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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1945

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EEPOET
OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND
INDUSTRY
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMRER 31st
1944
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OP THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945. To His Honour W. C. WOODWARD,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended December 31st, 1944.
EENEST CRAWFORD CARSON,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Department of Trade and Industry,
Office of the Minister,'
Victoria, British Columbia.
Honourable Ernest Crawford Carson,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended December 31st, 1944.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
EDWIN G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
for the Year ended December 31st, 1944.
It is very gratifying to be able to report another year of vigorous industrial
activity, with industrial pay-rolls for 1943 totalling $381,196,427 as compared with
$303,000,000 for 1942, again setting a new high in the history of the Province.
Logging was seriously impeded for a time by labour shortage, but the influx of
able-bodied workers from the Prairies has done much to relieve this condition,, and
with a greater number of experienced woodsmen available the industry's general labour
situation has been much improved. In the coastal mills, curtailment of other war
industries in the region has released a certain amount of experienced man-power, but
while common labour is fairly plentiful there is still a shortage of skilled workers.
The housing situation, too, is making itself felt acutely, and is adding seriously to
our difficulties.
In coal and base-metal mining the labour situation is fairly good, but the goldmines are still very much undermanned, with small sign of improvement.
In the secondary industries, however, the demands for labour show a decided
decrease. In aircraft plants there have been many " lay-offs," with certain plants
closed down entirely. Efforts are being made to place the workers as speedily as
possible, and with considerable success.
Constructional activity is confined chiefly to small projects, but even there the
lack of skilled tradesmen is a grave handicap.
From this it will be seen that the steady accretion to our industrial pay-rolls
cannot be expected to continue indefinitely, but at the same time there is every reason
to hope that many of the new industries brought to British Columbia by war-time
demands will become firmly established and continue to contribute to our post-war
growth and development. Unquestionably, British Columbia's industrial capabilities
and potentialities are infinitely better appreciated than was formerly the case, a consummation from which the Department of Trade and Industry feels fully justified in
claiming its share of credit.
Elsewhere in this report is a review of the statistical and advisory services performed during 1944. Studies in the field of foreign trade, interprovincial trade,
tourist trade, cost-of-living, and industrial development have been advanced; statistical
co-operative efforts between the Bureau and other Federal or Provincial agencies have
been satisfactorily fulfilled; and numerous special reports have been prepared and
consultative services rendered to other departments of the Provincial Government.
This report also contains highlights of the activities of the Bureau of Industrial
and Trade Extension and the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau. Here the
summaries reflect a year of purposeful efforts in a variety of activities covering a
widely diversified field.
TRADE REPRESENTATIVE AT OTTAWA.
Since October, 1939, the Bureau of Industrial and Trade Extension maintained its
representative at Ottawa.
During this time our representative carried on continuous contacts with the
Department of Munitions and Supply, heads of the three armed services, members of
all purchasing and technical missions, foreign legations, various departments of the
Dominion Government, together with Government operated and controlled companies,
3 II 4 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
numerous boards and controls, and war-time manufacturing firms, plus manufacturers
of commodities for civilian use. The volume of business placed in British Columbia as
a consequence of this work can be safely said to run into very substantial figures.
The Department's representative continued to direct " Invitations to Tender " to
British Columbia manufacturers, priorities have been secured through Ottawa and
Washington, D.C., which undoubtedly have been invaluable to certain industries within
the Province. Substantial assistance has been given to the securing of raw materials,
business licences, plant extensions, and additional equipment. The installation of new
and modern equipment will place many of our industries in a position to more readily
compete in Canadian and foreign trade following the war.
Early in the year now under review it became apparent that the scope of this
Ottawa work had changed, the war contacts had been made, industry had been
acquainted with the channels of approach, and productive capacity in the Province had
been surveyed to a point where the industrialists were for the most part able to maintain and extend their relations with departments concerned with war supply without
the continuous assistance and intervention of a Provincial representative at Ottawa.
The whole matter was under review in July, when the Trade Representative
announced that in any case he desired to sever his connections with the Department.
It was then decided to suspend the operations of all resident representation at Ottawa
until such time as a new directive could be issued to meet the changed conditions.
The Trade Representative's resignation was regretfully accepted and industry was
generous in expressing to the Department the appreciation of his constructive services
during his time at Ottawa.
This matter is being carefully reviewed with the full realization that representation in Eastern Canada will play an important role in the future usefulness of the
Department of Trade and Industry in industrial, settlement, and tourist development
during the transition and post-war period.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT.
Interdepartmental Industrial Advisory Committee.
Reference was made in the last report to the work of the Advisory Committee on
Industrial Development and Rehabilitation. This continued during the first months
of the year, but the status of the committee was necessarily changed by the abolition
of the Rehabilitation Council as such and with the formation of the Bureau of Rehabilitation and Reconstruction under the Cabinet committee. The interdepartmental committee has, however, continued to perform a useful function as a clearance-house for
administrative problems in which the interests of the various departments of Government are concerned. The Chairman of the Bureau of Rehabilitation and Reconstruction has repeatedly requested surveys and recommendations from this committee under
specific headings.
In addition, the committee has appointed special sub-committees to consider and
report on special phases of industrial extension, most of which are directly related to
conversion or post-war problems. One committee tabled a comprehensive report on the
apparent need of basic industry surveys with a main objective of listing industry
problems in co-operation with industry itself.
Another sub-committee under the chairmanship of the Deputy Minister of Trade
and Industry has prepared a questionnaire, and instituted a " survey of existing tourist
facilities and possible future development." This survey is being made in conjunction
with the Regional Advisory Committees of the Post-war Rehabilitation Council. The
Vancouver Tourist Association and the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau are
co-operating in this effort. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. II 5
The sub-committee on Reconversion continued its special work under direct
instructions of the Cabinet committee, extending its group and individual contacts.
At the request of this sub-committee the Rehabilitation committee of the British
Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association undertook to make a
special survey of the Metal Trades Section of the Association; a summary of this
survey appears elsewhere in this report.
Following this comprehensive survey of the Metal Trades Industry the subcommittee again met the Rehabilitation Committee of the British Columbia Division
of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association and requested similar surveys of all industrial groups within the Association. The British Columbia Division of the Canadian
Manufacturers' Association agreed to undertake surveys covering post-war problems
of reconversion, labour, markets, and transportation of the following groups:—
Interior Lumber Manufacturers.
Wooden-boat Builders.
Furniture Manufacturers.
Printing Industry.
Dairying and Ice Industry.
Coast Box Manufacturers.
Bottling Industry.
This work is now under way.
The Department of Trade and Industry is most appreciative of the assistance and
co-operation  rendered by the  British  Columbia  Division,  Canadian  Manufacturers'
Association, who have stated their desire to use the machinery of the Department of
Trade and Industry as a focal point and clearing-house in such surveys.
The following is the personnel of this Committee:—
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry (Chairman).
J. V. Fisher, Assistant Deputy Minister of Finance (Vice-Chairman).
R. S. O'Meara, Trade Commissioner, Department of Trade and Industry.
T. L. Sturgess, Administrative Assistant, Department of Trade and Industry.
A. Dixon, Deputy Minister of Public Works.
J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
J. Gawthrop, Secretary, Bureau of Post-war Rehabilitation and Reconstruction.
N. Taylor, Superintendent of Lands.
R. Bowering, Public Health Engineer, Provincial Board of Health.
A. Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour.
E. Davis, Comptroller of Water Rights, Water Rights Branch.
J. E. Lane, Deputy Comptroller of Water Rights, Water Rights Branch.
C. D. Orchard, Chief Forester, Forestry Department.
G. Melrose, Assistant Chief Forester, Forestry Department.
J. B. Munro, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
W. H. Robertson, Provincial Horticulturist, Department of Agriculture.
E. MacGinnis, Marketing Commissioner, Department of Agriculture.
W. A. Carrothers, Chairman, Public Utilities Commission.
G. N. Perry, Director, Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of
Trade and Industry.
H. Sargent, Chief Mining Engineer, Department of Mines.
G. Alexander, Assistant Commissioner of Fisheries, Fisheries Department.
A. L. Carruthers, Chief Engineer, Public Works Department. II 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDUSTRIAL AND SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
COUNCIL.
At an organization meeting held on January 26th, 1944, under the joint chairmanship of the chairman of the War Metals Research Board and the Deputy Minister
of Trade and Industry, the Hon. E. C. Carson, Minister of Mines and Minister of Trade
and Industry, outlined the purpose of the meeting, stressed the necessity of a well-
organized Scientific Research Council in British Columbia, and expressed the opinion
that same would be a most effective step in making greater use of the natural resources
of the Province.
The chairman of the War Metals Research Board (Dean J. N. Finlayson), the
Deputy Minister of Mines (Dr. J. F. Walker), the Department of Trade and Industry's
Trade Commissioner (Mr. R. S. O'Meara), the British Columbia representative of the
National Research Council (Colonel G. M. Shrum), and selected industry contacts were
among those actively concerned with this and other organization meetings which followed a series of intimate contacts with Federal and Provincial Government Departments concerned and special committee of the University of British Columbia.
The Interdepartmental Industrial Advisory Committee was effectively used in the
organization of the Council which was actually established and incorporated under the
" Societies Act " in April, 1944.
The initial Provincial grant of $50,000 was channeled through the Department of
Trade and Industry's appropriation.
The Council acts as a clearance-house which will:—
(1.)   Co-ordinate the work of existing and prospective Research Units and
avoid danger of duplication.
(2.)   Initiate and channel new research work in ail fields of particular interest
to British Columbia.
(3.)  Relate this problem to other problems of industrial rehabilitation in the
post-war period.
(4.) Apply results of research to the creation of new industries, actual trade
extension programmes, and relate the work of laboratories and field
units to industrial and market extension of the Province.
The present Board of Management consists of the following personnel :-
Chairman—Hon. E. C. Carson, Minister of Mines and Minister of Trade and
Industry of the Province of British Columbia.
Provincial Government—
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
C. D. Orchard, Chief Forester.
Dominion Government—
Dr. W. E. Cockfield, Bureau of Geology and Topography.
Dr. Neal Carter, Fisheries Experimental Station, Vancouver.
National Research Council—Col. G. M. Shrum, University of British Columbia.
University of British Columbia—
Dr. R. H. Clark, Professor and Head, Department of Chemistry.
Dr. B. Eagles, Head of Department of Dairying.
Professor F. A. Forward, Department of Metallurgy. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY. II 7
Industry—
A. G. DesBrisay, British Columbia Fruit-growers' Association.
S.  J.  Hammitt,  Vice-President,  British  Columbia  Division,  Canadian
Manufacturers' Association.
John A. Humbird, President, Seaboard Lumber Sales Company, Limited,
Vancouver.
Labour—Birt Showier, President, Vancouver, New Westminster, and District
Trades and Labour Council.
Monthly meetings of the Board of Management have been held and considerable
progress has been made.    Industries' interests in the work of the Technical Advisory
Committees is referred to elsewhere in this report.
SUMMARY OF THE METAL TRADES SURVEY.
This work was undertaken by Mr. W. H. Harvey, of the British Columbia Division
of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, who reported jointly to his own Association and the sub-committee of the Interdepartmental Industrial Advisory Committee
on Reconversion.
The survey covered forty-six firms in Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, and
Nanaimo, whose war-time activities represented a fair cross-section of the Metal
Trades Industry in the Province in so far as group and individual problems are
concerned.
All firms stated that the main problem was presented in reconversion of plant by
worn-out equipment which in itself is linked to the taxation problem.
Regarding post-war competition, twenty-one firms stated that they were fairly
certain they would be able to lower costs of production due to better equipment and
better methods learned during the war. Twenty-one firms were doubtful of meeting
competition because of high wage costs and their inability to replace inefficient
equipment.
The survey showed several firms actively engaged in exploring hew products, and
the follow-up machinery of the Department of Trade and Industry is being used by
many as a result of interest revealed in the survey.
Regarding ship-building, many firms expressed a feeling that this industry should
be carried on in British Columbia after the war and furthermore that ship-building is
economically possible.
The survey disclosed varied and constructive opinions on such variety of topics as
taxation, excess profits tax, renegotiation of contracts, steel smelter, steel rolling-mill,
copper smelter, tariffs, Government subsidies, scientific research, disposal of war assets,
domestic and foreign trade, post-war trade, rail and shipping costs, natural resources,
housing, slum clearance, public works, land settlement, rural electrification, immigration, and technical training.
The report was referred back to the Bureau of Post-war Rehabilitation and Reconstruction for information and action.
PLANT VISITS BY DEPARTMENT OFFICIALS AND
PURCHASING AGENTS.
In an effort to assist manufacturers who are engaged in war production to maintain as far as possible their present volume in the post-war period, the Department
requested and received the co-operation of the Purchasing Agents' Association of
British Columbia in the institution of plant visits.
These plant visits are primarily for the purpose of encouraging, by a mutual
exchange of information between buyer and manufacturer, the production of articles
previously imported into British Columbia from outside sources. II 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The manufacturers visited to date have expressed the opinion that contacts of
this nature are a practical means of furthering the interests of industry in the
Province.
TIMBER TRADE EXTENSION WORK.
Due to market and other disruptions imposed by war conditions, the British Columbia Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association suggested that the Department
suspend the special grant to the Timber Trade Extension Bureau during the year 1943.
The Timber Trade Extension Bureau, however, is determined to maintain their
overseas services upon cessation of hostilities, and the Department is co-operating with
them in the maintenance of skeleton machinery, in preliminary surveys of post-war
possibilities, and analyses of pre-war movements and war-time trade disruption.
The industry is of opinion that the efficacy of trade extension work is indisputable, and that results in British Empire Markets for 1932 onwards are ample justification for its continuance on an extended scale. It is agreed that active trade extension
work must be continued if the Province is to meet the inevitable competition of the
post-war period.
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
Statement of Loans and Guarantees outstanding, December 31st, 1944.
Loans.
Loans. Interest.
Charles Cormack (Acme Cabinet Works)     $903.47 $3.39
B.C. Livestock Producers Co-operative Association   20,000.00 1,161.42
Canadian Western Woodworkers      9,000.04 101.25
Gordon Campbell, Ltd.   16,873.57 33.75
T. H. Waters & Co.   15,407.16 1,908.63
Guarantees.
Big Bend Cedar Pole Co., Ltd.  (White Pine
Lumber Co., Ltd.)      2,481.38 	
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF INDUSTRIAL AND
TRADE EXTENSION.
In the year under review (as in 1943) the Trade Commissioner devoted a great
deal of his time to special activities under industrial rehabilitation (contacts and
surveys), research programme, and other headings which are covered elsewhere in
this report. In addition, he has continued to act in special representative capacity for
Ottawa boards and controls, as noted elsewhere in the report.
In addition, the Bureau, through the Trade Commissioner, has continued the close
co-operative contacts already established with Federal and Provincial Departments for
ordinary trade extension programmes. Contacts with commercial and other organizations in the Province have been consolidated and extended.
CO-OPERATIVE CONTACTS.
The restricted sphere of activities due to war conditions has, of course, been again
reflected in Provincial Department policy, but there has been close collaboration with
Ottawa offices and with the Trade Commissioners on special duties there. Progress
can be reported on co-ordinated plans being worked out with Federal Departments
under a number of headings. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY. II 9
Department of Trade and Commerce.
The concept here is that the Department of Trade and Industry of British Columbia, through the Trade Commissioner's office, should be used as a clearing-house by
Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, in matters affecting the mutual interests of the two
Departments, with a main objective on our part of placing emphasis on the British
Columbia position:—
(1.)   In regional breakdown of industrial or production surveys.
(2.)   In surveys for potential or actual export capacity.
(3.)  For surveys of selected overseas markets.
(4.)   In placement of official trade personnel in markets of special interest to
the Province.
(5.)   In surveys of export markets by representatives from industry.
(6.)   In directives to the Commodity Divisions at Ottawa, under industry
headings, to ensure a reference to sources of supply in British Columbia,
to enable the Commodity Divisions to build up their information files,
and to direct current inquiries through the most effective channels.
(7.)   In directives to the Export Planning Division at Ottawa.
(8.)   In  directives  to  the   reorganized   Commercial  Relations   and   Foreign
Tariffs Division of the Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa.
(9.)   In plans for the establishment of an Import Division at Ottawa.
Other Contacts.
Producers and exporters in the Province have again maintained close co-operation
with the Bureau. The Federal Trade Commissioners' offices overseas (in their limited
war-time sphere) have again used the Bureau as a clearing-house for many problems
affecting producers in British Columbia. All interchange of information with Trade
Commissioners in the field is co-ordinated to their own central direction through the
Director, Commercial Intelligence Service, Ottawa.
The Department has continued its constructive contact with the Agent-General for
British Columbia in London, England, and correspondence and follow-up in relation to
his-industry surveys, or trade inquiries, have been handled in the Trade Commissioner's
office. Special attention is being paid to the position of the United Kingdom manufacturer for branch plant establishment, or for manufacture in the Province under
royalty or licence arrangements.
The Bureau has again been associated with market problems of interest to other
Provincial Departments at Victoria, has co-ordinated its activities with them, and has
been associated with distribution of products of interest to them. Examples of this
are contacts established for volume movement of seed potatoes to the United States,
and survey for roundwood export to the United Kingdom.
Other Federal Departments—Reconstruction Contacts.
In addition to the Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, the Departments
of Munitions and Supply, Fisheries, and Agriculture have again used the facilities of
the Bureau in special endeavours involving market problems affected by emergency
conditions.
Contacts were extended with other organizations at Ottawa.    Special reference
should be made to prospective and continuing arrangements:—
(a.)  With the Industrial Development Bank.
(&.)  With the War Assets Corporation.
(c.)  With the National Research Council and departments affected by research
developments. II 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(d.)  With the newly developed Export Credit Insurance Corporation, to which
a British Columbia man has been appointed as Chief Executive Officer.
(e.)  With the National Housing Administration, with special reference to
co-ordination of research interests.
(/.)  With the newly created  Department  of  Reconstruction, with  special
reference to industrial rehabilitation and regional breakdown of administrative plans.
The Trade Commissioner has organized and maintained this liaison by personal
contacts on his visits to Ottawa, Toronto, and Montreal.
NEW INDUSTRIES.
With additional staff,* and increased attention to the importance of contacts with
industry, the Bureau machinery has been effectively used for survey of new industries,
and in plant extensions required for emergency production. Preliminary surveys have
been made in co-operation with leading industrialists and data collected for them.
The Bureau has maintained its key contacts for branch factory establishment, with
particular reference to possibilities in the post-war period.
Through the efforts of the Department it was possible to announce the completion
of negotiations to establish a match-factory in the Province—the only one of its kind
in the West. This factory will bring substantial business to other industries, including manufacturers of pulp-board, lumber, paper, and other allied trades.
The textile industry is receiving the attention of the Department and contacts
have been made with Eastern Canadian industrialists in an effort to create further
interest in this industry in British Columbia.
After review of the war-time productive capacity of the Province, the Bureau is
prepared to assist in a practical way for the possibilities presented in selected cases
for continued enterprise:—
(1.)  Where the production can find markets on a competitive basis under
post-war economic and other factors.
(2.)   Where the cost structure can be defined for competitive production.
(3.)  Where proven labour policy, proven adaptability, proven personal initiative,  and  proven  quality  can  be  retained  in  a  continuing production
picture for:—
(a.)   Basic industry requirements.
(b.)   Immediate local consumption,
(c.)  Export markets.
Federal Construction Control authorities (through their Provincial advisory committee)  have again used the Bureau during the year in surveys for plant extension.
Contacts established with the building and construction industry have been of very
great value in special surveys referred to elsewhere in this report.
WAR METALS RESEARCH BOARD.
By Order in Council, June 8th, 1943, the Department of Trade and Industry made
a grant of $2,500 to the work of this Board, and the grant was renewed for the second
year.
The original intention was that the facilities of the Board might be extended, not
only in war-time application of current investigations, but also in a broader approach
to industrial research in the Province, including wood products, fisheries, and agriculture. That the conception was practical is evidenced by the active part that the
War Metals Research Board has taken in the organization of the Industrial and Scientific Research Council of British Columbia.
*An Administrative Assistant, Industries, was appointed to the Department on June 1st, 1944. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. II 11
Definite results were again obtained under war-time metal and mineral research,
and in the application of these results to war industry. In particular the liaison facilities of the Trade Commissioner's office were used in approaches to Mines and Resources,
Munitions and Supply, and related departments or branches in Ottawa for financial or
other assistance to extend the work of the Board under physical metallurgy, in its
application to war-time industry and possibilities in the conversion period. One gratifying result of this has been the ability of the Board itself to strengthen contacts under
this heading and to broaden its field of activities.
The Trade Commissioner was named a Director of the War Metals Research Board
in June, 1943, has continued in that capacity in the year under review, and has been
closely associated with the programme devised by the War Metals Board in relation to
the larger sphere of industrial research in the Province.
INDUSTRIAL AND SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH COUNCIL.
Reference is made elsewhere in this report to the developments of the Council,
following organization meetings early in the year. The Trade Commissioner was
general convener of all Technical Advisory Committees, and organized this structure
for the Council in co-operation with conveners under industry headings. Most of
these conveners were subsequently appointed chairmen of Technical Advisory Committees, as follows:—
Technical Advisory Committee on Agriculture—Chairman, Dr. G. H. Harris,
Department of Horticulture, University of British Columbia.
Technical Advisory Committee on  Forestry—Chairman, Mr. R.  M. Brown,
Superintendent,   Forest   Products   Laboratory,   University   of   British
Columbia.
Technical Advisory Committee on Power and Irrigation—Chairman, Mr. T.
Ingledow, Chief Engineer, B.C. Electric Railway Co., Ltd.
Technical Advisory  Committee on  Mining and  Metallurgy—Chairman,  Dr.
H. T. James, Managing Director, Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Limited.
Technical Advisory Committee on Fisheries—Chairman, Mr. G. J. Alexander,
Assistant Commissioner of Fisheries.
Technical Advisory Committee on Secondary Industries—Chairman, Mr. R. S.
O'Meara, Trade Commissioner.
At a later stage of organization, the Trade Commissioner was appointed chairman
of what is now known as the Industries Advisory Committee of the Council, and this
Committee membership includes:—
The five chairmen of the Primary Industry Committees. .
Three representatives from the Canadian Manufacturers' Association.
Two representatives from the Vancouver Board of Trade.
One representative from the Victoria Chamber of Commerce.
One representative from the New Westminster Board of Trade.
One representative (at large) from the Regional Committee, Canadian Chamber of Commerce.
The Industries Advisory Committee co-ordinates the work of the five Primary
Industry Committees for industrial application of projects undertaken by them.    It
maintains contact with existing primary and secondary industries of the Province for
assistance by the Council in current research problems.    It assists in surveys for new
production and encourages further processing of raw materials, where research has
indicated possibilities.    It seeks to apply research results to new establishments under
secondary industry headings.    It helps to co-ordinate the machinery of all Government
Departments (including the Trade Commissioners overseas) with the Research Council
in market surveys and Trade Extension programmes. 11 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Director of the Council is ex officio a member of the Industries Advisory
Committee. The Administrative Assistant (Industries), Department of Trade and
Industry, is secretary of the Committee. A first meeting was held on August 25th,
1944.
In the broader field of the Research Council, the Trade Commissioner has undertaken contact work with Ottawa departments during the year in organization and later
stages. He attends all meetings of the Board of Management ex officio, welding the
work of his Industries Committee to the Technical Advisory Committee structure of
the Council, with centralized administration from the Director's office of the Council.
SUMMARY REVIEW OF TRADE EXTENSION EFFORTS.
As in previous years, even under restricted war conditions, the main types of trade
extension efforts have fallen under definite headings:—
(1.)  Contact with foreign markets through co-operation with the Federal
Trade Commissioners overseas.
(2.) Special export surveys in co-operation with Ottawa or other Government
departments.
(3.)  Independent export surveys arising from war conditions:—■
(a.)  Loss of existing markets.
(&.)   Opportunities to replace exports from enemy countries.
(c.)  Survey of new markets opened by disruption of Scandinavian or
other sources of supply.
(4.) Increased war-time co-operation with agricultural interests on special
marketing problems.
(5.)  Assistance in extension of war industries of the Province.
(6.)  Co-operation on market problems with the committee for general industrial survey of the Province.
(7.) Assistance in timber trade extension.
(8.)  Specialized assistance to unorganized producing and exporting groups.
(9.)   Special assistance to the metal fabrication industry in organization, production, and export problems—referred to elsewhere in this report.
SPECIAL EXPORT ENDEAVOUR.
Control of the Peat-moss Industry.
The arrangements made for 1942 were consolidated and extended during 1943.
They were renewed for the year under review, and the established machinery was used
successfully to meet a new series of difficulties which faced the industry.
From July 15th, 1942, peat-moss had been declared a vital war metal; all trading
in it was placed directly under the Metals Controller, and administrative authority for
the control was passed to the Department of Trade and Industry, through the Trade
Commissioner, as authorized representative of the Metals Controller.
Using field warehousing and centralized shipping machinery, the Department has
acted as a control centre for all market outlets:—
(1.) Movement to Defence Plants Corporation in the United States for metallurgical requirements.
(2.)  Commercial movement under export permit to the usual distributer channels in the United States.
(3.) Allotments by special arrangement with the Feeds Administrator, for
local poultry and horticultural requirements.
The independent production of twelve companies has been covered by the control.
In addition, the Industrial Peat Company, a United States Government development, DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. II 13
became responsible from September, 1943, for a large volume output for war purposes,
and operations there have been included in the scheme of centralized direction, through
the Trade Commissioner's office.
By balanced movement from all sources of supply, the control continued to maintain uninterrupted volume flow to the United States for magnesium requirements until
April, 1944. During the first three months of 1944, it was necessary not only to accelerate production at Industrial Peat, but to supplement this by increased shipments
from the independent plants, in spite of the fact that developments in 1943 had allowed
the independents to resume a portion of their ordinary commercial commitments.
The accelerated emergency movement for war purposes ceased abruptly at the
end of April, on declaration of United States authorities that peat-moss was no longer
required for metallurgical purposes. Production could once more be channeled to meet
commercial demand, but the established industry was also faced with a serious problem
of stock piles accumulated at the Industrial Peat Company, a Government-owned
operation.
A main objective for control was an orderly flow of vital material for war purposes,
and it can now be revealed that over a million bales were channeled from the Province
for magnesium requirements. A secondary objective, however, was now presented by
the need of orderly liquidation of war stocks accumulated, and the need of some
co-ordinated and co-operative arrangement to protect an industry which had been
placed in a peculiar position as a result of emergency demand made upon it in 1941.
Accordingly, the Metals Control at Ottawa co-operated with the industry, with
Industrial Peat operators, and with the United States authorities by continuing the
control during 1944 with a main objective of centralized contact for residual, administrative, and liquidation problems involved. At the close of the year the results of the
plan have been eminently successful. The independent companies themselves have
co-operated in an allotment scheme under which plans were completed (before the end
of the year) for liquidation of 164,000 bales of moss which were ready for processing
at Industrial as at April 30th, and for a considerable portion of the dug peat on the
Industrial bog, all to flow to commercial export channels and/or domestic allotments
(indicated by the Feeds Administrator).
The independent producers have cut back on their own shed stocks, and in most
cases have centralized their domestic allotments for baling at Industrial, ensuring an
orderly and continuous operation at that plant.
From the centralized arrangements for output from Industrial, and from allotments made through the independent companies, Feed Administrator's local requirements for poultry and horticultural purposes have been filled to a total of 80,000 bales
during the year under review, as compared with 50,000 bales the previous year, under
a renewed scheme of reallotment to feed and other distributers.
Organization and administrative arrangements on all disposals have centred in
the Trade Commissioner's office. Many related problems of the industry, including
material and other priorities, have been directed to him.
Special Products Board.
The Trade Commissioner has again acted as agent for the Special Products Board,
Ottawa, with special reference to the shipments of fruits in S02 to the United Kingdom
Ministry of Food.
Resumption of volume movement in 1944 was made possible by series of negotiations between the Departments concerned, including the British Food Mission, the Food
Requirements Committee at Ottawa, the Wartime Prices and Trade Board, and the
Special Products Board. The Trade Commissioner handled all the arrangements in a
consolidated plan to cover collection, ocean space allotment, shipment, and financing, II 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
from the time that export allocations were made by the Wartime Prices and Trade
Board at the end of July.
During the weeks that followed before overseas shipment, the processors were
provided with a service of field warehousing to prove the existence of collateral at the
points of storage, were able to arrange interim financing with their banks, and were
provided with one central point of contact for the furtherance of the contracts. A total
of 4,050 barrels was included in the movement and supplies were secured from scattered
areas in the Fraser Valley and the Okanagan, all drawn to one terminal point for shipment by the Special Products Board in co-operation with the British Food Mission.
Delivery was on basis of f.o.b. inland point, and 700 tons net fruit, raspberries in
S02 solution, and 100 tons net fruit, strawberries in S02 solution, moved to the United
Kingdom on this plan in the year under review.
The Department of Trade and Industry appeared as shippers. The Provincial
Department of Finance again extended their practical co-operation, and prompt payment was effected from the Dominion Treasury on presentation of Department of Trade
and Industry shipping documents. The innovation of field warehousing was very well
received by the processors and by the banks.
United Kingdom Housing Survey.
The Trade Commissioner's office was used during the year as a clearing-house, in
co-operation with the Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, for a special and
confidential survey in connection with housing requirements for the United Kingdom.
The regional breakdown of the Ottawa survey entailed central contact with the Trade
Commissioner's office by technical representatives from Ottawa, and a series of meetings with lumber, ply-wood construction, and engineering industries.
As a result of this organization, a special representative follow-up committee was
named in Vancouver, and continues to co-operate closely with the Department of Trade
and Industry in the furtherance of the whole programme.
The survey centres around possibilities of shipping prefabricated emergency dwellings from this Province, and the ultimate programme might have a very important
effect on the whole industrial and employment picture in this Province. The special
reconstruction committee of the Construction Industry has co-operated fully, and
a sample house designed and built for the committee by the Dominion Construction
Company in Vancouver was sent to the United Kingdom in October.
Publicity has not been desired, for matters of policy are involved between the two
Governments, with special reference to material supply and financing, in event of movement from any part of Canada. The Trade Commissioner of the Province, however,
has been actively concerned, at Ottawa and locally, in a series of conferences and discussions, to centralize the approach and to maintain effective co-operative contact with
the related Departments at Ottawa, with the Canadian Trade Commissioners in the
United Kingdom, and with the Agent-General of the Province in London.
Special Surveys for the British Ministry of Supply.
Additional and for the most part confidential surveys have again been undertaken
for the British Ministry of Supply. In particular, at the request of Pitwood Export,
Limited, Moncton, and of the representative in Vancouver for the British Timber Control, the Trade Commissioner reopened a survey which was conducted in 1939 and 1940
in regard to possibilities of mine-props for the United Kingdom. Earlier indications
had shown freight and other transportation differentials against which it was unlikely
the Province could secure this business in competition with the Maritime suppliers.
A changed position, however, has resulted in a new and effective survey of the Province.
Volume contracts have been placed from selected areas. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. II 15
SPECIAL INDUSTRY ENDEAVOUR.
Field Warehousing.
The successful operation of field warehousing, with negotiable instruments issued
at the points of storage, has now been used by the Trade Commissioner's office in
several cases, notably in the peat-moss movement referred to elsewhere in this report,
and, during 1944, in the movement of S02 fruit products. The possibilities presented
by extension of this plan in the inventory problerns which will face the industries of
the Province during the conversion period has been studied by the Trade Commissioner
through the year. It has already been the subject of discussions with selected industry
itself, with the War Assets Corporation, with the Industrial Bank, Canadian Warehousemen's Association, local warehouse companies offering the service, and others
interested.
Inventory Disposal—Industry Problems.
In approach to inventory problems, and other problems of industry, the Trade
Commissioner has:—
(a.)  Attempted by a series of contacts with industry itself to find out collective and individual problems under selected headings.
(6.)  Helped to provide a factual background in pressing main contentions, for
objective furtherance of industry opinion.
(c.)  Examined local possibilities provided by overall industrial credit or other
machinery.
(d.)  Reviewed with industry the whole question of orderly inventory disposal
and interim financing during the conversion period.
Special attention has been paid to the prospective position of the small producer.
The Trade Commissioner has reviewed and pressed the need in industry for effective co-ordinated planning in its own particular problems of raw material inventories,
as well as its problems of equipment, and he has stressed the vital interest of the primary producer in this planning.    An example of this last is furnished by the successful
arrangements made for a Metals Industry Symposium in November, at the time of the
annual meeting of the Mining and Metallurgical Institute in Vancouver.
The Trade Commissioner has reviewed with industry the apparent need for orderly
arrangement in the most effective replacement of tools and equipment, surplus in one
operation but needed in another, and has offered the facilities of the Department of
Trade and Industry as a clearing-house for exchange of views in this whole connection.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PRODUCTS.
Mention should again be made of the co-operation extended to the British Columbia
Products and Industrial Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade, and to the British
Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and with other organizations concerned in the increased sale of British Columbia products. The Trade
Commissioner is an executive member of the British Columbia Products and Industrial
Bureau, and the Department has also assisted directly in advertising programmes.
ASSISTANCE IN TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS.
The Department made a grant of $3,500 to the Vancouver Board of Trade for
special services rendered by the Transportation and Customs Bureau in connection
with shipments of raw and manufactured products affected by maximum car loading
orders issued by the Transport Controller of Canada.
Throughout the year the Trade Commissioner attended meetings of the Transportation Bureau, Board of Trade, Vancouver, as member ex officio of their executive,
establishing direct liaison with their efforts. II 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND
STATISTICS.
The Bureau of Economics and Statistics is, as its name implies, a fact-finding and
advisory body. It has two primary functions: (1) To provide a statistical service;
i.e., to collect and compile economic statistics of interest to the Provincial Government;
(2) consultation and economic research; i.e., economic counsel and, when necessary, to
conduct investigations into economic questions affecting the Province. In order to
carry out these objectives the Bureau is divided into several sections dealing with
statistical service and one section dealing with economic research. Since other governmental agencies are also concerned with the collection of statistics, a series of working
agreements designed to prevent overlapping, or duplication, have been arranged in
recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, as
well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, and Provincial Secretary.
During 1944 the essential statistical services performed for other Provincial
departments, as well as for the Department of Trade and Industry, were maintained;
and all agreements relating to the collection, co-ordination, and publication of statistics
existing between this Bureau and other governmental agencies were satisfactorily
fulfilled. Reflecting the increased governmental and private interest in post-war issues,
the research activities of the Bureau were largely focused upon problems which may
become of major importance with the return of peace. A full description of the research
and statistical services performed during the year has been provided under the appropriate divisions which follow.
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Business activity in British Columbia during 1944, in so far as the limited number
of available indices can be assumed to have shown the trend, may compare favourably
with the exceptional performance of 1943. Under the stimulus of war-time demand,
business activity in 1943 attained a new war-time peak in this Province. The estimated net value of production rose from $500,027,020* in 1942 to $575,000,000+ in
1943; and incomplete returns suggest that the net value of production may have risen
to $600,000,000 in 1944. Much of the increase can be attributed to increased production, as well as prices, in the manufacturing, agricultural, and construction industries.
Agriculture was the only primary industry to show a substantial increase in 1943, with
the net value of production estimated to be $86,917,546, as compared with $73,748,235
in 1942. The fishing, mining, and forestry industries registered slight declines. The
net value of the fisheries production in 1943 was $32,477,964; of the forestry production, $118,434,000; and of the mining production, $65,892,395. The Provincial gross
pay-roll in 1943 was estimated to be $381,196,427, being approximately $78,303,000
over the estimated 1942 gross total of $302,892,946.* Both the index of wholesale and
the index of retail sales showed a slight increase in 1943 over 1942. The volume of
commercial payments, as indicated by bank debits, continued to increase and showed
an increase of 16.06 per cent, in 1943 over 1942. Employment, measured by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics' monthly employment indexes, showed an increase of
15.29 per cent, in 1943 over 1942. These, and other changes, are summarized in
Table 1.
* Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
t Preliminary estimate of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
$ Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Labour Division. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
II 17
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 19U3,
compared ivith 19^2.
Unit
1943.
1942.
Percentage
Increase (-f-) or
Decrease (—).
Mining—
$
65,892,395
239,003
3,858,496
75,551,093
477,422
4,080,775
5,052,866
15,575,104
13,536,801
— 12.78
— 49.94
Oz.
$
$
4,971,132
15,214,417
13,405,481
: —   1.62    ,
$
Zinc production!.. 	
$
A -      .97
Long ton
1,821,654
1,938,158
Forestry—
$
118,434,000
2,848,958
274,722
124,720,000
3,014,488
327,474
M.B.M.
Ton
16 If
Fisheries—
$
32,477,964
38,059,559
1,814,297
14 67
1,258,623
Agriculture-
$
86,917,546
73,748,235
+ 17.86
Apples—
3,249,473
5,094,689
— 36 22
2,835 074
4,409,603
685,086
414,399
External trade—
Export of canned salmon6   	
Cwt.
691,243
776,574
— 23.87
Export of planks and boards, Douglas fir6 ...	
M. ft.
561,141
741,303
— 24.30
1,447,990
2,636,078
45 07
Internal trade—
Index of wholesale sales6   	
1935-39 = 100
186.9
174.1
+    7.35
Index of retail sales—6
1935-39 — 100
161.7
159.5
+    1.38
+    2.10
Not available
1935 39—100
160.2
156.9
Automobile sales, new6 _ „ _	
$
Not available
Not available
86,934
73,187
+  18.78
—    2.69
9,245,155
9,500,400
2,567,830
2,565,905
+      .08
+    8.82
ooo %
44,261
40,673
Construction—
000 $
13,803
20,579
— 32.93
000 $
7,698
10,201
—  25.54
Finance—
ooo $
3,297,400
2,841,100
+  16.06
Tourist trade—
Automobile entries on 60-day permits6  	
No.
38,724
55,947
— 30.78
Estimated expenditure of United States tourists
%
10,400,000
9,430,000
+ 11.03
Employment—6
1926—100
190.0
164.8
4 15.29
1926—100
273.9
230.4
+ 18.88
1926—100
1,057.9
725.4
+ 45.84
1926 — 100
123.6
137.4
— 10.04
Pulp and paper _ _	
1926=100
155.9
157.1
-      .76
1926—100'
195.7
191.4
+    2.25
1926—100
181.7
172.0
+    5.64.
Mining __  ._  	
1926—100
99.3
104.6
—    5.07
Logging       __ __	
1926—100
133.7
114.2
+ 17.08 r :
1926=100
1926 = 100
164.7
138.7
122.6
129.1
+ .34.34: .    ■
Communication  _ _	
'+    7.44
1926—100
111.8
101.5
4-1*0.15    '
Services	
1926=100
158.3
144.6
4-    '9.47    "
Trade -   -	
1926=100
163.9
166.1
-    1.32
1 British Columbia Department of Mines.
2 British Columbia Department of Lands, Forest Branch.
8 British Columbia Department of Fisheries.
* British Columbia Department of Agriculture.
5 British Columbia Tree Fruit Board.
6 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
7 Bureau of Economic? and Statistics, preliminary estimate. II 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
THE RESEARCH DIVISION.
Occupational Survey of Public School Students, June 30th, 1943 and 1944.
In collaboration with the Department of Education and with the co-operation of
the School Boards and teachers throughout the Province, the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics has conducted an annual occupational survey of students leaving Grades VIII.
to XIII., inclusive, since 1938. This report reveals the results of the surveys conducted in June, 1943 and 1944. The objective of the survey has been to ascertain
the probable number leaving school and the nature of the occupations or special
training which the students would seek thereafter.
Final tabulation has revealed that 3,264 students were registered in the June,
1943, survey. Of this number, 1,361 students were uncertain whether they would or
would not return to the public school system in September. The remainder, 1,903
students, were definite in stating that they would not return.    The survey of June,
1944, shows that of the total 2,819 students registered 1,230 students were uncertain
whether they would or would not return to the public school system in September.
The remainder, 1,589 students, were definite in stating that they would not return.
Students who knew definitely in June that they would be returning to school in
September did not complete the questionnaire.
The principal reasons given for leaving school, as shown in the 1943 and 1944
surveys, have been compared with similar figures for 1942 in the following table:—
Table 2.
Number of Students.
Percentage.
Principal Reason.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1,634
1,012
11
294
294
17
297
33
129
89
1,347
895
8
146
230
13
472
32
11
110
994
756
14
115
182
32
467
10
43
206
42.9
26.6
0.3
7.7
7.7
0.4
7.8
0.9
3.4
2.3
41.4
27.4
0.2
4.5
7.1
0.3
14.4
1.0
0.3
3.4
35.3
26.8
0.5
Unable to continue for financial reasons	
4.1
6.5
1.1
16.3
No further schools in vicinity- 	
0.3
1.5
7.3
Totals  	
3,810
3,264
2,819
100.0
100.0
100.0
The actual number of students that subsequently entered the labour market is, of
course, not definitely known. Excluding those students intending to seek special training, those joining the armed services, those leaving the Province, the invalid, and those
required to assist at home, we might reasonably expect that approximately 2,200
students sought employment in the Provincial labour market in 1942, and approximately
1,600 in 1943, as compared with nearly 1,400 students in 1944.
In spite of the obvious difficulties confronting students asked to state the occupation they intended to seek after leaving school, 2,352 students attempted to answer this
question in the 1943 survey and 2,031 students answered in 1944. The 1943 survey
revealed that 738 boys and 757 girls had been assured an opportunity to obtain employment in their stated occupation. In 1944, the survey reveals that 265 boys and 218
girls had been assured an opportunity. The remaining number of boys and girls
reported that they had no assurance of employment in the occupations indicated.
It is probably true to say, also, that the particular occupations shown by the
students were, in many cases, merely indicative. For that reason the occupations have
been consolidated into larger industrial groups, which, it is thought, provide a general DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
II 19
picture of the actual situation.    In the following tables the occupations have been
consolidated in this way:—
Table 3.—Occupations sought by Students leaving School, June, 1943.
Boys.
Girls.
Industry.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
Agriculture -     	
118
16
30
1
177
11
53
69
4
14
536
437
41
2
37
19
383
49
6
12
1
92
8
21
35
2
6
332
289
16
2
17
8
149
69
10
18
85
3
32
34
2
8
204
148
2.5
20
11
234
250
55
50
2
118
62
24
2
131
359
789
160
38
35
1
61
49
15
1
59
281
484
90
Logging     	
Mining, quarrying, etc.-	
17
Electric light and power -	
15
57
Armed forces   	
13
9
1
Personal service 	
72
78
305
1,412
713
699
1,842
1,184
658
Table 4.—Occupations sought by Students leaving School, June, 19UU.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
Agriculture     	
247
7
26
5
118
7
29
42
2
17
470
395
30
3
22
21
302
118
4
14
5
62
2
22
27
2
8
281
238
15
1
11
16
102
129
3
12
56
5
7
15
9
189
157
16
2
11
5
200
352
42
69
1
93
388
10
27
4
72
275
599
185
28
42
1
53
282
6
23
1
47
205
349
167
Logging  - 	
14
27
40
106
4
Professional     	
4
3
26
70
250
1,273
647
626
1,544
940
604
To indicate in more precise terms the type of employment sought by these students,
we have listed the principal occupations sought in Tables 5 and 6. The occupations
have been listed in the order of magnitude as shown in the 1944 survey. In 1943, the
leading occupations, in the case of girls, included 362 students seeking office-work as
stenographers, typists, clerks, and book-keepers; 118 students seeking employment as
saleswomen in the retail trade; and another group of 46 students seeking work as
telephone operators. In 1944 the survey indicates that the leading occupations
remained the same with 435 students seeking office-work, 90 students preferring work
as saleswomen, and 65 students seeking work as telephone operators.    In the case of II 20                                                      BRITISH COLUMBIA.
boys, the 1943 survey indicates that 435 students reported their intention to join
various branches of the navy,-army, and air services;   118 students were seeking
employment as farm and garden helpers;   60 students were seeking employment as
machinists;   and 30 students were seeking work in logging and forest occupations.
In 1944 the leading occupations remained the same with 378 students seeking to join
the various branches of the armed services, 247 students seeking employment as farm
and garden helpers, 38 students seeking employment as machinists, and 26 students
seeking work in logging and forest occupations.
Table 5.—Principal Occupations sought by Girls, 1943 and 1944-
Principal Occupations.
1943.
1944.
Total.
Assured
of an
Opportunity.
Not
assured
of an
Opportunity.
Total.
Assured
of an
Opportunity.
Not
assured
of an
Opportunity.
245
117
118
46
13
10
32
24
12
5-
431
789
228
102
102
44
11
8
29
19
12
5
185
12
17
*     15
16
2
2
2
3
5
246
777
167
108
90
65
25
15
12
8
6
4
446
598
30
40
23
24
8
8
5
5
6
2
62
5
137
68
67
41
17
7
7
3
2
384
593
Dressmakers' and tailors' apprentices - —	
1,842
757
1,085
1,544
218
1,326
Table 6.—Principal Occupations sought by Boys, 1943 and 1944.
Principal Occupations.
1943.
1944.
Total.
Assured
of an
Opportunity.
Not
assured
of an
Opportunity.
Total.
Assured
of an
Opportunity.
Not
assured
of an
Opportunity.
118
245
114
76
60
30
25
22
23
19
12
22
23
18
8
9
1
9
10
9
193
366
85
116
26
59
56
25
20
21
21
16
9
21
21
14
8
9
1
8
9
8
171
14
33
129
88
17
4
5
5
1
2
.3
3
1
2
4
1
1
1
22
352
247
133
132
113
38
26
19
17
15
12
12
12
11
10
6
6
5
5
4
1
150
299
59
27
27
26
16
12
9
7
11
4
5
1
8
5
2
4
4
1
35
2
188
106
105
87
22
14
10
10
4
8
7
11
3
5
4
6
1
1
3
1
115
297
Machinists' apprentices and mechanics (N.E.S.)	
Auto mechanics' apprentices - 	
Deck-hands and stewards, merchant service -     •
Office clerks, book-keepers, accountants, etc  	
Ship-building and shipwrights' apprentices	
Carpenters' apprentices -	
Aircraft apprentices and mechanics 	
Mining occupations   .- -	
'Truck-drivers -—  	
Totals ...   	
1,412
738
674
1,273
265
1,008 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
II 21
In both years the largest number of students were shown to have emerged from
Grade XII.; while more boys than girls were expecting to leave from Grades VII.,
VIII., and IX. Slightly over 66 per cent, of the students covered by these surveys were
between the ages of 16 and 18 years. And, as might be expected from the distribution
of the population in the Province, the largest number of students were reported from
schools in the Lower Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island areas.
The External Trade of British Columbia.
Since the outbreak of war, at the request of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
the Bureau has suspended publication of the regular annual report on the trade of
British Columbia as a precautionary measure. When circumstances are again favourable publication will be resumed. In the meantime the agreement between this Bureau
and the External Trade Branch, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, consummated in the
fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under this agreement the Bureau now receives,,
monthly, a duplicate set of punch-cards (I.B.M.) showing in detail the importation;
and exportation of every commodity listed in the Federal trade reports, which has been
recorded at customs ports in British Columbia.
With most of the overseas trade routes exposed to enemy action, the foreign trade
of British Columbia has changed both in character and direction since 1939. A few of
the broad aspects of the changes between 1939 and 1942 have been set forth in the
following tables.
In Tables 7 and 8, exports and imports have been classified in large commodity
groups. A noticeable increase in the exportation of British Columbia products is
shown in Table 7; the value of British Columbia products exported rising from
$112,004,920 in 1939 to $221,645,772 in 1942. Most of this increase is reported under
the heading of miscellaneous products, which includes such exports as ships, and in
the wood product group as well as the fishery product groups. The value of imports,
roughly corrected for consumption within the Province, rose from $57,608,209 in 1939
to $86,077,853 in 1942. The principal increases were recorded in the miscellaneous
products and in the iron group.
Table 7.—Exports, by Commodity Groups, to the British Empire and Foreign Countries
of British Columbia Products for the Years 1939-42, inclusive* (excluding Gold).
Commodity Groups.
Agricultural and farm products—
Fish and fishery products —	
Fibre and textile products	
Wood, wood products, and paper-
Iron and its products— _.	
Non-ferrous metals and prodycts	
Non-metallic minerals and products-
Chemicals and allied products	
Miscellaneous products	
Totals, all products..	
721,593
345,447
69,234
924,968
391,872
618,597
499,853
075,576
357,780
$5,521,118
13,709,207
61,304
70,026,598
28,398,195
1,636,221
4,666,574
317,387
$6,295,472
19,443,919
99,396
79,970,695
258,914
25,739,720
1,668,049
4,632,100
364,417
$5,247,392
21,755,707
17,162
73,105,466
189,452
24,721,731
2,272,889
4,528,284
89,807,689
$112,004,920
$124,336,604
$138,472,672
$211,645,772
* Includes exports through all Canadian ports in the case of some products that are considered to be of British
Columbia origin. II 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 8.—Imports, by Commodity Groups, from the British Empire and Foreign
Countries consumed in British Columbia for the Years 1939-42, inclusive (excluding Gold).
Commodity groups.
1940.
1941.
1942.
Agricultural and vegetable products (for food)	
Agricultural and vegetable products (not for food).
Animals and animal products- - 	
Fibres, textiles and products _	
Wood, wood products, and paper -	
Iron and its products   	
Non-ferrous metals and products	
Non-metallic minerals and products-
Chemicals and allied products	
Miscellaneous products	
Totals, all products..
$10
2
1,
4
2
11
1
13,
2,
7,
,269,130
411,755
783,892
091,659
734,391
357,845
,559,555
379,199
680,118
340,666
$12,282,748
2,196,801
1,928,446
5,282,890
2,604,305
16,904,235
2,036,435
12,964,458
3,033.542
4,403,428
$13,790,081
2,428,120
2,022,253
7,479,958
1,896,424
21,977,217
3,364,231
11,955,293
3,673,680
7,767,781
$12,487,642
2,218,636
1,785,268
7,425,206
1,867,016
23,170,285
3,324,563
13,986,282
2,968,607
16,843,348
$57,608,209
$62,637,288
$76,345,038
$86,077,853
Changes also occurred in the direction of British Columbia's foreign trade between
1939 and 1942. Exports to the United States rose from $36,922,389 in 1939 to $165,-
299,515 in 1942; while, in the same period, imports from the United States rose from
$35,211,710 to $66,411,711. Displaced by the United States in 1942 as British Columbia's leading export market, the United Kingdom purchased British Columbia products
valued at $45,686,849 in 1942, as compared with $43,737,032 in 1939; while imports
from the United Kingdom declined from $9,748,295 to $5,452,805 between 1939 and 1942.
In 1939 the six principal markets for British Columbia exports were: United Kingdom,
$43,737,032; United States, $36,922,389; Australia, $8,573,208; Japan, $8,458,726;
British South Africa, $2,385,293; Hawaii, $1,531,809. In 1942 the order of leading
export markets had become: United States, $165,299,515; United Kingdom, $45,686,849;
Australia, $2,217,055; British South Africa, $1,418,454; New Zealand, $920,647; and
Egypt, $828,441. In 1939 the six leading sources of supply for British Columbia
importers were: United States, $35,211,710; United Kingdom, $9,748,295; Japan,
$1,283,543; Australia, $792,827; Hong Kong, $645,391; and China, $607,570. By
1942 this order had become: United States, $66,411,711; United Kingdom, $5,452,805;
New Zealand, $4,419,159; Fiji Islands, $3,077,043; Australia, $1,669,437; and British
India, $1,217,160.
The Cost of Living in British Columbia.
Since 1936 the Bureau has compiled an index of food prices in fifty-two cities,
towns, and villages for the private use of the Provincial Department of Labour. In
1939, this food index was supplemented by a new monthly full cost-of-living index,
which included clothing, rentals, fuel, and other essential household items in the four
Coast cities of Vancouver, New Westminster, Victoria, and Nanaimo. Under arrangements sponsored by the Provincial Department of Labour, this full cost-of-living index
was used as a cost-of-living barometer by a number of British Columbia Coast firms
until the Dominion War-time Wages and Cost-of-living Bonus Order made the use
of the all-Canada index, prepared by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, mandatory
throughout Canada.
The food index measures the change in prices as they occur in the case of forty-
six selected food items, forming a scientifically tested budget. At the suggestion of the
Health Department, the food budget adopted was modelled on the plan of the Subcommittee on Nutrition, British Commonwealth Scientific Conference, Ottawa, 1936;
this represented the latest information available when the food budget was created in
1936. The budget contains sufficient quantities of staple foods to maintain, in good
health for one month, a family of five;   of which two are adults, one an infant—6 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
II 23
months to 1 year old, one a child—6 years to 10 years old, and one a child—11 years
to 13 years old.
The monthly full cost-of-living index, prepared for the Coast area, covers approximately 64 per cent, of the expenditures made by an average British Columbia family in
receipt of an income between $1,200 and $1,400 a year.*    The index is made up as
follows :  Per Cent.
Food  44.05
Rent   25.25
Clothing  14.93
Fuel    5.37
Furniture  2.59
Kitchen equipment  2.39
Electricity  2.13
Textiles, household  1.99
Water   1.30
Total
100.00
* Based on a survey conducted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in Vancouver, in 1938.
Table 9.—The Cost of Living in Canada and in British Columbia.
For comparative purposes only, the Dominion and Provincial cost-of-living indexes
have been translated to the same period, 1936 = 100.*
Caution.—These indexes do not measure the difference in the actual dollar cost of
living between British Columbia and Canada as a whole. They show only the extent
to which the cost of living in British Columbia, or in Canada, has varied from the
average cost of living in that area during 1936.
Full Cost-of-
living Index.
Food Index.
Canada.*
British
Columbia
Coast Area.t
Canada.*
British
Columbia, t
1940—
September....	
1   First
of Month.
108.46
109.07
109.89
110.09
110.40
110.30
110.30
110.70
111.52
112.64
114.07
115.90
116.92
117.74
118.55
118.04
Fifteenth
of Month. §
107.02
107.84
108.58
108.79
108.66
109.33
110.21
111.38
111.57
113.79
114.08
115.83
116.89
118.11
119.74
118.52
First
of Month.
107.77
108.49
111.15
111.55
112.17
111.25
111.45
112.58
112.17
115.03
119.22
124.03
126.07
125.97
128.22
126.58
Fifteenth
of Month.§
103.33
104.92
November -	
106.30
107.39
1941—
107.03
February	
March     ...
108.93
-109.02
111.42
111.81
116.09
July     _.            _
117.07
120.55
121.10
October	
November	
December    ..   _„                           ,                         ...
121.24
123.93
121.57
* The Dominion Bureau of Statistics* index is actually compiled on the basis of 1935-39 = 100, These figures
have been translated into terms of 1936=100 for comparative purposes only. See the Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
" Prices and Price Indexes," for actual figures used.
f Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for four Coast cities of Vancouver, New "Westminster,
Nanaimo, and Victoria.
J Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for fifty-two centres in the Province.
§ Note.—Since May 15th, 1942, the cost-of-living index and the food index for British Columbia have been
compiled quarterly, giving statements in March, June, September, and December, whereas, prior to this date,
monthly figures were given. II 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 9.—The Cost of Living in Canada and in British Columbia—Continued.
Pull Cost-of-living Index.
Food Index.
Canada.*
British
Columbia
Coast Area.t
Canada.*
British
Columbia.!
1942—
First
of Month.
117.64
117.94
118.14
118.14
118.35
118.96
120.18
119.98
119.67
120.08
120.90
121.10
119.37
119.16
119.47
120.39
120.39
120.80
121.10
121.51
121.71
121.61
121.71
121.61
121.30
121.20
121.30
121.41
121.51
121.30
121.30
121.20
121.10
120.90
121.20
Fifteenth
of Month. §
118.33
119.40
120.23
First
of Month.
125.05
125.87
126.48
126.48
127.10
129.04
133.23
132.52
131.39
132.72
135.38
135.79
130.16
129.55
130.57
132.82
132.82
133.84
134.76
136.20
136.50
135.90
136.09
135.69
134.46
133.84
134.05
134.46
134.66
134.05
134.97
134.46
134.15
133.74
Fifteenth
of Month. §
120.99
122.55
123.71
May  	
120.72
125.12
July                                                                                       	
121.92
128.39
November   	
125.33
134.63
1943—
126.01
134.19
126.24
135.46
124.74
September  — -	
132.45
124.54
132.05
1944—
February	
122.89
128 28
April 	
May -
122.91
July    •  	
September  	
October .„_	
123.15
128.06
November  -	
December—	
* The Dominion Bureau of Statistics' index is actually compiled on the basis of 1935-39 = 100. These figures
have been translated into terms of 1936 = 100 for comparative purposes only. See the Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
" Prices and Price Indexes," for actual figures used.
t Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for four Coast cities of Vancouver, New Westminster,
Nanaimo, and Victoria.
t Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for fifty-two centres in the Province.
§ Note.—Since May 15th, 1942, the cost-of-living index and the food index for British Columbia have been
compiled quarterly, giving statements in March, June, September, and December, whereas, prior to this date,
monthly figures were given. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
II 25
The Tourist Trade.
No special investigations in the field of tourist expenditures were attempted
during 1944. The Dominion Bureau of Statistics, in its publication " Canada's International Tourist Trade, 1943," has presented its latest estimate of the expenditures in
Canada of travellers from the United States as: 1941, $107,000,000; 1942, $79,000,000;
and 1943, $87,000,000. In 1941, this Bureau, after a careful investigation, estimated
that United States travellers had expended $12,769,000 in British Columbia; and
assuming the all-Canada trend—as shown by the Dominion Bureau figures above—
to be also true of British Columbia, purely tentative estimates have been found for
1942 and 1943 as follows:  1942, $9,430,000;  and 1943, $10,400,000.
As Table 10 shows, a war-time decrease in automobile tourist traffic has been
compensated by an increase in the number of travellers coming by rail, steamer, and
bus. Although reduced in number, automobile tourists from every American State
visited the Province in 1943, as the accompanying Chart A reveals.
Table 10.—Entries into British Columbia of Tourists from the United States,
classified by Types of Traffic.
(Automobile traffic statistics indicate number of automobiles only;   all other types
of traffic indicate number of travellers'.)
Type of Traffic.
i
1937.    1    1938.
1
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
I. Automobile traffic   (number of automobiles
and other vehicles) —
41,917
114,481
*
42,635
117,869
*
46,701
113,862
*
36,743
147,417
*
*
43,179
92,278
*
27,275
108,293
11,728
*
58,298
92,048
5,478
27,756
128,003
16,701
6,386
36,223
55,947
5,179
36,360
76,091
18,445
4,417
27,547
(2.)   Traveller's vehicle permit ,     ■ -
38,724
4,140
II. Rail traffic (number of travellers) _________ _
39,674   |     35,520
111,029   |   102,903
* *
* *
71,523
131,082
21,202
6,309
* Not available.
f Exclusive of local bus traffic between border communities.
Source.—Canada, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, " Canada's International Tourist
Trade, 1943." II 26
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
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INDUSTRIAL SURVEY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In the fall of 1944, the Bureau, with the endorsation of the Interdepartmental
Committee on Industrial Development, reorganized its industrial survey programme in
order to prepare for anticipated post-war demands. It had been anticipated that the
end of hostilities would bring a greatly increased demand for statistical and industrial
information from both governmental and private sources. In particular, it had been
assumed that the following groups would require statistical information:—
(1.)  War industries seeking to convert their war-time plant from war to
peace-time products;
(2.) Demobilized members of the armed forces, and war-workers, seeking to
go into business on their own account;
(3.)  Established peace-time industries trying to expand their operations, or
trying to appraise the effect of increased post-war competition.
Foreign Trade Statistics.
Anticipating that market information would be particularly in demand, the Bureau
made preparations to resume the release of monthly foreign trade summaries as well
as the publication of the annual trade report. Plans have also been prepared to compile
a small number of quarterly trade reports—giving complete details of all imports and
exports passing through British Columbia ports. To keep down the expense, this
special quarterly report would be furnished to Boards of Trade and other central
agencies dealing continuously with business-men.
Interprovincial Trade Statistics.
The demand for accurate statistics of interprovincial trade has already increased
in intensity and the Bureau has devoted much time to this problem. Conferences on
this subject have been held with officials of the Alberta Department of Trade and
Industry, with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and with the Alberta-British Columbia Continuing Committee—an organization of Boards of Trade and Chambers of
Commerce. Investigations into the possible use of the bill of lading as a medium for
the collection of interprovincial trade statistics, designed to show the cost, utility, and
administrative difficulties, have been carried out. A considerable amount of careful
research work is still to be done on this project.
Manufacturers' Handbook Series.
A revised edition of the British Columbia Trade Index, first published in 1941,
has been in preparation during the last six months and it is expected that the new
edition will be published early in 1945. In addition to providing an alphabetical list
of products manufactured in the Province, the new Trade Index will contain an alphabetical list of firm names for cross-reference.
The preparation of two new handbooks, designed to supplement the Trade Index,
was commenced in November. One of these new handbooks will contain a useful
collection of the latest statistics showing the nature and volume of consumption within
the Province. Statistics covering population, salaries and wages paid, and so on, are
being brought together for the convenience of manufacturers. The main purpose is to
describe British Columbia as a market for prospective manufacturers.
The second new publication is designed to provide a handy compendium of pertinent information on such topics as taxation, labour conditions, wage rates, freight
rates, incorporation, and so on. The purpose is chiefly to describe British Columbia
as a site for manufacturing.
Late in the year the economic analysis of imports from foreign countries was
resumed.    This project, which was originally started in 1939 consists of (1) determin- II 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ing the principal use served by the imported commodity; and (2) inquiring whether
British Columbia sources of supply are competitive. This project is part of the long-
term economic research plan adopted by the Bureau in 1938—described in the 1943
Annual Report.
Advisory Services and other Reports.
In addition to the projects previously outlined, the Bureau has prepared numerous
special reports and memoranda for officials of the Provincial Government. As well as
performing the normal work of the Department of Trade and Industry, the services of
the Director—as a consultant—and members of the Research Division have been frequently extended to other departments. Important assistance has, in this way, been
rendered to members of the Executive Council, to the Bureau of Post-war Rehabilitation and Reconstruction, to the Royal Commission on Forestry, and to departmental
officials.
Services of a statistical nature have similarly been freely extended to both governmental and private agencies on a wide variety of subjects. An increased number of
special compilations for corporations and private individuals were made in response to
written inquiries. In this connection the Bureau has at all times received the fullest
co-operation from officials in other departments of the Provincial and Dominion Governments.
The Labour Statistics Division.
In accordance with an agreement concluded in 1938 between the Provincial Department of Labour and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, the Labour Statistics
Division conducted and compiled the 1943 statistical survey of wage-earners employed
in British Columbia trades and industries; a summary of which may be found in the
statistical sections of the Annual Report of the Department of Labour for 1943. In
addition to the work performed for the Department of Labour, special compilations
were prepared for Boards of Trade, other Provincial Departments, and for the National
Selective Service.
Steady progress was made in the study of labour turnover, and a new project commenced in the field of wage-rates. In conjunction with the Mechanical Tabulation
Division, a special compendium of male industrial wage-rates was commenced during
the year; a brief insight into the form of this material has been given in Table 11,
which provides a few sample wage-rates drawn from the brewery industry.
Other projects assisted by the records maintained in the Division included research
on the revised British Columbia Trade Index and material for a study of the effects of
war-time conditions on employment and pay-roll. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
II 29
Table 11.—Occupational Wage-rates in the Brewery Industry.
Number
employed.
Wage-rates.
Hourly.
Daily.
Weekly.
Biweekly.
Monthly.
Bottler                   	
1
1
3
1
4
3
13
1
1
2
64
57
1
1
8
1
1
Cents.
21%
37y2
45%
50
65%    .
70
78
41%
75
—
$4.80
6.00
S15.75
30.85
34.15
34.70
35.00
	
6.00
The Mining and Metallurgical Statistics Division.
In accordance with the agreement concluded in 1938 between the Provincial
Department of Mines, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics, all mining statistics are collected and compiled by this Division. Under
this agreement uniform statistics are compiled from the one set of returns prepared
by industry, and no overlapping or duplication of effort is involved on the part of the
above-mentioned agencies, which co-operate in the collection and use of mining statistics. The information, when collected, is made available to other than Government
departments in a form which preserves the confidential aspects of individual company
returns. Special returns covering data not readily available in other departmental
reports are often prepared at the request of banking and other institutions.
The normal work of the Division has been maintained and, in addition, several
co-operative projects were carried out in conjunction with other divisions of the
Bureau. Special statistical breakdowns for officials of the Department of Mines, who
are given priority in service, have frequently been prepared during the year.
In April, upon relinquishing his temporary appointment as Acting-Director, the
statistician in charge of this Division was given additional duties as the office manager
of the Bureau.
The Mechanical Tabulation Division.
The rapid preparation of large-scale statistical and accounting statements frequently can be accomplished only by the use of mechanical tabulation machinery. The
Mechanical Tabulation Division, equipped with punch-card machines (Hollerith system), is responsible for this type of work in the Bureau. Operated as a service
department, it has continued to accept work from other Provincial Government
departments in addition to performing the tabulating work arising within the Bureau.
The large volume of work made possible by this arrangement has permitted the
efficient use of these machines.
During the year several minor changes were effected in the equipment. A numeric
key-punch was replaced by a non-printing alphabetic key-punch and a mechanical
verifying punch was added. The line of tabulating machines now in use consists of
one full-capacity alphabetic tabulator, one numeric printing tabulator, two card-sorters,
two numeric key-punches, two alphabetic key-punches, and one mechanical verifier. II 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Three new projects were undertaken in the period under review. The punch-card
system was applied to an analysis of the expenditures of the Department of the
Provincial Secretary; voucher listings and budget control statements were prepared
monthly, and other reports were tabulated as required. The monthly pay-roll of the
Department of Printing and Stationery was adapted to the punch-card method; a
notable feature of this project being the ease with which summary statements of payroll deductions could be produced by this technique. In conjunction with the Research
Division, mechanical tabulation was employed in the preparation of the British
Columbia Trade Index, 1945 edition; the returns from over 2,300 firms were sorted
over a list of 10,000 commodity items in the process.
With the installation of their own equipment at Yarrows, Limited, the special
war-time contract between this Division and the firm was terminated early in the
year.    All other regular contracts have proceeded on a routine basis.    Some idea of
the diversity of the work handled by the Division can be gleaned from the following
list of agencies making use of the mechanical tabulation facilities in the Bureau:—
Department of Trade and Industry: Bureau of Economics and Statistics—
Research Division.
Labour Statistics Division.
Department of the Attorney-General:   Provincial Police—
Motor Records Branch.
Department of Finance:  Surveyor of Taxes—
Tax Billings.
Department of Lands:   Forest Branch—
Forest Inventory.
Department of the Provincial Secretary:
Board of Health—
Accounts.
Health Statistics.
Vital Statistics.
King's Printer.
Department of Public Works—
Census of Construction.
Equipment Inventory.
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU.
GENERAL.
The year 1944 saw little change in the travel picture as presented in the annual
report from 1943. The cities of Vancouver and Victoria, from their well-established
popularity as vacation centres, continued to benefit handsomely, but the American
family unit, with its car and its fishing-tackle, and the urge to " see British Columbia,"
was still conspicuously absent from the general picture. Again, as in 1942 and 1943,
its place was taken to an encouraging extent by visitors from other parts; on the Coast
by visitors from the Interior and in the Interior by visitors from the Coast, but
" Tourism " as it is normally understood has had a less prominent place in British
Columbia's war-time economy.
It is interesting to note in passing the extreme sensitivity of Tourism to external
conditions. In 1940, with Canada at war, the travelling public of the United States
were inclined to be apprehensive as to the conditions which they might expect to DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. II 31
encounter, and Tourism for that year showed a distinct falling-off. In 1941, thanks
largely to energetic action by the Bureau, those apprehensions were removed and
travel at once resumed its normal flow. From 1942, with the United States an actual
co-belligerent, it has shown a sharp decline, a condition which may be expected to
continue until the war situation permits of some relaxation.
That Tourism will revive, and on an altogether unprecedented scale, may be taken
for granted. No doubt need be entertained that when the war is over, and freedom of
movement is restored, Tourism will come into its own again as an economic factor, and
will occupy a place of much greater significance than before. Indeed, it may easily be
the shock-absorber to ease us over the difficult transition period from war-time to
peace-time production.
The British Columbia Government Travel Bureau is fully alive to the situation,
and is actively planning for the greatly augmented volume which is to be expected in
the immediate post-war years. With that end in view it has kept itself constantly in
touch with all kindred organizations, and has steadily cultivated what it regards as its
most profitable market—namely, the eleven Western States. At the same time, it
has created a degree of co-operation, closer than ever before, with the Resort-owners
throughout the Province and a feeling of confidence between the industry and itself
which augurs well for the future.
It would be pertinent here to comment again upon the attitude of the Resort-
owners, which the Bureau finds most heartening and encouraging. At all times they
have shown a complete readiness to assist, and have been unsparing in their efforts to
strengthen its hands. The Bureau finds this particularly gratifying, being fully cognizant of the importance of maintaining this close and friendly relationship.
Influenced largely by this feeling, and by the desire to do all in its power to foster
and cement the industry, the Bureau took, in November, 1943, what may prove to be
a most far-reaching and beneficial step. It had felt for some time that the industry
was too loosely knit really to attain its proper measure of recognition, and that it had
assumed an importance as an economic factor which made the formation of a representative body urgently necessary, especially in view of the instant and enormous
expansion which will follow the removal of war-time restrictions. Accordingly, it put
forward a suggestion for the formation of an Association to represent the Resort-
owners of British Columbia. It was careful to explain that by " Resort-owners " was
meant the proprietors of auto courts, auto camps, fishing camps, and lodges catering
primarily and mainly to recreational travel.
The plan involves the dividing of the Province into administrative districts of
convenient size, in each of which a branch of the Association would be established,
representatives of which would unite in a central administrative body.
It seemed to the Bureau that Resort-owners would have nothing to lose and much
to gain from the formation of such an Association, in that its suggestions and recommendations would carry more weight than those of an individual, since it would be
evident that the views expressed were those of the majority.
The suggestion met with a prompt and extremely gratifying response; the Resort-
owners being unanimous in their approval and in their congratulatory comments.
For its own part, the Bureau was willing to be content to inaugurate the movement and to allow the Resort-owners themselves to develop it. This in due course they
did, and the movement is now actively under way on Vancouver Island, in the Greater
Vancouver area, the Lower Fraser Valley, the Kamloops area, and the Okanagan Valley,
with every evidence of its being generally adopted and substantially on the lines
suggested by the Bureau.
With this Association actually in being, the Bureau feels confident that highly
beneficial results will accrue, not only to the Resort-owners from the unification which
it will bring about, but to the travelling public from the satisfaction of dealing with II 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
an organized and cohesive body and from the improved service which it may be
expected to provide.
The movement was foreshadowed in the annual report for 1943, where it was
mentioned that the Bureau had plans for even closer measures of co-operation, through
which it hoped, among other benefits, eventually to secure the complete statistics which
it regards as so essential for a proper appreciation of the industry.
PUBLICITY.
Nothing having transpired to affect its policy, the Bureau again conducted a
" token " campaign, employing recognized advertising agencies, the main object of
which was, as before, to maintain the pleasant relations which have already been
established and to keep the name of British Columbia constantly before the public.
The theme continued to be, " Not now, but later. Buy Bonds and Save for that
Post-war Vacation."
Field-work.
This activity was continued, and established contacts were renewed and fresh contacts made to an extent which is expected to have an appreciable effect on post-war
travel to British Columbia. It is felt that the Bureau's Field Representative is carrying out his functions in a highly satisfactory manner and one calculated fully to
maintain its prestige.
Motion Pictures.
The Bureau has continued to enlarge on this activity. Housed now in much more
suitable quarters, and with a properly equipped projection-room, dark room, studio, and
film library, the operations of the official photographer and his assistants have been
greatly facilitated. Mention was made in last year's report of the series comprising
" Vancouver Island, British Columbia's Island Playground," " Romantic Cariboo, British Columbia's Historic Highway," " The Okanagan Valley, British Columbia's Orchard
Playground," and " The Kootenays, British Columbia's Mountain Playground." Higher
priorities have interfered to some extent with the processing of these films, but " Vancouver Island " is actively in circulation in Eastern Canada, where it has delighted
many thousands of people, and work is proceeding on the others as rapidly as circumstances will permit. In the making of these films, the industrial and settlement angles
have not been overlooked, and will be featured in all future films where they can appropriately be introduced. With these angles chiefly in mind, the official photographer
was present at the Kamloops Fat Stock Show and Bull Sale, the Kamloops Feeder Stock
Sale, and the Williams Lake Annual Bull Sale. Films were also made of the stock-
farms in the Nicola Valley. Another important event to be so recorded was the opening of the new highway connection to Prince Rupert. The Motion-picture Branch of
the Bureau reports that during the calendar year 1944 our films were shown to
audiences totalling 104,138 persons.
Literature.
i
The circumstances which have dictated a modified advertising campaign have had
their bearing, naturally, on the production of literature. No new travel publications
were undertaken in 1944. The subject is touched upon again under the heading of
"Settlement." .
Co-operative Activities.
The Bureau was pleased to be able to co-operate again with the British Columbia
Products Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade, and with the National War
Finance Committee in its Sixth and Seventh Victory Loan Campaigns. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. II 33
The friendly relations existing between the Bureau and the Vancouver Tourist
Association, the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau, and the Evergreen Playground
Association continue to be of the best, and a source of very real co-operation. Mention
must be made, too, of Mr. T. J. Monty, Acting Canadian Government Trade Commissioner at Los Angeles, for his valuable assistance.
TOURIST COUNCIL.
This advisory body met on November 22nd, 1944, for a general discussion of the
current situation and of plans for the future. A comprehensive campaign was outlined,
to take effect as soon as conditions seem to indicate that the time is ripe for expansion.
The Bureau's plans for the amalgamation of the Resort-owners were fully discussed,
and plans made for a comprehensive survey of all existing auto court, auto camp,
fishing camp, and lodge facilities, and the potentialities for further developments of
that nature, so as to place the Bureau in possession of the complete picture in anticipation of the great post-war revival.
This survey is now in hand with the co-operation of the Regional Advisory Committee of the Bureau of Post-war Rehabilitation and Reconstruction, the Vancouver
Tourist Association, and the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau. The Bureau's
plans for the amalgamation of Resort-owners are also fully under way.
NATIONAL TOURIST ADVISORY COMMITTEE.
The first meeting of the National Tourist Advisory Council convened in Windsor,
Ontario, on September 25th, 1944.
The following delegates represented British Columbia: The Honourable Minister
of Trade and Industry; Chairman of the Vancouver Parks Board; President, Vancouver Tourist Association; Secretary-Manager, Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau;
and the Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
The Committee recommended that the Dominion Government grant the Canadian
Government Travel Bureau a minimum of $750,000 for tourist promotion as soon after
the war as practicable.
The successful prosecution of the war was the key-note of the meeting. The Conference passed several far-reaching resolutions designed to provide for maximum
employment in the Travel Industry of returned men and women and industrial war-
workers.
SETTLEMENT.
As pointed out in the opening paragraph of this report, since 1942 Tourism 'has
held a relatively inconspicuous place in the economic scheme; so much so, in fact, as to
bring about an almost complete reorientation of the British Columbia Government
Travel Bureau.
It has been emphasized in previous reports that the Bureau does not confine itself
to travel, but has for several years taken an active interest in settlement. It is felt
that the Bureau has been extremely fortunate in having these " two strings to its
bow," so that the shrinkage created by war-time travel restrictions found it able to
adjust itself so easily and so quickly. In the meantime, far from simply holding its
organization together and planning for the future, it has actually been busier than
ever, and through its settlement activities has so widened its field that it is to-day
better and more widely known than at any other time in its history.
There is no day which does not bring its volume of settlement inquiries from all
parts of Canada and the United States; no week which does not produce its quota
from the United Kingdom and abroad. Many of them are from people who are looking
simply for a place in which to make their homes, with no industrial interests;  but by II 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
far the greater number are from people who are interested in the agricultural and
industrial opportunities, and who have the capital and experience for their proper
establishment. A substantial number are from men in the armed forces, and even
from German and Italian prison camps.
With the co-operation of the other Departments the Bureau has made itself able
to deal with all such inquiries of whatever sort and so completely as usually to bring
them to a successful issue. In fact, it has been so very successful that it is recognized
now, not only by the other Departments, but by such organizations as the University of
British Columbia, banks, Boards of Trade, insurance and investment companies, and
Canadian Government Trade Commissioners all over the world as the channel through
which all such inquiries are handled and the source to which their clients should be
referred.
It confines itself usually to broad generalities. That is to say, it does not attempt
to tell a man how to operate his farm, but it does try to tell him where in British
Columbia he can follow his particular branch of farming to the best advantage. It does
try to read his mind and to visualize his needs, even where he himself is vague, and to
suggest locations and activities where he is most likely to succeed with his capital and
experience. It does so so completely and frankly that a remarkable degree of'Confidence has been established, to the point where it is not at all uncommon for people,
often many thousands of miles away, to dispose of their interests and take the decisive
step solely on the confidence which the Bureau has created. It never confines itself to
a bare recital of facts, but goes out of its way to advise, direct, guide, and counsel as
the best interests of the settler may seem to indicate.
It will easily be understood that the knowledge for this has been gained only from
years of patient application; but the Bureau has it now and is constantly adding to it,
as new problems arise with which it has not previously been confronted.
A great many of its inquiries come from England, and the Bureau is in close and
constant touch with Mr. McAdam, Agent-General for British Columbia in London, who
has been most helpful and co-operative, not only in putting the Bureau in touch with
the settlers but in suggesting angles and ways of approach likely to appeal to the
British people and the British farmer. Through his co-operation, the Bureau has
a complete symposium of the views of the leading authorities on agriculture in England
and Scotland, and this will form the basis for a handbook designed chiefly for circulation in those countries.
Most of the literature produced by the Bureau in the past two years has been
directed to the prospective settler, and much of that which it has in view for the immediate future will be on the same lines.
A folder on the Peace River District is now in the hands of the King's Printer,
presenting the facts from the post-war settlement standpoint, and similar folders are
planned on the Lower Fraser Valley, the Okanagan Valley, Central British Columbia,
and the Cariboo.
The Bureau's land settlement activities may be expected to grow steadily in
importance. There is no suggestion that they will continue to be the Bureau's main
preoccupation, but the Bureau is so deeply involved in settlement, has developed that
angle to such an extent, and is now so firmly established as the authority on it, that
it can never again become a secondary interest. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. II 35
BRITISH COLUMBIA OVERSEAS TOBACCO FUND.
Following representations to the Government from Mr. W. A. McAdam, Agent-
General for British Columbia in London, this Department undertook in February,
1941, the organization and operation of the British Columbia Overseas Tobacco Fund.
The work is carried on in conjunction with the office of the Agent-General in
London. The fund has been a distinct success and has proven a boon to British
Columbia men serving in Britain. Generous donations have been received from
individuals and organizations which have provided millions of cigarettes for general
distribution at the discretion of the Agent-General in London. To date 144,700,700
cigarettes and 32,332 lb. of tobacco have been shipped to British Columbia House,
London, for distribution to individual recipients and for general distribution.
In August, 1944, the fund, at the request of the Dominion authorities, curtailed
its operations to conform with a new scheme set up by the military authorities. This
scheme provides quicker delivery and also makes it possible for the armed services to
purchase cigarettes and tobacco from Canadian depots in the United Kingdom and in
other theatres of war where Canadian troops are stationed.
No orders for individual recipients have been accepted by the fund since August
17th, 1944.
In withdrawing from the one field now being taken over by the new military and
Dominion Government scheme, the British Columbia Government is in no way
relinquishing the splendid service that has been established for the benefit of British
Columbians abroad. The fund continues to accept orders for British Columbia prisoners of war and these orders are dispatched through the regular services provided
by the Red Cross organization.
The fund also accepts donations from individuals and organizations for the
express purpose of purchasing cigarettes and tobacco to be distributed by Mr. W. A.
. McAdam, Agent-General for British Columbia in London, to British Columbia prisoners of war in Europe, British Columbia personnel in British hospitals, and to British
Columbia personnel cited for distinguished service or who have received decorations
for valour.
Regular donations are being received from many organizations throughout the
Province and through same it is expected that a continuous supply of cigarettes will
be dispatched to British Columbia House in London for distribution as stated.
The fund is indebted to the Junior Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce
throughout the Province, the Vancouver Council of the United Commercial Travellers
of America, and the Princeton Lodge of the B.P. Order of Elks, who acted as our
agents.
We are also indebted to many women's patriotic organizations, various branches
of the auxiliary services of the armed forces, service clubs, private citizens, and
British Columbia industries for their generous assistance in providing an exceptionally fine service which is appreciated by British Columbia .men and women serving
overseas.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Ciiaeles P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945.
1,005-345 5453   

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