Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL Provincial Game Commission REPORT for the… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1947

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0339794.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0339794.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0339794-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0339794-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0339794-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0339794-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0339794-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0339794-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0339794-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0339794.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Provincial Game Commission
REPORT
,   for the Year ended December 31st
1945
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.  To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game
Commission for the year ended December 31st, 1945.
GORDON S. WISMER,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1946. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., December 31st, 1946.
The Honourable Gordon S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1945.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
JAMES G. CUNNINGHAM,
Game Commissioners. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Reports— PAGE.
Game Commission  7
Game Wardens, "A" Division  12
Officer Commanding " B " Division  13
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson, " B " Division  20
Officer Commanding " C " Division  29
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson, " C " Division  37
Officer Commanding " D " Division  44
Game Wardens, " E " Division  49
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-45, inclusive  51
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences and Deer (Game) Tags  52
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences  53
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Anglers' Licences and Outfitters'
Licences  54
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers' Licences  55
Revenue—Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalty on Fur 56
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade 1921-45, inclusive  57
Comparative Statement showing Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty
has been collected, 1921-45, inclusive  58
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty was
collected during Year 1945  59
List of Confiscated Fur, 1945  60
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1945, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur
and Firearms  60
Bounties paid, 1945 •_  61
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922—45, inclusive  62
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1945  63
Prosecutions, 1945  87
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1945  89
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1945  90
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special (Trapping) Firearms Licences,
Season 1944-45  102
Statement—Returns of Fur-farmers, 1945  102
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1945  103
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1945  104
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1945, also showing Revenue from
Sale of Bird-bands  105
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1945  106
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1945  111  Report of the Provincial Game Commission, 1945.
With the cessation of hostilities abroad, demobilization of service personnel, both
in Canada and the United States, we find a strong desire on the part of the citizens of
North America for more recreation, especially in the line of hunting and fishing, with
the result that the year under review has seen an increased drain on the wild life
resources of British Columbia. The number of resident hunting and anglers' licences
increased 16,754 over the previous year. There has been an even more alarming
increase of non-resident sportsmen, as during the year records show an increase of
4,391 over 1944.
The revenue derived under the " Game Act" reached the all-time record figure
of $456,479.80, an increase over the year 1944 of $147,214.21. An examination of the
records of the Department shows revenue has increased from $197,057.92 in 1934 (the
year the present Game Commission took office), to the very large sum already quoted,
showing an increase over those eleven years of $259,421.88.
Increased Governmental revenues are very desirable, but we have cause for alarm
when it comes in increases such as those mentioned in the previous paragraph, especially
if such increases are going to continue. While British Columbia has the finest stand of
big game in North America and our fishing is second to none, still we know that they
can be very seriously depleted in a very short period of time if adequate measures are
not taken to conserve and restock so as to combat the terrific drain on these resources.
Especially is this the case in the more accessible areas, such as Vancouver Island, the
Lower Mainland, Okanagan, the Kootenays, and Cariboo Districts. We feel that provision should be made for modern fish-hatcheries in the more congested areas, particularly
in the Vancouver Island and Okanagan Districts. The demand for liberation of
pheasants throughout the suitable pheasant areas in the Province is growing stronger.
This is especially so on the Lower Mainland where we find some licensed hunters operating over an area that a few years ago was devoted to grain growing but is now
principally used for dairying purposes, and fast being broken up into small holdings.
The guide situation can still stand considerable improvement, and every step is
being taken in this regard. During the 1945 Session of the Legislature the " Game
Act" was amended to provide for grading of guides, along with other regulations
governing the operations of guide traffic, but further amendments will be required to
clarify the situation and improve conditions.
The organized sportsmen have been expressing alarm at the amount of big game
being taken out of the Lillooet and Cariboo Districts, particularly by non-resident
sportsmen. Estimates have been made placing the number of moose exported all the
way from 3 to 7,000. This Commission has a fair check on the non-resident big game
taken, and an examination of the statement on trophy fees paid, which can be found
elsewhere in this report, will show a total of 899 moose taken by non-residents, and a
further check on guide returns, trophy fee receipts, and export permits shows that of
that number approximately 798 moose were taken in the Kamloops, Cariboo, and Lillooet
districts. A further check shows that 144 moose were taken from an area of approximately 20 miles square.
In order to have a clear picture of the moose situation in the areas in question, we
hope to obtain funds so that we will be in a position, along with the Department of
Zoology of the University of British Columbia, to make an investigation during the
coming summer and fall. Such a check, it is felt, will give a clear picture of the
amount of game being taken, by whom, and in what districts it is being secured. GG 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
REGISTRATION OF TRAP-LINES.
There has been a heavy demand by discharged service personnel and people
recently taking up residence in the Province from the Prairies for trap-lines. Unfortunately, we are unable to satisfy these demands, as all the unorganized portions of the
Province have long been covered by trap-line registrations, and to break into the trapping business necessitates taking over a line that has been cancelled for some reason
or the purchase of a line from some trapper already established.
With the extremely high prices being offered for fur, poaching on trap-lines appears
to be increasing. This is a matter that is difficult to cope with due to the large areas
which necessarily have to be covered by individual Game Wardens. The patrol area of
the average Game Warden in British Columbia is around 6,000 square miles. Another
very unsatisfactory situation is the ever-increasing number of private property trappers. We are powerless to stop a man from trapping his own property, although he
must have a licence to do so, but in most cases he is situated in the heart of some registered trapper's area and naturally is profiting from the efforts of such registered
trapper.
The British Columbia Registered Trappers' Association, under the leadership of
Eric Collier and E. W. Bobb, is striving hard to cope with conditions affecting registered trappers. These gentlemen have accomplished wonders on their own trap-lines
through untiring conservation efforts on their own part. A series of meetings will be
held during next year with the registered trappers, and as a Commission, we would
like to see them organized in the same manner as the game and angling associations of
the Province. Owing to the variable conditions which are to be encountered throughout the Province, and likewise diversified views of trappers, it is going to be a difficult
matter to obtain the sort of organization desired.
We find a very strong agitation coming from some areas for a prohibition against
the shooting of squirrels, beaver, and muskrats, while other areas are showing opposition to any such regulation. There is also a growing feeling against the use of the
.22-calibre rifle throughout all trapping areas. The main argument in favour of the
prohibition on the shooting of squirrels is to discourage poaching on trap-lines. This
state of affairs could at least be partially remedied with the appointment of more Game
Wardens. ' While we know that, for the time being, any prohibition against the shooting of squirrels will meet with considerable opposition, still there appears no reason
why this prohibition should not be applied to muskrats and beaver, but before introducing such a regulation we feel that the opinion of the registered trap-line holders
should be first obtained.
During the year under review, a system of tagging beaver-pelts was introduced.
While there has been some criticism over the method of clearing and tagging beaver in
the more inaccessible areas, and we know there have been some abuses of the regulation, still we feel that the tagging of beaver-pelts has been a move in the right direction,
although it will take a season or two before it will be working as efficiently as desired.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES.
New guide regulations were introduced during the year, and while they helped
considerably, still there will have to be further amendments before the desired control
or supervision of big-game guides will be satisfactorily established. To give an idea
of what we are up against, one just has to peruse the statements accompanying this
report. The number of guide licences issued during the year increased to 513 from a
total of 237 licences for the year 1944, while the number of non-resident hunting
licences increased to 2,021 from a total of 941 for the season 1944. Such an increase
in this branch of the Department in one season did not allow our staff sufficient time REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 9
to make a proper check on applications for guides' licences with the result that many
inexperienced guides were in the field, resulting in a number of dissatisfied non-resident
hunters.
FUR-FARMING.
The established fur-farmers had a very successful season. Farmed fur was in
heavy demand, principally mink. During the year many inquiries were received from
veterans desiring to become established in the business of fur-farming.
Fur-farming is specialized farming, as much so as that of cattle raising. There
is a growing desire on the part of the fur-farmers for a transfer of fur-farming from
the supervision of the Game Department to that of the Department of Agriculture,
because of the fact that that Department has facilities available, such as veterinary
services, etc., not obtainable from the Game Department. This Department is only
too anxious to co-operate in this matter and would bow to the wishes of the industry,
as long as the taking of wild fur-bearing stock remains under the supervision of the
Game Department.
BOUNTIES.
A perusal of the comparative statement of bounties paid on predators from 1922 to
1945 appearing on page 62 of this report will indicate the expenditure of large sums of
money, mainly contributed from funds of the department. The demand for increased
bounties, principally from stockmen and agriculturists, continues.
Examination of the statement of bounty payments appearing on page 61 of this
report will show decrease in the take of wolves, while the take of cougar increased from
301 to 472. The take of coyotes increased from 1,259 to 5,508. The increase in the
coyote-kill was undoubtedly due to the increase of bounty from $2 to $5, and not due
to an increase in the coyote population. Lack of demand for long-haired fur, with
consequent decrease in prices paid by the fur trade on coyotes, resulted in a great
number of pelts being turned in for bounty payment that would otherwise have found
their way into the fur markets. The total sum expended on bounties amounted to
$46,627, an increase from $20,243 in 1944.
In regard to the wolf situation, while there is a strong demand on the part of
stockmen as well as sportsmen, trappers, and others for an increase in the bounty, still
a perusal of the comparative bounty statement will show that bounty claims for
destruction of wolves have dropped from 1,659 in the peak year of 1940 to 1,202 for
the year 1945.
It is generally agreed that the payment of bounties is not the sole solution to the
predator question, and this Commission is endeavouring to establish a staff of
predatory-animal hunters, with suitable training and equipment such as dogs, etc.
The hunting of cougar calls for specially trained dogs, and it will take time before we
can find suitable men and train sufficient dogs to cope with the situation.
While the demand is strong for increases in bounties, care must be taken that such
increases coincide with payments in adjoining Provinces and States to discourage any
transfer of pelts from areas paying lesser bounties. In fact, the whole question should
be one to be taken up at a Dominion Conference so that payments of bounties could be
equalized to discourage any such bootlegging from Province to Province.
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
The publicizing of British Columbia's game potentialities across the Border is no
longer necessary. Consequently, the Department has refrained from advertising outside the Province. We have spent whatever sums we had set aside for advertising
within the Province for the purpose of educating our own citizens in game conservation.    There is a great field for such a campaign, particularly in the schools. GG 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
This Department is being besieged with inquiries, particularly from south of the
Border, for information in regard to possible locations of sites for commercial hunting
and fishing lodges and areas for private hunting. A considerable number of established businesses have been sold to non-residents desiring to cater to the tourist in
pursuit of fishing or hunting. This is a matter that is creating some concern among
our own resident sportsmen. Then there is the possibility, and in some cases this is
already a fact, of overcrowding of tourist resorts on some of our more popular lakes, to
the detriment of the fishing or hunting available in those districts.
The co-operation of the Department of Lands and Forests is greatly appreciated.
Wherever we have had any reasonable objection to the sale or lease of land for the
establishing of resorts, private shooting or to the detriment of the public or sportsmen
at large that Department has co-operated 100 per cent.
GAME PROPAGATION.
During the year under review 7,397 pheasants were purchased from game-bird
farmers and liberated throughout the Province. The majority of these birds were
liberated on the Lower Mainland, where we had 15,817 licensed hunters expecting to
find good pheasant shooting in an area that once was grain producing but is now used
principally for dairying. The only way we can hope to provide pheasant shooting
for the large hunting population of the Lower Mainland is by the artificial propagation
of pheasants. Sportsmen in other parts of the Province are requesting heavier liberations of pheasants in order to introduce new blood and to replenish areas that are not
producing up to expectations. With an increase of 12,481 resident hunters over the
previous year, and an anticipated corresponding increase for 1946, we must be prepared to make a very considerable increase in pheasant liberations.
Again, as during the fall of 1944, we were successful in trapping thirty-three blue
grouse in the Campbell River district on Vancouver Island, and liberating them on
Texada Island. This venture appears to be paying dividends. Prior to the season
1944 there were no grouse on this island, and at the time we were making our second
liberation several coveys were observed at the point of the first liberation. The island
should provide good grouse shooting in years to come as food conditions there are ideal.
MIGRATORY BIRDS.
The season under review has been disappointing throughout the whole of the
Province. The birds did not put in an appearance and prospects for 1946 do not
appear any too bright. On the Lower Mainland, where we had 15,817 licensed hunters
operating, conditions were bad. As previously stated, the area is changing from
grain growing to that of dairying, with consequent loss of proper feeding areas for
migratory water-fowl. There is a growing demand for some system of feeding throughout the district to encourage ducks to delay or put off their migration south to, according to reports, areas where steps have to be taken to prevent damage to farming interests by water-fowl. The majority of sportsmen on the Lower Mainland are in favour
of the feeding of ducks on game reserves under the supervision of the Game Department, while some sportsmen are in favour of a return to the system of feeding by
privately operated clubs. This is a matter that no doubt will be dealt with prior to
the opening of another hunting season.
GAME LAW ENFORCEMENT.
With the ever-increasing number of hunters comes increased violations of the
various Acts pertaining to game and game fish. A perusal of the statement on page
87 of this report will show a total of some 632 convictions as against 372 for the pre- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 11
vious year. A special check over the Labour Day week-end at the toll-gate at Yale
accounted for many convictions under the " Game Act." Another season it is proposed that a twenty-four-hour check be made during the entire game season at some
suitable point, probably at Cache Creek, to ascertain just what game is coming out of
the hunting areas and by whom same is being taken, as well as to check up on violations
of the " Game Act " and fisheries regulations.
GAME-FISH CULTURE.
To a very large extent the game fishes of British Columbia are responsible for the
influx of a large number of sportsmen and tourists. The total number of non-resident
anglers' licences issued reached an all-time high of some 8,585, an increase of 3,535 over
1944. These numbers do not show any indication of the number of tourists who came
to British Columbia to angle for salmon in the salt water, as up to the present no fees
are collected for that sort of fishing.
While angling in the Interior lakes continues to be fair, some steps must be taken
at once if we hope to hold the present standard. With the ever-increasing demand
for trout fishing, especially in the more populated portions of the Province, more trout-
hatcheries should be constructed at the earliest possible date. Provision is being made
in the 1946-47 estimates for the construction of a modern fish-hatchery at some point
in the Okanagan District. The actual location has not been selected, but we hope to
have an examination of the proposed sites, in co-operation with Dr. W. A. Clemens, of
the University of British Columbia, and the sportsmen in the Okanagan, this coming
summer, but from present indications there is the possibility that the construction of
this hatchery will be delayed through difficulty of obtaining building material. However, the necessity for the hatchery is becoming more acute as time goes on.
The need for a new trout-hatchery on Vancouver Island cannot be too strongly
stressed, and we hope to be able to provide one within the next season or two, as the
present small hatcheries at Veitch Creek and Qualicum are entirely inadequate and
obsolete.
We are sorry to report that conditions at the Stanley Park Hatchery have not
changed, and chlorination of the water-supply continues in spite of the cessation of
hostilities overseas. From information received, chlorination will continue from time
to time, at least until such times as power-line construction is completed up the Capi-
lano Valley to Britannia, with no assurance that chlorination will cease even after that
time. We have lost several years' operation of this hatchery, with strong reason to
believe that chlorination will continue to be a menace. The reservoir at the park is
now becoming a heavy liability on the Department, and as the park authorities appear
anxious to obtain the site on which the hatchery is located, it would appear advisable
that we come to some agreement with the Vancouver Parks Board and take steps to
move our operations to Cultus Lake where an opportunity is provided for the construction of modern facilities for trout propagation without any anxiety over possible
chlorination of water-supply.
There is a growing demand from the sportsmen of the Cariboo and Prince George
districts for more consideration in regard to fish propagation. Many of the lakes in
those areas are overpopulated with coarse fish and other lakes are in need of stocking.
The residents of British Columbia angling north of the 52nd parallel do not require
angling licences, and this Commission feels that until this situation is changed we
would not be justified in allotting funds from the areas where licences are required to
areas not contributing in the form of licences to angle. The sportsmen of Prince
George and Quesnel have intimated their desire for a change in the law, but to date
there has been no concerted effort in this direction. GG 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
A programme of fertilization of lakes in order to increase fish food has been suggested by many game and angling associations. Some experiments have been undertaken in the Eastern States and Provinces in fertilizing shallow lakes in which are to
be found fish other than trout. This Commission is interested in this matter and
there are one or two small projects in the Interior that we are watching carefully, but
before embarking on a programme of fertilization on a large scale we feel that we
should have scientific advice, and it is hoped that before another season has closed we
may be favoured with the co-operation of the Department of Zoology of the University
of British Columbia in an investigation into the advisability of fertilization.
A statement showing trout distributions during the past season will be found on
page 91 of this report.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
During the year under review, our administration has been in receipt of very
valuable assistance from all Government Departments. The officers and men of the
British Columbia Police as usual have been most co-operative and our appreciation is
hereby extended to Commissioner T. W. S. Parsons and Deputy Commissioner John
Shirras. Dr. W. A. Clemens, Dr. D. C. B. Duff, and Dr. Ian McTaggert Cowan, of the
University of British Columbia, have again been of great assistance. We have had to
call on these gentlemen many times throughout the year and advice has always been
freely furnished. Again we have enjoyed the fullest co-operation from the Department of Lands and Forests, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Public
Works, game associations, Farmers' Institutes and all other organizations with whom
we have come in contact.
"A" DIVISION (VANCOUVER ISLAND, THE GULF ISLANDS, AND THE MAINLAND COAST FROM TOBA INLET NORTH TO CAPE CAUTION, INCLUDING THE ISLANDS ADJACENT TO THE EAST COAST OF VANCOUVER
ISLAND NORTH OF CAMPBELL RIVER).
" A " Division is supervised from Game Headquarters at Vancouver. The following excerpts are from reports of the Game and Fishery Officers of " A " Division, along
with observations made by members of the Game Commission.
Bear (Black).—Far too numerous, necessitating a continued year-round open
season.
Bear (Grizzly).—This very valuable big-game animal is found at the heads of all
our coastal Mainland inlets from Toba Inlet north, and the farther one goes they become
more plentiful.    No grizzly bear are to be found on Vancouver Island.
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—These animals are very plentiful and afford sport
for an ever-increasing number of hunters on Vancouver Island. Owing to the great
influx of sportsmen from the Mainland to areas such as Cowichan, Campbell River, and
Sayward districts and the number of deer taken, there is a growing agitation on the
part of the game associations on the Island, particularly in the north end, for a tightening up of regulations governing the taking and possession of deer. If the hunting
population continues to increase, it is only a matter of a short time when seasons and
bag-limits will have to be reduced.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals are not plentiful, although we have several herds
found at different points on both the east and west coast of Vancouver Island. In one
location they are the cause of considerable complaint from a farmer who has taken up
lands in the heart of an area that has been the home of a fairly large herd of elk for
many years. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 13
Fur-bearing Animals.
The beaver season on Vancouver Island has been closed for many years, but in
instances where the registered trappers can prove, and after due investigation on the
part of the local Game Warden, that the stand of beaver has been maintained, permits
are issued for the taking of a limited number of animals. The results have been very
gratifying and beaver are increasing. A certain amount of poaching does occur, but
with the introduction of beaver tagging, this practice will be somewhat curtailed.
Since there is small demand and consequent low prices paid for racoon-pelts, these
animals, in many places, are becoming too plentiful. The muskrats introduced on
Vancouver Island some twenty years ago are firmly established and are providing
considerable revenue for the trappers.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—Once again Vancouver Island has provided excellent blue grouse
hunting. With the ever-increasing logged-off lands and the suitability of such lands for
blue grouse propagation, these birds are standing up wonderfully well in spite of the
increasing number of hunters. The opening day of the season found all available accommodation on the Island taken up. Limit bags were in the majority, but there is some
anxiety as to how long this situation will last. There is an indication that there will
be a strong agitation on the part of the Vancouver Island game associations, especially
those of the northern areas, for some curtailment of the regulations before another
season arrives.
Grouse (Willow).—This bird is not plentiful, except in some isolated areas.
Pheasants.—The situation on Vancouver Island in regard to pheasants is poor.
Owing to past complaints, particularly in the southern part of the Island in the vicinity
of Duncan, re damage to bulb and other crops, this Commission has refrained from
liberating new stock in these areas. This policy will continue until such times as the
Farmers' Institutes of these areas are willing that pheasants be again liberated.
Courtenay district provides some fair pheasant shooting.
Partridge.—Reports of the European partridge liberated in the Cedar district,
south of Nanaimo, are not too encouraging.   The number of birds liberated was small,
but this Commission, after repeated attempts, has been unable to locate a further supply
of birds for liberation.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks and Geese.—Like other districts along the Coast, there was a decided
decrease in the number of migratory birds throughout the Division. A fair number of
black brant were taken, but they only arrive, particularly along the east coast, just a
few days prior to the closing of the season. There is a strong desire on the part of the
sportsmen for a later closing date, and owing to the small number of birds taken in
British Columbia it is felt that a later closing date would do no serious harm.
Predatory Animals.
Cougar bounty payments throughout the Division increased to a total of 76 from
a total of 64 for the previous year. While some complaints have been received in regard
to wolves, the numbers taken do not indicate an increase. There were 2 wolves taken
during the past year, with the same number for the year 1944.
"B" DIVISION  (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit annual report of game conditions in " B " Division during
the year 1945. Sport fish matters are the subject of a separate report by Fishery
Supervisor C. H. Robinson. GG 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big Game.
Moose.—Moose continue to flourish and extend their range from the East Kootenay
to areas farther west, although their permanent penetration of the more densely wooded
and damper West Kootenay is still a matter of conjecture. These animals were much
sought after by non-resident hunters during the open season and, due to prevailing
shortages, it was noted that more interest was shown in the meat than the trophy.
Wapiti (Elk).—For some years this annual report has been optimistic in tenor
concerning the increase of elk. This was amply proven during the past open season
when, due to very favourable hunting conditions, elk were very plentiful. (An estimated
300 bulls were taken in the Canal Flats district.) Possibly the bag was too heavy to be
permitted annually, but it did serve to indicate the good numbers of this species as
many bulls were in evidence when the season was over. Cows and calves were in
large bands.
Transplanted elk are well established east of Penticton and in the Princeton district
and good bags were obtained, considering the limited area.
Mountain-sheep (Bighorn).—Still scarce compared to years previous to 1941 when
the epidemic of hemorrhagic septicaemia decimated the Rocky Mountain section where
they range. However, they do appear to be on the increase since the extreme low of
four years ago and it is confidently hoped that in time they will increase to their former
abundance. Hunting for this species during the past season was only fair and guides
were obliged to cover more territory than in former years to obtain trophies. The small
bands near Okanagan Falls and Keremeos have increased to numbers sufficient for a
short open season.
Caribou.—These animals (woodland) are absent from the Rocky Mountains but are
well distributed in the Selkirk Range as far west as the Arrow Lakes. Due to their
timber-line habitat they are not much hunted, but a few bulls were taken during the
open season.
It is interesting to note that at the turn of the present century caribou were
occasional in the Rockies and also in the Boundary Districts, but have not been reported
in either locality for many years. Their migration elsewhere has been compensated
by a heavier stand of elk and mule-deer.
Mountain-goat.—Well distributed throughout the Division, but not plentiful in
the Boundary-Similkameen country.
Mule-deer.—Abundant throughout the Division. An unusually heavy bag during
the open season has not noticeably reduced their numbers.
White-tail deer.—Numerous in the Kootenays and increasing in the Boundary by
comparison with former years.
Bear (Black or Brown).—Bears are common everywhere and complaints are received each year of damage to orchards, but instances of stock being molested are
infrequent.
Grizzly Bear.—Are well distributed although by no means so plentiful as the
blacks. They may be regarded as numerous in the area due west and north of Kootenay
Lake. An occasional kill of domestic stock by a transient grizzly is reported from the
Boundary District.
Fur-bearing Animals.
The accelerating price of furs increases the already precarious existence of fur-
bearing animals and will be a stern test of our ability to conserve them. The trapping
regulations are the outcome of much experience and sound in principle, but when even
red squirrel skins sell for more than $1 each it requires a very level-headed trapper
to restrain from trapping too heavily, remembering how fur prices tumbled after
World War I. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 15
Marten and lynx, beaver, muskrat, weasel, mink, and red squirrels are the principal
fur-bearers in order of importance.    Fisher, fox, wolverine, and otter are scarce.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue Grouse.—Well distributed and in fair numbers, but not as plentiful as in
former years. (This is likely a cyclical condition as the condition is general and not
due to too much shooting.)
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—Scarce generally, with fair stands in some localities.
The year 1945 marked another phase in the ten-year cycle which has been recorded in
the annual reports since 1905, when ruffed grouse were infected with ticks and pin-
worms with a resultant heavy mortality. The same condition was reported in 1915,
1925, 1935, and now again during the past year.
This cyclical decimation of ruffed grouse due to disease has been extensively investigated in the United States as well as Eastern Canada, and it seems to affect, to some
extent, all species of grouse. One strongly supported theory tends to regard the
cyclical epidemics as the result of overcrowding.
Certain it is in British Columbia that the ruffed grouse population increases and
decreases in spite of open seasons or weather conditions. When these birds are at the
bottom of the cycle they are absent in practically the same ratio from the unhunted,
remote valleys as they are in the readily accessible parts. It may be expected that for
the next few years ruffed grouse will show a steady increase until the peak of the cycle
is reached. To the argument that ruffed grouse are gone from localities where they
formerly flourished, it will be noted that this is due to a change in the local environment
through land clearing and a reduction in their natural coverts.
Franklin Grouse (Fool-hen).—Not plentiful but well distributed in the mid-
elevations or jack-pine areas which are their suitable habitat. It is a tenable premise
that they are subject to the same fluctuations as the ruffed grouse.
Sharp-tailed Grouse.—Have made a noticeable increase in the Cranbrook-Wasa
district where it would seem a short open season would be in order. They are few to
occasional in the Boundary area where forty years ago they were numerous.
Ptarmigan.—Well distributed from timber-line to the high peaks, but of little
account as a game bird.
Pheasants.—Creston, Grand Forks, and Penticton-Oliver-Keremeos are districts
where these birds are well established. Conditions do not vary greatly from year to
year, and the shooting is generally good.
Past plantings at Robson and Nakusp have provided only fair results, and similar
experiments in the Inonoaklin Valley, at Kaslo, Waldo, and Canal Flats have not been
successful. In these instances the results were promising at first, but the original
stock, as well as some broods that were hatched, did not survive. This despite a great
deal of voluntary co-operative local interest.
Partridge (European).—Are permanently established in Creston, Grand Forks, and
Penticton-Oliver districts and provide satisfactory sport during the short open season.
The original stock was migrant from the adjoining States and for a few years partridges were observed in transit all over the Division. In some instances the coveys
remained for a season or two. Presumably local conditions were not as favourable as
the localities mentioned above.
Quail (California).—These birds survive in limited numbers in the Penticton district but have little chance in the rest of the Division where colder and more inclement
weather is to be expected.
The experimental plantings of bob-white quail near Cranbrook and Creston so far
do not look promising, although climatic conditions are no more rigorous than in some GG 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of the States where they are numerous.    Possibly they require large cultivated areas
for their permanent subsistence.
Migratory Game Birds.
Geese (Canada).—Are nesting in larger numbers than formerly and are a frequent
matter of local comment. This is very noticeable in such suitable places as the north
end of Upper Arrow Lake, the sloughs along the Duncan River north of Kootenay Lake,
and at Creston. The main increase in nesting water-fowl is in the floodlands on either
side of the Columbia River from Invermere to within a few miles of Golden, which has
always been a prolific nesting area.
Ducks.—Locally reared ducks are also on the increase, although this is not so
noticeable as the increase in geese. It is probably also a general condition throughout
Western Canada since the ebb years of duck population not so long ago. It is interesting to again note that local ducks—mostly mallards—are reluctant to migrate and
winter in good numbers on Kootenay Lake as well as many of the larger lakes that do
not freeze over in the winter.
The open season is too long in the eastern part of the Division because of the
congregation of ducks in certain spring-fed ponds that do not readily freeze. They
are too easily killed by pot-hunters.
Coots.—Are numerous and not hunted.
Snipe (Wilson's).—Make a temporary appearance in migration but are disregarded
as sporting birds.
Destruction of Vermin.
Ten Game Wardens destroyed 14 cougars, 4 bobcats, 59 coyotes, 20 stray dogs,
112 wild house-cats, 61 magpies, 33 owls, 100 injurious hawks, 3 eagles, and 282 crows
during the year.
Game-protection.
There were 106 convictions and 6 dismissals under the " Game Act" and 5 infractions of the Special Fisheries Regulations (Game Fish) during the year in this Division.
Game Propagation.
Forty-eight pheasants were released in the Penticton area and 36 at Grand Forks
to improve the local stock.
Game Reserves.
The Elk River Game Reserve—comprising portions of the watersheds of the White,
Bull, and Elk Rivers—is the most important reserve in this Division as it affords protection to deer, moose, elk, sheep, and goats during the open season.
Deer sanctuaries on the Kettle River in the Boundary District and along the Wigwam River in the East Kootenay are natural concentration points for mule-deer and
give them respite during the open season, particularly when the snowfall is early.
Three Brothers Game Reserve near Penticton is beneficial during the early part
of the open season.
Game-bird sanctuaries at Vaseaux Lake, Penticton district, and on Kootenay Lake
near Nelson continue to meet with general approval.
Revelstoke, Glacier, Kootenay, and Yoho National Parks all lie within this Division,
and no hunting is permitted therein. They would, it is felt, be of appreciable benefit
were it the policy of the National Parks Bureau to destroy predatory animals.
Fur Trade.
Very little fur is exported out of the Province directly, but it goes to Vancouver
via local fur-dealers, of whom there are nine in the Division. REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 17
Fur-farming.
Mink and silver fox are the popular farmed fur-bearing animals, but eight farmers
are also rearing marten, which now seem to thrive in captivity and will not doubt be
a most profitable animal to raise.
Fifteen fur-farmers specialize in mink exclusively, seven in silver foxes, one beaver,
one muskrats, and one in nutria. The remainder raise mink in conjunction with
marten or foxes.
Fur-farmers in general seem content with current operations and the ready sale
of ranch-raised pelts at a good price.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The salvation of the fur-bearing animals of the Province beyond any shadow of
doubt. If the old haphazard methods of trapping prevailed nowadays, inevitably the
fur would be trapped too heavily and a close season would be necessary, as has happened
in the past.
The demand for trap-lines continues and none has been available for some years,
other than those becoming vacant through death, old age, or failing health. During
the past year a survey was made of the registered trappers to ascertain if any wished
to dispose of their trap-lines to returned overseas veterans, and a few mutually agreeable transfers were approved and recorded.
Approximately 500 trappers, including Indians and trappers on private holdings,
operate in this Division.
Registration of Guides.
The system of grading guides inaugurated during the past year has proven both
successful and popular. Some Game Wardens believe that the standard of guides—
inasmuch as equipment is concerned—should be a trifle more arbitrary, but on the
whole, very few complaints have been raised in this regard by their employers.
The past season saw an unusual influx of non-resident big-game hunters, many of
whom sought the services of the local Game Warden to secure a guide. Indications
are—judging by hunting parties booked in advance—that even more non-resident
hunters may be expected next year.
Special Patrols.
None could be classed as such, although routine patrols were made consistently to
remote areas by horse and foot in the summer and fall and on snow-shoes in the winter.
Hunting Accidents.
Emilia Joseph Ferraro, age 17, fell while hunting near Fife, B.C., and the double-
barrelled shotgun he was carrying discharged and wounded him in the left hand and
forearm. He managed to walk 2 miles to a neighbour who drove him to medical aid.
It is hoped the full use of his hand will return in time.
Cummine Abel, Kettle Valley, B.C., was wounded when his rifle, leaning against
the car door, slipped, struck the running-board and wounded Mr. Abel in the foot. He
has now recovered.
J. F. Falconer and K. A. McFarlane, age 18, of Corbin, B.C., were walking in single
file along a trail when McFarlane's .30 W.C.F. carbine discharged and wounded
Mr. Falconer, who was ahead, in the fleshy part of the leg 4 inches above the ankle.
The wound was not serious. Examination disclosed the hammer sear on the half-cock
was badly worn and would release with a sudden jerk or jar. The gun was repaired
before further use. GG 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Gordon McKay, of Invermere, B.C., was mauled by a grizzly bear while guiding two
non-resident hunters. He was unarmed at the time and was attacked by a young
grizzly which was shot by one of the hunters. The mother grizzly then attacked
Mr. McKay, who threw himself flat on the ground and covered his face with his arms.
The grizzly tore his pack-sack from his back and both bit and scratched him seriously.
She was in turn wounded by the hunter, whereat she left Mr. McKay and ran away.
Mr. McKay has now fully recovered.
Summary and General Remarks.
Outstanding conditions during the year were the plentitude of non-residents, the
abundance of deer, and the scarcity of grouse. The latter has been commented upon
earlier in this report.
The plentitude of deer, or rather the ease with which they were bagged, was
unusual, although a similar condition may arise in any year when the snowfall occurs
early in the season. Snow fell copiously in the hills during the last week in October
and early in November, which tended to bring the deer down to the lower levels. The
hunting was exceptional, even for such heavily wooded areas as Nelson and Revelstoke,
which are not normally such good districts as the Boundary or the East Kootenay.
There was little to choose this past season, as the buck bag was heavy everywhere.
Snow was one reason for good hunting. The second reason is that we have lots
of deer. Too many, according to the farmers in some sections. But it is not felt that
the bag this year has been excessive as some sportsmen have suggested. Still, the
open season is long and the bag-limit is generous and the local hunting population is
increasing and being augmented by non-residents, mostly from the adjoining States.
Again, our total legal bag is confined to male animals, and even admitting that an
excess number of bucks are killed in any one season—which so far does not seem to be
the case—that is no indication that the crop of fawns will be less the following spring.
Much the same argument may be applied to both moose and elk, but conditions
are different. To start with, they are only plentiful in restricted localities and then
again they are relatively easy to hunt. Much too easy in the early part of the season.
A shortening of the season on both elk and moose in the East Kootenay seems reasonable, because these animals—particularly moose—are now being sought as a source of
meat by the non-residents.
In past years a favourite topic among residents was the waste involved whenever
a big-game animal was killed as a trophy because the meat was seldom utilized. The
situation is now changed. Hunters from as far distant States as California came into
the East Kootenay with trailers to take back the meat of deer, elk, and moose, even
going to considerable expense to keep it chilled en route. This is no doubt the outcome
of the current meat shortage in the States.
With the end of the wars and also gasoline rationing the increase in tourist volume
was immediate from Alberta and the Border States. So much so that accommodation
at hotels and established camps was taxed to capacity and more. Every Game Office
was deluged with inquiries—both in person and by mail—about fishing-waters and
hunting-grounds. This situation persisted until well on into the hunting season. In
many cases Game Wardens made arrangements for hunting and fishing parties by
contacting suitable guides. The presence of non-resident hunters entails much detail
in respect of licences, guides, collection of trophy fees, and export permits. With the
increasing number of non-residents, the Game Wardens sometimes wonder if their
duties lay in the field or in the office. The following excerpt from the annual report
of Game Warden Ben Rauch, of Cranbrook, B.C., is an example:—
" The excellent co-operation of the sporting clubs in the district, the Provincial
Police, Forestry and Public Works Departments, with other institutes and organiza- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 19
tions, as well as ourselves, has made possible the maintaining of a fairly high standard
of efficiency in our Department, notwithstanding the fact that the past few trying years
a great many duties and responsibilities have been added to our ordinary duties. But
I must say that with the increased hunting and fishing, the necessary fish-culture work,
influx of non-residents, numbers and species of game in this district, and area to be
covered, if the present standard of efficiency is to be maintained, that it will be absolutely necessary to double the personnel of the Department in the East Kootenay the
coming season. The hunting season of this year has been a glowing example of what
we are to expect in the future. I might add that during my thirteen years with the
Department, this fall was the first year that I have felt that it was impossible to do
the work as it should be done; that there was hardly a time that one was not in doubt
if there was not something more important that should be attended to than that which
was being done. Working under these circumstances makes one irritable and much
less efficient.    I feel quite certain that the same applies throughout the East Kootenay.
" Game conditions through the summer were good and it looked as if the hunting
would be average. This supposition was entirely wrong, as was proven later in the
season. Snow came in late October, and in early November the game began to concentrate and move; from then on until the close of the season the amount of game that
could be seen is astonishing. As one man put it: ' There was deer behind every tree,
and elk every place you looked.'
" Deer killed in the early part of the season would have taken prizes at a fat-stock
show, and they remained in excellent condition until the end of the season. The does,
fawns, and cow and calf elk are still in first-class condition regardless of the fact that
we have already had two hard months of winter (December 31st, 1945)."
From present indications we can expect a heavy tourist traffic in 1946, and while
much of this will be from the States, the amount of car traffic from the Canadian
Prairies is large in itself. Only a small proportion of visitors are interested in hunting, but most of them, including the women and children, do want to fish. It is a matter
of immediate concern that we augment our game-fish propagation programme as well as
tighten the present too generous bag-limit if we wish to maintain our fish ratio to the
angling public.
Just what to recommend for daily catch and possession limits of trout is a problem.
A blanket regulation for the Province is not satisfactory, and would even fall short of
the requirements of this Division where conditions vary so greatly, both in size of trout
and accessible waters. Remote streams or high-level lakes are in a different category
to waters that are bordered by car roads.
Possibly a system of zones might be considered.
The sudden death of Game Warden M. J. (Matt) Wilson while on duty removed
a veteran officer and one who had an intimate knowledge of wild life gleaned from much
earlier experience as a trapper and hunter. He had been in failing health for some
months but resolutely kept on^hoping to regain his former vigour, for which he was
noted.
The loss of Fishery Officer J. F. (Bud) Thompson, whose death followed complications from an injury received in fish-culture operations at Meadow Creek, was a severe
one. Due to his long service with the Dominion Fisheries prior to joining the Game
Department some years ago, his accurate acquaintance of Kootenay Lake, as well as
his intense personal interest in fish culture, his place will not be easy to fill.
As in previous years, we are again grateful for the unstinting co-operation
extended by all Provincial Departments and the sportsmen of the various rod and gun
clubs throughout the Division. GG 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Report of C. H. Robinson, Fishery Supervisor, covering Game-fish
Conditions in " B " Game Division.
I beg to submit herewith report covering a review and trend of the fisheries of
" B " Game Division for the year ended 1945.
Climatic conditions during the spring restricted the catches of sport fish in various
lakes, subsequently as the season advanced, most all waters produced the average
catches. The alpine lakes situated at higher altitudes were not fished to any extent,
and where natural reproduction is in excess of the outtake the matured trout has
deteriorated in condition as a result of insufficient food to recuperate after spawning.
Probably under normal conditions the trout populations will be more evenly balanced
to fit in with the food-supplies.
Encouraging reports were received of improved trout fishing in the south end of
Okanagan Lake and Arrow Lakes, especially the upper lake and including Whatshan,
Slocan, Moyie, Munroe, Smith, Manistee, Surveyors, and Windermere Lakes. The
Kootenay Lake yielded the average catches of large Kamloops trout with an improvement towards the south end of the lake. Immatured trout appeared to be fairly
plentiful in certain areas for future replacement of large trout.
Under normal conditions, renewed interest is expected towards the development of
rearing-ponds, undertaken so far at the expense of organized sportsmen, individuals,
and municipalities for public benefit, with the co-operation of the Game Commission in
supplying trout fry for release in the ponds and in some instances, the employees
operating the ponds.
Towards the latter part of the season, resulting from the cessation of hostilities
and gas restrictions being lifted, there was an influx of non-resident anglers, some
having in their possession various equipment to ice, salt, smoke, and can their catches
of trout. This is an example of what is to be expected in future, and demonstrates
the necessity to regulate the number of trout in possession or taken during one week
for conservation measures.
Trout distributions are covered in detail elsewhere in the report of the Game
Commission.
Sport Fish and other Species that Inhabit the Waters of " B " Game Division.
Kamloops (rainbow), cut-throat, hybrid, Eastern brook and Dolly Varden (char or
bull) trout, including Kokanee (silver trout), small- and large-mouth black bass.
Other less important species are sturgeon, perch, sunfish, Rocky Mountain (grayling)
whitefish, tench, carp, ling, squaw-fish, suckers, chub, and various varieties of minnows.
Non-native fish introduced: Eastern brook trout, large-mouth black bass, carp,
sunfish, tench, and perch probably migrated from American waters, although the last-
named specie—perch—has been introduced in two landlocked lakes unofficially.
Similkam,een and South Okanagan Waters.
As natural reproduction is much restricted in most waters situated in the Similkameen and South Okanagan Districts, it is necessary to depend upon the supplies of
Kamloops (rainbow) trout eyed eggs, fry, and fingerlings distributed from Penask
Lake, Summerland, and Beaver Hatcheries in order to maintain the supply of trout.
Most lakes and streams produced the average catches of trout, with a continued
slight improvement in the catches from Similkameen River, Clearwater Lake, and the
south end of Okanagan Lake.
The One Mile Creek chain of lakes, conveniently located in the Princeton area,
failed to produce many trout after closure and yearly plantings of eyed eggs, fry, and
fingerlings. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 21
At the expense of organized sportsmen of Princeton, the water levels and supply
was restored in a small lake known as Jameson Lake, and special provision was
arranged by the Game Commission to establish trout therein. Other work was also
effected in the form of stream improvement to assist natural spawning and reproduction of trout, together with the display of suitable signs for the guidance of anglers
to reach and fish the various lakes.
Similar co-operation was rendered by the organized sportsmen of the Nickel Plate
Camp accepting the responsibility and cost of affording protection for rainbow trout
when spawning in the inlet creeks of Clearwater Lake, together with an endeavour
to increase the natural food-supplies by transplanting fresh-water shrimps and aquatic
weed-growth, further foregoing the restocking of this lake the last two seasons in
order to blend the trout population according to available food-supplies. Apparently
fruitful results have been attained so far in this lake at an elevation of 6,100 feet.
Skaha (Dog) Lake.—This accessible large lake did not produce the desired catches
of Kamloops trout as a result of quite substantial fry plantings from the Summerland
Hatchery. It is hoped with the return of normal conditions and the resumption of
operating the Summerland rearing-ponds, fingerlings will be available for liberation in
this lake, having a much better chance of survival than fry. Conditions will be investigated during next season in an effort to determine the future policy of replenishment, etc.
The various small lakes situated in the Oliver, Okanagan, Penticton, and Peachland
areas yielded the usual catches of rainbow trout, from yearly fry liberations, in view
of extreme fluctuation of water-levels in some instances, as a result of water storage
and diversions for irrigation purposes. The organized sportsmen rendered valuable
assistance towards fry liberations.
Fish Lake.—Summerland. Intermittent planting of Eastern brook trout fry
proved very effective, and it is claimed the ratio of the specie taken was at least 5 to 1
of rainbow trout. Consequently, in future the planting of speckled trout should
receive preference as previously recommended, owing to the outward movement of
spring spawning variety of trout when water is released for irrigation, resulting in
a number of parent fish becoming stranded and perishing from regulated water-flow in
the outlet creek.
Boundary District Waters.
Generally, reports indicated that some of the accessible lakes and streams did not
produce the average catches of Kamloops (rainbow) trout—namely, in the Kettle River
and Granby River (North Fork), Smelter and Christina Lakes—in spite of suitable
spawning areas to aid natural reproduction, together with yearly plantings of eyed
eggs and fry in suitable nursery waters. Considering the amount of angling in the
West Fork of Kettle River, mostly by non-resident anglers, the supply of trout was
fairly good, with ample small trout for replacement.
Jewel Lake.—This quite important lake produced slightly better catches of rainbow trout taken by trolling and on the fly. The minnow population seems to be decreasing and are now acting as a forage-fish for the larger trout; varying to 5 lb. and over.
Immatured trout appeared fairly plentiful, which would indicate that a fair percentage
of yearly fry liberations had survived.
Wilgress (Loon) Lake.—This somewhat small productive lake yielded good catches
of Kamloops trout, varying to 10 lb. in weight, as a result of systematic plantings of
fry each year.
Lake Christina.—Kamloops trout fishing in this popular lake was fair during the
spring and fall, varying to 12 lb. in weight. The yearly replenishment of eyed eggs in
suitable tributary creeks is fairly successful, although probably fingerlings would attain
better results considering the presence of small-mouth black bass. GG 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Small-mouth Black Bass.—While these fish do not appear so plentiful, they provide
good fishing towards the north end of Lake Christina, varying mostly under 5 lb. in
weight.
Kokanee (Redfish).—Ordinarily these fish provided good trolling with baited
multiple lures throughout the season. However, since they have diminished in size to
about 5 to 1 lb., less people fish for them. The very late spawning around the beaches
of Lake Christina curtailed the catches for domestic use, resulting in about 250 lb.
being taken.
Since the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River, apparently
the populations of coarse fish have increased, including the European carp. Prior to
the construction of said dam, the small-mouth black bass controlled the increase of
coarse fish. The use of gill-nets or other nets under licence to reduce the numbers of
coarse fish has not been tested out by the licensee.
West Kootenay Waters.
Big Sheep and Beaver Creeks.—Produced the average catches of Eastern brook
trout for the local anglers. Unfortunately, water conditions towards the upper reaches
of Big Creek during the latter part of the summer cause losses of trout in the various
channels. Existing conditions prevent the salvage and transfer of the stranded fish to
any extent.
Champion Lakes.—Supplied fair catches of Kamloops trout, varying to 6 lb.
The liberation of fingerlings from the Nelson rearing-ponds on behalf of the organized
sportsmen of Trail, in place of fry, has been successful.
Columbia River.—Flowing between Castlegar and Waneta. Contrary to expectation, the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam has not so far increased the trout
supply, but instead the coarse fish population has increased to the detriment of sport
fishing.
Arrow Lakes.—Considerable angling is now carried on in the river, but even so,
the reports were of considerable interest of improved catches of Kamloops trout, varying to 15 lb. in weight, especially in the upper lake. This would indicate that the
systematic planting of eyed eggs and fry has assisted towards the improvement.
Whatshan Lakes.—These popular lakes continue to yield good catches of rainbow
trout taken on the fly and troll. Probably the establishment of cycle-runs of the
kokanee as a forage-fish will increase the growth of trout.
Revelstoke Area.—The introduction of cut-throat trout, four yearly plantings, in
the chain of lakes west of Revelstoke—namely, Summit, Victor, Three Valley, and
Griffin Lakes—has not been determined as to their success, although a few have been
caught and others observed in the Eagle River and small tributary streams thereto.
The lakes also produce fair catches of rainbow trout.
Begbie and Beaver Lakes and the lower reaches of the Illecillewaet River around
Greeley Creek produced fair catches of rainbow trout, as a result probably from fingerlings liberated in this glacial stream.
Trout Lake.—Was again well patronized by local and non-resident anglers; the
Kamloops trout were mostly taken on the troll, varying to 17 lb. in weight. It is quite
possible the American anglers will in future journey to the lake by plane. Hence the
importance of maintaining the supply of trout to compensate those for expenses
incurred.
Box Lake.—South-east of Nakusp, showed some improvement in the catches of
Kamloops trout from yearly replenishment. Wilson Lakes remained quite popular and
supplied the average catches of rainbow trout and kokanee (silver trout).
Slocan Lake.—This quite large body of water continued to produce good catches of
trout taken on the fly and troll, especially towards the north end of the lake.    While REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 23
the Kamloops trout taken are mostly under 10 lb., there is a marked improvement in
the catches, possibly attributed to eyed eggs, fry, and fingerling plantings in selected
nursery waters.
Cahill, Evans, and Beatrice Lakes.—The first-named lake showed a slight improvement towards the condition of Kamloops, mostly taken under 5 lb. Beatrice Lake is
overpopulated from natural reproduction, owing to the scanty food-supplies. It is possible, if the trails are improved, the trout population will be reduced to fit in with
prevailing conditions.
Slocan and Kootenay Rivers.—Supplied fair fly and bait fishing for rainbow trout.
That portion of Kootenay River flowing between the Beasley Boom and Slocan River
closed for precautionary war measures was lifted during the month of September.
This was much appreciated by the local anglers and resulted in fair catches of rainbow
trout up to 5 lb., although somewhat thin. The increased trout population in the Slocan
Pool as a result of the closure should be of benefit to the anglers next spring.
West Arm Kootenay Lake.—Trolling for the large Kamloops trout was good during
the early part of the season in the vicinity of Kaslo, and later around Queen's Bay area
and towards the south end of the lake. In fact, more large trout were caught in the
latter area than ever recorded before. The immatured trout supplied some good flyfishing at the mouths of inlet creeks, together with limit catches taken on baited
multiple lures. Moreover, apparently the smaller trout appeared- fairly plentiful in
certain areas for future replacement of large trout.
The Nelson Gyro Club conducted their sixth Kootenay Lake Trout Derby from
May 1st to November 26th following. The competitors included local and non-resident
anglers from the Kootenays, Alberta, and the United States. A total of 489 trout of
5 lb. and better was weighed and recorded. Total weight, 5,940 lb. 21/2 oz. The largest
fish, winner of the competition, weighed 23 lb. 14 oz. Compared to a similar competition in 1944 when 329 trout were recorded, weighing 3,967 lb. 3 oz., and the largest
fish weighed 23 lb. 6 oz. The 1945 Derby was second to the 1941 Derby when 595
trout were recorded weighing 6,053 lb.
Large-mouth Black Bass.—Migrants from the United States waters, provided good
spring and summer fishing in the sloughs and back channels on Kootenay Flats, vicinity
of Wynndel and Creston. The bass do not appear to be circulating as freely to certain
areas of the Kootenay Lake as in former years, and much prefer their old haunts in
the warm sluggish waters where they originally inhabited when first discovered in the
year 1920.
The numerous somewhat small alpine lakes located in the Kootenay and Salmon
River drainage systems were not fished in some instances sufficiently to offset the
increased populations, but no doubt under normal conditions the supplies of trout will
be more equally balanced to fit in with the food-supplies.
Salmon River.—It is of interest to mention that during the suspension of mining
operations on Sheep Creek for about one year, the rainbow trout made a wonderful
recovery and provided good fly-fishing, and excellent specimens were taken up to
16 inches in length. Of course, unfortunately, with the recurrence of pollutions from
resumed mining operations, the condition has changed.
Goat River.—The lower reaches below the canyon provided fair fishing for the
Kamloops. (steelhead) trout. Above the canyon the stream supplied good fly-fishing
for cut-throat trout subject to the water-flow and temperatures. In the upper reaches
of the river the trout remain very plentiful and provide excellent fishing. The migratory feature to the upper reaches is a true characteristic of cut-throat in most streams. GG 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Cranbrook Waters.
Moyie River and Lakes.—Accessible from auto highway, the angling for cut-throat,
Kamloops, and hybrid trout showed some improvement, and unless there is considerable
outward migration as suspected, the substantial plantings of eyed eggs, fry, and fingerlings yearly should bring excellent results.
Monroe Lake.—Ideally situated, provided good fishing for cut-throat and hybrid
trout. The raising and controlling of the water-levels of the lake at the outlet, as
undertaken by the local organized sportsmen, has and will prove beneficial towards
angling and the food-supplies. It is possible that sawmill operations at Mineral Lake
will affect the future outtake of trout.
Smith Lake.—Continued to yield good catches of Kamloops trout, up to 15 lb.,
taken on the fly and troll, as a result of fingerling plantings.
Premier Lake.—This quite important lake was well patronized by the Kimberley
people and continued to produce fairly good catches of Kamloops trout, mostly under
5 lb. Moreover, the kokanee (silver trout) introduced commencing the year 1938 has
proven a very valuable sport and forage fish.
St. Mary Lake, River and Tributaries.—Provided fair trolling and fly-fishing for
cut-throat trout, considering increased angling by the numerous sportsmen of Kimberley. A few Kamloops trout were taken on the troll, up to 2% lb., as a result of
experimental liberation of fingerlings commencing the year 1942.
Skookumchuck and Kootenay Rivers.—Subject to seasonal and water conditions
these streams provided good fly, bait, and spinner fishing for cut-throat and Dolly
Varden trout.
The various small lakes produced the average catches of cut-throat and rainbow
trout, mostly as a result of yearly replenishment.
Fernie District.
Surveyors Lake.—Reports indicated that the liberation of Kamloops trout fingerlings in place of fry has been successful, good specimens of trout were taken up to
8 lb. The change of plantings was due to the voracious nature of the chub minnow
towards small fry liberated.    This also applies to North Star Lake.
McBains (Rosen), Silver Springs, Manistee, Loon, Burton, Snowshoe, Barnes, and
Edwards Lakes.—Continue to produce the average catches of cut-throat and Kamloops,
mostly from the result of plantings of fry and eyed eggs effected yearly.
Elk River and Tributaries.—The usual large amount of angling was carried on by
the residents and non-residents, estimated to number at least 2,000. The heavy drain
on the cut-throat trout populations makes it very difficult to maintain a supply of legal-
sized fish in spite of substantial plantings of eyed eggs in selected nursery streams and
fairly prolific natural reproduction, together with the closure of six tributary streams
to boost the supply.
Grave (Emerald) Lake.—Yielded fair catches of Kamloops trout to 11 lb. in weight.
Further, it is possible with the introduction of the kokanee as a forage-fish the growth
of trout will increase.
The local organized sportsmen, with the co-operation of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal
Company, have constructed a cable suspension bridge over the Elk River and expect
that a connecting secondary will be completed next spring leading from the bridge to
the lake. This will increase the popularity of the lake and assist greatly towards
game-fish culture in the plantings, etc.
Columbia District.
Columbia Lake.—This quite large and somewhat shallow body of water produced
fair catches of Kamloops and an occasional cut-throat trout. Angling is much restricted
due to the scarcity of accommodation and suitable boats. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 25
Lake Windermere.—Has become quite popular, especially for the tourists. The improved fishing for the Kamloops trout, varying to 8 lb., probably as a result of yearly
plantings of eyed eggs in suitable tributary streams, adds to the attractions.
Deer, Paddy Ryan, Lillian, Dunbar, Twin, Bott, Baptiste, Cartwright, and Lead
Queen Lakes.—Provided good fly-fishing and trolling for rainbow, Eastern brook, and
cut-throat trout mostly attained from yearly plantings of fry and eyed eggs.
Magog, Cerulean and Sunburst Lakes.—Situated in the Mt. Assiniboine Provincial
Park, were fished mostly by non-resident anglers for the Montana black-spotted cutthroat trout. So far the fishing has not been extensive and probably natural reproduction will be sufficient to maintain a fair supply subject to feed conditions in the two
first-named lakes.
Golden District.
Extreme glacial water conditions do to some extent restrict the expansion of trout
distributions, but every consideration is given to suitable waters, as referred to
herewith.
Blackwater, Bush, Cedar, and Wiseman Lakes, and including Cedar Creek.—These
waters provided fair fishing for rainbow and cut-throat trout, from the resultant yearly
plantings of eyed eggs and fry.
Island Lake, Spillimacheen.—The results of two small plantings of rainbow trout
fry of 1941-42 remains obscure.
Summary of Hatchery Operations.
Summerland Hatchery.—Seasonal operations for the South Okanagan and Similkameen waters: Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Beaver Lake Hatchery, 580,000;
Penask Lake Hatchery, 200,000; total, 780,000. Resultant fry, 755,828, liberated in
twenty-one lakes and streams.
Revelstoke Hatchery.—Seasonal operations at the expense this year of the Revelstoke Rod and Gun Club: Cut-throat trout eyed eggs received from the Cranbrook
Hatchery, 150,000; Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from the Beaver Lake Hatchery,
100,000; resultant cut-throat fry, 137,900, liberated in four lakes; Kamloops fry,
89,400, liberated in five lakes and one stream.
Nelson Hatchery.—Year-round operations for East and West Kootenay, Boundary,
and Okanagan waters: Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Penask Lake Hatchery,
900,000; Lloyds Creek Hatchery, 50,000. The resultant fry and eyed eggs planted,
927,994, in thirty-two lakes and streams, including one rearing-pond.
Received from Gerrard Hatchery: 100,000 Kamloops trout eyed eggs; resultant
fry, 93,600, liberated in the Nelson Hatchery rearing-ponds.
Eastern brook trout eggs collected at Boundary Lake the fall of the year 1944,
265,000; Loon Lake, 100,000; total, 365,000. The resultant fry planted during the
spring of 1945, 307,615, in sixteen lakes and streams throughout the Kootenay and
Okanagan Districts.
Eastern brook trout collected during the fall of 1945 at Boundary Lake, 320,000,
under incubation in the hatchery.
Cut-throat trout eggs collected at Rosebud Lake, 30,000, resultant fry returned to
the lake.
Kokanee eggs held over in the hatchery from 1944, 246,000, liberated as fry the
spring of 1945 in three lakes.
Kokanee eggs received from Meadow Creek in 1945, 3,000,000, and from Kaslo
Hatchery, 2,411,000 eyed eggs. Distributed 3,500,000 to the Idaho State Game and
Fish Department; 1,380,000 planted in fifteen lakes throughout the Interior. Remaining in the hatchery for liberation next spring as fry, 165,000. GG 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Cranbrook Hatchery.—Seasonal operations for East Kootenay waters with the
co-operation of the Cranbrook District Rod and Gun Club and subsidy granted by the
Game Department: Cut-throat trout eggs collected Fish Lakes, 1,328,000; Monroe
Lake, 119,000; total, 1,447,000; eyed eggs and fry distributed, 915,725, into twenty-six
lakes and streams. Sold to the Department of Mines and Resources, Ottawa, 290,500
eyed eggs.    Supplied to the Revelstoke Hatchery, 150,000 eyed eggs.
Hybrid trout eggs collected at Monroe Lake, 204,250. Resultant eyed eggs and fry
distributed in six lakes and streams, 171,590.
Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Gerrard Hatchery, 200,000; Lloyds Creek
Hatchery, 100,000; Penask Lake Hatchery, 300,000; total, 600,000; distributed in
Murphy Lakes, 15,000 eyed eggs; Kootenay Lake, 125,000 fry; Bjerkness rearing-
ponds, 100,000 fry;   Kaslo rearing-ponds, 419,594 fry.
Kokanee eggs received from Meadow Creek, 3,500,000. Resultant eyed eggs
distributed, 2,411,000 shipped to the Nelson Hatchery and 100,000 planted.
Summary of Rearing-ponds operated, etc.
Summerland Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—Used temporarily, 20,000 Kamloops trout
fry released therein. Resultant small fingerlings liberated in the Okanagan Lake not
counted.
Nelson Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—Liberation of Kamloops trout fingerlings retained
from year 1944. Penask stock, 3-inch fingerlings, 20,040, Kootenay River above the
Brilliant Dam.
Kootenay River, between Grohman Creek to Cora Linn Dam, Penask stock, 2,305
3-inch fingerlings and 2,610 Lloyds Creek stock;  total, 4,915.
West Arm Kootenay Lake.—Lloyds Creek stock, 4-inch fingerlings, 2,765; Gerrard
stock, 7,728 4-inch fingerlings; Gerrard stock, 2,995 5-inch to 9-inch fingerlings marked
by the removal of right ventral and adipose fins.
Transferred to No. 1 circular pond, 5,000 fingerlings, Gerrard stock, for liberation
in the West Arm of Kootenay Lake next spring, 1946.
Liberated in Champion Lake, 3-inch to 4-inch fingerlings, Gerrard stock, 2,070.
Total liberation of Kamloops trout fingerlings raised in the Nelson rearing-
ponds, 65,513.
Replacement of trout held in the Nelson Hatchery rearing-ponds, June, 1945:
Gerrard fry, 93,600; Lloyds Creek fry, 18,191; transferred to No. 1 circular pond,
5,000 fingerlings, Gerrard stock.
Bjerkness Rearing-ponds.—Transferred from Kaslo Hatchery, July 28th, 100,000
fry, Gerrard stock. Resultant fingerlings liberated August 22nd to 30th, into Kootenay
Lake, 27,000 2-inch fingerlings; Slocan Lake, 28,500 2-inch fingerlings. Total distributions, 55,500.    Water conditions compelled the early liberations.
Kaslo Rearing-ponds.—Transferred from Kaslo Hatchery to ponds, July 19th to
August 1st, 419,594 fry, Gerrard stock. Resultant fingerlings liberated into Kootenay
Lake, 2 inches to 3 inches in length, from December 27th to 31st, 334,076. The early
liberation was due to condition of fish.
New Denver Rearing-ponds.—Not operated due to the pollution of Carpenter
Creek, the source of water-supply, but in place thereof 28,500 Kamloops trout fingerlings raised in the Bjerkness ponds and liberated into Slocan Lake.
Matthew Creek Rearing-ponds.—Consisting of natural waters as a result of beaver
dam, 30,000 cut-throat trout fry liberated therein for St. Mary River.
Fernie Rearing-ponds.—A total of 10,000 cut-throat trout fry liberated in the No. 2
and No. 3 ponds with fair success.    Resultant fingerlings entered the Elk River. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 27
Private Ponds and Small Lakes.—Four applications were received to purchase small
allotments of Eastern brook and Kamloops trout fry, receiving favourable consideration
by the authorities.
Miscellaneous Subjects.
Fertilization of Lakes.—As a result of numerous inquiries received with regard to
the experimental use of commercial fertilizers to increase the productivity of certain
lakes inhabited with trout, and in view of the expense involved in these experiments if
conducted, the Game Commission referred the matter to the biological authorities for
review and comments.
However, in the meantime, permission was granted (entirely at the expense of the
applicants) to test out suitable fertilizers as undertaken by the Bear Lake Rod and Gun
Club in Bear Lake, elevation 3,500 feet, Sandon district, and by the Nickel Plate Rod
and Gun Club in Clearwater Lake, elevation 6,000 feet.
From subsequent investigations in each case, it appeared that where the fertilizer
was applied there was an increase in algae weed growth and plankton life, otherwise it
was not possible to determine if the applications of fertilizer had increased the growth
of trout life.    This will be confirmed later.
Fertilizer was applied to the semi-natural Bjerkness rearing-ponds, but due to
water conditions the test could not be completed, but it was proven that the fertilizer
increased plankton life, thus reducing artificial feeding 50 per cent., and the growth
attained by the fingerlings in these ponds compared favourably with those retained in
the Kaslo ponds fed twice daily.
Experiments.—As approved of by the authorities, the Fish Committee of the
Kimberley Rod and Gun Club were permitted to place two floating fry-pens on Bartholomews Lake to ascertain the growth and to afford protection to newly liberated fry.
The small allotments retained in the pens made exceedingly good growth during time
held, but unfortunately the fry were liberated before the test was completed and the
pens destroyed by unscrupulous people.
Similarly, another test was undertaken by the Fish Committee of the Grand Forks
Rod and Gun Club in a small nursery stream with marked success.
In co-operation with the organized sportsmen, forty meetings were attended during
the year, including thirty-eight investigations pertaining to game-fish culture, together
with assistance rendered at the various hatcheries and rearing-ponds regarding eyed
eggs planted, including the liberation of fry and fingerlings, etc.
Stripped kokanee supplied from Meadow Creek collecting-station for feeding trout
fry and fingerlings retained in the Kaslo, Bjerkness, and Nelson rearing-ponds: Kaslo
refrigeration plant, 3 tons;   Nelson refrigeration plant, 4 tons.
Coarse Fish.—Heavy spring freshets in the Okanagan River flowing between the
outlet dam and Skaha Lake prevented the use of traps. A total of 328 carp was
removed from the trap at the outlet of Okanagan Lake.
The operation of a gill-net in the Slocan Lake to reduce the numbers of squaw-fish
was tested out. Stormy weather and wind prevented the effective use of the net' and
only fifty squaw-fish were taken.
The returns of coarse fish taken by fur-farmers are not available at present.
Reducing the numbers of carp in Lake Christina by one licensee was not tested out
with gill-nets, but is receiving attention.
Salvage and Transfer of Trout.—In spite of the extreme hot summer, the water-
flow in most streams was adequate to sustain the trout, except in Big Sheep Creek where
a loss occurred of Eastern brook trout which was unavoidable.
Fishways.—The six small fishways installed in dams under 10 feet in height are
in fair condition and working, situated at the outlet of Okanagan Lake and on Eholt GG 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Creek, Little Sand Creek, at the outlet of McBains (Rosen) Lake, Alexander Creek, and
Paddy Ryan Lakes.
Obstructions.—Elk River, vicinity of Elko. As requested by the organized sportsmen of Fernie district, the investigation was completed with regard to natural and
artificial obstructions on this stream, with a view to making provision to afford free
ascent of migratory fish from Kootenay River. The findings of this investigation will
be duly reported and discussed with the organized sportsmen concerned.
Lardeau River.—To ensure a free passage to the parent Kamloops trout from
Kootenay Lake reaching their spawning areas adjacent to the Gerrard Hatchery, attention was given to the removal of a partial obstruction on the river, but due to the somewhat early snowfall the work could not be completed economically. The matter is
receiving attention next fall.
From available information on hand, no other natural-formed obstructions exist
that would seriously affect the passage of migratory or spawning trout.
Pollutions (Mining Industries).—With the return of normal conditions it is
expected some mines will resume operations, otherwise, with the exception of the Sheep
Creek and Sandon areas, the pollution of waters frequented by trout has not been
serious, as referred to herewith.
Similkameen River.—All possible attention has been given to the impoundment of
concentrator refuse as undertaken by the Granby Mining and Smelting Company, of
Copper Mountain, Kelowna Exploration Company and Mascot Mining Company, of
Hedley, resulting in improved trout fishing.
' Okanagan River.—Considerable refuse enters the river as discharged from the
smelter and fertilizer plants operated by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company at Trail. Possibly the unabated pollution does not affect fish life seriously owing
to the volume of water-flow.
Salmon River and Sheep Creek.—As a result of the resumption of operations by
the Sheep Creek Gold Mines, and later by the Gold Belt Mining Company, the streams
in question will become seriously polluted; this in some respects cannot be well avoided,
due to the location of plants and precipitous nature of the ground for impoundment.
Seaton and Carpenter Creeks.—The management of the Zincton Mines, Limited,
has and is giving attention to control the concentrator refuse by impoundment for the
interests of a hydro-electric plant and sport fisheries.
Summit Creek.—Before the resumption of operations next spring, the management
of the Bayonne Consolidated Mines, Limited, has made provision to control and impound
the concentrator refuse; this is very difficult, owing to the precipitous terrain where
the plant is situated.
St. Mary River.—The continued precautions taken by the Consolidated Mining and
Smelting Company to control and impound the huge discharge of concentrator refuse
has resulted in the river not being seriously polluted.
Elk River.—The control of coal sludge from the washing-plant operated by the
Elk River Collieries on Coal Creek and Michel has prevented serious pollutions.
Lumber Industries.—With the exception of two minor complaints received, the
operators of stationary and portable sawmills have complied with the fishery regulations
in force.
Water Conditions.—Were favourable for fish cultural purposes, also permitted
natural spawning. Forest fires were quite serious in certain areas, which may affect
fish life in future, although no losses occurred during the fires.
Diseases.—During the year no mortality was observed or reported resulting from
disease affecting fish life in streams and lakes.
Co-operation.—Although war-time conditions curtailed the activities somewhat,
however, the assistance rendered was generally appreciated from the organized sports-
J REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 29
men, individuals, municipalities, Forest Branch, Water Rights Branch, and the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company, and for scientific information supplied by
Dr. W. A. Clemens and Dr. G. Clifford Carl, Director, Provincial Museum.
Sport Fish.—The supplies of trout generally have been maintained from natural
and artificial propagation, but with the increasing demand for Kamloops trout eyed eggs
from the consolidated collecting-stations at Penask Lake and Lloyds Creek and very
restricted collections at the latter station due to unusual water conditions, it now seems
imperative that an attempt should be made to augment the supply of eggs for the Nelson
Hatchery, if possible, from local waters with surveys taken in that respect.
" C " DIVISION  (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, CHILCOTIN,
AND SQUAMISH DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C "
Game Division during the year ended December 31st, 1945.
Big Game.
Moose.—In the 1944 annual report mention was made by the writer that we should
judge the big-game stand not on any single seasonal kill but rather to cover a five-year
period, as conditions might be very favourable to hunters one year and completely
unfavourable the following year, owing largely to climatic conditions and other factors.
When that view-point was expressed in the 1944 report, it was based on war-time conditions with large numbers of our former hunters overseas and an equally large number
engaged in war industries.
Since then conditions have changed with the cessation of hostilities, and to-day we
find a vastly increased resident hunting population besides a 33-per-cent. increase in the
number of non-resident hunters over that of 1944. We are now faced, in the settled
areas at least, in so far as one of our most valuable assets is concerned, with a situation
that calls for wise judgment based on sound game management through first-hand
observation and the experience of big-game guides in the field. Statistical information
given by fifty Class "A" guides will be given under the heading of " Guides " in this
report on conditions affecting big-game hunting and the desire for better organization.
It would be quite safe to estimate that between 750 and 1,000 moose were taken by
non-residents over the west half of our Province. Estimates are not yet available for
the entire Province, but this figure, while not alarming, does call for a review, especially
if the resident big-game kill is added to the above unfinished estimate. If we add an
estimate of the big-game resident kill (the figures for which are not obtainable since
residents are not required to submit returns of game taken), the potential moose kill
is bound to give us concern. The Indian kill of big game should also be included in
these totals. One must take these factors into consideration in an effort to obtain a
more accurate picture of the situation. Statistical information based on actual kill
figures and census of animals in winter yarding-grounds would do much toward eliminating uncertainty of the actual big-game population.
The number of moose taken both by resident hunters and non-resident hunters in
transit along the Cariboo highways was at times of a spectacular nature. In the
conservation of our big-game resources we must think of to-morrow, and our gauge for
that must of necessity be the ever-increasing number of resident and non-resident
hunters appearing here. Overcrowding of guides and non-residents was noticeable in
many districts, while other areas less accessible were indeed lacking, not so much in
the case of guides as in the number of non-resident hunters. GG 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
There seemed to be a feverish desire on the part of all hunters to obtain meat rather
than heads, and favourable climatic conditions during the latter part of the season
aided the hunt. Hunting of moose was, therefore, a great success, but gave cause at
the same time for some reflection. The kill was fairly heavy and the number of hunters
in the bush revealed a state of affairs somewhat out of proportion to that of former
years.
If we are to have this asset in continuity, very definite recommendations will have
to be put into effect, not in the way of half measures, but of a regulatory nature, both
as to time and the number of hunters and guides accompanying those hunters. All
these changes should be in relation to the actual big-game population. The observations of guides, census of animals on wintering grounds, and the reports of trappers
and farmers would do much toward supplying valuable data.
Moose have been observed at Sugar Lake in the Vernon district and as far south
as Creighton Valley.
Wapiti.—Very few of these animals were taken during the season as conditions
were unfavourable and heads were certainly not in demand.
Caribou.—In the Clearwater and northern portion of this Division a closed season
should prevail for a number of years.
The question of allowing domestic sheep to graze where caribou have long held
sway is a problem requiring extremely careful consideration. Some semblance of wild
life should be left to those who are interested in its welfare. The caribou is not like
the mule-deer, and it is not an animal taking kindly to civilization.
Mountain-sheep.—Very few of these were taken as the season was shortened by
the early snowfall. In the Yalakom Game Reserve mountain-sheep have increased
steadily. One hundred and seven sheep were observed in one day. Unfortunately,
however, mining operations are due to start in that vicinity and plans for a road are
now being pushed. It would be well worth the expenditure to appoint a Warden to look
after this reserve. Regular visits are being made to the Shorts Creek area by Wardens
in the Okanagan. Both Squilax and Shorts Creek areas should not for a number of
years at least be opened for hunting, as both areas are far too small to even consider
an open season and their numbers do not warrant throwing the season open to all and
sundry. Any future open season for a few days should be under permit only, and only
a specified number of sheep should be taken.
Deer.—In Moha, Bridge River, Okanagan, and in the Kamloops Districts there is
no scarcity. As deer are fairly prolific breeders, there is no immediate cause for
concern.
Mountain-goat.—A few were taken from the vicinity of Momich River. As high
as seventy-three goats have been observed in previous years in the same district, but
this year no bands of any size were observed.
Bear (Grizzly, etc.).—Not many were taken, but inquiries made through Divisional
Headquarters at Kamloops by United States sources would indicate a growing interest
in the big-game possibilities of this Province.
Fur-bearing Animals.
The last returns of beaver catch in this Division showed a downward drop from the
peak figures of 1943. Prices were high. In the Okanagan Valley, with its limited
timber resources and its extensive fruit-growing, any water-supply held through the
presence of beavers at the headwaters of the Okanagan streams means much to the
agricultural industry.
It would seem that we shall have to give some consideration to the suggestion of
engaging men for the exclusive supervision of trap-lines, which would involve regular
patrols over lines where beavers mean so much to agriculture.    We can quite easily tie REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 31
in one Provincial asset with another and so render assistance, which in the dry years
is interdependent one with the other.
To add the required impetus so obviously needed both in the interests of agriculture
and game propagation, a much larger programme of beaver plantings should be inaugurated, even if it means the acquiring of additional trap-lines to enhance the present
programme. To keep in line with the tremendous development of our resources, the
swamp-lands and unused hay meadows of doubtful value should be surveyed for potential fur-bearing wealth. There are thousands of areas, both large and small, in parts
of the Province which, with a little survey of water-levels, could be made to produce
tremendous fur wealth.
While on a recent patrol of inspection covering the trap-line of Eric Collier, president of the British Columbia Registered Trappers' Association, Riske Creek, the
potentialities of wild fur propagation were amply demonstrated on this trap-line.
Armed with a shovel only, Mr. Collier dammed up twenty-three out of twenty-five old,
disused swamp-lands which were once the habitat of beavers, muskrats, and other
fur-bearers. These areas ranged in size from 80 to 500 acres each. The winter snows
were held and in the spring water flooded these swamps. This was followed by the
appearance of muskrats and other fur-bearers, water-fowl, big game, as numerous
tracks testified. In fact, the whole situation and appearance of the country changed
from one of apparent stillness and dearth of life to animation and restoration of its
pristine condition. To assist this project the Game Department liberated a few beavers.
This can be done with many other trap-lines. To develop and carry on a scheme of this
kind would naturally demand trained personnel, and with the present limited staff of
Game Wardens any suggestion of increased staff to handle the manifold duties before
us will have to wait until its importance as a wealth-producer is recognized.
The irrigation problems of one area contiguous to the Collier trap-line have been
largely solved as a result of the above project. This trap-line, starting with a capital
expenditure of $18 a few years ago, now produces an annual income in the four-figure
bracket from furs alone.
Aquatic insect-life, so valuable to the feeding of trout, has increased to an enormous
extent, and fishing is now once more being enjoyed at the mouth of Meldrum Creek as
a result of the growth of aquatic insect-life on Collier's trap-line ponds. Bird-life has
also increased in the alfalfa fields, where the irrigation water, teeming with aquatic
insects, forms a change of diet to both insectivorous and game birds alike. This is only
one example of the tremendous possibilities lying before us and awaiting the green
light to go ahead. Beavers have increased in the Quesnel district, west of the Fraser
River.
The Registered Trappers' Association held a meeting at Kamloops last spring and
the subject of squirrel-destruction by the use of the .22 rifle came up for discussion.
Following is the average beaver census per trapper for " C " Game Division from
1934 to 1944, inclusive:—
Season.
No. of Trappers
submitting
Estimates.
Estimate of
Beavers.
Average
per Trapper.
1934-35	
275
343
367
345
307
348
345
350
404
361
361
4,789
6,392
6,347
5,945
5,315
6,501
7,228
6,663
7,852
7,609
7,244
17.41
1935-36    	
18.60
1936 37              	
17.29
1937 38              	
17.23
1938 39                                 	
17.30
1939 40              	
18.68
1940-41          	
20.95
1941 42                          	
19.04
1942 43                	
19.43
1943 44                                   	
21.06
1944 45	
20.07 GG 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse have been scarce throughout this Division and a shorter or close season
is desirable. Pheasants were in fair abundance. A considerable number of hunters
came to Interior points for pheasant shooting. Suggestions have been made that the
season on pheasants should open all on the same day over the entire Province to
prevent overcrowding. There is a very definite agitation in favour of pheasant
tagging.
European partridges are increasing in the Ashcroft district and along the Fraser
River.    Quail liberated around Ashcroft in 1939 are increasing.
Migratory Game Birds.
The season was disappointing as a whole for duck shooting. Quesnel reported
an increase in ducks and geese. At Kelowna and Kamloops it was indeed a poor year.
This is purely one of those migratory mysteries for which at present there is no
accounting. As science delves into the mystery of the migratory urge and discovers
more about the phenomena we shall have to leave the explanation in the meantime
largely to conjecture. It was observed that there was also a mysterious absence of
ducks in coastal regions.
Water conditions in the Okanagan and Cariboo are decidedly more favourable for
next year. In the Williams Lake area prior to July 1st water conditions were improved
and the nesting season was considered good. The early snowfall greatly altered the
situation, affecting geese feeding on the stubble-fields above Kamloops. Over 3,000
whistler swans passed over the Kelowna area during the fall migration.
Vermin.
Considerable agitation among the cattle-growers for an increased bounty on
wolves has been made during the year. The system of predatory-animal hunters has
been revived in this Province. Observations by the writer and hunters, trappers, and
guides in the field indicate the presence of wolves in areas far to the south of their
usual range. There has been a noticeable movement of these animals accompanying
the trek of moose.
Thoroughly trained predatory-animal hunters, preferably young men, should be
placed in strategic locations to cope with the increase of these wolves. With but few
exceptions, wolves will travel long distances in twenty-four hours, which makes them
particularly hard to trap or kill. If snow is not deep, horses should be used in actual
hunting.
Predatory animals and birds were destroyed in numbers along similar lines in
previous years. Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth destroyed ten cougars besides
other predators. Complaints by wool-growers were not as numerous as in previous
years.
Game-protection.
One hundred and forty-seven prosecutions were launched by officers of the Game
Department. Of these, Provincial Police prosecuted none. Seven cases were dismissed.
Owing to the greatly increased traffic due to non-resident and resident hunters, our
staff of Wardens simply could not keep pace with and check the continual flow of
hunters arriving in the Interior. Even the office-work alone was far too heavy where
officers were continually answering inquiries both by telephone and correspondence.
If this high percentage of hunters continues to come to the Interior, and preliminary
inquiries are already being made by our friends across the Border for next year's
hunting, additional Game Wardens and other help will have to be engaged. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 33
Game Propagation.
Forty-eight pheasants were released in the Kamloops District. Lack of snow prevented trapping of pheasants at Tranquille. A few Salmon Arm pheasants were taken
in traps and liberated around the Kamloops area. We expect to release a few Kamloops
birds in Salmon Arm this year if conditions permit, as an exchange of new blood.
Game Reserves.
Yalakom, Bowron Lake, Tranquille, and Minnie Lake Game Reserves and a small
deer reserve in the Lillooet district are the only reserves in this Division. One answer
to the heavy drain on big game, game birds, and fur is the creation of sanctuaries
strategically placed, of sufficient size to propagate and maintain any dwindling game
population. Already one for water-fowl is recommended for Kamloops. Williams
Lake has discussed the creation of a sanctuary for big game and Salmon Arm has
proposed a large area adjacent to the city.
The aerial traffic about to start in 1946 and increasing monthly on a large scale
opens the way to hinterland accessibility. Sanctuaries also in the far north to protect
breeding-grounds should be established now. To wait until after the Province is
settled through air-borne visitors and property-holders merely increases the difficulty.
Landing strips adjacent to thousands of lakes will be constructed before long. We are
assuredly living in an age of action and progress and therefore should keep abreast of
modern development.
Fur Trade.
This business is carried on largely at the Coast on a much greater scale than any
in the Interior. Beaver tagging now in operation for 1945 should be carried out in
each detachment before shipping. We shall then be in a position to keep track of the
extent of fur catch.
Fur-farming.
Much has been written about the great lack of activity in this Province. There is
room for considerable expansion and initiative in the creation of large fur-farms on
a similar scale to those in Russia.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This system is an outstanding success, but with it should go an educational programme as a means to an end. The writer has made it a point to send to each and
every trapper a yearly appeal to conserve fur-bearers within their boundaries.
Inspection of trap-lines should be extended on a considerably larger scale. At least
four Wardens, young and of good physique, should be steadily engaged on trap-line
inspection-work during the entire twelve months. These men should be trained in fur
conservation and should have engineering experience involving water-levels, creation
of ponds, and conservation of water for irrigation and propagation of our fur resources.
If we are to succeed in utilizing and multiplying our water fur-bearers into a Province-
wide asset of tremendous wealth, a definite and far-reaching plan will have to be
evolved. If Ducks Unlimited, with its financial backing, could consider a plan of water
development through beaver propagation in this Province, not only would it assist the
fur-bearer but it would supply ponds for the feeding and propagation of hundreds of
thousands of ducks. The Collier project at the head of Riske Creek is a brilliant
example of what can be done for fur-bearers and water-fowl alike.
Registration of Guides.
Under normal conditions the present system of guiding non-resident big-game
hunters fulfilled various requirements:— GG 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(1.) To satisfy the hunter coming here by hiring qualified guides to show
where the game was to be obtained.
(2.)  To supervise the killing of big game in accordance with the regulations
provided therein.
(3.)  To meet the demand of normal traffic.
This year particularly, a set of unusual conditions prevailed. Three hundred
guides in " C " Game Division tried to cope with a 33-per-cent. increase of resident
hunters over that of the previous year. As these hunters were not evenly distributed
there were complaints of overcrowding of both guides and hunters. The areas so well
known by residents, and as a result of the advertising by guides, were filled to capacity
by both resident hunter and non-resident. All lodges and auto camps were booked for
weeks ahead and at times hotel accommodation was at a premium. The net result of
this invasion was the thrill provided in obtaining one's limit of big game. True, there
was some difficulty at first, as moose and other big game were well back in the hills
and fewer heads, etc., were taken. Snow came early in October to stay. Big game
was driven to lower levels. At this juncture the heaviest kill of the season took place,
and car after car could be seen coming from the hills with its full quota of meat.
This spectacle naturally prompted people living here to ask if all this slaughter by both
resident and non-resident alike was in the best interests of the Province. There was
a justifiable feeling that, through no fault of ours, we were perhaps overdoing a good
thing. In some places guides were idle and in other places Americans had to hang
around and wait their turn for a guide. Clearly there was too much overcrowding in
some places and not enough hunters in others. Several lodges had several guides on
full-time employment.
In a concentration of guides and hunters of this kind covering a limited area, the
kill for the entire season was heavy and somewhat unbalanced. Guides had a waiting
list of non-resident hunters ranging from two to thirty-five and forty to each guide.
Guides brought out moose kills ranging from two moose to as high as thirty-five or
forty animals to each guide. Some considerable controversy arose among the guides
and others on the ultimate effect of the overcrowding by resident and non-resident
hunters in some settled areas.
Special Patrols.
Special patrols were made by Inspector Robertson and Game Warden Ellis through
the Nehalliston Forest Reserve. The suggestion that a road be constructed through
this reserve, which at one time was recommended, is now discarded. The area is too
small for a north and south highway. Instead, the use of horses is recommended for
both hunting and fishing. A substantial number of applications for lake-shore properties has now been received.
A patrol was carried out by Game Wardens Martin and Holmes in the Lillooet
detachment. Two convictions were obtained under the provisions of the " Game Act."
No other outstanding patrols were made during the year.
Hunting Accidents.
The following hunting accidents took place during the hunting season:—
On Sunday, November 14th, at 11.45 a.m., Ronald William Bertram Harmer, Trapp
Lake, B.C., was fatally shot through the right lung by his brother, Stanley Harmer,
while they were hunting in the vicinity of their home.
Ronald and Stanley Harmer separated.    Ronald Harmer killed a deer and was
stooping down to clean it.    Stanley thought he saw a deer and fired, accidentally killing
his brother. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 35
On Sunday, November 21st, Herman Bauer, of Poulsbo, Wash., U.S.A., was accidentally killed near Duckling Lake in the Forest Grove area. His friend, Ralph Kvins-
land, also of Poulsbo, Wash., tripped in the underbrush, fell, and in so doing discharged
his rifle.    The bullet entered Mr. Bauer's side.
Game-fish Culture.
Fishing conditions as a whole were satisfactory. The great influx of new arrivals
from abroad and the resident war-time population were responsible for some overcrowding on many of our popular lakes. It is now becoming evident that trout in those
heavily fished lakes do not get a chance to attain an attractive size. As a result of this
situation a few of the lakes are being deserted by the fastidious angler for other bodies
of water less accessible. It would seem that a daily and seasonal bag-limit would be
necessary on these heavily fished lakes. Otherwise they will become less of a tourist
attraction.
There was also an increased number of boats being carried on tops of cars.
The hiring of boats, once a profitable business at numerous lodges, owing to public
demand, has now been relegated very largely to the residents of these lodges.
The question of supply of aquatic insect-life in most of our lakes is not, strictly
speaking, a problem. We have too much sunshine in the Interior to ever worry about
food for trout. We are more concerned with the problem of the greatly increased
visitation of anglers to our already heavily fished lakes. Some limitation must necessarily follow.
The creation of artificial spawning-beds where none previously existed may give
trout a reasonably good start in a new body of water. I am afraid that, unless we
maintain these beds from year to year, the discharge of spawn will be delayed. Running
streams for spawning purposes are in the majority of cases necessary for the maintenance of a healthy condition. Unless we have an adequate staff to maintain this
principle of artificial spawning-beds we should delay any suggestion of its inception
for the time being.
Summary and General Remarks.
The heavy increase of hunters, both resident and non-resident, after the cessation
of hostilities, was abnormal. It gave a preview of what to expect in the years to come.
From the standpoint of results it was indeed a success and large numbers of hunters
returned with the largest kill of big game in history. Residents interested in this great
attraction, both from a business point of view and because of the sport it provided,
quite naturally queried the wisdom of too generous a bag-limit and a season that was
too long. It was indeed a situation to a large extent quite unexpected. The heavy
war-time population of hunters from Vancouver and Interior points took to the hills
and fields as a welcome diversion. Departmental facilities were of far too limited a
nature to cope with such a large number of hunters. It is evident, therefore, that
far-reaching changes are required in the face of new developments.
Younger animals were taken this year and the horn spread was noticeably smaller
than the year previous.
The caribou are not increasing, either in the north or Clearwater districts.
Applications for grazing permits have been received for the Clearwater area and great
care will have to be exercised if we are to admit domestic sheep. Large numbers of
sheep on a range, with sheep moving from place to place, do not improve the status of
an area used by big game.
Mountain-sheep at Shorts Creek and Squilax are at normal levels. Their numbers
are not large and their natural habitat is limited. Any future open season should be
carried out under permit, and only limited numbers of hunters should be admitted GG 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
strictly in accordance with the local population of bighorns. Very few other species of
big game were taken. Their limited numbers are not in a position to stand heavy
hunting.
Greater interest is being taken in beaver conservation and it seems that we shall
have to make provision for a more elaborate catch of live animals. More traps are
necessary. The work of one trapper in the Meldrum Creek area on water conservation
and its correlating increase in the growth of fur-bearers and water-fowl and other
game is an outstanding example of what can be done through planning and initiative.
There is indeed a great deal that we can do toward creating projects along similar lines.
A far-reaching plan with an adequate staff to handle a Province-wide project should be
seriously considered.
The .22 rifle has received some condemnation as a weapon used in the needless
destruction of game and fur. Forthcoming legislation should more rigidly control
its use, particularly in the destruction of squirrels.
This was not a good year for grouse. The close season in the Cariboo found a few
hunters, mostly from outside points, getting into trouble for shooting grouse.
The season on migratory water-fowl was, on the whole, disappointing.
Predator control has been considerably in the limelight this year and, with such
a large amount of game residue left in the hills from the heavy kill of big game,
an increase in some sections of British Columbia, especially in wolves, has been
reported.
Our staff and Wardens in the field were far too limited in numbers. This situation
requires a remedy.
In the matter of protecting our resources in northern British Columbia (and in
this I particularly refer to water-fowl breeding areas), a definite move should be made
now to protect this heritage before aerial travel develops. Some provision should be
made to set aside large areas of water where no aeroplanes would be allowed to land.
These lakes would be reached by horse or foot. The air regulations should be closely
scrutinized and necessary precautions taken to protect our wild-life resources by the
insertion or creation of regulations dealing with these emergency problems.
Beaver tagging will come into full operation in 1946. This should be a constructive
measure designed to fill a much-needed form of protection. Might I suggest that beaver
tagging be carried out in the detachment where beavers are caught. The new system
will lose most of its effectiveness if beavers are shipped for tagging to outside points.
I particularly wish to stress the importance of this suggestion and sincerely trust that
something will be done to prevent abuses growing out of beaver-tagging operations.
Applications are being received daily for summer-home and lakeshore-lodge sites
on many of our lakes. As the Game Commission is now one of the licensing authorities
under the Department of Trade and Industry, the demand for properties to the Lands
Department at Victoria is increasing. Each lake has to be judged on its merits as
a body of water capable of furnishing trout fishing. There is little use overcrowding
these lakes with lodges and tourist camps. Therefore, their numbers are limited in
relation to the lake's potentialities. In this way lodge-owners are assured of an opportunity of making a profit from their investment. The plan is a good one and also
guards to some extent against any possibility of plying the lake with too many boats
for commercial purposes.
The tremendous interest now being taken in our game and fishery attractions is
rapidly reaching a point where, to preserve its value, great care and scientific readjustment will have to take place. The co-operation of numerous game associations and the
widespread interest of our guides and trappers clearly indicates a healthy state of
affairs which speaks well for British Columbia as the wild-life Province of the Western
Hemisphere. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 37
To all those with whom we have so happily carried out our duties our grateful
thanks are extended, not only for the interest they have shown, but also for the assistance so gladly rendered. We sincerely trust that the same spirit of good-will and
co-operation will continue in the trying years that lie ahead.
Report of C. H. Robinson, Fishery Supervisor, covering Game-fish
Conditions in " C " Game Division.
I herewith beg to submit report covering a review and trend of the fisheries of
" C " Division, combined with data of some lakes supplied by the Game Wardens, for
the year ended 1945.
The late cold spring retarded fishing and the catches of trout and to some extent
ova collections, but later most waters yielded the average catches of trout, except somewhat shallow and sluggish lakes during the hot summer months, where in some
instances, the fish, if caught, are not very palatable for domestic use.
Some favourable reports indicated good and improved trout fishing in certain
lakes, namely, Shuswap, vicinity of Sicamous, Mara, Adams, Echo (Creighton Valley),
Pinantan, Ta-Weel, Lac le Jeune, Hihium, Knouff, Nicola, Penask, Peterhope, Glimpse,
and Gillis Lakes.
With the return of normal conditions, increasing numbers of non-resident anglers
fished the various accessible lakes and streams, also the tourist camps and lodges were
filled to their capacity. Consequently, it is doubtful even with the yearly replenishment
the productive capacity of these waters can continue to supply a fair share of trout to
resident and non-resident anglers, unless additional restrictions are placed on the
daily catch-limit of trout or the number allowed in possession during' one week.
The distributions of trout will be found in detail elsewhere in the report of the
Game Commission.
Sport fish and other species that inhabit waters of " C " Game Division: Steelhead,
Kamloops (rainbow), cut-throat, Eastern brook, Dolly Varden (char), lake trout, and
kokanee and including three species of migratory salmon—springs, sockeye, and cohoe;
other less important species—sturgeon, perch, Rocky Mountain whitefish, carp, ling,
squaw-fish, suckers, chub, and a variety of minnows (shiners).
Non-native fish introduced: Eastern brook trout, migratory or transferred perch
and carp.
North Okanagan Waters.
Okanagan Lake.—Angling and trolling for the Kamloops trout improved in the
central and northern regions of the lake, as indicated by the fish caught, varying in
weight up to 23 lb. 9 oz. No doubt the seasonal liberation of quite large trout fingerlings from the Kelowna rearing-ponds and substantial allotments of fry from the Summerland Hatchery has contributed to the increased supply of trout, although probably
the trout Derby instituted encouraged more fishing, as referred to herewith.
Sponsored by the Vernon, Kelowna and Penticton Fish and Game Protective Association, the first Okanagan Lake Rainbow Trout Derby was conducted from May 15th,
1944, to February 28th, 1945, regarding trout caught from Okanagan, Kalamalka, and
Skaha (Dog) Lakes, and kokanee (silver trout) from Woods Lake.
The statistics compiled at Vernon disclosed that 272 trout of 5 lb. and over were
entered and weighed in, total weight 2,502 lb. ll1/^ oz-> taken from Okanagan Lake;
Kalamalka Lake, 11 lb. 9 oz.; and Skaha Lake, 14 oz. taken on the fly. Woods Lake
kokanee weighed 3 lb. 1% oz.
The majority of fish were taken during January and February, and mostly from
Okanagan Lake:   Penticton area, 35;   Kelowna area, 83;   and Vernon area, 154. GG 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prizes donated by the Okanagan Valley business-men were valued at $1,633.
Attendance at the banquet, Vernon, May 17th, 1945, when the prizes were presented,
650 people.    Net profit carried forward for propagation work, $1,219.69.
Some interesting data was obtained as to the growth of trout by scale readings, etc.
Beaver Lake and Dee Lake Chain.—These lakes supplied fair catches of rainbow
trout by fly and troll for the numerous resident and non-resident anglers. However,
with the foreseen influx of non-resident anglers, it is doubtful if these waters will continue to produce the desired number of trout, unless the length of the fishing season is
reduced and additional restrictions placed on the number of trout taken daily or in
possession during a week.
Oyama Lake.—Not so accessible, provided good fly-fishing and trolling for Kamloops trout, varying to 10 lb. in weight.
Woods Lake.—Fair numbers of Kamloops were taken, mostly by trolling. The
results of fairly substantial plantings of trout fry and eyed eggs the past four years in
this accessible and productive lake remains obscure. Fishing for kokanee, a splendid
type and edible fish, improved, mostly taken on baited multiple lures. The supply from
beach spawning has been fairly well maintained even though the Indians are permitted
to take the kokanee by jigging methods when spawning the past forty years or more.
Examinations of catches revealed that at least 80 per cent, were male kokanee.
Shannan Lake.—Since the year 1943 the planting of Eastern brook trout fry in
this small landlocked lake was deferred, owing to the unofficial introduction of perch
which now appear quite numerous.
Caribou and Pear Lakes.—The intermittent liberation of Eastern brook trout fry
in these lakes, which are connected, has proven a success and provides fair trolling and
fly-fishing, varying to 3 lb. in weight. It is of interest to mention that the dwarfed
specie of sucker that inhabit the lakes are now readily consumed by the speckled trout,
thereby the destruction of the sucker when attempting to spawn should not be encouraged or permitted. Due to restricted spawning areas and water conditions, the
periodical replenishment with fry is essential. The renewed interest and possible
development of camping and boating facilities at the lakes will add to the attractions.
Kalamalka Lake.—Ideally situated and a popular summer resort, provided fair
fishing for the Kamloops trout by fly and troll, varying to 11 lb. in weight. The bottom
clay formation of the lake restricts the growth of aquatic vegetation and the food-
supplies, as indicated by the growth and condition of the fish, more particularly during
the spring. The kokanee-runs established in Coldstream Creek, a tributary, have
assisted with the food-supply for the larger trout.
Echo Lake (Creighton Valley).—This landlocked lake, conveniently located, provided good fly-fishing and trolling for quite large Kamloops trout during the spring and
fall. As conditions are entirely unsuitable to aid natural reproduction, the yearly
replenishment with trout fry is imperative.
Sugar Lake.—Yielded the average catches of rainbow trout by fly and troll, varying
to 3 lb. The increased size of the trout is due to raising of the water-levels for
hydro-electric power.
Swan Lake.—Very accessible, although not considered ideal trout waters due to
its shallowness and weed-growth, produced fair catches of well-proportioned Kamloops
trout during the spring and fall taken from the deeper portions of the lake by troll.
This should offer some encouragement for fry liberations next spring.
Salmon Arm District Waters.
Shuswap Lake.—Continued to yield fair catches of Kamloops trout, varying to
12 lb. in weight, including considerable numbers of smaller trout taken on the fly and REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 39
baited multiple lures in the vicinity of Salmon Arm. The anglers of the Sicamous
region appeared well satisfied with the trout fishing generally.
There was the usual concentration of anglers at Little River and at the mouths of
Adams River and Scotch Creek. The fishing for rainbow trout during the early part
of the season was not so good, but later improved. It is very doubtful if these waters
will continue to produce the desired catches of trout as in the past for the increasing
numbers of resident and non-resident anglers. Probably if the period of fishing is
reduced, to afford more protection to the spring runs of trout, it would be a step towards
conservation and is worthy of investigation.
Mara Lake.—Provided good fly-fishing and trolling for Kamloops trout throughout
the season, especially at the mouth of Shuswap River during the spring. Average
weight of trout taken was 3 lb. The popularity of this lake is increasing, as indicated
by the construction of tourist camps and summer homes.
Mabel Lake.—Quite popular as a summer resort. Provided fairly good fly-fishing
and trolling for Kamloops trout averaging about 2 lb. in weight, also fairly large lake
(grey) trout were taken.    The coarse fish appears to be on the increase.
Adams Lake.—Trolling for Kamloops and Dolly Varden trout remained fairly good
throughout the season. The average weight of Kamloops trout taken was about 4 lb.
The removal of the artificial obstruction on the outlet of the lake may increase the
trout population in the lake.
Pillar Lake.—This popular lake was well patronized by non-resident anglers, and
in spite of extensive fishing, it continued to produce fair catches of Kamloops trout on
fly and trolls, varying to 10 lb. in weight, as a result of yearly replenishment with fry.
The productivity of Pillar Lake, of about 100 acres in extent, has been fairly consistent, as indicated by a fairly accurate creel census taken in 1944, when the catches
of trout amounted to 4,582 lb., average weight of 3 lb., and the largest 11 lb., compared
to the top weight of a trout 39 lb. taken after the introduction year 1917.
Kamloops District Waters.
Pinantan Lake.—Reports indicated that mostly trolling for Kamloops trout
improved and the catches of trout varied from 1 to 3 lb. The examination of stomach-
tracts of the larger trout taken revealed the presence of consumed dace minnows. This
will probably check the increase of minnow and their suspected migration into Paul
Lake.    No trout eggs were collected from the lake during the season.
Paul Lake.—Was fished extensively but produced fair catches of Kamloops trout,
varying from 1 to 3 lb., taken on the fly and troll. In some instances a percentage of
anglers were keenly disappointed over their catches of trout and expressed the opinion
of depletion caused by insufficient restocking. No doubt the adopted systematic replenishment is sufficient according to the productive capacity of the lake. An alternative to ensure fair catches of trout to the increasing number of anglers would be to
reduce the daily catch-limit of trout.
Knouff Lake.—This productive body of water provided good fly-fishing and trolling
throughout the season for Kamloops trout, mostly from 1 to 5 lb. The efficient screening of the outlet of the lake has conserved the supply of matured trout. A total of
715,000 trout eggs were collected at this lake, compared to 1,000,000 in 1944.
Lac Le Jeune.—This quite popular and productive lake was heavily fished throughout the season by fly and troll for Kamloops trout, mostly from 1 to 2% lb. In many
instances the limit catches were taken, which would indicate that the supply of trout
has been well maintained from natural and artificial propagation.
Ta-Weel Lake.—This rather inaccessible lake was fished considerably by nonresident anglers and maintained its good reputation of providing good fly-fishing and
trolling for Kamloops trout, varying in weight from 1 to 12 lb.    It is possible the GG 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
heavy outtake will balance the prolific natural reproduction and the lake will continue
to supply fairly large trout.
Hihium Lake.—Was fished fairly steadily throughout the season by fly and troll
for Kamloops trout from 1 to 4 lb. in weight. The supply of trout has been reasonably
maintained, mostly from natural reproduction.
Merritt District Waters.
Nicola Lake.—Situated adjacent to the auto highway, produced the average
catches of Kamloops (rainbow) trout, mostly under 3 lb., by fly and troll, subject to
weather conditions. The kokanee, natural habitants of the lake, acts as a sport and
forage fish, the supply of which is fairly well maintained from natural reproduction,
although the protection of the specie when spawning is warranted to avoid depletion.
Peterhope Lake.—This popular and productive lake continued to yield fair catches
of Kamloops trout, mostly under 10 lb., by fly-fishing and trolling, except during the
extreme hot weather. With increasing amount of fishing ahead, it is questionable if
the productive capacity of this somewhat small lake can continue to supply a fair share
of trout to each angler, unless further restrictions are placed on the daily catch of
trout or number in possession during a specified period.
Glimpse Lake.—Another productive lake, provided good trolling and some flyfishing for Kamloops trout, varying in weight to 10 lb. or more, especially during the
spring and fall from intermittent restocking with fry and some natural reproduction
in the inlet creek.
Penask Lake.—Not so accessible and situated at a higher elevation, but very
important from a standpoint of seasonal ova collections. Provided good fly-fishing and
trolling for Kamloops (rainbow) trout, varying from 1 to 4 lb. The collection of eggs
at this point is beneficial towards balancing the trout populations, consistent with the
available food-supplies to support them.
Gillis Lake.—Barren of fish life prior to the year 1939, provided excellent flyfishing and trolling for Kamloops trout, averaging 2 lb. in weight, resulting from small
allotments of fry released in this small lake.
Alleyne (Bates) Lake.—This very accessible and rather small landlocked lake
yielded fair catches of Kamloops trout by fly and troll, varying to 8 lb. in weight.
Reports indicate that coarse fish are now present in this lake, probably introduced by
escaped or discarded live bait.
Several other small lakes of less importance supplied good catches of trout, subject to climatic conditions, from yearly replenishment with fry.
Lillooet District Waters.
Kwotlenemo Lake.—The planting of 30,000 Kamloops trout eyed eggs, year 1940,
resulted in excellent fly-fishing and trolling throughout the season, except in August.
The fish taken averaged 2% lb. Existing conditions of this somewhat small lake did
not permit much fishing until the past season, when boats were placed on the lake
which were used frequently throughout the season.
Crown Lake.—Continued to produce fair catches of Kamloops trout, averaging 2
lb., taken on fly and troll. Apparently the fish taken were not quite so large during
the past season, and probably the yearly plantings of fry should suffice in this small
lake.
Turquoise Lake.—Of small acreage and situated close to Crown Lake, was fished
steadily during the summer for the somewhat small Kamloops trout by fly and troll.
Possibly the food-supplies in the lake will support additional small plantings of fry.
Pavilion Lake.—Considerable improvement was reported in the catches of Kamloops trout, varying from 1 to 8 lb., taken by fly and troll.    The increased population REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 41
of trout indicates that the seasonal fry plantings were successful, combined with precautions taken to prevent loss of parent fish when attempting to spawn in the outlet
creek.
Alta Lake.—Was fished extensively by fly and troll and continued to produce fair
catches of rainbow trout averaging 1 lb. throughout the season. The resultant intermittent planting of kokanee eyed eggs was successful, serving as a forage and sport
fish. Due to very restricted natural spawning it is suggested that kokanee eyed eggs
be planted each fall.
Alice Lake.—This small lake provided good fly-fishing for cut-throat trout, varying
to 9 inches in length.    The trout are quite plentiful from natural reproduction.
Clinton District Waters.
Kelly Lake.—Favourable water conditions aided natural reproduction and including Kamloops trout eyed eggs planted in Porcupine Creek. The lake continued to produce fair catches of trout by fly and troll, varying to 6 lb. in weight. Trout fishing
generally showed some improvement.
Loon Lake.—Provided good fly-fishing and trolling for the small Kamloops trout.
Natural production appears ample, in fact, probably in excess of the available food-
supplies.
Beaver Dam Lake.—Supplied good trolling for Kamloops trout averaging to about
4 lb. in weight. Natural feed, including abundant supply of fresh-water shrimps, is
ample to support the present trout populations.
Watch Lake.—Throughout the season the lake supplied fair catches of Kamloops
trout by fly and troll, varying to 2% lb. in weight. The seasonal planting of eyed eggs
in the inlet creek appears successful in order to maintain the supplies for future extensive angling.    The coarse fish are increasing due to the migration from Green Lake.
Canim Lake.—This large body of water, as usual, provided fairly good trolling
for Kamloops trout, varying from 1 lb. to 10 lb. Kokanee, introduced in 1940-41
primarily as a forage-fish, were taken on the troll during the season, indicating that
the plantings were a success. In order to establish a cycle run of kokanee, 100,000
eyed eggs were planted during the fall. The reason why the four-year plantings were
not affected was due to curtailed travel during war-time conditions.
Horse Lake.—Continued to produce fair catches of Kamloops trout up to 10 lb.,
and including Dolly Varden trout, varying to 20 lb., mostly taken on the troll. As a
result of extensive fishing, the trout do not appear quite so plentiful, in spite of some
natural reproduction and yearly replenishment with fairly substantial allotments of
eyed eggs planted in the inlet creek. Coarse fish are increasing in numbers from circulation throughout the Bridge Lake watershed.
The lakes mentioned are accessible to auto travel.
Williams Lake and Quesnel District Waters.
Lac la Hache.—Accessible to the Cariboo Auto Highway and the various tourist
camps, provided fair trolling for Kamloops trout, mostly under 3 lb. in weight, more
particularly during the spring and fall, including also Dolly Varden and lake trout up
to 15 lb. Reports indicate that the Kamloops trout are not so plentiful, and restocking
appears advisable for the benefit of non-resident anglers.
The kokanee that inhabit the lake are quite important as a sport fish and the ratio
taken on baited multiple lures is at least 5 to 1 of trout taken. The kokanee average
y2 lb. in weight.
Horsefly Lake.—This quite large body of water produced fair catches of Kamloops
and Dolly Varden trout by trolling methods, varying in weight to 15 lb. GG 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Rose Lake.—Conveniently situated, produced less Kamloops trout than in previous
years, mostly taken on the troll, varying to 7 lb. in weight. Insufficient suitable spawning areas and probably escapage when attempting to spawn, hence replenishment to
restore the supply of trout.
Dempsey Lake.—This shallow lake produced fair catches of Kamloops trout by
trolling during the spring and fall. The fish, if caught during the summer months,
are not very palatable for domestic use.
Williams Lake.—Conveniently located, produced fair catches of Kamloops trout,
mostly under 3 lb., during the spring and fall by trolling. Cloudy water conditions
during the summer and early fall is detrimental to fishing generally. The trout are
not so plentiful due to spawning facilities, etc.
Quesnel Lake.—This large lake provided fair trolling for Kamloops trout, varying
to 25 lb., and including Dolly Varden and lake trout, remains plentiful.
Big Lake.—Somewhat shallow, produced fair catches of Kamloops trout on the
troll during the spring and fall, mostly under 3 lb. Lake trout average to about 10 lb.
weight.
Summit Lake.—Supplied fair fishing for Kamloops trout up to 2 lb. in weight,
taken by fly and troll, but do not take the lures freely at certain periods.
Ahbou Lake.—Not fished to a great extent but produced fair catches of Kamloops
trout by troll and fly, varying to 10 lb. in weight.
Miscellaneous.
Lloyds Creek Hatchery, 1945.—Kamloops trout eggs collected and received (Paul
Lake 485,000, Knouff Lake 715,000), 1,200,000; eyed eggs received from Penask Lake
Hatchery, 2,100,000; total, 3,300,000. In comparison to the year 1944: Paul Lake,
1,155,000; Knouff Lake, 1,000,000; Pinantan Lake, 105,000; Lac la Jeune, 550,000;
total, 2,810,000; eyed eggs received from the Penask Lake Hatchery, 630,000; grand
total, 3,440,000.
Penask Lake Hatchery, 1945: Kamloops (rainbow) trout eggs collected: Spo-
komin Creek, 1,820,000; Penask Creek, 2,440,000; total, 4,260,000. In comparison to
the year 1944:   Spokomin Creek, 340,000;   Penask Creek, 3,000,000;   total, 3,340,000.
Beaver Lake Hatchery, 1945: Kamloops (rainbow) trout eggs collected: Buck-
horn Creek, 1,000,000; Coldwater Creek, 200,000; Crooked Lake outlet, 300,000;
Oyama Lake outlet, 683,000; Alex Mountain, 317,000; total, 2,500,000. In comparison
to the year 1944: Buckhorn Creek, 1,000,000; Coldwater Creek, 50,000; Crooked Lake
outlet, 400,000;   Oyama Lake outlet, 500,000;  total, 1,950,000.
Kelowna Rearing-ponds.—In 1943 Kamloops trout fry from Beaver Lake were
liberated in No. 3 pond and retained until April 11th, 1945. Resultant fingerlings were
liberated into Mission Creek for Okanagan Lake. Estimated number reared, 10,000.
Average weight count, 6 to 1 lb.
Kamloops trout fry liberated in Pot-hole A, 1944, were released into No. 3 pond
as fingerlings to replace those liberated into the Okanagan Lake. Total fingerlings
liberated in No. 3 pond, 4,800.    Weight count, 220 to 1 lb.
Vernon Rearing-ponds.—The usual allotment of 30,000 Kamloops trout fry from
Beaver Lake Hatchery were released in this pond for gradual natural release down
Vernon Creek into Okanagan Lake. Apparently some stream improvements has taken
place, thus eliminating the ponds entirely.
In the event of the Salmon Arm Fish and Game Club developing ponds on Palmer
Creek, weekly water temperatures were taken for reference.
War-time conditions prevented the arrangement of ponds under consideration by
the Grindrod-Mara-Enderby Rod and Gun Club. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 43
Kokanee (Redfish).—In an effort to maintain and establish the runs of creek-
spawning kokanee as a food-supply for Kamloops trout, the following plantings of eyed
eggs were effected: Okanagan Lake—Deep Creek, 50,000; Trepanier Creek, 50,000;
Mission Creek, 100,000; Mill Creek, 25,000; Shuswap Lake—Salmon River, 100,000;
Canim Lake—Bridge Creek, 100,000;  total, 425,000.
Investigations.
Beaver Lake, Kelowna District.—Additional water-storage affecting fish-culture
operations;  mutual arrangements effected.
Loon (Gardam) Lake, Grindrod.—To create artificial spawning areas for the benefit of Eastern brook trout introduced (for completion).
Bear Lake, Kelowna District.—To protect and conserve the spawning trout, suitable screen arrangement effected at the artificial outlet.
Mission Creek.—Remedial measures to prevent the loss of trout entering the irrigation systems, for further attention, with expected co-ordinated assistance from
organized sportsmen and water-users next spring.
Williams Lake, Cariboo District.—Water conditions, restoration of trout-supplies,
and reducing the number of coarse fish (for completion).
Rose Lake.—Depletion of trout and restocking, and the escapage of spawning trout
at the outlet diversions (for further attention).
Big Lake.—Trout depletion and reducing the numbers of coarse fish that frequent
the inlet creek (for further investigation).
Lac la Hache.—Trout and kokanee fishing. Installation of trap on the outlet creek
to reduce the numbers of coarse fish (receiving attention for next spring).
Okanagan Lake, Vernon.—Water conditions, depletion and protection of beach-
spawning kokanee (receiving all possible attention).
Palmer Creek, Salmon Arm.—Water-flow, temperatures in connection with proposed construction of rearing-ponds, etc.
Destruction of Coarse Fish.
Okanagan Lake.—Mission trap, Boyes Creek—carp (933), 3,752 lb.; Mission trap,
Boyes Creek—ling (5), 10 lb.; Otter Creek trap (estimated)—carp, 10,000 lb.; Duck
Lake, outlet creek—carp (100), 500 lb.;  Woods Lake, inlet creek—carp (85), 425 lb.
Salmon Arm District.—Shuswap Lake (fur-farmers)—carp, 1,260 lb., and squaw-
fish, 825 lb.; Shuswap Lake (anglers)—carp, 650 lb.; Mara Lake (fur-farmers) —
carp, 650 lb., and squawfish, 60 lb.
Clinton District.—Burns Lake—squawfish and suckers, 6,000 lb.; Crystal Lake—
squawfish and suckers, 2,000 lb.; Bridge Lake—squawfish and suckers, 4,000 lb.; Deka
Lake—squawfish and suckers, 6,000 lb.
Quesnel District.—Norwood Creek—suckers, 6,500 lb.; Anderson Creek—suckers,
500 lb.;  Jordan Creek—suckers, 500 lb.
Abnormal high-water conditions in the Okanagan Lake system curtailed the capture of coarse fish.
Fish Barriers and Screens.—For conservation measures, the barriers and screens
installed functioned very satisfactorily at the various points: Coldstream Creek, Kalamalka Lake, outlet of Oyama Lake, outlet of Knouff Lake, outlet of Paul Lake, inlet and
outlet of Pillar Lake, outlet of Monte Lake, and the outlet of Pavilion Lake. The investigation of major irrigation systems with a view to screening, if deemed advisable, is
not entirely completed.
Pollutions.—Except in the Bridge River area, there was no serious pollution from
mining and lumber industries of waters frequented with fish. GG 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Obstructions.—No natural-formed obstructions were observed or reported that
would prevent or seriously impede the passage of spawning and migratory trout.
Diseases.—Observations and reports indicated that no mortality occurred amongst
fish life that could be traced to diseases.
Water Conditions.—Unusual heavy spring freshets seriously curtailed ova collections at Paul Lake, otherwise conditions were favourable at the other collecting-stations,
including also the planting of trout eyed eggs and fry.
Mission Creek.—The essential water diversions for irrigation purposes resulted in
a loss of trout that entered and became stranded in the irrigation systems. All possible
remedial measures will be taken in an effort to prevent recurrence of such losses.
Game-fish Culture.—The efficient operation of Beaver Lake, Lloyds Creek, and
Penask Lake Hatcheries has reasonably maintained the supplies of trout, aided by some
natural reproduction in most waters. Fortunately, the productivity of the various
lakes does to some extent prevent cannibalism amongst the trout, hence the success of
fry and eyed-egg plantings.
Co-operation.—The interest shown and assistance rendered towards the advancement of game-fish culture by the organized sportsmen and individuals was greatly
appreciated.
" D " DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, PRINCE RUPERT, FORT
GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Big-game Animals.
Favourable reports regarding moose in " D " Division have been received from all
game districts. A great number have been killed as trophies, for the meat, by drowning, by trains, by ticks, wolves, and other predators, and although these animals are in
great numbers, the annual toll taken each year is very excessive, and some measures of
conservation will have to be instituted if the species is to be preserved for our future
generations. In view of the great number of animals killed for trophies, and as food,
I beg to suggest that the trophy fee be increased and that a moose-tag of $1 be collected
from the resident hunters.
AH other big-game animals are reported as holding their own in numbers, and no
anxiety as to their decrease is being felt.
The open season on black bear, which are increasing steadily throughout the
Division, should be maintained, and the bag-limit of three could be taken off without
danger.
Fur-bearing Animals.
From reports received from the various districts in " D " Division, the registered
trap-lines of white trappers show a general increase in fur-bearing animals. I am
very sorry to have to report very few Indian trap-lines show the same increase.
In a few cases, and under the direction of some Indian Agents, Indians have been
induced to conserve beaver on their lines, and in such cases the beaver are showing a
marked increase, but this applies only in very few cases.
The Department should encourage and assist the Indian Agents in their endeavours, and it has been suggested that a close season on beaver be declared by Order
in Council over any trap-line the Indian Department, in co-operation with the registered owner, wishes to conserve the beaver or other fur-bearers thereon.
To my mind, such a ruling, regulation, or Order in Council would greatly assist
the Indian Department in establishing beaver preserves over a number of Indian areas. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 45
Upland Game Birds.
All grouse (with the exception of ptarmigan) are reported as scarce throughout
the Division, and a close season on all grouse (except ptarmigan) is recommended.
Migratory Game Birds.
In view of the few birds killed in the northern area in comparison with the southern
part of the Province, and the States to the south, the season should be lengthened and
the bag-limit increased.
Very few residents will obtain their limit, and although the season may seem
unduly long, from September 1st to December 15th, winter as a rule causes the season
to be shortened, as the rivers and lakes freeze over before the middle of November,
causing the birds to migrate.
Vermin.
Wolves and Coyotes.—Numerous complaints received from every district in the
Division. Predatory-animal hunters appointed in the Lake District, Ootsa-Francois
Lake area, were very disappointing; very few wolves and coyotes were killed. On the
other hand, in the Atlin area, where a system of issuing permits to use poison, to a few
selected trappers, was instituted, very good results were obtained, and from six permits
issued, some thirty-seven wolves were destroyed.
Permits have been issued in the Peace River, Lower Post, and Telegraph Creek
areas, and good results are anticipated.
Methods of destroying wolves and coyotes should be closely studied, and in order
to control the predators, the best methods should be given publicity and encouraged by
the Department.
To my mind, an increased bounty, although it may assist in a small way, will not
solve the problem of wolf and coyote control.
Game-protection.
Owing to increased administrative duties and large districts to patrol, Game
Wardens have difficulty in carrying out all patrols that are desired.
Game Propagation.
No game propagation work has been undertaken during 4he past year.
Game Reserves.
There are no game reserves in this Division. Some game reserves, created as bird
sanctuaries or safety zones, have been established at Kunghit Island (southernmost
island of the Queen Charlotte group). No reports or information have been received
regarding this sanctuary. Kaien Island Game Reserve was established as a safety zone
for the City of Prince Rupert; Lake Kathlyn Sanctuary, near Smithers, established as
a safety zone around the lake as a protection from shooting for summer dwellers around
the lake, and for the travelling public on highway skirting the lake; a bird sanctuary
in the vicinity of Vanderhoof affords protection to the inhabitants of the village and
the travellers along the highways following the Nechako River. The Prince George
Game Reserve is a safety zone and protection for the city and travelling public along
the highways crossing said game reserve.
All the above sanctuaries, reserves, etc., must be kept for the purpose they were
created—safety of the public in general.
The creation of a game reserve over part of Tweedsmuir Park area should be given
due consideration. Previous reports on this proposition have been submitted at various
times, and the need of establishing same is becoming a necessity. GG 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fur Trade.
Fur trade in general benefited greatly from an increase in prices and a greater
number of traders entered the field, and old-established traders extended the scope of
their enterprises by establishing posts at various points in the Division, resulting in
better prices being paid to the trapper. An even better season is anticipated for next
year.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming is not going ahead as it should, and unless some encouragement is
given this very important industry, it will remain dormant and will not appeal to any
investors.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of trap-lines has proven its worth during the depression and
during the war period, and is proving a great asset in this very difficult period of
rehabilitation. Soldiers returning to their trap-lines, kept for them during their
absence in His Majesty's service, are more than pleased to find their trap-lines a great
asset in their re-establishment. Prices for fur were exceptionally high, and trappers—
returned soldiers and others—are quite satisfied with the system.
The most difficult to train in regard to conservation are the Indian trappers, who,
as a rule, are not interested in conservation of fur-bearers for the future, but live from
hand to mouth and take everything that comes their way, regardless of the future.
The Indian Department is trying to interest the Indians in the conservation of all
game; some sanctuaries (beaver) have been established, and more are in the stage
of being established. The Department should, and will, I am sure, give the Indian
Department all possible assistance in its undertakings, with the hope that in the future
better conservation of all game animals will be the result.
As a whole, the registration of trap-lines is a success, and as experience is gained
and improvements introduced to further conservation of fur-bearers, especially beaver,
greater success is anticipated, resulting in a greater number of satisfied traders who
will be ensured of a steady source of pelts.
A greater number of Game Wardens are required in order to cover the huge area
of " D " Division in an efficient manner and promote greater conservation of all game.
• Registration of Guides.
A great increase in the number of guides is noticeable. Some are naturally
efficient, whereas quite a few lack experience and the necessary knowledge of woodcraft and habits of the big-game animals, and do not give satisfaction.
In order to eliminate the inexperienced guide, it would be advisable to put all applicants through a test covering all phases of travel, care of trophies, care of hunter,
horses, dogs, etc. The test should be strict enough that any person obtaining a Grade
" A " licence would be recognized the world over as a guide of character, knowledge,
and efficiency, resulting in better service to our visiting big game hunters.
However, big-game hunters visited the Division in great numbers, and we expect
an even greater influx next season.
Special Patrols.
No outstanding patrols were made during the period from January 1st to December 31st, 1945. Constant patrols are being made by all Game Wardens. They cannot
be classed as of a special nature;  however, a few patrols are worthy of mention.
Two patrols by Game Warden A. J. Jank, assisting British Columbia Police in the
search for, and eventual burial of, two missing trappers in the Stikine and Bear River
areas might be mentioned as special, although not on game business. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 47
The first patrol, from February 13th to March 13th, 1945, Game Warden Jank left
Fort St. James on the 14th of February to locate two missing trappers, Evans and
Middlemiss. The body of Evans was found and buried. The trap-line was covered
for the purpose of springing traps and locating Evans' partner. The latter was not
found.    Mileage covered was:   Aeroplane, 1,020 miles;  foot (dog-team), 230 miles.
The second patrol was undertaken upon information having been received of the
discovery of the body of A. Middlemiss, Evans' partner. Patrol started from Prince
George by aeroplane on April 5th; the remains of Middlemiss were located on April
9th, but owing to mild weather, the body could not be brought out and was buried on
April 10th. The patrol was completed on arrival at Fort St. James on Saturday, April
14th, 1945, and covered a period of ten days. Mileage was: Aeroplane, 330 miles;
foot, 94 miles.
Two patrols made by Constable H. Jamieson, in charge of Telegraph Creek Detachment of the British Columbia Police, may also be mentioned. Patrol was made by dog-
team and snow-shoes from Telegraph Creek to Dease Lake, Porter's Landing, Lake-
town, etc. A distance of 342 miles was covered in a period of thirteen days. Good
information was obtained re predators. The second patrol by Constable Jamieson was
by foot and pack-dogs, on which he visited Tanzilla River area, Upper Stikine and McBride River areas to ascertain the whereabouts of Hugh Ford, reported missing. During the fifteen days of travel a distance of 419 miles was covered.
The above-mentioned patrols, although not of a special, but rather a routine,
nature, are brought to your attention as being worthy of commendation.
Hunting Accidents.
I regret to report an increase in the number of hunting accidents. Two of the
shooting accidents proved to be fatal, the victims dying of their wounds. The shootings were found to be accidental.
Three deaths occurred on trap-lines: two partners from starvation and exposure,
one trapper believed killed by grizzlies.
April, 1945.—Austin Middlemiss and Arthur Evans, trapping partners of Hazel-
ton, were found dead from starvation and exposure on the trail of the Stikine and
Sustut Rivers. No evidence of foul play was found, and there was no prosecution in
this case.
August 12th, 1945.—Mary Ellen MacKinnon, of Prince Rupert, was shot in the
right thigh by Private Spinella, United States Army. The girl recovered, and the
American authorities took disciplinary action.
September 16th, 1945.—William F. Schultz, Vanderhoof, was accidentally shot by
James Simonson. Simonson was aiming at some ducks; Shultz attempted to prevent
him from shooting by extending his hand across the gun just as the boy fired. He
received early treatment and recovered.    No action was taken.
September 30th, 1945.—John Maclvor, Wistaria, was instantly killed by his own
gun, placed in bow of boat when loaded. Whilst launching the boat, the shell in the
breech exploded. The Coroner's jury convened, finding death accidental. No action
was taken.
October 3rd, 1945.—Frank Johnson reported missing. Search was instituted from
October 4th to October 14th. Johnson was not found, and it is presumed he was killed
by a grizzly bear.
October 12th, 1945.—Robert Hamilton, age 18, accidentally discharged rifle while
crawling through fence.    He has fully recovered.    No disciplinary action was taken.
November 11th, 1945.—Walter Brooks, an Indian boy, 15 years of age, using a
single barrel .22 as a cane—muzzle upwards—when the rifle discharged and the bullet GG 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
entered his left upper-arm.    The bullet was removed and the boy recovered.    The rifle
was destroyed, but no action has been taken.
November 14th, 1945.—Harry Prince, an Indian boy, 14 years old, of Fort St.
James, was shot by John B. Patrick, 39-year-old Indian, also of Fort St. James. Investigation and Coroner's inquest revealed that the shooting was accidental. No prosecution took place, nor was there any disciplinary action.
Game-fish Culture.
Various Rod and Gun Clubs were supplied by the Game Commission with eyed
Kamloops trout eggs, and disposed of as follows:—
The Prince George Rod and Gun Club received 100,000 eggs in very good condition.
The hatching was only fair. Out of 100,000 eggs, 20,000 fish were planted in Cluculz
Lake, 10,000 in Summit Lake, 15,000 in Six Mile Lake, and 10,000 in West Lake.
The Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club, operating a small hatchery at Kathlyn Lake,
received 60,000 eyed Kamloops trout eggs, which were hatched very successfully, with
a very light loss, resulting in a very good planting of healthy fry.
No data is on hand regarding the Ocean Falls Rod and Gun Club.
In order to be in a position to take adequate care of the tourists who visit the
Division for the purpose of fishing, the planting of fry by the various Rod and Gun
Clubs will have to be encouraged, and it has been suggested that a Fishery Officer conversant with the hatching of eggs visit the various hatcheries in the Division during
the hatching period, with a view of instructing all interested in the propagation of
fish, etc., in the proper methods of handling eggs or fry.
The Prince George Rod and Gun Club would welcome the visit of a competent
hatchery expert, and I trust you will be in a position to send such an individual to
Prince George during the hatching season.
Summary and General Remarks.
A noticeable increase in the number of non-resident big-game hunters occurred
during the year. Fine weather prevailed during the early autumn, creating a condition very favourable to hunting, especially deer and moose, which were killed in great
numbers, causing some alarm as to the eventual depletion of the species. The alarm
is shared by all sportsmen, and some very drastic curtailments of both bag and season
have been suggested.
In view of the greatly increased administrative duties imposed on all Game Wardens,
their districts should be cut down.
In order to cope with the ever-increasing number of hunters, it will be necessary
to increase the staffs in this Division.
Upland game birds remain scarce, and it is hoped that the close season to be
declared in 1946 will be beneficial, and that an increase in their numbers will be the
result of same. Migratory game birds did not remain in this Division after the first
frosts. The birds did not stop over, as is usual in milder autumns, but went right over
to warmer climes.
Game Wardens, although greatly restrained by their numerous administrative
duties, carried out quite a few patrols in a very efficient and commendable manner.
I am very pleased to extend my sincere thanks to all for the loyal support extended to
the Department during the past year.
The Constables of the Provincial Police, especially those stationed in the northern
portion of " D " Division, fully co-operated with the Game Department in all phases of
game-work, and I sincerely hope that the Game Commission will send these Police
Officers, in recognition of their very efficient support, a letter of acknowledgment and REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 49
commendation, which I trust will be conducive to a continuation of the friendly relations existing between the two Departments.
In conclusion I might say that this increase in administrative work keeps all
employees at Divisional Headquarters very busy, and the addition of more help to our
staff would be greatly appreciated and would be conducive to greater efficiency for all
concerned.
" E " DIVISION  (MAINLAND COAST SOUTH OF TOBA INLET AND
LOWER MAINLAND AS FAR INLAND AS NORTH BEND).
This Division is also supervised from Game Headquarters at Vancouver, and the
following are excerpts from reports of Game Wardens and Fishery Officers of " E "
Division:—
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—Coast deer are fairly plentiful throughout the Division, but they are difficult to hunt. The areas frequented by this animal were logged
off many years ago and are now covered with evergreen thickets and underbrush, making the hunting of deer, on the Lower Mainland particularly, very difficult. This also
applies to other parts of the Coast, including the islands in Howe Sound.
Elk (Wapiti).—The elk liberated at McNab Creek in Howe Sound do not appear
to be increasing. Unfortunately, it is a difficult matter to keep a constant check on
this herd due to the area being so isolated.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Several registered trappers are found in the Division, but the bulk of the fur
comes from unregistered areas or within the boundaries of municipalities where musk-
rats are the principal fur-bearing animal. The Lower Mainland or Fraser Valley,
being mostly delta land with miles of dykes, provides ideal habitat for muskrats, marten,
mink, weasel, racoon, and red fox. Beaver and otter, however, are scarce. The red
fox, while considered a fur-bearing animal, is a decided menace on the Lower Mainland
owing to its depredations on the bird life of the district.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue or Ruffed).—"E" Division can no longer be considered from a
grouse-hunting standpoint. As logged-off areas are again becoming evergreen thickets,
and the population grows with consequent settlement of areas formerly populated with
willow grouse, the situation appears hopeless in so far as any increase in grouse is
concerned.
Pheasants.—Pheasant hunting is becoming more difficult each year. With the
ever-decreasing number of acres to hunt over, and the change in crops from grain-
growing to dairying, the situation appears to be a most difficult one to improve. The
only way the hunters of the Lower Mainland can obtain any degree of pheasant hunting is through the annual liberation of greater numbers of pheasants. This necessarily
means increased appropriations.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—The migratory bird situation on the Lower Mainland during the season
under review was very poor. From information received, the situation was about the
same in the State of Washington. There appears to be an ever-growing desire on the
part of the sportsmen of the Division for a change in the regulations in regard to
artificial feeding of ducks so as to encourage the birds to remain longer in the district.
Geese.—The Division cannot lay claim to having any good goose hunting, except
for a few birds in the Pitt Lake area and an occasional flight on the way to their
wintering grounds south. GG 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Black Brant.—Hunting for brant in the Boundary Bay district showed some
improvement over the previous war years, probably due to the closing-down of the airport in that area. However, the district is too small to accommodate all the sportsmen desiring to obtain brant hunting.
Band-tailed Pigeons.—These birds are not plentiful. Here again the change in
agriculture throughout the Fraser Valley has had a noticeable effect on the habits, as
well as the population, of pigeons.
Predatory Animals.
The red fox is the principal predator of the Division. This animal, along with the
domestic cat gone wild, accounts for a great number of birds. The protection of red
fox throughout the Fraser Valley was removed some twenty years ago, but in spite of
this fact there appears to be a definite increase. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 51
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.
Comparative Statistics, 1913-1945.
Calendar Year.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences and
Fees.
Revenue
derived from
Fur Trade.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
1913	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
53S
498
477
454
451
585
613
547
440
446
409
356
379
652
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
436
552
574
526
419
430
392
342
372
632
7
21
21
17
14
17
25
27
17-
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
23
16
15
33
39
21
21
16
17
14
7
20
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
19
14
20
42
21
18
9
27
18
8
30
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,758.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
4,399.50
3,965.00
5,332.50
5,729.50
4,776.50
5,197.00
4,977.50
5,079.50
5,554.50
5,570.50
8,381.50
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148,689.64
157,647.30
177,771.33
192,024.07
193,170.53
188,605.20
213,267.67
205,451.71
207,661.72
238,902.36
352,228.85
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
$5,291.39
1921	
24,595.80
1922	
51,093.89
1923	
60,594.18
1924	
56,356.68
1925	
56,287.78
1926	
62,535.13
1927	
71,324.96
1928	
58,823.07
1929	
47,329.89
1930	
45,161.11
1931	
46,091.08
1932	
40,363.79
1933	
44,167.48
1934	
47,102.81
1935	
49,831.95
52,196 50
1936	
1937	
53,697.48
1938	
44,963.87
1939	
49,187.00
1940	
68,466 33
1941	
63,125.30
1942	
68,475.07
58,354.03
70,363.23
104,250.95
1943	
1944	
1945	
Totals	
13,604
12,747
821
827
$188,466.07
$4,888,416.98
$1,400,030.75 GG 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
_o
■«_<
O-
as
H
m
H
U
H
Q
o
H
H
a*
<
P
55
<:
H>
o
<.
H
I
K
H
H
Q
n
cn
H
o
iz;
w
o
w
cd
z
H
a
cn
W
rt
o
Eh
55
H
s
H
H
<!
H
W
<
o_
6
d
9
O
s
<
io © :
t-o :
© o o o o o i
io © © _o o © :
1Q O IO
t-O CM
io fh ■>* (M ea th j
C-rH CO
60
XciCMOO-HcoQO_o^^coegi>eMOO.Ho©toco©-002_ot^©cgoi.HCicocicoc-jioioiooiai
(OHffq^^ONO-OOCC._)HO_-C.Cv.lOHK!t-^l-)t-M^9W.tCHKIO._-t-)MMNtDOO
100.Mm00-0fflM00l>_^WN-QC0TfNW<NC.t-roUlMQaWOOC»^'TC0M0-OWON
eg io oi-^ co co r
UrlirfN(DtOW'ellO»U;!D<OI30N(N"*(N<DOt)_6(OOOOOai©!CKl
(Ot-COH-aoOt-CO^OOH-OtONlMcO^tOH^'WHitNHO.N   00 00
rH   eg   rH t-H tO   SO   rH CO t-rH-*J< IO 00 CO   r-<        rH rH      tO
00 Ol Ol O ■"#
CM rH CO CNI
cooi   : coi^cgtococooc^©^ooccoo-*,HtocgrHco©'^inco©tooi-^cocO'*tf   :otowV.w
eg eg   ; co co «* in eg -^ co 011- ■*     eg H to to to t- co io eg to     t-HioroH     -n-^   ^o-ojon
: iH        CO   CO      rH CO   £- CM "* rH CO    _ rH W rH iH
MW-DOO-DONH^lOO-O-Or
CO-OClOlOCOOOt-tDClcgrHCOT
co ci -^ cm ■*#  ■ "*C
t-WM001O0-H_000Ot-M-«f00rao
tDojTfcocotDtDDOiHoiegooco-^^fio
t- CO        Ol rH CO rH        iH Cg rH rH iH
eg eg t-o 01
rH tD O CO Ol
■*OI0Nlr-6Hli:C-O©C-H^QW_0-0Hra_0KIC0C0HOt-"JiT|iCi.
COCgN01CNC^COCOWOOrHt>CSltOtDiHI>_n^l>-^"tJ<t-_J5rHCOC001l>0
 "(DW«f H-SWHIOUSN
SO OO . ■*}< © IO eg t-© rH IO t-© CD C-rH ■** CI tD IO IO rH 00 1.
ooco :cowejoic_gcigcooO-ocOrHt-egtotDrHt-_0"W<t-'"
«H !H,*OO.COH«lMNO.HWCOHOMHt-_b'<t .
iH? '   iH-^rH rH   iH      COtH   CO   rH
rH 00 rH CO Ol
iov co eg oi
eg oo o io co
_o IO
t-t-
o
©
t- 00
IO CO
Ol
CO
CM
Ol
IO
Ol
._>_-
H tD CO   rH r
rH rH  HO
eg »h oi co o co
rHiH  eg
3 CO O rH CO CO
H-OHNIOt-MtDH
OO
IO©
t^o"
lOOOOlOOtDrHOOJCgoO
tOrHrHtOtO'tftOObt— Olt-
eg^^f'^cgtDt-rjtco
<*    rt -.
ooooooooooooooopooooooooooo
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
MOM^^t-t-O-^doicOt^rfintDHodoO-NC-     "
rHt00101t-00C00l00Cgcg010J00O00Q0<___.rHrHair— t
-OM^m_-_-oi>oo-00t-rnn(DHooocne.ccHcocc(D
HtD0101l_^C0i_00100NMOW00O0000<__lrHrH01t>tDrHC0tDCg
IM M (M IM Tf (-_ M<M*ll_eiAn_M_«t lOlO-OCOlOtDiHXf
to     cm co cg eg ■***
<OtDOOOOO.■VO.t-N'*10CO■^•^*01MOHI^.(^.O.OCOO-01■^
tO       CO -^t" Cg Cg "#       CO       WlOrft-kOMOMi       IO to IO OS IO to OJ ^c
rH rH     eg co     cm eg     rH iH eg
o o
o :
co :
toco
t- ;
PMHNHHOONNKKDM
uacOOOeg^^OOrHtHOOlOOOOrHOtOOOegoOOOt-rHCOOrHtDOlt-OOtDt-tDCO^DCOCOlO
t-i>r^cooQoao.-ot-nHiooT|iowmNOTtt~^NWHi_jNc.Hoi>'iiNt«to-0-_)M
«©Cg        OOt- © O tO ■tfHtDWHH-DHia        COOlrHrHO>NOlCOCgCO00iHI_—^iHOIOO
tO tD CO Ol C
HOiJ'OOOHO'^IO-OOOfMNOaHHr
-1 tD rH eg IO Cg (N Cg rH CO rH t-CO CM tD tD U
H N        rH rHIO COCOrH
ffCOQOt-H(M(COK)-l
t-iocoto-oeg^oscgti
rH        _H   tD      r
CI CO-3" -Hj<
^* "** d t-
cg io ^
CM CO
© © © ©
© © © ©
co oi co t-^
O rH t- CO
ci eg m co
co"th
(DO.HNTliHOOC>NMCi30.f.C._-COt-Nt-HOHONt"-_)
^CMcoioioooto_>oioiocDCOto^tDcoioegcgcjit-tDcococgco
IO ^ O eg CO tO tXJ tD O IO tD tD to o rH-^ IO Cg IO tO o rH iO   © CS t-
■-* CO
-U If
c-eo
00rH00C0I^t0rH^rHC0C^C0l>^00t-OC3C0^-0rHt-^C001t001M,O__-O_>OtDC)l000tD
COCO U3C0CgOO0lWC0^Cg00rHCMCM01O03C0O01U^C0C0^rHt-O010100rH00O-rf<^J"rH
OH rH t-CM CO-tf i—. rH rH rH CO rH CM CM Ol O rH 00 CM 00 CO CO tf CO Tj« rH CM tD CO rH CD CO CM CM rH
rH CM rH iHTHrHrH^r}. t- rH CO
d °
<.«.<.S
O  O  tD
rH    CO
; S£
SO?
>. .a
-.   Sill §1 11 II
§ s s eta § s et__2-2 e s- * -. s:-g g 5.5.S.S s js ills
oop^feoooMMMi-iS2;^;^;2;oPHP.PH»HPH&.G'KP.!)_-oH>>>
H.   .
■0 P
E B
£is REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 53
Revenue derived from Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and
Prospectors' Firearms Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1945.
Anglers.
Guides.
Free
Farmers.
Prospectors.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
741
196
410
1,239
1,338
759
743
109
268
174
1,889
163
1,352
192
346
1,267
2,054
350
5,100
265
1,449
587
1
537
5
285
1,201
488
1
6,011
1,701
1,729
29
289
$741.00
196.00
141
7
13
18
13
30
57
6
8
1
32
14
1
3
29
2
4
2
11
12
80
29
20
12
9
40
90
90
11
15
21
17
42
112
7
77
4
8
24
71
11
150
9
48
62
13
46
17
3
52
3
3
59
44
45
155
99
33
6
3
9
11
7
15
1
2
22
2
9
13
13
12
2
.    54
3
27
5
22
2
9
11
2
33
14
50
51
12
21
3
23
12
100
15
16
31
$1.00
$742.00
196.00
Atlin	
410.00
1,239.00
1,338.00
759.00
743.00
$793.00
50.00
1,203.00
1,289.00
1,338.00
759.00
80.00
110.00
98.00
150.00
823.00
110.00
109.00
268.00
174.00
1,889.00
163.00
1,352.00
192.00
346.00
1,267.00
2,054.00
350.00
5,100.00
265.00
1,449.00
207.00
418.00
174.00
330.00
2,219.00
163.00
1,352.00
35.00
1.00
228.00
346.00
1,267.00
2,100.00
350.00
46.00
5,100.00
265.00
5.00
198.00
1,454.00
198 00
587.00
587.00
90.00
5.00
20.00
215.00
20.00
90 00
1.00
537.00
5.00
285.00
1,201.00
488.00
1.00
6 00
3.00
4.00
560 00
305 00
1,201.00
25.00
8.00
80.00
85.00
9 00
80 00
6,011.00
1,701.00
1,729.00
29.00
289.00
12.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
6,108.00
1,703.00
1,731.00
491.00
460.00
181.00
Totals	
33,268
$33,268.00
513
$3,084.00
1,628
636
$27.00
$36,379.00
5.00
$36,374.00 GG 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CO
H
O
i
w
cn
03
H
H
H
s
p
o
Q
55
o
55
w
CJ
H. .
- "1
cn 51
« o.
H rH
H .,
O Eh
55 M
«. Jo
a
<
in
03
m
§
H
.   O
| Q
oi
| 5
« 55
1 -<
55 Kj
o
ft.
O
H
P
o
I
s
p
w
p
55
|
si
__
z
_3^'sl3
_.g_.|3
_S_5o
zaggs
a < Z _. c-
fa
Z
H
to £
__  H
H _. J z _.
fa w
K  H> E_  O
Z b o a
a < Zo
O go!,-,
fa
__
OOOOOOOIOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
ioin©©©oineg-oop©in_o©io©©©in©_n_o©o>o©-o©©iO-o©
o-^©-dcocdocg©io©^.Heot-©-d-tf©ooco^t-©toidid©cd©.Heg1io
tD©l0001-rJ-CO'*,^CO©C001lOMH©tD©COCO-r-©tDc010CMt-©tDtD'>*COrH
t& OOt-t-CgOOrHlOlOlO "«* CO © rH rH CO Ol        Ol © IO rH        -ej< rH Cg CO rH rH CO
rH CM" CM        ^ cdrHlOrHrH
t-OOCO © rH
tH tD># ©*tf
co to t-eoio
©
©
o
©
©
©
o
©
o
-O-*egCD©rfrHC0©©C000rHO-rl'CC0000ClCM©©O
rHin01CO,rJ<CM01-0-0^lOcOCO,^,tOH*COlO©"*-0-OrH
CO-^ CO rH 00 lOWCOCO©        rH Cg CO        CO CM IO
O-tDCMTHCOt-tDCTl-HH©rHCMOl©-OCMrHlO00>OtOtDC0     : CM 00 © © iO
CONHTjiH        Cg IO t-"* © IO        "*t-HHt-10 10HH
rH l-H        IO fl        NHH 00        O CO rH
o©
p©
rH J>
©
o
cd
©
o
cd
CD
o   :
©   ;
eg   i
o
©
©
©
id
CM
©lOOOOlOOlOCOlOlOrH
_ot-coioc-iocg©cg__-eg
wtfeoco     oi th co     eg©
tD IO W -*}■
© t- t- t-
CO t- CO ©
IO IO tD IO©
cm eg © t-©
■^p co co eg t-
tDHlOO
HOCOrf
CM rH
© t-^* eg io co t-
t- CO tDrH 00
c o
u **  ~
<«
S   0   Q,
£ tH C   it,   ;fa|§
^ t_
^ t. t_ £
i_ S-- (_ s n
ogKOWo
01 £
oooafafaooofc.MMh.S!?l52;^oPHfi.faP.c.0HaPHP.ai
£   ._!   Ri   0)
-0_H>>
<_ gg  *■
>>££ REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 55
Statement of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers' Licences (Minors),
January 1st to December 31st, 1945.
Non-resident Ordinary
Firearms Licences.
Anglers' Licences
(Minors).
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
1
1
1
3
1
4
3
1
2
7
7
4
30
1
12
8
12
3
88
1
56
217
34
18
4
3
1
3
3
5
32
$2.00
7.00
7.00
4.00
30.00
$2.00
7.00
7.00
4.00
30.00
$3.00
3.00
3.00
1.00
12.00
8.00
12.00
3.00
88.00
1.00
56.00
217.00
34.00
18.00
4.00
3.00
1.00
4.00
12.00
8.00
12.00
3.00
88.00
1.00
3.00
59.00
217.00
34.00
18.00
4.00
3.00
9.00
3.00
12.00
9.00
10.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
5.00
32.00
15.00
Vernon	
12.00
5.00
3.00
35.00
Totals	
15
$45.00
551
$551.00
$596.00 GG 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
03
P
fa
55
o
Eh
P
<
O
Ph
a
55
<
cn
a
o
55
w
o
cn
« .
55 3
55 2
03
»- H
cn  cq
H P
cn
03
a
p
3
03
EH
03
P
fa
6.
O
m
p
<!
a_
o
Cn
Q
w
>
I—I
03
w
Q
W
P
55
w
>
5
O
H
H n
yj
§£
H®
*Z
HI Z
H-.
H
_*»
s
03
ii
el
II
II
-.*
faC
-0«30a.OlONN-OOHWbOO»0_OlOCOoHOOON-QaoCO«J
cot-©©ioeg©co-oiocMO©©©©t_-cocgcM_o-oogiocoio_o©t_-©©
cm co to cd th oi'id cMrHcot-cdwcoeg©o-t^t_-co©iHidcMt_^cgMcdo*Q6©
©iot-©     co-^'^fco     co ** eg ©     ©     -h-eg co     hnhho-mw-^c-q
Wt-        rH        rH        Cg rH Cg        IO CO        IO ©        00 © tD t- i-H
(fit-r
t-co ■*
eg©
CO
o>
f CM
eg^i" CM
©
©
o
oi
o
©
©©
oo
ncm
©
©
CD
rH rH
CO
io co oq
CM CO r
&3-IT-
HHC-Wt-r
CJ © t-N t-tO r
HCOrH _M00r
©
©
©
©
«9-
O
©
©*
©
N
04
©
©
©
©
o
©
©
©
©
©
©
o
©
©
©
©
©
o
©
o
© ©
© ©
©" id
© t-
CM ©
9
o
©
©
©
O
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
rH
CO
rH
tt<
3
CMt-
^t1
~
«__>
© ©
o   :
©
©   :
o
©©
©   :
o©
©©
©
io   :
IO
IO©
io
cm   ;
t-
NO
eg   :
cm eg
tH
©
eg cm
-a 5
e-?
fag«
illlaliSj
c S 2 § a
2-c. m ci 2
Ss B I E 3 Et.2 § S-2.2 R §» * &£ § | a cc » « £
<<ooonfafaooMK.JS2;!2;!z;!z;fL,faA<fai_HfaCTo3-o-S_H>>
,_.    .
1 0>
^ <. ,__
sI-Seh
sa c
>is|£ REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 57
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1945, inclusive.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-traders',
Tanners', and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
1921....                             	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
39,423.87
44,238.00
62,745.33
56,755.30
63,176.07
52,122.03
63,412.23
93,793.40
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
5,540.00
4,949.00
5,721.00
6,370.00
5,299.00
6,232.00
6,951.00
10,559.00
$30,790.80
1922....            	
57,458.89
1923..:.           ..	
67,524.18
1924	
62,446.68
1925	
56,287.78
1926	
62,535.13
1927	
71,324.96
1928	
58,823.07
1929	
47,329.89
1930	
45,161.11
1931                           	
45,981.08
40,363.79
1932	
1933	
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
58,354.03
70,363.23
104,352.40
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943 :	
1944	
1945	
$1,265,514.81
$154,796.00
$1,420,310.81
Note.—No refunds taken into consideration in the preparation of this statement.
in 1945, please refer to previous statement.
For amount of refund paid GG 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ODCCHWt-HC.OXHOI-'JfCCO.K.'tOOOMMOOC.'*
00
lOC0-*©t-»O©C0©rH©COCM__-©©t-C000lO-O©CMCgc0
0-C.C!__)M'<lN<C!OCOU_K.C-fl.lXl_OWNK^-C_--NHO)
s _>«
J*8
lOOlOMt-OffiWJt-^ONlOtDC.HNI'Nt-t-HH^t-
IO
'VHOtOCOteHHOOHlDO.NflDf-.fNlOMNMCO
©
eg
60-
©C0©rH00-OCMt-CO'^'©©C0t_-t-t-©lOrHC0©©00©©
a
P
Eh
COCgNCMCMCOlO^COCOCMCMCMCMCMCMegCMrHCMCgrHiHCMCM
©
©"
10ci5CC00ON_-NOOCi._-H(_)OI-mCl_-OffiO"*<-!C.
OOOOt-HIOMMHCOOll-.C.OHOI'lOC.-C^ClHMM
P
P
o
NWfQONC-MC-lBIOeOCCMWffiNOHHlIJffiCgHNN
©
tt'^t-O.lOOmtCt-NWCIOMO.'JlOCCtOHCv.t-NN'*
^
CMCMeocMegcoco-^©©"^"*xJ,^_'Coco^i,"^"iot-coioiococo
©
u
55
H
US
§
'lajjin^s
CM
©
cn
<
M
CO
rH-ocor-.cgooeg^iot.-coococMcoooiHioo'^cot-rHegt-
OHHCOOO.COHNM^'^HtDlOOO.t-    CM    N    H    t-   C.    CO    N
•3tun_Jis
Mt-00lO00t-HHt-00_OCO_O_OCO'!l'CO-*M'^«l,*CO-O-*
t-
Eh
P
rH©^l,-O©©00rHrH©rH-OrH©e0©Cg00t-Q0C0-O©©CO
O
_3lOOO.IOC.M1_-©_-100.HI»K._»_-OC.^Nt-1lM
•uooDBy;
OONlOO-HTjiHN_-HlOCO^a.C«.C.Mrtt-<CHHlOIN
©
cqtoit.-'f^iot-.-ioconwe.c.HNC.NNHNNeowM
CO
«
Q
9
o
<fl-_.NCi«MXH<O00t-NMOMT)iftDt-C-t0115t-HlO
M
OHMtOHOOOOCl6nOONt-_-_3NC.!O^OK)HNOO
H
■•lattO
OC_00t-_-_-O0-C0WWOl>t-K)_-«ilD'Ct-_~'^,^--«0
>
i
Q
_OCM©©rHtO-*fl'©tD©©C10rHCTlrHtOtOCO©CMO"lrHCM©
cn
C0m^C-MN00Ci.0.O(NOMHMacDHl_.ONl0-0-0^
P
P
o
rHCM00-OC0"^"C0rH©-O©lOCMrHC0IOrH_OlOIOt-t-©rHrH
©
55
ss
■^BJ3isnj\[
t-eOMO.OHioaK_cOOOO-NOC-t-C-CClHHK)O.OOC10
o
Y,
cn
m
P
<_j
W
CON!_.H-OOOCOCCO-3COt-tDOOMNOOC.U3-!.^-CflO
O-
oicot-©©-o-*a,©cg©cgt-to©-otoco'"a,t-oot-cg©©o
a
s
*3l"!W
OO.NC._-H__)©NC--00.0'^'llMOH_OC.tC'^^MCO
©
© od© o" co ^" «c h oo M©"cg"i>_HrH©*od©t^t^©"cd©*©"_o
3
rHrHrHCMrHCMrHrH                      HnHNOlNHNNmN^COCOOS
55
T-H
«<
IO
<d
o
o
00rHC0©10OC0©lOCM©OC0t-©rH©rH00C0©r-
H
tf
Nco^ccci.c.OHfflt-uiacc'^t- t-^tocot— o  io 't t- ^
O
55
rHrHOC-_00©©CgrHOt-'*J't-©OCO'M-0©e<ICO-OOcO
CM
i-H
H
•H    CM    o"rHt>©"rH"rHrH01CO*CO"rH"©"cd©"orod©©"crod©rHI--i1
©
N
03
1
0.
i-H
n
_r
©_0©O00Ol0t-C0'^J,©C0^1'C0rHt-rHev
©    IO    CO    ©    ©    io
r-1
^lOTnOOlOCCO.COCCO.t-tD'JitflOl-lOONC.Qt-    CMrHcO
Q
O
55
•xu^t;
NOOOTO^MCOMW-OlONOlOtOlQt-IOHNNMlO^N
rf
o
eg
03
p
fa
w
03
m
fa
IH
s
Ch
*(paui_ie.j)
H
T-I
uinm^d 'xo^
Eh
o
H
o
eg rH
CO
w
a
•atoBia 'xo£
m
Eh
P
H
fa
a
55
t-H
P
ft
«
eg
CO
•(pauijtfji)
C<JCMCgt-tD©©CMCOlO-tf
OHiCOXCOMOt-lOXlf
tf   CO   CM
t-   CM   ©
Q
z
ania 'xo£
io"
t-0_Or.C.r.OH00OO'#NC.C0Nt-O00Mnt-NC0!0
55
«
n
M
CSTPlOMCSMOCipNt-MHit-.OH-DNTfP.MlO'fHQOO.
■paa 'xoj;
Cg-*©CM_OCO_0©©-0»0©©-0-^t,©COOO©t-00-^,©©tD
rHiHCMCgrHrH                                         iHCgCMrH                                        H   «    ^    IO
©
1—1
IS
S
a
55
"*
©©ojo_o©cMo©iHegco'^i,©oo_o©cgegiot-co©'M'©
o
K
ifllONN^N'JHU.OWKHTfa.tONt-iooC.MC.MlO
•SSOJQ 'XO£
N«TfffiHNMC-Oi»-t__Ot"NlDHtD«)_(.tOlOOCiMH
CO
02
CO
rH
Eh
CMOO'^t©CO©-^CO©Ot-t-'^,©©OCO©CMCM'^<rHOCM©
©
55
tOCCHH^H_-t-C.UJlDHt-001HO.HH_-<JimCCO«.
HNN^-OlONHWO-Ht-tflO-OOMt-HiMHCB-O
m
U9AIIS 'X0.J
£
CO
B
1-3
HOlOt-tCOC-C-O-HCOOOMffiHOONajOOWO-TlOOD
Eh
HCOt-NNM^OO^XWlQbONOt-OM-OCCOO^COCO
fi
H-l
Eh
CO
•jousi^
t--oio©ioorHOot-©©io©---t-_>©_o-oio-ocg'^©t-
rH    rH                                                                                                                                     rH
IO
t-"
i
co©cM©rHOoooegt-t-co^i.rH©co©CMrHcoegt-©t-t-oc
t-10HHCOt*HOWMNN'tlC.C-CDCi_0-''f-OOtOK-,^(D
o
•*WNON^Tf«Dt-HH(Dt--C_ONO_Nt--DHNC.HOJ
©
i—c
© eg "W co" co" ■>*  ©" -^  t-^ co cm  h o* co" ^* io io w o* h oo* t-* co co
c
Eh
ol
C.MC.rtHC.MHHHHHHriHHHHC.O.rlHHN
"*
-tf
4J
£3
ft
't    CO    H   Tf
t-
<
0.
3
•jeSpBg
-* eg cm co
CM
K
Eh
C-t-t-O.O.l-.Cn-O'O-OHC.H^MHNlOtDOTfNHrl'C-
o
03IMC.MC-ON«00'*0.-OiOH'Jit-Ol-300C)-CiMOO
•araag
©
"aS
o
1
r.
QJ     .
cn
""3
D
gg
O
■a*
H
fe
o
rHCMCO'«rflO©t-00©OrHCMCO'^<»0©t-CO©©rHe'
cgcgcvicMCMCMcgcgcgcocococococococococo'Tj-^t"'*;
©©©©©©©©©©©©ai©oi©©ai©©oicr
©   ©   © REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 59
10
Eh
m
OS
H
eg
a
H
O
W
P
o
Eh
Eh
cn
5
55
3
<_
P.
55
H
K
05
a.
<C
B
Eh
P
<
>H
O
tf
W
o
H
IS
55
O
cc
P
<
I-H
55
<!
o
Z
2
1
s
Oi
p
fa
Eh
O
cn
H
W
fa
cn
P
O
i—i
os
<
>
Ch
o
cn
Oi
<
p
P
O
05
<!
fa
p
Ph
_.
O
0
z
0
z
Hi
i
EQ
9
s
55
•aui-taAioM
OC
CO
CO
CM
©
CO
c
©
cc
IO
rH
©
t£
•pSBOAi.
CM
CO
00   ©   ■*#
tr-   rH
©_
rH
rH
rH
IO
CO
00
10
rH
© b-
© t-
t-   rH
rH
©  t-
©    CO
CM
©    rH    rH    IO
rH    00    rH
io too
rH           t-
CM
©
IO
^"
CO
*[ai__inbs
oo _a t-
rH © eg
rH
ri
©   ©   ©
©   ©
CM
00*
00
©
CO
CO
CM
CM
t>
IO
©
CO   ©
IO    IO
CO   CO
oo"
CO    rH
CM   T-i
©   CM
IO
CO    IO    ©   "tf
©   ©   CM
©   Tji    rH
©"  -^p    ©"
T-I               IO
CO
CM
IO
eg
CM
t-
->*
t-
co
■-junsig
©
CO
©
00   rH
©     : 00
co     : **
: co
•UOOOBy
IO
CM
I-H
CM
CO
00
t-
00
CO
CO
CO
•»wo
CM   ©
©
IO
t-   fc-
iH    E-
IO
H   N   **
rH   CO    CM
IO
IO
00
©
'^B-t-{ani<j[
rH   IO
©
■«3i
CM   IO   IO
©    rH
©    CO
©
CM
©
©
CM
CO
IO
cs
CM   IO
©    CO
00
00   ■<*
CO   U_J
00   CM   t-  IO  CM   CM      :
©   00   00   i-H                       :
CM    t-    rH                                   j
O                                   *
00
IO
t-
rH
00
00
•_H_!H
CO   ©
IO    CM
CM
O    CO   IO
cm  eg  rH
IO
T-i
©   CO
©
rH
e» t- •*
© eg
CO
rH   io   rH   t-
CM    ©    rH    rH
rH             C-   rH
tA                     CM
65
7
316
221
755
26,350
11
1,637
■_#
O
rH
CO
CO
»
io"
CO
•najJBin
t>   ©   CO
eg
CO
to
00
IO
CO
rH
©   CO
t- eg
->*   CO
CM   i-H
CO   ©  o   -^   ©   CO  IO
i-l    O    iH
IO  -*   *H
CO
00
CO
•xu-tT
©
CO
t-
©
©
T-I
©
CO
CO   t-
©
eg
©
CM
t-   rH    CO
t-   IO    ©
IO    ©
COCO
■(pooi-rej)
umul}E[a
'XO.J
•_lOB[a; 'xo^
iH
rH
•(pauuB^)
anja 'xo,a
IO
IO
IO
CO
CO
©
©
■paa •xo.j
CM
T-i
CM  ©
IO
rH
CM
rH
•^    CO    -*
IO
eg"
©   00
00
rH
CD   CM
©    CO   -#
t-    t-   rH
©
oi"
10 rH    :
00
©
©
LO
■SSO-IQ 'XO^
CO
i-H
IO
|H
rH
©
©
rH
CO    CM
©
fc-
io © ^ io cm io    :
©   ©   00
trio
CO*
•J3AIJS 'XO.J
IO   H   ^   H   M   N   Tf
©           rH           ©   rH   ©
rH
©
CO
CO
©
rH
«tf           IO
t-   CO   ""#    CO    CM    tH
CO             rH    CO    CM                 I
t>             rH                 J
©
MS
rH
■jaqsi^
©
CO
©
eg
CO
tH    ©
eo
o w*
io  CO  t-
CO
©
t-
■JOABOg
T-I
IO
CM
eg co
IH    00
eg
t-
©
© ©
t- »o
© -^
rH    to
CO
t__   to   CO
CO    ©   CO
CO    IO    rH
rH   W
o
fees
eg
•jBsg
1-1
rH
CO
t-
©
CO
00
CO    CO    ■*    CO
©           CO
rH
CO
CO
©
T-i
■jospna
rH
CO
CO
CO
tj
a
0)
to
o
-p
B
i
>
o
0
I
1
C
«
1   i
j   5
1   <
F
J
1
c
!
1
c
1     1
)   c
J   1
M
-i  :
!-|
1   i
1
^ P
j    I
i !
3   (3
u
!    t-
>   &
i +
1
J    c
. &
1
i
D
;   r
c
1
s   t
3 C
I
H      0
1
a
1
1
j
(
r
<
I
a
1
i
|z
r
a
1
]
D
J
&
J
4
1
<
!
a
t
I
Q
I
l
ft
y
j
i
ft
c
1
c
a
)   e
\
ft
1
ft"
4
■   e
C
■<-
ft
I
i
c
t
1
0
c
P
J
i
£
<
i
c
0
a
!
i
1
} V
i
c
C
1
!    t
a
I
_
l< p
p
c
) fc
c
>
>
j
>
a
e
I
i
S
E
CJ
US
a
+.
C
E- GG 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1945.
Confiscated from
Confiscated at
Kind
3F   PUR   CONFISCATE!:
.
Date of
Confiscation.
>
_j
V
M
.j
o
>>
0
o
H
_ <U
M >
a
cs
s
._.
to
3
S
1,
o
o
o
o
cd
'cU
*3
DO
cd
3
1
1
7
4
2
2
1
17
1
2
2
3
6
8
5
Feb.   23..    .
27
Mar.   13
11..   .
Roberts, S. A	
Nobels, C	
17
R
May    25
July     6.     .
6
Bagley, W	
Sept.  24	
13
2
2
19
4
1
9
13
3
Note.—Tbe sum of $1,454 was received during 1945 from the sale of confiscated and surrendered fur.
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1945.
Date of
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Firearms
confiscated.
Rifles.
Shotguns.
M.
ir.     1
1        	
Kitkatlah	
13
Katsaros, William	
1
Ju
Ju
Ai
Se
N<
De
,      15	
ne   11        	
1
20	
Archibald, E	
20	
,     20	
20	
23	
23	
,     25	
Iy    25	
Bridal Falls	
25   	
Julseth, C	
Bridal Falls	
,     25	
25	
g.   31	
pt.    4	
Coots, Kelly	
1
>v.   21	
6	
Campbell, J. H	
,
11	
Griffiths, R	
11	
11	
McDonald, E	
,      11	
11	
11	
1
11	
Southwick, H. D	
Bear Flat	
,      15	
Polak, William	
Totals	
26
4
Note.—The sum of $149.50 was received during 1945 from the sale of confiscated firearms. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 61
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1945.
Government Agency.
Kind of Animals.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Total.
2
52
5
116
1
9
5
1
272
245
61
22
33
1
324
5
48
13
6
5
11
24
6
10
4
3
9
36
3
13
15
28
22
3
1
6
14
9
10
1
40
4
3
7
34
26
84
16
2
8
316
362
85
535
42
23
142
389
8
L09
30
195
117
16
152
178
191
22
47
356
13
22
133
95
48
18
163
1,533
156
$215.00
Atlin	
530.00
40.00
1,720.00
1,885.00
165.00
360.00
515.00
3,985.00
280.00
160.00
845.00
2,575.00
40.00
590.00
395.00
1,200.00
420.00
915.00
135.00'
865.00
3,700.00
210.00
3,537.00
870.00
250.00
2,600.00
125.00
110.00
1,040.00
590.00
3,480.00
650.00
1,205.00
9,405.00
1,020.00
1,202
472
5,506
$46,627.00 GG 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1945.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
285
196
261
265
301
472
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
2,487
3,427
7,095
■ 20
89
17,625
172
$60',494.80
1923	
14,840.00
1924	
172
20,398.40
1925	
24,397.00
1926	
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
1927	
65,377.95
1928	
1,025
1,389
403
1
50,709.25
1929	
42,122.00
1930	
36,090.25
1931           	
42,036.15
1932	
80.00
1933	
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
1,002
1,039
1,017
1,321
1,202
6,285.00
1934	
6,825.00
1935                             	
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
2,038
1,924
1,546
1,221
1,259
5,506
12,374.00
1936	
20,350.00
1937	
19,540.00
1938	
21,018.00
1939	
26,399.00
1940	
23,131.00
1941      	
16,868.00
1942	
17,397.00
1943	
16,687.00
1944     	
20,243.00
1945	
46,627.00
14,878
8,788
82,239
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$651,266.80 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 63
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
a a
m £
w o
6 H
3M
C},J
* JE.
o g
c a
o J
Ashcroft—
Creso, C. L., Spanaway, Wash	
Murphy, C. C, Seattle, Wash	
Scalzo, T., Seattle, Wash	
Barkerville—
Halbig, W. C, Bast Orange, N.J	
Tripp, R. H., Chatham, N.J	
Clinton—
Anderson, B., Seattle, Wash	
Blake, H. A., Olalla, Wash	
Bollerud, J., Everson, Wash	
Bulger, Dr. I. J., Richland, Wash	
Button, R. A., Tacoma, Wash	
Byler, W. J., Seattle, Wash	
Caen, R. J., Tacoma, Wash	
Cain, A. B., Seattle, Wash	
Cameron, H. N., Seguin, Wash	
Chatfleld, C, Seattle, Wash	
Clark, L. R., Seattle, Wash	
Conn, A. C, Everett, Wash	
Dale, Lola E., Seattle, Wash	
Dale, Dr. D. H., Seattle, Wash	
Davis, M. H., Napa, Calif	
DePew, S. F., Bellingham, Wash	
Dilley, W. J., Vancouver, Wash	
Eckenberg, A. L., Seattle, Wash	
Eckenberg, Ethel A. M., Seattle, Wash..
Eli, A., Custer, Wash	
Evans, C. H., Seattle, Wash	
Farnsworth, J. H., St. Petersburg, Fla.
Fladero, A., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Flood, Dr. C. R., Seattle, Wash	
Fry, H., Tacoma, Wash	
Gardner, R. L., Yakima, Wash	
Gibbons, F. J., Seattle, Wash	
Graf, C. T., Seattle, Wash	
Greener, Dr. I. B., Everson, Wash	
Gunnery, H., Kelso, Wash	
Hardy, Paul, Winslow, Wash	
Hathaway, W. E-, Port Angeles, Wash.
Haynes, M. L., Selah, Wash	
Hendricks, J. A., Chehalis, Wash	
Hughes, L. A., Tacoma, Wash	
Jacobsen, G. A., Bremerton, Wash	
Jastad, M., Chehalis, Wash	
Jastad, E., Morta, Wash	
Johnson, F. W., Selah, Wash	
Johnson, C, Tacoma, Wash	
Kelliver, R. S., Ferndale, Wash	
Klein, A. W., Seattle, Wash	
Kossuth, C. N., Seattle, Wash	
Krebs, 0., Anacortes, Wash	
Larsen, E. L., Bremerton, Wash	
Lease, G. L., Yakima, Wash	
Lidral, J. F., Winslow, Wash	
Lutzen, N., Kingston, Wash	
Manilla, P. T., Everett, Wash	
$25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
45.00
25.00
25.00
20.00
40.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
2B.00
25.00
30.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
55.00
40.00 GG 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency),
N
o
3
Ol
n
a?
m o
CQ o
a
o
r2
'in
S
Q
a
4
"J
-_-
CO
s
O
U
$
at
n
49
C    .
SI
n
g
k
'3
+_ .
c P.
ij
S.-S
3
5
'S
a
Amount.
Clinton—Continued.
Miller, Dr. J. C, Richland, "Wash.
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
3
....
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
I
1
1
$25.00
25.00
McClure, H., Seattle, "Wash..
25.00
McFadden, H. E., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
40.00
Nelson, G. W., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Newell, E., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
25.00
Norwood, Dr. W. D., Richland, Wash	
40.00
25.00
Pape, K., Chehalis, Wash	
55.00
30.00
Powell, C. E., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Power, F. W., Seattle, Wash.
55.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
Ryan, R. B., Port Orchard, Wash	
30.00
25.00
40.00
Shearer, A. F., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Singer, C. B., Seattle, Wash	
40.00
25.00
Stanley, Dr. G. E., Bellingham, Wash	
25.00
40.00
25.00
25 00
40.00
30.00
Trulin, H. M. (Jr.), Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Trulin, H. M. (Sr.), Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Victor, H., Seattle, Wash	
25 00
25 00
Walsh, H. E., Seattle, Wash	
55.00
Ware, "V., Seattle, Wash.                        	
25 00
Watson, A. C, Seattle, Wash	
40 00
Wightman, Dr. R., Seattle, Wash	
40.00
Worthen, C. F., Yakima, Wash	
25.00
Cranbrook—
25.00
Barker Dr. R. H., Seattle, Wash	
40 00
15 00
30 00
55 OP
40 00
55 00
.... 1   1
.... 1....
.... 1 ....
30 00
45 00
Holling, H., Fairfield, Wash	
.... j ....
15.00 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 65
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Nam. and Address
(Government Agency).
mi?
5 a
Amount.
Cranbrook—Continued.
Houselt, A., Oakland, Calif	
Larkin, J. R., Selah, Wash	
Liston, H. L., Yakima, Wash	
Lugar, Dr. L. L., Yakima, Wash	
McDonald, V. and D., Wapato, Wash...
McGinnis, Fay, Norfolk, Mich	
Partee, C. C, Mount Carmel, 111	
Poole, H. L., Yakima, Wash	
Poole, Geo. L., Yakima, Wash	
Poole, R. E., Yakima, Wash	
Roberts, C. E., Colfax, Wash	
Fernie—
Barry, Paul, Richland, Pa	
Bowker, O. D., San Diego, Calif	
Brock, A., Eureka, Mont	
Duncanson, D., Mott, N. D	
Gibson, A., Eureka, Mont	
Goble, F., Waterton Park, Alta	
Grant, L., Mott, N.D	
Grant, R. A., Mott, N.D	
Jacobson, J., Eureka, Mont	
Kern, F., Mott, N.D	
Knutson, C, Columbia Falls, Mont	
Knutson, O. J., Columbia Falls, Mont..
Maves, Dr. R. A., Burien, Wash	
Maves, Mrs. R. A., Burien, Wash	
Rockwell, J., St. Louis, Mo	
Rogers, Capt. C. V., Martinsville, Va...
Schafer, L„ Kalispell, Mont	
Stewart, B., Cut Bank, Mont	
Swindler, M. F. (Sr.), Kalispell, Mont.
Swindler, C Mott, N.D	
Swindler, A., Mott, N.D	
Swindler, F. M., McLean, Va	
Swindler, L., Mott, N.D	
Wade, R. S., Elizabeth, N.J	
Walberg, R. D., La Jolla, Calif	
Fort Fraser—
Bolton, A., Gardena, Calif	
Feek, R. J., Seattle, Wash	
Garrison, K. C, Norwalk, Calif	
Gray, R. C, Hollywood, Calif	
Graybill, B. F., Kelso, Wash	
Hague, R. J., Seattle, Wash	
Hanson, A. L., Pasadena, Calif	
Irvine, F. C Hermosa, Calif	
Kellog, H., Tacoma, Wash	
Konen, J. F., Lewiston, Idaho	
Kramer, D., Ritzville, Wash	
Martin, Dr. W. H., Burlingame, Calif..
MacGill, C, Tacoma, Wash	
McPhail, R., Tacoma, Wash	
Olson, Mrs. H., Evanston, 111	
Schukei, R. A., Waterloo, Iowa	
Scott, W. E., Pasedena, Calif	
Scott, R., Pasadena, Calif	
$25.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
100.00
25.00
65.00
45.00
45.00
45.00
15.00
130.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
70.00
25.00
15.00
50.00
40.00
35.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
55.00
15.00
55.00
30.00
35.00
25.00
5.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
50.00
25.00 GG 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
O
C
a
3
PQ
£ g
S >
" o
_.*u
W o
s
o
a
o
T3
C
t.
0I_J
p£
O
o
a)
P
-_.
a .
2S
i
o
h
'3
c a,
° jU
5
'3
Amount.
Fort Fraser—Continued.
Sligar, P., Seattle, Wash	
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
3
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
....
1
1
I
1
I
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
::
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
$25.00
Walsh, H. E., Seattle, Wash  ,	
Walton, P., Everett, Wash.
25.00
25.00
Widrig, J. A., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Golden—
Churchill, G. and M. C, Drain, Ore	
90.00
30.00
25.00
England, V., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
25.00
40.00
Holling, H., Fairfield, Wash.
25.00
Johnson, F. D., Pueblo, Calif.
25.00
25.00'
15.00
30.00
25.00
40.00
40 00
25.00
30 00
25 00
40.00
Greenwood—
Fronde W. E.  Seattle, Wash.
30 00
Miller R D., Bothwell, Wash.
Miller, Mrs. G., Bothwell, Wash	
White M. W., Yakima, Wash.
Grand Forks—
Whitney  J. E., Shotress, Wash	
Kamloops—
25.00
Wagner D., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Wilson  G. H., Oroville, Wash	
Kaslo—
130.00
30.00
15.00
40.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
I REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 67
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
CJ
HI
ffl
o   ■
eS n
ffl is
^ o
_J K
«ffl
ffl o
p
o
cs
O
oj
S3
Jig
P£
o
O
P
*3
43
E    .
SI
g
o
h
"3
§|
3   CO
2
g
'a
s
is
Amount.
Lillooet—
....
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
3
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
1
$26.00
Campbell, W. E., Seattle, Wash	
30.00
40.00
Nanaimo—
Murfee, R. L., Colinga, Calif	
10.00
5.00
Uhl, A. E., Alameda, Calif                	
5.00
10 00
Wilson, J. A., Seattle, Wash.                	
15 00
New Westminster—
30.00
Allison, A. C, Seattle, Wash..   ._          	
25 00
40.00
40.00
30 00
25.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
55 00
Ashe, F., Granite Falls, Wash.             	
Auld, C. A., Seattle, Wash.                    	
25 00
Austin, F. F., Seattle, Wash	
15.00
Baer, W. H., Edmonds, Wash	
25 00
40 00
Baird, Dr. R. M., Everett, Wash	
55 00
Bakenhus, H. W., Seattle, Wash	
15 00
Ballard, H. G , Seattle, Wash.               	
Bailer B M   Bellingham, Wash                                     	
30.00
Bedell E B   Blaine, Wash.                   	
30 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
15 00
25 00
25.00
25 00
25.00 GG 68                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA.
BlG-GAME TROPHY FEES PAID BY NON-RESIDENTS, JANUARY 1ST TO
December 31st, 1945—Continued,
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
o
h
ffl
ffl e
£**
rtffl
& u
ffl o
i
*E
s
o
s_s
p£
_j
c.
O
O
a
k
'3
+_
s  .
tu
1
3
4_     .
c ft
gai
f=5 «
_«
s
'5
03
1*
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
i
2
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$25.00
Bland, W. C, Bellingham, Wash	
25.00
Bleakney, J. M., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Blick, R., A., Everett, Wash	
25.00
25.00
Blunck, F. T., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
40.00
55.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
60.00
25.00
5.00
85.00
Bodvin, E. T., Seattle, Wash	
Bolster, T. A., Seattle, Wash	
Bowlus, H. H., Seattle Wash.
Boyle, W. G., Yakima, Wash	
Bradley, Dr. R. R., Everett, Wash	
Braida, H., Seattle, Wash	
Briggs, E. W., Everett, Wash	
Brown, L. G. and party, Bremerton, Wash	
Brundage, E. H., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Bull, L. L., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
40.00
15.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
55.00
20.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Bushaw, G., Seattle, Wash	
Cade, E. M., Seattle, Wash	
Caldwell, C. N., Seattle, Wash	
Carey, P. 0., Seattle, Wash	
Carslay, T. A., Seattle, Wash	
Carter, J. E., Seattle, Wash	
Castner, N., Seattle, Wash	 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 69
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
o
u
a
CJ
ffl
u   •
-3 c
ffl P
rfffl
ffl o
d
o
A
'u
a
O
T3
5
m
2 J
H_S
<"£
CO
o
u
Ih"
0)
s
p
'3
o «
a5
co
O
o
a
k
'3
4-     .
s»
- <_l
0 QJ
2
s
33
'3
«
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Chilson, J. M., Seattle, Wash	
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
$25.00
25.00
25.00
25 00
Claus, G. E., Bellingham, Wash	
25.00
Cline, S. W., Kirkland, Wash	
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
Copeland, F., Seattle, Wash ,
55.00
15.00
Cordon, C. H., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
40.00
30.00
15 00
Coughlin, C. W. 0., Tacoma, Wash	
30.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
Dear M E., Seattle, Wash	
15.00
55.00
55.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
Dodd, E. R., Seattle, Wash	
25 00
25.00
45.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
30.00
25 00
25.00 GG 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
>>
«
o
u
cs
QJ
ffl
4 .
5 1*
" o
3m
i. *
M o
o
c.
o
a
c.
P?
+>
n
a
o
O
n>
R
"3
4J
SI
O
O
B
k
'3
-p .
c ft
p a)
o QJ
S  CO
_3
s
33
ft
is
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
1
1
1
2
—
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
l
l
l
l
1
1
1
l
1
l
l
l
l
1
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
1
1
l
l
l
l
l
l
1
1
1
$40.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
20.00
25.00
Ely, E. E., Seattle, Wash	
15.00
25.00
65.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
Evetts, R. S., Bellevue, Wash	
15.00
15.00
35.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
55.00
15.00
55.00
40 00
40.00
50.00
Gaeth, C. J., Everett, Wash	
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25 00
Gehie, 0. F., Puyallup, Wash.     .
25.00
25.00
25 00
25 OO
25 00
Gillanders, H. R., Seattle, Wash	
25 00
55 00
Gleason, E. F., Seattle, Wash.	
25 00
25 00
Goher, R. E., Seattle, Wash	
20 00
30 00
25.00
Gray, F. H., Seattle, Wash	 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL
GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 71
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by
December 31st,
NON-RESIDENTS, JANUARY 1ST TO
1945—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
Amount.
p\
N
"s
o
iH*
09
QJ
ffl
M
o   •
CO c
►♦.ft
caffl
3   H
ffl o
3
o
T3
fi
B)
QJ___;
3'3
"J
pp
H->
(8
O
D
Sh"
QJ
QJ
ffl
J.
QJ
O
O
k
'3
+_  .
a a
3  QJ
o QJ
S    01
s
ft
is
New Westminster—Continued.
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
I
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
1
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
1
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
1
l
l
l
l
l
1
1
l
1
l
l
l
l
l
l
$40.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
20.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
40.00
Hahn, E. A., Seattle, Wash	
Hale, G. H., Everett, Wash	
Hall, B. M., Doe Bay, Wash	
Hall, M. S., Chico, Calif	
Hanson, W. T., Seattle, Wash	
Harvey, G. W., Santa Paula, Calif.	
Healy, G., Kirkland, Wash	
Hilbert A W   Seattle, Wash	
Hill L H.  Seattle Wash	
Hill W., Tacoma, Wash	
Hoff H B    Seattle Wash.            	
2     ....
1
' GG 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
13
H
O
IH*
a
3
ffl
A4
o   •
rt c
ffl &
C J-
rtffl
,8 h
ffl o
0
o
't-i
o
•a
S
(IS
QJr-
BF
BO
i
0
o
QJ
01
ffl
i
a
3
la
QJ
co
O
O
B
a
3 .
G a
0 0)
O <U
s
'ft
a
is
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
....
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
i
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
$30.00
15 00
25.00
30.00
25 00
25 00
30.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
25 00
25.00
25.00
Isby C   Bothel, Wash.                        	
25 00
40.00
15 00
25.00
55.00
15 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
Kirk, J. M., Ferndale, Wash.            	
30.00
Kitchel, H., Seattle, Wash.           	
55.00
Knight, R. T., Tacoma, Wash.          	
30.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
40.00
15.00
25.00
Knott, E. K., Seattle, Wash	
Knutson, C. E., Seattle, Wash.         	
Kolb, 0., Seattle, Wash.                 	
Kounkel, C. W., Seattle, Wash	 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL
GAME COMMISSION, 1945.                 GG 73
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by
December 31st,
NON-RESIDENTS, JANUARY 1ST TO
1945—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
Amount.
ti
O
u
a
QJ
ffl
o   •
ffl £
u u
rtffl
ffl o
a
o
«
13
a
a
23
(fa
oji:
PjS
4-
C_
-3
O
o
u
V
01
P
k
'3
4-
QJ
(0
0
o
B
k
'3
?_ si
3  QJ
O QJ
2
H
+_
'ft
=.
is
New Westminster—Continued.
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
3
1
$25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
40.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
5.00
15.00
40.00
30.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
6.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
20.00
40.00
15.00
90.00
25.00
55.00
Landors, W. J., Seattle, Wash	
Law, C. H., Seattle, Wash	
Lee, C. N., Seattle, Wash	
Lillis, J. G., Seattle, Wash	
Lintz, C. E., Bellingham, Wash	
Lynch, K. T., Bothel, Wash	
Manley, J. J., Bothel, Wash	
Martin, R. M., Seattle, Wash	
Marvick, F. F., Seattle, Wash	
Mastudi, F., Seattle, Wash	
Merkley, E. W., Seattle, Wash	
Miller, W. B., Kirkland, Wash , GG 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
a c
S f
o
i_ H
QJ__;
(IS
cjC
sa
c a
o Q-
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Miller, W. J., Lynden, Wash	
Mimi, Louise A., Seattle, Wash	
Mimi, W. F., Seattle, Wash	
Misner, James, Portland, Ore	
Mitchell, R. J., Belfair, Wash	
Moak, J. W., Everett, Wash	
Mohns, N. R., Everett, Wash	
Moline, W. E., Des Moines, Wash	
Monroe, T. O., Bremerton, Wash	
Moore, W., Salem, Ore.	
Morris, L. C, Seattle, Wash	
Mortenson, H. W., Auburn, Wash	
Morton, M. W., Everett, Wash	
Moser, H. A., Tacoma, Wash	
Mower, Dr. M. L., Olympia, Wash ,
Mullhollen, D., Marysville, Wash	
Murff, W. W., Everett, Wash	
Murphy, C. C, Seattle, Wash	
Myers, V. L., Belleflower, Ore	
Myrick, A. H., Snohomish, Wash	
Muzzall, L. B., Oak Harbor, Wash	
McAllister, A., Snohomish, Wash	
McAlmond, N. L., Sequim, Wash	
McCaughley, D. A., Seattle, Wash	
McConnell, W. M., Seattle, Wash	
McCormick, E. E., Vashon Island, Wash..
McCormick, G. P., Vashon Island, Wash..
McCoullay, M., Lyman, Wash	
McCoy, B. B., Santa Barbara, Calif	
McCrorie, H. R., Sequim, Wash	
McDonough, S. A., Roekfort, Wash	
McMahan, N. D., Randale, Wash	
McMahon, J., Bellingham, Wash	
McMenamin, J. N., Seattle, Wash	
McMichael, L. S., Custer, Wash	
McMillen, A. G., Everson, Wash	
Naber, E. B., Seattle, Wash	
Neal, L. E., Santa Barbara, Calif	
Neal, C. E., Santa Barbara, Calif	
Neal, C. R., Oswego, Ore	
Neely, C. W., Seattle, Wash	
Nelson, A. J., Seattle, Wash	
Nelson, A. J., Lynden, Wash	
Nelson, A. W., Bellingham, Wash	
Newman, W. B., Bremerton, Wash	
Noble, G. C, Tacoma, Wash	
Norris, R. E., Seattle, Wash	
Noteloom, C. W., Lynden, Wash	
Ohman, A. C, Seattle, Wash	
Olsen, A., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Olson, J., Seattle, Wash	
Orr, S., Naches, Wash	
Osten, A. M., Seattle, Wash	
Ottevaeve, A. F., Bremerton, Wash	
Overway, J. E., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Paice, C. P., Everett, Wash	
$25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
26.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
55.00
55.00
25.00
40.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL
GAME
COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 75
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by
December 31st,
NON-RESIDENTS, JANUARY 1ST TO
1945—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
Amount.
H
'u
O
9
ffl
m
o    ■
3 d
n|
rtffl
_9 *
ffl o
p
o
3
o
T3
13
CU
_?.-s
0_3
1
O
_."
0)
OJ
P
k
'3
+_
a .
sa
QJ
10
O
o
s
k
'3
__■ .
c ft
H   QJ
o <u
3
S
is
New Westminster—Continued.
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
I
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$30.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
10.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
5.00
15.00
55.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
60.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
40.00
55.00
Peters, W. G., Portland, Ore	
Petroff, A., Seattle, Wash          ..           	
Phillips, E. L., Seattle, Wash.               	
Pierce, W. H., Seattle, Wash	
Ping, C. W., Seattle, Wash	
Potter, R. W., Pinehurst, Wash	
Prather, C, Selah, Wash	
Pratt, F. H., Seattle, Wash	
Preffle, 0., Seattle, Wash;	
Raley, J. C, Buckley, Wash	
Reed, H. E., Elbe, Wash	
Reynolds E E., Seattle, Wash	
Rhode B. L., San Diego, Calif	 GG 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
a a
5 E
iT 5
Sm
J K
P. o
S ft
_)  QJ
o oj
_s-°
i=i _.
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Riel, H., Yakima, Wash	
Rivard, W. E., Monroe, Wash	
Robeck, B. J., Everett, Wash	
Robinson, J. W., Enumclaw, Wash....
Rochester, N., Mercer Island, Wash-
Roderick, W., Seattle, Wash	
Rogers, J. H., Seattle, Wash	
Roland, G. O., Bellingham, Wash	
Ross, J. E., Seattle, Wash	
Rosselli, C, Seattle, Wash	
Roth, H., Seattle, Wash	
Rueck, Sam, Port Oregon, Ore	
Ruffln, R., Seattle, Wash	
Russan, Max M., Mukilteo, Wash	
Sandvig, A., Everett, Wash	
Sasse, C. W., Seattle, Wash	
Say, J. D., Seattle, Wash	
Scalzo, J., Seattle, Wash	
Scarp, A., Manchester, Wash	
Schan, O., Seattle, Wash	
Schedivetz, H. W., Bremerton, Wash
Scheres, F. A., Seattle, Wash	
Schilperoort, G., Wapato, Wash	
Schoner, J. J., Alderwood, Wash	
Schultz, Dr. A. G., Seattle, Wash	
Scott, E. D., Bremerton, Wash	
Scott, R. J., Seattle, Wash	
Scott, L„ Big Harbor, Wash	
Scovell, H. B., Bellevue, Wash	
Scroggin, Ralph, Lebanon, Ore	
See, A. A., Renton, Wash	
Seigel, L., Seattle, Wash	
Shand, H. W., Bremerton, Wash	
Sheets, H. J., Custer, Wash	
Sheets, O. L., Lynden, Wash	
Shaw, R. T., Bellingham, Wash	
Sibley, D. S-, Mount Vernon, Wash....
Sievers, L., Belleflower, Ore	
Siler, H. M-, Enumclaw, Wash	
Simmons, E-, Tacoma, Wash	
Simmons, J. L., Seattle, Wash	
Sistig, L. W., Seattle, Wash	
Slatburg, C. J., Ludlow, Pa	
Smith, H., Tacoma, Wash	
Smith, H., Seattle, Wash	
Smith, H. A., Bellingham, Wash	
Smith, G. N., Everett, Wash	
Snell, C, Sedro Woolley, Wash	
Snow, G., Seattle, Wash	
Soike, A. D., Bremerton, Wash	
Sondona, T., Cle Elum, Wash	
Spalinger, E., Enumclaw, Wash	
Speck, R. H., Poulsbo, Wash	
Spotts, Chas. K-, Bremerton, Wash....
Spotts, Mary J., Bremerton, Wash	
Standish, R., Anacortes, Wash	
$25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
15.00
40.00
40.00
5.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 77
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
" c
an
_j _=
sa
S ft
O OJ
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Standt, E. T., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Stanley, A., Wenatchee, Wash	
Stenberg, L. H., Tacoma, Wash	
Stender, B., Castle, Wash	
Stennett, W. A., Bellevue, Wash	
Stewart, M. B., Bellevue, Wash	
Stetmiller, G., Seattle, Wash	
Stine, J. L., Burlington, Wash	
Stingle, E. W-, Bremerton, Wash	
Storwick, M., Tacoma, Wash	
Strachan, J. L., Bremerton, Wash	
Strain, L. A., Kent, Wash	
Straw, Mrs. R. B., Seattle, Wash	
Strickland, G. L., Port Orchard, Wash....
Strigen, T-, Seattle, Wash	
Sund, Q., Conway, Wash	
Sund, W., Conway, Wash	
Swain, C, Enumclaw, Wash	
Swanson, J. M., Des Moines, Wash	
Swanson, R. A., Olympia, Wash	
Talmage, G., Lynden, Wash	
Temmerson, J., Ferndale, Wash	
Templeton, Dr. C. L., Seattle, Wash	
Thayer, V., Aberdeen, Wash	
Theodore, A. A., Seattle, Wash	
Thomas, Charles, Seattle, Wash	
Thomas, G-, Snohomish, Wash	
Thorsvig, H. A., Seattle, Wash	
Tiffaney, J. M„ Bellingham, Wash	
Townsend, R-, Hermaton, Ore	
Trantner, W., Enumclaw, Wash	
Tromp, H., Lynden, Wash	
Troxtell, B., Seattle, Wash	
Tuerk, C. T-, Everett, Wash	
Tyler, C. M., Oregon	
Unruh, L. E., Seattle, Wash	
Vail, L., Sumas, Wash	
Vander Cook, M. W., Seattle, Wash	
Van Derveer, F., Seattle, Wash	
Van Doran, W-, Ferndale, Wash	
Vander Houwen, L., Yakima, Wash	
Vander Yacht, D. G„ Lynden, Wash	
Vander Yacht, H. C, Lynden, Wash	
Van Winkle, G., Everett, Wash	
Vilott, D., Anaheim, Wash	
Vincent, R. J., Seattle, Wash	
Vockrodt, H. K., Bremerton, Wash	
Vockrodt, Mrs. H. R., Bremerton, Wash.
Von Harten, J. H., Mercer Island, Wash
Von Losson, E. P., Seattle, Wash	
Wade, D. B., Wenatchee, Wash	
Waddington, G. H., Naches, Wash	
Waite, H. H., Tacoma, Wash	
Walker, G. B., Seattle, Wash	
Walker, H. G., Oak Harbor, Wash	
Walker, J. R., Kirkland, Wash	
$25.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
55.00
40.00
15.00
25.00
5.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
40.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
40.00
25.00
15.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
55.00
45.00
30.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
40.00
25.00 GG 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
'Jh
o
£
3
ffl
a d
w 0
£ s
rtffl
ffl o
3
o
CD
o
d
CS
^^
SI
(J-3
QJ j-
as-
__
£
u
at
Q
'3
-4->
a  .
91s
5 g
cu
O
O
s
+-> .
d a
o OJ
~2
H
'p.
CS
is
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Walker, L. B., Seattle, Wash                            	
1
i
l
i
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
I
$10.00
25.00
Walker, P. H., Seattle, Wash.                 	
Wall J. E.  Seattle, Wash.                         	
40.00
25.00
Walter, A., Seattle, Wash	
40.00
Walton, G A   Seattle, Wash.    .            	
25 00
15.00
25.00
Ward, A. H., Sedro Woolley, Wash	
25.00
Watts, C. E., Seattle, Wash	
30.00
Watts Mrs. C. E., Seattle, Wash	
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15 00
Way J E.  Seattle, Wash	
.... 1
1
15.00
Weedin   J   K , Seattle, Wash	
25 00
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
40.00
25 00
Welcome J  J   Seattle, Wash	
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Whitfield, L. V., Lake Stevens, Wash	
25.00
25 00
25.00
25 00
25.00
55.00
25 00
25.00
1 I
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
30 00
30 00
25 00
25 00
Wood, J. E., Bellingham, Wash	
25.00
40 00
25.00
25.00
Woodson, F., Seattle, Wash	
25 00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 79
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
>>
£
a
o
ffl
M
o   .
a d
ffl *
3m
M o
i
o
.a
C.
o
a
_)
QJ__
_2'3
QJ £
°j£
pp
-t-i
1
o
i_r
QJ
QJ
P
k
'3
■_*
B   .
sa
QJ
to
O
o
k
'3
+-    .
B ft
O  <U
s
4-
'o
as
Amount.
Prince Rueprt—
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
i
i
i
i
....
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
I
....
I
I
$25.00
25.00
Ellsworth, W. H., Nichols, N.Y	
Guerin, H. E., Santa Monica, Calif	
5 00
Olson, H. E., Evanston, 111	
Rude, Dr. J. 0., Juneau, Alaska	
25 00
Prince George—
Brock, 0. C, Eric, Pa	
Crump, C. 0., Bristol, Va	
25 00
Crump, Mabel L., Bristol, Va	
25 00
Ferrell, L. J., Everett, Wash	
25.00
5.00
65.00
5.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
Marnhout, G. G., Philadelphia, Pa,	
Mills, W. B., Yakima, Wash	
....    |    ....
i
Saul, F., Mesick, Mich           	
60.00
25.00
80.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
26.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
Wood, F. W., Yakima, Wash	
Penticton—
Adams, H. W. H., St. Helens, Ore	
Ashe, F., Granite Falls, Wash	
Bean, W., Seattle, Wash	
15.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
30 00
Cain C W , Silverdale, Wash	
Cain, T. A., Bothwell, Wash	
25 00 GG 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
PIS
q£
o a
a a
G   CJ
Penticton—Continued.
Clark, C., Wapato, Wash	
Clark, W. L., Oroville, Wash	
Cook, D. W., Des Moines, Wash	
Coffman, J. L., Bremerton, Wash	
Cook, R. J., Seattle, Wash	
Courtright, J. S., Omak, Wash	
Coy, E. E., Pullman, Wash	
Crichton, E. W., Portland, Ore	
Crocker, E., Tonasket, Wash	
Crow, W. M., Seattle, Wash	
Crow, W. S., Seattle, Wash	
Cushman, F., Everett, Wash	
Damico, C, Yakima, Wash	
Deford, S. R., Port Gamble, Wash	
Deitz, C. L., Poulsbo, Wash	
Demeroot, K. G., Seattle, Wash	
Devenport, O. R-, Carnation, Wash	
Dewar, Dr. D. W., Chelan, Wash	
Dickerson, R. C, Seattle, Wash	
Edholm, W. M., Seattle, Wash	
Enouf, E. L., Oroville, Wash	
Evans, W. W., Fall River, Wis	
Fay, Jack, Seattle, Wash	
Fear, H. A., Tacoma, Wash	
Finsen, L., Oroville, Wash	
Fleishman, B., Winthrop, Wash	
Flennor, J. N., Yakima, Wash	
Floe, I. (Jr.), Chehalis, Wash	
Forsberg, C. E., Longview, Wash	
Fraser, Col. W. D., Seattle, Wash	
Frederick, R. E., Columbus, Wis	
Frederickson, Dr. W. J., Yakima, Wash.
Garbe, O. R., Yakima, Wash	
Gargett, Leslie, Omak, Wash	
George, N., Tonasket, Wash	
Gerhardt, C, Cowiche, Wash	
Gerken, E. G., Quincy, Wash	
Ghrames, P., Seattle, Wash	
Glessner, C. G., Mansfield, Wash	
Grant, E. L., Tonasket, Wash	
Guinn, M. D-, Omak, Wash	
Hahn, E. A., Seattle, Wash	
Hammersmith, N. N., St. Helens, Ore....
Hancock, T. H., Wapato, Wash	
Harder, C. D., Ritzville, Wash	
Harley, Col. C. S., Seattle, Wash	
Harms, J., Oroville, Wash	
Haroldson, V. E., Seattle, Wash	
Harris, O. J., Merrill, Ore	
Hatley, J. W., Wenatchee, Wash	
Hatton, F., Yakima, Wash	
Hayes, E. E., Seattle, Wash	
Hayes, L. G-, Yakima, Wash	
Hilkert, A. N., Seattle, Wash	
Hill, H. B., Port Orchard, Wash	
Hurd, E. L., Seattle, Wash	
$15.00
30.00
20.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
40.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
I I REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 81
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
3s
o cd
sa
a a
p _>
°_=
Amount.
Penticton—Continued.
Hutchinson, J. T., Oroville, Wash	
Jansen, G., Lynden, Wash	
Kepec, T., Okanogan, Wash	
Kepp, K., Seattle, Wash	
Ketcham, E. J., Seattle, Wash	
Keys, R-, Winslow, Wash	
Keys, W., Winslow, Wash	
Kirshaw, W. E., Yakima, Wash	
Kittelson, A. L., Onalaska, Wash	
Klenberg, L. Seattle, Wash	
Labbee, P., Yakima, Wash	
Laney, R. A., Onalaska, Wash	
Lapsley, H. A., Tacoma, Wash	
Larkin, J. R., Selah, Wash	
Larkin, Olive P., Selah, Wash	
Larson, B., Port Gamble, Wash	
Lawson, F. E., Wenatchee, Wash	
Lees, G. J., Okanogan, Wash	
Lees, W., Okanogan, Wash	
Leonard, A. N., Seattle, Wash	
Lillis, J. G., Seattle, Wash	
Lofgren, P. J., Seattle, Wash	
Love, N. W., Omak, Wash	
Lundberg, L. H., Wapato, Wash	
Malmberg, D. W., Seattle, Wash	
Mallory, D., Tonasket, Wash	
Manke, F. S., Mansfield, Wash	
Manley, J. J., Bothell, Wash	
Markham, W. E-, Centralia, Wash	
Marsh, C. B., Okanogan, Wash	
Mascher, V., Bremerton, Wash	
Maser, H. A., Tacoma, Wash	
Mason, Dr. I. W., Redmond, Wash	
Mellor, Dr. R.. Seattle, Wash	
Messner, D. W., Bremerton, Wash	
Mills, J. W., Yakima, Wash	
Moreland, C. T., Seattle, Wash	
Moss, E. W., Okanogan, Wash	
McCann, C. E., Wenatchee, Wash	
McComb, W. M., Tonasket, Wash	
McDougall, G. S., Bremerton, Wash...
McFerran, E. M., Seattle, Wash	
McGuey, R. H, Granderon, Wash	
Macintosh, Dr. P. G., Yakima, Wash
McNett, R. L., Omak, Wash	
Nelson, T. G., Yakima, Wash	
Nichols, B. V., Seattle, Wash	
Nieni, W. F., Seattle, Wash	
Nonce, C. B., Keyport, Wash	
Oakes, Wm., Tonasket, Wash	
Oliver, B. A., Odessa, Wash	
Packard, L. D., Anacortes, Wash	
Palmer, C. A., Omak, Wash	
Palmer, Jesse, Omak, Wash	
Parker, R. D., Bremerton, Wash	
Parsons, L. G-, Wenatchee, Wash	
$30.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
5.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
. 30.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00 GG 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
i?
N
o
£
a
0)
ffl
M
5 d
ffl e
cdffl
•S *
ffl o
P
o
O
13
d
-_-
Pi*
+_
$
O
u
QJ
QJ
a
_d
'3
d  .
g ca
OJ
CO
o
o
a
k
d
B 0.
B QJ
5 QJ
^ t/j
H
'__
'p.
c.
IS
Amount.
Penticton-—Continued.
Patrick, B. R., Yakima, Wash	
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
....
■
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
$30.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
Pratt, T., Tonasket, Wash	
25.00
Quinlan, L. F., Bothwell, Wash	
30.00
Rabb, H., Omak, Wash	
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
15.00
Roe, E., Omak, Wash	
40.00
Holland, A. B., Albany, Ore	
25.00
15.00
25.00
Schaeffer, E. S., Yakima, Wash	
30.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
Schan, 0., Seattle, Wash	
....  !           30.00
Schultz, H. H., Yakima, Wash	
25.00
Scott, E. D., Bremerton, Wash	
30.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
Smiley, E. S., Yakima, Wash	
30.00
Smith, A. M., Seattle, Wash	
40.00
15.00
30.00
.... [ ....
30.00
Stangle, B. C, Seattle, Wash	
I
25.00
Starseth, S. P., Selah, Wash	
25.00
Steel, J., Fall River, Wash               	
25.00
Stewart, E. T., Omak, Wash	
25.00
30.00
Styer, C. M., Seattle, Wash	
30.00
Sumpter, C. H., Ritzville, Wash	
55.00
25.00
25.00
Titus, F. L., Pullman, Wash	
30.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
Way, S. E., Everett, Wash	
30.00
15.00
25.00
30.00
Whited, C. R., Centralia, Wash	
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 83
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
"fi
o
£
&
<u
ffl
M
o   .
M c
ffl e
£h
rtffl
ffl o
d
o
"E
a
o
d
sjj
iJ-S
1
U
qj
QJ
p
k
'3
._■
s .
3i_
^a
QJ
CG
O
o
s
k
'c.
._■  .
B a
_)  QJ
0 QJ
S   CO
K
'ft
c.
is
Amount.
Penticton—Continued.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
....
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
I
1
....
1
1
2
2
1
I
I
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
i ....
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
I
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
...
1
2 i
:::: i
$30.00
30.00
25 00
30.00
Pouce Coupe—
75 00
Bechtell, L. L., Brounfield, Tex	
80.00
Brent, C, Dallas, Tex	
5.00
25.00
65.00
80.00
70.00
Foster, W., Rio Vista, Calif	
75.00
25.00
25 00
55.00
Grener, W. F., Hillards, Ohio	
30.00
85.00
75.00
75.00
80.00
90.00
Joseph F., Little Fulk, N.J             	
25.00
25.00
65.00
105.00
50.00
50.00
95.00
75.00
60.00
65.00
5.00
65.00
50.00
65.00
25.00
Quesnel—
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
|         | GG 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species
13
£
M
d
-tJ
0
ffl 1
d
o
8
*  rli
OS
0
D
u
_?«
E
0)
ffl
ffl o
d
R_*
0)
Q
o d
Is
J_
B ft
3 QJ
O w
Quesnel—Continued.
Dilley, O. L., Cosmopolis, Wash	
Dougan, J. A., Rathie, Wash	
Drake, L. B., Forest Grove, Ore	
Eckstein, C, Langley, Wash	
Eckstein, E., Langley, Wash	
Ely, E. E., Seattle, Wash	
Ford, F. W., Bellingham, Wash	
Framborse, L. L., Yakima, Wash	
Gallagher, F. H., Seattle, Wash	
Gerllickson, A., Index, Wash	
Gisle, S., Redmond, Wash	
Granston, E. R., Seattle, Wash	
Granston, W. R., Seattle, Wash	
Gray, L., Coulee Dam, Wash	
Green, E., Bellingham, Wash	
Hansen, G. W., Port Angeles, Wash	
Hause, R. V., Blanchard, Wash	
Heap, G., Oak Harbor, Wash	
Heard, W., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Henry, J., Stanford University, Calif	
Huff, R. H., Seattle, Wash	
James, L. D., Seattle, Wash	
Johnson, A., Seattle, Wash	
Johnson, E. R., Marysville, Wash	
Jones, Dr. D. D., Seattle, Wash	
Kale, Dr. H. E., Granville, Idaho	
Kale, H. F., Seattle, Wash	
Kasden, E-, Kingston, Wash	
King, G. R., Belleview, Wash	
Lester, J. A., Seattle, Wash	
Lingenfilter, Dr. J. S., Seattle, Wash	
Machado, W., Stanford University, Calif.
Magnuson, G. F., Seattle, Wash	
Magnuson, Dr. L. J., Seattle, Wash	
Martin, J. F., Seattle, Wash	
Mead, R. L., Yakima, Wash	
Morgan, L. A., Sedro Woolley, Wash	
Morgan, L. W., Sedro Woolley, Wash	
McCord, E., Sedro Woolley, Wash	
McKellers, J. D., Yakima, Wash	
Oakson, E., Seattle, Wash	
Olson, A., Sekin, Wash	
Philpott, D., Everett, Wash	
Rivord, W. A., Sedro Woolley, Wash	
Schwald, P., Seattle, Wash	
Scott, J. M., Bellingham, Wash	
Scott, W. H., Bellingham, Wash	
Segemore, C. L., Sedro Woolley, Wash	
Shag, A., Bremerton, Wash	
Shogh, J., Seattle, Wash	
Sinclair, S. L., Redmond, Wash	
Smith, R. W., Forest Grove, Ore	
Sweeney, G., South Bellingham, Wash	
Swift, A. H., Kingston, Wash	
Swindland, A. G., Tacoma, Wash	
Thompson, D., Sequim, Wash	
$25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 85
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
a c
3 *
3M
QtS
o S
:
n a
_5  Oi
5 oj
Amount.
Quesnel—Continued.
Van Hee, E., Bremerton, Wash	
Van Hee, E. A., Bremerton, Wash	
Van Hee, Frank, Port Orchard, Wash.
Walton, C, Everett, Wash	
Walton, P., Everett, Wash	
Wallace, H. B., Everett, Wash	
Whitford, J. G., Seattle, Wash	
Zeek, R., Everett, Wash	
Revelstoke—
Carroll, H., Seattle, Wash	
Turner, K., Chicago, III	
Salmon Arm—■
Baker, D., Seattle, Wash	
Telegraph Creek—
Iversen, L., Pittsburg, Pa	
Laszlo, Dr. A., New York, N.Y	
Mellon, Mrs. R. K., Ligoner, Pa	
Mellon, R. K., Ligoner, Pa	
Rockwell, R. H., Janesville, Va	
Walters, R. S., Southmont, Pa	
Young, J. S., New York, N.Y	
Vancouver—
Baker, D. R., Seattle, Wash	
Bates, D. H., Portland, Ore	
Gilbert, P. M., Atlanta, Ga	
Hooker, G., Sarnia, Ont	
Johnson, Dr. D. E., Seattle, Wash	
Ketcham, E. J., Seattle, Wash	
Maynard, J. W., Amarillo, Tex	
Patterson, W. W., Saginaw, Mich	
Walker, W. R., Seattle, Wash	
Wartz, W. E., Amarillo, Tex	
Victoria—
Doerr, E. G., Kent, Wash	
Haslam, F., Silverdale, Wash	
Haslam, W., Silverdale, Wash	
Weener, E., Port Orchard, Wash	
Williams Lake—
Anderson, A. P., Seattle, Wash	
Barton, Dr. J. E., Longview, Wash	
Bowman, L. R., Lebanon, Ore	
Burns, D., Seattle, Wash ."	
Downe, Dr. A. K., Longview, Wash	
Fair, A. J., Blaine, Wash	
Fair, F. E., Blaine, Wash	
Ford, E. H., Lebanon, Ore	
Ford, H. C, Lebanon, Ore	
Ford, M., Lebanon, Ore	
Halbert, O. D., Fort Worth, Tex	
Miller, E. D., Redmond, Wash	
Mimmo, C Fort Worth, Tex	
Phelps, C, Seattle, Wash	
Sabo, A., Seattle, Wash	
Staley, F. W., Redmond, Wash	
2
2
I     2
I     1
$15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
35.00
30.00
5.00
75.00
125.00
190.00
205.00
65.00
165.00
180.00
5.00
50.00
20.00
15.00
80.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
5.00
90.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
5.00
15.00
50.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
40.00 GG 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
*E
o
Jh*
5
ffl
M
o   .
d d
ffl|
dffl
W o
3
o
jO
*n
CO
O
i
d
■
OJ j-
03
C.
0
O
_.
0)
V
p
k
'8
4-
c  .
g g
5. _o
QJ
DQ
O
O
s
k
'3
+_ .
C p.
ij
3
3
n
c.
Amount.
Windermere—
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
1 "
"I
l
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
i
l
l
....
l
l
i
l
l
l
l
l
l
i
i
l
l
l
l
l
$25.00
55.00
50.00
15.00
Boyd, H. L., Montreal, P.Q	
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Eisenshind, G., Banff, Alta. y
40.00
40.00
50 00
50.00
30.00
55 00
50 00
15 00
Holling, W., Plaza, Wash	
30 00
Hutchinson, W. B., Seattle, Wash	
15.00
Ketcham, E. W., Seattle, Wash	
1
25.00
30.00
1
1
2
2
30.00
15.00
40.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
30.00
80.00
80.00
Owens, T., Seattle, Wash	
Russell, B. D., Seattle, Wash	
Scott, Dr. F., Detroit, Mich	
Skeel, E. L., Seattle, Wash	
Westphal, H. W., Rasaila, Wash	
Wetherbee, A. W., Tacoma, Wash	
44
64 ) 37
1
684
42
89
899
52
50
$39,175.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 87
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January
December 31st, 1945.
LST
ro
Description of Offence.
Divisions (See Foot-note).
CIS
'rt
n
c_
1
W
S
c_
p
4o
o
">
a
o
O
kS
O ra
og
£'43
_ rt
<ss
d
0
<_.
. p
d
o
_     c_
m.E
. p
a
0
_    co
S   P
d
.2
;   «_
p_E
: P
d
0
H_E
_ P
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animals.
5
1
7
4
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
24
5
1
2
l
__»■—
l
l
2
5
1
2
1
2
1
36
1
15
2
7
9
1
2
11
4
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
27
1
1
11
1
4
4
1
2
4
5
2
1
13
1
1
6
2
1
2
8
18
1
1
1
66
23
2
2
3
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
17
1
17
1
10
1
2
1
32
3
1
2
8
21
1
1
4
6
2
9
3
3
3
1
2
2
1
166
1
1
1
54
4
4
1
2
19
4
18
1
10
1
2
1
32
6
3
1
2
8
3
21
1
1
4
7
2
9
3
3
3
1
2
2
1
166
2
1
1
55
5
4
$25.00
Killing, hunting,  or in possession of game animals of
50.00
Killing, hunting, or in possession of game animals dur-
385.00
Killing or hunting game during prohibited hours   (pit-
500.00
Possession of untagged deer or violation of regulations...
215.00
10.00
155.00
25.00
Possession   of   deer   from   which   all   evidence    (sex)
25.00
Game Birds.
75.00
Hunting or in possession of upland game birds during
440.00
70.00
Hunting game birds with a rifle, contrary to regulations
20.00
10.00
20.00
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours	
80.00
Hunting,  killing,  or  in  possession  of migratory game
26.00
Allowing dogs to run at large during breeding season	
10.00
10.00
Fur and Trapping.
Setting poison for the taking of fur-bearing animals	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearers during close season	
60.00
175.00
35.00
420.50
125.00
160.00
415.00
25.00
100.00
20.00
10.00
Licences.
1,285.50
10.00
50.00
10.00
505.00
200.00
Note.—" A " Division:   Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland.    " B '
areas.    "C" Division:   Kamloops,  Yale,  Okanagan,  Cariboo,  and  Lillooet ares
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas.     " E " Divis
Mainland areas.
Divig
s.    "
on:    1
ion:
D"  D
v/ancoi
-Cooter
vision
lver,
ay an
:    Atl
3 oast,
d Boundary
in,  Skeena,
and Lower GG 88
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1945—Continued.
Divisions
(See Foot-note) .
CO
g
ta
co
"fl
m
a
co
d
o
|
'>
c
o
O
O co
dg
Bs
~. rt
$ £
Description of Offence.
d"
o
<E
. R
c
o
_     M
«_£
: a
d
o
_ .js
o_8
: P
o
ol
- p
d
o
_   'co
- p
Fines or
Penalties,
imposed.
Miscellaneous.
Interfering with a  Game Warden  in  the discharge of
1
10
1
1
1
6
1
1
4
1
1
6
2
2
14
4
5
5
1
1
2
3
37
6
6
3
2
1
1
1
7
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
13
4
28
26
8
3
1
2
5
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
8
27
4
3
1
3
1
92
38
8
17
4
4
2
5
6
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
10
28
4
3
1
3
1
93
38
8
18
5
5
2
5
6
4
1
1
1
2
1
$10.00
25.00
200.00
251.00
25.00
55.00
50.00
40.00
10.00
Firearms.
Carrying a loaded firearm or discharging same from an
930.00
380.00
Discharging firearms on or across highway in munici-
80.00
Minor carrying firearms without being accompanied by
55.00
British Columbia Fishery Regulations.
20 00
50 00
5.00
45.00
100.00
Gaol Sentences.
$8,381.50
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence	
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Totals	
95
111
147
53
226
20
632
652
Note.—"A" Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. "B" Division: Kootenay and Boundary
" C " Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. " D " Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas.
Gaol sentences ranged from seven days to ninety days. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 89
07
H
z
H
a
o
o
<
g
3
to
o
Z
<
o
z
H
n
CO
CO
CO              BO              CO              OT
OT
^s
d
d           d
d       d        d        d            c
d   d
a
o           o
o       o       o        o            c
5  5
»x
j-  oi       oi       c           e
*C      'E      'C      *E       m 1
w  in  E
d g
* _?
Oi     g             h             Qj                    CJ
a)       cd       cd        a;       a   a
3   m   cj
coq          o          co            •    co           •          ot          co          to          co          om            •   o    m    co     ■            ...
o   5       fc       o       .2   o       .2       5       o       o       5       fc  o       .2  K  o  o .2       .2 .2 .2
ftco      co      »      PS      Q      2      2      3      £      mT-
Qt/i&lZIQ       QflO
+a           M
1
bo
5        0
P
,-a
'5
w
co  *C    bo
K   d   d
•w
qp
X
o
3
N          CU   S    to
cj       d *   d
8*             «h   a
Pi        M   0    o
O          X
tub
CU
co             .                         i__
®                           !                         d
-S        rJ          CD         <y          P
T3          B          d          ._          rt
Oil      rM
c3       ^      IS
I-H
«m       d   d
•4^
B' '     "5 ■"■■'¥
S         *>
+»   ^  A
+»       in ,2 'O   J _q f.       «-       oj       *       ««       d       *>
h  d    .
0
CD
i
:   c_ —   c
W   0  __  E        bi
h
» d     5?**Sp      S      _g      .g     3      5      di
.S "8    *s 6 -51 «'S     "     -S     .2     fi     «     ? t
0*2      df^g.S'c     .5     is     *     .9      >>     "St
g 5      +3 .£  £  o  o  5       q      g       5      4a      +>  «  o £
be       >> .S  d       d
x^
I?
d    ^^'ci-5    bOd^-C
_p tP3   d 4» 71   d-^   d*-«
t:   °-*J,pi  C   dTi-t-11   o
£ £     ffl     w     wis     w     (i,     w     ffl     ffl     p}r
3     r;   ih     p    fl   ,J;     P*  *"  J51
sioKfli.     m X w
^
bo       t
cd         c
X
c
-4-
o
+>
P
1
c
1
■s
B
C
1
t
4
J
*
I
1
F
X
4-
J
«
3         'JJ         >
c     «     ^_
1      9     I
!_          §          =
ri    1
_3    __
■sB
J3   a,
01 cc
_J3
is
CJ
o
d
'E
fe
a
"E
d
CD
rH
3
+1
g
3
1
4
A
>
=
b
■*-
c
a
c
a
c
d •*!
.i
El
£
_c
i
CC
d         g         OJ        "2 m
■°     ~      ft     5 J
1   §   1   *!
fe          bo         »         *h
s
3
_¥
•S x
a
p
0
CJ
a.
d ^
.  o
X    0)
-Si   fl
X  ■-
-"   B
__'"
.9    hn
O
9
a,
E
O    c
-1-
c_          C
pp
C
■°        d   *
.5      *3  d
■s      s «
g         d   eg
0        ,_d ^
rd       *
i S1 g j aa - s 9
_)  .S   ,S  5_    H   «H    «-          _3
S3  !__ 't1     -   O          qj    m
hT3T3t-"_.t._H
S ■ o a -_ ojjoSt.
« * N. ■" 3        >*   °
CO
P
d
A  _
e
o, t
0
■r
bo tuo cu _2       a
S3 | ^     t
fl'5 o
d   d   _ +J         e
03    nj    d    to         ,C
* J3 ,J3  o  d
1 1
N    co          fe
13    4J
CD    d
*___:   a
ii
< <
I*
g E
.5  i
(-
0-
d
i
3
<
co    w
CO     CT
9    J
"o .0
u   ■<-
d   d
u cj
U   4_
l'S
S    61
is s
° __
cn   cc
s
c3  "g
It
■S *
«
■y   cu   cd   a
53      C
0 "S
Si .
a 1 I I" «-E1 "S § 1
c. .2   5   S "S   S   i* -2 V  "   «
2   s   a J? *        i_-3'-h__.
4$
a
a
00
c
c
c
>
5
4
A
i
_-
_•
>
q
0
0
X
8 i
& «
3.  1-
v
4)
5
CD
1
(-
a
1
M   a
n)    t
B
1
j
B.
P
rt _>
a. ^
a,
* S .2
(\fi   r=5    X
M-       8°.
P
E
-2    p
E
^
£
8
el j~
p^jjCc;-^        c(d«'
i. .t.   cj   h   o         d   o   d
a
i
0 'f
p
_
I
X
c
i-
" .*
>
C
O P-
V
tr
(.
a
C
5 tx
^   PL,   fe   PU   h          W   Pt4   ^
B
o
CO _.
•
§'s
c
c
CD
P
U
c
In
d
r3
r*
i x
o
CO
C
CD
M
CJ
c
+-
3 §3
w 4 *
O CD
cu 2
5 '55
a
<*-
EC
c
E
*
s-
<•-
D
"i
5*-
J£
C
P
«H
*l-
<3
H    <4-
e.
P-
P
5^d
~
1
^
M
4
1
K
1
C
1
CO t/-
:   o .;   o   O        4J j m
<! m W cc h      wKS
s
-*
*o
d"
§
s .
£ S
*|
s
d
£
G
x
c
C
>
cd
N
c
h
»
c
C
|
a
t
i
>
_.
e
iS
e
c
I
2
9
P
.e
c
*-.
c
1
a
p
c
1
DC
s
>
E-
E
(V
e
ffl
,Z
"a
1*
0
C
p
c"
0
1
d
2
<
*
i
s
*
0
p
B
I
1
P
CU
q
■9
J3
e
d
0
d
0
X
fl
p
c
P!
1
s
X
c
•5
0
Hj
<%
oi
d
0
c
"a
a
4-
c
c
E
»3
d
M   '-
^^    C
ffl   (fc
c
cd"  </
p   n
u   >
i
r-
d
g
c
■*■
+-
C
s s
P-
s b
£
C
0
W
a <3
><3fcpQPH      fflWS
u
a
tt
«c
C
o
O
0.
cc
«
o;
w
oc
oc
oc
M.
•*
CT
S
"g
>-"
r-
CQ
co   rH
■-1
t-
T-
rH
•H
CM    CN
CN                      t-i    t-i             H    N
p
p.
•  +j
»
. i u
*   ej
_   O     «    *    -           --S
a
c
3
H GG 90
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary of Game-fish Distributions, showing Eggs, Fry, and
Fingerlings, 1945.
Kind of Game Fish.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fingerlings.
1,083,380
301,435
307,615
3,447,722
269,812
3,463,450
4,880,000
567,222
I         	
Totals	
9,426,830
4,326,584
567,222
Summary of Game-fish Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings at Departmental
Hatcheries, December 31st, 1945.
Hatchery.
Eastern
Brook.
Kamloops.
Kokanee.
Eggs or Fry.
Fingerlings
or Fry.
Eggs or Fry.
98,560
217,706
109,349
146,567
93,935
23,313
112,110
303,100
169,250
Smiths Falls	
Totals	
303,100
801,540
169,260
Eggs
Fry __
Fingerlings
Summary.
Total distributions	
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1945_
TotaL
9,426,830
4,326,584
567,222
14,320,636
1,273,890
15,594,526
Note.—A number of game clubs or associations were, as in past years, granted
subsidies for use in assisting the Department in its game-fish culture programme of
development.
Trout eggs were shipped to a number of game associations, as will be noted on
examining the statement of distributions or plantings. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 91
TO
o
Z
r—I
Z
<
E-i
P
O
«
EH
o
!*
cs
<!
S
S
P
w
u
Z
<!
B3
M
h
3
P
EH
►J
P
o
w
TO
la  m
2   d
£fe
btu
d o
ooooooooo
OOOOOOOOO
OOOOIOOIOO©
O o o o o
o o o o o
IO  IO  o  o  io
WO-NON'^'tfOlCN^H
OOOOOOOOOOO
ooooooooooo
IOOOVOOOIOOIOOO
N   N   ^* IO   N   ■*" "*   H   f* IO   00
as
r,v
"A
B
H
l-3
<r,
4J
M
d
fe
:  J
60 ,
1  ,-.
.3 1? __j
i   S6J   ,
I'Si ja   M O
I « •_!     M
i P.
s
jd     CD
5 h  d  5
CD     CD
ft   M
£\   O
fcJD Ij   H  ,13
■S1»■_! 1
,—     £   c3   ~-   ^
S  a  5  J w
£ A!
^ H.
oi
_-< .K
oi    c.
J. M
.,   °J
o _3 _5 •_.  SB  o
c   qj   q   o   EIP
_y      M      C_
P, a ?
c«_=  5  e •_:  u  o  &°°.-_=  o  o"g--spo  „  5  nats^ji
OOOHhc.OOl.i.i.Jc.r.B^oaKBiaBHiiiiPf GG 92
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
t_
3
S
■co
-to
s
o
O
■^
G_
TO
o
z
EH
z
<!
Ph
Eh
P
O
as
_H
fa
o
<
B
B
P
CO
H
Z
cd
M
H
P
EH
p
o
w
TO
l-H
fa
I
fa
B
o
T N
&H.
60 h
§ o
CD CO
bfibc
o o
_o  IO
T-I      CS
#3
P.
B
_»
a
5
w
5 §
S g
h s^
s _i a
_. &.2
81
En
2
>
o o
g o
© <__
o o o © o o
O O O © O CC_
cp o © © © -^*
CO CO © <P © IO
.52  g   &
6 P.
.5   I J3 Jj
s*
OOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOO
■3   QJ _2
! J5 B i
■5 E
pj    JJ
1 « 1 a, is
el |i<?
<a s _s
6.
q K
d   _
W  h! iJ Z  Ph Cfl  CO
o  a
O     CD
O   ghJ
A
N
Hi
d   d   C
ijj    o
q
c
-S .2 T5 -S  F
S   c3   cd   cd   oi
c
o a ffi
S
«
1 A. ~
I   3 W
1 3    cd
W HH Hi  a REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 93
*
M
CX
t£
___:
EC
c
OS
N
CO
IN
CM
eo
CM
o
IO
OOOOOOOOO
OOOOOIOOOO
OOOOOCNOOO
eocoioco-^-tfooio
rH    CM
o
o
o
o"
CO
o
o
o
o*
o
o
©
o
O
o
o
o"
o  o
o o
o o_
IO   IO
o
o
o
US
o
o
o
IO*
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o"
10,000
30,000
15,000
10,000
75,000
40,000
100,000
o
o
©
o"
CD
o o
o o
o o
© o"
CD   CO
o
o
o^
o
o o
o o
© o
o  ©
©    rH
o
o
o
:
t
z
t-
c
cc
a
t-
I
V.
1
-
a
IS
0
!-
c
Ec
i
s
«
1
1
a
c
«l-
>«
a
cc
I
s
1=
c
1
y
<
(
H
\
c
2
I
$
a
H-
cr
a
fC
t
+-
K
a
a
H
2
+
c
E
'oi
_c
c
3)
c_>
JS
c_!
e
tq
»3
-_.
I
f.
a
>
5
c
p
e.
1
I
Cc
-
I
XT
'
od
3
a
Eh
Okanagan District.
Lloyds Creek Hatchery.
a
a
H
<
a
M
■a
r-
E
«
1
a
,4
B
If
&
I
a
>
It
a
a
a
H
C
If
t
EC
a
J_
*
i-
}
t
J-
cc
a
c
H
£
C
(
i
_
»
-
is
£
*
>
K
p
a
"4
P
0.
0
a
tr
a
a
H
> 8
c
1
"ft
a
cc
H
ft
EC
c
i
_
a
1
"j
H
c
C
4-
>C
.5
c
H
8
H
0
i   £
i
a
1
1-
F
I
a
a
c
1
a
i
i
'i
■ GG 94
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
<__
I
■cc_>
t-_
s
o
O
_o
O-
TO
O
z
z
<
p
C>H
EH
p
o
M
Eh
fa
o
OS
«!
B
B
P
X
Z
<
p.
w
fa
03
P
E-i
P
o
X
TO
fa
I
H
B
<
Is;
Sfa
Ml,
a o
t_< .
QJ CO
__ -D
a a
t_
w
_o
_e
H
a
bn
o
d
<
c .■
H
W
^
»«
W
rtr"
Q
H
3*3
CJ
<t!
H->
K
cd
Ph
o o © o o
o o o o o
© © o o o
o* o © o" o*
»o o o o to
r.   M N ■* rt
o  o  o o
©OOO
O o o o
© o o" IO
O   CO   CM   CM
OOO
O O O O
o o o o
O © © O
o ©" o o
©©OOO
O   O   O   O   o
© o o ©  ©
o o* ©* o  o
tf   IO   IO   O   CO
o
I
3
«(
o
pq h.
-S     CD   .S     CD   h.   h1
j-.  d '
CJ  Hh
th    0
! P3
» o M
5 W
Hi    CD
O   ft  M 5   rt .2 J .S |£ O
cd   cd.^.S   3cu^   § j_* ,£  .2   «   P
•% %
(H     CD
1   cd   cd
5 J   C ^O
ft    *    3    >•   «
_rj   co   o   cd ,£.
_ « ^ ^
jj   to   cs   c -h
j   •-_     cu   .^   -H
eh £ 3 o
Ah  W  U O a £« >
i—i    tu p n)
d    cd »h
I s I %
H -a o o
<. « M O REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 95
O   O   O   O   o
o o o  o o
o o o  o  o
o o  o  o  o
o o o o o
o © o © o
O IO O IO IO
io io 10 t> ci
O O © © ©
O O © O o
o 10 O O O
' O I" 10 10 10
0
0
0
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
0
IN
CM
O
CM
10
o © © o
O  O   CO   o
O   O   CD   o
0
©
0
0
©
0
0
©
-O
i-H
O   O
O   O
©   O
CO   i-H
O
©
O
O*
IO
i U
P
P
■a s
^ Hi
w w
'> 'A
cd 3
P o
L3^ tS
OS j
O   [>    o
oi    CD
jg M
■    cd    4
CD
K
a x
B     Q   H   "-1     KM     4
a <a m g u ^^
8 t-i •£ .»   cd   ccj   cu
cn T3
_*    $
o ,_.
1 «> i_ rS
, _-) 8 P.
!   «H   (
C.   g
■* ■a £ 3
2 K
o
EH
R_J'SBBBOtg'OggHi>>JSa
so^gacuoo3*_2ai;SS
OWr.t.Mi.r.hlt.SSSf.OI.
3" * v^
P.  W  B
E-i O U 3 13
QJ
V
sj   3
►• i_
-a
i in.   ai  S
«     4    Hi
I    *   ^
01    QJ    cd  -^    4
cd a ,_s <■_*
CJ r1- -h J
ft 4 g
■  O ,__! * C
•   id   2 ■*! S
1  -G  A    bd 13
Sh    gj
-5 i I £ ^ „
ft   o  2   0   01   <D
Cd     (HOJHCDajwwv'F"---;!—•     w     w
H«OOfiflqHHHr.J!ili.
2 45 ' GG 96
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
•e
s
o
in
Htf
O-
rH
DO
e
z
z
<
p
Ph
Eh
P
O
P.
fa
o
I*
Pi
«:
B
B
P
_»
Z
<:
ea
ffl
fa
PS
P
H
P
P
o
ft,
TO
fa
B
<
£
So
HH)
^
B* •
cd v.
w
ES
o
OS
|Ej CD
rrt-o
ffl
o
H
3 Hi
CJ
a
cd
Ph
T* ft
c o
o
o
o
o
o
IO
©
o
o
o
to
CO
o
©
00
CD  cfi
ooo©
©OOO
©OOO
©
©
o
CM*
OS
o
o
o
o
©
o
o
©
o
©
o o o o
© o o o
o o o o
©   o   00   o   ©   ©   ©
©   O   CM   O   O   O   O
o  o  oo  o o  © ©
IO   IO   IO   »0   IO   O   O   :
o
.5 ■* K
Soo
0)
■* __!
)_.   a   a)
iS ► .   33
! H JJ O
: -a p, <u
■  a p, o
a ca
O
a
s
t_3
S J ^ _S |
C- QJ    c. TS
■g I H K g
CD     CD   M «j   '£ "S H
■X   -«    CD M    5 S S
4   cd ^ « fa J g
w w o 2 _. a m
C3    eg    m C    CD d O
1 =1 51 1 g
ibS-ci.'-i.-
:K_Hr>tSi4(.f.S»l>
s
s
V
o   aj
OJ
u.  a  f_  a
3 is,_, ,3-s i. ^ i. >3
a j<
5 p-1
■o j_
a
a oj
a 3
-   ... P. a •-
5 s >*^
a o cd # u
5   >. *h   3  cd
w w A A S!
<CHOQflfeOH^OO
4  o  p. cd  >
O h. QQ REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 97
25,000
20,000
:     : oo     ;     :     :     :     :
:     j io     i     :     i     :     i
iio::::;
• m	
500,000
500,000
250,000
50,000
30,000
100,000
25,000
100,000
500,000
.:::.::;;.-    i ©    :
:::::::::::: c-    :
:::    ;    ;::::::: o_    :
j    j    j    j    j    ;    j    :    i    j    :    | <m    |
:    : oo io    :    :    :    :
:    : oo to    :    :    :
: «4* "ok    j    :    ;    :
i    i co" ■<#    :    :    :    :
j    : co <m    :    ;    :    :
© © © o o
o   o   o   ©   ©
OOO © o_
O    O*  Ifl"  o"  rt*
Tf   IO             N   H
i-H
00
CM
00
IO
to
40,000
15,000
30,000
10,000
25,000
50,000
10,000
15,000
95,000
35,000
10,000
o o    :    :    :    :    :    :
© ©:::::    :
(©<©:::;:;
©©*:::!::
io cm     :     :     :     :     :     :
30,000
30,000
40,000
30,000
20,000
60,000
10,000
20,000
f.
>
5
c
q
CL
£
e
JJ
1
'a
_i «
S J<
J15   si
« *
.-..5
cd   Jh
Jd   P
02 K
:   m
I    CD
: +11
:   >
i "£
i   P
pi s
S p
CD     C
cd
+5
o
H
Kootenay District.
Nelson Hatchery.
American Falls Hatchery	
Ashton Hatchery	
Bear Lake	
Beaver Creek	
Big Sheep Creek	
Boundary Creek ,
Box Lake	
CahillLake	
Canim Lake	
Christina Lake	
Clearwater Lake	
Clucutz Creek .'.	
Cottonwood Lake	
Hill Creek	
Kettle River	
Kettle River (West Fork)	
Kootenay River (above Brilliant Dam)	 GG 98
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
-a
3
s
■w
8
o
05
TO
O
Z
hH
Eh
Z
<
P
Ph
EH
p
O
CO
H
fa
o
!"
PS
<
a
s
p
i_<_
W
o
Z
<.
Co
M
fa
p.
P
Eh
P
P
<__>
W
TO
fa
Kb
a o
QJ  co
bo bo
a a
QJ   CO
u bo
a S
o o o o
o o o o
o © o o
© ©
© ©
© ©
© ©_
iO   ©
: © © ©
: o © o
; ©   ©  ©
©  © ©  ©
© © o ©
©^ © o ©_
© © © in
-*   CO N   CO
•   cn
Z   bO
2 a
m
_. £Si
2 ffl5
Pi
SU  a
Cm
o
J
QJ
"•go
*   £   «
.§o.S
J-  .2 ■
a r_.
►J 2
■SP
a  a
W 3
:   H   _J     :
;"i.-g
j  S p-l   4>
e *
_._._.
! _S  ?i
QJ
di
oi   a
.■. O
« j!   a J!
i .2 £ .£ " h.  ".J.  S TJ
• -s .2 o c c eo «,_,>-<« _." & __. 1_ a
• - ■ ilic.lassSi.31ia
JQ J.    5
*  «   a  g o
a _a
oQjaaacejco^
jh m > ja _a j_i a
J  a  a   J
a  a M
E £ 2
S    £    m
S S a
fa i-l
, £ _§ _s 1 j?; . § *_
g^ggSSSOft»<KPi»!_i.i.[_t_i_i_i_[_J]»i_i_f<[HP?
* a
a §
P J
a w
a c_
i i
a t_
j= .r
E rJ
a   5
is |S REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 99
©
©
o
o
O
o
o
©
o
cm"
*  *  *
OOO
o  o ©
o  o  ©
O    rH    O
O    CO    O
CM    CO    rH
w
o
o
a
CD
en
•M-
IO
©
Ok
CO
<M
.:
CO
tp"
o
o
©"
00
© ©
© ©
© ©_
©" ©*
LO    IO
o
o
o
©
o
1-H
io
o*
CO
©
o
■>*
CO
OS
o
CD
x*
i-H
©
o
o
rH
o
©
OO
IO
to
CO
©OOO
OOO©
O   O   IO   o
IO io  oo" cT
O    i-H    CM    O
CO                      rH
O
o
IO
00
io
o
CM
IO
to
rH
©
of
©
©
o
©"
o
o
©R
LO
o
©
©
1©
la
©
IO
CO
oT
©
©
IO
©
©
©*
c.
©  o o     :
o o ©     :
o © ©     :
CO"  IO*  Oh?       1
to
o
CO
o
OS
■o
oo"
CM
io ©    :    :    ;
io ©    :    :    :
us ©    |          j
o rH    :    i    i
cm          :    |    :
o
o
©
IO
©
O
a
ot?
©
©
©
IO
io    : © o
co     : © ©
i.o    : io o
co     : io io
: © oo
: cm
IO
00
©
co"
© ©
o o
O ©b
©"  1C3
© c.
2
1
a
(
c
_>
T
P
a
a
a
A
t,
a
a
«
a
Q
1
S
c
-
>
s
<
!
S
c
<
X
e
c
.
t
e
c
r-
c
p
c
1
•_
_
C
■
c
E-
*§
1
p.
■a
8
a
a
s_
c_
_S
u
a
a.
"55
e
1
C
c
>i
c
£
c
a
_
a
P
a
a
P
>
1
c
c
a
a
|
c
Q
t
__
5
Q
B
_
a
X
P
c
e
t
a
!
i
_
a
i
to
H->
0
C_>
1
3
!>
CO
>
u
q
,£
c.
4-
0
n
c
o
u
X
c
cd
h
c
>
a
X.
e_
+j
a
ffi
_c
"3
B
>
a
4=
c
-p
rt
H
B
c
D
"a
2
0
"a
-)-
0
E-
I
A
CJ
a
o
1
a
,i
s
a
p
a
q
a
w
IS
a
£
o
o
X
0
a
q
ci
PI
u
<_
"a
Pd
CJ
B
5
£
B
t
C
J
1
d
h
>
5
a
0
P
P
c
+■
f-
P
PC
a
C
v
p
CT
5
PC
D
q
M
6
1
c
C
u
X
a,
g
a
Pd
CCJ
p
B
S
c
eg
■J
U
a
R
c
*
c
a
*,
H
t
a
_
P
c
0
Q
.
_.
3
c
c_
CL
K
•8
f
a
D
a
!
i
a
I
•
a
f
s
P.
C
I
+
D
a
c
r
0
•c
F
c.
a
a
c
i
cw
0
-u
c
qj
1
S
P
a
P
a
cc
|
*>
C
P
a
q
•5
hi
P5
•c
c
a
c
i
E-
cc
_=
B
B
P
Q,
J-
I
0-
n
■0
*
i
•e
Pi
a
1
_
£
IS.
i
c
r>
P
cd
»-
C
s-
D_
q
B
P
-g
P
a
B
P
C
t-
e.
OJ
t>
c
B
g
3
A
B
P
j:
a
P GG 100
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
©
_o
m
O
g
H
<:
p
Ph
Eh
P
O
Pi
H
&.
O
!►.
P.
<c
S
S
P
C/2
W
O
S
3
M
H
P3
P
P
P
w
w
S
<l
o
to
H
H
o
n
a
p
Bfa
O
CI
%
U
DO
g
3
a
|
o
m
bo
b
bot.
a o
S
++
o    ;
©    :
co    :
co    :
T-I           j
■
bo
to
H
■H-
: lo
: ©
: "*.
: ©
: ■*
++
©
tree
:    : lo
: i-h
: ©
:    : co*
:    : r_l
j    :    |    : lo    |
::::©:
::::_>;
;     :     :     : cnj     :
ft
1
1
CO
QJ   C_
to bo
E.S
■_
5
bo
H
E
<
w
o
M
cn
bo
bo
W
to
E
o
s
s
H
M
t>_  .
O) cn
bo bo
E.S
&
o
©
©
©
CM
©    O
©    ©
©   ©
IO   CO
O   ©
© o
© c>
oo* oi"
i-H
O
t-i    :
©
co*     :
©    :©©    :©©■*©     :ooo©
o     :o©     :©o-*©     :oooo
©     joo     :oootj<o     :oooo
io     :lo^j"    i t- io i> m"    : cd ■»* ©* lo
I-H        J                          j    00                      rH        ;    CM    rH
■a
bo
to
H
©
o
©
o
CO
o
o
CO
©*
©
r. «
__ o
IS
r3m
P.
bo
a
o
3
P
o
o
&
5,000
31,120
20,000
61,170
10,000
30,000
25,000
10,000
__
bo
P.
: o     :
: cm    i
: «*     :
i oo"    :
: ©    :
:     ; o     :     : lo io     :     :
:    i o    :    i o oo    i    ;
;     : ©     :     ; <* o
:    i o    :    i io o    i    i
:     : (M     :     ; tji io     :     :
i    :::. to    :.:.::;    ;
.:...*#:._:;.:,.
::::: ^     :::;:::     :
:    :    _    ;    . us    I::::.:;    i
::;:: n     ;:;::::     :
o
z »
2 c
I. 33
H a'
e.  a _
!&
"a!
I?
Si
:
Kootenay District—Continued.
Cranbrook Hatchery—Continued.
1
+■
B
C
CD    4
r*    Pi
cd   cc
P. P
QJ   +■
>   E
fH     *
O [I
ill
j .<-
lit
jj   3  i
m   5 P
° ixi S
H  hi   h
I _
!   Jl
:   cc
di ^
■a »
a -2
§|
•a
j
c
-
_
At
c
I
1
§
Moyie Lake	
H   ft
QJ   Ac
>     CC
.a £
O   P
McBains Lake	
North Star Lake.	
■s
a
E
t
QJ
P
Silver Springs Lakes	
Smith Lake	
St. Mary Lake	
At
8
E
C
>
>
q
A
B
P
01
a
£
IH
c REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 101
+-5-
o
OS
OO
t-*
CM
©
©
CO
"HH
i-H
©
o
©
©
00*
©
CM
©
IO
co"
t-
CM
: © ©    :
: o o    :
: o o     ;
i © o"    i
j   rH   CO       ;
LO
CO
cm"
t-
<M
© lo    :
© ©
©   IO       :
lo •«#"    :
rH    CO        J
: ©
: o
: °
i ©
: io
o
00
CO
CO
00
o
i
1
I
£
t
t
i
;     C
L
: 1
i "
1.
:   i
t  t
]i
■■ _
r
D
f
i
) £
j \
k
:
] f>
a
.!
ll
1   •
> »
> i
. 6
c _3
S "
P a
bo   g
.So
w   -.
a  s
a a
, *-  a
•US
2 «
.   ?   q
< 3 Ph
V
*
c
b
PROVINCIAL  UBRAHT
VICTORIA. B. C, GG 102
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Returns from 2,574 Holders of Special Firearms Licences, showing Big Game,
Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1944-45.
Bear	
Caribou
Deer	
Moose —
Beaver  7,876
Fisher  485
Fox  3,675
Lynx  1,564
Marten  11,711
Mink  7,387
Muskrats   96,741
Big Game.
514 Mountain-goat __
46 Mountain-sheep
1,012 Wapiti (elk) _____
509
Fur-bearing Animals.
Otter	
84
19
6
  251
Racoon  2,188
Skunk  148
Squirrels  113,840
Weasel  22,534
Wildcat   361
Wolverine  170
Cougar
Coyotes
Predatory Animals.
66 Wolves
2,852
258
Fur-farm Returns, 1945.
Adult and
Young
(Reared)
Animals.
Animals
purchased
or received
by Trade.
Died or
killed.
Animals
sold
or traded
Alive.
Pelts sold
(including
all Pelts sold
in 1945).
Total Animals on Hand
as at December 31st, 1945.
Males.
Females.
21
45
2
195
35,986
238
25
1
8
14
13
1
64
3,577
47
10
6
3
6
20
21
Marten	
Mink	
Nutria	
1
1,139
2
1
16
19,874
116
9
46
1,608
1
19
15,193
102
70
12,066
76
7
Note.—Figures in respect to beaver approximate.    There were 299 fur-farmers in 1945.
Two licensed fur-farmers have not submitted their returns.    There were six nil returns.
Cancelled permits, 27. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 103
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1945.
Kind of Animals or Birds destroyed.
Game Divisions.
Total.
" A."
"B."
" C."
" D."
"E."
Animals.
5
246
73
158
8
63
2
8
17
1
18
71
35
122
28
2
414
11
121
139
21
8
16
33
18
158
33
11
189
15
2
504
21
204
417
145
44
94
15
5
6
53
22
9
11
43
1
14
4
392
56
38
1,155
80
97
45
1
5
2
35
55
327
68
Wolves	
26
954
178
38
2
Skunk	
2
Birds.
2,284
Eagles	
142
494
556
Owls	
224
104
38
2 GG 104 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary of Liberations of Game Birds, 1945.
Area. - Pheasants.
Vancouver Island—
Courtenay  96
Ladysmith   3
Nanaimo-Parksville   48
Victoria   56
Total      203
Lower Mainland—
Agassiz       210
Chilliwack      487
Delta       412
Lulu Island   1,144
Matsqui      195
Mission       983
Pitt Meadows  1,325
Squamish        36
Sumas Prairie  1,130
Surrey  1,105
Total  7,027
Interior—
Castlegar  24
Grand Forks  36
Kamloops  48
Kimberley    11
Penticton   48
Total  167
Summary.
District.
Vancouver Island  203
Lower Mainland  7,027
Interior  167
Total  7,397 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 105
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1945.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1945.
Pheasants  1,593 Geese         3
Quail        71
Ducks        20 Partridge        67
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 1945.
Pheasants  9,426 Ducks       20
Quail         10 Partridge       32
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1945.
Pheasants      387
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 1945.
Pheasants  7,768 Partridge       32
Quail       46
Number and Kind of Birds killed or died, 1945.
Pheasants  1,040 Partridge        15
Quail          7
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1945.
Pheasants  2,598 Geese         3
Quail        28 Partridge        52
Ducks        40
Note.—Game-bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during the year 1945:
511 bands at 10 cents, $51.10.
Miscellaneous Revenue.
Sale of list of licensed fur-farmers  $28.00
Sale of list of licensed fur-traders  6.00
Sale of list of game-bird farmers  3.00
Sale of confiscated canoe  8.00
Export fees on game meat  5.00
Export fees on live, wild fur-bearing animals  120.00
Sale of trout eggs  125.00
Total  $295.00
Definition of Guide Licence Grades.
Grade " A " Guide is one who has been acting as a guide for at least three years,
and who has suitable equipment for outfitting any person desiring to hunt game.
Grade " B " Guide is a person who cannot qualify as a Grade " A " Guide, but who
acts as an assistant to a Grade " A " Guide, or whose activities as a guide are confined
to guiding in areas where, by reason of local conditions, there is no necessity to use
extensive equipment.
Grade " C " Guide is one who guides a person hunting, taking, or killing game
birds or angling for trout. GG 106
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1945.
West Kootenay District.
Name and Address of Guide.
Blythe, Richard T. T..
Leon 	
Licence
Grade.
Name and Address of Guide.
The Gates of St.
Licence
Grade.
 B
 B
Brett, Ashley, Wynndel  C
Cummings, Ray, Boswell  C
Daney, (Jr.), Selden M., Ferguson  A
Eftoda, Gordon, Kaslo	
Fletcher, Corrine, Ainsworth C
Law, Ian Wright, The Gates of St. Leon B
Rorick, Clifford, The Gates of St. Leon A
Lillooet-Cariboo-Chilcotin District.
Name and Address of Guide.
Adams, J. N.,Bridge Lake	
Aiken, Edward F., Marguerite	
Aiken, Leslie J., Marguerite	
Alexander, Jack, Lac la Hache	
Anderson, Charles D., Canim Lake
Archie, Cassian, Canim Lake
Licence
Grade.
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
Archie, George, Canim Lake  A
Archie, Jacob, Canim Lake
Ash, Christopher, Big Lake __
Baher, James A., 21 Mile, Ashcroft
Baker, J. C, Loon Lake, Clinton	
Baker, R. M., Loon Lake, Clinton ___.
Barton, Thomas, Lac la Hache	
Bates, Murray, Clinton 	
Bathgate, J. S., Lac la Hache	
Bell, T. D., 70-Mile House __.
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
Bishop, James A., Clinton __.   B
Bob, Edward, Canim Lake B
Bobb, E. R., Marguerite B
B
A
B
B
B
B
A
A
Bobb, Henry, 100-Mile House .
Bones, Alex, Clinton	
Bones, Frank, Clinton	
Bones, Pete, Clinton 	
Bonner, James, Big Creek
Borthwick, Hector, Forest Grove
Bourdle, Philip P., Hanceville ___..
Bourelle, Walter, Hanceville .
Bowden, George Reade, Clinton B
Bowden, Ronald, Clinton B
Boyce, Modeste, Canim Lake  B
Boyce, Julian, Canim Lake B
Boyd, Ambert L., Marguerite  B
Bradford, A. N., Fawn  B
Bradford, Harold J., Bridge Lake  B
Brandley, Erwin, 83-Mile House B
Burgess, T. R., Fawn  A
Carson, John R., Horsefly B
Christy, Frank R., Moha  B
Church, Richard, Big Creek A
Cleveland, James George, Bridge Lake B
Cleveland, L. C, Bridge Lake A
Cleveland, Robert C, Bridge Lake B
Cleveland, Weston L., Bridge Lake B
Coldwell, Henry Wilsher, Jesmond A
Collins, E. M., Ashcroft  A
Collins, Robert, Cache Creek B
Coulson, H. R., 70-Mile House B
Cowan, K. E., Fawn  B
Craig, Norval F., Bridge Lake  B
Cruickshank, George, Canim Lake B
Name and Address of Guide.
Cunningham, Charles B., Bralorne
Curtis, Rae, Williams Lake  __
Daniels, George, Canim Lake	
Daniels, Steve, Canim Lake	
Davis, Francis, Clinton 	
Dean, J. C, Fawn 	
Decker, English, Canim Lake 	
Dougherty, Charles A., Clinton	
Dougherty, Edward G., Clinton	
Dyer, Guy H., 70-Mile House
Licence
Grade.
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 A
 B
Eagle, Clifford B., Lac la Hache A
Edall, Lute, Fawn  B
Eden, Donald D., Fawn  B
Ellison, Crayton, Hanceville  A
Erickson, S. Wilhelm, Canim Lake B
Ewart, Darnel, Lac la Hache  B
Felker, Wm. R., 150-Mile House B
Fenton, Walter, Big Bar Creek  B
Ferguson, James, Ashcroft B
Flaherty, R. J., 100-Mile House  A
Floyd, Garth, Forest Grove  B
Ford, C. H., Horsefly  B
Forster, Hubert H., Likely B
Froste, Freeman T., Ashcroft B
George, Henry, Cache Creek B
George, Steven, Lillooet B
Gibbons, M. L., Horsefly B
Graham, James, Horsefly  B
Grinder, Albert W., Jesmond B
Grinder, Isadore, Clinton  A
Grinder, John, Big Bar A
Grinder, William, Jesmond  B
Gunn, J. M., Horsefly B
Hamilton, Herbert M., Lac la Hache A
Hamilton, Garvin G., Williams Lake B
Hamilton, Isadore, Lac la Hache B
Hamilton, Peter, Williams Lake  B
Hamilton, Thomas, Williams Lake B
Hansen, John F., Bridge Lake A
Hansen, R. Lee, Bridge Lake A
Hansen, Wesley B., Bridge Lake B
Harry, Alfred, Canim Lake  B
Henny, Archie, 150-Mile House  B
Higgins, Cecil, Fawn  B
Higgins, Marion, Bridge Lake A
Higgins, Ronald, Fawn  B
Higginbottom, Alfred, Jesmond B
Holgate, Lawrence, Loon Lake, via Ashcroft  B
Holland, Alfred, Narcosli Creek B REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 107
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1945—Continued.
Lillooet-Cariboo-Chilcotin District—Continued.
Name and Address of Guide.
Hooker, Fred Charles, Horsefly
Hooker, S. B., Horsefly ____.
Horn, Walter A., Fawn
Licence
Grade.
A
.A
B
Houseman, G. H., Buffalo Creek B
Houseman, J., Buffalo Creek  B
Hunison, Jay H., Williams Lake B
Huston, Richard W., Williams Lake B
Jasper, John D., Riske Creek B
Jefferson, Jesse, Big Creek B
Johnson, Claude, Bridge Lake B
Johnson, James Andrew, 100-Mile House _ B
Johnson, Thomas W., Riske Creek B
Johnson, Zale Alfred, Bridge Lake B
Johnston, Vincent J. H., Bridge Lake  B
Jones, Fred E., Horsefly B
Jones, Lawrence, Horsefly B
Keary, Charles, Minto Mine  B
King, Gordon, Bridge Lake  B
Knauff, Harold Grand, Fawn  B
Krebes, E. R., Ochiltree  B
Krebs, Leonard B., Lac la Hache B
Labordie, Eddie, Clinton A
Land, Robert R., Moha  A
Larson, Jack D., Roe Lake, via Fawn A
Larson, Leonard L., Fawn  B
Larum, Sigurd, Fawn  B
Leavitt, (Jr.), F. W., Fawn B
Lee, Thomas W. C, Alexis Creek B
Levick, John S., Fawn  B
Lonneke, F. W., Horsefly  A
Lonneke, Louise, Horsefly  B
Lord, Ed., Buffalo Creek  B
Lowden, Davis A., Likely B
Lowe, F. J., Ashcroft B
Mackill, Clarence, Kleena Kleene  A
Madden, E. E., Cache Creek B
Mallicoat, Oscar T., 100-Mile House  B
Marriott, Ron, Clinton B
Matier, J. H., Clinton  B
Mayfield, Marvin, Lac la Hache  B
Miller, Wayne, Fawn  B
Mobbs, Alfred H., 70-Mile House B
Mobbs, Ben, 70-Mile House  B
Monkman, E. N., Narcosli Creek  A
Moore, George, Ochiltree B
Moore, James, Ochiltree  B
Morgan, Dallas J., Likely  B
Morris, Raymond L., Forest Grove B
Muench, Henry, Lac la Hache B
Muluahill, Frank, Redstone  B
Mulvihill, M. J., Jesmond A
Murray, George, Loon Lake, via 21-Mile
House  B
Myers, A. K., Horsefly  B
McConnell, David G., 70-Mile House  B
McDonald, Harold, Big Lake B
MacLean, Donald, Fawn B
McNeil, B. Spencer, Canim Lake B
McNeil, Herbert M., Canim Lake A
Name and Address of Guide.
Nelson, William L., 70-Mile House
Nicholson, John D., Fawn	
Nicol, Alex, Horsefly 	
Nicol, Shelly, Horsefly	
Odian, E. J., Fawn	
Ogden, Percy Wm., Lac la Hache __
Olafson, Hugh James, Fawn __
Owens, John K, Ashcroft
Licence
Grade.
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
 B
  B
Park, Arlie H., 70-Mile House B
Park, Donald K, 70-Mile House B
Park, Jack P., 70-Mile House B
Perrault, Joseph, Jesmand B
Peter, Christopher, Forest Grove B
Peters, Michell, Clinton B
Phillips, E. C, Forest Grove C
Pigeon, Aure P., Clinton  B
Pigeon, Clarence L., Clinton B
Pigeon, Joseph R., Clinton  B
Pollard, Harold, Clinton  B
Pollard, John, Clinton  B
Porter, Joe, Clinton  B
Powell, Henry J., Lone Butte  B
Powell, Thomas, Fawn  B
Prentice, J. Charles, Forest Grove B
Pringle, Charles, Jesmond B
Pringle, Robert S., Jesmond  B
Prydatok, Steve, 70-Mile House  B
Racher, Wilfred J., Horsefly B
Rankin, Fred R., Soda Creek B
Reinertson, C. W., 70-Mile House B
Reynolds, A. J., Big Bar Creek B
Roberts, C. F., Riske Creek B
Robertson, Alexander H., Macalister B
Robertson, Alexander T., Macalister  B
Rosette, August, Gang Ranch  B
Roy, Harold C, 70-Mile House  B
Scheepbower, J. C, 70-Mile House  A
Scott, Douglas, 100-Mile House  B
Scott, Duncan, Bridge Lake A
Sedman, Jack E., Fawn  B
Sellers, Albert, Soda Creek B
Sharp, William, Ochiltree B
Stephenson, Allan, Likely B
Steigler, Robert, Clinton B
Thomason, David McLean, Bridge Lake B
Thorsteinson, Charles, Fawn  B
Thygessen, Julius, Horsefly  B
Trew, Frederick, Fawn  B
Turney, R. J., Fawn  A
Twan, David John, Marguerite A
Umphrey, Samuel I., Fawn  B
Vaness, John J., Horsefly B
Walsh, Francis, 83-Mile House B
Walters, Glenn H., Horsefly  A
Walters, Harry L., Horsefly B
Walters, I. H., Likely B
Walters, Lloyd, Horsefly  B
Webster, Alister, Horsefly  B
Webster, Hugh James, Narcosli Creek A GG 108
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1945—Continued.
Lillooet-Cariboo-Chilcotin District—Continued.
Licence
Name and Address of Guide. Grade. Name and Address of Guide.
Webster, William Blair, Narcosli Creek B
Weir, Donald John, Redstone B
Westwick, Lawrence, 150-Mile House  B
Wiggins, James, Miocene  B
Wilkinson, Charles, 70-Mile House B
Winquist, William, Horsefly B
Witte, Duane, Hanceville  B
Licence
Grade.
 B
 B
Witte, Frank, Big Creek	
Wohlleben, Werner, Ashcroft	
Woods, William Fred, Hanceville A
Wotzke, Herb, Ashcroft B
Wright, Douglas, Lac la Hache  B
Young, William, Clinton  B
Zimmerlee, Ernest, Clinton B
East Kootenay-Fernie District.
Name and Address of Guide.
Arbuckle, John, Fernie
Licence
Grade.
Bagley, Ruth, Invermere  C
Baher, Martin C, Natal A
Baher, Mathias, Natal  A
Barnes, J. W., Fernie
Bossio, Albert, Fernie __.
Bossio, Gene, Fernie	
Burkhardt, John, Parson 	
Canning, Lester, Ta Ta Creek
Clarkin, Martin, Athalmer
B
B
B
B
B
B
Davies, David, Fairmont  C
Dvorak, Wenzel, Fernie B
Eugene, J. Roy, Wilmer  B
Falconer, John Hingley, Corbin  B
Foyston, Thomas E., Invermere  B
Gould, Percy, Canal Flats  A
Harrison, William 0., Edgewater A
Hicks, Frank, Fernie A
Hicks, Philip, Fernie  B
Jones, Richard Kenneth, Golden  A
Kain, Isadore, Wilmer B
Kemble, Charles, Invermere B
King, Norman F., Golden  B
Lawrence, Charles, Golden  A
Lindborg, Axel, Golden  B
Lucas, Edward, Fernie  B
Lum, Peter, Fort Steele A
Michael, David, Invermere  B
Morigeau, Martin, Fairmont  A
McClain, J. I., Galena  A
Name and Address of Guide.
McGinnis, Earl C, Natal 	
McKay, Gordon J., Athalmer 	
Nicol, Arthur Henry, Fort Steele
Nixon, Leigh, Invermere	
Nixon, Walter J., Invermere
Licence
Grade.
B
A
A
B
A
Ogilvy-Wills, James B., Fairmont A
O'Loughlin, E. P., Spillimacheen B
Philips, Lloyd, Fernie  B
Phillips, F. Alex, 1551 St. Andrews Street,
North Vancouver  A
Pommier, Emile, Ta Ta Creek B
Reay, Doyle, Jaffray  B
Richter, Frank, Invermere B
Sam, Marlin, Windermere B
Stewart, Charles, Galena  B
Strain, George, Galena  B
Strom, Erling, Banff, Alta.  B
Sykes, Harry, Galena  B
Tegart, Hiram W., Brisco  B
Tegart, James, Brisco  A
Thomas, Guy Anthony, Parson  A
Thomas, Orville E., Parson  A
Thompson, James C, Brisco  B
Thornton, Sidney, Invermere A
 A
 B
 A
 B
 B
 A
Webber, Sidney, Golden
White, Elmo, Canal Flats ...
White, James T., Fort Steele
Whiting, Renal, Natal 	
Weidenman, Edwars, Golden _.
Weidenman, Otto, Golden	
Kamloops-Salmon Arm District.
Name and Address of Guide.
Licence
Grade.
 B
Avery, Walter D., Criss Creek	
Bisehoff, Fred, Magna Bay  B
Brousseau, Clifford, Savona  B
Burdett, George, Savona B
Burdett, Loretta, Savona  B
Cahoon, Charles R., Westsyde, Kamloops.. B
Cameron, James B., Savona B
Christian, Douglas, Savona  B
Cochran, William P., Darfield B
Cooper, Norman T., Savona B
Cooper, Phillip T., Westsyde, Kamloops— B
Licence
Grade.
 B
Name and Address of Guide.
Deaver, H. James, Savona 	
Dever, Dolly, Savona  .__ B
Dexheimer, John, Savona  B
Donald, William J., Savona  B
Gourlay, James R., Kamloops  B
Grant, Charles, McLure B
Grant, Gordon, McLure  A
Haines, James W., Black Pines B
Haycock, William A., Sicamous  B
Helset, Torbjoin, Clearwater A
Heyworth, Ted, Red Lake  B REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945.
GG 109
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1945—Continued.
Kamloops-Salmon Arm District—Continued.
Name and Address of Guide.
Licence
Grade.
Hoover, Eldred F., McLure  A
Hoover, Leonard, McLure  A
Inkskip, Henry George. Kamloops B
Johnson, Jack, Savona  , B
Johnson, Stewart, Criss Creek  A
Kipling, John R., Black Pines  B
La Fave, John, Barriere B
Langman, Samuel, Red Lake  B
Latremouille, Joseph L., Little Fort B
Ludtke, Lawrence Alvin, Clearwater A
Meeker, Clark, Darfield  B
Mobley, Howard I., Salmon Arm  A
Morton, Alfred, McLure  B
McDiarmid, Garfield, Kamloops  B
McKort, Clarence, Clearwater A
McKort, Irwin, Clearwater B
McLean, Clifford W., McLure  A
Nelson, Gerald, Black Pines B
Rawson, John Clarke, Squilax  B
Name and Address of Guide.
Reaugh, William H., Savona
Reese, Richard, Squilax
Routley, Arthur M., Criss Creek
Sleeth, Edward, Savona
Licence
Grade.
 B
 B
 B
 B
Small, Reg., Clearwater  B
Smith, A. W, North Kamloops  B
Smith, William, North Kamloops  B
Stewart, Edwin, Armstrong  B
Thomas, Alex, Kamloops  B
Thompson, Earl, Chinook Cove  B
Threlkeld, Harold C, Savona B
Threlkeld, Richard, Savona  B
Tompkins, Floyd S., Savona B
Vinnie, Alexander, Kamloops  B
Walters, Jack, Savona B
Walters, June, Savona  B
Walters, Loretta, Savona  B
Welland, J. E., Red Lake  B
Woodward, E. A. John, Clearwater  B
Cassiar District.
Name and Address of Guide.
Licence
Grade.
Carlick, Billy Fann, Telegraph Creek  B
Davidson, John Ogilvie, Lower Post, via
Watson Lake  A
Dennis, Alex, Telegraph Creek  B
Dennis, Andrew, Telegraph Creek B
Name and Address of Guide.
Licence
Grade.
Dennis, John Creijke, Telegraph Creek ____ A
Gleason, Henry, Telegraph Creek B
Quock, John C, Telegraph Creek  A
Quock, Nelson, Telegraph Creek B
Tashoots, Jack Pete, Telegraph Creek ______ B
Coast District.
Licence
Grade.
 B
Name and Address of Guide.
Mack, Clayton, Bella Coola 	
Rossignol, Philias, Campbell River __     ___ B
Stanton, James R., Glendale Cove, Knights
Inlet A
Name and Address of Guide.
Thorne, Harold A., Brackendale
Walker, Thomas A., Bella Coola
Weisenberger, Joseph M., Hope
Licence
Grade.
 B
 A
 A
Hazelton-Burns Lake District.
Licence
Name and Address of Guide. Grade.
Beaver, Albert E., Ootsa Lake B
Clark,  (Jr.), James Eli, Ootsa Lake  A
Eakin,  (Jr.), Samuel, Ootsa Lake  B
Harrison, Clifford Victor, Wistaria B
Henry, Stanley, Ootsa Lake B
Henson, Frank E., Marilla  B
Jaenicke, John, Ootsa Lake  B
Name and Address of Guide.
Licence
Grade.
Knox, John, Ootsa Lake B
Lion, Paddy, Topley  B
Morgan, James E., Wistaria  A
McKinley, Thomas, Ootsa Lake B
McNeill, John William C, Ootsa Lake A
Van Tine, Edward, Ootsa Lake B
Williams, Walter, Topley  C
Similkameen-Boundary District.
Licence
Grade.
 B
Name and Address of Guide.
Abel, Cummine, Westbridge 	
Abel, Wm. Simpson, Kettle Valley ...        .. B
Anschetz, Chris, Rock Creek B
Bohnett, James, Rock Creek B
Carey, Bertram Chas., Rock Creek B
Carpenter, Walter Erwin, Westbridge ______ B
Licence
Grade.
 B
 B
Name and Address of Guide.
Elliot, Adam A., Kettle Valley ._..
Fernstrom, Axel, Kettle Valley _.
Fernstrom, John, Rock Creek  B
From, Gus, Westbridge  B
From, Aliver Gustav, Westbridge B
From, Inguall Nels, Westbridge  B GG 110
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1945—Continued.
Similkameen-Boundary District—Continued.
Name and Address of Guide.
Hall, D. Elmer, Westbridge	
Jupp, Wm. Henry, Westbridge
Lelievre, L. John, Penticton _
Lewis, James, Princeton ___.
Licence
Grade.
 B
 B
 B
 A
Lockhart, Fred, Beaverdell B
Lutner, Edwin Charles, Beaverdell  B
Morgan, Kenneth, Princeton  B
McKay, John Richard, Westbridge B
Nesbitt, Harry, Princeton B
Noren, Arnold Fritz, Westbridge  B
Name and Address of Guide.
Noren, C. W., Westbridge	
Peterson, Frank 0., Westbridge __
Peterson, Stanley, Westbridge	
Rand, S. Percy, Beaverdell	
Richter, John, Keremeos	
Richter, Josephine, Westbridge ___
Smith, Howard John, Westbridge
Soderquist, Eric Ansalm, Westbridge ___ .__ B
Spence, Geo. Stanley, Westbridge B
Licence
Grade.
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
Quesnel-Barkerville District.
Name and Address of Guide.
Licence
Grade.
Name and Address of Guide.
Licence
Grade.
Armstrong, Thomas B., Quesnel A
Armstrong, Wilfred R., Quesnel A
Becker, Fred, Wells  A
Cochran, James D., Barkerville A
Coldwell, Reginald, Punchaw B
Dolvin, Edward, Quesnel B
Evans, Charles, Quesnel  A
Fleury, Joseph A., Wells B
Lord, Robert E., Tchesinkut Lake B
Lynos, Hans, Quesnel B
Marsh, Ruric L., Quesnel  A
Mertz, Walter C, Quesnel B
Miller, Isaac E., Punchaw  B
McKenzie, Frank, Cinema  B
McKenzie, James, Cinema B
O'Leary, Arthur, Quesnel B
Peas, Clarence A., Quesnel B
Quanstrom, Carl, Quesnel A
Quanstrom, Julius, Quesnel  A
Rawling, Arden, Quesnel  A
Stead, John K., Barkerville  B
Tibbies, Fred, Quesnel  A
Tibbies, James, Quesnel A
Revelstoke District.
Licence
Name and Address of Guide. Grade.
Cullis, Bert, Taft  B
De Simone, Samuel Harry, Revelstoke A
La Forme, George Wilfred, Revelstoke —_ A
Name and Address of Guide.
Makarenko, Harry, Craigellachie
Martin, Clem, Revelstoke	
Licence
Grade.
 A
 B
Peace River District.
Name and Address of Guide.
Licence
Grade.
Name and Address of Guide.
Licence
Grade.
Bigfoot, Charlie, Prophet River  B
Birdsell, Sam, Kelly Lake via Goodfare,
Alta.  B
Cameron, Patrick, Moberly Lake A
Campbell, Alfred, Kelly Lake via Good-
fare, Alta.  B
Chattar, Alfred, Goodfare, Alta B
Collinson, Lynch, Rose Prairie A
Couvoisier, Henry C, Fort St. John A
Dahl, Joel Olaf, East Pine B
Dhenin, Rene G., Montney A
Ferguson, Joseph, Fort St. John B
Ferguson, Victor, Fort St. John B
Fleet, Jay, Charlie Lake B
Foote, Thomas F., Fort St. John B
Gary, James Powell, Hudson Hope B
Gauthier, Alexie, Moberly Lake B
Gladu, Isadore, Kelly Lake via Lynburn,
Alta.  B
Hambler,  George,  Kelly Lake via  Good-
fare, Alta.  B
Hambler, Joe, Kelly Lake via Goodfare,
Alta.  B
Haralson, Lome, Fort St. John B
Longhurst, William J., Fort St. John A
Letendre,   Roland,   Mount   Valley   P.O.,
Alta.  B
Nobur, Nobe, Prophet River B
Noskey, Narcisse, Goodfare, Alta.  B
Pitts, Wilbert Ray, Hudson Hope B
Powell, Gary James, Hudson Hope B
Ross, James A., Bear Flat A
Rutledge, Leo George, Hudson Hope A
Sebesey, Fred, Fish Lake  B
Sheffield, Bert, Charlie Lake A
Sheffield, C. A., Fort St. John  A
Southwick, Harvey, Bear Flat A
Thomas, John, Arras  B
Wanandie, Paul, Goodfare, Alta. B
Non-resident Outfitters.
Brown, Frank E., Hazelmere.
Philipps, Frank A., North Vancouver.
Sunderman, Sidney, Hythe, Alta.
Thomas, Jack, Banff, Alta. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1945. GG 111
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1945—Continued.
Prince George District.
Licence Licence
Name and Address of Guide. Grade. Name and Address of Guide. Grade.
Carr, Stan J., Tete Jaune Cache A Miller, Delmar N., Ware B
Davidson, Charlie, Vanderhoof A Neighbor, H. M., Tete Jaune Cache B
Davidson, Labart, Vanderhoof B Prince, John, Fort St. James B
Hargreaves, Roy F., Mount Robson A Sande, Walter J., Sinclair Mills A
Hobe, Henry, Hansard B Simonson, Edwin, Hulatt  B
Hooker, James B., Bend  A Williams,   Ernest   Charles,   Mount   Rob-
Malgunas, Costo, Mud River B son  B
Personnel of Game Commission as at December 31st, 1945.
Attorney-General (Minister) Hon. Gordon S. Wismer, K.C Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Frank R. Butler Vancouver.
Jas. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Headquarters.
Sergeant Game Warden R. P. Ponder Vancouver.
Senior Clerk H. D. Simpson Vancouver.
Senior Clerk-Stenographer Miss I. Lawson Vancouver.
Senior Stenographer Miss N. Munkley Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss J. Smith Vancouver.
Game-fish Culture Branch.
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson Nelson.
Fishery Officer E. Hunter Nelson.
Fishery Officer R. A. McRae Kaslo.
Fishery Officer F. Pells Cultus Lake.
Hatchery Officer A. Higgs Qualicum Beach.
Hatchery Officer J. D. S. Inverarity Victoria.
Hatchery Officer C. O. Mellor Vancouver.
Hatchery Officer F. H. Martin Cultus Lake.
"A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Lower Mainland).
Game Warden B. Cash Victoria.
Game Warden __. S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden J. W. Jones Victoria.
Game Warden J. Dewar Alberni.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Game Warden.___ R. S. Hayes Courtenay.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Duncan.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Inspector C. F. Kearns Nelson.
Clerk-Stenographer Mrs. E. H. Edgar Nelson.
Corporal Game Warden A. F. Sinclair Grand Forks.
Game Warden G. Haskell Nelson.
Game Warden N. Cameron Golden.
Game Warden __. W. H. Cartwright Creston.
Game Warden A. F.Gill Princeton.
Game Warden W. H. McLean Revelstoke.
Game Warden A. Monks Penticton.
Game Warden J.J. Osman Fernie.
Game Warden B. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game Warden H. Tyler Invermere. GG 112
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Commission as at December 31st, 1945—Continued.
"C" Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts).
Inspector..
_.R. M. Robertson
Kamloops.
Clerk-Stenographer
Game Warden	
 Miss H. Swadling Kamloops.
 E. Holmes Kamloops.
Game Warden D. D. Ellis Kamloops.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Vernon.
Game Warden 1 D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden W. A. H. Gill Lillooet.
Game Warden L. Jobin Williams Lake.
Game Warden E.M.Martin Merritt.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden O. Mottishaw Quesnel.
Game Warden R. S. Welsman Clinton.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector..
Clerk	
Corporal Game Warden..
_.T. Van Dyk_
_.R. J. Guay..
Prince George.
Prince George.
 K. 0. Alexander Fort Nelson.
Corporal Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Clerk- Stenographer Miss E. Foster Prince Rupert.
Game Warden P. Brown Vanderhoof.
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
A. J. Jank __
. Prince George.
 C. D. Muirhead Smithers.
 W. 0. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
 D. Roumieu Burns Lake.
 J. W. Stewart Lower Post.
Game Warden J. D. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
__.W. Kier...
__W. Clark..
__R. S. King_
Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
Inspector	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden H. L. Rose Vancouver.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe Mission.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke (deceased) Cloverdale.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Predatory-animal Hunter and Special Game Warden.
C. Shuttleworth Kamloops.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiahmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.
1,005-147-9280

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0339794/manifest

Comment

Related Items