Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1946

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0320812.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0320812.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0320812-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0320812-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0320812-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0320812-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0320812-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0320812-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0320812-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0320812.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL EEPOET
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR THE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1944
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Cf4Altr.ES F. Baxfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1944
is herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
July, 1H5. The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
SIR,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twenty-seventh Annual Report on
the work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1944.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., July, 1945. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
List of Acts affecting Labour Inside front cover
Eeport of Deputy Minister  7
Statistics of Trades and Industries  7
Pay-roll  8
Comparison of Pay-rolls  8
Industrial Divisions  9
Average Weekly Wage by Industries  11
Racial Origin and Nationality  16
Statistical Tables  17
Summary of all Tables  30
" Hours of Work Act "  31
Average Weekly Hours  32
Hours of Work Regulations  76
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers  33
New Labour Legislation  34
" Barbers Act Amendment Act, 1945 " .  34
" Fire Departments Hours of Labour Act Amendment Act, 1945 "  34
" Wartime Labour Relations Regulations Act "  34
Board of Industrial Relations  35
Meetings and Delegations  35
New Orders and Regulations  36
Statistics covering Women and Girl Employees  37
Summary of all Occupations  43
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum  44
Single, Married, and Widowed Employees  45
Years of Service Table  46
Inspections and Collections  46
Court Cases  47
Comparative Wages  49
Special  Licences    50
Statistics for Male Employees    50
Summary of Orders ,  54
List of Orders in Effect  75
Hours of Work Regulations    76
Women's and Children's Division  81
Control of Employment of Children Branch  83
Table of Permits issued under Act    84
Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch (Secretary-Registrar's Report)  86
Summary of Cases dealt with  87
Disputes and Number of Employees affected  87
Summary of Disputes  88
Table of Conciliation Proceedings  90
Boards of Conciliation  93
Organizations of Employees and Employers  94 I 6 SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
' Page.
Inspection of Factories  110
Inspections  110
Accident-prevention    110
Factory Conditions ,  111
Welfare    111
Women in Industry  111
Child Labour  112
„ Industrial Home-work  112
Passenger and Freight Elevators  113
Apprenticeship Branch  114
Trade-schools Regulation Branch  116
Safety Branch  120 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1944.
This Annual Report for the year 1944, being the twenty-seventh of the Department,
reflects a changing picture in the industrial life of the Province.
In the fifth year of the war, and with victory assured, some curtailment in heavy
production brought a modifying influence to bear on the upward surge of industrial
pay-rolls which had marked the peak year 1943.
With the completion of many large war contracts in 1943, noticeably in the heavy
construction industries, our Provincial estimated pay-roll for 1944 dropped to $378,-
117,554, to show an apparent decrease of $16,835,477 from the final estimated total of
$394,953,031 for 1943.
Average weekly wages continued to show strength throughout 1944, the average
increasing in twenty-two of the twenty-five tables in this report.
The average weekly wage for all adult male wage-earners rose to $38.70 for 1944,
representing a gain of $1.51 over the previous year, and establishing an all-time high
in the records of the Department.
Twenty of the twenty-five tables relating to the industrial group showed increases
in the pay-roll totals for 1944.
Greatest increase was in food products manufacturing (up $3,000,000), followed by
miscellaneous trades and industries (up almost $2,000,000), lumber industries (up over
$1,500,000), and Coast shipping (up almost $1,000,000). For others in order of
increase see " Comparison of Pay-rolls " in report data.
Due to the completion of large war contracts during the latter part of the previous
year, greatest decrease was noted in the construction industry (down over $16,500,000),
followed by ship-building (decreased by over $12,500,000). Other industries showing
decreases were metal-mining (down almost $2,000,000), smelting and concentrating
(down $1,000,000), and oil-refining (down $188,000).
While production demands had necessitated an unprecedented volume of employment in many essential industries during 1943, a gradual decrease in both male and
female employment totals in these industries was evident in 1944, particularly in
the heavy construction industries, ship-building, metal trades, and industries of a
like nature. The average monthly employment high for all industries in 1944 was
138,911 in August of that year, compared with the all-time high of 152,694 recorded in
August, 1943.
Shorter working-hours were, with few exceptions, general throughout the industries covered, the average weekly working-hours for all employees decreasing to 46.02
as against 47.19 for the previous year.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
While continuing to show the effect of war production in most industries, the statistical section for 1944 reveals many changes which mark the beginning of a period of
transition from the feverish activity of the peak year 1943 to a more stable and balanced
industrial life normally associated with peace-time years.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 5,044.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 5,044,
as compared with 4,727 in 1943, an increase of 317. I 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PAY-ROLL.
A total pay-roll of $289,799,678 was reported by the 5,044 firms filing returns in
time for classification. Representing only industrial pay-rolls, however, this total is
not considered as the total Provincial pay-roll until further augmented by additional
figures which follow, showing an accumulative estimated total of $378,117,554, an
apparent decrease of $16,835,477 over final estimates for 1943.
Pay-rolls of 5,044 firms making returns to Department of Labour   $289,799,678
Returns received too late to be included in above summary  792,368
Employers included in Department's inquiry, not sending in returns (estimated pay-roll) 1,350,000
Transcontinental railways (ascertained pay-roll)  _ .—      21,045,508
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey;   viz., Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, miscellaneous (estimated pay-roll)       65,130,000
Total.
$378,117,554
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS.
The total estimated Provincial pay-rolls since 1928 are as follows:—
1937 ...-  $162,654,234
1938  158,026,375
1939 - -  165,683,460
1940  ._  188,325,766
1941  239,525,459
1942  321,981,489*
1943 --  394,953,031*
1944.- - -  378,117,554f
* 1942 and 1943 totals revised since publication of 1943 report.
f 1944 preliminary total subject to revision.
Due to the rapid expansion of industrial pay-rolls during the years 1942 and 1943,
previously estimated totals for these years have been revised in accordance with more
complete information, and provision will be made in subsequent departmental reports
for preliminary estimated totals to be revised from year to year, based on additional
information not available at the time of publication.
A percentage distribution showing the proportion of the total pay-roll allotted to
each class of worker is contained in the following table:—
1928    	
 -  $183,097,781
1929
       192,092,249
1930            	
-     167,133,813
1931	
1932              	
     131,941,008
     102,957,074
1933        -	
       99,126,653
1934
      113.567,953
1935
     125,812,140
1936
--             142.349.591
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
Officers, superintendents, and managers
Per Cent.
10.22
11.15
78.63
Per Cent.
9.29
10.11
80.60
Per Cent.
7.13
8.66
84.21
Per Cent.
6.57
9.18
84.25
Per Cent.
7.26
10 72
82 02
Totals	
100.00
100.09
100.00
100.00
100 00
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
While the general trend in industrial pay-roll totals continued upward, a levelling-
off in some heavy industries which had rocketed to new highs during the previous year
brought decreases in some instances. Twenty of the twenty-five tables showed increases
for 1944. Leading in the group showing increased pay-roll totals, food products gained
$3,129,114 over the previous year, followed by miscellaneous trades and industries, up
$1,962,232, and the lumber industries with an increase of $1,510,058; Coast shipping
increased by $967,272, followed by the public utility group, up $872,505, and pulp and
paper mills with a gain of $722,657; breweries, an increase of $456,046; coal-mining,
up $440,057;  printing and publishing, up $315,745;  laundries, cleaning and dyeing, an REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 9
increase of $298,790; garment-making, up $183,980; leather and fur goods, $124,830;
wood manufacturing (N.E.S.), $117,786; house furnishings, $88,561; paint-manufacturing, $53,339; builders' materials, $35,472; jewellery-manufacture, $17,528; metal
trades, $7,367; cigar and tobacco manufacturing, $5,503; and explosives and chemicals,
up $4,654.
Due to the completion of many large war-time contracts during the latter part of
1943, pay-roll totals in the heavy construction group for 1944 showed a decrease of
$16,882,586 from the record high set for the previous year. Ship-building also
decreased from the all-time high figure set in 1943 to show a drop of $12,876,421.
Decreases were also noted in metal-mining, down $1,950,826; smelting and concentrating, down $1,022,041;   and oil-refining, off $188,264.
Comparison op Pay-rolls.
1942.
1943.
1944.
Industry.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries  —	
34
76
3
27
117
889
24
572
63
65
12
104
53
938
800
127
455
53
10
145
13
46
5
110
104
$1,584,038.00
2,000,579.00
4,441.00
4,491,833.00
8,660,344.00
30,101,754.00
3,501,356.00
16,276,059.00
1,264,303.00
1,778,909.00
343,552.00
2,018,329.00
866,701.00
43,935,333.00
17,223,536.00
11,808,861.00
16,012,831.00
3,039,683.00
429,195.00
4,143,521.00
8,824,524.00
47,203,906.00
7,881,503.00
12,734,102.00
5,917,196.00
31
74
3
26
119
753
23
547
66
67
11
99
55
948
801
93
510
62
10
142
12
47
5
115
108
$1,758,828.00
2,306,658.00
6,971.00
4,890,314.00
10,019,897.00
43,356,556.00
4,014,989.00
18,192,018.00
1,403,599.00
1,822,614.00
347,097.00
2,433,302.00
926,231.00
47,078,896.00
24,637,007.00
11,318,358.00
26,160,573.00
3,229,243.00
457,182.00
4,337,734.00
8,727,109.00
65,494,519.00
7,466,686.00
13,613,489.00
7,406,450.00
32
80
3
27
110
916
23
582
71
77
13
108
69
1,041
858
79
456
59
11
140
12
46
5
105
121
$2,214,874.00
2,342,130.00
12,474.00
5,330,371.00
10,987,169.00
26,473,970.00
4,019,643.00
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
21,321,132.00
1,587,579.00
1,911,175.00
364,625.00
House furnishings  	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing . .	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of
2,732,092.00
1,051,061.00
48,588,954.00
24,644,374.00
9,367,532.00
28,122,805.00
3,040,979.00
510,521.00
4 653 479 00
9,449,766.00
52,618,098.00
6 444,645.00
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc.
Wood manufacturing (N.E.S.)—	
14,485,994.00
7,524,236.00
4.845   [$252 046.389.041
4 727   IS311 40fi J?n no
5,044
$289,799,678.00
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
The industrial activities of the Province have again been segregated into three
divisions—Greater Vancouver, Rest of Mainland, and Vancouver Island. In 1944, due
to some curtailment in heavy industry within the Greater Vancouver area, the percentage of the total pay-roll attributable to this division decreased to 44.11 from 46.88 per
cent, in 1943, with a corresponding increase in the Mainland percentage to 38.33 as
against 35.36 per cent, for 1943. The Vancouver Island percentage showed little
cnange—with 17.56 per cent, as compared with 17.76 per cent, for the previous year. I 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The application of these percentages to the total estimated 1944 pay-roll gives a
break-down of that figure as shown in the following table, with comparative figures
for previous years:—
1940.
1941.
1942.*
1943.*
1944.t
$67,477,121.96
82,034,703.67
38,813,940.37
$92,504,732.26
98,157,533.10
48,863,193.64
$147,821,701.60
115,623,552.70
58,536,234.70
$185,153,980.93
139,655,391.76
70,143,658.31
$166,787,653.07
144,932 458.45
66 397 442.48
Totals 	
$188,325,766.00
$239,525,459.00
$321,981,489.00
$394,953,031.00 .
$378,117,554.00
* 1942 and 1943 totals revised since publication of 1943 report.
f 1944 preliminary total subject to revision.
Numbers employed in the lower wage brackets continued to decrease in most industries, a survey of adult males employed at less than $19 per week showing decreasing
percentages in fourteen of the twenty-five tables.
The following list of industries is arranged in order of diminishing percentages to
show the number of adult males employed during the week of greatest employment,
together with the percentage of total in receipt of less than $19 per week:—
Industry.
Food products ..
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing .
Garment-making    	
Printing and publishing	
House furnishings 	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing.
Leather and fur goods	
Builders' materials	
Coast shipping  	
Number
employed.
.... 11,650
»
209
...    1,098
Explosives and chemicals —
Smelting and concentrating.
Breweries	
Construction   —	
Metal trades    	
Miscellaneous trades and industries.
Ship-building    _	
Wood manufacturing  (N.E.S.) .
Lumber industries   	
Pulp and paper manufacturing.
Jewellery-manufacturing 	
Oil-refining	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc. .
Coal-mining  	
Paint-manufacturing   	
Metal-mining	
510
306
1,248
5,045
1,259
2,657
910
17,181
9,179
10,370
24,839
2,897
27,383
3,668
66
1,244
5,162
2,741
132
4,238
Per Cent.
Less than $19.
11.34
11.11
10.53
9.47
9.06
7.45
6.86
5.61
5.35
4.05
3.65
3.41
3.29
2.78
2.51
2.42
2.31
1.64
1.61
1.52
1.06
0.99
0.80
0.76
0.14 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 11
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRIES.
Increases in the average weekly wage for adult male workers were evident in
iwenty-two of the twenty-five tables. The averages are based on the week of employment of the greatest number, and with changes incorporated in the statistical form for
1944 a more complete picture was obtained of workers in the higher wage brackets, with
a resultant upward swing in the averages shown for those industries employing large
numbers at high rates of pay.
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males
ONLY).
Industry.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
$26.18
22.31
15.50
27.46
31.99
25.61
24.58
23.85
22.97
22.25
34.60
22.89
21.23
26.81
24.77
30.34
23.85
27.92
23.08
33.69
26.75
27.88
25.08
27.20
21.97
$27.42
22.82
13.00
28.20
32.93
25.81
24.20
23.70
23.15
20.80
38.95
23.33
22.23
26.59
25.09
30.48
23.46
28.68
22.78
34.19
26.36
28.76
24.80
27.78
22.68
$27.98
23.23
19.75
29.39
29.35
26.12
25.75
23.23
24.25
22.53
39.23
23.19
21.19
27.14
25.38
30.86
23.91
28.97
22.69
34.34
26.54
28.55
25.57
28.63
23.22
$28.23
24.15
17.70
28.04
30.34
27.52
31.67
23.59
25.22
23.59
43.44
24.00
21.72
28.83
26.18
31.77
24.36
29.17
23.15
34.34
29.84
31.74
32.75
28.57
24.88
$29.29
26.26
14.50
31.84
30.03
30.21
33.39
25.65
26.51
25.74
38.72
24.76
26.07
31.01
29.90
33.72
26.97
30.97
24.95
36.78
32.13
35.27
37.07
30.93
27.01
$31.85
30.78
15.83
34.56
31.24
36.41
36.45
30.52
27.72
27.76
38.59
28.20
27.80
33.94
34.00
37.19
33.58
33.40
28.73
37.10
33.92
40.32
38.49
32.28
30.24
$33.46
31.61
15.10
39.00
33.97
39.60
37.54
32.66
32.03
28.13
41.14
30.39
30.18
37.09
36.37
35.82
34.92
35.52
30.71
38.39
36.41
40.08
38.47
35.01
33.34
$34.72
33.17
23.61
42.38
35.86
Construction — - -	
38.47
36.50
35.06
34.42
31.28
44.64
33 05
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of
Lumber industries  	
32.47
41.28
39.07
Metal-mining - -	
Miscellaneous trades and industries
39.40
37.21
37.99
33 42
39.47
Pulp and paper manufacturing —	
Ship-building —- 	
37.71
40.36
36 74
Street-railways, gas, water, power, tele-
37.29
Wood, manufacturing of (N.E.S.)	
34.75
The increases and decreases in the average weekly rates are as follows:
Increase.
Breweries   	
Builders' materials  	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing .
Coal-mining   	
Coast shipping ____. ~
Food products, manufacture of.	
Garment-making __ 	
House furnishings — - 	
Jewellery, manufacture of -	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing-	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of
Lumber industries   	
Construction
$1.26
1.56
8.51
3.38
1.89
2.40
2.39
3.15
S.50
2.66
2.29
4.19
Metal trades ..
Metal-mining
$2.70
3.58
Miscellaneous trades and industries _. 2.29
Oil-refining    _, _ „ 2.47
Paint-manufacturing      2.71
Printing and publishing . ____ 1.08
Pulp and paper manufacturing  1.30
Ship-building        0.28
Str49et-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc.    2.28
Wood, manufacturing of (N.E.S.)  ___. 1.41
   $1.13
Explosives and chemicals _     1.04
Decrease.
Smelting and concentrating .
$1.73
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The recorded average weekly wage for all adult males in the wage-earner group
rose to $38.70 in 1944, an increase of $1.51 over the 1943 figure.    The effect of higher I 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
wage-scales on the averages shown for the war years may be noted in the following
table, which shows the average industrial wage for each year since 1918:—
1918	
  $27.97
      29.11
     31.51
1932	
  $23.62
1919	
1920	
1933	
1934	
     22.30
            .    23.57
1921	
     27.62
1935	
1936	
     24.09
1922 ...	
     27.29
 _    26.36
1923	
     28.05
     28.39
      27.82
     27.99
     28.29
1937	
     26.64
1924 	
1925      -
1926               	
1938 	
1939	
1940    	
     26.70
  _    26.80
     28.11
1927 -
1941	
1942	
1943	
     34X67
1928
28.96
     35.24
1929 	
     29.20
      37.19
1930 	
     28.64
1944 _
       38.70
1931	
     26.17
The weekly wage-rates shown above appear in the following chart, which depicts
the trend of average weekly wages for adult male workers from 1918 to 1944.
AVERAGE  WEEKLY WAGES   PAID
1918 -
TO  ADULT
1944
MALE  EMPLOYEES
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WAGES
YEAR
1918
1919
mo
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
4929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
^39-00
38.00
37.00
36 00
35.00
34.00
33.00
32.00
31.00
30.00
29 00
28 00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.00
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
A
/
A
/
/
/
/
/
\
—^
.^
rr"
\
/
^./
<•"
\
v
/
/
V
\
/'
\
/
\
/"
V
(1944 figure—$38.70.) AVERAGE  MONTHLY   NUMBER of WAQE-EARNERS    (Male and Female)
1929 -31 -32-39 -40-41 -42-43-44
| JAN. |   FEB. |  MAR.|   APR.|   MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG. | SEPT.| OCT. | NOV. | DEC.
150,000
145,000
140,000
135,000
13 0.000
125,OOO
120,000
1 15.OOO
1 1 0,000
'\ 05,00 0
100,000
95,000
90,000
85,000
80,000
75,000
70,00 0
65.0 OO
60.000
55,000
50,000
45,0 00
40,000
...---
^^
1943
1942
1944
1941
I940
1929
1939
/93I
1932
-M
^„
'--.._
'
..--
"'
/
NN
y'
/
/
\
\
"^
^
-""
^"
\
—-
s
\
/
/
/
\
^
\
y
/
y
\
y
y
C^^
-"-        -
y
y
/
/
/
^
N
\
s'
y
/
/
<
	
v
\
s
y
■
'
\
1
■ \
--*
A
/
>
^
X*
/
1
/
^
-	
\
r***
— ■-
\
\
\
v>
.<-'.-
—
\
"n.
\
^
>,
Mr,
■-^' -REFERENCE-^     J
nployment   in —
1929 shown  thus
1931
1932
1939
1940
194-1
1 942
1943
3
	
	
1944
January ..
February
March —
April _.....
May  	
133,737
133,887
133,485
133,045
134,405
137,192
July   	
August 	
September
October 	
November
December ..
138,878
138,911
137,305
132,428
131,520
124,850 I 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Weekly Percentage
Waf?es- Employees.
Under $15    3.90
$15 to   20 _ _ 18.29
20 to   25  26.37
25 to   30 ,   20.07
30 to   35 _. 15.26
35 to   40      7.88
40 to   45 _    4.62
45 to   50      1.82
50 and over     1.79
Under $15      4.18
$15 to    20'.    14.10
20 to   25  23.33
25 to   30    19.54
30 to   35  17.03
35 to   40   10.71
40 to   45     5.99
45 to   50     2.75
50 and over.     2.37
Under $15...    2.65
$15 to   20     7.55
20 to   25   20.42
25 to   30 - -  20.40
30 to   35    17.46
35 to   40   13.08
40 to   45  10.65
45 to   50      4.17
50 and over     3.62
Under $15      1.66
$15 to   20      2.99
20 to   25.     9.20
25 to   30 _  17.62
30 to    35   17.12
35 to    40 _.. 18.32
40 to   45-   12.42
45 to   50    9.34
50 and over _  11.33
Under $15     1.99
$15 to   20'     1.82
20 to   25    4.83
25 to   30.  12.08
30 to   35. _ 19.33
35 to   40  18.91
40 to   45   14.21
45 to   50  11.90
50 and over   14.93
Under $15      1.97
$15 to   20      1.72
20 to   25     3.53
25 to    30      9.90
30 to    35   22.06
35 to   40  19.48
40 to   45 _ 17.38
45 to   50  11.53
50 and over  12.43
*2          5          in          g          0.          <
^         s«         >?          »i          v?
u
tS
(0
w
■ ■■■
■■■■■"
■ ■
■■
10
T
0
■ ■■■r
■ ■■
■ ■r
to
■ ■■"
■ ■■■r
■ ■■■"
ID
■■
■ ■■
N
T
w
■■
■■
■ ■
"*
MmWT
The above bar diagrams show the relative percentages of adult male wage-earners
in the various wage classifications from 1939 to 1944. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 15
OT
S3
<
H
>t
o
Eh
H
Ol
<;
s
CU
H
>.
B
O
fc
-M
-fJ
H
OT
P
o
0.
5^
rQ
i—i
rr*
bn
K
n
V
• I-H
<.
u
a
3
T3
%
t*i
1-1
F4
H
-M
Z
rt
w
T3
a
a
(M
,,h
o
x
J
o
S
a!
a
S
w
*rt
&.
-i->
o
a
a>
g
fci
o
EH
o
<<
ft
S
cu
>
o
«
a
O
o
H
-M
fc
ca
p
c3
o
>
<i
cu
,0
w
-tJ
a
OT
H
fi
tl
o
tS
fS
o
42
W
OJ
OT
4^»
Sfl
w
1
s-i
ca
o
<
E-4
o
«H
cu
fl
H
HT3
OJ   V
rO   >,
il
a p.
«H B
gW
o a.
.a >,
3 fl
is s
5 >>
gW
P   P.
!5g
41)    C
■s|
a-a
§1
gH
4V4-C
QJ   QJ
Xi >.
%  S
Ss
gH
HWroWfflt-WCOlOMfflHCOOOt-   O   t-   W    i-t   ■**   CO
n ^ o h" oj        rH        ci       ai" ct> eo oT h n?" h cj to ■»*
o '    \    i                         ■         -                { •   -P                  '
+3 I     |   j                j     |     •     ;     ;     ;     !     ;     | J,\   a     ' J           i     j     j
d   fi fl-nou^^dbscfioflOtdfi'"l+iflflw
^r; w[nDQS<3hgbhTaaiQ<ilr,r,<OMr,q
hhr;
MlOt-^-^t-COlfflCO'^HCiOHHOOOiW'tOOMcDCiO
HNHt-NTfCOOiroHpNOOOOl^WtOlOtOM
t"  H   Q   CO  t-  rl   IO Mt-lOClOOOHWrflDWt-lD
fj  IO   N   H   t-   H   H 4M ti)   ffl   ^   V   H H   ^"  00   W   O   ^
9   C  -Q    O   fi
* -*  J ■ P
"J   fc   P   1-3
00   00   '
o to
IT- p
Ot^rHt-OM^^ft-t-00WW00^(N»0«Di-Ht-00t-
tD01M(»inMbM'*lr-WN6l0t-(DNMfflMl0M
Ui   SO   SZ>   Ol   tZ>   t7>   rt CiUirtCOOiCOIr-rtCOOQCO'^i't-irt
Ci   •*£   "#    rt   V- rt rt O)   O.   ^  H rt   CO   QQ   Oi   SO   -#
§ « 5 5 £ 1 * £ § 3 S S-ij 3 5 rf>S5« S^ «
•^<OOSCOOOtr-OmMt-OtOWOi-lOOK5t-00(NlO»n
»neO^Wt^Ot©COiX>?HOS"tf^NrHIr—   lOWlO*tfi3i00
X   M   H   IO  M   r(   w MOXWCdiOH^cOiOJoriu-
IM   IO   ©
i-t        cn
-*  O  cm  ec  -tc
•- s
<l<ro      S<Hj"<ai<l"<bM?li»<!^fi<!^O^hh"<<l
.2 -» s
Jh S. rt
a. oj .
iS 2 3
£ '3 .»
m pq o
60
•4 &
.S     *        ;
I s g §
rt   c   r.   cn
^ a o .
C '3 ° >
SM Ih «
+3 -u O
'     M to —
cd C
p s *s
C   »M
bl) '3   p
II g
gs g
a
p. to
a fi
Si
>i   4jj   eg
-5 S ,
i S © ■*»
f« -? rj
.5   d ■
d   «
D F-5 ,
8 ■g a <S
•SSS3
o   o   o   X   o
J    3«
■5 3
0  a
- '  ^ ^! £ :-   a   t.
ft   D   D   o
2 S £ £
mm to? I 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
RACIAL ORIGIN AND NATIONALITY OF EMPLOYEES.
A total of 189,776 employees were covered in the survey dealing with racial origin
and nationality, of which 144,381 or 76.08 per cent, were originally from English-
speaking countries; 34,665 or 18.27 per cent, originally from Continental Europe; 7,498
or 3.95 per cent, from Asiatic stock; and 3,232 or 1.70 per cent, from other countries,
or racial origin not stated.
Comparative percentages for the past five years are set out in the following table:—
Racial Origin.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
Per Cent.
75.37
15.10
7.70
1.83
Per Cent.
75.93
16.18
6.27
1.62
Per Cent.
77.37
16.55
4.34
1.74
Per Cent.
75.25
18.87
3.*0
2.08
Per Cent.
76.08
18.27
3.95
1.70
Totals.   	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
Continued increase in the number of firms reporting in the higher pay-roll bracket
is noted for 1944, a total of 435 firms reporting pay-rolls of over $100,000, compared
with 423 in this classification for 1943.
As stated in previous reports, pay-rolls of public authorities (Dominion, Provincial,
or municipal) are not included, nor are wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental railways, or vessels engaged in deep-sea transportation.
Again leading in the list of industries reporting in the higher bracket, the lumber
industry was credited with 118 firms in this category, an increase of 15 over the previous year; followed by metal trades with 48, decreased by 2; construction industry
with 46, a decrease of 17; food products, 46, an increase of 7; miscellaneous trades and
industries, 26, up 3; Coast shipping, 19, up 3; metal-mining, 17, down 1; ship-building,
17, unchanged; public utilities, 15, up 2; wood manufacturing (N.E.S.), 15, unchanged;
pulp and paper manufacturing, 9, unchanged; coal-mining, 8, down 2; printing and
publishing, 8, up 1; breweries, 7, up 1; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 7, up 2; oil-
refining, 7, down 2; builders' materials, 6, unchanged; garment-making, 4, up 1;
explosives and chemicals, 3, unchanged; house furnishings, 3, unchanged; leather and
fur goods, 2, up 1; jewellery-manufacture and paint-manufacturing, both 1, unchanged;
and smelting and concentrating, 2, unchanged from the previous year.
Of the 435 firms reported above, eight had pay-rolls in excess of $5,000,000, two
between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, five between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000, ten between
$2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and twelve between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 17
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders* Material, etc.—Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick; also
stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed rock.
No, 3. Cigar and Tobacco manufacturing.-—Comprises only
these trades-
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation
of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general and
towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include the
operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction.—Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-metal
works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel
fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves, dredging,
pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic sprinklers.
Firms making returns as building contractors, constructors of dry-
kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces, electrical contractors,
hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc.—Includes the manufacture of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries and
dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packing-houses, curers
of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers of
candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces, coffee, catsup, and
spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' out-fitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11: Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as
well as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical instruments   (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.-—Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and leather
Indian novelties;   also furriers and hide and wool dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills, and
lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine black-
smithing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops, galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of handsaws, nuts
and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and repairs to
same.
No.  16.  Metal-mining.-—-Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, cartage and warehousing, motor and aerial transportation,
ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.—Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-ruling,
bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of
rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only firms
engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-
ship building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
engaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial gases, operation of street-railways, and waterworks.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified}.'—
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings, barrels,
boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes and tanks,
wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins, and undertakers'
supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
 Returns covering 32 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $288,244.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        253,977.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers).     1,672,653.00
 Total   „  $2,214,874.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
733
166
July	
923
244
February.	
759
167
August	
905
247
March	
768
179
September
854
246
April	
793
194
October	
924
367
May...	
847
203
November
928
348
June	
900
248
December
929
303
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00.	
5
6
3
2
3
2
2
1
1
2
1
3
3
15
2
10
1
15
10
13
31
6
47
215
382
84
19
18
3
1
1
3
3
1
5
2
2
1
3
2
4
4
4
6
1
3
13
1
4
__
8
2
2
2
9
3
1
1
2
1
4
1
23
7
6
3
96
52
36
19
5
12
3
5
13
19
$6.00 to $6.99 	
3
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99.
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99
5
13.00 to 13.99 	
14.00 to 14.99
4
15.00 to 15.99	
1
16.00 to 16.99          	
11
17.00 to 17.99	
1
18.00 to 18.99.
5
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99	
22
21.00 to 21.99	
1
22.00 to 22.99 	
23.00 to 23.99	
1
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00' to 25.99
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99.
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99 	
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99    	
50.00 to 54.99     .   	
55.00 to  59.99     	
60.00 to 64.99
65.00 to 69.99           	
70.00 and over	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian _	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian-
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
516
326
1
6
24
28
18
25
1
British
Subject.
238
98
1
10
"l
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)   —  	
Males.      Females. I 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 80 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments,
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers..
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc _
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)-
Total   	
1944.
 $312,430.00
259,090.00
     1,770,610.00
I.. $2,342,130.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Moath.
Males.
Females.
January...	
February
1,013
1,026
1,059
1,046
1,050
1,083
35
35
35
34
35
43
July 	
August	
September.
October
November _
December
1,079
1,064
1,049
1,056
1,121
1,128
45
45
46
1    55
May	
June 	
56
67
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wagt
-earners only).
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6 00 to $6.99   	
14
2
1
1
7
3
4
5
2
6
3
4
15
3
9
14
3
16
16
43
27
31
40
80
114
347
203
121
50
37
16
8
3
3
1
3
~~8
2
1
1
3
2
2
1
3
15
3
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
__
1
1
3
2
5
2
9
6
1
2
"12
3
1
2
1
	
8.00 to    8.99. 	
	
10.00 to 10.99   	
11 00 to 11.99   	
13 00 to 13.99   	
1
14.00 to 14.99   	
15 00 to 15.99   	
16.00 to 16.99    	
1
17 00 to 17.99   	
19 00 to 19.99   	
21 00 to 21.99    	
22.00 to 22.99    	
23.00 to 23.99    	
24.00 to 24.99    	
25.00 to 25.99    	
26.00 to 26.99    	
27.00 to 27.99    	
29.00 to 29.99    -	
30.00 to 34.99     	
35.00 to 39.99.  -	
40.00 to 44.99     	
45.00 to 49.99    	
50.00 to 54.99    	
55.00 to 59.99     	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over ...-	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland ...
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavia,	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
594
389
15
36
17
34
27
7
57
70
3
10
British
Subject.
60
Alien.
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)  —
Females.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
 Returns covering 3 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $1,040.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc..
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers).
Total  	
$11,434.00
$12,474.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February	
March 	
April 	
May  _
June -	
8
8
8
8
9
9
3
3
3
3
3
3
July 	
August
September-
October
November ...
December ...
9
9
9
9
9
9
3
3
3
3
3
3
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00.--	
1
1
6
	
2
1
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99.	
10.00 to 10.99 -
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99-	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99 	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99-	
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to 20.99 	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00' to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99 —
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99
30.00 to 34.99 —
35.00 to 39.99 — ..
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99 -
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00  and over 	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French „...
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
British
Subject.
Alien.
Females.
British
Subject.
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) „  	
Males. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 19
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
 Returns covering 27 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $404,097.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc.-        115,465.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     4,810,809.00
Total .
5,330,371.00
Average Number
of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March...	
April	
May	
June.	
2,715
2,646
2,610
2,566
2,578
2,546
3
3
3
3
5
6
July	
August
September
October	
November
December
2,497
2,526
2,317
2,348
2,331
2,357
8
7
2
2
2
2
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 .-
2
3
6
1
3
7
1
1
4
3
10
32
14
20
16
41
347
473
772
683
139
39
57
13
54
6
9
6
6
6
17
22
2
1
1
1
3
$6.00 to $6.99          	
7.00 to    7.99     	
8.00 to    8.99  -
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99   	
11.00 to 11.99     -
12.00 to 12.99          	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99           -
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99    	
19.00 to 19.99     	
20 00 to 20.99      	
21.00 to 21.99	
22 00 to 22.99     	
23 00 to 23.99
24 00 to 24.99       	
25 00 to 25.99         .
26 00 to 26.99	
27 00 to 27.99
28.00 to 28.99    	
29.00 to 29.99   	
30 00 to 34.99       	
35.00 to 39.99	
40 00 to 44.99     ....	
45 00 to 49.99            	
50.00 to 54.99         	
60 00 to 64.99           	
65 00 to 69.99     	
70.00  and over   	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
9
10
280
93
239
45
173
54
4
"36
1
2
29
14
41
6
36
33
British
Subject.
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)  - -
15
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
 Returns covering 110 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers        $846,180.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  714,857.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)       9,426,132.00
 Total     $10,987,169.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January    _
February
March   	
April	
May 	
4,697
4,603
4,667
4,674
4,835
4,957
162
147
153
149
165
168
July
August
September
October
November ..
December
4,926
4,940
4,841
4,893
4,905
4,782
184
180
184
177
177
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wagt
-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to $6.99.	
25
3
11
41
8
26
7
11
9
6
27
17
46
33
69
124
166
117
98
65
212
134
228
238
114
412
794
1,150
390
162
67
154
42
39
10
3
2
1
6
9
119
11
63
2
3
19
50
51
15
80
26
23
12
3
4
1
2
2
2
4
1
11
2
6
88
3
13
5
3
5
6
3
15
9
4
1
7.00 to    7.99 —
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99...	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99 	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to  14.99	
15.00 to 15.99-	
1
16.00 to 16.99	
2
17.00 to 17.99
1
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99
21.00 to 21.99	
2
22.00 to 22.99   ....
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99   ....
25.00 to 25.99   ....
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99 	
6
29.00 to 29.99
30.00 to 34.99 	
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99	
—-
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99 -
70.00 and over	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese...:	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Subject.
British
Subject.
3,064
1,860
262
17
27
19
15
18
183
104
17
1
65
118
149
80
4
2
3
2
1
1
9
2
2
1
111
1
4
5
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)  	
39 I 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 6.
CONSTRUCTION.
 Returns Covering 916 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $2,197,302.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       1,936,144.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     22,340,524.00
 Total.    -  $26,473,970.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
11,834
697
July	
11,574
903
February	
11,627
724
August	
11,784
828
March	
12,160
757
September-
11,366
691
April	
12,074
788
October	
11,248
388
May	
11,920
865
November-
10,994
335
June 	
11,845
873
December ..
10,056
337
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 -
$6.00 to $6.99
52
18
19
35
28
42
37
47
42
17
58
40
57
73
47
106
74
132
142
301
241
348
237
717
282
4,015
2,366
3,274
2,182
1,194
426
210
84
238
7
2
7
10
10
9
13
26
17
7
29
21
26
10
14
27
9
16
39
43
23
20
18
33
14
121
21
12
14
7
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
2
13
12
2
21
9
21
62
64
67
24
29
48
58
54
32
27
91
27
140
37
10
4
1
1
1
3
2
7.00 to    7.99 	
1
8.00 to    8.99  .
9 00 to    9.99
10.00 to 10.99        	
11.00 to 11.99.	
1
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99	
5
14.00 to 14.99 	
2
15.00 to 15.99—	
3
16.00 to 16.99	
5
17.00 to 17.99 	
3
18.00 to 18.99 -	
11
19.00 to 19.99 -
2
20.00 to 20.99 -	
5
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
2
24.00 to 24.99 -	
4
25.00 to 25.99.	
26.00 to 26.99	
5
27.00 to 27.99	
29.00 to 29.99        	
30.00 to 34.99	
3
35.00 to 39.99	
1
40.00 to 44.99         	
2
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99         	
55.00 to 69.99    	
60.00 to 64.99 	
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over ——.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek. Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
British
Subject.
8,506
4,506
665
157
210
207
165
338
1,472
844
87
32
42
1
4
112
8
320'
34
19
31
135
383
28
Females.
British
Subject.
780
168
10
4
9
5
14
40
43
1
2
6
22
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)    	
Females.
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
 Returns covering 23 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers..      $133,209.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         612,993.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)—     3,273,441.00
 Total  -  $4,019,643.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
1,136
187
July 	
987
224
February	
1,185
189
August -	
1,002
225
March	
1,104
190
September-
959
226
April	
1,051
204
October	
997
225
May	
1,062
232
November...
1,025
221
June 	
1,066
236
December .
974
208
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00.. -	
$6.00 to $6.99	
9
4
8
1
4 "
9
2
__
2
1
3
3
7
7
8
7
10
17
12
14
41
31
273
352
262
121
38
3
2
6
2
2
3
1
2
1
5
3
2
3
2
6
2
4
8
4
38
19
6
3
1
1
4
3
5
5
5
9
1
2
16
6
4
6
3
1
17
54
68
24
1
7.00 to    7.99	
1
8.00 to    8.99-	
9.00 to    9.99 	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99    -
12.00 to 12.99    ..
1
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99 	
15.00 to 15.99	
3
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to 20.99 	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99.
1
26.00 to 26.99	
1
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99 -
29.00 to 29.99
30.00 to 34.99 -
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99. 	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99 —
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over 	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian-
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above.-..
British
Subject.
812
381
9
4
13
2
7
48
15
16
14
3
British
Subject.
179
41
1
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) —— 	
Males.       Females. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 21
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
 Returns covering 582 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $2,205,175.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       2,827,614.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers).     16,288,343.00
 Totals-    ...... $21,321,132.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January...	
6,163
3,457
July    	
9,251
5,493
February	
5,712
2,745
August 	
9,840
6,855
March	
5,652
2,646
September-
9,796
7,928
April.	
6,293
2,759
October.-	
8,968
7,477
May	
6,802
2,783
November
8,311
6,600
June	
7,881
3,482
December
7,516
5,018
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
229
70
41
53
43
63
53
85
63
57
47
73
66
378
69
121
69
100
92
314
238
198
293
476
617
2,552
1,974
1,254
583
485
207
81
39
577
119
20
18
18
28
24
16
33
16
32
44
29
50
60
46
46
37
36
33
46
42
33
46
52
42
257
113
79
37
21
11
8
4
2
319
82
99
89
106
147
110
210
160
236
379
425
362
381
436
466
327
506
509
704
350
193
460
269
191
606
308
214
95
71
5
3
2
194
$6.00 to $6.99    ...
35
7.00 to    7.99 	
43
8.00 to    8.99	
32
9.00 to    9.99 	
10.00 to 10.99	
61
35
11.00 to 11.99 —	
41
12.00 to 12.99	
45
13.00 to 13.99    -
51
14.00 to 14.99    ...
106
15.00 to 15.99	
116
16.00 to 16.99    ...
75
17.00 to 17.99	
88
18.00 to 18.99— -
85
19.00 to 19.99
100
20.00 to 20.99    —
44
21.00 to 21.99	
77
22.00 to 22.99	
71
23.00 to 23.99 	
130
24.00 to 24.99 	
93
25.00  to 25.99	
49
26.00 to 26.99
32
27.00 to 27.99	
47
28.00 to 28.99	
32
29.00 to 29.99
17
30.00 to 34.99 	
83
35.00 to 39.99-	
40.00 to 44.99
46
27
45.00 to 49.99- —
17
50.00 to 54.99	
4
60.00 to 64.99— -
65.00 to 69.99   	
70.00 and over 	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland..	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
253
87
129
87
202
132
722
559
133
14
687
1
52
1,549
4
159
13
40
53
106
8
1
1,026
~32
Females.
British
Subject.
5,463
1,381
262
49
96
81
237
126
291
681
20
6
13
3
176
1,479
4
129
3
19
17
26
129
5
10
Males.
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)  - - 	
119
Table No. 9.
GARMENT-MAKING.
 Returns covering 71 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $238,747.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        219,569.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)..     1,129,263.00
 Total __ $1,587,579.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March	
April...	
May	
June	
203
205
209
203
199
207
844
921
938
929
914
917
July—	
August
September
October—	
November -
December —
197
202
199
198
204
207
827
772
784
811
824
826
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage
-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
1
1
1
7
1
10
1
3
2
7
3
3
7
4
5
6
5
45
47
25
7
5
4
3
5
1
5
1
4
2
1
1
1
12
5
6
5
7
10
13
20
37
46
32
193
96
60
55
58
35
47
44
19
36
19
10
21
8
32
6
2
4
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99     	
1
4
10.00 to 10.99—	
1
11.00 to 11.99	
13
12.00 to 12.99
4
13.00 to 13.99
14
14.00 to 14.99	
13
15.00 to 15.99
6
16.00 to 16.99	
3
17.00 to 17.99	
3
18.00 to 18.99  	
2
19.00 to 19.99	
2
20.00 to 20.99	
2
21.00 to 21.99   	
2
22.00 to 22.99	
1
23.00 to 23.99   	
24.00 to 24.99
25.00 to 25.99     	
26.00 to 26.99      	
27.00 to 27.99    	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99    	
30.00 to 34.99    	
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99    	
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99     - —
55.00 to 59.99    	
60.00 to 64.99 —
65.00 to 69.99     	
70.00 and over  ,.  	
Racial Origin anc
Nationality
of Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
93
60
5
3
2
1
4
3
5
10
1
22
8
1
1
1
1
1
9
2
1
11
656
227
13
1
3
3
8
1
27
25
3
17
6
...„.
1
6
2
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian-
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
5
1
8
4
2
6
Hindu, other East Indian-
1
Indian (native Canadian).
Others not shown above....
24
Males.
Femaies.
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified) — 	
3
15 I 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 77 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $267,019.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        267,710.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     1,376,446.00'
 Total   $1,911,175.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
642
669
686
675
689
716
610
659
655
662
672
699
July	
August
September
October.
November ...
December
717
722
715
732
788
799
677
February
March	
April	
May	
June	
670
678
702
745
727
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
9
5
1
4
3
7
3
5
8
3
5
9
6
13
8
13
12
21
14
20
46
14
52
205
113
42
27
10
2
4
26
8
3
2
1
6
4
6
3
6
12
18
3
7
9
9
2
4
3
8
3
1
1
7
4
12
7
8
11
5
14
19
21
30
84
63
65
63
63
31
42
19
40
27
12
19
5
9
7
2
1
8
$6.00 to $6.99.  	
7.00 to    7.99
8 00 to    8.99
1
9.00 to    9.99   	
3
10.00 to 10.99	
2
11 00 to 11.99
3
12.00 to 12.99- _...
13.00 to 13.99
3
6
14.00 to 14.99	
10
15.00 to 15.99	
12
16.00 to 16.99 	
9
17.00 to 17.99   	
4
18 00 to 18.99
4
19.00  to 19.99 	
20.00 to 20.99  -
2
21.00 to 21.99	
5
22.00 to 22.99 	
2
23.00 to 23.99	
24 00 to 24.99    	
4
25 00  to 25.99
26.00 to 26.99 	
1
27.00 to 27.99	
2
28.00 to 28.99 	
3
29.00 to 29.99	
1
30.00 to 34.99 	
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99  -	
45.00 to 49.99 	
50.00 to 54.99     	
55 00  to 59.99 	
60.00 to 64.99 	
65 00 to 69.99     	
70.00 and over 	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian-
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro...	
Others not shown above....
Males.
British
Subject.
458
246
20
10
15
11
27
59
8
5
1
1
Females.
British
Subject.
492
166
4
6
10
17
15
7
26
43
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) 	
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
 Returns covering 13 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $25,722.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     177,226.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     161,677.00
Total.
$364,625.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
72
69
67
69
70
69
17
17
18
19
21
21
July	
August
September
October
November .
December.
68
70
70
71
72
73
21
February
March	
April 	
May  —
June	
21
21
22
21
22
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $
$6.00 to
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
11.00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
50.00 to
55.00 to
60.00 to
65.00 to
70.00 an
5.00	
$6.99..„
7.99...
8.99 ...
9.99 -
10.99....
11.99—
12.99 -
13.99—
14.99 —
15.99-
16.99...
17.99—
18.99 ...
19.99....
20.99—
21.99—
22.99....
23.99—
24.99...
25.99...
26.99 -
27.99—
28.99 ...
29.99 ...
34.99...
39.99 —
44.99 ...
49.99—
54.99 —
59.99 -
64.99	
69.99 ...
d over
Males.
21 Yrs.      Under
and over.   21 Yrs.
6
18
12
11
6
3
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
and over.   18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian-
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish ....
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian-
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above....
Males.
Subject.
43
27
......
.... -
1
2
4
British
Subject.
31
5
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)    	
Females. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 23
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING.
       Returns covering 108 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers..      $202,037.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc          452,917.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers).    2,077,138.00
 Total      $2,732,092.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March	
April	
May 	
469
486
496
498
505
515
1,586
1,684
1,746
1,777
1,798
1,786
July. 	
August
September-
October—	
November ..
December ..
522
512
518
516
516
527
1,818
1,779
1,875
1,836
1,875
1,781
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
3
1
1
2
4
1
2
4
5
3
3
9
10
7
11
13
22
34
14
27
26
20
115
66
55
17
8
6
3
6
12
8
1
4
2
1
1
4
7
7
2
1
3
1
3
2
3
1
1
59
20
42
59
66
38
46
101
75
103
187
176
203
162
99
111
73
39
32
26
20
13
10
26
3
9
3
10
8
1
7
5
21
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
3
1
8.00 to    8.99 	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99-	
1
1
11.00 to 11.99	
5
12.00 to 12.99	
7
13.00 to 13.99	
14
14.00 to 14.99 	
18
15.00 to 15.99	
27
16.00 to 16.99	
25
17.00 to 17.99	
18
18.00 to 18.99-	
10
19.00 to 19.99	
1
20.00 to 20.99   .
4
21.00 to 21.99—      	
2
22.00 to 22.99 	
23.00 to 23.99	
1
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99 	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99.. 	
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99.	
40.00 to 44.99	
2
45.00 to 49.99  -
50.00 to 54.99- 	
3
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99 -
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian-
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese -	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above..-
British
Subject.
372
203
7
5
5
11
British
Subject.
1,428
296
9
8
20
25
16
27
44
79
6
2
5
1
5
21
12
1
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) — —	
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS-
MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 69 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers,  Superintendents, and Managers.      $174,712.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        184,312.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)        692,037.00
Total .
$1,051,061.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.1
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
297
342
July..... —
320
363
February	
308
343
August	
323
360
March 	
311
337
September-
322
370
April— _
310
334
October	
313
382
May -	
310
350
November-
322
392
June	
315
365
December ..
320
375
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
2
1
2
3
3
7
1
2
2
3
3
5
8
10
11
8
5
12
16
85
79
23
7
6
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
5
1
1
5
4
4
5
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
6
2
4
3
1
13
12
11 .
36
15
24
20
17
23
23
28
13
20
18
7
16
13
7
3
3
19
9
1
9
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99—	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99   ...
1
1
10.00 to 10.99	
3
11.00 to 11.99	
3
12.00 to 12.99	
8
13.00 to 13.99	
11
14.00 to 14.99.	
8
15.00 to 15.99—     	
5
16.00 to 16.99
17.00 to 17.99  —
1
18.00 to 18.99 '	
3
19.00 to 19.99
2
20.00 to 20.99—	
2
21.00 to 21.99	
1
22.00 to 22.99    ..
23.00 to 23.99- 	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99.	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99
30.00  to 34.99 ....    	
35.00 to 39.99 ....
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99—     	
50.00 to 54.99...  .....
55.00  to 59.99 ....
60.00 to 64.99. 	
65.00 to 69.99   ..
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
91
1
2
11
32
13
13
15
18
1
1
Females.
British
Subject.
264
54
9
4
6
10
9
10
11
16
4
2
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified) —- 	
Females. I 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
 Returns covering 1,04.1 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $2,981,929.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       1,766,662.00'
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     43,840,363.00
Total ..
$48,588,954.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January ",.,
February
March	
19,224
21,012
21,588
22,174
23,008
22,877
370
416
446
455
493
606
July —	
August
September.
October	
November ..
December
22,004
22,626
22,525
22,835
22,830
20,761
518
513
534
500
486
June 	
441
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99         	
77
33
23
24
25
16
15
35
30
20
40
44
27
40
133
70
68
74
77
282
175
259
462
638
691
6,609
5,325
3,329
2,956
1,906
1,034
950
511
1,385
20
4
1
5
2
6
1
7
4
14
5
16
8
10
17
10
16
18
8
54
27
29
57
84
81
378
285
68
37
22
6
10
2
4
4
3
5
3
1
6
7
10
8
9
6
21
12
28
21
15
8
42
33
29
34
21
26
94
64
33
5
2
1
1
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99        	
9.00 to    9.99        	
10.00 to 10.99 	
1
11.00 to 11.99        	
12.00 to J.2.99     	
1
13.00 to  13.99         	
1
14.00 to 14.99 -	
1
15.00 to 15.99        	
1
16.00 to 16.99   	
2
17.00 to 17.99	
3
18.00 to 18.99 ...   	
2
19.00 to 19.99	
1
20 00 to 20.99
6
21.00 to 21.99 	
22.00 to 22.99    .. 	
1
23.00 to 23.99        	
3
24.00 to 24.99 	
8
25.00' to 25.99.	
11
26.00 to 26.99         	
3
27.00 to 27.99 -	
6
28.00 to 28.99  	
3
29.00 to 29.99 	
30.00 to 34.99     .    -	
2
5
35.00 to 39.99         	
4
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
1
50.00 to 54.99   	
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99          	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
Males.
British
Subject.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
13,546
3,135
234
118
347
213
433
1,207
2,852
1,411
275
146
960
543
612
702
23
416
66
104
269
430
179
200
1,191
201
132
British
Subject.
50
2
1
16
1
10
.... _
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) — — — -
318
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
 Returns covering 858 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $3,550,417.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       4,200,544.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     16,893,413.00
 Total...    $24,644,374.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
8,507
1,187
July.—	
8,715
1,147
February	
8,535
1,170
August 	
8,780
1,148
March	
8,570
1,162
September
8,509
1,119
April — -
8,557
1,180
October	
8,423
1,088
May	
8,616
1,198
November..
8,302
1,011
June -	
8,732
1,173
December ..
8,104
913
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
27
6
10
15
17
17
13
15
13
22
29
17
18
36
23
77
46
61
56
117
142
113
129
209
204
1,617
1,813
2,083
1,205
663
229
115
48
74
32
19
13
17
20
34
34
42
26
19
49
23
32
48
38
39
18
50
16
41
25
24
49
37
47
151
47
26
7
5
2
15
3
2
4
10
6
5
15
5
24
46
18
35
48
24
54
45
71
60
45
73
54
77
90
66
223
144
82
20
1
1
3
$6.00 to $6.99 --	
7.00 to    7.99       	
8.00 to    8.99 	
2
9.00 to    9.99
10.00 to 10.99        ..-..
2
11.00 to 11.99	
2
12.00 to 12.99       	
4
13.00 to 13.99	
3
14.00 to 14.99
3
15.00 to 15.99.      	
11
16.00 to 16.99 	
5
17.00 to 17.99        	
2
18.00 to 18.99
6
19.00 to 19.99
3
20.00 to 20.99 -	
21.00 to 21.99
3
22.00 to 22.99  ....
3
23.00 to 23.99
1
24.00 to 24.99         	
2
25.00 to 25.99
26.00 to 26.99
1
27.00 to 27.99	
1
28.00 to 28.99 	
1
29.00 to 29.99
1
30.00 to 34.99
4
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99         	
2
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99 	
60.00 to 64.99
65.00  to 69.99         	
70.00 and over 	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
British
Subject.
6,443
2,848
214
60
113
121
144
93
540
697
24
16
24
1
19
Alien.
27
7
35
42
48
2
15
Females.
British
Subject.
1,240
257
149
2
14
18
17
12
70
3
8
1
...„
1
41
Alien.
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)    	
Males.
23 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 25
Table No. 16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 79 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $711,520.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc -    1,172,326.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)    7,483,686.00
Total .
$9,367,532.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January...	
February
March	
3,807
3,793
3,710
3,544
3,447
3,380
194
186
184
174
184
182
July	
August
September..
October
November..
December ..
3,344
3,257
3,111
3,150
3,287
3,382
177
181
175
172
172
June —	
176
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99—
7.00 to    7.99 ...
8.00 to    8.99 ...
9.00 to 9.99...
10.00 to 10.99—
11.00 to 11.99...
12.00 to 12.99 ...
13.00 to 13.99...
14.00 to 14.99 —
15.00 to 15.99...
- 16.00 to 16.99 ...
17.00 to 17.99 -
18.00 to 18.99 ...
19.00 to 19.99...
20.00 to 20.99...
21.00 to 21.99 —
22.00 to 22.99 ...
23.00 to 23.99 ...
24.00 to 24.99—
25.00 to 25.99...
26.00 to 26.99 ...
27.00 to 27.99 —
28.00 to 28.99...
29.00 to 29.99 ...
30.00 to 34.99 ...
35.00 to 39.99 —
40.00 to 44.99 ...
45.00 to 49.99 —
50.00 to 54.99-
65.00 to 59.99 _
60.00 to 64.99...
65.00 to 69.99 ...
70.00 and over
Males.
21 Yrs.
and over.
1
6
4
10
7
5
8
20
771
1,836
745
741
44
9
12
3
10
Under
21 Yrs.
1
7
38
19
9
18 Yrs.     Under
and over.   18 Yrs.
10
12
3
20
12
11
10
11
18
2
4
30
6
5
"43
16
3
1
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
Subject.
2,088
904
26
22
30
92
56
54
405
130
50
11
14
9
3
23
35
28
233
95
32
144    |
1
19
British
Subject.
212
29
1
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)  - 	
58
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES.
 Returns covering 456 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $1,567,094.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       4,996,224.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     21,559,487.00
Total.
$28,122,805.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March	
April	
May 	
June	
8,953
9,013
8,605
8,148
8,039
8,264
5,058
4,960
4,817
4,781
4,674
4,866
July —
August
September
October.	
November —
December —
8,706
8,398
8,202
6,984
6,527
6,362
4,751
4,313
4,174
3,482
2,879
2,642
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 	
37
10
8
3
9
25
11
•     17
9
14
37
11
28
41
86
80
24
58
22
100
96
112
157
842
429
2,124
2,195
1,910
1,227
317
121
133
13
64
22
7
10
10
8
20
12
15
13
25
17
15
12
31
28
17
21
35
26
187
22
26
40
280
' 16
178
18
10
17
3
3
14
8
7
8
15
22
12
36
50
60
106
114
125
126
664
158
96
198
60
133
102
80
43
1,276
30
1,270
1,157
295
14
8
2
1
1
2
42
$6.00 to $6.99    	
21
7.00 to    7.99           _.   .
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99 	
9
18
10.00 to 10.99
11.00 to 11.99 	
15
12.00 to 12.99     	
13.00 to 13.99    	
14.00 to 14.99
15.00 to 15.99          	
24
16.00' to 16.99    	
52
17.00 to 17.99          	
18.00 to 18.99 	
31
19.00 to 19.99   	
42
20.00 to 20.99 	
17
21.00 to 21.99	
25
22.00 to 22.99 	
7
23.00 to 23.99    	
7
24.00 to 24.99   	
27
25.00 to 25.99	
9
26.00 to 26.99    	
27.00 to 27.99
28.00 to 28.99    	
1
29.00 to 29.99      	
2
30.00 to 34.99 	
35.00 to 39.99	
14
4
40.00 to 44.99     —	
6
45.00 to 49.99	
3
50.00 to 54.99
1
55.00 to 59.99  	
1
60.00 to 64.99—	
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
Males.
British
Subject.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
6,692
3,131
138
96
99
70
116
102
359
528
27
23
44
13
27
139
3
250
2
1
5
11
15
91
—
22
Females.
British
Subject.
3,816
2,218
39
50
61
24
63
48
175
259
15
7
7
4
192
3
1
2
1
1
2
98
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)	
Males.      Females. I 26
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
 Returns covering 59 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $440,987.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         997,901.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers).     1,602,091.00
 Total  - --  $3,040,979.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March	
April	
May 	
June	
877
931
805
781
869
921
26
21
26
20
26
31
July 	
August
September
October
November
December ..
952
974
921
933
895
843
35
34
32
34
25
23
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
1
1
4
1
1
2
2
2
3
5
4
8
11
4
7
12
44
41
356
276
268
112
33
11
15
3
16
1
1
1
1
2
5
1
2
5
1
2
3
2
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
3
6
1
7
1
4
1
$6.00 to $6.99. 	
7.00 to    7.99     —	
8.00 to    8.99      	
9.00 to    9.99 	
10 00 to 10.99      	
11.00 to 11.99        	
12.00 to 12.99    	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99    	
15.00 to 15.99-	
16.00 to 16.99      	
17.00 to 17.99
18.00 to 18.99      	
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99      	
1
21.00 to 21.99 	
22.00 to 22.99 	
23.00 to 23.99       —
24 00 to 24.99       	
25.00 to 25.99    	
26.00 to 26.99      	
27.00 to 27.99 	
28.00 to 28.99    	
30.00 to 34.99 	
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99     	
50.00 to 54.99	
55 00 to 59.99      	
60.00 to 64.99       	
65 00 to 69.99      .   -
70.00 and over	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
914
328
20
5
5
2
6
7
127
16
97
"ll
British
Subject.
93
18
2
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) - ._.
Males.
Females.
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
 Returns covering 11 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $100,459.00
Clerks,   Stenographers,  Salesmen,  etc.     154,212.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     255,850.00
 Total    .- $510,521.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
114
120
130
130
126
137
60
58
55
56
60
62
July 	
August 	
September..
October
November ...
December —
129
131
124
123
124
122
64
February. 	
63
58
54
55
June .....
52
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00.	
1
1
2
4
1
4
2
3
72
24
13
1
1
_.-
3
8
3
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
5
6
14
3
7
2
1
4
13
3
$6.00 to $6.99.	
7.00 to    7.99	
	
8.00 to    8.99.	
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99 	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99	
14,00 to 14.99      -
15.00 to 15.99.—	
1
16.00' to 16.99        	
5
17.00 to 17.99	
2
18.00 to 18.99
1
19.00 to 19.99        	
2
20.00 to 20.99
1
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99. _
28.00 to 28.99        	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99-	
35.00 to 39.99	
	
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99. 	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99 	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99 	
70.00 and over —
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
Males.
British
Subject.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above....
47
3
_
___
1
1
6
Alien.
Females.
British
Subject.
63
7
~~1
1
1
5
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) 	
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 27
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 140 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $679,643.00'
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc— —    1,451,067.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)    2,522,769.00
Total..
$4,653,479.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.        Month.
Males.
Females.
1,104
1,118
1,125
1,110
1,151
1,133
303
296
302
323
308
325
1,143
1,142
1,158
1,171
1,177
1,199
331
February
March	
April —
May	
June	
August	
September
October
November .
December.
334
329
334
340
346
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00   .
14
3
3
5
2
3
2
5
7
3
10
6
19
22
9
11
7
11
9
10
17
18
7
24
10
69
181
287
134
91
41
21
16
21
53
11
3
5
5
13
6
23
8
9
9
6
7
5
4
4
2
1
2
2
1
1
3
6
3
9
2
4
8
8
12
14
35
13
17
14
14
23
20
31
6
29
6
7
5
13
4
9
3
11
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99 :....
2
9.00 to    9.99 -
10.00 to 10.99—	
6
7
11.00 to 11.99	
4
12.00 to 12.99-	
25
13.00 to 13.99. -	
9
14.00 to 14.99 -...
6
15.00 to 15.99  -
16.00 to 16.99	
6
17.00 to 17.99   .
1
18.00 to 18.99	
2
19.00 to 19.99
1
20.00 to 20.99
3
21.00 to 21.99 	
22.00 to 22.99- .
2
23.00 to 23.99	
1
24.00 to 24.99..	
25.00 to 25.99 	
1
26.00 to 26.99 —
27.00 to 27.99— -
28.00 to 28.99 	
29.00 to 29.99  ...
30.00 to 34.99    .
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99 	
45.00 to 49.99— -
50.00 to 54.99 -
55.00 to 59.99   	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99 	
70.00 and over	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Subject.
1,108
486
18
1
1
Alien.
British
Subject.
559
134
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified) - —	
50
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $518,557.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc _.        726,634.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     8,204,575.00
Total-
$9,449,766.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.         Males.
Females.
January...	
February
March.. -
3,531
3,589
3,519
3,442
3,573
3,680
602
614
599
632
639
664
July—	
August	
September..
October
November..
December ..
3,765
3,797
3,737
3,775
3,800
3,736
675
657
644
631
606
June	
582
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
1 Yrs.      Under
and over.    21 Yrs.
Under $
$6.00 to
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
11.00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
50.00 to
55.00 to
60.00 to
65.00 to
70.00 an
3.00—
$6.99-
7.99-
8.99..
9.99..
10.99-
11.99-
12.99-
13.99-
14.99..
15.99-
16.99.
17.99..
18.99-
19.99-
20.99-
21.99-
22.99-
23.99..
24.99-
25.99..
26.99..
27.99-
28.99.
29.99.
34.99..
44.99 —
49.99—
54.99-
59.99 —
64.99-
69.99 -
d over
13
~6
1
5
6
1
4
3
5
1
"ii
l
l
l
l
l
4
2
14
79
89
1,307
1,033
434
400
114
44
21
8
39
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
and over.   18 Yrs.
3
1
8
4
103
23
3
1
5
3
3
3
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
3
1
4
38
1
15
4
6
13
46
1
44
1
53
1
17
5
16
16
16
51
251
19
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
1,766
703
26
15
118
102
47
31
124
138
9
4
331
1
27
"43
5
1
6
7
25
100
79
13
72
Females.
British
Subject.
522
69
4
2
8
17
13
10
27
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) 	
14 I 28
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
 Returns covering 46 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $1,175,106.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       3,429,131.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     48,013,861.00
 Total 1  $52,618,098.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
26,785
26,219
25,633
24,737
24,156
24,194
1,883
1,824
1,775
1,711
1,652
1,648
July	
August
September.
October
November .
December .
23,552
22,005
21,673
19,737
21,409
21,214
1,555
1,342
1,215
April	
May  	
June	
1,289
1,314
1,296
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00            	
112
25
22
36
40
28
28
36
36
29
39
60
57
54
48
71
66
257
53
93
79
299
225
191
361
5,486
3,808
5,839
3,954
2,044
487
404
212
261
39
10
6
3
9
11
7
14
7
11
16
13
15
14
13
15
7
20
74
22
22
51
39
29
25
336
252
225
159
40
6
6
2
24
11
4
6
7
16
7
17
13
10
19
7
16
19
34
30
38
55
57
60
46
132
64
34
70
4
$6.00 to $6.99.. 	
7 00 to    7.99         	
2
8.00 to    8.99 —
9.00 to    9.99	
10.00 to 10.99 —
3
1
11.00 to 11.99         	
12.00 to 12.99         	
13.00 to 13.99 	
14.00 to 14.99     	
2
15.00 to 15.99 	
16.00 to 16.99     .	
1
17.00 to 17.99 _ 	
18.00 to 18.99         	
1
19.00 to 19.99   ...    	
1
20 00 to 20.99          	
1
21.00 to 21.99 	
9
22.00 to 22.99     	
4
23.00 to 23.99           	
2
24 00 to 24.99           ...   .
2
25.00 to 25.99 ....    	
3
26.00 to 26.99          	
4
27.00 to 27.99	
1
28.00 to 28.99
2
1
30.00 to 34.99         	
456    1          2
35.00 to 39.99	
353
168
66
12
1
1
1
1
40.00 to 44.99           —.
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain.
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
Subject.
13,654
7,012
376
149
131
155
195
276
1,085
943
144
6
344
13
51
6
351
26
5
16
7
48
346
345
48
1
288
Females.
British
Subject.
1,305
315
7
7
13
2
15
33
3
3
1
35
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified) —   	
Males.
327
Females.
11
Table No. 23.
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING.
 Returns covering 5 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers..      $191,212.00'
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,223,904.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     5,029,529.00
Total.
1,444,645.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
2,396
139
July.	
1,894
207
February	
2,426
137
August	
1,866
199
March	
2,202
134
September
1,819
194
April	
2,030
141
October	
1,854
186
May.	
2,044
164
November .
2,039
189
June	
2,011
186
December .
2,018
173
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
20
5
3
2
2
7
7
6
3
8
7
4
17
6
7
18
14
7
18
10
16
21
13
21
51
622
931
530
200
81
6
2
1
1
1
2
2
10
1
5
2
7
8
2
8
6
4
2
8
7
11
6
6
9
77
43
8
2
1
3
4
1
2
2
7
18
4
1
6
1
4
6
.    2
4
2
1
11
2
3
10
72
36
1
1
$6.00 to $6.99    	
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99-	
9.00 to    9.99      	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99
12.00 to 12.99      	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99      	
15.00 to  15.99	
16.00 to 16.99      	
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99      	
19.00 to 19.99      	
1
20.00 to 20.99      	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99     	
23.00 to 23.99
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00' to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99 -	
29.00 to 29.99          .
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99    	
45.00 to 49.99 	
50.00 to 54.99        	
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over 	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
1,431
692
4
3
3
303
79
19
74
36
18
62
2
33
9
5
70
29
Females.
British
Subject.
131
44
1
10
United States citizens  (racial origin
not specified)  	
107 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 29
Table No. 24.
STREET-RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
 Returns covering 105 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers...    $1,069,969.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       2,619,192.00'
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     10,796,833.00
Total	
  $14,485,994.00
Average
Number
of Wage
■earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March 	
April	
May	
June	
4,550
4,556
4,601
4,746
4,747
4,773
1,696
1,706
1,775
1,778
1,816
1,853
July. 	
August
September.
October.
November..
December ..
4,853
4,821
4,766
4,755
4,815
4,876
1,909
1,934
1,918
1,887
1,874
1,890
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For "Week ot
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $
$6.00 to
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
11.00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
50.00 to
55.00 to
60.00 to
65.00 to
70.00 an
5.00	
$6.99	
7.99	
8.99	
9.99 —
10.99	
11.99.....
12.99 ....
13.99—
14.99 —
15.99—
16.99 —
17.99 ....
18.99 —
19.99	
20.99 --
21.99....
22.99 ....
23.99 —
24.99 ....
25.99 ....
26.99 ....
27.99.....
28.99 ....
29.99.....
34.99	
39.99 —
44.99 ....
49.99 ...
54.99 ....
59.99 —
64.99 —
69.99.....
d over _.
Males.
21 Yrs.      Under
and over.    21 Yrs.
8
3
2
3
2
2
1
4
3
3
i"
3
6
1
1
1
11
1
15
13
14
1
45
42
55
154
2
74
1
78
256
1
183
15
307
1,046
4
1,383
3
560
2
353
145
172
99
60
70
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
and over.   18 Yrs.
25
8
13
14
10
19
23
18
22
10
25
29
26
52
71
94
68
106
121
110
126
74
87
71
70
274
124
16
6
7
12
16
27
31
20
16
12
10
2
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French ,	
Italian	
German, Austrian.	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian-
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian-
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above....
Subject.
2,660
2,618
34
18
19
64
68
47
142
113
18
11
1
12
1
18
....-
Subject.
2,245
432
7
4
1
1
3
11
3
2
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified)  —	
101
42
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF (N.E.S.).
 Returns covering 121 Firms.	
Salary and Wage Payments, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers.      $743,205,00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        317,574.00
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     6,463,457.00
Total.     $7,524,236.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.         Month.
Males.
Females.
January    ...
February
March	
April	
May —	
June -	
2,908
2,900
2,899
2,924
2,973
3,084
1,372 1
1,347
1,366
1,356
1,520
1,554 |
July	
August
September
October
November
December.
3,121
3,163
3,009
3,023
2,962
2,942
1,451
1,342
1,290
1,288
1,277
1,243
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
and over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
and over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00—.	
$6.00 to $6.99	
6
3
2
3
1
4
4
5
3
3
5
12
7
9
9
11
10
48
26
30
79
52
115
93
148
1,019
582
327
153
83
32
5
3
5
12
3
1
6
1
3
2
4
10
7
16
23
19
10
16
42
9
42
19
46
23
16
17
147
41
2
7
3
5
3
3
2
3
3
8
17
18
15
28
59
49
44
34
30
113
223
119
158
106
11
73 '
204
28
1
2
1
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00 to    9.99. 	
10.00 to 10.99
11.00 to 11.99   	
5
12.00 to 12.99    	
2
13.00 to 13.99 —
14.00 to 14.99    	
3
10
15.00 to 15.99 	
12
16.00 to 16.99     .
9
17.00 to 17.99     	
20
18.00 to 18.99   .
15
19.00 to 19.99
11
20.00 to 20.99 	
9
21.00 to 21.99
9
22.00 to 22.99
5
23.00 to 23.99  .
28
24.00 to 24.99 	
52
25.00 to 25.99	
12
26.00 to 26.99     	
27
27.00 to 27.99	
22
28.00 to 28.99    	
2    .
29.00 to 29.99  - .
5
30.00 to 34.99 	
6
35.00 to 39.99    	
1
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99     	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99  	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99   	
70.00 and over    	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
530
29
54
179
54
106
86
173
222
5
1
24
20
3
19
26
1
2
16
49
55
8
57
......
Females.
British
Subject.
972
132
6
22
151
16
42
53
95
1
5
22
17
2
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) -	
56
27 I 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 5,044 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1944.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers -
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc.
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers) —
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary 	
Estimated pay-roll of employers covered by Department's inquiry from whom returns
were not received   — —   - - -	
Transcontinental railways  — —   — _	
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey:    viz.,  Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, miscellaneous (estimated pay-roll) 	
$21,026,012.00
31,077,245.00
237,696,421.00
$792,368.00
1,350,000.00
21,045,508.00
65,130,000.00
$289,799,678.00
88,317,876.00
Total.
$378,117,554.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
Males.
Females.
112,738
113,515
113,184
112,583
113,625
115,295
115,248
114,859
112,569
109,036
109,693
105,236
20,999
20,372
20,301
20,462
20,780
21,897
August
September 	
24,052
24,736
23,892
21,827
19,614
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French ...
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese 	
Hindu, other East Indian.
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above...
British
Subject.
73,431
33,751
2,360
879
1,490
1,899
1,822
2,709
8,513
6,146
877
283
2,587
598
744
2,734
46
2,297
114
46
275
269
534
2,089
1,739
338
208
2,980
246
1
304
British
Subject.
21,386
6,230
534
162
430
234
462
303
835
1,441
62
47
50
8
192
1,510
13
522
11
7
12
32
28
74
283
11
1
20
73
49
United States citizens   (racial origin
not specified) 	
Males.    I Females.
2,079
366
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
21 Yrs.      Under
and over.    21 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to $6.99
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to    8.99..
9.00 to    9.99 .
10.00 to 10.99
11.00 to 11.99
12.00 to 12.99.
13.00 to 13.99-
14.00 to 14.99.
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to  16.99 .
17.00 to 17.99 .
18.00 to 18.99 .
19.00 to 19.99.
20.00 to 20.99
21.00 to 21.99-
22.00 to 22.99 .
23.00 to 23.99
24.00 to 24.99
25.00 to 25.99...
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99...
28.00  to 28.99 .
29.00 to 29.99
30.00 to 34.99...
35.00 to 39.99...
40.00 to 44.99 ..
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99 ..
70.00 and over
Totals ....
196
166
222
202
253
203
302
234
211
331
317
392
743
537
773
631
985
729
.636
,554
,766
,345
,967
696
712
,242
,405
,534
535
959
295
065
881
134,685
90
72
87
90
138
101
180
132
135
205
173
234
349
238
276
151
246
252
509
259
306
382
610
315
1,879
917
464
278
104
26
29
9,605
Females.
18 Yrs.  Under
and over. 18 Yrs.
511
152
208
217
248
301
251
502
480
577
961
1,168
1,093
1,159
1,641
1,365
1,036
1,303
1,225
1,548
1,050
887
1,005
1,964
672
3,798
2,393
866
223
97
17
11
4
6
28,939
302
66
61
50
99
69
96
145
137
244
221
219
184
191
195
148
173
120
192
204
96
S3
91
52
30
126
57
39
24
5
1
3,720 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 31
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Since the " Hours of Work Act " became effective the Board has shown the average
hours by industries, and the accompanying table sets out comparative figures for the
years 1930 to 1944* inclusive.
COMPARATIVE FIGURES, 1930
TO 1944.
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Employees
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 54 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
54 Hours.
1930    	
4,704
4,088
3,529
3,530
3,956
4,153
4,357
4,711
4,895
4,829
4,971
5,115
4,845
4,727
5,044
87,821
84,791
68,468
71,185
75,435
81,329
90,871
102,235
96,188
94,045
103,636
118,160
154,191
151,420
143,640
Per Cent.
77.60
83.77
80.36
77.95
85.18
88.78
87.12
89.31
88.67
88.68
88.93
89.61
84.70
89.10
92.42
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
5.76
5.26
6.42
4.57
5.29
5.42
5.13
4.49
7.51
4.57
4.59
Per Cent.
9.04
1931  	
1932	
9.44
11.92
1933      	
1934          •   	
11.12
9.06
1935 - 	
1936          	
5.96
6.46
1937    	
1938	
6.12
6.04
1939 --	
5.90
1940  _	
5.94
1941 -	
5.90
1942           	
7.79
1943        -	
6.33
1944   	
2.99
The average weekly working-hours for all employees for same years being :-
1944..
1943-
1942..
1941-
1940..
1939-
1938..
1937-
46.02
47.19
48.12
46.90
46.91
47.80
46.84
47.25
1936...
1935...
1934..
1933...
1932...
1931...
1930...
47.63
47.17
47.32
47.35
47.69
47.37
48.62
The 5,044 firms reporting to the Department of Labour submitted information
regarding hours covering some 143,640 male and female employees for 1944. Of this
number 92.42 per cent, were shown as working 48 hours or less per week, 4.59 per cent,
working from 48 to 54 hours per week, and 2.99 per cent, working in excess of 54 hours
per week. I 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES.
Industry.
1940.
1941.
1942.
|    1943.
1944.
44.95
45.31
41.60
48.03
50.38
44.01
45.81
46.78
43.38
44.76
43.87
44.35
44.93
48.37
52.65
45.17
49.17
48.17
47.35
45.13
50.20
45.96
48.17
43.95
42.24
47.78
43.68
49.28
45.40
47.27
45.07
45.97
35.33
48.02
52.95
45.03
47.09
47.28
42.51
44.62
44.16
45.20
45.37
48.24
52.77
46.33
48.50
48.40
47.29
45.14
50.24
46.97
49.82
43.87
42.90
47.46
43.63
47.84
45.44
46.08
44.88
48.05
44.57
47.99
52.05
50.06
47.84
48.33
44.30
44.88
44.01
45.37
44.82
48.78
51.40
46.42
49.95
48.44
47.20
45.42
49.89
47.65
47.54
43.86
43.70
47.84
47.88
49.40
45.64
46.59
45.05
47.43
44.80
47.90
51.69
51.14
46.75
47.59
43.30
44.00
43.88
44.99
43.79
48.67
53.00
45.23
49.27
48.47
46.42
45.02
49.35
47.68
45.83
43.95
42.13
48.27
43.92
49.72
45.77
46.28
45.37
46.20
41.80
47.96
51.48
44.09
45.31
47.72
42.72
43.55
43.47
43.37
43.25
Lumber industries—
48.46
52.50
44.79
47.98
Shingle-mills  	
46.28
45 18
48 82
47 36
Oil-refining. ._    —	
Paint-manufacturing    _ _	
46.57
43.75
Pulp and paper manufacturing            	
48.04 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 33
STATISTICS OF CIVIL AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS.
The following data dealing with pay-roll and employment totals of civic and
municipal workers in British Columbia have been compiled from returns submitted to
the Department of Labour by the various cities and municipalities throughout the
Province.
Included in the figures are workers engaged in public works, the construction and
maintenance of roads, the operation and maintenance of waterworks, generation and
distribution of light and power, and similar operations owned and operated by the
city or municipality making the return.
Inasmuch as the data herewith to follow have already been incorporated in other
tables in this report as a portion of the total industrial pay-roll, it should be pointed
out that totals shown in this section are not in addition to figures quoted elsewhere,
but rather a segregation of civic and municipal returns for separate study.
For the year 1944, and based on ninety-five returns submitted by civic and municipal administrations, the total pay-roll reported was $4,886,263, of which $3,743,665
was expended in the wage-earner section and $1,142,598 allotted to the salaried groups,
officers, superintendents, managers, clerks, and stenographic staffs.
Average monthly employment totals based on the returns received for wage-
earners only were as follows:—
1944.
Average number of wage-earners during the month of—
January     _.      —	
February   ...        	
March      —    	
April   —        .	
May               	
June            ... — _ 	
July            _...._    .....	
August  	
September
October   —
November
December
Wales.
Females
2,256
86
2,238
76
2,288
86
2,410
112
2,520
142
2,620
184
2,648
252
2,638
219
2,491
149
2,412
84
2,402
74
2,357
70
A percentage distribution of employment with relation to earnings is shown in
the following, based on the numbers of adult male wage-earners in the wage classifications as noted :  Percentage Percentage
of of
Weekly Wages. Employees.     Weakly Wages. Employees.
Under $15 - -     1.47 $35 to $40    10.82
$15 to   20   — -— -    0.61 40 to   45  10.36
20 to   25 — —  10.65 45 to   50  —  1.61
25 to   30  20.50 50 and over  ___. 0.54
30 to   35    43.44
Average weekly wage for adult male wage-earners on civic and municipal payrolls in 1944 was $32.08, while the average for male wage-earners under 21 years of
age was $21.
Female wage-earners 18 years of age and over reported in the returns during the
week of greatest employment were paid an average weekly wage of $22.68, while the
average for those under 18 was $18.15.
The average weekly hours of work for all wage-earners reported in the returns
was 42.63. I 34 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR.
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1945.)
"BARBERS ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1945."
The amendment provides that the Board of Examiners in Barbering shall be
composed of three members of the Barbers' Association elected by ballot by the Association, instead of one barber who is an employer or master and two others who work
as journeymen or employees. The fourth member of the Board of Examiners is
appointed by. the Minister of Labour.
" FIRE DEPARTMENTS HOURS OF LABOUR ACT
AMENDMENT ACT, 1945."
When the above-mentioned Act comes into operation, on a day to be fixed by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council, no officer and no employee of the fire department in
any municipality to which the Act applies shall be required to be on duty for more
than forty-eight hours in any one week, unless an arrangement has been made whereby
the hours of duty for officers and employees when averaged over a number of weeks
shall be not more than at the rate of forty-eight hours per week, but the municipalities
above mentioned shall not be relieved from complying with the provisions of the " Fire
Departments Two-platoon Act."
If the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has not fixed a date on which the Act shall
come into operation one year after the present war has concluded, the Act shall come
into operation without Proclamation.
"WARTIME LABOUR RELATIONS REGULATIONS ACT
AMENDMENT ACT, 1945."
This amendment provided that acceptance by a member of a Conciliation Board,
who is also a member of the Legislative Assembly, of an allowance or of expenses in
respect of his services on the Conciliation Board shall not render him ineligible as
a member of the Legislative Assembly, and shall not disqualify him to sit and vote
therein, notwithstanding that any part of the allowance or expenses is derived from
public funds. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 35
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman -Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell _ — -  ...1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton  (on loan to Federal Government, place taken temporarily by Essie Brown)
 _ 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
4. James Thomson _ 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. J. A. Ward Bell —   _ 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
Mabel A. Cameron — — Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Head Office     _ Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch Office    — 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the Eleventh Annual Report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1944.
The activities of the Board include those formerly directed by the Minimum Wage
Board, which functioned for sixteen years prior to 1934. The original Board dealt
with minimum wages, hours and conditions of employment for women and girls, so
this report, in so far as it relates to women workers, is the twenty-seventh annual
record of labour laws and their results in that sphere.
In 1934 the Board of Industrial Relations took over the administration of not only
the " Female Minimum Wage Act " but the " Male Minimum Wage Act," and as a result
its duties were broadened and extended to a marked degree.
The Board, during the year under review, was still faced with problems arising
out of war-time conditions, and these presented many angles. The hiring of employees,
both older and younger than is usual in normal times, meant that extra precautions
had to be taken to ensure the safety of this class of worker and assurance afforded
that orders and regulations of the Board would be complied with in their cases, as well
as in the cases of the regular employees.
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS.
The Board planned to revise many of its Orders to bring minimum wages nearer
to the prevailing or standard rates in effect during the year. However, its good intentions were thwarted, owing to the fact that the Federal Government Wartime Wages
Control Order prescribed that an employer might, without a direction from the
Regional War Labour Board, increase a wage rate paid by him to an employee established at any time by, or pursuant to, powers conferred by Provincial Minimum Wage
Legislation, if such minimum wage rate was not in excess of 35 cents per hour, or
such higher rate per hour, if any, established for such employee by or pursuant to such
legislation on November 15th, 1941.
If our Board had revised any Orders above the 35-cent rate, it felt it would be
conflicting with the Federal Order and would be unable to obtain the necessary approval
from the Regional Board, with which it has always worked in harmonious relations.
In addition to this, employees affected by Provincial Orders would not benefit to any
appreciable degree by such a revision up to the ceiling established by the Federal Order.
The Provincial authorities felt that until such time as the Dominion Order was amended
or rescinded its efforts could be better expended along other lines. I 36 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
For these reasons fewer meetings were necessary than in previous years. Ten
sessions were held in six days, the meetings being equally divided as to place of venue
between Victoria and Vancouver.
A delegation appeared before the Board towards the end of the year to deal with
hours of work in beauty-parlours and hairdressing establishments during the Christmas holiday season. The meeting was a very representative one and many problems
were discussed and clarified.
Another large delegation was comprised of representatives of the Telephone Operators Organization of British Columbia and their employers, officials of the British
Columbia Telephone Company, which also controls the Northwest Telephone Company,
the Kootenay Telephone Company, Limited, the Chilliwack Telephones, Limited, and
the Mission Telephone Company, Limited.
The representatives of the operators requested a general revision of the Order of
the Board covering the industry, particularly with regard to hours of work and other
conditions of employment. They realized if the Board reopened the existing Order
the minimum wage could not be raised above 35 cents per hour, but their working
agreement with their employers covered the wage phase fairly satisfactorily and they
understood the position of the Board in relation to the Dominion Order, as a result of
several interviews with the chairman.
While a new Order was not promulgated in 1944, early in 1945 Order No. 79,
relating to the telephone and telegraph occupation, came into force. A summary of
this Order appears in the appendix to this report.
Another delegation representing employees in the logging and sawmill industries
appeared before the Board in connection with overtime for certain types of employees
covered by Order No. 1 (1943) relating to the logging industry and Order No. 50
(1943) covering sawmills. These were the most important delegations heard by the
Board during the year.
NEW ORDERS AND REGULATIONS.
Routine Orders to take care of seasonal problems were made as follows:—
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52N. This is the customary Order under
the " Female Minimum Wage Act " for resort hotels in unorganized territory for the
summer season. It remained in force from June 29th to September 9th, 1944. A summary of this Order appears in the appendix.
Mercantile.—Order No. 24, Supplementary (1944), covered rates of pay for women
and girl employees during the Christmas season.
Mercantile.—Order No. 59, Supplementary (1944), prescribed rates of pay for
men and boys during the Christmas season.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT " REGULATIONS.
Regulations under the above-mentioned Act were made for:—
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Regulation No. 21k exempted the industry from
the provisions of the Act to permit longer hours of work necessary during the height
of the season. The Orders relating to wages carry with them, for male and female
employees, higher rates of pay after certain daily hours, and this has been found to
act as a check on hours which keeps them within reasonable limits.
Mercantile.— (Christmas, 1944, Temporary.) These regulations dealt with working-hours at the busy Christmas season to ensure that employees in stores would not
be required to put in unduly long hours.
The tendency, in the larger centres particularly, in recent years has been to eliminate overtime and evening hours to a very marked extent.    The public is co-operating REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 37
in shopping earlier in the year and earlier in the day, so the necessity for stores
remaining open in the evenings has been gradually reduced.
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
Women workers continued to play an important part in British Columbia's business and industrial life during 1944. Returns received from some 7,289 employers
of women and girls showed a total of 60,410 female workers for the year under review,
an increase of 5,505 over the figure for 1943. The number of firms reporting in time
for tabulation was 7,289, an increase of 395 over the total for the previous year.
These mounting totals make it apparent, and the Board realizes, that the position
of women and girl workers is vitally tied up with the whole economic structure of
British Columbia's business development. Their contribution during the war years
has been notable. With peace still to be attained in the Pacific we believe they will
continue to play their part until that goal is reached, and the problems arising during
the post-war period will not be solved without taking into consideration the part women
and girls may play in the complicated days ahead.
The following tables relate to those occupations and industries covered by Orders
of the Board:—
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
Number of firms reporting 	
1,515
10,618
9,187
1,431
$158,242.80
$15,103.61
$17.22
$10.55
13.48%
37.99
1,330
9,929
8,408
1,521
$127,289.88
$16,777.71
$15.14
$11.03
15.32%
37.76
1,146
7,733
6,706
1,027
$98,400.56
$10,145.09
$14.67
$9.88
13.28%
39.04
927
7,368
6,647
721
$90,166.19
$6,373.25
$13.56
$8.84
9.79%
39.30
815
6,480
Total weekly wages—
$78,154.39
$4,293.42
$13.09
58.45
7.84%
38.75
Average weekly wages—
Employees under 18 years  	
Average hours worked per week   	
A total of 1,515 firms reported in the mercantile industry for 1944 as against a
total of 1,330 for the previous year. With the increase in firms reporting the total
employment figure rose to 10,618, compared with 9,929 in 1943.
The average weekly wage figure for employees over 18 years of age increased to
$17.22 from $15.14 for the previous year, while in the under-18-year section, with a
smaller percentage of this younger group employed, the average weekly earnings
dropped slightly to $10.55 as against $11.03 in 1943.
Average weekly hours of work showed a fractional increase to 37.99, compared
with 37.76 in this industry for the previous year.
Laundry Industry (Female).
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
161
138
141
122
124
2.151
1,830
1,725
1,469
1,318
2,117
1,762
1,517
1,371
1,228
34
68
208
98
90
$32,765.37
$26,370.25
$22,697.95
$18,698.02
$15,941.10
$463.27
$726.36
$2,272.71
$991.06
$741.14
$15.48
$14.97
$14.96
$13.64
$12.98
$13.63
$10.68
$10.93
$10.11
$8.23
1.58%
3.72%
12.06%
6.67%
6.83%
38.90
40.49
42.94
41.89
42.00
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees 	
Experienced  _..	
Inexperienced.  	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees  	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees _ 	
Inexperienced employees —	
Percentage of inexperienced employees -
Average hours worked per week	 I 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Firms reporting in the laundry industry increased from 138 to 161 in 1944, the total
number of employees reported rising to 2,151 from 1,830 shown for the previous year.
Average weekly wage for experienced workers increased to $15.48 as against $14.97
in 1943, while in the inexperienced section average earnings rose to $13.63 compared
with a previous average of $10.68, although fewer employees were reported in this category, the figure representing only 1.58 per cent, of total.
The average weekly working-hours for all employees in this industry further
decreased to 38.90 from 40.49 in 1943.
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
1,137
9,078
8,648
430
$146,428.79
$5,146.47
$16.93
$11.97
4.74%
41.01
1,137
8,879
8,371
508
$137,097.40
$5,234.53
$16.38
$10.30
5.72%
41.50
1,075
6,818
6,313
505
$96,210.79
$5,446.17
$15.24
$10.78
7.41%
43.30
1,005
5,528
5,309
219
$74,660.52
$2,621.25
$14.06
$11.97
3.96%
43.34
943
4,974
4,811
163
Total weekly wages—
$66,383.16
Inexperienced employees. 	
Average weekly wages—
$1,792.51
$13.80
$11.00
3.28%,
43.12
Average hours worked per week	
While the number of firms reporting in this classification remained unchanged,
total employment shown increased to 9,078 as against 8,879 reported for 1943.
For the experienced employees the average weekly wage again increased, the figure
rising to $16.93 from $16.38 for the previous year. Average weekly earnings for the
inexperienced workers also increased from $10.30 to $11.97 for the year under review,
although the number of employees represented in this group dropped to 4.74 per cent,
of total.
Average weekly hours of work for employees in this industry eased slightly to
41.01 compared with 41.50 in 1943.
Office Occupation (Female).
1940.
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years 	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years ..	
Employees under 18 years _	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years 	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
Average hours worked per week	
2,984
13,251
12,770
481
$294,314.50
$7,667.04
$23.05
$15.94
3.63%
40.82
2,766
12,172
11,614
558
$237,803.37
$7,903.27
$20.48
$14.16
4.58%
40.69
2,649
9,991
9,653
338
2,537
8,513
8,327
186
$188,753.83    $155,758.51
$4,553.04
$19.55
$13.47
3.38%
41.29
$2,237.85
$18.71
$12.03
2.18%
40.80
2,417
7,438
7,321
117
$133,397.18
$1,358.66
$18.22
$11.61
.    1.57%
40.35
The number of firms reporting employees in office occupations increased from 2,766
to a total of 2,984 for the year 1944. Total number of employees covered in this classification increased to 13,251, compared with a total of 12,172 reported for 1943.
The average weekly wage for experienced office-workers climbed to $23.05 as
against $20.48 for the previous year, while in the younger and inexperienced class the
average rose to $15.94, also showing a considerable increase over the 1943 figure of
$14.16 for this group. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 39
The percentage of younger workers employed in office occupations, on the increase
for several years past to reach a high of 4.58 per cent, in 1943, declined to 3.63 per cent,
for the year under review.
Average weekly working-hours in this occupation showed a fractional change to
40.82 from 40.69 for the previous year.
As in former years, a record is maintained showing some of the numbers receiving the more worth-while salaries. A $65 monthly rate is the legal minimum for
experienced employees 18 years of age or over.
The following table shows the numbers of office-workers recorded in the salary
ranges above the $65 legal minimum. It will be noted that in 1944 the trend was definitely towards the higher brackets. In 1943 the largest group—namely, 1,496—were
reported as receiving remuneration extending from $65 to $70 per month. The 1944
tabulation reveals that the wage classification from $100 to $105 monthly accounted for
the largest number—1,248 women office-workers having been paid within that range.
Monthly Salary Classification.
Numbers employed in Office Occupations.
1943.
1944.
S6E to $70      ..
1,496
945
1,340
933
1,245
849
636
944
567
377
317
238
309
204
108
117
361
555
70 to   75    	
679
75 to   80-          	
997
80 to   85     	
1,054
85 to   90 .          	
1,166
90 to   95           	
1,183
95 to 100  	
811
100 to 105-  -  	
1,248
105 to 110  	
761
110 to 115     	
759
11 5 to 120-             	
644
120 to 125 .           -	
372
125 to 130              	
552
ISO to 135                    ...	
308
135 to 140    —
308
140 to 150                    —	
322
693
10,986
12,412
Personal Service Occupation (Female).
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
134
134
125
200
214
476
453
380
581
607
460
446
374
553
581
Under 18 years — 	
16
7
6
28
26
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  -	
$8,891.45
$7,463.48
$6,033.37
$7,384.08
$7,715.72
Employees under 18 years .— —
$162.80
$80.07
$53.28
$172.06
$131.33
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years   —  	
$19.33
$16.73
$16.13
$13.35
$13.28
Employees under 18 years  	
$10.18
$11.44
$8.88
$6.15
$5.05
Percentage of employees under 18 years 	
3.36%
1.55%
1-58%
4.82%
4.28%
40.50
39.94
40.32
35.98
35.35
The above table has been compiled to include only that section of the personal
service group employed in beauty-parlours; the remaining occupations—theatre ushers,
attendants, etc., now being included in a new table under the heading of Public Places
of Amusement. I 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
While no change is noted in the number of firms reporting in this classification, the
total employment figure increased from 453 to 476 in 1944.
Average weekly wage for the experienced class of employees increased to $19.33
from $16.73 shown for the previous year, while in the younger and inexperienced group
average weekly earnings decreased from $11.44 to $10.18 for the year under review,
with an increasing percentage of this class of worker being employed.
A slight increase in the average weekly working-hours in this occupation was noted
for 1944, the average increasing to 40.50 from 39.94 in 1943.
Fishing Industry (Female
.
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
19
656
656
16
372
363
9
$7,317.48
$68.25
$20.16
$7.58
2.42%
39.58
8
172
167
5
$3,614.36
$41.06
$21.64
$8.21
2.91%
40.67
6
160
130
30
$1,868.08
$401.26
$14.37
$13.38
18.75%
35.54
10
105
7S
27
Total weekly wages—
$12,214.60
$1,222.54
$261.33
Average weekly wages—
$18.62
$15.67
$9.68
Percentage of inexperienced employees 	
Average hours worked per week  —
25.71%,
36.28
38.82
Due to the expansion of the Order of the Board to include additional occupations in
this industry, a marked increase is noted in the employment totals in the above table.
With a further increase in the number of firms reporting, the total employees
covered in this classification rose to 656, all of which were reported as being paid above
the legal minimum for experienced workers.
The average weekly earnings for all employees covered decreased to $18.62 from
$20.16 shown for the previous year; a decrease also being noted in the average hours
worked, which figure declined from 39.58 to 36.28 for 1944.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female).
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
Number of firms reporting    	
194
2,353
2,346
7
$54,152.23
$80.13
$23.08
$11.45
0.30%
40.52
186
2,185
2,013
172
$37,636.99
$1,843.73
$18.70
$10.72
7.87%
40.54
189
2,341
1,995
346
$37,822.30
$3,743.28
$18.96
$10.82
14.78%
41.26
150
1,887
1,818
69
$36,327.20
$632.96
$19.98
$9.17
3.66%,
40.38
132
1,922
1,872
Inexperienced  	
Total weekly wages—
50
$35,047.43
Inexperienced employees  	
Average weekly wages—
$486.27
$18.72
$9 73
2.60%
40.10
I
Average hours worked per week   —
Included in the above table with regular telephone and telegraph company employees are those operating switchboards in offices and other establishments, such as
hotels, hospitals, etc.
Firms reporting employees in this occupation increased to 194 from 186 for the
previous year, the total reported employment increasing to 2,353 as against 2,185 in 1943.
Marked increases were noted in the average weekly wages for both experienced and
inexperienced workers, the average for the experienced employees rising to $23.08 from REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 41
$18.70 in 1943, while with a negligible percentage of inexperienced employees shown the
average earnings for this group increased to $11.45 for the year under review.
Little change was noted in the average hours of work in this occupation—the 1944
figure decreasing fractionally to 40.52 as against 40.54 for 1943.
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
849
16,221
15,928
293
$412,583.97
$3,361.97
$25.90
$11.47
1.81%
42.35
873
14,869
14,287
582
$293,807.69
$5,877.68
$20.56
$10.10
3.91%,
42.66
740
10,738
10,114
624
$192,695.51
$5,862.55
$19.05
$9.40
5.81%
42.62
551
4,450
3,815
635
$59,149.52
$6,234.27
$15.50
$9.82
14.27%
42.65
501
3,545
3,061
484
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees —    	
Inexperienced employees 	
Average weekly wages—
$45,411.50
$4,490.36
$14.84
$9.28
13.65%
42.36
Average hours worked per week ~	
Continuing in the lead with the greatest number of women employed, the manufacturing industry reported a total of 16,221 for 1944 compared with 14,869 for the previous year, although the number of firms reporting dropped to 849 from the 1943 high
of 873.
Increases in the average weekly wages for both experienced and inexperienced
workers was again evident in this industry. For the experienced workers the figure
rose to $25.90 to set an all-time high average for female workers in any of the occupations covered by the Orders of the Board. The average weekly earnings for inexperienced employees also increased to show a figure of $11.47 compared with $10.10 for the
previous year.
The percentage of inexperienced workers continued to decrease, only 1.81 per cent,
of the total remaining in this category as against 3.91 per cent, in 1943.
Average weekly working-hours in the manufacturing industry decreased fractionally from 42.66 to 42.35 for 1944.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female).
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced   	
Inexperienced —
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees ....
Inexperienced employees .
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees —
Inexperienced employees 	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
72
4,941
4,931
10
$106,895.45
$102.40
$21.68
$10.24
0.20%
44.64
69
3,539
3,518
21
$65,804.78
$199.99
$18.71
$9.52
0.59%
45.04
72
4,012
3,831
181
$68,007.64
$2,352.39
$17.75
$13.00
4.51%
46.14
$67,
$1,
82
4,141
3,922
219
752.93
945.17
$17.28
$8.88
5.29%
47.17
$59
$1
76
3,649
3,529
120
173.40
067.67
$16.77
$8.90
3.29%
47.16
With additional firms reporting, this industry showed increased activity in 1944, a
total of 4,941 employees being recorded as against 3,539 for 1943.
Increases were general in both wage groups, the average weekly wage for experienced workers rising to $21.68 from a previous figure of $18.71, while for the inexperienced workers the average stood at $10.24 compared with $9.52 for 1943.    The I 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
percentage of the total employed at inexperienced rates of pay further decreased to
show only 0.20 per cent, remaining in this category for 1944.
Average weekly hours for the fruit and vegetable industry further decreased from
45.04 to 44.64 for the year under review.
Transportation Industry- (Female).
1944.
1943.
1941.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees 	
Over 18 years  	
Under 18 years. 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years..	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
Average hours worked per week	
138
235
174
61
$3,663.55
$733.50
$21.05
$12.02
25.96%
42.29
160
400
306
94
$6,361.32
$945.88
$20.79
$10.06
23.50%,
43.43
129
313
186
127
$3,268.60
$1,155.66
$17.57
$9.10
40.58%
41.61
32
107
20
87
$207.42
$712.58
$10.37
$8.19
81.31%
43.19
This classification includes female workers engaged in delivery, truck-driving,
messenger work, etc.
With the shortage of male workers in these occupations during the war years, a
rapid increase in the number of female workers was evident in the above table, employment reaching the highest in the peak year 1943. In 1944 the number of firms reporting females in these occupations decreased to 138 from 160 reporting for 1943, with a
resultant drop in employment to 235 as against 400 shown for 1943.
Average weekly wages continued to increase in both the over-18-year and the
under-18-year classes, the average in the older section increasing to $21.05 from $20.79
in 1943, while for the younger employees average weekly earnings rose to $12.02 from
$10.06 recorded for 1943.
A slight increase was noted in the percentage of younger workers employed, 25.96
per cent, of total being in the under-18 class for 1944 compared with 23.50 per cent,
in 1943.
The average weekly working-hours in this industry decreased from the 1943 high
of 43.43 to 42.29 for the year under review.
Public Places of Amusement (Female).
1944.
1943.
1942.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years. 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years —
Employees under 18 years...
Average weekly wages—
Employees over .18 years	
Employees under 18 years...
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
Average hours worked per week- _
86
430
320
110
$3,931.40
$797.01
$12.29
$7.25
25.58%
25.16
85
277
189
!2,189.76
$592.87
$11.59
$6.74
31.77%
26.95
83
238
186
52
$2,203.61
$352.64
$11.85
$6.78
21.85%,
29.32
This section includes theatre ushers, check-room attendants, and all such occupations previously included in the personal service group, exclusive of hairdressers and
beauty-parlour occupations. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 43
Inasmuch as these figures were formerly included with those in the personal service
group, no comparative figures are available prior to 1942, at which time a separate
tabulation was commenced.
Although little change is noted in the number of firms reporting, employment in
this classification climbed to 430 in 1944 from a total of 277 in 1943.
Average earnings for the over-18-year employees increased from $11.59 to $12.29
in 1944, while in the group of younger employees under 18 years of age average weekly
earnings rose to $7.25 from $6.74 in 1943. With part-time and casual hours of work
general in this occupation, the weekly earnings do not in most cases represent a full
week's work.
Average weekly working-hours in this occupation further decreased from 26.95 to
25.16 for the year 1944.
Summary of all Occupations (" Female Minimum Wage Act ").
1942.
1941.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees    	
Over 18 years, or experienced 	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced —	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or inexperienced    —
Average hours worked per week - -	
7,289
60,410
57,537
2,873
,234,084.11
$33,618.20
$21.45
$11.70
4.76%
40.84
6,894
54,905
51,277
3,628
$949,142.40
$40,250.34
$18.51
$11.09
6.61%
41.0S
6,357
44,461
41,042
3,419
$719,708.52
$35,977.87
$17.54
$10.52
7.69%
41.16
5,612
34,204
31,912
2,292
$511,972.47
$22,321.71
$16.04
$9.74
6.70%
41.82
5,232
30,038
28,453
1,585
$442,446.42
$14,622.69
$15.55
$9.23
5.28%
41.48
As shown in the summary, the firms reporting increased to 7,289 in 1944 as against
a figure of 6,894 for the previous year, with actual figures included in the returns
covering some 60,410 women and girl employees.
Total aggregate salaries and wages for one week amounted to $1,267,702.31, an
increase of $278,309.57 over the figure for 1943.
The average weekly wage for all occupations increased to $21.45 in the over-18-
year, or experienced group, compared with a high of $18.51 for the previous year.
Legal minimum wages for women 18 or over in the various classifications covered
by Orders of the Board ranged from $12.75 the lowest, as set for the mercantile industry, to $15.84 for a 48-hour week in the fishing group. It is therefore evident from the
summary that the average amount received continues to be far in excess of the highest
minimum set by law.
A further decrease in average weekly hours of work was again noted, the average
figure for the 60,410 employees reported decreasing to 40.84 as against 41.03 in 1943.
The percentage of employees under 18 years or inexperienced further decreased to
show 4.76 per cent, of total in this section compared with 6.61 per cent, in the previous
year.
The average earnings for the adult or experienced workers increased in ten of the
eleven tables. In the fishing industry, due to increased coverage of the occupations
included in this table and shorter working-hours for all employees, the average earnings
decreased relatively from the previous year.
Only those workers with classes of employment for which minimum wage orders
have been set by the Board are included in the 60,410 total reported in the summary,
the- figures not being inclusive of domestic workers, farm-labourers, or fruit-pickers,
which are excluded from coverage by the provision of the " Female Minimum Wage I 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Act." Similarly returns are not requested for women and girls employed in banks, as
conditions of employment in this case are regulated by the Dominion " Bank Act."
Federal employees are also not covered by the Provincial legislation.
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum for Experienced Female Workers.
Industry or
Occupation.
Legal
Minimum
Wage for
Full-time
Experienced
Employees.
Receiving Actual
Minimum~Wage"
SET FOR
Experienced
Workers.
Receiving More
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Receiving Less
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Total.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
Mercantile 	
Laundry. ._ _.	
$12.75*
14.88t
14.00*
15.001
14.25*
15.84t
lB.OOt
14.00t
14.401
14.25*
118
24
298
273
16
2
8
123
13
1
1.11
1.12
3.28
2.06
3.36
0.31
0.34
0.76
0.26
0.23
8,479
1,276
6,648
12,142
391
411
2,177
14,293
3,939
148
79.86
59.32
73.23
91.63
82.14
62.65
92.52
88.11
79.72
34.42
2,021
851
2,132
836
69
243
168
1,805
989
281
19.03
39.56
23.49
6.31
14.50
37.04
7.14
11.13
20.02
65.35
10,618
2,151
9,078
Office  .......
Personal service	
13,251
476
656
Telephone and telegraph .
Manufacturing	
2,353
16,221
4,941
Public places of amusement-
430
Totals, 1944 —
876
1.46
49,904
82.93
9,395
15.61
60,1758
Totals, 1943 .
4,069
7.47
39,587
72.63
10,849
19.90
54,505
* 40-48 hours per week. f 48 hours per week. $ 37a/2-48 hours per week.
§ In the transportation industry, 235 employees excluded from above table and not included in totals, as it is
impractical to state the weekly rate owing to the variation of minimum wages in the Order, depending on whether
the work is done on foot or bicycles, by motor-cycles or other types of motor-vehicles.
Wage levels continued higher during the year 1944, with the percentage of employees included in the returns who were receiving wages in excess of the legal minimum increasing to 82.93 per cent, of total, compared with 72.63 per cent, in this group
for the previous year. Decreasing percentages in the group at less than the minimum
and those receiving the actual fixed rate were also evident in the above table.
The effect of casual and part-time hours of work in certain occupations may again
be seen in the section showing the percentage of those receiving less than the minimum.
In such instances as the workers in the group comprising public places of amusement
due to the short working-hours required by the industry a relatively high percentage
of the total employees earned less than the minimum amount for a full week's work.
Also included in this section dealing with percentages at less than the required minimum are the younger and less skilled employees for whom special rates have been fixed
by the Board.
Leading in the section showing those receiving above the fixed rate, the telephone
and telegraph industry reported 92.52 per cent, of the total employees at wages above
the legal minimum; followed by the office group with 91.63 per cent, above and the
manufacturing industry with 88.11 per cent. In the personal service section 82.14 per
cent, were above the minimum; followed by the mercantile industry and the fruit and
vegetable group with 79.86 and 79.72 per cent, respectively, and the hotel and catering
section with 73.23 per cent, above the fixed rate. In the fishing industry 62.65 per
cent, were shown above the minimum set; followed by the laundry group with 59.32
per cent, above and public places of amusement with 34.42 per cent, in this category. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 45
It is interesting to note the high wages recorded each year in the various industries
and occupations. For the year 1944 the top salaries in each classification were as
follows:—
Weekly Wages
Occupation or Industry. or Salary.
Office   — _      — 	
Manufacturing   .!	
Mercantile _   _	
Fruit and vegetable       	
Hotel and catering    	
Telephone and telegraph   1   —	
Personal service        	
Transportation   _ __  	
Fishing    .        ~       r	
  .    —    $77.30
.......  .1  75.94
   _   75.00
  _   64.66
    64.61
   -    53.05
       49.22
     46.75
    :       ;  43.42
Laundry, cleaning and dyeing       37.50
Public places of amusement — —    34.62
The highest individual earnings for the week reported were again shown in the
office group, in which one executive employee was paid a total of $77.30 for the week.
Highest amount paid to one worker for the week reported in the manufacturing section
was $75.94, while in the mercantile group one employee received a weekly salary of $75.
In the fruit and vegetable industry one employee in a supervisory capacity received
a total of $64.66 for the week shown, while top salary in the hotel and catering group
was $64.61. Highest weekly amount paid in the telephone and telegraph occupation
was $53.05, while one worker in the personal service occupation earned a total of $49.22
for the week under review. The transportation industry reported one employee receiving a weekly salary of $46.75. One worker in the fishing group earned a total of $43.42
for the week reported. Highest weekly amount shown in the laundry, cleaning and
dyeing section was $37.50, while in the group comprising public places of amusement
the highest recorded weekly earnings were shown at $34.62.
Table showing Number of Single, Married, and Widowed Employees
and their Earnings for Week reported.
Industry or Occupation.
Single.
Earnings.
Married.
Earnings.
Widowed.
Earnings.
Total Earnings for Week
reported.
Mercantile   	
6,374
1,004
4,553
9,364
278
275
1,858
9,535
2,217
129
307
$101,614.17
15,961.45
76,875.50
213,405.16
5,317.09
4,555.20
43,247.58
245,836.67
44,303.77
2,033.70
2,982.95
3,877
1,047
3,817
3,506
185
351
438
6,261
2,604
97
116
$64,893.93
15,780.21
62,633.00
79,201.15
3,457.20
7,000.58
9,545.22
160,175.09
59,954.25
2,159.54
1,639.41
367
100
708
381
13
30
57
425
120
9
7
$6,838.31
1,486.98
12,066.66
9,375.23
279.96
658.82
1,439.56
9,934.18
2,739.83
203.81
106.05
$173,346.41
33,228.64
151,575.16
Office	
301,981.54
Personal service 	
9,054.25
12,214.60
54,232.36
415,945.94
106,997.85
Transportation —  	
Public places of amusement	
4,397.05
4,728.41
Totals   	
35,894
$756,133.24
22,299
$466,439.58
2,217
$45,129.39
$1,267,702.21
59.42%
59.19%
36.91%
37.23%
3.67%
3.58%
The above table shows the relative percentage of single, married, and widowed
employees engaged in the various industries covered.
During 1944 the percentage of married women-workers employed decreased slightly
to 36.91 per cent, of total, off fractionally from 37.23 per cent, in the peak year 1943.
A relative small increase was noted in the percentage of single employees, the 1944
percentage showing at 59.42 as against 59.19 per cent, in the previous year. Little
change was evident in the percentage of widowed employees. I 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
A greater proportion of married workers was again noted in such industries as
the fruit and vegetable industry, fishing, and laundry industries, while single employees
were in the majority in the office group, mercantile industry, and the telephone and
telegraph section.
Although the returns are also tabulated to show the numbers of workers divorced,
separated, or marital status not stated, the percentages in these groups were less than
1 per cent, in each case and are not shown separately in the above table, the figures
being included with the total of single workers.
Table showing Years of Service of Female Employees with Employers
reporting for 1944.
Industry or Occupation.
•V
QJ
o S
fr
o £
rJ   QJ
rt|W
« £
o rt
r.  QJ
nX
o rt
rJ     OJ
CO**
.r. ra
o fl
4J   QJ
to £
o a
rr QJ
«- 2
o ^
rr QJ
°°2
O C3
tn a>
o> 8
o rt
+. a,
ooX
o ^
FH     r.
O   Oi
■ri   01
OlX
rt Si
O     r.
rr o
«H in
O  QJ     .
aj £< qj
r,    O   r-i
ill
s g a
Sh2
•rr
o     u
r.     a
QJ       ...
& w ,
Mercantile 	
Laundry 	
627
66
422
364
26
12
17
567
293
4
45
5,394
1,173
5,494
4,477
209
508
878
9,360
3,076
116
245
1,172
262
1,065
1,735
70
57
286
2,846
586
48
53
1,473
301
966
2,325
64
38
411
2,057
368
54
55
730
121
381
1,248
36
20
124
610
249
10
16
277
42
127
626
19
7
51
186
86
2
4
162
20
99
336
15
29
104
85
2
95
33
80
232
8
2
27
71
26
1
5
79
12
44
191
2
2
28
45
29
82
13
49
193
3
'2
52
48
23
1
54
11
43
145
1
1
27
40
19
1
473
97
308
1,379
23
7
423
287
101
3
10,618
2,151
9,078
13,251
476
656
2,353
16,221
4,941
235
430
1,515
161
1,137
2,984
134
Fishing 	
Telephone and telegraph
Manufacturing	
19
194
849
72
Transportation	
Public places of amuse-
138
86
Totals 	
2,443
30,930
8,180
8,112
3,545
1,427
852
580
432
466
342
3,101
60,410
7,289
The length-of-service table indicates the length of time each employee has been
in the service of the employer sending in the return.
With the employment of female workers continuing in strength throughout 1944,
the total employees shown as having worked less than one year remained high—some
30,930 being reported in this category compared with 31,546 in 1943.
In each occupation special note is made of the employee credited with the greatest
number of years' service. One employee in the mercantile industry was reported with
36 years' service. Highest recorded in the laundry, cleaning and dyeing section was
29 years, while the hotel and catering group showed one employee with 36 years' service. In the office occupation one employee was credited with 44 years. Longest service in the personal service section was 21 years, while for the fishing industry 20
years was the record length of service. The telephone and telegraph industry reported
one employee with a total of 38 years' service. In the manufacturing section 34 years
was the longest, while one worker in the fruit and vegetable group was reported with
23 years' service. The transportation industry, one of the more recent industries to
report details of female employment, showed one employee with 6 years' service.
Longest service reported in the group comprising public places of amusement was 19
years.
INSPECTIONS AND WAGE ADJUSTMENTS.
Our staff made 9,012 inspections during 1944, which was an increase of 370 over
the previous year.
When it is realized that a complete check of operations of an employer with hundreds of wage-earners on his pay-roll (and during these war years there are many in
this category) is counted as one inspection only, although it may require more than
a day to finish the investigation;   when it is realized to make one call on an isolated REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 47
firm, such as a sawmill or logging camp, many miles from a main highway, compels an
Inspector to travel miles over difficult roads, the record is a creditable one.
The inspection staff comprises twelve persons, six of whom make Vancouver headquarters. They cover Vancouver and vicinity, the Fraser Valley, the mainland territory along the Coast as far as Powell River, across to Lillooet and south from there
to the International Boundary.
From Victoria three Inspectors have as their area the whole of Vancouver Island
and a strip of the Mainland north from Powell River to Ocean Falls.
One Inspector, with headquarters at Kamloops, covers the Central Interior; another,
with his office at Nelson, is responsible for the south-eastern Interior; and the balance
of the Province falls to the lot of the Inspector with headquarters at Prince George.
In addition to Provincial departmental work, our staff works in close co-operation
with the Regional War Labour Board of the Dominion Government to obviate the need
for one of their officials visiting a locality in which our staff may be working. Similarly
some of our officials have accomplished a great deal of work for the Wartime Labour
Relations Regulations Branch to save overlapping whenever possible.
To carry out this work the cars of the Department covered 4,447 miles less than in
1943 to accomplish 370 more inspections.
In the cities where the employers' establishments are congregated in close quarters
the staffs divide the areas and travel by foot, street-car, or bus. We would like to
pay tribute to the earnestness with which our Inspectors, male and female, pursue their
duties.
Through their efforts during the year arrears amounting to $6,437.24 were paid
over to employees who had not been paid the correct amounts prescribed by our various
Orders. This sum represents the difference between what they should have received
and what they were actually paid.
Under the " Female Minimum Wage Act" and Orders 109 women employees of
seventy firms received $2,773.83, and under the " Male Minimum Wage Act " and
Orders 138 males were paid $3,663.41 arrears due them from fifty-nine employers.
The individual amounts for employees ranged from $1.07 to $1,020. The latter
sum was paid to an employee whose name had been omitted altogether from the pay-roll,
due to illness of the person responsible for keeping records, and also to the fact that
the employee had been doing office-work at her home. It is very rarely that such a
combination of circumstances is found.
Most employers and employees are now familiar with the requirements, and wages
in most cases are well in advance of the legal minimum set by various Orders.
The matters of posting of schedules of shifts, and keeping accurate daily records
of hours worked by employees, are less likely to be complied with than payment of the
correct wage.
Many employers have come into British Columbia from other Provinces to start in
business, and they are unfamiliar with all the details of our Orders and Regulations.
The Inspectors have to devote much time in such cases to see that the requirements are
understood and to ensure compliance with the law, so that unfair competition will be
eliminated and so that the employees will have all the protection given by our
legislation.
COURT CASES.
The Board refrains from Court cases if it can effect satisfactory compliance with
the law by other means.
It was deemed advisable and necessary to institute proceedings against certain
employers during the year. I 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The following summary depicts graphically the cases taken under various Statutes
administered by the Department:—
Statute.
Cases.
Convictions.
Dismissed or
Withdrawn.
2
1
1
1
9
2
1
1
1
9
Totals    	
14
14
" Female Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1. Cash Groceteria  (Samuel J. Matthews),
Grand Forks
2. Robert Brown, Greenwood	
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure  to  keep  true  and  correct
records
Fined $10 and $3.75 costs.
Fined $10 and $3.75 costs.
Male Minimum Wage Act."
1. Raymond Bouffard, Hammond
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs, or fifteen
days.
" Hours of Work Act."
1. Dominion Produce Co.   (Mrs. H. Pang),
1515 Bay Avenue, Trail
Failure to  keep  true  and  correct
records
Fined $10 and costs.
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act/
T. L. Black, c/o Abbotsford Hotel, Vancouver
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs.
" Control of Employment of Children Act.
1. Swanson Lumber Company, Ltd.   (Wm.
Gregorschuck, Manager), Clearwater
2. Blue    Eagle    Cafe     (Harry    Sam),    130
Hastings Street East, Vancouver
3. Satin   Dairy   (Sam   Silas),   796   Robson
Street, Vancouver
4. Chapman's Recreations, Ltd. (William J.
Mills, Manager), 1312 Broadway West,
Vancouver
5. B.C.    Bowling    Company,    Ltd.     (John
Penner, Manager), Chilliwack
6. B.C.    Bowling    Company,    Ltd.     (John
Penner, Manager), Chilliwack
7. B.C.    Bowling    Company,    Ltd.    (John
Penner, Manager), Chilliwack
S. B.C.    Bowling    Company,    Ltd.     (John
Penner, Manager), Chilliwack
9. B.C.    Bowling    Company,    Ltd.     (John
Penner, Manager), Chilliwack
U nlawf ully    employing    a    child
under 15 years without a permit
Unlawfully     employing     a     child
without a permit
Unlawfully    employing    a    child
without a permit
Unlawfully    employing    a    child
without a permit
child
child
child
Unlawfully    employing
without a permit
Unlawfully     employing
without a permit
Unlawfully    employing
without a permit
Unlawfully    employing    a    child
without a permit
Unlawfully    employing    a    child
without a permit
Fined $10 and costs.
Fined $15 and $5 costs ;   in default,
two months.
Fined $15 and $5 costs ;   in default,
ten days.
Fined $15 and $5 costs;   in default,
thirty days.
Fined $10 and $4.75 costs.
Conviction; suspended sentence.
Conviction ; suspended sentence.
Conviction ; suspended sentence.
Conviction ; suspended sentence. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 49
COMPARATIVE WAGES, 1918, 1942, 1943, AND 1944.
Figures showing comparative wage trends are furnished in the following tables
for the year 1918, when data were first compiled, and for the three most recent years—
namely, 1942, 1943, and 1944. It will be noted these relate to non-seasonal occupations
only.
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1918.
1942.
1943.
1944.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years..... ..—	
$12.71
$7.70
16.49%
$14.67
$9.88
13.28%,
$15.14
$11.03
15.32%
$17.22
Percentage of employees under 18 years	
13.48%
Laundry Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees  — _	
$11.80
$14.96
$14.97
$15.48
Inexperienced employees    __
$9.78
$10.93
$10.68
$13.63
Percentage of inexperienced employees   	
21.80%
12.06%
3.72%
1.58%
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees  	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
$14.23
$11.77
5.51%,
$15.24
$10.78
7.41%
$16.38
$10.30
5.72%
$16.93
$11.97
4.74%
Office Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
$16.53
$10.88
7.45%
$19.55
$13.47
3.83%
$20.48
$14.16
4.68%,
$23.05
$15.94
3.63%
Personal Ser
vice Occupation
(Female)
Average weekly wages—
$13.83
$6.96
15.38%
$16.13
$8.88
1.58%
$16.73
$11.44
1.55%
$19.33
Employees under 18 years —	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .	
$10.18
3.36%,
Telephone and
Telegraph Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
$15.55
$11.90
8.70%
$18.96
$10.82
14.78%
$18.70
$10.72
7.87%,
$23 08
$11 45
0.30%,
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
$12.54
$9.57
28.64%,
$19.05
$9.40
5.81%,
$20.56
$10.10
3.91%
$11 47
Percentage of inexperienced employees 	
1.81%, I 50 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The information dealing with employment and earnings of female workers as
reported in the statistical tables is based on a questionnaire restricted to female employees only.
Where possible from industrial classifications dealt with elsewhere in this report,
a segregation has been made to isolate males in occupations included in the coverage
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act" for similar presentation in the separate tables
which follow. While detailed information is not available from this source for all
occupations covered by the Male Minimum Wage Orders, the tables show the trend of
wages and employment for males in some of the more important occupations covered.
The figures are based on industrial returns which show the week of employment
of the greatest number, and the male employees included are segregated to show those
over and under 21 years of age. ,
SPECIAL LICENCES.
Recognizing the fact that some inexperienced employees need a training period
before they are entitled to the legal minimum wage in certain occupations, the Board
made provision for a sliding scale of wages under various Orders drawn under the
" Female Minimum Wage Act."
The length of time varies and the wage-scales are set according to conditions to
be dealt with.
When employers desire to use these learners at the lower rates, a joint application
form is completed by the employee and the employer. These applications are closely
checked by one of the inspection staff, who interviews both parties. If it is apparent
that the application is made in good faith, a special licence is issued, the original going
to the employee and the duplicate to the employer.
In many instances the wages are raised sooner than the licence, based on its
appropriate Order, requires. When this occurs, when the licence expires, or when the
employee leaves before her training period has been completed the employer is requested
to return the licence to the Board with a notation explaining what has happened.
Due to the acute labour shortage in recent years, many young girls or inexperienced women have been started at the legal minimum fee for experienced employees, and in such instances no special licences are required.
The following table shows the number of licences granted in various occupations
and industries for the year under review and for comparative purpose for 1943:—
Number issued.
1944. 1943.
Telephone and telegraph      _ _       5 22
Mercantile       _     16 54
Laundry,   cleaning  and  dyeing —     28 125
Office   ....          49 73
Hotel and catering       85 109
Manufacturing     195 362
Totals    378 745
It will be noted that in 1944 a substantial decrease took place in the number of
licences issued. Employers were generally willing to start the inexperienced employees
at the legal minimum wage.
STATISTICS FOR MALE EMPLOYEES.
While most of the foregoing tables in this report deal with female employees only,
the Board has many Orders covering males as well. The figures compiled for women's
employment were obtained from a questionnaire sent to employers listed on our index
as having women or girls on their pay-rolls. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 51
A complete coverage by questionnaire for employers with men and boys on their
staffs is not available, but from industrial returns submitted for the Department of
Labour's general report a break-down of figures has been prepared in certain industries
whose activities are covered by minimum wage Orders.
The tables that follow, therefore, present a picture relative to industrial groups
only:—
Baking Industry (Male).
1944.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees..
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years   -
lotal weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over—	
Employees under 21 years 	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over 	
Employees under 21 years  .-..
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week 	
$41
$39
$1
169
1,167
1,089
78
.031.00
687.00
344.00
$36.44
$17.23
6.68%
45.60
167
1,150
1,030
120
$36,042.50
$34,081.50
$1,961.00
$33.09
$16.34
10.43%
45.80
172
1,209
1,106
103
.$36,411.50
$34,877.00
$1,534.50
$31.53
$14.90
8.52%
46.69
174
1,265
1,166
99
$33,313.00
$32,143.00
$1,170.00
$27.57
$11.82
7.83%,
46.87
Construction (Male).
Number of firms reporting  1	
Total number of male employees	
21 years of age and over 	
Under 21 years  — 	
Total weekly wages    	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over  	
Employees under 21 years  	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week 	
916
17,808
17,181
627
$676,180.00
$660,869.50
$15,310.50
$38.47
$24.42
3.52%
44.09
753
24,754
23,837
917
$969,551.00
$943,888.00
$25,663.00
$39.60
$27.99
3.70%,
51.14
25,550
24,795
705
$921,080.00
$902,784.50
$18,295.50
$36.41
$25.95
2.76%,
50.06
1,054
14,798
14,445
353
$442,926.50
$436,318.50
$6,608.00
$30.21
$18.72
2.39%
45.03
Fruit and Vegetable (Male).
88
2,807
2,136
671
$82,688.50
$65,879.00
$16,809.50
$30.84
$25.05
23.90%
51.87
84
2,068
1,482
586
$58,653.00
$44,246.50
$14,406.50
$29.86
$24.58
28.34%
54.43
84
1,947
1,423
524
$53,560.50
$41,670.50
$11,890.50
$29.28
$22.69
26.91%
51.59
92
2,102
314
$50,506.00
$44,987.50
Employees under 21 years 	
Average weekly wages—
$5,518.50
Employees under 21 years 	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years	
Average hours worked per week   ,
$17.57
14.94%,
49.15
House Furnishings (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees..
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages -_
Employees 21 years and over _.
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over....	
Employees under 21 years ._	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week   	
77
829
684
145
$23,660.50
$21,398.00
$2,262.50
$31.28
$15.60
17.49%,
43.55
67
733
595
138
$19,001.00
$16,734.50
$2,266.50
$28.13
$16.42
18.83%
44.00
65
1,051
815
236
$26,294.00
$22,627.50
$3,666.50
$27.76
$15.54
22.45%,
44.88
60
1.171
814
357
$25,980.50
$20,956.00
$5,024.50
$25.74
$14.07
30.49%,
44.62 1 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Logging (Male).
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
546
521
526
552
Total number of male employees   	
12,768
12,589
12,992
13,602
21 years of age and over_  	
12,249
11,904
12,556
13,319
Under 21 years - ....    ' 	
519
685
436
283
Total weekly wages -	
$595,607.50
$513,106.00
$492,348.00
$469,025.00
Employees 21 years and over	
$577,224.00
$489,219.00
$479,185.00
$461,333.50
$18,383.50
$23,887.00
$13,163.00
$7,691.50
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over   	
$47.12
$41.10
$38.16
$34.64
Employees under 21 years	
$35.42
$34.87
$30.19
$27.18
Percentage of male employees under 21 years 	
4.06%
5.44%,
3.36%0
2.08%,
Average hours worked per week    _
48.46
48.67
48.78
48.24
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees .
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years 	
Total weekly wages  —
Employees 21 years and over..
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over..
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week	
101
704
672
32
$25,609.50
$24,911.50
$698.00
$37.07
$21.81
4.55%,
40.91
92
647
626
21
$23,150.00
$22,730.00
$420.00
$36.31
$20.00
3.25%,
42.38
118
589
573
16
$20,679.00
$20,344.00
$335.00
$35.50
$20.94
2.72%
42.70
126
550
535
15
$17,281.00
$17,004.00
$277.00
$31.78
$18.47
2.73%
42.77
Sawmills (Male).
372
1
307
284
266
12,895
12,871
13,905
12,862
12,306
556
12,234
12,178
Under 21 years __   	
661
693
666
Total weekly wages	
$463,514.00
$429,632.00
$419,243.50
$349,116.00
Employees 21 years and over 	
$444,015.50
$411,678.50
$402,783.50
$337,417.50
$19,498.50
$17,953.50
$16,460.00
$11,698.50
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over____  	
$36.29
$33.81
$30.42
$27.42
Employees under 21 years	
$29.50
$25.91
$24.71
$21.04
5.13%
5.38%
48.47
4.79%,
48.44
4.32%
48.40
47.98
Shingle-mills (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees..
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years	
Total weekly wages „
Employees 21 years and over..
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over..
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week 	
40
1,677
1,638
39
$64,506.00
$63,456.50
$1,049.50
$38.74
$26.91
2.33%
46.28
43
1,713
1,677
36
$59,128.00
$58,220.50
$907.50
$34.72
$25.21
2.10%
46.42
45
2,246
2,211
35
$73,535.50
$72,677.00
$858.50
$32.87
$24.53
1.56%,
47.20
50
2,364
2,310
54
$73,702.50
$72,363.50
$1,339.00
$31.33
$24.80
2.28%
47.29 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 53
Ship-building (Male).
1944.
1943.
1942.
1941.
Number of firms reporting _.    	
46
26,357
24,839
1,518
$1,053,057.00
$1,002,618.00
$50,439.00
$40.36
$33.23
5.76%,
43.07
47
30,488
29,020
1,468
$1,213,203.50
$1,162,994.00
$50,209.50
$40.08
$34.20
4.82%
43.92
46
28,597
26,913
1,684
$1,136,225.50
$1,085,034.50
$51,191.00
$40.32
$30.40
5.89%,
47.88
52
11,363
10,601
762
$391,512.00
Employees 21 years and over    ,
$373,859.00
$17,653.00
Average weekly wages—
$35.27
$23.17
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..	
Average hours worked per week ____ , ,	
6.71%
43.63
Wood (N.E.S.) (Male).
Number of firms reporting  -	
Total number of male employees 	
121
3,434
2,897
537
$114,736.50
$100,679.00
$14,057.50
$34.75
$26.18
15.64%,
45.61
108
3,836
3,218
618
$121,058.00
$107,298.00
$13,760.00
$33.34
$22.27
16.11%
46.28
104
3,645
2,996
649
$103,040.50
$90,605.00
$12,435.50
$30.24
$19.16
17.81%
46.59
103
3,595
2,697
898
$87,733.50
$72,855.50
$14,878.00
$27.01
$16.57
24.98%
Under 21 years  	
Employees 21 years and over   	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over    	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years 	
CONCLUSION.
The transition period from war to peace will be presenting many problems to
employers, employees, and to our officials, but we earnestly hope that the same cooperation will be experienced in the future as in the past. We wish to state at this
time that we sincerely appreciate the efforts made by employers to cope with numerous
difficulties that have existed in the past year and at the same time to comply with our
Orders and Regulations. To employees we express our gratitude for their willingness
to put in extra hours under permit when it was impossible to find other means of
carrying on essential work.
The majority of employers and employees have shown compliance with the laws we
administer, but our inspection staff finds it necessary to be on the alert at all times to
educate those who come into the Province from other places and who are not familiar
with our requirements. As they travel about in the course of their work they are also
:>ften able to assist persons with whom they come in contact by giving information of
a general character necessary for the smooth conduct of business. Our Inspectors continue their educational work with employers and employees to keep them posted on new
regulations, and to help them with their many problems. A very harmonious relationship exists between these three groups and in the days ahead, when readjustments will
be necessary after the war, the machinery of the Department will be in good running
order for the work ahead.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. I 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO "MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
BAKING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 17 (1942), Effective July 20th, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 17.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, cakes,
doughnuts, pies, and similar products.
Occupation.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—
21 years of age and over..
Under 18 years of age	
18 years and under 19 years-
19 years and under 20 years..
20 years and under 21 years..
Delivery salesmen 	
48
48
48
48
48
54
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
BARBERING  (MALE).
Order No. 42, Effective June 14th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 8.)
Barbering includes the work of male persons engaged in the shaving of the face or cutting or
trimming or singeing of the hair or beard for hire, gain, or hope of reward, or in connection with any
of the foregoing the shampooing or massaging or the treating the head or face.
Occupation.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
$18.00 week
45c. per hour
Daily minimum, $1.80
(Maximum hours, 48 per week.)
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
(6.)  Does  not  apply  to  male  persons  employed   in   beauty-parlours   or  hairdressing-shops  while  working   on
women or children only.
BOX-MANUFACTURING (MALE).
Order No. 55 (1943), Effective July 19th, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 55.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the making of wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel
staves and heads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, or other wooden containers.
Hours per Week.
Adult males, 90% of total..
Adult males, 10% of total, not less than..
Males, 18 to 21 years of age  —
Males, under 18 years of age 	
48
48
48 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 55
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—-
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act" and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as denned in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26   (1940)   and Order No. 26a
(1940) of the Board.
Note.-—Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under " Apprenticeship Act."
BUS-DRIVERS  (FEMALE).
Order No. 76, Effective September 28th, 1942.
Includes female employees in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public, for which service a charge
is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point Grey
which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City of
Vancouver;   the City of New Westminster;   the Corporation  of
the Township of Richmond;   the Municipality of the District of
Burnaby;   Municipality of the District of West Vancouver;   the
City of North Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver
50c.
55c.
40 to 48.
Less than 40.
Note.— <1.) If bus-drivers are required to wear uniforms or special articles of wearing-apparel no deduction
shall be made from bus-drivers' wages for such uniforms or special apparel, except under terms with regard to
cost duly approved in writing by the Board as being fair and reasonable.
(2.)   Employees required by employer to wait on call shall be paid for waiting time.
(3.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
(4.) Rest period of twenty-four consecutive hours from midnight to midnight in each calendar week shall be
given to employees.
BUS-DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 70, Effective March 18th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 31.)
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which service a charge is
made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
50c.
65c.
75c.
40 to 50.
Less than 40.
In  excess of 9 hours
in   any   one  day   or
60 hours in any one
week. I 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BUS-DRIVERS (MALE).
Order No. 70a, Effective June 27th, 1940.
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of a bus-driver
while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by a bus-driver from the time
he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty until he returns again to his employer's
headquarters or garage where he originally reported for duty; and shall include the time occupied by
a bus-driver in dead-heading from his employer's headquarters or garage to the place where he is to
take charge of the bus and vice versa; but the minimum wage shall not apply to waiting-time of a bus-
driver when occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 66, Effective August 21st, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. UO.)
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and  the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt,
Highland, Metchosin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew .
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 58, Effective November 7th, 1938.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
The City of Vancouver, the City of New Westminster, the Municipality of
the District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver,
the City of North Vancouver, and District of North Vancouver  	
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
, CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 65, Effective August 1st, 1939.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Provincial   Electoral   Districts   of   Rossland-Trail,   Grand   Forks-Greenwood,
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)  " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 72, Effective May 27th, 1940.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
That portion of Vancouver Island within a radius of 5 miles from the centre
|
TRo.                                     AH
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 57
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 73, Effective May 27th, 1940.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
That portion of Vancouver Island within a radius of 5 miles from the centre
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)  " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 68, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 61.)
.   " Christmas-tree industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the cutting, gathering, hauling, and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Male employees, 85 per cent, not less than 40c. per hour.
Permissible, 15 per cent, not less than 30c. per hour.
Note.— (a.) Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 12 (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 12, Order No. 12A, Order No. 12B, Order No. 45, Order No. J.5K,
and Order No. i8.)
Includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or demolition of any building, railway,
tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well,
telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of
construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of any such work or structure.
Area.
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate,
under 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
The City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point
Grey which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the
City of Vancouver;   the City of Victoria;   the City of New
Westminster;    the   City   of   Nanaimo;    the   City   of   Prince
Rupert;   the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt;   the
Municipality of the District of Oak Bay;   the Municipality of
the District of Saanich ;   Municipality of the District of West
Vancouver;    the   Municipality   of   the   District   of   Burnaby;
45c.
40c.
35c.
30c.
48
48
Note.— (a.)   Above rates do not apply to indentured apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act.'
(6.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS   (MALE).
Order No. 54, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 32.)
Includes every male elevator operator and starter.
37 V2 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37 M: Hours per Week.
§14.00 per week.
37%c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board (21) meals, $4.00 per week.
(6.)   Individual meals, twenty cents  (20c.)  each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven  (7) days, $2.00 per week,
(e.)  Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/.)   Uniforms or special wearing-apparel, required by the employer, must be supplied and laundered without
cost to the employee.
(g.)  The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(h.)   Employees must be given twenty-four (24)  consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(i.)   Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted. I 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS  (FEMALE).
Order No. 53, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. SO and Order No. 5.)
Includes every female operator and starter.
37 Ms to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37*& Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37^c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.—As for male elevator operators, see Order No. 54.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM   (MALE).
Order No. 18 (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 18, ISA, 18b, and 18c.)
Includes every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while under
steam-pressure or in motion.    " Special engineer " means holder of a special or temporary certificate.
(See " Boiler Inspection Act," section 28 (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.      1 Hours per Week.
60c.                             48
40c.                             48
Note.—(o.) Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the *' Hours of Work Act" 48 hours per
week may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(6.)   For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(c.) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 40 cents
per hour.
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS  (MALE).
Order No. 39 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. S9.)
First-aid attendant means every male employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid attendant
under the authority of a certificate of competency in first aid, satisfactory to the Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia, and designated by his employer as the first-aid attendant in charge.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Rate.
First-aid attendant  	
Assistant first-aid attendant 	
Overtime rate when engaged in first-aid work~
50c.
50c.
$4.00
4.00
Note.— (a.) "Hours of Work Act" regulates the daily hours in industry, but should overtime be necessary,
attendant must be paid overtime rate.
(6.) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any industry or occupation within an industry, the first-aid
attendant employed in such industry or occupation must be paid such higher rate.
(c.) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the medical practitioner or hospital.
FISHING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 78, Effective May 3rd, 1943.
(Superseding Order in Effect since February 28th, 1920.)
" Fishing industry " means the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving,
canning, drying, curing, smoking, packing, labelling and reconditioning of containers, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use or for shipment any kind of fish or shell-fish.
Hourly Rate.
Experienced employees-
Learners of any age	
33c.
28c. for first 200 hours of employment in the industry ;
33c. thereafter.
Note.— (1.)   Above rates do not apply to employees engaged in heading and filling.
(2.) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age below 33c.
per hour.
(3.)  Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(4.) Employees shall not be employed more than eight hours a day or forty-eight hours a week except under
permit from the Board.
(5.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 59
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 47 (1942), Effective September 28th, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 47.)
Includes the work of males engaged in canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh
fruit or vegetable.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
Experienced rate   (payable to at least 85 per
First 10 hours
38c.
cent, of male employees)
11th and 12th hours
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
In excess of 12 hours
Double regular rate of pay.
Inexperienced rate  (payable to not more than
First 10 hours
28c.
15 per cent, of male employees)
11th and 12th hours
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
In excess of 12 hours
Double regular rate of pay.
Note.— (1.)  After five  (5)  hours continuous employment, employees must have one   (1)  hour free from duty,
unless shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
'(2.)  Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
(3.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 46 (1942), Effective September 28th* 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 46.)
Includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh
fruit or vegetable.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
Experienced rate   (payable to at least 90 per
First 10 hours
30c.
cent, of employees)
11th and 12th hours
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
In excess of 12 hours
Double regular rate of pay.
Inexperienced rate  (payable to not more than
First 10 hours
25c.
10 per cent, of employees)
11th and 12th hours
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
In excess of 12 hours
Double regular rate of pay.
Note.— (1.)  After five  (5)  hours continuous employment, employees must have one   (1)  hour free from duty,
unless shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(2.)  Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
(3.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 52, Effective February 14th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. SO and Order No. 5.)
Includes the work of females in:—
(o.) Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which a charge
is made.
(6.) Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets, banquet-halls,
cafeterias, tea-rooms, lunch-rooms, lunch-counters, ice-cream parlours, soda fountains, hospitals, nursing-homes, clubs, dining-rooms or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial establishments
or office buildings or schools, or any other place where food is cooked, prepared, and served, for which
a charge is made; whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or
in connection with any other business.
This Order does not apply to females employed as graduate or undergraduate nurses in hospitals,
nursing-homes, or other similar establishments.
Experienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37y%z. per hour.
Daily guarantee, $1.50. I 60
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Inexperienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 per week, 1st 2 months.
10.50 per week, 2nd 2 months.
12.00 per week, 3rd 2 months.
14.00 per week thereafter.
Licences required for all inexperienced employees
working at above rates.
25c. per hour, 1st 2 months.
30c. per hour, 2nd 2 months.
35c. per hour, 3rd 2 months.
37%c. per hour thereafter.
Daily guarantee of four (4) hours pay per day.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board  (21)  meals, $4.00 per week.
(6.)   Individual meals, twenty cents (20c.) each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven  (7) days, $2.00 per week.
(e.) Emergency overtime up to ten (10) hours per day, but not to exceed fifty-two (52) hours in any one
(1) week.
(/.) Time and one-half regular rate of pay shall be paid for all hours in excess of eight (8) in the day, or
forty-eight (48)  in the week.
(g.) Split shifts shall be confined within fourteen (14) hours from commencement of such split shift. (Se«
Order 52b.)
(h.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(t.) Uniforms or special wearing-apparel required by the employer must be supplied and laundered free of cost
to the employee.
(i.)   Accidental breakages shall not be charged to employees.
(k.)   Employees must be given twenty-four (24)  consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(I.)   See Order 52p for "Resort Hotels."
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY (FEMALE).
Order No. 52b, Effective May 19th, 1938.
Allows a split shift to be spread over 14 hours immediately following commencement of work,
thereby cancelling section 8 of Order No. 52. Every employee whose split shift extends over 12 hours
shall be paid at the rate of one and one-half times her regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of her work.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY (FEMALE).
Order No. 52p (Resort Hotels), Effective June 18th, 1945, to September 8th, 1945.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 52k, 52D, 52F, 52H, 52K, 52M, and 52N.)
Covers the work of females in any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or lodging
are furnished to the general public, for which a charge is made.
Allowing:—
Hours not to exceed ten  (10)  in any one day, nor more than fifty-six (56) \v any one week.
Hours in excess of forty-eight (48) in any one week shall be paid at not less than time and one-
half (1%) regular rate of pay.
Provides for a rest period of twenty-four (24) consecutive hours in each calendar week, unless in
exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved by the Board on application in writing from
employer and employees.
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 51, Effective November 22nd, 1937.
Includes the manufacture of kitchen furniture, dining-room furniture, bedroom furniture, living-
room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of household furniture, customarily manufactured in
a furniture factory.
Males.
Rate per Hour.
Hours per Week.
21 years of age or over 	
Under 17 years of age  	
17 years and under 18 years of age..
18 years and under 19 years of age .
19 years and under 20 years of age .
20 years and under 21 years of age .
40c.
20c.
25c.
27 He
30c.
35c.
48
48
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)   60 per cent, of all male employees must be paid not less than 40c. per hour.
(h.)   This Order does not apply to apprentices duly indentured under the " Apprenticeship Act." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 61
JANITORS   (MALE).
Order No. 43  (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 1,3, iSA, and 1,3b.)
janitor-cleaner, janitor-fireman, or janitor-engineer.
-seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
gs of four  (4)  residential suites and under, thirty-
1. Includes every person employed as janitor,
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, thirty
3. (a.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildin
seven and one-half cents (ST'Ac.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings,
5 residential suites, $27.00 per month
6 residential suites, $30.00 per month
7 residential suites, $33.00 per month
8 residential suites, $36.00 per month
9 residential suites, $39.00 per month
10 residential suites, $42.00 per month
11 residential suites, $45.00 per month
12 residential suites, $48.00 per month
13 residential suites, $51.00 per month
14 residential suites, $54.00 per month
15 residential suites, $57.20 per month
16 residential suites, $60.50 per month
17 residential suites, $63.80 per month
18 residential suites, $67.10 per month
19 residential suites, $70.40 per month
20 residential suites, $73.70 per month
21 residential suites, $77.00 per month
22 residential suites, $80.30 per month
23 residential suites, $82.50 per month
24 residential suites, $84.70 per month
25 residential suites, $86.90 per month
26 residential suites, $89.10 per month
27 residential suites, $91.30 per month
28 residential suites, $93.50 per month
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (b).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents (371/4c.)
per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitor
shall be given twenty-four  (24)  consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitor shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.— (1.) In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building the suite occupied by the
janitor shall not be included.
(2.)   Order does not apply to janitors employed in one-room school-houses.
containing:—
29 residential
30 residential
31 residential
32 residential
33 residential
34 residential
35 residential
36 residential
37 residential
38 residential
39 residential
40 residential
41 residential
42 residential
43 residential
44 residential
45 residential
46 residential
47 residential
48 residential
49 residential
50 residential
over 50 residential
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
suites,
$95.70 per month;
$97.90 per month;
$100.10 per month
$102.30 per month
$104.50 per month
$106.70 per month
$108.90 per month
$111.10 per month
$113.30 per month
$115.50 per month
$117.70 per month
$119.90 per month
$122.10 per month
$124.30 per month
$126.50 per month
$128.70 per month
$130.90 per month
$133.10 per month
$135.30 per month
$137.50 per month
$137.50 per month
$137.50 per month
$137.50 per month I 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
JANITRESSES  (FEMALE).
Order No. 44  (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 44, 44a, and 44b.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitress, janitress-cleaner.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half
3. (a.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings of four (4) resi
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:—•
5 residential suites, $27.00 per month
6 residential suites, $30.00 per month
7 residential suites, $33.00 per month
8 residential suites, $36.00 per month
9 residential suites, $39.00 per month
10 residential suites, $42.00 per month
11 residential suites, $45.00 per month
12 residential suites, $48.00 per month
13 residential suites, $51.00 per month
14 residential suites, $54.00 per month
15 residential suites, $57.20 per month
16 residential suites, $60.50 per month
17 residential suites, $63.80 per month
18 residential suites, $67.10 per month
19 residential suites, $70.40 per month
20 residential suites, $73.70 per month
21 residential suites, $77.00 per month
22 residential suites, $80.30 per month
23 residential suites, $82.50 per month
24 residential suites, $84.70 per month
25 residential suites, $86.90 per month
26 residential suites, $89.10 per month
27 residential suites, $91.30 per month
28 residential suites, $93.50 per month
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents
(37%c.) per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (o.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitress
shall be given twenty-four (24)  consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitress shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.— (1.) In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building the suite occupied by the
janitress shall not be included.
(2.)   Order does not apply to janitresses employed in one-room school-houses.
29
residential suites,
30
residential suites,
31
residential suites,
32
residential suites,
33
residential suites,
34
residential suites,
35
residential suites,
36
residential suites,
37
residential suites,
38
residential suites,
39
residential suites,
40
residential suites,
41
residential suites,
42
residential suites,
43 residential suites,
44
residential suites,
45
residential suites,
46
residential suites,
47 residential suites,
48
residential suites,
49
residential suites,
50
residential suites,
over 50
residential suites,
or janitress-fireman.
cents (37%c.) per hour,
dential suites and under, thirty-
$95.70 per month;
$97.90 per month;
$100.10 per month
$102.30 per month
$104.50 per month
$106.70 per month
$108.90 per month
$111.10 per month
$113.30 rir month
$115.50 per month
$117.70 per month
$119.90 per month
$122.10 per month
$124.30 per month
$126.50 per month
$128.70 per month
$130.90 per month
$133.10 per month
$135.30 per month
$137.50 per month
$137.50 per month
$137.50 per month
$137.50 per month
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING  (FEMALE).
Order No. 74, Effective March 10th, 1941.
(Superseding Order in Effect since March Slst, 1919.)
Per Hour.
Daily Minimum,
except Saturday.
Daily Minimum,
Saturday only.
81 e.                                        SI 9A REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 63
Learners must have permit, if employed at following rates:-
First four months
Second four months
Third four months
Thereafter
24c. per hour.
27 %c. per hour.
31c. per hour.
-
Four Hours or Less
per Day (except
Saturday).
Three Hours or Less
on Saturday.
First four months
Second four months
Third four months
Thereafter
84c. per day
96c. per day
$1.10 per day
$1.24 per day
73c. per day.
82%c. per day.
93c. per day.
Note.— (a.)   Every employee called for employment shall be paid after reporting at the place of employment.
(b.) When employees are required to wear uniforms or special articles of wearing-apparel, no deduction shall
be made from the wages for such uniform or special articles of wearing-apparel, or for the repair or laundering
thereof, except as approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.) No deduction shall be made for the accidental damage to any article, or as a penalty for unsatisfactory
work.
(d.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(e.)  Hours of work governed by " Factories Act."
(/.)   Maximum hours, forty-eight in the week.
LOGGING (MALE).
Order No. I (1943), Effective August 2nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 1 (1940).)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to hauling by truck or rail, driving,
rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
40c. per hour
37a/£c. per hour
$2.75 per day
$1.30 per cord
48
48
Cook- and bunk-house employees 	
Unlimited.
48
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No.- 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay after com-
( pletion  of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as denned in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers, timekeepers, and office employees when employed on a monthly basis.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees engaged exclusively in the transportation of men or supplies.
Note.— (1.)  Certain exemptions re hours granted under "Hours of Work Act"  (see Regulations).
(2.)  Watchmen in logging camps where operations are entirely suspended are exempt from provisions of the
Order.
(3.)  Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act."
LOGGING (MALE).
Order No. 1a (1943), Effective September 23rd, 1943.
(Amending Order No. 1  (1943).)
Overtime does not apply to—
Boatmen when employed on a monthly basis.
Emergency fire-fighters. I 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 25 (1942), Effective November 2nd, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 25.)
Includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting,
printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity, except as provided by any other Order of the Board.
Weekly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Experienced employees   	
Learners of any age—
First two months  - -	
$14.00
8.00
10.00
12.00
14.00
48
48
48
48
48
291/fi c.
16%c.
20 %c.
25c.
29%c.
Note.— (1.) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age at
rates below $14 per week or 29%c. per hour.
(2.)  Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(3.)  Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under the "Apprenticeship Act."
(4.) Employees shall not be employed more than eight hours a day or forty-eight hours a week, except when
permission granted under the " Factories Act " or by permit from the Board when the said Act does not apply.
(5.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
MERCANTILE  (MALE).
Order No. 59, Effective October 20th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 38.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
(2.) 21 years of age and over .
(3.) 21 years of age and over-
Minimum rate per day—	
$15.00 per week
40c. per hour
$1.60 per day
37% to 48 hours per week.
If less than 37% hours.
Males under Twenty-one (21) Yeaks of Age.
37 Mi to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37H Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
(4.)   (1.)
$6.00 per week
7.50 per week
9.00 per week .
11.00 per week .
13.00 per week
15.00 per week .
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
19 and under 20
20 and under 21
Thereafter
60c.
80c.
$1.00
1.20
1.40
1.60
Beginners and those recommencing, Eighteen (18)  Years and under Twenty-one (21). to whom Permits
have been issued by the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37 % to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
(4.)   (2.)
$8.00 per week, 1st 12 months	
10.00 per week, 2nd 12 months	
13.00 per week, 3rd 12 months	
Thereafter rates as shown in (2) or (3).
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
20c.
25c.
35c.
80c.
$1.00
1.40
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed five
(5)  days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
30c.
$1.20 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 65
Males Twenty-one (21) Years and under Twenty-four  (24).
Inexperienced and partly inexperienced, to whom Permits have been granted, under Section 6
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
25c.
30c.
35c.
$1.00
1.20
1.40
Thereafter the rates as shown in (2) or (3).
Note.— (a.) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers, employed in wholesale and (or) retail establishments, shall be
paid at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26.
(6.)   Employees must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(c.)  Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(d.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
MERCANTILE   (FEMALE).
Order No. 24, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order No. 18.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or)  retail trade.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over .
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over _
Minimum, 18 years of age or over-	
$12.75 a week.
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
40 to.48
If less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$7.50 a week for 1st 3 months
20c
per hour during 1st 3 months.
8.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
21c
per hour during 2nd 3 months.
8.50 a week for 3rd 3 months.
23c.
per hour during 3rd 3 months.
9.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
25c
per hour during 4th 3 months.
9.50 a week for 5th 3 months.
26c
per hour during 5th 3 months.
10.00 a week for 6th 3 months.
27c
per hour during 6th 3 months.
10.50 a week for 7th 3 months.
29c
per hour during 7th 3 months.
11.00 a week until age of 18 years is reached.
30c.
per hour until age of 18 years is reached.
Minimum, $1.00 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 a week 1st 3 months.
25c. per hour 1st 3 months.
• 10.00 a week 2nd 3 months.
27c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
11.00 a week 3rd 3 months.
30c. per hour 3rd 3 months.
12.00 a week 4th 3 months.
35c. per hour 4th 3 months.
12.75 a week thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Note.— (a.)   Licences must be obtained for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over at above rates.
(6.)   Maximum working-hours, 48 per week.
OFFICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 34, Effective January 30th, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. 4.)
Includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks, filing
clerks, cashiers, cash-girls  (not included in other orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer operators,
auditors, attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Experienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$15.00 per week.
40c. per hour.
Minimum, $1.60 per day. I 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
(Licence required in this Class.)
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
30c. per hour for 1st 3 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
32%c. per hour for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 3 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
87%C. per hour for 4th 3 months.
15.00 a week thereafter.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years op Age.
37Mr to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
30c. per hour for 1st 6 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
32%c. per hour for 2nd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 6 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 6 months or until
37V2C per hour for 4th 6 months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
employee reaches age of 18 years.
15.00 a week thereafter.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Note.—Office employees are not allowed to exceed eight hours per day without a permit.
1 PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.
Order No. 71, Effective June 1st, 1940.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
Rate per Hour.
City of Vancouver, including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, City of North Vancouver, District of North Vancouver          _	
75c.
Note.— (a.)  This Order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)  Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(c.)   All wages must be paid semi-monthly.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.
Order No. 75, Effective June 2nd, 1941.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
Rate per Hour.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt, Highland, Metchosin,
75c.
Note.— (a.)   This Order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(c.)   All wages must be paid semi-monthly.
PATROLMEN  (MALE).
Order No. 69, Effective February 5th, 1940.
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes to watch
or patrol the premises of more than one person for the purpose of guarding or protecting persons or
property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman " means an employee  (not covered by any other Order of the Board)  employed by
a private patrol agency.
Hourly rate
35c.
Note.— (o.) Wages must be paid semi-monthly.
(6.)   Employees must be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(c.)  Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement approved by the Board of Industrial Relations. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 67
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27, Effective September 5th, 1935.
(Superseding, in part, Personal Service Order.)
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring;   hairdressing;   barbering;   massaging;
physiotherapy;   giving of electrical, facial, scalp, or other treatments;    removal of superfluous hair;
chiropody;   or other work of like nature.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over .
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Minimum     —
$14.25
ZTVzt. per hour
$1.50 per day
40 to 44
Less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 6 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 6 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 6 months, or until employee
35c. per hour during 4th 6 months, or until employee
reaches age of 18 years.
reaches age of 18 years.
14.25 a week thereafter.
37M>c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
35c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
14.25 a week thereafter.
37i£c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Note.— (a.) Employees waiting on call to be paid according to rates to which they are entitled as set out above.
(6.)  44-hour week and one-half hour for lunch between 11 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.     (See 27A.)
(c.)  Where special article of wearing-apparel of distinctive design, trimming, colour, or fabric is required, it
shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired free of cost to the employee.     (See 27b.)
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27a, Effective March 30th, 1939.
(Amending Order No. 27.)
The above Order fixes the weekly hours at forty-four  (44)  and not more than nine  (9)  hours in
any one day.
Also provides for one-half  (%) hour free from duty between the hours of eleven  (11)  a.m. and
two-thirty (2.30)  p.m.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Order No. 27b, Effective May 1st, 1940.
The above Order requires that where a distinctive uniform of special design, trimming, colour, or
fabric, or special article of wearing-apparel is required, it shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired
free of cost to the employee.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27d, Effective March 13th, 1941.
Adds physiotherapy to the definition of Order No. 27. I 68
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT  (FEMALE).
Order No. 67, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding parts of Personal Service Order.)
" Public place of amusement " includes theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, lecture-halls, shooting-
galleries, bowling-alleys, swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions, and other similar places to which a charge
for admission or service is made to the public.
40 to 48 Hours
per Week.
Less than 40 Hours
per Week.
2 Hours or Less in
any One Day.
Female attendant (of any age).
$14.25
35c. per hour.
75c.
Note.— (a.)  Employees on call, 35c. per hour.
(b.)   Where uniforms or  special  articles  of  wearing-apparel  are  required  they  shall  be  furnished,  repaired,
laundered, cleaned, etc., free of cost to the attendant.
(c.)   Cashiers are still covered by Office Order No. 34.
SAWMILLS   (MALE).
Order No. 50 (1943), Effective July 5th, 1943.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 50 and 50A.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills and planing-mills.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Male employees     	
40c.
30c.
$2.75 per day
40c.
48
48
48
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act" and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26 (1940) and Order No. 26a (1940).
Note.— (1.)   Certain exemptions re hours granted under "Hours of Work Act"  (see Regulations).
(2.)   For wages, etc., of stationary steam engineers see Order No. 18  (1942).
(3.)   For wages, etc., of truck-drivers see Order No. 26 (1940).
(4.)   For wages, etc., of first-aid attendants see Order No. 39   (1940).
(5.)   Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 69
SHINGLE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 62 (1943), Effective August 2nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 62 (1941).)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of shingles.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles, understood and accepted as a standard by the
industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936, issued by the National Research Council of
Canada.
Per Square.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Sawyers—
25c.
20c.
15c.
40c.
40c.
40c.
Other employees not included in any other Order of the Board   —
Employees packing or sawing shingles on any other basis than by the square
shall be paid on the same proportionate basis.
40c.
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Shingle-sawyers.
Shingle-packers.
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees  in  the  transportation  industry  covered by  Order  No.  26   (1940)   and  Order  No. 26a
(1940) of the Board.
Note.—Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under " Apprenticeship Act.' I 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SHINGLE INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 77 (1943), Effective August 2nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 77.)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of wooden shingles.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles, understood and accepted as a standard by the
industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936, issued by the  National  Research  Council of
Canada.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Sawyers-
No. 1 shingles  .—	
Shingles lower in grade than No. 1  _	
Packers, all grades _ — 	
Other employees not included in any other Order of the Board
40c.
40c.
40c.
40c.
Overtime, effective west of Cascade Mountains only—
In excess of eight hours per day or forty-eight hours per week
Rate: One and one-half times
employees' regular rate of
pay.
Note.— (1.)  Where an arrangement under section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act " is in effect with respect to
hours of work, overtime rates shall not apply until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(2.)   Overtime rates shall not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of
Work Act."
Shingle-sawyers.
Shingle-packers.
Cook- and bunk-house employees covered by Order No. 52 of the Board.
Office employees covered by Order No. 34 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26b of the Board.
(3.)   Employees shall not be employed more than eight hours a day or forty-eight hours a week, except when
permission granted under the " Factories Act " or by permit from the Board when the said Act does not apply.
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 20 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 20.)
Includes all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, painting,
and cleaning of hulls, putting on or taking off the ways, or dry-docking, of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Ship-carpenter, shipwright, joiner, boat-builder, or wood-caulker	
67%c.
60c.
25c.
48
48
Employees under 21, not more than 10 per cent, of total male employees in plant
48
Note.—This order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the " Apprenticeship Act."
TAXICAB DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 33 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 33, Order No. SSA, and Order No. SSB.)
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is
driven or operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Working-hours.
All ages.
$2.75
9 per day.
54 per week.
NOTE.— (a.)   If uniform or special article of wearing-apparel is demanded by employer, it must be without cost
to the employee except by arrangement approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(6.)   Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 71
TAXICAB DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 60, Effective November 17th, 1938.
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is
driven or operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Less than 10
Hours per Day.
Daily
Minimum.
Working-
hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich	
All ages.
$3.00
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
10 per day.
Note.-—(a.) Permits shall be obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours
can be paid 35c. per hour.
(b.)   Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 45c. per hour.
(c.)   Drivers must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(d.)   Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(e.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Order No. 79, Effective April 16th, 1945.
(Superseding Order Effective April 5th, 1920.)
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the operating of the various
instruments, switch-boards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and
telegraphy.
Experienced
Employees.
Inexperienced Employees.
Maximum Hours.
$2.80 per day.
$1.50 per day for first 3 weeks.
2.10 per day for following month.
2.30 per day for following 2 months.
2.50 per day for following 3 months.
2.80 per day thereafter.
8 per day.
48 per week.
Note.— (a.)   Part-time employees' wages shall be prorated.
(6.)   Employees required to report for work to receive at least 3 hours' pay per day.
(c.) In emergencies employees may work up to 56 hours per week, with one and one-half times their regular
rate of pay for hours in excess of 48.
(d.) Where employees reside on employers' premises an arrangement may be made for employees to answer
emergency calls between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m., subject to approval in writing by the Board.
(e.)   Working-hours shall be confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of work.
(/.)   Every employee shall have a rest period of 24 consecutive hours in each calendar week.
(g.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(k.) Where hours of work in bona-jide trade-union agreements differ from those prescribed by the Order the
Board may, in its discretion, exempt in writing the union and the employer from sections in the Order pertaining
to hours, to the extent mentioned in the exemption. I 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY   (MALE).
Order No. 26 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
Order No. 26a (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 26, Order No. 26b, and Order No. 26C.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net
weight or over, as specified on the motor-
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Hourly rate  _ _	
(2.) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than
2,000 lb. net weight, as specified on the
motor-vehicle licence, and operators of
motor-cycles with wheeled attachments,
exclusive of those specified in section 7
hereof
Hourly rate   	
Less than 40
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 50
40c.
40 and not more
than 50
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
B2Vjc.
(3.) Operators of motor-cycles with not more
than two wheels and without wheeled attachment
Hourly rate -   -  	
(4.) Bicycle - riders and foot - messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger
work  (e)
Hourly rate - 	
(5.)   Swampers and helpers .
Hourly rate 	
(6.)  Drivers  of horse-drawn   vehicles  other  than
those covered by section 7 hereof
Hourly rate   	
Less than 40
Less than 40
20c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
45c.
40 and not more
than 48
40 and not more
than 48
17c.
40 and not more
than 50
35c.
40 and not more
than 50
40c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52%c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
(7.) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery of
milk
Hourly rate, 40c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(b.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)  Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery men may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than ten (10)
hours are worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a period of
seven (7) weeks.
(e.)   Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 59.
(/.)   Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 73
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 26b, Effective August 18th, 1941.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(].)   Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb.  net
Less than 40
40 and not more
In excess of 50 and
weight  or  over,   as  specified  on  the motor-
than 50
not more than 54
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
45c.
40c.
60c.
(2.)   Operators    of   motor-vehicles    of   less    than
Less than 40
40 and not more
In excess of 50 and
2,000   lb.   net   weight,   as   specified   on   the
than 50
not more than 54
motor-vehicle    licence,    exclusive    of    those
specified in sections 3 and 7 hereof
40c.
35c.
52y2c.
(3.)   Operators   of   motor-cycles   with   not   more
Less than 40
40 and not more
than two wheels and without wheeled attach
than 48
ment
30c.
25c.
(4.)   Bicycle-riders  and  foot-messengers  employed
Less than 40
40 and not more
exclusively on delivery or messenger work
than 48
20c.
17c.
than 50
not more than 54
40c.
35c.
52y2c.
(6.)  Drivers   of  horse-drawn  vehicles   other  than
Less than 40
40 and not more
tn excess of 50 and
those covered by section 7 hereof
than 50
not more than 54
45c.
40c.
60c.
(7.)   Drivers   of   vehicles   employed   in   the   retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery of
milk
Hourly rate, 40c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rate.
(6.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery employees may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than
ten (10) hours are worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a
period of seven   (7)   weeks.
(e.)  Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly. I 74
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
WOOD-WORKING.
Order No. 49 (1943), Effective July 19th, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 49.)
Includes all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of manufacturing sash and doors,
cabinets,  show-eases,  office  and  store  fixtures,  wood  furniture,  wood  furnishings,  ply-wood,  veneer
products, and general mill-work products.
Adult Males 	
] 8 to 21 years of age.
Under 18 years	
Weekly Hours.
48
48
48
Overtime applies throughout the Province to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act" and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26  (1940)  and Order No. 26a
(1940) of the Board.
Note.— (1.)   Total male employees receiving less than 40 cents per hour must not exceed 33%  per cent, of all
male employees in plant or establishment.
(2.)   Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 75
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders now in effect, compiled as at July
31st, 1945.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum Wage
Act.
41
17 (1942)
42
56 (1943)
70
70a
76
58
65
66
72
73
68
12 (1940)
53
54
18 (1942)
39 (1940)
78
46 (1942)
47 (1942)
51
52
52b
52p
43 (1942)
44 (1942)
74
1 (1943)
1A (1943)
28
25 (1942)
24
59
34
75
71
69
27
27a
27b
27d
67
50 (1943)
62 (1943)
77 (1943)
20 (1940)
33 (1940)
60
60a
79
26 (1940)
26a (1940)
26b
49 (1943)
Apprentices, Indentured 	
Baking   ...- _ -
Barbering   	
Box-manufacture —	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-driVer    —	
Carpentry (Vancouver and District) .—
Carpentry (Kootenay Area).—	
Carpentry (Victoria and District).
Carpentry (Alberni) —	
Carpentry (Nanaimo)	
Christmas-trees .—	
Construction	
Elevator Operators  —
Elevator Operators 	
Engineers, Stationary Steam	
First-aid Attendants 	
Fishing  .—	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Household Furniture 	
Hotel and Catering _	
Hotel and Catering -
Hotel and Catering (Resort Hotels).
Janitors —  	
Janitresses _  	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing 	
Logging    —	
Logging             —~
Logging and Sawmills   (Cost of  Board,
Cranbrook Area)
Manufacturing  	
Mercantile  _ ..— —
Mercantile  — -	
Office Occupation-  	
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(southerly portion of Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(Vancouver and District)
Patrolmen  —	
Persona] Service -	
Personal Service —	
Personal Service    —
Personal Service  	
Public Places of Amusement  	
Sawmills _..	
Shingle   — -—	
Shingle  -
Ship-building   	
Taxicab-drivers   	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity) .
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity).
Telephone and Telegraph  	
Transportation ...'..—  	
Transportation    	
Transportation 	
Wood-working  	
Feb. 3/37	
July 15/42	
April 5/37	
July 14/43 .....
March 12/40...
June 21/40	
Sept. 21/42	
Sept. 15/38 ....
June 23/39	
Aug. 16/39	
May 14/40 ......
May 14/40	
Aug. 31/39	
Nov. 26/40	
Feb. 28/38 ......
Feb. 28/38 ......
Sept. 9/42	
Oct. 8/40	
April 14/43...
Sept. 21/42	
Sept. 21/42	
Nov. 17/37	
Feb. 8/38	
May 18/38 .	
May 17/45
Sept. 9/42	
Sept. 9/42.	
Feb. 25/41	
July 14/43	
Sept. 16/43 ...
Sept. 25/35	
Oct. 15/42	
May 29/35	
Oct. 12/38
Jan. 24/36.	
April 22/41	
April 26/40 ...
Jan.19/40	
Aug. 29/35 ....
March 23/39 ..
April 23/40 ....
March 11/41...
Aug. 31/39	
June 25/43	
July 23/43	
July 23/43	
Oct. 8/40	
Oct. 8/40	
Nov. 15/38 —
Oct. 8/40	
Mar. 13/45 ....
Oct. 8/40	
Nov. 26/40 .....
Aug. 12/41	
July 14/43	
Feb. 11/37	
July 16/42	
April 8/37	
July 15/43	
March 14/40..
June 27/40....
Sept. 24/42....
Sept. 22/38 ...
June 29/39 —
Aug. 17/39 ....
May 16/40 —
May 16/40 ....
Sept. 7/39	
Nov. 28/40 ....
March 3/38 ...
March 3/38..
Sept. 17/42...
Oct. 10/40 .....
April 22/43...
Sept. 24/42...
Sept. 24/42...
Nov. 18/37—
Feb. 10/38 ....
May 19/38 ....
May 25/45 ...
Sept. 17/42—
Sept. 17/42...
Feb. 27/41 ....
July 15/43 ....
Sept. 23/43...
Sept. 26/35 ...
Oct. 22/42.....
June 6/35	
Oct. 20/38 ....
Jan. 30/36 ...
April 24/41...
May 2/40 ......
Jan.25/40	
Sept. 5/35 .....
March 30/39
April 25/40 .
March 13/41.
Sept. 7/39 .....
July 2/43	
July 29/43—
July 29/43...
Oct. 10/40 .-.
Oct. 10/40 .-.
Nov. 17/38...
Oct. 10/40 _
Mar. 15/45 ...
Oct. 10/40 _
Nov. 28/40 ...
Aug. 14/41...
July 15/43—
Feb. 11/37 —
July 20/42	
June 14/37	
Aug. 2/43.	
March 18/40..
June 27/40 —
Sept. 28/42...
Nov. 7/38	
Aug. 1/39.	
Aug. 21/39—.
May 27/40 .....
May 27/40	
Sept. 11/39	
Nov. 28/40.	
March 3/38...
March 3/38.....
Sept. 21/42—
Oct. 10/40	
May 3/43	
Sept. 28/42—
Sept. 28/42....
Nov. 22/37—.
Feb. 14/38.	
May 19/38	
June 18/45 to
Sept. 8/45
Sept. 21/42.....
Sept. 21/42 ....
March 10/41
Aug. 2/43	
Sept. 23/43 —
Sept. 26/35 ....
Nov. 2/42...
July 1/35 ..
Oct. 20/38 .
Jan.30/36-
June 2/41 ...
June 1/40 .
Feb. 5/40	
Sept. 5/35	
March 30/39..
May 1/40	
March 13/41..
Sept. 11/39....
July 5/43	
Aug. 2/43	
Aug. 2/43	
Oct. 10/40 —
Oct. 10/40 .....
Nov. 17/38	
Oct. 10/40	
April 16/45...
Oct. 10/40 ....
Nov. 28/40 ....
Aug. 18/41....
Aug. 2/43......
Male and female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male. I 76
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Province of British Columbia.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT.'
BE IT KNOWN that, pursuant to and by
virtue of the powers and authority vested
in the Board of Industrial Relations by the
" Hours of Work Act," the said Board has
made the following regulations, namely:—
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
[1   (a)  Consolidated for convenience only.    See Regulation
No. 26.]
1. (a.) Persons employed in sawmills, planing-mills, shingle-mills, and logging industry,
including all operations in or incidental to the
carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and
booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles, situate in that part of the
Province lying east of the Cascade Mountains
may work one hour per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act, but
the total hours worked in any week shall not
exceed fifty-four (54).
(6.) In the industrial undertakings referred
to in clause (a) of this regulation, the limit of
hours of work thereby fixed may be exceeded by
one hour per day on five days of each week for
the purpose of making a shorter work-day on
one day of the week, but the total hours worked
in any week shall not exceed fifty-four (54).
(c.) In sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-
mills situate in that part of the Province lying
east of the Cascade Mountains, and which are
operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen, and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and
oilers may work overtime to the extent of one
and one-half hours per day, to cover preparatory and complementary work, in addition to
the said fifty-four (54) hours per week set
forth in clauses (a) and (6) of this regulation.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-
mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may
work a total of forty-eight (48) hours each
week in five nights, in lieu of forty-eight (48)
hours each week in six nights, but the number
of hours worked in any night must not exceed
ten (10).
Logging.
3. Persons employed in:—
(1.)  The logging industry in:—
(a.)  Booming operations;   or
(6.)  Transporting logs  by logging-
railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or
river-driving;  or
(c.)  Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d.)  Or in the operation and upkeep
of donkey-engines:
Fish-canning.
(2.) Canning fish or manufacturing byproducts from fish, but not those engaged in salting fish;  and in
Cook and Bunk Houses.
(3.) Cook and bunk houses in connection
with any industrial undertaking,— _
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed
by section 3 of the said Act to the extent necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
Engineers, Firemen, and Oilers.
4. In all industrial undertakings which use
steam as a motive power and which are operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen,
and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and oilers
may work overtime to the extent of one and
one-half hours per day to perform preparatory
or complementary work, in addition to the
maximum hours of work prescribed by section
3 of the Act.
Shipping Staff.
5. Persons employed as members of the
shipping staff in industrial undertakings where
shipping operations are of an intermittent
nature may work such hours in addition to the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the said
Act as (but only so many as) shall be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-hours
limited by section 3 of the Act are being unduly
exceeded, the Board shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the industrial
undertaking from the provisions of this regulation for such period of time as the Board
considers advisable.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons employed
in ship-yards, engineering-works, machine-
shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal
works, belt-works, saw-works, and plants of a
like nature may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but not more than) may be
necessary to prevent serious loss to, or interruption in the operation of, the industrial
undertaking for which the repairs are being
made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture of
wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables
may work during the months of June, July,
August, and September in each year such hours
in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3
of the said Act as may from time to time be
necessary to fill urgent orders. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 77
Seasonal Soft Drinks Delivery.
Note.—Regulation 8 cancelled by 8a, February 13th, 1936.
Laundries.
Note.—Regulation 9 cancelled by 9a, September 26th, 1940.
Seasonal Lithographing.
10. During the months of May, June, July,
August, September, and October in each year
persons employed in the lithographing industry
may work such hours in excess of the hours
prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may
from time to time be necessary to fill urgent
orders. This exemption shall only apply when
sufficient competent help is not available.
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by
the Board by the granting of written temporary
exemption permits limiting by their terms the
extent thereof, but only upon being satisfied
by application in writing, signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly authorized, of
the urgency and necessity for the exception,
that it is of a temporary nature, and that no
other means of adequately overcoming such
temporary urgent condition is, or has been,
reasonably available, and that the additional
working-hours applied for will not be more
than will suffice for the extra pressure of work
requiring the same.
Overtime Record.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in
the manner required by subsection (1) of
section 9 of the said Act of all additional hours
worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said
Act or in pursuance of any regulation.
12a. Every employer shall furnish the Board
with a copy of his pay-roll, or record in such
form prescribed by the Board, showing the
hours worked and the nature of the work performed by his employees in respect of section 6
of the Act, or Regulations Nos. 6 and 11 of the
Board, not later than fifteen (15) days after
such hours have been worked. (Effective December 12th, 1940.)
13. Every employer shall notify, by means
of the posting of notices in conspicuous places
in the works or other suitable place, where the
same may readily be seen by all persons
employed by him, the hours at which work
begins and ends, and, where work is carried on
by shifts, the hours at which each shift begins
and ends; also such rest intervals accorded
during the period of work as are not reckoned
as part of the working-hours; these hours shall
be so fixed that the duration of the work shall
not exceed the limits prescribed by the " Hours
of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall not
be changed except upon twenty-four hours'
notice of such change posted as hereinbefore
specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the
Act or Regulation 11 above, a like notice of the
change in working-hours shall be posted, which
notice shall also state the grounds on which
the exemption was granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia,
this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th, 1934.
Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 14.
Occupation of Barbering.
The occupation of barbering is hereby added
to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 24th
day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th
day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd, 1934.
Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15.
Mercantile Industry.
The mercantile industry is hereby added to
the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 7th
day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th
day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th, 1934.
Effective August 9th, 1934.)
Regulations Nos. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d
cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e.
Mercantile Industry.
Note.—Regulation 15e cancelled by 29, September 30th, 1939.
Regulations Nos. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, and
16e cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f.
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores.
1. Persons employed in drug-stores as registered apprentices, certified clerks, or licentiates
of pharmacy may work not more than ninety-
six (96) hours in any two (2) successive
weeks, but in no case shall the hours of work
of any such registered apprentice, certified
clerk, or licentiate of pharmacy exceed fifty-
two (52) hours in any one week, or nine (9)
hours in any one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made
and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of
August, 1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd
day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th, 1939.
Effective April 6th, 1939.) I 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REGULATION No. 17.
REGULATION No. 18a.
Baking Industry.
The baking industry, by which expression is
meant all operations in or incidental to the
manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or
cakes, is hereby added to the Schedule of the
said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the
said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 6th day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 17a.
Baking Industry.
Employees employed in the baking industry
as deliverymen may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 18.
Catering Industry.
The catering industry, which includes all
operations in or incidental to the preparation
or to the serving, or to both preparation and
serving, of meals or refreshments where the
meals or refreshments are served or intended
to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-
house, dance-hall, cabaret, banquet-hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunch-room, lunch-counter, icecream parlour, soda-fountain, or in any other
place where food is served and a charge is
made for the same either directly or indirectly,
whether such charge is made against the
persons who partake of the meals or refreshments or against some other person, is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on the
1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective December 1st, 1934.)
Catering Industry.
Employees in the catering industry, working
on a split shift, are hereby exempt from the
provisions of section 3 of the "Hours of Work
Act Amendment Act, 1937," being chapter 30
of the Statutes of British Columbia, 1937, to
the extent that their working-hours on a split
shift shall be confined within fourteen (14)
hours immediately following commencement of
work; but this exception shall not be applicable unless every employee whose split shift
extends over twelve (12) hours is paid at the
rate of not less than one and one-half times
his regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within twelve (12)
hours immediately following commencement of
work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 5th
day of May, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 6th, 1938.
Effective May 6th, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 19.
Retail Florists.
Persons employed in the establishments of
retail florists may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but only so many as) shall
be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise
overcome: Provided that the working-hours
of such persons shall not exceed ninety-six (96)
hours on the average in any two successive
weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-
hours limited by section 3 of the Act are being
unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written
notification to the management, exclude the
employer's establishment from the provisions
of this regulation for such period of time as
the Board considers advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective November 15th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 20.
The Occupation of Elevator Operator.
The occupation of elevator operator is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 28th
day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 28th,
1935.    Effective February 28th, 1935.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 79
Regulations  Nos. 21, 2lB, 21c, 2lD, 2lE, 21f,
21g, 2lH, 2lJ, and 21k cancelled by
REGULATION No. 2lL.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The fruit and vegetable industry, which
means and includes the work of employees
engaged in canning, preserving, drying, or
packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable,
is hereby exempt from the operation of the
" Hours of Work Act " up to and including the
31st day of March, 1946.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 17th
day of May, 1945.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 25th, 1945.
Effective to March 31st, 1946.)
REGULATION No. 22.
Transportation Industry.
The transportation industry, which includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any
other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further
transported to some destination other than the
place at which such aforementioned carriage
or delivery terminates, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 23.
Transportation Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation the
expression " transportation industry " includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air,
any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles,
or material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or
public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and
the carrying or delivering to or collecting from
any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air,
or road transport, for the purpose of being
further transported to some destination other
than the place at which such aforementioned
carriage or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation industry, other than those employed as (a) operators of motor-cycles, (6) bicycle-riders and
foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers of
vehicles employed in the retail delivery of milk,
are hereby permitted to work six (6) hours
per week in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," in accordance with the provisions of
Order No. 26 of the said Board of Industrial
Relations dated the 19th day of June, 1935,
fixing minimum wages in the transportation
industry: Provided that no such employee in
the transportation industry shall work more
than ten  (10) hours in any one day.
3. That employees in the transportation industry employed as drivers of vehicles in the
retail delivery of milk are hereby permitted to
work fifteen (15) hours per week in excess of
the hours prescribed by section 3 of the said
"Hours of Work Act, 1934": Provided that
over a period of seven (7) weeks no such employee shall work more than three hundred and
seventy-eight (378) hours, nor more than ten
(10) hours in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24.
Occupation of Hotel Clerk.
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes
the work of all persons engaged as room clerks
(day or night), mail clerks, information clerks,
cashiers, book-keepers, accountants, telephone
operators, and any other persons employed in
clerical work in hotels, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 26th,
1935.    Effective September 26th, 1935.) I 80
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REGULATION No. 26.
REGULATION No. 28b.
1. That Regulation No. 1 (a) of the Board,
dated the 14th day of June, 1934, is hereby
amended by striking out the word " and"
before the word " shingle-mills," and inserting
after the word " shingle-mills " the words " and
logging industry, including all operations in
or incidental to the carrying-on of logging;
pole, tie, shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile
cutting; and all operations in or incidental to
driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles,
ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles."
2. That this regulation shall become effective on publication in The British Columbia
Gazette on the 24th day of March, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 23rd
day of March, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, March 24th,
1938.    Effective March 24th, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 28.
Taxicab Industry.
The taxicab industry, which includes the
work of all employees in charge of or driving
a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven
(7) passengers or less than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public,
and which is driven or operated for hire, is
hereby added as item No. 12 to the Schedule
of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 3rd
day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st,
1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 28a.
Taxicab Industry.
Persons employed in the taxicab industry,
which includes the work of all employees in
charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven (7) passengers or less
than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or
operated for hire, may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by- section 3 of the Act, but in no case shall
the daily hours worked by any such employee
in the taxicab industry exceed nine (9) in any
one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette September 1st,
1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.) '
Note.—The taxicab industry having been
brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is
now subject to the following provision of that
Statute:—
" The working-hours of employees working
on a split shift shall be confined within twelve
hours immediately following commencement of
work."
Taxicab Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation, the
expression " taxicab industry " shall have the
meaning as assigned to it in Regulation No.
28 of the Board, dated the 22nd day of August,
1938.
2. That persons employed in the taxicab industry in the City of Victoria, the Municipality
of the Township of Esquimalt, the Municipality
of the District of Oak Bay, and the Municipality of the District of Saanich, may work:—
(a.) Two (2) hours per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the
" Hours of Work Act," provided that
such ten (10) hours are confined within
eleven (11) hours immediately following commencement of their work:
(b.) In excess of the ten (10) hours permitted by clause (a) hereof, provided
they are paid not less than the minimum rate for overtime—namely, forty-
five cents (45c.) per hour—prescribed
by section 5 of Order No. 60 of the
Board, dated the 15th day of November, 1938.
3. Regulation No. 28a of the Board, made
the 22nd day of August, 1938, is hereby varied
accordingly.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 15th
day of November, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 17th,
1938.    Effective November 17th, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 29.
Mercantile Industry.
Persons employed in the mercantile industry,
which includes all establishments operated for
the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade
in the Province of British Columbia, with the
exception of the City of Vancouver, the City of
North Vancouver, Municipality of the District
of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the
Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt,
the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay,
and the Municipality of the District of Saanich,
may work three (3) hours per day in excess
of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said
Act, on Saturday of each week and on the day
preceding a statutory holiday, when such statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but the
total hours worked in any one week shall not
exceed forty-eight (48).
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 8th
day of November, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 9th,
1939.    Effective November 9th, 1939.)
COMPILED JULY 31st, 1945.
By BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 81
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S DIVISION.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the second annual report of the Women's and Children's
Division.
WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT.
Many tributes have been paid to the women for the part they have played in producing the munitions of war. In the war industries, expansion has permitted women
to work side by side with men on the same jobs held by men.
In general, more men than women are found in the better paid jobs, but in studies
over a period of years, where comparison can be made between men's and women's
earnings in the same occupation in the same industry, differences still are found to be
almost entirely in favour of men.
There are many establishments in which the management admitted that there was
no definite policy of wage progression. Women usually had greater difficulty than
men in getting their rates of pay raised as they gained experience, and women less
often than men were given the chance to move up into better paid jobs. Lack of
opportunity to gain a footing in the more skilled occupations, and the tradition that
a woman's work is worth less than man's, continue to keep women's earnings at a
lower level.
During the year many inspections and reinspections relating to the employment
of women were made.
Many women are to be found in stores, laundries, and restaurants. These are the
establishments that have been hard pressed to hold their workers against the pull of
glamour and higher wage-rates in the industries that appear to be more directly connected with the war.
This Department has continued to efficiently deal with the problems that arise
from time to time. During the year 1944 there was a marked improvement in employer-employee relations, employers in general showing co-operation in regard to
safety and healthful working conditions for their employees by way of providing
sanitary conveniences, dining-rooms, recreation facilities—in fact, every care to ensure
the health and safety of the employee.
CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT.
A determined effort to enforce child labour laws has been carried out during the
year. Realizing that compliance with the law depends largely on public opinion, the
Department is trying not only to discover violators of the " Control of Employment of
Children Act," but also to inform the public about the whole problem of the employment of children under the age of fifteen, the law's requirement of an employment
permit, the value of such a permit both to the young worker and to the employer, the
danger to the health and welfare of children who work too long hours or at night.
After all, only a beginning has been made in affording this security to children.
Family and child life has endured many severe strains during the war. The call
of the services and war industries have deprived many families of their natural
leaders. Many mothers have had to assume a dual role in the home. In addition,
large numbers have wanted to do their part by entering into war-work by taking jobs
that were vacated by men called up. As a result, these war dislocations have left many
children with the merest shreds of home life.
Children and young people have also heeded the call of war industry. In this
connection there has been a considerable amount of employment of girls and boys
between the ages of fourteen and sixteen. DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
During the year many inquiries were made by employers, parents of children,
children themselves, and school teachers regarding the possibilities of employment for
children. Needless to say, many were discouraged from taking employment which was
considered detrimental to the health and general welfare of the children.
Each year, as the Act becomes better understood and publicized, we experience
more helpful co-operation from the majority of employers. In this respect we have
been invited by a number of schools to explain to children and teachers the necessity of
interviewing representatives of the Department before taking employment. In addition to schools, we have also addressed young people's study groups and church
organizations.
During the year infractions occurred and, in a number of cases, police court
proceedings were instituted, but not until fair and repeated warnings had been given
to employers.    The chief offenders were proprietors of bowling-alleys.
During the war many schools have come to take an easy-going attitude towards
lack of school attendance. Children are thus indirectly encouraged in developing an
indifferent frame of mind towards compulsory presence at school.
We must contribute our part to making present child labour and educational standards as effective as possible. This calls for a strict enforcement of child labour laws
and school attendance laws. Law alone cannot give us high standards of child labour
or compulsory school attendance. Proper understanding on the part of the public
generally makes enforcement of our labour standards much easier.
Permits were issued to employers authorizing the employment of children for
vacation period, but not until an application from the employer was submitted as well
as a declaration from the parent or guardian. These permits were granted only on the
understanding that the employer was familiar with provisions of the control of the
employment of children. Before granting permits, the employers were contacted and
an inspection was made of the type of work to be performed by the child.
The schools and Welfare Branch continue to utilize the facilities of our Department
in endeavouring to locate children.
We desire to record our appreciation of the co-operation of employers, parents, and
children, as well as the schools and Welfare Branch and interested public who have lent
encouraging support on many occasions.
Essie Brown,
Women's and Children's Division. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 83
CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN BRANCH.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the first annual report of the activities of the Branch
administering the " Control of Employment of Children Act" for the year ended
December 31st, 1944.
This important Act was placed on the Statute-books of the Province at the 1944
session of the Legislature. It prohibits the employment of children under the age of
15 years unless permission has been granted to the employer by the Minister of
Labour, or any person appointed by him for that purpose.
The writer was placed in charge of the administration of the Act, and other senior
officials of the Department of Labour in Victoria, Vancouver, and Interior points of the
Province were authorized by the Minister to issue permits when they were satisfied that
it was to the advantage of the child to be employed.
Before a permit is granted meticulous care is taken to ensure that the child will
not be exposed to hazards or dangers, that the work to be performed will not interfere
with school standing, and that proper supervision will be available at all times.
Most permits issued so far cover school vacation work, and the children in practically every instance returned to their studies when holidays ended. For those who
worked under permit while school was in progress the educational authorities co-operated with our Department in ascertaining that the part-time work would not retard
the child's standard at school or have an unfavourable effect on the child's health.
Naturally some requests for permits for these eager youngsters had to be refused
on safety grounds, or because of possible interference with their school progress.
When the written applications came in with declarations by parents as to age, place
of birth, etc., it was very noticeable that the majority of these youthful would-be wage-
earners had come to British Columbia from the Prairie Provinces of Alberta and
Saskatchewan. It is evidently more customary for the younger members of the family
to go out to work in those localities than it is in this Province, and when they move
west they wish to continue to add to the family resources or start their employment at
a very tender age. On checking with the school officials it was found that many of
these boys and girls from the neighbouring Provinces were less advanced with their
studies than our own lads and lassies, so it was essential to be certain that the educational feature of each case would not suffer when a work permit was being sought.
The Act specifies eight occupational groups in which these boys and girls under
15 years of age may work after obtaining permits from the Department. Other occupations may be added by Order in Council.
The industries, businesses, trades or undertakings set out in the Schedule to the
Act in which employers of young children must secure permits include:—
(1.)   Manufacturing industry.
(2.)   Ship-building industry.
(3.)  Generation of electricity or motor power of any kind.
(4.)  Logging industry.
(5.)   Construction industry.
(6.)  Catering industry.
(7.)  Public places of amusement.
(8.)  Shops that are exempt from the provisions of the " Shops Regulation and
Weekly Half-holiday Act."
These classifications are fully defined in the Act, and in keeping a record of the
permits issued during the year we segregated them into the above groups.    We also
kept our figures to show the localities in which the permits were granted, dividing them
in the same manner as the general inspection-work for the Department of Labour.
The appended table portrays the picture for the calendar year 1944:— I 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Z
h
«
a
j
n
o
&.
o
H
z
w
s
o
j
Cl,
S
o
►J
o
H
H
z
o
O
a
H
C
P
a
w
P
DO
OT
CQ
H
§
PS
H
C^
O
J
£
to
CO
CM
t*
CQ
ri
o
ir—          CC
00         is
o        oc
tO             -rt
t-          r-
H
IO               "Xl
CO           CC
tc        c-
rH               OC
CO
Tf               0-
Cl
OQ
rt
ui
O
rG
OS             CO             00             O             rt             r-
rt             rH                 ;
a>        ot
CM
1-1             """
rt
(N           o
^_
k  in
H
rH
ffijS
2 «
"*             OS             CQ             CO                 !
m        co        rt
co         ir
Ci
1-1
(N          r-
tj
CO
OQ
O
c
h
01
rt
"#           CN           CQ           ■"«               !
Oi
tM           CQ     rH           a
CO
OQ           N           CO           CO               !
to           if
D
p   ,
H
rH
5 ri
oo 0
g~
CO         to         t-l         t-i       .(NI          CN         i-H         tH
o        c
*H
c
3
bi
rt
rt
B
tl
be
O           O           CM           CM           CO           CO               1
IN                  T-
c-        t:
CM
o
1-1
o    .
5|
0 £
QJ  o
, ti
P.J
£2
•*$           "5f           CN           OQ           rt           rt               !
t-        t-
pQ
6  ,
2.5
fc"
cm
eo
T~H
CQ
B *-
OtD^CO-eJH-^r-ieOT-Hr-
O           O
to
c3 D
oo        c-        eo        co
ia        eo
t-           "d
S^
rt             rt
(N             Cv
to
O0
W
rt
o
C-CQ"C01OrHrH©0C
to        -u
co
H
lOTjiCOCOrHi-HtOCO
rH            CC
CO
W             rT             rr             -H
*#         er
- ■*
ITS
a.
to
IO             CM             CD             CS             rH             i-
co        to
o        oc
o
■*&          *»          CO          to
IN               rt
■^        e\
eo
CM
eo
OQ
H
CO
to
OQ
CM
c?
oq        rH        tr-        to        o        c
(N           CS
to         *J
t>        er
CM
w
tH             O             .-1             rH             rH             r-
CQ           O.
tr-           ir
IO
CM           CO
i.
p
H3
u
Tf
c
0>
43
tt
CS
"m
0)
H
C
HJ
(-<
>
to
OJ
+
j
ca
c
h2
CO
r4
0J
"fi
O
"e
_c
1
-u
5
0
cd
>
a
B
c
'fi
a
09
c
'fi
c
"fi
03
a
EO
Q
P
D
t-
"qj
>
QJ
Pi
"re
E
c
TJ
e
ed
c
a
c
QJ
c
QJ
HH>
c
c
+3
.a   fi
-P
p
c
.2
.2
c
c
O    QJ    cfl
0
rt
QJ
>   to
£
C
C
"-P
+i
H«U
H
rt   1
3
a
fi  S
a
to  a
r-                    9
C     QJ
R
—     OJ
rj      Q
0    I
11
"  oj —;
R   0   <u
O    m    u
■S .SS  c
O    0
O      DQ
H  .2
"5
o
C
t.
S 5 o
c .2 e
fi    3
» .2
—    QJ   rt
«     QJ     rf
.«    QJ   rt
Qj     QJ     Bi
Cfl     CD     (fl
P»
«
o
>
«
a
p
«
o
U
M
0
K
M
0 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 85
As most of the permits were issued for school vacation work, a survey was made
early in September. This revealed that practically all boys and girls had returned to
school and their permits were cancelled on our records. Many had become 15 years of
age during the holiday period. In some few instances the children continued in part-
time employment and permits were reissued in these cases, setting out the changed
shifts.
Reference to the foregoing table will show the numbers that carried on after school
resumed. Employers generally have co-operated whole-heartedly with officials of the
Department in the administration of the " Control of Employment of Children Act"
and, had it not been for the shortage of more suitable help, many of these children
would not have been employed.
One type of work, however, gave us some concern and resulted in several Court
cases. Bowling-alleys in various localities wanted to use children as pin-setters.
In certain centres municipal by-laws laid down conditions of employment in these
places, and as the busy hours in the alleys were in the evening, running on towards
midnight, it was considered inadvisable to issue any permits to girls under fifteen years
of age, and very few to boys under that age. Where a few were granted the quitting-
time was definitely set out, none being allowed after 10 o'clock.
Close check was made at these places of amusement and disclosed that some
employers, after being warned, had deliberately employed children without permits.
Prosecutions followed in nine cases, in all of which convictions were recorded for
employing these children without permits. Details appear in the section of the report
covering Court cases.
The Department's policy is to continue its strict supervision of employment of
these school-age children, and to maintain the standard set down by our Statutes and
Orders. The Act gives the necessary machinery to prevent a child employment problem
developing in a Province which has long prided itself on its social legislation. It is
hoped that as Service personnel and war-workers gradually return to take their places
in civil positions there will be less demand by employers for the services of the very
young boys and girls, for while peace has been declared in Europe before this report
goes to press, the war in the Pacific has not yet been won.
Other reference is made to these young wage-earners in the sections of the report
relating to the Factory Branch and to the Women's and Children's Division of the
Department.
Respectfully submitted.
Mabel A. Cameron,
Acting Assistant Deputy Minister. I 86 DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION BRANCH.
Head  Office    Parliament Buildings,  Victoria,  B.C.
Secretary-Registrar   B. H. E. Goult.
Branch Office  .789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Chief Conciliation Officer ._ James Thomson.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the seventh annual report of the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1944.
In February the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations (P.C. 1003) of the Government of the Dominion of Canada were made effective by Ottawa.
Application of the Regulations in British Columbia was considered by the Legislative Assembly of the Province in March, and upon March 15th assent was given to
make these Regulations applicable to industries in respect of which employer-employee
relationships are within the exclusive legislative jurisdiction of the Province. (" Wartime Labour Relations Regulations Act," chapter 18, B.C. 1944.) The Act was Proclaimed April 18th, 1944.
An agreement between the Dominion and the Province made the Regulations
applicable in British Columbia on April 18th, 1944.
During the time the Act is in force the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act" is of no effect, except as to matters pending when the Act came into force and as
to matters covered by the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" that are not
covered by the Dominion Regulations.
Since April 18th, 1944, the staff formerly engaged in the administration of the
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," with additional assistance, has been
engaged in the administration of the Regulations in British Columbia.
A summary of the Regulations is to be found in the departmental report for 1943
on page 105 et seq.
The report of this Branch includes, in the following pages:—
(1.) A summary of the work done by the Branch from the date of the coming
into effect of the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations in  British
Columbia (April 18th, 1944), to the year's end.
(2.)  The record of industrial disputes.
(3.)  The record of conciliation.
(4.)  The record of the findings of Boards of Arbitration in summary.
(5.)  The  record  of organizations  of employers  and  employees,  with  each
organization listed.
The total number of cases dealt with by this Branch of the Department during the
year just past totalled 992.    Details of the number of applications for certification and
other cases are set out in the first table in this section.
According to the statistical returns by the Federal Department
of Labour, the number of cases dealt with by the Wartime Labour
Relations Regulations Branch of British Columbia exceeds the total
of the cases dealt with by all other Provinces of the Dominion, and
the National Board, during the same period. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 87
I. SUMMARY OF CASES DEALT WITH.
A statistical summary of applications for certification and other cases dealt with
by the Wartime Labour Relations Branch, Department of Labour, British Columbia,
April 18th to December 31st, 1944, follows:—
Applications dealt with _ _. 	
Certifications granted
Applications—•
Rejected	
Withdrawn 	
Being investigated
Referred to National Board	
Representation votes taken	
Investigations by Conciliation Officers .
Conciliation Boards established 	
Preliminary investigations made by departmental officials .
Appeals to National Board  - 	
Boards of Inquiry set up _	
841
746
70
25
71*
17
2
10
2t
1
Total cases dealt with .
992
* As at December 31st, 1944.    f One case later withdrawn by appellant.
A table showing the number of industrial disputes in British Columbia since 1933
follows: —
Number of Disputes, Number of Employees affected, and Time lost
in Working-days, 1933-44.*
Year.
No. of
Disputes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1944*           .... 	
1943                    	
15
43
50
8
1
4
1,1
16
16
23
17
14
6,379
21,704
18,804
1,408
204
822
837
1,188
5,741
7,321
4,427
2,397
4,510
78,129
35,024
7,594
8,510
13,803
8,236
3942
1941                             -                      —
1940               	
1939          	
J938t	
J 937                                                      	
30,022
75,311
1936                       	
3935                                      ..	
140,706
1933                  	
25,760
* The record of the Department includes lockouts as well as strikes. A lockout, or an industrial condition that
is undeniably a lockout, is rarely encountered, and strikes and lockouts are therefore recorded together in the
statistical tables. The term " dispute " is used in reference to either strike or lockout. Figures shown are inclusive
of all disputes which have come to the attention of the Department. Methods taken to obtain this information
preclude the possibility of serious omission. Since it is not always possible to secure exact information concerning
the duration of a dispute or the number of employees involved, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later
information.
Estimates of time lost are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute lasts by the number of
employees directly involved and not replaced. The number of employees indirectly affected are not included in the
computations.
t 1938 was the first calendar year in which the "Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" became effective.
t 1944 was the first calendar year in which the " Wartime Labour Relations Regulations " became effective. DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
II. SUMMARY OF DISPUTES.*
A summary of all disputes commencing in 1944, and causing loss of time follows:
Summary of Disputes commencing in 1944.
Industry or
Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employers
affected.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time lost
in Working-days.
Coal-miners and coke-
Commenced January 3rd ;   against increase of 50 cents a
1
750
1,000
oven workers.
ton   for  household   coal;    negotiations;    in   favour   of
Michel
employer ;   terminated January 4th
Construction-workers,
Commenced  January  5th;    dismissal  of  a  foreman  for
1
250
850
Brilliant
cause ;   Conciliation   (Federal) ;   in favour of workers ;
terminated January 8th
Gold-miners, Hedley....
Commenced January 12th ;   for Union agreement;  return
of workers pending further negotiations ;   in favour of
workers ;   terminated January 12th
1
44
44
Factory-workers, air
Commenced January 24th ; alleged discrimination against
1
337
40
craft parts, Van
Union  members in lay-off of six  workers ;   return of
couver
workers ;   lay-off due to reduced production ;   in favour
of employer ;   terminated January 24th
Miners (copper), Bri
Commenced February 4th ; against dismissal of miner for
1
264
264
tannia Beach
quitting work early;   conciliation (Federal) ;   return of
workers pending reference to National Selective Service ;
employer ;   terminated February 5th
Seamen, Vancouver ..
Commenced Februarv 8th ;  for steam percolators and hot
water   in   crew   quarters:    conciliation    (Federal) ;    in
favour of workers ;   terminated February 9th
1
30
30
Coal-miners, Corbin ...
Commenced March 11th ;  for Union recognition and wage
adjustments ;  conciliation (Federal) ;  return of workers
pending reference to W.L.B. re wages   (Union agreement secured) ;   compromise;  terminated March 14th
1
69
138
S hip yard-wo rkers,
Commenced April 24th ;   re lay-off of riveters during slack
1
200
50
Esquimalt
period;    conciliation   (Federal) ;    compromise;    terminated April 24th
Shipyard-workers,
Commenced May 29th ;   against working with a certain
1
57
57
Vancouver
foreman and alleged discrimination in lay-off procedure ;
conciliation    (Federal) ;    return   of   workers   pending
investigation ;     in    favour   of    employer;     terminated
May 30th
"Welders and burners.
Commenced June 13th ;  against dismissal of charge-hand ;
1
426
107
North Vancouver
conciliation  (Federal) ;   and return of workers pending
investigation;   compromise;   terminated June 13th
Shipyard-wo rkers,
Commenced  June   15th ;   interunion   dispute re  entry  of
1
1,135
600
Vancouver
business  agents  to  yard  pending   certification   of  bar
gaining   agency;    conciliation   (Provincial) ;    compro
1
mise ;   terminated June 15th
Shipyard-workers,
Commenced June 17th ;   interunion dispute re dismissal
1
1,800
450
North Vancouver
of two shop stewards ;   conciliation   (Federal) ;   return
of workers pending certification of bargaining agency ;
in favour of employer;   terminated June 17th
Ship yard-wo rkers,
Commenced August 2nd ;   against working with six non
1
430
510
Prince Rupert
union   workers;    return   of   workers;    in   favour   of
employer ;   terminated August 4th
Shipyard-wo rkers,
Commenced   August   14th;    against   demotion   of   eight
1
360
300
Vancouver
charge-hands;  conciliation (Provincial) ;  and return of
workers pending settlement;   in favour of employer;
terminated August 15th
Machinists and pipe
Commenced  November  8th;    jurisdictional  dispute over
1
227
70
fitters, North
installation of certain  equipment;   return of workers
Vancouver
pending settlement;   negotiations and arbitration ;   in
favour of employer ;   terminated November 8th
Totals 	
15
6,379
4,510 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 89
Prior to the coming into effect of the " Wartime Labour Relations Regulations
Act," upon April 18th, 1944, the majority of the industrial disputes in the Province
came within the jurisdiction of the Federal Government by virtue of the provisions of
the " War Measures Act."
The Wartime Labour Relations Regulations provide that certain classifications of
industry come within the exclusive legislative jurisdiction of the Federal Government.
These are described in detail in section 3 (1) of P.C. 1003, and may be briefly described
as navigation and shipping (inland or maritime), railways, ferries between any Province and any British or foreign country, or between two Provinces, and works which,
though wholly situate within the Province, have been declared by Parliament to be to
the general advantage of Canada, or for the advantage of two or more of the Provinces.
In addition, by agreement with the Province of British Columbia, Federal jurisdiction has been extended to cover the coal-mining industry within British Columbia. I 90
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
H
_o
"o
%r
CU
t»
CU
rC
rT
o
CU
it
■rV
<J5
2   a
fl »l-l
£     &
O    .2
HH       fl
H
<^
HH
HH
O
o
<u
rQ
13
'rr
o
3
ai
cu
'rr
CU
0
o
o
O
a
o
o
a
o
O
<u
_g
'3
■
8! >,■«
S3 9
O   Q   >
s .s >
•-» -r—i
rr   QJT3
5  U   QJ
Bifi"e
fi-O
Ho
a
Sr
e
o
o
«
CQ
pa
QJ   T3     QJ     O    c
(<    O,    ffl   eg   "5 g
55
OBOfiOf-OcOc
TJ    "rt    rTJ    <rt    rQ    .r-i    rQ    .—    rrj    .,—
_:   oj •£   oj "n   a> ■£ ■« 4s  » *2
rg s ,2 s .« £ .2 S .g s .2
U    qj qj tt) 0) OJ
CQti ^ ti ti ti
H?
fl*
OJ   T3
I a
■a .S £ £
■a S
o
E
>
oj
a
«H
0
u
Hp
O
cj
tt
a
o
QJ
u
0
a
c
eo
■8
js      8
I s g 1
tn    S  .2    QJ
3  5   fc1
a g tp
O   &
fl 5 .° .2
S ft
r     ^ qj " qj
e« ■
CujJuuSSb
— ™    2 S    0
> 8 o
. V
P    CQ
QJ   P
> P.
g fl
ft ""
ft 9
a A
s «
«o.s
.ft    O   rr
j-    O
B     -   o
•H   ft   u
°E p
g #
ft o
* K
to 6
■3 B ~ e « B 5
.£2 qj .2 qj > o ■-
> S > E 5 u ■-
PqjOqjJhtS^
^QjtjQjftQjg^
QJ
2  ft "* «h s  o
S-S.S e
H
"*
• rt
li
o
TJ
uj
tz
t^l
i< i
QJ
E
CL>
a
CJ
OJ '■
0
Pi
d
M
or!
ta
o   j
"5
S
p
ti
OJ
g
1
ft J
s '
«
m
H
5
H
v   T) Ol 'O m
1 ffl HI o
B O fl p.
a a 3 g1
3 o 3 m
UJ JH 0> Q.
TJ ft *o M
Jh C Sh ,S
&■ ft £> fi
ft 43 fi rfl
g S g «
9
S
'a
0)
<D
0)
*H
0)
►O
Jh
tt
>»
th
O
4>
_c
Th
.S
Pi
£
+j
E
w
W
^■39
C   O ,B
E
ES»
9 S^
fl
0)
3
o
c
CD
-rt
0
OJ
0
p.
QJ
V
Q
-rt
fi
o
a
.£
u
■4J
fi
<u
o
u
cd
Q
.2
fl
V
CO
c
tt
CU
>.
r2
ft
£
OJ
CO
o
ft
0
-
a
4=
-*-■ fi
fi p
« t
«   fi
3 a
TJ
OJ
•tj
T)
V
q
OJ
TJ
tl
o
1
■a  ?
_fl
00
.£
r
OJ
fl
.2
0
QJ
B   5
.=    QJ
TJ
0
ft
o
QJ
TJ
be
c
3
T!
'5
■h
8-S
13  13
M
ft
tt
c
tl
u
fl
fe 5
UJ
QJ
13
(4
CJ
c
0
0
'ft
ft
fi
0
-C
TJ
OJ
5
C
ej
fl
& &
ft r=
£
o
£
rO
£
CO
e "
K
H
K
<
w
i-I  i-I rl  « iH
5 S
w eg
6 J
ft   QJ
<!   B
Q)     QJ
B   fi
&
c
c
a
>
c
c
p
fH
h
*0
.  fl
p
c
tt
$
CQ
B
1
rG        .2
!5ft      (5 >
tl
rt
fl
c
rt
o
&
JS
ca
fl
CJ
£
13
c
d
fl
&
Oj
cC
X
<s
0)
s
H
>
o
>
fc
to
CO
(0
t,
fl
fl
OJ
p
o
r*
u
S
ti
tl
OJ
OJ
OJ
O
Oj
<rt
<H
&
.5
t
ft   fi 13    X S S3
s s
QJ      QJ
W w O
.9 fc
S 2
3
OJ
s
'B       c REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 91
4J    H     >    j   H
ns    & .5    O
-r. £
o -={   O    W   fl
TJ    P   "c   ^    3    fl  T3
OJ   TJ   •£     QJ   TJ   «S     OJ
bC   ft   bO   £
CJ   t_     O   <H     CJ
OJ OJ
ti ti
o c r* 3
co $ 'O «
b ^ B ^
2 tc ti o
QJ
.a  o
ft ,fi
s -
ft-S  f?.2
" £
Ps
C8   B p J
is » 8
bo qj .g
£  ° .2
fig      «b *2
r^'S-S
fi    .£      S
fl ^ .2
o  £ o
bo UJ bo
OJ    QJ OJ
fl    H C
B   bO r
oj    rt QJ
JS > I
as O'
E 1
o ii
S S
Pffi
bfl •
t-    m   JJh    to
u   fl h > ft   g
J- B ft ft "o
B   B ft Q 8      .
P    QJ . ' eQ   +J
ft 2 .1 1 o s
a 5" a
QJ   rfl    QJ   ___
(U  *C   «M   *5  ^     25     u   TJ
o   *  o   *  « S^  g
0jfitt)fi,tflortS
C  o   2   O   o o
fl-pp-Soj-ufiO;
a « .^ « ^ fi 2 *
£ oj
fi S
OJ fi
H O
bfl S
rt fi
oj
> fe
*HCjHrtfl«Hfl«wfl(H
fl  ¥       aj       fi       fi   fi
TS    O    >*    ft.   £   TJ    O   TS    O    >»uj
ojuj2o£oj<->ojejOt,
ft X
E
fee  b£  D
cs ir -b ja
B   ft » 5   ft 0
s* s
e        w
go
•f-     rt   +j
co   O
■si's
B    K   E
5 «
O   ft   QJ
tfl    o    u
'Si
£ js  n
u   a   g
H
E ■"     E "°
rr qj     0
l-s
B ,S
QJ    *"
■tr ca
.S    B
3 .2
E .2
co    rt
a
u
rt
(a
0
S w
ft*
o
0
M
8 -i
a  8
T3
TJ
QJ
-c
13    fi
B
to
.5
o
fl
Oj
£
C    «
QJ     "
rr
0)
ti
fl
3    C
B
XJ
rt
QJ
13   rt
5 s
3  o
ft "°
£
OJ
OJ
ti
OJ
>»
0
c
CJ
s
ti
OJ
>.
0
ft
-fl
to
rt
OJ
>
tl   ft
Oj  v*
fh   ^
QJ
CO    QJ
fi
£
-r*
B*
rr
H
w
w
1ft
QJ    CQ
SQJ
■g t
<=• ..
D, J3 -S
g   »    S»
fi J?
ft   QJ
SI
■a
■a fc
3 CQ I 92
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
s
g
s
o
O
cn
O
HH
Eh
o
o
E c
C-c3 fi
w   -
s§a
11
o  -■
<m
ti
4)
&
Ul
ti
TJ
a1-
OJ
tt
cifl"
&
£
o
o
I
CJ
OJ
j:
>
o
QJ
s
*H
o
TJ
QJ
BD
o
a
0
i~
t< tfl!
OJ   -rt
<H     CJ
fi «
8 6
2
a
+J    rg
si
a  ft
QJ     O
c  fi
.2 ~
x
8
■c *.
« B
1 s
a 8
ti
fl be
2 rf
co 4»
fi   +3
rt
q
.2
'on
rt
c
cfl
cp
J»
rt
o
TJ
c
rt
OJ
rt
it
QJ
TJ
UJ
Tt
£
fe
fl
OJ
£
rt
OJ
Ih
QJ
C
fi
fi
_fl
u
TJ
a
OJ
£
0
.5
G
OJ
fl
p
UJ
£
CJ
o
UJ
TJ
rt
OJ
T!
rt
99
QJ
UJ
Ih
bfl
-
tn
Ui
a
tl
bO
rt
bfl
>
o
OJ
d.
CJ
fl
TJ
fl
■a
a
£
p
UJ
£
a
£
CJ
rQ
tfi
a
£
rt
bo
£
s
>
a
CJ   jj
M   fl   2   a
fi IdM
° ? +» _
« bfl a QJ
C    rt   S    g
■rt       OJ       5*       ft
«   " °
| I 5 ft
O    OJ
8? if -B J2
2 O QJ —
B    3    fi    a
■sill
- l»-a
S..O
o  S  ^
3 Q|
cr   «
15   C   ft tt
g~   E   °
fi -B
.- CJ
2 2
3 g REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 93
IV. BOARDS OF CONCILIATION, 1944.
Pursuant to the provisions of an agreement dated April 18th, 1944, concerning
the administration of the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations (P.C. 1003), between
the Federal and Provincial Governments, Boards of Conciliation are constituted by the,
Federal Minister of Labour upon recommendation of the Minister of Labour for
British Columbia. Consequently, the reports made by such Boards appear shortly
after their submission to Ottawa, in current issues of The Labour Gazette. For that
reason, the usual procedure of summarizing such reports in these pages has been
discontinued.
In the following table, reference is made to the issues of The Labour Gazette in
which these reports may be found.
While reference to other tables in this report will show that seventeen disagreements have been referred to Boards of Conciliation, the table following is descriptive of
the Boards whose work has been completed, and whose members have submitted their
reports to the Hon. Minister of Labour for Canada, at the time of going to press.
No. of
Board.
Disputant Parties.
Outcome of Hearings.
Labour Gazette
Reference.
10
National Machinery Co., Ltd., and National Shops, Ltd., Vancouver, and certain of their employees, represented by
United Steelworkers of America, Local No. 2765
Sitka Spruce Lumber Co., Ltd., Vancouver, and certain of
its employees, represented by the International Woodworkers of America, Local No. 1-217
Vancouver News-Herald, Ltd., Vancouver, and certain of its
employees, represented by Vancouver Newspaper Guild,
Local No. 2
Blair Iron Works, New Westminster, and certain of its employees, represented by the United Steelworkers of America,
Local 3254
Sun Publishing Co., Ltd., Sun Directories, Ltd., and Vancouver Engravers, Ltd., Vancouver, and certain of their employees, represented by Vancouver Newspaper Guild, Local
No. 1
Corporation of the City of Kelowna, Kelowna, and certain of
its employees, represented by the Kelowna Civic Employees'
Union
Various employers, members of Okanagan Federated Shippers'
Association, Kelowna, and certain of their employees, represented by Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Local
Nos. 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8
Yarrows, Ltd., Esquimalt, and certain of its employees, represented by Industrial Clerks* Association, Local No. 1
Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting & Power Co., Ltd.,
and certain of its employees, represented by Copper Mountain Miners' Union, Local 649 of the International Union
of Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers
Island Mountain Mines, Ltd., Wells, and certain of its employees, represented by Wells Miners' Union, Local 685 of
the International Union of Mine, Mill, and Smelter
Workers
Westminster Foundry, Ltd., New Westminster, and certain
of its employees, represented by United Steelworkers of
America, Local No. 3254
Unanimous award
Unanimous award
Majority award, employees' representative
dissenting
Supplementary report
signed unanimously by
all members of Board
Unanimous award	
Majority award, employers' representative
dissenting
Majority award, employees' representative
dissenting
Majority award, employees' representative
dissenting
Unanimous report with
supplementary report
from employers' and
employees' representatives
Unanimous award 	
Unanimous award
Unanimous award
Sept., 1944 ; pp.
1124-1125.
Oct., 1944; pp.
1235-1236.
Oct., 1944 ; pp.
1236-1238.
Feb., 1945; pp.
168-170.
Dec, 1944; pp.
1490-1493.
Dec, 1944; pp.
1493-1499.
Feb., 1945 ; pp.
162-163.
Feb., 1945; pp.
170-175.
March, 1945 ;
313-319.
April, 1945 ;
490-491.
April, 1945 ; pp.
502-504.
April, 1945 ;
505-506.
I I 94
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
V. EMPLOYERS' AND EMPLOYEES' ORGANIZATIONS.
Under the provisions of section 9 of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act" every organization of employers and employees was required to file certain
returns; namely, a certified copy of its constitution, rules, and by-laws; certified copies
of any amendments to these documents when made; and an annual list of the names of
its officers as at the 31st day of December.
Additional information has been required from associations of employees, or trade-
union locals, under the provisions of section 5a of the " Department of Labour Act."
This return requires the name and business address of the organization, its affiliation
(if any), and its total paid-up membership at the date of return.
While the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations (P.C. 1003), have been effective
in British Columbia since April 18th, 1944, somewhat similar information to that
obtained under the provisions of the "Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" may
be required under section 22 of the Regulations. The provisions of the " Department
of Labour Act " are not affected by the coming into effect of these Regulations.
While every care is taken to ensure accuracy, revisions are sometimes made in the
light of later information.
Annual returns received since this information was first requested in 1938 have
shown a consistent growth in membership. Details of the number of organizations
making returns since 1939, and their memberships, follow:—
Number of Employees' Organizations making Returns and Membership
thereof, 1939-44.
Year.
No. of
Organizations.
Total
Membership.
1939    	
380
404
402
415
473
617
44,867
50,360
61,292
91,618
107,402
110,045
1940 "  	
1941        	
1942 	
1943      	
1944 	
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYEES.
This list is arranged by cities and towns in alphabetical order. In all cases where
the information could be obtained, the names and addresses of the presidents and secretaries were revised to the date of publication.
The post-office addresses of the officers are the same as the heading under which
they appear, unless otherwise stated.
The list of employers' organizations follows immediately after that of the employees. Returns in this category numbered twenty-five in 1939 and in 1940, twenty-seven
in 1941, thirty-two in 1942, thirty-four in 1943, and thirty-six in 1944.
Ainsworth.
Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers' Union, Ainsworth District, No. 666.—Address Secretary,
c/o Union, Ainsworth.
Alberni.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, T. J. Underwood; Secretary,
H. R. Burdon, Alberni.
Albreda.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 15.—President, W. Kelly; Secretary-Treasurer, A. A. Charters, Albreda.
Armstrong.
Woodworkers' Union, B C, No. 5.—President,
Arthur B. Flindell; Secretary, B. Ian S. Mac-
Pherson, Box 89, Kelowna. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 95
Bamberton.
Cement Workers' Federal Union, B.C., No. 166.—
President, F. Tomlinson; Secretary, D. Duncan,
Bamberton.
Blue River.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 143.—
President, D. H. Daniel; Secretary, D. H.
Daniel, Blue River.
Bonnington Falls.
Operators' Organization of the West Kootenay
Power& Light Co., Ltd.—President, J. C. Gilker;
Secretary-Treasurer, L. R. Hammond, Bonnington Falls.
Bralorne.
Miners' Union, Bralorne, No. 271.—President,
Chas. Radcliffe; Financial Secretary, L. Larsen,
Bralorne.
Britannia Beach.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Britannia, No.
683.—President, J. H. Balderson; Financial Secretary, McDonnel Knight, Box 42, Townsite,
Britannia Beach.
Burnaby.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Burnaby, No. 23.
—President, Joseph McHale; Secretary, J. F.
Grover, 3812  Myrtle  Street, New Westminster.
Fire-fighters' Association, Burnaby, No. 323.—
President, Cecil A. McDonald; Secretary-Treasurer, Gordon McDonald, 1106 Sixteenth Avenue,
Burnaby, New Westminster.
Pacific Coast Packers, Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, D. H. Gardner; Secretary-
Treasurer, Christena Davie, 2100 McPherson
Avenue, Burnaby.
Chapman Camp.
Sullivan Workers' Union. — President, Harry
Stuart; Secretary, C G. Schulli, Chapman
Camp.
Chemainus.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
38/164.—President, F. Lewis; Secretary, H. E.
Thornett,  Chemainus.
Chilliwack.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1843.—President, Geo. McKenzie;
Recording Secretary, H. Borrell, Box 861, Chilliwack.
Colquitz.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Humphries; Secretary, Alex.
Lindores, Colquitz.
Comox.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. L. Brown; Secretary, W. A. W.
Hames, Courtenay.
Copper Mountain.
Miners' Union, Copper Mountain, No. 649.—President, George P. Hallinan; Business Agent,
Geo. W. Anderson, Box 42, Copper Mountain.
Copper River.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 335.—President, P. LeRoss; Secretary-
Treasurer, G. Somerville, Kitsalas via Copper
River.
Courtenay.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1638.—President, H. G. Russell;
Secretary, Karl Dresen, Comox.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Courtenay, No.
156.—President, W. A. Cowie; Secretary, Sidney Godwin, Courtenay.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-363.—President, E. F. Anderson; Secretary,
J. Higgin, Box 458, Courtenay.
Cranbrook.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 563.—
President, F. R. McDaniel; Local Chairman,
J. S. Dunlop, Box 878, Cranbrook.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 559.—President, R. Bartholomew;
Secretary, M. H. John, Box 214, Cranbrook.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, B. W. Flynn; Secretary, Mar-
got van Braam, Cranbrook.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 588.
—President, Wm. Henderson; Secretary, R. J.
Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 229.—Secretary, 0. A. Eliason, Box 853,
Cranbrook.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 585.—
President, W. L. Zimmerman; Secretary-Treasurer, H. B. Haslam, Box 784, Cranbrook.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
No. 173.—President, Charles Romano; Secretary, Jas. F. Lunn, 300 Durick Avenue, Cranbrook.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 407.—President, D. A. Burton; Secretary, H. J. Huxtable,
Box 262,  Cranbrook.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1292.—President, R. B. Pelton; Secretary-Treasurer, E. G. Dingley, Box 728, Cranbrook.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-405.
—President, Allan Parkin; International Representative, Wm. Langmead, Box 364, Cranbrook.
Cumberland.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
John H. Vaughan; Secretary, Alfred G. Jones,
Box 562, Cumberland.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7293.—
President, John H. Cameron; Secretary-Treasurer, John Bond, Box 614, Cumberland.
Duncan.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, G. Lines; Secretary, W. Wal-
don, Duncan.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-80.
—President, Owen Brown; Secretary, Wilfred
Killeen, Box 430, Duncan. I 96
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Essondale.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Lowndes; Secretary, R. S. H.
Evans, Essondale.
Fernie.
Brewery and Soft Drink Workers of America,
International Union of United, No. 308.—President, J. H. Brown; Secretary, F. E. Alexander,
Box 1071, Fernie.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Clarke; Secretary, A. Lees,
Fernie.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7310.—
President, D. W. Ashmore; Secretary, W. Martin, Box 212, Fernie.
Field.
Miners'   Union,   Field   and   District,   No.   807.—
President, T. Alton;   Secretary, R. Nelson, Box
957, Field.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of," No.
1454.—President, P. Decicco;   Secretary, W. M.
Brown, Box 943, Field.
Fraser Valley.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, A. A. Price; Secretary, N. J.
Wallinger, Huntingdon.
Golden.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, B. Gilmour; Secretary, Court J.
Dainard, Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 165.—Secretary, 0. G. Carlson Box 93,
Golden.
Grand Forks.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, John Roylance; Secretary,
E. Ross Oatman, Grand Forks.
Hedley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Hedley Mascot,
No. 655.—President, John Moffett; Secretary,
Clifford James, Box 329, Hedley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Hedley Nickel
Plate, No. 656.—President, G. McDonald; Secretary, R. Small, Hedley.
Hutton Mills.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 202.—President, J. D. Denicola; Secretary-
Treasurer, C. H. Weaver, Hutton Mills.
loco.
loco Refinery Employees' Association.—President,
W. D. Farrell; Secretary, R. C. Ronnquist, 201
Carnarvon  Street, New Westminster.
Kaleden.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 4.—
President, J. V. Findlay; Secretary, J. E.
Atkinson, Kaleden.
Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 821.
—President, Charles Spencer; Secretary-Treasurer, Wm. A. Harris, 727 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 855.—
Chief Engineer, S. A. Johnson; Secretary-
Treasurer, P. J. Millward, 753 Dominion Street,
Kamloops.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
11.—President, D. C. Miller; Secretary, L. P.
Dorion, 125 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 258.—President, G. L. Ken ward;
Secretary, John Woods, 744 Seymour Street,
Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 930.—President, O. B. Hoover; Secretary, J. B. Gibson, R.R. 1, Kamloops.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. J. Beesley; Secretary, Miss
E. Pearl Williams, Kamloops.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 80.
—President, A. R. McKay; Secretary, E. Ellis,
Powers Addition, Kamloops.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 748.
—President, J. H. Blakey; Secretary, L. E.
Crowder, 359 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 31.—President, M. R. McDermid; Secretary, R. McLure, c/o C.N.R., B. & B. Department, Lome Street, Kamloops.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 519.—
President, C. W. King; Secretary-Treasurer,
Vernon H. Mott, 521 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
148.—President, H. C. Cowles; Secretary, R.
Lapsley, 907 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, No.
611.—President, E. R. Chapman; Secretary,
H. P. Battison, 36 Nicola Street West, Kamloops.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 150.—
President, G. N. Roberts; Secretary, L. Phillips, Box 402, Kamloops.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, Lodges
Nos. 30 and 45.—President, Charles Beattie;
Secretary-Treasurer, D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue  Building, Winnipeg. L
Kaslo.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotnerhood of,
No. 173.—Secretary, T. H. Horner, Crescent
Road, Kaslo.
Kelowna.
Civic Employees' Union, Kelowna.—President,
Richard Jones; Secretary, Rupert Brown, Box
171, Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 5.—
President, H. Turner; Secretary-Treasurer,
Mrs. A. Wilkison, Box 525, Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union No. 8.—
President, Wm. H. Fleck; Secretary, Mrs. Clara
N.  Beebe, R.R.  1,  Kelowna. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 97
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Roy Hunt; Secretary, H. K.
Hume,  Kelowna.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer,, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' Union, Kelowna.—President,
Mrs. Katherine Halter; Secretary-Treasurer,
Mrs. Dorgjhy Wardlaw, Box 176, Kelowna.
Processing and Cannery Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, A. E. Knooihuizen; Secretary, Miss
M. Horn, Box 377, Kelowna.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 217.—President, W. H. Sands^ Secretary-Treasurer, R.
Wood,  Box 1372, Kelowna.
Simpson's Employees' Association.—President,
George Handlen; Secretary, Howard Wilson,
Box 576, Kelowna.
Woodworkers' Union, B.C., No. 4.—President,
Andy Mclnroy; Secretary, Marion R. Holtom,
Box 1335, Kelowna.
Kilgard.
Brick and Clay Workers' Federal Union, No. 136.
—President, J. A. Watson; Secretary, C. W.
Gough,  Kilgard.
Kimberley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Kimberley, No.
651.—President, Donald M. Martin; Secretary-
Treasurer, Henry Nicholson, Box 388, Kimberley.
Ladysmith.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
Thomas Jordon; Secretary-Treasurer, Fred
Johnston, 119 Baden-Poweil Street, Ladysmith.
Lake Cowichan.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 2824.—President, T. A. Giles; Secretary-
Treasurer, George E. Robins, Box 139, Lake
Cowichan.
Langford.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Alex. McDonald; Secretary,
W. H. House, Langford.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 533.—President, J. B. Bell; Secretary-
Treasurer, H. W. McKenzie, Langford P.O.
Langley.
Municipal Employees, Langley.—President, H. B.
Devine; Secretary, T. W. Winget, 2482 Roberts
Road, Langley Prairie.
':' Marguerite.
Maintena-ce-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 221.—President, M. Latin; Secretary, H.
Robinson, Marguerite.
Marpole.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, E. A. Miles; Secretary,
Chas. Bird, Marpole.
-V
Merritt.
Government   Employees'  Association,   B.   C.   Provincial.—President, Clarke Jackson;     Secretary,
Herbert Pidcock, Merritt.
7
Mission.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-367.—President, Frank Gaglardi; Secretary,
Cecil S. Mills, R.R. 2, Mission.
McBride.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 247.
—President, R. T. Clay; Secretary, G. T. Hold-
way, Box 26, McBride.
Nanaimo.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189.—President,
A. Wylie, Secretary-Treasurer, Birt Showier,,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 527.—President, Wm. J.
Emerson; Secretary, Wm. Little, 217 Irwin
Street, Nanaimo.
Civic Employees' Association, Nanaimo.—President, T. M. Mumberson; Secretary, Colin McArthur, 146 Nicol Street, Nanaimo.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, Ross Lamont; Secretary-Treasurer, H. W.
Spencer, 433 Fourth Street, Nanaimo.
Firemen's Association, Nanaimo, No. 7.—President, Fred Laithwaite; Secretary-Treasurer,
Albert Dunn, 131 Harvey Street, Nanaimo.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. H. Cochrane; Secretary,
E. W. Cowie, Nanaimo.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7355.—
President, Dan Radford; Secretary, Percy Law-
son,   Union Hall, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), North Vancouver Island Branch.—
President, Paul Carlson; Secretary, J. Haw-
thornthwaite, 325 Vancouver Avenue, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic Division), North Vancouver Island Branch.
—President, Loyis MacDonald; Secretary, Vivian Ranger, 365 Milton Street, Nanaimo.
Typographical Union, Nanaimo, No. 337.—President, John B. Paul; Secretary, L. C. Gilbert,
Box 166, Nanaimo.
Natal.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7292.—
President, Tony Podrasky; Secretary-Treasurer,  Simeon  Weaver,  Natal.
Nelson.
Automotive Employees' Association, Nelson.—
President, Walley Davis; Secretary-Treasurer,
R. V. Culley, 312 Hoover Street, Nelson.
Barbers, Hairdressers' and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
196.—President, A. J. Hamson; Secretary-
Treasurer, Frank Defoe, Ward Street, Nelson.
Civic Employees' Federation, Nelson, No. 8.—
President, F. E. Wheeler; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. Stromstead, 224 Observatory Street, Nelson.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, C. F. Gigot; Secretary, F. C. Collins, 911
Edgewood Avenue, Nelson. I 98
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 579.—
President, L. W. Humphrey; Secretary-Treasurer, Gordon Allan, 1115 Ward Street, Nelson.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 18.—
President, J. R. Taylor; Secretary-Treasurer,
Raymond L. Romano, 315 Observatory Street,
Nelson.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 631.—President, F. H. Abbott;
Secretary, E. N. Mannings, 318 Observatory
Street,  Nelson.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. E. Stratton; Secretary,
Jas. Ryley, Nelson.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No.
75.—President, J. C. Chambers; Secretary-
Treasurer, Geo. C. Massey, 306 Third Street,
Nelson.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 663.
—President, W. M. Wallace; Secretary, W. M.
Wood, 402  Victoria  Street,  Nelson.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 558.—
President, J. S. Edwards; Secretary-Treasurer,
C. H. Sewell, 41 High Street, Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
98.—President, Albert H. Smith; Secretary,
Alex.  Ioanin, 512 Third  Street, Nelson.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 460.—President, W. E. Marquis; Secretary, A. Kirby, 820
Carbonate  Street,  Nelson.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1291.—President, J. S. Brake; Secretary,  E.  F. Phillips, 220  Silica Street,  Nelson.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), Nelson Branch.—President, R. B.
Smith; Secretary, Art Ruzicka, 422 First
Street, Nelson.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic
Division), Interior Branch.—President, Isabell
Kay; Secretary-Treasurer, Jessie L. Gentles,
1114 McQuarrie Avenue, Nelson.
Typographical Union of North America, International, No. 340.—President, William H.
Priest; Secretary, George W. Priest, 707 Richards  Street, Nelson.
New Westminster.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, No. 189.—President, A.
Wylie; Secretary-Treasurer, Birt Showier, 529
Beatty  Street, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers and Culinary Workers, No.
835.—President, H. M. Bilodeau; Business
Agent, W. Morton, 405 Campbell Avenue, New
Westminster.
Boilermakers, Iron-ship Builders and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, No. 194.
—President, Thomas Dowall; Secretary, Peter
Nicolson, 1215 Cameron Street, New Westminster.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, No.
3.—President, H. Pattinson; Secretary-Treasurer, W. Taylor, 3030 Miller Avenue, West
Burnaby,  New  Westminster.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1251.—President, Stanley
Durance; Secretary, John T. Bannan, 1008
Sixth Avenue, New Westminster.
Civic Employees' Association, No. 1.—President,
O. Booth; Secretary, E. G. Hudson, 417 Eighth
Street,  New Westminster.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, R. V. Cheale; Secretary-Treasurer, Fred
McGrath, 316 Strand Avenue, New Westminster.
Cordage Employees' Association, New Westminster.—President, A. I. Sharpe; Secretary, Charlotte R. Campbell, 509 Ash Street, New Westminster.
Distillery, Rectifying, and Wine Workers' International Union of America, No. 69.—President,
William Thacker; Secretary, Mrs. L. Johnston,
1053  Seventeenth Avenue, New Westminster.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No.
256.—President, R. L. Fitzpatrick; Secretary-
Treasurer, Loyd C. Bussey, No. 1 Fire Hall,
New  Westminster.
Gas Workers' Union, No. 376.—President, F. R.
Alty; Secretary, A. F. Chandler, 2525 Elizabeth Avenue, West Burnaby, New Westminster.
Gypsum Workers' Union, No. 578.—President,
Stanley B. McKee; Secretary, G. H. Eckenswil-
ler, 2225 Walker Avenue, New Westminster.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 131.
—President, Jas R. Christie; Secretary, W. L.
Neily, 702 Royal Avenue, New Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 151.
—President, F. Maguire; Secretary, T. Ken-
yon, 448 Fader Street, New Westminster.
Pacific Coast Terminals Independent Employees'
Union.—President, G.Wilson; Secretary-Treasurer, J. Walker, 116 Mclnnes Street, New
Westminster.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
180.—President, Hugh Clark; International
Representative, William S. Symington, 1022
Edinburgh  Street,  New Westminster.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
456.—President, L. H. Cutting; Secretary, Mrs.
Lilian Mahony, 1831 Seventh Avenue, New
Westminster.
Plumbers, Steamfitters, and Pipefitters of
America, United Association of, No. 571.—
President, Jas Mitchell; Secretary-Treasurer,
Thos. H. Poulton, 725 Second Street, New Westminster.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
280.—President, W. Hamilton; Secretary, A. M.
Cawley,  R.R.  4,  New Westminster.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 226.—President, J. Spick; Secretary, L. H. Stevens, 223
Osborne  Street,  New  Westminster.
Sheet-metal Workers, International Association
of, No. 314.—President, Geo. Watson; Secretary, J. A. Smith, 201 Agnes Street, New Westminster.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor-coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, Division No. 134.—President, David L.
Bryce; Business Agent, R. Cromack, 57 Alexander Street, New Westminster.
Typographical Union, New Westminster, No. 632.
—President, A. R. MacDonald; Secretary-Treasurer, R. A. Stoney, Box 754, New Westminster. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 99
Waterfront Workers' Association, Royal City, No.
502.—President, C. C. Lavery; Business Agent,
C. P. Latham, 71 Tenth Street, New Westminster.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-357.—President, Percy A. Smith; Secretary,
J. R. Lindsay, 650 Columbia Street, New Westminster.
Oakalla.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, P. E. Berkey; Secretary,
W. R. Shaw, Oakalla.
Ocean Falls.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
360.—President, W. H. Marshalls; Secretary,
N. H. Compton, Box 262, Ocean Falls.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 312.—President,
Howard A. Webster; Secretary, Percy A.
Tweedie,  Ocean  Falls.
Oliver.
Oliver Sawmills, Ltd., Employees of.—President.
E. L. Roberts;    Secretary, S.  McBryde, Oliver.
Osoyoos.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 3.—
President, Alf. Ackerman; Secretary-Treasurer,
Mrs. Maud Mayer, Osoyoos.
Peace River.
Government Employees' Association, "B.C. Provincial.—President, J. F. Murrell; Secretary,
G. P. Tyrrell, Pouce Coupe.
Pemberton.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 215.—President, J. K. Purdie; Secretary-
Treasurer,  J.   M.   Crowston,  Pemberton.
Penticton.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 213.—President, Jas B. Clarke; Secretary,
R. E. Lindquist, 208 Eckhardt Avenue, Penticton.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 866.—
President, C. E. Hulett; Secretary-Treasurer,
W.  Osborne,  812  Argyle   Street,  Penticton.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
10.—President, J. D. Crawford; Secretary,
W. T. Mattock, Kerr Block, Main Street, Penticton.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 884.—President, P. H. Coulter;
Secretary, D. Raincock, Penticton.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, J. W. Blogg; Secretary, A. Lyons,
Box 365, Penticton.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1023.—Secretary, F. Parsons, Box 160,
Penticton.
Municipal Employees' Union, Penticton, No. 1.—
President, A. S. Gough; Secretary-Treasurer,
Marguerite Young, General Delivery, Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 914.—
President, N. E. McCallum; Secretary-Treasurer, G. M. Clark, Box 875, Penticton.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 179.—President, R. L. R. McBeath; Secretary-Treasurer,
C. A. Yule, Box 67, Penticton.
Pioneer Mines.
Miners' Union, Pioneer, No. 693.—President,
George Miller; Secretary, John D. A. Conn,
Pioneer Mines.
Port Alberni.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 513.—President, O. W.
Kelly; Secretary, R. W. Stubbs, Box 908, Port
Alberni.
Hospital Employees' Union, West Coast, No. 91.
—President, Garfield Zinck; Secretary-Treasurer, Florence  Hall, Box  1303, Port Alberni.
Hotel, Restaurant, and Beverage Employees'
Union, No. 697.—President, Dell Edwards;
Business Agent, C. Nichol, Box 900, Port
Alberni.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 503.—President, Ben Welch;
Secretary, Cal Cook, Box 804, Port Alberni.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-85.
—President, Walter S. Yates; Secretary, Alfred Dewhurst, Box 569, Port Alberni.
Port Alice.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 514,—President,
E. M. Ore; Secretary, Murdo Thomson, Port
Alice.
Port Mellon.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 297.—President,
Wallace A. Arrowsmith; Secretary, Neville
Shanks, P.O. Drawer 97, Port  Mellon.
Powell River.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 2068.—President, R. Dore;
Secretary, F. A. Smith, Wildwood Heights P.O.,
Powell  River.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
8.—President, S. Davies; Secretary, R. A.
Bridge,  Powell  River.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, S. R. Maggs; Secretary,
Rita E. Powell, Powell River.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
142.—President, T. Waldron; Secretary, H. B.
Moore, Box 730, Powell River.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 76.—President,
C. Murray Mouat; Secretary, Colin Johnston,
P.O. Drawer 160, Powell River.
Premier.
Mine, Mill, and Tramway Workers, Silbak Premier, No. 694.—President, William Hobill; Secretary, N. Cunningham, Box 1478, Premier. I 100
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Prince George.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 843.—■
Chief Engineer, L. McNeil; Secretary-Treasurer, Geo. A. Hodson, Prince George.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 827.—President, R. R. Anderson;
Secretary, J. Armstrong, Box 294, Prince
George.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. G. Henning; Secretary,
Jean MacMillan, Prince George.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary,
Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street, Vancouver.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, No.
620.—President, E. M. Hipsley; Secretary-
Treasurer, D. Ross, Box 224, Prince  George.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 28.—■
President, H. A. McLeod; Secretary, H. W.
Beckley, Box 675, Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 636.—President,
Stanley Moran; Secretary, F. Carl McEwen,
Box 196, New Royal Hotel, Prince Rupert.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union of
Canada, No. 4.—President, George Stanton;
Secretary-Treasurer, Angus Macphee, Box 1403,
Prince Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1735.—President, Jack
Fisher; Business Agent, J. S. Black, Box 694,
Prince Rupert.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 5.—President,
H. Thomas Harvey; Secretary, Sam Bill, Box 4,
Prince Rupert.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. B 344.—President, C. W. Wardale; Secretary, J. Alfred Chappell, Box 457, Prince
Rupert.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
510.—President, David Crocker; Secretary,
A. W. Johnson, Box 12, Prince Rupert.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No.
559.—President, Vernon Wagar; Secretary-
Treasurer, A. C. Cameron, Box 506, Prince
Rupert.
Fishermen's Federal Union of B.C., Deep Sea,
No. 80.—President, Erling Grinstrand; Secretary-Treasurer, Geo. Anderson, Box 249, Prince
Rupert.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. C. St. Clair; Secretary,
Geo. Wilson, Prince Rupert.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance, No. 331.—President, Mrs. Sadie
Knapp; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Rae Pirie,
General Delivery, Prince Rupert.
Industrial Workers' Union, Prince Rupert, No. 1.
—President, H. E. E. Faure; Secretary, Mrs.
Myrtle Storrie, Box 1394, Prince Rupert.
Longshoremen's Association, Canadian. — President, William Ferguson; Secretary, William A.
Pilfold, Box 531, Prince Rupert.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of
America, Brotherhood of, No. 1442.—President,
Joe Bayzand; Secretary, A. L. Lawrence, Box
1012, Postal Station B, Prince Rupert.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Dock, and Wharf Builders,
No. 1549.—President, C. N. Hendrickson; Secretary, W. M. Dunn, 711 Third Avenue, Prince
Rupert.
Plumbers and Steamfitters of U.S. and Canada,
United Association of, Journeymen, No. 180.—
President, John K. Haynes; Secretary, Nicholas Bird, Box 1134, Postal Station B, Prince
Rupert.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
426.—President, D. T. Elder; Secretary-Treasurer, R. Pollock, Box 496, Prince Rupert.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 154.—President,
D. Creed; Secretary, P. Jones, Box 676, Prince
Rupert.
Shipwrights', Joiners', and Caulkers' Industrial
Union, No. 2.—President, J. Blakey; Secretary-
Treasurer, J. W. Mavins, General Delivery,
Prince Rupert.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen, and Helpers,
International Brotherhood of, No. 136.—President, Howard Steen; Secretary-Treasurer, J.
Mulroney, 1207 Water Street, Prince Rupert.
Typographical Union, Prince Rupert, No. 413..—
President, E. F. Saunders; Secretary, Chas. H.
Collins, Box 552, Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Brewery Workers, International Union of United,
No. 367.—President, Douglas Stuart; Secretary, Earl G. Young, Princeton.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7875.—
President, Archibald Samuel; Secretary-Treasurer, John Howarth, Jr., Princeton.
Quesnel.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Raymond Stephenson; Secretary, Miss M. Trueman, Quesnel.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Retallack.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 181.—Secretary, Paul Munch, Retallack.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, International
Union of, No. 698.—President, Anker Johnson;
Secretary,  T. Kangrga, Retallack.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 407.—President,
Alexander C. Robinson; Secretary, Jas. M.
Goble, Box 283, Revelstoke.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 657.—
Chief Engineer, H. W. Keegan; Secretary-
Treasurer, G. L.  Ingram,  Box 485,  Revelstoke.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 341.—President, C. H. Stoodley;
Secretary, F. J. Westlake, Box 187, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 381.—President, Douglas Blackwell; Secretary-Treasurer, Samuel Anderson, Box 7, Revelstoke.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. Dabell; Secretary, Cecil G.
Graham, Revelstoke. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 101
Machinists, International Association of, No. 258.
—President, J. M. Donaldson; Secretary, R.
Robertson, Box 209, Revelstoke.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 208.—Secretary, H. Prestwich, Box 153,
Revelstoke.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 51.—
President, Charles Isaac; Secretary, D. E.
Johnson, Box 28, Revelstoke.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
481.—President, A. S. Parker; Secretary, J.
Bell, Box 387, Revelstoke.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 487.—President, Stanley Porrit; Secretary-Treasurer,
Thos. B. Philip, 407 Fourth Street, Revelstoke.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 72.—
President, Geo. Watson; Secretary-Treasurer,
L. W. File, 202 Eighth Street, Revelstoke.
Rossland.
Fire-fighters' Association, B.C. Provincial, No. 9.
—President, George Dingwall; Secretary-Treasurer, William Yawney, Rossland.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. K. Scatchard; Secretary,
E. L. Hedley, Rossland.
Silverton.
Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers, International
Union of, No. 662.—President, J. A. Moir;
Secretary,' Chas. E. Towgood, Silverton.
Skeena-Omineca.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, S. G. Preston; Secretary, C. L.
Gibson, Smithers.
Smithers.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 111.—
President, James Buchan;   Secretary-Treasurer,
C. A. Thurston, Box 240, Smithers.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No. 340.—President, J. W. Hall;    Secretary, D.
Small, Box 29, Telkwa.
Railroad   Trainmen,   Brotherhood   of,   No.   869.—
President, J. M. Graham;    Secretary-Treasurer,
S. W. Gould, Box 86, Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415.—President,   Jack   Cathrae;    Secretary,  D.
MacLean,  Box   146,   Smithers.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian   Brotherhood   of,   Division   No.   93.—
President,   E.   M.   Erickson;    Secretary,   P.   B.
Emerson, Box 51, Smithers.
South Slocan.
\
Workmen's   Co-operative   of   the   West   Kootenay
Power   &   Light   Co.,   Ltd.—President,   A.   B.
Macrone;     Secretary,   W.   R.   Walkley,   South
Slocan.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1419.—President. L. S. Moule; Secretary, J. E.
Holmes, Box 46, Squamish.
Summerland.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 9.—
President, Allan Omand; Secretary, Mrs. Agatha Letts, Summerland.
Trail.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 76.
—President, Wm. Secord; Secretary, S. T.
Spooner, 2017 Second Avenue, Trail.
Smelter Workers' Union, Independent.—President,
Charles W. McLean; Secretary-Treasurer, Carl
M. Loeblich, 1198 Cedar Avenue, Trail.
Smelter Workers' Union, Trail and District, No.
480.—President, F. W. Henne; Business Agent,
Howard Forbes, 1298 Bay Avenue, Trail.
Tranquille.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. Hume; Secretary, Miss G.
Weber, Tranquille.
Vananda.
Quarry and Mine Workers' Union, Texada Island,
No. 816.—President, G. H. Leibich, Jr.; Secretary, J. K. Johnson, Vananda.
Vancouver.
Aeronautical Mechanics' Lodge, No. 756, International Association of Machinists.—President,
Gordon Baird; Secretary, Thos. E. Parkin, 106,
413 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Auto Workers' Lodge, No. 1857, International
Association of Machinists.—President, S. Har-
tin; Secretary, L. E. Butler, 106, 413 Granville
Street, Vancouver.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, No. 469.—President, W. A.
Bell; Business Agent, A. E. Jackson, 608, 16
Hastings Street East, Vancouver.
Bakery Salesmen, No. 189.—President, A. Wylie;
Secretary-Treasurer, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Barbers' Association of B.C.—President, David
Willington; Secretary, R. W. Morrow, 1403,
207 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
120.—President, R. H. Parliament; Business
Agent, C. E. Herrett, 304, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association.—
President, F. T. Arnott; Secretary, L. E. Beard,
425 Carrall Street, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 676.—President,
W. G. Couper; Secretary-Treasurer, J. F.
Mohan,  Hall A, 535  Homer  Street, Vancouver.
Blacksmiths' and Helpers' Union of Canada, No. 1.
President, R. W. Fleming; Secretary, C. T.
Rouse, 2605 Scott Street, Vancouver.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 151.—President,
Wm. J. Barltelt; Secretary-Treasurer, Albert
Arman, 2048  Second Avenue West, Vancouver.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union of
Canada, No. 1.—President, C. A. Henderson;
Office Manager, K. Culhane, 339 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
105.—President, Francis J. Milne; Secretary,
Thomas Carroll, 1336 Twentieth Avenue East,
Vancouver. I 102
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Brewery Workers,-International Union of United,
No. 300.—President, M. Bushel; Secretary, Ed.
Sims, 5392 Clarendon Street, Vancouver.
Bricklayers' and Masons' International Union,
No. 1.—President, G. Drayton; Secretary-
Treasurer, S. Padgett, 2066 Eighth Avenue,
■Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural, and Ornamental-iron Workers'
Union, No. 97.—President, Roderick Morrison;
Secretary, Ernest G. Cook, 531 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural, and Ornamental-iron Workers'
Union, No. 661 (Shipyard Riggers).—President, R. J. Tigg; Business Agent, E. G. Cook,
531  Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Building Service Employees' International Union,
No. 244.—President, Wm. Bradbury; Secretary,
Mrs. Margaret Campbell, 7004 Fraser Avenue,
Vancouver.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, No.
1.—President, N. MacLean; Secretary, F. L.
Barratt, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, No. 2
(Shipyard Section).—President, J. M. McGuire;
Business Agent, Percy F. James, 21, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 452.—President, Geo. R. Ben-
gough; Business Agent, H. P. Hamilton, 310,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of Amarica, United Brotherhood of, No. 2346.—President, Ray Olund;
Secretary, J. A. Gildemeester, 529-531 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Cemco Employees' Association.—President, J. S.
Gauthier; Secretary, Edith I. Gosnell, 22 Fifth
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Cement Finishers' Section, No. 602, International
Hod Carriers, Building, and Common Labourers'
Union.—President, Alex. Wilson; Business
Agent, W. James, 531 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Checkers' and Weighers' Association, Marine.—
President, S. Earp; Secretary, R. Mettam, 1410,
207  Hastings  Street West, Vancouver.
City Hall Employees' Association, Vancouver,
No. 59.—President, Thomas Lewis; Secretary,
James Tarbuck, 434 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Association, North Vancouver.—
President, William Dunnet; Secretary, James
W. Henderson, 439 Seventh Street East, Vancouver.
Civic Federation, Vancouver.—President, T. H.
Lewis; Secretary, Robert Skinner, 195 Pender
Street East, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 28.—President, William L. Ash; Business Agent, David Rees, 195
Pender Street East, Vancouver.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, H. A. Benbow; Secretary, Harold Baker,
434 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Clerks' and Warehousemen's Union, No. 10, Amal-
gamatsd Building Workers of Canada.—President, Ewen MacLeod: Secretary-Treasurer,
G. W. Locke, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Communications Union, Canadian, Pacific Branch
No. 5.—President, J. Howard; Secretary, Albert Becker, c/o Radio Range- Station, Department of Transport, Vancouver Air Mail Field,
Vancouver.
Distillery, Rectifying, and Wine Workers' International Union, No. 92.—President, Everett Kil-
leen; Secretary-Treasurer, Frank R. Davie,
2189   Forty-seventh   Avenue   West,   Vancouver.
Divers' and Tenders' Union, Submarine.—President, Laurence T. Shorter; Secretary, J. N.
Smith, 414 Third Street East, North Vancouver.
Dockyard and Shipyard Workers' Union, No. 2.—
President, W. J. Robson; Secretary, John
Sandusky, 339 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Electric Welded Anchor Chain Association, No. 1.
—President, R. Cunningham; Secretary, John
Mitchell, 615 Twenty-sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Electrical Workers, Amalgamated, No. 3.—President, W. H. Clarke; Business Agent, R. Adair,
20, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. B 213.—President, F. Looney; Business
Manager, J. Ross, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Elevator Constructors, International Union of,
No. 82.—President, H. C. MacKichan; Secretary, R. Holmes, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Embalmers and Undertakers Assistants' Union,
No. 23374.—President, Wm. Scott; Secretary,
J. A. Dougall, 1334 Nicola Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 320.—
President, T. A. McEwan; Secretary, W. J.
Hill, 6438 Victoria Drive, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 907.—
President, C. Glibbery; Secretary-Treasurer,
F. J. Allen, 1032 Fourteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Engineers of Canada, National Association of
Marine, No. 7.—President, R. W. Pyne; Business Agent, E. R. Smith, 319 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
Engineers, National Union of Operating, No. 3.—
President, E. M. Strachan; Business Agent,
J. C. Barrett, 704, 16 Hastings Street East,
Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
115.—President, David Hodges; Business Representative, C. H. Wren, 217, 193 Hastings
Street East, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
882.—President, J. Henderson; Business Representative, E. W. King, 216, 193 Hastings
Street East, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
963.—President. Kenneth Ross; Secretary, Alex.
M. Reid, 3079 Euclid Avenue, Vancouver.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 15.—
President, J. Henderson; Secretary, Sylvia R.
Glen, 774  Sixty-third Avenue East, Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees, No. B-71.—President,
Sidney Walker; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss R.
Patterson, 950  McLean Drive, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, City, No. 1.—President, H. S.
Bird; Secretary-Treasurer, C. H. Hagman,
1638 First Avenue East, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, City, No. 3.—President,
W. G. Miller; Secretary-Treasurer, T. Cum-
ming, 315 Eleventh Street East, North Vancouver.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
4.—President, H. L. Sherlock; Secretary-Treasurer, T. Smith, 3 Acadia Circle, University Hill,
Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 103
Fire-fighters' Union, Vancouver, No. S-18.—President, H. Liddle; Secretary-Treasurer, Chas. A.
Watson, 935 Twentieth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 656.—President, H. W. M. Parr;
Secretary, W. R. O'Neill, 1611 Eighth Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 939.—President, C. Simons; Secretary, J. Livingstone, llll Barclay Street, Vancouver.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 289.—President, P. J. Dunphy; Secretary,
W. R. Chapman, 1165 Beach Avenue, Vancouver.
First-aid Attendants' Association of B.C., Industrial.—President, J. B. Livsey; Secretary, H. W.
Mahler,  603  Hastings  Street West, Vancouver.
First-aid Employees, Vancouver and Vicinity, No.
217.—President, Chas. Campbell; Secretary,
Samuel Todd,  529  Beatty  Street, Vancouver.
Fishermen and Allied Workers, United.—President, George Miller; Secretary-Treasurer, Wm.
Rigby, 138 Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 190.—
President, F. M. Filgiano; Secretary, Walter
W. Shaw, 3435 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 232.—
President, Mrs. Lydia Wier; Secretary, James
Mitchell, 1241 Clyde Avenue, Hollyburn P.O.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies',
No. 276.—President, H. Appleton; Secretary,
Colin Carr, 119 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Glove Workers' Union, Vancouver, No. 104.—
President, Harry Hendrickson; Secretary-
Treasurer, E. Dorothy Halsall, 2834 Georgia
Street East, Vancouver.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, H. Stubbs; Secretary, Thelma
Jones, Vancouver.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America—President, A. S. Simpson; Secretary-
Treasurer, Alexander Fordyce, 20 Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Harbour Employees' Association, Vancouver.—
President, Jas. D. Kennedy; Secretary, Cyril
M. Hampton, 1011 Richelieu Avenue, Vancouver.
Hod Carriers, Building and Common Labourers'
Union, International, No. 602.—President, Seth
Burnley; Business Agent, W. James, 309, 529
Beatty  Street, Vancouver.
Hospital Employees' Federal Union, Vancouver,
No. 180.—President, Alexander Paterson; Secretary-Treasurer, George R. Gilbert, 434 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, No. 28.
—President, Barbara Stewart; Business Agent,
May Ansell, 304 413 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Jersey Farms Employees' Staff Council.—President, Lionel Warwick; Secretary, Margaret B.
Matheson,  2256   Broadway  West,  Vancouver.
Jewelry Workers' Union, International, No. 42.—
President, T. H. Hawken; Secretary, Karl
Zuker, 304, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Lathers'   International   Union,   Wood,   Wire,   and
Metal,    No.    207.—President,    G.    W.    Morris;
Secretary, T. R. Crane, 222 Sixth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Laundry  Workers' International  Union,  No. 292.
—President,   W.   A.   Taylor;     Secretary-Treasurer,   Frances   Mehera,   6007   Ontario    Street,
Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 12.
—President,  D.  W.  Samson;    Secretary-Treasurer, John Cass, 426 Seventeenth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Library  Staff Association, Vancouver Public, No.
7.—President,   Mrs.  Dorothy  Fearman;    Secretary, Edith  Sturdy, Vancouver Public Library,
Main  and  Hastings  Streets, Vancouver.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, No. 44.
—President, Frank Phipps;    Secretary, Charles
Hewitt, 1091 Tenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's   Association,    International,    No.
38/163.—President,    R.    McBeath;      Secretary-
Treasurer, James Darwood, 45 Dunlevy Avenue,
Vancouver.
Longshoremen's  and  Warehousemen's  Union,  International, No. 501.—President, Joseph Boyes;
Secretary-Treasurer, J.  A.  Taylor,  45  Dunlevy
Avenue, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 182.
—President, J.  Christie;    Secretary, J. Bygate,
621  Seventh Avenue  East, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 692.
—President, J. A.  McCarthy;    Business  Agent,
R.  Osman,  303,  529  Beatty  Street,  Vancouver.
Mailers'   Union,   Vancouver,   No.   70.—President,
Bertram   Wells;    Secretary-Treasurer,  R.   Gordon   Taylor,   1176   Duchess   Avenue,   Hollyburn
P.O.,  West Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No.  167.—Secretary,  P. J.  Doyle,  3631  Trafalgar Street, Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No.  210.—Secretary,  R.  Halliday,  3383  Pender
Street  East,  Vancouver.
Malkin    Co.,    Ltd.,    Warehousemen    and    Truck
Drivers'  Union,  W.  H.—President,  F.   H.   Calhoun;   Secretary-Treasurer, W. Doig, 57 Water
Street,  Vancouver.
Marshall-Wells     Employees'    Association.—President,   W.   A.   Griggs;     Secretary,   Jean   L.   McDonald, 573 Carrall Street, Vancouver.
Merchants  Service  Guild,  Inc.,  Canadian.—President,  Captain  J.  S.  Dennis;    Secretary,  G.  F.
Bullock,  675  Dunsmuir  Street,  Vancouver.
Metal  and  Chemical  Workers'  Union,  Vancouver
District,    No.    289.—President,    John    Frame;
Secretary,   C.  G.  Woods,  717  Holden  Building,
Vancouver.
Milk-wagon Drivers' and Dairy Employees' Union,
No.  464.—President,  R.  McCulloch;    Secretary-
Treasurer,   Birt   Showier,   529   Beatty   Street,
Vancouver.   .
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union of North
America,    International,    No.    281.—President,
John   H.   Smith;    Secretary,  A.  Paterson,  1609
Cypress  Street, Vancouver.
Municipal  Employees' Association, West Vancouver.—President,  H.  Thakery;    Secretary,  T.  J.
Elliott, 1125 Inglewood Avenue, Hollyburn P.O.
Musicians'   Mutual'Protective  Union,  No.  145.—
President, William  Pilling;    Secretary, Edward
A. Jamieson, 51, 553 Granville  Street, Vancouver. I 104
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, Percy A. Miles; Secretary, William J. Telfer, 99 Cordova Street
East, Vancouver.
National Biscuit and Confection Co., Ltd., Association of Employees of the.—President,
George David; Secretary, Mrs. Dorothy Huff,
1706 First Avenue West, Vancouver.
National Paper Box, Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, George F. Paone; Secretary-
Treasurer, J. D. Sharp, 160 Third Avenue West,
Vancouver.
*Native Brotherhood of British Columbia.—President, Alfred Adams; Business Agent, Guy R.
Williams,  508   Holden  Building,  Vancouver.
Neon Employees' Association.—President, George
Storrar; Secretary, Lily Gillespie, 1108 Georgia
Street West, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, No. 1.—President,
S. A. Bligh; Secretary, H. Byers, 1405 Sun
Building, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, No. 2.—President,
Len A. Weeks; Treasurer, Miss E. M. Lang-
dale, 426 Homer Street, Vancouver.
Office Employees' International Union, No. 15.—
President, O. Walker; Secretary, Mrs. Renee
Nelissen, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Office and Professional Workers of America,
United, No. 173.—President, Marshall A. Johnson; Secretary, James W. Wilson, 5577 Aberdeen Street, Vancouver.
Oil Workers' Union, United, No. 1.—President,
Alex. McKenzie; Secretary, Arthur A. Anderson, 501, 736 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Oil Workers of Canada, United, No. 2.—President, Alex. McLeod; Secretary-Treasurer, Cyril
Jones, 324 Seventeenth Street East, North Vancouver.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
162.—President, Edward E. Readhead; Secretary, Kenneth Onions, 902 Dominion Bank
Building, Vancouver.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
249.—President, James Bury; Secretary, Mario
F. Dean, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
283.—President, R. J. Brintnell; Representative, Wm. Symington, 905 Dominion Bank
Building, Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of
America, Brotherhood of, No. 138.—President,
Bruce Mitchell; Secretary, James Glover, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Photo-engravers' Union, Vancouver, No. 54.—
President, Wm. Wilson; Secretary, Ralph H.
Grantham, 3941 Eleventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
Pile-drivers', Bridge, Wharf, and Dock Builders'
Union, No. 2404.—President, Chas. Anderson;
Secretary, S. C. Allan, 130 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association of,
No. 170.—President, J. Dillabough; Business
Agent, A. Mathieson, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Police Federal  Association, Vancouver, No.  12.—
President,    Chas.    W.    Macdonald;     Secretary-
Treasurer, K. W. MacLean, 236 Cordova Street
East, Vancouver.
* Approximately sixty-three branches in British
Columbia.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Vancouver, No. 69.—President, Max Erenberg;
Secretary-Treasurer, Thos. S. Ezart, 1807
Thirty-eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 433.—President,
Francis McDermott; Secretary, Mrs. Agnes
Nickel, c/o Pacific Mills, Ltd., foot of Campbell
Avenue, Vancouver.
Radio Station Employees' Union, No. 23757.—
President, Hugh D. Wilson; Secretary, Mar-
garette Duncan, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144.—
President, Wm. Pennington; Secretary-Treasurer, R. H. Blackwell, 666 Fifty-third Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 987.—
President, E. F. Marsden; Secretary, R. T.
Houghton, 26, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, No. 58.—President, Robert Learmond; Secretary, Samuel S.
Shearer,  3651   Pender  Street  East,  Vancouver.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 267.—President, I. W. Smith; Secretary-Treasurer, J. B.
Physick, 4153 Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 59.—President, J. S. Jones; Secretary, J. W. Hardy, 955
Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 82.
—President, H. H. Prior; Secretary, R. E.
Schafer, 3363 Thirty-ninth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 220.
—President, R. Anderson; Secretary, L. C.
Crossley, 729 Hamilton Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 221.
—President, Percival Jones; Secretary, L. J. D.
Villeneuve,   Lochdale   P.O.,   Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 223.
—President, C. A. Furman; Secretary, J. Cold-
well, 4851 Fairmont Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 275.
—President, Norman J. Lance; Secretary, Miss
S. J. Lund, 4414 Third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association, Vancouver.—
President, C. J. Green; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. H. Menzies, 3772 Twenty-third Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 48.—President, W. J. Smith; Secretary-
Treasurer, D. E. Horner, 2556 Sixteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 626.—President, G. H. Stubbs; Secretary, J. E. FitzGerald, 358 Forty-fifth Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 630.—President, Arthur Gordon; Secretary, W. J. Mason, 3116 Thirteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 105
Refrigeration Workers' Union, No. 516.—President, A. M. Campbell; Secretary, J. W. More,
637 Eighteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Retail Clerks' Union, No. 279.—President, Geo. A.
Wilkinson; Secretary, George Johnston, 406
Province Building, Vancouver.
Retail Employees' Association, Vancouver, No. 1.
—President, R. M. Stevenson; Secretary, T.
McGowan, 3567 Dunbar Street, Vancouver.
St. Paul's Hospital Employees' Association.—
President, Harry Ernest Piper; Secretary, E.
Marie Knechtel, 1080 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Seafarers' Association, Canadian.—President, H.
Taylor; Secretary, C. Smillie, 405 Powell
Street,  North  Vancouver.
Seamen's Union, B.C., Vancouver Branch, Pacific
District.—President, H. Lundeberg; Secretary,
H. Murphy, 144 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Seamen's Union, Canadian (Pacific Coast District).—President, G. Bogard; Secretary, J. M.
Smith, 517 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Sheet-metal Workers' International Association,
No. 280.—President, H. F. Elliott; Business
Agent, J. Walker, 308, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Shipwrights', Joiners', and Caulkers' Industrial
Union, No. 1.—President, Edwin H. Baker;
Secretary-Treasurer, George H. Brown, 339
Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Shoe-workers' Union, Western, No. 1.—President,
John Turner; Secretary, George Clerihew, 2918
Thirty-fourth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Sign and Pictorial Painters' Union, No. 726.—
President, A. Collins; Secretary, A. C. Lacey,
531  Beatty  Street,  Vancouver.
Sitka Spruce Lumber Workers' Union.—President,
J. A. Byers; Secretary, Wm. Webster, 995
Sixth Avenue  West, Vancouver.
Slade, A. P., Ltd., and Associated Companies Employees' Association.—President, Robert Gray;
Secretary, Marguerite Cooper, 147 Water
Street,  Vancouver.
Spear & Jackson's Employees' Club.—President,
M. Wilson; Secretary-Treasurer, D. R. Alexander, 4055 Dundas Street, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2655.—
President, A. Port; Secretary, P. Baskin, 905
Dominion   Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2765.—
President, C. Kemp; Secretary, A. McFarlane,
905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2821.—
President, M. Lukas; Secretary, A. Whittaker,
905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2951.—
President, A. Wilson; Secretary, W. Hodges,
905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2952.—
President, Bruce Loudon; International Representative, James Robertson, 905 Dominion Bank
Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3229.—
President, L. D. Dafoe; Secretary, J. Roberts,
905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3253.—
President, E. H. Lee; Secretary, Arline Roberts, 905  Dominion  Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3254.—■
President, Gordon Hazelwood; Secretary, Bruce
Hamilton, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3302.—
President, A. Kemp; Secretary, E. Freeding,
905  Dominion   Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3307.—
President, C. Campbell; Secretary, Evelyn
Whyte, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3376.—
President, D. Hardy; Secretary, R. Strand, 905
Dominion  Bank  Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3392 —
President, A. McDonald; Secretary, R. Kennedy, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3435.—
President, W. Hardy; Secretary, E. Wilson, 905
Dominion  Bank Building,  Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3452.—
President, M. Ekblad; Secretary, H. Rempel,
905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3495.—
President, A. S. Richdale; Secretary, R. N.
Wilson, 905 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 3546.—
President, Geo. Home; Secretary, D. Harris,
905  Dominion  Bank  Building,  Vancouver.
Stereotypers' & Electrotypers' Union, No. 88.—
President, R. Myles; Secretary, J. M. Anderson, 4616 Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Stone-cutters of North America, Journeymen.—
President, F. H. Louis; Secretary-Treasurer,
Frank Hall, 4507 Sixteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor-coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, No. 101.—President, Thomas Dunlop; Business Agent, C. M. Stewart, 307, 175 Broadway
East, Vancouver.
Sugar Workers, Industrial Union of, No. 1.—
President, J. Dockwray; Secretary-Treasurer,
O. F. Plumbley, 7790 French Street, Vancouver.
Switchmen's Union of North America, No. 111.—
President, W. J. Ing-lis; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. S. Crosson, 3925 Fourteenth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Tailors' Union of America, Journeymen, No. 178.
—President, Mrs. H. Clausner; Secretary, Mrs.
Dorothy L. Roberts, 606 Forty-seventh Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Taxicab, Stage, and Bus Drivers' Union, No. 151.
—President, C. E. Youngs; Business Agent,
Chas. A. Gower, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
*Teachers' Federation, B.C.—President, F. J. Mc-
Rae; Secretary, C. D. Ovans, 1300 Robson
Street,  Vancouver.
Telegraphers' Union, Commercial (Canadian Pacific System), B.C. District, Division No. 1.—■
President, I. R. Burns; Secretary-Treasurer,
Mrs. Phyllis  M.  Cline, Box 432, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Clerical Division), Mainland Branch.—President,
E. J. Case; General Secretary, R. M. Smith,
543 Granville Street, Vancouver.
* There are fifty-six branches of the Federation
in British Columbia. I 106
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), Mainland Branch.—President, Tom
Reilly; General Secretary, R. H. Milner, 308,
543   Granville   Street,  Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic
Division), Mainland Branch.—President, Frances Shaw; General Secretary, Jeanne Cameron,
307, 543  Granville  Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic
Division), Cafeteria Branch.—President, Mrs.
Marguerite Beattie; Secretary, Lorena Asher,
307,' 543  Granville  Street, Vancouver.
Textile Workers' Union, No. 12.—President, Janet
G. Wicks; Secretary, Diane Wilson, 78 Second
Avenue   East,   Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees of the United States
and Canada, International Alliance of, No. 118.
—President, Gordon Martin; Secretary, Walter
Blake, Box 711, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving-picture
Machine Operators of the United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, No. 348.—
President, R. G. Pollock; Secretary, George E.
Thrift,  Box  345,  Vancouver.
Tile, Marble, and Terraza Helpers' Union, No. 78.
—President, A. Wood; Secretary-Treasurer,
D. F. Snow, 802 Richards  Street, Vancouver.
Tile Setters, B.C., No. 3.—President, R. Neville;
Secretary, W. Richards, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Truck Drivers and Helpers, General, No. 31.—
President, Wm. M. Brown; Secretary, R. D.
Atkinson, 529  Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Typographical Union, Vancouver, No. 226.—
President, R. Gouthro; Secretary-Treasurer,
R. H. Neelands, 529 Beatty  Street, Vancouver.
University of British Columbia Employees' Federal Union, No. 116.—President, A. McRoy;
Secretary, A. C. Hill, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Welders', Cutters', and Helpers' Union, No. 1.—
President, Draper M. Rea; Secretary, Wm. T.
Berry,  12a, 445  Granville  Street, Vancouver.
Woodworkers' Union, B.C., No. 2.—President,
N. E. Sadler; Business Agent, Chas E. Rough-
sedge,  501  Vancouver  Block, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-71.
—President, John McCuish; Secretary-Treasurer, E. Dalskog, 204 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-217.—President, Don S. Watts; Secretary,
Mrs. Gladys Shunaman, 409 Holden Building,
Vancouver.
Vanderhoof.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1870.—President, M. Heyhoruk; Secretary,
J. Wall, McCall via Vanderhoof.
Vernon.
Civic Employees' Union, Vernon.—President,
W. A. Phelps; Secretary-Treasurer, H. J.
Haines,  Box   1381,  Vernon.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 6.—
President, Maurice Graham; Secretary, J. E.
Gray, Box 1189, Vernon.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, F. H. C. Wilson; Secretary,
L.  E.  Mona  Pearson, Vernon.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Mechanics' and Associated Workers' Union, Interior General, No. 1.—President, R. A. Law-
son;   Secretary, R. N. Valair, Box 267, Vernon.
Telephone Operators' Union, Interior B.C., No. 1.
—President, Evelyne Tebo; Secretary-Treasurer, Enid McMaster, Box 594, Vernon.
Typographical Union, Vernon, No. 541.—President, E. N. Lockwood; Secretary-Treasurer,
V. L.  Bronson,  Box 851, Vernon.
West Canadian Hydro Electric Corporation, Ltd.,
and Okanagan Telephone Co. Plant Employees'
Association.—President, A. W. Smith; Secretary, Ron Robey, 119 Langille Street West,
Vernon.
Victoria.
Asbestos Workers, Canadian Union of, No. 3.—
President, Norman D. Ashwood; Secretary,
Wm.  LeVert,   Seven  Oaks   P.O.,  Victoria.
Automotive Maintenance Workers' Federal Union,
No. 151.—President, G. V. Jarvis; Secretary,
John  Walsh, 602  Broughton  Street, Victoria.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, No. 267.—President, W. L.
Williams; Secretary, Sven V. Jensen, 602
Broughton  Street,  Victoria.
Barbers' Union, Canadian, No. 2.—President, W.
Taylor; Secretary, Walter Tantow, 650 Johnson   Street,  Victoria.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, No. 372.—President, George A. Turner; Secretary-Treasurer,
Jas. A. Green, 1319 Douglas Street, Victoria.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association.—
President, W. E. Holland; Secretary, Miss
M. D.  MacNeill,  1016 Langley Street, Victoria.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union, No.
2.—President, F. Cardwell; Secretary-Treasurer, P. B. Ross, 902 Government Street, Victoria.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
147.—President, W. A. Johnston; Secretary-
Treasurer, J. A. Wiley, 141 Clarence Street,
Victoria.
Brewery and Soft Drink Workers of America,
International Union of United, No. 280.—
President, J. H. Allan; Secretary, W. E. Bryan,
2642  Scott  Street, Victoria.
Bricklayers, Masons, and Plasterers, International Union of, No. 2.—President, D. Mertton;
Secretary, J. Beckerley, R.R. 3, McKenzie Avenue, Victoria.
Bridge, Structural, and Ornamental-iron Workers,
International Association of, No. 643 (Shipyard
Riggers, Benchmen, and Helpers).—President,
A. G. Sainsbury; Secretary, A. W. Sage, 602
Broughton Street, Victoria.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated.—
President, Thomas Vickers; Secretary, George
E.  Williams,  902  Government  Street,  Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1598.—President, J. G.
Laurie; Secretary, Alex Sims, 602 Broughton
Street, Victoria.
Chemical and Explosive Workers' Industrial
Federal Union, Canadian, No. 128.—President,
Robert Barrie; Secretary-Treasurer, Herbert
Rowland, 909 Stafford Street, Victoria. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 107
City Hall Employees' Association.—President,
S. James; Secretary-Treasurer, Yvonne Meikle,
1508 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Civic Employees' Protective Association of Victoria, No. 50.—President, Joseph Wm. Watson;
Secretary, R. Betts, 2858 Shakespeare Street,
Victoria.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Victoria
Local Council.—President, E. W. Jones; Secretary-Treasurer, G. K. Beeston, 314 Post-office
Building,  Victoria.
Clerks' Association, Industrial, No. 1.—President,
Arthur R. Willis; Secretary, Julia Kent-Jones,
805 Linden Avenue, Victoria.
Defence Civilian Workers' Union, National, No.
129.—President, Len Martin; Secretary-Treasurer, E. F. M. Sim, 602 Broughton Street, Victoria.
Dockyard and Shipyard Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, Nick Russell; Secretary, J. Sault,
1116 Broad Street, Victoria.
Drivers' Division No. 234, Vancouver Island.—
President, A. H. Hart; Secretary, J. S. Ready,
1116 Broad Street, Victoria.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 230.—President, A. S. Bevan; Business
Manager, F. J. Bevis, 1005 Government Street,
Victoria.
Engineers of Canada, Inc., National Association
of Marine, No. 6.—President, H. M. Sallaway;
Secretary-Treasurer, G. W. Brown, 402, 612
View Street, Victoria.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20.—
President, Herbert Wilkinson; Secretary-Treasurer, F. E. Dutot, 2176 Pentland Road, Victoria.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No.
730.—President, John F. Abbott; Secretary,
Thos. F. McBratney, No. 1 Fire-hall, 626 Cormorant  Street, Victoria.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 690.—President, E. W. Collins;
Secretary, G. H. Stewart, 716 Craigflower Road,
Victoria.
Garage Employees, Association of Vancouver Island Coach Lines.—President, Walter Bate;
Secretary, Walter McAdams, 615 Courtney
Street, Victoria.
Gas Workers' Union, Victoria, No. 815.—President, Kenneth L. Reach; Secretary-Treasurer,
Gordon  Page,  398  Gorge  Road  West,  Victoria.
Government Employees, American Federation of,
No. 59.—President, Thos. F. Monaghan, 205
Campbell Building, Victoria.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. P. Swansborough; Secretary,  K.  Wilson,  Victoria.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance, No. 459.—President, Antonia Sadlish;
Secretary, Laura MacNeil, 602 Broughton
Street, Victoria.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, Martin Dunsmuir; Secretary-
Treasurer, Sam J. Robinson, 367 Water Street,
Vancouver.
Lathers' Association, Vancouver Island.—President, E. -C. Day; Secretary, R. J. Ferguson,
2500 Blackwood Avenue, Victoria.
Laundry Workers' Union, No. 1.—President, Donald F. Newell; Secretary-Treasurer, David H.
Fullerton, 1693 Earle Street, Victoria.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 11.
—President, H. W. Rivers; Secretary, Fred C.
Hurry,  898   Front  Street,  Victoria.
Library Staff Association, Victoria Public, No. 9.
—President, Mrs. T. C. Shaw; Secretary, Margaret Howieson, 764 Yates  Street, Victoria.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
38/162.—President, James Lackie; Secretary-
Treasurer, W. N. Scott, 1406 Douglas Street,
Victoria.
Machinists, Fitters, and Helpers, National Union
of, No. 2.—President, George Taggart; Business Agent, Robert Noble, 902 Government
Street, Victoria.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 456.
—President, H. E. Thayer; Secretary, C. H.
Lester, 902 Government Street, Victoria.
Mailers' Union, Victoria, No. 121.—President, A.
Veitch; Secretary-Treasurer, F. W. E. Gregory,
2530 Central Avenue, Victoria.
Moulders and Foundry Workers, International,
No. 144.—President, William Gennoe; Secretary, Sam Emery, 864 Old Esquimalt Road,
Victoria.
Municipal Employees' Association, Saanich, No.
5.—President, David R. McAdams; Secretary,
Frances Tatham, Royal Oak P.O.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 247.—
President, Chas. W. Hunt; Secretary, William
F. Tickle, 207 Hamley Block, Victoria.
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers of
America, Brotherhood of, No. 1163.—President,
F. Dewhurst; Secretary, W. , Brigden, 602
Broughton  Street, Victoria.
Pantorium Employees' Association. — President,
Henry Reimer; Secretary, Miss S. Moskalyk,
1239 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
367.—President, L. S. Hemming; Secretary,
Mrs. Sena A. S. Guest, 4-1847 Crescent Road,
Victoria.
Pile-driving and Bridgemen's Union, No. 2415.—
President, S. Berrow; Secretary, E. Hovey,
2511 Empire Street, Victoria.
Plumbers and Steam-fitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of Journeymen,
No. 324.—President, James C. Woodend; Secretary, George Pyper, 602 Broughton Street,
Victoria.
Police Mutual Benefit Association, Victoria.—
President, H. F. Jarvis; Secretary, Stanley T.
Holmes, 625 Fisguard Street, Victoria.
Postal Employees, Canadian.—President, W. Craig-
myle; Secretary-Treasurer, J. H. Hedley, 1166
Chapman Street, Victoria. k
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Victoria, No. 79.—President, F. Elliott; Secretary-
Treasurer, F. H. Larssen, 1236 McKenzie Street,
Victoria.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 613.—
President, H. C. Horner; Secretary, J. A.
Stone, 1320 Burleith Drive, Victoria.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
50.—President, G. Graham; Secretary, H.
Greaves, 638 Victoria Avenue, Victoria.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 289.—President, James W. Thomson; Secretary, J. N.
Forde, 707 Wilson  Street, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 222.—
President, G. L. Woollett; Secretary, C. Irwin,
jS     c/o C.N.R., Point EUice, Victoria. I 108
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, Division No. 276.—
President, A. E. Veronneau; Secretary, H.
Ogden, Box 1769, R.R. 3, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 526.—President, Alan R. Davie; Secretary, H. S. Hughes, 1022 Chamberlain Street,
Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1137.—President, F. X. O'Neill; Secretary, Ralph T. Moore, 579 Marifield Avenue,
Victoria.
School Board Employees' Association, Victoria.—
President, Leonard E. Clarke; Secretary-
Treasurer, Robert W. Todd, 1449 Grant Street,
Victoria.
Sheet-metal Workers' International Association,
No. 276.—President, A. J. Stevenson; Secretary, F. W. Shaw, R.M.D. 4, Blenkinsop Road,
Box 294, Victoria.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor-coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, Division No. 109.—President, Frederick
Davison; Secretary, Wilfrid Turner, 3060 Carrol  Street,  Victoria.
Sweeney Cooperage Employees' Association.—
President, W. G. Mitchell; Secretary, Phyllis
Marwick, 2640 Quadra Street, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Clerical Division), Island Branch.—President, Lionel
Huxtable; Secretary-Treasurer, Beatrice Hoff-
maister, 611, 1405 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant
Division), Island Branch.—President, L. M.
Butler; Secretary, Miss F. E. Harris, 1095
Lockley Road, Victoria.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic Division), Island Branch.—President, Daisy
Grossmith; Secretary, Euphemia Nicholson,
611, 1405 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Motion-picture
Machine Operators, International Alliance of,
No.-168.—President, S. H. McKay; Secretary,
S. R. Barwick, Box 524, Victoria.
Typographical Union, Victoria, No. 201.—President, V. J. Baines; Secretary-Treasurer, H.
Warren, 311, 723 Fort Street, Victoria.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-118.
President, E. H. Clark; Business Agent, J. M.
Wainscott, 24, 1116 Broad Street, Victoria.
Wells.
Miners' Union, Wells, No. 685.—President, Eric
Meausette; Secretary, Victor Johnson, Box 45,
Wells.
White Rock.
Fibre Flax Workers' Union, No. 1.—President,
Walter Barth; Secretary-Treasurer, Harry
Maxfield, White Rock.
Woodfibre.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 494.—President,
A. V. Duncan; Secretary, E. W. Preiss, Wood-
fibre.
Zincton.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Zincton, No. 667.
—President, Frank Rissie; Secretary, D. St.
Germaine, Zincton Mine, New Denver.
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
Calgary.
Bituminous Coal Operators' Association, The
Western Canada.—President, A. N. Scott; Secretary-Treasurer, C. Stubbs, 516-520 Lougheed
Building, Calgary, Alta.
Kelowna.
Shippers' Association, Okanagan Federated.—
President, F. L. Fitzpatrick; Secretary, c/o
Okanag/m Federated Shippers' Association,
Leckia Block, Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
Nanaimo.
Truck Loggers' Association, B.C.—President, O. A.
Buck; Secretary, F. H. Adames, 21 Bastion
Street,  Nanaimo.
Penticton,
Co-operative Growers, Penticton.—President, W.H.
Morris; Secretary-Treasurer, D. G. Penny, 234
Main   Street,  Penticton.
Prince George.
Lumbermen's Association, Northern Interior.—
Chairman, M. S. Caine; Secretary, H. F. Alexander, Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association, Canadian
Halibut.—President, Alf. Ritchie; Secretary,
Ole Stegavig, Box 1025, Postal Station B, Prince
Rupert.
Vancouver.
Bakers' Association,  B.C.—Secretary,  F.  A.  Wilson, 199 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Bakers'   Association,   Master.—President,   B.   M.
Colwell;    Secretary,  F. A.  Wilson,  199  Eighth
Avenue  East,  Vancouver.
Box Manufacturers' Section, Interior.—Chairman,
J.   G.   Strother;    Secretary,  Hugh   Dalton,   608
Marine   Building,  Vancouver.
Building  and  Construction   Industries   Exchange.
—President, C. L. McDonald;    Secretary, R. J.
Lecky, 342 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Contractors'    Association,    General. — President,
H.   H.   Johnson;     Secretary,   R.   J.   Lecky,   342
Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Electrical    Association,   Vancouver. — President,
C.  E.  Longley;    Secretary, J.  S.  Homersham,
1359 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Fishing   Vessel   Owners'   Association   of   B.C.—
President,   James   Fiddler;     Secretary,   H.   A.
Christenson,   138   Cordova   Street   East,   Van- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944.
I 109
Hotels' Association, British Columbia.—President,
A. Paterson; Secretary, J. J. Kahn, 626 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Industrial Association of B.C.—President, W. L.
Macken; Secretary, Margaret M. Riley, 1024,
355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Jewellers' Association, Canadian (British Columbia Section).—President, A. E. Collett; Secretary, A. Fraser Reid, 1635 Napier Street, Vancouver.
Laundry, Dry Cleaning & Linen Supply Club,
Vancouver.—President, W. R. Morrow; Secretary-Treasurer, A. R. Bernard, 910 Richards
Street, Vancouver.
Loggers' Association, Inc., The British Columbia.
—Chairman, R. McKee; Secretary, John Burke,
1522, 510 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, Interior.—
Chairman, 0. S. Harris; Secretary, Hugh Dai-
ton, 608, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association,
B.C.—President, F. A. E. Manning; Secretary-
Manager, T. H. Wilkinson, 837 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Metal Trades Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association.—Chairman, R. G. Smith; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 608, 355 Burrard Street,
Vancouver.
TMilk Distributors' Association, Vancouver.—President, D. F. Farris; Secretary, F. A. Wilson,
199 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Milk Producers' Association, Fraser Valley.—
President, W. L. Macken; Secretary, Jno J.
Brown, 425 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Morticians, B.C. Society of.—President, E. A.
Simmons; Secretary, F. J. Harding, 2216 Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Motor Carriers' Association of B.C.—President,
N- Usher; Secretary, Gene L. Buckman, 914,
207 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Plastering and Lathing Contractors' Association,
Greater Vancouver.—President, W. G. Jenner;
Secretary-Treasurer, Geo. A. Skinner, 4865
Fairmont Street, Vancouver.
Printers' & Stationers' Guild of B.C.—Chairman,
Charles E. Phillips; Secretary, Audrey C.
Parkinson, 608, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Red Cedar Shingle Association of B.C., Consolidated.—President, W. H. McLallen; Secretary-
Manager, G. S. Raphael, 509, 837 Hastings
Street West, Vancouver.'
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.—
President, W. S. Charlton; Secretary-Manager,
Geo. R. Matthews, 218-19, 744 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Shipping Federation of British Columbia.—President, R. D. Williams; Secretary, D. M. Cameron, 45 Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver.
Upholstered Furniture Manufacturers' Association of B.C.—President, Henry E. Tynan;
Secretary-Treasurer, John M. Richardson, 701—
703 Royal Trust Building, 626 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
Victoria.
Bakers' Association, Victoria Master.—President,
J. P. Land; Secretary, T. P. McConnell, 120
Pemberton  Building, Victoria.
Beer Licensees' Employers' Association.—President, A. Mawer; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs.
F. A. A. Newmarch, 891 Admirals Road, Esquimalt.
Builders' Exchange, Ltd., Victoria.—President,
V. L. Leigh; Secretary, W. J. Hamilton, 1712
Douglas  Street, Victoria.
Electrical Association, Victoria (B.C.).—President, H. J. Langdon; Secretary-Treasurer, A. R.
Colby, 645 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Taxi Operators' Association of Greater Victoria.
—President, D. E. Jones; Secretary, P. Reid,
708 Johnson Street, Victoria.
B. H. E. Goult,
Secretary-Registrar, " Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Act." I 110 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., June 4, 1945.
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection Branch for
the year 1944.
During the past year a number of factories which were engaged exclusively in
reconditioning, manufacturing, and assembling parts for aeroplanes ceased production
entirely. Curtailment was also noted in other industries engaged exclusively in the
manufacture of devices required only during war-time. However, there was no noticeable decline in the production of commodities for civilian use. Practically all plants,
with the limited labour supply available, seemed to be working to capacity.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1944, 2,260 inspections and reinspections of factories were made.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
In each succeeding year the factories of this Province have become a safer place in
which to earn a livelihood, through the combined efforts of management, employees, the
Government, and other agencies. While accidents occur all too frequently, our investigations disclose that the greater majority of personal injuries are received because of
unsafe work practices, such as making adjustments while machinery is in motion,
removing or rendering ineffective safety devices which have been provided, and failure
to wear personal protective equipment, which, in most instances, is also provided.
Unsafe work practices can be discovered and satisfactorily corrected only by continual watchfulness and painstaking training and education. No person is in a better
position to achieve results in this respect than the plant foreman. One of the most
important industrial problems is that of training men in safe and efficient habits. The
new employee follows the habits of the older men and of his immediate supervisor, and
therefore his training must be done largely by the foreman who is in close daily contact
with the men and is able to watch and correct them.
We all make mistakes and errors in judgment, and a workman who is injured as a
result of an industrial accident has, in the average case, made the same mistake or error
in judgment many times previously without having been injured. The foreman's
opportunity to prevent accidents lies therein. One who is under the impression that
accidents can be prevented without knowing why they occur is unduly optimistic, and
one who permits an accident to pass unnoticed merely because there were no serious
consequences is laying the foundation for an increased accident frequency rate.
It is not enough merely to hand an employee a set of rules and expect him to avoid
accidents, but careful and thorough instructions must be given to each employee.
Safety instructions must be practical and relate specifically to the job.
After many years of using mechanical safeguards on machinery it seems that we
have now arrived at the place where reliance upon them for control is not enough.
Analyses of accident causes reveal the fact that human failure and not failure of things
or objects is the underlying cause of the vast majority of accidents, regardless of type
or location. A solution to the problem will be achieved largely by attacking the problem
from the human angle. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 111
FACTORY CONDITIONS.
As the factory-worker spends a large part of his life-time inside the four walls of
a building, he has the right to expect that every practical precaution be taken to safeguard his health.
Occupational diseases are contracted by exposure to harmful quantities of dangerous dusts or poisonous gases, fumes, or vapours. After the exposures have been
identified, controlled methods can then be planned. With but few exceptions, no great
mechanical problem would be involved in their effective removal at the point of origin,
if the employer would realize that the protection of the worker should begin on the
draughting-table in the design of suitable ventilating equipment. This procedure
requires consultation with, and the services of, a ventilation engineer. Factories constructed during the war years have invariably followed this procedure. When the
peace comes and these war factories shift over to the manufacture of consumer goods,
these correct methods of proper ventilation will prove to be very valuable.
While it is agreed that it is difficult during the war years to procure satisfactory
factory space in rented premises, that does not mean that any employer should overcrowd his factory to an extent that the health and safety of his employees are jeopardized.
We noted such a condition during the year. A certain factory was operating in a building totally unsuitable for manufacturing purposes, and the condition was rectified by
the employer being forced to procure premises which would comply with the provisions
of the " Factories Act."
WELFARE.
Comment has been made in previous reports regarding the high standard of facilities provided for the factory employees' welfare in connection with their daily employment. There was a time when these important matters did not receive the attention
they deserved.
It is no longer necessary for a production employee to be compelled to work in
conditions fit only for a machine and return to his home covered with dust and grime,
the waste products of industry. These conditions are now largely controlled by means
of exhaust systems, and facilities are provided which enable the factory-worker to leave
the plant clean and well groomed, thus maintaining his self-respect.
Many of the executives of industrial plants have recognized the fact during recent
years that good working conditions not only increase production but also result in
improved industrial relations. It has only been in recent years that personnel officials
have become an established part of our industrial enterprises. Most of our large companies now have such officials, whose responsibilities consist, in part, of assisting in
looking after the employees' welfare on and, in many instances, off the job.
WOMEN IN INDUSTRY.
For a number of years women in coveralls have been a familiar sight coming to
and going from industrial plants where they may be employed at occupations requiring
a considerable measure of skill. Some of the industries in which they form a very
large percentage of the total employees are engaged in the manufacture of products
entirely new to the Province. The work being performed in these plants is comparatively light and largely repetitive.
While many of our plants have employed a high percentage of women in peace-time,
their number has been considerably increased during the war years. In order that safe
working conditions shall prevail at whatever industrial occupation they are employed,
periodical inspections are made to ensure that all hazardous parts of power-driven
machinery are adequately guarded. I 112 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
While rules and regulations stipulate that caps shall be worn by female workers
who operate or come within close proximity to power-driven machinery, some difficulty
has been experienced in enforcing this. Various reasons are given for reluctance to
wear a proper head-covering. Until such time as management makes the wearing of
proper covering over the hair a condition of employment, distressing scalp injuries are
very liable to occur.
It is generally conceded by industry that women have performed a remarkable job
during the war years, and many tributes are being paid in this respect. When the
peace comes, whether or not there will be a wholesale exodus of women from the ranks
of industry remains to be seen. We find, in conversation with foremen and officials
supervising their occupational duties, that there is a diversified opinion as to their
continued employment. However, they have disproved the common opinion that women
have no mechanical ability, and we are of the opinion that employers who may have been
reluctant to employ them will probably be just as reluctant to relinquish the trained
dexterous female hands.
CHILD LABOUR.
At the 1944 session of the Provincial Legislature there was placed on the Statute-
books of the Province an Act to control the employment of children, and defined a
" child " as a male or female person under the age of 15 years. Previous to the enactment of this legislation, the employment of children was governed by certain provisions
of the " Factories Act" and applied only to children employed in factories. They were
being employed in industrial and other occupations, which in some instances were
hazardous and in others where their moral well-being and health were being impaired.
The employment of children in these occupations is now prohibited, as enumerated in
the Schedule to the " Control of Employment of Children Act."
Occasionally we are called upon to decide as to whether or not it would be in the
best interests of society and the so-called problem child to permit him to be employed
in a factory earning something which he might attempt to secure by other than legal
means. The very rare instances in which we have authorized the employment of such
children, we believe, have been the means of their becoming useful members of society.
Our records refute the contention advanced from some quarters that earnings
received by a child while in authorized industrial employment during the summer school
holidays have a tendency to create a desire not to return to school the following term.
A survey revealed that all children under the age of 15 years who had been in authorized
employment during the 1944 vacation period in British Columbia had returned to school.
We still have the employer who wishes to exploit the child and also the parent or
guardian who desires to do likewise. The parent (or guardian) claims it is good for
the child, because it teaches him (or her) thrift and obedience, but no intelligent citizen
holds such views to-day. If our nation is to be strong for its tasks of the future, the
right of its growing children to a fair start in life must be defended.
INDUSTRIAL HOME-WORK.
Industrial home-work has long been considered an industrial and social evil, and it
is difficult to understand on what basis it is permitted to increase to such magnitude in
some of the other Provinces. It is an admitted fact there are instances where industrial
home-work serves a useful purpose, but it should be limited to persons who are unable
to leave the home because of the care of an invalid or for some other worthy reason.
An increased home-worker personnel means a decreased personnel in the factory
where work is performed under controlled conditions, such as sanitation, hours of work,
wages, etc. Our employers in this Province, a number of whom have to contend with
this unfair outside competitive practice, are placed in anything but an advantageous REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 113
position. We wish to pay tribute to them because they have shown no indication of
desiring to be permitted to introduce industrial home-work on a large scale in this
Province. During the year under review, eight permits were issued to employers and
twenty-three to home-workers.
PASSENGER AND FREIGHT ELEVATORS.
There is no form of transportation more in general use to-day by the public than
the passenger-elevator. One has only to enter a department store, office building, or hotel
to realize the large number of persons transported daily by this means of conveyance.
When entering an elevator a person is justified in assuming that every precaution
has been taken for safety, and many safety devices are installed for this very purpose.
Included in these safety devices are door and gate interlocking equipment, so installed
that they are inaccessible from outside the hoistway. Inspection and investigation of
injuries received have revealed in some cases that these important safety devices have
been rendered ineffective either by removal or other dangerous practices, and have been
the direct cause of persons receiving serious injuries by falling down the elevator hoist-
way. Owing to our inability to determine with certainty the individuals responsible
for rendering these safety devices ineffective, we have been unable to take appropriate
action.
ELEVATQR OPERATORS' LICENCES.
During the year 1944, 939 licences were renewed and 530 temporary and 429 permanent licences issued.
ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1944, there were 1,462 inspections and reinspections of freight
and passenger elevators.
NEW ELEVATOR INSTALLATIONS.
Fifteen plans and specifications relating to the installation of modern elevator
equipment were approved.
CONCLUSION.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all officials and employees connected
with industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Douglas,
Inspector of Factories. I 114
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE APPRENTICESHIP BRANCH, 1944.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
J. A. Ward Bell, Chairman.
Adam Bell.
J. F. Keen.
James Thomson.
Administrative Officials of Branch.
Hamilton Crisford—
Arthur H. Dugdale.-
_.Director of Apprenticeship.
..Assistant Director.
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit annual report on the development of apprenticeship for
the year 1944.
On December 31st,  1944, the standing and  distribution  of apprentices in the
various trades or occupations was as follows:—
Year op Apprenticeship being served.
Total
Number of
Trade or Occupation.
First.
Second.       Third.
Fourth.
Fifth.
Apprentices.
33
8
3
5
14
5    '
20
1
33
7
60
2
3
12
4
2
14
8
13
21
3
1
2
2
1
20
10
10
5
1
3
28
18
6
73
5
15
4
8
8
6
4
14
2
1
1
1
10
4
4
1
4
10
4
3
69
2
20
3
7
3
10
16
1
2
1
1
9
9
3
11
10
2
53
12
4
5
17
1
12
11
3
1
1
3
1
3
2
22
8
1
3
3
6
5
1
3
72
18
19
22
1
Carpentry  —   -	
34
3
8
71
1
Hairdressing, beauticians    	
Jewellery and watch manufacturing    	
51
19
5
Moulding -   — - 	
58
12
13
Sheet-metal and tinsmithing 	
67
3
6
4
Totals  - 	
276
243
175
166
58
918
730
1,648
The above table does not include 114 lads working as probationary apprentices on
preliminary contracts.
The standing in regard to completed apprenticeships at the same date stood at
950 and this figure includes 165 machinists and fitters who have contributed much to the
industrial war effort, 105 in automobile maintenance, 96 carpenters, 82 hairdressers
and beauticians, 62 barbers, 61 electricians, 66 pharmacists, 43 moulders, 29 plumbers,
29 boiler-makers, 30 sheet-metal workers, and 182 in miscellaneous trades and
occupations. As reported in last year's report, the Federal Government having realized the
desirability of a uniform system of apprenticeship throughout the Dominion had
suggested to all Provinces that Apprenticeship Acts be placed on their Statutes and that
such Acts be along the same lines as the British Columbia and Ontario Apprenticeship
Acts, these being the only two Provinces that had developed a regulated apprenticeship
system.
The Federal Government proposals culminated in all Provinces placing Apprenticeship Statutes on their books and agreements were then presented to all Provincial
Governments, under the provisions of the " Vocational Training Co-ordination Act,"
whereby Federal funds could be made available for the technical and vocational training
of all apprentices duly indentured in accordance with the provisions set out.
The Government of British Columbia signed this agreement on the 8th day of
August, 1944, covering that fiscal year and expiring on the 31st day of March, 1954.
Under this agreement the Federal Government will assist the various Provinces in
setting up machinery for efficient technical, trade, and vocational training in connection
with apprenticeship and will pay practically the whole cost of such training for discharged members of His Majesty's armed forces eligible for rehabilitation in accordance
with the terms of the War Emergency Training Agreement.
The development of practical apprenticeship classes in all the various trades and
occupations requires a great deal of study and organization, but this is well under way
in British Columbia, where technical schools were already established and had already
been used for this purpose to a limited degree.
It is hoped during the coming year full training facilities will be available and that
classes will be established on a permanent basis. This will necessitate a realization by
industry and by the youth of the Province that a higher standard of general education
is essential in those desiring to enter the skilled trades, as otherwise they will be unable
to absorb the knowledge available through apprenticeship trade classes and their
progress in the various trades and occupations will be stunted.
While progress has been consistent under the British Columbia " Apprenticeship
Act" and the Province can look with some pride at the results so far achieved, it is
believed that the new agreement will add much to our present system and that it will
make possible an advance in general apprenticeship conditions in conformity with the
modern trend to assure proficiency which is an ever-present necessity on this American
continent if we are to maintain our present high standards in production and living.
Hamilton Crisford,
Director of Apprenticeship. I 116 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH.
Administrative Offices—789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Administrative Officers.
J. A. Ward Bell    -  Chief Administrative Officer.
Mrs. Rex Eaton.
Hamilton Crisford  „ - - Secretary-
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit annual report of the Trade-schools Regulation Branch for
the calendar year 1944.
The year passed without any major complaint in regard to the operation of registered schools and all schools have complied with the general regulations under which
they are allowed to operate.    The following is the list of registered schools:—
Alexander Hamilton Institute, Ltd., 54 Wellington Street West, Toronto, Ontario.—
Business training.
Canadian Institute of Science and Technology, Limited, 219 Bay Street, Toronto,
Ontario.—Civil, architectural, and mining engineering; hydraulics, hydraulic
machinery, sanitary engineering, municipal and county engineer's course,
building construction, heating and ventilating, mechanical and electrical engineering, business and accountants' course, salesmanship, advertising, wireless,
television, aeronautical engineering, aeroplane courses; other courses as per
prospectus.
Canadian Writers' Service, 817 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Short-story
writing.
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, Inc., 3224 16th Street N.W., Washington,
D.C.—Radio engineering.
Cooper Institute of Accountancy, Ltd., Cooper Building, Winnipeg, Manitoba.—
Accountancy.
Hemphill Diesel Engineering Schools, Ltd., 1160 Hastings Street West, Vancouver,
B.C.—Diesel engineering.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian; Limited, 1517 Mountain Street,
Montreal, Quebec.—Agriculture, air-conditioning, applied art, architecture,
aviation engineering, business education, chemistry, civil engineering, domestic science, electrical engineering, general education, mining and mechanical
engineering, navigation, paper manufacture, plumbing and heating, railroad
operation, textile manufacture;   other courses as per prospectus.
International Accountants Society, Inc., 209 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago 6,
Illinois.—Accountancy.
LaSalle Extension University, 4101 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.—
Higher accountancy, business management, industrial management, elements
of accounting, C.P.A. coaching, salesmanship, railway accounting, effective
speaking, commercial law, stenotypy, business English, modern business correspondence, credit and collection correspondence, practical accounting and
office practice;   other courses as per prospectus.
M.C.C. Schools, Limited, 301 Enderton Building, Winnipeg, Manitoba.—Dominion
Civil Service, home kindergarten.
National Radio Institute, Inc., 16th and U Streets N.W., Washington, D.C.—
Practical radio and television. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 117
National Schools, 4000 S. Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, California.—Radio and
television, Diesel and other combustion engines, air-conditioning and refrigeration, applied electrical engineering, modern machine-shop instruction,
advanced radio engineering.
Northern Institute of Technology, 54 Bloor Street, Toronto, Ontario.—Commercial
radio operating, radio technology, applied radio and electronics, advanced
engineering, electrical technology.
Plastics Industries Technical Institute, 186 South Alvarado Street, Los Angeles,
California.—Plastics.
Shaw Schools, Limited, 1130 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario.—Commercial course,
short-story writing, stationary engineering.
Toronto School of Design, 1139 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario.—Designing.
Academy of Useful Arts, 615 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Dressmaking,
designing and kindred arts.
Academy of Useful Arts, 853 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.—Dressmaking, designing
and kindred arts.
B.C. School of Pharmacy and Science, 615 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Pharmacy.
B.C. Tree Fruits, Limited, Okanagan, Kootenay and Creston Districts, Kelowna,
B.C.—Fruit-packing.
B.C. Logging Power Saw School, 1805 Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Power-saw
operations, logging industry. (The sale of tuition is confined to persons
recommended by operating west coast logging companies and to those who can
produce evidence that they have.had suitable experience on Coast logging
operations.)
Central Business College, Mcintosh Building, Chilliwack, B.C.—Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Comptometer School, 342 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Comptometer
operation.
Brisbane Aviation Company, Limited, Vancouver Civic Airport, Vancouver, B.C.—
Aircraft engineering.
Dobell School of Business, Island Highway and Duncan Avenue, Courtenay, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Duffus School of Business, Limited, 540 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
El-Mar Handcraft School, 3057 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Dressmaking,
designing and kindred arts, millinery.
Eyii's Civil Service Business College, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Fenton Commercial School, 2001-2003 Forty-first Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Goodman's School of Fashion and Design, 445 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—
Costume designing, fashion sketching, pattern-making, dressmaking and
tailoring.
Grandview Business College, 1768 Williams Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Harradine Commercial College, 5665 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Herbert's Business College, Room 3, Casorso Block, Kelowna, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Hollyburn Business College, Fourteenth Avenue and Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental). I 118 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Lonsdale Shorthand and Typewriting Academy, Crown Building, 615 Pender Street
West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (shorthand, typewriting and elementary book-keeping).
Lownds School of Commerce, Limited, 80 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Loyd-Griffin Business School, Fairview and Main Street, Penticton, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Maxine Beauty School, 619 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Hairdressing.
Moler Barber School, 20 Cordova Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Barbering.
Moler Hairdressing School, 303 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Hair-
dressing.
Victor Mott  .  .   .   Fashions, 620 Trounce Alley, Victoria, B.C.—Fashion designing.
McEwen-Wilkie Business College, Corner Vance and Barnard Avenue, Vernon, B.C.
—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Nelson Business College, 107 Baker Street, Nelson, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster Commercial College, 713 Columbia Street, New Westminster,
B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Pitman Business College, Limited, 1450 Broadway West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Roger of " The Russian Duchess Beauty Salon," 768 Granville Street, Vancouver,
B.C.—Advanced hairdressing, individual personal instruction.
Royal Business College, 1006 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.—Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Standard School of Stenography and Typewriting, 1526 Pandora Avenue, Victoria,
B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
H. Faulkner Smith School of Applied and Fine Art, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver,
B.C.—Commercial art.
St. Ann's Academy, Commercial Department, 835 Humboldt Street, Victoria, B.C.
—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Sprott-Shaw Schools, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Sprott-Shaw Radio School, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Wireless telegraphy combined with radio engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Victoria Business Institute, Limited, 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria,
B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental), radiotelegraphy.
Trail Business College, 648 Weir Street, Trail, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Vancouver Engineering Academy, 407 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Stationary, marine and Diesel engineering.
Vancouver Display School, 2055 Seventh Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.—Window
display and show-card writing.
Voice Production and Radio Broadcasting School, 1879 Barclay Street, Vancouver,
B.C.—Radio announcing.
Welding Construction School, 148 First Avenue East, Vancouver, B.C.—Electric
welding, acetylene cutting.
Western School of Commerce, Limited, 712 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Western College of Pharmacy, 1524 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Pharmacy.
Willis College of Business, 850 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 119
Don Wilson Studios, 813 Birks Building, 718 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—
Radio broadcasting.
Excellent co-operation has been received from the Better Business Bureau in
directing persons desirous of purchasing tuition to this office for information.
The daily newspapers have been co-operative in that there has been an almost total
absence of misleading advertising in so far as trade-schools are concerned.
The Act continues to have whole-hearted public support.
Hamilton Crisford,
Secretary. I 120 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SAFETY BRANCH.
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Safety Branch for the year 1944.
The work of the Branch in the lumber industry has been concentrated on educational lines in close contact with employers and their associations and with the workers
and their safety committees.
An interchange of experiences and new accident-prevention ideas was started in
June through the safety news letter service. The ideas of any one in the lumber
industry are recorded and passed on to other interested company officials and members
of safety committees.
The quarterly survey of compensable accidents in the lumber industry west of
the Cascade Mountains has been carried on during the year. Approximately 24,000
employees are covered, 8,000 of which are employees of the logging industry and 9,000
employees of the sawmill industry. The individual operators are notified of the
frequency and severity rates of the compensable injuries in their operations at the end
of each quarter. So that they may make a comparison, they also are supplied with
the average rates for the Association to which they belong, together with the average
rates for the section of the lumber industry in which they are classified. Thus they are
able to judge how their individual experience stands in comparison to the average for
each quarterly period. To keep the operators notified of the trend of compensable
accidents in their operations, their experience is carried forward for successive
quarterly periods and their frequency and severity rates based on a larger number of
actual man-hours exposure. By the Safety Branch sending out reports at regular
intervals the managements of the operations on the Coast are becoming more concerned
about their accident record.
The beginning of a safety-first drive among the employers and employees east of
the Cascades was started by the Safety Branch when the Interior lumber companies
were visited in September, 1944. At that time the annual convention of the Interior
Lumbermen's Association was attended.
As well as regular inspection-work throughout the year, when a fatal accident
occurred a special investigation was made, wherever possible, and the coroner's inquest
attended by a representative of the Safety Branch. As a result of the findings at such
times, several suggestions for the prevention of recurrence of accidents were made'to
the Workmen's Compensation Board and they have been adopted in the revised regulations of the Board.
In June, the Safety Branch joined the National Safety Council of the U.S.A.
Numerous safety committee meetings in logging camps and sawmills were attended
during the year. Also, active participation was taken in the following meetings and
conventions:—
January 2nd and 3rd: Seventh annual convention of the International Woodworkers of America, New Westminster, B.C. (Following the convention, meetings
were held with the executive officials to help arrange the Union's co-operation in safety
matters.)
January 21st and 22nd: First annual convention of the Truck Loggers' Association, Vancouver, B.C. A special accident-prevention session for the convention was
arranged by the Safety Branch. (This Association set up a safety committee to plan
their accident-prevention campaign with the help of the Branch.)
March 22nd: The B.C. Industrial Safety Council and the Safety Branch held
a special meeting in Victoria, B.C., which was addressed by the Honourable G. S. Pear- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1944. I 121
son, Minister of Labour.    A few of the regular meetings and the first annual meeting
of the Council were attended.
April 18th: The Safety Branch called a meeting of representatives of the lumber
industry from Vancouver Island and the Vancouver Mainland District, which was held
at Vancouver, B.C.
June 7th, 8th, and 9th: Western Safety Conference, Lumbering Section, Eugene,
Oregon. At these sessions there was an interchange of safety information with
accident-prevention workers in six western States represented.
September 3rd: Workers' Educational Association, Summer School, Ocean
Park, B.C. Also, this Association's conference was attended in December, at Vancouver, B.C.
October 18th: A part was taken in the second accident-prevention broadcast on
the radio programme " Green Gold." On this programme the fullest co-operation with
employers and with the Government in reducing accidents was pledged by the International Woodworkers of America.
December 8th: Meeting arranged by the Safety Branch and held at Victoria, B.C.,
for the lumber industry to learn about Job Safety Training which is available to
industry through the Dominion Department of Labour and the British Columbia
Department of Education. This training is under the auspices of the Vocational
Training Programme and is sponsored by the Safety Branch for employees of the
lumber industry to learn safe working methods and reduce accidents.
The experience of the past year is definite proof that a sustained educational programme is the best way to prevent accidents. The collection of Workmen's Compensation Board assessment from the logging industry was reduced by about 25 per cent,
for 1944. The compensation assessment rate is set at 10 per cent, for 1945 which
is a 13-per-cent. reduction over 1943. It is hoped that the growing interest shown by
employers and employees will result in a permanent improvement in the whole lumber
industry as conditions return to normal.
I would like to express special thanks to the different employers' Associations which
have co-operated continually with the Safety Branch and to the International Woodworkers of America for their action in endorsing our educational work.
Sincere thanks are extended to the Honourable the Minister of Labour for his
support of the Branch and to the Deputy Minister for his assistance in developing a
progressive industrial safety policy.
Respectfully submitted.
A. M. Whisker,
Safety Adviser.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
minted by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945.
2,005-745-7344   

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0320812/manifest

Comment

Related Items