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SEVENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1942-43 BY THE… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1945

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Full Text

 SEVENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF  THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1942-43
BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OP EDUCATION
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg respectfully to present the Seventy-second Annual Report of the Public
Schools of the Province.
H. G. T. PERRY,
Minister of Education.
February, 1944.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.
'     1942-43.
Minister of Education:
The Honourable H. G. T. PERRY.
Deputy Minister
and Superintendent of Education:
S. J. Willis, B.A., LL.D.
Assistant Superintendent of Education:
D. L. MacLaurin, B.A., Ph.D.
Chief Inspector of Schools:
H. B. King, M.A., Ph.D.
Inspectors of High Schools:
J. B. DeLong, B.A., Vancouver.
A. Sullivan, B.A., Victoria.
Inspectors of Elementary, Superior, Junior High, and High Schools:
J. E. Brown, M.A., Penticton.
P. G. Calvert, Vancouver.
T. G. Carter, M.C. (in Active Service).
E. G. Daniels, B.A., New Westminster.
J. P. K. English, M.A., B.Paed., Pouce
Coupe.
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Cranbrook.
W. G. Gamble, B.A., Victoria.
G. H. Gower, M.A., Courtenay.
F. A. Jewett, B.A., Nelson.
V. Z. Manning, B.A., Vancouver.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools:
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed., Victoria. C. G. Brown, M.A., Burnaby.
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster. John Gough, M.A., Saanich.
W. Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS.
Vancouver:
Ernest Lee, B.A., B.Sc. in P.E.
A. F. Matthews, M.A., Kamloops.
H. McArthur, B.A., Kamloops.
H. H. Mackenzie, B.A., Vancouver.
W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A.,
F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., Nanaimo.
T. F. Robson, Prince George.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Prince George.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., Prince Rupert.
A. S. Towell, M. A., Abbotsford.
A. Turnbull, B.A., M.C, Revelstoke.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Rossland.
A. R. Lord, B.A., Principal.
T. R. Hall, B.A., Vice-Principal.
W. P. Weston, A.R.C.A., F.R.S.A
H. B. MacLean.
A. E. C. Martin, B.Sc.
J. M. Ewing, B.A., D.Paed.
F. C. Boyes, M.A.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A.
Miss M. McManus, B.Mus., M.A.
Miss Margaret Maynard, B.A.
Model School:
Miss Z. M. Manning.
Miss M. Macdonald, B.A., A.T.C.M.
Victoria:
V. L. Denton, B.A., D.C.L., Principal. Mrs. N. E. Murphy, B.Sc. (on leave of
H. O. English, B.A., B.S.A., Vice-Principal.        absence).
Miss H. R. Anderson, M.A., Ph.D. Miss Barbara Hinton, B.Sc.
F. T. C. Wickett, A.R.C.O. Mrs. Ethel Reese-Burns.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS.
Registrar:  T. W. Hall.
Officer in Charge of Industrial Education:  F. T. Fairey, B.A.
Inspector of Technical Classes:  H. A. Jones.
Director of Home Economics:   Miss J. L. McLenaghen, B.Sc.
Assistant Inspector in Home Economics:   Miss B. Rogers, B.Sc.
Officer in Charge of High Correspondence School:  Miss E. E. LUCAS, B.A., D. es L.
Officer in Charge of Elementary Correspondence School:  Miss Anna B. Miller.
Organizer of School and Community Drama:
L. Bullock-Webster, A.R.C.M., F.T.C.L., M.R.S.T.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch:  P. G. Barr.
Chief Clerk:  R. D. SMITH.
Principal, School for the Deaf and the Blind:   C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Director, Recreational and Physical Education:  Ian Eisenhardt (in Active Service). TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Superintendent of Education      7
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools    32
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver    37
Victoria    38
Report of the Director of the Summer School of Education    40
Report of the Officer in Charge of Industrial Education    50
Report of the Director of Home Economics     58
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver    60
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
Victoria     72
New Westminster    77
North Vancouver (City and District) and West Vancouver    79
Burnaby__    80
Saanich     82
Report of the Principal, School for the Deaf and the Blind     84
Reports of Officers in Charge of Correspondence Schools—
High Sctiool and Vocational Courses     86
Elementary School Courses     92
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch    94
Report on Work of Adult Education    97
Report of the Executive of Recreational and Physical Education  108
Report of Organizer of School and Community Drama _■_  113
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust  115
Report of Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act"  118
Statistical Returns—
High Schools (Cities)  120
High Schools (District Municipalities)  134
High Schools (Rural Districts)  139
Superior Schools (District Municipalities)  145
Superior Schools (Rural Districts)  146
Junior High Schools (Cities)  150
Junior High Schools (District Municipalities)  158
Junior High Schools (Rural Districts)  163
Elementary Schools (Cities)  165
Elementary Schools (District Municipalities)  196
Elementary Schools (Rural Districts)  214
Elementary Schools (Community Districts)  233
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each City  234
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each District Municipality  237
Enrolment (Recapitulation)  241
Names of Schools, Number of Teachers, etc., in each of the Electoral Districts  242 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION, 1942-43.
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1944.
To the Honourable H. G. T. Perry,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Seventy-second Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1943.
ENROLMENT.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province decreased during the year from
118,405 to 115,447 and the average daily attendance decreased from 102,085 to 93,473.
The percentage of regular attendance was 80.96.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Schools.
Cities.
District
Municipalities.
Rural
Districts.
Community
Districts.
Total.
13,572
3,553
925
3,557
18,832t
1,994
2,320
1,243
17,829
526
19,119
3,245
10,042
41,054*
14,842
78,241
Totals, 1942-43. _   	
64,668
26,867
23,386
526
115,447
Totals, 1941-42.  _ 	
66,808
26,727
24,329
541
118,405
* These figures include an enrolment of 49 in the Provincial Model School  (Vancouver).
t These figures include an enrolment of 86 in the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind
(Burnaby).
Students.
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled in the—
High Correspondence School classes, regular students (exclusive of the 1,474 officially registered in high, superior, or
elementary schools) 	
Elementary Correspondence School classes, regular students..
Classes formed under section 13 (g) of the " Public Schools
Act" :	
Adult education—
Classes under the Dominion-Provincial Youth
Training and War Emergency Training Programmes   16,688
Vocational classes   (Provincial Government)  not
1,317
1,354
15
supported by Dominion grants
Night-schools	
Vancouver School of Art	
Vancouver School of Navigation	
High Correspondence School (adults only)
65
4,933
571
144
1,171
183
Elementary Correspondence School (adults only)
Recreational and Physical Education classes  11,444
35,199
Carried forward..
37,885 B 8
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
Brought forward..
Summer School of Education (1942 Session)
Normal School, Vancouver	
Normal School, Victoria	
Victoria College	
University of British Columbia
Total
__ 37,885
726
189
30
264
...    2,609
41,703
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADES AND SEX.
Grade.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Grade I.                            - 	
6,976
6,050
5,921
5,707
5,884
5,875
5,684
4,900
3,858
2,803
2,150
1,822
346
6,232
5,598
5,344
5,253
5,484
5,702
5,518
5,250
4,646
3,501
2,632
2,038
273
13,208
Grade II _   - 	
11,648
Grade III.                                                                         .     -               —	
11,265
Grade IV.                                                          .                    __ 	
10,960
11,368
Grade VI.                       _  -	
11,577
Grade VII.       -         -   	
11,202
Grade VIII 	
10,150
Grade IX.                                                                               	
8,504
Grade X.      -     . -        	
6,304
Grade XI.    __ —  	
4,782
Grade XII.                                                 	
3,860
619
Totals        - - 	
57,976
57,471
115,447
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO THE
DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS AND DISTRICTS.
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number
of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per
teacher are shown in the following table:—
Schools.
0J
■o
A
O J*
«_S
dg
.3 Eh
Si »
ft O
O u
is
o
t_
'p,
3
■".Si
°Z
6 c
'A  <_
m
^._a
HioH
SJ si
P..C
_!~ 0)
u o-o
s s«
> C u
ce a> o
g g-s
> +_ *.
«0
426
121
106
23
94
271
104
40
1,119
522
821
20
140
40
21
2
74
24
6
69
11
1
566
161
127
23
96
345
128
46
1,188
533
822
20
13,572
3,553
1,994
925
2,320
10,042
3,557
1,243
41,054
18,832
17,829
526
11.76
3.08
1.73
0.80
2.01
8.70
3.08
1.08
35.56
16.31
15.44
0.45
32
30
19
40
25
37
34
31
37
36
22
26
25
High schools (district municipalities) _	
23
15
30
Superior schools (rural districts)._ _	
20
31
Junior high schools (district municipalities) _  _	
27
29
28
18
18
Elementary schools (district municipalities) t— - - - —
Elementary schools (rural districts) -   _
Totals   	
3,667
388
4,055
115,447
100.00
31
25
* These figures include 2 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 49 pupils enrolled in the Provincial Model School (Vancouver).
f These figures include 12 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 86 pupils enrolled in the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind (Burnaby). REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 9
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES.
The following table shows the number of teachers of each sex employed and also
the number of certificates of each class :■—
Schools.
1
V
V
to
S
Eh
■0
a
o
o
V
CO
U
3
'3
a
m
g
o
A
s
<_
Eh
6
to
c
c.
X
H
_-!
S
u
Eh
'a
o
Eh
434
130
94
5
175
50
21
179
16
20
8
3
20
20
63
66
42
14
740
399
493
6
1
3
14
2
2
1
235
94
152
11
4
16
8
30
119
28
13
2
102
34
9
8
15
3
8
1
4
1
127
3
1
6
340
86
70
5
28
151
50
13
260
93
92
1
226
75
57
18
68
194
78
33
928
440
730
19
566
161
127
23
96
345
Junior high schools (district municipalities) 	
128
46
Elementary schools (cities) * 	
Elementary schools (district municipalities) f	
1,188
533
822
20
Totals, 1942-43-	
1,124
1,874
515
58
330
147
7
1,189
2,866
4,055
Totals, 1941-42	
1,268
1,966
503
46
364
66
11
1,440
2,784
4,224
* These figures include 2 teachers employed in the Provincial Model School, Vancouver.
t These figures include 12 teachers employed in. the Provincial School for the Deaf and the Blind, Burnaby.
NEW SCHOOLS.
Superior schools were established at Fort St. James, Harewood (Nanaimo-Lady-
smith United), Skidegate Inlet United, and Sunrise (Peace River).
Elementary schools were opened for the first time in the following districts :•—■
Name of School District. Electoral District.
Passmore Kaslo-Sloean.
Cisco Yale.
Winter Harbour Comox.
The following rural districts were created but no schools were opened:-—
Cheslatta Omineca.
Dumaresq Mackenzie. B 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and
also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year.
No. of
Teachers
employed.
No. of
School
Districts.
Aggregate
Enrolment.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Percentage of
Attendance,
Government
Expenditure
for
Education.
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools.
1877-78...
1882-83...
1887-88_.
1892-93...
1897-98...
1902-03...
1907-08.-
1912-13..
1913-14...
1917-18...
1922-23._
1927-28__
1928-29...
1929-30...
1930-31...
1931-32.
1932-33..
1933-34...
1934-35..
1935-36...
1936-37-
1937-38-
1938-39..
1939-40..
1940-41..
1941-42..
1942-43.
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
597
,859
246
118
,668
,784
854
,948
,959
,912
,873
,942
,956
025
092
,194
,220
248
224
055
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
$48,411.14*
60,758.75*
113,679.36*
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.28}
3,532,518.95}
8,765,920.69}
3,743,317.08}
3,834,727.19}
4,015,074.37}
2,849,972.02}
2,611,937.80}
2,835,040.74}
2,972,385.04}
3,277,660.23}
3,524,962.69}
3,630,670.78}
3,585,769.00}
3,963,848.24}
4,028,397.88}
3,924,243.53}
$215,056.22t
425,555.10
604,357.86
1,220,509.85
4,658,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.54}
9,261,094.98}
11,149,996.27}
10,008,255.66}
10,061,387.99}
9,719,333.81}
8,941,497.34}
8,213,369.04}
8,458,156.00}
8,775,353.78}
9,593,562.64}
10,193,367.08}
10,640,740.47}
10,521,684.92}
10,982,364.49}
11,120,801.94}
11,502,291.35}
* The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
t This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
} This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL TO
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT.
The following table shows the enrolment during the last twelve years and also the
cost to the Provincial Government of each pupil :•—
School-year.
Enrolment
at High
Schools.
Enrolment
at other
Public
Schools.
Total
Enrolment.
Percentage
at High
Schools of
the Total
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance.
1931-32 _
1932-33-    	
1933-34... -.-	
1934-35 _  ..__
1935-36  _         _..-
18,134
18,552
18,932
19,969
21,119
22,338
22,582
23,747
24,436
23,568
22,184
19,119
97,785
98,264
96,860
97,264
95,603
96,093
97,778
97,187
96,023
96,066
96,221
96,328
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
15.64
15.80
16.35
17.03
18.09
19.71
18.76
19.63
20.28
19.70
18.74
16.56
29.62
21.55
19.51
20.40
21.35
22.93
24.05
24.85
24.52
27.82
28.51
28.82
L_
33.18
23.98
21.85
23.47
1936-37  	
1937-38 _	
26.10
1938-39       _	
27.14
32.25
33.13
35.59
1940-41          	
1941-42   _ _
1942-43       	 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. B 11
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE SCHOOL-YEAR 1942-43.
Grand total cost of education $11,502,291.35
Less—
Grant re salaries of faculty of Victoria College     $4,360.09
General grant to Victoria College       5,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia  435,753.37
Normal School, Vancouver     25,248.76
Normal School, Victoria     18,150.54
Cost of Night-schools       9,199.14
Correspondence Schools—
High School     46,102.07
Elementary School      15,769.72
Adult Education      37,879.46
         597,463.15
Net cost for total enrolment of 115,447 pupils $10,904,828.20
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  94.46
Cost per pupil per school-day (194 days) on total enrolment  .49
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 93.473  116.66
Cost per pupil per school-day (194 days) on average daily attendance  .60
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 115,447 pupils
for year ($3,924,243.53—$597,463.15)     3,326,780.38
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment  28.82
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (194 days) on
total enrolment  .15
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily attendance  _•_  35.59
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (194 days) on
average daily attendance   .18
Cost per capita for year on population of 865,000 (1943 estimate)  *12.61
Cost per capita per school-day (194 days) on population of 865,000  *.07
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on population of
865,000  +3.85
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (194 days) on
population of 865,000   t-02
* Computed on net total cost of $10,904,828.20.
} Computed on net total cost to Provincial Government of $3,326,780.38. B 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE.
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the
Province during the year was as follows:—
School.
CO
C
a
u
'u
CD
Eg
V
_i
u
O
.a
o
_5
o
a
ai
a
_t
_j
T_
B_
c
Ed
<_
n
a
aj
_i
a
.2
'tn
B
3
'>
19
a
B_
H
cd
'3
03
t, a)
O QJ
88
E
r.
0
(_
u
'3
o
p
BJ
x
3,°
o
<
O
0
S
Eh
a
«
M
i-.
Cm
M
CO
0
<!Eh
H
276
60
292
18
11
8
54
63
85
23
182
199
15
5
294
40
128
6
134
28
150
36
461
186
163
61
381
211
2,626
Superior schools  „	
944
367
111
11
51
161
289
21
343
40
131
222
555
193
513
3,008
596
699
151
163
458
789
116
798
112
482
508
1,651
768
1,335
8,626
Elementary schools in district
municipalities  ,	
258
85
14
64
244
891
93
109
42
216
498
839
315
' 642
4,310
317
70
412
115
248
782
59
360
256
244
224
790
290
811
4,978
8
501
2
2
3
4
520
Totals	
1,882
1,275
1,108
510
1,219
3,132
309
1,944
586
1,235
1,638
4,484
1,793
3.897 25.012
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure  for   school  purposes   was   made   during   the   school-years   1942-43 ' and
1941-42:— 1942-43.
City school districts     33
District municipality school districts     26
Rural school districts   598
Community school districts        4
Totals    661*
1941-42.
33
26
633
4
696
* At the time this Annual Report was prepared 354 school districts were under the administration of Official
Trustees.    In 259 of the 354 districts schools were in operation.
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city high schools during the year was 13,572. Of this number, 6,236 were boys and 7,336 were girls.
The number of schools, the number of divisions, the number of teachers, and the
enrolments for the years 1942-43 and 1941-42 in each city are shown in the following
table:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
6
5
12
4
6
4
3
2
3
4
8
7
18
6
8
5
3
2
4
4
175
128
392
117
147
54
87
61
90
80
Armstrong  _   _
141
411
192
126
117
86
Grand Forks   	 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 13
High Schools—Cities—Continued.
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
12
1
8
2
8
7
2
8
8
22
2
2
5
3
6
3
5
1
7
228
13
6
30
1
11
2
8
10
2
11
9
29
2
2
7
6
8
4
6
1
11
302
16
7
46
21
253
49
247
214
52
226
'235
757
67
21
139
128
153
85
157
24
240
7,458
486
194
1,035
21
267
28
Kelowna—       	
232
217
69
210
276
820
57
27
159
224
Revelstoke — -  - -	
175
93
165
15
246
9,081
517
205
1,206
44
426
566
13,572
15,874
HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality high schools for the year was 3,553.
Of this number, 1,535 were boys and 2,018 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the
years 1942-43 and 1941-42 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
Abbotsford:   Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Educational
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
3
1
7
24
1
4
4
2
8
6
4
11
1
6
6
16
4
11
6
9
34
1
6
4
2
9
7
5
16
1
7
7
'   23
5
17
8
188
755
34
90
109
41
255
148
89
408
20
194
171
487
79
287
198
219
851
70
102
105
Kent   	
40
259
219
117
431
10
208
253
514
104
363
Vancouver, West  -   	
239
22
121
161
3,553
4,104 B 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural high schools for the year was 1,994. Of this number,
885 were boys and 1,109 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the
years 1942-43 and 1941-42 are shown in the following table:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
Athalmer-Invermere—
Bralorne 	
Britannia Mine	
Burns Lake—	
Castlegar United	
Cobble Hill	
Comox	
Copper Mountain..
Cowichan Lake	
Creston Valley United-
Dawson Creek	
Dewdney	
Field—.- 	
Fort Fraser	
Fruitvale	
Golden  	
Harewood —
Hedley	
Howe Sound United-
loco .	
James Island-
Keremeos	
Kimberley	
Lillooet	
Lumby—	
Michel-Natal..
McBride. 	
Nakusp. „
New Denver...
North Bend -
Ocean Falls.—
Oliver-Testalinda-Osoyoos High School Area..
Oyama   	
Parksville—
Port Alice.
Powell River	
Princeton-	
Qualicum Beaeh-
Quesnel.	
Rutland  	
Saanich, North, Consolidated-
Salmo  	
Saltspring Island United-
Sechelt United  	
Smithers— 	
Southern Okanagan United-
Squamish.   ....
Telkwa	
Terrace.-   	
Tsolum    	
University Hill-
Vanderhoof	
Wells-Barkerville United-
Westbank  	
Woodfibre  	
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
8
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
10
2
5
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
9
5
2
2
37
15
37
16
46
32
50
20
31
149
41
38
22
11
27
31
22
33
25
9
23
197
33
69
11
42
18
22
28
26
19
136
60
31
33
64
41
21
36
11
42
74
27
11
29
47
41
19
15
24
14
Totals -
52
106
127
1,994
32
21
41
11
21
40
54
14
27
139
42
41
20
8
24
25
51
22
42
27
11
28
185
11
30
80
15
51
20
21
40
77
33
30
24
180
59
34
47
74
44
32
38
15
54
35
19
33
45
43
21
20
25
30
2,206 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 15
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality superior schools during the year was
925.    Of this number, 467 were boys and 458 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the
school-years 1942-43 and 1941-42 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
Abbotsford :   Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Educational
3
1
19
4
19
4
767
158
741
101
4
23
23
925
842
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural superior schools for the school-year was 2,320. The
number of boys was 1,157, of girls, 1,163.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and
the enrolment for the school-years 1942-43 and 1941-42 :•—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
Alert Bay—
Ashcroft—
Atlin	
Blue River..
Brechin	
Campbell River-
Canal Flat -	
Chase 	
Falkland	
Fort St. James....
Fort St. John	
Gabriola United-
Hope   	
Kaleden 	
Lodore. 	
Lytton	
Malakwa	
Malcolm Island .	
Mackenzie United .	
Nanaimo-Ladysmith United-
Cedar, North	
Harewood 	
Lantzville.— __
Wellington, South..
Oyster, North 	
Peace River Educational Administrative Area-
Baldonnel  	
Doe River	
Pine, North 	
Pouce Coupe	
Progress   .....
Sunrise  	
Swan Lake    .	
Pender Harbour.   _ 	
Pender Island  	
Pioneer Mine   	
Procter 	
Robson (Castlegar United)..
Rolla 	
Skidegate Inlet United..
101
29
48
80
58
71
92
119
32
60
48
54
249
70
106
37
61
44
95
28
52
24
39
32
38
51
37
53
102
41
56
130
106
43
84
47
56
31
113
44
31
50
32
72
58
58
70
77
37
40
42
72
30
35
35
33
70
47
66
42 B 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
Superior Schools—Rural Districts—Continued.
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
Sooke   — _ _  - _	
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
3
4
2
4
2
3
4
2
125
43
66
126
49
122
64
65
Waldo United                                                     	
39
Williams Lake-      - -
Yahk United                	
123
48
Totals                               	
34
94
96
2,320
2,400
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city junior high schools was 10,042. The number of boys
was 4,905, of girls, 5,137.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and
the enrolment for the school-years 1942-43 and 1941-42:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
17
6
6
9
1
9
9
10
. 25
2
9
6
14
112
12
10
14
24
8
8
11
1
14
12
14
34
4
10
8
15
137
14
14
17
623
183
161
311
40
352
382
318
902
75
337
200
594
4,284
377
395
508
600
Duncan   	
179
151
306
21
349
Nanaimo  _ 1	
283
322
906
76
296
163
513
4,411
369
375
552
Totals—           _           —           -             	
23
271
345
10,042
9,872
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality junior high schools was 3,557. Of this
number, 1,711 were boys and 1,846 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the
school-years 1942-43 and 1941-42 are given in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
Burnaby— —	
3
27
34
928
893
Coquitlam    - - 	
1
6
8
224
211
Delta    _	
1
5
5
123
126
1
7
10
269
Mission  	
1
6
9
202
241
Penticton _   - - 	
1
9
15
321
309
Richmond— —     —— 	
1
12
12
406
391
Surrey ._  	
3
22
23
751
766
Vancouver, West- - — - „:
1
10
12
333
360
Totals— _	
13
104
128
3,557
3,639
I REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 17
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural junior high schools was 1,243. The number of boys
was 603, of girls, 640.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the
school-years 1942-43 and 1941-42 are given in the following table:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
2
8
3
_-
8
3
3
5
2
7
2
9
5
10
3
3
5
2
202
76
254
59
242
106
66
206
32
224
39
263
59
157
248
112
101
44
Totals - - - -      	
9
40
46
1,243
1,247
SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT IN HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The following is a summary of enrolment in high and junior high schools:—
Number
of
Pupils
enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Ndmber of Pupils enrolled in Grades
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
Senior
Matriculation.
High schools:
13,572
3,553
1,994
6,236
1,535
885
7,336
2,018
1,109
10,455.43
2,792.88
1,551.04
'2,753
586
460
4,280
1,267
. 625
3,274
945
495
2,744
692
379
521
District municipalities 	
63
35
19,119
8,656
10,463
14,799.35
3,799
6,172
4,714
3,815
619
Junior high schools:
Cities  	
District municipalities  -
10,042
3,557
1,243
4,905
1,711
603
5,137
1,846
640
8,312.99
2,781.23
1,027.10
3,676
1,233
466
3,496
1,248
400
2,870
1,076
377
	
Totals -	
14,842
7,219
7,623
12,121.32
5,375
5,144
4,323
	
Grand totals - —
33,961
15,875
18,086
26,920.67
5,375
5,144
8,122
6,172
4,714
3,815
619 B 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city elementary schools was 41,054. Of this number, 21,131
were boys and 19,923 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the
school-years 1942-43 and 1941-42 are given in the following table:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
Alberni -.—	
Armstrong	
Chilliwack—
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland-
Duncan	
Enderby.	
Fernie	
Grand Forks..
Greenwood —
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna .—
Ladysmith-
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New ^Vestminster-
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland - __	
Salmon Arm	
Slocan - 	
Trail-Tadanac _
Vancouver	
Provincial Government Model School-
School for the Deaf and the Blind	
Vancouver, North   :	
Vernon  	
Victoria..	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
2
6
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
50
1
3
1
15
Totals-
11
10
9
13
7
10
4
7
9
2
14
2
17
9
5
14
17
48
14
6
5
9
17
10
13
4
2
38
638
2
31
23
90
1,119
11
10
9
14
7
10
4
7
9
2
14
2
18
9
5
14
18
48
15
6
5
9
17
10
13
4
2
40
697
2
31
24
93
343
413
376
339
509
272
383
125
284
363
35
524
39
662
353
147
476
666
2,039
601
226
186
373
686
357
520
146
49
1,505
22,560
49
1,173
950
3,325
41,054
305
432
351
336
490
335
370
123
295
326
67
502
53
658
296
166
590
643
1,978
571
222
175
315
599
352
495
132
52
1,388
23,176
41
89
934
842
3,363
41,062 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 19
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality elementary schools was 18,832. The
number of boys was 9,792, and of girls, 9,040.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and
the enrolment for the school-years 1942-43 and 1941-42:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
Abbotsford: Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Educational
9
19
1
1
11
2
4
2
7
1
2
16
7
8
2
1
1
1
6
16
8
1
23
5
2
22
97
10
5
35
3
14
2
12
15
8
33
19
16
20
2
18
5
29
49
10
8
54
20
16
22
99
12
5
85
3
14
2
12
19
8
33
19
16
21
2
19
5
30
49
10
8
54
20
16
824
3,571
86
185
1,208
130
560
56
407
572
268
1,231
684
497
792
62
713
187
1,059
2,012
262
272
1,832
748
614
849
Burnaby...        - —   - 	
3,567
Chemainus - —   	
193
1,072
90
534
58
Delta..                  -— .               	
367
472
Kent..                         	
245
1,219
788
458
Oak Bay         -      	
753
Peachland _     	
60
690
214
1,017
1,942
294
Summerland—   -     —
268
1,724
684
584
Totals              - -
156
522
533
18,832
1
18,142
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in elementary schools of the rural districts was 17,829. The number of boys was 9,287, and of girls, 8,542.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and
the enrolment for the school-years 1942-43 and 1941-42:—
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
596
821
822
17,829
18,476
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—COMMUNITY DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the elementary schools of the community school districts was
526.    Of this number, 267 were boys and 259 were girls.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and
the enrolment for the school-years 1942-43 and 1941-42 :■—
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1942-43.
Enrolment,
1941-42.
12
20
20
526
541 B 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS OF EACH CLASS AND NUMBER OF TEACHERS
IN EACH CLASS OF SCHOOL.
Class of School.
No. op
Schools.
No. of Teachers.
1942-43.
1941-42.
1942-43.
1941-42.
High schools:
44
22
52
4
34
23
13
9
114
156
596
12
44
22
54
4
40
23
13
9
120
156
648
13
566
161
127
23
96
345
128
46
1,188
533
822
20
613
District municipalities     —	
168
131
Superior schools:
District municipalities- - - _ 	
23
106
Junior high schools:
Cities          — —	
355
136
49
Elementary schools:
1,214
District municipalities-     - 	
531
877
21
Totals    -        	
1,079
1,146
4,055
4,224
SALARIES.
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (quoted in dollars only) paid to teachers during the school-year 1942-43. (Exchange and part-time
teachers are not included) :—
High Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Junior High Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Cities.
Alberni	
Armstrong	
ChilKwack	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland	
Duncan— _____
Enderby.	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood 	
Kamloops —	
Kaslo 	
Kelowna — 	
Ladysmith.	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson—	
New Westminster-
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam-	
Port Moody. _.
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke  _
Rossland  	
Salmon Arm	
Slocan — -	
,300
,000*
500
,900
,800
250
500
150
,900
,510
800
800
350
330
,260
300
800
750
500*
900
200
262
920
550
700
250*
500
$1,250
1,300*
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,250
1,460
1,300
1,510
1,400
1,310
1,250
1,270
1,460
1,360
1,550
1,496
1,290*
1,400
1,200
1,260
1,460
1,230
1,450
1,400*
1,500
$1,564
1,607*
1,633
1,643
1,340
1,507
1,375
1,946
1,575
1,510
1,919
1,555
1,578
1,595
1,727
1,893
2,164
2,677
1,636*
1,650
1,450
1,555
1,918
1,626
1,863
1,742*
1,500
$2,195
1,500
1,520
1,875
1,390
2,450
2,000
3,409
3,200
1,250
1,990
1,750
$1,200
1,175
1,440
1,200
1,300
1,100
1,160
1,550
1,100
1,200
1,300
1,450
$1,407
1,363
1,467
1,448
1,300
1,400
1,613
2,078
2,086
1,225
1,555
1,571
$2,000
1,600
1,500
1,600
2,700
2,100
1,600
1,450
1,350
1,450
J,O30
2,500
1,100
2,290
1,660
1,420
1,570
2,600
2,500
2,600
1,500
1,350
2,260
2,334
2,270
2,500
1,948
1,250
$925
900
900
1,000
1,050
850
900
880
1,250
1,000
900
1,000
1,000
950
950
1,150
1,020
1,100
950
980
900
950
1,020
1,070
980
950
1,270
1,000
$1,219
1,103
1,170
1,261
1,404
1,260
1,023
1,058
1,336
1,150
965
1,509
1,050
1,186
1,277
1,234
1,474
1,452
1,498
1,270
1,067
1,050
1,264
1,482
1,326
1,281
1,440
1,125
* These figures refer to high school area. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 21
Salaries—Continued.
High Schools.
Junior High Schools.
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Cities—Continued.
$3,950
4,400
3,000
2,900
3,800
$1,850
1,360
1,300
1,300
1,400
$2,305
2,900
2,181
1,728
2,423
$2,400
4,400
2,700
1,700
3,300
$1,520
1,100
1,100
1,100
1,550
$1,817
2,309
1,663
1,448
2,181
$2,850
4,000
2,020
2,700
3,000
$1,050
900
950
900
1,050
$1,332
1,782
1,319
1,231
Victoria..  	
1,728
$4,400
$1,200
$2,434
$4,400
$1,100
$1,988
$4,000
$850
$1,622
District Municipalities.
Abbotsf ord:   Matsqui-Sumas-
Abbotsford Educational Ad-
$2,055
3,060
$1,200
1,200
$1,522
1,826
$1,725
2,904
1,220
1,705
1,200
1,300'
1,125
1,650
2,542
1,050
1,400
1,450
1,496
3,000
900
2,150
1,150
2,275
2,390
1,250
2,200
1,275
2,150
2,512
$900
840
900
850
900
875
950
840
990
900
830
830
830
950
900
950
840
850
900
1,000
950
840
1,000
950
$1,118
$2,860
$1,100
$1,506
1,338
1,056
	
1,500
1,564
1,807
1,550
1,395
1,444
1,679
2,264
1,400
1,681
1,056
1,400
1,360
1,050
1,600
1,400
1,100
1,225
1,028
1,038
Delta  	
2,060
2,350
1,700
2,050
2,230
2,444
3,100
1,400
2,750
1,200
1,400
1,400
1,200
1,200
1,275
1,650
1,400
1,450
1,100
1,218
1,007
1,453
Kent
*
931
1,100
1,130
1,241
1,418
1,011
1,380
1,775
1,051
1,061
1,662
900
1,700
1,200
1,504
1,175
973
Richmond 	
2,475
2,695
1,205
1,300
1,670
1,866
1,722
1,120
1,338
1,281
1,314
1,053
2,050
2,500
1,250
1,200
1,550
1,485
1,269
Surrey   	
1,440
2,030
1,100
1,176
920
1,504
3,000
1,300
2,148
1,400
1,649
1,506
For all  district municipalities-  -
$3,100
$1,200
$1,734
$2,860
$1,100
$1,386
$3,000
$830
$1,205
Rural Districts.
$3,500
$1,200
$1,655
$2,300
$1,200
$1,485
$2,440
$780
$980
Community Districts.
	
$1,175
$875
$948 B 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
Salaries—Continued.
Superior Schools.
Highest
Lowest
Average
Salary.
Salary.
Salary.
$1,840
$900
$1,148
1,700
1,000
1,313
1,230
1,150
1,190
1,250
1,050
1,150
1,700
1,100
1,275
1,300
900
1,100
1,400
900
1,100
1,260
900
1,008
1,150
900
1,025
1,250
900
1,017
1,250
650
1,033
1,600
950
1,163
1,200
900
1,050
1,209
936
1,027
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Abbotsford:   Matsqui-SumaS'
Abbotsford Educational Ad
ministrative Area 	
Ashcroft  —
Atlin   	
Blue River-	
Campbell River—	
Canal Flat 	
Chase  - -
Delta (Kennedy) 	
Falkland	
Fort St. James 	
Fort St. John 	
Hope	
Malakwa    	
Malcolm Island	
Mackenzie United _ 	
Nanaimo-Ladysmith United-
Peace River Educational Administrative Area 	
Pender Harbour	
Pender Island	
Procter.	
Rolla	
Skidegate Inlet United	
Sooke	
Stewart 	
Stillwater United	
Williams Lake	
Yahk United	
For all superior schools—
$1,250
1,500
1,300
1,250
1,100
1,225
1,200
1,100
1,500
1,400
1,400
1,600
1,200
$1,800
$1,150
900
800
900
850
930
900
950
900
1,000
900
1,000
1,000
$800
$1,200
1,053
1,013
1,075
975
1,078
1,050
1,025
1,138
1,200
1,067
1,225
1,100
$1,098
The average yearly salary paid to teachers employed in all public schools (high,
superior, junior high, and elementary) of the Province for the school-year 1942-43 was
$1,562; to teachers employed in all high schools, $2,176; to teachers employed in all
superior schools, $1,098; to teachers employed in all junior high schools, $1,806; to
teachers employed in all elementary schools, $1,323; and to teachers employed in all
community schools, $948. REPORT OP SUPERINTENDENT.
B 23
SALARY CLASSIFICATION.
The following table shows the number of teachers in the Province receiving the
annual salary indicated for the school-year 1942-43:—
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Below $780
$780     	
None
14
30
1
120
104
26
306
12
27
184
43
160
17
18
116
31
116
12
25
66
25
141
13
25
78
30
109
14
16
87
19
84
24
19
77
23
91
29
20
53
16
75
7
12
52
$1,661-1,680	
1,681-1,700 	
1,701-1,720
1,721-1,740	
13
63
11
14
26
9
379
4
5
30
7
43
4
9
23
2
62
13
6
17
4
37
3
2
22
1
41
3
4
16
6
35
3
7
9    .
44
7
8
3
41
5
3
8
2
$2,581-2,600
2,601-2,620.	
26-
2
6
33
3
5
1
26
1
3
7
61
2
1
2
1
22
2
6
1
20
1
5
2
96
10
1
1
1
18
$3,501-3,520
3,521-3,540
781-   800
2,621-2,640	
3,541-3,560
3,561-3,580	
3,581-3,600
801-   820
2,641-2,660
821-   840
1,741-1,760.
1,761-1,780
1,781-1,800	
2,661-2,680    -	
21
841-   860.
2,681-2,700	
3,601-3,620
3,621-3,640
3,641-3,660
3,661-3,680
861-   880.
2,701-2,720	
881-   900
1,801-1,820-	
2,721-2,740	
901-   920
1,821-1,840	
2,741-2,760.
2,761-2,780
2,781-2,800.
2,801-2,820-	
921-   940	
941-   960
1,841-1,860	
1,861-1,880.
1,881-1,900	
1,901-1,920	
3,681-3,700	
3,701-3,720	
2
961-   980.     . .
3,721-3,740..
981-1,000
2,821-2,840	
3,741-3,760-
2
1,000-1,020
1,921-1,940	
2,841-2,860	
3,761-3,780
3,781-3,800-	
1,021-1,040.
1,941-1,960
1,961-1,980
1,981-2,000	
2,001-2,020	
2,861-2,880	
5
1,041-1,060	
1,061-1,080	
2,881-2,900
2,901-2,920
2,921-2,940	
3,801-3,820	
3,821-3,840.
3,841-3,860-
1,081-1,100
1,101-1,120	
1,121-1,140
2,021-2,040 -
2,941-2,960
2,961-2,980    	
3,861-3,880
3,881-3,900 	
3,901-3,920
3,921-3,940	
3,941-3,960	
3,961-3,980
2,041-2,060	
1,141-1,160
2,061-2,080	
2,981-3,000
1,161-1,180
2,081-2,100	
3,001-3,020
3,021-3,040	
3,041-3,060
3,061-3,080
3,081-3,100
3,101-3,120
1,181-1,200.
1,201-1,220
2,101-2,120	
2,121-2,140-	
1
1,221-1,240
2,141-2,160-	
3,981-4,000
3
1,241-1,260	
1,261-1,280
2,161-2,180	
2,181-2,200	
4,001-4,020.
4,021-4,040
4,041-4,060..
4,061-4,080 ,.
4,081-4,100	
4,101-4,120-	
4,121-4,140	
1,281-1,300	
1,301-1,320	
1,321-1,340
2,201-2,220	
2,221-2,240-	
3,121-3,140	
3,141-3,160
2,241-2,260	
3,161-3,180     ....
1,341-1,360
2,261-2,280-	
-3,181-3,200   ....
1,361-1,380 -
2,281-2,300.
2,301-2,320—	
3,201-3,220	
1
1,381-1,400
3,221-3,240 	
4,141-4,160
1,401-1,420
2,321-2,340
2,341-2,360 	
2,361-2,380. .    .
3,241-3,260	
4,161-4,180    	
1,421-1,440
3,261-3,280    —
4,181-4,200	
1
1,441 1,460
3,281-3,300
4,201-4,220,
4,221-4,240	
4,241-4,260.
4,261-4,280
4,281-4,300   	
1,461-1,480	
1,481-1,500	
1,501-1,520
2,381-2,400   .
3,301-3,320
3,321-3,340
3,341-3,360    	
2,401-2,420	
2,421-2,440 	
2,441-2,460
2,461-2,480	
2,481-2,500 —
—
1,521-1,540	
3,361-3,380    —
1
1,541 1,560
3,381-3,400   —
4,301-4,320
1,561-1,580	
1,581-1,600
3,401-3,420
3,421-3,440
3,441-3,460
4,321-4,340
4,341-4,360
2,501-2,520	
1,601-1,620
2,521-2,540	
4,361-4,380	
1,621-1,640	
1,641-1,660	
2,541-2,560 -
3,461-5,480 	
4,381-4,400 	
5
2,561-2,580	
"Total
4,029
* Exchange and part-time teachers not included. B 24 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
EXPENDITURES FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1942-43.
Minister's Office:
Salaries   $10,594.35
Office supplies  461.45
Travelling expenses  1,464.25
$60,886.87
Less fees       14,784.80
Correspondence Schools—Elementary:
Salaries      $13,354.49
Office supplies        2,415.23
Industrial Education:
Sailaries   $16,330.01
Office supplies  947.13
Travelling expenses  4,479.78
Grants in aid   6,963.22
Night-schools    9,199.14
Inspection of Schools:
Salaries   $95,556.48
Office supplies  10,189.78
Travelling expenses  24,639.93
$130,386.19
Less amount paid by School Boards       11,115.63
Normal School—Vancouver :
Salaries (less deduction for rent, $468)   $41,495.48
Office supplies  1,673.20
Travelling expenses  480.80
Fuel, light, and water  2,363.85
Books, binding, periodicals   370.34
Allowance to Demonstration School  1,900.00
$12,520.05
General Office :
Salaries   $26,791.63
Office supplies  2,515.58
Travelling expenses  242.76
  29,549.97
Text-book Branch:
Free text-books, maps, etc.  51,030.34
Correspondence Schools—High:
Salaries   $40,264.33
Office supplies  17,250.04
Revision of courses   2,661.44
Travelling expenses  117.77
Science equipment  208.17
Payment to Text-book Branch for special services  180.00
Incidentals   205.12
46,102.07
15,769.72
37,919.28
119,270.56 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. . B 25
Normal School—Vancouver—Continued.
Furniture (by Public Works)  $584.31
Maintenance (by Public Works)   542.75
Incidentals   634.53
$50,045.26
Less Normal School fees       24,796.50
Normal School—Victoria:
Salaries (part by Public Works)   $18,558.85
Office supplies  1,015.25
Travelling expenses  215.07
Transportation of students to outlying practice-schools 39.79
Incidentals  427.86
Fuel, light, and water (by Public Works)   96.97
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)   875.10
Furniture (by Public Works)   904.15
$22,133.04
Less Normal School fees         3,982.50
School for the Deaf and the Blind:
Salaries (less deductions for rent, etc., $3,207.60)  $34,316.89
Office supplies _•__  772.24
Laundry and janitor supplies   828.06
Travelling expenses  708.06
Fuel, light, and water  2,957.37
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)   5,100.64
Furniture and equipment (part by Public Works)  1,521.06
Provisions   5,287.47
Incidentals   397.80
$51,889.59
Less amount received for board and tuition  of
pupils from Alberta   2,025.00
$497,655.96 $80,963.82 $315,279.37 $1,372,628.64
$25,248.76
18,150.54
49,864.59
High. Superior.        Junior High. Elementary.
Salary grants to cities $298,717.67 $188,309.06     $508,463.54        995,490.27
Salary grants to district municipalities...    109,761.40 $15,310.50     90,848.80       333,787.13        549,707.83
Salary grants to rural
school districts        89,176.89   65,653.32     36,121.51       518,046.70        708,998.42
Salary grants to community school districts   12,331.27 12,331.27 B 26 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
Special grant under section 13 (g) of the Act  $544.00
Special salary grants :
Cities   $286,001.30
District municipalities       79,774.69
Rural school districts       82,661.60
■        448,437.59
School buildings, erection and maintenance, and special aid to school
districts :  99,994.66
Education of soldiers' dependent children  12,773.00
Bursaries for children over 16 years of age in Mothers' Allowances
Families  .  2,938.50
School tests, High School and Senior Matriculation examinations      $31,752.08
Less fees for examinations and certificates      23,497.73
  8,254.35
Conveying children to central schools          137,925.85
School libraries  6,967.79
Summer schools and teacher-training for special certificates    $16,160.45
Less fees       12,777.49
  3,382.96
Official Trustee, Community School Districts:
Salary       $2,400.00
Expenses  790.15
$3,190.15
Less paid by districts        1,614.56
  1,575.59
Board of Reference  79.15
Adult Education:
Extension and adult education and education of the
unemployed      $21,949.82
Recreational and physical education for  youths  over
school age        15,929.64
  37,879.46
School radio broadcasts:
Salaries  (less amount paid by Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation, $1,250)        $1,770.00
Expenses         4,397.18
6,167.18
Curriculum revision and educational supervision, etc.      $18,989.31
Less sale of tests        3,375.52
  15,613.79
Incidentals and contingencies  5,938.18
University of British Columbia  435,753.37
Special Grant to Victoria College  5,000.00
Grant to Fairbridge Farm School  12,500.00
Cost-of-living Bonus   10,564.44
Total cost to Government    $3,924,243.53 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 27
Amount expended by districts, including debt charges :■—
High. Superior. Junior High. Elementary.
Cities   $1,517,502.34       $849,136.29 $2,931,687.33  $5,298,325.96
District municipalities         301,013.19    $25,768.14       195,067.16       681,339.45     1,203,187.94
Rural school districts         213,341.78      97,104.38 93,574.10       660,195.17     1,064,215.43
Community school
districts    117.50          12,200.99 12,318.49
2,031,974.81 $122,872.52 $1,137,777.55 $4,285,422.94
Grand total cost of education..
$11,502,291.35
EXAMINATIONS, 1943.
University Entrance Examinations.
Subject.
June.
Number of
Candidates.
Number
passed.
August.
Number of
Candidates.
Number
passed.
English VI 	
Social Studies V  -—	
Health and Physical Education VI..
Mathematics VI 	
General Science V	
Latin III 	
French HI.—
German III...
Physical Sciences..
Geography II	
German A 	
Home Economics (A) III—
Home Economics (B) III	
Home Economics (CC) IIL-
Industrial Arts (A) III -
Industrial Arts (B) III	
Bible Study  	
3,056
3,143
3,004
2,915
3,474
1,149
2,928
41
802
821
117
20
21
296
131
74
1
2,635
2,837
2,988
2,245
3,094
960
2,518
24
633
795
108
17
20
293
121
306
191
73
483
217
103
230
8
76
24
3
3
1
5
1
4
158
132
71
175
148
42
85
5
38
17
2
3
1
4 B 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
Senior Matriculation Examinations.
Subject.
June.
Number of
Candidates.
Number
passed.
August.
Number of
Candidates.
Number
E nglish  	
World History	
Economic History-
Canadian History-
Mathematics 	
Physical Sciences -
Biology I..	
Biology II.. 	
Agriculture III	
Chemistry I	
Physics I	
Latin IV- 	
French IV-	
German A —
German B- 	
German IV	
Greek I	
Greek II. 	
Home Economics (CC) IV-
576
171
119
106
547
292
212
71
4
269
206
132
586
49
9
23
3
4
14
161
101
87
376
238
167
47
4
194
154
103
447
34
7
17
2
4
14
29
16
37
19
113
31
38
15
61
54
23
89
15
3
9
1
1
24
15
34
18
54
17
28
11
24
37
15
72
11
1
7
1
SCHOLARSHIPS.
University Entrance.
The Royal Institution Scholarships awarded in June, 1943, by the University of
British Columbia to the students who ranked first and second in their respective districts were won by the following:—
District.
Name.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Scholarship.
Donald George Brown- - —
92.4
91.8
90.8
90.2
86.6
.86.6
88.8
87.2
91.0
89.8
86.6
80.4
89.6
88.6
86.6
81.0
81.0
$175
No. 1
175
(2) Gwendolyn Margaret Shaw 	
175
No. 2	
John Shaw, Nanaimo    	
175
*(2) Richard Alfred Gritten _	
* (2) Dennis Kershaw	
175
175
No. 3    	
North Vancouver   	
Kitsilano, Vancouver - -	
175-
175
No. 4	
175
(2) John Henry Duffus — 	
Prince of Wales, Vancouver	
175
No. 5. 	
175
175
No. 6	
(1) Agnes Ethel Mehling-	
(2) Leonard Gordon Miller	
175
175
No. 7 _	
175
*(2) Colin William Eraser  	
Trail _	
175
*(2) William Leith	
175
* These students tied for second place in their respective districts. REPORT OP SUPERINTENDENT.
B 29
Senior Matriculation.
The winners of the scholarships awarded in June, 1943, by the University of
British Columbia on the results of the Senior Matriculation examination to (1) the
two students obtaining the highest standing in the Province, (2) the student obtaining
the highest standing in districts other than Greater Vancouver and New Westminster,
were:—
Name.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Scholarship.
King Edward, Vancouver— _—_ .__ 	
91.8
88.6
83.6
$175
175
175
The three additional scholarships established by the University of British Columbia for the students obtaining the next highest standings in Districts 2, 5, 6, and 7
were awarded to the following:—
Name.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Scholarship.
Miriam Katherine Spencer-
James Earl Hoover 	
Beatrice Eleanor Olson —	
Creston Valley-
Nelson - 	
Powell River -
83.4
82.0
81.2
$175
175
175
SPECIAL AID RE RURAL SCHOOL TEACHERS' SALARIES.
In addition to the regular salary grants for rural school teachers, which range
from $305 to $680 for an elementary-school teacher, from $355 to $800 for a junior
high school teacher, and from $380 to $900 for a high school teacher, over $23,000 was
granted to rural school districts during the school-year to enable them to increase the
salaries of their teachers, and the sum of $180,000 has been distributed as special aid
to rural districts for the fiscal year 1943-44 for a similar purpose. This amount was
apportioned on a sliding scale based upon the 1943 assessed value of taxable property
and the 1943 rate of taxation for school purposes and the number of teachers employed
in the various rural school districts. The grants ranged from $55 per teacher in the
wealthier districts to $225 for each teacher in the poorer rural districts. No grant
was made to any district in which the assessed value of taxable property per teacher
exceeded $320,000.
RELEASE OF STUDENTS FOR FARMING OPERATIONS.
In March, 1943, the Council of Public Instruction again made a regulation for the
release of some students from school to assist on the farms. By this regulation the
assistance given by the schools was extended this year to include the release of pupils
from Grade VIII.    The regulation of the Council was as follows:—
"(a.) The principal of a school, with the consent of the Board of School Trustees,
is authorized to release from school after June 1st, 1943, boys and girls of Grades VIII.,
IX., X., and XI. who, in the opinion of the principal have made such progress during
the year as to entitle them to promotion to a higher grade for the next school-year and,
at the same time, to release boys and girls of Grade XII. who have made an average
standing on the year's work of C+ (66 per cent.) and are worthy to be recommended by
the principal for a High School Graduation Diploma or a University Entrance Certificate ; provided that in no case shall a release be granted unless the boy or girl has been
offered and accepted employment in farming operations and undertakes to remain in
said employment to the end of the school-year.
PROVINCI"     LI
brary B 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
"(&.) With the consent of the School Board a school principal may keep at school
for an additional hour on regular school-days during April and May boys and girls who
wish to be released before the end of the school-year for work on farms.
"(c.) The principal of a high school, with the consent of the Board of School
Trustees, is authorized to close the high school during the months of September and
October, 1943, or, if the school is kept open, to excuse from attendance boys and girls
who are employed in farming operations during those months, and to make such
arrangements for the intensive training of these students when they return to school
as may be considered necessary to bring their work up as quickly as possible to the
required standards for their respective grades."
CONSOLIDATION OF RURAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The admitted advantages of larger units of administration and the lack of an
adequate supply of teachers combined this year to encourage the establishment of
united rural school districts, of which six were brought into operation since the beginning of July, 1942. The largest consolidation was in the Nanaimo and Ladysmith areas
on Vancouver Island, where nineteen rural school districts were united into one district
under the name of the Nanaimo-Ladysmith United Rural School District. Qualified
voters over the whole area voted in favour of the proposal by a large majority. The
reorganization of the schools in this new district reduced the number of teachers
required by twelve. An additional rural school district has since joined this consolidation. There are now in existence in the Province twenty-nine united rural school
districts, comprising 164 original school districts.
ABOLITION OF SUMMER SCHOOL TUITION FEES.
To reduce the expense of attending summer courses and to provide encouragement
to teachers to improve their professional standing, the Council of Public Instruction by
regulation abolished the tuition fees charged British Columbia teachers who attend the
Summer School of Education. The regulation also provided that a refund would be
made to teachers who attend Summer School from remote parts of the Province of
return transportation fares in excess of $20.
REDUCTION IN NORMAL SCHOOL FEES.
The Council of Public Instruction also provided that the fees charged students at
the Provincial Normal Schools shall be reduced for the duration of the war from $135
to $50. The reduced fee of $50 came into effect in September, 1943, and is payable in
two equal instalments, one in September and the other in February.
SCHOOL WAR SAVINGS SERVICE.
Since the war began the schools in the Province have been playing an ever-
increasing role in their contribution to the war effort. In a report received in August,
1943, Miss Elizabeth Waller, Director, School Savings Section of the National War
Finance Committee for British Columbia, makes the following statements:—
" Since 1940, War Savings in British Columbia Schools have increased steadily
each year. The reported total for the three years now stands at three-quarters of a
million dollars. For the term, September, 1942, to June, 1943, incomplete returns from
650 schools out of the 1,050 in the Province, show a total of $269,569.25.
" Many students, especially in high schools, have also invested in Victory Bonds
this year. A total of $31,750 in bonds alone was bought by students in thirty
communities.
" Both teachers and students are to be congratulated on their efforts and are urged
to ' Save and Serve ' for Victory." REPORT OP SUPERINTENDENT. B 31
SPANISH.
Spanish has been an optional two years' course for many years. Interest in the
subject, however, has increased greatly in the last few years, and a revised three-year
course, Spanish I., II., and III., was issued. This course came into effect in September,
1943. A student may now earn fifteen credits in Spanish towards the completion of
High School Graduation and University Entrance.
THE LATE JAMES L. WATSON, REGISTRAR.
In the death of Mr. Watson this Department lost a most faithful and conscientious
official, and the teachers of the Province a wise and good counsellor. He was a graduate of the University of Toronto and before enlistment in the First World War was a
teacher at Greenwood.    He joined the staff of this Department in 1920.
In addition to carrying out the regular work of his office as Registrar he acted as
Secretary of the Provincial Board of Examiners and was chiefly responsible for all
arrangements for the conducting of these examinations. He was also Secretary of the
Local Committee of the Strathcona Trust Fund, from which grants are made annually
to the schools deemed to be most efficient in physical training and cadet work.
Blessed with a good memory, he could recall at once the names and qualifications
of teachers whom he had not seen for many years. His experience, good scholarship,
and sound judgment combined to make him a most valuable member of the Provincial
Civil Service.
CHANGES IN THE STAFF.
On August 16th, 1943, Mr. K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Inspector of Schools,
was appointed Municipal Inspector of Schools for the District Municipality of Surrey.
To fill the vacancy caused by "Mr. Woodward's appointment as Municipal Inspector
of Schools, Mr. Frederick A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Supervising Principal of Ocean
Falls High, Junior High, and Elementary Schools, was given temporary appointment,
effective August 16th, 1943, as Inspector of Schools, with headquarters at Pouce Coupe.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. J. WILLIS,
Superintendent of Education. B 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
REPORT OF H. B. KING, Ph.D., CHIEF INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The war has continued to draw heavily upon the teaching personnel of the Province.
Many of the most vigorous men and women teachers have enlisted in the services,
where their administrative and teaching experience has been found highly valuable.
The larger urban district municipalities have been able to secure adequate staffing, and
no marked falling off in the quality of teaching in these areas is to be noted. Many of
the replacements have turned out to be excellent teachers who have readily adjusted
themselves to the British Columbia programme. Unfortunately this has not been
universally the case and the rural schools have been the greatest sufferers. A particularly heavy task has been thrown upon the Inspectors who have had to give help to
teachers from other parts of the world, and to teachers trained many years ago either
in this Province or elsewhere, with respect to the meaning of our Programme of
Studies. They have found it necessary to bring to their notice new principles of teaching which educational science has developed in recent decades.
RURAL EDUCATION.
The outstanding event in the supervision of schools during the year was the workshop in Rural Education conducted in Victoria during the last week of July and the
first week of August, 1943. This workshop was attended by all but one of the Provincial Inspectors of elementary schools, by three Normal School instructors, and by
a number of other interested persons. The course was directed by Miss Iman E. Schatz-
mann, of the American Committee on Rural Education and of the University of
Chicago, and author of the book, " The Country School " (University of Chicago Press).
The experience was most enlightening and stimulating, though unfortunately it came
at the end of the fatiguing work associated with the marking of examinations and the
compilation of the Annual Report. Nevertheless, all who participated' in the workshop
felt that it had been most beneficial; undoubtedly the supervision of rural schools and
the development of rural education will be more efficient and better based upon rural
sociology because of the insight gained by those who shared in the conference.
At the time of writing (October, 1943), the conference had its aftermath in the
formation in several inspectorates of study groups with a view to co-operative effort
by Inspectors, principals, and teachers to develop the school as a community institution
and to relate its activities more closely to rural life.
Teachers of rural schools who are conscious of the fact that their schools are not
really rural schools, but one-roomed city schools located in the country, may get a vision
of what country schools might do by obtaining the material prepared by the Bureau of
School Service, School of Education, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.
They should write for the price-list of the publications of this Bureau. They are
referred particularly to the reading materials which have been developed and to the
bulletin, " The School Curriculum and Economic Improvement." These publications
are inexpensive.
DIVISION OF TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS.
A carefully compiled catalogue of tests stocked by this Division is available to
teachers and school boards. The tests have been repriced to cover the actual cost to
the Department, not counting overhead costs.
It is pointed out that the number of good Canadian tests has increased and that
these tests are lower in cost than American tests because foreign exchange has not
had to be added to the price. INSPECTION OP SCHOOLS. B 33
The Division of Tests and Measurements has produced during the year the tests
listed below. They are based upon our own Programme of Studies, which fact gives
them curriculum validity. They will be standardized during the present year, and will
be for sale in the school-year 1944-45.
Test. Grades. Forms.
Arithmetic Computation ...  III.-IV. A
- Arithmetic Computation  III.-IV. B
Arithmetic Computation     IV.-V. A
Arithmetic Computation     IV.-V. B
Arithmetic Computation     V.-VI. A
Arithmetic Computation  V.-VI. B
Arithmetic Reasoning  III.-IV. A
Arithmetic Reasoning     IV.-V. A
Arithmetic Reasoning     V.-VI. A
Arithmetic Concepts    A
Mathematics IX.-o Entering IX.
Health Vocabulary  V.-VII. A
Health  VI.-VII. A
Application of Principles in Health       A
Scholastic Aptitude (Advanced)       A
General Science III       A
General Science IV       A
THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL.
In the past decade the junior high school has multiplied in British Columbia. It
has gained considerable public approval and has made a contribution to British Columbia education. Nevertheless, a considerable number of junior high schools are not
good models of the junior high school as conceived in our Programme of Studies and
in the literature in which the philosophy of the junior high school has been developed.
That philosophy has changed since our junior high schools have been established and
there has been too little recognition of this fact.
The writers upon the junior high school have discussed the steps which should
be taken before a junior high school is established. One of the preliminaries usually
mentioned is the " self-preparation of the principal." He should have pretty well
saturated himself in what has been written upon the junior high school and should
haye visited junior high schools which are good exemplars of the junior high school
philosophy. When this essential procedure has been omitted and the junior high school
has been formed simply upon a mechanical interpretation of the Programme of Studies,
it is likely to be not much more than a traditional high school beginning with Grade
VII., departing from this traditional mould only in so far as the prescription of subjects compels it to.
Some junior high schools have required every pupil in Grades VII. and VIII. to
study French. This has occurred in some combined junior and senior high schools.
The idea apparently has been that, if this policy is followed, pupils will do better upon
the Matriculation examination. Yet a test of Reading Comprehension will reveal that
many of these pupils are below the Grade VII. level in Reading and should be given,
not French, but more English, probably Remedial English. Some junior high schools
have no Music or Art after Grade VIII. Some have not given Music to all of the
Grades VII. and VIII. pupils, although the Programme of Studies recommends that
only those pupils be excused from Music who have been found to lack musical capacity
as tested by a scientific test of musical ability.
3 B 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
There have been new procedures established in elementary schools for the vitalizing of education—the Enterprise technique, for example. The overdepartmentaliza-
tion of the junior high schools stands in the way of the development of these procedures,
with the result that there are elementary schools where the teaching procedures in
Grades VII. and VIII. are more modern and progressive than those in the junior high
schools. The same defect, of course, exists in those elementary schools which have
copied the departmentalizing of the junior high schools.
When the junior high school was established, departmentalizing was considered
a point of merit. The growth of the idea of integration through purposeful activities
has been a development since the junior high school was established. Failure to keep
in touch with these developments in the philosophy of education has had the result that
some of our junior high schools are as formal as the older and passing type of senior
high school.   A rereading of the junior high school literature would seem to be in order.
THE HOLDING POWER OF HIGH SCHOOLS.
One of the criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of a high school is its holding
power. The holding power of a school is measured by its pupil-retention. Pupil-
retention is the resultant of the forces tending to hold the pupil in school and the forces
drawing him away from it. The factors drawing the pupil away from the school may
be either internal or external.
A diversified programme which makes provision for individual needs and differences, which has regard for the pupil who will enter commerce, industry, and the outdoor occupations of the country, as well as for the one who will enter the professions,
will be found to have high holding power.
No index of holding power is perfect because the number of variables affecting the
situation is great. The index which is used below, while crude, has significance. It
indicates that many schools have problems to solve. The figures after the number of
a high school were obtained by calculating the ratio, expressed in hundredths, of the
attendance in Grade XII. in the last Annual Report to the attendance for Grade X. in the
same year. Grade X. was taken instead of Grade IX. because in some school districts
where there are junior high schools, the distribution of pupils at the end of Grade IX.
causes schools to have increases or decreases which have no relation to their holding
power. As, however, many pupils do not go past Grade IX., the use of Grade X. as a
base probably gives a higher index number than would be found with Grade IX. as a
base. Attractive opportunities for employment may entice pupils from school, even
when the school itself has a satisfactory programme. If, however, a school has abandoned itself to the college preparatory philosophy, its elimination of pupils will be heavy
and many of these pupils will live their lives on an unnecessarily low economic and
cultural level.
To prevent invidious comparisons, schools are not named. Teachers can identify
their own schools by finding the ratio of attendance in Grade XII. to Grade X. as in the
Annual Report.    They might continue the investigation for previous years. INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
B 35
Holding Power of Fifty-six British Columbia Schools
in the School-year 1941-42.
No. of School.
Holding
Index.
Rank.
No. of School.
Holding
Index.
Rank.
86
84
78
77 |
77 [
76
74
71
70
69 \
69 J
68]
68 j.
68 j
66
1
2
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
12
15
16
19
22
23
25
28
59
56 1
28
30 - 	
56
56
■
30
55
53
52
33
34 	
34
35- -  	
36 	
51-
51
49
49
48"
48
48
48
48
t
36
38
40 :	
41 _  	
44 	
65
65
63"
63
63
62.E
62 '
62
60 '
60
60
59
'
45  __
45
43 1
43
43 j
42
41
39 |
39 \
34
33 )
33 (
30
45
46-	
19  	
47  	
48    -
46
51   	
51
53
26  	
54 	
54
The figures given above are for schools with three or more divisions for Grades
X., XL, and XII.
A statistically more refined method of calculation would doubtless change the index
numbers and the order of rank, but it would not interchange the upper and lower thirds.
Where the index number and the ranking are low, the reasons for this condition should
be studied. The cause may lie in the curricular offerings. In the bad old days, pupils
were eliminated in the early grades of high school so that the percentage of Matriculation passes might be higher. Yet the percentage of Matriculation passes might be very
high while the holding power of the school was low. A measure of holding power is,
therefore, a better index of a school's value to its community, and, it may be added, a
better index of its all-round efficiency.
SPANISH.
During the year a new three-year course in Spanish was prepared and published
in a bulletin. As the subject may now be continued at the University it should soon
be upon a good footing in the schools. It should be possible to start Spanish classes in
schools outside of the larger centres with reasonable expectation of finding a successor
to a teacher who may have vacated his position.
The practical and the cultural values of Spanish, its importance upon this hemisphere, have been referred to in previous reports. It should without delay be put upon
the same footing with respect to admission to the University as the other languages
now recognized. There are no reasonings which may be offered in opposition to this
policy which will stand scrutiny. B 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
LIBRARY FACILITIES.
During the year some hundreds of new professional books have been added to the
Teachers' Professional Library of the Public Library Commission. These books may
be obtained free of postal charges from the Commission, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
This library is open to all teachers in the Province.
A depository of text-books, supplementary text-books, and school library books is
maintained, and kept up to date by donations from publishers, in the Provincial School
Inspectors' Offices, Vancouver, B.C. The purpose of this depository is to give teachers
an opportunity to find and examine books either for their own or for their pupils' use.
The depository is open to teachers from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on school-days and to noon
on Saturdays.
REPORT OF THE POST-WAR REHABILITATION COUNCIL.
The Interim Report of the Post-war Rehabilitation Council of the Provincial Legislature should be studied carefully by teachers, especially by those who feel that education has important social functions. This report points the finger to many of the
problems affecting the Province both in general and in respect to education. By studying the report one may forecast the way in which the schools will grow during the next
decade. One may expect in the immediate post-war years to see developments in the
following directions:—
(1.)   The training of teachers for rural education:
(2.)  The community school:
(3.)  The training of teachers as community leaders:
(4.)  The junior college:
(5.)  The nursery school:
(6.) Vocational (including agricultural) education.
The carrying-out of such a programme will require the services of a vigorous and
socially-minded teaching body. No doubt many men and women now in the war services will be a dynamic part of the teaching personnel that will bring into being the
programme which is envisaged, but teachers now in the schools should look to the future
and be ready for it.
The Report of the Council may be obtained from the King's Printer for $1. PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
B 37
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF A. R. LORD, B.A., PRINCIPAL.
The forty-second session of the Vancouver Normal School opened on September
8th, 1942, and closed on June 11th, 1943.    Attendance and results were as follows:—
Enrolment _	
Withdrew during the year-
Diplomas granted	
Men.
16
4
12
Women.
173
6
157
Total.
189
10
169
"Distinction" standing was awarded to Eleanor Belshaw Gamble, Vancouver;
Dorothy Hilda Hamilton, B.A., Vancouver; Joan Marjorie Langdon, Vancouver; Jean
Marianne Norris, Vancouver; Marion Fern Pickering, Lumby; and Kathleen Jennie
Wilkinson, Trail. The medal for outstanding ability in Physical Education was won
by Nancy Florence Harvey, Vancouver.
Every student in attendance during the second term, who had not already done
so, completed a St. John Ambulance course in First Aid and received a senior certificate;   172 also received Strathcona Trust, Grade B, certificates.
For the first time in many years no teachers from other Provinces were enrolled
for the usual three months' course to qualify for British Columbia certificates. Despite
this, however, the attendance, 189, has been exceeded only three times in the last decade
and is substantially above the average for that period; a major reason, though not the
only one, was the decision by the Department of Education to admit to Normal Schools
any applicants who had complete University Entrance standing together with at least
one subject of Senior Matriculation. It had been the practice in former years to admit
to this school students with one or two deficiencies in Senior Matriculation; the reduction in admission requirements resulted in thirty-eight attending who could not otherwise have done so.
It should be pointed out that no change has been made in the basic requirement
of Senior Matriculation or its equivalent for a First-class Teacher's Certificate.
Students with academic deficiencies receive temporary certificates valid for one year
only.
It has been interesting to compare the progress of these " unqualified " students
with that of the others who possessed full requirements for admission. Any possible
measurements are, of course, highly subjective, but a quantitative summary may be
both interesting and significant.
Two to Four
Years
University.
Full Senior
Matriculation.
Less than
Senior
Matriculation.
16
2
95
5
5
3
78
Failed       - - -          	
5
1
Distinction standing-—.____ _ _ _  _ _
Conclusions can not be drawn from the results of wie year, but there appears to
be at least an indication that the possession of Senior Matriculation offers little more
promise of teaching ability than does University Entrance.    In so far as this school B 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
can judge an added year of maturity is desirable, but there is little in our experience
to suggest that the spending of that year in Senior Matriculation is preferable to
spending it in industry or commerce or travel. Perhaps, out of our present difficulties
will emerge a two-year course from High School graduation and ending with a teacher's
certificate but with a very different content.
General administration was carried on along much the same lines as .in former
years with, however, two welcome additions. Our increased enrolment made the provision of extra class-rooms for participation almost imperative. Once again Vancouver's Superintendent of Schools, Mr. H. N. McCorkindale, came to our assistance by
providing four class-rooms in the Simon Fraser School and an ungraded class-room in
the Model School. This gave a total of sixteen regular and three ungraded class-rooms
which are used almost daily as well as another ninety-five—ten in New Westminster
and eighty-five in Vancouver—for the January and May teaching Practica.
The kindly help which has been accorded to this school by the Vancouver and New
Westminster school systems has been remarkable. Not only has no request of ours
ever been refused but, at various times, help has been offered when we could scarcely
have asked for it. Superintendent McCorkindale, Inspector Thomas, Municipal Inspector Shields, and their staffs are deserving of our warm thanks.
In this connection a word should be said concerning our three ungraded classrooms. Two of these, belonging to the Normal School, are conducted by the principal,
Miss Zella M. Manning, and the assistant, Miss Margaret Macdonald; the third, under
the Vancouver School Board, is taught by Miss Helen M. Grier. It is probable that
these three rooms contribute more to the success of teacher-training than does any
other phase of this school's work and it is certain that the instructors carry a very
heavy load. Yet they continue to occupy class-rooms that are not adequate. More
satisfactory accommodation should be provided.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VICTORIA.
REPORT OF V L. DENTON, B.A., D.C.L., PRINCIPAL.
In August, 1942, the Provincial Government arranged a lease of space in Memorial
Hall, through the courtesy and friendly spirit of the Bishop of British Columbia and
the Synod of the Diocese. Normal School opened on September 8th, 1942, and closed
on June 25th, 1943. During the year, thirty students were in attendance. Diplomas
were awarded to twenty-nine students, two of whom received honour standing. The
following table presents a summary of enrolment:—
Women.
Men.
Total.
Awarded diplomas.—	
27
1
2
Withdrew 	
1
Total - -, 	
28
2
Our quarters in Memorial Hall proved adequate for the small number of students
who elected to come to the Victoria institution. Danger of enemy bombing was imminent all through the summer of 1942, and students resident in the Interior of the
Province were permitted to attend Vancouver Normal if they so desired. In view of
this situation the staff was reduced. Mr. K. B. Woodward resumed his duties as
Inspector at Rossland, Mr. John Gough was appointed Municipal Inspector of Saanich PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS. B 39
Schools, and Mrs. Nita Murphy was granted leave of absence. She attended Oregon
State College and has since graduated with a Master's Degree in Home Economics.
In order to round out certain phases of our teacher-training programme, we were
fortunate in securing the services, for a limited time, of Miss Marian James, Primary
Supervisor of Victoria City Schools. The action of the Municipal Inspector and School
Board in making this arrangement helped us materially and we thank them for their
aid at this time. In a similar manner, Mr. Wilfrid Johns, of North Ward School,
carried through the Art activities in a most commendable manner. By means of these
adjustments, the students received a well-rounded course and completed their training
with credit to their instructors.
Again this year practice-teaching was given particular emphasis. It is said that
" we learn to do by doing " and it is probably true that we learn to teach by teaching.
During the year under review, four weeks were spent in Grades I. to VI., inclusive,
and four weeks, in June, in rural school situations. Individual letters from the students
testify to the value of this latter practice and especially since such practice is carried
on under real-life situations at the end of the term.
One trend of the times might be mentioned here. That is the advisability of the
establishment of a number of Junior Colleges in our Province. If a teacher-training
course were to be offered in each of these institutions, as and when created, the advantage of securing specialized training in the local environment would be attained. Our
Province is so large in area that there would be little danger of the acquisition of a
parochial state of mind. Those who are interested in education generally, welcome
the changes and adjustments which have already taken place. We know that our educational system must continually come under review in an attempt to meet changing social
concepts of what is best. It may be that the Junior College is an answer to some of
our educational problems.
May I, at this time, thank those critic teachers who, during the year, contributed
so generously of their time and experience in helping us with our teacher-training. B 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed., DIRECTOR.
The thirtieth session of the Summer School of Education, and the fourth to be
held since the outbreak of war, opened on June 30th and closed on August 3rd. The
date of closing had been announced as August 4th, but confusion arose as to whether
Dominion Day was to be celebrated on July 1st or July 5th, and the students voted to
attend classes on both dates so that the school could close one day earlier. Summer
School opened and closed in the middle of the week. This was a radical departure
from the custom of the past, and was resorted to only because it was believed that it
would be exceedingly difficult for the transportation companies to bring the students
to Vancouver and Victoria on a week-end. The congestion of traffic certainly was
eased, but the mid-week opening encouraged students to stay away for the first three
days. Many who did so found themselves in trouble over their attendance when they
missed one or more additional classes, and, on the whole, the experiment cannot be
considered to have been a success.
The two chief obstacles which had to be overcome this year were encountered in
the purchasing of satisfactory food, equipment, and course supplies, and in obtaining
accommodation for the students. Some of the food for the cafeteria had to be bought
in lots of one or two cans, and board and rooms for 600 persons had to be found at a
time when the National Housing Registry could accommodate only thirty. Nevertheless, a surplus of rooms was available when the session opened, and although course
supplies sometimes were exhausted it always was possible to make substitutions.
It was found necessary to discontinue the Summer School Health Service temporarily because of the shortage of doctors and nurses. It is to be hoped that, as soon
as the war situation allows medical services to civilians to be increased, this exceedingly
valuable service at Summer School may be re-established.
First Aid classes were continued under the leadership of Mr. R. T. Kipling, who
holds a Commercial St. John Ambulance Association First Aid Certificate. Mr. Kipling is the principal of Burnside Elementary School during the school-year and a First
Aid attendant at V.M.D. and Yarrows shipyards during the summer. Seven students
qualified for certificates, five for vouchers and two for medallions at the First Aid
examinations which followed the course.
ENROLMENT.
When courses were being organized during the winter of 1942-43, it was expected
that Summer School enrolment would be very low. The registration had decreased 176
students from 1941 to 1942, and many factors indicated that a similar decrease would
take place this year. Further enlistments in the armed forces, the attractive salaries
to be obtained outside of the teaching profession, the sharp increase in the marriage
rate, the cost of attending Summer School, and the difficulty of obtaining accommodation seemed to point toward an enrolment of less than 500. During the Session of
the Legislature, however, it was announced that no fees would be charged to British
Columbia teachers and that further assistance would be granted by increasing the
transportation refunds. The effect of this announcement was an immediate increase
in the advance registration, and until Summer School opened it seemed that the enrolment would greatly exceed that of 1942. It was found necessary to close six courses,
and to add four new instructors when the classes grew too large for the accommodation
which could be provided.
Unfortunately, much of this advance registration proved to be false, and when the
number of absentees greatly exceeded that of previous years, it was possible to reopen SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
B 41
several courses after the classes had met. Over fifty students registered in the expectation of attending but failed to appear, probably because they intended to leave the
profession or had accepted summer employment. As this caused considerable inconvenience to other students and to the office staff, it is intended in future to hold places
for students only until registration day.
The net result of all of these changes was an enrolment which did not differ greatly
from that of 1942. The number of persons was slightly smaller, but the number of
courses taken was slightly larger. As might have been expected, the number of men
in attendance reached a new low. There were only twenty-seven men in the academic
section, seven in Art and Commercial courses, and thirty-eight in Industrial Arts.
Courses.
Instructors.
Enrolment.
35
29
19
12
588
109
Totals for 1943           _
64
67
59
83
31
33
34
42
697
726
902
Totals for 1940   _      	
889
COURSES.
Seven new courses were given for the first time, and others were reintroduced
after several years' absence.    The new courses were:—
No.   98. Introducing Beginners to School.
No.   99. Laboratory Class for Beginners.
No. 125. Elementary Book-keeping.
No. 190. Drawing and Painting II.
No. 192. Design and Colour II.
No. 203. Nutrition.
No. 204. Family Relationships and Child Care.
Courses 1a and 10a, which usually have been given at the Vancouver Normal
School, were discontinued for one year. No other courses were cancelled or withdrawn.
Four courses were added after the Bulletin was published, when the preliminary enrolment exceeded expectations. These were No. 94—Problems in Primary Methods; No.
98—Introducing Beginners to School; No. 99—Laboratory Class for Beginners; and
No. 161—Materials and Methods in Health Education.
The courses which were offered, and the enrolment in each, are given below:—■
Victoria Section.
History and Philosophy of Education: Enrolments.
I. Principles and Techniques of Elementary Education  103
8. Integrative Teaching in the Elementary School  110
Psychology and Measurement:
10. Educational Psychology     81
II. Tests and Measurements     58
Individual Development and Guidance:
22. Child Guidance  	
Organization and Administration:
31. Rural School Problems	
91
89 B 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
Graphic and Practical Arts: Enrolments.
54. Elementary Typewriting  68
60. Practical Arts   70
English and Social Studies:
72. Senior Matriculation English  23
113. Senior Matriculation History  29
Primary Education :
90. Principles and Practices of Primary Education  54
91. Primary Observation and Laboratory  58
94. Problems in Primary Methods   63
96. Language and Literature in the Primary Grades  72
98. Introducing Beginners to School  84
99. Laboratory Class for Beginners  85
Music Education:
140i. Music in the Intermediate Grades j ,,«
140R. School Music for Rural Schools     (""
142. Creative Music  29
143. Choral Music and Conducting  60
145. Intermediate Harmony and Counterpoint   6
147. Advanced Music Literature and History  20
149. Musical Form _  9
Physical Education:
160h. Introduction to Physical Education  19
161. Materials and Methods in Health Education  33
162. Play and Playgrounds  14
164. Anatomy and Physiology  42
167. Elementary School Physical Education Laboratory  42
168. High School Physical Education Laboratory  51
169. Teaching Practice of Physical Education  2
171. Sports' Education  46
173. Primary Rhythmics, Games and Folk Dancing  67
180. Techniques of the Modern Dance  46
Library Service:
210. School Library Organization and Administration  37
211. Functions of the School Library  27
Vancouver Section.
Art Education:
190. Drawing and Painting II  19
192. Design and Colour II  28
Commercial Education:
121. Stenography Practice   9
125. Elementary Book-keeping   10
128. Business Law  10
129. Office Practice, Correspondence and Filing  13
Home Economics Education:
200. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  6
203. Nutrition   16
204. Family Relationships and Child Care  17 SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. B 43
Industrial Arts Education: Enrolments.
223. Plane and Solid Geometry       3
224. Freehand Sketching, Applied to the Industrial Arts     11
225. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork       9
227. Elementary Woodwork   3
228. Elementary Wood-turning   7
229a. Farm Mechanics (Woodwork)   6
229b. Farm Mechanics (Electricity)   3
229c Farm Mechanics  (Blacksmithing)    9
231. Elementary Electrical Theory       4
232. Elementary Electrical Shop-work       4
234. Art Metalwork        7
235. Elementary Sheet-metal Work —_     6
236. Elementary Machine-shop Work       7
241. Practical Geometry        2
242. Freehand Sketching        2
245. Advanced Woodwork  (Bench-work)       5
246. Advanced Wood-turning        2
247. Practice in the Use of Wood-working Machinery;  Care and
Maintenance        4
249. Advanced Sheet-metal Work       1
250. Advanced Machine-shop Work       5
Total of Student Courses in 1943  2,028
Total of Student Courses in 1942  1,945
Total of Student Courses in 1941  2,237
REGISTRATION.
An analysis of the registration reveals the following information covering those
in attendance:—
Teaching Experience: Enrolments.
13 or more years     97
10 to 12 years .,    25
7 to 9 years     53
4 to 6 years     69
1 to 3 years  395
Less than 1 year"     38
Not reported     20
Total  697
Class of School.—In 1942-43 the students were teaching in:—
Rural schools   274
District municipality schools  144
City schools   174
Town schools   49
Not reported, or not teachings  56
Total  697
Three of the students were teaching outside of British Columbia last year, although
their homes are in the Province;   nine were teaching in British Columbia although B 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
their homes are outside, and fifty-six were residing and teaching outside of British
Columbia.    Many of the latter hope to obtain British Columbia positions this year.
ClaSS Of Certificate: Interim.    Permanent.      Total.
Academic     13 26 39
First-class    373 141 514
Second-class       13 -   44 57
Third-class  3 3
Special              76
Not reported             8
Total  697
University Degrees:
Bachelor of Arts  27
Master of Arts    4
Bachelor of Science (Home Economics)  15
Bachelor of Education    2
Bachelor of Laws _    2
Bachelor of Philosophy     2
Bachelor of Commerce     1
Total  53
Attendance at Summer School.—The following numbers of teachers reported that
they had last attended Summer School:—
In or previous to the year 1933     10
In the period 1934 to 1936, inclusive _.      4
In the period 1937 to 1939, inclusive    25
In the period 1940 to 1942, inclusive  348
Not reported as having attended previously  310
Total  697
Specialist Certification.—The following numbers of teachers indicated that they
are seeking Specialist certification in the following fields:—
Primary     90
Physical Education      67
Music      51
Industrial Arts     37
Library  '     28
Art    25
Commerce      18
Home Economics      17
Total I  333
Credits.—The following numbers of teachers held the indicated number of credits
at the beginning of the session:—■
12 y2 or more     48
10 to 11% .    29
7% to 8%    52
5 to 6Vi     58
2% to 3%  183
0 to 1 %  327
Total  697 SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. B 45
The following conclusions may be drawn from a comparison of these tabulations
with those of previous years:—
(1.) The student-body contained a higher proportion of students with very
little teaching experience than the class of 1942, and a much higher
proportion than that of 1941. A larger number than usual held interim,
temporary, and special certificates. Many teachers with permanent certificates have been accepting summer employment or even leaving the
profession, and not as many of these are attending Summer School as in
the years before the war.
(2.) As in 1942, a majority of the students came from rural schools or schools
in district municipalities, but there was a sudden increase in the proportion which came from city schools. It is believed that the reason
for this lies in the fact that teachers with interim certificates, who formerly were employed almost exclusively in rural districts, now are able
to obtain positions in larger centres without having had previous
experience.
(3.) The total number of teachers with second-class certificates continues to
decrease, in spite of the number who have returned to the profession
since the outbreak of war.
(4.) The number of students who hold University degrees has dropped 50 per
cent, in a two-year period, undoubtedly because of the attractiveness of
war employment to students with higher education.
(5.) The number of students seeking Specialist certificates has decreased, the
greatest reduction being in the field of Commercial Education. Home
Economics, Art, and Primary courses also show a decrease in enrolment,
while Physical Education and Library courses are becoming more
popular.
FACULTY.
A large portion of the credit for the success of the 1943 session must go to the
student-teachers who showed an industriousness and a friendly spirit of co-operation
which, according to older members of the staff, never has been equalled. The members
of the instructional staff also are entitled to a large share of the credit. While it was
not always possible to provide the materials, equipment, books, or assistance which
they needed to instruct large classes efficiently, they all showed great ability in overcoming difficulties by their own ingenuity. Each member of the teaching staff also
was willing to devote unlimited time to the students, and to assist them in solving any
professional or personal problems they might have.
Some of the staff members were members of the staffs of the Normal Schools in
Vancouver and Victoria, and several were outstanding teachers in British Columbia
schools. There also were four visitors from the United States: Mrs. Irene Bostwick,
of the University of Washington; Dr. Reuben Law, of Brigham Young University,
Utah; Miss Betty Lynd Thompson, of Oregon State College; and Miss Lucille Wall,
of Compton, California.   A complete list follows-:—
Bostwick, Mrs. Irene, B.M., Assistant Professor, School of Music, University
of Washington, Seattle.
Copeland, Miss Winnett A., Primary Specialist, Sir James Douglas School,
Victoria.
Ewing, John M., B.A., D.Paed., Instructor in Educational Psychology, Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
Hatton, Mrs. Evelyn, B.Sc. (H.E.), formerly Instructor in Home Economics,
Central Junior High School, Victoria. B 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
Heywood, Robert H., B.A., Commercial Specialist, Head, Commercial Department, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Hinton, Miss Barbara, B.Sc, Provincial Normal School, Victoria.
James, Miss Marian D., Primary Supervisor, Victoria Schools.
Johns, Harold P., M.A., Victoria High School, Victoria.
Johnson, Miss Muriel, B.H.Sc, Instructor in Home Economics, Central Junior
High School, Victoria.
Johnston, Miss Effie, Primary Teacher, Dawson Annex School, Vancouver.
Kipling, Rudyard T., B.A., Principal, Burnside Elementary School, Victoria.
Kurth, Burton L., Chief Supervisor of Music, Vancouver Schools.
Lanning, Walter, B.A., B.L.S., Librarian, Vancouver Technical School.
Law, Reuben D., M.S., Ed.D., Professor and Chairman of The Department of
Elementary Education, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah.
Lee, Ernest, B.A., B.S. in P.E., Instructor in Health and Physical Education,
Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
Melvin, Miss Grace, D.A., Head, Department of Design, Vancouver School of
Art, Vancouver.
Michaelsen, Miss Helen, M.S., Professor of Home Economics, Central Washington College of Education, Ellensburg, Washington.
Parkes, Miss Jessie F. B., Supervisor of Practical Arts, Vancouver Schools.
Peck, Miss Miriam, Templeton Junior High School, Vancouver.
Scott, Charles H., A.R.C.A., F.R.S.A., Director, Vancouver School of Art,
Vancouver.
Shaffer, Miss Marion, B.A., Commercial Specialist, Dominion-Provincial War
Emergency School, Victoria.
Smith, Alexander G., B.A., Commercial Specialist, Fairview High School of
Commerce, Vancouver.
Thompson, Miss Betty Lynd, M.A., Associate Professor of Physical Education,
Head of Educational Dance, Oregon State College.
Wall, Miss Lucille E., B.Ed., M.A., Pre-primary and First Grade Teacher,
Compton, California.
Whitaker, Miss Geraldine, B.A., Instructor, Lord Kitchener School, Vancouver.
Woodward, Kenneth B., B.A., B.Paed., Inspector of Schools, Rossland.
Industrial Arts.
Lidster, George W., Instructor of Soldier Machinist Fitters' Classes, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Ross, Joseph H., Instructor of Soldier Blacksmith Classes, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Russell, A. E., Instructor in Sheet-metal Work, Vancouver Technical School,
Vancouver.
White, John S., Instructor in Draughting, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Wishart, Alfred, Instructor in Woodwork and Draughting, Lord Byng High
School, Vancouver.
Wright, J. S., Instructor in Electricity, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
SATURDAY AND EVENING TEACHER-TRAINING CLASSES.
The decrease in attendance at courses provided by local school administrators,
which was noticed in 1942, continued this year. It is hoped that interest in professional improvement among teachers may be revived as soon as the war has ended. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. B 47
The following courses were in operation during the winter of 1942-1943:—
VICTORIA. Enrolment.
171. Sports' Education     18
Vancouver.
60. Cardboard Modelling and Bookbinding      19
61. Light Woodwork      7
Needlecraft      14
63. Weaving   13
Soft Metal   11
162. Play and Playgrounds   40
171. Sports' Education  38
179. Rhythmic Hand Apparatus  17
Total   177
The total enrolment in courses of this type, since 1937, now has reached 1,572.
This does not represent accurately the total number of teachers who have taken
in-service training, because many teachers have taken more than one course.
TRANSPORTATION REFUNDS.
Although special excursions were discontinued in 1943, representations which were
made to the railroads through the Canadian Passenger Association, and to the Minister
of Transport, resulted in the continuation of the special rate of fare-and-one-third to
teachers attending Summer School.
In addition, British Columbia teachers whose summer return railway fare (exclusive of berth and meals) or steamship fare (which includes berth and meals) exceeded
$20 were granted a refund of the excess. These refunds have made Summer School
attendance much less expensive to teachers from remote parts of the Province.
The following conditions were imposed before the grants were paid: (1) That
2y2 units of credit be earned at the current session; (2) that a monthly report be
received indicating that the teacher was subsequently engaged in teaching in a British
Columbia school.
EXTRA-CURRICULAR FUNCTIONS AND ACTIVITIES.
Each student who attended the Victoria Section of the Summer School of Education was required to pay a $2 activity fee. This covered admission to all lectures,
concerts, dramatic performances, and social functions. If any student could have
found time to attend them all, the average cost per function would have been approximately 5 cents. It was emphasized, however, that no student should attempt to attend
all the functions or take part in all the events, but should choose wisely among those
which would give him or her the most enjoyment and the greatest sense of satisfactory
personal development.
The " Concert Hour " programmes attracted the largest attendance. These programmes, which were given at 11 o'clock almost every morning, have become well known
throughout neighbouring Provinces and States as well as in British Columbia, and
through them an attempt is made to provide the students with the best music, lectures,
or artistic performances which it is possible to obtain. Several world-famous artists
will be found among those listed below, as well as others from the junior group whose
reputation is spreading rapidly. Thanks are particularly due to the members of the
armed forces who gave their time and talents willingly to entertain the students. B 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
Dances were held each Friday evening, and because more than nine out of ten
students were women, male partners were found by issuing blocks of tickets through
the War Services, padres, or sports officers of various units of the Army, Navy, and
Air Force. The dances proved so popular that at times our accommodation was
severely taxed. Partners also were provided for dances held in various training camps
or forts in the neighbourhood to which the students were transported by bus.
Many students took part in the softball, volley-ball, basketball, badminton, bridge,
table-tennis, or bowling tournaments which were held throughout the session. Others
attended the weekly " Music-lovers' Hour " with Mr. Burton Kurth, or learned square
and folk dances from Miss Betty Lynd Thompson. " Learn-to-swim" classes and
riding classes were also provided.
Most of the extra-curricular functions and activities which were held are listed
below:—
June 30th.—Opening assembly in the auditorium.
July 1st.—Vocal recital by the English duo, Victoria Anderson and Viola
Morris.
July 2nd.—Weekly dance in the gymnasium.
July 5th.—The Esquimalt Garrison Band, with a demonstration by Bandmaster G. E. Bower.    Opening of the Bowling League.
July 6th.—David Oldham, baritone, and Edgar Holloway, pianist.
July 7th.—Piano recital by Jan Cherniavsky.
July 8th.—The Royal Canadian Navy Band and Choir, directed by Lieut.
Cuthbertson and Attdt. Alan Johnson.
July 9th.—Weekly dance in the gymnasium.
July 10th.—Army entertainment at Forts Macaulay and Mary Hill.
July 12th.—Piano-violin recital by Max and Leila Pirani.
July 13th.—Navy Day programme, featuring the Naval Orchestra.
July 14th.—Recital by Muriel Jarvis Ackinclose, soprano, and Pierre Timp,
baritone.    First meeting for square dancing in the gymnasium.
July 15.—Vocal and piano duets by Elizabeth Angus, Betty Evans, Adele
Goult, and Rita Nevard.    Beach party and sing-song at Willows Beach.
Dance at the R.C.A.F. Recreational Hall, Patricia Bay.
July 16th.—" There Are No Walls," by Kenneth Caple, director of School and
Community Broadcasts.    Weekly dance in the gymnasium.
July 19th.—Dance recital by  Eleanor King, of the  Cornish  School of the
Dance.
July 20th.—Light opera duets by Ann Watt, soprano, and Beverly Fife, tenor.
July 21st.—Variety concert, including three one-act plays, by the members of
the Victoria Little Theatre.
July 22nd.—The Army Show, with Gnr. Charles Hovey, directed by Sgt. Paul
Michelin.
July 23rd.—Dance demonstration by Miss Betty Lynd Thompson and Miss
Madlyn Stearns.    Weekly dance in the gymnasium.
July 26th.—Recital by young Victoria artists.    Splash Party at the Crystal
Garden.
July 27th.—Recital by Virginia Morgan, harpist.
July 28th.—Lecture by Dr. Iman E. Schatzmann, secretary of the Rural Life
Association of America.
July 29th.—Piano recital by Gertrude Huntly Green.
July 30th.—Closing dance in the Empress Hotel. The Beginners' Class at Play.
The Beginners' Class at Work.  Weaving, Building, and Painting—Primary Demonstration Class.
The Rhythm Band in Full Swing.    Course 99.  The Library Corner in Course 91.
Bugs!    Course 99.  SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. B 49
FINANCIAL REPORT.
Herewith is appended a financial summary of the operation of the Summer School
of Education for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1943. It should be noticed that
these figures are not for the current year which does not end until March 31st, 1944,
during which transportation refunds will be larger and the chief source of income will
be the Government grant.
Academic Account.
Receipts:
Fees paid by registered students  $16,248.25
Sale of text-books, mimeographing, and supplies       1,883.93
Government grant in aid of Summer School         928.99
$19,061.17
Disbursements:
Staff (including honoraria, living and travelling expenses) $8,982.65
Text-books, mimeographing, supplies, printing, etc  7,677.54
Refunds to students on account of courses  371.53
Transportation refunds   607.83
Rentals, accommodation charges, janitorial charges.  1,421.22
$19,061.17
Extra-curricular Account.
Receipts:
Activity fees paid by students (less refunds)     $1,162.00
Miscellaneous receipts and grants  774.92
$1,936.92
Disbursements:
Fees and expenses of artists, lecturers, etc  $1,173.87
Social affairs, dances, picnics, teas, excursions, sports, etc. 626.49
Miscellaneous charges, services, rentals, etc  136.56
$1,936.92
These accounts are audited annually by officials of the Provincial Treasury Department, and by Ismay, Boiston & Holden, chartered accountants.
It is a fixed policy that all moneys received from teachers shall be expended on
behalf of the Summer School, and any deficits shall be made up by grants provided by
the Department of Education. At the close of the fiscal year under review, tuition
fees were abolished for British Columbia teachers and transportation refunds were
increased. This greatly decreased the cost of summer courses to teachers and increased
the portion which is contributed by the Provincial Government. B 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.
REPORT OF F. T. FAIREY, B.A., OFFICER IN CHARGE.
This report is for the school-year 1942-43, and covers the work of the following:—
(a.)   Industrial Arts (Woodwork and Draughting) in elementary schools.
(b.)  Industrial Arts (Woodwork, Draughting, Metalwork, and Electricity) in
junior and senior high schools.
(c.)  Industrial Arts Option Courses in high schools—"A" Woodwork and " B "
Metalwork—for University Entrance.
(d.)  Vancouver Technical School.
(e.)  High School Commercial and Agricultural Courses.
(/.)  Vancouver School of Art.
(g.)   Night-schools.
(/..) Teacher-training.
Most officials of the Department of Education have mentioned the serious effect
which the war has had upon the work of the schools, and it is not my desire to labour
this point. Suffice it to say that the past year has not shown any improvement.
Teachers continue to leave the service. All we can do is to carry on as best we may
until this conflict is over.
It has frequently been stated that this is a war of machines and supplies, and that
victory will come to the side best able to produce and use equipment of a technical
nature. Emphasis has been placed upon the value of technical and vocational training
in practical skills, and eulogies have been written about how splendidly the young men
of the past three years have been able to measure up to their duties because of the
training received in these skills in our schools. It is strange, therefore, to record that
in schools where options are offered the tendency seems to be away from Industrial
Arts and Home Economics. There are fewer students in the higher grades of high
schools electing Industrial Arts than there should be and, if we are to keep a proper
balance, those responsible for guidance in the schools must do a better job than they
are apparently doing now.
In last year's report Dr. King, Chief Inspector of Schools, stressed the importance
of guidance. In my view, nothing is more important to our young people to-day than
that a proper Guidance Service be organized. This, together with a fully developed
system of Tests and Measurements, should provide the teacher with proper information
upon which to base his Guidance Programme. The world cries for people able to do
things, and I trust that school principals who may read this report will give some
thought to the lack of balance which seems to obtain in most high schools, and attempt
to correct a trend which seems to the writer contrary to the trend in the adult world.
Industrial Arts, as has many times been stated, is not a vocational subject. It
contributes its share to the growth and development of the child. It is an important
part of that training and should not be neglected.
"VOCATIONAL TRAINING CO-ORDINATION ACT."
This Act has been passed by the Parliament of Canada and, amongst other things,
makes provision for assistance to vocational schools on the secondary-school level. This
assistance may take several forms and, although this provision does not come into effect
until the conclusion of the present war, thought must be given to the ways in which
vocational training opportunities can be provided for a greater number of secondary-
school pupils in all parts of the Province.
We look forward to the establishment of vocational departments in high schools
and composite schools in the Interior of the Province.    Provision will be made for INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. B 51
assistance towards the building and equipping of such schools for a variety of courses
leading to gainful employment. These include not only the so-called " mechanical "
trades, but will include Agriculture and. Commercial work. At the conclusion of the
war it is expected that the demand will be great for this type of training, and those
in charge of schools throughout the Province, together with officials of the Department,
should be thinking of ways in which vocational training may be included in an enriched
educational programme.
Much of my time has been spent attending to my duties as Regional Director of
the War Emergency Training Programme, which is described fully under the heading
of " Adult Education." This programme continues to encroach upon the space and
facilities of several schools in the Province, particularly in Vancouver, Victoria, and
New Westminster. I can only express, once again, my appreciation to the School
Boards of those cities, and to the teaching staffs of the schools who have so courteously
readjusted themselves in order to provide this Emergency Programme with the facilities it so badly needs. Some compensation for the use of this equipment may be
possible.   This is referred to in my report on the War Emergency Training Programme.
Many of our teachers of Industrial Arts are still not fully qualified. They are
doing well, and will do much better as they continue to receive training at the Summer
School of Education. The inspection of all schools was undertaken again by Mr. H. A.
Jones, Inspector of Technical Classes, and I am glad to report that the high standard
achieved in the past is being maintained under rather difficult circumstances.
Mr. Jones also has continued to act as Institute Conductor for the Dominion
Government in its Foremanship Training Plan. As a result of his work, several
thousand tradesmen have been trained with resultant improvement in production in
many of our war plants.
The reports upon Industrial Arts which follow have been prepared by Mr. Jones.
INDUSTRIAL ARTS.
Elementary Schools and Junior High Schools.
Many schools have been handicapped this year by the lack of teachers or the fact
that only partially trained teachers have been available. The teachers have done their
best under difficult circumstances and, on the whole, the standard of work has not been
lowered. So many teachers have joined the armed forces, or have gone to positions in
industry, that little progress has been made in some places. The Industrial Arts Pool
has helped considerably in supplying new teachers with mimeographed material, which
has assisted them in their school-work. Because of the absence of supplies of metal,
teachers and pupils have shown initiative and, in some cases, great ingenuity in utilizing scrap metal.
Many general shops have been replanned now into work areas, and work places
have been arranged providing all tools, equipment, and supplies for quick and efficient
use. Shop environment has an important effect on pupils in training them in good
habits.
The Correspondence Branch of the Department of Education now has issued
Mechanical Drawing I., which corresponds to the Drawing given in Grades VII., VIII.,
and IX.
There are fifty-six cities and districts where Industrial Arts shops are established:
Alberni, Armstrong, Ashcroft, Burnaby, Chilliwack, Coquitlam, Courtenay, Cranbrook,
Creston, Delta, Duncan, Esquimalt, Fernie, Howe Sound, loco, Kamloops, Kaslo,
Kelowna, Kent, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui-Sumas-Abbots-
ford, Michel-Natal, Mission, Nanaimo, Nanaimo-Ladysmith United, Nelson, New Westminster, North Saanich, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Ocean Falls, Penticton, Port
Alberni, Port Moody, Powell River, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Revel-
. B 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
stoke, Richmond, Rossland, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Southern Okanagan United, Sum-
merland, Surrey, Trail, University Hill, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria, Wells, and West
Vancouver.
Senior High Schools.
All boys who have taken shop courses for High School Graduation have been able
to get jobs in war industry, and the demand has exceeded the supply. The basic training given in school shops also has been beneficial for boys who have joined the Navy,
Army, and Air Force, because it gives them a start in their training as service tradesmen. Our courses follow, in general, the Pre-induction Training Courses given in the
high schools of the United States for the armed forces.
Teachers are asked to encourage boys to start a basement workshop. Suggestions
have been made to teachers to plan and to make kits of tools as projects, which include
the basic operations of the course. The workshop, as a project, will not only strengthen
the work of the Industrial Arts shop in the school by the added interest it will arouse,
but it will also stimulate the creative instincts in the boy, enrich his home life, and
contribute something to the widening of his social contacts with wholesome companions
of similar tastes.
INDUSTRIAL ARTS OPTIONS FOR UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE.
Some pupils are advised to select an Industrial Arts option for University Entrance.
They can take Drawing and Woodwork, or Drawing and Metalwork. The high school
Drawing course is paralleled by a correspondence course, Mechanical Drawing II.,
which is well prepared and conducted along high standards. Recently a Correction
Scale has been printed to help pupils reach better standards of work. This scale is
available now for high schools.
Drawing in high schools has steadily improved. This training has been much
appreciated by men in industry, as well as by those students who are intending to take
a Science Degree in the university. The practical work in Woodwork and Metalwork
is closely integrated with the Drawing course, and gives the practical experience so
necessary to get a full understanding of Drawing fundamentals.
In addition to those passed upon the recommendation of principals of accredited
high schools, sixty-seven students from fifteen high schools wrote the examination in
June and August, 1943.
The total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school shops in the Province (of which fifty-
three are general shops)  is        153
The. total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school instructors is        120
The total number of pupils participating is:—
Elementary school  3,414
Junior high school  :  6,900
Senior high school   3,024
  13,338
VANCOUVER TECHNICAL SCHOOL.
In my last report it was noted that the War Emergency Training Programme
continued to make encroachments upon the facilities of this school, and it was pointed
out that there seemed to be no indication that the same conditions would not persist
for another year.
In the past year the school has carried on its regular courses despite the presence
of approximately 300  soldiers  and 400  airmen  who  have  been  taking training in INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. B 53
adjacent buildings under the War Emergency Training Programme. The co-operation
of the school with this Programme continues to be marked by cordiality, and the irritations which one would expect to have arisen after three years of compromise have
nowhere shown themselves. This is due in no small measure to the geniality of the
principal, Mr. Sinclair, whose willingness to give way to the needs of the war emergency
is apparent at all times, and his spirit permeates the whole staff.
Towards the end of June requests were received from Ottawa to open special
classes at the Vancouver Technical School to take care of an emergency situation which
had occurred in the provision of men for air crew. It was suggested that 250 young
airmen be sent to Vancouver, there to receive educational refresher courses in English,
Mathematics, and Science, and it was suggested that this could be done at the Vancouver Technical School. Several members of the staff and some from other high schools
of Vancouver were persuaded to give up their holidays for this special work. The
School Board generously gave me a free hand in the use of the school building, and so
we were able to give this added service at a time when it was greatly needed.
Despite these disturbances, the regular work of the school continues to flourish.
It is regretted that the numbers in the senior grades show some falling off. This is
due, of course, to the demand of local war industries for boys who have had the preliminary training which has been taken at this school in the earlier grades.
The details of the courses which have appeared in other reports are repeated
here:— ,
(1.) High School Graduation (Technical).—A diploma is granted to students who
complete Grade XII., and include two years in a major shop. This certificate does not
admit to the University. Major courses are given in the following: Sheet Metal,
Printing, Woodwork, Machine-shop Practice, Automotive Engineering, Electricity,
Mining, Lumbering, and Diesel Engineering.
(2.) High School Graduation (University Entrance).—Selected students, who will
ultimately specialize in Science, are given shop experience in addition to the courses
prescribed for University Entrance.
(3.) Special Advanced Courses are offered in Sheet Metal, Printing, Woodwork,
Acetylene and Arc Welding, Machine-shop, Automotive and Diesel Engineering,
Draughting, Electricity, Cookery, and Aviation Mechanics.
Special students devote full time to the subject of their choice, except that Mathematics and Engineering Drawing may be required as part of the course. Those permitted to enrol for Special Courses are: (a) Students who have had at least three
years' high school work; (b) youths and men who have been in industry and who wish
further technical training;    (c) adults who desire special instruction.
The total number of boys attending the Technical School in 1942-43 was 626.
The school conducts also a large night-school during the winter months. Once
again the courses offered have been arranged not to interfere with the special part-time
classes given under the War Emergency Training Programme in the school building.
Instruction was given in the following subjects: Acetylene Welding, Blue-print Reading, Diesel Engineering, Draughting, Electrical Engineering, Electricity, Machine
Draughting, Machine-shop Practice, Mechanical Drawing, Motors, Plumbing, Printing,
Radio, Sheet Metal, Technical Draughting, Technology of Metals, Woodwork. The
students enrolled in 1942-43 numbered 629.
HIGH SCHOOL COMMERCIAL AND AGRICULTURAL COURSES.
It is encouraging to note the number of junior and senior high schools which
include a Commercial department. The schools are reminded that the Department
assists them in the purchase of equipment, and full advantage should be taken of this
opportunity to equip centres properly.    Good work cannot be done with poor equip- B 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
ment, and every endeavour should be made to supply the latest type of commercial
equipment so that students leaving our high schools will be able to go directly into
gainful employment.
In Vancouver there are two schools devoted exclusively to Commercial work. These
are the Fairview High School of Commerce and the Grandview High School of Commerce, and it is hoped that as soon as the war ends there will be other schools organized
along similar lines.
The schools and their enrolments are as follows:—
Abbotsford
Burnaby 	
Students.
80
594
Students.
Ocean Falls        26
Penticton      184
Chilliwack      239
Coquitlam	
Cranbrook ....
Creston 	
Delta 	
Duncan 	
Fernie	
Kamloops ____.
Kelowna 	
  41
  22
  83
  27
  53
  73
  61
  158
Kimberley   169
Lady smith  65
Langley   61
Lumby   16
Maple Ridge   119
Mission   41
Nanaimo   112
Nelson   75
New Westminster   195
North Vancouver  211
Oak Bay  53
Port Alberni ___
Port Moody	
Powell River ___
Prince George
Prince Rupert _
Revelstoke 	
Richmond 	
Rossland 	
Saanich 	
34
44
84
10
. 102
34
85
32
.     174
50
12
Surrey       215
Vancouver   3,674
Vernon       96
Victoria      291
West Vancouver     213
Southern Okanagan
United 	
Squamish 	
Total   7,908
More and more the tendency should be for the curriculum of a school to fit its own
local community. Agriculture therefore should be a major subject in many districts
in our Province. Equipment will be needed and, as soon as the war ends, opportunities
for acquiring equipment will be greatly increased. In the meantime, schools are
reminded that limited grants are available from this Department to encourage the
purchase of Science equipment and Agricultural equipment.
Agricultural  courses  were   offered  in  the  last  school-year  in  the  high  school
grades of:— students.
Abbotsford      6
Burnaby     22
Chilliwack   102
Dawson Creek      9
Kent    28
Langley      26
Maple Ridge      7
Students.
_    23
New Westminster	
North Vancouver  23
Oyama   5
Peace River  3
Rutland  36
Total
290
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF ART.
The Vancouver School of Art, which is organized and administered by the Vancouver Board of School Trustees, is the only full-time Art School in the Province.
Besides a number of special courses, the day-school offers two certificates:— INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. B 55
(1.) The Diploma is granted following completion of a four-year course in one
of the following fields: (a) Drawing, Painting, Illustration; (b) Commercial Art;
(c) Design and Crafts;   (d) Interior Decoration;   (e) Art Teachers' Training.
(2.)   The School Merit Certificate is granted on completion of a two-year course.
In addition, the school offers a High School Graduation Course in Art for students
who have completed Grades IX. and X.    This course is free to Vancouver residents.
The year brought some changes in enrolment due to the impact of war on a city
which is much concerned with war industry. Naturally enough students who, in
normal times, would have continued their studies into the senior years had either joined
the armed forces or had entered war plants. This reduced full-time day enrolment to
a point which might have made it difficult to carry on had not a large number of part-
time day students been registered. Many of these part-time students were mature
adults, others were swing-shift workers from war plants who, in other times, would
have attended night-school.
As a result of the reduction in full-time day students, mixed classes were formed
' which called for more personal tuition and less class teaching and, perhaps, a lessening
of that cumulative power which comes when large classes are embarked on the same
projects. Incidentally, it calls for more elasticity in teaching. It also calls for a stocktaking and revaluation of courses. In this connection a new course in Elementary
Draughting and Isometric Perspective Drawing was given to second- and third-year
students with the view of making the students able to enter war plants. Many former
students now are in war plants doing such work as Draughting, Perspective Drawing,
Modelling, and Casting, and appear to be doing very satisfactory work.
In contrast to the day-school, the night-school enrolment was large and enthusiastic, so much so that extension classes were held during April and May in order to
meet the student demand. This is a very satisfactory condition and augurs well for
the forthcoming winter. The night classes held their annual exhibition in school at
the end of March.
The junior Saturday morning classes showed an increased enrolment over the
previous year, and the average attendance was very satisfactory.
It is expected that the Vancouver School of Art will play an important part in the
rehabilitation of men and women discharged from the armed forces. Courses along
this line have been given already, and it is hoped to do more in the future.
The following were the registrations for the year in the various branches of the
school:—
Day-school     54
Night-school and Saturday classes   488
Summer School      29
Total   571
NIGHT-SCHOOLS.
It was expected that, because of the War Emergency Training Programme, there
would be a reduction in the number of night-schools offered by local School Boards, and
this has occurred. The total number taking training, however, has increased rather
than decreased when the two programmes are taken together. Many special classes
have been started for workers engaged in war industry, but these numbers are detailed
in the report on Adult Education. Evening vocational classes are established in many
centres as detailed below, while the two large systems in Vancouver and Victoria
continue to offer a large variety of courses that are well attended.
Instruction in the subjects listed below was given to 4,933 students. B 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
Subjects.—Acetylene Welding, Advertising, Aircraft Recognition, Algebra, Armature Winding, Art, Band Music, Blue-print Reading, Book-keeping, Cabinetmaking,
Carpentry and Joinery, Chemistry, Child Art, Choral Singing, Commercial Arithmetic,
Commercial Art, Commercial and Remedial English, Cookery, Current History, Current
Events, Diesel Engineering, Draughting, Dramatic Art, Drawing, Dress Appreciation,
Dressmaking, Electricity, Electrical Engineering, English, English for New Canadians,
First Aid, French, General Science, General Shop, Geometry, Handicrafts, High School
Continuation, Home Economics, Home Nursing, Household Arts, Industrial Arts,
Interior Decoration, Machine Construction and Technical Draughting, Machine
Draughting, Machine-shop Theory and Practice, Manual Arts, Mathematics, Mechanical Drawing, Mechanical Engineering, Mining and Prospecting, Modelling, Motors,
Music, Painting (Oil and Water-colour), Physical Culture, Physics, Plumbing, Pottery,
Practical Arts, Practical Mathematics, Printing, Psychology, Public School Subjects,
Public Speaking, Pulp and Paper, Radio, Radio Communication, Secretarial Practice,
Sheet Metal, Sheet-metal Draughting, Shorthand (Pitman and Gregg), Short-story and
other Creative Writing, Show-card Writing, Singing, Social Studies, Spanish, Speech
Correction, Stationary and Marine Engineering, Steam Engineering, Technical
Draughting, Technology of Metals, Trigonometry, Typewriting, Voice Culture, Weaving, Woodwork, and Writing for the Radio.
Summarized Statement of Attendance and Teachers in Evening Vocational
Schools for Period July 1st, 1942, to June 30th, 1943.
Municipality or School.
o
ii
_  OJ
O 3
Ho.
O
d
'3 m
HO
Total Enrolment, all
Classes.
Number op Individuals
enrolled.
Teachers.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Abbotsford .__   _.._	
4
1
1
2
1
1
6
2
4
1
3
1
9
8
4
1
11
52
22
8
1
1
3
1
2
3
1
2
1
2
1
11
'      5
1
26
103
24
119
24
53
85
14
124
45
18
34
28
61
22
133
184
61
41
488
2,753
646
15
1
12
12
14
22
21
104
23
41
73
102
24
18
34
119
24
53
85
14
124
45
18
34
'  28
61
22
133
184
61
41
488
2,753
646
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
7
1
4
1
7
58
23
3
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
8
2
8
16
4
5
1
1
Kamloops ____ ._._    	
2
2
9.8
Nanaimo   _ .,	
North Vancouver   	
11 [          50
3     |          19
94     |          39
65     j        119
30     |          31
12 |          29
136    j        352
1,506    |    1,247
2
1
Peace River   	
9
Summerland    	
1
Victoria    	
330    |        316
27
Totals    -
205
1
4,933
9.M9.     1     S. 621      1     /IOSS
111
52
163
TRAINING OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS TEACHERS.
Teachers of Industrial Arts are offered opportunities to complete their qualifications for service at a branch of the Summer School of Education held in the Vancouver
Technical School during the summer. The numbers attending are not as large as they
should be. Teachers whose qualifications are not complete sometimes have felt it their
duty to spend their summers in connection with some war effort. It is my opinion,
however, that, despite the valuable experience so gained, they would be well advised
not to omit opportunities given them at the Summer School.    Their duties throughout INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. B 57
the year in connection with giving instruction to the young students in the public
schools of the Province are too important to be neglected, and the Department cannot
continue to permit partially qualified instructors to teach if they do not take advantage
of the opportunities which the Department provides for them to increase their teaching
skills.
Thirty-eight men were in attendance at the Summer School of Education held at
the Vancouver Technical School. ' B 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS.
REPORT OF MISS JESSIE L. McLENAGHEN, B.Sc, DIRECTOR.
This year has seen a decided advance in Home Economics. The long-hoped-for
course at the University has at last become a reality, and classes are to commence in
September, 1943. Miss Dorothy P. Lefebvre, B.H.Sc. (Saskatchewan), M.Sc. (Iowa
State College), who has been appointed Associate Professor and Acting Head of the
department, has done brilliant work as a home economist in her native Province of
Saskatchewan, from the standpoint of both scholastic and practical achievement. Miss
Stella Beil, B.Sc, M.Sc. (Kansas State College), who has been made Assistant Professor,
also has an outstanding record behind her. We wish Miss Lefebvre and Miss Beil
every possible success in the new'duties they are undertaking.
We cannot rejoice in the fact that we now have our Chair of Home Economics at
the University of British Columbia without acknowledging the debt of gratitude we
owe to the Provincial Parent-Teacher Association, to the Provincial Local Council of
Women, and to the many other organizations that have for a number of years striven
so tirelessly to establish the course. We are also indebted to the Honourable the Minister of Education for the part he has played in championing this cause. We sincerely
hope that future developments in Home Economics will prove that the faith of our
supporters has not been misplaced.
In the schools throughout the Province the work has progressed satisfactorily.
War-time restrictions have made it difficult to secure some of the commodities required
for the classes, but this situation, instead of dampening the ardour of our teachers,
has challenged their ingenuity to find ways and means of overcoming the obstacles
presented.
It has been stressed time and time again, through News Letters and circulars,
that Home Economics teaching, if it is to attain its objectives, must seek to meet the
needs of the students and the community. The Home Economics Programme of Studies
is elastic, not rigid, and full permission has been given to teachers to make whatever
adjustments seem to be necessary to fit the course to local conditions, the only proviso
being that they notify the Provincial Director of changes adopted. More and more
are home economists realizing that they have an important part to play in laying the
foundations for higher standards of living, and most of our teachers are making a
determined effort to take advantage of every chance that presents itself to carry their
teaching beyond the class-room. In a number of places adult classes in certain phases
of Home Economics are being carried on, and school nurses and Home Economics
instructors are co-operating to bring about changes that will provide better nutrition
for school children.
Summer School was held in Vancouver this year. Although the enrolment was
not so large as usual, the enthusiasm was just as great. Our visiting instructor was
Miss Helen Michaelsen, M.Sc, of the Central Washington College of Education, Ellens-
burg, Washington, who gave courses in Nutrition, Family Relationships, and Child
Care. All who enrolled gave a glowing account of their work under Miss Michaelsen
and displayed great keenness. An excellent course on Curriculum and Methods in
Home Economics was again conducted by Mrs. Evelyn Hatton, B.Sc. Teachers who
attended will go to their schools equipped with many new and practical ideas.
Two hundred and ninety-seven students attained University Entrance and seventeen Senior Matriculation standing in Home Economics. Correspondence courses in
this subject continue to be popular.
The second convention of the Canadian Home Economics Association was held this
July at Toronto.    Two years ago it was decided that, in spite of war-time conditions, INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS. B 59
the members of an organization as new as this needed to meet if the interest that had
already been kindled was to be kept alive. Consequently, a " war-time conference "
was planned stressing the relationship between the various phases of Home Economics
and a war programme. Addresses were given on the following topics: " Dietitians
in the R.C.A.F."; " War-time Clothing "; " The Maintenance of Quality in Textiles
and Clothing in War-time"; "Textiles from the Consumer Angle"; "The Home
Economists' Responsibility for Better Nutrition in Canada "; " Food in the National
Perspective "; " Home Economists in the Community "; and " The Child and Society."
Altogether, the meetings were most successful, and the general conclusion was
that no mistake had been made in holding the convention. These opportunities for
binding together the members of the Association are invaluable, and all who were
present felt that, as a result of this conference, they would return to their various
duties with a new zest and interest.
The total number of Home Economics centres (including private
schools) in operation during the year was     133
The total number of Home Economics teachers was     127
The total number of pupils taking Home Economics was as
follows:—
In Elementary Schools  3,750
In Junior High Schools  7,223
Of these, the total number taking:—
Home Economics I. (Grade VII.) was 2,673
Home Economics II. (Grade VIII.) was 2,839
Home Economics III. (Grade IX.) was _ 1,711
In High Schools 2,890
Of these, the total number taking:—
Home Economics III. was     939
Home Economics (A) was     110
Home Economics (B) was     197
Home Economics (CC) was 1,428
Home Economics (C) was     152
Home Economics V. (pre-vocational course) was     24
Home Relations was      15
Senior Matriculation was      25
The total number taking Home Economics in clubs (boys) was    238
The total number of young women in Normal Schools taking
Home Economics was     201
The total number of young men in Normal Schools taking
Nutrition was       18 B 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF H. N. MacCORKINDALE, B.A., SUPERINTENDENT
OF SCHOOLS.
ENROLMENT.
Type of School.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
25,978
4,578
8,772
25,833
4,454
9,131
25,348
4,266
9,506
24,338
4,165
10,016
23,556
4,080
9,856
23,032
4,149
9,471
23,091
4,354
8,741
22,014
4,175
7,166
Totals ,,,	
39,328
39,418
39,120
38,519
37,492
36,652
36,186
33,355
From the table above the rate of change in enrolment over the past seven years
can be calculated.    The following is a table of enrolment variation:—
Years compared.
Elementary.
Junior High.
Senior High.
1935-36  - __ 	
— 145
— 485
-1,010
— 782
— 524
+     59
— 1,077
— 124
— 188
— 101
— 85
+     69
+   205
— 179
+   359
+   375
+   510
—   160
1936-37 -_  	
1937-38.	
1938-39 _  	
1939-40— _ __._    	
385
1940-41- _      _  __ _ _	
730
1941-42    ._   _ _	
— 1,575
In the elementary school the annual decrease was at its maximum in 1938. It
should be noted that the birth-rate of the 1938 group entering school (those born in
1932 and 1933) was the lowest according to the birth-rate table below. Since 1938
there has been a gradual shrinkage in the decrease until 1941, when there was an
actual increase of 59 over the previous year. The decrease in the year 1942 gives
a very irregular figure as we examine previous years. This was caused by the withdrawal of 1,356 Japanese children from the Vancouver elementary schools. This withdrawal of school children was caused by the removal of the Japanese families by the
British Columbia Security Commission from the Pacific Coast area.
When one considers the total number enrolled, the junior high school enrolment
has not changed a great deal over the past years. The increase in the years 1940 and
1941 was caused by the opening of the Lord Byng Junior High School as part of the
Lord Byng Senior High School organization. This is the second junior-senior high
school to be organized in the Vancouver City school system. The Kitsilano Junior-
Senior High School was organized in 1927. This type of organization has been found
to operate most successfully.
In the senior high school, for over a period of fifty years, the enrolment had always
increased from year to year up to and including 1938. The high birth-rate following
World War No. 1 in the years 1919 and 1920 is very noticeable in the 1938 enrolment.
Since 1938 there has been a growing decrease over the remaining years. This growing
decrease was caused partly by the decreased birth-rates in the years following 1921
and partly by the increased number of high school students going into the armed forces
and into war industry. It should be noted that approximately 700 Japanese students
withdrew from the senior high schools when the Japanese families were evacuated
from the Pacific Coast. This, in part, accounts for the very large decrease of 1,575
senior high school students in 1942. SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VANCOUVER.
B 61
To assist in predicting school enrolment in a system such as the City of Vancouver
it is necessary for one to study very carefully the birth statistics as well as trends in
population movements. Below is a table giving the number of children born in the
City of Vancouver from 1927 to 1942, inclusive:—
Year.
Female.
Male.
Total.
1927                                   „          	
1,997
2,211
2,279
2,272
2,120
1,784
1,598
1,629
1,758
1,774
1,916
1,999
2,090
2,671
2,801
3,211
2,199
2,245
2,368
2,385
2,253
1,905
1,725
1,780
1,830
1,804
2,034
2,228
2,275
2,420
2,876
3,440
4,196
1928       - -	
4,456
1929  	
4,647
1930                               	
4,657
1931           	
4,373
1932 _. .-.
3,689
1933            	
3,323
1934                                 —           .         ..                     	
3,409
1935 _
3,588
1936	
3,570
1937 _  -  	
3,950
1938                                                         	
4,227
4,365
5,091
5,677
6,651
1939                                                         	
1940
1941                                 	
1942                                	
If one examines the birth-rate figures for the years 1940, 1941, and 1942, it can
be estimated that the average annual increase during these three years will be approximately 700. It should also be noted that the total number of births in the City of
Vancouver in 1942 is approximately double the total births in 1933. It is difficult to
visualize the problems of administration that will arise as these groups progress from
grade to grade through the school system. It will be a repetition in greater magnitude
of the post-war period of World War No. 1. There will be greater demands for primary
pupil personnel, equipment, and supplies for the next few years at least.
The moving school population (aggravated by the war) must also be taken into
consideration with birth-rates when considering our city school enrolment. Below is
a table which shows the geographical origin of new pupils enrolled in the Vancouver
City school system from September 1st, 1942, to November 30th, 1942:—
Origin.
Elementary.
Secondary.
Total.
1,219
589
410
200
6
135
34
5
1
1
2
2
1
413
132
110
51
4
40
13
3
1
1,632
2. Alberta    —      .  _	
721
520
251
10
175
47
5
4
11. China       -        - - —    - -	
2
15. Unknown... ..  , _ _ 	
1
2,605
767
3,372
Note.—This summary of'moving school population has been made by Inspector
Straight over a period of seven years. The totals are as follows: 1936, 2,012; 1937,
2,249;   1938,1,865;   1939,1,760;   1940,2,294;   1941,2,931;  and 1942, 3,372. B 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
From the above table it will be noticed that the number of school children moving
into the Vancouver City school system is on the increase and will balance somewhat the
withdrawal of Japanese children and the withdrawal of others to war services and war
industries.
The enrolment in the elementary schools for the school-year 1943-44 should show a
slight increase, while the junior and senior high school enrolment should show a small
decrease. The upper grades of the senior high schools may still continue to decrease
should war conditions warrant students withdrawing to enter industries and the armed
services.
SCHOOL ACCOMMODATION.
There is still another movement of school population always taking place. This
is the movement within the city itself. In some of the older sections of the city
school population is decreasing, while in newer areas extensive building projects have
caused considerable increase in the school enrolment, necessitating more class-room
accommodation.
There are sufficient class-rooms in the system to accommodate the school enrolment,
but the population movements make some of these rooms, for the time being, of little
value. Alteration of school boundaries will help in some cases, but in others it will be
necessary to provide new accommodation.
The following areas are ones to which the Board and its officials must give special
attention in order to provide elementary-school accommodation:—
(1.) South of Fifty-seventh  Avenue  West,  between  Granville  Street and
Marine Drive:   Through the co-operation of the City Council and Parks
Board, the Board of School Trustees was able to procure in this area a
site for a small four-room primary school.    This new unit will be an
annex to one of the larger elementary schools.    The development of this
school-site is to be planned jointly by the School and Parks Boards.
(2.)  South of Sixteenth Avenue West, between Blenheim Street and Arbutus
Street:   The School Board is at present negotiating for a site at the
corner of Twenty-fifth Avenue and Trafalgar Street.    It is to be hoped
that this site can be procured adjacent to the park reservation on the
south  side  of  Twenty-fifth  Avenue.    The  whole  area  could   then  be
developed jointly and in co-operation with the City Council and Parks
Board.    I have every reason to believe that satisfactory arrangements
can be made for the procuring of this property.
(3.)  South of Thirty-seventh Avenue West, between Granville Street and Oak
Street:  A site has been procured between Forty-third Avenue West and
Forty-fifth Avenue West and east of Selkirk.    This site is adjacent to a
park reservation in the same area.    The  entire site will be jointly
developed by the School and Parks Boards.
(4.) East of Renfrew Street, between Great Northern Tracks and Third
Avenue East:  A small site has been procured large enough to develop a
four-room primary school as an annex to one of the larger elementary
schools.
All of the four areas mentioned above are sections of the city where considerable
building development has taken place during the past two years.
The decreased enrolment in the elementary schools in the past few years has made
it possible to provide, in nearly all our elementary-school buildings, a room for library
facilities, a room for music instruction, as well as a good Art and Crafts room. We
were very fortunate in being able to modernize all old school plants in this way.
Because of these changes, it was possible to provide the revised curriculum for the
development of the aptitudes and capacities of our pupils.    We are extremely proud of SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VANCOUVER. B 63
our school-plant adjustments and the fine way in which they operate. However, we
are very near the time when our elementary-school population will begin to increase.
I do hope that when that time comes, we shall be able to keep these necessary facilities
which we have been able to procure at some cost of planning and organization. Inspector Thomas has stated on more than one occasion, and has been supported by Inspector
Straight, that a survey of existing accommodation should be made next year and that
plans should be drawn up for such changes in organization of the boundaries of school
districts as would avoid the necessity of eliminating these very necessary facilities.
BUILDING MAINTENANCE.
A good building "maintenance programme is one that provides for repairs and
renewals immediately any deterioration is noticed. This has the advantage of keeping
costs to a minimum and of always having the buildings in good repair. It is by such
a policy that the Vancouver school system has been able to maintain its plant in good
condition at an expenditure of approximately l1^ per cent, of the total building and
equipmeht value. This is an extraordinary low rate for building maintenance and
alterations. Included in our total expenditure for maintenance are various minor
alterations so necessary to make our school plants suitable for the teaching of the
content of the modern curriculum. Rapid strides have been made in lighting, plumbing, and heating. Consequently there has been a constant annual improvement in our
class-room lighting by removing the old style drop-lights and replacing them with the
direct lighting through opalescent shades. These lighting improvements have been
practically completed. Although the consumption of electric power is greater, the
improved facilities are more than justified from the point of view of health alone.
Thus there has been an endeavour on the part of the Board to provide the advantages which are enjoyed by some students fortunate enough to reside in districts where
schools have been built in recent years. This general policy, apart from being practical, gives an equal opportunity to the children of the system as a whole. It is unfortunate that we have so many elementary schools without gymnasiums and auditoriums.
These schools were built prior to the time when such facilities were considered an
essential part of a modern school. In some instances we have been able to provide
some gymnasium accommodation by joining together two frame class-rooms. These
class-rooms were constructed to fill the temporary need for accommodation after the
last war.
During the year our architect and building superintendent, Mr. H. W. Postle, and
our building maintenance foreman, Mr. J. McKellar, retired under the " Superannuation Act." This was very much regretted because they had both contributed long
and valuable service to the Board. Their retirement was accepted with our best wishes.
The Board of School Trustees appointed Mr. F. J. Beechey as successor to Mr. Postle
and Mr. J. McKinnon as successor to Mr. J. McKellar. During the short time that
these men have occupied their new positions I have been very much impressed by the
very excellent way in which they have continued with the building maintenance programme. The Board feels proud of the very competent way in which these new
appointees have undertaken their new responsibilities.
BUREAU OF MEASUREMENTS.
Below is a brief summary of the main activities of this important department
under the direction of Mr. Robert Straight, Inspector of Schools :—
1. Testing:—
(a.)  Number of Individual Intelligence Tests given       703
(b.)  Number of pupils given Group Intelligence and Achievement Tests 10,268
(These tests were actually administered by the personnel of the
Bureau of Measurements.) B 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1942-43.
(c.) Intelligence tests for beginners were given to 273 prospective Grade I.B
pupils who were under 6 years of age prior to December 1st, 1942; 104
of the 273 were admitted on trial to Grade I.B, and the remainder, 169,
were rejected as being unlikely to succeed in the work of the first grade.
The Detroit Beginning First-Grade Intelligence Test (Revised) was
given to the pupils of " C " Class and to problem case children of Grade
I.B. In some schools, at the request of the principal, all beginners were
tested.
(d.) For June, 1943, achievement tests in the fundamental subjects were
given to approximately 3,200 Grades VI. and VIII. pupils; the Grade VI.
pupils in junior high school areas for promotion to junior high school,
and the Grade VIII. pupils in senior high school areas for promotion to
senior high school. These are very valuable standardized tests which
assist the principals and inspectors in maintaining levels of achievement.
(e.) In accordance with the agreement with the Vancouver General Hospital
Board and the Vancouver School Board, probationary classes in nursing
for the Vancouver General Hospital were given intelligence tests in
November and March.
(/.) In June, 390 pupils taking Mathematics VI. in King Edward, Magee,
John Oliver, Prince of Wales, and Technical High Schools were given the
Co-operative General Mathematics Test, Revised Series, Form N. This
test had been given in June, 1941. A comparison between scores earned
in 1941 and in 1943 will be made and the results of the study will be
available at a later date.
2. Other Activities:—
(a.) Analysis of results of junior and senior matriculation examinations,
June, 1942.
(b.) Analysis of the results of the achievement tests given to junior high
school entrance pupils and to senior high school entrance pupils in areas
where there are no junior high schools.
(c.) Compilation of statistics on the geographical origin of new pupils enrolling in Vancouver Schools, September 1, 1942, to November 30, 1942.
(d.) Compilation of statistics on Age-grade Census for September, 1942, and
Promotion Summary for June, 1942.
(e.)   Tabulation of the Oriental school population, as in former years.
(/.) Two hundred and thirty-five school records were compiled for men and
women seeking membership in the Defence Forces.
(g.) Three hundred and seventy-four applications for transfers of pupils
across school boundaries dealt with.
(h.) Two hundred and thirty-four applications for exemption from school
attendance dealt with.
(i.)  Ten applications for deferred payment of tuition fees dealt with.
(j.) The total number of home visits made by the members of this Department, exclusive of those made by the Supervisor of Special Classes, was
335.
(k.) Preparation of outlines of courses to be offered in the different secondary
schools during the school-year 1943-44. Copies of these were sent to all
elementary and secondary schools.
(..) An educational guidance letter (four pages) to Grade VIII. pupils was
prepared and sent to each of the 1,800 Grade VIII. entrance candidates.
(m.) Sorting and forwarding to principals of secondary schools the applications of students for choice of course—approximately, 3,700. SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VANCOUVER. B 65
(n.)  Record and medical cards and requests for same handled:-—■
Number of cards coming into office  (record card and medical card
for the same pupil counted as one card), 19,360.
Number of requests for cards made by schools (record card and medical card for the same pupil being counted as one request), 12,922.
Requests which the Bureau of Measurements made to schools for
cards which had not been sent to office (record card and medical
card for the same pupil being counted as one request), 3,656.
(o.)  In December a traffic census was taken which showed the number of
pupils who:  Walk to school;  ride in street-cars to school;  ride in family
autos to school;  ride to school on bicycles;  cross arterial highways, walking or on bicycles, on the way to or from the school, etc.
(p.)  At the request of Col. F. T. Fairey, Director of Technical Education,
Department  of  Education,  Victoria,  B.C.,  a  questionnaire  containing
information on Industrial and Commercial Arts education was sent during May through the Bureau of Measurements' to the schools.    A tabulation of the results was made by the Bureau and forwarded to each
Trustee, to Col. Fairey, and to officials of the Vancouver School Board.
When schools reopen in September, a copy of the report will also be
furnished each principal.    Bulletin 107 of the Bureau of Measurements
contains further particulars regarding this study.
(q.)  Selective Service and Vacation Employment of Students:   Conferences
were held with Mr. W. MacGillivray, Director of the Dominion-Provincial
Emergency Farm  Labour Service;   Col.  Wood,  of Mr.  MacGillivray's
office;  and Mr. G. E. Street, of Selective Service, to make arrangements
for the employment of youth during the summer,
(r.)   Nurses' Week, May 9th to 15th:   During Nurses' Week, groups of girls
from the different secondary schools visited the local hospitals.    Miss
Elinor M. Palliser, Director of Nursing, Vancouver General Hospital,
reported that all groups from Vancouver Schools, visiting that hospital,
were accompanied by teacher-counsellors.    She states further that she
hopes to arrange for more such tours for the school-year 1943-44.
Mr. Straight and his staff of able assistants are to be congratulated upon the very
capable way in which they have undertaken the many important duties which have been
allotted to them.
NIGHT-SCHOOLS.
During the year the Vancouver night-schools conducted classes in many different
subjects. Prominent amongst the courses newly introduced into the programme at the
commencement of the year were those covering Aircraft Recognition and also Target
Practice and Care of Small Arms—courses designed for the instruction of teachers in
the Vancouver school system. In addition, courses in Ship-fitting and in Machine-shop
Theory and Practice were conducted for special groups desiring intensive training for
industrial purposes.
At the commencement of the fall session elementary and advanced courses in
Spanish were instituted for teachers. Encouraging registrations have been obtained
for both classes and the students are carrying on their