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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY MENTAL HOSPITALS PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR 12… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1947

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
MENTAL HOSPITALS
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
FOR   12  MONTHS ENDED MARCH  31st
1946
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.  To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the General
Superintendent of the Mental Hospitals for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1946.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office.  TABLE OF CONTENTS.
PART I.—MEDICAL.
Page.
Officers and Staff, List of     7
Report—General Medical Superintendent     9
Report—Laboratory  14
Report—X-ray Department  17
Report—Physiotherapy  18
Report—Psychologist  18
Report—Dentist  19
Report—Beauty-parlour  20
Report—Training-school  21
Report—Social Service  21
Statistical Tables—
1. Movement of Population during Year  27
2. Summary of Operations of Hospitals since Inception  29
3. Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths  30
4. Civil State of Patients admitted  31
5. Religious Denominations of Patients  31
6. Educational Status of Patients  32
7. Nationality of Patients  32
' 8. Districts from which Patients were admitted  33
9. Occupation of Patients prior to Admission  35
10. Age of Patients on Admission  36
11. Number of Attacks at Time of Admission  36
12. Alleged Duration of Attacks prior to Admission  36
13. Table of Heredity  37
14. Alleged Cause of Insanity in Patients admitted  37
15. State of Bodily Health of Patients admitted  38
16. Form of Mental Disorder in Patients admitted  38
17. Probation, Number allowed out on  38
18. Discharges, showing Alleged Duration of Insanity  39
19. Discharges, showing Length of Residence in Hospital and Condition at Time
of Discharge  39
20. Deaths, Cause of, and Length of Time in Hospital, Essondale, New West
minster, and Saanich  40
PART II.—FINANCIAL.
Report—Business Manager  45
Balance-sheet, New Westminster  46
Balance-sheet, Essondale  47
Balance-sheet, Saanich  48
Expense Statement, Psychopathic Department  49
Expense Statement, Headquarters Department ,  49
Statement, Receipts and Disbursements, New Westminster  50
Statement, Receipts and Disbursements, Essondale  51
Statement, Receipts and Disbursements, Saanich  52 HH 6 TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Financial Tables— page.
A. Average Residence, Maintenance, and Per Capita Cost for the Past Ten
Years  53
B     )
'.. >   Yearly Gross Expenditure, Analysis of, for the Past Ten Years  54
C. Summary of Gross and Net Per Capita Cost in all Hospitals  56
D. Expense Statement, New Westminster  57
E. Expense Statement, Essondale  57
F. Expense Statement, Saanich  58
Revenue, Table of, for the Past Ten Years  59
Report, Financial—Tailor's Department  59
Report, Financial—Shoemaker's Department  60
Production Tables—
Articles made and repaired in Sewing-room, New Westminster  61
Occupational Therapy—
Wood-working Department  62
Upholstery, Weaving, Basketry, and Shoemaking Departments  62
Patients' Clothing Department  63
Nurses' Uniforms (New)  63
Nurses' Uniforms (Repairs)  63
Mattress Department  64
Hospital Furnishing Department  64
PART III.—COLONY FARM.
Report—Financial, General—Business Manager  65
Balance-sheet  66
Profit and Loss Account  67
Dairy and Herds Department—
Profit and Loss Account  68
Production and Costs Account  68
Milk Production and Cost  68
Mature Cow Department—Profit and Loss Account  69
Calves Department—Profit and Loss Account  69
Yearling Department—Profit and Loss Account  69
Bull Department—Profit and Loss Account  70
Work-horse Department—
Sales and Deaths Account  70
Horse-labour Account  70
Hog Department—Profit and Loss Account  71
Cannery—Profit and Loss Account  71
Orchard and Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account  72
Crop Department—Profit and Loss Account, etc  72
Tractor Account  73
Truck Account  73
Maintenance and Administration, General  73
Miscellaneous Statements, Inventories, etc.—
Produce supplied to Essondale  74
Produce supplied to New Westminster  74
Accounts receivable  74
Remittances to Treasury  75
Equipment  75
Orchard and Small Fruits  75 DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. George S. Pearson, Provincial Secretary.
P. Walker, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
A. L. Crease, M.D., CM., General Superintendent and Provincial Psychiatrist.
E. J. Ryan, M.D., CM., Medical Superintendent.
Gowan S. Macgowan, Business Manager.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, ESSONDALE.
Medical:
A. M. Gee, M.D., CM., L.M.C.C
U. P. Byrne, M.B., D.P.H., L.M.C.C
J. M. Jackson, M.D., L.M.C.C.
A. E. Davidson, B.A., M.D., L.M.C.C.
T. G. Caunt, M.D., L.M.C.C
G. Kirkpatrick, M.D., L.M.C.C.
A. J. Warren, M.D., D.P.M., L.M.C.C. (on
Active Service).
L. G. C. d'Easum, M.B., L.M.C.C.
B. F. Bryson, M.D., L.M.C.C.
R. C. Novak, M.D., L.M.C.C.
F. E. McNair, B.A., M.D., CM., L.M.C.C
R. L. Whitman, B.Sc, M.B., D.P.M.,
L.M.C.C.
R. M. Rice, B.Sc, M.B., L.M.C.C
Milton Jones, D.D.S.
C B. Watson, M.A., Psychologist (on
Active Service).
W. R. Brown, Director of Recreation.
K. Woolcock, Pharmacist.
W. Creber, Chief Attendant.
Miss M. Parsons, R.N., Director of Nursing.
Miss E. M. Pullan, R.N., Instructress of
Nurses.
Miss J. F. Kilburn, R.N., Social Service.
Miss B. Cooper, Dietitian.
Miss D. A. Tisdall, Occupational Therapist.
Mrs. I. H. Wedge, Branch Secretary.
Miss A. Dingle, Clinical Clerk.
Business:
Thos. Weeks, Paymaster.
F. A. Matheson, Assistant Bursar.
W. Headridge, Steward.
J. F. Anderson, Cost Accountant.
Miss J. K. Gordon, Stenographer.
W. E. Skillicorn, Book-keeper.
Rev. W. Barlow, Protestant.
Chaplains:
Rev. Father J. M. Barry, Roman Catholic.
Trades, Essondale :
J. L. Malcolm, Engineer. W. Worrall, Laundryman.
J. Renton, Outside Overseer. T. Harrison, Electrician.
W. G. Armour, Baker. G. Matthews, Plumber.
H. Lonsdale, Foreman of Works. A. L. Blair, Barber.
A. Cooter, Chief Cook. B. T. Brown, Auto Mechanic.
R. T. Hall, Occupational Therapy. OFFICERS AND STAFF, NEW WESTMINSTER.
Medical:
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., CM., L.M.C.C,  ■
Medical Supervisor.
C E. Benwell, M.B., L.M.C.C.
K. B. Sunderland, M.B., L.M.C.C.
F. Gillard, Clinical and Receiving Clerk.
Miss V. M. Sanders, R.N., Superintendent
of Nurses.
Miss W. Fighter, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses.
Charles Monteith, Chief Attendant.
Rev. J. L. Sloat, Protestant.
Business:
A. Fraser, Steward.
Chaplains:
Rev. Father A. B. Bergin, Roman Catholic.
Trades, New Westminster:
R. Gow, Carpenter.
C. Stapleton, Gardener.
J. H. Wilson, Chief Engineer.
H. Bailey, Farmer.
G. COULSON, Laundryman.
J. McMillan, Shoemaker.
Wm. Powell, Painter.
G. Carruthers, Acting Head Tailor.
C M. Doyle, Plumber.
COLONY FARM.
P. H. Moore, B.A., B.S.A., Superintendent.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, COLQUITZ.
Geo. Hall, M.D., CM., Visiting Physician.
T. A. Morris, Supervisor. P. McLeod, Chief Attendant. Report of the Medical Superintendent
for the Twelve Months ended March 31st,  1946.
PART I—MEDICAL.
Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, B.C., April 1st, 1946.
The Honourable the Provincial Secretary,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith for your consideration the Seventy-
fourth Annual Report of the Provincial Mental Hospitals at Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich.
The following table gives a brief summary of the movements of the Hospital population during the year April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946:—
Movement of Population.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2,399
63
1
446
1,620
97
388
4,019
160
1
834
2,909
2,105
5,014
252
81
161
227
102
79
479
183
240
494
408
902
2,415
1,697
4,112
(1.) Increase in number of admissions         12
(2.) Net increase in population         93
(3.) Rate of deaths to total treated      5.84
(4.) Rate of discharges to admissions  (exclusive of deaths)     57.43
ADMISSIONS.
An analysis of the birth column shows that, of the number admitted, 429 (or 51.44
per cent.) were Canadian born, 235 (or 28.16 per cent.) were born in other parts of
the British Empire, and 164 (or 19.70 per cent.) were of foreign extraction;   6 were
unknown.
DISCHARGES.
The following table shows that the shorter the duration of the mental illness prior
to admission, the greater are the chances of recovery through treatment:—
Table showing Alleged Duration op Insanity, prior to Admission, in those discharged prom the Three Institutions during the Year April 1st, 1945, to
March 31st, 1946.
Less than six months
Over six months	
Not insane	
Duration unknown
Total	
240
117
11
111
479 HH 10 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
During the year 479 patients were discharged in full. Of this number, 117 were
discharged as recovered, 232 as improved, 119 as unimproved, and 11 as not insane.
In the last few years psychiatry has come greatly to the fore as a real medical
specialty. The great impetus rendered to this study has been caused in no small
measure by the open criticism given to it by the public write-ups of mental hospitals
in the press and the stories told over the radio. It has come about through many
factors, such as mental illness affecting so large a number, low salaries given to
employees caring for the patients, very low per capita cost for their treatment, together
with the fact that these services are supposed to share the same as other services where
the real expenditure has been better understood. There is also unreasonable delay in
supplying accommodation for the proper treatment and care of those suffering from
mental illness, and there is definite lack in furnishing ample prevention and research.
It is indeed a great satisfaction to our employees, patients, and the vast number of
relatives to know that you have attacked this situation rather than remain neutral or
retreat from this perplexing problem.
The stress you have placed on education and raising the standard of the staff, giving them more security, the raising of the pitifully low per capita cost, the provision
for recreation, occupation and the treatment of the patients, provision for prevention
of mental illness, encouraging research, furnishing more accommodation—all these are
basic needs on which better mental hygiene is actually founded.
Before the war education of the nursing staff, both female and male, was carried
on but with a skeleton service. During the war this phase suffered greatly, but since
the war, it has been brought up to a more generally accepted standard. It has taken
time. The employees are unanimous in expressing the fact that these courses follow
those standards set by the Canadian and American Mental Hygiene Commissions, which
are gradually enhanced as newer phases of teaching develop and higher standards of
applications are required. A larger number of doctors are employed, and here again
teaching has been instituted and provision made for higher education. This course
follows the premises of the total personality rather than the phase of just psychiatry
alone. Fortunately, we have on our staff a considerable number of specialists to carry
out this phase of the work. The teaching includes the broad programme of treatment
and also preventive work in connection with both the adult and child. Recreation and
occupational work are receiving attention and are being placed in the field of general
treatment. The study of neurology, as well as psychiatry, is being forwarded, and considerable neurosurgery (most competently done under Dr. Frank Turnbull) has resulted
in much benefit to both the patients and hospital. This is a newer phase of treatment
which is now accepted by the noted neurological surgeons of America.
TREATMENT.
(a.) The insulin treatment has been continued, as it has proven its value over the
years in aiding the schizophrenic and other cases. The number of those treated and
the resultant state as to the degree of assistance given to these patients is set out in
the following table:  Total. Per Cent.
Recovered  23 26
Much improved  11 12
Improved   35 39
Unimproved  20 23 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT.
HH 11
Disposal—
Discharged 	
Discharged later
Transferred to electro-shock
Remaining	
Total.
Per Cent
52
58
5
6
11
12
21
24
Total
89
One naturally looks primarily at the benefit the patient receives, but the saving in
the large amount of money to the hospital must not be overlooked in any form of
treatment administered.
(b.) The electric shock treatment has shown more and more beneficial results.
It has wide application in the various cases, which is set out clearly below, and the
complete course was given to 239 patients:—
Male.
Female.
Total.
Percentage.
13
15
19
25
25
19
67
56
38
34
86
81
15.89
14.23
35.89
33.89
Totals	
72
167
239
Disposal—
Discharged	
23
9
2
10
24
4
55
14
2
25
4
66
1
78
23
4
■ 35
4
90
5
32.64
9.62
1.67
14.64
1.67
37.65
2.09
Totals          	
72
167
239
We were very fortunate to obtain the interest and services of Dr. Frank Turnbull
to guide our neurological branch; he operates on, and watches over, the after-treatment
of our lobotomy cases. He has already done nine cases, with much benefit to the
patients and the hospital. Positively the most outstanding types were chosen—those
who were most difficult to treat and who did not respond to any other known methods.
Results are not given for the reason that Dr. Turnbull will report them later on when
the numbers are sufficient for a special article.
In recent years the method of treating the venereal disease cases has improved
tremendously.    Last year 54 such patients underwent remedial care.
At the present time the X-ray Department is doing chest X-rays on all the
admissions and on the general whole patient population each year. This enables
tubercular cases to be diagnosed very early, and proper treatment instituted in the
incipient stages. As a result, our incidence of tuberculosis is greatly reduced. There
are at the present time 69 active tubercular cases under treatment at Essondale. This
same procedure is carried on at the New Westminster branch, and a total of 14 active
cases are under treatment there. The work in this department has greatly increased.
The chests of the patients are checked on admission and at stated periods. The staff is
also carefully watched. These procedures are naturally to the advantage of the hospital
and Province at large, but it makes this branch of our service busier than ever, as can
be seen in the report, and it is now considered that a full-time head should take over.
Dr. Gee has always done this work, but now must be relieved of this ever-growing
demand. HH 12 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
The optometrist was able to examine and prescribe for 143 patients and, in addition,
carry on the required repairs arising in this field. There has been much relief given
to those suffering from eye strain.
The laboratory has done excellent work and under difficult circumstances of being
understaffed due to war conditions; nevertheless, it has always been of great aid to the
medical service. The volume of work has been considerable, and the overcrowded
conditions affect this situation to a great degree, but, even with the presence of these
difficulties, the reports come through in fairly good time, and the entire number of
examinations totalled in all 18,873.
In the Physiotherapy Department much good work has been accomplished, yet
sufficient staff has not been available to enable us to extend this treatment to the degree
we have in mind.
Psychology has been instituted in the hospital to a more practical degree, as will be
seen by the report given elsewhere. This study is to be placed in the educational field
and worked up as circumstances permit. The present battery of test carried on gives
the doctors a clearer insight into the status of the personality.
Dr. Milton Jones has been very active in the dental service to the patients. Much
was done in the way of treatments, fillings, repair, and prophylaxis, with considerable
relief and satisfaction to those cared for.
The activity in the Occupational Department has continued during the year. Great
difficulty is still experienced in obtaining the proper materials, and there again shortage
of staff is in evidence. This service is much appreciated by the patients and is a
satisfactory method of treatment for those engaged in it.
The work in the beauty-parlour is progressing favourably. We are hoping to have
more operators; those already in this department are interested and enthusiastic and
anxious to build it up. They have opened a manicuring-booth and are doing some
facials and scalp treatments as well as marcels and finger-waves. Patients are also
receiving haircuts regularly, and a big improvement has been noted in this respect.
A radio has been installed and has proven to have beneficial effects; the patients are
quieter and there are fewer disturbed reactions.
Miss Parsons, R.N., was made Director of Nursing following the resignation of
Mrs. Duke. Miss Pullan, in turn, took over Miss Parsons' place as senior instructress
in the nursing-school. In order to build up the teaching personnel, two chosen nurses
were sent to the nursing-school at McGill, where they had service in the Allan Memorial
Psychiatric Institute. Their experience has been most valuable to the hospital,
especially in the training of personnel. Miss Parsons is pleased at the progress made
in our school, and it has been difficult to carry on, as you are all aware what a stringent
shortage there is in the whole field of nursing.
The Social Service Department has had a large load to carry. It is a long, tedious
road to travel to gain sufficient trained staff. This is natural because it is a recent
service, and excess trained personnel is not available. However, the growth of the
service is steady and of great value to the patients in receiving information about the
family situation and preparing the family for the return of the patient and his
re-establishment. The field service throughout the Province has always been a great
aid in furthering the rehabilitation of the patient in the home as well as giving a full
picture of the situation from which he came.
The work of the Child Guidance Clinic has increased. The growth and demand for
clinical service for children have made it necessary to appoint Dr. Byrne as Director of
Clinics. He is arranging for a full-time clinic in Vancouver and Victoria, and also a
travelling clinic to periodically cover the whole Province. They are able to go to only
the principal towns on occasions.   There is difficulty in selecting personnel, and it is SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. HH 13
not possible to do more than is being done at the present time.    There is need of a
second clinical team in Vancouver, but this will be arranged for at a later date.
In order to relieve the monotony of institutional life and enhance the treatment of
patients, a Director of Recreation has been appointed. In the experience of the institution, rarely has anything been received with such outspoken favour by patients and
staff as adding recreation to our programme. In the past, moving pictures have been
shown weekly, but not all could attend, so now shows are put on actually in the wards
by using the 16-mm. machine. In this way picture shows are available to every patient.
Music is supplied at the dances and other entertainments. In folk-singing, pieces are
shown on the screen.    Outdoor music is used also by the public address hook-up system.
CHANGES IN STAFF.
V-E Day, May 7th, 1945, and V-J Day, August 14th, 1945, were days of great
rejoicing to us all. Not only did it mean the end of hostilities, but it meant that our
doctors who were on active service would be coming back to us, and also that our
numerous trained attendants and other personnel would be returning as well.
Mrs. Duke, who had been our Superintendent of Nurses for many years, left to be
with her husband, following his return from overseas.
Dr. R. L. Whitman, D.P.M., joined our staff, following his retirement from the
Army.
Harry Bailey, attendant at our institution in New Westminster, and Mr. Adams,
engineer at Essondale, were superannuated July 31st, 1945. Also, on March 31st, 1946,
H. E. Bristow and C. E. S. Wilkinson, attendants at New Westminster, were superannuated, and the institution feels the loss of these valued employees who have served
us long and faithfully.
COMMENTS.
The cottages for the treatment of elderly patients are well under way and will
serve to accommodate some of those who have been admitted during the period of construction, and will thus assist a little towards relieving the overcrowding. The buildings are comfortable, well planned, pleasant, durable, and are of cheaper construction.
The new treatment unit is under construction, the excavations having started in
January, 1946. This is a unit which is long overdue. Here will be housed the newly
admitted cases, who will receive treatment in the most modern setting. The doctors
are eagerly waiting to see its completion so that they will be able to have the proper
facilities for treating their patients and can classify them in a proper degree.
RECOMMENDATIONS.
In the over-all mental hygiene programme our former suggestions (if they are
carried out) will round out a proper form of dealing with the situation; but there is
one outstanding gap, and that is the provision for out-patient treatment of adult cases,
and also preventive care. The purpose of this clinic is to handle early psychotics, pre-
psychotics, psychoneurotics, and psychosomatic cases. In our humble opinion the outpatient service of the future will be greater than the in-patient treatment, in the light
of modern knowledge of mental hygiene. It will be much more satisfactory to the
patients, relatives, and employees, and furthermore it will be a great deal more
economical.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
I would like to extend my very grateful thanks to all those who have assisted in
the work of the hospital. In this connection I wish to especially mention Dr. Ryan and
Dr. Gee, whose keen interest in and-deep knowledge of all hospital matters have done
so much towards its smooth running. HH 14 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
I also wish to voice my appreciation of all those who have worked so faithfully
during the year and whose unfailing co-operation has done much towards helping the
hospital maintain its programme.
I wish to thank the returned soldier organizations for their continued interest in
our many returned soldier patients, and for the extra comforts and entertainment provided them.
Our thanks are due to the members of the Provincial Police Department for their
courteous co-operation at all times.
The work of our branch at New Westminster, which, as you are aware, cares for
our subnormal class of patient, is most ably carried on under the directorship of Dr.
L. E. Sauriol. Regular school classes are held, which are in charge of five graduate
school-teachers. Notable progress is being made, and the children are greatly interested in their studies. More recreation is provided; there is now an industrial arts
teacher who assists in the occupational therapy department. Altogether, these children
are cheerful, busy, and happy, and we feel grateful to those who have been untiring in
their efforts to promote the welfare of these cases, which are often more difficult of
treatment.
I wish also to make favourable mention of Mr. Macgowan, our business manager,
upon whose department falls the heavy responsibility of the financial and business side
of this large institution, and it is only due to their keen interest and foresight that the
hospital has not suffered unduly from the current shortages of materials and foodstuffs.
I would also wish to speak of the excellent co-operation and assistance I have
received from T. A. Morris, supervisor of our branch institution at Saanich, and also
from Mr. Lonsdale, the foreman of works at Essondale.
Finally, to you, sir, and the Deputy Minister, and the officers of the Public Works
Department, I wish to extend my sincere gratitude for your keen sympathy and appreciation of the many problems which arise in maintaining a mental hospital of this size.
We have come a long way and are still looking forward, but our progress has only been
made possible by the close co-operation and assistance rendered by your Department.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. L. CREASE,
General Superintendent.
LABORATORY REPORT.
Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, B.C., March 31st, 1946.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D.,
General Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the laboratory at
Essondale from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946:—
Blood—
Kahn, positive   75
Kahn, negative  809
Red blood-count and haemoglobin  1,384
White blood-count and differential   1,757 LABORATORY REPORT. HH 15
Blood—Continued.
Sedimentation rate  444
Coagulation time _  5
Bleeding time  5
Platelet count  3
Reticulocyte count  8
Prothrombin time  3
Fragility  3
Grouping   322
Cross-agglutination   35
Schilling count  3
Glucose   79
Glucose tolerance  3
Non-protein nitrogen   52
Urea nitrogen  4
Uric acid  1
Creatinine   4
Cholesterol   4
Bromide  38
Rh. agglutination  27
Iron   5
Culture   20
Widal 1  79
Agglutination for B. abortus  17
Paul Bunnell  1
Serum—
Calcium   10
Phosphorus  3
Icterus index   17
Van den Bergh  28
Phosphatase  (alkali)    3
Phosphatase (acid)   1
Hanger flocculation   15
Spinal fluid—
Kahn, positive   53
Kahn, negative  52
Cell-count   19
Colloidal gold  103
Total protein   2
Sugar   1
Urines—
Routine general _•_  4,435
Acetone  1,653
Quantitative sugar  530
B romides   651
Benzidene   456
Quantitative albumin  46
Ascheim-Zondek   17
Bile  45
T.B.   1
Urobilinogen   52
Barbiturate  1 HH 16 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Smears—
Miscellaneous  451
Gonococcus   90
T.B.   17
Vincent's angina   28
Malaria  17
Trichomonas   5
Eontana  _  4
Sputum for T.B.   88
Cultures—
Miscellaneous  105
T.B.   1
Typhoid   702
Dysentery  1,171
Fseces—
Parasites   6
Occult blood   7
Injections—
Typhoid vaccine   504
Diphtheria vaccine   15
Staphylococcus toxoid   91
Pollen antigen   12
Scarlet fever toxin  72
Skin tests—
Tuberculin (Vollmer)   179
Pollen sensitivity  25
Dick test  38
Schick test  _'_  10
Schultz Charlton   3
Smallpox vaccinations   " 95
Gastric analysis  9
Gastric for T.B.   7
B.M.R.'s   54
Biopsies    3
Autopsies  _  38
Animal autopsies   25
Sections   674
Donors supplied  20
Water for bacterial count  1
Water for pH  12
Water for total acidity  1
Agglutinations for dysentery  585
Agglutinations for typhoid  183
Electrocardiographs   32
Penicillin assay   1
Ascorbic acid determinations   43
Pneumo typing  1
Dark field  2 X-RAY DEPARTMENT. HH 17
Ascitic fluid for cell count  1
Ascitic fluid for Rivalta test  1
Total number of examinations  18,793
I have, etc.,
Alice Hagen,
Technician.
X-RAY REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D.,
General Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
'   Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the X-ray department
of the hospital from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946:—
Number of patients X-rayed  _ ,
6,777
Chests     _                   _ _ _
Patients.
6,114
Films.
6,166
Gastro-intesinal _____          _
27
68
Pelvis     —   - -     _ -          - 	
      125
155
Extremities     _    _    _    _    ______   	
268
639
Heads     __    _       _     ___________
39
87
Spine     __ ---   _    -      .     	
        68
153
Shoulders   _ __       __   _   _ _ 	
        32
61
Urinary bladder     	
          2
3
Kidney _   _   ___         _ _ ___ 	
          3
3
Jaws   _          _ _ _	
        17
30
Sinuses
12
29
Teeth
        30
84
Mastoid
6
16
Ribs
        14
28
Colon          -    __   __  _ _ _ _ _
          5
17
Gall-bladder _        _   _ _ _  __      _     	
          8
23
Soft tissue                      _
          2
4
Nose _      __          _ -   	
          5
7
6,777 7,573
I have, etc.,
A. M. Gee,
Physician and Roentgenologist. HH 18
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
A
PHYSIOTHERAPY REPORT.
L. Crease, Esq., M.D.,
General Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of the treatments which were given in the physiotherapy department at Essondale from July 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946:—
Male.
Female.
Total.
189
655
55
43
844
55
109
47
30
210
298
95
175
188
152
47
30
295
305
172
229
505
603
404
188
1,341
186
1,754
252
3,095
438
I have, etc.,
Allen E.
Davidson,
Physician.
PSYCHOLOGISTS' REPORTS.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D.
General Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of work performed for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1946 :—
Stanford-Binet 	
A.S. Reaction Study 	
Bell Adjustment Inventory	
Bernreuter Personality Inventory
Gamin 	
  10
  24
  33
  32
  34
Guilford-Martin Inventory  33
  16
  24
  25
  10
Kuder Preference Record
Minnesota Multiphasic ____
Personality Schedule	
Purdue Pegboard 	
Harrower-Erickson Rorschach Test
S.T.D.C.R. 	
Strong Inventory 	
Wechsler-Bellevue 	
Willoughby E-M Scale __.
Behaviour Rating Scale
Total	
30
3
47
13
5
347
I have, etc.,
Z. Thompson,
Psychologist. DENTAL REPORT.
HH 19
CHILD GUIDANCE CLINIC.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D.,
General Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of work performed for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1946:—
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Nanaimo
and
Courtenay.
Chilliwack.
New
Westminster.
Penticton.
Fotal.
Stanford Binet	
Cattell Infant Intelligence	
California Mental Maturity	
Porteus Maze	
Betts Telebinocular	
California Test of Personality	
Minnesota Multiphasic	
Humm-Wadsworth	
Stogdill Behaviour Cards	
Monroe Reading-	
Haggerty Reading	
Gray's Oral Reading	
Iota Word Test	
Word Discrimination Test	
Detroit Word Recognition	
Columbia Vocabulary	
Ayres Spelling	
Stanford Arithmetic	
Strong Vocational Interest	
California Occupational Interest	
Minnesota Clerical Aptitude	
Turse Shorthand	
Nursing Aptitude	
Stanford Scientific Aptitude	
Meier Art Judgment	
Bennett Mechanical Comprehension
MacQuarrie Mechanical Aptitude....
Crawford Tri-dimensional	
Minnesota Rate of Manipulation	
Purdue Pegboard	
Tweezer Dexterity	
Ishihara Colour-blindness	
Special Observation	
Vocational Guidance Interviews	
Tutoring in Reading	
Totals	
537
40
12
8
200
150
91
17
1
83
43
1
2
1
1
1
29
43
20
10
2
1
6
9
13
1
5
2
32
3
1
1
40
1,412
19
1
15
34
12
13
15
179
47
46
41
12
3
200
209
103
17
1
111
74
1
2
1
1
1
46
70
20
11
3
2
1
6
9
13
1
5
2
32
3
1
2
40
I have, etc.,
Marjorie Munro,
Psychologist.
DENTAL REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D.,
General Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
SiRj—Following is the annual report of the dental department from April 1st, 1945,
to March 31st, 1946 :—
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
All patients able to be present were examined, and dental charts filed.    All acute
conditions were given precedence, and all suffering relieved the same day as reported. HH 20 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Dentures were made for patients recommended by members of the medical staff.
Restorations of carious teeth have been made as far as possible.
Examinations 	
Summary.
  645
Extractions 	
     728
Fillings inserted 	
  258
Treatments 	
  137
Local anaesthetics	
392
Dentures repaired 	
58
Dentures rebased	
12
Dentures made	
40
Bridges reDaired 	
2
Alveolotomv                                                              11
Prophylaxis 	
  142
Davis crown	
       1
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster.
All new patients were examined and record charts made.
Examinations	
Summary.
305
Diseased teeth extracted _
140
Local anaesthetics 	
85
Abscess treatments 	
6
Fillings inserted	
74
Gingivitis treatments 	
19
Pyorrhoea treatments 	
47
Palliative treatments	
91
Vincent's infection treatments
11
Dentures repaired 	
4
We have,
etc.,
Milton Jones
Emery Jones
, D.D.S
D.D.S.
BEAUTY-PARLOUR REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D.,
General Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the annual report of the appointments in the beauty-parlour
from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946:—
Marcels       312
Curls       350
Finger-waves  1,034
Shampoos   2,436
Manicures   1 950
Haircuts   7,093
Oil treatments         27
I have, etc.,
J. White. SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT. HH 21
TRAINING-SCHOOL REPORT.
The Provincial Mental Hospital school of nursing completed the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1946, with the following personnel: Registered nurses, 24; mental graduates, 30; student-nurses, 194—making a total staff of 248. This is approximately
the same number of staff members as last year. Resignations for the year were 102
and replacements were 107. Three of our mental graduates returned to the hospital
after successfully completing their course in general nursing. Two staff members are
attending the one-year course in psychiatric nursing at the University of McGill and
will return to the hospital at the termination of the course.
Another forward step has been taken in the training of male members of the staff.
The three-year course, which was resumed last fall, was temporarily set aside, and a
qualifying course for all men was set up. The training of the men has been carried on
entirely by male instructors, namely, Mr. Pritchard and his assistants R. Strong and
R. Palm. Mr. Palm is responsible for the New Westminster branch employees.
To date 60 charge and deputy charge attendants received a very short course, while 26
men received 100 hours' instruction. New Westminster branch had 19 men instructed
in the short course and 34 in the 100-hour course.
This year 29 nurses received diplomas for the three-year course in psychiatric
nursing. This is the largest group to graduate in the history of the school. Two
registered nurses completed their six-month course in postgraduate study. Certificates
were awarded to 26 men at the graduation ceremonies. Forty-eight students from
four general hospitals received a two-month affiliation course in psychiatric nursing,
and 27 nurses from the public health division of the University of British Columbia
were given a week of active observation in the departments of the hospital.
This year an attempt has been made to provide recreational facilities for nurses.
Miss Pullan and Mrs. Blythe formed an Arts and Crafts Club, and many nurses availed
themselves of the opportunity and enjoyed one evening a week. Mr. Brown, Recreational Director, is planning further recreation in swimming, badminton, and moving-
picture shows, etc. At the beginning of the school term, Mrs. Hopkins, who assisted
with classes last year, returned to the X-ray department. Miss K. Soames joined the
teaching staff. In March Miss M. E. Parsons replaced Mrs. Linea Duke as Superintendent of Nurses, and Miss E. Pullan was appointed Instructress of Nurses. Mrs.
Duke very ably directed the school through the formative stage and guided it during
the trying war period.
With new student-nurses and an active teaching programme, we are much indebted
to the medical staff, nursing staff, and other teaching personnel who have given so
freely of their time and counsel.
Mona E. Parsons, R.N.,
Superintendent of Nurses.
SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT.
This is the first report of this department after its amalgamation with the Social
Assistance Branch of the Department of the Provincial Secretary. Because the work
involves both the social services of the Child Guidance Clinic and the social services of
the Provincial Mental Hospital, the report has been divided into two sections—Child
Guidance Clinic and Essondale Mental Hospital. Figures do not mean a great deal,
and although statistics have been kept and are available, they are not being used in the
report of the Child Guidance Clinic because of the space involved. HH 22 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Child Guidance Clinics.
The two stationary clinics, Vancouver and Victoria, are now each staffed with a
permanent psychiatric social worker who, in addition to management of the clinic routine, carries a case-load of privately referred cases, as well as giving consultative services
to other social workers who have the follow-up within their own agencies of clinical
examinations. This move has been a decided advancement in the work, as there is now
an opportunity to give help at the time needed rather than through correspondence.
By " privately referred " cases we mean those cases not known or active with
another social agency. As parents come to respect the advisability of asking help for
emotional difficulties which they encounter with their children, they lose the false shame
of attending a child guidance clinic and of receiving help through that source. They
then very vigorously advise their friends to seek advice, and so with the improvements
of service given the demand for this type of examination increases. However, we are
far from secure in this endeavour. We should have sufficient psychiatrically trained
personnel to give the required help. With the lack of adequate staff we are not only
unable to sufficiently help the parents who come of their own volition and are thus
ready to help, but too great emphasis is placed upon quick results and not enough
thought and continual contact is given to ensure more lasting improvement.
Family doctors refer cases and often ask that case-work within the home should
be carried by the psychiatric social worker. These are cases we should have time for,
or else the private physician gets the idea that our services cannot assist him and the
child guidance programme has little to offer in the remedial or preventive field of
emotionally maladjusted individuals.
This department, because it represents one of the Provincial services, should be
keyed to leadership in this particular field, and for this reason do a more proficient
piece of work.
There were 127 private children's cases carried by the two social workers; 26 of
these were referred by the family physician, 18 by private schools, and the remaining
83 were referred by some member of the family—52 by the mother, 8 by the father,
and 5 by the brother or sister.
In aditidon to the latter, each worker had a number of pre-psychotic adults on
which they did case-work following clinical appointments. When a worker has this
type of service to give, she should have particularly good training and should have had
the actual contact and training with the psychotic patient in hospital setting in order
to be proficient in psychiatric social work, either in the preventive or the remedial centre.
Mental hospital social service experience is most essential.
Throughout the year the social workers of the clinic have carried on a teaching
programme to social service and public health students, as well as giving a number of
addresses to interested groups, such as women's and youth organizations, as well as
giving psychiatric counselling to social workers who asked for it in conjunction with
their case-loads.
As much opportunity as possible is given each social worker to avail herself of
further training while in the service by attending series of lectures given by staff
psychiatrists at Essondale and by courses in advanced case-work given by the Department of Social Work at the University of British Columbia. SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT. HH 23
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL AND HOME FOR THE AGED.
Statistical.
Number of cases referred to Social Service Department, including those cases
referred for probation and therapy visits only:—
In Vancouver    409
Out of Vancouver    425
     834
Disposition—
Discharged on probation—
In Vancouver     164
Out of Vancouver     323
     487
Discharged in full—
In Vancouver        20
Out of Vancouver       80
     100
Died—
In Vancouver      44
Out of Vancouver     196
     240
Report of social service work carried out by member of Social Service Department
at Essondale:—
Initial interviews to obtain social histories—
In Vancouver    347
Out of Vancouver        5
     352
Probation visits—
In Vancouver     170
Out of Vancouver	
     170
Therapy visits—
In Vancouver 5,608
Out of Vancouver	
 5,608
Collateral   1,612
Letters   1,111
The above statistics picture a volume of work achieved by three full-time and two
part-time social workers. It is needless to say that good routine is essential, but even
at that thorough work cannot be done, nor can as small a staff give adequate help to
the field service throughout the Province, to whom supervision must be carried on by
mail. If the Social Service Department can hope to fulfil the role of working in partnership with the hospital psychiatrists, they must have time as well as knowledge to
follow out plans made by the group, and to plan for adequate treatment within the
home environment to ensure the investment already made by the hospital treatment.
As soon as patients arrive at the hospital, plans for their " after care " must be
considered, and the machinery put in motion. This is especially essential since treatments for the mentally ill are so actively used and where patients must be discharged as
soon as possible because of the overcrowded condition of the hospital.
The after-care can generally be accomplished through good case-work being done
within the patient's own family group, but to do this, good co-operation between the HH 24 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
home and hospital must be established and kept. The social worker is generally the
person best known to both. She represents the " outside " to the patient and the
" inside " to the relative. Families need to be encouraged to accept their responsibilities, and to do this they need to know that someone is near to give a helping hand.
In the last year six patients have been rehabilitated in homes other than with
relatives or personal friends. These patients were boarded in homes approved by municipal authorities and paid for by the social assistance received from the area from
which the patient originally came. One patient had a chest condition, for which she
had to remain in Vancouver to receive active treatment. She finally progressed well
enough to be self-supporting. A second is partly self-supporting, and two have returned to different Provinces and to their own relatives. One has returned to the
mental hospital for further care, and the other is self-supporting and welcomed by her
own family who were formerly much against her ever leaving the hospital.
The social service workers at the hospital have not participated in the Child Guidance Clinic this past year. Consequently, there has been more continuity in the service
given to the hospital and to the social work carried on by the field workers of the Social
Assistance Branch. If it was not for the latter workers, our patients and their families
would receive little help. For this reason, every effort is used to give good supervision
to the field service and to give as much help to them while they are at the hospital
during their orientation period.
Lectures to the Essondale school of nursing were given, and student training was
participated in both for the University of British Columbia social work students and
postgi'aduate nurses attached to the hospital. The newly developed family service of
the Social Assistance Branch has been a very great help in the family care of our
patients' dependents.
The private social agencies of Vancouver and Victoria and the municipal workers
have been most co-operative throughout the Province.
We will be very glad when we can report even a fair coverage for all our patients,
but to do so we will need many more workers attached right to the hospital and more
psychiatric training for field workers throughout the Province.
Josephine F. Kilburn.
CHILD GUIDANCE CLINIC.
Attached herewith is a consolidated report of the work done in the Child Guidance
Clinic from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
There has been a noticeable increase in the number of clinics held, the number of
cases seen, the agencies referring the cases, and in the requests for services of the
clinic in areas of the Province not already visited.
In meeting the needs of the Province by extending and improving clinics there are
two difficulties that must be overcome, namely, geographical and personnel. It is felt
that adequate coverage within the standards recommended by the American Psychiatric
Association can be provided by four psychiatric teams. Each team would consist of
one psychiatrist with special training in child psychiatry, two clinical psychologists,
four psychiatric social workers, including a case-work supervisor, and necessary clerical
help.
At present the nuclei of two teams have been carrying on the work in Vancouver,
Victoria, Nanaimo (including Courtenay), New Westminster, and Chilliwack (including
Mission). During the past year clinics have been held for the first time in Vernon
and Penticton. Plans have been completed to conduct clinics in Nelson, Prince Rupert,
and Prince George in the near future. SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT.                                             HH 25
With the acquisition of additional trained personnel to complete four psychiatric
teams, it is planned to station one team in Victoria, where facilities are already avail
able, to serve Victoria and Vancouver Island.    The psychiatrist from this team would
act also as consulting psychatrist to the Provincial Mental Home at Colquitz.    Two .
teams would be stationed in Vancouver to serve the Lower Mainland area, and the-
fourth team would act as a travelling team to cover the rest of the Province.    In the
meantime the work is being carried out from the Vancouver clinic.
In addition to the work in child guidance, the clinic, in working outside Vancouver's
metropolitan area, has provided clinical services where indicated for pre-psychotic
adults, the aged, and for patients on probation from the mental hospital.
A function of the clinical service that has shown very rapid growth is a consultative
service, which is available to parents in regard to difficulties in child training and to
social agencies who discuss difficulties they are finding and need to adjust while await-
ing a clinic appointment for their clients.    Frequently, as a result of the consultative
conference, it becomes unnecessary for the client to be examined at the clinic, thus
relieving the case-load.
The staff of the clinic spends considerable time attending meetings and discussion
groups, where an opportunity is presented to disseminate information about the clinic's
functions and types of cases treated to those agencies that can make use of the clinic
services in helping to solve their perplexing problems.
The work of the clinic has been aided materially by the understanding co-operation
of the various referring agencies who have submitted the initial case-histories and
assisted in making possible the recommended treatment.
Statistics.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Nanaimo.
Chilliwack.
New
Westminster.
Penticton.
Vernon.
Total.
Number of clinics held	
216
23
5
3
3
1
1
252
New cases	
528
91
12
10
14                    2
4
661
Males—
33
9
[
42
260
43
9
7
12                    1
1
1
333
Females—
Adults....	
88                   16               	
1
105
'   147                   23                      3
2
4
2
1
1
2
3
181
1.1
104                   21
9
Males—
|
8
55
2
11
7
3
1
1
11
77
Children	
Females—
Adults      	
10
31
632
1
7
112
2
21
1
14
15
1
4
4
11
42
802
Total cases	
Physicals	
585
91
21
14
15
4                     4
734
321
41
280
264
92
172
480
52
9
43
39
16
23
91
16
16
5
5
21
10
10
4
1
3
14
13
13
2
2
15
2                     1
1
1 1
2 3
415
51
364
319
109
210
629
2
4
3
4
Play-room observation	
450
450
54
15
54
15
P.H.N, students	
15
15
578
86
21
16
8
5
4
718
Consulting conferences	
32
11
7
50
Psychiatric interviews	
667                 191
27
26
15
11
8
945
18
1
18
1 HH 26
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Sources of Cases.
Source.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Nanaimo.
Chilliwack.
New
Westminster.
Penticton.
Vernon.
5
47
27
101
35
231
8
38
9
25
15
1
12
1
9
65
2
1
24
27
2
22
1
4
7
18
1
6
2
1
6
12
9
5
14
1
1
3
4
Social Service Department—
T.B. Social Service	
	
1
Ultan P. Byrne, M.B., D.P.H.,
Director. STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 27
STATISTICAL TABLES.
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich, from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Movement of Population.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
In residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1945	
1,761
363
275
58
3
2
1
1,369
251
94
2
3,130
614
275
152
5
2
1
2,463
446
1,716
388
On probation, carried forward from 1944—45, Essondale	
On probation, carried forward from 1944—45, New-Westmin-
Escaped, carried forward from 1944—45, New Westminster
4,179
Admitted during the year 1945—46—
By ordinary forms...'.	
400
18
18
2
8
361
9
15
3
761
27
33
2
11
834
Total under treatment, Essondale, New Westminster, and
Saanich, April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946	
Discharged during period April  1st,  1945,  to March 31st,
1946—
(a.)   From Essondale—
55
115
63
5
72
1
137
62
110
45
5
98
71
117
225
108
10
170
1
208
2,909
495
2,105
408
5,014
448
391
839
(_».)  From New Westminster—
As improved	
5
7
5
11
2
3
4
8
7
10
9
19
Died	
28
17
45
(c.)  From Saanich—
1
1
1
13
1
1
3
1
13
19
19
Total discharged from Essondale, New Westminster,  and
903
Total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich
2,414         1,696
|
4,110 HH 28
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich, from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946—Continued.
Movement of Population.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Essondale—
Total on books, March 31st, 1945	
1,819
446
18
7
1   1,463
388
11
j
3,282
834
29
7
2,290
521
1,862
421
Admissions during 1945—46 	
4,152
Discharged during 1945—46    	
448
37
36
391
30
839
67
36
Transferred to Saanich	
942
366
37
253
30
619
67
1,769
1,441
3,210
New Westminster—
Total on books, March 31st, 1945	
403
46
283
28
686
28
18
17
11
45
29
74
278
36
278
36
357
255
Saanich—
Total on books, March 31st, 1945	
314
26
314
Discharged during 1945—46	
19
7
19
7
26
1,769
357
288
1,441
255
3,210
612
288
288
Total in residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1946	
2,414
1,696
Grand total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and
Saanich, March 31st, 1946	
4,110
Daily average population 	
Percentage of discharged on admissions   (not including deaths).
Percentage of recoveries on admission	
Percentage of deaths on whole number under treatment	
4,057.64
57.43
14.02
5.84 STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 29
Table No. 2.—
Showing in Summary Form the Operations of
its Inception.
the Hospital since
Year.
in
C
.2
w
JO
1
Discharges.
u_
A
S
a
-P
g
•a °
°_; %
►_r +*   _i
A a qj
Q)
0D
C.
01
u
o
c
GO
S3
0)
!.
QJ
a
u
0>
A
E
0>  <y
!«
PI
d 3 _.
oj > —
0 0 e
u 0 c
0  QJ 13
Percentage of Discharges to Admissions (Deaths
excluded).
QJ
■8
QJ
O
>
o
Oi
p.
T3
Gj
s
>
-P o
in
Percentage of
Deaths to Who
Number under
Treatment.
1872	
18
15
12
29
22
14
16
18
17
13
7
8
10
20
27
36
26
41
52
49
52
1
10
4
3
11
4
7
4
5
2
3
3
4
3
1
i
5
3
10
5
3
8
8
5
5
2
3
2
16
14
19
32
35
38
36
41
48
48
49
49
51
61
66
77
5
13
3
3
5
7
1
2
10
5
11
2
2
2
28
18
31
26
48
54
49
54
54
58
61
55
57
59
71
88
102
103
123
152
166
175
179
213
224
228
246
285
327
356
377
413
466
480
505
552
666
765
816
896
1,034
1,065
1,264
1,364
5.55
66.66
33.33
10.34
50.00
28.57
43.75
22.22
29.41
38.46
42.85
50.00
20.00
25.00
37.03
41.66
46.15
34.15
32.69
38.77
32.69
31.81
16.25
46.77
35.93
27.03
33.33
30.69
33.63
34.78
24.79
27.34
40.00
33.33
23.03
21.30
28.30
31.00
30.00
19.57
18.90
22.63
14.43
25.00
20.68
23.72
20.00
20.20
14.17
20.08
20.77
18.56
13.66
12.00
15.38
5.55
80.00
33.33
26.89
63.63
78.57
62.50
27.77
29.41
61.54
57.14
62.50
60.00
25.00
59.25
55.55
69.23
46.34
44.23
46.94
51.92
72.72
40.00
64.51
75.00
37.83
49.38
62.37
57.52
52.17
50.41
53.96
62.61
61.78
52.06
41.20
53.90
64.60
59.28
54.42
5.55
1873	
16 12
1874	
11 53
1875	
20 83
1876	
1877	
6 12
1878 .....
16 16
1879	
14.81
1880	
8 62
1881	
S
3
8 19
1882	
3 1
4 1
2    I        4
3 63
1883	
5.26
1884	
3.33
1885	
5
5
6.94
1886	
10              6
15     |         5
12    |        6
14    |        5
17             6
19    |        4
17     1       10
6
5
3
4
12
20
13
14
19
20
9
14
19
6.81
1887	
4 80
1888	
82
5
2 87
1889	
100
117
123
135
133
162
164
18
17
6
12
29
2
3.25
1890	
7.64
1891	
11.69
1892	
6.95
1893	
44
14
18
19
11
25
7.60
1894	
80
62
64
74
81
101
13
29
23
8.92
1895	
8.92
1896	
171
7
3.94
1897	
20
8
203     1       32
5.69
1898	
27
,31
13
221
234
258
284
311
349
321
348
388
461
507
536
595
690
752
919
1,027
1,090
1,205
1,301
1,347
1,458
1,566
1,649
1,697
1,784
1,884
1,995
2,125
18
13
24
26
27
38
27
43
73
46
29
48
105
6.66
1899	
32
21
6.42
1900	
113    |      38
115     |       40
121     j       30
139    j      38
115    |      46
123     |       43
150    j      36*
221    |      48
230     j       68*
232     |       73t
280     1       84
332    |      67t
375    |      74*
380    1      90§
402    |      58
332     1       83
27     |       29
20    j      25
31            25
37    |      26
26     !       26
8.14
1901	
6.63
1902	
6.06
1903	
5.57
1904	
5.42
1905	
1906 	
33
43
43
56
77
82
114
128
146
27
2S
39
57
40
41
60
76
67
5.34
5.04
1907	
1908	
5.08
7.44
1909	
6.40
1910	
4.57
1911	
5.83
1912      	
62
53.80
7.02
1913	
167
108
63
115
96
46
111
108
83
48
87
100
111
130
	
62.10     |     5.30
1914    	
126     |       74
91     j       89
96     1       80
78    j    106
95     I     132
■   45.77    |    5.43
1915	
	
1,437
52.41     1     6.19
1916	
1917	
353
371
375
574
489  .
478
438
447
461
475
494
73t
88
75
116
88
96
91
84t
63
57||
76§
	
1,527
1,650
1,753'
2,025
2,043
2,137
2,180
2,234
2,327
2,434
2,565
47.87
44.74
45.33
58.71
72.60
57.32
59.36
64.20
66.16
62.53
5.24
6.42
1918      	
7.47
Jan. 1, 1919, to
March 31, 1920
1920-1921	
221
173
178
167
121
242
240
132
122
114
133
163
138
142
6.51
5.97
1921-1922	
5.33
1922-1923	
1923-1924	
6.10
7.25
1924-1925	
5.93
1925-1926...     	
5.83
1926-1927	
171
161
50.00    |    6.27
1
1
* Three not insa
ne.             t One not insane.             t Two not insane.             § Four not ir
sane.
]] Six not insane. HH 30
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Hospital since
its Inception—Continued.
B0
C
Q
CO
w
i
«.
Discharges.
03
£
QJ
a
B
QJ
T3 <_.
•s °
QJ  0J
0_  S_  J.
-0 CJ**
3 "^ u
£ -p c.
«*.  C.   QJ
QJ
__
ca
$
u
o
C
Qj'
_.
9
QJ
K
V
0
u
CJ
_o
1
ll
<p       to
g.s§
Percentage of Discharges to Admissions (Deaths
excluded).
oi
Year.
13
QJ
u
o
>
o
CJ
QJ
M
>6
QJ
u
>
43   0
o o
Is
■gJJ
oji> e__
$*> h QJ
uti S s
OJ o^ _,
PhO!?_-i
1927-1928	
542
543
602
632
562
635
610
653
679
783
834
827
869
864
834
803
840
822
834
75*
92t
118*
70*
58K
44§
61$
71*
63*
78t
74
72*
111**
1071
71 tt
91«
87
96§§
117tt
252
294
311
235
299
323
309
349
304
300
330
345
455
410
400
443
423
377
351
147
181
223
191
181
195
200
221
291
268
207
208
230
254
255
260
309
300
240
2,269
2,347
2,411
2,550
2,676
2,824
2,960
3,080
3,180
3,301
3,487
3,612
3,710
3,836
3,902
3,925
3,960
4,019
4,112
144
78
64
139
126
148
136
120
100
121
186
125
98
126
66
23
35
59
93
2,743
2,914
3,063
3,148
3,214
3,390
3,530
3,721
3,838
4,067
4,255
4,471
4,713
4,781
4,843
4,919
4,965
4,960
5,014
13.28
16.76
19.10
10.60
10.32
6.92
10.00
10.87
9.27
9.96
8.87
8.71
11.39
12.38
8.51
11.32
10.36
10.46
14.02
60.33
71.07
71.26
64.24
63.52
58.42
60.65
64.32
54.05
63.60
67.30
78.72
88.50
79.97
56.46
66.50
61.66
58.39
57.43
5.36
1928-1929	
6.21
1929-1930	
7.28
1930-1931     	
6.06
1931-1932	
5.63
1932-1933     	
5.75
1933-1934	
1934 1935      	
5.66
5.94
1935 1936      	
7.58
1936-1937	
1937-1938	
6.59
4.86
1938-1939     	
4.65
1939-1940	
1940 1941     	
4.88
5.31
1941-1942	
6.54
1942-1943	
1943-1944	
1944-1945	
1945-1946	
5.31
6.02
6.04
5.84
* Three not insane.
** Twelve not insane.
t One not insane,
ff Ten not insane.
: Two not insane. § Four not insane. fl Five not insane.
$} Eight not insane. §§ Seven not insane.
Table No. 3.—Showing the Total Number of Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths
from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Months.
Admissions.
Discharges.
Deaths.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1945.
April	
38
44
42
31
35
29
38
38
32
44
29
46
29
35
42
24
28
31
42
30
24
38
30
35
67
79
84
55
63
60
80
68
56
82
59
81
18
17
16
26
15
15
28
16
25
33
19
24
23
19
18
18
20
20
18
12
23
20
17
19
41
36
34
44
35
35
46
28
48
53
36
43
15
8
14
15
11
9
15
21
19
9
16
9
9
6
3
6
5
4
6
6
11
9
10
4
24
14
17
21
16
13
21
27
30
1946.
18
Totals	
446
388
834
252
227
479
161
79 STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 31
Table No. 4.—Showing the Civil State of Patients admitted from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
136
238
9
39
21
3
175
120
5
74
14
311
358
14
113
35
3
446
388
834
Table No. 5.—Showing Religious Denominations of Patients admitted from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Religious Denominations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
4
8
4
1
1
2
6
1
2
38
1
1
1
11
4
2
268
1
73
2
2
2
1
8
3
6
1
1
2
2
3
22
2
1
2
271
1
59
1
4
1
1
2
3
2
7
8
10
1
1
1
1
2
8
3
2
3
60
2
1
1
1
12
6
2
539
2
132
3
6
3
1
1
2
11
446
388
834 HH 32
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Table No. 6.—Showing the Degree of Education of those admitted from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Degree of Education.
Male.
Female.
Total.
14
79
214
90
38
11
12
94
195
45
37
5
26
Good                                       	
173
409
135
75
16
Totals                	
446
388
834
Table No. 7.—Showing the Nationality of those admitted from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
4
1
11
3
1
69
1
2
1
6
1
3
4
7
1
1
2
12
10
3
7
30
1
7
1
18
3
6
3
20
93
17
2
7
56
3
6
22
1
2
1
2
1
75
3
2
2
1
1
4
13
2
2
5
6
1
4
20
1
3
23
3
3
1
18
92
12
1
5
38
5
32
2
2
14
5
2
144
1
5
3
8
Holland	
2
4
8
20
Italy	
4
17
Poland	
16
4
50
2
10
1
41
6
9
4
Canada—
38
Q
Totals 	
446
388 STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 33
Table No. 8.-
-Showing what Districts contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
1
1
1
9
1
2
1
4
4
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
6
1
	
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
	
5
1
1
3
	
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
20
1
1
1
1
1
1
15
1
1
2
3
5
3
5
1
4
1
2
1
1
6
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
7
1
5
1
69
3
6
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
6
26
1
1
12
7
2
1
4
2
3
1
1
5
5
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
72
1
2
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
4
3
1
2
21
2
3
2
1
1
2
1
3
1
4
1
2
1
2
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
	
1
4
141
Kimberley	
3
1
8
1
Lake Cowichan	
1
1
1
3
8
Bridal Falls
Lillooet	
1
Lynn Valley	
Maillardville	
1
2
Marpole	
2
Buffalo Creek	
Burnahy	
Matsqui	
Mayne Island	
2
2
1
1
Mission	
7
1
1
Moyie	
2
6
Naramata :	
1
Nelson	
9
Cobble Hill	
Neskainlith Indian Reserve..
1
2
47
1
North Kamloops	
2
North Pender Island	
1
North Vancouver	
15
Oakalla Prison Farm	
9
Osoyoos	
1
Paldi	
1
Penticton	
4
Pioneer Mine	
1
Pitt Meadows	
1
Port Alberni	
7
Port Alice	
1
Port Coquitlam	
6
Port Edward	
1
Port Hammond	
2
Field
Port Mann	
4
Pouce Coupe	
1
3
Prince George	
6
Prince Rupert	
G
4
1
Qualicum Beach	
1
1
1
2
1
High Bar Indian Reserve
1
1
Hudson Hope	
Kamloops	
1
1
2
1
8
Carried forward	
69
72
141
194
165
359 HH 34
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Table No. 8.—Showing what Districts contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946—Continued.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
194
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
165
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
359
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
209
2
1
1
197
3
18
2
2
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
178
1
4
159
1
1
30
1
1
4
6
1
1
387
Salmo	
Taylor Flats	
Trail	
1
6
1
1
Seton Lake	
Shoreacres	
Vancouver	
Vanderhoof	
356
1
4
48
2
1
Wells..
2
1
Squilax	
Westview	
White Rock
1
8
2
1
1
2
209
178
387
1
Totals	
446
388
834 STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 35
Table No. 9.—Showing the Occupations of those admitted from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
1
1
1
2
1
4
3
3
1
1
1
2
1
10
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
4
3
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
10
1
1
1
14
2
1
10
1
2
1
1
17
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
42
6
5
1
1
1
2
2
3
1
217
1
1
6
3
1
1
1
66
3
1
212
19
3
1
5
1
1
1
1
6
10
1
61
2
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
40
1
1
10
1
5
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
13
1
5
2
2
2
1
1
3
3
2
255
1
	
1
1
.......
78
8
	
	
	
	
.
	
	
13
9
2
3
6
1
6
1
467
19
3
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
7
10
Caddy	
1
139
8
2
2
1
1
1
Clerk	
11
2
1
10
1
2
3
1
Plumber	
o
1
1
3
1
1
1
[        17
1       1      	
1
1       1      	
5
1       1      	
1       1      	
1
1 1      	
        I           1
42
5                  1
5
1
        1            1
1-      |
2 I       	
2
        1            1
217
       [           1
1
        1           <»
3
1
1
1
66
       1          3
     !      i
1
Rancher	
Repairman	
1
1
1
53
1
Sales clerk	
4
10
1
14
1
Seaman	
2
2
3
Service-station operator	
Shipwright	
Shipvard-worker	
1
Fisherman _	
1
1
1
Foundry-worker	
1
Soldier	
13
1
Stenographer	
3
11
Tailor	
2
2
Telephone-worker	
Tile-setter	
2
1
Insurance agent	
Iron-worker	
Trackman	
Trapper	
1
3
3
Usherette	
1
6
Laundress	
Weaver	
Welder	
Totals	
1
2
212               255               467
446               388
834
[
| HH 36
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Table No. 10.—Showing the Ages of those admitted from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Age.
Male.
Female.
Total.
26
15
31
36
36
32
37
23
25
28
32
30
31
32
32
23
19
30
30
30
40
28
26
27
28
26
22
20
21
18
49
„     20    „         	
34
„     25    „                                     	
61
„     30    „                                                   	
66
„     35    „                        	
66
40    „                                               	
72
45    „                               	
65
50    „                                                              	
49
„     55    „        	
52
„     60    „                     !	
56
65    „                         	
58
70    „                      	
52
75    „                                            	
51
80    „                                  	
53
Over    80    „                                           	
50
446
388
834
Table No. 11.—Showing the Number of Attacks in those admitted from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Number of Attacks.
Male.
Female.
Total.
First...                                                             	
257
46
17
13
2
1
1
9
4
96
226
71
28
13
7
3
2
9
4
25
483
117
Third                                                                                           	
45
Fourth        	
26
Fifth	
9
Sixth                                                                         	
3
3
Eighth                                             	
1
18
8
121
446
388
834
Table No. 12.—Showing the Alleged Duration of Attack prior to Admission from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Duration of Attack.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Un
39
67
47
25
13
25
30
13
2
6
4
132
43
32
64
52
34
26
21
37
22
9
7
4
48
32
71
131
46
67
Ov
No
Un
Lif
13
8
Totals	
446
388
834 STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 37
Table No. 13.—Showing Statistics of Heredity in those admitted from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Heredity.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Paternal branch	
3
8
11
6
414
4
5
9
13
2
355
4
8
17
24
8
769
8
Maternal branch	
Heredity	
Heredity, inferred	
Heredity, unknown	
Not insane	
Totals	
446
388
834
Table No. 14.—Showing the Alleged Cause of Attack in those admitted from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Alleged Cause.
Male.
Female.
Total.
15
34
....     1
1
1
8
207
1
1
3
2
12
1
11
6
8
3
2
1
1
23
1
4
1
1
88
1
5
3
4
36
1
2
1
10
203
1
2
11
13
2
9
5
1
2
3
2
6
1
4
1
60
1
1
6
19
70
1
1
3
Childbirth            	
4
24
8
2
5
3
1
29
1
1
8
1
1
1
148
1
1
6
9
446
388
834 HH 38
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Table No. 15.—Showing the State of Bodily Health in those admitted from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Bodily Condition.
Male.
Female.
Total.
156
245
45
135
190
63
291
435
108
Totals	
446
388
834
Table No. 16.—Showing the Form of Mental Disorder in those admitted from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Form of Disorder.
Male.
Female.
Total.
34
12
23
32
9
33
9
12
4
1
• 9
6
10
143
88
15
3
1
2
36
13
5
30
6
66
11
8
4
1
1
9
3
1
8
121
59
4
2
70
25
28
62
15
99
20
20
8
2
1
18
9
1
18
264
147
19
3
2
1
2
Totals                                           	
446
388
834
Table No. 17.—Showing the Number allowed out on Probation and Results from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Results.
Male.
Female.
Total.
55
121
71
5
46
81
62
112
48
5
42
102
117
233
119
10
88
Still out at end of the year	
183
Totals ....                         	
379
371
750 STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 39
Table No. 18.—Showing the Alleged Duration of Insanity prior to Admission
in those discharged from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Less than 1 week	
„    1 month	
,,    2 months	
„    3 months	
„    6 months	
„ 12 months	
„    2 years	
,,    3 years	
Three years and over..
Not insane	
Unknown	
Totals...	
Alleged Duration.
252
ale.
Female.
20
23
45
59
21
19
11
8
14
20
7
19
16
12
5
4
28
27
5
5
80
31
227
Total.
43
104
40
19
34
26
28
9
55
10
111
Table No. 19.—Showing the Length of Residence of those discharged from
April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946.
Discharged
recovered.
Discharged
improved.
Discharged
unimproved.
Not
Insanb.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
6
11
8
21
1
10
10
22
8
14
13
30
25
12
3
7
2
14
12
27
16
16
9
3
2
11
41
3
2
4
6
7
1
3
2
2
21
2
2
7
8
3
2
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
7               13
2
1
1
5
1
1
j
Totals	
55               62
120       1     112
71
48
6                5 HH 40
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich.
Register
Initials.
Sex.
Age.
Time
in Hospital.
Certified Cause.
No.
Years.
Months.
Days.
3869
J. H. S.
M.
67
31
4
16
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
8039
C. F.
M.
70
21
3
14
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
10354
C. A. B.
M.
48
16
6
7
Chronic myocarditis.
17021
E. L.
F.
85
6
7
8
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
22204
E. A. D.
M.
76
0
4
30
Exhaustion due to senility.
9912
B. R.
M.
60
17
4
30
Coronary thrombosis.
22386
W. A.
M.
68
20
2
17
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
21829
M. W.
F.
56
0
10
14
Cerebral haemorrhage.
4585
B. M.
F.
53
29
6
11
Lobar pneumonia.
22246
S. M. T.
F.
72
0
4
20
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
16079
G. R.
M.
74
7
9
14
Chronic myocarditis.
21424
D. P. M.
M.
78
1
4
5
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
21711
E.S.
F.
25
1
0
20
Disseminated sclerosis ; undulant fever.
2556
J. P. C.
F.
65
35
3
1
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
22250
R. S. McK.
M.
76
0
4
24
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
22179
G. E. H.
M.
55
0
5
22
Cancer of the head of the pancreas.
14683
W. R. H.
M.
34
9
7
13
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
22499
M. R. F.
M.
66
0
1
9
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
15405
F. N.
F.
63
8
7
27
Chronic myocarditis.
22406
W. McC.
M.
67
0
2
7
Exhaustion due to senility.
14100
N. S.
F.
56
10
6
6
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
6882
A. A.
M.
58
23
11
16
Chronic myocarditis.
20426
M. A.
F.
25
2
8
7
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
22619
M. K. B.
F.
54
0
0
9
Cerebral arteriosclerosis ; haemorrhage into the
pons.
21487
J. F. R.
M.
59
1
4
15
Exhaustion due to Alzheimer's disease.
18975
W. P.
M.
71
4
5
14
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20773
W. E. C.
F.
63
2
3
11
Carcinoma of liver.
21631
P. R. McL.
M.
63
1
2
19
Subacute combined degeneration; pernicious
anaemia.
12332
H. R. W.
M.
40
13
5
11
Bronchopneumonia.
22403
H. A.
F.
71
0
3
19
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
21890
F.J.
F.
68
0
11
8
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20661
F. G. S.
M.
18
2
5
12
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
22387
J. P.
M.
69
0
4
3
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
22668
M. C.
M.
67
0
0
5
Chronic myocarditis.
22675
J. E. F.
M.
73
0
0
4
Chronic myocarditis.
21883
P. G.
M.
60
0
11
16
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
22394
S. S.
F.
65
0
4
4
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
16107
W. V.
M.
58
7
10
24
Chronic myocarditis.
18009
A. C. T.
M.
55
5
7
26
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
22438
W. T. C.
M..
74
0
3
26
Acute myocarditis.
11875
M. B. F.
M.
61
14'
3
6
Chronic myocarditis due to general paresis.
9701
J. C.
M.
64
18
0
18
Chronic myocarditis.
12693
0. H. N.
M.
74
12
11
4
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis.
22674
F. G. W."
M.
60
0
0
25
Exhaustion due to involutional melancholia.
11859
G. H. B.
M.
71
14
4
5
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
22297
C. w. w.
M.
84
0
6
11
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
15002
A. B.
M.
65
9
3
29
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
22436
G. R.
M.
58
0
4
13
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
13369
H. H.
M.
67
11
10
5
Chronic myocarditis.
22710
A. McK.
F.
73
0
0
22
Chronic myocarditis.
20393
E.N.
F.
55
2
10
22
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
5634
J. A. B.
M.
58
26
9
10
Coronary thrombosis.
18670
T. M.
M.
61
4
11
6
Chronic myocarditis.
22720
A. L.
M.
65
0
0
21
Chronic myocarditis.
18809
G. McC.
F.
55
4
9
14
Cerebral haemorrhage.
22732
C. McK.
M.
66
0
0
20
Coronary thrombosis.
22489
A. P.
F.
73
0
4
2
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
18226
W. R.
M.
74
5
5
23
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis.
22103
S. A. F.
M.
1
81
0
9
22
Chronic myocarditis ; chronic passive congestion of the lungs and spleen; intracapsular
fracture of neck of left femur. STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 41
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Register
Sex.
Time
!N Hospital.
No.
Initials.
Age.
Certified Cause.
Years.
Months.
Days.
22703
E. D. W.
F.
38
0
1
12
Exhaustion due to acute mania.
6976
W.N.
M.
70
23
11
17
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
16003
Y. A.
M.
26
8
1
21
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
22635
L. F.
M.
66
0
2
10
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
22692
L. B.
M.
73
0
1
21
Chronic myocarditis.
20190
K. F.
F.
44
3
2
12
Intestinal obstruction due to adhesion following
perforation of the ileum.
22678
S. I.
F.
44
0
2
3
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
21195
W. McL.
M.
63
1
11
9
Squamous cell carcinoma.
22826
A. H.
M.
57
0
0
6
Cerebral haemorrhage; hypertension.
12287
M. W.
F.
64
13
8
17
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
22397
F. W. M.
M.
80
0
6
13
Coronary thrombosis.
22727
M. B.
F.
74
0
2
1
Chronic myocarditis.
2657
O. L. W.
F.
88
35
2
0
Chronic myocarditis.
22495
F. W. O.
M.
70
0
5
6
Right bronchopneumoia.
22598
W. J. V.
M.
46
0
3
27
Chronic myocarditis due to syphilis.
21911
H. R.
M.
72
1
1
24
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
23308
A. J. D.
M.
62
0
7
25
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis.
22165
S. W. W.
M.
46
0
9
27
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
19888
W. C.
M.
51
3
7
11
Coronary thrombosis.
20489
H. L. W.
M.
60
2
10
28
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
14050
M. P.
F.
71
9
11
17
Chronic myocarditis.
22673
A. B.
M.
86
0
3
17
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
22001
R. J. N.
M.
89
1
1
8
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
16161
W. P. R.
M.
53
8
1
11
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
10326
A. C. E.
F.
67
17
1
3
Carcinoma of breast.
22625
W. C.
M.
43
0
4
18
Coronary thrombosis.
22667
A. E. B.
F.
78
0
3
30
Chronic myocarditis.
19722
K. C.
F.
67
3
10
25
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
16208
F. T.
M.
76
8
1
4
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20542
C. L. L.
M.
62
2
10
27
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
22838
H. B.
M.
65
0
1
24
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
22591
F. H.
M.
82
0
5
8
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
22946
J. G. W.
F.
76
0
0
2
Chronic myocarditis.
21934
E. E.
M.
66
1
2
24
Coronary thrombosis due to chronic myocarditis.
21263
J. R.
F.
67
2
0
3
Cerebral haemorrhage.
6994
J. L.
M.
59
24
1
17
Chronic nephritis due to hydronephrosis.
22723
W. D.
M.
72
0
2
11
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
22881
A. R.
M.
81
0
0
16
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
22848
M. E. H.
F.
69
0
1
24
Cerebral haemorrhage.
18353
E. C. T.
M.
69
5
6
27
Chronic degenerative myocarditis.
22784
S. D.
M.
63
0
3
1
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
22962
A. L. H.
F.
58
0
0
5
Chronic myocarditis associated with diabetes
and arteriosclerotic dementia.
10744
L. G. B.
M.
62
16
11
12
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
22913
J. M. D.
M.
89
0
0
29
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
21710
I. S.
M.
67
1
6
17
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
16023
H. H.
M.
50
8
4
10
Cerebral haemorrhage due to cerebral arteriosclerosis.
22686
J. Mel.
M.
59
0
4
15
Exhaustion due to progressive muscular
atrophy.
4748
D. M.
M.
54
29
6
10
Right bronchogenic carcinoma with lung abscess with metastasis to left ninth and tenth
ribs.
17888
J. M.
M.
71
6
1
0
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
22869
D. J. H.
F.
13
0
2
3
Acute encephalitis ; non-epid congenital hydrocephalus.
17407
G. M.
F.
66
6
8
11
Cerebral haemorrhage.
13794
J. M.
M.
56
11
5
26
Exhaustion due to paranoidal schizophrenia.
22707
E. E. G.
F.
86
0
4
25
Chronic myocarditis. HH 42
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Time
in Hospital.
Register
Initials.
Sex.
Age.
No.
Years.
Months.j Days.
2476
C. H. I.
M.
73
36
1
6
11171
A. G. R.
M.
53
15
9
14
22743
S. K. K.
M.
72
0
4
16
6711
S. P.
M.
57
24
9
26
22830
J. E. H.
F.
78
0
3
5
23041
L. m. r.
F.
74
0
0
3
23046
T. M. S.
M.
50
0
0
3
23039
A. V. E.
M.
62
0
0
7
23033
J. McD.
M.
51
0
0
9
21899
M. R.
F.
68
1
4
20
23016
E.S.
M.
S5
0
0
17
22407
N.Y.
M.
65
0
9
9
22977
S. A. P.
M.
79
0
1
2
20900
A. J. B.
F-
79
2
7
1
23048
T. S. P.
M.
85
0
0
10
22874
E. S. McR.
M.
63
0
2
24
22252
F. B.
M.
77
0
11
21
22157
A. T. H.
M.
80
1
0
26
22785
H. C.
M.
78
0
4
9
23064
C. A. B.
M.
76
0
0
6
23056
C. M. L.
F.
70
0
0
12
19134
W. B. N.
M.
64
4
9
8
22275
A. N. S.
F.
57
0
11
21
10837
A. M.
F.
62
16
5
7
20515
Y. S.
F.
51
3
1
16
23078
E. R.
M.
80
0
0
11
17066
J.N.
M.
74
7
2
14
22840
J. P.
M.
64
0
3
30
9615
J. C.
F.
82
18
8
1
9844
E. C. B.
M.
83
23
2
29
23040
F. C.
M.
58
0
1
5
23057
M. J. C.
F.
67
0
1
2
22955
E. M.
F.
87
0
2
10
5836
T. R.
M.
56
26
8
17
14076
A. T.
M.
73
11
2
16
22050
M. E.
F.
70
1
3
20
22991
J. S.
M.
72
0
1
29
23074
E. P.
F.
81
0
1
3
22949
J. F. O'N.
M.
75
0
2
19
22497
K. N.
M.
65
0
8
25
17260
R. McM.
M.
25
7
0
7
23093
W. B. E.
M.
78
0
0
26
11529
T. K.
M.
52
15
4
9
10518
R. V.
M.
35
17
0
12
22268
J. R.
M.
82
1
1
6
23000
F. S. W.
M.
68
0
2
24
23177
J. S. K.
M.
63
0
0
5
10248
O. L.
M.
68
17
6
29
20882
A. B.
M.
83
2
9
14
22478
J. R.
F.
30
0
10
5
22767
M. M. C.
F.
37
0
6
13
23171
S. B. Z.
F.
9 mo.
0
0
14
20883
M. C.
F.
60
2
9
11
22849
F. H. S.
F.
77
0
5
7
22566
B. L. S.
F.
72
0
9
11
21623
CD.
F.
83
1
10
23
23203
J. H.
M.
63
0
0
4
5240
M. J. P.
F.
79
28
4
20
22997
G. R. G.
M.
77
0
3
7
Certified Cause.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Chronic degenerative myocarditis.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Adenocarcinoma of uterus.
Chronic myocarditis.
Exhaustion due to meningovascular syphilis.
Diabetes mellitus.
Exhaustion due to schizophrenia.
Chronic myocarditis-
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Bilateral lobar pneumonia.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Cerebral thrombosis.
Chronic myocarditis.
Carcinoma of tongue.
Pulmonary tuberculosis and general paresis.
Cancer of bladder.
Chronic myocarditis.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
Coronary thrombosis.
Chronic myocarditis.
Exhaustion due to involutional melancholia.
Exhaustion due to Huntington's chorea.
Chronic myocarditis.
Shock due to spontaneous eruption; hydronephrosis and pulmonary tuberculosis.
Exhaustion due to schizophrenia.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Chronic myocarditis; bronchopneumonia.
Chronic myocarditis.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
Complications of lacerations of throat.
Chronic myocarditis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Complications of pulmonary tuberculosis.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Gangrene of the transverse and descending
colons and haemorrhage.
Chronic myocarditis.
Angina pectoris.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Bacillary dysentery.
Bacillary dysentery.
Bronchopneumonia.
Chronic myocarditis.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Chronic myocarditis.
Acute bronchopneumonia.
Coronary thrombosis.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia. STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 43
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Register
Age.
Time
in Hospital.
No.
Initials.
Sex.
Certified Cause.
Years.
Months.
Days.
17732
I. R.
M.
26
6
6
18
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
22689
A. S. W.
F.
76
0
7
25
Chronic myocarditis.
23083
M. J. S.
F.
69
0
2
5
Chronic myocarditis.
9492
K. F. A.
F.
64
19
0
27
Chronic myocarditis.
23072
G. W. S.
M.
83
0
2
13
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
23197
W. G. S.
M.
72
0
0
12
Chronic myocarditis.
22715
S. A.
F.
92
0
7
20
Carcinoma of the breast.
8772
D. W. B.
M.
88
20
6
15
Chronic myocarditis ; arteriosclerosis.
22685
V. G.
F.
77
0
8
0
Arteriosclerosis ; chronic myocarditis.
22722
J. P. B.
M.
62
0
7
20
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
23035
M. T.
F.
51
0
3
0
Cancer of breast with metastases.
23027
K. S.
M.
66
0
3
8
Left renal thrombosis; perinephric haemorrhage ;   arteriosclerosis.
13838
R. W. G.
M.
46
11
8
14
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
15566
A. W.
,M.
63
9
2
23
Coronary thrombosis.
3887
A. C.
F.
82
32
2
8
Chronic myocarditis.
22661
Y. S. L.
M.
58
0
8
24
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
5081
H. W.
M.
65
28
9
15
Coronary thrombosis.
22852
E. W.
F.
82
0
6
2
Chronic myocarditis.
23232
L. D.
F.
47
0
0
14
Lobar pneumonia.
22906
W. S. McK.
M.
80
0
5
23
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
21069
N. K.
F.
62
2
7
25
Coronary occlusion.
23044
C. L.
F.
63
0
3
14
Chronic myocarditis.
23210
A. G. J.
M.
72
0
1
0
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
8829
E. V. V.
M.
90
20
5
23
Carcinoma of head of pancreas.
23124
H. R.
M.
62
0
2
8
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
15524
M.S.
F.
70
9
3
29
Diabetes mellitus.
22170
J. P. R.
M.
69
1
4
2
Cerebral vascular accident.
23090
D. M.
M.
53
0
3
0
Acute mania.
2506
L. F.
M.
61
36
3
14
Bronchopneumonia.
20714
M. K.
M.
39
3
1
19
Tubercular peritonitis due to tuberculosis.
17917
A. M. McL.
F.
70
6
5
23
Coronary thrombosis.
21109
D. D.
M.
67
2
8
2
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
23311
I. G. M.
F.
71
0
0
10
Cerebral haemorrhage; arteriosclerosis ; diabetes.
23325
P. G.
M.
59
0
0
12
Acute mania ; acute myocarditis.
23245
C. H.
F.
67
0
1
18
Chronic myocarditis.
6455
W. G. b.
M.
63
25
8
17
Idiopathic epilepsy with psychosis.
20826
L. W.
M.
53
3
0
20
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
5783
H. F. F.
M.
58
18
1
4
Coronary thrombosis.
7435
A. S.
M.
62
22
10
10
Coronary thrombosis.
7326
M.S.
M.
68
23
3
25
Myocardial degeneration.
14252
M. J. W.
M.
65
12
0
16
Cerebral haemorrhage.
6164
C. L. M.
M.
63
25
10
13
Interstitial nephritis.
9394
C. S.
M.
45
19
0
30
Cancer of stomach.
9091
H. D.
M.
50
19
7
9
Cancer of liver.
4827
E. C. S.
M.
79
29
4
29
Myocardial degeneration.
7086
L. C.
M.
63
24
0
24
Carcinoma of stomach.
17130
M. G.
M.
38
7
2
2
Acute bronchitis.
6017
C. L.
M.
72
26
5
17
Coronary thrombosis.
3731
D. R.
M.
76
32
7
19
Myocardial degeneration.
9799
M. J. D.
M.
45
18
7
5
Cardio-renal disease. HH 44
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1945, to March 31st, 1946,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Netu Westminster.
Initials.
Sex.
Age.
Time
in Hospital.
Certified Cause.
No
Years.
Months.
Days.
18731
W. A. B.
M.
8 mo.
5
21
Exhaustion due to idiocy.
19660
C. M. M.
F.
24
3
6
8
Iliocolitis.
22358
G. K.
M.
6 mo.
3
6
Hydrocephalus.
14676
M. J. C.
F.
24
9
7
9
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
22610
B. E. N.
M.
1
6
Status epilepticus.
22647
G. A. C.
F.
1
23
Exhaustion due to idiocy.
20858
S. A. MacK.
F.
9
2
2
17
Juvenile general paresis ; congenital syphilis.
17559
P. P. B.
M.
29
6
2
26
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
16369
L. B.
M.
36
7
7
5
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
16106
D. A.
F.
50
8
1
15
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
22911
L. L.
M.
1
2
10
Exhaustion due to hydrocephelus.
21825
J. B.
F.
2
1
6
4
Exhaustion due to idiocy.
13586
A. B.
F.
53
11
10
18
Chronic endocarditis.
18882
V. O.
M.
26
5
2
Bronchopneumonia.
11282
C. E. G.
M.
48
15
8
21
Bronchopneumonia.
22893
D. C.
F.
12
3
17
Bronchopneumonia.
16410
L. S.
M.
30
8
27
Status epilepticus.
23149
A. S.
M.
10 mo.
1
2
Hydrocephalus.
21705
R. R.
M.
2
1
10
14
Bronchopneumonia. BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT. HH 45
PART II—FINANCIAL.
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT.
Essondale, B.C., December 17th, 1946.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
General Superintendent of Mental Hospitals,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith for your consideration the financial report of the
Provincial Mental Hospitals of British Columbia for the year ended March 31st, 1946,
including balance-sheets, profit and loss accounts, and various other tables and reports.
The gross operating costs of the three institutions, see Table C, amount to
$2,228,565.13, exclusive of the cost-of-living bonus, an increase of $257,462.48 over
the previous year. When the cost-of-living bonus is included for both years, the
increase amounts to $272,627.63. This gives a gross daily per capita per patient of
$1.63 as against $1.48 in 1944-45, an increase of 15 cents per day. This increase of
10 per cent, is due in part to steady price increases in all lines and to additional
services and treatment for patients. X-ray, recreational, and occupational departments have been enlarged and made far greater use of. The medical and nursing
staffs have also been increased by the return of employees from the services and by
the addition of staff to permit the full operation of the attendants' school and other
services.
Maintenance and sundry collections increased from $317,735.15 in 1944-45 to
$350,163.87.
Our daily average patient population increased 101—from 3,957 to 4,058. Patients
in residence on March 31st, 1946, numbered 4,110.
Recreational and occupational therapy have been paid particular attention during
the year, although the latter has been very handicapped through lack of and inability
to secure equipment.
The psychopathic division, conducting clinics throughout the Province, expended
$20,446.59, and this has been incorporated into our cost statements; also included is
Public Works Department expenditures of $152,006.83, covering maintenance of buildings, plant, and grounds.
Purchases from Colony Farm of milk, vegetables, pork, and other produce
amounted to $193,623.92 and forms part of our dietary costs.
Respectfully submitted.
Gowan S. Macgowan,
*
Business Manager. HH 46 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, NEW WESTMINSTER.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1946.
Assets.
Cemetery   $610.89
Buildings    $953,186.38
Plant and equipment       21,200.82
Furniture and fixtures      32,233.46
     1,006,620.66
Inventories (unissued stores) —
Medical care, drugs, etc.        $1,896.54
Nursing and ward service supplies       19,552.96
Dietary         5,770.13
Fuel         1,827.06
  29,046.69
Buildings, grounds, and general maintenance supplies   3,667.75
Petty Cash Account—
Cash on hand and in bank  150.00
$1,040,095.99
Liabilities.
Government of the Province of British Columbia—
Capital expenditure   $1,039,945.99
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
Accountable advance   150.00
$1,040,095.99 ESSONDALE. HH 47
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1946.
Assets.
Land       $117,763.50
Buildings  $4,361,106.54
Furniture and fixtures _■_.        113,709.72
Plant and equipment  59,016.98
     4,533,833.24
Inventories (unissued stores) —
Medical care         $14,291.59
Nursing and ward service supplies  48,481.77
Dietary   23,571.30
Fuel   4,296.14
  90,640.80
Buildings, grounds, and maintenance supplies  33,537.59
Business Manager's Petty Cash Account—
Advance, New Westminster institution  $150.00
Vouchers collectable  981.98
Cash on hand and in bank  868.02
 ■ 2,000.00
Pay-roll Account—
Provincial Government vouchers collectable       $84,769.27
Less overdraft at bank         83,769.27
  1,000.00
Patients' Trust Fund—
Cash on hand and in bank         39,525.74
$4,818,300.87
Liabilities.
Government of the Province of British Columbia—
Capital expenditure  $4,775,775.13
Business Manager's petty cash advance  2,000.00
Pay-roll Account advance  1,000.00
 ■ $4,778,775.13
Patients' Trust Account—
Cash on hand and in bank   39,525.74
$4,818,300.87 HH 48
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, SAANICH.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1946.
Assets.
Buildings	
Furniture and fixtures
Airing and recreation courts	
Inventories (unissued stores) —
Nursing and ward service supplies
Dietary 	
Fuel	
Laundry
Buildings, grounds, and maintenance supplies __
Cash on hand and in bank—
Petty Cash Account	
Patients' Trust Fund	
$291,174.59
20,095.91
$311,270.50
750.00
$11,741.59
3,323.96
1,751.00
467.17
$200.00
539.91
17,283.72
983.05
739.91
$331,027.18
Liabilities.
Government of the Province of British Columbia—
Capital expenditure  $330,287.27
Current advance  200.00
Patients' Trust Account—
Cash on hand and in bank
$330,487.27
539.91
$331,027.18 HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT. HH 49
PSYCHOPATHIC DEPARTMENT.
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1946.
Salaries  $15,951.76
Office supplies  855.23
Telephone and telegraph  418.34
Travelling expenses  1,301.99
Fuel   178.71
Water  11.95
Light and power  123.20
Janitor's service and supplies  221.38
Incidental expenses  1,384.03
$20,446.59
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population.
Per Cent.
Essondale      78
New Westminster     15
Colquitz       7
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT.
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1946.
Salaries  _■_  $26,758.67
Office supplies       1,911.23
Travelling expenses         229.61
  $28,899.51
Less rent credits         327.50
$28,572.01
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population.
Per Cent.
Essondale      78
New Westminster     15
Colquitz        7 HH 50
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, NEW WESTMINSTER.
Receipts and Disbursements for Twelve Months ended March 31st, 1946.
Receipts.
Maintenance—
Receipts for patients' maintenance	
Excess of disbursements over receipts
Disbursements.
Office, stores, and general
Medical care 	
Nursing and ward service
Less credits, including rent deductions
Dietary
Less credits, including board deductions
Light, heat, water, and power
Laundry 	
Cars and trucking 	
Occupational therapy	
Miscellaneous expenses
Provincial Secretary's Department vouchers
Less increase in inventories	
Buildings, grounds, and general maintenance-
Public Works Department vouchers	
Plus decrease in inventories	
$52,317.34
343,395.29
$395,712.63
$193,449.87
12,970.20
$83,276.74
22,201.22
$15,496.08
20,799.11
180,479.67
61,075.52
53,775.66
5,235.32
199.10
7,017.30
10,272.63
$354,350.39
604.04
$353,746.35
$41,824.03
142.25
41,966.28
$395,712.63 ESSONDALE. HH 51
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE.
Receipts and Disbursements for Twelve Months ended March 31st, 1946.
Receipts.
Maintenance—
Receipts for patients' maintenance      $272,050.19
Miscellaneous—
Sale of sundry O.T. articles  1,399.98
Total receipts      $273,450.17
Excess of disbursements over receipts     1,363,140.95
$1,636,591.12
Disbursements.
Office, stores, and general         $54,725.95
Medical care        136,400.93
Nursing and ward service  $775,170.83
Less credits, including rent deductions      43,477.64
        731,693.19
Dietary   $508,362.12
Less credits, including board deductions      127,684.59
  380,677.53
Light, heat, water, and power  150,729.40
Laundry  14,949.16
Cars and trucking   11,534.53
Occupational therapy   24,395.82
Miscellaneous expenses  35,779.24
Provincial Secretary's Department vouchers  $1,540,885.75
Plus decrease in inventories  4,888.62
$1,545,774.37
Buildings, grounds, and general maintenance—■
Public Works Department vouchers  $100,802.06
Less increase in inventories          9,985.31
  90,816.75
$1,636,591.12 HH 52 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, SAANICH.
Receipts and Disbursements for Twelve Months ended March 31st, 1946.
Receipts.
Maintenance—
Receipts for patients' maintenance     $24,414.76
Excess of disbursements over receipts     171,846.62
$196,261.38
Disbursements.
Office, stores, and general       $9,475.65
Medical care         6,087.78
Nursing and ward service  $84,423.39
Less credits, including rent deductions      1,558.07
       82,865.32
Dietary   $45,027.92
Less credits, including board deductions     11,291.81
  33,736.11
Light, heat, water, and power  23,287.46
Laundry  2,315.28
Cars and trucking  3,238.65
Occupational therapy  5,321.78
Miscellaneous expenses  20,384.37
Provincial Secretary's Department vouchers   $186,712.40
Plus decrease in inventories  37.31
Buildings, grounds, and general maintenance—
Public Works Department vouchers     $9,380.74
Plus decrease in inventories  130.93
$186,749.71
9,511.67
$196,261.38 FINANCIAL TABLES.
HH 53
FINANCIAL TABLES.
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence each Year,
the Total Amounts spent for Maintenance, and Gross per Capita Cost.
(For Past Ten Years.)
Year.
Average
Number in
Residence.
Maintenance
Expenditure.
Per Capita
Cost.
1936-37, New Westminster	
510.65
2,448.90
258.38
532.41
2,602.17
261.52
596.25
2,710.32
261.62
603.03
2,796.69
271.35
611.17
2,884.96
279.95
607.40
2,976.62
286.40
605.17
3,042.06
284.06
601.15
3,047.75
279.61
606.25
3,072.84
277.87
610.36
3,163.61
283.67
$219,117.21
844,164.44
98,070.47
225,208.71
934,572.97
102,822.42
251,759.54
990,851.72
107,104.86
263,036.99
1,044,253.55
115,171.63
269,354.39
1,114,944.32
114,496.86
265,107.15
1,080,329.80
134,961.02
272,710.60
1,111,175.96
140,988.20
282,859.56
1,232,172.03
153,428.62
339,375.79
1,437,497.52
194,229.34
395,712.63
1,636,591.12 '
196,261.38
$429.09
1936-37, Essondale	
344.71
1936-37, Saanich 	
379.56
1937-38, New Westminster	
423.00
1937-38, Essondale	
359.15
1937-38, Saanich	
393.17
1938-39, New Westminster	
422.24
1938-39, Essondale	
365.58
1938-39, Saanich       .                            	
409.39
436.19
1939-40, Essondale	
373.38
1939-40, Saanich	
424.43
440.71
1940-41, Essondale          	
386.46
1940-41, Saanich            	
408.99
436.46
1941-42, Essondale	
362.93
1941-42, Saanich	
471.23
450.76
365.28
1942-43, Saanich 	
496.43
470.65
404.25
547.96
559.80
467.81
1944 45  Saanich        ..               	
698.99
648.32
517.32
691.86 HH 54
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
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Table C.—Summary Statement showing the Gross and Net per Capita Cost
of Patients in the Three Institutions.
Gross operating costs—
New Westminster    $395,712.63
Essondale   1,636,591.12
Saanich       196,261.38
Gross cost for the three institutions    $2,228,565.13
Less collections remitted to Treasury         350,182.27
Net cost for the three institutions    $1,878,382.86
Cost-of-living bonus          184,638.23
$2,063,021.09
Daily average population for the three institutions  4,057.64
Gross per capita cost, one year—
Exclusive of cost-of-living bonus  $549.23
Including cost-of-living bonus  594.73
Gross per capita cost, one day—
Exclusive of cost-of-living bonus  1.50
Including cost-of-living bonus  1.63
Net per capita cost, one year—
Exclusive of cost-of-living bonus  462.93
Including cost-of-living bonus  508.43
Net per capita cost, one day—
Exclusive of cost-of-living bonus  1.27
Including cost-of-living bonus  1.39 FINANCIAL TABLES.
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HH 59
Remarks.
New
Westminster.
Essondale.
Saanich.
612
610.36
$648.32
1.78
693.70
1.90
3,210
3,163.61
$517.32
1.42
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Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day	
Gross maintenance per capita cost, including cost-of-living bonus,
Gross maintenance per capita cost, including cost-of-living bonus,
one day	
2.02
REVENUE OF MENTAL HOSPITALS FOR PAST TEN YEARS.
1936-37  $185,269.93 1941-42  $238,532.90
1937-38     207,343.84 1942-43  261,986.32
1938-39    209,216.39 1943-44  322,522.87
1939-40     245,837.55 1944-45  317,735.15
1940-41     229,045.45 1945-46  350,182.27
TAILOR'S REPORT, 1945-46.
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
Stock 	
Alterations
Relining 	
Pressing 	
Repairs 	
Total..
$8.00
944.40
472.50
1,100.50
4,787.90
$7,313.30
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster.
Stock 	
Alterations
Relining	
Pressing	
Repairs 	
Total..
$2,563.80
551.00
382.50
560.35
3,941.10
$7,998.75 HH 60 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
STATEMENT OF TAILOR-SHOP, 1945-46.
Production—
For Mental Hospital, Essondale     $7,313.30
For Mental Hospital, New Westminster       7,998.75
$15,312.05
Material on hand, March 31st, 1946  755.50
$16,067.55
Costs—
Material on hand, March 31st, 1945        $575.48
Salaries—
Tailors   $1,860.00
Seamstresses     2,000.00
Shirt-maker      1,260.00
       5,120.00
Electric power      $100.00
Electric light  60.00
  160.00
Material purchased, 1945-46     10,987.58
     16,843.06
Loss on operations       $775.51
SHOEMAKER'S REPORT, 1945-46.
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
Repairs—
586 pairs of boots  $1,219.40
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster.
Repairs—
300 pairs of men's boots  $634.10
272 pairs of women's shoes    290.90
$925.00
Statement op Shoemaker-shop, 1945-46.
Production—■
Essondale   $1,219.40
New Westminster       925.00
$2,144.40
Material on hand, March 31st, 1946        149.40
  $2,293.80
Costs—
Salary of shoemaker  $1,740.00
Materials purchased        502.79
Light and power  35.00
Material on hand, March 31st, 1945        135.92
     2,413.71
Loss       $119.91 PRODUCTION TABLES.
HH 61
PRODUCTION TABLES.
Articles made in Sewing-room, Provincial Mental Hospital,
New Westminster, Year ended March 31st, 1946.
Aprons, nurses'  146
Bedpan-covers     78
Bedspreads, crib      4
Belts, abdominal       2
Bibs, nurses'   194
Caps, nurses'     71
Cuffs, nurses'  162
Curtains     24
Camisoles     13
     40
       2
       4
     41
       6
     23
Coffee-bags	
Chair-covers 	
Dresses, junior
Food-covers 	
Hoovers 	
Ironing-board covers
Buttonholes made
Isolation gowns	
Laundry-bags, T.B.
Physicals 	
Press-covers	
Sheets	
Shrouds 	
  14
  1
  3
  36
  24
  26
Silence-cloths   10
Table-cloths  27
Tea-towels   118
T-straps 	
Triangular bandages
Urn-bags 	
Uniforms, nurses'
Uniform waists	
Waist-bands 	
14
8
37
67
19
59
3,986
Articles repaired at Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster,
Year ended March 31st, 1946.
For Female Wards.
Aprons, nurses'      108
Aprons, kitchen
Bibs, nurses' 	
Bibs	
Brassieres 	
Blouses	
Blankets	
Blankets, crib ___
Bedspreads 	
Bedpan-covers ___
Bedjacket 	
Caps, nurses'
Cuffs, nurses' ____
Caps, cooks' 	
Camisoles 	
Corselettes 	
Curtains	
Dresses 	
Dresses, junior
Diapers 	
Hose 	
Hoovers	
429
33
59
10
74
78
228
94
51
1
5
19
2
32
4
10
1,248
663
34
159
83
Ironing-board covers
Isolation gowns 	
Kimonos	
Laundry-bags	
Nightgowns 	
  16
  43
  41
  15
  672
Nightgowns, junior  416
Pyjamas  69
Panties   1,051
Panties, junior  319
Pillow-slips  116
Princess slips  641
Princess slips, junior  359
Runners   18
Sheets   321
Sheets, crib 	
Sun-suits 	
Sweaters 	
Sweaters, junior
Silence-cloths 	
Table-cloths	
Towels	
Vests 	
  176
  54
  133
  19
  4
  14
  375
  396
Vests, junior  209 HH 62
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Articles repaired at Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster,
Year ended March 31st, 1946—Continued.
For Male Wards.
Aprons, kitchen
Blankets	
Bedspreads 	
Combinations	
Drawers	
  68
  45
  92
  125
  728
  69
  2
Nightshirts   150
Nightshirts, junior  269
Pyjamas  78
Pillow-slips  69
Drawers, junior
Laundry-bags	
Pillow-tick
Sweaters ___
Socks 	
Sheets 	
Topshirts  _
  1
        74
  2,078
      155
      972
Topshirts, junior      152
Towels      183
Undershirts   1,533
Undershirts, junior      287
White coats        18
Occupational Therapy, Mental Hospital, Essondale, Year ended
March 31st, 1946.
1945.
April 	
May	
June 	
July 	
August	
September
October _____
November
December .
1946.
January 	
February __
March	
1945.
April __
May _
June __.
July ....
August	
September
October _____
November _
December __
1946.
January ____
February _.
March	
Wood-working Department.
Upholstery Department.
Cost of
Material.
$131.70
162.20
136.40
105.05
126.20
142.55
118.55
229.85
73.55
155.00
113.00
238.60
$1,732.65
Cost of
Material.
$357.50
426.20
453.05
394.30
442.60
348.45
665.10
574.80
187.55
299.15
451.65
456.90
$5,057.25
Value of
Products.
$340.40
391.95
338.50
261.15
306.90
379.25
292.95
559.30
186.20
363.40
274.25
571.35
$4,265.60
Value of
Products.
$743.05
797.15
829.15
782.20
801.15
719.05
1,199.60
1,114.80
560.75
690.25
874.90
930.90
$10,042.95 PRODUCTION TABLES.
HH 63
Occupational Therapy, Mental Hospital, Essondale, Year ended
March 31st, 1946—Continued.
1945.
October
1945.
April __
Weaving Department.
Basketry Department.
Cost of
Material.
$4.80
August 	
October ____
November
December
Cost of
Material.
$0.45
28.20
5.05
1.00
.2.30
$37.00
Value of
Products.
$24.00
Value of
Products.
$2.70
88.20
24.75
5.00
11.00
$131.65
Shoe-making Department.
1945.
April 	
May 	
June 	
July 	
August 	
September
October	
November .
December _.
1946.
January 	
February _.
March	
Cost of
Material.
$79.45
67.45
102.45
75.10
63.55
87.10
81.50
83.00
44.15
89.90
66.50
98.45
$938.60
Value of
Products.
$183.45
155.25
235.30
170.60
141.25
193.95
180.20
188.75
100.10
204.05
151.45
221.50
$2,125.85
Patients' Clothing Department.
Print dresses   1,382
Strong dresses  1,747
Slips   2,111
Vests  1,482
Nightgowns   1,105
Bloomers      997
Bed-jackets   4
Isolation gowns 	
Open-back nightgowns
Panties 	
Men's nightshirts	
Ward jackets	
Special dresses	
Dining-room uniforms
Nurses' Uniforms (New).
Aprons   1,793
Bibs      957
Belts       857
Caps 	
Cuffs (pairs)
Uniforms 	
Uniforms
Nurses' Uniforms (Repairs).
      386 Aprons 	
180
575
515
405
384
2
1
421
708
762
612 HH 64
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
Occupational Therapy, Mental Hospital, Essondale, Year ended
March 31st, 1946—Continued.
Mattress Department.
Mattresses
638
Hospital sheets	
Pillow-slips 	
Property-bags	
Hand-towels 	
Slippers (pairs) 	
Roller towels 	
Trousers altered (pairs)
Barber towels	
Nurses' sheets 	
Table-napkins 	
Coats altered 	
Table-cloths 	
Suit altered	
Hospital Furnishing Department.
       5,514 Sanitary belts
  3,955 T-binders	
      250
Triangular bandages
Chefs' caps	
Tea-bags 	
Cabinet-covers 	
Face-cloths 	
Surgical head-scarves
Dressing-bags  	
Sterile supply-bags ____
Air-ring covers 	
Table-covers	
Bedpan-covers 	
Kitchen aprons	
Tea-towels 	
Net curtains (pairs) _
Drapes lined 	
Lambrequins  	
Lambrequins lined
Doctors' caps 	
Feeding-bibs 	
Table-runners 	
Milkers' hats	
Tray-cloths	
Dining-room aprons
Screen-covers 	
Hot-water bottle covers
Cushion-covers 	
Cooks' aprons 	
Doctors' towels 	
T.B. laundry-bags 	
Surgical sheets 	
Lithorotomy sheets	
Laporotomy sheets 	
Doctors' leggings 	
Key-cords 	
1,474
9
336
8
100
392
359
16
289
1
84
87
218
31
500
24
8
156
5
113
215
102
747
39
26
9
20
16
12
3
3
112
100
75
75
9
72
84
28
7
2
1
1
24
24
74
24
2
Laparotomy towels 	
Doctors' aprons 	
Nightshirts   483
Topshirts    2,292
Undershirts  3,550
Underdrawers   2,462
Socks (pairs)  12,146
Overalls  751
Jumpers  33
Blankets  218
Spreads  814
Sheets   2,523
Pillow-cases  631
Bath-towels   279
Hand-towels   92
Tea-towels   4
Roller towels   23
Table-cloths  48
Aprons   396
White coats   248
White overalls  18
White pants   12
Doctors' coats   45
Pneumonia jackets  40
Isolation gowns   443
Laundry-bags ....
Kimonos	
X-ray gowns	
Screen curtains
Ward jackets 	
Dresses 	
Nightgowns 	
Slips 	
Vests 	
Bloomers 	
Baby nightgowns
Combinations	
Stupe wringers ___
Laundry-bags 	
Sweaters	
Tray-covers 	
Bedpan-covers 	
Binders 	
Bath-mats	
55
70
2
16
45
3,731
2,519
913
895
721
3
19
12
18
4
2
2
12
6 COLONY FARM. HH 65
PART III. —COLONY FARM.
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT ON COLONY FARM.
Essondale, B.C., December 17th, 1946.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
General Superintendent of Mental Hospitals,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith please find financial statements covering operations of Colony Farm
for the year ended March 31st, 1946.
The profit and loss statement shows a loss on operations of $12,327.07 after charging up cost-of-living bonus and patient-labour. If patient-labour were not taken into
account, a profit of $6,672.93 would result. The value of this farm in giving an occupational outlet to certain types of patients is something not reducible to figures, but is
a point which should not be lost sight of.
The fact that the farm is also ineligible to benefit from Dominion Government subsidies, while maintaining a price in line with market quotations, naturally results in
a loss of some thousands of dollars of revenue. This is evident in the report of the
Dairy and Herds Department, where a loss of $3,405.66 is shown.
The only other department showing a loss is the Work-horses, Sales, and Deaths.
The Hog, Orchard and Truck-garden, and Field Crop Departments all show substantial
profits.
The bulk of the farm's produce has been received by the Essondale and New Westminster hospitals, whose purchases amounted to $171,992.07 and $21,631.85 respectively, while the Home for the Aged, the Boys' Industrial School of Port Coquitlam,
and the Mental Home at Colquitz participated to a lesser extent.
Full particulars may be had from the profit and loss statements and other reports
presented herewith.
Respectfully submitted.
Gowan S. MacGowan,
Business Manager. HH 66 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
BALANCE-SHEET, YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 ST, 1946.
Assets.
Land Account—
Colony Farm  $117,484.86
Wilson Ranch     108,164.35
 $225,649.21
Buildings and plant     260,332.17
Water system          4,411.25
Bridge       17,535.89
Fencing, pavement, etc.      68,818.67
Inventories—
Equipment     $28,675.50
Bulls          3,500.00
Cows       62,650.00
Yearlings       14,150.95
Calves        1,922.03
Work-horses         3,370.00
Hogs       20,509.00
Feed       19,730.50
Gasoline and sundry  945.25
Orchard and truck-garden      12,409.10
     167,862.33
Accounts receivable       35,370.62
Growing Crops Apportionment Account         5,891.42
$785,871.56
Liabilities.
Surplus Account  $454,667.27
Profits to March 31st, 1945  $331,420.29
Profits for year 1945-46  $18,784.00
Less patient-labour     19,000.00
  216.00
     331,204.29
$785,871.56 COLONY FARM.
HH 67
PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT, YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST, 1946.
Department.
Debits.
Credits.
Loss
(Deaths and
Destroyed).
Loss.
Gain.
$87,563.98
5,387.00
842.05
570.98
275.00
1,475.00
15,344.57
44,049.80
28,622.39
21,140.69
3,476.74
2,939.04
39,709.65
20,337.89
$84,158.32
7,982.76
4,695.42
818.27
728.00
560.00
15,790.00
58,786.42
28,824.91
33,759.46
4,964.00
3,633.00
3,089.22
42,729.00
$3,405.66
$1,045.00
45.00
330.00
75.00
490.00
$3,640.76
3,898.37
577.29
Bulls	
528.00
425.00
445.43
14,736.62
202.52
12,618.77
1,487.26
693.96
36,620.43
22,391.11
$271,734.78
$290,518.78
$1,985.00
$40,451.09
$61,220.09
., destroyed s1
ock, and pati
40,451.09
$20,769.00
.. $1,985.00
... 19,000.00
20,985.00
$216.00
12,111.07
all operating
$12,327.07 HH 68 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
DAIRY AND HERDS DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
Expenses.
Total expenses for year  $87,563.98
Production.
Dairy produce supplies  $81,658.32
Credit for manure      2,500.00
     84,158.32
Loss for year     $3,405.66
Production and Costs Account, March 31st, 1946.
Dairy—
Salaries and upkeep     $2,648.63
General herd—
Salaries and upkeep  $33,612.20
Feed      48,782.99
Pasturage and green feed      2,520.16
     84,915.35
$87,563.98
Less allowance for manure       2,500.00
$85,063.98
Milk Production for Year 1945-46.
Production.
1945- Lb. Cost.
April  200,185          	
May    231,440          	
June   216,068         	
July  223,726          	
August   228,535	
September   216,742
October   218,632          	
November   218,551          	
December   223,246
1946.
January   238,295         	
February   216,375         	
March  236,188         	
2,667,983 $85,063.98
Average cost of production, pasteurization, etc., 31.9 cents per gallon. COLONY FARM.
HH 69
MATURE COW DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
Asset Value.
4 cows died or destroyed  $1,050.00
2 cows sold        125.00
28 cows butchered     4,212.00
Gain on inventory     	
$5,387.00
Profit for year
Selling Price.
$5.00
136.80
4,248.56
3,592.40
$7,982.76
5,387.00
$2,595.76
4 calves died or destroyed
23 calves sold	
39 calves vealed	
Manure, credit 	
CALVES DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
Asset Value.
        $45.00
        531.20
265.85
$842.05
Profit for year
Selling Price.
$3,635.00
860.42
200.00
$4,695.42
842.05
$3,853.37
YEARLING DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
Asset Value.
2 yearlings died or destroyed  $335.00
1 yearling butchered   153.90
1 yearling sold  82.08
Manure, credit    	
$570.98
Profit for year
Selling Price.
$5.00
103.27
200.00
510.00
$818.27
570.98
$247.29 HH 70                              MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
BULL DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
Asset Value.
1 bull sold                      $100 00
Selling Price.
$137.06
1 bull died or destroyed                                                               75 00
1 bull butchered                                                                100 00
151.74
439.20
Gain on inventory	
$275.00
$728.00
275.00
Profit for year	
$453.00
WORK-HORSE DEPARTMENT.
Sales and Deaths Account, March 31st, 1946.
Asset Value.
Selling Price.
5 horses sold __ $735.00 $550.00
2 horses died or destroyed         500.00  ' 10.00
Loss on inventory        240.00
$1,475.00 $560.00
■- 1,475.00
Loss for year  $915.00
Work-horse Labour Account, March 31st, 1946.
Salaries and upkeep  $10,760.96
Feed and pasturage  4 583.61
$15,344.57
Less credit for manure  250.00
$15,094.57
Horse-labour charged to crop and other departments     15,540.00
Profit for year        $445.43
Note.—Against cost of $15,094.57, 25,172 hours of horse-labour were performed
at a cost of 60 cents per horse-hour, including teamsters' wages. COLONY FARM. HH 71
HOG DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
Receipts.
By sales—
Live hogs  $3,389.23
Pork supplied Essondale Hospital  31,259.54
Pork supplied New Westminster Hospital  3,028.65
By credit for manure  600.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1946  20,509.00
$58,786.42
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep  $6,064.65
Feed   18,268.15
Horse-labour  31.00
Truck   696.00
Tractor  58.00
$25,117.80
Inventory, March 31st, 1945     18,932.00
    44,049.80
Profit   $14,736.62
CANNERY.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
Production.
Supplies to Mental Hospital, Essondale  $22,257.95
Supplies to Mental Hospital, New Westminster       4,576.41
Supplies to Mental Hospital, Colquitz       1,884.30
Supplies to Sanatorium, Tranquille  94.25
Supplies to Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam  12.00
  $28,824.91
Expenses.
Salaries   $4,200.00
Repairs   801.37
Fruit and vegetables  14,649.37
Sugar, spice, etc.  3,109.30
Cans, crates, and containers  4,116.85
Truck-haulage   445.50
Fuel  800.00
Light, water, and power  500.00
     28,622.39-
Profit         $202.52 HH 72 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
ORCHARD AND TRUCK-GARDEN.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
Receipts.
Produce sold to sundry institutions  $374.14
Produce sold to Essondale Hospital  19,171.10
Produce sold to New Westminster Hospital  561.97
Produce supplied to cannery  1,243.15
Inventory, March 31st, 1946  12,409.10
Expenses.
Salaries, seeds, etc.   $4,341.19
Horse-labour   2 849.00
Truck-haulage   43.50
Tractor-work  348.00
Manure and fertilizer  700.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1945  12,859.00
$33,759.46
     21,140.69
Profit   $12,618.77
FIELD CROPS AND PASTURAGE.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
Yield Yield
Crop.                                                                     Acreage.           (Tons). per acre. Value.
Potatoes       59.00         792.73 13.44 $26,978.02
Oats     19.00           17.34          0.91) 1,015.10
Straw      19.00 32.18 1.69 j
Hay      91.00        112.43          1.24 3,035.61
Ensilage      50.50        925.50 18.32 4,164.75
Onions        3.75          20.84          5.56 1,991.42
Mangels        8.00          49.78          6.22 248.92
Turnips        3.00          51.41 17.14 2,005.02
Pasturage and green feed  291.75             3,290.16
$42,729.00
Costs.
Horse-labour  $6,059.00
Tractor-work  3 317.00
Trucking   505.50
Manure   3,360.00
Fertilizer and spray  3 035.02
Seeds and sets _.  2 981.37
Supervision   1,080.00
     20,337.89
Profit   $22,391.11 COLONY FARM. HH 73
TRACTOR.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
2,478 hours' work
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep       _ _    $3,045.82
Gasoline and oil      ___   •                          430.92
3,476.74
Profit              ____      _     	
$1,487.26
TRUCKS.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
2,422 hours' work ____                               __ _ _
$3,633.00
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep        _ _ __       __    _             _             $2,509.26
Gasoline and oil              _           ___                                                            429.78
2,939.04
Profit             	
$693.96
GENERAL EXPENSES OF MAINTENANCE AND ADMINISTRATION.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1946.
Salaries and vouchers  $27,306.43
Horse-labour        1,088.50
Truck-work   394.50
Tractor   252.00
Heating   60.00
Gasoline, oil, etc.  352.11
Sundry       1,152.25
- $30,605.79
9,103.86
$39,709.65
Less sundry credits       3,089.22
$36,620.43
Proportion, Headquarters expense      $2,100.00
General repairs through Public Works Department       7,003.86 HH 74 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1945-46.
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.
Mental Hospital, Essondale—Produce Supplied by Colony Farm
for year ended march 31st, 1946.
Dairy produce—
Milk, 1,602,546 lb  $49,678.91
Cream, 1,306 quarts          979.67
Table cream, 7,414 gallons     11,837.40
$62,495.98
Meats—■
Veal, 3,990 lb.   $798.00
Beef, 24,848 lb.   4,441.68
Hearts, livers, tongues, 644 lb.   124.31
Fresh pork, 167,218 lb.   30,935.34
Pork plucks, 3,242 lb.   324.20
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh   $44,706.61
Canned      22,257.95
36,623.53
66,964.56
Sundries—Horse-labour          5,908.00
$171,992.07
Mental Hospital, New Westminster—Produce Supplied by Colony Farm
for year ended march 31st, 1946.
Dairy produce—
Milk, 181,700 lb  $5,632.70
Cream, 282 quarts         211.49
Table cream, 1,089 gallons     1,742.40
Meats—
Fresh pork, 16,196 lb  $2,996.25
Pork plucks, 324 lb.   32.40
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh   $6,389.20
Canned      4,576.41
$7,586.59
3,028.65
10,965.61
Sundries—
Tractor-work         $40.00
Miscellaneous          11.00
  51.00
$21,631.85
Accounts Receivable, March 31st, 1946.
Sundry amounts due from live stock, etc., sold  $35,370.62 COLONY FARM.
HH 75
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.—Continued.
Remittances to Treasury.
Sundry remittances to Treasury during year 1945-46, in payment of live
stock and produce  $226,376.78
Summary of Equipment Inventories, March 31st, 1946.
Equipment in dairy	
Equipment in cannery 	
  $4,084.50
  3,890.20
Horse and cattle barns and piggery  4,139.00
Farm implements  12,359.30
Pumping-stations and land-clearing   3,186.00
Butcher-shop   166.00
Carpenter-shop   357.50
Blacksmith-shop   493.00
$28,675.50
Orchard and Small Fruits.
Apple-trees __
Pear-trees ___
Cherry-trees
Prune-trees _
Plum-trees ___
Strawberry-plants
Raspberry-canes —
Rhubarb clumps ___
$730.00
1,523.00
444.00
1,752.00
1,925.00
300.00
2,000.00
3,200.00
$11,874.00
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.
405-247-9433 

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