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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT For the Year ended December 31st 1945 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1947

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year ended December 31st
1945
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
.-tiggfaa-.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1946.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1945
is herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
July, 1946. The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twenty-eighth Annual Report on
the work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1945.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., July, 1946. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
List of Acts affecting Labour Inside front cover
Report of Deputy Minister  7
Statistics of Trades and Industries  7
Pay-roll  8
Comparison of Pay-rolls  8
Industrial Divisions _'_  9
Average Weekly Wage by Industries  11
Racial Origin and Nationality  16
Statistical Tables  17
Summary of all Tables  30
" Hours of Work Act " ,  31
Average Weekly Hours  32
Hours of Work Regulations  88
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers  33
Summary of New Laws affecting Labour  35
" Annual Holidays Act "  35
" Hours of Work Act Amendment Act, 1946 "  35
" Factories Act Amendment Act, 1946 "  35
" Male Minimum Wage Act Amendment Act, 1946 "  35
" Female Minimum Wage Act Amendment Act, 1946 "  36
" Shops Regulation and Weekly Half-holiday Act Amendment Act, 1946 "  36
"Workmen's Compensation Act_Amendment Act, 1946"  36
Board of Industrial Relations  37
Meetings and Delegations  37
New Orders and Regulations :  39
Statistics covering Women and Girl Employees  40
Summary of all Occupations  47
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum  48
Single, Married, and Widowed Employees  49
Years of Service Table  50
Inspections and Wage Adjustments  50
Court Cases  51
Comparative Wages  53
Special Licences :  54
Statistics for Male Employees  55
Summary of Orders  59
List of Orders in Effect -— 87
Hours of Work Regulations  88
Women's and Children's Division  93
Control of Employment of Children Branch  95
Table of Permits issued under Act  97
Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch (Secretary-Registrar's Report)  99
Functions of the Provincial Board  99
Work of the British Columbia Board  100
Summary of Cases dealt with  100
Conciliation Procedure under the "Wartime Labour Relations Regulations
Act"  100
Table of Conciliation Proceedings  102
Boards of Conciliation  104
Strikes and Lockouts, 1945  105 H 6 SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch—Continued. Page.
Summary of Disputes  106
Analysis of Strikes by Industries, 1945  107
Time-loss through Industrial Disputes  107
Organizations of Employers and Employees  107
Inspection of Factories  124
Inspections -  124
Accident-prevention ..  124
Factory Conditions  125
Women in Industry  125
Child Labour  126
Welfare  126
Passenger and Freight Elevators  126
Elevator Operators' Licences  127
Elevator Inspections  127
New Elevator Installations    127
Industrial Home-work  127
Apprenticeship Branch  128
Trade-schools Regulation Branch  131
Safety Branch  135
Changes in Administrative Organization of Department  136 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1945.
This annual report for the year 1945, being the twenty-eighth of the Department,
covers a year of both war and peace.
With the cessation of hostilities during the year, marked variations were prevalent
in the trends of production and industrial pay-rolls, the growing magnitude of which
had been increasingly accentuated with the progress of the war.
The bright promise of peace ahead brought curtailment in many industries geared
to high standards of production for war, with a resultant drop in our 1945 Provincial
estimated pay-roll total to $371,625,927, an apparent decrease of $16,474,073 over the
final estimated total of $388,100,000 for 1944.
Average weekly earnings continued in strength throughout the year, such decreases,
where evident, being generally of a fractional nature, and the average increasing in
eleven of the twenty-five tables in this Report.
The average weekly wage for all adult male wage-earners was recorded at $38.50
for 1945, representing only a slight recession from the all-time high of $38.70 established during the previous year.
Eighteen of the twenty-five tables relating to the industrial group showed increases
in the pay-roll totals for 1945.
Greatest increase was in the public utility group (up $2,000,000), followed by food
products manufacturing (up over $1,500,000) and coast shipping (up $1,000,000).
For others in order of increase see " Comparison of Pay-rolls " in report data.
Conversion to peace-time requirements brought the greatest decrease in the shipbuilding industry (down over $10,000,000), followed by miscellaneous trades and industries (decreased by over $9,500,000) and metal trades (down almost $2,000,000).
Decreases were also noted in the construction industry (down over $1,800,000) and coalmining (off $400,000), while minor recessions were apparent in paint-manufacturing
and cigar and tobacco manufacturing.
The transitory shift of war-time employment to other fields of endeavour brought
decreasing totals of both male and female workers in metal trades, ship-building, and
vital industries of a like nature, while increased employment totals were general in
those industries progressing normally under more peaceful conditions. The average
monthly employment high for all industries in 1945 was 132,220 in July of that year,
compared with a high of 138,911 recorded in August of 1944.
Average weekly hours of work continued to decrease throughout the year in most
industries, the average weekly working-hours for all employees decreasing to 45.59 as
against 46.02 for the previous year.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
With peace-time standards replacing war-time demands, the statistical section for
1945 presents a rapidly changing picture in the industrial life of the Province, revealing
many changes which clearly mark this year as a year of transition.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 5,687.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 5,687,
as compared with 5,044 in 1944, an increase of 643. H
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PAY-ROLL.
The 5,687 industrial firms filing returns in time for classification in the tables
reported a total pay-roll of $276,336,872 for the year 1945. In as much as this figure,
however, represents only industrial pay-rolls, it is not considered as the total Provincial
pay-roll until further augmented by additional figures which follow, showing an
accumulative estimated total of $371,625,927, an apparent decrease of $16,474,073 over
final estimates for 1944.
Pay-rolls of 5,687 firms making returns to Department of Labour  $276,336,872.00
Returns received too late to be included in above summary  541,794.00
Transcontinental railways  (ascertained pay-roll)       21,297,261.00
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey;   viz., Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, miscellaneous (estimated pay-roll)....      73,450,000.00
Total  $371,625,927.00
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS.
The estimated Provincial pay-roll totals since 1928 are as follows :-
1928  $183,097,781
1929  192,092,249
1930  167,133,813
1931  131,941,008
1932  102,957,074
1933  99,126,653
1934  113,567,953
1935  125,812,140
1936  142,349,591
1937  $162,654,234
1938  158,026,375
1939  165,683,460
1940  188,325,766
1941  239,525,459
1942  321,981,489
1943  394,953,031
1944  388,100,000*
1945  371,625,927t
* 1944 total revised since 1944 report.
t 1945 preliminary total subject to revision.
Previously estimated totals for the years 1942, 1943, and 1944 have now been
revised in accordance with more complete information, and, as stated in the previous
year's report, provision is being made for preliminary estimated totals to be revised
from year to year, based on additional information not available at the time of
publication.
A percentage distribution showing the proportion of the total pay-roll allotted to
each class of worker is contained in the following table:—
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Per Cent.
9.29
10.11
80.60
Per Cent.
7.13
8.66
84.21
Per Cent.
6.57
9.18
84.25
Per Cent.
7.26
10.72
82.02
Per Cent.
7.95
Totals _ _	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
With a drop in heavy production following the cessation of hostilities, resultant
declining pay-roll totals were noted in some larger industries during 1945. Peace-time
activity, however, brought increases in most instances, with eighteen of the twenty-five
industrial classifications recording gains over the previous year. Leading in the section
showing increased pay-roll totals, the public utility group gained by $2,171,277 over the
previous year, followed by food products, up $1,793,485, and coast shipping with an
increase of $1,052,973; oil-refining increased by $900,624, followed by printing and
publishing, up $702,556, and breweries and distillers with a gain of $574,347; house
furnishings, an increase of $569,518;  builders' materials, up $540,968;   lumber indus- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 9
tries, up $485,739; pulp and paper manufacturing, an increase of $430,614; wood-
manufacturing (N.E.S.), up $418,078; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, up $375,071;
metal-mining increased by $212,515; smelting and concentrating, up $151,995; leather
and fur goods, $116,950; garment-making, $57,077; jewellery-manufacturing, $55,151;
and explosives and chemicals, up $28,076.
Greatest decrease was evident in the ship-building industry, down $10,247,912 from
the previous year, followed by miscellaneous trades and industries with a decrease of
$9,655,804, and metal trades, off $1,897,723. Heavy construction showed a further
decrease of $1,869,918 from the previous year's total. Decreases were also noted in
the coal-mining industry, down $425,500; paint-manufacturing, down $2,814; and
cigar and tobacco manufacturing, off $149.
Comparison of Pay-rolls.
Industry.
1943.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1944.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries	
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Construction	
Explosives and chemicals	
Food products	
Garment-making	
House furnishings	
Jewellery-manufacturing	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of..
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous	
Oil-refining .'.	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper mills	
Ship-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc...
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
Totals	
31
74
3
26
119
753
23
547
66
67
11
99
55
948
801
93
510
62
10
142
12
47
5
115
108
$1,758,
2,306.
6,
4,890,
10,019,
43,356
4,014
18,192,
1,403
1,822,
347.
2,433
926
47,078
24,637
11,318
26,160.
3,229.
457
4,337
8,727
65,494
7,466
13,613
7,406
828.00
658.00
971.00
314.00
897.00
556.00
989.00
018.00
599.00
614.00
097.00
302.00
.231.00
896.00
007.00
.358.00
573.00
243.00
.182.00
.734.00
,109.00
.519.00
686.00
.489.00
,450.00
32
80
3
27
110
916
23
582
71
77
13
108
69
1,041
858
79
456
59
11
140
12
46
5
105
121
4,727
$311,406,320.00
5,044
$2,214,
2,342.
12,
5,330,
10,987.
26,473
4,019,
21,321,
1,587,
1,911,
364,
2,732,
1,051,
48,588
24,644,
9,367,
28,122,
3,040,
510
4,653,
9,449
52,618
6,444
14,485
7,524
874.00
,130.00
,474.00
,371.00
,169.00
,970.00
,643.00
,132.00
,579.00
,175.00
,625.00
,092.00
,061.00
.954.00
,374.00
,532.00
,805.00
979.00
,521.00
,479.00
,766.00
;,098.00
645.00
,994.00
,236.00
23
106
1,116
2,8
617
68
99
19
123
75
1,174
957
111
496
67
9
143
9
56
5
114
147
$2,789,
2,883,
12,
4,904,
12,040,
24,604,
4,047,
23,114
1,644
2,480
419
3,107,
1,168,
49,074
22,746
9,580
18,467,
3,941
507.
5,356
9,880
42,370
6,596
16,657
7.942
221.00
098.00
,325.00
871.00
142.00
,052.00
,719.00
,617.00
,656.00
,693.00
,776.00
,163.00
,011.00
,693.00
,651.00
,047.00
001.00
,603.00
,707.00
,035.00
,380.00
,186.00
,640.00
,271.00
,314 00
$289,799,678.00
5,687
$276,333,872.0)
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
For purposes of comparison a segregation of the industrial activities of the Province
has been maintained in three divisions—Greater Vancouver, Rest of Mainland, and
Vancouver Island. While in 1944 some curtailment was noted in the Greater Vancouver section, resulting in a slight decrease in the percentage of the total pay-roll
attributable to this division, the 1945 totals increased the percentage for this area to
49.43 as against 44.11 per cent, for the previous year. A corresponding decrease was
recorded in the Mainland percentage, which fell to 31.59 from 38.33 per cent, for 1944.
The Vancouver Island totals recorded an increase, the percentage representing this
division rising from 17.56 to 18.98 per cent, for 1945. H 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
A divisional break-down of the total estimated 1945 pay-roll is obtained by the
application of these percentages to the total figure, and is shown in the following table
together with comparative data for previous years:—•
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.*
1945.f
Greater Vancouver	
Rest of Mainland 	
$92,504,732.26
98,157,533.10
48,863,193.64
$147,821,701.60
115,623,552.70
58,536,234.70
$185,153,980.93
139,655,391.76
70,143,658.31
$171,190,910.00
148,758,730.00
68,150,360.00
$183,694,695.72
117,396,630.34
70,534,600.94
Totals	
$239,525,459.00
$321,981,489.00
$394,953,031.00
$388,100,000.00
$371,625,927.00
* 1944 total revised since publication of 1944 report,
t 1945 preliminary total subject to revision.
A survey of adult males employed at less than $19 per week showed decreasing
percentages in the lower wage brackets in eleven of the twenty-five industrial classifications.
Industries in the following list are arranged in order of diminishing percentages
to show the total adult males employed during the week of greatest employment, together
with the percentage of that number in receipt of less than $19 per week.
Number Per Cent.
Industry.                                                                                                                   employed.        Less than $19.
House furnishings         982 9.78
Leather and fur goods        384 8.85
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing        545 6.79
Food products   12,307 6.63
Builders' materials      1,573 5.91
Coast shipping      5,348 5.39
Printing and publishing      1,379 5.08
Garment-manufacturing  _.        193 4.66
Miscellaneous trades and industries     7,617 4.17
Construction    16,031 3.73
Metal trades      9,287 3.68
Breweries and distillers       1,189 3.62
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)       3,209 2.87
Smelting and concentrating     2,298 2.52
Explosives and chemicals     1,220 2.17
Ship-building    20,939 1.83
Paint-manufacturing        127 1.57
Oil-refining      1,410 1.49
Coal-mining        2,383 1.47
Lumber industries   28,362 1.22
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc     5,760 1.01
Pulp and paper manufacturing     3,762 0.98
Metal-mining     4,520 0.60
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing          10 0.00
Jewellery-manufacturing    _.        101 0.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 11
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRIES.
Based on the week of employment of the greatest number, the average weekly
wage for adult male workers increased in eleven of the twenty-five tables, remained
unchanged in one, and decreased in the remaining thirteen.
Average weekly earnings for adult males in each industry are shown in the following table from 1938 to 1945.
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
$27.42
22.82
13.00
28.20
32.93
25.81
24.20
23.70
23.15
20.80
38.95
23.33
22.23
26.59
25.09
30.48
23.46
28.68
22.78
34.19
26.36
28.76
24.80
27.78
22.68
$27.98
23.23
19.75
29.39
29.35
26.12
25.75
23.23
24.25
22.53
39.23
23.19
21.19
27.14
25.38
30.86
23.91
28.97
22.69
34.34
26.54
28.55
25.57
28.63
23.22
$28.23
24.15
17.70
28.04
30.34
27.52
31.67
23.59
25.22
23.59
43.44
24.00
21.72
28.83
26.18
31.77
24.36
29.17
23.15
34.34
29.84
31.74
32.75
28.57
24,88
$29.29
26.26
14.50
31.84
30.03
30.21
33.39
25.65
26.51
25.74
38.72
24.76
26.07
31.01
29.90
33.72
26.97
30.97
24.95
36.78
32.13
35.27
37.07
30.93
27.01
$31.85
30.78
15.83
34.56
31.24
36.41
36.45
30.52
27.72
27.76
38.59
28.20
27.80
33.94
34.00
37.19
33.58
33.40
28.73
37.10
33.92
40.32
38.49
32.28
30.24
$33.46
31.61
15.10
39.00
33.97
39.60
37.54
32.66
32.03
28.13
41.14
30.39
30.18
37.09
36.37
35.82
34.92
35.52
30.71
38.39
36.41
40.08
38.47
35.01
33.34
$34.72
33.17
23.61
42.38
35.86
38.47
36.50
35.06
34.42
31.28
44.64
33.05
32.47
41.28
39.07
39.40
37.21
37.99
33.42
39.47
37.71
40.36
36.74
37.29
34.75
$33.73
34.12
20.90
42.11
36.54
37.50
40.43
35.62
36.11
31.39
41.38
31.34
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of..
31.63
41.24
38.41
39.99
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
35.31
38.71
33.42
41 63
37 88
39 96
41 19
Street-railways, gas, water, power, tele-
37 21
Wood, manufacturing of (N.E.S.)	
34.70
The increases and decreases in the average weekly earnings are as follows:
Increase.
Builders' materials  ¥0.95
Coast shipping     0.68
Explosives and chemicals     3.93
Food products, manufacture of     0.56
Garment-making'      1.69
House furnishings  -     0.11
Metal-mining _  $0.59
Oil-refining      0.72
Printing and publishing      2.16
Pulp and paper manufacturing     0.17
Smelting and concentrating      4.45
Decrease.
Breweries   $0.99
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing  2.71
Coal-mining   0.27
Construction   0.97
Jewellery, manufacture of  3.26
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing  1.71
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of 0.84
Lumber industries   $0.04
Metal trades   0.66
Miscellaneous trades and industries  1.90
Ship-building   0.40
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc  0.08
Wood, manufacturing of (N.E.S.)   0.05
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The recorded average weekly wage for all adult males in the wage-earner group
stood at $38.50 for 1945, to show a slight recession from the all-time high of $38.70
established in the previous year. The average industrial wage figures for each year
since the formation of the Department are recorded as follows:— H 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
1918  $27.97
1919  29.11
1920  31.51
1921  27.62
1922  27.29
1923  28.05
1924  28.39
1925  27.82
1926  27.99
1927  28.29
1928  28.96
1929  29.20
1930  28.64
1931  26.17
1932  $23.62
1933  22.30
1934  23.57
1935  24.09
1936  26.36
1937  26.64
1938  26.70
1939  26.80
1940  28.11
1941  30.67
1942  35.24
1943  37.19
1944  38.70
1945  38.50
The above average weekly wage figures are represented in the following chart,
showing the trend of average weekly wages for adult male workers from 1918 to 1945.
Average Weekly Wages paid to Adult Male E
MPLOYEES,
1918-
-1945.
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WAGES
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
!932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
!93«
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
I94S
1946
*3<?.00
36.00
37.00
36 00
35.00
34.00
33.00
32.00
31.00
30.00
29:00
28.00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.00
r
/
/
/
/
/
j
A
/
'\
1
/
\
1
/
/
\
■""^.
\
/
—s
-*
\
\
/
'
\
\
/
\
/
\
V
(1945 figure—$38.50.) AVERAGE MONTHLY   NU MBER of WAGE-EARNERS   (Male and Female)
1929 -31-32-39 -40-41 -42-43-44-45
JAN.     FEB.    MAR.    APR.    MAY   JUNE  JULY    AUG.   SEPT.   OCT.     NOV.    DEC.
.
1945.
January   120,344 July   132,220
February     121,848 August   129,949
March    122,046 September    126,890
April   122,781 October   125,398
May   125,281 November   122,785
June   129,685 December   114,333 H 14
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Weekly Percentage
Wages. Employees.
Under $15     4.18
$15 to   20  14.10
20 to    25  23.33
25 to    30  19.54
30 to    35  17.03
35 to    40  10.71
40 to    45     5.99
45 to    50     2.75
50 and over     2.37
Under $15     2.65
$15 to    20     7.55
20 to    25  20.42
25 to    30  20.40
30 to    35  17.46
35 to    40  13.08
40 to    45  10.65
45 to    50     4.17
50 and over     3.62
Under $15  1.66
$15 to    20  2.99
20 to    25  9.20
25 to    30  17.62
30 to    35  17.12
35 to    40  18.32
40 to    45  12.42
45 to    50  9.34
50 and over  11.33
Under $15     1.99
$15 to    20     1.82
20 to    25     4.83
26 to    30  12.08
30 to    35  19.33
35 to    40  18.91
40 to    45  14.21
45 tq    50  11.90
50  and over   14.93
Under $15  1.97
$15 to    20  1.72
20 to     25  3.53
25 to    30  9.90
30 to    35  22.06
35 to    40  19.48
40 to    45  17.38
45 to    50  11.53
50 and; over  12.43
Under $15     1.81
$15 to    20     1.62
20 to    25     3.85
25 to    30     9.89
30 to    35  22.38
35 to    40  19.70
40 to    45  18.97
45 to    50     9.59
50 and over  12.19
=             IV              w             Jg
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in the various wage classifications from 1940 to 1945. ..... ,,.,..- .
REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 15
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SSoftp,fcSoiS H 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
RACIAL ORIGIN AND NATIONALITY OF EMPLOYEES.
The 1945 survey dealing with racial origin and nationality covered a total of
181,488 employees, of which 141,307 or 77.86 per cent, were originally from English-
speaking countries; 29,833 or 16.44 per cent, originally from Continental Europe;
6,286 or 3.46 per cent, from Asiatic stock; and 4,062 or 2.24 per cent, from other
countries, or racial origin not stated.
Comparative percentages for the past five years are set out in the following table:—
Racial Origin.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
Per Cent.
75.93
16.18
6.27
1.62
Per Cent.
77.37
16.55
4.34
1.74
Per Cent.
75.25
18.87
3.80
2.08
Per Cent.
76.08
18.27
3.95
1.70
Per Cent.
77.86
Continental Europe  - _
Asiatic ...- - —	
16.44
3.46
2.24
Totals ....- - -	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
The number of firms reporting in the higher pay-roll bracket again increased in
1945, a total of 449 firms reporting pay-rolls of over $100,000, compared with 435 in
1944 and 423 in this classification for 1943.
As previously stated, pay-rolls of public authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or
municipal) are not included, nor are wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental railways, or vessels engaged in deep-sea transportation.
The lumber industry continued to lead with 121 firms reporting in the higher
bracket, an increase of 3 over the previous year; followed by food products with 48,
an increase of 2; construction industry, 46, unchanged; metal trades, with 44, a
decrease of 4; miscellaneous trades and industries, 29, up 3; coast shipping, 19,
unchanged; ship-building, 17,unchanged; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), 17, increased
by 2; metal-mining, 16, down 1; public utilities, 16, up 1; oil-refining, 11, up 4; pulp
and paper manufacturing, 9, unchanged; builders' materials, 8, increased by 2; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 8, up 1; printing and publishing, 8, unchanged; breweries
and distillers, 7, unchanged; coal-mining, 7, down 1; garment-making, 5, up 1;
explosives and chemicals, 3, unchanged; house furnishings, 3, unchanged; leather and
fur goods, 2, unchanged; paint-manufacturing, 2, up 1; smelting and concentrating, 2,
and jewellery-manufacturing, 1, both unchanged from the previous year.
Of the 449 firms reported above, seven had pay-rolls in excess of $5,000,000, two
between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, four between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000, eight
between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and sixteen between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 17
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc.—Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick; also
stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation
of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general and
towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include the
operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction.—Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-metal
works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel
fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves, dredging,
pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic sprinklers.
Firms making returns as building contractors, constructors of dry-
kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces, electrical contractors,
hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc.—Includes the manufacture of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacturing of.—This table includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packing-houses,
curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers
of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces, coffee, catsup,
and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' out-fitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacturing of.—Includes the repair as
well as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical instruments   (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacturing of.—Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills, and
lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine black-
smithing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops, galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of handsaws, nuts
and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and repairs to
same.
No.   16.   Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.-—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, cartage and warehousing, motor and aerial transportation,
ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.—Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-ruling,
bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of
rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only firms
engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-
ship building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
engaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.-—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial gases, operation of street-railways,' and waterworks.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings, barrels,
boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes and tanks,
wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins, and undertakers'
supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering SU Finns.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $285,357.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        323,466.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     2,180,398.00
 Total   $2,789,221.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
986
966
977
998
1,016
1,122
319
403
348
349
328
288
July	
August
September...
October
November...
December...
1,040
1,138
1,232
1,233
1,140
1,206
202
February
March	
April 	
May	
June	
294
517
646
466
445
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00 	
$6.00 to $6.99..... 	
7.00 to    7.99
13
2
2
6
1
1
2
3
9
2
2
1
5
10
10
4
30
15
55
38
37
68
367
354
87
33
14
13
1
1
3
4
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
7
1
6
1
2
2
1
2
9
2
7
2
1
	
	
12
2
16
1
2
7
12
2
7
25
3
30
40
30
72
63
83
108
6
81
8
1
5
2
4
5
3
	
1
2
8.00 to    8.99 	
9.00 to    9.99  -
10.00 to 10.99          	
1
11.00 to 11.99 	
12.00 to 12.99   	
3
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99	
3
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99          	
1
17.00 to 17.99   	
1
18.00 to 18.99      -
4
19.00 to 19.99 	
4
20.00 to 20.99
3
21.00 to 21.99
2
22.00 to 22.99     	
4
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99    	
2
25.00* to 25.99
26.00 to 26.99     	
27.00 to 27.99          	
28.00 to 28.99     	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99 	
35.00 to 39.99            .
40.00 to 44.99 	
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99       	
56.00 to 59.99            	
60.00 to 64.99   	
65.00 to 69.99          -
70.00 and over .  ..—
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
' Born in Great Britain,
Ireland..	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian ,
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavia	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above....
Males.
British
Subject.
748
286
38
7
37
21
20
13
34
24
3
1
1
"25
British
Subject.
73
20
"■14
4
1
2
6
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified) .—	 H 18
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
 Returns covering 88 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $326,179.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        374,071.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     2,182,848.00
 Total   $2,883,098.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January..	
February
March—	
1,175
1,173
1,177
1,204
1,233
1.240
41
41
40
41
38
38
July 	
August
September...
October.	
November...
December ...
1,293
1,298
1,311
1,380
1,433
1,421
38
38
37
45
May ..--	
June   	
45
42
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number,
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00-	
$6.00 to $6.99    	
12
6
5
2
3
5
3
7
1
4
6
6
21
12
17
16
6
15
22
46
28
29
32
83
124
412
285
185
87
51
21
14
2
5
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
4
1
5
1
1
16
18
3
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
3
3
12
2
6
2
1
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99          	
9.00 to    9.99
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99          	
12.00 to 12.99           	
13.00 to 13.99 	
14.00 to 14.99 	
15.00 to 15.99 --
16.00 to 16.99          	
17.00 to 17.99          	
1
18.00 to 18.99 	
19.00 to 19.99          	
20.00 to 20.99          	
21.00 to 21.99          	
22.00 to 22.99    ..    	
23.00 to 23.99          	
24.00 to 24.99           	
2
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99          -    -
27.00 to 27.99          	
28.00 to 28.99    ..    	
29.00 to 29.99           	
30.00 to 34.99          	
35.00 to 39.99     	
40.00 to 44.99      ..   -	
45.00 to 49.99      -
50.00 to 54.99           	
55.00 to 59.99  -
60.00 to 64.99           	
65.00 to 69.99 	
70.00 and over	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Tugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian..
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above....
Males.
British
Subject.
951
376
38
29
18
32
16
10
63
60
5
7
1
11
4
22
2
10
"63
Females.
Subject.
64
4
......
1
1
Alien.
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified) 	
Males.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
 Returns covering 3 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $1,040.00
Clerks,  Stenographers,  Salesmen,  etc	
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     11,285.00
 Total  -  $12,325.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January
February
10
10
10
10
10
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
July	
August
September
October	
November—
December
10
10
10
10
10
10
1
1
1
1
1
June 	
1
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs. 1 Under
and over.   18 Trs.
Under $6.00	
2
7
1
1
$6.00 to $6.99 	
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to    8.99 -
9.00 to    9.99
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99       	
13.00 to 13.99
14.00 to 14.99
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00' to 16.99
17.00 to 17.99
18.00 to 18.99
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99
21.00 to 21.99 --
22.00 to 22.99 ___
23.00 to 23.99           	
24.00 to 24.99            	
25.00' to 25.99  --
26.00 to 26.99           	
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99
29.00 to 29.99            	
30.00 to 34.99    	
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99     _...
60.00 to 64.99
65.00 to 69.99       	
70.00 and over 	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Tugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
Subject.
Females.
British
Subject.
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)  	
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 19
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 23 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $406,SS3.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        106,592.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     4,391,396.00
 Total   $4,904,871.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March	
April	
May	
2,347
2,382
2,383
2,380
2,341
2,357
3
3
1
2
2
2
July	
August
September..
October
November..
December .
2,296
2,255
2,280
2,201
2,343
2,371
2
2
2
1
1
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00 ....
5
1
1
1
2
4
4
1
3
5
2
6
4
10
4
3
15
10
13
15
23
12
50
275
455
688
441
111
44
145
11
19
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
2
3
7
4
8
6
25
16
19
1
1
1
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99   	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99   	
14.00 to 14.99 	
15.00 to  15.99
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99     	
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99 ... ...__	
23.00 to 23.99 	
24.00 to 24.99 	
25.00 to 25.99  	
26.00 to 26.99            .
27.00 to 27.99	
28 00 to 28.99
29.00 to 29.99   	
30 00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99  -
40 00 to 44.99         	
45.00 to 49.99	
50 00 to 54.99
60.00 to 64.99   	
65.00 to 69.99   	
70.00 and over
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak.
Hungarian, Rumanian
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Tugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
718
2
6
3
191
64
153
23
172
65
6
"Ti
2
42
19
43
5
32
35
"74
Females.
British
Subject.
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) 	
26
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 106 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers        $904,367.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  771,757.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     10,364,018.00
 Total    $12.040 142.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ...rt
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males. Females.
5,053
5,030
5,128
5,150
5,176
5,184
199
210
221
202
212
211
Month.
July	
August	
September-
October	
November.-
December...
Males.  Females.
5,375
5,355
5,307
5,209
5,204
5,042
225
228
211
205
194
193
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00 to
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
11.00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
L5.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
15.00 to
50.00 to
55.00 to
30.00 to
■35.00 to
70.00 an
$6.00..
7.99...
8.99....
9.99 ...
10.99...
11.99 —
12.99 ...
13.99....
14.99...
15.99—
16.99...
17.99...
18.99...
19.99...
20.99 —
21.99 ...
22.99 ...
23.99 —
24.99 —
25.99 ...
26.99 ...
27.99...
28.99 —
29.99...
34.99 ...
39.99 ...
44.99 ...
49.99...
54.99 ...
59.99 ...
64.99—
69.99 ...
d over.
Males.
21 Trs.  Under
and over. 21 Trs.
22
1
58
1
5
5
4
15
23
42
47
49
52
102
168
217
86
112
138
88
201
235
174
586
840
844
358
501
124
157
31
46
Females.
18 Trs.  Under
and over. 18 Trs.
1 I
To
4
10
17
8
82
8
33
15
25
20
35
67
75
"46
4
6
1
2
8
12
1
5
5
2
1
88
5
7
8
2
11
3
1
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak.
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Tugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian..
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above....
Subject.
3,370
1,636
99
29
18
28
24
55
217
116
10
15
1
353
British
Subject.
Ill    I
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)    - -      	 H 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 6.
CONSTRUCTION.
Returns covering 1,116 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $2,170,485.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       2,205,892.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     20,227,675.00
 Total   $24,604,052.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.          Males.
Females.
January	
9,314
9,424
9,589
9,906
10,515
10,973
338
347
398
437
516
554
July	
11,582
12,341
12,348
12,622
12,637
11.944
593
570
March	
September...
421
342
May    .
June	
November-
December—
320
272
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99 -	
7.00 to    7.99	
87
38
25
37
40
25
31
56
39
31
46
41
45
57
91
111
85
142
124
243
238
320
350
743
243
4,006
2,174
3,093
1,822
926
283
191
80
168
10
7
6
11
9
12
12
24
17
17
39
19
40
10
17
35
21
26
7
37
16
32
38
49
12
83
51
10
4
8
1
1
20
6
4
4
4
4
1
12
9
9
21
12
5
57
19
35
8
20
15
27
35
26
15
16
11
44
25
10
3
1
1
8
2
1
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99	
2
13.00 to 13.99	
4
14.00 to 14.99    	
3
15.00 to 15.99	
3
16.00 to 16.99	
7
17.00 to 17.99	
1
18.00 to 18.99	
7
19.00 to 19.99	
1
20.00 to 20.99
3
21.00 to 21.99	
1
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99 	
1
24.00 to 24.99
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99      	
27.00 to 27.99	
1
3
29.00 to 29.99     	
30.00 to 34.99 .1	
35.00 to 39.99	
40 00 to 44.99         	
45.00 to 49.99	
50 00 to 54 99          	
60 00 to 64.99 _
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Tugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
Subject.
9,470
394
142
260
178
212
248
765
49
19
23
8
13
71
5
641
10
14
30
19
49
199
5
British
Subject.
2
17
571
88
6
1
4
4
6
1
21
18
1
2
1
"20
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)   - — _ 	
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
 Returns covering 28 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $154,203.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        664,766.00
Wag^earners   (including piece-workers)     3,228,750.00
 Total   $4,047,719.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January...	
February
March	
April 	
May 	
June	
1,040
1,056
1,032
999
976
1.008
222
227
228
226
223
222
July 	
August.
September..
October
November..
December
951
941
952
1,036
1,119
1,136
203
202
200
184
143
97
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00 ..
6
1
1
6
2
1
4
1
1
3
3
6
5
8
5
15
10
9
5
18
16
162
307
251
126
246
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
4
2
1
2
1
1
2
8
1
30
26
2
6
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
6
5
2
5
17
4
2
3
13
2
13
3
1
4
2
35
76
21
9
46
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99 ..-	
8.00 to    8.99
9.00 to    9.99
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99      	
12.00 to 12.99   ..
13.00 to 13.99
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99	
3
19.00 to 19.99	
1
20.00 to 20.99  	
21.00 to 21.99 	
22.00 to 22.99 	
23.00 to 23.99
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99     .
26.00 to 26.99 	
27.00 to 27.99...'..
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00  to 34.99 .rt__ _
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00  to 44.99 	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99	
BB.O0 to 59.99 	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99     	
70.00  and over
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British:
Born in Canada-	
Born in Great Britain,
809
377
7
4
1
32
6
9
45
8
2
16
1
3
1
3
7
3
6
1
220
44
2
9
1
3
2
3
1
7
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
1
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian. Czech, Slovak.
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Hindu, other East Indian..
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above....
Males.
Females.
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)      - -	
58
7 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 21
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURING OF.
 Returns covering 617 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $2,418,641.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       3,132,019.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     17,563,957.00
 Total   $23,114,617.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March 	
April	
6,431
6,327
6,146
6,700
7,204
7,904
3,762
3,388
2,912
2,815
3,175
3,664
July	
August..
September...
October
November	
December	
9,551
10,025
10,111
9,699
8,430
7,769
5,664
6,994
7,798
7,216
6,069
4,541
June 	
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99.__.
7.00 to    7.99....
8.00 to    8.99--
9.00 to    9.99....
10.00 to 10.99—
11.00 to 11.99....
12.00 to 12.99 _..
13.00 to 13.99—
14.00 to 14.99...
15.00 to 15.99—
16.00' to 16.99....
17.00 to 17.99...
18.00 to 18.99—
19.00 to 19.99...
20.00 to 20.99--
21.00 to 21.99—
22.00 to 22.99 ...
23.00 to 23.99...
24.00 to 24.99—
25.00 to 25.99—
26.00 to 26.99 ...
27.00 to 27.99..-
28.00 to 28.99 ...
29.00 to 29.99 _
30.00 to 34.99 —
35.00 to 39.99 —
40.00 to 44.99 ...
45.00 to 49.99 —
50.00 to 54.99...
55.00 to  59.99 —
60.00 to 64.99....
65.00 to 69.99 ...
70.00 and over
Males.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
167
54
43
41
40
43
27
65
45
52
68
41
46
84
81
107
107
115
104
581
507
305
344
597
580
2,444
2,101
1,257
745
590
191
136
67
532
179
28
28
28
24
18
6
15
18 Trs.     Under
and over.   18 Trs.
349
123
96
106
123
160
15
169
26
284
38
331
26
458
30
408
30
468
44
376
43
433
47
489
38
531
46
549
71
565
45
490
74
348
73
302
80
270
54
202
238
653
160
328
70
156
24
50
29
30
12
4
10
2
5
2
5
2
251
46
28
19
45
40
23
53
54
93
89
70
81
118
62
89
101
80
86
108
60
39
36
26
23
64
38
21
7
3
1
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Tugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above.-
Males.
British
Subject.
7,010
2,444
179
102
144
74
190
100
638
477
116
10
367
1
27
1,488
9
155
14
17
40
29
94
170
30
1,031
"ii
85
Females.
British
Subject.
6,237
1,182
113
85
105
86
209
121
316
717
10
4
32
4
72
1,423
8
129
4
38
25
16
199
17
"91
Males.
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)	
Table No. 9.
GARMENT-MAKING.
 Returns covering 68 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $241,209.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        216,675.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     1,186,772.00
 Total   $1,644,656.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January...	
February
March...	
April	
177
176
177
177
175
174
851
914
956
953
925
900
July	
August _.
September-
October
November....
December.—
172
175
179
195
206
205
861
801
856
950
1,020
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00	
4
4
1
7
2
4
2
3
6
2
4
4
8
45
33
31
17
6
5
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
8
4
2
6
4
8
12
19
23
50
32
145
64
98
67
70
55
52
39
43
42
46
29
22
14
42
15
3
4
1
$6.00 to $6.99	
1
7.00 to    7.99 	
8.00 to    8.99.	
1
9.00 to    9.99	
2
10.00 to 10.99
2
11.00 to 11.99	
3
12.00 to 12.99
4
13.00 to 13.99	
6
14.00 to 14.99	
11
15.00 to 15.99 ..
1
16.00 to 16.99	
9
17.00 to 17.99	
3
18.00 to 18.99 	
1
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99   	
2
21.00 to 21.99	
1
22.00 to 22.99	
2
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99 	
25.00 to 25.99	
2
26.00 to 26.99      	
1
27.00 to 27.99 	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99         	
30.00 to 34.99           .   ..
35.00 to 39.99 	
40.00 to 44.99 	
45 00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99	
60 00 to 64.99     	
70.00 and over     	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Axistrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian-
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Tugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian-
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above—
Males.
British
Subject.
53
7
2
2
3
4
17
2
19
2
1
Alien.
Females.
British
Subject.
2
1
4
11
679
222
9
8
10
13
12
3
33
60
4
11
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)   1
Males.
13 H 22
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
 Returns covering 99 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $326,709.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        210,043.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     1,943,941.00
 Total   $2,480,693.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
827
834
857
841
800
839
694
719
717
725
716
718
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-_-
December..--
859
915
951
1,048
1,157
1,169
687
February
March	
April	
May—	
June	
686
716
703
705
711
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage
-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00      	
5
3
4
2
8
1
8
7
7
5
7
8
12
19
17
25
22
27
13
34
17
45
59
30
68
199
173
81
28
35
11
1
1
31
2
3
2
1
2
3
9
7
9
23
8
4
16
8
13
6
9
3
4
5
2
7
1
5
12
1
13
5
1
6
3
5
11
14
16
22
29
57
67
61
66
72
30
63
30
59
24
11
23
3
6
13
3
7
1
1
1
1
10
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99   	
1
8.00 to    8.99- 	
9.00 to    9.99   - -	
2
2
10.00 to 10.99   	
3
mi.00 to 11.99 -
1
12.00 to 12.99   	
2
13.00 to 13.99   	
9
14.00 to 14.99   	
2
15 00 to 15.99	
2
16.00 to 16.99	
14
17.00 to 17.99   	
8
18 00 to 18.99   	
2
19.00 to 19.99   	
4
20.00 to 20.99    —
1
21 00 to 21.99   .
22.00 to 22.99   	
3
23.00 to 23.99   	
24.00 to 24.99    	
2
25.00 to 25.99   	
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99   	
1
29.00 to 29.99   	
30.00 to 34.99   	
35.00 to 39.99   	
40.00 to 44.99   	
45 00 to 49.99   	
50 00 to 54.99     	
60 00 to 64.99    	
70.00  and over 	
	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French :	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Tugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
Alien.
Females.
British
Subject.
732
281
8
12
9
13
24
21    I
39
	
458
142
21
1
9
3
2
10
19
1
11
3
6
1
68
5
1
1
10
1
1
1
1
24
35
54
14    I
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)  	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
 Returns covering 19 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $51,756.00
Clerks,  Stenographers,  Salesmen, etc     193,902.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     174,118.00
 Total   $419,776.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
76
77
75
75
73
73
29
34
30
32
31
34
72
77
89
95
109
112
37
February
August
September..
October
November-
December....
39
39
April	
May 	
June	
40
41
42
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00 __.
$6.00 to $6.99	
1
1
1
1
5
2
2
1
2
12
10
26
20
12
1
2
2
1
4
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
6
1
5
1
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99 	
2
11.00 to 11.99	
1
12.00 to 12.99
1
13.00 to 13.99
14.00 to 14.99	
1
15.00 to 15.99	
1
16.00 to 16.99-	
17.00 to 17.99 	
18.00 to 18.99. -
19.00 to 19.99 _	
20.00 to 20.99. _	
1
1
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99    .
1
23.00 to 23.99-	
1
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99.  —
26.00 to 26.99 -	
27.00 to 27.99	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99—	
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian..
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above..-
Males.
British
Subject.
82
31
2
1
1
British
Subject.
35
2
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) _ 	
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 23
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING.
 Returns covering 123 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $235,724.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        520,495.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     2,350,944.00
 Total   $3,107,163.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
509     1   1.795
July -	
569
568
572
587
607
611
2,056
2,019
2,046
2,064
February
516
524
524
532
553
1,812
1,854
1,882
1,937
2,036
August	
September-
October —
November-
December ...
May	
June 	
2,029
2,015
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00   .
6
3
1
1
3
1
1
2
3
2
2
2
10 •
4
9
7
7
13
24
34
23
36
36
31
139
77
36
9
10
4
2
7
6
2
1
1
1
6
3
1
3
4
2
2
2
1
6
1
1
1
2
2
2
49
23
32
59
32
35
38
66
59
124
175
199
223
228
129
108
108
72
35
41
33
13
9
15
4
12
4
6
5
10
4
2
43
$6.00 to $6.99 	
13
7.00 to    7.99
5
8.00 to    8.99— 	
9.00 to    9.99 	
10.00 to 10.99 	
3
1
1
11.00 to 11.99	
4
12.00 to 12.99	
6
13.00 to 13.99 	
12
14.00 to 14.99	
15
15.00 to 15.99 	
16.00 to 16.99	
19
36
17.00 to 17.99	
28
18.00 to 18.99	
22
19.00 to 19.99
8
20.00 to 20.99 	
1
21.00 to 21.99	
2
22.00 to 22.99	
3
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99
1
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99   	
29.00 to 29.99.	
30.00 to 34.99 	
35.00 to 39.99 _
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99.	
50.00 to 54.99    	
60.00 to 64.99 . 	
65.00 to 69.99           	
70.00 and over ...	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavia	
Hebrew ,
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...,
Males.
British
Subject.
422
210
5
2
7
5
10
17
.18
Females.
British
Subject.
1,508
369
9
14
23
17
20
33
43
1
"l2
4
87
7
3
9
2
1
4
7
8
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)  -
Males.
35
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS-
MANUFACTURING OF.
 Returns covering 75 Finns.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $155,747.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        192,328.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)        819,936.00
 Total   $1,168,011.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.        Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March	
321
321
330
337
332
341
321    1
329
330
338
347
351    1
July	
August -
September-
October	
November-
December....
345
344
375
401
422
425
349
349
370
May	
June	
375
337
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00 _._.	
2
3
2
5
3
3
1
3
9
3
5
10
5
4
13
11
15
15
11
14
14
92
88
36
8
5
2
1
1
4
1
1
2
1
3
6
2
3
9
9
2
3
1
4
1
3
3
2
1
1
1
3
2
2
3
3
5
3
4
10
18
10
12
30
23
25
35
18
18
15
18
14
13
21
6
7
2
5
16
7
1
$6.00 to $6.99	
1
7.00 to    7.99—-	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99 -—_	
2
11.00 to 11.99	
2
12.00 to 12.99	
2
13.00 to 13.99	
2
14.00 to 14.99	
12
15.00 to 15.99-—	
5
16.00 to 16.99.___	
6
17.00 to 17.99	
5
18.00 to 18.99   	
5
19.00 to 19.99	
3
20.00 to 20.99	
1
21.00 to 21.99 -_    .
2
22.00 to 22.99 	
23.00 to 23.99 	
1
24.00 to 24.99     .
25.00 to 25.99	
2
26.00 to 26.99. 	
27 00 to 27.99
1
28.00 to 28.99   	
29.00  to 29.99    '	
30.00 to 34.99 	
35.00 to 39.99  	
40 00 to 44.99   	
45.00 to 49.99 . -	
50.00 to 54.99	
60.00 to 64.99 -	
70.00 and over
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above....
British
Subject.
257
89
3
1
7
21
7
11
14
21
2
2
Females.
British
Subject.
46
2
1
1
4
2
17
10
2
24
Alien.
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified).— 	
Males.      Females. H 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 1,174 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $3,085,170.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       1,531,935.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     44,457,588.00
 Total   $49,074.693.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
20,794
21,740
22,018
21,801
22,614
22.807
428
442
442
473
484
507
July	
21,635
22,984
23,555
24,433
24,073
21,294
506
February
March      . __..
August
September_-
October	
November.—
December	
493
491
469
May	
Jiinp
431
399
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and oyer.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00 	
48
16
9
18
19
18
18
23
21
18
41
39
27
31
190
72
39
67
97
178
165
200
212
463
597
7,238
5,908
3,862
3,203
1,932
1,066
865
476
1,186
8
1
2
2
9
6
6
2
5
2
5
8
4
12
15
9
10
11
11
45
15
44
27
35
43
471
404
113
52
13
6
3
4
6
7
1
6
4
6
5
16
7
2
9
8
6
19
8
25
21
13
10
34
25
23
11
22
24
111
47
17
1
2
1
$6.00 to $6.99    	
7.00 to    7.99    	
8.00 to    8.99 	
9.00 to    9.99    	
10.00 to 10.99    ..
11.00 to 11.99
12.00 to 12.99    	
1
13.00 to 13.99 	
14.00 to 14.99    ...-	
15.00 to 15.99    	
16.00 to 16.99
1
17.00 to 17.99    	
1
18.00 to 18.99
3
19.00 to 19.99    	
4
20.00 to 20.99    	
3
21.00 to 21.99	
3
22.00 to 22.99    	
3
23.00 to 23.99     	
4
24.00 to 24.99     	
6
25.00' to 25.99	
2
26.00 to 26.99    	
i
27.00 to 27.99     .    .
2
28.00 to 28.99    	
2
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99     	
2
13
35.00 to 39.99     .
21
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99 	
50.00 to 54.99     	
55.00 to 59.99      	
60.00 to 64.99 	
65.00 to 69.99     	
70.00 and over 	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
Males.
British
Subject.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
. Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Tugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian..
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above....
14,328
3,386
233
172
394
202
460
703
2,738
26
13
62
76
244
1,288
601
34
248
172
1
10
1
2
521
1,096
1
529
1
519
221
4
685
11
14
1
506
76
13
British
Subject.
44
5
1
5
1
3
33
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)	
Males.
436
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
 Returns covering 957 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $3,457,692.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       4,658,277.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     14,630,682.00
 Total   $22,746,651.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January_	
February.
March	
April—	
May 	
June 	
7,743
7,847
7,859
7,985
7.983
8,129
838
874
952
872
910
944
July	
August
September-
October	
November-
December —
8,215
8,111
7,894
7,748
7,894
7,898
901
843
744
709
649
640
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and oyer.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00
27
11
13
16
19
22
22
21
20
15
33
33
38
52
37
112
39
117
72
118
214
150
159
219
116
1,597
1,924
2,154
973
403
165
126
80
170
27
13
15
18
11
37
27
35
20
24
71
24
50
39
32
49
26
59
22
36
35
32
27
30
15
110
47
23
14
7
2
6
4
5
7
4
5
9
13
5
20
10
15
42
21
36
38
27
50
28
54
35
57
55
47
72
41
29
125
53
13
3
2
1
1
$6.00 to $6.99.	
7.00 to    7.99      	
8.00 to    8.99 	
9.00 to    9.99
2
10.00 to 10.99	
2
11.00 to 11.99        	
12.00 to 12.99    	
6
13.00 to 13.99      	
14.00 to 14.99     	
15.00 to 15.99	
10
16.00 to 16.99      	
3
17.00 to 17.99   	
3
18.00 to 18.99   	
4
19.00 to 19.99 _.
2
20.00 to 20.99     	
1
21.00 to 21.99 	
22.00 to 22.99      	
1
23.00 to 23.99   	
3
24.00 to 24.99          _.
5
25.00 to 25.99	
2
26.00 to 26.99       	
27.00 to 27.99      	
29.00 to 29.99      	
30.00 to 34.99     ..	
2
35.00 to 39.99	
4
40.00 to 44.99         	
45.00 to 49.99 -	
50.00 to 54.99     	
55.00 to 59.99 	
60.00 to 64.99        	
65.00 to 69.99    	
70.00 and over  ..—	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian-
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian-
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above....
British
Subject.
7,199
2,619
120
71
116
102
135
110
275
346
30
20
20
1
5
1
2
214
11
10
14
4
18
41
32
5
......
......
Ts
Females.
British
Subject.
1,008
141
3
3
14
14
20
5
35
46
1
4
1
35
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified) 	
Males.
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 25
Table No. 16.
METAL-MINING.
 Returns covering 111 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $881,612.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,176,804.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     7,521,631.00
 Total   $9,580,047.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
3,566
3,539
3,487
3,316
3,2S8
3,347
163
163
169
173
173
184
Month.
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December -rt-
Males. Females.
3,397
3,385
3,409
3,583
3,920
4,026
188
183
171
164
166
167
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under $
$6.00 to
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
11.00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
50.00 to
55.00 to
60.00 to
65.00 to
70.00 an
5.00	
$6.99....
7.99 —
8.99—
9.99 —
10.99—
11.99....
12.99 ...
13.99—
14.99...
15.99 —
16.99 —
17.99—
18.99 —
19.99—
20.99...
21.99...
22.99 ...
23.99 —
24.99 —
25.99 ...
26.99 -
27.99 —
28.99 —
29.99 ...
34.99...
39.99 ...
44.99...
49.99...
54.99 ...
59.99 ...
64.99...
69.99 ...
d over
3
1
3
3
4
7
13
17
7
9
12
19
720
1,567
1,431
383
182
43
28
20
24
Under
21 Trs.
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
and over.   18 Yrs.
13
......
4
1
12
35
11
3
1
15
3
15
3
14
3
11
13
7
14
'~22
12
33
1
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian-
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
. Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian..
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above....
Males.
British
Subject.
2,566
925
24
17
51
71
46
63
381
130
49
7
9
1
116
11
4
37
47
20
165
83
31
38
Females.
British
Subject.
177
36
3
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)  —-
Males.
61
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES.
 Returns covering U96 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $1,453,792.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       3,468,473.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     13,544,736.00
 Total   $18,467,001.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January
February
March...	
April	
May	
June	
6,294
6,392
6,563
6,561
6,665
7,518
2,543
2,648
2,672
2,817
2,960
3,575
July	
August -	
September...
October	
November-
December ...
7,349
6,404
5,202
4,172
4,168
4,097
3,614
2,481
1,537
1,180
1,165
1,091
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
56
8
6
15
16
11
22
31
11
23
36
26
34
23
70
51
55
81
57
180
165
160
231
367
198
1,750
1,700
1,497
417
150
59
32
23
56
34
3
6
7
12
14
12
16
17
6
22
26
12
28
30
37
38
42
46
56
33
34
22
47
25
105
57
28
12
3
2
1
1
53
15
15
17
13
47
20
28
30
44
72
93
111
121
134
236
112
168
51
140
141
96
59
260
38
654
320
49
12
4
3
2
3
36
$6.00 to $6.99	
9
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99 	
9.00 to    9.99.
7
10.00 to 10.99.	
13
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99	
18
13.00 to 13.99 	
14.00 to 14.99	
31
22
15.00 to 15.99...
16.00' to 16.99	
38
17.00 to 17.99.. ..
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99-	
16
20.00 to 20.99 .
21.00 to 21.99.	
22.00 to 22.99..
16
23.00 to 23.99- _	
6
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
5
26.00 to 26.99	
13
27.00 to 27.99 .
28.00 to 28.99.. ..
7
29.00 to 29.99 .
8
30.00 to 34.99	
11
35.00 to 39.99	
9
40.00 to 44.99	
2
45.00 to 49.99	
4
50.00 to 54.99	
2
55.00  to 59.99 	
1
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99           - _
70.00 and over —	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
5,010
1,955
92
64
49
48
83
75
224
425
19
7
32
6
8
170
5
343
20
33
....-
"26
British
Subject.
2,948
362
21
24
31
20
33
19
141
162
9
2
1
1
137
27
1
......
"4
"28
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified) - —
Males.
75
Females.
31 H 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
 Returns covering 67 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $473,739.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,684,880.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     1,782,984.00
 Total   $3,941,603.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
922
877
809
841
896
957
34
31
27
26
32
39
980
980
985
989
1,000
963
40
August	
September-
October
November	
December	
45
42
April 	
May	
June	
41
34
35
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Trs.
Under $6.00     	
3
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
8
1
2
1
3
4
29
7
4
9
28
82
316
343
323
128
35
19
13
12
30
1
1
1
2
1
1
4
2
3
3
3
4
16
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
5
1
8
1
11
2
4
2
$6.00 to $6.99. -	
7 00 to    7.99
8.00 to    8.99. ---	
9 00 to    9.99
10.00 to 10.99 -
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99
14.00 to 14.99
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99          .
17.00 to 17.99
18.00 to 18.99    -
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99
21.00 to 21.99
22.00 to 22.99
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99
25 00 to 25.99
26.00 to 26.99    -     .    -
27.00 to 27.99. -
28 00 to 28.99
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99 	
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54 99
55.00 to 59.99       -
60 00 to 64 99
65 00 to 69.99
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch ,
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian-
Japanese ,
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
1,091
415
23
3
4
4
3
15
2
1
7
Females.
Subject.
137
25
2
86
2
62
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)-  	
Males.
56
Females.
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
 Returns covering 9 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $99,734.00
Clerks,  Stenographers,  Salesmen,  etc.     155,477.00
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     252,496.00
 Total   $507,707.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females, j      Month.
II
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March	
117
124
117
118
120
119
51
56
58
62
66
66
July	
August
September-
October	
November-
December —
120
136
131
135
136
137
63
63
60
60
May—_	
June	
58
58
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Trs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Trs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
4
3
4
7
57
28
11
2
1
4
3
2
1
3
1
1
1
4
3
9
12
4
9
6
2
4
3
1
2
$6.00 to $6.99 	
7.00 to    7.99     	
8.00 to    8.99     ..-
9.00 to    9.99     	
10.00 to 10.99     ..    .
11.00 to 11.99     	
12.00 to 12.99     	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99     ..   -
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99     	
4
18.00 to 18.99     	
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99     .
21.00 to 21.99     .    -
22.00 to 22.99     —
23.00 to 23.99     	
24.00 to 24.99     ..   .
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99      	
27.00 to 27.99     	
28.00 to 28.99     	
29.00 to 29.99     	
30.00 to 34.99   	
35.00 to 39.99     .
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99     	
65.00 to 59.99   	
60.00 to 64.99     	
65.00 to 69.99      	
70.00 and over   ...
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian..
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above....
Males.
British
Subject.
40
1
1
1
Females.
British
Subject.
59
4
""i
4
""l
2
1
United States citizens (racial origin
not specified)   .	
Males.
Femalea. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 27
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
 Returns covering 143 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $897,006.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,481,210.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     2,977,819.00
 Total    $5,356.035.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
1,258
393
July.	
1,302
447
February	
1,269
406
August —	
1,292
431
March	
1,254
437
September.
1,365
433
April	
1,267
425
October	
1,425
423
May     .__
1,267
419
November-
1,502
416
June	
1,277
441
December	
1,510
419
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
6
1
1
3
7
2
3
1
6
'4
5
16
14
6
29
10
14
11
14
37
21
22
13
19
103
136
281
271
188
39
61
18
16
24
5
4
6
4
18
7
21
8
8
17
8
11
9
5
7
2
3
1
2
1
4
1
5
2
6
2
3
2
2
13
14
16
22
20
23
19
22
42
21
30
9
47
14
7
9
12
4
10
8
1
1
1
$6.00 to $6.99.— __„.
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99.	
4
10.00 to 10.99 —
5
11.00 to 11.99	
4
12.00 to 12.99	
13
13.00 to 13.99	
14
14.00 to 14.99	
15
15.00 to 15.99	
12
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99       	
18.00 to 18.99
19.00 to 19.99	
1
20.00 to 20.99 	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00* to 25.99 	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99..	
28.00 to 28.99    -
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99  •
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99 	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99 	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99    	
70.00 and over .,	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian..
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.
471
23
2
2
4
10
3
10
11
3
1
14
38
1
20
Females.
British
Subject.
684
115
5
2
11
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)         	
Males.
26
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
 Returns covering 9 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers,  Superintendents,  and Managers       $683,425.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        941,962.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     8,254,993.00
Total   $9,880,380.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March ____
April—	
May	
June 	
3,644
3,604
3,593
3,509
3,480
3,496
516
501
504
508
518
527
July	
August	
September-
October	
November _.
December .
3,618
3,563
3,580
3,703
3,866
3,845
537
561
540
500
463
416
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
21 Yrs.      Under
and over.    21 Yrs.
Under $
$6.00 to
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
11.00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
50.00 to
55.00 to
60.00 to
65.00 to
70.00 an
.00	
56.99 ...
7.99 ...
8.99....
10.99....
11.99—
12.99 ...
13.99 —
14.99 —
15.99 —
16.99 —
17.99 ...
18.99 ...
19.99 —
20.99 ...
21.99...
22.99 ...
23.99 -
24.99...
25.99 —
26.99 ...
27.99 ...
28.99 ...
29.99 ...
34.99 ...
39.99 —
44.99 -
49.99 ...
54.99 ...
59.99 -
64.99 ...
69.99 ..
d over
2
2
2
2
5
1
4
3
2
4
3
10
1
7
11
19
37
14
37
1,395
1,119
476
332
125
51
27
13
39
15
1
1
4
2
1
3
1
9
122
33
2
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
and over.   18 Yrs.
14
2
1
2
2
......
5
3
7
16
16
4
23
11
71
19
18
8
34
4
5
126
24
10
7
4
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
"l4
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian-
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian-
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above....
British
Subject.
2,016
748
19
62
96
99
47
37
116
101
15
4
305
1
Subject.
29
77
85
17
"65
320
52
1
2
28
13
6
15
14
22
1
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)  —- —	
56 H 28
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
 Returns covering 56 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $1,050,447.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       2,896,035.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     38,423,704.00
 Total   $42,370,18.6.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
-'emale...
January	
February	
20,127
20,512
20,414
20,263
19,909
20,037
1,085
1,111
1,169
1,181
1,196
1,180
July	
August
September...
October
November.—
December-
19,565
16,052
13,699
12,709
12,089
10,200
1,126
746
610
April	
May 	
June.	
399
245
84
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 	
$6.00 to $6.99    	
45
24
13
19
22
23
11
30
29
26
29
48
23
41
50
39
68
51
47
61
58
229
110
89
609
4,747
3,314
6.637
11
4
10
3
9
7
6
5
8
5
9
5
16
13
12
3
12
21
42
48
13
33
19
8
9
159
113
55
18
1
4
5
4
9
2
4
11
12
14
23
4
15
17
15
37
32
33
27
39
119
38
33
47
349
230
167
44
18
6
4
1
2
4
7.00 to    7.99	
1
8.00 to    8.99    	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99	
1
1
11.00 to 11.99
12.00 to 12.99
13.00 to 13.99           	
14.00 to 14.99
2
15.00 to 15.99           	
2
16.00 to 16.99            	
17.00 to 17.99	
1
18 00 to 18.99            .   ..
19.00 to 19.99    	
2
20.00 to 20.99     -
2
21.00 to 21.99-	
1
22.00 to 22.99	
10
23.00 to 23.99
3
24 00 to 24.99
1
25.00 to 25.99
1
26 00 to 26.99            .. ..
1
27 00 to 27.99
1
28 00 to 28 99
1
30 00 to 34 99             . ...
1
35.00 to 39.99	
40 00 to 44.99
1
45.00 to 49.99	
2,217    !        36
1,202    I       26
402     |          6
232    [          2
140               1
50.00 to 54.99
55 00 to 59 99
60 00 to 64 99            	
70.00 and over .. 	
254
	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
Males.
Subject.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Tugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
11,360
6,417
601
134
27
108
14
132
7
175
1
204
230
644
250
180
41
4
1
282
262
10
35
4
258
30
Females.
British
Subject.
1,145
282
11
6
9
1
11
10
29
36
2
1
24
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)  	
Females.
16
Table No. 23.
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING.
 Returns covering 5 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $232,532.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,299,890.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     5,064,218.00
 Total   $6,596,640.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
2,016
1,966
1,913
1,823
1,850
1,868
168
165
163
160
153
150
1,709
1,709
1,746
1,892
2,048
1,983
136
February
March	
August. ...
September-
October	
November-
December....
133
133
105
May	
June.. 	
88
63
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00    ..
19
1
4
2
2
3
3
2
3
2
3
3
5
6
5
3
8
11
4
6
7
5
11
15
5
240
692
476
284
467
1
9
1
1
2
1
2
7
1
1
1
1
3
2
2
2
1
3
5
6
3
26
52
15
2
5
1
2
1
1
4
16
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
12
3
2
3
36
72
12
3
21
$6.00 to $6.99 . ..
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99 -rt..  _
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99 . ...
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99
17.00 to 17.99 	
18.00 to 18.99
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to 20.99	
1
21.00 to 21.99 —
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99    .
24.00 to 24.99	
1
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99
28.00 to 28.99 .....	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99 	
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99 —	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British;
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
37
625
37
3
5
2
1
290
21
19
6
35
14
73
53
38
20
2
British
Subject.
130
Alien.
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)	
Males.
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 29
Table No. 24.
STREET-RAILWAYS,  GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
 Returns covering 114 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $1,159,043.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       3,576,767.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     11,921,461.00
 Total   $16,657.271.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males,
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March	
April	
May 	
June  	
4,714
4,783
4,837
4,952
5,056
5,075
1,947
1,854
1,843
1,917
1,935
2,030
July	
August	
September-
October	
November
December
5,119
5,271
5,273
5,422
5,437
5.404
1,966
1,952
1,941
1,960
1,978
1.969
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00-	
13
2
4
1
3
5
2
3
6
6
5
1
7
9
7
7
24
38
104
82
110
242
224
341
1,328
1,464
722
492
236
146
75
21
30
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
1
2
2
3
2
67
10
20
17
26
15
24
10
2S
16
16
22
37
76
96
110
105
103
127
119
123
81
99
55
63
224
96
3
13
$6.00 to $6.99    	
3
7.00 to    7.99	
2
8.00 to    8.99.	
9.00 to    9.99      	
2
8
10.00 to 10.99
2
11.00 to 11.99	
2
12.00 to 12.99 	
4
13.00 to 13.99	
2
14.00 to 14.99	
3
15.00 to 15.99	
9
16.00 to 16.99          ..   .
5
17.00 to 17.99	
8
18.00 to 18.99	
16
19.00 to 19.99 	
30
20.00 to 20.99
24
21.00 to 21.99	
22
22.00 to 22.99     ___.
22
23.00 to 23.99
20
24.00 to 24.99
8
25.00 to 25.99
3
26.00 to 26.99       	
1
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99    	
29.00 to 29.99 	
30.00 to 34.99 	
35.00 to 39.99 	
40.00 to 44.99 	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99      	
65.00 to 69.99 .-._.
70.00 and over
	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak.
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
3.306
2,701
44
19
20
75
56
36
130
112
18
1
17
10
23
49
......
"ll
......     |
2,422
397
9
3
5
2
1
6
12
7
2
United States citizens   (racial orig
not specified)       	
52
Table No. 25.
WOOD MANUFACTURING (N.E.S.).
 Returns covering 147 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1945.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $809,897.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        322,452.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     6,809,965.00
 Total   $7,942,314.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January	
February	
March	
April	
May -_	
June	
Males.   Females.1'      Month.
2,934
2,976
2,999
3,040
3,060
3,185
1,209
1,248
1,306
1,387
1,413
1,430
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December...
Males.   Females.
3,247
3,122
3,221
3,420
3,533
3,467
1,407
1,344
1,297
1,264
1,200
1,082
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 	
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
9
5
2
3
3
5
3
8
12
14
6
5
17
9
26
8
21
24
81
54
70
70
139
186
1,073
696
.   358
166
91
26
7
5
7
23
6
2
3
3
9
5
3
6
13
4
15
25
28
18
14
25
12
39
16
50
21
21
16
184
41
5
1
1
12
2
5
5
3
3
7
7
10
11
35
32
37
53
45
45
47
37
.    47
93
79
185
64
96
84
226
27
4
2
8.00 to    8.99 	
9.00 to    9.99-—	
2
10.00 to 10.99 —	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to  12.99
13.00 to  13.99  	
3
14.00 to 14.99.	
15.00 to 15.99
2
8
16.00 to  16.99  —	
10
17.00 to 17.99
5
18.00 to 18.99 	
19.00 to  19.99 	
20.00 to 20.99	
1
15
12
21.00 to 21.99
8
22.00 to 22.99	
15
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
8
16
27
26.00 to 26.99	
27
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99  	
12
1
29.00  to 29.99   -_.-
6
30.00 to 34.99
9
35.00 to 39.99 	
1
40.00 to 44.99     	
45.00 to 49.99
59.00 to 54.99 ....	
55.00 to 59.99
65.00  to 69.99   	
70.00 and over
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland 	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian 	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
British
Subject.
628
38
35
55
37
103
119
210
12
1
28
22
13
"58
British
Subject.
3
15
12
46
50
2
1,073
79
2
23
31
16
45
22
36
61
2
10
1
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) -  - -      ■_
45 H 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 5,687 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1945.
Officers,   Superintendents,   and  Managers     $21,962,389.00
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc     32,106,168.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     222,268,315.00
  $276,336,872.00
Returns received too late to be included in above summary         $541,794.00
Transcontinental railways        21,297,261.00
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey;   viz.,  Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, miscellaneous  (estimated pay-roll)     73,450,000.00
■       95,289,055.00
Total   $371,625,927.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January....
February-
March	
Apr-I.May—.
June-
July ..
August	
September-
October	
November-
December-—
102,394
103,921
104,268
104,777
106,571
109,593
110,371
108,451
105,777
105,347
104,483
98,245
17.950
17,927
17,778
18,004
18,710
20,092
21,849
21,498
21.113
20,051
18,302
16,088
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
76,546
31,300
2,037
920
1,405
1,665
1,711
1,958
7,139
5,079
829
116
1,690
581
606
2,603
47
3,073
119
79
292
248
538
1,700
1,641
333
7
2,848
296
3
302
21,150
3,789
244
185
305
236
384
263
788
1,351
' 43
32
52
6
84
1,447
19
460
17
5
9
52
46
55
.    277
5
1
25
98
158
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Hindu, other East Indian..
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above....
Males.
Females.
United States citizens
not specified) „'.	
(racial 01
igin
1,826
365
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Trs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99--	
7.00 to    7.99	
557
186
194
164
195
198
172
268
208
226
332
332
345
452
666
762
663
950
769
1,903
1,845
1,888
2,220
3,397
3,594
29,303
25,788
24,843
12,562
7,519
2,717
2,120
1,004
2,594
377
76
92
87
86
141
98
144
110
115
261
162
212
215
221
320
199
283
224
407
218
367
322
389
237
1,700
1,028
360
146
93
29
23
15
12
645
143
•   212
262
204
269
279
405
407
660
872
1,167
1,126
1,379
1,146
1,348
1,213
1,331
1,103
1,485
1,187
1,046
809
875
551
2,719
1,355
507
136
140
18
13
8
3
386
81
48
38
74
77
45
117
137
185
182
204
174
213
167
176
169
1B9
134
170
105
87
59
44
39
115
73
24
11
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99—	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99 —	
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to 20.99    -
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99 	
23.00 to 23.99
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99.	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99   —    .
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99 _-.
65.00 to 69.99    ..    ~
70.00 and over	
Totals	
130,936
8,769
25,023
3,500 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 31
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Since the " Hours of Work Act " became effective the Board has shown the average
hours by industries, and the accompanying table sets out comparative figures for the
years 1930 to 1945, inclusive.
COMPARATIVE FIGURES, 1930 TO 1945.
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Employees
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 54 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
54 Hours.
1930    ,	
4,704
4,088
3,529
3,530
3,956
4,153
4,357
4,711
4,895
4,829
4,971
5,115
4,845
4,727
5,044
5,687
87,821
84,791
68,468
71,185
75,435
81,329
90,871
102,235
96,188
94,045
103,636
118,160
154,191
151,420
143,640
141,182
Per Cent.
77.60
83.77
80.36
77.95
85.18
88.78
87.12
89.31
88.67
88.68
88.93
89.61
84.70
89.10
92.42
93.46
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
5.76
5.26
6.42
4.57
5.29
5.42
5.13
4.49
7.51
4.57
4.59
4.20
Per Cent.
9.04
1931 	
9.44
1932
1933
1934
11.92
11.12
9.06
1935.
5.96
1936.
6.46
1937..
6.12
1938-
6.04
1939 .
5.90
1940
1941
1942.
5.94
5.90
7.79
1943
6.33
1944
1945	
2 34
The average weekly working-hours for i
1945                        45.59
ill employees for same
1937	
1936
_ years being:—•
47.25
1944                          46.02
47.63
47.17
47.32
47.35
47.69
47.37
48.62
1943.            47.19
1942 _   48.12
1935 „
1934 __	
1933 	
1932... 	
1941 —  46.90
1940     46.91
1939 _  47.80
1938   46.84
1931	
1930	
The 5,687 firms reporting to the Department of Labour submitted information
regarding hours covering some 141,182 male and female employees for 1945. Of this
number 93.46 per cent, were shown as working 48 hours or less per week, 4.20 per cent,
working from 48 to 54 hours per week, and 2.34 per cent, working in excess of 54 hours
per week. H 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES.
Industry.
1941. 1942. 1943. 1944
1945.
Breweries — 	
Builders' materials _ 	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing __ _
Coal-mining   	
Coast shipping  	
Construction- „  	
Explosives, chemicals, etc.-   _	
Food products, manufacture of 	
Garment-making    - —
House furnishings   	
Jewellery, manufacture of	
Laundri.s, cleaning and dyeing  - -..
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of- 	
Lumber industries—
Logging  - - —
Logging-railways     	
Lumber-dealers —   	
Planing-mills  _  	
Sawmills       —	
Shingle-mills    -..
Metal trades   —  	
Metal-mining  _ 	
Miscellaneous trades and industries 	
Oil-refining  	
Paint-manufacturing —-    -
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Shipbuilding  _ 	
Smelting and concentrating  - —	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc.-. 	
Wood manufacturing (not elsewhere specified) -
44.88
48.05
44.57
47.99
52.05
50.06
47.84
48.33
44.30
44.88
44.01
45.37
44.82
48.78
51.40
46.42
49.95
48.44
47.20
45.42
49.89
47.65
47.54
43.86
43.70
47.84
47.88
49.40
45.64
46.59
45.05
47.43
44.80
47.90
51.69
51.14
46.75
47.59
43.30
44.00
43.88
44.99
43.79
48.67
53.00
45.23
49.27
48.47
46.42
45.02
49.35
47.68
45.83
43.95
42.13
48.27
43.92
49.72
45.77
46.28
45.37
46.20
41.80
47.96
51.48
44.09
45.31
47.72
42.72
43.55
43.47
43.37
43.25
48.46
52.50
44.79
47.83
47.98
46.28
45.18
48.82
47.36
46.57
43.75
41.45
48.04
43.07
47.73
45.40
45.61
44.64
45.12
43.27
47.91
51.13
42.79
44.18
47.36
41.45
43.40
43.09
44.09
43.03
48.13
51.69
44.39
47.72
47.46
45.90
43.26
48.57
46.30
43.93
43.63
41.46
47.97
43.10
48.02
45.18
45.61 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 33
STATISTICS OF CIVIL AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS.
Taken from annual returns submitted to the Department of Labour by the various
cities and municipalities throughout the Province, the following data has been compiled
dealing with pay-roll and employment totals of civic and municipal workers for the
year 1945.
In as much as the data herewith to follow have already been incorporated in other
tables in this report as a portion of the total industrial pay-roll, it should be pointed
out that totals shown in this section are not in addition to figures quoted elsewhere,
but rather a segregation of civic and municipal returns for separate study.
The figures include workers engaged in public works, the construction and maintenance of roads, the operation and maintenance of waterworks, generation and distribution of light and power, and similar operations owned and operated by the city
or municipality making the return.
For the year 1945, and based on 111 returns submitted by civic and municipal
administrations, the total pay-roll reported was $5,438,424, an increase of $552,161
over the $4,886,263 reported for 1944. Of the total pay-roll reported, $4,176,837 was
expended in the wage-earner section and $1,261,587 allotted to the salaried groups—
officers, superintendents, managers, clerks, and stenographic staffs.
Average monthly employment totals for the comparative years 1944 and 1945,
based on the returns received for wage-earners only, were as follows:—
Month.
1944.
1945.
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
2,256
2,238
2,288
2,410
2,520
2,620
2,648
2,638
2,491
2,412
2,402
2,357
86
76
86
112
142
184
252
219
149
84
74
70
2,268
2,249
2,286
2,322
2,443
2,590
2,666
2,733
2,677
2,707
2,759
2,741
60
69
99
126
243
134
86
99
Percentage distributions of employment with relation to earnings are shown in the
following, based on the numbers of adult male wage-earners in the wage classifications
as noted:—
Weekly Wages.
Percentage of Employees.
1944.
1945.
1.47
0.61
10.65
20.50
43.44
10.82
10.36
1.61
0.54
2.28
2.25
9.64
18.09
47.26
12.67
5.18
1.98
0.65 H 34 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
With employment increasing in the wage-earner group, the average weekly
earnings for adult male wage-earners on civic and municipal pay-rolls was recorded at
$31.48 for 1945, decreased slightly from the $32.08 reported in this section for the
previous year.
Increasing numbers of casual and part-time workers reported in the female wage-
earner group during the week of greatest employment were responsible for a decrease
in the average weekly earnings recorded in this section. Average weekly earnings for
female wage-earners 18 years of age and over stood at $19.70, compared with $22.68
shown for the previous year.
The average hours of work for all wage-earners reported in the returns decreased
to 42.50 in 1945, from 42.63 for the previous year. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 35
SUMMARY OF NEW LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR.
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1946.)
" ANNUAL HOLIDAYS ACT."
This important new Statute makes provision for an annual holiday of at least one
week with pay for every working-year of employees.    It applies to employers and
employees in every industry, business, trade and occupation except:—
(a.)  Farming and horticultural operations.
(b.)  Domestic service in private residences.
The working-year is defined as one year's continuous service, comprising not less
than 280 days of actual work.
Employees are entitled to annual holiday in an unbroken period within ten months
after they become entitled to it.
The holiday pay to which they are entitled on an hourly, weekly, semi-monthly, or
monthly basis is defined.
Rights in case of uncompleted year's employment are set out.
Where employees have more favourable conditions as to annual holidays with pay
the Act does not affect them, but when they have less favourable arrangements through
other Acts, agreements, contracts of service or custom, such less favourable plans are
null and void.
No agreement shall deprive employees of the benefits of the Act.
Powers of inspection are vested in the Minister of Labour or his duly authorized
representative. No prosecution under the Act shall be instituted without leave of the
Minister.
The Act became effective July 1st, 1946.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1946."
This amendment reduced the working-week of employees in industrial establishments from forty-eight to forty-four.
Split shifts shall not extend beyond twelve hours immediately following commencement of work.
In cases where the Board of Industrial Relations is satisfied that extra hours over
eight in the day or forty-four in the week are necessary to overcome employment conditions that may arise from time to time and are not inimical to the interests of the
employee, they may grant permission in writing to exceed the eight-hour day or forty-
four-hour week.
This Act came into force July 1st, 1946.
" FACTORIES ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1946."
This amendment reduced the working-week of young girls or women in factories
from forty-eight to forty-four to bring it into line with the " Hours of Work Act"
amendment.
The " Factory Act" gives power to the Factory Inspector to permit certain
exemptions from the weekly hours of women and young girls, but these permits must
be in writing. Formerly he could issue a permit for six hours in addition to the then
legal forty-eight. Now that a forty-four week is the law these permits shall not exceed
fifty hours in any one week.
The amending Act came into force July 1st, 1946.
" MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1946."
This amendment made it possible for the membership of the Board of Industrial
Relations to consist of not more than seven and not fewer than five members, one of
whom should be Chairman.    The former Board was a five-member body, with the H 36 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Deputy Minister of Labour as Chairman. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council under
the amending Act appoints an officer of the Department of Labour to be Chairman.
The other members, of whom at least one shall be a woman, shall be appointed by
and hold office during the pleasure of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, and shall
be representative of organized groups of employers and employees and of the general
public.
A quorum for a seven-member Board shall be five; for a six-member Board, four;
and in case of a five-member Board, three.
In dealing with hours of work of male employees the Board formerly had to do so
by regulation under the " Hours of Work Act."
It may now incorporate provisions regarding hours and conditions of labour and
employment in Orders made under the " Male Minimum Wage Act." This will be a
much less cumbersome procedure than the former method.
Orders fixing overtime rates of pay may be made by the Board through the Chairman or any person authorized by him.
If overtime rates of pay have been established by union agreement between
employer and employees, the minimum wage prescribed by a Board Order shall not be
less than the overtime rate of pay prescribed in the said agreement.
" FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1946."
The " Female Minimum Wage Act " authorized the Board of Industrial Relations
to make Orders fixing minimum wages and also gave it power to specify maximum
hours of labour and conditions of labour and employment for women and girls. In
view of the fact that the " Hours of Work Act " now sets an eight-hour day and forty-
four-hour week, instead of an eight-hour day and forty-eight-hour week, the amendment provides that maximum hours of labour specified by the Board in any Order shall
be " not inconsistent with the ' Hours of Work Act' and regulations thereunder."
Provisions regarding payment of overtime rates are similar to those appearing in
the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
" SHOPS REGULATION AND WEEKLY HALF-HOLIDAY ACT
AMENDMENT ACT, 1946."
This amending Act adds " the business of a shoe-shine stand " to the definition
of " shop."
It also provides machinery for the closing of any class or classes of shops within
a municipality for a whole day in any one week if an application signed by not less
than three-fourths of the licensed occupiers of any such class or classes of shops is
presented to the Municipal Council. The Council may then by by-law require such
closing, notwithstanding previous by-laws passed by the Council on its own initiative
setting out weekly half-holidays and closing times for shops.
Special provisions are made in the amending Act relative to automobile garages,
automobile service-repair shops, and gasoline service-stations.
To conform with the provisions of the forty-four-hour week enacted by the " Hours
of Work Act Amendment Act, 1946," the previous forty-eight-hour week for young
persons is changed to a forty-four-hour week.
" WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1946."
Amendments broadened the scope of application of the Act, providing for compensation from date of disability in cases where the disability was of more than six
days' duration instead of fourteen days, and made it possible to apportion the cost of
compensation in respect of inhalation of silica-dust when the workmen had been
exposed to it in two or more classes or sub-classes of industry, and many other
sweeping amendments to ensure smoother administration and greater benefits to the
employees. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 37
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell 1000 Douglas Street,  Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
4. James Thomson 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. J. A. Ward Bell 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
Mabel A.  Cameron Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
Head Office Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
Branch Office 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the twelfth annual report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1945.
As the functions of the Board include activities formerly controlled by the Minimum Wage Board relative to wages, hours, and conditions of labour of women and
girls, this is actually the twenty-eighth annual record of labour laws, their expansion
and enforcement in so far as women workers are concerned.
Since 1934 the present Board assumed jurisdiction over male employees covered
by the " Male Minimum Wage Act " in addition to those within the scope of the
" Female Minimum Wage Act," the latter Statute dating from 1918.
Through years of prosperity and depression, through two post-war periods and
during the recently terminated World War II. the problems of the Board have been
many and varied. The difficulties still to be faced will require the combined co-operated
efforts of our officials, all employers and all employees throughout the Province.
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS.
Usually Board meetings are held either in Victoria or in Vancouver, but under
certain circumstances it is necessary for sessions to be convened in other parts of the
Province. During 1945 thirty-three sessions were held on eighteen different days.
Victoria was the meeting-place on six days, Vancouver seven days, Nelson, Cranbrook,
and Vernon one day each, and on two days the Board met in Prince George.
Having received a brief from the International Woodworkers of America, C.I.O.,
District No. 1, requesting a cancellation of the Board's regulation permitting a nine-
hour day and fifty-four-hour week in the logging and sawmilling industries east of
the Cascade Mountains, the Board arranged an itinerary to hear evidence in the matter.
During July public hearings were held in Nelson, Cranbrook, and Vernon. These
were well attended, and comprehensive briefs were submitted by the International
Woodworkers of America, C.I.O., District No. 1, on behalf of the employees, and by
the Interior Lumber Manufacturers' Association through their secretary and their
industrial relations officer.
Additional submissions were made verbally by numerous operators and workers.
To accommodate the latter group evening sessions were arranged.
The following month the Board travelled to Prince George. The meetings held
there were also very representative of the industry. Employees were represented by
officials of the International Woodworkers of America, C.I.O., District No. 1, and by
district officers of local unions. H 38 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The employers were represented by the industrial relations officer of the Interior
Lumber Manufacturers' Association of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, by
the president of the Northern Interior Lumbermen's Association, and by the legal
counsel of the latter organization.
Written briefs were submitted and much additional data presented verbally by
numerous witnesses called by both sides. The employers vigorously opposed the
requested reduction in hours at each and every meeting held. When the Board
returned to Victoria the evidence was considered, and as a result the hours of work
for employees in the logging and sawmilling industries east of the Cascades were
reduced to eight in the day and forty-eight in the week, the same as prevailed west of
the Cascades, thus bringing the whole Province into line as far as hours of work were
concerned. Provision for necessary overtime is taken care of in the covering Orders
of the Board upon payment of higher rates set out in the respective Orders. Certain
classes of employment in both logging and sawmilling are exempt from the overtime
rates.    (See summary of Orders in appendix to this report for details.)
While the Board was meeting in Vernon the Okanagan Federated Shippers' Association requested an opportunity to submit a brief and verbal information intimating
that the fruit and vegetable industry would be affected by the requested reduction in
hours, inasmuch as they depended largely on wooden containers for their products.
The Board willingly consented to hear the submissions, and briefs were read and
filed with which the B.C. Fruit Growers' Association concurred.
Comprehensive and exhaustive evidence was presented to the Board. The lumbering and fruit industry together held the floor from 7 p.m. to well after midnight,
covering every phase of the question at issue.
The hotel and catering industry occupied the attention of the Board later in the
year, and numerous public hearings were arranged in an endeavour to reach a workable plan regarding women workers on night-shifts, many of whom previously finished
their duties in the early hours of the morning when transportation problems presented
difficulties.
Morning, afternoon, and evening sessions were held at which employers, employees,
union officials, representatives of Vancouver's tourist association, Vancouver Labour
Council, the Canadian Congress of Labour (Hotel Workers' Section), the Canadian
Legion, and the general public expressed their respective views.
Outside of the employers and the tourist association all were in favour of an
Order to prohibit the shifts of women and girls terminating at such hours as 2 or 3 a.m.
After carefully sifting the evidence the Board brought in an Order whereby no
female employee could be employed between the hours of 1.30 a.m. and 6 a.m. unless
her employment was continuous during that period, and it would be contrary to the
provisions of the Order to require her to commence or finish her shift between the
aforementioned hours. Rest periods or time off for meals on the premises are
permissible.
Employees in hospitals and nursing homes residing on the premises are exempt
from the Order, as well as employees working on Christmas Day, New Year's Day, or
other days designated by the Board from time to time.
Provision is made whereby the Board may grant exemption in writing from the
Order to employees engaged in catering if it seems advisable to do so.
A delegation from the Amalgamated Association of Street, Electric Railway, and
Motor Coach Employees appeared before the Board in Vancouver to request that
certain of their members be brought under the " Hours of Work Act" so that their
working shifts would be confined within a twelve-hour period. They were asked to
approach their employers to see if the matter could not be dealt with in a less cumber- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 39
some way than would be necessary if the Board acted in the matter. Only 100 men
out of approximately 1,400 would be affected. The delegation promised to approach
their employers along the lines suggested.
The Board certainly has a variety of topics discussed before it, and in addition
to those mentioned above telephone problems were aired by employees and employers,
and one session was devoted to all ramifications of the undertaking business. The
Union of Embalmers and Undertakers' Assistants asked to be brought under the provisions of the " Hours of Work Act." Their views were expressed, together with those
of the employers represented by the B.C. Society of Morticians. The legal counsel of
the latter body and individual members presented much data to the Board.
After the hearing, committees from each side met in an endeavour to work out
something satisfactory to both sides. The ultimate result, however, was that until
such time as the Dominion Government lifted some of its regulations the controversial
question would have to remain in abeyance.
A lengthy session was held with the Labour-Government Committee who elaborated
on resolutions presented to the Government, some of which affected Statutes administered by our Board. Others, however, had to be referred to other branches of the
Government service for attention.
In all, twenty delegations appeared before the Board during the year, but the bald
figure does not convey a graphic idea of the amount of time spent at the hearings.
ORDERS MADE DURING 1945.
Routine Orders were made as follows under the " Female Minimum Wage Act "
to take care of seasonal or special problems:—
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52P. This covered women workers in
resort hotels in unorganized territory for the summer season from June 18th to
September 8th, 1945.
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Orders Nos. 52Q, 52r, 52s, and 52t dealt with
night-shifts of female employees to prevent their starting or finishing shifts in the
early hours of the morning when transportation to their homes is difficult or unavailable by street-car or bus.
Mercantile (Supplementary, 1945).—Dealt with rates of pay for workers during
the Christmas season.
Under the " Male Minimum Wage Act " one Order was promulgated:—
Mercantile (Supplementary, 1945).—This took care of male employees for the
Christmas period.
Telephone and Telegraph Industry.—Order No. 79. This was an Order superseding the one which had been in effect since 1920.
The daily wage was raised to $2.80 a day of eight hours, which was as high as
Dominion Government regulations would allow. The training period was shortened
and other changes made.
REGULATIONS MADE DURING 1945.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Regulation No. 21l. This is the usual regulation
exempting the industry from the provisions of the " Hours of Work Act," to permit
perishable commodities to be taken care of when they come from the orchards and
farms. Inasmuch as higher rates of pay are set in the fruit and vegetable Orders
after certain hours, this acts as a control in keeping the length of the working-day
for men and women within reasonable limits.
Lumbering Industry, East of the Cascade Mountains.—Regulation No. 30. This
reduced the daily hours from nine to eight and the weekly hours from fifty-four to
forty-eight. H 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Mercantile (Christmas, 1945, Temporary).—This regulation was the usual one
made to deal with hours of work for male and female employees during the Christmas
season.
(Summaries of the above-mentioned Orders and regulations, together with other
existing and new Orders and regulations made in 1946 prior to this report going to
press, may be found in the appendix to this section of the report.)
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
The increasing importance of women workers in the business and industrial life
of the Province is again evident in the 1945 statistical section herewith presented.
Returns were received in time for tabulation from some 8,061 employers of women
and girls, who reported a total of 59,176 female workers for the year under review.
While the 8,061 reporting firms represent a substantial increase over the previous
year's total of 7,289, the reported employment total decreased slightly from the high
of 60,410 established in 1944, due to curtailment in some vital industries previously
employing large numbers of female workers during the war years.
The following tables relate to those occupations and industries covered by Orders
of the Board:—
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1943.
1942.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
1,650
11,039
9,759
1,280
$171,326.37
$13,511.81
$17.56
$10.56
11.60%
38.02
1,515
10,618
9,187
1,431
$158,242.80
$15,103.61
$17.22
$10.55
13.48%
37.99
1,330
9,929
8,408
1,521
$127,289.88
$16,777.71
$15.14
$11.03
15.32%
37.76
1,146
7,733
6,706
1,027
$98,400.56
$10,145.09
$14.67
$9.88
13.28%
39.04
927
7,368
6,647
721
$90,166.19
$6,373.25
$13.56
$8.84
9.79%
39.30
Total firms reporting in the mercantile industry increased to 1,650 in 1945, compared with a previous year's total of 1,515. A corresponding increase is noted in the
total employment figure which rose to 11,039 from 10,618 in 1944.
The average weekly wage for employees over 18 years of age increased to $17.56
from $17.22 recorded in 1944. In the under-18-year section, average weekly earnings
remained practically the same as in the previous year, the difference being only 1 cent
more for the year under review.
The percentage employed in this younger group continued to decrease, with 11.60
per cent, of total under 18 years of age in 1945, compared with 13.48 per cent, reported
in 1944.
Average weekly hours of work showed little change, increasing slightly to 38.02
from 37.99 in this industry for the previous year. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 41
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries (Female).
1945.
1943.
1942.
1941.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees.	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees.
Average hours worked per week	
181
2,332
2,316
16
$37,766.97
$198.97
$16.31
$12.44
0.69%
39.88
161
2,151
2,117
34
$32,765.37
$463.27
$15.48
$13.63
1.58%
38.90
1,830
1,762
$26,370.25
$726.36
$14.97
$10.68
3.72%
40.49
141
1,725
1,517
208
$22,697.95
$2,272.71
$14.96
$10.93
12.06%
42.94
122
1,469
1,371
98
118,698.02
$991.06
$13.64-
$10.11
6.67%
41.89
The number of firms reporting in this section increased from 161 to 181 in 1945,
the total employment figure rising to 2,332, as against a total of 2,151 recorded for 1944.
The average weekly wage for experienced workers rose to $16.31 from $15.48 in
1944, while for inexperienced workers earnings dropped slightly from the 1944 high
of $13.63 to $12.44 for 1945, although less than 1 per cent, of the total employees
appeared in this category.
Average weekly working-hours increased in this industry to 39.88 during 1945,
as against 38.90 recorded in 1944.
Many of the larger laundries and cleaning establishments have been working under
trying conditions for several years, owing to increased volume of business arising out
of large contracts with the armed services—Naval, Military, and Air Forces—who
required rush work in quantities undreamed of in peace times. Increased population
and lack of washing-machines added a burden from the civilian angle. With equipment showing the effects of strenuous wear and replacements unobtainable, with labour
problems probably more pronounced than in other lines of industry, employers and
employees alike deserve credit for the manner in which they have carried on.
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
1944.
1942.
1941.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
1,271
9,553
9,225
328
$159,047.26
$3,337.48
$17.24
$10.18
3.43%
40.56
1,137
9,078
8,648
430
S.428.79
i,146.47
$16.93
$11.97
4.74%
41.01
1,137
8,879
8,371
508
$137,097.40
$5,234.53
$16.38
$10.30
5.72%
41.50
1,075
6,818
6,313
505
$96,210.79
$5,446.17
$15.24
$10.78
7.41%
43.30
1,005
5,528
5,309
219
$14.06
$11.97
3.96%
43.34
The number of firms reporting in this classification increased from 1,137 to 1,271
for the year under review, the total employment figure rising to 9,553, as against a
total of 9,078 for 1944.
An increase was again noted in the average weekly wage for experienced employees, the 1945 figure mounting to $17.24 from $16.93 for the previous year. Weekly
earnings for the inexperienced workers decreased to $10.18 from $11.97 recorded in
1944, although the percentage of the total remaining in this group was reduced to 3.43
per cent, from 4.74 per cent, shown for the previous year. H 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Average weekly hours of work for employees in the hotel and catering industry
continued to decrease, the 1945 figure declining to 40.56 compared with 41.01 in 1944.
New firms supplying accommodation and facilities for meals continue to make
their appearance to cater to the needs of a growing Province, especially in the more
populous centres.
These establishments have and are still experiencing difficulties in obtaining and
retaining trained female help, and meal-hours in most restaurants and cafes in the
larger centres are trying times for employers and employees and the general public.
Office Occupation (Female).
1945.
1943.
1942.
1941.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years-
Average hours worked per week	
$311
3,274
13,790
13,345
445
931.92
5,856.48
$23.37
$15.41
3.23%
40.43
2,984
13,251
12,770
481
1,314.50
.,667.04
$23.05
$15.94
3.63%
40.82
2,766
12,172
11,614
558
$237,803.37
$7,903.27
$20.48
$14.16
4.58%
40.69
2,649
9,991
9,653
188,753.83
$4,553.04
$19.55
$13.47
3.38%
41.29
2,537
8,513
8,327
186
$155,758.51
$2,237.85
$18.71
$12.03
2.18%
40.80
Firms reporting employees in office occupations increased from 2,984 to 3,274 in
1945, a total of 13,790 workers being reported, as against 13,251 for the previous year.
A further upward swing was evident in the average weekly wage for experienced
office-workers, which climbed to $23.37 from the previous high of 1944. Average weekly
earnings for the younger and inexperienced class was off slightly at $15.41, compared
with $15.94 in the previous year.
The percentage of younger workers employed in office occupations declined during
the year to 3.23 per cent, of the total number of female employees.
A fractional decrease in the average weekly working-hours of office employees was
noted, the 1945 figure dropping to 40.43 from 40.82 in 1944.
Interesting comparison is made in the following table showing the numbers employed at office occupations in the various salary classifications as noted, for the years
1943, 1944, and 1945.
Monthly Salary Classification.
Numbers employed in Office Occupations.
1943.
1944.
1945.
$65 to $70	
1,496
945
1,340
933
1,245
849
636
944
567
377
317
238
309
204
108
117
361
555
679
997
1,054
1,166
1,183
811
1,248
761
759
644
372
552
308
308
322
693
582
70 to   75	
75 to   80 :.	
580
1,026
1,063
1,221
1,144
80 to   85 —
85 to   90               	
90 to   95	
95 to 100	
100 to 105	
1,226
105 to 110	
110 to 115	
115 to 120	
120 to 125	
493
125 to 130	
130 to 135	
427
346
409
803
135 to 140	
140 to 150	
Totals	
10,986
' REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 43
The above distribution of office-workers again shows a definite trend toward
higher salaries in this occupation. The 1945 tabulation reveals that the wage classification from $100 to $105 monthly again accounted for the largest number, 1,226 office-
workers having been paid within that range, and increasing numbers are noted in all
salary brackets upward from $120 per month.
Personal Service Occupation (Female).
1945.
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
149
535
521
14
$10,197.64
$152.93
$19.57
$10.92
2.62%
39.88
134
476
460
16
$8,891.45
$162.80
$19.33
$10.18
3.36%
40.50
134
453
446
7
$7,463.48
$80.07
$16.73
$11.44
1.55%
39.94
125
380
374
6
$6,033.37
$53.28
$16.13
$8.88
1.58%
40.32
200
581
553
28
$7,384.08
$172.06
Average weekly wages—
$13.35
$6.15
4.82%
35.98
Average hours worked per week	
The personal service occupation includes the work of females employed as beauty-
parlour operators, chiropodists, and similar occupations. It must be borne in mind
that while there are many more beauty-shops in the Province than the 149 reported, a
great many establishments are run by the owners without help of any kind and consequently are not included in the tabulations.
Firms reporting in this classification rose to 149 from 134 in the previous year,
with a resultant increase in the total employment to 535, compared with 476 shown
for 1944.
In the personal service group the average weekly earnings for experienced employees went up to $19.57 from the previous year's figure of $19.33, and for inexperienced
workers the weekly average also registered a gain to show $10.92, as against $10.18
for 1944.
Average weekly working-hours in personal service occupations decreased slightly
during the year, declining to 39.88 from 40.50 previously recorded.
Fishing Industry (Female).
1945.
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
17
441
441
19
656
656
16
372
363
9
$7,317.48
$68.25
$20.16
$7.58
2.42%
39.58
8
172
167
5
$3,614.36
$41.06
$21.64
$8.21
2.91%
40.67
6
160
Experienced	
130
30
Total weekly wages—
$9,307.73
$12,214.60
$1,868.08
$401.26
Average weekly wages—
$21.11
$18.62
$14.37
$13.38
18.75%
35 54
35.22
36.28
With fewer firms reporting in 1945, the total employment figure in this industry
dropped to 441 from a high of 656 established during the previous year.
All employees reported, however, were shown as receiving wages in excess of the
legal minimum set for experienced workers. H 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The average weekly earnings for all employees covered increased to $21.11 for the
year under review, compared with an average figure of $18.62 for the previous year.
A further recession in the average weekly working-hours in this industry was
noted, the 1945 average declining to 35.22, as against 36.28 recorded in 1944.
The relatively low number of employees in this industry is due to the fact that
the governing Order does not apply to women engaged in heading and filling in fish
canneries.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female).
i
1942.
1941.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
221
2,096
2,064
32
$43,962.57
$447.17 |
$21.30
$13.97
1.53%
37.78
194 j 186
2,353 | 2,185
2,346 I 2,013
7 I 172
$54,162.23 $37,636.99
$80.13
$23.08
$11.45
0.30%
40.52
$1,843.73
$18.70
$10.72
7.87%
40.54
189
2,341
1,995
346
$37,822.30
$3,743.28
$18.96
$10.82
14.78%
41.26
150
1,887
1,818
69
$36,327.20
$632.96
$19.98
$9.17
3.66%
40.38
Included in the above table with regular telephone and telegraph company employees are those operating switchboards in offices and other establishments, such as hotels,
hospitals, etc.
Although the number of firms reporting employees in this occupation increased
from 194 to 221 for the year 1945, the over-all employment total decreased from the
1944 high of 2,353 to 2,096 for the year under review.
Average weekly wages for experienced workers, previously at a new high figure
of $23.08 in 1944, declined to $21.30 during 1945. In the inexperienced classification,
however, with a slightly increased percentage reported in this group, earnings continued to rise, the average weekly figure increasing to $13.97, compared with $11.45 for
the previous year in this section.
A marked decrease in the average weekly working-hours was recorded in this
occupation, the average figure of 40.52 noted in 1944 decreasing to 37.78 during 1945.
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
1943.
1942.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
1,036
14,016
13,851
165
$320,350.13
$1,633.77
$23.13
$9.90
1.18%
40.33
16,221
15,928
293
$412,583.97
$3,361.97
$25.90
$11.47
1.81%
42.35
873
14,869
14,287
582
$293,807.69
$5,877.68
$20.56
$10.10
3.91%
42.66
740
10,738
10,114
624
$192,695.51
$5,862.55
$19.05
$9.40
5.81%
42.62
I
551
4,450
3,815
635
$59,149.52
$6,234.27
$15.50
$9.82
14.27%
42.65
The manufacturing industry continued in the lead with the greatest number of
women employed. In spite of an increase in the number of firms reporting, due to
curtailment in some vital industries employing large numbers of female workers dur- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 45
ing the war years the total employment in this classification decreased to 14,016 from
the record high of 16,221 reported for 1944. It will be interesting to note the future
trend in this industry now that production is swinging to civilian goods instead of
war requirements.
Earnings for female workers in this industry registered decreases in both the
experienced and inexperienced groups, the average weekly wage for experienced workers
being $23.13 for 1945, as against $25.90 in 1944, and average weekly earnings for inexperienced employees $9.90, compared with $11.47 for the previous year.
The percentage of inexperienced workers continued to decrease, only 1.18 per cent,
of the total being included in this category for 1945.
The general curtailment reported in this industry is especially evident in the
reduced working-hours, the weekly average for 1945 declining to 40.33 from 42.35
recorded for the previous year.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female).
1941.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced 	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
4,836
4,822
14
$100,752.07
$157.08
$20.89
$11.22
0.29%
43.01
72
4,941
4,931
10
$106,895.45
$102.40
$21.68
$10.24
0.20%
44.64
69
3,539
3,518
21
$65,804.78
$199.99
$18.71
$9.52
0.59%
45.04
72
4,012
3,831
181
$68,007.64
$2,352.39
$17.75
$13.00
4.51%
46.14
82
4,141
3,922
219
$67,752.93
$1,945.17
$17.28
$8.88
5.29%
47.17
With a slight decrease in the number of reporting firms, the total employment
reported in the fruit and vegetable industry dropped to 4,836, as against the high of
4,941 established in 1944.
Average weekly earnings for the experienced workers decreased from the 1944
record figure of $21.68 to $20.89 for 1945, although a moderate increase was noted in
the earnings for inexperienced employees, the average weekly figure increasing from
$10.24 to $11.22 for the year under review. Less than 1 per cent, of the total, however, appeared in this latter group.
The average weekly hours of work recorded in the industry continued to show a
decrease, the 1945 figure declining to 43.01, compared with 44.64 in this classification
for 1944.
In this seasonal occupation when fruits and vegetables pour into the packinghouses and canneries, all available help is recruited to cope with the perishable products.
Many women go into the Okanagan (where the bulk of the business is centred) from
the nearer Prairie Provinces, and some workers travel from the Coast to assist during
the peak period. H 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Transportation Industry (Female).
1944.
1942.
1941.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years.
Average hours worked per week	
102
227
152
75
$2,914.60
$871.10
$19.18
$11.61
33.04%
37.79
138
235
174
61
$3,663.55
$733.50
$21.05
$12.02
25.96%
42.29
160
400
306
94
$6,361.32
$945.88
$20.79
$10.06
23.50%
43.43
129
313
186
127
$3,268.60
$1,155.66
$17.57
$9.10
40.58%
41.61
32
107
20
87
$207.42
$712.58
$10.37
$8.19
81.31%
43.19
This classification includes female workers engaged in delivery, truck-driving,
messenger-work, etc.
With the return of male workers to many of the jobs in this classification done by
female workers in the war years, decreasing totals are significant in this table. The
women and girls were definitely filling in for men as drivers of trucks and bicycle
messengers.
A total of 102 firms reported in this section for 1945, compared with 138 for the
previous year, with a decrease shown in total employment from 235 to 227 for the year
under review.
Average weekly earnings decreased in both the over-18-year and the under-18-year
classes, the figure in the older section decreasing to $19.18 from a high of $21.05 in
1944, while for the younger employees it dropped to $11.61 from a high of $12.02
established during the previous year.
With many employees in the older group being replaced by male workers, the percentage of the younger section continued to increase, 33.04 being in the under-18-year
class, as compared with 25.96 per cent, in this group for 1944.
A sharp decline in the weekly working-hours was noted in this industry, the average weekly figure decreasing to 37.79 from 42.29 shown for the previous year. The
short work-week is due to unsteady hours. In this line of work when deliveries are
finished the employee is through for the day, and in many cases it rests largely with
the worker how soon her duties are completed.
Public Places of Amusement (Female).
1945.
1943.
1942.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
91
311
209
102
$2,359.41
$805.17
$11.29
$7.89
32.80%
26.12
430
320
110
$3,931.40
$797.01
$12.29
$7.25
25.58%
25.16
85
277
189
$2,189.76
$592.87
$11.59
$6.74
31.77%
26.95
83
238
186
52
$2,203.61
$352.64
$11.85
$6.78
21.85%
29.32
This section includes theatre ushers, check-room attendants, and all such occupations previously included in the personal service group. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 47
Inasmuch as these figures were formerly included with those in the personal service group, no comparative figures are available prior to 1942, at which time a separate
tabulation was commenced.
An increase is noted in the number of firms reporting in this classification, although
the total employment shown decreased to 311 from a high of 430 established in 1944.
Average earnings for the over-18-year employees dropped to $11.29 as against
$12.29 for the previous year, while a slight increase was apparent in the weekly earnings for the younger employees, the average rising to $7.89 from $7.25 recorded in
1944. The percentage of younger workers employed in this classification also increased
during the year.
The average weekly working-hours in this occupation gained slightly with the drop
in employment, to show 26.12 hours per week as against 25.16 for the previous year.
The short week is accounted for by the fact that theatre ushers comprise the most of
the employees in this group, and their hours are very short compared with other
occupations.
Summary of all Occupations ("Female Minimum Wage Act").
1945.
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
8,061
7,289
6,894
6,357
5,612
59,176
60,410
54,905
44,461
34,204
56,705
57,537
51,277
41,042
31,912
2,471
2,873
3,628
3,419
2,292
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
$1,169,916.67
$1,234,084.11
$949,142.40
$719,708.52
$511,972.47
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced
$27,971.96
$33,618.20
$40,250.34
$35,977.87
$22,321.71
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
$20.63
$21.45
$18.51
$17.54
$16.04
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced
$11.32
$11.70
$11.09
$10.52
$9.74
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or in
experienced	
4.18%
4.76%
6.61%
7.69%
6.70%
Average hours worked per week	
39.94
40.84
41.03
41.96
41.82
Actual figures concerning some 59,176 women and girl employees are shown in
the above summary table for 1945.
Total aggregate salaries and wages for one week amounted to $1,197,888.63, a
decrease of $69,813.68 from the high recorded during the peak year 1944.
The average weekly wage for all occupations fell to $20.63 in the over-18-year or
experienced group, as against a record $21.45 reached during the previous year when
war industries were booming.
In 1945 it was again evident from the summary that the average amount received
continued to be far in excess of the highest minimum set by law. During that year
the legal minimum wages for women 18 or over in the various classifications covered
by Orders of the Board ranged from $12.75, the lowest, as set for the mercantile
industry, to $16.80 for a forty-eight-hour week in the telephone and telegraph section.
The average weekly hours of work continued to decrease during the year, the
average figure for the 59,176 employees reported declining to 39.94 as against 40.84
in 1944.
A further decrease in the percentage of employees under 18 years or inexperienced
was noted, the 1945 percentage figure decreasing to 4.18 per cent., compared with 4.76
per cent, in the former year.
The average earnings for the adult or experienced workers increased in six of the
eleven tables. Decreases were in most instances due to shorter working-hours in those
occupations yielding high earnings during the war years. H 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The summary figures are not inclusive of domestic workers, farm-labourers, or
fruit-pickers which are excluded from coverage by the provision of the " Female Minimum Wage Act." Only those workers with classes of employment for which minimum
wage orders have been set by the Board are included in the 59,176 total reported in the
tables. Similarly, returns are not requested for women and girls employed in banks,
as conditions of employment in this case are regulated by the Dominion " Bank Act."
Federal employees are also excluded from the coverage of the Provincial legislation.
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum for Experienced Female Workers.
Industry or
Occupation.
Legal
Minimum
Wage for
Full-time
Experienced
Employees.
Receiving Actual
MinimukTWage
SET FOR
Experienced
Workers.
Receiving More
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Receiving Less
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Total.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
Mercantile	
$12.75*
14.88f
14.00*
15.00$
14.25*
15.84f
16.80t
14.00t
14.40t
14.25*
98
21
200
287
19
1
4
125
93
3
0.89
0.90
2.09
2.08
3.55
0.23
0.19
0.89
1.92
0.96
9,045
1,598
7,304
12,725
445
332
1,622
12,151
3,730
103
81.94
68.53
76.46
92.28
83.18
75.28
77.39
86.69
77.13
33.12
1,896
713
2,049
778
71
108
470
1,740
1.013
17.17
30.57
21.45
5.64
13.27
24.49
22.42
12.42
20.95
11,039
2,332
9,553
Office	
13,790
635
Fishing	
Telephone and telegraph	
Manufacturing _	
441
2,096
14,016
4,836
Public places of amusement...
205       | 65.92
311
Totals, 1945	
851       |    1.44
49,055
83.22
9,043      |  16.34
58,949§
Totals, 1944 ...
876        1     1.46
49,904
82.93
9 395         1   15 61
60,175
* 40-48 hours per week. t 48 hours per week. J 37^-48 hours per week.
§ In the transportation industry, 227 employees excluded from above table and not included in totals, as it is
impractical to set a weekly rate owing to the variation of minimum wages in the Order, depending on whether the
work is done on foot, on bicycles, by motor-cycles, or other types of motor-vehicles.
The general trend of wages for female workers continued upward during 1945, the
percentage of employees included in the returns who were receiving wages in excess of
the legal minimum increasing to 83.22 per cent, of the total from 82.93 per cent, shown
in this group for 1944. The above table also shows the relative decrease in the percentages of those at less than the minimum, and those receiving the actual minimum
set by the Board.
It should be again noted that while certain occupations may show relatively high
percentages of employees at less than the minimum for a full week's work, this is due
in most instances to the fact that working-hours are short or that employment is casual
or intermittent. In the public places of amusement section, for example, where casual
and part-time hours are the rule, 65.92 per cent, of the total employees were shown at
less than the minimum amount for a full week's work. Also included in this section
dealing with percentages at less than the required minimum are the younger and less
skilled employees for whom special rates have been fixed by the Board.
Leading in the section showing those receiving above the legal minimum, the office
group reported 92.28 per cent., followed by the manufacturing industry with 86.69 per
cent, above and the personal service group with 83.18 per cent. In the mercantile
section 81.94 per cent, were above the minimum, followed by the telephone and telegraph industry and the fruit and vegetable industry with 77.39 and 77.13 per cent,
respectively, and the hotel and catering industry with 76.46 per cent, above the fixed
rate. The fishing group reported 75.28 per cent, above the minimum set, followed by
the laundry group with 68.53 per cent, above and public places of amusement with 33.12
per cent, in this category. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 49
Top salaries reported in each classification for 1945 were as follows:—
Weekly Wages
Occupation or Industry. or Salary.
Office   $75.00
Fruit and vegetable  68.80
Manufacturing  67.02
Hotel and catering   65.31
Mercantile   65.00
Personal service   56.75
Telephone and telegraph   55.38
Fishing   52.26
Laundry, cleaning and dyeing   37.50
Transportation   37.39
Public places of amusement   34.62
The office group continued to lead in the section reporting highest individual
earnings, one executive employee in this group receiving a salary of $75 for the week
reported. Top earnings in the fruit and vegetable industry for one employee in a
supervisory capacity were $68.80, while in the manufacturing section the highest
amount paid to one worker was $67.02 for the week under review. The hotel and
catering group reported a high of $65.31, while top weekly salary shown in the
mercantile section was $65. Highest earnings for the week reported in the personal
service were $56.75. The telephone and telegraph group reported one employee in
receipt of $55.38, while highest weekly wage shown in the fishing section was $52.26.
The laundry, cleaning and dyeing industry reported one employee as receiving a high
of $37.50 for the week, while the top amounts paid in the transportation section and
the group comprising public places of amusement were $37.39 and $34.62 respectively.
Table showing Number of Single, Married, and Widowed Employees
and their earnings for week reported.
Industry or Occupation.
Single.
Earnings.
Married.
Earnings.
Widowed.    Earnings.
Total Earnings for Week
reported.
Mercantile	
Laundry	
Hotel and catering	
Office	
Personal service	
Fishing	
Telephone and telegraph	
Manufacturing	
Fruit and vegetable-	
Transportation	
Public places of amusement.
Totals	
1945 per cent	
1944 per cent	
6,845
1,193
4,920
9,777
335
181
1,687
8,414
2,256
156
246
$112,111.06
19,623.14
83,715.84
225,889.67
6,584.12
3,401.47
35,984.89
189,034.32
45,379.41
2,312.38
2,356.43
36,010   1   $726,392.73
60.85%
59.42%
3,763
1,012
3,934
3,580
182
238
357
5,174
2,467
63
59
$64,449.53
16,271.18
66,260.37
82,113.64
3,394.25
5,371.19
7,126.07
123,230.24
53,001.91
1,328.29
736.25
431
127
699
433
18
22
52
428
113
$8,277.59
2,071.62
12,408.53
10,785.09
372.20
535.07
1,298.78
9,719.34
2,527.83
145.03
71,90
$184,838.18
37,965.94
162,384.74
318,788.40
10,350.57
9,307.73
44,409.74
321,983.90
100,909.15
3,785.70
3,164.58
20,829   |   $423,282.92
2,337
$48,212.98
1,197,8
35.20%
36.91%
3.95%
3.67%
Relative percentages of single, married, and widowed employees in the various
occupations covered are shown in the above table.
During 1945 the percentage of married women-workers employed continued to
decrease, the previous figure of 36.91 per cent, in 1944 decreasing to 35.20 per cent, for
the year under review. The percentage of single employees increased to 60.85 per cent,
of total, as against 59.42 per cent, in 1944, and a fractional increase was recorded in
the percentage of widowed employees.
Single employees continued in the majority in the office group, telephone and
telegraph occupations, and the mercantile industry, while greater proportions of
married workers were again noted in such industries as the fruit and vegetable
industry, fishing, and laundry industries. o H 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Inasmuch as the percentages of workers shown as divorced, separated, or " marital
status not stated " were less than 1 per cent, in each case, no separate tabulation was
made, the figures being included with the total of single workers in the above table.
TABLE SHOWING YEARS OF SERVICE OF FEMALE EMPLOYEES WITH EMPLOYERS
REPORTING FOR 1945.
Industry or Occupation.
-d
w
tti
rt
-S    rt
c a)
o rt
4j  OJ
rr.  &
o ti
4J  QJ
.*, tn
—   tr
o «
4-      CJ
CO r*
<r tn
o rt
+_  QJ
to »
o rt
+-   OJ
■>£
o rt
+_  qj
00 £
O    ti
«_J    QJ
o. £
o ti
4-   QJ
00 !*
S £
o rt
+J   QJ
a.!*
rt S
QJ £
S*o
o u
rt  O
O   OJ
Ja ohh
= S o
Number of
Firms
reporting.
367
54
380
218
13
37
4
308
172
4
4
. 5,707
1,161
5,819
4,460
246
252
702
6,942
3,138
130
197
1,766
428
1,424
2,533
105
68
429
2,722
601
42
58
1,152
286
848
1,996
54
41
302
2,237
370
43
21
808
165
431
1,449
37
13
148
914
165
6
15
313
50
153
681
32
11
55
245
135
2
7
178
38
74
391
12
5
17
148
37
4
87
35
51
236
6
2
22
71
58
80
8
31
163
9
1
16
50
16
3
72
14
34
158
4
3
22
41
21
58
10
33
155
2
1
24
32
17
451
83
275
1,350
15
7
355
306
106
2
11,039
2,332
9,553
13,790
535
441
2,096
14,016
4,836
227
311
1,650
Laundry	
181
1,271
Office     	
3,274
149
17
Telephone and telegraph-
221
1,036
69
102
Public places of amuse-
91
Totals	
1,561
28,754
10,176
7,350
4,151
1,684
904
568
377
369
332
2.950159.176
8,061
An indication of the time each employee has been in the service of the employer
filing the return is contained in the above table.
Due largely to a curtailment of new employment in certain war-time industries
included in the manufacturing group, the total employees shown as having worked less
than one year decreased to 28,754 in the above table, compared with a total of 30,930
in this category for 1944.
Special note is made of the employee credited with the greatest number of years'
service with the employer reporting. In the mercantile industry a woman-worker has
appeared on the same pay-roll for thirty-three years. Longest period with employer
in the laundry, cleaning and dyeing section was thirty years, while in the hotel and
catering classification thirty-seven years is the record. One office employee has served
the same firm for forty-five years.
In the personal service occupation twenty-two years' service topped all others.
The fishing industry has one woman employee with a twenty-three-year record.
A thirty-eight-year unbroken record is shown for one woman in the telephone and
telegraph industry.
Manufacturing has an employee on the same pay-roll for thirty-nine years, the
fruit and vegetable industry a worker with twenty-one years' service, and in the
classification of public places of amusement a nineteen-year record holds high place.
The transportation industry has been covered by a Board Order for women for only
a short period and this is the reason that four years with the reporting employer is the
longest in this type of work.
INSPECTIONS AND WAGE ADJUSTMENTS.
During the year our fourteen Inspectors made 9,233 actual investigations, an
increase of 221 over the 1944 figure.
The Province is divided into five districts with the staff working out from Victoria,
Vancouver, Kamloops, Nelson, and Prince George.
As each inspection consists of a detailed check of pay-rolls, hour records, conditions
of employment, and other details covered by Board Orders, and interviews with officials
J REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 51
and often employees in firms with hundreds of workers, each investigation requires
considerable time. On the departmental records it is counted as one inspection only,
even though it might necessitate several days to complete.
Considering the distances to be travelled the staff is to be commended for the year's
work and the co-operative spirit they have built up over the years with employers who
are still harassed by post-war problems of many varieties.
In the regular course of their duties our Inspectors found certain irregularities,
the most tangible of which were payments of wages below those required by law.
Through their efforts and with the co-operation of the employers, ninety-three
firms paid 161 women-workers arrears amounting to $2,736.08. A much larger sum
was paid over to 198 male employees by eighty-four employers who made adjustments
amounting to $9,835.60. Thus a total of $12,571.68, being the difference between what
they should have received and what they were actually paid, reached the pockets of
workers in the Province which, but for the help of the Board and the protective
legislation, they would either have lost altogether or been forced to take legal action
to recover on their own behalf.
Some employees do exercise their civil rights under the Male and Female Minimum
Wage Acts through the Courts without coming to the Board, but naturally we have no
record of what amounts they collect under such circumstances.
In addition to their regular departmental work many members of our staff have
assisted the Wartime Labour Regulations Branch in various parts of the Province.
Our departmental cars and private cars operated for Board of Industrial Relations
work covered 81,576 miles, of which 15,036 were run for the Wartime Labour Relations
Branch. Some of this work was done on special trips and at other times it was
accomplished while the Inspectors were doing their regular work, and in the latter
case mileage and costs were divided proportionately.
As the years go on and our Orders and regulations become better known the
well-established firms are aware of their responsibilities, but with many employers
coming into the Province from other places, particularly the Prairies, we must be on
the alert to keep them posted as to their responsibilities. As new Orders and regulations are made it is a continuous process of keeping employers, employees, and the
general public fully informed of the amendments.
COURT CASES.
When infractions of our labour laws occur it is usually possible to persuade the
erring employers to bring their operations into conformity with our Orders and regulations without resorting to prosecution. The ordeal of appearance in Court as witnesses
is a trying one for employees, particularly for women and girls, and the usual policy of
the Board has been to refrain from subjecting them to this experience except in
extreme cases. However, if it is found that employers persist in violation of the law,
or when after repeated warnings they fail to regulate their businesses in a legal
manner, Court actions are started against them.
The following tabulations show the cases taken during the year under the various
Statutes administered by the Department:—
Statute.
Cases.
Convictions.
Dismissed.
Withdrawn.
4
1
8
12
17
1
4
1
6
11
13
1
2
1
4
43
36
3
4 H 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
" Female Minimum Wage Act.:
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1
Failure to pay minimum wage to
employee
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to post and keep posted
a copy of Order No. 52
Failure  to  give  twenty-four-hour
rest period a week to employee
Fined $25 ;   arrears of $2 ordered.
2.
3.
4.
Maple Leaf Cafe (J. George), Williams
Lake.
Prince George Cafe (Gordon Woo),
Prince George.
Roslyn Rooms (Mike Kohoot), 621 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Fined $25,  $2.50 costs ;   in default,
two months.
Fined   $5,   $1.75   costs;    in   default,
ten days.
Conviction and suspended sentence.
Male Minimum Wage Act."
1. Charles D. Bloom, Lumby..
Contravening Order No. 26 (1940)     Fined   $10   and   costs ;    arrears   of
$32.25 ordered.
" Hours of Work Act."
1.
Boston   Cafe    (George   James),   Prince
Rupert.
Failure to   post  notice  of   shifts
Fined $25;
in default, one month.
2.
Boston   Cafe    (George   James),   Prince
Rupert.
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Fined $25;
in default, one month.
3.
Deep Creek Sawmills (Wilfred A. Bush),
Terrace.
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Dismissed.
4.
Maple Leaf Cafe  (J. George), Williams
Working  an   employee  in  excess
Dismissed—
-employee  with   primary
Lake.
of legal hours
evidence
absent at trial.
5.
Maple Leaf Cafe  (J. George), Williams
Failure to   post  notice  of   shifts
Fined $25,
$2.50 costs;   in default,
Lake.
four mon
ths.
6.
Prince   George  Cafe   ( Gordon   Woo),
Failure to post schedule of hours
Fined $10,
$1.75 costs;   in default,
Prince George.
of work
ten days.
7.
Roslyn Rooms   (Mike Kohoot), 621 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Failure to   post notice  of   shifts
Fined $25.
8.
Young   Brothers    (Young    Kai),    3496
Failure  to   post  notice  of  hours
Conviction
;    $5   costs;    suspended
Dunbar Street, Vancouver.
of work
sentence
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act."
1. Deep Creek Sawmills (Wilfred A. Bush),
Terrace.
2. Deep Creek Sawmills (Wilfred A. Bush),
Terrace.
3. Deep Creek Sawmills (Wilfred A. Bush),
Terrace.
4. Victor Hutchinson, Columbia Gardens....
5. Lloyd Jordan, Edgewood..
6. McKelvie Mills  (John Allen McKelvie),
Newlands.
7, 8, 9. H.  E.  Montgomery,  1620  Commercial Drive, Vancouver.
10. Phillips   Lumber  Co.,   Ltd.,   Prince
George.
11. S. & O. Logging Co., Ltd. (A. S. Stone),
944 Granville Street, Vancouver.
12. S. & O. Logging Co., Ltd. (A. S. Stone),
944 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Failure to pay an employee wages
semi-monthly
Failure to pay an
semi-monthly
Failure to pay an
semi-monthly
Failure to pay an
semi-monthly
Failure to pay an
semi-monthly
Failure to pay an
semi-monthly
Failure   to   pay
employees semi
employee wages
employee wages
employee wages
employee wages
employee wages
three   separate
monthly
Failure to pay an employee wages
semi-monthly
Failure to pay an employee wages
semi-monthly
Failure to pay an employee wages
semi-monthly
Fined $25, $2.25 costs; or in
default thirty days; arrears of
$86.50 ordered.
Conviction;      arrears     of     §533.26
ordered.
Conviction;      arrears     of     $124.94
ordered.
Dismissed when cheque for $85
arrears produced.
Fined $50, costs $16; arrears of
$116 ordered.
Fined $25; in default, distress;
arrears of $324.26 ordered.
Fined $25 on first charge and suspended sentence on other two
when $56.20 arrears paid previous to sentence.
Conviction and suspended.sentence ;
arrears of $38.50 paid forthwith
and $855.46 ordered paid to other
employees.
Fined $25 ; in default, thirty days ;
arrears of $250 ordered.
Fined $25; in default, thirty days ;
arrears of $67.10 ordered. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 53
" Control of Employment of Children Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1.
Allen & Maron Sawmill, Reid Lake	
Unlawfully
employing    a     child
Convicted and fined $5.
without a
permit
2.
Chapman's   Recreations,   Ltd.,   1312
Broadway West, Vancouver.
Employing
permit
a
child
without
a
Fined $50 ; in default, 30 days.
3.
Commodore Recreations (C. R. Young),
840 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Employing
permit
a
child
without
a
Fined $10 ; in default, three days.
4.
Common Gold Cafe  (Chang Sang), 151
Hastings Street East, Vancouver.
Employing
permit
a
child
without
a
Fined $10 ; in default, three days.
5.
Guilford Sawmills, Ltd., Penny	
Employing
permit
a
child
without
a
Fined $10 and $1.75 costs.
6-S
. La    Salle   Recreations,    Ltd.    (Harry
Employing
fot
r child
ren without
Charges withdrawn.
McCuaig), 945 Granville Street, Van
permits
couver.
10.
La Salle Recreations, Ltd. (Vic Huckle),
945 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Employing
permit
a
child
without
a
Fined $25 ; in default, ten days.
11.
Maple Leaf Cafe (Kin Jung), Nanaimo
Employing
a
child  in   excess
of
Fined $25 ; in default, one week.
hours set by permit
12.
Marine Workers Holding, Ltd.   (Harry
J.  Taylor),  339 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Employing
permit
a
child
without
a
Fined $25 ; in default, ten days.
13.
Marine Workers Holding, Ltd.  (Walter
Allen),    339    Pender    Street    West,
Vancouver.
Employing
permit
a
child
without
a
Fined   $50,   $5   costs;    in   default,
thirty days.
14.
Francis  Millerd  & Co.,   Ltd.,  Great
Northern Cannery, West Vancouver.
Employing
permit
a
child
without
a
Fined $25, $2.50 costs.
15.
Francis  Millerd  &  Co.,   Ltd.,  Great
Northern Cannery, West Vancouver.
Employing
permit
a
child
without
a
Fined $25, $2.50 costs.
16.
Olympic Recreations   (B.  Joyner), 777
Granville Street, Vancouver.
Employing
permit
a
child
without
a
Fined $10 ; in default, three days.
17.
Shaughnessy Market   (Tommy Hong),
2925 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Employing
permit
a
child
without
a
Fined $25 ; in default, ten days.
" Factories Act."
1. Columbia Grain Milling Co. (E. A.
Woodward, Manager), 2780 Commissioner Street, Vancouver.
Operating a freight elevator the
operation of which had been
suspended on account of failing to comply with regulations
Suspended sentence to bring operations into compliance with regulations within twenty days.
COMPARATIVE WAGES, 1918, 1943, 1944, AND 1945.
Figures showing comparative wage trends are furnished in the following tables
for the year 1918, when data were first compiled, and for the three most recent years—
namely, 1943, 1944, and 1945. It will be noted these relate to non-seasonal occupations
only.
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1918.
1943.
1944.
1945.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$12.71
$7.70
15.49%
$15.14
$11.03
15.32%
$17.22
$10.55
13.48%
$17.56
$10.56
11.60% H 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Laundry Industry (Female).
1918.
1943.
1944.
1945.
Average weekly wages—
$11.80
$9.78
21.80%
$14.97
$10.68
3.72%
$15.48
$13.63
1.58%
$16.31
$12.44
0.69%
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees.
$17.24
$10.18
3.43%
Office Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$23.37
$15.41
3.23%
Personal Service Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$19.57
$10.92
2.62%
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
$21.30
$13.97
1.53%
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees.
$25.90
$11.47
1.81%
$23.13
$9.90
1.18?
SPECIAL LICENCES.
In order to give inexperienced employees a chance to commence work, provision is
made in the various Orders of the Board for a graduated scale of wages leading up to
the legal minimum after a certain length of time. Such learners have to secure special
licences.
The number of employers taking advantage of these licences decreased during 1945,
as labour shortage worked to the advantage of those seeking employment. Employers
in most instances were willing to pay the legal minimum to learners, so only 217
licences were issued, as against 378 in 1944 and 745 in 1943. The following table
shows the numbers issued in various lines of work in 1945 and 1944:— REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 55
1945. 1944.
Telephone and telegraph    5
Personal service  -        1
Laundry           6 28
Mercantile    -     16 16
Office        26 49
Hotel and catering      43 85
Manufacturing     125 195
Totals    -  217 378
The original licence is sent to the employee so she may know when her increases
are due. A duplicate is forwarded to the employer and when the girl is raised to the
legal minimum, either before or at the expiration of the licence, or when she leaves the
firm, the employer returns his copy for cancellation on our records. Many employers
raised the wages of the girls to the legal minimum much sooner than the licence or
permit required.
STATISTICS FOR MALE EMPLOYEES.
The information dealing with employment and earnings of female workers as
reported in the statistical tables is based on a questionnaire restricted to female
employees only.
Where possible from industrial classifications dealt with elsewhere in this report,
a segregation has been made to isolate males in occupations included in the coverage
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act " for similar presentation in the separate tables
which follow. While detailed information is not available from this source for all
occupations covered by the Male Minimum Wage Orders, the tables show the trend of
wages and employment for males in some of the more important occupations covered.
The figures are based on industrial returns which show the week of employment of
the greatest number, and the male employees included are segregated to show those
over and under 21 years of age.
Baking Industry (Male).
1945.
1944.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years-
Average hours worked per week	
182
1,469
1,353
116
$51,174.50
$49,109.50
$2,065.00
$36.30
$17.80
7.90%
45.04
169
1,167
1,089
78
$41,031.00
$39,687.00
$1,344.00
$36.44 [
$17.23 |
6.68% |
45.60 |
167
1,150
1,030
120
$36,042.50
$34,081.50
$1,961.00
$33.09
$16.34
10.43%
45.80
■    172
1,209
1,106
103
$36,411.50
$34,877.00
$1,534.50
$31.53
$14.90
8.52%
46.69
Construction (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week	
1,116
16,712
16,031
681
$617,345.50
$601,207.50
$16,138.00
$37.50
$23.70
4.07%
42.79
916
17,808
17,181
627
$676,180.00
$660,869.50
$15,310.50
$38.47
$24.42
3.52%
44.09
$969,
$943,
$25
753
24,754
23,837
917
551.00
888.00
,663.00
$39.60
$27.99
3.70%
51.14
25,550
24,795
705
$921,080.00
$902,784.50
$18,295.50
$36.41
$25.95
2.76%
50.06 H 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Fruit and Vegetable (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years
Average hours worked per week	
94
2,758
2,056
702
$84,880.00
$65,809.00
$19,071.00
$32.01
$27.17
25.45%
49.96
2,807
2,136
671
$82,688.50
$65,879.00
$16,809.50
$30.84
$25.05
23.90%
51.87
84
2,068
1,482
586
$58,653.00
$44,246.50
$14,406.50
$29.86
$24.58
28.34%
54.43
84
1,947
1,423
524
$53,560.50
$41,670.50
$11,890.50
$29.28
$22.69
26.91%
51.59
House Furnishings (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
.    Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years ...
Percentage of male employees under 21 years
Average hours worked per week	
99
1,198
982
196
$34,177.00
$30,824.00
3,353.00
$31.39
$17.11
16.36%
43.40
77
829
684
145
$23,660.50
$21,398.00
$2,262.50
$31.28
$15.60
17.49%
43.55
67
733
595
138
$19,001.00
$16,734.50
$2,266.50
$28.13
$16.42
18.83%
44.00
65
1,051
815
236
$26,294.00
$22,627.50
$3,666.50
$27.76
$15.54
22.45%
44.88
Logging (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years
Average hours worked per week	
639
13,249
12,635
614
$608,209.50
$585,334.00
$22,875.50
$46.33
$37.26
4.63%
48.13
546
12,768
12,249
519
$595,607.50
$577,224.00
$18,383.50
$47.12
$35.42
4.06%
48.46
621
12,589
11,904
685
$513,106.00
$489,219.00
$23,887.00
$41.10
$34.87
5.44%
48.67
526
12,992
12,556
436
$492,348.00
$479,185.00
$13,163.00
$38.16
$30.19
3.36%
48.78
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years.
Average hours worked per week	
125
800
777
23
$28,130.00
$27,565.50
$564.50
$35.48
$24.54
2.88%
42.15
101
704
672
32
$25,609.50
$24,911.50
$698.00
$37.07
$21.81
4.55%
40.91
92
647
626
21
$23,150.00
$22,730.00
$420.00
118
589
573
16
$20,679.00
$20,344.00
$335.00
$36.31
$35.50
$20.00
$20.94
3.25%
2.72%
42.38
42.70 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 57
Sawmills (Male).
1945.
1944.
1943.
1942.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years
Average hours worked per week	
412
13,394
12,765
629
$491,406.50
$471,756.50
$19,650.00
$36.96
$31.24
4.70%
47.46
372
12,895
12,234
661
$463,514.00
$444,015.50
$19,498.50
$36.29
$29.50
5.13%
47.98
307
12,871
12,178
693
$429,632.00
$411,678.50
$17,953.50
$33.81
$25.91
5.38%
48.47
284
13,905
13,239
666
$419,243.50
$402,783.50
$16,460.00
$30.42
$24.71
4.79%
48.44
Shingle-mills (Male).
Number of firms reporting ,
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years
Average hours worked per week	
$67.
$1:
44
1,742
1,700
42
859.00
754.00
105.00
$26.31
2.41%
45.90
40
1,677
1,638
39
$64,506.00
$63,456.50
$1,049.50
$38.74
$26.91
2.33%
46.28
43
1,713
1,677
36
$59,128.00
$58,220.50
$907.50
$34.72
$25.21
2.10%
46.42
45
2,246
2,211
35
$73,535.50
$72,677.00
$858.50
$32.87
$24.53
1.56%
47.20
Ship-building (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly "wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years
Average hours worked per week	
56
21,668
20,939
729
$858,836.00
$836,680.50
$22,155.50
$30.39
3.36%
43.10
46
26,357
24,839
1,518
$1,053,057.00
$1,002,618.00
$50,439.00
$40.36
$33.23
5.76%
43.07
$1
47
30,488
29,020
1,468
213,203.50
162,994.00
$50,209.50
$40.08
$34.20
4.82%
43.92
46
28,597
26,913
1,684
$1,136,225.50
$1,085,034.50
551.191.90
$40.32
$30.40
5.89%
47.88
Wood (N.E.S.)   (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—■
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years
Average hours worked per week	
147
3,818
3,209
609
$127,076.50
$111,349.00
$15,727.50
$34.70
$25.83
15.95%
45.61
121
3,434
2,897
537
$114,736.50
$100,679.00
$14,057.50
$34.75
$26.18
15.64%
45.61
108
3,836
3,218
618
$121,058.00
$107,298.00
$13,760.00
$33.34
$22.27
16.11%
46.28
104
3,645
2,996
649
$103,040.50
$90,605.00
$12,435.59
$30.24
$19.16
17.81%
46.59 H 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONCLUSION.
At the close of another year the Board wishes to acknowledge its appreciation of
help extended to its officials in the administration of the various labour laws.
It is realized that employers in a post-war period are coping with problems that at
times seem more difficult than those which faced them during the actual war years.
The transition era is presenting its challenges to employers and employees, and we are
very grateful for the consideration shown our Inspectors when they make their routine
visits during these busy times.
While this report is for the calendar year 1945, of necessity it can not be published
until some time in 1946, and at the time of going to press we realize the tremendous
task that faces us now that Dominion Government regulations have handed back to the
Province the authority to deal with hours and wages. This dated from July 1st, 1946.
For a short period prior to that date the Board has held many sessions with a view to
amending its Orders and regulations.
The appendix to this report will reveal that considerable progress has already been
made, and a programme has been mapped out to continue this upward revision of wage
rates to bring them more into line with present-day standards.
For Orders not yet dealt with, a blanket Order prescribing a 20-per-cent. increase
was put into effect on July 1st so that many thousands of workers, both male and female,
have felt the protection of these new enactments. For besides dealing with wages and
hours, the policy has been to incorporate provisions relating to such matters as rest
periods, appropriate living accommodation, rates for overtime when necessary, and
many other helpful clauses. A new Order relating to the cost and up-keep of uniforms
has been made to cover all occupations and industries. For the future we foresee a
very strenuous time and bespeak the continued co-operation from employers, employees,
and the public which we have had in the past.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 50
APPENDIX.
(Compiled August 31st, 1946.)
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO " MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
APPRENTICES INDENTURED UNDER THE "APPRENTICESHIP ACT."
Male and Female Minimum "Wage Order No. 2 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 194.6.
1. Minimum wages  fixed by any  Order of the  Board  shall not apply to  apprentices indentured
under " Apprenticeship Act."
2. Employer shall pay to apprentice rate of pay fixed by contract of apprenticeship.
3. Rate of pay under contract of apprenticeship  shall  constitute the minimum wage payable to
apprentice in lieu of the minimum wage fixed by the Board in any other Order.
BAKING INDUSTRY ORDER No. 17   (1942)   (MALE).*
Effective July 20th, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 17.)
" Baking industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of bread, biscuits,
cakes, doughnuts, pies, and similar products.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
"Weekly Hours.
Bakers—
21 years of age and over	
Under 18 years of age	
18 years and under 19 years	
19 years and under 20 years	
20 years and under 21 years	
At least 85% of employees to get not less than
48c.
24c.
30c.
36c.
42c.
44
44
44
44
44
44
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
(6.)   Delivery salesmen (see Transportation Ord*er).
BARBERING MINIMUM WAGE ORDER No. 42   (1946)   (MALE).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 42.
" Occupation of barbering " means the work of persons engaged in  the  shaving of the face or
cutting or trimming or singeing of the hair or beard for hire, gain, or hope of reward, or in connection
with any of the foregoing the shampooing or massaging or the treating of the head or face.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
Rate.
Hours.
Class A employees	
Class B employees ......
Employees classified under section 6 of " Male Minimum Wage Act
working  under  permit
Apprentices	
$25.00 a week
65c. per hour
(Daily guarantee
of 4 hours' pay)
As prescribed in
the permit
See Order No. 2
(1946)
40—44 per week.
Less than 40 per
week.
Not more than 44
per week.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay.
Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates
of Class B employees.
Note.— (1.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(2.)   Schedule of daily shifts* and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(3.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to he kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4.)   Records to he produced to authorized officials.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BOX-MANUFACTURING ORDER No. 55   (1943)   (MALE).*
Effective July 19th, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 55.)
" Box-manufacturing industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the making of wooden
boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel staves and heads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, or other wooden containers.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
4Sc.
36c.
36c.
30c.
44
44
44
44
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of 8 hours
in any one day or 48 hours in any one week.
I
Working in excess of 9 hours in any one day or
50 hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act.
Rate of Pay.
One   and  one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees (see Order No. 4 (1946)).
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26  (1940)   and Order No. 26A
(1940) of the Board.
Note.—Does not apply to apprentices indentured under " Apprenticeship Act " (see Order No. 2 (1946)).
BUS-DRIVERS ORDER No. 76  (FEMALE).*
Effective September 28th, 1942.
" Bus-driver " means every female employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating
accommodation for more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public, for which
service a charge is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point Grey
which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City of
Vancouver;   the City of New Westminster;   the Corporation of
The Township of Richmond;   the Municipality of the District of
Burnaby;   Municipality of the District of West Vancouver;   the
City of North Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver
60c.
66c.
40 to 48.
Less than 40.
Note.— (1.) If bus-drivers are reauired to wear uniforms or special articles of wearing-apparel, no deduction
shall be made from bus-drivers' wages for such uniforms or special apparel, except under terms with regard to
cost duly approved in writing by the Board as being fair and reasonable.
(2.)   Employees required by employer to wait on call shall be paid for waiting time.
(3.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of payment.
(4.) Rest period of 24 consecutive hours from midnight to midnight in each calendar week shall be given
to employees.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 61
BUS-DRIVERS ORDER No. 70   (MALE).*
Effective March 18th, 1940, superseding Order No. 31.
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which service a charge is
made.
Area.
Vancouver Island and Saltspring Island-
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
60c.
40 to 50.
66c.
Less than 40.
90c.
In excess of 9 hours
in   any one day  or
50 hours in any one
week.
BUS-DRIVERS ORDER No. 70a   (MALE).
Effective June 27th, 1940.
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of a bus-driver
while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by a bus-driver from the time
he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty until he returns again to his employer's
headquarters or garage where he originally reported for duty; and shall include the time occupied by
a bus-driver in dead-heading from his employer's headquarters or garage to the place where he is to
take charge of the bus and vice versa; but the minimum wage shall not apply to waiting-time of a bus-
driver when occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).*
Order No. 66, Effective August 21st, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 40.)
" Carpentry trade " means and includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the
construction and erection of any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling,
alteration, or repairing of any existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt,
Highland, Metchosin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew
90c.
44
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act"   (see Order No. 2   (1946)).
(b.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages to be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).*
Order No. 58 and 58a, Effective November 7th, 1938, and February 29th, 1940.
" Carpentry trade " means and includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the
construction and erection of any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling,
alteration, or repairing of any existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
The City of Vancouver, together with all that area, known as Point Grey,
which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City of Vancouver,
the City of New Westminster, the Municipality of the District of Bur-
naby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, the City of North
90c.
44
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act "  (see Order No. 2  (1946) ).
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages to be paid as often as semi-monthly.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).*
Order No. 65, Effective August 1st, 1939.
" Carpentry trade " means and includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the
construction and erection of any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling,
alteration, or repairing of any existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Provincial   Electoral   Districts   of   Rossland-Trail,   Grand   Forks-Greenwood,
90c.
* 44
Note.— (et.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act "  (see Order No. 2  (1946) ).
(b.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages to be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).*
Order No. 72, Effective May 27th, 1940.
" Carpentry trade " means and includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the
construction and erection of any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling,
alteration, or repairing of any existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
That portion of Vancouver Island within a radius of 5 miles from the centre
90c.
44
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act"  (see Order No. 2  (1946)).
(b.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages to be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).*
Order No. 73, Effective May 27th, 1940.
" Carpentry trade " means and includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the
construction and erection of any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling,
alteration, or repairing of any existing building or structure or part thereof.
•                                                               Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
That portion of Vancouver Island within a radius of 5 miles from the centre
90c.
44
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act"  (see Order No. 2  (1946)).
(b.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages to be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY  (MALE).*
Order No. 68, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 61.)
" Christmas-tree  industry"  includes   all   operations   in   or  incidental   to   the   cutting,  gathering,
hauling, and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Male employees, 85% not less than 48c. per hour.
Permissible, 15% not less than 36c. per hour.
Note.— (a.)  Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 63
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY  (MALE).*
Order No. 12 (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 12, Order No. 12a, Order No. 12b, Order No. 45, Order No. 45a,
and Order No. 48.)
" Construction industry " includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or demolition of
any building, railway, tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge,
viaduct, sewer, drain, well, telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork,
waterways, or other work of construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of
any such work or structure.
Area.
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate,
under 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
The City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point
Grey which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the
City of Vancouver;   the City of Victoria ;   the City of New
Westminster;    the   City   of   Nanaimo;    th-2   City   of   Prince
Rupert;   the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt;   the
Municipality of the District of Oak Bay ;   the   Municipality of
the District of Saanich ;   Municipality of the District of West
Vancouver;    the   Municipality   of   the   District   of   Burnaby;
54c.
48c.
42c.
36c.
44
44
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to indentured apprentices under '
(6.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
Apprenticeship Act " (see Order No. 2 (1946) ).
COOK- AND BUNK-HOUSE OCCUPATION.
(In Unorganized Territory.)
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 4 (1946).
Effective July 8th, 1946.
" Cook- and bunk-house occupation " means any work performed by any male or female employee
in or incidental to operation of any kitchen, dining-room, cook-house, bunk-house, or recreation-room
operated in connection with any industrial undertaking in unorganized territory, and without limiting
the generality of the foregoing description means the work of cooks, dish-washers, waiters, bunk-house
and recreation-room attendants, and others employed in a similar capacity.
Hourly rat?:   50c, except to employees working under permit under section 6 of " Male Minimum
Wage Act " or section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage Act," wage prescribed by permit.
Hours:   Unlimited.
(1.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
(2.)   No charge or deductions for accidental breakages.
(3.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(4.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6.)   Records to b'e produced to authorized officials.
Note.—This Order is not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities.—Alberni, Armstrong, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Fernie, Grand
Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster,
North Vancouver, Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Revelstoke, Rossland,
Salmon Arm, Slocan, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby, Chilliwhack, Coldstream, Coquitlam, Delta, Esquimalt, Fraser Mills, Glenmore, Kent,
Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Mission, North Cowichan, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Peachland, Penticton, Pitt
Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Sumas, Summerland, Surrey, Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry Lake, Creston, Dawson
Creek, Gibsons Landing, Hope, Lake Cowichan, Lytton, McBride, Mission, New Denver, Oliver, Osoyoos, Parksville,
Pouce Coupe, Qualicum Beach, Quesnel, Silverton, Smithers, Stewart, Terrace, Tofino, Vanderhoof, Westview,
Williams Lake.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS   (MALE).*
Order No. 54, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 32.)
Includes every male elevator operator and starter.
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$16.80 per week.
45c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.80.
Notk.— (a.)   Full week's board  (21) meals, $4.00 per week,
(b.)   Individual meals, twenty cents   (20c.) each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven (7)  days, $2.00 per week,
(e.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/.)   Uniforms or special wearing-apparel, required by the employer, must be supplied and laundered without
cost to the employee.
(g.)   The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(h.)  Employees must be given twenty-four  (24)  consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
( i.)   Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND  STARTERS   (FEMALE).*
Order No. 53, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 30 and Order No. 5.)
Includes every female operator and starter.
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$16.80 per Week.
45c per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.80.
Note.—As for male elevator operators see Order No. 54.
ENGINEERS,  STATIONARY  STEAM   (MALE).*
Order No. 18 (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 18, 18a, 18b, and 18c.)
" Stationary steam engineer " means every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant
under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam
boiler or engine while under steam-pressure or in motion. " Special engineer " means holder of a
special or temporary certificate.    (See " Boiler Inspection Act," section 28 (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Engineer	
Engineer, special..
60c.
48c.
44
44
Note.— (a.) Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the "Hours of Work Act," 44 hours per
week may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(b.)   For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(c.) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 48 cents
per hour.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 65
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS  (MALE).*
Order No. 39 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 39.)
" First-aid attendant " means every male employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid
attendant under the authority of a certificate of competency in first aid, satisfactory to the Workmen's
Compensation Board of British Columbia, and designated by his employer as the first-aid attendant
in charge.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Rate.
60c.
60c.
$4.80
4.80
Note.— (a.) "Hours of Work Act" regulates the daily hours in industry, but should overtime he necessary,
attendant must be paid overtime rate.
(b.) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any industry or occupation within an industry, the first-aid
attendant employed in such industry or occupation must be paid such higher rate.
(c.) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the medical practitioner or hospital.
FISHING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).*
Order No. 78, Effective May 3rd, 1943.
(Superseding Order in Effect since February 28th, 1920.)
" Fishing industry " means the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving,
canning, drying, curing, smoking, packing, labelling and reconditioning of containers, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use or for shipment any kind of fish or shell-fish.
Hourly Rate.
40c.
40e. thereafter.
Note.— (1.)  Above rates do not apply to employees engaged in heading and filling.
(2.) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age below 40c./
per hour.
(3.)  Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(4.) Employees shall not be employed more than eight hours a day or 44 hours a week except under permit
from the Board.
(5.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47  (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 47 (194-2).
" Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable.
June 1st to November 30th, inclusive.
Rate payable to at least 85% of male employees
Rate payable to balance of male employees	
Overtime ,	
December 1st to May 3lst, inclusive.
Rate payable to at least 85% of male employees
Rate payable to balance of male employees	
Overtime	
Hourly Rate.
48c.
Daily minimum, $1.44
38c.
Daily minimum, $1.14
Time and one-half regular rate
Double regular rate
48c.
Daily minimum, $1.44
38c.
Daily minimum, $1.14
Time and one-half regular rate
Daily Hours.
Up to 8.
Up to 8.
9 to 11, incl.
Over 11.
Up to 8.
Up to 8.
In excess of 8 daily or 44 weekly.
Note.— (1.) After 5 hours* continuous employment, employees shall have 1 hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2.)  Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(3.)  Copy of Order to be posted.
(4.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY. ~
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 46,  (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 46 (194.2).
" Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Hours.
June 1st to November 30th, inclusive.
Rate payable to at least 90% of female employees	
Rate payable to balance of female employees	
40c.
Daily minimum, $1.20
35c.
Daily minimum, $1.05
Time and one-half regular rate
Double regular rate
40c.
Daily minimum, $1.20
35c.
Daily minimum, $1.05
Time and one-half regular rate
Up to 8.                         ~-      ...	
Up to 8.
December 1st to May 31st, inclusive.
Rate payable to at least 90% of female employees
Over 11.
8.
8
In excess of 8 daily or 44 weekly.
Note.— (1.) After 5 hours' continuous employment, employees shall have 1 hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(3.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(4.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 67
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 52 (1938).
"Hotel and catering industry" means the work of male and female employees employed in:—■
(a.)  Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which a
charge is made;
(6.)  Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses,  dance-halls, cabarets, banquet-
halls,  ice-cream  parlours,  soda-fountains,  hospitals,  sanatoriums,  nursing homes,  clubs,
dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial establishments or
office buildings or schools, or any similar place where food is cooked, prepared, or served,
for which a charge is made,—
whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or in connection with
any other business.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry, working
under permit from the Board.
Class A employees-
Class B employees..
$18.00 per week
45c. per hour
(Daily guarantee
of 4 hours' pay)
Hours.
40—44 per week.
Less than 40
per week.
Learners (any age).
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$12.00 per week for 1st 2 months.
30c. per hour for  1st 2 months.
14.00 per week for 2nd 2 months.
35c. per hour for 2nd 2 months.
16.00 per week for 3rd 2 months.
40c. per hour for 3rd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
45c. per hour thereafter.
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay at respective
hourly rates as set out above.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Hours.
Employees classified under section G of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
or section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage Act" working under
permit
Wage set in
permit
Not more than 44
per week.
Hours.—-Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week except:—
(a.)   When authorized by the Board or by section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act " :
(b.)  In cases of emergency which can not reasonably be otherwise overcome:-—■
Not more than 10 in the day or 48 in the week.
Split shifts to be confined within 12 hours of commencing work.     ("Hours of Work Act" provision.)
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
w^ek. Th'is overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section
5 or 11 of " Hours of Work Act *' until he has completed hours so established.
Night-work.—Employment between 1.30 a.m. and 6 a.m. to be continuous. Working shifts not to start or finish
between these hours.
This does not apply to employees :—
(a.)  In hospitals, sanatoriums, and nursing homes residing on the premises:
(&.)  In catering where exemption has been granted in writing by the Board:
(c.)   On Christmas Day and New Year's Day and any other days declared to be exempt by the Board.
Rest Period.—32 consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved by
the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a
call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees. H 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Board or Lodging.—For meals partaken of or accommodation used by employee, not more than the following
deductions to be made from employee's wages:—
(a.)  Full week's board of 21 meals, $4 per week:
(6.')  Individual meals, 20c. each:
(c.)   Full week's lodging for 7 days, $2 per week.
Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
Uniforms.—See Order No. 3   (1946)  relating to uniforms.
Rest-rooms, Toilet and Wash-room Facilities.—To be provided by employers for use of employees.
Note.— (1.)   Order does not apply to:—
(a.)  Graduate nurses with certificate of completed training:
(b.)  Student-nurses   in   training   in   approved   school   of   nursing,   as   defined   by   sections   22   and   23   of
" Registered Nurses Act " :
(c.)   Students employed in a school where enrolled:
(d.)  Bell-boys as far as ivages are concerned:
(e.)   Employees covered by another specific Order of the Board.
(2.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(3.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(4.)   Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials.
RESORT HOTELS IN HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY IN UNORGANIZED
TERRITORY DURING THE SUMMER SEASON.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52a (1946).
Effective June 15th to September 15th, inclusive, each Year.
" Resort hotel " means any establishment in unorganized territory wherein imeals or lodging are
furnished to the general public for which a charge is made.
" Summer season/' that part of each year from June 15th to September 15th, inclusive.
Hours.—Not more than 10 in any one day nor 52 in any one week.
Overtime.—One and one-half times regular rate of pay for all hours in excess of 44 in any one week.
Rest Period.—24 consecutive hours each calendar week, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by the Board on joint application of employer and employee.
Variation of Order No. 52 (1946).—All provisions of Order No. 52 (1946) apply except those relating to hours
of work and rest period.
Note.— (1.)   Order to be posted.
(2.)   Order not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities.—Alberni, Armstrong, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Fernie, Grand
Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster,
North "Vancouver, Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Revelstoke, Rossland,
Salmon Arm,  Slocan, Trail, Vancouver,  Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby, Chilliwhack, Coldstream, Coquitlam, Delta, Esquimalt, Fraser Mills, Glenmore, Kent,
Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Mission, North Cowichan, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Peachland, Penticton, Pitt
Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Sumas, Summerland, Surrey, Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry Lake, Creston, Dawson
Creek, Gibsons Landing, Hope, Lake Cowichan, Lytton, McBride, Mission, New Denver, Oliver, Osoyoos, Parksville,
Pouce Coupe, Qualicum Beach, Quesnel, Silverton, Smithers, Stewart, Terrace, Tofino, Vanderhoof, Westview,
Williams Lake.
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (MALE).*
Order No. 51, Effective November 22nd, 1937.
" Household-furniture manufacturing industry " includes the manufacture of kitchen furniture,
dining-room furniture, bedroom furniture, living-room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of
household furniture, customarily manufactured in a furniture factory.
Males.
Rate per Hour.
Hours per Week.
21 years of age or over	
Under 17 years of age	
17 years and under 18 years of age
18 years and under 19 years of age.
19 years and under 20 years of age.
20 years and under 21 years of age.
48c.
24c.
30c.
33c.
36c.
42c.
44
44
44
44
44
44
Note.— (a.)   60% of all male employees must be paid not less than 48c. per hour.
(6.)  Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act "  (see Order No. 2  (1946)).
♦As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 69
GENEEAL INTERIM MINIMUM WAGE ORDER  (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946.
1. That this Order shall apply to, every employer and to every male and female employee in every
industry, business, trade, or occupation covered by the following orders, namely:—
Order
No.
17 (1942)
55 (1943)
70
76
58
65
66
72
73
68
12 (1940)
53
54
18 (1942)
39 (1940)
78
51
43 (1942)
44 (1942)
1 (1943)
25 (1942)
24
59
75
71
69
27
67
50 (1943)
62 (1943)
77 (1943)
33 (1940)
60
79
26 (1940)
26b
49 (1943)
Industry.
Baking	
Box-manufacture	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Saltspring Island)	
Bus-driver	
Carpentry (Vancouver and District)	
Carpentry (Kootenay Area)	
Carpentry (Victoria and District)	
Carpentry (Alberni)	
Carpentry (Nanaimo)	
Christmas-trees	
Construction	
Elevator Operators	
Elevator Operators :.	
Engineers, Stationary Steam	
First-aid Attendants	
Fishing	
Household Furniture	
Janitors	
Janitresses	
Logging	
Manufacturing	
Mercantile	
Mercantile	
Painters,  Decorators,  and  Paper-hangers   (southerly portion  of
Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers (Vancouver and District)
Patrolmen	
Personal Service	
Public Places of Amusement	
Sawmills	
Shingle	
Shingle :	
Taxicab-drivers	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)	
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Wood-working	
Date of Order.
July 15, 1942	
July 14, 1943	
March 12,1940	
September 21, 1942
September 15, 1938
June 23, 1939	
August 16, 1939	
May 14, 1940	
May 14, 1940	
August 31, 1939	
November 26, 1940.
February 28, 1938...
February 28, 1938...
September 9, 1942...
October 8, 1940	
April 14, 1943	
November 17, 1937.
September 9, 1942...
September 9, 1942..
July 14, 1943	
October 15, 1942	
May 29, 1935	
October 12, 1938	
April 22, 1941	
April 26, 1940	
January 19, 1940....
August 29, 1935	
August 31, 1939	
June 25, 1943	
July 23, 1943	
July 23, 1943	
October 8, 1940	
November 15, 1938.
March 13, 1945	
October 8, 1940	
August 12, 1941	
July 14, 1943	
Minimum
Wage
Act.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
2. That on and after the 1st day of July, 1946, all minimum wage-rates fixed by the orders of the
Board, as set out in section 1 of this Order, are hereby increased by adding thereto 20% of such
minimum wage-rates.
3. That the orders as set out in section 1 of this Order are varied accordingly.
4. That this Order, made by the Board at Victoria, B.C., on the 25th day of June, 1946, and
published in The British Columbia Gazette on the 27th day of June, 1946, shall take effect on the 1st
day of July, 1946. H 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
JANITORS  (MALE).*
Order No. 43 (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 43, 43A, and 43B.)
1. " Janitor"   means   and   includes   every   person   employed   as   janitor,   janitor-cleaner,   janitor-
fireman, or janitor-engineer.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, 45c. per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings of 4 residential suites and under, 45e. per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:-
29 residential suites, $114.84 per month
30 residential suites, $117.48 per month
31 residential suites, $120.12 per month
32 residential suites, $122.76 per month
33 residential suites, $125.40 per month
34 residential suites, $128.04 per month
35 residential suites, $130.68 per month
36 residential suites, $133.32 per month
37 residential suites, $135.96 per month
38 residential suites, $138.60 per month
39 residential suites, $141.24 per month
40 residential suites, $143.88 per month
41 residential suites, $146.52 per month
42 residential suites, $149.16 per month
43 residential suites, $151.80 per month
44 residential suites, $154.44 per month
45 residential suites, $157.08 per month
46 residential suites, $159.72 per month
47 residential suites, $162.36 per month
48 residential suites, $165.00 per month
49 residential suites, $165.00 per month
50 residential suites, $165.00 per month
over 50 residential suites, $165.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $112.20 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid 45c. per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for 2 rooms and bathroom, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and  (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing 20 residential suites and over, every janitor shall be
given 24 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than 19 and not less than 12 residential suites,
every janitor shall be given 8 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.— (1.) In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building, the suite occupied by
the janitor shall not be included.
(2.)  Order does not apply to janitors employed in one-room school-houses.
5 residential suites, $32.40 per month
6 residential suites, $36.00 per month
7 residential suites, $39.60 per month
8 residential suites, $43.20 per month
9 residential suites, $46.80 per month
10 residential suites, $50.40 per month
11 residential suites, $54.00 per month
12 residential suites, $57.60 per month
13 residential suites, $61.20 per month
14 residential suites, $64.80 per month
15 residential suites, $68.64 per month
16 residential suites, $72.60 per month
17 residential suites, $76.56 per month
18 residential suites, $80.52 per month
19 residential suites, $84.48 per month
20 residential suites, $88.44 per month
21 residential suites, $92.40 per month
22 residential suites, $96.36 per month
23 residential suites, $99.00 per month
24 residential suites, $101.64 per month;
25 residential suites, $104.28 per month;
26 residential suites, $106.92 per month;
27 residential suites, $109.56 per month;
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 71
JANITRESSES   (FEMALE).*
Order No. 44 (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
..   (Superseding Orders Nos. 4i, 4iA, and 44b.)
1. " Janitress"   means   and   includes   every   person   employed   as   janitress,   janitress-cleaner,   or
janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, 45c. per hour. -  •-: __-
3. (a.)   Resident janitress in apartment buildings of 4 residential suites and under, 45c. per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $32.40 per month
6 residential suites, $36.00 per month
7 residential suites, $39.60 per month
8 residential suites, $43.20 per month
9 residential suites, $46.80 per month
10 residential suites, $50.40 per month
11 residential suites, $54.00 per month
12 residential suites, $57.60 per month
13 residential suites, $61.20 per month
14 residential suites, $64.80 per month
15 residential suites, $68.64 per month
16 residential suites, $72.60 per month
17 residential suites, $76.56 per month
0.52 per month
4.48 per month
3.44 per month
2.40 per month
6.36 per month
9.00 per month
29 residential suites, $114.84 per month
30 residential suites, $117.48 per month
31 residential suites, $120.12 per month
32 residential suites, $122.76 per month
33 residential suites, $125.40 per month
34 residential suites, $128.04 per month
35 residential suites, $130.68 per month
36 residential suites, $133.32 per month
37 residential suites, $135.96 per month
38 residential suites, $138.60 per month
39 residential suites, $141.24 per month
40 residential suites, $143.88 per month
41 residential suites, $146.52 per month
42 residential suites, $149.16 per month
43 residential suites, $151.80 per month
44 residential suites, $154.44 per month
45 residential suites, $157.08 per month
46 residential suites, $159.72 per month
47 residential suites, $162.36 per month
48 residential suites, $165.00 per month
49 residential suites, $165.00 per month
50 residential suites, $165.00 per month
over 50 residential suites, $165.00 per month.
18 residential suites,
19 residential suites,
20 residential suites,
21 residential suites,
22 residential suites,
23 residential suites,
24 residential suites, $101.64 per month;
25 residential suites, $104.28 per month;
26 residential suites, $106.92 per month;
27 residential suites, $109.56 per month;
28 residential suites, $112.20 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid 45c. per hour for each hour
worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for 2 rooms and bathroom, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing 20 residential suites and over, every janitress shall
be given 24 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than 19 and not less than 12 residential suites,
every janitress shall be given 8 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.— (1.) In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building the suite occupied by the
janitress shall not be included.
(2.)   Order does not apply to janitresses employed in one-room school-houses.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
LAUNDRY, CLEANING, AND DYEING INDUSTRIES.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 74 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 74.
" Learner " means an employee of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry,
working under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
40c. per hour
4T hours* pay
3 hours* pay
31c. per hour
34c. per hour
37c. per hour
40c. per hour
"1
8 per day.
j       44 per week.
Learners, any age—
Third 2 months	
J
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Rate.
Hours.
Employees classified under section 6 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
or section 5 of " Female Minimum Wage Act " working under
permit
Wage set in
permit
Not more than 44
per week.
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5
of the " Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section
5 or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
Rest Period.—32 consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved by
the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period
spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a
call, 4-hour daily guarantee, except on Saturday when 3-hour daily guarantee applies.
Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
Note.— (1.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(2.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(3.)  Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4.)   Records to be produced to authorized officials. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 73
LOGGING  (MALE).*
Order No. 1 (1943), Effective August 2nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 1 (1940).)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to hauling by truck or rail, driving,
rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
48c. per hour
45c. per hour
$3.30 per day
$1.56 per cord
44
44
44
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of 8 hours
in any one day or 48 hours in any one week
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees (see Order No. 4 (1946)).
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers, timekeepers, and office employees when employed on a monthly basis.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees engaged exclusively in the transportation of men or supplies.
Note.— (1.)   Certain exemptions re hours granted under "Hours of Work Act" (see Regulations).
(2.)  Watchmen in logging camps where operations are entirely suspended are exempt from provisions of the
Order.
(3.)  Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act."
LOGGING (MALE).
Order No. 1a (1943), Effective September 23rd, 1943.
(Amending Order No. 1 (1943).)
Overtime does not apply to—
Boatmen when employed on a monthly basis.
Emergency fire-fighters.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).*
Order No. 25 (1942), Effective November 2nd, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 25.)
Includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting,
printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity, except as provided by any other Order of the Board.
Weekly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
$15.40
8.80
11.00
13.20
15.40
44
44
44
44
44
35c.       ...'.(
Learners of any age—
20c.
25c.
30c.
35c.
Note.— (1.) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age at rates
below $15.40 per week or 35c. per hour.
(2.)  Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(3.)   Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under the " Apprenticeship Act."
(4.) Employees shall not be employed more than 8 hours a day or 44 hours a week, except when permission
granted under the " Factories Act " or by permit from the Board when the said Act does not apply.
(5.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of payment.
MERCANTILE   (MALE).*
Order No. 59, Effective October 20th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 88.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
21 years of age and over	
21 years of age and over --	
$18.00 per week
48c. per hour
$1.92 per day
8TH to 44 hours per week.
If less than STY2 hours.
Males under 21 Years of Age.
37^ to 44 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37 ^ Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
19 and under 20
20 and under 21
Thereafter
18c.
24c.
30c.
36c.
42c.
48c
72c
$1.20
1.92
Beginners and those recommencing, IS Years and under 21, to whom Permits have been issued by
the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37y2 to 44 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
$9.60 per week, 1st 12 months..
12.00 per week, 2nd 12 months.
15.60 per week, 3rd 12 months.
Thereafter $18.00 per week.
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
24c.
30c.
42c.
96c.
,$1.20
1.68
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 75
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed 5
days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
not less than	
36c.
$1.44
Males 21 Years and under 24.
Inexperienced and partly inexperienced, to whom Permits have been granted, under Section 6
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 44 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
$10.80 per week, 1st 6 months	
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
30c.
36c.
42c.
$1.20
1.44
1.68
Thereafter $18.00 per week.
Note.— (a.)   Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers, employed in wholesale and  (or)  retail establishments, shall be
paid at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26.
(b.)  Employees must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(c.)   Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every 7 days.
Uniforms.—See Order No. 3  (1946)  relating to uniforms.
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.
Female Minimum Wage Order No." 24 (1946).
Effective August 5th, 1946, superseding Order No. 2U.
" Mercantile industry " means the work carried on in establishments operated for the purpose of
wholesale and  (or) retail trade.
" Class A employees," those working from 39 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 39 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry, working
under permit from the Board.
Class A employees-
Class B employees...
$17.00 a week
.45c. an hour
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay)
39-44 per week.
Less than 39 per week.
Learners (any Age).
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$11.00 per week 1st 2 months.
30c per hour 1st 2 months.
13.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
35c per hour 2nd 2 months.
15.00 per week 3rd 2 months.
40c per hour 3rd 2 months.
17.00 per week thereafter.
45c per hour thereafter.
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay at respective hourly
rates as set out above.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5
of the " Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section
5 or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until she has completed hours so established. H 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent
at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call,
4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Uniforms.—See Special Order No. 3   (1946)   relating to uniforms.
OFFICE OCCUPATION.
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 34 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No. 34.
" Office occupation " means the work of females employed as stenographers; book-keepers; typists;
billing clerks; filing-clerks; cashiers; cash-girls (not included in any other Order of the Board);
checkers; invoicers; comptometer operators; auditors; attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices,
and other offices, and the work of females employed in all kinds of clerical work.
" Class A employees," those working from 36 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 36 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry, working
under permit from the Board.
Rate.
Hours.
Class A employees-
Class B employees...
$18.00 a week
50c. an hour
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay)
36-44 per week.
Less than 36 per week.
Learners (anyAge).
Class A Employees.
Class B Employees.
$12.00 per week 1st 2 months.
35c per hour 1st 2 months.
14.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
40c per hour 2nd 2 months.
16.00 per week 3rd 2 months.
45c per hour 3rd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
50c per hour thereafter.
(Daily guarantee of 4 hours' pay at respective hourly
rates as set out above.)
( Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5
of the *' Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week.
Reporting on Call.—Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for
entire period spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in
response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
Uniforms.—See Special Order No. 3   (1946)   relating to uniforms. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 77
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.*
Order No. 71, Effective June 1st, 1940.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
Rate per Hour.
City of Vancouver, including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, City of North Vancouver, District of North Vancouver	
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act"   (see Order No. 2  (1946)).
(6.)   Does   not  apply  to  those  permanently   employed   at  maintenance-work   in   industrial  or  manufacturing
establishments, public and private buildings,
(c.)  All wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.*
Order No. 75, Effective June 2nd, 1941.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
Rate per Hour.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt, Highland, Metchosin,
Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew	
90c.
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices indentured under " Apprenticeship Act "  (see Order No. 2  (1946) ).
(b.)   Does   not  apply  to  those  permanently   employed   at  maintenance-work   in   industrial  or  manufacturing
establishments, public and private buildings,
(c.)  All wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
PATROLMEN   (MALE).*
Order No. 69, Effective February 5th, 1940.
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes to watch
or patrol the premises of more than one person for the purpose of guarding or protecting persons or
property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman " means an employee (not covered by any other Order of the Board) employed by
a private patrol agency.
Hourly rate  42c.
Note.— (a.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(6.)   Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(c.) Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
* As amended by General Interim Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 78
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).*
Order No. 27, Effective September 5th, 1935.
(Superseding, in part, Personal Service Order.)
" Personal service occupation " includes the work of females employed in manicuring; hairdressing;
barbering; massaging; physiotherapy; giving of electrical, facial, scalp, or other treatments; removal
of superfluous hair;   chiropody;   or other work of like nature.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over
Minimum	
$17.10 per week
45c. per hour
$1.80 per day
40 to 44
Less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years op Age.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$12.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
32c. per hour during 1st 6 months.
13.20 a week for 2nd 6 months.
35c. per hour during 2nd 6 months.
14.40 a week for 3rd 6 months.
38c. per hour during 3rd 6 months.
15.60 a week for 4th 6 months, or until employee
42c. per hour during 4th 6 months, or until employee
reaches age of 18 years.
reaches age of 18 years.
17.10 a week thereafter.
45c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.50 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 44 Hburs per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$12.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
32c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
13.20 a week for 2nd 3 months.
35c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
14.40 a week for 3rd 3 months.
38c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
15.60 a week for 4th 3 months.
42c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
17.10 a week thereafter.
45c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.50 per day.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Note.— (a.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid according to rates to which they are entitled as set out above.
(b.)  Forty-four-hour week and one-half hour for lunch between 11 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.    (See 27A.)
Uniforms.—See Order No. 3  (1946)  relating to uniforms.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION (FEMALE).
Order No. 27a, Effective March 30th, 1939.
(Amending Order No. 27.)
The above Order fixes the weekly hours at 44 and not more than 9 hours in any one day.
Also provides for one-half hour free from duty between the hours of 11 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION (FEMALE).
Order No. 27b, Effective May 1st, 1940.
The above Order requires that where a distinctive uniform of special design, trimming, colour, or
fabric, or special article of wearing-apparel is required, it shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired
free of cost to the employee.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27d, Effective March 13th, 1941.
Adds physiotherapy to the definition of Order No. 27.
* As amended by General Interim Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 79
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT   (FEMALE).*
Order No. 67, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding Parts of Personal Service Order.)
" Public place of amusement " includes theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, lecture-halls, shooting-
galleries, bowling-alleys, swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions, and other similar places to which a charge
for admission or service is made to the public.
40 to 48 Hours
per Week.
Less than 40 Hours
per Week.
2 Hours or Less in
any One Day.
$17.10
42c. per hour.
90c.
Note.— (a.)  Employees on call, 42c. per hour.
(b.)  Where uniforms or special  articles of wearing-apparel  are required,  they  shall  be furnished, repaired,
laundered, cleaned, etc., free of cost to the attendant.
(c.)   Cashiers are covered by Office Order No. 34  (1946).
SAWMILLS  (MALE).
Order No. 50 (1943), Effective July 5th, 1943.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 50 and 50A.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills and planing-mills.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Male employees	
Not more than 10% of all employees at not less than.....
Cook- and bunk-house employees (organized territory)
-At least 90% of all employees to get not less than	
48c.
36c.
$3.30 per day
48c.
44
44
Unlimited.
44
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of 8 hours
3 > in any one day or 48 hours in any one week
Working in excess of 9 hours in any one day
or 50 hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one - half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by ar-
.., -  ,   ... rangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of
Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees (see Order No. 4 (1946)).
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26 (1940) and Order No. 26a (1940).
Note.— (1.)   Certain exemptions re hours granted under "Hours of Work Act"  (see Regulations).
(2.)   For wages, etc., of stationary steam engineers see Order No. 18  (1942).
(3.)   For wages, etc., of truck-drivers see Order No. 26  (1940).
(4.)   For wages, etc., of first-aid attendants see Order No. 39  (1940).
(5.)  Does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act"  (see Order No. 2  (1946)).
' As amended by General Interim Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 80
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
SHINGLE INDUSTRY  (MALE).*
Order No. 62 (1943), Effective August 2nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 62 (1941).)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of wooden shingles.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles, understood and accepted as a standard by the
industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936, issued by the National Research Council of
Canada.
Per Square.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Sawyers—
30c.
24c.
18c.
48c.
48c.
48c.
48c.
Employees packing or sawing shingles on any other basis than by the square
shall be paid on the same proportionate basis.
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of 8 hours
in any one day or 48 hours in any one week
Working in excess of 9 hours in any one day
or 50 hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act" and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of
Work Act."
Shingle-sawyers.
Shingle-packers.
Cook- and bunk-house employees (see Order No. 4 (1946)).
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees  in the transportation  industry  covered by  Order  No. 26   (1940)   and  Order  No. 26a
(1940) of the Board.
Note.—Does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act"  (see Order No. 2  (1946)).
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 81
SHINGLE INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).*
Order No. 77 (1943), Effective August 2nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 77.)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of wooden shingles.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles, understood and accepted as a standard by the
industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936, issued by the National Research Council of
Canada.
Sawyers—
No. 1 shingles...	
Shingles lower in grade than No. 1 ...	
Packers, all grades	
Other employees not included in any other Order of the Board
Per Square.
30c.
24c.
18c.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
48c.
48c.
48c.
48c.
Overtime, effective west of Cascade Mountains only—
In excess of 8 hours per day or 48 hours per week
Rate:   One and one-half times employees'
regular rate of pay.
Note.— (1.)  Where an arrangement under section 5 of the "Hours of Work Act" is in effect with respect to
hours of work, overtime rates shall not apply until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(2.)   Overtime rates shall not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of
Work Act."
Shingle-sawyers.
Shingle-packers.
Cook- and bunk-house employees in unorganized territory covered by Order No. 4  (1946) of the Board,
■  • ' in organized territory by Order No. 52  (1946).
Office employees covered by Order No. 34 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26b of the Board. ', .;;:
:        (3.)  Employees shall not be employed more than 8 hours a day or 44 hours a week, except when permission
granted under the "Factories Act " or by permit from the Board when the said Act does not apply.
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY.     :f... ....   . • .  ,:/
Male Minimum .Wage Order No. 20 (1946).
s    ,-,.:   :ti     ;.      .  Effective July 1st, 1946, superseding Order No- 20. --.-  ;*
" Ship-building industry" means all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration,
repair, demolition, painting, cleaning, preserving, reconditioning, putting on or taking off the ways, or
dry-docking of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Hours;
Employees doing the work usually done by journeymen, and without restricting the generality of the foregoing, the work of shipwrights, joiners,
boat-builders, caulkers, painters, fitters, electricians, machinists, boiler-
makers, plumbers and steam-fitters, blacksmiths, sheet-metal workers,
welders, hoistmen, engineers, riggers, and asbestos-workers	
Employees exclusive of the above-mentioned	
When 90% of total number of employees (exclusive of indentured apprentices) are paid not less than the 90c. or 60c. per hour rate, the balance
may be paid	
Employees classified under section 6 of the Act working under permits	
90c. per hour
60c. per hour
45c. per hour
Rate set in
permit
8 per day.
44 per week.
8 per day.
44 per week.
8 per day.
44 per week.
8 per day.
44 per week.
Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section 5 of
the " Hours of Work Act."
Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5
or 11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order  (1946), July 1st, 1946.
6 H 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment.
Note.— (1.)   Copy of Order to be posted.
(2.)   Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(3.) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names,
ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4.)  Records to be produced to authorized officials.
TAXICAB-DRIVERS   (MALE).*
Order No. 33 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. S3, Order No. 33a, and Order No. 33b.)
11 Taxicab-driver" means every employee in charge of or driving a .motor-vehicle with seating
accommodation for seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the
public and which is driven or operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Working-hours.
All Ages.
$3.30
9 per day.
54 per week.
Note.—Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly.
Uniforms.—See Order No. 3  (1946)  relating to uniforms.
TAXICAB-DRIVERS  (MALE).*
Order No. 60, Effective November 17th, 1938.
" Taxicab-driver" means every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating
accommodation for seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the
public and which is driven or operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Less than 10
Hours per Day.
Daily
Minimum.
Working-
hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich....
All ages.
$3.60
42c. per hour.
$1.68 per day.
10 per day.
Note.— (a.)   Permits shall be obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours
can be paid 42c. per hour.
(6.)  Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 54c. per hour.
(c.)  Drivers shall be paid at least semi-monthly.
(d.)  Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every 7 days.
Uniforms.—See Order No. 3  (1946) relating to uniforms.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 83
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION (FEMALE).*
Order No. .79, Effective April 16th, 1945.
(Superseding Order Effective April 5th, 1920.)
" Telephone and telegraph occupation " means the work of all persons employed in connection with
the operating of the various instruments, switch-boards, and other mechanical appliances used in
connection with telephony and telegraphy.
Rate.
Maximum Hours.
Employees, any age—
$1.80 per day.
2.52 per day.
2.76 per day.
3.00 per day.
3.36 per day.
\
Thereafter	
Note.— (a.)   Part-time employees' wages shall be prorated.
(6.)  Employees required to report for work to receive at least 3 hours' pay per day.
(c.) In emergencies employees may work up to 56 hours per week, with one and one-half times their regular
rate of pay for hours in excess of 48.
(d.) Where employees reside on employers* premises, an arrangement may be made for employees to answer
emergency calls between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m., subject to approval in writing by the Board.
(e.)   Working-hours shall be confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of work.
{ /.)   Every employee shall have a rest period of 24 consecutive hours in each calendar week.
(g.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(h.) Wh'ere hours of work in bona-fide trade-union agreements differ from those prescribed by the Order, the
Board may, in its discretion, exempt in writing the union and the employer from sections in the Order pertaining
to hours, to the extent mentioned in the exemption.
* As amended by General Interim Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 84
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY  (MALE).*
Order No. 26 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
Order No. 26a (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 26, Order No. 26b, and Order No. 26c.)
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting
for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor
thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of
goods by rail, water, air, or road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some
destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.)
Operators  of motor-vehicles of  2,000 lb.  net weight or over,  as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Less than 40
54c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
36c.
Less than 40
24c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
54c.
40 and not more
than 50
(2.)
Operators of motor-vehicles of less than 2,000 lb. net weight, as
specified  on  the motor-vehicle licence,  and  operators  of motorcycles with wheeled attachments, exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
40 and not more
than 50
42c
(S.)
Operators of  motor-cycles  with not more than  two  wheels  and
without wheeled attachment
40 and not more
than 48
(4.)
Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery
or messenger work (e)
40 and not more
than 48
ffi )
than 50
(6.)
Drivers    of   horse-drawn    vehicles    other   than   those    covered   by
section 7 hereof
Hourly rate	
40 and not more
than 50
48c
(7.)
Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in
the retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(b.)   Uniforms.—See Order No. 3  (1946)  relating to uniforms.
(c.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery men may work 15 hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than 10 hours are
worked in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(e.)   Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 59.
( f.)   Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly.
* As amended by General Interim Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 85
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).*
Order No. 26b, Effective August 18th, 1941.
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting
for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor
thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of
goods by rail, water, air, or road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some
destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
(1.) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net weight or over, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Hourly rate	
(2.) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than 2,000 lb. net weight, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in sections 3 and 7 hereof
Hourly rate	
(3.) Operators of motor-cycles with not more than two wheels and
without wheeled attachment
Hourly rate.	
(4.) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery
or messenger work
Hourly rate	
(5.)   Swampers and helpers	
Hourly rate	
(6.) Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than those covered by
section 7 hereof
Hourly rate ,	
(7.)  Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in
the retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
Weekly Hours.
Less than 40
54c.
Weekly Hours.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
42c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 48
36c.
30c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 48
24c.
20c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
42c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 50
54c.
48c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(6.)   Uniforms.—See Order No. 3  (1946)  relating to uniforms.
(c.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery employees may work 15 hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than 10 hours are
worked in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(e.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. H 86
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
WOOD-WORKING.*
Order No. 49 (1943), Effective July 19th, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 49.)
" Wood-working industry " includes all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of
manufacturing sash and doors, cabinets, show-cases, office and store fixtures, wood furniture, wood
furnishings, plywood, veneer products, and general mill-work products.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
48c.
36c.
30c.
44
Overtime applies throughout the Province to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of '.
in any one day or 48 hours in any one week
hours
Working in excess of 9 hours in any one day
or 50 hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act" and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
)ne   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
)ne and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
ne and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees (see Order No. 4 (1946)).
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees  in  the transportation industry covered by  Order  No. 26   (1940)   and Order  No. 26a
(1940) of the Board.
Note.— (1.)   Total male employees receiving less than 48c. per hour must not exceed 33% per cent, of all male
employees in plant or establishment.
(2.)  Does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act"  (see Order No. 2  (1946)).
COST AND UPKEEP OF UNIFORMS.
Male and Female Minimujj Wage Order No. 3 (1946).
Effective July 1st, 1946.
1. Applies to every employer and to every male and female employee in every industry, business,
trade, and occupation to which the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts apply.
2. (1.) Subject to the provisions of subsection (2), when an employee is required to wear a uniform or special article of wearing-apparel, it shall be furnished, cleaned, laundered, or repaired free of
cost to employee by employer.
(2.) Where employer and employee make written application to the Board, the Board may give
written approval to a different arrangement regarding uniforms.
* As amended by General Interim Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 87
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders now in effect, compiled as at August
31st, 1946.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum Wage
Act.
41
2 (1946)
17 (1942)
42 (1946)
55 (1943)
70
70a
76
58
65
66
72
73
68
12 (1940)
4 (1946)
53
54
18 (1942)
39 (1940)
78
46 (1946)
47 (1946)
52 (1946)
52A (1946)
51
43 (1942)
44 (1942)
74 (1946)
1 (1943)
1A (1943)
28
25 (1942)
24 (1946)
59
34 (1946)
75
71
69
27
27A
27b
27D
67
50 (1943)
62 (1943)
77 (1943)
20 (1946)
33 (1940)
60
60a
79
26 (1940)
26A (1940)
26b
3 (1946)
49 (1943)
Apprentices, Indentured	
Apprentices, Indentured	
Baking	
Barbering	
Box-manufacture	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-driver	
Carpentry (Vancouver and District)	
Carpentry (Kootenay Area)	
Carpentry (Victoria and District)	
Carpentry (Alberni)	
Carpentry (Nanaimo)	
Christmas-trees	
Construction	
Cook- and Bunk-house Occupation (in
Unorganized Territory)
Elevator Operators	
Elevator Operators	
Engineers, Stationary Steam	
First-aid Attendants	
Fishing	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Hotel and Catering	
Hotel and Catering (Resort Hotels) (Unor
ganized Territory)
Household Furniture	
Janitors	
Janitresses	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing	
Logging	
Logging	
Logging and Sawmills (Cost of Board,
Cranbrook Area)
Manufacturing	
Mercantile	
Mercantile	
Office Occupation	
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(southerly portion of Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(Vancouver and District)
Patrolmen	
Personal Service	
Personal Service	
Personal Service	
Personal Service	
Public Places of Amusement	
Sawmills	
Shingle	
Shingle	
Ship-building	
Taxicab-drivers	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)....
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)....
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Uniforms, Cost and Upkeep of	
Wood-working	
Feb. 3/37	
June 19/46...
July 15/42....
June 19/46...
July 14/43....
March 12/40.
June 21/40...
Sept. 21/42...
Sept. 15/38...
June 23/39...
Aug. 16/39...
May 14/40....
May 14/40....
Aug. 31/39...
Nov. 26/40...
June 26/46...
Feb. 28/38....
Feb. 28/38....
Sept. 9/42	
Oct. 8/40	
April 14/43...
June 25/46...
June 25/46...
June 19/46...
June 26/46...
Nov. 17/37....
Sept. 9/42	
Sept. 9/42	
June 25/46...
July 14/43....
Sept. 16/43...
Sept. 25/35...
Oct. 15/42	
July 11/46....
Oct. 12/38	
June 19/46...
April 22/41...
April 26/40..
Jan. 19/40....
Aug. 29/35....
March 23/39.
April 23/40..
March 11/41.
Aug. 31/39...
June 25/43...
July 23/43....
July 23/43....
June 19/46...
Oct. 8/40	
Nov. 15/38....
Oct. 8/40	
March 13/45.
Oct. 8/40	
Nov. 26/40....
Aug. 12/41....
June 19/46....
July 14/43	
Feb. 11/37....
June 27/46...
July 16/42....
June 27/46...
July 15/43....
March 14/40.
June 27/40...
Sept. 24/42...
Sept. 22/38...
June 29/39...
Aug. 17/39...
May 16/40....
May 16/40....
Sept. 7/39	
Nov. 28/40...
July 4/46	
March 3/38...
March 3/38..
Sept. 17/42...
Oct. 10/40	
April 22/43..
June 27/46...
June 27/46...
June 27/46.:.
July 4/46	
Nov. 18/37....
Sept. 17/42...
Sept. 17/42...
June 27/46...
July 15/43....
Sept. 23/43...
Sept. 26/35...
Oct. 22/42	
July 18/46....
Oct. 20/38	
June 27/46...
April 24/41..
May 2/40	
Jan. 25/40....
Sept. 5/35	
March 30/39.
April 25/40...
March 13/41.
Sept. 7/39	
July 2/43	
July 29/43....
July 29/43....
June 27/46...
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 17/38....
Oct. 10/40	
March 15/45.
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 28/40....
Aug. 14/41....
June 27/46...
July 15/43	
Feb. 11/37	
July 1/46	
July 20/42	
July 1/46	
Aug. 2/43	
March 18/40...
June 27/40	
Sept. 28/42	
Nov. 7/38	
Aug. 1/39	
Aug. 21/39	
May 27/40	
May 27/40	
Sept. 11/39	
Nov. 28/40	
July 8/46	
March 3/38	
March 3/38	
Sept. 21/42	
Oct. 10/40	
May 3/43	
July 1/46	
July 1/46	
July 1/46	
July 15 to Sept
15 each year
Nov. 22/37	
Sept. 21/42	
Sept. 21/42	
July 1/46	
Aug. 2/43	
Sept. 23/43	
Sept. 26/35	
Nov. 2/42	
Aug. 5/46	
Oct. 20/38	
July 1/46	
June 2/41	
June 1/40	
Feb. 5/40..	
Sept. 5/35	
March 30/39....
May 1/40	
March 13/41....
Sept. 11/39	
July 5/43	
Aug. 2/43	
Aug. 2/43	
July 1/46	
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 17/38	
Oct. 10/40	
April 16/45	
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 28/40	
Aug. 18/41	
July 1/46	
Aug. 2/43	
Male and female.
Male and female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male and female.
Male and female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male and female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male and female.
Male. SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
(AND AS AMENDED BY INTERIM AMENDMENTS  (1946), EFFECTIVE JULY 1ST, 1946.)
Section 3.—" Subject to the exceptions provided by or under this
Act, the working-hours of an employee in any industrial undertaking
shall not exceed eight in the day and forty-four in the week."
BE IT KNOWN that the Board of Industrial Relations has made the following
regulations, namely:—
Note.—Regulation 1 cancelled by Regulation 30. Cancellation effective October 31st,
1945.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-
mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may
work a total of 44 hours each week in five
nights, in lieu of 44 hours each week in six
nights, but the number of hours worked in
any night must not exceed 9.
Logging.
3. Persons employed in:—
(1.)  The logging industry in:—
(a.)   Booming operations; or
(&.)   Transporting logs by logging-
railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or
river-driving; or
(c.) Transporting workmen or
supplies for purposes of the said
industry;
(d.)  The occupation of boatmen;
(e.)   The occupation of emergency
fire-fighters:
Fish-canning.
(2.) Canning fish or manufacturing byproducts from fish, but not those
engaged in salting fish;   and in
Cook- and Bunk-houses.
(3.)  Cook- and bunk-houses in connection
with any industrial undertaking in
unorganized territory,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed by section 3 of the said Act.
Engineers, Firemen, and Oilers.
4. In all industrial undertakings which
use steam as a motive power and which are
operated with a single shift of engineers,
firemen, and oilers, the engineers, firemen,
and oilers may work overtime to the extent
of 1 % hours per day to perform preparatory
or complementary work, in addition to the
maximum hours of work prescribed by
section 3 of the Act.
Shipping Staff.
5. Persons employed as members of the
shipping staff in industrial undertakings
where shipping operations are of an intermittent nature may work such hours in
addition to the working-hours limited by
section 3 of the said Act as (but only so
many as) shall be necessary to surmount
extraordinary conditions which can not
reasonably be otherwise overcome.
In determining extraordinary conditions
the decision of the Board shall be final, and
where the Board is of the opinion that,
under the provisions of this regulation, the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the
Act are being unduly exceeded, the Board
shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the industrial undertaking
from the provisions of this regulation for
such period of time as the Board considers
advisable.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons
employed in shipyards, engineering-works,
machine-shops, foundries, welding plants,
sheet-metal works, belt-works, saw-works,
and plants of a like nature may work such
hours in addition to the working-hours
limited by section 3 of the said Act as (but
not more than) may be necessary to prevent
serious loss to, or interruption in the operation of, the industrial undertaking for which
the repairs are being made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture
of wooden boxes or wooden containers for
shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or
vegetables may work during the months of
June, July, August, and September in each
year such hours in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may
from time to time be necessary to fill urgent
orders.
Note.—Regulation
February 13th, 1936.
Note.—Regulation
September 26th, 1940.
Seasonal Lithographing.
10. During the months of May, June, July,
August, September, and October in each
year persons employed in the lithographing
industry may work such hours in excess of
the hours prescribed by section 3 of the said
Act as may from time to time be necessary
to fill urgent orders. This exemption shall
only apply when sufficient competent help is
not available.
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed
by the Board by the granting of written
temporary exemption permits limiting by
their terms the extent thereof, but only upon
being satisfied by application in writing,
signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly authorized, of the urgency and
necessity for the exception, that it is of a
8 cancelled   by   8a,
9 cancelled   by   9a, REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 89
temporary nature, and that no other means
of adequately overcoming such temporary
urgent condition is, or has been, reasonably
available, and that the additional working-
hours applied for will not be more than will
suffice for the extra pressure of work requiring the same.
Overtime Record.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in
the manner required by subsection (1) of
section 9 of the said Act of all additional
hours worked in pursuance of section 6 of
the said Act or in pursuance of any regulation.
12a. Every employer shall furnish the
Board with a copy of his pay-roll, or record
in such form prescribed by the Board, showing the hours worked and the nature of the
work performed by his employees in respect
of section 6 of the Act, or Regulations Nos.
6 and 11 of the Board, not later than 15
days after such hours have been worked.
(Effective December 12th, 1940.)
13. Every employer shall notify, by means
of the posting of notices in conspicuous
places in the works or other suitable place,
where the same may readily be seen by all
persons employed by him, the hours at which
work begins and ends, and, where work is
carried on by shifts, the hours at which each
shift begins and ends; also such rest intervals accorded during the period of work as
are not reckoned as part of the working-
hours ; these hours shall be so fixed that the
duration of the work shall not exceed the
limits prescribed by the " Hours of Work
Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall
not be changed except upon 24 hours' notice
of such change posted as hereinbefore specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary
exemption granted by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12
of the Act or Regulation 11 above, a like
notice of the change in working-hours shall
be posted, which notice shall also state
the grounds on which the exemption was
granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia, this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th,
1934.    Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15.
Mercantile Industry.
The mercantile industry is hereby added
to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to
such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 7th day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th
day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th,
1934.   Effective August 9th, 1934.)
Regulations Nos. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d
cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e.
Mercantile Industry.
Note.—Regulation  15e cancelled by 29,
September 30th, 1939.
Regulations Nos. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d,
and 16e cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f.
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores.
1. Persons employed in drug-stores as
registered apprentices, certified clerks, or
licentiates of pharmacy may work not more
than 88 hours in any two successive weeks,
but in no case shall the hours of work of
any such registered apprentice, certified
clerk, or licentiate of pharmacy exceed 48
hours in any one week, or 9 hours in any
one day.
2. Regulation No. 16E of the Board made
and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of
August, 1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd
day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette. Ap_.il 6th,
1939.    Effective April 6th, 1939.)
REGULATION No. 17.
REGULATION No. 14.
Occupation of Barbering.
The occupation of barbering is hereby
added to the Schedule of the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council
dated the 24th day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
24th day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd,
1934.    Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
Baking Industry.
The baking industry, by which expression
is meant all operations in or incidental to
the manufacture and delivery of bread,
biscuits, or cakes, is hereby added to the
Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 6th
day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
22nd day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November
22nd, 1934.  Effective November 22nd, 1934.) H 90
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REGULATION No. 17a.
Baking Industry.
Employees employed in the baking industry as deliverymen may work 6 hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
22nd day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November
22nd, 1934.  Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 18.
Catering Industry.
The catering industry, which includes all
operations in or incidental to the preparation or to the serving, or to both preparation
and serving, of meals or refreshments where
the meals or refreshments are served or
intended to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-house, dance-hall, cabaret,
banquet-hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunchroom, lunch-counter, ice-cream parlour,
soda-fountain, or in any other place where
food is served and a charge is made for the
same either directly or indirectly, whether
such charge is made against the persons
who partake of the meals or refreshments
or against some other person, is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council
dated the 9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on
the 1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this
9th day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November
15th, 1934.    Effective December 1st, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 19.
Retail Florists.
Persons employed in the establishments of
retail florists may work such hours in addition to the working-hours limited by section
3 of the said Act as (but only so many as)
shall be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions which can not reasonably
be otherwise overcome: Provided that the
working-hours of such persons shall not
exceed 88 hours on the average in any two
successive weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions
the decision of the Board shall be final, and
where the Board is of the opinion that,
under the provisions of this regulation, the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the
Act are being unduly exceeded, the Board
shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the employer's establishment
from the provisions of this regulation for
such period of time as the Board considers
advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this
9th day of November, 1934.
(Published   in   B.C.   Gazette,   November
15th, 1934.  Effective November 15th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 20.
The Occupation of Elevator Operator.
The occupation of elevator operator is
hereby added to the Schedule to the said Act,
the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council
dated the 15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
28th day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February
28th, 1935.   Effective February 28th, 1935.)
Regulations Nos. 21, 21b, 21c, 21d, 21e, 21f,
21g, 21h, 21j, and 21k cancelled by
REGULATION No. 21m.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The fruit and vegetable industry, which
means all operations in establishments
operated for the purpose of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of
fresh fruit or vegetable, is hereby exempt
from the operation of the " Hours of Work
Act " from June 1st to November 30th,
inclusive, in each year.
REGULATION No. 22.
Transportation Industry.
The transportation industry, which includes all operations in or incidental to the
carrying or transporting for reward, by any
means whatever, other than by rail, water,
or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on
behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private
or public owner, or by or on behalf of any
wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor
thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying
or delivering to or collecting from any other
carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or road
transport, for the purpose of being further
transported to some destination other than
the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates, is hereby added
to the Schedule to the said " Hours of Work
Act, 1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 91
said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th,
1935.    Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 23.
Transportation Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation the
expression " transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the
carrying or transporting for reward, by any
means whatever, other than by rail, water,
or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying
or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material by or on behalf
of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof,
or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier
of goods by rail, water, air, or road transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the
place at which such aforementioned carriage
or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation
industry, other than those employed as (a)
operators of motor-cycles, (6) bicycle-riders
and foot-messengers employed exclusively on
delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers
of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of
milk, are hereby permitted to work 6 hours
per week in excess of the hours prescribed
by section 3 of the said " Hours of Work
Act, 1934," in accordance with the provisions of Order No. 26 of the said Board of
Industrial Relations dated the 19th day of
June, 1935, fixing minimum wages in the
transportation industry: Provided that no
such employee in the transportation industry
shall work more than 10 hours in any one
day.
3. That employees in the transportation
industry employed as drivers of vehicles in
the retail delivery of milk are hereby permitted to work 15 hours per week in excess
of the hours prescribed by section 3 of the
said " Hours of Work Act, 1934 ": Provided
that over a period of seven weeks no such
employee shall work more than 350 hours,
nor more than 10 hours in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June- 20th,
1935.    Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24.
room clerks (day or night), mail clerks,
information clerks, cashiers, book-keepers,
accountants, telephone operators, and any
other persons employed in clerical work in
hotels, is hereby added to the Schedule to
the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934," the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council
dated the 20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British
Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September
26th, 1935.   Effective September 26th, 1935.)
Note.—Regulation 26 cancelled by Regulation 30. Cancellation effective October
31st, 1945.
REGULATION No. 28.
Taxicab Industry.
The taxicab industry, which includes the
work of all employees in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity
for 7 passengers or less than 7 passengers,
used for the conveyance of the public, and
which is driven or operated for hire, is
hereby added as item No. 12 to the Schedule
of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to
such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
3rd day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
22nd day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st,
1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.)
Occupation of Hotel Clerk.
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes the work of all persons engaged as
REGULATION No. 28a.
Taxicab Industry.
Persons employed in the taxicab industry,
which includes the work of all employees in
charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with
seating capacity for 7 passengers or less
than 7 passengers, used for the conveyance
of the public, and which is driven or operated for hire, may work 6 hours per week
in excess of the weekly limit prescribed by
section 3 of the Act, but in no case shall the
daily hours worked by any such employee in
the taxicab industry exceed 9 in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this
22nd day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st,
1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.)
Note.—The taxicab industry having been
brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is
now subject to the following provision of
that Statute:—
" The working-hours of employees working on a split shift shall be confined within
12 hours immediately following commencement of work." H 92
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REGULATION No. 29.
REGULATION No. 30.
Mercantile Industry.
Persons employed in the mercantile industry, which includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or)
retail trade in the Province of British
Columbia, with the exception of the City of
Vancouver, the City of North Vancouver,
Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the District of
Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt, the
Municipality of the District of Oak Bay, and
the Municipality of the District of Saanich,
may work 3 hours per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the said Act,
on Saturday of each week and on the day
preceding a statutory holiday, when such
statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but
the total hours worked in any one week shall
not exceed 44.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 8tb
day of November, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 9th,
1939.    Effective November 9th, 1939.)
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
BE IT KNOWN that, pursuant to and by
virtue of the powers and authority vested in
the Board of Industrial Relations by the
" Hours of Work Act," the said Board
hereby cancels Regulation No. 1 of the
Board, dated the 14th day of June, 1934, and
Regulation No. 26 of the Board, dated the
23rd day of March, 1938, such cancellation
to be effective as and from the 31st day of
October, 1945.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th
day of September, 1945.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September
27th, 1945.)
By BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL
RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 93
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S DIVISION.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the annual report of the Women's and Children's
Division.
WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT.
The main object of the Women's Department is to assist those who are concerned
with the transition of women called into a war economy to a responsible and satisfactory place in a civilian economy.
Women have always worked in the home and out to care for themselves and their
families. War casualties have increased the number who must support themselves.
The number of women workers is increasing and will continue to increase. For maximum prosperity we need both men and women.
We are concerned with all women who work, irrespective of race or marital status,
and with women in all fields of employment—manufacturing, the trades and professions,
and business.
We are alive to changing conditions, prosperous conditions, or depression. We are
also concerned with the need of improving labour standards for women, with wages and
conditions of work in individual industries.
We are responsible for studying, safeguarding, and promoting the interests of
women in all their various fields of employment.
Linked closely with the struggle for employment is the fight for the maintenance of
wage standards and the establishment of labour legislation that will ensure security.
Each year, as the requirements become better understood, the Department experiences
the greatest co-operation from both employers and employees. With an ever-increasing
number of personal investigations and interviews, with telephone inquiries and correspondence, the labour regulations are becoming much better known.
Since the cessation of war there has been a wholesale exodus of women from war
industries which, needless to say, closed down. A great many of these women have
gone home or are shopping around for an easier and better-paying job. This accounts
for one of the most severe shortages of female help, especially in restaurants, dry-
cleaning establishments, laundries, and stores. Our efforts on behalf of these employees
have been greatly appreciated.
On behalf of the Department, we are grateful for the harmonizing relationship
which has been built up by the employers, employees, and the Department.
CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT.
To-day we have hundreds of teen-age people who left school to go into industry
during the war period, some who were most sincere in their desire to help the war effort
and others attracted by high wages.
These boys and girls have not had sufficient education to take their place in the
business world, have no training, and are past the age where, in most cases, they would
be willing to return to school. Some of these boys and girls should have special consideration and be given an opportunity of completing their education under some special
training scheme.
It is remarkable the co-operation existing between the employers, the children, and
their parents. Only occasionally do we find the child who falsifies his or her age, or the
parent who has done likewise. This has caused a great deal of necessary and unpleasant work for the enforcement officer.    An outstanding case happened recently, when we H 94
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
were obliged to prosecute an employer for engaging four children, all girls, 13 and 14
years of age, to work in his restaurant. In this particular case there was absolutely no
co-operation from the parents, in fact they did everything they could possibly do to
embarrass and prevent successful Court proceedings. Not only was the employer prosecuted, but it was the first time we were forced to prosecute a mother, who, under the
Act, is equally responsible. In both instances we were successful, both employer and
mother being fined.
In granting permits for children's employment, we are occasionally called upon to
decide whether the work the child applies for is hazardous or the hours too long. These
facts certainly have a tendency to impair their health, but the employer, when appealed
to, is usually quite considerate. A greater number of permits are issued for summer
vacation time only, the majority of children returning to school, and these permits
are then cancelled. If children wish to continue part-time employment, permits are
reissued. If a child, for some reason or other, does not return to school, it has been our
policy to consult the School Department, and not until he has been granted a release by
the school is he given a permit for full-time employment. As the school-leaving age is
15 years, these cases are rare, and only in very exceptional cases are permits granted.
As the problem of juvenile delinquency has brought a great deal of comment from
various sources, it is hoped that the Department will continue strict enforcement of
this legislation, as it is undoubtedly one of the most important contributions of the
Government.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all employers and parents, as well as
school authorities, who have so ably assisted in the enforcement of the Act.
Respectfully submitted.
Essie Brown,
Women's and Children's Division. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 95
CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN BRANCH.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—The second annual report of the activities of the Branch administering the
" Control of Employment of Children Act" is submitted for the year ended December
31st, 1945.
The Statute prohibits the employment of children under 15 years of age unless a
permit has been granted to the employer by the Minister of Labour or a person duly
authorized by him to issue such permits.
Careful check is made as to the suitability of the work, and when it has been
established that the child's health will not suffer, that the work will not expose the boy
or girl to unsafe conditions or interfere with their standing at school, the permits are
issued.
Naturally most applications are received during school vacations in the case of
youngsters eager to earn some money and occupy their time to advantage.
Boys and girls are not encouraged to work during their entire summer holidays,
and fortunately employers and most parents realize they do need some time for play so
that they may return to their studies refreshed for the work ahead.
It has been noticeable that the certificates of parents as to age and birth-place
(required when permits are being considered), disclose that the majority of these young
would-be wage-earners come from the Prairie Provinces. Apparently it is more customary there than in British Columbia to have all members of the family, even the
youngest ones, seek employment.
As our " Public Schools Act " requires boys and girls to remain at school until they
become 15 years of age, we work in close co-operation with the educational authorities
in checking applications for employment of children, especially when they are seeking
jobs while school is in session. These are usually for a few hours' delivery work after
school, although the odd request is received for full-time work. It is in the latter case
that most searching inquiry is made. In some very few instances where it is deemed
by the school officials that the child would be better off at work than at school employment permits have been granted.
The schedule to the original Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries
for which permits are required.    These include:—•
(1.)  Manufacturing industry.
(2.)  Ship-building industry.
(3.)  Generation of electricity or motor-power of any kind.
(4.)  Logging industry.
(5.)  Construction industry.
(6.) Catering industry.
(7.)  Public places of amusement.
(8.) Shops that are exempt from the provisions of the " Shops Regulation and
Weekly Half-Holiday Act."
(NOTE.—On January 10th, 1946, an Order in Council was passed amending the
original schedule by deleting Classification No. 8 and adding the following to the
schedule:—
(8.) Mercantile industry.
(9.) Shoe-shine stands.
(10.) Automobile service-stations.
(11.)  Transportation industry. H 96 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
On August 30th, 1946, the definition of the mercantile industry was further amended
to make the coverage more complete and now all establishments and businesses in the
wholesale and retail trade are within the scope of the Act.)
Records of the permits granted are kept in such a manner that it can easily be
seen in which occupations the boys and girls were working.
The following table gives the picture for 1945 and it is interesting to note that
only thirty-three child permits were in force at the end of the year. The previous year
there were eighty-three in effect at December 31st. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 97
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K H 98
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
After school starts all permits granted for the vacation period are cancelled and
a check is made to see that the boys and girls have actually returned to their studies if
they are still under 15.
When parents and children are interviewed every effort is made to induce them to
have the boys and girls carry on with their education beyond the compulsory school age.
Fortunately most parents realize the advantage of giving their children this important
start in life.
- Many employers who hired these youthful workers in 1944 were able to get more
mature help in 1945 and they did not attempt to use the services of boys and girls under
15 years of age.
This " Control of Employment of Children Act" provides the necessary machinery
to prevent a child-labour problem developing in the Province and very strict enforcement is exercised.
Other sections of the Department's report will reveal that Court cases were instituted against employers who hired young boys or girls without the necessary permits.
Further reference is made to this phase of the labour question in the section
dealing with the Women's and Children's Branch.
Respectfully submitted.
Mabel A. Cameron,
Acting Assistant Deputy Minister. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 99
INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION BRANCH.
Head Office Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary-Registrar B. H. E. Goult.
Branch Office 789 Pender Street West,  Vancouver, B.C.
Chief Conciliation Officer James Thomson.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the seventh annual report of the Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1945.
In February, 1944, the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations (P.C. 1003) were
made effective by Ottawa. An agreement between the Dominion and the Province made
the Regulations applicable in British Columbia on April 18th, 1944. During the period
that enabling legislation is in effect ("Wartime Labour Relations Regulations Act,"
chapter 18, B.C. 1944), the "Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" is of no
effect, except as to matters pending when the new legislation came into force, and as to
matters covered by the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" and not covered
by the Dominion Regulations.
The administration of the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations is in the hands
of the Wartime Labour Relations Board (National) and associated Provincial Labour
Relation Boards. In British Columbia the Hon. Minister of Labour discharges the
functions of the Provincial Board. The Regulations under Provincial administration
are applicable to employees usually within the exclusive legislative jurisdiction of the
Province. However, by amendment to the agreement between the Dominion and British
Columbia (P.C. 5484), the National Board has been given jurisdiction over the
employers and employees in the coal-mining industry in the Province.
FUNCTIONS OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD.
The functions of the Wartime Labour Relations Board (British Columbia) may be
briefly summarized as follows:—
1. The certification of bargaining representatives upon application. When, upon
investigation, and following such inquiries as the Minister may think necessary, such
representatives are shown to be properly elected by an employees' organization, or
chosen by a trade-union and supported by the majority of the employees affected,
certification is granted. In performing this function, the Minister must determine
whether or not the unit (the groups of employees or plant, or portions of a plant covered
by the application) is appropriate for collective bargaining purposes. He must also
decide on the exclusion of confidential and supervisory employees, who exercise the
functions of management, from the bargaining unit.
2. Intervention with the view to the completion of a collective agreement. When
negotiations have continued for thirty days, and the parties believe an agreement will
not be reached within a reasonable time, either one of them may make application to the
Minister for a Conciliation Officer. Should this official fail to bring the parties to an
understanding, recourse may be had to a Board of Conciliation.
3. Establishment of a procedure for the final settlement of disputes concerning the
interpretation or violation of a collective agreement. This function is confined to
situations where the agreement lacks appropriate procedure for the final settlement of
such disputes. Such procedure may be instituted upon the application of either party
to the agreement.
4. Granting or refusing permission to institute proceedings for violation of the
Regulations.    It is within the discretion of the Minister to grant or withhold permission H 100 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
to prosecute in matters concerning unfair labour practices, illegal strikes or lock-outs,
failure to bargain collectively, and other breaches of the Regulations.
5. Interpretation of the Regulations. This duty is discharged by the Minister,
acting as the Board. It is a special function of the National Board, however, where
appeals may be entered against the decision of the Provincial Board with the consent of
the Minister.
6. Regulations relating to procedure. Various regulations have been made by the
Minister relating to procedure. These regulations, numbered 1 to 6, were made between
April 28th, 1944, and August 16th, 1944. Copies of such regulations may be obtained
upon application to the Registrar.
A summary of the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations may be found on page
105 et seq of the departmental report for 1943.
WORK OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA BOARD.
During the year ended December 31st, 1945, departmental officials in British
Columbia dealt with a total of 737 cases. There were 651 applications for certification.
Of these, 469 were granted and 81 rejected. Applications withdrawn numbered 44.
A total of 56 applications were being investigated at the end of the period under review.
Six representation votes were ordered and taken. There were 49 investigations by
Conciliation Officers, and 15 Conciliation Boards established.
According to statistical tables published by the Federal authorities, the number of
cases dealt with by the Wartime Labour Relations Branch of the Department of Labour
again exceeds the total number of cases dealt with by all other Provinces.
The statistical summary of all cases dealt with in British Columbia from January
1st to December 31st, 1945, follows:—
Table I. Summary of Cases dealt with.
Applications dealt with  651
Certifications granted   469
Applications—
Rejected        81
Withdrawn       44
Being investigated as at December  31st     56
Referred to National Board       1
Representation  votes  taken  6
Investigations by Conciliation Officers  49
Conciliation Boards established  16
Preliminary investigations by departmental officials  11
Appeals to the National Board  2
Grievance procedures provided  2
Total cases dealt with  737
CONCILIATION PROCEDURE UNDER THE "WARTIME
LABOUR RELATIONS REGULATIONS ACT."
The Wartime Labour Relations Regulations provide for the utilization of conciliation machinery whereby an attempt may be made for the settlement of disputes arising
out of negotiations for a collective agreement, or negotiations for the renewal of an
existing agreement (sections 11 to 14).
If certified bargaining representatives have negotiated with an employer for thirty
days, and either party has reason to believe that an agreement will not be completed
within a reasonable time, application may be made to the Provincial Minister of Labour
for intervention. A Conciliation Officer is then appointed to confer with the parties,
and to attempt to effect an agreement.    If he is unable to do so, he reports to the REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 101
Minister, and may state that in his view an agreement might be facilitated by the
appointment of a Board of Conciliation.
When a Board of Conciliation is established, each of the parties is required to
nominate one person for membership on the Board. The two parties thus appointed
are requested to recommend a third member as chairman of the Board. If they are
unable to do so, the appointment is made by the Minister. The Board, when constituted,
endeavours to bring the parties together, and reports its findings and recommendations
to the Federal Minister of Labour.
During the year ended December 31st, 1945, there were thirty cases involving
procedure under the conciliation provisions of the Regulations, involving the issuance
of forty-nine Conciliation Commissions. Fourteen cases were settled by the Conciliation Officers without recourse to Board procedure.
Sixteen Boards of Conciliation were established during the year. At the year's
end all had reported.    Five settlements had been effected thereby.
The following tabulation shows the record of conciliation during the year:—
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B. C. H 102
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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H 103
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a m H 104 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BOARDS OF CONCILIATION, 1945.
In accordance with the provisions of the agreement between the Province of British
Columbia and the Dominion of Canada concerning the administration of the Wartime
Labour Relations Regulations (P.C. 1003), Boards of Conciliation are constituted by
the Federal Minister of Labour upon the recommendation of the Minister of Labour
for the Province. Reports made by such Boards appear shortly after their submission
to Ottawa in the current issue of The Labour Gazette. For that reason the usual
procedure of summarizing such reports in these pages has been discontinued, and
reference is made in the following tabulation to the issues of the The Labour Gazette
in which these reports are found.
Reference is made to the work of Boards of Conciliation who had submitted reports
between the months of February and April, 1945, in the annual report of the Department for 1944, page 93. The table following is descriptive of the work of those Boards
reporting to the Federal Minister since April, 1945, at the time of going to press with
this report. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 105
Table III. Boards of Conciliation, 1945.
No. of
Board.
Disputant Parties.
Outcome of Hearings.
Labour Gazette
Reference.
14
15
16
17
18
19
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co., Ltd., Wells, and its employees, represented by Wells Miners' Union, Local No. 685 of
International Union of Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers
Bush & Miller Co., Eburne, and certain employees, represented by Local 1-217, International Woodworkers of America
Keystone Shingles & Lumber Co., Ltd., New Westminster,
and Local  1-357, International Woodworkers of America
Fraser Valley Fibre Flax Co-operative Association, White
Rock, and Fibre Flax Workers'  Union, No.  1
Dominion Bridge Co., Ltd., Burnaby, and Boilermakers' and
Iron-ship  Builders'  Union of Canada,  No.  1
American Can Co., Ltd., Vancouver, and Local 2821, United
Steelworkers of America
Boeing Aircraft of Canada, Ltd., Vancouver, and Aeronautical Mechanics' Lodge 756 of International Association of
Machinists
Atkins Stage Lines, Ltd., Chilliwack, and Division 101, Amalgamated Association of Street, Electric Railway, and Motor
Coach  Employees of America
Bralorne Mines, Ltd., Bralorne, and Bralorne Miners' Union,
No.  271
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Retallack, and Local 698, Retallack Mine and Mill Workers' Union.
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Pioneer, and Pioneer Miners'
Union,  Local  693
Canadian Liquid Air Co., Ltd., Vancouver, and Local 1,
Boilermakers'  and Iron-ship  Builders'  Union  of Canada.
B.C. Marine Engineers & Shipbuilders, Ltd., Vancouver, and
Local No.  2, Dock and Shipyard Workers' Union.
The Holden Building, Vancouver, and International Union of
Building   Service   Employees,   Local   244.
Welding Shop & Engineering Co., Ltd., Vancouver, and Local
1,   Boilermakers  and  Iron-ship   Builders'  Union  of  Canada
Hudson's   Bay   Co.,   Inc.,   Victoria,   and   Local   279,
Clerks'   International   Protective  Association
Retail
Pacific   Cafe,   New   Westminster,   and   Local   28,   Hotel   and
Restaurant Employees'  Union
MacLean Weft*, Ltd., Vancouver, and Local 1,  Boilermakers'
and Iron-ship Builders' Union of Canada
Cranbrook Cartage and Transfer Co.,  Cranbrook,  and  Local
1-405, International Woodworkers of America
Agreement executed
and unanimous report by the  Board.
Unanimous report recommending form of
agreement
Unanimous report recommending form of
agreement
Agreement executed and
unanimous report by
the   Board
Majority report, employer's nominee to Board
dissenting
Majority report, employees' nominee to Board
dissenting
Majority report, employer's nominee to Board
dissenting
Unanimous report recommending form of
agreement
Majority report, employees* nominee to Board
dissenting
Unanimous report 	
Majority report, employees' nominee to Board
dissenting
Unanimous report with
additional comments
from employees' nominee to the Board
Unanimous report 	
Unanimous report .
Unanimous report recommending form of
agreement
Majority report, employer's nominee to Board
dissenting
Unanimous report 	
Unanimous report 	
Unanimous report 	
May, 1945 ; pp.
714-715.
May, 1945 ; pp.
715-717.
June, 1945 ; pp.
847-848.
June, 1945; p.
857.
June, 1945 ; pp.
857-862.
July, 1945 ; pp.
975-979.
Aug., 1945 ; pp.
1147-1153.
Oct., 1945 ; pp.
1464-1465.
Oct., 1945 ; pp.
1469-1471.
Oct., 1945 ; pp.
1490-1491.
Dec, 1945; pp.
1805-1807.
Dec, 1945 ; pp.
1807-1811.
P-
Dec, 1945
1813.
March, 1946
311.
April, 1946 ; pp
480-484.
p.
April, 1946 ;
485-487.
pp.
April, 1946 ; pp.
487-488.
April, 1946 ; pp.
489-490.
April, 1946; p.
491.
STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 1945.
A record of the time-loss occasioned by industrial disputes has been maintained in
British Columbia since 1933, and includes lockouts as well as strikes. A lockout, or an
industrial condition that is undeniably a lockout, is rarely encountered, and lockouts
and strikes are therefore recorded together in the statistical tables. The term " dispute " refers to either strike or lockout.
The figures shown are inclusive of all disputes which have come to the attention of
the Department. While methods taken to procure this information preclude the possibility of serious omission, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later information. H 106                                             DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Estimates of time lost are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute
lasts by the number of employees directly affected and not
replaced.
The summaries
include only the record of time lost by workers directly involved.
A marked increase in strike activity was recorded in 1945 as compared
with the
previous year.    During 1944 there were fifteen strikes, involving 6,379 employees and
a loss of 4,510 working-days.    In the year under review eighteen strikes involved 6,810
employees and caused a loss of 69,595 working-days.
Table IV. Summary of Disputes commencing in 1945.
Industry or
Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employers
affected.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time-loss
in Man-
days.
Bus-drivers, Vancou
Commenced   January   6th;     for   increased   wages   and
1
63
350
ver Island
change  in  working  conditions ;    conciliation   (Provincial) ;   reference to Regional War Labour Board;   in
favour of workers;   terminated January  12th
Street-railway work
Commenced January 9th;   against National War Labour
3
2,454
24,540
ers, Victoria, Van
Board denial of increase in wages approved by Regional
couver and New
War Labour Board;   conciliation   (Federal) ;   and re-
Westminster
ref'erence  to   Regional  War   Labour   Board;    compromise ;   terminated January 19th
Coal-miners,
Commenced   March   29th;    against  refusal  of  lamps  to
1
128
128
Cumberland
miners  habitually late for work ;   return of workers ;
in  favour of employer ;   terminated  March 29th
Bus-drivers,
Commenced April 24th ;   against failure of Regional War
1
77
154
Vancouver
Labour  Board  to  make  wage   increase  retroactive  to
July   1st,   1944;    return   of   workers   pending   further
reference to National War Labour Board;   in favour
of workers ;   terminated April 26th
Shipyard riveters,
Commenced   June   13th;    against  cancellation   of   piece
1
175
300
Esquimalt
work rates for riveting;   conciliation   (Federal) ;   reference to National War Labour Board;   compromise;
terminated June 14th
Coal-miners,
Commenced   July   9th;    for   increased   brushing   in   low
2
800
2,400
Cumberland
long-walled areas;   conciliation   (Federal);   in favour
of  workers;   terminated  July  12th
Can-factory workers,
Commenced  July  27th;    for  implementation  of minority
1
446
5,600
Vancouver
report of Board  of  Conciliation  for  Union  shop  and
check-off;    Government took  control  and  placed  plant
in   control   of  a   Commissioner;    compromise   check-off
approved;   terminated August 11th.
Meat-packing plant
Commenced   July   30th;    in   sympathy   with   strikers   in
1
146
550
workers, Vancouver
Toronto  plant;   conciliation   (Provincial) ;    in  favour
of employees ;   terminated August 3rd
Shipyard-workers,
Commenced August  14th ;   inter-Union  dispute re work
1
258
50
North Vancouver
ing with members of another Union ;   return of workers ;   in favour of employer ;   terminated August 14th
Coal-miners, Michel
Commenced    September    27th;     protest    against    meat
rationing ;   return of workers ;   in favour of employer ;
terminated October  21st
1
562
11,240
Coal-miners, Elk
Commenced    September    27th;     protest    against    meat
1
299
5,980
River and Fernie
rationing ;   return of workers ;   in favour of employer ;
terminated October  21st
Coal-miriers,
Commenced September 30th;  protest against meat ration
1
500
6,000
Nanaimo
ing ;   return of workers ;   in favour of employer ; terminated  October  15th
Coal-miners,
Commenced  October   1st;    protest against meat ration
1
800
9,600
Cumberland
ing ;  return of workers;   in favour of employer ; terminated October  15th
Carpenters and
Commenced  October   12th;    against reduction  of wages
1
42
63
helpers, Vernon
from Vancouver rates to local rates ;   negotiations and
reference to War Labour Board ;   in favour of workers ;    terminated   October   15th
Shingle-mill workers,
Commenced   November   28th;    for  Union   agreement  to
1
60
2,640
New Westminster
provide   increased   wages;    conciliation    (Provincial);
agreement signed  in  favour  of  workers;   terminated
Totals	
January 22nd
18
6,810
69,595
i REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 107
An analysis of disputes by industries shows that the greatest loss of time occurred
in the mining industry.    Transportation was next seriously affected.
Table V. Analysis of Strikes by Industries in British Columbia, 1945.
Industry.
No. of Employees
affected.
No. of Employers
affected.
Time-loss in
Man-days.
42
■ 60
3,089
592
433
2,594
1
1
7
2
2
5
63
2,640
35,348
6,150
350
Mining (coal)	
25,044
Totals            	
6,810
18
69,595
A survey of the number of employees affected by industrial disputes, and the time
lost, shows that although there was only a slight increase in the number of disputes
compared with 1944, the time-loss increased sharply. The following table shows the
rise and fall in the number of disputes since 1935:—
Table VI. Number op Disputes, Number of Employees affected, and
Time lost in Working-days, 1935-45.*
Year.
No. of
Disputes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1935  	
23
16
16
11
4
1
8
50
43
15
18
7,321
5.741
1,188
837
822
204
1,408
18,804
21,704
6,379
6,810
140 706
1936	
1937	
75,311
30,022
8,236
13,803
8,510
7,594
35,024
75,129
4,510
69,595
1938f                      ..    -
1939	
1940	
1941               	
1942	
1943	
1944J	
1945	
* Estimates of time lost are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute lasts by the number of
employees directly involved and not replaced. The number of employees indirectly affected are not included in the
computation.
t 1938 was the first calendar year in which the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " became effective.
t 1944 was the first calendar year in which the " Wartime Labour Relations Regulations Act " became effective.
EMPLOYERS' AND EMPLOYEES' ORGANIZATIONS.
Section 9 of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " requires every
organization of employers and employees to file certain returns—namely, a certified
copy of its constitution, rules, and by-laws; certified copies of any amendments to these
documents when made; and an annual list of the names of its officers as of the 31st
day of December—in each year.
Additional information has been required of associations of employees, or trade-
union locals, under the provisions of section 5a of the " Department of Labour Act."
This return requires the name and business address of the organization, its affiliation
(if any), and its total paid-up membership at the date of return. Members over three
months in arrears are not included in this figure.
The Wartime Labour Relations Regulations (P.C. 1003) have been effective in
British Columbia since April 18th, 1944, and somewhat similar information to that
required under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " H 108
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
may be required under section 22 of the Regulations. The provisions of the " Department of Labour Act " are not affected by the coming into effect of these Regulations.
It should be noted that the returns are from all employees' organizations of record,
and that these returns are made in some instances by organizations which are not
defined as a trade-union under section 2 (1)   (n) of P.C. 1003.
While every care is taken to ensure accuracy in all returns, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later information.
Annual returns received since this information was first obtained in 1938 have
shown a consistent growth in the nlembership of employees' organizations. In 1945
there was a slight increase in the number of organizations making returns, and a
decrease in the total membership reported. Details of the number of organizations
making returns since 1939, and their reported memberships, follow:—
Table VII. Number of Employees' Organizations making Returns
and Membership thereof, 1939-45.
Year.
No. of
Organizations.
Total
Membership.
1939           	
380
404
402
415
473
617
636
44,867
50,360
61,292
91,618
107,402
110,045
108,125
1940                                                          	
1941                     .                                	
1942                                    	
1943      	
1944	
1945	
Organizations of Employees.
The list is arranged by cities and towns in alphabetical order. In all cases where
this information could be obtained, the names and addresses of the presidents and
secretaries were revised to the date of publication.
The post-office addresses of the officers are the same as the heading under which
they appear, unless otherwise stated.
The list of employers' organizations follows immediately after that of the
employees'. Returns in this category numbered twenty-five in 1939 and in 1940,
twenty-seven in 1941, thirty-two in 1942, thirty-four in 1943, thirty-six in 1944, and
thirty-seven in 1945.
Alberni.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—Secretary, H. R. Burdon, Alberni.
Abbotsfobd.
Brick and Clay Workers' Federal Union, No. 136.
—President,  F.  Holtsbaum;    Recording  Secretary, S. W. Jeffery. R-R- I, Matsqui.
Bamberton.
Cement Workers' Federal Union, B.C., No. 166.
—President, R. Dale; Secretary, D. Duncan,
Tod Inlet, Bamberton.
Blue River.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 143.—
President, D. H. Daniel;" Secretary, D. H.
Daniel,  Blue  River.
Bralorne.
Miners' Union, Bralorne, No. 271.—President, C.
Radcliffe;   Secretary, A. McCormack, Bralorne.
Britannia Beach.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Britannia, No.
663.—President, J. H. Balderson; Financial
Secretary, K. A. Smith, Box 42, Townsite, Britannia Beach.
Burnaby.
Civic Employees' Union, Burnaby, No. 23.—President, Joseph McHale; Secretary, Miss Doris
Smith, 3633 Jersey Avenue, Burnaby, via New
Westminster.
Fire-fighters', International Association of, No.
323.—President, Gordon Monk; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. MacRae, 3506 Booth Avenue,
Burnaby.
Pacific Coast Packers, Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, A. M. Emarson; Secretary-
Treasurer, Christina Davie, 733 Thirteenth
Street, New Westminster.
School Janitors' Federal Union, Burnaby, No.
224.—President, Charles Brookman; Secretary-
Treasurer, Albert Francis, 2606 Telford Street,
New Westminster. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 109
Chapman Camp.
Sullivan Workers' Union.—President, Harry Stuart; Secretary, Charles G. Schulli, Chapman
Camp.
Chemainus.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
38/164.—President, F. Levis; Secretary, H. E.
Thornett,  Chemainus.
Chilliwack.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1843.—President, Austin Keith;
Secretary, Richard G. Hannah, 107 Hazel Street,
Chilliwack.
Clearwater.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 15.—President, W. Kelly; Secretary, J.
Pawson, Clearwater.
Colquitz.
Government Employees' Association, B. C. Provincial.—President, J. Humphries; Secretary,
Harry Durham, Colquitz.
Comox.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. L. Matthews; Secretary,
W. A. W. Hames, Box 233, Courtenay.
Copper Mountain.
Miners' Union, Copper Mountain, No. 649.—President, Angus Campbell; Business Agent, George
W. Anderson, P.O. Box 42, Copper Mountain.
Copper River.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 355.—President, P. LeRoss; Secretary-
Treasurer, G. Somerville, Copper River.
Coquitlam.
Municipal Employees' Union, District of Coquitlam.—President, K. Olsen; Secretary-Treasurer, W. J. Joyce, 529 Stewart Avenue, New
Westminster.
Courtenay.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1638.—President, L. V. Steves;
Secretary, Karl Dresen, Comox.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 156.—President, Frank Plowright; Secretary-Treasurer,
Sidney Godwin, Box 339, Courtenay.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-363.—President, E. F. Anderson; Secretary,
J. E Higgin, Box 458, Courtenay.
Cranbrook.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 563.—
Chief Engineer, F. R. McDaniel; Secretary,
C. H. Faulkner, Box 878, Cranbrook.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 559.—President, R. Bartholomew;
Secretary, K. Jolliffe, Cranbrook.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, B. W. Flynn; Secretary, Miss
Margot van Braam, Cranbrook.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 588.
—President, A. A. Bouchard; Secretary, R. J.
Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 229.—Secretary, 0. A. Eliason, Box 853,
Cranbrook.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 585.—
President, W. L. Zimmerman; Secretary, H. B.
Haslam, Box 784, Cranbrook.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
173.—President, Charles Romano; Recording
Secretary, J. A. Gillis, 312 Watt Avenue, Cranbrook.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 407.—President, D. A. Burton; Secretary, H. J. Huxtable,
P.O. Box 262, Cranbrook.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1292.—President, R. Pelton; Secretary-
Treasurer, E. G. Dingley, Box 728, Cranbrook.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-405.—President, A. H. Parkin; Secretary,
Patrick Walsh, Box 438, Cranbrook.
Cumberland.
Firebosses'  Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
John H. Vaughan;    Secretary, Alfred G. Jones,
P.O. Box 562, Cumberland.
Mine  Workers   of  America,   United,   No.   7293.—
President, J. H. Cameron;   Secretary-Treasurer,
John Bond, Box 614, Cumberland.
Duncan.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, G. Lines; Secretary, W. R.
Chester, Koksilah P.O.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-80.
—President, Owen G. Brown; Secretary, George
Grafton, Box 430, Duncan.
Essondale.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Lowndes; Secretary, S. R. H.
Evans, P.O. Box E, Port Coquitlam.
Fernie.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of United, No.
308.—President, Jack Brown; Secretary, Harold
Peterson, Box 1071, Fernie.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Clarke; Secretary, A. Lees,
Fernie.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7310.—
President, Mike Nee; Secretary, William Martin, P.O. Box 212, Fernie.
Field.
Miners'   Union,   Field   and   District,   No.   807.—
President, Thomas J. Alton;   Secretary, Robert
Nelson, Box 857, Field.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1454.—President,   Pietro   Decicco;     Secretary,
William M. Brown, Field.
Fraser Valley.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Mr. Fawcett; Secretary, S. F.
Deans, Aldergrove. H 110
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Golden.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, F. 0. Parsons; Secretary, Mrs.
A. Lenny, Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 165.—Secretary, H. Carlson, Golden.
Grand Forks.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, John Roylance; Secretary,
E. Ross Oatman, Public Works Department,
Grand Forks.
Hansard.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 202.—President, S. Fedoruk; Secretary-
Treasurer, W. Haws, Hansard.
Hedley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Hedley Mascot,
No. 655.—President, Donald Morrison; Secretary, John Moffett, Box 329, Hedley.
loco.
loco Refinery Employees' Association.—President,
W. D. Farrell; Secretary, C. J. Wise, 301 Third
Avenue, loco.
Kaleden.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 4.—
President, W. G. MacKenzie; Secretary, Mrs.
S. Fretz, Kaleden.
Kamloops.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1540.—President, Jack Striegler;
Recording Secretary, Roy F. Maskell, 726 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 821.—
President, Charles Spencer; Secretary-Treasurer, W. A. Harris, 727 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 855.—
Chief Engineer, S. A. Johnson; Secretary-
Treasurer, P. J. Millward, 753 Dominion Street,
Kamloops.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
11.—President, D. C. Miller; Secretary, L. P.
Dorion, 682 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 258.—President, Gordon L. Kenward;
Secretary, John J. Waugh, 749 St. Paul Street,
Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 930.—President, O. B. Hoover; Secretary, L. P. Martin, 753 Pleasant Street, Kamloops.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, A. L. B. Clark; Secretary,
J. Carmichael, 220 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 80.
—President, Angus R. McKay; Secretary, Reta
I. Maclean, 153 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 748.
—President, J. H. Blakey; Secretary, L. E.
Crowder, 359 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 31.—President, R. McMillan; Secretary,
R. McLure, Kamloops.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 519.—
President, F. C. Puff; Secretary-Treasurer,
Vernon H. Mott, 521 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
148.—President, H. C. Cowles; Financial Secretary, Robert Lapsley, 907 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, No. 611.
—President, E. R. Chapman; Secretary, H. P.
Battison, 36 Nicola Street West, Kamloops.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 150.—
President, G. N. Roberts; Secretary, L. Phillips,
Box 402, Kamloops.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, Lodge No.
30.—General Secretary, D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue Building, Winnipeg.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 45.—
General Secretary, D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue
Building, Winnipeg.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-417.
—President, S. A. Simpson; Secretary, W. S.
Lynch, 234 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Kaslo.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 173.—Secretary, T. H. Horner, Crescent
Road, Kaslo.
Kelowna.
Civic Employees' Union.—President, Alec Ruddock; Secretary-Treasurer, Rupert Brown, Box
171, Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 5.—
President, Mrs. Elizabeth Flack; Secretary-
Treasurer, Mrs. I. F. Black, Box 1287, Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 8.—
President, William H. Fleck; Recording Secretary, Mrs. C. N. Beebe, R.R. 1, Kelowna.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Roy Hunt; Secretary, H. K.
Hume, Box 1571, Kelowna.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' Union.— President, Mrs. K.
Halter; Secretary, Miss R. Welsh, Box 1570,
Kelowna.
Processing and Cannery Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, Samuel T. Jessop; Secretary, Mrs.
Gladys P. Boyer, Box 1091, Kelowna.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 217.—
President, W. H. Sands; Secretary, Robert Gill,
Box 312, Kelowna.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-423.
—President, F. M. Fulton; Secretary, Val
Hungle, Box 1557, Kelowna.
Kimberley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Kimberley, No.
651.—President, J. J. Rollhieser; Financial
Secretary, J. R. McFarlane, Box 627, Kimberley.
Ladysmith.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
Dan McMillan; Secretary-Treasurer, Fred
Johnston, 119 Baden-Powell Street, Ladysmith. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 111
Lake Cowichan.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 2824.—President, J. High; Secretary-Treasurer, George Robbins, Box 172, Lake Cowichan.
Langford.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. J. Wishart; Secretary,
H. A. Bailey, Luxton, R.R. 1, Victoria.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 533.—President, J. B. Bell; Secretary-
Treasurer, H. W. McKenzie, Langford.
Lillooet.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 215.—President, J. K. Purdie; Secretary-
Treasurer, J. M. Crowston, Garibaldi.
McBride.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 247.—
President, R. T. Clay; Secretary, G. T. Hold-
way, P.O. Box 25, McBride.
Marguerite.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 221.—President, M. Latin; Secretary, H.
Robinson, Marguerite.
Marpole.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, E. A. Miles; Secretary, Charles
Bird, Marpole.
Merritt.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, A. H. McLean; Secretary, P. C.
Currie, Merritt.
Mission.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-367.
—President, F. Gaglardi; Secretary, F. 0.
Theiss, Box 489, Mission City.
Murrayville.
Municipal Employees' Association, Langley, No.
10.—President, Horace E. Penzer; Secretary,
Bernice L. Tomlin, Municipal Hall, Murrayville.
Nanaimo.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189.—President, A.
Wylie; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 527.—President, William Emerson; Secretary, William Little, 217 Irwin
Street, Nanaimo.
Civic Employees' Association, Nanaimo, No. 14.—
President, T. Mumberson; Secretary, Colin
McArthur, 146 Nicol Street, Nanaimo.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, Joe Bradwell; Secretary-Treasurer, H. W.
Spencer, 433 Fourth Street, Nanaimo.
Fire-fighters' Association, Nanaimo, No. 7.—President, Fred Laithwaite; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. G. Dunn, Nanaimo Fire Department, Nanaimo.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. H. Cochrane; Secretary,
Miss M. E. Booth, Nanaimo.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers'
Union, International, No. 1087.—President,
Ernest C. Hamilton; Secretary-Treasurer,
Frank Skidmore, Box 261, Nanaimo.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' Union, Nanaimo Dry Cleaning,
No. 1.—President, Eula Patterson; Secretary-
Treasurer, Kathleen Gamble, 330 Hecate Street,
Nanaimo.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7355.—
Acting-President, Thomas Newman; Secretary-
Treasurer, Percy Lawson, Union Hall, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No. 3.
—President, W. Vater; Secretary-Treasurer,
C. L. Talliman, 507 Bradley Street, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No. 12.
—President, Miss Loyis McDonald; Secretary,
Miss Ethel Weeks, R.R. 1, Chase River, Nanaimo.
Typographical Union, Nanaimo, No. 337.—President, John B. Paul; Secretary-Treasurer, L. C.
Gilbert, P.O. Box 166 or 491 Fifth Street, Nanaimo.
Natal.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7292.—
President, Tony Podrasky; Secretary, Simeon
Weaver, Natal.
Nelson.
Automotive Employees' Association, Nelson.—
President, Verne Irwin; Secretary-Treasurer,
R. C. Couch, 208 Nelson Avenue, Nelson.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
196.—President, A. J. Hamson; Secretary-
Treasurer, Frank Defoe, Ward Street, Nelson.
Civic Employees' Federation, Nelson, No. 8.—
President, F. E. Wheeler; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. Stromstead, 224 Observatory Street, Nelson.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, C. Gigot; Secretary-Treasurer, F. C. Collins, 911 Edgewood Avenue, Nelson.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 579.—
Chief Engineer, L. W. Humphrey; Secretary-
Treasurer, Gordon Allan, 1115 Ward Street,
Nelson.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 18.—
President, J. R. Taylor; Secretary, J. E. Ludlow, Jr., 609 Cedar Street, Nelson.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 631.—President, J. C. Young; Secretary, Charles Robertson, 1417 Stanley Street,
Nelson.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. E. Stratton; Secretary,
James Ryley, Box 510, Nelson.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 75.
—President, A. S. Homersham; Secretary-
Treasurer, G. C. Massey, 306 Third Street,
Nelson.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 663.
—President, T. A. Swinden; Secretary, W. M.
Wood, 402 Victoria Street, Nelson.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 558.—
President, J. S. Edwards; Secretary-Treasurer,
C. H. Sewell, 41 High Street, Nelson. H 112
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Eailway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
98.—President, A. H. Smith; Recording Secretary, Alex. G. Ioanin, 512 Third Street, Nelson.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 460.—President, W. E. Marquis; Secretary-Treasurer, A.
Kirby, 820 Carbonate Street, Nelson.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1291.—President, J. S. Brake; Secretary, R. R. McCandlish, 111 Union Street, Nelson.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 4.—President, L. E. Hadfield;
Secretary-Treasurer, Art Ruzicka, 422 First
Street, Nelson.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No. 13.
—President, Miss I. Kay; Secretary, Miss Jessie
Gentles, 1114 McQuarrie Avenue, Nelson.
Typographical Union, International, No. 340, Nelson and Trail.—President, Elmer D. Hall;
Secretary, George W. Priest, 706 Richards
Street, Nelson.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-425.
—President, Hugh Campbell; Financial Secretary, George Argotoff, Box 149, Nelson.
New Westminster.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189.—President,
A. Wylie; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers and Culinary Workers, No.
835.—President, H. M. Bilodeau; Business
Agent, W. Morton, 405 Campbell Avenue, New
Westminster.
Boilermakers, Iron-ship Builders and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, No. 194.
—President, G. A. Bailey; Secretary-Treasurer,
P. Nicholson, 490 Fourteenth Avenue, New
Westminster.
Building and Construction Workers of Canada,
Amalgamated, No. 6.—President, H. Pattison;
Secretary, H. Pattison, 442 Second Street, New
Westminster.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1251.—President, Stanley Dru-
ance; Secretary, Robert Grooves, 727 Fifth
Avenue, New Westminster.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 12.—President, Walter Hogg; Secretary, Neil B. Saunders, 217
Seventh Avenue, New Westminster.
Cordage Industrial Rope and Twine Workers
Union, No. 1.—President, W. Eakin; Secretary,
S. Campbell, 1711 London Street, New Westminster.
Distillery, Rectifying, and Wine Workers' International Union of America, No. 69.—President,
William Thacker; Secretary, Miss M. Nilsson,
503 Fader Street, New Westminster.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No. 256.
—President, L. J. Wisheart; Recording Secretary, Lloyd C. Bussey, No. 1 Fire Hall, New
Westminster.
Gas Workers' Union, No. 376.—President, F. R.
Alty; Recording Secretary, A. F. Chandler,
2525 Elizabeth Avenue, West Burnaby, New
Westminster.
Gypsum Workers' Union, No. 578.—President,
W. H. Hannaford; Secretary, J. W. Beattie,
1355 Second Street, New Westminster.
Hod Carriers, Building and Common Labourers of
America, No. 1070.—President, E. N. Goodridge;
Secretary-Treasurer, M. J. Musa, Suite 8, Brae-
view Apartments, New Westminster.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Lumber Inspectors' Union, B.C. Division.—President, C. R. Reelie; Secretary-Treasurer, E.
Lehman, 307 Archer Street, New Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 131.
—President, W. Neily; Recording Secretary,
W. Head, 3243 Neville Street, New Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 151.
—President, F. Maguire; Secretary, T. Kenyon,
Eagles Lodge Hall, Columbia Street, New Westminster.
Moorhouse Stage Drivers'Union.—President, Lloyd
Fraleigh; Secretary, R. M. Brennen, Fort
Langley.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union, International, No. 281.—President, Fred Abernethy;
Secretary, John Smith, 1012 Queens Avenue,
New Westminster.
Pacific Coast Terminals Independent Employees'
Union.—President, George Wilson; Secretary-
Treasurer, John Walker, 116 Mclnnes Street,
New Westminster.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
456.—President, William Jacobson; Recording
Secretary, Walter Ross, 222 Ninth Street, New
Westminster.
Plumbers, Steamfitters, and Pipefitters of America, United Association of, No. 571.—President,
James Mitchell; Secretary-Treasurer, Thomas
H. Poulton, 725 Second Street, New Westminster.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
280.—President, William Jackson; Recording
Secretary, A. H. Cawley, R.R. 4, New Westminster.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 226.—
President, J. Spick; Secretary, L. H. Stevens,
223 Osborne Avenue, New Westminster.
Sheet-metal Workers, International Association
of, No. 314.—President, George Watson; Financial Secretary, G. H. Dobb, 1116 Seventh Avenue, New Westminster.
Stone Cutters of North America, Journeymen.—
President, F. H. Lowe; Secretary-Treasurer,
Frank Hall, 2148 Randolph Avenue, New Westminster.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, Division No. 134.—President, David L. Bryce;
Business Agent, R. Cormack, 57 Alexander
Street, New Westminster.
Typographical Union, New Westminster, No. 632.
—President, A. R. MacDonald; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. A. Stoney, P.O. Box 754, New
Westminster.
Waterfront Workers' Association, Royal City, No.
502.—President, William H. Lawrence; Secretary-Treasurer, C. P. Latham, 71 Tenth Street,
New Westminster.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-357.
—President, Percy A. Smith; Recording Secretary, Rae Eddie, 533 Clarkson Street, New
Westminster.
Nickel Plate.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Nickel Plate, No.
656.—President, P. S. Dannhauer; Financial
Secretary, J. Rogers, Nickel Plate Mine. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 113
Oakalla.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. W. Lane;    Secretary, W. R.
Shaw, P.O. Drawer 0, New Westminster.
Ocean Falls.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
360.—President, N. H. Compton; Secretary,
A. W. Young, P.O. Box 431, Ocean Falls.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 312.—President,
Howard A. Webster; Secretary, D. J. McDonald,
Ocean Falls.
Oliver.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 2.—
President, Victor Tomlin; Secretary, A. S.
Skelton, Box 260, Oliver.
Oliver Sawmills, Ltd., Employees' Organization.—
President, E. L. Roberts; Secretary, N. M.
Boult, Box 261, Oliver.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
334.—President, V. Tomlin; Secretary, Eric
Greene, Oliver.
Peace River.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. F. Murrell; Secretary, C. P.
Tyrrell, Pouce Coupe.
Penticton.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 866.—
President, R. Johnson; Secretary-Treasurer, W.
Osborne, 812 Argyle Street, Penticton.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
10.—President, James D. Crawford; Secretary,
W. T. Mattock, Main Street, Penticton.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 884.—President, P. H. Coulter; Secretary, D. Raincock, Box 926, Penticton.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 1.—■
President, Jack Blogg; Secretary, Mrs. Rosina
Campbell, Westminster Avenue, Penticton.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. Edge; Secretary, Miss M. C.
Ruud, Box 14, Penticton.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1023.—Secretary, F. Parsons, Box 160,
Penticton.
Municipal Employees' Union, Penticton, No. 1.—
President, A. S. Gough; Secretary-Treasurer,
Miss R. M. Young, P.O. Box 520, Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 914.—
President, N. E. McCallum; Secretary-Treasurer,
G. M. Clark, Box 875, Penticton.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 179.—President, R. L. R. McBeath; Secretary-Treasurer,
C. A. Yule, Box 67, Penticton.
Pioneer.
Miners' Union, Pioneer, No. 793.—President,
George Miller; Financial Secretary, John D. A.
Conn, Pioneer Mines.
Port Alberni.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 513.—President, T. Veiman;
Secretary, R. Walker, Box 492, Alberni.
Hospital Employees' Federal Union, West Coast
General, No. 91.—President, Garfield Zinck;
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss A. L. Kolach, Box
1138, Port Alberni.
Hotel, Restaurant, and Beverage Employees, No.
697.—President, H. Roseberg; Secretary-Treasurer, Jack Murphy, Box 773, Port Alberni.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 503.—President, P. Goddard;
Secretary, Cal Cook, Box 804, Port Alberni.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-85.
—President, Walter S. Yates; Secretary, Alfred
Dewhurst, Box 569, Port Alberni.
Port Alice.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 514.—President,
Charles L. Hudson; Secretary, K. A. Monk-
house, Box 123, Port Alice.
Port Mellon.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 297.—President,
Franklin R. Home; Recording Secretary, Wallace A. Arrowsmith, P.O. Box 97, Port Mellon.
Powell River.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2068.—President, John Gibson;
Secretary, F. A. Smith, Wildwood Heights P.O.,
Powell River.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No. 8.
—President, S. Davies; Secretary, R. A. Bridge,
Box 688, Powell River.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, S. R. Maggs; Secretary, Miss
E. Cook, Powell River.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
142.—President, T. Waldron; Recording Secretary, H. B. Moore, P.O. Box 730, Powell River.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 76.—President,
C. M. Mouat; Secretary, J. S. Mabell, Drawer
160, Powell River.
Premier.
Mine, Mill, and Tramway Workers' Union, Silbak
Premier, No. 694.—President, William Hibill;
Secretary, Norman Cunningham, Box 1478,
Premier.
Prince George.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 843.—■
Chief Engineer, L. McNeil; Secretary-Treasurer,
George A. Hodson, P.O. Box 941, Prince George.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 827.—President, H. R. Anderson;
Financial Secretary, F. Armstrong, Prince
George.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. G. Henning; Secretary,
Miss Jean MacMillan, Prince George.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 620.—President, J. Williams; Secretary-Treasurer, D. Ross,
Box 224, Prince George.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 28.—
President, H. A. McLeod; Secretary, H. Allen,
Box 675, Prince George. H 114
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-424.
—President, Hilding Ekblad; Secretary, Frank
Petzinger, Box 819, Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 636.—President,
Edward W. Standing; Secretary, A. J. Turcotte,
P.O. Box 196, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1735.—President, Jack Fisher;
Secretary, J. S. Black, Box 694, Prince Rupert.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 5.—President, L. Hol-
stead; Secretary-Treasurer, Sam Bill, Box 981,
Prince Rupert.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 344.—President, C. W. Wardale; Financial
Secretary, J. N. Forman, Box 457, Prince
Rupert.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
510.—President,    David     Crocker;      Secretary,
A. W. Johnson, Box 12, Prince Rupert.
Fire-fighters,   International   Association   of,   No.
559.—President, A. H. Iverson; Secretary-
Treasurer, A. C. Cameron, Box 506, Prince
Rupert.
Fishermen's Federal Union of B.C., Deep Sea, No.
80.—President, Erling Grinstrand; Secretary-
Treasurer, George Anderson, P.O. Box 249,
Prince Rupert.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, H. A. Ivarson; Secretary, Miss
E. Rivett, Box 759, Prince Rupert.
Industrial Workers' Union, Prince Rupert, No. 1.
—President, E. Faure; Secretary, Miss M.
Dalzell, P.O. Box 1394, Station B, Prince Rupert.
Longshoremen's Association and Warehousemen's
Union, International, No. 505.—President, Laurence Ryan; Secretary, William A. Pilfold,
Box 531, Prince Rupert.
Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial
Union, No. 2.—Vice-President, David A. Mac-
Phee; Secretary-Treasurer, John McGuire, Postal
Station B, Prince Rupert.
Pile Drivers', Bridge, Dock, and Wharf Builders'
Union, No. 1549.—President, C. N. Henrickson;
Secretary, Harold McKay, Box 694, Prince
Rupert.
Plumbers, Steamfitters, and Marine Pipefitters,
United Association of, No. 180.—President, J. K.
Haynes; Recording Secretary, George S. Weath-
erly, Box 1296, Prince Rupert.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
No. 426.—President, D. T. Elder; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. Pollock, P.O. Box 496, Prince
Rupert.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 154.—
President, D. Creed; Secretary, P. Jones, Box
676, Prince Rupert.
Shipwrights', Joiners', and Caulkers' Industrial
Union, No. 2.—President, J. R. Blakey; Secretary-Treasurer,  J.   Stewart,  Box  1075,  Station
B, Prince   Rupert.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen, and Helpers,
International Brotherhood of, No. 136.—President, Howard Steen; Acting-Secretary, J. Mul-
roney, Box 1453, Prince Rupert.
Typographical Union, Prince Rupert, No. 413.—
President, Stephen Galloway; Secretary,
Charles H. Collins, Box 552, Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, and Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of, No. 367.—
President, Eli Plecash; Secretary, D. Stuart,
Princeton.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7875.—
President, Archibald Samuel; Secretary, John
Howarth, Jr.,  Princeton.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-418.—President, Walter G. Smith; Financial
Secretary, H. J. Latreille, Princeton.
Quesnel.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Raymond Stephenson; Secretary,  Miss  M.  Trueman,  Quesnel.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Retallack.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No.  181.—Secretary,  Paul  Munch,  Retallack.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 407.—President,
Alexander Robinson; Secretary, James M.
Goble, P.O. Box 283, Revelstoke.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 657.—
Chief Engineer, H. W. Keegan; Secretary-
Treasurer,  G. J.  Ingram,  Box  485,  Revelstoke.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 341.—President, E. M. Lloyd; Secretary, F. J. Westlake, Box 187, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 381.—President, Douglas Blackwell; Secretary-Treasurer, D. A. Rix, Revelstoke.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. Dabell; Secretary, Cecil G.
Graham,  Revelstoke.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 258.
—President, C. B. York; Recording Secretary,
H. Gillett, Revelstoke.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 208.—Secretary, H. Prestwich, Box 153,
Revelstoke.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 51.—
President, C. Isaac; Secretary, D. E. Johnson,
Box 728, Revelstoke.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
481.—President, A. S. Parker; Secretary, P.
White, Revelstoke.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, No. 487.
—President, Stanley Porritt; Secretary-Treasurer, T. B. Philip, Box 261, Revelstoke.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 72.—
President, George Watson; Secretary-Trea-
urer, L. W. File, 202 Eighth Street, Revelstoke.
Rossland.
Fire-fighters' Association, B.C. Provincial, No. 9.
—President, George Dingwall; Secretary-Treas-
surer, William Yawney, Rossland.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Robert Munn; Secretary, W. S.
Nason, Box 190, Rossland. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 115
Salmon Arm.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, William A. Webb; Secretary,
Miss  E.  Buchan,  Salmon Arm.
S keena-0 mineca.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, S. G. Preston; Secretary, C. L.
Gibson,  Smithers.
Smithers.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 111.—
President, James Buchan; Secretary-Treasurer,
C. A. Thurston, Box 240, Smithers.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 340.—President, J. Denicola; Secretary-
Treasurer, J. E. Middleton, Walcott.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 869.—
President, E. V. Glass; Secretary-Treasurer,
S. W. Gould, Box 86, Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415.—President, J. Cathrae; Secretary, C.
Mehaffey, Smithers.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 93.—
President, E. M. Erickson; Secretary, P. B.
Emerson, Box 51, Smithers.
South Slocan.
West Kootenay Power & Light Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.-—President, I. R. Jones; Secretary-Treasurer, W. C. Muir, South Slocan.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1419.—President, Robert Watson; Secretary,
Alexander Fraser,  Squamish.
Trail.
Bus Drivers' Association of Trail.—President,
George Donish; Steeretary-Treasurer, F. C.
Sharpe, 1429 Fourth Avenue, Trail.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 287.—President, A. F. Biollo; Financial
Secretary and Treasurer, A. Eldridge, 1239
Green  Avenue,  Trail.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 76.
—President, William E. Secord; Secretary,
S. T. Spooner, 2017 Second Avenue, Trail.
Smelter Workers' Union, Independent.—President,
C. W. McLean; Secretary, J. M. Graham, 1198
Cedar Avenue, Trail.
Smelter Workers' Union, Trail and District, No.
480.—President and Business Agent, F. W.
Henne; Secretary, J. J. H. McTague, Box 120,
Trail.
Tranquille.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, James Carr; Secretary, K
Hawksworth, Tranquille.
Vananda.
Quarry and Mine Workers' Union, Texada Island,
No. 816.—President, E. W. Olson; Financial
Secretary, J. K. Johnson, Vananda.
Vancouver.
Aeronautical Mechanics' Lodge, No. 756, International Association of Machinists.—President,
Cecil Gwinn; Business Agent, Tom Price, 413
Granville Street, Vancouver.
Auto Workers' Lodge, No. 1857, Vancouver.—
President, V. Sorensen; Secretary, J. W. Cor-
bett, 106, 413  Granville  Street, Vancouver.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, No. 468.—President, Wilmer
A. Bell; Secretary, Melvin Kemmis, 608 Holden
Building,  Vancouver.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, Local 189.—President,
A. Wylie; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Barbers' Association of B.C.—President, David
Wellington; Secretary, R. W. Morrow, 1403
Dominion Bank Building, 207 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
120.—President, R. H. Parliament; Secretary-
Treasurer, C. E. Harrett, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association.'—
President, G. C. Lunn; Secretary, A. E. Arnold,
425 Carrall Street, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 676.—President,
G. Coleman; Business Agent, F. W. Mills, 535
Homer Street, Vancouver.
Blacksmiths' & Helpers' Union of Canada, No. 1.
—President, R. Fleming; Secretary-Treasurer,
William Betts, 2358 Fifth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 151.—President,
William J. Barllett; Secretary-Treasurer, Albert Arman, 2048 Second Avenue West, Vancouver.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
105.—President, Frank Roberts; Secretary,
Thomas Carroll, 1336 Twentieth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Brewery Workmen of America, International
Union of United, No. 300.—President, M.
Bushel; Recording-Secretary, Ed. Sims, 5392
Clarendon Street, Vancouver.
Bricklayers' and Masons' International Union,
No. 1.—President, A. Dickie; Secretary, S. Padgett, 2066 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural, and Ornamental-iron Workers'
Union, International Association of, No. 97.—
President, R. Morrison; Business Agent, E. G.
Cook, 531 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural, and Ornamental-iron Workers'
Union, International Association of, No. 661.—
President, R. Tigg; Business Agent, E. G. Cook,
531 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Building and Construction Workers of Canada,
Amalgamated, No. 1.—President, N. MacLean;
Secretary-Treasurer, F. J. Barratt, 163 Hastings
Street West, Vancouver.
Building and Construction Workers of Canada,
Amalgamated, No. 2.—President, L. H. Kelly;
Secretary-Treasurer and Business Agent, T.
Wilson,  163  Hastings  Street  West,  Vancouver.
Building Material, Construction, and Fuel Truck
Drivers' Union, No. 213.—President, Winston S.
Churchill; Secretary, Custer S. Solem, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver. H 116
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Building Service Employees' International Union,
No. 244.—President, W. R. Bradbury; Secretary, Miss Ada Easley, 434 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 452.—President, George Ben-
gough; Secretary, H. P. Hamilton, 310, 529
Beatty  Street,  Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2346 (Shinglers).—President,
J. C. Atherton; Recording Secretary, J. A. Gilde-
meester, 529-531 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2968.—President, A. A. Taylor;
Recording Secretary, George Lawson, 1957 Third
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Cemco Employees' Association, No. 72.—President,
Walter Perry; Secretary, Bernice Dowsett, 22
Fifth  Avenue  East,  Vancouver.
Cement Finishers' Section, International Hod
Carriers', Building and Common Labourers'
Union, No. 602.—President, 0. Anderson; Secretary, W. James, Room 309, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
Checkers' and Weighers' Association, Marine.—
President, W. Wright; Secretary-Treasurer, S.
Earp, 1410 Dominion Bank Building, 207 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
City Hall Employees' Association, Vancouver, No.
15.—President, James Robison; Secretary, T.
Lewis, 434  Pender  Street West, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Association, North Vancouver.
—President, A. C. Dimock; Secretary, J. W.
Henderson, 439 Seventh Street East, North
Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Federal Labour Union, No. 28.
—President, John McRitchie; Secretary-Treasurer and Business Agent, James Buchanan, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, A. L. Nicholas; Secretary, Harold Baker,
434 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Clerks' and Warehousemen's Union, No. 10, Building and Construction Workers of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, Ewen MacLeod; Secretary-Treasurer, D. J. Davis, 163 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Communications Union, Canadian, Pacific Branch
No. 5.—President, J. Howard; Secretary, A. H.
Miller, Vancouver Airport, Vancouver Air Mail
Field.
Distillery Workers' Federal Union, Vancouver,
No. 231.—President, W. Shearer; Secretary-
Treasurer, George Guy, 545 Forty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Divers' and Tenders' Union, Submarine.—President, L. T. Shorter; Secretary-Treasurer, J. N.
Smith, 414 Third Street East, North Vancouver.
Electrical Workers, Amalgamated, No. 3.—President, J. H. Myers; Business Agent, Robert
Adair, Room 20, 163 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. B 213.—President, W. Fraser; Business
Manager, J. N. Ross, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Elevator Constructors, International Union of,
No. 82.—President, R. Purdie; Recording Secretary, H. C. MacKichan, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
Embalmers & Undertakers Assistants' Union,
No. 23374.—President, William Scott; Secretary, J. A. Dougall, 1334 Nicola Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 320.—
President, C. J. Greer; Secretary-Treasurer,
W. J.  Hill,  6438 Victoria Drive, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 907.—
Chief Engineer, C. Glibbery; Secretary-Treasurer, F. J. Allen, 1720 Graveley Street, Vancouver.
Engineers of Canada, National Association of
Marine, No. 7.—President, R. W. Pyne; Business Agent, D. L. Heard, 319 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
115.—President, D. Hodges; Secretary, Allan
Scott, 217, 193 Hastings Street East, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
882.—President, J. Holliday; Secretary, W. A.
Gillespie, 216, 193 Hastings Street East, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
963.—President, A. W. Davie; Recording Secretary, L. A. Roach, 2932 Sophia Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, National Union of Operating, No. 16.
—President, E. M. Strachan; Secretary-Treasurer, J. C. Barrett, 35, 163 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 15.—
President, Jack Henderson; Recording Secretary, Miss Sylvia R. Glen, c/o Canadian Pacific
Express  Co., Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees, No. B-71.—President,
W. R. McArthur; Secretary-Treasurer, C. W.
Backus, Film Exchange Building, Davie and
Burrard  Streets,  Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, City, No. 1.—President, H. S.
Bird; Secretary-Treasurer, C. H. Hagman, 1638
First Avenue East, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, City, No. 3.—President,
W. G. Miller; Secretary-Treasurer, T. Cum-
ming, Thirteenth and St. George Avenues, North
Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, Vancouver, No. S-18.—President, H. Liddle; Acting-Secretary, Charles A.
Watson, 935 Twentieth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 656.—President, A. R. Carrall;
Secretary, H. O. Tooke, I.O.O.F. Hall, Pender
and Hamilton Streets, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 939.—President, C. Simons; Recording Secretary, J. Livingstone, 4, 1024 Clark
Drive,  Vancouver.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 289.—President, P. Dunphy; Secretary,
W. R. Chapman, 1165 Beach Avenue, Vancouver.
First-aid Attendants' Association of B.C., Industrial.—President, J. Paynter; Secretary, H. W.
Mahler,  603  Hastings  Street West, Vancouver.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United.—
President, G. Miller; Secretary-Treasurer, William Rigby, 138 Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 190.—>
President, Phoebe M. Pescod; Secretary, W. W.
Shaw, 3435 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 117
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 232.—
President, Harry Osovosky; Secretary, Mrs.
Dora Turner, 361 Water Street, Vancouver.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies',
No. 276.—President, H. Appleton; Secretary,
Colin Carr, 119 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Glaziers' and Glass Workers' Union, No. 1527.—
President, L. F. Carr; Secretary-Treasurer,
J.  H.  Swales, 531  Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Glove Workers' Union, Vancouver, No. 104.—
President, H. Henriekson; Secretary, Miss
Dorothy Halsall, 2834 Georgia Street East,
Vancouver.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, C. N. Cook; Secretary, Miss
J. A. Bruce, Vancouver.
Granite Cutters' International Union.—President,
A. S. Simpson; Secretary-Treasurer, Alexander
Fordyce, 20 Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Grocery and Food Clerks' Union, Retail, No. 1518.
—President, Jack Laffling; Secretary, George
Johnston, 406 Province Building, Vancouver.
Harbour Employees' Association, Vancouver.—
President, James D. Kennedy; Secretary, C.
Hampton, foot of Dunlevy Street, Vancouver.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers'
Union, International, No. 602.—President, Seth
Burnley; Business Agent, W. James, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Hospital Employees' Federal Union, No. 180.—
President, Alexander Paterson; Secretary-
Treasurer, Paul C. Hurley, 434 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, No. 28.
—President, Mrs. E. Watts; Business Agent,
Mrs. May Ansell, 304, 413 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
Jewelry Workers' Union, International, No. 42.—
President, W. George Lewis; Secretary, W. L.
Routley,  304,  413  Granville  Street,  Vancouver.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire, and
Metal, No. 207.—President, W. G. Morris; Secretary, T. R. Crane, 222 Sixth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 12.
—President, G. Stewart; Secretary-Treasurer,
John Cass, 426 Seventeenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Library Staff Association, Vancouver Public.—
President, Miss V. Johnston; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Morley, Main and Hastings
Streets, Vancouver.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, No. 44.
—President, Frank Phipps; Secretary, Charles
Hewitt, 2832 Broadway East, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 501.—President, J. Boyes; Secretary-Treasurer, R. H. Clewley, 45 Dunlevy
Avenue, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
163.—President, H. Cunningham; Secretary-
Treasurer, James Darwood, 45 Dunlevy Avenue,
Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 182.
—President, A. B. Ward; Recording Secretary,
J. Bygate, 1784 Seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 692.
—President, J. A. McCarthy; Business Agent,
R. Osman, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Mailers' Union, Vancouver, No. 70.—President,
Cecil G. Stubbs; Secretary-Treasurer, R. Gordon Taylor, 1176 Duchess Avenue, Hollyburn
P.O., West Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 167.—Secretary, P. J. Doyle, 3631 Trafalgar Street, Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 210.—Secretary, R. Halliday, 3383 Pender
Street East, Vancouver.
Malkin, W. H., Co., Ltd., Warehousemen's and
Truck Drivers' Association.—President, F. H.
Calhoun; Secretary-Treasurer, William Doig,
57 Water  Street, Vancouver.
Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial
Union, No. 1.—President, W. L. White; Secretary-Treasurer, C. W. Caron, 339 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
Marshall-Wells Employees' Association.—President, William A. Griggs; Secretary, Miss Jean
L. McDonald, 573 Carrall Street, Vancouver.
Meat Employees' Federal Union, Retail, No. 222.
—President, James Long; Secretary, George
Johnston, 406 Province Building, Vancouver.
Merchant Service Guild, Inc., Canadian.—President, Capt. J. S. Dennis; Secretary, G. F.
Bullock,  675  Dunsmuir  Street,  Vancouver.
Metal and Chemical Workers' Union, Vancouver
District, No. 289.—President, J. T. McDonald;
Secretary-Treasurer, C. G. Woods, 717 Holden
Building, Vancouver.
Milk Wagon Drivers' and Dairy Employees'
Union, No. 464.—President, R. McCulIoch; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Municipal Employees' Association, West Vancouver.—President, T. J. Elliott; Secretary, H. T.
Thomas, 1451  Bellevue Avenue, Hollyburn.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 145.—
President, W. Pilling; Secretary, E. A. Jamie-
son, 51, 553 Granville Street, Vancouver.
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Ltd., Employees'
Association.—President, K. H. Burnet; Secretary, Frank Taylor, 99 Cordova Street East,
Vancouver.
National Biscuit and Confection Co., Ltd., Employees' Committee of.—Chairman, L. J. Ganet;
Secretary, Miss Doris Holden, 1706 First Avenue West, Vancouver.
*Native Brotherhood of British Columbia.—
President, William D. Scow; General Secretary,
Herbert Cook, Alert Bay.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, No. 1.—President,
Fraser Wilson; Secretary, Miss Simma Milner,
1405,  500  Beatty  Street, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, No. 2.—President,
Barry Mather; Secretary, Jean M. King, 426
Homer Street, Vancouver.
Office Employees' International Union, No. 15.—
President, Mrs. McKenna; Secretary, Miss W.
Williams, 2123 First Avenue West, Vancouver.
Office and Professional Workers of America,
United, No. 173.—President, John E. Dedrick;
Secretary, C. Goldstein, 925 Cardero Street,
Vancouver.
* Approximately sixty-seven branches in British
Columbia. H 118
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Office and Professional Workers' Organizing Committee, No. 8.—President, T. Simington; Secretary, Mrs. M. Bradley, 905 Dominion Bank
Building, Vancouver.
Oil Workers' Union, United, No. 1.—President,
Alexander McKenzie; Secretary, G. C. Smith,
501, 736 Granville  Street, Vancouver.
Oil Workers of Canada, United, No. 2.—President, Alexander McLeod; Secretary, Arthur
Warren, 501  Vancouver  Block, Vancouver.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
162.—President, H. Jowett; Secretary, R. C.
Smith,  1285 Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
180.—President, A. McWhinnie; Secretary,
Hugh Clark, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
249.—President, James Bury; Secretary, M. F.
Dean, 2668 Dundas Street, Vancouver.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
283.—President, George Home; Secretary, May
Harvey, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
341.—President, Paul Johnson; Secretary,
Grace White, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of
America, Brotherhood of, No. 138.—President,
Bruce Mitchell; Secretary, W. E. Eaton, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
528.—President, Norman Reid; Recording Secretary, Ronald C. Sallis, National Paper Box
Co., Ltd.,  160  Third Avenue  West,  Vancouver.
Photo-engravers' Union, Vancouver, No. 54.—
President, William Wilson; Secretary, Ralph
H. Grantham, 3941, Eleventh Avenue West,
'Vancouver.
Pile Drivers', Bridge, Wharf, and Dock Builders'
Union, No. 2404.—President, C. Anderson; Secretary, S. C. Allan, 193 Hastings Street East,
Vancouver.
Plasterers and Cement Finishers, Operative, No.
779.—President, A. Hurry; Secretary-Treasurer, H. West, 3419 Twenty-third Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Plastic Workers' Union, Industrial, No. 1.—President, Larry Bruin; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs.
J. Cunningham, 501 Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association of,
No. 170.—President, J. Dillabough; Business
Agent, F. Carlisle, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Police Federal Association, Vancouver, No. 12.—
President F. Dougherty; Secretary-Treasurer,
T. Collishaw, 236 Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Vancouver, No. 69.—President, Max Erenberg;
Secretary-Treasurer, Thomas S. Ezart, 1807
Thirty-eighth Avenue  East, Vancouver.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 433, Vancouver
Converters.—President, F. McDermott; Secretary, Mrs. Agnes Nickel, c/o Pacific Mills, Ltd.,
foot of Campbell Avenue, Vancouver.
Railroad   Trainmen,   Brotherhood   of,   No.   144.—
. President, William Pennington; Secretary, E. S.
West, 4197 Eleventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 987.—
President, E. F. Marsden; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. Peladeau, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, No. 58.—President, Robert Learmond; Secretary, Samuel S.
Shearer,  7641  Osier  Street, Vancouver.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 267.—President, I. W. Smith; Secretary, J. B. Physick,
4153  Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 59.
—President, J. S. Jones; Secretary, J. W.
Hardy, 955 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 82.
—President, H. H. Prior; Secretary, H. R.
Morrison,  Room 23,  Scott Block, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 220.
—President, James Finlay; Secretary, L. C.
Crossley, 1431 Seventy-first Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 221.
—President, Percival Jones; Secretary, L. J. D.
Villeneuve, 6861 Aubrey Street, Lockdale P.O.,
Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 223.
—President, C. A. Furman; Secretary, J. Cold-
well, 4851  Fairmont  Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 275.
—President, L. Lineham; Secretary, A. Cyr,
2829 Woodland Drive, Vancouver.       •
Railway Mail Clerks' Association, Vancouver.—
President, S. C. Bate; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. H. Menzies, 3772 Twenty-third Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 74.—
General Secretary, D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue
Building, Winnipeg.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 46.—President, William J. Smith; Secretary-Treasurer, D. E. Horner, 2556 Sixteenth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 626.—President, G. H. Stubbs; Secretary, C. F. Mosher, 723 Eleventh Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, Pacific Lodge No. 630.—President, Arthur
Gordon; Secretary-Treasurer, W. J. Mason,
3116 Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Refrigeration Workers' Union, No. 516.—President, Allan M. Campbell; Secretary, Lionel R.
Wintle,  137 Fortieth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Retail Clerks' Union, No. 279.—President, George
A. Wilkinson; Secretary-Treasurer, George
Johnston, 406 Province Building, Vancouver.
Retail Employees' Association, Vancouver, No. 1.
—President, R. M. Stevenson; Secretary, T.
McGowan, 3567 Dunbar Street, Vancouver.
St. Paul's Hospital Employees' Club.—President,
John S. Johnston; Secretary, Miss M. Fal-
asconi, 1081, Burrard Street, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 119
Seafarers' Association, Canadian.—President, H. H.
Taylor; Secretary, G. Smillie, 405 Powell
Street, Vancouver.
Seafarers' International Union of North America.
—President, Harry Lundeberg; Secretary-
Treasurer, Hugh Murphy, 144 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Seamen's Union, Canadian, No. 7.—President,
J. M. Smith; Secretary, Harry Sipes, 517 Holden
Building, Vancouver.
Sewerage and Drainage Board Employees' Union,
Greater Vancouver Water District and Joint.—
President, Peter D. Stewart; Secretary, J. M.
Morrison, 1303 Sun Building, Vancouver.
Sheet-metal Workers' International Association,
No. 280.—President, F. Cocker; Secretary, J.
Laurence, 529 Beatty  Street, Vancouver.
Shingle Weavers' Union, No. 2802.—President,
Vernon C. Larson; Recording Secretary, Alexander Low, 1184 Seventy-third Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Shoe-workers' Union, Western, No. 1.—President,
John Turner; Secretary-Treasurer, George D.
Clerihew, 2918 Twenty-fourth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Sign and Pictorial Painters' Union, No. 726.—
President, A. Collins; Secretary, William 0.
Clarkson, Labour Temple, Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Slade, A. P., Ltd., and Associated Companies Employees' Association.—President, W. Scott; Secretary, Miss Marguerite Cooper, 147 Water
Street,  Vancouver.
Spear & Jackson's Employees' Club.—President,
Matthew Wilson; Secretary-Treasurer, D. R.
Alexander, Granville Island, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2655.—
President, A. Port; Secretary, A. Kraus, 905
Dominion  Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2765.—
President, Cy Kemp; Secretary, A. McFarlane,
905 Dominion  Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2821.—
President, M. Lukas; Secretary, G. C. Emary,
905  Dominion  Bank Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2951.—
President, D. Hinton; Secretary, R. Anderson,
905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2952.—
President, B. Loudon; Secretary, N. Pearce,
905  Dominion  Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3229.—
President, F. Rowland; Secretary, E. Darcey,
905  Dominion  Bank  Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3253.—
President, E. H. Lee; Secretary, S. Nelson, 905
Dominion   Bank   Building,   Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3254.—
President, A. E. Page; Secretary, E. VanDaele,
905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3302.—
President, A. Kemp; Secretary, E. Whyte, 905
Dominion   Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3376.—
President, D. Hardy; Secretary, R. Strand, 905
Dominion  Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3435.—
President, A. Brandt; Secretary, W. Robertson,
905 Dominion  Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3452.—
President, S. Lindahl; Secretary, T. Symons,
905  Dominion  Bank Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3495.—
President, M. Gavrilik; Secretary, W. Symington, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3546.—
President, E. M. Orr; Secretary, Dan Harris,
905 Dominion  Bank  Building, Vancouver.
Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union, International, No. 88.—President, R. N. Myles; Secretary-Treasurer, E. Preston, 5507 Elm Street,
Vancouver.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, Division No. 101.—President, James Hark-
ness; Business Agent, G. M. Morrison, 307, 175
Broadway East, Vancouver.
Sugar Workers, Industrial Union of, No. 1.—
President, William Kilpatrick; Secretary-Treasurer, O. F. Plumbley, 7790 French Street, Vancouver.
Switchmen's Union of North America, No. 111.—
President, A. B. Kerr; Secretary, A. S. Crosson,
3925  Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Tailors' Union of America, Journeymen, No. 178.
—President, Harry Clausner; Recording Secretary, Marion E. MacDonald, 2549 York Street,
Vancouver.
Taxicab, Stage, and Bus Drivers' Union, No. 151.
—President, C. E. Youngs; Business Agent,
C. A. Gower, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
*Teachers'  Federation,  B.C.—President,  Bernard
C. Gillie;   Secretary, C. D. Ovans, 1300 Robson
Street, Vancouver.
Telegraphers' Union, Commercial.—Chairman, I. R.
Burns; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Phyllis M.
Cline, 428 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of.—Acting-President, Eric Mallett; Secretary, R. M.
Smith, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), No. 1.—President, T. Reilly; Secretary, C. W. Mellish, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No. 10.
—President, Miss F. Allen; Secretary, Mrs. Edna
Robinson, 307, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, No. 14.
—President, Miss M. Beattie; Secretary, Miss
Lorena Asher, 307, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Textile Workers' Federal Union, Vancouver, No.
12.—President, Mrs. Betty Hayman; Secretary,
Norman W. Scott, 78 Second Avenue East, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees of United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, No. 118.—
President, Gordon Martin; Recording Secretary, W. Blake, P.O. Box 711, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving-picture
Machine Operators of the United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, No. 348.—
President, J. H. Leslie; Secretary, G. E. Thrift,
P.O. Box 345, Vancouver.
Tile, Marble, and Terraza Helpers' Union, No. 78.
—President, Bert Pollack;   Secretary-Treasurer,
D. F. Snow, 802 Richards Street, Vancouver.
Tile   Setters'   Union,   B.C.,   No.   3.—President,   R.
Neville;   Recording Secretary, W. Richards, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver.
* There are sixty-two branches of the Federation in British Columbia. H 120
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Truck Drivers' and Helpers' Union, General, No.
31.—President, W. E. Groome; Secretary, R. D.
Atkinson, 529  Beatty  Street, Vancouver.
Trunk and Bag Industrial Union, Vancouver, No.
1.—President, M. Shaldrake; Secretary, Elias
Underwood, 1436 McLean Drive, Vancouver.
Typographical Union, Vancouver, No. 226.—President, R. Gouthro; Secretary, R. H. Neelands,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
University of British Columbia Federal Employees' Union, No. 116.—President, M. A. McCoy; Secretary, A. C. Hill, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
Welders', Cutters', and Helpers' Union, United,
No. 1.—President, D. M. Rea; Secretary-Treasurer, Paul Seifner, 115, 445 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
Woodworkers' Union, B.C., No. 2.—President,
Nat. Sadler; Business Agent, Charles E. Rough-
sedge, 501 Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-71.
—President, J. McCuish; Secretary, E. Dalskog,
204 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-217.
President, Don Watts; Financial Secretary,
Mrs. G. Shunaman, 409 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Vanderhoof.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1870.—President, F. Galati; Secretary, J.
Wall,   MeCall  via   Vanderhoof.
Vernon.
Civic Employees' Union, Vernon, No. 1.—President, J. R. Stroud; Secretary-Treasurer, H. J.
Haines, Box 1381, Vernon.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 6.—
President, Maurice E. Graham; Secretary, J. E.
Gray, Box 1189, Vernon.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Harry Evans; Secretary, Miss
L.  E. Mona  Pearson, Vernon.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Mechanics' and Associated Workers' Union, Interior General, No. 1.—President, A. E. Matten-
ley;   Recording Secretary, W. Deeks, Vernon.
Okanagan Telephone Plant Employees' Association.—President, A. B. Edwards; Secretary-
Treasurer, George B. Carter, Vernon.
Telephone Operators' Union, Interior B.C., No. 1.
—President, Mrs. E. Tebo; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss N. Forbes, Box 1474, Vernon.
Typographical Union, Vernon, No. 541.—President, E. N. Lockwood; Secretary-Treasurer,
W. B. Hilliard, Box 272, Penticton.
Victoria.
Automotive Maintenance Workers' Federal Union,
No. 151.—President, F. Nelson; Secretary-
Treasurer, W- J- Frampton, 602 Broughton
Street,   Victoria.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers, International
Union of America, No. 267.—President, J. H.
Gard; Secretary-Treasurer, Sven V. Jensen,
60  View Royal Avenue,  Victoria.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189.—President,
A. Wylie; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty
Street,   Vancouver.
Barbers' Union, Canadian, No. 2.—President, W. D.
Taylor; Secretary-Treasurer, Shirley Temple,
604 Trounce Arcade, Victoria.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, No. 372.—President,
George A. Turner; Secretary-Treasurer, James
A.  Green, 1319 Douglas  Street, Victoria.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association.—
President, W. E. Holland; Secretary, Miss
M. D. MacNeill,  1016 Langley  Street, Victoria.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union of
Canada, No. 2.—President, F. E. Cardwell;
Secretary-Treasurer, A. Clyde, 902 Government
Street, Victoria.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
147.—President, Roy Barnes; Secretary-Treasurer, J. A. Wiley, 141 Clarence Street, Victoria.
Brewery and Soft Drink Workers of America,
International Union of United, No, 280.—
President, J. H. Allan; Secretary-Treasurer,
W. Bryan, 2642 Scott Street, Victoria.
Bricklayers, Masons, and Plasterers, International
Union of, No. 2.—President, D. Mertton; Secretary-Treasurer, J. Beckerley, R.R. 3, McKen-
zie  Avenue,  Victoria.
Building and Construction Workers of Canada,
Amalgamated, No. 9.—President, Thomas Vick-
ers; Secretary, George Williams, 3319 Cook
Street,  Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1598.—President, R. Hill;
Secretary, Alex Sims, 602 Broughton Street,
Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 2415.—President, Sidney
Burrow; Financial Secretary, E. Hovey, 2511
Empire Street, Victoria.
Chemical and Explosive Workers' Industrial Federal Union, Canadian, No. 128.—President,
Robert Barrie; Secretary, H. S. Rowland, 1214
Palmer Road, Victoria.
City Hall Employees' Association, Victoria.—
President, Kenneth Reid; Secretary, Miss
Katherine   Rowe,   City   Hall,   Victoria.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, No. 50.
—President, W. H. Spence; Secretary, R. Betts,
2858 Shakespeare Street, Victoria.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, L. Fieldhouse; Secretary, G. K. Beeston,
314 Post  Office Building, Victoria.
Construction and General Labourers' Union, No.
1093.—President, E. W. G. Butt; Secretary,
William James Nelson, 602 Broughton Street,
Victoria.
Defence Civilian Workers' Union, National, No.
129.—President, T. Bryant; Secretary-Treasurer, O. Jowett, 489 Garbally Road, Victoria.
Dockyard and Shipyard Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President K. L. Peaker; Secretary, G. Garlick,
1116 Broad Street, Victoria.
Drivers' Division, No. 234, Vancouver Island.—
President, R. Jones; Secretary-Treasurer, J. S.
Ready, 4,  1116  Broad Street, Victoria.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 230.—President, A. S. Bevan; Secretary
and Business Manager, F. J. Bevis, 602
Broughton  Street,  Victoria.
Engineers of Canada, Inc., National Association
of Marine, No. 6.—President, A. Logie; Secretary, G. W. Brown, 402 Union Building, 612
View  Street, Victoria. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 121
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20.—
President, H. Wilkinson; Secretary-Treasurer,
F.  E. Dutot, 2176 Pentland Road, Victoria.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No.
730.—President, J. F. Abbott; Secretary-Treasurer, Thomas Crabbe, No. 1 Fire Hall, Victoria.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 690.—President, E. W. Collins;
Recording Secretary, G. H. Stewart, 716 Craig-
flower Road, Victoria.
Garage Employees, Association of Vancouver
Island Coach Lines.—President, H. Woodford;
Secretary, W. McAdams, 633 Courtney Street,
Victoria.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, A. Smith; Secretary, Miss K.
Wilson,   Victoria.
Government Employees, American Federation of,
No. 59.—President, Thomas F. Monaghan, 205
Campbell  Building,  Victoria;    no  secretary.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance, No. 459.—President, Miss M. White;
Secretary, Mrs. Emily Aitken, 602 Broughton
Street, Victoria.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-Treasurer, R. R. Kinnison, 367 Water Street, Vancouver.
Lathers' Association, Vancouver Island.—President, E. C. Day; Secretary, A. J. Ferguson,
2500  Blackwood  Street,  Victoria.
Laundry Workers' Union, No. 1.—President, J. H.
Beirnes; Secretary-Treasurer, H. R. Braden,
1050  Oliphant  Street,  Victoria.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 11.
^President, H. W. Rivers; Secretary, Fred C.
Hurry, 898 Front Street, Victoria.
Library Staff Association, Victoria Public, No. 9.
—President, Miss I. Pike; Secretary and
Library Assistant, Miss Joy Kirchner, 764
Yates Street, Victoria.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
38/162.—President, G. C. Richards; Secretary,
W. N. Scott, 602 Broughton Street, Victoria.
Machinists, Fitters, and Helpers, National Union
of, No. 2.—President, Howard V. Yerex; Secretary, John Cornthwaite, 902 Government
Street, Victoria.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 456.
—President, H. E. Thayer; Secretary, C. H.
Lester,  Room  3,  Labour  Hall,  Victoria.
Mailers' Union, Victoria, No. 121.—President,
Andrew Veitch; Secretary-Treasurer, F. W. E.
Gregory,  2530   Central  Avenue,   Victoria.
Moulders and Foundry Workers, International,
No. 144.—President, Roy Cain; Secretary, Sam
Emery, 864 Old Esquimalt Road, Victoria.
Municipal Employees' Association, Saanich, No. 5.
—President, Roy Wootten; Secretary, Miss
Frances Tatham, Royal Oak P.O.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 247.—
President, Charles Hunt; Secretary, William
F. Tickle, Trades and Labour Hall, Broughton
Street, Victoria.
Newspaper Guild Federal Union, Victoria, No.
219.—President, L. M. Sallaway; Secretary,
Miss K. Mclntyre, 602 Broughton Street,
Victoria.
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers of
America, Brotherhood of, No. 1163.—President,
F. Dewhurst; Recording Secretary, W. Brigden,
Labour Hall, 602 Broughton Street, Victoria.
Pantorium Employees' Association. — President,
Henry Reimer; Secretary, Miss Mona Davies,
117 St. Lawrence  Street, Victoria.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
367.—President, J. Newbigging; Secretary, J.
Moonen, 1461 Ocean View Road, Victoria.
Plumbers and Steamfitters of United States and
Canada, United Association of Journeymen, No.
324.—President, James C. Woodend; Secretary,
George Pyper, 602 Broughton  Street, Victoria.
Police Mutual Benefit Association, Victoria. —
•President, Henry Jarvis; Secretary, Stanley T.
Holmes, 625 Fisgard  Street, Victoria.
Postal Employees, Canadian. — President, W.
Craigmyle; Secretary-Treasurer, John H. Hedley, 1166 Chapman Street, Victoria.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of
North America, Victoria, No. 79.—President, F.
Elliott; Secretary, F. H. Larssen, 1236 McKen-
zie Street, Victoria.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 613.—
President, H. C. Horner; Secretary, J.A.Stone,
1320  Burleith Drive, Victoria.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
50.—President, A. Lorandini; Recording Secretary, H. Greaves, 638 Victoria Avenue, Victoria.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 289.—President, James W. Thomson; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. N. Forde, 707 Wilson Street, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 222.
—President, G. L. Woollett; Secretary, C. Irwin, c/o C.N.R., Point Ellice, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 276.
—President, Oliver Day; Secretary, Harold
Ogden, R.M.D. 3, Box 1769, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 526.—President, Alan R. Davie; Secretary-Treasurer, Henry S. Hughes, 1022 Chamberlain Street, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1137.—President, F. X. O'Neill; Recording Secretary, R. T. Moore, 579 Marifield Avenue, Victoria.
School Board Employees' Association, Victoria.—
President, Leonard Clarke; Secretary-Treasurer, Robert W. Todd, 1449 Grant Street, Victoria.
Sheet-metal Workers' International Association,
No. 267.—President, A. J. Stevenson; Financial
Secretary, F. W. Shaw, Labour Hall, 602
Broughton  Street,  Victoria.
Shipyard Riggers, Benchmen, and Helpers, No.
643.—President, William McLaughlin; Secretary, A. W. Sage, 602 Broughton Street, Victoria.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, Division 109.—President, Fred Davison;
Recording Secretary, W. Turner, corner Broad
and Yates Streets, Victoria.
Sweeney Cooperage Employees' Association.—
President, William Mitchell; Secretary, W. G.
Hipwood, c/o Sweeney's Cooperage, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Clerical Division), No. 21.—President, O. C. Jones;
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss B. E. Hoffmeister,
611, 1405 Douglas Street, Victoria. H 122
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of  (Plant
Division),   No.   1.—President,   L.   M.   Butler;
Secretary, Miss T. E. Harris, 611 Bank of Toronto Building, Douglas Street, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C. Federation of (Traffic
Division), No. 11.—President, Miss Kay Good-
all; Secretary, Miss Kay Slack, 611 Toronto
Building,  Victoria.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving-picture
Machine Operators, International Alliance of,
No. 168.—President, Stanley H. McKay; Acting-Secretary, Stanley Barwick, P.O. Box 524,
Victoria.
Typographical Union, Victoria, No. 201.—President, V. J. Baines; Secretary-Treasurer, H.
Warren, 311 Jones Building, Victoria.
Woodworkers of America, International,. No.
1-118.—President, T. R. Lidgate; Business
Agent, John Wainscott, 24, 1116 Broad Street,
Victoria.
Wells.
Miners' Union, Wells, No. 685.—President, F. J.
O'Neill; Recording Secretary, Frank Hennessey, P.O. Box 45, Wells.
White Rock.
Fibre Flax Workers' Union, No. 1.—President,
Harry Maxfield; Secretary, Dan Lawson, R.R. 1,
White Rock.
Woodfibre.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 494.—President,
S. G. Green; Recording-Secretary, A. S.
Knowles, Jr., Woodfibre.
Zeballos.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Zeballos District,
No. 851.—President, William Cutts; Financial
Secretary, Barney McGuire, Privateer Mine,
Zeballos.
Organizations of Employers.
Calgary.
Bituminous Coal Operators' Association, The
Western Canada.—President, J. A. Brusset;
Secretary-Treasurer, C. Stubbs, 516, 520 Loug-
heed Building, Calgary, Alta.
Kelowna.
Shippers' Association, Okanagan Federated.—
President, F. L. Fitzpatrick; Secretary, L. R.
Stephens, c/o Okanagan Federated Shippers'
Association,  221  Bernard Avenue,  Kelowna.
Nanaimo. .
Truck Loggers' Association, B.C.—President, 0. A.
Buck; Secretary, F. H. Adames, 21 Bastion
Street,   Nanaimo.
Penticton.
Co-operative Growers, Penticton.—President, John
Coe; Secretary-Treasurer, D. G. Penny, Lake-
shore  Drive,  Penticton.
Prince  George.
Lumbermen's Association, Northern Interior.—
Chairman, C. T. Clare; Secretary, W. E.
Kirschke, Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association, Canadian
Halibut.—President, Barney Roald; Secretary,
Ole Stegavig, Box 1025, Station B, Prince
Rupert.
Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, B.C.—President, B. M. Col-
well; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, Master.—President, B. M.
Colwell; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Box Manufacturers' Section, Interior (C.M.A.).—-
Chairman, J. G. Strother; Secretary, Hugh
Dalton, 608 Marine Building, Vancouver.
Euilding and Construction Industries Exchange.
—President, J. G. Bennett; Secretary, R. J.
Lecky,  342 Pender  Street West, Vancouver.
Contractors' Association, General. — President,
H. H. Johnson; Secretary, R. J. Lecky, 342
Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Electrical Association, Vancouver.—President, R.
Beaumont; Secretary, J. S. Homersham, 1358
Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of B.C.—■
President, James Fiddler; Secretary, H. A.
Christenson, 2705 Fourth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Hotels' Association, British Columbia.—President,
A. Paterson; Secretary, J. J. Kahn, 626 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Industrial Association of B.C.—President, W. L.
Macken; Secretary, Miss M. M.' Riley, 1024
Marine  Building,  Vancouver.
Jewellers' Association, Canadian (B.C. Section).
—President, J. A. Porterfield; Secretary-Treasurer, A. Fraser Reid, 1635 Napier Street, Vancouver.
Laundry, Dry Cleaning, and Linen Supply Club,
Vancouver.—President, W. R. Morrow; Secretary-Treasurer, A. R. Bernard, 910 Richards
Street, Vancouver.
Loggers' Association, Inc.—The British Columbia.
—Chairman, H. S. Irwin; Secretary, J. Burke,
1518, 510 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, Interior
(C.M.A.).—Chairman, O. S. Harris; Secretary,
Hugh Dalton, 608 Marine Building, Vancouver.
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association,
B-C—President, F. A. E. Manning; Secretary,
T. H. Wilkinson, 718 Metropolitan Building,
Vancouver.
Metal Trades Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association.—President, R. G. Smith; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 608 Marine Building, Vancouver.
Milk Producers' Association, Fraser Valley.—
President, W. L. Macken; Secretary, J. J.
Brown, 425 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Milk Producers' Association, Vancouver.—President, D. F. Farris; Secretary, F. A. Wilson,
199 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Morticians, B.C. Society of.—President, J. M.
Mclntyre; Secretary, F. J. Harding, 2216 Fifteenth  Avenue  West,  Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945
H 123
Motor Carriers' Association of B.C.—President,
Norman Usher; Secretary, G. L. Buckman, 914,
207 Hastings  Street West, Vancouver.
Plastering and Lathing Contractors' Association,
Greater Vancouver.—President, W. T. Handy;
Secretary-Treasurer, George A. Skinner, 4865
Fairmont  Street, Vancouver.
Printers' and Stationers' Guild of B.C.—Chairman, C. E. Phillips; Secretary, Audrey Parkinson, 608, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Red Cedar Shingle Association of B.C., Consolidated.—President, W. H. McLallen; Secretary,
G. S. Raphael, 509 Metropolitan Building, 837
Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Restaurant Association, Canadian (B.C. Section).
—President, Nat. Bailey; Secretary, Mrs. F. G.
Montgomery, 809, 6 Adelaide Street, Toronto,
Ont.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.—
President, W. S. Charlton; Secretary, George
R. Matthews, 744 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Shipping Federation of British Columbia.—President, R. D. Williams; Secretary, D. M. Cameron, 45 Dunlevy Street, Vancouver.
Upholstered Furniture Manufacturers' Association, B.C.—President, Henry E. Tynan; Secretary-Treasurer, J. M. Richardson, 626 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Victoria.
Bakers' Association, Victoria Master.—President,
J. P. Land; Secretary, T. P. McConnell, 120
Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Beer Licensees Employers' Association.—President, A. Mawer; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs.
F. A. A. Newmarch, 891 Admirals Road, Esquimalt.
Builders' Exchange, Ltd., Victoria.—President,
V. L. Leigh; Secretary-Treasurer, W. J. Hamilton,  1712  Douglas  Street,  Victoria.
Electrical Association, Victoria (B.C.).—President, H. J. Langdon; Secretary-Treasurer, A. R.
Colby, 645 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Taxi Operators' Association of Greater Victoria.
—President, M. J. de La Mothe; Secretary-Treasurer, L. C. Wakeman, 722 View Street, Victoria. H 124 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., August 30th, 1946.
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection Branch for
the year 1945.
As a result of the victorious conclusion of the war, industries engaged in the
manufacture of products necessary only during the continuation of hostilities at first
curtailed their production, and previous to the close of the year had entirely ceased
production. Despite the unexpected sudden end of the war with Japan, industry generally was able to withstand this sudden termination without faltering.
While there was limited evidence of reconversion to the production of civilian
goods in plants tooled exclusively for war-time production, the transition period
required considerable planning, and of necessity took some time to perfect.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1945, 2,500 inspections and reinspections of factories were made.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
We can recall during the early days of Factory Inspection in this Province the
lack of interest shown, and in some instances evident resentment while carrying out
our duties relative to the prevention of industrial accidents. The employer, while
protecting himself by Employers' Liability Insurance, surely practised " Safety First"
from a monetary point of view as far as he personally was concerned. He gave little
thought to the safety of his employees, and all too frequently the employees were
maimed or lost their lives while serving industry. While considerable progress was
achieved in making a factory of those days a safer place in which to earn a livelihood,
our efforts were considerably handicapped because of this attitude.
The advent of Workmen's Compensation legislation was the contributing factor in
changing what seemed to be the prevalent opinion of those days that fatal and disabling
industrial accidents were the price of industry. To-day management of industry
generally, regardless of their classification, realize that accident-prevention measures
are necessary from a monetary as well as humanitarian point of view.
Volumes have been written expressing opinions as to the causes of industrial accidents, and varying opinions have also been given as to the most successful means of
prevention. Even though an organized effort has been made by management to guard
against all known hazards in their plants, managerial responsibility does not end there.
While of necessity they would have to delegate to their supervising officials (such as
the superintendent or foreman) a large share of the responsibility, we are of the opinion
that these officials in co-operation with the Safety Director, if one is employed, and the
Employees' Safety Committee are the key men in directing a successful accident-
prevention campaign.
The occasional visit of the Inspector will reveal only the defects in the safety
structure in evidence at a particular moment. While outside agencies may help to
promote the safety activities, only the men in the plant are in a position to find and
correct the variety of unsafe conditions which appear and reappear all the time. Adequate training for the job is a very important safety measure and is something every
employee has a right to expect. Without it he or she is not likely to become a safe or
efficient worker. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 125
In order to accomplish the aims of a safety programme employee interest must be
maintained. This is largely the responsibility of the supervisor and members of the
Employees' Safety Committee, whose duties require them to periodically inspect the
entire plant operations and suggest measures to eliminate occupational hazards. This
will require, at times, a certain amount of creative thought, which has in the past and
no doubt in the future will be found in the plant suggestion box.
During the war-production period, management of industry acted promptly and
favourably towards suggestions relative to the use of safety equipment. Never in the
history of this Department has there been such an acceptance of accident-prevention
devices as in the last five years, and it follows that never before have there been so
many safety devices which are required to be kept in place and maintained in good order.
FACTORY CONDITIONS.
As the worker's time is largely divided between his home and the factory, conditions in the factory as to cleanliness, lighting and heating, should, wherever practical,
bear a close relationship. Employees prefer to work in factories in which good
housekeeping prevails, and considerable advancement has been made in this respect.
Mechanical exhaust systems which remove injurious dusts and gases have not only
contributed to the employees' health but have also been a great factor in improving
factory housekeeping.
More attention is also being given to designating by means of brightly coloured
factory floor lines the areas which must at all times be left clear for free passage of
the material produced in the manufacturing industry. This is also a very important
accident-prevention measure as it eliminates the tripping hazard.
Because of a variety of reasons such as expansion and the difficulty experienced in
procuring premises to house new industries, we have been requested to view basement
premises in order to determine their suitability for industrial occupations. In every
instance the premises inspected would, if their occupancy were authorized, require such
an expenditure for artificial lighting, air-conditioning, and sanitary conveniences that
the employer would, in view of this expenditure, be inclined to occupy such premises
indefinitely. As it is not considered to be in the best interest of the employees' health
and welfare, requests of this nature were not favourably considered.
WOMEN IN INDUSTRY.
Returns submitted to this office reveal that with the coming of the peace there has
been a notable decline in the number of females who were, during the war years, on the
pay-roll of both light and heavy industry. This, of course, was to be expected. Plants
which were constructed and tooled for the exclusive production of instruments of war
have ceased operating entirely. A number of these plants were constructed for a
specific purpose, and because of their modern design it is to be hoped that it will be
found practical to have them adapted to the production of consumer commodities in
which women will again form a large part of the personnel. Whatever the future holds
for the women industrial workers of World War IL, whether it be in the home or
factory, they will have the satisfaction of knowing that they performed an excellent
job and contributed greatly to the successful conclusion of the war.
There are high-speed production machines in industry to-day manufacturing
various types of specialized commodities. These machines are being operated by
women; the nature of the work incidental to the operation of these machines is largely
repetitive and monotonous. While the production methods do not require any great
amount of physical exertion they do cause fatigue. Progressive management has come
to recognize this fact by the introduction of ten- to fifteen-minute rest periods, morning
and afternoon. In addition to this, in order to relieve the monotony, they rotate particularly their female employees in order to permit diversified occupational employment. H 126 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CHILD LABOUR.
Investigations made and interviews held with parents who requested us to authorize
a child's employment during the school term revealed at times that the child was the
victim of circumstances. This due to such as a prolonged illness which incapacitated
the bread-winner, and the child's earnings being urgently needed to augment the family
income. In considering requests of this nature, our decision was based largely upon
particulars which the Probation Officer had over a period of time verified and which
he communicated to us.
We also come in contact with the parent of a child who absents himself from school
and when in attendance will not apply himself. Instances such as these, while not
frequent, cause extreme disappointment to the parent involved who desires to have the
child acquire the education he or she has been denied. Inability to convince the child
that his best interests would be served by continuing at school usually results in the
parent requesting a school release to enable the child to procure some form of employment. Previous to consideration being given to this request by the school authorities,
investigation is made by this Department of the type and place of employment desired.
If considered suitable the school authorities are so notified, and following the issuance
of a release (from school) a permit is issued subject to the conditions as set forth in
the " Control of Employment of Children Act."
WELFARE.
If some of our industrial leaders of by-gone days (whose employees would, at the
end of a ten-hour working day, leave the plant covered with the waste products of
industry) could view to-day the transformation which their successors have effected by
the provision of sanitary conveniences of a very high standard—individual lockers,
shower-baths, dining-rooms, etc.—we wonder what their reaction would be. The
Department of Factory Inspection has, over the years, been instrumental in securing
these provisions for the employees. Each succeeding year has witnessed voluntary
(employer) improvement in this respect. It is now generally recognized that good
working conditions increase efficiency and do much to improve employer and employee
relations.
In conversation with management of diversified industry during the year under
review, we were informed that employee retirement plans had been completed and were
in effect. Others advised us that they are investigating retirement plans and hope to
have details completed and the plan in effect in the near future. This is a forward step
by industry and we feel it will be considered as such by the employees involved.
PASSENGER AND FREIGHT ELEVATORS.
Each succeeding year additional modern passenger and freight elevator equipment
is being installed throughout the Province. This is almost exclusively of the traction
type which has safety features not possessed by the drum type machine which they
replace.
All elevator installations are required to comply with the standards as specified in
the regulations governing the operation of elevators in this Province. It is one of the
responsibilities of this Department to periodically inspect this equipment in the interest
of the safety of the large number of persons using this form of conveyance.
While mechanical safety devices are provided in connection with the installation of
any elevator, these are effective only if properly maintained. Inspection reveals at
times that very important safety devices have been deliberately rendered ineffective by
persons with limited knowledge as to the importance of this safety equipment. In
some instances inspection has detected this dangerous practice, while in others injuries
were received by persons previous to the determination of the cause. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 127
During the year under review we have, because of the installation of additional
passenger elevator safety provisions (willingly installed by the agent or owner of the
building), been able to assist disabled veterans in obtaining employment as licensed
elevator operators.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS' LICENCES.
During the year 1945, 1,007 licences were renewed and 475 temporary and 406
permanent licences issued.
ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1945 there were 1,522 inspections and reinspections of freight and
passenger elevators.
NEW ELEVATOR INSTALLATIONS.
Twenty-eight plans and specifications relating to the installation of modern elevator equipment were approved.
INDUSTRIAL HOME-WORK.
Industrial home-work performed in this Province with but few exceptions involves
principally persons who because of family responsibilities such as the care of an invalid
or some other equally worthy reason are unable to leave the home.
The work performed by these persons is to a large extent intermittent, and is
usually supplied by the home-worker's former employer. Permits authorizing industrial home-work to be performed in the home have during the year been issued to
twenty-three persons and nine employers, embracing the following diversified occupations: Plain and fancy sewing, stocking-mending, painting on glassware, mending
china, making wooden novelties, artificial flowers, etc.
This total, in contrast to published reports from some of the eastern Provinces
(having similar legislation as contained in Part II. of the British Columbia " Factories
Act"), would indicate that home-work has been permitted to reach alarming proportions in the eastern Provinces.
CONCLUSION.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all officials and employees connected
with industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Douglas,
Inspector of Factories. H 128
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE APPRENTICESHIP BRANCH, 1945.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
3. A. Ward Bell, Chairman.
Adam Bell.
J. F. Keen.
James Thomson.
Administrative Officials of the Branch.
Hamilton  Crisford Director of Apprenticeship.
Arthur H. Dugdale Assistant Director.
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit annual report on the development of apprenticeship for
the year 1945.
On December 31st, 1945, the standing and distribution of apprentices in the
various trades or occupations was as follows:—
Trade or Occupation.
Year op Apprenticeship being served.
Total
First.
Second.
Third.
Fourth.
Fifth.
Apprentices.
40
19
1
4
39
2
8
54
1
36
12
52
3
2
10
4
30
5
26
33
2
3
25
2
2
6
12
1
4
16
1
17
7
56
2
3
13
4
2
14
10
12
21
1
2
2
1
17
1
11
4
1
1
26
4
68
5
10
7
8
8
6
2
11
1
1
13
1
6
1
12
10
3
3
51
1
14
4
18
2
9
15
1
9
1
20
1
1
50
16
2
6
2
12
6
3
95
21
14
27
67
4
13
4
Moulding	
46
5
Totals	
386
235
192
165
129
1,107
687
1,794
The above table does not include sixty-eight lads working as probationary apprentices on preliminary contracts. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 129
Distribution of Apprentices who have successfully completed
their Apprenticeship.
Number fully
Occupation covered. trained to Date.
Automobile maintenance   114
Boiler-makers  32
Barbers     76
Carpenters     103
Electricians   69
Hairdressers     105
Machinists  and fitters  202
Moulders    47
Pharmacists   75
Plumbers    33
Sheet-metal workers    39
Miscellaneous trades    201
Total  1,096
With the development of theoretical training outlined in last year's report a great
many apprentices have been benefited by the special classes established under the
Dominion-Provincial Agreement, but the benefit of these classes will naturally be more
apparent as they apply to new apprentices who will now be able to obtain co-ordinated
theoretical instruction throughout the whole period of their contract.
The educational aspect of apprenticeship both prior and during the period set out in
the apprenticeship contract is now being emphasized, as the shortage of skilled tradesmen with technical skill is one of the main difficulties confronting industry in the
future.
It is hoped that technical school training prior to apprenticeship may be considerably developed, and apprentices with this advantage will be carefully watched to
ascertain the extent to which such training advances and adds to their usefulness in
the practical work on the job.
In co-operation with technical and theoretical classes employers are showing a
readiness to advance the apprentice more rapidly in cases where knowledge obtained
can be practically applied, thereby reducing to some extent the very necessary period
of training on the job. It is hoped by this method to induce the best class of lad to
select the apprenticeship route at an early age.
DISCHARGED  SERVICE  PERSONNEL FROM THE  ARMED  FORCES.
A further scheme of co-operation between the Dominion and Provincial Governments in regard to the establishment in trades of ex-service personnel with little or
no previous trade experience has now been established.
An apprenticeship contract is entered into in co-operation with the Dominion
Department of Canadian Vocational Training with employers who are ready and
willing to take these men and are able to offer the necessary training facilities.
This experiment in adult apprenticeship offers better protection and working conditions to the ex-service man anxious to obtain trade qualifications than any other
re-establishment scheme evolved to date, as it provides him with a living wage during
the training on the job period and assures him of every facility possible for steady
employment and advancement.
During the few months it has been in operation 110 ex-service men have taken
advantage of this scheme, and there is every indication that as discharges from the
armed forces are accelerated it will gain in popularity. Its final success as a means
of adding to the number of skilled tradesmen available to industry will largely depend
upon the men themselves and their application both on the job and in attending such
classes as are available. H 130
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The list of trades designated under the Apprenticeship Act has not been changed,
but changes in the training of pharmaceutical apprentices is anticipated and a university course with a short period of training in a drug-store is now recommended by
the Pharmaceutical Association and will receive the consideration of the Government
at the next Session of the Legislative Assembly.
The consistent progress of apprenticeship in this Province has been more than
maintained and the work of the Department has consequently increased considerably.
The desirability of maintaining our established principle of keeping our regulations
and training schedules as fluid as possible, consistent with satisfactory results, has
been amply demonstrated during the war years and will be of considerable assistance
in the change over of our industries from war production to peace-time economy with
the multiplicity of problems involved.
Hamilton Crisford,
Director of Apprenticeship. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 131
TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH.
Administrative Offices—789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Administrative Officers.
J. A. Ward Bell Chief Administrative Officer.
Mrs. Rex Eaton.
Hamilton Crisford Secretary.
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit annual report of the Trade-Schools Regulation Branch for
the calendar year 1945.
The year passed without any major complaint in regard to the operation of registered schools and all schools have complied with the general regulations under which
they are allowed to operate.
The following is the list of registered schools:—
Alexander Hamilton Institute, Ltd., 54 Wellington Street West, Toronto, Ontario.-—
Business training.
Canadian Institute of Science and Technology, Ltd., 219 Bay Street, Toronto,
Ontario.—Civil, architectural, and mining engineering; hydraulics, hydraulic
machinery, sanitary engineering, municipal and county engineers' course,
building construction, heating and ventilating, mechanical and electrical engineering, business and accountants' course, salesmanship, advertising, wireless,
television, aeronautical engineering, aeroplane courses; other courses as per
prospectus.
Canadian Writers' Service, 817 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Short-story
writing.
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, Inc., 3224 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington,
D.C.—Radio engineering.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian, Limited, 1517 Mountain Street,
Montreal, Quebec.—Agriculture, air-conditioning, applied art, architecture,
aviation engineering, business education, chemistry, civil engineering, domestic science, electrical engineering, general education, mining and mechanical
engineering, navigation, paper manufacture, plumbing and heating, railroad
operation, textile manufacture;   other courses as per prospectus.
International Accountants Society, Inc., 209 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago 6,
Illinois.—Accountancy.
La Salle Extension University, 417 South Dearborn Street, Chicago 5, Illinois.—
Higher accountancy, business management, traffic management, industrial
management, elements of accounting, C.P.A. coaching, salesmanship, railway
accounting, effective speaking, commercial law, stenotypy, business English,
modern business correspondence, credit and collection correspondence, practical accounting and office practice;  other courses as per prospectus.
M.C.C. Schools, Limited, 301 Enderton Building, Winnipeg, Manitoba.—Dominion
Civil Service, home kindergarten.
National Radio Institute, Inc., Sixteenth & U Streets N.W., Washington, D.C.—
Practical radio and television.
National Schools, 4000 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles 37, California.—Radio
and television, Diesel and other combustion engines, air-conditioning and
refrigeration, applied electrical engineering, modern machine-shop instruction,
advanced radio engineering. H 132 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Northern Institute of Technology, 54 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario.—Commercial radio operating, radio technology, applied radio and electronics,
advanced engineering, electrical technology.
Plastics Industrial Technical Institute, 1601 South Western Avenue, Los Angeles 6,
California.—Plastics.
The School of Accountancy, Limited, 507 Great West Permanent Building, Winnipeg, Manitoba.—Accountancy.
Shaw Schools, Limited, 1130 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario.—Commercial course,
short-story writing, stationary engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Radio School, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Wireless telegraphy combined with radio engineering.
The Toronto School of Design, 1139 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario.—Designing
women's wear.
Academy of Useful Arts, 615 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Dressmaking,
designing, and kindred arts.
Academy of Useful Arts, 853 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.—Dressmaking, designing,
and kindred arts.
Margaret Atkins School of Retouching (Photography), 208 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.—Photography, retouching portraits and commercial
finishing prints.
B.C. School of Pharmacy and Science, 615 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—•
Pharmacy.
B.C. Tree Fruits, Ltd., Kelowna, B.C.—Fruit-packing.
B.C. Logging Power Saw School, 1805 Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Power-saw
operations, logging industry. (The sale of tuition is confined to persons
recommended by operating west coast logging companies and to those who can
produce evidence that they have had suitable experience on coast logging
operations.)
Brisbane Aviation Company, Limited, Vancouver Civic Airport, Vancouver, B.C.—
Aircraft engineering.
Central Business College, Mcintosh Building, Chilliwack, B.C.—Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Comptometer School, 342 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Comptometer
operation.
Dobell School of Business, Island Highway and Duncan Avenue, Courtenay, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Mrs. A. M. Downes, 4550 Osier Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Shorthand writing.
Duffus School of Business, Ltd., 522 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
El-Mar Handcraft School, 3057 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Dressmaking,
designing and kindred arts, millinery, leathercraft.
Eyrl's Civil Service Business College, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Fenton Commercial School, 2001-2003 Forty-first Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Goodman's School of Fashion and Design, 445 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.	
Costume   designing,   fashion   sketching,   pattern-making,   dressmaking   and
tailoring.
Grandview Business College, 1768 Williams Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Harradine  Commercial College,  5665  Granville  Street,  Vancouver,  B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 133
Herbert's Business College, Room 3, Casorso Block, Kelowna, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Alfred D. Hewson School of Salesmanship, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver,
B.C.—Salesmanship.
Hollyburn Business College, Fourteenth Avenue and Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Helen Labrum's Dressmaking School, 1620 Redfern Street, Victoria, B.C.—Dressmaking.
Lonsdale Shorthand and Typewriting Academy, 615 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (shorthand, typewriting, and elementary bookkeeping).
Lownds School of Commerce, Limited, 80 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Loyd-Griffin Business School, Fairview and Main Street, Penticton, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Maxine Beauty School, 619 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Hairdressing.
Moler Barber School, 20 Cordova Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Barbering.
Moler Hairdressing School, 303 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Hair-
dressing.
Victor Mott   .   .   .   Fashions, 620 Trounce Alley, Victoria, B.C.—Fashion designing.
McEwen-Wilkie Business College, Corner Vance and Barnard Avenue, Vernon,
B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Nelson Business College, 107 Baker Street, Nelson, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster Commercial College, 713 Columbia Street, New Westminster,
B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Pitman Business College, Limited, 1450 Broadway West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Roger of " The Russian Duchess Beauty Salon," 768 Granville Street, Vancouver,
B.C.—Advanced hairdressing, individual personal instruction.
Royal Business College, 1006 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.—Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Standard School of Stenography and Typewriting, 1526 Pandora Avenue, Victoria,
B.C.—Office occupations  (commercial and governmental).
H. Faulkner Smith School of Applied and Fine Art, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver,
B.C.—Commercial art.
St. Ann's Academy, Commercial Department, 835 Humboldt Street, Victoria, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Sprott-Shaw Schools, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental), journalism, wireless telegraphy combined with
radio engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Victoria Business Institute, Ltd., 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental), radio-telegraphy.
Trail Business College, 648 Weir Street, Trail, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Vancouver Engineering Academy, 407 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Stationary, marine and Diesel engineering.
Victoria Hairdressing School, 104 Woolworth Building, Victoria, B.C.—Hairdressing.
Voice Production and Radio Broadcasting School, 1879 Barclay Street, Vancouver,
B.C.—Radio announcing. H 134
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Welding Construction School, 148 First Avenue East, Vancouver, B.C.—Electric
welding, acetylene cutting.
Western School of Commerce, Ltd., 712 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Western   College   of  Pharmacy,   1524   Sixth  Avenue  West,  Vancouver,   B.C.—
Pharmacy.
Willis College of Business,  850  Hastings  Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Don Wilson Studios, 813 Birks Building, Vancouver, B.C.—Radio broadcasting.
Excellent co-operation has been received from the Better Business  Bureau in
directing persons desirous of purchasing tuition to this office for information.
The daily newspapers have been co-operative in that there has been an almost total
absence of misleading advertising in so far as trade-schools are concerned.
The Act continues to have whole-hearted public support.
Hamilton Crisford,
Secretary. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1945 H 135
SAFETY BRANCH.
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Safety Branch for the year 1945.
It is to be regretted that it can not be reported that any noticeable improvement
is being effected in the accident occurrence in the lumber industry.
No other branch of industry is covered by the activities of the Safety Branch. As
compared to the year 1944 fatal accidents increased from forty-six to fifty-eight, and
the number of time loss accidents to workmen engaged in this industry rose from 4,975
to 5,118.
Every effort has been made by the Branch to carry on its educational campaign,
and 2,500 companies and key workmen now regularly receive our News Letter service.
The quarterly accident survey, which has been so strongly supported by the
industry, now covers the work history of 25,914 employees. One hundred and three
of the largest operations in the Interior have voluntarily come under the quarterly
reporting system and are now given complete service from the Safety Branch.
The Safety Branch has continued to investigate all fatal accidents and it is felt
that this effort will ultimately prove of great value.
Very close harmonious relations exist between the Branch and the union of the
workers, and it is felt that a well-balanced programme is being developed that is
acceptable to both the employers' association and the union.
Serious study has been given to the possibility of operating a boat service for
educational purposes among the coast logging camps. A boat has been purchased and
a skipper and safety adviser engaged. This effort is definitely being attempted as a
trial and will be discontinued if it is not found to be of advantage.
The job safety training of the Department of Labour has been endorsed by the
Safety Branch, and a very definite attempt has been made to carry this beneficial training into the ranks of all the companies that are seriously studying the problem of
accident-preventfon. In the Victoria area, where the most concentrated effort has been
made, it is encouraging to report that over 95 per cent, of all the key employees, up to
and including the rank of manager, have attended the training programme classes and
expressed their approval of it.
I would like to express my sincere appreciation of the continued co-operation of
the employers' associations in the efforts of the Branch to carry the educational work
to its employees.
The acceptance by the union of the safety programme of this Branch has enabled
us to carry our work directly to the employees, and it is gratifying to report that there
has been no complaint from any union official or any employee criticizing our efforts.
The continual encouragement given by the Honourable the Minister of Labour to
the accident-prevention work has been deeply appreciated, and for your own co-operation in gradually developing our programme I wish to express my sincere thanks.
Respectfully submitted.
A. M. Whisker,
Safety Adviser. H 136
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CHANGES IN ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION OF
DEPARTMENT.
Effective as from September 3rd, 1946, certain changes in the administrative
organization of the Department were announced by the Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour. Mr. Adam Bell, who for fifteen years had held the position of
Deputy Minister and Chairman of the Board of Industrial Relations, retired from
these positions to become Chairman of the Workmen's Compensation Board.
Mr. James Thomson, formerly Chief Conciliation Officer, supervisor of the Vancouver office of the Department and member of the Board of Industrial Relations,
became Deputy Minister and Chairman of the Board.
Mr. Andrew Whisker was appointed Chief Administrative Officer and Supervisor
of Inspectors, responsible for the enforcement of labour laws and regulations.
Miss Mabel A. Cameron retained the position of Secretary of the Board of Industrial Relations.
Mr. Robert Lemmax was appointed Chief Inspector of Factories as from October
1st to succeed Mr. Herbert Douglas, retired.
Mr. Barrie Goult was appointed to the new position of Chief Executive Officer of
the Branch in charge of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" of the
Province and the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations of the Dominion, P.C. 1003.
Under that same Branch Mr. Norman Lyons became Registrar, Mr. Reginald
Clements, Assistant Registrar, and Mr. William Fraser, Senior Conciliation Officer.
VICTOEIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1946.
1.805-746 5953

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