Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Thirty-fourth and Thirty-fifth Reports of the Medical Inspection of Schools… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1947

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0339789.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0339789.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0339789-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0339789-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0339789-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0339789-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0339789-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0339789-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0339789-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0339789.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Thirty-fourth and Thirty-fifth Reports of the
Medical Inspection of Schools
For the Years ended June 30th,   1945 and   1946
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.  Department of Health and Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., March 31st, 1947.
To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Reports of the Medical
Inspection of Schools for the years ended June 30th, 1945 and 1946.
G. S. PEARSON,
Minister of Health and Welfare. Department of Health and Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., March 31st, 1947.
The Honourable Geo. S. Pearson,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Thirty-fourth and Thirty-fifth
Reports of the Medical Inspection of Schools for the years ended June 30th,
1945 and 1946.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT, M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health. REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS
This report, dealing with the medical inspection of schools, brings together
the results of the school inspections for the years ended June 30th, 1945 and
1946. The statistics in this report, together with those in the one immediately
preceding it, are based on the standard method of reporting introduced in 1941
and cover a period of five years. The provision of this information as required
in this report makes possible not only a review of the statistics themselves, but
presents an opportunity for reviewing the subject of school health services
generally.
Interest in this Province in the medical inspection of schools has been stimulated in recent years by a number of factors which have been responsible for
focusing attention on this service. The net effect of this stimulation, it is suggested, cannot help but be beneficial in bringing home to those interested in this
service the realization that school services can and should change with the
times to meet the health needs of the school in the light of experience and
changed and improved local health services.
Important factors influencing the development of school health services
include the introduction of a standard method of assessing the physical status
of the school child; the extension of local health services, with an increase in
the total community health service; and the experimental development of
screening methods and referral procedures as they apply to the physical examination of school children.
THE REVISED FORM FOR THE SCHOOL MEDICAL INSPECTION.
The revised form for the school medical inspection report and the school
health record for the individual child was introduced in the school-year commencing September, 1941. The individual child health record forms were
drafted in such a manner as to give the School Health Inspector a basis for
appraising the physical status of the child after the examination had been completed. This was done through the medium of a standard code, by which the
child's physical status or general condition was classified in one of three major
groups as "A," " B," or " C." Under each of these three major groups were
two sub-classifications indicated by " d " or " e," depending upon whether the
child had a physical defect or whether an unsatisfactory environmental factor
was present.
For example, a child classified as "A" was one who enjoyed an average
satisfactory state of health. If the child was classified as "Ad," this denoted
an average satisfactory state of health, with a slight physical defect which did
not affect the general health. When a child's physical condition was classified
as "Ae," it denoted a good average condition of health in spite of a defective or
unsatisfactory environmental factor. If a child's condition was classified as
" Bd," this denoted moderate impairment of health due to the presence of some
physical defects in the pupil himself. A classification as " Be " indicated a
physical condition moderately below par and due to some condition outside the
21 5 PP 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
pupil himself, such as poor home environment, poor health habits, etc. Classification as " Cd " denoted a physical condition much below par, due to pathological conditions. " Ce " denoted a condition much below par, due to external
causes, including heredity as well as environment. "Ade," " Bde," " Cde " were
used in the code to denote the combination of physical and environmental
defects.
The statistics dealing with the School Medical Inspectors' reports based on
the methods of reporting as outlined above for the school-years ended June 30th,
1945 and 1946, will be found at the end of this report. In addition, a summary
of the collected figures for the five-year period in which this method of reporting has been in use is also provided.
These statistics merit review by those interested in assessing the value of
the routine annual school medical examination. The information now available
which has to do with this question indicates that over 80 per cent, of the school
children examined in the past five years were classified as "A" or as "Ad."
The percentage of children in these two classifications is approximately the
same whether one considers the figures by individual years or for the whole
five-year period.
While there may be a considerable margin of error in the number of children classified specifically as "A " or as "Ad " because of the fact that opinions
of different examiners may vary regarding the individual case, it can be assumed
reasonably that in considering the figures for the two classifications together as
has been done above, the margin of error becomes quite small. In other words,
then, it can be stated that according to the information collected and presented
in this report over 80 per cent, of school children in this Province on medical
examinations were found to be in a satisfactory state of health with or without
some minor physical defect which, if present, was not sufficient in itself to
impair the health of the child. It would also appear on the basis of these statistics that some 80 per cent, of the time of the physician doing routine school
examinations is spent on the examination of children who are actually in satisfactory physical condition and do not need his services. In the past, great
importance has been attached by some to the medical examination of each school
child each year, and considerable exception has been taken to the policy forced
on the health authorities by the scarcity of medical personnel during the war of
having children in certain grades only (I., IV., VIL, and X.) examined routinely.
In view of the information now available the importance of the routine physical
examination, in so far as most school children are concerned, would appear to
have been considerably overestimated.
INFLUENCE OF LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES.
The provision of full-time local health services (health units and public
health nursing services) by an increasing number of communities has been in
itself an important factor in bringing to the attention of the health authorities
and local Boards the need for reconsideration of the relative importance and
place of the routine school medical examination in a school health service as
part of a general community public health service. In years gone by many
communities, in providing for some form of medical examination for school MEDICAL INSPECTION OP SCHOOLS, 1945-46. PP 7
children, assumed that in doing so they were meeting the needs of the community
for public health services. Again, as public health nurses became available to
communities, it was assumed by many that she should spend all or a great part
of her time in the school, and she became known in a great many communities
as a school nurse instead of a public health nurse. This whole attitude has been
changing in recent years and will continue to change with the realization that
school health services are only a part of the total community need for health
services generally, and that this need can be met only through the development
of adequate local health services as provided through health units. In recent
years there has been a steady and substantial increase in the establishment of
local health services and in the types of services rendered by them, so that at
the present time over 90 per cent, of the population of this Province is served
by public health nurses and over 65 per cent, by full-time health units. Progress in this respect has been particularly marked in the past year, with requests
for health unit service far exceeding the supply of trained personnel. This
demand has been accentuated by two factors: the desire of communities to see
plans for health units which were held up in war years implemented, and the
arrangements made in the past year by the Provincial Department of Health
for the provision of health unit services under conditions most favourable to
the communities interested in this type of local health service.
With all this development has come the realization that the school child
cannot be segregated from the rest of the community, that he is actually as much
a part of the community as any one else, and that his welfare is linked with the
total community welfare. In other words, the health of the school child is
dependent on the health services provided for the community as a whole rather
than on the provision of school health service as such. It has been becoming
increasingly apparent in recent years that the better and more extensive the
general health services, the fewer health problems there are in the school. An
adequate infant welfare and pre-school health service pays dividends in happier
and healthier school children, and a proper child-health programme includes the
school child but is not based on the provision of service to this group alone.
Similarly the other community health services, be they communicable disease
control or sanitation, are reflected in the school, so that in most communities the
emphasis formerly placed on the school service is now being placed on the provision and use of the generalized service. As a result of such considerations,
there has developed in many communities recognition of the need to develop a
more worth-while school health service and replace the time-consuming routine
medical examination of all school children with a more practical method of
detection of defects based on some form of screening and referral method.
Procedures of this type utilize the services of both the teacher and the public
health nurse and permit the School Health Inspector to spend his time on the
smaller group of children actually in need of his services.
CONSIDERATIONS FAVOURING THE DEVELOPMENT OF
SCREENING METHODS.
The routine examinations of school children in health units already under
the supervision of full-time trained public health personnel has been under study
for some time, both in this Province and elsewhere.   The results of such investi- PP 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
gations suggest that it is a costly procedure in both time and money; as a rule
it has to be carried out at the expense of other equally important services within
and without the school; and by spreading the time of the School Health Inspector over all children, it fails to provide adequate time for special consideration
of the smaller group of children actually in need of his service or for the reexamination of selected children where such re-examination ordinarily is indicated. The examination of all children in the school takes up so much of the
time of the School Health Inspector that he sees the individual child as a rule
only once a year and for only a very short time. Consequently he is dependent
for much of the information concerning the child, just as he would be if screening methods were used, on the public health nurse, who sees the child many
times during the same period.
The procedure followed during the routine examination itself has also been
subject to investigation and studies which indicate the need for review of this
question. The chest examination, for instance, has been considered in the past
to be an essential procedure in the routine physical examination of the school
child. It is now recognized, however, that tuberculosis as a general rule will
not be detected in school children by use of the stethoscope and the usual physical examination as carried out routinely in the school. Pulmonary tuberculosis
in school children fortunately is very rare, and such rare cases can be discovered
with greater certainty by referral of child contacts of tuberculosis to the mobile
and travelling X-ray services provided by the Provincial Department of Health
than by physical examination of the individual concerned. School children, of
course, are subject to infections and conditions of the lower respiratory passages and lungs, other than tuberculosis. However, experience has shown that
few, if any, children suffering from acute infections of the lungs are among
those present at the time of the routine school examination. Where such children continue to attend school, there are usually other and obvious physical
signs that make it clear to the observant teacher or nurse that the child should
be at home under the care of the family physician. Such children, therefore,
are rarely dependent on the School Health Inspector for diagnostic purposes.
Organic disease of the heart again fortunately is relatively rare in school
children. Moreover, experience has shown that practically all children found
by the School Health Inspector to be suffering from genuine organic lesions of
the heart are already under the care of the family physician and are known to
the public health nurse by the time they are brought to the attention of the
examiner in the course of the routine school examination.
The noting and recording of orthopaedic defects in school children has been
emphasized in the past as an important feature of the examination performed
by the School Health Inspector. In actual practice, however, it has been found
that these defects are more usually brought to the attention of the examining
physician by the public health nurse, who has had many opportunities to discover them in the course of her contact with the child. The finding of such
defects in school children, in any case, emphasizes the need for placing more
stress on the examination of the infant and pre-school child, at a time when
such defects are more easily and successfully dealt with or can be prevented.
Information gained from the use of the individual's health record forms in
schools in this Province in recent years shows clearly that a great part of the MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1945-46.
PP 9
defects found in school children are those having to do with teeth, tonsils and
adenoids, and vision. It has been found also that the School Health Inspector's
examination of the teeth is, as a rule, one which can be duplicated by the public
health nurse or the teacher, since the purpose is essentially to detect defects
which are visible and apparent without special examinations with the use of
instruments. Tests for defects of vision are carried out in most schools already
by the nurse with or without the assistance of the teacher, with referral of the
defects found to the School Health Inspector or the family physician. Experience has also shown in this Province and elsewhere that defects of tonsils and
adenoids on the whole are as readily apparent to the public health nurse as to
the School Health Inspector.
Of considerable interest in this respect are the results of a survey carried
out in a health unit in this Province, in which a comparison was made of the
defects noted in the course of physical examinations carried out independently
by public health nurses and by the School Health Inspector on the same group
of school children.   The results of this survey are given below.
Examination of School Children.
Examined by Nurse.
Examined by Physician.
Number.
Per Cent.
Number.
Per Cent.
767
384
196
305
14
7
4
3
41
50.0
25.5
39.9
1.8
0.9
0.5
0.4
5.3
767
387
189
297
13
10
8
3
42
50.0
24.6
38.5
1.7
1.3
1.0
0.4
5.4
Fifty per cent.-of these children were found by the nurse and by the doctor
to have one or more defects. Defective teeth varied in severity from slight to
gross defects in one or more teeth. The majority of these defects, however,
were moderate or slight and many were in first teeth. Defective tonsils varied
from the slightly enlarged to the severely infected. Defects in vision varied
from slight to moderate, with only two severe defects of vision reported for this
particular group of children. All defects caused by organic heart disease were
found to be under the care of the family physician.
From a consideration of the findings given above, it is obvious that there is
little difference in the results obtained by the two methods of examination. It
would appear then that in the detection of physical defects of the usual type,
the trained public health nurse is just as successful as the School Health
Inspector. It is also apparent that the public health nurse is competent to
detect children suffering from defects of a less specific nature but which are
sufficiently serious to affect the general health of the child. In such instances
it is a simple matter for her to refer such children to the School Health Inspector
for further examination. In this regard it should be pointed out that the
results of this survey are in agreement with the findings of surveys of a similar
nature carried out elsewhere in Canada and the United States. PP 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
An adequate school service in a community having a properly organized
and functioning health service ideally provides, directly and indirectly, a service
which is concerned with considerably more than the detection of physical
defects. Under the auspices of full-time local health services as provided in
health units, it is possible to develop a much more effective school programme
than that provided in the past. The development of such a programme by the
local health authorities, however, is dependent upon public support if reorganization and reorientation of the school service is to be carried out in such a
manner as to take full advantage of the personnel and services which are available. It would appear from a consideration of the results discussed in this
report that the first step toward reorientation of the programme in the schools
is dependent upon the changes which can be made in regard to the routine
examination of school children. In other words, it appears that little progress
will be made towards providing more adequate school services until better use
is made of the time of the personnel responsible for giving this service. It is
suggested, therefore, that those interested in this problem be prepared to accept
reasonably recommendations from qualified health authorities regarding the use
of the public health nurse and the teacher in some form of screening and
referral system whereby the public health nurse becomes responsible for the
screening of the school children and detection of the usual physical defects
and, in consultation with the teacher, refers to the School Health Inspector only
those children who are considered for one reason or another to be in need of his
services.
Statistics concerned with the medical inspection of school personnel are
included in this report chiefly for purposes of record. On the basis of the
information available it would appear that there is a need for further consideration of this aspect of the school health service.
The many special examinations of school children are not included in this
Report.
PROGRESS IN SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES.
Through developments of the type discussed above, the way can be cleared
for the further advancement of a school health service as an active and integrated part of a local full-time health service. Much progress has already been
made in this respect in recent years. Increasing advantage is being taken in
the schools of the services provided locally and of special consulting services
provided through the local health services by the Provincial Department of
Health.
Sanitation.
Sanitation in the schools and the school environment is receiving much
greater attention than formerly. The introduction of standard forms for •
reporting the status of school sanitation has been of considerable assistance in
stimulating this interest and in bringing about improvements in school sanitation, which makes possible the teaching of certain health standards and some
of the amenities as they apply to every-day living.
Immunization.
Steady progress has been made in protecting school children against the
serious preventable communicable diseases, and as a result diphtheria is a rela- MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1945-46. PP 11
tively rare occurrence. In most communities to-day smallpox has become for
the time being practically non-existent, and whooping-cough and scarlet fever
are not the serious problems they were some years ago. Control of these
diseases requires constant vigilance and utilization of immunization procedures
by the public with protection of susceptible new additions to the population and
the periodic reinforcement of immunity previously established. In the past
much of this work has been carried out in the schools, but the increased provision
of these services for pre-school children and infants where full-time health
services are available will reduce the time required in the schools for this purpose and provide protection for the child at a time when he is most susceptible.
Nutrition Services.
In the past year the nutrition services of the Provincial Department of
Health have been revised, and the programme in nutrition, as now provided, has
proven to be of very definite value to the schools. Consulting services are available for use to the schools through their local health services for teaching
material and assistance where school lunch programmes are being considered or
are provided. The provision of school lunches entails considerable responsibility
on the part of those undertaking the planning or supervision of this service,
and the assistance and advice of the Provincial Nutritionist is being utilized
increasingly in this respect.
Health Education.
The importance of health from the point of view of the individual and the
community has been recognized by the educational authorities, and health-
teaching has been given an important place in the school curriculum. Because
of the many opportunities which present themselves in the school for providing
information and for influencing attitudes and habits in a very practical manner
as they relate to health, teachers more and more are discussing their health-
teaching problems with local full-time public health personnel and making use
of the information and assistance provided by them and by the Division of Public Health Education of the Provincial Department of Health. It is readily
apparent that much can be accomplished in health-teaching on a co-operative
basis, and in recognition of this fact joint committees of educational and public
health authorities have been set up in a number of communities to deal with
health-teaching and the health problems in the school. As an example of this
co-operative effort, may be cited the teaching of venereal disease prevention
and control in a number of schools on a tentative basis as worked out by a committee such as that described. Further efforts of a similar nature include on
the Provincial level, the arrangements already under way for revision of the
curriculum on health-teaching as a co-operative effort by representatives of the
Provincial Departments of Health and Education.
Extension of Health Unit Services.
The programme of the Provincial Department of Health for expanding
health unit services virtually ensures the provision of these services for many
communities within the next two years. There is general recognition of the
value of these services, and the main factor in delaying a more rapid extension
of them is the difficulty in obtaining a sufficient number of trained personnel. .PP 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Coincident with the extension of health unit services has been the interest
displayed in the two metropolitan areas in the closer knitting together of
adjacent health services into one co-ordinated service. The advantages of such
a procedure in metropolitan areas are readily apparent, and further development
in this respect is not improbable. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF
SCHOOLS,
1945-46.
PP  13
STATISTICAL T
ABLES.
iiined in the Schools for the
, 1942 to 1946.
Physical Status of Total Pupils Exat
Years ended June 30tb
1941-42.
1942-43.
1943-44.
1944-45.
1945-46.
118,405
59,642
50.4
48.7
35.2
2.0
1.7
8.0
1.2
1.6
0.9
0.6
77,844
40,006
51.4
45.3
39.6
0.9
1.9
8.7
0.9
1.9
0.5
0.1
0.2
78,443
34,383
43.8
40.0
41.4
1.9
3.3
8.4
1.6
1.4
0.4
0.1
1.5
75,085
34,621
46.1
41.7
44.2
1.0
1.4
9.1
0.5
1.4
0.4
0.1
0.2
88,588
39,131
44.2
38.8
48.3
0.9
2.4
7.6
0.3
1.1
0.5
0.1
Total pupils examined      	
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A ..... 	
Ad   ,	
Ae.       .  	
Ade               .-          -      	
Bd    -                            	
Be    ..      .            	
Bde             .-        	
Cd            -   ....      	
Ce    -         ~~                	
Cde                ..          ....       	
Physical Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory, 1945-46.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
88,588
39,131
44.2
38.8
48.3
0.9
2.4
7.6
0.3
1.1
0.5
0.1
77,233
31,197
40.4
37.2
50.4
0.5
2.3
7.6
0.3
1.1
0.5
0.1
11,355
7,934
69.9
45.0
40.0
2.4
2.7
7.6
0.4
1.1
0.7
0.1
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A   ....       	
Ad 	
Ae.....    ,  	
Ade .            	
Bd   ,	
Be      .
Bde                     	
Cd    .           —          	
Ce    .       	
Cde  	
Grade I.
10,985
9,168
83.5
31.2
53.2
1.0
2.5
9.9
0.4
1.2
0.5
0.1
9,202
7,509
81.6
29.2
56.0
0.6
2.2
10.0
0.4
1.0
0.5
0.1
1,783
1,659
93.0
40.0
40.8
2.4
3.7
9.5
0.5
2.0
0.9
0.2
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A                      ,       - -- 	
Ad                          . _        	
Ae               ~             	
Ade                    	
Bd  .        i	
Be     	
Bde            .....     	
Cd  	
Ce.      	
Cde	 PP 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Physical Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory,
1945-46—Continued.
Grades II.-VI.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
41,994
14,337
34.1
40.5
46.0
1.2
3.2
6.9
0.3
1.2
0.6
0.1
35,887
10,168
28.3
39.6
47.8
0.6
3.3
6.4
0.2
1.3
0.7
0.1
6,107
4,199
68.8
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A      ,    	
42.5
Ad   .
41.2
Ae  	
Ade                                                          	
2.7
2.9
Bd                      ,   	
8.2
Be                           	
0.5
Bde                              .
1.1
Cd                        	
0.7
Ce    - -     	
0.1
Cde                                         ..    	
0.1
Grades VII.-IX.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined	
22,924
10,241
44.7
41.7
46.9
0.7
2.0
7.0
0.2
1.0
0.4
0.1
20,233
8,563
42.3
39.4
48.8
0.5
2.0
7.5
0.3
1.0
0.4
0.1
2,691
1,678
62.4
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A                      ,                          .   -               	
53.5
Ad                                                                        	
36.8
Ae                          —                              .    .
1.8
Ade	
Bd                          -  .              	
1.7
5.0
Be	
Bde                                                	
0.1
0.5
Cd                                     	
0.5
Ce  	
Cde 	
0.1
Grades X.-XIII.
12,639
4,934
39.0
46.5
43.5
0.4
1.0
7.0
0.4
0.6
0.4
0.2
11,908
4,463
37.5
44.7
44.9
0.3
1.0
7.2
0.5
0.7
0.5
0.2
731
471
64.4
62.9
30.8
1.7
0.8
3.4
0.2
0.2
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined  	
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—■
A i  	
Ad    	
Ae       	
Ade	
Bd _	
Be	
Bde      .....
Cd  	
Ce 	
Cde	 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1945-46.
PP 15
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1945-46.
Total Pupils examined.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total pupils  enrolled  in
88,588
38,631
43.6
39.3
47.7
0.9
2.4
7.7
0.3
1.1
0.5
0.1
54,661
19,176
35.1
31.9
56.5
0.4
1.2
7.7
0.4
1.2
0.5
0.2
11,158
3,294
29.5
27.0
56.0
0.3
1.4
10.0
0.1
0.9
0.3
65,819
22,470
34.1
31.2
56.4
0.4
1.2
8.7
0.4
1.2
0.4
0.1
7,817
6,126
78.4
59.6
26.4
0.5
6.4
5.3
0.2
1.0
0.5
0.1
14,952
10,035
67.1
44.9
41.0
2.3
2.6
6.9
0.4
1.0
0.8
0.1
22,769
Total pupils examined—	
Percentage of pupils en-
16,161
71.0
Physical status — percentage of pupils examined—
A    „.„
Ad.
50.5
35.4
Ae	
Ade   	
1.6
4.1
Bd    ....
Be	
6.3
0.3
Bde
1.0
Cd  	
Ce	
Cde  	
0.7
0.1
Grade I.
Grades II.-VI.
Total pupils enrolled in
grade examined	
10,985
6,144
1,321
7,465
1,271
2,249
3,520
9,168
5,165
820
5,983
1,131
2,052
3,183
Percentage of pupils en
rolled examined	
83.5
84.1
62.1
80.1
89.0
91.2
90.4
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A    ...
31.3
24.6
21.8
24.2
54.0
39.0
44.4
Ad
53.2
1.0
2.4
61.6
0.5
1.4
60.4
0.4
1.6
61.5
0.5
1.3
29.5
1.1
6.0
42.4
2.2
3.7
37.8
Ae.  .  ....     	
1.9
Ade 	
4.4
Bd  	
9.9
9.9
15.0
10.6
7.4
9.1
8.5
Be
0.4
1.2
0.5
1.0
0.6
0.5
0.9
0.2
1.4
0.4
2.0
0.3
Bde  	
1.7
Cd	
0.5
0.4
0.2
0.4
0.2
1.1
0.8
Ce	
	
Cde..   	
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.2
Total pupils enrolled in
grades examined 	
Total pupils examined —
Percentage of pupils en-
41,994
14,367
34.2
40.4
45.9
1.2
3.2
7.0
0.3
1.2
0.8
24,234
5,427
22.4
30.9
58.3
0.4
1.4
6.6
0.2
1.5
0.6
0.1
5,447
949
17.4
25.2
56.3
1.7
14.1
0.1
2.0
0.5
0.1
29,681
6,376
21.5
30.1
58.0
0.3
1.5
7.6
0.2
1.6
0.6
0.1
4,351
2,974
68.4
59.5
26.6
0.4
7.4
4.5
0.1
1.0
0.4
0.1
7,962
5,017
63.0
42.4
41.9
2.8
2.8
7.5
0.6
1.0
0.9
0.1
12,313
7,991
64.9
Physical status — percentage of pupils examined—
A                    ...     	
48.8
Ad                         -- -
36.2
Ae
1.9
Ade                        	
4.5
Bd	
Be	
Bde     ...   	
6.4
0.4
1.0
Cd	
Ce                   ..     	
0.7
Cde                          .—.
0.1 PP 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1945-46—Continued.
Grades VII.-IX.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total pupils enrolled in
22,924
10,241
44.7
41.7
46.9
0.7
2.0
7.0
0.2
1.0
0.4
0.1
14,782
5,439
36.8
34.5
54.6
0.5
1.2
6.9
0.4
1.3
0.4
0.2
2,956
1,032
34.9
27.4
55.3
0.6
1.5
14.7
0.4
0.1
17,738
6,471
36.5
33.4
54.8
0.5
1.2
8.2
0.3
1.2
0.3
0.1
1,900
1,560
82.1
61.0
26.2
0.4
5.3
5.5
0.2
0.7
0.7
3,486
2,210
63.4
52.7
38.4
1.5
1.9
4.4
0.1
0.5
0.5
5,386
3,770
70.0
56.1
33.3
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined 	
Physical status — percentage of pupils examined—
A 	
Ad 	
Ae                       	
1.1
Ade                                   	
3.3
Bd   	
Be
4.9
0.1
Bde                                   	
0.6
Cd	
Ce
0.6
Cde 	
Grades X.-XIII.
Total pupils enrolled in
10,839
4,954
45.7
46.4
43.4
0.4
1.0
6.8
0.4
0.6
0.4
0.6
7,497
3,165
42.2
41.1
48.1
0.3
0.4
7.5
0.6
0.7
0.4
0.9
1,438
490
34.1
38.0
49.8
0.2
0.6
10.6
0.2
0.4
0.2
8,935
3,655
40.9
40.7
48.3
0.2
0.4
7.9
0.6
0.7
0.4
0.8
692
471
68.1
68.2
20.0
0.4
5.9
3.8
0.2
1.1
0.4
1,212
828
68.3
58.7
35.0
1.1
0.5
3.9
0.2
0.6
1,904
1,299
68 2
Percentage of pupils en-
Physical status — percentage of pupils examined—
A  	
Ad  	
Ae          	
62.2
29.6
0.8
Ade	
Bd                        	
2.5
3 8
Be           - .        -
0 1
Bde                    	
0 5
Cd         —    	
0 5
Ce                        	
Cde                          .....
Medical Inspection of School Personnel, Organized and
Unorganized Territory, 1945-46.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganised.
Total personnel employed in grades examined	
3,511
337
9.6
81.6
10.7
2.7
3.2
0.9
0.9
2,924
148
5.1
67.7
15.5
5.4
7.4
2.0
2.0
587
Percentage of personnel employed examined... 	
32 2
Physical status—percentage of personnel examined—
A ,         	
92 6
Ad ,  	
6 9
B       	
0 5
B d ,     ...
C     ..
Cd	 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1945-46.
PP 17
Medical Inspection of Rural and Urban School Personnel, 1945-46.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total  personnel  employed
3.511
352
10.0
83.0
10.7
2.3
3.4
0.3
0.3
1,995
102
5.1
81.4
7.8
4.9
3.9
1.0
1.0
454
47
10.4
48.9
34.0
17.1
2,449
149
6.1
71.1
16.1
3.4
8.0
0.7
0.7
322
2
0.6
100.0
740
201
27.2
91.5
7.0
1.5
1,062
203
19.1
91.6
Total personnel examined...
Percentage  of personnel
employed examined	
Physical status — Percentage   of. personnel   examined—
A    ....         	
Ad	
B               	
6.9
1.5
Bd  	
C         	
Cd 	
Physical Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory, 1944-45.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined	
75,085
34,621
46.1
41 7
44 2
1.0
1.4
9.1
0.5
1.4
0.4
0.1
02
60,167
24,724
41.1
39.2
47.3
0.5
1.0
9.7
0.3
1.5
0.3
0.2
14,918
9,897
66.3
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—•
A        	
48.0
Ad                                                                	
36.4
Ae.         	
Ade          —...
2.3
2.4
Bd                                                             .
7.8
Be                                     	
0.8
Bde
1.2
Cd
0.7
Ce   	
0.1
Cde                                                             ..
0.3
Grade I.
9,957
7,056
70.9
34.0
48.0
1.5
1.6
12 2
0.4
1.5
0.5
0.3
7,810
5,264
67.4
31.5
52.0
0.7
0.8
13.0
0.2
1.4
0.3
0.1
2,147
1,792
83.5
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A                                                                                  .    —
41.2
Ad                                                                 	
36.1
Ae 	
3.9
Ade                                                -                     -
4.0
Bd   	
10.1
Be                                  	
08
Bde                                              .     	
1.8
Cd                                                   	
1.1
Ce                                .        ...
0.2
Cde                                            -    	
0.8 PP 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Physical Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory,
1944-45—Continued.
Grades II.-VI.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined             	
35,460
13,690
38.6
35.5
49.1
1.1
1.7
9.9
0.5
16
0.4
0.2
27,852
8,556
30.7
30.6
54.5
0.4
1.3
10.9
0.2
1.8
0.2
0.1
7,608
5,134
67.5
43.7
40.0
2.2
2.5
8.3
0.9
1.2
0.8
0.1
0.3
Total pupils examined     	
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined   	
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A  	
Ad	
Ae          	
Ade  . ._                	
Bd  ._          	
Be
Bde    	
Cd
Ce                   	
Cde       ...    	
Grades VII.-IX.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined    	
19,162
9,012
47.0
43.1
44.7
0.9
1.3
7.6
0.3
1.6
0.3
-----
0.2
15,722
6,673
42.4
38.3
48.8
0.7
1.1
8.6
02
1.7
0.3
0.3
3,390
2,339
69.0
56.7
33.5
1.5
1.8
4.8
0.4
1.1
0.2
Total pupils examined       	
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—■
A          	
Ad'.....                     	
Ae              	
Ade     	
Bd                  	
Be	
Bde              __          	
Cd           ,
Ce    	
Cde 	
Grades X.-XIII.
10,633
4,811
45.2
56.3
35.7
0.3
0.3
5.0
0.9
0.7
0.6
0.2
9,404
4,102
43.6
54.7
37.1
0.3
0.3
5.2
0.9
0.6
0.6
0.3
1,229
709
57.7
65.4
26.9
0.5
0.3
4.1
0.8
1.4
0.6
Total pupils examined            	
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A                  .   ...
Ad      _     	
Ae   	
Ade  	
Bd   ....       	
Be       	
Bde        	
Cd        	
Ce ...	
Cde 	 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1945-46.
PP 19
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1944-45.
Total Pupils examined
Urban
Total,   ■
Urban.
Rural
Unorgan
Total,
Rural.
Total.
Cities.
Municipalities.
Municipalities.
ized and
Villages.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
75,085
41,346
10,558
51,904
7,389
15,792
23,181
Total pupils examined	
34,621
16,046
3,042
19,088
4,905
10,628
15,533
Percentage   of   pupils   en
rolled examined  	
45.7
38.8
28.8
36.8
66.4
67.3
67.0
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A 	
41.7
32.7
33.8
32.8
63.3
47.7
52.6
Ad	
44.2
1.0
1.4
53.9
0.3
1.1
41.3
0.2
0.7
51.9
0.3
1.0
30.7
0.4
0.4
36.5
2.4
2.6
34.7
Ae....              	
1.7
Ade	
1.9
Bd 	
9.2
9.1
22.6
11.2
4.0
7.8
6.7
Be   	
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.8
0.6
Bde  	
1.4
1.9
0.9
1.8
0.7
1.2
1.0
Cd  	
0.4
0.3
0.4
0.4
0.3
0.6
0.5
Ce  	
0.1
0.1
Cde....	
0.2
0.3
0.1
0.3
0.3
0.2
Grade I.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grade examined ...
9,957
4,504
1,282
5,786
1,851
2,320
4,171
Total pupils examined	
7,056
3,523
736
4,259
846
1,951
2,797
Percentage   of   pupils   en-
70.9
78.2
57.4
73.6
45.7
84.1
67.1
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A	
34.0
28.5
26.8
28.2
47.5
40.7
42.8
Ad 	
48.0
56.5
48.5
55.1
37.2
37.0
37.0
Ae  	
1.5
0.4
0.3
0.4
1.4
3.8
3.1
Ade..              .
1.6
0.7
0.5
0.7
0.7
4.2
3.1
Bd ...           .	
12.2
0.4
12.0
0.1
22.3
13.9
10.3
0.5
9.7
1.0
9.9
Be    	
0.8
Bde 	
1.5
1.5
0.8
1.3
2.1
1.8
1.9
Cd	
0.5
0.2
0.7
0.3
0.2
1.0
0.8
Ce  	
0.1
0.1
Cde 	
0.3
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.7
0.5
Grades II.-VI.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined	
35,460
18,132
5,226
23,358
4,146
7,956
12,102
Total pupils examined	
13,660
5,155
1,152
6,307
1,932
5,421
7,353
Percentage   of   pupils   en
rolled examined	
38.5
28.4
22.0
27.0
46.6
68.1
60.8
Physical status ■— percent
age of pupils examined—
A  	
35.6
20.0
25.6
21.0
60.6
43.6
48.0
Ad  	
48.9
1.1
1.8
65.7
0.2
1.5
42.8
1.0
61.5
0.1
1.4
33.2
0.3
0.6
39.9
2.4
2.6
38.3
Ae ..                	
1.9
Ade 	
2.1
Bd..   	
9.9
9.7
28.5
13.2
4.0
8.2
7.2
Be...   	
0.5
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.9
0.7
Bde  	
1.6
2.5
1.5
2.3
0.5
1.3
1.0
Cd  	
0.4
0.1
0.3
0.1
0.6
0.7
0.7
Ce	
0.1
0.1
Cde .    	
0.2
0.1
0.3
0.1
0.3
0.2 PP 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1944-45—Continued.
Grades VII.-IX.
Urban
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Unorgan
Total,
Rural.
Total.
Cities.
Municipalities.
Municipalities.
ized and
Villages.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined 	
19,112
11,162
2,754
13,916
1,563
3,633
5,196
Total pupils examined	
9,012
4,600
763
5,363
1,113
2,536
3,649
Percentage   of   pupils   en
rolled examined „ 	
47.2
41.2
27.7
38.5
71.2
69.8
70.2
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A       	
43.1
32.7
41.4
34.0
58.2
55.7
56.5
Ad 	
44.8
53.9
36.5
51.4
37.9
33.8
35.1
Ae   	
0.8
1.3
0.4
1.3
1.8
0.5
0.6
1.2
0.4
0.2
1.7
1.8
1.3
Ade	
1.3
Bd	
7.6
8.3
19.0
9.8
2.7
5.0
4.3
Be                 	
03
1.5
0.3
2.2
0.4
0.2
2.0
0.1
0.4
0.4
1.2
0.3
Bde..... 	
0.9
Cd                                  	
0.3
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.3
0.1
0.4
0.4
0.1
0.3
0.1
0.2
Ce                                  	
Cde 	
0.1
Grades X.-XIII.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined  	
10,633
7,483
1,202
8,685
609
1,339
1,948
Total pupils examined	
4,887
3,190
475
3,665
426
796
1,222
Percentage   of   pupils   en
rolled examined	
46.0
42.6
39.5
42.2
70.0
37.0
62.7
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A	
55.9
52.4
51.6
52.3
68.8
65.8
66.9
Ad	
35.6
39.0
33.7
38.3
30.0
26.4
27.7
Ae	
0.3
0.4
0.2
0.4
0.4
0.2
Ade 	
0.3
0.4
0.4
0.3
0.2
B d .	
5.4
4.6
14.3
6.0
1.2
4.5
3.3
Be. r	
0.9
1.2
1.0
	
0.7
0.5
Bde	
0.8
0.8
0.7
1.4
0.9
Cd 	
0.6
0.7
0.2
0.6
0.5
0.3
Ce	
0.1
Cde	
0.2
0.4
0.3
......
	
Immunization Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory,
1944-45.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
78,085
60.6
16.5
54.2
60,167
68.4
13.5
61.6
14,918
Percentage immunized—
41.3
31.7
35.4 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1945-46.
PP 21
Immunization Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory,
1944-45—Continued.
Grade I.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
9,957
46.0
12.2
44.4
7,810
51.0
11.1
51.0
2,147
Percentage immunized—
27.9
15.9
Smallpox  	
20.1
Grades II.-VI.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined	
Percentage immunized—
35,460
60.5
20.4
57.8
27,852
65.1
16.1
62.6
7,608
43.5
36.4
39.9
Grades VII.-IX.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined —_   •      	
Percentage immunized—
19,162
53.0
16.3
56 8
15,722
55.8
12.4
62.3
3,390
40.4
34.5
32.5
Grades X.-XIII.
10,633
46.3
11.1
57.7
9,404
47.3
8.3
61.3
1,229
Percentage immunized—
38.0
33.0
30.0
Rural and Urban Immunization Status, 1944-45.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined    .	
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria  	
75,085
53.7
17.1
56.4
41,346
54.2
8.8
64.4
10,558
77.1
17.3
63.2
51,904
58.9
10.5
64.2
7,389
43.0
33.7
45.4
15,792
41.9
31.1
36.1
23,181
42.2
31.9
Smallpox	
39.0 PP 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Rural and Urban Immunization Status, 1944-45—Continued.
Grade I.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total    pupils    enrolled
grade examined	
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria	
Scarlet fever	
Smallpox	
9,957
45.2
12.2
44.4
4,504
57.7
8.8
62.6
1,282
72.0
13.7
58.9
5,786
60.9
9.9
61.8
1,851
16.2
15.1
18.5
2,320
29.1
15.5
21.5
4,171
23.4
15.3
20.2
Grades II.-VI.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined	
Percentage immunized—
35,460
57.7
20.4
57.8
18,132
60.6
10.4
67.5
5,226
82.5
19.3
64.7
23,358
65.5
12.4
66.9
4,146
40.2
36.7
40.5
7,956
43.8
35.3
40.0
12,102
42.5
35.8
Smallpox	
40.2
Grades VII.-IX.
Total    pupils    enrolled
grades examined -
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria	
Scarlet fever 	
Smallpox ...	
19,112
54.8
16.3
57.0
11,162
51.7
8.3
62.8
2,754
74.9
16.0
62.3
13,916
56.3
9.8
62.7
1,563
72.7
32.0
59.1
3,633
41.6
34.4
34.2
5,196
50.9
33.7
41.7
Grades X.-XIII.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
10,633
46.3
35.1
57.7
7,483
45.3
36.1
61.0
1,202
51.2
10.2
62.0
8,685
46.1
44.0
61.2
609
64.2
33.3
64.7
1,339
39.1
32.7
31.8
1,948
47.0
Percentage immunized—
Scarlet fever	
32.9
42.1
Medical Inspection of School Personnel, Organized and
Unorganized Territory, 1944-45.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganised.
Total personnel employed in grades examined  	
3,237
440
13.6
71.6
21.6
0.9
5.2
0.5
0.2
2,427
117
4.8
66.7
17.9
12.8
1.7
0.9
810
323
39.9
Physical status—percentage of personnel examined—
A              	
73.4
Ad    ..--       ....
B           	
22.9
1.2
Bd       	
2.5
C                 	
Cd      .                                                                 	 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1945-46.
PP 23
Medical Inspection of Rural and Urban School Personnel, 1944-45.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total   personnel   employed
in grades examined 	
Total personnel examined
Percentage    of    personnel
employed examined	
Physical status — percentage   of   personnel   examined—
A  	
Ad  	
3,237
440
13.6
71.6
21.6
0.9
5.2
0.5
0.2
1,782
18
1.0
44.5
22.2
33.3
354
27
7.6
40.7
37.1
22.2
2,136
45
2.1
42.2
31.1
26.7
226
21
9.3
81.0
19.0
875
374
42.7
74.6
20.6
1.1
2.9
0.5
0.3
1,101
395
35.9
74.9
20.5
B	
Bd	
C      ...     '
1.0
2.8
0.5
Cd	
0.3
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.
815-447-2534 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0339789/manifest

Comment

Related Items