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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS Forty-second Annual Report April 1st,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1947

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROVINCIAL
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
Forty-second Annual Report
April  1st,   1945, to March 31st,  1946
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.  To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Forty-second Annual Eeport of the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1946.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. S. PEARSON, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Ross, George A., Superintendent. Mayers, E. W., Assistant Superintendent.
Sturrock, B., Social Worker.       Garrard, Miss J. McK., Acting Nurse-Matron.
Goodlad, John L, Teaching Supervisor. Gilley, Miss D. F., Clerk. Provincial Industrial School for Boys.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I submit herewith the forty-second annual report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, and would respectfully draw to your attention the various departmental
reports and statistical tables contained herein.
Forty-six different Juvenile Courts committed a total of 111 boys to the school,
and of these boys 22.5 per cent, were between the ages of 9 and 13 years, 67.6 per cent,
were between 14 and 16 years, and 9.9 per cent, were 17 years and over. By using the
Welfare Branch district boundaries we find that 25.2 per cent, came from District No. 1,
45.1 per cent, came from District No. 2, 9.9 per cent, came from District No. 3, 9 per
cent, came from District No. 4, and 10.8 per cent, came from District No. 5. As in
previous years the coast cities provided the bulk of our enrolment.
A daily average of seventy-four boys shows a slight decrease from last year,
although there were periods during the year when our population reached its highest
peak in many years.
1943-44 21,895 inmate-days, daily average, 60 boys.
1944-45 31,083 inmate-days, daily average, 85 boys.
1945-46 27,144 inmate-days, daily average, 74 boys.
Of the total commitments, seventy-eight were for theft or for breaking and entering and stealing.    The balance of thirty-three were for a variety of other charges.
From our health service report it will be noted that almost 100 per cent, of the
boys entering our school require dental care, eighty of whom received treatment.
Eighteen required surgical care and hospitalization and seventy-seven were treated
for minor ailments within the school. Eighteen boys were fitted with glasses. Every
effort has been made to restore to normal health those committed to our care.
Our social work and educational departments continue to make very satisfactory
progress, and Mr. J. Goodlad, teaching supervisor, is at present engaged in making an
intensive study of fifty boys within the school, assembling subject-matter for his thesis
for his master's degree.
Following considerable work in investigating available properties suitable as a site
for the establishment of the new Boys' Industrial School, the 160-acre Vipond property
at Wellington was secured and surveyed. Plans were prepared for an up-to-date
cottage-type institution, but owing to exorbitant cost of construction a decision was
made to plan for a congregate type of building, work on plans in this regard being
commenced. Naturally, we look forward to transferring the school from its present
surroundings to Wellington where we will have a beautiful site and adequate room and
facilities for programme of training and controlled freedom.
May I express my appreciation to the many individuals and departments of Government, and to the other social agencies, public and private, for the efficient, courteous
co-operation we have received during the past year and to all who have taken a kindly
interest in our programme and welfare.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Superintendent. Z 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1945, TO
MARCH 31st, 1946.
Number in school, April 1st, 1945	
Number on parole, April 1st, 1945	
Number on extended leave, April 1st,
1945.
83
140
2
Number away without leave, April 1st, 1945  14
Number of new commitments during year  111
Number of boys released  81
Number on parole, March 31st, 1946  177
Number transferred to Oakalla  4
Number on extended leave, March 31st, 1946  2
Number away without leave, March 31st, 1946  10
350
274
Number in school, March 31st, 1946     76
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1945, TO MARCH 31st, 1946.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
Admission
PREVIOUS  to
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Years.
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
14
14
Life.
4
1
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
1
8
Life.
Life.
9
Life.
2
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
7
7
Life.
Life.
4
Life.
Life.
Life.
9
Life.
7
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
1
3 mos.
Life.
Life.
3
Life.
Life.
Life.
4
Life.
3
Life.
1
Life.
Life.
Life.
2184
2185
2186
2187
2188
2189
2190
2191
2192
2193
2194
2195
2196
2197
2198
2199
2200
2201
2202
2203
2204
2205
2206
2207
2208
2209
2210
2211
2212
2213
2214
2215
2216
2217
2218
2219
2220
Canyon, B.C	
Boothroyd, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
New Westminster, B.C...
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Fernie, B.C	
North Vancouver, B.C.—
Vancouver, B.C	
Seattle, "Wash	
Vancouver, B.C	
Edam, Sask	
Moose Jaw, Sask	
Duncan, B.C	
Cranbrook, B.C	
Grande Prairie, Alta.	
Rio Grande, Alta	
Fairview, Alta	
Barrhead, Alta	
Langley, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Yorkshire, England	
Big Bar, B.C	
Portage la Prairie, Man..
Vancouver, B.C	
Model Farm, Sask.	
Naicam, Sask	
Ocean Falls, B.C	
Youbou, B.C	
Cornwall, Ont	
Calgary, Alta	
Harptree, Sask	
Lytton, B.C	
Edmonton, Alta	
Hepburn, Sask.	
Verigin, Sask.	
Kelowna, B.C	
Ukrainian (both)	
Indian (both)	
Canadian (both)	
Canadian  (both)	
Danish-Canadian	
Unknown	
English (both)-	
Canadian-English	
Danish-Canadian	
Scottish-Unknown....
English (both)	
English (both)	
Unknown-Scottish....
Scottish-Canadian	
Swiss-German	
American (both)	
Indian (both)	
Indian (both)	
American (both)	
Canadian (both)	
Canadian (both)	
English (both)	
American-Canadian..
Canadian (both)	
Unknown	
Polish (both)	
Canadian (both)	
Norwegian (both)....
Canadian-American..
American-Canadian..
Unknown-Canadian..
Canadian (both)	
Indian (both)	
Canadian (both)	
Dutch-American	
Doukhobour (both)...
Canadian-American.. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS,
•
1945-46.                      Z 7
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1945, TO
Continued.
MARCH 31ST, 1946—
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
residence previous to
Admission to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
2221
2222
2223
2224
2225
2226
2227
2228
2229
2230
2231
2232
2233
2234
2235
2236
2237
2238
2239
2240
2241
2242
2243
2244
2245
2246
2247
2248
2249
2250
2251
2252
2253
2254
2255
2256
2257
2258
2259
2260
2261
2262
2263
2264
2265
2266
2267
2268
2269
2270
2271
2272
2273
2274
2275
2276
2277
2278
2279
2280
Years.
Life.
9
Life.
Life.
5
9
Life.
Life.
Life.
4 mos.
Life.
7
Life.
2 mos.
2 mos.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
1
3
Life.
3
Life.
8
Life.
3
Life.
3 mos.
1
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
5
2
6
Life.
Life.
2
4
10
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
9
4
9
Life.
7
Life.
Life.
14
Life.
3
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
12
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
3 mos.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
14
Life.
Life.
Victoria, B.C.          	
English (both)
English (both)	
South Fort George, B.C	
Trail, B.C	
Wytell, Mont	
English (both)	
Victoria, B.C	
White Rock, B.C	
Verigin, Sask	
Swedish (both)..
Spokane, Wash..	
English (both)              	
Scottish (both)	
Willow Point, B.C	
Nelson, B.C	
Kelowra, B.C	
Polish-Canadian	 Z 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1945, TO MARCH 31st,
Continued.
1946-
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
residence previous to
Admission to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
2281
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
8
Life.
Life.
4
5
Life.
Unknown.
4
Life.
Life.
Years.
Life.
2282
Life.
2283
Trail, B.C          	
Life.
2284
Life.
2285
Life.
2286
Life.
2287
Kelowna, B.C	
Life.
2288
Life.
2289
Life.
2290
Penticton, B.C	
Life.
2291
Unknown	
Life.
2292
Life.
2293
Irish (both)               	
Life.
2294
Victoria, B.C                 	
Life.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American (both)   7
American-Canadian   4
Canadian (both)   31
Canadian-American  8
Canadian-English   2
Canadian-Norwegian  1
Canadian-Polish
Canadian-Russian   1
Danish-Canadian  2
Doukhobour (both)   2
Dutch-American  1
English (both)   8
English-Canadian   3
Indian (both) 	
Irish (both) 	
Irish-Scottish 	
Jugoslavian (both)
Norwegian (both) .
Polish (both) 	
Polish-Canadian 	
Roumanian-Canadian
Russian (both) 	
Scottish (both) 	
Scottish-Canadian	
Scottish-Irish 	
_ 1
_ 1
- 1
._ 2
_ 3
. 1
. 1
. 1
1
_      1
Ukrainian (both)        3
Unknown 	
Unknown-American	
Unknown-Canadian 	
Unknown-Halfbreed 	
Unknown-English 	
Unknown-Scottish	
Welsh-English 	
Scottish-Unknown
Swedish (both) _.__
Swedish-Canadian
Swiss-German 	
Total  111 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1945^6.
Z 9
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION FOR THE
YEARS 1943-44, 1944-45, 1945-46.
Birthplaces.
Alberta
1943-44.
14
Australia     _  ._    __ _ _ _     _.       _ __
British Columbia           _      1
             62
Enfflnrid      „                            __ _       	
Manitoba     __   	
       3
Nova Scotia
Ontario                                                    	
Poland               	
               1
Quebec     _.     	
        _      2
Russia     	
     „._      1
Saskatchewan   _         ■     	
       _    10
Scotland	
       1
United States of America    	
3
Totals	
     97
1944-45.
14
1
68
2
4
1
2
10
104
1945-46.
15
62
1
6
19
111
Charges resulting in Commitment.
1943-44.
     34
       3
       2
Theft	
Attempted theft	
Breaking and entering	
Breaking and entering and stealing  32
Attempted breaking and entering and stealing 	
Retaining stolen property  4
  7
  2
  1
  3
Wilful damage of property
Arson 	
Assault 	
Indecent assault	
Armed robbery	
Gross indecency	
B uggery	
Murder	
Violation of probation	
Being a juvenile delinquent __
Incorrigibility 	
Infraction of " Railway Act ".
Forgery 	
Being intoxicated	
Fraud 	
Attempt to defraud	
False pretence	
Vagrancy 	
1944-45.
54
4
26
1945-46.
40
2
3
38
1
4
Totals.
97
104
111 Z 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Ages of Boys.
1943-44. 1944-45. 1945-46.
9 years             1
10 years       2 12
11 years      2 4 2
12 years       9 4 11
13 years     19 15 9
14 years     15 17 19
15 years     22 25 30
16 years     16 19 26
17 years     11 17 11
18 years       1 1
Unknown   1         	
Totals     97 104 111
Length of Sentence.
1943-44. 1944-45. 1945-46.
Indefinite     96 100 93
Indefinite—not over 2 years               15
45 days        1 1         	
3 months     1
1 year               1
Not over 1 year    1 1
Not less than 2 years  1
Until 18 years of age            1
Totals     97 104 111
Places of Apprehension.
Agassiz 	
1943-44.
1944-45.
3
1
3
5
2
3
1
4
1
1
1
1945-46
Alberni 	
        2
Alert Bay 	
2
Armstrong 	
                       1
Brighouse	
1
Burnaby 	
10
3
Campbell River	
1
Castlegar	
                      1
Chilliwack 	
       6
Clinton 	
Cloverdale 	
       2
5
1
Courtenay 	
        ,      2
1
Cranbrook 	
1
Creston     _ _    	
1
Dawson Creek - _ „       __
2
Duncan 	
                         1
5
Fernie    _.   	
2
1
Fort Fraser	
       1 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS,
1945-46.
Z 11
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION-
PLACES of Apprehension—Continued.
1943-44.
Fort St. John        ..    . "
-Continued.
1944-45.     1945-46.
2
1
1
7            1
2
3
9            1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3 3
2            8
1
4 1
2            2
1            2
2
2
3
1 1
1
4            1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2 3
1
14          21
1
14          14
1
Grand Forks           „ _     3
Greenwood       	
Hammond    .       ...            	
Haney            3
Hope     	
Kamloops        4
Kelowna        2
Kimberley ..             .   ...
Ladysmith      	
Langley        2
Lillooet     ....
Lumby       1
Lytton   ...          _   	
Maple Ridge        . .
Merritt        ■
Mission        1
Murrayville ...             ...    . _
Nanaimo            1
Natal      ....    ,..
Nelson      1
New Westminster       8
North Bend                    ...           ._        .    .
North Vancouver         ..     ...       1
Penticton        1
Port Alberni         •       ....   __        _      2
Port Coquitlam                 .        . .
Prince George                    —     1
Prince Rupert              .	
Princeton            ....... _  _
Pouce Coupe                   .
Powell River           . _   .      ..       1
Queen Charlotte City            _	
Quesnel     .  ... ..     ...    _       .      1
Quinsam      	
Revelstoke .                  ...
Rossland  '     	
Sechelt   .   	
Sidney     .  ....         1
Smithers              .   .          .     	
Sooke     ......                  2
Squamish             _ _                   . _        ..
Stuart Island         ...      .... .      2
Trail                2
Transferred from Oakalla .   .   	
Vancouver      11
Vernon       .                                       ....           1
Victoria     .                           ...    .      13
West Summerland               ..     _ __ _          	 Z 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Places of Apprehension—Continued.
1943-44.     1944-45.     1945-46.
West Vancouver                2
Yale      2
Totals..
97
Parental Relationships.
With
With
With
With
With
With
With
With
With
With
With
With
With
With
both parents living.,
both parents dead...
1943-44.
.    46
7
father living and mother dead  5
mother living and father dead  7
both parents living but separated  23
foster parents  1
parents whose whereabouts are unknown.... 1
father living and stepmother  3
mother living and stepfather  4
mother dead and father married again     	
father dead and mother married again  ....
parents separated and father married again    	
parents separated and mother married again    	
parents separated and both married again   	
104
1944-45.
64
7
4
16
1
6
1
3
2
111
1945-46.
55
1
2
7
22
2
2
10
Totals.
97
Religion.
1943-44.
Baptist  	
Christian Institute  .—
Christian Science  1
Church of England   18
Church of God   	
Doukhobour  1
Evangelical   1
Greek Catholic  	
Greek Orthodox   _
Jehovah's Witness   —
Lutheran  1
Mennonite   . 1
Methodist   	
Pentecostal  —
Plymouth Brethren   1
Presbyterian    3
Roman Catholic   28
Russian Orthodox 	
Salvation Army   1
Seventh-day Adventist   2
Sons of Freedom   —
United  17
Non-denominational   22
104
1944-45.
3
1
24
2
2
1
30
1
2
13
23
111
1945-46.
5
25
1
3
4
27
1
2
17
23
Totals..
97
104
111 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1945-46.
Z 13
HEALTH.
" SIR,—Medical care for the year 1945-46 was as follows:—
Number Number
" Hospitalization :                                                                                                       of Cases. of Days.
Removal of tonsils and adenoids     7 14
Herniotomies and operation on undescended testicle     34- 63
Orchidectomy and submucous resection     1 17
Removal of bursae from ankle     1 5
Fractured fibula and tibia     1 13
Abscesses lanced     3 14
Observation .     1 5
Observation for swallowing foreign body     1 7
18+
" Cases treated within the school:
Septic throats	
Rheumatic fever	
Pneumonia and pleurisy
Infected ears	
Influenza	
Boils	
Superficial infections
Lacerations 	
Sinusitis 	
Ringworm 	
138
Number
of Cases.
15
l
l
6
9
5
9
6
2
1
Gingivitis   2
Impetigo   3
Infectious conjunctivitis   9
Scabies  8
77
"All scabies infection was brought in on admission. One boy was admitted with
active tuberculosis and transferred to the tuberculosis division of the Vancouver General Hospital. All chest X-rays except the one on this boy were negative for active
disease. Kahn tests and urinalyses for all boys were essentially negative. Twenty
boys had their eyes examined by a specialist and eighteen were fitted with glasses.
Two boys attended an ear specialist.
" On the whole, this group is well developed and well nourished. The average
height and weight gain is good. Healthful living conditions and prompt attention to
individual ailments have helped considerably to avoid the many infections of epidemic
type which were so prevalent among the general public during this past year. Neglected
teeth and eyes, diseased tonsils, and hernias continue to require the greatest amount
of care.
"Almost 100 per cent, of the boys entering the school require extensive dental care.
This year there were 166 visits to dentists and 80 boys received treatment. In addition
to the services of Dr. E. Jones, of New Westminster, who has been doing the dental
work for the school for many years, it was found necessary to increase our dental
services owing to the large number requiring dental care. Arrangements were made
with Dr. L. Alexander, of Haney, and our service doubled. We find, however, that we
are still behind in our work. It is hoped that by next year every boy will have his
teeth attended to while in the school. Z 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" The boys are very appreciative of the care they receive. They show it in their
eagerness to take advantage of the services offered. They are a happy group with good
intentions to improve and become better citizens.
"Jennie McK. Garrard, R.N.,
Acting Nurse-Matron." REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1945^6.
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g QJ O Z 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
EDUCATIONAL.
" Sir,—During the year commencing April 1st, 1945, and ending March 31st,
1946, the staff of the educational department consisted of the following:—
Division 1—J. I. Goodlad.
Division 2—E. W. Blagburn.
Division 3—(Mrs.) A. L. Arthur.
Industrial Arts—J. B. Pattern.
Motor Mechanics—D. W. Munro (first term);  J. S. Iveson (second term).
" Attendance at academic school classes followed much the same pattern as that
of the previous year, the highest enrolment of sixty-seven occurring during the fall
term and the lowest of fifty-one just at the close of the fiscal year.    In all, 135 boys
attended as follows:—
Division 1      51
Division 2      52
Division 3      32
Total  ,   135
" The fifty-one on the roll at March 31st, 1946, were distributed as follows:—
Special Class (Grades I.-IV.)      6
Grade V.  11
Grade VI    8
Grade VII.      9
Grade VIII     6
Grade IX    9
Grade X.      2
Total   51
" In June, 1945, Mr. E. G. Daniels, the School Inspector, approved the promotion
to Grade IX. of nine of the eleven boys enrolled in Grade VIII., while five of the six
Grade IX. students were promoted to the next grade. The inauguration of Grade IX.
proved successful enough to warrant its continuation with the commencement of the
new term in September.
" It is interesting to note that although there was only a fractional change from
the median intelligence quotient of 86 measured the previous year, the median for
Division 3 was only 78, with a low of 43 and a high of 103. This fact, in itself,
explains why it was necessary to maintain a low total enrolment in this division. If
any worthwhile work is to be done with children who present both behaviour problems
and limited learning ability, it is absolutely essential that classes be kept small enough
to permit of maximum individual attention on the part of the teacher.
" The fifty-one boys previously listed by grades were retarded, on the average,
two full years, while one boy was seven years behind where he should have been for
his age. This unfortunate circumstance may be explained by a number of contributing
factors. Of prime importance, of course, is the matter of intellectual capacity already
mentioned. Then, no doubt, parental interest in school affairs reflects directly upon
the attitude of the child to his studies. In answer to our questionnaire, the forty-
three principals who replied reported only twenty-three families of our boys as having
co-operated satisfactorily with the school situation. Next, the fifty-one cases attended
an average of 3.14 schools each during the elementary period. Continually having to
adjust to new environmental conditions, besides producing unusual conflicts, has an
undesirable effect on school progress. Finally, truancy plays a major role in producing
retardation.    Only four were innocent in this regard, while thirty-five were absent REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1945-46.       Z 17
more than once monthly for this reason.    Sixteen of the group well might be classed
as chronic truants.
" An examination of the type of student coming to the Industrial School provides
the solution for educational treatment.    A study of progress cards shows the following
ratings of the fifty-one boys, as graded with fellow students in the normal school
situation:—
A standing      0
B standing     2
C standing   20
D standing   15
E standing   14
Total   51
" Teachers' reports indicate that thirty of the fifty-one displayed unsatisfactory
conduct, while the boys' own statements revealed that thirty-six disliked school to a
marked degree. Treatment, then, must aim, first, to arouse an interest in school affairs
and, secondly, to provide individual instruction to remedy learning difficulties.
" Once again we owe gratitude to Dr. Lucas and her staff of the Correspondence
School and to the Visual Aids Department of the Vancouver School Board for valuable
assistance. Many boys in the institution, whether or not attending regular school,
took advantage of such courses as mechanical drawing, automotive engineering, house
painting and decorating, principles of radio, and so on. They were assisted in these
studies by the industrial arts instructor. Twice monthly, educational films were used
to illustrate lessons in health, science, history, art, and geography. The delivery of
the radio now on order will provide the facilities for auditory learning aids and so
round out the entire programme.
" By Christmas of this year the boys in the industrial arts shop had prepared a
creditable array of useful models. Besides following a definite curriculum of draughting, woodwork, and electricity, every boy worked out at least one project of his own
choosing. As a result, each boy paroled took with him a nut tray, magazine rack,
lamp-stand or some other useful article of his own making. By mid-term most boys
were requesting permission to spend additional periods in the shop. Increased interest
resulted in decreased disciplinary problems.
" Classes in motor mechanics were conducted twice weekly. Boys were given both
instruction and practical experience in everything from changing a tire to adjusting
the carburettor. The fundamental training obtained here has enabled a number of
boys to become useful apprentices or assistants in garages all over the Province.
" This year the experience gained during the previous term enabled the senior
students to shoulder a greater responsibility in producing their paper. Four editions
of " The Biscoq Tradition " were published—at Hallowe'en, Christmas, Easter, and
June. By selling copies at 4 cents each, they raised enough money to finance a very
successful picnic at Maple Ridge Park.
" Under the present system every boy in the institution receives specific classroom instruction from a minimum of two to a maximum of eight half-days per week.
All boys are given the opportunity of taking advantage of the following: academic
class-room instruction, academic or vocational correspondence study, visual and auditory
learning aids, vocational class-room instruction, vocational shop-work practice, and
school projects or recreational activities. It is to be expected, then, that each boy
derives from his stay with us something to assist him in solving the problems of
adjustment that he invariably must meet on return to his community.
" John I. Goodlad,
Teaching Supervisor." Z 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
SOCIAL WORK DEPARTMENT.
" Sir,—The policy as set up with the school and the agency supervising the boy's
home in making a plan for his release is showing gratifying results. It is felt that
with this procedure of supervision while the boy is in the school and following his
release the boy will make a better readjustment to community life.
" During the past year 111 boys were admitted to the school. In each case individual records were set up, contact was made with the agency already familiar with the
boy and his home, or contact was established with the agency best fitted to meet his
particular needs. Following is the breakdown showing the supervising agency and
the numbers of boys in each case.
Vancouver Probation Service    24
Victoria Juvenile Court     11
Vancouver Children's Aid Society       3
Victoria Children's Aid Society      3
Family Division, Social Assistance Branch    34
Family Welfare Bureau        1
Child Welfare Division     27
Direct cases       4
Burnaby Juvenile Court      2
Catholic Children's Aid Society       1
Indian Agent       1
111
" A development of vital importance is the case conference. This direct method of
exchanging factual data and the thinking of all agencies concerned with the boy's welfare has proven itself to be of real value.
" The conference method is also used to great advantage within the school itself.
Regular weekly conferences are held when the heads of departments of the school meet
to discuss problems at large and individual cases.
" Individual interviews with the matron, attendants, and school teachers make for
a fuller insight into the boy's needs. In this way we feel a full picture of the boy's
social, medical, academic, and group adjustment is brought to light.
" The greatest single resource in our social work programme lies in the Child
Guidance Clinic. Throughout the year fifty-seven boys were given complete psychiatric
examination with the subsequent case conference discussion. Intensive psychiatric
treatment was given to thirteen boys. This treatment was on the highest level of professional skill, involving unstinted time and interest by the psychiatrist. A number
of parents were also interviewed at the clinic when this was felt to be of particular
value. The incurred benefits from this service to the individual boy, school social
worker, and the school itself cannot be overstressed.
" In conclusion, it has been apparent that from the present satisfactory procedures
evolved there is still room for constant opportunity for further growth in the methods
of pre-parole and post-parole planning. With increased staff in the field the next year
should bring closer co-operation between the Court, the social worker, and the school.
" Bruce Sturrock,
Social Worker." REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1945-46. Z 19
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
" Sir,—Work in the tailoring department during the year 1945-46 comprised the
following:—
Tailoring:  44 pairs tweed pants, 157 pairs denim pants, 258 pairs shorts.
Miscellaneous:    98  sheets,  29  pillow-covers,   15  mattress-covers,   13  rubber
sheets, 19 curtains, 104 tea-towels, 105 pairs tweed pants pressed and
repaired, 39 suits pressed, 2 overcoats repaired.
" Shoe check was held regularly and 272 pairs were repaired.
" During the year five boys have received instruction and training in tailoring.
" J. Henderson,
Tailor."
Greenhouse and Garden.
" Sir,—Our greenhouse and garden group has an average daily attendance of six
boys, boys that are keenly and actively interested in watching the process from seed
to full-grown products of vegetables and flowers. Propagation by cuttings or slips
seems to amount to a miracle to their interested minds, and I feel very satisfied with
the results we are getting.
" Practically 2% acres of virgin soil were broken up this year. This required a lot
of real labour removing stumps, brush, roots, and rocks before the actual seeding was
done this spring.
" The results of last fall's harvest were most gratifying. We had a very good
crop of vegetables—potatoes, turnips, carrots, parsnips, beets, cabbage, Brussels sprouts,
tomatoes, vegetable marrows, Hubbard squash, beans, onions, cucumbers, peas, and
lettuce gave us a good variety to supply our kitchen. Our flower garden was a riot of
colours and bloom.
" The removal of motor mechanics instruction from my duties has left me more
badly needed time to spend instructing and supervising this department.
" The use of fall rye is certainly showing marked results in retarding water
erosion of the soil, improving moisture content, and building badly needed humus.
" Our fall harvest for 1946 promises to be among our best as it is showing good
development now. « D  w_ MuNR0)
Gardener."
RECREATION.
" Sir,—As in the preceding year, the results of the activities of 1945-46 were quite
satisfactory and considerable interest was maintained. Again the recreational programme may be discussed in these four groups.
" The first group, composed of the junior boys, forms the Hobby Club. These boys
spent their spare time during the summer in bicycling, swimming, boat races, and
improving their camping spot on the Coquitlam River. Their main interest lay in
model building and various group projects, which included the improvement of their
clubhouse and grounds.
" The second and third groups, known as the Athletic and Boat Clubs, consisted
of the larger junior and senior boys. Their recreational periods were spent in remodelling their clubhouses and grounds. In addition, these two groups spent their leisure
time working on hobby projects of radio, sailboat, and aeroplane models.
" The fourth group, known as the Beginners' Club, was made up of the new boys
and those finding it difficult to adjust themselves to the school.    These boys were given Z 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
more supervision and followed a routine programme of gymnasium work, swimming,
and other athletics, until we felt they were ready to take part in the clubs with a more
varied programme.
" This year we have been able to interest the boys to play in one or more games.
Although some have played a little of each, very few have ever belonged to an organized
team. Therefore, under the guidance of our leaders, the boys as a whole were given
a thorough training in physical education, boxing, lacrosse, Softball, and basketball.
This enabled our softball and basketball teams to enter into leagues with competition
from outside teams. Many games were played at the school and on outside grounds in
which these boys showed wonderful sportsmanship and deserved a great deal of credit
for the exceptional showing they made.
" Throughout the year conferences were held with the boy's group leader and the
school social worker. Individual cases were discussed to review the boy's adjustment
to his group and to the school in general. There also seemed to be more co-operation
between the boys and their leaders in our programme, and now that our staff is once
more back to normal strength the school's recreational programme should strike a new
high in the coming year.
" Walter Shogan,
Instructor."
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don MgDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.
705-147-8813

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