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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1945

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
OF
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
FOR THE YEAR ENDED
DECEMBER 31 ST, 1943
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1045.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game
Commission for the year ended December 31st, 1943.
R. L. MAITLAND,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1945. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., January 30th, 1945.
Honourable R. L. Maitland, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1943.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
JAMES G. CUNNINGHAM,
Game Commissioners. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Reports— Page.
Game Commission       7
Game Wardens, "A" Division       9
Officer Commanding " B " Division  13
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson, " B " Division  16
Officer Commanding " C " Division  27
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson, " C " Division  32
Officer Commanding " D " Division  37
Game Wardens, " E " Division  40
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-43, inclusive  43
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences and Deer (Game) Tags  44
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences '. ,  45
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Anglers' and Outfitters' Licences 46
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers' Licences  47
Revenue—Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalty on Fur 48
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-43, inclusive  49
Comparative  Statement showing Pelts  of Fur-bearing Animals  on which
Royalty has been collected, 1922-43, inclusive  50
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty was
collected during Year 1943  51
List of Confiscated Fur, 1943  52
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1943, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur
and Firearms    52
Bounties paid, 1943  53
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922-43, inclusive  53
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1943  54
Prosecutions, 1943    61
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1943  63
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1943  64
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special (Trapping) Firearms Licences,
Season'1942-43 j.  76
Statement—Returns of Fur-farmers, 1943  76
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1943  77
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1943  78
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1943, also showing Revenue from
Sale of Bird-bands  79
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1943  80
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1943  82  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,
1943.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
Notwithstanding existing war conditions and the various restrictions imposed as
the result thereof, we have not found it necessary to make provision for any drastic
change in the system of game administration in the Province.
We have continued where and whenever possible to bring before the general public
the ever-increasing need of sane game and sport-fish protective measures being necessarily undertaken even during these strenuous times. Our game and fish films depicting the wild-life resources of British Columbia and the conservation measures put into
force in order to ensure perpetual protection to all our wild life have been exhibited
before numerous organizations such as schools, Game Associations, Boards of Trade, etc.
REGISTRATION OF TRAP-LINES.
The important and approved amendments to the regulations pertaining to the
registration of trap-lines have been a great assistance to trappers in protecting their
interests, and we are doing our utmost at all times towards improving conditions
generally in connection with the conservation of the valuable fur-bearing animals of
British Columbia.
As each year passes the fact is more forcibly brought home that our system of
trap-line registration has done and is doing everything in assuring the necessary protection to fur-bearing animals and has been of great help to trappers in protecting their
trap-lines and enabling them to farm the fur thereon.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES.
In the near future we propose to submit definite recommendations under which
the business of guiding game hunters and anglers will be placed on a sound footing.
In a few years we feel that there will be a very definite increase in our non-resident
hunters and fishermen and we firmly believe that now is the time to see that the
provisions of the " Game Act" respecting guiding be strengthened not only in the
interests of the hunter and fishermen but in the interests of guides as well.
FUR-FARMING.
Many fur-farmers have had to discontinue their operations as they have been
unable, in a great many instances, to obtain necessary food-supplies, labour, and equipment to carry on their fur-farming operations. However, there are still a fairly large
number of fur-farms in operation and these farmers appear to be making a financial
success of their business.
After the war there would seem to be no doubt that the fur-farming industry will
increase to a great extent.
BIRD-BANDING.
As in 1942, no bird-banding has been carried on this year by the Department.
PREDATORY-ANIMAL CONTROL.
We have again been in receipt of numerous requests for increased bounties on
cougars, wolves, and coyotes, but in preference to payment of bounty we feel that
7 JJ 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
probably better control over predatory animals and noxious birds would be secured if
moneys were provided for the employment of specially trained and properly equipped
hunters who naturally would be kept under strict supervision.
Statement of bounty payments during the year and a comparative statement of
bounties paid over a period of years are to be found in the statistical section of this
report. Your attention is also drawn to the statement showing predatory animals and
noxious birds destroyed by Game Wardens during 1943, which is also to be found in
the section referred to.
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
An increase is to be noted in the number of non-resident big-game hunters who
visited and hunted in the Province this year. The trophy fees paid by these hunters
have, as a result, increased over the fees paid in 1942.
As in past years, we have continued to co-operate whole-heartedly with the Provincial Department of Trade and Industry in promoting the interests of the Province.
GAME PROPAGATION.
We have continued carrying out our policy of purchasing and liberating pheasants
and other game birds, but as our finances would not permit the purchase of game birds
on the scale of previous years the total number of birds purchased is, therefore, considerably lower.
Some one hundred European partridges were purchased from and through the
kind co-operation of the Alberta Fish and Game Association. Fifty of these birds
were liberated in the Nanaimo district, on Vancouver Island, and the remaining fifty
birds were turned loose in a section of the Lower Mainland.
Our policy of trapping beaver on the Bowron Lake Game Reserve, near Barkerville,
and planting them in other portions of the Province has been continued with good
results. When funds are available an increased number of beaver should be trapped
and liberated, as we feel this policy is warranted and most necessary.
Established game reserves have been regularly patrolled and there would seem to
be no doubt that these reserved and protected areas act as feeders of game to the
surrounding districts.    It is felt that these reserves should be maintained.
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS.
Throughout the Province migratory game birds of all kinds are increasing. The
transplanting of beavers in various areas in the Province will undoubtedly increase our
wild fowl by providing many more suitable nesting areas. In some portions of the
Province, however, owing to climatic conditions encountered, the shooting or hunting
of migratory game birds during the open season was only fair.
REVENUE.
As in 1942, a decrease is to be reported in our revenue. This decrease can be
attributed solely to reduced fur royalty collections and amounted to $7,911.03.
GAME-FISH CULTURE.
We believe that the statement showing our game-fish liberations will indicate that
our programme of restocking lakes and streams in the Province is being carried out
as fully as possible. Some concern has been expressed by some that our hatchery-work
is not proving as successful as it should, but we cannot agree with this contention and
in this regard we would respectfully draw your attention to the very complete reports
of Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 9
The coarse-fish problem in the Province we feel is a most serious one, and while
steps have been taken to eliminate coarse fish in a number of lakes and streams no
concerted effort in this regard can be made until after the war, when it is hoped more
funds which are very necessary will be available for this purpose.
Pollution of a number of lakes and streams has also given us a good deal of concern, but generally we find that industrial and other interests have been only too willing
to co-operate in preventing pollution.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
Valuable assistance has been given us during the year by the British Columbia
Police and the friendly relation between this Force, the Forest Branch, and the Department of Agriculture, as well as many other Government Departments, is, we assure
you, very greatly appreciated.
The excellent spirit and friendly co-operation of the Washington State Game
Department has been most helpful and the Director, Mr. B. T. McCauley, has always
been quite willing to furnish us with any advice or assistance required.
In conclusion, we wish to express our most sincere appreciation to the Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner of the British Columbia Police, the officers and men
of this Force; the Provincial Fisheries Department; the Honourable the Minister of
Fisheries for the Dominion; the Chief Supervisor of Dominion Fisheries for the Province; Dr. W. A. Clemens, Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan, and Dr. D. C. B. Duff, of the
University of British Columbia; the Chief Federal Migratory Bird Officer for British
Columbia; Game Associations, farmers, and many other organizations and residents
of the Province who have so willingly helped us at all times during the year in our work
of conserving for the benefit of the people of British Columbia our very valuable game
and sport-fish resources.
"A" DIVISION   (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE
MAINLAND COAST).
Information obtained from reports of Game Wardens dealing with game conditions in " A " Game Division for the year ended December 31st, 1943.
Game Animals.
Bear.—The majority of reports would seem to indicate that black bear are on the
increase and some Game Wardens, in view of the damage attributed to black bear in
respect to private property and stock, even go so far as to recommend that black bear
be classed as vermin.
Only black bear are to be found on Vancouver Island, but on the Mainland Coast,
at the heads of various inlets, especially Knight Inlet, grizzly bear are to be found in
fair numbers, and during the fall and spring months resident as well as non-resident
hunters visit these inlets for the purpose of hunting this king of our wild animals.
Deer.—Coast or Columbian deer are increasing in most sections of the Division
and in some portions thereof are still the source of complaint in connection with damage
to private property and crops. In this regard, however, the provisions of the " Game
Act" enable a property-owner or farmer to protect his land or stock against damage.
In every instance of a complaint being received Game Wardens report they have immediately investigated and have done whatever they could to relieve any situation of
this nature. During the past hunting season fair numbers of deer were shot in the
Division.
Fallow deer which were liberated in a portion of the Alberni district and also on
some of the Gulf Islands are not increasing. JJ 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mountain-goat.—The Game Warden at Duncan advises that he has not personally
observed or heard of the mountain-goat on the Shaw Creek Game Reserve (Lake
Cowichan) for some considerable time. The logging operations within this reserve
have been almost completed and probably after this logging has ceased a special patrol
into the reserve will be the means of obtaining more authentic information on mountain-goat in this section of the Division.
On the Mainland Coast a slight increase has been observed. Mountain-goat have,
however, not been hunted to any great extent during the past few years in any of the
areas on the Coast where they are to be found.
Wapiti (Elk).—While wapiti or elk on Vancouver Island have been protected for
a great many years they do not seem to be increasing in numbers to any appreciable
extent. In the Courtenay area, however, due to army manoeuvres, the wapiti have been
driven down into the low-lying and farming country and, in consequence, have done
some damage to private property and crops.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Undoubtedly the beaver can be given first ranking among the fur-bearing animals
in the Division. Fairly numerous complaints of these animals doing damage to private
property and public roads have been received, while on many registered trap-lines
beaver have increased to such an extent that special permits have been issued to many
responsible trappers to take off the surplus animals on their trap-lines. Where beaver-
have been the cause of damage, permits to trap them have been promptly granted.
Muskrats appear to be withstanding fairly heavy and consistent trapping. Complaints of these fur-bearers doing damage are not being received as frequently as in
former years, although in some portions of the Division muskrats are reported as
increasing.
Mink and racoon can be classed as being fairly plentiful. Racoon, owing to better
market prices, were fairly heavily trapped during the trapping season. In the southern
sections of Vancouver Island, racoon have been responsible for the destruction of game
birds and domestic birds.
Marten have been trapped in greater numbers, especially in the Courtenay district.
All other fur-bearing animals such as otter, squirrels, weasel, and wolverine are to be
found throughout the Division.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—Except in the Victoria and Alert Bay regions, blue grouse were
in good numbers in the Division, especially in the Cowichan Lake, Courtenay, and
Campbell River districts.
Grouse (Ruffed).—Only two districts, Cowichan and Alberni, report these birds
as being in fair numbers. In all of the remainder of the Division reports indicate
that great care must be exercised in not permitting lengthy shooting seasons if we are
to fully protect this remarkable sporting game bird from possible extermination.
Pheasants.—Due to the areas close to the City of Victoria becoming more settled
each year most of the suitable pheasant country is fast disappearing. In the Nanaimo,
Alberni, and Courtenay districts pheasants do not appear to be very plentiful, even
though in some years fairly heavy liberations have been undertaken.
As pheasants were the source of complaint from farmers and others in the
Cowichan district, no new blood has been put down in this area and, consequently, the
pheasants in this district are fast disappearing.
European Partridge.—Following release of a number of partridge in the Nanaimo
district reports from that area indicate that these imported birds are becoming
acclimatized and several large coveys have been observed.    In the Victoria district, REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 11
however, partridge do not appear to be increasing, even though hunting in this area
is not permitted at any time.
Quail.—California quail are to be found in what might be termed small numbers
in the Alberni, Nanaimo, Cowichan, and Victoria districts, but nowhere can they be
considered as being plentiful. Fairly heavy snows and severe winter weather during
1942-43 accounted for a considerable decrease in the stand of quail on Vancouver
Island.
Ptarmigan.—In the high mountains of Vancouver Island a fair number of ptarmigan are to be found.
Migratory Game Birds.
No doubt it would be advisable under this heading to take the reports of each
Game Warden individually, as conditions respecting migratory game birds vary so
much in various portions of the Division.
Game Warden, Alert Bay.—Ducks have not been plentiful, but there has been
a good showing of geese.
Game Warden, Courtenay.—There has been a fair migration of geese this year,
but most of them passed through the district before the hunting season opened.
A number of snow geese were observed, this being an uncommon occurrence in this
district.
Duck-shooting was very poor as the birds migrated some three weeks before the
season was opened and, as a result, very few local or resident hunters obtained good
shooting.
Many swans were seen at various times migrating south. A number of these
birds winter around Upper Campbell and Long Lakes. Last winter these lakes were
frozen over and, as a result, many swans were killed through depredations by eagles.
Game Warden, Alberni.—Geese and ducks were to be found in fair numbers all
along the west coast of Vancouver Island. Black brant have also been plentiful, but
Wilson's or jack snipe have been scarce.
Game Warden, Nanaimo.—The open season on ducks has not been very good,
probably due to the lack of water in the swamps that are to be found in this district.
Very little shooting has taken place due to the shortage of ammunition. Swans still
migrate through the district each fall, while black brant have been generally plentiful
during the months of February, March, and April. In the latter part of February
and at the conclusion of the hunting season, good bags of black brant were obtained.
Game Warden, Duncan.—Owing to the late opening of the hunting season in this
district duck-shooting has been poor. Canada geese are to be observed in small numbers on Quamichan Lake, but many large flocks of geese were to be observed flying
north or south during the course of migration. Swans were also seen during the
migration period and especially was this the case in the Nitinat area. Black brant
were to be observed during the winter months near Crofton, but very few of these
birds were shot during the open hunting season. Wilson's or jack snipe seem to appear
each year in about the same numbers and some good bags were taken during the open
hunting season.
Game Warden, Victoria.—Ducks appeared in fair numbers but owing to shortage
of ammunition shooting was greatly curtailed. Black brant appeared in good numbers
during migration.
Vermin.
Reports indicate that in some sections of the Division cougar and wolves are
increasing, due possibly to many residents who formerly hunted cougar with the use
of trained dogs having enlisted in the armed forces. (Particulars of predators killed
by Game Wardens during the year can be obtained from a statement to be found in
the statistical section of this report.) JJ 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game-protection.
As in past years, patrols have been continually carried out by all Game Wardens
in their respective districts. Particular attention has again been given to the matter
of preventing the illegal practice of pit-lamping and many night patrols have been
undertaken in an endeavour to stop this very objectionable method of hunting. As
a result of these patrols Game Wardens advise that pit-lamping has been greatly
reduced during the year.
Game Propagation.
Very few pheasants were released during the year but a number of European
partridges were imported from Alberta and liberated in the Nanaimo district. These
birds apparently have taken hold, as reports indicate that a number of large coveys
have been seen during the year.
Game Reserves.
The two largest reserves on Vancouver Island are Strathcona Park and Forbidden
Plateau (Courtenay district) and Shaw Creek (Lake Cowichan district). These reserves
continue to act as feeders to the surrounding country. All game reserves and bird
sanctuaries in the Division have been constantly patrolled and there would seem to be
no doubt that these reserved areas are most important in the interest of the preservation of game of all kinds.
Fur Trade.
Fair catches of fur-bearing animals have been reported during the year. While
a few transient fur-traders purchase fur pelts on Vancouver Island the majority of
trappers ship their fur direct to fur-traders in Vancouver.
/
Fur-farming.
Owing to existing war conditions, the number of fur-farms on Vancouver Island
has considerably decreased, but some mink-farmers still in operation appear to be
carrying on their farms successfully. There would seem to be every possibility of
fur-farming becoming an important industry after the war.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Registered trappers continue to take a great interest in the farming of the fur-
bearing animals on their trap-lines and reports indicate that the system of trap-line
registration is proving more beneficial each year.
Registration of Guides.
Vancouver Island cannot be considered a big-game country and, as a result, there
are no registered guides on the island, but one guide does operate on the Mainland
Coast at Knight Inlet and makes it his business each spring and fall to take out hunters
who are desirous of securing a grizzly-bear trophy.
Special Patrols.
All Game Wardens remark that they have not taken any patrol that might be
termed as a " special " patrol, but that they have continually and frequently patrolled
every portion of their districts during the year.
Hunting Accidents.
Two hunting accidents were reported as having taken place in the Division, one
of which resulted in the death of a Mr. Geoffrey Oram who was shot while hunting in
the Lake Cowichan district. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 13
Game-fish Culture.
The Game Warden at Nanaimo advises that good results are being obtained
through the release of trout in his district. Quamichan and Rogers Lakes, Cowichan
district, stocked annually with trout, show every indication that these liberations have
greatly improved fishing in these lakes. Shawnigan Lake, Victoria district, is a striking example of what can be done in making a poor fishing lake into a good one.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Game Wardens m the Division report a fair season for the hunting of game and
improved fishing, due to many lakes being built up through annual liberations of trout
from the two departmental hatcheries on Vancouver Island.
Each Game Warden advises that every possible assistance has been given during
the year by the British Columbia Police Force, the British Columbia Forest Branch,
Game Associations, farmers, and sportsmen, and they all wish to express their sincere
appreciation for this assistance and co-operation.
"B" DIVISION   (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By A. F. Sinclair, Officer Commanding.
I herewith beg to submit annual report of game conditions in " B " Division for
the year ended 1943, as well as the report of Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson on
game or sport-fish conditions.
Big Game.
Moose.—Still plentiful east of the Kootenay and Columbia Rivers from the International Boundary to the Canoe River. There are a good number of moose on the west
side of the rivers mentioned, on the west side of the Moyie River, and with a few in
the Creston district.    A moose was also reported north-west of Penticton.
Wapiti (Elk).—A general increase is noted in the East Kootenay where wapiti
are spreading all over the district. They are also reported to have increased on Summit Creek, west of- Creston. Elk have scattered out over the Penticton detachment
and there are a considerable number in the vicinity of Princeton. The kill was light
this year owing to an open fall.
Mountain-sheep.—One variety only in the " B " Division, Rocky Mountain or bighorn. They inhabit the Rocky Mountains south of Golden to the International Boundary.
Some sheep are to be found in the vicinity of Keremeos and Okanagan Falls, also in
the Ashnola country. In these districts they are protected. In the East Kootenay
hsemorrhagic septicemia seems to have run itself out. This disease seems to have left
the sheep rather scarce.
Caribou.—Are reported to be increasing about Revelstoke and in the country south
of Nelson. There is a small number of caribou in the Big Bend area and from that
point south through the Selkirks to the International Boundary.
Mountain-goat.—Very plentiful throughout the Division, except in the Boundary
country, where they are reported to be increasing.
Mule-deer.—Fairly plentiful throughout the Division, but more plentiful in the
Kettle River district.
White-tailed Deer.—These are well distributed over the Division, except the western part'of the Boundary district. There was a light fall kill owing to the absence of
snow.
Bear (Black, Brown, and Grizzly).—Black and brown bear are plentiful throughout the Division, where they cause considerable damage in the orchards. Grizzly are
fairly numerous throughout the unsettled parts of the Division, where they are considered a top trophy by non-resident hunters. JJ 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fur-bearing Animals.
I can only repeat my request of last year in regard to beaver, and that is that
some regulation should be brought into effect which would allow the taking of beaver
by permit and tag, in order that the Department might obtain control over the number
of beaver taken annually.
In regard to muskrats we should have a fall season, as no one would try to winter-
stock with the expectation of being able to take an increased number in the spring,
especially if they were short of food in the spring. With no snow this year the rats
are wandering around on top of the ice. Frozen out of their houses they are easy
prey for owls and coyotes.
The remainder of the fur-bearers seem to be holding their own, except squirrels.
There are various reports on these animals. Some of the Game Wardens claim a shortage due to trapping and others claim an increase.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue Grouse.—These birds are fairly plentiful throughout the Division. They live
high up and are about holding their own.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—From various reports received it would appear that
ruffed grouse are on the increase in the Division, due perhaps to fewer hunters being
out during the past season.
Franklin Grouse.—These appear fairly plentiful in the higher parts of the Kootenays, where they are not hunted so heavily.
Sharp-tailed Grouse.—A few coveys of these birds can be seen in the Kootenay-
Boundary districts. They are reported to be increasing in the Lower Okanagan and
along the Kootenay River.
Ptarmigan.—Reported from various high parts of the Division.
Pheasants.—The winter of 1942-43 was a hard winter on these birds and there
was a decided decrease this past season in the Similkameen, Lower Okanagan, Grand
Forks, and Creston areas.    There are a few birds at Waldo, Robson, and Nakusp.
Partridge.—There are some partridge in the Lower Okanagan,- Grand Forks, and
Creston districts, but they show very little increase.
Quail (California).—These birds do not stand cold weather and the winter of
1942-43 was very hard on them, but I have better hopes for these birds this year.
Quail are to be found in the Similkameen, Lower Okanagan, and Grand Forks areas.
Migratory Birds.
Ducks.—Shooting was not so heavy as usual, due to shortage of ammunition. This
resulted in a slight increase in the number of ducks.
Geese.—There is noted an increase in geese along the Upper Columbia Valley and
they are numerous at, or near, Creston.
Willow Snipe.—As usual, there is very little increase in these birds.
Coots.—These are too numerous and no one shoots them. They do considerable
damage to small fish and may eat duck-food.
Vermin.
The following vermin were destroyed by the Game Wardens and myself in this
Division: 3 bobcats, 116 cats, 112 coyotes, 26 dogs, 104 hawks, 90 magpies, 54 owls,
1 skunk, 8 black bear, 7 cougar, 149 crows, 11 eagles, 8 kingfishers, 106 magpie eggs,
and 3 ravens.
Coyotes.—Are still on the increase, but the price of fur is high and many people
have been hunting them. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 15
Cougar.—Still far too plentiful and lack of snow has hindered hunting, and this
has been very much in their favour.
Timber-wolves.—Appeared in the East Kootenay and in the Princeton districts
and are apparently old dogs driven from the north, but they are still able to kill elk
and deer.
Game-protection.
There were forty-four prosecutions with thirty-nine convictions and five dismissals under the " Game Act." Thirty-five convictions were obtained under the
Special Fishery Regulations.
Game Propagation.
The Kimberley Rod and Gun Club liberated a number of pheasants on the St. Mary
Prairie.
Considerable feeding was done during the winter at Creston, Penticton, and Grand
Forks.
Game Reserves.
The Elk River Game Reserve, situated on the White, Bull, and Elk Rivers, is a
-most important game reserve as it is situated in the heart of the big-game country.
Game-bird sanctuaries adjacent to Nelson and Vaseaux Lake, south of Penticton,
are proving to be very beneficial.
Deer sanctuaries exist in the Kettle River and Elko districts. They are on winter
yarding-grounds of mule-deer and serve to protect the deer if we have a heavy fall of
snow before the hunting season ends.
Fur Trade.
We have very few fur-traders in this Division, and practically all of the fur goes
to Vancouver.
Fur-farming.
There is no easy money in raising fur. Feed is so expensive and it is very hard
to make very much out of the business. There are a few, however, who appear to make
a go of it by raising No. 1 animals, selling breeding stock, and pelting at the proper
time.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of trap-lines was one of the most important steps taken for the
protection of fur in the Province, also for the protection of the trapper.
There are a few points in regard to who should hold a trap-line I should like to
mention. No person should be allowed to farm a line out to another. This applies to
women as well as to men. I have yet to see any of these transient or part-time trappers
who consider any one but themselves and think only of how much they can get from
trapping.    This is not fur conservation and the result is a depleted trap-line.
Registration of Guides.
There are thirty-four registered guides in this Division.
Business was fair with a promise of greater patronage of American hunters after
the war. We should prepare for this by overhauling our guides regulations as they
are in need of adjustment due to present conditions.
Special Patrols.
Fourteen special patrols were undertaken by Game Wardens in " B " Division
during the year. JJ 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Hunting Accidents.
Ralph Nixon, aged 22 years, upset a canoe in Sunburst Lake, Mount Assinaboine
Provincial Park, on October 6th, 1943, while on a hunting-trip with the Governor-
General of Canada and was drowned.    The body has not been recovered.
William Van Tassel, Rossland, B.C., reported in hospital last year for injuries
received December 13th, 1942, has now fully recovered.
Game-fish Culture.
During the year 1943, the Game Wardens gave the usual assistance to the Fishery
Officers.
C H. Robinson, Fishery Supervisor, is directly in charge of game-fish culture in
" B " Division and has submitted the usual report.
Summary and General Remarks.
The year 1943 was fair for game, and the climate was not too wet nor too dry,
with no excessive heat and very few fires.
Fur prices were rather high but a great many of the trappers were engaged in
other work.
Due to high prices being paid for coyotes and the excessive number of them around
there was a very large take reported.
I again wish to express the thanks of myself and the entire personnel of " B "
Division to the Provincial Forestry Branch and the Public Works Department, both for
direct assistance and the loan of equipment. Also to " B " Division Provincial Police
for their splendid co-operation throughout the year.
We have also received a great deal of assistance from the individual sportsmen
and the Rod and Gun Clubs throughout the Division, which assistance was very much
appreciated.
Report of C. H. Robinson, Fishery Supervisor, covering Game-fish Conditions
in " B " Game Division.
I herewith beg to submit a report covering game-fish culture and general fishery
conditions in " B " Division, including some information kindly supplied by the Game
Wardens in their patrol districts.
Generally, throughout the Interior, the late and cold spring affected trout-fishing,
due probably in some respects to the scarcity of surface feed, but as the season advanced
there was a decided improvement, with average catches from most waters.
Game-fish culture operations and distributions therefrom received the usual careful consideration from the Game Commission, preference being given to the most
important and accessible waters, in view of curtailed angling in lakes of higher altitudes and the necessity of conserving rubber and gas.
During the year, with the splendid co-operation from the organized sportsmen and
interested co-operators, additional progress was made towards game-fish culture in
rearing-ponds constructed and others under review.
The improvements to the Nelson Hatchery set-up and water-supply system as
undertaken by the Game Commission should, when finished, prove invaluable in the
propagation of trout for waters in the East and West Kootenay, Boundary, and Okanagan districts.
The operation of rearing-pohds and summary report in connection with hatchery
operations is referred to later in this report.
Similkameen and South Okanagan Waters.
The series of lakes and streams situated in the Princeton area produced the average
catches of Kamloops (rainbow) trout, the supply of which is chiefly maintained from REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 17
yearly distributions. However, the chain of lakes on Allison (One Mile) Creek failed
to produce many trout in spite of yearly replenishment.
Apparently the Kamloops trout reaching maturity in Hornet and Deadman Lakes
took advantage of the spawning areas in the inlet creek prepared by the organized
sportsmen of Princeton, which resulted in fair natural production.
A number of Eastern brook-trout (which were introduced some twenty years ago)
were observed spawning in One Mile Creek. It has been suggested that this species of
trout be substituted for Kamloops trout in lakes of the One Mile Creek system, but this
should first be a matter for careful investigation.
Clearwater Lake, Hedley, yielded fairly good catches of rainbow trout, considering
existing conditions. For experimental purposes 25,000 Kokanee eyed eggs were planted
during the fall, primarily as a forage-fish and in an effort to increase the productivity
of the lake. Again during the season the organized sportsmen of the Nickel Plate
Mine financed and assumed the responsibility of affording protection to the spawning
trout that inhabit the said lake.
Cathedral Lakes, situated in the Ashnola watershed, were not fished to any extent;
therefore it appeared advisable to defer future planting of rainbow trout, subject to
natural reproduction and the out-take.
From a sport-fishing standpoint the proposed reduction of the size-limit of trout
from 8 to 6 inches in certain streams of the Similkameen watershed is being investigated to determine the practicability of permitting the capture of 6-inch trout and the
resultant reaction that might occur from the proposed change.
Twin Lakes and Keremeos Creek.—The Eastern brook-trout introduced has provided good fishing. So far Lush Lake has yielded but few speckled trout, although
conditions appear suitable for the species.
Osoyoos and Vaseaux Lakes.—These somewhat warm-water lakes produced fair
catches of large-mouth black bass. It was reported that trout-fishing in the first-named
lake was poor during the spring and fall, in spite of fry liberations.
Bear and Madden Lakes.—The Kamloops trout introduced in the first-named lake
are thriving, varying up to 6 lb. in weight; the latter lake, of small acreage, produced
but few trout.
Skaha (Dog) Lake.—Reports varied somewhat regarding general fishing conditions and catches of Kamloops trout taken during the spring and fall months; apparently there was a slight improvement, and it is hoped that with increased plantings of
fry and fingerlings fishing will improve in this well-located lake.
Okanagan Lake (South End).—Again the spring fishing for Kamloops trout was
very good, there being limit catches, mostly varying in weight from 1 lb. upwards.
This would indicate that fry and fingerlings liberated had survived, as natural spawning
areas are now very restricted. In order to maintain and assist with the food-supply
for the large trout, kokanee eyed eggs were planted in selected creeks with excellent
results, as indicated by the return of the matured fish to spawn.
Situated throughout the Penticton and Summerland areas there are numerous
small lakes, most of which, from reports received, yielded good catches of trout, including Chute Lake, where the condition of the trout has gradually improved since regulated
liberations of fry have taken place.
Boundary District Waters.
Kettle River and West Fork.—These streams continued to produce good catches of
rainbow trout, varying in weight to 4 lb., as a result of extra protection and systematic
planting of the eyed eggs in nursery waters. Water conditions were not so favourable
during the early fall, but regulations in force gave the fish necessary protection.
Conkle (Fish) Lake.—Very favourable reports were received regarding the catches
of rainbow trout and their improved size and weight;   probably the extra protection JJ 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
afforded until June 1st each year is of benefit. The several lakes situated in the Kettle
River watershed furnish good fly- and bait-fishing.
Jewel Lake.—This lake provided fair fishing for Kamloops trout, most of which
varied in weight from 1 to 5 lb., being quite a contrast to several years ago when
30-pounders were quite common.
To conserve and prevent the outward migration of spawning trout, the outlet of
Jewel Lake was screened off by installing a permanent lumber panel fence, 5 by 32
feet, spaced at V2-inch intervals. The set-up proved to be very effective. It was
financed by the organized sportsmen of Greenwood and Grand Forks.
Wilgress (Loon) Lake.—This small, productive, mud-bottom lake provided fair
trolling for Kamloops trout, although the low-water conditions affected the fishing
somewhat. In order to improve the conditions and assist the parent trout in natural
spawning, a gravel-bed was created to accommodate the fish, which will be completed
when the water-levels of the lake will permit.
Granby River and Smelter Lake.—In comparison to the season 1942 the fly-fishing
for rainbow trout was not quite so good; apparently small trout are plentiful, indicating fair results from eyed-egg plantings and natural spawning. The section of the
Kettle River flowing between Carson and Billings produced good catches of rainbow
trout.
Christina Lake.—One of the most popular summer resorts in the Interior, this lake
provided fairly good fishing for Kamloops trout during the spring and fall, possibly
the results of increased eyed-egg plantings. Angling for small-mouthed black bass
remained fairly good, although probably they are not so plentiful since less protection
is afforded.
The kokanee continued to fill in when the trout are not biting so freely. Due to
the late spawning of the kokanee, towards the latter part of November, the catch was
restricted to 10,956 kokanee (5,074 lb.) for commercial use.
West Kootenay Waters.
Big Sheep and Beaver Creek.—The supply of Eastern brook-trout has been fairly
well maintained from yearly fry liberations and natural spawning in spite of extensive
angling.
Champion Lakes.—The small allotments of Kamloops trout fingerlings liberated
yearly since 1939 has provided fairly good fishing for the Trail anglers. The creel
census proposed and started again this year failed to produce the desired data.
Columbia River.—That portion flowing between Castlegar and Waneta. Apparently
the rainbow trout fishing was not quite so good as during the season of 1942. The
organized sportsmen of Trail are somewhat concerned over the increasing numbers of
coarse fish, possibly the result of the Coulee Dam construction.
Lower Arrow Lakes.—Some very good specimens of Kamloops trout were taken,
varying in weight up to 24 lb., in the vicinity of Broadwater. While there has been
an improvement in the numbers of trout caught, because of the increased number of
anglers in that region it may be necessary to increase the plantings to offset a depletion
in future years.
Whatshan Lakes.—Gratifying reports were received regarding the fly-fishing and
trolling for rainbow trout, but it is doubtful under normal conditions whether the
supply can be maintained unless the numbers of trout in possession are restricted.
A number of whitefish were taken from the lakes, which are covered under the subject
of coarse fish later in this report.
Summit, Victor, Three Valley, and Griffin Lakes.—These lakes, west of Revelstoke,
received another experimental planting of 190,000 cut-throat trout eyed eggs to determine their suitability in place of Kamloops trout. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 19
Apparently the Kamloops trout fishing improved in Three Valley Lake, probably
the result of fingerlings liberated. It was also reported that the Kamloops trout are
doing fairly well in the Illecillewaet River from small experimental plantings. This is
of interest considering extreme glacial conditions throughout the summer. Begbie and
Beaver Lakes provided good rainbow trout fishing.
Trout Lake, Lardeau.—In comparison to season 1942, encouraging reports were
received of improved fishing for Kamloops trout, there being fair catches throughout
the season, varying in weight up to 18 lb. However, subject to the collection of eggs
at Gerrard and natural spawning, due consideration will be given to replenishment, in
view of the fact that this lake is well patronized by Revelstoke and Okanagan anglers,
and also non-resident anglers from the United States.
Wilson Lakes.—Near Nakusp. The rainbow trout supply was fairly well maintained from natural spawning and eyed eggs planted, resulting in a fairly good flyfishing and trolling season. The upper lakes can be reached by auto, hence extensive
fishing. The kokanee introduced are providing food for the trout—from stomach tracts
examined.
Bear and Fish Lakes.—These two small alpine lakes produced the usual good
catches of rainbow trout, mostly for the employees at the Zincton Mines, Limited.
The suggested use of fertilizers to increase the productivity in Bear Lake, if feasible,
to be financed by the interested anglers, was duly investigated and found to be too
expensive for effective results.
Slocan Lake.—Quite important and accessible. Continued to produce fairly good
catches of Kamloops trout by fly-fishing and trolling throughout the season. Increased
plantings of eyed eggs, fry, and fingerlings have increased the trout population.
Natural spawning is much restricted in tributary streams. No doubt the pollution of
Carpenter Creek affected the food-supply of trout.
Evans, Cahill, and Beatrice Lakes.—With restricted travel, this chain of lakes, not
being very accessible, was not fished to any great extent. Consequently, eyed-egg
plantings have been deferred since 1940, in view of natural reproduction and the
decreasing food-supply to sustain the Kamloops trout.
Slocan River.—Flowing more or less parallel to the Slocan Highway, provided fairly
good fishing for rainbow trout. With ideal spawning areas and fry plantings yearly,
this stream should produce more trout, although the coarse fish probably take a toll
of the young trout.
Kootenay River.—Flowing between Grohman Creek and the Columbia River (except
the portion closed for war-time precautionary measures), provided fair fishing for
rainbow trout. Water-storage in the Kootenay Lake and dam-construction has changed
water conditions entirely. The increased trout population in the closed portion was
investigated and the suggested transfer of surplus fish was not feasible.
Rosebud Lake.—Produced the usual good catches of cut-throat and some rainbow
trout, mostly for non-resident anglers. Again a joint operation was carried out in
protecting the spawning trout and the collection of 263,705 cut-throat trout eggs for
incubation in the Nelson Hatchery. The collection of eggs was considerably reduced
resulting from the trap being raided, which may also affect the collection this coming
season.
Boundary Lake, Nelway.—Situated close to the International Boundary, provided
fairly good catches of Eastern brook-trout from yearly plantings of fry. As conditions
do not permit natural spawning, 450,000 eggs were collected for incubation in the
Nelson Hatchery.
Salmon River and its Tributaries.—Since the pollution from mining industries has
been considerably reduced, attention now is being given to restoring the trout population where feasible.    The several small alpine lakes situated at high altitudes were not JJ 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
fished very much, except Six-mile and Cottonwood Lakes, which produce good fishing,
mostly for the juvenile anglers.
West Arm of Kootenay Lake.—As usual, was fished extensively, with fair catches
of Kamloops (rainbow) trout and some kokanee (silver) trout. The liberations of
trout fingerlings from the Nelson Hatchery rearing-ponds should assist materially
towards increasing the supply. Also the reduction of numbers of coarse fish by juvenile
anglers will be of benefit. The creel census sponsored by the organized sportsmen
failed to produce authentic data as to numbers of trout caught.
Kokanee, Keen, Garland, Kaslo, and Tanal Lakes.—Quite important alpine waters,
situated in the Kokanee Glacier Park, were not patronized very much; therefore, the
catches of cut-throat trout were governed accordingly.
Sunset Lake, Woodberry Creek.—Provided good catches of cut-throat trout.
Kootenay Lake.-—Seasonal conditions may have affected and reduced the catches of
Kamloops trout in the vicinity of Procter, Queen's Bay, and Ainsworth, but in the
vicinity of Kaslo and towards the south end of the lake catches were up to average,
including a number of marked trout taken on the fly varying in weight to 5 lb., resulting from 1941 fingerlings liberated from the Kaslo rearing-ponds.
The Nelson Gyro Club conducted their fourth Kootenay Lake Trout Derby from
May 1st to November 16th. The event, considering restricted travel, was a success and
afforded some keen competition among the resident and non-resident anglers. Some
253 Kamloops trout weighing 5 lb. and over were recorded, weighing a total of 2,723 lb.
3 oz., with a 19-lb. 3-oz. one taking the first prize, compared with the 1942 competition
when 345 trout were registered weighing 4,082 lb. 15 oz., with a 24-lb. 14-oz. trout
winning the first prize.
Gerrard Hatchery.—Seasonal operations: Due to the extraordinary late spring and
water conditions in the Lardeau River, the collection of Kamloops trout eggs amounted
to 502,000 compared to 1,005,000 eggs for the 1942 season. While the run of parent
fish from Kootenay Lake was well up to the average, existing water conditions did not
induce them to reach the spawning areas at Gerrard as in previous years.
Large-mouth Black Bass.—-These non-native fish did not circulate so freely in the
Kootenay Lake during the season, but preferred to stay at the south end of the lake
and in waters of the Creston area, where good numbers are caught.
Goat River (below the Canyon).—Produced fair catches of rainbow (steelhead)
trout which work up from Kootenay River. Cut-throat trout fishing was good above
the canyon and to the upper reaches, possibly the results of yearly eyed-egg plantings.
Meadow Creek, a tributary, yielded good catches of Eastern brook-trout, conditions
being ideal for that species.
East Kootenay Waters.
Moyie River and Lakes.—Average catches of Kamloops and cut-throat trout were
taken by fly and trolling. The Upper Moyie Lake produced fairly good catches of
Kamloops trout, varying in size and weighing up to 14 lb. It is possible, with finger-
ling liberations and the introduction of kokanee, that the size and catches of Kamloops
will improve.
Monroe and Mineral Lakes.—Accessible to auto travel; provided fair fly-fishing
and trolling and are a valuable asset to the local anglers. It is necessary to restock
these lakes annually.
Smith Lake.—It is quite possible that the Kamloops trout were not so plentiful,
due to a number of spawners passing out of the lake down the outlet creek where they
became stranded. However, the trolling was fair. Also, fly-fishing provided good sport
for Kamloops trout, varying in weight to 14 lb.
Fish Lakes.—The usual fish cultural operations were carried out resulting in the
collection of 1,511,750 cut-throat trout eggs for incubation in the Cranbrook Hatchery
in comparison to 1,890,000 eggs handled in the 1942 season. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 21
New Lake.—Suffered a rather severe set-back when the winter kill took a heavy
toll of Kamloops trout. A similar loss occurred in the season 1936-37. In an effort
to restore the trout population, 5,000 Kamloops trout fingerlings were liberated therein.
Premier Lake.—This important lake from a recreational and fishing standpoint,
mostly for the Kimberley residents, yielded good catches of rainbow trout. The condition of the trout taken, mostly less than 5 lb., would indicate that the food-supply
is not so plentiful. There were fair numbers of kokanee observed spawning in Diorite
Creek and some in the south inlet creek.    The fish varied from 1 to l1/.. lb.
St. Mary Lake and Tributaries.—Some favourable reports were received regarding
improved fly-fishing for cut-throat trout in St. Mary River. The lake and tributaries
produced average catches of cut-throat trout varying in weight up to 2 lb. These
waters are conveniently located and well patronized by the Kimberley anglers.
Skookumchuck River.—The cut-throat trout population in the river below the falls
is regulated by migration to and from Kootenay River. This stream in the past has
produced good catches of trout, hence the need for liberal egg plantings which are
being undertaken.
Bull River and Tributaries.—Above the falls continued to provide excellent flyfishing for cut-throat trout up to 2 lb. in weight. The bountiful supply has been maintained from natural reproduction. The stretch of the river below the falls to the dam
is now restocked yearly.
The series of small lakes situated in the Cranbrook district produced the average
catches of Kamloops and cut-throat trout, the supply of which is principally maintained
by artificial propagation.
Tie Lake, Jaffray.—This lake was referred to in the 1941 report as to the uncertain
results of Kamloops trout fry and fingerlings liberated up to the year 1940. During
the season a number of trout were taken on the troll between 3% to 5% lb. in weight,
indicating that some of the fish planted survived.
Surveyors Lake.—The presence of large minnows (shiners) made it doubtful as
to the survival of Kamloops trout fry planted. However, during the month of July
several trout were taken on the troll up to 8V2 lb. in weight.
McBain's Lake, Silver Springs (Rosen), Mainstee, and Loon Lakes.—Provided the
usual fair catches of Kamloops trout, varying up to 12 lb. in weight. It was an off-year
for North Star Lake.
Edwards Lake.—Situated partly on the Indian Reservation, continued to supply
good catches of Kamloops trout, mostly less than 5 lb. in weight.
Elk River and Tributaries.—The cut-throat trout fishing improved in the river
south of Fernie. Also, according to water conditions, the upper reaches of the river
and tributaries provided good fishing. Towards 500,000 cut-throat trout eyed eggs
were again planted in nursery waters for the Elk River watershed.
Summit Lake, Crow's Nest.—As a result of the winter kill, 1941-42, few cut-throat
and Kamloops trout were taken during the season. However, there was no loss in the
winter of 1942-43. The two experimental plantings of fry in 1942-43 are being closely
studied, the result of which will govern future plantings.
Grave Lake.—Provided fair fly-fishing and trolling for Kamloops trout planted
yearly. This lake is quite important for the Michel-Natal anglers, who are desirous of
introducing the kokanee for experimental purposes. The matter will receive attention
before the collections of kokanee eggs take place next fall.
Deer Lake.—Apparently the plantings of Kamloops trout eyed eggs in one of the
inlet creeks, commencing 1943, has proven successful, resulting in good catches of trout
from the lake up to 2% lb. in weight and in splendid condition. Some steps will be
taken to increase gravel areas for egg plantings to ensure effective results. JJ 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Columbia Lake.—Failed to attract many fishermen, due possibly to limited accommodation and few boats available. At times the lake is affected with sudden changes
from wind-storms, at which time few people will venture out.
Windermere Lake.—Continued to provide fair trolling for Kamloops trout, varying
in weight up to 5 lb. Naturally the fishing is best in the spring and early fall, as during
the summer the water conditions are adverse to good fishing. Coarse fish remain very
plentiful in the lake.
Lillian Lake.—Conveniently situated, produced fair fly-fishing and trolling, mostly
for Kamloops trout up to 5 lb. in weight. In view of the suspected migration of the
spawning fish into Toby Creek that cannot return, a screen panel fence will be installed
at the outlet, with possibility of creating spawning areas this coming spring.
Paddy Ryan Lakes.—Conveniently situated, provided the usual good fly-fishing for
cut-throat trout up to 2 lb. in weight, mostly from yearly fry plantings.
Dunbar, Twin, and Bqtt (Fish) Lakes.—This chain of lakes provided the average
catches of cut-throat, although the trout are somewhat temperamental in their habits
in the first-named lake. They do, subject to seasonal conditions, provide excellent flyfishing for trout up to 3 lb.
There are a series of small lakes in the Fish Lake region wherein the cut-throat
trout fishing was up to average, considering all existing water conditions.
Baptiste Lake.—Apparently there was no improvement in the catches of cut-throat
trout from this small lake which is used for water storage. The sluggish water conditions are not entirely suited for the species mentioned.
Blackwater Lakes.—Located adjacent to the Trans-Canada Highway, provided good
fly-fishing for the somewhat small rainbow trout. With some natural reproduction and
yearly fry liberations the supply has been maintained considering the out-take and
available food-supply.
Bush Lakes.—Continued to produce fair catches of Kamloops trout, probably the
result of planting eyed eggs and fry liberations.
Wiseman Lake, Donald.—Although small, is producing good catches of Kamloops
trout introduced in 1938-40. The changing of a water-flow in a small creek adjacent
has resulted in some natural reproduction, possibly sufficient to take care of the supply.
Cedar Lakes.—No. 1 and No. 3: The Kamloops trout fishing remained fair, mostly
from fry liberations. Coarse fish introduced in the No. 1 from live-bait fishing has
seriously affected the food-supply for the trout.
Sport-fishing is somewhat restricted in streams of the Golden area due to extreme
glacial silt conditions during the summer and anchor-ice in the winter with resultant
scouring by ice-jams.
Summary of hatchery operations and rearing-ponds, and the distribution therefrom, is covered elsewhere in the report to the Game Commission.
Cranbrook Hatchery.—Seasonal operations for the benefit of East Kootenay waters
in conjunction with the Cranbrook Rod and Gun Club, which club is subsidized by the
Game Commission: Cut-throat trout eggs collected from Fish Lakes were 1,511,759;
Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Gerrard Hatchery, 115,000; Lloyd Creek
Hatchery, 200,000;  Penask Lake Hatchery, 400,000.
Gerrard Hatchery.—Seasonal operations for the Kootenay Lake, etc.: Kamloops
trout eggs collected, Lardeau River, Gerrard, 502,000.
Kaslo Hatchery.—Yearly operations for- the rearing-ponds, etc.: Received from
Gerrard Hatchery, 248,400 Kamloops trout eyed eggs for Bjerkness and Kaslo rearing-
ponds. Received from Meadow Creek operations, 2,260,000 kokanee green eggs. Supplied to the Idaho State Fish and Game Department, 2,000,000 eyed kokanee eggs.
Nelson Hatchery.—Yearly operations for the benefit of the East and West Kootenay and Boundary Districts and Okanagan waters:   Cut-throat trout eggs collected at REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 23
Rosebud Lake, 263,705. Eastern brook-trout eggs collected at Boundary Lake, 450,000,
and 232,000 fry distributed carried over from eggs collected in the fall of 1942. Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Gerrard Hatchery, 50,000; Lloyd Creek Hatchery,
350,000; Penask Lake Hatchery, 1,100,000. Kokanee green eggs received from Meadow
Creek collecting station, 1,616,000.
Summerland Hatchery.—Seasonal operations for waters of South Okanagan and
Similkameen Districts: Kamloops trout eyed eggs received from Beaver Creek Hatchery, 583,00. In addition, 105,000 eyed eggs and fry were planted direct from Penask
Lake for some waters of the Princeton area. Also received from Lloyd Creek Hatchery,
100,000; Penask Lake Hatchery, 200,000 Kamloops eggs. Meadow Creek-Lardeau,
seasonal operations for the collection of kokanee eggs, 1943 collection, 3,876,000.
Rearing-ponds.—Taft rearing-ponds are not operated, but in place thereof cutthroat and Kamloops trout eyed eggs were planted under similar arrangement as during
the season of 1942. With the probability of fish cultural operations being discontinued
at Taft, there is a possibility of same being carried on in Revelstoke by the Rod and
Gun Club in co-operation with the Game Commission.
Summerland Rearing-ponds.—Were not operated, owing to the difficulty and
expense of obtaining suitable food for the young trout.
Nelson Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—The resultant Kamloops trout fingerlings raised
from 30,000 eyed eggs, 10,000 advanced fry, and 5,000 small fingerlings, all Gerrard
stock carried over from 1942, were released during the month of June into the West
Arm of Kootenay Lake, except 1,000 for Champion Lakes, which amounted to 15,100
from 2 to 6 inches in length with an estimated escapage from the ponds during the
retainment of 5,922 fry and fingerlings into Cottonwood Creek flowing into the West
Arm. To determine the possible migration of the trout to the main lake 1,000 were
marked by removal of the adipose and left ventral fins.
Following on 18,000 fry were released in the No. 1 circular pond, 36,000 fry in No.
2 pond (Lloyd Creek stock), and 48,061 fry in No. 5 pond (Gerrard stock). Estimated
number of fingerlings as recorded remaining in the ponds as at December 31st, 1943,
80,926 fingerlings.
During the year two new ponds were constructed of approximate dimensions 13 by
30 by 3 by 6 feet, under similar arrangements as the two previously constructed in
1942; namely, through the co-operation of the City of Nelson cement and gravel, also
the equipment, were supplied. The Nelson Rod and Gun Club provided the labour.
It is expected that the four ponds will be available next spring, together with the use of
the circular pond.
Bjerkness Rearing-ponds.—The following Kamloops trout fry were released: In
No. 1 pond, 80,000; in No. 2 pond, 80,000, on August 6th and 7th. The liberation of
the resultant fingerlings in the No. 2 pond became necessary September 17th and 19th,
and including the No. 1 pond between October 3rd-12th, being accounted for as follows:
52,600 transferred to Kaslo rearing-ponds, 12,000 to Slocan Lake, 7,500 to Kootenay
Lake, with 212 lost in transfer and draining the ponds. Total number of fingerlings
raised, 72,312; weight count from No. 2 pond, 600 to the pound; No. 1 pond, 500 to
the pound. The visible loss of fry and fingerlings was extremely light during retainment.    The trout were fed once a day from the free-swimming stage.
Kaslo Rearing-ponds.—On August 23rd, 87,912 Kamloops fry were liberated in the
ponds, and the resultant fingerlings therefrom, together with the 52,600 transferred
from the Bjerkness ponds, were held in the Kaslo ponds until it was found necessary to
liberate towards the end of November. Consequently, between December 1st to the
31st, 99,890 were liberated into the Kootenay Lake; weight-count, 500 to the pound.
Approximate number remaining in the ponds as at December 31st, 1943, 37,657
fingerlings. JJ 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
New Denver Rearing-ponds.—Were not operated, due to the pollution of Carpenter
Creek, and in lieu thereof 12,000 Kamloops trout fingerlings were transferred from the
Bjerkness ponds to Slocan Lake.
Cranbrook Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—Were not operated, but in place thereof
111,275 Kamloops trout fingerlings were raised in the hatching-troughs from 115,000
eyed eggs supplied from the Gerrard Hatchery. The fingerlings made excellent growth
during the forty days of retainment and the figures mentioned indicate the loss as
being very light.
Kimberley Rearing-ponds.—Lois Lake. In view of the Consolidated Mining and
Smelting Company taking over the lake for water storage and diversion to the Sullivan
mine it was not possible to retrieve or determine the results of cut-throat trout fry
plantings therein.
Arrangements between the Kimberley Rod and Gun Club and the Company mentioned probably will result in some up-to-date ponds being constructed this coming
spring, as Lois Lake is not satisfactory from a rearing-pond standpoint.
Matthew Creek Rearing-ponds.—Following up similar arrangements as in 1941-42,
30,000 cut-throat fry were released in the series of abandoned dams connected to St.
Mary Lake, where the results of such liberations appear quite favourable.
Fernie Rearing-ponds.—Three small, partially natural ponds, situated on the property of the City of Fernie, were taken over by the Fernie District Rod and Gun Club
to experiment with proposed raising of cut-throat trout fingerlings for the adjacent
Elk River. To start off with, 10,000 fry were released in No. 2 and No. 3 ponds the
latter part of June, and the resultant 3-inch fingerlings from-No. 3 pond were allowed
to enter the Elk River during the month of December. It was not possible to estimate
the number of fish released or to quote the approximate number that remained in the
No. 2 pond. However, the experiment is so far fairly successful, considering the lower
pond is a habitat for various water-fowl.
Windermere Creek Rearing-pond.—Owing to the location and difficulty of controlling the water-flow in Windermere Creek, where the pond is situated, operations were
discontinued.
Private Ponds and Trout-farms.—Except for two applications received to purchase
fish (Kamloops trout fry), which were favourably considered, there were no new
developments.
Miscellaneous.
The disposal of kokanee from spawning operations at Meadow Creek, Lardeau, for
domestic purposes received the usual favourable consideration by the authorities as
follows: Approximately 10,400 lb. supplied to the B.C. Security Commission at Kaslo.
Dependents of Active Service men and other residents of Kaslo, 800 lb.; together with
residents of Lardeau Valley, Trail, and Nelson, 1,500 lb.; and 6,000 lb. placed in cold
storage at Kaslo for trout-food. Total amount of culled kokanee, 19,100 lb. The
handling and transportation expenses were borne by the B.C. Security Commission.
Sturgeon.—From waters of Kootenay River, near Brilliant, a sturgeon was caught
weighing 255 lb. Also an occasional small sturgeon was taken from the Kootenay
River, Creston area.
Whatshan Lakes.—Destruction of coarse fish: Under proper supervision, approximately 3,000 Rocky Mountain whitefish were taken from the upper lake, 1,000 lb. of
which was supplied to the B.C. Security Commission at New Denver and 500 lb. to the
local residents.    The operational expense was borne by the B.C. Security Commission.
West Arm, Kootenay Lake.—In a coarse-fish competition sponsored by the Nelson
Rod and Gun Club for the juvenile members, 304 lb. of squawfish, suckers, and chub,
also whitefish, were taken.
Lardeau River Spawning Areas.—Approximately 500 lb. of whitefish and suckers
were taken during the spawning operations. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 25
Skaha (Dog) Lake.—Two traps were operated to intercept the coarse fish that
frequent the Okanagan River and which spawn above the lake, resulting in one fur-
farmer, under licence, taking and using the following fish: Carp, 1,900 lb.; ling, 55
lb.;   squawfish, 245 lb.;   suckers, 2,100 lb.;   total weight, 4,390 lb.
The general returns covering coarse fish taken by fur-farmers are not at present
available, although it might not be amiss to mention the quantities of fish taken from
certain waters, season 1942:—
Chain Lake:   Suckers, 200 (weight, 525 lb.) ;  taken by a licensed fur-farmer.
Osprey Lake:  Suckers, 200 (weight, 525 lb.) ; taken by a licensed fur-farmer.
Columbia River and Sloughs: Ling, 47 (weight, 161 lb.); squawfish, 1,778
(weight, 1,680 lb.) ; suckers, 2,388 (weight, 2,252 lb.). Number of fish taken, 4,213
(weight, 4,213 lb.), by fourteen licensed fur-farmers.
Windermere Lake: Squawfish, 395 (weight, 515 lb.) ; suckers, 125 (weight, 312
lb.) ;   taken by one fur-farmer.
Salvage and Transfer of Trout.—Generally, the water-flow in most streams was
sufficient to prevent any serious loss of trout, nor was it necessary to salvage or transfer
any stranded fish, except it became necessary to open up a channel at the outlet of Fish
Lake, Summerland, to release about 2,000 Eastern brook-trout fingerlings.
Fish Guards and Screens.—The screening of intakes of irrigation systems is
receiving attention, including the placing of stop-screens fencing the outlets of certain
lakes to prevent the outward migration of spawning trout and subsequent loss. A panel
screen fence, 5 by 32 feet with V2-inch spaces, was installed at the outlet of Jewel Lake
with effective results. Similar attention to the outlet of Lillian Lake will be given
during the coming spring.
Fishways.—In addition to the six small fishways installed in water-power logging
or irrigation dams, one new fishway was installed in a dam on McRae Creek, flowing
into Christina Lake, under the authority of the B.C. Security Commission, Greenwood.
The dam is less than 10 feet in height and is used for power purposes.
Hydro-electric Power Development.—Kootenay River, near Brilliant, by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Trail. In lieu of a fishway in the power
dam under construction, the Company involved will contribute annually $600 towards
maintaining the trout-supply in that portion of the Kootenay River to the Slocan pool
and the Slocan River affected by this artificial barrier.
Obstructions (Natural), Handy Log-jam, Lardeau River.—The open channel on the
north side of the huge log-jam again afforded free passage to the parent Kamloops trout
from Kootenay Lake to their original spawning-grounds adjacent to Gerrard Hatchery.
However, it is quite possible that some work on the channel will be necessary in the
near future. From information to hand, there are no other known naturally formed
obstructions that would seriously impede or stop the movement of spawning or migrating trout.
Pollutions, Mining Industries.—The operation of mines producing gold-bearing
ores has been curtailed to some extent, but in other instances some base-metal mines
have resumed operations, from which pollutions have and will occur, as referred to
herewith.
Similkameen River.—The impounding area of the Kelowna Exploration Company
of Hedley, adjacent to 20-Mile Creek and river mentioned, was affected with the spring
thaw, thus causing a cave-in and the resultant release of sludge into the said waters.
This created some concern among the interested sportsmen. However, immediate
action was taken to overcome the pollution by the Company officials, who have from the
inception of the operations impounded 650,000 tons of tailings at the cost of 5 cents
per ton.
The freeze-up caused small quantities of sludge to escape from the impounding
area of the Mascot Mining Company into 20-Mile Creek, in spite of the daily atten- JJ 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
tion to the discharge of tailings. Approximately 360,000 tons of tailings have been
impounded since operations commenced at the cost of 5 cents per ton.
There was no escapement of concentrator tailings from the impounding areas of
the Allenby Mining Company at Copper Mountain.
Salmon River and Tributary.—The lower reaches of the river continued to be
seriously polluted from direct discharge of concentrator refuse into Sheep Creek, resulting from the operations of the Sheep Creek Gold Mines. The operation of the Emerald
mine by the Wartime Metals Corporation, Ottawa, was of brief duration. Precautionary measures were taken prior to milling of the ore to prevent the tailings entering
the Salmon River.
Columbia River.—The continual discharge of refuse from the smelter and fertilizer
plants operated by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Trail does, no
doubt, restrict the presence of trout in water areas affected, including bottom-feed, etc.
Kootenay Lake.—The Florence^ mine, a base-metal property near Ainsworth,
resumed operations, with the possibility of concentrator refuse being discharged into
the lake, but as a small water area will be affected it should not be very harmful
towards fish life.
Kaslo Creek.—Flowing into Kootenay Lake. Probably with the resumed operations of the Whitewater mine and concentrator taken over by the Kootenay Belle Gold
Mines, tailings as in the past will enter the creek. The matter of pollution is receiving
attention from fishery interests at Kaslo.
Seaton and Carpenter Creeks.—Flowing into Slocan Lake. With increased production and treatment of base-metal ores from Zincton Mines, together with resumed
operations of the Reco Mountain Base Metal Mines (Noble Five) at Sandon, large
quantities of concentrator refuse is carried into Slocan Lake. While the refuse does
not circulate very far out into the lake, it does affect and reduce the food-supply of
trout.
Slocan Lake.—The Western Exploration Company continued to operate the Standard
and Mammoth mines at Silverton and treatment of tailings from the Enterprise mine.
The resultant concentrator refuse is discharged into the lake, but with limited circulation it does not appear very harmful towards fish life.
St. Mary River.—The usual steady attention is given by the officials of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company in connection with the discharge and impoundment of sludge from the Sullivan concentrator, thus preventing the serious pollution
of the river from this important industry.
Elk River.—Provision has been made with the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company in
connection with the operations of the Elk River Collieries on Coal Creek to impound
the sludge from the coal preparation plant, to avoid any serious pollution of Coal Creek
and Elk River.
Lumber Industry.—The operators of the various stationary and portable sawmills
have reasonably complied with the fishery regulations to prevent the pollution of waters
with sawdust or mill refuse, although in a few instances it became necessary to investigate for the protection of fish life.
Water Conditions.—The gradual spring run-off, followed by a fair amount of
moisture, ensured the average water-flow for effective results from eyed eggs planted
and natural propagation. Fortunately, weather conditions aided forest-protection,
resulting in no serious forest fires or loss of trout in the various watersheds.
Diseases.—During the year no known diseases occurred to affect fish life, except
a natural occurrence of " winter-kill " in New Lake, vicinity of Cranbrook, where large
numbers of 3- to 5-lb. Kamloops trout perished, being a repetition of the loss during
the winter of 1936-37. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 27
Conservation.—Under normal conditions it is very doubtful if the supply of trout
can be maintained in the lakes and streams accessible to auto travel, unless the number
of trout in possession is restricted during a calendar week.
Co-operation.—On behalf of my fellow employees and myself I wish to express my
sincere appreciation for the valuable assistance rendered by the organized sportsmen
and individuals, including the Forest Branch, Public Works Department, British Columbia Security Commission, and the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company in connection with rearing-ponds and all other phases of game-fish culture. Further, to
Doctors W. A. Clemens, D. C. B. Duff, University of British Columbia, and G. Clifford
Carl, Director, Provincial Museum, for scientific information supplied and assistance
rendered.
" C " DIVISION   (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO,
CHILCOTIN, AND SQUAMISH DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in
" C " Game Division during the year ended December 31st, 1943.
Big Game.
Moose.—These animals are definitely on the increase in the Bridge River and
Pemberton Valleys. According to certain residents, they are in sufficient numbers to
warrant an open season. Premature opening of such a season, however, would undoubtedly have a detrimental effect. It is indeed a more profitable move to wait for fuller
and more extensive infiltration where they are now for the first time making their
appearance. This applies to many other parts of this Division to as far south as the
Penask Lake area, north-east of Merritt, and also to the Okanagan Valley. Disease
in moose killed is reported from the Wells area. From Quesnel comes a recommendation for a shorter season on moose.
Caribou.—The Clearwater district around Battle Mountain was inspected during
the hunting season. Hunters report a scarcity or temporary disappearance of caribou
from and around the Philip Mountain-Battle Mountain area. Moose-tracks were
observed in considerable numbers in this district. A patrol will be made during the
forthcoming year by the writer through the Murtle Lake area to ascertain the extent
of the caribou movements. Reports come to hand that these animals Spend the summer
months around the Thompson River glaciers north of Murtle Lake. In other portions
of this Division the caribou herds are about at a standstill in population.
Deer.—There is no drastic change in the deer population, but Williams Lake
reports a great scarcity. The usual crop of recommendations from hunters who have
had difficulty in getting their bag-limits continue to be received. The buck law has
stood the test of time over a long period and, taken as a whole, is in satisfactory
condition. Disease is reported affecting deer west of the Fraser River in the Clinton
detachment, where domestic sheep are now ranging. Caseous lymphadenitis is suspected in these cases. If this is true, it will be the first sign of this disease appearing
in deer in the Chilcotins.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are numerous east of Williams Lake, according to
reports. At Lijlooet and also in the Momich River area >these animals have not been
hunted as extensively as in former years.
Mountain-sheep.—A closed season on mountain-sheep took place in the Squilax
area. The season remained open at Squam Bay (Adams Lake), where very few animals were taken. Several bands were seen on the Yalakom Game Reserve. These
animals are increasing in the Deer Park Ranch district in the Williams Lake detachment. JJ 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Wapiti.—No reports of any having been seen east and west of the Fraser River,
in the Clinton detachment, have come to hand. We should give some consideration to
the proposal for a short open season at the head of Adams Lake. The terrain lends
itself well to the protection of this species. I hope to receive additional information
and possibly make another patrol into this district to ascertain their numbers and
condition. Reports of cougars and extensive killing of deer at the head of Adams Lake
have reached this office. A patrol will be made by Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttle-
worth in a check-up on wapiti and also to destroy some of the cougars reported at large
in the Adams Lake district.
Bears.—Black bears are hunted very little. In the southern portion of this Division they have become quite a menace to stock. Grizzlies are about the same in numbers throughout this Division. One grizzly was responsible for the destruction of
several head of stock in the Kelowna district, and Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttle-
worth destroyed this animal in the act of killing a steer.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Recent statistics in this Division show that there is a decrease in the number of
beaver. With existing high prices, some prohibition in the allowance of a free rein
to some trappers may have to be brought about. This might be accomplished by means
of the tag system, so long under discussion, and which I hope will be put into effect
during the beaver season for 1944. The longer this is delayed, the more depleted
beaver on trap-lines will become. Trappers report a scarcity of lynx and other
fur-bearers.
The pressing need of the moment is for some form of action to combat a tendency
toward depletion of our fur resources. I am again submitting the beaver census for
" C " Game Division covering the year 1943. These returns exclude Indian trap-lines
as the Indian situation is as yet unsolved.
Season.
No. of Trappers
submitting
Returns.
Estimate of
Beaver.
Average
per Trapper.
-1934-35     - - - -	
275
343
367
345
307
348
345
350
404
4,789
6,392
6,347
5,945
5,315
6,501
7,228
6,663
7,852
17.41
1935-36     	
18.60
1936-37 	
17.29
1937-38    	
1938-39   	
17 30
1939-40 ._ _     ...	
1940-41  _ __	
1941-42  	
19.04
19.43
1942-43 - - 	
To ensure that census and catches are accurately reported would require a vastly
increased staff of Game Wardens. The catch on beaver can be fairly accurately kept
by means of numbered tags, but the census check-up is far too large an undertaking
for one Game Warden, especially when he has from 60 to 124 trap-lines in his detachment, covering in many cases extremely difficult country.
There is a definite scarcity of the following fur-bearers: Marten, lynx, fisher,
mink, squirrels, and, in some areas, beaver. Wardens state that something will have
to be done with the private-property trapper. He is beginning to threaten the success
of the registered trap-line system. The tag system will be a more accurate check on
the number of beavers caught, provided each tag is numbered and the numbers are
marked on the trapper's licence when the pelts are presented for tagging along with his
permit to trap a specified number. This number should be based, to a large extent, on
previous beaver returns and census. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 29
Upland Game Birds.
Pheasants are numerous around Lillooet, Kamloops, and, to a lesser extent, around
Salmon Arm. In the Vernon and Kelowna districts they have been greatly reduced in
numbers through the open season on hens some time ago and destruction by some
farmers claiming damage to crops. The breeding season was also a poor one. Willow
grouse are very scarce in Kamloops and particularly Lillooet, where it is said very few
are left. The request is for a close season in favour of Lillooet. Vernon reports an
increase in willow grouse but a decrease in blue and Franklins. Quesnel recommends
a close season on all species of upland game birds for 1944.
European partridges have not done so well in this Division. The influx of ravens
into the Kelowna and Vernon districts is quite noticeable. Crows have been largely
killed off and ravens are now taking their place. In no other part of this Division does
this condition exist. Quail have disappeared from the Lillooet district because of the
extreme cold in January, 1943.    Most of them were frozen to death.
•Migratory Game Birds.
Where feeding and nesting conditions have been suitable, water-fowl have greatly
increased. This, in a measure, is also due to less shooting because of ammunition and
gasoline shortages. The majority of detachments report an increase. The proposal in
some places of creating winter feeding-grounds for ducks where migration has not
taken place should receive careful consideration. We can, in a spirit of benevolence,
inflict cruelty on water-fowl by delaying their migration through premature feeding of
ducks and other migratory species while on their way to their winter quarters. To
increase to a considerably greater extent the water-fowl population, might I suggest
the extensive liberation of beaver over large areas out of reach of Indian Reserves or
Indian trap-line areas and away from the immediate vicinity of irrigation projects.
Large numbers of ducks are injured during night-shooting in the open season.
These water-fowl in many cases are not fit to make an extensive migration south and
therefore stay where there are open patches of water in southern British Columbia.
Examination of many of these birds could readily be made after feeding them into a
trap without injury, to prove this contention. By limiting the shooting-time each day
or making a definite daily time to cease shooting, we would be performing an act of
charity.    Night-shooting should be cut out entirely.
Vermin.
Nine officers destroyed the following predators: Horned owls, 9; crows, 333;
magpies, 297; hawks, 60; ravens, 48; eagles, 2; cougars, 6; coyotes, 200; bobcats,
11;   house cats, 57;   dogs, 9;  bears, 17;   and timber-wolves, 3.
Approximately forty farmers complained of predators doing damage on their
property.
Game-protection.
There were sixty-eight prosecutions under the " Game Act " in this Division during
1943.    Of these, five cases were dismissed.
Game Propagation.
Seventeen pheasants were trapped at Tranquille during the winter of 1943-44 and
liberated in other parts of the Kamloops district. Five beaver which were taken from
the Bowron Lake Sanctuary were liberated in other parts of this Division. The number
taken was small, due largely to high water and fluctuating levels; also a scarcity of
beaver in certain sections of the reserve.
PROVINCIAL.  LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B. C. JJ 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Reserves.
Yalakom Game Reserve, in the Lillooet detachment, was patrolled quite regularly.
There is nothing to report on Tranquille Game Reserve except that white posts were
erected to show the boundary-lines. This also applies to the Minnie Lake Reserve in
the Douglas Lake area.
Fur Trade.
This trade goes mainly to Vancouver. The actual fur catch is low considering the
size of the area over which trapping operations are carried on.
Fur-farming.
Mink and fox farming are the principal ones. The industry as a whole requires
a stimulus. Some of the new colour phases in foxes and mink are in great demand.
New and variable colours in other species of fur-bearers will tend to place the industry
on a more secure footing. Thirty-six fur-farms are operating in this Division at
present.
Registration of Trap-lines.
There is no such thing as a perfect system. It is only regular changes and the
adoption of new ideas that makes for success in anything. The term " registration
of trap-lines " implies just what it states. It gives the trapper the exclusive right to
trap within a specified area without interference. There is one possible exception to
this right. The fur-bearers within a certain registered area are available for trapping
by the trapper, but only on Crown land. This does not give the trapper the right to
take fur-bearers on private property without the sanction of the private-property
holder. Since the fur-bearers on private property belong to the Government and roam
over Crown lands within a registered trapping area, it presents a problem to the
registered trapper when he finds that private-property holders or owners have given
the right to other trappers who are not registered trap-line holders to take fur-bearers
from their private lands. He rightly feels that he is not getting a square deal since
he is endeavouring to conserve, like many other trappers, the fur-bearers which travel
off and on to this private property.
This situation is the cause of a great deal of friction and it is increasing to a considerable extent. The private-property trapper is free to roam at will within half
a dozen large registered trapping areas, provided permission is once obtained from
the private owners. In other words, he is living off the efforts of the registered
trapper and he has no permanent stake in the country, since he does not know from
one year to another just where he will be allowed to trap next. It is a problem that
will have to be solved in the immediate future. For instance, there are sixty-six non-
registered trappers trapping on private property and assisting, in a very few cases,
registered trappers on their trap-lines within the Clinton detachment. There are
seventy-one registered white trappers operating over registered areas. The proportion
of private-property trappers to that of registered trappers is too large and does not
give the registered trapper a show at all.
Special Patrols.
Three patrols were made, one by Game Warden Stewart, another by Game Warden
Gill, and, finally, one by Game Warden Mottishaw. All these patrols were made in
connection with the report of wolves operating within the boundaries of these detachments. Appropriate action was taken when conditions permitted. Sixty-three convictions were obtained during the year.    Five additional prosecutions were dismissed. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 31
Hunting Accidents.
On Wednesday, November 17th, 1943, about 4 p.m., Gordon G. A. Nicol, of Kamloops, B.C., was shot in the right leg below the knee. His friend's gun was already in
the pit and as he laid his own in the pit his friend's gun began to slip and went off.
They were hunting geese near Brigade Lake. This accident necessitated the amputation' of Mr. Nicol's leg above the knee.
John Kennedy, Trail, B.C., was out hunting pheasants near Salmon Arm with
William Leslie Wood and Eugene Urbshadt on Monday, October 25th, 1943. A pheasant
came into view and all three hunters swung their guns on the bird and William Leslie
Wood shot John Kennedy accidentally in the face and chest. He was taken to the
Salmon Arm Hospital and later to Vancouver for treatment by a specialist. He passed
away at Vancouver on November 1st, 1943.
Lou Weaver, of 1910 S.W. 47th Avenue, Seattle, Washington, had been hunting
deer in the Timothy Lake area. He and his daughter were packing the car preparatory
to leaving for Seattle about 8 a.m. on November 16th, 1943, near Timothy Lake. He
was placing two guns on top of a sleeping-bag in the back seat of the car, when one of
the guns, a 32.40 Winchester, discharged, shooting him in the heart. Mr. Weaver
passed away immediately.
There are far too many doubtful weapons in use during the hunting season. We
prohibit the use of cars with defective brakes and yet in the use of firearms many
hunters operate guns in which the trigger pull is dangerously light. One accident, at
least, was caused through the use of a faulty weapon during 1943 in this Division.
We have no record of the number of near-accidents through the use of faulty weapons.
Several suggestions have been included in past annual reports on methods of prevention of these regrettable accidents.
Summary and General Remarks.
Practically all detachments report an increase in revenue over the past year. Game
conditions were generally good in most places. In willow grouse, however, there was
a distinct scarcity. Regarding blue grouse, the reports are somewhat conflicting as
to increase and decrease. Kelowna reports a scarcity of ducks due to the drying-up
of many sloughs.
The Game Wardens in this Division again obtained the Gold Award during the
last Victory Loan campaign.
As previously recommended, might I suggest the liberation of beaver on a more
extensive scale? There is ample evidence to show the great benefit to be derived
from beaver liberated at the headwaters of thousands of streams in our Province.
The increase in water-fowl alone would be well worth the undertaking. Except where
requested, these animals should be kept away from irrigation projects. Four beaver
were liberated in 1942 in the Chilcotin area near the headwaters of a creek supplying
irrigation-water to farms on the lower level. Since their liberation there has not been
a single complaint of the lack of water. A variety of water-fowl, never before seen
on the dams, have now made their appearance.
The prevention of hunting accidents should be given some consideration.
I wish to extend thanks for assistance rendered in the operation of coarse-fish
traps to the Bridge Lake Rod and Gun Club.
To those Game Associations who also helped in various other ways and to the
members of the various Governmental Departments I am indebted for their helpful
advice and co-operation during the year. JJ 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Report of C. H. Robinson, Fishery Supervisor, covering Game-fish Conditions
in " C " Game Division.
I beg to submit a summary report of game-fish conditions in " C " Division covering some important waters and other phases of fish-culture in conjunction with information supplied by the Game Wardens for the year ended December 31st, 1943.
As in other parts of the Interior climatic conditions during the spring affected
sport-fishing and restricted the catches of trout. However, as conditions became
normal there was a marked improvement in most waters, except certain lakes, which
failed to produce the average catches of trout.
Due to restricted travel, there was a noticeable decrease in the number of nonresident anglers visiting and fishing the waters of the Interior. There was also less
fishing by resident anglers in waters not so conveniently accessible.
The trout distribution and operation of hatcheries is referred to later in the report
by the Game Commission.
North Okanagan and Salmon Arm Waters.
Okanagan Lake.—The north end region of the lake, in the vicinity of Kelowna and
Okanagan Landing, provided some good fishing for Kamloops trout varying in weight
to 18 lb. Most of the large trout are taken on the troll with some fly- and bait-fishing
for the immature fish. The liberation of yearly trout fingerlings from the Kelowna
rearing-ponds has probably assisted towards the improvement. The proposed Trout
Derby next spring, sponsored by the organized sportsmen of Vernon, Kelowna, and
Penticton, will boost the fishing in the lake and the collection of interesting data.
Cariboo and Pear Lake, McCulloch.—The Eastern brook-trout introduced in the
year 1939 (in place of rainbow trout) are now fairly well established, varying in weight
to 3 lb. Due to prevailing low-water conditions during the fall, spawning was much
restricted.
Shannon Lake.—Reports indicate that the Eastern brook-trout introduced into this
small lake (land-locked) in 1942 are thriving. The local anglers of Kelowna propose
to create artificial spawning areas to accommodate the fish.
Beaver Lake.—Provided the usual good catches of Kamloops trout for the resident
and non-resident anglers, both by fly and trolling, as did also the Dee Lake Chain.
Apparently the size and condition of the trout improved in Beaver Lake, the weight of
which varies to 3 lb. The reduced planting of fry probably has been of benefit.
Seasonal fish-cultural operations are carried out at the lake with excellent results.
Trapper Lake.—Apparently during the winter of 1942-43 the Kamloops trout
suffered a set-back from winter-kill. Previously the lake produced 10-lb. trout on the
fly. To restore the now depleted supply it will be necessary to restock from the Beaver
Lake Hatcheries.
Woods Lake.—Apparently it was an off season for kokanee fishing. The reason
these catches were so poor might be attributed to climatic conditions during the spring.
Otherwise the lake has been noted for producing extra large kokanee weighing up to
4 lb., taken on baited trolls. The possibility of increasing the trout from the stepped-up
plantings of Kamloops eyed eggs and fry the last three years is awaited with interest.
Kalamalka (Long) Lake.—Produced fairly good fishing for the Kamloops trout,
varying in weight to 10 lb. Owing to the somewhat scanty food-supply, the trout are
rather thin the first part of the season. The planting of kokanee eyed eggs in Coldstream Creek, a tributary, was to maintain the run as a food-supply for the large trout.
Echo Lake, Lumby.—This land-locked lake has produced quite large Kamloops
trout, mostly on the troll. The best fishing is in the early spring and fall. With no
natural reproduction, yearly replenishment is necessary. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 33
Sugar Lake.—This lake continued to produce the average catches of rainbow trout,
the growth of which has increased since the West Canadian Hydro Electric Company
constructed the storage-dam on the outlet of the lake in 1942, thus increasing the
bottom and surface feed. The raising of the lake-level will not affect the spawning-
grounds of the trout.
Mara Lake.—Some very encouraging reports were received of good spring and fall
fishing for Kamloops trout, averaging about 3 lb. in weight. No doubt the outward
movement of salmon fry from Shuswap River in the spring attracts the trout. The
future of Mara Lake looks bright with the various tourist camps and summer homes,
and it is important that the trout-fishing be maintained.
Mable Lake.—This lake was fairly well patronized by the local anglers and the
trout-fishing showed an improvement. Fair catches of Kamloops trout, averaging 2%
lb., were reported, also the usual lake-trout were taken.
Shuswap Lake.—In waters of the Salmon Arm area the trolling and fly-fishing for
Kamloops trout was fair. The use of the baited multiple lures make or ensure limit
catches of immatured trout daily. The condition of these trout indicates that the
food-supply is not plentiful, due possibly to the presence of carp. As a food-supply for
the larger trout, kokanee eyed eggs were planted in Granite Creek and the Salmon
River during the past four years.
In the Sicamous region of Shuswap Lake some favourable reports were received
regarding the catches of Kamloops and lake trout. Compared with normal conditions
few people were out fishing.
Towards the outlet of Shuswap Lake, rainbow trout fishing was fairly good in the
vicinity of Adams and Little Rivers. The salmon-runs in the fall and outward migration of fry in the spring is an important factor towards the congregating and catches
of trout.
Adams Lake.—Apparently only fished by local residents who secure average catches
of Kamloops trout and some quite large Dolly Varden.
Aylmer (Star) Lake.—Produced fair catches of Kamloops weighing an average of
4 lb. Conditions were partly investigated to determine the future policy of replenishment and the feasibility of preparing artificial spawning areas in an effort to improve
the parent fish.
Pillar Lake.—Was well patronized by non-resident anglers. While possibly the
catches of Kamloops trout are not quite so good as in former years, yet this lake
remains productive, considering the amount of fishing and the number of fish taken
each season.    The average weight of trout caught vary from 2 to 10 lb.
Kamloops District Waters.
Monte Lake.—Produced fair catches of Kamloops trout, but due to the very cloudy
condition of the water from algas the latter part of the season fishing was curtailed.
There is some doubt whether trout-fishing can be improved under present existing
conditions.
Paul Lake.—Apparently failed to produce the average good fishing for Kamloops
trout the first part of the season, but towards the fall there was an improvement.
It is quite possible that seasonal conditions affected the catches of trout. From the
heavy run of spawners and collection of eggs therefrom, including the numbers of
immatured trout observed feeding in the shallows, there would appear to be no serious
signs of depletion.
Pinantan Lake.—Provided fairly good fishing for Kamloops trout from l1^ up to
2 lb. It appears that since the presence of minnows or shiners, first observed in the
lake in 1939, the growth and condition of the fish has not been so good. Possibly the
shiners may act as a forage-fish for the large trout. The shiner does, no doubt, consume large quantities of microscopic food, thus retarding the growth of small trout. JJ 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Knouff Lake.—The spring fishing for Kamloops trout by fly and troll was rather
poor, but improved towards the fall. The average weight was from 2 to 3 lb. compared
to 20-pounders several years ago. For the conservation of the parent spawning trout,
the temporary stop-fence at the outlet of the lake was replaced with trap and pens for
ova collections.
Lac le Jeune.—A general utility lake, provided the usual good fishing throughout
the season by fly and troll. Kamloops trout averaged V/z lb. with an occasional
4-pounder reported. It appears that the growth of the trout has improved slightly
from the increased supply of fresh-water shrimps.
McGlashon (Wolfe) Lake.—Situated on the Campbell Range, provided good flyfishing for the Kamloops trout first introduced in 1940-41 which averaged from 2 to
4 lb. It is reported that some natural reproduction occurred resulting from the trout
spawning on the gravel-bars fed by the springs.
Peterhope Lake.—Remained very popular and continued to produce good catches
of Kamloops trout from 2 to 19 lb., and 7- to 12-pounders were quite common. The
phenomenal natural reproduction in the inlet of the lake in 1942 provided ample fry
for restocking purposes and good fishing during the season.
Taweel Lake.—Rail transportation permitted numbers of non-resident anglers to
fish this lake. The usual good catches of Kamloops trout averaging from 3 to 5 lb.
and a few towards 9 lb. were reported. Moreover, the two small lakes adjacent produced very good fly-fishing for trout from 1 to 4 lb., with limit catches daily. Apparently
the outtake, coupled with the decreasing food-supply, has not kept up to the natural
reproduction, hence smaller trout. It is possible that under normal conditions the
fishing will increase to balance natural spawning.
Cariboo District Waters.
Beaver Dam Lake (Canoe Creek Road).—It is reported that Kamloops trout in the
lake were frozen out the winter of 1942-43, thereby reducing the catches of trout up
to 10 lb. in weight.    To offset the loss of trout from winter-kill, eyed eggs were planted.
Loon Lake.—There was considerable fishing for Kamloops trout from 1 to 1% lb.
Apparently the lake is somewhat overstocked with trout compared to the food-supply,
although the fish are slightly larger since more fishermen are visiting the lake.
Bridge Lake.—The resident and non-resident anglers report that the fishing for
Kamloops trout is improving each year, including the growth, average weight up to
6 lb. The spawning areas were improved in the outlet creek of the lake by removal
of a huge log-jam. Two tons of coarse fish suckers were taken from Chase Creek
flowing into the lake.
Deka Lake.—Was not fished very heavily. However, there is a noted improvement
in the growth of the trout from 5 lb. The spawning areas were reported favourable
and with the yearly planting of eyed eggs the supply of trout should be well maintained.
Three tons of coarse fish were trapped and destroyed.
Horse Lake.—Reported improved conditions and catches of Kamloops trout around
2 and 3 lb. with suitable spawning areas for natural reproduction.
Canim Lake. — Due to restricted travel this quite large lake was not fished as
extensively as in former years. The Kamloops trout vary in weight to 5 lb. and with
fair spawning streams and yearly plantings of eyed eggs the supply of trout is taken
care of.    The coarse fish are quite numerous in this lake.
Quesnel Lake.—Produced fair catches of Kamloops trout, varying from 2 to 21 lb.
Lake-trout averaged 15 lb. The feed conditions remained good. Also, the lake was
very well patronized by resident and non-resident anglers. This information applies
also to Horsefly Lake.
Big Lake.—Provided fair fishing for Rainbow trout, averaging 2 lb. in weight,
from the spring to the early part of the summer.    The feed conditions remained fair. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 35
Rose Lake.—During the spring this lake produced fair catches of rainbow trout
averaging 3 lb. in weight. Due to the muddy taste of the fish during the early part of
the summer, the lake is not so popular to the tourist.
Lac la Hache.—The spring and fall fishing for rainbow trout is generally good,
some averaging 3 lb. and the lake-trout 15 lb.    Feed conditions remain good.
Bouchie, Melburn, and Puntataenkut Lakes, Quesnel Area.—Fishing for rainbow
trout was good with numerous anglers out. The weight of the trout taken varied from
y2 to 8 lb.
Tzenzaikut, Trout, and Ahbou Lakes, Quesnel Area.—These lakes were not fished
to any extent.    Fish varied in weight from % to 8 lb.
During the year approximately 3% tons of coarse fish were destroyed in different
streams of Quesnel district. It is reported that by reducing the numbers of coarse fish
in certain streams and lakes the size of the trout and also the fishing conditions have
improved.
Bowron Lake.—Supplied fairly good fishing for rainbow and Dolly Varden trout
throughout the season. Rainbow averaged iy2 lb., Dolly Varden around 7 lb. The
kokanee, native to the lake, appear rather small, 6 inches in length, and weigh % lb.
They are quite valuable as a forage-fish.    Coarse fish are reported numerous.
Indian Point Lake.—Throughout the season this lake provided fair fishing for
Kamloops trout, varying from 1 to 6 lb.;   Dolly Varden averaging 7 lb.
Isaac Lake.—Although not so accessible, produced fair fishing for Kamloops trout,
averaging 14 lb., and Dolly Varden 8 lb. or more.
Beaver, Spectacle, and Swan Lakes.—General fishing conditions remain good with
fair catches of Kamloops averaging from 1 to 8 lb., including Dolly Varden trout. It is
reported that numbers of coarse fish were trapped and destroyed during the tagging of
the salmon by the International Pacific Salmon Commission at the outlet of Bowron
Lake. It is suggested that conditions be investigated in Swan and Bowron Lakes with
a view to reducing the coarse fish in these lakes.
Miscellaneous.
Kelowna Rearing-ponds.—These natural ponds were developed by the organized
sportsmen of Kelowna, and were subsequently taken over and operated by the B.C.
Game Commission. Fairly good results were obtained from yearly fry liberations and
the fingerlings raised therefrom. Fortunately the natural food-supply is sufficient to
support the trout throughout the period of retainment, thus reducing the operating
expenses.
The following Kamloops trout advanced fry were liberated in the ponds, August
8th, 1942:  Pot-hole, 4,600;  Pond No. 2, 8,240;   Pond No. 3, 24,000.    Total, 36,840 fry.
Recovery of fingerlings (weight count), April 17th to 21st, 1943: Pot-hole A,
2,690, 100 per pound; Pond No. 2, 1,640, 65 per pound; Pond No. 3, 1,505, 35 per
pound.    Total, 5,835.
Distributions.—Okanagan Lake (Penticton), 2,065, loss 30. Okanagan Lake
(Kelowna), 2,265.    Okanagan Lake (Vernon), 1,505.    Total, 5,836 fingerlings.
Vernon Rearing-pond.—This is a natural pond, partly developed and operated by
the Vernon Fish and Game Protective Association for the benefit of the Okanagan Lake.
In co-operation with the Game Commission, yearly allotments of 30,000 Kamloops trout
fry have been supplied since the year 1940. Due to natural food-supply being insufficient to support the fish entirely, and the difficulty of securing suitable food, the fish
are not retained very long but are allowed to pass out gradually into Vernon Creek
flowing into Okanagan Lake. This method of release is probably better than direct
fry liberations into Okanagan Lake.
Some attention was given to the possibility of the Grindrod-Mara-Enderby Fish
and Game Association creating rearing-ponds.    However, the matter was held in abey- JJ 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ance for more data and with the expectation of other organized sportsmen taking part
in the venture.
Kokanee (Redfish).—As a result of investigations commencing in the year 1938,
and for the primary purpose of maintaining the food-supply for Kamloops trout and,
where possible, to restore the depleted spawning runs for this fish in streams, the eggs
from Kokanee Lake (Kokanee Creek spawners) have been planted in the following
waters: 1938-43, south end of Okanagan Lake, 2,390,000 eyed eggs; 1940-43, Kala-
malka Lake, 550,000; 1940-42, Woods Lake, 250,000; 1940-43, Shuswap Lake (Salmon
Arm), 425,000. Other lakes not previously inhabited with kokanee: 1940-41, Canim
Lake, 250,000; 1940, Murtle Lake, 100,000; 1941, Brown's (Island) Lake, 15,000 fry;
1941, Echo Lake via Lumby, 15,000 fry. The results of the majority of these plantings
have been successful.
Conservation.—Salvage and transfer of trout: Knouff Lake, 213 spawning Kamloops trout between 2 and 3 lb. were salvaged from the outlet creek and returned to
the lake.
Peterhope Lake.—One hundred and twenty-seven spawners (Kamloops), average
weight to 5 lb., were salvaged from the outlet creek and returned to the lake by local
Game Wardens.
Fish Barriers and Screens.—In order to prevent the loss of spawning Kamloops
trout passing out of certain lakes to become stranded in the outlet creeks and from
entering irrigation streams, the installation of barriers and panel screens were effective
at the following points: Coldstream Creek (Kalamalka Lake) ; outlets of Beaver and
Oyama Lakes; outlet of Knouff Lake; inlet and outlet of Monte Lake; outlet of
Pavilion Lake, and possibly the outlet of Surrey and Sussex Lakes.
Destruction of Coarse Fish.—Extreme low-water conditions during the spring in
the Okanagan Lake, vicinity of Kelowna, prevented the trapping of carp. However, in
some waters of the Division effective measures were taken to reduce the numbers by
Game Wardens and fur-farmers in the Salmon Arm area. The returns covering coarse
fish taken by fur-farmers are not at present available, so the information cannot be
detailed.
Shuswap Lake, Salmon Arm.—Approximately 4,000 lb. of carp, squawfish, and ling
were taken by fur-farmers, including 800 lb. of carp taken by the Game Commission
trap at Rosmond-Mara Lake.
Okanagan Lake.—In Otter Creek trap a large number of carp were taken by
Indians, no record being kept as to the number or weight.
Bridge Lake.—Approximately 4,000 lb. of suckers and squawfish, also chub, were
trapped;  and 2,000 lb. from Crystal Lake.
Burns Lake.—Approximately 6,000 lb. of suckers and squawfish were trapped.
Deka Lake.—Approximately 6,000 lb. of suckers, squawfish, and chub were trapped
and destroyed.
In the different streams situated in the Quesnel district it is estimated that 7,000
lb. of coarse fish were taken and destroyed.
From waters of Williams Lake district 500 lb. of large coarse fish were destroyed.
Diseases.—There was no known loss of trout from disease, but from natural
causes, " winter-kill," during the winter of 1942-43 a heavy loss of Kamloops trout
occurred in Trapper Lake, Kelowna district, and Beaver Dam Lake, Clinton district.
Steps have been taken to restore the loss by restocking.
Water Conditions.—Were favourable for ova collections and for the planting of
eyed eggs, nor were streams seriously affected to warrant the salvage of stranded trout,
except as referred to herein. Further, there were no serious forest fires to affect
fish life.
Game-fish Culture.-—Generally the supply of trout has been well maintained in most
waters throughout the Division, through some natural reproduction and with a greater REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 37
percentage of artificial propagation successfully carried out at Beaver Lake, Lloyd
Creek, and Penask Lake Hatcheries. The result of fry plantings in the numerous
productive lakes has so far maintained the supply of trout, subject to the outtake and
general feed conditions.
In concluding I wish to thank the various fish and game associations and individuals for the splendid co-operation rendered during the year.
" D " DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, PRINCE RUPERT, FORT
GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Big-game Animals.
Again conditions were favourable throughout the Division. All big-game animals
are steadily increasing in numbers. The migration of the moose westerly is continuing
and is reported as far west as Lakelse Lake, south of Terrace, in the Skeena Electoral
District.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Very good reports have been received from various districts in the Division, which
indicate that the beaver are steadily increasing in numbers. A number of trap-lines
are being kept in good standing for members of the armed forces. These trap-lines
will receive special protection during the coming trapping season with a view to keeping
poachers from depleting the fur-bearers, and ensure for the registered trap-line holders
serving in His Majesty's Forces a good living on their return from the war.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Owing to adverse weather conditions during the nesting season, the
expected increase in the numbers of these upland game birds did not materialize, but
although reported scarce along the highways, sufficient birds were left in the remote
parts of the Division to ensure an increase next season providing suitable weather conditions prevail during the early spring. Should a second adverse season occur, a close
season on these birds will have to be given consideration in the year 1945-46.
Migratory Birds.
The increase in the numbers of all migratory birds anticipated last year has
materialized, and ducks and geese, etc., are now in sufficient numbers to give good hunting throughout this Division. The fall season is expected to be exceptionally good
from a sportsman's point of view.
Vermin.
Very few complaints have been received in regard to depredations by coyotes and
cougars, but numerous complaints have come in from various parts of the Division
regarding the depredations by wolves.
In order to cope with the situation, numerous permits have been issued throughout
the Division to selected farmers, stockmen, and trappers, authorizing them to use poison
in the destruction of these predators.
Very good results were obtained in some cases, and it is expected that a greater
number of wolves will be destroyed next season as a result of the experiments conducted
in the use of poison and experience gained thereby.
A concerted effort (International) by all Provinces, States, and Territories, etc., in
the destruction of all predators would reduce to a minimum, if not eliminate, the wolf
problem. JJ 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game-protection.
s
All Game Wardens in " D " Division carried on their usual patrols and in some
cases undertook special patrols in their districts. Special attention is drawn to these
special patrols further in this report. Some 100,738 miles were covered. All means
of transportation were used, as follows:— Mjies.
Train       4,929
Automobiles   71,826
Foot (including dog-team)      5,800
Horse (including sleighs)        587
Boat     7,982
Plane     9,614
An increase in the number of Game Wardens in " D " Division is fast becoming
a necessity, and it is expected that extra Wardens will be appointed as quickly as possible after the end of the present hostilities.
Game Propagation.
No special propagation-work has been undertaken in " D " Division during the
year.
Game Reserves.
No properly organized game reserves have been established in this Division. However, a number of sanctuaries have been established, Kaien Island (Prince Rupert),
Kathleen Lake (Smithers), Nechako Sanctuary (Vanderhoof), and the Prince George
Sanctuary at Prince George. A great number of birds are making use of these sanctuaries during the migration periods.
Fur Trade.
Although no complete data are available for the Division, information came to hand
which points to a very successful season; quantities of furs and prices paid were very
satisfactory. A number of fur-traders expressed a wish that a resident travelling fur-
buyer's licence, to cover fur-buyers who purchase furs away from their principal place
of business, be introduced. The fee suggested varied from $50 to $200. The introduction of such licence at a fee of $100 is hereby recommended.
Fur-farming.
This industry is not prospering. It is my opinion that the industry should be
encouraged by the Department by way of giving the fur-farmer all possible assistance
in the shape of experiments conducted under the supervision of a Government pathologist; results of such experiments to be passed on to the fur-farmer free of charge.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of trap-lines in the northern part of the Province is suffering
through lack of proper maps. In order to save the best fur district in this Division,
" North of the 57th degree of north latitude," surveys should be made of the unmapped
areas and adequate maps obtained. I trust this matter will receive your very kind
consideration.
Special Patrols.
Patrols of the Division are constantly made; a few of them undertaken for special
reasons are classed as special.
Game Warden P. Brown made a few patrols which could be classified as special.
Patrols of the Nation River, Omineca River, and Takla Landing area were undertaken,
averaging 500 miles each. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 39
Special patrols undertaken by Constable J. W. Todd, of Telegraph Creek, are also
worthy of mention, especially the patrol to Kluachon Lake, when very valuable information regarding the migration of caribou was obtained.
Hunting Accidents.
I regret to report the following hunting accidents which took place during the past
year:—
Don Moffat, of Prince George, B.C., aged 16, whilst hunting in the vicinity of
Six-mile Lake on October 31st, 1943, shot at a grouse, when the shell missed fire and he
took it out of the gun, putting it in his pocket. About two minutes later the shell
exploded, setting off a number of other shells, causing puncture wounds to both buttocks.
Moffat has fully recovered from his injury.
Marcel Audet, Gnr., 20th Field Artillery, R.C.A., Prince George, B.C., was out
hunting on November 10th, 1943, in the vicinity of Reid Lake, in company with a
number of other soldiers. Pte. George Robidoux, who was standing about 2-feet from
Audet, suddenly turned around, when his rifle discharged, the bullet striking Gnr.
Audet in the chest, killing him almost instantly.
Frank Goreing, Ordinary Seaman, Royal Canadian Navy, stationed at Prince
Rupert, whilst out hunting on January 23rd, 1943, attempted to pull his shotgun out
of the bow of a boat, muzzle first, when same accidentally discharged, the full force of
the charge striking him in the chest.    He died the following morning.
Nels C. Westergaard, Bear Flat, B.C., on April 10th, 1943, whilst out hunting
horses, saw a coyote and took his rifle out of a scabbard and injected a shell into the
chamber, when he discovered that the coyote had gone behind a bush. In putting the
rifle back into the scabbard, it suddenly discharged, shooting off his middle toe.
Westergaard has fully recovered from his injury.
Game-fish Culture.
Kamloops trout eyed eggs were supplied by the Game Commission and distributed
as follows:—
Prince George Rod and Gun Club, operating a small hatchery at Prince George,
were supplied with 80,000 eyed eggs and 65,000 were distributed as follows: Cluculz
Lake, 25,000; Summit Lake, 10,000; Bednesti Lake, 15,000; Six-mile Lake, 10,000;
and West Lake, 5,000.    The estimated loss being about 20 per cent.
The Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club received 70,000 eyed eggs which were
hatched in the hatchery operated by this club, and the fry distributed as follows: 2,000
fry liberated in Seymour Lake; 2,000 in McLure Lake; and 61,600 in Kathlyn Lake.
The estimated loss being 6.25 per cent.
The Terrace Rod and Gun Club planted 40,000 eyed eggs in streams and tributaries of Lakelse Lake.
In addition to the operation of the various hatcheries, outstanding work was performed by Game Warden P. Brown in patrolling various spawning streams in his
district, especially Corkscrew Creek, during the spawning season, 1,014 miles being
covered during these patrols.
Summary.
Weather conditions were most unfavourable during the nesting period of upland
game birds, resulting in a decrease in their numbers. Given better conditions next
season, a substantial increase in their numbers is anticipated.
The friendly spirit and co-operation existing between the British Columbia Police
and Game Department in " D " Division has been maintained, and I wish to extend to
all Provincial Police Officers my most sincere thanks for their support at all times so
freely given. JJ 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
To the members of all Game Clubs in " D " Division I also wish to convey the most
sincere thanks and appreciation of all members of the Game Department for the support
extended, at all times, in the execution of their numerous duties.
" E " DIVISION   (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY
DISTRICTS).
Information secured from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in
" E " Game Division for the year ended December 31st, 1943.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear are increasing in numbers and are a constant source of complaint as to their being responsible for damage to property and domestic stock. Grizzly
bear are to be found in fair numbers in the Division, especially at the heads of the
various inlets along the Mainland Coast.
Deer.—Coast or Columbian deer have been observed in good numbers throughout
most sections of the Division. In some portions, however, these animals, due to climatic
conditions and the shortage of ammunition, have also been the source of complaint re
damage to property and crops.
Mountain-goat.—Fair numbers of these animals are to be found at the heads of the
various inlets along the Coast and in portions of the Lower Mainland sections of the
Division.    These animals, however, are not hunted to any great extent.
Wapiti (Elk) .—Wapiti liberated at McNab Creek, Howe Sound, are reported as
slightly increasing in number.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Muskrats, mink, marten, racoon, and weasel are fairly plentiful, but in some sections muskrats have been trapped heavily due, undoubtedly, to the favourable price
obtainable for the pelt of this animal on the fur market. These remarks apply especially to the Pitt Meadows district.
Owing to the Lower Mainland Coast being trapped extensively, beaver are now
only to be found in remote sections of the Division.
Excellent work has been accomplished by the Game Wardens in charge of the Mission and Chilliwack districts in ridding these areas of red foxes. Foxes cannot be
classed as other than predators in the Fraser Valley farming district.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Blue and ruffed grouse would seem to be increasing in some portions of
the Division, while in other portions this is not the case. Near settled areas these birds
are fast disappearing and there would seem to be no way in which this situation can
be remedied.
Pheasants.—Severe cold weather in the Sumas Prairie, Chilliwack, and Mission
districts took a very heavy toll, and the supply of pheasants can only be increased in
these districts by carrying out considerable artificial propagation work in the release of
a greater number of farm-raised birds. In the Delta district some damage was caused
to nesting pheasants through anti-aircraft firing being carried on during the breeding
season. This condition not only applied to nesting game birds but to nesting domestic
birds as well.
California Quail.—Small numbers of these birds are to be found in the Pitt
Meadows, Matsqui, and Powell River areas, but only appear in numbers sufficient to
warrant a short open hunting season in the Delta Municipality.
European Partridge.—These birds are to be found in the Delta Municipality and in
some of the neighbouring districts, but not in sufficient numbers to permit even a short
open hunting season. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 41
Migratory Game Birds.
In late October and early November, ducks were fairly plentiful in the interior
sections of the Lower Mainland, but as soon as cold weather set in these birds moved
out to the tidal foreshore or migrated south. In the latter part of December, ducks
were very plentiful along the tidal foreshore in the Delta, Lulu, and Sea Islands areas,
and for a limited time hunters were able to obtain some fair shooting.
Canada geese were in good numbers in the Pitt Lake district, but owing to ammunition shortage and the necessity of using a gas-boat to get into this area very few of
these birds were shot.
Wilson's or jack snipe have been as plentiful as in former years. Swans were resident in the district in some numbers during the course of their migration, while band-
tailed pigeons have not been as plentiful as in previous years.
Vermin.
During the year complaints covering depredations by cougar increased, which
would seem to indicate that these animals have been more plentiful than in any previous
year. Four cougars were killed through the use of departmental trained dogs in the
Coquitlam district. Wolves at the head of Pitt Lake, according to reports, seem to have
more or less moved out of that district.
' Domestic cats have again been the source of considerable damage to game and
insectivorous birds. Many of these animals have been allowed by their owners to roam
at large and it is not very long before they become very wild. Red foxes throughout
the Lower Mainland, especially in the Chilliwack, Sumas Prairie, Mission, Surrey, and
Delta districts, have been most destructive to game and domestic birds. The Game
Wardens at Mission and Chilliwack have accounted for a fairly large number of red
foxes. Bighorned and snowy owls, while observed throughout the Division at various
times, have not been as plentiful as in former years.
Bobcats are reported as being quite plentiful and doing considerable damage to
game birds in some sections of the Division. It is most difficult to control the increase
of predators owing to the shortage of ammunition, which will not permit hunters going
after these predators in the same manner as before the war.
Game-protection.
Frequent special and regular patrols have been carried out into remote portions
of the Division and constant supervision has been carried out in the main portions of
each Game Warden's district during the year.
Game Propagation.
As in past years, pheasants have been liberated in most sections of the Lower
Mainland, but owing to the need of curtailing expenditures as well as the difficulty in
obtaining farm-raised pheasants, not as many birds have been liberated. The vermin
campaigns carried out by Game Wardens, assisted by members of Game Associations,
have been responsible for improved game conditions.
Game Reserves.
The largest game reserve in the Division is the North Vancouver Game Reserve,
and it, along with other smaller reserves and bird sanctuaries, has been carefully and
fully patrolled throughout the year. Owing to existing conditions, the bird-banding
operations previously carried on at the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve, near Chilliwack, have had to be discontinued. JJ 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fur Trade.
A further reduction in the amount of fur royalties collected has been noted during
the year. The stand of fur-bearing animals, however, with the possible exception of
beaver and muskrats in some districts, has not diminished to any great extent.
Fur-farming.
There have been very few new fur-farmers started in the Division during the year,
but those fur-farms that have been well established appear to be carrying on successfully, notwithstanding the effect of shortages of suitable food and the handicaps created
through various war-time restrictions.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Registered trappers in the Division are still carrying out the true intent of the
system of trap-line registration in that they are, in the majority of cases, farming the
fur-bearing animals on their trap-lines.
Registration of Guides.
Only a few guides are registered in the Division in view of the fact that the Division cannot be considered as a big-game area.
Special Patrols.
Each Game Warden has constantly patrolled the district under his supervision and
some special patrols have been undertaken into remote and sparsely settled sections of
the Division with very excellent results.
Hunting Accidents.
There was one minor accident in the Pitt Meadows district and a fatal accident in
the Mission area during the year.
Game-fish Culture.
As during the past five years, many lakes and streams on the Lower Mainland have
been planted with artificially reared trout from the Stanley Park, Cultus Lake, and
Smith Falls Hatcheries. In carrying out this annual programme of trout liberations
reports indicate that sport-fishing conditions have been and are being greatly improved.
(Particulars of liberations during the year are to be found in the statistical section
of this report.)
Summary and General Game Conditions.
The breeding season in the spring was, owing to continued wet and cold weather,
very poor and this undoubtedly was responsible for the loss of a fairly large number of
young game birds. In some sections, however, especially in the Mission district,
pheasants were fairly plentiful.
Fishing was reported by all Game Wardens as being excellent.
Migratory game birds were fairly plentiful, but in some portions of the Division
these birds did not remain long due to the scarcity of food and also unfavourable
climatic conditions.
All Game Wardens are desirous of expressing their sincere appreciation of the
assistance rendered to them during the year by members of the British Columbia Police
Force, Game Associations, farmers, and sportsmen. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943.
JJ 43
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.
Comparative Statistics, 1913-43.
Calendar Year.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences and
Fees.
Revenue
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913. 	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
454
451
585
613
547
440
446
409
356
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
436
552
574
526
419
430
892
342
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
23
16
15
33
39
21
21
16
17
14
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
19
14
20
42
21
18
9
27
18
$4,417.50
5,060.00'
4,097.50'
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,758.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
6,227.82
4,399.50
3,965.00
5,332.50
5,729.50
4,776.50
5,197.00
4,977.50
5,079.50
5,554.50
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50'
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148,689.64
157,647.30
177,771.33
192,024.07
193,170.53
188,605.20
213,267.67
205,451.71
207,661.72
191-1  .
1915. 	
1916	
1917-	
1918 	
1919	
1920 -
$5,291.39
24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
46,091.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
1921	
1922    	
1923      .     .
1924	
1925
1926	
1927                        	
1928                     	
1929	
1930                      	
1931	
1932 -	
1933                     	
1934. .  	
1935 -	
1936 	
1937	
1938	
1939 	
1940    ...
1941 .                  	
1942	
] 943 	
58,354.03
Totals 	
12,573
11,743
802
789
$174,524.07
-$4,297,312.77
$1,225,416.57 JJ 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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>££ REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943.
JJ 45
Revenue derived from Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and
Prospectors' Firearms Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1943.
Government Agency.
Anglers.
Guides.
Free
Farmers.
Prospectors.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
Total.
Albern i 	
767
153
$767.00
153.00
61
2
3
4
12
10
12
2
1
9
4
9
1
1
3
2
14
11
8
9
8
35
63
97
9
19
27
26
56
159
8
84
9
15
41
76
21
279
15
35
57
14
78
9
3
46
9
1
187
33
42
197
114
31
15
6
10
10
1
24
2
31
3
10
11
19
8
4
34
1
41
8
21
5
5
11
2
36
25
32
46
9
27
11
15
72
27
12
10
......
$2.00'
1.00
$769.00
Ashcroft _	
Atlin 	
Clinton ..._ „
190
1,386
961
80S
730'
190.00
1,386.00
961.00
809.00
730.00
102.00
180.00
176.00
1,342.00
181.00
1,057.00
142.00
213.00
1,078.00
1,802.00
355.00
3,700.00
198.00
' 1,069.00
S 555.00
2.00
$305.00
10.00
495.00
Cranbrook ._	
Cumberland _	
2.00
1,398.00
961.00
Duncan.	
Fernie _
15.00
20.00
60.00
745.00
Fort Fraser     ,	
Golden 	
102
180
176
1,342
181
1,057
142
213
1,078
1,802
355
3,700
198
1,069
Greenwood	
50.00
60.00
226.00
Kamloops.	
Kaslo _ _ _	
1.00
1,403.00'
181.00
2.00
1.00
1,059.00
153.00
213.00
10.00
Merritt	
1.078.0O
1,810.00
351.00
Nels on _	
N ew Denver 	
5.00
3.00'
-
3.00
3,703.00
198.00
Oliver	
Penticton  _	
1,069.00
45.00
Pouce Coupe..— 	
45.00
555
2
Prince George  	
20.00
8.00
3.00
30.00
Princeton ___
585
6
250'
1,215
334
585.00
6.00
250.00
1,215.00
334.00
585.00
Quesnel 	
Revelstoke- _ 	
45.00
5.00
3.00
54.00
255.00
1,215.00
339.00
5.00
15.00
10.00'
15.00
Vancouver	
4,910
1,281
1,468
44
266
4,910.00
1,281.00
1,468.00
44.00
266.00
6.00
1.00
4,926.00
1,282.00
1,468.00
Williams Lake _
70.00
55.00
1.00'
115.00
321.00
..    . .
Totals  _.
27,507
$27,507.00
161
$805.00
1,935
589
$37.00
$28,349.00 JJ 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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P5 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943.
JJ 47
Statement of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms Licences and Anglers' Licences
(Minors), January 1st to December 31st, 1943.
Government Agency.
Non-resident Ordinary
Firearms Licences.
Anglers' Licences
(Minors).
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
Cranbrook	
1
1
2
1
1
11
1
	
1
3
1
31
1
9
3
44
13
51
3
4
S
$1.00
3.00
l.OO
31.00
1.00
$1.00
3.00
1.00
$3.00
31.00
1.00
Golden                       .    ..
3.00
9.00
3.00
44.00
13.00
51.00
3.00
4.00
9.00
3.00
6.00
44.00
13.00
51.00
3.00
Penticton -	
6.00
3.00
3.00
33.00
3.00
10.00
3.00
3.00
s.nn
36.00
1         |               1.00
20                      20.00
4.00
20.00
Tntnla	
1 8                   S54 no
1SR           1           S1RRM
$242.00 JJ 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur-traders', Taxidermists', and Tanners' Licences
and Royalty on Fur, January 1st to December 31st, 1943.
Government
Resident
Fur-traders'
Licences.
Agent for
Non-resident
Fur-traders'
Licences.
Royalty or Tax
on Furs.
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Tanners'
Licences.
Total.
No.        Amt.
No.         Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
2
1
2
3
1
22
1
5
1
2
3
1
2
30
9
12
14
9
4
56
4
1
22
1
$50.00
25.00
50.00
75.00
25.00
3
2
4
1
1
8
2
8
87
9
14
1
5
8
2
12
14
1
592
1
102
21
2
7
24
4
23
32
411
8
66
5
3
1
1
1
2
7
1
2
1
$2.00
$50.00
	
25.00
Atlin                    	
$16.30
.40
.80
73.90
74.30
39.95
1,969.38
44.12
111.18
.75
75.00
66.30
75.40
$2.00
27.80
73.90
74.30
39.95
550.00
25.00
125.00
	
2,519.38
69.12
2.00
240.18
Kaslo
.75
	
75.00
25.00
50.00
	
25.00
44.50
1.20
22.55
46.00
2.00
94.50
	
1.20
75.00
99.55
46.00
25.00
50.00
750.00
	
25.00
6.30
10,674.55
4.00
3,166.69
995.79
22.25
287.41
19.12
35.50
1,856.07
1,372.52
30,820.16
22.60
258.10
61.45
9.19
56.30
$600.00
4.00
12,028.55
4.00
Prince George	
225.00
300.00
	
3,391.69
1,295.79
22.25
350.00
637.41
19.12
35.50
225.00
100.00
1,400.00
100.00
25.00
550.00
25.00
2,081.07
Telegraph Creel-
Vancouver	
Vernon	
14.00
2.00
4.00
1,472.52
400.00
32.634.16
124.60
287.10
601.45
34.19
Totals
208
$5,200.00
5
$1,000.00
1,468
$52,122.03
15
$30.00
1
$2.00
$58,354.03
» REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943.
JJ 49
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1943, inclusive.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-traders',
Tanners', and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
1921 _-.
1922....
1923 ....
1924 _.
1926 —
1926 -.
1927 —
1928 ....
1929 _.
1930—
1931....
1932....
1933 _..
1934....
1935 ..-
1936 ....
1937	
1938 ....
1939 ...
1940 ....
1941—
1942	
1943	
Totals-
$24
51,
60;
56,
48,
56
61
51
40
40
41
36
39
42,
44,
46,
47,
39,
44,
62,
56,
63,
52,
595.80
093.89
594.18
,356.68
,737.78
,045.13
,629.96
,563.07
,769.89
,431.11
,056.08
,253.79
592.48
,697.81
986.95
186.50
257.48
423.87
238.00
745.33
755.30
176.07
122.03
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
5,540.00
4,949.00
5,721.00
6,370.00
5,299.00
6,232.00
$1,108,309.18
$137,286.00
$30,790.80
57,458.89
67,524.18
62,446.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
45,981.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
58,354.03
$1,245,595.18 JJ 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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JJ 51
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1943.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of
Fur confiscated.
Date of
Confiscation.
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Burns Lake—	
1
„     27-	
Klein, Charles.	
Vananda - -	
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Mar. 24..	
Sobotka, F.	
Goldbridge _	
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Apr.  19	
1
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15
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8
„     20	
Simutka, John	
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1
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.,     28
Tegart, Hiram	
10
June 29	
Rutland	
R.C.N.V.R	
3
4
July     9	
Kirk, John L. V	
„     30
Brisson, Arger	
Wlasuk, William _.
12
Oct.     5 _ -
Vernon  ,	
	
12
Nov. 25
Swansky, Thomas
Lubin, A.	
2
5
Dec.     1	
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1
....
„     14	
Cook, Ernest F	
Totals	
Burnaby	
....
1
_
2
1 I   1
l
1
4
6
37
6
1
15
34S
Note.—The sum of $536.82 was received in 1943 from the sale of confiscated fur.
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1943.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Firearms
confiscated.
Rifles.
Shotguns.
Jan.   27	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Feb.   15	
„      15	
Mar.   2  	
Graham, Donald -	
Seymour, Abraham	
Warnboldt, John. _.._	
Burnaby _	
*
Port Coquitlam- _\	
5	
„     13	
Gresko, Victor	
Barnes, Robert 	
Apr.    8 	
8..	
Port Alberni  .,
1
8	
Corbett, Ellis	
Barnum, W. G -	
Bodaly, V. S	
8	
1
„     .8	
8	
May   19.	
Ritchie, G —	
McCulloch, A. G..             	
1
July 21	
Aug. 27	
Bondor, Bruce	
Rasmussen, Martin	
1
Sept. 16	
Oct.   27	
Nanaimo   -.-	
1
Totals	
13
5
Note.—The sum of $103.50 was received in 1943 from the sale of confiscated firearms. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943.
JJ 53
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1943.
Government Agency.
Coyotes.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Total.
61
175
16
91
11
2
18
115
4
57
16
20
22
61
3
37
3
16
47
1
1
28
12
2
2
51
291
58
1
26
4
97
6
2
2
1
130
342
54
64
20
1
1
184
5
77
6
2
1
13
17
11
4
2
17
2
7
8
10
9
1
9
6
16
6
26
1
4
2
42
15
16
12
$100 00
Atlin     	
260 00
192.00
365 00
195 00
255.00
Fernie  	
197.00
1,152.00
82 00
4.00
66 00
Kamloops.- _	
545.00
8 00
Kelowna     ,	
114.00
82 00
Merritt     	
145.00
140.00
Pouce Coupe  - - - - ,	
1,441.00
3,734.00
636 00
1,124.00
17.00
2 00
Revelstoke „	
Stewart . —- —
10.00
64 00
1,844.00
684 00
1,592.00
Totals ..    _    _.	
1,221
1,017
265
$16,587.00
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1943.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922          	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384.
366
285
196
261
265
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
2,487
3,427
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$601,494.80
14,840.00
20,398.40
24,397.00
41,077.00
1923             	
172
1926          	
5,770
10,046
1927            - -	
65,377.95
1928           -            1	
1,025
1,389
403
1
50,709.25
42,122.00
36,090.25
42,036.15
80 00
1929          	
1930           	
1931           —
1932        	
1933        -- - 	
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
1,00:2
1,039
1,017
	
6,285.00
1934                                       	
—
6,825.00
12,374.00
20,350.00
1935         —
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
2,038
1,924
1,546
1,221
1936          	
1937 	
19,540.00
1938    --
'     21,018.00
26,399.00
23,131.00
1939 - -	
1940  -
-
1941. -	
16,868.00
1942	
17,397.00
16,587.00
1943 —- 1	
Totals	
12,355
8,015
75,474
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$584,396.80 JJ 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1943.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
o
5
0)
PQ
_.
a a
Bl
n o
0
o
'u
cfl
O
-_
a
st
OJ_J
a!
-IT
0?
4-
B
o
a
rH
4)
_
n
g
'3
U
0 g
S5
QJ
to
o
o
a
a
^- .
c a
-J  oj
o a>
5
H
'S
a
Amount.
Ashcroft—
1
...
....
l
l
"
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
1
I
1
1
....
1
1
i
i
i
i
i
i
$25.00
Clinton—
25.00
Bancroft, E., Everett, Wash -	
25.00
40.00
40.00
Coley, J. H., Seattle, "Wash -
25.00
Corliss, Forrest, Port Orchard, Wash.   	
40.00
25.00
25.00
30:00
40.00
Fry, Herbert, Tacoma, Wash   -	
Gaeth, Chris T., Everett, Wash 	
55.00
25.00
25.00
Hahn, E. A., Seattle, Wash _ _
25.00
40.00
Hancock, Dr. V. K., Seattle, Wash  	
Hilket, A. W., Seattle, Wash	
40.00
25.00
Johnson, C. E., Sedro Woolley, Wash. ._	
Knott, Dr. E. K., Seattle, Wash	
30.00
55.00
Krebs, Oliver, Anacortes, Wash __ _	
Lidrall, J. F., Seattle, Wash                1	
25.00
80.00
15.00
Martin, J., Bellingham, Wash. 	
Merkley, E. W., Seattle, Wash _____
Nix, F. E., Issaquah, Wash. - _	
Power, J. W., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Pratt, Dr. F. H., Seattle, Wash. _ 	
25.00
Pride, Wallace, Everson, Wash  	
Rea, William M., Seattle, Wash.	
25.00
30 00
25.00
Schultz, H. H., Yakima, Wash 	
25.00
Seaman, J. M., Mount Vernon, Wash.  „ 	
Sloan, E. F., Yakima, Wash              	
15.00
25 00
Steele, John E., Seattle, Wash    	
Templeton, Dr. L. C, Seattle, Wash.- .„	
40.00
25.00
Van Zanten, G. J. V., Lynden, Wash	
Walsh, H. E., Seattle, Wash  	
Walters, August, Seattle, Wash.  	
Walter, P. H., Seattle, Wash  	
Wightman, Dr. R., Seattle, Wash 	
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Cranbrook—
Dahl, E. 0. B., Brooklyn, N.Y	
Miller, W. J., Corvallis, Ore.	
Miller, R. C, Philomath, Ore	
95.00
Fernie—
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
Callison, I. P., Union, Wash.	
Coleman, Mrs. W. F., Seattle, Wash. _ _   	
Green, Carl L-, Bloomington, 111.	
Hausmann, E., Havana, Cuba .,. . „ 	 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL
GAME COMMISSION, 1943.                   JJ 55
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by
December 31st,
Non-residents, January 1st to
1943—Continued.
Species.
Amount.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
o
M
0)
m
| .
as a
n ■*
w o
tT x
3m
W o
p
o
'u
a
o
■0
a
a
oi _^
rZ£
QJj-
s
o
O
QJ
<-
Q
'3
c  .
tn
o
0
a
'3
C  E,
0  OJ
o a>
1-8
3
5
"ft
Golden—
l
l
l
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
i
i
i
i
i
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
i
i
1
i
I
i
i
1
2
1
1
1
i
i
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
i
$25.00
40.00
15.00
45.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
65.00
65.00
80.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
50.00
55.00
55.00
25.00
15.00
95.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
55.00
Fallon, G. F., Deer Park, Wash 	
Genman, E. L., Palo Alto, Calif       	
Leuthold, G. H., Deer Park, Wash 	
Leuthold, W. M., Deer Park, Wash— , _	
Grand Forks—
Connelly, R. A. M., Seattle, Wash.
Kamloops—
Higby, R. C, Big Moose, N.Y  - 	
Lillooet—
Nelson, S. (Sr.), Seattle, Wash  _	
Nelson, S. (Jr.), Seattle, Wash.                	
New Westminster—
Alspaugh, E. M. and M. W., Bremerton, Wash	
Belknap, W. W., Port Orchard, Wash 	
I
....
.-   1           25.00
40.00
25.00
5.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
30.00 '
15.00
25.00
_
25.00
10.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00 JJ 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1943—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
13
N
'u
O
9
M
u   •
£ B
if u
3m
N o
3
O
'C
cd
a
cd
0)_J
21
m
cd
o
O
m
D
g
'3
HH
g-sl
0)
0}
o
O
a
.g
'3
HH     ,
e p,
:_ v
o oj
ps tn
w
"ft
cd
is
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
....
1
I
3
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
I
$25.00
Crowder, Al., and Evanson, H. F., Seattle, Wash..	
30.00
40.00
40.00
De Burgh, A. R., Bellingham, Wash.	
Dederick, Geo., Bremerton, Wash. __ -
25.00
25.00
70.00
Denning, M. B., Seattle, Wash  ,	
Dick, C. R., Vancouver, Wash..— _ 	
Downey, Wm., Seattle, Wash.	
Downing, Robt. L., Renton, Wash  —  .
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
Due, Paul, Marysville, Wash   	
25.00
40.00
Ely, Edwin E., Seattle, Wash. _    '	
25.00
Fayette, Fred F., Blaine, Wash. _ _	
25.00
Forbe, Alec, Seattle, Wash. _ '       „_	
55.00
Gay, Fred H., Seattle, Wash. _ _ 	
George, J. E., Seattle, Wash    _	
George, Lynn A., Snohomish, Wash.   _
25.00
25.00
30.00
Guffey, F. S., Seattle, Wash. __	
Hagen, Rudolph, Bellingham, Wash __	
Hall, Mrs. M. L., Snohomish, Wash... __  	
15.00
Halley, C. A., Bellingham, Wash	
Hallum, V. D., Seattle, Wash __	
5 00
25.00
25.00
Hanson, B., Blaine, Wash  ___	
Hawkins, Chas. S., Seattle, Wash	
Heath, E., Seattle, Wash __	
Henderson, J. L., Seattle, Wash.	
Hill, Curtis L., Tacoma, Wash. _..._	
....   |   .-
[
25.00
25.00
15.00
45.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
15.00'
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
Hoff, Harvey B., Seattle, Wash	
Hulbush, W., Burlington, Wash.-	
Hughes, Fred, Mount Vernon, Wash	
Hughes, H. C, Mount Vernon, Wash.	
Hunnicutt, H. W., Tacoma, Wash.	
Hunter, Dr. C. M., Sedro Woollev, Wash	
Hylen, N. H., Bremerton, Wash..	
Jeffrey, J. W., Seattle, Wash _	
Kelley, B. H., Seattle, Wash	
Kellenberger, E., Lebanon, Ore.	
Kem, E. A., Edmonds, Wash	
Ketcham, E. A., Seattle, Wash....:-	
Keyes, P., Vancouver, Wash.	
Kirkpatrick, Earl, Seattle, Wash.	
Knutson, W., Blaine, Wash..       	
Landon, L. E., Tacoma, Wash _	
Law, C. H., Seattle, Wash.
Lee, C. N., Seattle, Wash	
.1 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943.
JJ 57
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1943—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
3«
a 3
*!
a _fl
3 .
c a
p 0)
O <U
a-s
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Lester, J. A., Seattle, Wash _
Lewis, P. R., Bremerton, Wash-
Lynch, Ken T., Bothell, Wash	
McCulloch, J. H-, Seattle, Wash. 	
McDermott, W. P., Burlington, Wash..
McFadden, L. P., Seattle, Wash -...
McFerran, E. M-, Seattle, Wash	
MacKintosh, P. G., Yakima, Wash	
Martin, Chas. E., Seattle, Wash 	
Martin, R. M., Kent, Wash 	
Mellor, Dr. Roy M., Seattle, Wash...
Messuly, C. E., Seattle, Wash..-	
Miller, E. W., Puyallup, Wash-	
Mitchell, R. J., Belfair, Wash	
Mohns, N. R., Seattle, Wash	
Morse, G. C, Seattle, Wash..	
Mulcahy, Harry, Seattle, Wash	
Mullen, L. J., Everett, Wash..—	
Mynhier, F., Tacoma, Wash -
Nickelsen, Dr. H. C, Tacoma, Wash..
Oliver, C. T., Kent, Wash	
Patrick, A. H., Seattle, Wash.  	
Paulson, Chester C-, Tacoma, Wash	
Pendleton, Walter E., Custer, Wash	
Peterson, J. C., Seattle, Wash	
Piatt, Glen C, Everett, Wash	
Pleas, Roy M., Seattle, Wash  	
Prankard, R. G., Mount Vernon, Wash—
Presley, B. R., Tacoma, Wash..	
Porter, Dr. E. R., Port Orchard, Wash.._
Presley, Wm. C, Tacoma, Wash 	
Probison, J. W.. Bellingham, Wash.	
Prothero, R. H., Bremerton, Wash	
Prouty, Dr. C H., Bellingham, Wash	
Putney, E. T., Seattle, Wash 	
Racine, S. F., Seattle, Wash _	
Robison. Wm. S., Bellingham, Wash -
Rudebeck, Nick, Everett, Wash.— 	
Runnels, Reg. F., Bremerton, Wash	
Ruth, W. E., Seattle, Wash......	
Salvino, F., Seattle, Wash.	
Sanderson, J. P., Seattle, Wash	
Schau, Omar, Seattle, Wash	
Schoner, J. J., Alderwood Manor, Wash..
Schuster, Roy M., Seattle, Wash 	
Shaw, Robert L., Bellingham, Wash	
Shedivetz, H. W., Bremerton, Wash—	
Sifferman, H. I., Seattle, Wash-.	
Siler, H. M., Seattle, Wash	
Skaarup, Harry, Burlington, Wash	
Sligar, P., Seattle, Wash _	
Smith, J. E., Seattle, Wash  	
Spalinger, Ed., Seattle, Wash	
Stender, Bruce, Seattle, Wash	
Storwick, Martin, Tacoma, Wash	
Strain, A., Kent, Wash 	
Strain, L. G., Seattle, Wash. -	
Sund, Alfred, Conway, Wash	
$25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
20.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00 JJ 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1943—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
'C
O
a
pq
tt o
i
"S
tf
Q
CO
cd
o
O
h
flj
eg
Q
3
o cd
■S 9
c_
0
o
a
h
'3
c a
0 OJ
a-s
M
5
cd
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Suter, 0., Redondo Beach, Calif _  	
Thompson, David E., Sequim, Wash.    .
Tyler, Lee R., Marysville, Wash.	
Van Winkle, G„ Everett, Wash ,	
....
2
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
i
i
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
.1
I
1
1
$25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
Van Vleet, R. L., Taft, Ore. -	
25.00
Vokrodt, Mr. and Mrs. H. K., Bremerton, Wash.	
110.00
25.00
Waite, S. J., Seattle, Wash	
40.00
Walker, A. L., Seattle, Wash- _ .,	
Walker, G. B., Seattle, Wash            	
40.00
10.00
Walton, Gilbert A., Seattle, Wash _ _ ,	
Ward, A. H., Sedro Woolley, Wash.	
40.00
25.00
25.00
Waugh, Herman D., Bremerton, Wash  	
25.00
30.00
25.00
26.00
Wheeler, G. W., Edmonds, Wash _	
25.00
25.00
Wilhelmi, E. P., Everett, Wash.                      -   ...
40.00
Wilson, H. G., Seattle, Wash	
Windon, Jess, Maple Fall, Wash. _	
Winn, Lyle R., Seattle, Wash.....  _	
Wray, L. F., Seattle, Wash .	
25.00
25.00
40.00
25 00
Penticton—
30 00
Bender, Otto S., Omak, Wash 	
25 00
Bendtsen, S. G„ Timentwa, Wash	
25.00
Braida, Hector, Seattle, Wash _„_
30.00
Brenner, C. C, Port Gamble, Wash.	
Callison, I. P., Union, Wash    .
Crowley, 0., Okanogan, Wash	
Demakis, Tom, Seattle, Wash   	
Demakis, Mrs. T., Seattle, Wash...	
25.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
Fleenor, G. W., Yakima, Wash-	
Frazer, W. D„ Seattle, Wash	
Gwinn, M. D., Omak, Wash  _ 	
Hahn, E. T. A., Seattle, Wash ___	
Harley, C. S., Seattle, Wash. —	
Hatton, F., Yakima, Wash	
Hilkert, A. W., Seattle, Wash	
Hill, C. L., Tacoma, Wash	
15.00
Kepp, Karl, Seattle, Wash	
Ketcham, E. J., Seattle, Wash.	
30.00
30.00
15.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL
GAME  COMMISSION, 1943.                    JJ 59
blg-game trophy fees paid by
December 31st,
Non-residents, January 1st to
1943—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
Amount.
N
H
•G
O
£
cd
m
a a
w o
u u
««
m o
s
o
cs
O
T3
e
cd
I. £
Vrt
®s
4J
tn
cd
o
U
u
V
V
0
a
+-
a .
a§
cu'
09
O
o
a
■
.5
'5
e a
-)   0)
o CJ
WJ-
r*t  tn
3
Haft
tf
Penticton—Continued.
Lockwood, R. E., Seattle, Wash	
McFerran, E. M., Seattle, Wash.__._	
McNett, R. L., Omak, Wash _	
i
l
l
i
i
i
' i
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
i
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
1
1
1
1
1
~
$30.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
55.00
125.00
105.00
100.00
105.00
80.00
95.00
40.00
30.00
65.00
25.00
66.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
46.00
Manley, J. G., Seattle, Wash   	
Mascher, V., Bremerton, Wash	
Meister, R. E., Seattle, Wash.—	
Mellor, Dr. R. M., Seattle, Wash _	
Mills, J. W., Yakima, Wash 	
Moss, L., Seattle, Wash.	
Paulson, C. C, Tacoma, Wash _.__ _	
Phelps, A. E., Seattle, Wash. __ _
Schau, Omar, Seattle, Wash	
Simpson, C. B., Port Gamble, Wash  ___	
Smiley, E. S., Yakima, Wash _	
Stender, B., Seattle, Wash 	
Strance, E. J., Seattle, Wash	
Styer, C. M., Seattle, Wash                   	
1
Twaddle, P. B., Seattle, Wash....	
Vedova, P. 0. D., Seattle, Wash	
Pouce Coupe—
English, A. B., Bristol, Tenn.	
Ferguson, Dr. G., Oklahoma City, Okla 	
Harley, C. S., Seattle, Wash  ___	
Keagy, H. F., Beverly Hills, Calif	
Van Wedel, Dr. C, Oklahoma City, Okla	
Weaver, A. D., Bristol, Tenn  ,	
Prince George—
Higby, Roy C, Big Moose, N.Y.          	
/           .
Prince Rupert—
*
Quesnel—
Baird, R. M., Everett, Wash 	
Bice, Dr. D. F., Yakima, Wash..	
Boulton, J. C, Seattle, Wash ., 	
Cronkhite, E. W., Everett, Wash.              	
■ JJ 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1943—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
T3
JJ
X
•
r.
a a
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Amount.
Quesnel—Continued.
Eland, Sydney S., Seattle, Wash..
Fortner, C C, Seattle, Wash	
Giske, S., Redmond, Wash..	
Good, Franklin, Mount Vernon, Wash...
Goodrich, Jerry, Everett, Wash	
Granston, E. L., Seattle, Wash	
Granston, W. R., Seattle, Wash..	
Hague, Raymond J., Seattle, Wash	
Hansen, B. L., Seattle, Wash	
Hansen, L. V., Seattle, Wash 	
Houser, Rex V., Blanchard, Wash 	
Johnson, Alvin, Seattle, Wash 	
Johnson, E. R., Redmond, Wash.-	
Kellogg, Harvey, Tacoma, Wash	
Lohr, Elmer W., Arlington, Wash	
Mason, John, Mount Vernon, Wash	
Meyers, Wm. B., Harrah, Wash	
Neukirch, O. E., Seattle, Wash...	
Noonan, D. C, Seattle, Wash 	
Oakson, E., Seattle, Wash 	
Olson, John, Seattle, Wash	
Pierce, S. R., Everett, Wash	
Sinclair, S. L., Seattle, Wash	
Skogh, Joseph, Seattle, Wash	
Smith, Ray, Forest Grove, Ore	
Snyder, Eugene D., Everett, Wash-
Stuchill, W., Everett, Wash	
Vincent, B. S., Seattle, Wash	
Whitehall, Loyd, Bremerton, Wash	
Wolf kill, M. V., Mount Vernon, Wash...
Zeek, Rex L., Everett, Wash 	
Revelstoke—
Edwards, Deo., Oregon	
Edwards, S., Springfield, Ore	
Kubas, Stanley, Munroe, Wash	
Telegraph Creek—
Wheeler, Dr. E. J., Wrangell, Alaska-
Vancouver—
Barnes, F. P., Campbellford, Ont.	
Bates, D. H., Oswego, Ore	
Campbell, R. E., Seattle, Wash _
Cushman, F. A., Everett, Wash	
Francis, C. E., Seattle, Wash	
Kenyon, Karl, San Diego, Calif-
McKay, W. O., Seattle, Wash.	
McMenamin, J. M., Lake City, Wash	
Skeel, E. L., Seattle, Wash 	
Victoria—
Harlam, F., Silverdale, Wash-	
Williams Lake—
Barton, Dr. J., Longview, Wash	
Windermere—
Christierson, Lieut.-Comdr. S. V., Idaho..
Gehrt, R. L., Indianapolis, Ind	
Gentry, H. L„ Bay City, Mich	
Hoedmaker, E., Seattle, Wash-	
McLemore, Dr. I. O., Seattle, Wash	
Totals..
18
30
227 | 13
$25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00'
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
55.00
30.00
55.00
15.00
55.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
50.00
50.00
160.00
40.00
70.00
247  14  14
$11,940.00 KEPOKT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943.
JJ 61
Prosecutions  (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1943.
Description of Offence.
Divisions (See Foot-note).
ui
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1
5
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Fines or
Penalties,
imposed.
C
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Game Animals.
i
1
Killing,   hunting,  or  in   possession   of  game animals  of
3
3
4
1
i |  ii
12
$820.00
Killing, hunting, or in possession of game animals dur-
3
1
3
4
1
1  12
12
600 00
Possession of game animals under 1 year of age 	
1
1
3
.— |      5
5
325.00
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during close
4
6
1
11
11
95.00
3
2
1
6
6
60.00
Possession of game on premises of logging camp, cafe, etc.
1
1
1
25.00
Removing all evidence of sex from game animals  	
1
1
1
25.00
2
2
2
35.00
1
1
1
Game Birds.
Allowing dogs to hunt or run game birds during pro-
1
1
2
2
10.00
1
1
2
2
50.00
Hunting or in possession of migratory game birds dur-
1
1
1
2
3
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game birds during
10
3
6
7
26
26
280.00
Hunting certain  game birds  with a  rifle,  contrary to
1
1
1
10.00
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours ~ .
1
3
1
4
10.00
3
3
3
45.00
Hunting migratory game birds from, or with the use of,
1
1   1      1
10.00
1
1
1
15.00
Trapping.
Interfering with a registered trap-line ,,	
3
5
8
8
270.00
Leaving traps set after end of open season  _	
1
1  1      1
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence  	
2
1
7
2
1
13   |     13
182.50-
3
4
7
7
570.00
Trapping  outside  the  limits   of  a  registered  trap-line
1
1
2
2
10.00
Trapping on registered trap-line as an assistant with-
1
1
1
10.00
1
1
1
10.00
Licences.
i
16
9
8
12
22
1
67  j    68
545.00
3
3 I      3
120.00
Minor carrying firearms without licence or without being
1
7
6
1
1
14 |    15
10.00
Non-resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling without
1
8
8 |      8
40.00
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence  	
1
1  1      1
50.00
Non-resident outfitter operating without a licence	
1
1  1      1
10.00
Resident  carrying  fishing-tackle  or  angling  without  a
1
fi
16
6
13
4  |    41  |    45
!           1
422.00
Note.—"A" Division:   Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland.    "B " Divis
on:   Kootenay an
I Boundary
areas.    "C" Division:   Kamloops,  Yale,  Okanagan,  Cariboo, and Lillooet areas.    ".
) " Division :    Atl
m,  Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas.    " E " Division :    "\
'ancouver,  Coast,
and Lower
Mainland areas. JJ 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1943—Continued.
Divisions (See Foot-note).
R3
to
SO
a
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. C
Fines or
Description of Offence.
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$s
Penalties
imposed.
Firearms.
Carrying   firearms   in,   or  discharging   same   from,   an
7
9
3
5
24
24
$220.00
Carrying, or in possession of, unplugged pump or repeat-
1
2
2
5
5
60.00
Discharging   firearms   on   or   across   a   highway   in   a
municipality	
1
3
4
4
55.00 .
Miscellaneous.
1
1
2
2
15.00
1
1
1
50.00
i
1
Interfering with Game Warden in discharge of his duties....
1
1
1
10.00
Making false statement in obtaining a licence, etc	
1
1
1
3
3
60.00
Non-resident Indian hunting game in Province -	
2
2
2
50.00
1
1
1
25.00
2
4
1
i
7
8
85.00
British Columbia Special Fishery Regulations.
1
1
1
5.00
Angling for trout during the close season  	
3
4
1
8
8
45.00
Angling with more than one line   - __ ■
2
2
2
20.00
1
1
1
10.00
Jigging, shooting, or using a torch in taking of trout
3
4
7
7
45.00
Netting kokanee without a licence  or taking kokanee
4
4
4
20.00
1
4
2
7
7
60.00
Trolling or angling with gear designed to catch more
5
5
5
40.00
Gaol Sentences.
$5,554.50
Angling for trout during the close season or without a
7
1
1
8
1
8
1
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game animals or
1
1
1
Interfering   with   a   Game  Warden   in   discharge   of  his
2
1
......
1
2
1
2
	
1
1
1
Totals 	
56
85
82
48
85
14
342
356
Note.—"A" Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. "C" Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. "D" Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. "E" Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas.
Gaol sentences ranged from five days to thirty days. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943.
JJ 6S
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5 JJ 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary of Game-fish Distributions, showing Eggs, Fry, and
Fingerlings, 1943.
Kind of Game Fish.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fingerlings and
Yearlings.
1,351,170
351,665
230,000
3,321,982
4,792,260
1,380,000
176,510
976,876
6,190
7,699,930
3.903.647         1           983.066
Summary of Game-fish Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings at Departmental
Hatcheries, December 31st, 1943.
Hatchery.
Eastern
Brook.
Kamloops.
Kokanee.
Eggs.
Fingerlings.
Eggs.
71,749
37,657
80,926
101,251
103,481
39,891
Kaslo            	
441,650
29,600
Smith Falls '	
Totals  	
441,650
434,955
29,600
Summary.
Eggs   7,699,930
.Fry   3,903,647
Fingerlings and yearlings   983,066
Total distributions 	
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1943.
Sold and moneys received placed to credit of Game
Vote—
Kamloops, fry          6,000
Eastern brook-trout, fry         2,000
Kokanee, eggs   2,000,000
12,586,643
906,205
2,008,000
Total  15,500,848
Note.—A number of Game Clubs or Associations were, as in past years, granted
subsidies for use in assisting the Department in its game-fish culture programme of
development.
Trout-eggs were shipped to a number of Game Associations as will be noted on
examining the statement of distributions or plantings. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1943.
JJ 65
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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JJ 73
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JJ 75
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Returns from 1,737 Holders of Special Firearms Licences, showing Big Game,
Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1942-43.
Big Game.
Bear   391 Mountain-goat   58
Caribou      35 Mountain-sheep   11
Deer   916 Wapiti (Elk) .1  15
Moose   494
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver  6,377
Fisher   218
Fox  2,377
Lynx  841
Marten  3,708
Mink  4,653
Muskrats   43,359
Otter ._
Racoon
Skunk ..
  195
  1,852
  55
Squirrels  104,028
Weasel   18,367
Wildcat   350
Wolverine  .. 97
Predatory Animals.
Cougar         51 Wolves
Coyotes   2,379
266
Fur-farm Returns, 1943.
Adult and
Young
(Reared)
Animals.
Animals
purchased
or received
by Trade.
Died or
killed.
Animals
sold
or traded
Alive.
Pelts sold
(including
all Pelts sold
in 1943).
Total Animals on Hand .
as at December 31st, 1943.
Males.
Females.
18
43
4
2,987
3
648
23,367
320
290
34
15
10
2
365
1
105
2,169
70
60
13
3
1
17
13
2
1,473
1
273
14,453
17
Fitch
2
Foxes	
75
1,880
1
318
14,649
172
173
23
60
757
Marten— 	
Mink  _.._	
2
729
...
14
415
58
14
213
6,863
20
OO   CO
18
3
Note.-—Figures in respect to muskrats and beaver approximate.    Cancelled permits, 69.    Nil returns, 3. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943.
JJ 77
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1943.
Kind of Animals or Birds destroyed.
Game Divisions.
Total.
" A."
" B."
•• C."
" D."
., E „
Animals.
4
225
116
28
2
36
4
6
4
2
9
127
86
127
29
3
116
8
137
92
63
3
8
21
6
252
15
288
20
6
780
3
228
586
148
48
14
5
2
22
10
4
11
35
22
10
5
1
509
81
62
12
1,824
15
84
28
2
4
45
29
398
86
21
1,151
246
Fox        .           	
62
21
Birds.
Crows	
2,770
38
Hawks	
489
678
Owls       .                                          	
254
94
Mergansers      	
Kingfishers 	
8
8 JJ 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary of Liberation of Game Birds, 1943.
Area. Pheasants.
Vancouver Island—
Ladysmith       20
Nanaimo-Parksville   8
Victoria   (North   and   South   Saanich,   Sooke,
Metchosin)           75
Partridge.
Totals      103
50
50
Lower Mainland—
Chilliwack   10
Lulu and Sea Islands   274
Mission (Hatzic, etc.)   262
Matsqui   6
Pitt Meadows  410
Sumas Prairie  331
Surrey   144
Totals
Interior—
Fruitvale 	
Kimberley 	
Totals
1,437
8
50
58
50
50
Summary.
District.                                                                                                           Pheasants. Partridge.
Interior        58 	
Lower Mainland ,_.___ 1,437 50
Vancouver Island      103 50
Totals  1,598
100 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 79
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1943.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1943.
Pheasants  1,305 Geese    14
Quail         88 Partridge   28
Ducks         41
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 1943.
Pheasants  2,390 Geese    3
-   Quail       192 Partridge  27
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1943.
Pheasants   92 Ducks      1
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 1943.
Pheasants   2,248 Partridge  20
Quail       206
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1943.
Pheasants  1,274 Geese  14
Quail         63 Partridge   22
Ducks        22
Note.—During the year 1943 there were one hundred and thirty-two licensed
game-bird farmers in the Province, but during the year twenty-four of these farmers
discontinued operations.
There were three nil returns.
Game-bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during the year 1943—439
bands at 10 cents—$43.90.
Miscellaneous Revenue.
Sale of list licensed fur-farmers.—  $35.00
Sale of list licensed game-bird farmers  1.00
•   Sale of list licensed fur-traders    7.50
Sale of list licensed trappers  90.00
Total :  $133.50 JJ 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1943.
Barkerville-Quesnel District.
Armstrong, Wilfred R—Quesnel.
Morrow, Richard A Quesnel.
Quanstrom, Carl Quesnel.
Quanstrom, Julius Quesnel.
Rawling, Arden.
.Quesnel.
Tibbies, Fred S Quesnel.
Tibbies, James Quesnel.
Cassiar District.
Ball, George B.
.Telegraph Creek.    Dennis, John Creyke Telegraph Creek.
Dennis, Alex Telegraph Creek.
Coast District.
Stanton, Jas. R Glendale Cove, Walker, Thomas A Bella Coola.
Knight Inlet.
Donald, Jimmie Burns Lake
Knox, John Ootsa Lake.
Hazelton District.
Van Tine, Edward Ootsa Lake.
Kamloops District.
Chester, Maurice Red Lake.
Deaver, Jas Savona.
Dever, Dolly Savona.
Grant, Gordon McLure.
Helset, Torbjorn Clearwater.
Hoover, Eldred F McLure.
Ivens, Joseph Okanagan Mission.
Johnson, Stewart Criss Creek.
Loveway, Thomas Little Fort.
McKort, Clarence Clearwater.
Raymer, Thomas Kelowna.
Welland, J. E.
Kootenay District.
Baher, Martin C Natal.
Bergenham, Peter Beavermouth.
Canning, Lester Ta Ta Creek.
Conover, Henry Castledale.
Croy, 'John M Natal.
Daniken, Joseph Brisco.
Desimone, Angelo C Vancouver.
De Simone, S. H Revelstoke.
Dilworth, James Athalmer.
Gould, Percy  Canal Flats.
Harrison, Wm. 0 Edgewater.
Haycock, Wm. A Sicamous.
Hynes, Ben Roy Galena.
Jaeggi, John Edgewater.
Jones, Richard K Golden.
Joseph, Carmille Fairmont.
Markuson, Levi Canal Flats.
Mclvor, Norman D Fort St. John.
McKay, Gordon J Athalmer.
McKeenan, Robert Castledale.
MacLain, J. I Galena.
Nicholas, Dominac Kootenay Reserve.
Nixon, Walter J Invermere.
Ogilvey-Wills, James R....Fairmont.
O'Loughlin, E. P Spillimacheen.
Phillips, F. Alex 1551 St. Andrews,
North Vancouver.
Thomas, Guy A Parson.
White, James T Fort Steele.
Whiting, Renal Natal.
Wiedemman, Otto Golden. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943.
JJ 81
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1943—Continued.
Lillooet-Cariboo-Chilcotin District.
Archie, Cassian Canim Lake.
Archie, George Canim Lake.
Archie, Jacob Canim Lake.
Archie, Tom Canim Lake.
Baker, J. C Clinton.
Baker, R. M Clinton.
Bidstrup, Volger Likely.
Bob, Edward Canim Lake.
Bones, Alex Clinton.
Bones, Pete Clinton.
Boyce, Modeste Canim Lake.
Cleveland, L. C Bridge Lake.
Cleveland, Robt. C.. Bridge Lake.
Coldwell, Henry W Jesmond.
Collins, E. M Ashcroft.
Collins, Herbert Cache Creek.
Coulson, H. R 70-Mile House.
Daniels, Steve Canim Lake.
Daniels, Walter ..Fawn.
Davis, S. G Bridge Lake.
Decker, English Canim Lake.
Dougherty, E. G Clinton.
Eagle, Clifford B Lac la Hache.
Evans, Charles Quesnel.
Fenton, Charles Big Bar.
Fenton, Walter Big Bar Creek.
Flaherty, R. J 100-Mile House.
Fletcher, Joe Clinton.
George, Charlie Clinton.
Grinder, Isadore Clinton.
Grinder, John Big Bar.
Hall, C. E.J. Bridge Lake.
Hamilton, Herbert M.Lac la Hache.
Hamilton, P .Williams Lake.
Hamilton, R. M Williams Lake.
Hamilton, Thomas Williams Lake.
Hansen, F. J Bridge Lake.
Hansen, R. Lee Bridge Lake.
Higgens, Cecil Fawn.
Higgins, Marion Bridge Lake.
Hooker, Frederick C..Horsefly.
Hunter, Archie Canim Lake.
Hutchison, D. B 70-Mile House.
Jenner, Ernest Horsefly.
Julstrud, E. J Fawn.
Kerr, A. H Clinton.
Labordie, Eddie Clinton.
Land, Robt. R._ Shalalth.
Larson, J. 0 Roe Lake.
Levick, J. S Fawn.
Lonneki, F. W Horsefly.
Mobbs, Ben 70-Mile House.
Muench, Henry Lac la Hache.
Mulvihill, M. J Clinton.
Murray, George Loon Lake, 21-Mile.
Nicol, Shelly Horsefly.
Odian, E. J Fawn.
Park, Arlie H 70-Mile House.
Park, Jack P 70-Mile House.
Peter, Benjamin Shalalth.
Peters, Michell Clinton.
Pollard, Harold Clinton.
Pollard, John Clinton.
Powell, Thomas Fawn.
Reinertson, C. W :70-Mile House.
Roper, Alfred Canim Lake.
Scheepbouwer, J 70-Mile House.
Scott, Duncan Bridge Lake.
Sears, Wilfred H Quesnel.
Sellers, Albert Soda Creek.
Sissons, Bob.— Loon Lake.
Striegler, Robert Clinton.
Tompkins, Earl 70-Mile House.
Turney, R. J Fawn.
Vaness, John J Horsefly.
Walters, Lloyd : Horsefly.
Westman, Henry Forest Grove.
Wohlleben, Werner .— 20-Mile, Ashcroft.
Woods, Wm 70-Mile House.
Young, Wm Clinton.
Peace River District.
Dhenin, Rene G Montney.
Gladu, Isadore Kelly Lake via
Lymburn, Alta.
Letendre, Roland Mount Valley P.O.
Alta.
Longhurst, Wm. J Fort St. John.
Noskey, Ernest Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Noskey, Narcisse Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Orford, Arthur C East Pine.
Wanandie, Paul Goodfare P.O., Alta. JJ 82 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1943—Continued.
Prince George District.
Carr, Stan J Tete Jaune Cache. Hooker, Jas. B Bend.
Davidson, Charlie Vanderhoof. Sande, Walter J  Sinclair Mills.
Hargreaves, Roy F Mount Robson.
Similkameen-Boundary District.
Beamish, Edward R—Beaverdell. Peterson, Morris Westbridge.
From, Guss W Westbridge. Peterson, Stanley Westbridge.
From, Oliver Westbridge. Rand, S. Percy Beaverdell.
Hall, Elmer Westbridge. Smith, Howard J Westbridge.
Lewis, James Princeton. Soderquist, A Westbridge.
Noren, C. W. Westbridge.
Non-resident Outfitters.
Brown, Frank E Hazelmere, Alberta.
Kitchen, Stan Jasper, Alberta.
Phillips, Frank A. (Jr.) 1551 St. Andrews Street, North Vancouver.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1943.
Attorney-General (Minister) R. L. Maitland, K.C Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Jas. G. Cunningham-. .Vancouver.
Frank R. Butler Vancouver.
Headquarters.
Game Warden G. E. Marshall Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T. Jones .Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss I. Pettigrew Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss H. Morris . Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss J. Smith Vancouver.
Game-fish Culture Branch.
Superintendent A. Robertson Cultus Lake.
Fishery Supervisor . C. H. Robinson Nelson.
Fishery Officer F. Pells Cultus Lake.  '
Fishery Officer J. F. Thompson Kaslo.
Fishery Officer E. Hunter Nelson.
Fishery Officer „ A. Higgs Qualicum Beach.
Fishery Officer C. 0. Mellor Vancouver.
Fishery Officer _E. M. Martin Victoria.
Fishery Officer F. H. Martin Cultus Lake.
"A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Lower Mainland).
Game Warden S. H. McCall .Victoria.
Game Warden B. Cash ' Victoria.
Game Warden J. Dewar Alberni.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Game Warden R. S. Hayes Duncan.
Game Warden _W. N. Massey Alert Bay.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Courtenay.
Game Warden J. W. Jones Royal Oak. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1943. JJ 83
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1943—Continued.
"B" Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Acting Inspector A. F. Sinclair Nelson.
Stenographer— Mrs. I. Anderson Nelson.
Game Warden N. Cameron Golden.
Game Warden W. H. Cartwright -—.Creston.
Game Warden A. F. Gill Princeton.
Game Warden G. Haskell Nelson.
Game Warden W. H. McLean Revelstoke.
Game Warden  A. Monks Penticton.
Game Warden . J. J. Osman Fernie.
Game Warden B. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game Warden H. Tyler Invermere.
Game Warden M. J. Wilson Grand Forks.
"C" Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts).
Inspector R. M. Robertson -Kamloops.
Stenographer _'. Miss H. Swadling Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Cameron.. Salmon Arm.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden C. F. Still Vernon.
Game Warden J. W. Stewart Clinton.
Game Warden ' _W. A. H. Gill Lillooet.
Game Warden 0. Mottishaw . Quesnel.
Game Warden L. Jobin   Williams Lake.
Game Warden G. Sandiford-  Kamloops.
Game Warden D. D. Ellis Kamloops.
Game Warden E. Holmes Wells.
Game Warden M. B. Ewart Merritt.
"D" Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector T. Van Dyk—  Prince George.
Clerk R. J. Guay Prince George.
Stenographer Miss E. Foster Prince Rupert.
Corporal K. 0. Alexander Fort Nelson.
Game Warden P. Brown— Vanderhoof.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
Corporal E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Smithers.
Game Warden J. W. Purdy Lower Post.
Game Warden W. 0. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
Game Warden D. Roumieu . Burns Lake.
Game Warden R. D. Symons Fort St. John.
Game Warden V. L. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson. JJ 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1943—Continued.
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Inspector W. Kier Vancouver.
Game Warden W. Clark Vancouver.
Game Warden . R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden. A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron i Ladner.
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe Mission.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
C. Shuttleworth Kamloops.
On Active Service.
Fishery Officer J. D. Inverarity Victoria.
Inspector C. F. Kearns Nelson.
Clerk F. R. Lobb Vancouver.
Fishery Officer R. A. McRae Kelowna.
Sergeant and Clerk R. P. Ponder Vancouver.
Fishery Officer (Assistant) H. L. Rose Vancouver.
Clerk J. B. Smith Vancouver.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Lillooet.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chasi.es F. Banfield, Printer to (lie King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945.
905-245-522VJ

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