Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA THIRTY-FIRST, THIRTY-SECOND, AND THIRTY-THIRD REPORT OF THE MEDICAL INSPECTION… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1945

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0319201.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0319201.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0319201-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0319201-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0319201-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0319201-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0319201-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0319201-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0319201-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0319201.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THIRTY-FIRST, THIRTY-SECOND, and THIRTY-THIRD
REPORTS
OF THE
MEDICAL INSPECTION OF
SCHOOLS
FOR THE
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30th, 1942, 1943, and 1944
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945.  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., December 10th, 1944.
To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Reports of the Medical
Inspection of Schools for the years ended June 30th, 1942, 1943, and 1944.
G. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary. Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., December 10th, 1944.
The Honourable Geo. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Thirty-first, Thirty-second, and
Thirty-third Reports of the Medical Inspection of Schools for the years ended
June 30th, 1942, 1943, and 1944.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT, M.D., D.P.H.,
Provincial Health Officer. REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
A complete change in the method of recording, reporting, and appraising
the health of school children was put into effect in British Columbia in the
school-year 1941-42. To provide a consolidated picture of this phase of public
health it was deemed wise to present the results of the new programme for the
first three-year period during which, by experience, it was possible to summarize more effectively the results than would have been possible publishing
each year's figures separately. Because of the pressure of other tabulation and
statistical work related to the war effort, it was difficult to obtain the service
necessary to prepare this combined report. These difficulties have now been
overcome and herewith are published in a single volume the reports for the
school-years ended June 30th, 1942, 1943, and 1944.
The report is divided into four major subdivisions: First, a brief historical
review is given showing the changes in policy since 1911; second, certain details
are outlined concerning recent revision of records and report forms; third,
school health services are dealt with in considerable detail, with particular
emphasis on their part in a community health programme as carried on by a
Health Unit; and fourth, comments are made on certain highlights of the
reports from the School Health Inspectors. The tabulations, by years, from
the School Health Inspectors' reports are appended.
HISTORICAL.
The first report on " School Hygiene " in British Columbia was for the
year 1911, and consisted of reports from the various School Medical Inspectors
throughout the Province on the health of the school children, and also the
environmental hygiene of the school building itself. It is interesting to note
that, at that time, there were only 538 schools in the Province, and the number
of pupils examined was slightly over 24,000. The growth in population during
the past thirty years is evidenced by the fact that at the time of publication
of the Medical Inspection of Schools Report for the year 1939-40, there were
more than 1,100 schools in the Province and a little over 100,000 pupils were
examined.
In the second Annual Report upon Medical Inspection of Schools, which
was for the school-year ended June 30th, 1913, the findings of the various School
Health Inspectors were tabulated under certain specific headings. This tabulation showed, for instance, the number of children at the various schools having
such defects as enlarged tonsils, enlarged glands, defective vision, defective
hearing, defective teeth, and such others as the School Health Inspector saw
fit to report. In addition, the communicable diseases which had occurred in
these schools were also given and a brief description of the school building itself.
This particular report form continued in use and the tabulation therefrom was
published in the annual Medical Inspection of Schools Report up to, and including, the school-year ended June 30th, 1939. Only minor changes were made in
the headings on the report form during this period of some twenty-five years. HH 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In 1938 an effort was made to determine whether any statistically significant evaluation could be made from the figures from the preceding ten years.
Because of the type of report form, and also the variation from year to year,
as well as between the various type schools, this was finally deemed to be impossible. This was further proven by the summary tables which were published
in the Medical Inspection of Schools Report for 1938-39. At that time defects
were chosen which might have been expected to remain fairly constant each
year, as they were of such a type as not to be greatly affected by the presence
or absence of epidemics. These tables portrayed no uniformity in the rate of
occurrence of these particular conditions, and, in addition, there was no definite
trend. Thus, although there was in existence this large volume of data dealing
with the physical defects of school children, it was not in a form which could be
utilized on a comparative basis, and, in addition, there was no way in- which
the physical status of the school children could be stated either for the Province
as a whole or for specific groups. Such comparative information was felt to
be not only practical, but essential, and as a result efforts were directed toward
the drafting of a new report form which would provide the basic data from
which suitable tabulation and analyses could be made.
In the summer of 1942 it became obvious that circumstances were going to
force some modification in so far as examination of school pupils annually was
concerned. A goodly number of the medical practitioners of the Province had
joined the Canadian armed forces, and, at the same time, there had been a
definite increased demand on the services of those medical practitioners carrying on civilian medical care. In certain localities the demand had been so great
that drastic measures were necessary for the physicians to meet the demands
made on them by the illnesses of the people. In many areas no time was available for the practising physician to perform routine duties in connection with
general public health and school medical examinations.
Over the past years, the co-operation of the School Health Inspectors had
resulted in a gradually increasing improvement in the standard of school-health
work which had been beneficial to the various communities, and it was desired
not only to maintain this standard, if possible, but also to continue to carry out
the medical examination of school children according to a definite prescribed
plan. In view of the above the Provincial Health Officer, in consultation with
the Provincial Secretary, and the Superintendent of Education, outlined a plan
whereby the former high standard of physical examination of school children
would be maintained. Under this plan approximately one-third of the school
children would be examined each year. In the larger schools in unorganized
territory the pupils in Grades I., IV., VII., and X. would be examined each year.
In the smaller one- and two-room schools the group of schools coming under
the supervision of each School Health Inspector are divided into three groups,
one group of which would be examined each year. In addition, those children
of other grades and other schools not examined in any one year are referred
by the Public Health Nurse, or teacher, if necessary, for examination by the
School Health Inspector, and those taking part in major athletics are examined
annually, or as the necessity arises.
The implementing of such a plan has meant that the load on the physician
has been reduced considerably, and experience to date would indicate that it MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44. HH 7
has been working fairly well. The shortage of physicians, the tremendous
demand on their time, as well as gasoline and tire rationing, has made it imperative that some such plan be put into effect if school medical inspections were to
be carried on at all. The school-year 1944-45 will see the completion of the
examination of the majority of the school pupils by this method. In certain
unorganized districts some practising physicians were quite keenly interested
in this work, and were able, and preferred, to carry out the annual examination
of all the school pupils in their area. For this reason the decrease in the
number of pupils examined was not so great as might otherwise be expected.
It was possible to increase by 50 per cent, the rate of payment to those School
Health Inspectors who were carrying on their examinations under the new
plan, and for those still able to carry on annual examinations of all pupils the
old rate continued in effect until the summer of 1943. At this time the new rate
was made applicable to all School Health Inspectors.
REVISION OF RECORDS AND REPORT FORMS.
The Annual Report on Medical Inspection of Schools for the years ended
June 30th, 1940 and 1941, pointed out that a special committee of trained public
health personnel spent several months in the revision of not only the School
Medical Inspection report forms on which the School Medical Inspector reports
his findings, but also on the revision of the school health record form on which
is kept a record of the health examination of each child examined in the school.
This individual child's health record form, together with its accompanying
instruction manual, were drafted in such a way as to give the School Health
Inspector a basis for appraising the physical status of the child after the examination had been completed. This was done through the medium of a standard code, by which the child's physical status, or general condition, was classified
in three major groups as " A," " B," or " C." Under each of these three major
groups were two sub-classifications indicated by " d " or " e," depending on
whether the child had a physical defect or whether an unsatisfactory environmental factor was present.
To illustrate, a child classified as "A" was one who enjoyed an average
satisfactory state of health. If a child was classified as " Ad " this denoted
an average satisfactory state of health, with a slight physical defect which did
not affect his general health. When a child's physical condition was classified
as " Ae " it denoted a good average condition of health in spite of a defective,
or unsatisfactory, environmental factor. If a child's condition was classified
as " Bd," this denoted moderate impairment of health due to the presence of
some physical defect in the pupil himself. A classification as " Be " indicated
a physical condition moderately below par and due to some condition outside the
pupil himself, such as poor home environment, poor health habits, etc. A classification as " Cd " denoted a physical condition much below par, due to pathological conditions. " Ce " denoted a condition much below par, due to external
causes, including heredity as well as environment. " Ade," " Bde," " Cde "
were used in the code to denote a combination of physical and environmental
defects. By the use of such a classification of school pupils examined, it was
hoped to obtain some indication of their physical status, not only for any one
year, but also the trend over the following years. HH 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The child's individual school health record follows him through his school-
life, and each time he is examined he will be classified under this new physical
status code. The findings will be useful to School Health Inspectors, Public
Health Nurses, and teachers in following the tendency to good or poor health
throughout school-life, and the influence exerted by correction of defects and
environment. The new individual health records and the new classification
were put into effect with the commencement of the school term in September,
1941.
The new school report form which was mentioned above, and on which
the School Health Inspector reports a summary for each school, was also put
into effect in September, 1941. Summary tables for the school-years 1941-42,
1942-43, and 1943-44 are appended to this report and comments on the figures
will be made later. This new report form for the School Health Inspector
represents a very considerable departure from the former type of report.
Thus, rather than giving the number of children suffering from various types
of physical defects, the number of children in various physical status classifications are given for each of the grades in school. An effort is also made to collect information with regard to the correction of physical defects by medical
care. This is assured by having the School Health Inspector report the number
of pupils with all defects corrected since the last report, those with some defects
corrected, those under treatment at the time of the report, as well as those
suffering from non-remedial defects.
An effort has also been made in the new school report form to collect information regarding the immunization status of the school population throughout
the Province. Thus, the School Health Inspector reports the number of pupils
immunized against smallpox, diphtheria, scarlet fever, whooping-cough, typhoid
fever, as well as the number of Dick, Schick, and tuberculin tests carried out.
It is a matter of some moment to know the physical status of every one in
a school building, and for this reason space is provided for the School Health
Inspector to classify under the same code as for the school pupils the physical
status or general health condition of teachers, secretaries, janitors, bus-drivers,
cafeteria staff, and any other employees of the local School Board. In addition,
the number of chest X-rays in the past two years for all of these employees is
requested.
In addition to the above, provision is also made for recording the amount
of time spent in carrying out the examination of school pupils and school personnel. It is obvious that the amount of time taken will vary within wide limits,
depending on whether the school medical service is on a part-time or full-time
basis, as well as on the interest of the physician doing the work.
SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES AND COMMUNITY HEALTH.
The health of the school child plays an important part in the future of the
country. However, the health of the school child cannot be separated from
the general health conditions in the community in which the child lives. The
best possible school health programme will only produce results in improving
the health of the pupils in so far as it is complemented by a well-planned and
administered health service for the community as a whole. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44. HH 9
It has been found, and it is quite logical, that those factors influencing the
health developments of the school child during his first existence in this world
and his home environment previous to the time he attains school-age and attends
school play an important part in the early development of the child's physical
and mental well-being. Physical and mental deficiencies found in a school child
are usually an indication that there may be like conditions found among the
other members of the family from which the child came, because the same
factors that have influenced the school child are still functioning in the home.
It is, therefore, essential that the development of a school health programme, to be of complete value, should be part of and closely correlated with
an effective community programme dealing with all the health problems of the
people, both in a general and specific family manner. Good, modern health
services utilizing trained public health personnel on a full-time basis can supervise the community and the families and improve the health and welfare of the
child from the prenatal period through the infant, pre-school, adolescent, and
adult phases of his life.
In British Columbia the school health programme has been extensively
developed over a period of many years. At first the programme only dealt with
the immediate school problems, including the general health of the school pupil,
and consisted primarily of school medical examinations by a School Health
Inspector who was usually one of the local practising physicians working on a
part-time basis. In some areas these School Health Inspectors had help from
school nurses. Supervision of the school buildings and grounds in regard to
general sanitation, as well as some attention to lighting, heating, and ventilation
was included as part of the programme. Co-operation with the teachers and
contacts with the homes provided the school and the school child with a certain
amount of public health service. However, it was soon realized that although
this programme was a tremendous advance, it did not begin to meet nor solve
the broad problem of the public health needs of the school child and his home
environment.
It was realized that a more far-reaching and effective health service was
necessary to serve the entire community. Since the communities in British
Columbia, outside of the two larger cities, were comparatively small, a method
was devised whereby a group of communities and rural areas could combine
their public health resources and with help from the Department of Education
and the Provincial Board of Health establish full-time local health services
known as Health Units. In this way trained public health personnel serving on
a full-time basis were made available to a number of geographic units throughout the Province. Health Units deal with all the public health problems in the
local community and develop a programme to progressively meet the needs of
the people. Close co-operation and co-ordination with other existing community
facilities is maintained so that the main objective, the improvement of the health
of all the people of the community, can be obtained as rapidly as possible. In
addition, the Health Unit, because of its trained public health personnel, is in a
position to be able to utilize to the fullest extent the many specialized public
health services provided through the Provincial Board of Health and which are
not economically possible for development by a local area.   For example, Health HH 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Units are the ideal and logical media for bringing to the people the specialized
services of the Provincial Board of Health provided in its Divisions of Tuberculosis Control, Venereal Disease Control, Public Health Laboratory, Vital Statistics, Public Health Engineering and Environmental Sanitation.
The Director of a Health Unit is a graduate physician with postgraduate
training in public health and preventive medicine. It is his responsibility to
direct and co-ordinate the entire community health programme, and he also acts
as Medical Health Officer and School Health Inspector for the territory served
by the Health Unit. Naturally, he is keenly interested in the health problems of
the community and develops his programme over a period of time to meet the
health needs.
Also on the staff of a Health Unit are a number of Public Health Nurses.
These staff members are graduate nurses with special postgraduate training in
public health. The number on a Health Unit staff is usually determined on a
basis of from 2,500 to 6,000 people per nurse, depending upon the density of the
population in the territory served. They carry on a complete, generalized public
health nursing programme, including school health nursing and, in addition, in
many areas also provide a demonstration bedside nursing programme.
One or more Sanitary Inspectors are also members of a complete Health
Unit staff. Just as with other technical personnel, this member of the staff must
be trained in public health and be nationally certificated by examination before
appointment. His work primarily deals with the many problems of sanitation
throughout the community, including the schools. As with the Public Health
Nurses, the number of Sanitary Inspectors on a Health Unit staff depends on
the density of population. The usual population served varies between 8,000
and 15,000 people per Sanitary Inspector.
The fourth type of person employed on a Health Unit staff is the statistical
clerk. She works in the central office and is responsible for the clerical work,
including accounting, the collection, tabulation, and analysis of certain statistical data under the direction of the Health Unit Director. In addition, she is
responsible for the various records, public relations to a degree, certain appointments and numerous other general duties in connection with the operation of
a Health Unit.
There is a very definite trend to-day toward the addition of a fifth type of
personnel to a Health Unit staff, namely, a Public Health Educator. It is hoped
that in the not too far distant future it will be possible to implement such a plan
in at least one of the Health Units operating at the present time. This staff
member will be a person well grounded through both training and experience
in the basic principles of teaching methods, with special postgraduate training
in public health. Reduced to its simplest terms the chief function of a local
health service is the reduction of unnecessary disease and death and the promotion of health and happiness through an enlightened public opinion on all
matters relating to the public health. It will be the function of the Public
Health Educator to further these objectives to the fullest possible extent.
The Health Unit with its complement of trained public health personnel
has proven, not only in British Columbia but throughout other parts of Canada
and the United States, to be the cheapest and most efficient way to provide a MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44. HH 11
complete, generalized public health service for a community. Such a service
protects the health of all the citizens, including the school children. In the
Province of British Columbia at the present time over 60 per cent, of the total
population is served by full-time local health departments, providing more or
less complete services. Some curtailment has, of course, been necessary due to
shortage of personnel in war-time. In all, more than 80 per cent, of the Province has the benefit of full-time Public Health Nursing Service.
It is a matter of some pride that British Columbia was the first Province
in Canada to develop Public Health Nursing Service using only qualified Public
Health Nurses. Since that time very rapid progress has been made in this
important phase of the work. It should be noted here that the average total
cost -per capita for a Health Unit at the present time rests between 65 cents and
and 80 cents. Only part of this cost, however, is provided locally. The remainder is contributed by grants-in-aid by the Provincial Board of Health.
At the 1944 Session of the Legislature the grants formerly paid to School
Boards on behalf of public health workers by the Department of Education were
transferred to the aegis of the Provincial Board of Health. In addition to these
statutory grants, the Provincial Board of Health also pays additional grants to
both Health Units and public health nursing services when developed and
organized on a scientific basis to provide generalized, effective service. This is
in addition to the specialized services made available to the people of the Province through the Divisions of Tuberculosis Control, Venereal Disease Control,
Laboratories, Vital Statistics, and Public Health Engineering. The Provincial
Board of Health also makes available highly technical public health supervision
and consultant service for the various members of the health unit staff.
The school health programme depends for its success and effectiveness on
close co-operation between the local health service and the teachers, parents,
children, family physicians, welfare agencies, and other Provincial and local
official and voluntary agencies. A brief summary of the various component
parts of the school health service developed gradually by the full-time health
unit programme will not only be of interest but will give an idea of the
protection afforded the community under this co-operative plan.
Medical examination of school children, preferably with the parents present, is provided by the Director of the Health Unit. This is done at as frequent
periodic intervals as possible. During the war, instead of a physical examination every year, it has only been possible to routinely examine the children in
Grades I., IV., VII., and X. In addition, any child in the other grades referred
by the teacher, parent, or nurse because of a specific problem, children taking
part in major sport, as well as those children showing a serious physical defect
previously are examined by the Health Unit Director. Advice is given to the
parent regarding the child's condition and, if necessary, the child is referred to
the family physician or other agencies for treatment. The Director of the Health
Unit also discusses the general health problem and certain physical defects with
the teachers concerned, so that every advantage will be given to assist the child
in reaping the fullest benefits from the educational opportunities provided
for him.
The Public Health Nurse works in close co-operation with the teachers,
parents, and the children, and forms a valuable link between the home, the com- HH 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
munity, and the school. She also assists the Director of the Health Unit at the
time of physical examination of the pupil. She is keenly interested in the entire
school environment as well as that of the home, the mental hygiene problems of
the children, and at periodic intervals inspects and supervises the pupils.
The Public Health Nurse also assists in the control of communicable disease, including the development of programmes for the immunization of the
children, and gives assistance to the Director of the Health Unit at the time
of immunizations. She assists the teachers in the various class-rooms in which
communicable disease has occurred, in inspecting the pupils to ascertain their
conditions daily and the presence of early symptoms of communicable disease.
In the home the Public Health Nurse endeavours to develop an acceptance on
the part of the parents of the principles of public health and prevention, and
to stimulate them to adopt practices and procedures that will supplement the
health teaching in the school. This is done by demonstrating the practical
application of the best methods that will help improve the welfare of the
children and the others in the home.
The teacher is responsible for the day-to-day observation of the children
and the recording of any behaviour, attitude, or problem exhibited by the children that may be due to physical, mental, or other health reasons. She reports
these to the Public Health Nurse who in turn sees that they are dealt with in
a satisfactory manner. More and more teachers are realizing the value of
checking the children of their classes each morning for any signs or symptoms
of communicable disease, including the common cold, and the taking of any temporary action that is necessary to prevent the spread of the disease within the
school. The same policy should be adopted by drivers of school buses and any
other person first coming into contact with the school children.
The Public Health Nurse also co-operates with the teacher in planning the
school activities of the children to conform with their physical and mental
ability. From the Public Health Nurse and other members of the Health Unit
staff the teacher can receive specific and up-to-date information on public health
and preventive measures.
Again, the Public Health Nurse in co-operation with the teacher assists
in developing a programme of first-aid training, and also instructs the teacher
not only in the rendering but also the teaching of first aid to the children. She
checks the needs of the school in regard to first-aid equipment and gives such
assistance as possible in providing this. She is interested in accident-prevention and such safety measures as are taken within the school and school-grounds.
Also coming within the purview of the Public Health Nurse, in co-operation
with the Sanitary Inspector, is the lighting, ventilation, and heating of the
school building, as well as the general sanitation, including the proper use and
care of toilets and lavatory facilities. At the present time very effective cooperation is being developed with the teaching staff in the matter of an active
interest in pack and hot lunches as well as the conditions under which they are
served. Not to be forgotten here is the importance of proper dish-washing,
cooking methods, and food-handling in general.
The Sanitary Inspector acts as consultant to the Public Health Nurse in
the many applications in the school of general sanitation and related subjects,
particularly as they apply to equipment and its function.    This includes the MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44. HH 13
safety of the school and grounds, toilet and lavatory facilities, sanitation in the
class-rooms, halls, gymnasium, lunch-room, kitchen (if any), as well as the matter of lighting, heating, and ventilation. The water-supply and milk-supply as
well as the food-supply utilized in the school is a matter of vital interest to the
Sanitary Inspector and also all other members of the Health Unit staff.
The recording of these findings and their analyses is done through the
Health Unit office by the statistical clerk in co-operation with the other members
of the Health Unit staff and the school staff. It will be seen from the above
that there is a great deal of co-operative planning necessary between the various
members of the Health Unit staff, the teaching staff, the parents, the children,
and the community at large in developing a proper, adequate, and effective
school health programme. No mention has yet been made of the broad subject
of teaching health in the schools.
The teaching of health in the schools is the responsibility of the teacher
who is trained in the methods, procedure, and techniques of teaching. She alone
is responsible for this phase of the work, but from all members of the Health
Unit staff she can receive a great deal of help and technical information. The
Health Unit staff not being qualified teachers confine their instructional work
to the homes and the community in which phase of education they are well
trained and qualified, and only assist in demonstrational types of education
within the schools other than individual instruction of children for specific
purposes.
Plans for the complete coverage of the people of the Province by a full-
time Health Unit service are under way so that this development can take place
as rapidly as possible in the post-war period. During the war considerable
developments have taken place, but these were primarily in strategic war areas
where new and difficult public health problems developed or were likely to
develop. The public health nursing services have been maintained with only
slight decrease in spite of the shortage of qualified personnel and many other
difficulties due to the war.
In many areas of the Province not served by the full-time health service of
a Health Unit there is a Public Health Nurse. She, in co-operation with one of
the local practising physicians who is appointed as School Health Inspector,
carries out as extensive a school health programme as possible. It is obvious
that this is only a partial public health programme compared with that possible
under a Health Unit but, nevertheless, it has provided in many instances a
valuable aid to the schools. In those areas where there is not a Public Health
Nurse only the part-time School Health Inspector service is available. This
varies in its effectiveness with the physician concerned and the demands on his
services from private practice. There is considerable variation in the effectiveness with which the medical examinations are performed and the amount of
immunization done. In spite of these variations and the difficulties due to the
shortage of physicians and Public Health Nurses, it has been possible during
the war years to considerably expand the programme, first through the Health
Units, then through the Public Health Nurses in areas where a Health Unit
has not yet been established, and even through some of the more progressive
part-time School Health Inspectors. HH 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Provincial Board of Health co-operates on the Provincial level with
the Department of Education and also with the various School Inspectors.
These Inspectors have performed a great deal of valuable service in acquainting
the people and the teachers with the types of service that can be developed and
have assisted in organizing new public health nursing districts where they have
been most urgently needed. From three to five nursing districts have been
added each year during the last four years.
An extensive nutrition programme under the joint auspices of the Provincial Nutrition Committee, of which the Provincial Health Officer is chairman,
and the Provincial Board of Health has been carried out in co-operation with
the principals, home economics teachers, other teachers, and local groups in the
schools as well as in the community. The Education Department have put a
great deal of energy and planning into the development of school-lunch programmes and have assisted in the broad community programme in a manner
which has produced a progressive and worth-while nutrition programme in
many parts of the Province.
The teachers are taking more and more interest in the development of their
health teaching programmes by undertaking routine weighing and measuring
of school children as well as other demonstration activities, particularly those
that can be incorporated into and as part of the health teaching programme to
make it more practical and applicable to present-day problems and living. Some
teachers also undertake the screening eye test and hearing tests of the children,
referring those found below normal to the health authority for further checking. By a close day-to-day observation of the children many defects come to
light that could not always be ascertained by the screening type of medical
inspection or examination.
Such a school health programme as has been outlined above assists in no
small measure in aiding pupils to absorb readily the teaching provided in the
school as well as in curtailing absenteeism and repeating of grades. The results
of such a programme co-ordinated with an effective and adequate programme
for the pre-school child and the general programme of the community should,
over a period of years, improve the general health and well-being of the school
children, the communities, and the people as a whole of British Columbia.
HIGHLIGHTS FROM REPORTS OF SCHOOL
HEALTH INSPECTORS.
In the summary tables which are appended it will be noted that those for
the three school-years, namely, 1941-42, 1942-43, and 1943-44, are shown
separately. Dealing with those for the school-year 1941-42, it will be noted
that the first table shows the number of pupils enrolled and the number
examined for both the whole Province as well as organized and unorganized
territory. The figure of only, roughly, 50 per cent, being examined is explained
by a number of factors. In some places the practice has been to examine only
Grade I. pupils. In others, the School Health Inspector occasionally does not
find it possible to examine all the school pupils in his area, even although he has
planned to endeavour to do so. Further, following the introduction of new
forms in 1941-42, a number of School Health Inspectors continued to use the old MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44. HH 15
report form, with the result that it was not possible to tabulate their findings
with those for the rest of the Province. If it had not been for these factors,
the percentage examined would have been considerably higher and would have
formed a greater contrast with the percentage examined in the school-years
1942-43 and 1943-44.
It is indeed interesting to note that the bulk of the children have been
placed in the first two physical status classifications; approximately 49 per cent.
in Grade " A " and approximately 35 per cent, in Grade " Ad " for the school-
year 1941-42. One of the functions of a local school health service is not only to
discover the presence of physical defects in the school children, but also to carry
this information back to parents and endeavour to point out the wisdom and
need of securing medical correction of these defects in order to have the child
in as good a physical condition as possible. This is of importance not only with
regard to the school-life of the child but may have a very direct bearing on
the physical condition of these individuals in later life.
Tables are also appended showing the physical status classification of the
pupils in Grade I., in Grades II. to VI., inclusive, Grades VII. to IX., inclusive,
and Grades X. to XIII., inclusive. It is interesting to note that the percentage
of children placed in physical category " A " shows a steady rise from 37 per
cent, in Grade I. to 60 per cent, in Grades X. to XIII., inclusive, and that pupils
in physical category " Ad " show a steady decline from 42 per cent, in Grade I. to
► 27 per cent, in the higher grades. It is felt that one may rightly conclude that
the school health service carried on by various Health Units and public health
nursing services throughout the Province are having a salutary effect in improving the physical status of school children through the education of parents in the
homes with regard to the correction of physical defects. However, a note of
caution must be introduced with regard to the use of these percentage figures
at absolute level. The apparent improvement in physical status must be considered only as a trend. There are a number of factors which enter the picture
which should make one particularly cautious about accepting these percentage
figures at their face value. In the first place, it must be remembered that the
form on which the medical examiner reported his findings was a new one, and
also that this method of grading pupils on a physical status was an entirely new
departure from what had been carried on in the past. The first two or three
years will have to be considered as a period of transition during which time
the medical examiners will become familiar with the new procedure. In addition, the general medical practitioner is much more experienced in the
examination of an ill person rather than in appraising the physical status of
an apparently healthy individual. For this reason there is likely to be considerable variation in the figures for a few years, and until such time as a larger
area of the Province is covered by full-time Health Units under the direction of
public health physicians.
Tables are also appended showing the physical status classification of pupils
by urban and rural breakdowns for the Province at large. There is nothing
particularly significant in these tables other than the fact that urban municipalities, in general, show a somewhat lower percentage of pupils of " A " classification for all school grades and a significantly higher percentage of pupils in HH 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Ad " classification.    It would be extremely difficult at this time to give any
accurate interpretation of this fact.
With regard to the tables for the school-years 1942-43 and 1943-44, it should
be particularly noted that the figures given for enrolment do not refer to the
total Province but rather only to the total enrolment in the school grades which
were examined. As has been mentioned earlier, in the larger schools and school
districts this only refers to the pupils of Grades I., IV., VIL, and X., while in
the smaller one- and two-room schools it refers to all grades in that school, since
in these latter cases all the pupils in the school were examined. The number of
pupils examined during these two school-years is roughly one-third of the total
enrolment in the Province. While the various percentage figures for physical
status classifications and immunizations in the tables for these two school-years
cannot be taken as the figure for the Province at large, nevertheless they are
a significant sample and can be considered as being indicative in a general way
of the situation throughout the whole Province. It is interesting to note that
again the bulk of the pupils have been placed in the first two physical status
classifications; approximately 45 per cent, in Grade " A " and approximately
40 per cent, in Grade " Ad " for the school-year 1942-43, and 40 per cent, in
Grade " A " and approximately 41 per cent, for the following year. Again, is to
be noted an increase in the percentage of children placed in physical category
" A " in Grades X. to XIIL, inclusive, in comparison with those in Grade I.
There is also a decline in the number of pupils categorized in Grade " Ad " as*
they progress from the lower to the higher grades for the school-year 1942^13,
but not during the following year. There is still the lower percentage of pupils
in " A " classification, and the higher percentage of pupils in " Ad " classification for urban municipalities as was mentioned earlier for the school-year
1941-42.
Immunization against preventable diseases, particularly diphtheria, smallpox, and scarlet fever, has been advocated by the Provincial Board of Health for
many years. This is important during normal times, but becomes more important during war-time because of the movement of troops and shifting of population that occurs. The figures for the Province at large for the three diseases
mentioned, for the school-year 1941-42, show a most unsatisfactory situation.
When one realizes that diphtheria takes its greatest toll of life in the pre-school
period, and that the majority of the individuals suffering from the disease are
in the school-age and early adult group, it is possible to appreciate the fact that
the percentage of school children immunized against this preventable disease
should be much higher than 21 per cent. Further, in the light of the experience
of this Province with smallpox, and also because of the apparent increase in
the number of cases to the south of us, 21-per-cent. protection in the school
population was a very low index.
Early in 1941 the Provincial Board of Health began a very intensive educational campaign with regard to immunization. This was carried on largely
through the local health services who did everything possible to increase the
amount of immunization in their areas. The success of this work was reflected
in two ways. The demand for biological products for immunization increased
very considerably during 1941 and the figure for the calendar year 1942 was
approximately double for that of 1941.    The results are also reflected in the MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44. HH 17
figures for immunization of school children for the school-years 1942-43 and
1943-44. Reference to the appended tables will show that there was a rise in
diphtheria immunizations from approximately 21 per cent, in 1941-42 to 71 per
cent, in 1943-44. For smallpox there was an increase from 21 per cent, to
approximately 59 per cent. For scarlet fever there was an increase from
5 per cent, to 26 per cent. While it is true that this is a very gratifying increase,
particularly with regard to protection against diphtheria and smallpox, nevertheless there is still much work to be done. Experience has proven that there
is no better way to prevent a widespread outbreak of these preventable diseases
than by having a very high percentage of not only infant, pre-school, and school
children, but also the adult population protected.
With regard to the appended tables showing the percentage immunization
for the various groups of school grades, it is interesting to note the higher
percentages in the lower grades, with a very definite falling off toward the upper
grades, for the school-year 1941-42. This might be accounted for by the fact
that the emphasis on immunization in the local areas has in the past been somewhat confined to only the lower grades of school in addition to the infant and
pre-school children. However, there are probably other factors involved about
which no very accurate statements can be made at the moment. This trend
varies from being only slightly present to absent in the following two school-
years. Education of the public in all areas where there are either Public Health
Nurses or full-time local health services, as to the need and importance of
immunization, is continuing in an endeavour to bring to as high a level as
possible the protection against preventable diseases.
Tables are also appended with regard to physical examination of school
personnel. Again, as with the pupils, the bulk of those examined are classified
as either " A " or " Ad." However, the same remarks as were made with regard
to the face value of these figures in connection with school pupils also applies to
school personnel. Further, the percentage of school personnel examined is
extremely small, and it is hoped that in succeeding years the number examined
will be considerably higher.
In summary, it can be said that this presentation of data, inaccurate to
some degree though it may be, does give us a picture of school health conditions
which was not possible before. It is felt that the time and effort spent on the
revision of school health records "and report forms, as well as their adoption,
has been fully warranted. The information presented herein is tangible and
the reports for the next few years should give a much more accurate picture of
school health than has been possible in the past.  MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44.
HH 19
MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Physical Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory, 1943-44.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined 	
78,443
34,383
43.8
40.0
41.4
1.9
3.3
8.4
1.6
1.4
0.4
0.1
1.5
68,225
26,579
39.0
39.0
43.4
1.4
3.9
8.6
1.6
1.4
0.2
0.1
0.4
10,218
7,804
76.4
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A      _
43.5
Ad       ....   	
35.1
Ae    „_    .....
Ade.     	
3.5
1.1
Bd      	
7.9
Be  	
1.6
Bde      	
1.4
Cd...        	
0.7
Ce     	
0.2
Cde        	
5.0
Grade I.
10,204
6,914
67.8
35.3
45.1
1.3
3.0
10.8
1.4
1.3
0.4
0.2
1.2
8,562
5,504
64.3
34.1
47.6
0.4
3.5
11.2
1.1
1.3
0.2
0.1
0.5
1,642
1,410
85.9
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A      	
40.4
Ad  	
Ae           	
35.8
4.7
Ade   	
1.1
Bd           	
9.2
Be    ...
2.3
Bde            	
1.3
Cd              .
1.0
Ce 	
0.3
Cde    	
3.9
Grades II.-VI.
36.155
16,090
44.5
32.1
46.9
2.5
4.2
7.3
2.0
2.8
0.3
0.1
1.8
30,330
10,439
34.4
35.9
42.8
2.6
5.9
8.1
2.4
1.6
0.2
0.1
0.4
5,825
5,651
97.0
25.0
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined—   	
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A        	
Ad  	
Ae  .      	
54.7
2.2
Ade 	
-Bd    ...   -
1.0
6.0
Be-                               .
1.1
Bde     .      .....
5.0
Cd.                                    	
0 5
Ce              .....
0.1
Cde   	
4.4 HH 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Physical Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory,
1943-44—Continued.
Grades VII.-IX.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined   	
19,771
8,751
44.3
36.6
48.5
1.1
1.6
8.1
1.2
1.5
0.3
0.1
1.0
17,593
6,573
37.4
38.2
45.7
1.0
2.0
9.6
1.1
1.8
0.3
0.1
0.2
2,178
2,178
100.0
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A                                                            .        —       	
32.2
Ad                       .      -    —-   -
56.0
Ae                       .      —.        _   	
1.4
Ade                                                                 —       —-      	
0.5
Bd                       ..      ■ ■    	
4.3
Be                                             ...       	
1.3
Bde                             '    ..."
0.6
Cd                    —-     -	
0.4
Ce                       .       ....     ■        	
0.2
Cde                              -     —-     	
3.1
Grades X.-XIII.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined 	
9,951
5,795
58.2
50.6
41.4
1.4
0.6
4 1
0.7
0.5
0.2
0.1
0.4
9,248
5,092
55.1
54.7
37.6
0.6
0.7
4.6
0.8
0.6
0.2
0.1
0.1
703
703
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined  	
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A                                               ...       —.      	
100.0
32.9
Ad                                ...         	
58.0
Ae            .       ....       	
4.8
Ade                                                     —            .....
0.1
Bd                                ...       	
2.0
Be                      .       ...       	
0.3
Bde                --     .—.       	
0.1
Cd           .   	
0.3
Ce . _   .    .             	
Cde        	
1.5
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1943-44.
Total Pupils examined.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Munici
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Munici
Unorgan-
Total,
palities.
palities.
Villages.
Total   pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined	
78,443
51,935
9,380
61,315
5,330
11,798
17,128
Total pupils examined   -
34,383
18,993
4,354
23,347
2,185
8,851
11,036
Percentage   of   pupils   en
rolled examined	
43.8
36.6
46.4
38.1
41.0
75.0
64.4
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A	
40.0
38.2
39.8
38.5
44.6
42.9
43.2
Ad —   	
41.4
43.9
49.1
44.8
27.8
35.9
34.3
Ae	
1.9
1.8
0.4
1.6
0.3
3.2
2.6
Ade                    	
3.3
8.4
3.4
8.6
1.2
8.6
3.0
8.6
13.9
7.1
1.2
8.2
3 8
Bd	
8.0
Be                       - 	
1.6
1.4
1.7
1.7
0.1
0.6
1.4
1.5
4.0
0.9
1.6
1.4
2 0
Bde	
1.3
Cd     	
0.4
0.2
0.1
0.2
0.5
0.7
0.7
Ce
0.1
0.1
0.1
' 0.1
0 2
0 2
Cde  	
1.5
0.4
0.1
0.3
0.8
4.7
3.9 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF  SCHOOLS, 1942-44.
HH 21
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1943-44—Continued.
Grade I.
Urban
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Unorgan
Total,
Rural.
Total.
Cities.
Municipalities.
Municipalities.
ized and
Villages.
Total   pupils    enrolled   in
grades examined 	
10,204
6,423
1,180
7,603
773
1,828
2,601
Total pupils examined	
6,914
3,953
912
4,865
480
1,569
2,049
Percentage   of   pupils   en
rolled examined	
67.8
61.5
77.3
64.0
62.1
85.8
78.8
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A 	
35.3
36.0
24.8
33.8
39.2
38.5
38.6
Ad	
45 1
45.4 .
60.5
48.2
37.3
38.2
38.0
Ae  	
1.3
0.6
0.5
0.2
4.2
3.3
Ade  	
3.0
3.4
1.2
3.0
8.5
1.2
3.0
Bd	
10.8
11.0
12.8
11.3
10.6
9.4
9.7
Be	
1.4
1.2
0.1
1.0
2.3
2.2
2.2
Bde . 	
1.3
0.4
1.4
0.2
0.4
0.1
1.3
0.2
1.5
0.2
1.3
1.0
1.3
Cd	
0.8
Ce 	
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.2
Cde :.	
1.2
0.6
0.1
0.5
0.2
3.7
2.9
Grades II.-VI.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined 	
36,155
22.249
4,796
27,045
2,656
6,454
9,110
Total pupils examined	
16,090
7,687
1,627
9,314
692
6,084
6,776
Percentage   of   pupils   en
rolled examined	
44.5
34.5
33.9
34.4
26.1
94.3
74.4
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A
32 1
46.9
2.5
33.1
44.8
3.4
49.3
39.3
0.3
35.9
43.8
2.9
37.1
28.7
0.7
25.6
53.9
2.1
26.8
Ad
51.4
Ae  ...-. 	
1.9
Ade	
42
5.9
1.6
5.1
19.1
1.1
2.9
Bd     	
7.3
2.0
8.0
26
8.1
0.2
8.0
2.2
6.0
6.2
6.5
1.1
6.5
Be  	
1.7
Bde 	
2.8
1.8
1.0
1.7
1.2
4.8
4.4
Cd            .   	
0.3
0.1
1.8
0.2
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.1
0.3
0.6
0.5
0.1
4.3
0.4
Ce        	
0.1
Cde  --	
3.9
Grades VII.-IX.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined —
19,771
13,549
2,444
15,993
1,119
2,659
3,778
Total pupils examined 	
8,562
4,326
1,171
5,497
608
2,457
3,065
Percentage   of   pupils   en
rolled examined 	
' 43.3
31.9
47.9
34.4
54.3
92.4
81.1
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A         	
36.5
36.3
37.3
36.5
48.1
34.0
36.7
Ad                          -   -	
48.6
1.1
1.6
8.1
47.5
1.1
1.2
10.1
51.4
1.2
0.9
8.5
48.3
1.1
1.1
9.8
28.0
0.2
9.7
7.4
53.9
1.2
0.6
5.0
49.0
Ae
1.0
Ade 	
2.3
Bd	
5.4
Be	
1.2
0.8
0.3
0.7
5.1
1.2
2.0
Bde                                	
1.5
0.3
2.5
0.2
0.3
0.1
2.0
0.2
0.5
0.8
0.5
0.5
0.5
Cd  - 	
0.5
Ce	
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.2
Cde                            - 	
1.0
0.2
0.2
0.2
2.9
2.4 HH 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1943-44—Continued.
Grades X.-XIII.
Urban
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Unorgan
Total,
Rural.
Total.
Cities.
Municipalities.
Municipalities.
ized and
Villages.
Total   pupils    enrolled   in
grades examined	
9,951
7,580
962
8,542
479
930
1,409
Total pupils examined ..	
5,206
3,506
646
4,152
225
829
1,054
Percentage   of   pupils   en
rolled examined	
52.3
46.3
67.2
48.6
47.0
89.1
74.8
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A	
50.6
59.8
41.3
57.0
59.6
35.7
39.5
Ad	
414
32.0
53.7
35.4
24.9
55.5
50.7
Ae  	
1.4
0.8
0.7
4.4
3.7
Ade '	
0.6
0.4
0.5
0.4
6.2
0.3
1.2
Bd  	
4.1
4.8
4.2
4.7
6.7
2.1
2.8
Be 	
0.7
0.9
0.8
1.3
0.4
0.6
Bde	
0.5
0.7
0.3
0.6
0.4
0.1
0.1
Cd	
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.9
0.2
0.3
Ce	
0.1
0.1
0.1
Cde	
0.4
0.2
0.1
1.3
1.1
Immunization Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory, 1943-44.
Organized. Unorganized.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria _•.	
Scarlet fever  	
Smallpox	
78,443
71.2
25.8
59.6
68,225
72.1
24.0
59.8
10,218
64.8
37.1
58.5
Grade I.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined .
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria  	
Scarlet fever     ..	
Smallpox	
1,642
79.5
41.0
69.4
Grades II.-VI.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined-
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria	
Scarlet fever	
Smallpox 	
5,825
65.8
38.4
59.6 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44.
HH 23
Immunization Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory,
1943-44—Continued.
Grades VII.-IX.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
19,771
74.5
36.0
61.1
17,593
76.8
37.1
62.5
2,178
Percentage immunized—
56 1
27.0
49 0
Grades X.-XIII.
9,951
50.4
33.9
61.5
9,248
50.3
34.9
62.7
703
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria      	
52.2
21 2
45.4
Rural and Urban Immunization Status, 1943-44.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined 	
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria  	
Scarlet fever	
Smallpox	
78,443
71.2
25.8
59.6
51,935
70.9
23.4
58.6
9,380
74.4
32.2
54.3
61,315
71.4
24.8
57.9
5,330
73.4
17.4
72.5
9,384
86.5
43.6
78.5
14,714
81.7
34.1
76.3
Grade I.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined 	
Percentage immunized—
10,204
64.5
24.4
58.3
6,423
56.5
22.5
52.7
1,180
86.4
24.0
62.2
7,603
61.2
22.7
54.2
773
56 4
9.7
68.0
1,828
81.6
37.5
71.1
2,601
74.1
29.3
Smallpox	
70.2
Grades II.-VI.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined .... 	
Percentage immunized—
36,155
82.9
■  24.9
63.3
22,249
85.2
22.2
61.5
4,796
90.2
25.6
59.2
27,045
86.1
22.8
61.1
2,656
85.7
18.7
88.9
6,454
68.3
36.0
62.0
9,110
73.4
31.0
Smallpox  	
69.9 HH 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Rural and Urban Immunization Status, 1943-44—Continued.
Grades VII.-IX.
Total.     .       Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined 	
Percentage immunized—
' 19,771
74.5
36.0
61.1
13,549
79.5
40.0
65.3
2,444
60.4
31.4
45.7
15,993
76.6
38.7
62.3
1,119
74 5
22.5
56.6
2,659
61.9
25.7
55.2
3,778
65.7
Scarlet fever  	
Smallpox  	
24.8
55.6
Grades X.-XIII.
Total   pupils    enrolled   in
grades examined 	
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria  	
Scarlet fever ....:. __
Smallpox.— 	
9,951
50.4
33.9
61.5
7,580
50.9
31.1
64.9
962
26.2
86.8
42.4
8,542
48.2
36.2
62.4
479
74.9
14.6
64.5
930
58.8
22.6
51.8
1,409
64.3
19.9
56.1
Medical Inspection of School Personnel, Organized and
Unorganized Territory, 1943-44.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganised.
Total personnel employed in grades examined  —
2,926
365
12.5
69.8
19.5
4.4
6.0
0.3
2,472
156
6.3
73.8
19.2
2.6
3.8
0.6
454
209
46.0
Physical status—percentage of personnel examined—
A                          ..    	
67.0
Ad                          	
19.6
B                   .....            	
5.7
Bd                                      	
7.7
C    	
Cd    	
Medical Inspection of Rural and Urban School Personnel, 1943-44.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total   personnel   employed
2,926
365
12.5
70.1
19.5
4.4
6.0
1,913
94
4.9
92.6
4.3
2.1
1.0
288
17
5.9
23.6
52.9
17.6
5.9
2,201
111
5.0
82.0
11.7
1.8
3.6
0.9
179
10
5.6
100.0
546
•      244
44.7
63.1
23.8
5.7
7.4
725
Total personnel examined ...
Percentage    of    personnel
employed examined  .
Physical status — percentage of personnel examined—
A  	
254
35.0
64.6
22.8
5.5
7.1
Ad-  	
B	
Bd- 	
C 	
Cd  	 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44.
HH 25
Physical Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory, 1942-43.
Total
Organized.
Unorganized.
77,844
40,006
51.4
45.3
39.6
0.9
1.9
8.7
0.9
1.9
0.5
0.1
0.2
67,926
31,813
46.8
44.3
40.9
0.7
1.9
8.7
0.8
2.0
0.4
0.1
0.2
9,918
8,193
82.6
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A               .                                      	
49.5
Ad     .
34.5
Ae   	
1.6
Ade..                	
1.9
Bd _   _  	
8.8
Be  ....:     .
1.1
Bde...   	
1.5
Cd. .              - 	
08
Ce  .   _   .....       ...   .
0 1
Cde                 	
0 2
Grade I.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined.
Total pupils examined	
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined..
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A   	
Ad      	
Ae     	
Ade      	
Bd   	
Be    	
Bde    	
Cd     	
Ce   —	
Cde   	
9,024
6,649
73.7
35.1
51.0
0.8
1.7
7.1
1.1
2.2
0.5
0.2
0.3
7,629
5,295
69.4
34.0
52.8
0.7
1.8
6.5
1.1
2.2
0.5
0.1
0.3
1,395
1,354
97.1
39.6
44.0
1.0
1.2
9.7
1.2
2.0
0.7
0.5
0.1
Grades II.-VI.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined	
Total pupils examined  — —	
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined 	
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined-
A     	
Ad-.
Ae...
Ade..
Bd-.
Be_..
Bde..
Cd-.
Ce-.
Cde..
37,707
15,701
41.6
41.0
39.6
1.1
2.6
11.0
0.9
2.5
0.9
0.1
0.3
32,813
11,710
28.0
39.7
40.1
0.8
2.6
11.8
0.8
2.8
1.0
0.1
0.3
4,894
3,991
81.5
44.8
38.1
1.7
2.7
8.9
1.1
1.8
0.6
*
0.3
* Less than 0.1 per cent. HH 26                                                BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Physical Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory,
1942-43—Continued.
Grades VII.-IX.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
20,034
8,058
40.2
61.9
21.7
0.9
1.7
9.8
1.1
2.1
0.6
*
0.2
17,959
6,353
35.4
63.0
19.2
0.7
1.9
10.7
1.1
2.5
0.6
0.1
0.2
2,075
1,705
82.2
57.4
31.3
1.7
0.9
6.4
0.9
0.8
0.6
*
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined
Physical status—percentage of pupils e?
A                                                    	
camined—
Ad            ~-     	
Ae                                —  -  	
Ade                                 	
Bd                	
Be          .--   	
Bde    -   -   	
Cd               	
Ce    -   	
Cde	
* Less than 0.1 per cent.
Grades X.-XIII.
9,705
5,044
52.0
61.2
30.9
0.7
0.5
4.3
0.8
0.7
0.5
0.2
0.2
9,018
4,483
49.7
60.3
32.0
0.5
0.5
4.2
0.8
0.7
0.6
0.2
0.2
687
561
81.7
68.9
22.6
1.8
0.4
5.2
0.5
0.2
0.2
0.2
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined
Physical status—percentage of pupils e!
A     	
camined—
Ad    	
Ae    -   	
Ade..   	
Bd        	
Be    	
Bde  	
Cd	
Ce     	
Cde  	
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1942-43.
Total Pupils examined.
Total.            Cities.
1
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total   pupils   enrolled   in
77,844
40,006
51.4
45.3
39.6
0.9
1.9
8.7
0.9
1.9
0.5
0.1
0.2
47,932
23,066
48.1
46.5
38.5
0.7
1.2
8.9
1.0
2.3
0.5
0.2
0.2
10,640
4,849
45.6
34.6
58.3
0.6
1.2
4.5
*
0.6
0.1
0.1
58,572
27,915
47.7
44.5
41.9
0.7
1.2
8.1
0.9
2.0
0.4
0.1
0.2
7,710
2,466
32.0
43.2
30.1
1.3
10.0
11.9
0.9
2.3
0.2
0.1
11,562
9,625
83.2
48.5
35.4
1.4
1.7
9.5
1.0
1.4
0.8
0.1
0.2
19,272
12,091
62.7
47.4
34.3
1.4
3.4
10.0
1.0
1.6
0.7
0.2
Percentage   of   pupils   enrolled examined	
Physical status — percentage of pupils examined—
A          	
Ad	
Ae           .   --      	
Ade
Bd  	
Be	
Bde  	
Cd   .     	
Ce   	
Cde...   	
* Less than 0.1 per cent. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44.
HH 27
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1942-43—Continued.
Grade I.
Urban
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Unorgan
Total,
Rural.
Total.
Cities.
Municipalities.
Municipalities.
ized and
Villages.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined	
9,024
4,922
1,403
6,325
1,091
1,608
2,699
Total pupils examined 	
6,649
3,651
865
4,516
577
1,556
2,133
Percentage   of   pupils   en
rolled examined  	
73.7
74.2
61.7
71.4
52.9
96.8
79.0
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A   	
35.1
36.1
28.3
34.6
31.2
38.3
36.4
Ad    	
51.0
53.1
63.7
54.9
35.4
45.0
42.5
Ae	
0.8
0.6
0.2
0.6
2.1
0.8
1.2
Ade  	
1.7
1.3
1.3
1.3
6.2
1.2
2.5
Bd	
7.1
4.2
5.4
4.4
19.6
10.5
12.9
Be   	
1.1
1.5
1.2
0.9
1.0
1.0
Bde.......  	
2.2
2.2
0.8
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.5
Cd   	
0.5
0.6
0.2
0.6
0.3
0.6
0.5
Oe...... 	
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.4
0.3
Cde 	
0.3
0.3
0.1
0.3
0.3
0.2
0.2
Grades II.-VI.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined- 	
37,707
22,184
5,392
27,576
4,487
5,644
10,131
Total pupils examined	
15,701
8,767
1,166
9,933
1,164
4,604
5,768
Percentage   of   pupils   en-
41.6
39.5
21.6
36.0
25.9
81.6
56.9
Physical status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A        	
41.0
41.8
24.6
39.8
40.3
43.6
43.1
Ad  ...... 	
39.6
1.1
2.6
11.0
38.0
0.8   ,
1.6
12.2
64.7
1.9
6.5
41.2
0.7
1.6
11.5
30.4
1.6
12.4
11.5
38.6
1.6
2.4
9.8
36.9
Ae  ...	
1.6
Ade    ....
4.4
Bd	
10.2
Be    	
0.9
0.9
0.2
0.8
0.9
1.2
1.1
Bde 	
2.5
3.0
1.7
2.9
2.6
1.8
1.9
Cd  '	
0.9
1.2
0.2
1.0
0.3
0.7
0.6
Ce	
0.1
0.3
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.2
0.3
•
*
0.3
*
Cde	
0.2
Grades VII.-IX.
Total    pupils    enrolled .in
grades examined	
20,034
8,058
40.2
61.9
21.7
0.9
1.7
9.8
1.1
2.1
0.6
*
0.2
13,490
4,676
34.7
70.2
10.0
0.8
1.8
11.5
1.5
3.3
0.6
0.1
0.2
2,659
828
31.1
35.4
56.2
0.4
1.3
5.9
0.1
0.4
0.2
0.1
16,149
5,504
34.1
65.0
17.0
0.8
1.7
10.6
1.3
2.8
0.5
0.1
0.2
1,398
456
32.6
52.2
31.6
0.2
5.5
9.6
0.7
0.2
2,487
2,098
84.4
55.6
32.1
1.5
0.9
7.6
0.8
0.7
0.8
*
3,885
2,554
Percentage   of   pupils   en-
65.7
Physical status — percentage of pupils examined—
A	
Ad
55.1
32.0
Ae  - -	
Ade            	
1.3
1.7
Bd             	
7.9
Be                 ~    	
0.6
Bde                       - '-	
0.7
Cd                	
0.7
Ce 	
Cde             	
*
* Less than 0.1 per cent. HH 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1942-43—Continued.
Grades X.-XIII.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total   pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined	
9,705
5,044
52.0
61.2
30.9
0.7
0.5
4.3
0.8
0.7
0.5
0.2
0.2
6,891
3,740
54.3
62.0
30.1
0.6
0.3
4.3
0.8
0.7
0.7
0.3
0.2
1,260
337
26.7
39.2
57.0
3.8
8,151
4,077
50.0
60.1
32.3
0.6
0.3
4.3
0.7
0.7
0.6
0.2
0.2
633
183
28.9
65.6
22.4
0.5
6.0
1.1
4.4
921
784
85.1
66.1
25.9
1.3
0.4
5.1
0.4
0.6
0.1
0.1
1,554
967
Percentage   of   pupils   enrolled examined 	
Physical status — percentage of pupils examined—
A    ...       	
62.2
66.0
Ad
25.2
Ae  : ....
Ade...    	
1.1
1.5
Bd.._   ...:„'
Be —	
4.4
1.1
Bde — -
Cd..  -	
Ce ..:.. 	
Cde—	
0.5
0.1
0.1
Immunization Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory, 1942-43.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria ., 	
Scarlet fever    	
Smallpox —  	
37.6
20.6
40.7
Grade I.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria-    	
Scarlet fever 	
Smallpox — -	
1,395
30.5
20.4
32.1
Grades II.-VI.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria 	
Scarlet fever  	
Smallpox   „
4,894
43.8
25.1
43.7 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44.
HH 29
Immunization Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory,
1942-43—Continued.
Grades VII.-IX.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
20,034
44.7
10.6
50.5
17,959
45.9
9.6
52.0
2,075
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria    	
Scarlet fever  J..... :...1	
Smallpox  —  .   	
34.2        :
19.2
37.4
Grades X.-XIII.
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined 	
Percentage immunized—              I
9,705
40.7
8.8
56.2
9,018
41.4
8.3
57.7
687
31.3     ;
15.9
.   36.7
Rural and Urban Immunization Status, 1942-43.
Cities.
Urban _  .  .
Munici- ™a£
palities.    i    Urt)an-
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total    pupils    enrolled   in
grades  examined....	
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria	
Scarlet fever 	
Smallpox	
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades  examined 	
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria.. 	
Scarlet fever.  	
Smallpox   ...
Total   pupils   enrolled   in
grades examined	
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria 	
Scarlet fever.  	
Smallpox...- 	
77,844
51.9
12.6
51.1
47,932
58.2
11.4
58.8
10,640
51.6
10.4
33.3
58,572
57.0
11.2
54.2
7,710
34.1
10.6
40.2
11,562
37.7
20.8
42.7
19,272
36.2
16.7
41.7
Grade I.
9,024
54.8
13.2
52.4
4,922
66.1
12.4
67.9
1,403
53.4
13.8
32.8
6,325
63.2
12.7
60.1
1,091
42.0
6.3
34.7
1,608
30.4
19.6
33.9
2,699
35.1
14.2
34.2
Grades II.-VI.
37,707
57.9
12.2
56.4
22,184
67.0
9.1
66.5
5,392
54.7
12.2
37.2
27,576
64.6
9.7
60.8 ■
4,487
34.9
11.6
44.7
5,644
43.4
24.7
44.4
10,131
' 39.7-.
18.9
44.5 HH 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Rural and Urban Immunization Status, 1942-43—Continued.
Grades VII.-IX.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total.
Rural.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades  examined	
Percentage immunized—
20,034
44.7
10.6
50.5
13,490
48.1
9.1
56.0
2,659
45.4
7.8
39.5
16,149
47.6
8.9
53.3
1,398
28.5
12.7
33.0
2,487
35.1
20.0
42.5
3,885
32.7
Scarlet fever  	
Smallpox  -
17.4
39.1
Grades X.-XIII.
Total    pupils    enrolled    in
grades examined 	
9,705
6,891
1,260
8,151
633
921
1,554
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria    .
40.7
45.9
23.7
42.4
30.0
32.7
31.6
Scarlet fever 	
8.8
8.8
3.1
7.9
4.4
19.9
13.6
Smallpox 	
56.2
63.8
33.3
59.1
37.1
43.8
41.1
Medical Inspection of School Personnel, Organized and
Unorganized Territory, 1942-43.
Total.
Organised.
Unorganised.
Total personnel employed in grades examined     ..
1,615
427
26.4
73.4
18.0
2.6
4.9
0.9
0.2
1,095
176
16.1
81.3
10.2
4.5
3.4
0.6
520
251
48.3
Physical status—percentage of personnel examined—
A         ....   ...
Ad --          -                                -.	
67.7
23 5
B  	
1.2
Bd     	
C      ,   	
6.0
1 2
Cd—.                 	
0 4
Medical Inspection of Rural and Urban School Personnel, 1942-43.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total   personnel   employed
in grades examined ....
Total personnel examined.
Percentage    of    personnel
employed examined	
Physical status — percentage of personnel examined—
A  	
Ad..... 	
B   	
Bd     ..
1,615
427
26.4
73.4
18.0
2.6
4.9
0.9
0.2
534
107
20.0
87.0
3.7
7.5
0.9
0.9
346
7
2.0
100.0
880
114
13.0
87.7
3.5
7.0
0.9
0.9
150
25
16.7
92.0
8.0
585
288
49.2
66.1
24.7
1.0
6.9
1.0
0.3
735
313
42.6
68.0
23.3
1.0
6.4
1.0
0.3
C   	
Cd- 	 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44.
HH 31
Physical Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory, 1941-42.
Total.
Organised.
Unorganised.
Total pupils enrolled   	
118,405
59,642
50.4
48.7
35.2
2.0
1.7
8.0
1.2
1.6
0.9
*
0.6
94,447
40,659
43.0
47.7
35.4
1.9
1.6
7.7
1.8
2.3
0.9
0.7
23,958
18,983
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined.. _ 	
79.2
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A  ....         —- -           	
50.9
Ad       	
34.7
Ae  —     —    .	
2.5
Ade      	
2.0
Bd           -       	
8.5
Be      	
Bde   	
Cd-                          .              	
0.9
Ce    -   - -   .
0.1
Cde   	
0.4
Grade I.
12,409
9,578
77.2
37.3
42.0
2.2
3.0
10.0
0.8
2.2
1.0
0.1
1.3
9,061
7,321
80.8
36.1
42.4
1.7
3.0
10.4
1.1
2.8
1.0
1.5
3,348
Total pupils examined    	
2,257
67.4
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A                          —   -	
41.3
Ad                       -             -    -           - — -  .
41.1
Ae                          -.   — - -	
3.6
Ade  	
3.0
Bd                    	
8.8
Be               - - - 	
Bde                          	
Cd  -                         	
1.2
Ce                     -        -.
0.5
Cde      .-  	
0.5
Grades 77.-77.
Total pupils enrolled   -   -	
57,568
23,495
40.8
45.8
38.2
2.0
1.9
8.1
0.8
1.7
0.8
*
0.6
44,029
14,329
32.5
46.1
37.3
1.4
1.5
7.8
1.4
2.9
0.9
0.7
13,539
9,166
67 7
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A     —  	
45.0
Ad-                                                    -
39.6
Ae— .                           - —~
3.0
Ade -   -.	
2.7
Bd -   	
8.4
Be -.                         	
Bde      	
Cd-                         	
0 7
Ce-      -.   	
0.2
Cde   -  	
0.4
* Less than 0.1 per cent. HH 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Physical Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory,
1941-42—Continued.
Grades VII.-IX.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
30,701
13,704
44.6
52.1
34.3
2.0
0.9
6.8
1.4
1.2
0.9
*
0.3
25,336
10,178
40.2
50.8
34.9
2.0
0.7
7.0
1.8
1.7
0.8
0.3
5,365
3,526
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined— 	
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A                                        .— 	
65.7
56.6
Ad                                                         - 	
32.4
Ae                                                         —     .   	
1.9
Ade                                - -         - 	
1.5
Bd                                                         - -—	
6.2
Be                                . - -   .
Bde                                 — - 	
Cd                   -   -  -	
1.1
Ce               ...       -	
*
Cde                              	
0.2
Grades X.-XIII.
Total pupils enrolled    .....
Total pupils examined .  —	
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined  	
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined-
A      	
Ad.   : 	
Ae.                -	
Ade   — - _.  	
Bd. :   -,   	
Be. —-   - 	
Bde            ; 	
Cd     -      .
Ce    ....... -	
Cde..      	
16,021.
7,375
46.0
59.3
28.2
2.4
0.7
4.5
2.5
1.5
0.6
0.3
1,706
1,300
76.2
67.7
25.6
1.2
0.6
4.4
0.2
0.2
* Less than 0.1 per cent.
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1941-42.
Total Pupils examined.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
118,405
59,642
50.4
48.7
35.2
2.0
1.7
8.0
1.2
1.6
0.9
*
0.6
66,808
30,962
46.3
51.9
32.0
2.0
1.8
6.8
1.9
2.4
0.7
0.5
13,518
5,854
43.3
30.8
56.1
1.0
1.0
8.1
1.0
1.1
0.8
*
80,326
36,816
45.8
48.5
35.8
1.9
1.7
7.1
1.7
2.2
0.7
0.4
13,229
2,996
22.6
43.0
29.3
2.3
0.4
12.8
3.3
3.8
1.9
3.2
24,850
19,830
79.8
49.9
35.0
2.4
2.0
8.9
0.1
0.9
0.2
0.5
38,079
22,826
59 9
Percentage   of   pupils   en-
Physical status — percentage of pupils examined—
A  	
49 2
Ad  	
34 2
Ae 	
2 3
Ade  	
BdL. 	
Be.  	
1.8
9.4
0.5
0.6
1.1
0.1
0.8
Bde  	
Cd . 	
Ce 	
Cde	
* Less than 0.1 per cent. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44.
HH 33
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1941-42—Continued.
Grade I.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total.
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total pupils enrolled...
12,409
9,578
77.2
37.3
42.0
2.2
3.0
10.0
0.8
2.2
1.0
0.1
1.3
6,041
5,637
93.3
37.3
40.0
2.0
3.8
10.2
1.3
3.3
0.9
1.2
1,444
1,091
75.5
30.8
57.6
1.2
*
7.6     '
0.4
1.1
1.2
*
7,485
6,728
89.9
36.3  .
42.8
1.8
3.2
9.8    '•
1.1
3.0
1.0
1.0 '
1,490
479
32.1
32.4
36.9
0.2
0.8
18.2
0.8
0.8
1.3
8.6
3,434
2,371
69.0
41.4
41.1
3.4
2.9
8.9
*
*
1.0
0.5
0.6
4,924
Total pupils examined	
Percentage   of  pupils   en-
2,850
57.9
Physical status — percentage of pupils examined—
A   ..
39.8
Ad-:   	
40.4
Ae   	
Ade :	
Bd 	
Be ....
2.9'
2.6
10.5
0.2
Bde--  - 	
0.2
Cd  	
Ce  ...... 	
1.1
0.4
Cde...	
1.9
Grades 77.-77.
57,568
29,527
7,153
36,680
7,003
13,885
20,888
23,495
10,698
1,988
12,686
1,190
9,619
10,809
Percentage   of   pupils   en-
40.8
36.2
27.8
34.6
17.0
69.3
51.7
Physieal status — percent
age of pupils examined—
A.     . . .... 	
45.8
50.8
26.1
46.9
41.8
44.8
44.5
Ad  - .
38.2
34.5
60.0
38.5
27.4
39.1
37.8
Ae... .......  	
2.0
1.6
0.7
1.4
1.3
2.8
2.7
Ade. 	
1.9
1.6
1.1
1.5
0.7
2.6
2.4
Bd  ..:„„,..
8.1
6.1
9.6
6.7
15.7
9.0
9.7
Be- .
0.8
1.7
0.8
1.6
2.8
0.7
0.4
1.4
0.6
1.4
2.6
0.7
1.1
5.3
2.7
0.2
0.8
0.2
Bde
0.7
Cd...  ..	
1.0
Ce  	
*
0.1
0.1
Cde...    .          .    —.	
0.6
0.3
*
0.3
4.0
0.5
0.9
Grades VII.-IX.
30,701
13,704
44.6
52.1
34.3
2.0
0.9
6.8
1.4
1.2
0.9
0.3
18,479
8,227
44.5
53.9
31.7
2.2
0.8
6.6
1.9
1.8
0.8
0.3
3,455
1,066
30.9
31.6
57.7
1.4
0.8
4.9
2.1
.1.2
0.2
*
21,934
9,293
42.4
51.2
34.7
2.2
0.8
6.4
1.9
1.7
0.8
0.3
3,142
693
22.1
54.3
29.8
0.9
10.7
0.7
1.3
1.4
0.9
5,625
3,718
66.1
54.2
34.0
1.8
1.4
f.O
*
*
1.2
*
0.3
8,767
Total pupils examined —
Percentage   of   pupils   en-
4,411
50.3
Physical status — percentage of pupils examined—
a... :  	
54.1
AdJ-.-.~-   -	
33.4
Ae..:  	
Ade.....  --.	
Bd                            	
1.7
1.2
7.6
Be                            	
0.2
Bde                          	
0.2
Cd— 	
Ce.     .
Cde                     	
1.2
*
0.4
* Less than 0.1 per cent. IIH 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Urban and Rural Summaries of Physical Status, 1941-42—Continued.
Grades X.-XIII.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total.
Rural.
17,727
8,675
48.9
60.5
27.9
2.2
0.7
4.5
2.1
1.3
0.5
0.3
12,761
5,847
45.8
63.8
22.8
2.8
0.7
4.2
3.0
1.7
0.6
0.4
1,466
1,089
74.3
36.7
52.1
0.8
0.6
7.0
0.9
1.3
0.6
14,227
6,936
48.8
59.7
27.4
2.5
0.7
4.7
2.7
1.6
0.6
0.3
1,594
378
23.7
60.9
37.3
0.8
0.5
0.5
1,906
1,361
71.4
64.9
27.8
1.2
0.7
4.8
0.4
*
0.1
3,500
Total pupils examined	
Percentage   of   pupils   en-
1,739
49.7
Physical status •— percentage of pupils examined—
A              	
64.1
Ad                	
29.8
Ae 	
1.1
Ade 	
Ba.      	
0.5
3.9
Be           	
Bde 	
Cd  	
Ce 	
Cde  	
0.1
0.3
*
0.1
* Less than 0.1 per cent.
Immunization Status,
Organized
and
Unorganized Territory,
1941-42.
Total.
Organized.
Unorganised.
Total pupils enrolled    	
118,405
21.4
5.2
21.2
94,447
19.6
3.7
18.5
23,958
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria        	
28.1
Scarlet fever....     ...   	
11.0
Smallpox     	
31.7
Grade I.
Total pupils enrolled...   -   	
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria       ..
Scarlet fever  _   	
12,409
27.2
3.7
23.8
9,061
31.0
3.1
27.1
3,348
16.8
5.4
14.8
Grades II.-VI.
Total pupils enrolled	
Percentage immunized-
Diphtheria	
Scarlet fever 	
Smallpox	
57,568
17.2
3.6
18.5
44,029
16.0
4.2
16.7
13,539
21.2
9.1
24.3 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1942-44.
HH 35
Immunization Status, Organized and Unorganized Territory,
1941-42—Continued.
Grades VII.-IX.
Total.
Organised.
Unorganised.
Total pupils enrolled     	
Percentage immunized—
30,701
15.9
3.5
17.7
25,336
14.6
2.2
16.1
5,365
22.1
9.5
25.1
Grades X.-XIII.
Total pupils enrolled	
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria 	
Scarlet fever	
Smallpox  	
1,706
22.0
12.1
28.3
Rural and Urban Immunization Status, 1941-42.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total.
Rural.
Total pupils enrolled...
Percentage immunized
Diphtheria 	
Scarlet fever	
Smallpox 	
118,405
21.4
5.2
21.2
66,808
17.3
3.7
15.9
13,518
30.9
1.2
24.5
80,326
20.1
3.3
17.4
13,229
19.2
5.0
21.9
24,850
28.2
11.6
30.9
38,079
25.1
9.2
27.7
Grade I.
Total pupils enrolled	
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria     .
12,409
27.2
3.7
23.8
6,041
26.5
2.7
25.5
1,444
53.5
1.2
28.7
7,485
31.7
2.4
26.2
1,490
26.0
5.6
28.3
3,434
17.9
5.9
18.6
4,924
20.3
5.8
Smallpox   	
21.6
Grades II.-VI.
Total pupils enrolled —
Percentage immunized
Diphtheria  —
Scarlet fever 	
Smallpox 	
57,568
17.2
3.6
18.5
29,527
13.8
3.9
13.3
7,153
12.5
1.0
18.8
36,680
13.5
3.4
14.4
7,003
21.9
6.3
25.6
13,885
21.9
10.2
22.8
20,888
21.9
8.9
23.8 HH 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.   .
Rural and Urban Immunization Status, 1941-42—Continued.
Grades VII.-IX.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
Total pupils enrolled...r	
Percentage immunized—
30,701
15.9
3.5
17.7
18,479
7.07
2.1
14.8
3,455
21.5
0.9
19.3
21,934
9.2
1.9
15.5
3,142
13.9
3.6
15.3
5,625
21.9
9.8
24.8
8,767
19.0
7.6
Smallpox—. .	
21.4
Grades X.-XIII.
17,727
11.9
3.1
19.1
12,761
9.0
2.1
16.3
1,466
26.0
2.7
36.7
14,227
10.8
2.2
18.4
1,594
11.7
1.6
12.4
1,906
19.7
11.5
23.8
3,500
Percentage immunized—
Diphtheria—, -	
16.1
7.0
Smallpox ; 	
18.6
Medical Inspection of School Personnel, Organized and
Unorganized Territory, 1941-42.
!                                                                                                      ■                                       '.•:■•'
Total.
Organized.
Unorganized.
4,224
1,002
23.7
84.4
11.7
■1.8
1.3
0.4
0.4
3,057
225
7.4 '
89.8
6.2
2.2
0.9
0.9
1,167
Total personnel examined-...- — —   	
Percentage of personnel employed examined  	
Physical status:—percentage of personnel examined—
A           — ——        	
777
66.6
82.8
Ad         -        - —-	
13.3
B -.  	
1.7
Bd
1.4
C             	
Cd         -. -    	
0.5
0.3
Medical Inspection of Rural and Urban School Personnel, 1941-42.
Total.
Cities.
Urban
Municipalities.
Total,
Urban.
Rural
Municipalities.
Unorganized and
Villages.
Total,
Rural.
4,224
1,002
23.7
84.4
11.7
1.8
1.3
0.4
0.4
2,100
115
5.5
89.5
5.2
1.7
1.7
1.7
416'
24
5.8
87.5
4.2
8.3
2,516
139
5.5
89.3
5.0
2.9
1.4
1.4
467
47
;   10.1
100.0
1,241
816
65.8
82.8
13.5
1.7
1.3
0.5
0.2
1,708
863
50 5
No. examined 	
Percentage of personnel em-
Physical status — percentage of personnel examined—        ;.
Ad.  	
B  __
83.7
12.7
1.6
1.3
0.5
0.2
Bd       	
C  	
Cd 	
* Less than 0.1 per cent. VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfiejld, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945.
905-245-5124   

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0319201/manifest

Comment

Related Items