistical
services performed during the year has been provided under the appropriate divisions
which follow.
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY.
As background for the review of business activity in British Columbia, it is useful
to first observe the general course economic conditions have taken in Canada since
VJ day. According to the revised index of industrial production (Dominion Bureau
of Statistics), which Covers output in the manufacturing, mining, and electric-power
industries, the level of activity reached a war-time peak at 207.1 (1935-39 = 100) in
March, 1944, and thereafter declined to the end of World War II; from 170.6 in
August, 1945, the index continued downward to 156.7 in November. Over the winter
of 1945-46 the index rose slightly to 165.8 in April, 1946, but it then went to a post-war
low of 149.7 in August, 1946. Reflecting the marked upsurge in activity which occurred
during the winter of 1946-47, the index climbed to a post-war high of 177.6 in April,
1947, where it has since levelled off, and unemployment in Canada fell to its lowest
point since the end of the war.
The period since August, 1945, has seen a gradual relaxation of Canadian price
and other war-time controls. This shift toward decontrol began in September, 1944,
with the relaxation of certain supply restrictions, but the movement did not gain
momentum until the middle of 1945. After VJ day supply restrictions were largely
eliminated and control over the movement of labour somewhat eased. In September,
1945, distribution controls were loosened. Then came the adoption of a more flexible
attitude toward application for price increases, including, as wage controls were relaxed,
the recognition of increased wage costs as a factor in setting ceiling prices. By the
end of 1945 about one-half of the Wartime Prices and Trade Board subsidies had
disappeared. The actual decontrol of prices began in February, 1946, when price ceilings were removed from several hundred items where price increases were considered
to be unlikely or relatively unimportant or where the administration was becoming
difficult;   further steps were taken in April, May, June, and July of 1946.    Serious AA 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
industrial disputes during the summer of 1946 prevented further price relaxations until
January, 1947. Ceiling controls were removed from most goods and services thought
not to be of " basic importance in living costs and production costs " on January 13th,
1947. During the next three months the policy of removing ceilings continued and
controlled price increases were allowed, for example, in the case of pork and beef. Meat
rationing, which had been reimposed in September, 1945, came to an end in March,
although meat price ceilings remained in force at that time. The process of price
relaxation has been continued. Some easing of rental controls also occurred during
1947, particularly in the case of commercial accommodations. A 10-per-cent. increase
in rentals on housing erected before 1944 has also been authorized in those cases where
the landlord was willing to enter into a two-year lease, and various other changes have
occurred.
In the second half of 1945 the wholesale price index was fairly stable. During
1946, as decontrol measures began to take effect, the index showed a gradual rise, but
during 1947 acceleration of the decontrol programme has resulted in noticeably larger
increases in wholesale prices. From August, 1945, to June, 1947, when the wholesale
price index stood at 127.8, the increase was 23 per cent., a total increase since August,
1939, of 77 per cent. In June, 1947, wholesale prices in the United States stood 40 per
cent, above the August, 1945, level and 97 per cent, above August, 1939. The official
cost-of-living index in Canada showed a somewhat similar course, rising 13 per cent,
between August 1st, 1945, and July 2nd, 1947, or an over-all increase since August 1st,
1939, of about 35 per cent.
One of the principal prime movers in the post-war upsurge in Canadian economic
activity has been the foreign lending programme of the Canadian Government. Under
the " Exports Credits Insurance Act " and the " United Kingdom Financial Agreement
Act," Canada has placed at the disposal of European countries the sum of $1,844,500,000.
Of this sum, about $768,000,000 remained undisbursed as at June 18th, 1947. At the
present rate of drawings, these credits should last through most of 1948. Complicating
Canada's international position, however, is the fact that imports from the United
States have risen to exceedingly high levels, reflecting the full employment conditions
in Canada. During 1946 Canada was obliged to use $263,000,000 (U.S.) of her official
gold and dollar reserves in settling up a current-account deficit of $603,000,000 with the
United States. At the beginning of 1947 the official gold and dollar reserves amounted
to $1,244.9 million, but at the present rate of importation it is quite possible that these
reserves will be significantly reduced by the end of 1947. The pending exhaustion of
the American loan to Great Britain and the general world scarcity of U.S. dollars has
already precipitated a number of trade restrictions in the United Kingdom, France,
Australia, and elsewhere which are of some significance for the future prosperity of
this Province.
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
1946.
While business activity remained at a high level during 1946, preliminary statistical returns indicate a levelling-off, or adjustment, from the high level established during
the recent war period. The year 1946 has been a period of reconstruction and readjustment, and interest was centred on the return to the production of consumer goods.
Reflecting rising prices, the retail sales index—indicating spending—has risen from
190.9 in 1945 to 221.5 in 1946. Incomplete returns indicate that the net value of production in the primary and secondary industries amounted to $530,000,000,* as compared with $535,488,648t in 1945 and $543,947,198t in 1944.    Production in three of
* Preliminary estimate of Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
t Dominion Bureau of Statistics. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
AA 25
the chief primary industries (agriculture, forestry, and mining) showed considerable
increases in 1946 over 1945. Fisheries production was down slightly, with manufacturing also showing a decrease over the same period.
1947.
While final statistics are not yet available, it is now evident that the level of
economic activity in 1947 will show an upward trend compared with 1946. The changeover and readjustment from the war period seems to have been completed, with surprising little dislocation, and industry is rapidly approaching record production levels.
Pressure for production has dominated the British Columbia scene, and industry has
centred its productive capacity in an attempt to meet this demand, which has arisen
from a high level of purchasing power. Preliminary statistics indicate a further rise
in 1947 of the retail sales index over the high established during 1946. The few indices
available at present indicate that the net value of production should show an increase
over the 1946 figure.
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1945 and 1946, with
Preliminary Estimates for 1947.
Unit or
Base
Period.
1947
Preliminary
Estimates."
Mining—
Total value of production1	
Gold production1	
Silver production1	
Copper production1	
Lead production1	
Zinc production1	
Coal production1	
Forestry—
Total value of production2	
Timber scaled2	
Paper production2	
Fisheries—
Total value of production6	
Pack of canned salmon3	
Agriculture—
Total value of production4	
Apples—
Total shipments5 6	
Domestic shipments5	
Export shipments6	
External trade—
Export of canned salmon6	
Export of planks and boards, Douglas fir6..
Export of red-cedar shingles6	
Internal trade—
Index of wholesale sales6	
Index of retail sales6	
Department stores	
Food stores	
75,500,000
Oz.
$
$
$
$
Long ton
MB.M.
Ton
Cases
Boxes
Boxes
Boxes
Cwt.
MR
Sq.
1935-39=100
1935-39=100
1935-39=100
1935-39=100
225,000,000
44,500,000
125,000,000
290.0
242.5
254.5
220.0
71,807,951
134,747
5,324,959
2,240,070
23,489,335
21,143,086
1,463,640
173,471,370
3,193,665
342,754
43,817,147
1,348,137
118,600,000
8,500,790
4,634,424
3,866,366
479,021
574,649
1,744,158
271.!
221.i
228.5
202.i
63,343,949
187,962
2,893,934
3,244,472
17,674,884
19,431,921
1,518,673
147,655,000
3,081,235
334,362
44,531,858
1,739,308
4,914,337
4,080,179
834,158
596,140
611,906
1,634,603
226.5
190.9
194.3
182.9
1 British Columbia Department of Mines.
2 British Columbia Department of Lands, Forest Branch.
3 British Columbia Department of Fisheries.
* British Columbia Department of Agriculture.
5 British Columbia Tree Fruit Board.
8 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
9 Subject to revision. AA 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1945 and 1946, with
Preliminary Estimates for 1947—Continued.
Unit or
Base
Period.
1947
Preliminary
Estimates.9
1946.
Internal trade—Continued.
Fuel-oil consumed6	
Railway freight loaded in British Columbia6	
Consumption of electric power6	
Sales of life insurance6	
Construction—
Contracts awarded6	
Value  of work  performed  in   construction  industry6	
Building permits issued6	
Finance—Bank debits6	
Tourist trade—
Automobile entries on sixty-day permits6	
Estimated   expenditure   of   the   United   States
tourist in British Columbia7	
Employment—6
AH employment	
Manufacturing	
Iron and steel products	
Lumber products	
Pulp and paper	
Textile products	
Other manufacturing	
Mining	
Logging	
Construction	
Communication	
Transportation	
Services	
Trade	
Salaries and wages8	
Barrels*
Tons
000 kwh.
000 $
000 $
000 $
000 $
000 $
Number
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
3,410,000
10,792,000
2,977,000
100,000
45,000
Not available
40,000
6,564,000
213,000
50,000,000
195.0
450,000,000
2,863,578
8,171,456
2,820,118
92,064
58,708
54,211
42,866
5,367,594
178,595
34,200,000
166.6
195.7
338.2
128.5
181.0
210.6
219.0
89.9
143.0
130.7
161.9
139.0
210.9
209.8
-03,161,610
2,546,671
8,399,597
2,788,577
58,258
38,033
43,414
24,672
4,416,364
107,506
22,000,000
175.1
242.3
737.3
129.4
168.1
204.3
201.9
87.9
144.7
100.4
141.9
128.5
188.3
186.3
383,700,000
6 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
7 Bureau of Economics  and  Statistics,  preliminary  estimate;
estimate.
8 Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Labour Division.
9 Subject to revision.
* Thirty-five imperial gallons per barrel.
1945  and   1946,  Dominion   Bureau  of  Statistics
THE RESEARCH DIVISION.
Occupational Survey of Public School Students.
The occupational survey of students leaving Grades VIII to XI, which the Bureau
has conducted annually since 1938 in collaboration with the Department of Education,
School Boards, and teachers throughout the Province, was suspended in 1945. In
co-operation with the Director of Vocational Guidance it was resumed in 1946. The
objective of the survey has been to ascertain the probable number of students leaving
school and the nature of the occupations or special training which these students will
likely seek.
Final tabulation has revealed that 2,793 students were recorded in the June, 1946,
survey. Of this number, 1,329 students were uncertain whether they would or would
not return to the public school system in September. The remainder, 1,464 students
were definite in stating that they would not return.    Students who knew definitely in DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
AA 27
June that they would  be  returning to  school  in  September  did  not  complete the
questionnaire.
The principal reasons given for leaving school are shown in Table 2.
Table 2.—Occupational Survey of Public School Students.
Number of
Principal Reason. Students.
Seek employment  1,232
Financial   178
To take special training  797
Health   13
Required at home   159
Leaving British Columbia  7
No further school in vicinity  14
Other reasons  144
Joining armed forces  30
Not stated   219
Total  2,793
The actual number of students that subsequently entered the labour market is, of
course, not definitely known. Excluding those students intending to seek special
training, those joining the armed services, those leaving the Province, the invalid, and
those required to assist at home, we might reasonably expect that approximately 1,800
students sought employment in the Provincial labour market in 1946.
In spite of the obvious difficulties confronting students asked to state the occupation they intended to seek after leaving school, 1,989 students attempted to answer the
question in the 1946 survey. This survey revealed that 291 boys and 281 girls had
been assured of an opportunity to obtain employment in their stated occupation. The
remaining number of boys and girls reported that they had no assurance of employment
in their occupations indicated.
It is probably true to say also that the particular occupations shown by the students
were in many cases merely indicative. For that reason the occupations have been
consolidated into larger industrial groups, which, it is thought, provide a general
picture of the actual situation. In the following table the occupations have been
consolidated in this way:—
Table S.—Occupations sought by Students leaving School.
Boys.
Girls.
Principal Industry.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain
69
12
56
5
168
17
89
46
4
15
56
47
3
2
79
541
37
9
27
1
80
9
44
23
1
5
23
31
1
1
43
194
32
3
29
4
88
8
45
23
3
10
33
16
2
1
36
347
11
1
46
4
72
1
39
106
.     4
1
447
852
3
27
3
48
1
20
63
3
1
310
456
8
1
19
1
24
19
43
1
137
396
1,209
529
680
1,584
935
649 AA 28
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
To indicate in more precise terms the type of employment sought by these students,
we have listed the principal occupations sought in Tables 4 and 5. The leading occupations, in the case of girls, included 427 students seeking office-work as stenographers,
typists, clerks, and book-keepers; 36 students seeking employment as saleswomen in
the retail trade; and 69 students seeking work as telephone operators. In the case
of boys the 1946 survey indicates that 79 students were seeking positions as office clerks
and book-keepers, 73 students were seeking employment as machinists' apprentices, and
69 students were seeking employment as farm and garden helpers.
Table ,4-—Principal Occupations sought by Girls, 1946.
Principal Occupations.
Total.
Assured
of
Opportunity.
Not
assured.
1
30
69
36
17
23
13
206
221
109
850
1
10
29
14
11
6
6
66
80
42
12
20
40
22
6
17
7
140
141
67
838
Totals           	
1,584
281
1,303
Table 5.—Principal Occupations sought by Boys, 1946.
Principal Occupations.
Total.
Assured
of
Opportunity.
Not
assured.
Farm hands, gardeners' apprentices	
Logging and forest operations	
Mining	
Ship-building	
Mill-hand (sawmill)	
Auto mechanics' apprentices	
Machinists' apprentices and mechanics (N.E.S.)	
Carpenters' apprentices	
Sheet-metal workers	
Deck-hands and stewards (merchant)	
Truck-drivers	
Salesmen (retail) ,	
Air Force	
Soldiers	
Navy (sailors and tradesmen)	
Draughtsmen	
Diesel engineers	
Office clerks and book-keepers	
Others	
Not specified	
Totals ,.	
69
56
5
3
15
2?
73
24
11
13
4
9
22
2
23
10
5
79
223
541
44
27
2
1
9
6
20
6
3
8
1
5
31
90
17
25
29
3
2
6
16
53
18
4
16
2
11
7
5
48
133
523
1,209
291
917
EXTERNAL TRADE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The agreement between this Bureau and the External Trade Branch, Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, consummated in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under
this agreement the Bureau receives monthly a duplicate set of punch-cards showing in
detail the importation and exportation of every commodity normally listed  in  the DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA 29
Federal trade reports which has been recorded at customs ports located in this Province.
While these records do not distinguish the exported merchandise originating in British
Columbia, nor the imports destined for consumption in this Province, from the other
goods passing through these customs ports, the records do provide the basis for a very
comprehensive annual report on the foreign trade of British Columbia. Although the
publication of this annual report was suspended as a precautionary measure during the
war period, the statistics for the period 1939-44 have been prepared and are now available for distribution. The statistics covering the 1945-46 period have now been compiled and will shortly be available for distribution. It is planned that commencing in
January of 1948 a monthly statement of trade through British Columbia customs
ports will be published, showing all export commodities valued at $25,000 and over and
all import commodities valued at $15,000 and over. A brief insight into the foreign
trade of British Columbia during the period 1939 to 1946 can be secured from Tables 6
and 7.    Only the main commodity groups have been set forth in these tables. AA 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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a DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA 31
From Table 6 it may be seen that for the period 1936-46 exports from British
Columbia had increased from $111,995,458 in 1939 to $205,714,878 in 1946, an increase
of 83.68 per cent. Also, from Table 7 it might be seen that over this same period
imports, roughly corrected for consumption in British Columbia, rose from $58,793,099
in 1939 to $123,116,092 in 1946, an increase of 109.41 per cent.
The statistics for 1947 (January 1st to August 31st) show that British Columbia
is exporting and importing more products than ever before in her history.
The.eight months'export totals for 1947 and 1946 are $276,072,238 and $193,435,378
respectively; the import totals for the same period are $129,110,044 and $78,865,148.
These totals show that British Columbia's trade in 1947 will rise to a record-smashing
high, exceeding the previous highs established in 1942 for exports and in 1946 for
imports.
Both the character and the direction of British Columbia's trade are approaching
conditions prevailing in the pre-war period, with the volume of trade at a much higher
level.
During the war the United States displaced the United Kingdom as British
Columbia's leading market; however, present trends indicate that the United Kingdom
has now returned to her pre-war position as the greatest importer of British Columbia's
products. The United States still remains by far the largest source of supply for
British Columbia importers. The character of British Columbia's trade has, as might
be expected, also changed from that noted during the war period, with its vast
quantities of war materials being replaced by foodstuffs, building supplies, and normal
peace-time materials.
STUDY OF INTERPROVINCIAL TRADE.
An accurate knowledge of the international and interprovincial trade is fundamental to any serious study of economic development. While the Bureau, through the
co-operation of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, has been able to secure a fairly
accurate record of the external trade of the Province, it has not been possible to
accomplish the same results in the field of interprovincial trade statistics. The search
has been continued for a method of securing interprovincial trade data with least
irritation to the shipping public. Much of the information collected on that occasion
has since been carefully sorted and tabulated. The purpose of this research-work has
been to secure a proper factual basis for any further attempts which may be made to
obtain interprovincial trade statistics either by the method of tabulating way-bills or
by some other means.
COST OF LIVING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Since 1936 the Bureau has compiled an index of food prices in fifty-two cities,
towns, and villages for the private use of the Provincial Secretary's Department and
the Department of Labour. In 1939 this food index was supplemented by a new
monthly full cost-of-living index, which included clothing, rentals, fuel, and other
essential household items in the four Coast cities of Vancouver, New Westminster,
Victoria, and Nanaimo. Under arrangements sponsored by the Provincial Department
of Labour, this full cost-of-living index was for a time used as a cost-of-living barometer
by a number of British Columbia Coast firms until the Dominion Wartime Wages and
Cost-of-living Bonus Order made the use of the all-Canada index, prepared by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, mandatory throughout Canada.
The food index measures the change in prices as they occur in the case of selected
food items, forming a scientifically tested budget. The food budget adopted was
modelled on the plan of the Sub-committee on Nutrition, British Commonwealth
Scientific Conference, Ottawa, 1936;  this represented the best-informed opinion avail- AA 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
able at the time the food index was created in 1936. More recent advances on nutrition
would probably modify the list of foods originally chosen; for statistical purposes,
however, the food budget is still informative. The budget contains sufficient quantities
of staple foods to maintain in good health for one month a family of five, of which two
are adults, one an infant 6 months to 1 year old, and one a child 6 years to 10 years
old, and one a child 11 years to 13 years old.
The monthly full cost-of-living index,, prepared for the Coast area, covers approximately 64 per cent, of the expenditures made by an average British Columbia family
in receipt of an income between $1,200 and $1,400 a year.*
The index is made up as follows:—
Food      44.05
Rent  1     25.25
Clothing     14.93
Fuel        5.37
Furniture        2.59
Kitchen equipment      2.39
Electricity       2.13
Textiles, household        1.99
Water       1.30
Total  100.00
* Based on a survey conducted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in Vancouver, 1938.
Rationing, shortages, fixed rents, and a housing shortage, as well as other war-time
effects, have somewhat reduced the value of the cost-of-living concept. As a general
guide to price trends in a field of particular concern to consumers, the concept still
serves a useful purpose; considered in this sense, Table 8, which shows a comparison
of Dominion and Provincial indexes over the period September, 1940, to August, 1947,
can be informative. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
AA 33
Table 8.—The Cost of Living in British Columbia.
For comparative purposes only, the Dominion and Provincial cost-of-living indexes
have been translated to the same base period, 1936 = 100.*
Caution.—These indexes do not measure the difference in the actual dollar cost of
living between British Columbia and Canada as a whole. They show only the extent
to which the cost of living in British Columbia, or in Canada, has varied from the
average cost of living in that area during 1936.
Full Cost-of-living Index.
Food Index.
Canada.*
British
Columbia
Coast Area.f
Canada.*
British
Columbia. $
1940—
First
of Month.
108.46
109.07
109.89
110.09
110.40
110.30
110.30
110.70
111.52
112.64
114.07
115.90
116.92
' 117.74
118.55
118.04
117.64
117.94
118.14
118.14
118.35
118.96
120.18
119.98
119.67
120.08
120.90
121.10
119.37
119.16
119.47
119.88
120.39
120.80
121.10
121.51
121.71
121.61
121.71
121.61
Fifteenth
of Month.
107.02
107.84
108.58
108.79
108.66
109.33
110.21
111.38
111.57
113.79
114.08
115.83
116.89
118.11
119.74
118.52
118.33
119.40
120.23
First
of Month.
107.77
108.49
111.15
111.55
112.17
111.25
111.45
112.58
112.17
115.03
119.22
124.03
126.07
125.97
128.22
126.58
125.05
125.87
126.48
126.48
127.10
129.04
133.23
132.52
131.39
132.72
135.38
135.79
130.16
129.55
130.57
131.60
132.82
133.84
134.76
136.20
136,50
135.90
136.09
135.69
Fifteenth
of Month.
103.33
104.92
106.30
107.39
1941—
107.03
108.93
March	
109.02
111.42
111.81
116.09
117.07
120.55
121.10
121.24
123.93
121.57
1942—
120.99
122.55
March	
123.71
120.72
125.12
121.92
128.39
November	
125.76
134.63
1943—
March	
126.01
134.19
126.24
135.46
July ..                                                                      	
124.74
132.45
124.54
132.05
■
* The Dominion Bureau of Statistics index is actually compiled on the basis of 1935-39=100. These figures
have been translated into terms of 1936=100 for the comparative purposes only. See the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, " Prices and Price Indexes," for actual figures used.
f Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for four Coast cities of Vancouver, New Westminster,
Nanaimo, and Victoria.
t Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for fifty-two centres in the Province.
Note.—From October 15th, 1939, to May 15th, 1942, the cost-of-living index and the food index of British
Columbia were compiled monthly.    Since May 15th, 1942, the figures have been compiled quarterly. AA 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 8.—The Cost of Living in British Columbia—Continued.
Full Cost-of-living Index.
Food Index.
Canada.*
British
Columbia
Coast Area.f
Canada.*
British
Columbia, t
1944—
First
of Month.
121.30
121.20
121.30
121.41
121.51
121.30
121.30
121.20
121.10
120.90
121.20
120.80
120.90
120.90
121.00
121.00
121.30
121.90
122.60
122.80
122.20
122.00
122.20
122.43
122.22
122.22
122.43
123.14
124.36
125.99
127.52
128.03
127.93
129.25
129.56
129.56
129.46
130.28
131.40
133.13
135.68
137.51
138.53
139.25
Fifteenth
of Month.
First
of Month.
134.46
133.84
134.05
134.46
134.66
134.05
134.97
134.46
134.15
133.74
134.56
133.23
133.13
133.54
133.95
133.95
134.66
136.40
138.65
139.26
137.22
136.30
137.01
137.32
135.79
135.48
136.09
138.14
140.80
145.30
147.44
147.96
146.42
149.80
149.90
144.69
148.77
150.31
152.04
155.01
158.38
161.25
163.39
164.21
Fifteenth
of Month.
March	
122.89
128.28
122.91
128.42
July
123.15
128.06
121.99
127.95
1945—
122.33
128.82
122.55
129.33
July t           	
123.10
130.96
122.94
130.17
1946—
122.10
127.87
126.49
134.98
July	
129.32
138.43
134.21
144.64
1947—
142.53
152.43
144.97
159.38
July	
151.06
166.07
* The Dominion Bureau of Statistics index is actually compiled on the basis of 1935-39=100. These figures
have been translated into terms of 1936—100 for the comparative purposes only. See the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, " Prices and Price Indexes," for actual figures used.
t Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for four Coast cities of Vancouver, New "Westminster,
Nanaimo, and Victoria.
t Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for fifty-two centres in the Province.
Note.—From October 15th, 1939, to May 15th, 1942, the cost-of-living index and the food index of British
Columbia were compiled monthly.    Since May 15th, 1942, the figures have been compiled quarterly. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA 35
TOURIST TRADE.
The Dominion Bureau of Statistics, in its publication " Canada's International
Tourist Trade, 1946," has presented its latest estimate of the expenditures in Canada
of travellers from the United States as: 1941, $107,000,000; 1942, $79,000,000; 1943,
$87,000,000; 1944, $116,600,000; 1945, $163,300,000; and 1946, $214,200,000. In 1941
this Bureau, after a careful investigation, estimated that United States travellers had
expended $12,769,000 in British Columbia, and assuming the all-Canada trend—as
shown by the Dominion Bureau figures above—to be also true of British Columbia,
purely tentative estimates have been found for 1942, 1943, and 1944 as follows: 1942,
$9,430,000; 1943, $10,400,000; 1944, $13,026,000. The International Payments Branch
of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics has estimated that United States travellers
expended $22,000,000 in British Columbia during 1945 and $34,200,000 in 1946. This
Bureau estimates the comparable 1947 figure will be close to $50,000,000.
It is planned in 1948 that this Bureau, in co-operation with the British Columbia
Travel Bureau, and the Department of Trade and Industry, Government of the Province
of Alberta, will undertake a study of tourist traffic through British Columbia-Alberta
ports where information is not now being collected. It is known that there is a considerable movement of tourist traffic through the British Columbia-Alberta Border,
but at present no accurate statistics are available. The measurement of this traffic
would, no doubt, add a considerable amount to the tourist expenditures in British
Columbia. Table 8 shows that during 1946 all types of traffic showed increases, except
rail traffic. Automobile traffic coming under the important " travellers " vehicle-permit
type of traffic (remaining more than forty-eight hours) reached an all-time high in
1946, with 178,595 cars entering, compared with 107,506 in 1945. While only preliminary statistics are available for 1947, the upward trend has been maintained, and
1947 will undoubtedly show an increase over the 1946 figure. Following the practice
established in earlier reports, American tourists visiting the Province by automobile
in 1945 and 1946, according to their State origins in the United States, have been listed
in Charts 1 and 2 respectively. AA 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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MANUFACTURERS' HANDBOOK.
To assist manufacturers and others contemplating investment or an expansion of
their plant facilities in this Province, the Bureau has been engaged in the preparation
of three handbooks. The first of these, the Trade Index of British Columbia (1945
edition), was released late in 1945. The Bureau is now compiling information for a
1947 edition, which it is hoped will be released early in 1948. This booklet will contain
a comprehensive and up-to-date list of nearly all products being manufactured in
British Columbia at this time.
The second handbook, entitled " British Columbia as a Market," has now been
published and is available for distribution.
It has been constructed in such a way that both those who already possess an
intimate knowledge of the Province and those who are less well acquainted with the
region will be able to form reasonable judgments about such questions as:—
(1) How many customers are there in British Columbia?
(2) Where do they live?
(3) What are their characteristics?
(4) How much money have they to spend?
(5) How have they spent their incomes in the past?
(6) How many distributers serve their needs?
(7) How many local producers supply the market?
(8) What climatic and geographical factors affect the market?
The third booklet, entitled " British Columbia as a Site for Manufacturing," is now
being prepared and should be available early in 1948. This booklet will contain general
information of interest to the manufacturer who might be interested in establishing
a plant in British Columbia.
RAILWAY FREIGHT INVESTIGATION.
This study was commenced in 1945 and was continued until late 1946, when it was
taken over by Mr. C. H. Locke, K.C. (later succeeded by Mr. C. K. Guild, K.C.), and
Mr. Charles Brazier. At that time the work of this office was handed over to the legal
counsel, and one of the staff placed exclusively at their service until the British
Columbia regional hearings had been concluded.
For tactical reasons with other Provinces, it was decided at the outset that the
case against the 30-per-cent. increase must be kept separate from the case against
" mountain differential." However, while the main issue to date has been the proposed
flat 30-per-cent. increase, which would bear proportionately more heavily on British
Columbia than other areas, much spade-work has been done toward the preparation of
a case for equalization of the rates in British Columbia with the rest of Canada. Until
the outcome of the " 30-per-cent. increase case " is known, however, it will be difficult
to find an up-to-date and otherwise satisfactory basis for any statistical or economic
analyses which might aid in establishing unjust discrimination in the case against the
" mountain differential."
As the Bureau has a heavy schedule before it, any further activity on freight rate
adjustments has been left to the initiative of the legal counsel.
DOMINION-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS.
Financial negotiations between the Dominion Government and the Provinces
occurred almost continuously between the summer of 1945 and the spring of 1947. The
Bureau has been called upon to assist the Department of Finance and the Office of the
Premier in these negotiations. Headed by Mr. G. Neil Perry, the then Director and
economic adviser to the Government, a small research staff was loaned by the Bureau.
These negotiations culminated in the spring of 1947 in a very important five-year tax
agreement. AA 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ADVISORY SERVICES AND OTHER REPORTS.
Members of the research staff were again loaned to many other branches of the
Government, namely: Premier's Office (Dominion-Provincial Relations), Royal Commission on Provincial-Municipal Relations, Department of Railways, Freight-rate
Investigation Committee, and Regional Development Division. The Bureau has prepared many special reports and memoranda for members of the Executive Council and
for offices of other Government departments.
In addition, many tabulations and special reports have been prepared for corporations, Boards of Trade, and private individuals, covering a wide range of topics.
A report relating to salaries and wages in the British Columbia Civil Service was
prepared for and at the request of the Provincial Secretary's Department.
A confidential survey of co-operatives in British Columbia was prepared for the
Hon. L. H. Eyres, Minister of Trade and Industry.
CO-OPERATIVE STATISTICAL AGREEMENTS.
The two co-operative statistical agreements negotiated in 1945 are now in operation. The Bureau, late in 1947, received the first Census of Industry Schedules for
1946 from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Also in 1947 the first monthly reports
covering sawmill statistics for the Province were received. These schedules now
provide the Bureau with valuable information, needed for analytical work within the
Bureau, and at the same time are of minimum inconvenience to the affected firms.
Another co-operative project commenced early in the year was the collection of
Provincial pay-roll statistics by this Bureau. This project is being done for the Payroll Division of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Preliminary work has been done,
and it is hoped that during 1948 statistics relating to Provincial government pay-rolls
could be put on punch-cards and tabulations made available to the Dominion Bureau
and interested Provincial Government departments.
LABOUR STATISTICS DIVISION.
As mentioned in previous reports, the co-operative agreement concluded with the
Provincial Department of Labour some years ago provides for the annual collection of
labour statistics through the Labour Division of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics. In accordance with this agreement the Labour Division again conducted the
regular annual survey of wage-earners employed in British Columbia trades and
industries, the 1946 summary of which appears in the statistical sections of the Annual
Report of the Department of Labour for that year. While the work of this Division
deals for the most part with the Department of Labour Report, many additional compilations were also prepared for private industry, Boards of Trade, and other Provincial
departments. Due to the increasing importance of the data collected, the Division
continued to prove a valuable source of information for many research projects in the
field of labour problems and was of further assistance to the Bureau in the work of
maintaining the British Columbia trade index.
Because of the growing interest in the fluctuations of the Provincial industrial
pay-roll, Table 10 has again been attached, and with the assistance of the Mechanical
Tabulation Division, a breakdown has been maintained to show the distribution of the
Provincial industrial pay-roll through the ten census divisions for the years 1942 to
1946. As explained in the Department of Labour Report, the industrial pay-roll figures
do not represent the total of all salaries and wages paid in British Columbia, the
industrial survey not including Governmental workers, railways, wholesale and retail
firms, financial houses, professional and service trades. The industrial totals, however,
serve to show the interesting changes in the different parts of the Province occurring
from year to year. In Table 10 the industrial pay-roll has been distributed according
to the ten census divisions for the years 1942 to 1946. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
AA 41
With the growing demand for information relative to all phases of the labour
problem, the work of this Division has been expanded during 1947, with extra assistance
required to cope with the many new projects being undertaken for the Department of
Labour and other Provincial departments.
Table 10.—British Columbia Industrial Pay-rolls by Statistical Areas
for the Comparative Years 1942 to 1946.
Regional Area.
Total Pay-rolls (Salaries and Wages).
1942,
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
No.   1	
$6,691,409
14,123,678
6,625,010
148,755,033
45,788,391
2,824,045
8,724,559
5,296,378
9,867,845
1,664,771
1,685,270
$7,151,250
15,561,173
6,763,085
185,947,943
.55,800,769
2,517,767
8,527,530
7,453,342
12,096,884
8,193,263
1,393,314
$8,374,558
14,346,342
7,463,090
182,191,571
50,899,508
2,611,208
8,645,994
3,297,207
10,439,557
1,070,361
460,300
$8,234,954
13,664,192
8,729,129
169,595,070
52,450,178
2,711,859
9,351,432
3,128,665
7,148,057
551,210
772,126
$8,792,650
No.   2	
15,409,997
No.   3	
11,047,243
No.   4	
158,098,206
No.   5	
52,609,'451
No.   6	
4,477,339
No.   7	
10,680,963
No.   8	
4,132,464
No.   9	
5,592,647
No. 10	
1,279,858
835,686
Totals	
$252,046,389
$311,406,320
$289,799,678
$276,336,872
$272,956,504
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION.
The rapid preparation of large-scale statistical and accounting statements frequently can be accomplished only by the use of mechanical tabulation machinery. The
Mechanical Tabulation Division, equipped with rented punch-card machines (Hollerith
system), is responsible for this type of work in the Bureau. Operated as a service
department, it has continued to accept work from other Governmental departments in
addition to performing the tabulating-work arising within the Bureau. Only with a
large volume of work is it possible to obtain the lowest unit cost of production with this
type of equipment.
During the years 1946-47 the equipment on rental was increased and modified to
meet the growing demands for mechanical tabulation. The numeric tabulator was
replaced by a small-capacity alphabetic printer. A reproducing gang-punch, a collator,
a numeric punch, a numeric verifier, an alphabetic verifier, and four alphabetic punches
were added to the installation. These changes were necessary to handle the increased
work undertaken by the Division. The equipment now installed in the Division
includes two alphabetic printers, two card-operated sorters, one collator, one reproducing gang-punch, six alphabetic punches, two numeric punches, one alphabetic verifier,
and one numeric verifier.
New projects undertaken during the period include personnel records and Pattullo
Bridge statistics for the Department of Public. Works, statistical tables for the Annual
Report of the Department of Education, a study on artificial insemination for the
Department of Agriculture, and personnel records for the Civil Service Commission.
This period also showed an increase in the amount of work done for departments
already utilizing the facilities of the Division. The biggest increase was in tax billing
for the Surveyor of Taxes, where the work previously undertaken was doubled. Additional reports were prepared for the Motor Records Branch of the Provincial Police and
exta projects tabulated for the Research Division of the Bureau. All other regular
contracts have proceeded on a routine basis.
Surveys have been conducted and proposals submitted on the application of punch-
card methods to salary pay-roll for the Department of Finance, and to the accounting AA 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
section of tax billing for the Surveyor of Taxes.    If these plans are progressed, it is
anticipated that a further increase of equipment will be necessary.
MINING AND METALLURGICAL DIVISION.
In accordance with the agreement concluded in 1938 between the Provincial Department of Mines, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics, all mining production statistics, with the exception of coal, are collected and
compiled by this Division. Under this agreement, uniform statistics are compiled from
the one set of returns prepared by operators, and thereby avoids overlapping or duplication of effort involved on the part of the above-mentioned agencies, which co-operate
in the collection and use of mining statistics. The information, when collected, is made
available for general use in a form which preserves the confidential aspects of individual
company or operator's returns. Mining statistics in detail will be found in the Annual
Report of the Minister of Mines. Numerous special compilations, covering data not
readily available in other departmental reports, were compiled during the period under
review by this Division for Governmental departments, banking and other institutions.
Continued close contact with the Department of Mines has been maintained, and special
statistical reports prepared for the internal use of that Department. Because of the
sustained interest in regional questions, the Division has prepared a tabulation of the
value of mine production by census divisions covering the 1946 calendar year. In
addition, Table I of the Annual Report of the Minister'of Mines for 1946 is also included
in this report. This gives the Provincial quantities and value of the various classes of
commodities produced by the industry.
It should be kept in mind that this Division, in order to maintain continuity of
records in the Department of Mines publications, compiles production statistics according to mining divisions, which in general follow closely the alignment as set forth for
census divisions, but there are a few deviations, and difficulty is found in accurately
placing minor quantities or values in the correct location in the approximate census
division, but no large amount is involved. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
AA 43
Table I.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1945 and 1946.
Quantity,
1945.
Quantity,
1946,
Value,
1945.*
Value,
1946.*
Metallics.
$
292,635
260,047
505,328
3,244,472
6,751,860
398,591
17,674,884
$
96,322
327,628
771,698
 lb.
25,852,366
175,373
12,589
353,497,689
17,500,538
117,612
15,729
347,990,146
2,240,070
Gold, lode	
4,322,241
Gold, placer 	
crude, oz.
 lb.
475,361
23,489,335
 lb.
6,157,307
6,365,761
2,893,934
484,490
331
19,431,921
5,324,959
 lb.
480,802
 lb.
301,737,902
270,718,128
21,143,086
Totals :	
51,938,493
58,671,502
 tons
Fuel.
Coal   (2,240 lb.)   	
1,518,673
1,463,640
6,454,360
6,220,470
NON-MBTALLICS.
63,414
70,266
16,272
127,434
1,985
3,146
1,267,350
43,447
45,221
969
55,732
1,116
71,531
Granules—slate and rock, talc 	
 tons
19,917
318,500
2,135
286
127,653
210
126,622
2,310
1,258,576
1,549,867
1,716,416
 No.
 No.
Clay and Clay Products.
Brick-
Common  	
Face, paving, sewer-brick 	
3,092,000
1,319,743
3,300,000
2,077,683
80,556
49,814
217,275
7,899
70,376
205,883
3,245
2,632
94,000
84,353
283,317
510
601
8,241
105,194
 No.
1,603,969
2,068,424
263,864
2,811
2,611
637,680
845,391
Other Structural Materials.
1,182,297
522,692
865,557
127,809
65,194
1,739,966
162,334
159,493
642,912
1,713,138
4,284
71,949
4,354
154,164
99,710
158,446
2,763,549
4,354,172
63,343,949
71,807,951
* Canadian funds.
t Sulphur content of pyrites
gases, and elemental sulphur.
.hipped, estimated sulphur contained in sulphuric acid made from waste smelter AA 44
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REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU.
GENERAL.
The year 1946 was a highly successful travel-year, and definitely set a new record
for tourist expenditures in Canada. It was estimated that no less than $214,000,000
was spent by visitors from the United States and around $7,000,000 by visitors from
other countries, making a grand total of $221,000,000, or $55,000,000 more than was
spent in 1945. British Columbia, naturally, participated handsomely, with an estimated
revenue of more than $34,000,000, where in 1945 our estimated revenue was given as
$22,000,000.
In 1946, 178,595 cars entered British Columbia through Border ports, as compared
with 107,506 in 1945. This was an all-time record, outstripping by 41,000 cars the
previous high established in 1930.
As was to be expected, this unprecedented influx imposed a heavy strain on our
accommodations, especially on the Coast, where they were taxed to the utmost. In the
Interior the strain was felt less severely, but resort-owners throughout the Province
were unanimous in reporting a satisfactory year's business.
There was some indication, however, that perhaps too much emphasis had been
laid upon the importance of making reservations well in advance, and that the impression had been created that accommodation might be extremely difficult to obtain. Care
was taken to lay less stress upon it in the advertising campaign of 1947.
Enormous as the influx was in 1946, still a new high was achieved in 1947, as the
following figures will show.
In considering the figures, it must be borne in mind that they represent only the
influx through Border customs ports; where 205,234 cars entered in 1947, they take
no cognizance of the huge volume which enters British Columbia over the interprovincial boundary, and by rail, bus, and steamship. Were it possible to present the picture
in its entirety, British Columbia's tourist industry, important as it is—$35,000,000
is a significant factor in the economy of any Province—would be seen in its real
proportions, and they would be impressive indeed.
At the same time, while the actual volume in 1947 exceeded that of 1946 by more
than 15 per cent., it was distinctly apparent that individual expenditures were being
scaled down. The care-free spending of 1946 gave place in 1947 to a thriftier outlook;
visitors were less lavish, more exacting; and while undoubtedly our revenue for 1947
will be greater than for 1946, it is unlikely to show the same substantial increase that
shows in volume.
There is nothing discouraging in that; it was, in fact, inevitable, and will appear
in every industry. It merely goes to emphasize the need for redoubled efforts if British
Columbia wishes to keep and nourish its tourist industry and see it grow. No single
country has a monopoly of the things which attract the tourist. Every country has
them in greater or less degree, and every country which feels that it has something to
offer is eager for the tourist dollar. America's tourist dollar has a new and vast
significance, and the struggle for it will be intense and the competition ruthless.
Our marvellous scenery, our incomparable resources of fish and game, our splendid
National and Provincial parks, have made British Columbia the Mecca for countless
thousands of tourists from all parts of North America. But it is no longer enough
simply to offer the tourist a bed and an acceptable meal. He expects a great deal more
nowadays than a bed, a chair, and a dresser, a cold shower and an outhouse. Let us
never forget that what the visitor has to say on his return to his home will have an
important bearing on the number of visitors that will follow him, and all the advertising
that we can do will not offset the effect of bad impressions. AA 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
We are extremely fortunate in having the complete co-operation of the resort-
owners. They appreciate what we are trying to do; they agree with us that the
comfort and convenience of the visitor must be studied, and almost without exception
they are doing everything in their power to raise the standard of accommodation to
where British Columbia will be the model for the rest of Canada.
In previous reports we have referred at length to the legislation brought down by
the Provincial Government in 1945, which gave the Bureau the power to frame certain
regulations governing tourist camps. They are not at all onerous; they contain
nothing with which the operator cannot readily comply. They deal mainly with
cleanliness and sanitation, and set forth what we deem to be the minimum requirements
for the comfort and convenience of our visitors.
It is our intention immediately to apply a system of classification under which all
resorts will be graded according to the accommodation and service which they are able
to offer. We feel that this classification is necessary, and that it will provide a healthy
inducement to the resorts which find themselves in the lower grades to improve their
accommodations and facilities. We have always felt that the essence of the tourist
industry was in clean, comfortable accommodations, reasonably priced, and we hope
soon to see the industry so organized that the visitor to British Columbia will have the
comfortable feeling of being cared for by a responsible body, offering the best accommodation for the price that he is willing to pay. In that regard, the attitude of the
industry itself is most encouraging.
With the excellent co-operation of the Department of Health, regular tours of
inspection are made, with most gratifying results in creating an even closer and more
friendly relationship, if that were possible, between the industry and the Bureau, an
atmosphere which has been assisted very greatly by the circulation of a news-letter
containing helpful hints and information of interest to the industry in general.
PUBLICITY.
Advertising.
The Bureau is pleased to report that its newspaper and magazine campaign in
1947 was conducted on a better than pre-war basis. Where in 1946 we had an appropriation of $40,000, in 1947 we had $62,000, and were able to expand in all directions.
As always, the main impact was on the eleven Western States, which we rightly regard
as our most productive travel market, with the inclusion for the first time of the
immensely rich state of Texas. Besides the newspapers, we were able to include a
number of widely read national publications, and to resume the use of the Gilliam
Service, Inc., of New York, in a syndicated series which carried our message to some
1,500 newspapers circulating all over the United States. We also resumed the practice
of placing colourful bulletin-boards at strategic points on the highways of California,
Oregon, and Washington. We were able, too, to engage in a modest fall campaign in
Eastern Canada to encourage winter travel and substantially lengthen the season for
our resort-owners.
Field-work.
Our field-work was vigorously maintained, and our Field Representative is performing a quite outstanding service to the industry and to the Province, in fostering
existing relationships and establishing new contacts throughout the Western States.
The value of his work becomes increasingly evident from year to year, and substantial
and lasting returns may confidently be expected.
Motion Pictures.
The Bureau's Photographic Branch continues to function in a highly satisfactory
manner.    Its series of travelogues in sound and colour are highly popular and in DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA 47
constant demand in Canada and the United States. Films on Vancouver Island, the
Romantic Cariboo, the Okanagan Valley, and the Pacific Great Eastern Railway are in
actual circulation. A film on Ernest Manning Park is in course of processing, and
films on the East and West Kootenays are in the cutting-room. Films still to be completed deal with Central British Columbia and the Lower Fraser Valley. Nor is
industry being neglected. A remarkably comprehensive film on the mining industry
is nearing completion, and others will follow. Besides these, the Bureau has a library
of more than 100 films on a wide variety of subjects, which are constantly in circulation
and which have given an immense amount of publicity to the industries, scenery, and
fish and game resources of British Columbia.
Literature.
The production of attractive and informative literature has always been one of the
Bureau's main preoccupations, and some 600,000 pieces of literature are distributed in a
normal year, directly and through our various distributing agencies. The literature is
kept constantly up to date. Outstanding among recent publications is a comprehensive
folder entitled "Alluring British Columbia."
Co-operative Activities.
The Bureau has several very successful co-operative efforts to record, notably the
advertising campaign carried out in partnership with the States of Washington and
Oregon, where full pages in full colour were carried in the popular publication " Holiday." These ran in December, 1946, and January and February, 1947, and the response
was remarkable. No less than 15,800 inquiries resulted from this advertising, in which
all three participants shared equally in space and mention.
The friendly relations between the Bureau and the Vancouver Tourist Association,'
the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau, and the Evergreen Playground Association
continue to be of the best and a source of keen gratification.    Mention must be made,
too, of Mr. V. E. Duclos, Canadian Government Trade Commissioner in Los Angeles,
who neglects no opportunity to co-operate.
SETTLEMENT.
The Settlers' Information Branch has been instrumental in establishing the Bureau
as one of the most effective agencies in Canada for settlement, and certainly one of the
most widely known. Its activities are world-wide. Inquiries come to it daily from all
parts of the British Commonwealth and other lands abroad, as well as from the United
States and the other Provinces. Never at any time has there been a keener interest,
in all groups and all walks in life, in what British Columbia has to offer. The Bureau
spares no pains in dealing with these inquiries, and it is to that fact that its success
must largely be attributed. The utmost care is taken to present the facts accurately
and completely, and its files are full of appreciative comments from all parts of the
world, from people who were impressed by the Bureau's methods and sincerity, and
who are now comfortably settled in the Province or definitely on their way.
It is a heavy responsibility to be the factor which induces those people to dispose
of their homes and holdings to move to British Columbia, but no matter to what extent 1
its travel activities may develop, the Bureau is too deeply involved in settlement, and
too generally recognized as the authority and the source of all such information, ever
to relinquish it. On the contrary, it will grow to such proportions as to enlarge the
Bureau's scope and influence very materially. AA 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TOURIST COUNCIL.
This advisory body meets annually for a general discussion of the current situation
and of plans for the future.
The personnel of the Council is as follows:—
E. G. Rowebottom (Chairman), Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
W. H. Currie, Commissioner, Government Travel Bureau.
T. W. S. Parsons, Commissioner, British Columbia Police.
C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests.
N. McCallum, Assistant Chief Engineer, Public Works Department.
J. V. Fisher, Deputy Minister of Finance.
F. R. Butler, Commissioner, Provincial Game Commission.
Elmer Johnston, Director, Vancouver Tourist Association.
G. I. Warren, Commissioner, Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau.
P. E. Robertson, Prince George Board of Trade.
Sydney J. Smith, Kamloops Board of Trade.
J. B. Spurrier, Kelowna Fish and Game Club.
W. G. Lanskail, Nelson Board of Trade.
Associate members are Earle Dickey, Revelstoke, B.C.; W. F. Calhoun, Vancouver,
B.C.;   J. S. Brown, Burns Lake, B.C.;   J. J. Kahn, Vancouver, B.C.;   Eric Atkins,
Chilliwack, B.C.;   Les Young, New Westminster, B.C.;   Ralph Williamson, Dawson
Creek, B.C.; and F. M. Dockrill, Prince Rupert, B.C.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIVISION.
With the purpose of aiding industrial development and expansion of the Provincial
economy, area surveys will shortly be carried out in all parts of British Columbia by
the Regional Development Division.
This new branch was recently established by Order in Council and has taken over
all those activities of the former Bureau of Reconstruction related to trade and industry. The proposed surveys to be undertaken by the Division will be carried out on
a regional basis in ten regional areas of British Columbia.
In order to assess British Columbia's industrial position, a complete and comprehensive Industrial Index will first be compiled of each regional area and the urban
centres in each region. This index of industrial activity will record and make available a flow of current economic information of general use and interest to industry
in the Province.
Existing manufacturing plans, natural resources, transportation facilities, available power and water-supply and its source and cost, man-power and labour supply,
climate and topography, population and service trades will be detailed, and an estimate
of the industrial potential of each area with respect to new industries will, as far as
possible, be indicated.
The main objective is to make the data, facilities, and services of the Department
of Trade and Industry fully effective and useful in aiding the economic and industrial
development of British Columbia. This concept of service to existing and prospective
industrialists will be carried through into all activities of the Regional Development
Division, working closely with all existing branches of the Department of Trade and
Industry.
The former Bureau of Reconstruction had already built up some effective machinery and organization in the establishment of advisory committees of Provincial officials
in several regional areas, as well as regional industrial committees on which industry
had representation. This organization will now be taken over by the Regional Development Division, and the further stimulation and encouragement of the work of these DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. AA 49
important committees will be sought in the proposed area development programme.
Field representatives of the Division have been appointed at key centres, and
regional offices have already been established at Kelowna for the Okanagan and South
Central British Columbia, Nelson for East and West Kootenays, and Prince George for
Central British Columbia and North Coastal areas. The Department's field representatives will work closely with local Boards of Trade and assist the members of the
regional advisory and industrial committees in their respective territories.
CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF TOURIST AND PUBLICITY BUREAUS.
At the annual meeting of the Canadian Association of Tourist and Publicity
Bureaus, held in the City of Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, September 23rd,
24th, and 25th, plans were made for the sponsoring of its Third Tourist Service
Educational Week, March 31st to April 7th, 1948.
This campaign has been planned and prepared by association members who are
thoroughly conversant with their subject and who, moreover, are well aware of the
industry's strength and weaknesses as they exist at the present time. It has been
designed primarily to bring home to Canadians generally the many-sided value of our
tourist trade; to create, if possible, a greater public tourist consciousness; and to set
out certain courses of action which must be followed, within this country and without,
if maintenance of the huge and profitable business which Canada enjoyed in 1946-47
is to be assured for the future.
At this meeting many resolutions were passed which, when carried out, will be of
great benefit to the industry in Canada in general and British Columbia in particular.
At this meeting of the association the Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry of
the Province of British Columbia was re-elected president for the ensuing year.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Don McDubmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1948.
1,315-248-8792
/ 

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