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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORTS OF THE COMMISSIONER OF PROVINCIAL… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1947

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OP THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORTS
COMMISSIONER OF PROVINCIAL POLICE
FOR THE YEAR
1945
AND
INSPECTOR OF GAOLS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED
MARCH 81bt, 1946
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiakmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.  To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the reports of the Commissioner of
Provincial Police for the year ended December 31st, 1945, and the Inspector of Gaols
for the year ended March 31st, 1946.
G. S. WISMER,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1946. Victoria, B.C., November 1st, 1946.
The Honourable the Attorney-General,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to enclose herewith for your perusal my Annual Report
for the year ended December 31st, 1945, which includes a report on the Provincial
Gaols for the year ended March 31st, 1946.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
T. W. S. PARSONS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police. S3
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i  Report of the Commissioner of Provincial Police, 1945.
The Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Annual Report for the year ended December
31st  ]945
STRENGTH AND DISTRIBUTION.
At midnight of December 31st, 1945, the strength of the Force stood at fifteen
officers and 372 N.C.O.'s and men, exclusive of Special Constables and stenographers.
The following table shows the strength distribution as at the end of the year:—
Statement of Strength as at Midnight, December 31st, 1945.
Headquarters.
"A"
Division.
"B"
Divisioi*.
"C"
Division.
"D"
Division.
"E"
Division.
Fort
George
Subdivision.
Peace
River
Subdivision.
Total.
Commissioner	
Deputy Commissioner,
1
4
1
5
2
2
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
20
1
1
3
5
48
4
2
2
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
6
36
1
S
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
4
2
34
5
7
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
16
3
5
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
6
1
56
6
11
5
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
9
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
5
2
2
2
1
	
1
1
9
Sub-Inspectors	
2
1
22
1
First-class Constables
Second-class Constables-
Third-class Constables....
206
23
37
20
Assistant Chief Clerks....
Senior Clerks	
4
4
Third-class Skippers	
Second-class Engineers...
Third-class Engineers	
Fourth-class Engineers-
5
1
1
1
Senior Radio Operators..
First-class Radio Operators	
Second-class Radio Operators	
Third-class Radio Oper-
5
12
3
Fourth-class Radio Oper-
Chief Mechanical Super-
1
Mechanical Supervisor-
Assistant Mechanical
1
3
2
Assistant Finger-print
1
Senior Finger-print
Operators	
Finger-print Operators-
Armourer	
Assistant   Armourer	
Assistant Photogra-
1
1
Stenographers	
25
Totals	
51
74
65
65
41
104
17
15
432 T 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ENGAGEMENTS, DISCHARGES, AND PROMOTIONS.
With the separation of the Motor-vehicle Branch from the Force at March 31st,
an Inspector, two Sub-Inspectors, and thirty-one other ranks were struck off our
strength.    Ordinary discharges were as follows:—
Purchased   38
Invalided     10
Time expired      7
Dismissed     5
Pensioned      4
Transferred to Civil Service     3
In all, 101 men left the Force during 1945.    Promotions during the year:—
To—
Inspector      3
Sub-Inspector      3
Chief Mechanical Supervisor .     1
Staff-Sergeant      2
Radio Supervisor     1
Mechanical Supervisor      1
Assistant Mechanical Supervisor     1
Corporal     3
Mechanic      1
Skipper, Third-class      1
Constable, First-class  52
Constable, Second-class  27
Since demobilization got under way, selection of police recruits has been entirely
confined to ex-service men. In line with this policy, twenty-two of our former members
and twenty-one ex-service men have been engaged and posted to the Force.
POLICING OF MUNICIPALITIES.
Under agreement the Force continues to police forty-one cities and municipalities
in the Province. Supervision is also exercised over the four municipal areas of Coldstream, Greenwood, Glenmore, and Slocan City.
The municipalities of Port Alberni, Armstrong, Burnaby, Richmond, Langley,
Alberni, and Penticton asked for and received extra policing personnel.
POLICE TRAINING-SCHOOL.
Inspector C. Mackenzie, officer in charge of police training, reports:—
" Except for a short period during 1945 the training-school in Victoria was
inactive. However, in May, it was possible to conduct a two weeks' course in basic
police subjects for platoon leaders of auxiliary police from Vancouver Island and the
Lower Mainland. In turn these officers were then in a position to impart instruction
to the members of their commands. The agenda included drill and discipline, elementary criminal law, weapon identification, elementary sketching, public relations, motor-
vehicle and traffic control, and the care and handling of prisoners. Class members
were as follows: Charles Hailstone, Chief Constable, West Vancouver; N. P. Steacey,
North Vancouver; L. A. Head, North Vancouver; James Page, Vancouver; James
Fairclough, Langley; B. T. Brown, Maillardville; G. A. Hoozer, Surrey; L. B. Howey,
Victoria; John Palmer, View Royal; H. N. Freeman, Nanaimo; and F. G. Bacon,
Port Alberni.
" While our own school activities were curtailed, we were able to take advantage
of training courses conducted by other organizations. be
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" In June and July, and for a period of ten days, through the courtesy of the United
States Federal Bureau of Investigation, the following selected personnel attended a
special refresher course in finger-prints at Tacoma, Washington: Corporal A. T. Lash-
mar, Prince Rupert; Constable P. Kelsberg, Vancouver; Constable H. Parsley, Duncan;
and Constable T. A. Quigley, Nelson.
" Having won a scholarship sponsored by the Automotive Safety Foundation of
America which entitled him to attend a five months' course at that institution, Assistant
Mechanical Supervisor J. G. M. Lock, of Nelson, was sent to- Northwestern University,
Evanston, 111. This Traffic Police Administration Course, extremely valuable from the
' specialist' point of view, comprises some forty-odd subjects, amongst them ' Police
Mathematics,' ' Physical Laws,' ' Scientific Aids to Investigation,' ' Chemistry,' ' Traffic
Engineering,'' Laws of Evidence,'' Practical Psychology,'' Teaching Methods,' ' Survey
Procedures,' etc.    At the close of the year we received some excellent progress reports."
CIVILIAN PROTECTION  (A.R.P.)  BRANCH.
Inspector S. F. M. Moodie, officer in charge of the Provincial Police section assigned
to the Provincial Civilian Protection Committee, reports:—
" During the year the activities of the Branch were considerably curtailed and its
personnel reduced owing to the cessation of hostilities. Prior to the defeat of Japan,
this Branch worked in co-operation with the armed forces and the Forestry Department
to combat the danger from Japanese balloons. Pools of forest fire fighting equipment
were established at Victoria, Nanaimo, Cloverdale, Prince George, and Smithers.
Volunteers were obtained from Civilian Defence personnel to accompany such equipment should it be called on, the arrangement being that actual fire-fighting would be
under the direction of the Provincial Forest Service and that transportation, if necessary by air, would be supplied by the armed forces."
MARKSMANSHIP.
The officer in charge of personnel records at Headquarters, Inspector C. Clark,
reports:—
" Additional to special firearms instruction given at the police training-school, all
ranks completed the annual revolver classification course. One hundred and seventy-
four men of all ranks (nearly 45 per cent, of the strength) passed the qualifying test
by making a score of 63% per cent, or better. Further, out of a possible 300, five men
qualified in the Master category with over 275, fourteen rated as Experts (250 to 274),
and 155 as Marksmen (190 to 249). Leading the Master class was Sergeant J. A.
Young, the Force's ballistic expert and firearms instructor, with a score of 284. High
Expert was Constable B. E. Munkley, of Fort St. James Detachment (273), and high
Marksman was Sergeant L. A. N. Potterton, of Smithers, with 249. High Tyro award,
a silver cigarette-box, annually awarded to the individual making the highest score
when qualifying for the first time, was won by Constable J. W. Purdy, of Burns Lake
Detachment. The Fraser Trophy, contested for annually under service conditions, was
won for the second consecutive year by Constable W. G. Bailey, of Alexis Creek
Detachment.
" The general results of the annual revolver classification showed some change in
the relative efficiency demonstrated by the personnel of each division. T 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Table of Comparisons.
1944-
B " Division
Per Cent.
- 67.15
Fort George Subdivision 53.50
" C " Division  48.00
Headquarters  47.70
" E " Division  36.20
" D " Division  35.00
" A " Division  33.80
Peace River Subdivision 29.80
1945.
Per Cent.
Fort George Subdivision 80.00
Peace River Subdivision 66.66
" B " Division  59.60
" D " Division  45.00
Headquarters  39.20
" C " Division  38.80
" A " Division  38.00
" E " Division  16.00
" During May, June, and July two of our pistol teams participated in a series of
postal matches sponsored by the Pacific Coast International Association of Law Enforcement Officials. Twenty-nine four-man teams, including those of the United States
Treasury and Immigration Departments, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and
many State police organizations participated. City forces were represented by teams
from Honolulu, T.H.; Long Beach, Berkeley, Upland, and Torrance, California; Provo
and Ogden, Utah; Klamath Falls and Albany, Oregon; and Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Oak Bay, British Columbia. Our own two teams finished in fourth and
seventh positions. The United States Treasury Customs Border Patrol team of Washington won the series; Texas Highway Patrol and Honolulu Police Department finished
in second and third places. Among the 116 contestants, Sergeant J. A. Young and
Constable W. G. Bailey, of this Force, were fifth and ninth in individual prowess.
" Provincial Police teams also competed in revolver matches held in Vancouver
and Seattle. At Vancouver, in a field of forty-nine contestants, Sergeant J. A. Young
came third in the aggregate with a score of 775 points out of 800. In eight four-man
teams contending in the team event, the United States Treasury won first place with
a score of 1,180 out of a possible 1,200. Our team, only 3 points behind, was second
with 1,177. At the North-west Regional Tournament at Seattle, Sergeant J. A. Young
and Corporal J. A. Henry distinguished themselves by winning ten special awards.
" Sergeant Young won the high Expert award in the .22 calibre timed fire, the .38
calibre slow fire, the .38 calibre timed fire, the .38 calibre rapid fire, as well as taking
top Expert honors in the centre fire National Match course event. In addition, he
won the Expert centre fire aggregate and the grand aggregate in the Expert class
—a most notable performance in an open international event."
PAY AND QUARTERMASTER BRANCH.
Paymaster D. D. Moses reports:—
" Records for the calendar year 1945 show 16,599 expense vouchers, totalling
$1,386,101.67, were checked, recorded, and passed through the Accounts Branch.
Collections for police services amounted to $327,160.45, and individual pay and allowance records were kept for 974 employees.
" The Quartermaster's Stores received and filled 2,047 requisitions covering 8,863
articles, and, although we experienced great difficulty in obtaining supplies of all kinds,
it was found possible to provide uniform, equipment, and supplies as set down in our
regulations and to continue servicing the Gaol and Provincial Game Departments. REPORT  OP PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1945.
T 9
" Collections of revenue  (by divisions and subdivisions)  for the year are given
hereunder:—
"A"
Division.
"B"
Division.
"C"
Division.
"D"
Division.
"E"
Division.
Fort
George
Subdivision.
Peace
River
Subdivision.
$123.25
$30.00
1,230.91
1,975.72
290.62
5,030.99
7,376.16
35,114.81
7,055.00
8,265.00
337.25
1,106.65
2,619.92
595.00
131.00
37.00
153.00
45.50
2.50
1,150.00
3,819.00
2.00
8.00
95.50
161.00
606.50
Total
Collections
Amusement tax	
" Stock-brands Act "	
" Game Act " (licences).
" Game Act " (tax)	
" Motor-vehicle Act "	
Police Court fines	
Police Court costs	
" Poll Tax Act "	
" Pool-rooms Act "	
" Sheep Protection Act ".
Sheriffs' fees	
" Trade Licences Act "....
" Gasoline Tax Act "	
" Fisheries Act "	
Vital Statistics	
Miscellaneous	
Total collections.
$205.29
213.50
12,565.86
83.75
73,035.11
24,700.68
2,683.02
3,327.75
80.00
2,039.00
17.00
8,728.50
12.00
233.00
993.00
1,919.00
$939.51
1,192.30
8,578.25
185.22
157,420.92
28,205.50
3,392.14
2,655.00
415.00
1,313.00
48.25
11,092.25
22.00
930.50
650.79
$139.62
3,803.45
3,323.50
913.88
65,942.70
23,244.55
2,422.29
1,608.25
86.00
1,299.00
306.15
6,761.50
1.50
164.50
850.25
$7.17
106.80
4,445.85
4,332.49
13,450.97
21,016.50
1,041.06
80.00
100.00
283.00
191.20
2,305.00
600.00
172.00
214.75
$50.60
5,986.75
28.75
110,350.53
44,037.50
5,599.80
50.00
1,002.60
317.15
3,442.50
44.50
397.50
2,520.50
$1,291.59
5,519.90
38,106.84
10,865.70
462,691.20
156,524.73
16,582.21
10,885.92
862.00
6,126.60
927.75
37,298.50
14.00
909.00
2,914.00
6,761.79
$130,836.46
$217,040.38
$110,867.14
$48,346.79
$173,828.68'$20,4S7.11;$56,875.17j$758,281.73"
I i
COMMENDATIONS AND AWARDS.
Excellent work performed by individual members of the Force occasioned forty-
seven commendations in monthly General Orders. Several men were commended twice.
As usual, particularly meritorious work was recognized by awards from the Police
Reward Fund (see Appendix III.). Game Warden A. J. Jank, of the Provincial Game
Commission, gave the Force the benefit of his assistance on a number of occasions, and
in two instances I thought it fitting that his name should be mentioned in Orders.
DISCIPLINE.
Instances of misconduct resulted in nineteen reprimands and the imposition of
eleven fines. In addition, one man was reduced in rank. Some of these reprimands
were connected with the careless handling of Government vehicles, and two men were
required to pay $100 towards the cost of repairs, another man was assessed $50 and a
fourth $25.
POLICE TRANSPORT BRANCH.
The Chief Mechanical Supervisor, Mr. J. F. McNaught, Transport Section, reports
the following table of mileage covered by the Force:—
Mileage.
Railway.
Cars.
Launch. .
Horse.
Foot.'
Public
Conveyances,
Air, and
Dogs.
Total.
Police.
Rented.
Police.
Chartered.
Headquarters*	
" A " Division	
" B " Division	
4,229
5,730
80,042
67,880
24,301
16,191
9,057
11,506
57,214
385,495
386,929
346,620
82,108
56,364
104,733
766,262
26,749
7,022
148
23,897
7,844
3,361
6,157
2,552
28,447
901
125
15,608
658
40
4,880
3,340
394
437
1,197
226
444
2,522
14
2,786
3,686
45
296
12,032
112,562
62,519
75,375
36,901
15,813
13,480
74,443
36,912
45,650
4,817
5,192
45,867
24,220
49,641
76,000
137,136
588,246
535,764
522,312
"D " Division	
Fort George Subdivision
Peace River Subdivision
" E " Division	
217,512
116,833
183,597
938,461
Totals	
218,936
2,185,725
77,730
50,659
8,560
6,827
403,125
288,299
3,239,861
* Including Criminal Investigation Department and Civil Defence. T 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Due in part to the number of motor-vehicles that have now reached an age when
expensive repairs are necessary, the cost of operation of all vehicles is still increasing.
However, this condition cannot be remedied until such time as new equipment becomes
available.
All water-craft, 221 Police cars, 23 vehicles belonging to the Game Department,
504 public carriers, and 125 school buses were inspected during the year.
Marine Section.
Police motor launches and boats are based at the following stations: P.G.D. 1,
Alert Bay; P.G.D. 2, Powell River; P.M.L. 6, Ganges; P.M.L. 7, Ocean Falls;
P.M.L. 8, Port Alberni; P.M.L. 9, Campbell River; P.M.L. 10, Port Alice; P.M.L. 11,
Kaslo;  P.M.L. 15, Prince Rupert.
In addition to the foregoing, small power-boats and marine equipment is on charge
at the following Detachments: Sicamous, Prince George, Atlin, Squamish, McDame
Creek, Ucluelet, Cowichan Lake, Fort St. James, Fort St. John, Kamloops District
Headquarters, Stewart, and Terrace.
POLICE RADIO.
Our Police radio network continues to be of inestimable assistance to the Force.
Incidentally, the establishment of radio-telephone communication between P.M.L. 9
and its Campbell River base and between P.G.D. 2 and its headaquarters at Powell
River has proved a welcome innovation. During the year 21,643 messages, totalling
960,479 words, passed through our system.
ASSISTANCE TO FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.
Full and friendly co-operation exists as between ourselves and the Federal services
associated with the Departments of Customs and Excise, Immigration, Transport,
Pensions, National Health, Indian Affairs, Mines and Resources, Wartime Prices and
Trade Board, National Defence, National War and Selective Service, Soldier Settlement, Radio Branch, and others.
ASSISTANCE TO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.
"A" Division, Vancouver Island (Inspector R. Owens).—"We were called upon
to undertake a great many investigations for, and in connection with, the various
Departments of Provincial Government, and I would particularly refer to the Departments of the Provincial Secretary (Social Services), Agriculture, Forests, the Provincial Game Commission, and to the office of the Provincial Fire Marshal. Much time, too,
was devoted to providing escorts, guards, etc., for official and other public functions."
" B " Division, South-eastern British Columbia (Inspector R. Harvey).—" We submitted reports on fires connected with buildings and automobiles to the Provincial Fire
Marshal and carried out such investigations as were necessary.
" A number of cases were investigated and reported upon for the Inspector of
Municipalities, and in some it was necessary to arrange for the renting and the sale
or care of property and chattels—duties which entail a very considerable amount of
work.
" At the commencement of the fiscal year, the Motor Branch was segregated from
the Provincial Police and became a separate branch. However, at all points where our
Constables had been collecting revenue under the ' Motor-vehicle Act,' they continued
to assist the new branch by carrying on in the collection of revenue, checking of
licences, and in the examination of drivers' licences, etc. ■rt
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" Besides the usual stock-brands inspections and the inspection of slaughter-houses,
we are being increasingly called upon to deal with the movement of cattle and horses
by truck and rail.   We also assist at most country stock sales."
"C" Division, Central British Columbia (Inspector E. Gammon).—"Assistance
was rendered various Departments of the Provincial Government service and their
branches, particularly the Department of the Provincial Secretary (Social Welfare),
the Department of Agriculture, the Forestry Service, the Game Commission, and
others."
"D" Division, Northern British Columbia (Inspector H. H. Mansell).—"During
the year past very considerable assistance was rendered the Provincial Government,
particularly the Board of Health in connection with the suppression of venereal disease.
Aid also was freely given to the Department of the Provincial Secretary in connection
with social welfare, old-age pensions, child welfare, mental hospitals, to the Department of Finance, Official Administrators, Coroners, and others."
" E " Division, Lower Mainland (Deputy Commissioner J. Shirras).—" Under this
heading it is quite safe to say that nearly every Department of the Provincial Government was given some measure of assistance and co-operation during the year. A great
deal of work was done for such Departments as that of the Provincial Secretary, the
Finance Department, and our own Department of the Attorney-General. Various
Departmental branches were assisted greatly, such as the Liquor Control Board, the
Fire Marshal's Office, Child Welfare, Old-age Pensions, Game Commission, etc. Our
radio system contributed greatly to the speedy handling of many investigations carried
out for them."
Fort George Subdivision (Sergeant G. H. Clark, M.c).—"As in previous years
the Game Commission leads all others of the Province with whom we deal officially.
The fullest co-operation exists between us.
" We were called upon to undertake investigations, enforcement, and prosecutions
for various Provincial Government Departments and branches. These included the
Provincial Secretary's Department—destitute, poor, and sick; juveniles, desertions,
dispositions of estates; the Fire Marshal's Office—investigations, prosecutions, and
fire reports; the Forest Branch—prosecutions and miscellaneous co-operation; Department of Agriculture—co-operation with local District Agriculturists; Provincial
Board of Health—sanitary inspections, V.D. Control, etc.; Official Administrator—
collection, disposition of effects, etc.; Motor-vehicle Branch—enforcement of the Act
and collection of revenue."
Peace River Subdivision (Sub-Inspector G. J. Duncan).—"Throughout the year
general assistance was extended to the Health and Game departments. Many investigations were carried out for the Department of Agriculture, and investigations and
inspections for the office of the Provincial Fire Marshal. In addition, the Department
of Lands, the Department of the Provincial Secretary, the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics, and others called for and received the benefit of our facilities."
ASSISTANCE TO OTHER FORCES.
It is with great pleasure that attention is again directed to the happy relationship
Which exists between other agencies devoted to law enforcement and ourselves. For
seventy years now there has been something rather more than a professional friendship with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police—and a not unlike spirit of camaraderie
can be observed in respect to the city forces of Victoria, Vancouver, and other municipal bodies; the Investigation Departments of the Canadian Pacific and Canadian
National Railways; and the Provincial Game Commission. Also to be mentioned are
our friendly contacts with the Canadian Navy, Army, and Air Force, and with the
Navy and Coast Guard and Federal, State, county, and municipal policing authorities
of the United States. T 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DEPARTMENT.
Inspector R. Peachey, M.C., in charge of the Criminal Investigation Department,
reports:—
" The records of the Criminal Investigation Department show that during the
year some 10,233 cases were prosecuted in Provincial Police Courts. This is an
increase of 244 over the previous twelve months. These figures include all types of
offences—criminal, Provincial and Federal Statutes violations, and infractions of
municipal by-laws. Of the cases prosecuted, 9,586 resulted in convictions, almost 94
per cent. With the closing of so many war industries and large numbers of men being
released at the cessation of hostilities in the European theatre (May 8th) and in the
eastern theatre (August 16th), it was forecast that we would witness a wave of crime
throughout the country:   something not evident so far as we were concerned.
" Omitting offences against Provincial and Federal Statutes and municipal by-laws,
our records indicate that we received 5,141 complaints of offences against the Criminal
Code of Canada as against 4,782 in 1944. A few more perhaps, but this may fairly
be attributed to an increase in the population of British Columbia. These 5,141 complaints resulted in 3,437 prosecutions, and almost the entire difference as between the
number of ' complaints received ' and ' charges entered ' is to be found in the ' theft'
and ' breaking and entering ' classes of crime. Many of these complaints are cleared
up when on one of his excursions the offender finally leaves evidence sufficient to enable
identification. Unfortunately, with evidence in one case only, many other offences
committed by the same person appear on our records as unsolved.
" Analysing the statistics as a whole, we find that complaints of theft increased
by 183, and complaints of breaking and entering by 76. Other types of crime which
show slight increases are robbery with violence, obtaining money by false pretences,
uttering forged documents, and damage to property. The most noticeable decrease is
in the ' disorderly house' class where premises were being operated for the purpose of
gambling. In 1944 there were 287 prosecutions for being keepers or inmates of such
houses, while in 1945 the figure dropped to 151.
" Of seven murders committed in territory policed by ourselves, six were dealt
with by the Courts. One, at Port Alberni, proved to be a murder and suicide. In two
others the accused were found insane and ordered to be held at the pleasure of the
Lieutenant-Governor. Of the remaining four, one accused was sentenced to be hanged,
one was found guilty of manslaughter, one was found not guilty, and in one case we
were unable to obtain any clues leading to the identity of the murderer. This latter
concerned Kitty Moen at Prince Rupert and is dealt with later in this report.
" With the total capitulation of the enemy on both fronts, the special assistance
which we had become accustomed to render to the Navy, Army, and Air Force was not
so much in demand. There were, however, many requests for inquiries under the
' National Resources Mobilization Act,' and also innumerable inquiries from the services
regarding application for discharge or for special leave oh compassionate grounds.
" When V-E Day arrived, this Province was fortunate in its freedom from any
disturbances or even wild demonstrations. Other places were not so fortunate, and
when V-J Day approached, their experiences prompted local authority to make preparations for any emergency which might arise. At the instance of Captain Donald,
R.C.N., Naval Officer in Charge at Esquimalt Dockyard, a meeting (to which all the
Chiefs of Police of the surrounding municipalities and ourselves were invited) was
held a few days prior to August 16th. Also attending were representatives from the
Naval Shore Patrol, Army Provost Corps, and R.C.A.F. Service Police, and I have no
hesitation in reporting that our preparations and the co-ordination arranged between
all  services  prevented  what  might  easily  have  resolved   into  a   serious   situation. CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION BUREAU.
SCIENCE AIDS THE MODERN POLICE OFFICER.
Mr. T, W. McConnell Davis, senior analyst of the Department of
Mines laboratory, is shown at the spectroscope as he analyses the
metallic composition of an exhibit.
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Although celebrations naturally occurred in other Provincial centres and thousands
upon thousands of people poured into the streets, there was no untoward incident.
" In October we were invited to attend an afternoon meeting of law enforcement
officers at Bellingham sponsored by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. On your
instructions the Deputy Commissioner and I proceeded to Bellingham and met many
law enforcement officers of the North-west, contacts which we felt to be quite valuable.
Very close and friendly relations exist between the United States Federal Bureau of
Investigation and ourselves, and I am grateful for the many opportunities afforded
members of this Branch to attend lectures and meetings initiated by the F.B.I. The
Criminal Investigation Department also enjoys the fullest co-operation with the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police and the various city and municipal police departments with
whom we deal.
" From time to time members of the Branch assisted all divisions and subdivisions.
Sergeants C. Ledoux and J. A. Young and Corporal J. C. Sweeney made journeys to
different points in the Province and were of great service in such cases as the murder
at Prince Rupert and a loss of valuable securities in the same city. Sergeants Young
and Ledoux also assisted Port Alberni Detachment in a series of theft and safe robberies. In one case sufficient evidence to connect the actual breaking and entering
could not be obtained; however, two men were successfully charged with conspiring
to commit an indictable offence—one was sentenced to two and one-half years and the
other to two years in the penitentiary. Sergeant Ledoux prepared the case for presentation at the preliminary hearing and conducted the entire prosecution. Incidentally, in the numerous cases in which members of the Criminal Investigation Department participated, all ranks were found to be most co-operative.
" Scientific Examinations.
" Mr. G. C. B. Cave, Chief Analyst, Department of Mines, and his staff have worked
with us in no less than forty different cases. Many and various are the exhibits submitted for analytical and microscopic examinations—fibres, glass, clothing for stains
or dust, etc. In a Saanich case the laboratory worked for nearly a month on exhibits
sent in by the municipal police, and in a safe robbery at Port Alberni a conviction was
obtained through the identification of dust in the clothing of a suspect. It compared
with material used as ballast in the safe.
" There were a number of cases in which firearms identification played the principal role, and Sergeant J. A. Young of the Criminal Investigation staff had ample
opportunity to demonstrate his ability in this branch of criminal investigation.
Sergeant Ledoux chemically restored and photographed numbers erased from an automatic pistol by filing and, also by means of chemicals, restored the original writing on
an invoice and a National Registration Certificate on both of which the writing had
been either completely erased or altered.
" Registration of Firearms.
" By Order in Council P.C. 5972, dated September 14th, 1945, registration of rifles
and shotguns was revoked. It had been expected that this registration would continue, and many organizations, such as service clubs, Fish and Game Associations,
expressed themselves as favouring the permanent continuation of this form of control.
" The registration of small arms is continued under the provisions of the Criminal
Code, and a quinquennial registration of this type of weapon became due in the year
1944; however, preoccupation with the war necessitated postponement until March 1st,
1945. Some concern was felt at the small percentage of reregistrations coming in—
about 50 per cent, of those previously registered—and constitutes a problem which
still confronts every police authority in Canada.    Through the co-operation of the press T 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
and moving-picture theatres we were able to obtain extensive publicity, and while for
a time this form of approach had some effect, it does not seem to have brought about
any real difference in the situation. Service personnel returning from overseas brought
large numbers of war souvenirs, and this presented another problem in connection with
small arms: it was difficult to convince them that they must register these weapons,
particularly as many of them had been brought into the country contrary to military
orders.
" Juvenile Delinquency.
" The juvenile question continues to engage the attention of all those charged with
law enforcement. In 1945 I find that there were 1,086 juveniles charged with various
offences—a decided increase over 1944. While this is a serious state of affairs, it must
not be forgotten that there has been a tremendous growth in population which, in the
nature of things, would account for what at first sight appears to be an unusually
sudden increase in juvenile dereliction. However, from my own observations and a
study of the records, I feel justified in stating that while there were many cases in
which juveniles were involved, the problem does not seem to be quite so serious as we
are led to believe, and that interest in this subject, taken by both public and police, is
not without effect.
" Complaints, Missing Persons, Inquests, etc.
" Of the more general classes of duties which the British" Columbia Provincial
Police is called upon to perform, our records show that 35,821 complaints of all types
were received and attended to. This is an increase of 2,725 over the previous year.
A total of 169,074 patrols were made attending such complaints, investigating offences,
and on general preventive police duty; 1,046 inquiries were made for missing persons;
559 inquests were attended;   and 600 mentally ill patients were taken to hospital.
" Accidents.
" Fatal accidents investigated by our Police numbered 406. Drowning accounted
for 135; automobiles, 57; logging, 55. Of the remainder, 25 persons lost their lives
in fires, while an additional 6 died as the result of severe burns. Aeroplane accidents
caused the death of 19 persons, and 22 were killed as a result of being struck by trains.
Firearms occasioned the deaths of 12 persons. All figures, including automobiles, are
for accidents which occurred in unorganized territory and in cities and municipalities
policed by the British Columbia Provincial Police.
" Finger-print and Photograph Section.
" From January 1st to December 31st, 1945, Assistant Supervisor A. G. Carmichael, Finger-print Section, reports that 2,669 finger-print forms were received for
classification and filing. Of these, 872 were identified as persons with criminal records
and previously registered. Seven hundred and one sets of civilian finger-prints were
received at the Section for classification and search. Applicants for entry into the
United States supplied 533 sets (six were identified with criminal records), while applicants for enlistment in our own Force and as prison guards provided the remaining 168.
The Finger-print Section furnished 2,927 sets of finger-prints (with complete previous
criminal records as known to us) to the following: Royal Canadian Mounted Police,
1,379; Vancouver City Police, 514; Calgary City Police, 514; New Westminster City
Police, 514; F.B.I., Washington, D.C, 6. The total number of persons with criminal
records registered at the Section at the end of 1945 is 31,053. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1945. T 15
" Photographs.
" During the year we printed 12,169 photographs of convicted persons and 1,742
photographs of various subjects, including enlargements. For this work it was necessary to make 381 new negatives. The Motor-vehicle Licence Branch was supplied with
720 prints and 42 negatives in connection with their statistical work on accidents.
Pictures were also made for Court use; for the Provincial Analyst; for Mr. H. B.
McLean, examiner of questioned documents; for the Royal Canadian Navy, Royal Canadian. Army, and Royal Canadian Air Force; and also for our own Modus Operandi
Section.
" A new camera for photographing prisoners has been installed at Oakalla Prison
Farm. This instrument, designed and constructed by members of the Criminal Investigation Department staff, takes full face, a side view, and a full-length picture all on the
same negative and from one fixed position. To effect this, the subject is moved back
a few feet to a marked position, from which point a novel lighting system provides the
correct amount of light for each pose. The advantage of having a prisoner's picture
exactly as he appears on the street is obvious to all law enforcement officials, and that
such a picture with views of the face can be taken, mechanically, by any one, even
though unskilled in photography, would seem to be a valuable innovation in this aspect
of criminal identification.
" Exhibits.
" Sixty articles of different kinds were sent in to the Finger-print Section for
examination. Some proved to be of no value for identification purposes, but on others
prints were found and identified as belonging to the complainants or persons in their
employ. In this connection it might be mentioned that in ten instances all those associated with certain offences were identified and subsequently convicted."
Outstanding Cases.
Kitty Moen (Murder of).—This person was found stabbed to death on April 15th,
1945, in her house on Comox Avenue, Prince Rupert. She lived alone and the first indication of anything wrong was the fact that for two days neighbours had noticed her
newspapers had not been taken in. Blinds, too, remained down and there was an
unusual atmosphere of desertion surrounding the premises. Despite exhaustive
inquiries among the neighbours, no one could be found who had seen anybody enter
or leave the house. Every possible source of information was followed up without
uncovering a " lead " of any description, nor was it possible to establish a motive for
the crime. Moreover, in view of the peculiar coincidence of the deceased woman's
sister, Esther Killas, having been murdered on the same street seventeen years previously almost to the day, the family history also was thoroughly inquired into. At this
writing the case, as does that of her sister, remains unsolved.
Rex vs. Moise Rousseau (Rape).—While this case commenced on December 11th,
1944, when it was reported to the British Columbia Provincial Police Detachment at
Port Alberni that a little girl, just under 4 years of age, had been found crying and
saying she was lost, the information leading to its successful conclusion was not
received until January 4th, 1945. The Police immediately responded and, led by the
informant, found the child very cold and shivering from exposure. She had neither
shoes on nor hat and her overalls were tangled round her feet. The only information
that could be obtained from the girl was that a man had stopped her and, saying he
would buy some candy and a tricycle if she would go with him, took her to the spot
where she was eventually found.    Medical examination disclosed sexual intercourse.
Our first " lead " came January 4th, 1945, following receipt of a letter from the
Chief Constable, Geraldton, Ont., advising the escape of Rousseau, believed to be in T 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Port Alberni, while en route to Port Arthur for trial on a charge of indecently assaulting a 4-year-old girl. We were also informed that his criminal record disclosed two
previous convictions for a like offence. On the Chief Constable's request, this man was
arrested and immediately became suspect in the rape case then under investigation.
An opportunity was afforded the little girl to see him in circumstances exactly similar
to those when she was first accosted, and she immediately recognized him as her assailant. Further exhaustive investigation produced additional corroborative evidence,
which included exhibits of woollen fibres picked off the clothing of the accused and
corresponding to material in the child's dress. At first Rousseau stoutly denied any
knowledge of the events and endeavoured to set up an alibi; however, after hearing the
evidence presented at his preliminary hearing, he elected speedy trial, pleaded guilty,
and was sentenced to fifteen years imprisonment in the penitentiary.
Rex vs. Harry Gill and Gordon Rorison (Rape).—The victim in this case was a girl
13 years of age. Having attended a dance at H.M.C.S. " Discovery " and while waiting
for a street-car to take her to her home at Marpole, she was forced into a car by the
two accused, who compelled her to have sexual intercourse with them. At its commencement this investigation was difficult, as the girl knew neither of her assailants
and could give but very meagre descriptions of them. However, by dint of persistent
investigation on the part of Corporal J. C. Watt, in charge of the Richmond Municipal
Detachment, and the men under him, particularly Constable J. C. White, suspicion led
to the two accused, who eventually confessed. Charged with rape, they pleaded guilty
to a count of unlawful carnal knowledge, and were sentenced to three years in the
British Columbia penitentiary. This account, necessarily brief, does not do full justice
to the amount of work that went into this investigation.
Rex vs. Braithwaite et al. (Illegal Operations).—In the early part of March, 1945,
the local doctor at Ashcroft telephoned the Police office and requested use of a Police
car to take a patient, seriously ill, to the hospital. Sergeant J. W. Hooker, then in
charge of the district, thought this a strange request and suggested that Police cars
were not ordinarily used as ambulances to take private patients to hospital. The
doctor explained that he usually made use of his own car, then under repair, adding it
was impossible for him to secure other transportation. On this the Sergeant agreed,
and the patient, a woman, was duly transported to the hospital. Nothing more was
thought of the incident until one day when a lady stopped him to inquire about a
friend who had been removed to hospital and who turned out to be the woman already
referred to. Sergeant Hooker gave her such information as he had, whereupon the
lady explained she was aware of her friend's trouble—the after-effects of an illegal
operation performed in Vancouver.
This information started an investigation which uncovered an extensive " ring "
practising illegal operations. Ultimately, sufficient evidence was obtained to enable
charges being laid against eight persons, and in respect thereto great credit is due
Sergeant Hooker for the energy with which he conducted his inquiries. Mention also
should be made of the Vancouver City Police officers who co-operated in obtaining the
evidence necessary to deal with those whose offences had their genesis within that city.
Rex vs. Harold Wesley Stewart and Wesley A. Johnson (Breaking and Entering
and Theft).—A warehouse at Annable, near Trail, B.C., was broken into early in
August and household goods to the approximate value of $5,000 were stolen therefrom.
The month following, Constable G. W. Anderson learned that one Wesley A. Johnson had attempted to sell a washing-machine. As Johnson was serving a sentence for
a crime committed at Kelowna, his wife was interviewed. This resulted in the subsequent recovery of a number of electrical appliances, all identified as stolen from the
warehouse. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1945. T 17
Interviewed at the Provincial gaol, Johnson, who had informed his wife the goods
had been purchased at a sale, denied all knowledge of the crime. In the meantime suspicion had fallen on one Harold Wesley Stewart, who left his employment at Trail about
the time of the warehouse theft. He had been well provided with money and had gone
to Merritt, B.C., later moving on to Powell River. Suspicion was sufficiently strong to
justify a search warrant being taken in respect to his Powell River domicile, and a
number of articles, corresponding to those stolen from the warehouse, were recovered
therefrom. Stewart's estranged wife, interviewed at Vancouver, also produced additional articles sent to her from Trail. These, too, proved to have been stolen, and as
the investigation proceeded, more goods were recovered at various points where they
had been left for storage.
As a culmination to several months' persevering investigation, both Stewart and
Johnson were convicted in County Court at Trail before His Honour Judge H. W.
Colgan. Johnson, who had a long criminal record, was sentenced to eighteen months'
imprisonment, and Stewart, in consideration for his assistance in recovering part of
the stolen property, eight months.
Rex vs. Nick Podovinikoff (Damage to Property by Night).—In the early morning
of July 29th, 1945, Peter N. Markin, of Slocan Park, B.C., complained to our Nelson
Detachment that on being awakened early that morning he had found his Ford tudor
car on fire but, with the help of his wife, managed to put it out. He told the Police of
returning early the previous evening, parking the car near his house, and that both
his wife and two sons had painted the body with blue paint. A careful examination
was made, but there was no sign of the paint having been smeared, and some footprints
found near the scene were too indistinct to be of any value. However, one Nick Podovinikoff was mentioned as a suspect, and the following day he was arrested at Castlegar.
Traces of blue paint were found on his hands, trousers, and shirt, and his shoes were
similar to the footprints found near the burned car.
On August 7th the accused appeared before William Irvine, Stipendiary Magistrate
at Nelson, on a charge of unlawfully and wilfully setting fire to and damaging Peter N.
Markin's automobile by night. He was committed for trial, and before His Honour
Judge W. A. Nisbet, County Court, Nelson, he elected speedy trial and pleaded guilty.
In extenuation, he told the Court he was so drunk that he did not know what he was
doing. However, this story was disbelieved, and in imposing a sentence of two years
in the penitentiary, His Honour took his previous criminal record into consideration.
Doukhobors as a rule are not inclined to co-operate with law enforcement officials,
but this case was rather unusual in that it was through the co-operation of the complainant and other Doukhobors that the case was brought to a successful conclusion.
Charles Leroy Bechtel, Deceased.—On the afternoon of Friday, August 17th, 1945,
Frank Biddlecombe complained to our Kimberley Detachment that one Charles L.
Bechtel, residing about 22 miles north-east of Kimberley, had threatened him with an
axe and accused him of stealing his property. He believed the man to be dangerously
insane.
The following day the Police visited Bechtel's farm and found him barricaded in
his cabin. After conversation through an open window, it was quite evident that he
was suffering from hallucinations. Further, he refused to open the door and informed
the Police he had a gun and would use it.
It was decided to employ tear gas, and on the 21st, after an unsuccessful attempt
to get him out of the barricaded cabin, a tear gas projectile was thrown in, but Bechtel,
carrying a rifle, managed to escape through the door into the surrounding bush where
an unsuccessful search was made for him until dark.
Early the following morning, with Police reinforcements from Cranbrook, the
search resumed, and Bechtel was found in his barn, a building about 15 feet square, T 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
made of heavy logs with only a door and small window which made it quite dark inside.
He was waiting for them, and tear gas thrown into the barn immediately drew two
shots, one of which narrowly missed Sergeant W. J. McKay. More tear gas was discharged, and after the smoke cleared away, the Police were preparing to rush the building when Bechtel fired through the window, striking Corporal F. Slater in the left side,
hitting and discharging his revolver, which back-fired, causing a dirty ragged wound
about 2 inches in diameter. To effect the retreat of the injured man, several shots
were fired into the barn as Slater was assisted to a car and driven to Kimberley Hospital. A guard was placed, and about noon the following day Bechtel came out of the
barn unarmed and was taken into custody. Found to be suffering from a gunshot
wound above the left hip, he was taken to Kimberley Hospital, where, owing to his
weakened condition and complications resulting from the wound, he died next morning.
Corporal Slater was in hospital some days, but early treatment hastened his eventual
recovery.
At the Coroner's inquest the jury absolved the Police from all blame in their
hazardous duty of effecting the lawful arrest of a person mentally ill and dangerous to
be at large.
MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH.
By the provisions of the " Motor-vehicle Act Amendment Act, 1945," our Motor-
vehicle Branch became a separate Branch of the Department of the Attorney-General as
at May 1st, 1945, and the details of its administration no longer form a part of this
report; however, as enforcement remains a Police function, it may be mentioned that
we undertook 1,371 prosecutions and obtained 1351 convictions for various derelictions
connected with motor-vehicle traffic. We also obtained 191 convictions out of 193
prosecutions under the " Motor Carrier Act."
With the separation of the motor-vehicle administration from that of the Police,
the new organization very naturally required to take with it all those highly specialized
members of the Force—enforcement sections omitted—hitherto associated with motor-
vehicle legislation. This meant that many officers, non-commissioned officers, and men
who for over twenty years had performed yeoman clerical service would be lost to us;
however, old ties were strong, and the former camaraderie, which means so much to
efficiency, continues undiminished and unimpaired, a desideratum in no small part due
to the sound professional abilities of Messrs. George A. Hood and J. P. M. Hannah, for
many years respectively Inspector and Sub-Inspector of Provincial Police and now
Superintendent and Deputy Superintendent of the Motor-vehicle Branch.
HIGHWAY PATROL.
Members of the Force whose principal duties are the enforcement of legislation
relating to the control of traffic made 213,689 check-ups, an increase of 49,408 or 30
per cent, against 1944, and investigated 303 motor-vehicle accidents this year. In doing
so they travelled 149,714 miles. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1945.
T 19
The type of check-ups made and the number of same according to division was as
follows:—
"A"
Division.
" B "
Division.
"O"
Division.
" E "
. Division.
Total.
Motor-vehicle licences	
9,377
167
450
2,047
9,377
1,920
9,377
1,028
309
3,904
1,733
9,377
2,515
1,938
1,771
3,237
32
155
902
3,167
884
3,237
295
798
1,129
503
3,237
2,855
386
545
2,107
46
208
860
2,107
762
2,107
1,947
452
885
819
809
487
812
824
6,446
14
611
1,936
6,446
360
6,446
415
579
346
211
3,164
1,846
1,377
1,608
21,167
259
1,424
5,745
21,097
Operation of motor-vehicles	
3,226
21,167
3,685
2,138
Warning signals	
6,264
3,266
16,587
Miscellaneous regulations	
7,703
4,513
4,748
Totals	
145,290
21,362
15,232
31,805
213,689
GENERAL.
In the Annual Report for 1939 there was a brief reference to the commencement
of World War II. Now, with equal brevity, it is possible to mention its victorious conclusion and draw attention to the fact that Provincial Policemen were intimately concerned with every activity associated with the requirements of internal defence.
RETIREMENTS.
Having reached the statutory age-limit, Inspectors John Macdonald and Charles G.
Barber retired on pension. In the course of long and honourable service in all parts
of the Province, and in the execution of their varied and important duties, neither
officer spared himself; in fact, their energy and singleness of purpose in the exercise
of wide responsibility will, I am sure, long remain a pattern and example for their
successors.
CONCLUSION.
In conclusion may I again avail myself of the opportunity of thanking you for your
continued personal interest in our welfare. I should also like to thank the Deputy
Commissioner, Mr. John Shirras, the Inspectors and all those non-commissioned officers
and men, and members of the office staffs, whose understanding, hard work, and loyalty
have done so much towards cementing the friendly relationship—evinced by many
letters of appreciation—which exist between the people of this Province and ourselves.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
T. W. S. PARSONS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police.   T 22
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T 27
APPENDIX II.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DEPARTMENT DUTY ANALYSIS,
JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 31st, 1945.
Investigations.
"A"
Division.
"C"
Division.
"B"
Division.
"D"
Division.
"E"
Division.
Fort
George
Subdivision.
Peace
River
Subdivision.
Total.
345
11,552
28
122
26
12
1
34
78
165
20
3
49,768
1
11
34
192
2
2
39
2
3
61
4,374
2
90
1
11
36
65
118
2
22,985
1
12
39
123
68
13
61
27
4,548
7
47
2
8
21
99
53
1
33,696
2
2
46
160
4
153
139
9
4,124
5
23
1
1
5
77
132
1
11,400
1
2
1
55
6
3
11
6
8
9,126
49
168
2
145
5
50
212
536
9
1
43,257
3
461
1,876
1,140
60
22
1,356
1
3
2
2
7
19
18
1
3,975
2
2
11
28
5
741
6
27
1
2
6
9
24
3,993
5
8
142
2
4
31
472
Complaints investigated	
35,821
98
480
34
Industrial School, Boys'	
Industrial School, Girls'	
181
6
159
559
1,046
30
8
169,074
7
37
Insane escorts	
600
2,576
12
Provincial Secretary's Department	
5
1,407
169
Miscellaneous	
161
Totals	
62,440
28,062
39,015
15,863
57,108
5,454
5,000
212,942 T 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX III.
COMMENDATIONS.
The undermentioned non-commissioned officers  and men were commended in  General
Orders for special services performed during 1945:—
Date of
Regt. General
No. Rank and Name. Order.
891. Constable Innes, R. J  17-1-45
963. Constable Cofield, R. J  17-1-45
709. Constable Gibault, J. G  15-2-45
126. Sergeant Service, S  19-3-45*
524. Sergeant Young, J. A ( 19-3-45*
) 15-6-45
646. Constable Carlson, T.  19-3-45*
528. Constable Hutchison, P. R  19-3-45*
822. Constable Mann, H.   19-3-45*
964. Constable Youngberg, G. E  13-4-45
897. Constable Curie, W. G ,  13-4-45
559. Constable Heatley, G. D  15-5-45
580. Constable Moore, T.  1 1  15-5-45
911. Constable Weeks, G. D  15-5-45
716. Constable Munkley, B. E  15-5-45
186. Sergeant Clark, G. H., M.c  15-6-45
205. Constable McKenney, H. L  15-6-45
699. Constable Shepherd, J.   15-6-45
616. Constable Matheson, M.   15-6-45
918. Constable Redhead, G.   17-7-45
388. Sergeant Hooker, J. W  18-9-45
542. Constable Kelsberg, P.   18-9-45
415. Skipper Winegarden, N. J  18-9-45
999. Engineer Milne, I  18-9-45
430.  Sergeant Woods-Johnson, F. B  18-9-45
662. Constable Saunders, F. G  18-9-45
586. Constable Nelson, F. E  18-9-45
695. Constable Sutherland, A. J  18-9-45*
853. Constable Cummins, J. N  18-9-45
721. Constable Duncan, A.   18-9-45
947. Constable Gibbon, A. E  18-9-45
1020. Constable Regan, F. X. J     18-9-45
412. Constable Hayward, R. H. P  17-10-45
954. Constable Tateson, J.   17-10-45
931. Constable Gibbon, N. D  17-10-45
769. Constable Irving, W. B  17-10-45
1002. Constable Cline, G. R  17-10-45
1018. Constable Cowgill, J.  (  17-10-45
]   19-12-45
509. Constable Emsley, G. J  21-11-45*
909. Constable Smith, L. G  21-11-45*
873. Constable Brue, T.  ,  19-12-45
959. Constable Turtle, E. M. C  19-12-45
1024. Constable Zorn, A. E  19-12-45
557. Constable Murdoch, J. W  19-12-45
440. Sergeant Halerow, D  19-12-45
419. Constable Cartmell, H.   19-12-45
* Awarded grant from Reward Fund. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1945.
T 29
APPENDIX IV.
BRITISH COLUMBIA POLICE.
Nominal Roll as at December 31st, 1945 (Midnight).
Headquarters.
Commissioner—T. W. S. Parsons, O.B.E., O.st.J., Victoria.
Deputy Commissioner—J. Shirras, Vancouver.
Commissioner's Office— Reet. No.
Inspector Clark, C, Victoria  	
Asst. Chief Clerk Patterson, E., Victoria   134
Miss P. S. Byrom (steno.), Victoria. 	
Radio Branch—
Radio Supvr. Conlan, W. F., Victoria 493
Sr. Radio Opr. Weld, B. C, Victoria 495
1/Radio Opr. Hicks, J. M., Victoria.- 588
Criminal Investigation Department—
Inspector Peachey, R., M.C, Victoria 	
Sergt. Ledoux, C, Victoria  253
Sergt. Young, J. A., Victoria   524
Corpl. Butler, W. J., A.F.C., Victoria 417
Corpl. Sweeney, J. C, Victoria   490
Miss D. P. Neate (steno.), Victoria ... 	
Miss T. M. Vye (steno.), Victoria	
Miss M. R. Smith (steno.), Victoria .. 	
Miss G. A.  Etheridge   (steno.), Victoria   	
Miss  F.  G.   Campbell   (steno.),  Victoria   	
Mrs.  V.  E.  Davidson   (steno.),  Victoria   	
Miss M. Ashby  (steno.), Victoria  	
C.I.D.—Finger-print Bureau—
Asst. F.P. Supvr. Carmichael, A. G.,
Victoria . -  341
Sr. F.P. Opr. Edwards, J. W., Vancouver   338
1/Cst. Pearson, G. S., Victoria   579
Miss D. Lancaster  (steno.), Victoria 	
C.I.D.—Firearms Registration
Bureau—
Sr. Clerk Grimshaw, F., Victoria  445
Miss M. E. Brinn (steno.), Victoria... 	
Miss J. R. Robson (steno.), Victoria	
Miss M. D. Rogerson   (steno.), Victoria   	
Regt. No.
Vic-
78
C.I.D.—Firearms Registration
Bureau—Continued.
Miss J. E. M. Strellett (steno.),
toria 	
Civil Defence—
Inspector Moodie, S. F. M., Vancouver 	
Sergt. Cline, S., Vancouver ... ,	
Sergt. Baker, T. R., Vancouver     135
Sergt. Hughes, H. P., Vancouver     225
Miss M. G.  Haskell   (steno.), Vancouver    	
Miss J. M. A. Smith  (steno.), Victoria   	
Accounts Branch—
Paymaster Moses, D. D., Victoria .... 647
Sr. Clerk Embleton, C. V., Victoria 327
1/Clerk Campbell, C. C, Victoria......    812
1/Clerk Excell, L. B., Victoria     876
3/Clerk Allen, E. E., Victoria  1026
Miss J. N. Smith  (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss E. M. Butler (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss D. L. Holmes (steno.), Victoria 	
Quartermaster's Stores—
1/Clerk Forbes, A. C, Victoria     629
1/Clerk Kirkpatrick, D. C, Victoria    710
Ordnance Branch—
Armourer Marshall, R., Victoria     651
Transport Branch—
Chief Mech. Supvr. McNaught, J. F.,
Victoria      409
Mech. Jaffray, W. A., Victoria     583
Mrs. E. Mcintosh  (steno.), Victoria 	
Mrs. M. Johnson (steno.), Victoria... 	
Police Training-school—
Inspector Mackenzie, C. K., Victoria 	
1/Cst. McVie, W., M.M., O.st.g., Victoria        815 T 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
"A" Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector R. Owens, Victoria.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Kennelly, T., Victoria.
Stenographer—Mrs. W. E. Overy, Victoria.
Motor Traffic Detail— R<«t. No.
1/Cst. Lockie, J., Victoria  658
1/Cst. Ring, R., Nanaimo  665
Victoria District—
Sergt. Jacklin, C. C, Victoria  265
Corpl. Backler, L., Victoria  470
1/Cst. Daubeny, H. C. C, Victoria.... 437
1/Cst. Smyth, H., Victoria  578
1/Cst. Fiander, N. J., Victoria  717
1/Cst. Gregory, J. F., Victoria  772
1/Cst. Dryden, C. S., Victoria  779
1/Cst. Bruce, W. A., Victoria  787
3/Cst. Shepherd, D. W. G., Victoria 1025
3/Skpr. Lockwood, E. W., Ganges  492
1/Cst. Dillabough, A. J., Ganges  558
1/Cst. Gibault, J. G., Sidney  709
1/Cst. Sinclair, R. W., Sidney  838
1/Cst. Quinn, A. W., Sooke  793
Duncan District—
Corpl. Henry, J. A., Duncan  414
1/Cst. Parsley, H., Duncan  613
1/Cst. Sarsiat, E. G., Duncan  697
1/Cst. McNamara, J. K., Duncan.  806
1/Cst. Holm, E., Chemainus  573
1/Cst. Clunk, F. J., Chemainus  852
1/Cst. Grant, A., Cowichan Lake  251
1/Cst. Ross, R., Shawnigan Lake  515
1/Cst. Todd, J. W., Youbou  727
Nanaimo District—
Sub-Inspector Russell, J., Nanaimo . 	
Corpl. Howe, J., Nanaimo  365
1/Cst. Martin, M., Nanaimo  282
1/Cst. Wellens, A. S., Nanaimo  385
1/Cst. Vickers, A. E.,  605
1/Cst. Colquhoun, D., Nanaimo  637
1/Cst. Stewart, T. A., Nanaimo  639
1/Cst. Healey, W. L., Nanaimo  609
1/Cst. Avis, F. D., Nanaimo  859
1/Cst. Van Meer, A. N., Nanaimo..... 870
1/Cst. Weeks, G. D., Nanaimo  911
2/Cst. Brassard, G. M., Nanaimo...... 927
1/Cst. Taylor, A. H., Ladysmith  530
1/Cst.   Cunningham,  A.   B.,   Ladysmith   830
1/Cst. Clay, L. W., Qualicum  669
Courtenay District—
Sergt. Hatcher, W. J., Courtenay.  210
1/Cst. Matheson, M., Courtenay  616
Courtenay District—Continued.         Regt- No-
1/Cst. Figueiredo, C. T. J., Courtenay  :     777
1/Cst. Corson, E., Courtenay........     858
1/Radio Opr. Patrick, H. C, Courtenay      880
1/Cst. Cawdell, F. L., Courtenay     895
2/Cst. Ehly, J. M., Courtenay     860
1/Cst. Ennals, C. E., Cumberland..... 885
Corpl. Davidson, W. H., Alert Bay... 403
Spec.  Cst.  Vivian,  S.  A.  C,  Alert
Bay...	
Spec. Cst. Harris, C. E. E., Alert
Bay 	
1/Cst. MacAlpine, M. N., Campbell
River      533
1/Radio   Opr.   Ward,  J.,   Campbell
River      847
1/Cst.   Morrison,   W.   R.,   Campbell
River      894
3/Cst.   McDonald,  J.   F.,   Campbell
River      984
1/Cst. Bell, E. W., Port Alice     798
1/Radio Opr. Muskett, A. H., Port
Alice      807
West Coast District—
Sergt. Service, S., Port Alberni     126
Corpl. Knox, J. A., Port Alberni      500
1/Cst. Green, J. M., M.B.E., Port Alberni        321
1/Cst. Hutchison, P. R., Port Alberni 528
1/Cst. Currie, W. J., Port Alberni...    635
1/Cst. Mann, H., Port Alberni     822
3/Skpr. Bond, V. J., P.M.L. 8, Port
Alberni      458
1/Cst. Trant, W. F.  C, P.M.L. 8,
Port Alberni    622
2/Cst. Domay, E. C, P.M.L. 8, Port
Alberni      933
2/Cst. Abrahamson, F. C, Port Alberni      949
3/Radio Opr. Hammer, E. L., Port
Alberni   1008
1/Cst. Shepherd, J., Alberni     699
1/Cst. Deans, W. W., Alberni     732
1/Cst. Redhead, G., Ucluelet     918 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1945.
T 31
" B " Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector R. Harvey, Nelson.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Smith, J. L., Nelson, Regt. No. 439.
Divisional Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Kidd, E. G., Nelson, Regt. No. 538.
Stenographer—Miss P. R. Ryan, Nelson.
Motor Traffic Detail— Regt. No.
Asst. Mech. Supvr. Lock, J. G. M.,
Nelson   453
Asst. Mech. Supvr. Scales, T., Nelson 600
1/Cst. Elphick, N. H., Nelson  735
1/Cst. Atchison, C. H., Penticton ..... 819
Boundary District—
Sergt. Halcrow, D., Penticton  440
Corpl. Murray, W. C, Penticton  424
1/Cst. Georgeson, D. C, Penticton ... 632
1/Radio Opr. Fleet, W. G., Penticton 660
1/Cst. Neff, D. G., Penticton  666
1/Cst. McKim, S. A., Penticton  726
3/Cst. Attree, K. A., Penticton  985
Spec. Cst. Green, R. H., Penticton..... 	
1/Cst. Stewart, W. B., Keremeos  39
1/Cst. Nelson, F. E., Oliver  586
Spec. Cst. Clayton, R. M., Oliver	
1/Cst. Howell, D. H., Oliver  826
1/Cst. Hassard, R. H., Princeton  313
1/Cst. Haynes, B. H., Princeton  682
3/Cst. Benton, W. E., Princeton  990
1/Cst. Cartmell, H., Summerland  419
Grand Forks District—•
Corpl. McKay, E. F., Grand Forks... 456
1/Cst. Drew, D. V., Grand Forks .... 796
1/Cst. Pelton, G. A., Grand Forks..... 862
1/Cst. Cox, J. E. D., Grand Forks..... 871
1/Cst. Rogers, D. G., Greenwood  795
Fernie District—
Corpl. Brabazon, A. G., Fernie  434
1/Cst. Lemm, W. I., Fernie  555
2/Cst. Ivens, R. J., Fernie  952
3/Cst. Hovind, G. E., Fernie  1005
1/Cst. Doree, L. A., Natal  360
1/Cst. Spiers, D. A., Natal  910
East Kootenay District— Regt. No.
Sergt. McKay, W. J., Cranbrook     337
Corpl. MacBrayne, M. B., Cranbrook    486
1/Cst. McLaughlin, W. G., Cranbrook   418
1/Cst. Shiell, R., Cranbrook     506
1/Cst. Quaite, T. C. S., Cranbrook...    680
1/Radio Opr. Ramsay, C. N., Cranbrook 	
1/Cst. Bacon, H. F., Cranbrook ....
1/Cst. Howarth, P. W., Invermere
Cpl. Slater, F., Kimberley	
1/Cst. Ellis, R. M., Kimberley..
718
904
883
507
..  708
3/Cst. Pringle, J. B., Kimberley     997
3/Cst. Lee, C. N. S., Kimberley  1009
Spec. Cst. Clinton, T. G., Kimberley 	
West Kootenay District—
S/Sergt. Wood, H. N., Nelson       73
Corpl. White, J., M.G., Nelson     402
1/Cst. Blaney, G. S., Nelson    552
1/Cst. Quigley, T. A., Nelson     562
1/Cst. DeVoin, J. L., Nelson     648
1/Cst. Martin, W., Lower Bonning-
ton      786
1/Cst. Payne, J. R., Castlegar     776
3/Cst. Borodula, A., Castlegar     996
3/Cst. Cline, G. R., Creston  1002
1/Cst. Parsons, M. S., Fruitvale     713
1/Cst. Glaholm, T. W., Kaslo     566
1/Cst. Butler, H. J., Nakusp    571
1/Cst. Roberts, J. A., New Denver.... 831
1/Cst. Jackson, J. S., Rossland City.. 627
3/Cst. Dodd, W. J., Rossland City ....    992
1/Cst. Pye, D. H., Salmo     829
1/Cst. McKay, R. B., Trail     474
" C " Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector E. Gammon, Kamloops.
Divisional Clerk—Sr. Clerk A. E. Gunn, Kamloops, Regt. No. 411.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Reith, S. V., Kamloops, Regt. No. 422.
Motor Traffic Detail—                        Regt- No.
Asst. Mech. Supvr. Fiander, T. A.,
Kamloops    447
L/Cst. Gurr, C. J., Vernon  523
Kamloops District—
S/Sergt. Fairbairn, A., Kamloops.  33
1/Cst. Heatley, G. D., Kamloops  559
1/Cst. Teal, W. T., Kamloops  805
Kamloops District—Continued. Regt. No.
1/Cst. Ball, G. D., Blue River  837
1/Cst. Waddell, C. J., Chase  546
1/Cst. Fraser, T. C, Merritt  706
2/Cst. Roberts, W. P., Red Pass  938
Kamloops City—
Corpl. Jennings, H. J., Kamloops  335
1/Cst. Forrester, R., Kamloops  770 T 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" C " Division—Continued.
Kamloops City—Continued. Kegt. No.
1/Cst. Hornsby, N. A., Kamloops.-.    888
2/Cst. Tateson, J. D., Kamloops     945
2/Cst. Cofield, R. J., Kamloops     963
3/Cst. Whitehead, C. A., Kamloops... 1006
3/Cst. McColl, D. C, Kamloops  1014
Spec. Cst. Hall, I. E., Kamloops	
North-east Kootenay District—
Sergt. Jarvis, E. A., Revelstoke     375
1/Cst. Macdonald, M., Revelstoke.....   574
1/Radio   Opr.   Bulman-Fleming,
S. E., Revelstoke     808
3/Cst. King, J., Revelstoke  1013
Spec. Cst. Read, C. L., Revelstoke	
1/Cst. Craig, W. A., Golden     782
Cariboo District—
Sergt.   McClinton,  J.   H.,  Williams
Lake 	
367
601
989
1/Cst. Sharpe, W. H., Williams Lake
3/Cst. Phillips, G. A., Williams Lake
3/Radio Opr. Johnstone, R. L., Williams Lake   980
1/Cst. Wales, E. A., Quesnel  614
Spec. Cst. Harvey, J. R., Quesnel  	
2/Cst. Turnbull, R, H., Alexis Creek 955
1/Cst. Buxton, L. P., Barkerviile ...... 728
Yale District—
Sergt. Barwis, C. W. A., Ashcroft..... 352
1/Cst. Marsh, T. B., Ashcroft  698
1/Cst. Dykes, J. N., Ashcroft  907
1/Cst. Grahame, M. G., Bralorne  526
1/Cst. Olson, L. I., Bridge River  511
Yale District—Continued. Regt. No.
1/Cst. Gray, J. D. L., Clinton  663
1/Cst. Dowling, J. T. E., Lillooet  624
1/Cst. Blakiston-Gray, J., Lytton...... 652
1/Cst.   Godfrey,   M.   R.,   Spences
Bridge   841
Vernon District—
Sergt. Nelson, R. S., M.C., Vernon... 262
Corpl. Pomeroy, A. J., Vernon  372
1/Cst. Duncan, A., Vernon  721
1/Cst. Calvert, A., Vernon  861
1/Cst. Drysdale, P. Q., Vernon  865
1/Cst. Dale, H. M., Vernon..  877
2/Cst. Gibbon, A. E., Vernon  947
3/Cst. Krivenko, A., Vernon  978
3/Cst. Regan, F. X. J., Vernon  1020
Spec. Cst. Dunk, E. W., Vernon	
1/Cst. Hayward, R. H. P., Armstrong    412
1/Cst. MacKinley, R., Enderby  290
1/Cst. Quesnel, J. A., Lumby  269
3/Cst. Payne, P. B., Salmon Arm.  1017
1/Cst. Smith, A. G., Sicamous  656
Kelowna District—
S/Sergt.   Thomson,   W.   J.,   D.S.M.,
Kelowna   293
1/Cst. Wyman, G. A., Kelowna  549
1/Cst. Murdoch, J. W., Kelowna  557
1/Cst. Poole, J. G., Kelowna  781
1/Cst. Hopcott, G. H., Kelowna  981
1/Cst. Baker, T. F., Kelowna  905
Spec. Cst. Hawkins, F. P., Kelowna.. 	
" D " Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector H. H. Mansell, Prince Rupert.
Divisional Clerk—Sr. Clerk Mead, G. D., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 201.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Macdonald, G. J. G., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 587.
Prince Rupert District— Regt. No.
S/Sergt.   Johnson,    G.    A.,   Prince
Rupert   202
1/Cst. Oland, C. F., Prince Rupert... 41
3/Skpr.   Good,   R.   C,   P.M.L.   15,
Prince Rupert  835
2/Engnr. Moorehouse, T., P.M.L. 15,
Prince Rupert  848
3/Radio    Opr.   Humphreys,   P.   J.,
P.M.L. 15, Prince Rupert  965
1/Cst. Meredith-Jones, J. R., Stewart 834
1/Cst. Kelly, T. J., Atlin  794
2/Cst.  Jamieson,  H.   O.,  Telegraph
Creek	
962
Corpl. Brunton, T. D., Terrace     449
1/Cst. Richmond, W. H., Terrace     919
3/Cst. Titcomb, W. L., Masset  1022
1/Cst. Price, C. W., Queen Charlotte
City      899
Prince Rupert District—Continued. Regt. No.
1/Cst. Walker,  F. J., Queen Charlotte City     867
1/Cst. Simons, G. L., Port Edward...    671
Prince Rupert City Detachment—
Sergt Hall, O. L., Prince Rupert    278
Corpl. Lashmar, A. T., Prince Rupert    425
1/Cst.  Anderson,  E.  D.,  Prince
Rupert      625
1/Cst. McLeod, M. H., Prince Rupert    844
1/Cst. Brue, T., Prince Rupert     873
2/Cst. Stevens, M., Prince Rupert....    930
2/Cst.   Turtle,   E.   M.   C,   Prince
Rupert      958
3/Cst. Brett, R. A., Prince Rupert... 1004
3/Cst. Cowgill, J., Prince Rupert...... 1018
3/Cst. Zorn, A. E., Prince Rupert..... 1024
Spec.  Cst.  Davidson,  A.  J.,  Prince
Rupert  .  	
Spec. Cst. Piers, G. H., Prince Rupert 	 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1945.
T 33
" D " Division-
Ocean Falls District— Regt. No.
Corpl. Norman, H. L., Ocean Falls ... 423
3/Skpr.   Mason,   W.   J.,   P.M.L.   7,
Ocean Falls  813
1/Radio Opr. Robson, A., P.M.L. 7,
Ocean Falls :  784
3/Engnr.   Gorrie,   C.   D.,  P.M.L.  7,
Ocean Falls  810
3/Cst. Medley, H. E. J., Ocean Falls 975
1/Cst. Bradley, E., Bella Coola  855
-Continued.
Hazelton District— Regt. No.
Sergt. Potterton, L. A. N., Smithers 297
1/Cst.   Dale-Johnson,  V.   L.   E.,
Smithers   712
1/Cst. Nelson, G. S., Smithers  851
1/Cst. Gardiner, W. C, Smithers...... 866
1/Cst. Strouts, R. W., Burns Lake... 915
1/Cst. West, W. A. A., Hazelton  824
" E " Division.
Officer Commanding—J. Shirras, Deputy Commissioner, Vancouver.
Assistant to Deputy—Inspector F. Swanson, Vancouver.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Wellings, J. E., Vancouver, Regt. No. 399.
Asst. Divisional Clerk—1/Clerk Ferguson, W. C, Vancouver, Regt. No. 901.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Putland, F., Vancouver, Regt. No. 438.
Stenographer—Miss A. Welch, Vancouver.
Stenographer—Miss M. V. Petrie, Vancouver.
Motor Traffic Detail— Regt. No.
Mech.   Supvr.   Macdonald,   H.   D.,
Vancouver   520
Mech. Cave, E. E., Vancouver  702
1/Cst. Estlin, C. E., New Westminster   914
2/Cst. James, W., Chilliwack  926
Vancouver District—
Sergt. Hooker, J. W., Vancouver  388
Corpl. Phipps, M. T., Vancouver  446
Det. Macdonald, J. A., Vancouver.  489
1/Cst. Thomson, D. S. E., Vancouver 428
1/Cst. Fetherstonhaugh, M. R., Vancouver   444
1/Cst. Orchard, W. C, Vancouver.  502
1/Cst. Kelsberg, P., Vancouver  542
1/Cst. Bradner, F. E., Vancouver.  567
1/Cst. Walker, R., Vancouver  704
1/Cst. Home, A. G., Vancouver  723
1/Cst. Johnston, W. A., Vancouver... 797
1/Cst. Tinnion, R., Vancouver  836
Miss L. K. Reid (steno.), Vancouver 	
1/Cst. Malins, E. M., University  839
2/Cst. Cottingham, W. L., Squamish 932
3/Cst. Thomson, A. R., Squamish...... 1015
Cpl. Jeeves, F. L., Powell River  483
3/Skpr. Winegarden, N. J., P.G.D. 2,
Powell River  415
1/Cst. Hall, J. O., Powell River  582
1/Cst. Betts, J. F., Powell River  820
4/Engnr. Milne, I., Powell River  999
1/Radio Opr. Lane, L. R. C, Powell
River   878
1/Cst.  Aylward, W.  P., D.C.M.,  Sechelt   738
New Westminster District— Regt. No.
Sergt.  Woods-Johnson," F.  B.,  New
Westminster   430
1/Cst. Vise, R., New Westminster..... 556
1/Cst. Causton, I. R., New Westminster   677
2/Cst. Duddy, H., New Westminster 956
3/Cst. Thornsteinson, F. C, Pattullo
Bridge   1001
3/Cst. Johnson, D. B. G., Pattullo
Bridge  ..... 1021
Spec.   Cst.   Bishop,  J.   H.,   Pattullo
Bridge   	
Spec.    Cst.   Jack,   D.   J.,    Pattullo
Bridge   	
1/Cst. Saunders, F. G., Port Coquitlam   662
1/Cst. Brandon, J. Q. W., Port Coquitlam   765
1/Cst. McGary, J. D., Port Coquitlam 825
Corpl. Kirkup, J., Essondale  387
1/Cst. Irving, W. B., Haney  769
2/Cst. Gibbon, N. D., Haney  931
1/Cst. Johnston, J. A., Langley  541
1/Cst. Williamson, J. O., Langley...... 736
1/Cst. Fletcher, J. M., Langley  917
1/Cst. Leighton, R. K., Mission  610
1/Cst. Cummins, J. N., Mission  853
1/Cst. Piers, C. E., Mission  912
Chilliwack District—
Sergt. Anderson, C, Chilliwack  679
1/Radio Opr. Dobell, J. D., Chilliwack   599
1/Cst. Fox, A. E. P., Chilliwack  602
1/Cst. Fleming, B. B., ChilliwacR.... 840 T 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" E " Division—Continued.
Chilliwack District—Continued. Regt. No.
3/Cst. Fielder, J. A., Chilliwack     970
Spec.   Cst.  Williams,  D.   G.,  Chilliwack   	
3/Cst. Crouch, C. P., Chilliwack     986
Corpl. McWhirter, D. R., Abbotsford    503
1/Cst. Curie, W. G., Abbotsford     897
Spec. Cst. Armstrong, J. H., Abbotsford   	
1/Cst. Davey, J. H., Agassiz     529
1/Cst.   Bonner,   H.   C,   Alexandra
Bridge 	
1/Cst. Sutherland, A. J., Hope..
1/Cst. Bell, J., Sumas	
864
695
737
North Vancouver District—
Sergt. Herdman, T., North Vancouver      315
1/Cst. Williams, J. A., North Vancouver        59
1/Cst. Sharpe, G. C, North Vancouver      153
1/Cst. Smith, P. B., North Vancouver      362
1/Cst. Kirkham, J. W., North Vancouver  :     442
1/Cst. Murphy, E., North Vancouver   443
1/Cst. Macdonald, D. A., North Vancouver      683
1/Cst. Nott, S. T., North Vancouver    908
1/Cst. Felker, D. B., North Vancouver  . .     916
1/Cst. Purdy, J. W., North Vancouver  :.     998
North Vancouver District—
Continued. Regt. No.
3/Cst.   Mcintosh,   D.   A.   D.,   North
Vancouver  :.. 1012
3/Cst. Knight, D. A., North Vancouver   1023
1/Cst. Murdoch, W., Deep Cove     766
1/Cst. Payne, D. A. B., Lynn Creek    640
Burnaby District—
S/Sergt. Macdonald, A., Burnaby..-    298
Corpl. Emsley, G. J., Burnaby     509
1/Cst.  Foote, R.  C. B., M.C., Burnaby      215
1/Cst. Twist, H., Burnaby     607
1/Cst. Nelson, N. C. B., Burnaby.-..    733
1/Cst. Abrahamson, A. A., Burnaby    874
1/Cst. Gilbert, R., Burnaby     890
1/Cst. Tuttle, A. J., Burnaby     892
1/Cst. Smith, L. G., Burnaby....—.....    909
1/Cst. Klick, H. E., Burnaby     923
2/Cst. Hughes, G. B., Burnaby     925
2/Cst. Stringer, R. I., Burnaby     934
3/Cst. Ehly, J. J., Burnaby     971
3/Cst. Lamb, J. F., Burnaby  1011
3/Cst. Johannson, B. L., Burnaby..— 1019
Spec. Cst. Lee, E. F., Burnaby	
Richmond District—
Corpl. Watt, J. C, Brighouse     469
1/Cst. Spall, A. E., Brighouse     801
1/Cst. White, J. R., Brighouse    714
1/Cst.   Secord,  I.   S.,  M.B.E.,  Brighouse      759
1/Cst. Mumford, C. W., Brighouse ...    800
3/Cst.   Thornsteinson,  I.   G.,   Brighouse      987
Fort George Subdivision.
N.C.O. i/c Fort George Subdivision—Sergt. Clark, G. H., M.c, Prince George,
Regt. No. 186.
,    Regt. No. Regt. No.
Corpl. DeWittf, N. O., Prince George... 368 2/Cst. Demmon, W. A., Prince George 951
1/Cst. McKenney, H. L., Prince George 205 2/Cst. Cawdell, C. A. B., Prince George 958
1/Cst. Smith, W., M.M., Prince George 270 3/Cst. Weeks, A. W., Prince George ... 983
1/Cst. Blezard, J., Prince George  441 3/Cst Russell, G. P. W., Prince George 994
1/Cst. Millar, A. N., Prince George ..... 575 gpec  Cgt gtrom) A w   prince George
1/Radio   Opr.   Lennox,   S.   J.,   Prmce _,    ,,
George 843 1/Cst. Munkley, B. E., Fort St. James    716
1/Cst. Rosberg, E. L., Prince George.    902 1/Cst. Maxwell, T. R., McBride     921
1/Cst. Perry, G. A., Prince George     920        _ 1/Cst. Moore, R. C, Vanderhoof     771 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1945.
T 35
Peace River Subdivision.
Officer Commanding—Sub-Inspector Duncan, G. J., Pouce Coupe.
Regt. No.
Sergt. Raybone, S. E., Pouce Coupe     369
1/Radio  Opr.  Harrison, R.  P., Pouce
Coupe 	
1/Cst. Ferguson, S., Pouce Coupe	
Spec. Cst. Cotter, A. T., Pouce Coupe..
1/Cst.   Lumsden,  W.  J.   F.,  Fort   St.
John 	
2/Cst. Youngberg, G. E., Fort St. John
809
856
731
964
Regt. No.
1/Cst. Faryon, L. E., Lower Post  823
1/Cst. Boulton, P., Muskwa  667
Corpl. MacAndrew, G., Dawson Creek 421
1/Cst. Drysdale, W., Dawson Creek.... 814
2/Cst. Fletcher, W. D., Dawson Creek.. 948
3/Cst. Jobling, D. A., Dawson Creek ... 969
3/Cst. Burke, P. N., Dawson Creek...... 1003
Spec. Const. Low, M. G., Dawson Creek 	  PART II.
INSPECTOR OF GAOLS.
INDEX.
Page.
Ages of prisoners   45
Commitments   44
Convictions, previous   47
Educational Status  .  43
Employment of prisoners  47
Expenditures and revenue  . .  49
Drugs, habits as to use of  45
Maintenance, cost of  49
Prison population, movement of  43
Nationalities   44
Occupations  45
Offences for which prisoners committed:—
(a.)  Crimes against the person   48
(6.)  Crimes against property  48
(c.)   Crimes against public morals and decency  48
(d.)  Crimes against public order and peace  48
(e.)  Other offences not enumerated above  48
Officers and employees, number of  49
Racial    45
Report of Inspector of Gaols  39
Report of Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm  39
Report of Warden, Nelson Gaol  41
Report of Warden, Kamloops Gaol  41
Report of Warden, Prince George Gaol  42
Religion (creeds)   46
Sentences, period of  46
Sex         44
Social status (married or single)  :  45  OAKALLA PRISON FARM.
fMM
-■•': M ff Fri7?imr||:;;;::;:: /'/T .v, ■,.
<
■ -:-
ir  •
The main (men's) building.
;.SW**'
The women's section.
.  Report of the Inspector of Gaols, 1945-46.
The Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I have the honour to submit my Annual Report for the year ended March
31st, 1946, covering the four Provincial gaols in the Province.
OAKALLA PRISON FARM.
Report of Warden J. Millman:—
" Farm operations have been greatly improved and facilitated by the construction
of new cow, horse, and calving barns, new chicken-houses, a partially completed pig
brooder, and a hay-storage shed, all built with inmate labour under the capable direction
of our building instructor, Mr. G. W. Deacon. Improvements have also been effected
in connection with the water-supply.
" Inside the main building it has been possible to redecorate the administrative
office and do some much-needed jobs of painting.
" Our motor licence-plate shop has rendered valuable service in producing 173,886
passenger, commercial, dealer, trailer, and motor-cycle plates, and 17,326 motor carrier
plates, to the total value of $15,687.98.
" The laundry is functioning most satisfactorily, as is the tailor-shop, which made
6,418 new articles of clothing, in addition to cleaning, pressing, and repair-work.
" The farm grows progressively and has been of great help during the war years.
Production value amounted to $8,829.
" An improved behaviour has been observed among the inmates and escapes have
been at a minimum, factors largely to be ascribed to a splendid spirit of co-operation
found not only amongst the staff, but as between the staff and those they are called
upon to supervise.
" I should also like to commend the following persons and societies for the excellent
work they have rendered in the line of social service and spiritual advice: The Salvation
Army, the Anglican chaplains, the Roman Catholic chaplains, the John Howard Society,
and the Elizabeth Fry Society which, in addition, contributed games and material
which have added to the well-being of the inmates."
WOMEN'S GAOL.
Miss Isabell I. Garrick, R.N., matron in charge, reports:—
" During the summer the canning-machine purchased last year was put to good
use, and we were able to bottle the following: 263 gallons of pickles, 9 gallons of
cherries, 30 gallons of dill pickles, 15 gallons of baby carrots and 50 cans of larger
carrots, and 660 cans of tomatoes.
" Some 1,175 articles of wearing-apparel, such as uniform dresses, nightgowns,
aprons, etc., were made from new materials for the inmates. In addition, repairs were
made to 1,180 miscellaneous articles, such as sheets, blankets, uniforms. Repairs were
also made to 11,530 garments from the men's gaol, such as socks, underwear, shirts, etc.
In the laundry some 22,269 articles were handled during the year, and 225 articles were
made for the Red Cross.
" The general health of the inmates has been good and reflects the excellent conditions under which our work is carried on. A doctor and nurse from the Provincial
venereal disease clinic visit each week and all inmates are thoroughly examined."
39 T 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
JUVENILE OFFENDERS.
Assistant Chief Gaoler T. A. Camm, who is in charge of the younger inmates or
" Star Class," reports:—
" On April 1st, 1945, we had thirty-seven lads, with an average age of approximately 18 years. During the year sixty-five lads were admitted and sixty-two were
discharged, leaving a balance of forty as at March 31st, 1946.
" Theft of automobiles still stands out as the predominant crime for which these
youths are convicted; often, however, the car-stealing is linked with the more serious
offence of breaking, entering, and theft. A large number are convicted for more than
a single offence. Many of the boys, although classed as first offenders, have previous
histories under the ' Juvenile Delinquents Act' and passed through the Industrial
School for Boys. With this type of lad a firm but kindly discipline is required and, on
the whole, satisfactory results have been noted from our method of handling such a
large number of young and active boys.
" Discipline has been successfully maintained with a minimum amount of punishment, and only two escapes were recorded during the year. Both lads were recaptured.
When it is considered that many of these boys have escaped from the Boys' Industrial
School on more than one occasion and feel keenly the bonds of restraint, it is all the
more gratifying that we have experienced so little trouble in this respect.
" Much useful and interesting work has been carried out in our wood-working shop
under the direction of Guard Instructor Berkey, and work to the value of $1,096 during
the year was completed. Additional work, which promises to be extensive, has been
commenced for the War Assets Corporation.
" Our outside working party has been efficiently handled by a new officer, Mr.
F. Pearson, who, by studying their case-histories and trying to understand their
problems, has proved himself a capable instructor of these young lads. Much useful
repair-work about the gaol property, as well as farm-work, Was carried out by this
working party.
" The education of the group has not been neglected, and every encouragement has
been given the lads to take up correspondence courses which might aidthem in securing
employment on discharge. Over 50 per cent, of the lads responded, and many of them
have turned in good work and obtained excellent marks. A cross-section of the courses
taken is as follows: Mechanical Drawing, Engineering (Auto), Steam Engineering,
Commercial Art, Junior Business, Book-keeping, Poultry-keeping, Drawing, Building
Construction, elementary studies in Reading, Writing, Spelling, and Arithmetic.
" Physical education has also been a feature of our programme, under the supervision of competent Pro-Rec instructors who visit us once every week. Expert
instruction is given in our spacious gymnasium, which is well provided with equipment.
Many of the lads have taken advantage of this opportunity to develop their bodies.
Apart from gym-work, the lads play baseball every Tuesday afternoon in the ball-ground
under the supervision of our own officers.
" Arrangements with the St. John Ambulance Association (Vancouver centre)
were continued for first-aid training, and these provide an interest heretofore unknown
to the average young offender.
" An effort is still being made to reach these lads through the religious appeal.
Every Wednesday afternoon a group of business-men known as the Anglican Layman
Association give religious instruction, meet the boys, and discuss their individual
problems.    This is in addition to the regular Sunday services.
" With the idea of providing efficient ' after care ' on release from this institution,
regular contact is maintained with our Provincial probation officers, so that they are
advised of the lad's behaviour, work ability, and character while under supervision. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1945-46. T 41
On discharge they are met by the officers and every effort is made to get them to their
destination.
" In conclusion it can be said that much good all-round work has been accomplished
with the lads committed to my jurisdiction under your authority, and every effort has
been made to improve their moral and physical well-being."
NELSON GAOL.
Warden R. Harvey reports as follows:—
" Administration has been carried out strictly in accordance with Gaol Rules and
Regulations; in general it has been very satisfactory. Senior Guard Tulloch and the
staff of guards have ably carried out their duties in the routine work of the institution,
the care and welfare of all inmates, including their obedience to rules and standing
orders.
" During the year reduced gaol population has presented some difficulties in selecting trusties for kitchen duties, also outside work in developing garden, maintenance,
and grounds has been affected to some degree.
" Population.—The number of inmates at the beginning of the year was 16. There
were 148 received and 150 discharged, leaving a total of 14 at the end of the year.
The peak of the inmate population was 19 and the lowest 4.
" Welfare and Recreation.—Inmates not engaged on regular work, and when conditions and safety permit, are allowed the freedom of the large cell block during the
day and in any event one hour daily, except Sunday, in the exercise yard. They also
have access to the well-stocked gaol library, and, in addition, the gaol subscribes to five
suitable magazines. Radio programmes controlled from the gaol office are permitted
daily.
" Religious Services.—The Salvation Army conducts a service every Sunday morning, commencing at 9 o'clock, and the Pentecostal Assembly hold their services every
second Sunday afternoon.
" Medical Care.—The general health of prison population throughout the year was
fairly good. There were three cases that required hospitalization, chiefly due to mild
attacks of influenza.
" Farm-work.—Prison labour in the garden produced a large quantity of vegetables,
which was applied to the gaol use and greatly supplemented the prison meals.
" Maintenance and Construction.—There was no construction-work carried out
during the year. The Public Works Department had the entire building painted on the
outside. Prison labour was chiefly used in the cleaning and painting of all Police
offices and gaol, and in the maintenance of the grounds surrounding the gaol and
Court-house.
" Discipline.—There were no serious breaches of discipline throughout the year."
KAMLOOPS GAOL.
Warden E. Gammon reports:—
" Conditions respecting the operation and administration of affairs of the gaol
during the year have been very satisfactory. Gaol Rules and Regulations, supplemented by orders to govern local conditions, were strictly adhered to. It was not
necessary to reprimand any of the prisoners.
" All inmates, except those awaiting trial, have been kept regularly employed with
janitor-work and other services required in the Police offices, quarters, gaol, and gaol
garden.
" I would like to draw attention to the able manner in which Constable W. T. Teal
has carried out his duties as gaoler." T 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PRINCE GEORGE GAOL.
Sergeant G. H. Clark, M.C, who is the warden at this gaol, reports:—
" Owing to the increase in the population in the district, the problem of accommodation in the gaol was at times quite acute. However, with the acquisition and
remodelling of the Army detention barracks this should be solved in the not too distant
future.
" Prisoners were employed in janitor-work and in a small garden where vegetables
were grown for use in the gaol. There were no escapes, nor was it necessary to
discipline any inmate for breach of the regulations.
" The Salvation Army conducts services on Sunday, and the library, which was
instituted last year, has been appreciated by the prisoners."
LIBRARIES.
I am much indebted to Mr. C. K. Morison, Provincial Librarian and Superintendent
of the Public Library Commission, for his continued help and advice in connection with
our gaol libraries. Perhaps the value of library-work is best illustrated by the fact
that circulation amongst male inmates at Oakalla reached the impressive figure of
22,720 books.
Men's Gaol.—An excerpt from a letter received from the librarian at Oakalla is
worthy of noting: " Several borrowers from the men's library at Oakalla have kept in
touch with me since their release. They all stress how much the library meant to them
while in Oakalla and one man went so far as to say, ' I wish it were possible to get
some sort of job in the Vancouver Public Library. I am surely enough in love with
that work now.'"
Another former inmate of Oakalla purchased ten books and donated them to the
South Wing collection. He used the library a good deal, and this gift was to show his
appreciation of the library service.
Women's Gaol.—In the Women's Gaol 3,884 books were circularized among the
inmates during the year. This is a substantial increase over last year's circulation.
The library consists of 551 books, made up of 375 fiction and 176 non-fiction
publications.
Kamloops, Nelson, and Prince George Gaols.—The libraries at these institutions
were considerably improved during the year by the addition of new books purchased by
the Department. Selection was by the Superintendent of the Public Library Commission in consultation with the wardens immediately concerned.
STATISTICS.
Attached are the statistics for each of the four Provincial gaols showing the
operational costs, the number of prisoners handled throughout the year, also various
summaries giving details as to age, sex, nationality, etc.
CONCLUSION.
At this time I should like to draw your attention to the excellent work of the
wardens, the guards, the matrons, and their assistants in what is often a difficult and
trying occupation. Fortunately for British Columbia, the type of men and women now
employed regard the Gaol Service as a career affording opportunities far in excess of
those formerly associated with custodial institutions. This means, apart from finding
the work congenial, they have the welfare of their charges at heart; so much so, that
to many of them we are indebted for those progressive suggestions which make our
gaol standards comparable with the best in Canada.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
T. W. S. PARSONS,
Inspector of Gaols. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1945-46.
T 43
APPENDIX.
ANNUAL REPORT ON GAOLS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1946.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
1
1
1
1
4
2. Total expenditure for gaol maintenance
in B.C.—
Year ended March 31st, 1946	
$241,188.73
$11,226.30
$4,849.51
$2,616.44
$259,880.98
Year ended March 31st, 1945	
237,494.35
12,550.15
4,574.50
3,978.46
258,597.46
3. Average total maintenance cost per day
per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1946	
$1.38
$2.70
$1.51
$1.34
$1.73
Year ended March 31st, 1945	
1.38
3.42
1.50
1.29
1.89
Average dietary cost per day per pris
oner—
Year ended March 31st, 1946	
$0,274
$0.27
$0,312
$0.52
$0,341
Year ended March 31st, 1945	
.229
.384
.273
.55
.35
4. Number of prisoners committed—■
Year ended March 31st, 1946	
1,970
99
189
312
2,570
2,044
99
182
264
2,589
I. Movement op Population, Year ended March 31st, 1946.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
On register April 1st, 1945	
Received—
From gaols and lockups	
By transfer	
By recapture	
By revocation of licence	
By forfeiture of ticket-of-leave	
By internal movements	
Insane	
Juveniles	
Deportation	
From bail	
Committed for trial	
Sentenced	
Totals	
Discharged—
By expiry of sentence	
By ticket-of-leave	
By deportation	
By pardon	
By escape	
By death	
By payment of fines	
By release on Court order (including " to bail ")
By transfer	
By internal movements	
To asylum	
Totals	
On register March 31st, 1946	
484
1
249
46
2,273
1,408
53
57
14
5
4
73
143
205
249
2,211
546
14
14
82
73
5
21
28
14
510
1
45
40
272
312
2,922
50
12
110
35
7
302
2,850
582 T 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
II. Commitments.
1944-45.
1945-46.
Decrease.
Increase.
Murder	
Manslaughter	
Crimes—
Against the person	
Against property	
Against public morals and decency	
Against public order and peace	
Other offences not enumerated above	
Insanity	
Number of prisoners sentenced	
Number of days' stay of prisoners	
Average number of prisoners per month
Average number of prisoners per day	
Escapes	
Escapes and recaptured	
Deaths in gaols	
97
641
192
1,342
74
31
2,514
180,837
15,091
497.7
2
5
7
7
122
699
137
1,342
240
17
2,495
185,110
15,165.75
498.283
5
4
4
55
14
19
25
58
156
4,273
74.75
.578
3
III. Sex.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
1,710
260
84
15
158
31
285
27
2,237
1,970
99
189
312
2,570
IV. Educational Status.
V. Nationality.
(Place of Birth.)
119
1,324
474
53
10
57
31
1
52
120
15
2
61
219
30
2
Totals	
1,970
99
189
312
2,570
British—
1,466
249
16
63
8
111
42
126
108
1
1,731
71
153
235
2,190
Foreign—
65
148
24
2
5
7
6
10
3
31
2
11
1
2
63
239
28
36
77
380
1,970
99
189
312
2,570
VI. Habits as to Use of Intoxicants.
157
906
907
12
40
47
25
34
130
14
44
254
Totals	
1,970
99
189
312
2,570 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1945-46.
T 45
VII.—Habits as to Use of Drugs.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
1,771
199
99
189
312
Totals	
1,970
99
189
312
2,570
VIII. Occupations.
113
305
210
940
300
30
72
10
21
15
36
11
3
3
60
9
21
65
23
2
9
4
3
31
256
14
4
Totals	
1,970
99
189
312
2,570
IX. Racial.
White	
1,705
22
204
39
86
122
250
7
6
65
2
60
2
Totals       	
1,970
99
189
312
2,570
X. Civil State.
1,240
486
73
171
55
35
3
6
129
32
12
16
219
68
17
8
Totals	
1,970
99
189
312
2,570
XI. Ages.
365
334
257
391
322
195
106
15
16
21
23
14
6
4
42
27
32
20
44
16
8
25
35
26
76
79
47
24
21 to 25	
25 to 30	
30 to 40	
40 to 50	
50 to 60	
Totals... 	
1,970
99
189
312
2,570 T 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
XII. Creeds.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
74
1
401
12
28
6
19
125
89
219
712
159
7
118
5
1
24
5
6
10
15
1
13
7
6
5
11
2
17
98
12
4
9
47
2
53
154
5
5
21
11
29
14
5
3
1,970
99
189
312
2,570
XIII. Duration of Sentence.
477
335
155
253
257
146
91
140
42
13
6
32
16
14
19
13
1
2
2
71
18
13
10
7
176
93
10
19
9
2
1
12
4
1
3
52
47
2
6
1,970
99
189
312 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1945-46.
T 47
XIV. Previous Convictions.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
900
282
166
92
79
58
45
41
35
38
29
20
18
10
9
11
11
9
8
12
5
7
1
9
18
38
19
72
14
4
1
1
110
22
17
9
10
7
2
4
1
221
35
21
14
12
4
*1                                         	
2	
3	
4	
5    ...                       	
6    	
1
2
1
7	
8    ..          ....                      	
2
1
1
9    	
10	
1
1
2
1
11	
12	
1
1
13    	
14	
15      	
1
1
16          	
17 	
18 and 19	
20 to 29	
1
30 to 39	
40 to 49    	
50 to 59	
1
60 to 69	
70 to 79	
80 to 99	
Over 100	
Totals	
1,970
99
189
312
2,570
54.314
27.27
42.3
34.28
* Number to be sbown according to actual gaol record. T 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
XV. Offences for which Prisoners were committed and sentenced during the Year.
Commitments.
Sentences.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
(a.)   Crimes against the person—
Oakalla	
90
8
12
8
5
1
	
95
9
12
8
90
7
10
8
5
95
7
Kamloops	
10
8
Totals...         	
118
6
124
115
5
120
(o.)   Crimes against property—
Oakalla	
596
26
21
20
33
2
1
629
28
22
20
849
24
21
20
35
1
1
884
25
Kamloops	
22
20
Totals	
663
36
699
914
37
951
(.c.)   Crimes against public morals and decency—
Oakalla	
72
4
4
3
52
2
124
6
4
3
84
1
4
3
57
2
141
3
Kamloops	
4
Totals	
83
54
137
92
59
151
(d.)   Crimes against public order and peace—
845
39
145
207
165
9
31
12
1,010
48
176
219
918
31
134
207
166
3
29
12
1,084
34
163
219
Totals	
1,236
217
1,453
1,290
210
1,500
(e.)   Other offences not enumerated above	
216
24
240
231
24
255
Grand totals   (totals of   (a),   (6),
(c),  (d), and  (e))	
2,316
337
2,653
2,642
335
XVI. Employment of Prisoners.
(Per Cent, of Population.)
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
.953
36.599
3.453
.525
7.641
17.154
.324
33.351
60.0
2.0
20.0
18.0
35.0
3.0
50.0
7.0
5.0
100.000
100.0
100.0
100.0 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1945-46.
T 49
XVII. Number of Officers and Employees on March 31st, 1946.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
3
1
2
3
6
42
1
3
9
4
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
Chief Clerk	
Storekeeper	
1
1
83
8
1_
3
a
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year ended March 31st, 1946.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
Expenditure.
Library	
Salaries	
Office supplies	
Travelling expenses	
Uniforms and clothing	
Janitors' supplies	
Farm operations	
Upkeep of grounds	
General equipment	
Laundry operations	
Fuel, water, and light,	
Provisions (upkeep of prisoners)	
Medical attendance and hospital supplies	
Good Conduct Fund	
Sheet-metal plant	
Incidentals and contingencies	
Cost-of-living Bonus	
Totals	
Public Works expenditure	
Gross expenditure	
Revenue.
Rental of quarters, etc., and maintenance of
prisoners	
Sales and salary refunds	
Fines and costs paid	
Totals	
$1,
137,
2,
1.
13
3.
11.
5.
4.
29
47
9
10.
12
841.36
348.02
402.44
288.05
920.76
528.20
747.55
278.41
207.80
284.59
519.14
804.86
662.27
607.45
958.65
239.51
519.15
$106.87
8,214.17
205.41
72.15
624.62
90.56
52.43
3.24
30.79
1.50
1,970.74
1,070.10
477.55
247.40
2.75
$310,
6.
158.21
534.05
$13,170.28
90.85
316.692.26
$13,261.13
$44,972.20
30,431.33
1,358.08
676.75
$75,403.53
$2,034.83
2,591.49
101.50
66.96
69.78
11.00
966.16
1,041.78
78.23
210.00
2,516.41
100.48
37.06
5.75
12.23
22.70
1,765.15
192.61
80.30
$5,145.26
100.00
$4,732.69
$5,245.26
$4,732.69
$395.75
$395.75
2,114.25
$2,114.25
$1,948.23
150,670.09
2,809.83
1,360.20
14,649.40
3,694.29
11.799.98
281.65
5,261.82
4,308.79
32,456.04
51,681.89
10,410.66
11.145.15
12,958.65
250.62
17,519.15
!, 206.44
i,724.90
$339,931.34
$47,482.20
31,789.41
676.75
$79,948.36 T 50
REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1945-46.
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year ended March 31st, 1946—Cont'd.
Total Gross Expenditure.
Total Revenue.
1945.
1946.
1945.
1946.
Oakalla	
$304,230.18
14,451.65
5,000.25
4,734.46
$316,692.26
13,261.13
5,245.26
4,732.69
$66,735.83
1,901.50
425.75
756.00
$75,403.53
2,034.83
2,114.25
Totals	
$328,416.54
69,819.08
$339,931.34
79,948.36
$69,819.08
$79,948.36
$258,597.46
$259,982.98
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiabmio, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1947.
755-1146-8226  

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