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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORTS OF THE COMMISSIONER OF PROVINCIAL… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1946

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORTS
OF THE
COMMISSIONER OF PROVINCIAL POLICE
FOR THE YEAR
1944
AND
INSPECTOR OF GAOLS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED
MARCH 31 st, 1945
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1946.  To His Honour W. C. WOODWARD,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
- The undersigned has the honour to submit the reports of the Commissioner of
Provincial Police for the year ended December 31st, 1944, and the Inspector of Gaols
for the year ended March 31st, 1945.
R. L. MAITLAND,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1945. Victoria, B.C., November 1st, 1944.
The Honourable the Attorney-General,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to enclose herewith for your perusal my Annual Eeport
for the year ended December 31st, 1944, which includes a report on the Provincial
Gaols for the year ended March 31st, 1945.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
T. W. S. PARSONS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police.   Report of the Commissioner of Provincial Police, 1944.
The Honourable R. L. Maitland, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Annual Report for the year ended December
31st, 1944.
STRENGTH AND DISTRIBUTION.
At midnight of December 31st, 1944, the strength of the Force stood at seventeen
officers and 428 N.C.O.'s and men, exclusive of Special Constables, stenographers, and
junior clerks. The following table shows the strength distribution as at the end of the
year:—
Statement of Strength as at Midnight, December, 31st, 1944.
Headquarters.
"A"
Division.
" B "
Division.
"C"
Division.
"D"
Division.
"E"
Division.
Fort
George
Subdivision.
Peace
River
Subdivision.
Total.
Commissioner	
Deputy Commissioner....
Inspectors ...-
Sub-Inspectors  	
Paymaster and Quartermaster.... 	
Staff-Sergeants 	
Sergeants 	
Corporals 	
Detectives 	
First-class Constables ....
Second-class Constables
Third-elass Constables _
Special Constables	
Chief Clerks 	
Assistant Chief Clerks...
Senior Clerks 	
First-class Clerks.—	
Second-class Clerks	
Third-class Clerks	
Messengers  	
Third-class Skippers	
Second-class Engineers
Third-class Engineers...
Fourth-class Engineers..
Chief Operators 	
Senior Operators _...
First-class Operators	
Second-class Operators _
Third-class Operators ....
M'echanical Supervisors
Assistant Mechanical
Supervisors 	
Mechanics .—	
Assistant Supervisors,
Finger-print Bureau .
Senior Finger-print Operators —
Stenographers	
Totals	
2
2
6
26
2
2
1
1
70
139
36
12
7
3
35
7
37
7
1
5
7
1
46
14
14
102
1
5
23
24
2
175
56
56
3
2
5
7
27
2
3
1
5
1
2
1
1
5
11
2
4
1
1
75 T 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MEMORIAM.
During the year the Force suffered the loss through death of two long-serving and
valued non-commissioned officers—Staff-Sergeant Frank W. Gallagher and Sergeant
Alexander Dunbar. These officers, both veterans of World War I., had spent the greater
portions of their active lives in the public service of British Columbia and although
their places in the ranks are filled there exists a feeling of vacancy and regret in the
minds of their one-time associates and comrades.
POLICING OF MUNICIPALITIES.
Under agreement the Force continues to police forty-two cities and municipalities
in the Province. In addition, supervision is exercised over the three municipal areas of
Coldstream, Greenwood, and Slocan City.
POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL.
The officer in charge of Police training, Sub-Inspector C. Mackenzie, reports:—
" Three instructional classes were conducted during the year. The first of these,
Class No. 10, carried over from 1943, was mentioned in the report for that year.
Designed for junior constables, the course was completed on February 3rd, 1944. Class
No. 11, also composed of junior constables, convened on February 28th and remained in
session until May 31st. Class No. 12, for senior constables, commenced September 15th
and terminated on December 14th. While previous classes were occupied with basic
studies Class 12 was on a quite different level. Advanced work was to the fore, with
special emphasis on such matters as police science; scientific aids and laboratory practices; visual education, aided by films obtained from the United States Federal Bureau
of Investigation and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; the laws of evidence; intelligence-security and co-operation with the Armed Forces; finger-prints; photography;
and criminal investigation in general. The members of this class (averaging ten years'
service) were in a position to benefit by this type of special instruction and the over-all
result was thoroughly satisfactory. Names of members attending the three courses
were:—
" Class No. 10: Third-class Constables T. R. Maxwell, H. D. Johnstone, G. M. Brassard, N. D. Gibbon, R. I. Stringer, J. L. Campbell, J. T. Douglas, and R. J. Cofield;
Special Constables D. R. Hodgins, D. A. Jobling, J. J. Ehly, and S. A. L. Hamblin.
" Class No. 11: Second-class Constables M. H. McLeod, F. D. Avis, and H. C. Bonner; Third-class Constables E. J. Hooker, E. L. Rosberg, R. W. Strouts, L. H. Jakeman,
H. E. Klick, M. Stevens, E. C. Domay, J. H. Callens, and W. D. Waddell.
" Class No. 12: First-class Constables L. I. Olson, T. A. Quigley, H. J. Parsley,
W. F. Trant, D. G. Neff, D. E. Chamberlin, E. G. Sarsiat, H. Lindsay, A. G. Home, and
J. A. Roberts;  Second-class Constables G. A. Pelston and W. C. Gardiner.
" Conduct and discipline was very good.
" The Attorney-General, the Honourable R. L. Maitland, K.C., followed his practice
of inspecting the class members on parade at graduation and of meeting them individually. Certificates of competency were presented to the men of one class by Mrs.
Maitland and to another by Miss Maitland. These little touches, the personal interest
in the men in training, the visits to the school by the Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner while classes are in session, and the talks given by these and other executive
officers add much to the general tone of the proceedings and produce a noticeably tonic
effect.
" The Department of Public Works converted an unused verandah at the training-
school building into a small laboratory-work display-room which was found very useful
for the kind of instruction given Class No. 12. With the addition of more equipment
its usefulness will increase as other senior classes are brought in. 1944.    Police training-school, Victoria, B.C.
Class in session.  " Sergeant F. B. Woods-Johnson was detailed to attend a three months' advanced
instructional course at the Canadian Police College (R.C.M.P.) at Regina, Sask., from
February 7th to May 6th. The Force now has had five non-commissioned officers graduated from the College."
CIVILIAN PROTECTION   (A.R.P.)   BRANCH.
Inspector S. F. M. Moodie, officer in charge of the Provincial Police section assigned
to the Provincial Civilian Protection Committee, reports:—
" Training.
" Training of volunteers having been completed, emphasis was placed upon advanced
training for executives and heads of services. During the year the Officer Commanding
this Branch was in charge of a general training plan for Eastern and Western Canada,
visiting all principal vulnerable centres in the Maritime Provinces and British Columbia.
" During the summer, training of auxiliary firemen was intensified and their
services utilized in guarding supply dumps at the termini of the trans-continental railways. In August an eliminating competition for auxiliary firemen of the Lower Mainland, using three different types of Civil Defence pumpers, was held in New Westminster, and in September final competitions for crews from all parts of the Province were
held in Vancouver.
" During the months of October and November competitions for warden, casualty,
ambulance, rescue, telephonist, gas services, and for incident officers were concluded.
Elimination competitions involving the Lower Mainland were held in Vancouver and
similar competitions for Vancouver Island in Victoria. Final competitions for each of
the services mentioned took place in Victoria on November 5th.
" Judges for the various competitions were provided by Army, St. John Ambulance
Association and Brigade, Victoria and Vancouver Engineering and Fire Departments,
British Columbia Police, and Civil Defence officials.
" Personnel.
" In February the personnel of this Branch was reduced by closing the Communication Centre, Victoria, and transferring it to Headquarters, " A " Division. One Staff-
Sergeant and four Constables were returned to general duty. In addition one Corporal
Instructor stationed at Vancouver was also transferred."
MARKSMANSHIP.
Inspector C. Clark, Headquarters, in charge of Personnel Records, reports as
follows:—
"All ranks were again required to shoot the annual revolver course during the
summer months and considering war-time ammunition shortages, which precluded any
extensive general practice beforehand, the results were fairly good.
" The course is the standard three-stage Camp Perry Police course involving thirty
shots in three phases of deliberate and fast firing at 25 yards. Six men qualified in the
Master grade (275 and up), fourteen qualified as Experts (250 to 274), and 143 passed
the Marksman qualification with scores between 190 and 249. Apart from the usual
marksman badges leaders in each grade were presented with gold and silver medallions
donated by our Police revolver club at Victoria. Sergeant J. A. Young, of the C.I.B.,
headed the list of Master shots with a score of 293 x 300; Constable C. Dryden, of Victoria, led the Expert class with 272; and Constable W. A. Craig, of Golden, was high
Marksman with 249. Constable Craig had the additional honour of winning the annual
Tyro Trophy, a handsome silver cigarette-box awarded each year to the Provincial
Police officer making the highest score among those qualifying for the first time. T 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" In the annual Fraser Trophy service-gun match Constable W. G. Bailey, of Alexis
Creek, won the cup from Sergeant J. A. Young with a score of 282. Sergeant Young
had held the cup for the past five years.
"A general analysis of the Force's shooting ability showed that "B" Division,
with over 67 per cent, of the command qualifying in one or other of the marksman
grades, had the highest over-all measure of efficiency, and the North-east Kootenay
District (" C " Division) was highest among the districts with 100 per cent of the
personnel passing the Marksman test."
PAY AND QUARTERMASTER BRANCH.
Paymaster D. D. Moses, reporting under this heading, states:—
" The records for the calendar year 1944 on Police and Stores Accounts shows that
17,406 expense vouchers, totalling $1,437,043.68, were checked, recorded, and passed
through the Accounts Branch during this period.
" Collections for Police services from city and district municipalities and from
governmental branches amounted to $281,218.45.
" There was an increase of 1,003 expense vouchers, totalling $155,672.72, and collections were up by $15,697.78.
" Individual pay and allowances records were kept for 922 employees. There were
some pay and allowance adjustments, the first in eighteen years. Non-commissioned
officers and constables received an increase in pay of 25 cents per diem and service-star
pay was extended to include non-commissioned officers. Increases were also granted
to executive ranks.
" The Quartermaster's Stores received and filed 1,782 requisitions covering 7,592
articles."
TABULATION OF ENLISTMENTS AND DISCHARGES.
Engagements   43
Discharges—
By purchase  17
By expiration of engagement     3
By invaliding     5
By dismissal      7
By pension     1
Transfers to other Government Departments     5
Deceased     2
Resigned (messenger)      1
41
CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE.
Although the general standard of conduct was good, there was a necessity for
disciplinary action in certain cases. Seven men were dismissed—four for unbecoming
conduct and three as unsuitable; and seven were fined. Per contra forty members
earned commendations in General Orders for good work and devotion to duty, one being
awarded $50 and another $25 from the Reward Fund.
POLICE TRANSPORT.
Mechanical Supervisor J. F. McNaught submits the following report on Police
Transport for the year:— REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 9
" Mileage.
Division.
Railway.
Cars.
Launches.
Horse.
Foot.
Air,
etc.
Total.
Police.
Other.
Police.
Other.
10,684
4,854
88,422
77,844
17,272
15,154
33,729
14,805
63,129
371,853
431,538
315,413
77,167
59,900
92,061
735,767
43,035
2,522
1,515
30,927
6,495
6,860
12,563
1,503
16,755
112,168
59,689
69,102
40,476
12,893
15,130
87,952
20,621
43,393
9,156
7,797
50,131
14,711
21,770
103,741
154,224
22,838
1,700
68
14,763
1,168
3,922
128
651
816
153
1,307
2,598
561,550
" B " Division 	
" C " Division 	
" D " Division....	
Fort George Subdivision
168
3,034
3,079
139
238
592,316
504,836
210,199
110,978
176,798
" E " Division 	
5,080
951,446
262,764
2,146,828
105,420
45,617
9,575
6,658
414,165
271,320
3,262,347
847
55,640
332
2,208
59,027
263,611
2,202,468
105,420
45,617
9,575
6,658
414,497
273,528
3,321,374
* Including the Criminal Investigation and Civilian Protection Branches.
" There were 166 pieces of equipment in operation during the year, allocated as
follows:—
Cars.
Motorcycles.
Total.
6
24
33
29
7
5
6
37
9
1
9
6
25
33
29
7
5
6
46
9
156
10
166
" Mechanical inspections carried out during the year were as follows:—
Public
Carriers.
School
Buses.
Police
Cars.
Game
Cars.
Total.
Headquarters, "A " Division, and " D " Division.
Mechanical Supervisor MeNaught  —— —_	
" A " Division.
Mechanic Jaffray*—__   — - ~~	
" B " Division.
Assistant Mechanical Supervisor Lock   	
" C " Division, " D " Division, and Fort George Subdivision.
Assistant Mechanical Supervisor Fiander. —	
" E " Division.
Assistant Mechanical Supervisor Macdonald____ _	
Mechanic Scales -	
Mechanic Lees -    	
Totals - —- —-	
269
71
25
6
40
12
10
1
193
14
37
27
144
131
148
44
7
180
* Mechanic Jaffray's time is devoted largely to inspection services on public passenger vehicles and " Motor
Carrier Act" enforcement; the other men do supervisory and clerical work in connection with speed limit zones,
new bus construction, school-bus applications, and also investigate the more serious accidents involving departmental
cars. They also report upon the upkeep, replacement, and costs of operation of Police equipment. Equipment
operated by the Provincial Game Commission also came within the scope of our inspection service from April 1st. T 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Marine Section.
" Motor launches and boats are operated by the Force as follows: P.G.D. 2, Powell
River; P.M.L. 6, Ganges; P.M.L. 7, Ocean Falls; P.M.L. 8, Port Alberni; P.M.L. 9,
Campbell River;   P.M.L. 10, Port Alice;   P.M.L. 11, Kaslo;   P.M.L. 15, Prince Rupert.
" In addition to the foregoing, small power-boats and marine equipment is on charge
at the following Detachments: Sicamous, Prince George, Atlin, Squamish, McDame
Creek, Ucluelet, Shawnigan Lake, Fort St. James, Fort St. John, Kamloops District
Headquarters, Stewart, and Headquarters, Victoria."
POLICE RADIO.
Our Police radio-telegraph network, which includes twenty-two stations, continues
to offer valuable assistance in prosecution of the Force's work. During the year 22,379
messages (964,518 words) were transmitted.
The only addition to the system during the year was the establishment of a small
station at Ocean Falls (CH3B).
ASSISTANCE TO FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.
As in the past there was very full co-operation with the Federal Government and
its Departments of National Defence, Wartime Prices and Trade Board, National War
and Selective Service, Mines and Resources, Fisheries, Customs and Excise, Transport,
Immigration, Indian Affairs, National Health, Pensions, Radio Branch, Soldier Settlement each had assistance from the Force. Incidentally, the Naval Officer Commanding,
Pacific Coast; the General Officer Commanding, Pacific Command; and the Air Officer
Commanding, Western Air Command, were kind enough to compliment the Force as a
whole and many of its individual members for assistance rendered during the year.
Again many hundreds of cases were handled for the Department of Labour—■
National Selective Service Mobilization and National Selective Service Civilian Regulations—and for the Chairman of the Mobilization Board.
Following long-established custom the Federal Department of Mines and Resources
(Explosives Branch) took advantage of our facilities for the issue of permits and supervision of powder-magazines.
ASSISTANCE TO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.
"A" Division, Vancouver Island (Inspector R. Owens).—"Assistance rendered follows the standard of previous years and covers practically all Departments."
" B" Division, South-eastern British Columbia (Inspector R. Harvey).—"Fifty-
eight reports on fires in connection with buildings and automobiles were forwarded to
the Provincial Fire Marshal and in some instances extensive investigations were made
into fires of a suspicious nature. There were also several inspections of buildings under
the ' Fire Marshal Act.'
" Sanitary inspections of camps received the usual amount of attention.
"A number of cases were investigated and reported on for the Inspector of Municipalities, and in some it was necessary for our Constables to arrange for the renting,
sale, or care of property and chattels in his charge.
" Besides the usual brand inspections of hides and inspection of slaughter-houses
we now supervise a considerable movement of live stock and shipments of horses from
other Provinces by truck and railway. The revenue collected under the ' Stock-brands
Act' for the year amounted to $919.70."
" C" Division, Central British Columbia (Inspector C. G. Barber).—"Apart from
assistance rendered to the various Provincial Departments close co-operation existed
between the Game Department and ourselves." REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944. T 11
"D" Division, Northern British Columbia (Inspector E. Gammon).—"Considerable assistance has been given to the Health Department in connection with the suppression of venereal disease; the Department of Agriculture in the inspection of hides, etc;
to the Old-age Pensions Department; the Social Welfare Branch; inquiries regarding
estates of deceased persons and those unfortunates who had been committed to the
Mental Hospital."
"E" Division, Lower Mainland (Deputy Commissioner J. Shirras).—"In some
form the great majority of the Departments of our Provincial Government received help
and assistance during the year. In particular may be mentioned the various branches
of the Provincial Secretary's Department, such as Old-age Pensions Branch, Collections
Office, Social Assistance Branch, and Child Welfare Branch. The Game Commission,
Motor Carriers, and Liquor Control Board were also assisted. In addition this Division
expedited their numerous inquiries and requests for information through the medium
of our radio network."
Fort George Subdivision (Sergeant G. H. Clark, M.C.).—"For obvious reasons
the Game Branch heads the list of those Provincial Government Departments with
whom we are most closely associated in this Subdivision. The fullest and most friendly
co-operation exists between the officers of that Department and our own.
" We have assisted the Welfare Branch, the Fire Marshal's office, the Forestry
Department, various Branches of the Provincial Secretary's Department, and the Official Administrator. We also carried out a number of inspections and collected revenue
as Brand Inspectors under the ' Stock-brands Act.' "
Peace River Subdivision (Sub-Inspector H. H. Mansell).—"We have co-operated
with and assisted the Game Department in every possible way, also with the local representatives of the Health Department. Assistance has been rendered to and a number
of investigations made for the Department of Mines, Department of the Provincial
Secretary, Department of Labour, Department of Agriculture, Department of Lands,
Health Department, the Provincial Fire Marshal, etc."
ASSISTANCE TO OTHER FORCES.
Our relationship with other police organizations and law-enforcement bodies has
always been one of mutual assistance and co-operation and the year under review saw
a continuation of this excellent state of affairs. The most cordial and helpful feeling
was evident between our Force and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the city and
municipal Forces of Greater Vancouver and Greater Victoria and the Forces of other
organized areas, the Game Commission of the Province, and the various city, county,
State, and Federal organizations of the United States. In addition, as in previous war
years, friendly and close contact was maintained with the Navy, Army, and Air Force
of this country and the United States.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION BRANCH.
Inspector Roger Peachey, M.C., in charge of the Criminal Investigation Branch,
reports as follows:—
" The total number of cases prosecuted during the year 1944 was greater by 633
than during the previous year; 9,989 charges were laid, sixty of which remained
unconcluded at the end of the year. Of those tried, 9,330, or practically 94 per cent.,
were convicted. This exceptionally high percentage suggests an excellent standard of
efficiency on the part of all members of the Force not only in the investigation and
preparation of cases but also in law enforcement generally.
" Breaking down the crime statistics we find that charges under the ' Indian Act'
showed the largest increase—432. Practically all prosecutions under this Statute arise
from intoxication, possession of liquor, or supplying liquor to Indians.    Spread fairly T 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
uniformly throughout all Divisions and Subdivisions (except perhaps in the Fort George
Subdivision where seventy charges were laid as against thirteen in 1943) the percentage of increase is not confined to any particular area in the Province. An examination
of individual crime reports covering Fort George Subdivision discloses that offences
were almost entirely confined to the City of Prince George where unknown soldiers are
cited as the source of supply, or within the Fort St. James Detachment area where the
responsible agent was home brew manufactured by the Indians themselves. The
departure of the troops from Prince George and constant searchings and seizures at
Fort St. James led to an improved situation during the latter half of the year.
"Apart from this, the number of cases prosecuted under all headings, Criminal
Code, Dominion and Provincial Statutes, remained about the same. A slight increase
is noted under the heading of disorderly houses, inmates and keepers. Theft, house and
shop breaking, false pretences, and kindred crimes show very little change between the
year 1943 and 1944. War Orders and Regulations still occupy our attention, 853 cases
being prosecuted in the year under review as against 780 in the previous year. Altogether eight murders and one attempted murder were committed within territory policed
by this Force, and attention is directed to the fact that in many of them members of
the C.I.B. staff were able to render a great deal of assistance.
" Sergeant J. A. Young made ballistic examinations and testified at the trials. He
also identified the print of a rubber heel on a piece of paper found at the scene of a
breaking and entering, and by means of the comparison microscope, was able to clear up
two cases of typewritten anonymous letters. In addition, he made a notable contribution to the investigation of a rape case at Port Alberni. Sergeant C. Ledoux also
performed highly specialized and most outstanding work in connection with some of the
more difficult cases. Incidentally, I can not speak too highly nor express with too much
emphasis the value of the work carried out by G. C. B. Cave, Provincial Analyst. In
the course of the year he examined a multitude of exhibits of all types—hairs, fibres,
blood, soil, paint, explosives, glass fragments, poisonous substances of various kinds,
and many other materials. He has testified to his findings in a number of successful
trials, demonstrating and proving to the satisfaction of the Courts the accuracy of his
analyses and microscopical examinations.
" The Criminal Investigation Branch has continued its close liaison with the Armed
Forces, particularly through the Joint Services Security Intelligence Bureau under the
chairmanship of Major H. R. Bray, O.B.E., E.D., G.S.O. 2, Intelligence (Security). lam
assured too that very great assistance has been rendered by us in the matter of searching our files, checking the characters of candidates for confidential positions, deserters,
and in general security investigations and inquiries. We also co-operated closely with
the Naval Shore Patrol, Army Provost Corps, and the Service Police of the Royal
Canadian Air Force.
" Investigations under the National Selective Service Regulations, both mobilization
and civilian, have fallen off slightly. In this regard it is interesting to recall a case at
the Elk River Timber Co., near Campbell River, where an employee of the company
completely severed one of his fingers following service of notice to report under the
National Selective Service (Mobilization) Regulations. After some difficulty we were
able to secure sufficient evidence to justify a charge on which he was convicted and
sentenced to twelve months hard labour. This, I am informed, is the only case of its
kind to have been prosecuted in Canada.
"According to the monthly reports submitted by Detachments, 33,096 complaints of
all types, criminal, and non-criminal, were received and attended to. This is over 2,500
more than the previous year. A total of 166,749 patrols were made attending such
complaints, investigating offences, and performing general duties. Four hundred and
forty-four inquests were attended and 159 mentally ill persons were detained for exam- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944. T 13
ination. Our files also disclose that in territory policed by us we investigated 404 fatal
accidents. Of these, 137 were drowning, 48 logging, and 54 automobile accidents; miscellaneous causes accounted for the remainder. Inquiries were made for 355 missing
persons, 313 of whom were located.
" Juvenile Delinquency.
"Although 424 juveniles were apprehended in rural and municipal areas policed by
us, there is an apparent improvement in the situation—something I think to be attributed to concerted action upon the part of our churches, welfare bodies, and the Provincial
social relations officers. Perhaps, too, some credit is due to those many policemen who
give so much of their limited spare time to supervising gymnastic and other classes
designed to promote the interests of the more youthful members of their communities.
" Criminal Investigations—Improvement in Technique.
" Members of the C.I.B. staff have devoted much time to furthering the interests of
the training-school. Sergeant C. Ledoux, Sergeant J. A. Young, Detective D. Shand,
Assistant Supervisor Finger-print Section A. G. Carmichael, and the writer have all
delivered lectures to the classes on a variety of subjects touching criminal investigation
matters. As every crime report that reaches this office is examined by members of the
staff, we are in a position to note evidences of the beneficial results obtained from the
school.
" Finger-print and Photograph Section.—From January 1st until December 31st,
1944, 2,480 finger-prints were received for classification and filing and of this number
734 were identified as those of persons previously registered at our Bureau. Our own
officers arrested and finger-printed 783 persons, and at Oakalla Prison Farm 887 inmates
were finger-printed by Senior Operator J. W. Edwards. Two hundred and seventy-nine
certified criminal records were issued for use in Court; sixty-five were supplied to the
Warden at Oakalla Prison Farm and a number of complete records were also sent to the
Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, D.C.
" Of the 396 sets of civilian finger-prints received, 281 related to persons applying
for entry into the United States—five identified as having previous criminal records;
102 were sets of finger-prints from applicants for enlistment in the British Columbia
Police Force or as guards at Oakalla Prison Farm—four identified; and thirteen sets
were received from the Unted States Army Intelligence, Prince Rupert, B.C.—one
identified.
" One hundred and forty-four sets of single finger-prints were forwarded to the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police for filing and seventy-nine sets were added to our own
single finger-print filing system.
" One thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight records of additional convictions
were added to those of persons previously registered in our Finger-print Section. The
number of persons with criminal records registered at this Bureau now totals 29,746.
" Our Finger-print Section supplied 2,782 sets of finger-prints with complete previous records (as known to us) to the following: Royal Canadian Mounted Police,
1,250; Calgary City Police, 509; Vancouver City Police, 509; New Westminster City
Police, 509;   F.B.I., Washington, D.C, 5.
" Photographs.—The number of photographs of prisoners processed in this section
in the year 1944 amounted to 11,515. Fifty-six film-packs for processing were received
from Oakalla Prison Farm and twenty-five rolls of film from Nelson and Kamloops
Provincial Gaols. From this total we supplied photographs to those with whom we
exchange finger-prints, as well as British Columbia gaols—Ticket-of-leave Branch,
Ottawa; Immigration Department, Vancouver; F.B.I., Washington, D.C.; Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Vancouver;  Victoria City Police;  also the Police Forces of the T 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
municipalities surrounding Victoria, and our own Modus Operandi Branch. Included
in this total were photographs of 348 discharged prisoners, sent out to twenty-three
key centres of the British Columbia Police. This required twenty-three photographs
of each person, or over 8,000 in all.
" Miscellaneous photographs supplied numbered 2,439 prints, including enlargements of all sizes up to 8 inches by 10 inches. Four hundred and fifty-six new negatives were made for this work. Included were 613 prints and thirty negatives for the
Motor Records office, the balance going to the Attorney-General's office; Commissioner's
office; Court work; Victoria City Police; Provincial Analyst; B.C. Police Training
School; H. McLean, examiner of questioned documents, Vancouver, B.C.; J. H. Beatty,
handwriting expert, Victoria, B.C.; Royal Canadian Navy; Royal Canadian Air Force;
and the Criminal Investigation Branch, B.C. Police.
"Exhibits.—During the year 1944 fifty articles of various kinds from scenes of
crimes were received for examination for finger-prints. Some, of course, proved to be
of no value, while others were identified as belonging to the complainants or employees.
Five identifications were made for our own Police Force, one for the Victoria City
Police, and one for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Victoria. In only one instance
was finger-print evidence required in Court. The accused was a juvenile, who was sent
to the Industrial School after finger-print evidence had proved his participation in the
offence charged. One identification was made from a palm-print found at the scene
of the crime."
Outstanding Cases.
Rex vs. Poynter, Albert Murray (Murder).—A telephone operator called the Bur-
naby district office at 5.40 o'clock on the morning of February 24th, 1944, and advised
the Constable on desk duty that there had been a fight at 2013 Edinburgh Street, in
District Lot 172, and that Police officers were required at once. As two members of
the Force were preparing to leave, a second call came in from an ambulance-driver to
the effect that there was a dead woman at this address. Within a few minutes officers
arrived at the scene.
They found Mrs. Anna Poynter, aged 35, in her night attire stretched out on her
bed with two wounds on her head and an axe lying close by. Her husband, Albert
Murray Poynter, was lying on a chesterfield in the living-room covered with a blanket.
An investigation was immediately set under way by Sergeant Charles Anderson, who
was later joined by Sergeant C. A. Barwis.
District Lot 172 is a small area of unorganized territory adjoining Burnaby Municipality and the City of New Westminster. While the original call had been answered
by members of the Burnaby district, subsequent investigation was carried out by members of the New Westminster district.
It was found that deceased and her husband had some marital differences for some
months prior to her death. During the night of February 23rd to the 24th two sons
occupying an adjacent bedroom heard their father and mother talking about a visit
Mrs. Poynter was planning for the following day. The boys then went to sleep and
were awakened by their father, who called out, " I've done it, boys." Both lads went
into their parents' bedroom and found the mother still alive but obviously dying. An
axe was lying in the doorway of the bedroom. An attempt at suicide by the father was
frustrated by the two lads and a neighbour was called. Eventually Poynter collapsed
and was laid on the chesterfield. Poynter's clothing was examined and it was found
that he had blood-stains on them and that his hands were also blood-smeared.
Arrested and charged with murder, Poynter appeared at a preliminary hearing on
March 8th, 1944. Several witnesses, including the two boys, testified to the accused
admitting having killed his wife. Committed for trial, he came before the spring
assize at New Westminster on April 18th, 1944.    Evidence adduced by the Crown was REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944. T 15
identical with that produced at the preliminary hearing. An alienist was called for the
defence to show that the accused could have been in such a mental state when he had
committed the offence that he might not have appreciated the gravity of his act. The
accused testified in his own behalf and told the Court that he had lived in harmony with
his wife until December, 1943, when he began to suspect she had an interest in another
man. He recalled entering the bedroom on the fateful morning with an axe in his
hand but did not recall killing his wife. A number of character witnesses were also
called for the defence. An alienist who testified on behalf of the Crown stated that he
had examined and observed the accused and felt that he was sane and fully aware of
the gravity of his act.
The jury found the accused guilty of manslaughter and made a strong recommendation for leniency.    Sentence, five years' imprisonment.
Sernaiotto, Angelo (Murder of).—On March 16th, 1944, Angelo Sernaiotto,
section-foreman of the Canadian Pacific Railway section at Waleach, B.C., did not turn
up for work at his customary time. His assistant, having work assigned to him from
the previous day, occupied himself until noon. He then called at the section-house but
found the place locked up. After lunch he again attempted to arouse Sernaiotto, who
lived alone. Unable to do so he went to Agassiz, a few miles away, and advised one of
the section-foreman's friends. They returned to Waleach and entered the section-house
through a basement window.
In the living-room they found Angelo Sernaiotto lying on the floor, face downwards, his reading-glasses still in place. There were no signs of a struggle except two
overturned chairs. An oil lamp was burning on a table; there were railway-work
forms, and apparently the section-foreman had been engaged in their completion.
Police officers were called and commenced an immediate investigation. There was $127
in cash in his trousers' pocket, and the body showed a number of puncture wounds which
might have been caused by a long thin-bladed knife or similar instrument.
All doors to the premises were locked and a door to the wood-shed, under the same
roof as the section-house building, was also found to be padlocked. Upon opening this
wood-shed it was seen that an attempt had been made to burn the premises down.
A charred sack lay in one corner of the wood-pile. This sacking had apparently been
soaked in coal-oil from the section oil-can and some of the fluid had also been thrown
on the pile itself. The man's keys were also found on the dirt floor of the wood-shed.
It is impossible to determine why the premises were not completely burned down, unless
perhaps lack of air in the wood-shed was the cause and smoke actually extinguished
the fire.
Sernaiotto was last seen alive at 4.30 p.m. on March 15th when he left his work a
few hundred yards up the railway-track and walked towards the section-house. With
the exception of the facts already mentioned careful examination of the premises disclosed nothing untoward. The deceased was dressed in working-clothes but wore no
outer garments such as raincoat, overcoat, or hat. These were lying on a couch in the
living-room.
The consensus of opinion of the people with whom he was best acquainted led
investigating officers to believe that he was a moderate drinker; had an aversion for
women; was a very careful spender and not addicted to gambling. He had been a
resident of Canada for thirty-three years and proved himself to be a good and industrious workman. He exhibited a preference for living alone and his record with the
company was excellent.
Sernaiotto was not known to have had any enemies and was well liked by the Italian
community in Vancouver, which he visited periodically. He was very reserved with
the local Indian population and avoided all social contact with them. It might be mentioned that Waleach is in a somewhat remote location, being 6 miles east of Agassiz on T 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
the C.P.R. main line. The only house within sight of the section-house is occupied
by an Indian family. The railway at this point runs through an Indian reservation.
Subsequent inquiry and interrogations included every Indian living within several miles
of the section-house, all persons known to the deceased within the district, and many
railway employees and members of train crews. Memoranda of addresses and names
of persons with whom he had been associated, which were found and studied, led to the
questioning of a number of Italian residents; in fact a full and complete survey took
our officers as far afield as Vancouver, New Westminster, Nanaimo, Port Alberni, Ash-
croft, and other points. However, although unsuccessful, the results of these inquiries
did eliminate a large number of possible suspects and in this respect the work of all
concerned has not been wasted.
The principal disadvantage encountered was the total lack of a motive for the
crime. It would not have been robbery as the deceased's funds were still intact in his
pockets. It could not have been a drunken brawl as there was no evidence whatever of
drinking. The theory of feminine involvement is discouraged by his friends and as he
had no known enemies there is no indication of revenge. Yet, in spite of all this, there
is reason to feel that the person who killed Sernaiotto had a personal acquaintance with
the deceased and his establishment. The deceased would not admit a stranger to his
domicile at night as he was timid. The position of the overturned chairs suggests two
persons had faced each other. The keys to the wood-shed—carried on the person—were
found in the padlocked wood-shed where the attempted arson took place. The coal-oil
can used for this attempt was his and came from a staircase in the house proper. He
was wearing reading-glasses and had his railway records on the table close to the lighted
lamp, uncompleted, as if he had been interrupted while at work.
Every possible clue has been followed to its logical conclusion. A reward of $250
has been recommended and authorized by the Attorney-General, and circulars were sent
throughout the Province of British Columbia and to other points in Canada- and the
United States.
Rex vs. Prince, Alex (Murder).—On March 10th, 1944, Donald W. Gilliland was
making his way from Finlay Forks, Northern British Columbia, to Fort Ware, up the
frozen Finlay River. Close to Mesmer Landing he noticed a dark shape on the surface
of the ice. Approaching the mass, which resolved itself into the ice-encrusted body of
a man, he found a big Newfoundland dog faithfully standing guard over the body of
its dead master.
Gilliland recognized the body as that of one Hans Pfeuffer, a trapper, who lived
with another trapper named Eugene Mesmer about 1,000 yards north. Going up-river
to the main cabin he found the kitchen door open but no sign of Mesmer. The door
to the inner room was locked. As it was getting late Gilliland made camp and set out
the following morning for Finlay Forks, where he arrived in the late afternoon and
advised the Police at Prince George by radio.
Provincial Police Sub-divisional Headquarters at Prince George had previously
received another message from J. Maguire, Hudson's Bay Company manager at Fort
Graham, that there was a dead man on the Finlay River near the Germans' cabin.
As both messages arrived in the evening a start could not be made until the following
morning, when Constable H. D. McKenney left by plane for Finlay Forks. On arrival
Constable McKenney picked up Gilliland and then continued by plane up the Finlay
River to Mesmer Landing. They found the body still guarded by the Newfoundland
dog but the animal allowed our Police officer to approach. The body was frozen into
the ice about 6 inches and when chopped out it was seen that deceased had been shot
through the hip. About 500 yards down-stream there was a blood-stain in the ice which
Constable McKenney chopped out to make sure it was blood. Between the blood-stain
and the body the dead man's snowshoes were found lying on the ice. 1858-1872.
Lytton, B.C.
The old colonial lockup (abandoned).
Mission, B.C.
Modern Provincial Police quarters.  REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944. T 17
A search of the cabin showed that it was not in the usual neat condition maintained
by the two Germans. There was evidence of disturbance; in fact, although there was
a substantial number of pelts on the premises, Constable McKenney thought it odd that
there were no valuable furs like fisher, marten, mink, or lynx pelts and especially so as
it had been a fairly abundant season for fur-bearing animals.
The plane, which had left to make a trip to Fort Graham, returned and it was then
learned that the two messages received at Prince George referred to two separate bodies,
and that the second one discovered by Maguire was up-stream from the cabin. They
at once searched the river surface north of the cabin and found Eugene Mesmer's body
about 1,000 yards from the cabin. This body, unlike that of Pfeuffer, was lying on its
face frozen to the ice with a bullet wound clearly showing beneath the right shoulder
blade. It also was chopped free and both bodies were removed to Prince George with
the permission of the coroner, M. W. Skinner. Due to the intense cold the bodies had
frozen solid and it was some time before they had thawed out sufficiently to allow an
autopsy to be carried out by Dr. Carl Ewart.
Mesmer's body had been found first on March 8th, 1944, by Mr. Maguire while on
the trail from Fort Graham to Finlay Forks. However, after discovering the body he
back-tracked and returned to Fort Graham for the purpose of sending out news by
radio. On March 11th neither Gilliland nor Maguire knew that the other had also
found a body.
Constable McKenney's investigation disclosed that three rifles owned by Pfeuffer
and Mesmer were missing. Two cameras and two pack-boards could not be found and
various other articles were missing, all of which indicated that after killing them the
murderer had robbed the dead.
A long and arduous investigation followed. It will be appreciated that travel in
the North Country at that time of year is limited to foot travel or by plane, and to
expedite the investigation air travel was used in covering the longer distances. Shorter
patrols were made on foot.
Constable McKenney returned to Prince George on the evening of March 13th and
left again the following day accompanied by Sergeant G. H. Clark and Game Warden
J. A. Jank. At Finlay Forks a trapper named Jack Blanchard reported he had found
a pack-board in a cabin recently occupied by Alex Prince, 23-year-old Indian of the Fort
St. James band. The pack-board had belonged to Mesmer. Accompanied by the owner
of the cabin and two trappers a patrol was made by Game Warden Jank to the Ospeka
River, about 12 miles from Finlay Forks. In the meantime Sergeant Clark, with Constable McKenney and also Gilliland, flew to Fort Graham and Collins Creek where they
interviewed a number of Indians. From these people it was learned that one, Alex
Prince, had arrived at Collins Creek on February 18th and for no apparent reason had
left on February 21st. Further, although it was usual for Indians who travelled up
and down the river to call in to see the two Germans who occasionally gave them a cup
of tea, the Sergeant was told, Alex Prince excepted, neither white man nor Indian had
travelled the river for some time back.
At Finlay Forks, after making further inquiries and hearing that Alex Prince had
a camera they reached the cabin he occupied with another Indian and two women. In
a cardboard box behind the cook stove there were two cameras, a gold watch and chain,
a photographic filter in a leather case, and a number of used and unused films. The
cameras were identified as the property of the two dead Germans and the watch as
belonging to Mesmer.
In his search of the cabin at Ospeka River Game Warden Jank also found a quantity of material which had belonged to the two dead trappers. There was a gold watch,
later identified as belonging to Pfeuffer, a brief-case with Mesmer's name on it, a number of rifle cartridges which fitted the dead trappers' rifles, and some other odds and ends. Behind a cupboard which had to be moved away from the wall he found a .300
Savage rifle, later found to be registered in Mesmer's name.
Arrested and taken to Prince George, Alex Prince, within one week of the Police
being notified, was formally charged with murder.
Autopsies showed that Hans Pfeuffer had died of a gunshot wound through the
right thigh, cold and exposure. Mesmer had met his death due to shock and haemorrhage from a gunshot wound in the right lower chest and another in the right shoulder.
In the latter case it appeared that Mesmer was knocked down by one shot and that
a second was then fired into the prone body.
One point of remarkable interest in this investigation was the identification of
a bullet jacket found embedded in Mesmer's back. Sergeant J. A. Young, ballistic
expert of the B.C. Police, Criminal Investigation Branch, made an examination of this
jacket and also of Alex Prince's rifle, which was a .30-.30 Winchester carbine. Firing
some test bullets he noticed a very rare feature. This rifle has six grooves each of
which normally should be the same in width. On being measured it was found that
one groove was .11 mm. narrower than the others. This flaw, very rare indeed had
indented itself on the fatal bullet. The engravings on the bullet also tallied perfectly
with those of the test bullet. This evidence, coupled with a mass of circumstantial
evidence produced by the Crown, made out a very strong case.
The accused was committed for trial on two charges of murder. At the spring
assize; having received short notice of appointment, defence counsel successfully applied
for a traverse until the fall.
When the case was brought before Mr. Justice Macfarlane, a number of witnesses
were called and had given their testimony when, taking exception to certain statements,
defence asked to dismiss the jury and empanel a new one. As this was impracticable
the trial was again traversed, this time to the assize next following.
I would like to point out that the officers of the Game Department, particularly
Game Warden Jank and his immediate superior, Inspector Van Dyke, who placed his
services at our disposal, rendered very valuable assistance in connection with this case
and by their indefatigable efforts materially shortened the investigation. Constable
McKenney, Sergeant Clark, and other members of this Force are also worthy of
commendation.
Rex vs. Bailey, Alan Roy (Attempted Murder).—On the afternoon of June 13th,
1944, Sergeant D. Halcrow, of Penticton, received word from Keremeos that Provincial
Constable W. B. Stewart had been shot. Leaving with a doctor and Police detail they
found Stewart to be in fair condition and arranged for his removal to the Penticton
Hospital.
It seems that Constable Stewart had received a telephone message from a local
merchant, Ben Williams, requesting him to come to his house at once as there was
trouble. On arrival he went upstairs and entering the residential part was suddenly
confronted by one Alan Roy Bailey, who pointed a .22 revolver at the Constable and
warned him not to come any further. Stewart, who knew Bailey, tried to reason with
him but without success. Deciding to arrest and disregarding all personal danger the
Constable advanced and Bailey fired. Although hit in the groin Stewart grabbed the
gunman's arm when a second shot went off, breaking Stewart's right leg above the
knee.    This rendered him helpless.
In the room at the time were Ben Williams, his wife, and their daughter, who is
married to Bailey. Later, on the arrival of the Police from Penticton, Bailey threatened to shoot his wife should these officers interfere. The Police then retired to positions outside the house and endeavoured to arrange some trap to apprehend Bailey, but
he was wary and suspicious. Subsequently he left the house, taking with him his wife
and Mrs. Williams as hostages, and drove off first to the park and then towards Hedley REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE,, 1944. T 19
in the Williams' car. About 4 miles out he parked near the Similkameen River, left
the two women in the car, and walking towards the river stated he was going to shoot
himself.
The Police who were in the vicinity heard two shots and investigating found fresh
footprints leading to the water. A thorough search was made for Bailey along the
river-bank until darkness set in. Resumed the next day, information was received
about noon of a man being seen on a small bushy island in the river and as Bailey was
a good swimmer it was thought probable he had managed to reach it. A small row-
boat was obtained and Corporal Murray with Constables Atchison and Cartmell started
across. Unfortunately, as the river was swift and swollen from recent rains, they
shipped considerable water, swamped, and were thrown into the water; in fact only
great effort and heroism on their part, and the men on shore, saved them from drowning.
Later a larger boat was obtained and two local residents, Carl Pedersen and Robert
Parsons, managed to cross to the island where they located Bailey and brought him
back, where he was placed under arrest. He was suffering from a self-inflicted gunshot
wound in the forehead.
At the Vernon fall assize Bailey was convicted of wounding and sentenced to
eighteen months' imprisonment in Oakalla Prison Farm.
Constable Stewart's condition has improved slowly but at the end of the year he
was still unable to resume his normal police duties. He was commended in General
Orders and awarded the sum of $50 from the Police Reward Fund. Sergeant D. Hal-
crow, Corporal W. C. Murray, and Constables H. Cartmell and C. H. Atchison were
also commended in General Orders for their part in the apprehension of this criminal.
Rex vs. Durocher, Philip (Murder).—On July 19th a half-breed Indian living near
Fort St. John cut the throat of his white wife and escaped into the bush. Continuous
search by our officers and the assistance of a trained R.C.M.P. dog from Alberta failed
to bring about apprehension of the culprit, who was a trapper and woodsman thoroughly familiar with the area. However, on September 11th, Durocher was found with
serious head wounds in an open shed at Fort St. John near the scene of the crime.
A discharged rifle lay within his reach and there was every indication of an attempt at
suicide. Taken to hospital and given every medical attention he has failed to recover
sufficiently to permit an appearance in Court.
Rex vs. Wong Fat (Arson).—At 2 a.m. August 5th, 1944, the Vernon Fire Department was called to 6 Coldstream Street, Vernon—a one-story frame building used by the
Women's Institute as a meeting-place. On arrival they found and quickly extinguished
a small blaze at one corner of the building. Looking around, the Fire Chief, Fred
Little, then observed a jute sack filled with newspaper propped against the building and
on the ground near-by the stumps of several burnt matches.
A short time before hearing the alarm Constable A. Krivenko, who was on duty
in the city, remembered seeing a Chinaman in the vicinity of the fire. He first saw
him walking slowly in the direction of Coldstream Street and about fifteen minutes
later saw him again but this time walking quickly in the opposite direction. He also
noticed that he wore low rubbers and no socks.
After the fire was extinguished Constable Krivenko and the Fire Chief searched for
tracks and in the lane directly behind the Women's Institute building found what
appeared to be tracks made by rubbers. These could be followed up and down the lane
and over to a garbage-box about 50 yards away. Within this box there were newspapers and some binder-twine bags similar to those used to start the fire. The Constable then followed these tracks to the door of a Chinese bunk-house situated two
blocks away. Going inside he discovered under a bed—in which a Chinaman was
apparently sleeping—a pair of rubbers similar to those which had made the tracks.
This Chinaman still had his pants on and Constable Krivenko recognized him as the T 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
man he had seen just before the fire. He gave his name as Wong Fat and stated that
he had retired to bed at 10 p.m. and had not been out since. Krivenko therefore took
the rubbers and as comparison with the tracks offered satisfactory identification Harry
Anderson, of the Dominion Entomological Laboratory, Vernon, made a series of photographs which proved extremely useful at the subsequent trial.
A Mrs. Mable Huselack, living next door to the Women's Institute building, stated
that she knew Wong Fat and had worked with him at the Palace Cafe, Vernon. She
had quit the cafe about two months before and since then Wong Fat had visited her at
her home on four or five occasions. On the last occasion she would have nothing to do
with him and he had gone away angry; she also said that while working at the cafe
she had scolded Wong Fat for the way he washed the dishes.
On August 7th, while this matter was still under investigation, Wong Fat called
at the Police office and wanted to know when he would have to come to Court and how
much he would have to pay or how long he would be in gaol. He denied having set the
fire but was willing to pay a fine or go to gaol.
Subsequently tried in the County Court, he was found guilty and sentenced to
imprisonment for two years.
Rex vs. MacAvity, John Francis, and Breen, George Stowell (Breaking, Entering,
and Theft and Escape from Prison).—On the night of April 29th-30th eight business
premises at Nakusp were broken into during a violent rain-storm. Three safes were
blown open and money, valuable securities and bonds to the value of over $13,000 as
well as a quantity of nembutal tablets from the drug-store were stolen.
An intensive investigation was carried out by the Police and about a mile from
Nakusp two abandoned camps with beds made of spruce-boughs were found in the
bush. Buried in these camps various articles were found, including some clothing
bearing a laundry-mark " M.A."
On May 5th a rowboat was reported stolen from Fauquier, 40 miles south of
Nakusp, and on May 6th two men who boarded the west-bound passenger-train at
Coykendahl were apprehended on their arrival at Grand Forks by Constable J. E. D.
Cox. They turned out to be two well-known criminals, John Francis MacAvity and
George Stowell Breen. Their sleeping-bags were covered with spruce-needles and on
their persons they had the approximate amount of cash stolen from the storekeepers at
Nakusp. One of them carried a small pencil-sketch of an unknown location and in
their pack-sacks was clothing bearing the laundry-mark " M.A." and a quantity of
nembutal tablets.
When the sketch, presumably of a location near ■ Coykendahl, was introduced in
Court during the preliminary hearing, the actions of the accused aroused the suspicions
of Corporal White. Further investigation revealed that this sketch conformed to the
site of one of the abandoned camps, where search eventually unearthed a glass sealer
containing $10,795 in bonds and certificates. Later on, both camps were again examined by Company Sergeant-Major Richards of the Royal Canadian Engineers. He used
an army mine-detector and although everything of a metallic nature was located he
found nothing of further value.
On the early morning of July 16th MacAvity and Breen overpowered the guard in
the Nelson Gaol and escaped. A widespread search was instituted and on August 7th
the two escapees were arrested by Sergeant W. J. McKay and Constable J. A. Roberts
in the Cross Keys Hotel beer-parlour at Cranbrook. At the Nelson fall assize before
Chief Justice Farris both pleaded guilty to escaping from prison and were sentenced to
two years in the penitentiary.
On August 29th the two accused appeared before His Honour Judge Nisbet, County
Court, Nelson, and after a lengthy trial, in which seventeen witnesses were called and
over thirty exhibits entered, they were convicted of breaking, entering, and stealing REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944. T 21
from the H. L. Miller Real Estate office at Nakusp and sentenced to three and a half
years in the penitentiary.
On December 20th the Appeal Court of British Columbia quashed the conviction
for breaking and entering but upheld the conviction for escaping from prison.
Corporal J. White was highly commended in General Orders for his excellent work
on this case and awarded $25 from the Police Reward Fund. His Honour Judge W. A.
Nisbet at the conclusion of the case remarked upon " the persistent, persevering, and
very capable efforts put forth by the law-enforcement officers of the Crown." Staff-
Sergeant H. N. Wood and Constables G. J. Emsley, H. J. Butler, and J. E. D. Cox were
also commended in General Orders for their good work.
Rex vs. Thompson, John; Gabriel, Jackie; and Andrews, Patrick (Breaking and
Entering).—On Sunday, July 9th, 1944, at 9.30 p.m. the B.C. Police at Kamloops
received a report that the Government Liquor Warehouse at Kamloops had been broken
into.
An immediate investigation was made by Constable R. Forrester at the scene and
stock was taken by the Liquor Vendor, who found that eighteen cases of beer were
missing. Entry was found to have been made by means of a pass-key into an unused
portion of the building where boards were removed from a partition leading into an
adjoining storage-room for beer. In their haste the culprits had apparently left the
key inside the building and the outside door unlocked.
Noticing that five cartons of beer had been left piled near the door by the culprits
Forrester decided they might return for this. Hiding in the building, his patience was
rewarded at 11.20 p.m. by the entry of three men through the unlocked door who, satisfied that the five cartons of beer were still by the door, then proceeded to get additional
cases from the storage-room. Challenging and keeping the three of them covered with
his revolver he forced one of their number to handcuff the remaining two together.
He then escorted them to the lockup where they were identified as John Thompson,
Jackie Gabriel (Indian), and Patrick Andrews (Indian).
Later that evening one Henry Bates was arrested by Constable D. McColl while
sleeping near the railway-yards surrounded by nine dozen empty beer-bottles of an
identical brand to those stolen from the Liquor Warehouse. He had been employed the
previous day in cleaning a chimney at the Liquor Warehouse building.
On July 17th, 1944, John Thompson, Jackie Gabriel, and Patrick Andrews were all
found guilty of breaking and entering and dealt with as follows: John Thompson, one
year in gaol with hard labour; Jackie Gabriel, three months in gaol with hard labour;
Patrick Andrews, sentence suspended for one year. Both Thompson and Gabriel had
previous criminal records. The same day Henry Bates was sentenced to six months in
gaol with hard labour for being in possession of stolen property. He also had a previous criminal record.
Rex vs. Wallace, Donald Edward (Theft of Cable), and Rex vs. Tessier, Louis
Anthony (retaining Stolen Cable).—February 26th, 1944, Martin Erskine, caretaker at
the Princeton Airport, complained to the Police at Princeton that approximately 265
feet of copper insulated high-tension cable valued at $300 had been stolen from the
airport. He suspected a truck belonging to one Louis Tessier, of Merritt, had been
used to transport the stolen cable.
Investigating, police found tracks in the snow of a dual-wheeled truck near the reel
from which the cable had been stolen and ascertained that Tessier was employed to
dismantle and haul old machinery by Donald E. Wallace, of New Westminster. They
were checked but no information could be obtained concerning the missing cable.
On June 7th, after an investigation covering almost four months, the Police again
contacted Louis Tessier at Merritt. He led them up a side-road several miles from
Merritt and handed over the missing cable, which was hidden in a ravine, covered with T 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
dead pine-branches. The cable appeared to have been there for some time. Tessier
stated he suspected the cable was stolen and had hidden it so as not to become involved.
Both Wallace and Tessier were arrested and before His Honour Judge Colquhoun,
County Court, Princeton, Wallace stated he had purchased the cable from Erskine and
partly paid for it. Tessier and another man and himself had loaded the cable on
Tessier's truck and taken it to Merritt where it had been hidden and he had not seen it
since. He was convicted of theft of the cable and sentenced to a fine of $250 or three
months' imprisonment. Tessier was convicted of retaining the stolen cable and sentenced to three months' imprisonment.
Constables R. H. Hassard and B. H. Haynes were commended in General Orders
for their good work on this case and Constable T. C. Fraser, of Merritt, for his valuable
assistance.
Rex vs. Dickie, Phillip (Theft of Bonds).—-On June 17th, 1944, Mrs. F. M. Phillips,
insurance and real-estate agent at Kimberley, complained that six $100 Victory Bonds
and $20 in cash had been stolen from her office. Little progress was made in the matter
until September 20th when Mrs. Phillips received a letter from the Public Debt Division
at Ottawa advising her that one of the stolen Victory Bonds had been accepted by the
Bank of Montreal at Calgary on June 28th and cashed by one J. or G. Bell.
On receipt of this information a careful investigation was made of all persons who
might have been absent from Kimberley around this date and the handwriting of one
Phillip Dickie, who left Kimberley shortly after June 24th, corresponded to the writing
on the receipt given to the bank. The Calgary City Police co-operated and ascertained
that Phillip Dickie had joined the armed forces on June 29th and was then stationed at
Shilo Camp, Manitoba. His wife's address in Calgary was obtained and on being
interviewed she produced three of the stolen bonds, which had been given to her by
her husband.
A warrant was then issued for the arrest of Dickie and when executed the other
two stolen bonds were found in his possession. October 16th Dickie appeared before
M. J. Halpin, Police Magistrate at Kimberley, pleaded guilty to theft of the bonds and
money, and was sentenced to six months' imprisonment in Oakalla Prison Farm. He
made full restitution to Mrs. Phillips.
Constables D. H. Howell and T. F. Baker were commended in General Orders for
their good work. The co-operation rendered by the Calgary City Police and Royal
Canadian Mounted Police was also of great assistance in bringing this case to a successful conclusion.
Rex vs. Fleming, Stuart Wellington (Theft of Motor-car).—August 11th, 1944,
Constable G. Brabazon, Invermere Detachment, was notified by the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police at Banff, Alberta, that Stuart Wellington Fleming, who had escaped
from the Port Arthur Gaol on July 6th, was reported to be in his Detachment area.
The following day while at Fairmont Hot Springs he noticed a young man answering
Fleming's description disappear into the surrounding bush. As it was impossible to
make an effective search with any hope of success, immediate plans were made to prevent his escape from the vicinity. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Game
Warden co-operated; roads were patrolled and guards stationed at all strategic points.
Late that evening a car, stolen from a dance at Canal Flats, 17 miles south of the
Springs, broke through a detail guarding the Kootenay River bridge and sped towards
Kimberley. A chase followed to Ta Ta Creek, then to Wasa, Fort Steele, Bull River,
and Wardner; the main highway to Kimberley was blocked and the many side-roads
and trails were searched. Early the following morning Fleming, found asleep in the
stolen car parked behind the hotel at Elko by Constable H. O. Jamieson, was arrested
and taken to Cranbrook. Appearing before Stipendiary Magistrate C. R. Ward, he
pleaded guilty to theft of a motor-car and was sentenced to imprisonment for two
years less one day. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944. T 23
MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH.
Inspector George A. Hood reports as follows:—
It is somewhat, surprising to find that irrespective of the fact that the manufacture
of motor-vehicles of the private passenger type for civilian use has ceased and that the
manufacture of commercial type motor-vehicles for similar purposes has been greatly
curtailed, there were more motor-vehicle licences issued this year than last year for
both of these types of motor-vehicles.
Of the total of 131,956 motor-vehicle licences issued, 99,063 were for private passenger type motor-vehicles and the balance of 32,893 were for commercial type motor-
vehicles. This is an increase of 143 in the passenger type and 1,747 in the commercial
type over the number so issued last year.
Of the passenger type of motor-vehicles 2,509 were new registrations, of which
2,173 had been previously licensed elsewhere, while 1,857 new registrations were rej
corded for commercial type motor-vehicles, 371 of which had been licensed elsewhere.
The motor-vehicles which had been previously licensed elsewhere were brought
into this Province from the following places:—
Place. Passenger. Commercial.
Alberta   964 231
Saskatchewan   502 66
Manitoba  .  221 21
Ontario   228 19
Quebec   27                 	
New Brunswick   7
Nova Scotia   4                 	
Yukon   5 10
Total used car registrations (Canadian)    1,958 347
Alaska  1                 	
California  77 6
Colorado   2                 	
Florida  3                 	
Idaho  5 1
Illinois  2                  	
Indiana   2                  	
Iowa   2                  	
Louisiana   1 _____
Minnesota _  13                 	
Michigan   5                 	
Missouri   1                 	
Montana   5 3
Nebraska  6                 	
Nevada  2                 	
New Hampshire  1                	
New Jersey  1                	
New York  6                	
Ohio v  1
Oregon  14                	
Pennsylvania   2                	
South Dakota  2                	
Texas   1                	
Utah  2 T 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Washington     55
Wyoming      1
14
Total used car registrations (U.S.A.)
Bahamas	
213
24
Total used car registrations (other countries)
Total used car registrations, 1944 licence-year 2,173
Increases.
371
During the year increases were recorded over the preceding year for the following:  Increase. Per Cent.
Passenger, renewal      160
Commercial, renewal   2,088
Non-resident touring permits	
Non-resident special permits	
Trailer licences 	
Original motor-dealers' licences	
Additional plates, motor-dealers' licences
Original motor-cycle dealers' licences	
Salesmen's licences	
Class " A " chauffeurs' licences	
  96
  29
  498
  41
  24
  1
  13
  248
Class " B " chauffeurs' licences  155
Class " C " chauffeurs' licences _
White drivers' licences (original)
21
153
White drivers' licences (renewal)  2,870
Chauffeurs' drivers' licences (renewal)  2,132
Permits to minors       27
Learners' permits         1
Decreases.
Decreases under last year were registered for the following:—
Decrease.
Passenger, new registrations        16
Commercial, new registrations      341
Non-resident commercial permits      146
Permits for temporary operation        15
Motor-cycle licences      172
Transfers   4,256
Chauffeurs' white drivers' licences (original)   1,084
Salesmen's drivers' licences        12
Learners' licences        24
Motor-vehicle duplicate licences      635
0.2
7.2
5.5
16.6
9.8
21.7
11.8
50.0
7.2
16.9
8.7
0.1
1.3
2.1
13.0
0.5
0.1
Per Cent.
0.6
15.5
44.2
9.5
5.2
7.9
41.4
7.8
1.0
19.1 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 25
A comparative statement of licences, permits, etc., issued during the years 1937 to
1944, inclusive, is given in the following table:—
Comparative Statement of Licences, Permits, etc., issued during the
Licence-years 1937 to 1944, Inclusive.
Licences issued.
1937.
1
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.    [
1
1942.
1
1943.
1944.
Motor-vehicles—
Passenger (new) 	
Passenger (renewal)  	
12,732
78,817
9,416
84,930
9,213
87,524
9,608
91,844
8,543
96,867
3,237
97,345
2,526
96,394
2,509
96,554
91,549
94,346
96,737
101,452
105,410
100,582
98,920
99,063
3,323
19,656
2,149
20,856
2,209
21,203
2,603
21,735
3,652
23,016
3,870
25,214
2,198
28,948
1,857
Commercial (renewal) „  	
31,036
22,979
23,005
23,412
24,338
26,668
29,084
31,146
32,893
114,528
117,351
120,149
125,790
132,078
129,666
130,066
131,956
Non-resident touring motor-vehicle permits
Total non-resident special motor-vehicle per-
8,522
565
21
290
8,180
603
59
309
7,546
530
87
425
6,015
503
115
292
7,159
541
112
280
2,456
250
141
961
1,741
174
158
330
1,837
203
143
Total  non-resident  commercial  motor-vehicle
184
Motor-cycles—
258
1,555
188
1,681
197
1,741
478
1,776
337
2,084
981
2,246
237
3,069
184
2,950
Total motor-cycles	
1,813
1,869
1,938
2,254
2,421
3,227
3,306
3,134
3,186
323
488
47
692
2
3,351
327
483
21
713
3
3,549
322
450
19
650
3
3,753
321
437
23
612
3
8
4
1,695
48
27
72,388
1,020
8
1,333
21
10,880
66
14,282
141,387
2,607
548
10,038
7
499
7,025
173
6,163
1,754
4,213
163,335
4,165
294
412
19
538
4,169
228
250
6
319
5,041
189
203
5
180
1
2
1
1,258
18
19
53,822
1,465
13
1,770
31
19,367
150
11,435
134,169
1,439
2,615
16,383
154
4,808
437
2,282
784
3,332
34,434
5,539
Motor-dealers—
230
227
4
193
1
11
5
1,600
63
24
68,604
1,184
9
1,507
26
14,355
91
14,364
145,592
2,184
992
12,637
6
477
7,266
134
5,203
5,203
4,139
75,320
6
1
1,053
35
19
47,677
1,310
11
1,685
37
17,478
127
11,691
140,456
1,805
1,856
14,420
	
290
5,413
262
2,585
778
2,919
40,782
3
1,735
47
22
66,429
799
5
1,318
14
9,006
42
18,248
127,226
2,609
510
8,184
17
462
5,082
90
2,093
721
4,527
107,478
1,416
36
21
62,576
857
6
1,304
5
9,218
56
15,605
134,934
2,718
403
9,045
4
532
5,009
74
2,537
907
4,267
148,298
1,512
40
10
64,325
911
6
1,307
9,601
38
11,764
136,610
2,865
299
9,610
6
532
5,351
127
4,530
1,389
3,926
80,930
1,382
22
17
Transfers  	
Chauffeurs—
49,566
1,713
12
17
19,388
60
Drivers—
11,588
137,038
1,266
1,531
18,515
Salesmen's (original) .'	
142
Permits to minors  —- ,	
4,835
305
Learners' licences -	
Learners' permits to minors  	
2,258
785
2,697
1,530 T 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Of the motor-vehicles licensed, 104,585 (79.3 per cent.) were at Coast points, while
27,371 (20.7 per cent.) were at Interior points. The following table, which shows the
issuance of motor-vehicle licences according to issuing office, gives, with the exception
of Victoria and Fernie, the distribution of motor-vehicles throughout the Province:—
1944 Motor-vehicle Licences issued according to Issuing Offices.
Issuing Office.
Passenger Motor-vehicles.
Used.
New.
Renewals.
Commercial Motor-vehicles.
Used. ' New.
newals.
Total.
Grand
Total.
Vancouver..	
Victoria..	
New Westminster..
Nanaimo	
Vernon 	
Nelson  _
Rossland  	
Cumberland	
Duncan 	
Penticton	
Kelowna — 	
Pouce Coupe 	
Kamloops -
Cranbrook 	
Alberni 	
Fernie	
Prince George-
Salmon Arm	
Prince Rupert.
Powell River.—
Oliver...	
Fort Fraser	
Princeton	
Smithers	
Williams Lake-
Grand Forks	
Revelstoke —
New Denver	
Lillooet	
Windermere	
Quesnel	
Merritt 	
Golden	
Greenwood	
Ashcroft — -
Clinton.	
Kaslo  	
Barkerville	
Stewart	
Atlin.	
Telegraph Creek..
Totals ....
719
271
356
43
47
46
18
22
14
40
50
205
10
32
5
182
21
12
12
3
17
1
1
4
264
34
6
1
1
5
2
2
38,326
17,341
15,292
2,489
1,929
1,637
1,870
1,869
1,842
1,580
1,404
687
1,186
1,311
1,052
534
613
586
469
567
432
324
327
281
247
274
300
222
229
173
189
219
181
145
120
98
83
86
23
17
39,309
17,646
15,654
2,533
1,977
1,688
1,890
1,893
1,859
1,620
1,454
896
1,199
1,346
1,057
717
637
598
482
570
449
326
329
285
247
282
306
223
231
182
190
221
190
146
120
100
85
86
23
17
2,173
336
96,554
99,063
27
27
44
5
8
12
5
1
1
2
6
142
1
1,002
154
77
17
20
29
11
4
9
11
10
34
16
17
5
8
10
2
13
2
6
1
5
3
4
2
11,450
4,249
3,981
772
964
903
515
459
464
624
783
804
606
443
252
233
342
298
340
173
276
256
160
177
196
143
119
166
114
130
120
70
92
97
85
73
36
30
19
16
7
12,479
4,430
4,102
794
992
944
531
464
474
637
799
980
623
466
257
277
357
303
365
175
289
259
160
182
200
148
119
169
115
148
120
71
97
97
85
73
38
30
19
18
7
1,486
31,036  | 32,893
51,788
22,076
19,756
3,327
2,969
2,632
2,421
2,357
2,333
2,257
2,253
1,876
1,822
1,812
1,314
994
994
901
847
745
738
585
489
467
447
430
425
392
346
330
310
292
287
243
205
173
123
116
42
35
7
131,966 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 27
Although the issuance at Victoria is shown in the foregoing table as 17,646 passenger and 4,430 commercial motor-vehicle licences, a total of 22,076, there were 2,486
passenger and 779 commercial motor-vehicle licences issued by mail from the Victoria
Office tO Other points, as follows:— Passenger.       Commercial.
Vancouver   1,133 173
New Westminster _•_  123 36
Vancouver Island and Islands  343 113
Balance of Province  887 457
Out of Province  20 18
Total   2,506 797
Issuance to residents of Victoria and vicinity was 15,160 passenger and 3,651
commercial motor-vehicle licences, a total of 18,811.
The issuance at Fernie, which is shown in the foregoing table, is 717 passenger
and 277 commercial motor-vehicle licences, a total of 994, which includes 142 passenger
and 29 commercial motor-vehicle licences issued to persons coming into this Province
through the Crowsnest Pass and proceeding to other points. The issuance to residents
of the Fernie area is, therefore, 575 passenger and 248 commercial motor-vehicle
licences, a total of 823.
Makes of Motor-vehicles Licensed.
There was only one change this year in the standing of the first ten leading makes
of motor-vehicles. This change took place in the passenger field where Essex-
Terraplane superseded Chrysler in sixth place. The standing and number of the first
ten leading makes of motor-vehicles licensed during the years 1942 to 1944, inclusive,
is given hereunder:—
Passenger.
1942.
1943.
1944.
Place.
Make.
Number.
Place.
Make.
Number.
Place.
Make.
Number.
1
Ford
23,300
18,992
9,677
8,182
4,849
3,784
3,706
8,561
2,874
2,677
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Ford 	
23,019
18,559
9,777
8,221
4,746
3,593
3,551
3,471
2,846
2,573
1
2
3
4
5
6
10
Ford   -  	
Chevrolet   	
23,038
2
18 522
3
9,899
4
8,363
5
4,741
6
Essex-Terraplane
3,578
7
Essex-Terraplane
McLaughlin-Buick
Oldsmobile  	
Essex-Terraplane
McLaughlin-Buick —
Oldsmobile —	
Nash	
3,552
8
9
McLaughlin-Buick
3,491
2,866
10
Nash  	
2,564
Commercial.
1
9,474
5,964
3,583
1,973
1,262
1,000
519
385
334
334
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Ford   -	
Chevrolet  	
10,761
6,201
3,873
2,112
1,372
1,106
625
455
331
323
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1 Ford    __ _	
11,231
2
| Chevrolet - — 	
International 	
6,521
International  _
3,915
4
2,244
5
G.M.C. ...  	
G.M.C _	
| G.M.C. -- _ _
1,513
1,115
7
627
8
Willys              	
Willys	
| "Willys - _ -	
584
9
341
10
Reo   _	
[ Reo       '	
325
1 T 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue.
The total revenue collected under the " Motor-vehicle Act" from licences, permits,
and fees during the licence-year 1944, less fees received from drivers' examinations,
amounted to $2,889,692.71, of which $1,999,296.72 (69.2 per cent.) was collected
through the main three issuing offices of this Branch located at Vancouver, Victoria,
and New Westminster, which collected $1,093,339.25, $471,684.22, and $434,273.25
respectively, the balance of $890,395.99 being accounted for through the various Government Agencies throughout the Province and Police Detachments reporting through
such agencies.
During the same period $15,770 was collected for drivers' examination fees, this
being a slight increase of $129 (0.8 per cent.) over the amount so collected during the
previous year. Of this amount, $5,917 was collected at the Vancouver motor licence
office, $2,437 at the New Westminster motor licence office, and the balance of $7,416
at the Victoria motor licence office and by travelling units operating in various parts
of the Province and reporting to such office.
The amount of $6,695.25 was also collected in addition to the above at the Victoria
office in connection with the registration of documents under the " Bills of Sale Act,"
" Conditional Sales Act," and the " Mechanics' Lien Act," and searches, etc., made
thereunder.   This is a slight increase of $110.40 over the amount so collected last year.
The number of refunds made this year showed an increase of 238 per cent., there
being 7,303, amounting to $35,567.80, as compared with 2,160, amounting to $16,178.17,
last year. This sharp increase was caused by refunding 20 per cent, of the annual
licence fees of 5,665 motor-vehicles of the private passenger type which had been paid
in full before the legislation authorizing such rebate was passed. While there was also
an increase of 115 (61.5 per cent.) in the number of miscellaneous refunds made, the
amount refunded decreased by $750.47 (21.8 per cent.). The number of refunds made
on relinquishment of licences under section 13 (2) of the " Motor-vehicle Act"
decreased by 301 (32.6 per cent.), and the amount of such refunds by $2,300.98 (35.2
per cent.). Seasonal refunds made under section 50 of the "Motor-vehicle Act" also
decreased this year by 336 (32 per cent.), and the amount refunded by $2,600.72 (42.9
per cent.), as compared with similar refunds made last year.
Examination of Motor-vehicle Drivers.
There were approximately the same number of drivers' examinations given during
the licence-year 1944 as in the previous year, the number given this licence-year being
only 53 less than the number given last year. Of the 14,564 drivers' examinations
given this year, 12,146 (83.4 per cent.) were given to male applicants and 2,418 (16.6
per cent.) to female applicants, which is a reduction of 309 (2.4 per cent.) in the
number given to male applicants but an increase of 256 (10.5 per cent.) in the number
given to female applicants.
As a result of these examinations it was found necessary to place restrictions on
the drivers' licences of 2,742 persons, which is 18.8 per cent.) of the number examined.
Of these, 2,742 persons, 2,319 (84.5 per cent.) were male and 423 (15.5 per cent.)
were female. It was also found necessary to prohibit 34 male applicants from driving.
Particulars of the reasons for the restrictions imposed, as well as for the failures,
segregated into age-groups, are shown in the following table:— REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 29
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Vision, including glasses	
Periphery, including glasses
Physical condition 	
Road tests  __ 	
0 T 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Drivers' examinations were also given to 2,178 of the mechanical transport personnel of His Majesty's Military, Naval, and Air Forces in accordance with existing
arrangements with such authorities.
The places at which such examinations were conducted and the personnel to whom
such examinations were given are as follows:—
Place.
Military.
Navy.
Air Force.
Total.
52
262
2
19
282
6
272
79
105
4
72
12
319
164
267
4
12
50
140
6
29
5
15
52
262
6
33
2
19
282
Nelson        ...	
6
272
Prince George     	
Prince Rupert..—   —	
79
117
4
77
Trail _     	
12
369
Vernon    —
164
422
Totals                               	
1,917
206
55
2,178
Convictions.
The number of convictions reported this year totalled 4,583, of which 3,545 were
under the provisions of the " Motor-vehicle Act" and regulations, 728 under section
285 of the Criminal Code, and 310 under the provisions of Order in Council No. 2800
(40-miles-per-hour speed-limit). This was a decrease of 135 (2.9 per cent.) in the
number of similar infractions reported during 1943. Of the convictions reported, 4,044
(88.2 per cent.) were for violations which took place within municipalities, the balance
of 539 taking place in unorganized territory.
Particulars of the types of convictions reported under the provisions of the " Motor-
vehicle Act " and regulations, as well as under section 285 of the Criminal Code, during
the years 1941 to 1944, inclusive, are given in the following table:—
Convictions under "Motor-vehicle Act " and Section 285, Criminal Code, 1941-44.
Offence.
1941.
1943.
Failing to stop after accident  —	
Unlawfully taking a motor-vehicle  	
Driving a motor-vehicle while intoxicated - _     -
Failure to obtain motor-vehicle licence or permit, mount same, etc.	
Failure of dealer to notify re sale, misuse of dealers' plates, etc.	
Operating with " D " plates without salesman's licence or permit, etc.
Failure to register as a tourist    _	
Employing unlicensed chauffeur      	
71
44
92
17
15
10
1
59
59
74
16
17
12
No driver's licence or failure to produce same, etc 	
Failing to take necessary precaution re horse-drawn vehicles .
Failing to take necessary precaution re street-cars  	
Failing to stop on approach of fire and police patrol.
Exceeding speed-limit passing schools and playgrounds	
Exceeding speed-limit indicated by " speed " signs 	
Driving to common danger, exceeding speed-limit in cities, etc.
Failing to report accident, etc _  	
Minor operating motor-vehicle without permit  	
49
52
736
701
65
62
8
31
1,520
1,256
723
708
3,098
2,223
56
50
60
34
32
84
33
14
2
3
1
33
621
2
42
13
834
471
1,384
59
19
83
33
10
3
1
2
44
614
57
11
880
440
1,235
52
57 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 31
Convictions under " Motor-vehicle Act " and Section 285, Criminal Code,
1941-44—Continued.
Offence.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
Operating motor-cycle with person in front of driver..	
Failing to transfer motor-vehicle, etc.. 	
3
5
64
28
20
48
78
21
2
149
5
1
5
2
32
63
45
7
46
1
31
69
2
2
5
8
1
82
2
4
1
7
82
41
13
39
100
17
1
1
164
2
4
2
34
58
23
5
23
8
52
46
6
6
87
2
1
4
102
25
21
43
59
16
1
1
169
2
1
3
1
28
31
27
8
25
4
30
63
1
11
71
3
2
1
70
56
12
38
Driving motor-vehicle as chauffeur without chauffeur's licence or permit
75
11
4
1
Failure to produce driver's licence to Magistrate, Police, etc  	
142
1
2
2
37
28
26
2
14
13
52
Failing to give required signals on turning or stopping 	
51
1
1
3
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence	
Altering number-plates and use of fictitious plates  _	
Operating defective motor-vehicle after ordered off road 	
Operating motor-vehicle with improperly mounted or unauthorized fog,
67
1
Totals    .".	
7,396
6,178
4,398
4,273
Suspensions and Cancellations.
There was a slight increase of 20 (3.2 per cent.) in the number of drivers' licences
it was found necessary to suspend or refuse this year, there being 638 which had to be
dealt with in this manner, as compared with 618 last year. Again this year the drivers'
licences held by minors were the largest group affected in this way, amounting to 54 per
cent, of the total. This, however, is less than last year, when 57.2 per cent, of the total
which had to be dealt with were in this group. An increase of 31 (23.8 per cent.)
over last year was also registered in the number of drivers' licences which it was found
necessary to suspend for driving to the common danger, as well as an increase of 3 for
manslaughter, 2 for failing to return to the scene of an accident, 1 under the Defence
of Canada Regulations, 2 for taking motor-vehicles without the consent of the owners,
and 13 who were unfit. However, a decrease of 1 was registered in the number of
drivers' licences which had to be dealt with for driving while intoxicated, as well as a
decrease of 4 for making a false statement, 5 for driving while licence suspended, and
10 for exceeding speed-limits. T 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The reasons for the suspensions imposed, as well as the length of time of such
suspensions, are given in the following table:—
Reason.
Sir
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Driving to the common danger and reckless
driving—__   , _ 	
Driving a motor-vehicle while intoxicated	
Manslaughter  _ _ ,.„.
50
5
1
3
2
16
4
1
37
1
4
1
1
3
	
1
9
1
5
39
17
6
3
1
1
1
1
8
5
10
19
4
289
3
1
1
8
2
37
36
161
23
8
2
345
8
Driving while licence suspended  	
Taking  motor-vehicle  without  consent  of
owner  ■    __ __ _
1
2
9
Loaning licence.—     	
Not in possession of a driver's licence	
Defence of Canada Regulations (O.C. 2800)
Unfit        	
1
1
3
37
36
Totals  _	
61
21
48
10
5
68
9
5
10
318
83
638
Under the financial responsibility sections of the " Motor-vehicle Act" it was also
necessary to suspend 747 drivers' licences and 446 motor-vehicle licences this year.
This is an increase of 17 (2.3 per cent.) in the number of drivers' licences and an
increase of 12 (2.7 per cent.) in the number of motor-vehicle licences suspended for
this reason last year.
Upon the necessary proof of financial responsibility being submitted 580 drivers'
licences were reinstated and 451 motor-vehicle licences were also reinstated upon
bona-fide sale of the motor-vehicle to other persons or upon the necessary proof of
financial responsibility being submitted. This is an increase over last year of 81 (16.2
per cent.) in the number of drivers' licences so reinstated. Motor-vehicle licences
reinstated showed a decrease of 56 (12.4 per cent.) under the number reinstated last
year.
Suspensions and reinstatements of drivers' licences and motor-vehicle licences
under the financial responsibility sections of the " Motor-vehicle Act " during the year
were as follows:—
Reason.
Drivers'
Licences.
Motor-vehicle Licences.
Suspended.
Reinstated.
Suspended.
Reinstated.
Driving to common danger or reckless driving  	
351
287
203
155
No further proof of financial responsibility given upon expiration
of proof previously given   	
273
234
219
152
Failing to remain at or return to the scene of an accident	
18
15
10
7
1
4
1
1
1
1
Taking motor-vehicle without owner's consent — -	
73
7
Driving or in charge of a motor-vehicle while intoxicated  	
26
25
13
9
Motor-vehicles transferred   _ - —	
126
Driving while driver's licence under suspension —-  	
4
6
Criminal negligence  -	
1
1
747
580
446 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944. T 33
Motor-vehicle Accidents.
I am very pleased to be able to report that irrespective of the fact that there was
an increase of 1.3 per cent, in the number of motor-vehicles licensed this year there
was a slight decrease in the number of motor-vehicle accidents, there being 5,203 as
compared with 5,213 during 1943. A decrease was also recorded in the number of
persons injured and in the number of fatalities emanating from this source. The
number of persons injured this year totalled 2,296 as compared with 2,403 last year,
a decrease of 107 (4.4 per cent.), and the number of persons who received fatal injuries
this year was 115, which is 6 less than last year, a decrease of 4.9 per cent. There was,
however, an increase of $33,500.99 (5.6 per cent.) in the amount of property damage
caused, such damage for the year amounting to $626,474.37, as compared with
$592,973.38 last year.
There were 105 fatal accidents this year as compared with 114 last year, a decrease
of 9 (7.8 per cent.). The number of motor-vehicles of the private passenger type and
motor-cycles, excepting taxis, involved in fatal accidents again decreased this year,
while the number of taxis and delivery motor-vehicles so involved increased.
Motor-vehicle accidents which occurred at railroad crossings showed an increase
of 36 per cent., there being 34 this year as compared with 25 last year, resulting in 6
persons receiving fatal injuries and 12 persons non-fatal injuries, as compared with
4 persons receiving fatal injuries and 3 persons receiving non-fatal injuries in this
connection last year. Out of the 34 accidents which occurred at railroad crossings this
year, 28 (82.3 per cent.) took place at unguarded crossings.
Again this year more motor-vehicle accidents took place on a Saturday than on
any other day, and the peak hour for accidents was between 4 and 5 p.m. Of the drivers
involved in motor-vehicle accidents 92.4 per cent, were male, and of those drivers
involved in fatal motor-vehicle accidents 97 per cent, were male. Last year 11 persons
were fatally injured in 5 motor-vehicle accidents, while this year 15 persons were
fatally injured in the same number of accidents. A slight increase was also recorded
this year in the number of members of the National Defence Forces who received fatal
injuries in motor-vehicle accidents, there being 17 of such members so injured as compared with 16 last year.   Of these, 10 were passengers, 5 drivers, and 2 pedestrians.
Drivers who did not have the right-of-way were again responsible for contributing
to more accidents than any other group, while the group who " drove off the highway "
were involved in more fatal accidents.
This year 648 pedestrians were involved in motor-vehicle accidents, of which 39
received fatal injuries. This is an improvement over last year when 665 pedestrians
were so involved, resulting in 48 fatalities. While more pedestrians were injured in
the street between intersections and also in crossing at intersections where no signal
was installed, the most dangerous practice was in walking on or along a highway. The
percentage of fatal injuries in such cases was 16.4 per cent, as compared with 3 per
cent, in crossing at intersections where no signal was installed and 6.3 per cent, in
being in the street between intersections.
There were 214 bicyclists involved in motor-vehicle accidents this year as compared with 232 last year. Of these, 5 received fatal injuries and 209 non-fatal injuries
as compared with 7 fatal injuries and 225 non-fatal injuries last year.
Motor-vehicle accidents which occurred during the hours of darkness still continue
to be nearly twice as fatal as those taking place during daylight hours. This year during the hours of darkness 1 accident in every 36 was fatal, while during the daylight
hours 1 accident in every 60 was fatal.
Of the motor-vehicle accidents occurring, 3,621 (69.6 per cent.) took place within
city municipalities, resulting in 51 (44.35 per cent.) of the fatalities, 1,545  (67.3 per T 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
cent.) of the persons injured, and $365,874.89 (58.4 per cent.) of the property damage
caused. This was a decrease of 115 (3.07 per cent.) in the number of accidents but an
increase of 6 (13.3 per cent.) in the number of fatalities, an increase of 41 (2.7 per
cent.) in the number of persons injured, and an increase of $1,269.20 (0.34 per cent.)
in the amount of property damage caused in such municipalities in comparison with
last year.
Motor-vehicle accidents occurring in district municipalities totalled 713, which was
13.7 per cent, of the total motor-vehicle accidents in the Province. These accidents
caused 23 (20 per cent.) of the fatalities, 367 (16 per cent.) of the injuries, and
$114,626.83 (18.3 per cent.) of the property damage caused this year. This was a
decrease of 5 (17.8 per cent.) in the number of fatalities, a decrease of 93 (20.2 per
cent.) in the number of persons injured, but an increase of $8,960.59 (8.4 per cent.)
in the amount of property damage caused as compared with last year.
In the unorganized portions of the Province 869 motor-vehicle accidents occurred
this year, which was 16.7 per cent, of the total motor-vehicle accidents. As a result of
these accidents, 41 persons received fatal injuries, which was 35.65 per cent, of the
total fatalities; 384 persons were injured, which was 16.7 per cent of the total injuries;
and property damage of $145,972.65 was caused, which is 23.3 per cent, of the total
property damage caused. This was an increase of 121 (16.1 per cent.) in the number
of reportable motor-vehicle accidents and an increase of $23,271.20 (18.9 per cent.) in
the amount of property damage caused, but a decrease of 7 (14.5 per cent.) in the
number of fatalities and a decrease of 55 (12.5 per cent.) in the number of persons
injured as compared with last year.
For purposes of comparison, a statement giving further details according to location of the motor-vehicle accidents occurring during this year and last year is given
in Appendix III., while a statistical summary of reportable motor-vehicle accidents
which occurred during the year is given in Appendix IV.
From the following brief summary in connection with reportable motor-vehicle
accidents occurring during the years 1941 to 1944, inclusive, it will be noted that, with
the exception of the amount of property damage caused, the steady decrease in the
ratio of motor-vehicle accidents has continued.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
133,231
6,799
19
129
1,032
3.227
41
$796,321.87
$5.97
132,435
5,451
24
125
1,059
2,437
54
$620,440.31
$4.68
133,150
5,213
25
121
1,100
2,403
55
$592,973.38
$4.45
134,942
Number of motor-vehicle accidents  	
Number of motor-vehicles per accident 	
6,203
26
115
1,173
2,296
58
$626,474.37
$4.64
Number of motor-vehicles per person injured  	
Amount of property damage caused by motor-vehicle accidents
Highway Patrol.
Members of the Force, whose principal duties are the enforcement of all legislation relating to the control of traffic, made 164,281 check-ups and investigated 346
motor-vehicle accidents this year and in doing so travelled 169,318 miles. This was
a decrease of 15,493 (8.6 per cent.) in the number of check-ups made as compared with
last year. The distance travelled in connection with their duties this year, however,
increased by 4,874 miles (2.9 per cent.) over last year, while the number of accidents
investigated was one more than last year. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 35
The type of ckeck-ups made and the number of the same according to Division was
as follows:—
"A"
Division.
"B "
Division.
" C"
Division.
"E"
Division.
Total.
Motor-vehicle licences   	
Motor-vehicle salesmen's licences	
10,415
182
459
2,315
10,415
2,325
10,415
1,492
382
4,454
1,995
10,415
2,689
1,873
1,969
4,381
51
350
1,018
4,304
1,978
4,399
687
558
1,263
601
4,404
3,602
773
926
7,849
131
169
2,988
7,849
1,115
7,849
4,581
1,016
1,689
1,563
1,490
1,177
1,742
2,001
5,505
24
284
1,147
5,481
745
5,458
799
136
1,531
569
3,378
2,652
1,005
1,268
28,150
388
1,262
7,468
28,049
6,163
28,121
Motor-vehicle head-lights, etc., tested    	
7,559
2,092
8,937
4,728
19,687
10,120
5,393
6,164
Totals -    .... ...	
61,795
29,295
43,209
29,982
164,281
The number of convictions registered as a result of these check-ups showed an
increase of 57 (9 per cent.), there being 689 convictions this year as compared with 632
last year, while the amount of fines and costs as a result of such convictions amounted
to $9,365.05, an increase of $1,197.45 (14.6 per cent.) over last year, and there were 9
cases of imprisonment as compared with 4 last year, an increase of 125 per cent.
Convictions obtained in this connection were as follows:—
Convictions.
Fines and Costs.
Imprisonments.
323
85
129
46
16
9
39
29
4
4
3
2
$3,210.50
848.25
1,632.75
1,206.55
815.25
67.50
264.00
887.00
56.76
90.00
238.25
48.25
5
3
Totals	
689
$9,365.05
The sum of $3,628.29 was also collected for fees, etc., under the " Motor-vehicle
Act " and " Motor Carrier Act" as a direct result of these check-ups. This was also
an increase of $616.65 (20.4 per cent.) over the amount so collected last year.
" Bills of Sale Act," " Conditional Sales Act," and
" Mechanics' Lien Act."
A decrease in the number of documents filed under the " Conditional Sales Act "
was again registered this year, there being 5,306 registrations made and 195 releases
filed, a decrease of 2,014 (27.5 per cent.) in the number of registrations and a decrease
of 28 (12.5 per cent.) in the number of releases.
However, an increase of 20.5 per cent, was recorded in the number of registrations
made under the " Bills of Sale Act" and an increase of 4 per cent, in the number of
releases filed under such Act, 2,015 registrations being made and 156 releases filed. T 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The number of searches made under the " Bills of Sale Act " and " Conditional
Sales Act" this year totalled 3,797, of which 1,846 were made under the " Bills of Sale
Act" and the balance of 1,951 under the " Conditional Sales Act." This was 696 more
than were made under these Acts last year, an increase of 22.4 per cent., and is the
largest number of searches made under such Acts in any year since the filing of documents under the same was centralized in this office in 1932.
The value of the law-stamps sold showed a slight increase and search tickets also
showed an increase, while decreases were registered in the value of law-stamps attached
to documents when received and in miscellaneous searches and certificates.
For purposes of comparison, the number of registrations and releases filed as well
as the number of searches made and the revenue collected under the above-mentioned
Acts by this Branch during this year and last year are given in the following table:—
Item.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
Per
Cent.
7,320
1,672
41
223
150
1,554
1,547
5,306
2,015
45
195
156
1,951
1,846
343
4
2,014
27.57
20.51
Registrations under " Mechanics' Lien Act ".. —	
28
9.76
12.56
6
397
299
4.00
25.55
19.33
$6,005.00
4,679.50
542.15
37.70
$6,012.50
3,697.00
656.50
26.25
$7.50
114.35
0.125
Value of law-stamps attached to documents when received .
Value of " Bills of Sale Act " and " Conditional Sales Act "
$982.50
20.99
21.09
11.45
$11,264.35
$10,392.25
$872.10
Public Passenger Vehicles.
As the result of 488 inspections of public passenger vehicles made this year by our
Mechanical Inspection Branch 62 (13.8 per cent.) such motor-vehicles were found to
have defective brakes and 140 (31.2 per cent.) defective steering. The necessary action
was taken immediately to have these defects corrected before the motor-vehicles concerned were permitted to continue to operate as public carriers.
Although there was an increase of 25 (22.1 per cent.) in the number of motor-
vehicle accidents in which this type of motor-vehicle was involved this year, the number
of persons injured in this connection was 59 (53.6 per cent.) less than the number so
injured last year, and there were only 2 fatalities as compared with 8 last year, a
reduction of 75 per cent., while only 31 persons required hospitalization from this
source as compared with 68 last year, a reduction of 45.5 per cent.
School Buses.
School-bus permits were issued this year for 257 school buses as compared with
213 last year, an increase of 20.6 per cent. These school buses were inspected from
time to time as warranted, 193 such inspections being made. As a result of such
inspections brakes were found defective in 23 cases and steering-gear defective in 51
cases.   Such defects were immediately corrected.
During the year there were only 2 accidents in which school buses were involved.
In one instance one bus was struck in the rear by another, no persons being injured.
In the other a school child ran into the side of the bus and had two bones broken in
her foot.
Nine new school buses were built in this Province during the year and our
Mechanical Inspectors were asked to co-operate in all instances with the School Boards
or contractors to see that these motor-vehicles complied with our regulations. REPORT OP PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944. T 37
Gasoline Licence and Ration Coupon Books.
Full co-operation was again given this year to the Dominion Oil Controller in
connection with the issuance of gasoline licence and ration coupon books by the various
motor-vehicle licence issuing offices throughout the Province from March until the end
of May. During this period 85,987 category "AA" ration coupon books were issued for
the private passenger type of motor-vehicles and 1,088 ration coupon books were issued
for motor-cycles, a total of 87,075. The sum of $87,075 was collected on behalf of the
Dominion Oil Controller and remitted to him less the actual cost incurred in connection
with the issuance of the same.
CONCLUSION.
In closing may I again express appreciation to the Deputy Commissioner, Mr. John
Shirras, our Inspectors, and those many departmental officers whose personal contributions have done so much to facilitate the administrative requirements of the times. In
this connection, too, I should also like to express the thanks of all of us for your own
sympathetic understanding and continued assistance in dealing with our many and
diversified problems.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
T. W. S. PARSONS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police.   T 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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T 45
APPENDIX II.
BRITISH COLUMBIA POLICE.
Nominal Roll as at December 31st, 1944.
Headquarters.
Commissioner—T. W. S. Parsons, Victoria.
Deputy Commissioner—J. Shirras, Vancouver.
Commissioner's Office— Reg.. No.
Inspector Clark, C, Victoria   	
Asst. Chief Clerk Patterson, E., Victoria   134
Mrs. B. W. McGregor, Victoria 	
Radio Branch—
Chief Radio Opr. Conlan, W. F., Victoria   493
Sr. Radio Opr. Weld, B. C, Victoria 495
1/Radio Opr. Hicks, J. M., Victoria.. 588
Criminal Investigation Branch—
Inspector Peachey, R., Victoria  	
Sergt. Ledoux, C, Victoria  253
Sergt. Young, J. A., Victoria   524
Corpl. Butler, W. J., Victoria :  417
Det. Shand, D. J., Victoria  436
Sr. Clerk Ockenden, C. O., Victoria. 273
Miss D. P. Neate  (steno.), Victoria.. 	
Miss P. S. Byrom (steno.), Victoria.. 	
Miss M. R. Smith (steno.), Victoria. 	
Miss V. C. Burnett (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss M. McConnell (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss M. W. Holder (steno.), Victoria 	
C.I.B.—Finger-print Bureau—
Asst.  F.P.  Supr.  Carmichael, A.  G.,
Victoria   341
Sr. F.P. Opr. Edwards, J. W., Vancouver   338
1/Cst. Pearson, G. S., Victoria   579
Miss D. Lancaster  (steno.), Victoria 	
C.I.B.—Firearms Registration Bureau—
Sr. Clerk Grimshaw, F., Victoria   445
Miss M. E. Brinn (steno.), Victoria.. 	
Miss T. M. Vye (steno.), Victoria ..... 	
Miss J. R. Robson (steno.), Victoria.. 	
Miss M.  D. Rogerson   (steno.), Victoria   	
Advisory Council (P.C.P.C. and
A.R.P.) —
Inspr. Moodie, S. F. M., Vancouver.. 	
Sergt. Cline, S., Vancouver     79
Sergt. Hughes, H. P., Vancouver   225
1/Cst. Deane, J. M., Vancouver  577
2/Cst. Gilbert, R., Vancouver ....  890
2/Cst. Turtle, A. J., Vancouver  892
3/Cst. Duddy, H., Vancouver  956
Miss N. Munkley (steno.), Vancouver 	
Advisory Council (P.C.P.C. and
A.R.P.) —Continued.                     E<«t- No.
Miss M. G. Haskell (steno.), Vancouver 	
Miss J. M. A.  Smith   (steno.), Victoria  	
Accounts Branch—
Paymaster Moses, D. D., Victoria .... 647
Sr. Clerk Embleton, C. V., Victoria ... 327
1 /Clerk Campbell, C. G., Victoria ...   812
2/Clerk Excell, L. B., Victoria   876
3/Clerk Hodgins, D. R., Victoria ___ 967
Miss J. N. Smith (steno.), Victoria... 	
Miss A. H. Chaney (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss E. M. Butler (steno.), Victoria    	
Quartermaster's Stores—
1/Clerk Kirkpatrick, D. C, Victoria _ 710
1/Clerk Forbes, A. C, Victoria   629
Transport Branch—
Mech.   Supr.   McNaught,  J.   P.,  Victoria   409
Mrs. E. Mcintosh (steno.), Victoria	
Mrs. M. Johnson (steno.), Victoria ... 	
Police Training School—
S/Inspr. Mackenzie, C. K., Victoria . 	
1/Cst. McVie, W„ Victoria   815
Motor Branch—
Inspr. Hood, G. A., Victoria   	
S/Inspr. Hannah, J. P. M., Victoria	
Chief Clerk Paulding, J. E., Victoria 289
Chief Clerk Cooke, A. 0., Victoria ..... 292
Sr. Clerk Brown, P. H., Victoria  462
Mechanic Jaffray, W. A., Victoria .... 583
1/Clerk Sharpe, A., Victoria   676
1/Clerk Moore, H. G., Victoria   693
1/Clerk Hadfield, R. A„ Victoria  694
1/Clerk James, G. H., Victoria  748
1/Clerk Wilkinson, E., Victoria  753
1/Clerk Merkley, L. W., Victoria  754
1/Clerk Colpman, W. H., Victoria  755
1/Clerk Copeland, C. H., Victoria  756
1/Clerk Cox, R. A., Victoria  811
2/Clerk Jewkes, F. R., Victoria  846
Messenger Glancy, D. W., Victoria .... 	
Miss N. E. Johnson (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss V. Jacklin (steno.), Victoria.  	
Miss J.  M.  Thorburn   (steno.), Victoria   	 T 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Headquarters
Motor Branch—Continued. R<*t. No.
Miss M. Metro (steno.), Victoria	
Miss E. Bourne (steno.), Victoria	
Miss E. A. Kay (steno.), Victoria	
Miss I. R. Casilio (steno.), Victoria.- 	
Miss R. Balcom (steno.), Victoria  	
Miss E. J. M. Coates   (steno.), Victoria   	
Miss E. J. Thorne (steno.), Victoria	
Miss J. D. McGraw (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss M. E. Dykes (steno.), Victoria	
Miss M. D. King (steno.), Victoria... 	
Miss E. V. Watson (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss  J.  M.  Robinson   (steno.), Victoria   	
Miss A. D. Pattinson  (steno.), Victoria   	
Miss V. C. Ross  (steno.), Victoria..___ 	
Miss D. Jeeves (steno.), Victoria  	
Miss F. S. Porter (steno.), Victoria	
Miss L. M. Huzzey (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss A. W. Wilkinson  (steno.), Victoria   	
Miss  J.  B.  M.  Speck   (steno.), Victoria   	
Miss P. D. Green (steno.), Victoria ... 	
Miss I. M. Mclndoe (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss V. Lea  (steno.), Victoria  	
Miss E. W. Noble (steno.), Victoria	
Miss F. M. Byatt (steno.), Victoria	
Miss B. F. Barrick (steno.), Victoria 	
Mrs. R. Williams (steno.), Victoria.. 	
Mrs. G. E. Phillion (steno.), Victoria 	
Mrs. M. A. McKay (steno.), Victoria 	
Mrs. E. R. Slegg (steno.), Victoria	
Mrs. E. Moran  (steno.), Victoria  	
Mrs.   J.   C.   Marshall   (steno.);   Victoria   	
Mrs. C. W. Kaehn (steno.), Victoria.. 	
Mrs. S. M. Roach (steno.), Victoria  	
Mrs. J. W. Ireland (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss F. Y. E. Pready  (steno.), Victoria   	
:—Continued.
Motor Branch—Continued.                 Keet- No-
Miss D. W. E. Brethour (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss 0. M. Digby (steno.), Victoria.. 	
S/Inspr. Lord, J. S., Vancouver  320
Sr. Clerk Lord, F. N., Vancouver  498
Sr. Clerk Bestwick, A. M., Vancouver 416
1/Clerk Barclay, J., Vancouver  519
1/Clerk McPherson, A. B., Vancouver 539
1/Clerk Hamilton, S., Vancouver  745
1/Clerk Niven, J. J., Vancouver  747
1/Clerk Archibald, W., Vancouver  760
3/Clerk Walkinshaw, J. B., Vancouver   942
Miss G. Beattie (steno.), Vancouver.. 	
Mrs. V. Stone (steno.), Vancouver.... 	
Mrs. M. Godwin (steno.), Vancouver 	
Miss C. A. Stevenson  (steno.), Vancouver   	
Asst.  Chief Clerk Lindsay, G., New
Westminster   525
1/Clerk Fraser, P. R., New Westminster   623
1/Clerk  Denyer,  F.,  New  Westminster   750
1/Clerk Gunn, J. A., New Westminster   751
Mrs.    T.    McMillan    (steno.),    New
Westminster   	
Miss C. E. Salvail   (steno.), Courte-
nay 	
1/Clerk Gordon, W. K., Nanaimo...... 757
1/Clerk Pennock, G. S., Chilliwack ... 747
Miss E. C. Leary (steno.), Chilliwack 	
1/Clerk Moore, W., Vernon  744
Mrs. M. J. Harris (steno.), Kamloops 	
1/Clerk Amsden, P. H., Nelson  591
1/Clerk Fehner, H. H., Nelson  749
1/Clerk Jacklin, B. R., Dawson Creek 661
Miss M. D. Howey (steno.), Kimberley 	
Miss V. E. Wyatt (steno.), Trail	
"A" Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector R. Owens, Victoria.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Kennelly, T., Victoria
Stenographer—Miss V. Page, Victoria.
Motor Traffic Detail— Rest. No.
1/Cst. Lockie, J., Victoria  658
1/Cst. Ring, R., Nanaimo  665
Victoria District—
Sergt. Jacklin, C. C, Victoria  265
Cpl. Backler, L., Victoria  470
1/Cst. Daubeny, H. C. C, Victoria.... 437
Victoria District—Continued. R<«.- No.
1/Cst. Smyth, H., Victoria  578
1/Cst. Dryden, C. S., Victoria  779
1/Cst. Bruce, W. A., Victoria  787
1/Cst. Sinclair, R. W., Victoria  838
2/Cst. Coupland, W. B., Victoria  898
2/Cst. Hooker, E. J., Victoria  900 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 47
' A " Division—Continued.
Victoria District—Continued. Re«t- No.
3/Cst. Cawdell, C. A. B., Victoria... 958
Spec. Cst. Hovind, G. E., Victoria  	
3/Skpr. Lockwood, E. W., Ganges...... 492
1/Cst. Currie, W. J., Ganges  635
1/Cst. Gibault, J. G., Sidney  709
3/Cst. Douglas, D. T., Sidney  936
1/Cst. Quinn, A. W., Sooke  793
Duncan District—
Corpl. Henry, J. A., Duncan  414
1/Cst. Parsley, H., Duncan  613
1/Cst. Sarsiat, E. G., Duncan  697
1/Cst. McNamara, J. K., Duncan  806
1/Cst. Holm, E., Chemainus  573
2/Cst. Clunk, F. G., Chemainus  852
1/Cst. Grant, A., Cowichan Lake  251
1/Cst. Ross, R., Shawnigan Lake  515
1/Cst. Todd, J. W., Youbou  727
Nanaimo District—
S/Sergt. Russell, J., Nanaimo     44
Corpl. Howe, J., Nanaimo  365
1/Cst. Martin, M., Nanaimo  282
1/Cst. Tannock, A., Nanaimo  572
1/Cst. Vickers, A. E., Nanaimo  605
1/Cst. Wellens, A. S., Nanaimo  385
1/Cst. Stewart, T. A., Nanaimo  639
1/Cst. Healey, W. A., Nanaimo  609
1/Cst. Colquhoun, D., Nanaimo  637
2/Cst. Avis, F. D., Nanaimo  859
3/Cst. Brassard, G. H., Nanaimo  827
2/Cst. Van Meer, A. N., Nanaimo.... 870
1/Cst. Taylor, A. H., Ladysmith  830
2/Cst. Patton, F. D., Ladysmith  849
1/Cst. Clay, L. W., Qualicum  669
Courtenay District—
Sergt. Hatcher, W. J., Courtenay  210
1/Cst. Matheson, H., Courtenay  616
1/Cst. Figueiredo, C. T. J., Courtenay 777
2/Cst. Corson, E., Courtenay  858
2/Radio Opr. Patrick, H. C, Courtenay    880
Courtenay District—Continued. Reg.. No.
2/Cst. Cawdell, F. L., Courtenay  895
3/Cst. Ehly, J. M., Courtenay  960
1/Cst. Shepherd, J., Cumberland  699
Corpl. Davidson, W. H., Alert Bay.... 403
1/Cst. Cunningham, A. B., Alert Bay 830
3/Radio Opr. Humphreys, P. J., Alert
Bay	
1/Cst.  MacAlpine, M.  N.,  Campbell
River 	
2/Cst. Ennals, C. E., Campbell River..
2/Cst.   Morrison,   W.   R.,   Campbell
River 	
3/Cst.   McDonald,   J.   F.,   Campbell
963
533
885
894
River   984
3/Skpr. Bellhouse, C. A., Port Alice.. 471
1/Radio  Opr.  Muskett,  A.   H.,  Port
Alice  807
West Coast District—
Sergt. Service, S., Port Alberni  126
1/Cst. Hutchison, P. R., Port Alberni 528
1/Cst. Carlson, T., Port Alberni  646
1/Cst. Deans, W. W., Port Alberni... 732
1/Cst. Mann, H., Port Alberni  822
2/Cst.   Crammond,   N.   G.   W.,   Port
Alberni   850
3/Cst.    Abrahamson,    F.    G.,    Port
Alberni   949
Spec.   Cst.   Whitehead,   C.   A.,   Port
Alberni   	
Spec.    Cst.    Hammer,    E.    L.,    Port
Alberni   	
3/Skpr. Bond, V. J., P.M.L. 8, Port
Alberni   458
3/Engnr. Hardiman, I. R., P.M.L. 8,
Port Alberni   875
3/Cst. Domay, E. C, Port Alberni...... 933
1/Cst. Sweeney, J. P., Alberni  618
2/Cst. Redhead, G., Ucluelet  918
" B " Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector J. Macdonald, Nelson.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Smith, J. L., Nelson, Regt. No. 439.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Kidd, E. G., Nelson, Regt. No. 538.
Stenographer—Miss P. R. Ryan, Nelson.
Motor Traffic Detail—                        Re*t. No.
Asst. Mech.  Supvr. Lock, J. G. M.,
Nelson  453
1/Cst. Slater, F., Nelson  507
1/Cst. Elphick, N. H., Trail  735
1/Cst. Atchison, C. H., Penticton ... 819
2/Cst. Wells, N. W., Cranbrook  889
Boundary District— Regt. No.
Sgt. Halcrow, D., Penticton  440
Corpl. Murray, W. C, Penticton  424
1/Cst. Cartmell, H., Penticton  419
1/Cst. Georgeson, D. C, Penticton .... 632
1/Cst. Lindsay, H., Penticton   711
1/Radio Opr. Fleet, W. G., Penticton 660 T 48                                                    BRITISH
COLUMBIA.
" B " ]
Division—Continued.
Boundary District—Continued.          Regt. No.
East Kootenay District—Continued. Regt. No.
3/Cst. Attree, K. A., Penticton	
985
2/Cst. Howarth, P. W., Cranbrook....
883
1/Cst. Stewart, W. B., Keremeos	
39
2/Cst. Bacon, H. F., Cranbrook	
904
1/Cst. Wisenden, J. A., Keremeos	
790
3/Cst. Morton, D. S., Cranbrook	
977
1/Cst. Nelson, F. E., Oliver	
586
1/Cst. Winegarden, N. J., Invermere
415
1/Cst. Hassard, R. H., Princeton	
313
1/Cst. Howell, D. H., Kimberley	
826
1/Cst. Haynes, B. H., Princeton	
682
2/Cst. Baker, T. F., Kimberley	
905
3/Cst. Benton, W. E., Princeton	
990
3/Cst. Pringle, J. B., Kimberley 	
997
1/Cst. Knox, J. A., Summerland	
500
West Kootenay District—
Grand Forks District—
S/Sergt. Wood, H. N., Nelson	
73
Corpl. McKay, E. F., Grand Forks ....
456
Corpl. White, J., Nelson	
402
1/Cst. Drew, D. V., Grand Forks	
796
1/Cst. Emsley, G. J., Nelson	
509
2/Cst. Pelton, G. A., Grand Forks
862
1/Cst. Blaney, G. S., Nelson	
552
2/Cst. Cox, J. E. D., Grand Forks
871
1/Cst. Quigley, T. A., Nelson	
562
1/Cst. Rogers, D. G., Greenwood	
795
1/Cst. Martin, W., Lower Bonnington
786
Fernie District—
1/Cst. DeVoin, J. L. (on leave) 	
648
Corpl. Brabazon, A. G., Fernie	
434
1/Cst. Payne, J. R., Castlegar	
776
1/Cst. Lemm, W. I., Fernie	
555
3/Cst. Borodula, A., Castlegar	
996
1/Cst. Neff, D. G., Fernie	
666
1/Cst. Clark, J. S., Creston	
684
1/Cst. Gaunt, A., Fernie	
670
3/Cst. Cline, G. R., Creston	
1002
3/Cst. Ivens, R. J., Fernie	
952
1/Cst. Parsons, M. S., Fruitvale . ....
713
1/Cst. Doree, L. A., Natal	
360
1/Cst. Glaholm, T. W., Kaslo	
566
2/Cst. Spiers, D. A., Natal	
910
1/Cst. Butler, H. J., Nakusp	
571
East Kootenay District—
Sergt. McKay, W. J., Cranbrook	
337
1/Cst. Roberts, J. A., New Denver
831
Corpl. MacBrayne, M. B., Cranbrook
486
1/Cst. Jackson, J. S., Rossland City __
627
1/Cst. Shield, R., Cranbrook	
506
3/Cst. Dodd, W. J., Rossland City .....
992
1/Radio Opr. Ramsay, C. N., Cran
1/Cst. Pye, D. H., Salmo	
829
brook 	
718
1/Cst. Anderson, G. W., Trail	
774
"C"
Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector
C. G.
Barber, Kamloops.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Wellings, J. E., Kamloops, Regt. No. 399.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opi
. Reith, S. V., Kamloops, Regt. No. 422.
Motor Traffic Detail—                         Regt. No.
Kamloops City—Continued.                Regt. No.
Asst.   Mech.   Supr.   Fiander,   T.   A.,
3/Cst. Tateson, J. D., Kamloops	
954
Kamloops 	
447
3/Cst. Cofield, R. J., Kamloops	
963
1/Cst. Gurr, C. J., Vernon	
523
North-east Kootenay District—
1/Cst. Whisker, C, Salmon Arm	
703
Sergt. Jarvis, E. A., Revelstoke	
375
Kamloops District—
1/Cst. Macdonald, M., Revelstoke	
574
S/Sergt. Fairbairn, A., Kamloops	
33
1/Cst. Brandon, J. Q. W., Revelstoke
765
1/Clk. Brown, J. M., Kamloops	
517
1/Radio Opr. Bulman-Fleming, S. C,
1/Cst. Heatley, G. D., Kamloops	
559
Revelstoke	
808
1/Cst. Teal, W. T., Kamloops	
805
1/Cst. Godfrey, M. R., Revelstoke.....
841
2/Cst. Innes, R. J., Kamloops	
891
1/Cst. Craig, W. A., Golden	
782
1/Cst. Ball, G. D., Blue River	
837
Cariboo District—
1/Cst. Waddell, C. J„ Chase	
546
Sergt. Baker, T. R., Williams Lake...
135
1/Cst. Fraser, T. C, Merritt	
706
1/Cst. Sharpe, W. H., Williams Lake
601
3/Cst. Roberts, W. P., Red Pass.	
938
1/Cst. Kemp, W. H., Williams Lake ...
818
Kamloops City—
3/Radio Opr. Johnstone, R. L., Wil
Corpl. Jennings, H. J., Kamloops	
335
liams Lake	
980
1/Cst. Quaite, T.C.S., Kamloops	
680
1/Cst. Wales, E. A., Quesnel	
614
1/Cst. Buxton, L. P., Kamloops	
728
3/Cst. Ritson, J. C. W., Quesnel   .
940
1/Cst. Forrester, R., Kamloops	
770
1/Cst. Anderson, E. D., Barkerville ...
625
2/Cst. Hornsby, M. A., Kamloops
888
1/Cst. Bailey, W. G., Alexis Creek
547 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 49
" C " Division—Continued.
Yale District— Regt. No.
Sergt. Hooker, J. W., Ashcroft  388
1/Cst. Grahame, M. G., Ashcroft  526
2/Cst. Dykes, J. N., Ashcroft  907
1/Cst. Holley, J. R., Bralorne  827
1/Cst. Olson, L. I., Bridge River  511
1/Cst. Gray, J. F. L., Clinton  663
1/Cst. Dowling, J. T. E., Lillooet  624
1/Cst. Blakiston-Gray, J., Lytton  652
1/Cst. Gregory, J. F., Spences Bridge 772
Vernon District—
Sergt. Nelson, R. S., Vernon  262
Corpl. Pomeroy, A. J., Vernon  372
1/Cst. Duncan, A., Vernon......  721
2/Cst. Calvert, A., Vernon  861
2/Cst. Drysdale, P. Q., Vernon  865
2/Cst. Dale, H. M., Vernon  877
3/Cst. Hamilton, J. F., Vernon  945
Vernon District—Continued. Reg*. No.
3/Cst. Gibbon, A. E., Vernon  947
3/Cst. Krivenko, A., Vernon  978
1/Cst. Hayward, R. H. P., Armstrong 412
1/Cst. MacKinley, R., Enderby  290
1/Cst. Quesnel, J. A., Lumby  269
1/Cst. Moore, T., Salmon Arm _._ 580
2/Cst. Weeks, G. D., Salmon Arm...... 911
1/Cst. Smith, A. G., Sicamous  656
Kelowna District—
Sergt. Macdonald, A., Kelowna  298
1/Cst. Wyman, G. A., Kelowna  549
1/Cst. Murdoch, J. W., Kelowna  557
1/Cst. Olts, W. H., Kelowna  606
1/Cst. Nicklen, F. W., Kelowna  761
1/Cst. Poole, J. G., Kelowna  781
3/Cst. Callens, J. H., Kelowna   939
" D " Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector E. Gammon, Prince Rupert.
Divisional Clerk—Sr. Clerk Mead, G. D., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 201.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Davis, W. T., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 778.
Radio Operator—1/Radio Opr. Ward, J., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 847.
Prince Rupert District— Res*- No-
S/Sergt.    Johnson,    G.    A.,    Prince
Rupert  202
1/Cst. Oland, C. F., Prince Rupert.....    41
3/Skpr.   Good,   R.   C,   P.M.L.   15,
Prince Rupert  835
2/Engnr. Moorehouse, T., P.M.L. 15,
Prince Rupert   848
3/Radio  Opr.  Jensen, F.  E., P.M.L.
15, Prince Rupert  982
1/Cst. Kelly, T. J., Atlin  794
1/Cst. Meredith-Jones, J. H., Stewart 834
3/Cst.   Jamieson,   H.   O.,   Telegraph
Creek   962
Corpl. Brunton, T. D., Terrace  449
2/Cst. Richmond, W. H., Terrace  919
1/Cst. Bell, E. W., Port Essington... 798
2/Cst. Bradley, E., Masset  855
2/Cst. Walker, F. J., Queen Charlotte
City   867
2/Cst. Price, C. W., Queen Charlotte
City  :  899
Ocean Falls District—
Corpl. Norman, H. L., Ocean Falls.-...- 423
3/Skpr.   Mason,   W.   J.,   P.M.L.   7,
Ocean Falls   813
1/Radio Opr. Robson, A., P.M.L. 7,
Ocean Falls   784
3/Engnr.   Gorrie,   C.   D.,   P.M.L.   7,
Ocean Falls  810
Ocean Falls District—Continued.      Regt. No.
3/Cst. Medley, H. E. J., Ocean Falls 975
1/Cst. Trant, W. F. C, Bella Coola... 622
Prince Rupert City Detachment—
Sergt. Hall, O. L., Prince Rupert  278
Corpl. Lashmar, A. T., Prince Rupert 425
1/Cst. McLeod, M. H., Prince Rupert 844
2/Cst. Gardiner, W. C, Prince Rupert 866
2/Cst.   Brotherstone,   G.   Y.,   Prince
Rupert   906
2/Cst. Strouts, R. W., Prince Rupert 915
3/Cst.    Johnstone,    H.    D.,    Prince
Rupert   924
3/Cst. Stevens, M., Prince Rupert..... 930
3/Cst.    McAllister,    J.    R.,    Prince
Rupert   941
3/Cst.    Turtle,    E.    M.    C,    Prince
Rupert  959
3/Cst. Thornton, J. F., Prince Rupert 968
3/Cst.   Hamblin,   S.   A.   L.,   Prince
Rupert     972
3/Cst. Brett, R. A., Prince Rupert... .1004
Hazelton District—
Sergt. Potterton, L. A. N., Smithers.. 297
1/Cst.    Dale-Johnson,    V.    L.    W.,
Smithers  712
2/Cst. Taylor, J. R., Smithers.......  913
3/Radio Opr. Shantz, D. O., Smithers 937
1/Cst. Purdy, J. W., Burns Lake  998
1/Cst. West, W. A. A., Hazelton  824 T 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" E " Division.
Officer Commanding—Deputy Commissioner J. Shirras, Vancouver.
Sub-Inspector R. Harvey, Vancouver.
Divisional Clerk—Sub-Inspector F. Swanson, Vancouver.
Asst. Divisional Clerk—3/Clerk Ferguson, W. C, Vancouver, Regt. No. 901.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Putland, F., Vancouver, Regt. No. 438.
Stenographer—Miss A. Welch, Vancouver.
Stenographer—Miss M. C. Thibodeau, Vancouver.
Motor Traffic Detail—                        Regt. No.
Asst. Mech. Supvr. Macdonald, H. D.,
Vancouver  520
Mechanic Scales, T., Vancouver  600
1/Cst. Dillabough, A. J., Chilliwack... 558
1/Cst. Cave, E. E., Burnaby  702
Vancouver District—
S/Sergt. Duncan, G. J., Vancouver....    75
Sergt. Barwis, C. W. A., Vancouver.. 352
Corpl. Phipps, M. T., Vancouver  446
Det. Macdonald, J. A., Vancouver  489
1/Cst. Thomson, D. S. E., Vancouver 428
1/Cst. Orchard, W. C, Vancouver...... 502
1/Cst. Kelsberg, P., Vancouver  542
1/Cst. Bradner, F. E., Vancouver _______ 567
1/Cst. Cameron, J., Vancouver  653
1/Cst. Walker, R., Vancouver  704
1/Cst. Home, A. G., Vancouver  723
1/Cst. Johnston, W. A., Vancouver.... 797
1/Cst. Tinnion, R., Vancouver  836
2/Cst. Brue, T., Vancouver  873
Miss L. K. Reid  (steno.), Vancouver 	
1/Cst. Malins, E. M., University  839
1/Cst. Fox, A. E. P., Squamish  602
3/Cst. Cottingham, W. L., Squamish.. 932
Corpl. Jeeves, F. L., Powell River  483
1/Radio Opr. Halsey Brandt, C. G.,
P.G.D. 2, Powell River  633
1/Cst. Betts, J. F., Powell River  820
4/Engnr. Milne, I., Powell River  999
2/Radio Opr. Lane, L. R. C, Powell
River  _'_  878
3/Cst. Fast, J., Powell River 995
1/Cst. Aylward, W. P., Sechelt  738
New Westminster District—
Sergt.   Woods-Johnson,   F.   B.,   New
Westminster   430
1/Cst. Vise, R., New Westminster  556
1/Cst. Causton, I. R., New Westminster  :  677
2/Cst. Eslin, C. E., New Westminster 914
3/Cst. James, W., Pattullo Bridge...... 926
3/Cst. Davies, H. G., Pattullo Bridge 928
3/Cst.  Thorsteinson, F.  C, Pattullo
Bridge . 1001
1/Cst. Saunders, F. G., Port Coquit-
lam  .  662
3/Cst. Sircus, S., Port Coquitlam .1000
1/Cst. McGary, J. D., Coquitlam  825
New Westminster District—
Continued. Regt. No.
Corpl. Kirkup, J., Essondale  387
1/Cst. Irving, W. B., Haney  769
3/Cst. Gibbon, N. D., Haney  931
1/Cst. Johnston, J. A., Langley Municipality   541
1/Cst.   Williamson,   J.   O.,   Langley
Municipality   736
1/Cst. Leighton, R. K., Mission  810
2/Cst. Cummins, J. N., Mission  853
2/Cst. Piers, C. E., Mission  912
Chilliwack District—
Sergt. Thomson, W. J., Chilliwack...... 293
Corpl. McWhirter, D. R., Chilliwack. 503
1/Radio Opr. Dobell, J. D., Chilliwack 599
1/Cst. Ellis, R. M., Chilliwack  708
1/Cst. Fleming, B. C, Chilliwack  840
2/Cst. Nelson, G. S., Chilliwack  851
3/Cst. Turnbull, R. H., Chilliwack  955
3/Cst. Fielders, J. H., Chilliwack  970
Corpl. MacAndrew, G., Abbotsford ___. 421
3/Cst. Crouch, C. P., Abbotsford  986
2/Cst.    Bonner,    H.    C,    Alexandra
Bridge   864
1/Cst. Davey, J. H., Agassiz  529
1/Cst. Sutherland, A. J., Hope  695
1/Cst. Bell, J., Sumas  737
North Vancouver District—
Sergt. Herdman, T., North Vancouver   315
Corpl. Taylor, D. W., North Vancouver   396
1/Cst. Williams, J. A., North Vancouver      59
1/Cst. Sharp, G. C, North Vancouver   153
1/Cst. Smith, P. B., North Vancouver 362
1/Cst. Kirkham, J. W„ North Vancouver   442
1/Cst. Fetherstonhaugh, M. R., North
Vancouver  444
1/Cst. Cummings, R., North Vancouver  570
1/Cst. Macdonald, D. A., North Vancouver   683
1/Cst. Chamberlin, D. E., North Vancouver   696 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 51
" E " Division—Continued.
North Vancouver District—
Continued.                                       Rest. No.
1/Cst. Thomson, M. L., North Vancouver   828
2/Cst. Nott, S. T., North Vancouver.. 908
2/Cst. Felker, D. B., North Vancouver   916
2/Cst. Fletcher, J. M., North Vancouver   917
3/Cst. Phillips, G. A., North Vancouver   989
1/Cst. Murdoch, W., Deep Cove  766
1/Cst. Payne, D. A. B., Lynn Creek... 640
Burnaby District—
Sergt. Anderson, C, Burnaby  679
1/Cst. Twist, H., Burnaby  607
1/Cst. Marsh, T. B., Burnaby  698
Burnaby District—Continued. Regt. No.
1/Cst. Nelson, N. C. B., Burnaby  733
1/Cst. Hopcott, G. H., Burnaby  981
2/Cst. Brown, T. G., Burnaby  860
2/Cst. Abrahamson, A. A., Burnaby__ 874
2/Cst. Curie, W. G., Burnaby  897
2/Cst. Smith, L. G., Burnaby   909
2/Cst. Klick, H. E., Burnaby  923
3/Cst. Stringer, R. I., Burnaby  934
3/Cst. Ehly, J. J., Burnaby  971
Richmond District—
Corpl. Watt, J. C, Brighouse  469
1/Cst. Spall, A. E., Brighouse  801
1/Cst. White, J. R., Brighouse  714
1/Cst. Mumford, C. W., Brighouse. 800
3/Cst. Thorsteinson, I. G., Brighouse 987
Fort George Subdivision.
N.C.O. i/c Fort George Subdivision—Sergt.
Regt. No.
Corpl. DeWitt, N. O., Prince George...... 368
1/Cst. McKenney, H. L., Prince George 205
1/Cst. Smith, W., Prince George   270
1/Radio   Opr.   Lennox,   S.   J.,   Prince
George   843
2/Cst. Perry, D. A., Prince George  920
2/Cst. Maxwell, T. R., Prince George... 921
G. H. Clark, Prince George, Regt. No. 186.
Regt. No.
2/Cst. Jakeman, L. H., Prince George ... 922
3/Cst. Demmon, W. A., Prince George _ 951
3/Cst. Weeks, A. W., Prince George  983
3/Cst. Russell, G. P. W., Prince George 994
1/Cst. Munkley, B. E., Fort St. James.. 716
1/Cst. Blezard, J., McBride  441
1/Cst. Moore, R. C, Vanderhoof  771
Peace River Subdivision.
Officer Commanding—Sub-Inspector H. H. Mansell, Pouce Coupe.
Regt. No.
Sergt. Raybone, S. E., Pouce Coupe  369
1/Radio   Opr.   Harrison,   R.   P.,   Pouce
Coupe   809
2/Cst. Ferguson, S., Pouce Coupe  856
3/Cst. Hughes, T. D., Pouce Coupe  925
Corpl. Sweeney, J. C, Dawson Creek .._. 490
1/Cst. Drysdale, W., Dawson Creek  814
2/Cst. Rosberg, E. L., Dawson Creek _ 902
3/Cst. Fletcher, W. D., Dawson Creek .. 948
Regt. No.
3/Cst. Youngberg, G. E., Dawson Creek 964
3/Cst. Jobling, D. A., Dawson Creek _____ 969
3/Cst.   Rowland,   E.   R.   M.,   Dawson
Creek  _'_  988
3/Cst. Burke, P. N., Dawson Creek 1003
1/Cst. Lumsden, W. J. F., Fort St. John 731
2/Cst. Walters, J. A., Fort St. John _____ 893
1/Cst. Faryon, L. E., Liard River  823
1/Cst. Boulton, P., Muskwa  667  APPENDIX III.
T 53
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLE ACCIDENTS, 1943-44, ACCORDING TO LOCATION.
City Municipalities.
Number op
Accidents.
Number oi
Vehicles.
Number op Injured.
Number of Deaths.
Property Damage.
Place.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1944.        (Increase. [Decrease.
4
2
15
10
7
1
26
1
3
24
14
1
2
31
12
207
25
26
10
3
23
54
2
11
2
14
2,811
26
369
5
3
27
13
3
1
16
4
2
5
29
13
3
39
17
206
34
30
11
5
18
46
3
5
3
12
2,668
29
370
Per Cent.
25.0
50.0
80.0
30.0
Per Cent.
7
3
28
19
10
2
47
1
4
7
5
47
22
5
1
26
7
4
8
51
21
5
1
69
26
354
54
49
18
6
30
69
4
7
5
15
4,433
48
614
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
1
2
3
10
4
Per Cent.
100.0
100.0
233.3
33.3
Per Cent.
1
Per Cent.
100.0
Per Cent.
$500.00
150.00
1,330.50
1,160.00
175.00
150.00
1,942.25
$338.00
340.00
3,502.00
1,693.35
94.80
25.00
750.00
235.00
160.00
353.50
4,596.80
1,556.25
110.00
260.80
4,529.45
1,547.00
23,279.70
4,467.50
4,089.00
1,045.00
462.00
1,191.10
3,685.95
375.00
315.00
222.00
730.00
1    264,019.25
|        3,598.65
38,302.79
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
32.4
66.6
67.8
15.7
126.6
163.1
45.9
3
3
4
54.1
50.0
50.0
44.6
100.0
45.7
83.3
38.4
8
1
2
5
1
37.5
61.3
300.0
600.0
	
1
100.0
100.0
326.4
100.0
63.7
50.4
4.7
124.1
82.3
33.3
100.0
37.50
Grand Forks    -
100.0
20.8
100.0
28.2
2
4
6
1
100.0
39
24
2
3
48
19
356
44
41
15
4
41
87
3
19
4
22
4,657
42
605
10
3
60.0
2,807.52
1,034.20
105.00
116.60
2,485.85
2,265.52
24,239.67
4,614.50
3,377.50
1,267.50
345.50
2,750.00
5,646.66
150.00
1,486.00
110.00
780.50
268,883.17
2,043.85
34,650.90
7.1
12.5
100.0
100.0
Ladysmith     	
200.0
150.0
50.0
66.6
25.8
41.6
43.7
36.8
10
6
86
24
17
4
17
6
93
14
17
5
16
3
22
1
2
70.0
1
2
3
100.0
31.69
0.4
0.56
8.1
6
1
1
66.6
3.9
North Vancouver City	
36.0
15.3
10.0
66.6
22.7
19.5
20.0
50.0
41.6
200.0
3.1
100.0
21.08
25.0
100.0
17.5
1
2
100.0
33.9
21.7
14.8
26.8
20.6
5
24
1
2
40.0
8.3
56.6
Prince Rupert   _...
3
3
34.7
50.0
33.3
150.0
54.5
63.1
78.8
50.0
25.0
101.8
Trail
14.2
5.08
31.8
4.8
7
1,111
13
159
6
!    1,122
21
162
14.2
6.4
0.99
61.5
1.8
27
1
5
30
8
11.1
1.8
11.5
0.27
14.2
1.4
100.0
76.1
10.5
60.0
Totals
3,736
3,621
3.07
6,196
6,011
2.9
1,504
1,545
2.7
45
51
13.3
$364,605.69
$365,874.89
0.34
District Municipalities.
Number of
Accidents.
Number of Vehicles.
Number of Injured.
Number of Deaths.
Property Damage.
Place.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1344.
Increase.
Decrease.
173
33
6
18
10
19
128
68
1
13
5
23
1
4
33
36
17
10
42
11
6
2
18
7
60
66
4
5
15
5
102
6
25
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
26.01
284
48
8
. 30
16
30
202
109
2
22
8
28
1
5
57
54
29
13
57
13
9
3
30
11
107
109
6
7
21
9
166
10
38
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
28.8
78
22
8
5
6
10
67
47
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
14.1
6
2
3
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
50.0
100.0
$21,066.85
6,112.75
110.00
1,614.25
405.00
2,461.08
$21,007.00
12,313.10
150.00
1,431.00
115.00
2,711.50
900.00
1,087.00
8,331.05
5,957.50
2,191.00
2,750.00
5,197.00
1,293.00
440.00
175.00
2,320.50
1,872.00
6,636.63
9,691.45
650.00
406.95
7,679.65
1,975.00
14,247.00
470.00
2,628.50
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
0.2
106.06
127.08
113.6
101.2
36.3
Coldstream	
83.3
27.7
50.0
75.0
26.6
50.0
6.6
100.0
20.0
4
8
16
1
100.0
11.3
Delta
33.3
60.0
2
1
100.0
71.6
Esquimalt  - 	
21.05
100.0
300.0
17.8
500.0
3
200.0
10.1
100.0
3,005.7
132.1
1,467.6
100.0
400.0
37.5
575.0
Kent
1
28
6
30
14
27
27
16
1
12
4
59
63
2
4
12
5
116
9
34
1
40
8
47
21
38
49
23
2
18
7
108
97
3
6
19
8
191
17
62
1
14
5
32
6
19
23
11
6
1
33
37
1
3
8
3
99
6
23
1
24
16
11
6
14
9
2
35.00
3,589.50
380.00
6,172.43
1,456.50
3,264.15
4,020.24
6,647.57
84.00
1,395.00
660.75
9,505.44
7,433.58
62.00
655.00
4,181.90
550.00
16,728.15
1,323.00
5,752.10
71.4
220.0
2
3
1
50.0
100.0
Maple Ridge ..*.  - 	
43.3
28.5
38.29
38.09
68.7
1
1
100.0
64 5
2
100.0
88.8
59.2
55.5
50.0
26.3
60.8
81.8
59.2
62.5
73.4
60.8
1
1
67 8
Oak Bay
93 3
100.0
50.0
75.0
1.6
4.7
100.0
25.0
25.0
50.0
66.6
57.1
108.3
66.3
183.6
10
3
28
22
5
2
66.6
200.0
0.9
15.1
40.5
1
2
1
3
30 1
13.4
100.0
16.6
10.5
12.5
50.0
30.3
948.3
400.0
33.3
100.0
37 8
83.6
259.09
3
55
2
12
12.06
33.3
26.4
13.08
41.1
38.7
44.4
66.6
47.8
9
4
55.5
14.8
64.4
54.3
1
100.0
Totals
729
713
2.19
1,181
1,126
4.6
460
367
20.2
28
23
17.8
$105,666.24
$114,626.83
8.4
•
	
Unorganized Territory.
Place.
Number of
Accidents.
Number of Vehicles.
Number of Injured.
Number of Deaths.
Property Damage.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
!                  !
1944.         Increase.) Decrease.
247
192
138
15
97
24
35
236
248
192
31
108
26
28
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
4.4
367
279
202
22
162
33
53
342
336
284
48
169
43
41
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
6.8
127
143
85
2
58
7
17
113
112
77
14
43
11
14
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
11.02
15
10
9
4
14
10
13
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
6.6
$45,161.65
33,843.55
20,596.70
2,040.00
12,944.75
3,465.00
4,649.80
$38,942.69
41  941  9fl
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
15.9
29.1
39.1
106.6
11.3
8.3
20.4
40.7
118.1
4.3
30.3
21.6
9.4
91   Q
44.4
36,408.70  |        76.7
K 45.0 98             iaa 1
600.0
100.0
25.8
1
100.0
16,941.43
3,585.00
3,423.35
30.8
3.4
Fort George Subdivision	
57.1
6
4
100.0
25.0
Peace River Subdivision	
20.0
22.6
17.6
3
26.3
Totals        	
748
869
16.1
1,118
1,263
12.9
439
384
12.5
48
41
14.5
$122,701.45
$145,972.65
18.9
Comparative Statement of Motor-vehicle Accidents, 1943-44.
City Municipalities, District
Municipalities, and Unorganized
Territory.
Number of Accidents.
Number of Vehicles.
Number of Injured.
Number of Deaths.
Property Damage.
1
1943.         1944.
Increase. Decrease.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.
1944.
Increase.
Decrease.
1943.    f    1944.
1
Increase.
Decrease.
1                      1
1943.        1        1944.         Increase.
Decrease.
Totals  	
5,213    |    5,203
1
Per Cent. (Per Cent.
  1          0.19
8,495
8,400
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
1.1
2,403
2,296
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
4.4
121    |        115
1
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
4.9
[PerCent.
$592,973.38  | $626,474.37 |          5.6
1             1
Per Cent.
1 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 55
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued.
Number of Accidents.
2.                               Hour or Occurrence.
Total.
Fatal.           *■?$£
Property
Damage only.
156
117
95
46
49
22
44
166
217
216
274
285
230
234
293
343
474
458
298
251
259
191
208
239
38
2
5
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
5
1
1
6
9
10
8
6
7
9
7
3
11
2
47
47
26
18
15
7
20
60
70
44
76
69
77
71
75
113
168
172
123
100
101
73
88
78
14
107
65
68
27
34
14
22
104
145
9 to 10 a.m.  	
170
196
11 to 12     m.                    .                     -          	
211
\9. to   1 p.m.
152
162
212
221
296
278.
169
144
149
9 to 10 p.m   	
111
10 to 11 p.m _	
117
li to 12 p.m	
150
22
TotalR
5,203
105
1,752
3,346
Number of Accidents.
3.                                Day of Occurrence.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
593
767
686
713
627
778
1,036
3
9
17
10
17
9
17
26
218
252
228
207
207
261
378
1
366
498
...  Tuesday
448
489
411
6. Friday......     	
500
632
8. Not stated	
2
Totals 	
5,203
105
1,752
3,346
Number of Vehicles involved.
4.                          Type of Vehicles involved.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1, Private passenger      	
5,556
144
18
247
139
612
32
1,643
9
49
4
3
3
13
42
1
1,596
106
5
73
40
189
7
389
3,911
34
3.  Rtapre
13
4.  Taxi
171
5.  Rn»
96
410
25
R.  Truck
1,212
9.  Not stated
8
Totals
8,400
115    •
2,405
5,880 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 57
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued.
Railroad Crossings.
Number of Accidents.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Gates not down	
2. Guarded crossing—man on duty	
3. Automatic signal	
4. Unguarded crossing	
5. Driver disregarded signal..
6. Signal not given	
7. Not stated	
Totals	
1
2
28
2
1
34
1
15
16
Drivers involved. Description of.
Number of Drivers.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Male.
2. Female -
3. Not stated-
7,767
581
52
112
2
1
2,226
166
13
5,429
413
Totals
8,400
115
2,405
Age of Driver.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury-
Property
Damage only.
1. Under 18 years	
2. 18 to 24 years	
3. 25 to 40 years __
4. 41 to 54 years	
5. 55 to 64 years	
6. 65 years and over~
7. Not stated	
222
1,216
3,707
1,913
892
283
167
5
27
49
15
14
1
4
74
381
1,076
515
232
83
44
143
808
2,582
1,383
646
199
119
Driving Experience.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Less than 3 months_
2. 3 to 6 months	
3. 6 to 12 months	
4. 1 to 4 years	
5. 5 years and over	
6. Not stated  -
36
50
81
1,083
7,010
140
1
1
1
22
75
15
15
18
22
320
1,981
49
20
31
58
741
4,954
76
Condition of Driver.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Intoxicated	
2. Physical defect....
3. Extreme fatigue..
4. Normal	
5. Other  	
6. Not stated.
38
19
88
7,540
40
675
2
1
1
95
19
8
35
2,151
14
178
17
10
52
5,294
26
481
Licence of Driver.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Licensed in B.C.-
2. Unlicensed 	
3. Non-resident	
4. Not stated 	
!,089
174
132
5
104
7
2
2
2,301
40
1
5,684
104
90
2 T 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued.
Action of Driver contributing to Accident.
Number of Drivers.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Reckless driving	
2. Exceeding speed-limit...
3. On wrong side of road-
Did not have right-of-way..
Cutting-in 	
Passing standing street-car..
Passing on curve or hill	
Passing on wrong side	
Failing to signal	
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Cutting left corner-
Car ran away .—
Through street—did not stop-
Driving off roadway  __.
Driving through safety-zone-
Car standing in roadway	
Hit and run	
Passing at intersection-
Following too close	
Railroad—did not stop._
Not stated 	
Totals.
314
5
276
1,035
125
1
297
13
341
58
125
51
580
405
83
74
320
25
4,272
8,400
2
2
19
1
2
5
68
115
64
282
17
45
2
13
16
30
19
176
60
7
13
70
11
1,453
2,405
183
2
211
750
108
252
11
328
42
93
30
344
73
60
248
9
2,751
5,880
8. Amount of property damage for period covered by this report, $626,474.37.
Amount of property damage this year to date, $626,474.37.
Number of Pedestrians.
9.                               Pedestrians involved, Actions of.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
22
12
27
21
100
8
126
3
3
5
61
46
63
88
63
2
1
3
8
1
10
1
2
4
7
22
12
20
97
8
118
3
4
51
45
61
84
56
Totals :	
648
39
609 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 59
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued.
Condition of Pedestrian.
Number of Pedestrians.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
1. Intoxicated	
2. Physical defect..
3. Confused by traffic...
4. View obstructed	
5. Careless	
6. Normal	
7. Not stated.
Totals .
45
31
161
209
166
1
2
6
2
4
12
12
26
7
39
29
157
197
154
648
609
10.
Classification of Victims.
Number of Victims.
Total.
Fatal,
Personal
Injury.
1. Drivers	
2. Passengers 	
3. Pedestrians  ___	
4. Others (persons in horse-drawn vehicles, etc.).
5. Bicyclists 	
6. Motor-cycle drivers  	
7. Motor-cycle passengers.	
8. Not stated    _	
506
919
648
12
214
95
16
1
Totals .
2,411
28
33
39
3
5
6*
1*
115
478
886
609
9
209J
891
15t
1
2,296
* One motor-cycle driver killed in collision with a street-car, Report No. 309-59.
t Seven motor-cycle drivers and two motor-cycle passengers injured in other than motor-cycle accidents,
motor-vehicle passenger injured in a motor-cycle accident.
% Three bicyclists injured in other than bicycle accidents.
One
Number of Victims.
11.                                          Nature op Injuries.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
69
270
30
109
1,559
31
209
28
8
8
90
56
13
18
6
5
15
1
8
2
4
252
24
104
1,559
16
8. Other injuries (sprains, dislocations, etc.) _  	
208
28
11. Burned- -   	
6
13. Not stated -	
86
Totals    	
2,411
115
2,296
Number of
Accidents.
12.                                Light Conditions.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
3,355
322
354
176
977
19
56
8
9
8
24
1,084
103
137
82
344
2
2,215
211
208
86
609
17
5,203
105
1,752
3,346 T 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued.
Number of Vehicles.
13.                   Condition of Vehicles involved.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
81
50
23
7
15
10
21
12
156
73
7,908
44
1
2
2
2
104
4
24
13
6
2
1
1
6
5
37
29
2,265
16
37
16
5
5. Head-light out (1 light)   	
14
6. Head-lights out (both)                                       	
15
8. Tail-light out or obscured.	
7
117
42
5,539
24
8,400
115
2,405
5,880
Number of Vehicles.
14.                             Direction of Travel.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
•   Injury.
Property
Damage only.
5,670
588
1,038
253
797
17
22
15
1
91           '          1 7-R
3,831
7
11
1
1
2
2
165
292
51
134
4
5
6
735
4. Backing —     -    	
201
8,400
115
2,405
Number of Accidents.
15.                                   Road Surface.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
3,080
1,394
32
135
428
108
26
68
20
1
7
6
3
1,136
448
8
23
90
38
9
1,876
926
'         23
105
67
5,203
105
1,752
3,346
Number of Accidents.
16.                               Road Condition.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
60
23
59
4,457
93
511
4
1
78
3
19
25
7
26
1,528
24
142
32
4. Normal   	
2,851
66
350
5,203
105
1,752
3,346 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1944.
T 61
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued.
Number of
Accidents.
17.                                     Type of Road.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
966
3,349
612
143
86
47
14
66
15
6
3
1
306
1,165
203
47
19
12
2,118
394
90
3. Gravel  - 	
4. Earth	
5. Brick or cobble  	
64
34
Totals - _	
5,203
105
1,752
3,346
Number of
Accidents.
18.                             Weather Conditions.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
3,123
565
551
824
110
14
16
73
13
4
13
1
1
1,104
206
135
278
23
4
2
1,946
2. Cloudy    —
346
412
533
86
6. Smoke or dust	
10
13
5,203
105
1,752
3,346  PART II.
INSPECTOR OF GAOLS.
INDEX.
Page.
Ages of Prisoners  74
Commitments     73
Convictions, previous   75
Educational status  73
Employment of prisoners  76
Expenditure and revenue  77
Drugs, habits as to use of  74
Maintenance, cost of  72
Prison population, movement of  72
Nationalities     73
Occupations   74
Offences for which prisoners committed:—
(a.)   Crimes against the person  .  76
(b.)  Crimes against property   76
(c.)   Crimes against public morals and decency  76
(d.)  Crimes against public order and peace  76
(e.)   Other offences not enumerated above  76
Officers and employees, number of  77
Racial   74
Report of Inspector of Gaols  65
Report of Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm  65
Report of Warden, Nelson Gaol  68
Report of Warden, Kamloops Gaol  69
Report of Warden, Prince George Gaol  69
Religion  (Creeds)  :  75
Sentences, period of  75
Sex  73
Social status (married or single)    74
.  Report of the Inspector of Gaols, 1944-45.
The Honourable R. L. Maitland, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Annual Report for the year ended March
31st, 1945. It covers the operation of the four Provincial Gaols, including the Women's
Gaol at the Oakalla Prison Farm, and the " Star Class " of youthful male offenders.
In his report on the Oakalla Prison Farm, Warden J. Millman states:—
" Our chief difficulty is securing and maintaining a competent staff of experienced
officers. This problem handicaps us in many ways, but it is hoped that with the return
of ex-servicemen to civil life the present situation will disappear.
" During August, 1944, our barn was destroyed by fire, and since then we have
been compelled to get along with a temporary milking-shed and the dairy, which suffered little damage. The root-house, situated beneath the barn-site, has been made
serviceable for the storage of vegetables, but there is no place for the hay-crop.
Although an effort was made to keep a portion of the 1944 hay-crop by stacking, it was
badly affected by dampness and could only be used for bedding. Unless construction
of a new barn is commenced immediately, we will be faced with the same problem this
year. A proper barn in place of the temporary milking-shed would also be much better
for the cattle. In view of this I strongly urge that this project be got under way as
soon as possible.
" It will be noted in the paint-shop report attached that the interior of the Women's
Gaol and the exterior of the old gaol building and outbuildings were all painted during the year and now present a greatly improved appearance.
" On the whole, although the general behaviour of the inmates has been quite
satisfactory, there has been a slight increase in the number of individuals, particularly
amongst the youthful offenders, whose conduct called for punishment. The number of
escapes was greatly reduced as compared with preceding years, and in no small
measure, despite the fact that a shortage of experienced officers compels us to assume
greater risks, I feel this may be attributed to better precautions and greater vigilance
exercised by the staff."
WOMEN'S GAOL.
Included in the Warden's report is a summary of the work performed at the
Women's Gaol, submitted by Miss Isabell L. Garrick, R.N., the matron in charge.
Miss Garrick's figures show:—
" Population.—Daily average, 50.940.
" Culinary.—A total of 55,674 meals were served during the year. The meals
were appetizing, well balanced, and diversified. There were no complaints as to
quality, quantity, or service. At Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year extras were
served to all inmates. A Victory Garden was maintained, and during the summer
the following edibles were put up: 75 gallons of pickles, 49 gallons of fruit and jelly
preserves, 75 gallons of vegetables (carrots, beets, etc.), 30 gallons of dill pickles.
A canning-machine was received in the late autumn, and in addition to the foregoing
164 No. 21/2 size tomatoes and 29 No. 2% size tomato puree were canned, a portion of
this being given to the Men's Gaol.
" Sewing and Needlework.—A total of 834 new articles were made for the use of
the inmates. Repairs done for the Men's Gaol, 9,466 garments, comprised the following: 5,428 pairs of socks; 908 underwear, winter and summer; 1,038 undershirts,
winter and summer;   1,945 hickory, black, and kitchen shirts;   138 pants, coats, and
65 T 66 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
aprons, etc. Repairs made in the women's quarters totalled 1,283 miscellaneous
articles, including sheets, pillow-cases, dresses and other items of female attire.
" Red Cross Work.—Eight hundred items were made up for the Red Cross, 121
for the V Bundles, and 96 for the Superfluity Store. These included Navy, Army, and
Air Force socks, Navy jackets, knitted sweaters, patch-work quilts, crocheted and
hooked rugs, etc., also such items as children's sweaters and diapers.
" Laundry.—A total of 18,358 articles were laundered during the year. These
included all articles worn by the female inmates, towels, doctors' gowns, and matrons'
uniforms. All work, including flat work done in the Men's Gaol, is ironed in this
institution.
" Library.—Circulation, 3,505 books. The circulation is steadily increasing. The
quality and class of literature now being read is noticeably improved. Book reviews
are well received, and the library stock of up-to-date and modern books is well maintained and being constantly improved under the able guidance of Mrs. M. Clucas, who
looks after this work for the Library Commission. She visits the quarters each week
and checks over books and circulation with the inmate assigned to this work.
" Health.—Frequent and regular visits were made by the Gaol physician and the
physician in charge of the V.D. Clinic. All treatments were given as prescribed, and
there were no epidemics or illnesses of a serious or untoward nature. It is noteworthy, too, since the release of penicillin, and due to the fact that graduate nurses
are on each shift, that we are able to use this drug extensively in cases of venereal
disease; e.g., a syphilis course consists of intermittent treatments every three hours
for a period of eight days and nights—sixty-two treatments in all. The most pleasing
aspect in this regard is that at the writing of this report no inmates are held under
the public health ' Venereal Diseases Suppression Act.' Venereal disease treatments
with penicillin since release this March were made up of the following: Girls for
gonococcus, 7;  girls for syphilis, 17.
" Church Services.—Interdenominational services were held regularly by visiting
clergymen and other groups, and the attendance record was good.
" Recreational.—Our thanks are due in no small measure to the Elizabeth Fry
Society in this direction. Under their auspices, moving pictures and programmes
went according to schedule twice a month. It was arranged for a teacher of singing
to come each week to instruct any girls showing talent along these lines. So successful
has the venture proven that a small Glee Club has been formed by the girls. The
materials and paraphernalia required by the ten girls taking correspondence courses
with the Department of Education is likewise provided by this society. This year the
society gave us a volley-ball and net.
" Summary.—Lending to a more cheerful atmosphere, the entire interior of the
building was redecorated. Rather than single out any individual member of the staff
for special mention, I would like to express my gratification for their good work
throughout the year and the efficiency and spirit of co-operation that has contributed
to the satisfying results that have been achieved."
JUVENILE OFFENDERS.
The Star Class of selected young offenders, segregated from the rest of the
Oakalla Prison population and given special supervision, continues to be a most worthwhile rehabilitation project. Their immediate care is in the hands of Assistant Chief
Gaoler T. A. Camm, who reports:—
" At the commencement of the year, owing to the large number of young offenders
entering this establishment, it was found necessary to increase the Star Class group
from twenty-five permitted under this set-up to approximately thirty inmates of an
average age of 18.5 years.    Later this number again had to be increased for the same REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1944-45. T 67
reason, and we took into the group the youngest of the first offenders coming into the
gaol.
" The Star Class has been operating under the guidance of the undersigned, assisted
by two guards—Mr. Berkey, in charge of the workshop, and Mr. Brotherston, engaged
on farm-work and general construction. Mr. Berkey has done well in his capacity as
workshop instructor and Mr. Brotherston gave equally good service in work of a more
general nature.
" The policy of engaging these lads in active, interesting employment has been
consistently maintained, and much useful work has been performed during the year.
Renovating, repairing, and reupholstering furniture for the Provincial Court-houses
has gone on steadily. Many fine oak chairs, plain, arm, and chesterfield, were successfully restored to their former condition, as were other pieces of furniture, to the
estimated value of $1,541.25. Material for this work was supplied by the Purchasing
Commission through the medium of their cabinetmaker, 0. D. McBride, to whom we
are indebted for able and active assistance.
" Similar assignments have been completed for the Girls' Industrial School to the
value of around $300, many chairs being repaired and renovated and returned to them.
Other work carried on has been that of making filing-cabinets for the Land Registry
Offices, drawing-boards, and a specially designed cabinet for the Provincial Police.
" In addition to the above, large quantities of articles and toys have been made for
the Red Cross Superfluity Shop at New Westminster, and similar articles for the
Seaforth Regiment Auxiliary.
" The Star Class has also made its contribution to work on the farm and of a
more general constructive nature about the precincts of the institution.
" With regard to the work record of the group, it can be said that the Star Class
has fully justified the policy of the Department of affording these young lads the
opportunity for work possessing training and constructive values.
"An endeavour has also been made to encourage the members of the Star Class
to take up educational courses, utilizing the old gaol building as a school-room. The
lads were interviewed as to requirements, and their educational status being taken into
consideration, they were advised as to the various types of courses provided by the
Department of Education.
" It is pleasing to report that over 50 per cent, of the inmate-group have taken
advantage of this educational opportunity. Most of them prefer technical courses,
such as auto mechanics, which is an outstanding favourite, but it is noticeable that the
majority will only study when supervised and very little work is done in their cells.
Others who did not wish to take study courses are given assignments and provided with
literature of an educational nature.
" Group study courses have also been conducted under my direction in such subjects
as ' Citizenship,' ' British Columbia History,' and ' Public Speaking.'
" Through the good offices of the Inspector of Gaols, Mr. T. W. S. Parsons, instructional classes were conducted under the able leadership of Mr. Rudyard Kipling, of St.
John Ambulance Association. At the beginning of 1944 fifteen Star Class members
volunteered for this three months' course of instruction. Twelve finished and received
their certificates.    The examining officer was very pleased with their performance.
" Pro-Rec classes were commenced on November 7th, 1944, by Mr. J. Mathisen,
Provincial Director, who arranged to have two instructors attend once every week. The
lads have responded very well, and they are given an opportunity of practising what
they have learned. Later on a gymnasium was constructed in the west wing of the old
gaol building, and this was splendidly equipped through the efforts of our Inspector of
Gaols, who has taken a great interest in this phase of the lads' activities. A definite
improvement in the class members' physique, as well as an increased alertness, is dis-
cernable as a result of this innovation, the first experiment of its kind in Canada.
I " With the idea of encouraging Star Class members to take an intelligent interest
in the many fine new books coming into our library, talks were arranged by Mrs. Clucas,
the visiting librarian, who brought in interesting speakers to discuss the various books.
Well received, a better standard of reading has resulted.
" The religious aspect has not been neglected. Apart from the ordinary Sunday
service and the visits of the prison chaplain, who takes a personal interest in the boys'
problems, a group of business-men known as the ' Anglican Laymen's Association '
attend every Wednesday afternoon in the class-room to discuss informally the boys'
problems and give religious instruction.
" On the whole, the results obtained from this venture in dealing with a section
of our young offenders has been very satisfactory. Consistent with the difficulties
inherent under the present set-up, an honest endeavour has been made to treat these
lads as individuals. Steady contact has been maintained with the Social Relations
officer, Mr. E. G. B. Stevens, with a view to placing the discharged lads in decent jobs
when released, and to restore them as worthy citizens. At the same time, good kindly
discipline has been enforced with a view to preventing the necessity of undue disciplinary action."
Warden R. Harvey, of the Nelson Provincial Gaol, reports:—
" The immediate supervision of the gaol and inmates has been most capably
carried out by Senior Guard Tulloch. Due to a reduced gaol population during the
past year, difficulty has been experienced in maintaining suitable cooking and kitchen
service, the institution being wholly dependent on selected trusties. Expenditure for
fuel and light increased through lack of prison labour, necessitating outside help in
handling and cutting winter fuel.
"Population.—The population of the gaol at the beginning of the year was 20.
During the year 179 new prisoners were received and 183 discharged, leaving 16
inmates at the end of the fiscal year. The peak of the inmate population was 29 and
the lowest 4, the daily average being 10.04, a decrease of 4.35 per cent, over the previous
year.
" Welfare and Recreation.—When compatible with safety, inmates not engaged
in work are allowed the freedom of the cell block during the day and one hour in the
exercise-yard in the fresh air. They are allowed one hour of radio programme at noon
each day and one hour in the early evening. The radio is controlled by guards from
the gaol office. One hundred new books were received into the gaol library, and these
are at the disposal of the prisoners to choose from.
" Religious Services.—The Salvation Army holds services every Sunday morning
at 9 o'clock, while other denominations hold service in turn each Sabbath day.
" Medical Care.—On the whole, the health of all gaol inmates has been very good
during the past year, only in one instance has a prisoner required hospitalization. Dr.
F. M. Auld, gaol surgeon, has given prompt and satisfactory service.
" Farm Work.—There was a decrease in the quantity of potatoes and carrots
grown in the gaol garden compared to the previous year, with the remainder of the
produce remaining stable. The decrease was due to a section of ground affected by
a fire at the Powell River Company which destroyed part of the gaol fence. It was
noted that produce grown on the gaol farm was not included in the comestibles, which
to some extent supplement the meals. This, in future, will be given an estimated value
and included in the cost, thereby decreasing the cost per diem of feeding inmates.
" Maintenance and Construction.—Maintenance-work during the year included
shingling and repairing the verandah roof of the gaol residence, and replacing and
painting a section of the gaol fence and root-house which were both destroyed by fire
May 16th. The fence of the small exercise-yard was also taken down and rebuilt.
Prison labour was utilized in the maintenance of the grounds around the gaol and REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1944-45. T 69
Court-house and gaol garden. In the latter part of the year washing and repainting
of the interior of Police and gaol offices was commenced, and is being carried into the
new year.
" Discipline on the whole was fairly well maintained throughout the year. Prisoners
John Francis MacAvity and George Stowell Breen escaped but were recaptured, and
upon conviction each was sentenced to two years' imprisonment. The escape was
mainly due to the negligence of a guard, who was dismissed. There were no other
reported breaches of discipline for prisoners, other than in one instance (since the
change of wardenship) when one prisoner was dealt with for a breach of the gaol
rules."
Warden C. G. Barber, of the Kamloops Gaol, reports:—
" Gaol Rules and Regulations, supplemented by orders to govern local conditions,
were strictly adhered to. It was not necessary to reprimand any prisoner during the
year.
" The general health of the prisoners was very good. Any sickness was confined
to minor colds and ailments.
" The conduct of the prisoners was good during the past year, the only exception
being two juveniles named Robert Mitchell Pinchin and William Maxwell Gordon, held
on charges of theft of cars at Kamloops and Vancouver, who, on the early evening of
March 2nd, 1945, while in the bath-room, secured the plunger from the wash-basin
and smuggled it under their clothes into the cell. Later one feigned sickness and lay
on the floor, the other called the Constable on duty, who was Constable J. D. Tateson.
While Constable Tateson was examining the youth on the floor the other struck him
on the head with the steel plunger, necessitating hospital attention. Both lads were
charged with theft of car at Kamloops and also with assaulting a peace officer. They
were later dealt with by the Vancouver City Police.
" All inmates, except those awaiting trial, were regularly employed in janitor-work
in and around the building; cleaning Provincial Home, Public Works building, and
gaol grounds; cutting lawns; gardening in the gaol garden; and cutting and splitting
wood for the gaol and living-quarters.
" The prison garden supplied a six months' supply of vegetables.
" Assistance was given the Public Works Department and Forest Branch in helping to install two 90-foot aerial poles.
" Fewer prisoners were received during the year capable of being employed as
cooks and doing janitor-work, which made it a little difficult.
" Female prisoners were employed in repairing prisoners' clothing while confined
in the gaol.
" The dietary cost of each prisoner per diem was higher than during the previous
year owing to higher prices prevailing due to war conditions, also the general over-all
expenses.
" I wish to draw your attention to the able manner in which Constable W. T. Teal
is carrying out his duties as gaoler;   it is a credit to him."
At Prince George the Provincial Gaol is under the supervision of Warden Geo. H.
Clark, who reports:—
" There was no unusual incident to disturb the routine during the year. Owing
to increased activity in the district, lack of accommodation was felt, making it necessary
to send a number of prisoners to Oakalla who would otherwise have served their term
at Prince George.
" Prisoners were employed during the year on general work around the gaol, and
vegetables were grown by prison labour in the small garden-plot at the rear of the gaol.
" Discipline was good and there was no occasion to reprimand any inmate."
. T 70 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIBRARY SERVICE.
Before concluding this report I should like to mention that Mr. C. K. Morison, the
Provincial Librarian and Superintendent for the Public Library Commission, has
taken a keen interest in our prison libraries, and his assistance and direction have been
most valuable.    In his report on the Oakalla library Mr. Morison says:—
" The first full year of library service at Oakalla Prison Farm has been one of
steady and very satisfactory progress. Under the guiding hand of Miss Julia Stockett,
the library at Oakalla has grown from a collection of very old and hardly ever read
volumes to an educational and entertaining collection of eleven hundred attractive
books.
" The Oakalla library is made up of three separate collections. The first and the
oldest is at the women's building, the second is the main collection at the men's building,
and the third is a small collection housed in a cell of the south wing.
" Women's Library.—This is housed in an attractive room at the front of the
building, and consists of 395 fiction and 112 non-fiction books. Open book-shelves line
one wall of the room, and the women are permitted to go and choose their books three
days a week—Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday. This collection also includes a few
magazine subscriptions. At the beginning of the year there were thirty women using
the library, but at the end of the year the number of borrowers had increased to fifty.
The total circulation for the year was 3,505 books. Special requests for books are
filled whenever possible. When it is not practical to add an expensive or too specialized
book, the requests are filled by loans from other libraries. The librarian also borrows
and arranges displays of mounted pictures from the Vancouver Public Library art
department. The women have taken good care of the library, and only one woman
has lost her reading privileges through misuse of the books.
" Book reviews are a regular feature of the library service, and the various
speakers have been very well received. The reviews are given one a month, and the
speakers are usually staff members of the Vancouver Public Library. The librarian
has an inmate assistant who arranges and charges the books and does whatever repairing is necessary. The library has been well looked after, and the records carefully
kept by the various assistants. The women are proud of their library and remark
from time to time on how much it means to them. Comparing Oakalla women's library
with that of another gaol, an inmate remarked, ' You wouldn't like it there. It's an
awfully old-fashioned gaol.    They haven't anything like this.'
" Men's Library.—A corner of the main hall at Oakalla men's building has been
partitioned off, and gives ample room for new shelves, supply cupboard, and work-
tables. The original and very old collection of worn-out discards from various public
libraries is gradually being replaced with new books. The bright and attractive covers
are decidedly more of an invitation to reading than the funereal garb of the old books.
Books are added every month, and the interest in the library grows by leaps and
bounds.
" At the end of the year this collection numbered 600 volumes and a few popular
periodicals. About 60 per cent, of the books are fiction. The books are catalogued and
monthly additions are entered on typed lists. These lists are carried by the inmate
assistant to each wing, and the men fill in reserve cards for the books they wish to read.
Books may be changed daily. There has been a steady increase in the number of men
using the library. In August, 1944, there were 150 registered borrowers and in March,
1945, there were 300.    The circulation for the year was 12,335 books.
" Special requests are filled with loans, and if an inmate has some special talent
or hobby, books on that subject are borrowed for him. This applies particularly to
the Star Group and those inmates taking correspondence courses to help re-establish
themselves. The requests are as varied as those of a recent week, which included hog-
raising and aviation. s
<;
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o_
.-i
Si
a
M
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c3
^--^^|_^^fe^ff^^l^x vl  _  REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1944-45. T 71
" Permission was granted by the Warden to present book talks to the Star Group
in their school-room, and the speakers are usually as intrigued as the boys by the discussion following the talk.
" At the beginning of the year all library effort was concentrated on the two main
collections because they served the greater number of readers. In October a small
collection was started for the south wing men. They are not allowed the facilities of
the main collection, and until this time they were still reading and rereading a few
very old books.
" A number of inmates have shown their appreciation of the library by making
gifts of popular books.
" It is to be hoped that at some future date it will be possible for selected groups
of inmates to have access to the library and to choose their books from the shelves.
Checking over the readers' cards in the south wing, it was noted that one man, who
was condemned to hang, had borrowed the following books just previous to and following his trial: ' Under a Lucky Star,' ' Endure no Longer,' ' Damned to Glory,' and
' Winged Peace.'
" The work at Oakalla has been helped greatly by the co-operation of the Warden,
the Matron, and their staffs.    They have shown every courtesy and consideration.
" Special mention should also be made of the manner in which Mrs. Margaret W.
Clucas has performed her duties as the librarian more directly in charge of operations, under the direction of Miss Stockett. The zealous attention she has given to
this work has been responsible in no small degree for the success of the library and
the interest displayed by the readers."
Of the other Provincial gaols, the Superintendent states:—
" The need and opportunity for developing library service in the gaols at Kamloops, Nelson, and Prince George have been considered a secondary problem as compared with that at Oakalla, taking into account the small number of inmates, the short
term of confinement, and the prevailing illiteracy amongst the Indians, who largely
constitute the type of person committed to the smaller gaols.
" There was included in the estimates for 1945-46, however, appropriations for
the purchase of $100 worth of books and periodicals for each of these gaols. At the
request of the Department, the Superintendent of the Public Library Commission is
making, in consultation with the Wardens, a careful selection of suitable books and
magazines for this purpose. Initial purchases were made early in the year and the
balance of the appropriations will be early expended, with particular attention to the
rather difficult requirements of a not very literate clientele."
STATISTICS.
In the attached statistics will be found the figures touching the number, sex,
nationality, etc., of prisoners confined during the year in the various Provincial gaols,
and in conclusion I should like to take this opportunity of expressing my appreciation
of the manner in which those connected with the Provincial Prison Service carried out
their duties during the year under review.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
T. W. S. PARSONS,
Inspector of Gaols. T 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX.
ANNUAL REPORT ON GAOLS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1945.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
1. Total number of County Gaols in B.C	
1
1
1
1
4
2. Total expenditure for gaol maintenance
in B.C.—
Year ended March 31st,  1945	
$237,494.35
$12,550.15
$4,574.50
$3,978.46
$258,597.46
Year ended March 31st,  1944—	
212,623.30
11,130.82
4,156.13
3,011.25
230,921.50
3. Average total maintenance cost per day
per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1945	
$1.38
$3.42
$1.50
$1.29
$1.89
Year ended March 31st,  1944	
1.47
2.11
1.28
1.63
1.62
Average dietary  cost per day per pris
oner—
Year ended March 31st,  1945 	
$0,229
$0,384
$0,273
$0.55
$0.35
Year ended March 31st,  1944	
.23
.17
.27
.40
.26
4. Number of prisoners committed—
Year ended March 31st, 1945	
2,044
99
182
264
2,589
I. Movement of Population, Year ended March 31st, 1945.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
On register, April 1st, 1944-
Reeeived—
From gaols —
By transfer	
By recapture._
By revocation of licence	
By forfeiture of ticket-of-leave-
By internal movements	
Insane— _	
Juveniles  —
Deportation _  	
Totals  	
Discharged—
By expiry of sentence..
By ticket-of-leave	
By deportation	
By pardon —	
By escape	
By death  	
By payment of fines	
By release on Court order (including " to bail ").
By transfer. 	
By internal movements .
To asylum..	
Totals	
On register, March 31st, 1945..
2,044
2
3
255
2,783
1,574
30
46
46
2
4
72
131
196
198
2,299
484
93
20
2
6
58
76
26
2
15
3
25
16
20
183
34
148
92
1
44
16
31
37
227
140
13
31
44
271
518
3,447
2,937
510 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1944-45.
T 73
II. Commitments.
1943-44.
1944-45
Decrease.
Increase.
Murder   t	
Manslaughter...    	
Crimes—
Against the person.-  	
Against property   	
Against public morals and decency—	
Against public order and peace 	
Other offences not enumerated above	
Insanity  _  	
Number of prisoners sentenced —	
Number of days' stay of prisoners	
Average number of prisoners per month
Average number of prisoners per day	
Escapes   _  	
Escapes and recaptured   	
Deaths in gaols —	
10
5
133
693
134
1,176
140
23
1,970
156,243
12,735
417
97
641
192
1,342
74
31
2,514
180,837
15,091
497.7
2
5
4
136
52
66
58
166
544
24,594
2,356
80
III. Sex.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
1,777
267
|
95         ]             162
4                     20
247                   2,281
17                       308
Totals    	
2,044
99        |           182
!
264                  2,589
1
IV. Educational Status.
115
1,338
549
42
8
67
23
1
62
104
15
1
72
159
26
7
2,044
99
182
264
2,589
V. Nationality.
(Place of Birth.)
British—
1,459
306
20
73
11
125
30
190
13
3
Totals      _ 	
1,785
84
155
206
2,230
Foreign—
76
163
19
1
2
11
2
3
22
2
32
23
1
2
Totals       —           -	
259
15
27
58
359
2,044
99
182
264
2,589 T 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
VI. Habits as to Use of Intoxicants.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
207
951
886
13
45
41
35
30
117
6
55
203
Totals :  	
2.044
99
182
264
2,589
1
VII. Habits as to Use of Drugs.
1,826
218
96
3
179
3
264
Totals       -	
2,044
99
182
264
2,589
VIII. Occupations.
150
294
182
397
920
28
73
12
5
3
58
16
1
4
52
10
16
71
20
6
7
24
5
4
192
29
6
4
2,044
99
182
264
2 589
IX. Racial.
White                               	
1.808                         91
122
58
2
_.__..
210
54
16
189
31
5
3
Totals  - 	
2,044
99
182
264
2,589
X. Civil State.
|
1.301                         59
104
52
12
14
166
69
19
10
470
78
195
30
2
8
Totals _     	
2,044
99
182
264
2,589
XI. Ages.
330
285
272
463
364
214
116
1
15                         35
17
22
23
67
70
47
18
21 to 25  _   	
12
13
28
17
7
7
23
11
32
41
29
11
25 to 30 _	
30 to 40 - _ —	
40 to 50 — - _ —	
50 to 60             - 	
Over 60  	
Totals  -	
2,044
99
182
264
2,589 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OP GAOLS, 1944-45.
T 75
XII. Creeds.
XIII. Duration op Sentence.
XIV. Previous Convictions.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
768
340
162
15
132
50
123
40
248
39
7
30
90
32
7
10
1
11
1
8
1
3
8
2
15
98
17
19
2
17
4
12
5
6
2
144
16
34
1
6
40
5
2
16
Others _ ___	
Totals-.                    	
2,044
99
182
264
2,589
605
253
124
289
304
146
42
186
24
1
32
36
1
3
31
17
16
23
2
3
3
4
51
46
13
9
3
8
8
44
228
14
6
10
6
2,044
99
182
264
2,589
Non<
953
278
153
105
70
67
59
55
52
30
12
17
17
16
8
6
6
10
10
7
9
3
5
5
57
21
13
53
12
10
8
3
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
117
14
13
6
7
4
3
3
5
2
3
2
1
2
162
30
41
16
4
1
2
8
*1                                          	
2  -
3	
4                                               ._ 	
5                                      	
6                                      	
7                                                    	
8                    ....            	
9                                         	
11                                             _.              	
12                                        	
13.     -	
14	
15                                                               	
16                                               	
17                                               .               	
50 to 59                                - -	
2.044
99
182
264
2,589
53.375
46.64
35.00
38.25
* Number to be shown according to actual gaol record. T 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
XV. Offences for which Prisoners were committed and sentenced during the Year.
Commitments.
Sentences.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
(a.)   Crimes against the person—
Oakalla 	
81
7
5
10
1
82
7
5
10
105
7
5
10
1
106
7
5
Prince George —	
10
Totals   .                          	
103
1
104
127
1
128
(6.)   Crimes against property—
Oakalla _	
573
16
26
24
21
3
594
16
29
24
924
16
26
24
40
3
964
16
29
24
Totals                   	
639
24
663
990
43
1,033
(c.)   Crimes against public morals and decency—
Oakalla    __ 	
Nelson   _ __  .
Kamloops  _   	
102
4
3
3
80
1
182
5
3
3
108
4
3
3
120
1
228
5
3
3
Totals —              	
112
81
193
118
121
239
(d.)   Crimes against public order and peace—
1,002
62
113
225
160
7
17
7
1,162
69
130
232
1,143
47
103
225
176
2
15
7
1,319
49
118
232
Totals  _ _._
1,402
191
1,593
1,518
200
1.718
(_.)   Other offences not enumerated above	
88
5
93
98
9
107
Grand totals   (totals of   (a),   (_>),
M,  (d), and (e)	
2,344
302
2,646
2,851
374
XVI. Employment of Prisoners.
(Per Cent, of Population.)
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
1.432
37.308
4.962
.683
7.187
16.038
1.102
31.288
65.0
1.0
1.0
20.0
13.0
59.0
1.0
32.0
8.0
Sick          .
	
Industrial —   _ _	
100.0
100.000
100.0
100.0
100.0 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1944-45.
T 77
XVII. Number of Officers and Employees on March 31st, 1945.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
2
3
7
37
1
1
3
9
5
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
Chief Gaoler                     	
Chief Clerk    ..      .                                                	
1
Totals                                                      	
82
8
2
2
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year ended March 31st, 1945.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
Expenditure.
$1,829.36
135,236.82
1,938.70
1,151.06
13,719.27
3,040.19
11,770.79
142.63
3,229.10
4,904.67
28,688.11
41,655.76
11,692.10
10,180.70
9,757.13
160.90
18,893.36
$1,829.36
8,938.72
175.77
48.89
387.46
81.52
112.81
2,528.47
84.56
2,493.91
23.76
149,197.92
2,222.79
1,199.95
Uniforms and clothing—_	
329.77
51.80
527.98
192.29
14,964.48
3,365.80
11,883.60
142.63
20.86
10.80
3,260.76
5.70
4,910.37
2,712.93
1,059.81
479.79
233.30
817.43
825.55
105.61
204.70
32,218.47
Provisions (upkeep of prisoners)	
Medical attendance and hospital supplies	
1,212.88
168.74
109.20
44,754.00
12,446.24
10,727.90
9,757.13
3.31
16.56
180.77
Cost-of-living bonus	
18,893.36
Totals 	
8297,990.65
6,239.53
$14,255.17
196.48
$4,975.25
25.00
$4,734.46
$321,955.53
6,461.01
$304,230.18
$14,451.65
$5,000.25
$4,734.46
$328,416.54
Revenue.
Rental of quarters, etc., and maintenance of
$40,325.90
26,409.93
$945.00
956.50
$425.75
$756.00
$42,452.65
27,366.43
Totals                    	
$66,735.83
$1,901.50
$425.75
$756.00
$69,819.08 T 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year ended March 31st,
1945—Continued.
Total Gross Expenditure.
Total Revenue.
•
1944.
1945.
1944.
1945.
Oakalla ...  •	
$263,442.27
12,979.14
4,544.88
3,907.25
$304,230.18
14,451.65
5,000.25
4,734.46
$50,818.97
1,848.32
388.75
896.00
$66,735.83
1,901.50
425.75
756.00
Totals                   	
$284,873.54
53,952.04
$328,416.54
69,819.08
S..3 952.04     1     ______ X19 (>!!
Less revenue    	
$230,921.50
$258,597.46
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1946.
755-1245-9961

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