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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS Thirty-second Annual Report April… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1947

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROVINCIAL
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR GIRLS
Thirty-second Annual Report
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.  To His Honour W. C. WOODWARD,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Thirty-second Annual Report of
the Provincial Industrial School for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1946.
G. S. PEAESON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1946.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
MAUDE V. FLEMING,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. G. S. PEARSON, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Fleming, Miss Maude V., Superintendent.
Peck, Miss Ayra E., Assistant Superintendent.
Sibbald, Miss Margaret W., Clerk.  PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT.
The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Thirty-second Annual Report of
the Industrial School for Girls from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
The past year was marked by a sudden decrease in the number of admissions.
Seventeen girls were admitted last year as against fifty-six during the previous year.
This circumstance lessened the inmate-days by over 7,000 and consequently raised the
per capita cost. A close check was kept on staff requirements but due to the nature of
the school there was a minimum which had to be maintained for efficient management,
regardless of the fluctuation in population. Many reasons may be given for this
apparent decrease in juvenile delinquency among girls. With the end of the war, the
mother is no longer engaged in war industry and the father, in most cases, has returned
home to his family. Undoubtedly another factor is the continued progress of the
Social Welfare Department throughout the Province. In communities where there is
a lack of recreational facilities and where homes are faced with strained economic
situations and too frequent domestic discord, the teen-age girl strikes out in socially
unacceptable ways for satisfactions and pleasures not to be found in her own home.
Social workers with their training and experience are in a unique position to combat
juvenile delinquency by giving leadership and advice in the development of community
resources, and also in co-operating with the Juvenile Court Judge in the treatment of
the young offender.
Discipline became a minor problem with a smaller group of girls and more progress
was made in our training programme. A good spirit of co-operation prevailed throughout the year and most of the girls were anxious to take advantage of the instruction
provided. May I refer you to the report of our training programme as outlined by the
Assistant Superintendent? Of special mention is the extension of our handicraft
department to include instruction on a four-harness floor-loom purchased through the
Bazaar Fund. In October, a very successful bazaar was held in the school when
various articles of woodwork, embroidery, crocheted and knitted goods made by the
girls in class were sold.
The general health of the girls was excellent. Our school physician held a weekly
clinic and all new girls received a complete physical examination and were taken later
to the chest clinic for X-ray. Several girls required a further examination by an eye
specialist and glasses were supplied. A further development in our medical and dental
services was brought about through the efforts of your deputy, Mr. Walker. A weekly
clinic is now held at the school by the Venereal Disease Division of the Provincial
Board of Health. With the co-operation of the Metropolitan Health Committee, dental
services were arranged by the Director of School Dental Services. Permission was
granted by the Burnaby Board of School Trustees for dental appointments to be filled
at the Capitol Hill School Dental Clinic near-by. Among other advantages, these services are a saving of time and much appreciated. During the past year several of the
girls required extensive dental treatment and it may be noted that in many cases this
asset to good health has been seriously neglected by the girls previous to their commitment. If we have reason to become discouraged over the progress of any girl during
her training period, we always have the assurance that she has greatly improved in
physical health.
7 FF 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
We valued the assistance of the Provincial Nutritionist, who through personal contact and correspondence gave us many helpful suggestions in the planning of meals and
preparation of food.
Another department that showed progress during the year was the Farm Operations. There was a substantial increase in the quantity and quality of garden produce,
and this abundance of fresh fruit and vegetables helped a great deal to maintain the
high standard of health among the girls. Improvements were made in the general
appearance of the school grounds and the flowers and shrubs were a source of pleasure
to the visitors and the girls.
The remodelling of the isolation quarters made a marked change in the atmosphere
of the school and deserves special mention. This improvement permits a new girl to
occupy a bright single room with toilet facilities, and to enjoy the freedom of an outdoor enclosure while awaiting the completion of medical examination. First impressions received by an emotionally disturbed girl are of vital importance, and the value
of the present quarters has been clearly demonstrated. Other additions were a staff
bath-room and new furnishings for staff bedrooms.
The Child Guidance Clinic was of great assistance to us in making plans for the
training of the girls during their stay in the school and in their rehabilitation. We
appreciate their continued co-operation and advice.
On completion of their training in the school, several girls were found employment in hospitals and launderies, while others returned to their community schools. As
pointed out a year ago, there is a definite need for more specialized training in the
school to enable the teen-age girl to learn a trade and on her release to be in a position
to apply this knowledge and be self-supporting in the industrial field.
The lack of religious knowledge and training was quite apparent on the part of
the majority of the girls admitted during the year. An evening of religious instruction was given twice monthly by two groups of women for the Protestant and Roman
Catholic girls. Representatives of the Church of England, United Church, Salvation
Army, and Women's Christian Temperance Union were very faithful in their presentation of a religious service each Sunday in rotation. With an order of service especially
suitable for girls, a real contribution was made to the life of the school which was truly
appreciated. Now that the war is over, we may expect the Sunday services to be resumed for the Roman Catholic girls. It was found necessary to curtail these owing to
other demands for the services of the priest.
We are glad to report the many enjoyable evenings of music and other entertainment provided by the Women's Musical Club, Women's Philharmonic Society, and the
Lion's Club Orchestra. Our own weekly movie continues to be a source of great delight
and all look forward to " movie night." On several occasions the girls have provided
their own entertainment with music and short plays. The Christmas season was a
jolly time as the lighted tree, holly, and other decorations gave the school a real festive spirit. Among the gifts on the tree were parcels for each girl from the Salvation
Army and the W.C.T.U.
During the past year we had the pleasure of welcoming several visitors to the
school, including students in Psychology and in Public Health Nurses' courses at the
University.
In conclusion, to you, sir, to the Deputy Minister, and to the officials of the Public
Works Department I wish to express my gratitude for your continued courtesy and
co-operation during the past year.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
MAUDE V. FLEMING,
Superintendent. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1945-46. FF 9
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31ST, 1946.
Total inmate-days from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946  9,050
Per capita cost, one year     $1,682.65
Per capita cost, one day  4.61
Operating expenditure by voucher—
Salaries   $22,409.30
Cost-of-living bonus        3,485.55
Office and school supplies, etc.—
Postage, office and school supplies       $241.85
Telephone and telegraph         163.51
  405.36
Travelling expenses  816.52
Farm operations  610.25
Furnishings, equipment, etc.   680.10
Clothing—
Clothing     $453.46
Boots and shoes         105.88
■  559.34
Janitors' supplies  219.87
Fuel, light, and water—
Fuel  $1,710.87
Water        286.00
Light and power         549.31
       2,546.18
Provisions—
Groceries   $3,462.20
Meat     1,035.72
Fish        212.51
4,710.43
Medical attendance, medical supplies, and dental cost—
Medical attendance  $500.00
Medical supplies  263.47
Surgery   315.00
Skin specialist   5.00
Dental cost   532.50
Eyes examined and glasses provided  137.00
       1,752.97
Good Conduct Fund  233.40
Incidentals and contingencies   611.67
Total expenditure for year by voucher  $39,040.94
Maintenance and repairs (expended through Public Works Department)      4,797.80
$43,838.74
Inventory, March 31st, 1945      1,156.54
$44,995.28
Less board *_  $1,702.11
Less rent         390.65
Less credit for sale of garden produce        174.67
Less inventory, March 31st, 1946       952.47
3,219.90
$41,775.38 FF 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
POPULATION OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1946.
On roll, April 1st, 1945
33
Girls admitted during year April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946  17
50
Released as wards of Family Court  13
Released as wards of Juvenile Court  12
Transferred to other institutions     2
— 27
Total in school, March 31st, 1946
23
LIST OF GIRLS ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1ST, 1945, TO MARCH 31st, 1946.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to School.
British
Columbia
Canada.
773
774
775
776
777
778
779
780
781
782
783
784
785
786
787
788
789
Vancouver, B.C	
Burnaby, B.C	
Williams Lake, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
England	
Vancouver, B.C	
North Bend, B.C ...
Vancouver, B.C	
Moncton, N.B	
Regina, Sask	
Estevan, Sask	
Winnipeg, Man	
Vancouver, B.C	
Kamloops, B.C	
Wanham, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
New Westminster, B.C.
Scotch, English-American	
Scotch, English	
English, Canadian	
Scotch, English-American	
English	
Polish	
Hungarian, English	
Scotch, American	
French-Canadian	
English-Canadian, German-Canadian
English, Scotch	
Scotch	
Swedish	
Irish-Indian, French-Indian	
Canadian, Danish	
Irish-Canadian, Polish	
Irish	
Years.
14
17
15
13
8
13
17
16
1
3
3
10
15
17
10
16
16
Years.
14
17
15
13
8
13
17
16
16
15
16
17
15
17
16
16
16
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
English (both) 	
Irish (both) 	
Polish (both) 	
Scotch (both) 	
Swedish (both) 	
Canadian, Danish	
English-Canadian,  German-
Canadian 	
English, Canadian 	
English, Scotch 	
French, Canadian  1
Hungarian, English  1
Irish, Canadian   1
Irish-Indian, French-Indian 1
Scotch, English-American ___ 2
Scotch, American  1
Scotch, English  1
Total  17
Alberta   1
British Columbia  11
England   1
Saskatchewan   2
WHERE GIRLS WERE BORN.
1 Manitoba 	
New Brunswick
Total.
1
1
17 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1945-46. FF 11
AGES OF GIRLS.
13 years  2   16 years  7
14 years  1   17 years  4
15 years   3
Total  17
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Vancouver   14 Kamloops     2
Victoria      1 —
Total  17
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
Incorrigibility      9 Theft     1
Arson      1 Vagrancy     1
Sexual immorality     5 —
Total  17
Roman Catholic	
     5
United Church ____ 	
     2
Unknown 	
     3
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929  17
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Church of England  1
English Lutheran  1
Mormon   1
Presbyterian   1 —
Protestant (church unknown) 3 Total  17
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  10
Number who have father living, mother dead  1
Number who have mother living, father dead  3
Number who have mother living, father unknown 1  2
Number whose parents are unknown  1
Total  17
Of the above, the parents of three girls are separated; four parents are divorced;
four girls have stepfathers; three girls have stepmothers; and one girl is adopted. FF 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Miss Maude V. Fleming,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the period from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946,
classes in handicraft were carried on with marked enthusiasm. Many of the articles
made by these groups provided material for our successful bazaar. Instruction in
woodwork, embroidery, crochet, knitting, and weaving was given by various members
of the staff skilled in these arts. Most of the girls have had little or no previous
knowledge of handicrafts and are delighted and proud to see the results of their own
efforts.
School classes were carried on as before during the afternoon. Following are the
movements of high school pupils:—
On roll, April 1st, 1945  2
Enrolled during the term  1
Released from classes  2
On roll, March 31st, 1946  1
These girls were, as previously, enrolled in Government Correspondence Courses,
taking English and Social Studies. I should like to express appreciation for the cooperation of Dr. Edith E. Lucas and her staff in connection with these courses. One
girl, upon leaving, entered hospital work, and the other enrolled in commercial school.
The remaining pupil intends to continue work at school upon her release.
Three girls also received tuition in shorthand and typing from the clerk in our
office.
At the beginning of the year, there were six girls attending classes in elementary
grades. During the term nine more girls entered the class. Of these, three were
enrolled in Government Correspondence Courses and the remainder received special instruction in subjects and grades suited to their individual needs. The interest and
assistance of Miss Anna B. Miller and her staff were much appreciated.
Interest in the Junior Red Cross was maintained. A money donation from our
bazaar proceeds, as well as the knitting of children's garments, was a concrete way of
showing this interest. The girls also knitted a variety of baby garments for the Catholic Children's Aid Society, from wool supplied by that organization.
Our sewing-room has provided instruction for those girls with interest and ability.
During the year eighteen girls received training in sewing, mending, and elementary
dressmaking. A total of 1,144 articles were made in this department, including table
and bed linen, girls' aprons and print dresses, blouses, skirts, and personal garments of
all kinds. Fifty-five pairs of curtains were made for the Women's Auxiliary to the
Air Force for use in the hospital. As in former years, a number of dolls were renovated and dressed for distribution by the Christmas Cheer Committee.
In the laundry, twenty-five girls received training under the capable instruction of
a trained supervisor. Here the girls learn all branches of laundry-work, including the
handling of electric mangles and washers, as well as hand ironing of fine, starched
articles.
Kitchen training is a goal toward which all girls look with interest. This training includes the preparation of three meals a day for the entire household and involves
the planning of meals and cooking of soups, meats, vegetables, desserts, and salads.
The making of jams, jellies, and pickles, and preserving of fruit were part of the
training provided.
Main and dormitory floors furnish instruction and practice in general housework,
including care of dining-room equipment, curtains, floors, and making of beds. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1945-46. FF 13
The radio for various programmes and dancing; the gymnasium and outdoor
playing-field for games and exercise; and our popular library continue to be sources
of pleasure and benefit during recreation hours. We were fortunate in having on our
staff a former member of the C.W.A.C. drill squad, whose instruction was greatly
appreciated by the girls. Birthday parties with candle-lighted cakes were one of the
chief pleasures enjoyed by all throughout the year.
Ayra E. Peck,
Assistant Superintendent and School-teacher.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.
405-147-9069   

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