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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION Seventh Annual Report Pursuant to Section 36… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1948

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
PUBLIC UTILITIES
COMMISSION
Seventh Annual Report
Pursuant to Section 36 of the
" Motor Carrier Act "
Licence-year 1946-47
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OP THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.  Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1947.
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
Sir,—We have the honour to transmit herewith, in accordance with section 36 of
the " Motor Carrier Act," the Seventh Annual Report of the Public Utilities Commission under that Act for the year ended February 28th, 1947.
PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION.
W. A. Carrothers, Chairman.
L. W. Patmore, Commissioner.
J. C. MacDonald, Commissioner.  CONTENTS
Page.
General .     7
Availability of New Vehicles for Replacements     8
Rehabilitation of Ex-service Men     8
Limited Passenger-vehicle (Taxi) Licences     8
Transfer of Licences     9
Comparative Statistics re Licences issued, Revenue, etc     9
Number of Licences in Effect  10
Applications for Licences  10
Number of Licences issued annually  10
Temporary Permits  11
Amendments to Regulations ,  11
Proof of Financial Responsibility (Insurance) for Passenger-vehicles  12
Peace River District  13
Rates and Tariffs  13
Statement of Tariffs and Time Schedules filed during the Licence-year 1946-47  15
Accounting Records of Motor Carriers  15
Annual Reports of Motor Carriers  16
Hearings ,  16
Publication of Decisions  17
Orders and Approvals of Public Utilities Commission  17
New Public Passenger and Freight Services  18'
Public Passenger Service—Greater Vancouver Area  18
Details of Decisions respecting certain Applications  19
Mechanical Inspections of Vehicles  23
Weights and Dimensions of Vehicles L  23
Annual Conference of Western Canadian Highway Officials  24
Conference of Inspectors  24
Staff  24
Inspectors' Reports  25
List of Scheduled Public Passenger and Public Freight Routes  25
Summary of Licensing of Motor-vehicles under " Motor Carrier Act"  25
Appendix A—Statement of Licences and Revenue for the Licence-year ended February 28th, 1947  26
Appendix B—Reports of Inspectors—
Inspector W. A. Jaffray ,  27
Inspector F. Black, assisted by Inspector E. DeBlaquiere  28
Inspector J. A. Carmichael  28
Inspector H. K. Hume  29
Inspector H. J. Maddaford  30
Inspector G. L. Greenwood  31
Inspector D. J. Doswell  32
Inspector C. A. Wood  33
Appendix C—
List of Public Passenger-vehicle Operators and Routes (Scheduled Service)— 34
List of Public Freight-vehicle Operators and Routes (Scheduled Service)  37
Appendix D—Chart illustrating the Licensing of Motor-vehicles under " Motor
Carrier Act "  41  Annual Report of the Public Utilities Commission,
pursuant to Section 36 of the "Motor Carrier Act,"
for the Licence-year ended February 28th, 1947.
GENERAL.
The comparative statistics included in this report show a general increase of over
15 per cent, in the number of motor-carrier licences issued, with an increase of 30 per
cent, in the number of commercial licences (passenger and freight) and an increase of
31 per cent, in total revenue. Furthermore, the total number of applications for new
or additional licences of all kinds increased 45 per cent, over the previous year, 5,921
applications having been recorded (approximately an average of 19 per working day)
as compared with 4,075.
A factor in the increase in the number of licences issued is the requirement, effective March 1st, 1946, that vehicles in the Peace River District, previously exempt, shall
be licensed under the " Motor Carrier Act"; but the total number of vehicles so
licensed is only 477, representing but 3 per cent, of the 15-per-cent. general increase
referred to above.
These figures are a reflection of the general increase in activity throughout the
entire Province, and indicate the extent of the " post-war boom." which apparently had
not yet reached its maximum before the close of the licence-year under review. While,
in general, increased business activity results in increased demands for transportation,
this is particularly noticeable in a community such as this Province which derives the
major portion of its income from basic industries such as lumbering, agriculture, and
mining, which require transportation of raw products and heavy machinery and
equipment.
It should not be thought that the policy of the Commission has been changed or
relaxed. This policy, as stated in previous reports, is to deal with applications strictly
on the basis of public convenience and necessity, as provided in the " Motor Carrier
Act." As formerly, many applications for licences were refused, but there was a great
increase in the volume of applications submitted and, in all cases, no commercial licence
was granted without investigation.
Factors contributing to the general increased demands for transportation include
a bumper fruit-crop, heavy demand for logs and lumber for domestic use and export,
demand for pit-props to be shipped in large quantities to the United Kingdom, new
industries of many kinds started, extensive highway and other construction projects
such as the new dam at Campbell River, expansion of mining activity in the East and
West Kootenays, and an influx of new population from other Provinces.
The strike of lumber-workers during the early summer of 1946 naturally slowed
down industry to a considerable extent and affected the revenues of truckers engaged
in transporting logs, lumber, and allied products. After settlement of the strike, there
was a call for increased production, particularly of box-shook, the supply of which
appeared to be in danger, and this had its effect on the trucking industry.
As to passenger transportation, it appears that, despite a considerable increase in
the number of buses licensed, the operators still find it difficult to cope with the demand
for bus transportation (which has practically replaced short-distance rail transport),
while the demand for taxi service has passed all expectation. The figures herewith
show a 55 per cent, increase in the number of taxis licensed under the " Motor Carrier
Act," which does not include the number of applications for such licences refused.
7 18 " MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
The figures also show an increase of 20 per cent, in the number of bus licences issued.
While this increased demand for passenger transportation is, in some measure, due to
the current shortage of new automobiles, there is no doubt that the public is now " bus "
and " taxi " minded to a greater extent than ever before.
AVAILABILITY OF NEW VEHICLES FOR REPLACEMENTS.
The number of new motor-vehicles available to operators is, to some extent,
reflected by the number of vehicles which were replaced during the year under the
heading " Replacements " in the table in Appendix A, amounting to 1,193, being about
6% per cent, of the total number of vehicles licensed, as compared with 12 per cent, in
1940, indicating that the supply of new equipment, particularly trucks and buses, is still
restricted.    The taxi operators appear to have been able to obtain new cars more freely.
REHABILITATION OF EX-SERVICE MEN.
While a fair number of applications was received from ex-service men on the
grounds of rehabilitation, toward the end of the year there was a marked dropping-off
in applications of this nature, and all Canadian service men have now returned. In general it may be said that the total number of applications received since the cessation of
hostilities has been considerably less than the number which was originally expected.
Every consideration has been given to such applications, but in some cases they have
been refused, it being felt that, apart from the question of public convenience and necessity, the applicants would have had very little success in their ventures.
LIMITED PASSENGER-VEHICLE   (TAXI)   LICENCES.
There was no falling-off in the number of taxi licences applied for, 375 new licences
or additional licences having been issued during the licence-year. The total number of
licences in effect during the licence-year 1946-47 was 1,053, an increase of 55 per cent,
over the previous year.
When this figure of 1,053 taxi licences for licence-year 1946 is compared with 513
for licence-year 1944-45, it will be seen that this class has more than doubled since the
end of the war.
At some points, particularly Victoria, Nanaimo, Alberni, and Port Alberni, it is
believed that the saturation point has been reached, and the indications are at the
present time that some of the operators are beginning to find that this field is overcrowded and are endeavouring to sell their businesses. In this connection it will be
noted that 195 taxi licences were transferred, which is a very large turnover. The
number of transfers for the previous year was 76.
The problem of dealing with applications for limited passenger-vehicle (taxi)
licences is, to some extent, complicated by the fact that comparatively few municipalities
place, or have the power to place, any restriction on the number of vehicle or business
licences to be issued by the municipality for the operation of taxis within the limits of
the municipality.
While a taxi operator who restricts his operation within the limits of one municipality does not require a carrier's licence, there are (except in Vancouver and Victoria)
comparatively few cases where a strictly municipal licence is sufficient, as an operator
invariably will receive requests to deliver a passenger to a more distant point and
therefore, having obtained a municipal licence, makes application for a Provincial
licence.
This difficulty has, to some extent, been met by consultation with the municipalities
concerned, with beneficial results in some cases. REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION.
I 9
TRANSFER OF LICENCES.
During the year 596 licences were transferred, as compared with 408 during the
previous year. These transfers include 147 public freight-vehicle licences, 37 limited
freight-vehicle licences, and, as already stated, 195 taxi licences.
During the licence-year 1942 only 63 licences were transferred, and the above-
mentioned figure for the licence-year 1946-47 constitutes a record to date.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS RE LICENCES ISSUED
AND REVENUE, ETC.
In Appendix A will be found a complete statement of licences issued and total
revenue received for the licence-year.
The following is an analysis of the various classes of licences issued during the
last six years, comprising new licences and licences renewed, but not including replacements and transfers:—
Kind of Licence.
Number of Licences (New and Renewed).
1941-42.    I    1942-43.        1943-44. 1944-45.        1945-46.        1946-47
Passenger (buses)	
Passenger (taxis)	
Public freight	
Limited freight	
Private freight (ordinary)
Private freight (farmers).
344
508
1,678
717
5,657
4,252
351
521
1,580
799
5,998
4,469
334
463
1,538
793
6,210
4,549
355
513
1,613
770
6,563
4,857
430
679
1,782
805
7,164
5,006
516
1,053
2,260
998
8,318
5,154
It will be noted from the above that the number of buses in service increased by
20 per cent., number of taxis by 55 per cent., number of public freight-vehicle licences
by 27 per cent., limited freight-vehicle licences by 24 per cent., and ordinary private
freight-vehicle licences by 16 per cent., and that the general increase is 15 per cent., of
which 3 per cent, is represented by licences issued in the Peace River District, previously exempt.
Revenue.
The following is a comparative statement of revenue for the past six years, showing
the various sources of revenue:—
Kind of Licence.
1941-42.
1942-43.
1943-44.
1944-45.
1945-46.
1946-47.
$20,061.60
5,281.72
100,696.10
37,723.89
3,853.26
56.70
$18,999.30
5,402.38
104,139.81
39,939.39
6,360.88
25.30
$17,986.14
4,926.49
103,888.20
41,438.20
5,249.95
41.55
$18,977.90
5,527.77
109,171.53
44,545.29
5,413.49
55.28
$23,045.10
7,108.47
121,050.25
49,370.45
6,881.24
55.40
$32,548.70
12,121.04
57,480 45
12,420 92
28 80
Totals	
$167,673.27
$174,867.06
$173,530.53
$183,691.26
$207,510.91
$272,213.66
It will be noted there is a general increase of 31 per cent, in revenue, of which
only a small proportion can be considered as arising from the inclusion of the Peace
River District under the " Motor Carrier Act" in 1946. The very large increase in
revenue from taxis and permits will be noticed, the latter having nearly doubled. I 10 "MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
NUMBER OF LICENCES IN EFFECT.
The figures in Appendix A show total number of licences issued during the year.
The following tabulation shows approximately the number of licences actually in effect
at the beginning of each month, taking into account licences surrendered or expired,
etc.:—
Approximate Number of Licences in Effect.*
Licence-year Licence-year
Month.                                                                                                           1945-46. 1946-47.
March     9,097 9,022
April   12,007 12,622
May   12,766 13,598
June   13,228 14,050
July   13,513 14,655
August  13,725 15,078
September   13,984 15,488
October  ,  14,092 15,822
November   14,298 16,137
December  14,411 16,352
January   14,453 16,534
February   14,499 16,513
End of licence-year  14,492 16,496
* Namely, the number of licences issued, less number of licences surrendered or expired.
APPLICATIONS FOR LICENCES.
The following tabulation shows the number of applications for new or additional
licences actually recorded, year by year, since the inception of the " Motor Carrier
Act":—
Number of Number of
Applications Applications
Licence-year. recorded. Licence-year. recorded.
1940-41  3,686 1944-45  3,277
1941-42  3,910 1945-46  4,075
1942-43  3,484 1946-47  5,921
1943-44  3,148
The number of applications for new or additional licences actually recorded
increased by 45 per cent, during the licence-year 1946-47, which, in itself, is an indication of the greatly increased amount of work in the Vancouver office and in the
offices of the various Inspectors.
NUMBER OF LICENCES ISSUED ANNUALLY.
The following is the total number of licences issued under Part V of the " Highway
Act" and under the " Motor Carrier Act" respectively for the years stated:—
Part V, " Highway Act "	
Licence-year.
Licences issued.*
1935-36
1,672
1936-37
7,832
1937-38
11,148
1938-39
11,970
1939-40
12,427 REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 11
" Motor Carrier Act "_
Licence-year.
Licences issued.*
1940-41
13,025
1941-42
14,635
1942-43
14,425
1943-44
14,485
1944-45
15,582
1945-46  -
16,989
1946-47
20,196
* Including licences transferred and renewed, and including replacements and substitute plates.
TEMPORARY PERMITS.
Summary of Temporary Permits issued during the Year 1946-47.
Class I permits (for temporary operation as private freight-
vehicle only)   1,038
Class II permits (for temporary operation as public or limited
vehicle for periods not exceeding ninety days)  3,682
Class III permits (for operation of licensed public or limited
vehicle temporarily in a manner other than is authorized
by the licence)  1,276
Class IV permits (for substitute vehicle when licensed vehicle
is disabled)       623
Class VI permits (for operation of school buses in connection
with authorized school functions—issued by Provincial
Police)       132
AMENDMENTS TO REGULATIONS.
Several important amendments and some minor amendments were made to the
regulations pursuant to the " Motor Carrier Act " during the year, as follows:—
By Order in Council No. 759, approved April 16th, 1946, paragraph 6.07 was
amended by defining international transportation of freight as including transportation of freight from any point in British Columbia, or from any point in Canada
through British Columbia, to the United States of America, or vice versa, irrespective
of whether such freight is transported directly across the International Boundary by
one motor carrier or is transferred from one motor carrier to another motor carrier at
the said boundary. " Interprovincial transportation of freight" was also defined in
a similar manner.
The reason for this amendment was the fact that certain carriers were found to
be engaging in international transportation or interprovincial transportation without
authority to do so, and it became necessary to define such transportation.
By the same Order the regulations were amended by rescinding the existing exemption of the Pemberton area from the provisions of the " Motor Carrier Act," as a result
of which vehicles in this area now require to be licensed. The amendment was made
at the request of carriers in the area.
By the same Order item (ii) of clause (I) of paragraph 1.1 was amended, redefining and slightly increasing that portion of Burnaby Municipality which lies adjacent
to Vancouver as an area into which carriers from Vancouver may operate without
a carrier's licence.    This change was made for the purpose of simplicity and clarification.
By Order in Council No. 942, approved May 8th, 1946, paragraph 6.420 of the
regulations was amended to require that buses equipped with an exit door at the centre
or rear of the vehicle shall be equipped with interior mirrors, allowing the driver a clear
view of the exit door and the step thereto. I 12 "MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
By Order in Council No. 2362, approved October 4th, 1946, paragraph 12.4 of the
regulations, governing annual reports of motor carriers, was amended to provide for
a variation of the form of annual report and a change in the reporting dates. An
arrangement with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics for a report form to be used
jointly was authorized.
By Order in Council No. 2825, approved November 30th, 1946, the following amendments to the Regulations were made:—
Paragraph 3.06 was altered to permit of licences being issued for a period of less
than three months, provided that the minimum fee is paid.
Paragraph 3.80 was altered to simplify the requirements with respect to fees, in
cases where a licence is reclassified, as the previous regulation was found to be unsatisfactory and inequitable.
Paragraph 10.2 was altered, providing for reduction in permit fee for Class II
permit when the vehicle is to be operated as a limited freight-vehicle, the fee having
been, until this time, based on the fee for public freight-vehicle licence.
Amendments to paragraphs 4.30 and 4.31 with respect to proof of financial responsibility (insurance) were made as follows, effective March 1st, 1947:—
(a) By removing the exemption to the effect that limited passenger-vehicles
(taxis) having a seating capacity of seven passengers or less shall not
be required to file proof of financial responsibility (insurance).
(6) By increasing the limits of proof of financial responsibility (insurance)
against loss or damage resulting from bodily injury to or death of two or
more persons. These limits, until this amendment came into effect, were
$10,000 in cases of vehicle of carrying capacity of twelve passengers
or less, $15,000 for vehicle licensed to carry from thirteen to twenty
passengers, and $20,000 for vehicle licensed to carry more than twenty
passengers.    The new amounts are as follows:—
Maximum Authorized Carrying
Capacity, including Standing
Passengers. Amount.
7 or less  $10,000
8 to 12, inclusive  15,000
13 to 21, inclusive  20,000
22 to 30, inclusive  30,000
31 to 40, inclusive r  40,000
41 to 50, inclusive  50,000
51 to 75, inclusive  75,000
Over 75   100,000
An amendment was also made to paragraph 3.72 (d) by including the Shavers'
Bench and Sunningdale subdivisions within the defined area adjacent to City of Trail,
within which the fee for public passenger-vehicle licence shall not exceed $5.
PROOF OF FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (INSURANCE)  FOR
PASSENGER-VEHICLES.
As reported above under "Amendments to Regulations," effective March 1st, 1947,
all persons operating taxis licensed under the " Motor Carrier Act" were required to
file proof of financial responsibility in the amounts of not less than $5,000/$10,000
public liability and $1,000 property damage. All licensees affected were duly notified
during the month of January of this requirement.
At the same time the limits for insurance for buses were raised in the amounts set
out under the above heading, requiring in most cases the filing of new certificates of
financial responsibility. REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 13
The additional work involved by the foregoing necessitated some reorganization of
the Motor Carrier Branch. The effect of these changes is, of course, greater protection
of the public availing themselves of the bus and taxi services licensed under the " Motor
Carrier Act." The amendments do not affect taxis operating exclusively within a
single municipality, which are exempt from the provisions of the " Motor Carrier Act."
However, the City of Vancouver requires all taxis licensed by the city to file insurance,
and elsewhere in the Province, with one exception, very few taxis confine their operations to one municipality, and therefore require to be licensed under the " Motor
Carrier Act."
PEACE RIVER DISTRICT.
As from March 1st, 1946, the " Motor Carrier Act " became effective in the Peace
River District.
In order to facilitate the administration of the Act in this district, an office was
set up and an Inspector installed at Dawson Creek during the month of May, 1946.
As will be seen from the Inspector's report, 477 licences of various classes were
issued, including 172 public freight-vehicle licences and 22 limited freight-vehicle
licences as well as 251 private freight-vehicle licences.
Whereas the proportion of public freight-vehicle licences appears to be high, this is
partly due to the fact that many operators at the outset claimed " grandfather " rights
and were therefore granted this class of licence. Subsequent to granting these licences,
quite a number have found that private freight-vehicle licences are all they need if
granted temporary permits for hauling in the harvest season, and it is expected that
there will be a reduction rather than an increase in the number of public freight-vehicle
licences issued in the year 1947.
Both the Deputy. Superintendent and, later the Superintendent of the Motor
Carrier Branch visited the Peace River District with a view to adjusting various difficulties and problems which had arisen as a result of taking over this territory under
the provisions of the " Motor Carrier Act." Valuable contacts were made and many
matters were satisfactorily dealt with, including, in particular, the question of contract
rates for transportation of petroleum products over the Alaska Highway.
RATES AND TARIFFS.
As previously reported, rates ceilings on passenger traffic were lifted during the
previous licence-year, but when this change was made, the restrictions regarding freight
rates remained in effect.
Effective August 1st, 1946, by Order No. A2068 the Wartime Prices and Trade
Board restrictions were modified by providing that " In the Province of British Columbia
the maximum rates at which any person may transport goods by motor vehicle shall be
the rates approved from time to time by the Motor Carrier Branch of the Public Utilities
Commission of B.C. provided, however, that the maximum rates so authorized shall at
no time exceed the ' less than car-load ' railway rates." Order No. A2068 did not apply
to certain specified commodities, namely, household goods, fluid milk and cream, and
certain building materials.
As a result of the above-mentioned abrogation of powers of the Wartime Prices
and Trade Board, many applications to file new tariffs were submitted by motor carriers
during the year 1946 and were dealt with.
Limited Passenger (Taxi) Rates.
As regards passenger operations, the greatest number of such applications were
submitted by those holding limited passenger-vehicle (taxi) licences, requesting accep- I 14 "MOTOR CARRIER ACT.'
tance of increased rates for charter passenger service. These applications, which
proposed increases ranging from 20 per cent, to 35 per cent, were supported by submissions showing increased cost of operations and increased value of services.
Public Passenger Rates.
It is notable that most of the applications to file new tariffs submitted by public
passenger-vehicle licensees were concerned with downward adjustments of fares rather
than with increases. This might appear to be inconsistent, but actually it is not, as
the factors determining rates charged for " public passenger " service and for " charter
passenger" service, respectively, differ. Unlike charter passenger service, the net
income from operation of public passenger service varies directly in the ratio which
the number of passengers carried bears to the carrying capacity of the vehicle (" load
factor "), and, as this ratio has increased in some cases, the revenue per vehicle has
therefore increased without a corresponding increase in cost of operation.
Freight Rates (General).
Following the issuance in August, 1946, of Order No. A2068 of the Wartime Prices
and Trade Board, various applications for acceptance of the filing of tariffs providing
for increased freight rates were made by individual carriers and by the Tariff Bureau
of the Automotive Transport Association under authority delegated to the association
in the form of filed " letters of authority " from individual carriers.
NON-SCHEDULED   FREIGHT   OPERATIONS.
Many non-scheduled motor freight carriers whose main business was confined to
operation within the limits of a single municipality and short distances outside municipal limits made application to file new rates showing roughly a 16-per-cent. increase
in charges. This increase was in line with an increase in rates for purely municipal
work authorized by Order No. A2168 of the Wartime Prices and Trade Board.
Scheduled Freight Operations.
Line-haul motor freight carriers could not apply a specific percentage increase in
rates owing to competitive forces affecting their charges (particularly railway competition), and increases applied for ranged from 1 per cent, to 50 per cent., or higher,
depending on the existing differential between motor carrier and railway L.C.L. class
rates.
Guidance provided for Applicants.
In order to clarify the situation resulting from the issuance of Orders Nos. A2068
and A2168 of the Wartime Prices and Trade Board, a meeting with representatives of
the industry was held by the Commission on November 8th, 1946, at Vancouver, and the
following instruction was subsequently issued to guide licensees desiring to file new
tariffs naming increased rates:—
" 1. Motor carriers licensed under the ' Motor Carrier Act' shall, when preparing
rate revisions, be governed by the provisions of Wartime Prices and Trade Board Order
No. A2068.
" 2. Except as provided in paragraph 3, where such revisions provide for any
increases, the carrier shall furnish a certificate signed by himself or his authorized
representative stating that no charge under the increased rates will exceed the charge
that would be made under L.C.L. railway rates for the same shipment: provided that
in areas or over routes where there are no comparable L.C.L. railway rates, the certificate shall state instead, that no charge under the increased motor carrier rates will
exceed the charge that would be made under railway L.C.L. mileage rates for the same
distance. REPORT OP THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 15
" 3. Any motor carrier whose increased rates are prepared on a basis which is not
comparable to L.C.L. railway rates (e.g., rates per hour) shall show the percentage
increase in his rates."
Uniform Rates.
It was considered reasonable to expect that, when war-time controls over maximum
rates were removed, it would be possible to establish uniform rates. The attainment
of uniformity was actually beset with many practical difficulties, chief among which
were the different factors affecting the cost of operation of competing carriers.
Some motor carriers who were able to control mounting maintenance costs by the
purchase of new vehicles, and who were comparatively unaffected by rising labour costs,
were reluctant to increase their rates, since they were able to operate profitably under
their prevailing rate structure. Carriers who, on the other hand, were not able to
obtain new vehicles, and who were subjected to the pressure of rising wages, were
faced with the problem of increasing their net revenue by every means at their disposal, and sought rate changes (both increases and decreases) which would tend to
increase their total revenues, if not their net income.
The two groups being practically incompatible, the number of carriers willing to
subscribe to uniform rates did not increase to any notable extent, and the number of
uniform filings which have been obtained have, as a consequence, been limited to isolated districts or routes where conditions affecting all carriers are substantially similar.
STATEMENT OF TARIFFS AND TIME  SCHEDULES
FILED DURING THE LICENCE-YEAR 1946-47.
Passenger time schedules  322
Freight time schedules      56
Passenger and express time schedules       8
■     386
Passenger and express tariffs   9
Local express tariffs   23
Public passenger tariffs   41
Charter passenger tariffs r  252
Class I public freight tariffs  31
Class II public freight tariffs  51
Class III public freight tariffs   459
Limited freight tariffs   11
Special commodity tariffs .  26
Baggage tariffs   2
     905
Contracts     417
Supplements to freight tariffs     23
Supplements to passenger tariffs     55
Revisions to tariffs  162
■     240
Total filings, 1946-47 1,948
Total filings, 1945-46 1,072
ACCOUNTING RECORDS OF MOTOR CARRIERS.
It is significant that, in spite of the existence of maximum-price controls, at a
time when costs were increasing, many motor carriers have not realized the importance
of keeping proper records, and there is little evidence that there has been much general I 16 "MOTOR CARRIER ACT.'
improvement in the book-keeping methods employed, notwithstanding Regulations 12.1
to 12.5 and the booklet " Accounting Methods for Motor Carriers," which was available
and sent to all carriers without cost.
It is possible that the necessity of preparing and submitting the Annual Motor
Carrier Report for the year 1946 will have the effect of spurring all licensees to maintain better book-keeping records, and it is hoped that considerable improvement during
the year 1947 may result.
ANNUAL REPORTS OF MOTOR CARRIERS.
As outlined on page 10 of the Sixth Annual Report, regulations were altered in
1945 to require licensed motor carriers (other than private freight operators) to
file an annual report with the Commission.
The Dominion Bureau of Statistics had been obtaining annual reports from most
of the larger carriers since 1941. In order to simplify the work of the carriers in
making reports, that Bureau proposed, on January 29th, 1946, that it and the Commission enter into a joint arrangement for the collection of motor carrier statistics.
This involved the drafting of a report form which could be used by both the Bureau
and the Commission in place of the separate forms previously required, the changing
of reporting dates, and the development of a procedure for joint action. It was finally
settled that the Bureau would be supplied each year with a list of carriers required to
report under the " Motor Carrier Act " and would mail the forms from Ottawa. After
filling them out, the carriers submit them in duplicate to the Commission, which checks
them and obtains further data where necessary, and then forwards a copy to the
Bureau. The joint arrangement was authorized by an amendment of the regulations
under the " Motor Carrier Act " (Order in Council No. 2362, approved October 4th,
1946).
HEARINGS.
Applications under sections 23 and 61 of the " Motor Carrier Act" are made
directly to the Commission, and not to the Superintendent of Motor Carriers. The
results of completed hearings under these sections are listed in this report under the
heading " Orders and Approvals of Public Utilities Commission." The application for
approval of a municipal bus franchise at Prince Rupert is not included in the list, as it
was not completed. This application was for approval of a proposed agreement between
the City of Prince Rupert as grantor of the franchise and Neil MacDonald, Charles
Pustak, and Stewart Johnston as grantees, and was heard by the Commission at Prince
Rupert on May 23rd, 1946. On May 28th, after consideration of the submissions made
at the hearing, the Commission referred the matter back to the city to consider further
the franchise payment of 7 per cent, of gross revenue and to give the existing operator,
Arrow Bus Lines, Limited, an opportunity to make a more definite and detailed offer.
The city appealed to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council under section 55 of the " Motor
Carrier Act," but it was decided that as the approval had been postponed rather than
refused, the time for appeal had not arrived.
The Commission also heard, directly, an application of Canadian Pacific Express
Company for freight licences under the " Motor Carrier Act" for operation on the
following routes, namely: Lytton-Merritt, Cranbrook-Kimberley, Fernie-Michel,
Penticton-Osoyoos, and Penticton-Kelowna. The purpose of the application was stated
by the company as follows: " It has been found in some instances that rail service
should be augmented by the more flexible highway medium to meet demands, and
where this situation exists the company, as it has done elsewhere with success, proposes
instituting in British Columbia co-ordinated rail-highway services to certain points now
served  by the Canadian  Pacific.    Providing more frequent and  earlier delivery of REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 17
traffic which has had or will receive a part rail haul is the purpose and aim of the
co-ordinated service proposed." The hearing was held at Vancouver on March 15th
and 16th, 1946, and after consideration of the objections made on behalf of the established truckers, the Commission decided that no licences be granted for operation
between Kelowna and Penticton but that the other licences be granted subject to certain
conditions as to filing of rates.
The Superintendent of Motor Carriers continued to hold hearings respecting
various applications for licences and alterations of licences, etc. The total number of
hearings held was 64, being the same as for the previous year, but 628 cases were dealt
with, as compared with 480 cases the previous year, an average of nearly 10 cases per
hearing.
PUBLICATION OF DECISIONS.
As previously, each week a complete list of decisions respecting applications (other
than applications for private freight-vehicle licences) was prepared and posted on the
notice-board in the Vancouver office and otherwise published. Instructions were given
during the year that a copy of the decisions shall also be posted in the office of each
Inspector of Motor Carriers.
A check of these decisions shows that a total of 2,083 applications for or affecting
public or limited vehicles was reported during the year, averaging 40 applications per
week, of which 623 or 30 per cent, were in connection with applications for limited
passenger-vehicle (taxi) licences, many of which were refused.
ORDERS AND APPROVALS OF PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION.
The following were consented to under section 23 of the " Motor Carrier Act ":—■
March 8th, 1946:  Transfer of shares of Johnston National Storage Limited,
and  Terminal  Cartage,  Limited, to Johnston Terminals,  Limited,  and
first-named companies permitted to join as parties in trust deed securing
bonds of Johnston Terminals, Limited.
August 31st, 1946:   Transfer of shares of Blue Line Transit, Limited, to
British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited.
October 4th, 1946:   Issue of 650 ordinary shares and $55,000 of 5-per-cent.
debentures of Vancouver Airline Limousines, Limited.
October 4th, 1946:   Transfer of shares of Dan MacLure's Taxi, Limited, to
Vancouver Airline Limousines, Limited.
October 28th, 1946:  Transfer of shares of Island Freight Service, Limited, to
Vancouver Island Coach Lines, Limited.
January 15th, 1947:   Transfer of shares of Island Freight Service, Limited,
to Canadian Pacific Railway Company.
The granting of franchises by municipalities was approved under section 61 of
the " Motor Carrier Act " as follows:—
March 11th, 1946: Bus franchise granted by City of Kamloops to S. E. Irwin.
May 6th, 1946:   Renewal of bus franchise of The Veterans' Sightseeing and
Transportation Company, Limited, by City of Nanaimo.
June 11th, 1946: Bus franchise granted by City of Kelowna to F. S. Thompson.
January 17th, 1947:   Bus franchise granted by District of Penticton to Columbia Coachways, Limited.
January 27th, 1947:   Bus franchise granted by District of Maple Ridge to
Maple Ridge Bus Service, Limited. I 18 "MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
Miscellaneous.
Taxi licences of the Village Taxi, Limited (West Vancouver), were cancelled after
a hearing.
Charter and sightseeing passenger tariff No. 3, Victoria and vicinity, was prescribed.
The British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited, was exempted from
the provisions of Regulation 5.64 to the extent that the address of the company need
not be displayed on trucks operated by the company.
NEW PUBLIC PASSENGER AND FREIGHT SERVICES.
The following is a list of new public passenger-vehicle services commenced during
the licence-year, in some cases approval being given during the previous licence-year,
namely:—
Archie Carswell:  Vernon City bus service;  March, 1946.
Fred S. Thompson (now Thompson Bus Lines, Limited) :   Kelowna City bus
service;  March, 1946.
John Pavle: Kelowna-Rutland, Kelowna-Glenmore, and Kelowna-East Kelowna;
March, 1946.
Selby E. Irwin (now Civic Transportation Company, Limited) :  Kamloops City
bus service and Kamloops-North Kamloops;  April, 1946.
H. W. Smith d/b/a Canadian Trailway Stages:   Extension of Prince George-
Vanderhoof service westerly to Smithers;  April, 1946.
Gordon Ferguson:  Nelson-Procter;  November, 1946.
Bayne & Ratcliffe:  Nelson-Blewett;  October, 1946.
As to scheduled public freight-vehicle service, the only important new route on
which service was commenced was from Kimberley and Cranbrook to Vancouver by
Miller & Brown Transfer Company, of Cranbrook.
PUBLIC PASSENGER SERVICE—GREATER VANCOUVER AREA.
Several important changes took place during the year under this heading, as
follows:—
(a) B.C. Motor Transportation, Limited, operating Pacific Stage Lines, took over
from Deep Cove Stages, Limited, the licences held by the latter company for scheduled
public passenger service from Vancouver to Deep Cove via Second Narrows Bridge, and
from Deep Cove to North Vancouver. At a later date the British Columbia Electric
Railway Company, Limited, having introduced local bus service between North Vancouver and Lynnmour (at which point there is connection "with the Pacific Stage Lines'
Vancouver-Deep Cove service), the service of the Pacific Stage Lines between Deep
Cove and North Vancouver was discontinued, and passengers from Deep Cove to North
Vancouver now transfer from Pacific Stage Lines to British Columbia Electric Railway
Company, Limited, buses at Lynnmour.
(6) The British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited, also acquired the
stage run of J. Roy Henry, which was operated from the terminus of British Columbia
Electric Railway Company, Limited, at the intersection of School Road and Bowser
Avenue northerly to the Upper Capilano Suspension Bridge, and extensions of this route
were thereafter made southerly to Marine Drive at Capilano Road, connecting with the
main bus service between Vancouver and North Vancouver.
(c) The British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited, having agreed with
the City and District of North Vancouver to replace street-cars with buses for local
service in those municipalities, took over from the Pacific Stage Lines the latter's run REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I Iff
between North Vancouver and Vancouver via Lions Gate Bridge. By this means the
people living in North Vancouver can now reach Vancouver via British Columbia Electric Railway service all the way, with transfer privileges to street-cars or buses operating in the City of Vancouver, and this change resulted in a substantial reduction of
fares between Vancouver and North Vancouver.
(d) The British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited, acquired the operation of Richmond Transportation Company, Limited, operating from Marpole to Sea
Island, and continued to operate with an augmented service, giving transfer privileges
from and to the British Columbia Electric Railway Company's system in Vancouver.
(e) B.C. Motor Transportation, Limited, acquired from Moorehouse Stages the
public passenger-vehicle licences held by the latter operating from New Westminster to
Ladner, Langley, Ocean Park, and other local points. As B.C. Motor Transportation,
Limited, was already giving service to some of these areas but over different routes,
it was, later, possible to consolidate and revise the routes and services of B.C. Motor
Transportation, Limited, to these areas with a view to giving a more convenient service.
DETAILS OF DECISIONS RESPECTING CERTAIN APPLICATIONS.
Blue Line Transit, Limited (Victoria).—The public passenger-vehicle licences held
by The Veterans' Sightseeing and Transportation Company, Limited, for service in
Victoria, Oak Bay, and Nanaimo were transferred "to Blue Line Transit, Limited. In
August, 1946, the Commission consented to the transfer of shares of Blue Line Transit,
Limited, to the British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited.
West Vancouver Municipal Bus Service.—During February, 1947, the Corporation
of the District of West Vancouver, which operates buses between Vancouver and West
Vancouver in competition with Pacific Stage Lines (B.C.M.T.), made application to file
a supplement to their tariff which would, in effect, reduce the rate between Vancouver
and the West Bay zone.
A review of the history of this operation indicated that it was the clearly expressed
intention of all previous decisions of the Commission relative to this service that the
operations of West Vancouver Municipality and B.C. Motor Transportation, Limited,
should be on an equal basis with respect to fares, and the application, which was opposed
by the B.C. Motor Transportation, Limited, was refused—the proposed change being
apparently more for the convenience of the municipality in accounting matters rather
than for the public convenience.
Burnaby-New Westminster Bus Service.—During June, 1946, E. H. Neville, operating public passenger service on two routes in Burnaby Municipality, applied for
extension of his Burnaby-Lochdale route into the City of New Westminster, which
application was approved.
Complaints having been received with respect to alleged unsatisfactory service
provided by Mr. Neville respecting his Lochdale service in the Municipality of Burnaby,
a hearing was held on March 28th, 1946. The complaints were based on alleged noncompliance with schedules, extensive overloading, frequent delays due to mechanical
breakdowns, and need for augmented and increased service.
While it was shown that the complaints were to a certain extent justified, it was
also shown that Mr. Neville started this run in Burnaby at a time when no other
transportation company or individual was interested, utilizing old equipment which had
been difficult to replace. Such instructions as were considered necessary were issued
with a view to improving the service.
Public Passenger-vehicle Service, Chilliwack-H tinting don via Sardis.—Atkins Stage
Lines, Limited, for many years have held public passenger-vehicle licences to operate I 20 " MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
from Harrison Hot Springs to Cultus Lake via Chilliwack. In 1939 they made a tentative application to extend this service to Huntingdon but did not proceed 'with the
application at that time.
On their further application and after a hearing, whereat the application was
objected to by the B.C. Motor Transportation, Limited, approval was given to Atkins
Stage Lines, Limited, to undertake this service.
Public Passenger-vehicle Service, Kamloops and Vicinity.—The application of Selby
Etsel Irwin for public passenger-vehicle licences for operation on two routes entirely
within the City of Kamloops and on an additional route between Kamloops and North
Kamloops was approved in March, 1946, subject to commencement of service not later
than the 1st of July, 1946. An application of B.C. Coach Lines, Limited, for permission
to operate a similar service was refused.
Under section 61 of the " Motor Carrier Act," approval was given to the granting
by the City of Kamloops of a franchise to the said S. E. Irwin for operation of bus
service within the city limits of Kamloops.
At a later date a limited company was formed under the name of Civic Transportation Company, Limited, and the franchise and licences were transferred to the limited
company.
Western Canadian Greyhound Lines, Limited.—An application of Western Canadian
Greyhound Lines, Limited, for the transfer to it from B.C. Coach Lines, Limited, of
certain public passenger-vehicle licences covering routes Kamloops to Vernon, Kamloops
to Salmon Arm and Revelstoke, and Vernon to Revelstoke was approved, following which
the Western Canadian Greyhound Lines, Limited, was able to consolidate its public
passenger-vehicle services extending through these areas.
The B.C. Coach Lines, Limited, retained the Kamloops-Merritt, Kamloops-Tran-
quille, and Vernon-Nakusp routes.
William Hugh Bennett, of Princeton, applied for and was granted a transfer from
Western Canadian Greyhound Lines, Limited, of two public passenger-vehicle licences
for scheduled public passenger service between Princeton and Copper Mountain. The
Western Canadian Greyhound Lines, Limited, had acquired this route from B.C. Greyhound Lines, Limited, when they took over the latter's operations in 1945, but the
Western Canadian Greyhound Lines, Limited, did not find it convenient to operate this,
the only local route covered by their licences.
Bus Service, Penticton Municipality, Columbia Coachways, Limited.—A tentative
application was made by Columbia Coachways, Limited, for five public passenger-vehicle
licences respecting twenty-seven-passenger buses, for scheduled service over certain
routes within the corporate limits of the District Municipality of Penticton. This
municipality at present has no bus service other than that given by Western Canadian
Greyhound Lines, Limited, as part of its through service. The application was approved,
subject to commencement of service within twelve months of date of approval
(January, 1947).
The Commission also approved, pursuant to section 61 of the " Motor Carrier Act,"
of the granting by the Corporation of Penticton of a franchise to this company to
operate this bus service.
Public Passenger-vehicle Service at Creston.—During the year three applications
were received to operate local public passenger service from Creston to Wynndel and
Creston to Lister or Huscroft. The application of Gus B. Alexander and Roy L. Smith
(later changed to Alexander and Joy) to license a bus for this service was approved.
Service did not commence prior to the end of the licence-year.
The application of W. F. Husband and S. J. Hilton to operate a sedan car and the
later application of B. H. Bayne and N. E. Peterson to operate a bus in this service
were refused. REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 21
Public Passenger-vehicle Service, Nelson-Procter and Nelson-Balfour.—An application of Gordon Ferguson, of Nelson, to extend the public passenger service now
operated by him between Nelson and Procter via Harrop Ferry to include service
between Nelson and Balfour was refused, but the restriction contained in his licences
whereby Mr. Ferguson was not permitted to give local service on the main highway
between Nelson and Harrop was removed.
At the same time an application of J. A. Morrison, W. Vickers, and R. Casson to
operate between Nelson and entrance to Kokanee Park, 12 miles east of Nelson (being
part of the Nelson-Harrop-Balfour route mentioned above), was refused.
Extension of Public Passenger Service, Prince George-Smithers.—The application
of H. W. Smith d/b/a Canadian Trailway Stages, Prince George, operating public
passenger service between Prince George and Vanderhoof, for extension of the said
service westerly to Smithers was approved.
Hamilton Trucking Service, Inc., Seattle, Wash.—This company again made application for Class III public freight-vehicle licences for transportation of machinery, contractors' equipment, and structural steel from points in King County, Wash., to any
point in British Columbia and vice versa. This application was refused, as it appeared
that same would be, to some extent, in direct competition with the already licensed
scheduled public freight-vehicle services between Vancouver and Seattle.
Applications of Canadian Pacific Express Company for Public Freight-vehicle
Licences.—This company made applications for public freight-vehicle licences, operating
from terminal points of Lytton, Penticton, Cranbrook, and Fernie respectively, for
transportation of freight for Canadian Pacific Railway Company and express for
Canadian Pacific Express Company, restricted to freight and express which had received
or was to receive a part rail-haul.
Proposed routes were Lytton to Merritt, Penticton to Osoyoos, Penticton to West
Summerland and Kelowna, Cranbrook to Kimberley, and Fernie to Michel. The object
of the applications was to enable the applicant company to transport freight and express
received by rail-car at the terminal points to the points named and vice versa, with a
view to expediting their pick-up and delivery service of freight and express.
The Public Utilities Commission held a hearing on this application during March,
1946, which lasted two days, and the application was very strongly opposed by the
motor-vehicle industry.
In dealing with the application, it became apparent that " public freight service "
was not intended and that the applications should have been for " limited freight-
vehicle licences," allowing the Canadian Pacific Express Company to transport freight
for the Canadian Pacific Railway Company and express for themselves.
The decision, made in September, 1946, was that four limited freight-vehicle
licences should be granted—namely, one from Lytton to Merritt, one from Penticton to
Osoyoos, one from Fernie to Michel, and one from Cranbrook to Kimberley—subject to
restrictions that the freight or express so carried shall have been transported by
Canadian Pacific Railway train from some other point to the terminal point mentioned
in each licence or vice versa and that there should be no local pick-up or delivery at
certain points where this work was already being carried out under contract by a local
carrier.    The granting of these licences was subject to the filing of rates.
The application to give service from Penticton to West Summerland and Kelowna
was denied.
During the early part of 1947 the Canadian Pacific Express Company made further
application to be permitted to give similar service from Penticton to Summerland and
West Summerland and vice versa, and a further hearing was held. It was shown that
the proposed service would be of convenience to the public, and the application was I 22 " MOTOR CARRIER ACT/
approved, subject to a proviso that no local pick-up or delivery should be given in West
Summerland, all freight so transported to be delivered to or picked up at the Canadian
Pacific Railway depot at West Summerland only.
At the same time, with respect to the Cranbrook-Kimberley licence, permission
was given to undertake pick-up or delivery of freight (not including express and live
stock) within a distance of 1% miles from Kimberley Railway-station, it having been
shown that the existing trucking contract had expired and that suitable arrangements
could not be made with any existing carrier for a new contract.
International Transportation of Freight.—During the month of September, Crown
Cartage & Warehousing Company, Limited; Holmes & Wilson Trucking Company,
Limited; and Arrow Transfer Company, Limited, each made application for alteration
of licences to include the right to undertake international transportation with respect
to certain operations carried out by them. This application was the result of an amendment to the regulations pursuant to the " Motor Carrier Act" providing that " international transportation of freight " includes the transportation of freight picked up by
a British Columbia carrier at the International Boundary if such freight is transported
across the said boundary.
The applications were refused, but, a request for reconsideration having been
received, the applicants were advised to apply for permits in cases where emergency
shipments should arise and to keep a record of such permits in order that it would be
possible to determine to what extent the granting of the applications either in whole or
in part may be warranted.
Public Freight-vehicle Service between Vancouver and Kamloops.—During June,
1946, an application of Kamloops-Okanagan Freight Lines, Limited, for three Class II
public freight-vehicle licences for scheduled public freight service between Kamloops
and Vancouver was approved, restricted to freight transported from Vancouver to
Kamloops only and vice versa.
At the same time an application of White Transport Company, Limited, then
licensed to operate seven vehicles, for seven additional licences to operate between
Vancouver and Kelowna was approved.
Public Freight-vehicle Service, Vancouver-Hope.—P. V. Kinnee, d/b/a Hiway
Transport Company, was the holder of five Class I public freight-vehicle licences
authorizing scheduled public freight service between Chilliwaek and Hope, connecting
with the B.C. Motor Transportation, Limited (Consolidated Truck Lines), at Chilliwaek.
His application for alteration of his licences to permit him to give through public
freight service from Vancouver to Hope was approved, it being considered that this
alteration of licences would result in more convenient service being given to the public
patronizing his service.
Public Freight-vehicle Service, Quesnel-Kelowna.—The application of Cariboo
Dry, Limited, of Quesnel, for two Class II public freight-vehicle licences for scheduled
public freight service between Quesnel and Kelowna was refused.
Scheduled Public Freight-vehicle Service from Vancouver to Cranbrook and
Kimberley.—An application of Millar & Brown Transfer of Cranbrook for Class II
public freight-vehicle licence to operate this service was approved for a trial period of
six months. Later during the year the applicants submitted figures showing that the
operation appears to be necessary and convenient to the public and applied for an additional licence respecting a truck and semi-trailer, which was granted.
Applications for Scheduled Public Freight-vehicle Service between Prince Rupert
and Points East.—A number of tentative applications having been received during the
past several years to operate scheduled public freight service over the Skeena Highway REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 23
from Prince Rupert to Terrace, Hazelton, Smithers, Telkwa, and Burns Lake, it was
decided to deal with these applications, and at a hearing during the month of October
the following applications were considered:—
Name of Applicant. Proposed Public Freight Service.
Marshall Brothers, Hazelton Hazelton-Prince Rupert.
Lindsay's Cartage & Storage, Limited,
Prince Rupert Prince Rupert-Terrace.
Harold Smith, Terrace Terrace-Prince Rupert.
Capling Transfer, Smithers Smithers-Prince Rupert.
Percy R. Cameron, d/b/a Hyde Transfer,
Prince Rupert Prince Rupert-Telkwa.
Fred W. Rosberg Telkwa-Prince Rupert.
Carlson Brothers Transfer, Burns Lake.... Burns Lake-Prince Rupert.
J. C. Saunders, Burns Lake Burns Lake-Prince Rupert.
None of the applicants appeared at the hearing, nor were they represented, but the
applications were opposed by Canadian National Railways.
In view of all the circumstances pertaining to the Prince Rupert Highway, including consideration of the winter conditions on that road, the applications were refused,
but each of the applicants, who held Class III public freight-vehicle licences, was given
the opportunity to obtain a licence to operate over the highway between Prince Rupert
and the area which he serves restricted to charter trips only, and several of the carriers
availed themselves of this opportunity.
MECHANICAL INSPECTION OF VEHICLES.
In the Sixth Annual Report it was stated that mechanical inspection of vehicles
under the " Motor Carrier Act " in the Lower Mainland area had been taken over by an
Inspector in the employ of the Public Utilities Commission and that arrangements had
been made for the proper training of the other Inspectors throughout the Province with
a view to this inspection-work being taken over entirely by Inspectors of the Commission, thus relieving mechanical supervisors of the British Columbia Police of these
duties.
Good progress was made along these lines, with a result that, by the end of the
licence-year, three of the Inspectors employed by the Commission had nearly completed
their training and other Inspectors were well advanced, so that it appeared probable
that the change-over could take effect not later than the end of April, 1947.
WEIGHTS AND DIMENSIONS OF VEHICLES.
During the summer the Public Works Department gave preliminary notice of
proposals to amend the regulations pursuant to section 34 of the " Highway Act "
governing gross weights, axle loads, and tire loads of trucks and buses operated on
public highways, and data concerning the proposed revisions were circulated. To some
extent these proposals provided for reduced allowances on conventional trucks and
trailers, with some increases with respect to combinations of trucks and semi-trailers
having multiple axles. The proposals had not, however, been put into effect at the end
of the period covered by this report, it being understood that, on account of certain
objections raised by the trucking industry, they are being reconsidered.
Any drastic change in the regulations would affect the licensing of vehicles under
the " Motor Carrier Act," as such licences are issued subject to and in conformity with
the Highway Regulations above referred to.    If the gross weights permitted should be I 24 " MOTOR CARRIER ACT.':
materially reduced, this would affect the carrying capacities of the trucks, which would
mean not only a complete revision of all licences affected, but also possibly some
reduction in revenue under the " Motor Carrier Act."
ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF WESTERN CANADIAN HIGHWAY OFFICIALS.
The Annual Conference of Highway Traffic and Motor Carrier Boards of the four
Western Provinces was held at Regina, Sask., on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd days of October,
1946. The Public Utilities Commission of British Columbia was represented by
Commissioner J. C. MacDonald and the Superintendent of Motor Carriers, R. M. Taylor.
Matters in connection with motor-vehicle operations, common to all Provinces, were
discussed.
The question of applications of railroad companies for licences to enter into the
motor-trucking business was discussed at length, and it appeared that such operations
are now part of railroad policy and further applications can be looked for. The general
policy of all Western Provinces in dealing with such applications appears to be very
similar, decisions being made on the public convenience and necessity for the operation.
The experience of all Western Provinces regarding applications for taxi licences is
much the same, and each Province has experienced a large increase in such applications,
particularly from returned service men. The same quota basis in the issuance of taxi
licences in cities is applied in most of the Western Provinces, being one taxi for each
1,000 of population.
All Western Provinces have had applications for increases in truck and passenger
rates on account of increased costs of operations.
A discussion took place on gross weights and axle loads for trucks, and the conference was advised of proposed alterations in British Columbia.
The matter of bus and truck terminals and stops was discussed, and it was stated
by the Saskatchewan representative that his Province required provision for a rest stop
every 50 miles.
Commissioner MacDonald, on behalf of the Province of British Columbia, extended
an invitation to the members of the conference to meet in Vancouver in 1947. This
invitation was accepted.
CONFERENCE OF INSPECTORS.
The annual conference of Inspectors of Motor Carriers was held during the second
week of January, 1947, and was attended by all Inspectors and other officials of the
Motor Carrier Branch.
An agenda containing some thirty different items was fully discussed, and satisfactory conclusions were reached with regard to the various problems or questions that
had arisen.
The opportunity was also taken by Inspectors from more distant points to discuss
problems with the Superintendent and other members of the staff.
STAFF.
As a result of the steady increase in the volume of work in the Vancouver office
arising from the new requirements as to financial responsibility of motor carriers, the
filing of annual reports by motor carriers, and the greatly increased number of applications for licences, necessary staff additions were made in the Vancouver office and some
reorganization of the Motor Carrier Branch was undertaken. It appears that further
reorganization and expansion may be necessary if the volume of applications, etc., is
maintained. REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 25
INSPECTORS' REPORTS.
The reports of Inspectors are contained in Appendix B.
LIST OF SCHEDULED PUBLIC PASSENGER AND PUBLIC
FREIGHT ROUTES.
In Appendix C will be found lists showing names of operators of scheduled public
passenger-vehicle services and of scheduled public freight-vehicle services respectively
as at February 28th, 1947, with a statement of the routes over which these operations
are carried out.
SUMMARY OF LICENSING OF MOTOR-VEHICLES UNDER
"MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
A chart illustrating the licensing of motor-vehicles under the " Motor Carrier Act "
is contained in Appendix D. This chart was distributed during the licence-year 1946-47
to police officers, Government Agents, and other officials, and was also made available
to carriers who required a copy. I 26
"MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
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H
o REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 27
APPENDIX B.
REPORTS OF INSPECTORS.
Inspector W. A. Jaffbay.
(Vancouver Island and Adjacent Islands.)
In the area with which this report deals, a great many new industries have opened up.
Lumbering and allied industries, coupled with an extensive Public Works program for roads,
and the building of the power project at Campbell River by the British Columbia Power Commission, constitute the major developments. New towns are springing up and established
cities are expanding beyond expectation.
The flexible transportation industry is advancing with the times, and buses are taxed to
capacity to handle passengers offering. The present prosperity, together with the shortage
of new motor-cars, has created a demand for taxi service that is out of proportion to the
population being served. Long-line freight-haulers are enlarging their fleets, and there is a
tendency to employ tractor-trailer units, with greater carrying capacity, to meet their obligations. Local haulers operating under public freight licences appear to be maintaining a
steady trade, with only limited expansion, while the roving fleet of dump-trucks is growing
to cope with the construction-industry requirements.
Projects such as the power-dam at Campbell River and road-building contractors are
employing a large fleet of dump-trucks. Public freight licensees have been given fair preference on these works, but limited freight or contract licences have been issued to operators,
mostly veterans, as they receive delivery of trucks and obtain employment on these contracts.
Complaints received were comparatively few in number, and in the early part of the
year it appeared that this steady volume of business was going to offset the necessity for
increasing tariffs. However, wages and cost of repairs have forced several to apply for tariff
adjustments. Dump-truck operators, on steady hauls, incurring high mileage, appear to have
been hit hard by rising costs, and contracts are now struck at a higher rate, usually on the
yard-mile or ton-mile basis.
New replacement vehicles are coming through fairly regularly, and, generally speaking,
there is a noted improvement in equipment. Public passenger carriers require many more
buses than are delivered to handle the traffic, and appear less fortunate in getting their orders
filled. Taxi operators, on the other hand, are obtaining new vehicles and, in some instances,
whole new fleets. The mechanical condition of the passenger carriers has improved and is
satisfactory.
Statistics compiled from the year's reports are as follows: —
(a)  Mechanical   inspections   of   passenger-vehicles   and  long-line
■ freight-trucks         282
Defects noted:—
Defective brakes   53
Defective steering         114
Failed to carry emergency equipment  9
Vehicles condemned  5
(6)  Investigations made        793
(c) Complaints investigated   97
(d) Prosecutions   ("Motor  Carrier  Act,"  sec.  9;    "Motor  Vehicle
Act," sec. 3)   12
(e) Mileage travelled in course of duty   17,282
W. A. Jaffray,
Inspector of Motor Carriers. I 28 " MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
Inspector-F. Black.
Assisted by Inspector E. DeBlaquiere.
(Vancouver Area and Lower Mainland, Sechelt, Powell River, Squamish,
and Pemberton, and Fraser Canyon between Hope and Boston Bar.)
The following is a summary of conditions generally in regard to the above territories for
the licence-year 1946-47.
The number of licences increased considerably during the year. Approximately 600
limited passenger and public passenger licences were in effect in the territory, together with
approximately 1,320 public freight and limited freight licences. The increase was due to the
availability of new trucks, buses, and cars, rehabilitation of veterans, and new industries
being put into operation. Farmers from the Prairie Provinces are continuing to migrate
into the area, and settling on small farms. Owing to the above increase, considerably more
investigations were made over the previous year in the handling of new applications, complaints, permits, transfers, and alteration of licences. A number of operators were contacted
who failed to file proper freight tariffs, but on correct information being given these operators,
satisfactory results were obtained. Owing to the Wartime Prices and Trade Board lifting
restrictions on certain classes of freight, the public freight carriers were granted permission
to increase their tariffs.
Public service given by the motor carriers has improved generally during the year, as
new equipment became available for replacements and where additional vehicles were required.
There is a greater demand to-day for motor transportation than at any time since the inception of the " Motor Carrier Act."
As a result of information given to municipal police, six convictions were obtained for
violation of Conditions of Licence, one conviction for transporting passengers on a freight-
vehicle, and four convictions for operators who failed to comply with section 5, Part I, of the
" Motor Carrier Act."
The usual numerous complaints from commercial carriers were received with regard to
the operations of Class I and Class III private freight carriers, which were investigated.
Inspector E. DeBlaquiere gave valuable service in assisting the writer in the above duties.
Mileage travelled in the performance of duty was 32,512 miles.
F. Black,
Inspector of Motor Carriers.
Inspector J. A. Carmichael.
(Revelstoke, Salmon Arm, Kamloops, Merritt, North Thompson, Ashcroft, Clinton, Lillooet,
Bridge River, and Southern Cariboo District, including Williams Lake
and the Chilcotin.)
With the return to peace-time occupations generally throughout the country, the transportation industry, during the licence-year 1946-47, has now just about completed its reconversion.
The logging and lumbering industry is still operating under pressure due to building
material shortages and an influx of population from the Prairie Provinces to British Columbia. Consequently a steady increase in limited freight licences throughout the area is still
being experienced.
Considerable difficulty is being experienced by the trucking and transportation industry
due to inability to obtain sufficient replacement units, both passenger and freight. Consequently units are being forced to continue operation on the roads beyond their reasonable
period of replacement, causing an upward trend in cost of operation and, through breakdown
of badly worn equipment, numerous delays in time schedules.
However, truck-, bus-, and passenger-car manufacturers are beginning to show an output which should alleviate this condition to a great extent during the coming year.
Numerous applications for all types of licences have been received and dealt with from
ex-service men wishing to rehabilitate themselves through the transportation industry. These
men have been given every assistance and consideration throughout, and wherever possible
have been given preference. REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 29
City bus service and taxi service opened by veterans in Kamloops has proven itself a
definite value to the community, and is now on a firm footing as an established business.
All Class III public freight-vehicle licences in Kamloops district were reviewed and
brought under uniform Conditions of Licence, as also were those in Chase district, all of which
is a step toward uniformity of rates, which now is mainly held up because of Wartime Prices
and Trade Board regulations still being in effect in unorganized territory.
A considerable increase in limited passenger-vehicle (taxi) licences has taken place
throughout the district in the past year. This increase is due in part to an increase in rural
population, particularly the smaller settlements where previously there was not sufficient
business to warrant a taxi licence, and also to the fact that manufacture and sale of private
passenger-cars is still very far behind the demand.
An increase in the number of temporary permits has been experienced during the past
year. This condition is due to the shortages of certain equipment in local areas, such as
properly equipped dump-trucks, required for road-construction work, and an increase in the
volume of crops harvested during the past season. The crop-year was very successful
throughout the agricultural district, and bumper crops of all types of vegetables and fruit
were moved. This movement was far in excess of the volume that could be handled by
licensed operators, and consequently the excess was handled by permits.
The Christmas-tree industry is fast becoming of considerable importance to the truckers,
coming at the end of the harvest season in Kamloops district, and during the past season a
number of permits were required to move this perishable commodity to rail-head.
General statistics for the licence-year 1946-47, showing routine duties performed, mileage
travelled, etc., are as follows:—
Number of investigations and interviews     1,037
Vehicles checked on highway        401
Mileage travelled .  20,470
J. A. Carmichael,
Inspector of Motor Carriers.
Inspector H. K. Hume.
(Okanagan Valley, Lumby, Armstrong, Enderby, and the Princeton District.)
This year has brought many changes in the transportation industry, resulting in added
efficiency and economy to the public. This is evident from the large volume of freight and
passengers being handled with little increase in the number of new licences issued during
this year.
New equipment is conspicuous on all highways—new buses and taxis are being purchased
when available and a large number of new trucks are being put into service. Thus the public
are receiving the benefit of faster and safer transportation.
City bus services have been put into operation in Vernon and Kelowna, and licences have
been approved for operation of a bus service within the Municipality of Penticton, to commence as soon as equipment is available.
The transportation of fresh fruit is still of major importance in the Okanagan Valley,
although lumber and other forest products are increasing in volume.
A total of 14,240 miles was travelled by the undersigned while making approximately 500
investigations and performing various other duties of Inspector of Motor Carriers. In making
inspections and investigations, it appeared that the transportation industry as a whole is
co-operative and interested in the " Motor Carrier Act " and the regulations pursuant thereto.
In addition to issuing 86 additional public and limited freight- and passenger-vehicle
licences, 11 short-term licences were issued and 536 temporary permits were granted to take
care of all emergencies that arose during the year.
H. K. Hume,
Inspector of Motor Carriers. I 30 " MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
Inspector H. J. Maddaford.
(Grand Forks-Greenwood District, East and West Kootenays, including Rossland, Trail,
Nelson, Kaslo, Slocan, Cranbrook, Fernie, Windermere, and Golden.)
The following is the annual report for the licence-year 1946-47 respecting the administration, operation, and enforcement of the " Motor Carrier Act " within the above-mentioned
district.
As may be seen by the statistics hereunder, there has been a steady increase in the number of public and limited licences granted during the year. In addition to the new licences,
many established businesses have changed hands.
The number of freight licences has increased for several reasons. The export of pit-
props to the British Isles continued throughout the year, and several new licences were
granted in connection with this work. The mining industry in both the East and West
Kootenays has expanded, increasing the number of hauling contracts for this class of work.
The lumbering industry has grown, particularly with respect to small operations. Portable
mills have been easier to obtain and have been set up on many small timber-sales. Each mill
requires the part-time service of a truck, which has increased the demand for licences.
A new public freight licence was granted for operation between Cranbrook and Vancouver via American routes. This operation has proved very successful, and the company has
recently purchased an 8-ton tractor unit and a dual axle semi-trailer, and intends putting
more of this type of equipment on the road in the near future.
Public passenger licences were granted to three new bus companies—one giving service
between Nelson and Blewett, the second between Nelson and Procter, and the third for the
Creston district, serving Creston, Wynndel, and Erickson. New equipment being available
this year has made it possible for public bus and freight lines to increase their schedules and
give better service.
Improved business conditions in towns and cities have had the effect of increasing the
number of limited passenger (taxi) and Class III public freight licences.
The relaxation of Wartime Prices and Trade Board regulations governing rate ceilings
has made it necessary to spend a great deal of time assisting licensees in the revision of their
filed tariffs.
The general attitude of the public in the area is very satisfactory. They are making use
of the Motor Carrier Branch office to obtain information regarding " Motor Carrier Act " and
regulations, and general information as to licences and tariffs.
Statistics.
New licences approved during the year:—
Public passenger   10
Limited passenger  ;  45
Class I public freight  4
Class II public freight  3
Class III public freight  34
Limited freight   ' 49
Transfer of licences  35
Alterations of licences  42
Temporary permits, all classes  1,258
Number of investigations and interviews  1,082
Mileage travelled in the course of duties  22,341
H. J. Maddaford,
Inspector of Motor Carriers. REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 31
Inspector G. L. Greenwood.
(Prince Rupert, Skeena, Omineca, and Prince George Districts, also Northern Cariboo
District, including Quesnel and Barkerville.)
The licence-year 1946-47 has been a period of industrial development and expansion in
the above-named districts, particularly in relation to the various forest-products industries.
The number of operating sawmills has increased over 200 per cent. The large-volume production of pit-props has absorbed any overflow of trucking equipment. Highway and building
construction has required the services of all available dump-trucks, and it has been necessary
to license additional vehicles of this type brought in from outside points. Other trucking
movements are above normal.
Scheduled passenger and freight operators are giving satisfactory service. They are
continually checked regarding rates, promptness, and general efficiency. Several additional
operators are giving scheduled service over new routes.
Due to the general increase in industry and population, a number of additional public
and limited freight and passenger licences have been issued. In the issuing of these licences
it is noted that special consideration has been given to applications from discharged members
of the armed forces.
The general attitude of the motor-carrier operators and shippers toward the administration of the " Motor Carrier Act" and regulations has been good for several years past. Their
attitude of confidence and co-operation is progressively increasing.
The period from March 1st, 1946, to March 18th, 1946, was used by the undersigned to
complete organization of the Peace River Block, from the base of Dawson Creek. An additional period of approximately four weeks was required at Prince George to complete necessary
documents in connection with this organization. In May, 1946, a resident Inspector was
appointed for the Peace River area.
The annual conference of Inspectors, held at Vancouver from January 8th, 1947, to
January 10th, 1947, inclusive, resulted in many constructive matters being discussed and satisfactory conclusions reached.
General statistics for the licence-year 1946-47, showing routine duties performed, mileage
travelled, etc., are as follows:—
Operators given technical assistance to prepare or revise rate tariffs
and time schedules        127
Vehicles checked on highway (approximately)       484
Investigations and interviews     1,140
Temporary permits issued (all classes)       497
Mileage travelled by automobile during course of duties  16,194
G. L. Greenwood,
Inspector of Motor Carriers. I 32 "MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
Inspector D. J. Doswell.
(Peace River Area.)
I submit herewith a report for the above-mentioned area covering the period from May
19th, 1946, to February 28th, 1947.
In May an office was set up in the Dudley & Wilson Building, located on Second Avenue,
Dawson Creek, one-half block from the centre of the town.
During the above-mentioned period there were approximately 1,100 interviews and investigations. The distance travelled during the course of duties in the area amounted to 13,694
miles.
The following tariffs were accepted for this area:—
Local freight tariff No. 1  144
Local freight tariff No. 2       4
Limited freight tariff    22
Public freight tariff (Class I and Class II)     11
Express tariff        6
Charter passenger tariff     10
Public passenger tariff       6
Freight time schedule     11
Passenger time schedule     11
Express time schedule       6
The following licences were issued:—
Public passenger-vehicle licences     12
Public and limited passenger-vehicle licences      4
Limited passenger-vehicle licences  (taxis)     11
Class I public freight-vehicle licences     21
Class II public freight-vehicle licences     13
Class III public freight-vehicle licences  138
Limited freight-vehicle licences     22
Class I private freight-vehicle licences     98
Class III private freight-vehicle licences  153
Combination  (F)  licences       5
Permits issued   246
This area is settling back to normal after the boom caused by the construction of the
Alaska Highway. There are still a large number of " boom " truckers in the area, and the
farmers, many of whom bought large trucks during the boom, have not replaced with lighter
units. Due to the over-abundance of trucks, the transportation industry in this area was
badly in need of the supervision provided for in the " Motor Carrier Act."
This area depends almost entirely on trucks for the distribution of freight set down at
Dawson Creek and Pouce Coupe. Most incoming and outgoing freight comes from and goes
to points over 30 miles from the above-mentioned centres. Since this area came under the
" Motor Carrier Act " in March, 1946, many problems of varied nature have been met and
dealt with. The movement of grain and live stock and other farm produce has been successfully handled by licensed truckers, and temporary permits were granted to farmers where
necessary. An interesting point with regard to licences granted since May, 1946, is that over
90 per cent, of all applicants were ex-service men.
Public passenger and limited passenger (taxi) operations show a big improvement with
regard to service and equipment.
A good start has been made with regard to rates, and every licensed operator has a filed
tariff.    Time schedules, etc., where required, are all filed.
With reference to the Alaska Highway, the granting of acreage to the public along the
British Columbia portion will undoubtedly bring increased activity in the transportation field,
also considerable freight will move via Alaska Highway to Alaska from Dawson Creek in the
licence period to come.
D. J. Doswell,
Inspector of Motor Carriers. Inspector (Mechanical) C. A. Wood.
(Lower Fraser Valley, Greater Vancouver, etc.)
On January 1st, 1946, the Motor Carrier Branch of the Public Utilities Commission
accepted the responsibility of mechanical inspections for all public and limited passenger-
vehicle licences under the " Motor Carrier Act" in the Lower Fraser Valley west of Hope,
including New Westminster, Lulu Island, Vancouver City, North Vancouver, and West
Vancouver.
Initially, inspection of public and limited passenger equipment brought out the fact that
a great number of limited passenger-vehicles (taxis), as well as a number of public passenger-
vehicles, were in very poor mechanical condition or were in need of replacement. It is the
opinion of the writer that this condition was brought about by the fact that replacements
were not procurable. The same condition existed with regard to replacement parts, as in
many instances it became necessary to remove vehicles from service for periods of up to six
weeks, depending upon the time in which parts could be obtained.
It is gratifying, however, to note that this condition has improved to a great extent, as
equipment is being replaced daily both by public and limited passenger operators—some
having replaced their entire fleet.
The general feeling of operators toward having equipment inspected by the Motor Carrier
Branch is readily expressed by their co-operation in having their equipment either repaired or
replaced in the shortest time possible, many having expressed their feelings by stating that
the vehicle inspections carried out by this department are a great step toward safer public
transportation.
General statistics covering mechanical inspections for the licence-year 1946-47 are as
follows:—
1. General inspections         817
2. Defective vehicles:—
(a)  Faulty steering   98
(6) Faulty brakes   86
(c) Faulty exhaust-lines   54
(d) Failure to comply with regulations completely   158
3. Vehicles condemned:—
(a.)  Public passenger   9
(6)  Limited passenger  (taxi)    10
4. Mileage travelled performing mechanical inspections   22,332
Chas. A. Wood,
Mechanical Inspector. I 34
"MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
APPENDIX C.
LIST OF PUBLIC PASSENGER-VEHICLE OPERATORS AND ROUTES
(SCHEDULED SERVICE), AS AT FEBRUARY 28th, 1947.
Name and Address of Operator.
George R. Abbey, Nelson	
A.P. Stages, Hope	
Arrow Bus Lines, Prince Rupert
Atkins Stage Lines
Route.
Nelson-Kaslo.
..Haig via Hope to a point on Hope-Princeton Road 30 road-miles from Hope.
.Prince Rupert-Seal Cove.
Prince Rupert-Port Edward.
B.C. Auto Interurban, Ltd., Nelson
B.C. Coach Lines, Ltd., Kamloops
B.C. Motor Transportation, Ltd., Vancouver..
Bayne & Ratcliffe, Nelson	
W. H. Bennett, Princeton	
Blue Line Transit, Ltd., Victoria
Arnold I. Boomhower, Prince George
James Cancelliere, Revelstoke	
Archie Carswell, Vernon	
Ltd., Cultus Lake Harrison Hot Springs to Cultus Lake via
Agassiz and Chilliwaek and to Huntingdon via Sardis.
Chilliwack-Ryder Lake.
.Trail-International Boundary at Pater-
son in connection with service to Spokane.
.Kamloops-Merritt.
Kamloops-Tranquille.
Vernon-Nakusp.
Vancouver-New Westminster.
Vancouver-Seattle.
Vancouver-White Rock.
Vancouver-Fort Langley.
Vancouver-Ladner-Boundary Bay.
Vancouver-Chilliwack.
Vancouver-Horseshoe Bay and Whyte-
cliffe (West Vancouver).
Vancouver-Deep Cove via Second Narrows.
North Vancouver-Horseshoe Bay and
Whytecliffe  (West Vancouver).
Vancouver-loco and Sunnyside.
Port Coquitlam-Ioco and Sunnyside.
Vancouver-Harrison Hot Springs-
Agassiz.
Port Coquitlam extension.
New Westminster-Ladner.
New Westminster-Cloverdale.
New Westminster-Mud Bay Road and
Johnston Road.
.Nelson-Blewett.
Princeton-Copper Mountain via Allenby.
.Victoria-Oak Bay.
Victoria-Haultain.
Nanaimo local bus service.
Nanaimo-Wellington via Departure Bay.
.Prince George-Chief Lake and Reid Lake.
Prince George-Summit Lake.
Revelstoke-Arrowhead.
.Vernon City bus service.
Vernon-Okanagan Landing.
T. H. Chamings, Lumby Lumby-Vernon via Long Lake.
Ernest J. Christien, Lumby Lumby-Vernon (direct route).
Civic Transportation Co., Ltd.
Kamloops Kamloops City bus service.
Kamloops-North Kamloops. REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 35
Name and Address of Operator. Route.
W. G. Clarke, Squamish Squamish-Cheekye.
C. E. G. Erickson (City Bus Service), Trail Local service at Trail and to Warfield,
Shavers' Bench, and Sunningdale.
M. C. Donaldson, Ltd., Salmo Salmo-Reno Mill.
J. R. Ellis, Salmon Arm Sicamous-Salmon Arm via Canoe.
Neal Evans Transportation Co., Ltd., Shalalth Shalalth-Pioneer.
Pioneer-Vancouver.
J. W. Farquhar and Katherine Begg, Harrison Hot   Harrison Hot Springs-Agassiz. ,
Springs
G. Ferguson, Nelson Nelson-Procter via Harrop.
Fraser Valley Bus Lines, Mission Mission-Huntingdon.
Mission-Hatzic Island.
Mission-Haney via Stave Falls.
Gallagher Transportation, Ltd., Hope Hope-Chilliwack.
Hope-Silver-Skagit Camp No. 2 and
Decco Camp No. 1 on Silver Creek.
L. E. Giles, Zeballos Zeballos-Privateer Mine.
Frank Grimes, Victoria Local service, City of Victoria.
Jessie B. Hall, Okanagan Mission Kelowna-Okanagan Mission.
Milo T. Hesselgrave, Kelowna Kelowna-McCulloch.
Estate of T. J. Hodgson, Williams Lake Williams Lake-Kleena Kleene.
Hole & Clarke Transportation Co., Ltd., Coal Har-    Coal Harbour-Hardy Bay.
bour Coal Harbour-Port Hardy Airport.
Hardy Bay-Port Hardy Airport.
J. A. Huffman, Fort St. James Fort St. James-Vanderhoof.
Pinchi Creek-Vanderhoof.
Fort St. James-Germansen Landing.
Alice Ingham, Port Alberni Alberni-Port Alberni.
Interior Stages, Ltd., Trail Trail-Rossland.
Trail-Nelson.
Nelson-Nelway.
Trail-Fruitvale.
Kimberley City Service Co., Ltd., Kimberley Local bus service, Kimberley and
Chapman Camp.
J. S. Keen, Pouce Coupe Pouce Coupe-Commotion Creek.
Henry Kershaw, Fort Steele Cranbrook-Fort Steele.
Fred W. Knott, Tofino Tofino-Ucluelet.
C. G. Lawrence, Gibsons Landing Hopkins Landing-Gibson Landing-
Garden Bay.
Lillooet Cartage Co., Ltd., Lillooet Lillooet-Lytton.
George Mcintosh, Sooke Sooke-Victoria.
Mary C. Magro, Cranbrook Cranbrook-Golden.
D. V. Manley, Ltd., Horsefly Horsefly Lake-Williams Lake.
Robert K. Munro, Naramata Naramata-Penticton.
A. W. Murray, Prince Rupert Prince Rupert-Port Edward.
E. H. Neville, Vancouver Three routes in Burnaby Municipality,
namely:—
Boundary Road-New Westminster via
Lochdale.
North-South Burnaby route.
Vancouver Heights service.
Also the following:—
Vancouver-Seymour Mountain.
Vancouver-Grouse Mountain.
North Coast Transportation Co., Seattle, Wash Vancouver-Seattle.
North River Coach Lines, Ltd., Kamloops  Kamloops-Birch Island. I 36
"MOTOR CARRIER ACT.'
Name and Address of Operator.
J. W. Pavle, Kelowna	
Powell River Stages, Ltd., Powell River..
Scenic Stages, Ltd., New Westminster-...
Semiahmoo Bus Service, White Rock	
H.  W.  Smith, d/b/a  Canadian  Trailway  Stages,
Prince George
W. A. Sproule, d/b/a Columbia Stage Lines, New
Westminster
Star   Stages   (Fred  Gnucci  and  Walter  Miller),
Cranbrook
C. E. Tedrow, Republic, Wash	
Thompson Bus Lines, Ltd., Kelowna.
James S. Tofin, Ashcroft	
H. B. Tuffey, Quesnel	
Arthur F. Wale, Langford..
Western Canadian Greyhound Lines, Ltd., Calgary,
Alta.
The Wildwood Bus, Ltd., Powell River..
S. W. Wilson, Milner	
Vancouver Island Transportation Co., Ltd., Victoria—
Vernon-Salmon Arm Coach Lines, Ltd., Vernon	
West Vancouver   (Corporation of the District of
West Vancouver)
Route.
Kelowna-Rutland.
Kelowna-Glenmore.
Kelowna-East Kelowna.
Powell River   (local service).
.New Westminster-Marpole via Richmond.
Local service from Fraser Avenue at
Marine Drive  into  Richmond Municipality.
Local service at White Rock.
Prince George-Smithers.
Prince George-Prince George Airport.
Prince George-Army Camp.
Prince George-Army Headquarters Camp.
Prince George-South Fort George.
Prince George-Sinclair Mills.
New Westminster-Port Moody and local
service.
Cranbrook-Kimberley.
..Carson-Cascade via Grand Forks (B.C.
portion of service between Republic,
Wash., and Colville, Wash.).
Kelowna City bus service.
..Ashcroft-Lillooet   via   Hat   Creek   and
Pavilion.
..Quesnel-Barkerville.
.Victoria-Thetis Lake.
Victoria-Langford Lake.
Victoria-Metchosin.
Victoria-Albert Head.
Crowsnest-Penticton.
Yahk-Kingsgate.
Nelson-Kaslo.
Nelson-Nakusp.
West Gate of Yoho National Park-Vancouver via Ashcroft.
Ashcroft-Prince George.
Cranbrook-South Gate of Kootenay Park
(near Radium Hot Springs).
Penticton-International Boundary at
Osoyoos.
Penticton-Kamloops via Vernon.
Vernon-Revelstoke via Grindrod and
Sicamous.
Penticton-Spences Bridge via Princeton.
-Wildwood-Powell River.
.Langley Municipality  (local service).
This company is licensed to give through
public passenger service on all important main routes on Vancouver Island,
with numerous local services.
Vernon-Salmon Arm.
West Vancouver-Vancouver. REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 37
Peace River District.
Name and Address of Operator. Route.
British Yukon Navigation Co., Ltd., White Horse,    Dawson Creek to northern boundary of
Y.T. B.C. via Alaska Highway (operates to
White Horse, Y.T.).
Canadian Coach Ways, Ltd., Dawson Creek Dawson Creek to B.C.-Alberta boundary
(operates to Edmonton, Alta.).
Darnell & Miller, Fort St. John —Fort St. John-Dawson Creek.
Dawson Creek-Hudson Hope.
J. S. Keen, Pouce Coupe Pouce Coupe-Commotion Creek.
Peace River Bus Lines, Ltd., Spirit River, Alta Dawson   Creek  to  eastern  boundary of
B.C.  (operates to Spirit River, Alta.).
Rimbey & Fontaine, Dawson Creek Dawson Creek-Pouce Coupe.
Dawson Creek-South Dawson.
LIST  OF PUBLIC  FREIGHT-VEHICLE  OPERATORS AND ROUTES
(SCHEDULED SERVICE), AS AT FEBRUARY 28th, 1947.
Atkins Stage Lines, Ltd., Chilliwaek Harrison    Hot    Springs-Cultus    Lake
(express service only).
B.C.   Motor   Transportation,   Ltd.    (Consolidated    Vancouver-New Westminster.
Truck Lines), Vancouver Vancouver-Mission and Dewdney.
Vancouver-Chilliwack and Rosedale.
British Columbia-Seattle Transport, Seattle, Wash Vancouver-Seattle.
Gordon E. Ball, Nelson Nelson-Procter.
Robert A. Baxter, Prince George Prince George-Quesnel.
Black's   Motor   Freight   (F.   LePore  and   C.   W.    Vancouver-loco.
Belknap),  Vancouver loco-New Westminster.
J. H. and R. E. Black, Vancouver Harrison  Hot Springs-Agassiz-Vancou-
ver.
Blue Line Freight (Helen I. Vant), Nelson Nelson-Rossland.
Trail-Salmo.
E. C. Boothby, Mission City Mission-Vancouver  and  New  Westmin
ster.
Broadway Messenger Service, Vancouver Vancouver-New Westminster and Fraser
Mills district.
J. A. Brown, Gabriola Gabriola Island-Nanaimo.
W. S. D. Brown, Salmon Arm Salmon Arm-Hayward's Corner.
Bruce Motor Cartage, Vancouver Vancouver-New Westminster.
Carson's Truck Line, Ltd., Vancouver Vancouver-Prince George.
D. Chapman & Co., Ltd., Kelowna Kelowna-Penticton.
F. J. Charlesworth, Newgate Newgate-Fernie.
Chilliwaek Cartage Co., Ltd., Chilliwaek Chilliwack-Vancouver.
Clarke & Miller Transport, Nelson Nelson-Nakusp.
George G. Clyde, Robson Robson-Castlegar.
E. M. Cottrell, Hope Hope-Vancouver.
Country Freight Lines   (J. C. Fleming & Sons),    Chilliwack-Vancouver.
Chilliwaek Vancouver-Kelowna via Princeton.
Cowichan Freight Service, Victoria Victoria-Shawnigan Lake and Duncan.
Crosstown Carriers, North Vancouver North Vancouver-Vancouver.
Delta Freight Lines, Ladner Ladner-Vancouver.
Dench of Canada, Ltd., Calgary, Alta Crowsnest-Creston       \   Interprovincial
Cranbrook-Kimberley or
Cranbrook-Kingsgate  j    International
Creston-Rykerts service.
F. S. Duggan, Kelowna Winfield-Kelowna.
Neal Evans Transportation Co., Ltd, Shalalth Shalalth-Pioneer. I 38
"MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
Name and Address of Operator.
Thos. Fawkes, New Westminster	
Route.
New   Westminster-Coquitlam
pality.
Munici-
Ferguson's Motor Transport Co., Vancouver Vancouver-Horseshoe   Bay,   West  Vancouver.
Vancouver-Deep Cove, North Vancouver.
Leonard S. Forry, Vernon Lumby-Cherryville.
Fraser Transfer, Ltd., Vancouver Vancouver-New Westminster.
Gallagher Transportation, Ltd., Hope Chilliwack-Choate (express service only).
R. H. George, Vinsulla Blucher Hall-Kamloops.
J. Goodkey, d/b/a Cascade Motor Freight, Grand    Penticton-Nelson.
Forks
Grayridge Motor  Freight   (K.  F.  Ridgway and    Vancouver-Trail.
W. K. Graham), Vancouver
Arthur W. Green, Agassiz	
C. R. Greenaway, Cloverdale	
Haney-Hammond Motor Freight, Ltd., Port Haney.
Estate of T. J. Hodgson, Williams Lake	
Harrison Hot Springs-Vancouver via
Agassiz.
Surrey Municipality-Vancouver.
Haney-Vancouver.
Williams Lake-Kleena Kleene (non-
scheduled service to Anahim Lake and
other off-route points).
R. H. Holt (Cordova Bay Freight), Victoria Victoria-Cordova Bay.
Reinhard W. Hopp, Vernon Vernon-Arrowhead via Revelstoke.
Houlden Transfer, North Vancouver Vancouver-Deep Cove, North Vancouver.
Vancouver-Horseshoe   Bay,   West  Vancouver.
W. R. Hume and D'Arcy LeBeau, Langley Prairie—Langley Municipality-Vancouver.
D. J. Innis, Keremeos Keremeos-Penticton.
Interior Truck Lines, Nelson Nelson-Salmo.
Invermere Contracting Co., Ltd., Invermere Cranbrook-Golden.
Island Freight Service, Ltd., Victoria All  public   freight  routes   described  in
schedule   filed   with   Public    Utilities
Commission.
Johnson Transfer, Vanderhoof Decker Lake-Vanderhoof-Prince George.
Vanderhoof-Fort Fraser.
Prince George-Hansard.
Jones Bros. Transfer, Deroche Deroche—Vancouver.
Kamloops-Okanagan Freight Lines, Ltd., Kamloops._Kamloops-Salmon Arm.
Kamloops-Vernon.
Vancouver-Kamloops.
Kamloops Transport Co., Ltd., Kamloops Kamloops-Williams Lake.
Kaslo Motor Transport, Ltd., Kaslo Kaslo-Nelson.
King's Motor Cartage, Vancouver Vancouver-New Westminster and Fraser
Mills and way points.
Vancouver-Port Moody and loco.
P. V. Kinnee, New Westminster Chilliwack-Hope-Choate.
Mabel Kinvig, Miocene Horsefly-Williams Lake.
Ladner Transfer, Ltd., Ladner Ladner-Vancouver.
Ladner-New Westminster and Vancouver.
Russell W. Large, Enderby Mabel Lake-Enderby.
Lee's Transport, Vanderhoof Pinchi Lake—Vancouver.
Peter A. Lind, Sandon New Denver-Sandon.
Joseph Logus, Poplar Creek Lardo-Gerrard.
R. H. Loney, White Rock Surrey Municipality-Vancouver.
Mclnnis & Wise, Armstrong Vernon-Salmon Arm.
M. H. Mclvor, d/b/a Trail Livery Co., Trail Nelson-Rossland.
Mrs. L. M. McKinnon, Barkerville Barkerville-Quesnel. REPORT OF THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. I 39
Name and Address of Operator. Route.
Lee C. McFarland, Penticton Penticton-Naramata.
George S. McMyn, Pitt Meadows Maple Ridge Municipality-Vancouver.
Martens & Neufeldt, Yarrow Yarrow-Vancouver.
J. F. Miller, Marguerite Castle Rock-Williams Lake.
Miller & Brown Transfer, Cranbrook Kimberley and Cranbrook-Vancouver.
Mountain's Transfer, Langley Prairie Langley Municipality-Vancouver.
J. C. Muir, Nelson Nelson-Rossland.
F. W. Munro and A. L. Jeroski, Vancouver Vancouver-Penticton via Spences Bridge
and Merritt.
G. J. Newton, Kamloops Kamloops-Merritt.
North Thompson Freight Lines, Kamloops Kamloops-Birch Island.
Northern Freighters  (C. H. Blackburn), Fort St.    Vanderhoof-Fort   St.  James-Germansen
James Landing.
Albert Ogden, Procter Procter-Nelson.
O.K. Valley Freight Lines, Ltd., Penticton Osoyoos-Vernon.
Penticton-Princeton.
Overland Freight Lines, Ltd., Chilliwaek Chilliwack-Vancouver.
Harold H. Perkins, Buffalo Creek Exeter-Canim Lake.
A. G. Perry, Notch Hill Notch Hill-Sorrento.
P. W. Popoff, Blewett Nelson-Bonnington.
H. R. L. and A. M. Potter, Oliver Oliver (rural mail route).
Revie's Freight Lines, Cranbrook Cranbrook-Kimberley.
Cranbrook-Fernie.
Cranbrook-Creston.
Richmond Transfer, Vancouver Vancouver-Steveston.
Leonard Roberts, Courtenay Courtenay-Menzies Bay.
Saanich Freight Service, Sidney Deep Cove (Saanich)-Victoria.
Scott & Peden, Ltd., Victoria Victoria-Hillbank.
Chas. H. Scribner, Salmo Salmo-Trail.
Seattle-Vancouver, B.C. Motor Freight, Ltd., Van-    Vancouver-Seattle,
couver
Lloyd W. Shannon, Summerland West Summerland-Penticton.
Sidney Freight Service, Sidney Sidney-Victoria.
Seth Smith, Quesnel Quesnel-Williams Lake.
A. L. P. Stevens, Crescent Surrey Municipality-Vancouver.
L. R. Stevenson, Milner ;_Willoughby-Vancouver.
P. R. Stocking, Upper Hat Creek Ashcroft-Upper Hat Creek.
Stoltze Motor Freight, Vancouver Vancouver-Stave Falls.
A. L- Stuart, Redstone Redstone-Williams Lake.
Surrey Freight Lines, Cloverdale Cloverdale-Vancouver   (serving   Surrey
Municipality and a portion of Langley
Municipality).
R. H. E. Taylor, Pemberton Pemberton-Wilsons Gate.
Terminal Cartage, Ltd., Vancouver Vancouver-New Westminster.
Wesley Thompson, Agassiz Harrison Lake-Agassiz-Chilliwack-Sar-
dis.
A. S. Towle, Milner Langley Municipality-Vancouver.
Vanderspek's Transportation, Hope Vancouver-Hope.
J. A. and R. W. Wade, Quesnel Quesnel-Barkerville.
Quesnel-Kamloops.
Robert I. Walters, Williams Lake Williams Lake-Keithley Creek.
L. F. Ward, Nakusp Nakusp-Edgewood-Vernon.
West Coast Freight Service, Ltd., Port Alberni Port Alberni-Nanaimo.
White Rock Transfer  (J. A. Roddick and F. A.    Surrey Municipality-Vancouver.
Best), White Rock
White Transport Co., Ltd., Vancouver Vancouver-Kelowna.
Williams Transfer, Nelson Nelson-Creston.
Nelson-Slocan City. I 40 " MOTOR CARRIER ACT."
Name and Address of Operator. Route.
Geo. W. Williamson, Winfield Vernon-Oyama.
D. M. Winton, Vancouver Vancouver-Abbotsford.
George D. Witte, Big Creek Witte Ranch (5 miles westerly from Big
Creek)-Hanceville P.O.
Wood & Fraser Transport, Vancouver Vancouver-Prince George.
John Wyatt, Kelowna Kelowna-Winfield.
S. Ylisto, Solsqua Malakwa-Salmon Arm.
Peace River District.
Ralph Baxter, Dawson Creek Dawson Creek-Old Ft. Nelson.
Dawson Creek to northern boundary of
B.C. via Alaska Highway (operates to
Watson Lake, Y.T.).
Leslie G. Bazeley, Ft. St. John Ft. St. John-Hudson Hope.
R. M. Bourdon, Ft. St. John Ft. St. John-Dawson Creek.
British Yukon Navigation Co., Ltd., White Horse,    Dawson Creek to northern boundary of
Y.T. B.C. via Alaska Highway (operates to
White Horse, Y.T.).
Clarence Cook, Pouce Coupe Pouce  Coupe to B.C.-Alberta  Boundary
(operates to Bonanza, Alta.).
Steve E. Gilbert, Rolla Rolla-Pouce Coupe.
Clayton B. Hardin, Pouce Coupe Dawson Creek-Commotion Creek.
Emile and Yves Laloge, Pouce Coupe Dawson Creek to B.C.-Alberta Boundary
(operates to Grande Prairie, Alta.).
Wallace R. McFarlane, Pouce Coupe Dawson Creek to B.C.-Alberta Boundary
(operates to Grande Prairie, Alta.).
W. L. Parent, Dawson Creek Dawson Creek to B.C.-Alberta Boundary
(operates to Edmonton, Alta.).
Orlo J. Reid, Ft. St. John Ft. St. John-Dawson Creek.
Michael Ryan, Dawson Creek Dawson Creek-Groundbirch.
Geo. Schmidt, Dawson Creek Dawson Creek-Ft. Nelson.
Dawson  Creek to northern boundary of
B.C. (operates to Watson Lake, Y.T.).
Jack Stain, Ft. St. John Ft. St. John-Dawson Creek.
Janet P. Williamson, Ft. St. John . Ft. St. John-North Pine.
Ralph M. Williamson, Dawson Creek Dawson Creek-Ft. St. John.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.
565-847-5176 APPENDIX D.
I 41
NOTE.—The operation of Vehicles
must be in conformity with the
regulations under section 34 of
the "Highway Act" respecting
weights, dimensions, etc
PROVINCE OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA,  PUBLIC  UTILITIES COMMISSION
CHART ILLUSTRATING THE LICENSING OF MOTOR-VEHICLES UNDER "MOTOR CARRIER ACT
Prepared by Public Utilities Commission for guidance of Government officials.   For full information consult the Act and Regulations thereunder.
JANUARY, 1947
'JJ
KIND OF
MOTOR CARRIER'S
LICENCE
(Notb.—Licence-year expires last day of February.)
CLASSIFICATION
AND USE
Subject to Terms and Conditions of Licence.
PASSENGER-
■PUBLIC—
(Operated for
compensation.)
-LIMITED-
(Operated for
compensation.)
Available for use by the public; operated over regular
route or between fixed termini and on a regular time
schedule. (Application Form M.C. 1—blue.)
Note.—A vehicle may also be licensed as a combined
Public and Limited passenger-vehicle.
(Application Form M.C. 1—blue.)
Other than public passenger, whether or not available
for use by public; i.e., a taxicab or a bus available for
charter. (Note.—A taxicab operating exclusively in
one municipality is exempt.)
(Application Form M.C. 4—pink.)
FEES
As to fees for periods less than full year, see
Regulations 3.06 to 3.09, inclusive.
Fee for Replacement, $2.    Fee for Alteration of
Licence, $2.   See also  " Miscellaneous Fees."
Licence or Renewal
Full Year Fee.    Minimum Fee.
Per Seat
(authorized seating capacity
exclusive of
driver).
$3.00
83.60
$2.00
$15.00
$18.00
$8.00
Transfer
$5.00
$6.00
$5.00
INSURANCE
(FINANCIAL  RESPONSIBILITY.)
(Passenger-vehicles or combination passenger and freight vehicles only.)
Bodily Injury or Death
(To include Loss or Damage resulting from Bodily Injury
to or Death of any Person being carried in or upon or entering or getting on or alighting from  the  Motor-vehicle.)
Maximum   Authorized   Carrying
Capacity,  including Standing
Passengers.
7 or less	
8 to 12, inclusive.
13 to 21, inclusive.
22 to 39, inclusive.
31 to 40, inclusive.
41 to 50, inclusive.
51 to 75, inclusive.
Over 75 	
(For combination of passenger and
freight licences, see regulations.)
I-PUBLIC—I
(Operated for
compensation.)
FREICHT-kiMiTED-
ClaSS   T Combination of Class II. and Class
(Application Form M.C. 2—green.)
ClaSS   I Operated only on regular time sched
ule and regular route, or on regular
time schedule between fixed termini.
(Application Form M.C. 2—green.)
r|oefi   TIT     NOT operated on regular time sched-
\>,id»»   in.   uie and regular route NOR on regular
time schedule between fixed termini.
(Application Form M.C. 3—dark yellow.)
Per Ton Freight
(authorized
carrying
capacity).
$15.00
$12.00
$10.00
$15.00
$12.00
$10.00
$6.00
$5.00
$5.00
(Operated for
compensation.)
-PRIVATE-
(See definition below.*)
" Private freight-vehicle " means a motor-vehicle, other than
a public vehicle or a limited vehicle, that is operated at any
time or from time to time on a highway for the transportation of freight, and includes any motor-vehicle which is so
operated for any of the following purposes, viz.:—
(a.) The transportation of freight bona fide the property of
the owner of the motor-vehicle;
(b.) The transportation of freight used or subjected to a
process or treatment by the owner of the motor-
vehicle in the course of a regular trade or occupation
or established business of such owner, when the transportation is incidental to such trade, occupation, or
business;
(c.) The delivery or collection of freight sold or purchased,
or agreed to be sold or purchased, or let on hire by
the owner of the motor-vehicle, otherwise than as
agent, in the course of a regular trade or established
business of such owner. (See sec. 2, " Motor Carrier
Act.")
Operated solely under a limited number of special or
individual contracts or agreements; not available for
use by the general public.
(Application Form M.C. 5—canary yellow.)
$8.00
$8.00
$4.00
ClaSS   TTT     Restricted to vehicle owned by and
operated by or on behalf of a bona-fide
(Farm-vehicle.)     farmer and used in the manner described below.**
(Application Form M.C. 7—
white with green printing.)
f^lfiee   T Comprising all private freight-vehicles
V>.lcl»»   A. oth^r than Class m   private freight-
vehicles.
(Application Form M.C. 6—
white with black printing.)
Nil
.50
Nil
.00
Nil
$1.00
[See Regulation
5.25 below.)
Amount  against  Loss   or
Damage from Bodily Injury
to or Death of:
$5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
Two or more
Persons.
$10,000
15,000
20,000
30,000
40,000
50,000
75,000
100,000
Property
Damage.
$1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
TEMPORARY PERMITS.
{SEE PART 10 OF REGULATIONS.)
INSURANCE NOT REQUIRED FOR FREIGHT-VEHICLES.
GENERAL INFORMATION.
The " Motor Carrier Act" is administered by the Public Utilities Commission
of British Columbia.
The Motor Carrier Branch of the Public Utilities Commission has its main
office in the Motor-vehicle Building, 1740 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, with
a branch office, Room 510, Central Building, Victoria, B.C.
Communications should be addressed to:—
Superintendent of  Motor Carriers,
• Public Utilities Commission,
1740 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Inspectors have their headquarters at Victoria, Vancouver, Kamloops, Kelowna,
Nelson, Cranbrook, Prince George, and Dawson Creek respectively.
Application forms obtainable from any of the above places, also from offices
as listed on inside front cover of " Motor Carrier Act and Regulations."
Cheques, etc., should be made payable to " Public Utilities Commission."
All cheques covering fees must be certified.
For copy of " Motor Carrier Act and Regulations " apply to Superintendent
of  Motor Carriers,  Vancouver,  B.C.
Temporary Permits may be issued as follows:—
CLASS I. Permit for Temporary Operation of a Vehicle as a Private Freight-vehicle.
Limited to thirty (30) days, except under special authority of the Commission. Permit
fee $1.    (See Reg. 10.1.)
CLASS II. Permit for Temporary Operation of a Vehicle as a Public or Limited Vehicle,
for Transportation of Freight or Passengers for Compensation. (See Reg. 10.2.)
Limited to a maximum period of ninety (90) days in any licence-year, except under special
authority of the Commission. Permit fee—for a period of seven (7) days or less, $2; in
other cases as follows:—
For permit to operate vehicle as public freight-vehicle—proportionate to amount of
full-year licence fee payable for Class III. public freight-vehicle licence;
For permit to operate vehicle as limited freight-vehicle—proportionate to amount of
full-year licence fee payable for limited freight-vehicle licence;
For permit to operate vehicle as public or limited passenger-vehicle—proportionate to
full-year licence fee payable for limited passenger-vehicle licence,—
based on carrying capacity of vehicle, but in each case not less than minimum fee, all as
shown hereunder, namely:—
Period. Fee. Minimum Fee.
7 days or less $2.00                         $2.00
8 days to 30 days %2 of licence fee 2.50
31 days to 60 days % of licence fee 5.00
61 days to 90 days */4 of licence fee                 7.50
CLASS III. Permit for Operation of Licensed Public or Limited Vehicle temporarily in
a Manner other than is authorized by the Licence, for Transportation of Freight
or Passengers for Compensation. (See Reg. 10.3.) Limited to period of thirty (30)
days, except under special authority of the Commission.   Permit fee $1.
CLASS IV. Permit for Substitute Vehicle when Licensed Vehicle is disabled. (See Reg.
10.4.) No fee. In case of passenger vehicle, proof of financial responsibility must be
filed with respect to substitute vehicle if such proof is required under the regulations
respecting the licensed vehicle.
Where Permits may be obtained.
Permits, Classes I. to IV., inclusive, are obtainable from Superintendent
of Motor Carriers at Vancouver, and from Inspectors of Motor Carriers at
Victoria, Kamloops, Kelowna, Nelson, Cranbrook, Prince George, and Dawson
Creek, and at such other places as may be ordered.
CLASS VI. Permit to operate a School Bus to transport Pupils and a Limited Number
of Adult Persons to or from a Function where the Transportation has been sanctioned in writing by the Board of School Trustees or other Party in Charge of School.
(See Reg. 10.6.)    No fee.   Apply to B.C. Police.
SCOPE OF ACT—EXEMPTIONS, ETC.
(Note.—Private passenger-vehicles do not come within the scope of the "Motor Carrier Act.")
irk Class III. private freight-vehicles, comprising every private
freight-vehicle owned by and operated by or on behalf of a
bona-fide farmer and used exclusively for the transportation
of his own agricultural, orchard, or dairy products produced
on his farm, or his own live stock, or supplies and commodities for his farm, but not including private freight-vehicles
used for transportation in connection with a farm operated
wholly or chiefly for the raising or growing or the marketing
of nursery stock, ornamental trees, shrubs, flowers, or bulbs;
mushrooms; fur-bearing animals; nor for transportation of
forest products, except in connection with actual clearing of
his land for agricultural purposes; nor for the transportation of any commodity purchased by a farmer for resale.
(See regulations pursuant to " Motor Carrier Act.")
REPLACEMENTS.
If licensee wishes to obtain a licence on a
different vehicle in place of licensed vehicle,
application for replacement should be submitted on Form M.C. 8 (white, red printing).
MISCELLANEOUS FEES
For copy, of Conditions of Licence, 50 cents.
For duplicate licence and  (or)  substitute licence-plate, $1.
For " express " on public passenger-vehicle see Regulation
3.71.
TRANSFER OF LICENCE.
GENERAL.—Use   Form   M.C.   10   (white,
blue printing).
TRANSFER   OF   PRIVATE   FREIGHT-
VEHICLE     LICENCES     (Regulation
5.25).
A private freight-vehicle licence may be
transferred only in cases where the vehicle
will be used by the transferee in connection
with the same established business as that
for which it has been used by the transferor.
SCOPE.
The Act applies to all freight and passenger vehicles operated for compensation and to all
private freight-vehicles, except as exempted by the Act or the regulations thereunder. Does
not apply to horse-drawn vehicles. Does not apply to vehicles operated exclusively on a private
road.
EXEMPTED BY THE ACT.
(i.) A school bus while used exclusively in transporting pupils or teachers to or from a
school. Such vehicle must, however, comply with section 22 of the Act re stopping at railway
crossings.
(ii.) A taxicab operating exclusively in one municipality.
EXEMPTED BY THE REGULATIONS.
(Note.—For complete list of exemptions see Part 1 of the regulations.)
The following is a brief list of same:—
(a.) Vehicle owned and operated by Dominion Government, Provincial Government, or
Government of the U.S.A.; and any vehicle operated exclusively on behalf of Dominion
Government or Government of the U.S.A. in connection with naval, military, or air force
operations:
(b.) As to vehicles owned by municipalities, refer to Reg. 1.1  (b) and (c):
(d.) Unlicensed private freight-vehicles transporting not more than 300 lb. of freight (exclusive
of game, which may be carried in addition):
(e.) Vehicle when operated as an ambulance:
(/.) Hearse, funeral-coach, or other vehicle when operated for purpose of funeral:
(g.) Vehicle used solely for towing, repairing, or salvaging disabled motor-vehicles:
(A.) As to vehicles owned by dealers and operated for demonstration or testing, etc. see Reg.
1.1 (A):
(*.) Vehicle rented to and operated on behalf of Dominion Government, Provincial Government, or Government of the U.S.A. if conditional certificate issued by employee of Government authorized to hire the vehicle:
(j.) Vehicle (not licensed in British Columbia) operated under permit issued under section
15 of the " Motor-vehicle Act" in cases where the permit allows of making not more than
one (1) trip into the Province:
(/.) Transportation of freight wholly within certain defined areas if the freight is not transported across any boundary of the area:
These areas are set out in detail in Reg. 1.1 (/), clauses (i.) to (xiv.), inclusive, of the
regulations and include:—
(iv.) The municipal area of any single incorporated municipality; the respective areas
comprising: Spallumcheen Municipality and City of Armstrong; City of Chilliwaek and
Municipality of Chilliwhack; City and District Municipalities of Salmon Arm; Fraser Mills
and Coquitlam Municipalities;   Village and District Municipalities of Mission;   Village of
Abbotsford and Municipality of Matsqui; Village of Abbotsford and Municipality of Sumas
together with Huntingdon; City of Duncan and North Cowichan Municipality; City and
District Municipalities of North Vancouver; Municipalities of Victoria, Oak Bay, Esquimau, and that portion of Saanich Municipality which lies within'radius of 5 miles from
Victoria City Hall; City of Vancouver, the University Endowment Lands, and certain
portion of Burnaby Municipality as described in item (ii.); City of New Westminster
and certain portion of Burnaby which is described in item (iii.).
(».) As to taxis and limited passenger-vehicle exemptions see:—
(A.) Section 2 of "Motor Carrier Act," "Interpretation," namely:  Limited passenger-
vehicle which " shall not include a taxicab operating exclusively in one municipality."
(B.) Clauses (m) and (») of Reg. 1.1.
For other total exemptions in certain areas see clauses (o) to (q) of Reg. 1.1.
EXEMPTIONS FROM FEES AND INSURANCE.
(Applies only when ordered by the Commission.)
(See Reg. 1.2.)
(a.)  Passenger-vehicle used exclusively for transporting industrial workers:
(b.) Vehicle employed by or under contract with the Dominion Government for the purpose of
carrying mail only:
(c.) Any vehicle owned by the Greater Vancouver Water District or the Vancouver and Districts Joint Sewerage and Drainage Board, and used exclusively in the business of either
or both.
CARRIER'S LICENCE PLATES.
Letter Classification.
A    Public Passenger-vehicle.
B    Limited Passenger-vehicle, over 7 passengers.
C    Limited Passenger-vehicle, 7 passengers or less.
D   Public and Limited Passenger-vehicle.
E    Limited Freight-vehicle.
F    Limited Passenger- and Freight-vehicle, and such other combinations of licences not otherwise specified herein, as the Commission may approve.
G    Public Freight-vehicle, Class II.
H    Public Freight-vehicle, Class III.
J    Public Freight-vehicle, Class I.
K    Private Freight-vehicle, Class III. (farmer).
L    Private Freight-vehicle, Class I.
Note.—Carrier's licence-plate is not transferrable from one vehicle to another vehicle;
if licensed vehicle is sold, carrier's licence-plate must be surrendered (see also " Replacements ").
VICTORIA, B.C.:   Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.

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