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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1946

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
OF
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
FOR THE YEAR ENDED
DECEMBER 31st, 1944
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1946.  To His Honour W. C. WOODWARD,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Eeport of the Provincial Game
Commission for the year ended December 31st, 1944.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1945.
R. L. MAITLAND,
Attorney-General. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., December 19th, 1945.
Honourable R. L. Maitland, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1944.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
JAMES G. CUNNINGHAM,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
Game Commissioners. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
'B:
Page.
  7
  11
 :  12
Division  16
  28
  33
  37
Reports—
Game Commission	
Game Wardens, " A " Division	
Officer Commanding " B " Division	
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson,
Officer Commanding " C " Division	
Officer Commanding " D " Division	
Game Wardens, " E " Division	
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-44, inclusive  39
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences and Deer (Game) Tags  40
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences  41
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Anglers' Licences and Outfitters'
Licences  42
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers' Licences  43
Revenue—Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalty on Fur 44
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-44, inclusive  45
Comparative Statement showing Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty
has been collected, 1921-44, inclusive  46
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty was collected during Year 1944  47
List of Confiscated Fur, 1944  48
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1944, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur
and Firearms  48
Bounties paid, 1944    49
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922-44, inclusive  49
  50
  61
  63
  64
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1944	
Prosecutions, 1944	
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1944	
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1944	
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special  (Trapping)  Firearms Licences,
Season 1943-44	
Statement—Returns of Fur-farmers, 1944	
76
76
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1944  77
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1944  77
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1944, also showing Revenue from
Sale of Bird-bands  78
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1944  79
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1944  82  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,
1944.
The year under review, in spite of the fact that Canada is still in the throes of
a world war, has been the most successful in the history of the Department. Game
conditions were excellent throughout the Province, and revenue derived under the
" Game Act" reached an all-time high of $309,265.59, showing an increase of $43,249.84
over the year 1943, and an increase of $112,207.67 over 1934, the year in which the
present Game Commission took office.
An examination of the tables accompanying this report will indicate the reasons
for increases in revenue, the principal causes being a higher collection of fur royalties,
an increase in the number of licences issued—particularly to non-residents—and a considerable increase in trophy fees collected from these non-residents.
British Columbia has one of the finest stands, if not the finest, of big game and
sport fish in America, and this fact is becoming widely known throughout the United
States, particularly along the Pacific Coast. With the cessation of hostilities overseas,
we can look for an ever-increasing number of non-resident big-game hunters and
fishermen.
During the year 1944, 941 non-resident big-game hunters visited this Province,
showing an increase of 362 over the year 1941, the previous record year, when some
579 non-resident big-game licences were issued. The fact that increases are taking
place during years when gasoline and tires are rationed, and travel generally is difficult, is an indication of what British Columbia can expect when hostilities cease and
normal travel is resumed.
The guides and outfitters, however, it would seem, are not prepared to handle the
expected influx of non-resident sportsmen. Many of our guides are overseas and others
are employed in essential war industries. There will be splendid opportunities for the
rehabilitation of many of our returning soldiers in this line of work. Your Game
Commission is preparing new amendments to the " Game Act" to cope with this
situation, which we hope to submit for approval at the 1945 Session of the Legislature.
REGISTRATION OF TRAP-LINES.
Since our last report there has been a new organization formed, known as the
" British Columbia Registered Trappers' Association." This organization has been
started through the efforts of Eric Collier and E. W. Bobb, of Riske Creek. These
gentlemen have personally demonstrated the value of our S5rstem of trap-line registration, and it is hoped that the new organization, under their guidance, will prove as
valuable to the welfare of our fur-bearing animals as the Game Associations have
proven in the welfare of the game and sport fish of this Province.
The British Columbia Registered Trappers' Association, Farmers' Institutes,
British Columbia Fruit-growers' Association, and other organizations, along with many
game associations, are pressing for more rigid protection of beaver. They are in
favour of the tagging of pelts before same can be placed on the open market, and it is
hoped that an amendment to the " Game Act" covering the tagging of beaver, which
we are preparing, will be approved.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES.
As previously mentioned, the provisions of the " Game Act" are greatly in need
of revision in order to cope with the expected influx of non-resident sportsmen.   We
7 W 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
are preparing amendments to the " Game Act" which, we sincerely hope, will help out
the situation. During the present year 237 guides' licences were issued, and it is
anticipated that this number will be considerably increased within the next year or so.
FUR-FARMING.
With the return of our veterans from overseas, there is no doubt that many of
them will be turning their minds to farming. There is no class of farming that will
reap such returns—at present prices—as fur-farming, taking into consideration the
initial outlay and the possibilities on small holdings of land. Many inquiries are
being received with respect to fur-farming.
We have many successful fur-farmers in the Province, but, on the other hand,
there also have been many failures. It must be borne in mind that the success of
fur-farming depends upon locating where supplies and food for the animals are available, the ability of the farmer to adapt himself to this kind of farming, and, above all,
a good market for his product. The fur market generally is the first to suffer at the
first signs of a depression.
BOUNTIES.
Perusal of the comparative statement of bounties paid on predatory animals from
1922 to 1944, appearing on page 49 of this report, indicates the expenditure of a large
sum of money, mainly contributed from the funds of the Department. There is a constant demand for increased bounties, the majority of these requests originating from
those interested in the welfare of domestic stock; and it is felt that much better results
can be obtained, should the bounty vote be increased, by the hiring of trained, properly
equipped, and supervised predatory-animal hunters. The predator situation is one that
affects the farmer as well as the sportsman and our game-supply.
Perusal of the statement on page 49 will indicate that claims for bounties covering
the destruction of wolves have decreased from 1,659 in the peak year of 1940 to 1,321
for the year 1944, but it is felt that the peak of the cycle has passed.
The prices on coyote-pelts are dropping, and it is more than likely that a recommendation will be made for an increased bounty in the coming year.
Many organizations are advocating a $10 bounty on black bear, and suggestions
have been made that this animal be placed on the predator list. Realizing that black
bear are becoming too plentiful throughout the Province, they have been removed from
protection by a close season, and now black bear may be shot at any time of the year.
If the Government could find the funds to pay all bounties recommended by all the
organizations interested in the matter, the annual payments would amount to over
$125,000.
The predator situation in the eastern portion of the Province is one that gives
this Commission some concern. There are several National parks lying between
Alberta and British Columbia, and the policy of the Federal administration is to allow
nature to take its course with game and predators alike, with the result that while we
are enjoying the benefits of any possible overflow of game from the parks we are also
paying bounties on a possible overflow of predators from these protected areas.
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
No effort has been made on the part of your Game Commission in recent years to
advertise our resources outside of the Province, but we are continually appearing
before meetings of Game Associations, Farmers' Institutes, and other clubs and organizations, as well as visiting many of the schools of the Province, and exhibiting our
coloured game and sport-fish films. By this method of advertising, we feel that we
have been successful in making the general public more game-conscious, educating the REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 9
school children along the lines of conservation, and the sportsmen in particular are
realizing their responsibility in the matter of game-protection.
During recent years, but more particularly during the past few months, applications for the purchase of some of our choice hunting-territory, or lands surrounding
certain excellent fishing-lakes, have been brought to the attention of your Game
Commission.
Applications to purchase are usually received from non-residents, although we
have also been advised of applications on behalf of residents, in some cases, for the
purchase of choice beaver or muskrat swamps situated within the boundaries of a trap-
line that has been improved at the expense of some conscientious trapper. Efforts are
also being made to purchase choice camping-sites on some of our most important lakes
for the purpose of commercialization or speculation at the expense not only of our
sportsmen but, in many cases, of the general public.
When such cases are brought to the attention of your Game Commission, an investigation is made and reports forwarded, with our recommendations, through the proper
channels. The Department of Lands and Forests has co-operated fully in these cases,
but it is a situation which will have to be watched, and we are indebted to the sportsmen for their co-operation in bringing many of these applications to our attention.
GAME PROPAGATION.
Some 3,477 pheasants were liberated throughout the Province during the year, the
majority of these liberations being on the Lower Mainland. This number does not
reach the proportions expected by the sportsmen, particularly on the Lower Mainland
where we have over 12,000 licensed hunters between Vancouver and Chilliwack, all
anxious to obtain pheasant-hunting near home. It is only by the artificial propagation
of pheasants that we can hope to keep up an ample supply in the area mentioned.
We are continuing to trap live beaver on the Bowron Lake Game Reserve for the
restocking of depleted areas, and it is hoped that our efforts along this line will continue
to pay dividends.
During August we were successful in trapping some thirty-two blue grouse in the
Campbell River district on Vancouver Island, and these birds were subsequently liberated on Texada Island. The transfer of these grouse was a success, and we hope to
be able to continue placing a number of these excellent sporting birds on Texada Island
for at least three years. This island was never naturally stocked with grouse, and
with the excellent food conditions prevailing on the island there would seem to be little
doubt regarding the success of the experiment.
MIGRATORY BIRDS.
The migratory-bird situation has been much the same as in past years. In some
areas they were plentiful while in others they were scarce. So far as the Lower
Mainland is concerned, the same conditions exist as in the case of pheasants, in that
we find some 12,000 hunters trying to obtain good duck-shooting over a very limited
area. Migratory-bird hunting in the Cariboo District was only fair, but there were
more satisfied sportsmen throughout the Okanagan District, where, after considerable
effort, they were at last granted a season closing at a later period of the year.
GAME-FISH CULTURE.
The game fishes of British Columbia are responsible, and will become more so as
time goes on, for the influx of a great number of non-resident sportsmen. Our lakes,
in the majority of cases, are in a healthy condition.    Every effort, however, will have W 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
to be made if we hope to retain the present stock of trout in our lakes and streams,
many of which are now feeling the effects of overfishing. The present stocks can not
be maintained, especially in the more heavily populated sections and in irrigation districts, unless we are in a position to assist in artificial propagation. More, larger, and
better equipped hatcheries will be needed in the future. The employment of at least
one trained fish-culturist is definitely necessary.
Your Commission is operating trout-hatcheries at Sooke and Qualicum on Vancouver Island, Stanley Park and Cultus Lake on the Lower Mainland, Kaslo and Nelson
in the West Kootenay, and there are seasonal operations at Summerland, Penask Lake,
Beaver Lake, Kelowna, Lloyds Creek, and Gerrard. We are also subsidizing the Cranbrook Hatchery, owned by the Cranbrook District Rod and Gun Club, Incorporated, and
we are financially assisting other Game Associations in the operation of local rearing-
ponds.
The two hatcheries on Vancouver Island were constructed some twelve years ago,
and are badly in need of replacement, especially in the case of the Qualicum Hatchery.
Through the drainage of swamps adjacent to the water-supply, and the consequent
scarcity of water at both of these hatcheries, we have had to curtail production, and
we feel that more fish could be produced at less expense if we were in a position to
construct one modern hatchery centrally located and close to transportation on the east
coast of the Island.
The hatchery at Stanley Park in Vancouver is well situated, but due to chlorina-
tion of the Vancouver City water-supply considerable trouble has developed, necessitating curtailment of production. It is hoped that, with the cessation of hostilities,
chlorination will not be necessary, and that we can again resume normal operations at
Stanley Park.
The sportsmen of the Okanagan realize the necessity for artificial propagation of
sport fish in their district, and with this in mind they started out to raise funds by
means of a trout Derby. During the year under review, the sportsmen of the Okanagan
have conducted a Derby known as the " Okanagan District Trout Derby," with the
intention of devoting surplus funds to the construction of a modern hatchery and the
appointment of a fish culturist for the Okanagan District.
It is desirable that a trout-hatchery be constructed in the Okanagan District at
a location where a suitable water-supply is available. Demands for water for irrigation purposes will increase as time goes on, and the location for the proposed hatchery
must be very carefully selected, as it is due to irrigation and the consequent drying-up
of streams that artificial propagation of trout in that district has become necessary.
A statement showing our trout distributions during the past season will be found
on page 64.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
As in the past, we have received from and through Commissioner T. W. S. Parsons
and Deputy Commissioner John Shirras, and the members of the British Columbia
Police Force, very valuable assistance and co-operation.
The assistance rendered by Dr. W. A. Clemens, Dr. D. C. B. Duff, and Dr. Ian
McTaggart Cowan, of the University of British Columbia, has also been very gratifying. The usual co-operation of the Department of Agriculture and Department of
Lands and Forests has also been received and is hereby gratefully acknowledged.
Game Associations, Farmers' Institutes, and other organizations, as well as sportsmen
in general, have been most helpful in our game-conservation work. REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 11
"A" DIVISION (VANCOUVER ISLAND, THE GULF ISLANDS, AND THE MAINLAND COAST FROM TOBA INLET NORTH TO CAPE CAUTION, INCLUDING THE ISLANDS ADJACENT TO VANCOUVER ISLAND NORTH OF
CAMPBELL RIVER).
This Division is directly supervised from Vancouver. The following excerpts are
from reports of the Game and Fishery Officers of " A " Division, along with observations made by members of the Game Commission.
Bear (Black).—Owing to the fact that the fur trade is no longer interested in the
purchase of bear-hides, these animals have become so numerous that it has been
necessary to provide a continuous open hunting season on them.
Bear (Grizzly).—While this animal is not found on Vancouver Island, they are
fairly numerous at the heads of most of our coastal inlets from Bute Inlet north.
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—This smallest member of our native deer continues
to provide the principal big-game hunting along the coast. They have been fairly
plentiful during the past few years throughout the logged-off lands north of Comox
on Vancouver Island and as far north as Sayward. Owing to complaints of damage in
the area adjacent to Cobble Hill, south of Duncan, it was found necessary to provide
a short open season on doe deer in order to reduce the population of deer in and around
this farming area.
Mountain-goat.—This animal is not a native of Vancouver Island, but they are
fairly plentiful throughout all our coastal inlet regions. The success of our endeavours
to introduce mountain-goat in the Cowichan District some twenty years ago is still in
doubt. Occasionally we find evidence of mountain-goat inhabiting the area north of
Cowichan Lake. It is hoped that with the release of more labour when war hostilities
cease, we will again be in a position to obtain another supply of mountain-goat through
the National Parks Bureau in order to make further liberations in various suitable
districts on Vancouver Island.
Wapiti (Elk).—There are several places on Vancouver Island where small herds
of elk may be found, but they are not plentiful enough to warrant any open season on
them. We have evidence that the black bear is a contributing factor in keeping the
elk herds down.   The elk in the Cowichan Lake country are increasing.
FUR-BEARING ANIMALS.
Vancouver Island produces a considerable quantity of fur, racoon and mink being
the most plentiful. Marten, muskrats, and beaver are also found on the Island.
Muskrats are not indigenous to Vancouver Island, but were introduced there about
the year 1925. Since that time they have continued to thrive, and to-day they are providing a considerable amount of revenue to many trappers. The trapping season for
beaver has been closed on Vancouver Island for many years, but in cases where a
registered trap-line holder can prove that he has protected his line and beaver have
increased, or are plentiful enough thereon to warrant trapping, permits are granted
for the taking of a limited number. Permits are also granted where beaver are found
to be doing damage.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—Vancouver Island provides better grouse-shooting than anywhere
else in the Province. The logged-off lands along the east coast provide the proper
environment for this class of game. During the opening week-end, at one checking-
station on the Cowichan Lake road in a six-hour check, some 1,537 blue grouse were
tallied by a member of the Game Commission. This gives an indication of the numbers
of blue grouse to be found and the popularity of this class of sport. W 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Grouse (Ruffed or Willow).—Willow grouse are not as plentiful as we would wish.
This bird will stand a limited amount of shooting, but, as the Island becomes more
settled, they are gradually disappearing.
Pheasants.—The pheasant population in "A" Division is very low. Complaints
of damage by these birds in and around the Cowichan area received from property-
holders has resulted in the curtailment of pheasant liberations in that district.
Partridge (European).—With the co-operation of the Nanaimo District Game
Association, we are endeavouring to establish European partridge in an area south of
Nanaimo, known as the Cedar District. Some small importations, when birds are
available, have been made from Alberta and liberated in the district mentioned. It is
too early at this date to report on the success or otherwise of this venture.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks and Geese.—Duck- and goose-shooting throughout the Division has been
fair. The geese were more plentiful than they have been in recent years, but the
opening date on the Canada geese was a little too late to allow hunting of these birds
at the time they were most plentiful.
Black Brant did not put in an appearance in any numbers until the last few days
of the season. The sportsmen on Vancouver Island are advocating a later season for
these birds, but the " Migratory Birds Convention Act" does not allow for any later
season than March 10th, and as the season has been closing on February 28th, there
seems to be no likelihood of a later closing date being allowed.
Sivans.—There were more swans observed in migration this season. Not since
1935 have they been seen in such numbers. As usual, we find the odd sportsman who
can not resist shooting at and wounding, or killing, these birds, and some prosecutions
have been successfully conducted for this offence.
Predatory Animals.
Cougar and Wolves are found throughout the Division, the cougar being by far
the more plentiful. Some 64 cougar were killed on Vancouver Island during the year.
Several complaints of wolves were received, but in most cases, after due investigation,
the marauders turned out to be dogs. Wolves are not nearly so numerous on the Island
as reports would indicate.
The Game Wardens of the Division have been doing fine work in destroying predators, such as cougar, stray dogs, domestic cats gone wild, crows, and ravens, etc.
"B" DIVISION   (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit annual report of game conditions in " B " Division for
the year ended December 31st, 1944.
Big Game.
Moose.—Moose are general east of the Kootenay and Columbia Rivers, in the Rocky
Mountain section from the International Boundary to Canoe River. They are also well
distributed, but in lesser numbers, on the west side of the above rivers. Reports continue to be received of moose being seen in the vicinity of Kootenay Lake, and the
persistence of such reports over a period of years would indicate that they are definitely
extending their range.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti parallel the moose in the Rocky Mountains, both in numbers
and tendency to extend their range to the Selkirk Mountains on the west side of the
Columbia River and north from Golden. To what extent the elk will follow the moose
is dependent on their ability to withstand the heavier snows of the Selkirk areas. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 13
Due to the satisfactory stand of elk, the season has been extended, and it is
interesting to note that a number of these animals—old bulls and dry cows—have been
destroyed this past year in the adjacent National parks, where they were considered to
be too plentiful. It should be noted that these animals range in and out of the National
parks.
Favourable reports come from the experimental stockings of past years in the
Princeton district, also in the South Okanagan District near Naramata. In both localities the season was opened and good trophies were available. The success in transporting elk to suitable areas has been amply demonstrated and might well be continued as
the need arises, bearing in mind the former extensive range of the wapiti throughout
the Province.
Sheep.—Rocky Mountain bighorn are probably the most attractive trophies for the
visiting hunter. They are reported to be in fair numbers, considering the heavy toll
of the hsemorrhagic septicaemia epidemic in 1941 and some sporadic outbreaks of the
same, or some other similar malady, the following year. Their range is the Rocky
Mountain section from the International Boundary to Golden.
Small bands have been reported in the Selkirks in the vicinity of Glacier National
Park. These reports have been current for the past twelve years or more, and have
again been confirmed by a reliable trapper, Earl Stevens, at the headwaters of the
Duncan River. This area is practically inaccessible from a hunting standpoint due to
the lack of trails and bridges.
There is no apparent change in the small bands near Okanagan Falls and on the
Ashnola watershed near Keremeos. These sheep graze a limited range in competition
with domestic stock and may be easily observed.
Caribou.—Caribou have their main range in the Selkirk Mountains, both east and
west of Kootenay Lake from the International Boundary to the Big Bend on the Columbia River. An estimate of their numbers is difficult on account of their migratory
tendencies, but the short open season is satisfactory, and hunters report they are not
hard to locate, although they range mostly at timber-line elevations.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are generally plentiful in the Rockies and Selkirks, east of the Arrow Lakes, but are comparatively scarce in the Boundary and
Similkameen Districts. They frequent the rocky and treeless peaks, where they are
easily seen and stalked.
Mule-deer.—Mule-deer are abundant throughout the Division. The short open
season on does in a portion of this Division during the year would not seem to have
had any appreciable effect on the mule-deer stand, as the weather was quite warm and
very few doe deer were reported as being taken.
White-tailed Deer.—This distinctive species may now be regarded as generally
plentiful, although not in the great numbers of the mule-deer, with perhaps the exception of the Similkameen District, where they are on the increase.
Bear (Black, Brown, and Grizzly).—Black, or brown, bear are plentiful throughout
the Division. Complaints have been received from the Princeton district of attacks on
domestic stock by these animals, and they also occasion some damage to orchards.
Destruction of the individual bears responsible usually relieves the situation.
Grizzlies are numerous on the watersheds of Arrow and Kootenay Lakes, Revelstoke, Big Bend, and Fernie districts. They are well distributed elsewhere, but are
scarce to occasional in the Grand Forks-Similkameen area.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Due to the prevailing high price of furs, there is more than usual activity among
trappers, and were it not for our trap-line registration system, the outlook for a continued stand of fur-bearers would be bleak.    Trap-lines are, for the most part, held by W 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
men who appreciate their value in yearly returns; also, many trappers are in the armed
forces and their trap-lines should show an increase in potential value during their
absence.
Forty years ago, due to uncontrolled trapping, pessimists were numerous who
insisted that the beaver was in the same category as the buffalo—gone for ever. It is
pleasant to note they were wrong. The annual catch of these animals for the past
several years is concrete proof that, while it is not possible to have a completely satisfactory control of wild life, the registration system is the best game management plan
so far evolved on this continent. While it functions as it does, we can dispense with
close seasons, which were unpopular at best, because it is now possible to have a definite
or fairly accurate estimate of our wild stock. At present trappers know just how much
fur of any variety they may trap without jeopardizing their catch for next season.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue Grouse.—Generally plentiful, except in the Cranbrook district.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—Are general, with the exception of Penticton, Creston,
and Nelson-Trail areas. These grouse are particularly subject to local conditions, and
if they survive in any numbers they must have suitable cover and reasonable open
seasons. Reports indicate they have increased in those sections where no open season
was allowed during the year.
Franklin Grouse.—Not so good. All sections report these birds (fool-hens) appreciably less than normal.
Sharp-tailed Grouse.—Scarce in the Boundary and Similkameen but quite plentiful
in the Cranbrook-Kimberley area, where large flocks are to be observed from the highway. The increase in this area is approaching their former good numbers of earlier
years.
Pheasants.—Plentiful in Similkameen, Lower Okanagan, Grand Forks, and Creston
areas, where open seasons do not seem to lessen their numbers.
Plantings in other sections of the Division during the past few years have not been
satisfactory. While most of these were frankly experimental, it was hoped they would
be successful. Perhaps it was too much to expect that they would rival the success of
places like Penticton, Grand Forks, or Creston, where conditions were right. These
experimental plantings have been made at intervals over the past ten years with the
co-operation of local Game Clubs and private citizens, but, with one or two possible
exceptions, will simply have to be charged to experience.
Partridge.—These birds fluctuate in numbers and seem to be migratory to some
extent, inasmuch as they frequently forsake a locality where they are quite numerous.
They are common in the Lower Okanagan, Grand Forks, and Creston districts, with
no appreciable increase.
California Quail.—Fairly plentiful in the Lower Okanagan and Keremeos districts,
and a few are to be found near Grand Forks. A covey of bob-white quail was reported
at Cranbrook, possibly transients from the State of Idaho.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—About normal. No appreciable increase, although a fair hatch of local
ducks was reported. Bags were on the small side, with a smaller number of hunters
than usual.
Geese.—Nested in good numbers in the Columbia Valley and the Beaton districts
at the head of the Arrow Lakes. Shooting was spotty as a whole, except in the Creston
district, where it was fairly good. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 15
Wilson Snipe.—Plentiful at times in migration on the sloughs. Not hunted to any
extent.
Coots.—Plentiful.
Swans.—Not reported during the year.
Vermin.
The following vermin were destroyed by Game Wardens:   Coyotes, 106;   eagles,
19;  owls, 57;  hawks, 125;  cats, 99;   dogs, 19;  crows, 376;   cougars, 8;   bears, 2.
A predatory-animal hunter, temporarily employed, killed twelve cougar.
Game-protection.
There were forty-eight convictions and one dismissal under the " Game Act," and
three convictions under the Special Fisheries Regulations for British Columbia.
Game Propagation.
No restocking of pheasants during the year. A limited amount of feed for game
birds was put out, but winter conditions were generally favourable for them.
Game Reserves.
The Elk River reserve, comprising the upper watershed of the Elk and Bull Rivers,
also White River, is the most important one as it is situated in the heart of the big-
game country.
Game-bird sanctuaries at Nelson and Vaseaux Lake, south of Penticton, are also
beneficial, and their establishment continues to meet with general approval.
Deer sanctuaries exist at Elko, Canal Flats, and the Kettle River. These are
located on winter yarding-grounds, and serve as a haven should unusual conditions
occur during the open season when deer might be too easily taken.
Fur Trade.
Six resident fur-traders share in the fur-catch in the Division with the Vancouver
traders;  very little fur is exported directly out of the Province by trappers.
Fur-farming.
Due to unsettled conditions, fur-farming has declined in favour to some extent,
although the established fur-farmers are doing well. The experiments in raising
marten in captivity continue to be encouraging.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Were it not for the system of registration of our trap-lines that is now on a sound
and appreciated basis, there is no doubt that we would have had little or no control over
the fur situation during these war years of high prices, and probably would have had,
by this date, to return to the old unsatisfactory system of temporary closed seasons.
Registration of Guides.
Thirty registered guides operated in the Division this year, but a number of guides
resident in other parts of the Province usually have parties here as well. An increase
is noted in hunters from Washington into the Kettle River area, but big-game hunters
were somewhat fewer than in past years.
Special Patrols.
Routine patrols were as usual during the year—by car, launch, rowboat, and horseback, also on foot. Many trips were made to the headwaters of various creeks to plant
eyed trout-eggs. W 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Hunting Accidents.
On October 7th, 1944, Stanley E. Angus was shot in the fleshy part of the calf of
the right leg by his hunting companion, Mr. Holt, of Rossland. Mr. Holt was loading
his shotgun, and when he snapped the breech shut one barrel went off. The shotgun
was subsequently found to have a defective firing-pin which protruded.    Recovered.
On November 2nd, 1944, Oliver From, of Cedar Creek in the Kettle Valley, was
guiding a non-resident. He was walking along a ridge when his .32 Winchester Special
rifle slipped from his hand, the butt striking the ground, and went off. At the same
time he caught the gun by the muzzle, the bullet passing through the web of his left
hand between the thumb and forefinger.    Recovered.
Game-fish Culture.
This activity is reviewed in detail by Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson in his
annual report.
Summary and General Remarks.
The Game Associations have been very active during the year and have particularly
directed their interest to game-fish culture, their contributions to the hatcheries at
Nelson and Kaslo taking the very tangible form of cash donations as well as voluntary
labour. Sport-fishing in this section is increasing in popularity, and some concern is
felt that the influx of visitors from the adjacent States and Provinces will react
adversely against the present good fishing enjoyed by local residents.
The argument in rebuttal is, of course, simply a matter of expense. As pointed out
in earlier annual reports, we are doing, and have done, very well in the way of fish-
culture when it is remembered that we have very little up-to-date equipment and a
most modest annual budget for fish cultural work. There is no question that with our
present knowledge of Interior waters and problems, given a competent sum for this
purpose, we will continue to have good fishing in the Division.
Game conditions are, as a whole, satisfactory. That is, there are plenty of big-
game animals—possibly too many deer in some sections; birds are holding their own,
and can be kept that way by regulating the open seasons accordingly.
Migratory birds show no undue depreciation, and the outlook for continued good
hunting is bright if Nature does not become too capricious with weather, floods, fires,
or epidemics.
Our cordial thanks are due to the Provincial Police, the Forest Branch, and Public
Works Department for much direct assistance and the use of equipment during the year.
The co-operation, advice, and timely assistance of many individual sportsmen, as well
as of the various Game Associations in the Division, are gratefully acknowledged.
Report of C. H. Robinson, Fishery Supervisor, covering Game-fish
conditions in " B " Game Division.
I herewith beg to submit report on game-fish culture and fishery conditions in
" B " Division for the year 1944, combined with information supplied by the Game
Wardens in their respective patrol districts.
Subject to seasonal conditions, most waters produced the average catches of
sport fish, with notable improvement in the following waters: Windermere, Slocan,
Arrow, and Okanagan Lakes, including also Similkameen River and Kaslo Creek.
While the supply of Kamloops trout eyed eggs received was much less than
anticipated, all possible consideration was given to the replenishment of more accessible
waters in preference to lakes situated in remote regions wherein angling was curtailed.
Prevailing water conditions in the Cranbrook and Nelson areas restricted in some
respects the collections of cut-throat and Eastern brook trout eggs. The run of spawning Kamloops trout in the Lardeau River from Kootenay Lake compared favourably
with any run for the past twenty-five years. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 17
During the year progress slowed up on the construction of rearing-ponds due to
help being difficult to obtain. However, the interest remains keen, and probably under
normal conditions the good work will continue. So far the development of rearing-
ponds has been largely at the expense and initiative of organized sportsmen, individuals,
and municipalities.
The completion of improvements to the Nelson Hatchery by the Game Commission
will be of public benefit throughout the district, together with the refrigeration plant,
equipped entirely at the expense of local organized sportsmen and individuals.
Trout distributions are covered in detail elsewhere in the report of the Game
Commission.
Similkameen and South Okanagan Waters.
Except the chain of lakes on Allison (One Mile) Creek, most other lakes produced
the average catches of rainbow trout in the Princeton and Penticton areas. Some of
the most important are referred to herewith.
Ludwig Lake.—Situated about 35 miles north of Princeton, provided good flyfishing for the rainbow trout introduced in 1941. The Five Mile Range trail leading
to the lake was much improved by the Forest Branch.
Hornet, Deadman, and Loosemore Lakes.—Located a short distance by trail off
the One Mile Highway, 25 miles north of Princeton, produced good catches of rainbow
trout, mostly taken on the fly, varying in weight to 10 lb.
Murphy Lakes.—Yielded good catches of rainbow trout to 5 lb., taken by fly and
troll during the early part of the season. Later the region was closed for forest-
protection.
Lightning Lakes.—Continued to produce the average catches of rainbow trout for
the local and non-resident anglers. Natural reproduction has so far maintained the
supply.
Nicomen Lake.—Situated in the Manning Park, was stocked with rainbow-trout
fry for the first time, and the results appear encouraging.
Similkameen River.—The lower reaches of the river provided good fly-fishing for
the rainbow trout up to 3 lb. The notable improvement can be attributed to the excellent co-operation received from the mining operators in that region in controlling the
escapement of concentrator refuse. The upper reaches of the river are teeming with
trout of a smaller size.
Clearivater Lake, Hedley.—The organized sportsmen of the Nickel Plate mine
continue to take an active interest in this lake in an endeavour to increase the natural
food-supply and the protection of spawning trout. The planting of trout fry in the
lake was deferred. The Cathedral Lakes, situated in the Ashnola watershed, were not
fished to any extent.
Twin Lakes.—The Eastern brook (speckled) trout planted in these somewhat small
landlocked lakes in 1940 provided good fishing, mostly by trolling. Good numbers of
carp are consumed by the trout—from stomach tracts examined.
Osoyoos Lake.—Situated partly in the Province, produced fair catches of rainbow
trout during the early and latter part of the season. The organized sportsmen on both
sides of the boundary are most anxious for the authorities to continue the restocking.
The lake is inhabited with several species of non-native fish, such as the European
carp, golden tench, small-mouthed black bass, and perch.
Bear and Madden Lakes.—The first-named lake produced fair catches of rainbow
trout to 6 lb. in weight. The latter lake in recent years has not produced many trout
from plantings effected each year. Consequently, the organized sportsmen of Oliver
have recommended the introduction of Eastern brook-trout for experimental purposes.
The lake is teeming with minnows. W 18 BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
Allendale Lake.—Provided some good fly- and bait-fishing for rainbow trout from
intermittent fry plantings. The lake can be reached by a mountain road, about 12
miles, via Okanagan Falls, thence by trail a short distance. MacLean and Clarke Lakes
in that region yielded fair catches of smaller trout.
Vaseaux Lake.—Adjacent to the highway, provided fair fishing for the large-
mouthed black bass.
Skaha (Dog) Lake.—Showed a slight improvement in the catches of Kamloops
trout, varying in weight to 10 lb. or more. It is quite probable the plantings of
fingerlings from the Summerland Hatchery rearing-ponds, when operated, will ensure
better results. There is some migration of trout up the connecting river to Okanagan
Lake.
Okanagan Lake (South End).—The general Kamloops trout fishing, mostly by
trolling, showed continued improvement. The best fishing was during the spring and
fall, when limit catches were made ranging to 10 lb. and more. The usual allotment
of kokanee eyed eggs was planted in suitable creeks primarily as a forage-fish.
The several small lakes—namely, Deer, Fish, Glen, Eneas, Agar, Garnet, Brenda,
Silver, Chute, and Peachland—continued to produce the average catches of rainbow
trout from yearly replenishment with fry.
Boundary District Waters.
Conkle (Fish) Lake.—This general utility lake provided fair fly-fishing and trolling
for rainbow trout, with an improvement in size and condition. The planting of eyed
eggs as scheduled was cancelled due to very high water temperatures in the outlet
creek. With the promised co-operation by the local anglers, some improvements will
be made to the inlet creek so as to assist natural spawning and egg plantings.
Kettle River and West Fork.—Apparently the rainbow trout fishing in these
accessible waters was not quite so good. This might be attributed to water and
seasonal conditions.
Jewel (Long) Lake.—Produced slightly better catches of Kamloops trout up to
5 lb. In the past most of the fish were taken by troll, but during the season fair
numbers were taken on the fly. Due to the predacious habits of the chub-minnows,
the planting of fingerlings in place of fry is strongly advocated.
Wilgress (Loon) Lake.—During the spring and fall the average catches of Kamloops trout were taken mostly on the troll, varying to 10 lb. in weight. From observations, minnows now inhabit the lake, probably from anglers discarding live bait, which
is contrary to the fishery regulations, as the lake is practically landlocked.
The several outlying lakes—namely, Arlington, Collier, Clarke, Williamson, Bull,
and Copper—and Boundary Creek continued to produce average catches of rainbow-
trout.
Smelter Lake and Granby River.—These accessible waters did not produce the
desired catches of rainbow trout, in spite of excellent spawning areas to aid natural
reproduction and yearly planting of eyed eggs and fry. Probably the increasing numbers of squawfish is a detriment; hence the requests received to reduce the numbers
of undesirable fish, and these requests are receiving attention. The stretch of Kettle
River flowing between Carson and Billings provided fair fly-fishing for rainbow trout.
Christina Lake.—Produced slightly better catches of Kamloops trout, mostly under
5 lb., during the spring and fall. The quite large yearly plantings of eyed eggs has
been fairly successful, considering the presence of small-mouthed black bass.
While the small-mouthed black bass are not so plentiful in the southern portion of
the lake, since less protection was afforded, average catches of rainbow trout were
made during the summer towards the north end of the lake, mostly under 5 lb.
The kokanee (redfish) provided fairly good trolling throughout the season, which
averaged about four to a pound, compared to about three to a pound last season.    The REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 19
spawning of the kokanee was again extremely late, commencing the latter part of
November, thus restricting the catches for commercial purposes, probably less than
2,000 lb., compared to 3,671 lb. in 1943.
Quite large numbers of European carp frequent the waters of Christina Lake;
possibly the first introduction was from anglers discarding live bait. However, the
carp would have eventually reached the lake as a result of the Grand Coulee Dam.
Reduction in the number of carp is receiving attention.
West Kootenay Waters.
Big Sheep and Beaver Creeks.—Typical waters for the Eastern brook-trout were
fished steadily by the anglers of Trail and Rossland. The extra protection afforded
and yearly replenishment with fry together with natural reproduction has maintained
the population of speckled trout. Under proper authority, steps have been and are
being taken to reduce the numbers of mergansers (fish-ducks) on Big Sheep Creek to
conserve trout-life.
Champion Lakes.—Yielded fair catches of Kamloops trout to 6 lb. as a result of
fingerling liberations each year since 1939.
Columbia River.—Flowing between Castlegar and Waneta, provided fair fishing
for rainbow trout for the numerous anglers of Trail. Coarse fish, including European
carp, are on the increase since the formation of Coulee Lake (Columbia River), south
of the border.
Arrow Lakes.—Some very encouraging reports were received of improved fishing
for the Kamloops trout on the fly and troll, particularly in the upper lake, where,
ordinarily, glacial silt is a detriment to trout-fishing during the summer months. The
systematic planting of eyed eggs in the several inlet creeks has possibly contributed
to the improvement, also some outward migration from Box Lake. The European carp
are now present in these lakes, which may seriously affect the food-supply of trout and
water-fowl.
Whatshan Lakes.—Provided the usual good fly-fishing and trolling for rainbow
trout from natural spawning and eyed-egg plantings. It is of interest to mention that
rainbow trout were taken up to 4 lb., as ordinarily the average size has been less than
1 lb. Very few Rocky Mountain whitefish were observed spawning, since the numbers
were reduced during 1942-43.
Summit, Victor, Three Valley, and Griffin Lakes.—West of Revelstoke, received the
third experimental planting of 150,000 cut-throat trout eyed eggs. While a few of the
species have been observed about 5 inches in length, it is too early to express an opinion
as to the success of these introductions. The lakes also provided fair catches of rainbow trout, which have been planted yearly, especially in Three Valley Lake. Begbie
and Beaver Lakes supplied fair catches of rainbow trout up to 5 lb.
Trout Lake, Lardeau.—Compared to the season 1943, average catches of Kamloops
trout were taken, mostly on the troll, up to 18 lb. Although the lake is in a remote
location, it was well patronized by the local and non-resident American anglers. As
the collection of eggs at Gerrard was considerably less than anticipated, the planting
of proposed eyed eggs was deferred. However, it is possible the natural spawning in
Trout Creek and at the outlet of the lake will suffice according to the present outtake.
Wilson Lakes.—Were fairly well patronized for fly-fishing and trolling, but compared to the previous season smaller catches were taken. The supply of rainbow trout
has been reasonably maintained from natural spawning in the connecting creek and
eyed-egg plantings.    The diminishing food-supply has resulted in much slower growth.
Box and Summit Lakes.—Adjacent to the Nakusp-Slocan Highway, produced fair
catches of rainbow trout;   in fact the Box Lake fishing improved. W 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Bear and Fish Lakes.—Adjacent to the Kaslo-Sandon Road, estimated to have
produced at least 10,000 mountain Kamloops trout. The proposed use of fertilizers in
these alpine lakes was held in abeyance.
Slocan Lake.—Gratifying reports were received of improved fishing for the Kamloops trout by fly and troll, especially towards the north end of the lake. The planting
of eyed eggs, fry, and fingerlings in the nursery waters possibly contributed towards
the improvement. Experimental tests were made with drag-seines to reduce the numbers of coarse fish, with poor results, and more suitable equipment will be used next
spring.
Cahill and Beatrice Lakes.—Were not fished to any extent. A suggested collection
of Kamloops trout eggs at Cahill Lake on behalf of the sportsmen of Sandpoint, Idaho,
is under consideration.
Slocan River.—Yielded fair catches of rainbow trout, but not in proportion to what
should be produced from ideal natural spawning conditions and yearly restocking with
fry. The stream is infested with squawfish and whitefish, which may be the cause of
poor fishing for trout. Moreover, the trout may have a tendency to migrate to other
waters.
Kootenay River.—Except the closed area, the rainbow trout fishing improved, especially at the mouth of Slocan River. The suggested lifting of the closure in that portion of the river between the Beasley boom and Slocan River was investigated and
found inadvisable in view of war-time industries involved.
Rosebud Lake.—The fishing for cut-throat and rainbow trout was exceedingly
poor; also, the collection of cut-throat trout eggs was seriously curtailed, amounting
to 70,000 eggs as compared to 263,705 in 1943. It is doubtful whether many eggs can
be expected from this source in future, although low-water conditions did not help
the situation.
Boundary Lake.—This small lake continues to produce fair catches of Eastern
brook-trout from yearly plantings of fry. The collection of 265,000 eggs was considerably less compared to 454,000 in the season of 1943. Low-water conditions changed
the spawning habits of the speckled trout and few used the outlet creek, where collecting
equipment was installed.
Salmon River and Tributaries.—The temporary suspension of concentrator operations on Sheep Creek has resulted in the lower reaches of the river being free of pollution for the first time in a period of approximately twenty years. The upper reaches
and tributary streams produced good catches of rainbow trout since other pollution has
ceased to exist.
West Arm of Kootenay Lake.—Reports varied from good to poor, as received from
numerous anglers, with regard to fishing and catches of Kamloops trout. It is hoped
that with the increased liberations of fingerlings from Nelson Hatchery rearing-ponds,
the supply of trout will increase, subject to possible migration to the main Kootenay
Lake. The marking of a percentage of fingerlings before liberation is recommended
as it will be of importance in ascertaining the migratory tendencies, if any, of these
fingerlings.
Kootenay Lake.—Average catches of large Kamloops trout were taken by trolling
in the vicinity of Kaslo and towards the south end of the lake. The areas in the vicinity
of Procter, Queens Bay, and Ainsworth did not produce as many trout as in previous
seasons. The immature trout, varying in weight to 5 lb., provided some good fly-fishing
at the mouths of creeks, also daily catch-limits were taken on the multiple lures which
are frequently used.
The Nelson Gyro Club conducted their fifth Kootenay Lake Trout Derby from
May 1st to November 15th, inclusive. The event included resident as well as nonresident anglers from Alberta and United States, and resulted in 329 Kamloops trout REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 21
of 5 lb. and over being weighed in and recorded. Total catch weight was 3,967 lb., and
the largest trout taken in the competition weighed 23 lb. 6 oz., compared to a similar
competition in 1943 when 253 trout were recorded, weighing 2,723 lb. 3 oz., and the
largest trout weighing 19 lb. 6 oz.
Lardeau River.—Provides the principal spawning areas for the parent Kamloops
trout of Kootenay Lake, and these spawning areas are approximately 30 miles up-stream
and adjacent to the Gerrard Hatchery. The run of spawners has been well up to the
average for the past twenty-five years, resulting in the spawning areas being well
seeded. In addition, eggs were collected for artificial propagation. Again this season
the clear water-flow induced a fair percentage of the fish to spawn below Canyon Creek.
War-time conditions restricted angling in the numerous alpine lakes in the Kootenay Lake drainage system, except Cottonwood and Six Mile Lakes, which were well
patronized by juvenile anglers. Consequently, in some instances natural reproduction
has been in excess of the food-supplies to support the increased population of cut-throat
and mountain Kamloops trout that inhabit some of the lakes, resulting in slower growth
and poor-conditioned fish.
Large-mouthed Black Bass.—Except in the south end of Kootenay Lake, these non-
native fish were not observed in more distant areas. Moreover, the bass are still quite
plentiful in the back channels and sloughs on Kootenay Flats, where they provide good
spring and summer fishing with plugs, spoons, and flies.
Goat River.—The lower portion of the river produced fair catches of Kamloops
trout. Above the canyon, which is a natural barrier, fishing for cut-throat trout
remained fairly good, although the reduced water-flow and high water temperatures
towards 70° caused the trout to have a tendency to work up-stream towards the forks,
where excellent fishing was obtainable.
East Kootenay Waters.
Moyie River and Lakes.—Continued to supply fair catches of cut-throat and Kamloops trout by fly and troll. As the waters are accessible to auto travel, the amount of
fish taken annually will increase under pre-war travel conditions. The substantial
plantings of eyed eggs, fry, and fingerlings yearly has attained fair results. Natural
spawning is much restricted.
Monroe Lake.—Produced average catches of cut-throat and hybrid trout, mostly
by trolling. For the first time in ten years cut-throat and hybrid trout eggs were
collected at the lake, being much restricted due to the north inlet being dry until May
4th and then flowing to about May 12th only. Eggs collected amounted to 115,000 cutthroat and 175,000 hybrid trout.
Mineral Lake.—This small productive lake supplied the usual good catches of cutthroat, hybrid, and Kamloops trout by fly-fishing and trolling. Approximately 28,000
hybrid trout eggs were collected at the small inlet creek. The last collection of eggs
was in 1939.
Fish Lakes.—Reserved for fish cultural purposes, produced 862,000 cut-throat trout
eggs, compared to 1,511,750 in the season 1943. Probably the reduced water-flow in
the outlet creek contributed to the smaller collection.
Smith Lake.—The fishing for Kamloops trout improved; good catches were taken
on the fly and troll during the spring and fall, varying to 14 lb. As there are no spawning areas to this lake, yearly plantings of fingerlings is carried out from the Cranbrook
Hatchery.
Premier Lake.—Supplied fairly good catches of Kamloops trout by fly-fishing and
trolling, mostly under 5 lb. Also some kokanee were taken by troll, having an average
weight of 1 lb. Since the trout reach maturity at a smaller size, the majority frequent Diorite Creek to spawn, with good natural reproduction.    In order to improve W 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
the condition of the fish and afford more protection when spawning, May 1st has been
recommended for the opening date instead of April 15th. The run of kokanee spawning in Diorite Creek was light.
St. Mary Lake, River, and Tributaries.—Provided fair fly-fishing and trolling for
the cut-throat trout. The results of Kamloops trout and kokanee introduced commencing 1942 remain obscure at present.
Skookumchuck River.—The stretch of river flowing between the falls and Kootenay
River, approximately 12 miles, provided fair fly-fishing for cut-throat trout, which are
mostly migratory from Kootenay River. Moreover, favourable reports were again
received of improved fishing for cut-throat trout above the falls, planted during the
year 1935.
Kootenay River.—In spite of glacial conditions, the stretch of the river flowing
between Canal Flats and Wardner provided good fishing for cut-throat and Dolly
Varden trout towards the early fall.
Bull River and Tributaries.—The supply of cut-throat trout has been reasonably
maintained from natural reproduction, affording good fly- and bait-fishing, except
possibly in one or two tributary creeks. Since the logging-road was abandoned, less
fishing is carried on.
Horseshoe Lake.—This small landlocked lake produced limit daily catches of Kamloops trout, taken mostly on baited multiple lures. In view of the large numbers of
immature trout of about half a pound in weight being caught by slich lures, the
organized sportsmen requested the lake be closed until further notice for conservation
measures, and this request was acted upon.
The several smaller lakes situated in the Cranbrook district—namely, Cooper,
Twin, Fish (above Monroe Lake), Echo, Ta Ta, Packhams, Johnson, Rothwell, and
Garbets Lakes (especially the latter lake)—produced good catches of cut-throat and
Kamloops trout.
Fernie District.
Tie Lake.—Was not fished to any extent, although a few Kamloops trout were
taken on the troll up to 5 lb. This would indicate that small allotments of fingerlings
planted were successful, considering the presence of numerous coarse fish and shiners.
McBains (Rosen) Lake.—There was an improvement in the catches of Kamloops
and cut-throat trout, mostly taken on the troll. The lake is quite important as a
summer resort for the residents of Fernie and district; therefore, all possible consideration is being given to maintain and increase the supply of sport fish.
Surveyors Lake.—Adjacent to camping-grounds. Due to the large population of
quite large chub-minnows, the yearly fry plantings were not very successful, although
some Kamloops trout were caught 5 lb. in weight. The plantings of fingerlings in place
of fry, commencing in 1943, indicate fruitful results.
Silver Springs Lakes.—The three small lakes continued to yield fair catches of
Kamloops trout up to 5 lb. in weight, first introduced in 1921. It was observed on
September 4th that minnows now inhabit the first and second lakes, possibly introduced
by illegal discarding of live bait. The presence of these fish may seriously affect the
growth of small trout.
Manistee, North Star, Burton, Loon, and Edwards Lakes.—Produced good catches
of Kamloops trout, varying to 15 lb. in weight in some instances.
Elk River and Tributaries.—These typical cut-throat trout waters supplied the
usual fair catches of cut-throat trout; but due to excessive angling by the local and
non-resident Alberta anglers it is becoming difficult to maintain the supply of trout of
legal size, coupled with the natural tendency of the larger trout to migrate up-stream,
where they remain plentiful. The annual plantings of eyed eggs in nursery waters
were considerably reduced owing to smaller collection of eggs. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 23
Grave Lake.—Fair catches of Kamloops trout were taken on the fly and trolls,
mostly under 5 lb. As conditions do not permit natural reproduction, the replenishment with fry each year is necessary. The experimental planting of kokanee fry as a
forage-fish has received favourable consideration, and will be duly carried out from
the Nelson Hatchery.
The local organized sportsmen have done very creditable work towards trail-
improvements leading to Grave Lake together with placing an overhead cable trolley
across the Elk River, and placing of stave piping at the outlet of the lake for possible
collection of eyed eggs to be planted in place of fry.
Summit Lake, Crowsnest.—The intended liberation of rainbow trout fry in the
lake was deferred due to very sluggish water conditions, caused by the very light snowfalls during the past two years. Barnes Lake produced good catches of cut-throat
trout, although rather small.    Natural spawning is ample to take care of the supply.
Columbia District.
Deer Lake.—The Kamloops trout fishing improved from plantings of eyed eggs
commenced in 1941. The recent construction of logging-roads from Findlay Creek
direct to the lake will increase the amount of fishing. Jeffrey Lakes near-by produced
fair catches of cut-throat trout.
Columbia Lake.—Fair catches of Kamloops trout varying up to 8 lb. were taken
on the troll. The lack of boats and accommodation curtailed the fishing. The planting of eyed eggs in the canal has been of great benefit to Lake Windermere.
Lake Windermere.—Very encouraging reports were received of improved Kamloops trout fishing, mostly by trolling; the trout taken varied in weight to 8 lb. The
third planting of kokanee eyed eggs was effected, the result of which is looked forward
to with interest.
Paddy Ryan Lakes.—Throughout the season these very accessible small lakes produced good fly-fishing for cut-throat trout up to 2 lb. in weight.
Lillian Lake.—Supplied some fly-fishing and good trolling for the Kamloops trout
up to 5 lb. The spring and early fall fishing is the best. A stop-panel screen fence was
placed in the outlet creek to prevent the outward migration of spawning trout. The
expense of the set-up was borne by the local organized sportsmen.
Dunbar, Twin, and Bott (Fish) Lakes.—These general utility lakes produced good
fly-fishing for native cut-throat trout, which are quite plentiful from natural spawning
and from yearly plantings of eyed eggs. Other small lakes in the Fish Lakes region
produced fair catches of cut-throat trout, with the exception of Hall Lakes, where low-
water conditions affected the fishing.
Baptiste Lake.—Well-proportioned cut-throat trout were taken on the fly, varying
to 5 lb. The creation of artificial spawning-grounds near the small inlet creek is
receiving attention, so as to encourage natural spawning and to improve the condition
of parent trout.
Magog, Cerulean, and Sunburst Lakes.—Situated in the Mount Assiniboine Park.
A preliminary survey was carried out during October to determine the prospects of
propagating the Montana black-spotted cut-throat trout introduced in 1935, which vary
in weight up to 8 lb. This is good growth considering the short growing season in the
lakes, which are found at about 6,000 feet elevation. As the trout spawn during the
month of July, the investigation will be completed at the opportune time.
Blackwater Lakes.—The four small lakes connected and adjacent to the Trans-
Canada Highway yielded good catches of rather small rainbow trout, mostly taken on
the fly. The supply has been well maintained from limited natural spawning and fry
liberations from the Cranbrook Hatchery. W 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Bush Lakes.—Partly adjacent to the Trans-Canada Highway, provided fair fishing
for the rainbow trout up to 3 lb. from eyed-egg plantings. The planting of kokanee
eyed eggs in the inlet creeks was carried out for the purpose of improving the food-
supply for the trout.
Cedar Lakes (No. 1 and No. 3) and Wiseman Lake.—Produced fair catches of rainbow trout up to 6 lb.
Island Lake, Spillimacheen.—Planted with two small allotments in 1941-42.
Results not yet determined.
The long periods of glacial silt entering the Columbia, Spillimacheen, Kicking
Horse Rivers, and other tributary streams render them unsuitable for but few trout.
Summary of Hatchery Operations.
Summerland Hatchery.—Seasonal operations for the South Okanagan and Similkameen waters: Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Beaver Lake Hatchery, 561,000;
Lloyds Creek Hatchery, 170,000; Penask Lake Hatchery, 200,000; total, 931,000.
Resultant fry distributed, 893,235.
Nelson Hatchery.—Yearly operations for East and West Kootenay, Boundary and
Okanagan waters: Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Gerrard Hatchery, 65,000;
Lloyds Creek Hatchery, 350,000; Penask Lake Hatchery, 880,000. Cut-throat trout
eggs collected at Rosebud Lake, 70,000; rainbow trout, 13,800. Eastern brook-trout
eggs collected at Boundary Lake, 265,000; Loon Lake, 100,000, and 454,000 eyed eggs
carried over from the fall of 1943. Kokanee (redfish) eggs received from Meadow
Creek operations, 3,190,000.
Gerrard Hatchery.—Seasonal operations: Kamloops trout eggs collected at
Lardeau River, 512,000, which were eyed and shipped to Kaslo, Cranbrook, and Nelson
Hatcheries.
Kaslo Hatchery.—Seasonal operations: Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from
Gerrard Hatchery, 300,000; the resultant fry for Kaslo and Bjerkness rearing-ponds.
Kokanee eggs received from Meadow Creek operations, 3,544,000.
Cranbrook Hatchery.—Seasonal operations for East Kootenay waters: Cut-throat
trout eggs collected at Fish Lakes, 862,000; Monroe Lake, 115,000, and 175,000 hybrid
trout eggs; Mineral Lake, 28,000 hybrid trout eggs. Kamloops trout eyed eggs
received from Gerrard, 125,000; Lloyds Creek Hatchery, 170,000; Penask Lake
Hatchery, 300,000.
Meadow Creek, Lardeau.—Kokanee eggs collected, 6,734,000. Disposal sold to the
Idaho State Fish and Game Department, 4,000,000 eyed eggs. Planted as eyed eggs
and fry in waters of the Province, 1,985,500; approximate losses of eggs and fry,
748,500.
Summary of Rearing-ponds operated, etc.
Taft Hatchery and Rearing-ponds.—Due to war-time conditions and the poor state
of the water-supply and ponds, operations were suspended after 1941. Subsequently,
the Taft townsite and all buildings thereon were sold, resulting in fish cultural operations being abandoned at that point, and all portable equipment was transferred over
to the Revelstoke Rod and Gun Club.
Summerland Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—Were only used temporarily during fry
liberations into the south end of Okanagan Lake.
Nelson Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—Kamloops trout fingerlings retained from 1943:
No. 2 pond, 39,449 (Lloyds Creek stock) ;  No. 5 pond, 41,477 (Gerrard stock).
Construction-work and faulty water-supply compelled the liberation of fingerlings
on January 27th from No. 2 pond into the West Arm of Kootenay Lake; estimated
number released, 20,000, besides unrecorded escapement. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 25
The fingerlings from No. 5 pond were liberated into the West Arm of Kootenay
Lake, May 18th to 31st, and totalled 26,506. Transferred to No. 1 pond, 3,050; Champion Lakes, 1,500. Total liberations, 32,056 (weight count), and were from 3 inches
to 4 inches in length.
Kamloops trout fry released in ponds, July and August: No. 2 pond, 22,361; No. 5
pond, 40,000 (Gerrard stock) ; No. 3 pond, 40,000 (Penask stock) ; No. 4 pond, 40,000
(Lloyds Creek stock). Owing to the condition of fingerlings in No. 5 pond, it became
necessary to release them into the West Arm of Kootenay Lake, September 16th;
estimated number, 29,722.
Approximate number of fingerlings in ponds as at December 31st: No. 1 circular
pond, 2,995;  No. 2 pond, 22,361;  No. 3 pond, 33,202;  No. 4 pond, 32,066;  total, 90,624.
Bjerkness Rearing-ponds.—Kamloops trout fry from Kaslo Hatchery released in
Nos. 1, 3, and 4 ponds, July 11th; 100,000 retained and fed once a day for a period of
seven weeks, then water conditions compelled the liberation of resultant fingerlings, as
follows: Kootenay Lake, 21,400; Slocan Lake, 6,000; loss in draining ponds, 65; total
liberations, 27,465 (weight count, 600 to 1 lb.). The percentage of fingerlings raised
was lower compared to previous years; due to predatory birds and insects, the visible
loss was extremely light.
Kaslo Rearing-ponds.—Kamloops trout fingerlings retained from 1943, 37,657,
subsequently released into Kootenay Lake between January 1st and April 24th. Total
weight count, 24,585 fingerlings.
On August 19th 199,141 Kamloops trout fry were released in the pond, retained
and fed until December, then due to the condition of the fish it became necessary to
commence the liberation of resultant fingerlings into Kootenay Lake, and from December 16th to January 6th 67,450 fingerlings were released (weight count, 485 to 1 lb.).
The liberation of the remainder of fingerlings in the pond was hastened by the pollution
of water-supply from Kaslo Creek from mining operations. Approximate number of
fingerlings liberated to January 13th, 1945, 130,209. Total liberations into Kootenay
Lake, 197,659 fingerlings, according to hatchery records, although probably actual
number released was somewhat less.
New Denver Rearing-pond.—Operation of this pond remained indefinitely suspended
owing to the serious pollution of Carpenter Creek from mining.
Kimberley Rearing-ponds.—The proposed construction of rearing-ponds by the
Kimberley Rod and Gun Club was deferred, pending possible co-ordinated action with
other clubs.
Matthew Creek Rearing-ponds.—The usual 30,000 cut-throat trout fry were planted
in the series of old abandoned beaver dams, wherefrom the fish have free access to the
St. Mary River.
Fernie Rearing-ponds.—Towards the latter part of June 10,000 cut-throat trout
fry were released in No. 1 and No. 2 ponds, which were attended to and fed by the
members of Fernie District Rod and Gun Club. A good percentage were raised from
2 inches to 3 inches in length and released into the Elk River, November 14th.
Private Ponds and Small Lakes.—Five applications were received and granted to
purchase small allotments of Kamloops trout fry and one for Eastern brook-trout fry.
Miscellaneous Subjects.
The disposal of stripped kokanee from spawning operations at Meadow Creek,
Lardeau, was as follows: 6,000 lb. placed in refrigeration storage at the Nelson Hatchery, 5,000 lb. in the cold storage plant at Kaslo for feeding of trout fingerlings retained
in rearing-ponds, and 1,000 lb. to local people for domestic use. The remainder of
stripped fish were liberated. W 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Lardeau River Spawning Areas.—Approximately 500 lb. of whitefish and suckers
were taken during spawning operations.
Skaha (Dog) Lake.—Low water prevented carp from entering the traps at entrance
of sloughs adjacent to Okanagan River. The general returns covering coarse fish taken
during the year are at present not available, except from 1943 returns as referred to
herewith.
Columbia River and Sloughs.—Suckers, 121 (67 lb.), by three licensed fur-farmers.
Christina Lake.—Suckers, 12 (40 lb.); ling, 43 (151 lb.); ordinary licences.
Chain Lake.—Suckers, 190 (500 lb.), by one licensed fur-farmer.
Osprey Lake.—Suckers, 190 (500 lb.), by one licensed fur-farmer.
Windermere Lake and Sloughs.—Suckers, 390 (840 lb.) ; squawfish, 601 (885 lb.) ;
ling, 90 (150 lb.); total, 1,875 lb., by one licensed fur-farmer.
Similkameen River.—Approximately 50,000 very small suckers were destroyed.
Some experimental tests were made in Slocan Lake with drag-seines to reduce the
numbers of coarse fish; the rugged shore-line and deepness of water prevented the
capture of many fish.    More effective equipment will be used next spring.
Salvage and. Transfer of Trout.—Favourable water conditions in most streams
prevented any serious loss of stranded trout, except in Big and Little Sheep Creeks,
Rossland area, where losses of Eastern brook-trout occurred, which could not be avoided
due to existing conditions.
Fish Guards and Screens.—The necessary screening of certain irrigation systems
for conservation measures is receiving attention, and data in that respect is being
recorded.
Fishways.—The six small fishways installed in dams under 10 feet in height are
in fair condition and operating satisfactorily. The new dam and fishway constructed
on McRae Creek, Christina Lake, by the Japanese, under the authority of the British
Columbia Security Commission, was not completed, so the passage of fish remains
unaffected.
Cottonwood Creek, Nelson.—A section of the lumber flume of approximately 200
feet was replaced with concrete by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, with the
installation of 4- by 4- by 3-inch concrete baffle-stops staggered and spaced 3 feet apart
to afford free passage to migratory fish.
Obstructions.—The hydro-electric power-development on Kootenay River, near
Brilliant, was completed and the water-control gates in the power dam were closed on
June 6th, and in lieu of a fishway in the structure considered not feasible. The West
Kootenay Power and Light Company, of Trail, contributed the annual sum of $600
towards maintaining the supply of trout in that portion of Kootenay River to Slocan
Pool and in the Slocan River, tributary to Kootenay River, above the artificial barrier.
Lardeau River.—Natural obstructions, the Handy Log-jam. The channel north
and adjacent to the major obstruction, which was cleaned out during the year 1941,
has again become partially choked up as a result of logs and debris from Trout Lake.
To ensure the free passage of spawning Kamloops trout from Kootenay Lake to their
respective spawning-grounds adjacent to Gerrard Hatchery, provision is made in the
1945-46 estimates to remove the obstructions next fall.
From information on hand, there are no other naturally formed obstructions that
would seriously impede or stop the movement of spawning or migratory trout.
Pollution by Mining Industries.—In some instances the operation of mines producing gold-bearing ores has been curtailed due to labour shortage, etc. Moreover,
there is a notable improvement in certain streams that were polluted since effective
control and impoundment of concentrator refuse, as referred to herewith.
Similkameen River.—During the spring there was an escapage of concentrator
refuse into the river from a breakage in the impounding area of the Kelowna Explora- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 27
tion Company at Hedley. At considerable expense the company has constructed and
developed a large area to dispose of and impound their tailings to avoid pollution, with
effective attention taken daily.
Similar action as above is taken by the Mascot Mining Company at Hedley, resulting in but slight pollution of Twenty Mile Creek, flowing into Similkameen River.
The Granby Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, of Copper Mountain, has taken
very effective measures in the form of impoundment of concentrator refuse from some
5,500 tons of copper ore treated daily. Also similar precautionary measures are being
taken to prevent the fine ashes entering the Similkameen River from their steam plant
near Princeton.
Okanagan River.—Flowing between Okanagan and Skaha Lakes, became polluted
towards the fall with waste fuel-oil as a result of escapage from a Canadian Pacific
Railway Company earth dump adjacent to the river. Immediate attention was given
to the repair of the sump, and to avoid a recurrence of pollution the company is constructing a concrete sump, which, with proper attention, will protect water-fowl, fur-
bearing animals, and fish against polluted waters.
Columbia River.—Remained polluted with refuse discharged from the smelter and
fertilizer plants operated by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company, of Trail.
The pollution does, no doubt, restrict the circulation of trout in the region affected,
and also is harmful to the bottom feed.
Salmon River and Tributaries.—For the first time in approximately twenty years
the lower reaches of the river and Sheep Creek are free of pollution, since concentrator
operations were suspended by the Sheep Creek Gold Mines and the Gold Belt Mines on
Sheep Creek, the only two operations now in the Salmon River area.
Kaslo Creek.—Tributary to Kootenay Lake. The Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Ltd.,
commenced the operation of the Whitewater mine, and in course of ore treatment pollution occurred intermittently in the creek from discharge of concentrator refuse. The
operators have been most sincere in their efforts to control and impound the waste by
installing pumping machinery, etc., but due to the breakdown of the power plant the
pollution was unavoidable.
Seaton and Carpenter Creeks.—Flow into Slocan Lake. Owing to the steady and
increased production and treatment of base-metal ores from the Zincton Mines, Ltd.,
the pollution continued. The Reco Mountain Base Metal Mines (Noble Five) at San-
don ceased operations since the concentrator burned down.
Slocan Lake.—The Western Exploration Company concentrator operated intermittently, resulting in a slight pollution of the lake, which does not seriously affect
fish-life.
St. Mary River.—The steady and careful attention given to the impoundment of
concentrator refuse from some 6,000 tons of base-metal ores treated daily by the
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company at Kimberley has prevented the serious
pollution of the river.
Elk River.—The precautionary measures undertaken by the Elk River Collieries
on Coal Creek has prevented coal sludge from entering the creek. Similar steps were
taken by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company at Michel to prevent the pollution of
Michel Creek, flowing into the Elk River.
Lumber Industries.—The operators of the various stationary and portable sawmills complied with the fishery regulations to prevent the pollution of waters frequented
by fish from sawdust and mill refuse, including slash from logging operations.
Water Conditions. •— The light snowfall in the East and West Kootenay areas
resulted in smaller collections of cut-throat and Eastern brook-trout eggs, also, in some
instances, the reduced water-flow in certain creeks restricted the planting of eyed eggs.
Fortunately during the year there were no serious forest fires, thus conserving moisture and vegetation for the benefit of fish-life. W 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Diseases.—During the year no disease was observed or reported amongst fish-life
in lakes and streams.
Introduction of Non-native Fish.-—While precautionary measures have been taken
in the fishery regulations to prohibit the possession and use of live bait, unfortunately
each year we find the presence of undesirable fish in certain lakes which previously
were inhabited with only trout.
Kaslo Hatchery.—In the event of the British Columbia Security Commission vacating the building towards next spring, provision is made in the 1945-46 estimates to
effect the necessary improvements, with some financial aid from the organized sportsmen.
Gerrard Hatchery, etc.—Arrangements are pending with regard to the transfer
of the hatchery building and staff-house from the Forest Branch to the Game Commission. The property is most useful for seasonal fish cultural operations, more particularly after the completion of the highway link between Shutty Bench and Lardeau.
Co-operation.—During the year we received splendid assistance from the organized
sportsmen, individuals, municipalities, Forest Branch, Department of Public Works,
and the Water Rights Branch; further, for scientific information supplied by Dr. W. A.
Clemens and Dr. D. C. B. Duff, University of British Columbia, and Dr. G. Clifford
Carl, Director, Provincial Museum, for which we offer our sincere thanks.
" C " DIVISION (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO,
CHILCOTIN, AND SQUAMISH DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in
" C " Game Division during the year ended December 31st, 1944.
Big Game.
Moose.—The bag-limits taken from the Cariboo area gave indications of climatic
conditions favourable to the killing of unusual numbers of these animals without even
the skill of hunting demanded. In the ordinary course of events it seemed that this
year favoured particularly even the inexperienced hunter, let alone the veteran of the
woods. Some considerable opposition was voiced by the resident hunters and non-
hunters in the Cariboo. To those depending in a business way on the tourist traffic and
the visiting hunter might come a loss of business, and fears were widely expressed that
a repetition of favourable climatic conditions might witness a pronounced deterioration in numbers as a business asset to the Cariboo and surrounding districts. It should
nevertheless be remembered that we can not take one single year as a yardstick for
future action. We have had several years, interposed with an occasional lag, in the
taking of the usual quota of big game. Let us rather view the situation over the five-
year period and judge our future course of action along these lines. If we work with
the law of averages as a basis, I do not think for a moment that we are in the red at
this stage. If similar conditions prevail, the coming year might provide argument for
some restriction. However, there may be some merit in the suggestion for a shorter
season.    It is well worth considering.
A few tracks of moose were observed east of Beaver Lake in the Kelowna district
and also at the head of Bear Creek. This species is on the increase in the Kamloops
area.   No sign of disease is reported.
Wapiti.—An open season was declared for the first time on wapiti at the head of
Adams Lake. Not a single animal was taken to our knowledge. The habit that some
sportsmen have of trying out their rifles in the area where they intend to hunt is not
a good one.   In a valley of limited width this practice has a tendency to drive animals REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 29
uphill. The obtaining of a substantial meat-supply was favoured by both resident and
non-resident hunter alike.
Mountain-sheep.—To our knowledge the open season at Squaam Bay did not bring
forth trophies. This area is difficult to negotiate. In the Shorts Creek area, near Vernon, their numbers appear to keep stationary. A thorough investigation by Predatory-
animal Hunter Shuttleworth into the stand of mountain-sheep is now being undertaken.
Mountain-goat.—Very few of these animals were hunted this year.
Bear.—Black bear are still a menace to stock, particularly in the sheep-raising
districts, and are still numerous. Limited numbers of grizzlies were taken in the Revelstoke and Crowfoot Mountains. Three grizzlies were reported killed by sheep-herders
at the headwaters of Mission Creek last spring. These animals are described as being
fairly numerous around the Bowron Lake sanctuary.
Mule-deer.—This species, and also that of the moose, provides the stand-by in the
matter of game-supply. These animals are such prolific breeders that I doubt if British
Columbia will ever run short of game. With the expected tremendous increase in postwar population, shorter open seasons should possibly be seriously considered. Deer
were numerous in most sections of this Division.
Caribou.—The caribou herd at Clearwater remains stationary in the matter of
numbers. If conditions are suitable, a special patrol will be made into the Clearwater
area during the coming summer to ascertain the extent of summer range, and also
their general conditions.
Reports from Bowron Lake on the stand of caribou are not at all reassuring, and
according to information received many hunters in the past have wantonly slaughtered
these animals. Wolves have also played their part in this destruction. The use of a
plane and the employment of six trained hunters for one month would soon reduce this
pest. Foot hunting over wide areas is too slow to cope with this menace. The caribou
population, reported stationary in some places and dwindling in others, should be
thoroughly investigated. Besides the predatory-animal situation there is another
factor having a physiological bearing relating to stationary big-game populations, of
which little is known.
Wolves are a recurring problem in British Columbia, and if additional funds are
required for this purpose then it should, by all the means at our disposal, be given prior
consideration so as to eliminate one possible factor in reduction of big game, especially
where the species is reported either at a standstill or are decreasing in numbera
Fur-bearers.
A slight increase is generally reported in the beaver population.in several detachments. In many species, I am of the opinion that we are operating far short of our
fur-bearing potential. After several disappointments in the delay of our request for
conservation measures relating to beavers, surely this will at last materialize. The
regrettable feature of all these delays is the lack of substantial increase of beavers as
shown, instead of the gradual upward swing in numbers of an animal so obviously
necessary to the welfare of this Province. Progress is made in steady, substantial
growth.   Other fur-bearers are much the same as in previous years.
The beaver census is again submitted and is self-explanatory. Indians are excluded
until the Dominion Government scheme for the conservation of beavers takes more
definite shape. Some comment has been made occasionally that these figures are not
accurate. It might also be said that the return of catch by trappers could stand very
close checking. There is only one way to obtain this and that is through the fur-buyers'
records. We have no Provincial-wide access to these records. The Game Wardens are
responsible for the checking of census returns over certain trap-lines, and also those
lines with a beaver census of ten animals and under.    The success of this system is to W 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
a fairly large extent in their hands, but it requires the co-operation of all concerned,
including the facilities at our disposal, to check records. Education is required, and in
this regard I would strongly suggest the use of moving pictures as a constructive
medium. The Indians on the reserves are a fertile field for the dissemination of ideas
and the stepping-up of education in the conservation of fur-bearers. This should also
apply to white trappers.
Season.
No. of Trappers
submitting
Returns.
Estimate of
Beaver.
Average
per Trapper.
1934-35 -	
275
343
367
345
307
348
345
350
404
361
4,789
6,392
6,347
5,945
6,315
6,501
7,228
6,663
7,852
7,609
17.41
1935-36	
18.60
1936-37    	
17.29
1937-38         	
17.23
1938-39-   	
17.30
1939-40 	
18.68
1940-41--	
20.95
1941-42    -  _	
19.04
1942-43—  	
19.43
1943-44  ....   	
21.06
Several patrols were made beyond the border of the Yalakom Game Reserve by
Game Warden W. A. H. Gill. Beavers have now moved into the southern portion of
this reserve, and a report states that they are making a steady increase.
Upland Game Birds.
Upland game birds are due for an open season in the Cariboo, and a general
recommendation is made to this effect for 1945, with the exception of Williams Lake.
The Game Warden for that district recommends an extension of the close season.
A slow increase is mentioned in the Clinton Detachment. Ornithologists should, and
invariably do, know the cycle of scarcity and abundance in grouse. It would appear
to the writer that there should be a shortening, or even closing, of the season when
at the bottom of the periodic decline, and an increase in the length of the season when
it reaches its maximum in the upward swing.    The suggestion has a scientific basis.
Army manoeuvres in the Vernon district did not help the pheasant situation. In
the Kamloops area the pheasant-shooting was reasonably good. Trapping of pheasants
in the Tranquille area is being followed during the present winter, 1944-45. If
weather conditions permit, we should liberate roughly thirty or forty birds around
Kamloops. The pheasants around Kamloops were hard to get during the open season,
and complaints of damage to crops were few in number. Quail are reported on the
increase in the Okanagan, and particularly at Kelowna.
Migratory Game Birds.
In the Vernon district ducks were fewer in number due to the drying-up of small
lakes. The migration to the South of ducks and other water-fowl took place, to a very
large extent, around October 30th. This was immediately prior to a cold and unusually
blustery period of weather lasting seven days. This spell of bad weather was, no
doubt, partly responsible for the departure, but it is well known that there is a much
more powerful influence affecting bird migration, entirely apart from weather conditions. Some migratory birds make their northern migration flight very often through
unfavourable weather conditions. The explanation of the mystery of migration has
never yet been given.
The winter of 1944-45 in the Interior of British Columbia has been a very mild
one up to date  (January 31st, 1945).    According to reports from Kelowna, roughly REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 31
2,000 whistling swans were observed migrating south last fall. In my opinion, considerable numbers of ducks are unable to make the southern migration because of
injury from lead shot during the open season.
Vermin.
Seven Wardens destroyed the following predators: Coyotes, 150; crows, 256;
owls, 85; hawks, 151; magpies, 551; cats (stray), 152; dogs (stray, etc.), 17; bobcats, 4;  ravens, 23;  golden eagles, 5;  bears, 13;  cougars, 8;  and wolf, 1.
Fairly large numbers of predators were killed by hunters in several districts, but
owing to shortage of ammunition this activity has been curtailed.
The use of the telescope and rifle is one of the best methods of destroying coyotes
known at present. An occasional trapper has had some success, but largely before
the snow comes. There is considerable room for inventive genius in the destroying of
much larger numbers of coyotes. Something in the nature of a very large wire pen
of sufficient height with adjustable bottoms and raised from the ground, with bait
placed inside long before the pen is to be used as a trap, might be utilized. The bottom flaps could be dropped by means of a simple mechanical arrangement once the
animals had acquired the habit of entering and feeding on the bait without interference. This method might have the advantage of capturing the entire number of
coyotes feeding on, or hanging around, the bait at one time. The question of choosing
the right time for such an experiment would be all important. It is worth a try at
any rate.    This animal is exceptionally hard to outwit.
Game-protection.
The cabin constructed by Game Warden Gill, with the assistance of one other
officer, has been a very important factor in the better protection of mountain-sheep
and beaver in the Yalakom Game Reserve. Seventy prosecutions were obtained during
the year, resulting in sixty-seven convictions. Two of these were laid by the Provincial
Police;  two cases were dismissed and one remanded indefinitely.
Game Propagation.
Twelve pheasants were trapped at Tranquille and liberated in other parts of the
Kamloops area. The trapping of pheasants is continuing. Twelve live beaver were
captured and liberated in various parts of the Province. I think this system of propagation could be largely increased through the acquisition of new beaver sanctuaries.
Game Reserves.
The accommodation at Bowron Lake has been greatly improved, and great credit
is due to Game Warden E. Holmes for the thorough workmanlike manner in which the
job has been accomplished. Yalakom Game Reserve has been fairly well patrolled, and
a general increase in fur-bearers and mountain-sheep has been noted.
Fur Trade.
Most of the fur trade is carried on through Coast agencies.
Fur-farms.
A few are operating. A bibliography of all fur-farming books has been prepared
in this Division, and one is given to each prospective fur-farmer. This is an industry
with tremendous possibilities, and a plan could quite well be prepared as a post-war
scheme. W 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This system works very smoothly and gives little trouble. The better the maps we
have, the easier the task becomes. There are roughly 98 per cent, renewals four months
before the end of the trapping season. As a system of registration of geographical
boundaries, it would be difficult to find its equal. Once completed in all phases of the
ultimate plan, it will become a trouble-free system. Educational facilities should be
a major part of fur-conservation.
Registered Guides.
I would like to say the same for the registered guides as I did for the registration
of trap-lines. Unfortunately, we are not yet organized in this very important branch
of our work. There is a lot to do in this field. It is to be earnestly hoped that some
constructive effort will be made during the coming year, especially with the end of the
European war apparently in sight.
Special Patrols.
A special patrol was made by Game Wardens Mottishaw and Jobin in connection
with a minor trap-line dispute in the vicinity of Cariboo Lake. There were no special
patrols of an outstanding nature.
Hunting Accidents.
Russell Erickson, 146 Eighty-third Street North, Seattle, Washington, was accidentally shot in the foot while trying a pump shotgun near Likely, B.C., on October
4th, 1944. This man lost a toe, and part of his foot was badly bruised, but was soon
released from the hospital at Williams Lake, B.C.
J. A. Sampson, of Vancouver, B.C., was accidentally shot in the right eye, near the
left eye, in the left antrum, in the right ear, in the left shoulder, and in the left hand
by his companion, Frank Andrews, while they were hunting pheasants on the Duffy
Ranch, near Kamloops, on October 14th, 1944. Sampson later had to have his right
eye removed.
On November 30th, 1944, Private Bennett A. Janning, Regimental No. K607656,
First Battalion, Sault Ste. Marie and Sudbury Regiment, was hunting near his home
at Darfield, B.C., while on leave. He shot himself in the foot accidentally while
crawling through a barbed wire fence. It was necessary to remove the second toe of
the left foot. Private Janning was unable to explain how the gun went off, but thought
it must have been set off by the barbed wire becoming caught in one of the hammers of
the gun.
Nothing of a really constructive nature has ever yet been devised in connection
with hunting accidents and in cases where hunters lose their bearings. Despite all the
frequently recurring accidents in the hunting field, we are still very much behind in
the adoption of new ideas. While it is true, according to one Game Association, that
hunters should be trained to avoid accidents from boyhood and which incidentally,
should be one of the main duties of all Game Associations, evidence appears to show that
most of the hunting accidents are caused by older hunters and not the young men.
To help in the reduction of these accidents might I suggest that the use of moving
pictures of the right and wrong way in the use of firearms be encouraged, and that these
pictures be shown as a regular feature of our programme.
In the industrial field the use of colours as a medium of safety promotion has been
long established. It has recently been developed as a result of war-time industry to a
very high degree, and standardization of this safety system is now utilized throughout
Europe and the North American Continent.    Any suggestion, however small, that will REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 33
be likely to provoke thought in the prevention of hunting accidents should be encouraged
and given proper publicity.
The colour commanding greatest attention in the hunting field and apparently by
far the most stimulating, is what has been described by industrialists as " alert orange,"
and it would seem to the writer that the use of this colour should be encouraged. Actual
tests carried out a few years ago by this Department, and described in a previous annual
report, left no doubt in the minds of the observers engaged in this test. The use of a
cap either of red or orange does not cover a large enough area to enable the hunter to
instantly detect the colour in another hunter. The writer has used an " alert orange "
sweater for years, and at a distance of 2 miles he can be instantly identified. Some
hunters state that this colour is too easily identified by game animals. This assertion
has not yet been scientifically demonstrated. Curiosity is an inherent weakness in most
animals, and if a colour such as " alert orange " will delay the departure of a game
animal once a hunter wearing this colour is observed, provided animals are sensitive to
certain colours, then it would be an asset to the hunter rather than act as a deterrent
to a successful hunt. Surely no hunter in the field to-day would ever resort to following
the law of all fauna protection in the use of natural camouflage, and yet many hunters
actually use neutral colours. This in itself would be an invitation to the average hunter
to pot-shot something resembling, say, a deer if the other hunter were to wear khaki.
Summary and General Remarks.
The open season on big game and the prevailing conditions favoured a heavy kill
of those animals. Many of the resident hunters became alarmed over the exodus of
such large numbers, particularly moose. The average kill over a five-year period would
be a better indication. It seems that a census of all big-game animals killed should
be taken. The open season on wapiti at the head of Adams Lake produced no results.
The bulls were too far back and the season too early.
In the matter of bird-hunting, the close season on grouse in the Cariboo has, no
doubt, had a good effect. Shorter seasons with carefully regulated bag-limits might
prevent close seasons. The adjusting of the bag-limits and length of season could well
be synchronized with the cyclic increase and decrease on grouse.
In the realm of the fur-bearer, there is a tremendous field for expansion both in
wild fur and fur-farmed animals. Plans to increase this asset should be under way as
a post-war measure.
The bird-shooting, both upland and migratory, was not up to previous years. Many
of the ponds had dried up. There appeared to be a premature migration of migratory
water-fowl under weather conditions of a temporary nature, which did not improve
matters. There are, no doubt, thousands of ducks quite unable to make the long migratory trip south because of injury. Predators do their share of killing under those
circumstances.
To all hunters and Game Associations, and to members of the Forestry Service,
the Water Rights Branch, and Provincial Police, we extend our grateful thanks for
the help and advice so ably given.
" D " DIVISION (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, PRINCE RUPERT, FORT
GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Big-game Animals.
Favourable weather conditions prevailed throughout the winter and spring. All
big-game animals are reported on the increase, with the exception of caribou in the
area south of, and in, Tweedsmuir Park. W 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Fur-bearers are on the increase in the areas trapped by the white trappers. Indian
territory, owing to improvidence and carelessness of the owners, is steadily decreasing
in value and the catches becoming less every year. It has been suggested that beaver
on Indian territory should be closed for a period of four or five years. Such a drastic
step, although advisable, should be carefully studied before being implemented.
Upland Game Birds.
Weather conditions having been more favourable, a substantial increase in all
species is reported, and the close season mooted last year will not be necessary.
Migratory Birds.
Good hunting was afforded the nimrods during last season. The season could be
extended two weeks at the beginning of the hunting season in the Eastern District,
that is from September 1st to December 30th in each year.
Vermin.
Complaints regarding depredations by coyotes and timber-wolves are decreasing.
Predatory-animal hunters appointed during the season 1944-45 killed a very small
number of predators, and, in my opinion, their services may not be required during
next season.
Game-protection.
Game officers in " D" Division carried out their duties in the usual efficient
manner, covering their respective detachment areas with a view of protecting game,
supervising trapping, inspecting fur-farms, checking fishing, etc.
A distance of 100,647 miles was covered by members of the Game Department
stationed in " D " Division.   All means of transportation were used, as follows:—
Miles.
Train     4,016
Automobiles   _'_  79,402
Foot  (including dog-team)       5,437
Horses (including sleighs)         722
Boat (steamer and river-boats)      5,322
Plane       9,764
As pointed out previously, an increase in the staff of Game Wardens in " D " Division is fast becoming a necessity, caused by the construction of new highways throughout the Northern Interior. This matter will, I hope, receive due consideration when
estimates are submitted to the Legislature.
Game Propagation.
No propagation-work has been started in this Division. No reports on past work
—the liberation of elk in the Queen Charlotte Islands—have been received.
Some complaints were received regarding the liberation of racoons on these islands,
and the suggestion made by Game Warden E. Martin that more racoons and some mink
be liberated should not be considered at this time.
Game Reserves.
No game reserves are located in " D " Division. The sanctuaries or safety zones
created in the vicinity of Prince Rupert, Smithers, Vanderhoof, and Prince George are REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 35
giving satisfaction. Quite a number of migratory birds are using the areas in the
vicinity of Prince George, Vanderhoof, and Smithers during the migration both north
and south.
Fur Trade.
Another successful season passed. Fur, although not abundant, brought very
good prices, especially the northern pelts.
Legislation passed establishing a licence covering transient fur-buyers has been
well received by the fur trade in general, and has had a tendency to stabilize the established trading-posts.
Fur-farming.
This industry is not receiving sufficient attention. Some 500 farms were started
in the Division, but only about thirty remain active.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Registration of trap-lines is being widely recognized as sensible and farseeing
legislation; results far exceed expectations, and trap-lines which a few years ago were
worthless are now rated at from $2,000 to $10,000 in value.
Closer supervision and protection, by employing more Game Wardens and creating
special game districts, especially where the trap-lines are fast becoming fur-farms,
should be given the trappers and trap-lines.
The Indian trapper should receive special attention, with a view of stopping the
indiscriminate killing of the fur-bearers and create an incentive to conserve the fur
on the trap-line, thereby creating fur-farms rather than trap-lines. Special legislation
should be passed dealing with poachers who steal furs from their neighbours. Such
offences could, perhaps, be brought under the Criminal Code of Canada.
Registration of Guides.
The number of big-game hunters visiting British Columbia having increased during
the last season, 1944, as compared with the 1943 season, most guides were occupied.
A greater influx is anticipated, and a shortage of qualified guides is expected.
New regulations will be put in force during the next season, 1945, which, I hope,
will result in greater efficiency in the field on the part of the guides, to the satisfaction
of the non-resident hunters.
Special Patrols.
Numerous patrols were undertaken by the Game Wardens in the Division, who
undertook some lengthy and strenuous patrols that could be considered of a special
nature; but the patrols maintained by Game Warden P. Brown, of Vanderhoof, during
the year, one of which was brought to our attention by the favourable comments made
by the N.C.O. i/c of the Fort George District, letter dated December 5th, 1944, are
brought to the attention of the Game Commission as outstanding and most efficient,
and although such patrols are made as regular duties of a Game Warden, I bring same
to your attention as, to my mind, the work of this Game Warden is outstanding and
constant.
Special patrols undertaken by Constable W. Trant, of Bella Coola, and Constable
J. W. Todd, i/c Telegraph Creek, during 1944, are also brought to your attention.
The patrol to Anahim Lake and Ulgatcho by Constable Trant, Game Wardens
Stevenson and Roumieu was very effective and very good work accomplished. Various
Indian settlements were visited for the first time. Some 300 miles were covered,
mostly by saddle-horse. W 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Hunting Accidents.
The following accidents occurred:—
Prince George District.—James Watts Phillips, of Prince George, carrying a loaded
firearm in his car for the purpose of killing bear doing damage around his sawmill, on
arrival near camp saw a bear, stopped his car, stepped out, dragging his loaded rifle
behind him; the gun discharged, bullet entering left side of back. Death was instantaneous.    Coroner's inquest held September 1st, 1944, found death to be accidental.
Vanderhoof Detachment.—John Braithwaite, of Lejac, aged 11 years, on November 11th, 1944, during his father's absence and contrary to his parents' wishes, took
a single-shot .22 rifle to shoot squirrels near a granary. Having cocked the gun, same
tangled into some brush; the rifle discharged, shot entered the boy's right thigh and
lodged in the left thigh. Report received December 6th that the boy had completely
recovered.   The parents having been sufficiently punished, no prosecution was instituted.
Game-fish Culture.
Kamloops trout eyed eggs were again supplied by the Game Commission to a number of Rod and Gun Clubs in this Division.    Same were distributed as follows:—
The Prince George Rod and Gun Club received 80,000 eyed Kamloops trout eggs,
operated a small hatchery, and distributed the fry as follows: Cluculz Lake, 25,000;
Summit Lake, 10,000; Bednesti Lake, 10,000; Summit Lake, 15,000; and West Lake,
5,000.    Total, 65,000;   loss, 15,000.
Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club received 60,000 eyed Kamloops trout eggs, also
operated a small hatchery and distributed the fry as follows: Seymour Lake, 2,000;
McClure Lake, 3,000;   Kathlyn Lake, 38,000.    Total, 43,000;   loss, 22,000.
Terrace Rod and Gun Club received 5,000 eyed Kamloops trout eggs, which were
planted in streams and tributaries flowing into Kitsumgallum Lake, north of Terrace.
As a result of plantings, which extend over a period of years, fishing along the
Canadian National Railway from Prince George to Hazelton is improving steadily, and
will eventually be the main attraction of the district, especially to tourists and big-
game hunters. This work will be kept up and, if possible, increased and improved
from year to year.
The efforts of the various Rod and Gun Clubs mentioned above are worthy of commendation, and it is hoped that such public-spirited efforts will be kept up during the
coming year.
In addition to Kamloops trout, 10,000 kokanee eyed eggs were planted in Cluculz
Creek. Results of this planting will not be noticed for a number of years. It is proposed to continue such plantings over a period of years, or until results of the plantings
are available.
Summary.
As a whole, the past season was very successful; weather and breeding conditions
have been favourable, with the result that an increase in the number of big-game animals, game birds, and migratory birds is quite noticeable. The close season mooted
last year will not be necessary during the season 1945-46.
Friendly relations have been maintained between the British Columbia Police
and Game Officers, and I take this opportunity to extend to all British Columbia Police
Officers my sincere thanks for the support they were always ready to give the Game
Wardens in this Division.
The various Game Clubs in " D " Division have, as in the past, co-operated to the
fullest with the Game Wardens in the Division, and I respectfully suggest that the
thanks of the British Columbia Game Department should be extended to each club. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 37
To all Game Wardens I extend my sincere thanks for their loyal support, and sincerely hope that the same loyal and efficient spirit will prevail during the coming
season.
"E" DIVISION   (MAINLAND COAST NORTH TO TOBA INLET AND
LOWER MAINLAND AS FAR INLAND AS NORTH BEND).
As in the case of "A" Division, this Division is supervised from Vancouver, and
the following are excerpts from reports of the Game Wardens and Fishery Officers of
the Division.
Big Game.
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—While this Division is not generally conceded to be
a big-game district, still coast deer are fairly plentiful. This game animal provides the
principal big-game hunting of the Division.
Elk (Wapiti).—The elk liberated in Howe Sound at McNab Creek, some 30 miles
from Vancouver, are slowly increasing.
Mountain-goat.—A few mountain-goat are found in parts of the district, but they
are not considered plentiful enough to warrant the hard hunting necessary to obtain
a specimen or trophy. Most of the big-game hunters of the Lower Mainland are going
farther afield for their game. With road conditions steadily improving throughout the
Interior, it is a much easier matter to reach good big-game districts by automobile than
it is to reach the coastal big-game districts by launch.
Fur-bearing Animals.
The Fraser Valley still produces a large number of muskrats. Other fur taken in
the district includes marten, mink, weasel, racoon, red fox, with beaver and otter being
scarce. The red fox is considered a pest in the Fraser Valley, and organized efforts
are being made to keep them from becoming too plentiful. The Game Wardens at
Chilliwack and Mission Detachments have several foxhounds, and have accounted for
a large number of foxes this year.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue and Ruffed).—"E" Game Division is not favoured with a great
number of grouse. Willow and blue grouse may be found in parts of the Division, but
not in numbers great enough to warrant a lengthy open season. No doubt the settling-
up of the Fraser Valley has been the cause of the decrease in the willow grouse of the
district.
Pheasants.—This splendid game bird provides the principal sport on the Lower
Mainland. It is a difficult matter to keep up the supply of pheasants required, and to
satisfy the number of licensed hunters in the district, there being considerably over
12,000 licensed sportsmen expecting to obtain good pheasant-shooting between Vancouver, Ladner, and Chilliwack.
In recent years the Lower Fraser Valley farming has changed from a grain-
growing district to one of dairying, which naturally has a material bearing on the
pheasant population. With the ever-increasing hunting population, the breaking-up of
large farms into smaller holdings and consequent increase in population, the change
in the variety of farming, and the large number of red foxes to be found throughout
the area, it is becoming more necessary to assist the pheasant population by ever-
increasing liberations of pheasants purchased from licensed pheasant-farmers.
California Quail.—There is only one small area in " E " Division in which there
are sufficient quail to warrant a short open season. That area referred to is the
Ladner district. W 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Partridge (European).—This fine sporting bird does not do well on the Lower
Mainland. Efforts have been made in the past to obtain stock from the Province of
Alberta, but without any great success.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—Some fair duck-shooting was obtained during the past fall in the Fraser
Valley and along the shores of the gulf, but here again the fact that the Lower Mainland is becoming a dairying district is having a serious effect on our duck-shooting.
Fair shooting can still be obtained on the Fraser River marshes and foreshores, but it
takes stormy weather to provide good shooting inland.
Geese.—Canada geese were fair, but the smaller varieties were most plentiful,
especially early in the season.
Black Brant.—Some very fine brant-shooting was obtained on the odd day at Boundary Bay when tides and climatic conditions were right. The brant-shooting in this
district is difficult owing to the very limited area in which it is possible to obtain the
birds and the very great number of sportsmen desiring to hunt them.
Band-tailed Pigeons.—These birds are not plentiful. During the past few seasons
they have been fewer in number, and it may be necessary to shorten the coming season.
Predatory Animals.
The principal vermin found in the Division are house-cats, with the odd cougar and
coyote.    The red fox is the pest that is giving the Department a great deal of concern.
Sportsmen have been unable to carry on their usual activities in conducting organized crow-shoots owing to the scarcity of shotgun shells. The Wartime Prices and
Trade Board was very co-operative in releasing a quantity of ammunition through the
Game Associations for this purpose, but the response by the sportsmen was slow. It is
expected that better results will be obtained next spring now that the sportsmen are
familiar with the procedure of obtaining the ammunition for the purpose of destroying
noxious birds.
Fur Trade.
Vancouver is the principal fur-trading centre in the Province. Many dealers are
operating in the city, as well as two fur-auction agencies. Prices have been fairly
steady, with a slight falling-off on the longer-furred animals, such as racoon, fox,
coyote, etc. There has been a considerable increase in fur-royalty collections during
the year. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 39
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.
Comparative Statistics, 1913-44.
Calendar Year.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences and
Fees.
Revenue
derived from
Fur Trade.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
1913
188
181
7
$4,417.50
$109,600.80
1914
294
273
21
5,060.00
92,034.20
1915 ...	
279
258
21
4,097.50
72,974.25
1916	
127
110
17
2,050.00
66,186.97
1917
111
97
10
1,763.50
65,487.50
1918
194
167
13
5
3,341.00
75,537.00
1919
267
242
25
36
6,024.50
116,135.00
1920...	
293
266
27
46
6,073.00
132,296.50
$6,291.39
1921	
329
312
17
74
6,455.00
114,842.00
24,695.80
1922 	
359
317
42
44
7,275.00
127,111.50
51,093.89
1923	
309
280
29
24
5,676.50
121,639.50
60,694.18
1924..	
317
283
34
24
4,758.00
125,505.50
66,356.68
1925...	
296
279
17
43
5,825.00
123,950.50
56,287.78
1926 --	
483
439
44
39
7,454.00
135,843.50
62,536.13
1927 	
518
469
49
47
10,480.50
139,814.00
71,324.96
1928  	
439
406
33
29
7,283.50
140,014.75
58,823.07
1929 	
602
569
33
54
9,008.00
142,028.22
47,329.89
1930	
678
636
32
33
9,572.75
147,660.00
45,161.11
1931 	
676
625
51
40
8,645.00
137,233.31
46,091.08
1932  -	
538
497
41
37
5,493.50
141,269.55
40,363.79
1933	
498
474
24
22
3,531.00
135,876.94
44,167.48
1934 ..•
477
454
23
4
5,227.82
149,955.11
47,102.81
1935 —
454
438
16
19
4,399.50
148,689.64
49,831.95
1936   	
451
436
15
14
3,965.00
157,647.30
52,196.50
1937 	
585
552
33
20
5,332.50
177,771.33
63,697.48
1938	
613
574
39
42
5,729.50
192,024.07
44,963.87
1939	
547
526
21
21
4,776.50
193,170.53
49,187.00
1940	
440
419
21
18
5,197.00
188,605.20
68,466.33
1941    	
446
430
16
9
4,977.50
213,267.67
63,125.30
1942   ._ -	
409
392
17
27
5,079.50
205,451.71
68,475.07
1943     	
356
342
14
18
5,554.50
207,661.72
58,354.03
1944 	
379
372
7
8
5,570.50
238,902.36
70,363.23
Totals
12,952
12,115
809
797
$180,084.57
$4,536,188.13
$1,295,779.80 W 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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OS REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 41
Revenue derived from Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and
Prospectors' Firearms Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1944.
Government Agency.
Anglers.
Guides.
Free
Farmers
Prospectors.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
759
159
$759.00
159.00
8
70
1
3
4
6
10
23
2
1
1
18
9
3
2
17
2
4
3
7
32
11
19
10
8
39
68
86
5
19
28
20
40
148
9
85
8
18
38
54
17
207
16
38
21
13
49
8
13
40
8
2
116
23
53
228
84
52
21
5
11
1
4
27
2
20
4
6
10
23
16
4
32
1
2
26
6
18
3
6
4
1
21
16
37
44
13
19
2
12
27
61
19
14
16
$3.00
1.00
$762.00
40.00
200.00
Atlin
220
1,230
1,153
787
812
220.00
1,230.00
1,153.00
787.00
812.00
350.00
5.00
570.00
C ranbrook , 	
1.00
1,236.00
1,153.00
	
787.00
15.00
20.00
30.00
50.00
827.00
1.00
21.00
98
202
156
1,505
195
1,002
148
281
1,181
1,836
327
4,222
205
1,141
98.00
202.00
156.00
1,505.00
195.00
1,002.00
148.00
281.00
1,181.00
1,836.00
327.00
4,222.00
205.00
1,141.00
128.00
252.00
156.00
115.00
2.00
1,622.00
Kaslo
195.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1,004.00
10.00
160.00
282.00
1,181.00
5.00
1.00
1,842.00
327.00
2.00
4,224.00
205.00
5.00
90.00
1,146.00
Pouce Coupe — 	
90.00
547
1
7
535
4
255
1,137
398
3
5,384
1,327
1,550
25
306
547.00
1.00
7.00
535.00
4.00
255.00
1,137.00
398.00
3.00
547.00
Prince George.	
45.00
15.00
10.00
85.00
10.00
6.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
52.00
24.00
Princeton  	
546.00
90.00
265.00
1,137.00
20.00
1.00
419.00
3.00
15.00
35.00
15.00
5,384.00
1,327.00
1,550.00
25.00
306.00
6.00
i.oo
5,425.00
1,328.00
1,550.00
160.00
55.00
2.00
187.00
361.00
Totals 	
29,098
$29,098.00
237
$1,185.00
1,711
533
$36.00
$30,319.00
Less refunds
1.00
$30,316.00 W 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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W 43
Statement of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms Licences and Anglers' Licences
(Minors), January 1st to December 31st, 1944.
Non-resident Ordinary
Firearms Licences.
Anglers' Licences
(Minors).
Total.
.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
1
1
1
1
1
1
23
2
5
54
1
1
26
67
27
1
1
3
14
$1.00
1.00
1.00
23.00
$1.00
1.00
$3.00
4.00
23.00
3.00
3.00
2.00
5.00
54.00
1.00
1.00
26.00
67.00
27.00
1.00
2.00
3.00
8.00
54.00
1.00
1.00
26.00
67.00
27.00
i.oo
3
3
2
9.00
9.00
1.00
3.00
1.00
9.00
6.00
12.00
6.00
14.00
14.00
11
$33.00
228
$228.00
$261.00 W 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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W 45
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1944, inclusive.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-traders',
Tanners', and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
1921 ..
1922 ..
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926
1927.
1928.
1929
1930.
1931
1932.
1933.
1934
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939-
1940.
1941.
1942..
1943..
1944.
Totals-
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
$30,790.80
57,458.89
67,524.18
56,356.68
6,090.00
62,446.68
48,737.78
7,550.00
56,287.78
56,045.13
6,490.00
62,535.13
61,629.96
9,695.00
71,324.96
51,563.07
7,260.00
58,823.07
40,769.89
6,560.00
47,329.89
40,431.11
4,730.00
45,161.11
41,056.08
4,925.00
45,981.08
36,253.79
4,110.00
40,363.79
39,592.48
4,676.00
44,167.48
42,697.81
4,405.00
47,102.81
44,986.95
4,845.00
49,831.95
46,186.50
6,010.00
52,196.50
47,257.48
6,440.00
53,697.48
39,423.87
5,540.00
44,963.87
44,238.00
4,949.00
49,187.00
62,746.33
5,721.00
68,466.33
56,755.30
6,370.00
63,125.30
63,176.07
5,299.00
68,476.07
52,122.03
6,232.00
58,354.03
63,412.23
6,951.00
70,363.23
$1,171,721.41
$144,237.00
$1,315,958.41 W 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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~ REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 47
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1944.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind op Fur confiscated.
Date of
Confiscation.
u
>
a
M
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fa#
i
a
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a
2
a
S
01
B
DO
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'3
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Mr. Funk	
Fedorus, Samuel	
Alexander, Jack	
Lazare, Peter.....	
Jacquot, Joe _ 	
Green, Bill
1
1
2
1
1
l
6
2
2
1
7
1
4
2
10
4
1
7
7
1
1
10
„     21
1
Feb.   16
»     16
„     21
Vanderhoof 	
6
„    21
Steveston 	
,,     21
„    21
„    21
Mar.    6
Strachern, Reuben	
Sopel, Eddie	
Mike, Mrs. Johnny _____ „	
Cleavely, J 	
Dyer, Harry 	
Steveston 	
Steveston .__  	
„   io
Little Fort    	
14
,,     15
„     24
Rogers, Harry  __	
Paul, Baptiste __ _..
Buttle Lake 	
,     27
,     28
Apr.  15	
Hayward, W. G-, and
Phillips, C. A	
Lampman, Arthur.— 	
LeClerc, Alphonse..,	
Watt, A. 	
Dibari, Michael 	
Totals _	
13
June    6	
9
Mile 313n, Alaska Highway. _
Fort St. John 	
„     19
Dec.     4
2
4
i
6
2
46
12
20
Note.—The sum of $394.91 was received in 1944 from the sale of confiscated fur.
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1944.
Date of
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Firearms
confiscated.
Confiscation.
Rifles.
Shotguns.
Cameron, Robert	
1
1
1
1
1
1
Apr.  18
May   16	
June 18   . 	
„     13
Southwick, H. TV    	
Cresswell, George 	
Fort St. John.	
Vancouver  	
--
Oct.   31
„     31
1
Nov.    3
1
Totals 	
5
3
Note.—The sum of $29.50 was received in 1944 from the sale of confiscated firearms. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 49
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1944.
Government Agency.
Coyotes.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Total.
69
146
16
150
5
14
23
94
7
S3
24
28
26
22
11
34
5
25
46
1
2
53
21
13
4
41
294
52
1
57
6
2
1
133
9
14
3
197
1
418
63
19
33
1
1
282
24
55
1
11
7
1
20
24
11
4
3
18
1
3
9
4
9
8
8
4
5
6
8
7
1
26
1
4
........
4
22
7
54
11
$175.00
Atlin       ..                              	
570.00
60.00
263.00
307.00
300.00
370.00
197.00
1,690.00
Golden    	
10.00
73.00
46.00
548.00
29.00
111.00
323.00
146.00
135.00
172.00
120.00
104.00
Pouce Coupe	
2,067.00
100.00
4,368.00
745.00
65.00
672.00
17.00
4.00
496.00
. .     10.00
112 00
2,846.00
578.00
1,948.00
Totals..            	
1,259
1,321
301
$20,243.00
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1944.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
285
196
261
265
301
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
2,487
3,427
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
14,840.00
20,398.40
24,397.00
41,077.00
1923           	
1924 .   .. -
172
1925    .       	
1926           —	
5,770
10,046
1927          	
1,025
1,389
403
1
1928          	
50,709.25
42,122.00
36,090.25
42,036.15
1929               ...
1930          	
1931          	
1932           	
1933         	
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
1,002
1,039
1.017
1,321
	
6,285.00
6,825.00
12,374.00
20,350.00
19,540.00
21,018.00
26,399.00
23,131.00
16,868.00
17,397.00
16,587.00
20,243.00
1934          - -
1935	
1,877
1,950
1,400
2.094
1,971
2,038
1,924
1,546
1,221
1,259
1936          	
1937           -
1938 .
1939  	
1940	
1941  -	
1942	
1943 -—    ...
1944	
Totals	
13,676
8,316
76,733
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$604,639.80 W 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
O
u
w o
PP o
3
O
jQ
'u
OS
O
a
S
4-J
M
OJ
O
O
OJ
33
Q
'3
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B ft
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CD
m
O
O
2
S
'43
s
is
Amount.
Clinton—
Abbott, J. R., Everett, Wash _—_ -
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
$15.00
25.00
25.00
Camon, W. B., Seattle, Wash 	
25.00
40.00
Coffey, Elmer G., Seattle, Wash.             _
25.00
25.00
40.00
Dittmer, Ernest, Mount Vernon, Wash  _	
Droullard, Fred, Everett, Wash _ —	
Ealey, John k., Seattle, Wash —__ —-	
15.00
25.00
25.00
35.00
25.00
25 00
25.00
Hall, B. M., Doe Bay, Wash.              	
25 00
Hood, H. A., Hollywood, Calif —__ 	
15 00
25 00
1 Johnson, Dr. Denton C, Seattle, Wash _. 	
55.00
25 00
55.00
25 00
25.00
25.00
40.00
Lidral, J. F., Seattle, Wash.            	
80.00
Marlack, Adrian, Oak Harbour, Wash.    \ ,  _
65.00
25.00
Nelson, G. A., Seattle, Wash.           _ "    _ ' '	
Parsley, Dr. Frank E., Seattle, Wash..—  	
15.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
Pratt, Dr. F. H.  Seattle, Wash.
Raab, K. L., Seattle, Wash.
Rader, Ralph W., Walla Walla, Wash 	
, Ryan, Robert B., Port Orchard, Wash...... 	
Scott, R. E., Bremerton, Wash    	
25.00
: Shay* Archie, Seattle, Wash  > 	
40.00
40.00
40.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
. Tallman, Clancy R., Everett, Wash	
Templeton, Dr. C. L., Seattle, Wash ' _	
Toppass, J. W., Seattle, Wash.	
Weedin, J. K., Seattle, Wash  .„.„.
1      0
Wells, Paul, Mount Vernon, Wash    _	
- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 51
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Tj
N
'u
0
N
ca
5
o   •
eS a
w o
M o
2
o
O
§
19
»J
Or.
a
a
o
O
o
V
a
a
a
s  .
S5
a
'a
_j  .
a a
0 4)
4)
SO
0
O
a
S
is
Amount.
Clinton—Continued.
Westman, H., Seattle, Wash	
1
1
I
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
2
1
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$30.00
55'.00
Wightman, Robert, Seattle, Wash.  	
Cranbrook—
Lugar, Dr. L. L., Walla Walla, Wash	
Fernie—
Maues, Dr. Robert, Van Burien, Wash. _ _	
65.00
25.00
40.00
Fort Fraser—
Magill, Dr. Clyde, Tacoma, Wash 	
Sligar, Porter, Seattle, Wash.    	
25.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
Golden—
Eidson, Foster, Paducah, Ky.  	
Hollingsworth, 0. R., Vermillion, Alta. _ — —__	
Kendall, James P., Bremerton, Wash _ _...
Grand Forks—
Evans, W. W-, Falls River, Wis..  „_ , ;	
Steele, J., Falls River, Wis	
Kamloops—•
25.00
Sumpter, C. H.( Ritzville, Wash.-.-    	
Valente, E. E., Omak, Wash. _	
Lillooet—
Coleman. W. F., Seattle, Wash 	
55.00
15.00
Matson, Howard A., Seattle, Wash..-  _ „
15.00
Thompson, R., and Churchill, N., Centralia, Wash 	
New Westminster—
Alspaugh, B. M., Seattle, Wash  __ _
125.00
40.00
55 00
40.00
40 00
30.00
Anthony, Pete, Seattle, Wash  	
15.00
25.00
Auld Chester A.  Seattle, Wash.                               	
25 00
25.00
Baird, Dr. R. M., Everett, Wash.	
25 00
Bakenhus, H. D., Seattle, Wash.
15 00
Bailer, B. M., Bellingham, Wash..	
Ballou, Maurice, Seattle, Wash. _	
40.00
30.00
40.00
Bellinger, Bert, Lebanon, Wash   	
15.00
25.00
25 00
Bleakney, T. M., Seattle, Wash	
70 00
Bodwin, E. T., Seattle, Wash _...__  	
25.00 W 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
a c
31
u u
.a
a
__■!
OP
S5
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Boulton, C. S., Seattle, Wash...
Boulton, John C, Seattle, Wash-
Bowman, J., Seattle, Wash.	
Bradley, Logan, Kent, Wash.
Bradley, R. R., Everett, Wash	
Brown, Loren G-, Bremerton, Wash._
Bull, Dr. L. L., Seattle, Wash. . __
Burks, Fred, Roseburg, Ore	
Bushaw, Gordon, Seattle, Wash „
Cammarano, James, Seattle, Wash. _.
Campbell, W. C, Seattle, Wash	
Campbell, W. E., Seattle, Wash	
Cannon, Wayne B., Sedro Woolley, Wash.
Carey, Paul O., Seattle, Wash 	
Carlson, R. C, Tacoma, Wash  	
Carlton, Floyd M., Bremerton, Wash. _
Carvenatto, Joe, Seattle, Wash	
Castner, Fred, Seattle, Wash 	
Castner, Neil, Seattle, Wash.   	
Chamness, W. A., Kirkland, Wash. ___
Chesser, Geo. O., Morton, Wash	
Chilton, A. J., Lynden, Wash. 	
Clarkson, R. W., Seattle, Wash 	
Cline, S. W., Kirkland, Wash	
Cly, Monte, Seattle, Wash 	
Collison, C. E., Seattle, Wash-	
Combat, L. J., Mount Vernon, Wash.__
Constantine, M., Seattle, Wash 	
Cordon, Clarence, Seattle, Wash. _	
Core, Marvin, Morton, Wash 	
Corning, Glen, Deming, Wash. _	
Corning, Ralph, Deming, Wash	
Corrington, H. A., Seattle, Wash	
Corrington, W., Seattle, Wash	
Corwin, C. A., Lynden, Wash	
Corwin, Lee, Lynden, Wash.___	
Cramer, Chas., Seattle, Wash 	
Crayne, A. E., Seattle, Wash	
Currie, Lieut. S. I., Bellingham, Wash..
Cushman, Frank A., Everett, Wash	
Dale, Dr. D. H., Seattle, Wash	
Dale, Lola E., Seattle, Wash	
Davidson, James F., Everett, Wash-
Davies, Harold E-, Seattle Wash	
Davis, C. H., Southworth, Wash	
Dawson, Ken, Seattle, Wash.	
Day, Capt. W. F., Seattle, Wash	
Dear, M. E., Seattle, Wash   _._
DeBurgh, Mrs. A. R., Seattle, Wash....
Degarimore, O. J., Bremerton, Wash..
Devenny, J. L., Seattle, Wash 	
Dingier, Dr. F. J., Seattle, Wash-	
Dobbs, Howard, Bremerton, Wash.	
Dodd, E., Seattle, Wash.	
Downey, William, Seattle, Wash.	
Driscott, Jack, Bremerton, Wash.	
i I
$25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
65.00
55.00
15.00
55.00
25.00
15.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
' 25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 53
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
m
"E
o
a
s
jjj a
3 P
*1 o
caPQ
ffl o
i
&
a
O
a
a
S_;
OP
<»
a
o
o
01
a
a
s
3
s   ■
ga
Is
c
a
+. .
B P.
a at
o v
5="°
m
w
o
0
a
2
g
'5
a
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
5
1
Z
I
1
2
2
1
2
:::
3
1
....
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
i
....
::::
....
t
z.
....
i
i
....
....
....
Due, Paul, Marysville, Wash. —	
25.00
Eby, Dr. R. D., Vernonia, Ore.
25.00
Eckenburg, W. L., Seattle, Wash.	
Equals, Don, Mount Vernon, Wash    ___	
Erickson, Allen, Seattle, Wash	
Erickson, C. A., Seattle, Wash _	
25.00
5.00
Erickson, J. F., Everett, Wash-  	
Fay, J. C, Seattle, Wash- _	
Feek, R. J., Seattle. Wash-	
Finical, W. H., Seattle, Wash	
Fisher, Wm. A., Bellingham, Wash  	
25.00
25.00
Ford, H. E., Fork, Wash. _	
25.00
Ford, Hugh C, Fork, Wash      •   	
25.00
Fortner, C. C, Seattle, Wash _	
25.00
195.00
40.00
25.00
Gaeth, Chris. J., Everett, Wash. _	
25.00
25 00
Gay, Fred H., Seattle, Wash _„_ _	
25.00
25.00
25 00
Gross, Lyle, Burlington, Wash— _ ___ _
Haag, J. J., Seattle, Wash.... _____	
25.00
25 00
40 00
Hancock, Dr. V. K., Seattle, Wash. __	
40 00
Hansen, N. H., Seattle, Wash. .           	
25 00
25 00
Hanson, Walter T., Seattle, Wash—  	
25 00
25 00
30.00
Haroldsen, V. E., Seattle, Wash.           _	
25.00
Hart, T. W., Seattle, Wash. .-__             	
25.00
Hawkins, Chas. S., Seattle, Wash— _  	
25.00
25.00
40.00
Hendricks, S., Chehalis, Wash...	
Hereth, Fred, Snohomish, Wash. — 	
Herr, L. L., Seattle, Wash     , _ __	
..-
....
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
Hilkert, A. W., Seattle, Wash 	
25.00
25 00
Holm, Mrs. H. A., Seattle, Wash   	
25.00
30.00
15.00
Houser, Rex, Blanchard, Wash  	
Howson, Cliffe, Renton, Wash  _. 	
55.00
15.00 W 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
New Westminster—Continued.
Hubbard, Everett, Mineral, Wash—	
Hulbush, Walter R., Burlington, Wash—
Hunnicutt, H., Tacoma, Wash..- —
Ingo, Joseph, Seattle, Wash.. 	
Inhof, Louis, Tacoma, Wash 	
Jeffery, J. W., Seattle, Wash ___
Jett, B. C., Yakima, Wash 	
Johnson, C. E., Sedro Woolley, Wash	
Johnson, Dr. R. W., Burlington, Wash	
Johnston, A. C., Ferndale, Wash 	
Judge, Dr. T. H., Friday Harbour, Wash—
Kasdorf, E., Kingston, Wash 	
Kean, W. C., Seattle, Wash	
Keck, Wm. G., Bremerton, Wash 	
Kem, E. A., Edmonds, Wash	
Kemp, Harold H-, Bremerton, Wash	
Kenning, H. A., Bremerton, Wash-	
Kirk, James M., Ferndale, Wash  	
Kirkpatrick, E., and party, Seattle, Wash-
Klein, A. W., Seattle, Wash 	
Kneip, Phil., Tacoma, Wash	
Knight, Robert T., Tacoma, Wash... 	
Knott, E. K., Seattle, Wash -	
Knutson, C. E., Seattle, Wash..-  	
Kossuth, C. J., Seattle, Wash _
Kruyt, Bert, Lynden, Wash  	
Landon, W. J., Seattle, Wash	
Langley, J. W-, Sumas, Wash— __
Lankhar, Len, Lynden, Wash __	
Law, C. H., Seattle, Wash 	
Leber, Chas. H., Seattle, Wash	
Lee, C. N., Seattle, Wash  _
Leonard, A. W., Seattle, Wash 	
Lessard, J. H., Seattle, Wash—	
Lewis, A. J., Burton, Wash 	
Lewis, Edwin A., Burton, Wash _
Lewis, J. H., Seattle, Wash	
Lewis, Paul R., Bremerton, Wash	
Lindsey, G. M., Seattle, Wash. 	
Lunden, Inguald, Bellingham, Wash..
Maberry, W. E., Custer, Wash	
Marshall, C. R., Seattle, Wash	
Martin, C. E., Seattle, Wash	
Martin, Jack, Bellingham, Wash	
Martin, Jeff, Point Roberts, Wash..
Martin, R. M., Kent, Wash. 	
Martret, H., Everett, Wash 	
Mastodi, Frank, Seattle, Wash..	
Mattson, C. R., Lynden, Wash	
Maulsby, Dean, Seattle, Wash.	
May, Carl, Sumas, Wash	
Meister, Roy E., Seattle, Wash	
Mercer, M. S., Bellingham, Wash	
Meredith, C. E., Bremerton, Wash—
Messerly, C. E., Seattle, Wash	
Metzler, H. S., Seattle, Wash	
%t
5 a
la
^.
c a
o <-
<. ..
Amount.
$25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
40.00
10.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
35.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
40.00
45.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
2.5.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
35.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 55
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
>
O
u
cd
w
n
■8 .
a c
M 0
C u
a«
03 o
3
O
j5
'E
a
O
T3
C
cd
QJ___;
01 r.
0>S
03
cd
o
O
0)
Q
.5
*ed
0 S
h
3  (!)
o cu
r^   CO
CJ
CO
o
o
s
5
a
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$25.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
40.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
Michelotti, C, Seattle, Wash	
Mohns, N. R., Everett, Wash.	
Morris, L. S., Seattle, Wash.... _	
Mylroie, R. 0., Seattle, Wash.
McDonald, D. N., Seattle, Wash	
McFerran, E. M., Seattle, Wash  __	
MacKintosh, C. G., Yakima, Wash.          	
1
1
1
I
McMillan, A. G., Everson, Wash. ____ _ ... _.
McMillan, I. W., Seattle, Wash—   _ 	
Mc Williams, H. C, Seattle, Wash _	
Neill, Roy, Seattle, Wash     __ __.
25.00
Neimi, W. F., Seattle, Wash  	
Nelson, Stanley, Seattle, Wash     	
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
15.00
O'Brien, Mike, Buckley, Wash               	
40.00
Ottevaese, Alex F., Bremerton, Wash  ,   	
Paice, Chas. P., Everett, Wash. __ _ __ _	
40.00
Patricelli, L.t Seattle, Wash. _  	
10 00
Peck, L. M., Mount Vernon, Wash _  	
20.00
25.00
Piatt, Glenn L., Everett, Wash	
Porter, W. E., Port Orchard, Wash _	
....   |  ....
9   ]
Prather, C, Selah, Wash  __	
1
2
1
15.00
Prothero, R. H., Seattle, Wash _   _	
30.00
25 00
15.00
Rader, Otto E., Tacoma, Wash   	
25.00
■25.00
Ramsay, W. E., Seattle, Wash.                   	
2   i
55 00
Randall, Andrew, Bellingham, Wash 	
1
1
2
1
: 15:00
25.00
40.00
Ridgeway, T. C, Portland, Ore.      .    .      	
25.00
15 00
30.00
Roderick, Warren, Seattle, Wash- ___	
Rogers, J. H., Seattle, Wash— _   _
30.00
15.00
Ross, James E., Seattle, Wash  __ ...
25.00
25 00 W 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
H
*E
CJ
h
cd
V
m
«   .
cd a
PQ o
3
O
*C
cd
O
q
<B j
3   r-
a
o
o
c
t_
4)
a
B
'a
■*-
N
si.
B
'a
a a
B QJ
O B
01
CD
o
o
a
5
a
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
_---
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
—
i
i
i
i
I
$25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
55.00
Scott, Robert J., Seattle, Wash..         	
25.00
Scott Walter K., Seattle, Wash.            	
25.00
25.00
Shedivetz, H. W., Bremerton, Wash — 	
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Sistig, L. W., Seattle, Wash _ _	
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
Spencer, W. A., Seattle, Wash  	
25.00
25.00
25.00
Stanley, Arnold, Wenatchee, Wash   	
Steele, John E., Seattle, Wash—       _	
40.00
55.00
40.00
25.00
Stingle, E. W., Bremerton, Wash.. - ,	
Strain, A., Kent, Wash            	
40.00
25.00
Strand, Dr. E„ Seattle, Wash. .                 	
15.00
Streets, H. J., Custer, Wash. ... 	
25.00
Stuie, J. L., Burlington, Wash. _	
Styer, C. M., Seattle, Wash. _ _
25.00
25.00
Sund, Alfred, Mount Vernon, Wash 	
Sweet, J. A., Seattle, Wash.
Taffie, B. E-, Selleck, Wash— _   -
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Terry, Dr. C. O., Tacoma, Wash _	
25.00
Thaden, H. E., Tacoma, Wash.	
25.00
40.00
Trulen, Harold, Seattle, Wash  __ _ _ „_	
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
Vedova, P. 0. D., Seattle, Wash	
15.00
Von Lossow, E. P., Seattle, Wash 	
15.00
Waite, S. J., Seattle, Wash   ...	
Walker, A. L., Seattle, Wash _	
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 57
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
O
£
cfl
w
o    >
cd a
3 a
.°
CQ o
3
o
jQ
X
cd
O
13
ft
cd
3 '3
Eo
cd
o
O
£
a.
cu
Q
.2
*3
§1
k
'a
+»  .
a a
3 01
o a
6
■
8
S
'S
a
IS
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Walker, Lloyd B., and party, Seattle, Wash  _
Walker, P. H., Seattle, Wash _	
--
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
5
....
.-.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
-
1
1
1
1
1
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
Wegs, Mrs. Francis, Lake Burien, Wash—  	
25.00
25.00
Welcome, J. J., Seattle, Wash.                             	
25.00
25.00
Wheeler, E. V., Edmonds, Wash.            .-   -              	
25.00
15.00
Wilhelmi, Ed. P., Everett, Wash   ________	
Wilson, H. G., Seattle, Wash.	
25.00
30.00
40 00
Wolfe, Geo. M., Renton, Wash —	
25.00
Wolfe, Geo. M. (Jr.), Renton, Wash- __ 	
Wray, Lloyd F., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Yellam, Joe, Seattle, Wash	
Ziegler, Jake, Tacoma, Wash. 	
25.00
Penticton—
30.00
Baker, Don, Seattle, Wash   _  „
15.00
30 00
SO 00
15.00
Birkheimer, C. M., Blakely, Wash.
Brender, Otto S., Omak, Wash. ,.. __
Brenner, Chester C, Port Gamble, Wash--  	
Brenner, Mrs. C. C, Port Gamble, Wash  	
25.00
30.00
15.00
Cady, Chas., Wanconda, Wash- —  	
Cain, C. W„ Silverdale, Wash	
Callison, I. P., Union, Wash               	
25.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
Cook, Richard, Seattle, Wash	
25.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
De Voe, F. E., Yakima, Wash _	
Dittmar, L. C, Seattle, Wash-  	
30.00
Frazer, Wm. D., Seattle, Wash _ _ 	
Fronde, W. E., Seattle, Wash— _	
15.00
30.00
25 00
Haines, John, Yakima, Wash—   	
25.00
40 00
Harley, C. S., Seattle, Wash   .,,... _
15.00
. W 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
'n
o
£
cd
3
CQ
o   .
cd S
w o
in
w o
B
o
a
u
-_
s
a
v -_
_,£
%£
a
o
O
u
0)
V
0
B
'a
c  .
o a
'a
B p,
_.-=
r=i   M
OJ
8
s
5
'S
a
*
Amount.
Penticton—Continued.
Hutchinson, Wm. B., Seattle, Wash     -	
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
....
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
l
i
i
$30.00
15.00
30.00
Kimball H R   Seattle, Wash.	
15.00
Kosmos, George, Seattle, Wash     	
30.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
25 00
15 00
30.00
25.00
30.00
McKay, Wm. 0., Seattle, Wash   -	
30.00
25.00
Neimi, W. F., Seattle, Wash. _	
30.00
30.00
Nelson, Thos. C, Yakima, Wash  _	
40.00
16.00
25.00
30.00
30 00
Paulson, Eli. M., Seattle, Wash.    	
30.00
16 00
Sands, Hans, Enumclaw, Wash. -	
Sather A J   Seattle, Wash.             	
15.00
Schroeder, G. E., Senbeck, Wash— _  	
30.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
Siemens Dr W T., Seattle, Wash.                     '
Styer C M   Seattle, Wash.                                    	
Vedova P. 0. D., Seattle, Wash.            	
Welcome J. J., Seattle, Wash—              	
30.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
Pouce Coupe—
Dilatush, Dr. F. A., Dayton, Ohio  	 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 59
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
>>
*n
0
£
cd
m
u   .
cd c
__? **
l«
« 0
B
o
a
o
c
a
<y_^
"_-
a
o
O
C
V
V
a
B
'a
B   .
° 8
C
'a
4-     .
B 0.
9 Si
-q to
8
s
3
S
A
a
It
Amount.
Pouce-Coupe—Continued.
Farrell, Dr. L. J., Everett, Wash ... ___
l
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
~
i
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
8
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
—
$45.00
Goeke, Dr. 0. F., Dizon, III  _ _	
45.00
290.00
Higby, Roy C, New York City, N.Y _	
50.00
Holliday, W. J. (Sr.), Hammond, Ind..
65.00
85 00
25.00
25.00
Kruger, Walter, Meriden, Conn __ „__	
55.00
60.00
40.00
25 00
Mannarino, Sam, New Kensington, Pa. _	
Mullen, L. J., Everett, Wash __ 	
40.00
McClanahan, Dr. B. V., Galesburg, 111	
55 00
105 00
95.00
80.00
70.00
Tetlow, R. D., Nedina, Ohio        	
90.00
Weir, Dr. N. H., Galesburg, 111	
25.00
40.00
Prince George—
Bean, M. L., Seattle, Wash	
80.00
Brewer, Geo. W., Sacramento, Calif __ _„_	
Clement, H. J., Pittsburgh, Pa.                          	
80.00
40 00
25.00
Gabriel, Fred C, Malta, Mont   	
15.00
25 00
Lidral, J. F., Seattle, Wash                       	
5.00
Mellon, T. A., Pittsburgh, Pa            	
55.00
Prince Rupert—
Princeton—
Carroll, H. L., Seattle, Wash _„__ 	
Quesnel—
Bauer, Joseph, Richmond Beach, Wash _
25.00
25 00
Carroll, H. L., Seattle, Wash.	
25 00
25.00
25 00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Hague R. J., Seattle, Wash.           	
25.00
25.00
Herb J. J., Seattle, Wash ___ 	
25.00
1 W 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
£
M
IH
cd c
a
o
u
a(H
'E
0)
_B s.
a
Ph
«o
O
Species.
^_
s .
la
Amount.
Quesnel—Conrtnw-of.
Johnson, Alvin, Seattle, Wash...
Johnson, Carl E., Edmonds, Wash..
Johnson, R., Redmond, Wash	
Kale, H. F., Seattle, Wash	
Karlson, Karl A., Seattle, Wash.	
Kellogg, H., Tacoma, Wash _.
Laueman, C. L., Snohomish, Wash...
Lester, J. A., Seattle, Wash	
Lewis, E. H., Seattle, Wash.	
Martin, J. F., Seattle, Wash	
Miller, C. W., Bellingham, Wash	
McCord, Earl, Sedro Woolley, Wash..
McKelheer, J. D., Yakima, Wash	
Oakson, E., Ballard, Wash. 	
Ramsden, R., Seattle, Wash	
Rhodes, Peter, Bellingham, Wash	
Ruth, W. E., Renton, Wash.	
Scott, Walter H., Bellingham, Wash..
Skogh, Joe, Seattle, Wash—	
Sinclair, S. L., Seattle, Wash	
Sizemore, C. L., Sedro Woolley, Wash...
Taylor, L. F., Seattle, Wash	
Thompson, D. E., Sequim, Wash	
Veys, Maurice, Castle Rock, Wash-
Walton, Clyde, Everett, Wash _..
Walton, P. B., Everett, Wash	
Warn, Arthur M., Seattle, Wash-
Telegraph Creek.
Callison, I. P., Union, Wash....	
Iverson, Mrs. L., Pittsburgh, Pa	
Vancouver—■
Baker, Don R., Seattle, Wash—	
Bates, Donald H-, Oswego, Ore.	
Belknap, L. A., Jamestown, N.Y	
Cadwell, G. H., and Templeton, Dr. L. C, Seattle, Wash-
Fisher, Helen, Santa Fe, Cal—	
Hardy, J. F., and party, Seattle, Wash.
Hickman, J. F., Jamestown, N.Y	
Kelly, B. A., Seattle, Wash. 	
Krienke, G. C, Blaine, Wash _	
Patterson, W. W-, Saginaw, Mich....
Rowe, C. F. T., Tacoma, Wash...	
Say, J. D., Seattle, Wash	
Victoria—
Haslam, F., Silverdale, Wash	
Kimball, H., Gig Harbour, Wash	
Williams Lake—
Barker, Dr. R. H., Seattle, Wash	
Barton, Dr. J. F„ Longview, Wash-
Bellinger, Bert, Lebanon, Ore 	
Cole, W. I., San Francisco, Calif	
Demeroutis, K. G., and Erickson, R. J. and W. J„ Seattle,
Wash. 	
Fair, F. E., Blaine, Wash.....  	
Hammer, E. G. and R. H., and Patterson, E. D., Redlands,
Calif 	
Richardson, Lee, Seattle, Wash  	
$25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
35.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
26.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
45.00
80.00
35.00
15.00
65.00
15.00
5.00
55.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
35.00
75.00
40.00
90.00
25.00
105.00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 61
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
o
£
cd
o
pq
o   •
cd c
M o
£ **
cdW
rS.   rA
Ph   O
3
O
cd
B
cd
s i,
£$.
CO
cd
o
U
£
CD
P
'3
c .
o g
IS bo
.5
"cd
gS!
(L.
CQ
0
o
s
2
5
'5
a
is
Amount.
Windermere—
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$85.00
Birkland, Thomas, Tacoma, Wash _   ...
15.00
40.00
15.00
Kidder, Clifford, Allegan, Mich	
Lewis, Dr. E., Jackson, Mich....	
40.00
25.00
15.00
Peetz, Arthur W., Prosser, Wash.  	
Street, Wm. S., Chicago, 111. _    ' 	
Street, Mrs. Wm. S., Chicago, 111. 	
Sutherland, W. C, Portland, Ore. _ _„ _ 	
25.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
Totals    	
24
37
14
331
22
51
31
414
9
$18,395.00
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1944.
Description of Offence.
Divisions (See Foot-note).
: a
ii
a
"a E
Fines or
Penalties,
imposed.
Game Animals.
Allowing dogs to run after or hunt dear _
Exceeding bag limit on big game —	
Killing, hunting, or in possession  of game animals of
female sex—   	
Killing, hunting, or in possession of game animals during close season _   _
Killing or hunting game during  prohibited hours   (pit-
lamping)     _	
Possession of game animals under 1 year of age __._ —
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during close
season _. —   —_ —	
Possession of carcass of untagged deer 	
Possession of game on premises of logging camp, cafe,
etc  	
Selling or buying big game illegally 	
Setting out poison for taking fur-bearing animals _
Trapping big game illegally _ _
Game Birds.
Exceeding bag-limit on game birds _ _ _	
Hunting   or   in   possession   of   migratory   birds   during
close season    __ _
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game birds during
close season —  	
Hunting  certain  game birds  with  a  rifle,  contrary  to
Game Regulations   -._ __	
1
15  | 16
25   | 25
i      !
1  I      1  I 2
$10.00
50.00
390.00
270.00
270.00
30.00
110.00
40.00
50.00
10.00
210.00
353.00
Note.—" A " Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. " C " Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. " D " Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas W 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Divisions (See Foot-note).
bS
'a
09
1
m
5
Ol
B
O
'■*_
V
">
a
o
o
O c_
ii
Description of Offence.
c
: Q
c
0
«!_;
z Q
B
O
_       Ol
= a
B
O
a'.>
: a
B
0
_ 'tis £
: a
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Birds—Continued-
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours	
	
11
11
ii
$110.00
1
1
i
10.00
Hunting migratory game birds from, or with the use of,
1
l
i
25.00
Trapping.
2
3
4
5
i
14
15
845.00
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence 	
1
1
5
2
8
17
17
315.00
Licences.
10
5
5
16
33
69
69
685.00
Guiding without a licence __ _    	
2
1
3
3
20.00
Minor carrying firearms without licence or without being
1
1
1
1
4
4
10 00
Non-resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling without
1
2
3
3
20.00
1
1
1
Resident  carrying  fishing-tackle  or  angling  without  a
4
13
1
24
42
42
420 00
Trading in pelts of fur-bearing animals without a licence
1
1
2
2
100.00
i
Firearms.
Carrying   firearms   in,   or  discharging   same   from,   an
6
12
9
2
14
43
Carrying, or in possession of, unplugged pump or repeat-
3
3
Discharging   firearms   on   or   across   a   highway   in   a
1
Miscellaneous.
Exporting fur without a permit or payment of royalty	
2
2
2
20.00
1
Interfering with Game Warden in discharge of his duties-
1
1
2
2
60.00
Making false statement in obtaining a licence, etc _	
1
2
2
i
5
6
60.00
Non-resident hunting big game without a licensed guide.—
1
1
1
50.00
Trespassing in pursuit of game —  — —	
3
7
10
10
85.00
British Cohtmbia Special Fishery Regulations.
Angling by using roe in prohibited area	
15
15
15
87.50
1
97.50
40.00
25.00
4
Exceeding bag-limit on trout    ..._	
1
1
1
Netting kokanee without a  licence or taking kokanee
1
1
12.50
50.00
4
1
5
5
Gaol Sentences.
$5,570.50
Angling for trout during the close season or without a
1
1
Hunting and killing big game in  unorganized district
by an Indian or farmer when not in need of same
1
1
4
1
1
1
5
2
1
5
2
Interfering with a registered trap-line _ _ 	
Pit-lamping of game     ___
Totals   _ __	
56
58
66
51
141
7
372
379
Note.—"A" Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. "B" Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. " C " Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. " D " Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas
Gaol sentences ranged from ten days to ninety days. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 63
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary of Game-fish Distributions, showing Eggs, Fry, and
Fingerlings, 1944.
I
Kind of Game Fish.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fingerlings.
769,040
120,000
3,558,385
2,640,000
9,605
217,560
306,000
2,248,254
28,960
1,426,464
Totals —  	
7,097,030
2,800,774
1,426,464
Summary of Game-fish Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings at Departmental
Hatcheries, December 31st, 1944.
Hatchery.
Eastern
Brook.
Kamloops.
Kokanee.
Eggs or Fry.
Fingerlings
or Fry.
Eggs or Fry.
111,782
146,645
88,960
115,561
112,431
343,800
247,550
Smiths Falls	
	
43,187
Veitch Creek	
76,000
Totals	
343,800
651,379
290,737
Eggs
Summary.
7,097,030
Fry      2,800,774
Fingerlings      1,426,464
Total distributions  11,324,268
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1944     1,285,916
Total     12,610,184
Note.—A number of Game Clubs or Associations were, as in past years, granted
subsidies for use in assisting the Department in its game-fish culture programme of
development.
Trout-eggs were shipped to a number of Game Associations, as will be noted on
examining the statement of distributions or plantings. -
REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.                   W 65
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W 67
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W 69
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Returns from 2,025 Holders of Special Firearms Licences, showing Big Game,
Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1943-44.
Bear __
Caribou
Deer ___
Moose ...
Big Game.
404 Mountain-goat _.
45 Mountain-sheep
826 Wapiti (elk) 	
558
189
1
7,874
521
8,242
Badger 	
Beaver 	
Fisher 	
Fox	
Lynx      1,108
Marten     5,952
Mink      8,807
Muskrats   49,492
Fur-bearing Animals.
Otter __
Racoon _
Skunk _
  259
  2,483
  136
Squirrels   91,683
Weasel   19,904
Wildcat   314
Wolverine  153
Predatory Animals.
Cougar         93       Wolves
Coyotes      4,428
365
Fur-farm Returns, 1944.
Adult and
Young
(Reared)
Animals.
Animals
purchased
or received
by Trade.
Died or
killed.
Animals
sold
or traded
Alive.
Pelts sold
(including
all Pelts sold
in 1944).
Total Animals on Hand
as at December 3 1st, 1944.
Males.
Females.
22
56
2,934
168
29,583
282
155
17
2
4
47
12
583
4
2
5
24
1,756
19
17,429
14
11
373
60
2,781
284
28
9
5
8
38
28
1,322
23
1.101
60
12,676
17
814
73
8.634
2
Nutria..	
58
1
39
10
1
32
7
Note.—Figures  in  respect  to  muskrats   and  beaver   approximate.    Cancelled   permits,   32.
farmers have not submitted their returns.    There were four nil returns.
Six   licensed  fur- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 77
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1944.
Kind of Animals or Birds destroyed.
Game Divisions.
Total.
" A."
" B."
" C."
" D."
" E."
Animals.
13
1
196
73
30
7
35
8
5
18
5
20
84
145
102
14
1
347
11
121
122
49
5
12
14
16
178
16
4
207
13
6
595
11
199
616
132
62
4
33
22
1
49
13
3
11
58
8
3
3
495
78
52
8
1,530
15
120
19
5
10
2
31
52
298
161
27
1,001
178
Fox ...	
52
15
Birds.
2,551
57
478
738
Owls            	
219
135
28
14
Summary of Liberation of Game Birds, 1944.
Area.
Vancouver Island—
Courtenay	
Pheasants.
100
Total  100
Lower Mainland—
Agassiz  105
Chilliwack   175
Lulu and Sea Islands  707
Mission (Hatzic, etc.)   496
Matsqui   161
Pitt Meadows   605
Sumas Prairie  545
Surrey  =  583
Total  3,377
District. Summary.
Vancouver Island  100
Lower Mainland  „  3,377
Total.
3,477 W 78 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1944.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 19bb.
Pheasants  1,154 Geese     9
Quail        73 Partridge  28
Ducks          7
Number and Kind, of Birds raised, 19bb.
Pheasants  5,517 Geese     4
Quail         84 Partridge  53
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1944.
Pheasants  146 Geese  2
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 19kk.
Pheasants  4,053 Partridge  18
Quail        48
Number and Kind of Birds killed or died, 19'ii.
Pheasants  991 Geese  1
Quail     47 Partridge   7
Ducks      4
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 19U.
Pheasants  1,773 Geese  14
Quail  1       62 Partridge  56
Ducks          3
Note.—During the year 1944 there were 115 licensed game-bird farmers in the
Province, but during the year twenty-five of these farmers discontinued operations.
There was one nil return. Game-bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during
the year 1944—482 bands at 10 cents—$48.20.
Miscellaneous Revenue.
Sale of list of licensed fur-farmers     $45.50
Sale of list of licensed fur-traders        7.50
Sale of list of licensed trappers      75.00
Total  $128.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 79
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1944.
Barkerville-Quesnel District.
Armstrong, Wilfred R-.Quesnel.
Becker, Frederick Wells.
Cochran, James D Barkerville.
Evans, Charles Quesnel.
Grevatt, Walter Quesnel.
Lavington, Arthur Quesnel.
Lyngos, Hans Quesnel.
Mann, Arnold R Likely.
McCall, Max A Quesnel.
Ostrum, Harry Likely.
Cooper, Thomas H Quesnel.
Quanstrom, Carl Quesnel.
Quanstrom, Julius Quesnel.
Rawling, Arden Quesnel.
Tibbies, Fred S Quesnel.
Tibbies, James Quesnel.
Webster, Hugh J Narcosli Creek.
Cassiar District.
Ball, George B Telegraph Creek.
Carlick, Billy Fann Telegraph Creek.
Dennis, Alex Telegraph Creek.
Dennis, John C Telegraph Creek.
Coast District.
Green, E. H Princess Louisa
Inlet.
Skuce, Herbert Ocean Falls.
Stanton, Jas. R Glendale Cove,
Knight Inlet.
Walker, Thomas A Bella Coola.
Leon, Paddy Topley.
Hazelton District.
Van Tine, Edward Ootsa Lake.
Kamloops District.
Allison, Alfred E Clearwater.
Brousseau, Clifford Savona.
Brownlee, Cleve A Red Lake.
Burdett, George Savona.
Cooper, Norman T Savona.
Deaver, H. Jas Savona.
Fraser, David J Barriere.
Grant, Gordon McLure.
Haycock, Wm. A Sicamous.
Helset, Torbjorn Clearwater.
Hoover, Eldred F McLure.
Ivens, Joseph Okanagan
Mission.
Johnson, Stewart Criss Creek.
Langman, Samuel Red Lake.
Marsden, Gladstone Criss Creek.
Mobley, Charles W Tappen.
Mobley, Howard I Salmon Arm.
McKort, Clarence Clearwater.
McLean, Clifford McLure.
Paul, Nick Salmon Arm.
Pedersen, Peter Sorrento.
Rawson, John C Squilax.
Riddle, Albert R Criss Creek.
Shook, Floyd A Clearwater.
Sleeth, Edward Savona.
Smith, William North Kamloops.
Walters, Budd Savona.
Walters, Jack Savona.
Walters, June Savona.
Welland, J. E Red Lake.
Kootenay District.
Ashman, Levi Waterton Lakes,
Alta.
Baher, Martin C Natal.
Barbour, George G Wilmer.
Daney, Seldon (Jr.) Ferguson.
Daniken, Joseph Brisco.
DeSimone, S. H Revelstoke.
Dilworth, James Athalmer.
Eftoda, Gordon Kaslo.
Harrison, Wm. 0 Edgewater.
Hicks, Frank Fernie.
Hynes, Ben R. Galena.
Montgomery, Miss
Agnes Spillimacheen.
McClain, J. I Galena.
Mclvor, Norman D Fort St. John.
McKay, Gordon J Athalmer.
McKeeman, Robert Parson.
Nicholas, Dominac Kootenay Reserve.
Nicol, Arthur H .—Fort Steele. W 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1944—Continued.
Kootenay District—Continued.
Ogilvy-Wills, J. R Fairmont.
Phillips, F. Alex 1551 St. Andrews
St., North Vancouver.
Quinn, Roy Parson.
Richter, Frank Invermere.
Sykes, Harry Galena.
Thomas, 0. E Parson.
Wiedenman, Otto Golden.
Lillooet-Cariboo-Chilcotin District.
Archie, George Canim Lake.
Archie, Jacob Canim Lake.
Baker, J. C Clinton.
Baker, R. M Clinton.
Bates, F. M .Clinton.
Bell, T. D 70-Mile House.
Bishop, James A Clinton.
Bobb, E. R Marguerite.
Bones, Alex Clinton.
Bones, Frank Clinton.
Bones, Pete . Clinton.
Bonner, Jas Big Creek.
Burgess, T. R Fawn.
Church, Richard Big Creek.
Cleveland, J. G Bridge Lake.
Cleveland, L. C Bridge Lake.
Cleveland, R. C. L Bridge Lake.
Coldwell, H. W Jesmond.
Colin, Arthur Lac la Hache.
Collings, E. M Ashcroft.
Coulson, H. R 70-Mile House.
Daniels, Geo Canim Lake.
Daniels, Walter Fawn.
Davis, S. E Bridge Lake.
Donald, Wm. J Savona.
Dougherty, C. A Clinton.
Dougherty, E. G Clinton.
Eagle, Clifford B Lac la Hache.
Ewart, D Lac la Hache.
Fenton, Charles Big Bar.
Fenton, Walter Big Bar Creek.
Ferguson, James Ashcroft.
Flaherty, R. J 100-Mile House.
Ford, C. H Horsefly.
Gaugh, Allan Lytton.
Gibbons, M. L Horsefly.
Grinder, Isidore Clinton.
Grinder, John Hig Bar.
Hamilton, M. M Lac la Hache.
Hamilton, J. R. (Jr.)..Williams Lake.
Hamilton, P : Williams Lake.
Hamilton, R. M Williams Lake.
Hamilton, Thomas Williams Lake.
Hansen, John F..__ Bridge Lake.
Hansen, R. Lee Bridge Lake.
Hansen, Wesley B Bridge Lake.
Harry, Alfred Canim Lake.
Higginbottom, A Jesmond.
Higgins, Marion Bridge Lake.
Higgins, Ronald Fawn.
Hockley, Geo Horsefly.
Holding, Richard Bankier.
Hooker, F. C Horsefly.
Hooker, S. B Horsefly.
Johnson, Claude Bridge Lake.
Johnson, J. A 100-Mile House.
Keary, Chas Minto Mine.
King, Gordon Bridge Lake.
Krebs, Leonard B Lac la Hache.
Labordie, Eddie Clinton.
Land, Robt. R Moha.
Larson, Jack 0 Roe Lake, Fawn.
Larson, L. L Fawn.
Larum, Sigurd Fawn.
Levick, J. S Fawn.
Lewis Jack .Williams Lake.
Lonneke, F. W Horsefly.
Lowe, F. J Ashcroft.
Mackill, Clarence Kleena Kleene.
Madden, E. E Cache Creek.
Marriott, Ron Clinton.
Miller, Wayne Fawn.
Mobbs, Ben 70-Mile House.
Monkman, E. N Narcosli Creek.
Monkman, F. G Narcosli Creek.
Moore, Geo Ochiltree.
Morgan, Dallas J Likely.
Mulvihill, M. J Jesmond.
Murray, George 21-Mile.
McClary, Wayne R Lac la Hache.
McNeil, H. M Canim Lake.
Nicol, Alex Horsefly.
Nicol, Shelly JJorsefly.
Owens, Jack Ashcroft.
Park, Arlie H 70-Mile House.
Park, Jack P .70-Mile House. REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944.
W 81
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1944—Continued.
Lillooet-Cariboo-Chilcotin District—Continued.
Paxton, H. E Macalister.
Perrault, Joseph Jesmond.
Perry, Frank Cache Creek.
Peters, Michell Clinton.
Pollard, Harold Clinton.
Pollard, John Clinton.
Powell, Thomas Fawn.
Prydatok, Steve 70-Mile House.
Reed, James C Bridge Lake.
Reinertson, C. W 70-Mile House.
Reynolds, A. J Big Bar Creek.
Rosetti, August Gang Ranch.
Scheepbower, J. C 70-Mile House.
Scott, Douglas 100-Mile House.
Scott, Duncan Bridge Lake.
Sellers, Albert Soda Creek.
Sporring, John Hridge Lake.
Thomason, David Bridge Lake.
Thorsteinson, C Fawn.
Turnbull, John R Cache Creek.
Turney, R. J Fawn.
Vaness, John J Horsefly.
Walters, G. H Horsefly.
Walters, Lloyd Horsefly.
Wilkinson, E. C 70-Mile House.
Wohlleben, W Ashcroft.
Wotzke, Herb Ashcroft.
Zimmerlee, Ernest Clinton.
Young, Wm Clinton.
Peace River District.
Beaton, Duncan Fort St. John.
Calliou, John Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Campbell, Leo Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Chatlan, Alfred Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Courtepatte, A Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Davidson, J. 0 Watson Lake, Y.T.
Dhenin, Rene G Montney.
Durney, Milo East Pine.
Gladu, Isadore Lymburn, Alta.
Gray, Geo. D Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Hambler, George Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Hambler, Joe Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Letendre, R Mt. Valley, Alta.
Longhurst, W. J Fort St. John.
Noskey, Ernest Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Noskey, Narcisse Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Sheffield, Bert Charlie Lake.
Thomas, John Arras.
Wanandie, Paul Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Prince George District.
Blackman, William Valemont.
Bowman, Geo. A Tete Jaune.
Carr, Stan J Tete Jaune Cache.
Corless, R. F. (Jr.) Prince George.
Davidson, Charlie Vanderhoof.
Hargreaves, Roy F Mount Robson.
Hobe, Henry .Hansard.
Hooker, Jas. B Bend.
Moore, L. B Tintagel.
McEwen, D. C Prince George.
McLaughlin, W. A .Valemont.
Neighbor, H. M Tete Jaune.
Sande, Walter J Sinclair Mills.
Van Somer, J. E Prince George.
Similkameen-Boundary District.
Abel, Cummins Westbridge. Noren, C. F Westbridge.
Fernstrom, John Rock Creek. Peterson, Morris Westbridge.
From, Carl H Westbridge. Peterson, Stanley Westbridge.
From, Guss W Westbridge. Rand, S. Percy Beaverdell.
From, Oliver Westbridge. Richter, John...: Keremeos.
Hall, D. Elmer Westbridge. Smith, Frank J Hope.
Lewis, James Princeton. Soderquist, Eric Westbridge.
Non-resident Outfitters.
Brooks, Carl Wembley, Alta.
Brown, Frank E Hazelmere, Alta.
Phillips, Frank A. (Jr.) 1551 St. Andrews Street, North Vancouver. W 82 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1944.
Attorney-General (Minister) R. L. Maitland, K.C Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Jas. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Frank R. Butler Vancouver.
Headquarters.
Senior Clerk (Grade 1) G. E. Marshall Vancouver.
Senior Clerk-Stenographer Miss I. Pettigrew Vancouver.
Clerk-Stenographer . Miss H. Morris Vancouver.
Senior Stenographer Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss J. Smith Vancouver.
Game-fish Culture Branch.
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson Nelson.
Fishery Officer E. Hunter Nelson.
Fishery Officer J. F. Thompson Kaslo.
Fishery Officer F. Pells Cultus Lake.
Hatchery Officer C. 0. Mellor Vancouver.
Hatchery Officer : A. Higgs Qualicum Beach.
Hatchery Officer J. D. Inverarity Victoria.
"A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Lower Mainland).
Game Warden S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden B. Cash Victoria.
Game Warden J. W. Jones .Royal Oak.
Game Warden R. S. Hayes Duncan.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Courtenay.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Game Warden J. Dewar Alberni.
Corporal Game Warden W. N. Massey Alert Bay.
"B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Inspector C. F. Kearns Nelson.
Game Warden N. Cameron Golden.
Game Warden W. H. Cartwright Creston.
Game Warden A. F. Gill Princeton.
Game Warden G. Haskell Nelson.
Game Warden W. H. McLean Revelstoke.
Game Warden A. Monks Penticton.
Game Warden J. J. Osman Fernie.
Game Warden B. Rauch Cranbrook.
Corporal Game Warden A. F. Sinclair Nelson.
Game Warden H. Tyler Invermere.
Game Warden M. J. Wilson Grand Forks.
Clerk-Stenographer Mrs. I. Anderson Nelson. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1944. W 83
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1944—Continued.
" C " Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts).
Inspector R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden C. F. Still Vernon.
Game Warden W. A. H. Gill Lillooet.
Game Warden 0. Mottishaw Quesnel.
Game Warden L. Jobin . Williams Lake.
Game Warden ....: G. Sandiford Kamloops.
Game Warden D. D. Ellis Kamloops.
Game Warden E. Holmes Wells.
Game Warden R. S. Welsman Clinton.
Game Warden E. M. Martin Merritt.
Clerk-Stenographer Miss H. Swadling Kamloops.
"D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Corporal Game Warden K. 0. Alexander Fort Nelson.
Game Warden P. Brown Vanderhoof.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
Corporal Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead : Smithers.
Game Warden W. 0. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
Game Warden D. Roumieu Burns Lake.
Game Warden J. W. Stewart Lower Post.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Clerk (Grade 1) R. J. Guay Prince George.
Clerk-Stenographer Miss E. Foster Prince Rupert.
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Inspector W. Kier Vancouver.
Game Warden A. J. B utler Chilliwack.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden W. Clark Vancouver.
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe Mission.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam. W 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1944—Continued.
Predatory-animal Hunter and Special Game Warden.
C. Shuttleworth Kamloops
On Active Service.
Clerk F. R. Lobb Vancouver.
Fishery Officer R. A. McRae Kelowna.
Sergeant and Clerk R. P. Ponder . Vancouver.
Fishery Officer (Assistant) H. L. Rose Vancouver.
Clerk J. B. Smith Vancouver.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Lillooet.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1946.
905-146-2148

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