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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT For the Year ended December 31st 1946 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1948

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL  REPORT
For the Year ended December 31st
1946
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiAimiD, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.  To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1946
is herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
August, 19b7. The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twenty-ninth Annual Report on
the work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1946.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., August, 1947.
JAMES THOMSON,
Deputy Minister of Labour. Summary of Contents.
Page.
List of Acts affecting Labour Inside front cover
Report of Deputy Minister   7
Statistics of Trades and Industries  7
Employers' Returns  7
Pay-roll   8
Previous Provincial Pay-rolls   8
Comparison of Pay-rolls   8
Industrial Divisions   9
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries  10
Industrial Wage :  12
Racial Origin and Nationality   16
Firms with large Pay-rolls   16
Statistical Tables   17
Summary of all Tables  30
" Hours of Work Act "  31
Average Weekly Hours  32
Hours of Work Regulations  91
Statistics of Civil and Municipal Workers  33
Summary of New Laws affecting Labour  35
" Annual Holidays Act Amendment Act, 1947 "  35
" Boiler Inspection Act Amendment Act, 1947 "  35
" Factories Act Amendment Act, 1947 "  36
" Female Minimum Wage Act Amendment Act, 1947 "  36
" Male Minimum Wage Act Amendment Act, 1947 "  36
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act, 1947 "  36
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act Amendment Act, 1947 "  38
" Shops Regulation and Weekly Half-holiday Act Amendment Act, 1947 "  38
Board of Industrial Relations  40
Meetings and Delegations   40
Orders made during 1946  41
Regulations made during 1946   42
Statistics covering Women and Girl Employees  :  42
Summary of all Occupations   49
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum  50
Single, Married, and Widowed Employees   51
Years of Service Table  52
Inspections and Wage Adjustments  53
Court Cases   54
Comparative Wages   56
Special Licences   57
Statistics for Male Employees  58
Summary of Orders    62
List of Orders in Effect  90
Hours of Work Regulations  91
Control of Employment of Children  97
Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch   100
Work of the British Columbia Board  100
Summary of Cases dealt with  100 K 6 SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch—Continued. pAGE.
Conciliation Procedure under the " Wartime Labour Relations Regulations
Act"  101
Table of Conciliation Proceedings   102
Boards of Conciliation  104
Strikes and Lockouts, 1946   104
Summary of Disputes  105
Analysis of Strikes by Industries, 1946   106
Time-loss through Industrial Disputes  107
Organizations of Employers and Employees   107
Inspection of Factories  124
Inspections  125
Accident-prevention    125
Lighting for Safety   127
Safeguarding the Workers' Health  128
Inspection of Freight and Passenger Elevators   129
Care and Maintenance of Elevators  130
Elevator Operators' Licences  131
New Elevator Installations   131
Elevator Inspections   131
Women in Industry  131
Industrial Home-work   132
Child Labour   133
Prosecutions   134
Apprenticeship Branch  135
Trade-schools Regulation Branch  138
Safety Branch   142 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1946.
This annual report for the year 1946, being the twenty-ninth of the Department,
marks a period of important advancement in the industrial history of the Province.
The decline in heavy production from record heights established during the war
yeare, while still in effect to some degree, was rapidly being overcome by increasing
industrial activity, stimulated by the demands of a peace-time economy.
With the balance favourable in the promise of a future prosperity, our 1946
Provincial estimated pay-roll totalled $403,161,610, an apparent increase of $19,461,610
over the final estimated total of $383,700,000 for 1945.
Average weekly earnings continued in strength throughout the year with increases
recorded in the average in twenty of the twenty-five tables in this report.
The average weekly wage figure for all adult male wage-earners stood at $39.87
for 1946, an increase of $1.37 over the preceding year and the highest recorded since
the formation of the Department.
Twenty-two of the twenty-five tables relating to the industrial group showed
increases in the pay-roll totals for 1946.
Greatest increase was in the construction industry (up $7,500,000), followed by
the lumber industry (up $5,000,000), and food products manufacturing (up over
$3,500,000). For others in order of increase see " Comparison of Pay-rolls " in report
data.
Termination of war contracts brought the greatest decrease in the ship-building
industry, which decreased some $27,500,000 from the previous year. Decreases were
also evident in miscellaneous trades and industries (down $4,500,000) and coal-mining
(off $13,000).
Employment totals continued to increase in those industries prospering normally
following reconversion to peace-time production. Expansion programmes designed to
overcome the demands created by war-time shortages brought added employment in
the construction industries, food products manufacturing, and the lumber industries.
The average monthly employment high for all industries in 1946 was 130,631 in August
of that year, compared with a high of 132,220 recorded in July of 1945.
Average weekly hours of work dropped sharply during the year in most industries,
the average weekly working-hours for all employees decreasing to 43.63 as against
45.59 for the previous year.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
With the shift of industrial weight from war production to the more permanent
function of equipping a civilian population with the needs of peace, the statistical
section for 1946 reflects the strength and stability of normal development within the
new era.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 7,326.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 7,326,
as compared with 5,687 in 1945, an increase of 1,639. K 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PAY-ROLL.
The 7,326 industrial firms reporting in time for classification in the tables showed
a total pay-roll of $272,956,504 for the year 1946. Representing only a summary of
industrial pay-rolls, however, this total is not considered as the over-all Provincial payroll unless further augmented by additional figures which follow, to give an estimated
accumulative total of $403,161,610, an apparent increase of $19,461,610 over final estimates for 1945.
Pay-rolls of 7,326 firms making returns to Department of Labour  $272,966,504.00
Returns received too late to be included in above summary         1,197,630.00
Transcontinental railways   (ascertained pay-roll)       23,301,258.00
Estimated additional pay-rolls, including employers covered by tbe survey but not
filing returns, and additional services not included in the tables; viz., Government workers, wholesale and retail firms, ocean services, miscellaneous (estimated pay-roll)       105,706,218.00
Total  $403,161,610.00
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS.
The estimated Provincial pay-roll totals since 1928 are as follows:—
1928  $183,097,781
1929  192,092,249
1930  167,133,813
1931  131,941,008
1932  102,957,074
1933  99,126,653
1934  113,567,953
1935  125,812,140
1936  142,349,591
1937  162,654,234
1938  $158,026,375
1939 .• 165,683,460
1940  188,325,766
1941  239,525,459
1942  321,981,489
1943  394,953,031
1944  388,100,000
1945*  383,700,000*
1946  403,161,6101
* 1945 total revised since 1945 report.
f 1946 preliminary total subject to revision.
In preparing the 1946 preliminary estimated pay-roll total, with increasing numbers
of firms reporting in the industrial section, due allowance has been made for increased
coverage and normal expansion in those additional services and occupations not included
in the tables.
As mentioned in previous reports, provision is now made for preliminary estimated
totals to be revised from year to year, based on additional information not available at
the time of publication.
The following table of percentages shows the proportionate distribution of the total
pay-roll, covering each class of worker included in the survey:—
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Per Cent.
7.13
8.66
84.21
Per Cent.
6.57
9.18
84.25
Per Cent.
7.26
10.72
82.02
Per Cent.
7.95
11.62
80.43
Per Cent.
9.07
12.14
Wage-earners -— - — — —
78.79
Totals                  -    - --
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
Recovering from the effects of a transitory period which closely followed the war
years, industrial pay-roll totals registered increases in twenty-two of the twenty-five
industrial classifications included in the survey for 1946.
Greatest peace-time gain was recorded in the construction industry, which increased
by $7,571,146 over the previous year, followed by the lumber industries, up $5,266,309,
and food products, with an increase of $3,828,480; the public utility group increased by REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 9
$2,370,100, followed by smelting and concentrating, up $1,381,401, and pulp and paper
manufacturing with a gain of $1,278,310; coast shipping, an increase of $955,091;
wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), up $950,933; builders' materials, up $881,476; house
furnishings, an increase of $760,047; printing and publishing, up $750,755; metal-
mining, up $593,911; metal trades, an increase of $454,026; laundries, cleaning and
dyeing, up $439,401; oil refining and distributing, up $371,746; garment-manufacturing, increased by $286,965; leather and fur goods, up $234,210; explosives and chemicals, $192,871; breweries and distillers, $177,470; jewellery-manufacturing, $103,808;
paint-manufacturing, $85,023;   and cigar and tobacco manufacturing, up $473.
Greatest decrease was again evident in the ship-building industry, where completion
of large war-time contracts brought a further pay-roll decrease of $27,620,083, followed
by miscellaneous trades and industries, down $4,681,206 from the previous year, and
coal-mining, with a decrease of $13,031.
Comparison of Pay-rolls.
1944.
1945.
1946.
Industry.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
32
80
3
27
110
916
23
582
71
77
13
108
69
1,041
858
79
456
59
11
140
12
46
5
105
121
$2,214,874.00
2,342,130.00
12,474.00
5,330,371.00
10,987,169.00
26,473,970.00
4,019,643.00
21,321,132.00
1,587,579.00
1,911,175.00
364,625.00
2,732,092.00
1,051,061.00
48,588,954.00
24,644,374.00
9,367,532.00
28,122,805.00
3,040,979.00
510,521.00
4,653,479.00
9,449,766.00
52,618,098.00
6,444,645.00
14,485,994.00
7,524,236.00
34
88
3
23
106
1,116
28
617
68
99
19
123
75
1,174
957
111
496
67
9
143
9
56
5
114
147
$2,789,221.00
2,883,098.00
12,325.00
4,904,871.00
12,040,142.00
24,604,052.00
4,047,719.00
23,114,617.00
1,644,656.00
2,480,693.00
419,776.00
3,107,163.00
1,168,011.00
49,074,693.00
22,746,651.00
9,580,047.00
18,467,001.00
3,941,603.00
507,707.00
5,356,035.00
9,880,380.00
42,370,186.00
6,596,640.00
16,657,271.00
7,942,314.00
32
92
3
25
112
1,732
36
649
81
135
21
130
91
1,549
1,209
142
691
73
10
130
8
79
4
111
181
$2,966,691.00
3,764,574.00
12,798.00
4,891,840.00
12,995,233.00
32,175,198.00
4,240,590.00
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Construction	
26,943,097.00
1,931,621.00
3,240,740.00
523,584.00
3,546,564.00
1,402,221.00
54,341,002.00
23,200,677.00
10,173,958.00
13,785,795.00
4,313,349.00
592,730.00
6,106,790.00
11,158,690.00
14,750,103.00
7,978,041.00
19,027,371.00
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
8,893,247.00
Totals	
5,044
$289,799,678.00
5,687
$276,336,872.00
7,326
$272,956,504.00
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
Segregating the industrial activities of the Province into three main divisions,
comparative statistical records are maintained from- year to year covering Greater
Vancouver, Rest of Mainland, and Vancouver Island. With the return to pre-war
standards of production in some of the heavier industries located in the Vancouver area,
the 1946 total decreased somewhat in this division, to show 44.23 per cent, of the total
pay-roll, as against 49.43 per cent, attributable to this division in the previous year.
The Mainland percentage accordingly increased to 36.50 per cent, from 31.59 per cent,
in 1945, while the Vancouver Island totals also recorded an increase, the percentage
representing this division rising from 18.98 to 19.27 per cent, for the year under
review. K 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
By application of these percentages to the total estimated 1946 pay-roll, a divisional
breakdown is obtained which appears in the following table, together with comparative
data for previous years:—
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.«
1946.T
Greater Vancouver	
$147,821,701.60
115,623,552.70
58,536,234.70
$185,153,980.93
139,655,391.76
70,143,658.31
$171,190,910.00
148,758,730.00
68,150,360.00
$189,662,910.00
121,210,830.00
72,826,260.00
$178,318,380.00
147,153,988.00
77,689,242.00
Totals	
$321,981,489.00
$394,953,031.00
$388,100,000.00
$383,700,000.00
$403,161,610.00
* 1945 total revised since publication of 1945 report.
t 1946 preliminary total subject to revision.
A study of the tables with respect to the number of adult male workers remaining
in the lower wage brackets again showed decreasing percentages in eleven of the
twenty-five industrial classifications.
In order to observe the percentages employed in each industry in the lower earnings
group in relation to the total employment of adult males, the following list of industries
is arranged in order of diminishing percentages to show the total adult males employed
during the week of employment of the greatest number, together with the percentage
of that number earning less than $19 per week.                           „   , _   _  ,
Number Per Cent.
Industry.                                                                                                                         employed. Less than $19.
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing        754 14.99
Coast shipping      6,584 6.67
House furnishings      1,338 6.50
Printing and publishing      1,430 5.87
Miscellaneous trades and industries     6,238 5.80
Garment-manufacturing  1        248 5.24
Food products   13,215 5.14
Smelting and concentrating      2,459 5.04
Leather and fur goods        425 4.00
Construction     21,191 3.71
Builders' materials      1,951 3.33
Metal trades      9,793 3.21
Explosives and  chemicals         1,818 3.14
Jewellery-manufacturing        110 2.73
Ship-building       9,092 2.36
Oil-refining      1,172 2.22
Wood-manufacturing   (N.E.S.)        4,008 2.17
Breweries and distilleries      1,264 1.58
Pulp and paper manufacturing     4,030 1.56
Paint-manufacturing         142 1.41
Lumber industries   32,126 1.30
Metal-mining       5,047 0.95
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc     6,367 0.83
Coal-mining      2,396 0.08
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing           9 o.OO
AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS BY INDUSTRIES.
A survey based on the week of employment of the greatest number showed increased
average weekly earnings for adult male workers in twenty of the twenty-five tables,
while decreases were noted in the remaining five.
Average weekly earnings for adult males in each industry are shown in the
following table from 1939 to 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 11
Average Weekly Earnings in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
$27.98
23.23
19.75
29.39
29.35
26.12
25.75
23.23
24.25
22.53
39.23
23.19
21.19
27.14
25.38
30.86
23.91
28.97
22.69
34.34
26.54
28.55
25.57
28.63
23.22
$28.23
24.15
17.70
28.04
30.34
27.52
31.67
23.59
25.22
23.59
43.44
24.00
21.72
28.83
26.18
31.77
24.36
29.17
23.15
34.34
29.84
31.74
32.75
28.57
24.88
$29.29
26.26
14.50
31.84
30.03
30.21
33.39
25.65
26.51
25.74
38.72
24.76
26.07
31.01
29.90
33.72
26.97
30.97
24.95
36.78
32.13
35.27
37.07
30.93
27.01
$31.85
30.78
15.83
34.56
31.24
36.41
36.45
30.52
27.72
27.76
38.59
28.20
27.80
33.94
34.00
37.19
33.58
33.40
28.73
37.10
33.92
40.32
38.49
32.28
30.24
$33.46
31.61
15.10
39.00
33.97
39.60
37.54
32.66
32.03
28.13
41.14
30.39
30.18
37.09
36.37
35.82
34.92
35.52
30.71
38.39
36.41
40.08
38.47
35.01
33.34
$34.72
33.17
23.61
42.38
35.86
38.47
36.50
35.06
34.42
31.28
44.64
33.05
32.47
41.28
39.07
39.40
37.21
37.99
33.42
39.47
37.71
40.36
36.74
37.29
34.75
$33.73
34.12
20.90
42.11
36.54
37.50
40.43
35.62
36.11
31.39
41.38
31.34
31.63
41.24
38.41
39.99
35.31
38.71
33.42
41.63
37.88
39.96
41.19
37.21
34.70
$37.09
37.02
28.94
43.53
37.27
39.17
38.87
38.00
36.50
33.27
43.00
33.06
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of..
34.72
43.20
37.83
42.31
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
35.23
39.05
33.31
42.12
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
43.43
40.28
38.70
Street-railways, gas, water, power, tele-
39 45
Wood, manufacturing of (N.E.S.)	
37.88
The increases and decreases in the average weekly earnings are as follows:—
Increase.
Breweries   and   distilleries     $3.36
Builders' materials   2.90
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing   8.04
Coal-mining     1.42
Coast shipping   0.73
Construction    1.67
Food products, manufacture of   2.38
Garment-making     0.39
House furnishings   1.88
Jewellery, manufacture of   1.62
Laundries,   cleaning  and  dyeing    1.72
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of $3.09
Lumber industries    1.96
Metal mining  „  2.32
Oil-refining     0.34
Printing and publishing   0.49
Pulp and paper manufacturing   5.55
Ship-building    0.32
Street railways, gas, water, power, telephones,  etc  2.24
Wood, manufacturing of (N.E.S.)    3.18
Decrease.
Explosives  and chemicals    $1.56
Metal  trades       0.58
Miscellaneous trades and industries      0.08
Paint-manufacturing     $0.11
Smelting and concentrating      2.49 K 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
During 1946 the computed average weekly wage figure for all adult male workers
in the wage-earner group rose to $39.87, the highest recorded since the formation of
the Department.
Average industrial wage figures from 1918 to 1946 are as follows:—
1918  $27.97
1919  29.11
1920  31.51
1921  27.62
1922  27.29
1923  28.05
1924  28.39
1925  27.82
1926  27.99
1927  28.29
1928  28.96
1929  29.20
1930  28.64
1931  26.17
1932  23.62
1933 $22.30
1934  23.57
1935  24.09
1936 -- 26.36
1937  26.64
1938  26.70
1939  26.80
1940  28.11
1941  30.67
1942  35.24
1943  37.19
1944  38.70
1945  38.50
1946  39.87
Based on the above average weekly wage figures, the following chart shows the
trend of average weekly earnings for adult male workers from 1918 to 1946.
AVERAGE   WEEKLY   WAGES   PAID
1918 -
TO  ADULT
1946
MALE   EMPLOYEES
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WAGES
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
39 00
3S OO
37 00
3b OO
35 OO
34 OO
33.00
32.00
31  00
30.00
29 00
28 00
27 00
2600
25 00
24 00
23 00
22.00
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(1946 figure—$39.87.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 13
O 0
January   109,941
February   109,512
March    111,965
April   114,115
1946.
May   113,764
June   110,566
July  123,640
August   130,631
September   130,317
October    129,253
November   128,780
December    121,995 K 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Percentage
Weekly of
Wages. Employees.
Under $15    2.65
$15 to    20     7.55
20 to   25  20.42
25 to   30  20.40
30 to   35  17.46
35 to   40  13.08
40 to   45  10.65
45 to   50     4.17
50 and over     3.62
Under $15  1-66
$15 to   20  2.99
20 to   25  9.20
25 to   30  17.62
30 to   35  17.12
35 to   40  18.32
40 to   45  12.42
45 to   50  9.34
50 and over  11.33
Under $15  1.99
$15 to   20  1.82
20 to   25  4.83
25 to   30  12.08
30 to   35  19.33
35 to   40  18.91
40 to   45  14.21
45 to   50  11.90
50 and over  14.93
Under $15     1.97
$15 to   20     1.72
20 to   25     3.53
25 to   30     9.90
30 to   35  22.06
35 to    40   19.48
40 to   45  17.38
45 to   50  11.53
50 and over  12.43
Under $15     1.81
$15 to   20     1.62
20 to   25     3.85
25 to   30     9.89
30 to   35  22.38
35 to   40  19.70
40 to   45  18.97
45 to   50     9.59
50 and over  12.19
Under $15     2.03
$15 to   20     1.45
20 to   25     3.22
25 to   30     7.43
30 to   35  17.52
35 to   40  22.43
40 to   45  19.53
45 to   50  10.69
50 and over  15.70
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in the various wage classifications from 1941 to 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
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! K 16
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
NATIONALITIES OF EMPLOYEES.
With reference to nationalities, the 1946 survey covered a total of 179,532 employees, of which 146,264 or 81.47 per cent, were originally from English-speaking
countries; 22,641 or 12.61 per cent, originally from Continental Europe; 5,082 or
2.83 per cent, from Asiatic stock; and 5,545 or 3.09 per cent, from other countries,
or nationality not stated.
The following table sets out comparative percentages for the past five years:—
Racial Origin.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
Per Cent.
77.37
16.55
4.34
1.74
Per Cent.
75.25
18.87
3.80
2.08
Per Cent.
76.08
18.27
3.95
1.70
Per Cent.
77.86
16.44
3.46
2.24
Per Cent.
81 47
Totals	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
The number of firms reporting pay-rolls in excess of $100,000 continued to increase
during 1946, a total of 475 firms being recorded in this higher pay-roll bracket compared with 449 for the previous year.
Excluded from the coverage of this survey are pay-rolls of public authorities
(Dominion, Provincial, or municipal), wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental
railways, and vessels engaged in deep-sea transportation.
Continuing in the lead, the lumber industry again showed the greatest number of
firms in the larger pay-roll group, with a total of 117, decreased by 4 from the previous
year; followed by food products with 54, an increase of 6; construction industry, 53,
increased by 7; metal trades, 48, an increase of 4; miscellaneous trades and industries,
32, up 3; coast shipping, 21, up 2; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), 20, an increase of 3;
ship-building, 17, unchanged; public utilities, 17, up 1; metal-mining, 15, down 1;
printing and publishing, 11, increased by 3; builders' materials, 9, up 1; laundries,
cleaning and dyeing, 9, an increase of 1; oil-refining, 9, a decrease of 2; pulp and
paper manufacturing, 8, down 1; breweries and distilleries, 7, unchanged; coal-mining,
7, unchanged; garment-making, 5, unchanged; explosives and chemicals, 4, increased
by 1; house furnishings, 4, up 1; leather and fur goods, 3, up 1; paint-manufacturing,
2, unchanged; smelting and concentrating, 2, unchanged; and jewellery-manufacturing, 1, unchanged from the previous year.
Of the 475 firms reported above, two had pay-rolls in excess of $5,000,000, four
between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, five between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000, nine between
$2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and seventeen between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 17
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading:-—-
No. 1. Breweries and Distilleries.—Comprises firms engaged
in these industries,  and carbonated-water manufacturers.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc.—Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick; also
stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.-—This group contains also the operation
of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.-—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-hoats (both general and
towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include the
operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction.—Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-metal
works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel
fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves, dredging,
pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic sprinklers.
Firms making returns as building contractors, constructors of dry-
kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces, electrical contractors,
hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc.-—Includes the manufacture of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacturing of.—This table includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packing-houses,
curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers
of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces, coffee, catsup,
and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.-—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' out-fitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacturing of.—Includes the repair as
well as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical instruments   (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacturing of.—Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills, and
lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine black-
smithing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops, galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of handsaws, nuts
and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and repairs to
same.
No.   16.   Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, cartage and warehousing, motor and aerial transportation,
ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.—Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.-—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-ruling,
bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of
rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only firms
engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-
ship building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
mgaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial gases, operation of street-railways, and waterworks.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings, barrels,
boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes and tanks,
wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins, and undertakers'
supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERIES, and AERATED-
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering 32 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers       $331,461
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        210,604
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     2,424,626
Total  $2,966,691
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
1,136
510
July   --	
1,241
339
February	
979
473
August —
1,223
319
March	
1,115
418
September
1,205
319
April	
1,118
472
October	
1,100
317
May	
1,104
511
November ..
1,080
315
June	
1,237
471
December
1,118
298
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99     .
5
2
2
2
7
2
5
3
5
4
6
14
5
14
30
27
21
286
449
271
47
31
14
6
4
2
2
3
1
1
1
2
4
2
2
2
6
1
11
2
4
7
5
3
2
9
4
1
1
1
4
2
3
1
2
7
5
5
8
5
16
25
123
41
24
7
93
13
75
1
33
8
10
7
7.00 to    7.99  	
8.00 to    8.99 -  -.
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99 	
12.00 to 12.99 	
2
13.00 to 13.99 -.- -..ffl
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99   —    .
16.00 to 16.99
17.00 to 17.99	
1
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99.	
20.00 to 20.99	
9
21.00 to 21.99
3
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99    	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00' to 25.99. -	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99 	
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99	
x
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99 	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99  ..-	
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.
Females.
864
329
40
3
2
29
20
14
6
33
38
4
Italy	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
13
Other European country	
3
British India and East Indies	
All other countries	
7
4 K 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 92 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $384,523
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        400,533
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     2,979,518
Total  $3,764,574
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January—	
1,479
41
July	
1,698
30
February....
1,523
44
August   	
1,737
31
March	
1,544
43
September ..
1.753
30
April	
1,599
35
October	
1,784
31
May  	
1,664
33
November...
1,811
31
June
1.699
33
December ..
1,772
30
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under J
$6.00 to
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
11.00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00  to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
50.00 to
55.00 to
60.00 to
65.00 to
70.00 an
6.00  ...
$6.99.
7.99
8.99-
9.99 .
10.99.
11.99 .
12.99
13.99.
14.99 .
15.99 .
16.99 .
17.99 .
18.99.
19.99
20.99
21.99 .
22.99
23.99 .
24.99 .
25.99 .
26.99 .
27.99..
28.99 .
29.99
34.99 .
39.99 .
44.99
49.99 .
54.99
59.99 -
64.99
69.99
d over
12
5
1
5
2
4
2
2
6
3
6
5
6
9
10
18
22
15
23
29
67
35
526
520
287
161
82
35
12
12
12
Under
21 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.
and over.
3
17
21
4
1
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.       Females.
Canada and Newfoundland ....
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
etc	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
All other countries	
1,159    |
483
61
1
3
20
47
18
2
71
75
19
61
40
42
5
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 3 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $1,280
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  864
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     10,654
Total	
$12,798
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January
February
March	
April	
May .—-	
June	
7
7
6
6
6
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
July	
August   	
September.
October	
November ..
December
8
7
7
7
7
8
2
3
3
3
4
4
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00  ..
     1     	
$6.00 to $6.99 	
7.00 to    7.99  	
1
1
1
1
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99 	
10.00 to  10.99 	
11.00 to 11.99 	
12.00 to  12.99   	
13.00 to 13.99 	
14.00 to 14.99
15.00 to  15.99 -	
16.00 to  16.99      -
17.00 to 17.99   	
18.00 to 18.99
3
1
1
4
19.00 to 19.99
.....ffl    1     _.....
20.00 to 20.99    -
......
21.00  to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99 	
24.00 to  24.99 	
25.00' to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99  	
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99     ..
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99  	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00  to 69.99 —-	
...ffl.,    1     .ffl..,.
70.00 and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.
Females.
5     i                4
1
1
Italy	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
1
All other countries.-.	
	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 19
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 25 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $464,744
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        104,388
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     4,322,708
Total  $4,891,840
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
2,432
2,433
2,445
2,305
2,283
2,274
5
5
5
5
5
5
July
2,269
2,198
2,162
2,215
2,286
2,361
5
February
March	
April	
May... 	
June	
August
September .
October
November __
December
5
4
4
4
4
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
1
1
1
1
5
16
6
7
5
5
4
172
231
1,207
518
58
28
121
7
2
$6.00 to $6.99_. 	
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99          	
10.00 to 10.99
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99 	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99
15.00 to  15.99
2
1
18
ll
7
1
	
2
1
16.00 to 16.99            	
17.00 to 17.99      -.
18.00 to 18.99
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99
21.00 to 21.99
22.00 to 22.99 ...	
23.00 to 23.99    	
24.00 to 24.99 	
25.00 to 25.99
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99
28.00 to 28.99            	
29 00 to 29.99
30.00 to 34.99        .      .
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99     -    	
55.00 to 59.99          	
60.00  to 64.99 ._..	
65 00  to 69 99
70.00 and over
	
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland.
etc	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China.	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
AU other countries	
1,020
658
44
5
6
193
34
125
15
231
'    23
78
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 112 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $1,087,747
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       1,040,795
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     10,866,691
Total  $12,995,233
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March 	
April 	
May 	
June 	
6,047
5,734
5,900
5,868
5,924
5,795
161 || July	
160     August-
160     September
157     October
163     November..
190 Ll December
5,878
6,118
6,203
6,383
6,529
6,848
198
201
179
165
162
159
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 ..
53
26
29
41
38
16
21
45
23
26
14
43
36
28
52
95
106
123
188
166
158
196
158
208
169
995
620
1,155
790
363
264
93
60
186
5
1
1
1
3
9
3
1
6
5
12
10
106
39
5
5
10
39
192
27
9
2
1
1
1
2
1
10
7
1
2
1
3
1
2
2
104
2
6
22
8
6
1
	
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99    .-
10.00 to 10.99- 	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99  	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99 - -
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
2
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99 	
20.00 to 20.99    ..
21.00 to 21.99--  --
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99   ..
26.00 to 25.99 . _
26.00 to 26.99 	
27.00 to 27.99
1
28.00 to 28.99 .__	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99 	
40.00 to 44.99 	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99  -
70.00 and over    	
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
etc	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
All other countries	
4,023
1,422
119
15
15
19
25
15
24
204
79
39
180
6
183
35
4 K 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 6.
CONSTRUCTION.
Returns covering 1,732 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $2,842,536
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       2,714,579
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     26,618,083
Total   $32,175,198
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
11,583
11,854
12,766
13,236
14.639
14,839
203
201
227
253
356
418
15,631
448
February
March	
April	
May 	
June
August
September
October
November
December
16,621
16,139
16.357
16.061
'4.796
439
321
296
304
269
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00  	
$6.00 to $6.99 ._	
7.00  to    7.99   --- -
108
65
44
61
35
58
25
62
55
53
48
50
61
62
16
4
3
7
14
15
9
34
23
17
22
20
15
20
32
3
6
6
1
10
3
9
5
10
12
12
26
33
4
26
3
10
14
8
14
15
11
8
8
38
16
5
1
4
1
5
10
5
1
8.00 to    8.99 -
9.00  to    9.99 	
2
4
10.00 to 10.99-	
11.00  to  11.99  .
3
2
12.00 to 12.99   	
3
13.00 to  13.99	
1
14.00 to  14.99	
7
15.00 to  15.99  	
1
16.00 to 16.99 —	
13
17.00 to 17.99 	
2
18.00 to 18.99	
12
19.00 to 19.99 	
88     [        34
20.00 to 20.99 	
128
76
178
143
238
207
344
245
693
303
5,295
3.265
2,887
2,015
3,002
587
293
126
35
24
37
13
23
21
45
29
36
22
150
86
48
14
7
1
2
1
10
21.00 to 21.99 	
2
22.00 to 22.99  	
3
23.00 to 23.99
4
24.00   to  24.99 	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99	
1
28.00 to 28.99    ..
1
29.00 to 29.99     ....
30.00 to 34.99  	
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99 	
2
45.00 to 49.99  	
50.00 to 54.99  ...   	
55 00  to 59.99
60.00  to 64.99 	
65.00 to 69.99    	
70.00  and over
311
2
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France-	
Italy.-.	
Germany	
Aust'ia and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
etc	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China  	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
A1! other countries 	
13,271
4,753
456
52
37
91
233
156
125
1,417
862
264
5
7
4
1,136
475
89
11
1
2
2
1
9
16
1
ii
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 36 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $236,299
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         821,456
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     3^182,835
Total   $4,240,590
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
1,134
74
July	
1,161
52
February	
1,180
70
August   .—
1,193
48
March	
1,206
72
September
1,160
49
April	
1,219
65
October   . .
1,210
49
May	
1.263
63
November
1,228
47
June	
1,218
53
December
1,213
41
Classified Weekly Earnings  (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00     ..___	
$6.00 to $6.99 	
7.00 to    7.99  	
8.00  to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
9
6
3
3
3
5
1
3
4
5
3
12
6
5
14
6
6
17
15
11
22
22
25
263
487
507
197
149
5
4
1
4
2
4
3
4
2
1
3
2
4
4
4
25
33
16
7
2
3
1
2
1
2
7
1
7
16
4
4
4
5
3
1
7
1
2
10.00 to 10.99  	
11.00 to 11.99 	
12.00 to 12.99
1
13.00 to 13.99 .-	
14.00  to 14.99  	
15.00 to  15.99
1
16.00 to  16.99 -	
17.00 to 17.99
1
18.00 to 18.99 --	
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to 20.99    -	
21.00  to 21.99 	
22.00 to 22.99 	
23.00 to 23.99 -
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00  to 25.99 	
26.00 to 26.99  	
27.00 to 27.99 - —
28.00 to 28.99    	
29.00  to 29.99     	
30.00  to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99   	
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99   	
55.00 to 59.99    —
60.00 to 64.99 —	
65.00 to 69.99
70.00  and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland
etc _	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
All other countries.	
1,279
482
77
2
1
2
56
1
6
56
37
1
5
Females.
107
16 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 21
Table No. 8.
FOOD  PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 6U9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers..
$2,836,097
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        3,523,166
Wag^earners (including piece-workers)	
20,583,834
Total
   $26,943,097
Average
Number
of Wage
earners.
Month.
Males.
Females
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
7.247
3,477
July 	
10,334
5,571
February	
6,591
2,762
August   —
11,119
7,931
March	
6.632
2,694
September
11,361
8,287
April	
7,386
2,728
October 	
10,993
7,574
May	
8.259
3,078
November
10,097
6,976
June
8.883
3,668
December
9,085
5,465
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00   	
$6.00 to $6.99	
142
39
21
37
26
48
41
45
46
38
46
51
53
46
101
88
67
91
101
131
346
205
221
401
489
3,137
2,545
1,696
873
739
296
211
118
680
108
22
22
9
21
29
19
16
20
21
28
27
31
33
27
37
33
37
40
74
45
41
68
54
48
298
151
■     91
63
31
15
12
2
2
277
72
72
64
63
122
101
164
170
232
228
310
404
559
357
497
382
457
320
758
464
393
466
373
387
920
401
194
78
50
17
21
13
7
168
26
7.00 to    7.99 	
27
8.00 to    8.99
38
9.00 to    9.99 	
27
10.00 to 10.99 -	
11.00 to 11.99 	
50
30
12.00 to 12.99 	
13.00 to 13.99	
34
30
14.00 to 14.99  	
15.00 to 15.99	
67
56
16.00 to 16.99	
71
17.00 to 17.99   -
96
18.00 to 18.99   	
90
19.00 to 19.99 	
58
20.00 to 20.99  	
79
21.00 to 21.99	
53
22.00 to 22.99   	
23.00 to 23.99
84
32
24.00 to 24.99   	
122
25.00 to 25.99    -
59
26.00 to 26.99  -
46
27.00 to 27.99 	
80
28.00  to 28.99   	
33
29.00  to 29.99        	
68
30.00 to 34.99
88
32
40.00 to 44.99      	
11
5
50 00 to 54.99           -
3
1
70.00 and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia  	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary--.-	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland
etc -..-	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China-- -	
British India and East Indies	
Jaian 	
All other countries  	
9,270
3,138
315
117
27
63
75
111
89
637
564
147
1,309
2
43
346
8,455
1,725
246
3
6
45
44
81
57
225
451
106
56
9
80
369
Table No. 9.
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 81 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers-      $240,358
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        282,387
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     1,408,876
Total   $1,931,621
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.         Month.
Males.
Females.
January
February....
March	
April  .
May ffl_-	
June .. ....
230
245
241
248
252
255
1,009 I
1,030
1,087
1,130
1,145
1,148
July	
August
September-
October
November-
December
255
266
256
261
269
275
1,056
957
988
1,079
1,094
1,073
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
6
3
3
2
	
12
7
9
6
8
46
45
41
14
14
10
4
1
3
2
2
3
2
3
5
1
8
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
	
12
5
2
7
8
9
12
27
27
52
50
8S
53
108
68
104
66
81
72
40
78
32
35
28
23
62
40
14
6
4
1
1
2
$6.00 to $6.99
2
7.00  to    7.99   	
8.00 to    8.99
1
9.00 to    9.99  	
1
10.00  to  10.99
2
11.00 to 11.99	
5
12.00 to  12.99
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99  	
15.00 to  15.99	
4
4
12
10
16.00  to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99   	
10
1
18.00 to 18.99 	
3
19.00 to  19.99   	
1
20.00 to 20.99  ..--	
21.00 to 21.99 	
1
22.00 to 22.99   	
23.00 to 23.99 	
24.00 to 24.99	
3
1
25.00 to 25.99 	
26.00 to 26.99  	
27.00 to 27.99	
3
28.00 to 28.99  '
29.00 to 29.99 	
30.00 to 34.99   	
35.00  to  39.99
40.00 to 44.99   	
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99
55.00  to 59.99   ._ -
60.00 to 64.99   	
65.00 to 69.99          	
70.00 and over
	
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace)
Males.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia -	
Belgium	
France _	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
etc 	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan _.
AM othpr countries 	
149
64
5
1
18
7
20
835
258
20
1
4
4
4
4
6 K 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 135 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $419,706
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        269,882
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     2,551,152
Total   $3,240,740
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.!        Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
1,181
651
July..,.,,	
1,285
584
February. ...
1,195
651
August
1,318
599
March	
1,231
661
September
1,328
581
April	
1,264
642
October	
1,396
606
May	
1,276
629
November -
1,452
612
June 	
1.239
575
December
1,459
616
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
9
14
4
1
7
2
6
4
3
7
3
9
18
12
13
15
25
11
24
27
57
46
72
59
334
321
121
66
22
14
4
8
17
5
1
1
4
5
4
11
12
9
12
11
18
7
12
20
5
19
14
11
2
5
13
9
3
1
8
3
1
2
2
6
2
9
10
13
21
21
56
82
59
75
41
49
24
43
36
30
25
20
15
30
7
6
1
$6.00 to $6.99   	
7.00 to    7.99   - -
2
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99   ...   	
1
1
11.00 to 11.99	
1
12.00 to 12.99    _
2
13.00 to 13.99    _
4
14.00 to 14.99   	
5
15.00 to 15.99   	
2
16.00 to 16.99   	
1
17.00 to 17.99   	
1
18.00 to 18.99    	
8
19.00 to 19.99   	
8
20.00 to 20.99    -
3
21.00 to 21.99   	
5
22.00 to 22.99   	
2
23.00 to 23.99   	
2
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99   	
1
27.00 to 27.99   .
1
28.00 to 28.99   	
2
29.00 to 29.99
30.00 to 34.99   ...   -
1
35.00 to 39.99     ..    __
40.00 to 44.99   	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99   	
55.00 to 59.99   	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 21 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $69,468
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     225,010
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     229,106
Total  $523,584
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
99
32
July	
118
35
February	
102
32
August 	
121
35
March. 	
115
34
September -
122
35
April	
116
36
October	
117
34
May -	
118
35
November ..
119
33
June 	
120
35
December
122
33
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99 -
7.00 to 7.99 .
8.00 to 8.99-
9.00 to 9.99-
10.00 to 10.99-
11.00 to 11.99-
12.00 to 12.99
13.00 to 13.99 -
14.00 to 14.99
15.00 to 15.99 ..
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99 .
18.00 to 18.99.
19.00 to 19.99-
20.00 to 20.99 -
21.00 to 21.99.
22.00 to 22.99 _
23.00 to 23.99 ..
24.00 to 24.99 ..
25.00' to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99 -
27.00 to 27.99-
28.00 to 28.99 -
29.00 to 29.99
30.00 to 34.99 .
35.00 to 39.99 -
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99 -
50.00 to 54.99 -
55.00 to 59.99 -
60.00 to 64.99 -
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over
I
Females.
21 Yrs.      Under
and over.   21 Yrs.
7
9
20
14
9
18 Yrs.     Under
and over.   18 Yrs.
Nationality of Emp
oyees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.
Females.
983
287
34
4
7
5
9
17
34
51
58
9
2
588
111
18
1
4
2
5
3
1
15
30
4
86
38
1
Italy....	
Italy	
Germany	
Germany	
1
3
3
2
1
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
Kussia or other Slav country	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
1
China :	
British India and East Indies	
1
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
All other countries	
Japan	
All other countries-	
63
7
1 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 23
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING.
Returns covering 130 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $275,672
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        489,645
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     2,781,247
Total  $3,546,564
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.        Month.
Males.
Females.
January.	
February
March
575
587
606
633
638
655
1,894
1,882
1,929
1,920
1,963
2,017
July -.
August    —
September
October
November
December
674
684
668
676
685
686
2,089
2,004
2,025
2,039
May  _
June --
2,014
1,965
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
.    Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 -	
$6.00  to $6.99    	
9
9
3
6
5
2
3
6
4
4
7
11
13
31
3
10
6
16
7
21
39
17
19
24
24
173
US
57
38
19
11
13
7
21
8
1
2
3
2
1
1
1
3
3
3
7
11
7
3
2
14
1
4
2
2
4
2
1
3
1
1
	
43
16
20
26
41
23
42
58
26
90
71
128
335
226
132
139
79
196
112
75
62
32
15
11
12
30
12
3
3
2
4
1
23
7.00 to    7.99        	
6
8.00 to    8.99    -—
4
9.00 to    9.99     	
1
10.00 to 10.99  —
4
11.00 to 11.99      -
3
12.00 to 12.99
6
13.00 to 13.99        	
5
14.00 to 14.99 	
9
15.00 to  15.99 --	
8
16.00 to 16.99    	
19
17.00 to 17.99 ..ffl-	
18.00 to 18.99 -   --	
19.00 to 19.99
39
20
8
20.00 to 20.99    	
9
21.00 to 21.99
3
22.00 to 22.99
4
23.00 to 23.99       -
10
24.00 to 24.99       	
25.00 to 25.99      	
1
26.00 to 26.99        	
1
27.00 to 27.99
1
28.00  to 28.99    	
29.00  to 29.99       	
30.00 to 34.99   	
1
40 00 to 44.99           ■ .
2
2
50 00 to 54.99
60.00  to 64.99 -  ...
65.00 to 69.99   -	
70.00 and over 	
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace)
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland
etc	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
All other countries -	
486
241
18
i
l
5
1
6
21
24
6
23
2
4
11
7
14
12
10
15
40
62
20
4
1
5
31
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS-
MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 91 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers       $183,977
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        202,689
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     1,015,555
Total  $1,402,221
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January 	
416
342
July 	
463
360
February ....
423
334
August  	
475
365
March	
440
334
September
474
373
April	
452
344
October	
517
384
May	
464
341
November
520
385
June 	
465
351
December
524
371
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
und over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00  -	
$6.00 to $6.99 	
7.00 to    7.99 	
8.00 to    3.99	
9.00 to    9.99 -.
2
2
2
1
1
4
5
1
12
2
11
7
9
16
12
6
16
8
70
140
67
15
10
5
1
6
1
2
1
2
5
3
2
8
3
7
11
5
6
3
10
1
3
5
4
1
4
3
2
	
4
1
4
3
4
10
5
7
37
14
18
34
25
30
19
24
19
14
32
13
18
7
7
17
3
4
4
1
10.00 to 10.99 	
2
11.00 to 11.99 -.   .
2
12.00 to 12.99 -	
2
13.00 to 13.99	
2
14.00 to 14.99	
16.00 to 15.99	
8
16.00 to 16.99     -   ...
5
17.00 to 17.93    --
2
18.00 to 18.99 	
5
19.00 .to 19.99  -
5
20.00 to 20.99   	
21.00 to 21.99 	
2
3
22.00  to 22.99     -
3
23.00 to 23.99 	
1
24.00 to 24.99 	
1
25.00 to 25.99
26.00 to 26.99   	
27.00 to 27.99
28.00 to 28.99    	
29.00 to 29.99   - -	
30.00 to 34.99
40.00 to 44.99
46.00 to 49.99  	
50.00 to 54.99 _
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99  	
65.00 to 69.99   . 	
70.00 and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace)
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium.	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
etc	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies 	
Japan -	
All other countries	
367
94
12
5
22
5
6
13
31
13
15
2 K 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 1,549 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $3,987,329
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       2,079,299
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     48,274,374
Total  $54,341,002
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March	
April	
21,408
23,296
23,399
24,164
20.480
319
316
345
351
325
292
July	
August
September-
October	
November-
December—
26,211
27,323
28,002
27,724
26,973
24,119
417
435
435
404
382
June 	
17,092
336
Classified Weekly Earnings  (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00      	
33
22
13
25
18
25
36
21
25
22
45
35
43
55
137
70
91
68
74
114
131
168
162
257
276
3,893
9,400
5,901
3,491
2,750
1,531
1,044
543
1,607
8
9
11
5
4
31
8
5
8
7
15
6
10
8
10
5
19
10
22
11
21
12
23
37
273
739
336
125
48
23
10
9
21
5
7
2
1
2
3
5
13
3
4
7
11
20
22
7
17
6
9
10
31
34
12
10
14
11
79
98
24
14
6
4
1
1
1
$6.00 to $6.99..	
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to    8.99 -.- -—
9.00 to    9.99 	
10.00 to 10.99 	
11.00 to 11.99   	
1
12.00 to 12.99
13.00 to 13.99   	
1
14.00 to 14.99    	
4
15.00 to  15.99    	
1
16.00 to 16.99    -.
3
17,00 to 17.99    -
1
18.00 to 18.99   —	
19.00 to 19.99   ...
2
20.00 to 20.99   -	
1
21.00 to 21.99
22.00 to 22.99   	
4
23.00 to 23.99   	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00' to 25.99   	
5
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99   	
28.00 to 28.99    	
1
29.00 to 29.99 	
30.00 to 34.99 -
35.00 to 39.99   —	
1
4
7
40.00 to 44.99
2
45.00 to 49.99   	
6
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99   	
60.00 to 64.99
65.00  to 69.99   	
70.00  and over        -.
	
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
etc	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country :	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan.-	
All other countries	
Males.
19,443
3,483
852
34
69
188
234
315
402
3,678
2,328
424
1,299
492
526
1.249
431
45
10
2
1
2
2
27
23
4
5
24
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 1,209 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $3,785,882
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       4,337,496
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     15,077,299
Total  $23,200,677
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.!
Month.
Males.
Females.
January.
February
March	
April	
May	
June	
7,807
7,878
8,173
8,428
8,630
7,839
544
550
537
539
559
553
July 	
August .
September-
October
November ..
December .
8,064
9,143
9,173
9,190
9,358
9,351
574
571
553
554
560
553
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 ....	
19
13
11
17
17
15
17
32
14
18
33
31
26
51
41
108
72
126
87
124
283
153
200
283
156
1,838
2,017
1,886
1,213
492
146
88
49
117
22
10
15
10
13
32
17
38
18
20
66
41
53
57
39
56
'   27
61
19
48
38
39
26
29
11
122
76
14
4
2
1
9
1
4
6
5
7
7
5
13
15
11
28
46
14
49
22
47
20
32
36
25
16
22
8
108
19
1
1
$6.00 to $6.99 	
7.00 to    7.99 	
1
8.00 to    8.99 	
9.00 to    9.99	
1
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99  -
1
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99
15.00 to 15.99
16.00  to 16.99     -    .
2
17.00 to 17.99 —	
2
18.00 to 18.99	
4
19.00 to 19.99	
2
20.00 to 20.99  	
21.00 to 21.99-	
1
22.00 to 22.99
5
23.00 to 23.99 — 	
24.00 to 24.99-—	
8
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99  .
1
27.00 to 27.99 	
1
28.00 to 28.99	
1
29.00 to 29.99	
2
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99
1
2
40.00 to 44.99 	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99 	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99 	
70.00 and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace)
Males.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden. Denmark, Finland,
etc	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
All other countries	
8,654
2,282
275
19
28
48
78
61
49
256
226
56
17
3
6
413
881
79
23
2
1
2
4
4
12 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 25
Table No. 16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 142 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers        $927,142
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       1,372,081
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       7,874,735
Total  $10,173,958
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
i       Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February	
March	
3,623
3,738
3,853
3,895
4,039
3.996
141
128
129
132
143
147
July ._.	
August.
September..
October
November....
December ...
2,992
2.858
2,707
2,586
3,114
121
115
105
97
114
June	
3.455
128
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
MA'
.ES.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
5
4
1
2
3
4
5
1
8
3
6
5
1
6
8
3
15
6
8
10
16
16
8
551
1,285
1,340
1,153
302
136
61
20
54
5
1
3
1
1
2
2
4
2
1
2
4
48
22
30
2
1
2
1
1
7
1
2
1
2
6
5
10
4
15
3
18
2
12
5
8
12
2
25
3
2
3
1
$6.00 to $6.99 -	
7.00 to    7.99 -
8.00 to    8.99— —-
9.00 to    9.99
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99 -
12.00 to 12.99 -	
13.00 to 13.99
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99 -
16.00 to 16.99 -
17.00 to 17.99 - -
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99
21.00 to 21.99 .
1
22.00 to 22.99    	
23.00 to 23.99
2
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00' to 25.99      -
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99  	
28.00 to 28.99    	
1
29.00 to 29.99  -	
SO,00 to 34.99  	
35 00 to 39.99       .    	
40.00 to 44.99   —-	
45.00 to 49.99    -
50.00 to 54.99— 	
55.00 to 59.99 - -
70.00 and over   .
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland.	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
etc	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
All other countries	
1,142
924
197
8
11
39
89
76
43
533
315
35
44
1
3
115
135
20
2
1
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 691 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $1,747,224
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       2,266,028
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       9,772,543
Total  $13,785,795
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January
February
March	
April _.
May 	
June ._ 	
4,372
4.293
4,422
4,597
5,147
5,249
1,112
1,113
1,057
1,184
1,292
1,481
July	
August
September-
October	
November-—
December...
5,411
5,744
5,516
4,777
5,221
5,213
1,395
1,517
1,294
1,296
1,313
1,284
Classified Weekly Earnings
(Wage-
earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00-	
$6.00 to $6.99    ...
69
32
14
19
17
17
18
23
10
15
33
21
28
46
42
53
54
145
61
95
153
106
251
217
192
1,332
1,373
916
480
193
83
59
22
49
27
10
3
11
7
14
3
21
8
14
30
15
17
25
23
.27
17
50
27
18
33
38
29
20
13
73
30
24
7
7
3
36
10
4
4
9
29
11
18
21
41
55
66
101
97
64
153
61
117
32
91
96
60
58
35
20
96
68
12
11
5
2
1
1
4
10
3
3
4
2
7.00 to    7.99 - -
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99   	
10.00 to 10.99
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99
13.00 to 13.99   ...
3
14.00 to 14.99	
25
15.00 to 15.99
37
16.001 to 16.99   —
23
17.00 to 17.99 ....   	
11
18.00 to 18.99   ...
15
19.00 to 19.99 —    ....
8
20.00 to 20.99   	
17
21.00 to 21.99	
14
22.00 to 22.99 - 	
23.00 to 23.99    ..
9
4
24.00 to 24.99 ...-	
5
25.00 to 25.99    ..
13
26.00 to 26.99
9
27.00 to 27.99.—
9
28.00 to 28.99 ....
2
29.00 to 29.99   .
7
30.00 to 34.99 —
11
35.00 to 39.99  -
8
40.00 to 44.99 	
2
45.00 to 49.99 -	
2
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99    	
60.00 to 64.99	
1
65.00 to 69.99    	
70.00 and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.
Females.
5,057
1,155
166
15
11
21
27
44
50
224
401
48
40
20
19
240
1,678
174
52
1
4
7
Italy                    	
2
Germany...-	
5
3
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
33
100
Other European country	
7
1
7
All other countries	
39 K 26
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering 73 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $422,793
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     2,252,144
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     1,638,412
Total  $4,313,349
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
818
766
760
740
765
833
32
33
24
23
29
33
July 	
August
September.
October
November -
December
888
900
867
882
945
954
34
February
35
30
32
May	
June ...
32
31
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
2
1
1
1
2
3
1
7
2
3
3
2
1
1
3
10
5
14
1
19
66
252
288
244
136
39
25
10
10
20
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
7
3
14
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
8
1
1
3
7
1
2
1
$6.00 to $6.99 -	
7.00 to    7.99 -
8.00 to    8.99 - „,.,.
9.00 to    9.99   	
10.00 to 10.99
11.00 to 11.99    -
12.00 to 12.99    	
13.00 to 13.99   	
14.00 to 14.99
15.00 to 15.99   	
16.00 to 16.99   	
17.00 to 17.99   	
1
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99   .- 	
21.00 to 21.99   —     -
22.00 to 22.99   	
23.00 to 23.99
24.00 to 24.99     ..
26.00 to 25.99  - -
26.00 to 26.99     	
27.00 to 27.99 —
28.00 to 28.99     ..     .	
29.00 to 29.99    -
30.00 to 34.99    	
35.00 to 39.99    -	
40.00 to 44.99    	
BO.OO to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99 ......	
60.00 to 64.99
65.00  to 69.99  	
70.00  and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace)
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium.	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
etc.-	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country.	
China.-- -	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
All other countries	
1,130
369
57
3
2
5
1
5
4
101
19
5
9
1
122
19
6
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 10 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $117,655
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     189,404
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     285,671
Total  $592,730
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
141
55
July..- _.
159
53
February	
138
55
August -	
156
49
March ...-	
145
54
September.
143
50
April	
147
55
October	
148
46
May 	
154
55
November-
153
46
June     .
152
55
December
150
46
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
1
1
3
2
4
2
3
9
7
66
27
14
2
1
1
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
3
1
2
5
8
5
3
6
3
4
2
3
3
1
$6.00 to $6.99    -    ,—
7.00 to    7.99 	
8.00 to    8.99 	
9.00 to    9.99
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99. ...
14.00 to 14.99 	
15.00 to 15.99     .
16.00 to 16.99—	
5
17.00 to 17.99	
6
18.00 to 18.99-	
19.00 to 19.99 —	
20.00 to 20.99 .	
1
21.00 to 21.99... .
22.00 to 22.99
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99 - -
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99      	
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99 	
40.00 to 44.99    	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99
55 00 to 59.99      	
60 00 to 64.99 -
65.00 to 69.99       	
70.00 and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland
etc	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China 	
British India and East Indies	
Japan _	
All other countries	
109
57
3
1
Females.
51
7
1 f
REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 27
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 130 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $806,851
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,928,587
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     3,371,352
Total   $6,106,790
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
1,391
1,401
1,431
1,416
1,460
1,461
337
337
351
348
353
379
July
1,470
1,503
1,524
1,536
1,555
1.588
365
February
March 	
April 	
May 	
June	
August	
September
October
November-
December
384
376
365
372
392
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
2
1
6
7
8
2
6
4
5
10
5
9
18
16
31
15
19
6
21
25
19
17
10
22
96
191
180
281
179
116
33
34
35
7
3
2
5
4
13
5
16
5
12
14
12
9
10
6
5
2
6
4
2
2
6
3
3
4
10
4
2
6
1
5
1
5
4
7
12
4
11
22
19
27
19
28
14
7
18
13
18
12
34
30
14
7
15
13
3
2
1
11
$6.00 to $6.99	
2
7.00 to    7.99 -	
1
8.00 to    8.99-	
9.00 to    9.99 -     -
1
2
10.00 to 10.99 	
11.00 to 11.99. 	
12.00 to 12.99 -	
2
7
13.00 to 13.99	
2
14.00 to 14.99
7
15.00 to 15.99
12
16.00 to 16.99	
6
17.00 to 17.99	
4
18.00 to 18.99
6
19.00 to 19.99.	
5
20.00 to 20.99	
3
21.00 to 21.99         	
22.00 to 22.99        	
23.00 to 23.99    	
3
24.00 to 24.99 -    -
25.00' to 25.99.	
1
26.00 to 26.99      	
27.00 to 27.99          -
28.00 to 28.99
29.00 to 29.99
30.00 to 34.99     	
40.00 to 44.99      -
45.00 to 49.99         	
50.00 to 54.99    	
65 00 to 59.99    	
60.00 to 64.99     -
65 00 to 69.99        	
70.00 and over	
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace)
Males.        Females.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
etc	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
All other countries	
1,643
476
40
2
1
4
1
16
7
3
19
1
1
51
626
99
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 8 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers        $495,325
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       1,104,100
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       9,559,265
Total  $11,158,690
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males,
Females.
January
February
March 	
3,894
3,838
3,833
3,856
3,971
3.863
360
346
332
311
313
291
July	
August
September...
October
November...
December..
3,997
4,084
4,084
4,135
4,208
4,180
283
276
290
May	
280
June ...	
280
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 -	
$6.00 to $6.99 - 	
7.00 to    7.99	
23
3
1
4
2
24
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
5
6
3
21
18
36
229
1,365
1,007
370
384
192
109
94
120
6
3
1
2
3
2
1
2
1
1
3
9
2
19
116
27
1
5
2
2
5
1
3
1
1
4
5
2
14
15
5
14
63
2
6
1
5
55
23
23
1
2
1
8.00 to    8.99	
1
9.00 to    9.99 	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
2
12.00 to 12.99    .
13.00 to 13.99- —	
14.00 to  14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
3
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99
18.00 to 18.99 	
4
19.00 to 19.99   -
20.00 to 20.99   -
2
21.00 to 21.99	
4
22.00 to 22.99 	
23.00 to 23.99 	
24.00 to 24.99	
6
25.00 to 25.99
26.00 to 26.99   	
1
27.00 to 27.99.	
1
28.00 to 28.99
3
30.00 to 34.99	
4
2
40 00 to 44.99  	
1
45 00 to 49.99	
50 OO to 54 99        	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99         	
70.00 and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.
Females.
2,411
819
163
5
2
9
109
16
32
180
191
69
380
3
268
15
12
1
1
Italy                	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
	
3
5
All other countries.	
4 K 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering 79 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers        $697,172
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       1,306,816
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     12,746,115
Total  $14,750,103
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.         Month.
Males.
-•Vi-ialefl
January	
February
March	
8,418
7,509
7,648
6,782
6,561
5.897
190
172
165
156
131
121
July
August 	
September-
October
November-
December
5.524
5.347
5,029
5,364
5,704
5.250
115
109
106
103
May	
June 	
95
95
Classified Weekly Earnings  (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00            ..      -
42
23
4
7
7
9
11
12
19
9
15
31
7
19
19
26
15
39
21
39
43
89
59
119
81
1,663
1,266
3,581
914
424
193
120
89
77
3
1
1
5
1
1
2
2
4
8
1
1
12
2
16
9
9
6
6
6
5
1
11
8
1
2
1
5
1
2
3
2
4
12
15
2
10
11
2
2
3
9
6
4
3
$6.00 to $6.99
7.00 to    7.99 - -.
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99  -
10.00 to 10.99     	
11.00 to 11.99     	
12.00 to 12.99  -
13.00 to 13.99      	
14.00  to 14.99
15.00 to 15.99-	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00  to 17.99        -
1
18.00 to 18.99- - --
19.00 to 19.99 -
20.00  to 20.99       	
21.00 to 21.99 -
22.00 to 22.99 -
23.00 to 23.99
1
24.00 to 24.99- 	
25.00 to 25.99  ._.    .
26.00 to 26.99  	
27.00 to 27.99 	
1
28.00  to 28.99
29.00  to 29.99
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99 	
40.00  to 44.99        	
45.00 to 49.99   -
50.00 to 54.99          - ..
55.00 to 59.99    	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.
Females.
5,271
3,050
265
42
29
38
59
45
62
473
261
73
145
3
167
35
8
Germany  	
1
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
3
China -                      	
All other countries	
37
	
Table No. 23.
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING.
Returns covering 4 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $257,137
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,659,834
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     6,061,070
Total   $7,978,041
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females. j       Month.
Males.
Females.
January.	
February
March	
April	
May	
June ...
1,990
2,017
2,044
2,036
2,146
2,110
40>
35
35
34
37
37
July	
August
September
October
November -.
December
1,908
1,874
1,851
1,935
2,109
2,043
30
30
31
32
40
38
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 ._. _
$6.00 to $6.99.-. 	
7.00 to    7.99  -	
12
28
5
4
13
5
3
9
3
12
5
7
18
4
9
22
10
8
15
12
8
22
19
13
272
735
667
363
154
2
3
8
5
1
1
2
5
3
2
5
2
1
3
4
3
3
3
3
1
5
7
35
54
21
1
2
2
1
3
15
5
1
3
2
4
1
1
1
1
4
3
8.00 to    8.99 ...  	
9.00 to    9.99 -  .
10.00 to 10.99 ...
1
11.00 to 11.99 	
1
12.00 to 12.99 .--	
13.00 to 13.99 -	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99
17.00 to 17.99   -- -
18.00 to 18.99 -	
19.00 to 19.99   	
20.00 to 20.99   -	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99   	
23.00 to 23.99   „ -
24.00 to 24.99 . „	
1
25.00 to 25.99 ..„ —
26.00 to 26.99     -	
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00  to 29.99    	
30.00 to 34.99    .__	
1
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99     	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99 	
55.00 to 59.99    	
60.00 to 64.99 -
65.00 to 69.99    -	
70.00 and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland -	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary 	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
etc.	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
AM ot^p*- countries -	
1,538
605
77
1
7
2
286
7
17
87
59
1
2
36
17
3 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 29
Table No. 24.
STREET-RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER,  LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 111 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $1,285,588
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       3,875,436
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     13,866,347
Total  $19,027,371
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
5,281
1,306
July	
5,858
1,316
February	
5,265
1,303
August    	
5,862
1,321
March —	
5,417
1,302
September.
5,806
1,314
April — -
5,637
1,311
October	
5,813
1,302
May — -
5,490
1,312
November ..
5,847
1,304
June   . ..:
5,748
1,307
December
5,774
1,301
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
13
3
2
2
3
4
2
10
1
3
1
6
10
13
5
56
19
74
53
60
87
202
17S
1.129
1,700
1,205
783
455
162
52
35
36
2
2
1
2
2
1
5
5
5
1
4
10
3
8
12
1
35
12
8
7
13
56
7
16
9
9
11
19
128
96
47
179
200
191
86
159
107
38
184
42
60
140
30
15
2
10
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99   	
6
6
8.00  to    8.99 ..-- -
9.00 to    9.99   	
58
2
10.00 to  10.99
23
11.00 to  11.99  --
5
12.00 to 12.99      -
3
13.00 to 13.99 -
4
14.00 to 14.99   —-	
3
15.00 to 15.99
2
16.00 to 16.99  	
15
17.00 to 17.99       	
71
18.00 to 18.99 -
9
19.00 to  19.99     	
11
20 00 to 20.99
47
21.00 to 21.99 —
16
22.00  to 22.99    	
3
23 00 to 23.99
4
24.00 to 24.99 	
25.00 to 25.99    -
26.00 to 26.99    - -
27 00  to 27.99
28.00 to 28.99   	
30.00  to 34.99    - -
40.00 to 44.99   	
46 00 to 49.99
55.00 to 59.99  -
70.00 and over
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Females.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary - -
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland
etc -	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan 	
All other countries--	
4,059
2,540
167
12
12
20
87
36
35
180
201
15
7
3
32
61
2,661
374
74
2
 3
2
12
2
3
Table No. 25.
WOOD-MANUFACTURING (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 181 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1946.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $851,599
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        492,121
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     7,549,527
Total  $8,893,247
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.          Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January
February
March	
April .ffl_	
3,421
3,513
3,637
3,767
3,306
3,169
975
974
960
968
July—	
August
September
October
November
December .
3,745
4,017
4,046
4,105
4,022
3,951
926
961
953
945
908
888
June 	
810
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest. Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99    ... .
7.00 to    7.99	
15
4
7
4
5
8
3
8
6
6
3
6
6
6
9
22
10
35
12
31
32
71
40
90
44
711
1,476
773
305
150
55
17
24
14
6
5
4
5
2
1
10
2
2
14
6
10
17
15
16
12
16
2
43
20
41
22
11
13
76
147
17
4
1
1
3
2
1
2
3
1
3
6
5
11
4
5
13
9
36
6
25
7
52
22
18
6
2
56
395
214
34
6
4
2
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99   	
12.00 to 12.99      .
13.00 to 13.99 	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99
16.00 to 16.99—	
17.00 to  17.99	
18.00 to 18.99   	
19.00 to 19.99 	
20.00 to 20.99    	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99   	
23.00 to 23.99 - -
24.00 to 24.99   	
25.00 to 25.99  	
3
26.00 to 26.99   	
1
27.00 to 27.99    -
28.00  to 28.99   - -
1
29.00 to 29.99
5
30.00 to 34.99     -
17
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99 -	
3
50.00 to 54.99
55.00  to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99- -
65.00 to 69.99     -
70.00 and over        ...   .
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Males.
Females.
3,183
600
117
1
7
21
28
33
45
203
179
56
48
869
56
23
Australasia	
1
Italy	
5
1
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
22
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China - 	
22
5
British India and East Indies-
Japan  - --.
All other cotrat"ies.	
18
9
65
17 K 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 7,326 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1946.
Officers,  Superintendents, and Managers  $24,755,565.00
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc     33,149,344.00
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)  215,051,595.00
  $272,956,504.00
Returns received too late to be included in above summary     $1,197,630.00
Transcontinental railways   (ascertained pay-roll)     23,301,258.00
Estimated additional pay-rolls, including employers covered by the survey but not
riling returns, and additional services not included in the tables; viz.. Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, ocean services, miscellaneous (estimated pay-roll)     105,706,218.00
     130,205,106.00
Total..
$403,161,610.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
Males.
January —
February-
March-—
April	
May	
June	
July..
August 	
September-
October	
November-
December—.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin (Birthplace).
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland
etc.	
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
British India and East Indies	
Japan	
All other countries	
Females.
96,130
13,811
96,505
13,007
99,009
12,956
100,915
13,200
100,039
13,725
96,095
14,471
107,242
16,398
111,891
18,740
111,586
18,731
111,211
18,042
111,353
17,427
106,295
15,700
Males.
Females
88,602
21,047
28,350
3,743
3,562
603
338
19
276
25
639
95
1,685
96
1,015
114
1,174
99
8,461
465
6,213
805
1,314
165
3,695
68
562
13
647
97
4,984
561
Classified Weekly Earnings (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under $6.00 ......
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99 ..
8.00 to    8.99...
9.00 to    9.99..
10.00 to 10.99-
11.00 to 11.99...
12.00 to 12.99 -
13.00 to 13.99 -
14.00 to 14.99 ..
15.00 to 15.99...
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99 ..
18.00 to 18.99 .
19.00 to 19.99 .
20.00 to 20.99 -
21.00 to 21.99...
22.00 to 22.99 ..
23.00 to 23.99 .
24.00 to 24.99...
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99 ..
27.00 to 27.99-
28.00 to 28.99 .
29.00 to 29.99 .
30.00 to 34.99...
35.00 to 39.99 ..
40.00 to 44.99 ,
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99 .
55.00 to 59.99 ..
60.00 to 64.99...
65.00 to 69.99 .
70.00 and over
Totals	
579
302
168
238
203
234
226
296
240
218
301
314
325
434
554
715
602
977
804
1,196
1,609
1,600
1,667
2,801
2,224
23,336
29,875
26,010
14,239
10,021
3,919
2,359
1,258
3,363
133,207
Under
21 Yrs.
254
85
49
69
82
122
98
162
97
118
231
175
201
236
194
239
154
325
155
394
259
284
218
240
214
1,432
1,564
656
239
105
42
29
15
26
8,763
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
and over.   18 Yrs.
491
134
129
124
164
277
213
377
306
499
558
721
1,246
1,399
869
1,469
986
1,297
775
1,438
1,119
816
995
630
642
2,066
976
351
129
79
29
26
15
18
21,361
253
47
47
109
41
95
55
83
56
141
148
175
244
176
109
190
111
128
63
170
83
62
96
45
83
130
56
21
15
3
3,037 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 31
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Since the " Hours of Work Act " became effective the Board has shown the average
hours by industries, and the accompanying table sets out comparative figures for the
years 1930 to 1946, inclusive.
COMPAEATIVE FIGURES, 1930
TO 1946.
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Employees
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 54 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
54 Hours.
1930    -	
1931   _ -ffl-   ffl.
1932  -.- --	
4,704
4,088
3,529
3,530
3,956
4,153
4,357
4,711
4,895
4,829
4,971
5,115
4,845
4,727
5,044
5,687
7,326
87,821
84,791
68,468
71,185
75,435
81,329
90,871
102,235
96,188
94,045
103,636
118,160
154,191
151,420
143,640
141,182
140,865
Per Cent.
77.60
83.77
80.36
77.95
85.18
88.78
87.12
89.31
88.67
88.68
88.93
89.61
84.70
89.10
92.42
93.46
94.87
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
5.76
5.26
6.42
4.57
5.29
5.42
5.13
4.49
7.51
4.57
4.59
4.20
2.98
Per Cent.
9.04
9.44
11.92
1933	
11.12
1934	
9.06
1935   - :   	
6.96
1936     	
6.46
1937	
6.12
1938   --	
6.04
1939    „	
1940    	
5.90
5.94
1941	
5.90
1942     -	
7.79
1943                 	
6.33
1944     -     ".	
2.99
1945	
1946	
2.34
2 15
The average weekly working-hours for all employees for same years being:—
1946  43.63
1945  45.59
1937  47.25
1944..
1943-
1942..
1941.
1940-
1939-
1938..
46.02
. 47.19
48.12
. 46.90
46.91
47.80
46.84
1936..
1935-
1934-
1933-
1932-
1931..
1930-
47.63
47.17
47.32
47.35
47.69
47.37
48.62
The 7,326 firms reporting to the Department of Labour submitted information
regarding hours covering some 140,865 male and female employees for 1946. Of this
number, 94.87 per cent, were shown as working 48 hours or less per week, 2.98 per cent,
working from 48 to 54 hours per week, and 2.15 per cent, working in excess of 54 hours
per week. K 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES.
Industry.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
Breweries and distilleries	
44.88
48.05
44.57
47.99
52.05
50.06
47.84
48.33
44.30
44.88
44.01
45.37
44.82
48.78
51.40
46.42
49.95
48.44
47.20
45.42
49.89
47.65
47.54
43.86
43.70
47.84
47.88
49.40
45.64
46.59
45.05
47.43
44.80
47.90
51.69
51.14
46.75
47.59
43.30
44.00
43.88
44.99
43.79
48.67
53.00
45.23
49.27
48.47
46.42
45.02
49.35
47.68
45.83
43.95
42.13
48.27
43.92
49.72
45.77
46.28
45.37
46.20
41.80
47.96
51.48
44.09
45.31
47.72
42.72
43.55
43.47
43.37
43.25
48.46
52.50
44.79
47.83
47.98
46.28
45.18
48.82
47.36
46.57
43.75
41.45
48.04
43.07
47.73
45.40
45.61
44.64
45.12
43.27
47.91
51.13
42.79
44.18
47.36
41.45
43.40
43.09
44.09
43.03
48.13
51.69
44.39
47.72
47.46
45.90
43.26
48.57
46.30
43.93
43.63
41.46
47.97
43.10
48.02
45.18
45.61
43.19
43.87
38.50
Coal-mining	
40.09
50.05
41.58
Explosives, chemicals, etc	
42.20
45.90
41.13
42.32
42.83
42.77
41.89
Lumber industries—
43.21
45.88
43.72
44.63
44.02
43.83
42.47
45.31
44.46
43.63
Paint-manufacturing	
43.51
40.74
44.17
42.02
42.28
44 50
43.32 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 33
STATISTICS OF CIVIL AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS.
The following data dealing with pay-roll and employment totals of civic and
municipal workers has been compiled from annual returns submitted to the Department
of Labour by the various cities and municipalities throughout the Province, reporting
for the year 1946. ♦
The totals herewith to follow have already been incorporated in other tables of this
report as a part of the total industrial pay-roll. They should therefore not be considered
as in addition to figures quoted elsewhere, but rather as a segregation of civic and
muncipal returns for separate study.
Included in the figures are workers engaged in public works, the construction and
maintenance of roads, the operation and maintenance of waterworks, generation and
distribution of light and power, and similar operations owned and operated by the city
or municipality making the return.
Based on 112 returns submitted by civic and municipal administrations, the total
reported pay-roll was $7,564,974, an increase of $2,126,550 over the $5,438,424 reported
for 1945. Of the total pay-roll reported, $5,807,929 was expended in the wage-earner
section, while $1,757,045 was allotted to the salaried groups—officers, superintendents,
managers, clerks, and stenographic staffs.
Increased employment in the wage-earner section proved a contributing factor in
the total pay-roll increase for 1946. Based on the returns received, the following table
sets out average monthly employment totals (wage-earners only) for the comparative
years 1944, 1945, and 1946:—
Month.
1944.
1945.
1946.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
2,256
86
2,268
60
3,020
47
February	
2,238
76
2,249
69
3,065
55
March	
2,288
86
2,286
99
3,317
74
April	
2,410
112
2,322
126
3,502
99
May	
2,520
142
2,443
186
3,826
193
June	
2,620
184
2,590
216
3,845
252
July :	
2,648
252
2,666
257
3,856
278
August	
2,638
219
2,733
243
3,831
254
September	
2,491
149
2,677
134
3,470
127
October	
2,412
84
2,707
86
3,368
85
November	
2,402
74
2,759
99
3,387
79
2,357
70
2,741
66
3,291
•
Indicating the distribution of municipal employment with relation to earnings, the
following table shows the percentages of adult male wage-earners in the various wage
classifications as noted, for the comparative years 1944, 1945, and 1946.
Weekly Earnings.
Percentage op Employees.
1944.
1945.
1946.
Under $15         	
1.47
0.61'
10.65
20.50
43.44
10.82
10.36
1.61
0.54
2.28
2.25
9.64
18.09
47.26
12.67
5.18
1.98
0.65
2.58
$15 to    20                          	
1.23
20 to    25                           -	
5.28
25 to    30         	
12.99
30 to    35                         	
54.88
35 to    40         	
14.32
40 to    45         	
4.74
45 to    50	
2.53
1.45 K 34 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Average weekly earnings for adult male wage-earners on civic and municipal
pay-rolls was $32.57, increased from $31.48 recorded for the previous year.
With a large proportion of female employees reported as casual and part-time
workers, the average weekly earnings for female wage-earners 18 years of age and
over dropped to $17.91, as against $19.70 for 1945.
The average hours of work for all wage-earners reported in the returns decreased
from 42.50 in 1945 to 41.99 for the year under review. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 35
SUMMARY OF NEW LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR.
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1947.)
"ANNUAL HOLIDAYS ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1947."
This amendment provides that holidays due or accruing due, or their equivalent
in wages and moneys due and accruing due, shall be deemed to be wages payable to
employees for work done.
This determination brings " holiday pay " within the application of the " Semi-
Monthly Payment of Wages Act" and the " Mechanic's Lien Act" with respect to
matters covering wages.
In addition to the above, the amendment defines the word " Board " as being the
Board of Industrial Relations, and a " Calendar year " as being a period of one year
commencing on any day in the year, and reduces the working-year for the purposes of
the Act from 280 to 250 days of actual work.
If the occasion arises when an employer is unable to locate any employee to whom
holiday pay is due, such holiday pay may be paid to the Board of Industrial Relations
to be held in trust for the employee, and if the Board is unable to locate the employee
within one month, the money is to be held in trust by the Minister of Finance.
"BOILER INSPECTION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1947."
A number of amendments were made in the " Boiler Inspection Act."
" High-pressure heating plant," as defined in the Act, is a steam-plant in which
no engine is used, in which the working-pressure exceeds 30 lb. per square inch, and
the capacity of the steam boiler does not exceed 50 horse-power.
" Pressure-vessel " is now defined as any vessel or appliance with a cubic capacity
of more than 1% cubic feet in which steam, gas, air, or liquid is contained above 15 lb.
pressure, and which is used in an industry within the scope of Part I of the " Workmen's
Compensation Act."
With respect to the inspection of steam-boilers during their construction, the fee
continues to be 10 cents per horse-power but it is now stipulated that the minimum
must be $5. Another amendment makes it clear that the fee for inspection of a
pressure-vessel when designed for a working-pressure of 1,000 lb. is $5, and where the
working-pressure is to be over 1,000 lb. and up to 2,000 lb., $10.
Changes were made with respect to the qualifications for engineers. A first-class
engineer must be qualified to take charge of any power-plant; a second-class engineer,
a steam-plant up to 900 horse-power and to act as second or assistant engineer of any
steam-plant; third-class, a steam-plant up to 450 horse-power and, as assistant, up to
900 horse-power, or to take charge of any low-pressure heating plant; and fourth-class,
a steam-plant up to 100 horse-power, as assistant up to 450 horse-power, and a low-
pressure heating plant up to 150 horse-power. As before, an engineer with a temporary
certificate must be qualified to take charge of the steam-plant mentioned in his
certificate and no other. An engineer with a special certificate is authorized to take
charge of a low-pressure heating plant up to 75 horse-power, a high-pressure heating
plant up to 50 horse-power, a logging-donkey or other type of steam-plant which may
be provided for in the regulations. Where two or more engineers are employed in any
steam-plant, one must be designated as chief engineer, and the others must work under
his direction. No person without an engineer's certificate may fire or raise steam on
any steam-boiler unless an engineer is present. An engineer in charge of a steam-plant
or shift must not leave the plant for more than 15 minutes while it is operating, unless
relieved by another engineer, or attend to other duties which will endanger the safety
of the plant. K 36 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
It is now provided that, in cases where an engineer's certificate is not granted, the
candidate may again be examined on payment of half-fee. Previously, no further fee
was required for a re-examination.
Higher qualifications are now required of a candidate for appointment as Inspector
of Steam-boilers. He must (1) be a Canadian citizen and have resided in British
Columbia for at least two years; and (2) have had four years' experience as a practical
machinist and three years as engineer of a steam-plant of not less than 750 horse-power;
or (3) have graduated in mechanical engineering from a university approved by the
Board and have had two years' experience as engineer of a steam-plant of not less than
750 horse-power, and in either case have passed a satisfactory examination. Previously,
the Act required five years' practical experience or two years' experience and a degree
in mechanical engineering.
" FACTORIES ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1947."
An amendment in the " Factories Act " permits factories to be exempted in writing
by the Inspector from the provision that employers must allow young girls and women
not less than one hour at noon of each day for meals. As regards overcrowding, the
Act has required the posting of notices specifying the number of workers allowed to
work in each room; it now stipulates that not less than an average of 300 cubic feet
of space must be provided for each worker in a room.
Repealed are sections of the Act dealing with hours of girls or women, permitting
exemptions and requiring the keeping of a register of women employed. These are now
covered by the " Hours of Work Act." Other changes include those consequent on the
" Hours of Work Act" and the " Control of Employment of Children Act, 1944."
" FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1947."
This amendment to the " Female Minimum Wage Act " provides that an employer,
who has paid to his employees wages of less amount than the wages fixed by the Board,
may pay to the Board of Industrial Relations the difference owing to the employee if
the employer is unable to locate the employee. If the Board is unable to locate the
employee within a month, the wages held in trust by the Board are to be held in trust
by the Minister of Finance.
" MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1947."
This amendment is similar to that provided in the " Female Minimum Wage Act
Amendment Act, 1947."
" INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT, 1947."
The principal features of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act, 1947,"
may be summarized as follows:—
1. Collective bargaining rights are guaranteed to workers and to employers.
2. Employers' or employees' organizations are precluded from participation in or
interference with the formation or administration of a trade-union or employees'
organization, or contributing financial or other support to it.
Employers may not (a) refuse to employ a person because he is a member or an
officer of a trade-union, (b) impose any condition in an employment contract restraining
an employee from exercising his rights under the Act, or (c) intimidate a worker by
any means in an endeavour to compel him to join or to refrain from joining or becoming
an officer of a trade-union or employees' organization.
However, nothing in the Act shall be interpreted to affect the right of an employer
to discharge an employee for proper cause. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 37
3. Provision is made for the assignment of fees and dues by an employee to a
union.    Such an assignment may be revoked in writing.
4. Provision is made for the certification of a bargaining authority where the
majority of the employees are members in good standing of a trade-union. If, after
investigation, a certification is issued, the union is named the bargaining authority.
On the other hand, if no union exists and the majority of the employees desire to elect
bargaining representatives, application may be made to the Board for certification
of the bargaining authorities.
No trade-union whose administration, management, or policy is, in the opinion of
the Board, dominated by an employer, and no bargaining representatives who are
dominated by an employer, can be certified. An agreement entered into between such
a trade-union or representatives and such an employer will not be considered to be a
collective agreement.
5. Where bargaining authority has been certified, it may give the employer, or be
given by the employer, ten days' notice to commence collective bargaining, with the
purpose of concluding a collective agreement. Wages and working conditions may not
be changed during negotiations except with the consent of the bargaining authority.
6. If collective bargaining has continued for at least fifteen days without success,
either party may apply to the Minister for the assistance of a Conciliation Officer. The
Conciliation Officer, if appointed, shall confer with the parties in an endeavour to reach
a common understanding. If he fails to do so, he may recommend as to the advisability
of appointing a Conciliation Board.
7. A Conciliation Board is composed of a nominee of the employer and of the
employees. Such nominees will endeavour to agree upon a chairman, and if unable
to do so, may ask the Minister to appoint a chairman. A report of the Conciliation
Board is submitted to the Minister, who may publish the award in such manner as he
sees fit.
8. Where a Conciliation Board has been appointed, either party may offer to be
bound by the recommendation of the Board in the same manner as parties are bound
by an arbitration. On the other hand, parties involved in a dispute may, before the
appointment of a Conciliation Board, agree to refer matters to a Mediation Committee,
and if the Minister's approval is given to such a step, the Mediation Committee will be
deemed to be a Conciliation Board for the purposes of the Act.
9. When a bargaining authority is certified under the Act, no strike may take place
until the bargaining authority and the employer have failed to conclude a collective
agreement and the report of the Conciliation Board has been sent to the parties.
Thereupon, a vote must be taken as to whether or not the employees are in favour of a
strike. Such votes are under the supervision of the Minister of Labour. Additionally,
at the expiry of a collective agreement there can be no strike or lockout until the entire
process of collective bargaining has been discharged and a strike vote has been taken.
The prohibition also applies to a dispute between an employer and his employees, otherwise than during the term of a collective agreement. Penalties are provided for illegal
strikes and lockouts, and for failure to bargain collectively.
10. Before a prosecution for an offence under this Act is instituted, permission to
do so must be given in writing by the Minister. In cases where the Minister receives
a complaint verified by statutory declaration from an employee claiming to be aggrieved
under the unfair practices section of the Act, the Minister may appoint a Referee to
investigate the grievance, and consideration must be given to the report of the Referee
before issuing permission to prosecute.
11. Collective agreements made after the coming into effect of this Act must
provide a provision for final and conclusive settlement of all differences by the persons
bound by the agreement concerning its interpretation, application, operation, or alleged
violation. K 38 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
12. Provision is made for the constitution of Boards of Conciliation. Such boards
are composed of three members—one nominated by the employer, one nominated by the
employees affecjted, and the third chosen by the two nominees. If the two members
primarily appointed fail or refuse to appoint a third member, appointment may be made
by the Minister. Persons who have any pecuniary interest in the matters referred
to the board or who have acted as agent or counsel for the parties within a six-month
period preceding the date of appointment cannot be appointed as a member of a Conciliation Board.    Members of the Legislative Assembly may be so appointed, however.
A Conciliation Board has the power of summoning witnesses, compelling evidence,
administering oaths, and are also given certain powers of entry and inspection.
13. The Minister may, upon application or upon his own initiative, appoint an
Industrial Inquiry Commission for the purpose of investigating industrial matters or
maintaining and securing industrial peace. Such a commission has the powers of a
Concilation Board.
14. The Act provides for the institution of a Labour Relations Board, to consist of
such number of members as the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may determine. The
Board has the power to investigate applications for certification and to issue certification
and to decide whether or not:—
(a) A person is an employer or employee:
(b) An organization or association is an employers' organization or a trade-
union :
(c) In any case a collective agreement has been entered into and the terms
thereof:
(d) The persons who are bound by a collective agreement, or on whose behalf
a collective agreement was entered into, are parties to an agreement:
(e) A collective agreement is by its terms in full force and effect:
(/) A person is bargaining collectively or has bargained collectively:
(g) A group of employees is a unit appropriate for collective bargaining:
(h) An employee belongs to a craft or profession;   or
(i)   A person is a member in good standing of a trade-union.
15. Each regulation, order, or decision made on behalf of the Minister, acting
under the authority of the " Wartime Labour Relations Regulations Act," shall be
deemed to have been done by the Minister, the Labour Relations Board of British
Columbia, or any person under this Act when the Act comes into force.
" SEMI-MONTHLY PAYMENT OF WAGES ACT
AMENDMENT ACT, 1947."
This amendment defines " Board " as the Board of Industrial Relations constituted
under the provisions of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," and provides that where an
employer has failed to pay his employees wages in accordance with the provisions of
the " Semi-Monthly Payment of Wages Act" but is unable to locate such employees
he may pay such wages to the Board to be held in trust for the employees, and if the
Board is unable to locate the employees within one month the money is to be held in
trust by the Minister of Finance.
" SHOPS REGULATION AND WEEKLY HALF-HOLIDAY ACT
AMENDMENT ACT, 1947."
The " Shops Regulation and Weekly Half-holiday Act" has been amended by
replacing " half-holiday ' by " holiday."
Shops and stands for the sale of vegetables have been removed from the businesses
exempt from the weekly holiday provisions, and the section is repealed which prohibited REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 39
any worker being employed in a bake-shop, except with the Inspector's written permission, on Sunday, or more than 12 hours in a day or more than 60 in a week.
The Act now permits a municipal council by by-law to set aside a whole day each
week as a holiday for any class of shops during the whole or any part of each year. No
occupier of a'shop in that class may allow an employee to be in the shop on any part
of such day. A repealed section of the Act provided for a weekly whole-day holiday
on petition of not less than three-fourths of the licensed occupiers of any class or
classes of shops within the municipality.
Another amendment allows a municipal council 60 days instead of one month
before making an early closing by-law after receiving an application from at least
three-fourths of the occupiers of any class of shops.
As amended in 1946, the Act stipulated that a by-law requiring the closing of
garages, repair-shops, or service-stations should permit as many of such places as are
necessary for the accommodation of the public to remain open after the appointed
closing hour, those remaining open to be nominated in writing by three-fourths of the
occupiers of such work-places or, failing such nomination, appointed by the council.
A new subsection stipulates that the Vancouver City Council in any such by-law must
make the provision it considers necessary for the accommodation of the public with
respect to service required after closing time.
When Christmas Day falls on a Thursday, Friday, or Saturday, or when two or
more of the public holidays enumerated in the Act, other than Christmas Day and the
day following, occur in the same week, the provisions of the Act with respect to the
closing of shops or a weekly holiday are not to apply.
New sections authorize the Government to make regulations requiring an employer
to provide a rest-room for the women employed in the shop and to allow them to spend
rest-periods there, at such times and of such duration as the regulations prescribe.
The penalty for violation of such regulations is the same as for most other infractions
of the Act, a fine of not less than $20 and not more than $50. K 40 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman, •
to August 31st, 1946 Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
James, Thomson, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman,
September 1st,  1946 Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell 1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
4. J. A. Ward Bell 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. H. Douglas 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
Mabel A. Cameron Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Head Office Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch Office  789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,-—We have the honour to present the thirteenth annual report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1946.
The activities of the Board include those formerly directed by the Minimum Wage
Board which functioned for sixteen years prior to 1934. The original Board dealt with
minimum wages, hours of labour, and conditions of employment for women and girls, so
this report in so far as it relates to women workers is the twenty-ninth annual record of
labour laws and their results in that sphere.
The responsibilities of the Board of Industrial Relations were considerably extended
when it took over the administration of the " Male Minimum Wage Act " in addition to
the " Female Minimum Wage Act" in 1934. This is exemplified in the gradual growth
of the staff since that date. In addition to the increase in the number of inspectors and
officers stationed in Vancouver and Victoria for the administration and enforcement of
the provisions of the various regulations and Orders of the Board, representatives of
the Department have been located in five different centres throughout the Province for
the convenience of employers and employees who are removed from the central offices at
Vancouver and Victoria.
During the year under review the Board held ninety sessions on forty-eight
different days. It convened in Victoria on sixteen of those days and in Vancouver
on thirty-two days.
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS.
During the years 1942, 1943, 1944, and 1945, the provisions of the Federal Government Wartime Wages Control Order, P.C. 9384, as amended, made it impracticable for
the Board to revise its minimum wage Orders. During those years, therefore, there
was very little change in Orders of the Board regarding minimum wages; however, by
Order in Council, P.C. 348, of January 31st, 1946, an amendment was made to the
Wartime Wages Control Order, which returned to the Provincial Government authorities, with effect from June 30th, 1946, jurisdiction over minimum wage rates, hours of
work, and vacations with pay. When this amendment to the Wartime Wages Control
Order was published, the Board of Industrial Relations made plans to revise the existing
Orders of the Board for the purpose of bringing the wage-rates and working-conditions
provided therein more in line with those prevailing.
Although the Board had hoped to revise the majority of the Orders and regulations
that were in effect at February 1st, 1946, by June 30th, 1946, it soon became evident
that this tremendous task could not be accomplished in that short time.   A few of the REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 41
Orders were revised, and increased minimum wage rates and changes in working-conditions were provided to take effect July 1st, 1946. In order that the majority of
employees covered by the minimum wage Orders would receive the benefits of increased
minimum wage rates when the jurisdiction returned to the Provinces on June 30th,
1946, the Board passed General Interim Minimum Wage Order, 1946, effective July 1st,
1946, which added 20 per cent, .to the minimum wage rates provided in thirty-seven
minimum wage Orders. It was the intention of the Board to revise these thirty-seven
Orders fully on subsequent dates.
Numerous delegations representing employers and employees and representative of
practically every industry in the Province appeared before the Board during the year to
speak to that body regarding revision of the Orders of the Board. In addition to
delegations who appeared regarding the revision of these Orders, three delegations
made representations to the Board requesting that the occupations of cemetery workers,
stationary steam engineers, and beverage dispensers be added to the Schedule of the
"Hours of Work Act." By December 31st, 1946, the Board had made considerable
progress in connection with amending the Orders, but its work in this connection is
still incomplete.
On September 1st, 1946, Mr. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour and Chairman
of the Board of Industrial Relations, was appointed Chairman of the Workmen's Compensation Board, and he relinquished his previous duties with the Provincial Labour
Department. Through his work with the Department of Labour, Mr. Bell had obtained
the confidence of both labour and management, and his experience and judgment had
been of tremendous value to the Board in fulfilling its obligations. Mr. Bell assumed
his new duties with the Workmen's Compensation Board with the best wishes of the
members of the Board and every employee of the Labour Department.
The Board has been fortunate in securing as Mr. Bell's successor Mr. James
Thomson, who had been a member of the Board of Industrial Relations for a number
of years and whose knowledge of labour and management problems and sympathetic
understanding forebodes a continued period of co-operation between the Board and the
persons who are affected by decisions that that body might make.
ORDERS MADE DURING 1946.
In line with the policy suggested in the introduction to this report, the Board
revised the following of its Orders to bring the minimum wage rates and working-
conditions provided therein more in line with those prevailing:—
Office Occupation.—Order No. 34, 1946.
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52, 1946.
Ship-building Industry.—Order No. 20, 1946.
Barbering Occupation.—Order No. 42, 1946.
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industry.—Order No. 74, 1946.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Order No. 46, 1946.
Mercantile Industry.—Order No. 24, 1946.
In addition to the revision of wage-rates and working conditions, male employees
were now included in the application of Order No. 52, 1946, with respect to the hotel
and catering industry.
Apprentices—Order No. 2, 19^6.—This Order of the Board provided that where
apprentices, either male or female, were serving an apprenticeship under a contract of
apprenticeship pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act," the rates of pay under the contract of apprenticeship would constitute the minimum wage payable by the employer
to the apprentice. K 42 DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Uniforms—Order No. 3, 1946.—This Order of the Board applies to male and
female employees and provides that unless the Board of Industrial Relations approves
of an alternative arrangement, when an employee is required by the employer to wear
a uniform, the upkeep of such uniform shall be maintained by the employer free of
cost to the said employee.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry—Order No. 47, 1946.—Previously the Order of the
Board with respect to this industry applied only to female employees. Order No. 47,
1946, of the Board established minimum wage rates and hours of work, etc., with
respect to male employees in this industry.
Cook and Bunk-house Occupation in Unorganized Territory—Order No. 4, 1946.—
With certain exceptions, this Order of the Board provided for the payment of a rate of
50 cents per hour to male and female employees in the cook and bunk-house occupation
in unorganized territory.
Resort Hotel, Unorganized Territory—Order No. 52 A, 1946.—This Order applied
to male and female employees in resort "hotels in unorganized territory during the
summer season, and provided for a variance of the hours of work set forth in Order
No. 52, 1946, with respect to the hotel and catering industry.
Mercantile Supplementary, 1946—Orders Nos. 59 and 24-—These Orders took care
of male and female employees for the Christmas period.
General Interim Minimum Wage Order, 1946.—This Order of the Board increased
the minimum wage rates provided in thirty-seven of its Orders by 20 per cent., with
effect from July 1st, 1946.
REGULATIONS MADE DURING 1946.
"Hours of Work Act " Regulations, Interim Amendments (1946).—The "Hours of
Work Act Amendment Act, 1946," reduced the working-week of employees in industrial
establishments from forty-eight to forty-four. It was therefore necessary to amend
certain regulations made pursuant to the provisions of the " Hours of Work Act" so
that the hours of work provided in the regulations would be consistent with the amendment to the " Hours of Work Act." This was accomplished by making the " Hours of
Work Act" Regulations, Interim Amendments, 1946.
Mercantile Industry (Christmas, 1946, Temporary).—This regulation was made to
deal with hours of work for male and female employees during the Christmas season.
(Summaries of the above-mentioned Orders and regulations, together with other
existing and new Orders and regulations made prior to this report going to press, may
be found in the appendix to this section of the report.)
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
The annual statistical survey of women workers as herewith presented for 1946
continues to reflect their ever-increasing importance in the business and industrial life
of the Province.
Returns were received in time for tabulation from some 7,882 employers of women
and girls, who reported a total of 55,332 female workers for the year under review.
Curtailment in many industries employing large staffs of female workers during
the war years was again an important factor in the decrease noted in the over-all
employment total, which declined to 55,332 in 1946, compared with 59,176 for the
previous year, and a high of 60,410 reported in 1944. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 43
The following tables relate to those occupations and industries covered by Orders
of the Board:—
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1944.
1943.
1942.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
1,696
10,808
9,818
990
$185,403.32
$12,287.76
$18.88
$12.41
9.16%
38.46
1,650
11,039
9,759
1,280
$171,326.37
$13,511.81
$17.56
$10.56
11.60%
38.02
1,515
10,618
9,187
1,431
$158,242.80
$15,103.61
$17.22
$10.55
13.48%
37.99
1,330
9,929
8,408
1,521
$127,289.88
$16,777.71
$15.14
$11.03
15.32%
37.76
1,146
7,733
6,706
1,027
'8,400.56
0,145.09
$14.67
$9.88
13.28%
39.04
I
The total number of firms reporting in the mercantile industry increased to 1,696
in 1946, as against a total of 1,650 for the previous year. While employment increased
in the group of employees over 18 years of age, the over-all total employed was off
slightly at 10,808, as against 11,039 for 1*945.
Increases were noted in the average weekly wages for both older and younger
employees. For employees over 18 years of age the average weekly wage rose to
$18.88 from $17.56 recorded in 1945, while in the under-18-year section average weekly
earnings increased to $12.41 from $10.56 for the previous year.
A continued decrease was evident in the numbers employed in this younger group,
the percentage declining to 9.16 per cent, of total, compared with 11.60 per cent, in
1945.
Average weekly hours of work increased slightly to 38.46 from 38.02 in this
industry for the previous year.
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries (Female).
1945.
1944.
1943.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
176
2,285
2,174
111
$38,896.77
$1,520.98
$17.89
$13.70
4.86%
39.01
181
2,332
2,316
16
$37,766.97
$198.97
$16.31
$12.44
-    0.69%
39.88
161
2,151
2,117
34
$32,765.37
$463.27
$15.48
$13.63
1.58%
38.90
138
1,830
1,762
68
$26,370.25
$726.36
$14.97
$10.68
3.72%
40.49
141
1,725
1,517
208
$22,697.95
$2,272.71
$14.96
$10.93
12.06%
42.94
With fewer firms reporting in this section for 1946, the total employment reported
decreased slightly to 2,285, compared with a high of 2,332 recorded in 1945.
Average earnings increased for both experienced and inexperienced workers. The
average weekly wage for experienced workers rose to $17.89 from a 1945 figure of
$16.31, while for inexperienced workers weekly earnings increased from $12.44 to
$13.70, with some 4.86 per cent, of the total employees shown in this group.
A decrease was noted in the average weekly working-hours in this industry, the
average figure declining from 39.88 to 39.01 for the year under review. K 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
1942.
1,174
9,492
8,785
707
$166,123.63
$9,361.18
$18.91
$13.24
7.45%
38.93
1,271
9,553
9,225
328
$159,047.26
$3,337.48
$17.24
$10.18
3.43%
40.56
1,137
9,078
8,648
430
$146,428.79
$5,146.47
$16.93
$11.97
4.74%
41.01
1,137
8,879
8,371
508
$137,097.40
$5,234.53
$16.38
$10.30
5.72%
41.50
1,075
6,818
6,313
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
505
$96,210.79
$5,446.17
$15.24
Average weekly wages—
$10.78
7.41%
43.30
Average hours worked per week	
The number of firms reporting in this classification decreased from 1,271 to 1,174
for 1946, with a slight drop in employment reported from the 1945 high. Total employment reported was 9,492, as against a high of 9,553 previously recorded.
Average weekly earnings for experienced employees in this industry increased to
$18.91 from $17.24 for the previous year, while an increase was also noted in the weekly
earnings for inexperienced workers, the average mounting to $13.24 from $10.18
recorded in 1945.
With increasing numbers of inexperienced workers being employed in hotel and
catering occupations during 1946, the percentage in this group rose to 7.45 per cent,
of total, compared with 3.43 per cent, in 1945.
Average weekly hours of work for employees in this industry further decreased
to 38.93 for 1946, compared with 40.56 noted for the previous year.
Office Occupation (Female).
1946.
1943.
1942.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
3,261
14,296
13,789
507
$337,371.11
$8,863.72
$24.47
$17.48
3.55%
39.46
3,274
13,790
13,345
445
$311,931.92
$6,856.48
$23.37
$15.41
3.23%
40.43
2,984
13,251
12,770
481
$294,314.50
$7,667.04
$23.05
$15.94
3.63%
40.82
2,766
12,172
11,614
558
$237,803.37
$7,903.27
$20.48
$14.16
4.58%
40.69
2,649
9,991
9,653
338
.,753.83
1,553.04
$19.55
$13.47
3.38%
41.29
Although the number of firms reporting employees in office occupations was slightly
less in 1946, the total employment figure mounted to 14,296, as against 13,790 for 1945,
establishing a record high employment total for this occupation.
Average earnings for office-workers continued to climb, the average weekly wage
for the experienced employees increasing to $24.47 from $23.37 previously recorded,
while in the younger and inexperienced group average weekly earnings rose to $17.48
from a 1945 figure of $15.41.
Little change was noted in the percentage of younger workers employed in this
occupation during 1946, with 3.55 per cent, of the total in this category compared with
3.23 per cent, in 1945.
Average weekly hours of work continued to decrease in office occupations, the 1946
average figure declining to 39.46 from 40.43 recorded for the previous year. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 45
Interesting comparison is made in the following table showing the numbers
employed at office occupations in the various salary classifications as noted, for the
years 1944, 1945, and 1946.
Numbers employed in Office Occupations
Monthly Salary Classification.
1944.
1945.
1946.
$65 to $70                                                            	
555
679
997
1,054
1,166
1,183
811
1,248
761
759
644
372
552
308
308
322
693
582
580
1,026
1,063
1,221
1,144
908
1,226
816
735
640
493
593
427
346
409
803
269
70 to   75                                                                            	
274
75 to   80	
80 to   85                                                              	
1,114
899
85 to   90                                         	
1,305
90 to   95 -	
95 to 100                                                  	
1,120
1,215
100 to 105                      	
1,200
105 to 110                                                         	
949
110 to 115                             	
811
115 to 120                                                                	
643
120 to 125      	
672
125 to 130                   	
452
130 to 135                                                   	
552
135 to 140                                     	
390
140 to 150               .               	
505
1,256
12,412
13,012
13,626
A definite trend toward higher salaries in the office occupation continues to show
in the above distribution of workers in this group. Decreasing numbers employed in
the lower wage brackets are again noted in the figures for 1946, with a general upward
shifting of the employment weight into the higher salaried classifications. Increasing
numbers are noted in all salary brackets upward from $130 per month.
Personal Service Occupation  (Female).
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
1942.
144
149
134
134
125
542
535
476
453
380
533
521
460
446
374
9
14
16
7
6
1,318.80
$10,197.64
$8,891.45
$7,463.48
$6,033.37
$116.50
$152.93
$162.80
$80.07
$53.28
$21.24
$19.57
$19.33
$16.73
$16.13
$12.94
$10.92
$10.18
$11.44
$8.88
1.66%
2.62%
3.36%
1.55%
1.58%
40.16
39.88
40.50
39.94
40.32
Number of firms reporting—	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
$11
Included in the above table covering the personal service occupation are females
employed as beauty-parlour operators, chiropodists, and those engaged in similar occupations. While there are many more such establishments in the Province than the
limited number of firms reported in the above table, it should be pointed out that a
great many firms in this business are operated by the owners without help of any kind,
and consequently are not included in the tabulations.
Although the number of firms reporting decreased from 149 to 144 for 1946,
employment in this occupation continued in strength, with a total of 542 employees
reported for 1946, compared with 535 for 1945. *
K 46                                               DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The average weekly earnings for experienced employees increased from $19.57 to
$21.24 for 1946, while for inexperienced workers the weekly average earnings also
registered a gain, to show $12.94 as against $10.92 for the previous year.
Average weekly working-hours in all personal service occupations increased fractionally to 40.16 from 39.88 recorded in 1945.
Fishing Industry (Female).
1946.
1945.                 1944.
1
1943.
1942.
20
774
774
17
441
441
19
656
656
16
372
363
9
$7,317.48
$68.25
$20.16
$7.58
2.42%
39.58
8
172
167
5
Total weekly wages—
$18,194.97
$9,307.73
$12,214.60
$3,614.36
$41.06
Average weekly wages—
$23.51
$21.11
$18.62
$21.64
$8.21
2.91%
37.49
35.22
36.28
40.67
With additional firms reporting in this classification, the total employment figure
for 1946 increased to 774, as against 441 shown for 1945.
As noted in the previous year, all employees continued to receive wages in excess
of the legal minimum set for experienced workers.
Compared with $21.11 in 1945, the average weekly earnings for all employees rose
to $23.51 for the year under review.
The average weekly hours worked in this industry increased to 37.49 in 1946,
compared with 35.22 for the previous year.    Inasmuch as-the governing Order does not
apply to women engaged in heading and filling occupations in fish-canneries, only a
relatively low number of female employees in the industry are included in the above
table.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female).
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
1942.
Number of firms reporting	
230
2,720
2,584
136
$59,902.91
$1,992.66
$23.18
$14.65
5.00%
40.61
221
2,096
2,064
32
$43,962.57
$447.17
$21.30
$13.97
1.53%
37.78
194
2,353
2,346
7
$54,152.23
$80.13
$23.08
$11.45
0.30%
186
2,185
2,013
172
$37,636.99
$1,843.73
$18.70
$10.72
7.87%
40.54
189
2 341
Total weekly wages—
$3,743.28
$18.96
$10.82
14.78%
Average weekly wages—
The above table includes not only the regular employees of telephone and telegraph
companies but also those operating switchboards in offices and other establishments,
such as hotels, hospitals, etc.
The number of firms reporting employees in this occupation increased to 230 for
1946, as against 221 reporting in 1945, and over-all employment in this occupation
increased sharply to 2,720 from 2,096 reported for the previous year.
Average weekly earnings increased in both experienced and inexperienced classifications, the average weekly wage for experienced workers rising to $23.18 from $21.30 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 47
previously recorded, while average weekly earnings in the inexperienced group increased
to $14.65 from $13.97 shown for 1945.
Together with increased employment, general expansion in the telephone and telegraph industry also resulted in an increase in average hours worked. Average weekly
working-hours for 1946 was 40.61, compared with 37.78 recorded in 1945.
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
1945.
1942.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced ■	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
948 I
8,757 |
8,495 j
262 j
$186,349.85
$3,185.64
$21.94
$12.16
2.99%
39.32
1,036
14,016
13,851
165
$320,350.13
$1,633.77
$23.13
$9.90
1.18%
40.33
16,221
15,928
293
$412,583.97
$3,361.97
$25.90
$11.47
1.81%
42.35
873
14,869
14,287
682
$293,807.69
$5,877.68
$20.56
$10.10
3.91%
42.66
740
10,738
10,114
624
$192,695.51
$5,862.55
$19.05
$9.40
5.81%
42.62
With the manufacturing industries returning to the business of supplying the
demands of civilian life rather than the requirements for war, decreases are at once
evident in the number of firms reporting and the total employees reported. Firms
reporting female workers in this classification decreased to 948 in 1946, as against
1,036 reporting in 1945. With curtailment in many vital industries previously employing large numbers of female workers, the total employment in this classification
dropped to 8,757 in 1946, as against 14,016 in 1945 and a high of 16,221 recorded
in 1944.
Average weekly earnings for experienced female workers in the manufacturing
industries decreased in 1946, following a downward trend from the high levels established at the close of the war years. The average weekly earnings for experienced
workers in 1946 was $21.94, compared with $23.13 in 1945 and an all-time high of
$25.90 established in 1944. Average earnings for inexperienced workers, however,
showed an increase to $12.16 from $9.90 in the previous year, an increasing percentage
of this group being noted in the 1946 figures.
General curtailment reported in this industry is further evidenced in the reduced
working-hours, the average weekly working-hours for all females reported in this section decreasing to 39.32 in 1946, as against 40.33 for the previous year.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry  (Female).
1946.
1943.
1942.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees -	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees.
Average hours worked per week	
72
5,245
5,185
60
$118,688.68
$22.89
$14.98
1.14%
42.97
69
4,836
4,822
14
$100,752.07
$157.08
$20.89
$11.22
0.29%
43.01
72
4,941
4,931
10
$106,895.45
$102.40
$21.68
$10.24
0.20%
44.64
69
3,539
3,518
21
.5,804.78
$199.99
$18.71
$9.52
0.59%
45.04
72
4,012
3,831
181
$68,007.64
$2,352.39
$17.75
$13.00
4.51%
46.14 K 48
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
With a slight increase in the number of reporting firms, total employment reported
in the fruit and vegetable industry increased to 5,245, compared with a total of 4,836
for 1945.
For the experienced workers, average weekly earnings increased to $22.89 for
1946, as against $20.89 recorded for the previous year. The percentage of inexperienced workers in this industry increased slightly over the previous year, and in this
section average weekly earnings rose to $14.98 compared with $11.22 noted for 1945.
. Little change occurred in the average weekly working-hours, the average figure for
this industry declining fractionally to 42.97 for 1946 from 43.01 previously recorded.
Transportation Industry (Female).
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
1942.
76
130
82
48
$1,494.08
$571.88
$18.22
$11.91
36.92%
36.96
102
227
152
75
$2,914.60
$871.10
$19.18
$11.61
33.04%
37.79
138
235
174
61
$3,663.55
$733.50
$21.05
$12.02
25.96%
42.29
160
. 400
306
94
$6,361.32
$945.88
$20.79
$10.06
23.50%
43.43
129
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
313
186
127
Total weekly wages—
$3,268.60
$1,155.66
Average weekly wages—
$17.57
$9.10
40.58%
41.61
Included in this classification are female workers engaged in delivery, truck-
driving, messenger-work, etc.
Decreasing totals of female workers employed in the transportation industry were
again in evidence during 1946. With male workers returning to jobs in this classification occupied by females during the war years, employment decreased sharply in both
the older and younger classes of female workers.
With 76 firms reporting females in these occupations, as against 102 firms reporting in 1945, the total employment figure dropped to 130 from 227 previously recorded.
Average weekly earnings for employees over 18 years of age further decreased to
$18.22 from $19.18 in 1945 and a high of $21.05 listed in 1944.
In the group of younger employees, average weekly earnings showed a fractional
gain from $11.61 to $11.91 for the year under review, and with increasing numbers of
the older group being replaced by male workers, the percentage in the younger section
rose to 36.92 per cent, of total, as compared with 33.04 per cent, in this group for 1945.
Further decrease in the weekly working-hours was again noted in this industry,
the average figure for 1946 declining to 36.96 from 37.79 shown for the previous year.
Public Places op Amusement (Female).
1943.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years.
Average hours worked per week	
85
283
192
91
S2.197.75
$762.88
$11.45
$8.38
32.16%
24.76
91
311
209
102
52,359.41
$805.17
$11.29
$7.89
32.80%
26.12
86
85
83
430
277
238
320
189
186
110
88
52
3,931.40
$2,189.76
$2,203.61
$797.01
$592.87
$352.64
$12.29
$11.59
$11.85
$7.25
$6.74
$6.78
25.58%
31.77%
21.85%
25.16
26:95
29.32 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 49
Included in this section are theatre ushers, check-room attendants, and all such
occupations previously included in the personal service group.
With fewer firms reporting females employed in these occupations, the 1946 total
employment figure in this classification dropped to 283 from 311 reported in 1945 and
a high of 430 recorded in 1944.
Slight increases were evident in weekly earnings for both the older and younger
groups of employees, the average weekly earnings in the over-18-year section increasing
to $11.45 from $11.29 previously shown, while for the younger employees the average
figure increased to $8.38 from $7.89 reported for 1945. The percentage of younger
employees reported in this classification remained almost unchanged during the year.
Average weekly working-hours decreased in this occupation for the year under
review, the 1946 average figure declining to 24.76, as against 26.12 shown for 1945.
The short working-week in this classification is due to the fact that the greater part
of the employees represented are theatre ushers, whose working-hours are very short
when compared with other occupations.
Summary of all Occupations ("Female Minimum Wage Act").
1943.
I
1942.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years, or experienced	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced-
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced..
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or
inexperienced	
Average hours worked per week	
7,882
55,332
52,411
2,921
$1,125,941.87
$39,561."78
$21.48
$13.54
5.28%
39.42
8,061
59,176
56,705
2,471
$1,169,916.67
$27,971.96
$20.63
$11.32
4.18%
39.94
7,289
60,410
57,537
2,873
$1,234,084.11
$33,618.20
$21.45
$11.70.
4.76%
40.84
I
6,894 |
54,905  |
51,277  |
3,628  I
$949,142.40
$40,250.34
$18.51
$11.09
6.61%
41.03
6,357
44,461
41,042
3,419
$719,708.52
$35,977.87
$17.54
$10.52
7.69%
41.96
The above table summarizes returns from some 7,882 firms reporting actual figures
concerning 55,332 women and girl employees for the year 1946.
Total aggregate salaries and wages for one week amounted to $1,165,503.65, a
decrease of $32,384.98 from the over-all total for the previous year.
The average weekly wage for all occupations increased from $20.63 to $21.48 in
the over-18-year or experienced group for 1946, exceeding the 1944 high and establishing a new high wage record in the summary table. Increased average earnings were
also noted in the younger or inexperienced group, the average weekly earnings for this
section increasing to $13.54 in 1946, compared with $11.32 recorded for 1945.
In spite of a general upward revision during 1946 of existing legal minimum wage
rates for female workers, it is again evident from the summary that the average
amount received continues to exceed the highest minimum set by law. During the
year the legal minimum wages for women 18 or over in the various classifications
covered by Orders of the Board ranged from $15.40, the lowest, as set for the manufacturing industry, to $19.20 for a forty-eight-hour week in the telephone and telegraph
section.
Average weekly hours of work continued to decrease during the year, the average
figure for the 55,332 employees reported declining to 39.42 in 1946, as against 39.94
for 1945. K 50
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
A slight increase was noted in the percentage of younger or inexperienced workers
employed during 1946, the percentage figure rising to 5.28 per cent, of total, as compared with 4.18 per cent, for the previous year.
The average earnings for the adult or experienced female workers increased in nine
of the eleven tables. Such decreases as occurred in the remaining two were largely the
result of a return to peace-time standards of production, or shorter working-hours, for
those occupations in which the earnings were highest during the war years.
The summary figures are not inclusive of domestic workers, farm-labourers, or
fruit-pickers, which are excluded from coverage by the provisions of the " Female
Minimum Wage Act." The total 55,332 reported in the tables is inclusive only of those
workers with classes of employment for which minimum wage Orders have been set by
the Board. Similarly, returns are not requested for women and girls employed in banks,
as employment conditions in this instance are regulated by the Dominion " Bank Act."
Federal employees are also excluded from the coverage of the Provincial legislation.
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum for Experienced Female Workers.
Industry or
Occupation.
Legal
Minimum
Wage for
Full-time
Experienced
Employees.
Receiving Actual
Minimum Wage
SET FOE
Experienced
Workers.
Receiving More
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Receiving Less
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Total.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
Mercantile	
$17.00*
17.60t
18,001
18.00§
17.10$
19.20||
20.16||
15.40t
17.60f
17.101!
1,417
255
1,416
697
51
1
55
76
6
12
13.11
11.16
14.81
4.88
9.41
0.13
2.02
0.87
0.12
4.24
7,070
1,166
4,859
12,103
395
547
1,758
7,202
3,925
38
65.41
51.03
51.19
84.66
72.88
70.67
64.63
82.24
74.83
13.43
2,321
864
3,218
1,496
96
226
907
1,479
1,314
233
21.48
37.81
33.90
10.46
17.71
29.20
33.35
16.89
25.05
82.33
10,808
2,285
9,492
14,296
542
774
2,720
8,757
5,245
Office	
Personal service	
Fishing	
Telephone and telegraph
Manufacturing "..
Public places of amusement...
283
Totals, 1946	
3,985
851
7.22
1.44
39,063
49,055
70.76
83.22
12,154
9,043
22.02
15.34
55,2021
Totals, 1945	
58,949
* 39-44 hours per week. f 44 hours per week. t 40-44 hours per week. § 36-44 hours per week.
I! 48 hours per week.
fl In the transportation industry, 130' employees excluded from above table and not included in totals, as it is
impracticable to set a weekly rate owing to the variation of minimum wages in the Order, depending on whether the
work is done on foot, on bicycles, by motor-cycles, or other types of motor-vehicles.
Due to a general upward revision during 1946 of the legal minimum wage rates
set by the Board, the data contained in the above table will not be strictly comparable
with similar information covering previous years.
The table shows the relative numbers of female workers in each occupation receiving the actual legal minimum set, together with those receiving above and below that
amount. In this connection it should be pointed out that while certain occupations
may show relatively high percentages of employees at less than the minimum for a full
week's work, this is in most instances due to shorter working-hours, or casual part-time
or intermittent employment. In the section covering public places of amusement, for
example, where casual and part-time employment is generally the rule, a high percentage of the total employees was shown as receiving less than the minimum amount
for a full week's work. Also included in the section dealing with percentages at less
than the required minimum are the younger and less skilled employees, for whom
special rates have been fixed by the Board. '
REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 51
The office group continued to lead in the section showing those receiving above the
legal minimum, reporting 84.66 per cent, above, followed by the manufacturing industry
with 82.24 per cent, and the fruit and vegetable industries with 74.83 per cent, above.
In the personal service group 72.88 per cent, were above the minimum, followed by the
fishing industry with 70.67 per cent, in this section. The mercantile industry and the
telephone and telegraph occupation showed 65.41 and 64.63 per cent, respectively. The
hotel and catering industry reported 51.19 per cent, above the fixed rate, followed by
the laundry group with 51.03 per cent, of total above and public places of amusement
with 13.43 per cent, in this category.
Note is made each year of individual high earnings reported in the various occupations covered.    For the year 1946 record top salary figures were as follows:—
Weekly Wages
Occupation or industry. or Salary.
Office     $75.00
Mercantile    75.00
Manufacturing     75.00
Hotel and catering  ,  73.08
Fruit and vegetable   69.84
Personal service   65.02
Telephone and telegraph   57.95
Fishing     50.12
Laundry, cleaning and dyeing   40.00
Public places of amusement .'  35.27
Transportation     35.00
Highest individual weekly earnings for 1946 were noted in the office occupation
and the mercantile and manufacturing industries, where in each case a high of $75
was reported. Top earnings in the hotel and catering industry were $73.08, while one
employee in the fruit and vegetable industry received $69.84 for the week under
review. Highest earnings in the personal service occupation were $65.02, and one
employee in a supervisory capacity in the telephone and telegraph group received
$57.95. Highest weekly wage shown in the fishing industry was $50.12. The laundry,
cleaning and dyeing section reported one employee in receipt of $40 weekly, while in
the public places of amusement and transportation occupations the record highest wage
amounts were $35.27 and $35 respectively.
Table showing Number of Single, Married, and Widowed Employees
and their Earnings for Week reported.
Industry or Occupation.
Single.
Earnings.
Married.
Earnings.
Widowed.
Earnings.
Total Earnings for Week
reported.
6,765
1,246
4,987
10,458
337
338
2,160
5,485
2,572
91
235
$122,704.31
22,252.25
92,968.31
254,187.13
7,260.57
7,877.08
49,449.07
118,721.77
66,354.13
1,319.75
2,415.75
3,616
949
3,777
3,356
192
398
503
2,958
2,535
34
45
$66,358.93
16,581.80
68,820.69
79,512.44
3,905.56
9,281.72
10,877.16
64,204.21
59,804.96
643.26
500.78
427
90
728
482
13
38
57
314
138-
5
3
$8,627.84
1,583.70
13,695.81
12,535.26
269.17
1,036.17
1,569.34
6,609.51
3,428.17
102.95
44.10
$197,691.08
40,417.75
175,484.81
346,234.83
Personal service	
11,435.30
18,194.97
61,895.57
Manufacturing	
Fruit and vegetable	
189,535.49
119,587.26
2,065.96
Public places of amusement	
2,960.63
34,674
$735,510.12
18,363
$380,491.51
2,295
$49,502.02
$1,165,503.65
62.66%
60.85%
33.19%
35.20%
4.15%
3.95%
Shown in the above table are the relative percentages of single, married, and
widowed employees in the various industries and occupations covered. K 52
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
The percentage of married women-workers, steadily decreasing since the war years,
further declined during 1946, with 33.19 per cent, in this category compared with 35.20
per cent, recorded for the previous year. Single workers increased during the period
under review, with 62.66 per cent, noted, as against 60.85 per cent, in 1945. A fractional increase in the percentage of widowed employees was also evident. Employment
opportunities within the office group, telephone and telegraph section, and the mercantile industry claimed the greatest majority of single employees, while larger percentages
of married workers were employed in the laundry industry, the hotel and catering
section, and the more seasonal fruit and vegetable and fishing industries.
Inasmuch as the percentages of workers shown as divorced, separated, or " marital
status not stated " continued as less than 1 per cent, in each case, no separate tabulation
was made, the figures being included with the total of single workers in the above table.
Table showing Years of Service of Female Employees with Employers
reporting for 1946.
Industry or Occupation.
S a
.H  tfi
Mercantile	
Laundry	
Hotel and catering ....
Office	
Personal service	
Fishing	
Telephone and telegraph.
Manufacturing	
Fruit and vegetable	
Transportation	
Public places of amusement	
Totals.,	
291
110
538
264
13
492
774
2
0*
5,925
1,239
5,870
5,470
252
537
997
4,119
2,997
72
195
2,530 27,673
I
id
«og
*>%
at
o a
o a
^
CO r**
•*>*
io!w
o ti
tD r*
1,528
336
1,134|
2,200
09
83
442
1,415
682
20
43
966
234
719
1,531
58
50
346
896
287
15
14
654
135
468
1,252
33
32
255
716
177
13
536
85
252
1,022
31
18
120
493
79
4
7,982   5,116   3,742   2,642   1,196
 I
211
31
106
506
17
6
78
164
70
1
124
18
61
295
2
6
22
79
24
1
St
61
15
56
163
4
632
423
61
5
30
140
9
307
St
rnri
tH    OJ
O   Qi     ,
!*o
OJ   .? <D I   O
■2■St -2
48
8
24
124
3
403
69
234
1,329
21
9
380
276
93
2,818
10,808
2,285
9,492
14,296
542
774
2,720
8,757
5,245
130
283
c t.
£ o
a a
1,696
176
1,174
3,261
144
20
230
948
72
76
85
7,882
The length-of-service table indicates, according to occupations, the length of time
each employee has been in the service of the employer sending in the return.
Under normal conditions the group shown as having worked less than one year
serves as an indication of any increase or decrease which may have occurred in the
volume of new employment during the year.
With the volume of new employment noticeably decreasing, particularly in the
manufacturing industries which had maintained large pay-rolls throughout the war
years, the total employees shown in the above table as having worked less than one
year decreased to 27,673, compared with a total of 28,754 in this section for 1945.
Special note is made of the employee credited with the greatest number of years'
service with the employer reporting. In the mercantile industry one woman-worker
was reported with thirty-four years' service. Longest period of service with one
employer in the laundry, cleaning and dyeing section was thirty-one years, while in the
hotel and catering classification thirty-eight years was the longest reported. One office
employee was credited with forty-five years' continuous service with the same employer.
In the personal service occupation one employee served for twenty-five years with
the same firm, while the fishing industry reported twenty years as the longest period
of service.
A forty-year record was shown for one employee in the telephone and telegraph
occupation. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 53
The manufacturing industry reported one employee as having served for forty
years, while in the fruit and vegetable industry twenty-five years was the longest
service.
The transportation section, in which females employed have been covered by the
Board Order for a comparatively short time, reported six years as the longest continuous
service.
In the public places of amusement classification one employee was credited with
twenty-three years' service with the same employer.
INSPECTIONS AND WAGE ADJUSTMENTS.
During the year our thirteen Inspectors made 8,113 actual investigations, which
is a slight decrease from the number made in 1945.
The Province is divided into seven districts with the staff working out from
Victoria, Vancouver, Kamloops, Nelson, Prince George, Kelowna, and Nanaimo.
As each inspection consists of a detailed check of pay-rolls, hour records, conditions
of employment and other details covered by Board Orders, and interviews with officials
and often employees in firms with hundreds of workers, each investigation requires
considerable time. On the departmental records it is counted as one inspection only,
even though it might necessitate several days to complete.
Considering the distances to be travelled the staff is to be commended for the
year's work arid the co-operative spirit they have built up over the years with employers
who are still harassed by post-war problems of many varieties.
In the regular course of their duties our Inspectors found certain irregularities,
the most tangible of which were payments of wages below those required by law.
Through their efforts and with the co-operation of the employers, 129 firms paid
249 women-workers arrears amounting to $3,051.72. A much larger sum was paid over
to 184 male employees by 101 employers who made adjustments amounting to $7,615.52.
Thus a total of $10,667.24, being the difference between what they should have received
and what they were actually paid, reached the pockets of workers in the Province which,
but for the help of the Board and the protective legislation, they would either have lost
altogether or been forced to take legal action to recover on their own behalf.
In addition to the foregoing, one firm paid 51 employees $573.05 holiday pay to
which they were entitled under the "Annual Holidays Act."
Some employees do exercise their civil rights under the Male and Female Minimum
Wage Acts through the Courts without coming to the Board, but naturally we have no
record of what amounts they collect under such circumstances.
In addition to their regular departmental work many members of our staff have
assisted the Wartime Labour Regulations Branch in various parts of the Province.
Our departmental cars and private cars operated for Board of Industrial Relations
work covered 80,045 miles, of which 19,608 were run for the Wartime Labour Relations
Branch. Some of this work was done on special trips and at other times it was
accomplished while the Inspectors were doing their regular work, and in the latter case
mileage and costs were divided proportionately.
As the years go on and our Orders and regulations become better known the well-
established firms are aware of their responsibilities, but with many employers coming
into the Province from other places, particularly the Prairies, we must be on the alert
to keep them posted as to their responsibilities. As new Orders and regulations are
made it is a continuous process of keeping employers, employees, and the general public
fully informed of the amendments. K 54
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
COURT CASES.
When infractions of our labour laws occur it is usually possible to persuade the
erring employers to bring their operations into conformity with our Orders and regulations without resorting to prosecution. The ordeal of appearance in Court as witnesses
is a trying one for employees, particularly for women and girls, and the usual policy of
the Board has been to refrain from subjecting them to this experience except in extreme
cases. However, if it is found that employers persist in violation of the law, or when
after repeated warnings they fail to regulate their businesses in a legal manner, Court
actions are started against them.
Court Cases, 1946.
Statute.
Cases.
Convictions.
Dismissed.
Withdrawn.
10
2
5
20
4
1
10
2
5
20
4
1
Totals	
42
42
" Female Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1. Cariboo Realty Bureau, Ltd. (Vinton F.
Jenks), Prince George
2. Chris* Grill (Chris Stamatis), 872 Gran
ville Street, Vancouver
3. Chris' Grill (Chris Stamatis), 872 Gran
ville Street, Vancouver
4. Empire Cafe (G. H. Chow), Rossland....
5. Empire Cafe (G. H. Chow), Rossland....
6. Mins' Cafe  (J. Cavanagh), Steveston....
7. Mins' Cafe  (J. Cavanagh), Steveston....
8. Nelson Hotel (Peter Petez), Union Bay
9. Prince George Caf£  (Gordon Woo),
Prince George
10. Prince George Cafe   (Gordon Woo),
Prince George
Failure to pay minimum wage to
employee
Failure to observe 1.30 a.m. to 6
a.m. shift
Failure to keep employee's hours
within schedule as posted
Failure  to  give  twenty-four-hour
rest period a week to employee
Failure to keep true and correct
records of wages
Failure to pay an employee wages
semi-monthly (sec. 9, Order 52)
Failure to pay an employee wages
semi-monthly (sec. 9, Order 52)
Failure to give twenty-four-hour
rest period a week to employee
Failure to observe Board rates as
set out in Catering Order No. 52
Failure to observe Board rates as
set out in Catering Order No. 52
Fined  $25,  $1.75  costs;   arrears of
$105.92 ordered.
Fined $25.
Conviction and suspended sentence.
Conviction and suspended sentence.
Fined $10, $3.50 costs.
Conviction and suspended sentence,
three months;   arrears of $68.50
paid.
Fined   $25,   and   costs;    in   default,
twenty-five   days;    arrears   of
$172.76 paid.
Fined $25, $2.50 costs.
Fined $25, $1.75 costs; in default,
15 days ; arrears of $13.88
ordered.
Fined $25 and costs; arrears of
$9.58   ordered.
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
1. Y. S. Chong, Metchosin j Failure to keep true and correct    Fined $15, $2.50 costs.
records
Failure to issue statements with    Fined $25.
pay to employee
2. Dominion Cab  (Wm. J. Truttman), 837
Yates Street, Victoria REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 55
" Hours of Work Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1.
2.
3
Commercial Cafe (Wong Yuen and Wong
Yee   Mon),   1308   Government   Street,
Victoria
Commercial Cafe (Wong Yuen and Wong
Yee   Mon),   1308   Government   Street,
Victoria
Failure to post schedule of hours
of work
Failure to keep  true  and  correct
records
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to post schedule of hours
of work
Failure to post schedule of hours
of work
Fined $50 ;   in default, one month.
Fined $50 ;   in default, one month.
Fined $22.50.
4.
5.
Dominion Cab  (Win. J. Truttman), 837
Yates Street, Victoria
Richards Meat Market (W. H. Richards),
Cranbrook
Fined $25.
Fined $25, $3.75 costs.
Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act."
1.
C. E. Albright, Slocan
City 	
Failure to pay an employee wages
semi-monthly
Fined $25, $6 costs ;  in default, two
months ;  arrears of $9 ordered.
2.
C. E. Albright. Slocan City	
Failure to pay an employee wages
Fined $25, $6 costs;  in default, two
semi-monthly
months;  arrears of $75 ordered.
3.
Failure to pay an employee wages
Fined $25, $2.50  costs ;   in default,
semi-monthly
thirty days; arrears of $32.50
ordered.
4.
R. Greveling, Haney....
Failure to pay an employee wages
semi-monthly
Fined $25,  $2.50  costs ;   in default,
thirty   days ;    arrears   of   $55
ordered.
5.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J. McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Fined   $25   and   costs;    arrears   of
Little Fort
semi-monthly
$102.39 ordered.
6.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J. McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence ;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $34.33
ordered.
7.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J. McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence ;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $193.42
ordered.
8.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J. McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $39.47
ordered.
9.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J. McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence ;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $291.18
ordered.
10.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J. McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence ;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $266.23
ordered.
11.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J. McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $282.38
ordered.
12.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J. McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence ;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $163.71
ordered.
13.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J. McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence ;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $73.44
ordered.
14.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J. McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $47.79
ordered.
15.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J, McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence ;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $77.52
ordered.
16.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J, McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $32.53
ordered.
17.
Little Fort Lumber Co.
(J. McKechnie),
Failure to pay an employee wages
Conviction and suspended sentence ;
Little Fort
semi-monthly
costs and arrears of $21.59
ordered. K 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
18. John Masloff, Taghum..
19. West  Coast  Lath   Co.   (Fred  Kurbis),
425 No. 5 Road, Lulu Island
20. West  Coast  Lath   Co.   (Fred   Kurbis),
425 No. 5 Road, Lulu Island
Failure to pay an employee wages
semi-monthly
Failure to pay an employee wages
semi-monthly
Failure to pay an employee wages
semi-monthly
Fined  $25,  $3.75  costs;   arrears of
$96.69 ordered.
Fined  $25;   in   default,  fourteen
days;   arrears of $110 ordered.
Fined  $25;   in   default,  fourteen
days;  arrears of $98.30 ordered.
" Control of Employment of Children Act."
1.
La Velve Cafe (Way Pow), 50 Hastings
Unlawfully   employing   a child
Fined $10 ;   in default, ten days.
Street East, Vancouver
without a permit
2.
La Velve Cafe (Way Pow), 50 Hastings
Unlawfully   employing   a child
Conviction and suspended sentence.
Street East, Vancouver
without a permit
3.
La Velve Cafe (Way Pow), 50 Hastings
Unlawfully   employing   a child
Fined $10;   in default, ten days.
Street East, Vancouver
without a permit
4.
Mrs. Diana Viatkin, 508 Cordova Street
Unlawfully permitting child to be
Fined $15;   in default, one week.
East, Vancouver
employed
" Factories Act."
1. Lim   Kee   Laundry,   345   Sixth   Avenue
"West, Vancouver
Operating after 7 p.m. without
the permission in writing of
the Inspector
Fined $50 ;   in default, thirty days.
COMPARATIVE WAGES, 1918, 1944, 1945, AND 1946.
Figures showing comparative wage trends are furnished in the following tables
for the year 1918, when data were first compiled, and for the three most recent years—
namely, 1944, 1945, and 1946. It will be noted these relate to non-seasonal occupations
only.
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1918.         |          1944.
!
1945.
1946.
Average weekly wages—
I
1
$12.71                  $17.22
$7.70                   $10.55
15.49%     J           13.48%
1
$17.56
$10.56
11.60%
$18.88
$12.41
9.16%
Percentage of employees under 18 years	
Laundry Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
$11.80
$9.78
21.80%
$15.48         |
$13.63
1.58%    |
$16.31
$12.44
0.69%
$17.89
$13.70
4 86%
Hotel and
Catering Industry
(Female).
Average weekly wages—
$14.23
$11.77
5.51%
$16.93        |
$11.97
4.74%    |
$17.24
$10.18
3.43%
$18.91
$13 24
7.45% REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 57
Office Occupation (Female).
1918.
1944.
1945.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years.
$16.53
$10.88
7.45%
$23.05
$15.94
3.63%
$23.37
$15.41
3.23%
$24.47
$17.48
3.55%
Personal Service Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$21.24
$12.94
1.66%
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees.
$21.30
$13.97
1.63%
$23.18
$14.65
5.00%
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
$21.94
$12.16
2.99%
SPECIAL LICENCES.
In order to give inexperienced employees a chance to commence work and become
experienced, provision is made in the various Orders of the Board for a graduated scale
of wages leading up to the legal minimum after a certain length of time. Such learners
have to secure special licences.
The number of employers taking advantage of these licences increased during 1946.
In 1946,1,258 licences were issued, as against 217 in 1945 and 378 in 1944. The following table shows the numbers issued in various lines of work in 1946 and 1945:—
1946. 1945.
Telephone and telegraph  	
Personal service   1
Laundry   »-      218 6
Mercantile        272 16
Office       270 26
Hotel and catering       345 43
Manufacturing        153 125
Totals   1,258 217
The original licence is sent to the employee so she may know when her increases
are due. A duplicate is forwarded to the employer and when the employee is raised to
the legal minimum, either before or at the expiration of the licence, or when she leaves
the firm, the employer returns his copy for cancellation on our records. Many employers
raised the wages of the employees to the legal minimum much sooner than the licence or
permit required. K 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
STATISTICS FOR MALE EMPLOYEES.
Information reported in that section of the statistical tables dealing with the
employment and earnings of female workers is based on a questionnaire restricted to
female employees only.
From industrial classifications dealt with elsewhere in this report, however, a segregation has been made to isolate male employees in occupations included in the coverage
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," for the purpose of presenting the following tables.
While from this source it has not been possible to obtain separate information for
all occupations covered by the male minimum wage Orders, the tables show the trend of
wages and employment in some of the more important occupations covered.
The information presented in the tables has been arranged to show details of male
employees over and under 21 years of age, and is based on industrial returns for the
week of employment of the greatest number.
Baking Industry (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week	
1945.
$64,
$51,
$2,
189
1,478
1,359
119
214.00
809.50
404.50
$38.12
$20.21
8.06%
41.53
182
1,469
1,353
116
$51,174.50
$49,109.50
$2,065.00
$36.30
$17.80
7.90%
45.04
1944.
169
1,167
1,089
78
$41,031.00
$39,687.00
$1,344.00
$36.44
$17.23
6.68%
45.60
167
1,150
1,030
120
$36,042.50
$34,081.50
$1,961.00
$33.09
$16.34
10.43%
45.80
Construction (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week	
$852,
$830,
$22,
1,732
22,040
21,191
849
297.50
077.00
220.50
$39.17
$26.17
3.85%
41.58
1,116
16,712
16,031
681
$617,345.50
$601,207.50
$16,138.00
$37.50
$23.70
4.07%
42.79
916
17,808
17,181
627
$676,180.00
$660,869.50
$15,310.50
$38.47
$24.42
3.52%
44.09
$943,
$25,
753
24,754
23,837
917
551.00
888.00
663.00
$39.60
$27.99
3.70%
51.14
Fruit and Vegetable (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week	
3,223
2,493
730
$111,684.50
$89,844.50
$21,840.00
$36.04
$29.92
22.65%
48.34
94
2,758
2,056
702
$84,880.00
$65,809.00
$19,071.00
$32.01
$27.17
25.45%
49.96
2,807
2,136
671
$82,688.50
$65,879.00
$16,809.50
$30.84
$25.05
23.90%
51.87
84
2,068
1,482
586
$58,653.00
$44,246.50
$14,406.50
$29.86
$24.58
28.34%
54.43 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 59
House Furnishings (Male).
1946.
1945.
1944.
1943.
135
1,569
1,338
231
$49,274.50
$44,516.00
$4,758.50
$33.27
$20.60
14.72%,
42.32
99
1,198
982
196
$34,177.00
$30,824.00
$3,353.00
$31.39
$17.11
16.36%
43.40
77
829
684
145
$23,660.50
$21,398.00
$2,262.50
$31.28
$15.60
17.49%
43.55
67
733
595
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
138
$19,001.00
$16,734.50
$2,266.50 '
Average weekly wages—■
Employees 21 years and over	
$28.13
$16.42
Percentage of male employees under 21 years	
Average hours worked per week	
18.83%
44.00
Logging (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years
Average hours worked per week	
816
639
546
521
15,273
13,249
12,768
12,589
14,479
12,635
12,249
11,904
794
614
519
685
$708,840.50
$608,209.50
$595,607.50
$513,106.00
$678,287.50
$585,334.00
$577,224.00
$489,219.00
$30,553.00
$22,875.50
$18,383.50
$23,887.00
$46.85
$46.33
$47.12
$41.10
$38.48
$37.26
$35.42
$34.87
5.20%
4.63%
4.06%
5.44%
43.21
48.13
48.46
48.67
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years ....
Percentage of male employees under 21 years
Average hours worked per week	
185
1,083
1,052
31
$40,262.00
$39,519.50
$742.50
$37.57
$23.95
2.86%
41.01
125
800
777
23
$28,130.00
$27,565.50
$564.50
$35.48
$24.54
2.88%
42.15
101
704
672
32
$25,609.50
$24,911.50
$698.00
$37.07
$21.81
4.55%
40.91
92
647
626
21
$23,150.00
$22,730.00
$420.00
$36.31
$20.00
3.25%
42.38
Sawmills (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years
Average hours worked per week	
585
15,421
14,509
912
$610,169.50
$577,826.00
$32,343.50
$39.83
$35.46
5.91%
44.02
412
13,394
12,765
629
$491,406.50
$471,756.50
$19,650.00
$36.96
$31.24
4.70%
47.46
372
12,895
12,234
661
$463,514.00
$444,015.50
$19,498.50
$36.29
$29.50
5.13%
47.98
307
12,871
12,178
693
$429,632.00
$411,678.50
$17,953.50
$33.81
$26.91
5.38%
48.47 K 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Shingle-mills (Male).
1946.
1944.
1943.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years.
Average hours worked per week	
45
1,956
1,898
58
$86,380.00
$84,204.00
$2,176.00
$37.52
2.97%
43.83
44
1,742
1,700
42
$68,859.00
$67,754.00
$1,105.00
$26.31
2.41%
45.90
40
1,677
1,638
39
$64,506.00
$63,458.50
$1,049.50
$38.74
.   $26.91
2.33%
46.28
43
1,713
1,677
36
$59,128.00
$58,220.50
$907.50
$34.72
$25.21
2.10%
46.42
Ship-building (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years.
Average hours worked per week	
$369,
$366,
$2
79
9,217
9,092
125
262.00
266.50
,995.50
$40.28
$23.96
1.36%
42.02
56
21,668
20,939
729
$858,836.00
5836,680.50
$22,155.50
$39.96
$30.39
3.36%
43.10
46
26,357
24,839
1,518
$1,053,057.00
$1,002,618.00
$50,439.00
$40.36
$33.23
5.76%
43.07
47
30,488
29,020
1,468
$1,213,203.50
$1,162,994.00
$50,209.50
$40.08
$34.20
4.82%
43.92
Wood (N.E.S.)  (Male).
Number of firms reporting....-	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years -	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years.
Average hours worked per week	
181
147
121
108
4,552
3,818
3,434
3,836
4,008
3,209
2,897
3,218
544
609
537
618
$167,409.00
$127,076.50
$114,736.50
$121,058.00
$151,804.00
$111,349.00
$100,679.00
$107,298.00
$15,605.00
$15,727.50
$14,057.50
$13,760.00
$37.88
$34.70
$34.75
$33.34
$28.69
$25.83
$26.18
$22.27
11.95%
15.95%
15.64%
16.11%
43.32
45.61
45.61
46.28
CONCLUSION.
During the year 1947 it is the Board's intention to continue the revision of Orders
and regulations so that their provisions will keep pace with the upward trend of wage-
rates and improved standard of working-conditions. As the Board is devoting more
attention than previously to the incorporation in its various Orders of conditions affecting the general welfare of the employees, such as daily and weekly limits of work, rest
periods, overtime rates of pay, etc., its problems have increased in number and variety.
Thus the proposed revisions of the Orders will require many meetings of the Board
and numerous interviews, but with the continued co-operation of all interested parties
the major part of this task should be accomplished in the near future. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 61
The Board at this time would like to acknowledge its appreciation of the co-operation extended during the year 1946 to its officials in the administration of the various
labour laws by the employers and employees of the Province.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
James Thomson, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
J. A. Ward Bell.
H. Douglas.
The statistics of trades and industries provided in the preceding pages were compiled by Harold V. Bassett, Bureau of Economics and Statistics. K 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
APPENDIX.
(Compiled August 31st, 1947.)
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO " MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
apprentices indentured under the "APPRENTICESHIP ACT."
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 2 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946.
1. Minimum wages  fixed by any Order of the Board shall  not apply to  apprentices indentured
under " Apprenticeship Act."
2. Employer shall pay to apprentice rate of pay fixed by contract of apprenticeship.
3. Rate of pay under contract of apprenticeship  shall constitute the minimum wage payable to
apprentice in lieu of the minimum wage fixed by the Board in any other Order.
BAKING INDUSTRY ORDER No. 17  (1942)   (MALE).*
Effective July 20th, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 17.)
" Baking industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of bread, biscuits,
cakes, doughnuts, pies, and similar products.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—
21 years of age and over	
Under 18 years of age	
18 years and under 19 years..
19 years and under 20 years..
20 years and under 21 years..
At least 85% of employees to get not less than..
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
(-..)   Delivery salesmen (see Transportation Order).
48c.
24c.
30c.
36c.
42c.
48c.
44
44
44
44
44
44
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
BARBERING MINIMUM WAGE  ORDER No. 42   (1946)   (MALE).
Effective July 1st, 19A6, superseding Order No. 4%.
" Occupation of barbering " means  the work of persons engaged  in  the shaving of the  face or
cutting or trimming or singeing of the hair or beard for hire, gain, or hope of reward, or in connection
with any of the foregoing the shampooing or massaging or the treating of the head or face.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
Class A employees	
Class B employees	
Employees classified under section 6 of " Male Minimum Wage Act
working under permit
Apprentices .'.	
Rate.
$25.00 a week
65c. per hour
(Daily guarantee
of 4 hours' pay)
As prescribed in
the permit
See Order No. 2
(1946)
Hours.
40-44 per week.
Less than 40 per
week.
Not more than 44
per week.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay.
Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates
of Class B employees.
Note.— (1.)  Copy of Order to be posted.
(2.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(3.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4.)  Records to be produced to authorized officials. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 63
BOX-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 55 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 55 (1943).
" Box-manufacturing industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of
making wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel staves and heads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, and other
wooden containers.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the box-manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their
work.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Rate payable to at least 80% of total employees	
Rate payable to balance, 20%   (inclusive of employees in respect of whom a
permit in writing has been obtained)	
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act" and
section 5 of the " Female 'Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment
permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or 44 hours
in week  (permits to be obtained from the Board to work such overtime)
50c.
40c.
Rate as prescribed
in permit
One and one-half
times regular
rate of pay.
44
44
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to—
(1.) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the
" Hours of Work Act."
(2.)  Employees  working under  an  arrangement 'with  respect  to hours  of  work established
pursuant to the provisions of sections 5 and 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " until the
employee has completed the hours so established.
Note.— (1.)  Wages to be semi-monthly.
(2.)   Every employer shall post and keep posted in a conspicuous place in his establishment:'—
(a.) Copy of this Order.
(6.)  A schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of
his employees.
(3.)   Records of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English language of
names, ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(5.)   "Annual Holiday Act" to be observed.
BUS-DRIVERS ORDER No. 76  (FEMALE).*
Effective September 28th, 1942.
" Bus-driver " means every female employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating
accommodation for more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public, for which
service a charge is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point Grey
which lies to the west of the westerly   boundary  of the  City of
Vancouver;   the City of New Westminster;   the Corporation of
The Township  of Richmond ;   the Municipality of the District of
Burnaby;   Municipality of the District of West Vancouver;   the
City of North Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver .
60c.
66c.
40 to 48.
Less than 40.
Note.— (1.) If bus-drivers are required to wear uniforms or special articles of wearing-apparel, no deduction
shall be made from bus-drivers' wages for such uniforms or special apparel, except under terms with regard to
cost duly approved in writing by the Board as being fair and reasonable,
(2.)   Employees required by employer to wait on call shall be paid for waiting time.
(3.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of payment.
(4.) Rest period of 24 consecutive hours from midnight to midnight in each calendar week shall be given
to employees.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. K 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BUS-DRIVERS ORDER No. 70   (MALE).*
Effective March 18th, 1940, superseding Order No. 31.
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which service a charge is
made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
60c.
66c.
90c.
40 to 50.
Less than 40.
In excess of 9 hours
in   any one day or
50 hours in any one
week.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
BUS-DRIVERS ORDER No. 70a  (MALE).
Effective June 27th, 1940.
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of a bus-driver
while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by a bus-driver from the time
he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty until he returns again to his employer's
headquarters or garage where he originally reported for duty; and shall include the time occupied by
a bus-driver in dead-heading from his employer's headquarters or garage to the place where he is to
take charge of the bus and vice versa; but the minimum wage shall not apply to waiting-time of a bus-
driver when occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads.
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 58 (1947), Effective August 4th, 1947.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 58, 65, 66, 72, 73.)
" Carpentry trade " means and includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the
construction and erection of any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any existing building or structure or part thereof.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
90c.
44
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act"   (see Order No. 2   (1946)).
(6.) Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work, or employees covered by another
Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages to be paid as often as semi-monthly.
(d.) Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay after eight hours per day and forty-four hours per week.
Permits to be obtained from the Board to work such overtime.
(e.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(f.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(g.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(h.)  Records to be produced to authorized officials. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 65
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 68 (1947).
Effective May 15th, 1947, superseding Order No. 68 (1943).
" Christmas-tree industry " means all operations in or incidental to the cutting, gathering, hauling,
and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Male and female employees-
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
44
This Order shall not apply to:—
(a.)  Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(6.)   Employees classified under section 6 of the "Male Minimum Wage Act" or section 5 of the "Female
Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board,
(c.)  Employees whose employment is determined by the Board to come under the provisions of section 4 of
the " Hours of Work Act."
Note.— (1.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
(2.)   Copy of this Order to be posted in the establishment.
(3.)   Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each of his employees to be posted in
establishment.
(4.)  Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English language of
names, ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of employees.
(5.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6.)   "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY   (MALE).*
Order No. 12 (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 12, Order No. 12A, Order No. 12b, Order No. 45, Order No. 45a,
and Order No. 48.)
" Construction industry " includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or demolition of
any building, railway, tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge,
viaduct, sewer, drain, well, telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork,
waterways, or other work of construction, as well as the preparation for, ot laying, the foundations of
any such work or structure.
Area.
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate,
under 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
The City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point
Grey which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the
City of Vancouver;   the City of Victoria;   the  City of New
Westminster;     the   City   of   Nanaimo;    the   City   of   Prince
Rupert;   the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt;   the
Municipality of the District of Oak Bay;   the   Municipality of
the District of Saanich;   Municipality of the District of West
Vancouver;    the   Municipality   of   the   District   of   Burnaby;
54c.
48c.
42c.
36c.
Note.— (a.) Does not apply to indentured apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act " (see Order No. 2 (1946)).
(b.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. K 66 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COOK- AND BUNK-HOUSE OCCUPATION.
(In Unorganized Territory.)
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 4 (1946).
Effective July 8th, 1U6.
" Cook- and bunk-house occupation " means any work performed by any male or female employee
in or incidental to operation of any kitchen, dining-room, cook-house, bunk-house, or recreation-room
operated in connection with any industrial undertaking in unorganized territory, and without limiting
the generality of the foregoing description means the work of cooks, dish-washers, waiters, bunk-house
and recreation-room attendants, and others employed in a similar capacity.
Hourly rat;?:   50c, except to employees working under permit under section 6 of "Male Minimum
Wage Act " or section 5 of '* Female Minimum Wage Act," wage prescribed by permit.
Hours:   Unlimited.
(1.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
(2.)   No charge or deductions for accidental breakages.
(3.)  Copy of Order to be posted.
(4.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages,  nationalities,  and residential addresses  of all employees.
(6.)  Records to be produced to authorized officials.
Note.—This Order is not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities.—Alberni, Armstrong, Chilliwaek, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Fernie, Grand
Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster,
North Vancouver, Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Revelstoke, Rossland,
Salmon Arm, Slocan, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby, Chilliwhack, Coldstream, Coquitlam, Delta, Esquimalt, Fraser Mills, Glenmore, Kent,
Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Mission, North Cowichan, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Peachland, Penticton, Pitt
Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Sumas, Summerland, Surrey, Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry Lake, Creston, Dawson
Creek, Gibsons Landing, Hope, Lake Cowichan, Lytton, McBrido, Mission, New Denver, Oliver, Osoyoos, Parksville,
Pouce Coupe, Qualicum Beach, Quesnel, Silverton, Smithers, Stewart, Terrace, Tofino, Vanderhoof, Westview,
Williams Lake.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS   (FEMALE)."*
Order No. 53, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 30 and Order No. 5.)
Includes every female 6perator and starter.
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 37 % Hours per Week.
$16.80 per Week.
45c per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.80.
Note.—As for male elevator operators see Order No. 54.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS   (MALE).*
Order No. 54, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 32.)
Includes every male elevator operator and starter.
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$16.80 per week.
45c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.80.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board  (21) meals, $4.00 per week.
(b.)   Individual meals, twenty cents  (20c.) each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven  (7)  days, $2.00 per week.
(e.)  Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/.)   Uniforms or spacial wearing-apparel, required by the employer, must be supplied and laundered without
cost to the employee.
(g.)   The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(h.)   Employees must be given twenty-four  (24)  consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
( i.)  Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 67
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM   (MALE).*
Order No. 18 (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
.  (Superseding Orders Nos. 18, 18A, 18B, and 18c.)
" Stationary steam engineer " means every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant
under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam
boiler or engine while under steam-pressure or in motion. " Special engineer " means holder of a
special or temporary certificate.    (See "Boiler Inspection Act," section 28  (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Engineer	
Engineer, special..
60c.
48c.
44
44
Note.— (a.) Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the "Hours of Work Act," 44 hours per
week may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(b.)   For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(e.) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 48 cents
per hour.
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS   (MALE).*
Order No. 39 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 39.) \
" First-aid attendant " means every male employee employed in whole -or in part as a first-aid
attendant under the authority of a certificate of competency in first aid, satisfactory to the Workmen's
Compensation Board of British Columbia, and designated by his employer as the first-aid attendant
in charge.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Rate.
60c.
60c.
$4.80
4.80
Note.— (a.) "Hours of Work Act" regulates the daily hours in industry, but should overtime be necessary,
attendant must be paid overtime rate.
(b.) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any industry or occupation within an industry, the first-aid
attendant employed in such industry or occupation must be paid such higher rate.
(c.) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the medical practitioner or hospital.
FISHING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).*
Order No. 78, Effective May 3rd, 1943.
(Superseding Order in Effect since February 28th, 1920.) *
" Fishing industry " means the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving,
canning, drying, curing, smoking, packing, labelling and reconditioning of containers, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use or for shipment any kind of fish or shell-fish.
Hourly Rate.
Experienced employees  40c.
Learners of any age ,  34c. for first 200 hours of employment in the industry;
40c. thereafter.
Note.— (1.) Above rates do not apply to employees engaged in heading and filling.
(2.) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age below 40c,
per hour.
(3.)   Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(4.) Employees shall not be employed more than eight hours a day or 44 hours a week except under permit
from the Board.
(5.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. K 68
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 46 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 46 (1942).
" Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Hours.
June 1st to November 30th, inclusive.
Rate payable to at least 90% of female employees
Rate payable to balance of female employees	
40c.
Daily minimum, $1.20
35c.
Daily minimum, $1.05
Time and one-half regular
Double regular rate
40c.
Daily minimum, $1.20
35c.
Daily minimum, $1.05
Time and one-half regular
rate
rate
Up to 9.
Up to 9.
9 to 11, incl.
December 1st to May 31st, inclusive.
Rate payable to at least 90% of female employees	
Over 11.
8.
8.
"In excess of 8 daily or 44 weekly.
Note.— (1.) After 5 hours' continuous employment, employees shall have 1 hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(3.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(4.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47  (1946).
Effective July 1st, 191*6, superseding Order No. 1*7 (191*2).
" Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable. ■
Hourly Rate.
Daily Hours.
June 1st to November 30th, inclusive.
Rate payable to at least 85% of male employees	
48c.
Daily minimum, $1.44
38c.
Daily minimum, $1.14
Time and one-half regular rate
Double regular rate
48c.
Daily minimum, $1.44
38c.
Daily minimum, $1.14
Time and one-half regular rate
Up to 9.
Up to 9.
December 1st to May 31st, inclusive.
Over 11.
Up to 8.
Up to 8.
In excess of 8 daily or 44 weekly.
Note.— (1.) After 5 hours* continuous employment, employees shall have 1 hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(3.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(4.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 69
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47a (1946).
Effective April 21*th, 191*7, amending Order No. 1*7 (19J*6).
This Order amends Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47 (1946) by exempting from the provisions
of Order No. 47 (1946) "persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4
of the " Hours of Work Act."
OCCUPATION OF HAIRDRESSING.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 27 (1947).
Effective May 12th, 191*7, superseding Order No. 27, partially, etc.
" Occupation of hairdressing " means the work of persons engaged in cutting, dressing, dyeing,
tinting, curling, waving, permanent waving, cleansing, bleaching, or other work upon the hair of any
person, the removal of superfluous hair, and all work in connection with the giving of facials and scalp
treatments, manicuring, and other work in hairdressing as denned and interpreted in the " Hairdressers
Act." It shall not include the work of any person the duties of whose occupation or profession require
any act of hairdressing to be performed as incidental thereto, nor the work of barbers as denned in the
" Barbers Act."
" Class A employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of 40 hours
or more.
" Class B employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of less than
40 hours.
" Learner " means only a male or female employee of any age for whose employment in writing
a permit has been issued by the Board who becomes employed in the occupation of hairdressing at a
time when the employee has had less than six months' experience in that occupation.
Class A employees..
Class B employees...
Rate.
$20.00 per week
50c per hour
(Daily guarantee
of 4 hours)
Hours.
40-44 per week.
Less than 40
per week.
Learners (anyage).
Class A Employees.
$15.00 per week 1st 3 months.
17.50 per week 2nd 3 months.
Class B Employees.
37%c. per hour 1st 3 months.
44c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
(Permits to be obtained from the Board for learners to be employed at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act" or section 5 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for
whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 9 hours in one day and
44 hours in week
Rate.
Wage-rate as set
out in permit
Time and one-half
of the regular
rate of pay.
Hours.
40-44 per week.
Note.— (1.)   Employees if called to work by the employer shall be paid not less in any one day than an amount
equal to 2 hours' pay if called to work and not put to work, nor less than 4 hours' pay if put to work.
(2.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
(3.)   Employees to get one-half hour free from  duty between  the hours  of  11  o'clock  in  the forenoon  and
2 o'clock in the afternoon, to commence not later than 1.30 p.m.
*     (4.)   Copy of this Order to be posted.
(5.)   Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of employees to be posted.
(6.)  Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8.)   'Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. K 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 52 (1938).
" Hotel and catering industry" means the work of male and female employees employed in:—
(it.)  Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which a
charge is made;
(6.)  Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses,  dance-halls, cabarets, banquet-
halls, ice-cream parlours,  soda-fountains,  hospitals,  sanatoriums,  nursing homes,  clubs,
dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial establishments or
office buildings or schools, or any similar place where food is cooked, prepared, or served,
for which a charge is made,—
whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or in connection with
any other business.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry, working
under permit from the Board.
Class A employees-
Class B employees...
Rate.
$18.00 per week
45c. per hour
(Daily guarantee
of 4 hours' pay)
Hours.
40—44 per week.
Less than 40
per week.
Learners (any age).
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$12.00 per week for 1st 2 months.
30c. per hour for   1st 2 months.
14.00 per week for 2nd 2 months.
35c. per hour for 2nd 2 months.
16.00 per week for 3rd 2 months.
40c. per hour for 3rd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
45c. per hour thereafter.
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay at respective
hourly rates as set out above.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 6 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
or section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage Act " working under
permit
Rate.
Wage set in
permit
Hours.
Not more than 44
per week.
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week except:—
(a.)  When authorized by the Board or by section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act " :
(b.)   In cases of emergency which can not reasonably be otherwise overcome:—
Not more than 10 in the day or 48 in the week.
Split shifts to be confined within 12 hours of commencing work.     (*' Hours of Work Act " provision.)
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section
5 or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
Night-work.—Employment between 1.30 a.m. and 6 a.m. to be continuous. Working shifts not to start or finish
between these hours.
This does not apply to employees:—
(a.)   In hospitals, sanatoriums, and nursing hom«s residing on the premises:
(b.)   In catering where exemption has been granted in writing by the Board:
(c.)  On Christmas Day and New Year's Day and any other days declared to be exempt by the Board.
Rest Period.—32 consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved by
the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a
call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 71
Board or Lodging.—For meals partaken of or accommodation used by employee, not more than the following
deductions to be made from employee's wages:—
(a.)  Full week's board of 21 meals, $4 per week:
(6.)  Individual meals, 20c. each:
(c.)   Full week's lodging for 7 days, $2 per week.
Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
Uniforms.—See Order No. 3   (1946)   relating to uniforms.
Rest-rooms, Toilet and Wash-room Facilities.—To be provided by employers for use of employees.
Note.— (1.)   Order does not apply to:—
(a.)  Graduate nurses with certificate of completed training:
(6.)  Student-nurses   in   training   in   approved   school   of   nursing,   as   defined   by   sections   22   and   23   of
" Registered Nurses Act " :
(c.)   Students employed in a school where enrolled:
(d.)  Bell-boys as far as wages are concerned:
(e.)   Employees covered by another specific Order of the Board.
(2.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(3.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(4.)   Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
RESORT HOTELS IN HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY IN UNORGANIZED
TERRITORY DURING THE SUMMER SEASON.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52a (1946).
Effective June 15th to September 15th, inclusive, each Year.
" Resort hotel " means any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or lodging are
furnished to the general public for which a charge is made.
" Summer season," that part of each year from June 15th to September 15th, inclusive.
Hours.—Not more than 10 in any one day nor B2 in any one week.
Overtime.—One and one-half times regular rate of pay for all hours in excess of 44 in any one week.
Rest Period.—2i consecutive hours each calendar week, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by the Board on joint application of employer and employee.
Variation of Order No. Si (19i6).—AU provisions of Order No. 52 (1946) apply except those relating to hours
of work and rest period.
Note.— (1.)  Order to be posted.
(2.)   Order not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities.—Alberni, Armstrong, Chilliwaek, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Fernie, Grand
Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster,
North Vancouver, Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Revelstoke, Rossland,
Salmon Arm, Slocan, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby, Chilliwhack, Coldstream, Coquitlam, Delta, Esquimalt, Fraser Mills, Glenmore, Kent,
Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Mission, North Cowichan, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Peachland, Penticton, Pitt
Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Sumas, Summerland, Surrey, Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry Lake, Creston, Dawson
Creek, Gibsons Landing, Hope, Lake Cowichan, Lytton, McBride, Mission, New Denver, Oliver, Osoyoos, Parksville,
Pouce Coupe, Qualicum Beach, Quesnel, Silverton, Smithers, Stewart, Terrace, Tofino, Vanderhoof, Westview,
Williams Lake. K 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 51 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 51 (1937).
. " Household-furniture manufacturing " means the manufacture of kitchen furniture, dining-room
furniture, bedroom furniture, living-room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of household
furniture customarily manufactured in a furniture factory.
" Learner " means, only, a male or female employee of any age for whose employment a permit in
writing has been issued by the Board who becomes employed in the household-furniture manufacturing
industry at a time when the employee has had less than 6 months' experience as an employee in that
industry.
This Order shall apply to every employer and every male and female employee in the household-
furniture manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically
defining their work.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
50c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
50c.
44
Rate payable to balance of employees:
Learners  (any age), not inclusive of apprentices (under section 5
of " Female Minimum Wage Act •" or section 6 of " Male
Minimum Wage Act ") —■
44
44
44
Thereafter  	
44
(Permits to be obtained from the Board for employees working at learners' rates.)
Employees classified under section 5 of "Female Minimum Wage Act"
and section 6 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in one day or 44
hours in week  (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
such overtime)
Wage prescribed
in permit
One    and    one - half
times  regular  rate
of pay.
44
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of
work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act" until the employee has
completed the hours so established.
Note.— (1.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2.)   Copy of this Order to be posted in the establishment.
(3.) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his
employees.
(4.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6.)   "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 73
JANITORS   (MALE).*
Order No. 43 (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 43, 43A, and 4SB.)
1. "Janitor"   means   and   includes   every   person   employed   as   janitor,   janitor-cleaner,   janitor-
fireman, or janitor-engineer.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, 45c. per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings of 4 residential suites and under, 45c. per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $32.40 per month
6 residential suites, $36.00 per month
7 residential suites, $39.60 per month
8 residential suites, $43.20 per month
9 residential suites, $46.80 per month
10 residential suites, $50.40 per month
11 residential suites, $54.00 per month
12 residential suites, $57.60 per month
13 residential suites, $61.20 per month
14 residential suites, $64.80 per month
15 residential suites, $68.64 per month
16 residential suites, $72.60 per month
17 residential suites, $76.56 per month
18 residential suites, $80.52 per month
19 residential suites, $84.48 per month
20 residential suites, $88.44 per month
21 residential suites, $92.40 per month
22 residential suites, $96.36 per month
23 residential suites, $99.00 per month
24 residential suites, $101.64 per month;
25 residential suites, $104.28 per month;
26 residential suites, $106.92 per month;
27 residential suites, $109.56 per month
29 residential suites, $114.84 per month
30 residential suites, $117.48 per month
31 residential suites, $120.12 per month
32 residential suites, $122.76 per month
33 residential suites, $125.40 per month
34 residential suites, $128.04 per month
35 residential suites, $130.68 per month
36 residential suites, $133.32 per month
37 residential suites, $135.96 per month
38 residential suites, $138.60 per month
39 residential suites, $141.24 per month
40 residential suites, $143.88 per month
41 residential suites, $146.52 per month
42 residential suites, $149.16 per month
43 residential suites, $151.80 per month
44 residential suites, $154.44 per month
45 residential suites, $157.08 per month
46 residential suites, $159.72 per month
47 residential suites, $162.36 per month
48 residential suites, $165.00 per month
49 residential suites, $165.00 per month
50 residential suites, $165.00 per month
over 50 residential suites, $165.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $112.20 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid 45c. per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for 2 rooms and bathroom, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and  (or)  gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing 20 residential suites and over, every janitor shall be
given 24 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than 19 and not less than 12 residential suites,
every janitor shall be given 8 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.— (1.) In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building, the suite occupied by
the janitor shall not be included.
(2.)   Order does not apply to janitors employed in one-room school-houses.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946.
• K 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
JANITRESSES  (FEMALE).*
Order No. 44 (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 44, 44a, and 44b.)
1. " Janitress"   means   and   includes   every   person   employed   as   janitress,   janitress-cleaner,   or
janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, 45c. per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings of 4 residential suites and under, 45c. per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $32.40 per month;
6 residential suites, $36.00 per month;
7 residential suites, $39.60 per month;
8 residential suites, $43.20 per month;
9 residential suites, $46.80 per month;
10 residential suites, $50.40 per month;
11 residential suites, $54.00 per month;
12 residential suites, $57.60 per month;
13 residential suites, $61.20 per month;
14 residential suites, $64.80 per month;
15 residential suites, $68.64 per month;
16 residential suites, $72.60 per month;
17 residential suites, $76.56 per month;
18 residential suites, $80.52 per month;
19 residential suites, $84.48 per month;
20 residential suites, $88.44 per month;
21 residential suites, $92.40 per month;
22 residential suites, $96.36 per month;
23 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
24 residential suites, $101.64 per month;
25 residential suites, $104.28 per month;
26 residential suites, $106.92 per month;
27 residential suites, $109.56 per month;
29 residential suites, $114.84 per month
30 residential suites, $117.48 per month
31 residential suites, $120.12 per month
32 residential suites, $122.76 per month
33 residential suites, $125.40 per month
34 residential suites, $128.04 per month
35 residential suites, $130.68 per month
36 residential suites, $133.32 per month
37 residential suites, $135.96 per month
38 residential suites, $138.60 per month
39 residential suites, $141.24 per month
40 residential suites, $143.88 per month
41 residential suites, $146.52 per month
42 residential suites, $149.16 per month
43 residential suites, $151.80 per month
44 residential suites, $154.44 per month
45 residential suites, $157.08 per month
46 residential suites, $159.72 per month
47 residential suites, $162.36 per month
48 residential suites, $165.00 per month
49 residential suites, $165.00 per month
50 residential suites, $165.00 per month
over 50 residential suites, $165.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $112.20 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid 45c. per hour for each hour
worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for 2 rooms and bathroom, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing 20 residential suites and over, every janitress shall
be given 24 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than 19 and not less than 12 residential suites,
every janitress shall be given 8 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.— (1.) In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building the suite occupied by the
janitress shall not be included.
(2.)   Order does not apply to janitresses employed in one-room school-houses.
* As-amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st. 1946. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 75
LAUNDRY, CLEANING, AND DYEING INDUSTRIES.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 74 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 74.
means an employee of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry,
" Learner
working under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
40c. per hour
4 hours' pay
3 hours' pay
31c. per hour
34c. per hour
37c. per hour
40c. per hour
"1
1          8 per day.
f      44 per week.
Learners, any age—
\
Third 2 months	
\
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 6 of " Male Minimum "Wage Act "
or section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage Act " working under
permit
Wage set in
permit
Not more than 44
per week.
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5
of the " Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section
5 or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
Rest Period.—32 consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved by
the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a
call, 4 hour daily guarantee, except on Saturday when 3-hour daily guarantee applies.
Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
Note.— (1.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(2.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(3.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials. K 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
LOGGING INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 1  (1947).
Effective February 1st, 191*7, superseding Order No. 1  (191*3).
"Logging industry" means all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie,
shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to hauling, driving,
fluming, rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles.
This Order shall apply to every employer and every male employee in the logging industry
except:—
(a.)   Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(b.)  Watchmen or caretakers employed in logging camps in which operations are suspended.
Male employees	
According to official scale of measurement, and such rate or price shall be
paid pro rata, according to the hours worked, to each and every person
so  engaged  under  a  contract  or  agreement  for  making  shingle-bolts;
that is, felling, bucking, splitting, and piling	
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act" in
respect of whom permits in writing have been issued by the Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and 44
hours in week   (permits must be obtained from the Board to work such
overtime)
Hourly Rate.
60c.
$2.00
Rate as set in
permit
One and one-half
regular rate
of pay.
Weekly Hours.
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to :—
(1.)   Persons holding positions of supervision  or management as  defined in  section  4  of the  "Hours  of
Work Act."
Persons making shingle-bolts.
Employees engaged exclusively in the transportation of men and supplies.
Persons regularly employed as boom-men and boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
(2.)   Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section  5 or 11  of the  "Hours of Work  Act"  until the employee has  completed the
hours  so  established.
(3.)   Male  office  employees  in   camps  from  May  29th,   1947,  to   December  31st,   1947.     (See  amendment,
Logging Order No. Ia  (1947)  below.)
(4.)   Employees  engaged  as  trainees  in   topographic  mapping   in   connection  with  the  logging  industry.
(See amendment 1b  (1947)  below.)
NOTE.— (1.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(3.) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his
employees.
(4.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6.)   "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
(7.)   See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
LOGGING INDUSTRY.
Order No. Ia (1947), Effective May 29th, 1947.
(Amending Order No. 1 (191*7).)
The above Order amends Order No. 1 (1947) by adding to section 3 (d)  (i.) "Male office employees
in logging camps," and to remain in force up till and including December 31st, 1947.
LOGGING INDUSTRY.
Order No. 1b (1947), Effective June 5th, 1947.
(Amending Order No. 1 (191*7).)
The above order amends Order No. 1 (1947) by adding to section 3 (d) (i.) "Employees engaged
as trainees in topographic mapping in connection with the logging industry," and to remain in force
up till and including September 30th, 1947. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 77
LOGGING INDUSTRY.
Charge for Board and Lodging—Male Minimum Wage Order No. 28a (1947).
Effective July 24th, 1947, superseding Order No. 28.
This Order rescinds Order No. 28 of the Board fixing a maximum price to be charged for board
and lodging in the logging and sawmill industry in certain parts of the Province of British Columbia,
as set out in the said Order No. 28.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 25 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 25 (1942).
" Manufacturing industry " means the work of employees engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for use
or sale any article or commodity.
" Learner " means employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry
working under permit from the Board.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their
work.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
31c.
34c.
37c.
40c.
(Daily guarantee
of 4 hours' pay at
respective rates
as set out above.)
44
Learners (any age) —
44
Second 2 months	
44
44
44
(Permits required for learners working at above rates except in case of force majeure.)
Employees classified under section 6 of the "Male Minimum Wage Act'' or
section 5 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment
permits in writing have been issued by the Board
Overtime.— Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and 44
hours in week
Rate as set in
permit
Time and one-half
of employee's regular rate of pay.
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of
work established pursuant to section 5 or 11 of the "Hours of Work Act" until the employee has completed the
hours so established.
Note.— (1.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2.)   Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3.) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his
employees to be posted in his establishment.
(4.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with a register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6.) Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent
at place of work with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call,
4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
(7.)   "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
(8.)   See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 25a  (1947).
Effective August 1st, 191*7, to April 30th, 191*8, amending Order No. 25 (191*7).
Amends Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 25  (1947)  by exempting from the overtime
provision of Order No. 25  (1947)  "employees in that section of the pulp and paper industry that is
exempted from the provisions of the ' Hours of Work Act' pursuant to the provisions of section 12 of
the said Act." K 78
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
MERCANTILE   (MALE).*
Order No. 59, Effective October 20th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 88.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
21 years of age and over.
21 years of age and over.
Minimum rate per day....
$18.00 per week
48c. per hour
$1.92 per day
37% to 44 hours per week.
If less than 37% hours.
Males under 21 Years op Age.
Age.
Less than 37M: Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
18c.
24c.
30c.
36c.
72c.
96c.
$1.20
1 44
20 and under 21  •
Thereafter
42c.
48c.
1.68
1.92
Beginners and those recommencing,  IS Years and under 21, to whom Permits have been issued by
the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
18 to 21
18 to 21
24c.
30c.
42c.
96c.
$1.20
18 to 21
1.68
Thereafter $18.00 per week.
Casual Employment.
Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed 5
days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
not less than	
$1.44
Males 21 Years and under 24.
Inexperienced and partly inexperienced, to whom Permits have been granted, under Section 6
of the " Mole Minimum Wage Act."
3iy2 to 44 Hours per "Week.
Age.
Less than 37^ Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
$10.80 per week, 1st 6 months	
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
30c.
36c.
42c.
13.20 per week, 2nd 6 months	
1 44
Thereafter $18.00 per week.
Note.— (a.)   Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers, employed in wholesale and   (or)   retail establishments, shall be
paid at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26.
(6.)   Employees must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(c.)   Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every 7 days.
•As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 79
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 24 (1946).
Effective August 5th, 1946, superseding Order No. 24-
" Mercantile industry " means the work carried on in establishments operated for the purpose of
wholesale and  (or)  retail trade.
" Class A employees," those working from 39 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 39 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry, working
under permit from the Board.
Class A employees..
Class B employees...
Rate.
$17.00 a vreek
45c. an hour
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay)
Hours.
39-44 per week.
Less than 39 per week.
Learners (any Age).
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$11.00 per week 1st 2 months.
30c per hour 1st 2 months.
13.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
35c per hour 2nd 2 months.
15.00 per week 3rd 2 months.
40c per hour 3rd 2 months.
17.00 per week thereafter.
45c per hour thereafter.
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay at respective hourly
rates as set out above.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5
cf the " Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section
5 or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until she has completed hours so established.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent
at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response'to a call,
4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Uniforms.—See Special Order No.  3   (1946)   relating to uniforms.
OFFICE OCCUPATION.
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 34 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 191*6, superseding Order No. 31*.
" Office occupation " means the work of females employed as stenographers; book-keepers; typists;
billing clerks; filing-clerks; cashiers; cash-girls (not included in any other Order of the Board);
checkers; invoicers; comptometer operators; auditors; attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices,
and other offices, and the work of females employed in all kinds of clerical work.
" Class A employees," those working from 36 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 36 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry, working
under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
Class A employees..
Class B employees..
$18.00 a week
50c. an hour
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay)
36-44 per week.
Less than 36 per week. K 80
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Learners (any Age).
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$12.00 per week 1st 2 months.
14.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
16.00 per week 3rd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
35c per hour 1st 2 months.
40c per hour 2nd 2 months.
45c per hour 3rd 2 months.
50c per hour thereafter.
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay at respective hourly
rates as set out above.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5
of the *' Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week.
Reporting on Call.—Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for
entire period spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in
response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Uniforms.—See Special Order No. 3   (1946)   relating to uniforms.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.*
Order No. 71, Effective June 1st, 1940.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
snd paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
Rate per Hour.
City of Vancouver, 'including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, City of North Vancouver, District of North Vancouver.	
90c.
Note.—-(a.)   Does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act"   (see Order No. 2   (1946)).
(b.)   Does   not   apply   to   those   permanently   employed   at   maintenance-work   in   industrial   or   manufacturing
establishments, public and private buildings,
(c.)   All wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.*
Order No. 75, Effective June 2nd, 1941.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
Rate per Hour.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt, Highland, Metchosin,
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act"  (see Order No. 2  (1946)).
(b.)   Does   not  apply  to  those  permanently  employed   at  maintenance-work   in   industrial  or   manufacturing
establishments, public and private buildings,
(c.)  All wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 81
PATROLMEN   (MALE).*
Order No. 69, Effective February 5th, 1940.
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes to watch
or patrol the premises of more than one person for the purpose of guarding or protecting persons or
property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman " means an employee (not covered by any other Order of the Board) employed by
a private patrol agency.
Hourly rate  42c.
Note.— (a.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(6.)  Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(c.) Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
* As amended by General Interim Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION.
(Male and Female.)
Order No. 5. (1947), Effective August 25th, 1947.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 27, 27a, 27b, 27d.)
" Personal service occupation " means the work of persons engaged in massaging and physiotherapy as denned in the " Physiotherapists' and Massage Practitioners' Act," chiropody, chiropractic,
osteopathy, electrical treatments, general and specialized therapeutics, and all work of a like nature.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Class A employees	
Class B employees	
Minimum	
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act" or section 5 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act *' for
whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
$20.00 per week
50c. per hour
$2.00 per day.
The wage or rate of
pay prescribed in
the permit.
40 to 44
Less than 40 hours
per week.
Note.— (a.)   If called to work and not put to work employee shall be paid for not less than 2 hours at the
employee's regular rate of pay.
(6.)   Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 8 in a day or 44 in
a week, or hours authorized by the Board.
(c.)   This Order does not apply to:—
(i.)   Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining: their work.
(ii.)   A graduate nurse who is in possession of a certificate showing she has completed a course of training in general nursing provided in a hospital and who is employed as a nurse,
(iii.)   A student nurse in  training in an approved  school of nursing as  defined by sections 22  and 23  of
the " Registered Nurses Act " of British Columbia.
(d.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(e.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(/.)   Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in  English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees,
(fir.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(h.)   Regarding uniforms, see Order No. 4  (1946). K 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT   (FEMALE).*
Order No. 67, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding Parts of Personal Service Order.)
" Public place of amusement " includes theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, lecture-halls, shooting-
galleries, bowling-alleys, swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions, and other similar places to which a charge
for admission or service is made to the public.
40 to 48 Hours
per Week.
Less than 40 Hours
per Week.
2 Hours or Less in
any One Day.
$17.10
42c. per hour.
90e.
Note.— (a.)   Employees on call, 42c. per hour.
(ft.)   Where uniforms or special  articles of wearing-apparel  are required,  th:y  shall  be furnished,  repaired,
laundered, cleaned, etc., free of cost to the attendant.
(c.)   Cashiers are covered by Office Order No. 34  (1946).
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946.
SAWMILL INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 50 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 191*7, superseding Order No. 50 (191*3).
" Sawmill industry " means all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills, veneer-
mills, lath-mills, and (or) planing-mills.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male employee in the sawmill industry,
except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
Rate payable to at least 90% of total	
Rate payable to balance of employees (inclusive of employees in respect of
whom a permit has been obtained under section 5 of " Male Minimum
Wage Act ")   not less than	
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act " for
whose employment permits in writing1 have been issued by the Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or 44
hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work such
overtime)
Hourly Rate.
50c.
40c.
Rate as set out
in permit
One and one-half
employee's regular rate of pay.
Weekly Hours.
44
44
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(1.)   Persons  holding  positions  of  supervision   or management  as  defined   in   section   4   of  the   "Hours  of
Work Act."
Persons regularly employed as boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
(2.)   Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " or Regulation No. 2 made under the said
Act until the employee has completed the hours so established.
Note.— (1.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2.)   Copy of this Order to be posted in establishment.
(3.)   Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of employees
to be posted.
(4.)  Re'cord of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register of ages, names, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6.)   "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
I REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 83
SHINGLE INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 62 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 62 (1943) and Order No. 77 (1943).
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacturing of wooden shingles
or shakes.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles of shingles, understood and accepted as a standard by the industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936 issued by the National Research
Council of Canada.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the shingle
industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
Per Square.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Sawyers—
30c.
24c.
18c.
50c.
50c.
50c.
50c.
44
Lower grade than No. 1 shingles	
44
44
Other employees not included in any other Order of the
44
(Employees packing or sawing shingles on any other basis than by the square shall be paid on the
same proportionate basis.)
Employees classified under section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act *' or
section 5 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment
permits in writing have been issued by the Board
Overtime.—Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and 44
hours  in  week   (permits to be obtained  from the Board to  work  such
overtime)
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Rate as set out
in permit
One and one-half
employee's regular rate of pay.
Weekly Hours.
44
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(1.)  Persons holding positions  of supervision  or management as defined in  section  4 of the  " Hours of
Work Act."
Persons regularly employed as boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
(2.)  Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act" or Regulation No. 2 made under the said
Act until the employee has completed the hours so established.
Note.— (1.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2.)   Copy of this Order to be posted in establishment.
(3.)   Schedule  setting out the  daily shifts  and  intervals  free  from  duty  of  each  occupational  group   of  his
employees to be posted.
(4.)  Record of wages and daily hours to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, nationalities,
and residential addresses of all employees.
(5.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6.)   "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. K 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 20 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 20.
" Ship-building industry" means all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration,
repair, demolition, painting, cleaning, preserving, reconditioning, putting on or taking off the ways, or
dry-docking of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Rate.
Hours.
Employees doing the work usually done by journeymen, and without restricting  the  generality   of  the  foregoing,   the   work   of  shipwrights,   joiners,
boat-builders,   caulkers,  painters,  fitters,  electricians,  machinists,   boiler-
makers,   plumbers   and   steam-fitters,   blacksmiths,   sheet-metal   workers,
90c. per hour
60c. per hour
45c. per hour
Rate set in
permit
f   8 per day.
) 44 per "week,
j   8 per day.
When  90%  of total number of employees   {exclusive of indentured apprentices)  are paid not less than the 90c. or 60c. per hour rate, the balance
) 44 per week.
|   8 per day.
Employees classified under section 6 of the Act working under permits	
1 44 per week.
f   8 per day.
) 44 per week.
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5 of
the " Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5
or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment.
Note.— (1.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(2.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(3.)  Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
TAXICAB-DRIVERS   (MALE).*
Order No. 33 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 33, Order No. 33A, and Order No. 33B.)
" Taxicab-driver" means every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating
accommodation for seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the
public and which is driven or operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Working-hours.
All Ages.
$3.30
9 per day.
54 per week.
Note.—Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 85
TAXICAB-DRIVERS   (MALE).*
Order No. 60, Effective November 17th, 1938.
" Taxicab-driver " means every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating
accommodation for seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the
public and which is driven or operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Less than 10
Hours per Day.
Daily
Minimum.
Working-
hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich....
All ages.
$3.60
42c. per hour.
$1.68 per day.
10 per day.
Note.— (a.)   Permits shall be obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours
can be paid 42c. per hour.
(6.)   Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 54c. per hour.
(c.)   Drivers shall be paid at least semi-monthly.
(d.)   Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every 7 days.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION (FEMALE).*
Order No. 79, Effective April 16th, 1945.
(Superseding Order Effective April 5th, 1920.)
" Telephone and telegraph occupation " means the work of all persons employed in connection with
the operating of the various instruments, switch-boards, and other mechanical appliances used in
connection with telephony and telegraphy.
Rate.
Maximum Hours.
Employees, any age—
$1.80 per day.
2.52 per day.
2.76 per day.
3.00 per day.
3.36 per day.
■
-
For following 3 months	
Thereafter	
48 per week.
Note.— (a.)   Part-time employees' wages shall be prorated.
(b.)   Employees required to report for work to receive at least 3 hours' pay per day.
(c.) In emergencies employees may work up to 56 hours per week, with one and one-half times their regular
rate of pay for hours in excess of 48.
(d.) Where employees reside on employers' premises, an arrangement may be made for employees to answer
emergency calls between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m., subject to approval in writing by the Board.
(e.)   Working-hours shall be confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of work.
( /.)   Every employee shall have a rest period of 24 consecutive hours in each calendar week.
(g.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(h.) Where hours of work in bona-fide trade-union agreements differ from those prescribed by the Order, the
Board may, in its discretion, exempt in writing the union and the employer from sections in the Order pertaining
to hours, to the extent mentioned in the exemption.
1 As amended by General Interim Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. K 86
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY  (MALE).*
Order No. 26 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
Order No. 26a (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 26, Order No. 26B, and Order No. 26c.)
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting
for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor
thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of
goods by rail, water, air, or road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some
destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.)
Operators  of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb.  net weight or over,  as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Less than 40
54c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
36c.
Less than 40
24c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
54c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c
(2.)
Operators of motor-vehicles of less than 2,000 lb. net weight, as
specified  on  the motor-vehicle licence,  and  operators  of  motorcycles with wheeled attachments,  exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
40 and not more
than 50
(3.)
Operators  of motor-cycles with not more than  two  wheels and
without wheeled attachment
40 and not more
than 48
(4.)
Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery
or messenger work (e)
40 and not more
than 48
(5 )
Swampers and helpers	
than 50
42c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
(6.)
Drivers   of   horse-drawn   vehicles   other   than   those   covered   by
section 7 hereof
(7.)
Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in
the retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(6.)  Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(c.) Milk-delivery men may work 15 hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than 10 hours are
worked in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(d.)  Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 59.
(e.)   Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly.
* As amended by General Interim Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).*
Order No. 26b, Effective August 18th, 1941.
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting
for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor
thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of
goods by rail, water, air, or road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some
destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.)
Operators  of motor-vehicles of  2,000 lb.  net weight or over,  as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Less than 40
54c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
36c.
Less than 40
24c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
54c.
40 and not more
than 50
48 c.
(2.)
Operators of motor-vehicles of less than  2,000 lb.  net weight,  as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in sections 3 and 7 hereof
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
(3.)
Operators of motor-cycles with not more than  two  wheels  and
without wheeled attachment
40 and not more
than 48
30c.
(4.)
Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on deliv-ery
or messenger work
40 and not more
than 48
20c.
(5.)
Swampers  and helpers             	
40 and not more
than 50
42c
(6.)
Drivers   of   horse-drawn   vehicles   other   than   those   covered   by
section 7 hereof
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
(7.)
Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in
the retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(6.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(o.) Milk-delivery employees may work 15 hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than 10 hours are
v/orked in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(d.)  Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 194S.
COST AND UPKEEP OF UNIFORMS.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 3  (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946.
1. Applies to every employer and to every male and female employee in every industry, business,
trade, and occupation to which the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts apply.
2. (1.) Subject to the provisions of subsection (2), when an employee is required to wear a uniform or special article of wearing-apparel, it shall be furnished, cleaned, laundered, or repaired free of
cost to employee by employer.
(2.) Where employer and employee make written application to the Board, the Board may give
written approval to a different arrangement regarding uniforms. K 88
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
WOOD-WORKING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 49 (1947).
Effective February 1st, 1947, superseding Order No. 49 (1943).
" Wood-working industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of
manufacturing sash and doors, cabinets, show-cases, office and store furniture and fixtures, wood furnishings, plywood, veneer products, and general mill-work products.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the woodworking industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their
work.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Rate payable to at least 85% of total 	
50c.
40c.
Rate as set out
in permit
One and one-half
times employee's
regular rate
of pay.
44
44
44
Rate payable to balance of employees   (inclusive of employees in respect of
whom a permit has been obtained under section  6 of " Male Minimum
Wage Act" or section 5 of "Female Minimum Wage Act") not less than
Employees  classified under  section   6  of   " Male  Minimum  Wage  Act"  and
section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime.—Employees working in  excess of 8  hours  in  any one day or 44
hours  in  week   (permits  to  be  obtained  from  the Board  to work   such
overtime)
Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(1.)  Persons holding positions of supervision  or management as defined in  section 4 of the  " Hours  of
Work Act."
(2.)  Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section  5  or 11  of the  " Hours of Work Act"  until the employee has  completed the
hours so established.
Note.—(1.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(2.)   Copy of this Order to be posted in establishment.
(3.)   Schedule setting out the  daily shifts  and  intervals  free  from  duty  of each  occupational group  of  his
employees.
(4.)   Record of wages and daily hours to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, nationalities,
and  residential addresses  of all employees.
(5.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6.)   "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
(7.)  See Order No. 3 re uniforms. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 89
GENERAL INTERIM MINIMUM WAGE ORDER  (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946.
1. That this Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in every
industry, business, trade, or occupation covered by the following orders, namely:-—■
Order
No.
17 (1942)
•55 (1943)
70
76
*58
*65
*66
*72
*73
*68
12 (1940)
53
54
18 (1942)
39 (1940)
78
*51
43 (1942)
44 (1942)
* 1 (1943)
*25 (1942)
•24
59
75
71
69
*27
67
*50 (1943)
*62 (1943)
*77 (1943)
33 (1940)
60
79
26 (1940)
26b
•49 (1943)
Industry.
Baking	
Box-manufacture	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Saltspring Island)	
Bus-driver	
Carpentry (Vancouver and District) ,
Carpentry (Kootenay Area)	
Carpentry (Victoria and District)	
Carpentry (Alberni)	
Carpentry (Nanaimo)	
Christmas-trees	
Construction	
Elevator Operators	
Elevator Operators	
Engineers, Stationary Steam	
First-aid Attendants	
Fishing	
Household Furniture	
Janitors	
Janitresses	
Logging	
Manufacturing	
Mercantile	
Mercantile	
Painters,  Decorators,  and Paper-hangers   (southerly portion  of
Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers (Vancouver and District)
Patrolmen	
Personal Service	
Public Places of Amusement	
Sawmills	
Shingle	
Shingle	
Taxicab-drivers	
Taxicab-drivera (Victoria and Vicinity)	
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Wood-working	
Date of Order.
July 15, 1942	
July 14, 1943	
March 12,1940	
September 21, 1942
September 15, 1938
June 23, 1939	
August 16, 1939	
May 14, 1940	
May 14, 1940	
August 31, 1939	
November 26, 1940.
February 28, 1938...
February 28, 1938...
September 9, 1942..
October 8, 1940	
April 14, 1943	
November 17, 1937.
September 9, 1942..
September 9, 1942..
July 14, 1943	
October 15, 1942	
May 29, 1935	
October 12, 1938	
April 22, 1941	
April 26, 1940	
January 19, 1940....
August 29, 1935	
August 31, 1939	
June 25, 1943	
July 23, 1943	
July 23, 1943	
October 8, 1940	
November 15, 1938.
March 13, 1945	
October 8, 1940	
August 12, 1941	
July 14, 1943	
Minimum
Wage
Act.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.'
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
2. That on and after the 1st day of July, 1946, all minimum wage-rates fixed by the orders of the
Board, as set out in section 1 of* this Order, are hereby increased by adding thereto 20% of such
minimum wage-rates.
3. That the orders as set out in section 1 of this Order are varied accordingly.
4. That this Order, made by the Board at Victoria, B.C., on the 25th day of June, 1946, and
published in The British Columbia Gazette on the 27th day of June, 1946, shall take effect on the 1st
day of July, 1946.
* Orders revised after July 1st, 1946. K 90
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders now in effect, compiled as at August
31st, 1947.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum Wage
Act.
41
2 (1946)
17 (1942)
42 (1946)
55 (1947)
76
70
70a
58
(1947)
68
(1947)
12
(1940)
4
(1946)
53
54
18
(1942)
39
(1940)
78
46
(1946)
47 (1946)
47A (1946)
27
(1947)
52
(1946)
52a (1946)
51
(1947)
43
(1942)
44
(1942)
74 (1946)
1
(1947)
IA (1947)
ll
(1947)
28a (1947)
25
(1947)
25A (1947)
24
(1946)
59
34
(1946)
75
71
69
5 (1947)
67
50 (1947)
62 (1947)
20 (1946)
33 (1940)
60
60a
79
26 (1940)
26a (1940)
26b
3 (1946)
49 (1947)
Apprentices, Indentured	
Apprentices, Indentured	
Baking	
Barbering	
Box-manufacturing-	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver and Vicinity)	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Carpentry	
Christmas-tree	
Construction	
Cook- and Bunk-house Occupation (in
Unorganized Territory)
Elevator Operators.	
Elevator Operators	
Engineers, Stationary Steam	
First-aid Attendants	
Fishing	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Hairdressing	
Hotel and Catering	
Hotel and Catering (Resort Hotels) (Unorganized Territory)
Household Furniture	
Janitors	
Janitresses	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing	
Logging	
Logging	
Logging	
Logging (Board)	
Manufacturing..--	
Manufacturing	
Mercantile	
Mercantile	
Office Occupation	
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(southerly portion of Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(Vancouver and District)
Patrolmen	
Personal Service	
Public Places of Amusement	
Sawmills	
Shingle - -	
Ship-building	
Taxicab-drivers -	
Taxicab drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)....
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)....
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Uniforms, Cost and Upkeep of	
Wood-working	
Feb. 3/37	
June 19/46....
July 15/42	
June 19/46....
Jan.16/47	
Sept. 21/42...
March 12/40.
June 21/40—
July 29/47...
May 9/47	
Nov. 26/40..
June 26/46..
Feb. 28/38....
Feb. 28/38....
Sept. 9/42....
Oct. 8/40	
April 14/43..
June 25/46...
June 25/46...
April 18/47..
May 2/47	
June 19/46...
June 26/46...
Jan. 16/47...
Sept. 9/42....
Sept. 9/42....
June 25/46..
Jan. 16/47-
May 21/47...
May 30/47...
July 15/47...
Jan. 16/47....
July 30/47....
July 11/46....
Oct. 12/38....
June 19/46...
April 22/41..
April 26/40..
Jan. 19/40....
Aug. 15/47...
Aug. 31/39...
■Jan. 16/47....
Jan. 16/47....
June 19/46...
Oct. 8/40	
Nov. 15/38...
Oct. 8/40	
March 13/45
Oct. 8/40	
Nov. 26/40—
Aug. 12/41...
June 19/46...
Jan. 16/47—
Feb. 11/37	
June 27/46	
July 16/42	
June 27/46	
Jan. 23/47	
Sept. 24/42	
March 14/40-
June 27/40	
July 31/47...
May 15/47...
Nov. 28/40..
July 4/46	
March 3/38-
March 3/38..
Sept. 17/42...
Oct. 10/40	
April 22/43..
June 27/46...
June 27/46...
April 24/47..
May 8/47	
June 27/46...
July 4/46	
Jan. 23/47—
Sept. 17/42..
Sept. 17/42..
June 27/46..
Jan. 23/47—
May 29/47....
June 5/47—
July 24 and
July 31/47-.
Jan. 23/47—
July 31/47—
July 18/46—
Oct. 20/38—
June 27/46...
April 24/41..
May 2/40	
Jan. 25/40	
Aug. 21/47	
Sept. 7/39	
Jan. 23/47	
Jan. 23/47	
June 27/46	
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 17/38	
Oct. 10/40	
March 15/45-
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 28/40	
Aug. 14/41	
June 27/46	
Jan.23/47	
Feb.11/37	
July 1/46	
July 20/42	
July 1/46	
Feb. 1/47	
Sept. 28/42—
March 18/40-
June 27/40	
Aug. 4/47....
May 15/47-
Nov. 28/40..
JuIy8/46	
March 3/38	
March 3/38	
Sept. 21/42	
Oct. 10/40	
May 3/43	
July 1/46	
July 1/46	
April 24/47	
May 12/47	
July 1/46	
July 15 to Sept
15 each year
Feb. 1/47	
Sept. 21/42	
Sept. 21/42	
July 1/46	
Feb. 1/47	
May 29/47	
June 5/47	
July 24/47-
Feb. 1/47-.
Aug. 1/47...
Aug. 6/46...
Oct. 20/38..
July 1/46—
June 2/41...
June 1/40-
Feb. 5/40	
Aug. 25/47...
Sept. 11/39-
Feb. 1/47	
Feb. 1/47	
July 1/46	
Oct. 10/40....
Nov. 17/38...
Oct. 10/40.....
April 16/45..
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 28/40...
Aug. 18/41...
July 1/46	
Feb. 1/47	
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 91
SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
(AND AS AMENDED BY INTERIM AMENDMENTS  (1946), EFFECTIVE JULY 1ST, 1946.)
Section 3.—" Subject to the exceptions provided by or under this
Act, the working-hours of an employee in any industrial undertaking
shall not exceed eight in the day and forty-four in the week." •
BE IT KNOWN that the Board of Industrial Relations has made the following
regulations, namely:—
Note.—Regulation 1 cancelled by Regulation 30. Cancellation effective October 31st,
1945.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-
mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may
work a total of 44 hours each week in five
nights, in lieu of 44 hours each week in six
nights, but the number of hours worked in
any night must not exceed 9.
Logging.
3. Persons employed in:—
(1.) The logging industry in:—
(a.)  Booming operations; or
(6.)  Transporting logs by logging-
railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or
river-driving; or
(c.) Transporting workmen or
supplies for purposes of the said
industry;
(d.)  The occupation of boatmen;
( e.)  The occupation of emergency
fire-fighters:
Fish-canning.
(2.) Canning fish or manufacturing byproducts from fish, but not those
engaged in salting fish;  and in
Cook- and Bunk-houses.
(3.)   Cook- and bunk-houses in connection
with any industrial undertaking in
unorganized territory,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed by section 3 of the said Act.
Engineers, Firemen, and Oilers.
4. In all industrial undertakings which
use steam as a motive power and which are
operated with a single shift of engineers,
firemen, and oilers, the engineers, firemen,
and oilers may work overtime to the extent
of 1 Vz hours per day to perform preparatory
or complementary work, in addition to the
maximum hours of work prescribed by
section 3 of the Act.
Shipping Staff.
5. Persons employed as members of the
shipping staff in industrial undertakings
where shipping operations are of an intermittent nature may work such hours in
addition to the working-hours limited by
section 3 of the said Act as (but only so
many as) shall be necessary to surmount
extraordinary conditions which can not
reasonably be otherwise overcome.
In determining extraordinary conditions
the decision of the Board shall be final, and
where the Board is of the opinion that,
under the provisions of this regulation, the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the
Act are being unduly exceeded, the Board
shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the industrial undertaking
from the provisions of this regulation for
such period .of time as the Board considers
advisable.
Note. — Regulation 5 cancelled by 5a,
October 9th, 1947.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons
employed in shipyards, engineering-works,
machine-shops, foundries, welding plants,
sheet-metal works, belt-works, saw-works,
and plants of a like nature may work such
hours in addition to the working-hours
limited by section 3 of the said Act as (but
not more than) may be necessary to prevent
serious loss to, or interruption in the operation of, the industrial undertaking for which
the repairs are being made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture
of wooden boxes or wooden containers for
shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or
vegetables may work during the months of
June, July, August, and September in each
year such hours in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may
from time to time be necessary to fill urgent
orders.
Note.—Regulation 8 cancelled by 8a,
February 13th, 1936.
Note.—Regulation 9 cancelled by 9a,
September 26th, 1940.
Seasonal Lithographing.
10. During the months of May, June, July,
August, September, and October in each
year persons employed in the lithographing
industry may work such hours in excess of
the hours prescribed by section 3 of the said
Act as may from time to time be necessary
to fill urgent orders. This exemption shall
only apply when sufficient competent help is
not available.
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed
by the Board by the granting of written
temporary exemption permits limiting by
their terms the extent thereof, but only upon
being satisfied by application in writing,
signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly authorized, of the urgency and
necessity for the exception, that it is of a temporary nature, and that no other means
of adequately overcoming such temporary
urgent condition is, or has been, reasonably
available, and that the additional working-
hours applied for will not be more than will
.suffice for the extra pressure of work requiring the same.
Overtime Record.
.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in
the manner required by subsection (1) of
section 9 of the said Act of all additional
hours worked in pursuance of section 6 of
the said Act or in pursuance of any regulation.
12a. Every employer shall furnish the
Board with a copy of his pay-roll, or record
in such form prescribed by the Board, showing the hours worked and the nature of the
work performed by his employees in respect
of section 6 of the Act, or Regulations Nos.
6 and 11 of the Board, not later than 15
days after such hours have been worked.
(Effective December 12th, 1940.)
13. Every employer shall notify, by means
of the posting of notices in conspicuous
places in the works or other suitable place,
where the same may readily be seen by all
persons employed by him, the hours at which
work begins and ends, and, where work is
carried on by shifts, the hours at which each
shift begins and ends; also such rest intervals accorded during the period of work as
are not reckoned as part of the working-
hours ; these hours shall be so fixed that the
duration of the work shall not exceed the
limits prescribed by the " Hours of Work
Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall
not be changed except upon 24 hours' notice
of such change posted as hereinbefore specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary
exemption granted by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12
of the Act or Regulation 11 above, a like
notice of the change in working-hours shall
be posted, which notice shall also state
the grounds on which the exemption was
granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia, this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th,
1934.   Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15.
Mercantile Industry.
The mercantile industry is hereby added
to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to
such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 7th day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th
day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th,
1934.   Effective August 9th, 1934.)
Regulations Nos. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d
cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e.
Mercantile Industry.
Note.—Regulation   15e  cancelled  by  29,
September 30th, 1939.
Regulations Nos. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d,
and 16e cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f.
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores.
1. Persons employed in drug-stores as
registered apprentices, certified clerks, or
licentiates of pharmacy may work not more
than 88 hours in any two successive weeks,
but in no case shall the hours of work of
any such registered apprentice, certified
clerk, or licentiate of pharmacy exceed 48
hours in any one week, or 9 hours in any
one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made
and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of
August, 1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd
day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th,
1939.   Effective April 6th, 1939.)
REGULATION No. 17.
REGULATION No. 14.
Occupation of Barbering.
The occupation of barbering is hereby
added to the Schedule of the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council
dated the 24th day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
24th day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd,
1934.   Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
Baking Industry.
The baking industry, by which expression
is meant all operations in or incidental to
the manufacture and delivery of bread,
biscuits, or cakes, is hereby added to the
Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 6th
day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
22nd day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November
22nd, 1934. Effective November 22nd, 1934.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 93
REGULATION No. 17a.
Baking Industry.
Employees employed in the baking industry as deliverymen may work 6 hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
22nd day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November
22nd, 1934.  Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 18.
Catering Industry.
The catering industry, which includes all
operations in or incidental to the preparation or to the serving, or to both preparation
and serving, of meals or refreshments where
the meals or refreshments are served or
intended to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-house, dance-hall, cabaret,
banquet-hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunchroom, lunch-counter, ice-cream parlour,
soda-fountain, or in any other place where
food is served and a charge is made for the
same either directly or indirectly, whether
such charge is made against the persons
who partake of the meals or refreshments
or against some other person, is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council
dated the 9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on
the 1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this
9th day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November
15th, 1934.    Effective December 1st, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 19.
Retail Florists.
Persons employed in the establishments of
retail florists may work such hours in addition to the working-hours limited by section
3 of the said Act as (but only so many as)
shall be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions which can not reasonably
be otherwise overcome: Provided that the
working-hours of such persons shall not
exceed 88 hours on the average in any two
successive weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions
the decision of the Board shall be final, and
where the Board is of the opinion that,
under the provisions of this regulation, the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the
Act are being unduly exceeded, the Board
shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the employer's establishment
from the provisions of this regulation for
such period of time as the Board considers
advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this
9th day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November
15th, 1934.  Effective November 15th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 20.
The Occupation of Elevator Operator.
The occupation of elevator operator is
hereby added to the Schedule to the said Act,
the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council
dated the 15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
28th day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February
28th, 1935.   Effective February 28th, 1935.)
Regulations Nos. 21, 21b, 21c, 21d, 21e, 21f,
21g, 21h, 21j, and 21k cancelled by
REGULATION No. 21m.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The fruit and vegetable industry, which
means all operations in establishments
operated for the purpose of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of
fresh fruit or vegetable, is hereby exempt
from the operation of the " Hours of Work
Act" from June 1st to November 30th,
inclusive, in each year.
REGULATION No. 22.
Transportation Industry.
The transportation industry, which includes all operations in or incidental to the
carrying or transporting for reward, by any
means whatever, other than by rail, water,
or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on
behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private
or public owner, or by or on behalf of any
wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor
thereof, or* dealer therein, and the carrying
or delivering to or collecting from any other
carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or road
transport, for the purpose of being further
transported to some destination other than
the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates, is hereby added
to the Schedule to the said " Hours of Work
Act, 1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the K 94
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th,
1935.    Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 23.
Transportation Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation the
expression " transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the
carrying or transporting for reward, by any
means whatever, other than by rail, water,
or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying
or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material by or on behalf
of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof,
or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier
of goods by rail, water, air, or road transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the
place at which such aforementioned carriage
or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation
industry, other than those employed as (a)
operators of motor-cycles, (6) bicycle-riders
and foot-messengers employed exclusively on
delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers
of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of
milk, are hereby permitted to work 6 hours
per week in excess of the hours prescribed
by section 3 of the said " Hours of Work
Act, 1934," in accordance with the provisions of Order No. 26 of the said Board of
Industrial Relations dated the 19th day of
June, 1935, fixing minimum wages in the
transportation industry: Provided that no
such employee in the transportation industry
shall work more than 10 hours in any one
day.
3. That employees in the transportation
industry employed as drivers of vehicles in
the retail delivery of milk are hereby permitted to work 15 hours per week in excess
of the hours prescribed by section 3 of the
said " Hours of Work Act, 1934 ": Provided
that over a period of seven weeks no such
employee shall work more than 350 hours,
nor more than 10 hours in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th,
1935.    Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24.
room clerks (day or night), mail clerks,
information clerks, cashiers, book-keepers,
accountants, telephone operators, and any
other persons employed in clerical work in
hotels, is hereby added to the Schedule to
the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934," the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council
dated the 20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British
Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September
26th, 1935.   Effective September 26th, 1935.)
Note.—Regulation 26 cancelled by Regulation 30. Cancellation effective October
31st, 1945.
REGULATION No. 28.
Taxicab Industry.
The taxicab industry, which includes the
work of all employees in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity
for 7 passengers or less than 7 passengers,
used for the conveyance of the public, and
which is driven or operated for hire, is
hereby added as item No. 12 to the Schedule
of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to
such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
3rd day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
22nd day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st,
1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 28a.
Occupation of Hotel Clerk.
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes the work of all persons engaged as
Taxicab Industry.
Persons employed in the taxicab industry,
which includes the work of all employees in
charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with
seating capacity for 7 passengers or less
than 7 passengers, used for the conveyance
of the public, and which is driven or operated for hire, may work 6 hours per week
in excess of the weekly limit prescribed by
section 3 of the Act, but in no case shall the
daily hours worked by any such employee in
the taxicab industry exceed 9 in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
22nd day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st,
1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.)
Note.—The taxicab industry having been
brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is
now subject to the following provision of
that Statute:—
" The working-hours of employees working on a split shift shall be confined within
12 hours immediately following commencement of work." REGULATION No. 29.
Mercantile Industry.
Persons employed in the mercantile industry, which includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or)
retail trade in the Province of British
Columbia, with the exception of the City of
Vancouver, the City of North Vancouver,
Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the District of
Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt, the
Municipality of the District of Oak Bay, and
the Municipality of the District of Saanich,
may work 3 hours per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the said Act,
on Saturday of each week and on the day
preceding a statutory holiday, when such
statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but
the total hours worked in any one week shall
not exceed 44.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 8th
day of November, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 9th,
1939.    Effective November 9th, 1939.)
REGULATION No. 30.
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
Be it known that, pursuant to and by
virtue of the powers and authority vested in
the Board of Industrial Relations by the
" Hours of Work Act," the said Board
hereby cancels Regulation No. 1 of the
Board, dated the 14th day of June, 1934, and
Regulation No. 26 of the Board, dated the
23rd day of March, 1938, such cancellation
to be effective as and from the 31st day of
October, 1945.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th
day of September, 1945.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September
27th, 1945.)
INTERIM AMENDMENTS  (1946).
Regulation 2 (lumbering, night shift) is
hereby amended by striking out " 48 " and
" 10," and substituting therefor " 44 " and
" 9."
Regulation 3 (1) (logging) is hereby
amended by striking out the present clause
(d), and substituting the following therefor:—
"(d.) The occupation of boatman;
or" and by adding the following as
clause (e) :—
"(e.)  The' occupation  of  emergency
fire-fighters."
Regulation 3 (3) (cook and bunk houses)
is hereby amended by inserting after the
word   " undertaking"   the   words   " in   un
organized territory," and by striking out all
the words after the word "Act."
Regulation 16f (mercantile industry —
drug-stores) is amended by striking out
" 96 " and " 52 " and substituting therefor
" 88 " and " 48."
Regulation 18a (catering industry) is
hereby rescinded.
Regulation 19 (retail florists) is hereby
amended by striking out " 96 " and substituting therefor " 88."
Regulation 21m (fruit and vegetable industry). The fruit and vegetable industry,
which means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of canning,
preserving, drying, or packing any kind of
fresh fruit or vegetable, is hereby exempt
from the operation of the " Hours of Work
Act" from June 1st to November 30th, inclusive, in each year.
Regulation 23, section 3 (transportation
industry), is hereby amended by striking
out " 378," and substituting therefor " 350."
Regulation 28b (taxicab industry) is
hereby rescinded.
Regulation 29 (mercantile industry) is
hereby amended by striking out " 48," and
substituting therefor " 44."
The above regulations made and given at
Vancouver, B.C., on the 19th day of June,
1946, shall become effective as and from the
1st day of July, 1946.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 27th,
1946.)
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY
(CHRISTMAS, 1946, TEMPORARY).
1. That persons employed in retail establishments in the mercantile industry in the
City of Vancouver, together with all that
area known as Point Grey which lies to the
west of the westerly boundary of the City of
Vancouver; the Municipality of the District
of Burnaby; Municipality of the District of
West Vancouver; the City of North Vancouver; District of North Vancouver; the
City of Victoria; the Municipality of the
Township of Esquimalt; the Municipality
of the District of Oak Bay; and the Municipality of the District of Saanich, may
work two (2) hours in excess of the limit
of eight (8)- hours prescribed by section 3
of the " Hours of Work Act" on each of the
following days, namely, Saturday, December
21st, and Monday, December 23rd, 1946.
2. That persons employed in retail establishments in the mercantile industry of
British Columbia, other than in those localities mentioned in section 1 hereof, may work
three (3) hours in excess of the limit of
eight (8) hours prescribed by section 3 of
the said Act on Saturday, December 21st,
and two (2) hours in excess of the limit of
eight (8) hours prescribed by section 3 of
the said Act on Monday, December 23rd,
1946. Eegulation No. 29 of the Board, dated
the 8th day of November, 1939, is hereby
varied accordingly. K 96
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this
28th day of November, 1946.
Note.—Orders No. 26 (1940), No. 26a
(1940), No. 26b, and Regulation No. 23 of
the Board set out the hours of work and
rates of pay for drivers, swampers, and
helpers.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, December 5th,
1946.)
REGULATION No. 32.
"HOURS OF WORK ACT," "FEMALE
MINIMUM WAGE ACT," AND
"MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
The Board authorizes the following persons, namely:—
The Chairman of the Board of Industrial
Relations,
The Chief Administrative Officer,
The Supervisor of the Vancouver office,
The Supervisor of Inspectors in the Interior,—
to issue temporary exemptions to industrial
undertakings to deal with exceptional cases
of pressure of work, and to issue permission
in  writing  allowing  the  working-hours  of
any employee in an industrial undertaking
in such exceptional cases to exceed the limit
of 8 hours a day or 44 hours a week.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 9th,
1947.)
REGULATION No. 31.
The Occupation of Cemetery-workers.
The occupation of cemetery-workers is
hereby added to the schedule to the " Hours
of Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition
to the said schedule having been obtained
by Order in Council dated the 6th day of
December, 1946.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this
11th day of December, 1946.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 23rd,
1947.)
Construction Industry.
Persons employed on the construction of
the project known as the Pine Pass Highway may work nine (9) hours per day and
fifty-four (54) hours per week from the
22nd day of May, 1947, up to and including
the 15th day of November, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
21st day of May, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 22nd,
1947.)
REGULATION No. 32a.
Construction Industry.
Persons employed on the construction of
the project known as the Hope-Princeton
Highway may work nine (9) hours per day
and fifty-four (54) hours per week from the
22nd day of May, 1947, up to and including
the 15th day of November, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
21st day of May, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 22nd,
1947.)
REGULATION No. 32b.
Construction Industry.
Persons employed on the construction of
the project known as the Princeton-Kaleden
Highway may work ten (10) hours per day
and fifty (50) hours per week from the 22nd
day of May, 1947, up to and including the
15th day of November, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
21st day of May, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 22nd.
1947.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 97
CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN.
The " Control of Employment of Children Act" prohibits the employment of
children under 15 years of age unless a permit has been granted to the employer by the
Minister of Labour or a person duly authorized by him to issue such permits.
Careful check is made as to the suitability of the work, and when it has been
established that a child's health will not suffer, that the work will not expose the boy
or girl to unsafe conditions or interfere with their standing at school, the permits
are issued.
Naturally most applications are received during school vacations in the case of
youngsters eager to earn some money and occupy their time to advantage.
Boys and girls are not encouraged to work during their entire summer holidays,
and fortunately employers and most parents realize they do need some time for play so
that they may return to their studies refreshed for the work ahead.
It has been noticeable that the certificates of parents as to age and birthplace
(required when permits are being considered), disclose that the majority of these young
would-be wage-earners come from the Prairie Provinces. Apparently it is more customary there than in British Columbia to have all members of the family, even the
youngest ones, seek employment.
As our " Public Schools Act " requires boys and girls to remain at school until they
become 15 years of age, we work in close co-operation with the educational authorities
in checking applications for employment of children, especially when they are seeking
jobs while school is in session. These are usually for a few hours' delivery-work after
school, although the odd request is received for full-time work. It is in the latter case
that most searching inquiry is made. In some very few instances where it is deemed
by the school officials that the child would be better off at work than at school employment permits have been granted.
The schedule to the original Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries
for which permits are required.   These include:—
(1) Manufacturing industry.
(2) Ship-building industry.
(3) Generation of electricity or motor-power of any kind.
(4) Logging industry.
(5) Construction industry.
(6) Catering industry.
(7) Public places of amusement.
(8) Shops that are exempt from the provisions of the " Shops Regulation and
Weekly Half-holiday Act."
Note.—On January 10th, 1946, an Order in Council was passed amending the
original schedule by deleting Classification No. 8 and adding the following to the
schedule:—
(8) Mercantile industry.
(9) Shoe-shine stands.
(10) Automobile service-stations.
(11) Transportation industry.
On August 30th, 1946, the definition of the mercantile industry was further
amended to make the coverage more complete and now all establishments and businesses
in the wholesale and retail trade are within the scope of the Act.
Records of the permits granted are kept in such a manner that it can easily be seen
in which occupations the boys and girls were working.
The following table gives the picture for 1946. K 98
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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After school starts all permits granted for the vacation period are cancelled and
a check is made to see that the boys and girls have actually returned to their studies
if they are still under 15.
When parents and children are interviewed every effort is made to induce them to
have the boys and girls carry oh with their education beyond the compulsory school
age. Fortunately most parents realize the advantage of giving their children this
important start in life.
This " Control of Employment of Children Act" provides the necessary machinery
to prevent a child-labour problem developing in the Province and very strict enforcement
is exercised.
Other sections of the Department's report will reveal that Court cases were
instituted against employers who hired young boys or girls without the necessary
permits. K 100 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION BRANCH.
Head Office Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Chief Executive Officer B. H. E. Goult.
.Registrar N. deW. Lyons.
Branch Office 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Senior Conciliation Officer W. Fraser.
Assistant Registrar. R. G. Clement.
James Thomson, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the eighth annual report of the Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1946.
During the year, the Branch, under the direction of the Hon. Minister of Labour,
continued the administration of the " Wartime Labour Relations Regulations Act"
(chapter 18, B.C. 1944). The Act made the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations
(P.C. 1003) effective in British Columbia. Further details regarding it and the
functions of the Wartime Labour Relations Board (British Columbia), constituted
under its provisions, may be found on pages 99 and 100 of the annual report of the
Department for 1945.
WORK OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD.
The summary of cases dealt with during the year ended December 31st, 1946,
shows a sharp increase over the figures for the preceding year. There were 1,014
applications for the certification of bargaining representatives, as compared with 651
for the year 1945.
Of the total for 1946, 670 certifications were granted, 106 rejected, 91 withdrawn,
4 referred to the National Board, and 143 were being investigated at the year's end.
Additionally, there were 34 representative votes conducted, 94 investigations by
conciliation officers, 12 conciliation boards established, 38 preliminary investigations by
Departmental officers, 2 applications granted for leave to prosecute, 4 grievance procedures established, and 9 appeals to the National Board.
Total cases dealt with in 1946 numbered 1,207, as compared with 737 the previous
year.
The number of cases dealt with in British Columbia again exceeded the total
number of cases dealt with by all other Provinces.
Table I. Summary of Cases dealt with.
Numher of applications dealt with   1,014
Certifications granted   670
Applications—
Rejected    106
Withdrawn      91
Referred to National Board        4
Being investigated as at December 31st   143
Representative votes conducted         34
Investigations by Conciliation Officers         94
Conciliation Boards established         12
Preliminary investigation by departmental officers        38
Applications for grievance procedure   4
Applications for leave to prosecute   2
Appeals to National Board   9
Total cases dealt with   1,207 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 101
CONCILIATION PROCEDURE, 1946.
The Wartime Labour Relations Regulations provided for the utilization of conciliation machinery whereby an attempt might be made to settle disputes arising out of
negotiations for a collective agreement or negotiations for the renewal of an existing
agreement. Under the provisions of the regulations, if bargaining representatives had
negotiated with an employer for thirty days, and either party believed a collective
agreement would not be concluded within a reasonable time, application could be made
to the Provincial Minister of Labour for intervention. A Conciliation Officer was then
appointed and made an effort to effect agreement. If he was unable to bring about
agreement, he reported to the Minister, and could state that in his view an agreement
might be facilitated by the appointment of a Board of Conciliation.
Each of the disputant parties were then required to nominate one person for
membership on the Board. The two nominees were then called upon to recommend a
third member as chairman of the Board. If they were unable to agree, the appointment was made by the Minister. The Board, when constituted, endeavoured to bring
the parties together, and reported its findings and recommendations to the Federal
Minister of Labour.
During the year there were 21 conciliation cases, involving 3,772 employees and 94
employers. Fourteen cases were settled by Conciliation Officers, four were referred to
Boards of Conciliation, and two to Industrial Disputes Inquiry Commissions under the
provisions of P.C. 4020.    One Conciliation Commission was cancelled.
In Table III it is shown that twelve Boards of Conciliation were established during
the year. Four of these were established as a result of conciliation proceedings during
the year, and eight as a result of proceedings initiated in 1945. All had reported at the
year's end. The Boards were unanimous in ten cases. In one instance an agreement
was executed between meetings of the Board. The following tabulation shows the
record of all cases heard by Boards during the year.
PROVINCIAL  LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B. C. K 102
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BOARDS OF CONCILIATION, 1946.
In accordance with the terms of the agreement entered into between the Province
and the Dominion concerning the administration of the Wartime Labour Relations
Regulations, Boards of Conciliation were constituted by the Federal Minister of Labour
upon the recommendation of the Minister of Labour for the Province. Text of reports
made by such Boards appeared shortly after their submission to the Federal authorities,
in The Labour Gazette.
In the table following, The Labour Gazette reference indicates the issue of that
publication and the pages in which the text of the report of the Boards appear.
Table III. Boards of Conciliation, 1946.
No. of
Board.
Disputant Parties.
Outcome of Hearings.
Labour Gazette
Reference.
1
The Holden Building1, Vancouver, and International Union of
Building Service Employees, Local 244
Unanimous report 	
March, 1946; p.
311.
2
Welding Shop & Engineering Co., Ltd., Vancouver, and Local
Unanimous   report   rec
April, 1946; pp.
1, Boilermakers and Iron-ship Builders' Union of Canada
ommending    form    of
agreement
480-484.
3
Hudson's Bay Co., Inc., Victoria, and Local 279, Retail Clerks'
Majority report, employ
April, 1946 ; pp.
International Protective Association
er's nominee to Board
dissenting
485-487.
4
Pacific   Cafe,   New   Westminster,   and   Local   28,   Hotel   and
Unanimous report 	
April, 1946 ; pp.
Restaurant Employees' Union
487-488.
5
MacLean Weir, Ltd., Vancouver, and Local 1, Boilermakers
and Iron-ship Builders' Union of Canada
Unanimous report 	
April, 1946 ; pp.
489-490.
6
Cranbrook Cartage and Transfer Co., Cranbrook, and Local
Unanimous report 	
April, 1946; p.
1-405, International Woodworkers of America
491.
7
Blue Cabs, Ltd., and Taxicab, Stage and Bus Drivers' Union,
Agreement executed be
No formal report
No. 151
tween   meetings   of
Board  of  Conciliation
made.
8
The Vancouver Block and certain of its employees, members,
Building Service Employees' Union, Local No. 244
Unanimous report 	
Oct., 1946; p.
1,426.
9
Dowells  Pacific  Transfer  and   Storage   Co.,   Ltd.,   and   Van
Agreement executed and
June, 1946; p.
couver Island Drivers' Division No. 234,  C.B. of R.E. and
unanimous   report   by
773.
O.T.W.
the Board
10
B.C. Packers, Ltd.   (Canadian Fish and Cold Storage, Ltd.),
Unanimous   report   rec
July, 1946 ; pp.
and United Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union
ommending    form    of
agreement
908-910.
11
Canadian   Fishing   Co.,   Ltd.    (Atlin   Fisheries,   Ltd.),   and
Unanimous   report   rec
July, 1946; pp.
United Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union
ommending    form    of
agreement
908-910.
12
The Corporation of the District of Penticton and Penticton
Municipal Employees' Union Local No. 1, C.C.L.
Unanimous report  ,..
Aug., 1946 ; pp.
1071, 1072.
(Note.—Four Conciliation Boards were established as a result of conciliation proceedings in 1946.
eight Boards were established as a result of conciliation proceedings initiated during 1945.)
The other
STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 1946.
The record of strikes in 1946 shows that more employees were affected and more
time lost in working-days than in any other year since this tabulation was begun
in 1933.
During the year under review there were 21 strikes involving approximately 40,014
employees, 524 employers, and causing a loss of 1,294,174 working-days. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 105
Table IV. Summary of Disputes commencing in 1946.
Industry or
Occupation.
No. of
No. of
Time-loss
Particulars.
Employers
Employees
in Man-
affected.
affected.
days.
Metal-factory work
Commenced March 5;   against dismissal of two workers
1
7
91
ers, Vancouver
allegedly   for   union   activity;    terminated   March   19 ;
negotiations;   in favour of workers
Shingle-mill workers,
Commenced  March  8;    against dismissal of worker for
1
29
415
New Westminster
cause;    terminated   March   28;    conciliation    (Provincial) ;   in favour of employer
Junk-yard workers,
Commenced   March   14;    against   dismissal   of   worker
1
33
290
Vancouver
allegedly   for   union   activity;    terminated   March   25 ;
negotiations;   in favour of workers
Fish-net workers,
Commenced  March  15;   for a  signed union agreement;
13
240
7,000
Vancouver and
terminated   April    20;     negotiations;     in    favour   of
district
workers
Sawmill-workers,
Commenced April 15 ;   protesting dismissal of mill super
1
69
78
Nanaimo
intendent ;    terminated   April   16;    negotiations;    in
favour of employer
Loggers, sawmill, and
Commenced April 15 ;   for new agreements providing for
416
35,000
1,100,000
shingle-mill work
increased wages, reduced hours, union shop, check-off,
ers, etc., British
etc. ;   terminated June 20 to 26 ;   controller appointed
Columbia
for   Interior   box-factories   and   supplying   companies,
also conciliation by I.D.A.;   Commissioner appointed by
Federal Government on  recommendation of Provincial
Government,  and  return   of workers  pending further
negotiations;    compromise
■Coal-miners, Cumber
Commenced   May   15;    against   failure   to   include   coal-
2
1,400   '
1,400
land and Nanaimo
miners in  44-hour week  legislation (" Hours  of Work
Act") ;   terminated May 15;   return of workers;   in
favour of employers
Foundry-workers,
Commenced  May  17;    for increased wages and  reduced
35
500
29,000
Vancouver and New
hours;   terminated August 6;   conciliation (Provincial)
Westminster
and return of workers pending reference to Commissioners
Beverage-dispensers,
Commenced  May 24;    against finding  and  direction  of
4
12
24
Crowsnest Pass,
N.W.L.B.    cancelling    wage    increases    approved    by
B.C.
R.W.L.B.;     terminated   May   25;    return   of   workers
pending further reference to N.W.L.B. ;   indefinite
Compositors,
Commenced June 5 ;   against refusal of employer to bar
1
53
2,120
Vancouver
gain as agency for national newspaper chain;   replacement of workers July 22;   indefinite
Pressmen, Vancouver
Commenced   June   5;    in   sympathy   with   compositors'
strike at Vancouver Daily Province ;   returned to work
July   23;    struck   again   September   12;    refusing   to
handle struck work;   returned September 26
1
20
1,060
Gold-miners, Sheep
Commenced   June   13;    against   discharge   of   cook   for
1
49
147
Creek
cause;   terminated June  18;   return  of workers pending reference to arbitration ;   indefinite
Freight-handlers,
Commenced June 20 ;   for increased wages;   terminated
1
10
40
Victoria
June 24 ;   return of workers pending joint application
to  N.W.L.B.;   indefinite
Metal-miners, British
Commenced July 3 ;   for increased wages, reduced hours,
15
2,070
149,000
Columbia
and  other  conditions ;   terminated  December  5
Tuna fishermen,
Commenced July 8 ;   for  a  signed  agreement  providing
25
60
360
Vancouver
for  uniform   division   of   proceeds   of   season's   catch;
terminated July 13 ;   return of workers following signing   of   preliminary   agreement   pending   reference  to
Arbitration Board after fishing season ;   indefinite
Machinists, New
Commenced   July   18;    for  a  new  agreement  providing
1
264
1,400
Westminster
for  increased* wages   and   reduced  hours;    terminated
July  24;    conciliation    (Provincial)   and   reference  to
R.W.L.B.;    compromise K 106
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table IV. Summary of Disputes commencing in 1946—Continued.
Industry or
Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employers
affected.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time-loss
in Man-
days.
Civic workers,
Commenced   August   6;    for   implementation   of   unani
1
46
460
Penticton
mous    report    of    Conciliation    Board    recommending
maintenance   of   membership   and   check-off   in   new
agreement;   terminated August 17 ;   negotiations ;   compromise,  maintenance of membership  incorporated in
new agreement
Bus-drivers and
Commenced September 25 ;   for a union agreement pro
1
14
28
mechanics, Burnaby
viding for increased wages ;   terminated September 26 ;
negotiations;   in favour of workers
Sawmill-workecs,
Commenced October 11 ;   for payment of wages for cer
1
8
36
Victoria
tain   workers   in   accordance  with   wage   schedule  approved by R.W.L.B.;   terminated October 19 ;   negotiations ;   in favour of workers
Dock and warehouse
Commenced    October    16;     misunderstanding    of    wage
1
10
13
workers, Victoria
schedule authorized by N.W.L.B.;   terminated October
17 ;   negotiations ;   in favour of employer
Gold-miners,
Commenced  November  1 ;    for a  union  agreement  pro
1
120
1,240
Tulsequah
viding   for   increased    wages,    reduced   hours,    union
security, etc.;   terminated November 15 ;   negotiations ;
compromise
524
40,014
1,294,202
A lockout, or an industrial condition that is undeniably a lockout, is rarely
encountered, and lockouts and strikes are therefore recorded together in the statistical
tables.    The term " dispute " refers to either strike or lockout.
The figures shown are inclusive of all disputes which have come to the attention
of the Department. While methods taken to procure this information preclude the
possibility of serious omission, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later
information.
Estimates of time lost are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute
lasts by the number of employees directly affected and not replaced. The summaries
include only the record of time lost by workers directly involved.
TIME-LOSS BY INDUSTRY.
An analysis of disputes by industries shows that the greatest loss of time occurred
in the logging and sawmill industry.    Metal-mining was next seriously affected.
Table V. Analysis of Strikes by Industries in British Columbia, 1946.
Industry.
No. of Employers
affected.
No. of Employees
affected.
Time-loss in
Man-days.
1
38
419
40
2
17
4         •
3
46
300
35,106
877
1,400
2,239
12
34
460
7,360
1,100,529
33,961
1,400
150,387
24
81
Totals	
524
40,014
1,294,202 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 107
The following table shows the rise and fall in the number of industrial disputes
from 1936 :—
Table VI. Number of Disputes, Number of Employees affected, and
Time lost in Working-days, 1936-46.
Year.
Number of
Disputes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1936	
1937	
1938 , :	
16
16
11
4
1
8
50
43
15
18
21
5,741
1,188
837
822
204
1,408
18,804
21,704
6,379
6,810
40,014
75,311
30,022
8,236
1939	
13,803
1940	
1941 '.	
1942	
1943	
8,510
7,594
35,024
75,129
1944	
4,510
1945	
69,595
1946	
1,294,202
EMPLOYERS' AND EMPLOYEES' ORGANIZATIONS.
Certain information has been required of associations of employees or trade-union
locals under the provisions of section 5a of the " Department of Labour Act." This
return requires the name and business address of the organization, its affiliation (if
any), and its total paid-up membership to the date of return. Members over three
months in arrears are not included in this figure.
While these returns are from employees' organizations of record, not all are
organizations defined as trade-unions under section 2 (1)   (w) of P.C. 1003.
The inclusion of the name of any organization of employees does not- constitute
its recognition as such, or as a trade-union, under the provisions of the " Wartime
Labour Relations Regulations Act, 1944," or the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act, 1947." Such a determination lies with the boards constituted under the
provisions of these Statutes, or the Honourable Minister of Labour acting on behalf
of such a board.
Every care is taken to ensure accuracy in all returns, but revisions are sometimes
made in the light of later information.
Table VII. Number of Employees' Organizations making Returns
and Membership thereof, 1939-46.
Year.
Number of
Organizations.
Total
Membership.
1939.         	
380
404
402
415
473
617
636
642
44,867
1940	
50,360
1941	
61,292
1942	
91,618
1943	
107,402
110,045
108,125
1946	
119,258 K 108
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Organizations of Employees.
The list is arranged by cities and towns in alphabetical order. The names and
addresses of the presidents and secretaries have been revised to the date of publication,
in all cases where this information could be obtained.
Post-office addresses of the officers are the same as the heading under which they
appear, unless otherwise stated.
The list of employers' organizations follows immediately after that of the employees'. Returns in this category numbered twenty-five in 1939 and 1940, twenty-seven
in 1941, thirty-two in 1942, thirty-four in 1943, thirty-six in 1944, thirty-seven in 1945,
and thirty-seven in 1946.
Abbotsford.
Brick and Clay Workers' Federal Union, No. 136.
—President, Ivor A. Davies; Secretary, S. W.
Jeffery, R.R. 1, Matsqui.
Alberni.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Percy Trill; Secretary, M.
Macgregor, office of Deputy Government Agent,
Alberni.
Bamberton.
Cement Workers' Federal Union, B.C., No. 166.—
President, R. Dale; Secretary, D. Duncan, Tod
Inlet P.O., Bamberton.
Blue River.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 143.
—President, T. Barron, Sr.; Secretary, J. F.
Parkin, Blue River.
Bralorne.
Miners'    Union,    Bralorne,    No.   271.—President,
E. P.  Geiger;    Secretary, D. B.  Cameron,  Box
851, Bralorne.
Britannia Beach.
Mine  and   Mill  Workers'  Union,   Britannia,   No.
663.—President,   J.   H.   Balderson;     Secretary,
K. A. Smith, Box 42, Townsite, Britannia Beach.
Burnaby.
Automobile, Aircraft, and Agricultural Implement
Workers' Union, Local No. 432.—President,
John W. Skelton; Secretary-Treasurer, Fred
McCoy, 3066 Sixth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 23.—President, J. McHale; Secretary, L. Francis, 5091
Union Street, Vancouver.
Pacific Coast Packers, Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, Stephen H. W. Exrell; Secretary-Treasurer, Christina Davie, 733 Thirteenth
Street, New Westminster.
School Janitors' Federal Union, Burnaby, No. 224.
—President, Jack Mitchell; Secretary-Treasurer,
Albert Francis, 2606 Telford Avenue, New
Westminster.
Chapman  Camp.
Sullivan Workers' Union.—President, H. Stuart;
Secretary, C. G. Schulli, Chapman Camp.
Chemainus.
Longshoremen's   Association,   International,    No.
38/164.—President,  R.  Rae;    Secretary,  H.  E.
Thornett,  Chemainus.
Chilliwack.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1843.—President, J. Dalgarno;
Secretary, James R. Johnson, 368 Cedar Street,
Cultus Lake P.O.
Clearwater.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, 'Brotherhood of,
No. 15.—President, H. Stutz; Secretary-Treasurer, J. Pawson, Clearwater.
Colquitz.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Henry Scrimshaw; Secretary,
Harry Durham, c/o Provincial Mental Home
(Staff), Colquitz.
Comox.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President, H. H. Bersey; Secretary,
W. A. W. Hames, Box 233, Courtenay.
Copper Mountain.
Miners' Union, Copper Mountain, No. 649.—President, Angus Campbell; Business Agent, George
W. Anderson, Copper Mountain.
Coquitlam.
Municipal Employees' Union, District of Coquitlam, No. 16.—President, David J. Blacklock;
Secretary, Fred Boyd, Gatensbury Road, R.R. 2,
New Westminster.
Courtenay.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1638.—President, L. V. Steeves;
Secretary, G. Billy, Courtenay.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 156.—President, Frank Plowright; Secretary, Miss M.
Cooper, Box 339, Courtenay.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-363.—President, E. F. Anderson; Secretary,
J. Higgin, Box 458, Courtenay.
Cranbrook.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 563.—
Secretary-Treasurer, C. K. Faulkner, Box 878,
Cranbrook.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 559.—President, R. Bartholomew;
Recording Secretary, M. H. John, Box 214,
Cranbrook.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, 0. H. Well; Secretary, Miss
M. van Braam, Cranbrook. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 109
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue, West
Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 588.
—President, A. A. Bouchard; Secretary, R. J.
Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 229.—President, T. Wacolchik; Secretary,
G. Marra, Wardner.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 585.—
President, W. L. Zimmerman; Secretary, H. B.
Haslam, P.O. Box 785, Cranbrook.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, No. 173.—President, C. Romano; Secretary, N. L. Smith, Cranbrook.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 407.—President, Charles LaFleur; Secretary, J. H. Hux-
table, Box 262, Cranbrook.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1292.—President, B. A. Cameron; Secretary-Treasurer, H. Andrews, P.O. Box 17, Cranbrook.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-405.—President, Mark B. Kennedy; Secretary,
S. Kemble, Box 364, Cranbrook.
Cumberland.
Firebosses'  Union,  Vancouver  Island.—President,
J.   H.   Vaughan;     Secretary,   Alfred   G.   Jones,
Cumberland.
Mine  Workers   of  America,   United,   No.   7293.—
President, J. H. Cameron;   Secretary-Treasurer,
John Bond, Box 614, Cumberland.
Duncan.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—Secretary, W. R. Chester, c/o Post-office,
Koksilah.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhoood of,
No. 533.—President, J. B. Bell; Secretary-
Treasurer, F. W. Costin, P.O. Box 460, Duncan.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-80.
—President, O. G. Brown; Secretary, J. Forbes,
Box 430, Duncan.
Essondale.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President,   D.   J.   L.   Wright;    Secretary,
S. R. H. Evans, P.O. Box E, Port Coquitlam.
Fernie.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of United, No.
308.—President, Albert Dicken; Secretary,
Harold Jones, P.O. Box 1071, Fernie.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, A. Lees; Secretary, R. G. Cor-
nock, P.O. Box 380, Fernie.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7310.—
President, Mike Nee; Secretary, William Martin, Fernie.
Field.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1454.—President, G. A. Gunn; Secretary, W. M.
Brown, Field.
Fraser Valley.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—Secretary, Stanley F. Deans, Aldergrove.
Golden.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. O. Henderson; Secretary,
Hugh B.  Sutton, Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 165.—Secretary-Treasurer, C. A. Johnson,
Box 52, Golden.
Grand Forks.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, John Roylance; Secretary, L.J.
Price, P.O. Box 620, Grand Forks.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 181.—Secretary-Treasurer, C. Holm, Box
503, Grand Forks.
Hedley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Hedley Mascot,
No. 655.—President, Don J. Munro; Secretary,
John Moffett, Box 289, Hedley.
loco.
Oil Workers, United, No. 3.—President, C. Wise;
Secretary, Percy Home, loco.
Kaleden.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 4.—
President, W. G. MacKenzie; Secretary-Treasurer, Eileen L. Preston, Kaleden.
Kamloops.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1540.—President, C. W. Wooley;
Secretary, R. F. Maskell, 726 Seymour Street,
Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 821.—
President, C. Spencer; Secretary, W. A. Harris,
727 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 855.—
Chief Engineer, F. C. Fuller; Secretary, A. J.
Millward, 753 Dominion Street, Kamloops.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
11.—President, E. Murray; Secretary, M. L.
Murphy,  27  Valleyview  Subdivision,  Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 258.—President, J. O. Richmond; Secretary, J. J. Waugh, 749 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 930.—President, T. B. Caswell; Secretary, D. H. C. Wilson, 636 Seymour Street,
Kamloops.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President, A. L. B. Clark; Secretary,
J. A. Carmichael, 220 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West  Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 80,
and Canadian Postal Employees' Association —
President, I. A. Crowder; Secretary, Joseph H.
Abear, 266 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 2990.—
President, F. Arnold; Secretary, G. S. McDonald,
Hut 1, Suite 4, Army Barracks, Kamloops.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 748.—
President, J. Parkin; Secretary, L. E. Crowder,
359  Seymour  Street, Kamloops. K 110
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 31.—President, R. McMillan; Secretary, R.
McLure, Kamloops.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 519.—
President, F. C. Puff; Secretary-Treasurer,
Vernon H. Mott, 521 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
148.—President, H. C. Cowles; Secretary, R.
Lapsley, 907 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, No.
611.—President, E. R. Chapman; Secretary,
H. P. Battison, 36 Nicola Street West, Kamloops.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 150.—President,
G. N. Roberts; Secretary, L. V. Phillips, Box
402, Kamloops.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 30.—
General Secretary-Treasurer, D. B. Roberts, 216
Avenue Building, Winnipeg, Man.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 45.—
General Secretary-Treasurer, D. B. Roberts, 216
Avenue Building, Winnipeg, Man.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No.
15.—President, Miss Norma Bryson; Secretary,
Miss Mary Saxton, 738 Dominion Street, Kamloops.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-417.
—President, S. A. Simpson; Secretary, W. S.
Lynch, 234 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Kaslo.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No.   173.—Secretary-Treasurer,   T.   H.   Horner,
Crescent Road, Kaslo.
Kelowna.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, Brotherhood
of, No. 2768.—President, Andrew Mclnroy; Secretary, George Handlen, 816 Wolseley Avenue,
Kelowna.
Civic Employees'Union.—President, Alec Ruddick;
Secretary-Treasurer, Rupert Brown, Box 171,
Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 8.—
President, William H. Fleck; Secretary-Treasurer, A. T. Kobayashi, Okanagan Centre.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. P. Gravel; Secretary, Miss
R. Lansdowne, P.O. Box 809, Kelowna.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 2768.—
President, Andrew Mclnroy; Secretary, J. O.
Camozzi, 2246 Spear Street, Kelowna.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 217—President,
W, H. Sands; Secretary, Robert Gill, Box 312,
Kelowna.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-423.
—President, F. M. Fulton; Secretary, Marion
Holtom, Box 1557, Kelowna.
Kimberley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Kimberley, No.
651.—President, J. Byrne; Secretary, J. R. Mc-
Farlane, Kimberley.
Ladysmith.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
Fred Bell; Secretary-Treasurer, Fred Johnston,
119 Baden-Powell Street, Ladysmith.
Lake Cowichan.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1812.—President, Arthur Lovat;
Secretary, H. J. White, Sunset Park, Youbou.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 2824.—President, I. High; Secretary-Treasurer, G. Robbins, Box 172, Lake Cowichan.
Langford.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President, W. J. Wishart; Secretary,
W. H. Sluggett, 3477 Saanich Road, Victoria.
Lillooet.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 215.—President, J. K. Purdie; Secretary,
J. M. Crowston, Garibaldi.
Langley Prairie.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189. — President,
T. J. Johnston; Secretary-Treasurer, Birt
Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Marguerite.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 221.—President, M. Latin; Secretary, Harry
Robinson, Marguerite.
Marpole.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, E. A. Miles; Secretary, Miss
Zella Black, c/o Provincial Infirmary (Staff),
Marpole.
Merritt.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President, A. H. McLean; Secretary,
P. C. Currie, P.O. Box 65, Merritt.
Mission.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-367.
—President, A. H. Hill; Business Representative, Rudy Wilson, Box 489, Mission.
Murrayville.
Municipal Employees' Association, Langley, No.
10.—President, Arthur R. Young; Secretary,
Denis H. Buchley, R.R. 2, Simmonds Road,
Langley Prairie.
McBride.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 247.—President,
R. T. Clay; Secretary, G. T. Holdway, Box 26,
McBride.
Nanaimo.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189. — President,
T. J. Johnston; Secretary-Treasurer, Birt
Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United, No.
527.—President, W. J. Emerson; Secretary, W.
Brankston, 19 Doric Avenue, Nanaimo.
Civic Employees' Association, Nanaimo, No. 14.—
President, T. Mumberson; Secretary-Treasurer,
Fred  Hedley,  264  Machleary   Street,  Nanaimo.
Civil Servants of Canada, Nanaimo, Amalgamated.
—President, Joseph Brad well; Secretary-Treasurer, H. W. Spencer, 433 Fourth Street,
Nanaimo.
!
i REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 111
Fire-fighters' Association, Nanaimo, No. 7. —
President, J. Baffle; Secretary-Treasurer, F.
Hedley, 264 Machleary Street, Nanaimo.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, A. R. Lane; Secretary, Miss
M. E. Booth, c/o Court-house, Nanaimo.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' Union, Nanaimo Dry Cleaning,
No. 1,—President, Mrs. E. Patterson; Secretary,
Lois Sheepwash, 24 Fraser Street, Nanaimo.
Machine Shop and Foundry Industrial Workers'
Union, Nanaimo, No. 1. — President, Frank
Shorrocks; Secretary, R. B. McDougall, 78 View
Street, Nanaimo.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7355.—
President, T. E. Well; Secretary-Treasurer,
Percy Lawson, Union Hall, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No.
3.—President, J. G. Young; Secretary, C. L.
Tallman, 507 Bradley Street, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No.
12.—President, Miss Velma Wilson; Secretary,
Miss Ruby Houston, 546 Prideaux Street,
Nanaimo.
Typographical Union, Nanaimo, No. 337.—President, Alex Grieve; Secretary-Treasurer, L. C.
Gilbert, P.O. Box 166, Nanaimo.
Naramata.
Fruit and  Vegetable Workers'  Union,  No.  11.—
President,  W.   I.   Lethbridge;    Secretary,   Mrs.
K. Macmillan, Naramata.
Natal.
Mine  Workers   of  America,   United,   No. 7292.—
President,  Tony  Podrasky;    Secretary, Simeon
Weaver, Natal.
Nelson.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
196.—President, A. J. Hamson; Secretary-Treasurer, F. Defoe, Ward Street, Nelson.
Civic Employees' Federation, Nelson, No. 8. —
President, W. F. Cartwright; Secretary-Treasurer, F. E. Wheeler, 916 Falls  Street, Nelson.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated—President, C. Gigot; Secretary, F. C. Collins, 911
Edgewood Avenue, Nelson.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 1003.—President, A. A. Pagdin; Recording
Secretary, J. H. Whitfield, 414 Falls Street,
Nelson.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 579.—
President, L. W. Humphrey; Secretary-Treasurer, Gordon Allan, 1115 Ward Street, Nelson.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 18.—
President, H. J. Speers; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. R. Taylor, 313 Carbonate Street, Nelson.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 631.—President, J. C. Young; Recording Secretary, F. M. Christian, Box 366, Nelson.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, B. W. Dysart; Secretary, Miss
F. Jeffreys, P.O. Box 510, Nelson.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No.
75.—President, A. S. Homersham; Secretary,
George C. Massey, 306 Third Street, Nelson.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 663.
—President, T. A. Swinden; Secretary, W. J.
Neil, Nelson.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 558.—
President, J. S. Edwards; Secretary, C. H.
Sewell, 41 High Street, Nelson.
"Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
98.—President, Alan Smith; Secretary, Alex G.
Ioanin, 512 Third Street, Nelson.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 460.—President, W. E. Marquis; Secretary-Treasurer, A.
Kirby, 820 Carbonate Street, Nelson.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express and Station Employees, No. 1291.—
President, J. S. Blake; Secretary, R. R.
McCandlish, 811 Third Street, Nelson.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 4.—President, L. E. Hadfield;
Secretary, A. Ruzicka, 422 First Street, Nelson.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic Division), No. 13.—President, Miss I. Kay;
Secretary, Miss Rilla Smith, c/o General Delivery, Nelson.
Typographical Union, International, No. 340.—
President, Elmer D. Hall, Jr.; Secretary,
George W. Priest, 706 Richards Street, Nelson.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-425.
—President, Allen F. Dunn; Secretary, George
Argotoff, 48 Ymir Road, Nelson.
New Westminster.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189.—President,
T. J. Johnston; Secretary-Treasurer, Birt
Showier, 529  Beatty  Street, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers and Culinary Workers Union,
Local 835.—President, J. G. Flowers; Secretary, T. Dougherty, 228 Sandringham Avenue,
New Westminster.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers of America, International Brotherhood of, No. 151.—
President, T. J. Rowson; Secretary-Treasurer,
Peter Mitchell, 1703 Dublin Street, New Westminster.
Boilermakers, Iron-ship Builders and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, No. 194.
—President, C. A. Bailey; Secretary-Treasurer,
Peter Nicolson, 490 Fourteenth Avenue, New
Westminster.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1251.—President, A. O. Forman;
Secretary, Robert Groves, 727 Fifth Avenue,
New Westminster.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 12.—President,
Walter Hogg; Secretary, Neil B. Saunders, 217
Seventh Avenue, New Westminster.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, R. V. Cheale; Secretary-Treasurer, Fred
McGrath, 316 Strand Avenue, New Westminster.
Cordage Industrial Rope and Twine Workers'
Union, No. 1.—President, William Eakin; Secretary, Irva Zimmerman, R.R. 2, New Westminster .
Distillery, Rectifying, and Wine Workers' International Union of America, No. 69.—President,
A. B. Strachota; Secretary, H. F. Redman,
460 Campbell Avenue, New Westminster. K 112
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Fire-fighters,   International   Association   of,   No.
256.—President,    Lloyd    Wisheart;     Secretary,
Dave W. Anderson, 1823 Hamilton Street, New
Westminster.
Fire-fighters'   Association,   Burnaby,   No.   323.—
President, L. C. Auvache;   Secretary-Treasurer,
G. McDonald, 3319  Sussex Avenue, New Westminster.
Gypsum   Workers'    Union,    No.   578.—President,
T.   H.   McCormick;     Secretary,   J.   W.   Beattie,'
1355 Second Street, New Westminster.
Hod Carriers, Building and Common Labourers of
America,   International,   No.   1070.—President,
E.   N.   Goodridge;    Secretary-Treasurer,   M.   J.
Musa, Suite 22, 1115 Sixth Avenue, New Westminster.
Kelly   Douglas  &   Co.,  Ltd.,   Employees'  Association.—President,  W.  R.  Thompson;    Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 131.
—President,   Ivan   Clitheroe;     Secretary,   William   J.   Haines,   1842   Richmond   Street,   New
Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 151.
—President,   F.   Maguire;     Secretary,   J.   D.
Wildy, 1606 Seventh Avenue, New Westminster.
Moulders'  and   Foundry   Workers'   Union,   International, No. 281.—President, Fred Abernethy;
Secretary,   John   Smith,   1012   Queens   Avenue,
New Westminster.
Office and Professional Workers of America,
United, No. 203.—President, Roy Selby; Secretary-Treasurer, John Grimmer, 1404 Tenth
Avenue, New Westminster.
Pacific Coast Terminals Independent Employees'
Union, No. 76.—President, T. R. Cosh; Secretary, J. Walker, 116 Mclnnes Street, New Westminster.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
180.—President, James McKnight; Secretary,
Georg-e Baxter, 375 Keary Street, New Westminster.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
456.—President, William Jacobson; Secretary,
Walter L. Ross, 222 Ninth Street, New Westminster. '
Plumbers, Steamfitters, and Pipefitters of America, United Association of, No. 571.—President,
James Mitchell; Secretary, T. H. Poulton, 725
Second Street, New Westminster.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
280.—President, W. Jackson; Secretary, A. H.
Cawley, R.R. 6, New Westminster.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 226.—President,
L. Stevens; Secretary, J. Spick, 1422 Hamilton
Street,   New  Westminster.
Sheet-metal Workers, International Association
of, No. 314.—President, George Watson; Secretary, George H. Dobb, 1116 Seventh Avenue,
New Westminster.
Stone Cutters of North America, Journeymen.—
President, F. H. Lowe; Secretary-Treasurer,
Frank Hall, 2148 Randolph Avenue, New Westminster.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, No. 134.—President, David L. Bryce; Secretary, S. I. Hurst, 1412 Seventh Avenue, New
Westminster.
Typographical Union, New Westminster, No. 632.
— President, A. R. MacDonald; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. A. Stoney, Box 754, New Westminster.
Waterfront Workers' Association, Royal City,
No. 502.—President, W. H. Lawrence; Secretary-Treasurer, C. P. Latham, 239 Fourth Street,
New Westminster.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-357.
—President, Percy A. Smith; Secretary, Rae
Eddie, 656 Eleventh Avenue, New Westminster.
Nickel Plate.
Mine,  Mill, and  Smelter  Workers'  Union,  Nickel
Plate,   No.   656.—President,   P.   S.   Dannhauer;
Secretary,  Joseph   Rogers,   Nickel   Plate   Mine.
♦ Oakalla.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. W. Lane; Recording Secretary, W. Rutherford, P.O. Drawer O, New
Westminster.
Ocean Falls.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
360.—President, Newman H. Compton; Secretary,  Sydney  T.  Dolan,  Box  491,  Ocean  Falls.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 312.—President,
D. J. McDonald; Secretary, W. S. Holgate,
P. O. Box 64, Ocean Falls.
Oliver.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 2.—
President, Vic Tomlin; Recording Secretary,
B. Potter, R.R. 1, Oliver.
Oliver Sawmills Employees' Association.—President, E. L. Roberts; Secretary-Treasurer,
Noel M. Boult, Box 261, Oliver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
334.—Recording   Secretary,   E.   Greene,   Oliver.
Peace River.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President,    Mr.    Martin;     Secretary,    R.
Ericson, Pouce Coupe.
Penticton.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 866.—
President, R. T. Johnson; Secretary-Treasurer,
W. Osborne, 812 Argyle Street! Penticton.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
10.—President, J. D. Crawford; Secretary,
W. T. Mattock, 356 Main Street, Penticton.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 884.—President, P. H. Coulter; Secretary, Dawson Raincock, Penticton.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, N. Vernon; Secretary, M. Johnston,
Box 633, Penticton.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. Edge; Secretary, R. D.
Clapperton, Oliver.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
New Westminster.
Municipal Employees' Union, Penticton, No. 1.—
President, H. Abrams; Secretary, R. J. Porteous,
Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 914.—
President, N. E. McCallum; Secretary-Treasurer, G. M. Clark, P.O. Box 875, Penticton. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 113
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 179.—Chief
Conductor, A. G. Peterson; Secretary-Treasurer, H. Johnston, P.O. Box 413, Penticton.
Pioneer.
Miners' Union, Pioneer, No. 693.—President,
Robert Falconer; Secretary, W. K. Durrell,
Pioneer Mines.
Port Alberni.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 513.—President, T. Veeman;
Secretary, Chris Peterson, Box 908, Port
Alberni.
Hospital Employees' Union, West Coast General,
No. 91.—President, Ernest Walker; Secretary-
Treasurer, Miss A. L. Kolach, Box 1138, Port
Alberni.
Hotel, Restaurant, and Beverage Employees'
Union, No. 697.—President, Rene Bourget;
Secretary-Treasurer, Robert Holland, Box 809,
Port Alberni.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union,
International, No. 503.—President, P. Goddard;
Secretary-Treasurer, Cal Cook, Box 804, Port
Alberni.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-85.
—President, Walter S. Yates; Secretary,
Mark F. Mosher, Port Alberni.
Port Alice.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 514.—President,
K. R. Sturdy; Secretary, K. A. Monkhouse,
Port Alice.
Port Mellon.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 297.—President,
Christopher H. Wood; Secretary, Jack Johnston, Port Mellon.
Powell River.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2068.—President, John Gibson;
Secretary, F. A. Smith, Wildwood Heights P.O.,
Powell River.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
8.—President, A. McLaren; Secretary, R. A.
Bridge, Box 688, Powell River.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. F. Otto; Secretary, Miss
Ethel Cook, Powell River.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
142.—President, T. Waldron; Secretary, H. B.
Moore, Box 55, Westview.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 76.—President,
C. M. Mouat; Secretary, J. S. Mabell, Box 810,
Powell River.
Premier.
Mine, Mill, and Tramway Workers' Union, Silbak
Premier, No. 694.—President, Thomas J. N.
Dunn; Secretary, B. J. Smithson, Box 1429,
Premier.
Prince George.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 843.-—■
Chief Engineer, L. McNeil; Secretary, George A.
Hodson, Prince George.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 827.—President, R. R. Anderson; Secretary, F. Armstrong, Box 294, Prince George.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Lome Swannell; Secretary,
Miss J. McMillan, Prince George.
Hotel, Restaurant, and Beverage Dispensers' International Union, No. 690.—President, Edward
Porrier; Secretary, A. Taylor, P.O. Box 126,
Prince George.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 202.—President, C. Adcock, New Hazelton;
Secretary-Treasurer, H. Haws, Hansard.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 620.—President, J. Williams; Secretary-Treasurer, D. Ross,
Box 224, Prince George.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 28.—President,
H. A. MacLeod; Secretary, H. Allane, Box 504,
Prince George.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-424.
—President, H. Ekblad; Secretary, Calvin
Perry, Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 636.—President,
E. W. Standing; Secretary-Treasurer, F. C.
McEwan, P.O. Box 196, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1549.—President, C. N. Hend-
rickson; Business Agent, Harold McKay, Box
694,   Prince  Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1735.—President, August Wallen;
Secretary, J. S. Black, Box 694, Prince Rupert.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Prince Rupert,
No. 5.—President, S. B. McCafferty;   Secretary,
E. H.  Keehn, Prince Rupert.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 344.—President, T. H. Wilford;    Secretary,
F. M. Kempton, Box 457, Prince Rupert.
Engineers,    International    Union    of    Steam    and
Operating, No. 510.—President, David Crocker;
Secretary, S. L. Peachy, 733 Tatlow Street,
Prince  Rupert.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No.
559.—President, J. Ewart; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. H. Iveson, 218 Sixth Avenue East, Prince
Rupert.
Fishermen's Federal Union of B.C., Deep Sea,
No. 80.—President, H. Hansen; Secretary,
George Anderson, P.O. Box 249, Prince Rupert.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. H. Murray; Secretary,
C. V. Smith, P.O. Box 337, Prince Rupert.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Alliance, Local
No. 331.—President, Mrs. Verna Ratchford;
Secretary, Elizabeth Oliver, General Delivery,
Prince  Rupert.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 505.—President, Tror Moe; Secretary, William A. Pilfold, Box 531, Prince
Rupert.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 335.—President, C.J.Wilkinson; Secretary-
Treasurer, P. LeRoss, Box 1191, Prince Rupert. K 114
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial
Union, No. 2.—President, William Sherman;
Secretary-Treasurer, S. Dominato, Box 71,
Prince Rupert.
Plumbers, Steamfitters, and Marine Pipefitters,
United Association of, No. 180.—President,
John Murray; Secretary-Treasurer, George
Weatherly, Box 1296, Prince Rupert.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
426.—President, D. T. Elder; Secretary-Treasurer, R. Pollock, 211 Third Street West, Prince
Rupert.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 154.—President,
D. R. Creed; Secretary, P. G. Jones, Box 676,
Prince Rupert.
Typographical Union, Prince Rupert, No. 413.—■
President, William H. Priest; Secretary, C. H.
Collins, Box 552, Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of, No. 367.—
President, E. Plecash; Secretary, A. Kowal,
Box 467, Princeton.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. Young; Secretary, T. R.
Cunliffe, c/o Department of Public Works,
Princeton.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1023.—Secretary-Treasurer, W. M. Thompson, Princeton.
Mine Workers, of America, United, No. 7875.—
President, Archibald Samuel; Secretary-Treasurer, John Howarth, Princeton.
Quesnel.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Ernie Ewing; Secretary, R.
Stephenson, c/o Department of Public Works,
Quesnel.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 407.—President,
A. Robinson; Secretary, Alf Olsson, Box 141,
Revelstoke.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 657.—
Chief Engineer, H. W. Keegan; Secretary-
Treasurer, G.  L.  Ingram,  Box 485, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 341.—President, E. M. Lloyd; Secretary, G. Hobbs, Box 746, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 381.—President, D. Blackwell; Secretary,
D. A. Rix, Revelstoke.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 10.—
President, H. J. Crich; Secretary, W. Roy
Crowle,  Revelstoke.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. Dabell; Secretary, C. G.
Graham, Office of Provincial Assessor, Revelstoke.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 258.
—President, C. B. York; Secretary, H. Gillett,
Revelstoke.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 208.—President, P. Lazzarotto; Secretary-
Treasurer, H. Prestwick, P.O. Box 153, Revelstoke.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 51. —
President, Charles Isaac; Secretary, D. E.Johnson, Box 728, Revelstoke.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
481.—President, T. Pugsley; Secretary, T. L.
Henderson, Revelstoke.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 481.—President, B. C. Calder; Secretary-Treasurer, D. L.
Hooley, Box 434, Revelstoke.
Rossland.
Fire-fighters'Association, B.C. Provincial, No. 9.—
President, George Dingwall; Secretary-Treasurer, William Yawney, Rossland.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial. — President, G. A. Benzies; Secretary,
W. S. Mason, P.O. Box 190, Rossland.
Salmon Arm.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, William A. Webb; Secretary,
Mrs. Elsie MacLeod, c/o Department of Public
Works, Salmon Arm.
Skeena-Omineca.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, S. G. Preston; Secretary, C. L.
Gibson,  Smithers.
Smithers.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 111.—
President, H. F. Powers; Secretary-Treasurer,
C. A. Thurston, Box 240, Smithers.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 340—President, J. D. Denicola; Secretary-
Treasurer, J. E. Middleton, Walcott.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Bulkley Valley,
No. 874.—President, Joseph Loftus; Secretary,
Garnet B. Robinson, Smithers.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 868.—
President, E. V. Glass; Secretary-Treasurer,
S. W.  Gould, Box 86,  Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415.—President, J. Cathral; Secretary, C. Me-
haffey, Smithers.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 93.—President,
E. M. Erickson; Secretary, P. E. Emerson, Box
51,  Smithers.
South Slocan.
West Kootenay Power & Light Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, J. E. Parker; Secretary-Treasurer, R. E. Johnson, Bonnington
Falls.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1419.—President, Robert Watson; Secretary,
Alexander Fraser, P.O. Box 46, Squamish.
Terrace.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-469.
—President, T. Parranto; Secretary, William
Langmead, Box 143, Terrace.
I REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 115
Trail.
Bus Drivers' Association of Trail. — President,
George Donish; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Evelyn
Donish, 1912 Third Avenue, Trail.
Electrical Workers', International Brotherhood of,
No. 287.—President, A. F. Biollo; Secretary,
A. G.  Eldridge, Kinnaird.
Fire-fighters' Association, Tadanac, No. 871.—
President, David Bisset; Secretary-Treasurer,
R. Houndle, 2024 Topping Street, Trail.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West  Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 76.
—President, John Barnes; Secretary, Syd T.
Spooner, 2017 Second Avenue, Trail.
Public Workers of America, United, No. 717.—
President, Jake Janzen; Secretary-Treasurer,
H. T. Bilkey, 1522 Third Avenue, Trail.
Smelter Workers' Union, Independent, No. 38 —
President, C. W. McLean; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. A. Saunders, 53 Bingay Road, Trail.
Smelter Workers' Union, Trail and District, No.
480.—President, Donald A. Berry; Secretary,
G. E. Carter, Box 120, Trail.
Tranquille.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, James Carr; Secretary, E. R.
Powell, c/o  Sanatorium   (Staff), Tranquille.
Tulsequah.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Taku and District,
No. 858.—President, R. J. Thomson; Secretary,
H. A. Adams, Tulsequah.
Vananda.
Quarry and Mine Workers' Union, Texada Island,
No.  816.—President,   E.  W.   Olson;    Secretary,
J. K. Johnson, Vananda.
Vancouver.
Aeronautical Mechanics' Lodge, No. 756, International Association of Machinists.—President,
K. G. Hennigar; Secretary, T. Price, 4558 Henry
Street, Vancouver.
Auto Workers' Lodge, No. 1857, Vancouver. —
President, W. Mattenley; Secretary, Gordon
Webb, 4544  Gothard  Street, Vancouver.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, No. 468.—President, Wilmer
E. Bell; Secretary, M. J. Kemmis, 2010 Burrard
Street, Vancouver.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189. — President,
T. J. Johnston; Secretary-Treasurer, Birt
Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Barbers' Association of B.C.—President, W. K.
Burns; Secretary, Offa A. Hawes, 5319 Joyce
Road, Vancouver.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
120.—President, R. H. Parliament; Secretary-
Treasurer, C. E. Herrett, 304, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
B.C. Electric Office Employees'Association.—President, G. C. Lunn; Secretary, A. E. Arnold, 4818
Fleming Street, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 676.—President,
A. T. McMullen; Secretary, F. W. Mills, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Blacksmiths' and Helpers' Union of Canada, No.
1.—President, John Moffat; Secretary-Treasurer, G. G. Cavill, 849 Churchill Crescent,
North  Vancouver.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
105. — President, F. Roberts; Secretary, W.
White, 2035 Forty-eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of United, No.
300.—President, A. L. Noble; Secretary, E. C.
Sims, 5392 Clarendon  Street, Vancouver.
Bricklayers' and Masons' International Union, No.
1.—President, A. Dickie; Secretary, S. Padgett,
2066 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers'
Union, International Association of,. No. 97.—
President, J. E. Fitzpatrick; Secretary, E. G.
Cook, 1175 Woodland Drive, Vancouver.
Building and Construction Workers of Canada,
Amalgamated, No. 1.—President, Norman McLean; Secretary, J. C. Barrett, Cecil Hotel,
Vancouver.
Building Material, Construction, and Fuel Truck
Drivers, No. 213.—President, Harry McBride;
Secretary, H. I. Bonnell, 4596 Inverness Street,
Vancouver.
Building Service Employees' Union, No. 244.—
President, V. Galbraith; Secretary, A. J. Wy-
brew, 434 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 452.—President, R. E. Guthrie;
Secretary, H. P. Hamilton, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2346 (Shinglers' Local).—President, J. C. Atherton; Recording Secretary, J. A.
Gildemeester,  2053   Cypress   Street,  Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2968.—President, A. A. Taylor;
Recording Secretary-Treasurer, George W. Law-
son, 1995 Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Cemco Employees'Association, No. 72.—President,
A. E. Cousins; Secretary, Jack Rossi, 3010
Seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Cement Finishers' Section, International Hod Carriers', Building and General Labourers' Union,
No. 602.—President, Oscar Anderson; Secretary, W. Baskerville, 2931 McGill Street, Vancouver.
Checkers' and Supercargoes Union, Marine, No.
506. — President, William Wright; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sidney Earp, 1410 Dominion Bank
Building,  Vancouver.
City Hall Employees' Association, Vancouver, No.
15.—President, James Robison; Secretary, T. H.
Lewis, 2159 Eighteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Association, North Vancouver,
No. 3.—President, A. Dimock; Secretary, N. E.
Woodard, 136 Seventeenth Street West, North
Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Union, Vancouver, No. 28.—
President, John L. Shea; Secretary, William L.
Ash, 2063 Grant Street, Vancouver.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, M. B. Whitehead; Secretary, Harold Baker,
3680  Collingwood Street, Vancouver.
Clerks' Union, Retail, No. 279.—President, George
A. Wilkinson; Secretary-Treasurer, George
Johnston, 1311 Pender Street West, Vancouver. K 116
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Clerks' and Warehousemen's Union, No. 10, Amalgamated Building and Construction Workers of
Canada. — President, R. J. Cave; Secretary-
Treasurer, Douglas J. Davis, 3549 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Distillery, Rectifying, and Wine Workers' International Union of America, No. 92.—President,
William Shearer; Secretary, George Guy, 545
Forty-seventh  Avenue   East,  Vancouver.
Divers' and Tenders' Union of Canada, Submarine,
Western Division.—President, L. T. Shorter, 139
Sixth Street East, North Vancouver.
Electrical Trades Union, No. 1.—President, J. H.
Bushfield; Secretary, Robert Adair, 20, 163
Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. B 213. — President, W. Fraser; Business
Manager, J. N. Ross, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Elevator Constructors, International Union of, No.
82. — President, T. McCabe; Recording Secretary, H. C. Mackichan, 2057 Seventh Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Embalmers and Undertakers Assistants' Union,
No. 23374.—President, William Scott; Secretary, J. A. Dougall, 1334 Nicola Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 630.—
Chief Engineer, C. J. Greer; Secretary-Treasurer, E. J. Wise, 3330 Manitoba Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 907.—
President, C. Glibbery; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. F. McGuire, 3533 Eighteenth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Engineers of Canada, Inc., National Association
of Marine, No. 7. — President, J. G. Pearce;
Business Agent, Dennis L. Heard, 319 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
115. — President, David Hodges; Secretary,
George E. Jones, 2681 Sixth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
882. — President, James Holliday; Secretary,
W. A. Gillespie, 217, 193 Hastings Street East,
Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
963.—President, A. W. Davie; Secretary, Leonard A. Roach, 2932 Sophia Street, Vancouver.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 15.—
President, A. H. Kennedy, Sr.; Recording Secretary, Miss S. R. Glen, 760 Sixty-third Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees' Union, No. B-71.—
President, R. W. McArthur; Secretary-Treasurer, C. W. Backus, 1928 Fortieth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, City, No. 1. — President,
Hugh S. Bird; Secretary, Harry G. Foster, 4469
Gladstone  Street, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, Vancouver, No. S-18.—President, H. Liddle; Secretary-Treasurer, C. A.
Watson, 2742 First Avenue East, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 656.—President, W. R. O'Neill; Secretary, G. G. Toombs, 4831 Windsor Street, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 939.—President, J. A. Rennie; Recording Secretary, J. Livingstone, 1111 Barclay
Street, Vancouver.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 289.—President, P. Dunpky; Secretary, W.
Chapman, 1165 Beach Avenue, Vancouver.
Firemen's Union, North Vancouver, No. 3.—President, W. G. Miller; Secretary, T. Cummings,
552 Fifth Street East, North Vancouver.
First-aid Attendants' Association of B.C., Industrial.— President W. A. Cowley; Secretary,
H. W. Mahler, 101, 603 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United.—
President, George Miller; Secretary-Treasurer,
William Rigby, 138 Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
Furniture Workers' Local No. 2533 (Carpenters
and Joiners of America).—President, L. Quance;
Secretary, P. Merrick, 967 Howe Street, Vancouver.
Furniture Workers' Local No. 2534 (Carpenters
and Joiners of America).—President, Charlie
Hayes; Secretary, Mrs. Betty Burton, 2560
Dow Road, New Westminster.
Fur and Leather Workers' Union, International,
No. 510. —President, R. Wall; Secretary, G.
Clerihew, 2918 Thirty-fourth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Fur Workers' Union, Vancouver, No. 197.—President, Marjorie Dodd; International Representative, E. E. Leary, 339 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 190.—
President, George Munro; Secretary, W. W.
Shaw, 3435 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 232.—
President, Harry Osovsky; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Lydia Wier, 1496 Nanaimo Street, Vancouver.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies',
No. 276.—President, Mrs. E. Thomas; Secretary, Colin Carr, 119 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Gas Workers' Federal Union, No. 225, Vancouver
and Victoria.—President, C. S. Martin; Secretary-Treasurer, F. R. Alty, 3746 Yale Street,
Vancouver.
Glaziers' and Glass Workers' Union, No. 1527.—
President, Z. E. Gregoire; Secretary, James H.
Swales, 365 Fifty-ninth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Glove Workers' Union, Vancouver, No. 104.—President, Harry Hendrickson; Secretary-Treasurer,
Miss Dorothy Halsall, 2834 Georgia Street East,
Vancouver.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. J. McCall; Secretary, Miss
J. A. Brace, 212, 825 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America.—President, Alex Simpson; Secretary-
Treasurer, William Morrice, 4535 Rupert Street,
Vancouver.
Grocery and Food Clerks' Union, Retail, No. 1518.
—President, Jack Laffling; Secretary-Treasurer,
George Johnston, 1311 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Guards' and Watchmen's Union, United, No. 7.—
President, S. Bozman; Secretary, W. MacCub-
bin, 544 Eighteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Harbour Employees' Association, Vancouver. —
President, James D. Kennedy; Secretary, Cyril
M. Hampton, 1011 Richelieu Avenue, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 117
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers'
Union, International, No. 602.—President, Seth
Burnley; Secretary, Hans Jorgenson, 786 Hastings Street East, Vancouver.
Hospital Employees' Union, Vancouver, No. 180.—
President, C.Jenkinson; Secretary, Alex Pater-
son,  192  Eighteenth  Avenue  West,  Vancouver.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, No. 28.—
President, Emily Watts; Secretary, May Ansell,
304, 413 Granville  Street, Vancouver.
Jewelry Workers' Union, International, No. 42.—
President, E. R. Hawken; Recording Secretary,
W. L. Routley, 2747 Eighteenth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue,
West Vancouver.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire, and
Metal, No. 207.—President, T. Vaughan; Secretary, T. Crane, 222 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' International Union, No. 292.
—President, K. R.Forbes; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. H. Irving, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 12.
—President, William Lauder; Secretary-Treasurer, John Cass, 426 Seventeenth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Library Staff Association, Vancouver Public, No.
7. — President, Elizabeth Musto; Secretary,
Marlys Middleditch, 1224 Fifteenth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, No. 44.—
President, Frank Phipps; Secretary, George
Tennant, 2538 Twtenty-fourth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
38/163. — President, A. E. Smith; Secretary-
Treasurer, James Darwood, 2049 Kitchener
Street, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 501.—President, W. E. Henderson; Secretary-Treasurer, R. H. Clewley, 660
Jackson Avenue, Vancouver.
Lumber Inspectors' Union, B.C. Division.—President, S. C. Dowling; Secretary-Treasurer,
D. McR. Nelson, 2996 Fifth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 182.
—President, H. A. Miller; Recording Secretary,
J. Bygate, 1784 Seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 692.
—President, J. A. McCarthy; Secretary, H.
Fishman, 2633 Fourth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Mailers' Union, Vancouver, No. 70. — President,
William E. Campbell; Secretary-Treasurer,
R. Gordon Taylor, 1176 Duchess Avenue, Holly-
burn P.O.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 167.—Secretary-Treasurer, P. J. Doyle, 3631
Trafalgar Street, Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 210.—Secretary-Treasurer, R. Halliday, 3383
Pender  Street  East, Vancouver.
Malkin, W. H., Co., Ltd., Warehousemen's and
Truck Drivers'Association.—President, W. Doig;
Secretary-Treasurer, James E. Fowler, 1923
Waterloo Road, Vancouver.
Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial
Union, No. 1.—President, William L. White;
Secretary-Treasurer, Malcolm MacLeod, 3518
Fraser Street, Vancouver.
Marshall-Wells Employees' Association. — President, E. Curling; Secretary, Miss I. Rudd, 3520
Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Meat Employees' Federal Union, Retail No. 222.—
President, James Long; Secretary-Treasurer,
George Johnston, 1311 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Merchant Service Guild, Inc., Canadian.—President, Capt. J. S. Dennis; Secretary, G. F. Bullock, 675 Dunsmuir  Street, Vancouver.
Metal and Chemical Workers' Union, No. 289.—
President, J. L. Irvine; Financial Secretary,
David Kirkwood, 157 Salsbury Drive, Vancouver.
Milk Drivers' and Dairy Employees' Union, No.
464.—President, R. McCulloch; Secretary-Treasurer, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver. .
Municipal Employees' Association, West Vancouver, No. 13.—President, Frank H. Bonar; Secretary, H. T. Thomas, 1508 Duchess Avenue, West
Vancouver.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 145.—
President, William Pilling; Secretary, Edward
A. Jamieson, Suite 51, 553 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Ltd., Employees'
Association.—President, K. H. Burnett; Secretary, Frank Taylor, 99 Cordova Street East,
Vancouver.
Nabob Food Products, Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, S. Brodie; Secretary, J. E.
Brown, 7767 Heather Street, Vancouver.
National Biscuit and Confection Co., Ltd., Employees' Committee of. — President, Leslie J.
Gavet; Secretary, Doris Holden, 1191 Seventy-
second Avenue West, Vancouver.
*Native Brotherhood of B.C.—President, William
D. Scow; General Secretary, Herbert Cook,
Alert Bay.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, No. 1.—President,
Fraser Wilson; Secretary, Miss E. Tomich,
1656 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, No. 2.—President,
Barry Mather; Secretary, Mrs. J. M. King, 1031
Bidwell  Street,  Vancouver.
Office Employees' International Union, No. 15.—
President, Miss W. Williams; Secretary, Mrs.
O. Vaughn, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Office and Professional Workers' Organizing Committee, No. 8.—President, T. Simington; Secretary, Mrs. M. Bradley, 1851 Adanac Street,
Vancouver.
Office and Professional Workers of America,
United, No. 173.—President, John Dedrick; Secretary, John J. Gelegan, 2033 Seventh Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Office and Professional Workers of America, No.
229.—President, Mrs. Kathleen Erickson; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Ellen Borden, 580 Sixteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Oil Workers' Union, United, No. 1.—President,
Alex McKenzie; Secretary-Treasurer, George C.
Smith, 308  South Delta Avenue, Vancouver.
Oil Workers' Union, United, No. 2.—President,
Alexander McLeod; Secretary-Treasurer, Samuel McLeod, 247 Fourth Street West, North
Vancouver.
* Sixty-seven   branches   in   British   Columbia    (1945
returns). K 118
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
162.—President, H. Jowett; Recording Secretary, J. Longmuir, 3727 Douglas Road, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
249.—President, James Bury; Secretary, Ernest
B. Cross, 4459 Eton Street, Vancouver,
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
283.—President, George Home; Secretary, May
Harvey, 4245  Beatrice  Street, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
341.—President G. Harding; Recording Secretary, Joe Pausche, 1617 Parker Street, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No.
350.—President, R. Lucy; Secretary, Jessie
Ainswdrth, 807 Fifty-fifth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, No. 138.—President, Bruce
Mitchell; Secretary, W. E. Eaton, 39 Fortieth
Avenue  West,  Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of America, No. 1550.—President, A. Haschiet; Recording Secretary, Miss A. Lenius, 1340 Howe
Street,  Vancouver.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
528.—President, R. H. Dalzell; Secretary, Caroline Whitfield, 813 Hornby Street, Vancouver.
Photo-engravers' Union, Vancouver, No. 54.—
President, Earl F. Lewis; Secretary, Edwin
David, 58 Lancaster Crescent, Sea Island, Vancouver.
Pile Drivers', Bridge, Wharf, and Dock Builders'
Union, No. 2404.—President, C. Anderson; Secretary,  S.  C. Allan,  P.O.  Box  369, Vancouver.
Plasterers' and Cement Finishers' International
Association, Operative, No. 779.—President, A.
Hurry; Secretary-Treasurer, H. West, 3419
Twenty-third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United
States and Canada, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices, No. 170.—President,
Jack Dillabough; Secretary, F. Carlisle, 426
Fifty-fourth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Policemen's Federal Labour Union, No. 12, City.—
President, Fred Dougherty; Secretary-Treasurer, T. Collishaw, 236 Cordova Street East,
Vancouver.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Vancouver, No. 69.—President, Max Erenberg;
Secretary-Treasurer, Thomas S. Ezart, 1807
Thirty-eighth Avenue  East,  Vancouver.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 443, Vancouver
Converters.— President, Orville Braaten;
Recording Secretary, Charles T. Gillard, 3640
Nootka Street, Vancouver.
Radio Station Employees' Union, No. 1, Vancouver.—President, A. G. Miller; Secretary, Miss
M. Fraser, 3084 Twenty-seventh Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144.—
President, William Pennington; Secretary,
Edwin S. West, 4197 Eleventh Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 987.—
President, E. F. Marsden; Secretary, A. Pela-
deau, 6129 St.  Catherines Street, Vancouver.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
No. 58.—President, Robert Learmond; Recording Secretary, S. S. Shearer, 2256 Twenty-
second Avenue  West, Vancouver.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
No. 773.—President, W. Tucker; Recording
Secretary, W. R. Ryan, 4233 Fourteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Railway Conductors, Order of No. 267.—President,
A. S. Emms; Secretary, J. B. Physick, 4153
Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 59.—President,
H. Strange; Secretary, W. Campbell, 4230
Beatrice Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 82.—President,
H. H. Prior; Secretary, A. P. Smith, 3446
Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 162.—President,
E. H. Vance; Secretary, L. D. Meadowcroft,
4143 Pender Street East, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 220.—President,
L. C. Crossley; Secretary, A. E. Fraser, 625
Nineteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 221.—President,
P. Jones; Secretary, L. Villeneuve, S.S. Prince
Rupert, C.N.S., Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 223.—President,
James M. Coldwell; Recording Secretary, S.
Cowieson, 4348 St. Catherine Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 275.—President,
William Fruet; Secretary, Anne Holubetz, 1556
Comox   Street,  Vancouver.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association, Vancouver.—■
President, J. C. Bate; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. H. Menzies, 3772 Twenty-third Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 74.—
General Secretary-Treasurer, D. B. Roberts,
216 Avenue Building, Winnipeg, Man.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 46.—President, W. J. Smith; Secretary-
Treasurer, C. H. Alexander, 978 Alberta Road,
Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 626.—President, G. H. Stubbs; Secretary, William Colville, 3290 Main Street, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 630.—President, A. Gordon; Recording
Secretary, T. W. Kirby, 3566 Triumph Street,
Vancouver.
Refrigeration Workers' Union, No. 516.—President, D. D. Forrister; Secretary-Treasurer,
L. R. Wintle, 137 Fortieth Avenue West, Vancouver.
St. Paul's Hospital Employees' Club.—President,
J. S. Johnston; Secretary, Miss Jeanette
McCourt, 922 Burrard  Street, Vancouver.
Seafarers' Association, Canadian.—President, H.
Taylor; Secretary, C. Smillie, 405 Powell
Street, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 119
Seafarers' International Union of North America.
—President, Harry Lundebert; Secretary, Hugh
Murphy, 2450 Heather Street, Vancouver.
Seamen's Union, Canadian (Pacific Coast District).—President, J. S. Thompson; Business
Agent, J. M. Smith, 53 Powell Street, Vancouver.
Sewerage and Drainage Board Employees' Union,
Greater Vancouver Water District and Joint,
No. 2.—President, E. L. McLaren; Secretary,
J. M. Morrison, 4573 First Avenue West, Vancouver.
Sheet-metal Workers' International Association,
No. 280.—President, F. Cocker; Secretary,
0. K. Sherry, 1608 Fell Avenue, North Vancouver.
Shingle Weavers' Union, No. 2802.—President,
Louis Cummings; Secretary, Alex Low, 1184
Seventy-third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Shoe, Leather, and Tannery Workers' Union, No.
505.—President, George Wood; Secretary, J. A.
Plumridge, 1007 Pacific Street, Vancouver.
Sign and Pictorial Painters' Union, No. 726.—
President, T. Goodwin; Secretary, William O.
Clarkson,  5802 Larch Street, Vancouver.
Slade, A. P., & Co., Ltd., and Associated Companies Employees' Association. — President,
George McVey; Secretary, Marguerite Cooper,
3530 First Avenue West, Vancouver.
Spear & Jackson's Employees' Club.—President,
M. Wilson; Secretary-Treasurer, D. R. Alexander, 4055 Dundas Street, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2655.—
President, E. Cockriell; Secretary, P. Baskin,
905 Dominion  Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2765.—
President, Cy Kemp; Secretary, John Bell, 905
Dominion Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2821.—
President, J. Blownski; Secretary, G. C. Emary,
905 Dominion Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2952.—
President, B. Christie; Secretary, J. Stephenson, 905 Dominion Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3229.—
President, F. Rowland; International Representative, P. Baskin, 905 Dominion Building,
Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3253.—
President, F. Douglas; Secretary, George Curly,
905  Dominion   Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3302.—
President, S. Campbell; Secretary, E. Whyte,
2691 Fifth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 33T6.—
President, G. Cosh; Secretary, Douglas Reid,
905 Dominion Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3452.—
President, J. Gunn; Secretary, R. Symons, 905
Dominion  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3495.—
President, M. Gavrilik; Secretary, A. W.
Edwards, 905 Dominion Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3546.—
President, E. M. Orr; Secretary, W. Elder, 1568
Eighth  Avenue  East, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3910.—
President, L. Coombes; Secretary, F. H. Carroll, 905  Dominion  Building, Vancouver.
Stereotypers and Electrotypers Union, International, No. 88.—President, R. N. Miles; Secretary,  E. Preston, 5507 Elm  Street, Vancouver.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, Pioneer Division No. 101.—President, Lloyd
Easier; Secretary, Alfred Jennings, 619 Thirty-
first Avenue East, Vancouver.
Sugar Workers, Industrial Union of, No. 1.—
President, M. H. Webster; Secretary-Treasurer,
C. Burke, 3925 Pandora Street, Vancouver.
Switchmen's Union of North America, No. 111.—
President, W. J. Inglis; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. S. Grossan, 3925 Fourteenth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Tailors of America, Journeymen, No. 178.—President, H. Clausner; Secretary, A. Nuttall, 4318
Trafalgar Street, Vancouver.
Taxicab, Stage, and Bus Drivers' Union, No. 151.
—President, C. E. Youngs; Secretary, C. A.
Gower, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
*Teachers' Federation, British Columbia.—President, C. J. Oates; General Secretary, C. D.
Ovans, 1300 Robson Street, Vancouver.
Telegraphers' Union, Commercial. — President,
I. R. Burns; Secretary-Treasurer, Phyllis Mc-
Cline, 1625 Nelson Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division). — President, T. Reilly; Secretary,
C. W. Mellish, 904 Twenty-first Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Telephone Workers-of B.C., Federation of (Clerical Division).—President, F. Perkins; Secretary, E. L. Mallett, 1689 Fifteenth Street, West
Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No. 10
(Traffic Division).—President, Miss Elvine Benson; Secretary, Mrs. Edna Robinson, 2974
Fortieth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No.
1-30 (Plant Division).—President, A. Pollard;
Secretary, C. Card, 1569 Gravely Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No. 14
(Traffic Cafeteria Branch).—President, Mrs. M.
Beattie; Secretary, Miss Lorena Asher, 326
Fifty-sixth  Avenue  East,  Vancouver.
Textile Federal Union, Vancouver, No. 12.—President, Mrs. B. Hayman; Secretary, Norman W.
Scott, 78 Second Avenue East, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees of United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, No. 118.—
President, Gordon Martin; Recording Secretary, Walter Blake, P.O. Box 711, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture
Machine Operators of the United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, No. 348.—
President, R. G. Pollock; Secretary, G. E.
Thrift, 2722 Thirty-fourth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Tile, Marble Setters' Helpers' and Terraza Workers' Helpers' Union, No. 78.—President, R. A.
Murphy; Secretary, T. R. Rouson, 8419 Frem-
lin Street, Vancouver.
Tile Setters' Union, B.C., No. 3.—President, T.
Anderson; Recording Secretary, W. Richards,
Pleasantside.
Truck Drivers and Helpers, General, No. 31.—
President, William M. Brown; Secretary, R. D.
Atkinson, 4313 Perry Street, Vancouver.
* There are fifty-five branches of the Federation in
British Columbia. K 120
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Trunk and Bag Industrial Workers' Union, No. 1,
Vancouver.—President, M. Sheldrake; Secretary, R. Petrie, 749 Sixteenth Street East, Vancouver.
Typographical Union, Vancouver, No. 226.—President, R. Gouthro; Secretary-Treasurer, R. H.
Neelands, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
University of British Columbia Employees' Federal Union, No. 116.—President, M. A. McCoy;
Recording Secretary, A. C. Hill, 4474 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Upholsterers' Industrial Union, Vancouver, No. 1.
—President, T. S. Paterson; Secretary, W.
Bleackley, 700 Georgia Street West, Vancouver.
Woodworkers' Union, B.C., No. 2.—President, N.
Sadler; Secretary-Treasurer, C. E. Roughsedge,
1365  Twenty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-71.
—President, N. C. Madsen; Secretary, John
McCuish, 204 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-217.—President, Vern Carlyle; Secretary,
Mrs. G. Shunaman, 409 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Vanderhoof.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1870.—President, G. P. Whitfield; Secretary, J. Wall, McCall, via Vanderhoof.
Vernon.
Civic Employees' Union, Vernon, No. 1.—President, John R. Stroud; Secretary-Treasurer,
William Baxter, P.O. Box 1036, Vernon.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Federation
of.—President, J. E. Gray; Secretary, Mrs.
M. M. Atwood, Box 1231, Vernon.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. U. Holt; Secretary, Miss
Nancy Bowen, Vernon.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue, West
Vancouver.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 2861.—
President, W. G. Foster; Recording Secretary,
J. E. Beck, P.O. Box 1104, Vernon.
Mechanics' and Associated Workers' Union, Interior General, No. 1.—President, Richard De-
Wolf; Secretary-Treasurer, E. Werner Hart-
man, 606 Seventh Street, Vernon.
Telephone Company Plant Employees' Association, Okanagan.—President, A. B. Edwards;
Secretary-Treasurer, George B. Carter, Box
121, Vernon.
Telephone Operators' Union, Interior, No. 1.—
President, Miss N. Forbes; Secretary, Miss M.
Poole, Box 453, Kelowna.
Typographical Union, Vernon, No. 541.—President, Donald Campbell; Secretary-Treasurer,
W. B. Hilliard, Box 272, Penticton.
Victoria.
Automotive Workers' Federal Union, Victoria, No.
151. — President, F. Nelson; Secretary-Treasurer, W. J. Frampton, 1 Maddock Avenue, Victoria.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, No. 267.—President, John F.
Litster; Secretary-Treasurer, S. V. Jensen, 60
View Royal Avenue, Victoria.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
372.—President, George A. Turner; Secretary-
Treasurer, B. J. Frankling, 1217 Broad Street,
Victoria.
Barbers' Union, Canadian, No. 2. — President,
W. D. Taylor; Secretary, J. C. Macrimmon,
2006 Oak Bay Avenue, Victoria.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association (Victoria and Island Branch).—President, W. E.
Holland; Secretary, Miss M. D. MacNeill, 2276
Cadboro Bay Road, Victoria.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
147. — President, R. Barnes; Secretary, R.
Foster, 1431 Richardson Street, Victoria.
Brewery and Soft Drink Workers of America,
International Union of United, No. 280.—President, J. H. Allan; Secretary-Treasurer, W. E.
Bryan, 2642 Scott Street, Victoria.
Bricklayers', Masons', and Plasterers' International Union, No. 2.—President, D. Mertton;
Secretary-Treasurer, J. Beckerley, 3965 Saanich
Road, Victoria.
Building and Construction Workers of Canada,
Amalgamated, No. 9. — President, Norman
Booth; Secretary-Treasurer, Charles S. C.
Simpson, 1317 Pembroke Street, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1598.—President, R. E. Hill;
Secretary, Alex Sims, 1158 May Street, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2415.—President, S. Berrow;
Secretary, E. Hovey, 2511 Empire Street, Victoria.
Chemical and Explosive Workers' Industrial Federal Union, No. 128, Canadian.—President, Robert Barrie; Secretary-Treasurer, Herbert S.
Rowland, 1214 Palmer Road, Victoria.
City Hall Employees' Association, No. 4.—President, C. M. Parrott; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
Katherine Rowe, 2323 Wark Street, Victoria.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, No. 50.—
President, Reginald Betts; Secretary, William
Gelling, 1209 Princess Avenue, Victoria.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, L. Fieldhouse; Secretary, G. K. Beeston,
314 Post-office Building, Victoria.
Construction and General Labourers' Union, No.
1093.—President, Thomas C. Shaw; Secretary,
Harry Church, 822 Lampson Street, Esquimalt.
Defence Civilian Workers' Union, National, No.
129.—President, F. R. Moore; Secretary-Treasurer, O. Jowett, 489 Garbally Road, Victoria.
Drivers' Division, No. 234, Vancouver Island.—
President, R. Jones; Secretary, J. Ready, 714
Powderly Avenue, Victoria.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. B 230.—President, C. A. Peck; Financial
Secretary, F. J. Bevis, 602 Broughton Street,
Victoria.
Engineers of Canada, Inc., National Association
of Marine.—President, W. Hichens-Smith; Secretary-Treasurer, G. W. Brown, 53 Lewis Street,
Victoria.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20.—
President, H. Wilkinson; Secretary-Treasurer,
F. E. Dutot, 2176 Pentland Road, Victoria.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No.
730.—President, J. A. Easton; Secretary, R. J.
Coates, 2609 Avebury Avenue, Victoria. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 121
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 690.—President, E. 0. Sommerville;
Financial Secretary, A. J. Thompsett, 1161 Bur-
dett Avenue, Victoria.
Garage Employees, Vancouver Island Coach Lines
Association.—President, Henry Woodford; Secretary, W. McAdams, 413 Obed Avenue, Victoria.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, H. G. Moore; Secretary, Miss
Kay Wilson, 873 Humboldt Street, Victoria.
Government Employees, American Federation of,
No. 59.—President, Thomas F. Monaghan, 205
Campbell Building, Victoria.
Guards' Union, Local No. 6.—President, R. B.
Helton; Secretary-Treasurer, W. A. Woods,
1115 Princess Avenue, Victoria.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance and Bartenders' International League
of America, No. 459.—Vice-President, Violet
Langlois; Secretary-Treasurer, Emily M. Aitken,
331 Huntington Place, Victoria.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, W. R. Thompson; Secretary-Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 2277 Kings Avenue, West
Vancouver.
Lathers' Association, Vancouver Island.—President, T. McKay; Secretary, A. J. Ferguson,
2751 Roseberry Avenue, Victoria.
Laundry Workers' Union, No. 1.—President, W.
Cool; Recording Secretary, W. G. Edwards,
1409 Taunton Street, Victoria.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 11.
—President, W. H. Rivers; Secretary, Fred C.
Hurry, 898 Front Street, Victoria.
Library Staff Association, Victoria Public.—President, Miss Nina Grieg; Secretary, Miss Diana
Hartshorne, 1209 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
38/162.—President, Gordon C. Richards; Secretary, W. N. Scott, 121 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 456.
—President, H. E. Thayer; Recording Secretary, C. H. Lester, 1286 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Mailers'    Union,    Victoria,    No.    121. — President,
James A. McCague;    Secretary, Christopher H.
-    Miller, 577 Michigan Street, Victoria.
Marine Workers', Machinists', and Boilermakers'
Industrial Union, No. 3.—President, S. W.
Daly; Secretary, W. A. S. Ashworth, 1389
Vista Heights, Victoria.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union, International, No. 144.—President, William Bohne;
Secretary, Sam Emery, 864 Old Esquimalt
Road, Victoria.
Municipal Employees' Association, Saanich, No. 5.
—President, Roy H. Wootten; Secretary, Peggy
Gillie, 1040 Tolmie Avenue, Victoria.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 247.—
President, Charles W. Hunt; Secretary, W. F.
Tickle, 628 Harbinger Avenue, Victoria.
Newspaper Guild Federal Union, No. 219, Victoria.—President, L. M. Sallaway; Secretary,
Helen Tooth, c/o Times Printing, Fort Street,
Victoria.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers, Brotherhood of, No. 1163.—President, L. Dewhurst;
Secretary, W. Brigden, 213 Helmcken Road,
Victoria.
Pantorium Employees' Association. ■— President,
Henry Reimer; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss M.
Davis, 117 St. Lawrence Street, Victoria.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
367.—President, J. L. Newbigging; Recording
Secretary, Ernest W. Parsons, 1257 Basil Avenue, Victoria.
Plasterers' and Cement Finishers' Union, Operative, No. 450.—President, E. E. Bartlett; Secretary, J. P. Bartlett, 191 Olive Street, Victoria.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United
States and Canada, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices, No. 324.—President,
James C. Woodend; Secretary, George Pyper,
1139 Balmoral Road, Victoria.
Police Mutual Benefit Association, Victoria.—
President, Stanley T. Holmes; Secretary, D. P.
Donaldson, 2537 Vancouver Street, Victoria.
Postal Employees, Canadian. — President, S. R.
Webb; Secretary-Treasurer, J. H. Hedley, 1166
Chapman Street, Victoria.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of
North America, No. 79, Victoria.—President, F.
Elliott; Secretary-Treasurer, F. H. Larssen,
1236 McKenzie Street, Victoria.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 613.—
President, H. C. Horner; Secretary, J. A. Stone,
1320 Burleith Drive, Victoria.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
50.—President, A. Lorandini; Recording Secretary, H. Greaves, 638 Victoria Avenue, Victoria.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 289.—President, J. W. Thomson; Secretary, James N.
Forde, 707 Wilson Street, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 222.—President, G. L. Woollett; Secretary, C. Irwin, c/o
C.N.R., Point Ellice, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 276.—President, O. Day; Secretary, R. Rawnsley, 1725
Oak Bay Avenue, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 526.—President, A, R. Davie; Secretary-
Treasurer, H. S. Hughes, 1022 Chamberlain
Street, Victoria. x
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1137.—President, James A. Miller; Secretary-Treasurer, C. H. Ormiston, 2542 Belmont
Avenue, Victoria.
School Board Employees' Association, Greater
Victoria.—President, Leonard Clark; Secretary,
R. W. Todd, 1449 Grant Street, Victoria.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association,
No. 276.—President, Lome W. Creighton; Financial Secretary, Charles Lewis, 866 Newport
Avenue, Victoria.
Shipyard Riggers, Benchmen, and Helpers, No.
643.—President, A. G. Sainsbury; Secretary,
A. W. Sage, 964 Dunsmuir Road, Victoria.
Shipwrights', Joiners', and Wood Caulkers' Industrial Union, No. 9.—President, N. D. Booth;
Business Agent, Don Douglas, 710 Cormorant
Street, Victoria.
Shipyard Workers' Federal Union, Victoria, No.
238.—President, J. G. Meadley; Secretary-Treasurer, A. Clyde, Fairfield Hotel, Victoria. K 122
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, Division No. 109. — President, Frank P.
French; Recording Secretary, W. Turner, 3060
Carrol Street, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No. 2
(Plant Division).—President, J. H. Potts; Secretary, W. H. Sturrock, ?63 Bushby Street, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No.
2-31.—President, G. T. Noble; Secretary, Miss
M. Rodger, 1331 Arm Street, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No. 11
(Traffic).—President, Miss A. Williamson; Secretary, Miss K. Slack, 611 Toronto Building,
Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No. 21
(Clerical Branch). — President, 0. G. Jones;
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss M. Harness, 1777
Hampshire Road, Victoria.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture
Machine Operators, No. 168.—President, Victor.
Henn; Secretary, R. E. Baiss, 1989 Crescent
Road, Victoria.
Typographical Union, Victoria, No. 201.—President, V. J. Baines; Secretary-Treasurer, H.
Warren, 2218 Beach Drive, Victoria.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-118.—President, R. Simmons; Financial Secretary, J. M. Wainscott, 24, 1116 Broad Street,
Victoria.
Wardner.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 229.—Secretary-Treasurer, G. Marra, Wardner, B.C.
Wells.
Miners' Union, Wells, No. 685. — President, J.
Purves; Recording Secretary, Spencer Daviers,
Box 221, Wells.
West Summerland.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2742 (Lumber and Sawmill
Workers' Union).—President, F. Burnell; Secretary-Treasurer, Claude Haddrell, General Delivery, West Summerland.
White Rock.
Fibre Flax Workers' Union, No. 1.—President,
Harry Manfield; Secretary-Treasurer, Dan
Lawson, White Rock.
Woodfibre.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 494.—President,
Stanley G. Green; Secretary, Andrew S.
Knowles, Jr., Woodfibre.
Zeballos.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Zeballos District,
No.   851.—President,   Paul   Gagnon;    Financial
Secretary, Harry Clement, Zeballos. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 123
Organizations of Employers.
Calgary.
Bituminous Coal Operators' Association, The
Western Canada.—President, J. A. Brusset;
Secretary-Treasurer, C. Stubbs, 516, 520 Loug-
head Building, Calgary, Alta.
Kelowna.
Shippers' Association, Inc., Okanagan Federated.
—President, F. L. Fitzpatrick; Secretary-Manager, L. R. Stephens, Kelowna.
Penticton.
Co-operative Growers, Penticton.—President, John
Coe; Secretary-Treasurer, D. G. Penny, Penticton.
Prince Rupert.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of B.C., Canadian Halibut.—President, Barney Roald; Secretary, Ole Stegavig, Box 1025, Station B, Prince
Rupert.
Vancouver.
Automotive Transport Association of B.C.—President, H. Roy Davis; Secretary, George Butler,
Box 1052, Haney.
Bakers' Association, B.C.—President, B. M. Col-
well; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, Master.—President, B. M.
Colwell; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Box Manufacturers' Section, Interior (CM.A.).—
Chairman, J. G. Strother; Secretary, Hugh
Dalton, 608 Marine Building, Vancouver.
Building and Construction Industries Exchange.
—President, J. G. Bennett; Secretary, R. J.
Lecky, 342 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Contractors' Association, General. — President,
R. C. Pybus; Secretary, R. J. Lecky, 342 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Electrical Association, Vancouver.—President, R.
Beaumont; Secretary, J. S. Homersham, 1358
Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of B.C.—President, 0. J. Hansen; Secretary, C. D. Clarke,
138 Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
Hotels' Association, British Columbia.—President,
A. Paterson; Treasurer, H. Evans, Devonshire
Hotel, Vancouver.
Industrial Association of B.C.—President, W. L.
Machen; Secretary, Miss M. M. Riley, 1024
Marine Building, Vancouver.
Jewellers' Association, Canadian (B.C. Section).—
President, J. A. Porterfield; Secretary, A.
Fraser Reid, 1635 Napier Street, Vancouver.
Laundry, Dry Cleaning, and Linen Supply Club,
Vancouver.—President, A. Christopher; Secretary-Treasurer, W. L. Russell, 1919 Pine Street,
Vancouver.
Loggers' Association, Inc., British Columbia.—
Chairman, R. J. Fiberg; Secretary, J. Burke,
1518, 510 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, Interior
(C.M.A.).—Chairman, C. G. McMynn; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 608 Marine Building, Vancouver.
Respectfully submitted.
Lumbermen's Association, Northern Interior
(Prince George) (C.M.A.).—Chairman, C. T.
Clare; General Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 608
Marine Building, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association,
B.C.—President, B. M. Ferris; Secretary, T. H.
Wilkinson, 718 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.
Metal Trades' Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association.—President, A. J. McDonall; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, Metal Trades Section, 608
Marine Building, Vancouver.
Milk Producers' Association, Fraser Valley. —
President, W. L. Macken; Secretary, J. J.
Brown, Surrey Centre.
Milk Producers' Association, Vancouver.—President, D. F. Farris; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199
Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Morticians, B.C. Society of. — President, D. E.
Nunn; Secretary, F. J. Harding, 2216 Fifteenth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Plastering and Lathing Contractors' Association,
Greater Vancouver.—President, William Smith;
Secretary-Treasurer, George A. Skinner, 4865
Fairmont Street, Vancouver.
Printers' and Stationers'Guild of B.C.—Chairman,
C. E. Phillips; Secretary, Audrey Parkinson,
608, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Red Cedar Shingle Association of B.C., Consolidated.—President, W. H. McLallen; Secretary,
G. S. Raphel, 509 Metropolitan Building, 837
Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Restaurant Association, Canadian.—President, N.
Bailey; Secretary, F. D. Paterson, 33 Adelaide
Street West, Toronto.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.—
President, W. S. Charlton; Secretary-Treasurer,
George R. Matthews, 218 Pacific Building, Vancouver.
Shipping Federation of British Columbia.—President, H. A. Stevenson; Treasurer, J. K. Cavers,
991 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Truck Loggers' Association. — President, O. A.
Buck; Secretary-Treasurer, F. H. Adames, 410
Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Upholstered Furniture Manufacturing Association, B.C.—President, Henry E. Tynan; Secretary-Treasurer, J. M. Richardson, 626 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Victoria.
Bakers' Association, Victoria Master.—President,
J. P. Land; Secretary, T. P. McConnell, 120
Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Beer Licensees Employers' Association. — President, A. Mawer; Secretary, R. S. Yates, 613
Central Building, Victoria.
Builders' Exchange, Ltd., Victoria. — President,
V. L. Leigh; Secretary, Roy T. Lougheed, P.O.
Box 608, Victoria.
Electrical Association, Victoria (B.C.). — President, W. C. Lewis; Secretary-Treasurer, A. R.
Colby, 645 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Taxi Operators' Association of Greater Victoria.—
President, M. J. de La Mothe; Secretary-Treasurer, L. C. Wakeman, 722 View Street, Victoria.
B. H. E. Goult,
Chief Executive Officer. K 124 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., July 12th, 1947.
Mr. James Thomson,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection Branch for
the calendar year 1946.
The closing months of the year under review saw many changes in the personnel
of the Department; the retirement on superannuation of Herbert Douglas, Chief
Inspector, and his assistant, W. F. Ironside. Mr. Douglas had been with the Department for some thirty-three years, and through his efforts much was accomplished
regarding the necessity of providing the workers (both men and women) who risk their
lives, health, or sight in the service of industry with the highest degree of protection.
We all wish Mr. Douglas and Mr. Ironside long life, health, and happiness, and may they
both be spared long to enjoy them.
During the war years British Columbia developed from a Province which had as its
basic industries lumbering, mining, and fishing to third place in Canada as a manufacturing Province. War-time expansion created a new economic situation, brought new
industries into being, introduced new processes, and developed new uses for raw
materials through new industrial processes, new chemicals, new poisons, and new uses
for old ones.
Under pressure of war-time demand the processing of many of the products of
basic industries, which had formerly been exported from the Province, was undertaken;
extensive research was engaged in, and by-products were produced and manufactured
for war purposes; at the same time a very large number of secondary industries were
developed on a large scale.
Small and heavy machinery, welding, and metal-working plants which had existed
in pre-war days to serve the local demand were expanded to handle major war contracts.
With the termination of hostilities this work naturally ceased, but long before this
many of these plants were planning their post-war program, with the result that the
past year witnessed the completion of reconversion in industry from war-time to peacetime production. The transition was effected almost without precipitable dislocation.
To-day plants which were engaged in the production of army and navy equipment,
ship-building, etc., and many other war-time products are producing toys, electrical
appliances, office and industrial equipment, and heavy machinery.
It is true there were some major lay-offs, as for instance in aeroplane production
and in the shipyards. In the case of the former it was not anticipated that industry
could carry on on any substantial scale after the war. The same thing was more or less
true of ship-building, but the extent to which employment and production have been
maintained in these yards, on new construction, reconversion, and on repair-work, has
been extremely gratifying.
In the shipyards one fact has been amply demonstrated, namely, that the skills
developed during the war, and the general efficiency built up, have enabled the concerns
to bid successfully in many cases, thereby guaranteeing continued employment in many
other industries. This was due in part to the type of war-work carried on during the
war years, which made it possible to use equipment and develop skills for that purpose
in the production of peace-time requirements.
In other plants the same skills employed in making winches, boilers, and the like
were naturally diverted to making sawmill and logging equipment, mining, pulp and
paper machinery, and similar lines. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 125
In the sawmills and plywood plants there was no reconversion problem whatever,
the only problem being to supply the unlimited demand for lumber and lumber products
in all forms for reconstruction and new construction both at home and abroad.
Very definite proof of the confidence held in the future industrial development of
British Columbia is seen in the power expansion program of this Province, the erection
of a new sulphite paper-mill on Vancouver Island, and the extensive development in the
food-processing, heavy machinery, and the pulp and paper industries, which all plan
large expansions. It is impossible to enumerate all the firms that are engaging in
industrial expansion, but these are by no means confined to the heavy industrial group.
In reviewing the development of industry in British Columbia, it must be remembered that working conditions in British Columbia are the most favourable of any part
of Canada. Labour legislation in British Columbia is more advanced than elsewhere
in the Dominion, and a 44-hour working-week has already been legally established in
the Province. Confidence prevails, but lack of equipment is the major delay factor in
the launching of many additional expansions in all fields of industrial activity.
The regular work of this Department is being continued with renewed effort to
reduce accidents, to lessen the incidences of occupational disease, to extend and improve
canteen service, and to bring about the application of new ideas concerning ventilation
and adequate lighting. No part of the work of this Department is of more immediate
importance for the well-being of workers in all branches of industry than that which
concerns the protection of life and limb, and to see that all the factories of this Province
are a safe place in which to earn a livelihood. ,
Before taking up in detail the work of the Department, I think it would be well to
explain our present administrative machinery. The Department has two Inspectors.
During the year we visited all places coming under our jurisdiction, but the territory
being large, it could not be covered thoroughly in the time at our disposal, and owing
to the rapidly increasing number of new firms, the correspondence and interviews
increased considerably. Additional staff will be needed during the coming year to
properly inspect the increasing number of factories, from the standpoint of efficiency
in our inspection-work.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1946, 2,300 inspections and reinspections of factories were made.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
During the year, factory inspection-work to some extent was beginning to settle
down to peace-time activities, but materials and labour were still scarce, and worn-out
or out-of-date equipment and buildings were being used. Nevertheless, the lessons
learned and the advances made during the war were not being forgotten or lost. Hours
were reduced, safety organizations in factories were extended and improved.
Engineering for safe plant operation consists essentially of preparing a safe
environment for the workman. While there may be differences of opinion as to methods
employed, the environment should be designed to match and to compensate for the
limitations of human capability.
On the other hand, the workman must understand his personal responsibilities
regarding acts which might conceivably cause injury to himself or others, and carefully
follow plant safety regulations. The admirable activities of these organizations and
individuals interested in the promotion of safety are successfully implanting the sense
of responsibility in the individual workman.
Inspection visits are made for the purpose of assisting management to obtain this
objective for the well-being of workmen in all branches of industry. We note with
satisfaction that designers of modern machinery are meeting with a largf measure of
success in their efforts to build safety into their machines. K 126 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
 *	
Built-in protection may be defined as any device or provision which is part of the
plant and helps to prevent accidents. The definition should include plant layout, guards
on moving parts, all handrails, toe-guards, non-slip flooring or stair-treads, or anything,
in fact, which tends to reduce dependence on safety rules and personal alertness.
Adequate illumination and effective use of colour, while not generally classed as
mechanical guarding, are, in fact, built-in and help to make a safe plant.
Training along broad lines will give the best results—training that will give a
knowledge of the scope of the work of the factory, and thus arouse interest in their
own particular jobs. Accident rate among boys can be curbed by adequate and proper
supervision; unsafe work practices can be discovered and satisfactorily corrected only
by watchfulness and painstaking training and education, and no person is in a better
position than the plant supervisor or foreman to achieve these results—the training of
men and women in safe and efficient habits.
Many serious injuries occur by failure to wear personal-protection equipment,
such as goggles, safety-shoes, and proper work-clothing.
When there is danger of contact with working parts of machinery, the clothing of
workmen should fit closely about the body, arms, and legs. Sweaters which are loose-
fitting about the body or arms, dangling neckwear, rings, bracelets, wrist-watches, or
like articles should not be worn, and unless the hair is cut short, it should be completely
confined by a cap or other suitable headgear.
Entirely different are the causes of eye injuries. A small piece of flying steel or a
splash tof a drop of acid is, as a rule, unimportant when encountered by other parts of
the body—but how dangerous when lodged in the eye. Wear goggles where they are
called for—never take a chance on eye injuries. Much education is still required
before some industrial workers will realize from bitter experience that a glass eye does
not restore their vision or enhance their personal appearance.
Adequate protective footwear can make an appreciable reduction in the number of
accidents. Two-thirds of these would not cause much injury if the feet were protected.
This protection consists of a specially designed toe-cap made of high-grade spring steel
built into an ordinary work-boot as a protection from vehicles and falling articles.
Also, the right clothing, the right tools, the right precautions, and the right attitude
mean a job done the right way—the safe way.
The prevention of industrial accidents is now generally accepted as a sound business
policy. When confronted directly with the necessity for action, difficulty is often
experienced in selecting practical procedure. What shall be done first? Hold safety
meeting, post safety bulletins, give timely safety talks, conduct accident-prevention
campaigns, make job-safety analyses, furnish protection equipment, or shall still other
means be selected? If all these things are done at once, is not the effort likely to be
spread too thinly to be effective? On the other hand, if only one or few of these are
done, is there not the danger of missing that which is most in need of attention?
If the work of accident-prevention is to be conducted effectively and economically,
it is clear that more time should be expended, on the elimination of the preponderant
supervisory causes of accidents rather than to give so great a percentage of time and
effort to causes that have relatively less bearing upon accident occurrence. It is
advisable to say that general education by means of safety organization meetings and
literature play an important part in accident-prevention. In developing a program for
accident-prevention, the same consideration entering the planning for efficient operation
must be taken into account. Conditions peculiar to the job in question must be weighed.
These factors, together with various standard operation procedures, can be used as
a foundation on which to build rules and regulations for accident-prevention. Workers
often accept danger and exposure to injury as part of their job. They are apt to
minimize the value or need of protection and often take needless chances. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 127
The development of a program for accident-prevention requires vision, imagination,
hindsight, and foresight. Hindsight is the ability to draw upon past experiences,
training, and imagination to assist in visualizing those accident causes to be avoided.
It involves listing mentally the operations or jobs done in the past where conditions
encountered were productive of accidents. Foresight is the ability to use the hindsight
in predicting or forecasting conditions which might possibly lead to accidents.
We are accustomed to the idea of a safety director and a safety program constantly
working for a" better accident record, advising the workers of safe methods and
hazardous conditions, building up a consciousness of responsibility on every worker's
part for safe practices. Safety is the joint responsibility of labour and management.
Hazards can be recognized, and a definite program for accident-prevention should be
fitted into the production schedule.
A planned program will produce results, increase production, and decrease accidents. Unsafe acts cause more injuries by far than unguarded machines. Good habits
cannot be formed in a minute nor in an hour. Their application in the process of work
must be repeatedly pointed out until they become integrated with the job.
Many workers remove guards, oil, clean, or adjust machinery while in motion,
clutter up work areas and use unsafe tools in unsafe ways, and violate other safety-
practice rules. The possibility of injury exists in all work activities, and it becomes
important to understand and control all work behaviour in the interest of safety. Time
gained at the expense of accidents is no bargain. The best practical method of developing this attitude is a continuous habit-forming, thought-provoking program of education
and training.
LIGHTING FOR SAFETY.
As regards good lighting, now recognized as an important factor in preventing
unrest, fatigue, and accidents, this is but one phase of the safety problem. All personal-
injury accidents involve a combination of personal and mechanical causes.
The chain of circumstances or series of causes which have brought a workman to
the verge of an injury frequently can be broken only if the workman can see quickly
and accurately the cause, and hence act to prevent the accident. Any factor which aids
seeing will increase the probability that the workman will detect the cause and act to
avert it.
It is realized that with rapidly moving material, mechanical failures often result
in accidents occurring too rapidly for any reaction on the part of the workman. However, mechanical failures of this nature are usually preceded by evidence of the
existence of undue stresses or strains, which may be detected if sufficient illumination
is provided.
The close correlation between the personal-injury rate and illumination is not
generally understood. In most cases where accidents are attributed to poor illumination, they occur because there is improper quality of illumination or practically no
illumination at all. Poor or indifferent lighting as a contributing cause of accidents
(even though it provides a measurable quality of light) has been overlooked by most
people.
Many accidents are also caused by delayed eye adaptation when coming from bright
surroundings into dark interiors. Frequently accidents which are attributed to the
individual carelessness can actually be traced to difficulty of seeing.
A uniform level of general lighting makes possible the most efficient arrangement
of machinery and conveyers, and better utilization of floor-space. Manufacturers have
discovered that more work can be achieved with less floor-space when the work flows in
straight lines through assembly or inspection section. Good lighting facilitates such
proper arrangements of the work and practically eliminates the likelihood of crowding. K 128 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Very frequently the older employee is well fitted physically and mentally for the
responsible work for which his years of experience have prepared him. In many cases,
however, failing vision will prevent such an employee from carrying on exacting work,
and thus he is relegated to simple routine tasks in which his experience is of little
value. It should not be construed that good lighting is of assistance only to the older
employee. Thirty-nine per cent, of all workers of 30 years of age are visually handicapped. It also aids all the visually handicapped to a greater extent than those with
perfect vision, but even those in the latter group find, under good lighting, a noticeable
improvement in eye comfort, which results in reduced fatigue.
There is also an important psychological effect connected with cheerful, pleasant,
noiseless working surroundings as compared to the dim, gloomy interiors which were
formerly so prevalent. In addition to the more cheerful appearance of a well-lighted
interior, many minor frustrations due to poor lighting which continually harass the
workman, such as difficulty in reading scales and micrometers, finding the proper drills
or other tools, are eliminated.
All industry has found that cleanliness invariably pays. Poor illumination makes
it difficult to see into corners or under machinery, and these dark areas inevitably
collect dirt and waste which would otherwise be cleaned out. Where dirt can be seen,
it is more likely to be removed. In the well-lighted plant such dingy areas do not exist
and much more sanitary conditions prevail.
The condition of the illumination at the point of accident and in the surrounding
area should always be inspected and reported in accident investigation.
While the use of artificial lighting at all times enables the illumination to be
strictly controlled, this does not, in the opinion of the Chief Inspector, compensate for
the boxed-in feeling produced by working in a windowless factory. We would point out
that the variations of natural lighting can be balanced by the use of modern lighting
systems which blend well with daylight. By means of photo-electric effect, arrangements can be made to bring artificial lighting into use automatically when daylight
illumination drops below the desired level.
SAFEGUARDING THE WORKERS' HEALTH.
Industrial accidents are not the only hazard facing the workers to-day; a real
danger to the workers' health exists in new industrial processes, new chemicals,-new
poisons, and new uses for old ones, which are being introduced.
Spray-painting, which has come into general use, can, in mass-production operations, be segregated, and, with the installation of spray-booths equipped with an
efficient exhaust-cylinder, much will have been accomplished toward the prevention
of unhealthy working conditions.
Natural ventilation in the majority of our industrial plants has proven inadequate
for the removal of harmful fumes and gases, and it has been necessary to resort to
mechanical means for this purpose by the installation of local exhaust equipment.
Dust, gases, and fumes are also inevitable by-products of many industrial processes,
and their removal at the point of origin often proves difficult to achieve. The control
of hazardous dust problems in industry involves a number of steps. The hazard must
be recognized, and method of control must be determined; frequently exhaust ventilation must be designed and installed; effectiveness of control must be verified; and
control system must be maintained, and its effectiveness periodically checked.
Most dust conditions requiring correction do not need elaborate industrial hygiene
studies to determine their existence. With a knowledge of material handled in a plant
and the relative hazard which those products in dust form produce, it becomes obvious
that visible dust escapement from an operation will mean high concentration of fine
material contaminating the working area and most likely the entire plant.    The need REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 129
for the air analysis and dust-counting techniques of the industrial hygienist will be
more useful as a check on the effectiveness of control measures after exhaust ventilation
has been installed.
The more completely an operation can be hooded or enclosed, the more positive and
effective the control. Such hood construction requires detailed knowledge of a process
if all variations are to be considered. In many cases it is the lack of such complete
information that requires hood modifications after installation, which may greatly
increase exhaust volumes necessary for effective dust-removal.
In many cases exhaust systems are given no further attention after they are
installed. An understanding of the items that reduce exhaust-system effectiveness is
imperative if continued control is to be obtained. Exhaust volumes should be checked
periodically, as obstructions in dust, belt slippage or exhauster drive, accumulations in
dust collector can reduce volume of air handled. A pilot-tube reading is recommended
to check air-flow in branch ducts, although static-pressure readings are somewhat
simpler and will show variation from original exhaust volume for most cases.
When we consider plant hygiene, our first thought is to provide the best working
conditions. Good housekeeping is our No. 1 objective. While not directly harmful to
health, poor housekeeping exposures can create bad working conditions and very easily
cause indifference in the attitude of the workers.
Industrial hygiene deserves higher regard and greater attention than most of us
have given to it. When there is a general realization of the benefits which it can bring,
marked improvements in health, manufacturing productivity, and industrial relations
will follow. Industrial-hygiene problems are not confined to plants which produce or
handle toxic chemicals. Working conditions may adversely affect the health, and hence
the productivity, of workers in any factory and any office.
Bad lighting, inadequate ventilation, uncomfortable equipment and furniture, poor
sanitary facilities, inadequate eating facilities, and numerous other such factors
adversely affect the comfort, health, or efficiency of workers.
Attention to the provision of correct lighting, proper and comfortable working
conditions, good housekeeping, adequate eating and sanitary arrangements, and education in good health practices are all factors in a satisfactory program of industrial
health.
While it is a comparatively simple matter, during the preparation of plans for the
construction of a factory building, to make ample provision for dining, dressing, and
wash rooms, it has not been until recent years that some of our industrial executives
have realized that expenditures made in connection with the welfare and health of
employees are a sound investment.
During our inspection visits each succeeding year we find additional measures
being introduced for the employees' welfare, such as rest periods, both morning and
afternoon, for the purpose of refreshment, the provision of radios in dining-rooms, and
the installation of shower-baths in or adjacent to dressing-rooms.
Nearly everyone is happier in clean, wholesome surroundings. The first important
role the manager plays in plant hygiene is to insist that his employees keep their work
areas clean and orderly. He can change operation procedure to eliminate dirty, messy,
and distasteful jobs. The supervisor is the man in a position to see these factors, and
having been trained to understand plant hygiene, he will be in a better position to do
a better job.
INSPECTION OF FREIGHT AND PASSENGER ELEVATORS.
The inspection of freight and passenger elevators is a very important part of our
duties, and is becoming more exacting each succeeding year because of the difficulty
and delay in obtaining replacement equipment, which inspections reveal to be necessary,
and which affects the safe operation of the car. K 130 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Many advances have been made in the construction of elevators to meet the
transportation requirements of a constantly growing multitude of passengers and the
ever-increasing amount of freight that must be hoisted or lowered from one level to
another.-
There is no form of transportation more in general use to-day by the public than
vertical transportation. One has only to enter a department store, office building, or
hotel to realize the large number of persons transported daily by this means of
conveyance.
New devices for promoting speedier and more efficient service have been developed,
and numerous safeguards and safety devices have been invented and adopted.
This Department made progress in rendering effective the new specified requirements issued under Order in Council May 11th, 1945, amending Rule 10, Part One,
clauses (c) and (d), of the Regulations governing Installation, Operation, and Maintenance of Freight and Passenger Elevators. The requirements of these regulations
shall be complied with prior to June 30th, 1947.
The tendency in modern elevator engineering is to employ, as far as is practical,
automatic apparatus in the form of mechanical, electrical, or pneumatic devices to open
and close hoistways and car-doors, and to start, stop, and level the elevator at the
various landings. These devices must be positive and reliable under all conditions,
however, and be proved and found acceptable by thorough and practical tests. They do
not replace the human operator, but do reduce the possibility of accidents resulting
from errors of judgment or lapses into careless habits.
CARE AND MAINTENANCE OF ELEVATORS.
A competent person to. take care of the mechanical equipment is one of the most
vital requirements for the safety of all concerned in elevator services, and one which
receives far too little consideration, especially where but one car is in operation. The
practice of leaving such important apparatus to the care of inexperienced men who
have no mechanical ability and no knowledge of elevator mechanism cannot be too
strongly condemned. The impression of some owners and leaseholders of buildings
where but one or two elevators are used is that the liberal use of oil and grease is the
only attention required, with some handy man, clerk, or young operator being delegated
to supply the lubricant. Thus the cables become rusted, bolts get loose and drop out,
safety devices become ineffective through corrosion, lack of adjustment, or the accumulation of gummed oil and dirt. Motor commutators, controlling switches, and wiring
are neglected; valves and pistons are not kept properly packed; shaftway doors and
locks become defective; overhead bearings run dry; and many other important features
are overlooked.
Arrangements should be made in such small plants to designate an employee with
sound mechanical knowledge, and one who recognizes the hazards of elevator operation,
to make frequent inspections of the equipment.
Inspections at regular intervals have long been recognized as essential to safe
operation, and this service is valuable, not only in connection with accident-prevention,
but also in providing economy of operation.
We are pleased to report that no fatal or serious injuries were received by any
person while being transported on passenger or freight elevators during the year. This
record has been achieved largely because all power passenger and freight elevators in
service have been equipped with interlocking devices, as specified by the regulations.
This equipment, if properly maintained, will continue to function as an effective
accident-prevention device, as it prevents the operator from moving the car unless the
hoistway door or gates are closed and in the locked position. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 131
While we had to contend with some opposition before attaining complete compliance
with the Regulations governing the Operation of Passenger and Freight Elevators, the
persons (few in number) who took this attitude have since informed us that they would
not be without these protective devices, and they now consider this accident-prevention
equipment indispensable.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS' LICENCES.
During the year 1,062 renewal operators' licences were issued, and 584 temporary
and 463 permanent licences.
NEW ELEVATOR INSTALLATIONS.
During the year sixty plans and specifications relating to the installation of modern
elevator equipment were approved.
ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS.
During the year, 1,500 inspections and reinspections of freight and passenger
elevators were made.
WOMEN IN INDUSTRY.
Women surprised a lot of people, including themselves, when the man-power
•shortage of war-time forced them into industrial pursuits they had never before
attempted and found them equal to the tasks. The preference for factory-production
work is not new among women workers. Even before the war a large number of
women workers were employed in factories, but during the war their number tripled
as shipyards, aircraft plants, and other heavy industries opened their doors to women
for the first time. Now that the war is over and we are getting back to normal production, it is likely that in some industries at least women are in industry to stay.
Women workers, as a rule, do not consider riveting and welding the glamour
occupation of peace-time. The kind of production jobs they like are the type women
long have filled—assembling, testing, inspection, and machine-operating (other than
sewing-machines). These are the factory jobs in which most women excel, and these
are the jobs most women ex-war workers want in peace-time, as they prefer metal-
working plants to the old-line garment or textile factories where a great number of
women workers were employed in pre-war days. Women like such work because it gives
them the opportunity to use their finger dexterity, exercise responsibility, and pay
attention to minute details. The work is interesting, the pay better, the working
conditions modern, and work less monotonous.
During our inspection visits we have found that aside from a few psychological
and emotional differences, women workers and men workers have quite similar safety
problems, but one thing that may concern the former is woman's attitude about dressing
for work. They must not let their desire for personal adornment or style lead to
accidents that may permanently mar their beauty.
There is no telling when a floppy sleeve may be caught in the lathe (if her hair
does not get caught first). How much more sensible it would be for operators of
drill-press machines to dress correctly and use a brush to remove chips. The girl who
removes her jewellery before starting work and the girl who uses safety-goggles is
smarter than the one who fails to protect her eyes. Safety-toed shoes may not appeal
to the style-conscious girl in the shop, but they are preferable to crutches.
Sensible slacks (without cuffs) or simple tailored skirts and blouses are to be
encouraged instead of fancy dresses with lots of frills, etc.
Not only beauty, but good sound health, may be involved in the little scratches that
occur from day to day on the-job.   The supervisor in charge should see that each minor K 132 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
mishap is an occasion for reminding the victim of the importance of first aid either
by a nurse or doctor or a trained first-aid attendant at the plant. Those who neglect
the little scratches are likely to be sorry if infection sets in and robs the worker of
a finger or an arm. Only alert supervisors who are aware of the hazards, and will
constantly instruct and remind women as well as men workers, can avert injuries that
befall many in industry.
INDUSTRIAL HOME-WORK.
In the year 1936 legislation having for its purpose close supervision over industrial
home-work (if permitted) was placed on the statute books and now forms Part II of the
" Factories Act." This legislation stipulates that every employer and every home-
worker must first obtain a permit before work may be given out or be performed in the
home. And further, no employer's permit shall be issued unless the Chief Inspector
is satisfied that the provisions of the " Factories Act," the " Male Minimum Wage Act,"
the " Female Minimum Wage Act," and the " Hours of Work Act" are complied with.
Owing to the fact that investigations previous to and following Part II being
enacted revealed deplorable conditions existing relative to sanitation, hours of work,
and remuneration received, the administrative policy has been to refuse permits either
to employers or home-workers when such conditions were found to exist. This procedure has been effective in forcing employers to build factories and make extensions
to present plants. And further, it has given employment to a considerable number of
factory employees whose hours of labour, wages, and general working conditions are
properly regulated.
The regulations of industrial home-work have a twofold purpose in that they seek
to protect the consumer by prohibiting goods being manufactured in unsanitary homes
and homes where there are contagious diseases. It denies to a type of employer the
advantages he previously secured by the practice of giving out work to be performed
in the home. In this respect it has, in addition to eliminating unfair competition
practices, provided more employment for factory-workers where work is performed
under controlled conditions.
Inspection of premises in which home-work is authorized to be performed discloses
that, while a high standard of sanitation is being maintained in these premises, the
volume of work given out to be performed in the home continues to decline. The
principal reason for this, we believe, is that it is realized it is more advantageous to
have the worker on the premises where all work can be supervised and mistakes, if
any, may be readily corrected.
Certain lines of industry engaged in the manufacture of household articles found
a shortage of skilled female factory employees, and because of this they were obliged
to request former employees, who had, upon marriage, resigned their positions and
established homes, to assist them in meeting their commitments by performing part-
time work in their homes. Following investigations made as to compliance with the
statutory requirements governing industrial home-work, a number of permits authorizing same were issued to the employers and home-workers.
Several home-workers with previous mechanical experience who, because of their
advanced age, were no longer able to keep pace with production requirements in industry
informed us, on requesting renewal of their permits, that they had become more than
self-sustaining.   This also applied to those with an infirmity.
Thus it has been proven that home-work, properly controlled, is not the industrial
evil which existed prior to legislative enactment in the year 1936.
During the year under review eight permits were issued to employers and twenty-
six to home-workers. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 133
CHILD LABOUR.
During the year many inquiries were made by employers and parents of children
regarding the possibilities of employment of children. Needless to say, many of these
were discouraged from taking employment where the work was considered detrimental
to health and general welfare of the child.
During the session of the 1944 Provincial Legislature there was placed on the
statute books of the Province, by the Honourable the Minister of Labour, an Act to
control the employment of children, and defined a " child " as a male or female person
under the age of 15 years. Previous to the enactment of this legislation, the employment of children was governed by certain provisions in the " Factories Act" and
applied only to children employed in factories, industrial and other occupational groups.
The employment of children in these occupations is now prohibited, as enumerated
in the Schedule to the " Control of Employment of Children Act."
A determined effort to enforce child-labour laws has been carried out during the
year. The Department is trying not only to discover violations of the " Control of
Employment of Children Act," but also to inform the public about the whole problem
of the employment of children under the age of 15 years.
As our " Public Schools Act " requires boys and girls to remain at school until they
have become 15 years of age, we work in close co-operation with the educational
authorities in checking applications for employment of children, especially when they
are seeking jobs while school is in session.
Each year, as the Act becomes better understood, we experience more helpful
co-operation from the majority of employers. Only occasionally do we find the parent
or the child who falsifies the age. Cases of this nature cause a great deal of unpleasant
work for the enforcement officer, and where there is absolutely no co-operation from
the employer or parents, Court proceedings are instituted. The control of " Employment of Children Act" provides the necessary machinery to prevent a child-labour
problem in this Province, and very strict enforcement is exercised.
Investigations made and interviews held with parents, by those who request us to
authorize a child employment permit, reveal that we still have those who wish to exploit
the child. We also come in contact with the parent of a child who absents himself from
school and when in attendance will not apply himself. Inability to convince the child
that his best interests would be served by continuing at school usually results in the
parent requesting a school release to enable the child to procure some form of employment. Previous to consideration being given to these requests by the school authorities,
a thorough investigation is made by this Department of the type and place of employment desired. If considered suitable, the school authorities are so notified, and in some
instances where it is deemed advisable by the school authorities that the child would be
better off at work than to continue at school, following the issuance of a school release
from school, a permit is issued subject to the conditions as set forth in the " Control
of Employment of Children Act."
We have for this reason, with but very few exceptions, confined the issuing of
permits authorizing the employment of children for the duration of the summer school
holiday only. We are.of the opinion that regardless of what vocation the child intends
to follow, he or she should attend school until they have attained at least their fifteenth
birthday.
We desire to record our appreciation of the generous co-operation extended by
industry in general, parents and children, the school authorities, the Unemployment
Insurance Commission, the interested public, and all those who have assisted in the
enforcement of An Act to control the Employment of Children. K 134 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PROSECUTIONS.
The proprietor of an oriental laundry was fined $50, or in default thirty days, for
operating the said laundry with persons working therein after the hour of 7 o'clock
in the afternoon without the permission in writing of the Inspector.
CONCLUSION.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all officials and employees connected
with industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
R. D. Lemmax,
Chief Inspector of Factories. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946.
K 135
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE APPRENTICESHIP BRANCH, 1946.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
J. A. Ward Bell, Chairman.
James Thomson.
J. F. Keen.
H. Douglas.
Administrative Officials of the Branch.
Hamilton Crisford Director of Apprenticeship.
Arthur H. Dugdale Assistant Director.
Mr. James Thomson,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I herewith submit annual report on the development of apprenticeship in
British Columbia for the calendar year 1946.
On December 31st, 1946, the standing and distribution of apprentices in the various
■trades and occupations was as follows:— •
Year of Apprenticeship being served.
Total
Number of
Trade or Occupation.
First.
Second.
Third.
Fourth.
Fifth.
Apprentices.
83
49
9
32
6
150
10
29
2
35
22
44
2
10
2
32
6
98
9
26
41
16
31
2
2
3
9
50
2   -
6
10
74
2
10
62
27
17
78
9
5
4
6
30
12
14
33
33
2
1
6
2
20
4
4
10
16
1
6
46
1
2
12
4
2
11
7
9
18
1
3
2
23
3
15
19
1
36
6
75
1
10
7
8
17
3
3
9
5
1
1
9
22
2
7
106
22
9
3
23
23
1
176
51
Boiler and tank making	
31
61
Brick and tile laying	
6
253
3
20
165
3
62
53
7
349
4
53
19
47
31
156
21
53
109
16
114
Ship-building (steel and iron)	
9
5
12
13
760
495
179
242
227
1,903 K 136 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The occupational distribution of those who have successfully completed their
apprenticeship under our present form of regulation stood at the end of the year
approximately as follows:—
Number fully
Occupation covered. trained to Date.
Automobile maintenance  164
Boiler-makers     45
Barbers  105
Carpenters     129
Electricians     97
Hairdressers      148
Machinists and fitters   286
Moulders     70
Pharmacists    110
Plumbers     59
Sheet-metal workers   65
Miscellaneous trades    276
Total  1,554
The year 1946 covered the heavy load of discharges from the armed forces and the
return to civilian life of the majority of the 687 former apprentices who had had their
training disrupted by the war.
A very large percentage of these lads, however, had been working at their trades
or at kindred occupations while serving their country and could be credited with the
experience they received. These credits in some cases entitled the ex-service apprentice
to his certificate, while in others they returned to their former employers with a comparatively short term to serve.
It is particularly gratifying that the large majority of indentured apprentices who
enlisted or were called up returned to their apprenticeship trades on their release and
are now satisfactorily established in civilian occupations.
A great many of these have been further assisted in this regard by the special
training facilities established by the Dominion Government under Canadian Vocational
Training. Under the joint agreement between the Dominion and Provincial Governments these training facilities are now available not only for ex-service men, but for
any properly indentured apprentice. It is, however, the partially trained ex-service
man who has so far been benefited to the greatest extent, as the additional training
has facilitated his re-establishment in civil life at a living wage in the shortest possible
time.
Among ex-service men who entered into training in industry under apprenticeship
contracts without any previous trade training, there has undoubtedly been a high percentage of non-fulfilment. The total number of ex-service men who have entered into
apprenticeship contracts to the end of the year was 709, and the number of cancellations
for one cause or another is over 10 per cent., with every indication of an increase of
this percentage rather than a decrease. This is possibly to be expected in any system
of adult apprenticeship, as it is extremely difficult for an adult without some trade
experience to visualize all the training requirements and the time element involved in
apprenticeship necessary to becoming a proficient craftsman.
During the coming year it is expected that a large number of ex-service men will
be released from Canadian Vocational Training Schools and these must be absorbed in
industry under some further training plan. It is anticipated, therefore, that the
experiment in adult apprenticeship will continue to absorb a large part of our activities
for some time to come.
This will naturally have a tendency to reduce the opportunities available for minors
to enter trades on leaving school, but the importance of a fair proportion of minors
entering industry annually cannot be overlooked if efficiency is to be maintained, and
this aspect will be given every consideration. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. . K 137
The special apprenticeship training classes carried on under the Dominion-Provincial Agreement with our Department of Education have made noteworthy advances
during the year. The housing of these classes is still a major problem, but there is
every evidence that the training syllabi is working down to a satisfactory and permanent basis, and the operation can, on the whole, be regarded as satisfactory.
The shortages of material is still a problem in most industries, and this limits
both employment and continuity of employment, which is an important angle in apprenticeship. It is hoped that the coming year will bring considerable relief from this
problem and that a more normal condition can be re-established.
Hamilton Crisford,
Director of Apprenticeship. K 138 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH.
Administrative Offices:  789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Administrative Officers.
J. A. Ward Bell _ Chief Administrative Officer.
Mrs. Rex Eaton.
Hamilton Crisford Secretary.
Mr. James Thomson,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit annual report of the Trade-schools Regulation Branch for
the calendar year 1946.
The year passed without any major complaint in regard to the operation of registered schools, and all schools have complied with the general regulations under which
they are allowed to operate.
The following is the list of registered schools:—■
Alexander Hamilton Institute, Ltd., 54 Wellington Street West, Toronto, Ont.:
Business training.
Canadian Institute of Science and Technology, Ltd., 219 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont.:
Civil, architectural, and mining engineering; hydraulics, hydraulic machinery,
sanitary engineering, municipal and county engineers' course, building-construction, heating and ventilating, mechanical and electrical engineering,
business and accountants' course, salesmanship, advertising, wireless, television, aeronautical engineering, aeroplane courses; other courses as per
prospectus.
Canadian Writers' Service, 817 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Short-story
writing.
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, Inc., 3224 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, D.C.:  Radio engineering.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian, Limited, 1517 Mountain Street,
Montreal, Que.: Agriculture, air-conditioning, applied art, architecture, aviation engineering, business education, chemistry, civil engineering, domestic
science, electrical engineering, general education, mining and mechanical engineering, navigation, paper manufacture, plumbing and heating, railroad operation, textile manufacture;   other courses as per prospectus.
International Accountants Society, Inc., 209 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago 6,
111.:   Accountancy.
La Salle Extension University, 417 South Dearborn Street, Chicago 5, 111.: Higher
accountancy, business management, traffic management, industrial management, elements of accounting, C.P.A. coaching, salesmanship, railway accounting, effective speaking, commercial law, stenotypy, business English, modern
business correspondence, credit and collection correspondence, practical
accounting and office practice;  other courses as per prospectus.
M.C.C. Schools, Limited, 301 Enderton Building, Winnipeg, Man.: Dominion Civil
Service, home kindergarten.
National Radio Institute, Inc., Sixteenth and U Streets N.W., Washington, D.C:
Practical radio and television.
National Schools, 4000 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles 37, Calif.: Radio and
television, Diesel and other combustion engines, air-conditioning and refrigeration, applied electrical engineering, modern machine-shop instruction, advanced radio engineering. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1946. K 139
Northern Institute of Technology, 54 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ont.: Commercial radio operating, radio technology, applied radio and electronics, advanced
engineering, electrical technology.
Plastics Industries Technical Institute, 1601 South Western Avenue, Los Angeles 6,
Calif.:   Plastics.
The School of Accountancy, Limited, 507 Great West Permanent Building, Winnipeg, Man.:   Accountancy.
Shaw Schools, Limited, 1130 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont.: Commercial course, short-
story writing, stationary engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Radio School, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Wireless telegraphy combined with radio engineering.
Academy of Useful Arts, 615 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Dressmaking,
designing, and kindred arts.
Academy of Useful Arts, 853 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.: Dressmaking, designing,
and kindred arts.
Margaret Atkins School of Retouching (Photography), 208 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.: Photography, retouching portraits, and commercial
finishing prints.
B.C. School of Pharmacy and Science, 615 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.:
Pharmacy.
B.C. Tree Fruits, Ltd., Kelowna, B.C.:  Fruit-packing.
B.C. Logging Power Saw School, 1805 Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Power-saw
operations, logging industry. (The sale of tuition is confined to persons
recommended by operating West Coast logging companies and to those who
can produce evidence that they have had suitable experience on Coast logging
operations.)
Brisbane Aviation Company, Limited, Vancouver Civic Airport, Vancouver, B.C.:
Aircraft engineering.
Central Business College, Mcintosh Building, Chilliwaek, B.C.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Comptometer School, 342 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.: Comptometer
operation.
Cowichan Business College, Duncan, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and
governmental).
Dobell School of Business, Island Highway and Duncan Avenue, Courtenay, B.C.:
Office occupations  (commercial and governmental).
Mrs. A. M. Downes, 4550 Osier Street, Vancouver, B.C.:   Shorthand writing.
Duffus School of Business, Ltd., 522 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
El-Mar Handcraft School, 3057 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Dressmaking,
designing, and kindred arts, millinery, leathercraft, draughting and cutting.
Eyrl's Civil Service Business College, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Fenton Commercial School, 2001-3 Forty-first Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Goodman's School of Fashion, 445 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Costume-
designing, fashion-sketching, pattern-making, dressmaking and tailoring.
Grandview Business College, 1768 Williams Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Harradine Commercial College, 5665 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Herbert Business College, Room 3, Casorso Block, Kelowna, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental). K 140 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Alfred D. Hewson School of Salesmanship, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver,
B.C.:  Salesmanship.
Hollyburn Business College, Fourteenth Avenue and Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C.:  Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Helen Labrum's Dressmaking School, 1620 Redfern Street, Victoria, B.C.: Dressmaking.
Lonsdale Shorthand and Typewriting Academy, 651 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.: Office occupations (shorthand, typewriting, and elementary bookkeeping) .
Lownds School of Commerce, Limited, 80 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Loyd-Griffin Business School, Fairview and Main Street, Penticton, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Maxine Beauty School, 619 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.:   Hairdressing.
Moler Barber School, 20 Cordova Street West, Vancouver, B.C.:  Barbering.
Moler Hairdressing School, 303 and 470 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
Victor Mott—Fashions, 620 Trounce Alley, Victoria, B.C.:   Fashion-designing.
McEwen-Wilkie Business College, Vance and Barnard Avenues, Vernon, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Nelson Business College, 107 Baker Street, Nelson, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster Commercial College, 713 Columbia Street, New Westminster,,
B.C.:   Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Pitman Business College, Limited, 1450 Broadway West, Vancouver, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Royal Business College, 1006 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Standard School of Stenography and Typewriting, 1526 Pandora Avenue, Victoria,
B.C.:   Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
H. Faulkner Smith School of Applied and Fine Art, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.:  Commercial art.
St. Ann's Academy, Commercial Department, 835 Humboldt Street, Victoria, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
St. Ann's Academy, Commercial Department, 110 Agnes Street, New Westminster,
B.C.:  Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
St. Ann's Convent, Commercial Department, Nanaimo, B.C.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Sprott-Shaw Schools, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental), journalism, wireless telegraphy combined
with radio engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Victoria Business Institute, Ltd., 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.:
Office occupations .(commercial and governmental).
Trail Business College, 648 Weir Street, Trail, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Vancouver Engineering Academy, 407 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.:
Stationary, marine, and Diesel engineering.
Victoria Hairdressing School, 104 Woolworth Building, Victoria, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Voice Production and Radio Broadcasting School, 1879 Barclay Street, Vancouver,
B.C.:   Radio announcing. Welding Construction School, 148 First Avenue East, Vancouver, B.C.: Electric
welding, acetylene cutting.
Western School of Commerce, Ltd., 712 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Willis College of Business, 850 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Don Wilson Studios, 813 Birks Building, Vancouver, B.C.:  Radio broadcasting.
The Act continues to have whole-hearted support.
Hamilton Crisford,
Secretary. K 142 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SAFETY BRANCH.
Mr. James Thomson,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Safety Branch for the year 1946.
In the year 1946 the Safety Branch attended 14 inquests, formed 89 safety committees, made 273 safety inspections, and attended 124 safety meetings.
It is regrettable it cannot be shown that there is a decrease in the number of
accidents, but there is a very noticeable improvement in the time-loss of these accidents
in the lumber industry. In comparison to the year 1945, fatal accidents increased from
fifty-eight to sixty-six and the number of time-loss accidents to workmen in this
industry increased by almost 1,000.
Early in the year 1946 a boat service was introduced into the field by the Safety
Branch to carry further the educational work, but it was abandoned and the work of
the Branch concentrated on the larger companies.
The quarterly accident survey, which has been so strongly supported by the industry, is now covering the work history of approximately-29,153 employees.
The Safety Branch has continued to investigate all fatal accidents, and it is felt
that a proper investigation has been made in all possible cases.
Very close relations exist between the Branch and the workers' unions, and it is
felt that the safety program developed has been accepted by the employers and the
employees, and the support of the unions has been encouraging. The continued
acceptance by the unions of the safety program of this Branch has enabled us to
continue to carry this work directly to the employees.
A study was made in the lumber industry of a group of sawmills, and it was found
that in cases where job-safety training had been carried out, the accidents immediately
decreased. In one plant alone, where thirty-eight men had taken this course, only one
of these men met with an accident, and this accident was minor. It is hoped that this
training will be continued in the accident-prevention work.
Continuing the policy of the Safety Branch—namely, that of co-operating with any
group that was in a position to test accident-prevention theories—the Branch has to
report that during the year 1946 a concentrated drive was made in the establishments
of the H. R. MacMillan Export Company, Limited, susidiary group, as a result of which
accident reductions up to 86 per cent, were achieved over the previous year's record.
Two of this group of companies obtained such success as to be acknowledged as outstanding on the North American Continent by the National Safety Council of Chicago.
The National Safety Council awarded pennants signifying this leadership to the
management of Alberni Pacific Lumber Company, Limited, and of Alberni Plywoods,
Limited.
It is felt that the test program worked out for this group of companies has established the fact that accident-prevention is possible wherever management, labour, and
government officials work on a common policy to eliminate accidents. A program which
has been so successful with the several thousand employees referred to appears practical
enough to apply to the entire industry. It is hoped that other industrial groups will
follow through in the same manner that has been so well demonstrated in this instance.
The continual encouragement given by the Honourable the Minister of Labour to
the accident-prevention work has been deeply appreciated, and for your own co-operation in gradually developing our program, I wish to express my sincere thanks.
Respectfully submitted.
Charles Whisker,
Safety Supervisor. VICIOHIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.
2,815-947-5749 

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