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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1946

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 ANNUAL EEPOET
OF THE
MINISTER OF MINES
OF THE PROVINCE OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR THE
YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER
1944
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OP THE  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945. BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES.
VICTOKIA, B.C.
Hon. E. C. Carson, Minister.
John F. Walker, Deputy Minister.
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines.
G. Cave-Browne-Cave, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
Hartley Sargent, Chief Mining Engineer.
P. J. MULCAHY, Chief Gold Commissioner. To His Honour Lieut.-Colonel William Culham Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The Annual Report of the Mining Industry of the Province for the year 1944 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
ERNEST CRAWFORD CARSON,
Minister of Mines.
Minister of Mines' Office,
June, 19 b5. Flying Officer James Roy Alexander Maconachie died in England
on February 28th, 1945, and was buried with full military honours in
Brookwood Regional Cemetery, Woking, England. He enlisted in the
R.C.A.F. in 1942, and completed his training in navigation at Edmonton. In May, 1944, he went to England, where he was attached to an
R.A.F. Mosquito Squadron. Flying Officer Maconachie was returning
from his thirty-second operational flight over occupied Europe when
his plane made a crash landing and he was killed.
He was born in Calgary, acquired his earlier education in Victoria
and graduated from the University of British Columbia in Geological
Engineering in 1934. In 1939 he returned to the University and
obtained his M.A.Sc. in 1940.
He was on the engineering staff of the Premier Gold Mining
Company in British Columbia for several years, and for a shorter
period was with Boyles Brothers in Ontario. From March, 1938, until
shortly before he enlisted in 1942, Maconachie was a member of the
engineering staff of the British Columbia Department of Mines and
was stationed at Nelson for most of this period.
Roy Maconachie's frankness, energy, ability, and pleasant manner
won him many friends and inspired respect. His death is keenly
regretted by the Department. CONTENTS.
Page.
The Mining Industry  9
Statistics—■
Method of computing Production  n
Table I.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1943 and 1944  13
Table II.—Average Metal Prices, 1901-1944  14
Table III.—Total Production to 1944  15
Table IV.—Total Production for each Year, 1852 to 1944  15
Table V.—Quantities and Values of Mine Products, 1941-1944  16
Table VI.—Production of Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1887-1944 17
Table VII.—Value of all Gold Production to End of 1944  19
Table VIII.—Total Value of Mine Production, by divisions, 1941, 1942, 1943,
and 1944  20
Table IX.A.—Production in Detail of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, and Silver, 1943
and 1944  21
Table IX.B—Production in Detail of Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1943 and 1944  22
Table IX.c.—Production Value of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead,
and Zinc in 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, and 1944  23
Table IX.d — Production of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, and Silver, 1900-1944  24
Table IX.E.—Production of Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1900-1944  25
Table IX.P.—Production Value of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead,
and Zinc, by Mining Divisions, 1900-1944  26
Table X.—Production in Detail of Structural Materials, 1942-1944  27
Table XI.—Production   in   Detail   of   Miscellaneous   Metals,   Minerals,   and
Materials, 1944 .  28
Table XII.—Graph—British Columbia Mine Production, 1895-1944  29
Table XIIL—Graph—British Columbia Lode Mines Production, 1913-1944.___ 30
Table XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date.-'.  31
Table XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens, from 1895 to 1925  31
Table XVI.—Coke and By-products Production, British Columbia, 1943, 1944._ 32
Table XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1944  33
Table XVIII.—Capital employed, Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity,
and Process Supplies, 1944   37
Table XIX.—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode Minerals, 1901-1944  38
Table XX.—Men employed in the Mining Industry of British Columbia, 1901-
1944  39
Table XXI.—Metalliferous Mines shipping in 1944  40
Table XXII.—Mining Companies employing an Average of Ten or more Men
during 1944  42
Departmental Work—
Administrative Branch ~  — 43
New Filing System  43
Central Records Office  43
Amalgamation of Mining Divisions  44
Gold Purchasing  44
List of Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-mining Recorders 45
Gold Commissioners' and Mining Recorders' Office Statistics  47
Chemical Laboratories and Sampling Plant  48
Inspection Branch  50 A 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Departmental Work—Continued. page.
Mineralogical Branch   _  50
Museums  50
Grub-staking Prospectors  50
Joint Offices of the British Columbia Department of Mines and of the Department of Mines and Resources, Canada  51
Publications  52
Geological Survey of Canada  52
PROGRESS NOTES.
Lode-gold Deposits—
Portland Canal Area  _ 53
Salmon River  53
Tide Lake  53
Stikine Mining Division  53
Cariboo Area    54
Bridge River Area  54
Taseko Lake Area  56
Stump Lake Area  56
Similkameen River Area   57
Southern Okanagan Area   58
Beaverdell Area   59
Camp McKinney Area  59
Greenwood-Grand Forks Area  59
Castlegar Area  59
Rossland Area  59
Nelson Area  60
Toad Mountain  60
Eagle Creek  60
Forty-nine Creek  60
Rover Creek   60
Ymir   60
Barrett Creek    62
Erie Creek  62
Sheep Creek  62
Silver-gold Deposits—
Bear River Area  63
Greenwood Area  63
Copper Deposits—
Similkameen River Area  _  64
Vancouver Area     65
Copper-gold Deposits—
Texada Island  66
Copper-zinc Deposits—
Vancouver Island   67
Silver-lead-zinc Deposits—
Beaverdell Area  68
Ainsworth Mining Division  68
Slocan Mining Division  70
Cranbrook Area    72
Windermere Area    74
Golden Area      74 CONTENTS. A 7
Mercury Deposits— PAGE.
Fort St. James Area    75.
Takla Lake Area    75
Placer-gold Deposits—
Atlin Area  75
Omineca Mining Division  76
Stikine Mining Division  76
Cariboo Area  76
Lillooet Area  79
Princeton Area  80
Barite  80
Clay and Shale Deposits—
New Westminster Area  81
Gabriola Island  81
Gypsum Deposits  81
Limestone Deposits—
Koeye River Area  82
Grand Forks Area  82
Texada Island  82
Vancouver Island  83
Silica Deposits  83
Stone, Sand, and Gravel—
Vancouver Area  83
New Westminster Area  83
Nelson Island  84
Vancouver Island  84
Coal Mines—
Production  85
Output and Per Capita Production, 1944 (Table)  86
Output and Per Capita Production in Districts, 1944 (Table)  87
Collieries—Production, 1944 (Table)  88
Collieries—Men employed, 1944 (Table)  89
Labour and Employment   90
Competition of Coal produced outside British Columbia  90
Accidents in and around Coal Mines  90
Explosives used  93
Machine-mined Coal    94
Safety-lamps  95
Electricity  97
Ventilation  97
Inspection Committees  98
Coal-dust  98
Dangerous Occurrences  98
Prosecutions  100
Government Mine-rescue Stations  101
Supervision of Coal Mines  101
" Coal Sales Act "—(Registered Names of British Columbia Coals)  102 A 8 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Coal Mines—Continued. page.
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials—
First-, Second-, and Third-class Certificates and Mine-surveyors' Certificates  103
Examinations for Certificates of Competency as Coal-miners___.  103
Registered List of Holders of Certificates of Competency as Coal-mine
Officials  104
Inspection of Coal Mines—
Vancouver Island Inspection District  114
Nanaimo  114
Comox  118
Nicola-Princeton Inspection District  121
Northern Inspection District  126
Vicinity of Quesnel  126
Telkwa Area  126
Peace River Area  127
East Kootenay Inspection District  129
Inspection of Metalliferous Mines  139
Geological Reports—
China Creek Area    142
Little Billie Mine  162
Whitesail Lake Area  175
ILLUSTRATIONS.
plate. (After page 177.)
I.—A. Looking down McQuillan Creek, China Creek Area.
B. Headwaters of McQuillan Creek, China Creek Area.
II.—A. Mount McQuillan and Mount Douglas, China Creek Area.
B. High, steep bluffs, typical of limestone on Mount Spencer, China Creek
Area.
III.—A. Typical diorite breccia, Mount McQuillan, China Creek Area.
B. Acidic dyke cutting diorite, and in turn cut by diabase dyke, China Creek
Area.
IV.—A. Ribbon-quartz, Havilah mine, China Creek Area.
B. Section of branch vein in 2,700 adit, " Black Panther " mine, China
Creek Area.
V.—A. Looking south-westerly from the Harrison Group, Whitesail Lake Area.
B. Granite Mountain, Whitesail Lake Area.
VI.—A. Ore-bin, Mount Sicker (Twin "J" Mines, Ltd.).
B. Surface at Little Billie Mine, Texada Island.
VII.—A. Open-pit coal mine, Corbin.
B. Loading coal with power-shovel, Corbin.
VIII.—Curran-Knowles by-product coke plant, Michel.
A. Showing ram at charging end of oven.
B. Showing coke being discharged from oven.
List of Publications    179
Prospectors' Sets ;_     isi
List of Libraries    182
Synopses of Mining Laws and Laws specially related to Mining  184
List of Prices charged for Acts  196
Index    198 Annual Report of the Minister of Mines, 1944.
THE MINING INDUSTRY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The value of mineral production for 1944 was $54,923,802.* This amount is almost
$11,000,000 less than the 1943 figure and is the lowest for any year since 1936. Compared with 1943, metal production was down almost $11,500,000 or 21 per cent. Non-
metallic minerals, clay products, and other structural materials showed losses or gains
which were not greater than 6 per cent, of the 1943 value. Coal production was some
112,000 tons more than 1943, an increase of $475,000 in value. Production of barite,
sulphur, lime, and limestone also increased.
The decrease in the value of mineral production reflects the general shortage of
labour. The reduction in value was greatest for the metals. For copper, lead, and
zinc the reduction in quantity was even greater than the reduction in value as the
prices used for 1944 are higher than those used for 1943. Production of placer gold,
lode gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc decreased 16 per cent, to 33 per cent, in quantity
and 10 per cent, to 36 per cent, in value. The quantity of mercury was less than
one-half that produced in 1943 and the value was little more than one-fourth of the
1943 value, reflecting a sharp decline in the price as well as the suspension of production.
The value of antimony produced increased 48 per cent., while bismuth and cadmium
were greatly reduced.
Five base-metal producers, including two mercury mines, were shut down during
the year. Base Metals Mining Corporation, Limited, resumed milling in July, having
been off production from January when the power plant was burned. Retallack Mines,
Limited, began production at the old Whitewater mine. Hedley Mascot Gold Mines,
Limited, resumed milling which had been suspended in September, 1943. Keen interest
was shown in searching for lode deposits and exploratory work, done on several prospects and producing mines, gave encouraging results.
Production of coal was begun at the White Rapids mine adjoining the former
Wellington-Extension Colliery in the Vancouver Island District and also at the Hasler
Creek mine in the Peace River area. Production of coal decreased in the Vancouver
Island and the Nicola-Princeton Districts and increased in the Northern and the East
Kootenay Districts. Increased production from the open-cast mine at Corbin more
than accounted for the increase for the East Kootenay District and for the Province.
The average number of employees in the industry (12,314) was slightly lower than
the 1943 figure (12,448) and was the lowest for any year since 1933. Shortage of
labour was general throughout the industry, and at the end of the year the total number
employed was less than for the corresponding period in 1943. The average number
employed in lode-mining underground decreased from 2,394 in 1943 to 1,896 in 1944,
in other departments of lode-mining and of the mining industry losses or gains were
much smaller. Some mines, notably gold-mines in the Hedley Camp, had more men
working at the end of the year than they had at the same time in 1943, but others were
still facing very serious labour shortage.
Dividends paid during 1944 amounted to $11,367,732, of which $413,595 was
distribution of capital by a company not at present operating. Dividends in 1943 were
$11,860,159, of which $399,101 was capital distribution. The dividends paid in 1939,
when production had a value of $65,681,000, amounted to $11,865,000. Since 1939,
taxes have increased greatly and the unit costs for labour and materials have also
increased. It is apparent therefore that funds for maintenance, development, exploration, and reserves were very much less than available in 1939 for these purposes.
* Based on average prices for metals, see pages 11, 12, and 14, and on the price of $4.25 per long ton of coal.
9 A 10 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
It appears probable that demand for base metals will continue through 1945.
Availability of labour therefore will have a very important bearing on production. The
output of lode gold will probably be increased moderately, and production of silver, lead,
and zinc may also increase, provided that the supply of labour is maintained. However, if the total number employed by the industry does not increase, improvement in
one branch or department can only be at the expense of another; diversion of labour
from base-metal mining might result in increased gold production at the expense of
the output of base metal, or diversion of effort from production to exploration, development, or maintenance would result in a temporary decrease in output. Coal production
is not expected to change greatly since even if more labour becomes available it will take
time to put the mines in position to increase production materially. The open-cast coal
mine at Corbin was shut down at the onset of winter, and should it not be operated in
1945 the total production of coal will probably be less than in 1944. STATISTICS. A 11
STATISTICS.
The collection and compilation of mining statistics and the preparation of statistical tables for this report is in charge of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics,
Department of Trade and Industry.
Since 1939 several mining divisions have been amalgamated with others. These
changes may be of interest to those studying the tables and therefore have been set
forth under the heading "Amalgamation of Mining Divisions," page 44.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION.
The total value of mine output of the Province, consisting of metalliferous minerals, coal, structural materials, and miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials, is
calculated at standard prices in Canadian funds.
In the Annual Report for 1925 some changes were made in the methods used in
previous years in computing and valuing the products of the industry, but in order to
facilitate comparisons with former years the same general style of tables was adhered
to. The methods used in the 1925 Annual Report have been followed in subsequent
Annual Reports, with the addition of new tables.
Metals.
The following notes explain the methods used:—
(1.) From the certified returns of lode mines of ore and concentrate shipments
made during the full calendar year by the producers the net recovered metal contents
have been determined by deducting from the " assay value content" necessary corrections for smelting and refining losses.
In making comparisons of production figures with previous years, it should be
remembered that prior to 1925 in the Annual Reports the total metal production, with
the exception of copper, was determined by taking the assay value content of all ores
shipped; deductions for slag losses were made by taking varying percentages of the
metal prices.
(2.) Gold-placer returns are received from operators giving production in crude
ounces recovered. The fine-gold content is calculated and is then valued at the yearly
average price of gold, which in 1944 was $38.50 per ounce. On this basis the average
crude-gold value per ounce was $31.66 on Provincial placer-gold production.
(3.) In the interests of uniformity the Statistical Bureaus of the Provinces and
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics use the same average metal prices in valuing mineral
production.
Normally the prices used in valuing the different metals are: For gold, the average
price for the year; for silver, the average New York metal-market price for the year;
for lead, zinc, and copper the average London metal-market price for the year. Before
1932 copper was valued at the average New York price. The bulk of the lead and zinc
production of the Province is sold on the basis of the London prices. The New York,
St. Louis, and Montreal lead- and zinc-market prices differ materially from the London
prices and therefore are not properly applicable in valuing British Columbia production of these metals. For some years British Columbia copper has been sold largely
or entirely in the United States and the New York export price for copper rather than
the London price is the basis for settlement. Any difference between the two prices
introduces a variation in the gross value of copper production as calculated (see footnote, Table I.).
The following procedures are used to take care of the exchange fluctuations:—
(a.)  Silver is valued at the average New York price, adjusted to Canadian
funds at the average exchange rate. A 12 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
(b.) Lead, zinc, and copper are valued at London prices, adjusted to Canadian
funds at the average exchange rate.
Trading on the London Metal Exchange was suspended on the outbreak of war and
since September 4th, 1939, prices in Great Britain have been controlled. The London
market prices therefore could not serve as the basis for valuing mineral production.
Since that time most of Canada's production of the principal base metals has been
sold under contracts with the British and Canadian Governments and for the years
1940, 1941, and 1942 the prices used in valuing Canadian mineral production were those
fixed by the contracts. British Columbia copper, however, continued to be sold in the
United States and the price used for settlement was higher than the price as fixed in
contracts with the British and Canadian Governments. Had the United States price
been used in the calculation, the value of our copper production would have been
materially greater (see note, Table I.).
For 1943 and 1944 production of copper, lead, zinc, and silver average prices were
agreed upon with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, in conjunction with the Dominion
Metals Controller. These prices reflect the fact that several producers have been
receiving higher prices than those fixed shortly after the outbreak of war.
Fuel.
(4.) In 1926 a change was made in computing coal and coke statistics. The practice in former years had been to list coal and coke production (in part) as primary
mineral production. Only the coke made in bee-hive ovens was so credited; that made
in by-product ovens was not listed as coke, but the coal used in making this coke was
credited as coal production. The result was that the coke-production figures were
incomplete. Starting with the 1926 Annual Report, the standard practice of the Bureau
of Statistics, Ottawa, has been adopted. This consists of crediting all coal produced,
including that used in making coke, as primary mine production. Coke-making is
considered a manufacturing industry. As -it is, however, of interest to the mining
industry, a table included in the report shows the total coke produced in the Province,
together with by-products, and the values given by the producers. This valuation of
coke is not, of course, included in the total gross mine production of the Province.
From 1918 to 1930 coal production was valued at $5 per long ton. In 1931 the
price used was $4.50, and from 1932 on the price used has been $4.25 per long ton.
The different prices should be kept in mind when comparing the dollar value of production for different years. STATISTICS.
A 13
TABLE I.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1943 and 1944.
Quantity,
1943.
Quantity,
1944.
Value,
1943.
Value,
1944.
Per Cent.
Increase ( + ) or
Decrease ( —).
Quantity.
Value.
Metallics.
Antimony  - -	
$
189,408
562,484
705,780
4,971,132
8,639,516
462,270
15,214,417
4,559,200
3,858,496
702,385
13,405,481
270
478,344
$
281,000
154,844
401,623
4,356,070
7,185,33a
361,977
13,265,886
1,210,375
2,453,293
236,788
12,055,328
299,643
— 14.2
— 16.8
— 21.7
— 27.3
— 55.3
— 33.1
— 16.3
$
+ 48.3
— 72.5
— 43.1
lb.
42,307,510
224,403
14,600
405,285,476
1,690,240
8,526,310
36,300,589
186,632
11,433
294,797,469
755,908
5,705,334
— 12.4
Gold, lodet   fine, oz.
— 16.8
— 21.7
 lb.
—  12.8
.... lb.
— 73.5
....oz.
— 36.4
—  66.3
Zinc   ... ..  	
- lb.
335,137,014
280,356,477
— 10.1
Other metals - -	
— 37.4
Totals _      	
53,749,183
42,262,159
— 21.4
tons
Fuel.
Coal  (2,240 lb.) . .... 	
1,821,654
1,933,639
7,742,030
8,217,966
+    6.1
+    6.1
NON-METALLICS.
19,207
140,299
11,711
142,176
4,836
4,697
1,039,108
63,579
100,283
17,903
103,927
8,200
473
1,123,868
— 19.4
+ 42.9
— 89.9
+    8.4
+231.0
78,713
664
63,443
949
— 28.5
Granules—slate and rock, talc .—	
Gypsum products, gypsite 	
tons
+ 52.9
— 26.9
+ 69.6
— 89.9
+    8.3
Sodium carbonate, magnesium sulphate
Sulphur J  	
.tons
tons
427
104,599
43
113,374
Totals _	
   1    1,362,034
1,418,233
+    4.1
Clay Products and Other Structural
Materials.
„ . ,                     Clay Products.
Brick—
2,736,792
695,064
2,038,193
1,182,784
56,508
21,825
227,594
9,706
27,617
153,153
2,917
5,485
40,936
41,495
181,199
17,283
26,627
165,905
— 25.5
+ 70.2
+ 425.0
+ 43.9
— 26.3
-No.
+ 90.1
—  20.4
706
3,706
+  78.1
3.9
..No.
1,204,508
1,733,114
+    8.3
3,444
— 37.2
	
503,805
476,789
—     6.4
Other Structural Materials.
128,469
1,146,865
340,988
890,058
56,436
100,996
1,085,918
421,648
935,370
64,794
40,926
+  14.8
— 34.9
— 58.9
—    5.3
147,444
+  23.7
+ 5.1
+ 14.8
—  59.5
Stone	
Rubble, riprap, crushed rock -  -
tons
tons
3,084
108,122
1,075
44,423
	
2,535,343
2,548,656
+    0.5
Total value in Canadian funds
-     -   1    —
65,892,395
54,923,803
—  16.6
* Dominion production of copper is evaluated at the average price on the London market, and in order that
the Dominion and Provincial compilations shall agree the same prices are used in calculating the value of British
Columbia copper production shown in the above table. However, British Columbia copper production is sold in
the United States and had the value been calculated, using the United States export price converted into Canadian
funds, an additional gross amount of about $473,845 could be added to the above value for 1943 and $315,815
for 1944. For 1944 production of copper, lead, zinc, and silver, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, in conjunction
with the Dominion Metals Controller, realizing several of the producers were getting higher prices than those
fixed shortly after the outbreak of war, agreed on what would be more adequate average prices, and the production
values in Table I. reflect that trend. British Columbia lead, zinc, and silver, in addition to being exported to the
United Kingdom under war-time contracts, are disposed of in considerable volume in Eastern Canada and the
United States.
t Canadian funds.
J Sulphur content of pyrites shipped, estimated sulphur contained in sulphuric acid made from waste smelter-
gases and elemental sulphur. A 14
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
TABLE II.-
-Average Metal Prices used in compiling Value of Provincial
Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc.
Year.
Gold,
Fine Ounce.
Silver,
Fine Ounce.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc.
Lb.
$
Cents.
Cents.
Cents.
Cents.
1901	
20.67
56.002 N.Y.
16.11   N.Y
2 577 N Y
1902
49.65
11 70
1903	
50.78
13.24
3 81
1904                                     	
53.36     „
12.82      „
3.88     „
1905                                  	
51.33
15 59
1906 —	
63.45      „
62.06      „
50.22      „
19.28      „
20.00      „
13.20
4.81      „
4.80      „
3.78
1907  	
	
1908—	
1909
48.93
12.98
3 85
1910                                     	
50.812    „
12.738
4 00
1911                                     	
50.64      „
12.38
3 98
4 90
1912 	
57.79
16.341    „
4.024
5 90
1913 -	
56.80      „
15.27      „
3.93
4.80
1914                                        _ 	
52.10
13.60
3 50
4 40
1915       -	
47.20
17.28      „
4.17
11.25
1916                                      	
62.38
27.202    ,
1917	
	
77.35      „
27.18      „
7.91      „
7.566    „
1918 - 	
91.93      „
24.63
6.67
6 94
1919 .   .	
105.57
18.70
5.19
6 24
1920.	
	
95.80      „
17.45      „
7.16      „
6.52     „
1921
59.52
12.50
4 09
3 95
1922
64.14
13.33
5 16
4 86
1*?B
61.63
14.42
6 54
1924   	
63.442    „
13.02      „
7 287
5 39
1925
69.065    ,
14.042    ,
7.892 Lond.
1">?6
62.107    ,
13.795    ,
6 751
1927
56.37
12.92
5 256
1928      ....          	
58.176    ,
14.570    ,
4 575
5 493
1929 -
52.993    „
18.107    „
5 050
6.385
1930  -	
38.154    „
12.982    „
3.927
3 599
1931	
28.700    „
8.116    „
2.710
1932    .             .                  	
23.47
31.671    ,
1933              	
28.60
37.832    ,
7.454    ,
1934	
34.50
47.461    „
7.419    „
2.436    „
3.044    „
1935 	
36.19
64.790    „
7.798    „
3.133    „
3.099    „
loan
35.03
45.127    „
1937	
34.99
44.881    „
13.078    „
5.110    „
4.902    „
1938             	
35.18
43.477    ,
9 972
8 344
3 073
1939    - -	
36.141
40.488    „
10.092    „
3.169    „
3.069    „
1940 —  	
38.50
38.249    „
10.086    „
3.362    „
3.411    „
1941	
38.50
38.261    „
10.086    „
3.362    „
3.411    „
1942  	
38.50
41.166    „
10.086    „
3.362    „
3.411    „
1943	
38.50
*45.254    ,
•11 75
1944
38.50
•43.000 „
* 12.000 „
*4.500 „
'4.300 „
Average, 1940-44 (in-
38.50
41.186   „
10.801    „
3.668    „
* Refer to foot-note on Table I. regarding average prices of copper, silver, lead, and zinc for 1944.
Note.—In making comparisons with average prices used prior to 1925, it should be remembered that deductions
were made from the average prices as a means of adjustment between the " assay value content" of ores shipped
instead of allowing percentage losses in smelting operations. The price of copper prior to 1925 was taken at " net " ;
silver, at 95 per cent.; lead, at 90 per cent.; and zinc, at 85 per cent. Subsequent to 1925 (inclusive) prices are
true averages, and adjustments are made on the metal content of ores for loss in smelting and refining. STATISTICS. A 15
TABLE III.—Total Production for all Years up to and including 1944.
Gold, placer   $91,899,360*
Gold, lode   326,156,278*
Silver    157,453,774
Copper    335,000,889
Lead   340,362,773
Zinc   221,831,454
Coal and coke  423,304,535
Structural materials   93,361,649
Miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials  44,749,983
Total  $2,034,120,695
* Canadian funds.
TABLE IV.—Production for each Year from 1852 to 1944 (inclusive) .
1852 to 1895 (inclusive). $94,547,370 1921  $28,066,641
1896  7,507,956 1922  35,162,843
1897  10,455,268 1923  41,304,320
1898  10,906,861 1924  48,704,604
1899  12,393,131 1925  61,492,242
1900  16,344,751 1926  67,188,842
1901  19,671,572 1927  60,729,358
1902  17,486,550 1928  65,372,583
1903  17,495,954 1929  68,245,443
1904  18,977,359 1930  55,391,993
1905  22,461,325 1931  34,883,181
1906  24,980,546 1932  *28,798,406
1907  25,882,560 1933  *32,602,672
1908  23,851,277 1934  *42,305,297
1909  24,443,025 1935  *48,821,239
1910  26,377,066 1936 ■  *54,081,967
1911  23,499,072 1937  *74,475,902
1912  32,440,800 1938  *64,485,551
1913  30,296,398 1939  *65,681,547
1914  26,388,825 1940  *75,701,155
1915  29,447,508 1941  *78,479,719
1916  42,290,462 1942  *75,551,093
1917  37,010,392 1943  *65,892,395
1918  41,782,474 1944  *54,923,803
1919  33,296,313                      	
1920    35,543,084 Total  $2,034,120,695
* Canadian funds. A 16
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
TABLE V.—Quantities and Values of Mine Products for 1941,
1942, 1943, AND 1944.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
Description.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
Gold, placer* ....crude, oz.
Gold, lode*   fine, oz.
Silver    oz.
Copper    lb.
Lead  lb.
Zinc   lb.
Coal     ...  long tons
43,775
571,026
12,175,700
66,435,583
490,185,657
363,302,195
1,802,353
$1,385,962
21,984,501
4,658,545
6,700,693
16,480,042
12,392,238
7,660,000
2,845,262
32,904
444,518
9,677,881
50,097,716
463,269,005
396,857,260
1,938,158
$1,041,772
17,113,943
4,080,775
5,052,856
15,575,104
13,536,801
8,237,172
3,143,382
7,769,288
14,600
224,403
8,526,310
42,307,510
405,285,476
335,137,014
1,821,654
$462,270
8,639,516
3,858,496
4,971,132
15,214,417
13,405,481
7,742,030
3,039,148
11,433
186,632
5,705,334
36,300,589
294,797,469
280,356,477
1,933,639
$361,977
7,185,332
2,453,293
4,356,070
13,265,886
12,055,328
8,217,966
3,025,445
4,002,506
Miscellaneous metals and
4,372,476
8,559,905
Totals	
$78,479,719
$75,551,093
$65,892,395
$54,923,803
* Canadian funds. STATISTICS.
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A 19
TABLE VII.—Value of Gold Production to Date.
Placer Gold.
Lode Gold.
Crude, Oz.
Value.
Fine, Oz.
Value.
1858-1862         	
493,582
814,180
494,766
450,960
278,996
192,076
126,271
17,806
20,276
24,084
27,201
25,676
3:2,167
67,245
63,936
48,505
53,657
53,021
55,765
48,465
47,420
41,400
32,350
23,850
27,000
21,300
27,775
25,000
28,500
38,500
29,025
24,800_
16,000*
14,325
11,080
11,660
18,240
20,320
21,037
16,476
20,912
9,191
8,424
6,983
8,955
17,176
20,400'
23,928
25,181
30,929
43,389
54,153
57,759
49,746
39,067
43,775
32,904
14,600
•  11,433
$9,871,634
16,283,592
9,895,318
9,019,201
5,579,911
3,841,515
2,525,426
356,131
405,516
481,683
544,026
613,520
643,346
1,344,900
1,278,724
970,100
1,073,140
1,060,420
1,115,300
969,300
948,400
828,000
647,000
477,000
540,000
426,000
555,500
510,000
565,000
770,000
580,500
496,000
320,000
286,500
221,600
233,200
368,800
420,000
420,750
280,092
355,503
156,247
143,208
118,711
152,235
291,992
395,542
562,787
714,431
895,058
1,249,940
1,558,245
1,671,015
1,478,492
1,236,928
1,385,962
1,041,772
462,270
361,977
	
$9,871,634
16,283,592
9,895,318
9,019,201
1863 1867              	
1873 1877              	
	
1878 1882           . „	
5,579,911
3,841,515
2,525,426
1893           	
1,170
6,252
39,270
62,259
106,141
110,061
138,315
167,153
210,384
236,491
232,831
222,042
238,660
224,027
196,179
255,582
238,224
267,701
228,617
257,496
272,254
247,170
250,021
221,932
114,523
164,674
152,426
120,048
135,663
197,856
179,245
247,716
209,719
201,427
178,001
188,087
145,339
160,778
146,039
181,564
223,529
297,130
365,244
404,472
460,781
557,522
587,180
583,416
571,026
444,518
224,403
186,632
$23,404
125,014
785,400
1,214,180
2,122,820
2,201,217
2,857,573
3,453,381
4,348,605
4,888,269
4,812,616
4,589,608
4,933,102
4,630,639
4,055,020
5,282,880
4,924,090
5,533,380
4,725,513
5,322,442
5,627,490
5,109,004
5,167,934
4,587,334
2,367,190
3,403,812
3,150,645
2,481,392
2,804,154
4,089,684
3,704,994
5,120,535
4,335,269
4,163,859
3,679,601
3,888,097
3,004,419
3,323,576
3,018,894
4,261,307
6,392,929
10,250,985
12,852,936
14,168,654
16,122,727
19,613,624
21,221,272
22,461,516
21,984,501
17,113,943
8,639,516
7,185,332
379,535
1894            —	
530,530
1895              - 	
1,267,083
1896              - 	
1,788,206
1897            —.- -
2,636,340
1898             - 	
2,844,563
1899           	
4,202,473
1900            	
4,732,105
1901	
5,318,703
1902	
5,961,409
5,873,036
1904              	
6,704,908
5,902,402
5,579,039
1907          -	
4,883,020
1908             	
5,929,880
6,401,090
1910            	
6,073,380
1911             	
5,151,513
5,877,942
1913               	
6,137,490
1911	
6,674,004
1915             	
5,937,934
1916                	
5,167,834
1917  .	
2,863,190
1918                 - 	
3,723,812
1919        —
3,437,145
1920                	
2,702,992
1921                 	
3,037,354
1922 : - -
4,458,484
4,124,994
1924            	
5,541,285
4,615,361
1926           	
4,519,362
1927          .     	
3,835,848
4,031,305
3,123,130
3,475,811
3,310,886
4,656,849'
6,955,716»
1934           -  	
10,965,416*
13,747,994*
1936	
15,418,594*
17,680,972*
1938             	
21,284,639*
22,699,764*
23,698,444*
23,370,463*
1942         	
18,155,715*
1943           	
9,101,786*
1944         	
7,547,309*
4,403,598
$91,899,360
12,059,190
$326,156,278
$418,055,636
* Canadian funds. A 20
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
TABLE VIII.—Value of Mine Production by Divisions, 1941, 1942, 1943, and 1944.
Miaing Division.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
Atlin                                                                  	
$1,449,341
2,262,577
640,785
32,991
3,157,927
1,547,379
2,459
170,457
183,054
107,525
34,657
740,814
2,223,666
4,786,602
44,408
127
35,417,691
721,155
11,823
3,748,001
19,443
625,979
3,095,444
95
44,257
9,963
2,429,603
13,688
5,991,503
3,034,831
679,169
16,347
4,024,175
1,211,7*3
$1,40.1,357
1,796,684
430,090
16,211
2,465,413
3,273,590
13,910
77,082
183,406
122,930
10,409
511,553
2,429,785
4,111,591
25,270
$314,005
1,100,439
58,309
2,311
1,161,053
5,357,775
59,354
20,366
161,820
155,606
2,177
361,396
1,490,858
3,497,570
49,405
$255,539
732,087
32,211
1,520
Cariboo _    	
979,399
1 409,984
5S.251
13,804
124,130
Nicola.. ...       	
83,032
3,225
Greenwood	
275,571
1,837,959
3,242,076
Ainsworth...    ..  .... 	
277,435
Port Steele    . .        .
35,427,802
528,800
1,031
2,682,612
30,997
884,623
4,154,407
34,696
59,598
1,612,444
8,602
5,093,991
3,418,984
654,719
34,397,668
438,726
95
892,159
29,031
1,089,433
3,282,427
30,532,861
324,525
1,288
544.663
19,664
1,193,092
2,246,794
Trail Creek  	
Windermere — 	
Alberni         ....
527,401
9,964
9,725
14,809
Clayoquot „   	
5,679
3,312,574
3,435,235
607,133
1,803
3,072,599
3,353,930
597,569
Lillooet _   _                      ,
Nanaimo.	
Quatsino   	
Vancouver
2,596,739
1,491,767
2,607,391
1,465,011
2,233,911
1,450,347
Totals	
$78,479,719
$75,551,093
$65,892,395
$54,923,803 STATISTICS.
A 21
TABLE IX.A (1943 AND 1944).-
-Production in Detail of Placer Gold, Lode Gold,
and Silver.
Divisions.
Year.
Tons.
Gold—Placer.
Golb—Lode.
Silver.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
9,814
7,826
$
310,734
247,777
$
S
50
93,003
68,496
141
22,157
15,289
5,428
853,045
588,627
87
335,600
109,630
37
47,141
31
19
73
48
2,751
1,885
1,004
952
982
601
2,311
1,520
87,103
59,997
31,789
30,141
60,884
54,227
26,397
23,030
1,016,285
886,655
2,905
2,189
1,315
941
639
430
49
16
20,232
13,614
1,551
507
__     .
1
13
500
TV     1
'
	
6
38
32
3,909
2,056
115,488
130,778
1,363,346
1,383,296
13,126
49,971
2,500,714
2,141,397
61,770
24,995
10
10
10
814
575
36,466
45,960
6,464
5,603
385
385
385
31,339
22,138
1,403,941
1,769,460
248,864
215,716
370
7
31
381,255
337,555
5,141
5,831
156,507
147,695
7,984
28,603
7,007,800
4,535,800
19,133
10,408
159
14
443
3
172,533
145,149
2,327
O     oos
2,507
18
4
570
127
70,826
63,509
3,613
10
385
12,299
68
40
2,153
1,266
3,171,310
1,950,394
8,658
4,476
T
3
95
27
51,504
16,267
3
21,497
6,979
115
827,635
268,692
547
11,244
5,374
235
2
6
8
43
63
190
253
1,361
5.088
2,311
137,645
140,886
2,428
121
14,106
54
141
88
417
356
13,485
145
5,428
3,388
16,054
13,706
519,173
5,582
420,396
427,358
63,353
153
5,352
114
190,246
183,764
28,670
66
2,422
49
27
38
31
42
56
45
855
1,203
982
1,330
1,773
1,425
144,897
126,616
85,078
79,462
3,275,503
3,059,287
21.247
18,281
9,615
7,861
e
12
23
190
380
728
--           ~      ,       .       ,
849,147
606,717
10,922
8,287
555
671
420,497
319,049
21,367
25,834
73,645
59,370
14,741
15,938
33,327
25,529
Victoria	
6,671
17,341
6,853
1943
1944
5,429,857
4,763,332
14,600
11,433
462,270
361,977
224,403
186,632
8,639,516
7,185,332
8,526,310
5,705,334
3,858,496
2,453,293 A 22
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
TABLE IXb (1943 and 1944).—Production in Detail of Copper, Lead, and Zinc.
Year.
Copper.
Lead.
Zinc.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
1943
1944
$
$
$
113,208
120,061
13,302
14,407
1,899,457
1,820,265
71,306
81,912
r.    ti.
4,221
190
597
26
_
230,406
174,010
8,650
7,830
296,564
201,076
11,863
8,646
^
68,679
182,594
22,892,724
22,248,642
8,069
21,911
.    „.
458,629
1,327,067
396,153,000
17,217
59,718
14,871,584
12,952,395
140,065
39,632
615,620
4,657,568
307,084,000
247,563,000
6,350,377
6,184,654
24,625
200,276
12,283,360
287,831,000
3,731,081
880,720
10,645,209
254,015
222,940
12,578
71,320
60,438
566
2,677
2,720
8,661
61,396
62,863
372
2,456
2,703
2,223,448
2,550,361
399,925
83,468
114,766
15,013
20,257,281
20,724,981
810,291
891,174
2,585,386
303,783
16,436,868
13,435,660
210,645
313,632
1,931,332
1,612,279
24,751
37,636
73,075
52,656
45,135
84,153
2,743
2,370
1,694
3,787
471,776
1,953,077
18,871
83,982
1943
1944
42,307,510
36,300,589
4,971,132
4,356,070
405,285,476
294,797,469
15,214,417
13,265,886
335,137,014
280,356,477
13,405,481
12,055,328
* Includes zinc and lead, recovered at the Trail Smelter, from current and reclaimed slags, derived from mine*
in several mining; divisions. STATISTICS.
A 23
Table IX.c.—Production Value of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper,
Lead, and Zinc in 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, AND 1944.
Divisions.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
Atlin            	
$
1,245,709
2,211,087
591,021
67,154
2,774,971
201,473
5,984
223,183
36,809
30,424
17,536
727,331
2,030,408
4,664,462
24,862
29,147,985
1,021,881
13,433
4,057,804
2,976
138,730
564,603
2,905,014
17,382
69,996
5,607,347
39,258
20,598
4,883,476
4,180
$
1,445,031
2,253,299
547,908
32,991
3,077,675
170,039
2,438
167,297
8,073
9,436
30,122
711,981
2,173,069
4,351,322
34,308
31,013,289
700,911
11,823
3,686,326
2,596
626,106
822,166
2,450,639
1,362
11,420
6,982,811
1,379
32,095
3,742,673
1,456
$
1,393,567
1,796,684
354,617
16,211
2,415,991
62,397
760
74,625
5,713
$
310,734
1,089,625
982
2,311
1,104,703
31,789
$
253,242
732,087
601
1,520
Cariboo  —.	
947,593
30,141
20,232
1,552
831
224,385
1,414,337
3,010,155
45,455
30,328,407
402,738
95
837,919
263
1,089,433
363,520
521,595
855
982
3,286,891
13,614
Kamloops	
1,007
760
7,473
458,573
2,122,417
3,621,198
3,870
30,921,250
497,178
398
1(33,763
Osoyoos      —
1,793,878
2,949,189
272,678
Fort Steele   .           .                  _  ..
25,549,264
267,048
1,288
276,616
2,633,021
1,108
884,623
178,645
1,610,534
7,635
6,554
5,075,552
1,102
3,758
2,245,915
380
1,361
1,193,092
Trail Creek _	
13,772
5,631
1,203
1,330
3,068,573
190
380
2,387,899
73,354
728
1,959,227
168,092
Victoria               ...         .                            	
68,197,067
63,601,981
56,401,251
46,551,312
39,677,886 A 24
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
TABLE IX.D.—Production of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, and Silver, 1900-1944.
Divisions.
Gold—Placer.
Gold—Lobe.
Sn.VEB.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
Atlin*               	
619,937
201
3,898
29,169
1,910,604
46,236
4,057
621,002
3,300
230
2,082
4,038
188
7,049
213
17,078
466
1,755
3,173
4,040
150
848
1,579
10,980
9,977
90,494
578
10,250
182
612
S
14,548,917
4,260
86,068
761,329
38,971,325
1,214,702
93,217
12,906,751
82,454
4,652
54,650
95,634
4,079
159,477
5,690
395,083
11,203
37,886
79,594
87,520
3,596
24,176
32,094
252,823
237,522
1,853,470
13,411
233,900
5,306
15,223
107,245
1,816,119
414,794
114
514,582
8,638
$
3,731,522
47,257,050
9,379,046
4,120
18,917,706
197,545
56,939
48,985,016
265,198
20
56,692
2,850,470
271
281,229
266,829
7,674
22,513,766
508,374
4,480,917
6,532,603
141,307,456
1,319,909
2,085,116
4,161,119
50,097
40,325,739
3,306,125
147,158
16,804
31,564
460,512
518,645
13,373
3,612,081
765,054
$
34,072
27,234,054
182,759
8
Cariboo t  --	
24,729
1,454,199
198
39,376
8,520
5,212
1,084,742
1,097,098
95,990
3,865
2,532
70
24,889
1,227,528
12
6,351
2,604,254
271,732
8,476
23,391
1,736,183
67,890
4,311
297,210
36,574
7,156
1,318,141
234,747
175,639
23,364,526
30,683,318
3,204,890
112,829
56,964
1,447
652,366
37,242,768
335
155,734
55,569,591
10,235,406
289,680
827,260
602,287,217
1,426,275
233,172
8.954,225
777,845
110
167,209
126,121
3,793
11,252,031
323,021
1,053,598
3,934,487
Fort Steele        	
66,931,196
790,007
1,119,850
2,240,645
Revelstoke.— —	
31,309
24,356,939
Trail Creek...   _ —.	
1,843,618
67,003
9,513
14,214
205,414
298,523
5,960
1,939,873
412,656
3,404,354
72,276,126
11,509,896
316,775,645
282,260,139
146,056,921
* Atlin totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1898.
f Cariboo totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
t Quesnel totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
§ LiHooet totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1874. STATISTICS.
A 25
TABLE IX.e.—Production of Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1900-1944.
Copper.
Lead.
Zinc.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
83,161
649,583,558
7,671,642
$
11,949
96,784,583
1,216,080
109,945
29,918,485
38,539
$
7,036
1,254,149
1,287
$
15,277
490
656
6,239,613
30
345,809
492
3,960,018
16
6,126,209
1,345,688
248,654
5,767,133
536,304
614
441,171,575
1,962,403
321,935,811
10,175
28,592
57,378
5,594
5,685,261
683
219,318
116,850,749
2,225,948
633,775
57,548
400
20,223,405
26,489
722,684,844
21,034,675
Kamloops 	
1,021,694
103,443
89
70,493,191
218,490
38,031,401
1,201
6,193
10,590
785
889,008
124
42,287
17,374,402
333,373
155,721
5,905
41
3,201,703
6,379
97,925,010
3,112,698
868,662
2,223,285
6,374
9,266,504
252,416
238,577
123,873,333
7,521,518,404
95,516,371
9,569,432
53,532,567
939,741
297,398,760
16,970,979
108,328
99
193
62,463
20,737
88,851
293
367,947
7,475
9,006
6,042,190
305,829,828
3,497,083
382,498
2,340,547
55,885
14,213,235
689,209
3,679
4
7
2,542
409,170
319,990
2,820
9,252,635
5,209
64,377
39,200,116
4,808,871,816
105,760,010
447,139
24,695,688
8,903
240,773,132
157,917,364
26,063
10,510
149
Greenwood  	
Osoyoos   	
Similkameen 	
Ainsworth , ,	
Fort Steele 	
Golden   	
310,173
163
2,616
1,240,474
193,865,097
3,632,564
20,393
1,464,396
Nelson  	
13,939,310
5,292,401
Trail Creek*	
Alberni  	
Ashcroft- -	
12,163
17,981,772
2,424,853
28,144
7,884,077
129,288
1,081
275,172
5,481
563,988
102,853
Provincial totals	
3,324,583,244
332,292,028
8,175,196,237
335,441,061
5,413,989,798
220,831,449
* Includes zinc and lead recovered at the Trail Smelter, from current and reclaimed slags, derived from mines
in several mining divisions. A 26
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Table IX.f.—Production Value of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead,
and Zinc, by Mining Divisions, 1900-1944.
Divisions.
Atlin* 	
Portland Canal
Skeena 	
Stikine	
Cariboof 	
Omineca 	
Peace River _.__.
Quesnelr): __ _
Kamloops 	
Nicola 	
Vernon 	
Greenwood 	
Osoyoos 	
Similkameen .._.
Ainsworth 	
Fort Steele	
Golden 	
Lardeau 	
Nelson 	
Revelstoke 	
Slocan 	
Trail Creek
Alberni 	
Ashcroft .	
Clinton 	
Lillooet§ ._-.
Nanaimo	
New Westminster
Vancouver 	
Victoria 	
Mining Division
Total.
$18,333,496
172,644,350
11,465,834
765,457
57,913,806
4,806,597
93,217
12,914,017
2,636,298
568,315
234,613
105,883,502
31,236,546
42,460,988
11,336,871
567,084,361
7,942,904
2,213,788
45,256,958
175,642
52,711,101
80,793,397
10,671,555
707,741
1,084,908
62,348,684
4,939,912
358,042-
109,663,574
4,426,756
Provincial totals
$1,423,673,230
* Atlin totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1898.
t Cariboo totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
t Quesnel totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
§ Lillooet totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1874. STATISTICS.
A 27
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TABLE XII.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1895-1944.
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V
\
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ui
SI
-V
M
\
111
\
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^
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0 "
\
u. '•
o
\
0
(0
m
z
n
0 ^
« j
-I
j
10 j
*■«
600,0
00/
in
400.
00
u
II
z
3
.500,1
00
7
°
200
OOO
GO
LD
0
IPO
QOQ
m^miOKcoinQ-     w   «    t    u
9          9                               q                               c
(Dh-como-iuio^ir
H                                 1
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CD    k    eo    cn     '
|
—      «l      K)       «f STATISTICS.
A 31
1836-1885	
1886	
1887.	
TABLE XIV-
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
     3,029,011
—Coal Prodi
Value.
$9,468,557
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
jction per Year to Date.*
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
1916      2,084,093
1917  ,     2,149,975
Value.
$7,294,325
        326,636
        413,360
7,524,913
1918..        2,302,245
1919      2,267,541
11,611,225
1888 _ 	
        489,301
11,337,705
1889.
1890.
        679,830
         678,140
1891 _    1,029,097
..   826,335
   978,294
   1,012,953
  939,654
  896,222
  882,854
  1,135,865
  1,306,324
1900 _  1,439,595
1901   1,460,331
1902   1,397,394
1903   1,168,194
1904    1.253,628
1905   1,384,312
1906 ...-  1,517,303
1892..
1893.
1894..
1895.
1896.
1897-
1898-
1899..
1907-
1908.
1909-
1910.
1911-
1912-
1913-
1914.
1915..
1,800,067
1,677,849
2,006,476
2,800,046
2,193,062
2,628,804
2,137,483
1,810,967
1,611,129
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,818,962
2,688,666
2,648,562
3,407,595
3,918,972
4,318,785
4,380,993
4,192,182
3,504,582
3,760,884
4,152,936
4,551,909
6,300,235
5,872,472
7,022,666
9,800,161
7,675,717
9,200,814
7,481,190
6,338,385
5,638,952
1920   2,695,125
1921    2,483,995
1922—.  2,511,843
1923...     2,453,223
1924   1,939,526
1925-
1926..
1927..
1928..
1929..
1930.
1931..
1932..
  2,328,622
  2,330,036
    2,453,827
   2,526,702
   2,251,252
  1,887,130
  1,707,590
   1,534,975
1933 _.  1,264,746
1934.
1935..
1936-
1937-
1938.
1939
1940..
1941..
   1,347,090
   1,187,968
  1,346,471
  1,444,687
  1,309,428
  1,477,872
  1,667,827
  1,802,353
1942   1,938,158
1943   1,821,654
1944.   1,933,639
Totals..
99,160,009
12,976,625
12,419,975
12,559,216
12,266,116
9,697,630
11,642,610
11,650,180
12,269,136
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
6,375,171
5,725,133
6,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565,069
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
8,237,172
7,742,030
8,217,966
$397,630,935
* For all years to 1925   (inclusive)  figures are net coal production and do not include coal made into coke; subsequent figures are entire coal production,  including coal made into coke.
TABLE XV.-
1895-97	
1898 (estimated) .
1899	
1909 	
1901  	
1902  	
1903	
1904  _.
1905 	
1906	
1907- _.
1908 _.	
1909	
1910	
1911	
1912 	
-Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens in British Columbia
from 1895 to 1925.
Tons.
Value.
(2,240 1b.)
19,396
$96,980
35,000
175,000
34,251
171,255
85,149
425,745
127,081
635,405
128,015
640,075
165,543
827,715
238,428
1,192,140
271,785
1,358,925
199,227
996,135
222,913
1,337,478
247,399
1,484,394
258,703
1,552,218
218,029
1,308,174
66,005
396,030
264,333
1,585,998
1913..
1914..
1916.
1916-
1917-
1918..   —.    188,967
1919 -      91,138
1920 	
1921. 	
1922  ,	
1923	
1924 _	
1925 	
Totals-
Tons.
Value.
(2,240 1b.)
286,045
$1,716,270
234,577
1,407,462
245,871
1,475,226
267,725
1,606,350
159,905
959,430
188,967
1,322,769
91,138
637,966
67,792
474,544
59,434
416,038
45,835
320,845
58,919
412,433
30,615
214,305
75,185
526,295
4,393,255
$25,673,600 A 32
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
TABLE XVI.—Coke and By-products Production of British Columbia,
1943 AND 1944.
Description.
1943.
1944.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
Coal used in making coke, long tons.— 	
232,441
$983,910
190,074
$1,439,891
38,184
39,192
83,673
$291,843
274,402
647,482
1
33,005               $301,201
42.322       1          347 245
78,955
565,393
161,049
$1,213,727
2,453,592
96,249
18,321
154,282
$1,213,839
2,562,610
56,476
19,046
..._.....
$3,781,889
$3,851,971 STATISTICS.
A 33
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1944.
Lode-gold Mines*
Company or Mine.
Arlington	
Athabasca..    	
Bayonne — — „ —	
Bralorne Mines, Ltd.-  	
Belmont-Surf Inlet..  	
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mines, Ltd	
Cariboo-McKinney Con. M. & M. Co.— „
Canadian Pacific Exploration (Porto Rico) „
Centre Star    _	
Fairview Amalgamated 	
Fern Gold Mining & Milling Co., Ltd	
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd	
Goodenough (leasers)   	
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd	
Island Mountain Mines, Ltd 	
I.X.L     	
Jewel-Denero   	
Kelowna Exploration, Ltd. (Nickel Plate)	
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Ltd.. 	
Le Roi Mining Co 	
Le Roi No. 2, Ltd.      _
Lome (later Bralorne) —	
Motherlode    	
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines, Ltd 	
Nickel Plate (Hedley Gold Mining Co., Ltd.).
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd.	
Poorman  _ — 	
Premier Gold Mining Co., Ltd 	
Privateer Mine, Ltd —  	
Queen —    	
Relief Arlington Mines, Ltd. (Second Relief)
Reno Gold Mines, Ltd   	
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd 	
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd  	
Spud Valley Gold Mines, Ltd _	
Sunset No. 2. —   -	
Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd.	
War Eagle     	
Ymir Gold    	
Ymir Yankee Girl  	
Miscellaneous mines 	
Total, lode-gold mines 	
Locality.
Erie	
Nelson .
Tye Siding 	
Bridge River	
Princess Royal Island .
Wells. —	
Camp McKinney	
Nelson   	
Rossland 	
Oliver 	
Nelson 	
Sheep Creek 	
Ymir	
Hedley.	
Wells 	
Rossland    —_.	
Greenwood	
Hedley  	
Sheep Creek.. _
Rossland 	
Rossland 	
Bridge River....	
Sheep Creek.	
Zeballos  	
Hedley  	
Bridge River-
Nelson	
Premier	
Zeballos - —
Sheep Creek-
Erie _	
Sheep Creek-
Sheep Creek-
Premier 	
Zeballos 	
Rossland	
Surf Inlet _
Rossland	
Ymir	
Ymir..-	
Class.
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold-copper..
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold —	
Gold —	
Gold 	
Gold - -—
Gold-copper _
Gold-copper
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold ...
Gold	
Gold -	
Gold 	
Gold 	
Gold    ...
Gold	
Gold	
Gold-copper..
Gold 	
Gold-copper..
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold	
Amount
paid.
$94,872
25,000
25,000
12,958,550
1,437,500
1,679,976
565,588
37,500
472,255
5,254
9,375
t868,595
13,731
1,290,553
1,034,945
134,025
11,751
1,350,000
357,856
1,475,000
1,574,640
20,450
163,500
165,000
3,423,191
9,299,393
25,000
U8,858,075
1,914,183
85,000
f290,000
tl,433,640
2,362,500
J2,250,000
168,000
115,007
120,279
1,245,250
300,000
T415.002
108,623
$67,984,059
* The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table.
f Includes " Return of Capital " distributions.
t Up to and including 1936, dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company, Limited, were derived from
operations of the company in British Columbia. Subsequent dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company,
Limited, have been derived from the operations of subsidiary companies in British Columbia and elsewhere and are
not included in the figure given. In 1936, Silbak Premier, a subsidiary of Premier Gold Mining Company, took over
the former gold operations of that company in British Columbia.    Dividends paid by Silbak Premier are given above. A 34
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1944—Continued.
Silver-lead-zinc Mines.
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
Rambler 	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-Iead-zinc.	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc __	
$10,000
97,200
48,000
388,297
25,000
5,500
♦126,455,483
5,203
50,000
35,393
45,668
8,904
' 132,464
633,256
6,000
400,000
20,000
20,000
213,000
50,000
80,000
6,000
10,257
70,500
71,387
45,088
72,859
497,901
6,754
110,429
1,438,000
131,824
25,000
467,250
334,992
125,490
566,000
1,267,600
10,365
2,734,688
88,000
64,000
• 135,000
20,000
592,515
70,237
Bell
New Denver _	
Trail	
Field	
Smithers 	
Ainsworth	
Cody  --	
Hall Creek 	
Beaverdell 	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc _
Goodenough   —  	
H.B. Mining Co.                         ■  - 	
Silver-lead-zinc _	
Silver-Iead-zinc	
Silver-Iead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc   -	
Silver-lead-zinc _	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Highland Bell Ltd.                                                           	
Similkameen  .
Salmo	
Sandon _	
Three Forks___	
Slocan City _ ......
Three Forks_	
Cody	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc __
Silver-lead-zinc __.
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-Iead-zinc _
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Cody -   _
Kimberley ■   	
Sandon _ _ _	
North Star—                   	
No. One _   - 	
Payne , - _    	
Sandon _	
Greenwood ,	
Alamo  	
Rambler " 	
Cody	
Sandon  	
Queen Bess  _ 	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc ■
Silver-Iead-zinc _ -
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-Iead-zinc - .
Silver-lead-zinc —
Silver-lead-zinc	
Ruth Mines, Ltd- ,*. 	
Spokane-Trinket. _—     —_ 	
Ainsworth 	
Silverton 	
Retallack   _ _
Kaslo	
Utica _ 	
Wallace Mines, Ltd. (Sally)-..- _	
Whitewater _ __ _	
Retallack-   	
Total, silver-lead-zinc mines 	
£137,691,507
* Earnings of several company mines, and customs smelter at Trail.
t These two properties were amalgamated as Silversmith Mines, Limited, in August, 1939. STATISTICS.
A 35
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1944—Continued.
Copper Mines.
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
Britannia M. & S. Co.* !	
Copper	
Copper	
Copper. _
Copper	
Copper	
Copper	
Copper 	
$11,511,449
Greenwood 	
Texada Island 	
Copper Mountain	
Texada Island 	
Nelson 	
615,399
Cornell  _                                	
8,500
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co.f	
26,568,261
175,000
Hall Mines..             	
233,280
261,470
$39,373,359
* Britannia Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, is a subsidiary of the Howe Sound Company, which is the
holding company for Britannia and other mines in Mexico and the State of Washington. Dividends paid by the
Howe Sound Company, therefore, cannot he credited to British Columbia. Dividends in the above table for Britannia
have been paid by that company, none being paid subsequent to 1930, until 1939. In making comparison with
yearly totals the amounts shown as paid by the Howe Sound Company have been deducted for the years shown, so
the total in the annual report concerned will show the higher figure.
t The Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power Company dividends as set out in the above table in the
Minister of Mines Annual Report for 1942 were incorrect, and the correct total is as above. The figure now includes
all dividends, capital distributions, and interim liquidating payments, the latter being $4,500,000, paid prior to
reorganization. Dividends commenced in 1904 and cover all company activities in British Columbia to date, the
present operations being conducted at Allenby, Copper Mountain, and a coal mine near Princeton.
The term " Miscellaneous " noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under, together
with payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance
given by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject.
Coal.
Wellington Collieries, Ltd., Nanaimo     $16,000,000
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd., Fernie       13,240,726
Total     $29,240,726
Miscellaneous, Structural, and Placer Gold.
Various      $2,758,104
Total
Aggregate of all Classes.
Lode-gold mining   $67,984,059
Silver-lead-zinc mining and smelting—  137,691,507
Copper-mining   39,373,359
Coal-mining   29,240,726
Miscellaneous, structural, and placer gold  2,758,104
$277,047,755 A 36 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1944—Continued.
Dividends paid Yearly, 1917-191th, inclusive.
Year. Amount paid. Year. Amount paid.
1917  $3,269,494 1932  $2,786,958
1918  2,704,469 1933  2,471,735
1919  2,494,283 1934  4,745,905
1920  1,870,296 1935  7,386,070
1921  736,629 1936  10,513,705
1922  3,174,756 1937  15,085,293
1923  2,983,570 1938  12,068,875
1924  2,977,276 1939  11,865,698
1925  5,853,419 1940  14,595,530
1926  8,011,137 1941  16,598,110
1927  8,816,681 1942  13,627,104
1928  9,572,536 1943  11,860,159
1929  11,263,118 1944  11,367,732
1930  10,543,500                  •	
1931    4,650,857         Total  $213,894,895
Dividends paid during 1943 and 19H.
1943. 1944.
Beaver Silver Mines, Ltd       *$48,000    	
Bralorne Mines, Ltd       1,496,400 $1,496,400
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd  183,932
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mines, Ltd  53,332    	
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co.
of Canada, Ltd       8,189,569 8,189,604
The Crow's.Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd          186,354 186,354
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd  f413,595
Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and
Power Co., Ltd          202,605 135,070
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd  135,848    	
Highland Bell, Ltd            39,476 13,159
Island Mountain Mines, Ltd            78,804 52,536
Kelowna Exploration, Ltd. (Nickel Plate) __           90,000 150,000
Privateer Mine, Ltd          171,786 49,082
Relief Arlington Mines, Ltd  f45,000    	
Reno Gold Mines, Ltd        fl31,600    	
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd         262,500 225,000
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd           325,000 125,000
Ymir Yankee Girl, Ltd ,        f222,501     _____
Others          181,384 148,000
Totals  $11,860,159    $11,367,732
* Liquidating dividend. f Distribution of capital. STATISTICS.
A 37
TABLE XVIII.—Capital employed, Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity,
and Process Supplies, 1944.
Glass.
Capital
employed.
Salaries
and Wages.
Fuel and
Electricity.
Process
Supplies.
$15,086,582
118,936
5,326,999
1,749,383
849,974
$4,628,285
9,024
310,610
566,594
274,158
$3,190,706
7,305
1,022,233
1,886,601
31,239
Totals, 1944	
t 	
$23,131,874
$5,788,671
$6,138,084
Grand totals, 1943 	
Grand totals, 1942	
Grand totals, 1941	
Grand totals, 1940 _ _	
Grand totals, 1939	
Grand totals, 1938 _	
Grand totals, 1937           	
$140,782,366
140,377,568
141,454,342
139,694,733
135,473,482
153,012,848
145,520,641
142,663,065
143,239,953
$26,051,467
26,913,160
26,050,491
23,391,330
22,357,035
22,765,711
21,349,690
17,887,619
16,753,367
226,651,744
$7,432,585
7,066,109
3,776,747
3,474,721
*3,266,000
3,396,106
3,066.311
2,724,144
2,619,639
♦42,611,033
$6,572,317
6,863,398
7,260,441
6,962,162
6,714,347
6,544,500
6,845,330
Grand totals, 1936 _	
Grand totals, 1935 	
Grand totals, 1935-44	
4,434,501
4,552,730
62,887,810
* Estimated. f Not available for 1944.
Note.—The above figures, compiled from returns on the subject made by companies and individuals, illustrate
the amount of capital employed in the mining industry, the amount of money distributed in salaries and wages,
fuel and electricity, and process supplies   (explosives, chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants, etc.).
Capital employed includes: Present cash value of the land (excluding minerals) ; present value of buildings,
fixtures, machinery, tools, and other equipment; inventory value of materials on hand, ore in process, fuel and
miscellaneous supplies on hand; inventory value of finished products on hand; operating capital (cash, bills and
accounts receivable, prepaid expenses, etc.). A 38
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
TABLE XIX.
-Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode
Minerals, 1901-1944.
Year.
Tonnage.*
No. of
Shipping-
mines.
No. of Mines
shipping
over 100
Tons.
Gross Value of
Lode Minerals
as reported by
Shipper.t
Net Value to
Shipper of
Lode Minerals
produced.?
Gross Value
of Lode
Minerals
produced. §
1901  	
920,416
998,999
1,286,176
1,461,609
1,706,679
1,963,872
1,804,114
2.083,606
2,057,713
2,216,428
1,770,755
2,688,532
2,663,809
2,175,971
2,690,110
3,188,865
2,761,579
2,892,849
2,112,975
2,178,187
1,562,645
1,573,186
2,421,839
3,397,105
3,849,269
4,775,073
5,416,021
6,241,310
6,977,681
6,803,846
5,549,103
4,340,158
4,030,978
5,116,897
4,916,148
4,381,027
6,145,144
7.377,021
7,211.223
7,937,358
7,938,803
6,708,277
5,429,557
•4,763,332
119
124
125
142
146
154
147
108
89
83
80
86
110
98
132
169
193
175
144
121
80
98
77
86
102
138
132
110
106
68
44
75
109
145
177
168
185
211'
217
216
200
126
48
51
78
75
74
76
79
77
72
59
52
50
45
51
58
56
59
81
87
80
74
60
35
33
28
37
40
55
52
49
48
32
22
29
47
69
72
70
113
92
99
92
96
76
32
31
$14,100,282
1902 -	
11,581,153
1903	
12,103,237
1904. r	
12,909,035
1905 	
15,980,164
1906 	
18,484,102
1907  	
17,316,847
1908  	
15,847,411
1909 	
15,451,141
1910.. . --
14,728,731
1911 	
11,454,063
1912 —
17,662,766
1913	
17,190,838
1914...	
15,225,061
1915	
19,992,149
1916 -.-
31,483,014
1917	
26,788,474
1918  	
27,590,278
1919          	
19,750,498
1920	
19,444,365
1921	
12,920,398
1922	
19,227,857
1923	
25,347,092
1924    	
35.538,247
1925
46,200,135
1926 	
$38,558,613
27,750,364
29,070,075
34,713,887
21,977,688
10,513,931
7,075,393
13,976,358
20,243,278
25,407,914
30,051,207
43,952,521
35,278,633
40,709,385
43,610,846
46.681,802
45,199,604
33,293,917
26,449,408
51,508,031
1927 	
44,977,082
1928	
48,281,825
1929 	
51,174,859
1930	
40,915,395
1931	
22,535,573
1932	
1933	
19,700,235
25,007,137
1934	
33,895,930
1935	
40,597,569
1936...
43,666,452
1937   	
1938.    	
$48,616,505
40,222,237
45,125,341
49,945,270
52,354,870
50,494,041
37,234,070
29,327,114
62,912,783
53,877,333
1939	
53,522,098
1940 	
1941 _	
62.848.642
62,216,019
1942   -	
1943     	
55,359,479
46,089.042
1944    -_ 	
39,315,910
Notes.—* Does not include mercury ore, which in 1944 amounted to 106,427 tons,
t Data not collected before 1937.
t Previous to 1937 the shipper reported " Net Value at Shipping Point," no indication being given as
to how the net value was arrived at.    Prom 1937 on the shipper has reported " Gross Value "
from which deduction of freight and treatment gives " Net Value."
§ Gross value as represented by valuing lode metals at yearly average prices. STATISTICS.
A 39
TABLE XX.—Men employed in the Mining Industry of British Columbia,
1901-1944.
Year.
to
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LOOB-MININO.
m
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COAL-MINING.
Structural
Materials.
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1901	
299
415
355
341
425
688
874
1,134
1,122
1,291
1,124
1,371
1.303
1,252
1,004
939
489
212
255
2,736
2,219
1,862
2.143
2,470
2,680
2,704
2,567
2,184
2,472
2.435
2,472
2,773
2,741
2,709
3.St) 7
3,290
2,626
2,513
2,074
1,355
1,510
2,102
2.353
2,298
2,606
2,671
2,707
2,926
2,316
1,463
1,355
1,786
2,796
2,740
2,959
3,603
3,849
3,905
3,923
3,901
2,920
2,394
1,896
1,212
1,126
1,088
1.163
1,240
1.303
1,239
1,127
1,070
1,237
1,159
1.364
1,505
1.433
1,435
2,036
2,198
1,764
1,746
1,605
975
1,239
1,516
1,680
2,840
1,735
1,916
2,469
2,052
1,260
834
900
1,335
1,729
1.497
1,840
1,818
2,266
2,050
2,104
1,823
1,504
1,699
1,825
3,948
3,345
2,750
3,306
3,710
3,983
3,943
3,694
3,254
3,709
3,594
3,837
4,278
4,174
4,144
5,393
5,488
4,390
4,259
3,679
2,330
2,749
3,618
4,033
5,138
4,341
4,587
5,176
4,978
3,576
2,297
2,255
3,121
4,525
4,237
4.799
5,421
6,115
5,955
6,027
5,724
4,424
4,093
3,721
808
854
911
966
832
581
542
531
631
907
720
1,168
919
996
1,048
1,025
960
891
849
2,461
2,842
2,748
2,948
3,197
3,157
2,036
2,436
2,890
2,771
2,678
3,027
3,158
3,187
2,944
3,072
3,555
2,835
2,981
3,041
3,101
3,137
3,278
3,127
3,415
2,862
4,432
4,713
5,903
5,212
5,275
4,950
4,267
3,708
3,694
3,760
3,658
4,145
4,191
4,722
4,712
4,342
3,894
3,828
3.757
3,046
3,814
3,675
3,389
2,957
2,628
2,241
2,050
2,145
2,015
2,286
2,088
2.167
2.175
2,229
1,892
2,240
2,150
931
910
1,127
1,175
1,280
1,390
907
1,641
1,705
1,855
1,661
1,855
1,721
1,465
1.2S3
1,300
1,410
1,769
1,821
2,158
2,103
1,932
1,807
1,524
1,615
1,565
1,579
1,520
1,353
1,256
1,125
980
853
843
826
799
867
874
809
699
494
468
611
689
3.974
4.011
4,264
4,453
4,407
4,805
3,769
6,073
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4,991
5,060
6,170
5,247
5,966
6,349
6,885
6,644
6,149
5,418
5,443
5,322
5,225
5,334
5,028
4,645
4,082
3,688
3,094
2,893
2,971
2,814
3,153
2,962
2,976
2,874
2,723
2,360
2,851
2,839
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
124
122
120
268
170
380
344
7,922
1902 i	
1903	
7,356
7,014
1904	
7,759
1905	
8 117
1906	
8,788
1907	
1908	
7,712
1909	
1910	
9,672
11 467
1911      	
1912	
1914  	
10,949
1915	
1916	
10,453
1917	
1918    ....    	
1919  	
10 225
1920	
1921	
1922	
] 923	
10,028
9,215
9,393
9,767
1924	
1925     	
9,451
10 581
1920	
14,172
14,830
1928  	
15,424
14,032
12,171
10,524
1933 	
269 408
11,369
1934  	
187
270
288
S27
360
754
825
938
369
561
647
422
12,985
13,737
1936	
1937	
14,179
16,129
9001295
652 1 311
16,021
1939	
15,890
827
766
842
673
690
334
413
15,705
1941 	
15,084
1942 	
378 I 202
13,270
1943	
326
351
567
628
12,448
* Tbe average number of wage-earners was obtained by adding the monthly figures for individual companies and
dividing by 12 irrespective of the number of months worked, the average number of wage-earners in the industry is
the sum of these individual averages. A 40
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
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Gold, silver.
Gold, silver.
Gold, silver.
Gold, silver, lead, zinc.
Gold, silver.
Gold, silver, lead, zinc.
Silver, gold, lead, zinc.
Gold, silver, zinc.
Gold, silver, copper.
Gold, silver, copper.
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♦ STATISTICS.
A 41
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f A 42
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
TABLE XXII.—Mining Companies employing an average of Ten or
more Men during 1944.
Shipping Mines.
Name of Mine or Company.
Days
operating.
Mine.       Mill.
Mined.
Milled.
Average
Number of Men.
Mine.
Mill
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd 	
Cariboo G«ld Quartz Mining Co., Ltd..
Island Mountain Mines Co., Ltd 	
Bralorne (Takla Lake)	
Cons. M. & S. Co. (Pinchi Lake).
Highland Bell, Ltd..	
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd—
Kelowna Exploration Co., Ltd	
Copper Mountain (Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co., Ltd.)	
Wartime Metals Corporation (Kootenay Florence)..	
Retallack Mines, Ltd. (Whitewater) 	
Sullivan (Cons. M. & S. Co.)	
Monarch and Kicking Horse (Base Metals, Ltd.)  	
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd..    	
Standard and Mammoth (Western Exploration Co., Ltd.).
Zincton Mines, Ltd. (Lucky Jim)  -	
Bralorne Mines, Ltd  .— —	
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd  _
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co.,
Twin " J " Mines, Ltd _ 	
Ltd...
310
306
366
256
188
304
312
366
322
126
280
308
272
317
365
366
366
308
305
310
366
366
258
188
249
366
325
134
220
299
175
127
365
312
366
312
305
138
68,496
32,833
21,186
10,807
95,620
1,373
40,171
88,491
1,378,541
10,431
39,515
2,143,945
24,866
13,092
38,479
100,588
115,391
16,989
606,717
17,341
68,496
33,041
21,186
10,807
95,620
1,373
42,285
88,491
1,383,296
10,431
39,515
2,141,397
24,995
13,092
100,588
109,751
16,865
606,717
17,341
175
161
60
46
171
30
102
135
289
32
58
1,309
50
42
99
55
204
' 107
415
37
14
14
8
4
17
22
58
162
3
8
309
6
6
29
18
18
8
116
4
Non-shipping Mines.
Privateer Mine, Ltd.   (employed at several other properties
under development)   	 DEPARTMENTAL WORK. A 43
DEPARTMENTAL WORK.
ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH.
The administrative branch is responsible for the administration of the Provincial
mining laws regarding the acquisition of mineral rights; and deals with other Departments of the Provincial Service for the Department or for any Branch.
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-mining Recorders, whose duties
are laid down in the " Mineral Act" and the " Placer-mining Act," administer these
Acts, the "Allied Forces Exemption Act," the "Free Miners' Exemption Act," and
other Acts relating to mining. Mining Recorders, in addition to their own functions,
may also exercise the powers conferred upon Gold Commissioners with regard to mineral claims within the mining division for which they have been appointed. Similar
duties may be performed by Mining Recorders with regard to placer claims but not in
respect to placer-mining leases. Recording of location and of work upon mineral
claims, placer claims, and placer-mining leases as required by the various Acts must be
made at the office of the Mining Recorder for the proper mining division. Information
concerning claims and leases which are held and concerning the ownership and standing
of claims and leases in any division may be obtained from the Mining Recorder for the
mining division in which the property is situate. Sub-mining Recorders, who act as
forwarding agents, are appointed at various places throughout the Province. They are
authorized to accept documents and fees and forward them to the office of the Mining
Recorder for the correct mining division. Officials and their offices in various parts
of the Province are listed in the table on pages 45 and 46.
Copies of the various Acts, upon payment of the prices listed on page 196, can be
obtained from the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner, the King's Printer, Victoria,
the Central Records Office in Vancouver, or from the offices of the Gold Commissioners
throughout the Province.
New Filing System.
A new card-index system put into operation on January 1st, 1945, provides a uniform system of entering and filing records at the offices of the Gold Commissioners and
Mining Recorders. Each Mining Recorder has been supplied with a small cabinet
designed to house cards which will provide a complete history of every mineral claim
and placer-mining lease in good standing in his mining division at September 1st, 1944,
and subsequently Mining Recorders will check their records each month and transfer
from the active file to an inactive file the cards of those claims and leases which have
forfeited; in this way, maintaining a constantly active file. The cards will be typed
in duplicate and the originals forwarded semi-monthly to the Central Records Office,
305 Federal Building, Vancouver, B.C.
In addition to the obvious benefits to the Department the new system will place
Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders in a position to give immediate replies to
inquiries regarding the status and ownership (as represented by documents recorded
and filed), etc., of any properties in their mining division. Information will be readily
available whether the inquiry is by way of the owner's name, claim name, placer-mining
lease number, or metal identification tag number.
Central Records Office.
The Central Records office provides information as to the ownership of claims
staked, placer-mining leases issued, certificates of work and bills of sale recorded, and
leases of reverted Crown-granted mineral claims. The approximate positions of mineral claims and placer-mining leases are shown on a series of reference maps from
information supplied by the locators.   The information outlined, so far as possible, is A 44
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
brought up to date on receipt of semi-monthly returns from all Mining Recorders.    The
maps and records may be inspected by any one who calls at the office in business hours.
Amalgamation of Mining Divisions.
(Particulars of Mining Divisions amalgamated since 1939.)
Date.
Mining Divisions amalgamated.
New Name.
Mining Recorder's
Office.
July      2, 1939
Sept.   18, 1939
Nov.   20, 1939
Slocan City and Slocan-	
Queen Charlotte and Skeena	
Aug.     1, 1940
Augr.     5, 1940
Skeena	
Prince Rupert.
Oct.     15, 1942
Arrow Lake and Slocan    .
Oct.     15, 1942
Golden     	
Nov.   30, 1942
Nanaimo	
Alberni	
Dec.      1, 1942
Gold Purchasing.
Late in 1935 the Department of Finance, co-operating with the Department of
Mines, undertook to purchase small lots of placer gold under 2 oz. in weight from the
individual placer-miner. The Gold Commissioners throughout the Province are paying
a cash price of $29 per ounce for clean placer gold and are purchasing dirty placer gold
and amalgam on a deferred-payment basis. Purchases made under this arrangement
are as follows:—
Year.
No. of Lots.
Paid.
Paid per Oz.
1936-	
1,470
1,657
2,397
2,322
1,336
631
229
93
59
$50,000
52,250
72,000
60,000
31,600
16,825
8,068
2,705
1,196
$28.00
1937           	
28.00
1938	
28.00
1939 _	
29.00
29.00
1941	
29.00
1942  :	
29.00
1943 :	
29.00
1944   -	
29 00
Totals	
10,194
$294,644
This purchasing scheme was established during the depression years to give the
individual miner the best possible price for his gold, and this was realized in that the
total price paid has been almost exactly the same as the receipts from the Royal
Canadian Mint. DEPARTMENTAL WORK.
A 45
List of Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-mining Recorders
in the Province.
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
Atlin  _
Sub-office	
Sub-office	
Sub-office    	
Atlin  .
G. H. Hallett-	
G. H. Hallett	
A. E. Roddis.
Mrs. F. Muncaster.
J. W. Stewart.
J. R. MacDonald.
M. S. Morrell.
John Brown.
Mrs. M. B. McLeod.
R. A. Farrell.
J. W. Stewart.
M. S. Morrell.
L. G. Skinner.
T. C. Brunton.
A. Fisher.
Oscar Olander.
Percy Gadsden.
G. H. Hill.
W. F. C. Trant.                                                   «
Dr. D. McColl.
Mrs. M. V. Leake.
D. H. Bruce.
W. F. C. Trant.
Mrs. M. McDougal.
Norman Henry.
W. B. Steele.
T. J. Thorp.
Geo. Milburn.
Percy Gadsden.
Mrs. M. B. McLeod.
T. C. Brunton.
Norman Earl
LePoidevin.
Geo. Ogsdon.
W. A. A. West.
John Brown.
J. L. Bethurem.
Wm. R. Henry.
W. E. Horwill.
L. G, Skinner.
Mrs. M. B. McLeod.
G. Milburn.
Mrs. M. McDougal.
Mrs. T. B. McLean.
E. C. Lunn.
Geo. Milburn.
J. Blezard.
J. E. Mclntyre.
E. C. Lunn.
H. W. Speed.
W. E. McLean.
A. B. Campbell.
W. Rae.
Miss J. Foster.
W. Haylmore.
G. M. Fennell.
H. Finley.
A. P. Suckling.
Squaw Creek	
Sub-office	
A. E. Roddis 	
Telegraph Creek —-	
A. E. Roddis	
Sub-office 	
Sub-office — 	
Fort St. John __„.
Dease Lake Townsite	
Sub-office	
Sub-office.	
N. A. Watt„ -	
Pouce Coupe ■
Prince Rupert	
N. A. Watt	
Sub-office . 	
Sub-office.- 	
Sub-office  --
Sub-office.._	
Sub-office	
Sub-office	
Sub-office — .,
Sub-office 	
Portland Canal	
Sub-office 	
Omineca _  - -
Sub-office	
Sub-office --_ 	
Sub-office 	
Sub-office	
Terrace - 	
Stewart 	
Rosswood 	
Kimsquit via Ocean Falls
Bella Coola ,
Queen Charlotte _	
A. Fisher	
N. A. Watt (at Prince
Rupert)
H. A. Bryant 	
H. A. Bryant	
Bella Coola 	
Fort St. James 	
Telkwa
Sub-office	
Sub-office   ,.,	
Sub-office	
Sub-office 	
Sub-office — 	
Sub-office	
Sub-office 	
Sub-office	
Sub-office — 	
Sub-office — -
Sub-office	
Sub-office — 	
Peace River.	
Sub-office .—	
Sub-office— —	
Sub-office -	
Cariboo. _  -
Sub-office 	
Sub-office -	
Sub-office 	
Sub-office  —
Quesnel - -	
Sub-office 	
Sub-office -	
Sub-office	
Sub-office  —
Sub-office	
Prince George  	
Kimsquit via Ocean Falls
Fort St. John	
Hazelton — .	
Usk
Doreen	
Pouce Coupe 	
M. S. Morrell 	
M. S. Morrell 	
Prince George 	
Barkerville 	
W. E. McLean -
Miss J. Foster
(Deputy)
Miss J. Foster
(Deputy)
Likely , _ -	
Barkerville „ , 	
Clinton    	
R. J. A. Dorrell  ,
R. J. A. Dorrell
D. Dalgleish	
Sub-office -	
Sub-office	
Kamloops 	
Sub-office	
Sub-office.     , -
Haylmore  	
D. Dalgleisi	 A 46
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
List of Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-mining Recorders
in the Province—Continued.
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
Ashcroft 	
D. Dalgleish (Kamloops)
W. F. Knowlton	
J. Blakiston-Gray.
D. Dalgleish (Kamloops)
Chas. Nichols	
E. F. Little — 	
R. G. Couper	
Chas. Nichols	
E. F. Little	
L. A. Dodd	
Similkameen-—	
Princeton	
Greenwood - 	
Greenwood	
Beaverdell	
L. A. Dodd	
Mrs. J. J. Clarke.
W. H. Laird.
Osoyoos _ - —-
Penticton  	
W. R. Dewdney	
W. R. Dewdney	
Oliver	
Golden	
Windermere.--	
C ranbro ok 	
W. H. Laird.
A. W. Anderson	
A. W. Anderson	
W. G. Taylor	
C. MacDonald	
W. G. Taylor	
W. M. H. Dunn
K. D. McRae.
Ainsworth 	
Kaslo l._	
A. Robb.
New Denver 	
C. MacDonald (Kaslo)
F. Broughton	
S. Hamilton  .
Creston 	
J. S. Clark.
Revels toke 	
Revelstoke 	
W. G. Fleming 	
W. G. Fleming (Revelstoke)
E  L. Hedley
W. G. Fleming	
C. A. McEIroy
Rossland	
E. L. Hedley	
W. H. Cochrane   	
W. H. Cochrane	
Alert Bay 	
Vananda —-	
H. J. Bull.
Zeballos -
Alberni 	
	
J. H   Byrne and H   R
Burdon.
Albern i	
Tofino  	
J. H. Byrne. 	
W. Armitage.
P. J. Mulcahy	
A. B. Gray	
R. H. McCrimmon
(Deputy)
J. F. Macdonald —
Miss G. Wrigley.
Chilliwack- ~
Lytton  - 	
C. N. Tingle.
Sub-office — --.
J. Blakiston-Gray.
Vancouver- -	
Vancouver	
J. Egdell (Deputy)
Miss J. Burnett
(Deputy)
Sub-office -   	
G. H. Beley    _	
G. H. Beley 	
Sub-office 	
W. Haylmore. DEPARTMENTAL WORK.
A 47
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fc- A 48
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
CHEMICAL LABORATORIES AND SAMPLING PLANT.
The Department has its principal laboratory at Victoria, and also a sampling plant
and an assay office at Prince Rupert. The Victoria laboratory has on its permanent
staff five analysts and technicians, as well as the Chief Analyst and Assayer. The
Assayer at Prince Rupert is also in charge of the. sampling plant there.
During the year 1944 the chemical laboratory in Victoria issued reports on 1,868
samples and specimens. A laboratory examination of a sample generally consists of
the following: (1) A mineralogical determination, by a mineralogist, of visible minerals and a classification of the type of rock; (2) a spectrographic analysis to determine
if any base metals are present in interesting percentages; (3) assays for precious
metals, and base metals shown to be present in interesting percentages by the spectrographic analysis. The laboratory reports were distributed in the following manner
amongst bona-fi.de prospectors, bona-fide prospectors who are grantees under the "Prospectors' Grub-stake Act," Departmental Engineers, and the Provincial Government
Sampling Plant at Prince Rupert:—
Samples and
Specimens.
Mineralogical
Determinations.
Spectrographic
Analyses.
Assays.
982
606
274
6
584
B91
10
6
707
558
41
4
1,551
Bona-fide prospectors (grantees)	
1,025
996
Sampling plant  —	
2
Totals 	
1,868
1,191
1,310
3,574
The laboratory instituted four new aids to the bona-fide prospector. Serially
numbered sample or specimen tags are now issued, stapled together in booklets of ten
sheets with a printed cover giving directions for their use. Each sheet is printed on
special strong water-proof paper. The Department now supplies shipping-tags, with
the proper address printed on them, for shipping samples or specimens to the laboratory. Bona-fide prospectors may obtain these booklets and shipping-tags free of charge
from any Gold Commissioner, Mining Recorder, or Sub-mining Recorder. Also, on
request made to this laboratory, a limited number of sample sacks will be loaned free
of charge. These services proved very popular and will be continued. Finally, the
laboratory collaborated with other officers of the Department in presenting Bulletin No.
18. The laboratory contribution to this bulletin consisted of an illustrated section
describing, in a non-technical manner, how samples are assayed here.
Proximate analyses and heat value determinations were made on twenty-one coal
samples. Of these, seven were for the Department of Mines and fourteen were for the
Department of Public Works.
For the Attorney-General's Department thirty-five cases of a chemico-legal nature
were undertaken, involving in all a study of 175 exhibits. The volume of work done is
more than twice that done in 1943 and there are indications that it will grow to a still
larger proportion in 1945. The analyses and examinations were of a very diversified
and time-consuming nature. They included toxicological analyses of pathological specimens, and of foods suspected of being contaminated with poison; examination of fibres
in a breaking and entering case; analyses of powder residues left after explosions;
analyses of powder and of dynamite; analysis of putty in a breaking and entering case;
comparisons of safe-packing, soap, and solder in a breaking and entering case; identification of several unknown liquids and powders; determination of per cent, grain
alcohol in liquids and wines; comparison of shell wadding and fired lead pellets with
wadding and pellets in unfired shells; and extensive analyses of sea water. Quantitative spectrographic analyses for traces of metals have played an important part in
several of the investigations.
Twelve analyses of soils and other raw materials for the Department of Agriculture and two analyses for the mineral content of water submitted by the Provincial
Board of Health completed the analytical work of the laboratory for the year. DEPARTMENTAL WORK.
A 49
Forty-one lots of placer gold amounting to 259.278 oz., representing purchases
from individual placer-miners, were received from Gold Commissioners.
Provincial Government examinations for certificates of competency and licence to
practise assaying in British Columbia were held in May and December. One candidate
sat in May and was granted a supplemental examination, which he passed in December.
He has been granted a licence to practise. One other candidate sat for the examination
in December but failed.
Prince Rupert Sampling Plant and Assay Office.*
During 1944 shipments to the sampling plant continued at about the same rate as
in 1943, but a very considerable increase in the number of small samples for assay was
noted. All assaying for tonnage lots, test lots, and assay samples was carried out in
the properly equipped laboratory now operated in conjunction with the sampling plant.
In addition, a considerable amount of assaying was done for the Victoria laboratory,
to help relieve the congestion of work there.
Many prospectors were interviewed and prospectors' identification cards issued to
a number of applicants.
In 1944 expenditure on account of ore purchased was $853.34; no ore was sold to
smelters. At the end of the year ore on hand, including carry-over from 1943, had an
estimated value of $1,381.64. Since the sampling plant commenced operations in
August, 1937, a total of 769 lots have been handled through the plant and a total of
$50,996.21 has been paid out to the various shippers. From the ore purchased the
sampling plant has realized $50,049.81, which, with the estimated value of ore on hand,
$1,381.64, amounts to $51,431.45. This total, compared with $50,996.21 paid to the
producers of the ore, indicates the care exercised in sampling the ore, thus giving
correct guidance to the small operators shipping to the sampling plant.
The principal statistics for tonnage lots, test lots, and samples for assay for each
year beginning with 1938, and the details for tonnage and test lots received in 1944,
are shown in the following tables:—
Prince Rupert Sampling Plant and Assay Office.
Ore Receipts.
Year.
No. of
Tonnage
Lots.
No. of
Properties.
Bulk
Test
Lots.
No. of
Properties.
Assay
Lots.
No. of
Properties.
Weights of
Shipments.
1938  	
1939       .. _	
24
43
40
25
3
1
2
12
20
16
14
2
1
1
90
101
117
81
37
2
4
35
40
32
36
13
2
3
47
27
27
21
16
17
70
24
13
16   .
10
12
12
19
104.261
217.672
171.345
1941 -
119.324
1942                 - -	
30.615
1943	
1944                  	
1.666
3.496
* Letters, tonnage lots, or samples should be addressed to:   The Manager, Department of Mines Assay Office
and Sampling Plant, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Sampling Plant.
Details of Tonnage Lots received, I9kk*
Lot
No.
Property.
Shipper.
Locality.
Dry
Tons.
Au.
Ag.
1
Cu.   1   Pb.
1
Zn.
WOi.
748
767
Tide Lake Gold	
Tide Lake Gold	
Phillips, Al
Phillips, Al -
Stewart..	
Stewart -	
0.5555
1.6040
Oz. per
Ton.
10.68
9.69
Oz. per
Ton.
22.6
41.1
Per
Cent.
Nil
Nil
Per
Cent.
Per
Cent.
19.5
22.8
Per
Cent. 4 50
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Sampling Plant—Continued.
Test Lots.
Lot
No.
Property.
Shipper.
Locality.
Dry
Tons.
Au.
Ag.
Cu.
Pb.
Zn.
W03.
697-T
765-T
768-T...
Troy Group.	
Nicholson Creek
Mining Corporation
McDonald, Neil
W. D. Galbraith
Davis, G	
Davis, G 	
Stewart	
Usk	
McDame Creek.
McDame Creek.
0.1440
1.0520
0.0228
0.1180
Oz. per
Ton.
0.02
1.40
3.63
1.01
Oz. per
Ton.
8.9
26.6
0.6
0.3
Per
Cent.
13.9
Per
Cent.
Per
Cent.
Per
Cent.
1.91
769-T	
INSPECTION BRANCH.
The full reports of the Chief Inspector and of the Inspectors of Mines, dealing
with the coal-mining industry, inspection of coal mines, and inspection of metalliferous
mines, begin on page 85. The information in the Progress Notes regarding metalliferous, industrial mineral, etc., deposits is largely supplied by the Inspection Branch.
MINERALOGICAL BRANCH.
Joseph T. Mandy, stationed in Vancouver, was occupied principally in attending to
requests for information, at the Vancouver Office.
B. T. O'Grady was occupied largely in organizing and directing the grub-stake
programme, and in dealing with applications for assistance re mining roads and trails;
he continues to assist the Superintendent of Brokers in administering the " Securities Act."
M. S. Hedley made a detailed geological study of the Lucky Jim and Whitewater
properties and of the intervening ground in the Slocan-Ainsworth area.
J. S. Stevenson completed a detailed examination of the Mount Sicker copper-zinc
property, made a detailed study of the Little Billie and adjoining ground in the copper-
gold area on Texada Island, and resumed detailed mapping in the Zeballos area.
S. S. Holland was occupied largely in supervising prospectors in receipt of assistance under the " Prospectors' Grub-stake Act." He also made preliminary studies in
the Cariboo lode-gold area and in the Whitesail Lake area.
K. DeP. Watson was occupied throughout the field season supervising prospectors
receiving assistance under the " Prospectors' Grub-stake Act."
W. H. Mathews spent the early part of the season studying limestone deposits on
Texada Island, and the latter part studying coal occurrences on Carbon Creek in the
Peace River area.
Museums.
The Department has a large exhibit of ores and minerals in the museum on
Superior Street, Victoria; smaller collections are displayed in the joint office, 305
Federal Building, Vancouver, and in the offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson
and Prince Rupert.
Information regarding collections of specimens of rocks and minerals available to
prospectors and schools in British Columbia will be found on page 181.
Grub-staking Prospectors.
The " War-time Prospectors' Grub-stake Act," passed at the 1943 session of the
Legislature, authorized the provision of grub-stakes as a means of assisting prospectors
in the search for strategic minerals required in the prosecution of the war. Amendments made to the 1943 Act by the Legislature in March, 1944, included striking out
the term " war-time " and the definition of " war minerals." Grub-stakes were limited
under the 1943 Act to $300 per man; the amended Act provided for an additional
allowance of up to $200 per man for travelling expenses if required. DEPARTMENTAL WORK. A 51
For the 1943 season (fiscal year 1943-44) $25,000 was appropriated and for each
of the 1944 and 1945 seasons appropriations of $50,000 were made. Expenditures for
the 1943 season were approximately $18,500 and for the 1944 season $27,215.
In 1943 ninety prospectors were granted grub-stakes. Search for deposits of
strategic minerals was stressed; the prospectors were urged also to be on the lookout
for deposits of ores of the precious or base metals which are the principal products of
the metal-mining industry of the Province. In addition to deposits of the more usual
type, deposits of scheelite and other strategic minerals were found, but by the end of
the field season it was apparent that the war demand for such minerals would be met
from properties already in production or fully developed. Gold-bearing deposits on
two properties staked by prospectors grub-staked in 1943 have already been found to
be of more than usual interest. Gold ore will probably be mined in 1945 from the
Good Hope property, near Hedley. The Harrison property, in Tweedsmuir Park
(Whitesail Lake area), staked to cover a scheelite-bearing zone, has been found to
contain gold-bearing veins. This discovery attracted much attention to that area
in 1944.
In 1944, 105 grub-stakes were granted; of these, thirteen were reduced or cancelled. Attention was directed principally to the search for lode-gold deposits. It is
reported that several claims staked by grub-staked prospectors in 1944 have been
optioned and that some of the discoveries appear promising, but it is still too early to
say more definitely what merit they possess.
In 1943 the prospectors grub-staked sent 773 samples and specimens to the Department's laboratories. In 1944 the number sent in was 606. The samples and specimens
are examined by an engineer, following which most of them are the subject of further
work involving one or more of the following: mineralogical determination, spectrographic analysis, assaying.
In 1943 prospectors in receipt of grub-stakes recorded eighty-seven mineral claims.
In 1944, 135 mineral claims were recorded.
Organizing work in the grub-stake programme has been in the hands of B. T.
O'Grady. In 1943 he was assisted by several Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders, who acted as grantors, and by the Inspectors of Mines stationed at Prince Rupert,
Lillooet, Princeton, and Nelson, who, in addition to acting as grantors, visited the prospectors in the field, so far as possible. In 1944 the four Inspectors assisted Mr.
O'Grady as grantors, J. T. Mandy interviewed applicants in Vancouver, and several
Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders interviewed applicants at other points.
Two engineers on the permanent staff of the Mineralogical Branch, and a third engineer
engaged for the summer months, devoted their time for the field season to visiting
grub-staked prospectors in the field to see what was being attempted, the progress being
made, and to give information and advice to the prospectors.
The grub-stake programme has two principal objectives; one is to assist in the
discovery of mineral deposits, the other is to assist in the rehabilitation of men released
from the armed services. To date the first objective alone has been possible and the
results obtained have been satisfactory in that two gold deposits of some promise can
be credited to the programme. The usefulness of the programme in providing a
healthful invigorating activity and thereby assisting in rehabilitation of men released
from the armed services has yet to be tested, as so far industry has absorbed the
physically able men who have been released.
JOINT OFFICES OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
AND OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND RESOURCES, CANADA.
The Provincial Department's Engineer, the Gold Commissioner and Mining Recorder for the Vancouver Mining Division, and the officers of the Dominion Geological
Survey now occupy one suite of offices. All official information relating to mining is
now available to the public in the one suite of offices at 305 Federal Building, Vancouver. A 52 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
The services offered to the public include technical information on mining, the
identification of mineral specimens, distribution of Dominion and Provincial mining
publications, a reference library, a display of rocks and minerals, and a central
records office. PUBLICATIONS.
Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines, bulletins, and other publications of the
Department, with prices charged for them, are listed on page 179.
Publications may be obtained from the offices of the Department in Victoria and
elsewhere in the Province. They are also available for reference use in the Department's library (Mineralogical Branch) at Victoria, in the joint office, 305 Federal
Building, Vancouver, in the offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince
Rupert, as well as in public libraries listed on page 182.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA.
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered
Confederation, geological investigations and mapping in the Province were to be
carried on by the Geological Survey of Canada; this agreement has been fully adhered
to by the Dominion of Canada and has proved of great benefit to the mining industry
of the Province. Each year several geological parties are kept in the field; and in the
many excellent reports and maps covering British Columbia, issued by the Geological
Survey of Canada, a vast amount of information has been made available to prospectors
and mining engineers.
For some years a branch office of the Geological Survey has been maintained in
Vancouver, where copies of maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained.
The officer in charge of the British Columbia office is W. E. Cockfield, and the address
is 305 Federal Building, Vancouver, B.C.
In 1936 a reorganization of several departments in the Federal Government was
effected, and the Department of Mines and Resources created. One of the main
branches of this Department is that of Mines and Geology, with sub-branches known
as the Bureau of Geology and Topography and the Bureau of Mines. The Geological
Survey of Canada and the Topographical Survey are now a part of the Bureau of
Geology and Topography. During the 1944 season the Bureau of Geology and Topography had the following officers employed on field-work in British Columbia:—
Geological Parties.
A. M. Floyd commenced topographical mapping of the Bennett area; longitude
134°-136°; latitude 59a-60°. Ground photography combined with the trimetrogon
aerial photography.
C. S. Lord continued geological mapping in the McConnell Creek area; longitude
126°-127°; latitude 56°-57°.
J. E. Armstrong completed the geological mapping of the Takla area; longitude
125°-126°; latitude 55°-56°.
J. E. Armstrong and J. B. Thurber completed the geological mapping of the
Manson Creek area; longitude 124°-125°; latitude 55°-56°.
H. M. A. Rice completed the geological mapping of the Princeton area; longitude
120°-121°; latitude 49°-50°.
A. F. Buckham continued a study of the coal-bearing rocks in the Nanaimo and
Cumberland areas, Vancouver Island.
W. E. Cockfield conducted several brief geological investigations in south-western
British Columbia, in connection with engineering projects and deposits of strategic
minerals.
F. H. McLearn made investigations of early Mesozoic stratigraphy in the Peace
River district. PROGRESS NOTES. A 53
PROGRESS NOTES.
The Progress Notes on metal-mining, quarrying, etc., are compiled from information supplied by the Inspectors of Mines and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics,
through the courtesy of the property-owners and from information obtained by the
officers of the Mineralogical Branch in the course of their field-work. The Registrar of
Companies and Superintendent of Brokers have also supplied information through their
respective offices.
The Notes are grouped in types of mineral deposits (Lode Gold, Limestone, etc.)
in named areas. The numbers in parentheses following the name of a property refer
to the latitude and longitude of the south-eastern corner of the one-degree quadrilateral
in which the property is situated and the letters refer to the particular quarter of the
quadrilateral.
LODE-GOLD DEPOSITS.
PORTLAND CANAL AREA.
Salmon River.
(56° 130° S.E.)    D. L. Coulter, General Manager;  J. G. Pearcey, Mine
Silbak Premier   Superintendent.    Capital: 3,000,000 shares, $1 par; issued, 2,500,000.
Mines, Ltd.     The property is in the Salmon River valley, about 14 miles from
Stewart.
The mine was worked 310 days and produced 68,496 tons of ore.    The production
has been greatly reduced because of shortage of labour, only 189 men being employed.
Operations have been confined mainly to 9a and 9b stopes between No. 4 and No. 6
levels.    Some ore from these stopes is from Premier Border.
Tide Lake.
(56° 130° S.E.)    Formerly owned by the late Mrs. Campbell, Hyder,
East Group.      Alaska.    The group comprises eight claims which lie about 5 miles
north of the Salmon Gold group, on Summit Lake.    A. Phillip and two
other men started sinking a small shaft on a high-grade vein from V2 inch to 8 inches
wide and were down about 30 feet when work was abandoned for the winter.
C. E. Barker prospected on the east side of Summit Lake, opposite Salmon Gold.
He did some open-cutting and got gold and silver values.
H. Melville and E. G. Langille, of Premier, prospected on some claims they staked
north of Salmon Gold.    They did about 80 feet of open-cutting and located two veins.
STIKINE MINING DIVISION.
McDame Creek.
(59° 129° S.W.)    Davies and Hope have five claims on McDame Creek.
Norah Claim.    A vein from 20 to 30 inches wide has been traced for 200 feet on the
Norah claim.   Some cutting was done on the vein and 10 tons of ore,
taken out and put through a small amalgamation plant, yielded 25 oz. of gold. A 54 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
CARIBOO AREA.
Wells.
(53° 121° S.W.) Capital: 2,000,000 shares, $1 par; issued, 1,333,309.
Cariboo Gold Because of the shortage of labour, particularly of miners, the output
Quartz Mining   was reduced and the company operated at a loss during 1944.    The
Co., Ltd.       labour situation was at its worst in July when there were only about
seventy men employed underground.    By January, 1945, this number
had increased to 116.    The surface crew remained more or less constant and numbered
about seventy, inclusive of staff.    The average number of men employed during 1944
was 175.
Development-work was again restricted to that necessary for ventilation, and
consisted of 14 feet of drifting, 11 feet of crosscutting, and 376 feet of raising. No
diamond-drilling has been done since July, 1942. It is estimated that stoping operations produced 32,359 dry tons of ore and 4,449 dry tons of waste. The tonnage milled
was 33,041 or slightly more than that broken. This yielded 13,589 oz. of gold and 1,057
oz. of silver. Again the broken ore came from all parts of the mine, with the exception
of the Butts and B.C. zones.
Because of the difficulty in obtaining adequate supplies of wood for the heating
plant, coal-grates were installed and a coal-bunker of about 120 tons capacity was built.
It has proved, however, to be just about as difficult to obtain sufficient coal of a satisfactory grade, at a reasonable price, as it was to get wood.
(53°  121°  S.W.)    Capital:   1,100,000 shares, 50 cents par;   issued,
Island Mountain 1,050,716.    The prolonged shortage of experienced machine-men and
Mines Co., Ltd.   timbermen is now affecting the condition of this company's mine at
Wells.    Rotting of timber is proceeding apace and the ore is not coming from the stopes as fast as it should, with the result that more timber replacement
is required than would normally be the case.    Considering the size of the present crew
a comparatively large amount of maintenance and repair work was accomplished, but
much still remains to be done and the men to do it are not available.
Also because of the shortage of labour, development was again curtailed drastically,
there being only 350 feet of drifting and crosscutting and 197 feet of raising, all necessary for the proper carrying-out of the stoping operations. A well-planned diamond-
drilling programme involved 4,776 feet of drilling from which several interesting intersections in replacement ore were obtained. This development-work was distributed
throughout the mine.
Work done in mining ore-bodies has revealed the presence of ore about equal in
quantity to that mined. At the end of 1944 ore reserves are about the same as a year
ago, and are estimated by the company at 68,700 tons. Ore mined and milled totalled
21,186 tons, or an average of 57.89 tons per day. This yielded 9,441 oz. of gold and
1,132 oz. of silver. The crew averaged sixty-eight for the entire operation. Corresponding averages for 1943 are 62 tons per day and sixty-two employees.
There were no additions or alterations to the plant.
BRIDGE RIVER AREA.
(50° 122° N.W.)    Capital: 2,500,000 shares, $1 par; issued, 1,751,750.
Pioneer Gold     Development during 1944 has added materially to the unbroken reserves
Mines of B.C.,   of this mine.    This development-work consisted of 2,106 feet of drift-
Ltd- ing, 122 feet of crosscutting, 194 feet of raising, and 3,016 feet of
diamond-drilling.    The greater part of this work was done on the
" 27 " vein as follows: On the 1,900 level, 362 feet; on the 2,000 level, 295 feet; on the
2,100 level, 263 feet; on the 2,500 level, 922 feet. PROGRESS NOTES. - A 55
The mine produced 19,989 tons, 5,935 of which came from development ore.
A total of 16,865 tons of ore was milled, yielding 9,112 oz. of gold and 1,527 oz. of silver.
The total crew increased from eighty-four on January 1st, 1943, to 104 on January 1st,
1945. The respective underground figures were thirty-four and forty-three. The
average number of men employed was 115.
Because of the enforced inactivity brought about in certain parts of the mine by
the labour shortage, timber decay was very marked, and a comparatively large percentage of the small crew was required for maintenance and repair work underground. On
the surface a new treated wooden head-frame was erected at No. 3 Shaft collar during
the summer.
Some work was also done at the old Taylor tunnel on the Eagle fraction. This was
cleaned out and is now being retimbered.
(50°  122°  N.W.)    Capital:   1,250,000 shares, no par value;   issued,
Bralorne Mines,  1,247,000.    M. M. O'Brien was appointed Managing Director during
Ltd. 1944.    Development footage showed a slight increase over the 1943
total.    The figures for 1944 are:   Drifts and crosscuts (5 by 7 feet),
5,435 feet;  raises, 939 feet;  diamond-drilling, 4,862 feet.
Drilling on the 1,400 level for the " E " block disclosed a 14-foot vein of very good
ore. Later development of this ore-shoot verified the drill results. Drifting on the
" C " block on the foot-wall of the " 53 " vein opened up a very good shoot of ore.
Development of the western end of the " 51 " vein on the 1,500 level gave promise of
good ore-shoots in this vicinity at depth. Drifting on the " 77b " vein on both 1,800
and 1,900 levels developed some very good ore-bodies. No work was done in either the
King or Coronation mines.
A total of 109,751 tons of ore was milled during 1944, making an average of 300
tons per day. This ore yielded 70,350 oz. of gold and 16,754 oz. of silver. The underground crew, excluding absentees, averaged 116 men daily; the total number of men
employed averaged 222. Ninety per cent, of the milled tonnage was obtained from
shrinkage stopes in the Crown and Empire mines, 2 per cent, was obtained from horizontal cut-and-fill stopes, 2 per cent, from rill stopes, 5 per cent, from stope sills, and
1 per cent, from development-work. At the mill, an all-time record of 97.7 per cent,
recovery was made in August; otherwise, milling operations were normal for 1944.
New surface construction during 1944 consisted of a one-room school to take care
of increased attendance which had overcrowded the regular school. The foundations of
several of the company's houses were replaced. The primary ore-bin was hopper-
bottomed and braced.
(50° 122° N.W.)    Capital: 4,500,000 shares, $1 par; issued, 2,461,131.
Bridge River     This company owns the mine of the same name on the east bank of the
Consolidated     Hurley River, a short distance above its confluence with the Bridge
Mines, Ltd.      River.    E. M. Thompson and associates obtained an option on this
property during 1944 and immediately started to explore its possibilities.    A pilot road, approximately 3,000 feet long, was built by hand from ,the B.R.X.
mill-site to the Forty Thieves vein on the Ural claim.    Diamond-drilling began about
October 1st on the Ural claim, and three holes totalling 1,944 feet were completed by
the end of 1944.    This drilling was done by Boyles Brothers.    H. Hill, the engineer
in charge, has established a mine office at Goldbridge.
(50° 122° N.W.)    Capital:   5,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;   issued,
B.R.X. Mines,   3,850,000.    The B.R.X. mine is on the east bank of the Hurley River,
Ltd. immediately above its confluence with the Bridge River.    Under the
direction of E. R. Shepherd, a diamond-drilling programme was started
June 1st with funds raised from the selling of treasury stock.    The first two holes,
totalling 1,600 feet, were drilled from the end of the main crosscut at the lower camp A 56 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
and were directed towards an albitite body lying to the east of the California vein.
The third hole was collared in the end of the north drift off this crosscut and was drilled
800 feet in a northerly direction towards the Golden Gate workings. It was stopped
after it intersected a fault, because exploration beyond the fault could be done at less
expense and faster from the Golden Gate tunnel. A fourth hole was then drilled 1,100
feet in a south-westerly direction from the main crosscut to intersect the Berta vein
system. Several mineralized intersections were made in these holes, but none was of
commercial grade.
It is proposed to drill the fifth hole from the far end of the easterly crosscut on the
300-adit level. It will be directed steeply downward to intersect the California vein
about 300 feet below the bottom of the present California incline. At the end of 1944
the 300-level adit was being cleaned out and retimbered to give access to this location.
The diamond-drilling is being done by Boyles Brothers and the other work by the
B.R.X. Mines, Limited.
(50° 122° N.W.)    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, no par value;   issued,
Minto Gold Mines, 3,000,000.    Under the direction of H. Hill, consulting engineer on the
Ltd. property from August 1st to December 1st, the company made a series
of open-cuts, seeking the northern extension of the main Minto vein.
As some encouragement was obtained from this work and as deep overburden made
trenching difficult, a diamond-drilling programme was started in  September.    The
Highway Construction Company, 612 Hall Building, Vancouver, obtained the contract
and by the end of November, when operations ceased because of approaching cold
weather, seven shallow holes totalling 1,687 feet had been drilled.
(50°  122°  N.W.)    This group of three claims lies on the northern
Success Group,   boundary  of   the   Bralorne  property.    Two   men,   working   for  two
months, freshened up some old outcrops and put in a number of open-
cuts and trenches, one of the latter being about 100 feet in length.    It is understood
that this work was done for Ventures, Limited.
(50° 122° N.W.)     Capital:   5,000,000 shares;   issued, 3,377,987.    This
Pacific Eastern   company entered into an agreement with the  Quebec Gold  Mining
Golds, Ltd.      Corporation whereby the latter is carrying out exploratory work on
the P.E. property adjoining Pioneer on the south-east.    Because of
restrictions on labour and because of the nature of the overburden, the work to date
has been limited to a preliminary study of the geology and other features of the
property.
TASEKO LAKE AREA.
(51° 123° S.W.)    This group, located about 5 miles south-westerly
Hi Do Group,    from the south end of Taseko Lake, is owned by A. Pelletier, A. J.
Allaire, and associates.    It was optioned during 1944 to the Quebec
Gold Mining Corporation after being examined by the Corporation's engineers.
STUMP LAKE AREA.
(50° 120° S.E.)    Capital: 6,500,000 shares, $1 par;  issued, 4,537,623.
Consolidated     This mine is at Stump Lake, 2 miles west of the Kamloops-Merritt
Nicola Goldfields, Highway and 30 miles from Merritt.    Mining operations were sus-
L,d- pended on December 9th, 1942, and were not resumed during 1944,
but about 5 tons of lead concentrates went to Trail during the year.
A caretaker resides at the property and a mechanic makes occasional visits to do the
necessary pumping of water from the mine. PROGRESS NOTES. A 57
SIMILKAMEEN RIVER AREA.
Hedley.
Company  office,  908  Royal  Bank  Building,  Vancouver,  B.C.;    mine
Hedley Mascot   offiee, Hedley, B.C.;   Vice-President, R. G. McCuish;   V. J. Creeden,
Gold Mines, Ltd. Secretary;   W. S. Charlton, Treasurer;   C. W. S. Tremaine, General
Superintendent;    J.   C.   Moore,   Mine  Foreman.    Capital:    3,000,000
shares, $1 par;   issued, 2,264,130.    This company operated the Mascot mine, 1 mile
north of Hedley, and did some development-work on the Good Hope mineral claim, 4
miles south-east of Hedley.
Hedley Mascot Mine.— (49° 120° S.E.) The concentrator and mine offices are on
the east bank of Hedley Creek and the mine camp is on the side of Nickel Plate Mountain. The ore is transported down the side of the mountain by an aerial tramway,
5,600 feet long, from the ore-bin at the mine to the mill. The two ore-skips have a
capacity of 2 tons each.
The mine has been developed by an 8- by 8-foot adit, 2,500 feet in length, and
generally known as the 4,800-foot level; this is the main haulage-level. All the ore is
passed by haulage and transfer chutes to the 4,800-foot level, the ore is then taken out
of the mine in cars hauled by battery-type electric locomotives. The 4,300-foot level is
the lowest operating level, and ore from this level is taken to the outside and hoisted
up the No. 2 tramway to the 4,800-foot level. Underground transportation is served
by two 3V2-ton Atlas battery locomotives and one Mancha trammer.
The workings of this mine are connected to the workings of the adjacent Nickel
Plate mine at several points underground; these connections are open, thus permitting
of a joint ventilation system. During months when natural ventilation is found to be
inadequate a 4-foot Jeffrey propeller-type fan in the 4,800-foot level is used to assist
the natural air-current.
The main development during 1944 was concentrated on the new level known as
the 3,700-foot level. At the end of the year the level had been driven approximately
600 feet. For the new development a surface tramway, 2,000 feet long, known as
the No. 4 tramway, and having a 38-degree slope, was built from an opening off the
4,800-foot level. A 35-horse-power electric hoist installed durir«rg August is used for
the hoisting and lowering of men and equipment.
The mill resumed operations in March after having been closed since September,
1943, because of man-power shortage. A total of 42,285 dry tons of ore was milled
during 1944, yielding 13,434 oz. of gold, 3,561 oz. of silver, and a quantity of copper
and arsenic.
A safety committee, elected by the miners' union, makes an inspection of the mine
twice a month, after which a safety-first meeting is held. The accident frequency rate
for the company's operations during 1944, including all accidents involving the loss of
one shift or more, was 0.96 per thousand shifts, this being a commendable improvement
over the 1943 rating of 1.51. The labour situation improved and at the end of 1944
fifty-six men were employed underground and seventy-nine on the surface. The average number of men employed during 1944 was 124. In December provision had been
made for aluminium-dust therapy at the mine for underground workmen; however,
because of delay in securing aluminium-dust, the introduction of the treatment was
postponed until early in 1945.
Good Hope Mineral Claim.— (49° 120° S.E.) This claim is situated about 4 miles
south-east of Hedley and was staked in 1943 by W. R. Wheeler. In the showing, gold
associated with bismuth telluride occurs in skarn. In many places the skarn is a
coarse-grained, pyroxene-rich variety containing much " watery " appearing quartz.
The property was operated under option by the Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Limited, A 58 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
who employed a small crew on exploratory work for several months. The ore produced
from this open-cut work was stock-piled at the property and a road was built to the
old Canty ore-bin, above the Mascot mine. It is proposed to transport the broken ore
over the new road early in 1945 to the ore-bin for subsequent treatment at the Mascot
mill.
(49° 120° S.E.)    Company office, 75 West Street, New York, N.Y.;
Nickel Plate     mme office, Hedley, B.C.;   W. A. Kissam, Chairman;   Sewell T. Tyng,
Mine, Kelowna   President; John W. Mercer, Treasurer;  R. Emmel, Secretary;  W. C.
Exploration      Douglass, General Manager; F. A. McGonigle, Manager; E.E.Mason,
Co., Ltd.       Mine Superintendent; Alex. Shaak, Mine Foreman.    This is a private
company  operating  the   Nickel   Plate   mine  at  Hedley.    The  mill,
machine-shops, and general offices are at Hedley.    The mine is at an elevation of 5,600
feet, approximately 4,000 feet above and 4 miles north of Hedley.
The transportation system up the side of Nickel Plate Mountain is in two sections;
a 10,000-foot gravity tramway from the ore-bin at the mill is operated with skips
having a capacity of 6 tons each. The portal of the mine is 1% miles north of the top
of the upper terminal; an electric trolley system hauls the ore from the mine to this
terminal.
The Nickel Plate is connected underground at several points with the Hedley
Mascot, and as the upper outlets of the Nickel Plate are approximately 2,000 feet higher
than the lowest outlet of the Mascot, there is a motive column of great magnitude which
should provide adequate natural ventilation. However, it is found that in the winter
months the air becomes stagnant in the large open stopes of the upper workings.
A ventilation survey was under way at the end of 1944 and it is believed that if the
potential natural power available were fully utilized, adequate natural ventilation could
be provided. If such planning is not successful it will become necessary to introduce
mechanical ventilation.
Development during 1944 consisted of 5,110 feet of drifting, crosscutting, and
raising; 8,094 feet of exploratory diamond-drilling, and 213 feet of diamond-drilling
for blasting. Development in the newly completed Morning incline workings was continued and advance was made on the four levels now established. In addition to the
shaft openings, connecting raises were completed from the lower to the upper levels.
At the mill a fine-ore screening and conveying belt was installed and one 6-cell
No. 15 Denver flotation unit was added. A new tailings pond was built near the
Similkameen River, approximately % mile below the mill.
Regular inspections of the surface and underground are made by the safety first
committee composed of representatives of the miners' union and the management. The
accident rate for the entire operations during 1944, including all accidents involving the
loss of one shift and over, was 0.75 per thousand shifts, this being a very slight
improvement over the 1943 rating. Aluminium-dust therapy was initiated during 1944
being made available to both underground and surface employees. The labour situation showed some improvement and at the end of 1944 eighty-five men were employed
underground and 105 on the surface.    The average number of men employed was 193.
A total of 88,491 tons of ore was mined and milled during 1944, yielding 32,526 oz.
of gold, 2,270 oz. of silver, 90,593 lb. of copper, and some arsenic.
SOUTHERN OKANAGAN.
Fairview.
Fairview Amalgamated Mine.— (49° 119° S.W.) This mine, previously operated by
the Fairview Amalgamated Gold Mines, Limited, was optioned by the Kelowna Exploration Company, Limited, and three men were employed for about six months in exploration-work and in cleaning up some of the old workings. PROGRESS NOTES. A 59
BEAVERDELL AREA.
(49° 119° S.E.)    This property, on Cranberry Creek, about 10 miles
Gold Nugget,    south of Beaverdell, is owned by Tom Henderson and Milton Thompson, of Beaverdell.    The showings consist of a series of flat-lying
narrow quartz veins in diorite, carrying, in places, substantial values in gold.    The
owners, under financial arrangements with the Highland Bell, Limited, did a limited
amount of surface and underground work with hand-steel.
s
CAMP McKINNEY AREA.
(49° 119° S.E.)    This property, at Camp McKinney, was operated
Cariboo-Amelia,  under lease by E. Wanke and 0. Johnson, of Greenwood, for the greater
part of 1944.    The property is equipped with a small complete mining
plant.    Ore was recovered from stope remnants and surface pillars above the old water
level.    A total of 178 tons was mined and shipped to Trail.    This yielded 69 oz. of gold,
111 oz. of silver, and 1,512 lb. of lead.
GREENWOOD-GRAND FORKS AREA.
(49° 118° S.W.)    This property is in an area known as the West
Mabel Jenny    Copper Camp, about 8 miles west of Greenwood.    The showings con-
Claims, sist of a number of well mineralized but very narrow quartz veins.
A small amount of stripping and surface trenching by hand methods
was done by the owner, C. Kerry, of Vancouver, but no ore was shipped.
CASTLEGAR AREA.
(49° 117° S.W.)    This property, on the summit of the ridge between
Gibson Creek    Pass Creek and the Kootenay River, and about 4 miles from Castlegar,
Group. is owned by John Sawchenko, of Trail.    Three large pegmatite dykes
cutting granitic rock of the same type as the Nelson batholith can be
traced along the summit of the ridge for several hundred feet and are opened up in
numerous places by shallow cuts and trenches.    It is reported that assays in gold and
tungsten have been obtained from some samples from the property, but several selected
samples taken by the Inspector failed to disclose anything of interest.    Two men were
employed.
ROSSLAND AREA.
Mount Roberts.
(49°  117°  S.W.)    This property, on Mount Roberts, is owned and
Midnight.       operated by B. A. Lins and associates, of Rossland.    Two men were
engaged in the work when other employment was not available.    The
property is equipped with a small complete mining plant.
(49° 117° S.W.)    This property adjoins the Midnight.    It was oper-
I.X.L. ated continuously throughout 1944 by C. Jorgenson and associates, of
Rossland, under lease.    The property is equipped with a small complete
mining plant.    The average number of men employed was four.    A total of 366 feet
of diamond-drilling was done.    Ore amounting to 46 tons was mined and shipped to
Trail and yielded 145 oz. of gold and 75 oz. of silver.
(49° 117° S.W.)    This property, adjoining the I.X.L., was operated
O.K. for a short time by lessees using hand-steel.    A small amount of work
was done, efforts being directed to reconditioning some of the old
workings near the surface. NELSON AREA.
Toad Mountain.
(49° 117° S.E.)     This property, on Toad Mountain, was purchased by
California.       Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Limited;  company office, 316 Stock Exchange
Building, Vancouver, B.C.    During 1944 work was confined to surveying underground and on the surface.
Eagle Creek.
(49° 117° S.E.)    Company office, 521 Central Building, Seattle, Wash-
Granite-Poorman, ington;  H. R. Smith, of Blewett, B.C., President and Manager.   Capi-
Livingstone      tal:   10,000 shares, no par value;   issued, 7,915.    This company owns
Mining Co.     an(j operates the Granite-Poorman mine on Eagle Creek.    The property is equipped with a complete mining plant and mill, but the latter
was  not  operated  during  1944.    No  development-work  was   done.    Two   men,   on
the average, were employed. In addition, two lessees with hand-steel worked on the
upper parts of the Poorman vein.    Ore was recovered from pillars and stope remnants
from the Poorman and Hardscrabble veins.    A total of 152 tons was mined and shipped
to Trail.    This yielded 105 oz. of gold and 183 oz. of silver.
(49° 117° S.E.) This property, adjoining the Granite-Poorman, is
Venango. controlled by A. Norcross and associates, of Nelson. The mine is
equipped with a small complete mining plant. During 1944 all work
was done under lease by Albert and Dave Norcross. Efforts were directed to development on a new vein about 140 feet west of the original Venango vein. About 100 feet
of drifting on this vein opened up a shoot of commercial ore about 50 feet long and
14 inches wide. A second adit, 70 feet lower, measured on the dip of the vein, was
driven on a vein averaging about 1 foot in width, for 95 feet. At that point it was
45 feet short of reaching the projection of the ore-shoot in the upper level. No ore
was shipped during 1944.
Forty-nine Creek.
(49° 117° S.E.) This property was located by George Gormley and
Miracle Group. Fred Solveoff, of Nelson. About 30 feet of drifting was done on a
showing just above the Forty-nine Creek road and 25 tons of ore,
shipped to Trail, yielded 10 oz. of gold and 24 oz. of silver. Later in 1944 a lease
and bond was taken on the property by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company
of Canada, Limited. A diamond-drilling programme was started and some six holes
were planned. Three of these holes were completed by the end of 1944 and work will
be continued if road and weather conditions permit. The option is being retained for
the present.
Rover Creek.
(49° 117° S.E.)    Company office, Room 11, K.W.C. Block, Nelson;
Rover Creek     L. D. Clark, Manager and Secretary.    This company, a subsidiary of
Mining Co., Ltd. the Alpine Gold, Limited, continued to prospect a group of claims on
Whitewater Creek where there is a large amount of quartz float carrying good gold values.    During the summer of 1944 a total of 7,600 feet of diamond-
drilling was done in nineteen holes.    Although results were not very encouraging the
option is still being held.
Ymir.
(49° 117° S.E.)    This property, on Elise Mountain, about 5 miles
Goodenough.    from Ymir, is now owned by L. S. Davidson, 850 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver.    It was leased during 1944 by A. Lata, G. Turk, and PROGRESS NOTES. A 61
F. Padulo, of Ymir and Nelson. Hand-steel only was used and ore was recovered by
mining pillars and stope remnants underground above the No. 1 level and by sorting
old surface dumps near the portal of the No. 3 level.
(49° 117° S.E.) This old property, adjoining the Goodenough, was
Ymir Mine.      operated under lease by E. P. Haukedahl and S. Lundgren, of Ymir.
Hand-steel was used to recover ore from pillars and stope remnants
near the old No. 8 level. A total of 196 tons shipped to Trail yielded 55 oz. of gold, 166
oz. of silver, and 3,885 lb. of lead.
(49° 117° S.E.)    Head office, 503 Westlake North, Seattle, Washing-
Ymir Good-Hope ton;  local office, Medical Arts Building, Nelson;  Sarkis Terzian, Man-
Mining Co.      ager.    Capital:   250,000 A shares, $1 par, and 1,500,000 B shares, 10
cents par; issued, 28,375 A and 1,500,000 B. This company operates
the X-ray group of claims on Huckleberry Creek, about 6 miles from Ymir. An active
development campaign was undertaken during 1944. With the assistance of a Government grant, three-quarters of a mile of road up Huckleberry Creek from the old Ymir
mill and 1,400 feet of trail to connect the end of this road to the showings were built.
A compressor-house was built at the end of the road and a small blacksmith-shop was
built near the portal of the tunnel. A Gardner-Denver type XH 7- by 6-inch two-
cylinder single-stage compressor, belt-driven by a 36- to 42-horse-power Petter engine,
was installed. Development-work included about 500 feet of surface stripping and
trenching and 400 feet of crosscutting. Three veins were encountered in the crosscut:
an 8-inch vein at 70 feet, a 2-foot vein at 302 feet, and a 4-inch vein, which may be the
downward extension of the surface showing on which the stripping was done, at about
400 feet.    A crew of seven men was employed.    No ore was shipped.
(49°   117°   S.E.)    Company  office,  525   Seymour  Street,  Vancouver,
Ymir-Yankee Girl B.C.;  E. P. Crawford, President;  W. A. Sutton, Secretary-Treasurer.
Gold Mines, Ltd.  Capital:  3,000,000 shares, no par value;  issued 2,225,005.    This property was operated under lease by Leo Madden, Ed. Emilson, and Oscar
and Clarence Anderson, of Ymir.    A small remnant of good ore was discovered on the
11 level.    This was mined out partly by hand-steel and partly by compressed air from
a small semi-portable plant installed by the lessees.    Operations were terminated when
this shoot was exhausted.    A total of 202 tons was mined and shipped to Trail.    This
yielded 201 oz. of gold and 1,080 oz. of silver.
(49° 117° S.E.) This property is on the ridge between Oscar (Bear)
Oxide Group.    Creek and Porcupine Creek, near Ymir.    It was discovered in 1943 by
Ed. Haukedahl, of Ymir. The showings consist of an impressive area
of gossan, parts of which showed values in lead and zinc. In 1944 an option was taken
on this property by the Leta Exploration Company, 678 Howe Street, Vancouver.
A diamond-drilling programme under the direction of D. F. Kidd was undertaken and
two holes aggregating some 600 feet in length were drilled through the oxidized
material.    Results were inconclusive and the option was retained.
(49° 117° S.E.) This property, about 3 miles from Ymir, was leased
Wesko (Ymir during 1944 by Ed. Emilson and Oscar Johnson, of Ymir. Hand-steel
Centre Star),     was used to recover ore from pillars and stope remnants.    A total of
30 tons was shipped to Trail, yielding 27 oz. of gold, 104 oz. of silver,
and some lead and zinc.
(49° 117° S.E.) Capital: 2,000,000 shares, 1 cent par; issued,
Maple Leaf Gold 439,555. This is a Spokane syndicate which has under option the
Mining Co., Inc. Porcupine group of claims on Porcupine Creek, about 4 miles from
Ymir. During 1944 approximately 125 feet of. drifting by hand under
the direction of Ed. Haukedahl, of Ymir, followed a large lamprophyre dyke showing
slight mineralization on one wall for the entire distance.    Five men were employed. a 62 report of the minister of mines, 1944.
Barrett Creek.
(49° 117° S.E.)    This property, on Barrett Creek, about 6 miles from
Spotted Horse,   the main highway, is controlled by E.  C. Wragge, of Nelson.    An
option was taken by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company
of Canada, Limited, who made eight trenches, removing 3,500 cubic feet of overburden.
Results were unsatisfactory and the option was dropped.    Four men were employed.
Erie Creek.
(49° 117° S.E.) This property, on Keystone Mountain, about 3%
Arlington.       miles from Erie, has been optioned from Relief Arlington Mines,
Limited, by B. and K. Golac and A. Shrieves, Box 223, Nelson. It was
operated continuously throughout 1944, two to three men being employed. Ore was
recovered from underground workings and by sorting the extensive surface dump.
Hand-steel only was used. A total of 437 tons was shipped to Trail and yielded 282 oz.
of gold, 744 oz. of silver, and 10,168 lb. of lead.
(49° 117° S.E.) This property, on Erie Creek, about 13 miles from
Second Relief.    Erie, is owned by a syndicate consisting of A. Burgess, M. Burgess,
C. M. Esche, and M. Towriss, of Salmo. This is an old mine with
extensive underground workings. From No. 5, the lowest adit level, to No. 11 level the
workings are served by a shaft and are flooded. The owners have installed a small
mining plant consisting of an International Diesel engine belt-connected to a single-
stage single-cylinder Jenks compressor and a Sullivan steel sharpener. The property
was worked continuously throughout 1944 by the four partners. Ore was recovered
from surface pillars, stope remnants, dumps, and clean-up around the mill. A total of
640 tons was shipped to Trail, which yielded 815 oz. of gold and 403 oz. of silver. The
average number of men employed was five.
Sheep Creek.
(49° 117° S.E.)    This property, on Sheep Creek, about 10 miles from
Kootenay Belle   Salmo, has been leased from the Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Limited,
Mine. by Russell Thompson, of Sheep  Creek.    Much of the surface and
milling equipment and some of the buildings, including the dry-house,
bunk-house, cook-house, office, and some of the residences have been dismantled and
moved to the Kootenay Belle's operation at Retallack.    During 1944, 250 tons was
recovered  from mill  clean-up,  broken  ore,  stope  remnants,  and  pillars.    This  was
shipped to Trail and yielded 107 oz. of gold and 114 oz. of silver.
(49° 117° S.E.)    Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Van-
O een couver, B.C.;   mine office, Sheep Creek, B.C.;   C. E. Marr, President;
Sheep Creek Gold J- Anderson, Secretary-Treasurer; H. E. Doelle, General Superinten-
Mines, Ltd. dent and Managing Director. Capital: 2,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;
issued, 1,875,000. The company owns and operates the Queen mine on
Waldie Creek, a tributary of Sheep Creek. The mine was operated continuously
throughout 1944. The mill was operated for only two periods during 1944, from January 1st to February 29th and from April 10th to June 18th. The reason for this was
lack of sufficient men to keep development-work ahead of mill requirements. The maximum crew employed during 1944 was sixty-one in April; this was reduced to less than
thirty near the end of the year. The average number of men employed was forty-eight.
This mine normally has a crew of from 100 to 110. Development-work included 491
feet of drifting, 19 feet of crosscutting, 83 feet of raising, and 936 feet of diamond-
drilling. During the periods in which the mill operated a total of 13,092 tons was
treated.    This yielded 4,781 oz. of gold and 1,322 oz. of silver. PROGRESS NOTES. A 63
(49° 117° S.E.) This property, adjoining the Motherlode and Reno, is
Nugget. owned by A. Endersby, Jr., of Fruitvale. It is equipped with a water-
driven compressor which supplies air to both the new workings accessible from the 4,900 tunnel and the old workings in the Fawn basin. During the early
part of 1944 ore was recovered from pillars and stope remnants in the area above the
4,900 level. Later, when road conditions permitted, mining was done in stopes above
the 3 level in the Fawn basin. Thirty feet of crosscutting, 30 feet of drifting, and 150
feet of raising were done. From four to five men were employed. A total of 1,072
tons .was mined and shipped to Trail.    This yielded 379 oz. of gold and 447 oz. of silver.
SILVER-GOLD DEPOSITS.
BEAR RIVER AREA.
(56°  129° S.W.)    Capital:   6,000,000 shares, no par value;   issued,
Mountain Boy    4,326,847.    J. O. LeFrancois, P.O. Box 1240, Place D'Armes, Montreal,
Mining Co., Ltd. Que., Engineer.    The property is located on American Creek, a tributary of Bear River.    A prospect adit, located about 300 feet south of
the old camp at about 2,470 feet in elevation, has been driven 286 feet.    Some open-
cutting was also done during 1944.
GREENWOOD AREA.
(49° 118° S.W.) This property, about 1% miles north of Greenwood,
Elkhorn.        was operated for several months during the summer under lease and
bond by W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood. It is an old property with
fairly extensive underground workings, largely served by a shaft about 150 feet deep.
The deposit consists of a narrow quartz vein, much the same as the Providence, carrying good values in gold and silver. The vein is badly faulted and the early operators
were unable to work out the faulting system and find additional blocks of ore. The
present operator unwatered the shaft and about 300 feet of workings from it and did
some 700 feet of diamond-drilling. This work was unsuccessful and the option was
dropped. A small gasoline-driven portable compressor provided air for pumping and
diamond-drilling.
(49° 118° S.W.) This property adjoins the Elkhorn. It was operated
Providence.      continuously throughout  1944  under lease by W.  E.  McArthur,  of
Greenwood, seven men being employed. The property is equipped with
a small complete electrically-operated mining plant. During 1944 development-work
included 150 feet of drifting, 45 feet of crosscutting, 60 feet of raising, and 350 feet of
diamond-drilling. Ore was recovered from several small faulted blocks lying near the
surface between the collars of the two shafts. Practically all of the known ore in the
area has now been mined. A total of 433 tons was shipped to Trail. This yielded 344
oz. of gold, 43,535 oz. of silver, and some lead and zinc.
(49° 118° S.W.) This property, just south-east of Greenwood, was
Gold Finch.      operated for a short time during the early part of 1944 under lease by
W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood. Development-work included one surface cut 80 feet long and from 5 to 12 feet deep, in solid rock, and 180 feet of raising.
A small portable gasoline-driven compressor was used for this work. A total of 72 tons
of siliceous ore was mined and shipped to Trail.    This yielded 64 oz. of gold and 663 oz. A 64 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
of silver.    The development programme failed to disclose any further ore or possibilities and the property was abandoned.    Three men were employed.
COPPER DEPOSITS.
SIMILKAMEEN RIVER AREA.
Princeton.
(49° 120° S.W.) Julian B. Beaty, President, New York, N.Y., and at
lut ■ Copper Mountain, B.C.; A. S. Baillie, Vice-President and General
Granby Consoli-' Manager; W. I. Nelson, Assistant General Manager; Robt. S. Doug-
dated las, Mine Superintendent; Ed. Foy, Mine Foreman. Capital: 600,000
M., S. and P.     shares, $5 par;   issued, 450,260.65.    The Copper Mountain mine and
Co., Ltd. £ne concentrator at Allenby have been in continuous operation since
work was resumed early in 1937, following several years of inactivity. The mine is located at Copper Mountain, at an elevation of 4,000 feet, and is
12 miles south of Princeton. A branch line of the Kettle Valley Railway from Princeton connects the mine, concentrator, and power plant.
The main development of the mine is by two adit haulage-levels, known as No. 2
and No. 6 levels, and two vertical shafts. The No. 1, or main shaft, handling all men
and all supplies for the upper portion of the mine, extends from the surface to the 6th,
or main haulage, level. The shaft is timbered throughout with 10- by 10-inch British
Columbia fir. It is closed to the levels by panel doors beyond the shaft stations to
assist in controlling ventilation. No. 2 shaft is used principally as an ore-hoisting
shaft and, until the 7th and 8th level service raise is completed, it will continue in
use for all men and supplies for these lower levels. All the ore is passed by haulage
and transfer chutes to No. 6 level, on which the main transportation system of the
mine is situated. The ore is taken out of the mine in Granby type cars, hauled by
electric trolley locomotives, to the crusher located near the portal of No. 6 level. After
crushing, the ore is transported on the railway to the concentrator at Allenby, 8 miles
distant. The more recently opened levels, No. 7 and No. 8, received no development
during 1944. The only work done on these lower levels was the drawing of ore mined
in some of the upper workings.
Mining methods at Copper Mountain have gradually changed from the shrinkage
methods of earlier years to the spiral method, which later was modified and improved.
Long-slope stoping combined with long-hole drilling was proved to have a decided
advantage over previous mining systems. Ore left in pillars was found to be most
advantageously mined by the use of diamond-drill holes, which are now used for all stoping. Percussion drills have been retained for development-work. Development during
1944 consisted of 1,845 feet of drifting and crosscutting, 4,507 feet of raising, and
139,552 feet of diamond-drilling. Six new chutes were built during 1944 and twenty
new grizzlies were made. Diamond-drill mining at the Princess May workings was
completed during 1944. A new method of transferring ore was introduced when a
" slushing drift " was completed on No. 6 level during the later part of the year. The
slusher scraper-hoist is powered by a 50-horse-power electric motor. There were no
major additions to surface plant equipment. Compressed air is developed by three
various sized Ingersoll-Rand compressors and one Sullivan compressor, these four units
being capable of a total delivery of 8,600 cubic feet a minute. PROGRESS NOTES. A 65
Underground ventilation generally is well maintained and the natural ventilation
is supplemented by five fans. Fresh air enters the mine through the old glory-holes
and ventilation raises, from which the fans force it to the stopes and other working-
places and thence outside. Ventilation-doors with sliding panels are placed in the
drifts and crosscuts to control and regulate the air. Both shafts are upcast.and are
closed to the levels, except on the 6th level. The potential capacity of the five fans in
use on the different levels is 204,000 cubic feet a minute.
The company employs a Safety Inspector and the Copper Mountain Miners' Safety
Committee holds meetings every two weeks. An emergency hospital with the customary
equipment and supplies, including a supply of blood plasma, is maintained at the mine
for the treatment of injured workmen. A competent nurse and an industrial first-aid
man are on hand at all times. In 1944 the overall accident frequency rate for all accidents involving the loss of one shift or more was 0.62 per thousand shifts, as compared
with the frequency rate of 0.76 for 1943. This was a noteworthy improvement which
placed Copper Mountain among the few mines reporting a reduced accident rate. At
the end of 1944 provision had been made for aluminium-dust therapy for the prevention
of silicosis.
Labour turnover was less than in the two previous years. The average number of
men employed was 451. Exclusive of townsite and staff employees, 224 men were
employed at the end of 1944.    Of these, 141 men were employed underground.
By December, 1944, diamond-drills had completely replaced percussion rock-drills
in drilling blast holes in mining ore. The fourteen men required for diamond-drilling
were in the employ of T. Connors, Diamond Drilling Company, Limited, and are
not included in the figures given for company employees. It is reported that the
amount of ore broken per man shift by the diamond-drilling method is about double
that broken by the percussion-drill method. A total of 117,360 feet of diamond-drilling
was done in 1944, compared with 7,255 feet in 1943.
A total of 1,383,296 tons of ore was milled, yielding 22,248,642 lb. of copper,
147,695 oz. of silver, and 5,603 oz. of gold.
VANCOUVER AREA.
(49° 123° N.E.)    Company office, 730 Fifth Avenue, New York City;
„ „     .   ... .     mine office, Britannia Beach, B.C.;   H. H. Sharpe, President;   C. P.
Britannia Mining '
and Smelting     Charlton,   Secretary-Treasurer;    C.   P.   Browning,   General   Manager;
Co., Ltd. and G. C. Lipsey, Superintendent. Capital: 100,000 shares, $25 par;
issued, 91,966. This company operates the Britannia Mines at Britannia Beach, Howe Sound. The mines being operated are the Victoria, No. 5, Fairview,
Bluff, and the 4,100-tunnel district, which includes No. 8 shaft. Despite the labour
shortage a fair amount of development-work was carried out and regular stoping
operations were carried on.
Preliminary development-work in the No. 8 shaft area has been done. The necessary equipment for hoisting has been installed. Dumping arrangement transfer raises
between the 4,100 and 4,500 levels, and the loading-pockets at the 4,600 level have been
completed. No. 8 hoist is a modern hoist manufactured by the Canadian Ingersoll-
Rand Company. It is a type " P.E.I." 21,000 lb. rope pull, having two steel plate
parallel drums (96 inches diameter by 60 inches wide), spiral grooved for l^-inch
diameter rope, single reduction double helical cut steel gears, gravity air-post brakes,
and each drum fitted with an air-operated internal expanding jaw-type clutch. Two
Model " D " Lilly controllers and enclosed platform desk control on which two 20-inch
diameter dial-type depth indicators with station tabs are included. The hoist is driven
by a 450-horse-power, 600-r.p.m., 2,200-volt, 3-phase, 60-cycle, A.C., 40-degree C. rise, continuous rated, wound rotor, hoist type induction motor, suitable for plugging duty,
with full magnetic control apparatus.
An auxiliary air-compressor unit was installed. It is a Canadian Ingersoll-Rand
type 30, 2-stage air compressor, powered with a 10-horse-power, 440-volt, 60-cycle,
3-phase, A.C. motor and V-belt drive with automatic start and stop control, air-filter
and air-cooled after cooler.
Development-work at these mines in 1944 totalled 7,053 feet or 1.34 miles, made
up as follows: Drifts, 2,907 feet; crosscuts, 1,250 feet; raises, 2,896 feet; powder-
blast workings, 1,902 feet; winzes, 9 feet. A total of 4,807 feet of diamond-drilling
was also done. The average number of men employed was 531. The total number of
men employed at the end of 1944 for all operations underground, on the surface, and at
the mill was 569. The total production of all mines amounted to 606,717 tons as compared with 864,357 tons in 1943.
The total metals produced, including copper from the copper precipitation plant,
was 13,435,660 lb. of copper, 8,287 oz. of gold, 59,370 oz. of silver, and 17,053 dry tons
of pyrite.
Ventilation and dust-control received great attention throughout 1944. The
greatest advance in the year was the introduction of aluminium-powder therapy for
the prevention of silicosis. All the active dry-rooms were equipped with aluminium-
dispersal units, and each man receives a treatment before going on shift. A satisfactory dustless Leyner machine was developed and put in use at the property during
1944, and is giving good results. The dust concentration in headings using this
machine is below the dangerous limit. The machine was equipped with standard tappet chuck fronthead and a New York backhead. A large water-needle is used with a
small clearance in the tappet-and hammer to prevent any air from passing into the
drill steel with the water. The New York type backhead prevents any dry-drilling as
the air cannot be turned on without the water being turned on automatically. The
average dust-counts all over the Britannia mines was lower in 1944 than in any
other year.
COPPER-GOLD DEPOSITS.
TEXADA ISLAND.
(49° 124° N.W.)    Company office, 626 Pender Street West, Vancouver,
Little Billie,     B-C-;  L- Prosser, President;   W. J. Grieve and J. Bray in charge of
Industrial Metals operations during 1944.    The Little Billie mine is near Vananda, on
Mining Co., Ltd. Texada Island.    The Little Billie shaft is 280 feet deep with four
levels—the 40-foot, 80-foot, 180-foot, and 280-foot.    During 1944 some
prospecting and development work was done on three levels as follows:   On the 80-foot
level, 275 feet of drifting, 25 feet of crosscutting, 50 feet of raising, and 561 feet of
diamond-drilling;   on the 180 level, 386 feet of drifting and 3,178 feet of diamond-
drilling;   and on the 280-foot level, 58 feet of drifting and 6,059 feet of diamond-
drilling.    Siliceous flux, amounting to about 355 tons, was shipped to Tacoma.    The
Copper Queen mine, also owned by this company and close to the Little Billie, was
unwatered to the 500-foot level and then allowed to fill up again.    Towards the end of
1944 only ten men were employed at the Little Billie.
In January, 1945, ownership of the property was transferred from Industrial
Metals Mining Company, Limited, to the Vananda Mining Company, Limited (N.P.L.),
607 Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C.; H. T. James, President and Managing Director.
This company proposes to initiate further work on the property by deepening the Little
Billie shaft an additional 200 feet.    (See page 162 for detailed report.) PROGRESS NOTES. A 67
COPPER-ZINC DEPOSITS.
VANCOUVER ISLAND.
Duncan.
(48° 125° N.W.) Twin " J " Mines, Limited. Head office, Vancou-
Mount Sicker, ver, B.C.; Col. E. M. Thompson, President; C. Rutherford, General
Manager, Vancouver, B.C.; R. B. Gayer, Mine Manager; mine office
address, Duncan, B.C. Capital: 3,000,000 shares, $1 par; issued, 3,000,000. This
mine was worked under a contract with Wartime Metals Corporation from the beginning of 1944 until May 19th when all underground operations were suspended because
of cancellation of the contract. All machinery and other equipment were left intact at
the mine in readiness for operations being resumed at short notice. J. W. Brickley
is in residence at the camp as caretaker.
During the above working period an average crew of seventy-five men was
employed, forty-one of these being employed underground. The following development-
work was completed during 1944: Drifting and crosscutting, 110 feet; raising, 441
feet; reopening and repairing old workings, 1,260 feet; and diamond-drilling, 1,786
feet. Production amounted to 17,341 tons of ore, estimated to yield 17,341 lb. of copper
and 1,493,604 lb. of zinc. This estimate was made by the management at the time the
mine was closed as accurate smelter returns were not available.
The mine represents an amalgamation of the old Lenora, Tyee, and Richard III.
mines which together produced 253,000 tons of copper-gold ore between 1898 and 1909.
During the more recent period of production from these properties, July, 1943, to
May, 1944, the present owners, Twin " J " Mines, Limited, milled 34,893 tons of ore
with an average grade of: gold, 0.075 oz. per ton; silver, 2.05 oz. per ton; copper,
1.32 per cent.; lead, 0.6 per cent.;  and zinc, 6.12 per cent.
The ore occurs as two separate, easterly-trending bodies about 150 feet apart,
known as the North ore-body and the South ore-body. Most of the ore in the early days
came from the South ore-body in all three mines, but most of that mined by Twin " J "
came from the North ore-body and mainly from the old Lenora mine, with a little from
the Tyee mine.
The two ore-bodies are parallel and lie along two main drag-folds in a narrow band
of sediments. The ore is a fine-grained replacement of tuffs and graphitic schists.
Mineralogically two types of ore are found, one is a " barite ore " consisting of a finegrained mixture of pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and a little galena in a gangue of
barite, quartz, and calcite; a second type is a " quartz ore " consisting mainly of quartz
with small amounts of chalcopyrite. The " quartz ore " is found as long, lenticular
masses replacing both " barite ore " and the enclosing schists along the drag-fold.
Although most of the North ore-body appears to have been mined, the South ore-
body still has some possibilities and extensions of it, probably down-faulted, could be
explored by cleaning out some old workings in the vicinity of the Richard III., and,
if need be, doing some diamond-drilling from these workings. A 68 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
SILVER-LEAD-ZINC DEPOSITS.
BEAVERDELL AREA.
(49° 119° S.E.)   Company offices, Creston, B.C.; mine office, Beaverdell,
Highland Bell,    B.C.;   R. V. Staples, Managing Director;   A. B. Staples, Mine Man-
Ltd. ager.    Capital:  1,500,000 shares, $1 par; issued, 1,315,856.    The com
pany owns and operates the Highland Bell mine on Wallace Mountain,
4 miles from Beaverdell. This property was operated continuously throughout 1944 on
a somewhat reduced scale. The difficulty of obtaining a satisfactory crew was largely
responsible for the reduction, the crew having decreased from about thirty men in the
early part of 1944 to less than twenty at the end. The chief development-work was the
completing and equipping of the raise from the 8 to the 4 level. This working is now
being used to handle all ore and supplies. The old cook-house and bunk-house have
been retained as it was not found practical to close them and find satisfactory accommodation for the fluctuating crew in the town of Beaverdell. The installations in the new
power-house and blacksmith-shop were completed during 1944. This included satisfactory guards around all moving parts and a substantial addition to the concrete base
of the large Rushton-Hornsby Diesel engine. This addition was necessary because the
original base, built in two sections, proved to be inadequate. Development during 1944
included: shafts, 150 feet; crosscuts, 600 feet; drifts, 300 feet; winzes, 100 feet; and
diamond-drilling, 200 feet. A total of 1,373 tons was mined and shipped to Trail. This
yielded 98 oz. of gold, 293,246 oz. of silver, and 148,893 lb. of lead.
AINSWORTH MINING DIVISION.
(49° 116° N.W.)    Company office, Ainsworth, B.C.;   M. Mohr, Mana-
Spokane Group,  ger-    This company operates the Spokane group of claims on Munn
Ainsmore Mines, Creek, about 3 miles from Ainsworth.    The property was operated
Ltd. continuously throughout 1944, an average of four men being employed.
It is equipped with a complete small mining plant which is electrically
driven. Power for this is obtained from the Corporation of the City of Nelson.
Development-work during 1944 included 150 feet of raise from the upper adit-level to
the surface. An estimated total of 25 tons of high-grade hand-sorted crude lead ore
was shipped to the Kellogg smelter, Idaho, under a contract with the Metals Reserve
Corporation of Washington, D.C. In addition, a small tonnage of milling grade lead-
zinc ore was accumulated for a possible future milling operation.
(49° 116° N.W.) This property was operated continuously until May
Kootenay Florence. 16th, 1944, when it was closed down on an order from the Wartime
Metals Corporation. Until that time it had been mining and milling
about 90 tons of ore per day. During the early part of 1944 a small part of this ore
was obtained from tailings dredged from Kootenay Lake, but this part of the undertaking was stopped in January. When the property closed, about 1,000 tons of broken
ore remained in the main stope below the No. 9 level. Faces of low-grade ore were left
in the small stope from the 9 level and in the raise from the 8 level near the main raise.
Two diamond-drill holes from the 7 level intersected the vein and showed some ore
which was never developed. Practically no development-work was done during 1944.
An average crew of about seventy-five men was employed up to the time the property
was closed. The underground workings were cleaned up and put in good condition and
all the surface plant and equipment were left on the property in charge of a watchman.
A total of 10,431 tons was milled, the concentrates from which, shipped under a Metals
Reserve Corporation contract, yielded 12,346 oz. of silver, 967,202 lb. of lead, 571,618
lb. of zinc, and some cadmium. PROGRESS NOTES. A 69
(50° 117° S.E.)    Registered office, 475 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.;
Whitewater     mine office, Kaslo, B.C.;  J. L. Trumbull, President; J. A. Clark, Sec-
Retallack Mines, retary;  James Hamilton, Richard Dowsey, W. R. Burgess, and Donald
Ltd. McLeod, Directors.    Incorporated June, 1943;  capital, 250,000 shares
of $1 par, all issued, 60 per cent, owned by Kootenay Belle Gold Mines,
Limited, and 40 per cent, owned by Whitewater Mines, Limited.
This company took over all holdings of Whitewater Mines, Limited, and for the
majority interest Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Limited, agreed to pay off all indebtedness
and to supply all necessary equipment and operating capital, the outlay to be repayable
from earnings. In December, 1943, a contract for sale of zinc concentrates was made
with U.S. Commercial Company and in April, 1944, a further contract for sale of lead
and zinc was arranged with American Smelting and Refining Company.
The old 125-ton mill was brought up to a capacity of 300 tons per day with the
installation of a bank of ten M.S. flotation cells, providing a total of thirty cells, and the
setting-up of the Kootenay Belle ball-mill and classifier. Diesel power was installed in
a newly constructed power-house early in 1944 and late in the year two additional
Diesels were installed to replace the old hydro-electric plant during the low-water
months. The total power plant capacity is 900 horse-power. Renovation of the old
camp and erection of new buildings, many of which were brought up from the Kootenay
Belle camp, was completed early in 1944. In August a small bin, crusher, and sampling
arrangement were installed just above the coarse-ore bin to facilitate the handling of
customs ore.
A diamond-drilling campaign, begun in 1943, was completed early in 1944, before
production started. This work blocked out remnants and continuations of formerly
explored ore-bodies below No. 11 level, which extend in a downward raking arc from
below the western end of No. 11 level to nearly 100 feet below the south-eastern face of
No. 14 level. These ore-bodies are replacements of limestone by sphalerite and smaller
amounts of galena closely associated with siderite (spathic iron). One ore-body
between Nos. 12 and 1,472 levels west of the main raise is a replacement of a lampro-
phyre dyke within the limestone; the gangue in this ore-body consists largely of magnetite and pyrrhotite.
These ore-bodies are all replacements within the Whitewater limestone and are
dominantly zinc bearing. They are below and completely separate from the silver-lead
ore-bodies of the old upper mine, which are dominantly fissure fillings in slates. Complex folding of the limestone has resulted in irregular, curving structures which are in
places difficult to follow but are of great importance to the localization of ore.
Milling commenced on March 14th at a rate of 100 tons a day and was later
increased to about 200 tons a day. Work was first concentrated on a large ore-body
lying between the south-eastern ends of Nos. 14 and 1,472 levels and, when this was
nearly exhausted, on ore-bodies between Nos. 12 and 13 levels. The 1,472 level was
advanced westerly with a view to getting beneath this latter ore and bringing it out
through No. 1,472 level to avoid the necessity of tramming on the upper, crooked levels.
Mining was done also on scattered remnants in other parts of the general ore-zone.
Some ore was recovered from the old upper mine dumps and was trucked to the mill.
The average number of men employed during 1944 was sixty-six. Development-
work included 650 feet of drifting, 50 feet of crosscutting, 200 feet of raising, 2,200 feet
of diamond-drilling, and the reconditioning of 500 feet of old workings. Tonnage
milled amounted to 39,515 tons, including 1,915 tons recovered from the upper dumps
and 421 tons from two customs sources, the Bell and Jackson mines. At the end of
1944 broken reserve in the mine was estimated at 4,000 tons. The 39,515 tons milled
yielded 15,154 oz. of silver, 359,309 lb. of lead, and 4,085,950 lb. of zinc. A 70 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
(50° 117° S.E.) This property, in the Jackson Basin, about 7 miles
Bell. from Retallack, was operated under lease and bond by Joe Gallo and
associates, of Nelson. During the winter about 85 feet of development-
work was done from the low-level tunnel in an attempt to intersect the Sunshine vein on
an adjoining claim. Early in the summer the road was repaired with the assistance of
a Government grant. A total of about 390 tons of high-grade zinc ore was recovered
from sorting surface dumps and from mining pillars and stope remnants underground
by hand-steel. This ore was hauled to Retallack and treated in the Whitewater mill,
the concentrates being included in the Whitewater shipments. Four men were
employed.    The operators plan to continue throughout the coming winter.
(50° 117° S.E.) This property, in the Jackson Basin, about 6 miles
Jackson.        from Retallack, was operated under lease and bond for a short time
during the summer. Some 30 tons of material containing values in zinc
was hauled from an old tailing dump and treated in the Whitewater mill at Retallack.
SLOCAN MINING DIVISION.
(50° 117° S.E.) Mine office, Zincton, B.C.; F. R. Thompson, Manager.
Lucky Jim, Zinc- This company, a subsidiary of Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Limited, owns
ton Mines, Ltd. and operates the Zincton (Lucky Jim) Mine at Zincton, B.C. The ore-
bodies on this property all lie within a single band of limestone. This
band, known as the Lucky Jim limestone, is from 20 to 50 feet thick and is strongly
brecciated in most parts of the mine. There is more limestone in the banded argillites
above and below the main band, but in thicknesses that rarely exceed 5 feet. The series
is strongly deformed, and the Lucky Jim limestone is warped and folded; great differences in horizontal width on some levels have been brought about by folding and by
squeezing (flowage) of the limestone. The average dip is about 45 degrees to the
south-west from the surface down to No. 9, the lowest adit-level, where a flattening
occurs. The flat section has not been fully explored, nor has an expected steepening
farther down the dip.    The structure plunges westward at an angle of about 20 degrees.
The ore is a replacement of limestone by sphalerite and pyrite. It occurs in relatively large and irregular ore-bodies as much as 25 feet thick. Former operations in
upper parts of the mine were concentrated for the most part on ore that was localized
by cross-fractures within the limestone and contained locally a high proportion of
galena. In the present workings there is virtually no galena and for the most part the
ore is not controlled by the existence of cross-fractures; instead, the ore-bodies follow
mainly the plunge of the general structure and tend to be localized along troughs.
Ore mined in 1944 all came from above No. 9 level, and some from above No. 8 level,
250 feet vertically above No. 9. Exploration by diamond-drilling encountered new ore
between recognized ore-bodies, as well as extensions of others already mined. A winze
was sunk 220 feet at 20 degrees, from No. 9 level, in 1943, in a promisingly mineralized
section, but shortage of labour prevented further development during 1944.
Some exploration was done by diamond-drilling on the upper surface, in ground not
reached by underground workings, but failure of the water-supply in midsummer put
a stop to this work for the rest of the year.
Operations were carried on continuously throughout the year, producing an average of about 320 tons a day while the mill was operating, the usual practice being to
run the mill 6 days a week. Taking the yearly operation as a whole there was a marked
falling off in the labour available. At the first of the year a crew of about ninety men
was employed but this was reduced to less than seventy before the year ended. The
average number of men employed was seventy-three. Development included 347 feet
of drifting, 203 feet of crosscutting, 387 feet of raising, and 11,769 feet of diamond-
drilling.    On the surface a new dry, a small building for accommodating staff and visi- PROGRESS NOTES. A 71
tors, and a larger building to be used either as a bunk-house or a recreation hall were
completed. All these buildings were of the locstave construction. The old dry was
used to house a steam-heating plant to serve the new dry, mill, assay office, office, and
staff house. A total of 100,588 tons was mined and milled during 1944, from which
15,350,781 lb. of zinc was recovered. The concentrates were shipped to the Anaconda
smelter, near Butte, Montana, under a contract with the Metals Reserve Corporation.
No lead was recovered and no payment was made for silver.
(50° 117° S.E.)    This property, on London Ridge, about 3 miles from
McAllister.      Three Forks, was operated for a short time during the summer by the
Allan Nelson Mining Company, Limited, Box 46, Nelson; Paul Lincoln,
Manager. During the summer a truck-road was built, with the assistance of a Government grant, from the lower tram terminal to the mine. This road is slightly over a
mile in length. A Diesel compressor plant, consisting of a 70-horse-power Petter 2-
cylinder 2-cycle Diesel engine, belt connected to an ER-2 14- by 9- by 12-inch 2-stage
Ingersoll-Rand compressor was taken to the mine and some preliminary preparations
were made to install it. Work was confined to sorting and shipping ore from an old
dump near the portal of the No. 3 level. The material from the dump was hauled underground and dropped through ore passes to the No. 6 level, from which it was trammed
to the upper tram terminal. A total of 309 tons was handled in this manner and
shipped to Trail. This yielded 4,384 oz. of silver. Five men were employed and all
work was done by hand methods. The company plans, after the installation of the
mechanical equipment, to mine a substantial tonnage of low-grade siliceous ore and ship
it to Trail.   Values are chiefly in silver.    The operation was closed for the winter.
(49° 117° N.E.)    This property, 3 miles from Sandon, is owned by
Victor. Mrs. D. Petty, of Nelson, and was operated continuously during 1944
under lease by E. Doney, of Sandon. A total of 34 tons of ore was
mined by hand-steel and shipped to Trail. This yielded 5,550 oz. of silver and 29,241
lb. of lead.
(49° 117° N.E.)    Mine office, Sandon, B.C.; A. H. Honsberger, Mana-
N ble Fi    Mine ger-    Capital:   3,000,000  shares,   50  cents  par;   issued,  2,000,000;
Reco Mountain   127,500 debentures, issued 127,500.    This company controls and oper-
Base Metal      ates the Noble Five mine, about 2% miles from Sandon.   The mill
Mines, Ltd.     was operated during January at about 80 tons a day, after which it was
closed for alterations and repairs. About fifty-six men were employed
while the mill was in operation. After that time a rather extensive diamond-drilling
programme was undertaken to explore the vein between the 1,800 and 800 levels. This
programme was in progress until April 16th, when the mill, power plant, office, warehouse, and lower tram terminal and all supplies and equipment contained therein were
completely destroyed by fire. At the time a water-driven generator was being operated
for lighting and charging storage-batteries in the mill and a stove was burning in the
power plant, which was in the lower part of the mill building. Either of these may
have caused the fire as both had given trouble previously. The buildings and equipment
were covered by insurance. No attempt was made to replace the equipment or rebuild
any of the structures and later in 1944 much of the heavy material was sold for scrap.
Concentrates produced while the mill was operating were shipped to the United States
under a Metals Reserve Corporation contract.
(49° 117° N.E.)    This property, on Enterprise Creek, about 5 miles
Enterprise.      from the  main  Slocan  Highway,  was purchased  by  the  Western
Exploration Company. No work, other than an examination, was
undertaken. Practically all the material from the recently erected mill was removed
and either salvaged or sold for scrap. The Western Exploration Company anticipates
carrying on an active programme on this property in 1945. A 72 ,       REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
(49° 117° N.E.) This property, on Springer Creek, about 5 miles
Ottawa. from Slocan City, was operated intermittently during 1944 by two
lessees with hand-steel. During the early part of 1944 about 150 feet
of drifting was done on the east vein on the No. 8 level without much encouragement. A total of 9 tons was mined from the 8 level stopes, shipped to Trail, and yielded
2,040 oz. of silver. This property has received considerable revenue from the British
Columbia Security Commission in rentals from the mill building, near Slocan City, and
the Diesel electric power plant and is now practically free of indebtedness.
(49° 117° N.E.)    Company office, Silverton, B.C.    Capital:   2,000,000
Standard and     snares>  50  cents  par;   issued,   1,514,482.    General  Manager,  A.  M.
Mammoth, West-Ham;   Mine Superintendent, R. A. Avison.    This company operates
ern Exploration   the Standard mine on Emily Creek, about 3 miles from Silverton, and
Co- the Mammoth mine on Avison Creek, about 4% miles from Silverton.
Both these properties were worked continuously during 1944.    At the
Standard mine a minimum of fifty and a maximum of sixty men were employed during
1944.    Ore was recovered from pillars and stope remnants above the No. 6 level.
At the end of 1944 practically all the ore between the 6 and 5 levels was exhausted and
stoping was being carried on above the 5 level.    Development-work included 1,617 feet
of drifts and crosscuts, 165 feet of raises, and 7,984 feet of diamond-drilling.
At the Mammoth mine a minimum of forty-three and a maximum of sixty men
were employed during 1944. The stopes between the 7 and 6 levels and 6 and 5 levels,
which comprised the largest part of the ore-body, were completely mined out. Some
small areas above the 4 and 5 levels are still producing ore. Development-work at this
property included 263 feet of drifts and crosscuts, 899 feet of raises, and 8,530 feet of
diamond-drilling. A substantial part of the diamond-drilling was done below the
7 level to explore the downward extension of the main part of the ore-body, but no
decision has been reached as to whether this area v/ill be opened up in the near future.
Diamond-drilling from the surface to the west of the present workings disclosed commercial values and widths and a crosscut is being driven to open up this new area.
A total of 38,749 tons of ore was treated in the Standard mill at Silverton from
December 1st, 1943, to November 30th, 1944. This included 22,293 tons from the
Mammoth, 16,405 tons from the Standard, and 51 tons purchased from the Enterprise
mine in 1943. The 1,808.54 tons of lead concentrates and 5,141.62 tons of zinc concentrates produced were shipped to Kellogg, Idaho, under a contract with the Metals
Reserve Corporation of Washington, D.C.
At the mill and power plant a crew of from thirty to forty men was employed in
addition to those at the Standard and Mammoth mines. The average number of men
employed in the entire operation was 128. During the summer a large part of the road
between Silverton and the Standard mine was relocated and constructed and several
of the steeper parts eliminated. The ore from the Standard mine was all hauled by
truck.    No other changes or additions of importance were made during 1944.
CRANBROOK AREA.
Sullivan Mine,
Consolidated Min-
(49°  115° N.W.)    Company office, 215 St. James Street, Montreal,
Que.; mine and smelter office, Trail, B.C.;  S. G. Blaylock, Trail, President;  R. E. Stavert, Montreal, Vice-President;  J. E. Riley, Montreal,
Ing and Smelting Secretary;   H. B. Fuller, Trail, Comptroller;   James Buchanan, Trail,
Co. of Canada,   General Manager.    Sullivan mine office:   Kimberley, B.C.;   William
Ltd- Lindsay, General Superintendent;   J. R. Giegerich, Mine Superinten
dent;   H. R. Banks, Mill Superintendent.    Capital:   4,000,000 shares,
$5 par; issued, 3,276,329.    The company owns and operates the Sullivan mine on Mark PROGRESS NOTES. A 73
Creek, near Kimberley, and the Sullivan concentrator at Chapman Camp, some 3 miles
away. During 1944 the output decreased to some extent from that attained in 1943,
because of the increased amount of preparation required to extract ore from the lower
levels and the necessity of limiting the production above the 3,900 level because of the
back-filling programme. Lack of an adequate labour supply was also in some measure
responsible.
In spite of determined efforts on the part of the management, the accident rate
has not shown marked improvement during 1944. This has resulted from the increased
activity in an attempt to maintain production and the fact that it was impossible to
maintain the same careful selection of men as was formerly exercised.
Ventilation of the underground workings was not materially changed during 1944.
The two large surface fans exhaust a total of 158,000 cubic feet of air a minute.
Seventeen auxiliary units varying in capacity from 2,200 to 45,000 cubic feet a minute
are in use underground and, in general, provide adequate distribution of air to the
more remote parts of the mine. Five spare fans are kept on hand to take care of any
emergency which may arise. A new ventilation raise in the extreme north section of
the mine is planned. This raise will be 1,340 feet long and will have an average cross-
section of 10 by 16 feet. It is proposed to pass some 200,000 cubic feet of air a minute
through this raise by the installation of a new surface unit.
Development-work done in 1944 included 2,524 feet of drifting, 966 feet of cross-
cutting, 9,050 feet of sub-level drifts and crosscuts, 20,634 feet of raising, and 903 feet
of sinking. In addition, 19,176 feet of core diamond-drilling was done. All the sinking was done from the surface, this work comprising the sinking of shafts through
unconsolidated material and rock for back-filling.
The installation of the belt conveyer from the 3,350 level to the 3,900 level was
completed and this piece of equipment was put in operation near the end of 1944. This
installation consists of a 36-inch conveyer belt built in six sections with a total length
of 2,538 feet and a total vertical lift of 680 feet. It is designed to deliver 400 tons per
hour from the 3,350 level to an 8,000-ton ore-pocket just above the 3,900 level at the
south end. This installation is equipped with a 3--foot service track with skips and
hoists for its entire length. It is electrically driven throughout and each section is
automatically linked up with all others in such a manner that failure in any part of
the system will result in the stopping of the entire belt so that a minimum of damage
and spilling will occur. All material, before being handled on the belt, is crushed to
8 inches. At the end of each section a sloping grizzly allows the finer materials to
fall on the belt first and provide a cushion for the larger pieces. Operation of this
conveyer should materially reduce the strain put on the hoisting capacity in the 3,901
shaft.
In the methods of mining followed there was a very marked increase in the footage
drilled with diamond-drills over that drilled^with conventional steel and detachable bits
as compared with 1943. There was also a marked increase in the use of detachable
bits not only in drilling which was done for breaking ore, but also in that which was
done for development-work. A total of 1,652,629 feet of holes was drilled in preparing
the ground for blasting in stoping and development-work. A total of 876,445 feet of
this was for stoping and 776,184 feet for development. In the drilling for stoping
273,405 feet was done by diamond-drills, 565,020 feet by detachable bits, and 38,020 feet
by conventional type bits. This means that approximately 31 per cent, of the total
drilling done for stoping purposes was done by diamond-drills. The diamond-drilling
for stoping purposes yielded 2.77 tons per foot of hole while the drilling by detachable
bits and conventional steel for stoping purposes yielded 2.53 tons per foot of hole.
Of a total of 776,184 feet of hole drilled on development-work, 584,288 feet was drilled
with detachable bits and the remainder with conventional steel. Of the total amount
drilled for both stoping and development purposes about 16 per cent, was drilled by
diamond-drills as compared with 5.2 per cent, in 1943. A 74 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Back-filling the large open stopes above the 3,900 level was actively carried on
during 1944 and, in addition, many concrete bulkheads were placed in strategic localities underground to prepare for next season's work. In all, a total of 1,723,530 cubic
yards of material was placed underground. This included 1,612,450 cubic yards placed
by trucks, shovel, and bulldozers, 96,880 cubic yards by caving brought about by the
drawing of pillars in the upper levels, and 14,200 cubic yards of development waste.
The following additions were made to the back-filling equipment: Five 13-cubic-yard
Euclid Diesel trucks, one power-grader for the roads, and one RD-8 tractor.
To provide water for back-filling operations, a pump, capacity 200 gallons a minute,
was installed underground to pump mine water to a new 50,000-gallon wood-stave tank
erected on the hill. The pump is equipped with a 150-horse-power motor and works
against 1,500 feet of a vertical lift. The water is pumped through 500 feet of 4-inch
cased diamond-drill holes and then through surface-lines to the tank. A carefully
predetermined amount of water is dumped with each load of back-fill material from
the Euclid trucks. This amount is varied with the clay content of the material and
with the distance which the material has to run in the stopes. This back-filling
method promises to be successful. The excess water drains off rapidly through an
opening left in the back-fill bulkheads and through the rock itself and in a short time
material placed underground in a semi-fluid condition is hard enough to walk on.
On the surface an extension was made to the mine office building and dry. This
was of brick' construction and provided room to accommodate 350 new lockers as well
as 2,688 square feet of additional office space. On the hill and in connection with the
back-filling operation a frame garage was built for repairing trucks. A brick warehouse and gasoline-station was constructed on the townsite for trucks and tractors.
Twenty-four new houses were built in Happy Valley and on the lower Blarchmont
townsite to accommodate northern employees.
At the beginning of 1944 there were about 1,600 employees on the pay-roll.
Of these about 800 worked underground, 400 in various other capacities on the surface,
and about 400 at the concentrator. At the end of 1944 there were about 200 less on
the pay-roll because of military call-ups and employees leaving for various other
reasons.
A total of 2,156,639 tons of ore was mined during 1944. Of this, 109,640 tons
was from development, 93,597 tons from surface dumps, 1,213,454 tons from above the
3,900 level, and 739,948 tons from below the 3,900 level. The proportion of the total
which will be taken from below the 3,900 level is expected to increase in the future.
WINDERMERE AREA.
(50° 116° S.E.)    This property, 18 miles from Invermere, is owned
P    idi e Mine   ^y ^e Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Limited.    During August and Sep-
Sheep Creek Gold tember some exploratory work was done underground.    This included
Mines, Ltd.     unwatering a winze on the 7,800-foot level and 373 feet of diamond-
drilling.    In addition to this, some of the old equipment was salvaged.
A crew of eight men was employed under the direction of J. S. Mcintosh.
GOLDEN AREA.
(51° 116° S.E.)    Company office, 350 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont.; mine
M n r h and    omce> Field, B.C.;  J. H. C. Waite, President;   G. C. Ames, Secretary-
Kicking Horse   Treasurer;   Alexander G. Ballachey, Manager;   H. D. Forman, Mine
Mines, Base     Superintendent; John Vallance, Mill Superintendent. Capital: 3,000,000
Metals Mining   shares, no par value;   issued, 2,330,714.    This company operates the
Corporation, Ltd. Monarch mine, on Mount Stephen, south of the Kicking Horse River,
and the Kicking Horse mine, on Mount Field, north of the river.   On PROGRESS NOTES. A 75
January 2nd, 1944, the power-house of this company was completely destroyed by fire
and considerable damage done to the Diesel, electrical, and compressor equipment
therein. The mill was of necessity closed after having milled only 96 tons in January.
The company purchased two new Ingersoll-Rand, type 40K series, semi-portable compressor outfits of about 500 cubic feet capacity each, and, with these, carried on an
active development programme in the Kicking Horse mine while the power-house was
being rebuilt and the equipment repaired. The mill, which had also undergone some
repairs and alterations during the shut-down, was started on June 12th and was operated continuously from then to the end of 1944. The development-work indicated
a substantial tonnage of good grade zinc ore on the extension of the No. 4 ore-body
in the Kicking Horse workings and this provided ore for the remainder of the year's
operation. A total of 24,995 tons was mined and treated, including a small tonnage
from the Monarch mine, where mining operations at the rate of about 35 tons per day
were started in November. Development done included 534 feet of drifting and cross-
cutting, 115 feet of raising, and 1,174 feet of diamond-drilling. All raising was confined to cutting box-holes in preparation for stoping operations. An average of fifty
men was employed while development and repairs were being carried out. This number
was increased to about an average of sixty-five men after the mill was put in operation.
All concentrates were shipped to the United States, under a contract with the Metals
Reserve Corporation, and yielded 10,408 oz. of silver, 880,720 lb. of lead, and 5,184,654
lb. of zinc.
MERCURY DEPOSITS.
FORT ST. JAMES AREA.
Pinchi Lake.
Pinchi Lake Mercury Mine, Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.— (54° 124°
N.E.)    Operations were suspended at this property in July.
TAKLA LAKE AREA.
Silver Creek.
Snell Property.— (55° 125° N.E.) The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company
of Canada, Limited, did some prospecting on this property on Silver Creek.
Takla Mercury Mine, Bralorne Mines, Ltd.— (55° 125° N.E.) Operations were suspended at this property in September.
PLACER-GOLD DEPOSITS.
ATLIN AREA.
Production from this area was reduced further during 1944. The large surface
operations were idle. The shovel operation of Spruce Creek Placers, Limited, was
started but because of trouble with the drainage flume and with some slides from the
bench very little was done during the season.
Dream, Shamrock, and New Year Leases, Columbia Development, Ltd.— (59° 133° N.W.)
J. H. Eastman, Manager.    Capital:  50,000 shares, $1 par;  issued, 50,000.    This is an A 76 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
underground operation on Spruce Creek, working on the Dream, New Year, and Shamrock leases on a lay from J. W. Noland.
The actual mining operations at present are on the Shamrock lease. There has
been no change in the methods of mining as outlined in previous reports. These have
been working out very satisfactorily.
A small Mancha trammer, a 40-cell Edison storage-battery locomotive with a 5-
horse-power motor, has been installed on B level for haulage.
Because of shortage of labour only one shift worked during 1944 and even that
was not at full strength. Twenty-nine men were employed. General conditions were
satisfactory.
(59° 133° N.W.)    J. W. Noland, Operator.    Only a few men were
Dream Lease,    employed and at irregular intervals on the Dream lease.    Mr. Noland
has purchased the holdings of the Spruce Creek Mining Company and
is now proposing to open up a drain from the Dorothy lease, No. 5 shaft, up through
Nos. 4, 2, and 1 shafts to the Dream shaft.    Nothing has been done yet on this work.
Several small lay operations employing from one to four men carried on during
1944.
OMINECA MINING DIVISION.
Manson and Germansen Creeks.
None of the large operations was worked during 1944. Some prospecting and
sniping were carried on by individuals.
STIKINE MINING DIVISION.
There was no activity, other than some prospecting, during 1944 in this area.
CARIBOO AREA.
Willow River Watershed.
(53° 121° S.W.) The dam at the head of this company's pit was
Lowhee Mining   removed at the beginning of 1944.    This slowed down the operation
Co., Ltd. somewhat, making it necessary to do more sledging of boulders so that
the water available from Ella and Groundhog Lakes would carry them
through the long 4-foot-wide flume. Only during August and September, in which
months the rainfall was very heavy, was there enough water to handle the boulders.
The face of the pit was advanced about 200 feet during the season and will probably
connect with the Stouts Gulch pit in 1945. The bottom of the channel widened considerably making it necessary to install two flumes in the form of a " V " to carry away
the washed gravels. The deep portion of the channel appears to be swinging towards
the east side of the pit. This, together with the difference in the bed-rock elevations
in the Lowhee pit and Stouts Gulch pit, suggests a possibility that the upper part of
the latter pit is on the flank of the deep channel. More will be known about this in
1945 when the top ends of the two pits will be connected. Estimated yardage from
the pit washed during the season was about 150,000 cubic yards. The crew consisted
of twelve men and a cook.
Rouchon Creek Placers.— (53° 121° S.W.) Work was curtailed considerably in 1944
and the recovery was very low.
Lease of C. Risberg.— (53° 121° S.W.) C. Risberg continued to sluice at his small
pit in Beaver Pass and made a small recovery of gold from the 2,700 cubic yards of
gravel which he estimates he washed.
Lease of Dr. Hougen.—.(53° 121° S.W.) P. McColm, who is working this ground
alone on a lay, is reported to have had a very successful season. The ground he is
working is very shallow but is apparently quite rich. PROGRESS NOTES. A 77
J. Powell Estate Lease.— (53° 121° S.W.) J. Chouse, with Izydor Andracki as a new
partner, continued to operate this lease on Coulter Creek which he is purchasing on
a time basis from the J. Powell estate. They removed a bulge of ground left previously
because of buildings on it and obtained exceptionally good returns for about four
months of piping. The remainder of 1944 was spent in building a new cabin, cutting
blocks, and clearing ground. It is understood that a shortage of lumber for sluice-
boxes made it necessary to stop piping.
Lease of H. C. and H. L. Ailport.— (53° 121° S.W.) This lease lies at the bottom of
Nelson Creek close to the old Sangdang operation of Wm. Hong and associates. Gravel
from odd patches totalling about 1,000 cubic yards was washed.
Red Gulch Placers.—(53° 121° S.W.) J. J. Gunn, layman, reports that he worked
alone all season and was accordingly much handicapped. Despite this he was able to
pipe off some 6,000 cubic yards at a new set-up, which gave him a better chance to
dispose of his tailings.
Lease of E. Rask.—(53° 121° S.W.) It is reported that E. Rask piped all season at
his small pit on Devil's Canyon Creek, about 5 miles west of Wells.
Langford Placers.—(53° 121° S.W.) At this operation, 7 miles north of the Wells
highway at Beaver Pass, Mr. Langford spent most of his time driving a tunnel at the
confluence of Aura Fina Creek with Tregillus Creek. He was searching for a channel
which he believed existed behind a rim of rock north-westerly across Tregillus Creek
from his previous operations.
Williams Creek Watershed.
Stouts Gulch.— (53° 121° S.W.) J. Marok obtained permission from the Lowhee
Mining Company to work out remnants of the old pay-gravels which had been left by
previous operators.    He had a small hydraulic plant.
Mink Gulch.—(53° 121° S.W.) R. Sehl, who previously worked Stouts Gulch, went
into partnership with G. Simmons to work the lease of W. H. Savery on a percentage
basis. Because of trouble over water rights, Sehl withdrew from the partnership.
Simmons continued to operate for a while but with mediocre results.
Walker Gulch.—(53° 121° S.W.) B. Stoyva obtained a lay on the J. J. Gunn lease
on this gulch, and with three others, working on a partnership basis, started work
but soon stopped, apparently because of unsatisfactory returns.
McArthur Gulch.— (53° 121° S.W.) K. Johannson continued piping but spent most
of his time prospecting for pay-gravel.    His returns were low.
Little Valley Creek.—(53° 121° S.E.) G. Halvoresen, lessee, hydraulicked about
800 cubic yards for a small recovery of gold.
J. T. A. Fleury reported sluicing about 2,000 cubic yards of gravel, averaging about
40 cents per yard.
J. J. Curtis Operation.—(53° 121° S.W.) J. J. Curtis, financed by Van Bibber
interests, continued to work on the east side of Williams Creek, below the town of
Barkerville. Col. J. E. Hamming took charge later in the season and was apparently
successful in making an agreement with the Mink Gulch interests concerning water
rights.
Antler Creek Watershed.
Waverly Placers.—(53° 121° S.E.) W. Moore continued to pipe shallow ground but
it was reported that it was not as good as that worked in 1943.
Nugget Gulch Placers.— (53° 121° N.E.) At the time of inspection, N. M. Hansen
and one other man were opening up a new pit. It is understood that the clean-up
proved disappointing. For a while it was thought that the continuation of the old
rich channel had been located. A 78 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Eight-mile Lake.— (53° 121° S.W.) M. A. Anderson, lessee, continued working at
Eight-mile Lake but nothing is known regarding the outcome of the year's operations.
Pinus Creek.— (53° 122° N.E.) J. Doody, lessee, continued to pipe and ground-
sluice on this creek and put about 1,600 cubic yards through his boxes. He also did
some road-work to facilitate moving supplies to the operation.
Lease of A. Holm.— (53° 121° S.E.) Holm and one other man sluiced about 2,000
cubic yards for one of the better gold recoveries of the season.
Lease of C. Bindschedlar.— (53° 121° S.E.) Bindschedlar spent a short time by himself ground-sluicing.
Lease of J. A. Sauve.— (52° 121° N.E.) Sauve and partner opened up a small pit
near the junction of Nugget Gulch and Antler Creek. The work to date can all be
classed as prospecting.
Lease of E. S. Dowsett.— (53° 121° S.E.) Dowsett estimates that he moved about
1,000 cubic yards of dirt in opening up his ground.    Some gold was recovered.
Guyet Placers, Ltd.— (53° 121° S.E.) New interests have obtained this ground,
which is situated on the slopes of Guyet Mountain, about 6 miles south-east of Barkerville. Considerable repair-work was done to the entire plant. This consisted of
cleaning out the pit and ditches, changing the pipe-line, and rebuilding bridges for
flumes.
Cunningham Creek.
Lease of Wm. Beamish.— (52° 121° N.E.) Beamish purchased and installed a small
monitor and pipe-line in 1944.
Lease of D. Jorgeson.— (52° 121° N.E.) It appears that very little work was done
on this ground in 1944.
Lightning Creek Watershed.
B. and K. Placers.— (53° 121° S.W.) This company again restricted its activities to
the Dunbar Flats ground. Only two men were obtainable for this operation. After
the channel pinched out and a new pit failed to find further pay-gravels, the operation
was closed for the season.
Lease of I. I. Felker.— (53° 121° S.W.) At this lease on Butchers Bench, about
opposite the confluence of Amador Creek with Lightning Creek, I. I. Felker piped all
season.    He handled about 5,000 cubic yards of gravel according to his estimation.
Ennerdale Placers.— (53° 121° S.W.) Hind and Freeman estimate that, they piped
about 2,000 cubic yards of pay-gravels from their pit at Grub Gulch. A well-mineralized
shear, which was exposed by this work, failed to carry gold values.
Slade Placers, Ltd.— (53° 121° S.W.) This company's operation on Mostique Creek
continued to be worked under the supervision of Mrs. M. Caldwell. With two men
she was piping out the last shallow gravels on the north-west corner of the property.
It is estimated that 25,000 cubic yards was removed but the gold recovery was very
low and it is doubtful if the operation will continue. It is impossible to open up new
ground with the present available crew.
Houseman Creek.— (53° 121° S.W.) Mr. and Mrs. L. Biggs continued to develop
their property on Houseman Creek. This was previously referred to as the lease of
G. Murphy.
Lease of Magnus Sundburg.— (53° 121° S.W.) This property had not been worked
for several years; in 1944 Sundburg took one man in as a partner and began ground-
sluicing on a small scale.
Cottonwood River Watershed.
Lease of M. Murloek.—(53° 122° S.E.) The gravels on this ground are getting
deeper and consequently require a stronger flow of water. Murloek accordingly spent
his time making a dam so that he might procure the necessary flow of water. PROGRESS NOTES. A 79
Lease of H. D. Wagner.—(53° 121° N.W.) Because he did not realize that he had
to apply for exemption each year under the provisions of the " Free Miners' Exemption Act," Wagner allowed his ground to lapse after doing a considerable amount of
preparatory work on it.    It is now held in reserve.
(52° 121° N.W., 52° 122° N.E.)    The St. Eugene Mining Corporation,
Sovereign Creek, Limited, has optioned and staked placer-ground along these water-
Reddish River,' courses and proposes to do considerable testing.    A trail has been
and Little Swift   made to above Eskridge Creek and a cabin built at the end of it.
Rlver- Several cross-sections of test shafts have been collared-in pending the
arrival of pumping equipment to permit testing below ground-water
level. A survey of the valley flats and low benches has also been started to aid in
placing the test-work.
Quesnel River Watershed.
St. Eugene Mining Corporation, Limited.    (52° 121° N.E.)    In addi-
Spanish Creek    ^on to *ne Sovereign Creek ground mentioned above, this corporation
North Fork of the has procured the old Ruby Pit at the mouth of Spanish Creek and the
Quesnel River,    holdings of Ashby and Speers a short distance below Spanish Creek
on the North Fork of the Quesnel River.
A remnant of the Ruby Pit channel was hydraulicked practically up to the pipeline.    As further work could not be done without disturbing the pipe-line and as it
appeared that there was not much of the channel left before it again entered the main
river, this work was discontinued.
On the Ashby and Speers ground an old Northwestern shovel was used to dig
test-pits along the benches up-stream from the pit and camp. It is understood that
later in the season the pipe-line was rearranged to give a better head than Ashby had,
and some piping was done at the old pit.
Some drilling was also done and it is understood that another channel has been
located by this work.
(52° 121° N.E.)    With H. Asserlind as partner this year, J. Has-
Lease of        brouck continued piping at his operation on Barr Creek, about 12
J. Hasbrouck.    miles north of Keithley.    When he ran out of pay-dirt he dropped
back to the bottom end of the pit and began to pipe out what appeared
to be a spillover into the pit from the south bank.    It is understood that some good
pay-gravel was found here but that it was again cut through.
McGregor and Tait.— (52° 121° N.E.) It is reported that McGregor and Tait continued to develop their ground at Keithley Falls by use of boom-gates.
Lease of Adolph Anderson.— (52° 121° N.E.) This lease is on the north shore of the
North Fork of Quesnel River, about opposite Murderer's Gulch. Anderson estimated
that he washed 3,000 cubic yards of gravel, working all summer with a wheelbarrow.
An old 90-foot shaft in the gravels near-by indicates the presence of a deep channel.
LILLOOET AREA.
Bridge River Watershed.
Principia Placers, Ltd.— (50° 122° N.E.) At this company's property on the west
bank of the Bridge River, about 20 miles from Lillooet, work was done by local labour
whenever it was available. The crew varied from two to four men who were employed
in piping out a small test-pit.
Lease of Wm. Haylmore.—(50° 122° N.E.) The long cut that Mr. Haylmore has
been driving into the gravel bank at the mouth of the Hurley River was advanced
about 50 feet during 1944. This cut is about 12 feet wide and 12 feet deep. It is
walled with the large wash and double track is laid on the floor. Two end-dump 1-ton
cars are used to carry the fines to the sluice-boxes at the end of the cut. A 80 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Lease of C. Wihksne.—(50° 122° N.E.) Mr. Wihksne reports that he advanced his
gravel cut about 40 feet.
Fraser River.
Lease of L. D. Leonard.—(50° 121° N.W.) This lease is situated at the mouth of
Sallus Creek, about 14 miles up the Fraser River from Lillooet. During the early
spring Mr. Leonard made a road from the highway to the property and repaired an
old cabin to serve as his living-quarters. In the late fall and winter he spent some
time advancing the lower of two exploratory adits a distance of 50 feet from the
adit at the edge of the Fraser River. The floor-level, which was controlled by the
level of the water in the Fraser River, was some 6 feet above the bottom of the channel.
The gravel is shovelled directly into the sluice-box from the face. A grizzly is used to
separate the coarse wash from the fine wash. The former is trammed out of the working while the latter is sluiced out. Water from Sallus Creek is carried by flume to
two storage-tanks outside the adit then to the head end of the sluice-box at the face.
This exploratory work can be done only when the Fraser River is low. Some coarse
gold has been obtained.
Leases of G. A. Carter.— (50° 121° N.W.) These leases are located on the east bank
of the Fraser River, about 10 miles south of Lillooet. An old road leading to a cabin
on the property was cleaned out and some testing of the gravels was done at various
points. Most of the work was done at the foot of a big bluff on its up-stream side
where some gold was found. Very heavy wash was also present at this point and
hindered the test-work considerably. This was not a suitable location for testing but
there are some sections of the property that might be tested to advantage.
PRINCETON AREA.
No activity in placer-gold deposits during 1944 was reported.
BARITE.
GOLDEN AREA.
(51° 116° S.W.) Capital: 1,000 shares, $100 par; issued, 500. This
Summit Lime property, about 6 miles from Parson on the Kootenay Central Rail-
Works, road, is owned by the Summit Lime Works, of Lethbridge, Alta. The
deposit consists of a vein of high-grade barite from 5 to 20 feet wide
which can be traced on the surface for more than 1,000 feet. This deposit has supplied
about 1,000 tons a year, the material being shipped to Lethbridge. Investigation has
shown that barite is an excellent material for permanent ballast in the 10,000-ton
freight ships now being built in coast shipyards. The Northern Construction Company and J. W. Stewart, Limited, have a contract to supply some 45,000 long tons of
barite for this purpose and have taken over the operation of this property. The preliminary work was started in June. The road from Parson to the mine was repaired.
A camp to provide accommodation for about twenty men, consisting of bunk-house,
cook-house, dry, warehouse, etc., was built at the property. The material was mined
by quarrying and loaded into trucks with a small gasoline-operated shovel. Other
mechanical equipment comprised two small portable gasoline-driven compressors, providing compressed air for drilling, seven standard 3-ton trucks, and a tractor provided
with a bulldozer blade. A total crew of twenty men was employed under the direction
of J. T. MacNeill.    A total of 14,334 tons was mined during 1944.    Of this 2,426 tons PROGRESS NOTES. A 81
has been stock-piled and the remainder shipped to the coast. In addition to this tonnage, seven 50-ton cars have been loaded for the Summit Lime Works' operation at
Lethbridge, as the Northern Construction Company's contract called for the filling of
the requirements of this company.
CLAY AND SHALE.
NEW WESTMINSTER AREA.
(49° 121° S.W.)    Company office, 850 Hastings Street West, Van-
Clayburn Co.,    couver, B.C.;   W. C. Cummings, Secretary-Treasurer;   J. W. Ball,
Ltd. Manager.    The mines and plant of this company are at Kilgard, about
50 miles east of Vancouver. The mines are operated on the room-
and-pillar system. The fireclay from the Kilgard mine is hauled by storage-battery
electric locomotive to the plant, and from 4b and No. 9 mine by truck. About thirteen
men are steadily employed underground. The production for 1944 amounted to: Fireclay from Kilgard, 15,479 tons; No. 4b, 1,695 tons; No. 9 mine, 2,295 tons; and shale
from quarry, 2,170 tons;  total production, 21,639 tons.
Riehmix Clay Co.—(49° 121° S.W.) 2891 Twelfth Avenue East, Vancouver, B.C.;
Geo. Richmond, Manager. A small mine has been opened up by this company near
the eastern boundary of the Clayburn company. A slope has been driven down about
200 feet and two men are employed.    Production for 1944 was 5,189 tons of fireclay.
GABRIOLA ISLAND.
Gabriola Shale Products Quarry.— (49° 123° S.W.) Evans, Coleman and Evans, Operators, Vancouver, B.C.; F. A. Higgs, Manager, Gabriola Island, B.C. This quarry was
idle in 1943 but resumed operations on May 15th, 1944. With a crew of six men
employed at the quarry and five men around the surface plant, work was carried on
for the rest of the year.
GYPSUM.
FALKLAND AREA.
(50° 119° N.W.)    Head office, Paris, Ontario;  British Columbia office,
Gypsum, Lime    509 Richards Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   British Columbia Manager,
and Alabastine,   Norman Jessiman, Vancouver, B.C.;   Quarry Superintendent, Alex.
Canada, Ltd.     Jessiman,  Falkland,  B.C.    Capital:   500,000 shares,  no par value;
issued, 440,043.    This company again confined its Falkland operation
to the No. 2 and No. 5 quarries, 40 miles south of Kamloops, near the Vernon-Kamloops
Highway.    Shipping facilities are provided by the Canadian National Railways at
Falkland, over which normally the gypsum is shipped to the calcining and board mill
at Port Mann, B.C.    However, because of the destruction of this mill by fire early in
July, most of the subsequent output was shipped to the Calgary mill, which in turn
supplied part of the west coast requirements of processed gypsum.    Shipments were
also made to the Canada Cement Company at Exshaw, Alta., and the Pacific Coast
Cement Company at Bamberton, B.C. A 82 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
The gypsum is mined in open quarries. The overburden is thin and with the
quarrying advancing into the hillside the walls rise to a considerable height above the
quarry-floors. This makes it necessary to keep the walls at a safe angle of inclination, and well barred down, for the safety of workmen. Drilling is done by compressed-
air operated jack-hammers. In addition to the actual quarrying a drag-line scraper
was used to remove overburden above the No. 5 quarry during the summer. The
quarries are 500 to 600 feet higher than the railway-bunkers, to which the gypsum is
transported by trucks.
A crew of eleven men was employed and 26,000 tons of gypsum was produced.
This is a reduction of approximately 7,000 tons below the 1943 output. The destruction of the Port Mann mill was chiefly responsible for the decreased output.
LIMESTONE.
KOEYE RIVER AREA.
Koeye Limestone Co.— (51° 127° N.W.) P. Christensen, Manager. The quarry is
on Koeye River, about 7 miles south of Namu. It was worked for 321 days and produced 13,374 tons of limestone. The entire output was taken by Pacific Mills at Ocean
Falls.
GRAND FORKS AREA.
Fife Limestone Quarry, Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Ltd.—-(49° 118°
S.E.) This company owns and operates the Fife Limestone Quarry, near Christina
Lake. A crew of nine men was employed during the summer under the direction of
G. E. Clayton, of Trail. No development-work was done during 1944, all the material
mined being taken from the glory-hole which was opened up in 1943. This working
is practically exhausted and it is planned to mine by open-cut and gas-shovels in the
future. A total of 15,700 tons of limestone was mined and shipped to Trail during
the season.    This material is used chiefly for fluxing purposes in the smelter.
TEXADA ISLAND.
Pacific Lime Co.—(49° 124° N.W.) Chas. W. Lowman, Manager. Capital: 5,000
preferred, $100 par, 10,000 common, $100 par; issued, 2,500 preferred, 7,500 common.
No. 2 quarry is the only operation carried on at present by this company at Blubber
Bay. Six kilns are working, producing quicklime and hydrated lime. In addition,
other limestone products are marketed. More than 40,000 tons of limestone is quarried
per year. Thirty-four men are employed in the quarry. This plant has been worked
continuously throughout 1944, and if more men had been available it could have had
a higher production.
Texada Quarry, B.C. Cement Co.— (49° 124° N.W.) The company operated a limestone quarry on the opposite shore of Blubber Bay from the Pacific Lime Company.
A new 36- by 48-inch Dominion jaw-crusher driven by a 160-horse-power motor has
been installed. This will allow increased production. The limestone is shipped to
the company's cement plant at Bamberton. R. Hamilton is in charge of operations.
Nineteen men are employed.
Vananda Quarries.— (49° 124° N.W.) Operated by Beale Quarries, Limited. This
quarry is situated a short distance from Vananda. An agricultural lime plant capable
of producing 60 tons per day is being operated. Limestone is shipped to various pulp-
mills and crushed limestone is produced for various purposes, including limestone-dust PROGRESS NOTES. A 83
for the coal mines, stucco dash, explosives, etc.    Twenty men are employed under the
supervision of W. D. Webster.
VANCOUVER ISLAND..
Bamberton, B.C. Cement Co.— (48°. 123° N.W.) Company office, corner of Fort and
Wharf Streets, Victoria, B.C. Capital: 15,995 "A" preferred, $100 par; 15,995
"B" preferred, $100 par; 10 common, $100 par; issued, 32,000. This company
operates quarries at Bamberton and Texada Island and a cement plant at Bamberton.
At Bamberton the total crew employed in the cement plant and quarry averages 120
men.    A shortage of labour hindered production during 1944.
SILICA.
Bailey Silica,
GRAND FORKS AREA.
(49°  118°  S.E.)     This property, 3 miles south of Grand Forks, is
owned by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada,
Consolidated     Limited.    A crew of nine men was employed during the summer
M. and S. Co. of under the direction of G. E. Clayton, of Trail.    Mining was carried
Canada, Ltd.     on jn the same manner as in 1943;   that is, by loading into trucks
with a small gasoline-shovel.    A new siding on the Great Northern
Railway,  about %  mile from the quarry,  greatly facilitated the handling of the
material and did away with the necessity of the 3-mile haul into Grand Forks.   A total
of 24,000 tons of high-grade silica was mined and shipped to Trail to be used as a flux
in smelting operations.    At the end of the season's operation the property was closed
and the shovel, Diesel plant, and all other equipment were removed.
STONE, SAND, AND GRAVEL.
VANCOUVER AREA.
North Vancouver.
Deeks Sand and Gravel Co., Ltd.—(49° 123° S.E.) Company office, 101 First Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C.;   T. O. Burgess, Superintendent.    Seven men are employed.
Highland Sand and Gravel Co.—(49° 123° S.E.) North Vancouver. About nine men
are employed.
Road Materials, Ltd.— (49° 123° S.E.)    North Vancouver.    Seven men are employed.
NEW WESTMINSTER AREA.
Gilley Bros. Quarry.— (49° 122° S.W.) A granite quarry and crushing plant is operated at Silver Valley, Pitt River. The stone is used for construction-work. About
twenty men are employed.
Maryhill Sand and Gravel Co.— (49° 122° S.W.) This quarry and screening plant is
operated by Gilley Brothers on the Fraser River bank, about 3 miles from Coquitlam.
More than twenty men are employed regularly. A 84 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
NELSON ISLAND.
Vancouver Granite Co.— (49° 124° S.E.) A dimension stone granite quarry is operated by this company on Nelson Island, when there is a demand for stone. About ten
men are employed when it is operating.
VANCOUVER ISLAND.
Cassidy Gravel-pit.— (49° 123° S.W.) A. Galloway, Foreman. This quarry is in the
Cassidy district, convenient to the main Island Highway, and is operated by the Public
Works Department to supply gravel and other supplies when required for highway
construction and repairs. A crew of four men was employed during 1944 as occasion
demanded. No explosives were necessary in this operation. The various benches in
the quarry proper have been kept fairly well trimmed and working conditions were
found satisfactory. COAL MINES. A 85
COAL MINES.
by
James Dickson.
The Province is divided into six Inspection Districts, as follows:—
Inspection District. Mining Divisions in Districts.
Coast Alberni, Nanaimo, Victoria, Vancouver, and New Westminster.
Northern Interior Lillooet, Ashcroft, Clinton, Quesnel,
Cariboo, and Peace River.
Interior   Similkameen, Osoyoos, Nicola, Vernon,
and Kamloops.
East Kootenay and Boundary„„.Greenwood,    Trail    Creek,    Nelson,
Slocan, Ainsworth, Lardeau, Revel-
stoke, Fort Steele, and Golden.
Northern Atlin, Stikine, Portland Canal, Skeena,
and Omineca.
The Inspectors inspect the coal mines, metalliferous mines, and quarries in their
respective districts.
Board op Examiners for Coal-mine Officials.
James Dickson Chairman, Victoria.
James Strang Secretary, Victoria.
H. E. Miard Member, Fernie.
Messrs. Strang and Miard and the Inspector of Mines of the district in which an
examination is being held form the Board for granting certificates of competency to
coal-miners.
An Inspector of Mines is empowered to grant provisional certificates to miners for
a period not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations.
Richard Nichol Nanaimo Station.
James L. Brown Cumberland Station.
Alfred Gould l Princeton Station.
Joseph J. Haile Fernie Station.
The District Inspectors of Mines have their headquarters in the different mining
areas as follows: John MacDonald, Nanaimo; James Strang, Victoria; Robert B.
Bonar, Cumberland; James A. Mitchell, Lillooet; E. R. Hughes, Princeton; Hamilton
C. Hughes, Nelson; H. E. Miard, Fernie; and Charles Graham, Prince Rupert.
PRODUCTION.
The total tonnage produced by the coal mines of the Province for the year 1944
was 1,933,639 tons, being an increase of 111,985 tons or 6.1 per cent, over 1943.
The Coast District, which includes Vancouver Island, Nicola-Princeton, and Northern Districts, produced 812,394 tons, a decrease of 81,778 tons from 1943.
Vancouver Island Collieries produced 689,714 tons, a decrease of 40,275 tons or
5.5 per cent, from 1943.
The Northern District produced 38,233 tons, an increase of 20,109 tons or 110.4
per cent, over 1943.
The Nicola-Princeton District produced 85,027 tons, a decrease of 61,032 tons or
41.1 per cent, from 1943. A 86
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
The East Kootenay District produced 1,120,665 tons, an increase of 193,183 tons
or 20.8 per cent, over 1943.
The following table shows the output and per capita production daily and for the
year 1944 at the various mines:—
Output and Per Capita Production, 1944.
Colliery and Mine.
Comox Colliery (No. 5 mine)	
Comox Colliery (No. 8 mine)	
South Wellington (No. 10 mine).
Wellington mine  	
Pr osp ect mine— 	
White Rapids mine— —	
Chambers' mine  	
Loudon mine	
Cassidy mine  	
Lewis* mine	
Deer Home mine	
Lake Road mine.	
Wellington No. 9 —
Pacific mine 	
Stronach mine...	
Middlesboro Colliery..
Merritt coal mines	
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co—
Tulameen mine — 	
Jackson mine (British Lands)..
Coldwater (Merritt)  	
Bulkley Valley Colliery..
Telkoal Colliery	
nS
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Coldspring mine (Cariboo) -
Hat Creek Colliery	
Packwood mine (Peace River)	
Gething mine (Peace River)	
Hasler Creek mine (Peace River).
Peace River mine (Peace River)....
Elk River Colliery-
Michel Colliery...	
Corbin Colliery (open cast)..
132,378
209,396
259,308
71,362
3,786
2,540
2,714
838
1,296
671
2,798
403
555
590
1,079
10,240
8,529
18,038
47,687
233
300
12,802
20,006
46
568
2,700
566
777
768
304,421
650,594
165,650
275
276
274
170
281
100
225
234
254
254
233
264
289
263
255
77
228
96
279
91
133
285
280
10
64
145
75
95
295
295
197
321
400
313
107
7
27
7
3
5
2
6
4
2
2
5
82
26
77
73
4
4
38
48
2
6
20
9
13
42
367
698
114
1.50
1.89
3.02
3.92
1.92
0.94
1.28
1.19
1.02
1.31
2.00
0.37
0.95
1.12
0.84
1.62
1.43
2.43
2.34
0.63
0.56
1.14
1.49
2.30
1.47
0.93
0.84
0.60
0.30
2.84
3.16
7.37
h.
QJ aj c
c 5 o
lit-
rt c *
o c v
412
523
828
667
541
279
259
335
466
100
277
295
216
125
328
234
653
58
75
337
417
23
94
135
63
59
18
840
932
1,453
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•3 ■Sag
239
312
276
91
6
25
5
3
4
2
5
4
2
2
4
55
16
59
62
28
32
1
4
11
276
582
2.01
2.43
3.46
4.61
2.24
1.02
2.41
1.19
1.27
1.31
2.40
0.37
0.95
1.12
1.13
2.48
2.33
3.19
2.75
0.84
0.56
1.60
2.23
4.60
2.22
1.70
1.02
1.02
2.10
3.70
3.80
0) S a; c
a h v o
o c c 0J
554
671
939
784
631
102
543
279
324
335
559
100
277
295
270
191
533
306
769
78
75
457
625
46
142
245
77
97
40
1,103
1,118
Collieries of Vancouver Island Inspection District.
The output of Vancouver Island Collieries was 689,714 tons. Of this amount
124,358 tons or 18 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market; 4,629 tons or 0.6
per cent, was consumed by operating companies as fuel; 565,077 tons was sold in the
competitive market; 4,350 tons of this was taken from stock. Of the amount sold in
the competitive market 510,880 tons or 90.4 per cent, was sold in Canada and 54,197
tons or 9.6 per cent, was sold in the United States.
Collieries op the Nicola-Princeton District.
Of the gross output of 85,027 tons produced by the collieries of the Nicola-Princeton District, 2,831 tons or 3.3 per cent, was consumed by the producing companies as
fuel, 26 tons was added to stock, and 82,170 tons was sold in the competitive market
in Canada. COAL MINES.
A 87
Collieries of the Northern District.
Out of a total of 38,233 tons produced, 1,234 tons was used by the operating companies as fuel, 220 tons was added to stock, 36,779 tons was sold in Canada, and 18 tons
in the United States.
Collieries of the East Kootenay District.
The output of the collieries in the East Kootenay District was 1,120,665 tons. Of
this amount 62,868 tons or 5.6 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market; 17,757
tons or 1.6 per cent, was consumed by producing companies as fuel; 113,056 tons or
10 per cent, was used in making coke; 901, 422 tons was sold in the competitive market;
and 21,458 tons was added to stock. Of the amount sold in the competitive market,
745,197 tons or 82.6 per cent, was sold in Canada and 156,225 tons or 17.4 per cent,
was sold in the United States.
The following table shows the per capita production of the various districts for
the past five years. Similar figures for the years prior to 1940 are shown in previous
Annual Eeports.
Output and Per Capita Production in Various Districts.
Year.
District.
Total
Coal mined
during Year,
Tons.
Total No. of   [           Coal
Employees    I      mined per
at Producing j  Employee for
Collieries.     |    Year, Tons.
|
No. of Men
employed
Underground
in Producing
Collieries.
Coal
mined per
Underground
Employee
for Year,
Tons.
.
776,618
891,309
1,667,827
1,026,053
776,300
802,353
1,047,713
890<,445
1,938,158
927,482
894,172
1,821,654
1,120,665
812,974
1,933,639
731
2,143
2,874
921
1,802
2,723
864
1,496
2,360
1,150
1,701
2,851
1,179
1,660
2,839
1,062
462
580
1,114
431
662
1.210
599
821
806 ■
525
639
950
489
681
550
1,625
2,175
753
1,476
2,229
696
1,196
1,892
885
1,355
2,240
858
1,292
2,150
1,412
1940 J
1941 J
Coast District — 	
Whole Province 	
East Kootenay District. 	
548
766
1,632
526
Whole Province .... ..	
808
1,505
1942   J
744
1 024
1943   J
East Kootenay District
1,048
659
1944   J
Whole Province  	
East Kootenay District 	
813
1,306
629
I
The following table shows the production and distribution of coal by the various
collieries and districts, compiled from returns furnished by the owners:— A 88
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1944.
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209,396
259,308
71,362
3,786
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2,714
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B A 90
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT.
During 1944, 2,839 persons were employed in and about the coal mines of the
Province, a decrease of twelve from 1943. Taking the average of the principal mines
in the Vancouver Island District, about 9 per cent, of the working-days were lost,
principally through Saturday afternoon crews not working. In the Nicola-Princeton
District about 15 per cent, of the working-days were lost. In the East Kootenay
District the mines worked about 98 per cent, of the working-days.
COMPETITION OF COAL PRODUCED OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA.
During 1944 the shipment of Alberta coal to British Columbia totalled 678,960 tons
(short). Coke shipped was 67,770 tons and briquettes 39,009 tons. The following
table shows the amount of Alberta coal brought into British Columbia during past
years:—
Year. Short Tons.
1935  221,748
1936  244,928
1937  269,023
1938  238,435
1939  239,227
Year.
1940-
1941_
Short Tons.
311,232
304,928
1942  652,222
1943  963,000
1944  678,960
Of the 1,585,448 tons of British Columbia coal marketed 138,705 tons was sold for
domestic and industrial uses in the Provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba;
221,771 tons was sold for railroad use in the Provinces; 13,324 tons was sold for railroad use in the United States and 188,165 tons was sold for railroad use in British
Columbia; 207,116 tons was exported to the United States and 62,018 tons was sold for
ships' bunkers. The tonnage of British Columbia coal used for domestic and industrial
purposes in the Province was 754,349 tons.
ACCIDENTS IN AND AROUND COAL MINES.
During 1944, 2,839 persons were employed in and around coal mines. Three fatal
accidents occurred during the year as compared with eight during 1943. The ratio of
fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed was 1.06 as compared with 2.80 for 1943.
In 1942 the ratio was 4.23; in 1941, 1.47; in 1940, 2.08; in 1939, 0.67; in 1938,
3.37; in 1937, 3.17; in 1936, 2.84; and in 1935, 1.67. The average for the ten-year
period was 2.31.
The number of fatal accidents per 1,000,000 tons produced during 1944 was 1.55;
during 1943 the figure was 4.33; in 1942, 5.15; in 1941, 2.21; in 1940, 3.65; in 1939,
1.35; in 1938,7.63; in 1937, 6.92; in 1936, 5.94; and in 1935, 4.21. The average for
the ten-year period was 4.14 per 1,000,000 tons raised.
The following table shows the collieries at which the fatal accidents occurred during 1944 and comparative figures for 1943:—
Name of Company.
Name of Colliery.
1944.
1943.
No. 10 mine, South Wellington	
Granby No. 1 :  	
Coal Creek             	
1
2
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P. Co., Ltd	
1
Michel   	
Elk River	
3 COAL MINES.
A 91
The following table shows the various causes of fatal accidents in 1944 and their
percentages of the whole and comparative figures for 1943:—
Cause.
1944.
1943.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
Per Cent
By falls, of roof and coal 	
1
1
1
33.33
33.33
3
1
4
37.60
12.60
60.00
33.33
Totals	
3
100.00
8
100.00
The following table shows the number of tons of coal mined for each fatal accident
in their respective classes in the years 1944 and 1943:—
1944.
1943.
Cause.
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Fatal Accident.
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Fatal Accident.
1
1
1
1,933,639
1,933,639
3
1
4
607,218
1,821,654
455,413
1,933,639
Totals * J.  	
3
644,546
8
227,707
The number of tons of coal mined per fatal accident during 1944 was 644,546 tons,
compared with 227,707 tons in 1943. The average for the ten-year period was 241,367
tons.
The following table shows the fatalities from various causes in coal mines during
the year 1944 compared with 1943, according to Inspection Districts.
Number of Deaths from Accidents.
Totals.
District.
Falls of
Roof and
Coal.
Mine-cars
and
Haulage.
Bumps.
Miscellaneous
(Surface).
1944.
1943.
1
1
....
1
1
2
1
1
6
1
3
1
1
4
1
3
8
Ratio of Accidents.
Accident Death-rate.
District.
Per 1,000 Persons
employed.
Per 1,000,000 Tons of
Coal mined.
1944.
1943.
1944.
1943.
0.82
1.69
0.79
2.88
5.19
1.44'
1.78
1.37
6.84
6.46
1.06
2.80
1.56
Totals 1943 -	
4.33 A 92 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
The details regarding the occurrences of fatal accidents in coal mines during 1944
are as follows:—
The fatal accident which occurred to William J. Moore, miner, No. 10 mine,
Canadian Collieries (D.), Limited, on February 23rd resulted from deceased falling
about 8 feet from a plank scaffold from which he was loading a shot-hole. Some coal
fell from the face and broke the planks on which he was standing. He suffered injuries
to the bladder from which he died two days later.
The fatal accident which occurred to James Galloway, steam-locomotive driver,
Elk River Colliery, Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, on May 26 resulted from
his head being crushed between the side of his locomotive and a timber support of
an overhead snow-shed when he was leaning out from the window of the locomotive
cab. Swelling ground had thrown the track out of alignment and tilted that side of
the locomotive towards the timber which normally gave sufficient clearance.
The fatal accident which occurred to Thomas Millar, driver, No. 1 East mine,
Elk River Colliery, Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, on December 6th resulted
from deceased being crushed between the front of a loaded car on which he was riding
and a dislodged roof-timber on a level road near a working-face in pillar-extraction
work. Some coal had fallen from above the timbers at this point and deceased had
one of the miners remove this coal, but the work was not completed when deceased
came out with a loaded car. The miner signalled Millar to stop, but apparently the
latter did not understand the signal or was unable to stop his horse, which mounted
the small pile of coal on the floor and displaced a roof-timber with its collar and
deceased was crushed between this timber and the loaded car. He died from his injuries
the following day. Deceased was on special furlough from the army to assist in coal
production. COAL MINES.
A 93
EXPLOSIVES.
The following table shows the quantity of explosives used in coal mines during
1944, together with the number of shots fired, tons of coal produced per pound of
explosive used, and the average pounds of explosive per shot fired (these quantities
include all explosives used for breaking coal and for rock-work in coal mines):—
Vancouver Island District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosives
used in
Pounds.
Coal
mined,
Tons.
Total No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosives
per Shot
fired.
30,431
67,550
71,600
15,175
1,800
15,825
2,100
900
700
850
2,240
350
750
350
1,550
132,378
209,396
259,308
71,362
3,786
2,540
2,714
838
1,296
671
2,798
403
555
590
1,079
30,431
67,550
68,400
25,450
4,200
14,550
3,300
1,450
1,150
1,250
3,250
432
1,169
845
1,450
4.35
3.10
3.63
4.70
2.10
0.16
1.28
0.98
1.85
0.79
1.25
1.23
0.74
1.70
0.70
1.00
Comox Colliery (No. 8 mine)	
South Wellington (No. 10 mine) -	
1.00
1.04
0.59
0.43
White Rapids mine -	
1.08
0.37
0.62
0.61
0 69
Deer Home mine 	
0.69
0.81
Wellington No. 9- _	
0.64
Pacific mine  	
0.41
1.07
212,171
689,714
224,877
3.25
0.94
Nicola-Princeton District.
Middlesboro Colliery .
Merritt Coal Mines, Ltd—
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co..
Tulameen mine —	
Jackson mine (British Lands)..
Coldwater (Merritt)	
Totals for district..
Northern District.
Bulkley Valley Colliery	
Telkoal Colliery... 	
Coldspring mine (Cariboo)
Hat Creek Colliery —	
Packwood mine (Peace)	
Gething mine (Peace)—	
Hasler Creek mine (Peace)
Peace River mine (Peace)..
Totals for district-
2,400
6,287
2,000
1,200
600
650
650
13,787
12,802
20,006
46
568
2,700
566
777
768
38,233
5,000
7,710
1,500
2,000
900
1,200
1,200
19,510
5.33
3.18
0.28
2.25
0.94
1.19
1.18
2.77
0.48
0.81
1.33
0.60
0.66
0.54
0.54
0.70
East Kootenay District.
36,640
45,000
2,900
304,421
650,594
165,650
45,000
50,284
1,683
8.31
14.45
57.12
0.81
0.89
1.72
84,540
1,120,665
96,967
13.25
0.87
337,093
1,933,639
379,564
5.91
0.86 A 94
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Quantity op Different Explosives used.
Monobel of different grades..
Permissible rock-powder	
Stumping-powder (on surface).
Total	
Lb.
309,370
25,123
2,600
337,093
MACHINE-MINED COAL.
During the year 1944, mining-machines produced approximately 1,195,415 tons or
62 per cent, of the total.
The following table gives the district, number of machines, how driven, and type
of machines used:—
Number driven by
Type of Machine used.
District.
Electricity.
Compressed
Air.
Chain Undercutting.
Puncher
Type.
....
27
15
63
5
21
9
6
15
54
5
110
30
80
In addition to the above, 125 air-picks are used in the mines of the Crow's Nest
Pass Coal Company. COAL MINES.
A 95
SAFETY-LAMPS.
There were 2,773 safety-lamps in use in the coal mines of the Province. Of this
number 244 were flame safety-lamps of the Wolf type and 2,529 were electric lamps of
various makes.
The following table shows the distribution of lamps by district, method of locking,
and illuminant used:—
Vancouver Island District.
Method of Locking.
Illuminant used.
Colliery and Mine.
Magnetic
Lock.
Automatic
Clip.
Naphtha
Gasoline.
Electricity.
Comox Colliery (No. 5 mine) '  '	
01
76
15
12
2
3
1
2
2
1
3
2
2
1
5
226
338
290
154
22
27
10
5
2
18
6
2
2
7
37
33
15
8
2
3
1
2
2
1
3
2
2
1
2
250
381
290
15S
22
White Rapids mine —	
27
10
5
2
18
6
2
2
10
188
1,109
114
1,183
Nicola-Princeton District.
7
2
74
86
2
2
60
22
12
7
2
4
5
2
2
60
22
70
Tulameen mine 	
81
Coldwater (Merritt)	
12
173
94
22
245
Northern District.
Bulkley Valley mine.
Telkoal Colliery	
Cold Spring mine (Cariboo).
Hat Creek Colliery :	
Packwood mine (Peace).	
Gething mine (Peace)	
Hasler Creek (Peace) —
Peace River mine (Peace)..
Totals for district.
34
39
1
12
20
7
21
30
35
11
19
6
20
East Kootenay District.
Elk River Colliery	
360
715
	
30
65
330
650
Corbin Colliery (open cast)	
1,075
95
980
Totals for Province 	
1,570
1,203
244
2,529 A 96 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Approved Safety-lamps, Electric and Flame.
A list of the approved safety-lamps, both electric and flame, was published in the
1930 Annual Report.    The following lamps, all electric, are now also approved :—
No. 8.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18 of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for use in this lamp carries the symbol BM-18 and is
manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland,
Ohio.
No. 9.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18f of the United States Bureau of
Mines. This model of Edison lamp in reality represents an extension of the lamp
approval given under Approval No. 18. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp
carries the symbol BM-18F and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the
General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 10.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18h of the United States Bureau of
Mines. This lamp represents an extension of the No. 18 approval of the United States
Bureau of Mines. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol
BM-18H and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric
Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 11.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 24 of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-24 and
is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.    This lamp is known as the Edison Model J lamp.
No. 12.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 25 of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-25 and
is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.    This lamp is known as the Edison Model K lamp.
No. 13.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Koehler Manufacturing Company,
and known as the Super-Wheat Model "W" electric safety cap-lamp under Approval
No. 20 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
No. H.—The electric lamp manufactured by The Portable Lamp and Equipment
Company, and known as the "Portable" electric safety cap-lamp under Approval No.
27 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
(Unless otherwise specified, all lamps are cap-lamps.)
Note.—While the use of flame safety-lamps is permitted, it is the policy of the
Department of Mines to encourage the use of approved electric safety-lamps for all
persons underground in the coal mines, except such flame-lamps as may be required by
the officials of the mines in the carrying-out of their duty and in such cases as it is considered advisable to provide flame safety-lamps in addition to the electric safety-lamps. COAL MINES. A 97
ELECTRICITY.
Electricity is used for various purposes on the surface at eleven mines and underground at four.
The purposes for which it is used, together with the average horse-power in each
instance, is shown in the following table:—
Nature of its use. Average H.P.
Above ground—
Winding or hoisting  2,077
Ventilation     1,838
Haulage   1,920
Coal-washing   2,600
Miscellaneous   4,601
Total horse-power   13,036
Underground—
Haulage     1,352
Pumping   1,080
Coal-cutting  .   	
Miscellaneous   43
Total horse-power     2,475
Total horse-power above and below ground  15,511
Of the above practically all the current was alternating.
VENTILATION.
The reports of the District Inspectors give detailed information regarding the
ventilation in the main airways and working splits of the different mines, the figures
given being those resulting from air measurements taken during the last inspections
of the year.
At the Comox Colliery the production of methane makes it necessary to have
a separate ventilating split for each long-wall and even a liberal supply of air passing
along the faces. The additional gas released by intermittent roof movements makes
it necessary to prohit shot-firing at times. In such cases the Inspector orders that no
shot-firing shall be done until further inspection and report.
Methane Detection.
The Burrell Methane Detector and the M.S.A. Methane Detector were in general
use throughout the year to detect the presence of methane in percentages less than
could be detected by means of the flame safety-lamp.
The flame safety-lamp is in general use as the everyday means of testing for the
presence of methane by the firebosses and mine officials, and during the year intensive
efforts were made by the Inspectors to train firebosses and miners to estimate closely
the percentage of methane indicated by very small " gas-caps " on the flame safety-
lamp. This work was carried out underground where the gas-caps could be calibrated
immediately with the results found at the same time and place by one of the above-
named methane detectors.
While practically all workmen underground use the electric safety-lamp, many of
the miners were given practical instruction in the use of the flame safety-lamp as a
methane detector, and all new men who apply for a coal-miner's certificate of competency must show that they possess this knowledge. A 98 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Mine-air Samples.
The work of sampling mine-air was maintained throughout the year according to
the conditions existing or anticipated. While the results of the analyses of the samples
are not as immediately available as the information obtained by the methane detectors
or the flame safety-lamp, the report of analyses form a valuable record and offer
a means of checking the accuracy of the other means of methane testing. During the
year 191 samples were taken.
INSPECTION COMMITTEES.
At all the larger mines the miners fully observed the requirements of General
Rule 37 of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" by appointing and maintaining Inspection Committees which inspect the mines on behalf of the workmen every month. These
committees generally display an efficient interest in their work and as the personnel is
changed at three- or six-month intervals a large number of the miners have, in the
course of years, been brought directly into this work, which should provide an added
safety factor.
A report of each monthly inspection is sent to the District Inspector of Mines.
COAL-DUST.
During the year the sampling and analyses of coal-dust was well maintained, 2,479
samples were analysed.
Very few samples showed less than 50 per cent, incombustible content. If samples
show less than 50 per cent, incombustible content, or if in successive samples a tendency
for the incombustible content to decrease is noted, further treatment with lime-dust
is ordered immediately.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
On January 5th an outburst of gas immediately followed the firing of a shot in
a place in No. 1 Diagonal slope, No. 10 mine, South Wellington, and necessitated the
withdrawal of all the men in this section.   The gas was cleared out by the following day.
On January 26th an outburst of gas occurred in No. 10 mine, South Wellington,
in the same location as the above and about one minute after the firing of a shot in
the place. All the men were withdrawn, at once, the gas was removed, and work was
resumed on the following shift.
On February 16th an outburst of gas occurred in No. 10 mine, South Wellington,
in No. 1 Diagonal slope, following the firing of a second shot of a round. Three sets of
timber were displaced and a considerable tonnage of coal was loosened.
On March 4th, at No. 9 mine, Elk River Colliery, a coal-car broke away from a trip
at the upper landing of the main surface incline, which is 1,500 feet long, and was
derailed and smashed at the bottom of the incline near the transfer-house of the
retarding conveyer. No person was injured and safety-ropes are used on all trips
since this occurrence.
On March 8th a small fire occurred on the first landing of the mainway in the Main
shaft No. 8 mine, Comox Colliery. This shaft is also the main intake of the mine.
A cutting-torch had been used in repairing the shaft-gates at the upper landing and
apparently a piece of hot metal had fallen down the shaft to the landing and started
the fire, which was discovered and extinguished before any material damage was done.
On March 10th an outburst of gas occurred in a place in No. 1 Diagonal, No. 10
mine, South Wellington, immediately following the firing of the second shot of a round.
The gas was cleared out and work was resumed on the following day.
On March 16th an outburst of gas and coal occurred in the same place as the outburst of March 10th, immediately after the firing of two shots simultaneously.    This COAL MINES. A 99
outburst was accompanied by a loud rumbling noise. All men were withdrawn from
the district, the gas was cleared off, and work was resumed on the following shift.
This outburst was quite severe as the roadway was filled completely with the blown-
out coal for a distance of 40 feet from the original position of the face at the time of
firing the shots.
On April 11th an outburst of gas and coal occurred in a place in No. 1 Diagonal,
No. 10 mine, South Wellington, immediately following the firing of two shots simultaneously. All men were withdrawn and the gas was cleared sufficiently to permit
resumption of work on the following shift.
On April 20th an outburst of gas immediately following the firing of two shots
simultaneously in No. 5 Dip section, No. 1 Diagonal, at 1.30 a.m. All men were withdrawn.    Work resumed at 3 p.m.
On April 26th a small outburst of gas occurred in No. 1 Diagonal, No. 10 mine,
South Wellington, at 1.30 a.m.   Work was resumed at 9 a.m. on the same day.
On May 11th a bump occurred in No. 1 East mine, Coal Creek, affecting the main
entry and travelling-road between No. 12 and No. 14 entries. No serious personal
injuries resulted.
On August 28th in No. 8 shaft, Comox Colliery, a descending cage was jammed
in the shaft because failure of lag-screws at a joint in the guides allowed the guides to
get out of alignment and stop the cage.   There were no persons on the cage at this time.
On September 25th at No. 8 mine, Comox Colliery, one of the two friction-drives
on the right-hand drum of the hoist fractured across its full cross-section and caused
this compartment of the shaft to remain inactive until repairs were made. No person
was injured.
On October 2nd in the No. 1 Diagonal Slope district, No. 5 Dip section, a fairly
heavy outburst of gas occurred after the firing of one shot, at 8.45 p.m. Gas cleared
away and work resumed at 7 a.m., October 3rd.
On November 13th at No. 8 mine, Comox Colliery, two new hoisting-ropes were
being installed and while the ropes were being adjusted to their proper hoisting-length
a man who was riding on the top of a cage to supervise part of the work and prevent
kinking of the rope was hoisted into the head-frame and injured. The hoisting engineer had overlooked the fact that the indicator did not at this time indicate the exact
position of the cage.
On November 30th at No. 8 mine, Comox Colliery, the right-hand cage was jammed
while descending, due to the guides being out of alignment from failure of lag-screws.
Five lengths of guides were damaged and a new cage was placed in service. Following
this occurrence the lag-screws were replaced by bolts.
On December 7th a slight local bump occurred in No. 1 East mine, Coal Creek, in
the No. 8 East section.    No one was injured.
Bumps.
On May 11th a bump occurred in No. 1 East mine, Elk River Colliery, and did
considerable damage in the No. 12 and No. 14 East sections. Part of the damage
consisted of the serious heaving of some 300 feet of main roadways and the displacement
of timber. The shock was felt on the surface at a distance of 1 mile but was not
noticed by some men underground at a lesser distance. There were no serious personal injuries resulting from this bump.
On December 7th, in No. 1 East mine, Elk River Colliery, a slight local bump
occurred in No. 8 East section and displaced some timber and threw some coal from
the sides of pillars.    There were no persons injured. A 100
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Outbursts of Gas and Bumps.
During 1944 a number of outbursts of gas, sometimes accompanied by the projection of coal, were experienced in the No. 1 Diagonal section of No. 10 mine, Canadian
Collieries (D.), Limited, at South Wellington. These outbursts all occurred in the
part of the mine which has gained the greatest depth of cover and is at approximately
the same depth at which outbursts of gas and coal were experienced in the Cassidy
mine to the south and the Reserve mine to the north.
As present and previous experiences with outbursts of gas and coal showed that
most of the outbursts either accompanied or immediately followed, within a margin of
a few minutes, the firing of a shot in the place, and to eliminate the possibility of an
outburst coinciding with the firing of a second shot of a round with the possible ignition
of the released gas, the following regulation applicable to the affected area was introduced and was still in force at the end of 1944:—
" Re ' Coal-mines Regulation Act,' Section 101, General Rule (c),
Amendment, 19 U0.
" In view of the emergent conditions that exist due to repeated outbursts of gas
in the workings on the Dip side of the 7 Right level, No. 1 Diagonal slope, No. 10 mine,
Canadian Collieries (D.), Limited, and in accordance with the provisions of the ' Coalmines Regulation Act,' Section 101, General Rule 12 (c), 1940 Amendment, I prescribe
hereby the conditions under which explosives may be used in above-described area,
namely:—
"(1.) That an interval of not less than two hours shall elapse between the
firing of shots in any one working-face.
"(2.) That two shots, but not more than two shots, may be fired simultaneously
in one working-face by being connected electrically.
"(3.) That where two shots are fired simultaneously no one shot shall be
dependent on the work of the other shot.
"(4.) That where a new working-face is being started near the face of an
existing working-face both faces, for the purposes of this regulation,
shall be considered as one face until both working-faces have been
advanced at least twenty-five feet from the point of their divergence.
"(5.)  That all persons authorized to fire shots in the above-defined area shall
be supplied with and acknowledge the receipt of this order.
"(6.)  That this regulation is now in force and until further notice."
The above regulation has worked satisfactorily and it was intended to increase
the number of shots that may be fired simultaneously, but the above occurrences,
together with a marked inferiority of the seam in this direction, has caused the mining
company to abandon further advance in this area.
PROSECUTIONS.
During 1944 there were three prosecutions for infractions of the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act," as follows:—
Date.
Colliery.
Occupation of
Defendant.
Offence charged.
Judgment.
Feb. 22
April 27
Aug. 2     ....
Michel	
Comox	
Michel	
Miner __ _ _
Fireboss   , 	
Miner	
Riding on a trip without permission
Unlawfully charging a second shot
in a place before the first shot
was fired and the place examined
Had a cigarette in his possession
underground
Fined $5 and costs.
Fined $25 and costs.
Fined $10 and costs. COAL MINES.
A 101
GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS.
The Department of Mines maintains four fully-equipped mine-rescue stations in
charge of trained instructors. These are located in the chief mining centres of
Nanaimo, Cumberland, Princeton, and Fernie. Those at Nanaimo and Cumberland
are for the service of the coal-mining industry in the respective areas, while the stations at Fernie and Princeton serve both coal and metalliferous mining.
The above rescue-stations provide a full course in mine-rescue work without charge
to any men who are physically fit and who volunteer for this work and a number of
men outside the mining industry have taken this training; these latter include members of fire brigades and others.
Since the inception of the war there has been a scarcity of the younger men from
the mines who formerly took up this work and maintained a regular training, and it
is difficult to interest the older men who may be still physically fit to undergo the
arduous training schedule which consists of a minimum of twelve two-hour training
periods in the actual use of the self-contained oxygen apparatus and Burrell all-service
gas-masks in an irrespirable atmosphere.
All of the above rescue-stations are also centres for the instruction of first aid
under the St. John Ambulance Association and are, at present, centres for air-raid
precaution work and serve as casualty stations.
During the year, in addition to the regular teams in training, twenty-three new
men took the full training and were granted certificates of competency:—
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where trained.
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where trained.
1182
1183
1184
1185
1186
1187
1188
1189
1190
1191
1192
1193
William Joseph Clarke .
Walker Addison	
Arthur Brignal Mawhinney..
Joseph Shepard 	
Orville Albert Batchelor..
James Carrol Sockett	
Leonard Ridley ....
Robert Mitchell 	
Joseph R. Langman	
George S. Bosnich	
Daniel Kreator 	
James Brennan	
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Princeton.
Princeton.
Princeton.
Princeton.
Copper Mountain.
1194
1195
1196
1197
1198
1199
1200
1201
1202
1203
1204
Leonard Empey	
David Ogren.	
Nels Hendrickson...
Hugh Kirkpatrick...
James H. Patterson
James Scott _	
Archibald R. Gee.	
John Cairns	
Fred Simister	
George F. Sutton......
Thomas F. Krall	
Copper Mountain.
Copper Mountain.
Copper Mountain.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Fernie.
Fernie.
Coal Creek.
Michel.
Michel.
Natal.
SUPERVISION OF COAL MINES.
During the year twenty-six companies operated thirty-two mines employing 2,150
men underground. In the supervision of underground employees there were eleven
managers, sixteen overmen, and ninety-three firebosses and shotlighters; or one official
for every eighteen men underground.
141681
PRQVh LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B. C. A 102
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
" COAL SALES ACT."
List of Registered Names of British Columbia Coals, approved by the Chief
Inspector of Mines, in accordance with the Provisions of the " Coal Sales
Act."
Registered Names of Coal.
Comox  „
Old Wellington..
Ladysmith-Wellington ..	
Hi-Carbon _ —
Lantzville-Wellington-..
Chambers-Extension	
Wellington Big Flame..
B iggs-Wei lington	
Berkley Creek-Little Wellington..
Cassidy-Wellington.	
Mi ddlesboro 	
Tulameen Valley Coal, Princeton.
Granby Tulameen 	
Hat Creek.
Tulameen Gem..
Bulkley Valley-.
Crow's Nest, Elk River-
Crow's Nest, Michel—	
Black Yale.	
Jackson Tulameen	
Merritt Diamond Vale~
Telcoal .	
Colliery and District.
Nos. 5 and 8 mines, Comox Colliery (Cumberland).
No. 9 mine (Wellington) :	
No. 10 mine (South Wellington) , 	
Mixture of Canadian Collieries' coal and B.C. Electric coke
Lantzville (Lantzville) 	
Chambers' (Extension) _ _.	
Richardson mine   _
Biggs' mine (Wellington)	
Berkley Creek Colliery (Extension).
Cassidy mine (Cassidy)	
Middlesboro (Merritt) 	
Tulameen (Princeton) _
Granby (Princeton) _
Hat Creek (Lillooet) .
Tulameen Collieries (Princeton)..
Bulkley Valley (Telkwa). s	
Elk River (Coal Creek) „
Michel (Michel)  _ 	
Black mine ( Princeton)	
Jackson Colliery (Princeton)	
Diamond Vale Colliery (Merritt).
Telcoal Colliery (Telkwa)	
Producing Company.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D-), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Lantzville Colliery.
R. H. Chambers.
A. B. Richardson.
Biggs' mine.
Hugh McLean Davidson.
A. H. Carroll.
Middlesboro Collieries, Ltd.
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co.
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P.
Co., Ltd.
Canada Coal and Development
Co., Ltd.
Tulameen Collieries.
Bulkley Valley Colliery, Ltd.   .
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Inland Collieries, Ltd.
British Lands, Ltd.
Merritt Coal Mines, Ltd.
Telkoal Co., Ltd. COAL MINES. ....... A 103
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
FIRST-, SECOND-, AND THIRD-CLASS CERTIFICATES AND
MINE-SURVEYORS' CERTIFICATES.
BY
James Strang.
The Board of Examiners, which was formed on July 10th, 1919, now consists of
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines, Chairman; H. E. Miard, member; and James
Strang, member and Secretary to the Board.
The meetings of the Board are held in the office of the Department of Mines in
Victoria. The examinations are held in accordance with the amended rules of the
Board of Examiners and approved by the Minister of Mines on September 28th, 1929.
Two examinations were held in 1944, the first on May 17th, 18th, and 19th, and
the second on November 22nd, 23rd, and 24th. The total number of candidates at the
examinations were as follows: For First-class Certificates, 3 (1 passed and 2 failed);
for Second-class Certificates, 6 (3 passed and 3 failed); for Third-class Certificates,
15 (9 passed and 6 failed);  and for Mine Surveyor, 1 (1 passed).
The following is a list of the candidates who successfully passed in the various
classes:—
First-class Certificate.—Archibald R. Gee.
Second-class Certificates.—William Dinsdale, Stephen Lazaruk, and Richard B.
Wilson.
Third-class Certificates.—-Hugh Kirkpatrick, Joseph Frew, Fred Simister, Daniel B.
Bobchak, Thomas S. Dunlop, Quentin F. Gething, Harry Batchelor, Martin Frobisher,
and James C. Sockett.
Mine Surveyor's Certificate.—Alexander F. Buckham.
EXAMINATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY
AS COAL-MINERS.     '
In addition to the examinations and certificates already specified as coming under
the Board of Examiners, the Act further provides that every coal-miner shall be the
holder of a certificate of competency as such. By miner is meant any person employed
underground in any coal mine to cut, shear, break, or loosen coal from the solid, either
by hand or machinery.
Examinations are held regularly in all coal-mining districts.
No certificate has been granted in any case where the candidate has failed to
satisfy the Board as to his fitness, experience in a coal mine, and a general working
knowledge of the English language.
During 1944 there were 127 candidates for coal-miners' certificates; of these 123
passed and 4 failed to qualify. In addition to the certificates granted above, substitute
certificates were issued to those who had lost their original certificates.
The Board of Examiners desires to thank the different coal-mining companies for
the use of their premises for holding examinations when necessary.
The Inspector of Mines in each district has authority under the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act" to grant, after a satisfactory examination, a provisional certificate
as a coal-miner to applicants, which entitles the holder to follow the occupation of
a coal-miner for a period not exceeding sixty days or until the date of the next examination before the Board. A 104
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
REGISTERED   LIST   OF   HOLDERS   OF   CERTIFICATES   OF   COMPETENCY
AS COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
Fiest-class Certificates of Competency issued under " Coal-mines
Regulation Act, 1897."
Name.
Date.
Name.
Date.
Horrobin, William	
Chandler, William	
Priest, Elijah	
Randle, Joseph	
Matthews, John	
Norton, Richard Henry
Hardy, Joseph	
Simpson, William G	
Cunliffe, John	
May
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
Aug.
Dec.
June
Aug.
1,1882
21,1883
21,1883
18.1888
8,1889
26.1889
17,1896
12,1899
3,1901
Browitt, Benjamin..
Wilson, A. R. 	
Budge, Thomas	
Richards, James A.
Wright, H. B 	
Coulthard, R. W.	
Roaf, J. Richardson
Manley, H. L	
Aug.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
3,1901
17,1902
17,1902
17,1902
21,1904
21,1904
21,1904
21,1904
First-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act
Further Amendment Act," 1904-1911-1919.
Name.
Date.
Name.
Date.
Baird, Harold	
Baxter, Andrew.	
Bennett, John	
Biggs, J. G	
Bonar, Robert	
Bonar, Robert (Jr.) —
Brace, Tom	
Bridge, Edward	
Brown, Robert Joyce.
Caufield, Bernard	
Chapman, William —
Church, James A. H._
Clark, Henry Wilton..
Cox, Richard	
Cumberf ord, James	
Cunningham, John Howard.
Davies, David	
Davies, Stephen -
Davies, Thos. Owen.
de Hart, J. B	
Devlin, E. H......	
Dickson, James	
Elliott, John B	
Emmerson, Joseph ..
Ewart, William	
Fairfoull, Robert
Foster, William R. _
France, Thos	
Fraser, Norman	
Freeman, H. N ■—
Frew, Wm. B..
Galloway, C. F. J	
Gascoyne, Rowland B.
Gee, Archibald R. -----
Gillham, John 	
Glover, Francis	
Graham, Charles	
Hanson, Wm. B. .	
Henderson, Robert—.
Hewlett, Howe .
Higgins, Alexander —
Hodge, William K	
Howden, Archibald	
Sept. 26
June 10
Dec. 30
July 22
Oct.
Dec.
May 13
July 22
May 13
May
Dec.
June 10
Oct. 9
May 13
Oct. 7
May 9
June 10
Nov. 15
May 21
May 17
Dec. 30
Oct. 31
June 30
Nov.
May 19
June 10
Dec. 31
Nov. 22
March   4
May
July
July    22
May    21
Jan.
Jan.
Oct.
Nov. 14
Dec. 9
Nov. 27
May 27.
Dec. 19
June 16
May   27
,1939
,1911
,1926
,1908
,1911
,1932
,1915
,1908
,1915
,1909
, 1938
,1911
,1943
, 1915
,1938
,1912
,1911
,1917
,1914
,1917
,1926
,1912
,1928
,1907
,1922
,1911
,1925
,1906
,1905
,1909
,1932
,1908
,1914
,1944
,1925
,1912
,1905
,1930
,1909
,1913
,1918
,1925
, 1913
Howells, Nathaniel-
Hughes, Edward R.Hughes, John C	
Humphries, Clifford.
Hunter, Alex. B	
Huntrods, Eustace S. F..
Jackson, Thos. R	
Johnston, John   _.
Lawrence, Stanley J	
Leighton, Henry	
Littler, James .
Mackinnon, Hugh G. .
Macauley, D. A	
McCulloch, James	
McDonald, John -	
McGuckie, Thomas	
McKay, Walter.
McLean, Michael D	
McVicar, Samuel	
Mazey, William John .
Miard, Henry Ernest.
Millar, John K.
Miller, Andrew Anderson _
Montgomery, John W	
Mordy, Thomas	
Morgan, Evan H 	
Murray, George  	
Newbury, Arthur	
Ovington, John	
Peacock, Frank David	
Penman, Hugh  	
Pettigrew, Robert 	
Phelan, Arthur 	
Powell, J. W	
Quinn, James A 	
Quinn, John Graham	
Ramsay, Peter Millar	
Reger, Frederick W	
Rolfe, Emrys	
Roper, William 	
Russell, John - 	
Shanks, John	
Shenton, T. J	
Oct.
Dec.
May
June
July
May
Nov.
June
Jan.
May
Dec.
May
June
Sept.
Oct.
July
Jan.
June
May
Oct.
May
Nov.
Oct.
May
Sept.
June
June
June
May
Oct.
May
June
May
June
Dec.
July
May
July
Dec.
May
May
May
Sept.
,1911
,1936
,1917
,1911
, 1916
, 1922
,1907
, 1928
,1943
,1912
, 1929
,1922
,1911
, 1910
,1919
,1908
,1944
,1925
,1909
,1912
,1912
,1906
,1912
,1909
,1910
,1944
,1921
,1920
,1913
,1911
,1914
,1933
, 1913
,1911
,1929
,1916
,1918
,1932
,1932
,1915
,1914
,1909
,1910 COAL MINES.
A 105
First-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act
Further Amendment Act," 1904-1911-1919—Continued.
Name.
Date.
Name.
Date.
Smith, A. E.—	
Smith, Joseph	
Smith, Thos. Edwin..
Spicer, J. E. 	
Stevens, L. C.  -.
Stewart, R. T	
Strang, James 	
Stubbs, Clement	
Taylor, James...	
Touhey, James -
Vincent, Thomas C.Walker, William
Wallbank, J	
Oct.
July
Dec.
Oct.
Nov.
Sept.
June
July
May
May
June
May
Sept.
28,1911
22.1908
19,1918
28,1911
27.1909
10.1910
10.1911
21,1929
16,1918
21,1914
24,1924
16,1918
10,1910
Wesnedge, William	
Whittaker, John 	
Whittaker, William C..
Williams, John Samuel
Williams, Thos. B	
Williams, Thos. H	
Wilson, Ridgeway R.	
Wilson, Thos. M	
Wilson, William	
Wylie, John	
Yates, Frank	
Young, David B	
Dec.
Dec.
April
Dec.
May
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
May
July
Dec.
Dec.
19,1918
19,1918
6,1938
19,1918
17,1917
22,1906
15.1917
23,1927
16.1918
20,1908
31,1925
6,1943
Second-class Certificates of Service.
Name.
Date.
No.
Name.
Date.
No.
Millar, J. K 	
March    4,1905
March    4,1905
B   10
B   13
Powell, William Baden	
March    4,1905   B   16
Second-class Certificates of Competency issued under " Coal-mines Regulation
Act Further Amendment Act, 1904."
Name.
Date.
No.
Name.
Date.
No.
Adams, Wm. Henry	
Allan, Alex. McDiarmid...
Almond, Walter 	
Alstead, Robert.. —
Archibald, William	
Barlow, Benjamin Robt..
Bastion, Albert 	
Bell, John  	
Beveridge, William	
Bevis, Nathaniel _._..
Biggs, John G.	
Bonar, Robt. B .....
Brace, Tom	
Bridge, Edward _	
Brown, George -
Brown, James L	
iBrown, John C 	
Brown, John Todd	
Brown, R. J 	
Brown, Robert 	
Brown, Robert Sneddon.
Brown, William Gold	
Brownrigg, John H	
Bushell, J. P. - 	
Carroll, Henry 	
Caufield, Bernard	
Caufield, John.
Cawthorne, L.
Challinor, Jno. Thomas .
Challoner, Jno. Arthur...
Chapman, Wm. 	
Chester, Daniel	
June
May
Nov.
June
Nov.
Dec.
Nov.
May
June
Sept.
Nov.
June
Nov.
Oct.
Dee.
Oct.
Oct.
May
Oct.
May
May
Dec.
May
May
July
Oct.
July
May
May
May
June
July
24,1935
27,1913
15,1917
24,1924
22.1922
19,1918
21.1923
17.1917
21, 1920
10,1910
2, 1907
30,1928
27,1909
23,1906
19, 1918
28,1911
23, 1906
9,1912
28,1911
21,1914
13,1915
19.1918
17,1917
1,1909
22,1908
23,1906
8,1916
1,1909
27,1913
21,1914
10,1927
24,1943
B286
B167
B213
B257
B250
B229
B256
B212
B233
B 123
B 40
B270
B 96
B 33
B225
B136
B 39
B150
B134
j B183
I B196
I B228
B124
B 81
B 62
B 30
B199
B 93
B169
B178
B268
B299
Christie, John	
Churchill, James..
Clark, Robt..
Clarkstone, Wm. W.Cochrane, James	
Cochrane, Thomas.....
Commons, Wm.	
Corbett, Garner S	
Coupland, George	
Courtney, A. W.	
Cox, Richard	
Crawford, David	
Cunliffe, Thomas	
Dando, John	
Davidson, Hugh	
Davies, J. C. H	
Davies, Stephen	
Dennis, Fred. W	
Devlin, Ernest H	
Dewar, Alexander —
Dickenson, Clifford -
Dinsdale, William	
Dockrill, Arthur H...
Dunn, Jas. W.	
Dunsmuir, John	
Dykes, J. W. -
Eccleston, Thomas (Jr.)_
Eccleston, Wm. 	
Fairfoull, James	
Fairfoull, R	
Finlayson, James  ~
Ford, Allan	
July
July
June
May
July
Jan.
Sept.
June
May
Oct.
May
May
May
May
May
June
Sept.
May
May
Oct.
May
June
Jan.
July
Nov.
May
June
May
May
May
July
May
1938
1908
1921
1914
1942
1941
1910
1928
1918
1911
1912
1909
1909
1913
1913
1934
1910
1914
1914
1912
1915
1944
1941
1932
1905
1909
1940
1909
1914
1909
1905
1913
B290
B 65
B242
i B180
B298
B297
B115
B272
B217
B 138
B 143
B 88
B 78
B 164
B 165
B285
B 113
B174
B179
B162
B189
B301
B296
B282
B 26
B 77
B294
B 87
B186
B 83
B 21
B171 A 106
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
SECOND-CLASS CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY ISSUED UNDER " COAL-MINES REGULATION
Act Further Amendment Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Name.
Date.
No.
Name.
Date.
No.
Foster, W. R	
France, Thos	
Francis, David M	
Francis, Enoch	
Francis, James	
Frater, George	
Freeman, Henry N.—
Frew, Wm. M 	
Garbett, Richard	
Gibson, Munro M	
Gilham, John	
Gillespie, Hugh	
Gould, Alfred	
Gourlay, Robert	
Graham, Chas	
Gray, David	
Gray, George - 	
Greenwell, Archibald
Gregory, Wm.—	
Hamilton, Robert N...
Hastings, Andrew P..
Hayes, Thomas 0	
Heathcote, Joseph—
Henderson, Robert -
Hodge, William K.	
Holliday, William	
Hopkins, Harry	
Horrocks, Abner G.	
Howells, Nathaniel —
*Hughes, Edward R.
Hughes, John C	
Hutton, Isaac	
Hutton, John	
Hynds, John  _.
Hynds, William	
Jackson, Thos. R	
James, David-—	
Jarrett, Fred	
John, Francis	
John, Howell	
Johnston, John	
Jones, Samuel	
Jones, William T.	
Jordon, Thos	
Kirkwood, John R.r—
Knowles, James E.	
Lancaster, Peter	
Lander, Frank	
Lawrence, Stanley J._
Lazeruk, Stephen	
Lee, Robert John	
Littler, Jas  _
Littler, Matthew	
Luck, George	
Manifold, Albert	
Mason, Joseph	
Massey, H.  	
Mather, Thomas	
Matusky, A ..
Mayer, Ralph Waldo.
Mazay, W. J.  	
Menzies, Fred	
Miard, Hy. E	
Nov.
May
May
May
July
July
Nov.
June
Oct.
June
June
July
May
Dec.
March
May
July
May
June
May
Dec.
July
July
July
Jan.
Dec.
June
June
Nov.
Sept.
Sept.
May
May
May
Dec.
March
Nov.
May
July
Sept.
June
May
July
Nov.
Oct.
Oct.
Dec.
May
Dec.
July
Sept.
June
Oct.
June
May
May
Nov.
June
May
May
Nov.
Dec.
Sept.
,1909
,1905
,1914
,1909
; 1908
,1916
,1907
,1927
,1912
,1934
,1920
,1905
,1915
,1918
,1905
,1909
,1916
,1918
,1931
,1914
,1918
,1943
,1929
,1908
,1925
,1918
,1930
,1911
,1909
,1931
,1910
,1914
,1912
,1922
,1920
,1905
,1907
,1909
, 1916
,1910
,1927
,1918
,1908
,1909
,1912
,1911
,1938
,1915
,1940
,1944
,1910
,1927
,1912
,1911
,1912
,1915
,1909
,1911
,1909
,1912
,1909
,1921
,1910
B102
B 27
B182
B 86
B 63
B204
B 45
B269
B161
B284
B237
B 24
B190
B227
B 1
B 76
B207
B220
B278
B175
B223
B300
B273
B 60
B259
B230
B276
B 130
B 97
B280
B 109
B185
B154
B247
B240
B 5
B 58
B 84
B200
B122
B267
B221
B 66
B104
B160
B137
B292
B195
B295
B302
B110
B266
B157
B128
B145
B193
B 99
B127
B 91
B144
B101
B244
B107
Middleton, Robert	
Mitchell, Henry	
Morgan, Daniel	
Morgan, Irvine	
Morgan, John	
Morgan, William	
Morton, Robert W.	
Murray, George	
Musgrave, J	
Myers, Peter	
MacKinnon, Hugh G	
McDonald, J. A	
McDonald, John	
McFegan, W	
McGarry, Martin	
McGuckie, Thomas M...
McKay, Walter	
McLaughlin, Alex	
McLean, Michael D	
McMillan, D.... 	
McNay, Carmichael	
McPherson, James E.Newbury, Arthur	
Newton, Wm	
Nicholl, Joseph O	
Osborne, Hugh	
Ovington, John	
Park, William. 	
Parkinson, T	
Parnham, Charles	
Pettigrew, Robt	
Quinn, James  	
Quinn, John	
Ramsay, Peter Millar..
Rankin, Geo.	
Raynes, M. T	
Rear, Albert E.....	
Reid, Wm _ 	
Renny, James :.	
Richards, Samuel	
Richards, Thomas	
Rigby, John	
Roberts, Ebenezer	
Robinson, William	
Rogers, George	
Roper, William	
Rowbottom, Thomas.—
Russell, John	
Scarpino, Francis	
Shanks, David	
Shaw, Thomas John —
Smith, John 	
Smart, Robert K	
Stafford, Matthew _
Stewart, John	
Stewart, J. M r	
Stobbart, Jacob	
Stockwell, William	
Strang, Thomas	
Stubbs, Clement	
Sutherland, John	
Taylor, James 	
Taylor, Robt.'.. 	
July
July
Nov.
July
Nov.
Dec.
July
Oct.
May
May
Dec.
Oct.
May
Nov.
Oct.
Oct.
June
May
June
June
May
July
May
Sept.
Dec.
Dec.
Nov.
June
May
Nov.
Dec.
May
May
May
Nov.
Oct.
June
Oct.
Oct.
May
Nov.
July
Sept.
July
May
May
May
Nov.
Dec.
Oct.
May
Oct.
Nov.
June
July
May
May
Nov.
Oct.
May
May
May
Dec.
22
8
21
18
2
19
22
3
1
9
22
28
27
31
31
23
30
13
21
10
9
22
21
10
31
14
2
21
1
2
15
21
9
17
27
28
15
28
28
9
2
29
10
22
1
9
16
2
19
31
27
3
22
10
21
1
9
2
31
18
16
13
30
,1908
,1916
,1923
,1938
,1907
,1918
,1908
,1919
,1909
,1912
,1921
,1911
,1913
,1909
,1912
,1906
,1926
,1915
,1920
,1911
,1912
, 1908
,1914
,1910
,1925
, 1920
,1907
,1920
,1909
,1907
,1931
,1914
,1912
, 1917
,1909
,1911
,1934
,1911
,1911
,1912
,1907
,1905
,1910
,1908
,1909
,1912
,1918
,1907
,1918
,1912
,1913
, 1919
,1922
,1911
,1929
,1909
,1912
,1907
,1912
,1922
,1918
,1915
,1926
B 72
B201
B254
B291
B 43
B224
B 59
B232
B 90
B149
B243
B133
B 172
B106
B 156
B 35
B262
B 191
B234
B125
B151
B 73
B184
B116
B261
B239
B 52
B238
B 80
B 49
B281
B181
B 146
B209
B 103
B139
B283
B 132
B 140
B152
B 57
B 29
B 117
B 69
B 79
B 141
B222
B 47
B226
B 159
B166
i B231
| B248
| B131
B274
B 95
B153
B 56
B 158
B245
B218
Bl-94
B265
« Substituted for B 279, June 16, 1931. COAL MINES.
A 107
SECOND-CLASS CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY ISSUED UNDER " COAL-MINES REGULATION
Act Further Amendment Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Name.
No.
Taylor, Thomas	
Thomas, Daniel W	
Thompson, Joseph	
Tonge, Thomas	
Touhey, James 	
Touhey, William	
Tully, Thomas	
Vaughan, John Henry-
Virgo, John	
Waddington, Daniel M
Walker, William	
Watson, Arthur W	
July
Nov.
Sept.
July
May
July
Nov.
July
May
June
May
May
8,1916
22,1922
10,1910
22,1908
9,1912
8,1916
15,1917
12,1939
1,1909
16,1931
13,1915
17,1917
B203
B249
B114
B 71
B147
B205
B214
B293
B 89
B277
B 192
B211
Webster, James S	
Wesnedge, William	
Williams, John Samuel
Williams, Watkin	
Wilson, Joseph  	
Wilson, Richard B	
Wilson, Robinson 	
Wilson, Thomas .	
Wilson, William	
Wood, Thos. James	
Worthington, Joseph ._
Yates, Frank	
June
Nov.
Nov.
Sept.
June
Jan.
May
July
July
May
May
Nov.
24,1924
27.1909
15,1917
10.1910
30,1928
16,1945
21,1914
22,1908
22,1908
21,1914
1,1909
22,1922
B258
B 98
B215
B118
B271
B303
B177
B 74
B 70
B176
B 85
B251
COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act Further Amendment
Act, 1904," sec. 38, subsec. (2), in exchange for Certificates issued under the
" Coal-mines Regulation Act Amendment Act, 1901."
Name.
No.
Name.
Date.
No.
Ashman, Jabez	
Auchinvole, Alex	
Barclay, Andrew	
Barclay, James	
Barclay, John	
Bowie, James	
Briscoe, Edward	
Campbell, Dan	
Carroll, Harry	
Clarkson, Alexander
Cpllishaw, John	
Courtney, A. W	
Crawford, Frank	
Davidson, David	
Dobbie, John	
Dudley, James	
Duncan, Thomas	
Dunsmuir, John..	
Eccleston, Wm 	
Fagan, Daniel	
Farquharson, John -
Findlayson, James —
Gibson, Edward	
Gould, Alfred	
Green, Francis	
Handlen, Jas.	
Hescott, John	
John, David	
Johnson, Geo	
Johnson, Wm. R	
Feb.
March
April
April
April
May
Oct.
March
March
April
Feb.
Nov.
April
April
Nov.
March
Aug.
March
March
April
April
June
May
April
Oct.
June
Jan.
Nov.
May
March
,1907
,1905
,1904
,1904
,1905
,1905
,1906
,1905
,1905
,1904
,1905
,1904
,1904
,1905
,1905
,1905
,1906
,1905
,1905
,1905
,1904
,1904
,1905
, 1906
,1904
,1904
,1905
,1904
,1904
,1905
C131
C 89
C 19
C   20
cm
C116
C129
C   93
C106
C126
C114
C128
C 90
C 80
C109
C 17
C 25
C118
C112
C 38
C122
C 62
C 49
C124
C   75
Lander, Frank	
Miard, Harry E	
Middleton, Robt	
Miller, Thos. K	
McKinnon, Arch'd-
Myles, Walter	
Nash, Isaac	
Neave, Wm...	
Nelson, James 	
Nimmo, Richard E.
Power, John	
Price, Jas	
Rafter, Wm	
*Roughead, George
Ryan, John _.
Shenton, Thos. J	
Shepherd, Henry..._
Smith, Geo 	
Stauss, Chas. F.	
Steele, John	
Stewart, Daniel W.
Stewart, Duncan H.
Stewart, John	
Stobbart, Jacob	
Sullivan, John	
Summers, Joseph -
Thomas, John—	
Vater, Charles	
Wilson, Austin	
Jan.
March
Feb.
Feb.
April
April
June
Oct.
April
April
Sept.
Nov.
March
Jan.
Dec. .
July
June
March
Feb.
June
May
March
April
Feb.
July
May
March
April
Feb.
9,1905
3,1905
11,1905
21,1905
3,1905
3,1905
1,1904
12,1904
27.1904
18,1911
8,1920
8.1904
29.1905
30,1907
28,1904
25,1904
13.1904
29.1905
9.1905
4,1913
16.1904
28, 1904
3.1904
21.1905
4,1916
17,1920
29,1905
6, 1904
7.1905
C 61
C 76
C 71
C 74
C102
C100
C120
C 43
C 16
C133
C142
C 50
C 95
C810
C 59
30
26
84
69
C 137
C 23
C 4
C104
C 73
C139
C141
C 97
C 6
C   67
* Issued in lieu of No. C 130, destroyed by fire. A 108
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act
Further Amendment Act, 1904."
Name.
Date.
No.
Name.
Date.
No.
Adams, Wm. H	
Adamson, Wm	
Ainsworth, Edward-
Allan, Alexander	
Almond, Walter	
Alstead, Robt	
Ambrosi, Antonio	
Anderson, John	
Anderson, John E.	
Anderson, Robt	
Angell, William	
Arbuckle, John..	
Archibald, Geo.	
Archibald, Thomas...
Ball, Alfred	
Bann, Thomas _
Baggaley, J	
Baguley, James	
Bain, James 	
Bainbridge, James	
Barber, Walter H -
Barker, Robert	
Barlow, B. R  	
Barr, Samuel	
Barrass, Robt.   	
Bastion, Albert  	
Batchelor, Harry	
Bate, Horace	
Bateman, Joseph William .
Beard, Henry C	
Beeton, D. H  	
Bell, Fred..
Bell, John .
Bennett, Andrew M. -
Bennett, John. 	
Bennie, William W	
Beveridge, Wm	
Biggs, James	
Biggs, Thomas	
Birchell, Richard	
Blakemore, Roydon E.
Bias, Emil .
Blewett, Ernest	
Blinkhorn, Thomas-
Bobchak, Daniel	
Bond, Frank	
Bowie, James I	
Bradley, William.	
Bradley, Wilfred	
Bridge, Edward	
Briscoe, F. 	
"Briscoe, Fred S	
Broderick, Matthew -
Brown, Arthur A.	
Brown, George	
Brown, George A	
Brown, James 	
Brown, James _ 	
Brown, James	
Brown, James M...	
Brown, Jas. Miller	
Brown, John	
Brown, Matthew	
Brown, Robert	
Dec.
Dec.
May
Oct.
July
June
June
Oct.
June
Oct.
May
May
May
Oct.
May
Oct.
July
Dec.
May
Nov.
Jan.
June
May
June
June
May
Jan.
Dec.
Oct.
May
May
May
May
Nov.
Oct.
July
June
June
Oct.
Oct.
Dec.
June
July
Dec.
Jan,
June
May
July
May
July
July
July
Jan.
Oct.
July
Dec.
Sept.
June
July
Jan.
May
Sept.
July
Oct.
9
22
16
28
22
21
16
28
24
14
21
13
21
28
17
31
22
2
27
21
20
10
1
10
30
30
20
30
28
30
1
27
9
15
14
18
10
1
28
1
27
24
22
19
2fi
30
6
22
17
29
22
7,
21
14
8
14
10
10
8
4
18
10
5
28
,1930
,1921
,1918
,1911
,1908
,1921
,1930
,1911
,1940
,1914
,1914
,1915
,1914
,1911
,1917
,1912
,1908
,1929
,1913
,1922
,1944
,1911
,1909
,1927
,1926
,1923
,1944
,1926
,1913
,1923
,1909
,1913
,1912
,1917
,1914
,1938
,1911
,1933
,1911
,1907
,1934
,1924
,1908
,1918
,1944
,1926
,1936
,1908
,1922
,1905
,1908
,1937
,1913
, 1914
,1916
,1920
,1910
,1911
,1916
,1943
,1915
,1910
,1932
,1911
C845
C721
C674
C430
C286
C719
C843
C437
C919
C599
C591
C622
C569
C454
C635
C494
C300
C829
C546
C744
C943
C415
C337
C809
C795
C750
C945
C802
C551
C751
C338
C514
C477
C661
C597
C895
C396
C858
C449
C266
C869
C774
C298
C681
C946
C 797
C873
C291
C733
C223
C309
C878
C525
C596
C626
C706
C364
C412
C625
C930
C615
C392
C854
C451
Brown, Robert D	
Brown, Robert S.	
Brown, William Gold	
Bryden, Thomas 	
Bullen, Thomas	
Bushell, Jas. P	
Cairns, Andrew	
Cairns, Robert  	
Caldwell, Peter	
Calverly, Joseph	
Camamile, Hollis	
Campbell, Andrew	
Campbell, Samuel	
Carroll, George 	
Carruthers, Robert 	
Carson, George 	
Cass, Wm. _ __	
Catchpole, Charles 	
Caufield, Edward-  _.
Caufield, John 	
Challoner, Arthur 	
Chambers, Ralph H. 	
Chapman, John  	
Chapman, Wm 	
Cheetham, Ben	
Chester, Daniel - 	
Chester, John _ 	
Christie, John	
Cimolini, Primo	
Cimolini, Romeo	
Cimolini, Sero J.  	
Clark, Walter Pattison.—.
Clarkson, Hugh G	
Clarkson, Robert 	
Clarkstone, Wm. W 	
Cleaves, Walter - 	
Clifford, William	
Cloke, Chas. E 	
Coates, Frank 	
Cochrane, James 	
Coldgrove, Charles Henry
Coldwell, Daniel  	
Commons, William ■_
Cooper, John Andrew	
Cooper, Leonard	
Cope, Frank	
Corbett, Garnet S. :	
Corrigan, Harry  	
Corrigan, James P. _
Coulthard, James 	
Coupland, David	
Crawford, David 	
Cullen, Alex.  	
Cunliffe, Thos  	
Cunliffe, Thos. H ....
Cunningham, G. F.. ___
Cuthell, George W 	
Dabb, Owen 	
Dando, John	
Davey, George 	
Davidson, Hugh	
Davies, Evan Thomas	
Davies, John H. C	
Davis, John David 	
June
June
July
June
Sept.
Oct.
June
May
June
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
March
Dec.
July
May
May
Oct.
Dec.
May
Dec.
July
Dec.
Oct.
Dec.
June
Jan.
Jan.
May
May
June
Oct.
May
July
June
June
June
Dec.
May
July
Dec.
Dec.
Oct.
Dec.
July
Jan.
June
June
March
July
Oct.
Dec.
Nov.
Dec.
May
May
June
May
May
May
May
10,1911
10,1911
8,1916
16,1930
10.1910
1,1907
10.1911
27,1913
21.1921
10.1910
28,1911
27,1917
15,1917
21.1922
22,1933
17.1917
30.1926
29,1905
16,1918
1,1909
28.1911
14,1920
30.1923
22, 1921
22,1908
20.1939
28,1911
20.1928
24, 1940
4,1943
4, 1943
9,1912
17,1922
21.1920
28, 1911
9, 1912
22,1908
16,1925
16,1925
24.1940
19.1918
17,1917
22,1908
19,1918
16, 1937
28.1913
23.1927
18,1938
10, 1944
10,1911
21.1921
4,1905
21.1929
1,1907
20,1938
11, 1905
2,1929
21.1914
9,1912
21.1921
9,1919
9,1912
17.1922
16,1918
C423
C408
C629
C842
C379
C264
C420
C539
C715
C375
C443
C651
C662
C746
C859
C663
C800
C227
C670
C321
C433
C709
C753
C720
C311
C912
C440
C820
C915
C929
C928
C480
C736
C696
C431
C475
C313
C782
C789
C914
C679
C639
C304
C689
C887
C549
C812
C901
C940
C407
C713
C208
C824
C265
C903
C229
C832
C578
C465
C718
C464
C463
C729
C669
1 Substituted for C 309, July 20, 1908. COAL MINES.
A 109
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act
Further Amendment Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Name.
Date.
Name.
Date.
Davis, William	
Dean, Alexander._
Dean, Andrew	
* Dean, John	
Dean, Joseph	
Delprato, Joseph
Derbyshire, A	
Dewar, Alex. -
Devlin, Edward	
Devlin, Ernest Henry.
Devlin, John	
Devoy, William 	
Dickenson, Clifford	
Dickie, Leslie  _.
Dingsdale, Geo	
Dinsdale, William	
Dockrill, Arthur H	
Dockrill, Frank M	
Doherty, J. S	
Doney, John .
Donnachie, John	
Dorrance, Orlin William -
Douglas, D. B	
Dow, And. Y	
Drybrough, Robert	
Dunlop, Thomas S.	
Dunn, Andrew	
Dunn, James	
Dunnigan, Richard	
Dunsmore, Alexander-
Dykes, Joseph W	
Easton, Andrew B	
Ebert, Henry R.  	
Eccleston, John J	
Eccleston, Thomas	
Eccleston, Thomas	
Eckersley, John	
Edwards, John	
Elliott, John	
Elliott, John B ....
Elmes, Levi-— _	
Evans, D.	
Ewing, Robert 	
Fairfoull, James	
Fairley, James .
Farrow, John William ...
Ferryman, Henry	
Fitzpatrick, T. J	
Flockart, David	
Ford, Allen  	
Forsyth, William	
Fowler, Robert	
Fowler, Samuel	
Frame, Muir	
Francis, David Morgan .
Francis, James	
Frater, George 	
Frater, Joseph	
Freeman, H. N 	
Frew, Joseph  	
Frew, William M	
Frobisher, Martin 	
Frodsham. Vincent	
Furbow, John	
May
June
Dec.
Jan.
May
June
June
Sept.
Oct.
May
Oct.
May
May
Nov.
Oct.
Dec.
Dec.
June
May
March
June
Jan.
Oct.
May
June
June
Jan.
July
June
Dec.
Oct.
July
Jan.
May
May
June
June
May
May
Dec.
July
July
May
Oct.
Jan.
Dec.
June
Oct.
Jan.
Oct.
June
Oct.
July
July
Oct.
Oct.
May
July
Nov.
June
May
Jan.
July
Jan.
,1909
, 1944
,1918
,1944
,1915
,1930
,1911
,1910
,1906
,1913
,1919
,1917
,1917
,1923
,1911
,1934
,1938
,1934
,1909
,1905
,1911
,1913
,1906
,1914
,1920
,1944
,1936
,1929
,1921
,1930
, 1907
,1938
,1941
, 1923
,1917
,1930
,1934
,1913
,1913
,1927
, 1932
,1908
, 1915
,1911
, 1940
, 1918
,1920
,1911
, 1913
, 1911
,1930
,1912
, 1941
,1939
,1913
,1907
, 1915
,1929
,1905
, 1944
,1923
,1945
,1908
,1913
C339
C931
C688
C952
C611
C837
C401
C369
C241
C538
C693
C638
C532
C762
C459
C868
C904
C865
C340
C211
C425
C517
C235
C587
C701
C948
C871
C821
C716
C847
C248
C893
C926
C757
C482
C841
C866
C542
C541
C811
C856
C284
C608
C453
C916
C683
C697
C452
C531
C445
C836
C495
C921
C906
C558
C250
C616
C828
C230
C947
C752
C950
C282
C528
I
Gabriel, Ernest P	
Gall, Louis	
Garbett, Richard	
Gascoyne, Rowland B	
Geater, Jas. Gordon _.
Gee, Archibald R  _
Gibson, Munro M 	
Gilham, John	
Gillies, William  - __
Gilmour, Hugh M	
Glen, James  	
Gordon, Davis John	
Gray, George .	
Greenhorn, John. 	
Gregory, William 	
Gregson, John B	
Griffiths, Edward 	
Groat, Ed. Murray 	
Gunnell, James _
Gunniss, Matthew	
Guy, George _.
Haile, Joseph G 	
Hall, James  	
Halsall, J 	
Earner, Joseph .— 	
Hamilton, Robert Nesbitt
Hampton, Abel E.	
Hampton, Samuel -
Hancock, Arthur 	
Hannah, Archibald	
Hanson, T. H 	
Hardy, Edward 	
Hart, Daniel M 	
Hartley, Thomas	
Harvey, Thomas. _.
Harvie, George... 	
Harwood, Fred	
Hayes, Ernest	
Heaps, Robert	
Hemer, Herbert 	
Hendry, James — 	
Herd, William	
Hetherington, Geo.	
Hey cock, James E.	
Heycock, William J.	
Heyes, Edward 	
Heyes, Thos. 0 	
Hilton, Arthur	
Hilton, Mathias ...- __
Hilton, R. G 	
Hindmarsh, John G.	
Hindmarsh, Peter	
Hodge, William K...._	
Hodson, R. H. 	
Holdsworth, William	
Holley, Thomas W. _.
Holliday, William	
Hopkins, Harry        	
Horbury, Joseph W	
Horrocks. A. G.   '.
Howells, Nathaniel	
Hughes, Edward R.	
Hughes, Isaac R  	
Hughes, Sydney S.	
May
Jan.
Sept.
Jan.
May
Jan.
Dec.
May
May
July
Oct.
May
May
May
May
Dec.
Oct.
Nov.
Oct.
May
June
May
May
July
Dec.
Oct.
Jan.
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
July
June
May
Oct.
May
Sept.
Sept.
Dec.
Sept.
Oct.
May
Dec.
July
July
Dec.
May
Jan.
Dec.
Dec.
Sept.
June
May
Nov.
March
May
July
July
Dec.
June
May
May
Dec.
June
July
17.1922
20,1944
10.1910
21.1913
21.1914
10, 1944
27, 1931
13.1915
16,1918
18,1938
28.1911
9,1912
9,1912
21,1914
30.1923
31,1925
31,1914
20,1923
31,1912
9,1912
16,1931
17,1922
17.1922
22,1908
9,1930
28.1913
7,1936
15,1917
15,1917
2,1929
8, 1908
21,1920
17, 1922
31,1912
9,1912
10,1910
10,1910
2,1929
10,1910
14.1914
9,1912
19,1918
21, 1929
5,1932
29, 1936
1, 1909
7, 1936
2, 1929
19, 1918
10,1910
30, 1926
30, 1923
20.1923
4, 1905
16,1918
2, 1943
8, 1916
31,1925
10,1911
1,1909
1,1909
9, 1930
18,1936
2,1943
C739
C942
C377
C513
C573
C939
C850
C623
C668
C896
C435
C474
C467
C575
C756
C790
C508
C764
C505
C460
C848
C731
C742
C307
C846
C550
C872
C650
C656
C834
C280
C694
C730
C510
C466
C378
C384
C830
C373
C595
C471
C682
C825
C852
C876
C 320
C870
C831
C825
C376
C 799
C755
C761
C216
C671
C932
C634
C791
C406
C324
C316
C844
C874
C938
* Substituted for C 617, June 2, 1915. A 110
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act
Further Amendment Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Name.
Date.
No.
C907
C913
C798
C786
C937
C232
C358
C707
C632
C507
C413
C582
C776
C588
C521
C256
C390
C813
C305
C803
C479
C894
C584
C861
C544
C518
C556
C221
C361
C391
C877
C426
C646
C839
C594
C350
C559
C944
C703
C936
C934
C888
C924
C815
C345
C925
C734
C386
C909
C637
C642
C737
J
C816
]
C933
]
C792
C410
]
C417
]
C418
1
C898
]
C436
]
C740
1
C923
1
C428
]
C416
]
Name.
No.
Hunchuk, William-
Hunt, Sydney (Jr.).
Hunter, Peter M	
Hunter, Thomas..
Hutchinson, Lawrence
Hutchison, Ben	
Hutchison, Fred	
Hynd, John 	
Hynds, William 	
Ireson, John    -	
Irvine, David -— -
Jack, John_~~.	
Jackson, Harry— ---
James, Thos.
Jardine, Geo. Edward-
Jarrett, Fred. J -	
Jenkins, John	
Jenkinson, Jonathan -
John, Howell	
Johnston, Fred	
Johnston, Robert..	
Johnstone, William W.
Jones, Alf. Geo— -
Jones, Douglas M...	
Jones, Samuel	
Jones, Samuel  	
Jones, William E	
Jones, William T	
Joyce; Walter 	
Judge, Peter - —
Karner, Joseph	
Keenan, Wm. James   -
Kelly, Ernest -
Kelly, Francis —-
Kemp, Wm.  —
Kirkeberg, H. S. —
Kirkham, Alfred	
Kirkpatrick, Hugh	
Klejko, Steve 	
Krall, Thomas F	
Kraus, Joseph 	
Lancaster, Peter	
Larner, Ralph .	
Lazaruk, Steve	
Leeman, T  —	
Leonard, Leon D..	
Lester, Frank	
Lewis, Benj. J	
Lewis, Glyn -	
Leyward, Paul 	
Lindsay, William... ~
Linn, George Y.	
Litherland, David	
Littler, Albert  —
Littler, James - -
Little, John  	
Littler, Matthew	
Littler, Robert..
Littler, Robert (Jr.)
Livingstone, Alex	
Lloyd, Thomas	
Louden, William D. ...
Loxton, George  _.
Loxton, John	
July
July
June
June
July
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
July
Oct.
June
May
June
May
Jan.
Oct.
Sept.
Dec.
July
Dec.
May
July
May
June
March
May
Jan.
Oct.
Nov.
Sept.
Dec.
June
May
June
Oct.
Nov.
Oct.
June
Dec.
July
July
Dec.
July
June
May
Jan.
May
Sept.
July
May
May
May
June
July
June
June
June
June
July
Oct.
May
July
June
June
12.1939
24.1940
30.1926
16.1925
2,1943
14,1905
27.1909
14,1920
8,1916
31,1912
10,1911
21,1914
24,1924
21,1914
21.1913
1,1907
10.1910
23.1927
22.1908
30.1926
9,1912
18.1938
21.1914
15,1934
4, 1905
27,1913
21,1913
28,1913
27.1909
10.1910
29.1936
10.1911
17,1917
16,1930
14, 1914
27.1909
28,1913
26, 1944
14,1920
2,1943
2,1943
16.1937
7,1941
30.1928
1,1909
16,1941
17,1922
10.1910
12.1939
17,1917
17,1917
17,1922
30,1928
2,1943
30,1926
10,1911
10,1911
10.1911
18.1938
28, 1911
17, 1922
7, 1941
10,1911
10,1911
Luck, George	
Lynch, Stewart	
Mackie, John— 	
Magielka, John - 	
Maki, Hannes	
Makin, J. Wm  	
Malone, John  	
Manifold, A	
Marrs, John —_  	
Marsh, Daniel Parks	
Martin, James  	
Mason, Joseph 	
Massey, Henry- 	
Mather, Thomas 	
Matusky, Andrew	
Mawson, J. T	
Maxwell, Alfred W. —	
Maxwell, Geo— 	
McAlpine, John .	
McArthur, John Malcolm
McArthur, Robert	
McCann, Thomas	
McCourt, John 	
McCourt, Thos	
McCulloch, James 	
McDonald, Allen	
McDonald, John	
McFagen, Alexander.	
McFegan, W 	
McGarry, Martin	
McGrath, James 	
McGregor, Gregor	
McGuckie, Thomas 	
McGuire, Thomas	
Mclnnis, John C.	
Mclntyre, Neil 	
McKay, Walter  	
McKenzie, Peter	
McKibben, Matthew	
McKinley, John	
McLachlan, Alex	
McLaren, John	
McLaughlin, James	
McLean, M. D.	
McLellan, William 	
McLeod, James 	
McLeod, John... 	
McMeakin, James 	
McMillan, D   .....
McMillan, Edward	
McMillan, Neil 	
McNay, Carmichael..	
McNeill, Adam L	
McNeill, Robert	
McVeigh, Francis	
McWhirter, Archibald	
Meek, Matthew    	
Menzies, Frederick	
Merrifield, George	
Miles, John 	
Miller, Frederick	
Mills, Christopher	
Mitchell, Charles	
Mitchell, Henry	
May
Oct.
June
June
July
Sept.
May
May
May
May
June
July
May
July
Oct.
Nov.
July
May
March
May
Dec.
July
Oct.
Dec.
May
June
Oct.
May
May
May
July
Jan.
July
Oct.
July
May
Nov.
June
May
Oct.
June
May
May
Sept.
March
July
May
May
Sept.
Oct,
Nov.
July
July
Sept.
July
June
May
Dec.
Oct.
June
July
July
May
Sept.
,1909
,1911
,1911
,1940
,1941
,1910
,1914
, 1909
,1917
, 1913
,1911
,1908
,1909
,1908
,1907
,1909
,1937
,1914
,1905
,1917
,1921
,1939
,1914
,1926
,1909
,1928
,1911
,1912
,1909
,1909
,1916
,1944
,1905
,1913
, 1937
,1914
,1923
,1911
,1914
,1914
,1912
,1923
,1912
,1910
,1905
,1908
,1915
,1915
,1910
,1912
,1917
,1908
,1908
,1910
,1932
,1926
,1912
,1920
,1906
,1911
,1929
,1938
,1909
, 1910
C318
C432
C421
C918
C922
C385
C585
C336
C640
C543
C398
C297
C317
C293
C259
C359
C881
C571
C217
C648
C723
C910
C605
C805
C315
C817
C448
C490
C319
C326
C630
C941
C226
C553
C885
C574
C763
C427
C580
C442
C419
C754
C485
C389
C219
C296
C609
C612
C363
C493
C654
C306
C281
C387
C855
C794
C484
C704
C239
C414
C823
C893
C322
C366 COAL MINES.
A 111
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act
Further Amendment Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Name.
Date.
Name.
Date.
No.
Moore, George	
Moore, John	
Moreland, Thomas..
Morgan, Cornelius
Morgan, Irving	
Morgan, John...	
Morgan, William-
Morris, David	
Murdoch, Jno. Y	
Murray, Robt 	
Myers, Peter	
Nash, George F...
Nash, George William...
Nee, Wm. R	
Neen, John R. 	
Neilson, William	
Nelson, Horatio	
Nicholson, James 	
Nimmo, James	
Norris, Joshua	
Nuttall, Wm	
Oakes, Robert 	
O'Brien, Reginald	
Odgers, Eli 	
Osborne, Hugh	
Oswald, Geo. L	
*Owen, Thomas	
Park, William—	
Parker, John H	
Parker, L  —
Parkinson, James Wm.
Parkinson, T.   _
Parkinson, Thomas	
Parks, Alexander	
Parrott, Jas. E	
Parson, Herbert	
Parsons, Albert	
Pasiaud, Roger A.	
Patrick, Andrew	
Pearson, Jonathan	
Penman, Hugh	
Perry, Lome B 	
Phillips, James	
Phillips, Richard S	
Pickup, A 	
Picton, W .-	
Plant, Samuel	
Pollock, John 	
Poole, Samuel	
Price, Walter	
Quayle, Alex. B—	
Queen, John 	
Queen, Peter 	
Quinn, James .—	
Quinn, John	
Radford, Albert	
Rallison, James	
Rallison, R. 	
Rankin, George —
Rankin, Wm. Shaw.
Raynor, Fred	
Rear, Albert E.	
Reid, Thos	
Oct.
May
July
Dec.
July
June
May
May
May
June
Oct.
Dec.
May
Dec.
Dec.
May
Oct.
May
May
Oct.
June
Oct.
June
Jan.
Oct.
Sept.
May
Dec.
June
May
Nov.
July
June
Jan.
May
May
June
July
June
May
Oct.
July
Nov.
May
July
May
Nov.
May
May
Sept.
Jan.
July
Jan.
Oct.
Oct.
May
May
July
July
May
Oct.
June
May
, 1906
,1909
,1908
,1921
,1937
,1924
,1917
,1912
,1914
,1926
,1911
,1921
,1917
,1921
,1937
,1912
,1907
,1912
,1912
,1913
, 1925
,1912
,1940
,1913
,1913
, 1910
,1909
,1918
,1934
,1909
,1917
,1908
,1924
,1913
,1914
,1915
,1927
,1938
,1931
,1912
,1913
,1939
,1922
,1917
,1908
,1909
,1905
,1923
,1913
,1910
,1925
,1939
,1941
,1911
,1911
,1914
,1923
,1908
,1908
,1912
,1907
,1927
,1914
C242
C335
C299
C725
C885
C773
C636
C472
C564
C796
C446
C727
C565
C724
C889
C481
C263
C469
C461
C557
C780
C498
C917
C523
C555
C370
C347
C684
C864
C341
C655
C289
C769
C519
C590
C621
C808
C897
C849
C473
C552
C911
C749
C620
C310
C 333
C233
C760
C536
C371
C778
C908
C927
C441
C429
C579
C759
C279
C275
C489
C257
C807
C592
Reid, Wm	
Reilly, Thomas	
Renney, Jas... _
Richards, James ...
Richards, Samuel.
Richardson, J. H...
Rigby, John..
Roberts, Arthur	
Roberts, Ebenezer	
Robertson, Thomas H...
Robinson, Asa 	
Robinson, Michael	
Robson, James	
Robson, Thomas	
Roper, William	
Rowbottom, Thomas —.
Royle, Edward- 	
Russell, Robert	
Sanders, Henry	
Saunders, Eustace L..
Scales, Joseph	
Scarpino, Francis	
Scott, Henry— 	
Seddon, James	
Shanks, David  	
Sharp, James 	
Sharpe, Henry 	
Shaw, Robert._	
Shea, Thomas J.	
Shields, Thomas	
Shipley, John W	
Shooter, Joseph	
Shortman, J.	
Sim, James
Simister, Frederick .
Simister, J. H	
Simister, W— 	
Simms, Hubert Allan	
Sinclair, William	
Slee, Thomas	
Smellie, John...- 	
Smith, A. E. 	
Smith, John Watterson	
Smith, Joseph	
Smith, Richard Beveridge
Smith, Thos. J. 	
Smith, Thomas 	
Smith, Thomas
I
Sockett, James C	
Somerville, Alexander
Sopwith, Reginald Scott.
tSparks, Edward	
Spencer, G.  	
Stafford, M 	
Starr, Wallace	
Staton, Edward	
Steele, Walter	
Stewart, George 	
Stewart, James B 	
Stewart, James M	
Stewart, John 	
Stobbart, David	
Stockwell, William	
June
July
Nov.
Nov.
Oct.
Oct.
July
June
May
July
June
May
June
May
July
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
June
Jan.
May
May
July
Oct.
Sept.
May
June
June
Dec.
May
Oct.
Oct.
May
Dec.
June
Nov.
May
Jan.
Jan.
June
May
Sept.
May
March
Oct.
Oct.
May
Dec.
Jan.
July
Jan.
Oct.
May
Sept.
May
May
Oct.
May
June
Oct.
Dec.
June
Oct.
10,
1911
22,
1908
27,
1909
1,
1907
23,
1906
28,
1911
29,
1905
24,
1924
1,
1909
7,
1937
10,
1925
1,
1909
16,
1925
21,
1914
22,
1908
31,
1914
31,
1912
27,
1909
15,
1934
21,
1913
17,
1922
17,
1917
22,
1908
3,
1919
10,
1910
1,
1909
16,
1925
1,
1933
22,
1921
16,
1918
28,
1911
1,
1907
1,
1909
14,
1920
26,
1944
27,
1909
1,
1909
21,
1913
21,
1913
30,
1926
29
1923
10
1910
16
1918
4
1905
28
1913
1,
1907
9,
1912
14
1920
16
1945
7
1937
21
1913
1
1907
1,
1909
10
1910
9
1912
21
1914
28
1911
27
1913
16
1925
23
1906
30
1926
16
1925
23
1906
C403
C303
C354
C249
C244
C458
C225
C772
C327
C883
C787
C332
C788
C566
C274
C492
C506
C351
C863
C520
C738
C649
C294
C824
C372
C325
C783
C857
C722
C667
C456
C261
C331
C711
C949
C353
C334
C526
C527
C793
C758
C367
C 665
C207
C561
C271
C486
C705
C951
C884
C512
C314
C329
C382
C488
C581
C439
C534
C785
C240
C801
C781
C238
I
* Issued as substitute for No. C 342.
t Issued in lieu of No. C 255, destroyed by fire. A 112
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1944.
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act
Further Amendment Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Name.
Date.
No.
Name.
Date.
No.
Stone, Wm. C.	
Strachan, John	
Strang, James	
Strang, Thomas	
Strang Wm	
Surtees, Edward	
Sutherland, John-
Sweeney, John	
Taylor, Charles M.Taylor, Henry	
Taylor, Hugh	
Taylor, James	
Taylor, Jonathan	
Taylor, J. T	
Taylor, Leroy..
Taylor, Reginald T..
Taylor, Robert	
Taylor, Thomas	
Taylor, Thomas	
Tennant, Joseph	
Thacker, Geo	
Thewlis, David	
Thomas, John B	
Thomas, Thomas	
Thomason, Charles .
Thompson, John-
Thompson, Joseph	
Thompson, Thomas	
Thomson, Charles	
Tiberghien, Alphonse..
Tolley, John	
Touhey, William	
Travis, Joseph 	
Tully, Thomas	
Tune, Elijah 	
Unsworth, John	
Uphill, Vernon R..
Valentine, Wilfrid	
Vardy, Robt  	
Vaton, Harry	
Vaughan, John Henry ._.
Vincent, Thomas C.	
Waddington, D. M. 	
Walker, George	
Walker, Jas. Alexander-
Walker, Robert C	
Walker, Wm— 	
June
Oct.
May
June
June
June
May
May
March
Dec.
Jan.
May
Dec.
Oct.
Sept.
June
June
May
July
June
May
July
Nov.
Sept.
Nov.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
June
June
Dec.
May
June
May
May
June
June
July
May
July
Oct.
Nov.
June
July
Oct.
May
May
21,1921
14.1914
13.1915
10,1911
10,1911
16,1930
27,1913
17,1922
4,1905
20.1928
21,1913
21,1914
19,1918
28,1911
10,1910
18,1936
21,1920
21,1914
7,1937
24,1924
27, 1913
2, 1943
14,1905
10, 1910
15, 1917
31, 1912
1,1907
1,1917
24, 1924
15,1934
19,1918
27,1913
21,1920
9,1912
9, 1912
16,1925
15,1934
21.1929
21,1914
5, 1932
28,1913
21, 1922
10, 1927
8,1916
31,1912
17, 1922
21, 1914
C714
C604
C614
C400
C395
C835
C545
C735
C213
C818
C530
C567
C680
C447
C381
C875
C695
C577
C882
C770
C537
C935
C231
C365
C657
C509
C269
C267
C765
C867
C678
C547
C699
C468
C476
C784
C862
C826
C570
C853
C560
C745
C806
C633
C496
C728
C586
Wallace, Fred ..
Waller, Wm. E..
Walls, John
Ward, Ernest Hedley.
Wardrop, James	
Watson, Arthur W	
Watson, George	
Watson, John	
Watson, Joseph-	
Watson, William—	
Watson, William 	
Weaver, William -	
Webb, Herbert	
Webster, James Stewart.
Weir, James 	
West, James Gloag	
Whalley, William	
Whittaker, John (Jr.)	
Wicks, Roy	
Wilkinson, Edward	
Williams, Arthur	
Williams, Cadwaladr	
Williams, John Sam- -
Williams, Watkin	
Wilson, John M	
Wilson, Joseph	
Wilson, Joseph	
Wilson, Joseph R 	
Wilson, Robinson .
Wilson, Thomas M —
Wilson, William	
Wilson, William	
Winstanley, H. 	
Winstanley, Robert	
Wintho, Thomas A. _.
Witherington, George .
Wood, Francis E	
Wood, Thos. James	
Worthington, J .....
Wright, John	
Wright, Robert	
Wright, William	
Wynne, Thomas M.	
Yates, Frank	
Yates, John -
Yeowart, Hudson-
Young, Alexander-
Oct.
July
Dec.
May
Oct.
May
July
May
Jan.
Oct.
May
Nov.
Oct.
Dec.
July
May
Dec.
July
July
Oct.
Dec.
June
June
June
Dec.
June
June
July-
June
Oct.
Oct.
May
July
Nov.
July
Oct.
Dec.
Oct.
July
May
May
Jan.
Dec.
May
June
June
May
1
5
14
17
31
27
22
17
21
22
17
17
28
19
7
16
19
18
21
28
20
16
10
22
16
24
30
18
10
1
1
17.
22
21
29
28
16
31
22
21
21
21
9
17
16
24
16
,1907
, 1932
,1920
,1917
,1912
,1913
,1908
,1922
,1913
,1906
,1917
,1922
,1911
,1918
,1937
,1918
,1918
,1938
, 1929
,1911
,1938
,1930
,1911
, 1908
,1937
,1924
,1928
, 1938
,1911
,1907
,1907
,1917
,1908
,1922
,1905
,1913
,1937
, 1912
, 1908
,1914
,1914
,1913
,1940
,1922
,1930
, 1924
,1918
C260
C851
C710
C641
C504
C535
C288
C743
C515
C246
C645
C748
C457
C685
C880
C676
C686
C891
C827
C438
C905
C838
C404
C301
C890
C767
C814
C902
C397
C272
C262
C647
C283
C747
C222
C554
C886
C491
C295
C593
C589
C522
C920
C 732
C840
C771
C666 COAL MINES.
A 113
Mine Surveyor Certificates issued under the " Coal-mines Regulation Act
amendment act, 1919."
Name.
No.
Name.
Date.
No.
Andersen, Thormod	
Anderson, Harry C	
Baile, Wynne Jeffreys..
Bapty, Harry	
Bonar, Robert B 	
Bowerman, Everard S..
Brehaut, Cecil H. __	
Buckham, Alexander F
Caufield, Bernard	
Corbett, Garnett S	
Cox, Richard 	
Crosscombe, James S—
Daniell, Geo. W. B	
Davis, Gerald D	
Delaney, James	
Dickson, James	
Drewry, Wm. Stewart..
Edwards, Jas.	
Freeman, Harry N	
Gardner, Harold H	
George, Frank J	
Gibson, Munro M 	
Graham,