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Minister of Mines PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT For the year ended 31st December 1945 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1947

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 Minister of Mines
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
For the year ended 31 st December
1945
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banitbld, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1940. BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. R. C. MacDonald, Minister.
John F. Walker, Deputy Minister.
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines.
G. Cave-Browne-Cave, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
Hartley Sargent, Chief Mining Engineer.
P. J. Mulcahy, Chief Gold Commissioner. '
To His Honour Lieut.-Colonel William Culham Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mining Industry of the Province for the year 1945 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
R. C. MacDONALD,
Minister of Mines.
Minister of Mines' Office,
June, 1946.  CONTENTS.
Page.
The Mining Industry  13
Statistics—
Method of computing Production  18
Table I.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1944 and 1945  19
Table II.—Average Metal Prices, 1901-1945  20
Table III.—Total Production to 1945  21
Table IV.—Total Production for each Year, 1852 to 1945  21
Table V.—Quantities and Values of Mine Products, 1936-1945  22
Table VI.—Production of Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1887-1945 23
Table VII.—Value of all Gold Production to End of 1945  25
Table VIII.—Total Value of Mine Production, by Divisions, 1941, 1942, 1943,
1944, and 1945  26
Table IX.A.—Production in Detail of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper,
Lead, and Zinc, 1944 and 1945  27
Table IX.b.—Production Value of Placer Gold, Lode Gold,  Silver,  Copper,
Lead, and Zinc, 1940-1945  28
Table IX.c.—Production and Value of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper,
Lead, and Zinc, 1900-1945 1  29
Table X.—Production in Detail of Structural Materials, 1944, 1945  30
Table XI.—Production in Detail of Miscellaneous Metals, Minerals, and Materials, 1944-1945  31
Table XII.—Graph—British Columbia Mine Production, 1895-1945  32
Table XIII.—Graph—British Columbia Lode Mines Production, 1913-1945_.___. 33
Table XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date  34
Table XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens, from 1895 to 1925  34
Table XVI.—Coke and By-products Production, British Columbia, 1944, 1945- 35
Table XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1945  36
Table XVIII.—Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity, and Process Supplies,
1945.  40
Table XIX.—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode Minerals, 1901-1945  41
Table XX.—Men   employed   in   the   Mining   Industry   of   British   Columbia,
1901-1945  42
Table XXI.—Metalliferous Mines shipping in 1945  43
Table XXII.—Lode Metal Mines employing an Average of Ten or more Men
during 1945 ,  44
DEPARTMENTAL WORK.
Departmental Work—
Administrative Branch -■  45
New Type Forms B and E (Mineral Act);   Certificate of Work (Placer-
mining Act)  45
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)  45
5 A 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Departmental Work—Continued. page.
Administrative Branch—Continued.
Amalgamation of Mining Divisions  46
Gold Purchasing  46
List of Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-mining Recorders 47
Gold Commissioners' and Mining Recorders' Office Statistics  49
Chemical Laboratories and Sampling Plant r  50
Inspection Branch  53
Mineralogical Branch  53
Museums  54
Grub-staking Prospectors  54
Joint Offices of the British Columbia Department of Mines and of the Department of Mines and Resources, Canada  55
Publications  177
Geological Survey of Canada    56
METAL-MINING  (LODE).
Notes on Metal Mines—
Atlin—
Engineer Mine     61
Taku River—
Taku River Gold Mines     61
Portland Canal—
Salmon River—
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd     61
Summit Lake—
Salmon Gold Mines, Ltd     62
Tide Lake—
East     62
Marmot River—
Gold Drop Mines, Ltd     62
American Creek—
Mountain Boy Mining Co     62
Willoughby Creek—
Wilby     62
Alice Arm—
Esperanza Mine     62
Omineca—
Usk—
Nicholson Creek Mining Corp., Ltd     63
Pacific—
Warrior     63
Gold Dome     64
Silver Creek—
McKee     64
Whitesail Lake Area—
Tahtsa Lake—
Riverside     65
Captain     67
Emerald     68 1
CONTENTS. A 7
Notes on Metal Mines—Continued. page.
Whitesail Lake Area—Continued.
Whitesail Lake—
Chikamin Mountain—
Mentor  68
Dad's Special :  69
Rainy and Gold Coin  69
Roosevelt  69
Garner No. 1 and Marie  70
North Side of Whitesail Lake  70
West End of Whitesail Lake—■
Harrison  71
Lam  72
Old Timer  72
Eutsuk Lake—
Surel Lake  72
Red Bird Mountain  73
Cariboo—
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co., Ltd  73
Island Mountain Mines Co., Ltd  79
Canusa Cariboo Gold Mines, Ltd  80
Barkerville Mining Co., Ltd  82
Wellknown and Unknown  82
Perkins Peak—
Bluebell  82
Taseko Lake—
Taylor Windfall Gold Mining Co., Ltd  82
Hido  83
Bridge River—
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd 'r  84
Bralorne Mines, Ltd  84
Ranger  85
Grull Wihksne Gold Mines, Ltd  85
Pinebrayle Gold Mines, Ltd  86
Bridge River Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd  86
B.R.X. Mines, Ltd  87
Paymuck j_  87
Pacific (Eastern) Gold Mines, Ltd  87
Minto Gold Mines, Ltd  88
Olympic Gold Mines, Ltd  88
Hillstake Mining Co  88
Congress Gold Mines, Ltd  89
Pilot Gold Mines, Ltd  89
Golden Ledge Syndicate  89
New Holland Gold Mines, Ltd 1 :  89
Stump Lake—
Consolidated Nicola Goldfields, Ltd ,-  90
Nicola Lake—
Guichon Mine, Ltd   90 A 8 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Notes on Metal Mines—Continued. page.
Copper Mountain—
Granby Consolidated     90
Hedley—
Apex  92
Hedley Monarch Gold Mines, Ltd  92
Hedley Amalgamated Gold Mines, Ltd  92
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd  92
Good Hope  93
Nickel Plate Mine  93
Camp McKinney—
Cariboo-Amelia     94
Beaverdell—
Highland Bell, Ltd      94
Greenwood-Grand Forks—
Wellington Camp—
Athelstan     95
Jewel Lake—
Dentonia Mines, Ltd     95
Central Camp—
Number Seven     95
Greenwood—
Providence     96
Rossland—
Mount Roberts—■
Midnight     96
I.X.L     96
Red Mountain—
Gertrude Gold Mining Co., Ltd     96
Nelson—
Eagle Creek—
Granite-Poorman     96
Morning Mountain—■
Irene     99
Hall Creek-
Golden Eagle and T.S     99
Fern     99
Ymir—
Oxide     99
Ymir Good-Hope Mining Co  100
Erie Creek—
Arlington   100
Second Relief  100
South Kootenay Lake—
Bayonne Consolidated Mines, Ltd  100
Sheep Creek—
Kootenay Belle  101
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd  101
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd   102
Nugget :  102
I CONTENTS. A 9
Notes on Metal Mines—Continued. Page.
Ainsworth—
Ainsmore Consolidated Mines, Ltd  102
Scranton-Pontiac  103
Kaslo-Three Forks—
Shutty Bench  103
Kokanee Chief  103
Voyageur  103
Bell  103
Whitewater  104
Lucky Jim  104
Sandon—
Victor  105
Silver Ridge  105
Sunshine  105
Noble Five  105
Silverton-New Denver—
L.H  105
Standard, Mammoth, and Enterprise  106
Hewitt  107
Bosun  107
Duncan River—
Erdahl and Pinchbeck Claims  107
Ferguson—
True-Fissure l. 109
Kimberley-^
Sullivan  109
Field—
Monarch and Kicking Horse  111
Skagit River—
Invermay Annex . ;  111
Ruskin—
L.A.P. Mining Co *_,. 112
Howe Sound—
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd  112
Texada Island—
Gem I'lLilIi 113
Red Hawk Gold Mines, Ltd  113
Copper King  , __—_.„. r. .1.13
Surprise Gold Mines, Ltd '.'. 'J—L-l  113
Little Billie - ,~,~,  114
Marble Bay Mining Co '.  114
Loyal 1-—i  114
Port Alberni  114
Great Central Lake—
Sherwood  1  — 115
Herbert Arm—
Berton Gold Mines, Ltd  115 A 10 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Notes on Metal Mines—Continued. page.
Zeballos—
Privateer Mine, Ltd  116
Inspection of Metal Mines—
Production  117
Fatal Accidents  117
Dangerous Occurrences  118
Explosives used in Mines  120
Prosecutions  120
Air-sampling  120
Dust and Ventilation   120
Safety and First-aid Work  121
PLACER-MINING.
Atlin—
Spruce Creek   123
Ruby Creek  124
Otter Creek '  124
Boulder Creek  124
Consolation Creek  124
McKee Creek  124
Cariboo—
Willow River  124
Big Valley Creek  125
Williams Creek  125
Antler Creek  126
Cunningham Creek  126
Lightning Creek ..  126
Cottonwood River  126
Quesnel River  126
LlLLOOET  127
NON-METALLICS.
(Including Structural Materials.)
Barite     130
Clay and Shale     130
Gypsum  131
Limestone  131
Marl ■___  132
Stone, Sand, and Gravel  133
COAL-MINING.
The Inspection Branch  136
Production—
Output and Per Capita Production, 1945 (Table)   137
Output and Per Capita Production in Various Districts (Table)   138
Collieries—Production, 1945 (Table)  139
Collieries—Men employed, 1945 (Table)   140 CONTENTS. A 11
Page.
Labour and Employment  141
Competition of Coal produced outside British Columbia  141
Accidents in and around Coal Mines  141
Explosives  141
Machine-mined Coal  145
Safety-lamps  146
Electricity  147
Methane Detection  148
Mine-air Samples  148
Ventilation  148
Inspection Committees  149
Coal-dust  149
Dangerous Occurrences  149
Bumps  150
Outbursts of Gas  150
Prosecutions  150
Government Mine-rescue Stations  150
Supervision of Coal Mines  151
"Coal Sales Act" (Registered Names of British Columbia Coals)  152
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials—
First-, Second-, and Third-class Certificates and Mine-surveyors' Certificates  153
Examinations for Certificates of Competency as Coal-miners  153
Notes on Coal Mines—
Vancouver Island Inspection District—
Nanaimo  154
Comox  159
Nicola-Princeton Inspection District—
Princeton  161
Merritt  162
Hat Creek  163
East Kootenay Inspection District  163
Northern Inspection District—
Telkwa  171
Hudson Hope  171
Pine River  175
List of Publications  177
Prospectors' Sets  179
List of Libraries  180
Synopses of Mining Laws and Laws specially related to Mining  182
List of Prices charged for Acts ,  194
Index ,  195 A 12 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
ILLUSTRATIONS.
(After page 60.)
Plate.
I.—A. Ranger group adit, Mount Truax, Bridge River.
B. Looking down Tahtsa Lake from Tahtsa Peak.
II.—A. Cariboo Gold Quartz mine from Island Mountain.
B. Sheep Creek Valley, showing Gold Belt and Kootenay Belle mills.
PLANS. PAGE.
Whitesail Lake area     66
Cariboo Gold Quartz mine—
Plan . -     75
Horizontal section      76
Veins in the Rainbow zone     77
Surface workings on the Sanders zone     78
King Gething coal mine, plan and sections  173
Peace River coal mine  174
Hasler Creek coal mine  175
Placer leaseholds, method of laying out  186 Annual Report of the Minister of Mines,  1945.
THE MINING INDUSTRY.
BY
Hartley Sargent, Chief Mining Engineer.
The gross value of mineral production for 1945 exceeded $63,300,000, an increase
of $8,400,000 or more than 15 per cent, compared with the value of production in 1944.
Of the metals, lode gold decreased 6 per cent, from the 1944 figure; copper
decreased 28.8 per cent, in quantity and 25.5 per cent, in value, while silver, lead, and
zinc increased from 7.6 to 20 per cent, in quantity and 18 to 61 per cent, in value. The
metals group increased nearly 23 per cent, compared with the value of production
in 1944.
Coal production decreased by 415,000 tons, or 21.5 per cent, in quantity and value.
The decrease resulted in part from a strike which fortunately was settled in a comparatively short time.
The value of non-metallics increased by 9.3 per cent., increases in gypsum and
sulphur more than offsetting reduced production of fluxes.
The group " Clay Products " increased by a third, all the major items recording
increases in value. The greatest increases were in " common brick " and in " structural tile—hollow blocks."
Of the group " Other Structural Materials," sand and gravel decreased but the
other items increased, giving an increase of 15 per cent, for the group.
Part of the increase in value is attributed to increases in average prices for metals,
the prices of all the principal metals except gold having increased materially as compared with 1944. This statement needs to be amplified by stating that the price for
each metal is the average price received for all of the particular metal produced in
Canada. Although the average price received by Canadian producers of zinc improved
markedly in 1945, some producers may have received lower prices at the end of the year
because they had lost the advantage of exporting to the United States market under
favourable war contracts.
The value of production in 1944 was the lowest for any year since 1936 and is
almost $4,000,000 lower than the average value for the twenty-year period 1926 to
1945. Comparison with the average for the twenty-year period may be of interest;
accordingly, the arithmetic averages for the twenty-year period and the production for
the years 1944 and 1945, in round figures, are set forth in the following table, which
includes metal prices with the production figures:—
13 A 14
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1945.
Average, 1926-45.*
Price.
Quantity.
Value.
$25.42
$30.85
45.26c.
10.94c.
3.86c.
4.07c.
26,600
314,000
9,440,000
60,790,000
351,000,000
255,000,000
$730,000
Gold, lode	
 fine, oz.
10,505,000
4,310,000
Copper	
Lead	
Zinc	
 lb.
 lb.
 lb.
7,030,000
13,440,000
10,070,000
$46,085,000
Coal	
$4.45
1,740,000
7,835,000
2,595,000
2,310,000
$58,825,000
1944.
$31.66
$38.50
43.00c.
12.00c.
4.50c.
4.30c.
11,500
186,500
5,705,000
36,300,000
294,800,000
280,400,000
$360,000
Gold, lode	
7,185,000
2,455,000
 lb.
lb.
4,355,000
13,265,000
Zinc	
 lb.
12,055,000
$39,675,000
$4.25
1.935,000
8,220,000
3,025,000
4,005,000
$54,925,000
1945.
Gold, placer crude, oz.
Gold, lode : :.... fine, oz.
Silver fine, oz.
Copper : lb.
Lead...:...: lb.
Zinc : lb.
Total value of principal metals	
Coal long ton
Structural materials	
Miscellaneous metals, minerals, etc	
Grand total, value	
$31.66
$38.50
47.00c.
12.55c.
5.00c.
6.44c.
$4.25
12,500
175,500
6,157,000
25,850,000
353,500,000
301,700,000
1,520,000
$400,000
6,750,000
2,895,000
3.245,000
17,675,000
19,430,000
$50,395,000
6,455,000
3,400,000
3,095.000
$63,345,000
* Prices and production figures for the period 1926-45 are arithmetic averages.
The quantities of the principal metals produced in 1944 and 1945 were well below
the twenty-year averages, except for zinc in both years and lead in 1944.5 The metal
prices for the two years were higher and in some cases materially higher than the
twenty-year average. It is interesting to note that production of zinc has increased
greatly in quantity and in relative importance, while copper production has declined
materially in the twenty-year period. The twenty-year period includes substantially
all our production of sulphur, mercury, tungsten, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, and
tin. These products make up a large part of the miscellaneous group which is now of
considerable importance but was relatively unimportant before 1925. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 15
In the early part of 1945 most mining operations were acutely short of labour.
Returns from the operators show that the average numbers of men employed for the
year, in all departments of the mining industry except underground in lode mines and
in the production of structural materials, were less than the averages for 1944. However, by the end of 1945 many more men were employed in metal mines than had. been
employed at the beginning of the year. Skilled miners were still short in supply, but
it is expected that the increasing experience of new employees and the efforts being
made to train new employees will increase the supply of skilled labour. The situation
at the coal mines has not improved materially, and improvement is apt to take more
time than for the metal-mining industry as the time required to train miners is longer
for coal-mining than for metal-mining.
Dividends credited to 1945 amounted to $10,487,395, compared with $11,367,732
credited to 1944. The 1945 figure includes $70,504 made up of capital distribution and
two amounts omitted from the amount credited to 1944.
Prospecting, development, and rehabilitation of mines and plants were pursued
actively during 1945 and are continuing in 1946. Exploratory work was undertaken in
the Portland Canal, Cariboo, Bridge River, Hedley, Boundary, Nelson, Slocan, Texada
Island, Taseko Lake, and Whitesail Lake areas. This work was directed principally
toward the search for gold ore, but base-metal ores also received attention. A note on
the grub-staking of prospectors by the Provincial Government will be found on page 54.
Work has been resumed at several gold mines which were shut down during the
war. Production from some of these properties will probably make a considerable
contribution to the 1946 total. It is also expected that production will be increased at
other properties where war conditions necessitated reductions. Expansion of copper
production to make up some of the war-time reduction is also expected. The price now
being obtained for silver is materially higher than for many years, and the prices for
copper, lead, and zinc are higher than during much of the time in recent years. These
conditions point to increases in quantity and value of metal production for 1946.
Industrial disputes have caused shut-downs in other industries, and should shut-downs
occur in the mining industry, production would obviously be affected adversely.
War requirements occasioned the beginning of production, or of substantially
increasing production, of several items included under " Miscellaneous Metals, Minerals, and Materials." The production of several of these items has been greatly
reduced; however, production of by-product metals and sulphur will probably continue
to make the miscellaneous group important in total value of production; there are also
prospects that some new production will be undertaken in this group. Production of
clay products and of other structural materials is expected to be above average because
of the activity in building and other construction.  STATISTICS.
The collection and compilation of mining statistics and the preparation of statistical tables for this report is in charge of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics,
Department of Trade and Industry.
Since 1939 several mining divisions have been amalgamated with others. These
changes may be of interest to those studying the tables and therefore have been set
forth under the heading "Amalgamation of Mining Divisions," page 46.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION.
The total value of mine output of the Province, consisting of metalliferous minerals, coal, structural materials, and miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials, is
calculated at standard prices in Canadian funds.
In the Annual Report for 1925 some changes were made in the methods used in
previous years in computing and valuing the products of the industry, but in order to
facilitate comparisons with former years the same general style of tables was adhered
to. The methods used in the 1925 Annual Report have been followed in subsequent
Annual Reports, with the addition of new tables.
Metals.
The following notes explain the methods used:—
(1.) From the certified returns of lode mines of ore and concentrate shipments
made during the full calendar year by the producers, the net recovered metal contents
have been determined by deducting from the " assay value content " necessary corrections for smelting and refining losses.
In making comparisons of production figures with previous years, it should be
remembered that prior to 1925 in the Annual Reports the total metal production, with
the exception of copper, was determined by taking the assay value content of all ores
shipped; deductions for slag losses were made by taking varying percentages of the
metal prices.
(2.) The data on placer-gold production were very largely obtained from the Gold
Commissioners until 1925. The value of placer gold in dollars is now obtained from
returns received annually from the operators. At the old standard price, $20.67 per
ounce of fine gold, $17 was regarded as a close approximation of the average value per
ounce of crude placer gold produced in British Columbia. Dividing the production
reported in dollars by 17 gave the equivalent in crude ounces. Beginning with 1932
the average value per crude ounce has been based on the same fineness but has recognized the varying price of gold. Since 1940 the price per fine ounce has been $38.50
in Canadian funds, and the equivalent average value per crude ounce has been $31.66.
(3.) In the interests of uniformity the Statistical Bureaus of the Provinces and
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics use the same average metal prices in valuing mineral
production.
Suspension of trading on the London Metal Exchange in September, 1939, and the
controls of metals during the war years have necessitated changes from the procedures
which had been followed previously. A foot-note under Table II. outlines the procedures which have been followed in recent years. The prices used formerly in evaluating metal and mineral production were:—
Gold and Silver.—The average United States prices for the year, as quoted
in the Engineering and Mining Journal, converted into Canadian funds
at the average exchange rate.
17 A 18
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Copper, Lead, and Zinc.—The average London Metal Market prices for the
year converted into Canadian funds at the average exchange rate.
British Columbia lead and zinc were sold largely on the basis of the London prices.
The New York, St. Louis, and Montreal lead- and zinc-market prices differed materially
from the London prices and were not properly applicable in valuing British Columbia
production.
Until 1932 the New York price for copper was used. British Columbia copper
production was sold largely in the United States, and the New York export price for
copper rather than the London price was the basis for settlement. Any difference
between the two prices introduced a variation in the gross value of copper production
as calculated.     (.See foot-note, Table II.)
Fuel.
(4.) In 1926 a change was made in computing coal and coke statistics. The practice in former years had been to list coal and coke production (in part) as primary
mineral production. Only the coke made in bee-hive ovens was so credited; that made
in by-product ovens was not listed as coke, but the coal used in making this coke was
credited as coal production. The result was that the coke-production figures were
incomplete. Starting with the 1926 Annual Report, the standard practice of the Bureau
of Statistics, Ottawa, has been adopted. This consists of crediting all coal produced,
including that used in making coke, as primary mine production. Coke-making is
considered a manufacturing industry. As it is, however, of interest to the mining
industry, a table included in the report shows the total coke produced in the Province,
together with by-products, and the values given by the producers. This valuation of
coke is not, of course, included in the total gross mine production of the Province.
From 1918 to 1930 coal production was valued at $5 per long ton. In 1931 the
price used was $4.50, and from 1932 on the price used has been $4.25 per long ton.
The different prices should be kept in mind when comparing the dollar value of production for different years. STATISTICS.
A 19
TABLE I.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1944 and 1945.
Quantity,
1944.
Quantity,
1945.
Value,
1944.
Value,
1945.
Per Cent.
Increase ( + ) or
Decrease (—).
Quantity.
Value.
Metallics.
$
281,000
154,844
401,623
4,356,070
7,185,332
361,977
13,265,886
1,210,375
2,453,293
299,643
236,788
12,055,328
$
292,635
260,047
505,328
3,244,472
6,751,860
398,591
17,674,884
— 28.8
— 6.0
+ 10.0
+ 20.0
— 100.0
+    7.9
— 100.O
+    7.6
+    4.1
+  67.9
+ 25.8
 lb.
36,300,589
186,632
11,433
294,797,469
755,908
5,705,334
25,852,366
175,373
12,589
353,497,689
— 25.5
Gold, lodet 	
—    6.0
Gold, placerf 	
crude, oz.
 lb.
+ 10.0
+ 33.2
 lb.
—100.0
Silver*   	
6,157,307
2,893,934
484,490
331
19,431,921
+ 18.0
 lb.
+ 61.7
— 100.0
Zinc* 	
 lb.
280,356,477
301,737,902
+ 61.2
42,262,159
51,938,493
+  22.9
Fuel.
Coal  tons
(2,240 lb.)
1,933,639
1,518,673
8,217,966
6,454,360
— 21.5
—  21.5
Non-met allics.
63,579
100,283
17,903
103,927
8,200
473
1,123,868
63,414
70,266
16,272
127,434
1,985
3,146
1,267,350
— 28.7
4-    2.1
+565.1
+ 12.6
Fluxes—-limestone,  quartz  	
Granules—slate and rock, talc
 tons
 tons
63,443
949
45,221
969
— 29.9
— 9.1
+ 22.6
— 75.8
Sodium carbonate 	
Sulphur %  	
 tons
 tons
43
113,374
286
127,653
+565.1
+ 12.8
Totals	
1,418,233
1,549,867
+    9.3
UCTURAL
 No.
 No.
Clay Products and Other Stb
Materials.
Clay Products.
Brick-
Common 	
Face, paving, sewer brick 	
2,038,193
1,182,784
3,092,000
1,319,743
40,936
41,495
181,199
17,283
26,527
165,905
80,556
49,814
217,275
7,899
70,376
205,883
3,245
2,632
+ 51.7
4- 11-6
— 86.2
— 7.5
+ 96.8
+ 20.0
+ 20.0
3,706
510
— 54.3
+ 165.3
+ 24.1
+100.0
— 23.6
Drain-tile, sewer-pipe 	
 No.
1,733,114
1.603,969
3,444
476,789
637,680
+  33.7
Is.
Other Structural Materic
1,085,918
421,648
935,370
64,794
40,926
1,182,297
522,692
865,557
127,809
65,194
+  10.0
+ 298.5
+ 62.0
+ 8.9
+  24.0
147,444
162,334
—     7.5
1,075
44,423
4,284
71,949
+ 97.3
Rubble, riprap, crushed rock 	
 tons
+ 59.3
Totals	
2,548,656
2,763,549
+    8.4
  |  	
54,923,803
63,343,949
+ 15.3
1
* For information on evaluation of silver, copper, lead, and zinc in 1945, refer to foot-note on Table II.
t Canadian funds.
$ Sulphur content of pyrites shipped, estimated sulphur contained in sulphuric acid made from waste smelter-
gases, and elemental sulphur. A 20
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
TABLE II.—Average Metal Prices* used in compiling Value of Provincial
Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc.
Year.
Gold.
Fine Ounce.
Silver.
Fine Ounce.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
1901	
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
1908	
1909	
1910	
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915 ..
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922	
1923 .	
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928	
1929 -
1030	
1931	
1932	
1933 /	
1934	
1935 -	
1930...	
1937 _	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941 _	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945 	
Average, 1941-45 (inc
$
20.67
23.47
28.80
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.60
Cents.
50.002 N
49.55
50.78
53.36
51.33
03.45
02.06
50.22
48.93
50.812
50.64
57.79
56.80
52.10
47.20
62.38
77.35
91.93
105.57
95.80
59.52
64.14
61.63
63.442
69.065
62.107
56.37
58.176
52.993
38.154
28.700
31.071
37.832
47.461
04.790
45.127
44.881
43.477
40.488
38.249
38.261
41.166
45.254
43.000
"47.000
38.50
42.936
Cents.
10.11    N.Y.
11.70
13.24
12.82
15.59      „
19.28
20.00      „
13.20
12.98      „
12.738    „
12.38      „
16.341    ,,
15.27
13.60
17.28
27.202
27.18
24.63
18.70
17.45
12.50
13.38
14.42
13.02
14.042    .,
13.795    ,.
12.92
14.570    ,,
18.107    ,,
12.982 „
8.116 .,
6.380 Lond.
7.454 ,,
7.419 ,,
7.795 ,,
0.477    ,,
13.078    „
9.972    ,,
10.092    „
10.086    „
10.080    ,,
10.086    „
11.75
12.000    „
•12.550    ,,
Cents.
2.577 X.Y.
3.06
3.81
3.88
4.24
4.81
4.80
3.78
3.85
4.00
3.98
4.024
3.93
3.50
4.17
0.172
7.91
6.07
5.19
7.10
4.09
5.10
0.54
7.2S7
7.848 Li
6.751 ,
5.250 ,
4.575 ,
5.050 ,
3.927 ,
2.710 ,
2.113 ,
2.391 ,
2.436 ,
3.133 ,
3.913 .
5.110
3.344
3.169 ,
3.362 ,
3.362
3.362
3.754
4.500
•5.000
nd.
11.204
3.990
4.00 B. St
4.90
5.90
4.80
4.40
11.25
10.88
7.566
0.04
(1.24
0.52
3.95
4.80
5.02
5.39
7.892
7.409
6,194
5.493
5.385
3.599
2.554
2.405
3.210
3.044
3.099
3.315
4.902
3.073
3.069
3.411
3.411
3.411
4.00
4.300
•6.440
nd.
4.31S
* Until price control was initiated in the recent war. the average metal prices used in evaluating British
Columbia metal production were those used by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and by all Provinces co-operating
with that Bureau. The average United States prices, as quoted in the Engineering and Mining Journal, converted
to Canadian funds were used for the precious metals. London prices were used similarly for the principal base
metals (see also note headed " Metals," page 17). The method of arriving at the price for gold continued unchanged,
but while controls were in effect during the war, the prices for the metals controlled were supplied by the Canadian
Metals Controller. In 1945 the controls were largely removed and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics again computed
average prices, using information supplied by the principal Canadian refiners of silver and the base metals.
In recent years the prices received for silver, lead, and zinc used in Canada have been substantially less than
the prices received for these metals exported to the United States. Further, in 1945 the prices for foreign silver
imported into the United States increased from 49.5 cents to 78.2 cents per ounce, in Canadian funds. The 1945
average price, 47 cents per ounce of fine silver, is a somewhat arbitrary figure, reconciling the markedly different
prices received for silver used in Canada and silver exported.
In addition to metal sold in Canada, British Cohimbia silver, lead, and zinc are exported to the United States,
Great Britain, and other markets abroad, and for some years all British Columbia copper has been sold in the
United States. If the United States prices were used instead of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics average price,
additional amounts could be credited to the copper production values; namely, for 1945, $82,728; for 1944 $315 815-
and for 1943, $473,845.
Note.—In making comparisons with average prices used prior to 1925, it should be remembered that deductions
were made from the average prices as a means of adjustment between the " assay value content " of ores shipped
instead of allowing percentage losses in smelting operations. The price of copper prior to 1925 was taken at
"net"; silver, at 95 per cent.; lead, at 90 per cent.; and zinc, at 85 per cent. Subsequent to 1925 (inclusive)
prices are true averages, and adjustments are made on the metal content of ores for loss in smelting and refining. STATISTICS.
A 21
TABLE III.—Total Production for all Years up to and including 1945.
Gold, placer   $92,297,951*
Gold, lode   332,908,138*
Silver   160,347,708
Copper   338,245,361
Lead    358,037,657
Zinc  241,263,375
Coal and coke  429,758,895
Structural materials   96,762,878
Miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials  47,842,681
Total  $2,097,464,644
* Canadian funds.
TABLE IV.—Production for each Year from 1852 to 1945 (inclusive).
1852 to 1895 (inclusive)   $94,547,370
1896-
1897-
1898
1899
1900
1901.
1902
1903.
1904
1905.
1906
1907
1908.
1909
1910.
1911..
1912
1913.
1914.
1915
1916
1917
1918
7,507,956
  10,455,268
  10,906,861
  12,393,131
  16,344,751
  19,671,572
  17,486,550
  17,495,954
  18,977,359
  22,461,325
  24,980,546
  25,882,560
  23,851,277
  24,443,025
  26,377,066
  23,499,072
  32,440,800
  30,296,398
  26,388,825
  29,447,508
  42,290,462
  37,010,392
  41,782,474
1919  33,296,313
1920  35,543,084
1921  $28,066,641
  35,162,843
  41,304,320
  48,704,604
_...-  61,492,242
  67,188,842
  60,729,358
  65,372,583
  68,245,443
  55,391,993
  34,883,181
  28,798,406*
  32,602,672*
  42,305,297*
  48,821,239*
  54,081,967*
74,475,902*
  64,485,551*
  65,681,547*
  75,701,155*
  78,479,719*
  75,551,093*
  65,892,395*
  54,923,803*
  63,343,949*
1922.
1923
1924
1925.
1926
1927-
1928.
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939-
1940-
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
Total $2,097,464,644
* Canadian funds. A 22
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
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A 25
TABLE VII.—Value of Gold Production to Date.
Year.
Placer Gold.
Crude
(Ounces).
Value.
Lode Gold.
Fine
(Ounces).
Value.
1858-1862	
1863-1867	
1868-1872	
1873-1877	
1878-1882	
1883-1887	
1888-1892	
1893	
1894	
1895	
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900	
1901	
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
1908	
1909	
1910	
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928	
1929	
1930	
1931	
1932	
1933	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
Totals
580,650
954,920
582,080
530.540
328.230
225,970
148,560
20,950
23.260
28.330
32,000
30,210
37.840
79.100
75.210
57.060
63.120
62,380
65.600
57,020
55,790
48.700
38.060
28.060
31,760
25.060
32.680
30.000
33,230
45,290
34,150
29,180
18.820
16,850
13,030
13,720
21,690
24,710
24,750
16,476
20.912
9,191
8.424
6.983
8,955
17.176
20,400
23.928
25.181
30,929
43,389
54.153
57.759
49.746
39.067
43,775
32,904
14,600
11.433
12.589
5,100,169
$9,871,634
16,283,592
9,895,318
9,019,201
5,579,911
3,841,515
2,525,426
356,131
405,516
481,683
544,026
513,520
643,346
1,344,900
1,278.724
970,100
1,073,140
1,060,420
1,115,300
969,300
948,400
828,000
647.000
477,000
540,000
426,000
555.500
510.000
565,000
770,000
580,500
496,000
320,000
286,500
221.600
233,200
368.800
420,000
420,750
280,092
355,503
156,247
143.208
118,711
152,235
291.992
395.542
562.787
714,431
895,058
1,249,940
1,558,245
1,671,015
1,478,492
1,236.928
1,385,962
1,041,772
462,270
361,977
_398,59i
1.170
6,252
39,270
62,259
106,141
110,061
138.315
167,153
210,384
236,491
232.831
222,042
238,660
224,027
196,179
255,582
238,224
267,701
228,617
257,496
272,254
247,170
250,021
221,932
114,523
164,674
152,426
120,048
135,663
197.856
179.245
247.716
209,719
201,427
178.001
188.087
145,339
160.778
146.039
181,564
223.529
297,130
365.244
404.472
460,781
557.522
587,180
583,416
571,026
444,518
224,403
186,632
175,373
$92,297,951
12,234,563
$23,404
125,014
785,400
244,180
,122,820
201,217
857,573
,453,381
,348,605
888,269
812,616
,589,608
.933,102
,630,639
.065,020
282,880
,924,090
,533,380
,725.513
,322,442
627,490
109,004
,167.934
,587.334
.367,190
,403.812
.150,645
481,392
.804,154
089.684
704.994
120.535
.335,269
,163,859
679.601
888,097
004,419
323 576
018,894
261,307
,392.929
250.985
852,936
168,654
,122,727
613.624
221,272
461.516
,984,501
113,943
,639,516
,185,332
751,860
.871,634
283,592
895,318
019,201
579,911
841,515
525.426
379,535
530.530
267,083
788,206
636.340
844,563
202,473
732,105
318,703
961,409
873.036
704.908
902,402
579,039
883.020
929,880
401.090
073.380
151.513
137.490
671,004
937.934
167.834
863,190
723.812
437.145
702,992
037.354
458.484
124.994
511,285
615,361
519.362
835,848
031,305
123.130
475.811
310.886
656.849*
955.716*
965.416*
747.994*
418.594*
680.972*
284.639*
699.764*
698.444*
370,463*
155.715*
101.786*
547,309*
150.451*
$332,908,138
$425,206,089
* Canadian funds. A 26
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
TABLE VIII.—Value of Mine Production by Divisions, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944,
and 1945.
Mining Division.
1943.
Atlin	
Portland Canal	
Skeena	
Stikine	
Cariboo	
Omineca	
Peace River..	
Quesnel	
Kamloops	
Nicola	
Vernon	
Greenwood	
Osoyoos....	
Similkameen	
Ainsworth	
Fort Steele	
Golden	
Lardeau	
Nelson	
Revels toke	
Slocan	
Trail Creek	
Alberni	
Ashcroft	
Clinton	
Lillooet	
Nanaimo	
New Westminster
Vancouver	
Victoria	
Totals	
$1,449,341
2.262.577
640,785
32,991
.3,157,927
1,547,379
2,459
170,457
183,054
107,525
34,657
740,814
2,223,666
4,786,602
44,408
35,417,691
721,250
11,823
3,748,001
19,443
626,106
3,095,444
2,473,860
9,963
13,688
5,991,503
3,051,178
679.169
4,024,175
1,211,793
$78,479,719
$1,401
1,796,
430.
16,
2,465
3,273.
13.
77,
183,
122.
10,
511,
2,429,
4,111.
25.
35,427.
528.
1,
2,682,
30.
884,
4,154,
1,647,
59,
8,
5,093,
3,418,
654,
2,596,
1,491,
357
684
090
211
413
590
910
082
406
930
409
553
785
591
270
802
800
031
612
997
623
407
140
598
602
991
984
719
739
767
$75,551,093
$314,005
1,100,439
58,309
2,311
1,161,053
5,357,775
59,354
20,360
161,820
155,606
2,177
361,396
1,490,888
3,497,570
49,405
34,397,668
438,726
95
892,159
29,031
1,089,433
3,282,427
527,401
9,964
5,679
3,312,574
3,435,235
607,133
2,607,391
1,465,011
$255,539
732,087
32,211
1,520
979,399
1,409,984
58,251
13,804
124,130
83,032
3,225
275,571
1,837,959
3,242,076
277,435
30,532,861
324,525
1,288
544,663
19,664
1,193,092
2,246,794
9,725
14,809
1,803
3,072,599
3,353,930
597,569
2,233,911
1,450,347
$65,892,395
$54,923,803
$321,227
736,125
37,443
348
1,033,181
142,315
32,342
14,533
135,791
27,099
1,338
191.767
2,069,351
2,205,091
254,429
41,367,966
825,803
516,283
35,904
954,479
2,790,460
6,194
1,393
3.368
2,412,843
2,981,253
677,220
2,124,478
1,443,925
$63,343,949 STATISTICS.
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
TABLE IX.b.—Production Value op Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper,
Lead, and Zinc in 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, and 1945.
Divisions.
1941.
1943
1945.
Atlin	
Portland Canal	
Skeena	
Stikine	
Cariboo	
Omineca	
Peace River	
Quesnel	
Kamloops	
Nicola	
Vernon	
Greenwood	
Osoyoos	
Similkameen	
Ainsworth	
Fort Steele	
Golden	
Lardeau	
Nelson	
Revelstoke.	
Slocan	
Trail Creek	
Alberni	
Ashcroft	
Clinton	
Lillooet	
Nanaimo	
New Westminster
Vancouver .,
Victoria	
Totals	
,245,709
.211,087
591,021
67,154
774,971
201,473
5,984
223,183
36,809
30,424
17,536
727,331
030,408
.564,452
24,862
147,985
,021,364
13,433
057,804
2,976
138.730
564,603
905,014
17,382
69,996
607,347
39.258
20,598
833,476
4,180
1,445,931
2,253,299
547,908
32,991
3,077,675
170,039
2,438
167,297
8,073
9,436
30,122
711,981
2,173,069
4,351,322
34,308
31,013,289
700,911
11,823
3,686,326
2,596
626,106
322,106
2,450,639
1,362
11,420
5,982,811
1,379
32,095
3,742,673
1,456
1,393,567
1,796,684
354,257
16,211
2,415,991
62,397
760
74,625
5,713
7,473
458,573
2,122,417
3,621,198
3,870
30,921,250
497,178
2,633,021
1,108
884,623
193,658
1,610,534
7,535
6,554
5,075,552
1,102
3,758
2,245,915
380
63,196,550
63,601,981
56,415,904
310,734
1,089,525
982
2,311
1,104,703
31,789
20,232
1,551
831
224,385
1,414,337
3,010,155
45,455
30,328,407
402,738
95
837,919
253
1,089,433
348,821
521,595
855
982
3,286,891
380
2,387,899
73,354
253,242
732,087
601
1,520
947,593
30,141
13,614
1,007
760
398
183,763
1,793,878
2,949,189
272,678
25,549,264
267,048
1,288
276,616
1,361
1,193,092
13,772
5,631
1,203
1,330
3,068,573
190
728
1,959,227
158,092
318.147
736,125
380
348
950,292
19,250
538
13,171
190
285
142,489
2,001,678
1,967,074
248,479
37,656,140
763,883
425,304
823
954,479
5,715
63
1,172
222
2,407,569
317
1,781,529
46,536,612
9,677,!
50,395,662 STATISTICS.
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
TABLE XII.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1895-1945.
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A 33
TABLE XIII.—Production of Lode Mines in British Columbia, 1913-1945.
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
TABLE XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date.*
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
1836-1885  3,029,011
  326,636
  413,360
  489,301
  679,830
  678,140
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1891  1,029.097
1892  826,336
1893  978,294
1894  1,012,963
1895  939,654
1896  896,222
1897  882,854
1898  1,135,865
1899  1,306,324
1900  1.439,595
1901  1,460,331
1902  1,397,394
1903  1,168,194
1904  1,253,628
1905  1.384,312
1906  1,517,303
1907  1,800,067
1908  1,677,849
1909  2,006.476
1910  2,800,046
1911  2,193,062
1912  2,628.804
1913  2,137,483
1914  1,810,967
1915  1,611,129
1916  2,084,093
Value.
$9,468,557
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3.038,859
2,818.962
2,688,666
2,648,562
3.407,595
3.918,972
4.318.785
4,380,993
4,192,182
3,504,582
3,760,884
4,152,936
4,551,909
6.300,235
5,872,472
7,022,666
9.800.161
7,675.717
9,200,814
7,481,190
6,338,385
5,638,952
7,294,325
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
1917  2,149,975
1918  2,302,245
1919  2,267,541
1920  2,595,125
1921  2,483,995
1922  2,511,843
1923  2,453,223
1924  1,939,526
1926  2,328,522
1926  2,330,036
1927  2,453,827
1928  2,526,702
1929  2,251,252
1930  1,887,130
1931  1,707,590
1932  1,534,975
1933  1,264.746
1934  1,347,090
1935  1,187.968
1936  1,346,471
1937  1,444,687
1938  1,309,428
1939  1,477,872
1940  1,667,827
1941  1,802 353
1942  1,938.158
1943  1,821,654
1944  1,933,639
1945  1,518,673
Totals 100,678,682
Value.
$7,524,913
11,511,225
11,337,705
12,975,625
12,419,975
12,559,215
12,266,115
9,697,630
11,642,610
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565,069
6,280,956
7,088.265
7,660,090
8.237,172
7.742,030
8,217,966
6,454,360
$401,085,295
* For all years to 1925   (inclusive)   figures are net coal production and do not include coal made into  coke;
subsequent figures are entire coal production, including coal made into coke.
TABLE XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens in British Columbia
from 1895 to 1925.
Tons. Value.
(2,240 1b.)
1895-97      19,396 $96,980
1898 (estimated)      35,000 175,000
1899      34,251 171,255
1900      85,149 425,745
1901  127,081 635,405
1902  128,015 640,075
1903  165,543 827,715
1904  238,428 1,192,140
1905  271,785 1,358,925
1906  199,227 996,135
1907  222,913 1,337,478
1908  247,399 1,484,394
1909  258,703 1,552,218
1910  218,029 1,308,174
1911      66,005 396.030
1912  264.333 1,585,998
Tons. Value.
(2,240 1b.)
1913   286,045 $1,716,270
1914    234,577 1,407,462
1915    245,871 1,475,226
1916    267,725 1,606,350
1917.....    159,905 959.430
1918    188,967 1,322,769
1919   91,138 637,986
1920 :   67,792 474,544
1921   59,434 416,038
1922   45,835 320,845
1923   58,919 412,433
1924   30,615 214.305
1925   75,185 526,295
Totals 4,393,265 $25,673,600 STATISTICS.
A 35
TABLE XVI.—Coke and By-products Production of British Columbia,
1944 and 1945.
1944.
1945.
Description.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
190,074
$1,439,891
206,132
$1,211,684
33,005
42,322
78,955
$301,201
347,245
565,393
12,021
52,766
81,859
$117,369
434,876
577,479
154,282
$1,213,839
2,562,610
56,476
19,046
146,646
$1,129,724
2,721,690
83,828
20,756
$3,851,971
$3,955,998 A 36
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1945.
Lode-gold Mines*
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Amount
paid.
Arlington	
Athabasca	
Bayonne ■	
Bralorne Mines, Ltd	
Belmont-Surf Inlet	
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co., Ltd	
Cariboo-McKinney Con. M. & M. Co	
Canadian Pacific Exploration (Porto Rico).
Centre Star	
Fairview Amalgamated	
Fern Gold Mining & Milling Co., Ltd	
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd	
Goodenough (leasers)	
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd	
Island Mountain Mines, Ltd	
I.X.L	
Jewel-Denero	
Kelowna Exploration, Ltd. (Nickel Plate)	
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Ltd	
Le Roi Mining Co	
Le Roi No. 2, Ltd	
Lome (later Bralorne)	
Motherlode	
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines, Ltd	
Nickel Plate (Hedley Gold Mining Co., Ltd.)..
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd	
Poorman	
Premier Gold Mining Co., Ltd	
P-rivateer Mine, Ltd	
Queen	
Relief Arlington Mines, Ltd. (Second Relief).
Reno Gold Mines, Ltd	
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd	
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd	
Spud Valley Gold Mines, Ltd	
Sunset No. 2	
Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd	
War Eagle	
Ymir Gold	
Ymir Yankee Girl	
Miscellaneous mines	
Total, lode-gold mines	
Erie	
Nelson	
Tye Siding	
Bridge River	
Princess Royal Island..
Wells	
Camp McKinney	
Nelson	
Rossland	
Oliver	
Nelson	
Sheep Creek	
Ymir	
Hedley	
Wells	
Rossland	
Greenwood	
Hedley	
Sheep Creek	
Rossland	
Rossland	
Bridge River	
Sheep Creek	
Zeballos	
Hedley	
Bridge River	
Nelson	
Premier	
Zeballos	
Sheep Creek	
Erie	
Sheep Creek	
Sheep Creek	
Premier	
Zeballos	
Rossland	
Surf Inlet	
Rossland	
Ymir	
Ymir	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold-copper..
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold-copper..
Gold-copper..
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold-copper..
Gold	
Gold-copper..
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
$94,872
25,000
25,000
14,205,560
1,437,500
1,679,976
565,588
37,500
472,255
5,254
9,375
t868,595
13,731
1,290,553
1,108,495
134,025
11,751
1,560,000
357,856
1,475,000
1,574,640
20,450
163,500
165,000
3,423,191
9.299,393
25,000
18,858,075
1,914,183
85,000
t308,000
tl,433,640
2,587,500
12,350,000
168,000
115,007
120,279
1,245,250
300,000
t415,002
108,623
$69,857,609
* The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table.
t Includes " Return of Capital " distributions.
t Up to and including 1936, dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company, Limited, were derived from
operations of the company in British Columbia. Subsequent dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company,
Limited, have been derived from the operations of subsidiary companies in British Columbia and elsewhere and are
not included in the figure given. In 1936, Silbak Premier, a subsidiary of Premier Gold Mining Company, took over
the former gold operations of that company in British Columbia.    Dividends paid by Silbak Premier are given above. STATISTICS.
A 37
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1945—Continued.
Silver-lead-zinc Mines.
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
Rambler	
$10,000
97,200
48,000
Bell	
388,297
New Denver	
New Denver	
Trail	
25,000
5,500
*134,645,136
Field	
5,203
Smithers	
Ainsworth	
Cody	
Silver-lead-zinc	
50,000
35,393
45,668
H.B. Mining Co..                                      ...    .
Hall Creek	
8,904
132,464
Highland Bell, Ltd.
646,415
Similkameen	
Sandon	
6,000
400,000
20,000
20,000
Three Forks	
Sandon	
Three Forks	
Sandon	
213,000
50,000
80,000
6,000
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
10,257
70,500
Three Forks	
Cody	
71,387
45,088
Cody	
Silver-lead-zinc-	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
72,859
497,901
Sandon	
6,754
110,429
1,438,000
fl42,328
25,000
467,250
Queen Bess .,
Alamo	
Rambler	
Cody	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
334,992
125,490
566,000
Silver-lead-zinc	
Sandon	
Ainsworth	
Silverton .'.
1,267,600
10,365
Silver-lead-zinc	
2,734,688
88,000
64,000
Wallace Mines, Ltd. (Sally)	
135,000
20,000
Silver-lead-zinc	
592,515
70,237
$145,904,823
* Earnings of several company mines, and customs smelter at Trail.
t Includes $10,504 paid in 1944 but not included in the yearly figure.
t These two properties were amalgamated as Silversmith Mines, Limited, in August, 1939. A 38
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1945—Continued.
Copper Mines.
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
Britannia M. & S. Co.*	
Canada Copper Corporation...
Cornell	
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co.f.-
Marble Bay	
Hall Mines	
Miscellaneous mines	
Total, copper mines..
Britannia Beach....
Greenwood	
Texada Island	
Copper Mountain..
Texada Island	
Nelson	
Copper       $11,511,440
Copper..
Copper..
Copper..
Copper..
Copper..
Copper..
615,399
8,500
26,643,227
175,000
233,280
261,470
$39,448,325
* Britannia Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, is a subsidiary of the Howe Sound Company, which is the
holding company for Britannia and other mines in Mexico and the State of Washington. Dividends paid by the
Howe Sound Company, therefore, can not be credited to British Columbia. Dividends in the above table for
Britannia have been paid by that company, none being paid subsequent to 1930, until 1939. In making comparison
with yearly totals the amounts shown as paid by the Howe Sound Company have been deducted for the years shown,
so the total in the annual report concerned will show the higher figure.
t The Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power Company dividends as set out in the above table in the
Minister of Mines Annual Report for 1942 were incorrect, and the correct total is as above. The figure now includes
all dividends, capital distributions, and interim liquidating payments, the latter being $4,500,000, paid prior to
reorganization. Dividends commenced in 1904 and cover all company activities in British Columbia to date, the
present operations being conducted at Allenby and Copper Mountain.
The term " Miscellaneous " noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under, together
with payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance
given by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject.
Coal.
Wellington Collieries, Ltd., Nanaimo     $16,000,000
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd., Fernie       13,427,080
Total     $29,427,080
Miscellaneous, Structural, and Placer Gold.
Various       $2,897,313
Aggregate of all Classes.
Lode-gold mining  $69,857,609
Silver-lead-zinc mining and smelting  145,904,823
Copper-mining  39,448,325
Coal-mining  29,427,080
Miscellaneous, structural, and placer gold  2,897,313
TotaL
$287,535,150 STATISTICS.
A 39
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1945—Continued.
Dividends paid Yearly, 1917-1945, inclusive.
Year. Amount paid.
1917  $3,269,494
1918  2,704,469
1919  2,494,283
1920  1,870,296
1921  736,629
1922  3,174,756
1923  2,983,570
1924  2,977,276
1925  5,853,419
1926  8,011,137
1927  8,816,681
1928  9,572,536
1929  11,263,118
1930  10,543,500
1931  4,650,857
1932  2,786,958
Year.
1933
1934
1935
Amount paid.
  $2,471,735
  4,745,905
  7,386,070
1936  10,513,705
1937  15,085,293
1938  12,068,875
1939  11,865,698
1940  14,595,530
1941  16,598,110
1942  13,627,104
1943  11,860,159
1944  11,367,732
1945  10,487,395
Total  $224,382,290
Dividends paid during 1944 and 1945.
1944. 1945.
Bralorne Mines, Ltd     $1,496,400 $1,247,000
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd..— 183,932      	
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co.
of Canada, Ltd       8,189,604 8,189,653
The Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd          186,354 186,354
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd..-.:       *413,595     	
Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and
Power Co., Ltd.....:. T         135,070 74,966
Highland Bell, Ltd           13,159 13,159
Island Mountain Mines, Ltd            52,536 73,550
Kelowna Exploration, Ltd. (Nickel Plate)...         150,000 210,000
Privateer Mine, Ltd  49,082      	
Providence       +10,504
Belief Arlington Mines, Ltd       *18,000
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd          225,000 225,000
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd          125,000 $100,000
Others          148,000 139,209
Totals  $11,367,732 $10,487,395
* Distribution of capital. f Omitted from 1944. t Includes $50,000 omitted from 1944. A 40
REPORT OP THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
TABLE XVIII,
-Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity, and
Process Supplies, 1945.
Class.
Salaries and
Wages.
Fuel and
Electricity.
Process
Supplies.
Lode-mining	
$15,295,945
121,314
4,892,350
1,315,095
990,205
$0,257,139
7,838
209,099
447,870
317.774
$3,113,273
8,350
Coal-mining :	
Miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials	
817,282
1.750.870
00.847
Totals, 1945	
522,620,975
$7,239,726
$5,756,628
Grand totals, 1944	
Grand totals, 1943	
$23,131,874
20,051,407
20,913,100
20,050,491
23,391,330
22,357,035
22,705,711
21,349,090
17,887,619
16,753,307
249,272,719
$5,788,071
7,432,585
7,000,109
3,770,747
3,474.721
"3,260,000
3,390,100
3.000,311
2,724,144
2.019,639
•49.850,759
$0,138,084
0,572.317
Grand totals, 1942	
Grand totals, 1941	
0,803,398
7,200,441
Grand totals, 1940	
6,902,162
Grand totals, 1939	
6,714.347
Grand totals, 1938	
6,544,500
Grand totals, 1937	
Grand totals, 1930	
6,845,330
4.434,501
Grand totals, 1935	
4,552,730
Grand totals, 1935-45	
08,044.438
* Estimated.
Note.—The above figures, compiled from returns on the subject made by companies and individuals, illustrate
the amount of money distributed in salaries and wages, fuel and electricity, and process supplies (explosives,
chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants, etc.). STATISTICS.
A 41
TABLE XIX.-
-Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode
Minerals, 1901-1945.
Year.
Tonnage.*
No. of
Shipping-
mines.
No. of Mines
shipping
over 100
Tons.
Gross Value of
Lode Minerals
as reported by
Shipper, t
Net Value to
Shipper of
Lode Minerals.
produced.!
Gross Value
of Lode
Minerals
produced. §
1901	
920.410
998,999
1,280,170
1.401,009
1,700,079
1,903,872
1.804,114
2.083,606
2.057,713
2,210,428
1,770,755
2.088,532
2,003.809
2.175,971
2.090,110
3,188,805
2.701,579
2,892,849
2.112,975
2.178,187
1,502.045
1,573,180
2.421.839
3.397.105
3.849,269
4.775.073
5.410,021
0,241,310
0.977.081
0.803,840
5,549.103
4.340.158
4.030.978
5,110.897
4.910.148
4.381,027
0,145.144
7.377,021
7.211,223
7.037.358
7.938,803
0.708,277
5,429.557
4.703,332
4,377,722
119
124
125
142
140
154
147
108
89
83
SO
80
110
98
132
109
1 03
175
144
121
80
98
77
80
102
138
132
110
100
OS
44
75
109
145
177
108
185
211
217
210
200
120
48
51
36
78
7 5
74
70
79
72
59
50
45
51
58
50
59
81
87
80
74
60
35
33
28
37
40
55
52
49
48
32
22
29
47
09
72
70
113
92
99
92
90
70
32
31
27
$14,100,282
11,581,153
1902	
1903
1904.
1905
1900
1907
17,316,847
15 847 411
1908
1909
14,728,731
17,190,838
15 225 061
19,750,498
19 444,365
25 347 092
35 538,247
$38,558,613
27,750,304
29,070,075
34,713,887
21,977,088
10,5 13,931
7,075,393
13,970,358
20,243,278
25,407,914
30,051,207
43,052,521
35,278,033
40,709,385
43,610,846
46,081,802
45,199,604
33,293,917
26,449,408
31,026,149
51,508,031
51 174,859
40,915,395
22,535,573
19,700,235
25 007,137
33 895.930
43,060,452
$48,010,505
40,222,237
45,125,341
49,945,270
52,354,870
50,494,041
37,234,070
29,327,114
34,156,405
62,012,783
53,877,333
53,522,098
02,848,642
62,216,019
1942	
55,359,479
46,089,042
39,315,910
49,997,071
: Does not include mercury ore, which in 1944 amounted to 106,427 tons.
" Data not collected before 1937.
: Previous to 1937 the shipper reported " Net Value at Shipping Point," no indication being given a
to how the net value was arrived at.    From 1937 on the shipper has reported " Gross Value '
from which deduction of freight and treatment gives " Net Value."
t Gross value as represented by valuing lode metals at yearly average prices. A 42
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
TABLE XX.—Men, employed in the Mining Industry of British Columbia,
1901-1945.
Year.
Lode
MINING.
n3
>
o
I
a
J3
0    1
<
Eh
Coal-mining.
Structural
Materials.
oi43
IS
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1900
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941.
1942
1943
1944
1945
299
415
355
341
425
088
874
1,134
1,122
1,291
1,124
1,371
1,303
1,252
1,004
939
489
212
255
209
2,730
2,219
1,662
2,143
2,470
2,680
2,704
2,567
2,184
2,472 |
2,435 |
2,472 |
2,773 |
2,741 |
2,709 |
3,357 |
3,290 |
2,626 |
2,513 j
2,074 |
| 1,355 1
| 1,510 |
| 2,102 |
| 2,353 |
| 2,298
| 2,600 |
| 2.671 |
j 2,707 |
| 2,920 |
| 2,316 |
I 1,463 j
| 1,355 |
| 1,780 |
| 2,796 |
| 2,740 |
| 2,959 |
I 3,003 1
3,849 |
3,905 |
| 3,923 |
3,901 |
| 2,920
2,394
1,896
1,933
1,212
1,126
1,088
1,163
1,240
1,303
1,239
1,127
1,070
1,237
1,159
1,364
1,505
1,433
1,435
2,030
2,198
1,704
1,740
1,605
9 75
1,239
1,516
1,680
2,840
1,735
1,916
2,409
2,052
1,200
834
900
1,335
1,729
1.497
1,840
1,818
2,206
2,050
2,104
1,823
1,504
1,099
1,825
1,750
3,948
3,345
2,750
3,306
3,710
| 3,983
3,943
3,094
3.254
3,709
3,594
3,837
4,278
4,174
4,144
5,393
5,488
4,390
4.259
3,079
2,330
2,749
3,618
4,033
5,138
4,341
4,587
5,176
4,978
3,570
2.297
2,255
3,121
4,525
4,237
4,799
5,421
0,115
5,955
6.027
5.724
4,424
4,093
3,721
3,683
808
854
911
900
832
581
542
531
031
907
720
1,108
919
990
1,048
1,025
900
891
849
822
! 2.401
j 2.842
'[ 2.748
I 2.048
| 3.197
I 3.157
| 2,036
I 2.436
| 2.890
| 2.771
I 2.678
I 3.027
1 3,158
3.187
I 2,944
I 3,072
j 3,555
| 2.835
| 2.981
! 2,834
3.041
3,101
3,137
3,278
3,127
3,415
2,862
4,432
4,713
5,903
| 5,212
| 5,275
| 4,950
| 4,267
| 3.70S
3,694
I 3,760
| 3,658
| 4,145
4,191
| 4,722
| 4,712
I 4,342
j 3,894
I 3,828
3.757
| 3.646
| 3,814
! 3,075
1 3,389
I 2,957
I 2,628
I 2,241
| 2,050
I 2.145
| 2,015
I 2,286
I 2.088
! 2,107
I 2,175
I 2 229
| 1,892
| 2,240
| 2,150
[ 1,927
931
910
1,127
1,175
1,280
1,390
907
1,041
1,705
1,855
1,661
1,855
1,721
1,405
1.283
1,366
1,410
1,769
1,821
2,158
2,163
1,932
1,807
1,524
1,015
1,565
1,579
1,520
1,353
1,250
1,125
980
853
843
820
799
807
874
son
099
494
408
011
089
503
3.974
4.011
4,264
4,453
4,407
4,805
3,769
6,073
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4,991
5,060
5,170 i
5,247 j
5,966 |
0,349 j
6,885 j
0,644 |
6,149 j
5,418 j
5,443 |
5,322 |
5,225 j
5.334 | 412
493
64 7
5,028 |
4,645 I
4.082 j
3,008 |
3,094 j
2,893
2,971 j
2,814 |
3,153 J
2,902 I 900
2.970 j 052
2,874 I 827
2,723 I 766
2,360 | 842
2,851 | 673
2,839 j 690
2,430 I 921
492
843
460
536
370
377
530
931
724
] 324
j 138
] 368
I 544
] 344
| 520
| 329
i 269
| 187
| 270
j 288
|327
[ 295
311
j 334
| 413
j 378
| 326
| 351
| 335
I	
j 124
| 122
|120
| 268
| 170
j 380
| 344
| 408
I 360
I 754
825
| 938
I 369
| 561
I 047
| 422
| 262
| 567
| 628
586
I
| 7.922
7.350
7,014
| 7.759
| 8.117
8.788
| 7,712
| 9,707
j 9.072
j 11.407
10,467
10,967
10.949
9.906
9,135
j 10,453
j 10.658
| 9.037
! 10.225
10.028
[ 9.215
| 0,393
| 9,767
| 9,451
| 10.581
| 14,172
j 14.830
j 15,424
j 15,565
| 14.032
j 12.171
| 1 0.524
I 11.369
I 12.985
| 13.737
| 14.179
| 10.129
! 16.021
j 15.890
I 15.705
j 15.084
j 13,270
| 12.448
] 12,314
I 11,820*
* The average number of wage-earners was obtained by adding the monthly figures for individual companies and
dividing by 12 irrespective of the number of months worked, the average number of wage-earners in the industry is
the sum of these individual averages. STATISTICS.
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
TABLE XXII.—Lode Metal Mines employing an Average of Ten or
more Men during 1945.
Shipping Mines.
Name of Mine or Company.
Days
operating.
Tonnage.
Average Number EMPLOYED.
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd	
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co., Ltd	
Island Mountain Mines Co., Ltd	
Highland Bell, Ltd	
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd	
Kelowna Exploration Co., Ltd	
Copper Mountain (Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co., Ltd.)	
Ainsmore Consolidated Mines, Ltd	
Retallack Mines, Ltd. (Whitewater)	
Sullivan (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada, Ltd.)	
Base Metals, Ltd. (Monarch and Kicking Horse)	
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd	
Western Exploration Co., Ltd. (Standard, Enterprise, Mam
moth)	
Zincton Mines, Ltd. (Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd.)	
Bralorne Mines, Ltd 	
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd 	
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd	
306
365
305
302
293
304
306
209
184
304
305
304
319
365
305
177
308
306
365
305
335
362
304
197
206
288
305
219
131
182
365
177
303
65,801
36,016
22,614
1.164
56,481
99,383
786,026
9,900
29,561
2,435.877
47.777
24,504
17,266
63,322
110,410
10,528
566,500
65,801
34,677
22,614
56,503
99,383
785.629
9,900
29.561
2.435,877
47,777
24,504
17,266
63,322
105,283
9,039
566,500
180
167
70
26
113
119
361
22
32
1,241
57
72
61
44
328
123
360
16
14
10
37
64
157
4
6
308
11
7
17
13
17
6
Non-shipping Mines.
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd	
Kenville Gold Mines, Ltd. (Granite-Poorman)
Privateer Mine, Ltd	
16
21
17 DEPARTMENTAL WORK.
ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH.
The administrative branch is responsible for the administration of the Provincial
mining laws regarding the acquisition of mineral rights, and deals with other Departments of the Provincial Service for the Department or for any Branch.
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-mining Recorders, whose duties
are laid down in the " Mineral Act" and the " Placer-mining Act," administer these
Acts, the "Allied Forces Exemption Act," the " Free Miners' Exemption Act," and
other Acts relating to mining. Mining Recorders, in addition to their own functions,
may also exercise the powers conferred upon Gold Commissioners with regard to mineral claims within the mining division for which they have been appointed. Similar
duties may be performed by Mining Recorders with regard to placer claims but not in
respect to placer-mining leases. Recording of location and of work upon mineral
claims, placer claims, and placer-mining leases as required by the various Acts must be
made at the office of the Mining Recorder for the proper mining division. Information
concerning claims and leases which are held and concerning the ownership and standing
of claims and leases in any division may be obtained from the Mining Recorder for the
mining division in which the property is situated and from the Central Records offices.
Sub-mining Recorders, who act as forwarding agents, are appointed at various places
throughout the Province. They are authorized to accept documents and fees and
forward them to the office of the Mining Recorder for the correct mining division.
Officials and their offices in various parts of the Province are listed in the table on pages
47 and 48.
Copies of the various Acts, upon payment of the prices listed on page 194. can be
obtained from the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner, the King's Printer, Victoria,
the Central Records office in Vancouver, or from the offices of the Gold Commissioners
throughout the Province.
New Type Forms B and E (Mineral Act) ; Certificate of Work
(Placer-mining Act).
Use of the counterfoil type of Forms B and E (" Mineral Act") and the Certificate of Work form (" Placer-mining Act ") was discontinued during 1945 and a carboncopy type of book substituted.
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver).
A Central Records office, 305 Federal Building, Vancouver, was established in
1942. The office provides information as to the ownership of claims staked, placer-
mining leases issued, certificates of work and bills of sale recorded, and leases of
reverted Crown-granted mineral claims. The approximate positions of mineral claims
and placer-mining leases are shown on a series of reference maps from information
supplied by the locators. The information outlined, so far as possible, is brought up to
date on receipt of semi-monthly returns from all Mining Recorders. The maps and
records may be inspected by any one who calls at the office in business hours.
Provision has been made to establish at Victoria the same services as now provided
in Vancouver, and it is anticipated that by August 1st, 1946, complete records will be
available at the General Office, Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C. Returns from
Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders will be forwarded semi-monthly to the
45 A 46
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Victoria office, and copies of the cards will be forwarded to Vancouver from Victoria.
The Vancouver office will continue to provide the same services as in the past.
Amalgamation of Mining Divisions.
(Particulars of Mining Divisions amalgamated since 1939.)
Date.
Mining Divisions amalgamated.
New Name.
Mining Recorder's
Office.
July      2, 1939
Sept.   18, 1939
Bella Coola and Skeena	
Nov.   20, 1939
Aug.     1, 1940
Grand Forks and Greenwood	
Oct.    15, 1942
Slocan	
Golden	
Oct.    15, 1942
Golden and Windermere	
Nanaimo and Quatsino	
Golden.
Nov.   30, 1942
Dec.       1   1942
Alberni	
Gold Purchasing.
Late in 1935 the Department of Finance, co-operating with the Department of
Mines, undertook to purchase small lots of placer gold under 2 oz. in weight from the
individual placer-miner. The Gold Commissioners throughout the Province are paying
a cash price of $29 per ounce for clean placer gold and are purchasing dirty placer gold
and amalgam on a deferred-payment basis. Purchases made under this arrangement
are as follows:—
Year.
No. of Lots.
Paid.
Paid per Oz.
1936	
1,470
1,657
2,397
2,322
1,336
631
229
93
59
63
$50,000
52,250
72,000
60,000
31,600
16,825
8,068
2,705
1,196
1,604
$28.00
1937	
28.00
1938	
28.00
1939	
29.00
1940	
29.00
1941	
29.00
1942	
29.00
1943	
29.00
1944	
29.00
1945	
29 00
Totals	
10,257
$296,248
This purchasing scheme was established during the depression years to give the
individual miner the best possible price for his gold, and this was realized in that the
total price paid has been almost exactly the same as the receipts from the Royal
Canadian Mint. DEPARTMENTAL WORK.
A 47
List of Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-mining Recorders
in the Province.
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Su b- recorder. •
Kaslo	
C. MacDonald	
W. M. H. Dunn	
A. Robb.
J. H. Byrne      	
Tofino	
Mrs. E. M. Burchett.
Nanaimo	
Ashcroft	
D. Dalgleish (Kamloops)
W. F. Knowlton	
Atlin	
G. H. Hallett    	
G. H. Hallett	
A. E. Roddis.
Squaw Creek	
J. W. Stewart.
M. S. Morrell.
Barkerville	
W. E. McLean	
Mrs. T. B. McLean.
S. Allen.
Prince George ....
J. E. Mclntyre.
Clinton 	
Clinton •	
C. G. Sutherland	
C. G. Sutherland
E. L. Hedley	
E. L. Hedley	
F. E. P. Hughes.
Golden        	
Golden	
A. W. Anderson	
A. W. Anderson	
Greenwood	
L. A. Dodd	
L. A. Dodd	
W. H. Laird.
Kamloops	
D. Dalgleish	
D. Dalgleish	
G. M. Fennell.
H. Finley.
T. G. O'Neill.
W. G. Fleming (Revelstoke)
G. H. Beley	
C. A. McEIroy	
G. H. Beley	
W. H. Cochrane	
W. H. Cochrane	
Stuart Island 	
J  B  Willcock
Henry Carter.
H. J. Bull.
J. H  Byrne and H. R.
Burdon.
S. Hamilton	
thorpe.
B J H. Ry'ey.
A. B. Gray	
D. Dalgleish (Kamloops)
K. D. McRae	
K. D. McRae	
Bella Coola	
E. Bradley. A 48
REPORT OF THE  MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
List of Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-mining Recorders
in the Province—Continued.
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
Omineca (Continued)
Manson Creek	
W. B. Steele.
T. J. Thorp.
Kimsquit via Ocean Falls
H. 0. Callahan.
T. C. Brunton.
LePoidevin.
W. A. A. West.
Usk
W. E. Horwill.
W. R. Dewdney	
W. R. Dewdney	
W. H. Laird.
Pouce Coupe	
Fort St. John   	
M. S. Morrell	
S. M. Carling
(Oeputy)
H. 0. Callahan.
Prince George	
G. Milburn.
G. Forbes (at Prince
Rupert)
Williams Lake	
Miss J. Foster
(Deputy)
Miss J. Foster
(Deputy)
S. Allen
L. R. Speed.
W. E. McLean
A. B. Campbell.
W. Rae.
Revelstoke	
W. G. Fleming	
W. G. Fleming	
A. J. Dillabough.
Prince Rupert	
G. Forbes	
G. Forbes.
Kimsquit via Ocean Falls
G. H. Hill
Bella Coola	
E. Bradley.
C. MacDonald (Kaslo)
W E Graham
A. E. Roddis	
A. E. Roddis
Sub-office	
Burns Lake	
Fort St. John	
Lower Post ,
M. S. Morrell
Trail Creek	
E. B. Offin
E. B. Offin	
Miss J. Burnett
(Deputy)
J. Egdell	
E. F. Little	
E. F. Little
K. B. Biakey
R. H. McCrimmon
(Deputy)
Miss L. Davey. \
;
DEPARTMENTAL WORK.                                                 A 49
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> A 50
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
CHEMICAL LABORATORIES AND SAMPLING PLANT.
The Department has its principal laboratory at Victoria, and also a sampling plant
and an assay office at Prince Rupert. The Victoria laboratory has on its permanent
staff six analysts and technicians as well as the Chief Analyst and Assayer. The
assayer at Prince Rupert is also in charge of the sampling plant there.
During 1945 the chemical laboratory in Victoria issued reports on 1,774 samples
and specimens. A laboratory examination of a sample generally consists of the following: (1) A mineralogical determination of visible minerals and a classification of the
type of rock; (2) a spectrographic analysis to determine if any base metals are present
in interesting percentages; (3) assays for precious metals, and for base metals shown
by the spectrographic analysis to be present in interesting percentages. The laboratory reports were distributed in the following manner amongst bona-fide prospectors,
bona-fide prospectors who were grantees under the " Prospectors' Grub-stake Act,"
departmental engineers, and the Provincial Government Sampling Plant at Prince
Rupert:—
Samples and
Specimens.
Mineralogical
Determinations.
Spectrographic
Analyses.
Assays.
771
448
532
23
629
439
19
6
624
428
302
23
Bona-fide prospectors (grantees)	
Departmental engineers	
907
818
Totals	
1,774
1,093
1,377
2,921
Serially numbered sample or specimen tags stapled together in booklets of ten
continued to be supplied free of charge to bona-fide prospectors during 1945. About
75 per cent, of those who submitted samples used these tags, and their availability was
drawn to the attention of those who did not. In addition, shipping-tags and sample-
sacks were loaned free of charge to those prospectors who requested them for use when
submitting samples or specimens to this laboratory.
Proximate analyses and heat value determinations were made on sixty-nine coal
samples. Of these, fifty-eight were for the Department of Mines and eleven were for
the Department of Public Works.
For the Attorney-General's Department, forty cases of a chemico-legal nature were
undertaken, involving in all a study of 289 exhibits. The analyses and examinations
were of a very diversified nature. Quantitative spectrographic analyses played a very
important part in the investigations.
Seventeen analyses of soils and other raw materials for the Department of Agriculture and one analysis of water submitted by the Provincial Board of Health completed the analytical work of the laboratory for 1945.
Sixty-three lots of placer gold amounting to 55.3 oz., representing purchases from
individual placer-miners, were received from Gold Commissioners.
A Provincial Government examination for certificates of competency and licence
to practise assaying in British Columbia was held in Victoria in December.    Of the two
candidates who sat for the examination, one was granted a supplemental examination
in wet assaying but the other failed.    One application for a licence to practise assaying
under subsection (2) of section 11 of the " Department of Mines Act" was received
and was granted.
Prince Rupert Sampling Plant.*
In 1937 the Department established a sampling plant at Prince Rupert. Small
shipments of ore are accepted at the plant, and payment is made for tonnage lots and
* Letters, tonnage lots, or samples should be addressed to:    The Manager, Department of Mines Assay Office
and Sampling Plant,  Prince Rupert, B.C. DEPARTMENTAL WORK.
A 51
bulk test lots after they have been sampled and the samples have been assayed. Lots
of any one class of ore are accumulated until the quantity is sufficient to warrant shipment to a smelter. Samples for assay are also accepted at the plant. An assay office
in conjunction with the sampling plant was opened in 1943.
The numbers of tonnage lots and of bulk test lots received annually at the Prince
Rupert sampling plant declined following the outbreak of the war. The number,
weight, and value of tonnage lots received in 1945 increased materially compared with
1944. High-grade gold ore from Tide Lake Gold Mines in the Stewart area made up
a large part of the total value of ore received in 1945.
In 1945 fifty-four samples were received for assay. This is less than the number
received in 1944 but greater than for any year preceding 1944. Since September all
samples assayed in the Prince Rupert assay office are forwarded to Victoria for spectrographic analysis to detect the rarer metals if present.
Prospectors' identification cards were issued to twelve prospectors during 1945.
The principal statistics for the sampling plant and assay office are set out in the
following tables:—
Summary of Ore Purchases and Sales for Fiscal Years 1937-38
to 1945-46, inclusive*
Ore Purchases.
Ore Sales
Fiscal Year.
Freight
Charges.
Paid to
Shipper.
Total Cost
of Ore.
receivable
from
Smelters.
1937 38                             	
$14.25
519.05
767.85
239.11
185.18
134.99
7.09
22.48
92.12
$609.79
8,038.07
13,602.09
11,860.11
12,173.06
1,705.04
289.45
1,677.99
12,097.01
$624.04
8,557.12
14,369.94
12,099.22
12,358.24
1,840.03
296.54
1,700.47
12,189.13
$318.15
1938 39                         	
8,281.70
1939-40	
10,724.35
1940 41                         	
14,565.66
1941 42                     	
11,943.21
1942 43                             	
3,964 53
1943 44                         	
252 21
1944-45 	
7.90
1945-46        	
14,430 46
$1,982.12
$62,052.61
$64,034.73
$64,500.43
$82.98
$12,938.90
$13,021.88
$14,430.46
Add estimated value of ore on hand December 31st,
1945	
Total	
Subtract estimated value of ore on hand January 1st,
1945	
1,381.64
Total	
$13,061.08
* Ore purchases and sales have been under the " Department of Mines Act " from the beginning of the fiscal
year 1938-39. For the few months of operation in the fiscal year 1937-38, operations were provided for under a
special warrant.
Summary of Ore Receipts, 1938 to 194-5.
Year.
Tonnage
Lots.
No. of
Properties.
Bulk Test
Lots.
No. of
Properties.
Assay
Lots.
No. of
Properties.
Weights of
Shipments.
Tons.
1938	
24
12
90
35
47
24
104.261
1939	
1940	
1941	
43
40
25
20
16
14
101
117
81
40
32
36
27
27
21
13
16
10
217.672
171.345
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
3
1
2
12
2
1
1
6
37
2
4
2
13
2
3
2
16
17
70
54
12
12
19
30
30.615
1.666
3.496
22.096 A 52
REPORT OP THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Sampling Plant Payments, 1945.
Lot No.
Date.
Shipper.
Property.
Freight,
etc.
Pavments to
Shippers.
Total Cost of
Ore purchased.
770	
Phillips, Julia K.
Tide Lake Gold
B.C. Gold           	
$841.89                     $841 89
771	
Mar. 27	
Apr. 18
Cameron, Art	
Cameron, Art	
Erickson, Axel	
Phillips, A. A	
Cameron, Art	
Phillips, A. A	
Phillips, A. A	
Phillips, A. A	
Christie, Neil	
Nightingale, Henry....
Phillips, A. A	
Merryth, Frank	
Nicholson Creek Mining Corp	
Totals	
$20.40
20.03
5.50
5.30
17.00
7.50
31.09                         51.49
772	
B.C. Gold           	
123.90                     143 93
773	
Gold Bar group	
Tide Lake Gold
Mountain Boy	
Tide Lake Gold	
79.06                         84.56
774	
775     	
July 17	
July 18 . .
1,490.43                   1,495.73
273.40                       290.40
776	
Aug. 14	
Aug. 14	
Aug. 14	
Sept. 18
Oct. 12	
Oct. 12
Oct. 11
Oct. 31
2,340.68                  2.348.18
777    	
Tide Lake Gold
Tide Lake Gold
Christie	
Nightingale	
Tide Lake Gold
6,738.47                  6,738.47
778	
85.97                         85.97
779      	
5.07                           5 07
780 T .   .   .
0.37                           0.37
781	
782-T	
5.00
0.75
1.50
910.68                       915.68
7.13                           7.88
786	
Nicholson Creek	
10.76                         12.26
$82.98
SI 2.938.90                SI 3 021.88
Ore received at Sampling Plant, 1945.
TONNAGE LOTS.
Lot
No.
Property.
Shipper.
Locality.
Dry
Tons.
Au.
Ag.
770    	
Tide Lake Gold..
B.C. Gold	
B.C. Gold	
Gold Bar group..
Tide Lake Gold..
Mountain Boy....
Tide Lake Gold...
Tide Lake Gold...
Tide Lake Gold..
Phillips, Julia K.
0.C2550
3.43600
4.30800
2.88550
0.04875
3.49850
1.12600
2.70850
1.83500
0.40850
1.07300
0.51700
Oz. per
Ton.
894.270
0.720
1.220
1.140
1,092.435
0.066
55.024
66.094
1.522
0.650
29.580
0.400
Oz. per
Ton.
1,225.60
0.80
0.40
1.66
1,466.89
196.98
155.35
140.57
19.13
Nil
134.06
11.60
Per
Cent.
Nil
Nil
Nil
0.50
0.14
0.09
Nil
8.38
Per
Cent.
1.66
2.54
6.40
11.88
Per
Cent.
3.42
16.60
22.18
11.93
Per
Cent.
771     	
Stewart	
Stewart	
Kallum Lake...
Stewart	
772    	
773	
774    	
Erickson, Axel
Phillips, A. A
Cameron, A	
Phillips, A. A
Phillips, A. A
Phillips, A. A
Christie, Neil	
Phillips, A. A
Nicholson Creek
Mining Corp.
Stewart	
Stewart	
Stewart	
Manson Creek
777
778	
779
781
Tide Lake Gold...
Nicholson Creek
Total
786
Usk	
21.87025
TEST LOTS.
780-T
782-T.	
Nightingale
Merryth	
Total	
Nightingale,
Henry	
Merryth, Frank...
Revelstoke
Carcross	
0.02570
0.20000
I
1
0.080
0.880 1
35.80
44.80
28.56
4.08
6.00
0.22570
  |
	
1
Total weight
of ore received
1             i  	
22.09595
  1   	
1
1
The sales to the smelter on account of ore purchased at the sampling plant in 1945
yielded some $200 less than the cost of the ore to the sampling plant. This difference
is traceable to four shipments of exceptionally high-grade gold ore. The four shipments were from Tide Lake, one lot having been shipped to the sampling plant by
■Julia K. Phillips, and the other three by A. A. Phillips. DEPARTMENTAL WORK. A 53
INSPECTION BRANCH.
In addition to statistics and other information on coal-mining, the section headed
" Coal-mining," page 136, contains information about the staff of the Inspection
Branch and their activities. Some further information concerning the activities of
Inspectors will be found under the subheading " Inspection of Metalliferous Mines "
in the section headed "Metal-mining (Lode)." Substantial parts of the information
on properties in that section and in the sections headed " Placer-mining " and " Non-
metallics " were contributed by officers of the Inspection Branch.
MINERALOGICAL BRANCH.
The activities of the Mineralogical Branch include collecting geological and mineralogical data in the field, compiling and editing the annual report, and dispensing
information for the benefit of the mining industry. Field-work is devoted principally
to geological mapping and the examination of mineral deposits, the results of which
are published partly in the annual report and partly in a series of bulletins.
In 1945 Part III. of Bulletin 20, " Lode-gold Deposits in Central Southern British
Columbia," was published, and Bulletin 21, " Notes on Placer-mining," was prepared
for publication. A paper entitled " Geology of the Twin ' J ' Mine," based on field-
work at Mount Sicker, was presented by John S. Stevenson in November, 1944, and
was published in the Transactions of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy,
Volume XLVIIL, 1945, pages 294-308. A paper covering part of his study of limestone deposits in South-western British Columbia was presented by W. H. Mathews
at the Vancouver meeting of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy in
October, 1945. Other activities of the branch are referred to in the following notes
on the field-work of the several engineers:—
J. M. Cummings continued to be on loan to the British Columbia Industrial and
Scientific Research Council where he is acting-head of the Division of Mining and
Metallurgy.
M. S. Hedley completed the detailed mapping of some silver-lead-zinc deposits in
the Slocan area and made examinations in the Nelson-Sheep Creek district. Assisted
by W. J. Lynott, he did some preliminary detailed mapping in the area lying south of
the Kootenay River between Cottonwood and Fortynine Creeks. Later a preliminary
study was made of the Merritt coal-basin.
S. S. Holland began detailed mapping on Lightning Creek in the Cariboo District
and made detailed examinations of some properties in the same district. He also
examined prospects in the Whitesail Lake area.
W. J. Lynott joined the staff of the Mineralogical Branch in July on obtaining his
discharge from the Royal Canadian Air Force. In addition to assisting Mr. Hedley
as outlined above, he made some independent examinations of properties.
J. T. Mandy undertook a reconnaissance trip from Kitwanga, on the Canadian
National railway, via Kitwanga Lake and Cranberry River to the Nass River.
W. H. Mathews continued studies of limestone deposits in South-western British
Columbia and spent part of the season studying coal deposits in the Peace River area.
B. T. O'Grady was occupied principally in Victoria organizing and directing the
grub-stake programme, dealing with applications for assistance in building and repairing mining roads and trails, and assisting the Superintendent of Brokers in administering the " Securities Act." D. H. Rae, N. G. Freshwater, and J. H. Parliament
assisted Mr. O'Grady on the grub-stake programme by visiting prospectors in the field.
J. S. Stevenson completed a programme of detailed mapping in the Zeballos Camp.
Compilation of both underground and surface geology is in course of preparation.
During the season visits were paid to Bridge River and Texada Island properties. A 54 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1945.
K. DeP. Watson began geological mapping in the territory adjacent to the Haines
Cut-off Road, in North-western British Columbia. The work included examination of
prospects in the Rainy Hollow section. During the season a visit was paid to placer
operations on Spruce and Pine Creeks near Atlin.
Museums.
The Department has a large exhibit of ores and minerals in the museum on
Superior Street, Victoria; smaller collections are displayed in the joint office, 305
Federal Building, Vancouver, and in the offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson
and Prince Rupert.
Information regarding collections of specimens of rocks and minerals available to
prospectors and schools in British Columbia will be found on page 179.
Grub-staking Prospectors.
The " War-time Prospectors' Grub-stake Act," passed at the 1943 session of the
Legislature, authorized the provision of grub-stakes as a means of assisting prospectors
in the search for strategic minerals required in the prosecution of the war. Amendments made to the 1943 Act by the Legislature in March, 1944, included striking out
the term " war-time " and the definition of " war minerals." Grub-stakes were limited
under the 1943 Act to $300 per man; the amended Act provided for an additional
allowance of up to $200 per man for travelling expenses if required.
For the 1943 season (fiscal year 1943-44) $25,000 was appropriated by the Legislature, and for each of the 1944 and 1945 seasons appropriations of $50,000 were made.
Expenditures for the three seasons have been approximately: 1943, $18,500; 1944,
$27,215;   1945,-$27,310.
In 1943 ninety prospectors were granted grub-stakes. Search for deposits of
strategic minerals was stressed. The prospectors were urged also to be on the lookout for deposits of ores of precious or base metals. Discoveries of scheelite and other
strategic minerals were made, but by the end of the season it was apparent that the
war demand for such minerals would be met from properties already in production or
fully developed. Two gold prospects located in 1943 are of interest. The Good Hope,
at Hedley, located by W. R. Wheeler, has been under development by Hedley Mascot
Gold Mines, Limited, and in 1945 ore was trucked from this property to the company's
mill for treatment. On the Harrison property in Tweedsmuir Park, a gold-bearing
vein has been explored by Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Limited, and much interest has
been attracted to the area.
In 1944, 105 grub-stakes were granted; of these, thirteen were reduced or cancelled. In 1945 eighty-four grub-stakes were granted, of which three were cancelled
and seven were reduced. In 1944 and 1945 attention was directed principally to the
search for lode-gold deposits. Samples of some promise were received from grubstaked prospectors in several areas.
In 1945 gold properties staked by grantees and taken under lease and bond by
mining interests include the following: Paymuck group on Marshall Creek, Bridge River
Camp, staked by L. J. Russell; D. C. Ault's Truax Mountain prospect, Bridge River
Camp, which was relinquished after shallow diamond-drilling but is to be further
explored by a syndicate; Warrior group on Carpenter Creek near Pacific, a divisional
point on the Canadian National Railway, staked by John (Paddy) Creagh who has also
staked the adjacent Gold Dome group on which he found good showings of gold ore.
Samples and specimens sent to the Department laboratories in the three years
were: 1943, 773; 1944, 606; 1945, 448. The samples and specimens were examined
by an engineer, following which most of them were given further study involving one
or more of:  mineralogical determination, spectrographic analysis, assaying. DEPARTMENTAL WORK. A 55
The prospectors grub-staked have located and recorded the following numbers of
claims:   1943, 87;   1944, 135;   1945, 181.
The grub-stake programme has been organized and supervised by B. T. O'Grady.
In 1945 he was assisted by D. H. Rae, N. G. Freshwater, and J. H. Parliament, who
were employed for the summer months to visit the prospectors in the field.
JOINT  OFFICES  OF  THE   BRITISH   COLUMBIA   DEPARTMENT  OF   MINES
AND OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND RESOURCES, CANADA.
The Provincial Department's engineer, the Gold Commissioner and Mining
Recorder for the Vancouver Mining Division, and the officers of the Dominion Geological Survey now occupy one suite of offices. All official information relating to mining
is now available to the public in the one suite of offices at 305 Federal Building,
Vancouver.
The services offered to the public include technical information on mining, the
identification of mineral specimens, distribution of Dominion and Provincial mining
publications, a reference library, a display of rocks and minerals, and a central
records office.
PUBLICATIONS.
Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines, bulletins, and other publications of the
Department, with prices charged for them, are listed on pages 177 to 179.
Publications may be obtained from the offices of the Department in Victoria and
elsewhere in the Province. They are also available for reference use in the Department's library (Mineralogical Branch) at Victoria, in the joint office, 305 Federal
Building, Vancouver, in the offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince
Rupert, as well as in public libraries listed on pages 180 and 181. A 56 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA.
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered
Confederation, geological investigations and mapping in the Province were to be carried on by the Geological Survey of Canada; this agreement has been fully adhered
to by the Dominion of Canada and has proved of great benefit to the mining industry
of the Province. Each year several geological parties are kept in the field; and in the
many excellent reports and maps covering British Columbia, issued by the Geological
Survey of Canada, a vast amount of information has been made available to prospectors
and mining engineers.
For some years a branch office of the Geological Survey has been maintained in
Vancouver, where copies of maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained.
The officer in charge of the British Columbia office is W. E. Cockfield, and the address
is 305 Federal Building, Vancouver, B.C.
In 1936 a reorganization of several departments in the Federal Government was
effected, and the Department of Mines and Resources created. One of the main
branches of this Department is that of Mines and Geology, with sub-branches known
as the Bureau of Geology and Topography and the Bureau of Mines. The Geological
Survey of Canada and the Topographical Survey are now a part of the Bureau of
Geology and Topography. During the 1944 season the Bureau of Geology and Topography had the following officers employed on field-work in British Columbia:—
Geological Parties.
C. S. Lord completed geological mapping in the McConnell Creek area; longitude
126°-127°, latitude 56°-57°.
J. E. Armstrong commenced geological mapping in the Aiken Lake area; longitude
125°-126°, latitude 56°-57°.
Stan Duffell and K. C. McTaggart commenced geological mapping in the Ashcroft
area;  longitude 121°-12?°, latitude 50°-51°.
H. M. A. Rice commenced further geological mapping in the Shuswap area;
longitude 119°-120°, latitude 50°-51°.
A. F. Buckham continued a study of the coal-bearing rocks in the Nanaimo and
Cumberland areas, Vancouver Island; J. L. Usher collected fossils from the coal-bearing
strata.
W. E. Cockfield conducted several brief geological investigations in various parts
of the Pi'ovince.
Topographical Parties.
A. C. Tuttle completed the field-work for mapping the Bennett area; longitude
134°-136°, latitude 59°-60°. METAL-MINING (LODE).
CONTENTS.
Notes on Metal Mines—
Atlin— Page-
Engineer Mine     61
Taku River—
Taku River Gold Mines     61
Portland Canal—
Salmon River—
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd     61
Summit Lake—
Salmon Gold Mines, Ltd     62
Tide Lake—
East     62
Marmot River—
Gold Drop Mines, Ltd     62
American Creek—
Mountain Boy Mining Co     62
Willoughby Creek—
Wilby .     62
Alice Arm—
Esperanza Mine     62
Omineca—
Usk—
Nicholson Creek Mining Corp., Ltd     63
Pacific—
Warrior     63
Gold Dome     64
Silver Creek—
McKee     64
Whitesail Lake Area—
Tahtsa Lake—
Riverside     65
Captain     67
Emerald '.     68
Whitesail Lake—
Chikamin Mountain—
Mentor     68
Dad's Special     69
Rainy and Gold Coin     69
Roosevelt     69
Garner No. 1 and Marie     70
North Side of Whitesail Lake     70
West End of Whitesail Lake—
Harrison     71
Lam     72
Old Timer     72
Eutsuk Lake—
Surel Lake     72
Red Bird Mountain     73
57 A 58 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Notes on Metal Mines—Continued. Page.
Cariboo—
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co., Ltd  73
Island Mountain Mines Co., Ltd  79
Canusa Cariboo Gold Mines, Ltd  80
Barkerville Mining Co., Ltd  82
Wellknown and Unknown  82
Perkins Peak—
Bluebell  82
Taseko Lake—
Taylor Windfall Gold Mining Co., Ltd  82
Hido  83
Bridge River—
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd •  84
Bralorne Mines, Ltd  84
Ranger  85
Grull Wihksne Gold Mines, Ltd  85
Pinebrayle Gold Mines, Ltd  86
Bridge River Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd  86
B.R.X. Mines, Ltd  87
Paymuck  87
Pacific (Eastern) Gold Mines, Ltd 1  87
Minto Gold Mines, Ltd .  88
Olympic Gold Mines, Ltd  88
Hillstake Mining Co  88
Congress Gold Mines, Ltd  89
Pilot Gold Mines, Ltd  89
Golden Ledge Syndicate  89
New Holland Gold Mines, Ltd  89
Stump Lake—
Consolidated Nicola Goldfields, Ltd   90
Nicola Lake—
Guichon Mine, Ltd  90
Copper Mountain—
Granby Consolidated  90
Hedley—
Apex  92
Hedley Monarch Gold Mines, Ltd   92
Hedley Amalgamated Gold Mines, Ltd '.  92
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd ,  92
Good Hope  93
Nickel Plate Mine  93
Camp McKinney—
Cariboo-Amelia  94
Beaverdell—
Highland Bell, Ltd  94 METAL-MINING (LODE). A 59
Notes on Metal Mines—Continued. PAGE-
Greenwood-Grand Forks—
Wellington Camp—
Athelstan     95
Jewel Lake—
Dentonia Mines, Ltd     95
Central Camp-
Number Seven     95
Greenwood—
Providence     96
Rossland—
Mount Roberts—
Midnight     96
I.X.L     96
Red Mountain—
Gertrude Gold Mining Co., Ltd     96
Nelson—
Eagle Creek—
Granite-Poorman     96
Morning Mountain—
Irene     99
Hall Creek-
Golden Eagle and T.S     99
Fern     99
Ymir—
Oxide     99
Ymir Good-Hope Mining Co  100
Erie Creek—
Arlington  100
Second Relief  100
South Kootenay Lake—
Bayonne Consolidated Mines, Ltd  100
Sheep Creek—
Kootenay Belle  101
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd  101
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd  102
Nugget  102
Ainsworth—
Ainsmore Consolidated Mines, Ltd  102
Scranton-Pontiac  103
Kaslo-Three Forks—
Shutty Bench  103
Kokanee Chief  103
Voyageur *  103
Bell  103
Whitewater   104
Lucky Jim   104
Sandon—
Victor  105
Silver Ridge  105
Sunshine  105
Noble Five  105 A 60 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Notes on Metal Mines—Continued. Page-
Silverton-New Denver—
L.H  105
Standard, Mammoth, and Enterprise  106
Hewitt ;  107
Bosun  107
Duncan River—
Erdahl and Pinchbeck Claims  107
Ferguson—
True-Fissure  109
Kimberley—
Sullivan  109
Field—
Monarch and Kicking Horse  111
Skagit River—
Invermay Annex  111
Ruskin—
L.A.P. Mining Co  112
Howe Sound—
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd  112
Texada Island—
Gem  113
Red Hawk Gold Mines, Ltd  113
Copper  113
Surprise Gold Mines, Ltd  113
Little Billie .  114
Marble Bay Mining Co  114
Loyal  114
Port Alberni  114
Great Central Lake—
Sherwood  115
Herbert Arm—
Berton Gold Mines, Ltd  115
Zeballos—
Privateer Mine, Ltd  116
Inspection of Metal Mines—
Production   117
Fatal Accidents  117
Dangerous Occurrences  118
Explosives used in Mines  120
Prosecutions  120
Air-sampling  120
Dust and Ventilation  120
Safety and First-aid Work  121 PLATE I.
A. Ranger group adit, Mount Truax, Bridge River.
B. Looking north-eastward down Tahtsa Lake from Tahtsa Peak at the west end. PLATE II.
^.j. »j* **.
A. View of Cariboo Gold Quartz mine from Island Mountain, showing the camp to the
left of the 1500-level dump and the power-house and mill to the right; the 1200-level
dump is at the upper right; Lowhee Creek is in the left background; and tailings
from the Lowhee hydraulic are in the foreground.
f.Jr*"*' .t
■y**"
B.  Sheep Creek Valley with Gold Belt mill in centre distance and
Kootenay Belle mill in foreground. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 61
NOTES ON METAL MINES.
The following section includes short notes on mines and prospects and more
detailed reports on some properties and areas. In the main the material in the short
notes was supplied by Inspectors of Mines and the more detailed notes are the work
of Engineers of the Department's Mineralogical Branch, but several embody the contributions of an Inspector and an Engineer. Authorship is indicated by foot-notes.
Information regarding development and production has been obtained from the Bureau
of Economics and Statistics through the courtesy of the property-owners. Information
has also been obtained from the office of the Registrar of Companies.
The notes are arranged in a geographical order under headings which are place-
names suggesting the area in which the properties are found. As a further aid in
placing the properties, the approximate geographic positions are indicated by numbers
and letters in parentheses following the name of each property. The numbers refer to
the latitude and longitude of the south-eastern corner of the 1-degree quadrilateral, and
the letters refer to the quarter of the quadrilateral in which the property is situated.
„  ,, ATLIN.*
Gold.
(59° 134° S.E.) Neil Forbes, T. J. Kirkwood, and Walter Sweet have
Engineer Mine,   acquired  and  are  working  the  Engineer  mine.    In  the  winter  of
1944-45 the three men sank a shaft for 30 feet and drove a drift for
50 feet along a vein. All work was done by hand and no other men were employed.
They report having struck some high-grade ore in the drift.
_  ,, TAKU RIVER.*
Gold.
(58° 133° N.W.)    Frank H. MacPherson, General Manager.   The mine
Taku River Gold is on the Tulsequah River, about 5 miles from its junction with the
Mines. Taku River.    It has been idle since March 31st,  1942.    During the
summer of 1945 a small crew of men was employed reconditioning the
camp and airfield and working on roads and bridges preparatory to commencing operations early in 1946.
Leta Explorations, Limited, employed four men for about a month prospecting on
the Stibnite group, on the South Fork of the Taku River.
PORTLAND CANAL.*
_ ,, Salmon River.
Gold.
(56°   130°  S.E.)     D. L.  Coulter,  General Manager;   J.  G. Pearcey,
Siibak Premier   Superintendent.    Capital:  3,000,000 shares, $1 par;  issued, 2,500,000.
Mines, Ltd.      The property is in the Salmon  River Valley,  about  14 miles from
Stewart.    Because of the severe labour shortage, little development
was done during 1945.    Mining was confined to the area between the No. 4 and No. 6
levels, adjacent to the Premier Border property, now controlled by Silbak Premier.
A monthly inspection was made by a committee appointed by the local union.    Several
recommendations on minor matters were made by the committee and were attended to
by the Company.
The mine was worked 306 days; ore produced amounted to 65,801 tons; development-work included 168 feet of crosscutting, 410 feet of drifting, and 1,009 feet of
raising.    The average number of men employed was 196.
* By Charles Graham. A 62 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
_ ,, Summit Lake.
Gold.
(56° 130° S.E.)    The property is on the west side of Summit Lake,
Salmon Gold     about 27 miles from Stewart.    It was formerly under option to Con-
Mines, Ltd.      solidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, who did
(N.P.L.).        some diamond-drilling, drove a .crosscut to intersect a vein, and did
some drifting on the vein.    The company dropped its option in July,
1939.    In 1945 the Salmon Gold Mines, Limited, was reorganized and 3,724 feet of
diamond-drilling was done on the property.    The average number of men employed was
five.    Most of the equipment for drilling and the supplies were flown in from Stewart.
Because of difficulties in transportation, work has been suspended for the winter.
_ ,, Tide Lake.
Gold.
East.— (56° 130° S.E.) A. Phillips and partners continued prospecting on a group
of claims about 5 miles north of the Salmon Gold group. Some high-grade ore was
shipped to the sampling plant at Prince Rupert.
Prospecting by individuals was done on claims adjoining the Salmon Gold property.
_,    , Marmot River.
Gold.
(55° 129° N.W.)    J. 0. Le Francois, Manager.    The property is on
Gold Drop Mines, the Marmot River, about 2x/2 miles from tidewater, at an elevation of
Ltd. about 1,000 feet.    About 2 miles of truck-road and 1 mile of tractor-
road have been constructed to the property. A small tractor is used
for transportation. A 5- by 7-foot adit was started in September and had been driven
300 feet near the end of 1945. A Sullivan air-compressor, with a capacity of 150 cubic
feet per minute, driven by a Buda gasoline-engine provides air for drilling. Near the
end of 1945, a fan and pipe-line were being installed for ventilation. The average
number of men employed was two.
American Creek.
Silver.
Mountain Boy Mining Co.— (56° 129° S.W.) J. O. Le Francois, Manager. On this
property, an additional 69 feet of drifting and crosscutting was done during 1945.
Gold.
WlLLOUGHBY CREEK.
(56° 129° S.E.) This group of claims, under option to the St. Eugene
Wilby. Mining Corporation,  is about 12 miles from Meziadin  Lake.     W7il-
loughby Creek is a tributary of the Nelson River, which flows into the
White River, which in turn flows into the Nass River. Some change was made in the
location of the trail over Bear River Pass. A trail was started from the south-east
end of Meziadin Lake and is almost completed to Nelson River. No work was done at
the property.
Gold. ALICE Arm-
Esperanza Mine.— (55° 129° S.E.) Under the supervision of A. G. Langley, some
diamond-drilling is being done with an X-ray drill. Three men will be employed for
most of the winter. METAL-MINING (LODE).
A 63
OMINECA.
Gold.
USK.*
Nicholson Creek
Mining Corp
(54° 128° N.E.) Bulkley Shannon, Manager. Capital: 5,000,000
shares, 1 cent par; issued, 2,660,452. The property is on Nicholson
Ltd. Creek, about 2 miles east of Usk. For some years little had been done
on the property, but in 1945 four men were employed almost continuously. About 3% miles of trail was built up to the MacShannon group, which is at
approximately 1,700 feet elevation, about 1,400 feet above the railroad. During the
winter a 6- by 6%-foot adit was driven by hand, and during the summer cleaning out
of old cuts and open-cutting were done. Approximately 1 ton of sorted ore was shipped
to the sampling plant at Prince Rupert. A good cabin to accommodate four men, a
blacksmith shop, and an explosives magazine were built at the MacShannon group.
The road to the Phoenix claims, where tunnelling had been done in previous years, was
repaired to enable a compressor to be brought down for use in drifting on the Mac-
Shannon group.
_ ,.  .. Pacific.t
Gold-silver.
The Warrior and Gold Dome Groups, located by John Creagh, holder of a grubstake under the " War-time Prospectors' Grub-stake Act," are near the headwaters of
a creek locally known as Carpenter Creek, which enters the Skeena River from the
north at a point about 4 miles down the valley from Pacific. A lower camp on Carpenter Creek, 1,500 feet higher than the railway, is reached by a trail 7 miles long.
(54°   128°   N.W.)     Three  claims,  Warrior  Nos.   1,  2,  and  3,  were
Warrior.        recorded in 1944, and two claims, Warrior Nos. 4 and 5, were recorded
in 1945.    The claims are up the south fork of the creek, about 2 miles
from the lower camp, and are reached by a steep trail.    The altitude ranges from 3,800
feet at the north-eastern end of the property to 5,300 at the south-western end.    Most
of the ground is steep hillside, flanking a snow-filled basin.
Steeply dipping altered sedimentary rocks, cut by a series of granitic dykes, are
exposed on both sides of the basin. As the main granitic contact, about a mile to the
south-west, is approached, the dykes become wider and more numerous.
A quartz vein traceable for at least 500 feet on the very steep side-hill cuts across
the sedimentary rocks. The vein strikes north 35 degrees east and dips 50 degrees to
the south-east into the hill. Widths up to 30 inches were observed and the average of
parts which could be examined is about 2 feet. The narrowest exposure is at the
north-eastern end, where the vein is 4 inches wide. Parts of the vein are well mineralized with sulphides, including pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, and arsenopyrite. No gold
is visible, but fine gold can be panned readily in a stream flowing from the northeastern end of a small glacier covering the higher part of the vein outcrop.
Details concerning three samples are as follows:—
Description.
Width.
Assays.
Gold.
Silver.
Inches.
6
14
20
1
Oz. per Ton.     j     Oz. per Ton,
0.01                          0.2
5.02                          3.56
fl.3fi                          B.40
* By Charles Graham.
t By D. H. Rae. A 64
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
(54° 128° N.W.)    The claims Gold Dome Nos. 1, 2, and 3, recorded in
Gold Dome.      1945, are about 1% miles in an easterly direction from the Warrior
group and are up the north fork of the creek, about 2y2 miles from the
lower camp. The lower (south-eastern) end of the group is at an altitude of about
4,000 feet. The claims are in the main mass of the batholith, the centre line of the
claims following a steep granite bluff. The several veins exposed are narrow, strike
about north 75 degrees west and dip about 45 degrees south-westward into the steep
side-hill. It was possible to examine a short section of one vein only. The other veins
are seen readily from the other side of the basin. The section examined consisted of
quartz fairly well mineralized with galena, pyrite, and chalcopyrite.
Details concerning two samples are as follows:—
Description.
Lowest part of vein exposure (sample 1).
50 feet north-west of sample 1	
Width.
Assays.
Gold.
Silver.
Inches.
Oz. per Ton.     j     Oz. per Ton.
6
0.03                          1.40
14
0.51
60.80
_ ,, Silver Creek.*
Gold.
McKee Group, Leta Explorations, Ltd.—(55°  125° N.E.)     D. F. Kidd, Geologist.     This
group of claims adjoins the Bralorne Takla mercury property.    An adit, which was
to be driven 800 feet, was abandoned at 350 feet.    The ground required lagging on both
the back and sides.    Eight men were employed.
WHITESAIL LAKE AREA  (53°  127°  S.E.).f
Eutsuk, Whitesail, and Tahtsa Lakes lie on the east side of the Coast Mountains.
From the westernmost ends of these three lakes it is possible to reach a stretch of about
50 miles along the eastern contact-zone of the Coast Range batholith. The lakes are
part of a water system that is navigable by shallow-draught river-boats. Whitesail
and Tahtsa Lakes drain into Ootsa Lake by navigable rivers, and Eutsuk Lake is
reached from Portage Bay on Whitesail Lake by a portage-railway 1% miles long.
Burns Lake, on the Prince Rupert branch of the Canadian National Railways, is
the nearest railroad point. From there a road runs south 42 miles to Ootsa Landing
on Ootsa Lake. The road extends along the north side of the lake a further 13 miles
to Wistaria. The west end of Ootsa Lake is 24 miles by boat from Ootsa Landing,
thence 4 miles to the junction of the Tahtsa and Whitesail Rivers. From there it is
about 38 miles by river to Tahtsa Lake and about 20 miles farther to the west end of
Tahtsa Lake.
From the Whitesail and Tahtsa Rivers' junction it is 13 miles to the east end of
Whitesail Lake, thence 13 miles to Portage Bay. Whitesail Lake is 28 miles long.
The west end of Eutsuk Lake is 15 miles from the south end of the portage-railway.
The area has received attention from prospectors at various times in the past.
Sibola Mountain was, in 1914, the scene of a small stampede occasioned by the discovery of a number of small quartz veins. The lead-zinc showings on Sweeney
Mountain were staked in 1915, by 1916 the zinc showings at Zinc Bay on Whitesail
Lake at the foot of Chikamin Mountain had been found, by 1918 the discovery of
silver-lead showings higher up on Chikamin Mountain was made, and by 1927 the
silver-lead-zinc showings on Swing Peak were discovered.
* By Charles Graham.
f By Stuart S. Holland. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 65
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada ceased work on the
Emerald property on Sweeney Mountain in 1931. From then on there was very little
prospecting in the country until 1944, when interest was renewed by the discovery of
gold-bearing quartz veins on the Harrison group at the west end of Whitesail Lake.
Prospectors and company scouts visited the area in 1944 and most of the previously
known showings were re-examined. Numerous claims were staked but no important
new discoveries were made.
In 1945 the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada had three
two-man prospecting parties in various parts of the area, the Freeport Exploration
Company had a prospecting party working on the south side of Tahtsa Lake, and about
six other prospectors were working in various places. Discoveries of previously
unknown showings were made on the south side of Surel Lake at the west end of
Eutsuk Lake.
Field-work.—About three and one-half weeks in August, 1945, was spent in making trips into Tahtsa, Eutsuk, and Whitesail Lakes and in examining properties of
current interest.
[References: Eutsuk Lake Area—Geol. Surv., Canada, Sum. Rept., 1925, Pt. A,
pp. 144-154. Whitesail-Tahtsa Lakes Area—Geol. Surv., Canada., Sum. Rept., 1924,
Pt. A, pp. 47-58. Eutsuk Lake District—Geol. Surv., Canada, Sum. Rept., 1920, Pt. A,
pp. 81-93. Tahtsa-Morice Area—Geol. Surv., Canada, Map 367a, 1936. Minister of
Mines, B.C., Ann. Rept., 1916, 1917, 1926, 1927, 1944.]
Geology.—The eastern contact of the Coast Range batholith as previously mapped
extends north-westward from the west end of Pondosy Bay, past the west end of Eutsuk
Lake, and between Whitesail and Lindquist Lakes. The contact has also been mapped
from the west end of Tahtsa Lake through to a point about 4 miles from the west end
of Morice Lake. On the accompanying index map the contact is assumed to run from
Little Whitesail to Tahtsa Lake on the basis of prospectors' reports that granitic rocks
outcrop near Seel Lake and at the head of Laventie Creek.
Coast Range intrusive rocks vary somewhat in composition. In the main they are
massive grey quartz diorite and diorite, and pinkish weathering granodiorite and
granite.    Near the contacts of intrusives the rocks may be foliated.
The rocks exposed in roof pendants within the main batholith and in the area
extending eastward from the eastern contact of the Coast Range batholith belong to
the Hazelton group. They consist of a wide variety of fragmental volcanics, mainly
andesitic and rhyolitic in composition and ranging from fine, thinly laminated tuffs to
coarse breccias, as well as flow-rocks of various types. Black argillites, limestone, and
sandy sediments are intercalated with the volcanics.
At places it has been possible to subdivide the Hazelton group into a lower volcanic
member, a middle sedimentary member, and an upper volcanic member. Geological
work, however, has not been sufficiently detailed to allow the mapping of the three
members and, consequently, the regional structure is imperfectly known.
Dioritic and aplitic dykes, as well as post-mineral basaltic dykes, cut the Coast
Range intrusives and Hazelton group rocks.
Mineral deposits have been found in the Coast Range batholith and also in the
Hazelton group. The middle sedimentary member of the Hazelton group, possibly
because of the greater disparity of its rock types, appears to be a somewhat more
favourable host-rock than the thick, massive upper and lower volcanic members.
_ ,, Tahtsa Lake.
Gold.
The Riverside group consists of four claims, located by J. W. McNeill,
Riverside.       J. Knox, and George Seel, of Ootsa Landing.    The claims are on the
north side of Tahtsa River and are reached from a camping-ground
that is about 1% miles down-stream from the junction of Kasalka (Blue) Creek. A 66
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
t-   +   +   +   */+   +   +   +   +   +   +   >,       „.r£ ,
+   +   +   + /+   +   +   +   +   +   +   +! »*o**i!^—4
+      +     +      +   A     +     +     +"   +      +     +     +     -\\\ *^^=r
PROPERTY LOCALITIES.
1. Riverside group.
2. Captain group.
3. Emerald group.
4. Chikamin Mtn. groups,
5. Harrison ond Old Timer groups.
6. Surel, Surel Lake, ond Three Bears
groups.
7. Old  Glory  group.
Magnetic declination 273 20' East                                                  8. Shirley and Core groups.
Index Map of Whitesail Lake Area.
Numbers show the locations of various groups described.    Areas of Coast Range
intrusives and related rocks are shown in pattern. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 67
The showing is a new discovery made on the east face of a rocky knoll, about 200
feet above the level of Tahtsa River and about 500 feet from the river's edge.
The main showing consists of mineralization along a fracture striking north 85
degrees east and dipping 80 degrees south. The fracture cuts across massive blocky-
fracturing dark greenish-black tufts and breccias. The fracture has acted as a locus
of silicification, and of mineralization by arsenopyrite and minor amounts of pyrite,
sphalerite, and chalcopyrite. The mineralization extends across a width of from 2
to 5 inches and in one place reaches a maximum width of 14 inches. The owners report
their highest sample assayed 0.36 oz. of gold per ton. A picked sample containing 25
per cent, arsenopyrite assayed: Gold, 0.13 oz. per ton; silver, 0.2 oz. per ton.
The Freeport Exploration Company, under the direction of Lamont West, did
some surface-work on the showing. By means of open-cuts the mineralized fracture
was traced for about 100 feet. It was uncovered again across a draw about 250 feet to
the east.
Four claims, the Tahtsa Nos. 1 and 2 and the Last Chance Nos. 1 and 2, held
by G. A. Young and W. T. Keys, of Vancouver, adjoin the Riverside group on
•the west.
The showings on this group consist of several sheeted-zones, one of which is about
15 feet wide. Massive tuffs and breccias are cut by zones of parallel fractures from
% inch to 2 inches apart, striking north 87 degrees east and dipping almost vertically.
Some fractures are occupied by narrow quartz veinlets, others are mineralized with
almost solid pyrite, and some with arsenopyrite. The pyritic mineralization does not
appear to carry gold values. A picked sample from a 1-inch veinlet of arsenopyrite
containing 20 per cent, arsenopyrite assayed:   Gold, 0.18 oz. per ton.
Silver-lead.
The Captain group consists of six located claims on the north-eastern
Captain. slopes of Swing Peak, covering showings previously held by George
Seel and then known as the Swannell group. The claims were located
by C. McNeill, of Ootsa Landing, and G. A. Young, of Vancouver. A well-graded trail
about 5 miles in length starts from Copp's cabin on a slough on the south side of
Tahtsa River, about 2 miles up-stream from the mouth of Kasalka (Blue) Creek, and
leads to an old burnt-out camp near timber-line.
The important previous work is an adit, 700 feet above the burnt-out camp, about
400 feet long, driven by Tahtsa Mining Company, Limited, and started in 1929. The
surface showing was described in the Minister of Mines' Annual Reports for 1927
and 1929.
This showing is a shear-zone that strikes about north and dips steeply to the east.
There is mineralization along the foot-wall of the shear-zone, mainly across narrow
widths but reaching a maximum of 10 inches. The mineralization consists of galena,
sphalerite, arsenopyrite, pyrite, and tetrahedrite. Picked samples carried high values
in silver and lead and little or no gold.
The adit cuts the shear-zone at 84 feet from the portal and follows along it in a
southerly direction for 290 feet to the face. The shear is well marked by several
inches of gouge. No vein material was seen, except for the last 110 feet to the face,
despite the fact that earlier reports noted the presence of a narrow vein. For the last
110 feet the shear-zone is occupied by short lengths of vein from 2 to 4 inches wide.
The vein material consists of quartz and rhodochrosite gangue containing galena,
sphalerite, pyrite, and tetrahedrite. A 68
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Five samples were taken with the following tabulated results:—
Distance from Face of Adit.
Width.
Gold.
Silver.
Lead.
Zinc.
110 feet	
Inches.
3
4
2
4
2
Oz. per Ton.
Trace
0.03
Trace
Trace
Trace
Oz. per Ton.
0.9
138.7
24.0
0.2
11.7
Per Cent.
0.2
28.0
26.9
0.3
8.1
Per Cent.
80 feet	
0.1
65 feet	
0.9
30 feet	
0.1
2.3
Another shear-zone lying about 500 feet to the west of the one explored by the
adit is traced by four open-cuts through the talus. The shear-zone strikes south 15
degrees east and dips almost vertically. The two walls of the zone are parallel and
from 3 to 5 feet apart. Mineralization consisting mainly of galena and arsenopyrite
appears in narrow widths along the west wall. In the uppermost open-cut 4 inches,
mainly of galena, assayed: Gold, 0.05 oz. per ton; silver, 73.8 oz. per ton; and lead,
57.6 per cent. Another picked sample containing about 50 per cent, arsenopyrite
assayed:   Gold, 0.06 oz. per ton;   silver, 1.4 oz. per ton;   and lead, 1.9 per cent.
[References:   Minister of Mines, B.C., Ann. Repts., 1927, pp. 154-155;   1929, p..
184.]
The Emerald group was staked in 1915.    The showings are on the
Emerald.        south side of Sweeney Mountain and are  reached by wagon-road,
starting from Emerald Landing, about 3 miles below the outlet of
Tahtsa Lake.    No work has been done on the property since operations were suspended
in 1931.    The property was not visited.
The original surface showing was a vein-zone 10 to 20 feet wide, having in one
place 10 feet of solid galena along the foot-wall side. The vein-mineralization is
chiefly galena with subordinate amounts of sphalerite, pyrite, and chalcopyrite. The
ore contains % to % oz. of silver to each per cent, of lead.
The group was taken under option by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company of Canada in 1928. Work was suspended in the spring of 1931 after a large
amount of underground exploratory work had been done.
[References: Minister of Mines, B.C., Ann. Repts., 1916, pp. 164-165; 1919, pp.
104-105;   1929, pp. 183-184.    Geol. Surv. Canada, Sum. Rept., 1924, Pt. A, pp. 56-57.]
Prospecting.—The Freeport Exploration Company had a prospecting party in
the field during the summer under the direction of Lamont West. Most of the prospecting was done by the geological team of Noel Hendry and Ivan Boyd. Their
supplies were back-packed to them from base camps on Tahtsa River and the south
shore of Tahtsa Lake. The party prospected along the south side of Tahtsa Lake.
Five claims were located within the Laventie Creek drainage-basin.
Whitesail Lake.
Chikamin Mountain.
Several mineral showings on Chikamin Mountain have been held by the Harrison
Brothers, of Wistaria, for a number of years.    Claims covering these showings are
under option to Privateer Mine, Limited, who, in addition, staked a number of other
claims on the mountain.
This group, the Mentor Nos. 1 and 2 claims, was located by C. V. Har-
Mentor.        rison, of Wistaria.    The claims are along the south shore of White-
sail  Lake  in  Zinc   Bay,   at  the  foot  of  Chikamin   Mountain.    The
showings were not seen.    No recent work has been done on the showings, which were
described under " Cariboo " in the Minister of Mines, British Columbia, Annual Report,
1916, pages 165-166, and in the Geological Survey, Canada, Summary Report, 1924, METAL-MINING (LODE). A 69
Part A, pages 52-53;   also under " Sunset " in Minister of Mines, British Columbia,
Annual Report, 1926, page 146, and 1927, page 155.
This group of four mineral claims was located by A. Ritz, of Wistaria.
Dad's Special.    The showing, 900 feet higher than the lake and about 1 mile up the
main trail from the beach, lies 100 yards east of the trail.    A small
creek exposes an area of rusty weathering, pyritized tuffs about 25 feet wide.    In the
creek-bottom is a ^-inch stringer of galena and a *4-inch stringer of sphalerite, both
striking north 45 degrees west and standing almost vertical.
Privateer Mine, Limited, in 1945 drilled one diamond-drill hole 134 feet long
beneath the surface exposure.
The Rainy No. 1 and Gold Coin mineral claims are on the south slope
Rainy and Gold   of Chikamin Mountain.    The showing in the California adit is on the
Coin. Gold Coin claim, about  1,300 feet above the level of the Chikamin
Mountain cabins.    The California adit, just a few hundred feet below
the summit, is reached by climbing a long talus-slope on the south flank of Chikamin
Mountain.
The work consists of an open-cut 30 feet long with an adit 25 feet long at the
end of it. The adit is along a shear-zone striking north 35 degrees west and dipping
70 degrees to the south-west that cuts fine and coarse tuffs striking north 10 degrees
west and dipping 65 degrees to the east. Two open-cuts have exposed the shear-zone
170 feet to the south-east and 90 feet to the north-west from the adit.
Near the face of the open-cut the shear-zone is partly silicified across narrow
widths and mineralized with pyrite, galena, sphalerite, and arsenopyrite. On the
dump there is about 5 tons of sorted mineralized quartz. A grab sample from this
dump assayed: Gold, 0.10 oz. per ton; silver, 6.3 oz. per ton; lead, 1.4 per cent.; and
zinc, 5.4 per cent. A sample across 3 inches of quartz mineralized with pyrite, galena,
and sphalerite assayed: Gold, 0.09 oz. per ton; silver, 44.9 oz. per ton; lead, 7.2 per
cent.;  and zinc, 5.3 per cent.
Gold-silver-lead-sinc.
The Roosevelt group of eight located claims covers old mineral show-
Roosevelt, ings partly explored by the Chikamin adit, which is reached by
about 2 miles of well-graded trail that climbs about 1,100 feet above
Whitesail Lake. The trail starts from a cabin in a protected bay about 3 miles west of
Zinc Bay. The original showing was partly exposed in several places along a small
creek-bottom. The Chikamin adit extends in a south-easterly direction and cuts a
shear-zone at 37 feet from the portal, thence it runs along the shear-zone striking
about south 30 degrees east for 40 feet. From that point a crosscut was driven 25
feet to the south-west.
The shear-zone is occupied by a quartz vein mineralized with pyrite, galena,
sphalerite, and arsenopyrite. The widest section of vein seen, 8 to 9 inches, is exposed
at the face of the drift, where a sample across 8 inches assayed: Gold, 0.29 oz. per
ton;  silver, 17.9 oz. per ton;  lead, 14.3 per cent.;  and zinc, 15.8 per cent.
The dump of sorted ore at the portal was estimated to contain 4 or 5 tons. From
it a selected piece containing about 50 per cent, arsenopyrite and no galena or
sphalerite assayed:   Gold, 0.28 oz. per ton, and silver, 0.6 oz. per ton.
At a point about 500 feet south of the Chikamin adit, Privateer Mine, Limited,
during the summer of 1945, drilled three diamond-drill holes totalling about 500 feet.
The longest hole was 181 feet. These holes were directed toward the southward
extension of the shear-zone.
I A 70
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Garner No. 1
and Marie.
Silver-lead-zinc.
The Garner No. 1, located by C. V. Harrison, and the Marie group of
three claims, located by W. H. Harrison, Sr., and W. H. Harrison, Jr.,
are on the north-east slope of Chikamin Mountain. The main cabin
on Chikamin Mountain is about 3 miles by trail from the lake-shore
and about 1,700 feet above it. The Ruby adit has been driven on a narrow though
remarkably persistent vein on the Garner claim.
The vein strikes about south 45 degrees east and dips 85 degrees to the southwest. It has been traced by open-cuts for about 2,000 feet. The vein cuts grey tuffs
striking south 55 degrees east and dipping 20 degrees to the south-west.
The Ruby adit, about 2,650 feet above the lake-shore and about 900 feet above the
Chikamin Mountain cabins, has been driven for 118 feet in a south-easterly direction
along the vein. In the drift the vein has a maximum width of 24 inches. It consists
of quartz mineralized with galena, sphalerite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, and possibly
tetrahedrite. A sample taken at the face across 12 inches assayed: Gold, 0.08 oz. per
ton; silver, 14.5 oz. per ton; copper, 0.9 per cent.; lead, 7.4 per cent.; and zinc, 8.7
per cent.
In 1939 B. T. O'Grady sampled the vein in the Ruby adit with following tabulated
results:—
Distance from Portal.
Width of Vein.
Gold.
Silver.
0 feet    ...                	
Inches.
S%
15
15
10
9
6
6
9
24
23
16
Oz. per Ton.
0.02
0.02
0.04
0.02
0.10
0.01
Trace
0.04
0.06
0.02
0.04
Oz. per Ton.
38.2
13 feet	
14.2
24 feet                	
12.0
32 feet	
12.8
50 feet   	
12.3
71 feet                 	
5.4
82 feet                . ...          	
7.8
89 feet	
6.8
11.7
107 feet                                                   ..                    	
17.6
118 feet (face) 	
16.8
[References: See Nickel Plate, Geol. Surv., Canada, Sum. Rept., 1924, Pt. A, pp.
54-55.    See Shamrock, Minister of Mines, B.C., Ann. Rept., 1926, p. 187.]
North Side of Whitesail Lake.
Two groups of claims were located in 1944 along the north side of Whitesail Lake.
One, the Shirley group of eight claims, extending north-eastward along the shore of
Whitesail Lake from the entrance into Little Whitesail, was located by Molly Nutter,
of Wistaria. The other, the Core group of twelve claims, located by Fred Paulig
and Orald Harrison, of Wistaria, covers the outcrop of a dioritic stock on the south
and south-east flanks of Core Mountain.
The Shirley group was not visited and no one was available to point out the
showings on the Core group. The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of
Canada established a base camping-ground in the protected cove on the Core group
and did a small amount of work on the group.
The Core Mountain diorite, where seen along the shore of Whitesail Lake, contains a small amount of disseminated pyrite that shows as rusty weathering areas.
Close to the camping-ground a few small open-cuts expose silicified and slightly
pyritized diorite. No other mineralization was seen. It is understood that no quartz
veins had been found and that the showings were of disseminated pyrite and pyrrhotite
mineralization with a very low gold content. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 71
West End of Whitesail Lake.
A large number of claims have been located between the west end of Whitesail
Lake and the north side of Lindquist Lake. Only three of the various groups were
visited: these are the Harrison group, under exploration by Pioneer Gold Mines of
B.C., Limited; the Lam group, on which Privateer Mine, Limited, did some diamond-
drilling; and the Old Timer group, located by D. F. Kidd.
Gold.
During 1945 Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Limited, continued explora-
Harrison.       tion-work on the Harrison group.    The work was under the supervision of A. E. Pike.    A tent-camp was established near timber-line,
at an elevation of 1,100 feet above the lake and 5 miles by pack-horse trail from the
west end of Whitesail Lake.    The claims were surveyed by J. T. Underhill, of Vancouver, and a geological examination was made of the ground by F. Joubin.
Exploratory work consisted of 3,728 feet of diamond-drilling and a small amount
of surface-trenching. Diamond-drilling was done by a standard machine working
two shifts per day and an X-ray machine working one shift per day. Snow conditions
are such that drilling was begun about the second week in July and was finished by the
second week in October.
The eastern contact of the Coast Range batholith runs almost due west across
the Harrison No. 22, No. 13, No. 12, No. 5, No. 1, and No. 2 mineral claims. The
contact-zone of the intrusive rock is gneissic and is quartz diorite that has both
transitional and intrusive contacts with pink granodiorite lying to the south.
The granitic rocks intrude sediments and volcanics of the middle member of the
Hazelton group. These include black slate, tuffaceous argillite, pale green thinly
bedded tuff, and some coarse volcanic breccias. Near the intrusive contact the slate
is metamorphosed to andalusite schist.
Along the intrusive contact there is a zone of quartz stringers as much as 100 feet
wide. The diorite between the stringers is intensely silicified, buff-coloured, and
generally retains its granularity. Post-mineral black basaltic dykes outcrop in several
places.
Diamond-drilling confirms the surface indication that the intrusive-sedimentary
contact dips southward;   the indicated dip is about 55 degrees.
The main showing on the Harrison group is a quartz vein in quartz diorite close
to the intrusive contact. The vein strikes almost parallel to the contact but dips north
at about 45 degrees. At the time of the first examination* it was thought that there
were three main veins. Since then surface-stripping and diamond-drilling have led
the company engineers to believe that there is just one main east-west vein and that
there are several low-dipping north- and north-westerly-striking veins on both foot- and
hanging-wall sides of the main vein. The current belief is that there is a western vein-
segment at least 500 feet long on the Harrison No. 5 mineral claim, and an eastern
segment in the east corner of the Harrison No. 13 claim that surface-stripping indicates
as being about 600 feet long. Vein-quartz in surface trenches in the intervening 800
feet is interpreted to mean that the vein has been cut by a series of step-faults between
the two segments.
Diamond-drilling during 1945 was chiefly on the western vein-segment and was
laid out to explore the downward extension of the vein in the quartz diorite. No
change in the behaviour of the vein was discovered at shallow depths. It is thought
that the vein will be proved to average more than 5 feet in width.
* Minister of Mines, B.C., Ann. Rept., 1944, p. 176. A 72 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
No information has been obtained on the behaviour of the north-dipping vein-
fracture at its junction with the south-dipping intrusive contact.
[Reference:  Minister of Mines, B.C., Ann. Rept., 1945, pp. 175-177.]
The Lam group of four mineral claims, the Lam Nos. 3 to 6, was
Lam. located in 1944 by W. A. Lammers, of Vancouver.    The group adjoins
the south-west side of the Harrison group.    The claims are about l1/^
miles west along the side-hill from the Pioneer Gold Mine camp on the Harrison group.
The claims are underlain by grey quartz diorite that is continuous with the dioritic
rocks on the Harrison group. There has been no surface-stripping done on the group.
In August, 1945, a 200-foot diamond-drill hole had been drilled for Privateer Mine,
Limited, below the outcrop of a narrow quartz vein. A sample from the outcrop taken
across 3 inches of quartz mineralized with pyrite assayed: Gold, 0.01 oz. per ton. No
other showings were seen.
The Old Timer group of six claims, the Old Timer Nos. 1 to 6, was
Old Timer. located in 1944 by D. F. Kidd, of Vancouver, The group adjoins the
north-west side of the Harrison group and lies on the north-east slope
of Lindquist Mountain. The claims may be reached by about 4 miles of trail, built in
1929, from the west end of Little Whitesail Lake. They may also be reached from
the Pioneer Gold Mine camp on the Harrison group by climbing 1,600 feet over the
ridge to the north-west.
The westerly-striking intrusive contact that crosses the Harrison group extends
north-westward over the ridge of Lindquist Mountain and cuts across the Old Timer
No. 4 and No. 6 claims. The intrusive rock, chiefly diorite, is in contact with sheared
chlorite schists, black slate, and dark grey laminated tuffs.
Two quartz veins outcrop at an elevation of about 5,000 feet close to the toe of a
small glacier. One vein, striking about north 45 degrees east and dipping 55 degrees
to the south-east, is enclosed by dark green sheared chlorite schist. It is exposed
for a length of about 100 feet and ranges in width from 6 to 30 inches. The quartz
is moderately well mineralized with pyrite, galena, sphalerite, and pyrrhotite. A
sample of selected pieces assayed: Gold, trace; silver, 1.3 oz. per ton. On the foot-
wall side of the first vein is a second striking about north 60 degrees east and dipping
45 degrees to the south-east. It may be seen outcropping for about 400 feet along
its strike. The quartz is fairly well mineralized with pyrite, galena, sphalerite, and
pyrrhotite, and ranges from 6 to 36 inches in width. A sample of selected well-
mineralized pieces assayed:   Gold, trace.
Other showings, previously described in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines
for 1929, were not examined.
[Reference: See Harloworth, Minister of Mines, B.C., Ann. Rept., 1929, pp.
184-185.]
Prospecting.—Two eight-claim groups, the Lena and Lena Nos. 2 to 8 and the
Kay and Kay Nos. 2 to 8, were located in September, 1945, near the head of the Gamsby
River, south-west of McCuish Pass, by A. Clore, of Copper River, and J. Stadin, of
Terrace. It is understood that these men were prospecting for the Consolidated
Mining and Smelting Company of Canada.    The nature of the showings is not known.
Eutsuk Lake.
Surel Lake.
Interest was aroused in 1945 by the almost simultaneous staking, by three prospectors working independently, of three mineralized showings near Marten Creek, on
the south side of Surel Lake. Surel Lake is at the west end of Eutsuk Lake' and is
reached by a mile of trail that runs along the east side of Surel Creek. Marten Creek
flows into the south side of Surel Lake about 2% miles from the east end. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 73
The three groups of claims are the Three Bears Nos. 1 to 8, located on the lower
part of Marten Creek by W. H. Harrison, Jr., of Wistaria; the Surel Nos. 1 to 6,
located on the upper part of Marten Creek by Fred Paulig; and the Surel Lake and
Surel Lake Nos. 1 to 7, located on the south side of Surel Lake at its east end by J. J.
Hepson, of Wells.    None of the showings was seen.
A roof-pendant of sediments and volcanics outcrops in the upper part of Marten
Creek. Paulig's showings on the Surel group are understood to be quartz veins 10 to
12 inches wide and having a maximum width of 2 feet. The quartz is mineralized
with pyrite, galena, sphalerite, and a few flakes of molybdenite. The veins are said
to be in the sedimentary rocks.
The showings on the Three Bears group, on the lower part of Marten Creek, are
said to be narrow quartz veins mineralized with pyrite, and some galena. The veins
are in sedimentary rocks.
The Surel Lake group of J. J. Hepson extends westward from the falls on Surel
Creek. The claims are underlain by grey diorite but are close to the eastern margin
of batholith. The vein is believed to be from 1 to 2 feet wide, to be exposed for less
than 50 feet, and to carry some high values in gold. The ore is thought to contain a
telluride mineral.
The Surel Lake group was examined in August, 1945, by J. A. Pike, of Island
Mountain Mines, Limited, who also located the adjoining Fly group of four claims.
Red Bird Mountain.
Mineralization on Red Bird Mountain was first discovered in 1929 and was located
as the Red Bird group.* These showings were relocated in 1944 by Molly Nutter as
the Old Glory group. The claims lie on the north-eastern side of Red Bird Mountain
and are reached from the valley of the creek flowing into the south side of Eutsuk Lake
just west of Trapp Point.
Red Bird Mountain was climbed from the north-western side, and although a considerable amount of bornite-mineralized float was seen, the original showings were not
found.
The varied mineralization reported on Red Bird Mountain includes both copper
and arsenopyrite mineralization as well as a galena showing.
_  ,. CARIBOO.
Gold.
(53° 121° S.W.)    Company office, 1007 Royal Bank Building, Vancou-
Cariboo Gold     ver> B.C.;   mine office, Wells, B.C.;   W. B. Burnett, President;   R. R.
Quartz Mining    Rose, Managing Director and Mine Manager;  P. N. Pitcher, Assistant
Co., Ltd.f       General Superintendent;   I. S. Comfort, Mine Superintendent;   J. D.
Boulding, Mill Superintendent;   L. Walker, Mine Foreman.    Capital:
2,000,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 1,333,309.    The company operates the Cariboo Gold
Quartz mine on Cow Mountain outside Wells.    The mine is on the south-east side of
Jack of Clubs Lake.    Wells is 56 miles by road from Quesnel, the northern terminus
of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
The company was organized in 1927. The Pinkerton claim was acquired first, then
the Rainbow group, previously owned by A. W. Sanders, was bought. Subsequently,
the company's holdings have been increased to 106 claims and fractions totalling about
3,600 acres. The present holdings extend in a continuous belt for about 6 miles southeastward from Mosquito Creek on the north-east slope of Island Mountain to the West-
port group on the south-east side of Williams Creek.
* Minister of Mines, B.C., Ann. Rept., 1929, p. 185.
t By S. S. Holland. A 74 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
The first underground development consisted of an adit started from Lowhee Creek
and driven as a crosscut at a depth of about 400 feet below the surface showings on the
Rainbow claim. These showings are now known to be the outcrop of the Sanders zone.
The crosscut was stopped short of its objective in 1930 when preparations were begun
to drive the 1500 adit at an additional depth of 375 feet and about 100 feet above Jack
of Clubs Lake. The 1500 adit, begun in 1931, is now the main haulage-level of the
mine and from it the mine-development has proceeded. Raises were put up on the Rainbow, Sanders, Pinkerton, and Butts zones, and the 1200 and 1000 levels driven out to
the surface. A connection was made through to the old crosscut adit from Lowhee
Creek, and the raise on the Butts zone put through to surface.
Three internal shafts have been sunk from the 1500 level to develop the zones at
depth. No. 1 shaft gives access to the No. 1 zone down to the 2000 level, and on the
2000 level a crosscut was started in 1940 and driven 1,300 feet towards the company's
holdings on Island Mountain. The No. 2 and No. 3 shafts give access to the Rainbow
and Sanders zones respectively and have been sunk to the 1900 level.
In 1938 a start was made to advance the 1500 adit-crosscut towards the B.C. vein.
This work was completed to the B.C. vein in 1941, and in the same year the B.C.
incline shaft was sunk 926 feet from the surface. The connection between the shaft
and the 1500 level crosscut was made in 1942. Very little development-work has been
done since 1942. In 1945 the development footage amounted to about 300 feet. To
date the total footage of workings is: Drifts and crosscuts, about 21 miles; raises,
about 15,000 feet;  and shafts, 2,731 feet.
Ventilation, except in long development-headings, none of which have been driven
for some time, is still controlled by natural differences between the inside and outside
temperatures. Underground temperatures vary between 42 degrees and 51 degrees
Fahrenheit.
In January, 1933, the initial mill, with a capacity of 50 tons per day, began operating. The mill capacity was increased to 100 tons daily in 1934; to 150 tons in September, 1935; to 200 tons in July, 1936; to 250 tons in September, 1937; to 300 tons
daily by October, 1938; and to the present capacity of 350 tons daily in 1940. Since
1942 the tonnage milled has been limited by labour shortage in the mine. The present
mill is a cyanide plant employing continuous counter-current decantation. In 1945,
36,016 tons of ore was mined, from which 13,476 oz. of gold, and 1,131 oz. of silver
was recovered. Published company statements show that from 1933 to the end of
1945, 358,424 oz. of gold was recovered from 898,864 tons of ore mined, a recovered
content of 0.399 oz. of gold per ton.
The veins of the Cariboo Gold Quartz mine are in a series of argillites, quartzites,
and calcareous schists that make up the upper part of the Richfield formation. More
especially are the veins found in the Rainbow member, which is one of five members
into which the uppermost Richfield rocks have been subdivided. The Rainbow member is overlain by calcareous rocks of the Baker member and underlain by black argil-
lite of the B.C. member. The Rainbow member, within the mine workings, is further
subdivided into four map units which are recognizable throughout most of the mine.
However, lithologic changes along the strike of the rocks have become sufficiently great
to make the units largely unrecognizable on the south-east side of the Lowhee fault.
In the mine the rocks have a north-westerly strike and dip 45 degrees to the northeast. They are cut by northerly-striking faults dipping about 60 degrees east that
offset the formations to the right. These faults from north-west to south-east along
the Rainbow member are: No. 1 fault with an offset of about 80 feet; Rainbow fault
with an offset of about 300 feet; Sanders fault with an offset of about 15 feet; Lowhee
fault with an offset of about 1,000 feet; and Goldfinch fault whose offset is not known
but may possibly be as much as 800 feet. I
METAL-MINING (LODE).
A 75
Productive quartz veins are localized mainly in the Rainbow member close to the
intersections of certain northerly striking faults (see Figure 1). As a consequence the
following vein-zones are recognized in the mine: No. 1 zone, associated with the
No. 1 fault; Rainbow zone, associated with the Rainbow fault; Sanders zone, associated
with the Sanders and Lowhee faults; Pinkerton zone, on the foot-wall side of the
Lowhee fault; and the Butts zone, on the hanging-wall side of the Lowhee fault. To
date most of the ore has been mined from, and about equally divided between, the
Sanders and Rainbow zones.
V ' ■,•■■■■■ ;: W ;,
B.C.  member
400 aoo
•   /
\
<i
v%.
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mine.
Fig.  1. Plan  of the  1500  level, showing the relationship between
quartz veins, the five major northerly-striking faults, and the Rainbow
member   (in stipple pattern).    The four subdivisions of the Rainbow
member are indicated.
The rock in the vein-zones is fractured in two dominant directions, giving rise
to two sets of quartz veins. The set of fractures that strikes about north 30 degrees
east represents tensional openings. These are occupied by the transverse veins. The
other set of fractures strikes north 70 degrees east to east and is a direction of shear
along which some movement may have taken place. This set is occupied by the
diagonal veins. The northerly-striking faults, the transverse vein-fractures, and the
diagonal vein-fractures appear to be parts of a co-ordinate fracture pattern.
Transverse veins are the most numerous. Their average width is less than 1
foot; most of them are less than 50 feet long and only the exceptional vein is 100 feet
long. Diagonal veins are less numerous, and although they are narrow they are
commonly wider, and are always more continuous, than the transverse veins. Most
are less than 150 feet long, though the exceptional one may be as long as 250 feet.
Both transverse and diagonal quartz veins are mined. In 1945, out of forty
working or workable stopes, ten were on diagonal veins. Many veins combine both
transverse and diagonal directions, and consequently diagonal veins are seen with
offshoots along the transverse fracture direction and transverse veins have offshoot
strands along the diagonal fracture direction. Figure 2, drawn from the company's
plans, shows horizontal stope-sections on veins of both types. One stope is close to 60
feet wide, yet the individual quartz veins are seldom more than a foot in width. The
other stope, X-shaped in plan, shows a complexity of short veins along the two dominant A 76
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
fracture directions. This stope might be taken as fairly representative of the typical
discontinuity of quartz mineralization in plan. The same type of discontinuity exists
in a vertical plane.
The two vein types are mineralized alike. They are quartz veins whose dominant
metallic mineral is pyrite. Commercial grade quartz contains on the average 15 to 25
per cent, pyrite. The wall-rock is pyritized in varying degree but carries less gold than
the veins. As a generalization it might be said that pure pyrite from a commercial
or near commercial grade vein assays about 2 oz. of gold per ton or better. Other
minerals that may be present are galena, sphalerite, arsenopyrite, cosalite, galena bis-
mutite, and bismuthinite. Visible free gold is frequently in or close to nests of cosalite.
The vein-quartz also contains ankerite, sericite, and scheelite.
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mine.
Fig. 2. Horizontal sections through two stopes, showing the way the
quartz veins are developed along two vein directions.
The Cariboo Gold Quartz mine is developed on short, narrow quartz veins that
individually are small and contain small tonnages of ore. It is only by virtue of the
fact that they are so numerous and that their density, or the number of veins per unit
area, is so great that they become of economic importance. Figure 3, drawn from the
company's plan of the 1800 level, shows the level development in the Rainbow zone
largely on the foot-wall side of the Rainbow fault. Most of the veins are within 300
feet of the fault and are in the upper three units of the Rainbow member. Both transverse and diagonal veins are present. More than a dozen major veins are present as
well as numerous small ones across a width of about 700 feet measured along the fault.
The figure illustrates the vein density in a vein-zone where the veins are slightly more
numerous than elsewhere in the mine.
The Cariboo Gold Quartz mine contrasts strongly with the nearby Island Mountain
mine where about a third of the tonnage mined comes from pyritic replacement ore. METAL-MINING (LODE).
A 77
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mine.
Fig. 3. Veins developed by the 1800-level workings in the Rainbow zone. A 78
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Replacement ore at the Cariboo Gold Quartz mine contributes an insignificant tonnage,
yet from time to time pyritic replacement ore-bodies are found. The latest was found
in 1944 and was being mined in the autumn of 1945. It is on the 1900 level in the
Rainbow zone and lies in the lower part of the Baker member, possibly within 100 feet
of the contact with the underlying Rainbow member. The replacement ore was found
during the course of drifting north-eastward along a transverse quartz vein. When the
rock enclosing the vein and exposed along the drift changed from argillaceous quartzite
to limestone, there was a corresponding termination of the quartz vein at the edge of
the calcareous beds. From the end of the vein-quartz, pyrite mineralization spreads
out in to the calcareous beds and replaces them with pyrite. The ore-body has a maximum width of 7 feet and a length of about 90 feet; its height is not known. The
pyrite is coarsely crystalline and occurs in streaks up to 12 inches wide or more lying
parallel to the bedding.    When drifting along the replacement ore, a second transverse
Sroped 35 feet below surface ,,  _f   jf
Stoped within 30 feet
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mine.
Fig. 4. Surface workings and shallow adits (in broken outline) on
the outcrop of the Sanders zone shown in relation to the veins developed
on the 900 level, and stopes above the 900 level  (in stippled pattern).
vein was found on the foot-wall side. At the time of examination (September, 1945)
the ore had been mined for about 30 feet up the dip and for a stope length of about 90
feet. There appear to be no structural irregularities in the bedding, and at the lateral
terminations of the ore the pyrite streaks become narrower and more widely spaced
before finally disappearing. The two quartz veins terminating on the foot-wall side of
the limey beds suggest that they were feeders for and localizers of the replacement ore
at that point.
The primary objective of the company in 1927 and several subsequent years was
the underground exploration and development of the surface showings on the Rainbow claim. These original showings are now known to be the outcrop of part of the
Sanders zone. A brief description of them may be of value to those engaged in prospecting and initial development elsewhere in the general area.    Figure 4 was compiled METAL-MINING (LODE). A 79
from company plans and shows Sanders' open-cuts and shallow surface adits superimposed on the veins developed on the 900 level of the mine some 40 to 125 feet beneath
the north-eastward-sloping ground surface.    Stopes are shown by a stipple pattern.
Sanders' prospecting and surface work outlined an area about 200 feet square
where it was possible to pan residual gold and where there was almost a stockwork of
narrow veinlets intersecting bedded stringers. The vein-outcrops were oxidized, much
of their pyrite was leached, and the area showed a large amount of rusty weathered
rock. The visible open-cuts and short adits are interpreted as meaning that much of
his work was done on the outcrops of four transverse veins.
Company development on the 900 level, about 40 feet beneath the surface, indicates
that the veins that outcropped did not persist to that depth. At the same time three
other sets of transverse veins were found and stoped to the surface at places where
Sanders evidently did not uncover any, and certainly where no surface work was done.
Two diagonal veins, shown on Figure 4 just south of Sanders' cabin, were found
by the company development on the 900 level. One was stoped to the surface at its
eastern end.
Veins were most numerous in that part of the zone closest to the Sanders fault. Of
seven stopes in that section, four terminated from 30 to 50 feet below the surface and
three broke through to the surface. It seems remarkable that this area, about 350 feet
long, 150 feet wide, and only 150 feet west, up the hill, from Sanders' surface workings,
was not found in the early prospecting. Actually, more ore was mined from immediately beneath the surface of this area than from the near-by area that Sanders explored
on the surface.
[References: See Rainbow, Minister of Mines, B.C., Ann. Repts., 1922, p.119; 1924,
p. 117; 1925, p. 149. Minister of Mines, B.C., Ann. Repts., 1927, p. 169; 1928, p. 194;
1929, p. 190; 1930, p. 166; 1933, p. 120; 1934, p. C 20. Geol. Surv. Canada, Sum.
Rept., 1933, Pt. A, pp. 44-48; Mem. 181, 1935, pp. 22-25. The Miner, August, 1938,
pp. 44-53.]
(53° 121° S.W.)    Company office, 744 Hastings Street West, Vancou-
Island Mountain ver, B.C.;  mine office, Wells, B.C.;  F. W. Guernsey, President;  H. E.
Mines Co., Ltd.* Dodge, Secretary-Treasurer;   J. A. Pike, Mine Manager.    C. Caldwell,
who has been Mine Foreman for the past two years, was recalled to
Eastern Canada and was replaced by P. L. Clark.    Capital:   1,100,000 shares, 50 cents
par;   issued, 1,050,716.    This company operates the Island Mountain mine on the north
side of Jack of Clubs Lake across from the Cariboo Gold Quartz mine.
About the middle of October, after watching the crew dwindle for several years,
the management noted a sudden increase in the number of applications for work. By
the end of October the influx of new men was so great that it was necessary to cancel
a standing order for muckers until more experienced miners or timbermen could be
hired or trained. Steps were taken immediately to catch up with the maintenance-work
that had been neglected for some time because of the lack of men.
Exploratory and development work although reduced was done to good advantage.
One crew of drillers was engaged until June in drilling for replacement ore.
On the 3375 level a drift was driven to one of the diamond-drill intersections which
had cut a body of replacement ore. On the 3125 level a start was made for the first
time to crosscut the Aurum fault to explore for replacement ore on the east or hanging-
wall side of it. This work was stopped in the fault as neither space for the waste nor
men to do the work were available. Practically all waste is used for fill; none is
trammed to outside dumps unless it is absolutely necessary to do so.
Production was maintained at a good rate. The miners who stayed with the company during the war became very efficient.    Working in big stopes, they probably
* By J. A. Mitchell. A 80 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
produced more ore per man-shift than can ever be expected again. About two-thirds
of the tonnage milled was from quartz veins and about one-third was from replacement
ore-bodies in limestone.
There were no changes in stoping methods during 1945. It is proposed, however,
to try a new system of obtaining fill by slashing it in checker-board fashion from both
walls. The slashes will be drilled at the same time as the ore but will be blasted after
the ore is removed.
A safety committee, composed of both mine officials and employees, makes regular
monthly inspections and reports its findings at a meeting following each inspection.
The mine manager presides at the meeting, which is attended by all mine officials and
the safety committee. After discussing each point, recommendations for correcting
the unsafe practice or condition are made. If not put into effect promptly, the recommendations are kept in the minutes of each monthly meeting until they are carried out.
Other matters pertaining to safety are also brought up at the meetings. This arrangement keeps down accidents, as is shown by the company's good record year after year.
Conditions were found to be satisfactory on all visits made by the Inspector of Mines.
The Inspector of the Silicosis Branch, Workmen's Compensation Board, commended the
management, staff, and crew for their efforts and success in applying dust-prevention.
A labour-management efficiency committee, composed of three members of the
staff and three members of the union, was inaugurated.
Anticipating a housing shortage, the company purchased several lots, on which
houses will be built as soon as labour and materials are available.
Because a moving clay-bank at the back of the mill was pushing the building off
plumb, it was found necessary to remove the old cribbing, cut away part of the bank,
and put in new cribbing. Water-lines that had been in the ground for ten years were
also replaced.
In order to keep the total weight of skips, rope, and load below the limit of the
rated rope pull of the hoist, when pulling from lower levels, it was necessary to replace
the old skips with new ones of lighter design. The hoisting signals were also changed
so that only the cage-tender may signal the hoistman. With this new system, the
cage-tender answers the call-bell and the hoistman answers the cage-tender's bell, which
is the only one that rings in the hoist-room.
Development-work done in 1945 included 382 feet of drifting, 40 feet of sinking,
and 2,121 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 22,614 tons of ore was mined and milled,
yielding 10,071 oz. of gold and 1,209 oz. of silver. The average number of men
employed was eighty-five.
(53° 121° S.W.) Company office, 306 Crown Building, Vancouver,
Canusa Cariboo B.C.; John Dunsmuir, President. Capital: 3,000,000 shares, 50 cents
Gold Mines, Ltd.* par; issued, 1,202,605. The company holds twenty-four mineral claims
and fractions lying south-west of the heads of Lowhee Creek and
Stouts Gulch. Of these, the Black Bull and Waoming are old Crown grants which
together with the New Black Bull Quartz, Blue Jay, Stouts, and Stouts Fraction mineral
claims adjoin the St. Laurent, Cariboo, and American mineral claims belonging to
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company, Limited.
The showings lie on ground to which reference was made in the Annual Report
of the Minister of Mines for 1933, page 124, under Cariboo Central Gold Mines Company and Blue Jay group. At that time a crosscut adit was driven about 170 feet on
the Blue Jay claim; the portal is at the present Lowhee camp. In the Annual Report
of the Minister of Mines for 1940, page A 56, reference is made to some further work
being done by Cariboo Rainbow Mines, Incorporated.    Hanson describes some of the
* By S. S. Holland. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 81
showings under " Upper Stouts Gulch " in Geological Survey, Canada, Memoir 181,
page 27.
The company's claims on the upper parts of Lowhee Creek and Stouts Gulch are
underlain across a width of 1,200 to 1,500 feet by grey quartzite and argillaceous quartz-
ite of the Lowhee member of the upper Richfield formation. On the south-west side
of the Lowhee member are black argillites of the Basal member. These rocks near
Watsons Gulch, on the Black Bull and New Black Bull Quartz claims, are cut by the
northerly-striking Lowhee fault. The possibility that two other faults, to the east of
the Lowhee, may cross the Blue Jay and New Black Bull Quartz mineral claims is
suggested by abrupt, presumably fault, terminations of the south-east end of the Black
Bull quartz vein exposed in the Lowhee hydraulic cut, and the north-west end of the
B.C. quartz vein partly exposed by surface-stripping on the American mineral claim.
The company's showings are reported to comprise two quartz veins in Emory
Gulch, three groups of quartz veins in upper Stouts Gulch, a quartz vein in the Lowhee
hydraulic pit, and the Black Bull quartz vein exposed south-east of Watsons Gulch in
the bottom of Lowhee Gulch.
The reported showings in Emory Gulch were covered with hydraulic tailings at
the time of examination and were not seen.
Of the three groups of quartz veins mentioned by Hanson in upper Stouts Gulch,
only two groups were exposed to view.
The first is a group of transverse quartz veins exposed about 900 feet south-east of
the head of Stouts Gulch, on the Stouts Fraction and Midnight Fraction mineral claims.
The rocks cut are grey argillaceous quartzites of the Lowhee member which strike north
75 degrees west and dip 40 to 50 degrees north. The veins, with one exception, strike
north 20 degrees east and dip steeply west. Across a distance of about 170 feet seven
veins are exposed for lengths ranging from 15 to 75 feet. The widths of individual
veins vary along their lengths and reach a maximum of 14 to 16 inches in several
instances.    These veins were originally uncovered by the old hydraulic operations.
Three samples of selected heavy pyritic concentrations were taken for assay.
A sample containing about 50 per cent, pyrite assayed 0.14 oz. of gold per ton, another
containing about two-thirds pyrite assayed 0.09 oz. of gold per ton, and a third sample
of almost solid pyrite assayed 0.07 oz. of gold per ton.
A thin band of pyritic replacement of quartzite, commonly 1 to 2 inches wide but
in one place 12 inches wide, extends out from one of the westernmost veins. The
length of the band is obscured by hydraulic tailings. A sample of the pyritic replacement material, containing about three-quarters pyrite, assayed 0.70 oz. of gold per ton.
A second group of narrow transverse quartz veins is exposed in the bottom of the
by-wash creek about 300 feet from the head of Stouts Gulch. Five veins were seen,
ranging from 1 to 4 inches in width and exposed across the creek-bottom for a length
of 10 feet. A sample from one vein 4 inches wide and containing about 25 per cent,
pyrite assayed 0.24 oz. of gold per ton.
The head of Lowhee pit is about 200 feet from the head of Stouts Gulch and is
close to the south boundary of the Blue Jay mineral claim. It is reported that the
hydraulicking in Lowhee pit in 1945 uncovered a north-easterly-striking quartz vein
as much as 5 feet wide.    Bed-rock was not exposed in the pit so no vein was seen.
Finally, a very large quartz vein is exposed in the bottom of Lowhee Gulch extending from its north-western termination at the Lowhee fault at Watsons Gulch southeastward for about 850 feet. It terminates abruptly at the south-east end and presumably is cut by a fault that would strike about north. The vein is parallel to the
strike of the enclosing rocks and ranges from 4 to 12 feet in width. Any original
pyrite has been leached from the vein-outcrop. No attempt was made to sample this
vein. A 82 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
(53° 121° S.W.)    This is a new company formed by Pioneer Gold
Barkerviile      Mines of B.C., Limited, to explore and develop the Proserpine group
Mining Co., Ltd. of claims and other ground in the Cariboo acquired by option or by
staking.    C. E. Gordon Brown is in charge of operations.    A new road
to the Warspite workings was built.    It starts from the Barkerville-Hudson Road just
outside Barkerviile, crosses Conklin Gulch, and runs along the north-west spur of
Proserpine Mountain.    It is approximately 17,000 feet long and rises steadily on an
easy grade all the way.    To obtain geological information, more than 10,000 feet of
bulldozer stripping was done on the Proserpine, Rex, and Elsie groups on Proserpine
Mountain.
Exploratory work was also done on several other groups, one of which includes
the old Hardscrabble mine on the Willow River north-west of Island Mountain.
(53° 121° S.W.)    Two groups of claims, the Wellknown Nos. 1 to 8 and
Wellknown and   the Unknown Nos. 1 to 8, were staked in the autumn of 1944 by W. H.
Unknown."       Armstrong and Q.  C. Heppner, of Wells, at the junction of Cooper
Creek and Sugar Creek.    The claims are about 9 miles by road and
trail north-west of Wells.    The claims cover veins that had been staked previously and
upon which work had been done in 1934 (see Annual Report of the Minister of Mines,
British Columbia, for 1934, page C26).
Armstrong and Heppner continued prospecting and exploratory stripping and are
reported to have found the vein-source of gold-bearing float.
PERKINS PEAK.*
Gold.
(51° 125° N.E.) This group is on the north-west flank of Perkins
Bluebell. Peak at an elevation of over 7,000 feet. The group was optioned during 1945 by T. Corless, of Quesnel, and associates from P. Evjen and
partners, of Kleena Kleene and vicinity. A contract was given for some tunnel-work
in October, 1945. It was reported that a 125-foot crosscut intersected the vein some
distance below the outcrop where it was still heavily oxidized. It is understood that
the occurrence consists of several lenses and stringers of quartz and bunches of pyrite
and arsenopyrite mineralization along a sheared contact between light-coloured silicified
quartzite and black graphitic argillite. In this respect it is similar to the main showings on the Mountain Boss group to the east and is probably a continuation of those
showings. The geology of the area and the showings on the Mountain Boss group are
described under the heading " Perkins Peak Section " on page F 38 of the Annual
Report of the Minister of Mines for 1938.
„ „ TASEKO LAKE.*
Gold.
(51° 123° S.E.)    Company office, 612 Hall Building, Vancouver, B.C.
Taylor Windfall  Capital:   2,000,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 1,910,333.    This company
Gold Mining Co., owns and has operated intermittently the property of the same name
Lrd. located on Battlement Creek near its junction with the Taseko River
about 12 miles south-east of Taseko Lake. A very detailed description
of this property is given in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines for 1935.
Since that report was written, the main shaft has been deepened and the 200 and the
300 levels have been opened up on the blind vein which was referred to in the report.
Considerable drifting and crosscutting was done before the war brought about a cessation of activities in 1939.
In 1945 funds were raised to carry out a diamond-drilling programme based on
recommendations of the company's engineer.    The job was given to D. & B. Drillers,
* By J. A. Mitchell. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 83
Limited, and the machinery was brought to the property late in the fall. Lack of facilities in this relatively inaccessible area coupled with the early arrival of cold weather
made it impossible to drill more than two holes, the results of which were inconclusive.
The drill was left at the property so that the programme could be continued without
undue expense and delay in the spring. The lowest adit workings were cleaned out
and drained.
(51° 123° S.W.)    This company was incorporated under an Ontario
Hido, Pellaire    charter by the Quebec Gold Mining Corporation   (offices,  184 Bay
Mines, Ltd.      Street, Toronto, Ont., and 148 Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;
Col. Rainville, President;   F. C. Buckland, Consulting Engineer)  to
take over and develop the Hido group of claims as well as adjoining ground subsequently
staked.    A detailed report of the Hido group is given in the Annual Report of the
Minister of Mines for 1937.
The principal showings of this group consist of a series of quartz veins striking
north-easterly across one spur of a northerly trending ridge which is 8,000 feet high.
This ridge lies between the Lord River and Falls Creek; the showings are about 6 miles
south-west of the south end of Taseko Lake. The veins outcrop in granite but they dip
north-westward at a steep angle towards a complex of volcanic rocks. The veins are
numbered 0 to 5 from south to north. Numbers 0 to 3 are either poorly exposed or
contain low values where they are exposed, and no work has been done on them beyond
that described in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines for 1937.
Vein No. 4 is a particularly strong lead which outcrops boldly, trending diagonally
down the east side of the spur from its crest to a talus-slope close to the granite-
greenstone contact. The vein is hidden under granite talus slides on the west slope of
the ridge, but crushed quartz exposed at several points is assumed to belong to this lead.
Vein No. 5 is parallel to vein No. 4 and lies about 100 feet north-westerly from it.
Its outcrop is not nearly as strong as that of No. 4.
Results of sampling No. 4 and No. 5 veins were considered sufficiently attractive by
officials of the Quebec Gold Mining Corporation to merit further exploratory work, so
an option was taken on the property and adjoining ground was staked. The holdings
now comprise about eighty claims which cover both sides of Falls Creek and extend
about 1,900 feet down the Lord River slope of the main ridge.
A comfortable temporary camp was established at timber-line, elevation 6,600 feet,
and a diamond-drill was brought to the property.
Hole No. 1 was collared on the crest of the ridge about 100 feet north of where the
ridge is crossed by No. 5 vein and about 280 feet north of where it is crossed by No. 4
vein. This hole was drilled south 50 degrees east at minus 60 degrees and cut both
veins in the granite; No. 5 at 70 feet from the collar and No. 4 somewhere between 268
and 284 feet from the collar. The latter intersection was poor inasmuch as the wall-
rock, as on the surface, was badly decomposed on both sides of the vein and did not core
well. The quartz in the vein was also badly crushed and full core-recovery was not
obtained.
Hole No. 2 was drilled vertically downward from the same set-up. It also cut both
veins in wide zones of decomposed granite; No. 5 at 94 feet and No. 4 at 450 feet from
the collar.
Hole No. 3 was collared 100 feet to the north of the previous two holes and was
drilled vertically downward. It cut No. 5 vein at 190 feet in an altered zone extending
from 183 to 200 feet. It entered greenstone at 361 feet, and it is understood that it
cut No. 4 lead in that rock before the water-supply froze and forced a shut-down
until spring.
The water was obtained from a cirque west of the showings and east of the main
ridge.    It was pumped through 2,900 feet of 1-inch pipe against a difference of eleva- tion of 530 feet. The drilling, which totalled 1,453 feet, was done by Keyes Construction, Limited, on a two-shift basis. A Boyles Brothers B.B.S. gasoline-driven drill was
used.    Including drillers, the crew totalled twelve.
It is proposed to build a road to the property, as soon as conditions permit, to bring
in supplies for driving a long crosscut to explore the veins at depth.
„  ,, BRIDGE RIVER.*
Gold.
(50° 122° N.W.)    Company office, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver,
Pioneer Gold    B.C.;   mine office, Pioneer Mines P.O., B.C.;   V. Spencer, President;
Mines of B.C.,   A. E. Bull, Secretary -Treasurer;   H. T. James, Managing Director;
Ltd. E. F. Emmons, Mine Manager;  H. A. Rose, Mine Superintendent;  P.
Schutz,   Mill  Superintendent.     Capital:    2,500,000   shares,   $1   par;
issued, 1,751,750.    This company owns and operates the Pioneer mine on Cadwallader
Creek, upper Bridge River.
The favourable development of the " 27 " lead at depth has added a number of
years to the life of the mine. Extensive repairs, which would have to be done eventually, were done in 1945 while men were still scarce for underground work and the mine
could be shut down without putting any one out of work. The No. 2 shaft was retim-
bered from the 500 level to the collar. This work included retimbering the station at
the 200 main adit, commonly referred to as the " water tunnel." It also included placing
cement-work at the collar and for some distance below it, where heavy overburden had
displaced the shaft timbers to the extent that the cage could not be taken through to
the surface. While this work was being done, access by shaft to the " 27 " lead was
impossible and the development was discontinued. Consequently, no ore was being
delivered to the mill and advantage was taken of the shut-down to make some repairs
there. Parts of the mill-floor were concreted. The pipe-line to the mill power plant
was replaced by 36-inch continuous wood-stave pipe.
During the period that the mine was being worked, a small tonnage of ore was
delivered to the mill from broken reserves. Some ore was obtained also from the
development of the " 27 " lead. A total of 10,528 tons was mined and 9,039 tons was
milled, yielding 4,944 oz. of gold and 690 oz. of silver. The development consisted of
1,538 feet of drifting, 560 feet of erosscutting, and 2,284 feet of diamond-drilling.
Some work was done in advancing the Taylor tunnel on the Eagle Fraction.
(50°   122°  N.W.)     Company office,  555  Burrard  Street,  Vancouver,
Bralorne Mines,   B.C.;  mine office, Bralorne P.O., B.C.;  A. C. Taylor, President;  R. H.
Ltd. Grace, Secretary-Treasurer; M. M. O'Brien, Managing Director; D. N.
Matheson, Mine Manager; C. M. Manning, Mine Superintendent; A. A.
Almstrom, Mill  Superintendent.    Capital:    1,250,000  shares, no  par value;   issued,
1,247,000.    This company owns and operates the Bralorne mine on Cadwallader Creek,
upper Bridge River, about 50 miles by road from Bridge River Station on the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway.    Development in 1945 consisted of 5,220 feet of drifts and
crosscuts, 717 feet of raises, and 7,145 feet of diamond-drilling.
During 1945 development-headings were opened up on the 100, 200, 300, 1600, and
2000 levels on the " 51 " vein. This work revealed two very good ore-shoots in the 1651
West drift.    A shoot of ore across 4% feet was opened up in the 2051 East drift.
Drifting west on the " 53 " vein on the 1200 and 1500 levels developed two excellent
shoots on the 1200 and a shoot 145 feet in length on the 1500 level.
On the 1500 and 1800 levels some development-work was done on the " 77 " vein.
The connection between the Crown and Empire shafts on the 1800 level was completed
by driving a crosscut to the Empire shaft from the 1877 East drift. This improved the
ventilation on the lower levels.    The ventilation of the lower levels was improved also
* By J. A. Mitchell. by the installation of two new fans of axial flow design, each with a maximum capacity
of 30,000 cubic feet per minute.
No development or extraction was done in the Coronation or King mines during
1945.
Surface work done during 1945 consisted of replacing the foundations of several
houses and of replacing 3,500 feet of the 36-inch pipe-line to the mine power plant with
creosoted fir-stave pipe, which has an expected life of thirty years. The new pipe
eliminates flooding of part of the highway, which used to be a hazard in winter.
The man-power shortage was critical during the greater part of 1945. From a
high of 149 men on the underground crew in January, the total gradually decreased to
93 in July and then gradually increased to 186 at the end of November. At this time
it was found necessary to reopen the Bradian Camp. The surface crew remained
almost constant at about 100 men. The total number of shifts worked to the end of
November was 78,601. During this time, on the surface and underground, there were
two fatal accidents and 56 accidents involving more than six days' lost time.
Milling was normal during 1945 with the exception of periods when development-
work on the " 53 " vein produced large amounts of serpentine which caused depressing
effects in the flotation circuits. Metallurgical tests were carried on with the object of
increasing the mill capacity by the use of cyanidation. A total of 110,410 tons of ore
was mined and 105,283 tons was milled. This yielded 57,364 oz. of gold and 15,570 oz.
of silver.
Bralorne Mines, Limited, also has an option on the Elizabeth group on Blue Creek,
a tributary of the Yalakom River, about 45 miles north of Lillooet. It also held a working option for a short time during 1945 on the Ranger group of claims.
(50° 122° N.W.)    This group is situated near the head of a tributary
Ranger. of Truax Creek, about 4 miles south of Minto P.O. and 4 miles east of
Gold Bridge P.O. The group was staked in the fall of 1944 by C. Ault,
a grantee under the " War-time Prospectors' Grub-stake Act," after he had discovered
interesting float in the slide-rock. It was turned over to a syndicate of ten and funds
were raised for surface exploratory work. When well-mineralized quartz was found
in place, the property was optioned to Bralorne Mines, Limited. The company drilled
three diamond-drill holes which failed to reach solid rock. The vein was followed for
about 25 feet in a surface cut and an adit which exposed vein-matter with a maximum
width of about 8 feet. The vein-matter and the adjoining wall-rock, however, were so
crushed and decomposed that the attitude and continuity of the vein were in doubt.
The adit is at about 8,000 feet altitude, well above the timber-line. Early snow and cold
weather made it difficult to obtain water for drilling, and the location of the showing
made it impossible to find timber or a suitable camp-site close to the working. The
Bralorne Company dropped its option on the property which, during the life of the
option, was known as the Ben d'Or. The decomposed quartz-sulphide mineralization
of the principal showing contains sufficient gold per ton to warrant further careful
prospecting.
(50° 122° N.W.)    This company is doing exploratory work on its prop-
Grull Wihksne   erty lying on both sides of Cadwallader Creek, north-westerly from the
Gold Mines, Ltd. Bralorne mine.    The company's engineers reported favourably on this
property early in 1945 and proceeded to make a large-scale geological
map of the surface to assist in a proposed exploratory programme.    Two areas were
selected as being worthy of investigation;   namely, the Don claims on the projected
continuation of the greenstone intrusive, and the soda-gran ite-albitite area on the Alma
and Millbank claims.
Trenching was done on the Don claims north of Bralorne, and Pioneer-type greenstone in contact with the Fergusson series of sedimentary rocks was exposed.    The A 86 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
heavy overburden, however, made it impractical to continue this work at present and
it was decided to work on the Alma showings.
Old trenches in the soda-granite on the Alma claim were cleaned out and a long
trench was extended in soda-granite 150 feet to the south.
Another trench 200 feet long in albitite in this area exposed a shear. Although
gold was panned in the shear at the surface it was not found in a shallow winze sunk
on the shear.
The soda-granite area was also tested by diamond-drilling. The first hole was
drilled in a westerly direction from a set-up close to the road which leads to the camp.
It was in albitite to 425 feet, soda-granite to 675 feet, and in greenstone to the end of
the hole at 1,059 feet. A quartz vein was intersected at 616 feet in the soda-granite.
A second hole is being drilled but information on it has not been made available yet.
During 1945 the average number of men employed was two.
(50° 122°  N.W.)     Company office, 602 Rogers Building, Vancouver,
Pinebrayle Gold   B.C.;   T. C. Botterill, Manager;   V. Dolmage, Consulting Engineer.
Mines, Ltd.      This company was formed to acquire and develop a group of thirty-one
claims extending along Cadwallader Creek on the western boundary of
the Bralorne holdings.    The initial programme included surveying, general prospecting, and trenching.    One drill-hole, drilled in a direction south 30 degrees west for
1,250 feet at minus 47 degrees about half a claim-length south of the Alma showing on
Grull Wihksne ground, passed througth argillaceous and cherty sedimentary rocks into
intrusive rocks.
(50° 122° N.W.)    Company office, 140 Stock Exchange Building, Van-
Bridge River     couver, B.C.;  mine office, Gold Bridge, B.C.;   C. Rutherford, Consult-
Consolidated     ing Engineer;  H. L. Hill, engineer in charge of operations.    Capital:
Gold Mines, Ltd. 4,500,000 shares, $1 par;   issued 2,761,131.    This company owns and
is exploring the property of the same name located on the Hurley River
above its confluence with the Bridge River.
A major programme was started in 1944 to explore the diorite-belt lying adjacent
to the serpentine exposed on both sides of the Hurley River on the Ural and Forty
Thieves claims. A pilot road was built with great difficulty and at considerable expense
through rock-slides and rough terrain to a point below the almost inaccessible outcrop
of the Forty Thieves vein. This vein crops out on the precipitous cliffs on the east
bank of the Hurley River. By the end of 1944 three diamond-drill holes, directed at
the Whynot and Jewess veins, were completed.
The programme was continued throughout 1945. The road was extended about
300 feet, making it 3,300 feet long from the B.R.X. Arizona adit to the portal of the
new B.R. Consolidated Ural adit. This adit is collared about 50 feet above the Hurley
River in crushed rock under a shallow mantle of slide material. The condition of the
ground around the portal made it necessary to put in a substantial cribbing 120 feet
long and 20 feet high above and on both sides of the portal. The adit was advanced
123 feet through crushed surface rock, serpentine, and greenstone by using a portable
compressor.
To obtain information prerequisite to driving this adit and to the proposed drilling
programme from underground, eleven holes, totalling 4,742 feet and located at intervals
along the Hurley River, were drilled on the Ural claim. The diorite-serpentine contact
was found to strike north 15 degrees west and to dip 65 degrees to the west; that is,
under the Hurley River. Holes which intersected the Forty Thieves vein showed
subcommercial values.
A 3,000-foot power-line leads from the main Bridge River power-supply at Brexton
to a new 500-cubic-foot compressor which was set up close to the portal of the Ural adit. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 87
This unit will expedite greatly the underground development programme.    During 1945
the average number of men employed was nine.
(50° 122° N.W.)    Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Van-
B.R.X. Mines,    couver, B.C.    Capital: 5,000,000 shares, 50 cents par; issued, 3,850,000.
Ltd. The company owns and is developing the property of the same name
lying along the east side of the Hurley River above the town of Gold
Bridge.    E. R. Shepherd is in charge of the development programme.
To date this programme has consisted of diamond-drilling. During 1945 the California adit, located at the edge of the highway south of the main camp, was cleaned
out and retimbered. A compressor was moved up from the portal of the Arizona adit
and housed on the California waste-dump. Power to run it was obtained from the
British Columbia Electric Railway Company's power-line which passes close by.
A station was then cut at the end of the California adit and four steep drill-holes,
striking from south 80 degrees west to south 40 degrees west, were fanned out to test
the California vein and adjacent ground at depth. Hole No. 1 was drilled at minus
84% degrees for 925 feet; hole No. 2 was drilled at minus 74 degrees for 1,023 feet;
hole No. 3 was lost at 279 feet; and hole No. 4 was not completed at time of writing.
These holes all intersected alternate bands of greenstone and diorite.
During 1945, 3,297 feet of diamond-drilling and 23 feet of raising were done.
The average number of men employed was five.
The Bridge River Exploration, Limited, has taken an option on a group
Paymuck.        of claims on Marshall Ridge, about 5 miles north-west of Rexmount
P.O.    Some tunnelling and trenching was done on several showings
at an elevation of about 4,800 feet.
Mineralized outcrops were discovered in 1944 on the ridge near the old Summit
workings by L. J. Russell, a grantee under the " War-time Prospectors' Grub-stake
Act." The Summit showings are described in the Summary Report of the Geological
Survey of Canada for 1912.
(50° 122° N.W.)    This is a company incorporated by the Quebec Gold
Pacific (Eastern)  Mining Corporation  (offices, 184 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont., and 148
Gold Mines, Ltd. Royal  Bank  Building,  Vancouver,   B.C.;    Col.   Rainville,   President;
F. C. Buckland, Consulting Engineer)  to acquire title to and to continue development of the Pacific Eastern group of claims lying on both sides of Cadwallader Creek above the Pioneer mine.    Additional ground in this area was acquired also.
A geological survey was made of the ground held and the information obtained
was plotted on maps and sections on a scale of 300 feet to the inch. Drilling was
started then to check the developed theories and to gain further information. The
first hole was collared on the south side of Cadwallader Creek about 1 mile above the
camp buildings. It was drilled north 27 degrees east at minus 45 degrees to check
formations in the regional anticline but it was lost at 220 feet while it was still in
bouldery overburden. A second hole was collared on the opposite limb of the fold and
was directed downwards at south 37 degrees west towards the axis of the fold but was
lost in a fault at 438 feet after passing through a band of serpentine which lies on the
hanging-wall of the greenstone on this limb of the fold. The third hole was given the
same attitude as the second but was started off with a 6-inch casing and, after much
difficulty, was drilled to the greenstone which was separated from the serpentine by a
narrow band of conglomerate. The greenstone and the serpentine are abundantly
mineralized with pyrite. During 1945 a total of 1,398 feet of diamond-drilling was
done.
The old workings are being cleaned out preparatory to starting an extensive
shaft-sinking and crosscutting programme at depth. A 88 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
(50° 122° N.W.)    Company office, 102 Pacific Building, Vancouver,
Minto Gold Mines, B.C.    Capital:    4,000,000   shares,   no   par   value;    issued,   3,800,000
Ltd. shares;   under option, 200,000.    A detailed description of this prop
erty is given in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines for 1936.
Since that report was written, the shaft has been sunk 347 feet farther and the
700 level has been opened up. Also, a station was cut at the 600-level horizon. The last
of the treasury stock was sold in 1944, and the HiWay Construction Company, of
Spokane, Washington, was employed to do some surface drilling.
After failure to get the desired results from the surface drilling done in 1944,
it was decided to move the drill underground. Accordingly, a gasoline compressor was
set up and the shaft was unwatered to the 600-level station. The seven holes drilled
are described briefly from information submitted by W. Davidson, who directed the
drilling.
The first hole was drilled to a depth of 501 feet in a direction north 32 degrees
west at minus 20 degrees from the 400-level shaft station.
The second hole was drilled horizontally from the 500-level station in a direction
north 74 degrees east for 75 feet. It was in the greenstone which occurs below the
east-west fault cut by the shaft below the 400 level.
The third hole was drilled from the 500-level station in a direction north 36 degrees
east for 116 feet at minus 34 degrees. It cut greenstone and was stopped at a flat fault
indicated in the bottom of the shaft.
The next four holes were all drilled from the 600-level station. The fourth went
north 75 degrees east at minus 74 degrees for 400 feet. It passed through sedimentary
rocks below the flat fault.
The fifth went north 80 degrees east at about minus 50 degrees for 460 feet. It
cut the lead in greenstone just above the flat fault and then entered serpentine below
the fault. The lead was so close to the fault that it was badly broken and core recovery
was poor.
The sixth hole was drilled for 168 feet in a direction south 71 degrees west at
minus 72 degrees.    It revealed a duplication of surface formations.
The seventh hole was drilled north 60 degrees east at minus 60 degrees for 547
feet. It passed into serpentine below the flat fault but entered what appeared to be
brecciated greenstone and talcose stringers in the last 20 feet.
(50° 122° N.W.)    Company office, 744 Hastings Street West, Vancou-
Olympic Gold    ver, B.C.;   G. S. Eldridge, President.    Capital:   1,500,000 shares, no
Mines, Ltd.      par value;   issued, 924,903.    This company owns the Olympic group
of claims on the south side of the Bridge River opposite Minto.    The
property is fully described in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines for 1934
and further work is noted in the report for 1935.    Since then the property has been
idle until the present programme of diamond-drilling was begun early in 1945.
Several drill-holes were put down, from a point on the surface adjacent to the
lower adit, to explore the shear at shallow depth. It is reported that one or two
interesting intersections were obtained.
The drill was then moved underground and a series of holes laid out to intersect
the shear from the end of the lower adit. A short crosscut was also driven and a shaft
collared at the end of it 75 feet above an interesting intersection obtained in drilling
from the surface. The work is being done by Keyes Construction under the supervision of J. H. Marshall.
Hillstake Mining Co.— (50° 122° N.W.) This company owns some thirty-one claims
that include the ground of the Reliance property on the south side of the Bridge River,
opposite the Congress mine. During 1945 one man did 50 feet of crosscutting for
E. R. Shepherd. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 89
(50° 122° N.W.)    Capital:  4,000,000 shares, $1 par;  issued 3,096,839.
Congress Gold   This company owns and is developing the Congress mine which lies
Mines, Ltd.     between Gun Creek and Bridge River a short distance south-west of
Minto P.O.    The property is described fully in the Annual Report of
the Minister of Mines for 1936.    Intermittent prospecting since then has resulted in
the discovery of some interesting ore occurrences along the Gun Creek slope.
The present programme of the company calls for a 500-foot winze on the vein from
the old hoist-chamber site on the third level. During 1945 a compressor-house,
blacksmith-shop, change-house, office, pump-house, and tank were built. The compressor
is a well-installed 500-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand machine which is belt-driven from a
rebuilt 100-horse-power motor. Power is obtained from the British Columbia Electric
Company's power-line which runs close to the plant.
The portal of the third level was cleaned out and retimbered. The bottom was
taken up for a distance of several hundred feet from the portal and new track was laid
to the winze-site. At the time of writing the rope raise for the winze is being completed.
B. W. W. McDougall is consultant and E. Hansen is in charge at the mine.
(50°  122°  N.W.)    Company office, 410 Seymour Street, Vancouver,
Pilot Gold Mines, B.C.;   A. B. Wing, President and General Manager;   J. H. Marshall,
Ltd. Foreman.    Capital:  3,000,000 shares, no par value;  issued, 2,450,000.
This company has done some development-work on the Pilot mine on
the west side of Gun Lake.    The property is described in the Annual Report of the
Minister of Mines for 1934 and subsequent work is noted in the 1935 and 1936 reports.
After the 300-level crosscut was stopped in 1937, a diamond-drill hole passed
through several feet of quartz about 33 feet ahead of the face.    In 1945 the crosscut
was advanced 109 feet to investigate this occurrence.    In the vicinity of the drill-hole
intersection it entered a zone of altered diorite in which small quartz stringers were
numerous.    Apparently the diamond-drill had passed along one of the stringers.    This
zone was drifted on for 40 feet towards Gun Lake.
Work done in 1945 consisted of unwatering the shaft, erecting a new head-frame,
and driving 109 feet of crosscut and 40 feet of drift. Drifting had to be discontinued
when the water-supply in Walker Creek became too low to run the 200-horse-power
Pelton plant, with the result that the shaft could not be kept unwatered.
(50° 122° N.W.)    Company office, 503-6 Rogers Building, Vancouver,
Golden Ledge    B.C.;   J. S. Harrison, President;   J. Graham, Foreman.    This is a
Syndicate.      private syndicate which owns and is doing intermittent work on its
group of twenty-one Crown-granted claims which straddle the Hurley
River below its confluence with Cadwallader Creek.
The property has been opened up by five levels lying between the highway and the
Hurley River. The bottom level, about 80 feet above the river, is the one on which
work has been done in 1945. A drift following north-westerly along a quartz lead
lying along or close to a contact between greenstone and sedimentary rocks was
advanced about 150 feet. It is intended to advance the drift to intersect an easterly-
striking vein exposed on the inaccessible banks of the river.
(50° 122° N.W.)    This company owned the Holland group of claims
New Holland Gold lying north-west of Pioneer and south-east of Bralorne mines.    It is
Mines, Ltd.      understood that a 60-per cent, interest was given to the Santiago
Mines, Limited, on condition that that company, which is associated
with the Silver Slipper Mining Company of Ontario, does at least 10,000 feet of
diamond-drilling within the next two years.
A drilling contract was given to Keyes Construction Company which started the
first hole before the end of 1945. This is reported to be a vertical hole close to the
north-west boundary of Pioneer. A 90
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Guichon Mine,
Ltd.
Copper. STUMP LAKE-*
Consolidated Nicola Goldfields, Ltd.—(50° 120° S.E.)     This mine is at Stump Lake, 2
miles west of the Kamloops-Merritt Highway and 30 miles from Merritt.    Mining,
suspended on December 9th, 1942, was not resumed during 1945.    A caretaker resides
at the property.
NICOLA LAKE.*
Copper.
(50° 120° S.W.) James D. Ferguson, Manager, Merritt, B.C. This
company was formed late in 1945 to acquire and work the Frinsbury
group of mineral claims, 2 miles south-west of Quilchena and 12 miles
east of Merritt. Work was done on the Ensign claim where a shaft
and an adit-level were developed. A level was driven in a north-westerly direction for
40 feet from the bottom of the shaft which is 11 feet by 6 feet and 65 feet deep.
An adit-level, 400 feet south-east of the shaft, was extended westerly into the hillside and on November 21st was in 60 feet. A diamond-drilling programme began about
the end of November.
A small portable compressor provides power for running a drifter. A compressor-
room and a storeroom were erected during November. Five men were employed. No
camp-site has been provided yet and the workmen are transported daily to and from
their homes at Merritt.
COPPER MOUNTAIN.*
Copper.
(49° 120° S.W.) Julian B. Beaty, President, New York, N.Y.; A. S,
Baillie, Vice-President and General Manager, Copper Mountain, B.C.;
W. I. Nelson, Assistant General Manager, Copper Mountain, B.C.;
Robert S. Douglas, Mine Superintendent; J. McMynn, Assistant Mine
Superintendent; Ed. Foy, Mine Foreman. Capital: 600,000 shares,
$5 par; issued, 450,260.65. A steam electric-power plant in Princeton
supplies power to the concentrator at Allenby, 3 to 4 miles south of Princeton, and to
the mine at Copper Mountain, 12 miles south of Princeton. A branch line of the Kettle
Valley Railway, from Princeton connects the mine and the concentrator. The mine and
concentrator have been in continuous operation since work was resumed in 1937, following a suspension of several years.
Surface elevation at the mine is about 4,000 feet. The main development of the
mine is by two adit-levels, No. 2 and No. 6, and two vertical shafts. The No. 1, or main
shaft, handling all men and all supplies for the upper part of the mine, extends from the
surface to the No. 6, or main haulage, level. The shaft is timbered with 10- by 10-inch
British Columbia fir. It is closed to the levels by doors beyond the shaft-stations to
assist in controlling ventilation. No. 2 shaft is used principally for hoisting ore but,
until the 7th and 8th level service raise is completed, it will continue to be used for all
men and supplies for these lower levels. All the ore is passed to No. 6 level. The ore
is taken out in Granby type cars, hauled by electric trolley locomotives, to the crusher
located near the portal of No. 6 level. After crushing, the ore is transported by railway
to the concentrator at Allenby, 8 miles distant. No. 7 and No. 8 levels received very
little development during 1945. Most of the work done on these levels was the drawing
of ore mined in some of the upper workings.
A diamond-drill system of mining, chiefly developed at Copper Mountain during
1944, now has displaced entirely the former percussion-drill methods. This new method
has been called the Horadiam method, the name being derived from a composition of
horizontal, radial, and diamond. The drilling is from raises within the ore, thus
eliminating the hazards to which miners were exposed when drilling from beneath
Granby Consolidated Mining,
Smelting, and
Power Co., Ltd.
* By E. R. Hughes. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 91
the ore-body. Another important advantage with regard to the increased safety of
workmen is a reduction in the amount of dust resulting from drilling. All blast-hole
diamond-drilling is done by the T. Connors Diamond Drilling Company, Limited, who,
at the end of 1945, had thirty-three men employed at Copper Mountain. A total of
320,325 feet of blast-hole diamond-drilling was done in 1945. Drifters are still used
for development-work but experiments are being made in using diamond-drills in drift
development.
Another new mining practice being developed is the use of slusher-drifts in place
of grizzlies which were extensively used at this mine. Four 50-horse-power electric
slusher hoists and scrapers were installed during 1945. Most sections being prepared
for stoping are being developed to use slusher hoists and scrapers for transferring ore.
In special instances, however, where this method is not practicable, broken ore will have
to be passed through a system of grizzlies. Two distinct safety features are obtained
in slusher-drift ore-transfer over the former grizzly method; plugging of large rocks is
done on solid ground instead of over an open grizzly and a positive system of ventilation
is attained more easily. A ventilation raise is driven at the end of each slusher-drift,
and the upper end of the raise is provided with an auxiliary fan so that dust and smoke
from scraping and blasting are carried away quickly.
Development during 1945 consisted of 3,019 feet of drifting, 7,799 feet of sinking,
3,584 feet of diamond-drilling, and the building of nine chutes and eight grizzlies.
There were no major additions to surface-plant equipment. Compressed air is furnished by three Ingersoll-Rand compressors and one Sullivan compressor, the four units
having a total capacity of 8,600 cubic feet per minute.
Underground ventilation was well maintained generally, although there were
instances where the ample volume of air available was not used to best advantage.
Inadequate ventilation at the inside end of No. 6 level and in the No. 928 block was
remedied before the end of 1945. Fresh air enters the mine through the old glory-holes
and ventilation raises, whence the fans force it to stopes and other working-places
and thence outside. Ventilation doors with sliding panels are placed in the drifts
and crosscuts to control and regulate the air. Both shafts are upcast and are closed to
the levels. The potential capacity of the five fans in use on the various levels is 204,000
cubic feet of air per minute.
The company employs a safety engineer and the Copper Mountain Mine Safety
Promotion Committee meets once a month to discuss the prevention of accidents. The
committee consists of elected workmen and company officials. Monthly tours of inspection of mine-workings, plant, shops, accommodation, etc., are made by the committee
and their recommendations are discussed at the subsequent monthly meeting. The
Labour-Management Committee also meets monthly and problems relating to production
and future operations are discussed. An emergency hospital with the customary equipment and supplies, including a supply of blood plasma, is maintained at the mine
for the treatment of injured workmen. A trained nurse and an industrial first-aid
attendant are on hand at all times. In addition to the provision made in 1944 for
aluminium-dust therapy for underground workers, similar provision has now been made
for the surface crew.
For the accommodation of employees there are eighty company houses, 161 private
houses, three bunk-houses, a staff-house, and a girls' dormitory. These latter five
buildings have a total of 138 two-bed rooms and thirteen single rooms. The buildings
are provided with lavatories and the rooms are furnished with steel single beds. All
bunk-house bedding is supplied by the company. A charge of $1.10-per day is made for
board, and the charge for a room in a bunk-house is $6.50 per month.
A doctor visits the Copper Mountain Camp twice a week and also is available in
emergencies.    Before the war-time shortage of doctors, one resided at the mine camp. A 92 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
The Princeton General Hospital is 12 miles from the mine and the company maintains
an ambulance for transporting sick or injured persons to the doctor or hospital.
A decrease in labour turnover was noted in 1945 compared with recent years.
A decided increase in the number of men available was noticed after the middle of
October. The company's pay-roll, covering all operations, showed an average of 482
employees for 1945. At the mine, exclusive of townsite, staff, and diamond-drill crew,
251 men were employed at the end of 1945;  of these, 168 were employed underground.
The mine, mill, and power plant were operated continuously throughout 1945.    Ore
milled in 1945 amounted to 785,629 tons, yielding 14,013,705 lb. of copper, 88,717 oz. of
silver, and 4,309 oz. of gold.
HEDLEY.*
Gold.
(49° 119° S.W.)    A. McLeod, Superintendent.    This small mine is on
Apex. Independence Mountain, at an elevation of about 7,000 feet, approxi
mately 6 miles east of the Nickel Plate mine. It consists of a shaft
120 feet deep and a connecting level 210 feet long. The property had been idle for some
years until it was optioned recently by R. Hunstone and A. McLeod, who did some
stoping from the side of the old shaft during the fall of 1945. The ore was transported
by truck to Hedley for shipment by the Great Northern Railway to the Tacoma smelter.
Four men were employed.
(49° 119° S.W.)    T. C. Botterill, Consulting Engineer; M. J. St. Clair,
Hedley Monarch Mine Superintendent.    Capital: 3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par; issued,
Gold Mines, Ltd. 1,000,000.    During the fall of 1945 this company began to reopen and
explore the property of the old Gold Valley Mines, Limited, near Olalla,
about 4 miles from Keremeos.
On November 20th work was being done on the Something Good section of the
property where there are three adit-drifts, known as the No. 1, Intermediate, and No. 2
levels. Three men were cleaning out a cave and retimbering the No. 2 level. No camp
had been provided and the workmen lived in Olalla.
(49°  120°  S.E.)    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;   issued,
Hedley 2,527,508.    After   being  inactive   for   several   years,   this   company
Amalgamated    resumed exploration during the fall of 1945 when three men, under the
Gold Mines, Ltd. direction of W. G. Norrie-Loewenthal, began a programme of surface
diamond-drilling.    On October 17th one hole had been drilled and
preparations were being made for drilling a second hole from above the Upper adit on
the southern slope of Stemwinder mountain, about 2 miles north-west of Hedley.    By
the end of 1945 a total of 700 feet of diamond-drilling had been done.
(49° 120° S.E.)    Company office, 908 Royal Bank Building, Vancouver,
Hedley Mascot   B.C.;   mine office, Hedley, B.C.;   R. G. McCuish, President;   W. S.
Gold Mines, Ltd. Charlton, Vice-President;  Wm. Paterson, Secretary-Treasurer;  V. J.
Creeden, General Manager;   C. W. S. Tremaine, Resident Manager;
J. C. S. Moore, Mine Foreman.    Capital:  3,000,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 2,264,130.
This company operated the Mascot mine, 1 mile north of Hedley, and did development-
work on the Good Hope property.
The concentrator and mine offices of the Hedley Mascot are on the east bank of
Hedley Creek and the mine camp is on the side of Nickel Plate Mountain. The ore is
transported by an aerial tramway, 5,600 feet long, from an ore-bin at the mine to the
mill.    The two ore-skips have a capacity of 2 tons each.
The mine has been developed by an 8- by 8-foot adit, 2,500 feet long, known as the
4800 level; this is the main-haulage level. All the ore is passed to the 4800 level and
is hauled out by battery-type electric locomotives.    The 4300 level is the lowest level
* By E. R. Hughes. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 93
being used, and ore from it is hoisted up the No. 2 tramway to the 4800 level. Two
3y2-ton Atlas battery locomotives and one Mancha trammer provide transportation
underground.
The workings of this mine are connected to the workings of the adjacent Nickel
Plate mine at several points underground; these connections are open, thus permitting
a joint ventilation system. During months when natural ventilation is inadequate, a
48-inch Jeffrey propellor-type fan in the 4800 level assists the natural air-current.
The main developments during 1945 were the continued advance on the 3700 level
and the beginning of a new underground incline. The 3700 level was advanced 1,850
feet during 1945. The new incline, starting from the surface at an elevation of 2,700
feet, is 15 feet wide, 7% feet high, and rises at 24 degrees. The incline will be 2,000
feet long and will connect with the 3700 level.
Frequent rock-slides in Climax Canyon caused damage to the new No. 4 surface
tramway servicing the 3700 level. On October 25th a rock-slide carried out about
1,500 feet of track and compressed-air line. Because of this the surface tramway was
abandoned and an aerial tramway, known as the No. 6, was put into operation in
November. This tram transports men and materials from the 4300 level to the new
development on the 3700 level.
The mill was operated throughout 1945 at an average rate of 185 tons per day.
Average number of men employed underground was fifty and on the surface eighty-five.
Development-work done in 1945 included 2,451 feet of drifting and crosscutting,
1,121 feet of raising, and 17,260 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 56,481 tons of ore
was mined and 56,503 tons was milled, yielding 16,708 oz. of gold, 3,823 oz. of silver,
and some copper.
(49° 120° S.E.) This property is about 4 miles south-east of Hedley,
Good Hope. and during 1945 it was operated by the Hedley Mascot Gold Mines,
Limited. Open-cut work was continued and an adit-level 70 feet long
was driven. A new road, connecting the property with the old Green Mountain Road,
was completed. This enables ore to be transported by motor-truck from the property
to the former Canty ore-bin, above the Mascot mine, whence it is conveyed by tramway
to the mine bins. A total of 1,700 tons of ore was produced and shipped to the Mascot
mill for treatment. The crew, in charge of J. Lyons, comprised five workmen and a
cook.    Work was suspended in November for the winter.
(49° 120° S.E.)    Company office, 75 West Street, New York, N.Y.;
Nickel Plate Mine,mine office, Hedley, B.C.;  W. A. Kissam, Chairman;   Sewell T. Tyng,
Kelowna Explora- President;   John W. Mercer, Vice-President;   R. Emmel, Secretary;
tion Co., Ltd.    J. C. Hammel, Treasurer;   Wm. C. Douglass, General Manager;  F. A.
McGonigle, Manager;   Alex. Shaak, Mine Superintendent.    This is a
private  company  operating  the  Nickel  Plate  mine.    The  mill,  machine-shops,   and
general offices are at Hedley.    The mine is at an elevation of 5,600 feet, four miles
north of the town of Hedley.
The transportation system up the side of Nickel Plate Mountain is in two sections;
a 10,000-foot tramway from the ore-bin at the mill is operated with skips having a
capacity of 6 tons each. The portal of the mine is 1% miles north of the top of the
upper terminal of the gravity tramway; an electric trolley system hauls the ore from
the mine to this terminal.
The Nickel Plate mine is connected underground at several points with the Hedley
Mascot mine, and as the upper outlets of the Nickel Plate are approximately 2,000 feet
higher than the lowest outlet of the Mascot, there is a motive column of sufficient
magnitude to provide adequate natural ventilation during most of the year. However,
there are times when the air is almost stagnant in some of the large stopes of the
upper Nickel Plate workings. ' A 94
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Development during 1945 consisted of 3,431 feet of drifting and raising and 16,546
feet of diamond-drilling. There were no major developments in either surface or
underground operations.
At the mill one 14- by 14-foot drum-type Northern Foundry filter was installed to
increase the separation of gold solution from the cyanide tails and the depressant lime
and cyanide from the flotation feed. Three 16- by 14-foot Dorr-type agitators were
installed to increase contact time and aeration of the cyanide pulp.
Compressed air for the mine and mill is provided by four compressors, two at
Hedley and two underground at the mine. Of the two compressors at Hedley, one is
a C.I.R.-RE-2 air-compressor of 1,800 cubic feet of free air per minute capacity, direct
connected to a 440-horse-power synchronous motor; and the other is a C.I.R. Class
BB-3-D compressor of 1,800 cubic feet of free air per minute capacity, belt-driven by a
400-horse-power slip-ring motor. The underground compressed-air installations are
auxiliary to the larger surface plant and cut in only when increased power is required.
Of the underground compressors, one is a C.I.R.-PRE-2, having a capacity of 500 cubic
feet of free air per minute, and is direct connected to a 100-horse-power synchronous
motor; the other unit is a Sullivan WN 32 of 500 cubic feet of free air per minute
capacity, belt-driven from a 100-horse-power slip-ring motor.
Regular inspections of the surface and underground are made by the Safety First
Committee, composed of representatives of the miners' union and the management.
Aluminium-dust therapy is available to both underground and surface employees. The
labour shortage experienced during 1944 was remedied gradually and during the latter
part of 1945 the crew was back to full strength. On November 30th 206 men were
employed, eighty-two underground and 124 on the surface. The average total crew for
1945 was 183.
A total of 99,383 tons of ore was mined and milled, yielding 34,582 oz. of gold,
1,494 oz. of silver, and some copper.
„  „ CAMP McKINNEY.*
Gold.
(49°   119°   S.E.)     This  property  at  Camp   McKinney  was  operated
Cariboo-Amelia,   under lease by Ed. Wanke, Olaf Johnson, Roy and John Hallstrom,
and E. A. Aim, of Rock Creek, B.C.    The property is equipped with
a small complete mining plant.    Early in 1945 the mine was unwatered to the No. 2
level, which is 165 feet below the collar of the main shaft.    The shaft was repaired
and reconditioned, and ore was mined from above this level.    Pumping equipment
includes  a 55-horse-power Petter  Diesel and  a  75-k.v.a.  generator which  produces
current for a 2-stage centrifugal pump, with a capacity of 180 gallons per minute,
driven by a 25-horse-power motor.    A total of 306 tons was mined and shipped to
Trail.    This yielded 144 oz. of gold, 363 oz. of silver, and 5,316 lb. of lead.
BEAVERDELL.*
Silver-lead.
(49° 119° S.E.)    Company offices, Creston, B.C.; mine office, Beaver-
Highland Bell,   dell, B.C.;   R. V. Staples, Managing Director;   A. B. Staples, Mine
Ltd. Manager.    Capital:   1,500,000 shares, $1 par;  issued, 1,315,856.    The
company owns and operates the Highland Bell mine on Wallace
Mountain, 4 miles from Beaverdell. The property was operated continuously throughout 1945, with the exception of two weeks in July and a month in the last part of
August and the first part of September. A crew of from twenty to twenty-seven men
was employed. On the surface, the old camp near the mine-workings was abandoned
and a complete new camp, consisting of bunk-house, cook-house, and dry-room, as well as
* By H. C. Hughes. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 95
a manager's residence and a house for the master mechanic, was built in Beaverdell. The
new camp is modern in every respect, and the men are transported daily from it to the
mine. Underground development-work was practically all confined to No. 8 level and
consisted of 300 feet of drifting, 210 feet of crosscutting, 139 feet of raising, and
2,600 feet of diamond-drilling. As a result of this work the downward continuation
of the ore from the levels above was found beyond a fault whose throw was considerably
greater than had been encountered anywhere else in the mine. No major purchase of
new equipment was made during 1945. A total of 1,164 tons was mined and shipped
to Trail.    This yielded 54 oz. of gold, 218,077 oz. of silver, and 97,807 lb. of lead.
GREENWOOD-GRAND FORKS.*
„ ,, Wellington Camp.
Gold.
(49° 118° S.W.) This property, in the Wellington Camp near
Athelstan. Phoenix, is owned by W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood. During the
summer of 1945 a development programme 'was undertaken with an
average of two men employed. Eight diamond-drill holes, totalling 500 feet, the longest
of which was 137 feet, had been completed when a breakdown in the machinery,
together with the approach of winter, necessitated postponement of work until next
year, 1946.    Some encouraging results were obtained.
„ ,, Jewel Lake.
Gold.
(49° 118° S.W.)    Company office, 572 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.;
Dentonia Mines, mine office, Greenwood, B.C.    Capital:  2,500,000 shares, no par value;
Ltd. issued, 1,716,600.    This company owns and operates the Dentonia mine
at Jewel Lake, 8 miles from Greenwood. The mine was reopened as
a company operation in June, 1945, with a crew averaging five men, after having been
worked by lessees for several years. Twelve men were employed under the direction
of Godfrey T. Johnson. Two new camp buildings, a bunk-house 24 by 30 feet and a
cook-house of the same size, were built, as well as a blacksmith-shop, carbide-house,
fuse-house, and powder-house. In addition to diamond-drilling equipment, an electrically driven compressor and complete mining equipment have been purchased. Power
is to be obtained from the West Kootenay Power and Light Company, and all transmission-lines for power and light have been installed. The telephone-line has also
been put in service.
Diamond-drilling was undertaken and some 1,200 feet of hole completed from
the surface and underground. Information obtained has led to preparations for
additional diamond-drilling and tunnel-work to explore further the ore occurrences
encountered.
Central Camp.
Gold.
(49° 118° S.W.) This property in the Central Camp, about 8 miles
Number Seven, from Greenwood, was operated under lease by W. E. McArthur, of
Greenwood. Two men were employed for a month on surface-
trenching in an effort to trace the vein down the hill from the original workings. The
argillite-serpentine contact in which the ore occurs in the old workings was found some
1,800 feet distant but did not contain ore where uncovered. A small amount of similar
work was done at the north end of the property with the same result. Three men did
a limited amount of development-work from the bottom of the underhand stope below
the lower level. A total of 36 tons was mined and shipped to Trail. This yielded
3 oz. of gold and 253 oz. of silver.
* By H. C. Hughes. A 96 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Silver-gold.
Greenwood.
(49° 118° S.W.) This property, about 1% miles north of Greenwood,
Providence. was operated continuously throughout 1945 under lease by W. E.
McArthur, of Greenwood. From five to nine men were employed.
The property is equipped with a complete electrically driven mining plant. Development-work included 1,500 feet of diamond-drilling, 80 feet of raising, and 150 feet of
drifting. An attempt was made to find extensions of the old ore-body by diamond-
drilling but this proved unsuccessful. All ore recovered during 1945 was from pillars
and stope remnants, and mining operations were in the nature of salvage. A total of
311 tons was mined and shipped to Trail. This yielded 98 oz. of gold, 29,560 oz. of
silver, and some lead and zinc.
ROSSLAND*
Gold. Mount Roberts.
Midnight.— (49° 117° S.W.) This property, on Mount Roberts, is owned and operated by B. A. Lins and associates, of Rossland. It is equipped with a small complete
mining plant.
(49° 117° S.W.)    This property, adjoining the Midnight, was operated
I.X.L. under lease by C. Jorgensen, of Rossland, and is equipped with a small
complete  mining plant.    A  small  amount of  development-work was
done and a total of 25 tons was mined and shipped to Trail.    This yielded 18 oz. of
gold and 28 oz. of silver.
_ „ Red Mountain.
Gold.
(49° 117° S.W.)    Charles Kenney, Manager and Secretary, Box 1512,
Gertrude Gold    Rossland, B.C.    This company has an option on the Gertrude Mineral
Mining Co., Ltd. Claim on Red Mountain, adjoining the Number One owned by the
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada.    Permission
has been obtained from the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada
to use the Number One adit and to extend this to explore showings on the Gertrude
at depth.    An electrically driven single-stage Gardner-Denver compressor has been
installed underground and the adit has been advanced about 125 feet.    Three men
have been engaged in the work.
NELSON.
Eagle Creek.+
Gold.
(49°  117°  S.E.)    Mine office, Box 390, Nelson, B.C.; B. Brynelsen,
Granite-Poorman, General Manager;   W. S. Hamilton, Manager;   A. C. Skerl, Geologist.
Kenville Gold    This company is a subsidiary of Quebec Gold Mining Corporation,
Mines, Ltd.      184 Bay Street, Toronto.    This company acquired during the winter
of 1944-45 a large tract of ground on the northern slopes of Toad
Mountain, west and south of Nelson.    The ground lies south of the Kootenay River,
between Fortynine Creek and the watershed of Giveout Creek.    The holdings include
fifty-four Crown-granted and eighty-five located claims.    The properties taken over
include the Granite-Poorman, Venango, Royal Canadian, Nevada, Eureka, Venus-Juno,
and Athabaska, to name the better known.    Work for the season was concentrated
on the Granite-Poorman but, in addition, all adit-portals on other claims were cleaned
out, except those which were seriously caved, and surveys were made of most of the
accessible workings.    Headquarters were set up in the Granite-Poorman buildings,
* By H. C. Hughes.
t By M. S. Hedley and H. C. Hughes. METAL-MINING  (LODE). A 97
and an active programme of development was carried out, starting with diamond-
drilling and including drifting when equipment became available later in the year.
This is one of the oldest properties in the district. A 10-stamp mill was erected
close to the Kootenay River in 1889 and ore was transported to it by aerial tram.
Since 1900 the property has changed hands seven times and between 1904 and 1929 it
was worked almost exclusively by lessees. In 1932 the property was acquired by
Livingstone Mining Company (H. R. Smith, manager), who operated intermittently
until 1944. In 1933 the old mill was dismantled and was reassembled with some
additions below what is now the 2570 adit-level. Past recorded production from all
veins of the group to the end of 1944 reached a total of 127,421 tons, from which
47,043 oz. of gold, 16,635 oz. of silver, 3,488 lb. of copper, and 6,253 lb. of lead were
recovered.
Bed-rock is very poorly exposed throughout the area and timber cover is heavy.
Most of the early prospecting along Eagle Creek was done by ground-sluicing in areas
of no outcrop. A new vein was discovered on the Venango in recent years by this
method. The Granite-Poorman veins are in dioritic rock. This rock, evidently a near-
contact variant of the granite, is locally gneissose, and variations in composition and
texture are probably due to assimilation. It is intrusive into greenstone, which is for
the most part massive, but is locally banded.
The five principal veins of the Granite-Poorman include, from east to west, the
Beelzebub, Granite, Greenhorn, Poorman, and Hardscrabble, in a horizontal distance
of about 1,700 feet. They are all alike in that they strike north 10 to 30 degrees west,
have an average dip of about 45 degrees north-east, and range in width from an inch
or so to a maximum of about 6 feet of quartz. They are mineralized with pyrite and
chalcopyrite chiefly but also contain minor amounts of galena, scheelite, sphalerite, and
some visible gold; rich pockets of visible gold are reported from earlier operations;
pink feldspar is a local constituent of the veins.
Reports are that pockets of free gold occurred at intervals and that consequently
the yield of the vein was greater than that indicated by sampling. The present
company installed a sorting plant in order to check the value of shipments against
that of sampling during the course of development-work.
The veins vary greatly in width, attitude, and in character of the quartz. The
dip of a vein may range from 20 to 75 degrees with no dip apparently more favourable
for ore than another. The veins are in weak fault-zones, part of a pattern of fracturing of the diorite. The hanging-wall of each vein has moved upward and southward
a distance that is not known, but must be small because the vein-fissures appear to play
out locally. A characteristic of the veins is the presence of flatter offshoots, principally
in the foot-wall, which strike northward or a few degrees east of north. Whereas the
main veins are for the most part free-walled and are accompanied by a gouge selvedge,
the flatter offshoots are frozen to the walls. The offshoots are tension cracks. A
second or co-ordinate direction of shearing is represented by rare veinlets which dip
south-westward at about 40 degrees.
The ore-bodies rake to the south, as is shown by the stope boundaries and by
individual ore-shoots within the stopes. The rake is the locus of intersection of flatter
tension cracks with the steeper shears. Workings beneath the ore-bodies show narrow
and somewhat erratic quartz; the tops of the ore-bodies in accessible stopes show
zones of fracturing of considerable irregularity.
The veins are cut by faults and by post-mineral lamprophyre dykes, many of which
are accompanied by faults. Slicing faults of steep dip drop the eastern block downward as much as 50 feet in the Hardscrabble vein. The largest fault dips 50 degrees
northward and has produced an offset of the Granite and Greenhorn veins of about 300
feet to the left; this fault is seen also in the lower Beelzebub adit, and the Beelzebub
vein has not been located beyond it at that level. A 98 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
The ore-bodies were largely mined out by former operators and it is difficult to
tell what average widths were mined. It is probable that the average was between
2 and 3 feet, although many parts of the old stopes are wider. In some instances it is
plain that the overbreak was deliberate in order to mine for a few feet the narrow
flatter foot-wall branches, particularly where these were numerous, and it is reported
that these locally contained higher values than the main veins. The greatest width of
vein in the stopes is reported to have been 8 feet, but that this was a single band of
quartz seems doubtful.
The Granite, Greenhorn, and Poorman veins are stoped out to the surface and
the Hardscrabble vein appears to be largely stoped. A sub-level 210 feet below the
2750 level (old No. 4) on both Poorman and Hardscrabble veins is beneath the ore-
zone on both veins, although some stoping has been done from intermediate levels
beneath the 2750 level. The greatest length of stoping-ground, about 1,000 feet, was
on the Poorman vein and the next greatest, about 900 feet, was on the Hardscrabble.
On the Granite vein, stopes extended over a length of about 800 feet and on the
Greenhorn vein about 400 feet. Some stoping was done also on the Beelzebub and
on the Red Rock, which latter is probably the southerly continuation of the Granite
vein, 600 feet to the south of the Granite surface workings.
Two veins on the Venango have been opened up and a small amount of stoping
was done on one of them in past years. These are similar to the Granite-Poorman
veins and belong evidently to the same system of fracturing.
The company drilled two holes from the bottom level of the Venango in search of
the downward continuation of the Venango No. 1 vein, but the main attention was
given to the Granite-Poorman veins. A number of holes were put down from surface
in search of possible blind veins which might occur between those already known, and
holes were drilled underground to test extensions of the known veins. In the first few
surface holes the cores showed several narrow widths of quartz and also patches of
disseminated chalcopyrite, of which some were accompanied by quartz or silicification.
The diorite does not show everywhere what may be termed a normal texture but is in
many places either gneissic or of a "streaky" nature; it is perhaps significant that
the latter rock is apt to contain small amounts of chalcopyrite. Some of the banding
or streakiness of the diorite is original and some probably owes its origin to post-
intrusive shearing. A point worth checking is whether the chalcopyrite mineralization
is a general characteristic of the diorite or whether it indicates the presence of veins
which, at the points intersected, were weak and insignificant.
The southerly rake of the ore-bodies at an angle between 15 and 30 degrees into
the northerly sloping and locally steep hillside makes exploration difficult. The known
ore-bodies occur at comparable levels on the Granite-Poorman veins and the downward
continuations lie well into the hill.    The property was visited in September, 1945.
Development-work done in 1945 consists of 10,999 feet of diamond-drilling, about
40 per cent, of which was done from underground and the remainder from surface.
The old mill adit, now known as the 257 level, was repaired and has been driven as a
crosscut for 200 feet to its intersection with the Hardscrabble vein and as a drift for
600 feet along this vein. This working will be continued to connect with workings at
the bottom of the old Hardscrabble winze. The 275 level, formerly the old No. 4 level of
the Poorman, has been reconditioned and a crosscut has been driven some 200 feet
from the Poorman vein eastward to develop a drill intersection between the Poorman
and Granite veins. On the surface, the old Granite-Poorman mechanical equipment has
been thoroughly overhauled and considerable additional equipment acquired. This
includes a 350-cubic-foot Ingersoll-Rand semi-portable Diesel-driven compressor, a 210-
foot Schramm gasoline-driven portable compressor, and an Ingersoll-Rand steel-
sharpener and  oil furnace.    New underground equipment purchased  included two METAL-MINING (LODE). A 99
Eimco loaders and two Mancha trammers. A complete sorting and sampling plant
has been built in the old Granite-Poorman mill and so arranged that the old mill bins
were utilized to good advantage. This plant consists of a grizzly above the main mill
bin and a conveyer-belt which carries material from this bin to a sorting-belt which is
so arranged that a great variation in speed is possible to facilitate the sorting of any
type of ore. Chute and bin arrangements from the sorting-belt are also arranged so
that either waste or ore may be sorted from the belts and fines kept separate from the
rest of the material, making the whole plant quite flexible. The lower part of the mill
has been utilized for a blacksmith and steel-sharpening shop while another intermediate
section has been converted into a modern sanitary change-house accommodating about
forty men. The office is being remodelled and, when completed, will include a well-
equipped first-aid room.    At the end of 1945 about sixty-five men were employed.
„ ,, Morning Mountain.*
Gold.
Irene Group.— (49° 117° S.E.) Three men, under the direction of A. St. Clair
Brindle, of Vancouver, did trenching and surface-stripping on mineralized shear-zones
on this property.
„ ., Hall Creek.
Gold.
(49° 117° S.E.)    This property on Hall Creek is operated by a small
Golden Eagle    local syndicate under the direction of W. Rozan, of Nelson.    During
andT.S.*        1945 the old shaft on the T.S. vein was repaired and retimbered for
examination and sampling, and about 40 feet of tunnel was driven
on a showing on the Golden Eagle mineral claim. All work was done by hand-steel
and no ore was shipped.
(49° 117° S.E.) This property on Hall Creek has been optioned by
Fern.f Harold Lakes and associates, of Nelson,  and development-work has
been carried on under the direction of Mr. Lakes. Premier Border
Gold Mining Company, Limited, and Quatsino Copper-Gold, Limited, have agreed
jointly with Mr. Lakes to provide necessary funds. The road from Hall Siding to
the mine was repaired and put in condition for truck-hauling. The old Fern camp
buildings were renovated and made to provide accommodation for eight to ten men.
A diamond-drilling programme was undertaken to locate the extensions of the
vein, particularly to the south of a fault which had bounded the stoped areas of the
mine. Six holes, totalling 2,120.5 feet, were drilled from the surface; two holes were
drilled to the north and four to the south of the fault. Intersections were obtained
in all holes, and from those south of the fault the position of the vein on the surface
was projected. A total of 185 feet of trenching was done to expose the vein south
of the fault. An adit-site was chosen about 100 feet vertically below the outcrop and
preparations are being made to drive on the vein. A blacksmith-shop and compressor-
house were built near the site and a small mining plant, including a 105-cubic-foot
single-stage gasoline-driven Schramm compressor, was installed. It is hoped to have
underground work started by the end of 1945. A 15-horse-power Caterpillar tractor
with bulldozer blade was also purchased to keep the road open and to transport
supplies during the winter.    The number of men employed averaged three.
YMIR.
(49° 117° S.E.)    This property, owned by Ed. Haukedahl, A. Bremner,
Oxide.j: and A. Phare, of Ymir, was optioned by International Mining Corpo
ration, 85 Richmond Street West, Toronto. It is on the ridge between
Oscar (Bear) Creek and Porcupine Creek, about 4 miles from Ymir.    The showings
* By H. C. Hughes.
t By H. C. Hughes and M. S. Hedley.
t By M. S. Hedley. A 100 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
extend across the ridge at an elevation of 5,500 feet between quartzites on the west
and crumpled argillite and limestone on the east in what appears to be a fault-zone,
possibly of regional extent. The deposit is completely oxidized to a gossan that contains values in lead and zinc; it has not been fully outlined but appears to be about
1,500 feet long and locally 30 or more feet wide. A considerable amount of trenching
was done under the direction of H. C. Gunning, extending down the Porcupine Creek
slope over a vertical range of 700 feet.    Diamond-drilling began late in 1945.
Gold.
(49° 117° S.E.)    Head office, 503 Westlake North, Seattle, Washing-
Ymir Good-Hope ton;   local office, Medical Arts Building, Nelson, B.C.;   Sarkis Terzian,
Mining Co.*     Manager.    Capital: 250,000 A shares, $1 par, and 1,500,000 B shares,
10 cents par;   issued, 28,375 A and 1,500,000 B.    This company works
the X-Ray group on Huckleberry Creek, about 6 miles from Ymir.    Development-work
on this property was continued during 1945.    Early in the summer about 1,200 feet
of  underground  diamond-drilling was  done  from the  crosscut  driven  in  1944.    A
promising intersection was obtained on a vein which was encountered in the crosscut
about 400 feet from the portal, and encouragement was also obtained from holes which
were drilled ahead in the general direction of the crosscut.    As the result of this
work the crosscut was extended for 100 feet, and 100 feet of drifting was done on the
vein mentioned above.    The drift showed the vein to be from 6 inches to 2 feet wide
and fairly abundantly mineralized.   The Diesel-driven compressor installed in 1900 was
replaced by an Ingersoll-Rand gasoline-driven portable compressor.    An average crew
of five men was employed during the summer and autumn.    No ore was shipped.
„ „ ERIE CREEK*
Gold.
(49° 117° S.E.) This property on Keystone Mountain, about 3%
Arlington.       miles from Erie, has been purchased from Relief Arlington Mines,
Limited, by B. and K. Golac and A. Shrieves, Box 223, Nelson, B.C.
It was operated for the greater part of 1945, two to three men being employed. Ore
was recovered from pillars and stope remnants. Investigation of the foot-wall in
several areas established the existence of closely parallel ore occurrences within the
vein-shear, indicating a possibility of considerable tonnage. Hand-steel only was used.
A total of 256 tons was mined and shipped to Trail. This yielded 275 oz. of gold, 733
oz. of silver, and 16,173 lb. of lead.
(49° 117° S.E.) This property on Erie Creek, about 13 miles from
Second Relief.    Erie, is owned and operated by a local syndicate consisting of A. and
M. Burgess, G. Murray, M. Towriss, and M. C. Donaldson, of Salmo.
It is equipped with a small complete mining plant which can be driven by either Diesel
or water power. Ore was recovered from pillars and stope remnants left by former
operators and, in addition, some work was done on a parallel vein which had received
very little attention in former years. A total of 242 tons was shipped to Trail and this
yielded 375 oz. of gold and 165 oz. of silver. The average number of men employed
was three.
SOUTH KOOTENAY LAKE.*
Gold.
(49°   116°   S.W.)    Company office,  308 Pacific Building, Vancouver,
Bayonne Consoli- B.C.;   mine office, Sirdar, B.C.;   C. Rutherford, Consulting Engineer;
dated Mines, Ltd. R. B. King, Manager.    Capital: 2,500,000 shares, no par value; issued,
2,500,000.    The company owns  and operates the  Bayonne mine on
Summit Creek, 23 miles by road from Tye Siding.    This property was closed down in
* By H. C. Hughes. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 101
1943 and was reopened in the late summer of 1945 with the object of putting it into
production again. The road was cleaned out and repaired, the camp and power plant
were renovated and overhauled, and underground development-work was started. It is
planned to sink a 250-foot shaft from No. 8 level at a point in the crosscut connecting
the A and B veins on that level, near the B vein. To this end the ditch on the No. 8
level was widened from the portal of the drift on the A vein to the shaft location and a
station and hoist-room were cut. A 50-foot rope raise and a 30-foot raise for the head-
frame were completed. About 12 feet of sinking was done by the end of 1945. In
addition to this about 100 feet of drifting was done on a showing on No. 4 level. About
twenty-five men were employed.
„ ,, SHEEP CREEK.
Gold.
(49° 117° S.E.)    This property on Sheep Creek, about 10 miles from
Kootenay Belle.* Salmo, has been leased from Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Limited, by
Russel Thompson and associates, of Sheep Creek.    During 1945 a small
electrically driven compressor was installed and preparations were made underground
for machine-mining.    Ore recovered from pillars and stope remnants above the No. 6
level was shipped to Trail.
(49° 117* S.E.)    Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Van-
Sheep Creek Gold couver, B.C.;   mine office, Sheep Creek, B.C.;   C. E. Marr, President;
Mines, Ltd.f     J. Anderson, Secretary-Treasurer;   H. E. Doelle, General Superintendent and Managing Director.    Capital:   2,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;
issued, 1,875,000.    The company owns and operates the Queen mine on Waldie Creek,
a tributary of Sheep Creek.    The mine was operated continuously throughout 1945 but,
owing to labour shortage, the mill was closed down during the months of January and
May and was operated intermittently and at a reduced tonnage during the other months.
' In the early part of 1945 the crew was down to about forty-six men but near the end of
the year it increased to about seventy.     The number was as high as ninety at one
time during the autumn.
Eleven sub-parallel quartz veins have been discovered along the course of a north-
south anticlinal structure in quartzite. The veins strike from north 56 degrees to
north 73 degrees east and dip steeply south-eastward. From the north they are successively named the Yellowstone, Queen, 92, 85, 83, 81, 76, 75, 68, 57, and 44 veins.
Mining and development during the past few years have been concentrated on the 92
to 57 veins, inclusive. What is presumably a second belt containing additional sub-
parallel veins lies about 1,000 feet to the east and remains to be explored at depth.
The mine is opened by two adit-levels, the No. 3 level on the Queen vein and the
No. 2 extending from the 92 to 68 veins. A vertical shaft extends from the No. 3 to
No. 12 level, a distance of 1,015 feet, in the foot-wall of the Queen vein. Nos. 5, 7,
and 9 levels are driven south from the shaft to explore the southern veins and, in 1945,
No. 10 was started as a general crosscutting level to explore the other veins at this
new depth. No. 7 level in addition cuts the Yellowstone vein and is also extended east
to the eastern belt of veins. Other levels are driven as intermediates on the individual
veins.
Stoping during 1945 was done mostly on the 81 vein. A total of 854 feet of
drifting, 183 feet of crosscutting, 175 feet of raising, and 900 feet of diamond-drilling
was done. Included in this total was work done on the 92 vein on Nos. 3 and 10 levels;
on the 85 vein on the No. 7 level; on the 83 vein on the Nos. 7 and 9 levels; on the 81
vein on Nos. 3, 6, 7, and 9 levels; on the 75 vein on No. 7 level. A total of 24,504
tons was milled, about one-half the tonnage in normal years; this yielded 9,925 oz. of
gold and 2,712 oz. of silver.
» By H. C. Hughes. 1 4 6 7 2l (J
t By H. C. Hughes and M. S. Hedley.
PROVING!*'    LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B. C.
 <fc 	 A 102 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
(49° 117° S.E.)     Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Van-
Gold Belt Mining couver, B.C.;   mine office, Sheep Creek, B.C.;   A. E. Jukes, President;
Co., Ltd.*       J.   Anderson,   Secretary-Treasurer;    F.   W.   Reger,   Mine   Manager.
Capital:   1,687,000 shares, 50 cents par;   issued, 1,237,000.    The company owns and operates the Gold Belt mine on Sheep Creek.    This property was closed
early in 1943 because of labour shortage, at which time practically all the readily
available ore had been mined.    It was reopened in the autumn of 1945 with an average
crew of sixteen men.
Near the portal of the 600 level, where a former camp was destroyed by fire, a
compressor-house 18 by 36 feet, a blacksmith-shop 16 by 20 feet, a bunk-house 24 by 52
feet, and a cook-house 24 by 36 feet have been built. In addition, a powder-house, oil-
house, and fuse-house have been built in suitable locations. The camp is modern in
every respect and is built to accommodate about twenty men. The branch from the
Nugget Road was repaired, and dams, water-lines, and electric power installations were
put in. The compressor plant and blacksmithing equipment formerly at the 1850-level
portal were moved up to the new site and installed. The only new equipment purchased was a tractor and bulldozer.
The company plans to drive the 600 level ahead to the north and make connections
with a raise which is to be completed from the 1400 level. This will explore the anticlinal structure which rises to the north and permit ore to be transferred underground
to the 2100, or mill, level. In addition to salvaging equipment from old workings and
laying track in the 600 level, 96 feet of crosscutting was done.
(49° 117° S.E.)    This property, adjoining the Motherlode and Reno,
Nugget.f is owned and operated by A. Endersby, Jr., of Fruitvale. It is equipped
with a water-driven compressor at the Reno mill-site, compressed air
being piped to the Nugget workings through the 4900 level and Motherlode workings.
During the summer ore was recovered from a stope between Nos. 2 and 3 levels in the
old Nugget mine. When snow conditions made it impossible to haul from the old workings, these were closed for the winter and mining was carried on in the lower Nugget
workings accessible from the 4900 crosscut. Five men were employed. No development-work was done. A total of 641 tons was mined and shipped to Trail. This
yielded 206 oz. of gold and 227 oz. of silver.
„.,       ,     ,   . AINSWORTH.
Silver-lead-sinc.
(49°  116°  N.W.)    Company office, Ainsworth, B.C.;  Carl M.  Mohr,
Ainsmore       Manager;   C. D. N. Taylor, General Superintendent.    This company
Consolidated     owns the Spokane group of claims on Munn Creek, about 3 miles by
Mines, Ltd.*     r0ad west of Ainsworth, and has recently acquired a number of claims
to give holdings which extend in an almost unbroken line from Coffee
Creek to Cedar Creek.    Early in 1945 the company bought the Kootenay Florence mill
and plant, 2 miles north of Ainsworth, and leased the Kootenay Florence property with
an option to purchase from the owner, George Webster, of Toronto.
The Spokane, formerly a shipper of high-grade lead ore, was operated almost continuously throughout 1945. Milling-ore was mined above the upper adit-level and put
through the Florence mill. In addition, a special mill-feed dump of several hundred
tons was milled, as well as some from the main dump. Sixty-eight feet of development-
work was done and three to four men were employed.
Work started at the Kootenay Florence in April. A rock-raise was put up to
surface near the portal of the No. 9 main-haulage level to serve as storage for ore
* By H. C. Hughes and M. S. Hedley.
t By H. C. Hughes. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 103
trucked in from other properties. Development-work included 195 feet of crosscutting,
502 feet of drifting, and 246 feet of raising. Milling commenced on about 1,500 tons
of broken ore left in the stopes from the earlier operation by Wartime Metals Corporation ; this work was done on contract for the owner. In addition to ore from company
operations, custom ore was received—149 tons from the Bell near Retallack and 110
tons from the New Jerusalem in the Ainsworth camp. The Spokane contributed 852
tons from the dumps and 2,858 tons from stoping operations. The Kootenay Florence
provided a total of 1,669 tons from stopes and 3,530 tons from development. The mill
was operated on a two-shift basis and treated about 60 tons per day. From the total
of 9,900 tons milled, 850 tons of concentrates were shipped to Kellogg, Idaho. From
this, 12,590 oz. of silver, 738,107 lb. of lead, 250,873 lb. of zinc, and some cadmium were
recovered.    The average number of men employed was twenty-six.
In the Kootenay Florence mine a 405-foot 60-degree raise had been put up by Wartime Metals Corporation from the lowest, or No. 9, adit-level to connect with No. 5,
the lowest adit-level of early operations. The principal work in 1945 consisted of the
development of No. 7 level from this raise, about 220 feet vertically above No. 9 and
130 feet below No. 5 level. Development-work for 1945 included 502 feet of drifting
and 246 feet of raising.
(49° 117° N.E.) No work was done during 1945 on this property,
Scranton-Pontiac* which is near the head of Woodbury Creek. However, the company
began constructing a road which will connect the mine with the
Nelson-Kaslo Highway. About 3 miles of this road was completed before snow conditions forced the work to be discontinued until 1946. A caterpillar tractor and bulldozer and a portable compressor were used. The work was under the direction of
W. T. Graham, of Forest Grove, Oregon.
,    .   . KASLO-THREE FORKS.
silver-lead-Binc.
(49° 116" N.W.) This property, on the hill above Shutty Bench, about
Shutty Bench.*   6 miles north of Kaslo, is owned by John Kuz, of Kaslo.    The showings
consist of a flatly dipping limestone-bed showing a considerable amount
of zinc replacement. This bed is from 4 to 6 feet thick and has been traced on the
surface by short adits and open-cuts for a distance of about 400 feet.
(49° 117° N.E.) This property, near the head of Keen Creek, is under
Kokanee Chief.* option to R. G. McLeod, of Seattle, Washington. The showings, consisting of narrow quartz-filled fissures in granite of the Nelson
batholith, have been developed by two adits 100 and 40 feet long. A limited amount of
underground hand-steel work was done by two men.    Values are chiefly in silver.
(50° 117° S.E.) This property, at the head of 10-Mile Creek and
Voyageur.*      about 18 miles from Kaslo, at an elevation of about 6,500 feet, is being
operated by Empire Mines Corporation, of Walla Walla, Washington,
under the direction of Roy Wallace. A truck-road about 7% miles long, joining the
mine to the Kaslo-New Denver Highway, was completed in 1945 after being under construction for the past three years. At the mine the portal of the adit-level was
retimbered.
(50° 117° S.E.) This property, in the Jackson Basin and about 7
Bell.* miles from Retallack, was operated under lease and bond by Joe Gallo
and associates, of Nelson. A total of 149 tons of ore, averaging about
30 per cent, zinc, was recovered from surface dumps and from pillars and stope remnants underground. This ore was treated in the Kootenay Florence mill and the concentrates included in their shipments. A limited amount of surface-trenching was also
undertaken.    Two men were employed and all the work was done by hand-steel.
* By H. C. Hughes. A 104 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
(50° 117° S.E.)    Registered office, 475 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.;
Whitewater      mine office, Kaslo, B.C.;  J. L. Trumbull, President;  J. A. Clark, Secre-
Retallack Mines, tary;   James Hamilton, Richard Dowsey, W. R. Burgess, and Donald
Ltd.* McLeod, Directors;  V. McDowall, Manager.    Incorporated, June, 1943.
Capital: 250,000 shares of $1 par; all issued, 60 per cent, owned by
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Limited, and 40 per cent, owned by Whitewater Mines,
Limited. Operations at this property were carried out intermittently because of power
shortages until September, 1945, when the mine and mill were closed down. From the
beginning of 1945 until the first week in April the mill was operated continuously at a
capacity of 160 tons per day but was closed at that time owing to a shortage of water
for the hydro-electric plant and to the necessity of making repairs in the power-house.
Milling operations were resumed on May 4th at a capacity of about 140 tons per day
when the spring run-off began. On May 23rd the entire Diesel power plant Was
destroyed completely by fire. There being a plentiful supply of water for hydroelectric power at this time, operations were resumed shortly after the fire and were
continued with some interruption until September 20th when the mine and mill were
closed down. For a large part of this latter period the mill operated at a capacity of
200 tons per day.
During the early part of 1945 the mill was supplied with magnetite-pyrrhotite-
zinc replacement ore from above No. 1472 level and with the more common siderite-zinc
replacement ore from a small stope below No. 14 level in the east end of the mine.
Mining of the old upper mine dumps was resumed later, and during the last stage of
operations ore was coming almost exclusively from the large composite dump between
Nos. 7 and 3 levels, which exists as a comparatively thin veneer on the steep hillside.
The earlier use of scrapers was found unsatisfactory, and the muck was moved by bulldozer into a loading-pocket from which it was trucked to the mill. Coming from workings driven primarily in search of silver-lead ore, the muck naturally contained a
higher proportion of these metals than that from the lower mine.
Development-work included 88 feet of drifting, 50 feet of crosscutting, 30 feet of
raising, and 1,869 feet of diamond-drilling. In addition, about 500 feet of old workings were reconditioned. A total of 29,561 tons of ore was treated in the mill; of this,
26,000 came from underground workings and the remainder from the surface dump.
Concentrates were shipped under a contract with Metals Reserve Corporation to the
American Smelting and Refining Company, and yielded 11,676 oz. of silver, 209,985 lb.
of lead, and 2,688,400 lb. of zinc. The number of men employed ranged from about
100 near the beginning of 1945 to fifty when the property was closed. The company
has tentative plans for operating on ore from the dump in 1946 during the months
when a plentiful supply of water will assure electric power. No custom ore was
treated in the Whitewater mill in 1945.   •
(50° 117° S.E.)    Mine office, Zincton, B.C.    This company, a subsidi-
Lucky Jim       ary °^ Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Limited, owns and operates the Lucky
Zincton Mines,   Jim mine at Zincton.    In 1945 F. R. Thompson, mine manager, was
Ltd.* transferred to the company's operation at Sheep Creek and J.  S.
Mcintosh was appointed manager at Zincton.    The mine was operated
continuously at a daily capacity of 320 tons until the end of June, when it was closed
because of cancellation of its contract with Metals Reserve Corporation, under which
zinc concentrates were shipped to the Anaconda Smelter in Butte, Montana.    Milling
operations were resumed on October 12th at a daily capacity of about 200 tons, which
was shortly increased to the normal figure as more men became available.    The mill
continued to operate at this capacity for the remainder of 1945, the concentrates being
shipped to the Trail smelter.
» By M. S. Hedley and H. C. Hughes. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 105
While the mill was closed, a development crew was employed. The main haulage
on No. 9 adit-level was graded and retracked and haulage equipment was reconditioned.
Some exploratory drifting was done south-east of the main raise on No. 8 level. On
the surface, a road 3% miles in length was built to the old No. 1 adit which is to be
driven ahead to intersect mineral located by diamond-drilling in 1943 and 1944. Late
in 1945 power capacity was increased by the installation of a 450-horse-power Fairbanks-Morse Diesel engine and generator in an addition built on to the back of the
power-house. On November 9th the mess-house was completely destroyed by fire and
temporary accommodation was provided in the recreation-hall; it is planned to build
a new mess-house in the spring.
Most of the tonnage milled came from stopes above No. 9 level and a small amount
was mined above No. 850 level. Stoping was commenced early in 1945 above No. 10,
a new level 70 feet below No. 9, which is developed by a 20-degree winze.
Development for 1945 included 373 feet of drifting, 178 feet of raising, and 7,861
feet of diamond-drilling.    While the mill was operating, the total number employed
ranged from forty to sixty men.    A total of 63,322 tons of ore was milled, producing
10,896 tons of zinc concentrates which was shipped to Anaconda and Trail.    This
yielded 10,792,579 lb. of zinc.
c.,      ,    ,   . SANDON.*
silver-lead-zinc.
(49° 117° N.E.)    This property, 3 miles from Sandon, is owned by
Victor. ^rs- D. Petty, of Nelson, and was operated continuously during 1945
under lease by E. Doney, of Sandon.    A total of 60 tons of ore was
mined by hand-steel and 30 tons was shipped to Trail.    This yielded 10,870 oz. of silver,
28,543 lb. of lead, and some zinc.
(49° 117° N.E.)    Head office, Box 338, Vernon, B.C.; Lloyd R. Smith,
Silver Ridge,     Manager.    This company has an option on the old Silver Ridge group,
Excelda Mines,   adjoining the Black Colt and about 2 miles from Sandon.    During the
Lt«l. summer a crew of five men was engaged in rehabilitating the camp
buildings and cleaning up and retimbering the underground workings.
A proposed programme of underground diamond-drilling was postponed until 1946
because of early heavy snowfall.    The property is equipped with a small mining plant.
(49°  117°  N.E.)    Company   office,   Sandon,   B.C.;   R.   A.   Grimes,
Sunshine silver   President;  P. D. Townsend, Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital: 2,000,000
Ridge shares,   50  cents  par;    issued,   662,400.    This   company  owns  and
Mining Co. operates the Sunshine group, situated on Silver Ridge, about 3y2 miles
from Sandon. The property, which is equipped with a small Diesel
mining plant, is to be reopened after having been idle since March, 1941. In November, 1945, a small crew was engaged in overhauling mining equipment and cleaning up
the underground workings in preparation for further development. Present plans
are to extend the crosscut driven during the last operation, which is more than 2,000
feet in length. By the end of 1945, 200 feet of crosscutting had been done. The
operators plan to continue work throughout the winter.
(49° 117° N.E.)    From this property, about 2% miles from Sandon,
Noble Five.      P. Lincoln shipped 20 tons of lead concentrates and 13 tons of zinc
concentrates.    These yielded 1,595 oz. of silver, 16,842 lb. of lead, and
13,305 lb. of zinc.
SILVERTON-NEW DENVER*
Gold.
(49° 117° N.E.)    This property on L. H. Creek, about 7 miles from
L.H. Silverton, has been optioned from A. R. Fingland, of Silverton, by
Kenville Gold Mines, Limited, a subsidiary of Quebec Gold Mining
Corporation.    Work was commenced in September.    The road was cleaned out and
» By H. C. Hughes. A 106
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
repaired and the old camp buildings renovated to accommodate a small crew. A programme of diamond-drilling was undertaken from the underground workings of No. 3
level, elevation about 5,200 feet, and about 2,000 feet of drilling was completed by the
end of 1945. It is planned to continue this work during the winter as long as transportation conditions permit.    About seven men were employed.
Silver-lead-zinc.
Standard,
Mammoth, and
Enterprise,
Western
Exploration Co.
(49° 117° N.E.)    Company office, Silverton, B.C.; A. M. Ham, General
Manager;   R.  A.  Avison, Mine Superintendent.    Capital:   2,000,000
shares, 50 cents par;   issued, 1,489,654.    This company operates the
Standard mine on Emily Creek, about 3 miles from Silverton;   the
Mammoth mine on Avison Creek, about 4% miles from Silverton;  and
the Enterprise mine on Enterprise Creek, about 17 miles from Silver-
ton.    The Standard mill was operated continuously until the end of
June, when it was closed on the cancellation of the contract with Metals Reserve Corporation, which provided for shipment to the smelter at Kellogg, Idaho.    Ore was
supplied from both the Standard and Mammoth mines for this operation.
The Mammoth mine was closed on May 31st after all ore had been taken from
above the lowest, or No. 7, level, at an elevation of 5,028 feet. Diamond-drilling of the
downward extension of the ore-body had been done in 1944, but deeper development
was not undertaken in view of the uncertainty of the times. An exploratory crosscut
adit was begun in 1944, following surface drilling, and was completed in January, 1945.
This adit is at an elevation of 5,349 feet, is 465 feet long in an average direction of
north 25 degrees east, and is 340 feet west of the western face on No. 7 level. A zone
containing some mineralization was cut 75 feet from the face of this adit, and it
appears probable that the Mammoth vein, if it comes through, is following here the
bedding of the argillites. Development at the Mammoth during 1945 included 79 feet
of drifting, 213 feet of crosscutting, 57 feet of raising, and 392 feet of diamond-drilling.
A maximum crew of fifty and a minimum of thirty-five was employed.
At the Standard mine, development was undertaken after the mill was closed.
This was directed towards exploring areas in the vicinity of the old stopes between
No. 6 level and the surface, and included sinking a 40-foot winze on a showing in the
floor of No. 6 level below the innermost ore-body. Development on No. 6 has included
investigations in the vicinity of the original " big " stope and may eventually solve
some problems relating to localization of this large ore-body which was mined in past
years; new mineralization has been found in the hanging-wall of the shear-zone or lode
near the " big " stope. No. 3 level was cleaned out from the surface, a distance of 1,100
feet, at considerable expense. No. 4 level was reached from an inner part of No. 5,
but the level is caved; a connection is to be made between Nos. 5 and 3 levels. Development for 1945 included 1,845 feet of drifting, 286 feet of crosscutting, 341 feet of
raising, 40 feet of sinking, and 3,109 feet of diamond-drilling. An average crew of
110 men was employed in the mine, mill, and power plant while the mill was operating
but the crew was reduced to about thirty after milling ceased. A total of 17,266 tons
of ore from the Mammoth and Standard mines was milled and the concentrates were
shipped to Kellogg, Idaho. This yielded 20 oz. of gold, 151,195 oz. of silver, 856,156
lb. of lead, and 2,082,800 lb. of zinc.
At the Enterprise mine, active development was undertaken as soon as weather
conditions permitted in the late spring. The road up Enterprise Creek from the main
Slocan Highway to the mine, a distance of 5 miles, was completely repaired and reconditioned ; 3 miles of mine road was also repaired. The old Enterprise Camp was practically rebuilt.    At the mine an ore-bin was built at the portal of No. 7 level and a METAL-MINING (LODE). A 107
small mining plant, consisting of a portable gasoline-driven compressor, blacksmith
equipment, etc., was installed. Underground, about 2,500 feet of the Nos. 7 and 5
levels were opened up and repaired; 822 feet of drifting was done and 76 feet of raising was done from the No. 7 level to connect eventually with No. 6 level. This will
provide good natural ventilation and a second opening from the lower workings.
A crew of about fifteen men was employed in this work. Present plans are to haul ore
from the Enterprise mine to the Standard mill by truck. It is not expected that stoping will begin before the spring of 1946.
(49° 117° N.E.)    This property, about 6 miles from Silverton, was
Hewitt. leased late in 1945 by Frank Mills, S. S. Clough, and J. Kelly, of Silver-
ton.   The No. 10, or lowest, adit-level was retimbered and a small
Diesel-driven compressor was installed before work was suspended for the winter.   The
operators plan to ship a milling-grade of lead-zinc ore to the Standard mill at Silverton.
(49°   117°   N.E.)    Mine  office,  New  Denver,  B.C.;   head  office,  423
Bosun, Santiago   Hamilton Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   T. R. Buckham, Mine Manager.
Mines, Ltd.      This company works the Bosun mine on Slocan Lake, about 1% miles
south of New Denver,    During the latter part of 1945 a crew of six
men was engaged in retimbering and reconditioning the No. 6, or lowest, adit-level.
About 430 feet of this level was repaired.    No mechanical equipment was used for this
work.
DUNCAN RIVER.
(50° 116° N.W.)    The five unsurveyed claims staked in June, 1945, by
Erdahl anj      R. E. Erdahl and J. E. Pinchbeck, of Trail, comprise the Tin City,
Pinchbeck       Canyon, Old Glory, Cyclone, and Erbeck claims.    They extend north-
Claims.*        westerly on the north-east side of the Duncan River Valley in the
vicinity of Cockle (Bear) Creek, about 10 miles north of the head of
Duncan Lake.    A small cabin, built by the owners, stands by the east bank of the Duncan River across from Healy's Landing.    The cabin may be reached by chartered
river-boat, except in periods of low water, or by some 14 miles of forestry trail extending from the head of Duncan Lake.
In the vicinity of the exposures the rocks are greyish-green and brown schist and
gneiss, limestone, and quartzite. The foliation strikes north 75 degrees to 45 degrees
west and dips north-easterly at angles ranging from 50 to 90 degrees. Narrow, discontinuous, and irregular veins, stringers, and lenses of glassy quartz containing varying amounts of dark tourmaline, mica, amphibole, and carbonate cut the rocks, usually
at a large angle to the foliation. Scattered grains of scheelite occur in many of the
veins, and sulphides are present in local concentrations. Traces of tin and beryllium
were detected by spectrographic analysis, the estimates for each metal ranging from
nil to 0.04 per cent., but the tin- and beryllium-bearing minerals were not recognized.
The Tin City claim lies north of Cockle (Bear) Creek Canyon at the north-westerly
end of the group and covers the area of the initial discovery of tin, beryllium, and
tungsten mineralization. The showings lie near the forestry trail, about 1% miles
up from the owners' cabin, at an elevation of 700 to 800 feet above the Duncan River.
Greyish-green mica-amphibole schist and gneiss, containing variable amounts of
carbonate, lie south-west of bedded limestone and quartzite. Quartz veins, stringers,
and lenses cut the schist and gneiss at large angles to the foliation. The foliation
strikes north 75 degrees to 50 degrees west and dips 50 degrees to 90 degrees northeast approximately parallel to the bedding of the limestone and quartzite. The veins
strike north 5 degrees to 25 degrees east and dip 40 degrees to 80 degrees southeasterly.    They vary in width from 10 inches to less than 1 inch within intervals of 20
* By W. J. Lynott. A 108
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
to 30 feet. All of the showings are in a northerly-trending zone some 500 feet in length.
Parts of the veins and lenses are covered by overburden but some exposures show blunt
or pointed vein-terminations. The veins are composed of glassy quartz, tourmaline,
amphibole, mica, and carbonate and are frequently banded parallel to the walls.
Scheelite occurs as scattered grains. The wall-rocks are tourmalinized locally.
Assays of chip samples are as follows:—
Location.
Width of Vein.
Tin.
Beryllium.
Tungsten.
Inches.
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
Lowest exposed vein	
10
Nil
0.04
Trace
Chip samples taken across vein at 2-foot intervals along
8-foot length extending from 53 feet to 61 feet from
7 (av.)
0.04
0.04
0.03
Chip sample across vein exposure 490 feet from sample 1  ...
8
Nil
0.04
1.90
Cockle (Bear) Creek, in a sheer deep canyon, crosses the Canyon claim between
the Tin City and Old Glory claims. Nothing of interest has been discovered on the
Canyon claim.
Near the location-line of the Old Glory claim schist and gneiss are cut by veins of
quartz and other minerals. A vein, similar to those on the Tin City claim, is exposed
from approximately 70 feet to 134 feet down-slope south-west of the initial post, the
extensions being covered by overburden. The width averages 12 inches over an exposed
length of 57 feet from the lower end and then narrows to 2 inches at the upper end of
the exposure. Assays of two samples across the vein show no traces of tin, beryllium,
or tungsten.
About 300 feet south of the initial post two short adits have been driven into an
irregular mineralized shear-zone. The mineralized material consists of quartz, wall-
rock fragments, and carbonate with arsenopyrite and small amounts of pyrite.
An assay of selected mineral specimens is as follows: Gold, 0.01 oz. per ton; silver,
1.0 oz. per ton; copper, trace; lead, 0.3 per cent.; tin, 0.04 per cent.; beryllium, trace;
tungsten, nil.
The Cyclone claim adjoins the south-east boundary of the Old Glory claim. Several
veins, veinlets, and lenses of quartz, tourmaline, etc., cut gneiss and schist near the
centre of the claim, along the location-line. The showings are similar to those on the
Tin City claim. Approximately 100 feet north of the south-easterly and of the location-
line, near the base of a steep bluff, a flat-lying vein up to 17 inches wide is exposed for
a length of about 40 feet. A few feet from the southern end of this exposure a vein
up to 12 inches wide is exposed up the face of the bluff for an estimated slope distance
of 80 feet, striking north 35 degrees east and dipping 70 degrees to the south-east.
Assays of chip samples across the veins are as follows:—
Location.
Width
sampled.
Gold.
Silver.
Tin.
Beryllium.
Tungsten.
Flat vein	
Inches.
17
10
Oz. per Ton.
Trace
Trace
Oz. per Ton.
Nil
0.4
Per Cent.
Nil
Nil
Per Cent.
Nil
Nil
Per Cent.
Nil
The Erbeck claim adjoins the south-easterly boundary of the Cyclone claim. The
underlying rocks are greyish-green and brown schist, quartzite, and limestone cut by
quartz veins. One vein, containing small amounts of pyrite and up to 36 inches in
width, is exposed for approximately 100 feet. Mr. Erdahl reports that greater width
and length of vein containing pyrite, pyrrhotite, and galena have been observed elsewhere on the claim. Assays of vein material from the Erbeck claim show negligible
values in gold and silver, and occasional traces of tin. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 109
„..       ,     .   . FERGUSON*
suver-lead-sinc.
(50° 117° N.E.)    Head office, 815 Queen Street West, Toronto 3, Ont.;
True-Fissure,    mine  office,   Ferguson,   B.C.;   0.   Tischauer,   Mine   Manager.    This
Comara Mining   company   operates   the   True-Fissure   mine   about   3%   miles   from
& Milling Co.,   Ferguson.    During 1945 the road from Ferguson to the mine was
d- completely repaired  and the camp  renovated.    Surface  exploration
was undertaken.    This included 2,200 feet of surface diamond-drilling,
1,300 feet of which was done beneath the True-Fissure outcrop and the remainder near
the St. Elmo workings.    In addition to this, some trenches and test-pits were dug near
the St. Elmo in an attempt to trace the St. Elmo vein south and to find its intersection
with the True-Fissure vein.    Work was suspended in November with intention to
resume in 1946.
„.,      , '      . KIMBERLEY.*
Silver-lead-zinc.
(49°  115° N.W.)    Company office, 215 St. James Street, Montreal,
. „. Que.;   mine and smelter office, Trail, B.C.;   R. W. Diamond, Trail,
Sullivan, > » i
Consolidated    President; R. E. Stavert, Montreal, Vice-President; J. E. Riley, Mon-
Mining and     treal, Secretary;   H. B.  Fuller, Trail,  Comptroller;   Sullivan mine
Smelting Co. of office, Kimberley, B.C.;   J. R. Giegerich, Mine Superintendent;   H. R.
Canada, Ltd.     Banks,   Mill   Superintendent.    Capital:    4,000,000   shares,   $5   par;
issued, 3,276,329.    The company owns and operates the Sullivan mine
on Mark Creek, near Kimberley, and the Sullivan concentrator at Chapman Camp,
about 3 miles away.    During 1945 the output was increased substantially above that
of 1944.    The reasons for this were a better supply of labour, chiefly towards the end
of the year, and more advanced stope preparation for diamond-drill blasting on the
lower levels.    The back-fill programme was not as extensive as in 1944, and this also
resulted in more men being available for production.
The accident record of the company showed a marked improvement over 1944 but
it was still far below the enviable position it held during the pre-war years. A great
deal of attention is being paid to the matter of safety and a very complete staff is
maintained under the direction of a safety engineer. Increased attention is being
given to the necessity for shiftbosses and foremen seeing that the men under them
are properly instructed in the safest methods of doing their work. The results of this
will undoubtedly show up in the future in an improved accident record.
Although the general system of ventilation of the underground workings was
not changed materially during 1945, progress was made on a new programme which,
when completed, should provide adequate ventilation throughout the mine. A new
exhaust raise north of the ore-body was started from the 3900 level and completed to
the surface, a total length of 1,115 feet. This raise is now being enlarged from 6 by
16 feet to 12 feet by 16 feet. Two fans, each of 125,000-cubic-foot capacity, are to be
installed at the head of this raise in the spring. In addition to the two main surface
fans at present in use with a total capacity of 158,000 cubic feet per minute, there are
four " booster " fans underground which at present take care of the main ventilation.
Late in 1945 one of the main surface fans, a 96-inch Sheldon aerodynamic driven by a
100-horse-power motor, was destroyed by fire. The fan is to be replaced as soon as
possible, but it is not anticipated that the temporary loss of this unit will be felt
seriously during the winter while a strong natural circulation can be maintained.
Twenty-three auxiliary units, ranging in capacity from 2,000 to 45,000 cubic feet per
minute, are in use underground to provide distribution of air to the more remote parts
of the mine.
• By H. C. Hughes. A 110 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
Dust counts were made regularly every month, and the average for 1945 for the
whole mine was 487 particles per cubic centimetre. This is slightly higher than in
1944. The use of atomizers and sprays is being stressed and dustless-type drifters are
being tried out, four being in operation at the present time.
Development-work done during 1945 included 4,485 feet of drifting and cross-
cutting, 22,160 feet of raising, and 475 feet of sinking. In addition to this, 8,400 feet
of sub-levels were driven for long-hole diamond-drilling and slusher-drift stopes and
164,000 feet of core-drilling was done. Sinking operations to continue the 3360 shaft
below the 3350 level were begun and 20 feet was completed towards the end of 1945.
The shaft, when completed, will serve that part of the mine below the 3350 level.
Present plans are to sink a pilot shaft for a distance of 800 feet at a slope of 38
degrees and to drive the main shaft as a raise from the pilot shaft. The other 455
feet of sinking was done from the surface and comprised the sinking of shafts through
unconsolidated material and rock for back-filling purposes.
New equipment for underground work included two Conway mucking-machines,
ten 90-cubic-foot ore-cars, and six 156-cubic-foot ore-cars. The latter were built in the
company shops in Kimberley. All underground shops at the north end of the mine
were moved to a new location between the north and south end stations. These new
shops, which include accommodation for machinists, electricians, carpenters, drill-
repairers, diamond-drillers, first-aid requirements, and lunch-rooms, all open off a
central haulage-way. The shops have concrete floors and are completely whitewashed
inside, presenting a very attractive and efficient appearance.
In the methods of mining used there was a further increase during 1945 in the
footage drilled with diamond-drills over that drilled with conventional steel and
detachable bits, although the increase was not as marked as in 1944. A total of
1,724,173 feet of hole was drilled in preparing ground for blasting in stopes and
development-work. Of this, 101,000 feet was drilled by conventional steel, 1,186,631
feet by detachable bits, and 436,542 by diamond-drill for blast-hole purposes. A total
of 1,309,300 tons of ore was broken by conventional steel and detachable bits and
1,137,670 tons was broken by diamond-drilling. The number of stopes which are still
being mined by the old method of benching beneath a high back has decreased very
markedly, and now this method is being used chiefly to open up slots for diamond-drill
blasting in the stopes below the 3900 level. A considerable amount of preparation was
made for pillar-extraction above the 3900 level in areas where back-filling had been
completed. The method employed is to drive sub-level slusher-drifts with draw-holes
in the foot-wall below the pillars and connect the draw-holes together to form a slot
for diamond-drilling. The pillar is then mined by a system of diamond-drill hole rings
Vvhich retreat down the foot-wall.
Back-filling operations from the surface were commenced as soon as conditions
permitted in the spring and were continued until about the middle of November.
Back-filling placed during 1945 amounted to 992,990 cubic yards: 916,820 yards from
surface, 34,170 yards from mine waste, and 42,000 yards from caving. The work of
placing concrete bulkheads underground in strategic locations in preparation for next
season's work is being continued.
The new hoist-house, shaft-house, and head-frame for the 3360 shaft are located
a short distance north of the old upper mine townsite. The work was started in the
autumn under contract and the buildings were about half completed by the end of 1945.
During 1945 there was an average of about 1,460 men on the pay-roll. Of these,
about 770 Worked underground, 320 in various capacities on the surface at the mine,
and 370 at the concentrator. The employment situation showed a decided improvement
towards the end of 1945. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 111
Of the total of 2,446,969 tons of ore mined during 1945, 1,264,581 tons came
from above the 3900 level and 1,182,388 tons from below the 3900 level. The proportion
of ore from below the 3900 level has substantially increased over that in 1944.
c.,       ... FIELD.*
Suver-lead-zinc.
(51° 116° S.E.)    Company office, 350 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont; mine
M        .      .     office, Field, B.C.;   J. H. C. Waite, President;   G. C. Ames, Secretary-
Kicking Horse,   Treasurer;   H. D. Forman, Manager;   E. G. Cameron, Mine Superin-
Base Metals     tendent;   John   Vallance,   Mill   Superintendent.    Capital:   3,000,000
Mining Corp.,    shares, no par value;   issued, 2,330,714.    This company operates the
Ltd- Monarch mine on Mount Stephen, south of the Kicking Horse River,
and the Kicking Horse mine on Mount Field, north of the river. The
Kicking Horse mine was operated continuously throughout 1945, supplying the mill
with a total of about 36,000 tons of ore averaging 1.2 per cent, lead and 16.3 per cent,
zinc. Development-work, at this property included 55 feet of drifting and 386 feet of
diamond-drilling. The Monarch mine was operated more or less intermittently but, as
demand for lead increased towards the end of 1945, more attention was concentrated on
this part of the operation. A total of about 11,000 tons, averaging 7% per cent, lead
and 4.3 per cent, zinc, was mined from this property. Development included 42 feet of
drifting in the vicinity of 175 D stope.
The mill was operated continuously throughout 1945 on a two-shift basis six
days a week. An average of sixty-eight men was employed throughout 1945. Present
ore reserves are believed to be sufficient to carry the operation until spring. In the
meantime limited development is being undertaken. A total of 47,777 tons of 2.7 per
cent, lead and 13.5 per cent, zinc ore was milled. Until June 30th all metal was sold
under a contract with Metals Reserve Corporation, but on the expiration of this
contract, new ones were arranged as follows: Zinc concentrates were sold to the
American Zinc Company of Illinois at East St. Louis, 111., and lead concentrates to the
American Smelting and Refining Company, East Helena, Montana. The concentrates
yielded 72,598 oz. of silver, 2,152,007 lb. of lead, and 9,660,898 lb. of zinc.
,     ,   . SKAGIT RIVER.t
Silver-lead-zmc.
(49° 121° S.E.)    G. Allan MacPherson, Manager; A. D. Maclsaac,
I Annex   Mine Superintendent.    The mine is approximately 25 miles south-east
Skagit River      of Hope in the part of the Skagit River area known as 23-Mile Camp.
Development     It is reached from the Skagit River Road by a trail 4 miles long, which
Co., Ltd. climbs   steeply   along  the  north   side   of   Silver   Daisy   Creek.    The
The workings on the property include Nos. 1, 2, and 3, and A and B
adits, together with several open-cuts, all at elevations between 5,890 feet and 5,350 feet.
The work being done on September 10th was surface diamond-drilling.    One hole
had been completed and a second hole was being drilled.    The diamond-drilling was
being done on contract by the D & B Diamond Drilling Company, who had four men
at work.
An aerial tramway approximately 2y2 miles long, of single continuous-wire type,
was used formerly for taking supplies from the lower terminal near the Skagit River,
1 mile south of 23-Mile Camp, to the upper terminal at the mine camp, at an elevation
of approximately 5,100 feet.    This tramway and other surface equipment installed
by former owners reverted to the Crown and were sold to private interests; the present
operators considered such equipment unsatisfactory for use in further development.
The workings of the mine were described in some detail in the Annual Report of
the Minister of Mines for 1938, pages F 23 to F 26.
* By H. C. Hughes.
t By E. R. Hughes. „ ,. RUSKIN.*
Gold.
(49° 122° S.E.)    This company, owned by L. A. Prosser, has a small
L.A.P. Mining Co. operation about % mile up the Stave River from the Ruskin power-
dam.    A crosscut is now in 50 feet from the surface.    The company
expects to reach a vein by driving the crosscut 200 feet farther.   Five men ai'e employed.
HOWE SOUND.*
Copper.
(49° 123° N.E.)    Company office, 730 Fifth Avenue, New York City;
Britannia Mining mine office, Britannia Beach, B.C.;   H. H. Sharpe, President;   C. P.
and Smelting     Charlton, Secretary-Treasurer;   C. P. Browning, General Manager;
Co., Ltd. E. C. Roper, Superintendent. Capital: 100,000 shares, $25 par;
issued, 91,966. This company operates the Britannia mines at
Britannia Beach, Howe Sound. The mines being worked at present are the Victoria,
No. 5, Fairview, Bluff, and 4100-tunnel district, which includes No. 8 shaft. Regular
development operations were hampered greatly because of labour shortage, but towards
the end of 1945 a slight improvement in the employment situation was evident. Development-work in the No. 8 shaft area was carried out methodically and regular stoping
operations were carried on in other parts of the mine.
In the No. 5 and Victoria mines the method of stoping is the square set and in
the Bluff area the powder-blast method is employed.
Development-work at these mines in 1945 totalled 6,079 feet, or 1.15 miles, made
up as follows: Drifts, 2,554 feet; crosscuts, 269 feet; powder-blast workings, 750 feet;
and winzes, 2,506 feet. A total of 6,370 feet of diamond-drilling was done. The total
production of all the mines amounted to 566,500 tons, compared with 606,717 tons
in 1944.
The total production, including copper from the copper precipitation plant, was
11,599,650 lb. of copper, 7,832 oz. of gold, 43,587 oz. of silver, and 9,095 dry tons of
pyrite.
Ventilation and dust-control received careful consideration throughout 1945, and
the aluminium-dispersal units installed in all the dry-rooms in 1944 were used continuously throughout the year.
The experiments carried out in 1944 with dustless Leyner drilling-machines were
considered very satisfactory and the use of these machines was increased in 1945.
A school for training men in timbering, etc., was started in the Victoria mine, and in
the Bluff mine a school for training miners in stoping, drifting, raising, etc., was
started with gratifying results. The men themselves are taking a keen interest in this
work and giving the officials every co-operation.
During 1945 the average number of men employed was 488 and at the end of the
year the total number of men employed underground, on the surface, and in the mill
was 555.
TEXADA ISLAND.
As a result of the success that attended the rehabilitation of the Little Billie mine
by diamond-drilling and underground work, prospectors and prospecting companies
were active on the island during 1945. Several of the larger well-established companies
actively prospected many of the older properties over an area at the north end of the
island extending from the east to the west coasts. The only underground exploration,
other than at the Little Billie, was at the old Marble Bay mine. Elsewhere on the
island work was confined to surface work and to diamond-drilling.
* By James Strang. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 113
Gold.
(49° 124° N.W.)    This property, about 4 miles south-westerly from
Gem.* Vananda, was unwatered and completely examined by an engineer of
the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company in the
summer of 1945.    No other work was done and the shaft was allowed to fill with water.
A watchman is kept on the property.
(49° 124° N.W.)    Company office, 808 Pender Street West, Vancouver,
Red Hawk Gold B.C.;  L. A. Weinrib, President;  Egil Lorntzen in charge of work in
Mines, Ltd.*     1945.    This company owns the R.W. group of six claims and a fraction,
east of the road to Gillies Bay, about 5 miles south-westerly from
Vananda.    It includes in part the showings of the old Red Wing property.    During
1945 trenches and pits were dug on the property.    The showings consist of a few short
fractures in limestone, some mineralized with pyrite and sphalerite and some with
galena and sphalerite.    The gold values are low.
(49°  124° N.W.)    The   Copper   King   Crown-granted   claim   is   on
Copper King.}    Surprise Mountain in the northern part of Texada Island.    A half mile
of road, now overgrown, leads to the showings from a point on the
Iron Mines Road about 4 miles from the town of Vananda.    Most of the work on this
claim was done at the close of the last century.    The claim is held by Berkley Grieve,
of Sandwick, B.C., and his associates.
The showings occur in massive greenstone of the Texada formation. A zone of
slight shearing, striking south 10 to 20 degrees east and dipping 70 degrees eastward,
is exposed in one of the workings.
A shaft, now flooded, said to be 63 feet deep, has been sunk in the greenstones on
or close to the shear-zone. A grab sample from a high-grade dump adjacent to the
shaft assayed:  Gold, nil;  silver, nil; copper, 5.3 per cent.
A short trench, now filled with rubble, lies 50 feet south 30 degrees east of the
shaft. A channel sample from the south end of the trench across 48 inches of sparsely
mineralized greenstone assayed: Gold, 0.02 oz. per ton; silver, 0.2 oz. per ton; and
copper, 0.2 per cent.
A second trench, exposing brecciated and slightly sheared greenstone, lies 60 feet
south 5 degrees east of this trench. This rock is sparsely mineralized with pyrite,
chalcopyrite, and vuggy quartz. A grab sample from the dump assayed: Gold, trace;
copper, 0.8 per cent.
(49° 124° N.W.)    This company, largely financed by the Quebec Gold
Surprise Gold    Mining Corporation, owns several Crown grants on Surprise Mountain
Mines, Ltd.J     on the west side of Texada Island.    Three-quarters of a mile of road,
now overgrown, leads to the Surprise shaft from a point on the Iron
Mines Road about 4 miles from the town of Vananda.
Most of the work on the Surprise claim was done in 1897 and 1898, at which time
the Surprise shaft was sunk. Work during 1945 was concerned mainly with making
a geological survey of the ground and in building a camp. Several of the old trenches
were cleaned out and examined. In the autumn diamond-drilling was begun with the
object of exploring a mineralized shear-zone that averages almost 5 feet in width and
extends for about 3,000 feet north-westerly from the Surprise shaft to the northwestern boundary of the Silver Tip claim. A branch from this shear extends from
near the Surprise shaft northerly to the Nancy Bell shaft. The Surprise shaft, sunk
on the shear-zone, is inclined south-westerly at an angle of 75 degrees.    A drift 8 feet
* By John S. Stevenson.
t By W. H. Mathews.
t By John S. Stevenson and W. H. Mathews. A 114 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
below the collar extends 12 feet north-westerly on the shear which is here 5 feet wide.
The shaft is reported to extend to a depth of 365 feet. It is now flooded to within
a few feet of the top. The rocks are mainly basaltic lava flows which strike northwesterly and dip 10 degrees to 45 degrees north-eastward. A bed of limestone from
8 to 10 feet wide outcrops about 300 feet north-west of the Surprise shaft. The same
bed presumably has been cut by the Nancy Bell shaft. The mineralization in the main,
or Silver Tip, shear consists of narrow' criss-crossing quartz stringers in sheared greenstone. The quartz contains a moderate amount of sphalerite and small amounts of
chalcopyrite and galena. Judging from specimens on the dump, the Nancy Bell shear,
where cut in the shaft, contained an abundance of sphalerite which is almost black and
very fine-grained and dense in texture.    Good values in gold are found in both shears.
Gold-copper.
(49° 124° N.W.)    Company office, 607 Rogers Building, Vancouver,
Little Billie      B.C.;   H. T. James, President;   Chas. R. Cox, Manager.    The Little
Vananda Mining Billie mine is near Vananda, Texada Island.    A detailed report on the
Co., Ltd.*       property was published in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines
for 1944.    During 1945 the shaft was deepened from the 280 to the
480  level.    This  part  of the  shaft has  three  compartments  and  is tightly lagged
throughout.    An exploration drift was driven about 350 feet in a direction south 20
degrees west from the 480 shaft station.    It reached an ore-body revealed by diamond-
drilling from the 280-foot level.    At 130 feet from the shaft the level passed southwesterly from quartz-diorite into cream-coloured garnet rock containing patches of
quartz.    Between 45 and 70 feet south-west of the shaft a strong shear-zone striking
north 35 degrees east was crossed.    This does not appear to be the main fault that is
found in the upper levels.    A total of 444 feet of diamond-drilling was also completed
on the 480-foot level during 1945.    Additions have been made to the power plant and
dumping equipment has been erected at the head-frame.   Twenty-two men are employed
in the whole operation, which includes a small sawmill.
(49° 124° N.W.)    This company has taken over the Marble Bay mine
Marble Bay      from L. A. Prosser.    The old Marble Bay shaft has been unwatered to
Mining Co.f     a point 60 feet below the sixth level and some exploratory diamond-
drilling was done from the fifth level.    Diamond-drilling during 1945,
including a large number of holes drilled from the surface, totalled 8,000 feet.   George
Griffiths is in charge at the mine.    Eight men were employed.
(49°   124°   N.W.)    During  1945  this  old  property,  1  mile  east of
Loyal.:): Blubber Bay and now covered by the Bay-Sun group of claims, was
prospected  by the  International  Mining  Corporation,   85  Richmond
Street West, Toronto, with J. M. Baker in charge.    The ground was thoroughly mapped
and several diamond-drill holes put down.    The results were inconclusive and the work
was suspended in July, 1945.
PORT ALBERNI.t
During 1945 the road up China Creek from Port Alberni to the Havilah mine was
reconditioned. Preliminary exploration of this property was undertaken by Mr. Greene
and associates, of Port Alberni, but it is reported that little besides reconditioning the
camps was accomplished.
Farther down Alberni Canal the road from Underwood Cove was extended beyond
the junction of Museum and Franklin Creeks to the Black Panther mine.    This prop-
* By James Strang and John S. Stevenson.
t By James Strang.
t By John S. Stevenson. METAL-MINING (LODE). A 115
erty is under development by Nitinat Golds, Limited, of 221 Hall Building, Vancouver,
B.C. It is reported that most of the work was confined to road-building and to erecting
a small mill on the property.
The Havilah and Black Panther properties have been fully described in the Annual
Report of the Minister of Mines for 1944, pages 153-154 and pages 157-159.
GREAT CENTRAL LAKE.*
The main activity in this area was the work done by the Cangold Mining and
Exploration Company on the Sherwood property near the headwaters of Drinkwater
Creek. It is understood also that prospectors worked in the area between the headwaters of Drinkwater Creek and Bedwell River.
Gold.
(49° 125° S.W.)    Company office, Credit Foncier Building, Vancouver,
Sh rwood        B.C.;   Robert B. Gayer, Vice-President and Managing Director, Van-
Cangold Mining  couver, B.C.;   Charles Bruder, Secretary-Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.;
and Exploration  E.  H.  Bates, Mines Superintendent.    Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C.,
Co., Ltd.        Limited, did considerable underground work on this property in 1940.
This work has been described fully in Bulletin 13 of the British Columbia Department of Mines, 1941, pages 86-95. Cangold Mining and Exploration Company, Limited, took over the option on the Sherwood property in the early part of 1945.
The property consists of twenty claims and fractions and is located on the headwaters
of Drinkwater Creek, approximately 9 miles by road and trail north-west of the upper
end of Great Central Lake. An old logging-railway grade, extending north-west from
the lake for a distance of 5% miles, was repaired and converted into a well-graded
truck-road. This work included the repairing of several bridges. The company also
ran a location-line, 19,500 feet long, for a road from the end of the railroad grade to
the bottom of the hill below the mine. The camp buildings at the mine were repaired
and an average crew of ten men was employed at the property from May 25th to October 30th. The work undertaken consisted of surface-stripping, surveys for camps,
mill-site, tram-line, and power-site, together with Crown-grant surveys for the claims
held by location. Repair-work was carried on in the lower adit, the raise from No. 7
level to No. 5 level, and the sub-level off No. 5 level; the raise and sub-level were also
surveyed and sampled. Surface-prospecting above the present mine-workings found
outcrops of several new gold-bearing quartz veins. These were discovered late in the
season and remain to be opened up by stripping and trenching.
According to reports the work accomplished during the 1945 season has enabled
the executive to decide on the construction of a 50-ton mill and surface plant to provide
power for further underground development and diamond-drilling. It is expected that
this work will begin as early as possible in 1946.
„ ,, HERBERT ARM.t
Gold.
(49°  125°  S.W.)    Company office, 815 Hastings Street West, Van-
Berton Gold     couver, B.C.;   B. L. Clayton, President and Superintendent;   Russel
Mines, Ltd.     Walker,   Vice-President;    James   E.   Cameron,   Secretary-Treasurer.
Capital:   3,000,000 shares, no par value.    During 1945 Berton Gold
Mines, Limited, acquired the Abco property at the head of Herbert Arm.    Since the
last complete description of the property in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines
for 1935, pages F 40-F 43, it is understood that considerable underground work was
* By John S. Stevenson and James Strang.
t By John S. Stevenson. A 116 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
done by Premier Gold Mines, Limited.    During 1945 the present company did 44 feet
of drifting.    The average number of men employed was two.
ZEBALLOS.*
The producing mines in this area have been closed since 1942 but during this time
watchmen have been kept at the three main producers, Privateer Mine, Limited, Spud
Valley Gold Mines, Limited, and Central Gold Mines, Limited. The road from the town
of Zeballos at the beach to the mines was kept in good condition by the Provincial
Department of Public Works during the shut-down period. Late in October, 1945,
Privateer Mine, Limited, sent a large crew of men to recondition the Privateer and
Prident mines, preparatory to production early in 1946.
Prospectors were active in the area during 1945 and several prospects were being
opened up. However, since the Zeballos mining camp will be fully described in a forthcoming bulletin of the Department of Mines, only brief mention of prospecting activity
will be given here.
At the Beano property Victory Mines, Limited, had a small crew of men, under the
supervision of V. Davies, engaged in building a tram-line from the end of the road to
the mine. The road only recently constructed from the beach to the mine, is 3 miles
long. Victory Mines, Limited, plan to mine and ship high-grade ore from the Beano
early in 1946.
At the Golden Portal, formerly Golden Gate, three men with one machine extended
the drift on the one adit on the property.
At the Barnacle property, on Lime Creek, A. Morod and W. MacLean continued
hand-mining in the drift on their main vein and prospected other showings on the
property.
At the Churchill property, at the headwaters of Lime and P'ault Creeks, S. M. Ray
and J. Foster continued surface-prospecting of a vein carrying values in silver and lead.
At the Cordova property, on Black Sand Creek, R. V. Murphy continued underground work by hand on a strong quartz vein.
At the I.X.L. property, on the north-east side of Spud Creek, V. Davies, owner,
employed one man in driving a drift by hand on a high-grade gold-quartz vein. By the
end of September, 1945, this drift was in about 40 feet.
Gold.
(50° 126° S.W.)    Company office, 602 Stock Exchange Building, Van-
Privateer Mine, couver, B.C.;   D. S. Tait, President;   N. E. McConnell, Managing
Ltd.t Director;   C. Harry Hewat, Manager.    The Privateer mine in Spud
Valley, about 4 miles by road from Zeballos, was reopened during
October, 1945, after being closed down for about two years because of war conditions.
The mine is being put in condition for operating; drifting is being carried on in the
1100 level and preparations are being made to take the water out of the shaft to open
up the 1225 level. The Prident mine, which adjoins the Privateer and is connected to
it by a crosscut and raise, is also operated by the Privateer Company. The 400, 500,
and 600 levels in the Prident are being drifted on, preparatory to blocking out ore for
stoping. It is expected that the mill at the Privateer will be in operation by the end of
February, 1946. Thirty-eight men are employed on the surface and underground at
the two mines. Development-work consisted of 40 feet of crosscutting and 525 feet of
drifting.
* By John S. Stevenson.
t By James Strang. METAL-MINING  (LODE).
A 117
INSPECTION OF METAL MINES.
BY
James Dickson.
PRODUCTION.
The output of metal mines for 1945 was 4,377,722 tons. This tonnage was produced from thirty-six mines, of which twenty-seven produced 100 tons or more.
FATAL ACCIDENTS IN METAL MINES (INCLUDING UNDERGROUND
PLACER-MINING).
There were nine fatal accidents in and around the metal mines and concentrators
in 1945, being an increase of five over 1944. There was one fatality at a surface placer
operation in Atlin and one teamster was killed on the highway near Bralorne. There
were no fatalities in the quarries in 1945. There were 3,683 persons employed under
and above ground in the metal mines and 822 persons in the concentrators in 1945.
The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed was 1.99 compared with
0.87 in 1944.
The tonnage mined per fatal accident during 1945 was 486,413 tons compared with
1,217,439 tons in 1944. The tonnage mined per fatal accident during the last ten-year
period was 504,572 tons.
The following table shows the mines at which fatal accidents occurred during 1945
and the comparative figures for 1944:—
Mine.
No. of Fatal Accidents.
1945.
1944.
1
2
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
9
4
The fatal accident which occurred to Richard Burrows, miner, Copper Mountain
mine, on January 11th, 1945, resulted from a fall of ground while he was barring
down near the top of a short raise which had been idle for some time. He was found
in a semiconscious condition at the foot of the raise where he had rolled or been carried
by a comparatively small amount of loose material. His partner was also found in an
injured condition some distance away, but neither man was able to state what had
occurred.    Burrows died the following day from his injuries.
The fatal accident which occurred to Robert Chimety, miner, Retallack Mines,
Limited, Retallack (Whitewater), on February 8th, 1945, resulted from a fall of ground.
Chimety and his partner had drilled fifteen holes through the slab that fell and injured
both men.    Chimety died while being taken to the hospital at Kaslo.
A fatal accident occurred to Joseph I. Graas, chuteman, Sullivan mine, on February 20th, 1945, when he was struck by a rock while barring at a loading-chute. He
was trying to bar a small rock from the chute when a larger rock came through the
chute and caused him to lose his balance and fall into the car, where the smaller rock
fell on him and killed him instantly.
A fatal accident occurred to Clifford L. de Pencier, trackman, Sullivan mine, on
March 12th, 1945, when he fell through an open dump while trying to pass a standing A 118 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
train by passing along a spill block only 7 inches from the train. He slipped off the
spill block and went down the raise. There was a crossover platform over the dump
and a good footway on the other side of the track.
A fatal accident occurred to Benjamin R. Stuart, tramway lineman, Silbak Premier
Mining Company, on June 2nd, 1945, when he was struck on the head by a piece of
a temporary gin-pole, which was being used to put the aerial tram rope into position.
The pole broke when strained and a falling piece struck Stuart, who died from his
injuries the following day. He had selected the gin-pole himself and after the accident
it was found to be defective because of rot. This accident occurred in Alaskan territory, through which the Silbak Premier tram-line passes.
The fatal accident which occurred to Edvin Benson, placer-miner, Wickstrom,
Sunde, and Benson, Atlin, on July 30th, 1945, resulted from strangulation. Benson
had attempted to enter and repair a stationary water-wheel, feet first, and apparently
his weight was sufficient to cause the wheel to turn before he got completely inside,
with the result that his head was caught on a board outside the wheel and one of the
spokes pressed on his neck with a fatal result.    He was alone at the time.
A fatal accident occurred to Mirko Starcevic, barman, Sullivan mine, on August
27th, 1945, when he was struck and carried down the foot-wall on a 40-degree slope by
moving muck. Starcevic was barring down loose material on the foot-wall and had a
safety-rope with him, but while the rope was securely fastened to an eye-bolt, he had
not secured himself to the rope.
A fatal accident occurred to Frederick Curley, teamster, Bralorne mine, on September 4th, 1945, when he was run over by a run-away team of horses and wagon.
While he was unloading the wagon at the incinerator, the horses took fright and bolted,
causing Curley to fall from the wagon and slightly injure his arm, and the horses and
wagon left the road. Curley went to the near-by hospital and had his arm treated, and
several hours later went back to assist in getting the wagon onto the road. This was
done, but the horses again bolted and Curley, in trying to stop them, was knocked down
and run over, receiving injuries from which he died immediately. After his first
injury, Curley had gone back merely to give instructions to the man who was to handle
the horses while he was recovering.
A fatal accident occurred to James Miron, miner, Bralorne Mines, Limited, on
September 10th, 1945. He was carried down and suffocated by a run of muck which
gave way over a hung-up chute.
The fatal accident to Edward Pearce, mucker, Britannia Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, on October 24th, occurred when he fell in a grizzly through which he had
just barred a large piece of ore. The ore carried his bar with it; he could not release
his hold in time and he was pulled into the grizzly, which discharged through a series
of wing raises for a distance of 250 feet.    Death was apparently instantaneous.
The fatal accident which occurred to Anthony D'Ercole, miner, Bralorne mine, on
December 12th, 1945, resulted from a fall of ground where he was barring down after
blasting. He was pinned down by a heavy slab of rock which had to be lifted by jacks
before he could be released. This was accomplished about half an hour after the
accident, but D'Ercole died before reaching the portal of the mine.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
On January 8th, 1945, a belt pulley on a 245-horse-power Winton engine in the
power-house at the Whitewater mine at Retallack flew apart while the engine was
being tested. The pulley, a new one, 68 inches in diameter with a 24-inch face, was
of the split type and was made of cast iron. One piece tore a hole about 2 feet by 6 feet
in the roof of the power-house and another piece made a small hole in the wall at the
west end.    The normal speed of the engine was 250 revolutions per minute but it was METAL-MINING (LODE). A 119
running at only 150 revolutions per minute when the pulley went to pieces. An
examination of the pieces of the rim of the pulley showed blow-holes and defects in
the casting and a variation in thickness in the rim of % to % of an inch. The pulley
was obviously defective.    No person was injured.
On January 24th, 1945, in No. 2 shaft of Pioneer mine, the west-side cage was
hoisted by error into the upper part of the shaft where heavy overburden had forced
the shaft timbers out of alignment, and at a point above the main adit-level collar.
This upper part of the shaft was not in use, pending repairs. It was not realized that
the cage was hung up until a considerable length of slack rope was payed out on the
west side while the east cage was being hoisted. The vibration of the east cage was
apparently sufficient to free the west cage, which fell to the limit of the slack rope,
at which point the cage was arrested with considerable damage to the shaft timbers,
the cage, and the rope. No person was injured. The shaft was retimbered from the
500-foot level to the surface before the end of 1945.
On February 11th, while one of the storage-battery locomotives was being lowered
in No. 2 shaft, Pioneer mine, the locomotive fouled the shaft timbers and the storage-
battery was thrown into a recess above the 1400-foot station and lodged there. The
cage and locomotive were damaged but no person was injured. Additional precautions
were adopted to prevent a recurrence of this type of mishap.
On May 22nd, 1945, the power-house and power plant of the Whitewater mine at
Retallack was entirely destroyed by fire. The origin of the fire was unknown but there
is no evidence to show that it might have started from the exhausts from the Diesels.
A plentiful supply of water under pressure was available but once the fuel and lubricating oil caught fire nothing could be done. Two of the engines in the power-house were
running at the time.
On August 24th, 1945, the rope raise of the 3901 shaft at the Sullivan mine,
between the collar of the shaft and the head sheave, showed decided evidence of
pressure. This raise was protected by a substantial concrete covering consisting of
two side-walls about 14 inches thick, a centre partition between the Nos. 1 and 2 compartments about 6 inches thick, and an arched concrete slab over the back 12 to 14
inches thick. As the result of pressure from back-fill and possibly ground movements,
the centre partition was completely crushed for a length of about 20 feet and the side-
walls and roof slab, especially on the south side, showed signs of failure. The south
compartment was then solidly filled with concrete for the distance affected, leaving a
small hole through the centre for the hoisting-rope. On September 14th, following a
heavy blast in which some 8,000 tons were broken 300 feet from the shaft, additional
pressure developed in the north compartment. This was then reinforced by 12- by 14-
inch timber for a distance of about 30 feet. There has been no evidence of movement
since that time.
About the 15th of November one of the main ventilating-fans at the Sullivan mine
was completely destroyed by fire. This is a Sheldon aerodynamic 96-inch fan with a
capacity of about 75,000 cubic feet per minute and driven by a 100-horse-power motor.
It is located on the surface at the collar of the No. 14 shaft and is used to exhaust
air from the mine. The fan-blades were broken in a manner which would suggest
that some object had struck them while they were turning at practically full speed.
One of the main bearings of the fan was also badly broken, although an examination
showed that both bearings were well lubricated. There is no definite evidence which
would indicate that the cause of the fire resulted from an electrical or mechanical defect.
The fan is to be replaced as soon as possible.
On November 4th, 1945, in No. 2 shaft, Pioneer mine, the descending east cage
was temporarily arrested by newly installed guides which had swollen to oversize.
The safety-catches also came into action and held the cage, although some 100 feet of A 120 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
slack rope was payed out before the hoistman noticed the absence of the load. No
person was injured and no damage resulted to equipment.
On November 9th, 1945, the cook-house and dining-room at the Lucky Jim mine
at Zincton were completely destroyed by fire. The fire apparently started in the hood
over the stove, where it went through the attic of the cook-house. Although a plentiful
supply of water under pressure was available, the fire could not be brought under
control because of the difficulty of getting at the attic of the building. The recreation-
hall is to be used for temporary cook-house accommodation until the spring.
On November 10th, 1945, in No. 1 shaft, Island Mountain mine, a sump on the
3750 level overflowed and the water ran into the shaft ore-pocket, evidently causing a
surge of ore which forced the lip of the chute to discharge into the shaft. This took
place late in the afternoon shift. When the hoistman came on shift, both skips were
at the surface and he lowered one to the shaft-bottom to put them in balance. When
the other skip was lowered, it fouled the projecting chute and damaged the guides, but
it was held there by the damaged guides, in which the safety-catches were firmly
embedded, and by the chute. About 600 feet of slack rope had been unwound on top
of the skip before this occurrence was discovered and 160 feet of rope at the skip end
had to be cut off because of kinks.    No person was injured.
EXPLOSIVES USED IN MINES.
During 1945 the quantity of explosives used in metal mines and quarries showed
an increase over 1944. The high explosives amounted to 3,677,200 lb.; fuse detonators,
1,151,000; electric detonators, 28,200; delay electric detonators, 6,200; primacord,
135,000 feet; and safety-fuse, 7,315,000 feet.
During 1945 the Inspector of Mines supervised the removal and destruction of
small amounts of explosives found at abandoned properties.
PROSECUTIONS (METALLIFEROUS).
During 1945 there were no prosecutions for infractions of the " Metalliferous
Mines Regulation Act."
AIR-SAMPLING.
Air samples were taken in cases where conditions indicated the possibility of
noxious gases such as carbon monoxide or nitrous oxide being present, or oxygen
content being below normal. The analyses showed no dangerous conditions but in
some cases augmented ventilation was considered necessary and was ordered by the
Inspector.
DUST AND VENTILATION.
The ventilation at all the larger mines and many of the smaller ones continues
to show general improvement as the value of power-produced and controlled ventilation
is recognized. Although there is room for improvement in the case of long single
drifts and raises.    They are receiving attention.
The use of aluminium-dust therapy is now standard practice at all the larger mines
in the Province and, from the reports available, has met with the full approval of the
men employed. Only a few individuals, for various personal reasons, have refused this
treatment and the total of those so objecting is less than a dozen.
The number of the dustless Leyner drills in use has increased during 1945 and
there is little doubt that all machine replacements will be of this type.
The application of water and water sprays on muck-piles and at transfer points
is not only on the increase but the men engaged at these points seem to be imbued with
the value of this precaution instead of merely using the water because the regulations
require it. METAL-MINING  (LODE). A 121
SAFETY AND FIRST-AID WORK.
The Mine Safety Associations in the different mining areas of the Province
carried on and fostered first-aid work and safety education in their respective districts
of Vancouver Island, Britannia, Princeton, East Kootenay, and Bridge River, to
which work the safety engineers at the various mines and the District Inspectors
of Mines added their efforts throughout 1945.
In addition to their other activities, the above associations held first-aid and
safety demonstrations at which not only the men engaged in the mines took part but
also many women, girls, and boys, so that the value of safety and first aid beyond the
immediate needs of the mines is being recognized.
While the success of this work depends very largely on the efforts of the personnel
of the Mine Safety Associations, the Department of Mines, by means of financial grants,
supplies most of the funds required to meet any necessary expenses.
The shortage of labour and the fact that so many of the new men entering the
mines are inexperienced have placed greater responsibility on both management and
experienced workmen to carry on safety education and to keep up the usual proportion
of trained first-aid men. In spite of these difficulties, very good progress has been
made during 1945.  PLACER-MINING.
CONTENTS.
Atlin— PAGE-
Spruce Creek -  123
Ruby Creek . ,_...:  124
Otter Creek '.  124
Boulder Creek . .  124
Consolation Creek  124
McKee Creek  124
Cariboo—
Willow River  124
Big Valley Creek .  125
Williams Creek :  125
Antler Creek  126
Cunningham Creek  126
Lightning Creek  126
Cottonwood River .  126
Quesnel River .  126
Lillooet  127
ATLIN*
During 1945 no new development or increase in production took place and the
large surface operations were idle.
Spruce Creek.
(59° 133° N.W.)    J.   H.   Eastman,   Managing   Director.     Capital:
Dre m New     50,000 shares, $1 par; issued, 50,000.    This is the largest underground
Year' and       placer operation in the district.    The company has a lease or lay from
Shamrock Leases, John W. Noland, which will expire on August 25th,  1946.    Actual
Columbia Devel- mining operations at present are on the Shamrock and New Year
opment, Ltd.    ieases.    Because of the time-limit on the lease, work is being concentrated on the rich section in the centre of the pay-channel, and the B
and J drives which were being advanced outside the pay-channel have been discontinued.
Pillar-extraction is also being carried on by the method described in previous reports.
Haulage is by storage-battery locomotive on B drive.    The company has been short
of labour and has been able to work only one shift, employing thirty-three men.
(59° 133° N.W.)    J. W. Noland, Operator.    During 1945 operations
Dream Lease,    were carried on intermittently, with seldom more than three men
employed.    The work included removing pillars and driving a small
drift for drainage toward workings on the Shamrock lease of Columbia Development,
Limited.    Mr. Noland has also acquired the leases of the Spruce Creek Mining Company, Limited, but has not done any mining on them yet.
Several other leases, each employing one to three men, most of whom were laymen
in partnerships, were worked during 1945.
* By Charles Graham.
123 Ruby Creek.
(59° 133° N.E.)    J. H. Eastman, Managing Director.    Capital: 50,000
_.  , _       shares, $1 par;   issued, 50,000.    This company has taken an option
stone, and      on *ne Gladstone and Graystone leases owned by E. Krumbeigel, and
Redstone Leases, has staked the Redstone lease.    Mr. Krumbeigel had sunk a 7%- by
Columbia Devel- 4%-foot two-compartment shaft to a depth of 141 feet when he was
opment, Ltd.    forced to stop by a lack of finance.    The shaft passes through 133 feet
of lava and penetrates 8 feet into the underlying gravel.    The shaft
was unwatered by two Cornish beam pumps driven by a water-wheel, and the guides
and ladder-way were renewed.
The hoist is gasoline-driven and uses half-inch cable; it has a drum 16 inches
wide and 6 inches in diameter, a cone clutch, and a foot brake. A Canadian blower-
fan with 8-inch discharge, which is belt-driven from the water-wheel, was installed.
(59°   133°   N.E.)    Wickstrom,   Sande,   and   Nelson,   laymen.    The
Farmer Lease,    property, owned by J. W. Noland, has been worked previously by other
laymen.    The present operators were opening up the inclined shaft
and building a shaft-house;   a water-wheel, sluice-boxes, and a flume.    The hoist will
be operated from the water-wheel.
Otter Creek (59° 133° N.E.).
Walter Johnson and Company, of San Francisco, have acquired the property of the
Compagnie Francaise des Mines d'Or du Canada. The ground was tested by Keystone-
drilling during the summer of 1945.
Boulder Creek (59° 133° N.E.).
Lay of Norman Fisher and partners. The property is owned by the Consolidated
Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, and is worked as a lay by Mr.
Fisher and six other men. It is a hydraulic operation, having two runs of water daily,
each lasting from three to four hours.
Consolation Creek (59° 133° N.E.).
This creek runs into Gladys Lake, north-east of Atlin. Men and materials are
flown in or taken up Surprise Lake by boat and over a trail to the creek. During the
spring of 1945 seven men, working in partnership, sunk an 8- by 4-foot shaft to a depth
of 47 feet. They are now on rim and have started to drive up-stream to locate a
channel.
McKee Creek (59° 133° S.W.).
Three groups of two men each are driving drifts into the bench on three leases.
CARIBOO.*
Willow River.
(53°  121°  S.W.)    This private company works the Lowhee placer
Lowhee Mining  mine, situated on Lowhee Creek which empties into Jack of Clubs
Co., Ltd.       Lake at Wells.    The shortage of water resulting from extremely small
snowfall during the winter of 1944-45 curtailed the amount of work
done at this property.    A connection between Lowhee and Stouts Gulches was not
made and the reason for the difference in the bed-rock elevations of the two gulches
still remains unknown.    It was impossible to make a complete clean-up with the result
that production decreased.    It was necessary to put a dam and flush-gate in the ditch to
get intermittent flows of water of sufficient volume to move material through the long
» By J. A. Mitchell. PLACER-MINING. A 125
4-foot flume. It was also necessary to sledge a greater proportion of boulders than
in previous years. J. House, Superintendent, supplied the information that work
began on April 16th and was stopped on October 25th, about 125,000 cubic yards of
gravel having been moved from the pit. The crew consisted of twelve men and a
cook.    The mine was worked on staggered shifts.
(53° 121° S.W.)    J. Chouse, with a new partner, C. Theriault, piped
J. Powell Estate intermittently for six weeks and, despite a shortage of water, removed
Lease. about 7,000 cubic yards of gravel.    The pay-streak is under about 60
feet of gravel, slum, and boulder-clay.    The rest of the season was
spent on maintenance-work.
Other operators within the Willow River drainage-basin are:—
J. Fry, who continued to maintain the Rouchon Creek pit with one other man
and a cook.
C. Risberg, on Kong Foo Creek.
P. McColm, who continued working the shallow ground on the Dr. Hougen lease
at Beaver Pass.
K. K. Langford, who continued with the tunnel started in 1944 at the confluence of
Aura Fina Creek and Tregillus Creek.
Ailport Bros., who sluiced 1,000 cubic yards on their lease on Nelson Creek.
J. J. Gunn, layman on Red Gulch near Wells.
E. Rask, who reported the removal of 3,000 cubic yards on his ground in Devil's
Canyon.
Wm. Hong, who reported piping out 6,000 cubic yards on the Toon Sing Tong claim
on Slough Creek.
Tom Elder, who removed 6,000 cubic yards from his lease on the east shore of
Jack of Clubs Lake.
L. Bedford and K. Huttula, who removed an estimated 1,000 cubic yards by drifting
on the Barton lease in Devil's Canyon.
B. Stoyva, who removed 2,000 cubic yards from the Waldron lease on Burns
Creek.
R. McDougall, who employed five men cleaning up bed-rock in the old Ketch pit
and moved an estimated 15,000 cubic yards of ground.
Big Valley Creek (53° 121° S.W.).*
The Freeport Exploration Company, between June 27th and August 7th, 1945,
drilled a total footage of 542 feet by Keystone drill on Big Valley Creek, on leases
which have now been allowed to lapse. Five holes were drilled in a line across the
valley, the line being 750 feet north of the final post of Lease 4540. The first of these
holes was about 100 feet east of the road and about 500 feet north of the point where
the road crosses Stewart Creek. From this hole the line continues eastward with
holes at intervals of 200 feet. The first hole reached bed-rock at a depth of 38 feet,
the second at 62 feet, the third at 73 feet, the fourth at 109 feet; the fifth hole was
stopped at a depth of 103 feet without reaching bed-rock. The total footage drilled
includes some drilling on holes which were abandoned because of difficulties and were
redrilled.
The material was glacial drift, consisting of silt and boulder-clay, with some sand
and gravel.
Williams Creek.
Operators in this subdivision of the Willow River drainage-basin are:—
J. Marok, who piped 2,000 cubic yards in sniping operations in Stouts Gulch.
R. Sehl and M. Landyga, laymen, who removed 2,000 cubic yards from Mink Gulch.
* Based on information supplied by the company.
I A 126 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1945.
K. Johannson, operating a small monitor on Walker Gulch.
J. J. Curtis, who continued to operate until midsummer on the east side of
Williams Creek opposite the town of Barkerviile.
Antler Creek.
Operators who worked within the Antler Creek drainage-basin include:—
Wm. Moore, who continued to pipe the shallow ground of the Waverly Placers on
Grouse Creek.
N. M. Hansen, on Nugget Gulch.
E. S. Dowsett, on Wolf Creek.
J. A. Sauve, at the junction of Nugget Gulch and Antler Creek.
Guyet Placers, Limited, on Mount Guyet.
C. Bindschedlar, who reported ground-sluicing 55 cubic yards of gravel.
A. Horn and T. Peterson, partners, who reported the removal of 1,200 cubic yards.
J. Doody, on Pinus Creek.
M. A. Anderson, on Eight-mile Lake.
Cunningham Creek.
The leases of Wm. Beamish and D. Jorgenson were both worked.
Lightning Creek.
Operators who worked during 1945 within the Lightning Creek drainage-basin
include :•—
I. I. Felker, who worked his lease on Butcher Bench.
Messrs. Hind and Freeman, who were piping in Grub Gulch.
Mr. and Mrs. L. Biggs, on Houseman Creek.
Magnus Sundburg, on Donovan Creek.
Alfred Brown, who was sinking a shaft at the mouth of Last Chance Creek.
Collins Pacific, Limited (N.P.L.), drilling on Peters Creek.
Mr. and Mrs. B. Carlson, on Angus Creek, adjoining Slade Placers on the west,
who removed 1,300 cubic yards of shallow gravels by piping. They also acquired a
portion of the Slade Placers ground which had been allowed to lapse.
Cottonwood River.
(53° 122° N.W. and S.W.)    These interests have large leaseholdings
A. E. Kent      on  the   Swift  River  and   elsewhere   in  the   Cariboo.    During   1945
Interests.       additional leases were acquired and test-pitting done on leases already
held.    A  large  number  of  test-pits  was  put  down   in   Lost  Valley,
which lies immediately east of the Swift River about 1% miles above its confluence
with the Cottonwood River.    Pits were also sunk along the Swift River just above the
Cottonwood.
Quesnel River.
A. E. Kent Interests.—-(52° 122° N.E.) These interests acquired during 1945 a
special lease on the Quesnel River about 12 miles from Quesnel. Test-pits were sunk
on part of this lease.
(52° 122° N.E.)    Company office, c/o Glenville A. Collins, Royal Bank
North American  Building, Vancouver,  B.C.    This company has acquired  5 miles of
Goldfields, Ltd.   special leases at Beavermouth on the Quesnel River.    A dredge was
under construction during the summer and early autumn.    Machinery
for this dredge was ordered early in 1945 but it was not delivered.    Some repairs were
done on the Quesnel River Road between Dragon Lake and about the Erickson Creek
Hill. PLACER-MINING. A 127
The same company owns a special lease on French Flats, close to Quesnel, and it
has also acquired the old Ashby and Speers property on the North Fork of Quesnel
River.
Lease of P. L. Cameron.—(52° 121° N.W.) This lease is at the mouth of Goose Creek
on the south-east shore of Cariboo Lake. After trying unsuccessfully for several years
to reach the channel up-stream from old workings, the operators attempted to drill it in
1945. It is understood that the drill-hole, which was located about 700 feet from
the lake-shore, went through 21 feet of gravel then glacial clay to 84 feet when the
hole and 60 feet of casing were lost.
Cariboo Northland Mining Co.—(52° 121° N.E.) A. Von Alvensleben, Superintendent.
Work on this company's ground on Cedar Creek was restricted to prospecting.
Several test-pits were put down south-easterly or up-stream from the old showings.
Lease of Adolph Anderson.—(53° 121° N.W.) At this small operation, A. Anderson
continued to shovel into his sluices.
Others working intermittently in the Keithley Creek area during 1945 include:—
E. Lang and G. Stengl, who drifted from the Onward pit in search of a back
channel for the Placer Engineers, Limited, and who spent the summer sniping around
this pit.
W. Hasbrouck and Baker, on Barr Creek where the clean-up was the poorest in
several years.
McGregor and two partners, on upper Keithley Creek.
Cariboo Keithley Placers, drilling on French Snowshoe Creek.
J. Chester, ground-sluicing at Four Mile Creek.
Wm. Olsen, drifting near the old Kitchener pit on lower Keithley Creek.
Oscar Hagen, drifting above Harvey Creek.
Raymond Rawn, drifting beyond Pine Creek.
Albert Sandberg, who was drifting on Duck Creek.
LILLOOET*
Lease of L. Leonard.—(50° 121° N.W.) Mr. Leonard did a considerable amount of
maintenance-work and drove one short tunnel on this property on Sallus Creek. He
also installed 2,500 feet of " V " flume, 140 feet of pipe, and cleared some ground
preparatory to hydraulicking in 1946.
Other leasers who did maintenance-work during 1945 in the Lillooet area
include:—
W. Haylmore, who continued his open-cut work at the mouth of the Hurley River.
C. P. Ashmore, on Tyaughton Creek.
Carl Wihksne