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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1945

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR THE
TEAS ENDED DECEMBER 31ST
1943
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OP THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY*.
<™>.SSJy_.§_-_
VIOTOEIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chables F. Banfield. Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1944.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1943
is herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
July, 1944- The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twenty-sixth Annual Report on the
work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1943.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., July, 1944- SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of Deputy Minister  7
Statistics of Trades and Industries  7
Pay-roll  8
Comparison of Pay-rolls ,  8
Industrial Divisions  9
Average Weekly Wage by Industries   11
Racial Origin and Nationality „  16
Statistical Tables  17
Summary of all Tables  30
" Hours of Work Act "  31
Average Weekly Hours ...  32
Hours of Work Regulations  35
Labour Legislation .  33
" Control of Employment of Children Act"  33
" Female Minimum Wage Act Amendment Act, 1944 "  33
" Male Minimum Wage Act Amendment Act, 1944 "  33
" Wartime Labour Relations Regulations Act "  33
Board of Industrial Relations  34
Meetings and Delegations  35
New Orders and Regulations  35
Statistics covering Women and Girl Employees  36
Summary of all Occupations  42
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum  43
Single, Married, and Widowed Employees  44
Years of Service Table  45
Inspections and Collections  45
Court Cases  46
Comparative Wages  48
Special Licences  49
Tables covering Male Employees  50
Summary of Orders  53
List of Orders in Effect  74
Hours of Work Regulations  75
Women and Children's Division  80
Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch  81
Secretary-Registrar's Report '.  81
Disputes and Number of Employees affected  82
Analysis of Disputes in British Columbia, 1943 ,  83
Summary of Disputes  83
Table of Conciliation Proceedings  85
Table of Arbitration Proceedings  86
Summary of Awards of Boards of Arbitration  86
Organizations of Employees and Employers  92
Wartime Labour Relations Regulations—Summary  105 K 6
SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Inspection of Factories	
Inspections	
Accident-prevention	
Factory Conditions	
Welfare	
Women in Industry	
Child-labour	
Industrial Home-work.
Freight and Passenger Elevators
Prosecutions	
Apprenticeship Branch	
Trade-schools Regulation Branch-
Safety Branch 	
Page.
. 108
. 108
. 108
_ 109
. 109
_ 110
_ 110
. Ill
_ 111
. Ill
. 113
_ 116
120 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1943.
This Annual Report for the year 1943, being the twenty-sixth of the Department,
marks a year in which the demands for all-out effort forced industrial pay-rolls to
record highs unique in the history of the Department.
In the fourth year of the war, and geared for mass production in the forging of
the tools for victory, British Columbia's industrial machine played an epic part in the
race of preparations for historic " D " day.
Our total Provincial pay-roll, with an increase of $78,303,481 over the previous
year, rose to $381,196,427, the highest on record in the history of the Province.
With demands for peak production bringing less casual employment, and overtime
hours in some instances, average weekly wages climbed to new heights in twenty-one
of the twenty-five tables, the cost-of-living bonus also being a contributing factor in
the general picture of higher wage-levels.
The average weekly wage for all adult male wage-earners rose to $37.19 for 1943,
representing an increase of $1.95 over the previous year, and the highest recorded
since the formation of the Department.
Twenty-two of the twenty-five tables relating to the industrial group showed
increases in the pay-roll totals for 1943.
Greatest increase was again in the ship-building industry (up an additional
$18,000,000 over 1942), followed by the construction industry (up $13,000,000), miscellaneous trades and industries (up over $10,000,000), metal trades (increased almost
$7,500,000), and lumber industries (up over $3,000,000). For others in order of
increase see " Comparison of Pay-rolls," in report data.
Decreases were noted in only three industries (metal-mining, with a further drop
of $490,000;  smelting, down $414,000;  and pulp and paper mills, down $97,000).
With the greatest increases again evident in those industries most essential to the
war effort, employment totals continued to soar, with record gains in metal trades,
ship-building, and industries of a like nature. Increasing numbers of female employees
added to the pay-rolls, replacing male workers for service or releasing others for
essential occupations, swelled the average monthly employment totals to a new high in
1943, the month of August showing a total of 152,694 as against a high of 143,760 in
November of 1942.
While in some vital industries production schedules necessitated longer working-
hours, the average in most industries decreased slightly from the 1942 figures, the
general trend being indicated by the average weekly working-hours for all employees,
which dropped to 47.19 from 48.12 in 1942.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Reflecting the general expansion of industrial activity in British Columbia under
pressure of war conditions the statistical section for 1943 presents an interesting
picture of marked progress in the industrial life of the Province, notwithstanding the
fact that the actual number of firms reporting showed a slight decrease in comparison
with the 1942 figures.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 4,727.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was
4,727, as compared with 4,845 in 1942, a decrease of 118.
7 K 8
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
PAY-ROLL.
The 4,727 firms filing returns in time for classification reported a total pay-roll of
$311,406,320. This total, however, represents only the industrial pay-rolls, and is not
considered as the total Provincial pay-roll until further augmented by additional figures
which follow, showing an accumulative total of $381,196,427, an increase of $78,303,481
over 1942.
Pay-rolls of 4,727 firms making returns to Department of Labour-
Returns received too late to be included in'above summary  _
$311,406,320
70,134
Employers included in Department's inquiry, not sending in returns   (estimated payroll)       __ _____ _ _ ,          1,350,000
Transcontinental  railways   (ascertained  pay-roll)  _ _ __       19,424,973
Pay-rolls  of additional services  not included in  the  industrial  survey;   viz.,   Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, miscellaneous  (estimated pay-roll)       48,945,000
Total _
$381,196,427
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS.
The total Provincial pay-rolls since 1928 are as follows:—
1928-	
   -  $183,097,781
1936  _	
1929 _
  -..    192,092,249
1937	
1930 _ 	
       167,133,813
1938 - - -	
1931- --	
.         131,941,008
1939   v     .._
1932 	
       102,957,074
1940	
1933	
 __    _._       99,126,653
1941	
1934 ____	
       113,567,953
1942.. _____   _
1935 	
     125,812,140
1943  _ _	
$142,349,591
162,654,234
158,026,375
165,683,460
188,325,766
239,525,459
302,892,946
381,196,427
The percentage of the total pay-roll expended in the wage-earner section continued
to increase over 1942, the following table showing 84.25 per cent, of the total allotted
to this class of worker for 1943.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
Officers, superintendents, and managers 	
Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen. —
Wage-earners     _'_ __ _
Per Cent.
10.82
11.86
77.32
Per Cent.
10.22
11.15
78.63
Per Cent.
9.29
10.11
80.60
Per Cent.
7.13
8.66
84.21
Per Cent.
6.57
9.18
84.25
Totals _ _____  	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
Industrial pay-roll totals continued to soar, with twenty-two of the twenty-five
tables showing increases for 1943. Again in the lead, ship-building reached an all-time
high with an increase of $18,290,613 over the previous year, followed by construction,
up $13,254,802, and miscellaneous trades and industries with a gain of $10,147,742;
metal trades increased by $7,413,471, followed by the lumber industries, up $3,143,563;
food products, an increase of $1,915,959; wood manufacturing (N.E.S.), up $1,489,254;
Coast shipping, a gain of $1,359,553; public utilities, up $879,387; explosives and
chemicals, up $513,633; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, $414,973; coal-mining,
$398,481; builders' materials, $306,079; printing and publishing, $194,213; oil-refining, $189,560; breweries, $174,790; garment-making, $139,296; leather and fur goods,
$59,530; house furnishings, $43,705; paint-manufacturing, $27,987; jewellery-manufacture, $3,545;   and cigar and tobacco manufacturing, up $2,530. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 9
Decreases were noted in metal-mining, with a drop of $490,503;   smelting, down
$414,817;  and pulp and paper mills, down $97,415.
1941.
1942.
1943.
Industry.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
37
85
3
27
124
1,054
26
597
70
60
11
104
60
951
841
164
404
58
11
145
12
52
5
111
103
$1,237,173.00
1,787,736.00
3,501.00
3,820,642.00
8,045,059.00
14,827,887.00
3,126,623.00
13,837,812.00
965,505.00
1,707,941.00
293,071.00
1,945,857.00
788,458.00
39,260,130.00
12,702,265.00
13,812,921.00
9,210,500.00
2,994,601.00
423,736.00
4,227,387.00
6,967,732.00
10,534,309.00
6,832,629.00
11,639,772.00
4,456,309.00
34
76
3
27
117
889
24
572
63
65
12
104
53
938
800
127
455
53
10
145
13
46
5
110
104
$1,584,038.00
2,000,579.00
4,441.00
4,491,833.00
8,660,344.00
30,101,754.00
3,501,356.00
16,276,059.00
1,264,303.00
1,778,909.00
343,552.00
2,018,329.00
866,701.00
43,935,333.00
17,223,536.00
11,808,861.00
16,012,831.00
3,039,683.00
429,195.00
4,143,521.00
8,824,524.00
47,203,906.00
7,881,503.00
12,734,102.00
5,917,196.00
31
74
3
26
119
753
23
547
66
67
11
99
55
948
801
93
510
62
10
142
12
47
5
115
108
$1,758,828.00
2,306,658.00
6,971.00
Coal-mining    __	
4,890,314.00
10,019,897.00
43,356,556.00
4,014,989.00
18,192,018.00
1,403,599.00
1,822,614.00
Jewellery-manufacturing  	
347,097.00
2,433,302.00
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of	
Lumber industries  	
926,231.00
47,078,896.00
24,637,007.00
11,318,358.00
26,160,573.00
3,229,243.00
457,182.00
4,337,734.00
8,727,109.00
65,494,519.00
7,466,686.00
13,613,489.00
7,406,450.00
Smelting             	
Wood manufacturing (N.E.S.) 	
Totals         	
5,115
$175,449,556.00
4,845
$252,046,389.00
4,727
$311,406,320.00
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
For purposes of record and comparison the industrial activities of the Province
are segregated into three divisions—Greater Vancouver, Vancouver Island, and Rest of
Mainland. Again, as in the year previous, due to the localization and development of
heavy industries within the Greater Vancouver section, a continued increase in the
percentage attributable to this division was evident in 1943, the percentage increasing
to 46.88, as against 45.91 per cent, in 1942. Resultant fractional decreases were noted
in the 1943 percentages representing the other divisions—the Vancouver Island percentage decreasing to 17.76 from a previous figure of 18.18, and the Mainland section
showing 35.36 per cent, as against 35.91 per cent, for 1942.
By the application of the above percentages to the total 1943 pay-roll, a breakdown of that figure covering the three industrial divisions is obtained, as shown in the
following table:—
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
$57,591,570.70
73,762,276.39
34,329,612.91
$67,477,121.96
82,034,703.67
38,813,940.37
$92,504,732.26
98,157,533.10
48,863,193.64
$139,058,151.51
108,768,856.91
55,065,937.58
$178,704,884.98
134,791,056.59
67,700,485.43
Rest of Mainland	
Vancouver Island  	
Totals    _
$165,683,460.00
$188,325,766.00
$239,525,459.00
$302,892,946.00
$381,196,427.00
An indication of the higher earnings in certain industries and the decreasing
numbers employed in the lower wage brackets is evident in the following—showing the K 10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
total number of adult males employed in the various industries for the week of employment of the greatest number, together with the percentage of those in receipt of less
than $19 per week:—
Industry.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing   _. _ __
Leather  and  fur  goods        _	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing „ _ __..__ __	
Coast shipping  _ __ _____ ____ _'„.
Food products      _ ____ _„  	
House furnishings    _ ____ __	
Printing and publishing
Breweries _ ____	
Explosives and chemicals
Metal trades  _	
Garment-making    _
Builders'  materials  - _ _ _ _ _     1,228
Smelting _ __ ____  	
Wood  manufacturing   (N.E.S.) _ _ _	
Miscellaneous trades and industries     	
Construction    ,.__   _ _     _.._
Ship-building    _ ___ _. _ __	
Oil-refining __ ____   _ ___	
Street-railways, power, etc.   _ _ _ ■	
Lumber   industries     _. _ _
Coal-mining   .__   ____   „ __  	
Pulp and paper manufacturing  ._   __ ____
Metal-mining   _  	
Jewellery-manufacturing      _ _	
Paint-manufacturing   _	
While in certain industries fluctuations in the numbers employed in the lower wage
groups occur due to the increased employment of unskilled labour, it is significant that
thirteen of the twenty-five tables continued to show diminishing percentages employed
in this lower wage group.
Number
Per Cent.
employed.
Less than $19
10
70.00
267
12.73
509
10.02
5,164
9.57
10,301
9.09
595
8.91
1,054
7.12
730
5.21
1,602
5.12
9,396
5.11
199
5.03
1,228
4.89
3,137
4.24
3,218
2.89
9,289
2.83
23,837
2.59
29,020
2.50
1,111
2.43
4,951
1.60
27,090
1.36
2,887
1.07
3,487
0.75
5,378
0.09
67
0.00
100
0.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 11
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRIES.
Increases in the average weekly wage for adult male workers were general in
twenty-one of the twenty-five tables, the decreases in the remainder being mostly of
a fractional nature. The averages are based on the week of employment of the greatest
number, and while considerable difficulty is experienced with some industries in the
matter of broken time, an endeavour is made to base calculations on a full working-
week.
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
$25.00
22.28
17.75
28.75
31.61
24.13
23.76
23.16
22.74
21.29
34.39
22.25
20.48
24.83
24.41
29.10
22.07
26.21
21.44
32.72
24.24
26.38
24.54
27.50
20.32
$26.18
22.31
15.50
27.46
31.99
25.61
24.58
23.85
22.97
22.25
34.60
22.89
21.23
26.81
24.77
30.34
23.85
27.92
23.08
33.69
26.75
27.88
25.08
27.20
21.97
$27.42
22.82
13.00
28.20
32.93
25.81
24.20
23.70
23.15
20.80
38.95
23.33
22.23
26.59
25.09
30.48
23.46
28.68
22.78
34.19
26.36
28.76
24.80
27.78
22.68
$27.98
23.23
19.75
29.39
29.35
26.12
25.75
23.23
24.25
22.53
39.23
23.19
21.19
27.14
25.38
30.86
23.91
28.97
22.69
34.34
26.54
28.55
25.57
28.63
23.22
$28.23
24.15
17.70
28.04
30.34
27.52
31.67
23.59
25.22
23.59
43.44
24.00
21.72
28.83
26.18
31.77
24.36
29.17
23.15
34.34
29.84
31.74
32.75
28.57
24.88
$29.29
26.26
14.50
31.84
30.03
30.21
33.39
25.65
26.51
25.74
38.72
24.76
26.07
31.01
29.90
33.72
26.97
30.97
24.95
36.78
32.13
35.27
37.07
30.93
27.01
$31.85
30.78
15.83
34.56
31.24
36.41
36.45
30.52
27.72
27.76
38.59
28.20
27.80
33.94
34.00
37.19
33.58
33.40
28.73
37.10
33.92
40.32
38.49
32.28
30.24
$33.46
31.61
15.10
39.00
33.97
39.60
37.54
32.66
32.03
28.13
41.14
30.39
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of.
30.18
37.09
36.37
35.82
Miscellaneous trades and industries
34.92
35.52
30.71
Printing and publishing _	
Pulp and paper manufacturing-	
38.39
36.41
40.08
38.47
Street-railways, gas, water, power, tele-
35.01
Wood, manufacturing of (N.E.S.)	
33.34
The increases and decreases in the average weekly rates are as follows:
Increase.
Breweries
$1.61
.83
Builders' materials  _ —	
Coal-mining - -  4.44
Coast  shipping   __.  2.73
Construction     - - 3.19
Explosives and  chemicals  —  1.09
Food products, manufacture of _  2.14
Garment-making  _ ——— - 4.31
House furnishings    37
Jewellery-manufacturing     __  2.55
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing   2.19
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of
Lumber  industries       _	
Metal   trades   ___ _ __  __
Miscellaneous trades and industries  _
Oil-refining     	
Paint-manufacturing    	
Printing and publishing  	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones,  etc - - 	
Wood manufacturing   (N.E.S.)   	
$2.38
3.15
2.37
1.34
2.12
1.98
1.29
2.49
2.73
3.10
Decrease.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing — $0.73
Metal-mining    - -     1-37
Ship-building
Smelting   __	
$0.24
.02
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
Establishing a further gain over the record high for the previous year, the average weekly wage for all adult males in the wage-earner group rose to $37.19 in 1943, K 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
an increase of $1.95 over the preceding year and the highest recorded since the formation of the Department.    The following shows the average for each year since 1918:—
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
 _      $27.97
1931 _ _	
         29.11
1932 _ _
1933	
                31.51
27.62
1934	
         27.29
1935	
                28.05
1936	
t                  ._ .    .                          28.39
1937	
27.82
1938 _	
 _ _ _       27.99
1939	
28.29
1940	
        28.96
1941 -	
29.20
1942 _	
...       _ _   _      28.64
1943 -	
$26.17
23.62
22.30
23.57
24.09
26.36
26.64
26.70
26.80
28.11
30.67
35.24
37.19
The weekly wage-rates shown above appear in the following chart, which depicts
the trend of average weekly wages for adult male workers from 1918 to 1943.
AVERAGE  WEEKLY WAGES  PAID
1918 -
TO  ADULT
1943.
MALE  EMPLOYEES
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WAGES
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
194-2
1943
37.00
3b OO
35.00
34.00
33.00
32.00
31.00
30.00
29.00
28.00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.00
/
/
/
/
I
f\
I
/
A
i
/
\
1
/
/
\
 .
\
/
—y
y
\
\
/
/
\
\
/
\
/
\
/'
v
(1943 figure—$37.19.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 13
AVERAGE   MONTHLY   N U MBER  op WAGE-EARN ERS    (Male and Female)
1929 -31 -32-39 -40-41 -42-4-3
JAN.     FEB.     MAR.    APR.     MAY   JUNE   JULY    AUG.    SEPT.   OCT.     NOV     DEC.
15 0,00 0
145,000
140,000
135,000
13 0,000
125,000
120,000
I 15,OOO
1 1 O.OOO
105,000
100,000
95,000
90,000
85,000
80,000
75,000
70,000
65,000
60,00 0
55,000
50,000
45,000
40,000
/
/
/
S_
/
7
\
— REFERENC E
Employment in —
1929 shown  thus —
1931
1932
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
^t
-V
^
1943
I94E
1929
1339
January
134,384
February  __ _  136,040
March  ___ _ -  139,280
April      140,420
May  -- _ -. 142,387
June   _ -    -- 147,186
July     151,465
August    _ -  152,694
September   -_ ______    150,388
October     _  147,884
November  __ _ _   145,569
December   ___     137,890 K 14
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
1939                  1940                   1941                   1942                  1943
:
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DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
RACIAL ORIGIN AND NATIONALITY OF EMPLOYEES.
A summary of returns dealing with the racial origin and nationality of employees
showed a total coverage under this question of 193,165 employees for 1943. Of this
total some 145,362 or 75.25 per cent, were originally from English-speaking countries;
36,450 or 18.87 per cent, originally from Continental Europe; 7,344 or 3.80 per cent,
from Asiatic stock; and 4,009 or 2.08 per cent, from other countries, or racial origin
not stated.
The following table sets out comparative percentages for the past four years:—
Racial Origin.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
Per Cent.
75.37
15.10
7.70.
1.83
Per Cent.
75.93
16.18
6.27
1.62
Per Cent.
77.37
16.55
4.34
1.74
Per Cent.
75 25
18.87
3.80
2.08
Totals --__   -- 	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
An indication of the demand for increased production is noted in the growing number of firms reporting in the higher pay-roll bracket—1943 figures showing a total of
423 firms reporting pay-rolls of over $100,000, compared with 386 for the previous year.
As in previous years, pay-rolls of public authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or
municipal) are not included, nor are wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental railways, or vessels engaged in deep-sea transportation.
The lumber industry was again in the lead with 103 firms reporting in the higher
bracket, although down 5 from the previous year's total; followed by the construction
industry with 63, an increase of 8; metal trades, 50, up 16; food products, 39, an
increase of 5; miscellaneous trades and industries, 23, up 3; metal-mining, 18,
decreased by 3; ship-building, 17, an increase of 4; Coast shipping, 16, unchanged;
wood manufacturing (N.E.S.), 15, up 1; public utilities, 13, unchanged; coal-mining,
10, up 1; oil-refining, and pulp and paper' manufacturing, 9 each, both increased by 1;
printing and publishing, 7, unchanged; breweries, and builders' materials, 6 each, both
up 1; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 5, an increase of 1; explosives and chemicals,
and garment-making, 3 each, both up 1; house furnishings, 3, unchanged; smelting,
2, unchanged; jewellery-manufacture, leather and fur goods, and paint-manufacturing,
1 each, all unchanged from previous year.
Of the 423 firms reported above, nine had pay-rolls in excess of $5,000,000, one
between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, five between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000, eleven between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and twenty between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 17
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading :—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc. —Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—-Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction. -Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing aad heating, and sheet-
metal works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc. — Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making. —Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.— Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.—Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties ; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries. — Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories, and others for which
separate tables are not at present maintained. They include
manufacturers of soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers,
brooms and brushes, tents, awnings, and other canvas
goods, aircraft and aircraft parts, cartage and warehousing,
motor and aerial transportation, ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.—Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting.—Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.— This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of domestic and industrial gases, operation of
street-railways, and waterworks.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (jwt elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, w^ooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering 31 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers 3257,537.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    215,122.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   1,286,169.00
Total $1,758,828.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
597
MH
603
624
635
673
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February ....
March	
April	
May	
June	
129
107
136
127
131
152
July .  	
August	
September .
November ..
December...
702
734
73?
730
752
720
170
157
167
175
206
161
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under ?6.00	
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
3
1
....
4
3
1
3
1
6
4
1
5
2
4
1
1
2
2
5
1
1
3
7.00 to    7.99    .
8.00 to    8.99	
9.00to     9.99	
10 00 to   10.99	
4
2
1
1
5
2
1
1
.2
5
8
2
4
2
4
8
22
3
5
21
16
14
275
212
60
26
19
3
3
11.00 to   11.99	
12.00 to   12.99	
13.00 to   13.99	
14.00 to   14.99	
15 00 to   16.99	
1
4
5
9
6
43
9
12
16
16
35
8
5
9
6
3
5
2
7
38
4
2
16 00 to   16.99	
7
2
18.00 to   18.99	
19.00 to   19.99	
21.00 to   21.99	
2
2
1
23 00 to   23.99	
26.00 to   26.99	
27.00 to   27.99	
28.00 to   28.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
35 00 to   39.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
483
213
1
4
13
23
23
10
27
13
5
1
167
37
9
1
4
2
5
8
2
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian	
Norwegian, Swedish,
Russian, Lithuanian,
Indian (native Canadian-! ...
1
1
4
Males.
Females.
United States citizens (racial origin not
8
O
PROVINCIAL  LIBRARY
 — =-^	 K 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 74 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     8299,764.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       251,554.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,755,340.00
Total $2,306,658.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January. ■
February
March....
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
1,043
1,042
1,117
1,121
1,086
1,077
25
26
24
25
Month.
July	
August. ..
September
October....
November .
December..
Males.    Females.
1,095
1,106
1,080
1,076
1,111
1,057
27
26
26
25
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Fem_
LRS.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
12
2
1
1
2
2
2
12
1
7
4
6
6
2
7
9
11
22
17
67
59
82
37
192
31
267
166
86
48
67
2
1
1
1
2
" 'i
i
i
i
4
8
11.00 to   11.99	
1
2
1
1
2
1
13.00 to   13.99	
14.00 to   14.99	
15 00 to   15.99	
16 00 to   16.99	
1
2
2
1
20 00 to   20.99	
2
1
23 00 to   23.99	
24.00 to   2».99	
26 00 to   25.99	
1
2
8
3
28.00 to   28.99	
4
29 00 to   29.99	
1
2
30 00 to   34.99	
45.00 to   49.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish   	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above ....
British
Subject.
27
16
15
38
34
41
1
1
6
3
7
1
30
66
Females.
British
Subject.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 3 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  .$360.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  231.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  6,380.00
Total .
J6.971.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.    Females.
January .... | 5
February... I 6
March  6
April  6
May  7
June I 7
Month.
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
Males.   Females.
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
J6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to   86.
7.99.
8.99.
to
to
to     9.99
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99..
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to lfi.99.,
to 17.99..
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
&over.    18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
7
1
1
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Norwegian, Swedish,
Russian, Lithuanian,
1
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 19
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 26 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $323,341.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       120,051.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,446,922.00
Total $4,890,314 00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
April	
May	
June	
2,604
2,627
2,591
2,558
2,583
2,575
o
2
2
2
1
2
July	
September .
October...
November...
December...
2,586
2,639
2,690
2,798
2,844
2,812
2
2
5
9
10
9
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners oifly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
23.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
27.99.
28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
3
o
2
1
3
5
4
3
7
2
6
7
9
9
10
10
25
9
38
65
485
826
719
362
274
Under
21 Yrs.
1
11
4
5
10
13
16
1
6
1
Females
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland 	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, P^inuish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish. Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese   ...
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above .
871
7
5
13
240
70
162
65
1
1
20
30
13
60
38
Females.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 5.
COAST  SHIPPING.
Returns covering 119 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $791,545.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       601,170.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    8,627,182.00
Total $10,019,897.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March .. .
April
May	
June
Males.   Females
4,573
4,707
4,752
4,862
4,767
4,945
124
114
128
137
141
155
Month.
July	
August	
September..
October	
November..
December ..
Males.    Females.
4,938
5,145
5,074
5,024
5,050
5,071
163
185
167
186
176
174
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to $6.
to 7.
to 8.
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99
21.99.
22.99.
23.99
24.99
25.99
26.99.
27.99.
28.99
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99
21 Yrs.
& over.
40
17
7
10
5
20
24
22
28
25
33
92
69
102
126
121
146
71
81
158
141
216
192
172
159
535
649
699
Under
21 Yrs.
6
5
33
13
a
7
9
77
107
3
16
10
18
70
62
1
72
14
11
2
3
1
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
10
1
3
1
1
1
2
2
3
2
4
103
1
2
1
1
26
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewliere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish. Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese   	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese.	
Indian (nativeCanadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above..
Males.
3,080
1,494
132
19
33
12
8
35
320
843
5
3
4
165
2
13
Females.
British
Subject.    Allen-
28
4
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.      Females. K 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 6.
CONSTRUCTION.
Returns covering 753 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $2,369,680.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    2,753,635.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 38,233,241.00
Total $43,356,556.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ..
February.
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
17,040
17,642
18,218
17,962
18,491
19,047
427
469
490
640
743
1,007
Month.
July	
August....
September
October ...
November.
December..
Males.   Females.
18,991
18,564
17,543
16,396
14,738
13,342
1,158
1,151
1,074
952
742
689
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
F.mployment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
.00 .
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
24.99.
25.99.
27.99.
28 99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
42
61
16
35
14
37
29
48
34
31
84
64
45
89
69
79
222
354
137
541
569
360
473
788
620
42]
324
294
117
851
Under
21 Yrs.
18
16
4
9
10
14
13
33
10
19
21
18
16
IS
21
14
52
39
40
21
36
54
16
34
20
90
87
39
29
106
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
3
2
5
0
5
17
10
10
25
47
17
19
9
47
177
65
75
38
29
105
13
41
5
211
32
200
6
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada   	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
British
Subject.
11,138
6,020
278
155
809
283
237
547
1,571
1,604
130
31
89
4
6
237
16
227
13
18
16
225
613
1
61
20
Females.
British
Subject.    Allen-
1,183
577
9
7
46
4
19
80
2
1
3
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
423
Females.
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 23 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $140,228.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      497,386.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   3,377,375.00
Total $4,014,939.00
 Average Number of Wage-earners.	
Month.
January ..
February.
March
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
1,343
1,363
1,298
1,319
1,210
1,217
150
167
203
244
223
195
Month.
J uly	
August	
September..
October....
November ..
December ..
Males.    Females.
1,091
1,066
1,075
1,095
1,157
1,146
204
221
227
241
214
202
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
$6 00	
23
to $6.99	
to  7.99 	
5
to  8.99	
3
to  9.99	
8
to 10.99	
7
to 12.99	
4
to 14.99 	
1
to 15.99	
to 16.99	
12
6
to 17.99 	
to 18.99	
to 19.99	
2
3
3
to 20.99	
6
to 21.99	
9
to 22.99	
27
to 23.99 	
10
to 24.99	
21
to 25.99	
to 26.99	
to 27.99	
22
25
11
to 28.99	
to 29.99	
to 34.99	
58
16
192
to 39.99	
339
to 44.99	
379
to 49.99	
281
and over 	
121
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
2
4
■2
7
5
14
13
7
3
16
28
12
2
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
12
5
2
3
5
4
2
9
5
2
50
42
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish. Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese.  ..	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.    Ahen-
1,012
422
11
14
4
6
37
17
1
1
io'
3
22
2
Females.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
160
37
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified) ,	
Males.
82
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 21
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 547 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $2,075,631.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    2,442,472.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 13,673,915.00
Total $18,192,018.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January .   ...
February 	
March	
April	
5,309
5,080
5,049
5,513
6,026
6,690
2,827
2,388
2,041
2,082
2,337
3,090
July	
August.
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
8,163
8,886
8,475
7,647
7,192
6,140
4,862
5,588
6,403
5,861
4,968
June   	
3,337
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21 00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
36.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
.00 .
to   $6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
21 Yrs.
& over.
183
72
43
53
44
70
39
58
69
78
80
87
179
71
148
157
182
315
353
420
738
409
!,372
,436
830
672
Under
21 Yrs.
120
14
31
11
19
18
16
51
21
25
31
35
30
41
41
49
48
39
49
47
74
44
52
78
47
184
86
26
19
22
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
255
69
99
98
115
162
126
210
384
358
377
415
340
368
361
374
426
502
428
437
452
292
203
124
128
428
145
32
119
19
30
26
57
60
38
69
97
106
83
104
67
75
83
72
78
53
28
30
12
10
18
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above ....
Males.
British
Subject.
4,990
2,259
140
57
88
75
157
528
304
142
15
780
1
10
1,636
6
74
Alien.
12
12
17
29
84
12
1
745
19
is'
British
Subject.
1,114
81
37
84
53
138
92
246
284
17
3
40
29
16
1,767
7
75
Alien
1
11
26
29
29
25
136
4
25
1.7
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 9.
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 66 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $218,231.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       176,409.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,008,959.00
Total $1,403,599.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Januarj'....
February...
March	
May	
June	
199
204
206
204
202
198
812
860
897
903
898
881
July	
September .
October 	
November..
December ..
204
197
201
197
197
203
819
736
749
773
780
761
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners oitly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
Ito 23.99.
)to 24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.09.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
10
8
7
4
38
32
18
14
11
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
2
3
3
5
12
6
48
59
67
84
141
63
75
60
51
39
31
27
18
21
11
6
5
5
14
5
1
1
2
Under
18 Yrs.
2
4
20
10
17
9
5
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian. Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian 	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
British
Subject.
64
4
4
3
2
5
17
1
9
5
1
1
Alien.
Females.
British
Subject.
194
5
6
5
6
7
32
a
12
12
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females. K 22
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 67 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $214,743.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    183,065.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 1,424,806.00
Total   $1,822,614.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Alonth.
Males.
Females.
January 	
February 	
April	
703
697
673
682
642
640
549
556
569
578
687
598
July 	
August...   .
September..
October   .,
November..
Decern ber...
614
624
697
599
623
616
593
583
574
601
633
June	
620
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6 00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11 00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
00	
$6.99..
7.99..
8.99..
9.99..
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99.
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29 99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99..
and over
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
3
12
7
14
23
10
34
19
37
33
35
39
36
30
127
72
14
13
6
Under
21 Yrs.
16
2
6
10
1
6
5
16
6
10
1
a
6
4
5
2
11
2
2
t
3
6
1
6
6
18 Yrs.    Under
&over.    18 Yrs.
14
3
5
3
12
5
9
17
29
42
62
81
81
58
40
40
16
26
9
6
17
5
3
1
1
2
26
8
25
4
3
3
6
4
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish   	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese   	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
428
252
3
6
13
7
14
22
32
42
20
British
Subject,
410
112
4
8
10
10
10
6
20
30
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 11 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $39,119.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  160,150.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 147,828.00
Total $347,097.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ..
February.
March....
April.   ...
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
69
70
70
69
18
19
19
18
18
18
Month.
July	
August. . .
September
October...
November
December.
Males.
Females.
68
20
69
19
66
19
66
21
64
20
63
21
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
7.99.
Under $6.00....
$6.00 to   $6.99
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10 00 to
11.00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18 00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40 00 to
45.00 to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18 99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99
23.99.
24.99.
25.99
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99
50.00 and over .
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
2
1
2
16
18
13
11
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish   	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew   	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese 	
Indian (nativeCanadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.    Ahen-
39
25
Females.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
23
1
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)     	
Males.
Females. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 23
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 99 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $205,446.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       396,806.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,831,050.00
Total.
.$2,433,302.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January..
February.
March. ..
April.. ..
May.
June
Males. ; Females.
501
505
507
610
509
510
1,446
1,496
1,547
1,597
1,620
1,698
Month.
July	
August
September..
October
November ..
December ..
Males.   Females.
620
499
498
502
497
601
1,743
1,710
1,726
1,727
1,689
1,666
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18,00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99,
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
1
2
5
2
1
1
6
7
5
5
5
0
6
5
12
11
27
47
19
28
21
19
120
51
41
18
27
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&L over.
32
26
33
45
38
28
45
77
76
160
183
208
241
107
90
65
27
29
21
28
15
6
6
1
6
8
5
5
Under
18 Yrs
5
2
3
5
5
6
8
37
22
48
19
11
43
4
8
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Brirain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian 	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew  	
Chinese   ...
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro   ....
Others not shown above..
190
6
5
5
9
22
1
1
Alie
British
Subject.
99
1
1
5
4
4
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)   	
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 55 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $110,442,00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     181,496.00
Wage-earners (includingpiece-workers) 634,293.00
Total $926,231.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March...
April....
May	
June. .. .
Males.   I'emales.
297
299
294
284
281
282
287
285
291
293
299
307
Month.
July	
August	
September..
October
November..
December   .
Males.   Females.
280
286
274
281
283
283
318
314
321
818
334
330
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
16.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99
20.99.
21.99.
22.99
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34 99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99
Males.
21 Yrs.
Under
& over.
21 Yrs.
9
6
2
2
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
3
3
4
2
5
4
7
9
5
12
13
13
62
61
20
Females.
18 Yrs.
<__ over.
2
4
1
1
2
11
8
12
12
15
31
20
33
21
20
5
14
12
8
13
8
6
4
8
Under
18 Yrs.
3
10
5
5
6
11
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French    ...
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew'	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above.  ...
1
2
11
25
14
1
2
British
Subject.
38
8
5
2
5
1
17
2
1
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)    ... K 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 948 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $2,857,975.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,607,899.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 42,613,022.00
Total.
.$47,078,896.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
18,804
384
July	
22,824
553
February...
19,817
406
August....
23,165
594
March	
21,965
437
September.
23,280
610
22,310
449
October ...
23,153
589
Mav	
22,666
468
November.
23,070
540
23,040
524
December..
20,582
512
Classified Weekly Wage-rates
(Wage
-earners
only).
For Week of
Ma
LES.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
tS_ over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
<S_ over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
47
4
10
12
12
16
78
14
36
28
36
30
22
23
188
68
115
140
170
578
302
604
553
1,367
552
7,208
5,015
2,967
2,783
4,112
4
6
41
3
1
21
7
2
5
6
13
11
12
46
25
42
31
41
105
43
56
47
69
50
340
365
78
26
14
4
1
$6.00 to   $6.99	
7.80 to     7.99	
2
2
1
3
2
4
7
5
7
9
4
10
26
16
23
29
30
31
87
12
9
59
08
46
7
1
1      |
1
8.00 to     8.99	
1
10.00 to   10.99	
1
11.00 to   11.99	
12.00to   12.99	
12
14.00 to   14.99	
3
16.00 to   15.99      	
5
16.00 to   16.99	
9
17.00 to   17.99	
2
18.00 to   18.99	
2
19 00 to   19.99      	
1
20.00 to   20.99	
10
21.00 to   21.99    	
22.00 to   22.99	
1
4
23.00 to   23.99	
24.00 to   24.99	
3
28
25.00 to   25.99	
8
26 00 to   26.99	
1
27.00 to   27.99	
28.00 to   28.99	
29.00 to   29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
1
4
35.00to   39.99	
3
40.00 to   44.99  ..
45.00 to   49.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada  12,491
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland  3,146
Born elsewhere  250
Belgian, Dutch  113
French  374
Italian  197
German, Austrian  353
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.... 510
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish  2,525
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian  1,166
Greek, Yugoslavic  132
Hebrew  5
Chinese  527
Hindu and other East Indian 580
Japanese  307
Indian (native Canadian)  675
Negro   I 16
Others not shown above...   .1 872
British
Subject.
32
27
86
127
386
1,383
549
236
Females.
British
Subject.    Allen-
257
32
181
22
43
124
300
20
"ll'
14
122
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)   	
Males.      Females.
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 801 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $3,197,533.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   3,617,629.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 17,821,845.00
Total   $24,637,007.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March
April	
May	
June .
Males.   Females.
8,523
8,494
8,614
8,744
8,900
9,179
803
835
883
977
1,052
1,115
Month.
Males.
July	
9,290
August	
9,430
September .
9,239
October ....
9,032
November ..
8,791
December...
8,589
1,145
1,216
1,300
1,250
1,194
1,200
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00...
$6.00 to $6.99
7.00 to 7.99
8.00 to 8.99
9.00 to 9.99
10.00 to 10.99
11.00 to 11.99
12.00 to 12.99
13.00 to 13.99
14.00 to 14.99
15.00 to 15.99
16.00 to 16.99
17.00 to 17 99
18.00 to 18.99
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99
21.00 to 21.99
22.00 to 22.99
23.00 to 23.99
24.00 to 24.99
25.00 to 25.99
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99
28.00 to 28.99.
29.00 to 29.99.
30.00 to 34.99.
35.00 to 39.99.
40.00 to 44.99.
45.00 to 49.99.
50.00 and over .
21 Yrs.
& over.
37
30
23
26
22
23
27
32
29
35
50
50
52
45
67
101
83
120
108
155
224
230
181
221
425
445
720
554
175
107
Under
21 Yrs.
36
13
34
22
17
46
33
62
27
25
53
29
51
54
43
33
42
32
45
34
38
28
21
17
19
126
91
67
41
47
18 yrs.
& over.
12
11
10
4
13
30
13
17
39
30
69
47
84
50
78
53
77
58
67
65
55
47
139
90
Under
18 Yrs.
1
3
1
2
1
11
5
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland.  ...   	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian ...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish. Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese.	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro 	
Others not shown above.  ..
British
Subject.
6,124
2,894
172
68
84
106
118
324
15
15
29
2
4
1
Alien.
21
13
24
25
65
66
7
1
British
Subject.
144
23
11
9
19
12
4
27
47
1
4
I United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.    : Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 25
Table No. 16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 93 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $810,991.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,176,333.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     9,331,034.00
Total $11,318,!
.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February ....
4,860
4,816
4,791
4,550
4,454
4,422
185
200
205
224
253
280
July	
August.
September..
October   ...
November...
December..
4,259
4,216
4,094
4,057
4,162
3,924
280
285
280
291
298
281
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to   $6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
4
8
8
41
2
18
32
64
71
32
100
1,747
2,287
667
246
46
Under
21 Yrs.
4
18
8
1
18
4
13
37
21
1
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
21
3
15
8
13
27
13
4
5
5
15
14
10
15
52
24
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish 	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic...    .
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above..
Males.
2,671
1,110
87
29
37
123
85
100
492
147
54
8
ii'
Alien.
11
3
31
54
83
261
91
35
2
46
27
British
Subject.
18
1
JJnited States citizens (racial origin not
specified) 	
Males.
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 510 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,520,712.00
Clerks,' Stenographers, Salesmen, etc.   4,122,240.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   20,517,621.00
Total   $26,160,573.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January..
February.
March
April	
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
7,604
7,635
7,852
8,009
8,149
8,273
3,754
3,822
3,872
4,031
4,150
4,369
July	
August....
September.
October
November.
December .
Males.   Females.
7,925
7,924
8,319
8,609
8,602
8,898
4,675
4,687
4,759
5,316
6,435
5,522
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
36.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to
to
10.99
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99
15.99.
16.99.
17.99
18.99
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
S9.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
2 1 Yrs.
& over.
25
8
19
10
8
16
7
21
23
16
32
20
26
33
79
56
81
94
49
277
148
235
436
932
111
1,979
1,670
1,513
766
600
Under
21 Yrs.
16
7
3
3
10
8
10
21
9
3
23
14
12
17
51
12
18
34
26
212
21
19
25
153
5
179
96
44
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
23
19
27
45
70
92
134
182
132
145
457
98
44
133
25
1,103
47
68
14
35
977
1,025
189
60
7
Under
18 Yrs.
19
3
3
5
4
19
7
37
29
39
35
47
31
10
7
2
1
25
2
10
16
4
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British :
Born in Canada.	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic ......
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)..
Negro	
Others not shown above..
5,011
3,406
122
83
87
74
136
391
562
28
18
31
21
15
164
Alien.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
10
1
3
21
29
Females.
3,279
1,432
36
45
60
24
57
55
196
13
5
6
224'
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
276
Females. K 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering 62 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $416,661.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,020,283.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     1,792,299.00
Total    $3,229,243.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February...
May	
June	
790
812
733
740
768
830
43
44
41
40
49
47
July	
August.  .   .
September..
November ..
December...
913
957
909
859
881
854
48
54
57
51
57
47
Classified Weekly Wag
e-rates
(Wage
earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
&over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
Under
IS Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
7 00 to    7.99	
8.00 to     8 99	
9.00 to     9.99	
1
10.00 to   10.99	
11.00 to   11.99  	
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
12.00 to   12.99	
13 00 to   13.99	
16.00 to   16.99	
17.00 to   17.99	
2
1
4
15
3
3
3
9
5
27
22
30
21
80
30
253
294
153
65
86
1
1
1
1
"V"
-
10
5
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
5
3
3
7
2
4
4
7
2
6
4
I
18.00 to   18.99	
19.00 to   19.99	
20.00 to   20.99	
21.00 to   21.99  	
22.00 to   22.99	
23.00 to   23.99	
24.00 to   24.99	
26.00 to   25.99	
26.00 to   26.99	
27.00 to   27.99	
28.00 to   28.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
9
2
2
2
1
1
1
35.00 to   39.99	
40.00 to   44.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian  ...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew   	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
British
Subject.   Al1™-
322
25
5
17
3
5
10
1
British
Subject.    A1,en-
103
21
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 10 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $91,105.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    137,275.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   228,802.00
Total  $457,182.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March
April.
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
113
121
118
118
114
115
49
52
65
53
56
55
Month.
July	
August
September..
October....
November .
December..
Males.    Females.
119
120
111
110
113
114
56
58
57
56
53
56
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
tc
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
16.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
7
33
6
4
3
20
10
5
1
5
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
10
8
7
2
4
3
2
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
■   Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro 	
Others not shown above ....
Males.
British
Subject.
84
61
1
Females.
British
Subject.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 27
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 142 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $661,574.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen,etc   1,354,022.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      2,322,13S.OO
Total $4,337,734.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
April	
May	
1,076
1,051
1,058
1,055
1,047
1,055
259
307
267
289
292
307
July	
August	
September..
November ..
December...
1,067
1,072
1,126
1,102
1,075
1,067
305
308
317
353
323
317
Classified Weekly Wage-rates
(Wage-
earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
&over.
Under
21 Yrs.
14
4
2
8
6
14
6
27
7
10
9
1
7
4
1
2
1
1
i
l
i
l
l
l
IS Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
4
4
1
7
3
4
10
4
3
6
9
10
7
3
12
6
11
16
18
9
12
24
11
84
100
345
191
126
13
1
4
3
3
3
10
56
7
17
23
10
13
16
18
54
20
26
14
14
7
4
1
9
5
5
4
2
7
7.00 to    7 99      	
8.00 to     8.99	
3
9.00 to     9 99  	
1
10.00 to   10.99	
12
11.00 to   11.99	
3
12.00 to   12.99	
13.00 to   13.99	
8
6
15.00 to   15.99	
16.00 to   16.99	
11
3
1
17.00 to   17 99	
1
18.00 to   18.99	
21.00 to   21.99	
1
1
1
22.00 to   22.99	
23.00 to   23.99	
25.00to   25.99	
26.00 to   26.99	
27.00 to   27.99	
29.00 to   29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
35.00 to   39.99	
40.00 to   44.99 	
45 00 to   49.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
Males.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian   	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above .
457
30
1
3
2
5
27
Females.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
109
24
2
3
United States citizens   (racial origin not
specified)      	
Females.
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    8743,560.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      081,001.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     7,302,548.00
Total $8,727,109.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.    Females.
January    3,044
February...   3,552
March | 3,458
April i 3,394
May j 3,414
June 3,386
4L3
411
433
442
457
500
Month.
July	
August
September.
October ...
November.
December..
Males.
Females.
3,435
517
3,441
534
3,340
581
3,347
584
3,408
602
3,423
582
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00	
$6.99
7.99..
8.99
9.99..
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99.
14.99..
15.99..
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
7
2
4
4
19
39
64
257
,167
983
382
344
187
Under
21 Yrs.
10
"3'
2
3
7
1
22
121
10
5
3
Females.
18 Yrs.
_. over.
20
35
6
31
60
33
20
6
7
25
10
73
19
80
31
Under
18 Yrs.
5
2
1
11
10
2
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial  Origin.
British
Subject.    Allen-
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
lapanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro 	
Others not shown above .
912
32
17
80
137
33
215
139
10
4
37
56'
2
4
4
24
56
99
7
British
Subject.    Allen
65
2
1
26
19
11
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	 K 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILD1N0.
Returns covering 47 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers 81,233,077.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    2,919,613.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 61,341,829.00
Total $65,494,519.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January 	
February....
March	
May	
June	
28,119
28,490
28,539
28,107
28,021
29,487
539
638
755
950
1,176
1,434
July	
September..
November ..
December...
29,238
28,805
26,946
26,602
26,980
26,711
1,720
1,723
1,794
1,789
1,993
1,894
Classified Weekly Wa(
e-rates
(Wage-
earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Qnder
18 Yrs.
Under $6 00	
123
39
50
34
39
27
42
52
53
52
60
42
49
63
79
103
110
136
85
362
282
219
174
257
329
3.550
6,516
5,120
6,233
4,740
19
3
4
3
4
2
6
5
2
3
8
8
3
11
8
7
11
103
17
10
65
34
18
46
30
329
228
246
182
63
14
9
5
3
17
1
6
9
5
14
9
5
12
14
15
11
30
34
18
70
52
43
37
34
184
291
287
180
91
32
5
$6.00 to   $6.99  	
7.00 to     7 99	
9.00 to     9.99	
10.00 to   10.99	
1
ll.OOto   11.99	
12 00 to   12 99	
9
13.00 to   13.99	
1
14.00 to   14.99	
15 00 to   15.99	
17.00 to   17.99	
18 00 to   18.99	
2
2
3
19.00 to   19.99	
3
20 00 to   20.99	
2
21.00 to   21.99.   	
6
22 00 to   22.99	
8
23.00 to   23.99	
3
24.00 to   24.99	
5
25.00 to   25.99	
1
26 00 to   26.99	
9
27 00 to   27.99	
3
28 00 to   28.99	
15
29.00 to   29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
16
3
40 00 to   44 99	
45.00 to   49.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian   	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian .
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic.........
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above .
Males.
British
Subject.
16,681
7,584
680
180
285
227
245
961
173
17
220
9
60
4
633
18
4
9
■ 5
41
209
166
42
Females.
British
Subject.
385
7
26
48
10
54
120
18
4
13
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 23.
SMELTINO.
Returns covering 5 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     5179,274.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,151,057.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    6,136,355.00
Total 47,406,686.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March..
April	
May	
June	
Males.   P'emales.
2,822
2,855
2,812
2,629
2,415
2,590
78
87
89
128
143
168
Month.
July	
August.
September..
October....
November ..
December...
Males.   Females.
2,450
2,276
2,246
2,296
2,551
2,386
174
186
191
204
188
175
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners orrly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
56.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to   $6.99.
to     7.99.
to     8.99.
to     9.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99
21 Yrs.
& over.
29
1
7
2
2
16
3
6
15
3
15
19
15
8
11
14
14
14
12
17
16
48
25
368
884
873
441
•244
Under
21 Yrs.
4
1
2
13
8
4
2
2
6
5
5
a
2
3
2
2
1
6
8
5
42
41
31
12
1
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
11
2
3
4
1
4
15
6
3
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere   	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian .
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish,  Finnish .......
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Y'ugoslavic 	
Hebrew  	
Chinese 	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese 	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above .
British
Subject.
797
12
10
5
322
20
48
2
1
11
1
56
17
108
29
6
Females.
British
Subject.
59
16
"i"
"-'
Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)     ....
Males.
120
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 29
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 115 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  SI,004,744.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     2,490,720.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  10,118,025.00
Total $13,613,489.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
4,649
4,497
4,554
4,095
4,582
4,545
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
May	
June	
1,654
1,561
1,639
1,655
1,673
1,734
July	
August	
September..
October ....
Novemlier ..
December...
4,564
4,600
4,583
4,568
4,569
4,492
1,771
1,795
1,789
1,782
1,799
1,870
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to   $6.99.
to     7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.   21 Yrs.
4
4
4
4
1
1
1
4
27
7
3
8
34
9
91
37
58
114
118
113
216
222
162
1,249
1,203
.502
511
244
6
1
1
16
1
1
2
7
Females.
18 Yrs.
Under
& over.
18 Yrs.
18
1
1
2
11
31
2
119
97
46
258
5
226
169
112
68
294
239
7
64
24
2
4
2
5
7
14
5
1
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish   	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (nativeCanadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above..
Males.
British
Subject.
2,397
2,817
69
18
26
57'
39
39
139
116
11
13
5
Females.
British
Subject.    A1,on-
2,057
450
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)   ....
Females.
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OP  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 108 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1943.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $681,679.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      341,577.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  6,383,194.00
Total  $7,406,450.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February .
March. ...
April	
May	
June ....
Males.    Females.
3,086
3,109
3,139
3,164
3,239
1,145
1,219
1,270
1,330
1,390
1,442
Month.
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November..
December .
Males.    Females.
3,304
3,301
3,224
3,163
3,193
3,100
1,463
1,484
1,464
1,413
1,375
1,335
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners oitly).
For Week of
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to
7.99.
8.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99..
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99 .
20.99
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over
Males.
Females.
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
& over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
15
28
12
6
6
7
2
1
4
1
1
1
5
3
4
4
3
5
1
7
2
6
2
4
5
9
6
9
3
15
6
2
14
9
10
4
16
17
13
5
26
37
22
9
31
25
10
5
14
68
14
14
19
65
6
15
49
82
31
17
44
94
52
17
44
281
93
71
21
83
15
30
49
145
5
134
29
111
9
75
7
24
.
158
42
22
5
98
18
21
2
250
36
40
5
113
13
21
4
994
78
83
12
478
14
30
2
293
1
7
192
1
190
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above..
Males.
2,138
625
17
31
68
27
80
65
189
217
17
1
17
18
2
28
1
22
1
9
15
12
67
35
2
58
4
Females.
British
Subject.
1,167
140
18
50
13
21
21
64
55
5
1
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Females. K 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 4,727 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1943.
Officers. Superintendents, and Managers ___
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc. .
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers) —
$20,444,952.00
28,599,196.00
262,362,172.00
$70,134.00
1,350,000.00
$311,406,320.00
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary —__ __ _____	
Estimated pay-roll of employers covered by Department's inquiry from whom returns
were not received — __._ — ___ — ____ -: _	
Transcontinental Railways _ __._ ~ - —   - - - _- _     19,424,973.00
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey: viz., Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, miscellaneous (estimated pay-roll)       48,945,000.00
69,790,107.00
Total .
$381,196,427.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January.. ..
February .
March..  ...
April	
May	
June.  ....
July.......
August....
September.
October....
November .
December..
118,
119,
122,
123,
124,
127,
128,
129,
125,
123,
121,
118
281
968
986
205
203
091
678
077
730
317
,912
.103
16,103
16,072
16,294
17,215
18,184
20,095
22,787
23,617
24,658
24,567
23,657
21,787
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian .
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian )
Negro	
Others not shown above
Males.
British
Subject.
76,000
35,392
2,107
831
2,068
2,004
1,687
2,265
8,270
816
134
2,101
651
364
3,031
58
2.952
British
Subject.
 : 18,907
  5,285
 I 248
148    | 332
85    | 342
318 | 240
319 | 463
782
2,445
1,443
1,001
34
3,906
131
'438'
233
1,588
1,308
84
29
76
33
29
1,792
14
514
14
28
32
211
4
1
34
19
33
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)    ....
Males.
2,243
Females.
357
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .   ..
to   $6.99.
to    7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.S9.
19.99.
20.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
Totals     144,62
Males.
Females.
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
& over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
626
302
457
172
254
76
144
29
200
85
176
43
216
115
184
54
179
87
245
77
271
121
304
129
282
129
306
89
302
229
670
214
285
133
831
213
267
164
905
258
456
232
1,346
231
410
164
1,525
218
405
180
1,256
185
535
216
1,196
118
827
378
1,341
147
822
332
1,324
163
1,027
303
1,515
201
1,364
357
1,115
156
995
297
1,063
111
2,778
529
1,996
136
2,463
398
868
76
2,866
374
695
47
3,072
257
439
41
5,582
565
601
44
3,489
263
1,446
48
27,960
1,603
2,548
60
27,344
1,078
951
21
20,552
567
672
3
17,214
327
128
21,684
244
55
144,627
10.095
26.092
3,284 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 31
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Since the " Hours of Work Act " became effective the Board has shown the average
hours by industries, and the accompanying table sets out comparative figures for the
years 1930 to 1943, inclusive.
COMPARATIVE FIGURES, 1930
TO 1943.
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Employees
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 54 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
54 Hours.
1930                          	
4,704
4,088
3,529
3,530
3,956
4,153
4,357
4,711
4,895
4,829
4,971
5,115
4,845
4,727
87,821
84,791
68,468
71,185
75,435
81,329
90,871
102,235
96,188
94,045
103,636
118,160
154,191
151,420
Per Cent.
77.60
83.77
80.36
77.95
85.18
88.78
87.12
89.31
88.67
88.68
88.93
89.61
84.70
89.10
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
B.76
6.26
6.42
4.57
B.29
6.42
6.13
4.49
7.51
4.57
Per Cent.
9.04
1931               	
9.44
1932  	
11.92
1933               _          "	
11.12
1934               -_._
9.06
1935	
6.96
1936                          _          	
6.46
1937	
6.12
1938 _   _ -	
6.04
1939           _	
5.90
1940  _ _ _ ...
1941                                                  __
6.94
5.90
1942                    '     	
7.79
1943                                                             	
•6.33
The average weekly working-hours for all employees for same years being :-
1943 _
1942-
1941-
1940-
1939 _
1938-
1937-
47.19
48.12
46.90
46.91
47.80
46.84
. 47.25
.  __-   47.63
  47.17
  47.32
  _.. 47.35
1932  47.69
1931  --     47.37
1930    48.62
1936.
1935-
1934-
1933..
Information submitted by the 4,727 firms reporting to the Department of Labour
regarding hours covered some 151,420 male and female employees for 1943. A segregation shows 89.10 per cent, working 48 hours or less per week, 4.57 per cent, working
from 48 to 54 hours per week, and 6.33 per cent, working in excess of 54 hours per week. K 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES.
Industry.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
45.41
45.07
40.40
47.92
49.42
43.82
42.57
47.59
43.69
44.12
40.75
44.66
44.27
48.47
50.36
45.80
48.71
47.98
47.57
44.93
50.19
45.64
47.69
44.10
42.64
47.96
44.08
47.89
45.11
46.39
44.95
45.31
41.50
48.03
50.38
44.01
45.81
46.78
43.38
44.76
43.87
44.35
44.93
48.37
52.65
45.17
49.17
48.17
47.35
45.13
50.20
45.96
48.17
43.95
42.24
47.78
43.68 "
49.28
45.40
47.27
45.07
45.97
35.33
48.02
52.95
45.03
47.09
47.28
42.51
44.62
44.16
45.20
45.37
48.24
52.77
46.33
48.50
48.40
47.29
45.14
50.24
46.97
49.82
43.87
42.90
47.46
43.63
47.84
45.44
46.08
44.88
48.05
44.57
47.99
52.05
50.06
47.84
48.33
44.30
44.88
44.01
45.37
44.82
48.78
51.40
46.42
49.95
48.44
47.20
45.42
49.89
47.65
47.54
43.86
43.70
47.84
47.88
49.40
45.64
46.59
45.05
47.43
44.80
Coal-mining- _ —_.  ■ —_ __ _
47.90
51.69
51.14
46.75
Food products, manufacture of-   __ —  	
47.59
43.30
44.00
43.88
44.99
43.79
Lumber industries—
48.67
53.00
45.23
49.27
48.47
46.42
45.02
49.35
47.68
45.83
43.95
42.13
48.27
43.92
49.72
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc.— — — __ 	
45.77
46.28 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 33
SUMMARY OF LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR.
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1944.)
"CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN ACT."
This Act prohibits the employment of children under the age of 15 years unless
permission to do so has been received from the Minister of Labour or any person
appointed by him for the purpose. Eight industries or trades are specified in the
Schedule to the Act in which such employment is prohibited unless under permit.
They are:—
1. Manufacturing industry.
2. Ship-building industry.
■    3. Generation, transformation, and transmission of electricity or motive power
of any kind.
4. Logging industry.
5. Construction industry.
6. Catering industry.
7. Public places of amusement.
8. Shops which are exempt from the provisions of the " Shops Regulation and
Weekly Half-holiday Act."
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may by regulation add to or delete from the
Schedule any branch of any employment.
Parents or guardians of children employed in contravention of the provisions of
the Act, as well as their employers, on summary conviction are liable to a fine of not
more than $50.
" FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT, AMENDMENT ACT, 1944."
" MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT, AMENDMENT ACT, 1944."
These two Acts require employers on every pay-day to furnish each of his employees a statement of wages in writing setting out:—
(a.)   The employee's earnings for the unit of time for which payment of wages
is made.
(6.)  Any bonus or living allowance to which the employee is entitled.
(c.)   The amount of each deduction from the earnings of the employee as well
as the purpose for which each deduction is made.
If he deems it desirable the Minister of Labour may require the employer to set
out the earnings of his employees with respect to overtime worked by them.
These Acts came into force June 1st, 1944.
"WARTIME LABOUR RELATIONS REGULATIONS ACT."
A resume of this important Act will be found in the section of the Report relating
to the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch of the Department of Labour. K 34 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman   Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell  __ .1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton (on loan to Federal Government, place taken temporarily by Essie Brown)
 _ _   789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
4. James Thomson— __     789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. J. A. Ward Bell _ 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
Mabel A. Cameron. _ _ _  Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Head Office   — -Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch Office      _ _789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the Tenth Annual Report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1943.
In 1934 the Board of Industrial Relations was formed, taking over the activities
of the former Minimum Wage Board and branching out into lines of endeavour not
covered by the original administrative body, which dealt with labour problems of
women and girl employees exclusively. For sixteen years the Minimum Wage Board
had functioned in the Province, so this is in reality the twenty-sixth report covering
labour laws and regulations.
As the war continues the problems of the Board are different to those confronting it in peace-times. The administrative staff does not have so much trouble in connection with wages, but when every one is being urged to work at top speed to get out
vital products in order to bring victory closer there is a tendency towards excessive
hours of work.
Overtime permits are asked for, and when the cause is justified these are granted,
as there is a sincere attitude on the part of the Board to co-operate as fully as possible
in urgent circumstances.
The labour shortage, general throughout the Province and, in fact, the whole
Dominion, has added difficulties for employers and the Board. Employers are faced
with engaging inexperienced help, often much older or much younger than they would
otherwise consider.
The Board realizes that extra precautions must be taken in such cases to ensure
safe and healthful employment and it has adopted a policy through its Orders and
Regulations to especially see that these inexperienced employees are safe-guarded in
their work and assured of appropriate wages and working conditions.
Special reference to various phases of these matters is found in the reports of the
Women's and Children's Division, the Factory, Trade-schools, Apprenticeship and
Safety Branches of the Department of Labour, so it is unnecessary to elaborate on
them in this section.
Requests have been received from certain quarters to reopen specific Orders of
the Board with a view to bringing the minimum wages up to amounts more nearly
approaching standard rates of pay at the present time.
The authority to increase or decrease wages, however, now rests with the Federal
Government through its National or Regional War Labour Boards.
If the Board of Industrial Relations deems it advisable to alter any of its Orders
or promulgate new Orders in such a way as to increase or decrease present rates, or
to require minimum wages to be paid to employees not previously covered, it must REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 35
obtain the approval of the Regional War Labour Board of British Columbia before
such changes may become effective.
We are pleased to record that the Regional War Labour Board has at all times
co-operated most whole-heartedly when approached by our Board for such approval.
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS.
Twenty-six sessions of the Board were held on fifteen days during the year.
Seventeen of these sessions were convened in Victoria and the remainder in Vancouver.
As the Board was studying the problems connected with overtime in the various
branches of the lumbering industry, arrangements were made for the appearance of
delegations representing employers and employees in these occupations. Much time
was devoted to these hearings.
The fishing industry was vitally interested in a revision of the Order dealing with
female employees; the mercantile industry was concerned with regulations for the
Christmas season and so the Board arranged for the appearance of delegations to
present their views on these topics.
In all, during 1943 thirteen groups representing various occupations and industries
met the Board at specially arranged sessions.
The employees' view-points were presented mainly through Union members.
NEW ORDERS AND REGULATIONS.
Eleven Orders were made during the year. These are summarized in the Appendix to the Report, but the following is a brief outline of the Orders:—
Fishing Industry.—Order No. 78 replaced the Order made in 1920 and extended
the scope to cover more female employees in the industry.
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52m. This is the usual Order under the
" Female Minimum Wage Act " for the resort hotels in unorganized territory for the
summer season.    It remained in force from June 14th, 1943, to September 11th, 1943.
Six Orders were promulgated during the year establishing overtime rates of pay
in certain industries. Five of the Orders were made under the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " and are as follows:—
Sawmill Industry.—Order No. 50 (1943).
Logging Industry.—Order No. 1  (1943).
Woodivorking Industry.—Order No. 49  (1943).
Box-manufacturing Industry.—Order No. 55  (1943).
Shingle Industry.—Order No. 62  (1943).
The sixth Order in this group was made under the " Female Minimum Wage Act"
and related to the Shingle Industry, Order No. 77 (1943).
The overtime rates of pay in these Orders apply west of the Cascade Mountains,
except for the woodworking industry, which is Province-wide in its scope.
Logging Industry.—Order No. 1a (1943) amended Order No. 1 (1943) by adding
two groups of employees to those exempt from the overtime rates.
Mercantile.—Order No. 24, Supplementary (1943), prescribed Christmas employment rates of pay for women and girls.
Mercantile.-—Order No. 59, Supplementary (1943), prescribed Christmas employment rates of pay for men and boys.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT " REGULATIONS.
In 1943 Regulations under the above-mentioned Act were made for:—
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Regulation No. 21j exempted the industry from
the provisions of the Act, but as working-hours of employees are extended the Orders K 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
of the Board require a rising scale of wages.    This tends to keep hours of employees
within reasonable limits.
Mercantile Industry.— (Christmas, 1943, Temporary.) Suitable regulations were
made to deal with the Christmas season rush, to ensure that working-hours of employees in stores would not be excessive.
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
Reflecting the increasing importance of women workers in the industrial life of
the Province returns received from some 6,894 employers of women and girls showed
a total of 54,905 female workers for 1943, an increase of 10,444 over the figure for the
previous year. The number of firms reporting also increased, the 1943 figure showing
a gain of 537 over the total for 1942.
The following tables concern those occupations and industries covered by Orders
of the Board:—
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
1,330
9,929
8,408
1,521
$127,289.88
$16,777.71
$15.14
$11.03
15.32%
37.76
1,146
7,733
6,706
1,027
$98,400.56
$10,145.09
$14.67
$9.88
13.28%
39.04
927
7,368
6,647
721
$90,166.19
$6,373.25
$13.56
$8.84
9.79%.
39.30
815
6,480
5,972
508
$78,154.39
$4,293.42
$13.09
$8.45
7.84%
38.75
664
5,194
398
$70,943.66
Under 18 years     -	
Total weekly wages—
$4,012.57
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  	
$13.66
S10.08
Percentage of employees under 18 years—	
Average hours worked per week 	
7.12%
42.14
Firms reporting in the mercantile industry increased to show a total of 1,330 in
1943 as against a previous figure of 1,146 for 1942. With the increasing demand for
female workers in this industry, the total employees recorded showed a total of 9,929
as compared with 7,733 in 1942.
Further .increase was noted in the average weekly wages—the average for employees over 18 years increasing to $15.14 as against $14.67 for the previous year,
and the average in the under-18-year group to $11.03 compared with $9.88 in 1942.
The percentage of this latter group of younger employees continued to increase over
previous years.
With added employment the average weekly hours of work within the industry
decreased to 37.76.
Laundry Industry (Female).
1943.
1942.
1940.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced __	
Inexperienced 	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees .
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees
Percentage of inexperienced employees-
Average hours worked per week	
138
1.830
1,762
$26,370.25
$726.36
$14.97
$10.68
3.72%.
40.49
141
1,725
1,517
208
122
1,469
1,371
$22,697.95   j     $18,698.02
$2,272.71   I $991.06
$14.96
$10.93
12.06%
42.94
$13.64
$10.11
6.67%
41.89
124
1.318
1,228
90
$15,941.10
$741.14
$12.98
$8.23
6.83%
42.00
111
1,182
1,126
36
$14,520.24
$460.97
$12.90
$8.23
4.74%
42.09 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 37
Although no increase was evident in the number of firms reporting in the laundry
industry, the total employees reported for 1943 increased to 1,830 as against 1,725
in 1942.
The average weekly wage for experienced employees gained fractionally to $14.97,
while for the inexperienced group, in which were represented only 3.72 per cent, of the
total employment, the average decreased slightly to $10.68, compared with $10.93 for
the year previous.
Average weekly working-hours dropped to 40.49 as against a high of 42.94 in the
previous year.
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
1,137
8,879
8,371
508
$137,097.40
$5,234.53
$16.38
$10.30
5.72%
41.50
1,075
6,818
6,313
505
$96,210.79
$5,446.17
$15.24
$10.78
7.41%
43.30
1,005
5,528
5,309
219
$74,660.52
$2,621.25
$14.06
$11.97
3.96%
43.34
943
4,974
4.811
163
$66,383.16
$1,792.51
$13.80
$11.00
.3.28%
43.12
819
4,380
4.288
92
Total weekly wages—
$59,156.99
$1,043.15
Average weekly wages—
$13.80
$11.34
Percentage of inexperienced employees _ _	
Average hours worked per week  — —
2.10%,
43.11
1
In the hotel and catering industry a total of 1,137 firms reported for 1943, an
increase of 62 over the previous year's total of 1,075. Total employees covered
increased to 8,879 as against 6,818 reported for 1942.
For the experienced employees the average weekly wage climbed to $16.38 compared with a previous figure of $15.24. In the inexperienced class the 1942 average
wage of $10.78 decreased slightly to show $10.30 for the year under review. A corresponding drop in the percentage of this latter group employed was also noted.
In line with the general trend in most of the tables, the average weekly hours also
decreased in this industry—the average showing as 41.50 as against 43.30 for the
previous year.
Office Occupation (Female).
1943.
1942.
I
1941.
1939.
Number of firms reporting __ 	
Total number of employees 	
Over 18 years _ —  	
Under 18 years.— —	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years   _
Employees under 18 years.  	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years-
Average hours worked per week _ —
2,766
12,172
11,614
558
$237,803.37
$7,903.27
$20.48
$14.16
4.58%,
40.69
2,649
9,991
9,653
338
$188,753.83
$4,553.04
$19.55
$13.47
3.38%,
41.29
$155
$2.
2,537
8,513
8,327
186
.758.51
237.85
$18.71
$12.03
2.18%
40.80
S133
$1
2,417
7,438
7,321
117
397.18
358.66
$18.22
$11.61
1.57%
40.35
$121
$1
2.241
6.779
6,691
691.66
006.38
$18.19
$11.44
1.30%
40.55
Firms reporting employees in the office occupation increased from 2,649 to a total
of 2,766 for the year 1943. Total employees reported rose to 12,172, an increase of
1,181 over the previous year.
Experienced workers in this group received an average weekly wage of $20.48 as
against $19.55 in 1942, while in the younger and inexperienced class the average wage
stood at $14.16, also representing an increase over the previous year's figure of $13.47. K 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The percentage of younger employees engaged in this occupation continued to show
an increase.
Average weekly working-hours in the office occupation decreased from the 1942
high of 41.29 to 40.69 for the year under review.
Interesting note is made of some of the numbers receiving the more worth-while
salaries. A $65 monthly rate is the legal minimum for experienced employees 18 years
of age or over.
There were 1,177 employed at $65.00 per month.
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
90.00
95.00
100.00
110.00
115.00
120.00
125.00
130.00
135.00
140.00
150.00
more than $150.00 per month.
The above figures show those actually receiving the quoted monthly rates and do
not include, for instance, those getting between $65 and $70, or between $70 and $75,
and so on down the list.
With higher wages general throughout the office-worker group for 1943, the numbers shown in low-wage brackets continued to decrease over figures for the previous
year, with noted increases in those assuming the more responsible positions at higher
rates of pay.
While the actual monthly minimum in the occupation is $65, only 1,177 were shown
as being paid that salary in 1943 as against a total of 1,240 in 1942, and in the higher
wage classes 292 were shown as receiving in excess of $150 monthly in 1943, compared
with a figure for the previous year of 184.
tt
tt
736
tt
502
tt
544
tt
549
tt
272
tt
733
tt
231
tt
149
ft
102
tt
212
tt
165
tt
41
tt
43
tt
69
tt
292
Personal Service Occupation (Female).
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
Number of firms reporting ___ _ __	
134
453
446
7
$7,463.48
$80.07
$16.73
$11.44
1.55%,
39.94
125
380
374
6
$6,033.37
$53.28
$16.13
$8.88
1.58%,
40.32
200
581
553
28
$7,384.08
$172.06
$13.35
$6.15
4.82%
35.98
214
607
581
26
$7,715.72
$131.33
$13.28
$5.05
4.28%
35.35
198
570
555
15
$7,696.07
$112.63
$13.87
$7.51
2.63%
36.89
Over 18 years _ ___	
Total weekly wages—
Average weekly wages—
Employees under 18 years  	
Percentage of employees under 18 years   ,	
Average hours worked per week	
As mentioned in a previous issue of this report, since 1941 the above table has been
compiled to cover only that section of the personal service group employed in beauty- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 39
parlours; the remaining occupations—theatre ushers, attendants, etc.—now being
included in a new table which follows under the heading of Public Places of Amusement.
Firms reporting in the beauty-parlour business increased to 134 from 125 in 1942,
the total employment reported increasing to 453 from 380 in the year previous. Of the
453 employees, 446 were shown as over 18 years of age.
In the experienced class of employee the average weekly wage increased to $16.73
over a previous figure of $16.13, while the small group shown as under 18 years of age
averaged $11.44 as against $8.88 for 1942.
Average weekly hours worked in beauty-parlour occupations declined slightly from
40.32 to 39.94 for the year under review.
Fishing Industry (Female).
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
16
372
363
9
$7,317.48
$68.25
$20.16
$7.58
2.42%
39.58
8
172
167
5
$3,614.36
$41.06
$21.64
$8.21
2.91%,
40.67
6
160
130
30
$1,868.08
$401.26
$14.37
$13.38
18.75%
35.54
10
105
78
27
$1,222.54
$261.33
$15.67
$9.68
25.71%
38.82
10
58
27
Inexperienced.   _	
Total weekly wages—
31
$455.81
$199.29
Average weekly wages—
$16.88
$6.43
Percentage of inexperienced employees ____	
Average hours worked per week _ __ _	
53.45%
31.78
While in previous years' reports the employees in this section have been comprised
of a relatively small number of women working within the fishing industry, due to the
expansion of the Order of the Board to include additional occupations added coverage
is evident in the above table.
The 1943 figures show a total of 16 firms reporting some 372 employees, of which
only 2.42 per cent, were in the inexperienced class of worker.
Average weekly wage in the experienced section was $20.16 as against a previous
high in 1942 of $21.64, while the small group in the inexperienced class of worker
averaged $7.58 compared with $8.21 in the year previous.
The average weekly hours worked declined slightly to 39.58 as against 40.67 in 1942.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female).
1943.
T
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
Number of firms reporting— -
Total number of employees  _ -
Experienced  —__. 	
Inexperienced  _	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees —_	
Inexperienced employees — —
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees — _ _ -
Inexperienced employees  _	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week 	
186
2,185
2,013
172
$37,636.99
$1,843.73
$18.70
$10.72
7.87%
40.54
189
2,341
1,995
346
$37,822.30
$3,743.28
$18.96
$10.82
14.78%
41.26
150
1,887
1,818
69
$36,327.20
$632.96
$19.98
$9.17
3.66%,
40.38
132
1,922
1,872
50
$35,047.43
$486.27
$18.72
$9.73
2.60%
40.10
145
1,880
1,766
114
$32,074.05
$1,156.11
$18.16
$10.14
Included in the above table with regular telephone and telegraph company employees are those operating-switchboards in offices and other establishments, such as
hotels, hospitals, etc. K 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
With a slight decrease in the number of reporting firms and employment fluctuations, particularly in the inexperienced group, the total employees reported in this
occupation decreased from a 1942 high of 2,341 to 2,185 in 1943. The percentage of
inexperienced workers dropped from 14.78 per cent, in 1942 to 7.87 per cent, for the
year under review.
Little change was evident in the average weekly wages—the figure for experienced
employees standing at $18.70 and the average for the inexperienced group at $10.72,
both registering a fractional decline of a few cents over previous years' figures.
Average weekly hours also decreased, showing an average of 40.54 in 1943, compared with 41.26 for the previous year.
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
S73
14,869
14,287
582
$293,807.69
$5,877.68
$20.56
$10.10
3.91%,
42.66
740
10,738
10,114
624
$192,695.51
$5,862.55
$19.05
$9.40
5.81%
42.62
.
551
4,450
3,815
635
$59,149.52
$6,234.27
$15.50
$9 82
14.27%
42.65
501
3,545
3,061
484
$45,411.50
$4,490.36
$14.84
$9.28
1.3.65%
42.36
435
3,208
2,784
424
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees  —_	
$41,240.31
$3,676.80
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees    ;    , ,,-	
$14.81
$8.67
Percentage of inexperienced employees —__ _—
Average hours worked per week  ,	
13.22%
42.01
The manufacturing industry again took the lead with the greatest number of
women employed. Firms reporting in this classification increased from 740 to 873 for
1943, showing a total of 14,869 employees as against 10,738 for the year previous.
For the experienced workers in this industry the average weekly wage climbed to
$20.56 to top the record high of $19.05 reached in 1942. The average weekly wage for
inexperienced employees also increased, rising to $10.10 over $9.40 for the previous
year. The percentage of the total being paid at the inexperienced rates of pay, however, continued to decrease—only 3.91 per cent, now remaining in this category.
Average weekly working-hours increased fractionally to 42.66 from 42.62 in 1942.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female).
1943.
1942.
1941.
Number of firms reporting — _
Total number of employees  _
Experienced      	
Inexperienced   _ __	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees __ 	
Inexperienced employees  ___
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees.- —
Inexperienced employees ..._ 	
Percentage of inexperienced employees _
Average hours worked per week —
69
3,539
3,518
21
$65,804.78
$199.99
$18.71
$9.5,2
0.59%,
45.04
72
4,012
3,831
181
$68,007.64
$2,352.39
$17.75
$13.00
4.51%
46.14
$67
$1
4,141
3,922
219
,752.93
,945.17
$17.28
$8.88
5.29%
47.17
76
3,649
3,529
120
$59,173.40
$1,067.67
$16.77
$8.90
3.29%
47.16
79
3,840
3,562
278
$57,232.59
$2,713.79
$16.07
$9.76
7.24%
46.75
This classification continued to show fewer firms reporting, with a resultant drop
in the total employees to 3,539 as against 4,012 in the previous year and a high of
4,141 in 1941.
The average weekly wage for experienced workers again showed an increase, rising
from $17.75 to $18.71 for the year under review.    In the inexperienced group, however, REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 41
with less casual employment and apparent loss in working-time, average weekly earnings decreased to $9.52, although only 0.59 per cent, of the total employees was included
in this class.
Average weekly hours for the industry further decreased from 46.14 to 45.04.
Transportation Industry (Female).
1943.
1942.
1941.
160
400
306
94
$6,361.32
$945.88
$20.79
$10.06
23.50%
43.43
129
313
186
127
$3,268.60
$1,155.66
$17.57
$9.10
40.58%
41.61
32
107
20
87
Total weekly wages—
$207.42
Employees under 18 years    — __...• 	
Average weekly wages—
$712.58
$10.37
$8.19
81.31%
43.19
This classification includes female workers engaged in delivery, truck-driving, messenger work, etc.
Since the first compilations under this heading in 1941, rapid increase in the
numbers of female workers engaged in these occupations has resulted in many interesting changes in the above table.
The number of firms reporting in this classification increased to 160 in 1943, compared with 129 for the previous year. With 31 more returns in this section, the total
employees reported rose to 400 as against 313 in 1942.
Average weekly wages increased in both the over-18-year group and the under-18-
year class. In the former the average weekly earnings rose to $20.79 to show a sharp
increase over the figure of $17.57 for the preceding year, while in the younger group
of employees average weekly earnings stood at $10.06 compared with $9.10 in 1942.
While in the preceding years a high percentage of younger employees was noted in
the transportation industry, from recent figures it is evident that increasing numbers
of older workers are now engaged in occupations included in this section. Compared
with the 1942 figure of 40.58 per cent, of total as under 18 years of age, the percentage
in this younger group of employees dropped to 23.50 per cent, of the total employees
reported for 1943.
Some increase was noted in the average weekly working-hours, which rose to 43.43
as against 41.61 for the previous year.
Public Places of Amusement (Female).
1943.
Number of firms reporting— — 	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years- 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years _	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years —	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
Average hours worked per week- 	
277
189
$2,189.76
$592.87
$11.59
$6.74
31.77%
26.95
83
238
186
52
$2,203.61
$352.64
$11.85
$6.78
21.85%
29.32 K 42                                            DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
This section includes theatre ushers, check-room attendants, and all such occupations previously included in the personal service group, exclusive of hairdressers and
beauty-parlour occupations.
No comparative figures are available for this group prior to 1942, inasmuch as the
figures at that time were included in the personal service group.
Returns were received from 85 firms in this classification reporting a total of 277
employees, as against 83 firms in 1942 with a total employment of 238.
Average weekly earnings declined fractionally with a larger percentage of younger
workers being employed and shorter hours evident in the occupations covered.    Due to
the nature of the occupations, with part time and casual hours of work, the weekly
earnings do not in most cases represent a full week's work.
In the over-18-year group the average weekly earnings dropped slightly to $11.59
from $11.85 in 1942, while for the younger class of employee the average appeared
almost steady at $6.74 as against $6.78 for the previous year.   The percentage employed
in this latter group of younger workers increased to 31.77 per cent., compared with
21.85 per cent, in 1942.
The average weekly working-hours for all employees in these occupations was
26.95.
Summary of all Occupations ("Female Minimum Wage Act").
1943.
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
6,894
54,905
51,277
3,628
$949,142.40
$40,250.34
$18.51
$11.09
6.61%
41.03
6,357
44,461
41,042
3,419
$719,708.52
$35,977.87
$17.54
$10.52
7.69%
41.96
5,612
34,204
31,912
2,292
$511,972.47
$22,321.71
$16.04
$9.74
6.70%
41.82
5,232
30,038
28,453
1,585
$442,446.42
$14,622.69
$15.55
$9.23
5.28%
41.48
4,702
27,489
25,993
1,496
$405,011.38
$14,381.69
$15.58
$9.61
5.44%,
42.24
Over 18 years, or experienced ,  — ,
Under 18 years, or inexperienced 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced 	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or inexperi-
Average hours worked per week   	
The number of firms reporting increased to 6,894 for 1943, and actual figures
concerning 54,905 women and girl employees are shown in the above table.
Total aggregate salaries and wages for one week amounted to $989,392.74, an
increase of $233,706.35 over the figure for 1942.
The average weekly wage for all occupations increased to $18.51 in the over-18-
years, or experienced, group, as against a high of $17.54 for the previous year.
While the lowest legal wage for women 18 or over in the various classifications
covered by Orders of the Board is still $12.75, as set for the mercantile industry,
ranging up to $15.50 in the fishing group, it is evident that the average amount received
is now well above the highest minimum set by law.
Average weekly working-hours for the 54,905 female employees decreased from
41.96 to 41.03 for the year under review.
The percentage of employees under 18 years or inexperienced dropped slightly
from the 1942 high of 7.69 per cent, to 6.61 per cent, for 1943.
Increases in the average wage for the adult or experienced worker were evident
in eight of the eleven tables.    Slight decrease in the average hours worked in the
telephone and telegraph industry resulted in a fractional decline of the average earnings in this group.    In the fishing industry added employment and shorter working-
hours created the same situation, while the average earnings in the public places of REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 43
amusement table were also off slightly compared with the previous year—lower working-hours also being a factor in this instance.
The 54,905 women and girls shown in the summary table are representative only
of those workers with classes of employment for which minimum wage orders have
been set by the Board, and do not include domestic workers, farm-labourers, or fruit-
pickers, which are excluded from coverage by the provision of the " Female Minimum
Wage Act." Returns are likewise not requested for women and girls employed in
banks, as their conditions of employment are regulated by the Dominion " Bank Act."
Federal employees are also not covered by the Provincial legislation.
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum for Experienced Female Workers.
Industry or
Occupation.
Legal
Minimum
Wage for
Full-time
Experienced
Employees.
Receiving Actual
Minimum Wage
SET FOB
Experienced
Workers.
Receiving More
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Receiving Less
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Total.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
$12.75*
14.88+
14.00*
15.001
14.25*
15.50t
15.00f
14.00t
14.40+
14.25*
1,058
78
1,181
1,177
57
2
82
382
28
24
10.66
4.26
13.30
9.67
12.58
0.54
3.75
2.57
0.79
8.66
6,485
931
5,511
9,809
312
272
1,614
11,970
2,619
64
65.31
50.88
62.07
80.59
68.88
73.12
73.87
80.50
74.00
23.11
2,386
821
2,187
1,186
84
98
489
2,517
892
189
24.03
44.86
24.63
9.74
18.54
26.34
22.38
16.93
25.21
68.23
9,929
Laundry	
1,830
8,879
Office 	
12,172
453
Fishing 	
Telephone and telegraph —
372
2,185
14,869
3,539
Public places of amusement-
277
Totals, 1943
4,069
4,015
7.47
9.09
39,587
30,365
72.63
68.78
10,849
9,768
19.90
22.13
54,505§
Totals, 1942	
.
44,148
* 40-48 hours per week. t 48 hours per week. ' 37^-48 hours per week.
§ In the transportation industry, 400 employees excluded from above table and not included in totals, as it is
impractical to set a weekly rate owing to the variation of minimum wages in the Order, depending on whether the
work is done on foot or bicycles, by motor-cycles or other types of motor-vehicles.
With wage levels generally higher in 1943, the percentage of employees included
in the returns who were receiving wages in excess of the legal minimum further
increased to 72.63 from a high of 68.78 per cent, in 1942. The percentages of those
receiving less than the minimum and the number actually receiving the fixed rate
showed relative decreases over the previous year.
In the section showing those at under the minimum are included the younger and
less skilled employees for whom special rates are fixed, and also the part-time and
casual workers who appear mostly in occupations not requiring full-time employment,
and hence are unable to earn an amount equal to the full weekly rate. An instance
of this appears in the group comprising public places of amusement, where due to the
casual nature of the work and the short working-hours required by the industry 68.23
per cent, of the total employees earned less than the minimum amount for a full
week's work.
The office occupation continued to lead with 80.59 per cent, of the total employees
in this section shown as receiving above the fixed rate in 1943; followed by manufacturing with 80.50 per cent, and the fruit and vegetable industry with 74 per cent.
In the telephone and telegraph section 73.87 per cent, were above the minimum; followed by the fishing group with 73.12 per cent, and personal service occupations showing 68.88 per cent, above the fixed rate.
The mercantile industry reported 65.31 per cent, above the minimum set, while in
the hotel and catering section 62.07 per cent, were above, and in the laundry group K 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
50.88 per cent, received more than the fixed rate.    In the group comprising public
places of amusement 23.11 per cent, were above.
Interesting note is made each year of the high wages recorded in the various
industries and occupations. For the year 1943 the top salaries in each classification
were as follows:—
Occupation or Industry.
Office     -         - $77.33
Manufacturing         -     70.20
Mercantile       - — -     65.00
Transportation      _  -	
Weekly Wages
or Salary.
Fruit and vegetable
Hotel and catering __.
Personal  service 	
Telephone and telegraph
Fishing     —	
Public places of amusement
Laundry, cleaning and dyeing
59.50
55.23
51.90
50.00
48.00
40.00
35.00
31.25
Highest individual earnings for the week reported were shown in the office group,
in which one executive employee was paid a total of $77.33 for the week. In the manufacturing section one worker earned a total amount for the week of $70.20. The mercantile industry reported one employee at $65 weekly. The transportation section
showed one truck-driver as having been paid a total of $59.50 for the week reported,
although in this case the earnings were assumed to include a basic rate together with
additional payment based on a percentage of the business transacted by the employee.
One piece-worker in the fruit and vegetable industry was shown as having earned
$55.23 for the week under review. The hotel and catering group showed a top wage
of $51.90, while in the personal service section $50 was the highest reported. In the
telephone and telegraph occupation one employee in a supervisory capacity received
$48, while the fishing industry showed one worker as having received $40 for the week.
In the new group covering public places of amusement the highest weekly amount
earned was $35, and in the laundry, cleaning and dyeing section highest reported was
$31.25.
Table showing Number of Single, Married, and Widowed Employees
and their Earnings for Week reported.
Industry or Occupation.
Single.
Earnings.
Married.
Earnings.
Widowed.
Earnings.
Total Earnings for Week
reported.
5,958
918
4,494
8,640
271
168
1,659
8,538
1,435
216
203
$85,273.41
13,686.77
72,161.40
173,722.29
4,436.92
3,270.36
30,030.19
170,848.79
25,088.43
3,276.20
1,875.92
3,658
813
3,768
3,187
170
190
470
5,937
2,011
169
69
$53,708.19
11,824.02
60,368.06
64,350.46
2,824.52
3,755.54
8,298.77
121,230.45
39,028.63
3,713.06
827.66
313
99
617
345
12
14
56
394
93
15
5
$5,085.99
1,585.82
9,802.47
7,633.89
282.11
359.83
1,151.76
7,604.13
1,887.71
317.94
79.05
$144,067.59
27,096.61
142,331.93
245,706.64
7,543.55
7,385.73
39,480.72
299,683.37
66,004.77
7,307.20
2,782.63
Office   	
Telephone and telegraph	
Manufacturing  —
Transportation _ -
Public places of amusement	
Totals:.....	
32,500
$583,670.68
20,442
$369,929.36
1,963
$35,790.70
$989,390.74
59.19%
66.94%
37.23%
29.71%
	
3.58%.
3.35%
Relative percentages of single, married, and widowed employees again showed
decided changes over figures for the previous year.
The percentage of married women-workers further increased to 37.23 per cent, in
1943 as against 29.71 per cent, in 1942, with a relative decrease noted in the percentage REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 45
of single employees, the figure dropping to 59.19 per cent, from 66.94 per cent, in 1942.
Little change was evident in the figure representing the percentage of widows.
Greater proportions of married workers were again evident in the fruit and vegetable and fishing industries, while a greater percentage of single employees continued
to show in the office occupation, the telephone and telegraph section, and the manufacturing industries.
Inasmuch as the figures reporting those employees divorced or separated were low,
these numbers were included with the married workers and are not shown separately
in the above table.
Table showing Years of Service of Female Employees with Employers
reporting for 1943.
Industry or Occupation.
Not>
specified.
CO  "
o rf
._H   tO
O  «
4->  tU
o -3
+_ i>
O rt
+_   0.
o rt
tor*
3 8
00 .*
2 »
— _,
O.X.
10 Years
or over.
Number of
Employees
reported.
Number of
Firms
reporting.
in
25
335
131
14
2
3
303
295
6
18
6,005
1,116
6,071
4,932
208
254
921
9,977
1,555
323
184
1,898
329
1,233
2,612
105
48
420
3,124
877
62
39
615
'    103
402
1,126
44
30
155
516
347
4
13
274
45
158
620
18
18
34
217
138
3
6
151
45
126
373
14
3
48
126
59
1
2
126
14
76
273
13
3
24
90
56
1
7
114
17
71
241
50
71
32
90
20
65
229
1
58
57
36
-----
1
58
14
44
150
6
2
29
48
21
1
56
12
29
1,16
3
19
32
21
1
431
9.929
1,330
Laundry   ._  	
90   1,830
269   8,879
1,369 12,172
21       453
7       372
424    2,185
308J14.869
102| 3,539
|     400
5|      277
138
1,137
Office            	
2,766
Personal service--	
Fishing	
Telephone and telegraph
134
16
186
873
69
160
Public places of amuse-
85
Totals—	
1,243
31,546
10,747
3,355
1,531
948
683
603
561
373
289
3,026 54,905
6,894
The length-of-service table indicates the length of time each employee has been in
the service of the employer sending in the return.
Further increase in the employment of female workers in 1943 is especially evident
in the total employees working less than one year, the above table showing 31,546 in
this group as against a figure of 27,003 for the year previous.
When compiling the figures, special note is taken in each occupation of the
employee credited with the greatest number of years' service. In the mercantile
industry one employee was reported with 35 years' service. The laundry, cleaning and
dyeing section showed a record of 28 years as the highest recorded. Long service in
the hotel and catering section was 35 years. In the office occupation one employee was
credited with 43 years. The personal service group showed 20 years as the longest
service in that occupation. The fishing industry listed one employee with 13 years'
service, while in the telephone and telegraph section long service was 36 years. The
manufacturing industry listed one employee with record service of 37 years. In the
fruit and vegetable industry 22 years was the longest service recorded. The transportation industry, as one of the newer industries reporting details of female employment,
showed one employee with 5 years' service. In the group reporting employees of public
places of amusement, one employee was credited with 18 years' service.
INSPECTIONS AND WAGE ADJUSTMENTS.
During the year under review the inspection staff made 8,642 personal inspections
throughout the Province. In the centres outside of Greater Victoria and Vancouver
where the districts to be covered are scattered it meant considerable travel, in many
cases into plants or establishments off the beaten highway. K 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The actual number of visits is slightly less than for the previous year. For practically the whole twelve months there was one less Inspector on duty than for 1942.
Several of the regular personnel are still on loan to the Dominion Government and
others, due to the war, are away with various branches of the Services.
As our Department functions in close co-operation with the Regional War Labour
Board our Inspectors are often called upon to devote some time to assist that body in
its important activities. While this work is definitely important, it has meant that the
total inspections under the Provincial Statutes have of necessity shown a drop.
The figures relating to wage adjustments bear tangible evidence to the benefits
of the various Minimum Wage Orders. While it is the accepted rule that wages are
standing at a high level owing to war-time conditions there still remain some employers
who, through ignorance or design, fail to comply with the law. The Inspectors and
office staff have been able to assist in making adjustments for employees who received
less than the amounts to which they were legally entitled.
Adjustments under Orders of the " Male Minimum Wage Act " were made for 218
employees of 66 different firms in the sum of $7,826.81.
For 213 women and girls whose work was covered by Orders promulgated under
the " Female Minimum Wage Act" 128 employers paid up arrears amounting to
$3,901.06. A g.rand total, therefore, of $11,727.87 was received by 431 employees from
194 employers who had failed to pay the correct wages.
These adjustments were made with the assistance of the Department and without
recourse to Court actions.
COURT CASES.
It was necessary in some instances to prosecute employers for various infractions
of the law and in two instances arrears of wages were ordered paid to employees in
the sum of $2,433.27 after conviction by the Magistrates for infractions of Minimum
Wage Orders.
Court cases are started by the Department only after other means of ensuring
compliance with the law have been unsuccessful.
The following summary shows at a glance the cases taken under the various
Statutes administered by the Department:—
Cases.
Convictions.
Dismissed or
Withdrawn.
2
3
9
2
1
2
1
8
2
1
D., 2
W   1
Criminal Code  — - - — _	
Totals           _ — - _	
17
14
D., 2 ; W., 1
" Female Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1. Bain's   Confectionery    (C   J.   Munro),
2526 Main Street, Vancouver
2. The   Hux    (H.   Hart),    169   Broadway
East, Vancouver
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to keep records  	
Fined $5 or three d_
Fined $15.
ys. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 47
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Hours of Work Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
1. National   Cafe    (Chow   Lung),'   Prince
George
2. National   Cafe    (Chow   Lung),   Prince
George
3. Willow River Spruce Mills, Willow River
Failure to post schedule of hours
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to keep records —	
Fined $25 or twenty days ; and costs,
$1.75.
Dismissed, but appeal taken by Department and same allowed.
Dismissed.
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act."
1.
Failure     to
monthly
pay
wages
semi-
Fined $25 and $5.25
to pay $33.48 arre
costs;   ordered
ars.
2.
Lloyd Jordan, Edgewood
Failure     to
monthly
pay
wages
semi-
Suspended sentence;
$34.18 arrears.
ordered to pay
8
Failure     to
monthly
pay
wages
semi-
Suspended sentence,
$33.48 arrears.
4
Failure    to
monthly
pay
wages
semi-
Suspended sentence;
$33.48 arrears.
ordered to pay
5
Lloyd Jordan, Edgewood
Failure    to
monthly
pay
wages
semi-
Suspended sentence;
$33.01 arrears.
6.
Squilax Lumber Mills, Ltd
, Blind Bay-
Failure    to
monthly
pay
wages
semi-
Fined $25 and costs ;
$36 arrears.
ordered to pay
7.
Squilax Lumber Mills, Ltd
, Blind Bay ...
Failure     to
pay
wages
semi-
Fined $25 and costs ;
ordered to pay
monthly to eleve
n employees
$857.60 arrears.
8.
Willow River Spruce Mills,
Willow River
Failure     to
pay
wages
semi-
Fined $25 and $1.75
costs;   ordered
monthly
to pay arrears of $1,372.04, cover
ing all employees.
9.
Willow River Spruce Mills,
Willow River
Failure    to
monthly
pay
wages
semi-
Withdrawn as in previous case, all
arrears were ordered paid.
Total arrears ordered paid, $2,433.27.
" Factories Act."
1. Grandview Steam Laundry (Sam Hong),
Operating laundry after 7 p.m	
Fined $50 and $2.50 costs.
891 Prior Street, Vancouver
2. Graycourt Hotel  (Wong Fum Gor), 176
Operating elevator  without a li
Fined   $15   and   $2.50   costs   or  ten
Hastings Street East, Vancouver
cence
days.
Criminal Code.
1. Gordon P. Cook, Chemainus
Corruptly accepting money from
an employee as an inducement
for allowing the employee to
remain at work for a lumber
company
Fined $100 and $6.25 costs. K 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COMPARATIVE WAGES, 1918, 1941, 1942, 1943.
Figures showing comparative wage trends are furnished in the following tables
for the year 1918, when data were first compiled, and for the three most recent years
—namely, 1941, 1942, and 1943. It will be noted these relate to non-seasonal occupations only.
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1918.
1941.
1942.
1943.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years —_	
$12.71
$7.70
15.49% .
$13.5.6
$8.84
 9.79%
$14.67
$9.88
13.28%:
$15.14
$11.03
15.32%
Laundry Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
$11.80
$9.78
21.80%
$13.64
$10.11
6.67%
1
$14.96
$10.93
12.06%
$14.97
$10.68
Percentage of inexperienced employees _ __ _ —
3.72%
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees 	
Inexperienced employees —	
Percentage of inexperienced employees .
$16.38
$10.30
5.72%
Office Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
$16.53
$10.88
7.45%
$18.71
$12.03
2.18%
$19.55
$13.47
3.83%
$20 48
Employees under 18 years  —-	
Percentage of employees under 18 years	
$14.16
4.58%,
Personal Service Occupation
(Female)
Average weekly wages—
$18.83
$6.96
15.38%
$13.35
$6.15
4.82%
$16.13
$8.88
1.58%
Employees under 18 years _	
$11.44
1-55%
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees..
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees _
$19.98
$9.17
3.66%
$18.96
$10.82
14.78%
$18.70
$10.72
7.87%
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees-	
Percentage of inexperienced employees _
$12.54
$9.57
28.64%
$20.56
$10.10
3.91% REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 49
SPECIAL LICENCES.
The Board has recognized that in most occupations for women that are covered by
Orders a training period to gain experience is needed before the girl is entitled to the
legal minimum wage. This period varies in different classes of work and lower rates
are set, usually on a graduated scale leading up to the minimum.
To deal with these learners special licences are granted, after employee and
employer have made written application to the Board. Before the issuance of such
licences the matter is carefully checked, and if some previous experience with another
employer in the same industry or occupation is disclosed, credit is given when the
licence is granted.
The employee receives the original copy, a duplicate going to the employer.
Upon expiry of the licence, or if an increase to the minimum wage is made before
expiration date, the employer is requested to return the licence to the Board for cancellation. Should the employee leave before the training period is completed the licence
is returned, with the reason for termination of service.
Of recent years it has been noted the learners in many cases are started at a
higher rate than an Order might require and many employers have made the necessary
increases before they really become due. The present state of the labour market has
been the cause of these concessions, as well as the decreased number of licences issued
during the current year in comparison with 1942, there having been only 747 issued as
against 1,586 for the previous year.
The following table shows the numbers issued in various occupations and industries for 1943 and the previous year:—
Licences issued covering Women or Girls.
Personal service	
Number issued.
1942.                       1943.
         12
Telephone and telegraph  _.__
23
22
Mercantile   	
152
54
Office       .
303
73
Hotel and catering  __
334
109
Laundry, cleaning, and dyeing	
384
125
Manufacturing 	
366
362
Totals	
1,574
745
Licences issued covering Men
Mercantile  ,	
or Boys.
       12
2
The tables reporting statistical information dealing with employment and earnings,
of female workers_ covered by Orders of the Board are based on a questionnaire
restricted to female employees only.
In order to give a similar picture of the trend of wages and employment for males
in occupations included in the coverage of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," a segregation and break-down of industrial classifications shown elsewhere in this Report has
been made to isolate these occupations, where possible, for presentation in the separate
tables which follow. It should be pointed out that detailed information is not available
for all occupations covered by the Male Minimum Wage Orders, and is here limited to
group coverage of certain sections of the industrial statistics where break-downs showing the required occupations were possible.
The figures are based on industrial returns which show the week of employment
of the greatest number, and the male employees covered are segregated to show those
over and under 21 years of age.
4 K 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Baking Industry (Male).
1943.
1941.
Number of firms reporting __	
Total number of male employees._
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years.-	
Total weekly wages 	
Employees 21 years and over.-
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over-
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week _	
167
1,150
1,030
120
$36,042.50
$34,081.50
$1,961.00
$33.09
$16.34
10.43%
45.80
172
1,209
1,106
103
$36,411.50
$34,877.00
$1,534.50
$31.53
$14.90
8.52%
46.69
174
1,265
1,166
99
$33,313.00
$32,143.00
$1,170.00
$27.57
$11.82
7.83%
46.87
Construction (Male).
753
24,754
23,837
917
$969,551.00
$943,888.00
$25,663.00
$39.60
$27.99
3.70%
51.14
889
25,550
24,795
705
$921,080.00
$902,784.50
$18,295.50
$36.41
$25.95
2.76%
50.06
1,054
14,798
14,445
353
$442,926.50
Employees 21 years and over  __  	
$436,318.50
$6,608.00
Average weekly wages—
$30.21
$18.72
2.39%
45.03
Fruit and Vegetable (Male).
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of male employees _
21 years of age and over	
.Under 21 years  —	
Total weekly wages —
Employees 21 years and over 	
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over  	
Employees under 21 years _	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years-
Average hours worked per week	
84
2,068
1,482
586
$58,653.00
$44,246.50
$14,406.50
.   $29.86
$24.58
28.34%
54.43
84
1,947
1,423
524
$53,560.50
$41,670.50
$11,890.50
$29.28
$22.69
26.91%
51.59
92
2,102
1,788
314
$50,506.00
$44,987.50
$5,518.50
$25.16
$17.57
14.94%
49.15
House Furnishings (Male).
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of male employees _
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years _ ___
Total weekly wages -
Employees 21 years and over..
Employees under 21 years '	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over-
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years ._
Average hours worked per week.____ _._
67
733
595
138
$19,001.00
$16,734.50
$2,266.50
$28.13
$16.42
18.83%
44.00
65
1,051
815
236
$26,294.00
$22,627.50
$3,666.50
$27.76
$15.54
22.45%
44.88
60
1,171
814
357
$25,980.50
$20,956.00
$5,024.50
$25.74
$14.07
30.49%
44.62 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 51
Logging (Male).
1942.
1941.
Number of firms reporting    _—
Total number of male employees....
21 years of age and over _	
Under 21 years __
Total weekly wages 	
Employees 21 years and over-
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over._
Employees under 21 years	
$513.
$489,
$23,
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week 	
521
12,589
11,904
685
106.00
219.00
887.00
$41.10
$34.87
5.44%
48.67
526
12,992
12,556
436
$492,348.00
$479,185.00
$13,163.00
$38.16
$30.19
3.36%
48.78
552
13,602
13,319
283
$469,025.00
$461,333,50
$7,691.50
$34.64
$27.18
2.08%
48.24
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male).
Number of firms reporting—	
Total number of male employees ._
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years 	
Total weekly wages	
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years -	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over  	
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years-
Average hours worked per week— __ 	
92
118
126
647
589
550
626
573
535
21
16
15
$23,150.00
$20,679.00
$17,281.00
$22,730.00
$20,344.00
$17,004.00
$420.00
$335.00
$277.00
$36.31
$35.50
$31.78
$20.00
$20.94
$18.47
3.25%
2.72%
2.73%
42.38
42.70
42.77
Sawmills (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees ._
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years 	
Total weekly wages —	
Employees 21 years and over  _	
Employees under 21 years ——	
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over	
Employees under 21 years 	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years-
Average hours worked per week-	
$429,
$411,
$17,
307
12,871
12,178
693
632.00
678.50
953.50
$33.81
$25.91
5.38%
48.47
284
13,905
13,239
666
$419,243.50
$402,783.50
$16,460.00
$30.42
$24.71
4.79%
48.44
266
12,862
12,306
556
$349,116.00
$337,417.50
$11,698.50
$27.42
$21.04
4.32%
48.40
Shingle-mills (Male).
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male employees..
21 years of age and over	
Under 21 years 	
Total weekly wages 	
Employees 21 years and over
Employees under 21 years	
Average weekly wages.—■
Employees 21 years and over..
Employees under 21 years..
Percentage of male employees under 21 years..
Average hours worked per week —	
43
1,713
1,677
36
$59,128.00
$58,220.50
$907.50
$34.72
$25.21
2.10%
46.42
45
2,246
2,211
35
$73,535.50
$72,677.00
$858.50
$32.87
$24.53
1.56%
47.20
50
2,364
2,310
54
$73,702.50
$72,363.50
$1,339.00
$31.33
$24.80
2.28%
47.29 K 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Ship-building (Male).
1943.
1942.
1941.
47
30,488
29,020
1,468
$1,213,203.50
$1,162,994.00
$50,209.50
$40.08
$34.20
4.82%
43.92
46
28,597
26,913
1,684
$1,136,225.50
$1,085,034.50
$51,191.00
$40.32
$30.40
5.89%
47.88
52
Total number of male employees 	
21 years of age and over___     —
11,363
10,601
762
$391,512.00
Employees 21 years and over      	
$373,859.00
$17,653.00
Average weekly wages—
Employees 21 years and over  __ 	
Employees under 21 years 	
$35.27
$23.17
6.71%
43.63
Wood (N.E.S.) (Male).
108
3,836
3,218
618
$121,058.00
$107,298.00
$13,760.00
$33.34
$22.27
16.11%
46.28
104
3,645
2,996
649
$103,040.50
.   $90,605.00
$12,435.50
$30.24
$19.16
17.81%
46.59
103
Total number of male employees                     	
3,595
2,697
898
Total weekly wages  	
Employees 21 years and over 	
Employees under 21 years	
$87,733.50
$72,855.50
$14,878.00
$27.01
$16.57
24.98%
46.08
Average weekly wages—
Employees under 21 years	
Percentage of male employees under 21 years .
Average hours worked per week	
CONCLUSION.
During the year fraught with trying circumstances we have received remarkable
co-operation from employers beset with inconveniences arising from lack of experienced
workers, difficulties in obtaining commodities necessary for their respective businesses,
and bounded by restrictions of various types deemed necessary by those in authority to
successfully prosecute the war effort. On behalf of the Board and its officials we are
grateful for the harmonious relationship that exists between employers and the
Department.
To employees, too, who have consulted us in instances where they felt our regulations were not being observed we would say we are glad "of their help, which in many
cases resulted in benefit to themselves in having adjustments made in hours or wages,
benefit to their employers for being placed in a position where they were observing
the law, and to the Board and its staff for the knowledge that the responsibilities
imposed by the Legislature were being fulfilled.
For any assistance given by the general public with reference to labour legislation coming under the jurisdiction of our Board we are deeply appreciative, and look
forward with confidence to the time in the not too distant future when problems to be
solved will relate to peace-time activities instead of those arising from a world at war.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 53
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO " MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
BAKING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 17 (1942), Effective July 20th, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 17.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, cakes,
doughnuts, pies, and similar products.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—■
21 years of age and over__
Under 18 years of age	
18 years and under 19 years—
19 years and under 20 years—
29 years and under 21 years—
Delivery salesmen -	
48
48
48
48
48
54
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
BARBERING  (MALE).
Order No. 42, Effective June 14th, 1937. '
(Superseding Order No. 8.)
Barbering includes the work of male persons engaged in the shaving of the face or cutting or
trimming or singeing of the hair or beard for hire, gain, or hope of reward, or in connection with any
of the foregoing the shampooing or massaging or the treating the head or face.
Occupation.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
$18.00 week
45c. per hour
Daily minimum, $1.80
(Maximum hours, 48 per week.)
NOTE.— (a.)   Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
(b.)   Does   not   apply   to   male   persons   employed   in   beauty-parlours   or   hairdressing-shops   while  working   on
women or children only.
BOX-MANUFACTURING  (MALE).
Order No. 55 (1943), Effective July 19th, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 55.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the making of wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel
staves and heads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, or other wooden containers.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week
40c.
48
30c.
48
30c.
48
25c.
48
Adult males, 90% of total	
Adult males, 10% of total, not less than..
Males, 18 to 21 years of age	
Males, under 18 years of age_ 	 K 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act" and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as denned in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26   (1940)   and Order No. 26a
(1940)  of the Board.
Note.—Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under " Apprenticeship Act."
BUS-DRIVERS  (FEMALE).
Order No. 76, Effective September 28th, 1942.
Includes female employees in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public, for which service a charge
is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point Grey
which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the  City of
Vancouver;   the City of New Westminster;   the Corporation  of
the Township  of Richmond;   the Municipality of the District of
Burnaby;   Municipality of the District of West Vancouver;   the
City of North Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver
50c.
55c.
40 to 48.
Less than 40.
Note.— (1.) If bus-drivers are reauired to wear uniforms or special articles of wearing-apparel no deduction
shall be made from bus-drivers' wages for such uniforms or special apparel, except under terms with regard to
cost duly approved in writing by the Board as being fair and reasonable.
(2.)   Employees required by employer to wait on call shall be paid for waiting time.
(3.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
(4.) Rest period of twenty-four consecutive hours from midnight to midnight in each calendar week shall be
given to employees.
BUS-DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 70, Effective March 18th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. SI.)
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which service a charge is
made.
Vancouver Island and Saltspring Island..
Hours.
40 to 60-
Less than 40.
In excess of 9 hours
in   any  one  day  or
50 hours in any one
week.
' REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 55
BUS-DRIVERS (MALE).
Order No. 70a, Effective June 27th, 1940.
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of a bus-driver
while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by a bus-driver from the time
he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty until he returns again to his employer's
headquarters or garage where he originally reported for duty; and shall include the time occupied by
a bus-driver in dead-heading from his employer's headquarters or garage to the place where he is to
take charge of the bus and vice versa; but the minimum wage shall not apply to waiting-time of a bus-
driver when occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads.
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 66, Effective August 21st, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. iO.)
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt,
Highland, Metchosin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew	
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 58, Effective November 7th, 1938.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
The City of Vancouver, the City of New Westminster, the Municipality of
the District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver,
the City of North Vancouver, and District of North Vancouver __	
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 65, Effective August 1st, 1939.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Provincial   Electoral   Districts   of   Rossland-Trail,    Grand   Forks-Greenwood,
Kaslo-Slocan, and Nelson-Creston _   _ „  _
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 72, Effective May 27th, 1940.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
That portion of Vancouver Island within a radius of 5 miles from the centre
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)  "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly. K 56
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 73, Effective May 27th, 1940.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
a-tfy new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
That portion of Vancouver Island within a radius of 5 miles from the centre
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 68, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 61.)
" Christmas-tree industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the cutting, gathering, hauling, and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Male employees, 85 per cent, not less than 40c. per hour.
Permissible, 15 per cent, not less than 30c. per hour.
Note.— (a.) Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 12 (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 12, Order No. 12a, Order No. 12s, Order No. 45, Order No. 45a,
and Order No. 4.8.)
Includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or demolition of any building, railway,
tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well,
telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of
construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of any such work or structure.
Hourly Rate,
Area.                                                                   21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate,
under 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
The City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point
Grey which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the
City of Vancouver;   the City of Victoria;   the City of New
Westminster;     the    City    of    Nanaimo;     the    City   of    Prince
Rupert;   the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt;   the
Municipality of the District of Oak Bay;   the Municipality of
the District of Saanich;   Municipality of the District of West
Vancouver;    the   Municipality   of   the   District   of   Burnaby;
and the Municipality and District of North Vancouver ,	
45c.
40c.
35c.
30c.
48
48
Note.— (a.)   Above rates do not apply to indentured apprentices under '
(6.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
Apprenticeship Act.'
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS  (MALE).
Order No. 54, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 82.)
Includes every male elevator operator and starter.
3714 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
371/^c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board (21) meals, $4.00 per week.
(6.)   Individual meals, twenty cents  (20c.)  each.
(c.)  Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven  (7)  days, $2.00 per week,
(e.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/.)   Uniforms or special wearing-apparel, required by the employer, must be supplied and laundered without
cost to the employee.
(fir.)   The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(ft.)   Employees must be given twenty-four (24)  consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(i.)   Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 57
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS  (FEMALE).
Order No. 53, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. SO and Order No. 5.)
Includes every female operator and starter.
37% to 48 Hours per Week,
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37%c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.—As for male elevator operators, see Order No. 54.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM  (MALE).
Order No. 18 (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 18, 18A, 18b, and 18c.)
Includes every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while under
steam-pressure or in motion.    " Special engineer " means holder of a special or temporary certificate.
(See " Boiler Inspection Act," section 28  (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
50c.
40c.
48
48
Note.— (a.) Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the "Hours of Work Act" 48 hours per
week may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(6.)   For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(c.) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 40 cents
per hour.
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS   (MALE).
Order No. 39 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 39.)
First-aid attendant means every male employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid attendant
under the authority of a certificate of competency in first aid, satisfactory to the Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia, and designated by his employer as the first-aid attendant in charge.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Rate.
..                      60c.
  _____     i                 fiO«.
$4.00
Assistant first-aid attendant  — —   .„
4.00
Note.— (a.) "Hours of Work Act" regulates the daily hours in industry, but should overtime be necessary,
attendant must be paid overtime rate.
(6.) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any industry or occupation within an industry, the first-aid
attendant employed in such industry or occupation must be paid such higher rate.
(c.) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the medical practitioner or hospital.
FISHING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 78, Effective May 3rd, 1943.
(Superseding Order in Effect since February 28th, 1920.)
" Fishing industry " means the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving,
canning,   drying,  curing,  smoking,  packing,  labelling  and   reconditioning  of  containers,  or   otherwise
adapting for sale or use or for shipment any kind of fish or shell-fish.
Hourly Rate.
Experienced employees-
Learners of any age	
33c.
28c. for first 200 hours of employment in the industry;
33c. thereafter.
Note.— (1.)  Above rates do not apply to employees engaged iti heading and filling.
(2.) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age below 33c.
per hour.
(3.)   Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(4.) Employees shall not be employed more than eight hours a day or forty-eight hours a week except under
permit from the Board.
(5.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment. K 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 47 (1942), Effective September 28th, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 47.)
Includes the work of males engaged in canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh
fruit or vegetable.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
Experienced rate   (payable to at least 85 per
First 10 hours
38c.
cent, of male employees)
11th and 12th hours
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
In excess of 12 hours
Double regular rate of pay.
Inexperienced rate  (payable to not more than
First 10 hours
28c.
15 per cent, of male employees)
11th and 12th hours
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
In excess of 12 hours
Double regular rate of pay.
Note.— (1.)   After five   (5)  hours continuous employment, employees must have one  (1)   hour free from duty,
unless shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(2.)  Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
(3.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 46 (1942), Effective September 28th, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 46.)
Includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh
fruit or vegetable. »
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
Experienced rate   (payable to at least 90 per
First 10 hours
30c.
cent, of employees)
11th and 12th hours
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
In excess of 12 hours
Double regular rate of pay.
Inexperienced rate (payable to not more than
First 10 hours
25c.
10 per cent, of employees)
11th and 12th hours
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
In excess of 12 hours
Double regular rate of pay.
Note.— (1.)  After five  (5)  hours continuous employment, employees must have one   (1)   hour free from duty,
unless shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(2.)  Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
(3.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 52, Effective February 14th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 30 and Order No. 5.)
Includes the work of females in:—
(a.) Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which a charge
is made.
(6.) Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets, banquet-halls,
cafeterias, tea-rooms, lunch-rooms, lunch-counters, ice-cream parlours, soda fountains, hospitals, nursing-homes, clubs, dining-rooms or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial establishments
or office buildings or schools, or any other place where food is cooked, prepared, and served, for which
a charge is-made; whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or
in connection with any other business.
This Order does not apply to females employed as graduate or undergraduate nurses in hospitals,
nursing-homes, or other similar establishments.
EXPEEIENCED  EMPLOYEES.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37^c. per hour.
Daily guarantee, $1.50. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.                                    K 59>
Inexperienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 per week, 1st 2 months.
10.50 per week, 2nd 2 months.
12.00 per week, 3rd 2 months.
14.00 per week thereafter.
Licences required for all inexperienced employees
working at above rates.
25c. per hour, 1st 2 months.
30c. per hour, 2nd 2 months.
35c. per hour, 3rd 2 months.
37VoC per hour thereafter.
Daily guarantee of four (4) hours pay per day.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board  (21)  meals, $4.00 per
(b.)   Individual meals, twenty cents (20c.) each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven  (7) days, $2.00 per
(e.)   Emergency overtime up to ten   (10)   hours per
(1) week.
week.
are partaken of by the employee,
week,
day, but not to exceed fifty-two   (52)   hours in any one
(f.) Time and one-half regular rate of pay shall be paid for all hours in excess of eight (8) in the day, or
forty-eight (48)  in the week.
(_/.) Split shifts shall be confined within fourteen (14) hours from commencement of such split shift. (See
Order B2B.)
(h.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(i.) Uniforms or special wearing-apparel required by the employer must be supplied and laundered free of cost
to the employee.
(j.)   Accidental breakages shall not be charged to employees.
(k.)  Employees must be given twenty-four (24)  consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(..)  See Order 52m for "Resort Hotels."
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 52b, Effective May 19th, 1938.
Allows a split shift to be spread over 14 hours immediately following commencement of work,,
thereby cancelling section 8 of Order No. 52. Every employee whose split shift extends over 12 hours,
shall be paid at the rate of one and one-half times her regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of her work.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 52n (Resort Hotels), Effective June 29th, 1944, to September 9th, 1944-.
(Superseding Orders 52A, 52b, 52V, 5211, 52K, and 52m).
Covers the work of females in any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or lodging
are furnished to the general public, for which a charge is made.
Allowing:—
Hours not to exceed ten  (10) in any one day, nor more than fifty-six (56)  in any one week.
Hours in excess of forty-eight (48) in any one week shall be paid at not less than time and one-
half (1%) regular rate of pay.
Provides for a rest period of twenty-four (24) consecutive hours in each calendar week, unless in
exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved by the Board on application in writing from
employer and employees.
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 51, Effective November 22nd, 1937.
Includes the manufacture of kitchen furniture, dining-room furniture, bedroom furniture, living-
room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of household furniture, customarily manufactured in
a furniture factory.
Males.
21 years of age or over 	
Under 17 years of age __ 	
17 years and under 18 years of age _
18 years and under 19 years of age
19 years and under 20 years of age
20 years and under 21 years of age .
Rate per Hour.
Hours per Week
40c.
48
20c.
48
■   26c.
48
27V2c.
48
30c.
48
35c.
48
Note.— (a.)   60 per cent, of all male employees must be paid not less than 40c. per hour.
(b.)   This Order does not apply to apprentices duly indentured under the "Apprenticeship Act.' K 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
JANITORS  (MALE).
Order No. 43  (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Order Nos. 43, 43A, and 4SB.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner, janitor-fireman, or janitor-engineer.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings of four  (4)  residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.) Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:-
5 residential suites, $27.00 per month
6 residential suites, $30.00 per month
7 residential suites, $33.00 per month
8 residential suites, $36.00 per month
9 residential suites, $39.00 per month
10 residential suites, $42.00 per month
11 residential suites, $45.00 per month
12 residential suites, $48.00 per month
13 residential suites, $51.00 per month
14 residential suites, $54.00 per month
15 residential suites, $57.20 per month
16 residential suites, $60.50 per month
17 residential suites, $63.80 per month
18 residential suites, $67.10 per month
19 residential suites, $70.40 per month
20 residential suites, $73.70 per month
21 residential suites, $77.00 per month
22 residential suites, $80.30 per month
23 residential suites, $82.50 per month
24 residential suites, $84.70 per month
25 residential suites, $86.90 per month
26 residential suites, $89.10 per month
27 residential suites, $91.30 per month
28 residential suites, $93.50 per month
29 residential suites, $95.70 per month;
30 residential suites, $97.90 per month;
31 residential suites, $100.10 per month
32 residential suites, $102.30 per month
33 residential suites, $104.50 per month
34 residential suites, $106.70 per month
35 residential suites, $108.90 per month
36 residential suites, $111.10 per month
37 residential suites, $113.30 per month
38 residential suites, $115.50 per month
39 residential suites, $117.70 per month
40 residential suites, $119.90 per month
41 residential suites, $122.10 per month
42 residential suites, $124.30 per month
43 residential suites, $126.50 per month
44 residential suites, $128.70 per month
45 residential suites, $130.90 per month
46 residential suites, $133.10 per month
47 residential suites, $135.30 per month
48 residential suites, $137.50 per month
49 residential suites, $137.50 per month
50 residential suites, $137.50 per month
over 50 residential suites, $137.50 per month.
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.)
per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitor
shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitor shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.— (1.) In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building the suite occupied by the
janitor shall not be included.
(2.)   Order does not apply to janitors employed in one-room school-houses. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 61
JANITRESSES  (FEMALE).
Order No. 44  (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Order Nos. 44, -MA, and 44b.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitress, janitress-cleaner, or janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents  (37%c.) per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings of four (4) residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.) Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $27.00 per month
6 residential suites, $30.00 per month
7 residential suites, $33.00 per month
8 residential suites, $36.00 per month
9 residential suites, $39.00 per month
10 residential suites, $42.00 per month
11 residential suites, $45.00 per month
12 residential suites, $48.00 per month
13 residential suites, $51.00 per month
14 residential suites, $54.00 per month
15 residential suites, $57.20 per month
16 residential suites, $60.50 per month
17 residential suites, $63.80 per month
18 residential suites, $67.10 per month
19 residential suites, $70.40 per month
20 residential suites, $73.70 per month
21 residential suites, $77.00 per month
22 residential suites, $80.30 per month
23 residential suites, $82.50 per month
24 residential suites, $84.70 per month
25 residential suites, $86.90 per month
26 residential suites, $89.10 per month
27 residential suites, $91.30 per month
28 residential suites, $93.50 per month
29 residential suites, $95.70 per month;
30 residential suites, $97.90 per month;
31 residential suites, $100.10 per month;
32 residential suites, $102.30 per month;
33 residential suites, $104.50 per month;
34 residential suites, $106.70 per month;
35 residential suites, $108.90 per month;
36 residential suites, $111.10 per month;
37 residential suites, $113.30 r;r month;
38 residential suites, $115.50 per month;
39 residential suites, $117.70 per month;
40 residential suites, $119.90 per month;
41 residential suites, $122.10 per month;
42 residential suites, $124.30 per month;
43 residential suites, $126.50 per month;
44 residential suites, $128.70 per month;
45 residential suites, $130.90 per month;
46 residential suites, $133.10 per month;
47 residential suites, $135.30 per month;
48 residential suites, $137.50 per month;
49 residential suites, $137.50 per month;
50 residential suites, $137.50 per month;
over 50 residential suites, $137.50 per month.
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (b).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents
(37%c.) per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitress
shall be given twenty-four  (24)  consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitress shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.— (1.) In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building the suite occupied by the
janitress shall not be included.
(2.)   Order does not apply to janitresses employed in one-room school-houses.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING (FEMALE).
Order No. 74, Effective March 10th, 1941.
(Superseding Order in Effect since March 31st, 1919.)
Per Hour.
Daily Minimum,
except Saturday.
Daily Minimum,
Saturday only.
Experienced rate (section 1)_
31c.
$1.24
X K 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Learners must have permit, if employed at following rates :-
Learner's rate (full time)  (section 2 (6)).
First four months
Second four months
Third four months
Thereafter
Learner's rate (section 2 (6) ).
Four Hours or Less
per Day (except
Saturday).
First four months
Second four months
Third four months
Thereafter
84c. per day
96c. per day
$1.10 per day
$1.24 per day
21c. per hour.
24c. per hour.
271/_.c. per hour.
31c. per hour.
Three Hours or Less
on Saturday.
63c. per day.
73c. per day.
82%c. per day.
93c. per day.
Note. (a.)   Every employee called for employment shall be paid after reporting at the place of employment.
(6.) When employees are required to wear uniforms or special articles of wearing-apparel, no deduction shall
be made from the wages for such uniform or special articles of wearing-apparel, or for the repair or laundering
thereof, except as approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.) No deduction shall be made for the accidental damage to any article, or as a penalty for unsatisfactory
work.
(d.)  Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(e.)  Hours of work governed by " Factories Act."
(/.)  Maximum hours, forty-eight in the week.
LOGGING  (MALE).
Order No. 1 (1943), Effective August 2nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 1 (1940).)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to hauling by truck or rail, driving,
rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles.
Rate.
Hours per Week
40c. per hour
48
37^0. per hour
48
$2.75 per day
Unlimited.
$1.30 per cord
48
Male employees   — __ —
Trackmen     _1— -	
Cook- and bunk-house employees —
Shingle-bolts (felling, bucking, and splitting) _
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion  of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers, timekeepers, and office employees when employed on a monthly basis.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees engaged exclusively in the transportation of men or supplies.
Note.— (1.)   Certain exemptions re hours granted under "Hours of Work Act"   (see Regulations).
(2.)  Watchmen in logging camps where operations are entirely suspended are exempt from provisions of the
Order.
(3.)   Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act."
LOGGING  (MALE).
Order No. 1a (1943), Effective September 23rd, 1943.
(Amending Order No. 1   (1943).)
Overtime does not apply to—
Boatmen when employed on a monthly basis.
Emergency fire-fighters. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 63
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 25 (1942), Effective November 2nd, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 25.)
Includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting,
printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity, except as provided by any other Order of the Board.
Weekly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
$14.00
8.00
10.00
12.00
14.00
48
48
48
48
48
29M.C.
Learners of any age—
First two months _ ...
16%c.
20 %c.
25c.
29y6c.
Note.— (1.) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age at
rates below $14 per week or 29M.C per hour.
(2.)   Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(3.)   Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under the " Apprenticeship Act."
(4.) Employees shall not be employed more than eight hours a day or forty-eight hours a week, except when
permission granted under the " Factories Act " or by permit from the Board when the said Act does not apply.
(5.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
MERCANTILE  (MALE).
Order No. 59, Effective October 20th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 38.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
$15.00 per week
40c. per hour
$1.60 per day
If less than 37^ hours.
Males under Twenty-one (21)  Years of Age.
37y2 to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
(4.)  (1.)
$6.00 per week
7.50 per week
9.00 per week
11.00 per week.
13.00 per week
15.00 per week.
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
19 and under 20
20 and under 21
Thereafter
15c.
20c.
25c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
60c.
80c.
$1.00
1.20
1.40
1.60
Beginners and those recommencing, Eighteen (18)-Years and under Twenty-one (21}. to whom Permits
have been issued by the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wat,j Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
(4.)  (2.)
$8.00 per week, 1st 12 months...
10.00 per week, 2nd 12 months..
13.00 per week, 3rd 12 months...
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
20c.
25c.
35c.
Thereafter rates as shown in (2) or (3).
80c.
$1.00
1.40
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed five
(5) days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
not less than —   	
30c.
$1.20 K 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Males Twenty-one (21) Years and under Twenty-four (24).
Inexperienced and partly inexperienced, to whom Permits have been granted, under Section 6
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$9.00 per week, 1st 6-months—
11.00 per week, 2nd 6 months..
13.00 per week, 3rd 6 months...
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
$1.00
1.20
1.40
Thereafter the rates as shown in (2) or (3).
Note.— (a.) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers, employed in wholesale and (or) retail establishments, shall be
paid at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26.
(b.)  Employees must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(c.)   Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(d.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
MERCANTILE   (FEMALE).
Order No. 24, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order No. 18.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over__
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Minimum, 18 years of age or over 	
$12.75 a week.
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
40 to 48
If less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per We*ek.
$7.50 a week for 1st 3 month"
20c
per hour during 1st 3 months.
8.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
21c
per hour during 2nd 3 months.
8.50 a week for 3rd 3 months.
23c.
per hour during 3rd 3 months.
9.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
25c
per hour during 4th 3 months.
9.50 a week for 5th 3 months.
26c.
per hour during 5th 3 months.
10.00 a week for 6th 3 months.
27c
per hour during 6th 3 months.
10.50 a week for 7th 3 months.
29c
per hour during 7th 3 months.
11.00 a week until age of 18 years is reached.
30c
per hour until age of 18 years is reached.
Minimum, $1.00 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 a week 1st 3 months.
25c. per hour 1st 3 months.
10.00 a week 2nd 3 months.
27c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
11.00 a week 3rd 3 months.
30c. per hour 3rd 3 months.
12.00 a week 4th 3 months.
35c. per hour 4th 3 months.
12.75 a week thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Note.— (a.)  Licences must be obtained for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over at above rates,
(b.)   Maximum working-hours, 48 per week.
OFFICE OCCUPATION (FEMALE).
Order No. 34, Effective January 30th, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. 4.)
Includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks, filing
clerks, cashiers, cash-girls  (not included in other orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer operators,
auditors, attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Experienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$15.00 per week.
40c. per hour.
Minimum, $1.60 per day. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 65
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
(Licence required in this Class.)
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37 % Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
15.00 a week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st 3 months.
32 %c. per hour for 2nd 3 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 3 months.
37He per hour for 4th 3 months.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours* pay.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
30c. per hour for 1st 6 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
32V2c. per hour for 2nd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 6 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 6 months or until
37V2c. per hour for 4th 6 months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
employee reaches age of 18 years.
15.00 a week thereafter.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Note.—Office employees are not allowed to exceed eight hours per day without a permit.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.
Order No. 71, Effective June 1st, 1940.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
Rate per Hour.
City of Vancouver, including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, City of North Vancouver, District of North Vancouver     	
75c.
Note.— (a.)  This Order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)  Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(c.)   All wages must be paid semi-monthly.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.
Order No. 75, Effective June 2nd, 1941.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.         	
Area.
Rate per Hour.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt, Highland, Metchosin,
75c.
Note.— (a.)  This Order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)  Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(c.)  All wages must be paid semi-monthly.
PATROLMEN  (MALE).
Order No. 69, Effective February 5th, 1940.
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes to watch
or patrol the premises of more than one person for the purpose of guarding or protecting persons or
property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman " means an employee  (not covered by any other Order of the Board)  employed by
a private patrol agency.
Hourly rate__
35c.
Note.— (a.) Wages must be paid semi-monthly.
(6.)  Employees must be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(c.)  Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement approved by the Board of Industrial Relations. K 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27, Effective September 5th, 1935.
(Superseding, in part, Personal Service Order.)
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring;   hairdressing;   barbering;   massaging;
physiotherapy;   giving of electrical, facial, scalp, or other treatments;   removal of superfluous hair;
chiropody;   or other work of like nature.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
$14.25
37%c. per hour
$1.50 per day
40 to 44
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.                                                               Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 6 months, or until employee
reaches age of 18 years.
14.25 a week thereafter.
27c. per hour during 1st 6 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 6 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 6 months.
35c. per hour during 4th 6 months, or until employee
reaches age of 18 years.
37%c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
35c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
14.25 a week thereafter.
37%c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Note.— (o.) Employees waiting on call to be paid according to rates to which they are entitled as set out above.
(6.)  44-hour week and one-half hour for lunch between H a.m. and 2.30 p.m.     (See 27a.)
(c.)  Where special article of wearing-apparel of distinctive design, trimming, colour, or fabric is required, it
shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired free of cost to the employee.     (See 27b.)
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27a, Effective March 30th, 1939.
(Amending Order No. 27.)
The above Order fixes the weekly hours at forty-four  (44)  and not more than nine  (9) hours in
any one day.
Also provides for one-half  (Vz)  hour free from duty between the hours of eleven  (11)  a.m. and
two-thirty (2.30) p.m.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27b, Effective May 1st, 1940.
The above Order requires that where a distinctive uniform of special design, trimming, colour, or
fabric, or special article of wearing-apparel is required, it shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired
free of cost to the employee.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27d, Effective March 13th, 1941.
Adds physiotherapy to the definition of Order No. 27. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 67
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT  (FEMALE).
Order No. 67, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding parts of Personal Service Order.)
" Public place of amusement " includes theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, lecture-halls, shooting-
galleries, bowling-alleys, swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions, and other similar places to which a charge
for admission or service is made to the public.
40 to 48 Hours
per Week.
Less than 40 Hours
per Week.
2 Hours or Less in
any One Day.
75 c.
Note.— (a.)  Employees on call, 35c. per hour.
(b.)   Where  uniforms  or  special  articles  of  wearing-apparel  are  required  they  shall  be furnished,  repaired,
laundered, cleaned, etc., free of cost to the attendant.
(c.)   Cashiers are still covered by Office Order No. 34.
SAWMILLS   (MALE).
Order No. 50 (1943), Effective July 5th, 1943.
(Superseding Order Nos. 50 and 50a.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills and planing-mills.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
30c.
$2.75 per day
40c.
48
48
48
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26 (1940) and Order No. 26a (1940).
Note.— (1.)   Certain exemptions re hours granted under "Hours of Work Act"  (see Regulations).
(2.)   For wages, etc., of stationary steam engineers see Order No. 18  (1942).
(3.)   For wages, etc., of truck-drivers see Order No. 26 (1940).
(4.)   For wages, etc., of first-aid attendants see Order No. 39  (1940).
(5.)   Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act." K 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SHINGLE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 62 (1943), Effective August 2nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 62 (1941).)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of shingles.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles, understood and accepted as a standard by the
industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936, issued by the National Research Council of
Canada.
Per Square.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate,
Sawyers—
25c.
20c.
15c.
40c.
Lower in grade than No. 1 shingles —   .	
40c.
40c.
40c.    ■
Employees packing or sawing shingles on any other basis than by the square
shall be paid on the same proportionate basis.
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Shingle-sawyers.
Shingle-packers.
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26 (1940) and Order No. 26a
 (1940) of the Board.	
Note.—Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under " Apprenticeship Act." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 69
SHINGLE INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 77 (1943), Effective August 2nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 77.)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of wooden shingles.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles, understood and accepted as a standard by the
industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936, issued by the National Research  Council of
Canada.
Per Square.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Sawyers—
25c.
20c.
15c.
40c
40c.
Other employees not included in any other Order of the Board 	
40c.
Overtime, effective west of Cascade Mountains only—
In excess of eight hours per day or forty-eight hours per week
Rate: One and one-half times
employees' regular rate of
pay.
Note.— (1.)  Where an arrangement under section 5 of the "Hours of Work Act" is in effect with respect to
hours of work, overtime rates shall not apply until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(2.)   Overtime rates shall not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of
Work Act."
Shingle-sawyers.
Shingle-packers.
Cook- and bunk-house employees covered by Order No. 52 of the Board.
Office employees covered by Order No. 34 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26b of the Board.
(3.)   Employees shall not be employed more than eight hours a day or forty-eight hours a week, except when
permission granted under the " Factories Act " or by permit from the Board when the said Act does not apply.
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY   (MALE).
Order No. 20 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 20.)
Includes all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, painting,
and cleaning of hulls, putting on or taking off the ways, or dry-docking, of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Occupation.
Hourly Bate.
Weekly Hours.
Ship-carpenter, shipwright, joiner, boat-builder, or wood-caulker~
A1I other employees..
Employees under 21, not more than 10 per cent, of total male employees in plant
may be employed at not less than-— _   _ _	
67^c.
50c.
25c.
48
43
48
Note.—This order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the " Apprenticeship Act."
TAXICAB DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 33 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 33, Order No. S3A, and Order No. 33B.)
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is
driven or operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Working-hours.
All ages.
$2.75
54 per week.
Note.— (a.)  If uniform or special article oi wearing-apparel is demanded by employer, it must be without cost
to the employee except by arrangement approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(6.)   Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly. K 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TAXICAB DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 60, Effective November 17th, 1938.
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is
driven or operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Less than 10
Hours per Day.
Daily
Minimum.
Working-
hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich
All ages.
$3.00
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
10 per day.
Note.— (a.) Permits shall be obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours
can be paid 35c. per hour.
(b.)   Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 45c. per hour.
(c.)  Drivers must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(d.)   Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(e.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION (FEMALE).
Effective April 5th, 1920.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the operating of the various
instruments, switch-boards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and
telegraphy, and shall also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the
operation of telephone or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Weekly Hours.
$15.00 per week.
3134c. per hour.
$11.00 per week for 1st 3 months.
12.00 per week for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 per week for 3rd 3 months.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
48
48
48
In case of emergency,
56 hours.
Note.— (a.)   Time and one-half is payable for hours in excess of 48.
(6.)   Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
(c.) Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m.,
10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the number of hours of
employment a week.
(d.) In cases where employees reside on the employers* premises, the employer shall not be prevented from
making an arrangement with such employee to answer emergency calls between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 71
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY   (MALE).
Order No. 26 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
Order No. 26a (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 26, Order No. 26b, and Order No. 26c.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net
weight or over, as specified on the motor-
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Hourly rate	
(2.) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than
2,000 lb. net weight, as specified on the
motor-vehicle licence, and operators of
motor-cycles with wheeled attachments,
exclusive of those specified in section 7
hereof
Hourly rate _   -	
(3.) Operators of motor-cycles with not more
than two wheels and without wheeled attachment
Hourly rate    _ - -
(4.) Bicycle - riders and foot - messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger
work  (e)
Hourly rate___- —_ - -	
(5.)   Swampers and helpers.   	
Hourly rate _ —	
•.)   Drivers  of horse-drawn  vehicles  other  than
those covered by section 7 hereof
Hourly rate.  - —.	
(7.) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery of
milk
Hourly rate, 40c.
Less than 40
45c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
30c.
Less than 40
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
45c.
40 and not more
than 50
40 and not more
than 50
40 and not more
than 48
40 and not more
than 48
17c.
40 and not more
than 50
35c.
40 and not more
than 50
40c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52V2c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52V2c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(6.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery men may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than ten (10)
hours are worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a period of
seven (7) weeks.
(e.)  Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 59.
(/.)  Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly. K 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 26b, Effective August 18th, 1941.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(L)
Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net
Less than 40
40 and not more
In excess of 50 and
weight  or  over,   as   specified  on  the  motor-
than 50
not more than 54 *
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
45c.
40c.
60c.
<2.)
Operators    of   motor-vehicles    of    less    than
Less than 40
40 and not more
In excess of 50 and
2,000   lb.   net   weight,   as   specified   on   the
than 50
not more than 54
motor-vehicle    licence,    exclusive    of    those
specified in sections 3 and 7 hereof
40c.
35c.
52 Vac.
<3.)
Operators   of   motor-cycles   with   not   more
than two wheels and without wheeled attachment
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 48
25c.
<4.)
Bicycle-riders   and  foot-messengers employed
exclusively on delivery or messenger work
Less than 40>
40 and not more
than 48
20c.
17c.
<5.)
Swampers and helpers     	
Less than 40>
40 and not more
than 50
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
40c.
35c.
52^2C
<6.)
Drivers   of  horse-drawn  vehicles  other  than
Less than 40
40 and not more
In excess of 50 and
those covered by section 7 hereof
than 50
not more than 54
45c.
40c.
60c.
<7.)
Drivers   of   vehicles   employed   in   the   retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery of
milk
Hourly rate, 40c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rate.
(6.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery employees may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than
ten (10) hours are worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a
period of seven  (7)  weeks.
le.)- Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 73
WOOD-WORKING.
Order No. 49 (1943), Effective July 19th, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 49.)
Includes all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of manufacturing sash and doors,
cabinets,  show-cases,  office  and  store  fixtures,  wood  furniture,  wood  furnishings,  ply-wood,  veneer
products, and general mill-work products.
Hourly Eate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
30c.
25c.
48
48
48
Overtime applies throughout the Province to—■
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arr
rangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen. .
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26   (1940)   and Order No. 26a
 (1940) of the Board.	
Note.— (1.)   Total male employees receiving less than 40 cents per hour must not exceed 33% per cent, of all
male employees in plant or establishment.
(2.)   Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act." K 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders now in effect, compiled as at July
31st, 1944.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum Wage
Act.
41
17 (1942)
42
55 (1943)
70
70a
76
58
65
66
72
73
68
12 (1940)
53
54
18 (1942)
39 (1940)
78
46 (1942)
47 (1942)
51
52
52b
52n
43 (1942)
44 (1942)
74
1 (1943)
*1a (1943)
28
25 (1942)
24
59
34
75
27
27A
27b
27D
67
50 (1943)
62 (1943)
77 (1943)
20 (1940)
33 (1940)
60
60a
26 (1940)
26A (1940)
26b
49 (1943)
Apprentices, Indentured  	
Baking _  	
Barbering 	
Box-manufacture   ,	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-driver __ _  	
Carpentry (Vancouver and District) 	
Carpentry (Kootenay Area)	
Carpentry (Victoria and District) _	
Carpentry (Alberni) 	
Carpentry (Nanaimo) __.   	
Christmas-trees 	
Construction       ____ —_	
Elevator Operators 	
Elevator Operators 	
Engineers, Stationary Steam ......	
First-aid Attendants  _	
Fishing   -
Fruit and Vegetable — _	
Fruit and Vegetable 	
Household Furniture ..__	
Hotel and Catering ..._	
Hotel and Catering ..       —_ —
Hotel and Catering (Resort Hotels)	
Janitors   - 	
Janitoresses	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing  —
Logging 	
Logging	
Logging and  Sawmills   (Cost of Board,
Cranbrook Area)
Manufacturing 	
Mercantile  _ _
Mercantile    	
Office Occupation  	
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(southerly portion of Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(Vancouver and District)
Patrolmen   —_ _	
Personal Service  - — 	
Personal Service  ■_ 	
Personal Service  	
Personal Service —__  	
Public Places of Amusement 	
Sawmills  	
Shingle   —__  	
Shingle   —__  	
Ship-building  _	
Taxicab-drivers  	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity) —
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)....
Telephone and Telegraph __ __
Transportation _ _	
Transportation _ _  	
Transportation  _ _	
Wood-working __	
Feb. 3/37-	
July 15/42—-
April 5/37 _.._.
July 14/43 -_
March 12/40 _
June 21/40-...
Sept. 21/42...
Sept. 15/38 ..
June 23/39 _.
Aug. 16/39...
May 14/40 _
May 14/40-..
Aug. 31/39-
Nov. 26/40...
Feb. 28/38 ...
Feb. 28/38 ..
Sept. 9/42—
Oct. 8/40 	
April 14/43-
Sept. 21/42-
Sept. 21/42...
Nov. 17/37 -
Feb. 8/38
May 18/38...
June 27/44...
Sept. 9/42—
Sept. 9/42—
Feb. 25/41...
July 14/43—
Sept. 16/43 .
Sept. 25/35 .
Oct. 15/42—
May 29/35 —
Oct. 12/38 -
Jan.24/36 -
April 22/41-
April 26/40 _
Jan.19/40	
Aug. 29/35 ...
March 23/39
April 23/40 ...
March 11/41-
Ang. 31 /39   .
June 25/43	
July 23/43	
July 23/43	
Oct. 8/40
Oct. 8/40
Nov. 15/38 —
Oct. 8/40 _
Feb.  11/37 —
July 16/42	
April 8/37 —
July 15/43	
March 14/40.
June 27/40 ...
Oct. 8/40 ...
Nov. 26/40 .
Aug. 12/41
July 14/43-
Sept. 24/42-
Sept. 22/38 ..
June 29/39 _
Aug. 17/39 ..
May 16/40 ...
May 16/40 —
Sept. 7/39 ....
Nov. 28/40 .
March 3/38 .
March 3/38
Sept. 17/42 .
Oct. 10/40 ..
April 22/43.
Sept. 24/42..
Sept. 24/42-
Nov. 18/37...
Feb. 10/38 ..
May 19/38 ...
June 29/44 .
Sept. 17/42..
Sept. 17/42..
Feb. 27/41 ...
July 15/43...
Sept. 23/43 .
Sept. 26/35..
Oct. 22/42—
June 6/35 ...
Oct. 20/38 ..
Jan. 30/36 .
April 24/41 .
May 2/40	
Jan. 25/40-
Sept. 5/35 ...
March 30/39
April 25/40
March 13/41
Sept. 7/39 ..
July 2/43 ...
July 29/43 —
July 29/43...
Oct. 10/40 —
Oct. 10/40 _
Nov. 17/38..
Oct. 10/40 -
Mar. 4/20 ...
Oct. 10/40 ...
Nov. 28/40...
Aug. 14/41 ..
July 15/43-.
Feb. 11/37	
July 20/42—
June 14/37...
Aug. 2/43
March 18/40
June 27/40 ...
Sept. 28/42	
Nov. 7/38 	
Aug. 1/39 —
Aug. 21/39 ...
May 27/40 .....
May 27/40 —
Sept. 11/39 —
Nov. 28/40 —
March 3/38 .
March 3/38 ...
Sept. 21/42	
Oct. 10/40 ....
May 3/43	
Sept. 28/42...
Sept. 28/42...
Nov. 22/37	
Feb. 14/38 ...
May 19/38 ....
June 29/44 to
Sept. 9/44
Sept. 21/42	
Sept. 21/42 ...
March 10/41
Aug. 2/43 —
Sept. 23/43 ....
Sept. 26/35 ...
Nov. 2/42	
July 1/35 —
Oct. 20/38 ...
Jan.30/36	
June 2/41	
June 1/40	
Feb. 5/40 _
Sept. 5/35 ..
March 30/39
May 1/40 ....
March 13/41
Sept. 11/39-
July 5/43	
Aug. 2/43 —
Aug. 2/43	
Oct. 10/40 ...
Oct. 10/40 ...
Nov. 17/38 —
Oct. 10/40 .	
April 5/20 ....
Oct. 10/40
Nov. 28/40—.
Aug. 18/41
Aug. 2/43...	
Male and female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 75
SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Province of British Columbia.
• HOURS OF WORK ACT."
BE IT KNOWN that, pursuant to and by
virtue of the powers and authority vested
in the Board of Industrial Relations by the
" Hours of Work Act," the said Board has
made the following regulations, namely:—
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
[1   (a)  Consolidated for convenience only.    See Regulation
No. 26.]
1. (a.) Persons employed in sawmills, plan-
ing-mills, shingle-mills, and logging industry,
including all operations in or incidental to the
carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to'driving, rafting, and
booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles, situate in that part of the
Province lying east of the Cascade Mountains
may work one hour per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act, but
the total hours worked in any week shall not
exceed fifty-four (54).
(6.) In the industrial undertakings referred
to in clause (a) of this regulation, the limit of
hours of work thereby fixed may be exceeded by
one hour per day on five days of each week for
the purpose of making a shorter work-day on
one day of the week, but the total hours worked
in any week shall not exceed fifty-four (54).
(c.) In sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-
mills situate in that part of the Province lying
east of the Cascade Mountains, and which are
operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen, and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and
oilers may work overtime to the extent of one
and one-half hours per day, to cover preparatory and complementary work, in addition to
the said fifty-four (54) hours per week set
forth in clauses (a) and (6) of this regulation.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-
mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may
work a total of forty-eight (48) hours each
week in five nights, in lieu of forty-eight (48)
hours each week in six nights, but the number
of hours worked in any night must not exceed
ten (10).
Logging.
3. Persons employed in:—■
(1.)  The logging industry in:—
(a.)  Booming operations;  or
(6.)  Transporting logs  by logging-
railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or
river-driving;  or
(c.)  Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d.)  Or in the operation and upkeep
of donkey-engines:
Fish-canning.
(2.) Canning fish or manufacturing byproducts from fish, but not those engaged in salting fish;   and in
Cook and Bunk Houses.
(3.) Cook and bunk houses in connection
with any industrial undertaking,— _
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed
by section 3 of the said Act to the extent necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
Engineers, Firemen, and Oilers.
4. In all industrial undertakings which use
steam as a motive power and which are operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen,
and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and oilers
may work overtime to the extent of one and
one-half hours per day to perform preparatory
or complementary work, in addition to the
maximum hours of work prescribed by section
3 of the Act.
Shipping Staff.
5. Persons employed as members of the
shipping staff in industrial undertakings where
shipping operations are of an intermittent
nature may work such hours in addition to the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the said
Act as (but only so many as) shall be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-hours
limited by section 3 of the Act are being unduly
exceeded, the Board shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the industrial
undertaking from the provisions of this regulation for such period of time as the Board
considers advisable.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons employed
in ship-yards, engineering-works, machine-
shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal
works, belt-works, saw-works, and plants of a
like nature may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but not more than) may be
necessary to prevent serious loss to, or interruption in the operation of, the industrial
undertaking for which the repairs are being
made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture of
wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables
may work during the months of June, July,
August, and September in each year such hours
in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3
of the said Act as may from time to time be
necessary to fill urgent orders. K 76
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Seasonal Soft Drinks Delivery.
Note.—Regulation 8 cancelled by 8a, February 13th, 1936.
Laundries.
Note.—Regulation 9 cancelled by 9a, September 26th, 1940.
Seasonal Lithographing.
10. During the months of May, June, July,
August, September, and October in each year
persons employed in the lithographing industry
may work such hours in excess of the hours
prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may
from time to time be necessary to fill urgent
■orders. This exemption shall only apply when
sufficient competent help is not available.
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by
the Board by the granting of written temporary
exemption permits limiting by their terms the
extent thereof, but only upon being satisfied
by application in writing, signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly authorized, of
the urgency and necessity for the exception,
that it is of a temporary nature, and that no
other means of adequately overcoming such
temporary urgent condition is, or has been,
reasonably available, and that the additional
working-hours applied for will not be more
than will suffice for the extra pressure of work
requiring the same.
Overtime Record.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in
the manner required by subsection (1) of
section 9 of the said Act of all additional hours
-worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said
Act or in pursuance of any regulation.
12a. Every employer shall furnish the Board
with a copy of his pay-roll, or record in such
form prescribed by the Board, showing the
"hours worked and the nature of the work performed by his employees in respect of section 6
■of the Act, or Regulations Nos. 6 and 11 of the
Board, not later than fifteen (15) days after
such hours have been worked. (Effective December 12th, 1940.)
13. Every employer shall notify, by means
■of the posting of notices in conspicuous places
in the works or other suitable place, where the
same may readily be seen by all persons
employed by him, the hours at which work
hegins and ends, and, where work is carried on
hy shifts, the hours at which each shift begins
and ends; also such rest intervals accorded
during the period of work as are not reckoned
as part of the working-hours; these hours shall
be so fixed that the duration of the work shall
not exceed the limits prescribed by the " Hours
of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall not
he changed except upon twenty-four hours'
notice of such change posted as hereinbefore
specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the
Act or Regulation 11 above, a like notice of the
change in working-hours shall be posted, which
notice shall also state the grounds on which
the exemption was granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia,
this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th, 1934.
Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 14.
Occupation of Barbering.
The occupation of barbering is hereby added
to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 24th
day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th
day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd, 1934.
Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15.
Mercantile Industry.
The mercantile industry is hereby added to
the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 7th
day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th
day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th, 1934.
Effective August 9th, 1934.)
Regulations Nos. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d
cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e.
Mercantile Industry.
Note.—Regulation 15e cancelled by 29, September 30th, 1939.
Regulations Nos. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, and
16e cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f.
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores.
1. Persons employed in drug-stores as registered apprentices, certified clerks, or licentiates
of pharmacy may work not more than ninety-
six (96) hours in any two (2) successive
weeks, but in no case shall the hours of work
of any such registered apprentice, certified
clerk, or licentiate of pharmacy exceed fifty-
two (52) hours in any one week, or nine (9)
hours in any one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made
and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of
August, 1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd
day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th, 1939.
Effective April 6th, 1939.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 77
REGULATION No. 17.
REGULATION No. 18a.
Baking Industry.
The baking industry, by which expression is
meant all operations in or incidental to the
manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or
cakes, is hereby added to the Schedule of the
said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the
said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 6th day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 17a.
Baking Industry.
Employees employed in the baking industry
as deliverymen may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 18.
Catering Industry.
The catering industry, which includes all
operations in or incidental to the preparation
or to the serving, or to both preparation and
serving, of meals or refreshments where the
meals or refreshments are served or intended
to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-
house, dance-hall, cabaret, banquet-hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunch-room, lunch-counter, icecream parlour, soda-fountain, or in any other
place where food is served and a charge is
made for the same either directly or indirectly,
whether such charge is made against the
persons who partake of the meals or refreshments or against some other person, is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on the
1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective December 1st, 1934.)
Catering Industry.
Employees in the catering industry, working-
on a split shift, are hereby exempt from the
provisions of section 3 of the "Hours of Work
Act Amendment Act, 1937," being chapter 30
of the Statutes of British Columbia, 1937, to
the extent that their working-hours on a split
shift shall be confined within fourteen (14)
hours immediately following commencement of
work; but this exception shall not be applicable unless every employee whose split shift
extends over twelve (12) hours is paid at the
rate of not less than one and one-half times
his regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within twelve (12)
hours immediately following commencement of
work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 5th
day of May, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 6th, 1938.
Effective May 6th, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 19.
Retail Florists.
Persons employed in the establishments of
retail florists may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of"
the said Act as (but only so many as) shall
be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise
overcome: Provided that the working-hours
of such persons shall not exceed ninety-six (96)
hours on the average in any two successive
weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-
hours limited by section 3 of the Act are being-
unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written
notification to the management, exclude the
employer's establishment from the provisions
of this regulation for such period of time as
the Board considers advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,.
1934.    Effective November 15th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 20.
The Occupation of Elevator Operator.
The occupation of elevator operator is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 28th:
day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 28th,.
1935.    Effective February 28th, 1935.) K 78
DEPARTMENT  OF LABOUR.
Regulations Nos. 21, 21b, 21c, 21d, 21e, 21f,
2lG, 21h, and 2lJ cancelled by
REGULATION No. 21k.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The fruit and vegetable industry, which
means and includes the work of employees
engaged in canning, preserving, drying, or
packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable,
is hereby exempt from the operation of the
" Hours of Work Act " up to and including the
31st day of March, 1945.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this
27th day of June, 1944.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 29th, 1944.
Effective June 29th, 1944, to March 31st, 1945.)
REGULATION No. 22.
Transportation Industry.
The transportation industry, which includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any
other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further
transported to some destination other than the
place at which such aforementioned carriage
or delivery terminates, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 23.
Transportation Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation the
expression " transportation industry " includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air,
any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles,
or material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or
public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and
the carrying or delivering to or collecting from
any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air,
or road transport, for the purpose of being
further transported to some destination other
than the place at which such aforementioned
carriage or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation industry, other than those employed as (a) operators of motor-cycles, (6) bicycle-riders and
foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers of
vehicles employed in the retail delivery of milk,
are hereby permitted to work six (6) hours
per week in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," in accordance with the provisions of
Order No. 26 of the said Board of Industrial
Relations dated the 19th day of June, 1935,
fixing minimum wages in the transportation
industry: Provided that no such employee in
the transportation industry shall work more
than ten  (10)  hours in any one day.
3. That employees in the transportation industry employed as drivers of vehicles in the
retail delivery of milk are hereby permitted to
work fifteen (15) hours per week in excess of
the hours prescribed by section 3 of the said
"Hours of Work Act, 1934": Provided that
over a period of seven (7) weeks no such employee shall work more than three hundred and
seventy-eight (378) hours, nor more than ten
(10)  hours in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24.
Occupation of Hotel Clerk.
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes
the work of all persons engaged as room clerks
(day or night), mail clerks, information clerks,
cashiers, book-keepers, accountants, telephone
operators, and any other persons employed in
clerical work in hotels, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 26th,
1935.    Effective September 26th, 1935.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 79
REGULATION No. 26.
REGULATION No. 28b.
1. That Regulation No. 1 (a) of the Board,
dated the 14th day of June, 1934, is hereby
amended by striking out the word " and"
before the word " shingle-mills," and inserting
after the word " shingle-mills " the words " and
logging industry, including all operations in
or incidental to the carrying-on of logging;
pole, tie, shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile
cutting; and all operations in or incidental to
driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles,
ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles."
2. That this regulation shall become effective on publication in The British Columbia
Gazette on the 24th day of March, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 23rd
day of March, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, March 24th,
1938.    Effective March 24th, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 28.
Taxicab Industry.
The taxicab industry, which includes the
work of all employees in charge of or driving
a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven
(7) passengers or less than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public,
and which is driven or operated for hire, is
hereby added as item No. 12 to the Schedule
of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 3rd
day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st,
1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 28a.
Taxicab Industry.
Persons employed in the taxicab industry,
which includes the work of all employees in
charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven (7) passengers or less
than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or
operated for hire, may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act, but in no case shall
the daily hours worked by any such employee
in the taxicab industry exceed nine (9) in any
one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette September 1st,
1938.    Effective September 1st, 1938.)
Note.—The taxicab industry having been
brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is
now subject to the following provision of that
Statute:—-
" The working-hours of employees working
on a split shift shall be confined within twelve
hours immediately following commencement of
work."
Taxicab Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation, the
expression " taxicab industry " shall have the
meaning as assigned to it in Regulation No.
28 of the Board, dated the 22nd day of August,
1938.
2. That persons employed in the taxicab industry in the City of Victoria, the Municipality
of the Township of Esquimalt, the Municipality
of the District of Oak Bay, and the Municipality of the District of Saanich, may work:—
(a.) Two (2) hours per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the
" Hours of Work Act," provided that
such ten (10) hours are confined within
eleven (11) hours immediately following commencement of their work:
In excess of the ten (10) hours permitted by clause (a) hereof, provided
they are paid not less than the minimum rate for overtime—namely, forty-
five cents (45c.) per hour—prescribed
by section 5 of Order No. 60 of the
Board, dated the 15th day of November, 1938.
3. Regulation No. 28a of the Board, made
the 22nd day of August, 1938, is hereby varied
accordingly.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 15th
day of November, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 17th,
1938.    Effective November 17th, 1938.)
(6.)
REGULATION No. 29.
Mercantile Industry.
Persons employed in the mercantile industry,
which includes all establishments operated for
the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade
in the Province of British Columbia, with the
exception of the City of Vancouver, the City of
North Vancouver, Municipality of the District
of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the
Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt,
the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay,
and the Municipality of the District of Saanich,
may work three (3) hours per day in excess
of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said
Act, on Saturday of each week and on the day
preceding a statutory holiday, when such statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but the
total hours worked in any one week shall not
exceed forty-eight (48).
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 8th
day of November, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 9th,
1939.    Effective November 9th, 1939.)
COMPILED AUGUST 2nd, 1944.
By BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. K 80 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
WOMEN AND CHILDREN'S DIVISION.
In October, 1942, there was established, as a distinctive branch of the Labour
Department, a Women and Children's Division.
The purpose is to create throughout the Province an informed public opinion of
problems in the field of labour affecting women and children.
With an ever-increasing number of personal investigations and interviews, with
numerous telephone calls, the benefits of the Women and Children's Department are
becoming better known. During the year 525 inspections were made, covering approximately 17,000 women and girls, who were nearly all in industry. This number does
not constitute women in other employment, such as shops, restaurants, offices, etc. As
a great many were going into jobs that have been previously held by men, the character
of these jobs and the conditions of work required to be investigated. Further, the
introduction of many industrially inexperienced women into factory, mill, or shipyards
has raised a number of questions basic to their health and safety. Investigations
show that these are women who are helping to build planes, ships, and guns, working
in factories making essential goods, who are'serving food in canteens, restaurants,
and in working in offices of the plants.
Many industrial plants, anticipating the employment of women, have made provisions for them by installing first-aid rooms, rest-rooms, lunch-counters, and in many
plants a graduate nurse is in charge.
The appreciation of the work women have been doing has been widespread. They
have responded ably to the call to service the war has made upon them. Plant after
plant has testified to women's efficiency on jobs new to them.
The general co-operation of industry in regard to women employees has been very
gratifying.
CHILDREN'S DIVISION.
Prior to 1943 child-labour was not existent in this Province; therefore, not a problem. Under the statutory limitations children under the age of 15 years were not
generally employed, but because of the shortage of man- and woman-power frequent
requests have been made to employ boys and girls under 15 years of age.
Evidence indicates an upward swing in the number of young persons seeking work.
Children under 15 are going chiefly into work such as errand and delivery boys, newspaper and magazine distributers, and garage helpers, as well as stock assistants, salesgirls in stores, and assistants at soda-fountains and sandwich-counters.
With the war-time opportunities for employment and war-time need for the "services of young people the Department realized that without sufficient legal safeguards
and good administration the situation might rapidly become serious and result in a
breakdown of standards which have been developed in the past.
The new Provincial Act to control the employment of children, passed in March
of this year, is now extending protective supervision over the employment of children.
This Act has met with much approval and support from the public as well as employers.
In conclusion, I wish to express our appreciation of the generous co-operation given
to us by the Welfare Council, schools, and industry in general.
Respectfully submitted.
ESSIE BROWN,
Women and Children's Division. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 81
INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION BRANCH.
Head Office  -   Parliament Buildings,  Victoria,  B.C.
Secretary-Registrar   B. H. E. Goult.
Branch Office   - - - -789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Chief Conciliation  Officer   James  Thomson.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the sixth annual report of the Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1943.
During the year an inquiry was held by the National War Labour Board into
labour relations and wage conditions in Canada. Public hearings were held by the
Board between April 15th and June 17th, 1943. During that time a considerable number of representations were made by business and labour organizations and various
other interests.
The report of the Board, signed by the Chairman, the Honourable Mr. Justice
C. P. McTague, and by Mr. Leon Lalande, employers' representative, together with
a minority report, signed by Mr. J. L. Cohen, then employees' representative, was
tabled in the House of Commons, January 28th, 1944.
The reports were transmitted to the Federal Minister of Labour during August and,
according to a statement made by the Prime Minister on December 4th, were " carefully studied by the Government in considering modifications of its labour policy."
Resultantly, recommendations emanating from the Board for a Dominion-wide
measure for compulsory collective bargaining were considered at a three-day conference between the Dominion and Provincial Ministers of Labour, held in Ottawa in
November.
In accordance with arrangements made at the conference, a draft of the proposed
labour regulations was sent to the Provinces, national trade-union organizations, and
major employers' organizations with a request for a full expression of the views and
opinions of those concerned.
Following consideration of these views, the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations
(P.C. 1003) were made effective. Provision was made in the Regulations for an agreement between the Dominion and any Province to set up suitable Provincial administrative agencies to deal locally and promptly with matters of a local nature.
Application of the Regulations in British Columbia was considered by the Legislative Assembly of the Province in March, 1944, and on March 15th assent was given
to a Bill to make the Regulations applicable to industries in respect of which employer-
employee relations are within the exclusive legislative jurisdiction of the Province.
("Wartime Labour Relations Regulations Act," chapter 18, B.C., 1944.) The Act was
proclaimed April 18th, 1944.
An agreement between the Dominion and the Province made the Regulations
applicable in British Columbia on April 18th, 1944.
During the time the Act is in force the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act" is of no effect, except as to matters pending when the Act came into force and
as to matters covered by the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" that are
not covered by the Dominion regulations.
Since April 18th, the staff formerly engaged in the administration of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," with additional assistance, has been engaged
in the administration of the Regulations in British Columbia.
A summary of the Regulations may be found elsewhere in the report of this
Branch. K 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Since by virtue of its war-time powers the Dominion had extended the powers of
the " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act " the majority of strikes occurring during
1943 came within Federal jurisdiction.
Of the forty-three strikes recorded during the year six were within the ambit
of the Province. A total of 21,704 employees were affected by these disputes and of
that number 463 were within the authority of British Columbia. Of the total of
78,129 man-days lost 1,299 were attributable to the six strikes within our jurisdiction.
There has been a larger number of disputes within the Province in past years,
but in 1943 the number of employees affected and time loss in man-working days are
amongst the highest recorded. As in the previous year, weight must be given to the
great industrial activity within the Province in considering these figures.
The industrial trend is again sharply reflected in the increased membership in
organizations of employees. In 1942, 415 organizations with a membership of 91,618
reported to the Department. In 1943, 431 organizations and their locals or branches
reported a membership of 129,902.
Complaints brought to the attention of the Branch numbered seventy in 1943,
while nineteen disputes were referred to Conciliation Commissioners.
Boards of Arbitration begun in 1943 numbered eleven. Of the nine awards made,
six were unanimous. The apparent discrepancy is explained by the fact that continued
collective bargaining resulting in the signing of union agreements halted hearings in
the case of two Boards.
The report of this Branch includes, in the following pages:—
(1.)   The record of industrial disputes.
(2.)   The record of conciliation.
(3.)   The record of the findings of Boards of Arbitration in summary.
(4.)   The record  of organizations  of  employers and  employees,  with  each
organization listed.
(5.)  A summary of the provisions of the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations.
A table showing the number of industrial disputes in British Columbia since 1933
follows:—
Number of Disputes, Number of Employees affected, and Time lost
in Working-days, 1933-43.*
Year.
No. of
Disputes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1943 	
43
50
8
1
4
11
16
16
23
17
14
21,704
18,804
■  1,408
204
822
837
1,188
5,741
7,321
4,427
2,397
78,129
35,024
7,594
8,510
13,803
8,236
30,022
75,311
140,706
73,977
25,760
1942       	
1941 _            	
1940           	
1939   	
1938t    - -	
1937    	
1936  	
1935 	
1934 	
1933    	
* The record of the Department includes lockouts as well as strikes. A lockout, or an industrial condition that
is undeniably a lockout, is rarely encountered, and strikes and lockouts are therefore recorded together in the
statistical tables. The term " dispute " is used in reference to either strike or lockout. Figures shown are inclusive of all disputes which have come to the attention of the Department. Methods taken to obtain this information
preclude the possibility of serious omission. Since it is not always possible to secure exact information concerning
the duration of a dispute or the number of employees involved, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later
information.
Estimates of time lost are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute lasts by the number of
employees directly involved and not replaced. The number of employees indirectly affected are not included in the
computations.
t 1938 was the first calendar year in which the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " became
effective. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 83
An analysis of disputes within the jurisdiction of the Province reveals the fact
that the greatest loss of time occurred in the metal products manufacturing industry.
Analysis of Disputes in British Columbia in 1943 by Various Industries.*
Industry.
No. of Employers  ; No. of Employees
affected. affected.
Time lost in Man-
working Days.
g
3
It
1
38
343
57
25
700
529
57
Trade                	
13
Totals	
8
463
1,299
* Provincial jurisdiction only.
t Same employer affected in each of two dispute
I. SUMMARY OF DISPUTES.
A summary of all disputes commencing in 1943 and causing loss of time follows :-
Summary of Disputes commencing in 1943.
provincial.
Industry or
Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employers
affected.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time lost
in Working-days.
Lau ndry-workers,
Commenced July 14th;   for increase in wages ;   concilia
1
7
7
Nanaimo
tion    (Provincial)    and   employees   returned   to   work
pending   reference   to   Regional   War   Labour   Board;
agreement signed ; terminated July 15th
Sawmill-workers,
Commenced September 17th; for Union recognition ; con
2
109
295
Kelowna
ciliation   and   arbitration    (Provincial);   compromise;
agreement signed; ended September 21st
Laundry-workers,
Commenced  October  6th;  against dismissal of worker ;
1
50
50
Nanaimo
conciliation   (Provincial) ;  return  of  workers  on  compromise ; terminated October 7th
Salesgirls, Vancouver^
Commenced October 23rd; against lack of heat in store;
return of workers ; in favour of employer   (some heat
supplied later) ; terminated October 25th
1
25
13
Jewellery-workers,
Commenced October 28th ; for increased wages and vaca
3
38
700
Vancouver
tion   with   pay ;   return   of   workers   and   reference   to
Regional  War  Labour   Board;   compromise;   increased
cost-of-living bonus and a week's holiday with pay approved ; terminated November 19th
•
Sawmill-workers,
Commenced November 11th; for increased pay for holi
1
234
234
Youbou
day   work ;   negotiations ;   agreement;   terminated   November 12th
9
463
1,299
FEDERAL.
Steel-mill workers,
Commenced  January   11th;  against  dismissal of  Union
1
350
130
Burnaby
worker  for  infraction of  company rules ;  conciliation
(Federal) ;  favour  of  employer;  terminated  January
11th
Carpenters (construc
Commenced February 15th; against employment of mem
1
139
15
tion) , Port Alberni
ber   of   another   Union;   conciliation    (Federal);   in
favour   of   workers;   worker   transferred;    terminated
February 15th
Metal-miners, Copper
Commenced February 23rd; against dismissal of worker
1
86
86
Mountain
for   using   abusive   language;   conciliation   (Federal);
compromise ;  worker  reinstated after apology ; terminated February 24th K 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Summary of Disputes commencing in 1943—Continued.
FEDERAL—Continued.
Industry or
Occupation.
No. of
No. of
Time lost
Particulars.
Employers
Employees
in Work
affected.
affected.
ing-days.
Shipyard-workers,
Commenced March 6th; for Union recognition and con
1
950
120
Vancouver
tinuance   of   shop   steward's   meetings;    compromise;
terminated March 6th
Shipyard-workers,
Commenced  March  30th;  for  enforcement  of  a  closed-
1
6,000
6,000
Vancouver
shop agreement; negotiations; in favour of workers;
terminated March 31st
Steel-erectors, Van
Commenced April 8th; against helping to clear vessel of
1
53
27
couver
tools before launching; negotiations; in favour of employer ; terminated April 8th
Seamen, Vancouver
Commenced April 7th; for war-risk bonus ; conciliation
(Federal)    and   reference   to   National   War   Labour
Board ; in favour of workers ; terminated April 8th
1
8
8
Electric welders, Van
Commenced April 16th; against employment of a charge
1
131
40
couver
hand; return of workers ; in favour of employer; terminated April 16th
Aircraft-repair work
Commenced April 19th; against cancellation of two 10-
1
951
60
ers, New Westmin
minute rest periods per shift; negotiations; in favour
ster
of employer ; terminated April 20th
Aircraft-factory work
Commenced   April   28th;   alleged   lockout   following   de
1
6,739
31,000
ers, Vancouver
mand for two  10-minute rest intervals per shift; return  of workers;  in  favour  of employer ; terminated
May 4th
Wire-rope factory
Commenced June 1st; for Union recognition; return of
1
68
102
workers, Vancouver
workers; in favour of employer; terminated June 3rd
Shipyard-workers,
Commenced June 14th; against meals and service in two
1
1,214
607
Prince Rupert
commissaries  operated by a  certain  agency;  negotiations and return of workers pending investigation ; in
favour of workers ; terminated June 15th
Steel-mill workers,
Commenced  June 23rd;  against notice posted on bulle
1
550
500
Burnaby
tin-board   by   foreman;   negotiations;    in   favour   of
workers; foreman apologized ; ended June 24th
Painters (shipyard),
Commenced  June 24th ; for  increase in  wages ;  concilia
4
184
200
Vancouver
tion  (Federal)  and further reference to National War
Labour   Board;   partially   successful;  terminated   June
26th
Welders and burners
Commenced August 4th; for bonus for work in confined
1
215
185
(shipyard), Vancou
spaces ;   negotiation ;   compromise ;   terminated   August
5 th
Commenced  September   2nd;  against  dismissal  of  fore
ver
Steel products factory
1
100
12
workers, Vancouver
man ; negotiations ; compromise ; reinstatement of foreman on probation; terminated September 2nd
Loggers, Queen Char
Commenced October 8th ; for a signed Union agreement;
3
500
7,000
lotte Islands,
conciliation   (Federal)   and reference to  Commissioner
under   " Industrial   Disputes   Investigation   Act";   in
favour of workers; terminated October 25th
Seamen, Vancouver	
Commenced  October  26th; ended  October  27th;  for  increased wages and right of Union representatives to
board   vessels;   conciliation    (Federal)   and   return   of
workers  pending reference  to   National  War  Labour
Board; compromise; increased wages approved
3
90
90
Coal-miners, British
Commenced November 1st; for increased wages and va
5
2,575
29,750
Columbia
cation   with   pay;   reference   to   Royal   Commission;
compromise; increase in wages and vacation with pay
approved; terminated November 8th, 12th, and 15th
!
1
Metal-miners, Silver-
Commenced November 5th; against lack of sugar, jam,
1
36
18
ton
etc., with meals ; negotiations; in favour of workers ;
terminated November 6th
|
Carpenters (ship
Commenced    November    26th;     against    suspension    of
1
60
30
yard), Vancouver
worker  Quitting early to  put away tools,  etc.;  negotiations ; in favour of workers ; warning whistle to be
blown ; terminated November 26th
1
1
1
Coal-miners, Prince
Commenced   December   6th;  for   closed-shop   agreement;
1
108
650
ton
mine dismantled ; indefinite ; terminated December 20th
]
Electricians (ship
Commenced December 16th ; against lack of heat in hulls
1
134
200
yard), Vancouver
during construction ; return of workers pending negotiations ; in favour of employer; terminated December
17th
j
1
I
Federal total-
. 34
21,241
76,830
Gross total
43         |
21,704     1
78,129 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 85
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DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
III. BOARDS OF ARBITRATION, 1943.
No. of
Board.
Disputant Parties.
Outcome of Hearings.
1
2
3
Mohawk Lumber Co., Ltd., New Westminster, and certain of its mill employees-
Central Transfer Co., Ltd., Vancouver, and certain of its transfer employees..	
Majority award, employees'
arbitrator dissenting.
Unanimous award.
4
5
Five fish-packing companies and certain of their fish-cannery and reduction
plant workers
Majority award, employers'
arbitrator dissenting.
6
7
8
11
12
15
Lake Logging Co., Ltd., and certain of its booming and logging employees 	
Victoria Lumber & Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Chemainus, and certain of its logging and mill employees
Comox Logging & Railroad Co., Ltd., Ladysmith, and certain of its logging and
sawmill employees
Ten undertaking and embalming establishments in Vancouver and New Westminster and certain of their undertaking and embalming employees
S. M. Simpson, Ltd., and Kelowna Sawmills, Ltd., and certain of their sawmill,
box-factory, planing-mill, and veneer plant employees
Corporation of the City of Vancouver and its fire-fighters, City Hall employees,
and certain civic employees
Unanimous award.
Board did not sit.*
Board did not sit.*
Unanimous award.
Unanimous award.
Majority award, employers'
arbitrator dissenting.
* Note.—In the cases of Boards Nos. 7 and 8, and in four other cases, in the matter of disputes between logging
and lumbering interests and certain of their employees, pending arbitration was halted when further collective
bargaining resulted in the signing of Union agreements.
A summary of texts of awards and minority reports of Boards of Arbitration
follow:—
No. 1, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Mohawk Lumber Co., Ltd.,  New Westminster, B.C.,
Employer, and certain of its Mill Employees.
Details of the report and award of the Board designated to inquire into the above-
mentioned dispute will be found in the Annual Report of the Department of Labour
for 1942, at page 110.
No. 2, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Central Transfer Co., Ltd., Employer, and certain of its
Cartage Employees.
Details of the report and award of the Board designated to inquire into the above-
mentioned dispute will be found in the Annual Report of the Department of Labour
for 1942, at page 112.
No. 3, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between Lyric Theatre, Vancouver, Employer, and its Projectionist
Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
His Honour Judge A. M. Harper, chairman; and Messrs. A. E. Jamieson and C. M.
O'Brian, K.C., members.
The projectionists declared that one of their number should be employed by the
theatre since he was the next eligible man in so far as seniority was concerned on the
Union waiting-list. The employer claimed that he would not hire the individual in
question, since all the contract between himself and the Union required was the hiring
of a person agreeable to him. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 87
The Board, after hearing evidence adduced and representations made on behalf
of the parties to the dispute, made a unanimous award. It declared that the projectionist in question was competent, and should be employed from the date of the award
(July 2nd, 1943) to and including August 31st, 1943—the date of the expiry of the
contract between the employer and the B.C- Projectionists' Society, No. 348, I.A.T.S.E.
and M.P.M.O.
The Board further recommended that the employer should have the right to terminate the contract of employment of the employee in question, and that if the employment was terminated the Union should furnish the employer with another competent
projectionist.
No. 4, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the British Columbia Packers, Ltd., Canadian Fishing Co.,
Ltd., Anglo-B.C. Packing Co., Ltd., Nelson Bros. Fisheries, Ltd., and J. H. Todd
and Sons, Employers, and certain of their Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. Justice Sidney Smith, chairman; and Messrs. R. K. Gervin and James H. Lawson,
members.
The employees, through their elected representatives, endeavoured to have their
employers accept and join in a Union agreement. There were two provisions in the
agreement which the employers would not accept and which the employees deemed
essential. A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed and failing to bring the parties
into agreement recommended that the matter be referred to arbitration and accordingly
the Board was thereupon designated.
The matters in dispute had been described by the employees' representatives as
follows: " There are two points of dispute. First, the Union asks for $25 per month
additional wages for employees employed in short season out-of-town canneries.
Secondly, the companies ask that local cannery managers have the right to determine
the starting-hour of each work-day, and the Union maintains that a regular starting-
hour for each work-day should be agreed upon."
The Board in its award supported the second contention in these words: " We
recommend that 8 a.m. shall be recognized as the regular starting-time of each workday."    It rejected the request for a $25 increase per month.
Mr. Lawson, the employers' arbitrator to the Board, dissented from the award
and filed a minority report. He agreed with the Board's rejection of the provision for
$25 additional per month but disagreed with the fixed starting-time each day, saying:
" I am of the opinion that the normal starting-hour during pre-seasonal operations
and during the period when canning operations are carried on should be 8 a.m., subject to the right of the manager of the cannery to direct, on reasonable notice, that
the starting-hour will commence at an hour from time to time determined by him
based on the contemplated arrivals of fish at the cannery."
No. 5, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between Buckerfields, Ltd., Employer, and certain of its Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. George R. McQueen, chairman;   and Messrs. R. 0. Campney and W. A. Tutte,
members.
The employees, through their bargaining representatives, endeavoured to negotiate
a Union agreement with their employer.    When they failed to do so, application was DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
made for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner, who recommended that the matter should be referred to arbitration.
The Board was thereupon constituted. On July 20th, 1943, it submitted a unanimous award, to which was attached a copy of the proposed agreement sought by the
Union (The Canadian Brotherhood of Railway and Other Transport Workers, Feed
and Seed Division, No. 223), and a copy of the agreement recommended for adoption
by the Board.
After reviewing the evidence, which indicated the harmonious relationship which
had existed for years between the Company and its employees, the Board declared its
members were " not convinced on the evidence submitted that the Union should be
made compulsory in the present agreement." However, the Board did recommend
that the Company recognize the Union as the sole bargaining agency for all employees
for all matters covered by the agreement.
It also included in the award a provision that if there were any recommendations
which required the approval of the Regional War Labour Board before they could
become effective, that the Board's proposals in this regard must be taken as recommendations only.
By its award the Board recommended an agreement, similar in some respects to
that proposed by the Union. Instead of incorporating a schedule of wage-rates, it
provided that such a schedule should be appended to the contract after approval by the
Regional War Labour Board. A cost-of-living bonus to be paid in accordance with
the provisions of P.C. 8253 was recommended.
Varying from the original agreement was the recommendation of the Board that
the management and committee draw up an hours of work schedule for all employees,
and that such a schedule be posted in the plant and copies be filed with the Union and
the Provincial Department of Labour.
The Board recommended that all employees should be entitled to a week's vacation
with pay after a year's continuous employment with the Company, and two weeks'
vacation with pay after five years' continuous service with the Company. The Union
had asked for two weeks' vacation with pay after a year's service.
It was recommended that an employee's seniority should date from the day upon
which he last entered the employ of the Company. The Union had originally proposed
that an employee become a Union member before seniority was considered.
Other recommendations made by the Board declared there should be no discrimination against an employee because he or she is or is not a member of the Union; that
no reduction of wages or increase in hours should be made because of the adoption of
the recommended agreement; and covered grievance procedure and the duration of the
proposed agreement.
The proposed agreement did not contain a provision that all employees must become
members of the Union within a certain period, as requested in the original agreement
submitted to the Company.
No. 6, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Lake Logging Co., Ltd., and certain of its Logging and
Sawmill Employees at the Hill Logging Co., Honeymoon Bay Boom, the Log Lift
on Lake Cowichan, Rounds, Crofton, Meads Creek, and Paldi.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. J. Howard Harman, chairman;   and Messrs. T. A. Barnard and Ralph S. Plant,
members.
The employees, through their elected representatives, endeavoured to have their
employer enter into a signed Union agreement but the employer declined so to do.
The matter was then referred to arbitration. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. '        K 89
The Board in making its award recommended that the agreement should contain
a definition of " Union " and its recommendation in this regard was: " ' Union ' shall
mean the Trade Union or Local thereof to which the majority of the employees shall
from time to time belong and in the event of the majority of the employees belonging
to no Trade Union, the word shall be deemed to mean the bargaining representatives
of the employees elected by majority vote of those employees affected." The further
essential recommendation of the award was to the effect that " The agreement will be
negotiated by the proper officers of the Union, and signed on behalf of the employees
by the proper officer of the Union. The parties to the agreement will be the Company
and the Employees."
Mr. Plant, the nominee to the Board by the employer, filed a minority report.
He stated that the evidence adduced before the Board and the various other reasons
which he deduced therefrom led him to disagree with the award. He expressed the
view that the agreement should be entered into between the principals, which he
designated as the employer and the employees, without the intervention of any outside
agency.
No. 7, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Victoria Lumber and Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Employer,
and certain of its Logging and Sawmill Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. A. Reg MacDougall, chairman; and Messrs. John Stanton and F. R. Anderson,
members.
The employees, through their elected representatives, endeavoured to negotiate
a Union agreement with their employer and being unable to do so applied for a Board
of Arbitration. The Board was thereupon designated. Before the Board acted, the
parties resumed negotiations and were able to arrive at an agreement.
No. 8, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Comox Logging and Railway Co., Ltd., and certain of its
Logging and Sawmill Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
His Honour Judge C. J. Lennox, chairman; and Messrs. Birt Showier and C. H. Locke,
K.C., members.
The employees, through their elected representatives, endeavoured to negotiate
a Union agreement. Being unsuccessful they applied for a Board of Arbitration. The
Board was thereupon designated. However, before the Board commenced arbitration
proceedings notice was had from the parties that negotiations had been resumed and
request was made that proceedings be postponed pending the outcome of the negotiations.    An agreement was thereafter concluded by the parties.
No. 11, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of Disputes between:—
S. Bowell & Son, New Westminster, and C. Frank Edwards & Son and Harron
Bros., Ltd., Vancouver, Employers, and certain of their Embalmers' and
Undertakers' Assistants, Employees: K 90 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Armstrong & Co., Bell Funeral Home, Center and Hanna, Ltd., The T.
Edwards Co., Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co., Ltd., Nunn and Thomson,
and Roselawn Funeral Directors, Vancouver, Employers, and certain of
their Embalmers' and Undertakers' Assistants, Employees.
The Boards of Arbitration designated to inquire into these disputes were composed of Mr. George R. McQueen, chairman; and Messrs. R. H. Neelands and Reginald
Hayward, members.
In each matter the employees, through their elected representatives, had sought
to have their employers enter into a Union agreement to define employment relations,
particularly providing for wages, hours of work, definition of duties and holidays, and
procedure for settling disputes.
More specifically, the employees asked that there should be no funerals on any
Sunday, New Year's Day, Good Friday, the first Monday in July, Labour Day, Christmas Day, and Thanksgiving Day, except those required by law. It was also proposed
that no embalmer, apprentice, or undertaker's assistant should be required to work
more than an average of seventy hours a week in any period of two weeks; that there
should be two weeks' vacation with pay for those employees in the service of the employer for one year or more; that there should be one full day free of duty every week;
and that employees should have every alternate night off duty.
A wage-scale was also indicated. This proposed rates of pay for apprentices,
ranging from $17.50 per week in the first year to $25 a week in the third year; a minimum wage of $150 per month for journeymen; and, rates of pay for work in excess of
seventy hours per week over a two-week period of $1 per hour for day work and $1.50
per hour for night work, and also 25 cents per hour for time " on call " in excess of
the seventy hours.
The provision for the settling of disputes provided for the setting-up of Boards of
Arbitration to hear, determine, and settle differences or trouble which might arise
between employees and employers, and that the decision of the majority of such a
Board would be final and be accepted by both parties.
In the first above-mentioned dispute the Conciliation Commissioner could not bring
the parties into agreement and recommended the dispute be referred to a Board of
Arbitration.
The Board was accordingly designated and the dispute referred to it.
The second dispute being similar to the first was referred' under section 5 (10) of
the Act to a Board comprising the same members and the two disputes were heard and
investigated as one.
Before these Boards had made their award Mr. McQueen died, and a new chairman
was appointed in the person of Mr. A. Reg. MacDougall. After hearings, the Boards
made a unanimous award recommending that the parties should enter into an agreement and suggested the terms it should contain.
The Boards suggested that each employer should enter an agreement with each of
its employees, while the original agreement was to have been one between the employer
in each case and the Union. Otherwise, the terms proposed covered virtually the same
ground as those of the agreement originally proposed, but that in the case of proposed
wage-scale it should be subject to the approval of the Regional War Labour Board, and
that both parties to each agreement should join in an application to that Board for
such approval.
Two of the employers—Bell Funeral Home and Roselawn Funeral Directors—were
excepted, as in the period from the time of designation of the Boards and the time of
the award their employees concerned had left their employ. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 91
No. 12, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matters
of Disputes between Kelowna Sawmills, Ltd., and S. M. Simpson, Ltd., Employers,
and certain of their Employees.
The Boards of Arbitration designated to inquire into these disputes were composed
of the same personnel, namely, Mr. A. Reg. MacDougall, chairman; and Messrs. Arthur
J. Turner, M.L.A., and R. L. Norman, members.
The employees, through their elected representatives, had endeavoured to have
their employers enter into agreements with them. The matter was investigated by a
Conciliation Commissioner who recommended that both cases should be referred to
arbitration, and Boards were thereupon designated.
Both matters were by agreement heard together and during the proceedings the
parties came together and concluded agreements and the award of the Board recommended that these agreements be entered into.
No. 15, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Corporation of the City of Vancouver, Employer, and
certain of its Civic Employees, certain of its City Hall Employees, and certain of
its Fire-fighting Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. J. Howard Harman, chairman; and Messrs. George Gerrard and Dugald Donaghy,
members.
There are three groups of employees of the Corporation of the City of Vancouver.
They are affiliated under the designation of The Civic Federation of Vancouver. One
of these, the Civic Employees' Group, through their elected representatives endeavoured
to have the City Council accept certain forms of procedure, more fully set out below,
and being unable to come to agreement applied for a Conciliation Commissioner. The
Commissioner being unable to bring the parties into agreement recommended that the
matter should be referred to arbitration.
The Board was thereupon designated and the dispute referred to it. In the time
intervening between the arising of this dispute and its reference to the Board the other
two groups of employees had raised the same matter in respect to themselves so their
disputes were likewise referred to the same Board.
The matters for inquiry were the requests of the employee groups, which were at
the time of the reference to the Board finally reduced to the following:—
" 1. That all employees, after a three months' probationary period, must become
members of—
(a)  The Civic Employees' Union;
(6)  The Vancouver City Hall Employees'Association;  or
(c)   The City Fire-fighters' Union, No. 1—
(as the case might be), affiliates of the Vancouver Civic Federation.
" 2. That the City Council of the City of Vancouver agrees that all matters affecting hours, salaries, working conditions, or any other matters which from time to time
arise affecting relations as outlined in the Agreement of December 22, 1919, between
the said City of Vancouver and the Civic Federation of Vancouver, become the business
of the conciliation board as set out in the said agreement."
The Conciliation Board was a body to be set up according to the terms of the
agreement of 1919, made up of appointees of the City and appointees of the Federation.
During the hearings held by the Board Item No. 1 was modified, at the request of
the employees, to except employees above the rank of foreman and others being tech- :k 92
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
nical employees or those partly in the employ of the Provincial Government, leaving
them to decide by their own vote whether they wished to be included or not.
By its award the Board recommended that the second request of the employees
should be agreed to by the City and that in the case of matters under the first request
they should likewise be referred to what is called the Joint Committee meaning, as it
showed, the same body as the Conciliation Board, referred to in the agreement of 1919.
In regard to its recommendation relating to the second request the Board made it clear
that it wished that request to be interpreted to include " any dispute in respect of any
promotion, discharge of an employee, or hiring of an employee." Mr. Dugald Donaghy,
the employer's appointee to the Board filed a minority report, concurring with the
Board's award relating to the second request, but pointing out in regard to the first
request that he considered the employees of a public body such as the City of Vancouver to be in a different relation to the public than would be the employees of a
private corporation, and that their demand in this aspect impinged upon democratic
principles and should therefore be disallowed.
N.B.—Certain matters in dispute were referred to Boards of Arbitration, numbered 9, 10, 13, and 14. However, before these Boards functioned continued negotiations resulted in the signing of agreements. For this reason there are no details
:given above of these Boards.
IV. EMPLOYERS' AND EMPLOYEES' ORGANIZATIONS.
Under the provisions of section 9 of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act," every organization of employers and employees was required to file certain
returns; namely, a certified copy of its constitution, rules, and by-laws; certified copies
of any amendments to these documents when made; and an annual list of the names
-of its officers as at the 31st day of December.
Additional information has been required from associations of employees, or trade-
union locals, under the provisions of section 5a of the " Department of Labour Act."
This return requires the name and business address of the organization, its affiliation
(if any), and its total paid-up membership at the date of return.
While the Wartime Labour Relations Regulations have been effective in British
Columbia since April 18th, 1944, somewhat similar information to that obtained under
the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" may be required
under section 22 of the Regulations. The provisions of the " Department of Labour
Act " are not, of course, affected by the coming into effect of the Regulations.
Annual returns received since this information was first requested in 1938 have
shown a consistent growth in membership. Details of the number of organizations
making returns since 1939 follow:—
Number of Employees' Organizations making Returns and Membership
thereof, 1939-43.
Year.
No. of
Organizations.
Total
Membership.
1939	
380
404
402
415
473
44,867
50,360
61,292
91,618
129,902
1940    	
1941 .           ._                             . _	
1942  	
1943     .....	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 93:
The printed list is arranged by cities and towns in alphabetical order. In cases
where the information could be obtained the names and addresses of the presidents-
and secretaries were revised to the date of publication.
The post-office addresses of the officers are the same as the heading under which
they appear, unless otherwise stated.
The list of employers' organizations follows immediately after that of the-
employees. Returns in this category numbered twenty-five in 1939 and in 1940,
twenty-seven in 1941, thirty-two in 1942, and thirty-four in 1943.
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYEES.
Ainsworth.
Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers' Union, Ainsworth District, No. 666.—President, Sam Nom-
land;   Secretary, A. N. McLeod, Ainsworth.
Alberni.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Thos. Underwood; Secretary,
Miss Jessie Freeland, Alberni.
Albreda.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No. 15.—President, J. Pawson;   Secretary, A. A.
Charters, Albreda.
Blubber Bay.
Pacific Lime Co., Association of Employees of.—
President, L. Phillips; Secretary, Roland Light,
Blubber Bay.
Blue River.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 143.—President, R. Munter; Secretary, D. H. Daniel, Blue
River.
BONNINGTON FALLS.
Operators' Organization of the West Kootenay
Power & Light Co., Ltd.—President, W. C. Motley;    Secretary, W. A.  MacCabe,  South  Slocan.
Bralorne.
Miners' Union, No. 271, Bralorne.— President,
J. C. Morrison;   Secretary, L. Larsen, Bralorne.
Britannia Beach.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 663.—President, J. H. Balderson; Secretary, F. G. Lindsay, Townsite, Britannia Beach.
Burnaby.
Civic Employees' Union, Burnaby, Local No. 23.—
President, R. E. O'Brien; Secretary, J. P..
Grover, 3812 Myrtle Street, New Westminster.
Packers, Ltd. Employees' Association, Pacific
Coast.—President, D. H. Gardner; Secretary,
C. Davie, 733 Thirteenth St., New Westminster.
Chemainus.
Longshoremen's Association, Chemainus and District.—President, F. Lewis; Secretary, R. W.
Anderson, Chemainus.
Colquitz.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Humphreys; Secretary, C_
Marston, Colquitz.
Comox.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. L. Brown; Secretary, W..
A. W. Hames.
Copper Mountain.
Miners' Union, No. 649.— President, Geo. W.
Anderson; Secretary, J. Ogbourne, Copper
Mountain.
Copper River.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Skeena Lodge, No. 335.—President, P. LeRoss;
Secretary, G. Somerville, Kitselas via Copper
River.
Courtenay.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 156.—President, A. E. Embleton; Secretary, M. Morrison,
Courtenay.
Woodworkers    of    America,    International,    No..
1-363.—President,  E.  F.  Anderson;    Secretary,
J. Higgin, Royston.
Cranbrook.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 559.—President, R. Bartholomew;
Secretary,  M. John,  P.O.  Box  214,  Cranbrook.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President,    Peter    Watson;      Secretary,.
Miss M. VanBraam, Cranbrook.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 588.— President, Wm. Henderson; Secretary, R. J. Laurie, P.O. Box 544, Cranbrook.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Buckley
Lodge, No. 585.—President, W. S. Zimmerman;
Secretary,  H.  B. Haslam,  Box 784,  Cranbrook.
Railway Carmen of America, No. 173, Brotherhood of.—President, Charles Romano; Secretary, Jas. F. Lunn, Cranbrook.
Railway Conductors, Order of, Elk River, No. 407. .
—President,   Chas.   LaFluer;    Secretary,   H.  J.
Huxtable, P.O. Box 262, Cranbrook.
Railway and Steamship  Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express,  and  Station   Employees,   Brotherhood'
of, No. 1292.—President, R. Pelton;   Secretary,,
E. G. Dingley, P.O. Box 728, Cranbrook. K 94
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Cumberland.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
Edward Surtees; Secretary, A. G. Jones, Cumberland.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7293.'—
President, J. H. Cameron; Secretary, John
Bond, P.O. Box 614, Cumberland.
Duncan.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, G. Lines; Secretary, F. R.
Mortimore, Duncan.
Utilities Employees' Association, Nanaimo-Dun-
can.—President, Chas. Lafek; Secretary, N. A.
Parker, 739 Watson Street, Duncan.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-80.
— President, Owen G. Brown; Secretary,
W. A. Killeen, Box 430, Duncan.
Edmonton.
Communications Union, The Canadian.—President, C. C. Shea; Secretary, H. A. Hooper, P.O.
Box 445, Edmonton. (Has membership in British Columbia.)
Essondale.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. H. Wilson; Secretary, Miss
L. Cruickshank.
Fernie.
Brewery Workmen, International Union of
United, No. 308.—President, J. H. Brown; Secretary, F. E. Alexander, Box 1071, Fernie.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Clarke; Secretary, A. Lees,
Fernie.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7310.—
President, D. W. Ashmore; Secretary, W. Martin, P.O. Box 212, Fernie.
Field.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Kicking Horse Lodge, No. 1454.— President,
C. W. Bradshaw; Secretary, Wm. M. Brown,
Field.
Fraser Valley District.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, S. Knox; Secretary, N. J.
Wallinger.
Grand Forks District.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, John Roylance; Secretary, E.
Ross Oatman, Grand Forks.
Haney.
Woodworkers of America, International, No.
1-367.—President, R. Stackhouse; Secretary,
Y. C. Hadvick, P.O. Box 294, Haney.
Hedley.
Mine  and  Mill  Workers'  Union,  Hedley  Mascot,
No.   655.—President,   John   Moffet;    Secretary,
R. D. Foote, Box 329, Hedley.
Mine  and   Mill   Workers'   Union,   Hedley   Nickel
Plate,   No.   656.—President,    Cliff   McDonald;
Secretary, E. A. Edwards, Hedley.
Hutton Mills.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 202.—President, J. D. Denicola; Secretary,
G. H. Weaver, Hutton Mills.
loco.
Imperial Oil Industrial Relations Council, loco.—
Chairman, C. W. Tait.
Kaleden.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 4.—
President, Stewart Lockhart; Secretary, Har-
ley Palmer, Kaleden.
Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 821.—
President, W. R. Snowden; Secretary, W. A.
Harris, 727 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Engineers, Locomotive, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 855.—President, S. A. Johnson; Secretary,
A. J. Millward, 753 Dominion Street, Kamloops.
P'ire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
11.—President, D. C. Miller; Secretary, L. P.
Dorion, 682 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 258.—President, Gordon L. Ken-
ward; Secretary, John Woods, 744 Seymour
Street, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Clearwater Lodge, No. 930.—President,
O. B. Hoover; Secretary, J. B. Gibson, R.R. 1,
Kamloops.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.— President, J. J. Beasley; Secretary,
E. Pearl Williams, Kamloops.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M.
Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 80.
—President, A. R. McKay; Secretary, E. Ellis,
Powers Addition, Kamloops.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 748.
—President, V. R. Hampton; Secretary, L. E.
Crowder, 691 Nicola Street, Kamloops.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, A. E. Elliott
Lodge, No. 519.—President, C. W. King; Secretary, Vernon H. Mott, 521 Seymour Street,
Kamloops.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
148.—President, H. C. Cowles; Secretary, B.
Lapsley, 907 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, No.
611. — President, E. R. Chapman; Secretary,
H. P. Battison, 36 Nicola Street West, Kamloops.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 150.—President, G. N. Roberts; Secretary, Miss B. Smith,
527 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 5.—
President, H. Turner; Secretary, Miss A. Wilkinson, Box 525, Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 8.—
President, Wm. Fleck; Secretary, F. L. Constable, R.R. 1, Kelowna.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M.
Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 95
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 217.—President, W. H. Sands; Secretary, E. E. Wilkison,
Box 525, Kelowna.
Simpson Employees' Association.—President, G.
Handlen;   Secretary, H. R. Wilson, Kelowna.
Truck Drivers', Transport Workers', and Warehousemen's Union, No. 2, Okanagan.—President,
W. H. Wands; Secretary, E. E. Wilkison, P.O.
Box 525, Kelowna.
Woodworkers' Union, No. 4, British Columbia.—
President, M. A. Plant; Secretary, J. E. Large,
P.O. Box 1312, Kelowna.
Kilgard.
Brick and Clay Workers' Federal Union, No. 136.
—President, James Watson; Secretary, C. W.
Gough, Kilgard.
Kimberley.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 651.—President, D. M. Martin; Secretary, H. Nicholson,
Box 627, Kimberley.
Ladysmith.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
T. Jordan; Secretary, Fred Johnston, 119
Baden-Powell Street, Ladysmith.
Lake Cowichan.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, United Brotherhood of, No. 2824.—President, T. A. Giles; Secretary, G. E. Robins, Box 139, Lake Cowichan.
Langford.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. H. House; Secretary, T.
Kershaw, Langford.
Langley.
Municipal Employees' Association, Langley.—
President, H. B. Devine; Secretary, T. W.
Winget, 2482 Roberts Road, Langley Prairie.
Marguerite.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 221.— President, F. Hinsche; Secretary,
Harry Robinson, Marguerite.
Marpole.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, E. Wade; Secretary, Chas.
Bird, Marpole.
Merritt.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Howard F. McLean; Secretary, P. C. Currie, Merritt.
Michel.
Bush and Millmen's Union.—President, Joseph
Bella;   Secretary, Joe Pugliese, Michel.
McBride.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 247.—President, R. T. Clay; Secretary, G. T. Holdway,
P.O. Box 26, McBride.
McGillivray Falls.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Lillooet Lodge, No. 215.—President, J. K. Pur-
die;    Secretary, T. W. Broadhead,  Seton Lake.
Nanaimo.
Bakery Salesmen, No. 189.—President, A. Wylie;
Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 527.—President, Wm. Emerson; Secretary,
Wm. Little, 217 Irwin Street, Nanaimo.
Civic Employees'Association.—President, Thos. M.
Mumberson; Secretary, Colin McArthur, 146
Nicol Street, Nanaimo.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, Lamont Ross; Secretary, H. W. Spencer,
433 Fourth Street, Nanaimo.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Co.—President, Wm. Cummins; Secretary, A. R. Rowbottom, 565 Stewart Street,
Nanaimo.
Fire-fighters' Association, Nanaimo, No. 7.—
President, F. Laithwaite; Secretary, Albert
Dunn, 131 Harvey Street, Nanaimo.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. H. Cochrane; Secretary,
H. W. Harding, Nanaimo.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M.
Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7355.—
President, Dan Radford; Secretary, Percy
Lawson, Union Hall, Nanaimo.
Telephone Operators, Organization of B.C.—
President, Miss S. M. Tombs; Secretary, Miss
Phyllis Jepson, 225 Vancouver Avenue, Nanaimo.
Typographical Union, No. 337.—President, John
B. Paul; Secretary, Lewis C. Gilbert, 491 Fifth
Street, Nanaimo.
Natal.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7292.—
President, Sidney Hughes; Secretary, Simeon
Weaver, Natal.
Nelson.
Barbers', Hairdressers' and Cosmetologists' Union
of America, Journeymen, No. 196.—President,
A. J. Hamson; Secretary, F. Defoe, Ward
Street, Nelson.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, J. S. Livingstone; Secretary, Constance E.
Hamson, 1017 Hoover Street, Nelson.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone—President, R. B. Smith; Secretary, Art.
Ruzicka, 422 First Street, Nelson.
Engineers, Locomotive, Brotherhood of, No. 579.
—President, L. W. Humphrey; Secretary, Gordon Allan, 1115 Ward Street, Nelson.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 18.
—President, Robert Todd; Secretary, A. D.
Bruce, 619 Silica Street, Nelson.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 631.—President, F. H. Abbott; Secretary, E. N. Mannings, 1011 Hall Street, Nelson.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. E. Stratton; Secretary, Jas.
Ryley, Nelson. K 96
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 75.
—President, J. C. Chambers; Secretary, G. C.
Massey, 306 Third Street, Nelson.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 663.
—President, W. M. Wallace; Secretary, Fred
Romano, Nelson.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 558,
Kootenay Lodge.— President, J. S. Edwards;
Secretary, C. H. Sewell, 41 High Street, Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, No. 98, Brotherhood
of.—President, A. H. Smith; Secretary, G. B.
Abbott, 2013 Stanley Street, Nelson.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 460.—President, W. E. Marquis; Secretary, A. Kirby, 820
Carbonate Street, Nelson.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1291.—President, J. S. Brake; Secretary, E. F. Phillips, 220 Silica Street, Nelson.
Telephone Operators' Organization (Interior
Branch).— President, Jean Coles; Secretary,
Irene Laughton, 909 Edgewood Avenue, Nelson.
Typographical Union of North America, International, No. 340.—President, Alec Cragg; Secretary, Geo.W. Priest, General Delivery, Nelson.
New Westminster.
Bakery Salesmen, No. 189.—President, A. Wylie;
Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers and Culinary Workers, No.
835.—President, G. McLean; Secretary, T. A.
Skinner, 203 Cunningham Street, New Westminster.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 151.—President,
W. J. Bartlett; Secretary, A. Buckingham, 1329
Stride Street, New Westminster.
Boilermakers, Iron-ship Builders, and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, No.
194.—President, W. F. Blatchford; Secretary,
C. A. Bailey, 634 Thirteenth Avenue, New
Westminster.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union of
Canada, No. 5.—President, Mike Kucy; Secretary, Ed. McMonagle, 217 Eighth Avenue, New
Westminster.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, No.
31.—President, Robert J. LeComte; Secretary,
W. Taylor, 3030 Miller Avenue, New Westminster.
Carpenters and~ Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1251.— President, A. E.
Corbett; Secretary, J. T. Bannan, 1008 Sixth
Avenue, New Westminster.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, R. V. Cheale; Secretary, Fred McGrath,
316 Strand Avenue, New Westminster.
Cordage Employees' Association.—President, W.
Eakin; Secretary, John A. Done, 310 Warren
Avenue, New Westminster.
Distillery, Rectifying, and Wine Workers' International Union, No. 69. — President, Wm.
Thacker; Secretary, Eileen Davidson, 1053
Seventeenth Avenue, New Westminster.
Fire-fighters' Union, City, Local No. 256.—President, E. L. V. Insley; Secretary, R. L. Fitz-
patrick, 1818 Eighth Avenue, New Westminster.
Fire-fighters' Association, No. 323, Burnaby.'—
President, G. Monk; Secretary, Gordon McDonald, 1106  Sixteenth Avenue, New Westminster.
Gas Workers' Union, No. 376.—President, C. S.
Martin; Secretary, Albert F. Chandler, 2525
Elizabeth Avenue, West Burnaby, New Westminster.
Gypsum Workers' Union, Local No. 578.—President, A. Gowen; Secretary, G. H. Eckenswiller,
2225 Walker Avenue, New Westminster.
Institutional Employees' Association, Provincial.
—President, J. H. Wilson; Secretary, Miss L.
Cruikshank, Essondale.
Janitors' Association No. 1, Burnaby.—President,
C. Brookman; Secretary, J. Morrison, 1210
Nelson Avenue, New Westminster.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M.
Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 131.
—President, A. Anderson; Secretary, Walter
Head, 3234 Neville Street, New Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 151. — President, F. Maguire; Secretary,
Thomas Kenyon, 448 Fader Street, New Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, Aircraft
Lodge, No. 1749.—President, W. R. Beamish;
Secretary, Mrs. Ora L. Percy, 1719 London
Street, New Westminster.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, Local
No. 180.—President, H. Clark; Secretary, S. S.
Hughes, 1917 Eighth Avenue, New Westminster.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
456.—President Max A. Bailey, Secretary, Herbert Halverson, 1523 Seventh Avenue, New
Westminster.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association of,
No. 571.—President James Mitchell; Secretary,
Thos. H. Poulton, 725 Second Street, New Westminster.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
280.—President, W. Hamilton; Secretary, A. M.
Cawley, R.R. 4, New Westminster.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 226.—President,
J. Spick; Secretary, L. H. Stevens, 409 Kelly
Street, New Westminster.
Sheet-metal Workers' Association, No. 314.—
President, H. H. Swinden; Secretary, J. A.
Smith, 45 Dufferin Street, New Westminster.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor-coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, No. 134.—President, J. T. Paterson; Secretary, S. I. Hearst, 1412 Seventh Avenue, New
Westminster.
Typographical Union, New Westminster, No. 632.
—President, A. R. MacDonald; Secretary, R. A.
Stoney, P.O. Box 754, New Westminster.
Waterfront Workers' Association, Royal City.—
President, P. C. Lavery; Secretary, C. P.
Latham, 71 Tenth Street, New Westminster.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-357.
—President, P. A. Smith; Secretary, J. R. Lindsay, 511 Summer Street, New Westminster.
Oakalla.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial—President, T. P. Owens; Secretary, W. R.
Shaw, Oakalla.
Ocean Falls.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
360.—President, R. Weaver; Secretary, C. Hod-
son, Ocean Falls. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 97
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 312.—President,
H. A. Webster; Secretary, P. A. Tweedie,
Ocean Falls.
Oliver.
Oliver Sawmills, Ltd., Employees of.—President,
E. L. Roberts; Secretary, R. J. Gardiner,
Oliver.
Osoyoos.
Fruit   and   Vegetable   Workers'   Union, No.   3.—
President,  B.  R.  Frenck;    Secretary, R.  Long,
Osoyoos.
Peace River District.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Murrell; Secretary, Miss
Violet L. Stuckey.
Penticton.
Electrical Employees' Association, Penticton Municipal.—President, J. B. Clarke; Secretary,
R. E. Lindquist, Penticton.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 866.—
President, C. E. Hulett; Secretary, A. R. Fulk-
erson, Penticton.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
10.—President, J. D. Crawford; Secretary,
W. T. Mattock, Main Street, Penticton.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 884.—President, C. P. Bird; Secretary, H. D. Raincock, 410 Orchard Avenue,
Penticton.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, E. Pratt; Secretary, Mrs. B. M.
Wheeldon, 424 Eckhardt Avenue, Penticton.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M.
Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Municipal Employees' Union, Penticton, No. 1.—
President, A. S. Gough; Secretary, Marguerite
Young, P. 0. Box 814, Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 914,
Okanagan Lodge.—President, M. E. McCallum;
Secretary, G. M. Clark, P.O. Box 875, Penticton.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 179.—President, H. C. Kirkpatrick; Secretary, C. A. Yule,
P.O. Box 67, Penticton.
Pinchi Lake.
Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers' International
Union, No. 661.—President S. Sandeson; Secretary, Harry Fenton, Pinchi Lake.
Pioneer.
Miners' Union, Pioneer, No. 693.—President,
George " Pat " Miller; Secretary, Wm. Rudy-
chuck, Box 699, Pioneer.
Port Alberni.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 513.—President, W. R. Bookhout;
Secretary, W. 0. Brown, Third Avenue North,
Port Alberni.
Waterfront Workers' Association, Alberni District.—President, Ben Welch; Secretary, Cal
Cook, Box 804, Port Alberni.
West Coast Hospital Employees' Union, No. 91.—
President, Garfield Zinck; Secretary, Ann Ko-
lack, West Coast Hospital, Port Alberni.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-85.
—President, Walter Yates; Secretary, Alfred
Dewhurst, Port Alberni.
Port Mellon. ,
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 297.—President,
W. A. Arrowsmith; Secretary, David G. Huntley, Port Mellon.
Powell River.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 2068.—President, J. R. Dore; Secretary,
F. A. Smith, Wildwood Heights P.O.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
8.—President, S. Davies; Secretary, R. A.
'Bridge, Powell River.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, S. R. Maggs; Secretary, Miss
Rita E. Powell, Powell River.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 142.—President, W. V. Thomson; Secretary, H. B. Moore, Box 55, Westview.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of.—President, H. L. Hansen;    Secretary, C. M. Mouat, Powell River.
Prince George.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Mount
Robson Division, No. 843.—President, J. M. Mc-
Cawley; Secretary, Geo. Hodson, Box 941,
Prince George.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of, No. 827.
—President, R. R. Anderson; Secretary, F.
Armstrong, Prince George.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. G. Henning; Secretary,
Miss J. McMillan, Prince George.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M. Hart,
626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Railway Conductors, Order of, Nechako Division,
No. 620.—President, J. Williams; Secretary,
David Ross, Box 224, Prince George.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 28.—President,
H. A. McLeod; Secretary, H. Allen, Box 504,
Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union of
Canada, No. 4.—President, George Stanton;
Secretary, James Nicoll, 1058 Sixth Avenue
East, P.O. Box 1403, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1735.—President, Jack Fisher;
Secretary, J. S. Black, Box 694, Prince Rupert.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 5.—President, Thos. Harvey; Secretary, James Harvey,
701 Fifth Avenue West, Prince Rupert.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
510.—President, D. Crocker; Secretary, S. L.
Peachey, 733 Tatlow Street, Prince Rupert.
Fire-fighters' Union, International, No. 559.—
President, John McLean; Secretary, A. Klatt,
517 Seventh Avenue West, Prince Rupert.
Fishermen's Federal Union of B.C. (Deep Sea),
No. 80.—President, W. H. Brett; Secretary,
George Anderson, P.O. Box 249, Prince Rupert.
Fish-packers, Associated, Local No. 1.—President,
Ed. Schroeder; Secretary, H. Langholm, Box
746, Prince Rupert. K 98
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Fish-packers' Federal Union, No. 49.—President,
Angus McDonald; Secretary, Thomas Elliott,
Seal Cove, Prince Rupert.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, R. C. St. Clair; Secretary,
Geo. Wilson, Prince Rupert.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, No. 331.
—President, Miss Dixie Whelan; Secretary,
Mrs. Rae Pirie, 253 Third Avenue, Prince
Rupert.
Industrial Workers' Union, No. 1.—President, E.
Faure; Secretary, Myrtle Cowie, P.O. Box 1394,
Postal Station B, Prince Rupert.
Longshoremen's Association, Canadian, No. 2.—
President, W. Ferguson; Secretary, Wm. A.
Pilfold, P.O. 531, Prince Rupert.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association of
Journeymen, No. 180.—President, John Murry;
Secretary, Nicholas Bird, Box 1134, Postal
Station B, Prince Rupert.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
426.—President, W. A. Sharpe; Secretary,
Frank Derry, P.O. Box 496, Prince Rupert.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 154.—President,
D. R. Creed; Secretary, J. E. Davies, Prince
George.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen, and Helpers,
International Brotherhood of, No. 136.—President, Howard Steen; Secretary, E. W. Strobel,
P.O. Box 694, Prince Rupert.
Typographical Union, No. 413.—President, E. F.
Saunders; Secretary, R. 0. Franks, Prince
Rupert.
Princeton.
Brewery Workers of America, International
Union of, No. 367.—President, Chris Mo; Secretary, E. G. Young, Princeton.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7875.—
President, Archibald Samuels; Secretary, John
Howarth, Princeton.
Quesnel.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, Sydney Allen; Secretary,
Marion Bradshaw, Quesnel.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 407.—President,
Alex. C. Robinson; Secretary, Jas. M. Gobb,
Box 283, Revelstoke.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 657.—
President, D. A. Johnston; Secretary, G. L.
Ingram, Box 485, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of, Gold
Range Lodge, No. 341.—President, A. 0. Almen;
Secretary, F. J. Westlake, Box 187, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 381.—President, D. Blackwell; Secretary,
S. Anderson.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 258.
—President, J. M. Donaldson; Secretary, R.
Robertson, Revelstoke.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 51.—
President, Chas. Isaac; Secretary, D. E. Johnson, Box 728, Revelstoke.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
481.—President, A. S. Parker; Secretary, P.
White, P.O. Box 496, Revelstoke.
Railway Conductors, Order of, Mount Stephen
Division, No. 487.—President, Stanley Porritt;
Secretary, Thos. B. Philip, 407 Fourth Street,
Revelstoke.
Rossland.
Fire-fighters, Trail, Rossland, and Nelson, No. 9.
—President, George Dingwall; Secretary, Wm.
Yawney, Rossland.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. K. Scatchard; Secretary,
Mrs. I. C. Eustis, Rossland.
Sheep Creek.
Emerald Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 653.
—President, Gordon Woods; Secretary, Pete
Monchakowsky,  Sheep Creek.
Skeena-Omineca District.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, G. Preston; Secretary, H. G.
Windt.
Silverton.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 662.—President, S. Marzoli; Secretary, G. P. Stewart,
Silverton.
Smithers.
Engineers,   Brotherhood   of   Locomotive,   Babine
Division,   No.   111.—President,   F.   V.   Foster;
Secretary, H. D. Johnson, Box 80, Smithers.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No. 340.—President, J. W. Hall;    Secretary, D.
Small, Box 29, Telkwa.
Railroad   Trainmen,   Brotherhood   of,   No.   869.—
President,   J.   M.   Graham;     Secretary,   S.   W.
Gould, Box 86, Smithers.
Railway   Carmen   of   America,   Brotherhood   of,
Bulkley Lodge No. 1415.—President, J. Cathrae;
Secretary, D. MacLean, Smithers.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian   Brotherhood   of,   No.   93.—President,
R.   W.   Champion;    Secretary,   P.   B.   Emerson,
Smithers.
South Slocan.
Workmen's Co-operative of the West Kootenay
Power and Light Co., Ltd.—President, A. B.
Macrone; Secretary, W. R. Walkley, South
Slocan.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1419.—President, A. Fraser; Secretary, J. E.
Holmes, Squamish.
Stewart.
Tramway Union, Alaska Aerial, No. 2.—President,
A. Phillips; Secretary, H. W. Thomas, Hyder,
Alaska.
Trail.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M.
Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 75.
—President, S. T. Spooner; Secretary, R. H.
Busch, 2183 Riverside Avenue, Trail.
Smelter Workers' Union, Independent.—President, C. W. McLean; Secretary, C. M. Loeblich,
1724 Groutage Avenue, Trail. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 99
Smelter Workers' Union No. 480, Trail and District.—President, F. W. Henne; Secretary,
Ralph J. Berry, Douglas Hotel, Trail.
Tranquille.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, W. Hume; Secretary, Miss G.
Webber, Tranquille.
Vancouver.
Aeronautical Mechanics, Lodge No. 756, International Association of Machinists.—President, P.
Canavan; Secretary, T. Parkin, 106, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, No. 468.—President, T.
Annal; Secretary, A. E. Jackson, 2095 Stains-
bury Avenue, Vancouver.
Bakery Salesmen, No. 189.—President, A. Wylie;
Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
Barbers' Association of British Columbia.—President, J. Jackson; Secretary, R. W. Morrow, 4,
441 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen,
No. 120.—President, F. W. Gust; Secretary,
G.  E.  Herrett, 529  Beatty  Street,  Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers, Local No. 676.—President,
W. G. Couper; Secretary, J. F. Mohan, 347
Pender  Street West, Vancouver.
Blacksmiths' and Helpers' Union of Canada, No. 1.
— President, F. Tiefensee; Secretary, C. T.
Rouse, 2605 Scott Street, Vancouver.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union of
Canada, No. 1.—President, W. Stewart; Secretary, C. W. Caron, 1614 Robson Street, Vancouver.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
105.—President, F. J. Milne; Secretary, T. Carroll,  1336  Twentieth  Avenue  East,  Vancouver.
Brewery Workers, International Union of, United,
No. 300.—President, M. Bushel; Secretary, E.
Sims, 5392 Clarendon Street, Vancouver.
Bricklayers' and Masons' International Union,
No. 1.—President, A. Fordyce; Secretary, S.
Pargett, 2066 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural, and Ornamental-iron Workers,
International Association of, No. 97.—President, J. E. Fitzpatrick; Secretary, R. McDonald, 5059 Chester Street, Vancouver.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association.—
President, F. T. Arnott; Secretary, E. J. McLaughlin, 3126 Georgia Street East, Vancouver.
Building Construction Workers, No. 1.—President,
N. MacLean; Secretary, F. L. Barratt, 795
Sixtieth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Building Service Employees' International Union,
No. 244.—President, Wm. R. Bradbury; Secretary, Mrs. M. Campbell, 7004 Fraser Street,
Vancouver.
Building Workers of Canada, No. 2, Amalgamated.
—President, M. Bruce; Secretary, W. Bray, 163
Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 452.—President, G. R. Bengough; Secretary, H. P. Hamilton, 1922 Stephens Street,
Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United, No.
2346 (Shinglers).—President, W. H. Harris;
Secretary, J. A. Gildemeester, 3885 Thirty-sixth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Cemco Employees' Association.—President, R.
Rybnick; Secretary, Mrs. B. Anderson, 2236
Thirty-second Avenue East, Vancouver.
Cement Finishers' Section, International Hod
Carriers and Common Builders' Union, No. 602.
—President, A. Wilson; Secretary, W. James,
529  Beatty  Street, Vancouver.
Checkers' and Weighers' Association (Marine).—
President, T. N. Stanton; Secretary, R. Met-
tum, 1211, 207 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
City Hall Employees' Association, No. 59.—President, W. M. Black; Secretary, J. Tarbuck, 3917
Eleventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Association (North Vancouver).
—President, W. Dunnet; Secretary, T. H.
Heape, 745 Thirteenth Street East, North Vancouver.
Civic Federation of Vancouver—President, T. H.
Lewis; Secretary, R. Skinner, 571 Twenty-
second Avenue West, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 28.—President, W. L.
Ash; Secretary, D. Rees, 195 Pender Street
East, Vancouver.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, H. A. Benbow; Secretary, H. Baker, 3680
Collingwood Street, Vancouver.
Constables' and Special Agents' Federal Union,
No. 15.—President, F. W. Klein; Secretary,
S. F. Bush, 1162 Rose Street, Vancouver.
Deep Sea and Inland Boatmen's Union of the
Pacific.—President, G. Bogerd; Secretary J. M.
Smith, 701  Holden Building, Vancouver.
Divers' and Tenders' Union, Submarine.—President, H. E. Ryan; Secretary, J. N. Smith, 414
Third Street East, North Vancouver.
Dock and Shipyard Workers' Union, No. 2.—
President, C. A. Saunders; Secretary, W. S.
Alcock, 2642 Triumph Street, Vancouver.
Electrical Employees' Org-anization, B.C. Telephone Co.—President, T. Reilly; Secretary,
R. H. Milner, 308, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Electric Welded Anchor Chain Association, No. 1.
— President, R. Cunningham; Secretary, J.
Mitchell, 615 Twenty-sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Electrical Workers, Amalgamated, No. 3.—President, W. H. Clarke; Secretary, R. Adair, 163
Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. B-213.—President, F. Looney; Business
Agent, J. N. Ross, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Elevator Constructors, International Union of,
No. 82.—President, H. C. MacKichan; Secretary, R. Holmes, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Embalmers' and Undertakers' Assistants' Union,
No. 23374.—President, Wm. Scott; Secretary,
J. A. Dougall, 1334 Nicola Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 320.—
Chief Engineer, W. J. Hill; Secretary, E. J.
Wise, 104 Tenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 907.—
Chief Engineer, V. Wright; Secretary, F. J.
Allen, 1032 Fourteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Engineers, National Association of Marine, Local
No. 7.—President, R. Milne; Secretary, E. R.
Smith, 319 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Engineers, National Union of Operating, Local
No. 3.—President, Wm. Ross; Secretary, J. C.
Barrett, 704 Holden Building, Vancouver. K 100
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
115.—President, F. L. Hunt;    Secretary, H. W.
Flesher, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
882.—President,   J.   Henderson;     Secretary,   C.
Graham, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
963.—President,   K.   Ross;     Secretary,   A.   M.
Reid, 3079 Euclid Avenue, Vancouver.
Express   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,   No.   15.—
President,    W.    E.    Ferrier;     Secretary,    Miss
Sylvia  R.  Glen,   774   Sixty-third  Avenue  East,
Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees, No. B-71.—President,
S. Walker; Secretary, Miss R. Patterson, 950
McLean Drive, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, City, Local No. 1.—President, H. S. Bird; Secretary, C. H. Hagman,
1638 First Avenue East, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, City, No. 3.—President,
W. G. Miller; Secretary, T. Cumming, 742
Third Street East, North Vancouver.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
4.—President, G. Horridge; Secretary, W. A.
George, No. 2 Acadia Circle, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' International Association, Local
S-18.— President, J. Lyon; Secretary, C. A.
Watson, 935 Twentieth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 656.—President, H. W. Parr; Secretary,
H. 0. Locke, 2649 Quebec Street, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 939.—President, S. Baxter; Secretary,
J. Livingstone, 1111 Barclay Street, Vancouver.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood
of, No. 289.—President, Patrick Dunphy; Secretary, W. R. Chapman, 1165 Beach Avenue,
Vancouver.
First-aid Attendants of B.C.—President, J. B.
Livsey; Secretary, H. W. Mahler, 603 Hastings
Street West, Vancouver.
First-aid Employees, Vancouver and Vicinity, No.
217.— President, C. Campbell; Secretary, S.
Todd, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Fish-cannery, Reduction Plant, and Allied Workers' Federal Union, No. 89.—President, C. M.
MacKenzie; Secretary, G. Gateman, 138 Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
Fishermen's Federal Union, United, No. 44.—
President, H. Stavenes; Secretary, W. T. Burgess, 138 Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 190.—
President, Mrs. M. E. Eckland; Secretary,
W. W. Shaw, 3435 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies,
No. 276.—President, Miss E. Thomson; Secretary, Colin Carr, 2884 Twenty-second Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Glove Workers' Union No. 104.—President, H.
Hendrickson; Secretary, E. Dorothy Halsall,
2834 Georgia Street, Vancouver.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, J. Dowling; Secretary, Miss
Thelma Jones, 825 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America.—President, A. S. Simpson; Secretary,
A. Fordyce, 20 Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Hod Carriers, International Building and Common Labourers, Local No. 602.—President, S.
Burnley; Secretary, W. James, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Hospital Employees' Union, No. 4.— President,
Mrs. D. Smith; Secretary, Mrs. L. McLuskie,
876 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, No. 28.
—President, Pearl Chan; Secretary, Barbara
Stewart, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Jersey Farms Employees' Staff Council.—President, G. Brown; Secretary, E. D. Seldon, 310
Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Jewelry Workers' Union, International, No. 42.—
President, T. W. Hawken; Secretary, K. Zuker,
1190 Eleventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M.
Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Lathers' International Union, No. 207.— President, G. W. Morris; Secretary, T. R. Crane,
222 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' International Union of America,
No. 292.—President, W. A. Taylor; Secretary,
Mrs. F. Mehera, 6007 Ontario Street, Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 12.
—President, D. W. Samson; Secretary, J. Cass,
426 Seventeenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, No. 44.
—President, Frank Phipps; Secretary, Arthur
Robold, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's Association, Burrard Coastwise.
— President, W. Shaver; Secretary, J. Dar-
wood, 2049 Kitchener Street, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's Association, North Vancouver.—
President, D. Paull; Secretary, T. E. Moody,
Indian Reserve No. 1, North Vancouver.
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Ltd., Employees'
Association.— President, G. E. Wray; Secretary, A. W. Messer, 2679 Ottawa Avenue, Holly-
burn, West Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 182.
—President, E. K. Pollard; Secretary, J. By-
gate, 1529 Comox Street, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, Beaver
Lodge, No. 182.—President, J. Bygate; Secretary, M. S. Peters, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 692.
—President, S. L. Rogers; Secretary, O. Pa-
quette, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Mailers' Union, Vancouver, No. 70.— President,
Wm. Campbell; Secretary, R. Gordon Taylor,
1176 Duchess Avenue, Hollyburn P.O., West
Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 31.—President, M. R. McDermid; Secretary, R. McLure, c/o C.N.R., B. & B., Lome
Street, Kamloops.
Malkin, W. H., Company Warehouse Employees'
and Truck-drivers' Association. — President,
F. H. Calhoun; Secretary, W. Doig, 719 Eighteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Marshall-Wells Employees' Association.-^President, Wm. A. Griggs; Secretary, Miss P. Baker,
3144 Forty-fifth Avenue, Vancouver.
Merchant Service Guild, Canadian.— President,
Capt. J. S. Dennis; Secretary, G. F. Bullock,
675 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Milk-wagon Drivers' and Dairy Employees' Union,
No. 464.—President, R. McCulloch; Secretary,
Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Moulders' and Foundry-workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, I. J. Wilson; Secretary, J. T. McDonald, 2264 Triumph Street, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 101
Moulders and Foundry-workers of North America,
International, No. 281.— President, J. Smith;
Secretary, A. Paterson, 324 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
Municipal Employees' Association, West Vancouver.—President, P. S. Hopkins; Secretary, T. J.
Elliott, 1125 Inglewood Avenue, Hollyburn,
West Vancouver.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 145.—
President, Wm. Pilling; Secretary, E. A.
Jamieson, Suite 81, 553 Granville Street, Vancouver.
National Biscuit and Confection Co., Ltd., Employees' Committee of.— President, F. W.
Ramsay, 437 Puget Drive, Vancouver. (No
secretary.)
National Paper Box, Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, G. F. Paone; Secretary, J. Douglas Sharp, 3651 Dunbar Street, Vancouver.
Native Brotherhood of B.C.—President, Alfred
Adams; Secretary, Herbert Cook, Alert Bay;
Business Representative, G. R. Williams, 518
Holden Building, Vancouver. (Twenty-nine
branches in B.C.)
Neon Employees' Association. —■ President, G.
Storrar; Secretary, Gertrude Riopel, 1108
Georgia Street West, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Local No. 1.— President, S.
Bligh; Secretary, Vivian Vicary, 500 Beatty
Street, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Local No. 2.—President, A. J.
Heide; Secretary, J. H. Thornton, 246 Blundell
Street, Steveston.
Oil-workers' Union, United, No. 1.—President, A.
McKenzie; Secretary, E. W. Clark, 975 Denman
Street, Vancouver.
Oil-workers of Canada, United, No. 2.—President,
A. McLeod; Secretary, Edward Smith Anderson, 876 Twelfth Street East, North Vancouver.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, Local
No. 249.—President, 0. E. Fischbacker; Secretary, J. D. Crawford, 1641 William Street, Vancouver.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
162.— President, E. E. Readhead; Secretary,
P. T. Christie, Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers of
America, Brotherhood of, No. 138.—President,
G. H. Randall; Secretary, A. Coleman, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Photo Engravers' Union, No. 54.—President, Wm.
Wilson; Secretary, J. A. Hinke, 3776 Thirty-
fifth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf, and Dock Builders,
No. 2404.—President, L. J. Corbett; Secretary,
S. C. Allan, 949 Eighteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Plumbers and Steamfitters of the U.S.A. and
Canada, United Association of Journeymen, No.
170.—President, S. Smylie; Secretary, F. Carlisle, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Police Federal Association, Vancouver, No. 12.—
President, C. W. Macdonald; Secretary, K. W.
MacLean, 2442 Gait Street, Vancouver.
Prefabricated Buildings Employees' Association,
No. 2746.—President, H. Dedecker; Secretary,
F. J. Davis, Box 489, Vancouver.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, No. 69.
—President, M. Erenberg; Secretary, T. S.
Ezart, 1807 Thirty-eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 433.—President, F.
McDermott; Secretary, Mrs. Agnes Nickel,
2550 Twenty-fifth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Vancouver
Lodge, No. 144.—President, Wm. Pennington;
Secretary, R. H. Blackwell, 557 Fifty-sixth
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 987,
Lion's Gate Lodge.—President, E. F. Marsden;
Secretary, R. T. Houghton, 3825 Lanark Street,
Vancouver.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
58.—President, H. L. Warde; Secretary, S. S.
Shearer, 1805 Whyte Avenue, Vancouver.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 267.—President, E. Pugsley; Secretary, J. B. Physick,
4153 Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 59.—President, B. Howard; Secretary, A. Shreeve, 202,
1253 Nelson Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,- Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 82.—President, A. A. Egan; Secretary, T. M. Sullivan,
2715 Dundas Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 220.—President, R. Anderson; Secretary, R. Heriot, 501
Vancouver Block, 736 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 221.—President, Percival Jones; Secretary, W. Harvey,
1344 Seventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 223.—President, I. Dorman; Secretary, J. Coldwell, 4851
Fairmont Street, Vancouver.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association, Vancouver.—
President, C. J. Green; Secretary, J. H. Men-
zies, 2990 Seventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 46.—President, R. Dixon; Secretary,
D. E. Horner, 2556 Sixteenth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Prince Lodge,
No. 526.—President, A. R. Davie; Secretary, V.
Groves, 1662 Barclay Street, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 626.—President, G. H. Stubbs; Secretary, J. E. Fitzgerald, 2046 Stainsbury Avenue,
Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 630.—President, A. Gordon; Secretary,
W. J. Mason, 3116 Thirteenth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Refrigeration Workers' Union, No. 516.—President, Allan M. Campbell; Secretary, John W.
More, 2990 Nineteenth Street West, Vancouver.
Retail Clerks' Union, No. 279.— President, G.
Johnston; Secretary, H. Box, 406 Province
Building, Vancouver.
Retail Employees' Association, Vancouver, No. 1.
—President, R. M. Stevenson; Secretary, T.
McGowan, 1105 Keith Road West, Vancouver.
St. Paul's Hospital Employees' Club.—President,
H. E. Piper; Secretary, Mrs. Mary Lodge, 1235
Nelson Street, Vancouver. K 102
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Seafarers' Association, Canadian, No. 1.—President, H. H. Taylor; Secretary, G. Smillie, 622
Seventeenth Street West, North Vancouver.
Seamen's Union, B.C.—President, H. Lundeberg;
Secretary, H. Murphy, 340b Cambie Street,
Vancouver.
Sheet-metal Workers' International Association,
No. 280.—President, H. F. Elliott; Secretary,
J. J. Laurence, 4195 Perry Street, Vancouver.
Shipwrights', Joiners', and Caulkers' Industrial
Union, No. 1.—President, E. Baker; Secretary,
G. H. Brown, 1787 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Shoe-workers' Union, Western, No. 1.—President,
John Turner; Secretary, G. Shipley, 3779
Union Street, Vancouver.
Sign and Pictorial Painters, No. 726.—President,
A. Lacey; Secretary, W. 0. Clarkson, 5802
Larch Street, Vancouver.
Slade, A. P., and Associated Companies Employees' Association.—President, R. Grey; Secretary, Miss M. Cooper, 3530 First Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Spear & Jackson's Employees' Club.—President,
M. Wilson; Secretary, D. R. Alexander, 3519
Twenty-sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2655.—
President, P. Baskin; Secretary, H. Watson, 10
Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2821.—
President, G. Sowden; Secretary, W. U. Lybar-
ger, 2732 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2951.—
President, E. Oliver; Secretary, W. Hodges, 10
Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2952.—
President, R. C. Sharpe; Secretary, Miss A.
MacPherson, 10 Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
Stenographers, Typists, Book-keepers, and Assistants, No. 18177.—President, Olga Walker; Secretary, Bernadette Gouthro, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' International
Union, No. 88.—President, W. L. McComb;
Secretary, J. Anderson, 4616 Thirteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Stonecutters of Noi'th America, Journeymen
(Vancouver, B.C., Branch).—President, F. H.
Lowe; Secretary, F. Hall, 2931 Forty-second
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor-coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, No. 101.—President, T. Dunlop; Secretary,
C. M. Stewart, 307, 175 Broadway East, Vancouver.
Sugar Workers' Industrial Union, No. 1.—President, J. Dockwray; Secretary, O. Plumbley,
7790 French Street, Vancouver.
Tailors of America, Journeymen, No. 178.—President, H. Clausner; Secretary, D. S. Roberts,
606 Forty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Taxicab, Stage, and Bus Drivers' Union, No. 151.
— President, C. Mclvor; Secretary, C. E.
Youngs, 900 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.— President, L. B.
Stibbs; Secretary, C. D. Ovans, 1300 Robson
Street, Vancouver.
Telegraphers' Union, Commercial, C.P.R. System,
No. 1.—President, I. R. Burns; Secretary, G. H.
Gloag, P.O. Box 432, Vancouver.
Telephone Operators' Organization of B.C.—
President, Jean Davidson; Secretary, Jeanne
Cameron, 307, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Textile Union, Federal, No. 12.—President, Miss
T. Marshall; Secretary, Miss J. Armstrong,
3756 Albert Street, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees, International Alliance of, No. 118.—President, G. Martin; Secretary, W. Blake, 655 Robson  Street, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving-picture
Machine Operators of the U.S.A. and Canada,
International Alliance of, No. 348.—President,
R. G. Pollock; Secretary, J. H. Leslie, P.O. Box
345, Vancouver.
Tile-layers' Union, No. 3.—President, R. Neville;
Secretary, W. Richards, 5326 Spencer Street,
Vancouver.
Tile and Marble Setters' Helpers' Union, International Association, No. 78.— President, A.
Wood; Secretary, D. F. Snow, 802 Richards
Street, Vancouver.
Truck-drivers' and Helpers' Union, General, No.
31.— President, F. Drury; Secretary, R. D.
Atkinson, 4313 Perry Street, Vancouver.
Typographical Union, Vancouver, No. 226.—
President, R. Gouthro; Secretary, R. H. Nee-
lands, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
University of B.C. Employees' Federal Union, No.
116.—President, J. Bruce; Secretary, A. C.
Hill, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Vancouver Shipyards Employees' Association.—
President, C. R. Kennedy; Secretary, R. Bell,
4055 Inverness Street, Vancouver.
Waterfront Workers' Association, No. 2140.—
President, J. T. Thompson; Secretary, A. G.
Smith, 2625 Hemlock Street, Vancouver.
Woodworkers' Union, B.C., No. 2.—President,
H. E. Sadler; Secretary, H. McLean, 1932
Ninth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local
1-71.—President, J. McCuish; Secretary, E.
Dalskog, 204 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-217.
—President, B. Melsness; Secretary, Gladys
Shunaman, 506 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Vanderhoof.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1870.—President, J. Stoynoff; Secretary, J.
Wall, McCall, Vanderhoof.
Vernon.
Civic Employees Union, Vernon, No. 2.—President, W. H. Phelps; Secretary, H. Haines,
Vernon.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 6.—
President, M. Graham; Secretary, S. G. Oga-
sawara, P.O. Box 1393, Vernon.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, F. H. C. Wilson; Secretary,
L. E. M. Pearson, Vernon.   "
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
— President,   W.   Shannon;     Secretary,   B.   M.
Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancquver.
Mechanics' and Associated Workers' Union, International General Local No. 1.—President, E.
Sigalet; Secretary, R. N. Valair, Box 267,
Vernon.
Telephone Operators' Union, Interior B.C., No. 1.
— President,   Mrs.   Evelyne   Tebo;     Secretary,
Enid McMaster, Vernon. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 103
Truck-drivers', Transport Workers', and Warehousemen's Union, No. 1. — President, Ed.
Briggs; Secretary, C. P. Felker, P.O. Box 277,
Vernon.
Typographical Union, Vernon, No. 541.—President, J. Murray; Secretary, W. B. Hilliard,
Box 272, Penticton.
Victoria.
Asbestos Workers, Canadian Union of, No. 3.—
President, D. Ashwood; Secretary, D. R. Pons-
ford, 3161 Fifth Street, Victoria.
Barbers, Hairdressers, and Cosmetologists, International Union of Journeymen, No. 372.—President, G. A. Turner; Secretary, J. A. Green,
1319 Douglas Street, Victoria.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association (Vancouver Island Branch).—President, W. E. Holland; Secretary, Miss S. G. Thorburn, 1026
Roslyn Road, Victoria.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union of
Canada, No. 2.—President, G. L. Culhane; Secretary, F. H. Dyke, 1116 Broad Street, Victoria.
Boilermakers, Iron-ship Builders, and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, No. 191.
—President, P. J. Harris; Secretary, W. S.
Duncan, 837 Old Esquimalt Road, Victoria.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
147.— President, W. A. Johnson; ' Secretary,
J. A. Wiley, 141 Clarence Street, Victoria.
Brewery and Soft Drink Workers, No. 280, International Union of United.—President, T. E.
Rigby; Secretary, W. E. Bryan, 2642 Scott
Street, Victoria.
Bricklayers, Masons, and Plasterers, International
Union of, No. 2.—President, W. Mertton; Secretary, J. Beckerley, R.R. 3, McKenzie Avenue,
Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1598.—President, C. W.
Marshall; Secretary, A. Sims, 1158 May Street,
Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 2415.—President, S. Ber-
row; Secretary, E. Hovey, 2511 Empire Street,
Victoria.
Chemical and Explosive Workers' Industrial Federal Union, Canadian, No. 128.—President,
R. A. Duncan; Secretary, H. S. Rowland, 3915
Cumberland Road, Victoria.
City Hall Employees' Association.— President,
J. J. Whittcomb; Secretary, Yvonne Meikle,
1542 Richmond Avenue, Victoria.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, No. 50.—
President, J. W. Watson; Secretary, G. A.
Fletcher, 1035 Hillside Avenue, Victoria.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, E. W. Jones; Secretary, G. K. Beeston,
406 Post-office Building, Victoria.
Defence Civilian Workers' Union, National, No.
129.—President, L. T. Martin; Secretary, W. E.
Griffiths, 3223 Quadra Street, Victoria.
Dockyard and Shipyard Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, N. Russell; Secretary, J. Sault, 1116
Broad Street, Victoria.
Draughtsmen's Association, Canadian, No. 1.—
President, N. W. Barker; Secretary, J. Jukes,
Sea View Road, Cadboro Bay P.O.
Drivers' Union, Vancouver Island Division, No.
234.—President, H. A. Allison; Secretary, J. S.
Ready, 1, 1116 Broad Street, Victoria.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Co.—President, J. H. Potts; Secretary,
W. H. Sturrock, 3567 Savannah Avenue, Victoria.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 230.—President, Harold L. Duncan; Secretary, F. J. Bevis, 1007 Government Street,
Victoria.
Engineers of Canada, Inc., National Association of
Marine, No. 6.—President, A. Alexander; Secretary, G. W. Brown, 53 Lewis Street, Victoria.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20.—
President, T. C. Johns; Secretary, F. E. Dutot,
2176 Pentland Road, Victoria.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
6.—President, R. H. Wootten; Secretary, N. A.
Duval, 3680 Douglas Street, Saanich.
Fire-fighters' Association, Greater Victoria, No.
730.—President, J. F. Abbott; Secretary, S. J.
McLaren, 1234 Basil Avenue, Victoria.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Lodge No. 690.—President, E. W. Collins; Secretary, G. H. Stewart, 716 Craigflower
Road, Victoria.
Garage Association, Vancouver Island Coach
Lines.— President, W. Bate; Secretary, W.
McAdams, 413 Obed Avenue, Victoria.
Gas Workers' Union, No. 815.—President, K. L.
Roach; Secretary, G. Page, 398 Gorge Road
West, Victoria.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—President, H. A. Carney; Secretary, Miss
B. Kennedy, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Government Employees. American Federation of,
No. 59.—Secretary, E. E. David, 205 Campbell
Building, Victoria.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance, No. 459.—President, Thelma P. Simmons; Secretary, Laura Mi MacNeill, 115 Government Street, Victoria.
Island Freight Service Employees' Association.—
President, W. Brown; Secretary, C. W. Wilkinson, 473 Superior Street, Victoria.
Kelly Douglas & Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.
—President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M.
Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Lathers' Association, Vancouver Island.—President, E. C. Day; Secretary, A. J. Ferguson,
2500 Blackwood Street, Victoria.
kaundry Workers' Union, No. 1.—President, D.
Newell; Secretary, D. H. Fullerton, 1693 Earle
Street, Victoria.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 11.
—President, E. N. Paver; Secretary, F. C.
Hurry, 898 Front Street, Victoria.
Library Staff Association, Victoria Public.—President, Isabelle Pike; Secretary, Miss A. D.
Archbold, 764 Yates Street, Victoria.
Longshoremen's Association, Victoria International, No. 38-162.—President, James Lackie;
Secretary, W. Normian Scott, 676 Battery
Street, Victoria.
Machinists, Fitters, and Helpers, International
Union of, Local No. 2.—President, L. A. Hod-
gins; Secretary, T. A. Mitchell, 915 Dunn
Avenue, Victoria.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 456.
—President, H. E. Thayer; Secretary, C. H.
Lister, 1137 Caledonia Avenue, Victoria.
Mailers' Union, Victoria, No. 121.—President, A.
Veitch; Secretary, E. G. Whitten, 241 Howe
Street, Victoria. K 104
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No.   533.— President,   J.   B.   Bell;     Secretary,
H. W. McKenzie, Langford.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union, No. 144.
—President, W. Gennoe;    Secretary, S. Emery,
864 Old Esquimalt Road, Victoria.
Municipal    Employees'    Association,    Saanich. —
President,   D.  R.   McAdams;    Secretary,  A.  D.
Corker, Wilkinson Road, R.R. 3, Victoria.
Musicians'  Mutual  Protective  Union,  No.  247.—
President, C. W. Hunt;  Secretary, H. J. Bigsby,
720 Sea Terrace, Victoria.
Painters,    Decorators,    and    Paper-hangers     of
America, Brotherhood of, No. 1163.—President,
F. W. Swain;    Secretary, L. N. Tonning, 2619
Wark Street, Victoria.
Pantorium    Employees'   Association.—President,
E. J. Galvin;    Secretary, Sophie Moskalyk, 327
Quebec Street, Victoria.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
367.—President, C. A. Bain;   Secretary, S. A. S.
Guest, 469 Walter Avenue, Victoria.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association of
Journeymen, No. 324.—President, J. C. Wood-
end;   Secretary, G. Pyper, 1131 Balmoral Road,
Victoria.
Police   Mutual   Benefit   Association,   Victoria.-—
President,    H.    F.    Jarvis;     Secretary,    S.    T.
Holmes, 1042 Vista Heights, Victoria.
Postal   Employees,   Canadian.—President,   H.   W.
Adams;   Secretary, J. H. Hedley, 1166 Chapman
Street, Victoria.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, No. 79.
—President, T. Nute;   Secretary, F. H. Larssen,
1236 McKenzie Street, Victoria.
Railroad   Trainmen,   Brotherhood  of,   No.   613.—
President,  H.  0.  Horner;    Secretary, J.  Stone,
1320 Burleith Drive, Victoria.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
50.—President,   G.  B.   Graham;    Secretary,   H.
Greaves, 638 Victoria Avenue, Victoria.
Railway   Conductors,   Order  of,   No.   289.—President, J.  W.  Thomson;    Secretary,  J.  N.   Forde,
707 Wilson Street, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian  Brotherhood of,  No. 222.—President,
G. L.   Woollett;     Secretary,   J.   G.   McAree,   80
Johnson Street West, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 234.—President,
H. A. Allison; Secretary, W. Moir, 158 Robertson Street, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1137.—President, F. X. O'Neill; Secretary, R. T. Moore, 579 Marifield Avenue, Victoria.
Sheet-metal Workers, International Association
of, No. 276.—President, S. J. Trickey; Secretary, F. W. Shaw, R.M.D. 4, Blenkinsop Road,
Victoria.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor-coach Employees of America, Amalgamated, No. 109.—
President, F. Davison; Secretary, W. Turner,
3060 Carroll Street, Victoria.
Sweeney Cooperage Employees' Association.—
President, J. Wadden; Secretary, Phyllis Mari-
wick, 1911 Belmont Avenue, Victoria.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving-picture
Machine Operators of U.S.A. and Canada, International Alliance of, No. 168.—President, S.
McKay; Secretary, C. Rau, Ascot Apartments,
705 Pandora Street, Victoria.
Typographical Union, Victoria, No. 201.—President, J. F. Hough; Secretary, J. Petrie, 1190
May Street, Victoria.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local
1-118.—President, E. H. Clark; Secretary, J. M.
Wainscott, 1116 Broad Street, Victoria.
Wells.
Cariboo Gold Quartz Employees' Co-operative
Association.—President, H. Kahrs; Secretary,
R. H. White, Wells.
Mines Employees' Association, Island Mountain.—
President, J. MacPherson; Secretary, H. Kinder,
Wells.
Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers' Union, International, No. 685.—President, A. Mclvor; Secretary, H. Kinder, Wells.
Zincton.
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 667.—President, F. Hennesey; Secretary, A. St. Germain,
Zincton.
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
Calgary.
Bituminous Coal Operators' Association, The
Western Canada.—President, A. N. Scott; Secretary, C. Stubbs, 516, 520 Lougheed Building,
Calgary, Alberta.
Kelowna.
Shippers' Association Inc., Okanagan, Federated.
—President, F. L. Fitzpatrick; Secretary, F. A.
Lewis, Kelowna.
Nanaimo.
Truck Loggers' Association, B.C.—President, H. J.
Welch; Secretary, F. H. Adames, 210 Pine
Street,  Nanaimo.
Penticton.
Co-operative Growers.—President, W. H. Morris;
Secretary, D. G. Penny, 235 Main Street, Penticton.
Prince George.
Lumbermen's Association, Northern Interior.—
President, M. S. Caine; Secretary, H. F. Alexander, Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association, Canadian
Halibut.—President, C. Giske; Secretary, Ole
Stegavig, Postal Station B, Box 1025, Prince
Rupert. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 105
Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, B.C.—President, B. M. Col-
well; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, Master—President, B. M.
Colwell; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199, Eighth
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Box Manufacturers' Section, Interior, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association.—President, J. G.
Strother; Secretary, H. Dalton, 608 Marine
Building, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Building and Construction Industries Exchange.—
President, C. L. McDonald; Secretary, R. J.
Lecky, 342 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Contractors' Association, General. — President,
M. C. Cameron; Secretary, R. J. Lecky, 342
Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Electrical Association, Vancouver.—President, C.E.
Longley; Secretary, J. S. Homersham, 1358
Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of B.C.—
President, J. Fiddler; Secretary, H. A. Chris-
tenson, 2860 Pandora Street, Vancouver.
Hotels Association, B.C.—President, A. Paterson;
Secretary, J. J. Kahn, 626 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Industrial Association of B.C.—President, W. L.
Macken; Secretary, M. M. Riley, 1024 Marine
Building, Vancouver.
Jewellers' Association, Canadian (B.C. Section).
—President, E. Collett; Secretary, A. Fraser
Reid, 1635 Napier Street, Vancouver.
Laundry, Dry Cleaners, and Linen Supply Club.—
President, W. R. Morrow; Secretary, A. R.
Bernard, 910 Richards Street, Vancouver.
Loggers' Association, Inc., The B.C.—President,
R. McKee; Secretary, J. Burke, 1522, 510 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, International
(Canadian Manufacturers' Association).—President, H. Turner; Secretary, H. Dalton, 608
Marine Bldg., Vancouver.
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association,
B.C.—President, H. J. Mackin; Secretary, T. H.
Wilkinson, 818 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.
Manufacturers' Association, Canadian Metal
Trades Section.—President, R. Samson; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, c/o Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver.
Milk Producers' Association, Fraser Valley.—
President, W. L. Mackin; Secretary, J. J.
Brown,  Surrey Centre.
Morticians, British Columbia Society of.—President, E. A. Simmons; Secretary, M. Hamilton,
19 Kingsway, Vancouver.
Motor Carriers' Association of B.C.—President,
J. V. Hughes; Secretary, N. Usher, B.C. District Telegraph & Delivery Co., Ltd., 104 Marine
Building, Vancouver.
Plastering and Lathing Contractors' Association,
Greater Vancouver.—President, W. G. Jenner;
Secretary, G. A. Skinner, 4865 Fairmount
Street, Vancouver.
Printers' and Stationers' Guild of B.C.—President, O. Weber; Secretary, Miss A. Parkinson,
608, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Red Cedar Shingle Association of B.C., Consolidated.—President, H. F. Hurndall; Secretary,
G. S. Raphael, 811 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.—
President, W. S. Charlton; Secretary, G. R.
Matthews, 744 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Shipping Federation of B.C.—President, F. W.
Harvie; Secretary, Wm. C. D. Crombie, 45
Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver.
Upholstered Furniture Manufacturers' Association of B.C.—President, S. H. Small; Secretary, J. M. Richardson, 626 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Bakers' Association, Master.— President, D. J.
McLean; Secretary, T. P. McConnell, 120 Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Builders' Exchange, Limited.-—President, C. J.
McDowell; Secretary, W. J. Hamilton, 1070
Southgate Street, Victoria.
Beer Licensees Employers' Association.—President, A. Mawer; Secretary, Mrs. F. A. A. New-
march, 891 Admirals Road, Victoria.
Electrical Association, Victoria, B.C.—President,
R. T. Murphy; Secretary, A. R. Colby, 645
Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
V. WARTIME LABOUR RELATIONS REGULATIONS.
SUMMARY.
The Regulations are administered in British Columbia by the Hon. George S.
Pearson, Minister of Labour.
The jurisdiction of the Province in so far as administration is concerned extends
to employees employed upon or in connection with a work, undertaking, or business
that is essential to the efficient prosecution of the war;* or whose relations with their
employers in matters covered by the Regulations are ordinarily within the jurisdiction
of a Provincial Legislature to regulate, and to whom these Regulations have been
applied by the Provincial Legislature in respect of their relations with their employees.
' See Regulations, Schedule A.
8 K 106 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The Regulations were applied in British Columbia by the passage of the " Wartime
Labour Relations Regulations Act," being chapter 18 of the Statutes of British Columbia, which was assented to March 15th, 1944, and proclaimed April 18th, 1944.
The jurisdiction of the Province does not extend to employees engaged in works,
undertakings, or businesses operated or carried on in connection with navigation or
shipping; lines of steam or other ships, railways, canals, telegraphs, and other works
and undertakings connecting the Province with any other Province, or extending
beyond the limits of the Province; lines of steamships between the Province and any
British or foreign country; ferries between the Province and any British or foreign
country, or between two Provinces, and such works as, although wholly situate within
the Province, may have been declared by the Parliament of Canada to be for the general
advantage of Canada, or for the advantage of two or more of the Provinces.
The coal-mining industry remains within the jurisdiction of the Dominion for the
purpose of these Regulations.
Provision is made in the Regulations for an agreement between the Dominion and
any Province to set up suitable administrative agencies to deal promptly with matters
of a local nature. To this end an agreement between the Dominion and the Province
was signed April 18th, 1944.
PROVISION FOR COMPULSORY COLLECTIVE BARGAINING.
Provisions for compulsory collective bargaining and the settlement of disputes
include the following:—
(i.) A procedure is established for the election of bargaining representatives by
majority vote of employees affected; or the election or appointment of bargaining
representatives by a trade-union in cases where the majority of the employees are
members of the trade-union, and for the certification of such representatives by the
Minister following investigation.
(ii.) Compulsory collective bargaining may then be initiated by the employer or'
the employees' bargaining representatives by due notice to the other party. The
parties are thereupon required to negotiate with one another in good faith to complete
a collective agreement.
(iii.) When agreement cannot be reached without outside assistance, the services
of a Conciliation Officer are provided. If this official cannot bring the parties together
the matter may be made one for reference to a Board of Conciliation. Strikes and
lockouts are prohibited during the period of negotiation.
(iv.) Negotiations for the renewal of an agreement may be initiated by notice by
either party within the sixty-day period prior to the expiry of the agreement. Following such notice parties must negotiate in good faith with one another for the renewal
of the agreement.
(v.) Where a collective agreement has been entered into, new bargaining representatives may not be elected until after ten months have elapsed.
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE AND SETTLEMENT OF DISPUTES.
The provision made for the settlement of grievances and disputes is designed to
place upon the employer and employees concerned joint responsibility for settlement
by their own actions, rather than by the imposition of an outside agency.
The parties must provide that in every collective agreement entered into after the
coming into effect of the Regulations a provision is made establishing a procedure for
the final settlement, without stoppage of work, upon the application of either party, of
differences concerning its interpretation or violation. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 107
Where there is no collective agreement in effect, employees must seek the certification of bargaining representatives (if they have not already done so), and thereafter
endeavour to negotiate such an agreement.
UNFAIR PRACTICES.
Unfair practices on the part of employers and employees, and trade-unions and
employees' or employers' organizations, are defined and prohibited. Penalties are
provided for failure to observe such prohibitions.
Employers are prohibited from seeking to dominate or interfere with trade-
unions or employees' organizations, or contributing financial support to them; against
refusing to employ or discriminating against members of trade-unions or employees'
organizations; and against the dismissal of an employee for belonging to a trade-union
or employees' organization, or for exercising his rights as a member or officer.
Trade-unions and employees' organizations are prohibited against the use of
coercion or intimidation to make a person join a trade-union or employees' organization; against activities during working-hours at the place of employment, to persuade
an employee to join a trade-union or employees' organization, except with the consent
of the employer; and from supporting or encouraging or engaging in a slow-down
designed to restrict or to limit production.
Detailed instructions are given elsewhere in the Regulations for their enforcement
and for the setting-up of Boards of Conciliation.
The " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" of the Province is of no effect
while the Regulations are in force, except as to matters covered by the Act and not
covered by the Regulations, and as to matters pending under the Act upon the date on
which the Regulations came into force.
The " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act " of the Dominion is to be of no effect
while the Regulations are in force, except as to matters pending. Certain Federal
Orders in Council relating to matters covered by the Regulations are revoked or
suspended.
B. H. E. GOULT,
Secretary-Registrar, " Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Act." K 108 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., June 30th, 1944.
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection Branch for
the year 1943.
In the closing months of the year under review, especially in heavy industry, there
was a production slow-down, more particularly in the ship-building industry. This
affected many of our smaller industries which had subcontracts to manufacture and
supply various equipment forming part of a ship's complement. Plants, which were
operating three eight-hour shifts, in some instances, rearranged their working schedules
so that it was possible to discontinue at least one shift. Continued expansion has taken
place in the aeroplane industry and, for a variety of reasons, subassembly plants have
been established in widely separated portions of the Province. This industry has now
become one of our largest employers of labour.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1943, 2,240 inspections and reinspections of factories were made.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
There are very few, if any, industrial plants to-day that are not vitally concerned
with preventing accidents. Executives, supervisors, and workers all agree that it is
desirable that accidents be prevented and all extend a measure of co-operation in
eliminating them. Why, then, do we continue to have so many and such serious
accidents? The answer is difficult to obtain. Some attribute it to the higher percentage of inexperienced help.
While it is true that a greater number of new and inexperienced employees are
being brought into our plants, the departmental supervisor should see that the new
employees are made thoroughly familiar with the safe methods of performing their
work and that they intend to follow them. There should be no more difficulty in
instructing them in " safety" than in teaching them their productive activities.
The supervisor should also realize that there is no double standard of safety for sex
or experience. A new employee must be properly instructed and supervised; keeping
him free from injury is the same job as for an old employee.
Present-day power-driven machine-manufacturers have done much toward building
safety into their machines, but all too often we find during inspection and while investigating the cause of injuries received on these machines that the efforts of the manufacturer have been nullified by some employee. When we visit a plant and find safety
equipment removed and we request that it be produced and reinstalled we invariably
find it to have been hanging on the wall or under a work-bench covered with dust or
other foreign matter. Instances such as these, and they are not uncommon, would
indicate that management and supervision have not, as yet, learned that the education
of their employees to the necessity of using the safety devices provided is their best
hope to combat the hazards of plant operation.
Many serious injuries are received by failure to wear personal protective equipment, such as goggles, safety-shoes, and proper work clothing. Power-driven machinery
is very tangible evidence of hazards that must be guarded against. These dangers are
continuous.
Entirely different are the causes of eye injuries. A small piece of flying steel and
the splash of a drop of acid are, as a rule, unimportant when encountered by other REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 109
parts of the body, but how dangerous when lodged in the eye. Much education is still
required before some industrial workers will realize from bitter experience that a glass
eye does not restore their vision or enhance their personal appearance.
FACTORY CONDITIONS.
Because industry has introduced into the industrial life of this Province new
industrial processes, new chemicals and new poisons, the services of an industrial
hygienist are required to determine, by analysis and dust counts, the concentrations
that are or are not injurious to the health of the worker. Once these are determined,
corrective measures should be taken to control the harmful fumes and remove the dust
at its point of origin. To do so effectively involves the installation of properly designed
ventilating equipment. However, in most instances, the plant lay-out permits these
operations to be performed in a room segregated from the factory proper.
There are certain solvents that are being used in industry to-day the fumes from
which are not considered as being harmful. We have, however, through interviews
with employees exposed to the fumes and also by receipt of confidential information,
found that they do cause discomfort. Upon investigations being made, it was disclosed
that these solvents were being kept in open containers. The substitution of closed
containers removed the cause of discomfort.
While some investigations have been made by Great Britain and the United States
relative to the ill effects of excessive noise on employees, we have not, as yet, learned
the results. During the year under review we received a request from the management
of an industrial plant engaged solely in war-time production to observe conditions under
which male and female employees were obliged to work. The employees claimed that
the noise from a machine located in a certain department of the plant induced violent
headaches and was a contributing factor in causing absenteeism. Inspection revealed
that the complaint made by the employees was justified. As it was practical to move
this machine outside the work-room proper, orders were issued accordingly. Upon our
return to the plant following the moving of this machine, the management stated that
production had increased in this department and complaints had ceased.
WELFARE.
The tangible evidence of the changed attitude of industrial management of to-day
in comparison with that of a few years ago, relative to facilities provided in connection
with the welfare of their employees, is indeed remarkable to view.
As industries are very often located a considerable distance from the homes of
the workmen, and also because of transportation problems and a shorter lunch-hour
period, the lunch-carrying container is much in evidence. In the not far distant past
it was not unusual to see the workman eating his lunch beside the machine he operated
and in an environment anything but appetizing. The progressive employer of to-day
has, at considerable expense, constructed dining-rooms for both male and female
employees where hot meals are served at a normal charge for those who desire them.
The worker who brings his or her lunch is privileged to use the dining-room and
consume the home-made lunch to the accompaniment of music or news broadcasts.
During morning and afternoon rest periods, which are becoming the general
practice throughout many industries, we have been privileged to partake of a cup of
coffee in these dining-rooms, surrounded by plant executives and employees.
Without detracting from management of industry the credit due for the high
standard of sanitary and other conveniences provided for employees, we are of
the opinion that the large number of women who have entered industry and replaced
men since the commencement of the war has had a decided influence in bettering
conditions for the male employees in this respect. K 110 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
WOMEN IN INDUSTRY.
While the employment of women in industry as a whole increased during the year,
we found that a number of industries had discontinued their employment entirely, and
that others were operating with a decreased staff. The decline in the number of
women in certain industries could be attributed largely to a slow-down in these
particular plants and the discontinuance of extra shifts.
Management of industry in which women replaced men at certain occupations
soon recognized that consideration had to be given to their physical limitations. As a
means of overcoming them, pedestal lifts, roller conveyers, and other mechanical
appliances were installed which eliminated the lifting of excessive weights. We have,
however, found that some women, if not restricted, were inclined (solely because of
the increased remuneration received) to attempt to perform work which was detrimental to their health and injurious to their physical well-being.
Notwithstanding the combined efforts of all those engaged in accident-prevention,
scalp injuries were all too frequently received by women industrial workers because of
failure to wear a proper covering over the hair. It is not unusual for us to observe
women wearing a cap on the back of the head, exposing the hair at the front of the head,
the very place where nearly all injuries occur. Improperly tied and exposed ends of
bandanas also create a hazard. Until such time as women industrial workers can be
brought to realize, through persuasion or otherwise, that strict observance of the
" regulation " which requires complete covering of the hair while operating or working
in close proximity to power-driven machinery is more important to their personal well-
being than a slight disarrangement of a new hair-do, distressing injuries will continue
to occur.
CHILD-LABOUR.
A considerable number of children by falsification of their ages and with
the knowledge and consent of their parents obtained employment in the shipyards and,
to a lesser extent, in other industries during the summer school holidays of the year
under review. Unfortunately, it took the life of a 14-year-old shipyard employee to
reveal the large number of children illegally employed.
Previous to the commencement of the summer school holidays, we notified all
shipyard personnel officials that it was their responsibility, if any doubt existed as to
the age of a boy seeking employment, to insist that he produce his birth certificate or
other legal proof of age. Owing to the fact that many boys under the age of 15 years
had received permits from Selective Service officials authorizing their employment in
the shipyards, and produced same when seeking employment, the employment officials
assumed that the boys presenting these permits could be legally employed.
As this Department did not issue permits authorizing the employment of any boy
under the age of 15 years in any of the local shipyards, Selective Service must accept
a certain amount of responsibility for the introduction of child-labour in the shipyards.
Following this fatality and the Minister's statement in the press in connection with
same, all boys who could not produce satisfactory proof that they had attained their
fifteenth birthday were removed from the shipyards.
Judging from press reports and information gleaned from various sources, child-
labour seems to have increased alarmingly in some of the Eastern Provinces and also in
the United States. We concur in the opinion so ably expressed by the Industrial Commissioner of New York State to the effect that the child who works at too young an age,
who works too long or too late after school-hours, and who, because of the undue tax
of his labour, falls asleep or mopes through his school classes is not only subjected to
physical harm, but mental and moral as well. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 111
We have, for this reason, with but very few exceptions, confined the issuing of
permits authorizing the employment of children for the duration of the summer school
holidays only. We are of the opinion that regardless of what vocation a child intends
to follow he or she should attend school until they have attained at least their fifteenth
birthday.    This is the administrative policy being followed by this Department.
INDUSTRIAL HOME-WORK.
Certain lines of industry engaged in the manufacture of household articles and
also furnishings urgently required for outfitting ships under construction found
a shortage of skilled female factory employees. Because of this they were obliged
to request former employees, who had, upon marriage, resigned their positions and
established homes, to assist them in meeting their commitments by performing part-
time work in their homes. Following investigations being made as to compliance with
the statutory requirements governing industrial home-work, a number of permits
authorizing same were issued to the employers and home-workers.
Several home-workers with previous mechanical experience, who, because of their
advanced age, are no longer able to keep pace with production requirements in industry,
informed us, on requesting renewal of their permits, that they had become more than
self-sustaining. This also applies to those with an infirmity, thus proving that homework, properly controlled, is not the industrial evil which existed prior to legislative
enactment in the year 1936.
FREIGHT AND PASSENGER ELEVATORS.
The inspection of freight and passenger elevators is a very important part of our
duties and is becoming more exacting during the war years. Because of the difficulty
and delay in obtaining replacement equipment which inspection reveals to be necessary
and which affects the safe operation of the car, many reinspections were required to
be made in order to assure ourselves that operating equipment which requires repairs
or replacement is not continued in service.
We regret to have to report a fatal accident which occurred to a boy 16 years of
age while attempting to operate a modern freight-elevator. As no one witnessed
the accident, and our investigation and attendance at the Coroner's inquest did not
reveal conclusive evidence as to the cause of same, any detailed expression of opinion
as to the cause would be from supposition only. Other than this, no serious accident
was received by any person while being transported on a passenger or freight elevator.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS' LICENCES.
During the year 1943, 914 licences were renewed and 547 temporary and 441 permanent licences issued.
ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1943, there were 1,421 inspections and reinspections of freight
and passenger elevators.
NEW ELEVATOR INSTALLATIONS.
Eleven plans and specifications relating to the installation of modern elevator
equipment were approved.
PROSECUTIONS.
.   An Oriental laundry was fined $50 and costs for an infraction of clause 2, section 4,
of the " Factories Act."
The proprietor of a hotel was fined $15 and costs for permitting an unlicensed
operator to operate the passenger-elevator in his hotel. K 112 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONCLUSION.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all officials and employees connected
with industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Douglas,
Inspector of Factories. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 113
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE APPRENTICESHIP BRANCH, 1943.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
J. A. Ward Bell, Chairman. J. F. Keen.
Adam Bell. James Thomson.
Administrative Officials of Branch.
Hamilton Crisford    Director of Apprenticeship.
Arthur Dugdale  Assistant Director.
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report on the development of apprenticeship
for the year 1943.
At the end of the year apprenticeship contracts in force were as follows:—
Designated trades  1,386
Undesignated occupations      138
Preliminary contracts        79
Total  1,603
This is an increase of 181 over 1942, but the number of apprentices at present
serving their country in the armed forces has increased to 518, an increase of 203
over 1942, which slightly more than takes care of the increase.
The requirements of the armed forces in depleting the ranks of apprentices has
now reached the point where employers hesitate to make replacements, having in mind
their post-war responsibilities under existing contracts and, in addition, the demands
that are likely to be made upon them in the rehabilitation of both ex-service men and
war-workers. It is expected therefore that from now on apprenticeship opportunities
for our young people leaving school will be considerably reduced.
During the past year the Federal Government has recognized the desirability of
a uniform system of apprenticeship throughout the Dominion and has made certain
proposals to all Provinces along these lines. These proposals have resulted in a number of Provinces passing or proposing to pass Apprenticeship Acts similar to our own,
and it is hoped that this will lead to more or less standardized conditions of training
throughout the Dominion, particularly in regard to such technical and trade classes as
are operated in conjunction with apprenticeships.
The Dominion Government also hopes that apprenticeship facilities will be made
available in connection with the rehabilitation of both ex-service men and women and
of partially trained war-workers.
In so far as British Columbia is concerned these facilities are already established
and available, but to what extent training or retraining through apprenticeship will be
found suitable and acceptable to adults is more or less an unknown quantity and will
naturally depend to a large extent upon the conditions and opportunities of employment
that are available and to the training and working conditions that can be arranged and
agreed upon with employers in industry and organized labour alike.
The following tables show the present distribution  of apprentices in  British
Columbia as at December 31st, 1943, exclusive of probationary contracts :—
Table 1.—Distribution of Apprentices already trained in Trades.
Table 2.—Distribution of Apprentices in training in Designated Trades.
Table 3.—Distribution of Apprentices in training in Occupations not yet
designated. K 114
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table 4.—Rise and Fall of Apprenticeship in Trades since Apprenticeship
Branch established.
Table 1.—Distribution of Apprentices who have successfully completed
their Apprenticeship.
Occupation covered.
Number
Fully Trained
to Date.
98
Occupation covered.
Number
Fully Trained
to Date.
      10
.     .         -    10
  _.      5
        8
        6
       60
  135
       3
 _    39
._       6
Painters and decorators __	
     18
       19
 ______     10
     91
 ___.    25
        4
 _       6
     59
      25
         5
         7
     48
 _        3
       4
Upholsterers     	
Miscellaneous occupations 	
Total   ,.,....	
        5
5
     66
      68
	
  848
APPRENTICESHIP CONTRACTS IN FORCE.
Table 2.—Occupations designated as Trades under the "Apprenticeship Act."
Number
in Force-
Occupation.
Automobile mechanics — -       104
Automobile metalwork  _
Automobile  painting	
Automobile-tire repairing
Aviation  mechanics 	
Boiler-making   	
37
5
4
41
35
Carpentry     _ _       106
3
92
25
29
12
61
2
5
Draughtsman
Druggists  	
Electrical  appliances   __	
Electrical work  -___	
Electrical  work—construction
Electrical work—shop  .— 	
Glass-working  ___ _ .	
Iron-worker     	
Occupation.
Jewellery-worker  _.
Lithography  _.
Machinist   —__ _ _.
Metal trades—miscellaneous
Moulding     _ ____	
Painting and decorating	
Pattern-making   	
Pipe-fitters —_ _	
Plastering     __,
Plumbing and steam-fitting _
Sheet-metal working 	
Ship and boat building _	
Sign and pictorial painting _
Number
in Force.
22
20
..     419
4
102
29
30
2
1
58
95
36
Total
1,386
Table 3.—Occupations not yet designated under the "Apprenticeship Act.1
Occupation.
Bakers and cooks
Barbers  _	
Blacksmiths   —	
Bookbinders __	
Number
in Force.
  9
  4
 _ 1
Bricklayers          2
  7
  1
  1
 ..„ 1
  1
Business-machine mechanics
Butcher _ _ „	
Butter-making   __	
Carpet and linoleum layer	
Clerk, automotive—wholesale
Dentistry  _
Dressmaking  5
Draughtsman     _ _ -  1
Fur-finishers    _    3
Gardeners   __ _„ _... 2
Occupation-
Hairdressers   _...
Hardware clerk 	
Harness—shoe repair
Lead-burners   	
Municipal clerk 	
Photo-finisher  	
Printing    ___ _„_„
Seedsman    _ ._
Spring-maker  _	
Shoe-repairing	
Upholsterers —	
Number
in Force.
..... 44
1
1
-__- ' 14
1
Watch-repairing ... _	
Wholesale hardware   	
Window-shade making _ _        1
Total REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943.
K 115
Table 4.—Rise and Fall of Apprenticeship in Trades as shown by the Number
of Live Contracts in Force by Years.
1
1935. I 1936.
i
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
51
100
114
9
12
85
38
48
136
12
14
110
76
47
144
24
22
126
65
66
5
16
13
196
47
26
16
4
44
55
18
6
163
149
42
32
134
80
76
6
15
15
279
69
38
22
4
57
68
22
6
161
137
43
34
113
92
97
2
21
16
359
87
32
28
4
53
82
27
6
136
150
41
10
12
70
35
Carpentry-   - -	
31
106
92
Electrical work  -	
5
26
47
127
2
7
8
11
11
138
32
14
9
16
13
146
36
16
10
1
38
43
24
11
159
22
20
129
428
102
1
10
15
8
29
30
1
2
5
16
21
28
6
65
31
35
17
11
111
39
42
22
11
147
60
95
36
Sign painting 	
7
141
Totals-    ;.
23
261
602
782
908
1,056
1,285
1,369
1,524
Hamilton Crisford,
Director of Apprenticeship. K 116 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH.
Administrative Offices—789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Administrative Officers.
J. A. Ward Bell     -   Chief Administrative Officer.
Mrs. Rex Eaton.
Hamilton Crisford  - - _ Secretary.
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit annual report of the Trade-schools Regulation Branch for
the calendar year of 1943.
Only very minor problems have occurred in connection with the administration of
the Act and no changes have been necessary in the regulations.
A number of schools have ceased operation owing to a slowing-down in the demand
for the class of tuition they were offering. This is the case in 90 per cent, of schools
established for the teaching of welding in connection with the building of ships and
aircraft to meet war demands. These schools filled a definite need but there is now
a sufficiency of skilled and semi-skilled tradesmen and vacancies are so reduced as to
make their further operation uneconomic.
All schools have complied with our somewhat stringent regulations in regard to
advertising and a great improvement is noticeable in this connection, advertising
now submitted being on an altogether higher plane and misrepresentation entirely
eliminated.
The following is the list of schools at present registered to do business in this
Province:—
Alexander Hamilton Institute, Ltd., 54 Wellington Street West, Toronto, Ontario.—
Business training.
Brisbane Aviation Company, Limited, Vancouver Civic Airport, Vancouver, B.C.—
Aircraft engineering.
Canadian Institute of Science and Technology, Limited, 219 Bay Street, Toronto,
Ontario.—Civil, architectural, and mining engineering; hydraulics, hydraulic
machinery, sanitary engineering, municipal and county engineer's course,
building construction, heating and ventilating, mechanical and electrical
engineering, business and accountants' course, salesmanship, advertising, wireless, television, aeronautical engineering, aeroplane courses; other courses
as per prospectus.
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, Inc., 3224 16th Street, N.W., Washington,
D.C.—radio engineering.
Cooper Institute of Accountancy, Ltd., Cooper Building, Winnipeg, Manitoba.—
Accountancy.
Hemphill Diesel Engineering Schools, Ltd., 1160 Hastings Street West, Vancouver,
B.C.—Diesel engineering.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian, Limited, 1517 Mountain Street,
Montreal, Quebec.—Agriculture, air-conditioning, applied art, architecture,
aviation engineering, business education, chemistry, civil engineering, domestic science, electrical engineering, general education, mining and mechanical
engineering, navigation, paper manufacture, plumbing and heating, railroad
operation, textile manufacture; other courses as per prospectus.
International Accountants Society, Inc., 3411 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago,
Illinois.—Accountancy. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 117
LaSalle Extension University, 4101 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.—Higher
accountancy, business management, industrial management, elements of
accounting, C.P.A. coaching, salesmanship, railway accounting, effective speaking, commercial law, stenotypy, business English, modern business correspondence, credit and collection correspondence, practical accounting and office
practice;  other courses as per prospectus.
M.C.C. Schools, Limited, 301 Enderton Building, Winnipeg, Manitoba.—Dominion
Civil Service, home kindergarten.
National Radio Institute, Inc., 16th and U Streets, N.W., Washington, D.C.—
Practical radio and television.
National Schools, 4000 S. Figueroa Stre'et, Los Angeles, California.—Radio and
television, Diesel and other combustion engines, air-conditioning and refrigeration, applied electrical engineering, modern machine-shop instruction, advanced
radio engineering.
Northern Institute of Technology, 54 Bloor Street, Toronto, Ontario.—Applied-
radio and electronics, commercial radio operating, advanced radio engineering.
Plastics Industries Technical Institute, 186 South Alvarado Street, Los Angeles,
California.—Plastics.
Shaw Schools, Limited, 1130 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario.—Commercial course,,
short-story writing, stationary engineering.
Academy of Useful Arts, 615 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Dressmaking,
designing and kindred arts.
Academy of Useful Arts, 853 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C:—Dressmaking, designing
and kindred arts.
B.C. School of Pharmacy and Science, 615 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Pharmacy.
B.C. Tree Fruits, Limited, Okanagan, Kootenay, and Creston Districts, Kelowna,
B. C.—Fruit-packing.
B.C. Logging Power Saw School, 1526 Broadway West, Vancouver, B.C.—Power-
saw operations, logging industry (the sale of tuition is confined to persons
recommended by operating West Coast logging companies and to those who can.
produce evidence that they have had suitable experience on Coast logging
operations).
Central Business College, Mcintosh Building, Chilliwack, B.C.—Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Commercial Welding School, 66 Kingsway, Vancouver, B.C.—Acetylene and arc
welding.
Comptometer School, 342 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Comptometer
operation.
Dobell School of Business, Island Highway and Duncan Avenue, Courtenay, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Duffus School of Business, Limited, 540 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Eyrl's Civil Service Business College, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Fashion Academy, 6325 Marguerite Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Dressmaking.
Fenton Commercial School, 2001-03 Forty-first Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Goodman's School of Professional Costume Designing, 445 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Costume designing, fashion sketching, tailoring and dressmaking.
Grandview Business College, 1768 Williams Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental). K 118 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Harradine Commercial College, 5665 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Herbert's Business College, Room 3, Casorso Block, Kelowna, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Hollyburn Business College, Fourteenth Avenue and Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Lonsdale Shorthand and Typewriting Academy, 877 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.
—Office occupations (shorthand, typewriting, and elementary book-keeping).
Lownds School of Commerce, Limited, B.C.E.R. Terminal Building, New Westminster, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Loyd-Griffin Business School, Fairview and Main Streets, Penticton, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Maxine Beauty School, 619 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Hairdressing.
Moler Barber School, 20 Cordova Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Barbering.
Moler Hairdressing School, 303 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Hair-
dressing.
Mott, Victor, Fashions, 620 Trounce Alley, Victoria, B.C.—Fashion designing.
McEwen-Wilkie Business College, Corner Vance and Barnard Avenue, Vernon,
B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Nelson Business College, 107 Baker Street, Nelson, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster Commercial College, 713 Columbia Street, New Westminster,
B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Pitman Business College, Limited, 1450 Broadway West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Roger of " The Russian Duchess Beauty Salon," 768 Granville Street, Vancouver,
B.C.—Advanced hairdressing, individual personal instruction.
Royal Business College, 1006 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.—Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Standard School of Stenography and Typewriting, 1526 Pandora Avenue, Victoria,
B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
H. Faulkner Smith School of Applied and Fine Art, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Commercial art.
St. Ann's Academy, Commercial Department, 835 Humboldt Street, Victoria, B.C.
—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
St. Margaret's Business School, 1848 Fern Street, Victoria, B.C.—Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Sprott-Shaw Schools, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Sprott-Shaw Radio School, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Wireless telegraphy combined with radio engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Victoria Business Institute, Limited, 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria,
B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental), radiotelegraphy.
Trail Business College, 648 Weir Street, Trail, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Vancouver Business School, 709 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Vancouver Engineering Academy, 407 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Stationary, marine and Diesel engineering.
Victoria Hairdressing School, Suite 104, Woolworth Building, Victoria, B.C.—
Hairdressing.
Victoria Trade School, 546 Herald Street, Victoria, B.C.—Welding. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1943. K 119
Welding Construction School, 148 First Avenue East, Vancouver, B.C.—Electric
welding, acetylene cutting.
Western School of Commerce, Limited, 712 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Western   College   of   Pharmacy,   1524   Sixth   Avenue   West,   Vancouver,   B.C.—
Pharmacy.
Willis College of Business, 850 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Hamilton Crisford,
Secretary. K 120 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SAFETY BRANCH.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Safety Branch for the year 1943.
The work of the Safety Branch was conducted by the Acting Assistant Deputy,
Mr. Charles Pearse, until June, when he terminated his services with the Civil Service
to take a position with a private firm, the Stuart Research Agency, in Vancouver.
Mr. Pearse worked for the Department of Labour for approximately ten years and
acted as Assistant Deputy for approximately one year. Since 1937 he carried on a very
excellent educational service to the lumber industry and his services will be greatly
missed by the Department of Labour.
The regular work is being continued and close contact is being maintained with
safety committees in all the different branches of the lumber industry.
Periodic meetings have been instituted with employers' representatives and from
these there is an interchange of ideas which is proving very valuable.
It is interesting to note that the number of accidents for each billion feet of log
production is not increasing and it is hoped that the peak has been reached in accident
frequency.    The following table is given showing the accident trend for the past four
years. Accidents
Production per Billion
Year. (Board-feet). Board-feet.
1940___  3,693,000,000 1,425
1941  3,679,950,000 1,495
1942  3,172,640,000 1,560
1943  2,848,958,000 1,540
Representatives of the operating companies asked the Safety Branch to institute
a system whereby the lumber companies would be rated as to the frequency of accidents
among their employees. Such a plan was drawn up and has been used since October 1st,
1943. This will give a quarterly report to the employers, giving them their standing
as individuals as well as the standing of their associations.
It is encouraging that there were less accidents in the lumber industry during
the last quarter of 1943 than any previous yearly quarter for some time. The Workmen's Compensation Board has reduced its assessment rate on the industry by one-half
of 1 per cent.
The report can not be closed without expressing sincere thanks to the Hon. the
Minister of Labour for his interest in the work of the Branch and to the Deputy
Minister for his assistance and advice in developing our accident-prevention campaign.
Respectfully submitted.
A. M. Whisker,
Safety Adviser.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Triuted by Chakles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1944.
1,805-744-2086

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