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FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1946]

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 FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF THE PROVINCE OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1944, TO MARCH 31ST, 1945
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945.  To His Honour William Culham Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Forty-first Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1945.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
  ■ Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1944, to March 31st, 1945.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. S. PEARSON, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Ross, George A., Superintendent. Mayers, E. W., Assistant Superintendent.
Melville, R.'N.'S., Social Worker.      Garrard, Miss J. McK., Acting Nurse-Matron.
Goodlad, John I., Teaching Supervisor. Gilley, Miss D. F., Clerk. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit herewith the forty-first annual report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys.
The statistical tables of our year's intake will be found interesting, an increase in
juvenile delinquency in some areas of the Province being indicated. Thirty-five
Juvenile Courts committed a total of 104 boys to the school. Of this number 20.2 per
cent, came from Vancouver Island, 32.7 per cent, from the Interior, while 47.1 per cent,
came from the lower mainland and coastal area.
Considerable variation in age at date of admission will be noted, ranging from
10%2 years to 18 years, the average of the total being 14% years. It is worthy of
note that five boys were under 12 years of age and eighteen boys were over 17 years
of age upon admission.
The total of inmate-days shows a decided increase in daily average population, as
will be noted from the following figures:—
1942-43 16,984 inmate-days, daily average, 46 boys.
1943-44 21,895 inmate-days, daily average, 60 boys.
1944-45 31,083 inmate-days, daily average, 85 boys.
Of the eighty-three boys in the school as at March 31st, 1945: Thirty-eight had
been with us under six months; twenty-two had been with us between six to nine
months; ten had been with us between nine to twelve months; nine had been with us
between twelve to eighteen months; three had been with us between eighteen to twenty-
four months;   and one had been with us over two years.
The increase in our population necessitated the building of a temporary dormitory,
which we took over in January of this year. It was filled to capacity immediately by
the overflow hitherto housed in the auditorium. This temporary addition permits the
segregation of juniors, intermediates, and seniors in separate sleeping quarters. Other
alterations made in the main building have increased the capacity of our dining-room,
easing the overcrowding considerably.
Your attention is respectfully directed to the medical report of Miss J. Garrard,
R.N., which shows the extent of the school's health services. It is evident that many
boys coming to us are in need of medical, surgical, and dental care. This may be due in
part to the scarcity of these services in the more remote parts of the Province as a result
of the war demands. As little can be accomplished in changing the behaviour pattern
of sick children, every effort is made to restore the boys in our care to normal health.
A long-felt need has been met by the appointment to our staff of a full-time social
worker. This, we feel, will result in closer co-operation and co-ordination of effort as
between the school and the various welfare agencies and more efficient service within
the school. The expanding programme of social assistance throughout the Province
necessitated a review of the place and function of our school as an integral part of the
whole, and in conference with the agencies concerned policies were drawn up to cover
details of procedure and responsibility. This should result in the elimination of
overlapping effort and facilitate the work with each individual case.
5 L 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
A marked increase in interest and enrolment in our educational department is
evident and the report of Mr. John I. Goodlad, teaching supervisor, contains many
interesting and indicative facts and figures. Regardless of the difficulties in accommodation and the fluctuation in enrolment owing to the continual turnover, it is felt that
this department has rendered maximum service to the boys under our care. May I
emphasize the appreciation expressed by Mr. Goodlad of the very fine co-operation we
have enjoyed from Dr. E. E. Lucas, Director of High School and Vocational
Correspondence Instruction, and her staff for the helpful services they have given our
educational department during the year.
On January 15th, 1945, Mr. W. Mayers, who was on leave of absence, returned to
his former duties as assistant superintendent, following three and one-half years in
the Royal Canadian Air Force, and Mr. H. Christie, who acted during Mr. Mayers'
absence, transferred to the Social Assistance Branch. Miss W. McLean, R.N., our
nurse-matron, was granted leave of absence to enlist in the Royal Canadian Army
Medical Corps, her duties being taken over by Miss J. Garrard, R.N., on March 1st,
1945.
The group work still continues to hold the interest of the boys, but the increase in
numbers participating has brought added duties and responsibilities to each member
of our staff in order that adequate supervision for the larger number may be
maintained.
The addition to our programme of a weekly moving-picture show is greatly
appreciated by the boys and the use of the equipment for educational films during
school hours has done much to create a real interest in the general programme.
Last year it was the privilege of the Superintendent, in company with the
Superintendent of Child Welfare, to visit many training-schools and other welfare
agencies and institutions serving children in Canada and the eastern United States,
with the view to assembling material helpful in planning for the development of a
modern training-school for British Columbia and observing techniques and methods
employed. The findings and recommendations following this trip have been covered
by special reports already submitted.
During the summer of 1944 considerable effort was put forth in an endeavour
to locate a suitable site for a new training-school and working-sketches of a modern
cottage plan school were drawn up. Efforts in this connection still continue and we
look forward to the day when we will be able to transfer our activities to a modern
equipment in a new location.
It would be difficult to single out those due to receive our special thanks, as in the
course of our duties we are dependent on so many. It is sufficient to say that we are
deeply grateful for the kindly co-operation and the many services rendered by the
various departments of Government, Juvenile Court Judges, police, children's aid
societies, and to all who have helped us in our work we express appreciation and thanks.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Superintendent. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1944-45.
L 7
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1ST, 1944, TO
MARCH 31ST, 1945.
Number in school, April 1st, 1944	
     77
Number on parole, April 1st, 1944  110
Number away without leave, April 1st, 1944       1
Number of new commitments during year  104
Number of boys released     53
Number on parole, March 31st, 1945  140
Number on extended leave, March 31st, 1945       2
Number away without leave, March 31st, 1945     14
292
Number in school, March 31st, 1945.
209
~83
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1ST, 1944, TO MARCH 31st, 1945.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
Admission to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
2080
2081
2082
2083
2084
2085
2086
2087
2088
2089
2090
2091
2092
2093
2094
2095
2096
2097
2098
2099
2100
2101
2102
2103
2104
2105
2106
2107
2108
2109
2110
2111
2112
2113
2114
2115
2116
2117
2118
2119
2120
2121
Saskatoon, Sask.	
Truro, N.S 	
Shoreacres, B.C. 	
New Denver, B.C	
Napinka, Man 	
Melville, S!ask	
Kelowna, B.C	
Fernie, B.C.	
Kelowna, B.C. ___	
Kelowna, B.C.-	
Kelowna, B.C	
Viceroy, Sask 	
Rivers Inlet, B.C	
Lytton, B.C 	
Vancouver, B.C ....
Nicola Valley, B.C	
Newton, B.C.	
Barnsley, England —
Hollow Lake, Alta	
New Norway, Alta.—
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
North Vancouver, B.C.
Vancouver, B.C	
Calder, Sask. ._	
Saskatchewan 	
Saskatchewan 	
Regina, Sask	
Cumberland, B.C	
Red Deer, Alta	
Calgary, Alta	
Victoria, B.C. 	
Kelowna, B.C.	
Scott, Sask.	
Vancouver, B.C.	
Campbell River, B.C.
Luseland, Sask	
Regina, Sask.  _	
Bonnyville, Alta. __	
Kitscoty, Alta	
Calgary, Alta 	
Vancouver, B.C	
Russian-Austrian _
English-Irish___	
Russian (both)	
Italian (both)	
Scottish-Canadian	
Dutch (both) 	
Hungarian (both)	
Russian (both) _—	
Bohemian-Canadian _
Russian (both)	
English-Indian 	
Russian (both)—	
Indian (both)	
Indian (both) —
Scottish-English	
Indian (both)	
English (both)	
English (both)	
Finnish-Norwegian __
English (both)..	
English (both) __
English-Italian _—
English (both)-	
English (both)-	
Ukrainian (both)	
Russian (both)	
Russian (both)	
Irish-Scottish._	
Japanese (both)	
Irish-Russian 	
Canadian (both)	
English (both)	
English-Swedish	
Russian (both) .__
English-Irish	
Indian (both)  	
American (both)..
Irish-Scottish	
Canadian (both).__
English (both)-	
Polish (both) 	
Belgian-Canadian..
Years.
5
14
Life.
Life.
11
10
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
17
3
1
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
9
7
7
12
Life.
3 wks.
6 mos.
Life.
Life.
14
Life.
Life.
9
14
7
4
6 mos.
Life.
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
17
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life. L 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1944, TO MARCH 31st, 1945-
Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
Admission
PREVIOUS to
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
2122
Unknown-Canadian. —	
Years.
Life.
12
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
4
2
15
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
9 mos.
3 mos.
Life.
2
Life.
Life.
Life.
2
Life.
Life.
1
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
11
1 mo.
2
Life.
8
Unknown.
.     Life.
Life.
Life.
6
Life.
Life.
1
Years.
Life.
2123
12
2124
Life.
2125
Life.
2126
Polish (both)     	
Life.
2127
Victoria, B.C	
English (both)  	
Life.
2128
Scottish-Canadian __   	
Indian (both)  _ ___	
Life.
2129
Shalalth, B.C	
Life.
2130
Victoria, B.C.
Life.
2131
Nelson, B.C.
Life.
2132
Life.
2133
English (both) _ _ _..
Life.
2134
Life.
Armstrong, B.C	
Life.
2136
Life.
2137
Life.
2138
Life.
2139
Victoria, B.C.
English (both) _	
Life.
2140
Life.
2141
Life.
2142
Life.
2143
Czechoslovakian-Russian  	
Life.
2144
Life.
2145
Calgary, Alta._ — _	
Life.
2146
Life.
2147
Life.
2148
Victoria, B.C.
Life.
2149
Victoria, B.C.
Life.
2150
Life.
2151
Life.
2152
Life.
2153
Estuary, Alta  	
Irish (both) _	
Life.
2154
Unknown ___	
Life.
2155
American-Canadian,	
Life.
2156
Life.
2157
Polish-Norwegian  	
Life.
2158
Life.
2159
Canadian-English   	
Life.
Abbotsford, B.C.
Life.
2161
Life.
2162
Life.
Taber Alta.
Life.
2164
Russian (both)     	
Life.
2165
Kelowna, B.C.
Life.
2166
Life.
2167
Irish (both)   __'__	
Life.
2168
Life.
2169
French-Unknown  	
Dutch-Canadian — _ 	
Life.
2170
Life.
2171
Life.
2172
Life.
2173
Life.
2174
Life.
2175
12
2176
Life.
2177
Burnaby, B.C _   	
Scottish-Canadian— __  	
Life.
Life.
2179
English (both) _ _.
Life.
2180
English (both)   	
6
2181
Life.
2182
Indian (both) __	
English (both)     	
Life.
St. James, Man — ____ ._
Life REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1944-45.
L 9
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American (both) ____.
American-Canadian
American-English ...
Belgian-Canadian ....
Bohemian-Canadian
Canadian (both) 	
Canadian-English __
Canadian-Irish 	
Canadian-Russian ...
Chinese (both)
Czechoslovakian-Russian
Dutch (both) 	
Dutch-Canadian 	
Dutch-Unknown 	
English (both)  _.._
English-Canadian 	
English-Indian 	
English-Irish	
English-Italian	
English-Swedish  :	
Finnish-Norwegian 	
French-Canadian  (both).
French-Unknown 	
Hungarian (both) 	
Hungarian-Irish 	
Indian (both) 	
2            Irish (both)   2
1            Irish-Canadian   2
1            Irish-English  1
1            Irish-Russian  1
1 Irish-Scottish   2
10            Italian (both)   1
2 Italian-Irish ___,  1
1           Japanese (both)   1
1           Norwegian (both)   1
1            Polish (both)   2
1           Polish-Norwegian   1
1            Russian (both)   9
1           Russian-Austrian   1
1           Russian-Canadian  1
14           Russian-Ukrainian   1
1           Scottish-Canadian   4
1 Scottish-English   3
2 Scottish-Irish   1
1            Scottish-Norwegian   1
1            Scottish-Tasmanian  1
1 Ukrainian (both)   3
2 Unknown-Canadian   1
1            Unknown-Irish   1
3 Unknown  ... 1
1 	
8                           Total  104
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION FOR THE
YEARS 1942-43, 1943-44, 1944-45.
Birthplaces.
1942-43.
Alberta              _.    ..     _          _ _    _   ..        _                             _         9
1943-44.
14
62
3
1
2
1
10
1
3
97
1944-45
14
Australia    	
1
British Columbia  	
England                                           _
    44
68
2
France   -    	
      1
India                       - -  ■	
       1
Manitoba   	
       3
4
Nova Scotia
1
Ontario         ..        —_ 	
       3
2
Poland             	
,_       1
Quebec                     -     	
1
Russia            	
Saskatchewan 	
Scotland          .    —.   _    -        	
       7
 :.   1
10
United States of America         	
_        1
1
Unknown     .   .   _   	
       1
Totals	
     72
104 L 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Charges resulting in Commitment.
1942-43. 1943-44.    1944-45.
Theft  -  34 34          54
Breaking and entering  3 2           4
Breaking and entering and stealing  13 32         26
Retaining stolen property   2 4
Wilful damage of property  ____ 7
Arson   1 2
Assault   112
Indecent assault   2 3            1
Armed assault  1
Gross indecency      1
Violation of probation  3 15
Being a juvenile delinquent  2 1
Incorrigibility   8 3            7
Unlawfully carrying firearms     1
Infraction of " Railway Act "   —_ 2
Forgery   ____ 1
Attempted theft  _.._ 3
Unlawfully wearing Air Force uniform  1
Being intoxicated   _.__ ....           1
Fraud   ____ ....            2
Vagrancy  .  .... ....            2
Totals .... 72 97        104
Ages of Boys.
1942-43. 1943-44.    1944-45.
10 years  12 1
11 years  ____ 2             4
12 years  7 9            4
13 years  11 19          15
14 years  13 15         17
15 years  20 22         25
16 years  12 16          19
17 years  5 11          17
18 years  3 11
Unknown   ____                       1
Totals  72 97        104
Length of Sentence.
1942-43.
Indefinite  72
45 days :.. ____
3 months   ....
Not over 1 year  ....
Not less than 2 years  ....
Totals  72 97        104
943-44.
1944-45
96
100
1
1
	
1
	
1
	
1 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1944-45.
L 11
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Places of Apprehension.
Agassiz	
Alberni	
Alert Bay _.
Armstrong
Ashcroft ....
Brighouse _
Burnaby ...
Campbell River
Castlegar 	
Chase 	
Chilliwack 	
Clinton 	
Cloverdale 	
Courtenay 	
Cranbrook 	
Duncan 	
Enderby 	
Fernie  	
Fort Fraser	
Grand Forks 	
Greenwood 	
Haney 	
Hope	
Kamloops	
Kelowna 	
Kimberley  ..
Langley	
Lillooet	
Lumby 	
Lytton 	
Masset 	
Merritt 	
Mission 	
Nakusp 	
Nanaimo	
Natal 	
Nelson 	
New Westminster
North Vancouver .
Penticton	
Port Alberni 	
Pouce Coupe 	
Powell River	
Prince George 	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton 	
Quesnel 	
Revelstoke 	
Rossland 	
1942-43. 1943-44.
1 2
.    .... 2
.    .... 1
3
5
1
2
1
1
1
2
10
1
6
2
2
1
2
1
3
3
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
8
1
1
2
1
1
1944-45.
3
3
5
2
3
1
4
1
1
1 L 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION-
Places of Apprehension—Continued.
1942-43.
Sechelt                                 1
-Continued.
1943-44.    1944-45.
1
2            1
2
2
2            2
11          14
1            1
13          14
2
97        104
1943-44.    1944-45.
3
1
1
18          24
2
1
1 2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
28          30
1
2 1
2
17          13
22          23
97        104
Sidney     	
Sooke 	
Squamish 	
Smithers       1
Stuart Island  ...    _  	
Trail                   2
Vancouver      19
Vanderhoof               1
Vernon  _ _   .               3
Victoria       5
West Summerland  ....                                      1
Williams Lake          1
Yale         1
Totals     72
Religion.
1942-43.
Baptist      3
Christian Institute      	
Christian Science  .. _.	
Church of England .                                                  16
Church of God	
Doukhobour  	
Evangelical      	
Greek Catholic        2
Jehovah's Witness      	
Jewish '       1
Lutheran        1
Mennonite      	
Methodist     ....
Moravian       ...                 1
Plymouth Brethren                 1
Presbyterian     . _                     6
Roman Catholic ...     ...   ..                      24
Salvation Army     .                     1
Seventh-day Adventist   ...	
Sikh      1
Sons of Freedom 	
United                                      6
Non-denominational ...                         9
Totals            72 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1944-45. L 13
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Parental Relationships.
1942-43.     1943-44.     1944-45.
With both parents living   40 46          64
With both parents dead __  4 7
With father living and mother dead   3 5            7
With mother living and father dead   5 7            4
With both parents living but separated  13 23          16
With foster parents   .... 1
With parents whose whereabouts are unknown       1
With father living and stepmother   2 3
With mother living and stepfather   5 4
With mother dead and father married again   .... _            1
With parents separated and father married again        1
With parents separated and mother married again      ....            3
With father dead and mother married again         6
With parents separated and both married again        2
Totals     72 97        104
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1945, the teeth of all the boys presented
were carefully examined and record charts made. Very few of the boys had evidence
of regular dental care and most of them had very unhealthy mouths. The following
work was completed:—
Examinations   144
Hopelessly diseased teeth extracted      83
Local anaesthetic for relief of pain     82
Fillings inserted   269
Minor treatments for relief of pain     16
Prophylaxis     12
Treatment for gingivitis and pyorrhoea       9
Silver nitrate treatment to prevent decay       8
" As far as time would permit the most urgent cases were selected and the mouths
placed in a healthy condition.
" I believe the services rendered will be of great benefit in assisting these boys
to become useful citizens.
"Emery Jones, D.D.S."
Medical Report.
" Sir,—The medical care extended during the year 1944-45 was as follows:—
No. of Cases.    No. of Days.
Tonsillectomy   14 38
Herniotomy  2 28+
Appendectomy   1 11
Cellulitis of knee  1 10
Removal of ingrown toe-nail  1                 2
Removal of cyst from wrist  1                  3
Removal of growth from finger   1                  3
Incision and drainage of carbuncle  1                 7 L 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HEALTH—Continued.
Medical Report—Continued.
No. of Cases.    No. of Days.
Fractured foot, cast applied      1 2
Sprained ankle, cast applied      1 2
Observation and lumbar puncture      1 9
Totals  25 115
"Minor injuries and illnesses treated within the school included:—
No. of Cases.
Infectious jaundice   20
Influenza   8
Boils : .... 20
Septic throat   7
Ear trouble   13
Eye injury ' 3
Lacerations requiring sutures—
Head  6
Fingers    2
Legs   2
Face   1
Eye  1
Ulcerated leg   2
Infected toe  2
Infected finger  2
Pinkeye   8
Scabies  6
Chicken-pox   1
104
" Ten boys had their eyes examined by a specialist and were fitted with glasses.
Seven pairs of glasses were repaired. Specialists were consulted on one psychiatric
case, two ear cases, one burn on eye, and one sinus case.   One cardiology was done.
" On admission to the school each boy has a complete physical examination, Kahn
test and chest X-ray. This year an immunization programme has been added which
includes Schick testing and innoculation against diphtheria and smallpox. Dispensing
of haliver-oil capsules during the winter months is a new step which has done much to
lessen the number of common colds.
" We appreciate the guidance of the Nutrition Consultant of the Provincial Board
of Health. War-time rationing of provisions continues to limit the variety in menu
but a well-balanced diet has been maintained.
" Occupation of the new temporary building has greatly relieved the congestion in
the dormitories, which was a definite factor in the spread of infection.
" It is evident, as we look back through the years, that increased emphasis is being
placed on health services. Medical, dental, nursing, and dietary supervision, specialists'
services, hospitalization, adequate infirmary and isolation quarters, physical education
and hygienic living conditions are included in the health programme now extended to
our boys. Preventive therapy is more apparent. It requires greater effort, greater
staff, and an increased financial expenditure, but it is beginning to show results. The
fact that this year we had no incidence of serious illness, no active tuberculosis, no
venereal disease, and no epidemics is one indication of progress made.   Carious teeth, REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1944-45. L 15
diseased tonsils, hernias, skin infections, and other conditions which have so apparently
been neglected before admission are our greatest burden now, but it is felt that the
effort to rectify them is warranted. Our aim is to send these boys into the world more
physically fit and more health conscious than when they came to us. We appreciate
the help we have received in our endeavour to fulfil this objective.
" Jennie McK. Garrard, R.N.,
Acting Nurse-Matron." L 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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O      *J (i) o REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1944-45. L 17
EDUCATIONAL.
" Sir,—With the consolidation of academic and vocational instruction into one
department in September, 1944, the school term commenced auspiciously.    The staff
was composed of the following:—
Division 1—J. I. Goodlad.
Division 2—September   11th   to   December   31st,   (Miss)   H.   V.   Pattison;
January 1st to March 31st, E. W. Blagburn.
Division 3—(Mrs.) A. L. Arthur.
Industrial Arts—J. B. Pattern.
Motor Mechanics—D. W. Munro.
" Unfortunately, we were unable to secure a teacher for Division 2 for over a week
after the commencement of the term.    Educational progress was further handicapped
by lack of accommodation, the intermediate class-room serving the dual purpose of
dormitory at night and hall of learning during the day.    However, this condition was
remedied with the opening of a new building early in 1945.
" During the year 1943-44, 128 boys attended school classes, an increase of forty-
four over the previous year. The highest attendance at any one time was seventy-one.
The average intelligence quotient of 86 represents no change from that of last term.
In June, 1944, the school inspector, Mr. E. G. Daniels, recommended the promotion to
Grade IX. of eight of the eleven boys enrolled in Grade VIII. Those on the roll as at
March 31st, 1945, constituting the lowest enrolment of the term, were graded as
follows:—
Special Class     4
Grade III     1
'     Grade IV    4
Grade V     9
Grade VI     4
Grade VII  11
Grade VIII  13
Grade IX     8
Grade XI.   (Correspondence).     1
Total  55
" The Special Class is so designated because in it are placed boys who, through
inability to attend school or lack of mental equipment, are seriously retarded. It was
extremely gratifying to witness the progress of several boys in this group who, at
first unable to read or to write more than their names, learned to read at Grade III.
level and to write neat letters to friends and relatives. The provision of three divisions,
lessening the load placed upon each teacher, contributed greatly to making this
satisfying educational achievement possible. Actually, there are many of the boys
listed in the higher grades who warrant Special Class instruction but have been placed
in the grade specified merely for convenience. It is not unusual to find a pupil studying
three separate subjects in as many different grades.
" Another factor conducive to individual attention is the constantly fluctuating
enrolment. For example, although eight boys enrolled for the newly-opened Grade IX.
class in September, 1944, and although there were still eight on the register as at
March 31st, 1945, a total of seventeen boys attended these classes, only one of whom
was in the institution for the entire period. A turn-over such as this, in addition to
hampering progress, necessitates constant review. However, although no positive
evaluation can be made until after the final examinations, our Grade IX. class appears
to be a successful venture. \ L 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" The following table of
interesting facts:—
As^ed 10 vears	
ages
on
the
roll
as
at
March
31st,
1945,
indicates
...    1
two
..     11     .
_     2
,     12     ,
,     13     ,
,     14     ,
,     15     ,
,     16     ,
.     17     .
...    6
__    9
... 14
... 12
...    8
.    3
Total	
... 55
" First, it is obvious that many boys are retarded in their schooling. As
previously suggested, mental deficiencies play a prominent role in producing this
condition. In many cases retardation is due to the fact that the pupil lived outside an
organized school district, that he worked (with the full approval of the parent and
contrary to existing law), or that he played truant. Secondly, although school attendance is no longer compulsory after the age of 15 years, 41.8 per cent, of those enrolled
were over this age. Many of these boys had been working before entering the
institution and came to school in order to resume a previously interrupted education.
Since this is probably the last contact with formal education for the majority of them,
they must not be bent to conform with the curriculum; rather must the curriculum
be revised and reshaped to suit their individual needs and experiences. Accordingly,
all those boys not attending regular academic school were directed to attend classes
one-half day weekly for instruction in such essentials as fundamental arithmetic,
letter-writing, job-application, and in the completion of business forms such as cheques,
bank deposit slips, and income tax forms. In addition, correspondence courses in such
subjects as automotive engineering, mechanical drawing, building construction, fruitgrowing, Diesel engineering, and so forth, provided the opportunity for specialization.
In this regard, we wish to thank Dr. Edith E. Lucas, Director of High School and
Vocational Correspondence Instruction, and her staff for their kind co-operation and
sympathetic understanding of our work.
" Our library is used primarily for recreational reading. Non-fiction books are
retained in the class-rooms where they are more readily available for educational
purposes. By an arrangement instituted in September, 1944, every boy in the school
draws any book he wishes from the library and reads it during designated periods.
He is free to change his book at any time and to draw out another for class or spare-
time reading. During the year all books were classified by a card-index system to
facilitate replacement and many of the more popular volumes were rebound. Still
required are a reading-room, accommodation for which is lacking, and replacements
for badly worn favourites.
" The sound motion-picture projector, secured on a part-time basis, served as a
very useful supplementary device. Films were shown for entertainment purposes
every Thursday night; while educational pictures, obtained through the kindness of
the Visual Aids Department of the Vancouver School Board, were displayed every
second Monday. By using the radios of various staff members, we were able to take
advantage of the School Radio Broadcasts.
" In Division 1, the most interesting activity was the publishing of a school paper,
' The Biscoq Tradition.' The boys held regular class meetings to elect their staff and
reporters, learning to conduct business meetings in the proper manner, to cut stencils,
draw cartoons, use good English, and to work co-operatively.    The paper proved so REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1944-45. L 19
successful that every attempt will be made to continue publication in succeeding years.
During their meetings, the boys sometimes held debates on topics of current interest
or invited speakers to address them on problems pertaining to specific vocations or
industries. Besides decorating the room with posters, designs, and scenic paintings,
the pupils in Grades VIII. and IX. drew and coloured a 20-foot mural depicting
twentieth century progress in transportation.
" The boys in Division 2 have made a table model of a hydro-electric power system.
It illustrates the converting of water-power in a mountain stream to electric energy
which, in turn, is conveyed to a near-by town. Because of the unsatisfactory accommodation previously described, intensive drill has been required to bring the class up
to a satisfactory standard.
" The younger boys who make up Division 3 have been busy constructing a table
model of the institution. The teacher in charge has spent considerable time in devising
methods for teaching illiterate boys to read.
" Each boy in the school takes either Industrial Arts or Motor Mechanics. In the
former, boys are placed in classes according to scholastic ability. Since this is the first
year that the Industrial Arts have been studied as a regular school subject, all Junior
High students were taught the Grade VII. course in order to provide the necessary
background. Since the class-room adjoining the shop seats only nine pupils, an
administration problem is created. The Industrial Arts Instructor assists the boys
who take correspondence courses.
" The classes in Motor Mechanics continue to be popular. In spite of the fact that
our Instructor has a full-time job in caring for the garden and greenhouse, he gives the
boys a thorough practical training and more than one of his students have gone directly
into garage work upon leaving the institution. As the machine continues to occupy
an ever-enlarging position in modern life, our educational system must be quick to
conform to its requirements. The least that the school can do is to arouse an interest
which may be pursued as a vocation or a hobby. Interests aroused to-day produce
inventions to-morrow.
" I feel that more has been accomplished during the past year than during the two
previous years together—and this in spite of increasing population and correspondingly
decreasing accommodation. The combined efforts of both vocational and academic
instructors have provided a more completely correlated educational experience than
previously. But much remains to be done. We must continue to arouse worthwhile
interests and to develop minds and bodies that may be utilized in making correct and
adequate adjustments to normal living.
" John I. Goodlad,
Teaching Supervisor."
SOCIAL WORK DEPARTMENT.
" Sir,—Preparation for parole is implicit in the total programme of the Boys'
Industrial School. The growing need for increased individual planning for individual
needs has occasioned the appointment of a full-time social worker whose specific duty
it is to keep in motion or initiate, as the case may be, plans designed to ensure each
boy's happy readjustment to the community. Such planning is not new to the Boys'
Industrial School; it is, rather, the appointment of a social worker and the setting-up
of routine planning procedures that are recent.
" The principal underlying our preparation for parole procedure is that of utilizing
existing social services in the community. In carrying this out the Boys' Industrial
School social worker acts as a liaison person between the boy-in-training' and the social
agency that is giving service to his family (or its substitute).    In most instances the L 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
boy, prior to his committal, has become known to some social agency. Depending on
the nature of his pre-committal problems and the location of his home, he may have
been in contact with any one of the following services: Child Welfare Division, Family
Service, the Children's Aid Societies, Probation Service of a Juvenile Court, or Family
Welfare Bureau. In the case of a boy who has never been known to a social agency,
early steps are taken to ensure that such a service be initiated through the agency
best situated to plan with the boy's family toward his successful parole. A summary
of the agencies providing pre-parole planning service with the boy's home (or its
substitute) during a typical month is illustrative of the extent to which existing
agencies are co-operating with the school:—
Agency. Number of Boys.
Child Welfare Division  36
Children's Aid Society (Vancouver)   4
Children's Aid Society (Victoria)   2
Catholic Children's Aid Society   5
Family Service  16
Family Welfare Bureau  2
Probation Service, Burnaby  1
Probation Service, Vancouver  21
Probation Service, Victoria  12
Supervision pending for current month   7
" Although each boy admitted to the Boys' Industrial School presents his own
peculiar problems and needs, a general basic routine of planning procedure has already
taken form. It should be emphasized, before outlining the essentials of this process,
that it has evolved from practices co-operatively developed as between the school and
the social agencies which form an integral part of the entire parole and follow-up
programme.
(1.)  On admittal of a boy immediate steps are taken by social worker to set
up a co-operative arrangement with that agency best situated to plan,
from the community view-point, for the period commencing on his release.
(2.)  Once such an arrangement is set up, the school provides the co-operating
agency with an initial report on the boy as the school sees him, his
problems and needs.    This first report usually includes tentative lines of
planning for boy's future.
(3.)  As soon as possible, the co-operating agency in the boy's community
provides the school with as full a picture of the boy's home and his place
in it prior to committal.    This first report from the field focuses on
' leads ' suggestive to special needs that might be met by the school's
training  programme  and  also  suggests  tentative  plans  for the  post-
discharge period.
(4.)  During the boy's period of commitment a continuing interchange of
reports from the institution and the social agency as it sees the boy's
family   (or its substitute)   is maintained.    This continuing service is
kept in motion until school and agency co-operatively are able to suggest
that a successful parole is indicated.
(5.) There is an increasing service being offered on the boy's discharge in the
way  of  follow-up by the  agency which  helped  to  develop his  post-
discharge plans.    In this way a real attempt is being made to prevent
recidivism.
(6.) -A vital part of our parole preparation programme has been the unstinted
diagnostic and consultative services offered by the Child Guidance Clinic. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1944-45.       L.21
(7.)  Staff conferences and the maintenance of case records on each boy are
two of the methods used to provide for a wise training programme
during  the  institutional  period  and  adequate  planning  for the  post-
discharge   period.      The   former   include   staff—e.g.,   superintendent,
assistant superintendent, nurse, boy's leader, teacher, social worker—
having direct bearing on the particular problem the boy presents.    Case
records include copies of all reports relating to the boy's progress within
the school and to the plans being developed within his community for his
ultimate parole.    The advent of the projected  new school,  with  its
facilities for observation on  intake and segregation on the basis of
individual needs and problems during training, will do much to refine and
improve the effectiveness of this department.
" The parole preparation process is felt to be a sound basis for carrying out the
provisions of section 11 of the 'Industrial School for Boys Act.'    It is early to give
either a full evaluation or make detailed recommendations relating to the improvement
of the process.   Two needs, however, are already abundantly apparent:  A fuller use of
Child Guidance facilities at the intake stage and increased follow-up on discharge.
These two needs will be met only when sufficient staff in the services concerned have
been gained.
"R. N. S. Melville,
Social Worker."
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
" Sir,—Work in the tailoring department during the year 1944-45 comprised the
following:—
Tailoring:   36 pairs tweed pants, 222 pairs denim pants, 179 pairs shorts.
Miscellaneous:   79 sheets, 119 bath-towels, 42 tea-towels, lO1/^ pairs curtains,
8   doz.   pillow-covers   stitched,   71   pillow-covers  made,   42   pairs   socks
tagged, 118 pairs tweed pants pressed and repaired, 28 suits pressed, 1
overcoat pressed, 14 softballs repaired.
"Shoe check was held regularly and repairs done to 392 pairs.
" During the year five boys have received instruction and training in tailoring.
" J. Henderson,
Tailor."
Greenhouse and Garden.
" Sir,—This fiscal year has passed with very satisfactory returns for labour
expended. Although the new building for the Home for the Aged found part of our
garden an ideal spot for its construction and made it necessary for us to break up 1%
acres of new land we found plenty of interest in the work and look for a good crop
of potatoes this fall.   All crops planted this year give promise of turning out well.
" Work in the greenhouse and flower-garden held the interest of the boys put
under my charge and a very nice profusion of flowers resulted.
" D. W. Munro,
Gardener." L 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Recreation.
" Sir,—In reviewing the year's activities I find that there has been satisfactory
progress made in most phases of the work and that interest was even more acute than
in the preceding year. The recreational activities were carried on in four groups,
which we will discuss separately.
" The first group, which contains the better junior boys, forms the Hobby Club.
These boys spent their spare time in the summer of 1944 in hiking, swimming, and
in the building of a fleet of 8-foot skiffs, which were used at their camp-site on the
near-by Coquitlam River. The early part of the winter programme was spent in the
repair of old bicycles which were obtained "from a merchant in New Westminster. On
the completion of a number of these bicycles the boys spent hours touring the countryside. The balance of the winter programme was spent on aeroplane models and other
projects centring around their club-house.
" The Athletic Club, a group of select seniors, spent the summer in the building
of boats which they used on the Coquitlam River, near their camp-site. This group of
boys specialized in athletics and in the mastery of the gymnasium apparatus. A number of games of Softball and basketball were played with outside teams in which they
won their share of games. The good sportsmanship shown in these games was always
a source of comment to onlookers and opposing teams. The winter programme of
this group was largely spent in fret-work, aeroplane models, and in the building of
a fireplace and chimney in their club-house.
" Due to overcrowding of the institution, a second senior group was formed.
These boys, of a more quiet nature, spent the most of their spare time in their clubhouse working on models, sailboats, and a victory garden of corn and potatoes. Due to
temporary leadership this group was disbanded and the more promising boys of this
group were given a trial in the Athletic Club.
" The fourth group is made up of the new boys and the boys who were not
prepared to make the effort to get into the top clubs. These boys received a strict
training in gymnasium work and swimming, as well as playing many outdoor sports.
" Similar to the previous year each group leader kept individual records of each
club member. Progress reports were made up from these records but again were only
as valuable as the leader's observations were accurate and up-to-date. Leadership
training in the form of panel discussions on problems and work methods was again
a source of encouragement and enlightenment to the members taking part.
"Walter Shogan,
Instructor."
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945.
360-945-8297  

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