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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Department of Trade and Industry REPORT For the YEAR ended December 31st… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1947

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Trade
and Industry
REPORT
For the Year ended December 31st
1945
printed by
authority of the legislative assembly.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesiy.
1946.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended December 31st, 1945.
ERNEST CRAWFORD CARSON,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Department of Trade and Industry,
Office of the Minister,
Victoria, British Columbia. Honourable Ernest Crawford Carson,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended December 31st, 1945.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
EDWIN G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
for the Year ended December 31st, 1945.
The year 1945, like 1944, was another year of vigorous industrial activity in the
Province. Industrial pay-rolls for 1945 totalled $371,000,000, approximately the same
as for 1944, in spite of the sharp curtailment of purely war-time activities and the
inevitable industrial unrest.
Many industries brought into being by war-time demands were found to be easily
convertible to peace-time requirements and played important parts in the industrial
picture of the year under review.
The housing situation continued to be a major problem, and, while the building
industries benefited substantially, other industries were hampered to some extent by the
lack of accommodation.
Ship-building, as was only to be expected, was drastically affected, but the situation
in that respect will undoubtedly improve as British Columbia is definitely established
as a leading factor in this important major activity. The reputation gained by British
Columbia's shipyards in the war years was outstanding and has earned for the Province
the title of " the Clydeside of Canada."
The construction industry still suffered from a shortage of skilled tradesmen and
essential materials, but a high level was maintained in spite of those handicaps, and it is
expected that this high level will be maintained and increased as men and materials
become increasingly available. The demand for accommodation of all sorts is pressingly
urgent and is one of British Columbia's paramount problems.
The basic industries of the Province have had many difficulties to contend with but
have applied themselves with a keen intelligence, which augurs well for the future.
The secondary industries in all branches faced similar difficulties and applied themselves with the same energy, adaptability, and determination to surmounting them,
with excellent results.
Here it might be appropriate to commend in the highest terms those industrial
leaders who have pointed the path to reconversion with such conspicuous success. The
Department of Trade and Industry feels proud to be associated with them in this effort
and of its modest part in a reconversion movement which has excited the respect and
admiration of the entire Dominion.
Business is moving to British Columbia. The tide of industrial expansion is
definitely flowing towards the West. Everywhere there is a keen desire to be informed
on what British Columbia has to offer, not only from the industrial but from the
investment and settlement angle, and the Department has been conspicuously and very
successfully active in fostering this interest.
Elsewhere in this report is a review of the statistical and advisory services performed during 1945. Studies in the field of foreign trade, interprovincial trade, tourist
trade, cost of living, and industrial development have been advanced; statistical
co-operative efforts between the Department and other Federal or Provincial agencies
have been satisfactorily fulfilled; and numerous special reports have been prepared
and consultative services rendered to other departments of the Provincial Government.
This report also contains highlights of the activities of the Office of the Trade
Commissioner, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, and the British Columbia
Government Travel Bureau. Here the summaries reflect a year of purposeful efforts in
a variety of activities covering a widely diversified field. R 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT.
Interdepartmental Industrial Advisory Committee.
This Committee met frequently during the year to consider industrial problems
which affected various departments of the Government service. The Committee was
extremely helpful in arriving at solutions of these problems and was of material
assistance in furthering industrial development.
The following is the personnel of this Committee:-—
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry (Chairman).
J. V. Fisher, Assistant Deputy Minister of Finance (Vice-Chairman).
R. S. O'Meara, Trade Commissioner, Department of Trade and Industry.
T. L. Sturgess, Administrative Assistant, Department of Trade and Industry.
A. Dixon, Deputy Minister of Public Works.
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
J. Gawthrop, Secretary, Bureau of Post-war Rehabilitation and Reconstruction.
N. Taylor, Superintendent of Lands.
R. Bowering, Public Health Engineer, Provincial Board of Health.
A. Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour.
E. Davis, Comptroller of Water Rights, Water Rights Branch.
J. E. Lane, Deputy Comptroller of Water Rights, Water Rights Branch.
C. D. Orchard, Chief Forester, Forestry Department.
G. Melrose, Assistant Chief Forester, Forestry Department.
J. B. Munro, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
W. H. Robertson, Provincial Horticulturist, Department of Agriculture.
E. MacGinnis, Marketing Commissioner, Department of Agriculture.
W. A. Carrothers, Chairman, Public Utilities Commission.
G. N. Perry, Director, Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of
Trade and Industry.
H. Sargent, Chief Mining Engineer, Department of Mines.
G. Alexander, Assistant Commissioner of Fisheries, Fisheries Department.
A. L. Carruthers, Chief Engineer, Public Works Department.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDUSTRIAL AND SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
COUNCIL.
Under the chairmanship of the Minister of Trade and Industry the Research
Council held monthly meetings at which were considered many problems of vital interest
to industrial advancement within the Province.
Dr. S. E. Maddigan, honour graduate in Physics of the University of British
Columbia who has made an outstanding record in the American research field, was
appointed Director of the Research Council in August. Dr. Maddigan succeeded
Dr. G. M. Shrum, head of the Department of Physics at the University of British
Columbia, who has been serving as Acting Director of the Council.
Industrial advancement is contingent upon scientific research, and it is the hope of
the Government and the Council that industry will take full advantage of the services
which the Council can render and which are available to all branches of industry within
the Province.
The Council acts as a clearance-house which will:—
(1.) Co-ordinate the work of existing and prospective Research Units and
avoid danger of duplication.
(2.) Initiate and channel new research work in all fields of particular interest
to British Columbia. (3.)  Relate this problem to other problems of industrial rehabilitation in the
post-war period.
(4.) Apply results of research to the creation of new industries, actual trade
extension programmes, and relate the work of laboratories and field
units to industrial and market extension of the Province.
The present Board of Management consists of the following personnel:—
Chairman—Hon. E. C. Carson, Minister of Mines and Minister of Trade and
Industry of the Province of British Columbia.
Provincial Government—
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
C. D. Orchard, Chief Forester.
Dominion Government—
Dr. W. E. Cockfield, Bureau of Geology and Topography.
Dr. Neal Carter, Fisheries Experimental Station, Vancouver.
National Research Council—Dr. G. M. Shrum, University of British Columbia.
University of British Columbia—
Dr. R. H. Clark, Professor and head, Department of Chemistry.
Dr. B. Eagles, head of Department of Dairying.
Professor F. A. Forward, Department of Metallurgy.
Industry—■
A. G. DesBrisay, British Columbia Fruit-growers' Association.
S.   J.   Hammitt,   Vice-President,   British   Columbia  Division,   Canadian
Manufacturers' Association.
John A. Humbird, President, Seaboard Lumber Sales Company, Limited,
Vancouver.
Labour—Birt Showier, President, Vancouver, New Westminster, and District
Trades and Labour Council.
TIMBER TRADE EXTENSION WORK.
Due to market and other trade disruptions imposed by war conditions, the British
Columbia Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association maintained only a skeleton
organization. The Department assisted the Association financially solely for the
making of preliminary surveys of post-war possibilities. It seems entirely possible
that interest may be taken by the Dominion Government which will ensure adequate
trade development overseas. The Department of Trade and Industry is keenly and
vitally interested in marketing problems and in the policy which the Dominion Government may adopt.
PLANT VISITS BY DEPARTMENT OFFICIALS AND
PURCHASING AGENTS.
In an effort to assist manufacturers who are engaged in war production to maintain as far as possible their present volume in the post-war period, the Department
requested and received the co-operation of the Purchasing Agents' Association of
British Columbia in the institution of plant visits.
These plant visits are primarily for the purpose of encouraging, by a mutual
exchange of information between buyer and manufacturer, the production of articles
previously imported into British Columbia from outside sources.
NEW INDUSTRIES
During the year under review a consistent effort has been made by the Department
to encourage and foster new industries in the Province. R 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Department has made every effort to bring into the Province a match-factory
and it is confidently expected that a modern plant will be in full production early
in 1946.
It is confidently expected that arrangements will be made in the very near future
for the establishment of a textile plant whose products have been successfully manufactured in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa.
CO-OPERATIVE CONTACTS.
The Department has consistently co-operated with the Boards of Trade, Chambers
of Commerce, and the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and is grateful for the assistance which these organizations have so willingly
and cheerfully provided.
All branches of the Department have continued their constructive contact with the
Agent-General for British Columbia in London, England.
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
Statement of Loans outstanding, December 31st, 1945.
Loans. Interest.
Charles Cormack (Acme Cabinet Works)      $603.47 $2.26
B.C. Livestock Producers Co-operative Association   20,000.00 2,192.34
Canadian Western Woodworkers     8,000.00 	
Gordon Campbell, Ltd  13,369.33 25.74
T. H. Waters & Co  15,407.16 1,908.63 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. R 9
OFFICE OF TRADE COMMISSIONER.
REORGANIZATION.
The Office of Trade Commissioner was created by amendment to the " Department
of Trade and Industry Act," effective April 1st, 1945. The new office replaces the
Bureau of Industrial and Trade Extension and is now charged with the administrative
functions formerly allotted to that Bureau. Provision is made for Administrative
Assistants under " Industries " and " Trade Extension " headings. There is a direct
line of reference for effective co-operation with Ottawa departments for export trade
contracts and for industrial development.
As a unit of the Department of Trade and Industry the office maintains direct
contact with industrial organizations and production units in the Province, acts as a
clearing-house for industrial application of research results, and maintains an industrial liaison with the work of the Provincial Bureau of Post-war Rehabilitation and
Reconstruction throughout the Province.
It co-ordinates the work of head office at Ottawa in the Foreign Trade Service and
the Federal Trade Commissioners abroad for special emphasis on the particular problems of British Columbia. It provides administrative Provincial machinery to act
directly for and on behalf of Ottawa boards in relation to export movement or industrial
development matters of special interest to the Province. In this it carries into a peacetime pattern the war-time liaison duties of the Trade Commissioner in relation to
administrative work of a number of Federal departments. The office thus provides
a direct channel of approach for the British Columbia industrialist to the over-all planning of Ottawa departments and related boards, and organizations under Federal jurisdiction. These approaches are co-ordinated to the work of all local organizations in
every part of the Province.
GENERAL ACTIVITIES.
In the year under review (as in 1944) the Trade Commissioner devoted a great
deal of his time to special activities under industrial rehabilitation, contacts and
surveys, research programmes, and other headings which are covered elsewhere in this
report. In addition, he has again acted throughout the year in special representative
capacity for Ottawa boards and controls, as noted elsewhere in the report.
In addition, the reorganized Office of Trade Commissioner has continued the close
co-operative contacts already established with Federal and Provincial departments for
ordinary trade extension programmes. Contacts with commercial and other organizations in the Province have been consolidated and extended.
CO-OPERATION WITH OTTAWA DEPARTMENTS.
There has been close collaboration with Ottawa offices and with the Trade Commissioners on special duties there. The office has been identified with reorganization
plans at Ottawa, themselves concerned with the establishment of the Foreign Trade
Service, replacing the Commercial Intelligence Service of Canada.
In addition to the Trade Commissioners in the field, the Dominion's Foreign Trade
Service now comprises a largely increased headquarters staff, including Directors of
the Trade Commissioner Service, Export Division, Import Division, Commercial Relations Division, and Trade Publicity Division. Commodity officers have been added
under specialty headings reporting to the Export Division, and a staff of Area Desk
officials report to the Director of the Trade Commissioner Service. At Ottawa all this
work is co-ordinated through the Deputy Minister, Department of Trade and Commerce. R 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In British Columbia it is the function and desire of the Department of Trade and
Industry to bring the results of that co-ordinated effort in the most practical way to
all Provincial interests.
To this end the Trade Commissioner of the Province works directly and closely
with the Commodity Divisions, with particular reference to wood products and other
headings in which British Columbia is concerned. The Department of Trade and
Industry consistently urges the appointment of men fully acquainted with British
Columbia to these positions at Ottawa, and urges continued intimate contact with
industry by encouraging and arranging tours of Ottawa officials from time to time.
It assists in the arrangements for visiting Trade Commissioners on tour and
emphasizes the importance of knowledge of British Columbia conditions in selected
appointments to the Federal Service.
The concept of co-operation with the Department of Trade and Commerce has
detailed objectives of placing emphasis on the British Columbia position:—
(1.)  In regional breakdown of industrial or production surveys.
(2.)  In surveys for potential or actual export capacity.
(3.)  For surveys of selected overseas markets in co-operation with the Trade
Commissioners.
(4.)  In placement of official trade personnel in markets of special interest
to this Province.
(5.)  In surveys of export markets by representatives from industry.
(6.)  In directives to the Commodity Divisions at Ottawa,  under industry
headings, to ensure reference to sources of supply in British Columbia,
to enable the Commodity Divisions to build up their information files,
and to direct inquiries through the most effective channels.
(7.) In directives to the Commercial Relations and Foreign Tariffs Division
for tariff matters affecting British Columbia industry.
(8.) In co-ordinating the import interests of the Province with the work of the
new Import Division, and relating the local phases of import procedure
with the work of the local consulates and the work of the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner Service.
(9.) In attempting to chart an orderly procedure in connection with foreign
purchasing missions at Ottawa in their own relation to the Department
of Trade and Commerce and the Canadian Commercial Corporation.
PLAN OF CONTACTS.
All interchange of information with Trade Commissioners in the field is co-ordinated through the direction of the Divisions at Ottawa.
The Department of Trade and Industry has also continued its constructive contacts
with the Agent-General for British Columbia in London, and correspondence and
follow-up in relation to his industries' surveys and trade inquiries have been handled
in the Trade Commissioner's Office. A special section of this report deals with the
survey made by the Trade Commissioner in the United Kingdom during the year.
The office has again been associated with market problems of interest to other
Provincial departments at Victoria, has co-ordinated its activities with them, and been
associated with distribution of products of interest to them. Examples are again
furnished in movement of seed-potatoes to the United States, in revival of the survey
for pit-prop supplies to the United Kingdom, and in the foodstuff movements to the
United Kingdom Ministry of Food in which the Department of Trade and Industry
has appeared as agent of the Special Products Board but has worked in close co-operation with production departments for surveys prior to placing of the contracts. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. R 11
RECONSTRUCTION CONTACTS.
Many other departments at Ottawa have been included in the scheme of co-operation worked out by the Trade Commissioner's Office. In particular, the complete
facilities of the Department of Trade and Industry were extended to the Regional
Council of the Dominion Department of Reconstruction when it was established in
Vancouver, with the concept that the Federal office might be used as a clearing-house
in presentation of the reconstruction problems under industry headings.
Effective contacts have been maintained with other organizations at Ottawa in the
reconstruction period:—■
(1.)  The  Industrial  Development  Bank  direct,   and  through   its  regional
organization in the Province.
(2.) The Export Credits Insurance Corporation at Ottawa.
(3.) The War Assets Corporation, Montreal, Ottawa, and regional offices.
(4.)  The National Research Council and Departments affected by industrial
research developments.
(5.) The Canadian Commercial Corporation, replacing and consolidating the
work of the Canadian Export Board.
(6.) Purchasing agencies of foreign Governments.
(7.) Residual timber construction and other controls.
The Trade Commissioner has organized and maintained this liaison by personal
contacts in visits to Ottawa, Toronto, and Montreal, and by local assistance to visitors
from Ottawa.    Resident regional representatives have been included in round-table
industrial group meetings convened by the Trade Commissioner and by the Inter-
Departmental Industries Committee, of which the Trade Commissioner is a member.
NEW INDUSTRIES.
Following up its war-time interest in plant establishment or extension for emergency production, the Office has been used effectively in survey for new industrial
establishment after the close of hostilities. Detailed data have been collected for
industrialists, and sources of capital investment have been explored in conjunction with
surveys of natural resources and secondary-industry development:—
(1.) Where the production can find markets on a competitive basis under
post-war and other economic factors.
(2.) Where the cost structure can be defined for competitive production.
(3.) Where proven labour policy, proven adaptability, personal initiative, and
quality can be retained in a continuing production picture for requirements of basic industry in immediate local consumption or for export
markets.
This concept has involved the closest co-operation and survey with central contacts
and existing production units in the primary and secondary industries of the Province.
It has included the arrangements for visits of industrial representatives in itineraries
to explore the potential possibilities in different parts of the Province.    It has included
the regional industrial planning of the Province in co-operation with the Bureau of
Post-war Rehabilitation and Reconstruction.
REGIONAL INDUSTRY COMMITTEES.
In attempting to give all parts of the Province access to co-ordinated efforts of the
office, personal surveys were undertaken during the year by the Trade Commissioner in
the Okanagan and Kootenay areas, with meetings of cross-sections of industries in
those areas and the formation of industrial committees to channel inquiries to the
clearing-house in Victoria, and through this clearing-house to use the broader facilities R 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
provided. The committees themselves are charged with the compilation of industrial
factual data in their areas for presentation and consideration of establishment opportunities which may be presented. The scheme is welded to the effective work of the
Regional Advisory Committees of the Bureau of Post-war Rehabilitation and Reconstruction.
INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH DEVELOPMENTS.
The annual report of 1944 carried a summary of the work of the War Metals
Research Board, which was merged in March, 1945, with the work of the Industrial
and Scientific Research Council under its Mining and Metallurgical Division. The
Trade Commissioner continued as a Director of the War Metals Research Board to the
close of its operations, and the application contracts established were carried into the
new organization.
The Trade Commissioner was appointed a member of the Board of Management, ex officio, British Columbia Industrial and Scientific Research Council, on June
20th, 1945.
The office has been closely identified with the further organization and project
phases of the work of the Council.
Appointed first as convener of the Technical Advisory Committees for the Council
and Chairman of the Technical Advisory Committee on Secondary Industries, the Trade
Commissioner was confirmed during the year as Chairman of the Industries Advisory
Committee. The Director of the Council is ex officio a member of this Committee, and
the Administrative Assistant, Trade Commissioner's Office, is the secretary. The
membership includes:—
The five Chairmen of the Primary Industry Committees of the Council.
Three members from the Canadian Manufacturers' Association.
Two representatives from the Vancouver Board of Trade.
One representative from the Victoria Chamber of Commerce.
One representative from the New Westminster Board of Trade.
One representative-at-large from the Regional Committee, Canadian Chamber
of Commerce.
Work of the Industries Advisory Committee.
The Industries Committee maintains contact with existing primary and secondary
industries of the Province for assistance by the Council in current research problems.
It assists in surveys for new production and assists in further survey of raw materials
where research has indicated possibilities. It seeks to apply research results to
new establishments under secondary-industry headings. It helps to co-ordinate the
machinery of all Government departments, including the Trade Commissioners overseas,
with the Research Council in market surveys and trade extension programmes.
All members of the Committee have assisted towards these main objectives. In
addition, during the year the group was used to form what was unofficially regarded as
an industries panel or central industrial contact in relation to the administrative plans
of the Federal Department of Reconstruction, and a central point for approach to
industrial development and placement problems in the Province. For purposes of
special meetings during the year the concept of usefulness was broadened for this panel
by additional attendance from industry other than Industries Advisory Committee
members by selected representation from banks, power companies, transportation
companies, and regional offices of the Ottawa reconstruction organizations.
Members of the Industries Committee of the Council have been concerned in
application of results under a number of specific headings during the year, including
steps taken towards the promotion of a drug-manufacturing industry—the results from
surveys undertaken by the Special Committee on Marine Plants of Economic Impor- DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. R 13
tance, referred to elsewhere in this report. Application and closer contact with industry
was stressed, in particular, through the Mining and Metallurgical Division of the
Council into the foundry field, and in further extension of the practical work which
was done under physical metallurgy as initiated by the War Metals Research Board.
The Office of Trade Commissioner has interested itself especially in the field
of engineering facilities available in the Province for application of new technical
processes, for exchange of technical information and personnel, and for local uses of
processes worked out in other parts of the world. The Office has undertaken personal
and other surveys in the United Kingdom and elsewhere to broaden contacts for
exchange of this type of information and to relate the work of the Co-ordinating
Council in British Columbia to the larger field of industrial research in other countries.
The whole matter of public relations for the Council has been an objective of the
Industries Committee, to allow all parts of the Province access to the facilities provided
and to encourage the closest contact between industry itself and the staff of the Council
by personal plant visits and by personal contacts with production units in the Province.
Secondary industry is now provided with clearly defined channels to present their
research problems. All members of the Advisory Committee have been urged to use
the machinery of their respective organizations in every way possible to make the work
of the Council known to industry in British Columbia.
SPECIAL EXPORT ENDEAVOUR.
Control of the Peat-moss Industry.
The Trade Commissioner continued to serve as special representative of the Metals
Controller for control of the peat-moss industry to September 1st, 1945, when the main
control was lifted. The residual responsibility in domestic allotments and control of
prices was passed to the Wartime Prices and Trade Board, through the office of the
Feeds Administrator in Vancouver.
From June 15th, 1942, to September 1st, 1945, the consolidated machinery which
was worked out with the Ottawa authorities was used successfully by the Trade Commissioner's Office to control a vital war material, to meet a series of difficulties which
faced the industry, and to allow a gradual resumption of free trading in the export
markets of the United States,
By balanced movement from all sources of supply the Control maintained uninterrupted volume flow to the United States for magnesium requirements until April, 1944,
and from that date to September 1st, 1945, the residual control allowed a smooth
transition to the new problems of the post-war period, leaving the industry in a sound
production and marketing position.
The main objective for control was orderly flow of vital material required for war
purposes, and over a million bales of peat-moss were channeled from the Province for
magnesium requirements. The apparent overproduction so stimulated did not result in
market-flooding when the special demand ceased. On the contrary, the industry during
the last months of 1945, from the new crop as well as residual stocks, was unable to
meet the current export demands.
Special Products Board.
The Trade Commissioner has again acted as agent for the Special Products Board,
with special reference to volume shipments of SO2 fruits to the United Kingdom
Ministry of Food.
Arrangements for movement in 1945 were completed after a series of negotiations
with the departments concerned, including the British Food Mission, the Food Requirements Committee at Ottawa, the Wartime Prices and Trade Board, and the Special R 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Products Board. The Trade Commissioner continued to handle all arrangements in a
consolidated plan to cover collection, ocean space allotment, shipping, and finance from
the time that export allocations were made by the Wartime Prices and Trade Board
during the processing season. Field warehousing was again used to cover interim
financing and delivery was effected on f.o.b. plant basis on 1,345 tons of raspberries
in SO2 solution and 205 tons of greengage-tree fruit-pulp.
United Kingdom Housing and Furniture Survey.
Following dispatch of a sample fir-plywood house to England in 1944 the Trade
Commissioner's Office continued its survey of possibilities in regard to United Kingdom
housing programmes.
Two main difficulties of policy in regard to financing and material remained
unsurmounted and were still apparent at the close of the year, but during November
and December new possibilities were opened by the apparent willingness of the United
Kingdom authorities to consider import licences for a few more sample houses of new
design. There has been further pressure on British Treasury for consideration in the
matter of payments and arrangements for some equable allotment of the material with
due regard to the export lumber quota from the Province. Cedar houses are now under
consideration.
Close liaison has also been maintained with London and Wood Products Division,
Foreign Trade Service, Ottawa, in the matter of knocked-down furniture for the United
Kingdom, and some interest shown by British Columbia manufacturers in a programme
which may be defined during 1946.
SPECIAL UNITED KINGDOM SURVEY.
The Trade Commissioner proceeded to England on October 11th, 1945, and returned
to Canada by air on December 12th, 1945, following intensive survey under selected
headings in the United Kingdom:—
(1.)   Co-ordination of Provincial interests with the general work of the Trade
Commissioners at Canada House.
(2.)  Position of the Province in appointment of Specialist Trade Commissioners by the Federal authorities.
(3.)  Foodstuff movement from the Province, with particular reference to
existing and future channels for movement of canned fish, fresh fruits,
eggs, and fruits in SO2 solution.
(4.)  Possibilities presented by branch plant or licence manufacture.
(5.)  Export timber and housing interests  of the  Province  in the United
Kingdom.
(6.) Industrial research developments.
Immediate consideration will be given to effective formulae under (1) and (2) to
help in placing the necessary emphasis on the particular industrial and trade problems
of the Province in its trade with the United Kingdom.
Under the other headings the following results may be especially noted at the close
of the year:—
(1.) Organization and other contacts with Canadian and United Kingdom
Government Departments, banks, and transportation companies.
(2.) Informal but detailed discussions with the Divisions of the British Ministry of Food, with reports back to industries and suppliers concerned.
(3.) Report to  metal-manufacturing interests,  following  review with the
United Kingdom interests.
! DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. R 15
(4.) Exploration of possibilities for exchange of technical personnel and allotment of manufacturing rights in the engineering industry, with reports
back to the metal-manufacturing industry of the Province, and definite
results already apparent at the close of the year.
(5.) Review of plans for effective co-operation with United Kingdom authorities and other organizations in the matter of United Kingdom exports
to British Columbia.
(6.) Extension of industrial research contacts, with arrangements for visits
of United Kingdom interests on special surveys and for exchange of
information with the British Columbia Industrial and Scientific Research
Council.
During the survey most generous and effective co-operation was provided through
the facilities of the Agent-General for the Province at British Columbia House, and
future plans for trade extension will be welded to the operations of that office.
FEDERATION OF CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE  OF THE
BRITISH EMPIRE.
At the suggestion of the Foreign Trade Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade,
with the approval of the Council and under arrangements with the Canadian Chamber
of Commerce, Montreal, the Trade Commissioner was attached as observer to the
meetings of this Federation in London during October.
The tenor of the discussions and of the committee recommendations can be
regarded as a summary digest of industrial opinion most useful to the Department in
contemplating its position in the trade crisis of the United Kingdom.
VISITING REPRESENTATIVES.
Reference has been made to co-operation extended to foreign purchasing missions,
and the Department has attempted wherever possible to present them with a factual
picture for procurement contacts in the Province, and to weld this with their own relation to the Canadian Commercial Corporation or other organizations charged with the
furtherance of the contracts or supply.
Efforts have been successful, through Trade Commissioners and otherwise, to
induce visiting delegations to extend their visits to include the Province of British
Columbia. In co-operation with the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Boards of
Trade, and other bodies, industrial tours have been arranged for visiting groups, and
supply and other contacts secured for visitors from South Africa, South America,
United Kingdom, and China. Special reference should be made to the arrangements
in connection with the visit of eleven members of the National Resources Commission
of China in May, 1945, and to visits of the British Ministry of Food and the British
Food Mission at Ottawa. The Deputy Minister of Trade and Commerce, Mr. M. W.
Mackenzie, visited the Coast in October, 1945, co-operating fully with the Department
of Trade and Industry, and mention has been made elsewhere of the co-operation
extended to visiting Trade Commissioners and other officials from Ottawa.
Arrangement of itineraries and general public relations contacts have become a
featured service of the Office of Trade Commissioners.
ASSISTANCE TO SMALL INDUSTRY.
The Department finds itself increasingly able to offer practical assistance to small
industry. In its organization stages, and in its exploration of market contacts in
particular, assistance has been given in a great many cases to clear confusion in
approaches to Federal Government Departments or organizations in the search for R 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
equipment or material supplies, in price-fixation problems of the Wartime Prices and
Trade Board, and in advice on financial structure and cost breakdowns. The Department has been specially pleased to give this assistance on a number of occasions to
ex-service men, receiving active co-operation from the Provincial Bureau of Rehabilitation and Reconstruction of the Federal Department of Veterans' Affairs.
MARINE PLANTS SURVEY.
In co-operation with the Research Council and the Department of Fisheries, the
Office of Trade Commissioner has been closely identified with progress made under
surveys of marine plants of economic importance. The Trade Commissioner serves as
a member of the special committee set up in co-operation with the University of British
Columbia and the British Columbia Industrial and Scientific Research Council, and he
has worked in close collaboration with the Provincial Department of Fisheries in the
formation of plans for control of areas and licensing of operations. Actual plant
establishment for production on a commercial basis can be reported in the algin-
producing seaweeds and their by-products. Plans for further intensive surveys under
the gracilaria headings have progressed with the co-operation of a firm in Eastern
Canada, and contact established with industrial interests in the United Kingdom who
proposed to make an intensive survey under algin headings for sources of material
supply and manufacturing possibilities.
CO-OPERATION WITH CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION
AND BOARDS OF TRADE.
The office has continued its effective co-operation with the British Columbia Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, using its branches and sections as main
contacts in its approach to industrial problems and special surveys.
The Department has extended its pattern of co-operation with Boards of Trade
throughout the Province, including central contacts through the Associated Boards of
Trade and activities co-ordinated with the field-work of the Canadian Chamber of
Commerce.
Co-operative contacts have been extended with the Vancouver Board of Trade.
The Trade Commissioner is an executive member of their Transportation and Customs
Bureau, of the Foreign Trade Bureau, and of the B.C. Products and Industrial Bureau.
Advertising and other assistance has been extended in B.C. Products campaigns. The
Foreign Trade Bureau's executive has been used as a clearing-house for discussion of
export problems, and a grant of $3,500 was made during the year to the Transportation
and Customs Bureau under the special heading of assistance in war-time transportation
problems. By this means the Vancouver Board of Trade was able to extend to all
Boards of Trade in the Province its effective cover and assistance on transportation
problems, with particular reference to the restrictions and regulations imposed by the
Transport Controller's Maximum Car Loading Orders. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. R 17
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS.
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics during 1945, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is, as its name
implies, a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: The first
being to provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into
economic questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and to
compile economic statistics of interest to the Province.
In order to carry out these objectives, the Bureau is divided into several sections
dealing with statistical services and one section dealing with economic research. To
ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the policy of
building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who could be relied upon
to perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been the policy to make
the services of the technical personnel continuously available to all other departments
of the Government. In this connection it may be of interest to note that out of four
research assistants who were engaged during the year, three of them, in addition to
their creditable professional training, had general service with the armed forces.
Since other Governmental agencies are also concerned with the collection of statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication
has been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, and
Provincial Secretary. During 1945 the essential statistical services performed for
the other Provincial Departments, as well as for the Department of Trade and Industry,
were maintained. A brief description of the research and statistical services performed during the year has been provided under the appropriate divisions which follow.
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Preliminary statistical returns indicate that business activity in British Columbia
during 1945 continued at a high war-time level. Incomplete returns for 1945 indicate
that the net value of production in the primary and secondary industries amounted to
approximately $561,000,000,* as compared with $569,000,000f in 1944, and $563,951,164*
in 1943.
Among the series showing increases in value in 1945 over 1944, as the following
Table 1 shows, were: Mineral production, forestry production, fishery production,
agricultural production, selected imports, wholesale and retail sales, gasoline sales,
consumption of electric power, sales of life insurance, construction, bank debits, and
the tourist trade. Declines were registered in 1945 by the tonnage of railway freight
loaded in British Columbia, the general employment index, and by the industrial
pay-roll.
* Preliminary estimate of Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
t Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 'R 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1943 and 1944,
with Preliminary Estimates for 1945.
Mining—
Total value of production!	
Gold production1	
Silver production!	
Copper production1	
Lead production1	
Zinc production1	
Coal production1	
Forestry—
Total value of production2	
Timber scaled2	
Paper production2	
Fisheries—
Total value of production6	
Pack of canned salmon3	
Agriculture—
Total value of production4	
Apples—
Total shipments5 6	
Domestic shipments5	
Export shipments6	
External trade—
Export of canned salmon6	
Export of planks and boards, Douglas fir6	
Export of red-cedar shingles6	
Internal trade—
Index of wholesale sales6	
Index of retail sales6	
Department stores	
Food-stores	
Automobile sales, new6	
Gasoline sales6	
Railway freight loaded in British Columbia6	
Consumption of electric power	
Sales of life insurance6	
Construction—
Contracts awarded6	
Value of work performed in construction
industry6	
Building permits issued6	
Finance—
Bank debits6	
Tourist trade—
Automobile entries on sixty-day permits6	
Estimated expenditure  of the  United States
tourists in British Columbia**	
Employment—6
All employment	
Manufacturing....	
Iron and steel products	
Lumber products	
Pulp and paper	
Textile products	
Other manufacturing	
Mining	
Logging	
Construction	
Communication	
Transportation	
Services	
Trade	
Salaries and wages8	
Unit or
Base
Period.
Oz.
Long ton
M.B.M.
Ton
S
Cases
Boxes
Boxes
Boxes
Cwt.
M. ft.
Square
1935-39=100
1935-39 = 100
1935-39 = 100
1935-39 = 100
$
000 gal.
Tons
000 k.w.h.
000 $
000 $
000 S
000 $
000 $
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926 = 100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926 = 100
1926 = 100
1926 = 100
1926=100
1926=100
1943.
65,892,395
239,003
3,858,496
4,971,132
15,214,417
13,405,481
1,821,654
118,434,000
3,078,767
274,722
32,478,632
1,258,221
86,917,546
3,249,473
2,835,074
414,399
591,243
561,141
1,447,990
190.8
161.3
161.5
158.9
1945
Preliminary
Estimates.9
54,923,803
198,065
2,453,293
4,356,070
13,265,886
12,055,328
1,933,639
146,611,000
3,096,333
310,734
34,900,990
1,097,555
97,737,916
7,064,135
3,915,839
3,148,296
540,039
544,899
1,472,958
199.0
174.0
177.1
168.4
86,934
84,383
9,245,155
9,541,029
2,567,830
2,577,000
44,261
44,550
13,803
78,251
7,698
3,297,405
38,724
32,536
31,903
17,538
3,735,622
10,400,000 13,026,000
190.0
273.9
1,057.9
123.6
155.9
195.7
181.7
99.3
133.7
164.7
138.7
111.8
158.3
163.9
1,953,031
185.7
271.4
978.3
127.1
163.7
208.0
196.1
92.6
151.7
110.0
135.2
123.0
171.6
175.7
378,117,554
63,000,000
Not available |   Not available
150,000,000
1,500,000
596,000
612,000
1,635,000
226.5
190.7
194.4
182.4
Not available
91,000
8,399,597
2,811,000
58,000
38,033
24,672
4,416,364
107,506
22,000,000
174.3
242.3
737.3
129.4
168.1
204.2
202.1
88.7
147.7
100.4
141.9
128.7
188.3
186.3
368,000,000
1 British Columbia Department of Mines.
2 British Columbia Department of Lands, Forest Branch.
3 British Columbia Department of Fisheries.
4 British Columbia Department of Agriculture.
5 British Columbia Tree Fruit Board.
6 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
7 Bureau of Economics and Statistics, preliminary estimate;
8 Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Labour Division.
9 1945 statistics are subject to revision.
1945, Dominion Bureau of Statistics estimate. THE RESEARCH DIVISION.
Occupational Survey of Public School Students.
The occupational survey of students leaving Grades VIII. to XIII., which the
Bureau has conducted annually since 1938, in collaboration with the Department of
Education, School Boards, and teachers throughout the Province, was suspended in
1945. In co-operation with the Director of Vocational Guidance, it will be resumed
in 1946. The objective of this survey will be to ascertain the probable number leaving
school and the nature of the occupations or special training which the students will
likely seek.
The External Trade of British Columbia.
The agreement between this Bureau and the External Trade Branch, Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, consummated in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under
this agreement the Bureau receives monthly a duplicate set of punch-cards (I.B.M.),
showing in detail the importation and exportation of every commodity normally listed
in the Federal trade reports which has been recorded at customs ports located in this
Province. While these records do not distinguish the exported merchandise originating
in British Columbia, nor the imports destined for consumption in this Province, from
the other goods passing through these customs ports, the records do provide the basis
for a very comprehensive annual report on the foreign trade of British Columbia.
Although the publication of this annual report was suspended, as a precautionary
measure, during the war period, the statistics have been compiled and will shortly be
available for general distribution.
In order to expedite the release of these statistics, a new departure was introduced
in 1945; a special quarterly report showing the quantity and value of all exports and
imports passing through customs ports in this Province was made available to interested
Boards of Trade and other central business agencies.
A brief insight into the foreign trade of British Columbia during the war period,
1939 to 1945, can be secured from Tables 2 and 3. Only the main commodity groups
have been set forth in these tables.
From Table 2 it may be seen that the value of exports from British Columbia rose
from $111,995,458 in 1939 to $221,061,595 in 1942, subsequently decreasing to $199,-
796,763 in 1943 and $179,586,138 in 1944. A very significant factor in this increase
over pre-war levels was, of course, the outward movement of goods directly and indirectly
on war account. From Table 3 it may be seen that the value of imports, roughly
corrected for consumption in British Columbia, increased from $57,608,209 in 1939 to
$118,306,367 in 1944.
Changes also occurred in the direction of British Columbia's foreign trade between
1939 and 1944. In 1939 the eight principal markets for British Columbia exports were:
United Kingdom ($43,480,392), United States ($37,968,762), Australia ($8,517,922),
Japan ($8,396,891), British South Africa ($2,385,634), Hawaii ($1,548,717), China
($1,099,948), and New Zealand ($932,243). In 1944 the order of the eight leading
export markets had become: United States ($107,498,262), United Kingdom ($45,463,-
306), Australia ($6,905,615), Russia ($5,487,959), British South Africa ($3,157,534),
British India ($2,944,309), New Zealand ($2,241,640), and Hawaii ($1,782,712). The
leading sources of supply for British Columbia's importers in 1939 were: United States
($35,709,929), United Kingdom ($10,575,617), Fiji Islands ($2,777,401), British India
($2,271,833), Japan ($1,696,229), Australia ($1,426,755), China ($837,194), and
Hongkong ($645,391). In 1944 the order of the leading supply countries had become:
United States ($95,311,231), United Kingdom ($6,525,729), Fiji Islands ($3,627,732),
British India ($2,502,724), Colombia ($2,295,367), New Zealand ($2,260,864), Australia
($2,019,088), and Salvador ($915,474). R 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 2.-—Exports, by Commodity Groups, to the British Empire and Foreign Countries
of British Columbia Products for the Years 1939-44, inclusive* (excluding Gold).
Commodity Groups.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.T
$7,649,538
13,345,446
69,234
57,924,968
392,664
26,620,036
1,500,717
4,073,297
419,558
$5,507,659
13,709,207
61,304
70,033,016
$6,250,457
19,443,919
99,396
79,970,695
258,805
25,739,720
1,079,876
4,632,100
385,612
$5,053,056
21,821,813
17,162
73,101,882
189,452
24,721,731
1,740,118
4,528,284
89,888,097
$5,650,527
18,983,186
. 2,983
63,598,853
29,376
20,605,359
2,818,156
9,448,812
78,659,511
$12,848,393
20,019,322
3,209
73,415,257
93,477
28,398,195
1,046,159
4,666,574
317,387
12,784,917
Non-metallic minerals and products
2,990,976
11,532,206
45,898,381
$111,995,458
$123,739,501
$137,860,580
$221,061,595
$199,796,763
$179,586,138
* Includes exports through all Canadian ports in the case of some products that are considered to be of British
Columbia origin.    Revised since previous report.
t Subject to revision.
Table 3.—Imports, by Commodity Groups, from the British Empire and Foreign
Countries consumed in British Columbia for the Years 1939-^4, inclusive (excluding Gold).
Commodity Groups.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.*
Agricultural and vegetable products—
For food	
$10,269,130
2,411,755
1,783,892
4,091,659
2,734,391
11,357,845
1,559,555
13,379,199
2,680,118
7,340,665
$12,282,748
2,196,801
1,928,446
5,282,890
2,604,305
15,904,235
2,036,435
12,964,458
3,033,542
4,403,428
$13,790,081
2,428,120
2,022,253
7,479,958
1,896,424
21,977,217
3,364,231
11,955,293
3,673,680
7,757,781
$12,487,642
2,218,636
1,785,268
7,425,206
1,867,016
23,170,285
3,324,563
13,986,282
2,968,607
18,060,620
$15,498,517
1,787,668
2,186,339
9,925,429
1,926,527
28,720,045
6,507,617
14,526,163
3,047,827
32,949,355
$19,333,362
1,884,698
1,828,709
6,153,460
2,341,873
22,932,002
4,620,713
17,318,340
3,404,161
38,489,049
Non-metallic minerals and products
$57,608,209
$62,637,288
$76,345,038
$87,294,125
$117,075,487
$118,306,367
* Subject to revision.
The Study of Interprovincial Trade.
An accurate knowledge of the international and interprovincial trade is fundamental to any serious study of economic development. While the Bureau, through the
co-operation of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, has been able to secure a fairly
accurate record of the external trade of the Province, it has not been possible to accomplish the same results in the field of interprovincial trade statistics. The search has
been continued for a method of securing interprovincial trade data with least irritation
to the shipping public.
The possibility of using bills of lading, or way-bills, as a medium for the purpose
of recording interprovincial trade has received attention during the past year. In
January, 1945, through the courtesy of the Vancouver Board of Trade, Transportation
and Customs Bureau, E. C. Carson, Minister of Trade and Industry; E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister; and G. Neil Perry, Director, held a conference with some
thirty or forty leading shippers. At this meeting the question of placing a
value on the way-bill was raised and the members asked for their comments—usually,
of course, values do not appear on a railway bill of lading. While there were some
speakers who thought that it would be difficult for them to place a value upon the DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. R 21
commodities listed on the way-bill, there were others who considered that if it were
necessary, they could add this information. In March four members of the research
staff of this Bureau made an intensive survey of pool-car and L.C.L. movements to
and from the City of Vancouver. Some 15,000 less-than-carload (L.C.L.) bills of
lading and some 4,000 pool-car way-bills were examined at that time. Through the
courtesy of certain pool-car shippers in Vancouver, the entire incoming and outgoing
business for the year 1943 of these firms was studied. Much of the information collected on that occasion has since been carefully sorted and tabulated. The purpose of
this research-work has been to secure a proper factual basis for any further attempts
which may be made to obtain interprovincial trade statistics, either by the method of
tabulating way-bills or by some other means.
The Cost of Living in British Columbia.
Since 1936 the Bureau has compiled an index of food prices in fifty-two cities,
towns, and villages for the private use of the Provincial Secretary's Department and
the Department of Labour. In 1939 this food index was supplemented by a new
monthly full cost-of-living index, which included clothing, rentals, fuel, and other
essential household items in the four Coast cities of Vancouver, New Westminster,
Victoria, and Nanaimo. Under arrangements sponsored by the Provincial Department
of Labour, this full cost-of-living index was for a time used as a cost-of-living barometer
by a number of British Columbia Coast firms until the Dominion Wartime Wages and
Cost-of-living Bonus Order made the use of the all-Canada index, prepared by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, mandatory throughout Canada.
The food index measures the change in prices as they occur in the case of forty-
six selected food items, forming a scientifically tested budget. The food budget
adopted was modelled on the plan of the Sub-committee on Nutrition, British Commonwealth Scientific Conference, Ottawa, 1936; this represented the best-informed opinion
available at the time the food index was created in 1936. More recent advances on
nutrition would probably modify the list of foods originally chosen; for statistical
purposes, however, the food budget is still informative. The budget contains sufficient
quantities of staple foods to maintain in good health for one month a family of five, of
which two are adults, one an infant—6 months to 1 year old, and one a child—6 years
to 10 years old, and one a child—11 years to 13 years old.
The monthly full cost-of-living index, prepared for the Coast area only, covers
approximately 64 per cent, of the expenditures made by an average British Columbia
family in receipt of an income between $1,200 and $1,400 a year.*
The index is made up as follows:— Per Cent.
Food     44.05
Rent     25.25
Clothing     14.93
Fuel       5.37
Furniture        2.59
Kitchen equipment       2.39
Electricity      2.13
Textiles, household       1.99
Water      1.30
Total  100.00
Rationing, shortages, fixed rents, and a housing shortage, as well as other war-time
effects, have somewhat reduced the value of the cost-of-living concept.    As a general
* Based on a survey conducted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in Vancouver, in 1938. R 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
guide to price trends in a field of particular concern to consumers, the concept still
serves a useful purpose; considered in this sense, Table 4, which shows a comparison of
Dominion and Provincial indexes over the period September, 1940, to February, 1946,
can be informative.
Table 4-—The Cost of Living in Canada and in British Columbia.
For comparative purposes only, the Dominion and Provincial cost-of-living indexes
have been translated to the same base period, 1936 = 100.*
Caution.—These indexes do not measure the difference in the actual dollar cost of
living between British Columbia and Canada as a whole. They show only the extent
to which the cost of living in British Columbia, or in Canada, has varied from the
average cost of living in that area during 1936.
Full Cost-of-living Index.
Food Index.
Canada.*
British
Columbia
Coast Area.f
Canada.*
British
Columbia, t
1940—
First
of Month.
108.46
109.07
109.89
110.09
110.40
110.30
110.30
110.70
111.52
112.64
114.07
115.90
116.92
117.74
118.55
118.04
117.64
117.94
118.14
118.14
118.35
118.96
120.18
119.98
119.67
120.08
120.90
121.10
Fifteenth
of Month.
107.02
107.84
108.58
108.79
108.66
109.33
110.21
111.38
111.57
113.79
114.08
115.83
116.89
118.11
119.74
118.52
118.33
119.40
120.23
First
of Month.
107.77
108.49
111.15
111.55
112.17
111.25
111.45
112.58
112.17
115.03
119.22
124.03
126.07
125.97
128.22
126.58
125.05
125.87
126.48
126.48
127.10
129.04
133.23
132.52
131.39
132.72
135.38
135.79
Fifteenth
of Month.
103.33
104.92
106.30
107.39
1941—
107.03
108.93
109.02
111.42
111.81
116.09
July                                     	
117 07
120.55
121.10
October _	
November	
121.24
123.93
121.57
1942—
122.55
May	
June	
120.72
125.12
July	
121.92
October	
125.33
134.63
* The Dominion Bureau of Statistics index is actually compiled on the basis of 1935-39=100. These figures
have been translated into terms of 1936=100 for the comparative purposes only. See the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, " Prices and Price Indexes," for actual figures used.
t Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for four Coast cities of Vancouver, New Westminster,
Nanaimo, and Victoria.
t Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for fifty-two centres in the Province.
Note.—Since May 15th, 1942, the cost-of-living index and the food index of British Columbia have been compiled quarterly, giving statements in March, June, September, and December, whereas prior to this date monthly
figures were given. Since February 15th, 1945, the cost-of-living figures and the food index for British Columbia
have been compiled quarterly, giving statements in February, May, August, and November. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
R 23
Table 4.—The Cost of Living in Canada and in British Columbia—Continued.
Full Cost-of
-living Index.
Food Index.
Canada.*
British
Columbia
Coast Area.f
Canada.*
British
Columbia, t
1943—
First
of Month.
119.37
119.16
119.47
120.39
120.39
120.80
121.10
121.51
121.71
121.61
121.71
121.61
121.30
121.20
121.30
121.41
121.51
121.30
121.30
121.20
121.10
120.90
121.20
120.80
120.90
120.90
121.00
121.00
121.30
121.90
122.60
122.80
122.20
122.00
122.20
122.43
122.20
122.20
Fifteenth
of Month.
First
of Month.
130.16
129.55
130.57
132.82
132.82
133.84
134.76
136.20
136.50
135.90
136.09
135.69
134.46
133.84
134.05
134.46
134.66
134.05
134.97
134.46
134.15
133.74
134.56
133.23
133.13
133.54
133.95
133.95
134.66
136.40
138.65
139.26
137.22
136.30
137.01
137.32
•   135.79
135.48
Fifteenth
of Month.
126.01
134.19
April	
June	
July       .                  	
126.24
135.46
124.74
132.45
December	
1944—
124.54
132.05
122.89
128.28
June	
July	
122.91
128.39
123.15
128.06
December.	
1945—
121.99
129.81
122.33
131.90
May	
122.55
133.27
July	
August	
123.10
135.11
November	
122.94
133.82
1946—
February	
122.18
131.27
* The Dominion Bureau of Statistics index is actually compiled on the basis of 1935-39=100. These figures
have been translated into terms of 1936=100 for the comparative purposes only. See the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, " Prices and Price Indexes," for actual figures used.
f Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for four Coast cities of Vancouver, New "Westminster,
Nanaimo, and Victoria.
t Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for fifty-two centres in the Province.
Note.—Since May 15th, 1942, the cost-of-living index and the food index of British Columbia have been compiled quarterly, giving statements in March, June, September, and December, whereas prior to this date monthly
figures were given. Since February 15th, 1945, the cost-of-living figures and the food index for British Columbia
have been compiled Quarterly, giving statements in February, May, August, and November. R 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Tourist Trade.
No special investigations in the field of tourist expenditures during 1945 were
attempted. The Dominion Bureau of Statistics, in its publication " Canada's International Tourist Trade, 1945," has presented its latest estimate of the expenditures in
Canada of travellers from the United States as: 1941, $107,000,000; 1942, $79,000,000;
1943, $87,000,000; 1944, $116,600,000; and 1945, $164,400,000. In 1941 this Bureau,
after a careful investigation, estimated that United States travellers had expended
$12,769,000 in British Columbia; and assuming the all-Canada trend—as shown by the
Dominion Bureau figures above—to be also true of British Columbia, purely tentative
estimates have been found for 1942, 1943, and 1944 as follows: 1942, $9,430,000; 1943,
$10,400,000; 1944, $13,026,000. The International Payments Branch of the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics has estimated that United States travellers expended $22,000,000
in British Columbia during 1945.
As Table 5 shows, a war-time decrease in automobile tourist traffic has been offset
by an increase in the number of travellers coming by rail, steamer, and bus. Following
the practice established in earlier reports, American tourists visiting the Province by
automobile in 1944, according to their respective State-origins in the United States,
have been listed in Chart 1.
Table 5.—Entries into British Columbia of Tourists from the United States,
Classified by Types of Traffic.
(Automobile traffic statistics indicate number of automobiles only; all other types
of traffic indicate number of travellers.)
Types of Traffic.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1945.
I. Automobile  traffic   (number  of
automobiles and other vehicles) :
(1.) Non-permit class—localtraffic.
(2.) Traveller's vehicle permit	
(3.)   Commercial vehicles	
II. Rail traffic (number of travellers)..
III. Boat traffic (number of travellers).
IV. Bus trafficf (number of travellers)..
V. Aeroplane traffic (number of travellers )	
42,635
117,869
35,520
102,903
46,701
113,862
36,743
147,417
43,179
92,278
... .*
27,275
108,293
11,728
58,298
92,048
5,478
27,756
128,003
16,701
6,386
36,223
55,947
6,179
36,360
76,091
18,445
4,417
27,547
38,724
4,140
71,523
131,082
21,202
6,309
31,197
51,280
3,697
67,864
173,325
23,536
7,059
41,102
107,506
6,298
60,987
176,949
31,740
12,304
* Not available.
t Exclusive of local bus traffic between border communities.
Source : Canada, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, " Canada's International Tourist Trade.' DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
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O R 26 • BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Manufacturers' Handbooks.
To assist manufacturers and others contemplating investment or an expansion of
their plant facilities in this Province, the Bureau has been engaged in the preparation
of three handbooks. The first of these, the Trade Index of British Columbia, 1945
edition, was released at the end of the year. This booklet contains a list of nearly all
products at present being manufactured in British Columbia.
The second handbook, entitled " British Columbia as a Market," is now in the final
stages of preparation. It has been constructed in such a way that both those who
already possess an intimate knowledge of the Province and those who are less well
acquainted with the region will be able to form reasonable judgments about such
questions as:—
(1.) How many customers are there in British Columbia?
(2.) Where do they live?
(3.) What are their characteristics?
(4.)  How much money have they to spend?
(5.)  How have they spent their incomes in the past?
(6.)  How many distributers serve their needs?
(7.) How many local producers supply the market?
(8.) What climatic and geographical factors affect the market?
The third booklet, entitled " British Columbia as a Site for Manufacturing," has
been delayed in preparation because of the demands made upon our research staff.
The purpose of this publication is to provide a convenient reference on such topics as
taxation, labour conditions, wage-rates, freight-rates, incorporation, and general
information of interest to the manufacturer who is trying to appraise British Columbia
as a possible location for his plant.
Railway Freight Investigation.
The Bureau was directed, in the spring of 1945, to examine some of the complaints
registered against certain aspects of the current railway freight tariffs in this Province.
Although the study has suffered frequent interruptions because of work arising from
the Dominion-Provincial Conference in Reconstruction (1945-46), a promising start
has been made. Under the " Railway Act" all disputes dealing with the railway
freight-rate structure must be presented to the Board of Transport Commissioners.
As a logical first step in the investigation, attention was directed to the Judgments of
this Board, and the general problem of establishing " unjust discrimination " considered. Further studies into the effects of the " mountain differential" and other
alleged discriminations are in progress.
Dominion-Provincial Relations.
Since the spring of 1945 the Director, Mr. G. Neil Perry, has been attached to the
Office of the Premier as Economic Adviser on Dominion-Provincial Relations. To
assist Mr. Perry in the work of analysing the proposals submitted to all Provinces by
the Dominion Government, as well as to assist in the preparation of the Dominion-
Provincial Conference on Reconstruction in August, a small research staff was loaned
by the Bureau. In the course of this work the eminent economist and outstanding
authority on monetary and fiscal policy, Professor Alvin H. Hansen, of Harvard
University, was associated for a short time as a special consultant with the Provincial
committee.
Advisory Services and Other Reports.
While it is customary for the Bureau to have some members of its research staff
temporarily on loan to other branches of the Government, there has been more of this DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY. R 27
during 1945 than usual. In addition to the assistance provided in connection with the
work on Dominion-Provincial Relations previously described, members of the Research
. Division were loaned to the Chairman of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Investigating Committee, as well as to the Royal Commission on Provincial-Municipal Relations.
The Bureau has prepared also numerous special reports and memoranda for members
of the Executive Council and for officials of other departments.
Services of a statistical nature have been freely extended to both governmental and
private agencies on a wide variety of subjects. A large number of special compilations
for corporations and private individuals were made in response to written inquiries.
New Co-operative Statistical Agreements.
Negotiations have been under way with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in
connection with two new statistical agreements. First, the Dominion Bureau has
desired to arrange for the collection of monthly statistics from sawmills in this
Province—the information is currently collected in all Provinces except British
Columbia—and, in collaboration with responsible trade associations, a series of discussions have been held to discover the best means of collecting the needed data with least
inconvenience to the operators. Second, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics has
requested the Dominion Bureau of Statistics to collect the Census of Industry—
a statistical schedule presently completed by all industries in the Province and showing
production, investment, and other important statistics—in duplicate; by this device,
valuable information which, though needed for analytical work within the Bureau, has
not hitherto been available without duplicating the efforts of the Dominion Bureau,
will be made available—it is hoped early in 1946—without inconvenience to the
affected firms.
THE LABOUR STATISTICS DIVISION.
In accordance with an agreement concluded in 1938 between the Provincial Department of Labour and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, the Labour Statistics
Division conducted and compiled the 1944 statistical survey of wage-earners employed
in British Columbia trades and industries, a summary of which may be found in the
statistical sections of the Annual Report of the Department of Labour for 1944. In
addition to the work performed for the Department of Labour, numerous special
compilations were prepared for Boards of Trade, other Provincial Departments, and
other agencies. The records maintained in this Division have again proved to be of
valuable assistance to the Bureau in connection with the publication of the British
Columbia Trade Index, and as a source of important information for many research
projects in the field of labour problems.
Table 6, prepared in this Division with the assistance of the Mechanical Tabulation
Division, showing the changes in the industrial pay-roll in different parts of the
Province, has been attached to the report because of the general interest in this
question. The industrial pay-roll—fully described in the Annual Report of the Department of Labour—does not represent the total of all salaries and wages paid in British
Columbia. Among the principal omissions are salaries paid by: Dominion, Provincial,
and municipal governments; railways; wholesale and retail firms; financial houses;
professional and service trades. The industrial pay-roll does, however, include the
salaries and wages paid by firms engaged in primary and secondary processing. In
Table 6 the industrial pay-roll has been distributed according to the ten census divisions
(see Chart 2) for the war period 1939 to 1944. R 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 6.— British Columbia Industrial Pay-rolls by Statistical Areas
for the Comparative Years 1939 to 1944.*
Total Pay-rolls (Salaries
and Wages).
Regional Area.
1939.
1940.
1942.
1943.
1944.
No.   1                      	
$4,051,274
9,939,869
6,399,693
65,272,318
27,406,458
2,469,615
5,999,251
2,150,318
3,379,496
46,389
196,342
$4,885,906
10,775,413
5,623,024
73,989,325
30,367,461
2,400,820
7,878,134
2,497,213
4,938,625
96,439
383,203
$6,691,409
14,123,678
6,625,010
148,755,033
45,788,391
2,824,045
8,724,559
5,296,378
9,867,845
1,664,771
1,685,270
$7,151,250
15,561,173
6,763,085
185,947,943
55,800,769
2,517,767
8,527,530
7,453,342
12,096,884
8,193,263
1,393,314
$8,374,558
No.   2 	
14,346,324
No    3                              	
7,463,090
No.   4    	
182,191,571
No.   5    	
50,899,508
No.   6	
2,611,208
No.   7	
8,645,994
No.   8	
3,297,207
No.   9	
10,439,567
No. 10	
1,070,361
460,300
Totals	
$126,311,023
$143,835,563
$252,046,389
$311,406,320
$289,799,678
* 1941 not available.
Chart 2.
CENSUS
DIVISION DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. R 29
THE MINING AND METALLURGICAL STATISTICS DIVISION.
In accordance with the agreement concluded in 1938 between the Provincial Department of Mines, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics, all mining statistics are collected and compiled by this Division. Under this
agreement uniform statistics are compiled from the one set of returns prepared by
industry, and no overlapping or duplication of effort is involved on the part of the
above-mentioned agencies, which co-operate in the collection and use of mining statistics. The information, when collected, is made available for general use in a form
which preserves the confidential aspects of individual company returns. Mining
statistics for the year 1945 will be found in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines.
Numerous special compilations, covering data not readily available in other departmental reports, were compiled during 1945 by this Division for governmental departments, banking and other institutions. Close contact with the Department of Mines
has been maintained, and special statistical reports prepared for the internal use of that
Department. Because of the general interest in regional questions, the Division has
commenced the tabulation of mineral production by census divisions; it is expected that
a preliminary return showing the value of mineral production in each census division
will be available next year.
THE MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION.
The rapid preparation of large-scale statistical and accounting statements frequently can be accomplished only by the use of mechanical tabulation machinery. The
Mechanical Tabulation Division, equipped with rented punch-card machines (Hollerith
system), is responsible for this type of work in the Bureau. Operated as a service
department, it has continued to accept work from other governmental departments in
addition to performing the tabulating-work arising within the Bureau. Only with a
large volume of work is it possible to obtain the lowest unit cost of production with
this type of equipment.
During the year several changes were effected in the equipment on rental. A
numeric printing tabulator was replaced with a small-capacity alphabetic tabulator and
a reproducing gang-punch was added. The line of machines now on rental consists of
one full-capacity alphabetic tabulator; one small-capacity alphabetic tabulator; two
card-sorters; one numeric key-punch; two alphabetic key-punches; one reproducing
gang-punch;  and one mechanical verifier.
Several new projects were undertaken during the year for the Departments of
Public Works, Education, and Agriculture. Enlargement occurred in the scope of
several other projects; in particular, the tax-billing service performed for the Surveyor
of Taxes, the analysis of motor accidents performed for the Motor Records Branch, and
many other projects performed for the Research Division of this Bureau. With the
installation of printing tabulators in the Division of Vital Statistics, work formerly
performed for the Department of the Provincial Secretary, Board of Health, was terminated during the year.    All other regular contracts have proceeded on a routine basis. R 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU.
GENERAL.
The year 1945 told much the same story as 1944 in so far as travel was concerned.
It was not expected, really, that any marked improvement would be shown, war-time
restrictions and priorities being still largely in effect at the time when travel plans
would normally have been made. The cities of Vancouver and Victoria continued to
benefit substantially to an extent which severely taxed their accommodations. The
reports from Interior points were distinctly good, with the majority of resorts declaring
themselves entirely satisfied, and with all their available accommodation fully occupied.
Indeed, the regularity with which business was being turned away from many
resorts gave ample confirmation to the Bureau's view that our existing facilities for
catering to the tourist were totally inadequate. This fact was made abundantly clear
by the comprehensive survey recommended by the British Columbia Tourist Council,
of which mention was made in the report for 1944.
This survey was undertaken with the help of the Regional Committees of the
Bureau of Post-war Rehabilitation and Reconstruction and the valuable co-operation
of the Vancouver Tourist Association and the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau.
The results were distinctly interesting, and placed the British Columbia Government
Travel Bureau in possession of a picture not only more complete than any that had
previously been presented, but more complete probably than has ever before been
attempted by any Province in the Dominion.
Briefly, it showed that at the present time there is invested about $8,000,000 in
auto courts, camps, lodges, and resorts, exclusive of the metropolitan and commercial
hotels. It disclosed that these establishments can accommodate approximately 15,000
persons at one time; that the average inclusive investment per cabin was roughly
$1,400; that the average number of cabins per establishment was ten; that 39 per cent,
of our operators have investments of up to $10,000, 43 per cent, of from $10,000 to
$25,000, 10 per cent, of from $25,000 to $40,000, and 8 per cent, with investments
exceeding that figure—in some cases, very substantially.
Contemplated improvements to existing establishments and new enterprises on
which work will begin as soon as labour and materials are available will increase the
total investment to over $10,000,000, and give employment to some 500 people apart
from the operators themselves.
That is to say, so far as we can see at the moment, our facilities for catering to the
tourist, apart from the metropolitan and commercial hotels, will be brought to where
they can accommodate perhaps 20,000 people at one time.
The survey revealed that while we have in British Columbia some of the finest
establishments of their kind to be found anywhere in North America and a general
average which may be considered excellent, we have still a number which are below what
we regard as the minimum standard for the comfort and convenience of our guests.
This makes it evident that the steps which have been taken to encourage and
protect those operators who have been consistent in their efforts to provide good accommodation and service are no more than timely. I refer now to the Regulations
governing Tourist Camps, which came into effect under the provisions of the " Tourist
Camp Regulation Act," being chapter 71 of the Statutes of 1945.
While the regulations refer specifically to tourist camps, they are intended to apply
and do apply to all establishments catering primarily or mainly to recreational travel DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. R 31
as distinguished from the commercial hotel, whether cabins, camps, auto courts, lodges,
or trailer camps, and deal chiefly with their construction, maintenance, and sanitation.
They require the operator to maintain his establishment in good repair and
appearance, to provide proper and adequate sanitary arrangements, and to keep it free
from rubbish, garbage, refuse, and waste. The water-supply must be pure and safeguarded from all danger of contamination. Adequate measures must be taken for
protection from fire. Cottages and cabins must be of approved construction and of
adequate cubic capacity, properly lighted and ventilated, and kept at all times in clean
and sanitary condition, and screened against insects and other pests. Careful record
must be kept of guests and vehicles. Cases of communicable diseases must be promptly
reported, and the necessary measures taken.
An important provision is the establishment of a Licensing Authority, consisting
of the Commissioner and Assistant Commissioner of the British Columbia Government
Travel Bureau, a member of the British Columbia Game Commission, the Assistant
Deputy Minister of Lands, the Assistant Chief Forester, and a member of the Provincial Board of Health. The Licensing Authority meets under the chairmanship of the
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. This body has power to refuse a licence
where such action appears to be in the best interests of fish and game conservation or
in the general interest of the public.
Nominal fees are charged for licensing or registration, and certificates are issued
showing that the resort in question has been duly licensed or registered—licensed if in
unorganized territory, registered if within the bounds of a city or municipality.
It is intended to provide for regular inspection of all tourist resorts and to apply
certain classifications, although these will not be applied until such time as operators
are able to obtain supplies and materials for such improvements as they may contemplate.
All this was prompted by our feeling that the tourist industry can be no better than
its accommodations, and that our promotional work and the development of our facilities
must walk in step. The classification referred to above will result, it is hoped, in a
substantial measure of uniformity in accommodation and service within the respective
groups—proper accommodation, fairly priced, being, we believe, the essence of the
industry.
Here again we are moved to comment upon the attitude of the resort-owners, with
whom the Bureau's relations are warmly cordial, to an extent, indeed, which makes
mutual co-operation a foregone conclusion. The fact that the industry is now properly
organized is having an important bearing and, while the Bureau takes no active part in
the affairs of the Association, it is at all times in close touch and is made to feel itself
to a greater extent than ever before a friendly partner with the resort-owners.
Naturally, this feeling is reflected in all its contacts and makes for a strong sense of
cohesion and common interest, which augurs well for the future of this vital industry.
PUBLICITY.
Advertising.
When the Bureau framed its publicity campaign for 1945, it did so in common
with all other travel agencies, and confined itself to a " token campaign " based on the
theme " Not now, but later."
Field-work.
This activity was vigorously maintained, with developments which it is expected
will result in an even closer co-operation with State and private travel organizations.
A conspicuous instance of the initiative displayed by the Bureau's Field Representative
brought an invitation for the Province to be represented at the Conference of the
Governors of the eleven Western States, at which conference British Columbia's tourist R 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
economy was officially recognized as one with that of the neighbouring States, and the
groundwork laid for a closer liaison. This was the first instance at which this conference was attended by a Canadian senior executive, in the person of the Minister of
Trade and Industry. During the year contact was maintained with all western directional agencies and travel bureaus, and the liaison preserved with all Pacific North-west
promotional organizations.
Motion Pictures.
This activity continues to develop in a highly satisfactory manner. The Bureau's
series of travelogues in sound and colour, consisting of films on " Vancouver Island,
British Columbia's Island Playground," and " Romantic Cariboo, British Columbia's
Historic Highway," was augmented by completion of the films on " The Okanagan
Valley, British Columbia's Orchard Playground," and " The Kootenays, British
Columbia's Mountain Playground." With the relaxing of war-time priorities it is
hoped that the two last-named will be sounded without delay and made available for
circulation, thus giving us a series of quite unparalleled beauty and interest, the
publicity value of which will be incalculable. Evidence of this is afforded by the fact
that " Vancouver Island " has already been shown to audiences in Southern California
totalling over 15,000, composed largely of service clubs and Chambers of Commerce,
from which a high percentage of our recreational travel is drawn.
Other highlights were the making of a film on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway,
designed to show the beauties and magnificent resources of the territory which it
serves, and of a highly comprehensive film on British Columbia's mining industry.
While the films on " The Okanagan Valley " and " The Kootenays " are primarily
travelogues, careful emphasis has been laid on the industrial aspects, a policy which the
Bureau fully intends to maintain in all future activities of this nature.
Literature.
Several new publications were placed in the printers' hands, notably a new highway
and travel map which, it is believed, will be outstanding among publications of that
type, and an elaborate folder entitled " Alluring British Columbia " in which colour is
being used extensively. This subject is touched upon.again under the heading of
" Settlement."
Co-operative Activities.
The Bureau was pleased to be able to co-operate with the Department of Agriculture in the filming of the world's record shipment of eggs, when 33,000,000 eggs were
shipped from British Columbia to Great Britain by the Western Canada Produce
Association, also, as usual, with the National War Finance Committee in its Eighth and
Ninth Victory Loan Campaigns.
The friendly relations existing between the Bureau and the Vancouver Tourist
Association, the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau, and the Evergreen Playground
Association continue to be of the best, and a source of extreme gratification. Mention
must be made, too, of Mr. T. J. Monty, Acting Canadian Government Trade Commissioner at Los Angeles, who neglects no opportunity to facilitate the work of the Bureau.
SETTLEMENT.
Sufficient emphasis has been laid on this aspect of the Bureau's activities in previous reports to make it unnecessary to go again into elaborate detail.
It becomes increasingly evident that settlement must never become a secondary
interest, but that the Bureau must continue to give it careful and unremitting attention, and at the same time extend its facilities for handling the flood of inquiries which
come to it daily from all parts of the world.    It may be pertinent here to remark that
I DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. R 33
the Bureau's outgoing mail on a single day recently contained exhaustive replies to
prospective settlers from England, Scotland, Ireland, Denmark, Australia, Kenya,
Tanganyika, India, British West Indies, Netherlands West Indies, and South America,
in addition to the normal number from other parts of Canada and the United States.
When it is pointed out that while all inquiries have certain points in common, there are
none which are identical, it will be seen that the work involved is substantial and the
broad general knowledge intricate in the extreme.
The Department of Agriculture has been most co-operative, and one of its recent
publications, " Some Facts about British Columbia," which goes exhaustively into all
phases of agriculture as practised in British Columbia, is likely to be of very great
value. At the same time, literature alone does not serve to convey the picture. So
many distinctly personal angles are involved that a careful appraisal is necessary in
almost every case, and the fact that the Bureau is at pains to recognize that fact and
to introduce the intimate personal touch is in great measure responsible for its marked
success as an agency for settlement.
Indeed, as pointed out in the report for 1944, the Bureau is so deeply engaged in
this phase, has developed it to such an extent, and is now so firmly established and so
widely recognized as the authority on it that it must continue to be one of its chief
preoccupations.
Mr. W. A. McAdam, Agent-General for British Columbia in London, gives the
Bureau every support and is in constant touch with it, to an extent which has gone far
to make settlement in Canada and the Province of British Columbia synonymous terms
in the minds of the prospective settler from the United Kingdom.
Excellent co-operation has been received, too, from the Colonization Branches of
the Canadian Pacific and Canadian National Railways. The latter has been conspicuously helpful, and greatly facilitated the production of the Bureau's latest folder
for the information of the settler; namely, that on " Central British Columbia," which
will be in general circulation early in 1946.
Folders.
The Bureau's settlement folder on " British Columbia's Peace River District " was
a gratifying success, and the Bureau hopes to be equally fortunate with the folder on
" Central British Columbia." These will be followed by folders on the " Lower Fraser
Valley," the " Okanagan Valley," " The Kootenays," and the " Cariboo," and later possibly on " Vancouver Island," which, of course, will place the Bureau in an excellent
position to develop and expand this phase of its activities.
It should be clearly understood that the Bureau's activities in connection with
settlement are limited strictly to the giving of accurate and dependable information to
the prospective settler. It has positively nothing to do with the framing of policy, nor
does it in any way conflict with or duplicate the work of the Land Settlement Board but,
on the contrary, works in close harmony with it.
TOUKIST COUNCIL.
This advisory body meets annually for a general discussion of the current situation
and of plans for the future.    A comprehensive campaign has been outlined to take
effect as soon as conditions seem to indicate that the time is ripe for expansion.
The personnel of the Council is as follows:—
E. G. Rowebottom (Chairman), Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
W. H. Currie, Commissioner, Government Travel Bureau.
T. W. S. Parsons, Commissioner, British Columbia Police.
C. D. Orchard, Chief Forester, Department of Lands.
Arthur Dixon, Chief Engineer, Department of Public Works. R 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
John V. Fisher, Assistant Deputy Minister, Department of Finance.
F. R. Butler, Commissioner, Provincial Game Commission.
Elmer Johnston, President, Vancouver Tourist Association.
G. I. Warren, Commissioner, Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau.
T. W. Brown, Solicitor, Prince Rupert.
Sydney J. Smith, Kamloops Board of Trade.
J. B. Spurrier, Kelowna Fish and Game Club.
W. G. Lanskail, Nelson Board of Trade.
CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF TOURIST AND PUBLICITY BUREAUS.
At the annual meeting of the Canadian Association of Tourist and Publicity
Bureaus held in the City of Toronto on November 6th, 7th, and 8th, plans were made
for the sponsoring of a Tourist Service Educational Week. It was felt that on the eve
of the revival of recreational travel that it was desirable to bring home the extent to
which this business affects each of us individually. This campaign will be inaugurated
in the early spring.
At this meeting many resolutions were passed which, when carried out, will be
of great benefit to the industry in Canada in general and British Columbia in particular.
At this meeting of the Association the Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry of
the Province of British Columbia was elected president for the ensuing year.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1916.
1,505-1146-8111

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