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THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1946

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Full Text

 THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1944, TO MARCH 31ST, 1945
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Ciiaiu.es F. Baxeiei.ii, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1940.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Thirty-first Annual Report
of the Provincial Industrial School for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1945.
G. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1945.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial School for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1944, to
March 31st, 1945.
MAUDE V. FLEMING,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. G. S. PEARSON, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Fleming, Miss Maude V., Superintendent.
Peck, Miss Ayra E., Assistant Superintendent.
Sibbald, Miss Margaret W., Clerk. Schmok, Miss Eleanor, Teacher.
r  PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT.
The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Thirty-first Annual Report
of the Industrial School for Girls from April 1st, 1944, to March 31st, 1945.
The report shows the largest increase of admissions in the history of the
school. At the beginning of the fiscal year there was a total of fifty-three girls
in the school and during this period there were fifty-six admissions. Statistical
reports alone do not give an adequate picture of the increase in the problems
which they bring with them. The largest number of girls came from the age-
group of 16 and 17 years, and this increased the disciplinary problem. There
was a tendency on the part of the older group to dominate the younger group.
With the increase, and no means of segregation, it was very difficult to carry
on a training programme. We had girls of 12 and 13 years of age to whom we
were expected to give the same training as to girls of 17 and 18 years. Younger
girls whose charge was incorrigibility were obliged to mingle twenty-four hours
a day with older girls committed on a more serious charge and of questionable
experience.
From observation and knowledge of the girls sent to us under the " Juvenile
Delinquents Act," it was possible to discover a few contributing causes; the
disruption of the home by the absence of the father in the army, the mother
working in a defence industry and, in some cases, permitting the presence of
another man in the home; moving of the family to a new community and making it necessary for the teen-age girl to attend a new school and find new companions ; a divided home and one parent or both remarried; lack of respect for
parental authority; the apparent lack of moral and religious training; and,
perhaps the most serious of all, the feeling of insecurity in family relationship.
Many of the older girls arrive at the school with bad habits crystallized,
and nothing short of a miracle will change their aim in life. To them we can
hope to provide custodial care only, and at times even this is very difficult. To
make our training programme more effective, we would recommend a closer cooperation between the day-school authorities and social agencies, so that the
young offender, who is usually a truancy problem, may early receive help and
guidance in a controlled environment when it is most needed and not, as is frequently the case, " as a last resort." This policy carried out in an institution
where segregation is possible and an organized effort made to educate parents
to their responsibility, would assist greatly in the solving of this increasing
problem of juvenile delinquency.
The health of the girls has been excellent, with no infectious diseases during the year. On admission, each girl received a physical examination, including chest X-ray, and considerable dentistry was required. There were several
eye examinations and glasses supplied when necessary.
The Child Guidance Clinic gave us regular appointments and all girls who
had not been examined previous to commitment were given an examination.
We appreciate the co-operation and valuable advice given in planning for the
girls during their stay in the school, and later in rehabilitation.
Arrangements were completed for several girls to secure employment on
their release from the school, but there appears to be a great need for more
specialized training, preferably in industry.   As we had no equipment in the Z 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
school to enlarge the scope of our vocational training, efforts were made to enrol
some of the girls in outside courses, but without success.
With the larger rtumber of girls, we found it necessary to organize more
classes of instruction. A class in woodwork in charge of a Pro-Rec instructor
was started and other classes in weaving, knitting, fancy work, and sewing provided other valuable occupation. We plan to hold a bazaar later in the coming
year to dispose of the articles made in these classes. The proceeds will be used
to buy other materials and to supply a donation to the Junior Red Cross Fund,
a branch of which functions in our school. A course in Home Nursing was
given by a staff member of the Victorian Order of Nurses, and a First-aid
course by the Assistant Superintendent of our school. The enthusiasm of the
girls was maintained throughout these courses.
Many of the girls have had very little religious training and in some cases
were unable to state any church affiliation. The usual Protestant service was
held each Sunday afternoon, and we are indebted to representatives of the
Church of England, United Church, Salvation Army, and the Women's Christian Temperance Union for their continued interest and inspiration. During
the early part of the year the Roman Catholics were represented by a Priest
and two sisters, who came for early mass on Sunday, but owing to other calls
on their services this had to be discontinued. Two groups of women continued
their Thursday evening meetings with the Protestant and Roman Catholic girls.
We were fortunate in our entertainment programme in having many
enjoyable musical evenings provided through the courtesy of the Women's Philharmonic Orchestra, the Women's Musical Club, the Salvation Army Junior
Band, and the Lion's Club Orchestra. One of the outstanding and thrilling
events was the introduction of a weekly movie show in the school. This entertainment, made possible through the purchase of a movie projector, shared with
two other Provincial institutions, has favourably affected the school discipline,
as the girls consider it a special privilege that must be maintained by good conduct. A large assortment of records, magazines, books and games were donated
by the pupils of two high schools in the city and other interested friends. At
the Christmas season the Salvation Army and W.C.T.U. provided each girl with
a gift.   We had the usual Christmas tree and other festivities.
In the realm of sport the Pro-Rec instructor was part-time leader in gymnastics, basketball, and baseball. The latter still remains the most popular
game and we believe it is a valuable recreation, not only from a health standpoint, but as a factor in training the emotions.
A change was made in the day dresses of the girls. The blue uniforms
were discarded and coloured patterned prints were introduced. Each girl chose
colours and patterns for two dresses and helped in their making in a sewing
class.
During the year we had several visitors at the school, including members
of the Legislative Assembly, the Women's School for Citizenship, and students
in Social Service and Public Health courses at the University. Their continued
interest in our work here is much appreciated.
In conclusion, to you, sir, to the Deputy Minister, to the Adviser on Social
Welfare Policy, and to the officers of the Public Works Department I wish to
express my gratitude for your courtesy and co-operation during my first year
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
MAUDE V. FLEMING,
Superintendent. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1944-45 Z 9
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF SCHOOL,
MARCH 31st, 1945,
Total inmate-days from April 1st, 1944, to March 31st,
1945         16,272
Per capita cost, one year       $941.70
Per capita cost, one day  2.58
Operating expenditure by voucher—
Salaries    $21,907.49
Cost-of-living bonus       3,519.77
Office and school supplies, etc.—
Postage, office and school supplies      $331.40
Telephone and telegraph        184.89
  516.29
Travelling expenses   554.11
Farm operations   883.49
Furnishings, equipment, etc.       1,308.45
Clothing—
Clothing       $262.45
Boots and shoes         319.78
  582.23
Janitors' supplies         262.37
Fuel, light and water—
Fuel   $1,957.01
Water        286.70
Light and power        541.84
      2,785.55
Provisions—
Groceries  $4,398.92
Meat      1,499.65
Fish        223.00
6,121.57
Medical attendance, medical supplies, and dental cost;—
Medical attendance      $491.25
Medical supplies       228.93
Surgery I         35.00
Dental cost        199.50
  954.68
Good Conduct Fund         351.05
Incidentals and contingencies        1,689.29
Total expenditure for year by voucher  $41,436.34
Maintenance and repairs (expended through Public Works Department)       3,118.92
Inventory, March 31st, 1944 :       1,243.23
$45,798.49
Less board  $2,167.68
Less rent :       470.23
Less inventory, March 31st, 1945     1,156.54
       3,794.45
$42,004.04 Z 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
POPULATION OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1945.
On roll, April 1st, 1944     53
Girls admitted during year April 1st, 1944, to March
31st, 1945      56
109
Released as wards of Juvenile Court   61
Transferred to Essondale Mental Hospital     3
Transferred to Women's Division,  Oakalla  Prison
Farm    11
Transferred to St. Joseph's Hospital     1
.     76
Total in school, March 31st, 1945     33
GIRLS ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1944, TO MARCH 31st, 1945.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Length of Term.
717
718
719
720
721
722
723
724
725
726
727
728
729
730
731
732
733
734
735
736
737
738
739
740
741
742
743
744
745
746
747
748
749
750
751
752
753
754
755
756
757
758
Vancouver, B.C..
Winnipeg, Man..
Central Butte, Sask	
Vermilion, Alta	
Barrhead, Alta	
Somerset, Man	
Balcarres, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Humboldt, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
Edmonton, Alta	
Hillcrest, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A.
Riske Creek, B.C	
Czechoslovakia	
Vancouver, B.C	
Calgary, Alta	
Qu'Appelle, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
Cranbrook, B.C	
Spruce Lake, Sask	
Telkwa, B.C	
Saskatoon, Sask	
Moricetown, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Ocean Falls, B.C	
Alert Bay, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Calgary, Alta	
West Vancouver, B.C	
Budapest, Hungary	
Port Alberni, B.C....	
Trenton, Ont	
Regina, Sask	
Grayson, Sask	
Monarch, Alta	
Shuswap, B.C	
Lloydminster, Sask	
Edmonton, Alta	
Calgary, Alta	
Irish-Scotch	
Scotch-Canadian,   French-Canadian	
Unknown	
Polish-English	
Irish-English	
Belgian-English	
French-Canadian, French-Indian
Scotch, English-American	
English-Spanish	
Polish-English	
Negro	
English-Irish	
Ukrainian-Polish	
English-American	
German-Scotch	
Indian	
Czechoslovakian	
Swedish-Canadian, English	
Scotch-Irish	
German	
Scotch	
Russian-English	
English-Irish	
Indian	
Russian	
Indian	
English-French	
English-Icelandic	
Indian	
Indian	
French-German	
German-Scotch	
Hungarian	
English-Canadian	
Unknown	
English	
Austrian	
German	
Indian	
American	
Polish	
Unknown	
Years.
14
1%
3>/3
3
5
2
7
15
16
3
14
5
2
17
11
17
16
14
7.
2
15
13
3
16
2
16
17
17
18
16
3
16
13
15
3
15
16
5
12
Years.
14
16
15
15
15
17
16
15
16
17
14
15
17
17
11
17
16
14
17
17
15
13
14
16
16
16
17
17
18
1G
17
16
15
15
15
16
17
17
16
17
14
15
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 16, J.D.A., 1908.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.. 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Indefinite.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Indefinite.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Juvenile Delinquents Act, 1929.
Two months.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Indeterminate.
Indefinite.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
1929.
1929.
1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20. J.D.A.,
Indefinite.
Indefinite.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
1929.
1929.
1929.
1929.
1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1944-45
Z 11
GIRLS ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1ST, 1944, TO
MARCH 31ST, 1945.—Continued.
No
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
759
Orville, Wash.,  U.S.A	
Victoria, B.C	
14
12
17
1
3
15
13
15
17
16
15
16
15
16
14
12
17
17
16
15
13
15
17
16
15
16
15
16
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
760
761
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
762
763
Gull Lake, Sask	
French-Canadian	
764
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
765
766
North Vancouver, B.C....
Port Alberni, B.C	
Bulgarian-American	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
767
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
768
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
769
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
770
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
771
North Vancouver, B.C....
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
772
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American (both) 	
Austrian (both) 	
Canadian (both) 	
Czechoslovakian
(both)   	
English  (both)  	
French-Canadian
(both)   _____ 	
German  (both)  	
Hungarian (both) _.
Indian (both) 	
Negro (both)  _'_.
Polish (both) 	
Russian  (both)  	
Scotch (both) 	
Unknown (both) 	
Belgian-English  	
Bulgarian-American
Canadian-American
English-Canadian	
English-American ___
English-French	
English-Icelandic __
English-Irish	
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
8
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
English-Scotch  1
English-Spanish   1
French-Canadian,
French-Indian  1
French-German   1
French, Irish-
American   1
German-Scotch   2
Irish-English  2
Irish-Scotch  2
Italian-American  1
Polish-English   2
Scotch-Canadian,
French-Canadian   .._ 1
Scotch, English-
American   1
Scotch-Irish  1
Scotch-Indian  1
Swedish-Canadian,
English   1
Russian-English   1
Ukrainian-Polish  1
Total  56
WHERE GIRLS WERE BORN.
Alberta  10
British Columbia  29
Manitoba      2
Saskatchewan   10
Ontario      1
Hungary      1
United States     2
Czechoslovakia     1
Total  56 Z 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
AGES OF GIRLS.
12 years   1
13 years   2
14 years   5
15 years   14
16 years   17
17 years   15
18 years     2
Total  56
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Vancouver   36
Victoria      3
North Vancouver      3
Kelowna	
Penticton 	
Williams Lake
Prince Rupert
Clinton 	
Cranbrook 	
Kamloops   1
New Westminster   1
Alert Bay   1
Dawson Creek   1
Langley  1
Cloverdale   1
Smithers   2
Total  56
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
Incorrigibility   18
Sexual immorality  21
Theft  9
Assault  1
Destruction of
property  1
Veneral disease   2
Intoxication in a
public place   2
Intoxication on Indian
Reserve      1
Found without lawful
excuse upon premises specified in a
beer licence      1
Total  56
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929 43
Juvenile    Delinquents
Act, 1929   1
Sec. 16, J.D.A., 1908 _ 1
2 months  1
Indefinite      7
Indeterminate      1
Undefined      2
Total  56
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
United Church  10
Church of England _ 11
Roman Catholic  20
Baptist      4
Protestant     5
Nazarene      2
Lutheran 	
Pentecostal
Presbyterian .
Unity Centre
1
1
1
1
Total  56 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1944-45 Z 13
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  30
Number who have father living, mother dead     5
Number who have mother living, father dead  10
Number who have mother living, father unknown     5
Number who have mother dead, father unknown     2
Number whose parents are unknown     4
Total  56
Of the above, the parents of eight girls are separated; two parents are
divorced; four girls have stepfathers; four girls have stepmothers; and four
girls are adopted.
MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT.
Miss Maude V. Fleming,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following medical report applies to the period from
April 1st, 1944, to March 31st, 1945 :—
Calls made by physician        43
Patients seen by physician, including treatment      369
Complete physical examination       41
Patients treated for Neisser infection       24
Smears taken for Neisser infection         71
Blood taken for Kahn test        44
Girls treated for syphilis         4
Anti-luetic treatments for syphilis        57
Prontylin tablets for Neisser infection (5 grains)  2,160
Urine tests        48
Vaccinations         18
Admitted to General Hospital—
Maternity cases   4
Emergency   2
X-ray for pregnancy  1
Ischio rectal abscess   1
Facial infection   1
Tonsilectomy   1
—       10
Admitted to St. Joseph's Hospital (T.B.)  1
The general health of the girls has been very good.    Each girl on admission receives a complete physical examination.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Mary B. Campbell,
Medical Officer. Z 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
DENTIST'S REPORT.
Miss Maude V. Fleming,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following is the report of dental services rendered at
the Industrial School for Girls during the year ended March 31st, 1945:—
Visits to dentist   10
Number of girls seen  34
Amalgam fillings   40
Porcelain fillings     3
Cement fillings   26
Extractions   52
Cleaning      1
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Stanley McQueen, D.M.D.
GENERAL REPORTS.
Visits to eye specialist  1
Glasses provided  1
Visits to skin specialist    7
Girls treated for skin conditions  3
Admitted to Ward X, General Hospital, for observation.— 4
X-rays at chest clinic  49
Miss Maude V. Fleming,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls, .
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—Following are movements of high school pupils from April
1st, 1944, to March 31st, 1945 :—
On roll April 1st, 1944     4
Enrolled during the year      5
—   9
Grade IX.      8
Grade X.      1
Released or left class     7
On roll March 31st, 1945     2
These girls were enrolled in Government Correspondence Courses and
attention and interest has been good. Owing to the fact that I feel that these
girls, on leaving this institution, make little or no use of their school work,
efforts have been made to provide some form of vocational training for those
girls who must earn their own living and who are mentally equipped to take
such training.    So far these efforts have met with no success.
Ayra E. Peck,
Assistant Superintendent and School-teacher. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1944-45 Z 15
Miss Maude V. Fleming,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—From April 1st, 1944, to March 31st, 1945, there was an
average daily attendance of twelve pupils.
Fourteen pupils were on the roll April, 1944, and during the year twenty-
seven more names were added, making a total of forty-one pupils on the roll—
eight in Grade VIII., twelve in Grade VII., eight in Grade VI., six in Grade V.,
four in Grade IV., two in Grade III., and one in Grade I. Twenty-six of these
were enrolled in a partial course in the Government Elementary Correspondence
School, and the remaining fifteen received individual instruction.
Of those enrolled, fourteen left the school or were withdrawn before completing their course, six are still continuing, and five satisfactorily completed
the prescribed lessons in literature, language, health, spelling, and mathematics.
One Grade VIII. girl completed the course in all subjects..
Eleanor Schmok,
School-teacher.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Mnjest.v.
194C.
405-246-2696 

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