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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORTS OF THE COMMISSIONER OF PROVINCIAL… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1945

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORTS
OF the
COMMISSIONER OF PROVINCIAL POLICE
FOR THE YEAR
1943
AND
INSPECTOR OF GAOLS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED
MARCH 31st, 1944
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945.
PROVINCE    UBRARY  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the reports of the Commissioner of
Provincial Police for the year ended December 31st, 1943, and the Inspector of Gaols
for the year ended March 31st, 1944.
R. L. MAITLAND,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 19UU. Victoria, B.C., November 1st, 1944.
The Honourable the Attorney-General,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to enclose herewith for your perusal my Annual Report
for the year ended December 31st, 1943, which includes a report on the Provincial
Gaols for the year ended March 31st, 1944.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
T. W. S. PARSONS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police. Report of the Commissioner of Provincial Police, 1943.
The Honourable R. L. Maitland, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Annual Report for the year ended December
31st, 1943.
STRENGTH AND DISTRIBUTION.
At midnight of December 31st, 1943, the strength of the Force stood as follows:
Seventeen officers and 425 N.C.O.'s and men, exclusive of Special Constables, stenographers, and junior clerks. The following table shows its distribution at the end of
the year:—
Statement of Strength as at December 31st, 1943.
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Inspectors   	
Sub-Inspectors  _   	
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524 W 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MEMORIAM.
During the year the Force lost another link with the past in the passing of ex-Commissioner Lieut.-Col. J. H. McMullin. Colonel McMullin died at his home in Victoria
on May 11th.
Charged with the reorganization of the Provincial Police in 1923, his sterling
administrative qualities had much to do with the Force's present-day efficiency and his
sudden passing was a source of deep regret to all who knew him.
COMMISSIONER.
Under date of June 2nd, 1943, His Majesty the King was graciously pleased to
appoint Thomas William Stanner Parsons an Additional Officer of the Civil Division
of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire.
Under date of July 23rd, 1943, His Majesty the King was graciously pleased to
sanction the admission of Thomas William Stanner Parsons as a Serving Brother of
the Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem.
POLICING OF MUNICIPALITIES.
The Department now polices forty-two cities and municipalities and we feel the
arrangement has proved its worth. Municipal administrators are relieved of a heavy
burden and the Province derives all the advantages pertaining to a closely knit
harmonious organization.
POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL.
Sub-Inspector C. K. Mackenzie, Officer Commanding Police Training, reports as
follows:—
" During the year three instructional classes were conducted, Nos. 8, 9, and 10.
Class 8 was of six weeks' duration, but in view of the increasingly complex nature of
police work in general it was felt that the time should be increased to at least three
months for junior officers. Accordingly Class 9 was in session for that period and
Class 10, on a similar basis, was scheduled to run into 1944. Names of men attending
were:—
"Class No. 8. January 11th to March 3rd: First-class Constable N. E. Asel,
Second-class Constable C. S. Dryden, Third-class Constables G. A. Perry, R. W. Sinclair,
E. Bradley, G. D. Bell, W. L. Cowan, P. W. Howarth, N. W. Wells, D. H. Pye, J. E. D.
Cox, F. D. Patton, F. J. Clunk, R. J. Brotherstone, M. Cramond, E. J. Hooker, W. H.
Kemp, and G. Redhead.
" Class No. 9. July 12th to October 6th: Special Constables F. C. Abrahamson,
R. Biswanger, C. A. Cawdell, W. A. Demmon, H. Duddy, J. M. Ehly, R. J. Ivens, D. C.
McColl, G. W. M. Mutter, J. D. Tateson, and R. H. Turnbull.
" Class No. 10. November 1st to December 31st (continuing into 1944) : Third-
class Constables T. R. Maxwell, H. D. Johnstone, G. M. Brassard, N. D. Gibbon, R. I.
Stringer, J. L. Campbell, T. D. Douglas, and R. J. Cofield; Special Constables D. R.
Hodgins, D. A. Jobling, J. J. Ehly, and S. A. L. Hamblin.
" The course of instruction and study was much along the lines indicated in previous Annual Reports, the extension of time to three months permitting much more
thorough work than heretofore. A pleasant feature on graduation is the presentation
of certificates of competency by Attorney-General the Honourable R. L. Maitland, K.C.,
in person. These little ceremonies, appreciated by all concerned, afford the Minister
an excellent opportunity to inspect the men and then meet them individually.
" Throughout each class conduct and discipline were well maintained." POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL.
Class No. 8.
Class No. 9.
Class No. 10.  REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943. W 7
CIVILIAN PROTECTION  (A.R.P.)  BRANCH.
Inspector S. F. M. Moodie, in charge of the Police section assigned to the Provincial
Civilian Protection Committee, reports:—
" Training.
" The framework of organization having been largely completed, emphasis has been
placed upon training. Due to the very large number of volunteers involved and to the
fact that new weapons of warfare necessitate continuous changes in training technique,
it was considered advisable to hold schools for potential instructors from the various
areas and especially so since the small number of instructors available at Headquarters
would be unable to provide all the local courses required. During the year a total of
over 500 such persons were trained, bringing the cumulative total of those receiving
instructors' courses to approximately 1,000. .- .
" Organization of the anti-gas services has been completed and a Provincial Gas
Officer, Dr. C. S. Beals, appointed.
"A very great deal of assistance and co-operation was received from the Army and
Air Force in the matter of instruction during the year. Of particular interest and
value was a demonstration of bombing and high explosives arranged by Army, Air
Force, and Civil Defence jointly and attended by selected personnel from the three.
" In addition to instruction provided for Civil Defence volunteers, motion pictures
dealing with Civil Defence were displayed before many thousands of the public.
" Personnel.
"As at December 31st, the total number of volunteers enrolled in the 155 active
organizations was:   Male, 46,140;   female, 16,804;   total, 62,944.
" General.
" Colonel R. J. Manion, M.C., M.D., Federal Director, whose death occurred during
the year, was succeeded by Brigadier-General Alex. Ross, C.M.G., D.S.O. General Ross
visited the Province and made a thorough inspection of areas in the Lower Mainland
and Vancouver Island.
"A reassessment of risk caused some changes in the regions in which Civil Defence
was deemed necessary. The Civil Defence forces in the Province of Ontario were
demobilized, but on the Pacific Coast the area of second degree risk was increased.
" During the year the official designation of the Federal organization was changed
from ' Civil Air Raid Precautions ' to ' Civil Defence,' and this latter term is now in
general use throughout the areas in the Province,"
MARKSMANSHIP.
Inspector C. C. Clark, in charge of Personnel and Records Branch, reports:—
" For the first time since the outbreak of hostilities the Force as a whole was able
to participate in annual revolver practice. The course shot is the standard Camp Perry
or Police Course, thirty shots in three stages. Considering the lapse of time since the
last practice results were most encouraging and showed that the groundwork of previous training had been well laid. Highest score turned in was from Constable Walter
G. Bailey (' C ' Division), who had 296 x 300. In the subsequent open competition for
the Fraser Trophy (competed for annually to distinguish the Force's high individual
revolver shot), Sergeant J. A. Young took first place.    The Tyro prize for the man W 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
making the highest score when qualifying for the first time went to Clerk C. T. Pughe,
of the Vancouver Motor Licence Office."
PAY AND QUARTERMASTER BRANCH.
Paymaster D. D. Moses reporting on police accounts and stores states that 16,403
expense vouchers totalling $1,283,370.96 were checked and passed through the Accounts
Branch during the year, and individual records were kept for pay and allowances of
928 individuals. Collections for Police services from city and district municipalities
and other branches of the Government amounted to $265,520.67.
ENLISTMENTS, DISCHARGES, ETC.
The gross strength of the Force was increased by eleven over the previous year's
total, and in the permanent ranks the following is a tabulation of enlistments and
discharges:—
Engagements  42
Discharges—
By purchase  19
By expiration of engagement     8
By invaliding     1
By dismissal      4
To pension      4
— 36
DISTRIBUTION.
Reduction in strength included one at Headquarters, four in " B " Division, one
in " C " Division, and one in " D " Division. On the other hand the strength of " E "
Division was increased by nine, Fort George Subdivision by two, and seven in the
Peace River Subdivision. Increase in " E " Division is accounted for by assignment
of a Constable to the Game Department's launch " P.M.L. 3," patrolling the Howe Sound
area; Squamish Detachment returned to two-man status; the policing of the Municipality of Langley added another two men to the strength; Pattullo Bridge patrol was
increased by two men; and a stenographer was added to the plain clothes section in
Vancouver. In addition, a relieving Sergeant was attached to " E " Division at the
end of the year and is so shown.
Additional police responsibilities in the Fort George Subdivision called for two
men extra at Prince George and postings at Pouce Coupe, Dawson Creek, and the
opening of detachments at Liard River and Muskwa added another seven men to our
strength in the Peace River area.
CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE.
Generally, although the standard of conduct was good, disciplinary action was
necessary in a few instances. Four men were dismissed, eight reprimanded, and five
fined. On the other hand many non-commissioned officers and men distinguished themselves by devotion to duty and outstanding work. In proof of this sixty-nine were
commended in General Orders, one was awarded $25 and another received $10 from
the Reward Fund.
POLICE RADIO.
Our network of short wave radio stations continues to provide us with Province-
wide coverage and 23,278 messages were passed between police posts equipped with
this means of communication.    In 1943 these messages totalled 958,453 words. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.
W 9
During the year a new installation permitting ship-to-shore contact between the
P.M.L. 7 and its base was added to the system at Ocean Falls.
By arrangement with the Provincial Game Commission equipment was also
installed on the Game Commission's patrol launch " P.M.L. 3 " and a Police Operator-
Constable assigned to the vessel.
In passing I should like to make special reference to the very conscientious manner
in which the radio personnel have carried out their duties; in fact, over the years, our
success in this field of communication has been mainly due to the whole-hearted interest
and enthusiasm of those in the Communication Branch. The work of Chief Operator
W. F. Conlan who supervises the system is particularly worthy of mention.
POLICE TRANSPORT.
Mechanical Supervisor J. F. McNaught submits the following report on the operation and maintenance of Police Transport, including launches:—
" Mileage.
Railway.
Cars.
Launches.
Horse.
Foot.
Otherwise.
Total.
Police.
Other.
Police.
Other.
Headquarters	
24,441
3,936
75,880
68,266
34,434
5,478
54,055
15,476
60,276
349,641
378,436
315,284
68,918
44,360
62,409
661,149
29,173
3,527
618
22.387
2,033
48
15,948
1,212
3,263
108,058
53,717
66,405
34,000
6,139
15,894
86,736
12,095
40,523
7,587
11,040
45,649
3,609
5,867
98,697
129,866
2,391
483
566
2,110
339
90
871
408
40
3,869
1,769
20
108
530,871
518,176
" C " Division   	
" D " Division   	
Fort George Subdivision
38,446
8,829
3,263
6,132
622
503,924
211,657
64,420
144,555
" E " Division 	
7,920
871,471
281,966
1,940,473
89,992
50,166
6,850
6,214
374,212
225,067
2,974,940
846
52,936
--
230
2,951
56,963
282,812
1,993,409
89,992
50,166
6,850
6,214
374,442
228,0-18
3,031,903
" Every effort has been made to reduce mileage and in the year under review it
has been found possible to cut down travel by some 115,000 miles. However, although
by careful rearrangement each Division has made a notable contribution to the total
saving, increased work in the Fort George and Peace River Subdivisions and activity
on the Alaska Highway has necessitated the employment of two additional Police cars
with their concomitant overhead.
"All water-craft, and 281 Police cars and twenty-three vehicles belonging to the
Game Branch were inspected during 1943.
" Marine Section.
"Police motor launches and boats are based at the following stations: P.G.D. 2,
Powell River; P.M.L. 6, Ganges; P.M.L. 7, Ocean Falls; P.M.L. 8, Port Alberni;
P.M.L. 9, Campbell River; P.M.L. 10, Port Alice; P.M.L. 11, Kaslo; P.M.L. 15, Prince
Rupert; R-3, rowboat and outboard, Sicamous; R-4, rowboat and outboard, Prince
George; R-7, canoe, Squamish; R-10, rowboat and inboard, Ucluelet; R-12, rowboat
and outboard, Squamish; R-13, rowboat and inboard, Shawnigan Lake; R-14, river-
boat and outboards, Fort St. James. Outboard motors are on inventory at Fort St.
John, Kamloops, Stewart, and Victoria; we also maintain a rowboat and outboard at
Atlin and a river-boat at McDame Creek.
" During the year a new river-boat, R-14, was constructed by Game Warden
Roumieu to replace canoe R-9, formerly stationed at Fort St. James. River-boat R-5
on charge to Fort St. John was also condemned and struck off records as a total loss. W 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Extensive repairs were carried out on P.M.L. 8, 9, 10, and 15. In this connection
attention is again drawn to the fact that with the exception of P.M.L. 15 all vessels
operated by the Police are showing signs of age. Because of this and in order to keep
them in a seaworthy condition heavy expenditures will continue until such time as it
becomes possible to replace a major portion of the fleet."
ASSISTANCE TO FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.
As is usual, we co-operated very fully with the Departments of National Defence;
Wartime Prices and Trade Board; National War and Selective Service; Customs and
Excise; Mines and Resources; Fisheries; Indian Affairs; Immigration; Transport;
Radio Branch;   Pension;   National Health;   and Soldiers Settlement.
From time to time there has been acknowledgment of the services rendered by
Provincial Police men in aiding the search and recovery of missing aircraft. Nanaimo
Office reported three planes crashed in their area with a loss of eleven lives and that
three soldiers from the same district were killed while driving Army equipment. In
each instance the fatality was duly investigated by the Force.
Hundreds of cases were handled for the Department of Labour—National Selective
Service Mobilization and National Selective Service Civilian Regulations. In addition
we received continued requests for information from the Chairman of the Mobilization
Board.
Very considerable assistance was also afforded the Department of Mines and
Resources (Explosives Branch) which frequently enlists our facilities in the supervision of powder-magazines and the issuance of permits.
ASSISTANCE TO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.
"A" Division (Inspector R. Owens).—"Assistance was rendered throughout the
year to the following departments of the Provincial Government: B.C. Forest Service
(Camp-fire Permits and complaints), Fire Marshal's Department, Superintendent of
Child Welfare, Department of Education (prosecutions under the ' Public Schools
Act'), Game Department, the Departments of Labour, Health, Public Works, Agriculture, and Welfare."
"B" Division (Inspector John Macdonald).—"Thirty-seven reports relating to
fires affecting buildings and automobiles were prepared and forwarded to the Fire
Marshal at Vancouver.
" Camp sanitation received a good deal of attention. We also assisted the Live
Stock Commissioner in reporting upon a number of cases under the ' Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act.'
" The Inspector of Municipalities requested investigations and reports and in some
instances it was necessary for our Constables to arrange for the renting, sale, and
care of properties of which he is the official custodian."
"C" Division (Inspector G. Barber).—"Considerable assistance was rendered to
the Provincial Health Department, particularly in connection with the suppression of
venereal disease."
"D " Division (Inspector E. Gammon).—"At Prince Rupert a good deal of assistance was given to the local Health Department in connection with its efforts to suppress venereal disease and throughout the Division we have done a considerable amount
of work for the Department of Agriculture, Social Assistance Branch, and many
others."
" E " Division (Assistant Commissioner John Shirras).—" All departments of our
Provincial Government received assistance in some form, and in particular I would
mention the Provincial  Secretary's  Collection  Office,  the  Social Assistance  Branch, REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943. W 11
Child Welfare section, the Fire Marshal, Game Commission, Motor Carrier Branch,
Liquor Control Board, etc."
Peace River Subdivision (Sub-Inspector H. H. Mansell).—"We have assisted the
Game Department in many ways, also local representatives of the Health Department.
Brand Inspections have been carried out for the Department of Agriculture and some
assistance was given the Provincial Secretary's Department. Over a score of investigations were made for the Fire Marshal, one of which included the inspection of some
250 dwellings in Dawson Creek for possible chimney damage."
Fort George Subdivision (Sergeant G. K. Clark, M.C.).—"Many investigations
have been made for the Provincial Secretary's Department, the Department of Health,
Fire Marshal's Department, and the Provincial Game Department."
ASSISTANCE TO OTHER FORCES.
During the year we were able to render a great deal of assistance to other police
organizations. It is also a pleasure to report continuation of the happy relationship
existing between ourselves and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the city and
municipal forces of Greater Victoria and Greater Vancouver, the Investigation Departments of the Canadian Pacific and Canadian National Railways, the Provincial Game
Commission, and the Sheriffs and Chiefs of Police of the Puget Sound area in the
neighbouring State of Washington. Reference also should be made to our close and
extreme friendly contacts with the Navy, Army, and Air Forces of Canada and the
United States.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION BRANCH.
Inspector Roger Peachey, M.C., reports as follows:-—
" An analysis of the criminal statistics set out in Appendix I. reveals certain new
trends in crime. For instance, in 1942 some 10,151 charges resulted in 9,555 convictions whereas this year 9,256 charges resulted in 8,750. However, this decrease in
' general' crime is offset by an increase in serious offences relating to public order,
morals, and theft, and to those lesser regulations and by-laws designed in the public
interests by municipalities. To particularize, we find 570 offences against morality
in 1942 increased to 922 in the next following twelve months and 894 cases involving
property rights increased to 1,286. In crime ' reduction ' the most noteworthy appears
to have been in relation to Provincial Statutes—4,301 charges in 1942 dropped to 3,625
in 1943. Perhaps ' war conditions ' explain the situation; in any event it is interesting to note that 1,763 charges under the ' Government Liquor Act' in 1942 decreased
to 1,493—a drop of 16 per cent. Perhaps rationing may have played a part—certainly
this suggestion would seem to find some support in our statistics under the ' Indian
Act '—1,676 cases in 1942, 593 in 1943.
" Due, no doubt, to gasoline and tire rationing and general war-time restrictions,
offences relating to motor-vehicles have also shown a marked decrease. Again, under
the ' Motor Carrier Act,' there were 339 cases in 1942 and less than one-third of that
number in 1943. A similar reduction is to be observed in connection with the ' Motor-
vehicle Act'—1,441 cases, and in 1943, 1,258. In particular, charges of ' furious
driving' under the Criminal Code decreased from 425 in 1942 to 317 in 1943.
" Offences connected with delinquency and the ' Infants Act' increased by 22—
60 cases against 82.
" Under the Wartime Prices and Trade Board Regulations there has been a very
definite increase from 443 cases in 1942 to 780 in 1943. Charges of theft increased
from 373 in 1942 to 569 in 1943. Receiving stolen goods from 103 to 140. House
and shop breaking from 107 to 262. W 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" There is no question that the increase in theft and juvenile delinquency can be
attributed to a more or less transient population and unsettled conditions, and to
improper home supervision on the part of parents who either work in war industry or
reside elsewhere than in British Columbia.
"At this point I particularly wish to refer to one important phase in the moral
field of law enforcement. Compelled by urgent war-time necessity the Governments
of the United States and Canada undertook vast projects in the Northern parts of this
Province. In the nature of things their camps, denied all ordinary forms of entertainment, offered an attractive objective to the underworld and something had to be done
about it. With this in mind, the Attorney-General instructed that no effort should be
spared in conducting a vigorous campaign against the various undesirable elements
preying on construction-workers—an effort to be applied throughout the Province.
Implementing these instructions, Detective D. Shand of the Criminal Investigation
Branch was detailed to make a series of special investigations and obtain such evidence
as might be necessary to prosecute the operators. In this he proved highly successful
and a large number of convictions were secured in the Peace River, Prince George,
Prince Rupert, and other districts. At the same time a sustained ' drive ' against
prostitution was followed by the elimination of bawdy-houses and dispersal of those
frequenting them. In this connection our thanks are due to Mr. H. Alan Maclean,
departmental solicitor, who rendered extremely valuable assistance in advising our
officers on matters of evidence and in conducting the prosecutions.
" As in the past, close co-operation exists between the Criminal Investigation
Branch of this Force and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Ontario Provincial
Police, the Vancouver and Victoria City Police, the Investigation Departments of the
Canadian National and the Canadian Pacific Railways, and other law enforcement
agencies throughout the country. Attention is also drawn to the fact that on a number
of occasions the Federal Bureau of Investigation of the United States Government sent
its agents to Canada to conduct inquiries initiated in American territory. Our facilities were always at their disposal and I am glad to say that in many cases their missions
were entirely successful.
" Since the various Northern development programmes came into being, a great
many United States citizens have come to Canada and Canadians have had to go to the
United States in connection with business and technical matters. Naturally this has
given the Branch much additional work of an international nature. Missing persons,
offences against United States citizens, and offences by United States citizens have all
furnished their quota, and attention is particularly drawn to the fact that the Federal
Bureau of Investigation, the Washington State Patrol, and the Seattle Police Department have always given us prompt and unstinted co-operation whenever called upon.
Assistance was also rendered the Defence Services in security investigations, tracing
deserters, thefts of Government property, suspicious persons, and so forth.
" The Doukhobor situation during the year 1943 was not of the best. There
seemed to be a general antipathy towards the National Registration Regulations and
war-time measures and this resulted in a number of prosecutions for failing to cooperate with the authorities. We also had to deal with incendiary fires. The Crestova
School was damaged and an incendiary bomb was found at the Slocan Park School.
Another fire which broke out on December 13th, 1943, at Brilliant, destroyed a jam-
factory, a general store, a service-station and garage, and a packing-shed, the collective
property loss amounting to approximately $85,000. Finally, on December 28th a
packing-shed near Castlegar was destroyed. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943. W 13
" The Modus Operandi Section of the Branch has been very active and every section of the Force has done much towards building up the files of this Department.
Briefly, in all cases where any crime appears to conform to a definite pattern of operation the Modus Operandi Section is given a detailed statement of the special methods
employed. These, set out on a prescribed form, are classified, filed, and then indexed
and cross-indexed under some 200 different headings. Thereafter, whenever a crime
of any particular nature in reported, search is immediately made to compare its ' trademarks ' with those of a like nature already filed by the M.O. Section. Another duty
is that of photostating all bogus and forged cheques uttered in any area policed by
this Force. These cheques or other documents are then indexed and filed for ready
reference against the time when other documents of like character are received for
comparison.
" In accordance with custom two members of the Criminal Investigation Branch
were on detached duty during the year. They are Senior Finger-print Operator J. W.
Edwards, stationed at Oakalla Prison Farm, and Detective J. A. Macdonald, who is
seconded to the Officer Commanding " E " Division, Vancouver, for investigational
duties.
" I should also like to draw attention to the fact that our Criminal Investigation
Branch contributes from one-quarter to one-third of the total instructional time given
at the British Columbia Provincial Training School at Victoria. Subjects lectured upon
by members of the C.I.B. are Crime Detection, Finger-print Identification, Statements
and Confessions, Modus Operandi, Ballistics, Photography, Plan-drawing, Firearms
Registration, Report Writing, and General Police Science.
" In conclusion may I say that in spite of the present shortage of scientific apparatus the Branch was able to secure a Zeiss comparison microscope. Since coming into
our possession this piece of equipment has proved of great value in making identification in the physical field of scientific investigation. In one case of manslaughter certain
fibres were found on an automobile radiator which the Crown alleged struck the
deceased. A comparison was made between these fibres and some taken from clothing
worn by the deceased at the time he sustained his fatal injuries. Evidence was adduced
that the fibres compared favourably; however, the defence sought to introduce other
fibres which they contended could have been similar to those left in the radiator grill.
Again, with the aid of the comparison microscope, an examination definitely showed
these fibres were dissimilar as to colour, etc.
" In January, 1943, this instrument was used for the first time in firearms identification work by our ballistics expert, Detective Sergeant J. A. Young. He was successful in eliminating a 7.65 mm. Ortgies pistol from suspicion in connection with the
investigation of two murder cases then under inquiry. This saved a long, fruitless,
and expensive search for the owner of the weapon. Since then many more identifications and eliminations have been made by Detective Young. Mr. G. C. B. Cave, the
Chief Analyst and Assayer of the Department of Mines, has also found the instrument
of great use in connection with examinations made on our behalf."
From the files of the Criminal Investigation Branch Records Office the following
additional figures are quoted:—
Missing Persons.—Of 337 searches to locate missing persons 176 were successful.
Accidental Deaths.—Accidental deaths for the year 1943 totalled 381, a decrease
of fifty-five from the 1942 figure and ten less than the total for 1941. There were 110
drowning accidents, while logging accounted for fifty-two and mining twenty-four.
Automobile accidents added seventy-eight to the list. (The figures cited are for those
accidents occurring in unorganized districts and cities or municipalities policed by this
Force;   they do not include accidental deaths taking place in cities and municipalities W 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
employing their own police organizations.) Various other circumstances occasioned
117 fatal accidents. Aeroplane crashes accounted for thirteen. Nineteen persons,
including one 2-year-old child, were killed in railway accidents. Fifteen persons,
including five children or infants, died as a result of burns. Seven persons, three of
whom were babies accidentally suffocated in bed, died from suffocation. Two persons
died from carbon monoxide generated by an automobile and one from the same cause in
a boat. Another person suffocated under a collapsed building. There were four deaths
due to poisoning. In one instance a 19-month-old child swallowed strychnine and in
another death by nicotine poisoning followed from a child of six eating some cigarettes.
One adult was poisoned by taking cyanide in error for water and an infant died as a
result of eating smoked salmon. There were nine fatal shooting accidents and a soldier
was killed in battle exercises. Another military death was due to a guard at a camp
shooting in error. One 3-year-old child was scalded to death, while an adult also died
from scalds sustained when a crane overturned. " Slides " accounted for seven deaths;
of these three were caused by rock-slides, three by snowslides, and one by a gravel-slide.
Accidental deaths from other causes were as follows: A person struck by a flying buzz-
saw wheel; one shipyard-worker crushed between a truck and a wall; a shipwright
killed by a falling bulkhead. Two people died as a result of being struck by falling
trees; one by falling timber at an airport; another by a falling trestle; and two others
by falling rock. One 14-year-old girl was killed by a shock received from a high-
tension wire when her younger brother tried to make a radio receiving set. Two persons were trampled by bulls; one child died as the result of falling on a nail; two
people died when an auto was hit by a train. One person was killed when struck by
a street-car, and another died of suffocation through some foreign object lodged in
the throat.
Finger-print and Photographic Section.—Two thousand two hundred and thirty-
eight sets of finger-prints were received for classification and filing from January 1st
until December 31st, 1943. Of this total, 722 were identified as persons previously
registered at our Bureau. Seven hundred and fifty-two were arrested and fingerprinted by our own officers and 816 were finger-printed by Senior Finger-print Operator
J. W. Edwards at Oakalla Prison Farm. In most cases of identification criminal records
were mailed or transmitted by radio to the Division, District, or Detachment immediately concerned.
Two hundred and seventy-seven certified " complete " criminal records were sent
out for Court use. The Warden at Oakalla Prison Farm was supplied with sixty-six
" complete " records and a number were sent to the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation. A " complete " record is one containing the known criminal life-history of the
individual under review.
During the year 1943 a form known as the " Final Disposition Form " was adopted
by the Finger-print Section. It has been of great value to the Bureau in keeping our
records up to date and for their assistance 302 F.D.F.'s were sent to the R.C.M.P.,
Ottawa.
Non-criminal finger-prints were received, classified, and searched as follows:—
Received.       Identified.
U.S. Army Intelligence, Prince Rupert, B.C  500 36
Persons going to the United States  229 3
Applicants for the B.C.  Police  Force and  Industrial
Guards   120 4
Totals j  849 43
One hundred and forty sets of single finger-prints were forwarded to the R.C.M.P.
Finger-print Section for their files and 120 sets were added to our own single-print file. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943. W 15
At the close of the year 1943, the number of persons with criminal records registered at this Bureau totalled 28,498. We received 1,459 additional records from the
R.C.M.P., Calgary and Vancouver City Police, Oakalla Prison Farm, and the F.B.I.;
and supplied 2,877 " complete " records to the R.C.M.P., and Calgary, Vancouver, and
New Westminster City Police.
Photographs.—Ten thousand and sixty-six photographs of prisoners were processed
during the year. From this large collection we supplied photographs to those with
whom we exchange finger-prints as well as to the British Columbia Gaols; the Ticket-
of-leave Branch, Ottawa; the Immigration Department, Vancouver, B.C.; the Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.; the R.C.M.P., Vancouver; the Modus Operandi
Section and the municipalities surrounding Victoria.
Miscellaneous photographic prints supplied amounted to 597 and involved the
processing of 271 negatives. This work was done and supplied to the office of the
Attorney-General; the Commissioner; Supreme, County, and Magisterial Courts; the
Victoria City Police; the Provincial Analyst; the B.C. Police Training School; the
Department of Mines; the Provincial Museum; the Provincial Archivist; to H.
McLean, examiner of questioned documents, Vancouver, B.C.; the Saanich Police;
the Royal Canadian Air Force; the Royal Canadian Navy; the Department of National
Defence; the B.C.P. Motor Branch; the Civilian Protection Branch and our own
Criminal Investigation Branch.
Firearms Registration Section.—This section handles all registrations of firearms
within the Province of British Columbia. Its files are referred to continuously in
matters relating to the identification of revolvers, shotguns, and small arms, and in
many instances these records have played an important part in clearing up crimes of
a serious and difficult nature. The routine work, which calls for great care and accuracy upon the part of the staff, is carried out under the direction of Senior Clerk F. E.
Grimshaw, whose long experience in the Force is of great value in all matters pertaining
to his office.
During the year 1943 the section was concerned in the recommendation and issue
of 19,211 permits of all classes. This entailed an immense amount of inquiry and
frequent reference to the central bureau maintained at Ottawa by the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police.
Outstanding Cases.
Rex vs. Poole, Stephen (Murder).—On January 11th, 1943, word was received from
Fort Ware, on the Upper Finlay River, that an Indian woman had died under circumstances pointing to murder. The only way of reaching Fort Ware at that time of year
was by plane and as the weather was bad Sergeant G. H. Clark, of Prince George, was
unable to reach Fort Ware until January 30th. On arrival he found that on January
8th Margaret Poole had visited the cabin of Chas. Van Somer, a trapper, married to
an Indian woman. There was dancing and some drinking. Later in the afternoon
Stephen Poole came to get his wife and stayed to supper.
About 9 p.m. they left to return to their own cabin some distance down the river.
Tommy, a 10-year-old son of the Poole's, had followed his father and hung around outside until they came out. He followed them in the cover of the trees and saw his
father attack and beat his mother about the head with a rifle. He tried to interfere
but was also struck by his father. Poole removed most of his wife's clothing to make
it appear she had frozen to death. He later returned and carried the body to his cabin
where it was seen on Sunday, January 10th, by Del Miller, a trapper on his way to
Fort Ware. Owing to weather conditions the plane had to leave immediately on the
return trip and Special Constable Davidson was left to locate Poole who was away on
his trap-line.    However, when the plane finally landed for fuel at Finlay Forks bad W 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
weather and a cracked cylinder forced the party to remain there until February 15th,
when a new engine part was flown in from Edmonton.
On March 2nd a party consisting of Magistrate and Coroner W. Harris, Capt.
J. C. C. Dawson, R.C.A.M.C, Sergeant Clark, Constable G. P. W. Russell, and Indian
Agent R. Howe flew to Fort Ware. The body of Margaret Poole was exhumed. Captain Dawson performed an autopsy and Coroner Harris held an inquest. Subsequently
charged with murder of his wife, Poole was committed for trial.
As it was impossible to get witnesses out in time for the spring assizes in May,
the case was traversed to the fall assizes when the Hon. R. L. Maitland, K.C., Attorney-
General, conducted the prosecution. Upon a verdict of manslaughter, Stephen Poole
was sentenced to imprisonment for life by Mr. Justice Bird.
Rex vs. MacGregor, Donald John (Murder).—On Tuesday afternoon, March 30th,
1943, Donald John MacGregor, a parole patient from the Mental Hospital, then living
with his parents at Appledale, about 36 miles north of Nelson, shot and killed his;
mother, Mrs. Greta Margaret MacGregor.
Neighbours across the road from the MacGregor residence heard a shot and looking
out saw Mrs. MacGregor emerging from her gate on to the road. Another shot was
heard and Mrs. MacGregor, struck in the back and killed instantly, dropped to the
ground.
Her son then opened the screen-door of the house, came out and walked over to
her. Leaning the rifle against a post he knelt beside his mother, got up again, returned
to the house, left the rifle inside, came out and walked up the road.
Shortly afterwards Constable R. A. Huber, of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police,
and Mr. Julius Hornstra, one of the neighbours, met Donald on the road and took him
to the store at Appledale, there to await arrival of the Provincial Police. Inspector
J. Macdonald with other members of the Force presently arrived from Nelson and took
MacGregor into custody.
On April 2nd, 1943, he appeared before J. Cartmel, Stipendiary Magistrate at
Nelson, and was committed for trial on a charge of murder.
On April 19th at the Nelson spring assize, before Mr. Justice Coady and a jury,
the accused was arraigned, found mentally unfitted to stand trial, and committed to
the Mental Hospital at Essondale.
Rex vs. Sellars, Michel Maurice, and Mrs. Sellars, Evelyn Maurice (Murder).—On
April 19th, 1943, Constable J. Ritson, Wells Detachment, received a complaint that one
Joseph Michaud, an employee of the Cariboo Gold Quartz Mine at Wells had been
missing for about a week.
Constable Ritson accompanied by Game Warden E. Holmes proceeded to Michaud's
home. Doors were locked so they entered with a pass-key. The house appeared to be
in order, but upon closer examination blood was discovered on the walls and ceilings
of the kitchen and bedroom. Sergeant T. R. Baker, Williams Lake, N.C.O. in charge
of the District, and Constable D. D. Mclndoe, Quesnel, were notified and Constable
Mclndoe, from information received, inquired into the movements of an Indian named
Sellars and his wife, who had left Wells for Soda Creek on April 11th. Located at the
Sugar Cane Reserve near Williams Lake they were taken to Quesnel where Mrs. Sellars
admitted to the slaying of Michaud. She indicated that the body had been thrown into
a lake near Wells and police commenced dragging operations but ceased when Sellars
stated that the remains had been hidden in the bush near-by. Following this a search
revealed parts of the body wrapped in canvas and tied with wire. When opened these
proved to be the torso, arms and portions of legs below the knee. In another gunny-
sack police found upper legs and the right arm. Michaud's National Registration
Certificate was also recovered as were two knives thrown away by the Sellars. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943. W 17
From statements received it appears that Michaud called upon Mr. and Mrs. Sellars and invited them to his house for a drink. The three sat drinking and Michel
Sellars, served with the larger share of liquor, collapsed. Deceased then attempted to
drag the woman into the bedroom. Seizing a chair she tried to strike Michaud over
the head; however, unsuccessful in this, she finally managed to pick up a hammer and
beat him into insensibility.
That night she left the house to return next morning to find her husband still
asleep. Michaud was dead. Cleaning up the blood they waited until after dark; then,
loading the body on to a sleigh, they took it to their own house and commenced dismembering the remains with axe and knife. The head was put into the kitchen stove
and a fire lighted. Next day an arm was thrown into the stove but, as the process of
burning was slow, it was decided to dispose of the remainder in the woods. This done,
they left for Williams Lake.
Later, upon the positive identification of the remains by the widow, Mrs. Joseph
Michaud and expert opinion offered in relation to the exhibits by Dr. A. G. Naismith,
of Kamloops, both were arrested and committed for trial on October 4th, 1943, before
Mr. Justice Bird. The jury returned a verdict of " not guilty " and Sellars and his
wife were discharged.
Commenting upon the case, Mr. Justice Bird commended Constables Ritson and
E. A. Wales upon the manner in which they conducted the investigation and gave their
evidence. The efforts of Constables Mclndoe and Sharpe, Game Warden Holmes, and
Detective Sergeant Young are also deserving of mention.
Rex vs. Hughes, James Wilson (Murder).—Nanaimo. On the morning of May
1st, 1943, a car was discovered on one of Nanaimo's back streets with a fence-post and
fencing-wire attached to the rear axle. On examination, it was found to contain the
naked and blood-stained corpse of a woman. Seated beside the body in the front seat
was the accused, Hughes, who was immediately taken into custody. As the investigation proceeded it became apparent that Hughes, who had been separated from his wife
for some time, had come from Cumberland to see her with regard to a settlement over
jointly owned property. He picked her up when she left work at 5 p.m. and they
drove to a quiet playground in Nanaimo where an argument followed. After spending
some time at this point they drove to a more isolated spot in an open field near
Departure Bay north from Nanaimo. Here further argument resolved in an assault
which culminated in the woman's death. On leaving, Hughes drove his car over a
Paige wire fence that had been down for several years and in doing so the wire
became entangled with the rear axle. This resulted in several posts and much wire
being dragged along behind the car. As the car neared Nanaimo some of the posts
and wire dropped off along the highway, a fact which led the investigators to the
scene of the fatal assault where tufts of hair, false teeth, and a land title were found.
Evidently Hughes was quite unaware of what had happened for he drove to a friend's
house in the middle of the night and very incoherently kept repeating " Daisy, speak
to me." Charged with murder and tried at the Nanaimo fall assize he was found
guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to eight years' imprisonment in the B.C.
Penitentiary.
Davies, Frank (Murder of).—On the morning of July 9th, 1943, Lum, Chinese
employee of the Davies Greenhouses, Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C., arrived at work about
7.05 a.m. He looked around for his employer, Frank Davies, and went into his bedroom which was situated on the premises but was unable to find him. The greenhouses cover considerable area and Lum proceeded to the centre greenhouse searching
for his employer. There he found a pool of partly congealed blood and spatterings of
blood on fragments of glass which had been broken at one end of the greenhouse.
2 W 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Chinaman notified Thomas Davies, brother of his employer, who immediately
informed the Provincial Police. After search Davies was eventually located some 50
feet from the rear door. He was in a dazed condition, practically insensible and suffering from lacerations about the head. However, while blood on the surrounding long
grass offered a possible clue to what may have transpired, further search revealed
neither weapons nor instruments likely to support a theory of assault. Removed to
hospital, Davies recovered sufficiently to be interviewed but, despite repeated questioning by Police and friends, he steadfastly maintained his inability to explain the matter
or assist those charged with carrying out the inquiry.
All persons with whom he was known to have had business or personal contacts
were interviewed but no apparent motive for the assault could be learned and there was
no evidence of robbery. Actually, from information supplied by the victim, considerable sums of money were found in hiding-places which he himself had described.
Davies was thought to be recovering, but on July 21st he was reported to be in a
critical condition; in fact, when officers called at the hospital with a view to obtaining an ante-mortem statement he was too ill to see them.
Following the death of Davies a great number of people were interviewed and
his whole past history was traced for a possible motive, however every " lead " was
followed without success and up to this time the crime remains a mystery.
Rex vs. Lockwood, Harold William John (Arson).—In July of 1943 within a space
of two days three fires all within two blocks of each other occurred in the City of
Penticton. At the last fire, on July 18th, two distinct attempts were made to burn
the barn of E. W. Unwin, of 801 King Street, by lighting dry grass under the flooring.
On one side the fire had gone out and two burned matches were found. On the other
side, the fire had burned through the floor and into the barn before it was put out by
the Penticton Fire Department.
Constable W. F. Armson was detailed to assist Fire Chief Foreman to make a
thorough investigation and as it was thought that the fires had been set by juveniles
a map, listing all houses and the names of their occupants within a radius of six blocks
of the fires, was prepared. On its completion every one in the area was interviewed.
Work continued day after day for almost a month and some 200 juveniles as well as
adults were interviewed. It was a slow and difficult inquiry as the case would seem
to rely entirely on a confession: however, on August 11th one John Lockwood, age
19, was interviewed. His story as to his movements at the time of the fires was full
of discrepancies and he finally admitted to being at the Unwin barn on the day of the
fire. " He had been smoking and might have thrown a match in the grass." After
being warned Lockwood made a full confession to the effect that he had set fire to the
grass round the barn and the other two fires in order that he might " watch the fire
engines put them out."
On September 8th, before His Honour Judge Colquhoun, Lockwood pleaded
" guilty " to three charges of arson. Witnesses gave character evidence to the effect
that the accused was of good morals and honest but subnormal and lacking in responsibility, and an aunt living elsewhere in Canada offered to provide a home for him.
Accepting this offer, the Court agreed to a recognizance in the sum of $500 and
suspended its sentence of eighteen months' imprisonment with hard labour.
Evans, W. (Attempted Rape).—Dawson Creek, B.C. At 1 a.m., February 3rd,
1943, Constables W. W. Rands and M. L. Begallie on patrol in the town of Dawson
Creek were advised that a woman, later identified, had been violently assaulted and
in such manner as to constitute the offence of attempted rape. The man allegedly
responsible was said to be a United States coloured soldier. The matter was given
immediate attention by United States Military Police and our officers, with the result
that W. Evans, a member of the United States coloured troops in camp near Dawson REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943. W 19
Creek, was apprehended by Military Police and held by the United States Army
authorities. Identified as the culprit and following instructions from the Hon. the
Attorney-General, a charge of " attempted rape " was laid against Evans and a warrant issued for his arrest. Advised of our action the United States authorities
refused to hand the man over to us for trial. Instead, they chose to try him by
United States Military Court Martial and on March 9th, 1943, Evans was brought
before such Court for trial. United States Military Police personnel, civilians, and
Constables Rands and Begallie all gave evidence on behalf of the prosecution. Found
" guilty," the accused was sentenced to fifteen years' imprisonment at hard labour,
dishonourably discharged from the United States Army and immediately returned
to the United States to serve sentence. In the investigation of this serious matter
the closest co-operation existed between the United States authorities and ourselves.
It might also be noted that under the Canadian Criminal Code the maximum punishment for this offence is seven years' imprisonment and whipping.
Rex vs. Oneski, Fred, et al. (False Pretences).—In the latter part of 1942 the
North Vancouver ship-building industry reported a series of pay-roll frauds which
gradually increased in number during the early part of 1943. All these frauds were
similar in nature and appeared to be the work of a small group who operated both in
the North Vancouver Ship Repairs' and the Burrard Drydock Company's shipyards.
Due to the large staffs employed at both of these yards, some 14,000 men, discovery
of the culprits proved to be very difficult.
The modus operandi was quite simple. The operator would appear at a wicket on
pay-day and represent himself as being one of the staff; then, by way of identification, he would display a forged brass identification tag or badge and also produce
a forged National Registration Certificate. At the North Vancouver Ship Repairs he
received a pay-cheque which he cashed as soon as possible in a local store or at the
bank. In the case of Burrard Drydock Company the operator would receive the pay
envelope and forge the employee's signature on the receipt-card.
These operators were very clever in selecting employees who were off shift at the
time, a practice which prevented immediate discovery as the offence would not be
known until, calling for his pay, the bona-fide employee would find some one else had
collected it. Such methods indicated a close knowledge of conditions on the part of
the operator and the investigation which lasted several months ultimately centred about
shipyard-workers.
During the inquiry we discovered another type of fraud which, for want of a better
name, might be called " criminal absenteeism." It was found that a large number of
men were drawing pay without actually working at the yards. The method adopted
here was again quite simple. The culprit would enter the yard with his own shift
and punch the clock. Then, as there was a little overlapping in shift movements, he
would leave the yard with the outgoing shift but fail to punch the clock. Later in
the day, when his own shift was to go off duty, he would re-enter the yard with the
men of the next shift and a few minutes later leave with his own shift and punch the
clock. A time-slip would be placed in the yard-box claiming the number of hours
worked. Sometimes, not even bothering to go down to the yard, the culprit would
get a fellow employee to punch the clock for him. This practice was facilitated by
the large number of men employed and the fact that the guards placed at the gates
could not watch all the men, perhaps 2,000, as they punched in or out.
At first this " clock-punching " matter was considered to be a problem only to be
dealt with by plant authorities. However, upon examination of the facts by the
Police, it was decided to make a test case and charge one of the men with " attempting to obtain money by false pretences," the " false pretences " being the time-slip
inserted in a yard collecting box.    In collaboration with plant police, a number of W 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
suspects were watched and upon securing definite proof that an employee who should
have been on shift was actually out of the yard, his record-slips were examined for
that period, then if he had put in a slip for the time he was absent prosecution followed.
Within a short time, six men were prosecuted and convicted.
Later, as the investigations proceeded, it seemed that there was a connection
between some of the criminal absentees and pay-cheque thieves. A detailed explanation
of the work performed would be too lengthy for this report, but I am glad to say that
before the end of 1943 the practice of pay-roll frauds was entirely eliminated. There
were seventeen charges laid of which twelve were for obtaining or attempting to obtain'
money by false pretences; one charge of theft of pay-roll cheque; one charge of obtaining money by means of a forged document; and three charges under the National
Registration Regulations. Sentences varied, the most severe being three years' imprisonment with hard labour in the British Columbia Penitentiary. Altogether twelve
persons were involved.
During the investigations two officers, Constables J. A. Williams and D. A. McDonald, were assigned to this work and the successful suppression of these frauds was
due largely to their efforts. As forgeries were involved, Mr. Henry B. MacLean, handwriting expert, assisted in the investigation. Valuable assistance was also rendered
by C.I.B. personnel who carried out the chemical treatment of forged National Registration Certificates.
Rex vs. Bachynski, Anthony (Breaking, Entering, and Theft).—On May 10th
Alex. Zuckerberg complained to the Constable at Castlegar that a small electric motor
had been stolen from his shop within the past few days. Investigating the complaint
our officer found entry had been made by prying a padlock off the rear door.
A number of juveniles were questioned and the premises of one of them searched
without result. The investigation was continued and finally Bachynski came under
suspicion. Working with Deputy Chief W. F. Fleming of the Tadanac Police, the
residence of Bachynski at Castlegar was searched and numerous articles belonging to
the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company were discovered on the property. In
view of this it was considered expedient to immediately search the premises of his
brother Joseph at Trail. This was done and a quantity of goods belonging to the
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company, together with the motor belonging to
Zuckerberg, were found there.
Duly arrested Anthony Bachynski was found guilty of theft in the Magistrate's
Court in Trail and before the County Court Judge at Nelson. Sentenced respectively
to four and six months' imprisonment with hard labour the prisoner was then removed
to Oakalla Prison Farm.
Constable J. L. DeVoin was commended in G.O. 295 for his good work on this case
which continued over a period of four months and resulted not only in the successful
conclusion of this case but the recovery of a large amount of stolen property at Trail.
Rex vs. Gatyshun, James, and Trottier, Leopold Alexander (Possession of Narcotics).—March 22nd, 1943, Gordon Wood, proprietor of Wood's Drug Store, Prince
George, reported that the store had been broken into and his stock of narcotic drugs
and a .45 Colt automatic pistol stolen. About the same time Dr. Carl Ewert discovered
that his office had been entered and the supply of narcotics stolen.
An intensive investigation resulted in arrests under the " Government Liquor
Act " of two men employed as kitchen help by Carter, Halls, Aldinger Construction
Company, Limited, Prince George.
Released on payment of their fines these men were kept under observation until
April 1st, when a special agent reported accompanying one of them on a trip to recover
a parcel of drugs hidden beneath a sidewalk. Duly located and taken to a hotel the
packet was opened, phials were broken and the contents placed in rubber finger-stalls
which Gatyshun and Trottier concealed in each other's bodies.    Arrested forthwith
J REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943. W 21
and removed to hospital the finger-stalls were recovered. Charged with possession of
narcotic drugs, Gatyshun admitted to his part in both robberies and took police to a
latrine at the air port where the Colt pistol was found. He also showed them where
some drugs had been concealed in a hollow stump beside the highway. Subsequently
taken to Vancouver for analysis we were advised that in diluted form the drugs would
sell for $10,000 on the underworld market.
The prisoners elected for speedy trial and pleaded " guilty." Both had long previous records. Trottier was sentenced to imprisonment for four years, a fine of $500
or a further six months in default of payment. In view of Gatyshun's assistance to
the Police, His Honour Judge Woodburn was more lenient and sentenced him to three
years' imprisonment with hard labour and a fine of $300 and in default of payment
imprisonment for an additional four months.
Rex vs. Eldridge, George Alfred, and Bell, Frank (Breaking, Entering, and Theft,
Section U60 CC), and Rex vs. Bell, Frank, and Lane, Patricia (Possession of Drugs,
Section U (d), "Opium and Narcotic Drug Act").—On Monday, June 7th, 1943, a
report was received at Kamloops Police Office that the drug-room at Tranquille
Sanatorium had been entered over the week-end and a quantity of drugs stolen. On
investigation it was found that entry to this room had been made by pushing back
the Yale lock with a piece of celluloid which was found on the floor. On the day
previous, Sunday, June 6th, Constable J. Campbell while visiting at the Sanatorium
had seen two men driving a Buick sedan leave the grounds. Police were instructed to
keep a watch for this car and the men, suspected of stealing drugs from hospitals and
drug-stores, were later located at a Kamloops Hotel and taken into custody.
Subsequent finger-printing brought out the fact that both were old offenders.
One, Lillian, wife of George A. Eldridge, and a Patricia Lane were also " picked up."
Finger-print Operator A. G. Carmichael, C.I.B., was sent for and conducted an examination and tests at Kamloops and Tranquille, but nothing implicating Eldridge and
Bell was brought to light. In view of this it appeared useless to proceed with a charge
of breaking and entering and Eldridge was released. Per contra, having been found
in the unlawful possession of drugs, Bell was detained and dealt with later. As they
were not connected with the theft, Mrs. Eldridge and Miss Lane were also released.
These women then commenced to visit Eldridge and Bell at the Kamloops Gaol
and as both were drug addicts and in desperate condition for lack of narcotics it was
believed they might attempt to hand drugs to their male associates. In view of this
the staff was especially vigilant. On the afternoon of Tuesday, June 8th, Miss Lane
embraced Bell and attempted to pass a drug. A struggle ensued and the Lane woman
and Bell were seized. In the woman's right hand was found a yellow finger-stall containing a drug. Bell and Miss Lane were charged with possession of drugs. Pleading " guilty " in City Police Court on June 16th, each was sentenced to six months'
imprisonment at Oakalla Prison Farm, a fine of $200 and additional imprisonment in
default of payment.
Rex vs. Lynde, Elmer Merritt, Nendick, Daniel Armond, and Nendick, Neil
(Attempted Theft of Gasoline).—In the early morning of Friday, July 2nd, 1943,
Constable M. S. Parsons, of the Fernie City Detachment, surprised a car parked in
the driveway of the Texaco Service Station in Fernie with its engine running and
the occupants acting in a suspicious manner. On seeing the Constable, one man started
to run and the driver, failing to heed the Constable's shouted warning to stop, drove
down the street.
The Constable again shouted a warning to stop but as this was ignored he fired
three shots from his revolver at the gas-tank and tires of the car. After proceeding
about a block the car stopped and, coming up to it, the Constable found a third man
with a woman and a little girl in the back seat. W 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The woman was moaning and complaining of pain. She had been hit by one of
the shots which had pierced the body of the car through the trunk and lodged in the
lower part of her back. She was rushed to the hospital, operated on, and subsequently
recovered.
All three men were taken into custody, and later all three were found to possess
criminal records.
The car was fitted up with an ingenious contrivance for siphoning gasoline into a
large extra tank built into the trunk of the car. A quantity of stolen goods was also
found.
On July 10th, before His Worship Mr. J. V. Rewers, Police Magistrate at Fernie,
they were found guilty of attempted theft of gasoline and sentenced to two months'
hard labour in the Nelson Gaol.
Lynde, the driver of the car was later convicted on two charges of retaining stolen
property and sentenced to six months' and one year's hard labour consecutively in
Oakalla Prison Farm.
Neil Nendrick paid a fine of $20 and costs for an offence under the " Government
Liquor Act," and sentenced to six months in Oakalla Prison Farm under the National
Selective Service Mobilization Regulations.
Rex vs. Farnell, Parker Howe, and Dubrueil, Wilfred Fritz (Breaking, Entering,
and Theft).—On November 11th, 1943, James Stewart, who had recently purchased the
McBride Trading Company Store at McBride, B.C., reported that his store had been
entered the previous night and a large quantity of merchandise stolen. This consisted
of clothing, boots, shirts, sweaters, and jewellery to the value of $400. Investigation
disclosed that two strangers had been seen in the furnace-room of the C.N.R. shops
at McBride. Later, a conductor on the way freight observed two men with large packs
and suit-cases leave the train at a flag-stop.
At 3.30 a.m., November 14th, Constable E. T. Corey, on duty at Prince George,
saw two suspicious characters at the C.N.R. station and arrested them. On search at
the lockup it was noticed that all their clothing was new and corresponded with articles
on the stolen property list, also as a key to the public lockers at the C.N.R. station was
found on one of them, the Company's Special Agent was called to open the locker. It
contained a suit-case full of stolen property. The other prisoner had an express shipping bill for a shipment to Edmonton and when this was returned it proved to be a
large pack and suit-case containing further stolen property. The man had shipped
it to himself.
Both Farnell and Dubrueil had previous records. Electing speedy trial, they
entered a plea of " guilty " and were each sentenced by His Honour Judge Woodburn
to two years in the B.C. Penitentiary.
Rex vs. Mallock, John (Breaking and Entering with Intent).—At 1.40 a.m., Monday, September 6th, 1943, Constables G. A. Perry and C. W. Price, on patrol in the
City of Prince George, heard a noise in the Strand Theatre. They found the doors all
securely fastened. While Constable Perry guarded the theatre Constable Price phoned
the owner and the N.C.O. i/c. On entering the building it was discovered that the
safe had been dragged from the office to the runway leading into the auditorium;
the dial had been knocked off, one hinge was off and the other partly removed. On the
floor was a large hammer, a pinch-bar, and chisel. Constables were called out and the
building surrounded. On searching the premises a man was found in the basement
attempting to dig himself out under the foundations. He was arrested and gave his
name as John Mallock. A steel punch was found on his person. Entry of the building had been made through a trap-door on the roof where Police found a rope still
dangling.    Mallock was found to have a long criminal record in Winnipeg.    On Septem- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943. W 23
ber 14th he appeared before His Honour Judge Woodburn and elected for speedy trial.
Pleading " guilty " he was sentenced to five years in the B.C. Penitentiary.
Rex vs. Pitt, Joseph Kenneth Lester Alfonso (19 Years), and Three Juveniles
(Theft; Theft of Horses; Retaining Stolen Property).—Thirteen charges in all;
value of property stolen, $500; number of horses stolen, seven; one horse and two calves
shot. The culprits in this case commenced their series of crimes on Saturday, July
10th, 1943, when they hired four horses from the Kamloops Livery Stable. On Sunday,
July 11th, as the horses had not been returned the matter was reported to the Police
at Kamloops. It was believed the youths were heading towards Merritt via Cherry
Creek and Savona, and Constable T. C. Fraser at Merritt Detachment was advised.
He immediately patrolled to the Mamette Lake District and made inquiries among the
ranchers thereabouts but without success.
On Monday, July 12th, a report was received at Kamloops that two horses together
with riding equipment had been stolen at about midnight, July 11th, from Heron
Brothers, Cherry Creek. The same party of youths were suspected and further patrols
and inquiries were made from Kamloops and Merritt, but still without results. Up
to Sunday, July 18th, other thefts including a wagon, another horse, a set of harness,
etc., and cattle shootings were reported. Finally two of the juveniles were apprehended
by Constable Fraser and R.C.M.P. Constable R. Clayton from Merritt. Search then
continued for Pitt and the remaining juvenile who was picked up near Merritt. On
Sunday, July 25th, Pitt surrendered to the Police.
The youths stated that after hiring the horses in Kamloops they proceeded to
Meadow Creek. En route they broke into the Heron ranch where they stole horses,
saddles, and foodstuffs. Next day, after sleeping in the woods, they proceeded overland
to the Fish Lake Road. Following this road down to what is known as Meadow Creek
they eventually broke into a cabin and stole more foodstuff, rifles, and ammunition.
Two of the lads then shot a calf for meat. After a couple of days these supplies ran
out so another calf was killed. They also entered a vacant farm-house and took more
foodstuff and a sawed-off 30.30 rifle which could be used as a small arm. Here also
they stole a wagon and proceeded towards Mamette Lake where two of the party were
arrested.
Constable T. C. Fraser conducted the search from Merritt and Constables G. D.
Heatley and M. L. Thomson worked out of Kamloops. All three were commended in
G.O. 294 for their excellent work.
Pitt was sentenced to imprisonment for one year at Oakalla Prison Farm. Two
of the juveniles were sentenced to six months' imprisonment and a third was committed
to the Boys' Industrial School.
Fire and Explosion, Dawson Creek, February 13th, 19U3.—During the early evening of February 13th, fire was observed in a structure in the business section of
Dawson Creek. The building was occupied by Miller Construction Company and subcontractors Oman-Smith Company as a storage warehouse for supplies and material.
Both United States firms and employed by the American Government they were engaged
in erecting telephone-lines along the Alaska Highway.
Local fire departments—U.S. Army and Canadian civil—were soon on the scene and
the fire appeared to be under control. However, it was found that sixty cases of 40
per cent, dynamite and sixteen cases of electric detonators were stored on the Oman-
Smith portion of the building. The explosive material ignited and resulted in a terrific
explosion which scattered burning debris over a large area and was followed by a serious conflagration. Hardly a pane of glass in the town was left intact and, with the
exception of one building, a whole city block covered with business premises was wiped
out. Damage of more than a quarter million dollars resulted. Scores of persons were
injured and five men lost their lives. W 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Following a full departmental investigation a charge of criminal negligence was
laid against the Oman-Smith Company. At a trial held at Pouce Coupe on October
1st before His Honour Judge Woodburn the accused company was found guilty and
sentenced to pay a fine of $10,000. An appeal against sentence was taken to the Appeal
Court of British Columbia who reversed the decision of the trial Judge and acquitted
the defendants: however, it is of interest to note that civil claims amounting to
several thousand dollars have since been paid by the Government of the United States.
MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH.
Inspector George A. Hood reports as follows:—
While there was a decrease of 1,662 in the number of passenger motor-vehicles
licensed during the 1943 licence-year under the number so licensed during the previous
corresponding year, there was an increase of 2,062 in the number of commercial motor-
vehicles licensed, so that an increase of 400 was recorded in the total number of
motor-vehicles licensed this licence-year as compared with last licence-year.
Of the total of 130,066 motor-vehicles licensed during the year, 98,920 were of
the passenger type and 31,146 of the commercial type. Of the 98,920 passenger type
motor-vehicles licensed, 2,526 were motor-vehicles which were being licensed in this
Province for the first time, and of these 2,526 passenger motor-vehicles 259 were new
and 2,267 were motor-vehicles which had been licensed elsewhere.
Of the 31,146 commercial motor-vehicles licensed, 2,198 were motor-vehicles which
were being licensed in this Province for the first time, and of these 984 were new
and the balance of 1,214 were motor-vehicles which had been licensed elsewhere.
The motor-vehicles which had been previously licensed elsewhere came into this
Province from the following places: —
Place. Passenger.      Commercial.
Alberta   1,040 758
Saskatchewan   542 274
Manitoba   229 64
Ontario  -  242 81
Quebec   27 1
New Brunswick  4             	
Nova Scotia  8 1
Northwest Territory  1             	
Total used car registrations (Canadian).... 2,093 1,179
Alaska   1 3
California  53 6
Colorado   3             	
Connecticut   1            	
Columbia   1             	
Idaho  :  5             	
Illinois   4            	
Kansas   2             	
Louisiana   1             	
Maryland   1              	
Massachusetts  ,  2             	
Michigan   1             	
Minnesota   7             	
Missouri   3             	
Montana   10 11
Nebraska   1             	 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL
POLICE, 1943.
W 25
Place.
Nevada 	
Passenger.
              2
Commercial.
New York	
          3
North Dakota	
2
Oregon 	
        13
2
Pennsylvania 	
          1
Rhode Island	
          1
South Dakota 	
1
Texas 	
          3
Utah	
1
Washington 	
        46
10
Wisconsin  	
          2
Wyoming .	
          2
1
car registrations (U
Total used
S.A.)      171
35
1
China	
England 	
         1
Hawaii 	
         1
• registrations (other
Total used cai
countries)          3
Total used car registrations, 1943 licence-year 2,267 1,214
The number of used passenger motor-vehicles previously licensed elsewhere and
brought into this Province this year showed a decrease of 177 (7.2 per cent.) under
the number brought in last year, but an increase of 367 (43.3 per cent.) was registered
in the number of commercial motor-vehicles previously licensed elsewhere and brought
into this Province during the 1943 licence-year.
Increases and decreases in certain types of licences, etc., have again reflected
existing war-time conditions. This year, incidentally, the classes affected are similar
to those noted in 1942. General increases over last year were registered in the following licences  and permits :  Increase. Per Cent.
Commercial, renewals   3,734 14.8
Permits for temporary operation         17 12.1
Motor-cycle licences        79 2.4
Trailer licences       872 20.9
Transfers   6,145 12.9
Total substitutions       187 16.8
Class " A " chauffeurs' licences .__.     155 11.8
Class " A " chauffeurs' licences (substitutional) ....         3 27.3
Class " B " chauffeurs' licences        85 5.0
Class " C " chauffeurs' licences   1,889 10.8
Class " C " chauffeurs' licences (substitutional) _      23 18.1
Chauffeurs' drivers' licences (original)      759 45.2
Chauffeurs' drivers' licences (renewal)   1,963 13.6
Permits to minors (duplicate)         175 66.4
Learners' permits           6 0.8
Duplicate motor-vehicle licences      413 14.2 W 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Decreases were also registered under last year in the following licences, permits,
and fees:—
Passenger  Decrease. Per Cent.
New registrations   711 22.0
Renewals   951 1.0
Commercial, new registrations   1,672 4.3
Non-resident touring motor-vehicle permits  715 29.1
Non-resident special motor-vehicle permits   76 30.4
Non-resident commercial motor-vehicle permits _ 631 65.6
Original motor-dealers' licences   39 17.1
Additional plates, motor-dealers' licences   47 18.8
Original motor-cycle dealers' licences  4 66.6
Salesmen's licences   139 43.6
Class " B " chauffeurs' licences (substitutional) .... 6 16.2
Drivers' licences  (original)    256 2.2
Drivers' licences (renewal)   6,287 4.5
Salesmen's drivers' licences (renewals)   136 46.9
Permits to minors  605 11.2
Learners' licences  303 11.7
Search fees   6,348 15.6
For purposes of comparison the following table shows the issuance of licences,
permits, etc., under the " Motor-vehicle Act " during the licence-years 1936 to 1943,
inclusive, and a study of the same will reveal some interesting facts; such as, there
are now twice as many trailers licensed in this Province as in 1936, and that there are
more than twice as many chauffeurs licensed as in 1936, and that in both these cases
more trailer licences and chauffeurs' licences were taken out this licence-year than
during any previous licence-year:— REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.
W 27
Comparative Statement of Licences, Permits, etc., issued during the
Licence-years 1936 to 1943, inclusive.
Licences issued.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
Motor-vehicles—
10,585
73,477
12,732
78,817
9,416
84,930
9,213
87,524
9,608
91,844
8,543
96,867
3,237
97,346
2,£26
96,394
Total passenger	
84,062
91,549
94,346
96,737
101,452
105,410
100,582
98,920
2,511
17,871
3,323
19,656
2,149
20,856
2,209
21,203
2,603
21,735
3,652
23,016
3,870
25,214
2,198
Commercial (renewal)	
28,948
20,382
22,979
23,005
23,412
24,338
26,668
29,084
31,146
104,444
114,528
117,351
120,149
125,790
132,078
129,666
130,066
Non-resident touring motor-vehicle permits
Total non-resident special motor-vehicle per-
6,885
339
15
266
8,522
565
21
290
8,180
603
59
309
7,646
530
87
425
6,015
503
116
292
7,159
541
112
280
2,456
250
141
961
1,741
174
158
Total non-resident commercial motor-vehicle
permits - - -	
330
Motor-cycles—
200
1,435
258
1,555
188
1,681
197
1,741
478
1,776
337
2,084
981
2,246
237
Renewals   .,   	
3,069
Total motor-cycles 	
1,635
1,813
1,869
1,938
2,254
2,421
3,227
3,306
2,525
286
434
23
457
1
3,186
323
488
47
692
2
3,351
327
483
21
713
3
3,549
322
450
19
650
3
3,753
321
437
23
612
3
8
4
1,695
48
27
72,388
1,020
8
1,333
21
10,880
66
14,282
141,387
2,607
548
10,038
7
499
7,025
173
6,163
1,754
4,213
163,335
4,165
294
412
19
538
4,169
228
250
6
319
5,041
Motor-dealers—
189
203
Substitutions- 	
Salesmen's licences   „
5
180
1
11
5
1,600
63
24
68,604
1,184
9
1,507
26
14,355
91
14,364
145,592
2,184
992
12,637
6
477
7,266
134
5,203
1,543
4,139
75,320
6
1
1,053
35
19
47,677
1,310
11
1,685
37
17,478
127
11,691
140,456
1,805
1,856
14,420
2
1,735
47
22
66,429
799
5
1,318
14
9,006
42
18,248
127,226
2,609
510
8,184
17
462
5,082
90
2,093
721
4,527
107,478
1
1,699
27
9
52,547
695
5
1,273
7
7,070
36
14,764
117,098
2,253
346
6,635
2
8
3,818
96
1,450
497
3,555
54,936
1,416
36
21
62,576
857
6
1,304
5
9,218
56
15,605
134,934
2,718
403
9,045
4
532
5,009
74
2,537
907
4,267
148,298
1,512
40
10
64,325
911
6
1,307
8
9,601
38
11,764
136,610
2,865
299
9,610
6
532
6,351
127
4,530
1,389
3,926
80,930
1,258
Motor-cycle (substitutions) - -	
18
19
Transfers     	
Chauffeurs—
53,822
1,465
Substitutional " A " - -	
Original Class " B ". - 	
Substitutional " B "  , 	
13
1,770
31
19,367
Substitutional " C "	
Drivers—
150
11,435
134,169
Duplicate  - -	
Chauffeurs' (original)	
1,439
2,615
16,383
290
5,413
262
2,585
778
2,919
40,782
154
4,808
437
Learners' licences -	
2,282
784
3,332
34,434 W 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In the distribution of motor-vehicles throughout the Province, 102,776 or 79 per
cent, were licensed at coastal points, the balance of 27,290 or 21 per cent, being
licensed at Interior points, which is approximately the same percentage as last year.
With the exception of the issuance shown at Victoria and Fernie, the distribution of
motor-vehicles throughout the Province can be fairly well gauged from the following
table:—
1943 Motor-vehicle Licences issued according to Issuing Offices.
Passenger Motor-vehicles.
Commercial
Motor-vehicles.
Grand
Total.
Issuing Office.
Used.
New.
Renewals.
Total.
Used.
New.
Renewals.
Total.
825
223
327
18
42
40
29
7
8
29
32
404
25
12
5
118
37
11
3
11
11
4
7
2
4
4
4
1
135  1   39.404
40,364
17,658
14,699
2,457
1,983
1,714
2,011
1,852
1,804
1,622
1,382
830
1,491
1,276
1,134
683
579
449
577
446
376
419
313
367
278
236
248
249
188
200
164
194
144
134
92
108
87
64
25
22
1
147
16
31
3
11
10
13
7
3
810
8
5
1
82
20
19
2
4
9
1
3
1
2
3
1
1
1
685
128
28
6
6
7
10
3
4
6
7
8
18
13
12
4
6
1
8
1
-
2
3
2
2
3
1
5
1
4
10,645
4,022
3,631
762
989
899
525
447
430
568
741
541
427
638
268
188
286
324
175
200
266
212
224
167
167
197
129
115
119
85
97
65
92
84
58
33
49
34
23
18
S
11,477
4,166
3,690
771
1,006
916
548
450
434
681
751
1,359
453
656
269
282
310
349
176
210
271
212
235
170
170
202
133
115
122
85
105
67
93
84
58
34
49
34
23
18
12
51,841
90
18
2
17,345
14,354
2,437
1,941
1,674
1,981
1,843
1,796
1,593
1,349
424
1,464
1,262
1,129
564
542
436
574
435
365
415
306
365
274
232
244
248
186
192
157
193
143
134
91
107
85
62
25
22
1
21,824
18,389
Nanaimo 	
3,228
2,989
Nelson 	
1
2
2,630
2,559
2,302
2,238
2,203
Kelowna      -
1
2
2
2
2,133
2,189
Cranbrook   	
Kamloops , 	
1,944
1,932
1,403
1
965
889
2
798
753
656
647
631
537
448
438
1
2
8
7
1
1
237
218
150
1
1
2
2
136
98
48
40
13
Atlin   	
Totals 	
2,267   |        259
i
96.394
98,920
1,214
984
28,948
31,146
130,066
As the Victoria office issued 4,310 passenger motor-vehicle licences and 1,285
commercial motor-vehicle licences by mail during the year, the total of 17,658 passenger motor-vehicle licences and 4,166 commercial motor-vehicle licences shown as
being issued at this office does not represent motor-vehicles operating in the immediate
vicinity of Victoria, as 3,230 passenger motor-vehicle licences and 755 commercial
motor-vehicle licences were issued by mail to various other points as follows:— REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.
W 29
Passenger. Commercial.
Vancouver   1,435 205
New Westminster      127 16
Vancouver Island and Islands       577 201
Balance of Province  1,040 302
Out of Province        51 31
Totals   3,230
755
Issuance to residents of Victoria and vicinity was 14,428 passenger motor-vehicle
licences and 3,411 commercial motor-vehicle licences.
The issuance at Fernie also included 83 passenger motor-vehicle licences and 43
commercial motor-vehicle licences which were issued to motor-vehicles entering this
Province from the East and proceeding to other points in the Province, so that the
number of passenger motor-vehicle licences and commercial motor-vehicle licences
issued at the Fernie office for residents of that vicinity is 600 and 239 respectively
instead of as shown in the foregoing table.
Makes of Motor-vehicles Licensed.
The passenger motor-vehicles licensed this year were made up of 97 different makes
(a reduction of 7 makes) and the commercial motor-vehicles of 124 different makes
(an increase of 6 makes) as compared with last year. The standing of the first 10
leading makes of both passenger and commercial motor-vehicles remained the same as
last year. The following table shows the standing and the number of motor-vehicles
of these makes which were licensed during the years 1941, 1942, and 1943:—
Passenger.
1941.
1942.
1943.
Place.
Make.
j Number.
Place.
Make.
Number.
Place.
Make.
Number.
1
Ford   	
Chevrolet  	
Plymouth — 	
Dodge	
Pontiac   	
Chrysler    ....
Essex-Terraplane  ...
McLaughlin-Buick  .
Oldsmobile   	
Nash    —.
.   23,950
19,985
|    9,570
|    8,185
|     5,165
|    4,166
- !     4,121
_|     3,920
.1     2,991
.      2,928
i
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Ford   -	
23,300
18,992
9,677
8,182
4,849
3,784
3,706
3,561
2,874
2,677
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Ford  	
Chevrolet   -
23,019
18,559
9,777
Dodge  —	
8,221
4,746
6
7
8
Chrysler 	
Essex-Terraplane  —
McLaughlin-Buick ...
Chrysler   	
Essex-Terraplane
McLaughlin-Buick „_
Oldsmobile  	
Nash — 	
3,593
3,551
3,471
2,846
2,573
Commercial.
Ford  	
Chevrolet —-	
International   	
Dodge  	
G.M.C.   	
Fargo    -.
Maple Leaf 	
Federal   —- -	
Eeo  	
White	
-| 8,708
.1     5,906
|    3,384
-|    1,834
_|        943
| 866
479
| 354
-|        342
|        249
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
Ford   	
9,474
5,964
3,583
1,973
1,262
1,000
519
385
334
334
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
| Ford  	
1 Chevrolet -—	
| International .
 | 10,761
2
3
Chevrolet	
International 	
[    6,201
3,873
|    2,112
5
6
7
8
9
10
G.M.C.    	
Fargo  	
; G.M.C _	
...... |    1,372
-.-     1,106
j Maple Leaf 	
| Willys	
.   .1        625
Willys .	
Federal  	
Eeo  	
 |       455
Federal  	
| Reo  	
[
|       331
j        323
1 W 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue.
The gross revenue collected from licences, permits, and fees under the " Motor-
vehicle Act " during the licence-year 1943, less fees received for drivers' examinations
(which are credited against the cost of salaries and expenses in this connection),
amounted to $3,175,392.39, which is an increase of $44,340.30 over the amount so
collected during the previous licence-year. The bulk of these collections—namely,
$2,196,734.13 (69.2 per cent.)—were made by the three main issuing offices of this
Branch located at New Westminster, Vancouver, and Victoria, which collected $448,-
503.72, $1,231,428.25, and $516,802.34 respectively, the balance of $978,658.08 being
collected through the various Government Agencies throughout the Province and Police
Detachments reporting through such agencies.
The amount of fees collected for drivers' examinations during the same period
was $15,641, which is a decrease of $845 (5.1 per cent.) under the amount collected from
this source during the previous year. Of this amount $6,054 was collected at the Vancouver motor licence office, $2,388 at the New Westminster motor licence office, and the
balance of $7,199 was collected at the Victoria office and by travelling units operating
throughout the Province and reporting to such office.
In addition to the above, $6,584.85 was collected during the calendar year 1943 at
the Victoria office in connection with the registration of documents under the " Bills
of Sale Act," " Conditional Sales Act," and " Mechanics' Lien Act," and searches, etc.,
made thereunder.
Refunds made totalled 2,160, amounting to $16,178.17, and although this was a
decrease of 510 (19.1 per cent.) in the number of refunds made, the amount refunded
only decreased $597.65 (3.5 per cent.). This is partly accounted for owing to the fact
that although there was a decrease of 27 (12.6 per cent.) in the number of miscellaneous refunds made, there was an increase of $1,602.40 (87.5 per cent.) in the amount
refunded, and in a similar manner, although there was a decrease of 115 (11 per cent.)
in the number of refunds made upon relinquishment of motor-vehicle licences, there
was an increase of $68.85 (or slightly over 1 per cent.) in the amount refunded in such
cases.
Examination of Motor-vehicle Drivers.
Drivers' examinations were completed by 14,617 persons this year, of which 12,455
(85.2 per cent.) were male and 2,162 (14.8 per cent.) were female. This is a decrease
of 383 (2.98 per cent.) in the number of examinations completed by males and 180
(7.68 per cent.) in the number completed by females, a total of 563 (3.71 per cent.)
under last year. As a result of these examinations it was found necessary to place
restrictions on the drivers' licences of 2,688 persons, of which 2,316 (86.16 per cent.)
were male and 372 (13.84 per cent.) were female, and to prohibit 4 males and 1 female
from driving. Particulars of the reasons for the restrictions imposed, as well as for the
failures, segregated into age-groups, are given in the following table:— REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.
W 31
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In accordance with existing arrangements with the Military, Naval, and Air Force
authorities, drivers' examinations were conducted for their mechanical transport personnel at various places throughout the Province during the year.
The following summary shows the places at which such examinations were conducted, for the particular service, and the number of personnel given examinations:—
Place.
Military.
Navy.
Air Force.
Total.
394
181
20
48
35
443
22
183
94
57
368
288
677
1
26
309
22
186
3
394
181
21
48
35
443
22
183
116
57
580
288
989
Totals  -         ....
2,810
336
211
3,357
As a new type of Standing Order containing mechanical transport drivers' certificates was issued to all mechanical transport personnel, it was necessary, before the
old type could be disposed of, to have the new type marked in accordance with the
examination stamps which had been placed on the type being substituted, and quite
an amount of time was spent in stamping the mechanical transport drivers' certificates
in these new Orders. _.
Convictions.
During 1943 there were 3,692 convictions reported under the provisions of the
"Motor-vehicle Act" and regulations; 706 convictions reported under section 285 of
the Criminal Code; 320 convictions reported under the provisions of Order in Council
No. 2800 (40-miles-per-hour speed limit), and 49 convictions reported under the Lighting and Black-out Regulations, a total of 4,767 convictions, which is a decrease of
1,721  (26.5 per cent.) under the number of convictions reported last year.
Particulars of the types of convictions reported under the provisions of the " Motor-
vehicle Act" and regulations and under section 285 of the Criminal Code during the
years 1940 to 1943, inclusive, are given in the following table:—
Convictions under " Motor-vehicle Act " and Section 285, Criminal Code, 19U0-U3.
Offence.
1941.
Failing to stop after accident- —	
Unlawfully taking a motor-vehicle — __    	
Driving a motor-vehicle while intoxicated   _ -	
Failure to obtain motor-vehicle licence or permit, mount same, etc.-
Failure of dealer to notify re sale, misuse of dealers' plates, etc	
Operating with " D " plates without salesman's licence or permit, etc.-
Failure to register as a tourist      	
Employing unlicensed chauffeur     __ _.
No driver's licence or failure to produce same, etc.- _.
Failing to take necessary precaution re horse-drawn vehicles..
Failing to take necessary precaution re street-cars 	
Failing to stop on approach of fire and police patrol -	
Exceeding speed-limit passing schools and playgrounds	
Exceeding speed-limit indicated by " speed " signs 	
Driving to common danger, exceeding speed-limit in cities, etc.
Failing to report accident, etc.    	
52
10
1,305
624
2,466
59
59
74
16
17
12
52
701
65
62
8
31
1,520
1,256
723
708
3,098
2,223
56
50
32
84
33
14
2
621
2
42
13
834
471
1,384
59 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.                                W 33
Convictions under " Motor-vehicle Act " and Section 285, Criminal Code,
19U0-U3—Continued..
Offence.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
30
1
3
39
38
11
43
128
12
22,1
6
2
3
2
27
43
199
8
20
1
28
25
2
6
1
68
1
4
7
60
3
5
64
28
20
48
78
21
2
149
5
1
5
2
32
63
45
7
46
1
31
69
2
2
5
8
1
82
2
4
34
1
7
82
41
13
39
100
17
1
1
164
2
4
2
34
58
23
5
23
8
52
46
6
6
87
2
19
1
4
102
Operating motor-vehicle without displaying plates as required	
25
21
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, etc	
Driving motor-vehicle as chauffeur without chauffeur's licence or permit.
Making false statement, permitting another to use licence, etc	
43
59
16
1
Failing to display number-plates unobstructed, clean, etc  	
Failing to notify re change of address  —   -	
2
1
3
1
Driving while driver's licence under suspension.—.  	
Driving without head-lights or improper head-lights 	
28
31
Driving overwidth motor-vehicle without clearance-lights..-	
8
Driving motor-vehicle without muffler   	
Failing to give required signals on turning or stopping.— 	
Driving with windshield obstructed- -   	
30
63
1
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence
Altering number-plates and use of fictitious plates -	
71
3
Operating motor-vehicle with improperly mounted or unauthorized fog,
spot, or auxiliary lights  — -   ., 	
Totals	
6,488
7,396
6,178
4,398
Suspensions and Cancellations.
The number of drivers' licences it was found necessary to suspend this year or to
refuse the right to obtain a driver's licence amounted to 618, which is a sharp decrease
of 304 (32.9 per cent.) under the number it was found necessary to take similar action
in connection with last year.
Drivers' licences held by minors were the largest group affected, amounting to 57.2
per cent, of the total.    I am pleased to state that there was a very sharp decrease in
the number of drivers' licences it was necessary to deal with by way of suspension for
driving to the common danger, driving a motor-vehicle while intoxicated, and for
exceeding the speed-limits, it being necessary this year to deal with 130 drivers' licences
for driving to the common danger, 24 drivers' licences for driving while intoxicated,
and 19 drivers' licences for exceeding speed-limits, as compared with 273 for driving
to the common danger, 74 for driving while intoxicated, and 57 for exceeding speed-
limits dealt with last year, a reduction of 143 (52.3 per cent.), 50 (67.5 per cent.), and
38 (66.6 per cent.) respectively.    The following table gives the reason for the suspensions imposed as well as the length of time of such suspensions:—
3 W 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Reason.
ft
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Driving to the common danger and reckless
36
5
1
1
11
7
6
1
2
35
1
9
1
1
1
1
2
2
4
5
28
21
10
2
1
6
2
1
3
3
1
16
20
2
2
292
2
3
1
5
4
1
24
36
130
Driving a motor-vehicle while intoxicated ._.
24
5
6
354
Accidents, failing to return to, report, etc.
Driving while licence suspended : 	
6
6
19
1
Not in possession of a driver's licence 	
Defence of Canada Regulations (O.C. 2800)
Unfit  	
5
2
24
Failed to appear for examination...-	
36
Totals
54
16
51
6
5
70
4
3
17
322
70
618
A decrease was also registered in the number of drivers' licences and motor-
vehicle licences it was found necessary to suspend under the financial responsibility
sections of the " Motor-vehicle Act," 730 drivers' licences being suspended this year as
compared with 941 last year, a decrease of 211 (22.4 per cent.), and 434 motor-vehicle
licences were suspended this year as compared with 579 last year, a decrease of 145
(25 per cent.).
During this year 499 drivers' licences were reinstated upon the necessary proof
of financial responsibility being submitted, which is an increase of 22 (4.6 per cent.)
over the number reinstated last year, and 507 motor-vehicle licences were reinstated
upon bona-fide sale being made to another person or proof of financial responsibility
being submitted, which is a decrease of 87 (14.6 per cent.) under the number reinstated
last year. Suspensions and reinstatements of drivers' licences and motor-vehicle
licences made under the financial responsibility sections of the " Motor-vehicle Act "
during the year were as follows:—
Reason.
Drivers'
Licences.
Motor-vehicle Licences.
Suspended.
Reinstated.
Suspended.
Reinstated.
823
284
14
1
1
69
25
4
9
266
173
14
2
2
7
30
3
2
191
204
8
1
1
6
19
1
3
143
No further proof of financial responsibility given upon expiration
113
2
Taking motor-vehicle without owner's consent 	
1
16
224
Driving while driver's licence under suspension -  	
Totals -  	
730
499
434
507
Motor-vehicle Accidents.
Although there was an increase of slightly over one-half of 1 per cent, in the number of motor-vehicles licensed this year there was a decrease of 4.3 per cent, in the
number of reportable motor-vehicle accidents, there being 5,213 of such accidents this REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943. W 35
year as compared with 5,451 last year. As a result of these accidents 2,403 persons
were injured as compared with 2,437 last year, a decrease of 34 (0.139 per cent.) ;
121 persons received fatal injuries as compared with 129 last year, a decrease of 4
(3.2 per cent.) ; and property damage amounted to $592,973.38 as compared with
$620,440.31 last year, a decrease of $27,466.83 (4.4 per cent.).
There does not appear to be any doubt but that gasoline rationing has had a definite bearing on the decrease in the number of motor-vehicle accidents, as although the
number of private passenger motor-vehicle licences decreased by 1.6 per cent., the
number of reportable motor-vehicle accidents in which private passenger motor-vehicles
were involved decreased by 9 per cent., and while the number of motor-cycles licensed
decreased by 5.5 per cent., the number of reportable motor-vehicle accidents in which
motor-cycles were involved decreased by 14.2 per cent. Both of these types of motor-
vehicles have been strictly rationed. In the commercial truck and delivery motor-
vehicles, however, it is significant that while there has been an increase of 8 per cent,
in the number of such motor-vehicles licensed, there has been an increase of 14 per cent,
in the number of reportable motor-vehicle accidents in which this type of vehicle has
been involved.
While there was a decrease in the number of persons who received fatal injuries
this year, there was an increase of 8 (7.5 per cent.) in the number of fatal motor-vehicle
accidents, there being 114 of such accidents this year as compared with 106 last year.
Last year 21 persons were fatally injured in 7 motor-vehicle accidents, while this year
11 persons were fatally injured in 5 such accidents. An increase was also recorded this
year in the number of members of the National Defence Forces who received fatal
injuries in motor-vehicle accidents, there being 16 of such members so injured as compared with 13 last year. Of the motor-vehicle accidents occurring during the year
3,736 (71.6 per cent.) occurred in city municipalities, resulting in 45 (37.1 per cent.) of
the fatalities, 1,504 (62.5 per cent.) of the persons injured, and $364,605.69 (61.4 per
cent.) of the property damage caused. This was a decrease of 39 (1.03 per cent.) in
the number of accidents and a decrease of 63 (4.02 per cent.) in the number of persons
injured, but an increase of 1 (2.2 per cent.) and an increase of $12,776 in the amount of
property damage caused in city municipalities in comparison with last year.
Motor-vehicle accidents occurring in district municipalities totalled 729, which was
13.9 per cent, of the total motor-vehicle accidents in the Province. These accidents
caused 28 (23.1 per cent.) of the fatalities, 460 (19.1 per cent.) of the injuries, and
$105,666.24 (17.8 per cent.) of the property damage. This was a decrease of 6 (17.6
per cent.) in the number of fatalities, a decrease of 8 (1.08 per cent.) in the number of
injuries, and a decrease of $2,509.87 (2.3 per cent.) in the amount of property damage,
but an increase of 52 (12.7 per cent.) in the number of persons injured in district
municipalities in comparison with last year.
In the unorganized portions of the Province the number of reportable motor-vehicle
accidents which occurred this year was 748 or 14.3 per cent, of the total motor-vehicle
accidents. In these accidents 48 persons received fatal injuries, which was 39.6 per
cent, of the total fatalities; 439 persons were injured, which was 18.2 per cent, of the
persons injured; and property damage amounted to $122,701.45, or 20.6 per cent, of
the property damage caused. This was a decrease of 191 (23.4 per cent.) in the number of accidents, a decrease of 23 (4.9 per cent.) in the number of persons injured, a
decrease of $37,733.15 (23.5 per cent.) in the amount of property damage caused, but
an increase of 1 (2.1 per cent.) in the number of fatalities which occurred in unorganized territory as compared with last year.
For purposes of comparison a statement showing further details according to location of the motor-vehicle accidents occurring during this year and last year is given
in Appendix No. V. W 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
More accidents again took place on Saturday than on any other day, and the peak
hour for accidents again was between 4 and 5 p.m. While the same number of accidents took place at railway crossings this year as last year, unfortunately they were
twice as fatal. Of the drivers involved in motor-vehicle accidents 93 per cent, were
male and 7 per cent, female, but of those drivers involved in fatal accidents 94.4 per
cent, were male. Of the drivers involved 3,792 (45.3 per cent.) were between 25 and
40 years of age, while 7,012 (84.1 per cent.) had a driving experience of 5 years and
over. A decrease of 20.8 per cent, was registered in the number of unlicensed drivers
involved in motor-vehicle accidents, and the number of non-resident drivers so involved
also showed a decrease of 28.5 per cent, when compared with last year. Drivers who
did not have the right-of-way were again responsible for contributing to more accidents
than any other group, although those who drove off the highway were involved in
considerably more fatalities.
This year 48 pedestrians were fatally injured and 619 received non-fatal injuries.
This is one more pedestrian fatality and 64 more pedestrians who received non-fatal
injuries than last year. Pedestrian fatalities this year comprised 39.6 per cent, of the
total fatalities, which is an increase of 2 per cent, over last year, and pedestrians who
were non-fatally injured comprised 25.7 per cent, of the total who were not fatally
injured, which is an increase of 3.3 per cent, over last year. In at least 191 or 28.7 per
cent, of these accidents which resulted in 14 pedestrians being fatally injured and 177
receiving non-fatal injuries, such accidents were caused by carelessness on the part of
the pedestrians who suffered as a result of the same. Last year there were 6 pedestrians under the age of 14 years and 29 pedestrians over the age of 50 years who were
fatally injured, while this year 11 pedestrians under the age of 14 years and 30
pedestrians over the age of 50 years were fatally injured.
There were 7 bicyclists fatally injured and 225 bicyclists received non-fatal injuries
this year in accidents involving motor-vehicles and bicycles. This is a reduction of 3
in the number of those fatally injured and 53 in the number of those receiving non-fatal
injuries as compared with last year.
Again this year the accidents which occurred during the hours of darkness were
twice as fatal as those occurring during the daylight hours; 1 accident in every 55
accidents taking place during daylight hours was fatal, while 1 accident in every 27
accidents taking place this year during hours of darkness was fatal.
For purposes of comparison a brief summary of motor-vehicle accidents reported
during the years 1940 to 1943, inclusive, is given hereunder, from which it will be
noted that the year 1943 shows a very favourable decrease in the number of accidents
taking place, in the number of persons receiving non-fatal injuries, and in the amount
of property damage caused, but that although the fatalities have decreased since 1941
we are still above the ratio of fatalities in 1940.
Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents, 19U0-U3.
1940.        [        1941.        |         1942.
1943.
126.648
6,246
20
108
1.172
2,937
43
$661,210.86
$5.22
1
133,231  |          132,435
6,799  |              5,451
19   |                   24
129  j                 125
1,032  j              1,059
3,227  |              2,437
41   [                     54
$796,321.87     $620,440.31
$5.97  j              $4.68
133,150
5,213
25
Number of motor-vehicles per accident   	
1.100
2,403
55
$592,973.38
$4.45
Number of persons injured in motor-vehicle accidents 	
Number of motor-vehicles per person injured 	
Amount of property damage caused by motor-vehicle accidents
Amount of property damage per motor-vehicle 	
Statistical summary of reportable motor-vehicle accidents which occurred during
the year is given in Appendix No. IV. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.
W 37
Highway Patrol.
This year 179,774 check-ups were made by members of the Force whose principal
duties are the enforcement of all legislation relating to the control of traffic, and in
doing so they travelled 164,444 miles and investigated 345 motor-vehicle accidents.
This was a decrease of 48,069 (21 per cent.) in the number of check-ups made, a
decrease of 94,740 (36.5 per cent.) in the number of miles travelled, and a decrease of
146 (29.7 per cent.) in the number of motor-vehicle accidents investigated as compared
with last year.
The type of check-ups made and the number of the same according to Division was
as follows:—
•
"A"
Division.
"B"
Division.
"C"
Division.
"E"
Division.
Total.
11,264
205
483
2,549
11,115
4,930
11,202
675
127
5,301
2,372
11,202
4,978
1,856
2,167
5,557
153
298
1,486
5,425
2,178
5,504
1,141
272
1,035
842
5,559
2,392
1,207
1,601
7,321
173
71
3,118
7,355
743
7,346
4,187
1,225
1,538
1,444
1,364
1,028
1,602
1,770
6,815
13
192
982
6,296
885
6,833
30,957
Motor-vehicle salesmen's licences : — 	
544
1,044
Chauffeurs' licences    —.	
Drivers' licences     -	
Operation of motor-vehicles — - '    -	
8,135
30,191
8,736
30,885
Motor-vehicle head-lights, etc., tested -	
6,003
2
2,162
366
5,610
3,211
357
689
1,626
10,036
5,024
23,735
Miscellaneous regulations    -	
" Highway Act," regulations, licences, etc.—	
" Motor Carrier Act," licences, regulations, etc.  	
11,609
6,022
6,227
70,426
34,650
40,285
34,413
179,774
As a result of these check-ups 632 convictions were registered, resulting in
$8,167.60 being collected in fines and costs and 4 cases of imprisonment. This was
a sharp decrease in the number of convictions of 403 (38 per cent.) and a decrease in
the amount of fines and costs of $3,908.15 (32.3 per cent.) under last year. Convictions
obtained in this connection were as follows:—
Convictions.
Fines and Costs.
Imprisonments.
" Motor-vehicle Act " and regulations -
" Highway Act " and regulations    	
" Motor Carrier Act " and regulations
Criminal Code    	
" Government Liquor Act " 	
I'attullo Bridge regulations ..—	
City by-laws — - —
" Munitions and Supply Act," D.C.R.O.C.
Miscellaneous - — 	
Totals - -	
328
65
53
44
13
16
36
69
632
$3,332.50
782.00
778.00
1,076.00
232.75
155.00
236.50
1,525.00
48.85
$8,167.60
In addition to the sums collected for fines and costs, the sum of $3,011.64 was
collected as a direct result of these check-ups; namely, $2,296.60 under the provisions
of the " Motor-vehicle Act " and $715.04 under the provisions of the " Motor Carrier
Act," a decrease of $3,553.92 (54.1 per cent.) under the amount so collected last year. W 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Bills of Sale Act,"
Conditional Sales Act," and
Lien Act."
Mechanics'
While a decrease in the number of documents being filed under the " Bills of Sale
Act," " Conditional Sales Act," and " Mechanics' Lien Act " was again registered this
year, this decrease was not nearly so heavy as that registered last year; and although
a decrease was registered last year in the number of searches made under the " Bills
of Sale Act" and the " Conditional Sales Act " a sharp increase was registered this
year in the number of such searches, there being more searches made this year than
in any year since 1932, at which time the filing of documents under the " Bills of Sale
Act " and " Conditional Sales Act " in connection with motor-vehicles was centralized
for the Province in this office. The total revenue, however, received under these Acts
for filing and searching documents, etc., showed a decrease.
The following table shows the number of registration's and releases filed as well as
the number of searches made and the sources of revenue this year under these Acts
as compared with last year:—
Item.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
Per
Cent.
9,866
1,758
75
273
118
1,045
1.052
7,320
1,672
41
223
150
1,554
1,547
2,546
86
34
50
25.81
4.32
45.33
18.31
Releases filed under " Bills of Sale Act "   	
32
509
495
27.12
48.71
Searches made under " Bills of Sale Act " 	
47.05
$7,048.00
6,762.50
367.50
44.60
$6,005.00
4,679.50
542.15
37.70
$1,043.00
2,083.00
14 80
30.62
Value of search tickets sold under " Bills of Sale Act " and
$174.65
47 44
Value of miscellaneous searches and certificates made—	
6.90
15.47
$14,222.60
$11,264.35
$174.65
$2,958.25
Public Passenger Vehicles.
During the year 673 inspections of public passenger motor-vehicles were carried
out by our Mechanical Inspectors, as a result of which 88 vehicles were found to have
defective brakes and 188 defective steering. The necessary action was taken immediately to have these defects corrected before the vehicles concerned were allowed to
continue to operate as public carriers.
An increase in the number of accidents in which these vehicles were involved was
shown over last year, being as follows:— 1942. 1943.
Total accidents :     87 113
Resulting in—
Passengers injured     58* 91
Cyclists injured   6
Pedestrians injured   13
58 110
Passenger fatalities   Nil 3
Cyclist fatalities   Nil 2
Pedestrian fatalities   Nil 3
NU ~8
Hospitalization required     30 68
* Not segregated in 1942. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943. W 39
School Buses.
This year 213 school-bus permits were issued for the operation of motor-vehicles
used for the conveyance of children to and from school, and operated by, or under
contract with, the Board of School Trustees or other authority in charge of the schools.
This shows an increase of 16 permits over last year.
These vehicles were inspected from time to time as warranted, 142 such inspections being made. Brakes were found defective in 17 cases and steering-gear defective
in 33 cases. The defects were of minor nature and immediately corrected. During
the year no accidents were reported in which school buses were involved.
Gasoline Licence and Ration Coupon Books.
Again this year the Department gave its full co-operation to the Dominion Oil
Controller in connection with the issuance of gasoline licence and ration coupon books
by motor licence issuing offices throughout the Province. From experience gained in
connection with the issuance of these books last year a different system was inaugurated
by the Dominion Oil Controller, and instead of having applications for commercial and
special categories returned from the office of the Regional Oil Controller to the applicant, who in turn had to again present himself at a motor licence issuing office to obtain
a commercial or special category which had been approved for him, such commercial
and special category ration coupon books were issued this year direct by the Regional
Oil Controller to the applicant concerned. It was therefore only necessary for our
motor licence issuing offices to handle the "AA" category gasoline ration coupon books
for motor-vehicles of the private passenger type and for privately operated motorcycles. The number of " AA " category gasoline licence and ration coupon books
issued by our offices was 90,280, and 1,451 were issued for motor-cycles, the revenue
-collected for the Dominion Oil Controller in this connection being $91,731.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
T. W. S. PARSONS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police.   W 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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W 47
APPENDIX II.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION BRANCH.
Duty Analysis, January 1st to December 31st, 1943.
Investigations.
"A "
Division.
" B"
Division.
"C "
Division.
"D"
Division.
"E "
Division.
Fort
George
Subdivision.
Peace
River
Subdivision.
Totals.
42
9,747
29
114
10
6
2
27
105
178
3
6
43,953
2
22
28
202
18
3
1
3
94
3,629
2
57
1
7
21
3,832
15
62
3
7
3
20
74
55
15
2,931
1
26
12
8,781
10
75
9
23
2
25
128
443
1
3
39,273
1
8
461
1,698
5
26
497
24
1,023
234
Complaints investigated 	
30,440
57
12
26
372
23
1
44
2
26
119
39
1
10,513
9
Mentally ill persons 	
Inquests   ,   ,	
20
56
38
9
28
39
8
27
145
135
537
937
4
1
25,694
1
35,667
5
9
24
141
49
12
Patrols made  	
2,343
5,274
1
2
10
162,717
9
3
23
65
13
1
2
2
68
5
3
18
7
49
39
90
30
588
2,214
122
8
12
	
3
4
25
4
43
566
52
National Selective Service Mobiliza-
1
11
11
Investigations for Departments of
3
1
1
76
78
54,501
29,791
40,601
13,851
51,035
2,987
6,571
199,337
APPENDIX III.
BRITISH COLUMBIA POLICE.
Nominal Roll as at December 31st, 1943.
Headquarters.
Commissioner—T. W. S. Parsons, Victoria.
Assistant Commissioner—J. Shirras, Vancouver.
Commissioner's Office— Rest. No.
Inspector Clark, C, Victoria 	
Asst. Chief Clerk Patterson, E., Victoria  134
Miss J. M. Whitehead  (steno.), Victoria   	
Radio Branch—
Chief Radio Opr. Conlan, W. F., Victoria   493
Sr. Radio Opr. Weld, B. C, Victoria 495
1/Radio Opr. Hicks, J. M., Victoria. 588
Criminal Investigation Branch—      Regt. No.
Inspector Peachey, R., Victoria  	
Sergt. Young, J. A., Victoria  524
Det. Shand, D. J., Victoria  436
Sr. Clerk Ockenden, C. O., Victoria., 273
Miss D. P. Neate (steno.), Victoria	
Miss P. S. Byrom (steno.), Victoria	
Miss M. R. Smith (steno.), Victoria	
Miss V. C. Burnett (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss E. Kinghorn (steno.), Victoria	 W 48                                                      BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Headquarters-
—Continued.
C.I.B.—Finger-print Bureau—          Reg-
..No.
Police Training School—Continued. Reg-
.. No.
Sr. F.P. Opr. Edwards, J. W., Van
Spec. Cst. Hamblin, S. A. L., Victoria
couver  	
338
Motor Branch—
Sr. F.P. Opr. Carmichael, A. G., Vic
Inspr. Hood, G. A., Victoria	
toria   	
644
S/Inspr. Hannah, J. P. M., Victoria_
F.P. Opr. Tinnion, R., Victoria	
836
Chief Clerk Paulding, J. E., Victoria
289
Miss D. Lancaster (steno.), Victoria
	
Chief Clerk Cooke, A. 0., Victoria....
292
C.I.B.—Firearms Registration Bureau—
Sr. Clerk Ellis, W. G., Victoria	
451
Sr. Clerk Grimshaw, F., Victoria	
445
Sr. Clerk Brown, P. H., Victoria	
463
Miss M. E. Brinn (steno.), Victoria..
	
Mechanic J affray, W. A., Victoria
583
Miss T. M. Vye (steno.), Victoria   -.
	
UClerk Sharpe, A., Victoria	
676
Miss J. R. Robson (steno.), Victoria..
	
1/Clerk Moore, H. G., Victoria	
693
Miss M. D. Rogerson   (steno.), Vic
1/Clerk Hadfield, R. A., Victoria
694
toria  .'  	
1/Clerk James, G. H., Victoria	
748
Mrs. F. J. Ritchie  (steno.), Victoria
	
1/Clerk Wilkinson, E., Victoria	
753
Advisory Council (P.C.P.C. and
1/Clerk Merkley, L. W., Victoria	
754
A.R.P.) —
1/Clerk Colpman, W. H., Victoria......
755
Inspr. Moodie, S. F. M., Vancouver_
	
1/Clerk Copeland, C. E., Victoria.
756
Sergt. Cline, S., Vancouver	
78
2/Clerk Cox, R. A., Victoria	
811
Sergt. Hughes, H. P., Vancouver	
225
2/Clerk Jewkes, F. R., Victoria	
846
Corpl. Taylor, D. W., Vancouver	
396
Messenger Prezeau, D. S., Victoria ...
	
1/Cst. Deane, J. M., Vancouver	
577
Miss R. M. Steele (steno.), Victoria..
	
3/Cst. Gilbert, R., Vancouver	
890
Miss   N.   E.   Johnson   (steno.),   Vic
3/Cst. Tuttle, A. J., Vancouver	
892
toria 	
'3/Cst. Duddy, H., Vancouver	
956
Miss V. Jacklin (steno.), Victoria.—
Miss N. Munkley (steno.), Vancouver
	
Miss J.  M. Thorburn   (steno.), Vic
Miss M. G. Haskell (steno.), Vancou-
toria 	
Miss M. Metro (steno.), Victoria	
S/Sergt. Johnson, G. A., Victoria	
202
Miss E. Bourne (steno.), Victoria	
	
3/Cst. Walters, J. A., Victoria	
893
Miss E. A. Kay (steno.), Victoria	
	
3/Cst. Johnstone, H. D., Victoria	
924
Miss I. R. Casilio (steno.), Victoria -
3/Cst. Domay, E. C, Victoria  ■
933
Miss R. Balcom  (steno.), Victoria.—
	
3/Cst. Cawdell, C. A., Victoria	
958
Miss E. J. M. Coates   (steno.), Vic-
Spec. Cst. Thornton, J. F., Victoria . 	
Miss J.  M. A. Smith   (steno.), Victoria   	
Accounts Branch—
Paymaster Moses, D. D., Victoria  	
Sr. Clerk Embleton, C. V., Victoria... 327
2/Clerk Campbell, C. C, Victoria— 812
3/Clerk Excell, L. B., Victoria  876
3/Clerk Walkinshaw, J. B., Victoria.. 942
Miss J. N. Smith (steno.), Victoria... 	
Miss A. H. Chaney (steno.), Victoria 	
Q.M. Stores—
1/Clerk Kirkpatrick, D. C, Victoria.. 710
2/Clerk Forbes, A. C, Victoria  943
Transport Branch—
Mech.  Supr.  McNaught, J.  F., Victoria   409
Mrs. E. Mcintosh   (steno.), Victoria 	
Mrs. M. Johnson (steno.), Victoria ... 	
Police Training School—
S/Inspr. Mackenzie, C. K., Victoria. 	
2/Cst. McVie, W., Victoria  815
Spec. Cst. Ehly, J. J., Victoria	
toria .	
Miss E. J. Thorne (steno.), Victoria .
Miss J. D. McGraw (steno.), Victoria .
Miss S. A. P. Sangster (steno.), Victoria   .
Miss M. E. Dykes (steno.), Victoria.. .
Miss M. D. King (steno.), Victoria... .
Miss M. L. Hood (steno.), Victoria... .
Miss E. V. Watson (steno.), Victoria.
Miss J. M. Robinson (steno.), Victoria   .
Miss D. E. Hemingsen (steno.), Victoria  ;  .
Miss A. D. Pattinson  (steno.), Victoria  ,	
Miss V. C. Ross (steno.), Victoria	
Miss D. Jeeves (steno.), Victoria ...
Miss F. S. Porter (steno.), Victoria.
Miss L. M. Huzzey (steno.), Victoria
Miss A. M. Wilkinson (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss J. B. M. Speck (steno.), Victoria
Miss P. D. Green (steno.), Victoria.-. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.
W 49
Headquarters—Continued.
Motor Branch—Continued. Regt. No.
Miss I. M. Mclndoe (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss V. Lea (steno.), Victoria  	
Miss E. M. Noble (steno.), Victoria ...
Miss F. M. Byatt (steno.), Victoria	
Mrs.  A.  D.  Johnston   (steno.),  Victoria   	
Miss J. W. Howell (steno.), Victoria 	
Mrs. G. E. Phillion (steno.), Victoria 	
Mrs. M. A. McKay (steno.), Victoria 	
Mrs. E. R. Slegg (steno.), Victoria	
Mrs. C. W. Kaehn  (steno.), Victoria 	
Miss B. F. Barrick (steno.), Victoria 	
S/Inspr. Lord, J. S., Vancouver  	
Sr. Clerk Lord, F. N., Vancouver .... 498
Sr. Clerk Bestwick, A. M., Vancouver 416
1/Clerk Barclay, J., Vancouver  519
1/Clerk Ellis, J. N. L., Vancouver..- 531
1/Clerk McPherson, A. B., Vancouver 539
1/Clerk Pughe, C. T., Vancouver  743
1/Clerk Hamilton, S., Vancouver  745
1/Clerk Niven, J. J., Vancouver  747
Motor Branch—Continued. Regt. No.
1/Clerk Archibald, W., Vancouver ... 760
Miss G. Beattie (steno.), Vancouver.. 	
Mrs. V. Stone (steno.), Vancouver.... 	
Miss C. A. Stevenson (steno.), Vancouver   	
Mrs. M. Godwin (steno.), Vancouver 	
Asst.  Chief Clerk Lindsay, G., New
Westminster   525
1/Clerk Fraser, P. R., New Westminster    623
1/Clerk Denyer, F., New Westminster 750
1/Clerk Gunn, J. A., New Westminster    751
Mrs.    T.    McMillan    (steno.),    New
Westminster   	
1/Clerk Gordon, W. K., Nanaimo  757
1/Clerk Pennock, C. S., Chilliwack- 746
Miss E. C. Leary (steno.), Chilliwack 	
1/Clerk Moore, M., Vernon  744
1/Clerk Fehner, H. H., Nelson  749
1/Clerk Jacklin, B. R., Dawson Creek 661
" A " Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector R. Owens, Victoria.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Kennelly, T., Victoria, Regt. No. 303.
Stenographer—Miss V. M. Page, Victoria.
Motor Traffic Detail— Regt. No.
1/Cst. Lockie, J., Victoria  658
1/Cst. Ring, R., Nanaimo  961
Victoria District—
Sergt. Jacklin, C. C, Victoria  265
Corpl. Backler, L., Victoria  470
1/Cst. Smyth, H., Victoria  578
1/Cst. Dryden, C. S., Victoria  779
2/Cst. Sinclair, R. W., Victoria  838
3/Cst. Coupland, W. B., Victoria  898
3/Cst. Hooker, E. J., Victoria  900
3/Cst. Douglas, D. T., Victoria  936
3/Cst. Tateson, J. D., Victoria  954
3/Cst. Mutter, G. W. M., Victoria _ 957
Spec. Cst. Hodgins, D. R., Victoria _ 	
Spec. Cst. Jobling, D. A., Victoria  	
Spec. Cst. Medley, H. E. J., Victoria	
3/Skpr. Lockwood, E. W., Ganges.— 492
1/Cst. Currie, W. J., Ganges  635
1/Cst. Gibault, J. G., Sidney  709
3/Cst. Weeks, G. D., Sidney  911
2/Cst. Quinn, A. W., Sooke  793
Duncan District—
Corpl. Henry, J. A., Duncan     414
1/Cst. Parsley, H., Duncan  613
1/Cst. Deans, W. W., Duncan  732
2/Cst. McNamara, J. K., Duncan  806
Duncan District—Continued. Rest. No.
1/Cst. Holm, E., Chemainus  573
3/Cst. Clunk, F. J., Chemainus  852
1/Cst. Grant, A., Cowichan Lake  251
1/Cst. Ross, R., Shawnigan Lake  515
Nanaimo District—
S/Sergt. Russell, J., Nanaimo     44
Corpl. Howe, J., Nanaimo  365
1/Cst. Martin, M., Nanaimo  282
1/Cst. Tannock, A., Nanaimo  572
1/Cst. Vickers, A. E., Nanaimo  605
1/Cst. Wellens, A. S., Nanaimo  385
1/Cst. Stewart, T. A., Nanaimo  639
1/Cst. Healey, W. L., Nanaimo  609
1/Cst. Colquhoun, D., Nanaimo  637
3/Cst. Avis, F. D., Nanaimo  859
3/Cst. Brassard, G. M., Nanaimo __ 927
3/Cst. VanMeer, A. N., Nanaimo  870
1/Cst. Taylor, A. H., Ladysmith  530
3/Cst. Patton, F. D., Ladysmith  849
1/Cst. Clay, L. W., Qualicum  669
Courtenay District—
Sergt. Hatcher, W. J., Courtenay  210
1/Cst. Matheson, M., Courtenay  616
1/Radio  Opr.  Halsey-Brandt,  C.  G.,
Courtenay   633 W 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" A " Division—Continued.
Courtenay District—Continued.         Regt. No.
1/Cst.  Figueiredo,  C.  T. J.,  Courtenay   777
3/Cst. Corson, E., Courtenay.—.  858
3/Cst. Cawdell, F. L., Courtenay  895
3/Cst. Ehly, J. M., Courtenay "960
1/Cst. Shepherd, J., Cumberland  699
Corpl. Davidson, W. H., Alert Bay... 403
2/Cst. Cunningham, A. B., Alert Bay 830
Spec.  Cst.  Humphreys,  P.  J.,  Alert
Bay 	
1/Cst.  MacAlpine,  M.  N.,  Campbell
River  533
3/Cst. Ennals, C. E., Campbell River 885
3/Cst.   Morrison,   W.   R.,   Campbell
River   ;  894
3/Skpr. Bellhouse, C. A., Port Alice _ 471
2/Radio Opr.  Muskett, A.  H., Port
Alice   807
West Coast District— Regt. No.
Sergt. Service, S., Port Alberni   126
1/Cst. Hutchison, P. R., Port Alberni 528
. 1/Cst. Carlson, T., Port Alberni  646
2/Cst. Mann, H., Port Alberni .....   .... 822
3/Cst. Cramond, M. G. W., Port Alberni   850
3/Cst. Hornsby, M. A., Port Alberni., 888
3/Radio   Opr.   Mowatt,   H.   B.,   Port
Alberni   896
3/Skpr. Bond, V. J., P.M.L. 8, Port
Alberni   458
1/Cst.   Good,  R.   C,  P.M.L.  8,  Port
Alberni   835
3/Engnr. Hardiman, I. R., P.M.L. 8,
Port Alberni -«75
1/Cst. Sarsiat, E. G., Alberni  697
2/Cst. Howell, D. H., Ucluelet  826
3/Cst. Redhead, G., Ucluelet  918
" B " Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector J. Macdonald, Nelson.
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Smith, J. L., Nelson, Regt. No. 439.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Kidd, E. G., Nelson, Regt. No. 538.
Stenographer—Mrs. B. E. Romano, Nelson.
Motor Traffic Detail— Regt. No.
Mechanic Lock, J. G. M., Nelson  453
1/Cst. Slater, F., Nelson  507
1/Cst. McCulloch, W., Penticton  491
1/Cst. Elphick, N. H., Trail  735
Boundary District—
Sergt. Halcrow, D., Penticton  440
Corpl. Murray, W. C, Penticton  424
1/Cst. Cartmell, H., Penticton  419
1/Cst. Georgeson, D. C, Penticton ... 632
1/Radio Opr. Fleet, W. G., Penticton 660
3/Cst. Lafek, J., Penticton  869
Spec. Cst. Waddell, W. D., Penticton —
1/Cst. Stewart, W. B., Keremeos —-    39
1/Cst. Winegarden, N. J., Oliver  415
1/Cst. Hassard, R. H., Princeton  313
1/Cst. Haynes, B. H., Princeton  682
2/Cst. Atchison, C. H., Princeton ..... 819
1/Cst. Hemingway, W. W., Summer-
land   522
Grand Forks District—
Corpl. McKay, E. F., Grand Forks ... 456
2/Cst. Drew, D. V., Grand Forks .. 796
3/Cst. Pelton, G. A., Grand Forks ... 862
3/Cst. Cox, J. E. D., Grand Forks .... 871
1/Cst. Emsley, G. J., Greenwood  509
Fernie Police District—
Corpl. Pomeroy, A. J., Fernie  372
1/Cst. Neff, D. G., Fernie  666
1/Cst. Gaunt, A., Fernie.—__,-.„— 670
Fernie Police District—Continued.   Regt. No.
3/Cst. Ivens, R. J., Fernie  952
3/Cst. Jamieson, H. O., Fernie  962
1/Cst. Doree, L. A., Natal  360
3/Cst. Spiers, D. A., Natal   910
East Kootenay District—
Sergt. McKay, W. J., Cranbrook  337
1/Cst. Scott, J., Cranbrook  468
1/Cst. Shiell, R., Cranbrook  506
2/Cst. Roberts, J. A., Cranbrook  831
3/Cst. Howarth, P. W., Cranbrook ... 883
3/Cst. Wells, N. W., Cranbrook  889
Spec. Cst. Davis, T. E., Cranbrook ._. 	
1/Cst. Brabazon, A. G., Invermere _. 434
1/Cst. Sweeney, J. P., Kimberley  618
3/Cst. Baker, T. F., Kimberley  905
Miss M. D. V. Howey (steno.), Kimberley   	
West Kootenay District—
S/Sergt. Wood, H. N., Nelson     73
Corpl. White, J., Nelson  402
1/Cst. Blaney, G. S., Nelson  552
1/Cst. Quigley, T. A., Nelson   562
1/Clerk Amsden, P. H., Nelson  591
1/Cst. Lindsay, H., Nelson  711
2/Cst. Rogers, D. G., Nelson  795
2/Cst.  Martin,  W.,  Lower  Bonnington   786
1/Cst. DeVoin, J. L., Castlegar  648 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.                                W 51
" B " Division
—Continued.
Reg
. No.
Regt. No.
West Kootenay District—Continued.
West Kootenay District—Continued.
2/Cst. Pye, D. H., Castlegar 	
829
1/Cst. Armson, W. F., New Denver.
590
1/Cst. Nelson, F. E., Creston  	
586
1/Cst. Jackson, J. S., Rossland City..
627
1/Cst. Lemm, W. L, Creston	
555
3/Cst. Bacon, H. F., Rossland City ...
904
1/Cst. Parsons, M. S., Fruitvale	
713
1/Cst. Payne, J. R., Salmo	
776
1/Cst. Glaholm, T. W., Kaslo	
566
1/Cst. Anderson, G. W., Trail  	
774
1/Cst. Butler, H. J., Nakusp 	
571
Mrs. M. G. Cook (steno.), Trail 	
" C " Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector
C. G. Barber, Kamloops.
•
Divisional Clerk—Asst. Chief Clerk Wellings, J. E., Kamloops, Regt. No. 399.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opi
. Reith,
S. V., Kamloops, Regt. No. 422.
Motor Traffic Detail—                         Reg
,. No.
Cariboo District—Continued.             Regt. No.
Asst.  Mech.  Supvr.  Fiander,  T.  A.,
1/Cst. Wales, E. A., Quesnel	
614
Kamloops 	
447
3/Cst. Ritson, J. C. W., Quesnel ......
940
1/Cst. Gurr, C. J., Vernon ...
523
1/Cst. Anderson, E. D., Barkerville .
625
1/Cst. Whisker, C, Salmon Arm	
703
1/Cst. Bailey, W. G„ Alexis Creek ...
547
Kamloops City—
Yale District—
Corpl. Jennings, H. J., Kamloops	
335
Sergt. Hooker, J. W., Ashcroft	
388
1/Cst. Quaite, T. C. S., Kamloops ....
680
1/Cst. Grahame, M. G., Ashcroft	
526
1/Cst. Forrester, R., Kamloops	
770
3/Cst. Dykes, J. N., Ashcroft	
907
2/Cst. Thomson, M. L., Kamloops	
828
2/Cst. Holley, J. R., Bralorne	
827
3/Cst. Campbell, J. L., Kamloops	
935
1/Cst. Olson, L. I., Bridge River	
946
3/Cst. Roberts, W. P., Kamloops     _
938
1/Cst. Gray, J. D. L., Clinton	
663
3/Cst. MacColl, D. C, Kamloops	
953
1/Cst. Welsman, R. S., Lillooet	
484
North-east Kootenay District—
1/Cst. Blakiston-Gray, J., Lytton	
652
Sergt. Dunbar, A., Revelstoke	
353
1/Cst. Gregory, J. F., Spences Bridge
772
Sergt. Jarvis, E. A., Revelstoke 	
375
Kelowna District—
1/Cst. Macdonald, M., Revelstoke   —
692
Sergt. Macdonald, A., Kelowna	
298
1/Cst. Brandon, J. Q. W., Revelstoke
765
1/Cst. Wyman, G. A., Kelowna	
549
2/Radio Opr. Bulman-Fleming, S. E.,
1/Cst. Murdoch, J. W., Kelowna	
557
Revelstoke  	
808
1/Cst. Olts, W. H, Kelowna	
606
2/Cst. Godfrey, M. R., Revelstoke
841
1/Cst. Nicklen, F. W., Kelowna	
761
1/Cst. King, J., Golden	
476
3/Cst. Callens, J. H., Kelowna	
939
Kamloops District—
S/Sergt. Fairbairn, A., Kamloops —
33
Vernon District—
1/Clerk Brown, J. M., Kamloops	
517
Sergt. Nelson, R. S., Vernon 	
262
1/Cst. Heatley, G. D., Kamloops	
559
Corpl. Hodgkin, W. L., Vernon	
397
2/Cst. Bruce, W. A., Kamloops	
787
1/Cst. Duncan, A., Vernon	
721
1/Cst. Teal, W. T., Kamloops 	
805
1/Cst. Craig, W. A., Vernon	
782
Mrs. M. J. Harris (steno.), Kamloops
3/Cst. Drysdale, P. Q., Vernon	
865
2/Cst. Ball, G. D., Blue River	
837
3/Cst. Dale, H. M., Vernon	
877
1/Cst. Waddell, C. J., Chase	
546
3/Cst. Hamilton, J. F., Vernon	
945
1/Cst. Fraser, T. C, Merritt	
706
3/Cst. Gibbon, A. E., Vernon	
947
2/Cst. Wisenden, J. A., Red Pass
790
1/Cst. Hay ward, R. H. P., Armstrong
412
Sergt. Baker, T. W., Williams Lake .
135
1/Cst. Mackmlay, R., Enderby	
802
1/Cst. Sharpe, W. H, Williams Lake
601
1/Cst. Quesnel, J. A., Lumby	
269
2/Cst. Kemp, W. H., Williams Lake.
818
1/Cst. Moore, T., Salmon Arm	
580
3 /Radio Opr. Patrick, H. ft, Williams
3/Cst. Calvert, A., Salmon Arm	
861
Lake     	
880
1/Cst. Smith, A. G., Sicamous ,	
656 W 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" D *' Division.
Officer Commanding—Inspector E. Gammon, Prince Rupert.
Divisional Clerk—Sr. Clerk Mead, G. D., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 201.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Davis, W. T., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 778.
Radio Operator—2/Radio Opr. Ward, J., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 847.
Prince Rupert District— Regt. No.
Sergt. Hall, 0. L., Prince Rupert _ 278
1/Cst. Oland, C. F., Prince Rupert._ 41
3/Skpr.  Brooksbank,  F.  H.,  P.M.L.
15, Prince Rupert  675
3/Engnr. Moorehouse, T., P.M.L. 15,
Prince Rupert  848
3/Radio Opr.  Shantz, D. O., P.M.L.
15, Prince Rupert   937
1/Cst. Knox, J. A., Stewart  500
2/Cst. Kelly, T. J., Atlin  794
1/Cst. Todd, J. W., Telegraph Creek 727
2/Cst. Meredith-Jones, J. H., Terrace 834
3/Cst. McKinnon, L. W., Terrace  _ 903
3/Cst. Richmond, W. H., Terrace  919
1/Cst. Bell, E. W., Port Essington— 798
Ocean Falls District—
Corpl.   Potterton,   L.   A.   N.,   Ocean
Falls   297
3/Skpr.   Mason,   W.   J.,   P.M.L.   7,
Ocean Falls   813
1/Radio Opr. Robson, A., P.M.L. 7,
Ocean Falls   784
3/Engnr.   Gorrie,   C.   D.,   P.M.L.   7,
Ocean Falls   810
1/Cst. Trant, W. F. ft, Bella Coola.. 622
Prince Rupert City Detachment—   Regt. No.
S/Sergt.   Gallagher,   F.   W.,   Prince
Rupert      68
Corpl. Lashmar, A. T., Prince Rupert 425
1/Cst. Moore, R. ft, Prince Rupert.. 771
2/Cst. McLeod, M. H., Prince Rupert 844
3/Cst. Ferguson, S., Prince Rupert. 856
3/Cst.     Gardiner,    W.     ft,    Prince
Rupert   866
3/Cst. Walker, F. J., Prince Rupert. 867
3/Cst.   Brotherstone,   G.   Y.,   Prince
Rupert   906
3/Cst. Strouts, R. W., Prince Rupert 915
3/Cst.    McAllister,    J.    R.,    Prince
Rupert  . ..... 941
3/Cst. Turtle, E. M. ft, Prince Rupert 959
Hazelton District—
Sergt. Boyt, F. W. B., Smithers  310
1/Cst. Ramsay, C. N., Smithers  718
2/Cst. West, W. A. A., Smithers  824
3/Cst. Taylor, J. R., Smithers  913
1/Cst. Clark, J. S., Burns Lake  684
1/Cst. Irving, W. B., Hazelton  769
Queen Charlotte District—
Corpl. Brunton, T. D., Queen Charlotte City   449
3/Cst. Bradley, E., Masset  855
" E " Division.
Officer Commanding—Assistant Commissioner J. Shirras, Vancouver.
Sub-Inspr. R. Harvey, Vancouver.
Divisional Clerk—Sub-Inspr. F. Swanson, Vancouver.
Asst. Divisional Clerk—3/Clerk Ferguson, W. ft, Vancouver, Regt. No. 901.
Radio Operator—Sr. Radio Opr. Putland, R., Vancouver, Regt. No. 438.
Stenographer—Miss A. Welch, Vancouver.
Stenographer—Miss M. C. Thibaudeau, Vancouver.
Motor Traffic Detail— Regt. No.
Asst. Mech. Supvr. Macdonald, H. D.,
Vancouver   520
Mechanic Lees, R. A., Vancouver  433
1/Cst. Dillabough, A. J., Chilliwack.. 558
Vancouver District— s
S/Sergt. Duncan, G. J., Vancouver  75
Sergt. Ledoux, ft, Vancouver  253
Sergt. Barwis, C. W. A., Vancouver.. 352
Corpl. Phipps, M. T., Vancouver  446
Det. Macdonald, J. A., Vancouver  489
1/Cst. Thomson, D. S. E„ Vancouver 428
1/Cst. Orchard, W. ft, Vancouver.... 502
1/Cst. Kelsberg, P., Vancouver   542
Vancouver District—Continued.        Hegt. No.
1/Cst. Bradner, F. E., Vancouver  567
1/Cst. Cameron, J., Vancouver  653
1/Cst. Walker, R., Vancouver  704
1/Cst. Williamson, J. O., Vancouver.. 736
1/Cst. Johnston, W. A., Vancouver  797
3/Cst.  Abrahamson, F.  ft, Vancouver   949
3/Cst. Cofield, R. J., Vancouver  963
Miss L. K. Reid  (steno.), Vancouver 	
1/Cst. Aylward, W. P., University      738
1/Cst. Fox, A. E. P., Squamish     602
3/Cst. Cottingham, W. L., Squamish 932
Corpl. Jeeves, F. L., Powell River    . 483 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.
W 53
E " Division—Continued.
Vancouver District—Continued.        Regt. No.
3/Skpr. Allan, R. E., Powell River.... 887
2/Cst. Betts, J. F., Powell River  820
3/Radio Opr. Lane, L. R. ft, Powell
River  878
1/Cst. Home, A. G., Sechelt  723
Chilliwack District—
Sergt. Thomson, W. J., Chilliwack .... 293
1/Cst. McWhirter, D. R., Chilliwack 503
1/Radio   Opr.   Dobell,  J.   D.,   Chilliwack    599
1/Cst. Sutherland, A. J., Chilliwack.. 695
1/Cst. Ellis, R. N., Chilliwack  708
2/Cst. Fleming, B. B., Chilliwack— 840
3/Cst. Turnbull, R. H., Chilliwack ... 955
Spec. Cst. Fielders, J. A., Chilliwack 	
Corpl.   MacAndrew,   G.   A.,   Abbotsford  .    421
3/Cst. Nelson, G. S., Abbotsford  851
1/Cst.    Frazer,    H.   J.,    Alexandria
Bridge   886
1/Cst. Davey, J. H., Agassiz  529
1/Cst. Norman, H. L., Hope  423
1/Cst. Bell, J., Sumas  737
Burnaby District—
Sergt. Anderson, ft, Burnaby  679
1/Cst. Asel, N. E., Burnaby   569
1/Cst. Pearson, G. S., Burnaby  579
1/Cst. Twist, H., Burnaby  607
1/Cst. Dowling, J. T. E., Burnaby- 624
1/Cst. Marsh, T. B., Burnaby  698
1/Cst. Dilworth, G. R., Burnaby  700
1/Cst. Cave, E. E., Burnaby  702
1/Cst. Nelson, N. C. B., Burnaby..- 733
3/Cst. Brown, T. G., Burnaby  860
3/Cst. Abrahamson, A. A., Burnaby,  874
3/Cst. Innis, R. J., Burnaby  891
3/Cst. Curie, W. G., Burnaby  897
3/Cst. Smith, L. G., Burnaby  909
3/Cst. Klick, H. E., Burnaby  923
3/Cst. Stringer, R. I., Burnaby  934
New Westminster District—
Sergt.   Woods-Johnson,   F.   B.,   New
Westminster   430
1/Cst. Vise, R., New Westminster— 556
1/Cst. Scales, T., New Westminster,. 600
1/Cst. Causton, I. R., New Westminster   677
3/Cst. Estlin, C. E., New Westminster    914
3/Cst. Bonner, H. G. G., New Westminster    864
Regt. No.
New Westminster District—Continued.
3/Cst. James, W., Pattullo Bridge . 926
3/Cst. Davies, H. G., Pattullo Bridge 928
3/Cst. Gibbon, N. D., Pattullo Bridge 931
3/Cst. Biswanger, R., Pattullo Bridge 950
1/Cst. Saunders, F. G., Port Coquitlam     662
1/Cst. Dale-Johnson, V. L.  E., Port
Coquitlam   712
2/Cst. McGary, J. D., Coquitlam   _ 825
Corpl. Kirkup, J., Essondale  387
3/Cst. Robertson, T. D., Haney  879
1/Cst. McGeachan, J., Haney  568
1/Cst. Johnston, J. A., Langley Municipality    541
2/Cst.  Malins,  E.  M.,  Langley  Municipality    839
1/Cst. Leighton, R. K., Mission    610
3/Cst. Cummins, J. N., Mission  853
3/Cst. Piers, C. E., Mission  912
North Vancouver District—
Sergt.  Herdman, T., North Vancouver  ,  315
1/Cst.  Williams, J.  A.,  North  Vancouver        59
1/Cst. Sharpe, G. ft, North Vancouver     153
1/Cst. Kirkham, J. W., North Vancouver  .,_   .__.   _. 442
1/Cst.    MacBrayne,    M.    B.,    North
Vancouver      . 486
1/Cst. Cummings, R., North Vancouver   571)
1/Cst. McDonald, D. A., North Vancouver       ._. , 683
1/Cst.    Chamberlin,   D.    E.,   North
Vancouver        , 696
3/Cst. Nott, S. T., North Vancouver 908
3/Cst. Felker, D. B., North Vancouver   .  916
3/Cst.  Fletcher, J.   M.,  North Vancouver  917
3/Cst. Stevens, M., North Vancouver 930
1/Cst. Murdoch, W., Deep Cove        ._ 766
1/Cst. Payne, D. A. B., Lynn Creek , 640
Richmond District—
Corpl. Watt, J. ft, Brighouse  469
1/Cst. Spall, A. E., Brighouse      801
2/Cst. Mumford, C. W., Brighouse   . 800
3/Cst. Brue, T., Brighouse  873 W 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fort George Subdivision.
Regt. No.
Sergt. Clark, G. H., Prince George  186
Corpl. De Witt, N. 0., Prince George .... 368
1/Cst. McKenney, H. L., Prince George 205
1/Cst. Smith, W., Prince George  270
2/Cst. Russell, J. H., Prince George _____ 817
2/Radio   Opr.   Lennox,   S.   J.,   Prince
George   843
3/Cst. Cowan, W. L., Prince George __ 863
3/Cst. Perry, G. A., Prince George  920
Regt. No.
3/Cst. Maxwell, T. R., Prince George.... 921
3/Cst. Jakeman, L. H., Prince George. 922
3/Cst. Corey, E. T., Prince George  944
3/Cst. Demmon, W. A., Prince George _ 951
1/Cst. Munkley, B. E., Fort St. James_ 716
1/Cst. Blezard, J., McBride  441
3/Cst. Price, C. W., Pinchi Lake  899
1/Cst. Mclndoe, D. D., Vanderhoof  481
Peace River Subdivision.
Regt. No.
S/Inspr. Mansell, H. H., Pouce Coupe.. 	
Sergt. Raybone, S. E., Pouce Coupe  369
1/Cst. Smith, P. B., Pouce Coupe  362
2/Radio   Opr.   Harrison,  R.   P.,  Pouce
Coupe    809
3/Cst. Hughes, G. B., Pouce Coupe  925
Corpl. Sweeney, J. ft, Dawson Creek — 490
1/Cst. Begallie, M. L., Dawson Creek ... 722
1/Cst. Lewis, H. S., Dawson Creek  734
2/Cst. Drysdale, W., Dawson Creek .... 814
Regt. No.
2/Cst. Faryon, L. E., Dawson Creek   - 823
3/Cst. Rosberg, E. L., Dawson Creek... 902
3/Cst. Fletcher, W. D., Dawson Creek.. 948
3/Cst. Youngberg, G. E., Dawson Creek 964
1/Cst. Mew, E. W., Fort St. John  592
1/Cst. Lumsden, W. J. F., Fort St. John 731
1/Cst. Poole, J. G., Fort St. John  781
2/Cst. Blair, W. F., Liard River  842
1/Cst. Boulton, P., Muskwa  667 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.
W 55
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Miscellaneous
Non-collision a
Not stated	
15
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Five pedestria
accidents;   th
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued.
Number of Accidents.
2.                               Hour of Occurrence.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
145
94
61
49
29
17
58
231
206
262
311
323
236
198
253
333
466
436
325
301
224
193
201
219
42
3
1
3
2
1
4
4
6
4
7
3
7
2
2
6
6
4
12
9
6
4
5
9
4
56
36
21
19
13
4
21
95
55
66
70
88
82
64
81
113
152
155
123
106
84
71
77
73
20
86
57
2 to    3 a.m.    - 	
3 to    4 a.m.    	
37
28
15
13
33
7 to    8 a.m	
132
192
10 to 11 a.m  	
11 to 12     m... _	
234
232
147
132
2 to    3 p.m	
170
3 to    4 p.m  _  ...             _	
214
308
7 to    8 p.m   _	
186
134
9 to 10 p.m.- , 	
10 to 11 p.m _ _	
119
11 to 12 p.m _  	
137
18
Totals   __	
5,213
114
1,745
3,354
Number of Accidents.
3.                                Day of Occurrence.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1.  Sunday   _ _                 _„..
509
712
733
651
667
938
1,001
2
19
12
18
7
15
20
23
190
235
237
229
212
307
334
1
300
3. Tuesday	
478
415
440
611
4. Wednesday _    _ __   _    _ 	
5. Thursday..	
6. Friday   	
8. Not stated-.. - 	
Totals 	
5,213
114
1,745
3,354
Number of Vehicles involved.
4.                          Type of Vehicles involved.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Private passenger   	
5,605
145
12
266
138
560
39
1,728
2
53
7
5
1
4
10
46
2
1,594
112
2
71
50
154
10
424
3,958
26
5
194
3. Stage                .    .
4   T»*'
5.  Una
84
396
7. " Drive Yourself "
8. Trur-lc
9. Not stated
29
1,258
Totals	
8,495
128
2,417
5,950 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.
W 57
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued.
Number of Accidents.
5.                                  Railroad Crossings.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1
17
4
3
2
2
2
1
4. Unguarded crossing _  	
13
Totals
25
4
3
Number
of Drivers.
6.                     Drivers involved, Description of.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1   Male      -— - 	
7,858
591
46
119
7
2
2,233
173
11
5,506
411
2. Female- -	
Totals                                      	
8,495
128
2,417
5,950
Age of Driver.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
220
1,300
3,792
1,903
867
272
141
2
25
59
24
7
4
7
86
392
1,097
469
271
69
33
2,636
1,410
589
199
101
Driving Experience.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
48
53
90
1,133
7,012
159
1
19
97
11
20
22
30
351
1,945
49
27
31
4,970
Condition of Driver.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
21
18
22
7,793
7
634
1
3
96
28
7
10
7
2,208
2
183
13
5,489
5
423
5. Other _ -	
Licence of Driver.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
8,172
183
135
5
116
6
4
2
2,303      ,
66
48
5,753
111
83
3 W 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Amount of property damage for period covered by this report, $592,973.1
Amount of property damage this year to date, $592,973.38.
Number of Pedestrians.
8.                               Pedestrians involved, Actions of.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
19
10
20
20
94
9'
112
6
8
7
81
52
48
87
92
3
9
1
3
2
12
3
2
6
7
19
10
20
20
91
9
103
5
5
5
69
12. Playing in street   - -   	
49
46
81
85
Totals     	
665
48
617
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued.
Number of Drivers.
7.           Action of Driver contributing to Accident.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
364
5
327
1,077
92
3
297
2
269
65
114
40
462
473
73
39
351
13
4,429
9
1
4
1
1
6
18
2
2
2
79
152
4
78
257
8
54
12
15
25
13
162
72
2
4
52
3
1,504
203
245
819
83
3
240
2
257
50
83 .
27
•     282
399
69
35
299
8
2,846
4. Did not have right-of-way-	
7. Passing on curve or hill-.-	
10. Cutting left corner..   	
14. Driving through safety-zone.  • 	
16. Hit and run - -	
20. Not stated - -	
Totals	
8,495
128
2,417
5,950 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.
W 59
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued.
Number of Pedestrians.
Condition of Pedestrian.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
1. Intoxicated	
23
8
26
29
191
236
152
1
3
14
15
15
22
2. Physical defect	
26
177
7. Not stated.   _	
Totals  	
665
48
Number of Victims.
10.                                    Classification of Victims.
Total.                Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
482
1,025
665*
22
232t
83t
IS,
30
28
48
7
6
2
452
997
617
22
225
77
13
8. Not stated  	
2,524
121,
2,403
* Five pedestrians injured ; one killed in other accidents; seven victims, not pedestrians, injured in pedestrian
accidents.
t Sixteen motor-cyclists injured; five killed in other accidents ; three victims, not motor-cyclists, injured in
motor-cycle accidents.
$ One bicyclist injured in a miscellaneous accident; two victims, not bicyclists, injured in bicycle accidents.
Number of Victims.
11.                                          Nature of Injuries.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
71
245
22
86
1,726
29
229
16
4
96
57
21
10
13
9
4
7
14
2. Fractured spine - _	
224
22
76
1,726
16
8. Other injuries (sprains, dislocations, etc.) 	
220
16
89
Totals -  -	
2,524
121
2,403
Number of
Accidents.
12.                                Light Conditions.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Daylight     	
3,348
370
374
189
912
20
60
5
12
3
33
1
1,079
125
123
80
330
8
2,209
240
239
106
549
11
5,213
114
1,745
3,354 W 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued..
13.
Condition of Vehicles involved.
Number of Vehicles.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Brakes defective -	
Steering-gear defective -
Other defects  -
Glaring head-lights	
Head-light out (1 light).
Head-lights out (both)...
Head-lights dim	
Tail-light out or obscured—
No chains (slippery road)-
Puneture or blow-out	
Apparently good-	
Not stated- _ —
Totals
80
50
21
7
7
15
53
18
155
50
1,003
36
1
1
116
4
22
21
9
1
4
16
6
30
18
2,279
11
8,495
128
2,417
55
27
12
7
5
11
37
12
124
31
5,608
21
5,950
14.
Direction of Travel.
Number of Vehicles.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Going straight -
2. Turning right..
3. Turning left™
4. Backing	
5. Parked or standing still	
6. Slowing down or stopping-
7. Skidding. 	
8. Not stated   _.
Totals .
5,650
587
1,012
250
948
11
16
21
!,495
98
5
18
3
4
1,752
175
282
54
139
2
3,800
407
712
193
805
9
8
16
128
2,417
5,950
Road Surface.
Number of Accidents.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Dry surface	
2. Wet surface	
3. Muddy surface..
4. Snowy surface..
5. Icy surface	
6. Loose sand or gravel-
7. Not stated	
Totals	
2,954
1,304
32
198
598
108
19
5,213
71
21
1,086
439
13
46
115
39
7
1,797
844
19
149
474
62
9
1,745
3,354
16.
Road Condition.
Number of Accidents.
Total.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Defect in roadway	
2. Road under repair.—
3. Obstruction in road..
4. Normal  —
5. Other 	
6. Not stated	
Totals.
60
19
21
4,535
45
533
5,213
3
3
1
70
2
35
114
23
7
6
1,517
if
181
1,745
34
9
14
2,948
32
317
3,354 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1943.
W 61
Statistical Summary—Motor-vehicle Accidents, British Columbia—Continued.
Number of Accidents.
17.                                      Type of Road.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
977
3,506
544
73
70
43
17
57
30
4
2
4
294
1,224
169
30
17
11
666
2,225
345
4,  Forth
39
51
28
TotalB                            	
5,213
114
1,745
3,354
Number of Accidents.
18.                               Weather Conditions.
Total.
Fatal.
Personal
Injury.
Property
Damage only.
1. Clear         .         _ 	
3,149
490
795
639
122
9
9
82
11
7
11
1
1
1
1,114
187
182
228
27
5
2
1,953
292
606
400
5. Snow  -	
94
3
6
5,213
114
1,745
3,354  APPENDIX V.
W 63
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLE ACCIDENTS, 1942-43, ACCORDING TO LOCATION.
City Municipalities.
Number of Accidents.
Number op Vehicles.
Number op Injured.
Number of Deaths.
Property Damage.
Place.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
7
4
2
15
10
7
1
26
1
3
24
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
42.8
14
7
3
28
19
10
2
47
1
4
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
50.0
1
3
3
4
Per Cent.
100.0
Per Cent.
	
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
$549.50
$500.00
150.00
1,330.50
1,160.00
175.00
150.00
1,942.25
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
8.9
100.0
25.0
100.0
32.1
18.7
57.1
	
100.0
65.6
Chilliwack City        	
12
10
8
19
16
15
7
3
1
803.50
1,259
1,243.50
7.8
12.5
33.3
300.0
	
100.0
85.9
100.0
36.8
100.0
100.0
46.8
100.0
19
32
4
8
1
2
100.0
100.0
100.0
2,031.70
4.3
4
1
4
2
14
3
2
47
11
153
16
31
4
10
18
30
2
6
25.0
100.0
5
1
7
2
20
6
3
86
17
263
32
50
7
13
33
48
4
9
20.0
100.0
1
1
155.00
37.50
76.1
100.0
500.0
39
24
2
3
48
19
356
44
41
15
4
41
87
3
19
4
22
4,657
42
605
457.1
10
100.0
1
300.00
790.00
2,412.50
291.50
205.00
4,277.45
1,445.14
14,874.40
3,238.00
2,784.50
810.00
1,280.00
2,700.00
2,653.35
250.00
257.50
2,807.52
835.6
100.0
66.6
100.0
1
12
100.0
75.0
100.0
100.0
14
1
2
31
12
207
25
26
10
3
23
54
2
11
2
14
2,811
26
369
20.0
3
1,034.20
105.00
116.60
2,485.85
2,265.52
24,239.67
4,614.50
3,377.50
1,267.50
345.50
2,750.00
5,646.66
150.00
1,486.00
110.00
780.50
268,883.17
2,043.85
34,650.90
57.1
66.6
44.1
	
63.9
46.6
Nanaimo	
34.04
7
3
68
8
11
4
10
4
15
10
6
86
24
17
4
42.8
100.0
26.4
200.0
54.5
1
2
3
100.0
100.0
41.9
9.09
35.2
56.2
11.7
35.3
37.5
56.7
62.9
42.1
21.2
56.4
6
1
1
1
100.0
100.0
16.1
18.0
2
50.0
150.0
114.2
70.0
69.2
100.0
100.0
73.04
27.7
80.0
24.2
81.2
5
24
1
2
7
1,111
13
159
25.0
60.0
100.0
1.8
112.8
Prince Rupert	
25.0
1
3
200.0
40.0
83.3
100.0
111.1
100.0
4
10
1,187
14
192
50.0
	
478.2
100.0
21
2,865
25
450
33.3
1.8
32
4,795
42
758
31.25
2.8
30.0
6.4
7.1
17.1
27
1
5
1,634.00
263,473.59
3,061.85
39,048.62
52.2
32
2
15.6
2.05
4.0
100.0
150.0
33.2
Victoria	
18.0
20.1
11.2
3,775
2,736
1.03
6,329
6,196
2.1
1,567
1,504
4.02
44
45
2.2
$351,829.60
$364,605.69
3.6
District Municipalities.
Number of Accidents.
Number of Vehicles.
Number of Injured.
Number of Deaths.
Property Damage.
Place.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1
1    1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
126
68
1
2
15
33
3
39
22
25
10
15
19
24
173
33
6
18
10
19
1
28
6
30
14
27
27
16
1
12
4
59
63
2
4
12
5
116
9
34
Per Cent.
37.3
Per Cent.
215
96
1
4
24
48
3
63
33
40
16
25
30
34
284
48
8
30
16
30
1
40
8
47
21
38
49
23
2
18
7
108
97
3
6
19
8
191
17
62
Per Cent.
32.09
Per Cent.
67
31
78
22
8
5
6
10
1
14
5
32
6
19
23
11
Per Cent.
16.4
Per Cent.
1
4
2
6
2
Per Cent.
500.0
Per Cent.
$15,294.34
10,311.90
26.00
109.00
1,745.00
4,649.00
1,542.00
4,725.00
5,692.95
4,523.50
1,612.50
2,572.00
2,447.55
2,995.25
$21,066.85
6,122.75
110.00
1,614.25
405.00
2,461.08
35.00
3,589.50
380.00
6,172.43
1,456.50
3,264.15
4,020.24
6,647.57
84.00
1,395.00
660.75
9,505.44
7,433.58
62.00
655.00
4,181.90
550.00
16,728.15
1,323.00
5,752.10
Per Cent.
37.7
Per Cent.
51.3
50.0
29.03
50.0
40.7
500.0
800.0
700.0
650.0
100.0
100.0
323.07
1,380.7
33.3
42.3
66.6
28.2
72.7
33.3
37.5
66.6
11
17
3
22
14
27
13
4
3
13
8
4
19
39
8
45.5
41.1
66.6
36.3
64.2
2
1
100.0
76.7
47.06
Kent
97.7
36.5
6
2
1
2
1
1
66.6
100.0
24.04
Maple Ridge	
75.7
93 3
20.0
40.0
80.0
42.1
17.5
31.25
52.0
63.3
18.5
36.4
53.8
100.0
9.6
375.0
666.6
2
1
26.9
64.2
121.9
100.0
15.8
1
50.0
100.0
33.3
33.3
42.8
32.3
100.0
100.0
	
18
7
40
85
6
6
10
15
92
7
49
28
12
68
150
9
10
15
27
144
13
81
35.7
41.6
6
1
33
37
1
3
8
3
99
6
23
25.0
75.0
3,218.70
2,287.00
4,695.90
14,362.90
685.00
645.00
2,050.00
1,777.50
14,624.97
792.00
4,791.15
56.6
47.5
2
2
2
1
1
6
1
2
100.0
50.0
71.1
58.8
73.6
102.4
25.8
66.6
33.3
35.3
66.6
40.0
5.1
87.5
48.2
100.0
90 9
Sp allumcheen —   — -
Sumas	
Summerland  — 	
100.0
1.5
103.9
20.0
26.6
8
9
63
2
23
66.6
66.6
70.3
100.0
70.7
26.08
28.5
32.6
30.7
57.1
200.0
9
50.0
14.3
67.04
20.05
West Vancouver    	
30.6
23.4
1
	
100.0
737
729
1.08
1,533
1,181
22.8
408
460
12.7
34
28
17.6
$108,176.11
$105,666.24
2.3
Unorganized Territory.
Number op
Accidents.
Number op Vehicles.
Number of Injured
Number of Deaths.
Property Damage.
Place.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
314
234
195
20
118
22
36
247
192
138
15
97
24
35
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
21.3
17.9
29.2
25.0
16.9
454
320
279
26
180
29
50
367
279
202
22
162
33
53
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
19.1
12.8
27.6
15.3
10.0
139
130
126
10
40
7
10
127
143
85
2
58
7
17
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
8.6
32.5
80.0
18
15
4
3
4
1
2
15
10
9
4
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
16.6
33.3
$50,063.30
39,598.95
36,238.45
3,678.50
21,315.85
2,546.55
6,993.00
$45,161.65
33,843.55
20,596.70
2,040.00
12,944.75
3,465.00
4,649.80
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
9.7
14 5
10.0
" C " Division	
" D " Division	
125.0
33.3
43.1
44.5
39 2
45.0
100.0
Fort George Subdivision	
Peace River Subdivision	
9.09
13.7
6.0
6
4
500.0
100.0
36.1
2.7
70.0
33.5
939
748
23.4
1,338
1,118
16.4
462
439
4.9
47
48
2.1
$160,434.60
$122,701.45
23 5
Comparative Statement of Motor-vehicle Accidents, 1942-43.
City Municipalities, District
Number of Accidents.
Number of Vehicles.
Number of Injured.
Number of Deaths.
Property Damage.
Municipalities, and Unorganized
Territory.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.    jlncrease.
1
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
1
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
1942.
1943.
Increase.
Decrease.
Totals
5,451
5,213
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
4.3
8,856
8,495
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
4.07
2,437
2,403
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
1.39
125
121
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
3.2
$620,440.31
$592,973.38
Per Cent.
Per Cent.
4.4 PART II.
INSPECTOR OF GAOLS.
INDEX.
Page.
Ages of prisoners  74
Commitments  73
Convictions, previous  75
Educational status  73
Employment of prisoners  76
Expenditure and revenue  77
Drugs, habits as to use of  74
Maintenance, cost of    72
Prison population, movement of  72
Nationalities .  73
Occupations      74
Offences for which prisoners committed—
(a.)  Crimes against the person  76
(b.)  Crimes against property  76
(c.)  Crimes against public morals and decency  76
(d.)  Crimes against public order and peace  76
(e.)  Other offences not enumerated above    76
Officers and employees, number of  77
Racial      74
Report of Inspector of Gaols    67
Report of Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm  67
Report of Warden, Nelson Gaol  68
Report of Warden, Kamloops Gaol  68
Report of Warden, Prince George Gaol  69
Report of Social Service Officer    69
Religion (Creeds)  75
Sentences, period of  75
Sex  73
Social status (married or single) -— 74  Report of the Inspector of Gaols, 1943-44r
The Honourable R. L. Maitland, K.C,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Annual Report for the year ended March
31st, 1944. This report covers the operation of our four Provincial Gaols, namely, the
Oakalla Prison Farm; the Provincial Gaols at Nelson, Kamloops, and Prince George;
and the " Star Class," a group of selected, young first offenders who—segregated from
the older prisoners—are given special supervision and training at the Oakalla Prison
Farm.
During the year under review the general health and conduct of the inmates of
our Provincial penal institutions was, with very few exceptions, most satisfactory.
In his report on the Oakalla Prison Farm, Warden John Millman states:—
"Two more acres of land have been slashed and cleared, 150 cords of wood cut,
twenty-five fence-posts made for hog and chicken pens, two more miles of land-draining
ditches cut, and eight new culverts made. During the year 168 hogs were raised, of
which 122 have been butchered for consumption within the institution. We have 175
hens laying approximately 100 eggs per day, and 194 pullets. Eighty birds were killed
for the kitchen.
" We were more than self-supporting in so far as produce was concerned, having
found it necessary to dispose of 9.35 tons of vegetables to other Provincial Institutions,
giving us a revenue of $366.25. These figures have been increased somewhat since the
close of the fiscal year.
" The Star Class has been progressing favourably under the supervision of First
Assistant Chief Gaoler T. A. Camm, assisted by two other officers. The Class is still
quartered on the two top tiers in the West Wing of the Main Building, but has study
quarters and a large workshop located in the Old Gaol Building. The youths have been
profitably employed during the past few months repairing and rebuilding worn out
furniture from the Court-house at Vancouver and other Provincial Institutions under
the direction of Guard P. E. Berkey. They are also given a certain amount of general
farm-work, thus ensuring plenty of fresh air and exercise and varied employment.
" Our efforts to dispose of the Jersey cattle here and replace them with a smaller
herd of Holsteins have to date been fruitless. The matter has not been lost sight of
however, and possibly our efforts will meet with greater success next year. I would
like to recommend the construction of a pig-brooder, similar to that presently being
constructed at the Colony Farm, Essondale.
"Accomplishments of the female inmates under the supervision of the Matron in
Charge, assisted by members of the Elizabeth Fry Society, to whom much credit is
due, are very satisfactory.    The Matron reports the making of the following:—
" For use in the institution: 65 uniform dresses, 40 nightgowns, 40 pairs drawers,
12 table-cloths, 12 crocheted rugs, and 112 tea-towels.
" To the New Westminster Superfluity Shop: 48 crocheted and hooked rugs, 13
garden ornaments, 4 Mexican plaques, 2 painted scenes, 2 pairs knitted woollen soakers,
5 knitted woollen sweaters, and 1 woollen patchwork quilt.
" To Vancouver Red Cross Society: 482 knitted washcloths, 44 knitted sleeveless
sweaters, 18 pairs socks, 5 women's service scarves, 4 navy scarves, 6 pairs baby felt
shoes, 1 woollen crocheted Afghan, 2 knitted woollen sweaters, 17 patchwork quilts, and
1 child's cotton dress.
"To New Westminster V Bundles:  70 seamen's jackets.
To confined inmates:  5 layettes.
67 W 68 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Proceeds of the output to the Canadian Red Cross Society and the V Bundles
netted $800. In addition, the Victory Garden maintained by the female inmates
enabled them to can 362 half-gallon bottles of vegetables for winter use.
" Many improvements have been made in the library of the Women's Gaol. Under
the organization of the British Columbia Library Commission, new shelves have been
built in the general office, 114 books have been recatalogued, 8 magazines and 236 new
volumes have been added, a dictionary table, filing cabinet, book-ends, and mending
material supplied. A lending system has been established under the supervision of
Mrs. Lucas of the Vancouver Public Library, who visits the gaol one afternoon each
week, and the Matron reports that circulation has increased considerably and that the
care taken of the books is highly commendable.
" The question of indefinite sentences being served by girls transferred from the
Industrial School is, however, an ever-present source of discontent, affecting not only
those directly concerned, but the efficiency and functioning of the entire institution.
I sincerely trust the Department will before long arrive at some means of placing these
girls on an equal footing with the other inmates and thus rectify this most unsatisfactory state of affairs.
" In conclusion, I may say that the general behaviour of the inmates, both male
and female, as a whole has shown a marked improvement over the preceding year.
This has not been achieved by disciplinary measures, except in one or two isolated cases,
but is the result of fair treatment extended to all inmates, irrespective of race or creed.
The placing of bench stools, previously mentioned, in each cell for their added comfort
and convenience, the adding of eggs at least once a week and butter two or three times
a week to the menu (luxuries never enjoyed before) are, I firmly believe, all contributory
factors to the improved behaviour. Escapes, while fairly numerous last summer, were
far below the previous year's total, and none have occurred to date in the present
calendar year."
Warden C. G. Barber, of the Kamloops Provincial Gaol, reports:—
" Conditions respecting the operation and administration of affairs of the gaol
during the past year have been very satisfactory.
" Gaol rules and regulations, supplemented by orders to govern local conditions,
were strictly adhered to. It was not necessary to reprimand any prisoner during the
year.
"All inmates, except those awaiting trial, have been kept regularly employed with
janitor-work and other services required in the Police offices, quarters, gaol, gaol garden,
and the grounds around the Provincial Buildings.
" All prison clothing kept clean and in repair.
" I would like to draw attention to the able manner in which Constable W. T. Teal
is carrying out his duties as Gaoler.
" The gaol kitchen was thoroughly renovated during the year and another cook-
stove, supplied by the Department of Public Works, installed. The old stove had
worn out.
" Fewer prisoners served sentence during the past year than during the year ended
March 31st, 1943.    The cost of keep of prisoners is slightly less than last year."
Reporting on the Provincial Gaol at Nelson, Warden John Macdonald states:—
"Administration.—The Nelson Gaol while retaining its status as a common gaol
since June 1st, 1942, has been used mainly as a lockup for prisoners sentenced up to
three months. This has greatly reduced the gaol population and has made it extremely
difficult to obtain suitable trusties to perform the necessary duties in the gaol. The
latter pertains in particular to cooks for the kitchen.
" Population.—The population of the gaol at the beginning of the year was nine.
During the year 188 new prisoners were received and 177 discharged, leaving twenty REPORT OF INSPECTOR OP GAOLS, 1943-44. W 69
inmates in gaol at the end of the fiscal year. The peak of the inmate population during
the year was twenty and the lowest six, the daily average being 14.39 against 21.28 for
the previous year, a decrease of 6.89 per cent.
" Welfare and Recreation.—The inmates not working are allowed the freedom of
the cell block during the day and one hour in the exercise yard in the fresh air. They
are also allowed one-half hour radio programme at noon, and one hour in the early
evening.    The radio is controlled by the Guards from the Gaol Office.
" Religious Services.—The Salvation Army hold services every Sunday morning at
9 o'clock, while other denominations hold service in turn every Sunday afternoon.
" Medical Care.—During the early part of the year the general health of the
inmates was very good, but during the latter part of the year considerable sickness
developed and in some cases inmates were removed on instructions of the Gaol Surgeon
to the Kootenay Lake General Hospital for treatment and care.
" Farm-work.—There was an increase in the amount of vegetables grown in the
gaol garden; this was partly due to the organic fertilizer used and partly to better
climatic conditions. Organic fertilizer is again being used and it is hoped to have
even better results in the future.
" Maintenance and Construction.—Maintenance-work during the year included the
replacing of the steel floors in the cells with cement; the scraping of old paint from the
cells and repainting; the papering of the living quarters and the washing of the whole
interior of the gaol, not including police offices.
" Discipline.—On a whole, the discipline was very good during the year. There
were no escapes and in only five instances were breaches of prison discipline reported
to me for attention."
Sergt. George H. Clark, Warden of the Provincial Gaol at Prince George, reports
no untoward incident in connection with the gaol's management during the year, but
recommends that an addition be built to provide a cell-room for female prisoners and
a kitchen. At the present time to reach the kitchen prisoners have to go back and forth
through the main office. The Warden reports that he has had to remove a cell from
what was formerly the women's cell-room to make room for additional office space.
This was necessitated by the increased activity in police-work in that area.
YOUNG OFFENDERS.
Mr. E. G. B. Stevens, previously titled the " Follow-up Officer," was appointed Provincial Social Service Officer on April 1st, and in his report for the ensuing twelve
months gives the following account of his work:—
" The duties of the Provincial Social Service Officer consist of the supervision of
rehabilitation of members of the Star Class, Oakalla Prison Farm, as well as any other
inmates referred specifically by the Warden of that Institution; adult probation work
with young offenders appearing before the Courts of Greater Vancouver and also the
preparation of pre-sentence reports on any other cases especially requested by Magistrates and Judges.
" With the change in policy at Oakalla Prison Farm and consequent establishment
of the Star Class on March 1st, 1943, under the supervision of Mr. T. A. Camm, a larger
number of young offenders have been given, in some measure at least, the advantages
of segregation and special attention. As outlined in the report of the Inspector of
Gaols, 1942, the policy of housing young offenders in the Old Gaol Building was dropped
owing to the fact that suitable material for transfer in accordance with previous standards became virtually non-existent. As a result it was decided to transfer the group
to one cell block in the main building and increase the number taking the youth training
programme. W 70 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
"As this group has been built up I have been kept in touch with each member.
In cases where a pre-sentence report had been prepared the information secured was
made available to the Warden. Weekly visits are made and frequent consultations are
held not only with the youths themselves but also with the officers under whom they
work. A plan of rehabilitation is worked out with each inmate and assistance is also
given them while in custody in solving numerous personal problems, the solution of
which necessitates some one to act as an agent on the outside.
" Upon completion of sentence each member of the Star Class is discharged direct
to the Social Service Officer and in most cases the first call is "then made to the office of
the National Selective Service. Here the youth now has the advantage of some one
who can speak for him, explain his background, experience, and abilities, and thus
secure in some measure employment which fits his particular qualifications. During
the year fifty-six such new cases were handled by the Social Service Officer, forty-four
of them being members of the Star Class, the balance being other inmates on whose
behalf the Social Service Officer was called in by the Warden.
"A breakdown of this group to date shows that fourteen of these are now in the
armed forces, thirty-two are established in industry, while ten have unfortunately
become recidivists.
" Concerning the adult probation work it might be reported that as near as possible
the trial of each young offender is attended. During the year I have been called upon
to prepare 114 pre-sentence reports in such cases for Magistrates and Judges. In each
instance every possible source of information is tapped and an attempt made in the
short time available to prepare as comprehensive a digest as possible on background,
family situation, work history, previous relations with Police and Social Agencies, and
a brief estimate of personality. As a result sixty new cases were turned over by the
Courts for supervision. The remaining fifty-four reports have aided Magistrates and
Judges in making the sentences pronounced better fit the criminal.
" Each of these probation cases report weekly to my office and in most cases report
back in Court monthly, at which time I attend and am usually asked by the Court to
report my experience with the delinquent since the last appearance. If the delinquent
is employed out of town his weekly reports are made by letter and I appear in Court
on his behalf.
" Of these new probation cases fourteen are now in the armed forces, forty-one
are established in industry, while five have appeared in Court a second time and have
since been sentenced. Contact with this latter group is not lost, however, as they usually are placed in the Star Class and are taken over again upon completion of sentence.
"A statistical summary of cases handled during the fiscal year is as follows:—
Follow-up cases  56
New probation cases  60
Probation cases carried over from 1942-43   30
Pre-sentence reports (other than probation)  54
— 200
" Of the follow-up and probation cases there are at present:—
In the armed forces    43
In industry  86
Become recidivists or since sentenced after a second appearance in Court   17
— 146 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1943-44.
W 71
" By ages the new cases dealt with are divided as follows:-
Age.
Follow-up.
Probation.
Total.
16	
5
.19
18
5
1
1
2
5
4
14
15
7
7
9
2
2
4
17	
19
18 ,	
34
19  ,	
25
20 _   _	
12
21	
9
22 	
3
23                                   ....           	
2
27
1
28            	
2
Over 30	
5
" From these figures it will be seen that of the 116 new cases dealt with, 103 were
21 years of age or under. .
" I cannot conclude this report without making special mention of the unfailing
co-operation I have received at all times from the Warden and officials of Oakalla Prison
Farm, Vancouver City Police and Court officers, officers of the British Columbia Provincial Police, National Selective Service officials, army authorities, Social Service
Exchange, John Howard Society staff, Salvation Army, and other Social Agencies."
In the attached statistics will be found the figures touching the number, sex,
nationality, etc., of prisoners confined during the year in the various Provincial Gaols,
and in conclusion I should like to take this opportunity of expressing my appreciation
of the manner in which those connected with the Provincial Prison Service carried out
their duties during the year.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
T. W. S. PARSONS,
Inspector of Gaols. W 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX.
ANNUAL REPORT ON GAOLS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1944.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
1. Total number of County Gaols in B.C	
1
1
1
1
4
2. Total expenditure for gaol maintenance
in B.C.—
Year ended March 31st, 1944 _.
$212,623.30
$11,130.82
$4,156.13
$3,011.25
$230,921.50
Year ended March 31st, 1943	
202,193.68
12,468.54
3,809.76
2,212.70
220,684.68
3. Average total maintenance cost per day
per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1944
$1.47
$2.11
$1.28
$1 63
$1.62
1 28
1.53
1.74
1.08
.79
Average dietary cost per day per pris-s
oner—
Year ended March 31st, 1944	
$0.23
$0.17
$0.27
$0.40
$0.26
Year ended March 31st, 1943 	
.29
.24
.25
.29
.26
4. Number of prisoners committed—
Year ended March 31st, 1944 	
1,726
151
299
276
2,452
I. Movement of Population, Year ended March 31si
, 1944.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops,
Prince
George.
Totals.
340
9
6
2
357
Received—
1,775
8
249
127
6
40
15
232
16
234
1,902
22
8
755
15
Juveniles  - -.-    - - -	
2,372
197
238
252
Discharged—
1,242
34
53
33
10
3
55
120
163
180
81
1
1
14
9
56
16
131
35
20
45
49
117
43
23
8
1,503
35
By death            	
By release on Court order   (including  "to
bail")	
Totals 	
1,893
177
231
240
2,541
479
20
7
12 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1943-44.
W 73
II.   COMMITMENTS.
1942-43.
1943-44.
Decrease.
Murder.—	
Manslaughter	
Crimes—
Against the person..
Against property	
Against public morals and decency 	
Against public order and peace 	
Other offences not enumerated above	
Insanity    -	
Number of prisoners sentenced 	
Number of days' stay of prisoners 	
Average number of prisoners per month .
Average number of prisoners per day	
Escapes  — — - -	
Escapes and recaptured —.: -	
Deaths in gaols _	
130
524
89
1,513
168
25
2,364
146,176
11,968
391
17
17
1
10
5
133
693
134
1,176
140
23
1,970
156,243
12,735
417
9
6
337
28
2
394
3
169
45
10,067
777
26
III. Sex.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
1,583
192
134
12
210
22
243
9
2,170
235
Totals  -
1,775                     146
232                     252                  2,405
IV. Educational Status.
72
1,197
463
43
15
101
28
2
59
124
43
6
53
146
47
■
199
1,568
581
Totals _	
1,775
146
232
252
2,405
V. Nationality.
(Place of Birth.)
British—
Canada (including Indians)
Great Britain and Ireland....
Other British countries	
Foreign—
United States-.. _ —
Europeans  - _	
Orientals - —-
Other foreign countries	
Totals	
1,264
285
13
63
131
17
2
1,775
100
11
4
21
9
1
123
57
9
30
2
11
232
149
26
18
10
1
7
41
1,636
379
31
183
35
55
2,405
VI. Habits as to Use of Intoxicants.
179
876
720
44
93
9
41
55
136
10
35
207
1,059
1,072
Totals _	
1,775
146
232
252
2,405 W 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
VII. Habits as to Use of Drugs.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
1,558
217
141
5
229
3
250
2
2,178
Addicts ._ _ _ _	
227
Totals _. _ _
1,775
146
232
252
2,405
VIII. Occupations.
Agricultural	
122
351
171
332
768
23
8
26
37
10
48
21
2
2
59
12
20
68
43
4
26
9
2
10
183
32
2
14
216
402
211
631
864
31
No occupation .._ _	
Student  _ 	
50
Totals ~                                 	
1,775
146
232
262
2,405
IX. Racial.
X. Civil State.
XI. Ages.
White	
1,589
15
153
18
1
134        |
3        i
9   !
I
173
1
56
2
223
19
10
2,119
16
231
39
Mongolian     . —	
Totals _ _	
1,775
J
146        j
232
252
2,405
1,134
367
64
210
82
57
3
4
140
59
7
26
184
51
14
3
1,540
534
88
Separated-   _ -. —	
243
Totals _ - _	
1,775
146
232
252
2,405
309
252
254
393
317
170
80
34
17
17
36
19
11
12
35
39
28
42
28
21
39
13
26
39
52
61
38
23
334
25 to 30      -   . ■	
30 to 40      -	
40 to 50       _	
50 to 60	
Over 60	
154
Totals _ _	
1,775
146
•
232
252
2,405 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1943-44.
W 75
XII. Creeds.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
643
290
220
18
117
40
97
5
244
14
5
9
73
28
12
5
9
5
6
1
24
46
1
9
1
106
28
12
4
13
9
21
10
2
28
112
6
53
4
4
46
3
.2
19
888
336
290
Methodist - —	
26
143
57
Lutheran .,. _  -	
■      169
9
280
60
6
Buddhist -	
Others - — -	
20
121
1,775
146
232
252
2,405
XIII.
Duration of Sentence.
480
215
117
288
247
145
36
163
25
4
20
2
26
6
1
49
15
14
35
17
2
2
1
3
8
96
34
28
11
7
1
14
6
35
196
16
8
15
4
3.
1
9
821
280
167
3 months and under 6 months	
6 months and under 12 months	
349
275
151
18 months and under 24 months.-   _.-
Sentenced to penitentiary  	
39
173
42
10
Sentenced to insane asylum .-
20
2
35
34
6
1
1,775
146
232
252
2,405
XIV. Previous Convictions.
875
233
120
104
63
54
43
31
19
17
19
18
9
5
10
11
14
8
6
87
17
12
107
13
5
3
5
1
3
3
1
2
1
1
1
78
32
26
27
29
15
8
6
7
6
3
1
164
45
29
8
3
1
1
1
1,224
*1                   _	
323
2	
174
3                     	
142
4                        .	
100
5                                          _	
70
6 _	
53
7       _.	
40
8                          .             ....-	
26
9  	
18
10      ..              	
28
11                        .           	
22
12   	
9
13  - 	
14	
15      .           - 	
8
10
12
16                     	
14
17                      	
9
18 and 19          	
6
20 to 29        	
88
30 to 39 - -	
17
50 to 59    	
60 to 69         - -	
12
Totals	
1,775
146
232
252
2,405
Per cent, of recidivists	
50.70
26.07
62.00
34.90
* Number to be shown according to actual gaol record. W 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
XV. Offences for which Prisoners were committed and sentenced during the Year.
Commitments.
Sentences.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
<o.)  Crimes against the person—
80
12
9
10
5
1
85
13
9
10
84
9
9
9
5
1
89
10
9
9
Totals -,	
111
6
117
111
6
117
(b.)  Crimes against property—
566
43
48
33
25
591
43
43
33
901
54
48
33
41
942
54
48
33
Totals -	
690
25
715
1,036
41
1,077
<c.)   Crimes against public morals and decency—
99
1
1
33
2
132
3
1
116
1
1
40
2
156
3
1
Totals	
101
35
136
118
42
160
(d.)   Crimes against public order and peace—
Oakalla	
812
28
195
190
125
4
21
7
937
32
216
197
951
33
174
190
146
4
21
7
1,097
37
195
Totals ...
1,225
157
1,382
1,348
178
1,526
147
12
159
162
28
Grand  total   (totals of   (a),   (6),
(c), (<Z),and (e) )	
2,274
235
2,509
2.775
295
3,070
XVI. Employment of Prisoners.
(Per Cent, of Population.)
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
1.619
48.809
5.781
0.625
4.364
10.025
0.594
28.178
65.0
3.0
2.0
12.0
18.0
45.0
10.0
30.0
15.0
Sick.....	
100.0
99.995
100.0
100.0
100.0 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1943-44.
W 77
XVII. Number of Officers and Employees on March 31st, 1944.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
3
10
41
1
1
3
9
2
1
1
	
1
4
1
1
1
1
Chief Gaoler                     _	
Chief Clerk                  	
Disciplinary Guards - —	
1
84
8                        2
2
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year ended March 31st, 1944.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Totals.
Expenditure.
$124,296.50
1,588.55
1,358.90
11,203.23
2,618.11
8,225.90
143.77
1,657.71
4,490.76
31,647.32
33,479.20
9,304.97
7,964.20
5,296.51
1,115.77
14,652.57
$7,833.30
194.90
42.55
382.05
171.82
106.60
$2,135.84
$2,289.58
$136,555.22
1,783.45
174.74
23.31
1,401.45
262.34
111.62
12,022.36
Janitors' supplies _  —..
2,924.86
8,332.50
143.77
General equipment 	
Laundry operations.— _ -	
•260.74
1,918.45
4,490.76
2,039.37
924.43
493.90
312.20
956.45
903.55
96.82
199.00
34,643.14
971.01
242.55
36,278.19
10,138.24
8,475.40
5,296.51
10.20
30.15
1,166.12
Cost-of-living bonus ,	
5.17
14,657.74
$259,043.97
4,398.30
$12,772.06
207.08
$4,494.88
50.00
$3,907.25
$280,218.16
Public Works expenditure-	
4,655.38
$263,442.27
$12,979.14
$4,544.88
$3,907.25
$284,873.54
Revenue.
Rental of quarters, etc., and maintenance of
$29,413.74
21,405.23
$728.00
$388.75
$896.00
$31,426.49
21,405.23
Fines and costs paid   —	
1,120.32
1,120.32
$50,818.97
$1,848.32
$388.75
$896.00
$53,952.04 W 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year ended March 31st,
1944—-Continued.
Total Gross Expenditure.
1943.
1944.
Total Revenue.
1943.
Oakalla	
Nelson	
Kamloops..
Prince George-
Totals -
$260,362.88
13,752.74
4,566.51
3,065.70
$263,442.27
12,979.14
4,544.88
3,907.25
$58,169.20
1,284.20
756.75
853.00
$50,818.97
1,848.32
388.75
896.00
Less revenue..
$281,747.83
61,063.15
$284,873.54
53,952.04
$61,063.15
$53,952.04
Net expenditure.
$220,684.68
$230,921.50
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945.
755-145-4563

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