Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1944

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0319055.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0319055.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0319055-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0319055-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0319055-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0319055-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0319055-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0319055-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0319055-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0319055.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
•
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
BEPOET
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
FOR   THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 3 1st, 1942
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Ban-field, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1943.  To His Honour W. C. WOODWARD,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.   '
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game
Commission for the year ended December 31st, 1942.
R. L. MAITLAND,
Attorney-G eneral.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 194S. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1943.
Honourable R. L. Maitland, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1942.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
JAMES G. CUNNINGHAM,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
Members, Game Commission. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Reports— PAGE.
Game Commission       7
Game Wardens, " A " Division       9
Officer Commanding " B " Division    12
Officer Commanding " C " Division _.—    27
Officer Commanding " D " Division     32
Game Wardens, " E " Division     35
Report on Kamloops Trout-feeding Experiments     38
Economic Status of Pheasants on Cultivated Lands in the Okanagan Valley     49
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-42, inclusive     63
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences and Deer (Game) Tags     64
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences     65
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Anglers' and Outfitters' Licences    66
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers' Licences     67
Revenue—Sale of Fur-traders' and  Taxidermists'  Licences and  Royalties  on
Fur ,_ 68
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-42, inclusive     69
Comparative   Statement   showing  Pelts   of   Fur-bearing   Animals   on   which
Royalty has been collected, 1921-42, inclusive     70
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty was
collected during Year 1942     71
List of Confiscated Fur, 1942     72
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1942, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur
and Firearms     73
Bounties paid, 1942     74
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922-42, inclusive     75
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1942     76
Prosecutions, 1942     83
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1942     85
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1942     86
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special  (Trapping)  Firearms Licences,
Season 1941-42 : ..  100
Statements—Returns of Fur-farmers, 1942 ,  100
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1942  101
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1942  101
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1942, also showing Revenue from
Sale of Bird-bands  102
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1942  103
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1942  105  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,
1942.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
As in the past few years, no material changes have been made in our system of
game administration. Frequent and, in many areas, almost constant patrols have been
undertaken with very beneficial results.
After many years of educational work, one of the most important phases of which
has been the taking and frequent showings of game and sport-fishing moving pictures,
we have now reached that point where we can safely state that the general public has
become better acquainted with the need of conserving and protecting our valuable
sport-fish and game resources; especially does this apply to our school children. These
game films have been shown to audiences outside the Province as well, and this has
been responsible for many non-residents coming into British Columbia for the purpose
of enjoying the excellent hunting and fishing that is available to them.
REGISTRATION OF TRAP-LINES.
In our report of last year, we mentioned the need of amending the regulations
covering the registration of trap-lines. The necessary amendments have been put
through and, as a result, we are now in a position to protect more completely our
important and valuable fur and trapping industry. These regulations, first introduced
in British Columbia in 1926, have been responsible for the better conservation of our
fur-bearing animals and, consequently, the system of trap-line control or registration
has now been adopted by a number of other Provinces in Canada.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES.
Due to existing conditions, no change has been made in the system dealing with
the registration of big-game guides. However, the various problems of our guides are
being closely watched and undoubtedly at an opportune time we will be in a position to
recommend the passing of new regulations which will not only control all phases of big-
game guiding, but will greatly assist all registered guides in the Province and will
further enable us to assure the big-game hunter that he will be under the supervision
of a qualified, capable, and properly equipped guide when he is hunting.
FUR-FARMING.
During these times fur-farmers are experiencing considerable difficulty in procuring adequate and suitable food-supplies for the animals they are farming. This
condition has resulted in many of the smaller farms going out of business. Probably
if the fur market had not kept a fairly steady position in fur prices, many more fur-
farmers would also have disposed of their farms.
BIRD-BANDING.
As during 1941, no bird-banding operations were carried out this year by the
Department.
BOUNTY ON PREDATORY ANIMALS.
There have been numerous demands for increased bounties. A system of employing responsible, trained, and properly equipped hunters would, no doubt, greatly assist
7 M 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
in taking care of predatory animals. It is interesting to note that the comparative
statement on bounties paid over a period of years shows a decrease in the number of
pelts of wolves and coyotes presented for bounty payment during 1942, which would
seem to indicate that the peak, or plentiful, period is on the wane.
Statements showing bounties paid this year, as well as over a period of years, are
to be found in the statistical portion of this report. The statement of vermin destroyed
by Game Wardens during the year is respectfully drawn to your attention.
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
A reduction in the number of non-resident hunters and fishermen and a consequent
falling-off in revenue is to be noted on examining the statement of licences issued.
While there has been a reduction in the number of inquiries as to hunting and fishing
during the year, taking everything into consideration, our non-resident trade is standing up much better than we anticipated. There would seem to be little doubt that
after this world conflict is over there will be a most decided increase in the number of
outside sportsmen coming annually to British Columbia.
We have continued to receive the whole-hearted co-operation of the Department of
Trade and Industry in advertising the exceptional possibilities that our Province offers
to visiting sportsmen. Needless to say, we are most appreciative of this friendly cooperation.
GAME PROPAGATION.
While we would have been pleased to have been in a position to increase our
pheasant propagation programme, we unfortunately could not do so owing to the very
great need of practising every economy in the administration of the Department. It is
to be hoped that we will be able during the coming year to increase our game-bird liberations in those portions of the Province where artificial propagation of certain species
of game birds is most necessary.
Our policy of trapping live beaver within the boundaries of the Bowron Lake Game
Reserve is still being carried out as far as possible. We might mention that live beaver
plantings already made by the Department have proven that our policy is an excellent
one and would warrant an increase in the number of beavers trapped and transplanted
elsewhere.
Game reserves which have been established over a period of time are responsible
for an increased game population in the adjacent areas. Every possible step has been
taken in protecting our'established game reserves and bird sanctuaries.
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS.
Reports indicate that in some districts ducks and other migratory game birds were
plentiful, yet in other areas the past hunting season was only fair. A survey would
seem to show that migratory game birds are on the increase throughout the Province
and only fair shooting in some districts can be attributed to poor weather conditions
and probably the scarcity of natural food.
REVENUE.
Increases have been shown in revenue during the past few years and it is with
considerable regret that we now have to advise that during 1942 a decrease was the
case. This decrease, while not very large, is attributable to the falling-off of revenue
from the sale of non-resident hunting and fishing licences. The total decrease in
revenue over the record revenue year of 1941 was $2,466.19.
GAME-FISH CULTURE.
Even under existing conditions, we have endeavoured to keep up our planned
programme of game-fish culture-work, although it has been necessary to refrain from REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 9
distributing trout in lakes or streams in remote areas. We have, however, concentrated our efforts on keeping up the available supply of trout in lakes and streams that
can be readily reached from the main highways.
As mentioned in our report of last year, an investigation has been carried on
covering the trout food problem encountered at our various hatcheries. A paper on
the preliminary work conducted is to be found later on in this report.
Our programme of destroying coarse or undesirable fish is being continued as far
as possible.
Statements covering our trout plantings or liberations during the year are contained in this report.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The British Columbia Police has furnished us with very valuable assistance during
the year and the continued friendly relations between the British Columbia Police, the
Forest Branch, and the Department of Agriculture, as well as many other Government
Departments, has been most gratifying.
As in past years, the excellent spirit and friendly co-operation of the Washington
State Game Department has been most helpful. It would seem that there is nothing
too small or. too great that our friends in the State of Washington will not do for us.
We wish, in conclusion, to express'our most sincere appreciation to the Commissioner and Assistant Commissioner of the British Columbia Police, the officers and men
of this Force; the Provincial Fisheries Department; the Honourable the Minister of
Fisheries for the Dominion; the Chief Supervisor of Dominion Fisheries for the Province; Dr. W. A. Clemens, Dr. Ian McTaggart-Cowan, and Dr. D. C. B. Duff, of the
University of British Columbia; the Chief Federal Migratory Bird Officer for British
Columbia; Game Associations, farmers, and many other organizations and residents of
the Province who have so willingly helped us at all times during the year in our work
of conserving for the benefit of the people of British Columbia our very valuable game
and sport-fish resources.
"A" DIVISION   (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF
THE MAINLAND COAST).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens dealing with game and sport-fish conditions in "A" Game Division for the year ended December 31st, 1942.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bears are increasing, due to the fact that they are very seldom
hunted, although the season for hunting them is open throughout most of the year.
Many complaints of black bear doing damage have been received and any such complaint has been given prompt attention.
Grizzly bear are to be found in various portions of the mainland coast but are not
found on Vancouver Island. At the heads of Loughborough and Knight Inlets grizzly
bears can be successfully hunted in season, and have been the means of attracting some
non-resident sportsmen to these districts each spring and fall.
Deer.—Game Wardens report deer as being very plentiful in nearly every section
of Vancouver Island, but in the mainland portion of the Division deer are scarce. As
in the case of black bears, deer have been responsible for numerous complaints of crop-
damage. In an attempt to alleviate damage, special permits to shoot deer at night have
been freely issued to farmers and others who have had cause for complaint.
Mountain-goat.—As in former years, mountain-goat have been observed in the
Cowichan Lake country, but these animals apparently are not increasing to any great
extent. Probably later on it would be advisable to liberate more of these animals, as
we really should not expect any great increase in the small number of animals liberated
some eighteen years ago. M 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Wapiti (Elk).—In the Campbell River and Alert Bay areas elk are not increasing,
while in the Cowichan Lake district some signs of elk increasing have been noted.
More calves were observed in the Shaw Creek Game Reserve, Cowichan Lake, than in
any past year.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver, in some districts, are plentiful, but complaints of these animals doing
damage have not been received in the volume of previous years. As in the past, the
policy of permitting the trapping of beaver doing damage to private and public property, and limiting the take of these animals on various registered trap-lines, has worked
out very well in the majority of cases.
Muskrats have been caught in fair numbers throughout the southern sections of
Vancouver Island and these animals can be considered as being on the increase in most
districts.
Generally, racoon are fairly plentiful, while marten, otter, weasel, and wolverine
are not overabundant.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—In some sections of the Division, especially in the Nanaimo and
Alberni districts, blue grouse were not plentiful, due to some extent to the adverse
weather conditions during the past breeding season.
Reports from Campbell River indicate these birds were fairly plentiful, but owing
to numerous slash-fires hunting was not as good as in the previous year, as the birds
migrated back into timbered country very early in the season.
Grouse (Ruffed).—As in the case of blue grouse, ruffed or willow grouse were
fairly plentiful in only a few sections, while in most areas they were scarce. It would
seem that the Alberni district provided the best shooting on ruffed grouse.
Pheasants.—In those portions of Vancouver Island where these birds have been
introduced, reports indicate that pheasants can not be considered as plentiful. However, a fair hunting season was the case in those areas near Victoria. ' Due to the
complaints of pheasants doing damage in the Cowichan area no fresh stock was liberated and, consequently, the crop of birds in this country has diminished to a considerable extent.
The Game Warden at Alberni reports pheasants as scarce in most sections, with a
fair showing in a few local areas.
Partridge.—Reported as scarce.
Quail.—California quail were to be found in small numbers in the Nanaimo,
Alberni, and Courtenay districts, while they were reported in fair numbers in the Cowichan and Victoria sections. A slight increase in mountain quail was noticeable near
Victoria.
Ptarmigan.—Generally these birds are not found to any extent on Vancouver
Island, but can be observed in fair numbers in the northern portions of the Division.
Migratory Game Birds.
■
As during the previous year, conditions encountered during the hunting season
were responsible for only fair shooting.
Some Game Wardens suggest that the season opened too late, and one Warden
reports that the season was below average, due to the fact that most ducks had left the
district before the opening of the hunting season.
Some reports indicate geese were observed in greater numbers during migration,
but very few birds rested on the island and consequently only a small number were
bagged. The Game Warden at Duncan advises that far more geese were observed in
migration over his district than in any previous year, and that some older residents of
the district informed him they had never seen so large a migration through that part
of Vancouver Island.
I REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 11
Swans were again observed in a number of sections. Some thirty birds were to
be seen at one time in the Upper Campbell Lake area.
Black brant were in good numbers, especially during the months of February,
March, and April. The hunting season for these birds closed on the last day of February and during that month good bags were obtained by hunters.
Shore-birds appear to be quite plentiful.
Vermin.
All reports indicate an increase in cougar, and in some districts bounty payments
have been much greater than in the previous year. Wolves are still present in some
districts on Vancouver Island.
All Game Wardens have been continually destroying vermin wherever possible
and some reports indicate a considerable reduction in the number of predators, which
include cougar, wolves, crows, and domestic cats and dogs gone wild.
Game-protection.
Patrols have been constantly carried out in every section of the Division and every
possible effort has been put forward to stop game and fish violations in order to improve
game conditions. Pit-lamping in some sections is still being carried on in spite of
exerting every effort to stamp it out. It might be mentioned, however, this nefarious
practice is not nearly so prevalent as it was a few years ago. Great difficulty has been
encountered in the Courtenay-Campbell River sections by the Game Warden patrolling
that area, due to the construction and use of many logging-roads which now penetrate
well into country which heretofore was not hunted to any great extent. The area
referred to covers a large territory and could, if finances permitted, be better patrolled
and supervised by engaging an additional Game Warden.
Game Propagation. \
Pheasants were released in a number of districts during the year.    Partridge
obtained through the co-operation of the Alberta Game Protective Association and
liberated in* the Nanaimo district have done fairly well.    It is known that they have
raised a number of chicks.    No reports have been received covering the experiment in
liberating pheasants in logged-off areas in the Sooke district, but the experiment is still
being carried on and a complete report will be available as to its success or otherwise in
the next year or two. _ „
Game Reserves.
All game reserves and bird sanctuaries on Vancouver Island have been carefully
supervised during the year.    Many patrols have been made into or through these areas.
The reports indicate that the area covered by the Shaw Creek Game Reserve, Cowichan Lake, was logged off to a great extent during the past year. Some slash-burning
has taken place, but as this was very well controlled it did more good than harm to the
game supply. This reserve has a fairly good population of wapiti (elk), deer, and
grouse.    The wapiti are at last slightly increasing and many calves were observed
during the year. _,      „
Fur Trade.
The fur-catch during the trapping season can be considered as being fair. Most,
if not all, the fur taken in the Division is shipped and sold to fur-dealers in Vancouver
and to a few transient traders travelling each year through some portions of Vancouver
Island- Fur-farming.
The properly established fox and mink farms seem to be operating quite well financially. However, due to existing conditions, some reduction in fur-farms can be anticipated for many reasons, the principal one being the difficulty in obtaining adequate
cheap food-supplies. M 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Trap-lines.
All Game Wardens report that the system of trap-line registration is working out
most satisfactorily and one officer writes that no improvement can be made in our
system of trap-line control.
Registration of Guides.
As the Division as a whole cannot be classed as a big-game district, there are only
a few registered guides to be found and these are in the mainland section where there
is grizzly-bear hunting.
Special Patrols.
Each Game Warden advises that patrols have been constantly carried out in their
respective districts. A few patrols that might be termed " special" were made during
the year into remote sections of the Division.
Hunting Accidents.
Four hunting accidents were reported during the year, only one of which was of a
serious nature. One of the four accidents reported was apparently caused through the
placing of a loaded shotgun in a leaning position against a log which was being sawed;
the saw jammed and, when endeavouring to clear it, the shotgun fell, exploded and
struck the person sawing the log in the chest, resulting in almost instant death. The
other three accidents were fortunately not of a serious nature. One hunter was injured
through falling off a bluff when hunting deer; another through slipping on a log,
resulting in a broken ankle; and the fourth case was apparently unavoidable. In this
instance a hunter travelling through some heavy brush stepped into the line of fire of
another hunter who had just shot at a grouse.
Game-fish Culture.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield, Nanaimo, writes that good results have been
obtained from planting trout fingerlings in the lakes under his supervision. Game
Warden B. Cash, Victoria, advises fishing has greatly improved in his district through
artificial-propagation work. Other Game Wardens report improved fishing conditions
generally throughout the Division.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
The past season was only fair in most sections of the Division. In the Victoria
district dry, hot weather and forest fires were in evidence and this was responsible for
somewhat adverse hunting conditions. Forest fires burned over a large part of the
area at Coal Creek, where pheasants had been previously released, and this fact resulted
in a set-back in connection with the experiment being conducted covering the propagation of pheasants in logged-off areas.
During March and April a number of yearling deer were found dead in the Kok-
silah, Shawnigan, and Sooke sections. Examinations of some of the carcasses indicated
they had lung-worm infestation and some form of dysentery.
All Game Wardens express their sincere appreciation of the assistance rendered
during the year by all members of the British Columbia Police Force, the British
Columbia Forest Branch, Game Associations, farmers, and sportsmen.
"B" DIVISION  (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By A. F. Sinclair, Officer Commanding.
I herewith beg to submit annual report of game conditions in " B " Division for
the year ended 1942, as well as the report of Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson on
game or sport-fish conditions. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 13
Big Game.
Moose.—Moose are still increasing east of the Kootenay and Columbia Rivers from
the International Boundary to the Canoe River. There are also a good number of
moose on the west side of the rivers mentioned, but not in such large numbers. Game
Warden B. Rauch reports a considerable increase in moose between the Moyie and the
main Yahk Rivers.    Moose are reported from Creston, but these are mostly drifters.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti range from the International Boundary to Bush River on
the east side of the Kootenay and Columbia Rivers, also between the Spillimacheen and
Skookumchuck Rivers, where they are increasing. There is now reported to be a good
number in the Gold Creek area, south-east of Cranbrook. Game Warden W. H. Cart-
wright reports a cow and a calf at the head of Boundary Creek, west of Creston. These
presumably came from the American side, where there is a band.
Game Warden M. B. Ewart reports that the wapiti in the vicinity of Princeton
have split up considerably this past fall and that some have migrated south to the State
of Washington. There was a short season in this area during which two bulls were
reported killed.
Wapiti are reported increasing in the Ashnola and east of the Okanagan. There
are also wapiti reported west of Summerland.    Very few were killed in the past season.
Mountain-sheep.—One variety only in " B " Division, Rocky Mountain or bighorn.
They inhabit the Rocky Mountains south from Golden to the Crowsnest Pass Railway.
There are several small bands in the vicinity of Keremeos and Okanagan Falls and also
some sheep in the Ashnola country. These sheep have been protected for years, but
very little increase has been reported. I am glad to report, however, that the past year
has shown a substantial increase.
The hsemorrhagic septicaemia which was prevalent in the fall and early winter of
1941 killed approximately 100 sheep at Radium and possibly twenty back of Fairmont.
A big decrease in sheep has been noted in the White Swan area, where undoubtedly the
sheep were infected by the disease. The disease apparently died out in this area and
no further report was received until the early part of December, 1942, when sheep were
reported coughing and were apparently sick in the vicinity of Premier Lake.
Caribou.—Very little information on these animals, but they appear to be holding
their own. They are found in this Division in the Big Bend and Revelstoke areas and
south along the height, of land from Glacier to Creston, on east side of Kootenay Lake.
Caribou are reported to have greatly increased their numbers in the country south
of Nelson.    The kill was light.
Mountain-goat.—Very plentiful throughout the Division, with the exception of the
Boundary country, where they are protected.
Mule-deer.—Fair numbers throughout the Division, with larger numbers in Kettle
River watershed.    There was a much larger kill this last year, owing to early snow.
White-tail Deer.—Quite well distributed throughout the Division, with the exception of the Similkameen. They appear to be holding their own, although there were
more killed the past fall, owing to early snow.
Bear (Black, Brown, and Grizzly).—Black and brown bears are plentiful throughout the Division, where they have created considerable trouble in orchards during the
past summer.
Grizzly are fairly plentiful throughout the unsettled parts of this Division.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Something should be done in regard to the regulating of the trapping of beaver by
permit or tag, or at least in some manner whereby the Game Commission would have
control of the number of these animals which might be trapped; and I can only repeat
what I mentioned last year, that this matter should not be delayed too long.
There seems to have been a much smaller take of muskrats in the past year. This
was, in some cases, due to freezing out, which will be the case as long as we have a M 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
spring season, as the fur-catch is taken from the muskrats who have managed to survive the winter; I believe it might be advisable to try a fall season for a few years as
this would allow the breeders to have all the available food and accommodation for the
winter.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue Grouse.—These birds were fairly plentiful throughout the Division. They
look after themselves very well as they are up in the high country before the season
opens. However, the past season was somewhat wet and the hatch was not so good as
ordinarily.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—Report about fair. There is no doubt that willow
grouse have been making a great deal of increase over the past three years. However,
last year's wet season did not help much for the year 1942, but there appeared to be a
good number of willow grouse about.
Franklin Grouse.—Fairly plentiful in the higher parts of the Kootenays, where
they have not been heavily hunted.
Sharp-tail Grouse.—A few coveys of these birds in the Kootenay, Boundary, and
Lower Similkameen districts.    They seem to hold their own.
Ptarmigan.—Reported from various high points in the Division.
Pheasants.—These birds have done very well in the Similkameen, Lower Okanagan,
Grand Forks, and Creston areas.    There is also a good number reported about Midway.
Pheasants at Wasa appear to have been pretty well exterminated the winter of
1941-42. There are a few birds at Waldo, Invermere, Kaslo, Procter, Nakusp, and at
Robson.
Partridge.—There are some partridges in the Lower Okanagan, Grand Forks, and
Creston districts, with very little increase.
Quail.—Quail are very plentiful in the Lower Okanagan and Keremeos districts.
There are also some at Grand Forks.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—Some increase. There appears to have been a fair hatch of local ducks,
with the shooting not as heavy as usual.
Geese.—Appear to have increased on the Upper Columbia, although they were
reported less plentiful at Creston.
Wilson Snipe.—These birds appear to be holding their own.
Coots.—Too many. The general opinion appears to be that coots are plentiful;
that they do a great deal of harm to fry; and nobody seems to be shooting them.
Swans.—Increase in swans continues.
Vermin.
The following vermin were destroyed by Game Wardens: 110 coyotes, 23 dogs, 8
ravens, 12 kingfishers, 88 carp, 131 hawks, 653 crows, 3 bobcat, 160 cats, 79 owls, 1
black bear, 7 eagles, 7 cougar, 246 magpies, 100 magpie eggs, and 6 rattlesnakes.
There was an increase of 29 coyotes destroyed over last year, which shows the
increase of these animals in the Division.
The cougar problem is still with us. They are continually being killed but they
seem to keep reappearing.
Two predatory-animal hunters were engaged for short periods during the year
and disposed of 27 cougar, 5 coyotes, 1 owl, and 1 bobcat.
Game-protection.
There were seventy prosecutions, with sixty-one convictions and five dismissals
under the " Game Act" and four convictions under the British Columbia Special
Fishery Regulations. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 15
Game Propagation.
No restocking.    Some feeding was done, but conditions were very good during
the year.
Game Reserves.
The Elk River Game Reserve, situated on the White, Bull, and Elk Rivers, is the
most important game reserve, as it is situated in the heart of the big-game country.
Game-bird sanctuaries adjacent to Nelson and at Vaseaux Lake, south of Penticton, appear to be very beneficial.
Deer sanctuaries exist at Elko and in the Kettle River district. They are on
winter yarding-grounds of mule-deer and serve to protect the deer if we get a heavy
fall of snow before the hunting season is closed.
Fur Trade.
We have very few fur-traders in this Division.    Practically all of the fur goes to
Vancouver.
Fur-farming.
The fur-farming business seems to have taken a great set-back in the last few
years and at the present has fallen off badly. The only bright spot appears to be in
the raising of marten, where at least two of our fur-farmers appear to have pretty
well solved the problem.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration and renewal of trap-lines takes up considerable time; but it is
time well spent, as the registration of trap-lines has worked both to the advantage of
trappers and to the stand of fur-bearers. A fair number of trappers have joined the
armed forces and their trap-lines are being held until they return, although in most
cases they make an agreement with some person to trap their lines during their absence.
Registration of Guides.
There were thirty-four licensed guides in the Division during the year. Business
was not so good as last year. Big-game hunting in the East Kootenay was away off.
The only bright spot was deer-hunting on the Kettle River, in which case there was a
great increase.
There is a great need for a drastic change in the " Guides " regulations. No guide
should be allowed to take out over two hunters at one time; for instance, one guide last
fall had nine hunters out at one time.
Special Patrols.
Twelve special patrols were reported by Game Wardens during the year. Also,
routine patrols were carried out as usual during the year.
Hunting Accidents.
On December 13th, 1942, William Van Tassel, Rossland, B.C., at about 2 p.m.,
while hunting on Tulip Creek on the Lower Arrow Lake at an altitude of about 5,000
feet, crossed a rock-slide. He apparently stepped on a key rock, releasing a large
boulder, which got him down and rolled across both legs, breaking the right leg below
the knee and badly bruising the other.
Van Tassel was located about 10.30 p.m., December 14th, by Game Warden Haskell,
and he was finally put into the ambulance at Syringa Creek at 5 p.m., December 15th.
Great credit is due Game Warden Haskell for the work he did both in finding and
assisting in getting the injured man out.
Van Tassel was still in the hospital at the end of the year. Trouble has been
experienced in properly setting his leg, owing to bad swelling and also both bones
being broken. M 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
On December 13th, 1942, while going down a cut-bank on his father's trap-line
on the Upper Kootenay, Carl Brewer, of Invermere, fell and the .22 rifle which he was
carrying was discharged. The bullet grazed the inside of his left foot. The boy was
able to walk to the cabin with the aid of a stick, where he was laid up for four days,
after which he went back to trapping.
Note.—Fred Poland, of Golden, injured in 1941, and reported under doctor's care
in my last year's report. The arm and hand are improving slowly but the boy has not
got the use of the hand yet, although the arm is greatly improved.
This accident was a self-inflicted wound in the upper arm, caused by pulling a
shotgun by the muzzle from a boat. The boy was aged fifteen at the time of the
accident and had gone hunting without being accompanied by an adult.
Game-fish Culture.
During the year 1942, game-fish culture in " B " Division was placed directly under
Fishery Supervisor Robinson, which has relieved me of considerable detail and, as
Mr. Robinson has made a full report on the year's activities, I shall confine myself to
just a short synopsis of the year's work.
All hatcheries were operated with the exception of the Taft Hatchery, which previously had been operated under a grant to the Revelstoke Rod and Gun Club.
In February and March a lower drain was put in for the Kaslo pond.
Through the efforts of the Nelson Rod and Gun Club, two rearing-ponds were
built and put into operation at the Nelson Hatchery.
At Gerrard, 1,005,000 rainbow trout eggs were taken, most of which were eyed
and distributed.
A total of 411,380 cut-throat eggs were taken at Rosebud Lake, south of Nelson,
and eyed at the Nelson Hatchery. Of these, 272,850 were planted in the watershed of
Eagle River, in the Revelstoke area. This was in the way of experiment. The Kamloops trout which had been previously planted in this watershed did not appear to stop
in the small lakes.
At Fish Lake, 1,890,000 cut-throat eggs were collected and distributed from the
Cranbrook Hatchery.
Over 7,000,000 kokanee-eggs were taken at Meadow Creek. These were all eyed
at Gerrard or Nelson. Approximately 1,250,000 eyed eggs were planted locally and the
balance went to the State of Washington. New plantings of kokanee-eggs in this
Division were St. Mary, Windermere, and Whatshan Lakes. Moyie Lakes got their
second planting.
A total of 380,730 Eastern brook fry brought over from 1941 were distributed in
• 1942. One hundred and sixty-three thousand eyed eggs and 80,000 Eastern brook ale-
vins were on hand at the end of 1942 in the Nelson Hatchery.
Some water-trouble was experienced during the year. Kaslo ponds suffered from
water-trouble due to the excessive use of water in the city. The ponds at the Summer-
land Hatchery were flooded by Okanagan Lake, which prevented their use.
Very good co-operation existed amongst the various Game Wardens and fishery
officers in this Division during the year.
Summary and General Remarks.
The year 1942, while not so wet as some previous years, was rather on the damp
side and, consequently, we had few forest fires.
Fur prices, which started low in the fall of 1942, advanced quickly before Christmas, but there does not appear to have been a very big take of fur.
As usual, a great deal of game-fish cultural work was done by the Game Wardens
in the Division. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 17
I again wish to express the thanks of the entire divisional personnel to the Provincial Forestry Service, the Public Works Department, and the Provincial Police, both
for direct assistance and also for the use of equipment during the year.
We have also received a great deal of help from individual sportsmen and various
Rod and Gun Clubs throughout the Division.
Report of C. H. Robinson, Fishery Supervisor.
I beg to submit herewith report on game-fish culture and general fishery conditions
in " B " Game Division for the year ended 1942, including information supplied by the
Game Wardens in their respective patrol districts.
The usual consideration was given by the Game Commission to game-fish culture
and trout distributions in an endeavour to maintain the future supply, but in order to
conserve rubber and gasoline plantings in less important and outlying waters were
reduced wherever feasible. The distributions of trout eyed eggs, fry, and fingerlings,
other than in rearing-ponds, is not touched upon, being covered elsewhere in the Commission's report.
Angling throughout the Division was less, in some respects, "due to travel restrictions, there being a noticeable decrease in the numbers of American non-resident
anglers. Moreover, the remote and distant'waters were not fished to a great extent by
the resident anglers.
Generally, sport-fishing was on the upward trend, considerable voluntary progress
being made with rearing-ponds which should, in a course of time, increase the supply
of trout in certain waters. The operation of rearing-ponds has been fairly successful,
with some setbacks resulting from the water supplies and feeding. The latter is a
matter for careful study; to decide on balanced diets that can be reasonably practised
in the Interior, with the use of a percentage of kokanee, a most valuable food when
reasonably used, but not in too large quantities.
Similkameen and Okanagan Districts.
Davis, Boss, and Tahla Lakes.—Produced good catches of rainbow trout. The
improvement might be attributed to restocking, as natural reproduction is much
restricted.
Hornet, Deadman, and Loosemore Lakes.—Provided good fly-fishing for rainbow
trout, introduced in 1940.
Blue (McCaffrey), MacKenzie, Dry (Round), and Bergeson Lakes.—Situated on
Allison (One Mile) Creek system. Trout-fishing did not improve and the results of
restocking have so far been very poor.
Alleyne, Kump (Lost), Cham, Link, and Osprey Lakes.—Yielded the average
catches of trout, including Lightning Lakes, where the supply is maintained by natural
spawning.
There are numerous other lakes in the Princeton area that provided good trout-
fishing, including the Similkameen River, with improved water conditions.
Martin Lake.—A small body of water, yielding good catches of Eastern brook-
trout over 2 lb. in weight. First introduced, April, 1941. During the summer months
the fish are not very palatable for domestic use. The lake is well patronized by the
Princeton juvenile anglers.
Clearwater Lake.—From reports received it appeared to be an off season for trout-
fishing. The local organized anglers of the Nickel Plate mine have assumed the responsibility of protecting the parent trout when spawning in the inlet creeks and also to
improve feed conditions in the lake. This arrangement was inaugurated in the fall of
1940, and has proved very satisfactory.
Cathedral Lakes.—Quite a few people visited the Ashnola scenic region and enjoyed
good rainbow and cut-throat trout fishing in the lakes. The native trout are quite
plentiful in the Ashnola River. M 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Osoyoos and Vaseaux Lakes.—Provided good fishing for the large-mouth black bass
during the summer months. Trout-fishing in the first-named lake was poor compared
to last season, when the spring and fall fishing was very good. The matter of a joint
international arrangement towards trout liberations in the lake is receiving attention.
Madden and Bear Lakes.—The latter is now producing quite large trout, owing to
the abundant food-supply. Trout-fishing did not improve in Madden Lake, possibly
due to the increased minnow supply.
Skaha (Dog) Lake.—This large body of water produced very few trout during the
early part of the season, but towards the fall there was a slight improvement, when
several Kamloops trout were caught up to 10 lb. in weight. It is quite possible that a
number of matured Kamloops trout pass up into Okanagan Lake during the spring and
high water.
Okanagan Lake (South End).—The spring fishing for Kamloops trout showed a
marked improvement and limit catches were taken, mostly by trolling methods. No
doubt some of the parent fish are attracted to Penticton Creek to spawn, but as the
season advances the trout seem to circulate towards the north end of the lake, where
fishing has much improved. Probably the liberation of trout fingerlings from the
Kelowna rearing-ponds has contributed towards the improvement. The plantings of
kokanee eyed eggs in suitable streams flowing into the south end of the lake is being
carried out in an effort to increase the food-supply for the matured trout.
Glen, Island, Deer, Allendale, and Fish Lakes.—Produced good catches of rainbow
and speckled trout in the latter lake. No doubt the heavy rain during the early part of
the summer was beneficial to fish-life in all lakes affected by water shortage for irrigation purposes throughout the Okanagan area.
Chute Lake.—The condition and growth of the rainbow trout has improved since
deferred restocking in 1940-41. Future trout-fry liberations will be governed by
natural reproduction and available food-supply, etc.
Numerous small lakes not mentioned provided good fishing;  in fact, generally,
there was a noted improvement throughout the district.    Coarse fish are referred to
later in this report.
Boundary District.
Kettle River and West Fork.—Angling for rainbow trout in the Kettle River
improved, the trout varying in weight up to 4 lb. The trout-fishing also improved in
the West Fork, from which good specimens were taken weighing up to 3 lb., this being
rather unusual for this stream. There are three factors that might have assisted
towards the improvement: extra protection towards the latter part of the summer,
improved water-flow the last three years, and systematic planting of eyed eggs.
Conkle (Fish), Arlington, and Williamson Creek Lakes.—Provided good fishing.
Especially the latter lake, from which limit catches of rainbow were taken, some of
which weighed over 4 lb. Other lakes and streams not so accessible provided good
fishing, including Boundary Creek.
Jewel Lake.—On different occasions the lake yielded fair catches of Kamloops
trout, but poor in comparison to a few years ago. To protect and conserve the parent
trout the outlet of the lake will be permanently screened, together with some experimental plantings of trout and the reduction of minnows.
Wilgress (Loon) Lake.—Continued to produce fair catches of Kamloops trout from
yearly fry liberations. The matter of artificial-spawning areas will receive attention
next spring.
Granby River (North Fork) and that Portion of Kettle River between Carson and
the Border Down-stream.—Provided excellent fishing for rainbow trout. The improvement is probably attributed to the increased water-flow during the past three years,
coupled with fry and eyed eggs planted in Smelter Lake and Granby River. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 19
Christina Lake.—Produced fair catches of Kamloops trout, the majority of which
weighed less than 2 lb. This would indicate fair success from yearly eyed eggs planted,
considering the presence of the small-mouth black bass and their voracious nature.
Bass-fishing was generally good during the summer, although it is claimed they are not
so plentiful.    This should help the trout situation.
Fairly good numbers of kokanee were taken by trolling methods from Christina
Lake, which averaged 8 oz. in weight in comparison to about 6 oz. last year. Due to
late spawning, less than 5,000 lb. of kokanee were netted for commercial purposes,
resulting in the spawning areas being well seeded to ensure the future supply.
West Kootenay.
Big Sheep and Beaver Creeks.—Under ideal conditions the supply of Eastern
brook-trout has been fairly well maintained, with yearly liberations and some natural
reproduction, considering the amount of fishing carried on.
Champion Lakes.—Provided fairly good fishing for Kamloops trout, resulting, no
doubt, from small allotments of fingerlings commencing the fall of 1939. A creel
census of fish caught from the lakes arranged by the organized sportsmen of Trail did
not materialize.
Columbia River.-—Flowing between Castlegar and Waneta. Produced fairly good
catches of rainbow trout which varied in weight up to 5 lb. It is possible the presence
of much larger rainbows during the season might have resulted from changed water
conditions caused by the Grand Coulee dam construction.
Arrow Lakes.—Some very encouraging reports were received from interested
sportsmen residing at Broadwater, Burton, Nakusp, and Galena Bay regarding improved rainbow trout fishing in said lakes. In the past there has been some doubt as
to the results of restricted restocking and the supply of trout, the catching of which is
partly governed by glacier water conditions.
Whatshan Lakes.—This chain of lakes provided average good fly-fishing the early
part of the season, then later mostly by trolling. Kokanee eyed eggs were planted for
the first time for experimental purposes and as forage-fish. The numbers of Rocky
Mountain whitefish were slightly reduced by approximately 10,000.
Summit, Victor, Three Valley, and Griffin Lakes.—West of Revelstoke. Following
up the recommendations of organized sportsmen, and as approved by the authorities,
272,000 cut-throat trout eyed eggs were planted in the inlet creeks of said lakes, owing
to somewhat poor results of Kamloops trout planted in previous years. Of course, the
cut-throat trout is a native fish to Revelstoke waters, being present in tributary streams
to Eagle and Columbia Rivers.
Trout Lake.—Lardeau. After producing excellent catches of Kamloops trout over
a long period, some rather discouraging reports were received of poor fishing and the
suspected depletion of trout in this large body of water. Conditions will be investigated and remedial measures taken forthwith, if found expedient to act.
Wilson Lakes, near Nakusp.—The two popular lakes provided some good fly-fishing
and trolling, there being an improvement in condition of the rainbow trout; this would
indicate the outtake of fish is fairly well balanced by natural reproduction and eyed
egg plantings.    The kokanee introduced act as a forage-fish and for sport purposes.
Summit and Box Lakes.—Adjacent to the Nakusp auto highway. Failed to produce many trout in spite of annual liberations of fry. It is possible that there is some
outward migration to Slocan and Arrow Lakes, so the fish are not actually lost.
Bear and Fish Lakes.—The two small lakes produced good catches of small rainbow
trout, mostly for the employees of the Zincton Mines, Limited.
Slocan Lake.—Similarly to last season, some very favourable reports were received
of improved Kamloops trout fishing.    This might be credited to the stepped-up plant-
- M 20 V* BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ings of eyed eggs, fry, and fingerlings and somewhat large plantings of kokanee eyed
eggs in inlet creeks not affected with pollution.
Evans, Cahill, and Beatrice Lakes.—Were not fished to any extent during the
season. However, with improved trail conditions undertaken by the Forest Branch,
they should offer some inducement to anglers.
Slocan River.—Some favourable reports were received of good fly-fishing for
rainbow trout, but, even so, there is some room for improvement. This might be
accomplished by reducing the numbers of coarse fish.
Little Slocan Lakes.—Failed to produce many Eastern brook-trout from annual
plantings of fry and fingerlings. The lakes are infested with coarse fish, which are
receiving attention.
Kootenay River.—Between Grohman Creek and Columbia River (except the closed
portion). Provided fair fly- and bait-fishing for rainbow trout, but, due to the water
condition in Kootenay Lake, the stretch of river above the Corra Lynn dam has changed
fishing entirely in the affected area.
Rosebud Lake.—Fishing for rainbow and cut-throat trout remained fairly good.
However, it is quite possible that illegal introduction of minnows (shiners) will seriously affect the food-supply of the immatured trout and retard their growth. Fish
cultural operations carried out at the lake acted in a twofold purpose by affording
protection to the spawning trout and the collection of 411,380 cut-throat and 39,000
rainbow trout eggs.
Boundary Lake, Nehvay.—The fishing and catches of Eastern brook-trout was
somewhat less compared to the season of 1941, as the lake is generally well patronized
by non-resident American anglers. Fish cultural operations were conducted at the
lake in a small way, with the collection of 264,000 speckled trout eggs for incubation
and distribution from the Nelson Hatchery next spring.
West Arm of Kootenay Lake.—There was no particular improvement in the
fishing conditions, but considering the extensive fishing carried on in the stretch of
water the catches of rainbow trout and kokanee (silver trout) were fairly good, subject
to seasonal conditions. However, it is generally conceded that the trout-fishing is not
so good as in former years. In order to determine the approximate number of trout
caught from the West Arm during the season the organized anglers arranged for a
creel census, with no definite returns to date. The rearing-ponds, under development
by the organized sportsmen and the city authorities at Nelson, should play an important
part towards improving the trout-fishing in the West Arm of Kootenay Lake.
Kokanee, Keen, Garland, Kaslo, and Tanal Lakes.—These small lakes, situated in
the Kokanee Glacier Park, produced fairly good catches of cut-throat trout and were
well patronized, considering the short season.
Sunset Lake.—Situated near the headwaters of Woodberry Creek at an elevation
of over 6,000 feet. Produced some fine catches of cut-throat trout, averaging 1% lb.
in weight, which were planted in June, 1938, principally for the benefit of prospectors
and miners.
Kootenay Lake.—In comparison to last season, there was a marked improvement
in the catches of matured Kamloops trout in the vicinity of Kaslo, and in the remainder
of the lake, south-west to Procter and Kootenay Landing, trolling for the larger fish
was fairly good, depending upon water and seasonal conditions. It is of interest to
report that fair numbers of marked immature Kamloops trout were caught on the fly
at the mouths of creeks flowing into the lake, which were liberated from the Kaslo
rearing-ponds, June, 1941.
The Nelson Gyro Club conducted their third Kootenay Lake Trout Derby from
May 1st to November 16th. This again created considerable interest amongst the
resident and non-resident Canadian and American anglers. The total amount of Kamloops trout caught by the competitors that weighed over 5 lb. amounted to 4,082 lb., REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 21
compared to 6,053 lb. in 1941. The largest trout caught and recorded weighed 24 lb.
14 oz., compared to 26 lb. 4 oz. in 1941.
The numerous small lakes at higher altitudes and tributary to Kootenay Lake and
Salmon River watersheds yielded good catches of rainbow and cut-throat trout, but, of
course, the fishing was much less than under normal conditions.
Large-mouth black bass again frequented waters in the vicinity of Nelson after
several years' absence, some were caught around the boat-houses and others were
observed in the bays of the West Arm of Kootenay Lake. These non-native fish originally came from American waters.
Goat River.—The lower reaches below the canyon yielded fair catches of rainbow
(steelhead) trout. Above the canyon and towards the upper reaches the cut-throat
trout fishing was very good. Yearly planting of cut-throat trout eyed eggs in nursery
waters has assisted to increase the supply. Meadow Creek, a tributary, provided the
usual fairly good fishing for Eastern brook-trout, the supply of which is partly maintained from fingerling liberations from Nelson Hatchery.
East Kootenay District.
Moyie River and Lakes.—These most accessible waters produced fair catches of
Kamloops and cut-throat trout by fly and trolling methods. As natural spawning is
much restricted, the waters in question are restocked with liberal allotments of trout.
Monroe and Mineral Lakes.—Provided the usual good fishing for cut-throat and
rainbow trout, caught mostly by trolling. As the lakes can be reached by auto and
with poor spawning areas, it is necessary to restock each year.
Smith Lake.—Produced fairly good catches of Kamloops trout by fly and trolling;
mud-bottom conditions with no suitable spawning areas make the yearly liberation of
Kamloops trout fingerlings very necessary to keep up the supply.
Fish Lakes.—Set aside for artificial propagation under ideal conditions to operate.
The collection of 1,890,000 cut-throat trout eggs was slightly in excess of any other
previous collection. This might be attributed to the increased water-flow in the small
inlet creek where the parent fish are handled and, subsequently, the eggs taken are
placed in the Cranbrook Hatchery.
New Lake.—A small productive lake near Cranbrook gave anglers a pleasant surprise, there being some doubt as to the results of Kamloops trout fingerlings liberated
in the lake in 1940-41. This proved a success and limit catches were taken, varying in
weight up to 3 lb. or more. There were other plantings of cut-throat and Kamloops
trout up to the year 1936, when winter-kill took a heavy toll of the fish.
Premier Lake.—Continued to produce fair catches of Kamloops trout as a result of
fingerling liberations and some natural reproduction in Diorite Creek. Since the
natural food-supply is not so plentiful the majority of trout caught are under 5 lb. in
weight, where, at one time, it was not uncommon to capture thirty-pounders.
St. Mary Lake and Tributaries.—Provided fair fishing for cut-throat trout for the
local anglers, but, even with liberal replenishment with eyed eggs and fry yearly, the
fishing has gradually declined. The suggested experimental plantings of rainbow trout
and kokanee (redfish) by the organized anglers was favourably considered by the
authorities and the two species of fish were planted in the lake.
Skookumchuck River.—The stretch of stream below the falls, to Kootenay River,
yielded fairly good catches of cut-throat trout, and in order to maintain the supply
approximately 100,000 eyed eggs were planted as desired by the local sportsmen.
From authentic reports received, the cut-throat trout eyed eggs planted above the falls
of the river in 1935 are now well established.
Bull River.—In the upper reaches of the river fly-fishing for cut-throat trout was
quite good.    Since the road was abandoned above the East Kootenay power plant it is M 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
necessary to use the trail, and the stretch of river below the falls flowing to Bull River
settlement was again restocked with cut-throat trout.
There are several small lakes situated in the Cranbrook District that produced good
catches of cut-throat and rainbow trout by fly-fishing and trolling. The supplies of
trout are mostly taken care of by yearly restocking.
Hart Lake.—Adjacent to McBains (Rosens) Lake. Produced some very fine specimens of cut-throat trout up to 5% lb. in weight.
North Star, McBains (Rosen), Rock (Mud), Burton, Silver Springs, Manistee,
Surveyors, Baynes, and Loon Lakes.—Yielded the average catches of Kamloops .trout,
subject to climatic conditions, mostly by trolling. The supply of trout is maintained by
yearly liberations of fry from Cranbrook Hatchery.
Edwards Lake.—Produced good catches of Kamloops trout, taken mostly by trolling. The plantings of eyed eggs each year has taken care of the supply for the Indians
and the public.
Elk River and Tributaries.—High-water conditions considerably curtailed the
fishing until the early part of the summer, and when the water-flow became normal
there were good catches of cut-throat trout taken by the numerous resident and nonresident anglers. The usual planting of cut-throat trout eyed eggs was carried out
under ideal conditions in nursery waters and amounted to over 500,000 eggs.
Summit Lake.—The trout population of Kamloops and cut-throat was considerably
reduced from winter kill, 1941-42. However, additional plantings were made this year
and the future policy of restocking will be governed by any extreme losses recorded.
Barnes Lake, Corbin.—The cut-throat trout are quite plentiful in this high-altitude
lake and in view of the very short open fishing season and available food-supply the
suggested closure is not warranted.
Grave Lake.—Apparently there was no improvement in the fishing and catches of
Kamloops trout from yearly liberations of fry. Interest in this lake appears to be on
the wane and more information will be obtained as to the future policy of trout liberations and the food-supply, etc.
Deer Lake.—Unconfirmed reports received of Kamloops trout being caught from
the 1941 planting of eyed eggs.
Columbia Lake.—This quite large and somewhat shallow lake does not produce
many fish from the yearly substantial planting of Kamloops trout eyed eggs, although
some fair catches were taken of Kamloops and an occasional cut-throat trout. Few
people fish the lake, but the planting of eyed eggs has benefited Windermere Lake.
Windermere Lake.—Produced fairly good catches of Kamloops trout, mostly by
trolling. The best fishing is during the spring and early fall. The fish vary in weight
up to 5 lb. and, as an experiment to produce and increase the size of the Kamloops
trout, kokanee eyed eggs were planted primarily as a forage-fish.
Paddy Ryan Lakes.—A chain of four quite small lakes; provided the usual fair
fly-fishing for cut-throat trout from yearly fry liberations.
Lillian Lakes.—Provided the usual fair catches of Kamloops and some speckled
trout by trolling and fly-fishing; this productive and rather small body of water has
produced excellent catches of trout from regular plantings of fry. The size and future
supply of trout is a matter for further study.
Dunbar, Twin, and Bott (Fish) Lakes.—Yielded the usual good catches of cutthroat trout, mostly by fly-fishing. The trout, although rather small, are very plentiful
in the latter lakes. Dunbar Lake produced cut-throat trout up to 3 lb., there being no
deterioration in the size in the last two decades or more. The supply of fish has been
well maintained from systematic plantings.
There are several small lakes in the Fish Lakes region, some of which are stocked
alternate years, where the fishing for cut-throat trout is quite good. The No. 2 and
No. 3 Creeks are affected with glacial silt during the summer, but as the water clears REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 23
rather small cut-throat trout are caught. In the North and South Forks of the
Salmon River cut-throat trout are quite plentiful, including some rainbow trout of
rather small size.
Baptiste Lake.—Apparently it was an off-year and very few cut-throat trout were
caught on the fly or by trolling. The existing conditions and restocking is a matter
for further study and report.
Cedar Lakes.—No. 1 and No. 3 Canyon and Wiseman Lakes provided fair flyfishing and trolling for Kamloops trout. The latter, Wiseman Lake, produced some
good fish weighing up to 6 lb., resulting from 1938-40 Kamloops fry plantings.
Wiseman and Cedar Creeks.—These previously barren waters were stocked with
cut-throat trout eyed eggs with fair results. The overflow of fish from the creeks will
be of benefit to other small streams flowing into Columbia River.
Blackwater Lakes.—Provided the usual good fly-fishing for the somewhat small
rainbow trout. The lakes are quite popular and a valuable asset to tourists and local
residents of Golden. Reasonable fry liberations are carried out each year, owing to
very restricted spawning areas to aid natural reproduction.
Bush Lakes.—While the two lakes connected cannot be termed ideal trout waters,
some gratifying reports were received of improved Kamloops trout fishing during the
summer, probably the results of eyed eggs planted the past few years. The lakes are
conveniently located, partly adjacent to the Trans-Canada Highway.
Miscellaneous.
Kokanee (Redfish).—Eggs were again collected from the run of kokanee in
Meadow Creek, Lardeau. With a somewhat light run and various unforeseen elements
to contend with, the collection did not exceed more than 7,160,000 eggs and the resultant
eyed eggs therefrom were disposed of as follows: 4,700,000 supplied to the Washington
State Game Commission and 1,292,000 planted in waters of the Interior.
In accordance to agreement between the British Columbia Security Commission at
Kaslo and the Game Commission, approximately 13% tons of surplus kokanee culled
and stripped from the spawning operations at Meadow Creek were supplied to the
Security Commission as a domestic food-supply for the Japanese; the entire cost of
handling and shipping the fish was borne by the Security Commission. Moreover,
approximately l1^ tons of stripped kokanee were supplied to the local residents of Kaslo
and vicinity free of any cost.
Fish-foods.—For local requirements in connection with feeding the Kamloops trout
fingerlings in Kaslo, Bjerkness, and Nelson Rearing-ponds, approximately 6 tons of
stripped kokanee were stored in our leased cold-storage plant at Kaslo.
Rocky Mountain Whitefish.—Following up the policy of reducing the numbers of
undesirable fish, and under departmental supervision, approximately 4,200 lb. of white-
fish were taken from Whatshan Lakes and supplied to the British Columbia Security
Commission at Kaslo. The costs of the entire operation were borne by the Commission
involved. Further, in the course of the operation, 900 lb. of whitefish were taken by
local residents. Estimated number of fish removed from the lakes was 10,200 and, in
addition, during the trout-spawning operation on the Lardeau River, Gerrard, approxi'
mately 2,000 whitefish were caught and destroyed.
Coarse Fish.—The returns are not available covering the approximate number and
weight of coarse fish taken by the fur-farmers during the season under licence. The
following coarse fish were destroyed from Skaha (Dog) Lake that entered the traps on
the Okanagan River above the lake: Carp 524, weight 2,096 lb.; squaw-fish 35, weight
140 1b.;  suckers 15, weight 30 lb.;  ling 7, weight 21 lb.
The capture of coarse fish was considerably curtailed due to exceedingly high water
caused by the break in the Ellis Creek water-storage dam. This also again postponed
the proposed draining of the Okanagan River and netting the coarse fish therein between Okanagan and Skaha Lakes. M 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Predatory Birds.—For effective operation of rearing-ponds it is necessary, unfortunately, to destroy a number of birds which frequent and prey upon the fish held in
ponds, such as kingfishers, ozels (dippers), sandpipers, mergansers, fish-ducks and
sometimes other ducks, with an occasional blue heron that may venture to the ponds and
then take a tremendous toll of young fish unless stopped. No action has been taken to
destroy mergansers and kingfishers on streams and lakes inhabited by trout.
Trout-rearing Ponds.—The operation of certain ponds was curtailed due to unforeseen elements to contend with in some instances. However, under purely voluntary
arrangements, and in co-operation with the Game Commission, excellent progress was
made in pond-construction in Nelson, undertaken by the organized sportsmen and the
city authorities, as referred to herein.
Princeton Rearing-ponds.—After being in operation nine years the pond had fulfilled its usefulness. Consequently, as mutually agreed by the executive members of
the Princeton Fish and Game Protective Association, operations ceased May 26th, 1942.
Summerland Rearing-ponds.—Extreme high water in the Okanagan Lake, caused
by the Ellis Creek washout, prevented the operation of these ponds.
Taft Hatchery and Rearing-ponds.—In agreement with the Revelstoke Rod and
Gun Club, operation of the hatchery and ponds was temporarily suspended and in place
thereof cut-throat and Kamloops trout eyed eggs were planted.
Nelson Rearing-ponds.—The circular concrete pond constructed by the City of
Nelson authorities in 1941 was put to use and 28,000 Kamloops trout fry liberated
therein. Under a joint arrangement between the Nelson District Rod and Gun Club
and the City of Nelson authorities two new ponds were constructed of concrete and
gravel bottoms, the inside measurements of which are approximately 30 feet by 9 feet
6 inches by 3 feet 6 inches and 30 feet by 12 feet by 3 feet 6 inches. The ponds were
put to immediate use and 15,000 advanced fry and fingerlings from Bjerkness ponds
were released in the two ponds.
Bjerkness Rearing-ponds.—The No. 1 and No. 2 ponds were operated with fair
success, considering the somewhat restricted water-supply towards the early fall, resulting in a loss of fingerlings from 337,000 Kamloops trout fry (Gerrard stock) liberated
in the ponds July 8th and 16th, and the following fingerlings were liberated, partly
towards the end of September and October: Kootenay Lake, 82,295; Slocan Lake,
10,000;   Nelson ponds, 15,000;   and Kaslo pond, 7,500.    Total, 114,795 weight amount.
Kaslo Rearing-ponds.—In co-operation with the Kaslo District Rod and Gun Club,
to facilitate the draining of the rearing-pond and liberation of fingerlings, assistance
was rendered by the Game Commission for two weeks by three employees to install a
lower 8-inch iron pipe leading from the rearing-pond to Kootenay Lake.
A small supply of Kamloops trout and fingerlings was carried over in the pond
from 1941. Two thousand were liberated in Champion Lakes and the remaining 402
were released in Kootenay Lake. On July 20th, 150,600 Kamloops trout fry (Gerrard
stock) were released in the pond and were retained and fed until September 6th, when
it became necessary to liberate approximately 137,240 as advanced fry into Kootenay
Lake. A small number estimated to be 5,000 fry (advanced) was held in the pond,
augmented with 7,500 fingerlings from Bjerkness ponds on October 30th. The fish will
be retained and released in Kootenay Lake next spring, and probably a small allotment
will be transferred to Champion Lakes.
New Denver Rearing-pond.—Carpenter Creek, from which the supply of water is
diverted for the pond, remains polluted, resulting from operations of the Zincton Mines,
Limited; thereby the pond could not be used and, in lieu thereof, 10,000 Kamloops trout
fingerlings were transferred from Bjerkness ponds and released in Slocan Lake, October
25th to 27th.
Cranbrook Rearing-pond.—Was not operated but, instead, the 193,164" resultant
fingerlings, which were from 200,000 Kamloops trout eyed eggs from Gerrard Hatchery, REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 25
•were successfully raised in the Cranbrook hatchery-troughs and were duly liberated in
thirteen lakes located in the Cranbrook district.
Kimberley Rearing-ponds.—Lois Lake improved and used on an experimental basis.
So far the success of retrievement and liberation of cut-throat trout raised therein has
not at present been determined from two plantings of fry (1941, 30,000; 1942, 10,000).
Mathews Creek Rearing-pond.—For the benefit of St. Mary River and Lake, an
allotment of 30,000 cut-throat trout fry was released in the ponds (abandoned beaver-
dams), from which the trout of their own accord can pass out into the river, with
probably better results than direct liberation into river or lake.
Premier Lake Rearing-pond.—Not used.    Owned by Mr. E. L. Staples.
Windermere Creek Rearing-pond.—In an effort to raise some Kamloops trout
fingerlings for Windermere Lake, some experiments have been carried out with a small
pond, with fair success, from 5,000 fry in 1941 and a similar number in 1942.
Private Ponds and Trout-farms.—There were no new developments regarding private ponds and trout-farms, nor were any applications received for the purchase of fry
or fingerlings for such waters.
Salvage and Transfer of Trout.—Increased precipitation during the early part of
the summer provided sufficient water-flow in most streams to prevent any serious losses
of trout from adverse water conditions, except in Big and Little Sheep Creeks, Rossland
area, where, towards the end of September, stretches of the two creeks partly dried up.
Thereby, the following stranded Eastern brook-trout were salvaged and transferred to
flowing water unaffected: Big Sheep Creek, 1,800 fingerlings from 3 to 8 inches in
length;   Little Sheep Creek, 400 fingerlings from 3 to 6 inches in length.
Fish Guards and Screens.—Irrigation systems. The installation of screens at the
intakes of water diversion for conservation measures is receiving such attention as
travel conditions will permit at present.
Fishtvays.—The six small fishways installed in water-power or irrigation dams are
in fair- working condition. Further, the matter of power-dam construction on the
Kootenay River, near Brilliant, by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of
Trail, is receiving attention to take care of the fishery interests involved.
Obstructions (Natural), Handy Log Jam, Lardeau River.—The water channel
opened up on the north side of the obstruction proved beneficial to the parent Kamloops from Kootenay Lake in reaching their respective spawning-grounds adjacent to
Gerrard Hatchery. In conjunction with road-protection, the Provincial Public Works
Department removed the logs and debris accumulated at the mouth of the channel
during the month of October. In future, it is hoped that mutual arrangements between
the two Departments can be effected for joint co-operation to prevent the obstruction
forming again, which requires annual attention, as a result of logs and debris passing
out of Trout Lake.
Pollutions, Mining Industries.—In some instances there has been an abatement of
pollutions owing to labour scarcity and some mines being closed down permanently.
Where there will not be a recurrence of pollution, steps have and will be taken to
restore the trout population. However, with the present demand for base and other
valuable metals, pollution may occur and increase in certain waters.
Similkameen River.—With the exception of unavoidable discoloured water entering
the river, pollution from solids is very light and trout-fishing is on the upward trend.
Big Sheep Creek.—Polluted from the operations at Fernie Coal Mines, Limited.
Precautionary measures were taken to overcome the pollution, since operations had
ceased owing to labour shortage.
Salmon River and Tributaries.—Mining and concentrator operations have been
considerably reduced. Consequently, Sheep Creek and that portion of the Salmon
River below the confluence of Sheep Creek remain polluted from operations of the Sheep M 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Creek Gold Mines, Limited, Gold Belt Mines, Limited, and probably from the proposed
operation of the Emerald mine, near Salmo, by the Wartime Metals Corporation.
The following mining properties from which pollution occurred to waters of the
Salmon River are now probably closed down permanently: The Reno Gold Mines, Limited, and Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Limited, on Sheep Creek; Relief-Arlington Gold
Mines, Limited, and Ymir Yankee Girl Gold Mines, Limited, on Salmon River.
Columbia River.—The discharge of refuse from the smelter and fertilizer plants
operated by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Trail apparently, so far,
has not seriously affected fish-life in the river, probably due to the water-flow.
Kaslo Creek.—This creek is now free of pollution, but should the Whitewater mine
resume operations, now under consideration by the Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Limited,
there will be further pollution. '
Seaton and Carpenter Creeks.—Flowing into Slocan, remain seriously polluted with
concentrator refuse, resulting from the operations of the Zincton Mines, Limited
(Lucky Jim).
Slocan Lake.—The treating-over of tailings and ores from the Standard and Mammoth mines, operated by the Western Exploration Company, caused but slight pollution
to the lake from concentrator refuse.
Enterprise Creek (10 Mile).—Flowing into the West Arm of Kootenay Lake, is
free of pollution, due to the Alpine mine closing down from labour shortage.
Summit Creek.—Flowing into Kootenay River, became free of pollution during the
summer, due to operations being suspended by Bayonne Consolidated Mines, Limited,
owing to labour scarcity.
St. Mary River.—Although much larger quantities of ore are being mined and
treated at the Sullivan concentrator, operated by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company, the control and impoundment of the refuse is receiving steady attention, thus
preventing a serious pollution of the river in question.
Kicking Horse and Columbia Rivers.—The waste crude-oil sumps at Field and
Beavermouth received the necessary attention by C.P.R. employees to prevent any
large quantities of oil escaping.
Lumber Industries.—With the exception of one rather serious pollution with sawdust and some minor complaints investigated, the other operators of stationary and
portable sawmills reasonably complied to the Fishery Regulations in preventing the
escape of sawmill refuse into waters frequented by fish.
Water Conditions.—The heavy spring and early summer rains restored numerous
small lakes to their natural levels, being of benefit to fish-life in lakes used for water-
storage and irrigation, more particularly in the Okanagan district. The heavy freshets
in certain streams were a handicap in connection with the planting of trout eyed eggs
and requiring extra attention to ensure a proper hatch and sufficient water-flow to the
free-swimming stage over the areas planted, in view of the fluctuating water-flow. The
additional moisture aided forest-protection, with no serious fires to affect the watersheds and fish-life.
Game-fish Culture.—In an effort to maintain the future supply of trout for the
resident and non-resident anglers, the Summerland, Nelson, Gerrard-Kaslo, and Cranbrook Hatcheries operated efficiently in the propagation and distribution of Kamloops,
cut-throat, and Eastern brook trout, and including kokanee, with augmented supplies of
Kamloops trout eyed eggs transferred from Penask and Lloyd Creek Hatcheries.
The Kaslo Hatchery, partly constructed in 1941 jointly by the organized sportsmen
and the city authorities at Kaslo, has been completed by the British Columbia Security
Commission to accommodate the Japanese under their charge. Floor space will be
available for fish cultural purposes, being an improvement to hatchery facilities in
the past. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 27
Diseases.—There were no indications of disease or the loss of fish-life during the
year.
Co-operation.—Again we received splendid co-operation from the organized sportsmen and other individuals, particularly the interest and assistance in the development
of rearing-ponds, etc. The Forest Branch and Public Works Department rendered
valuable aid to us in the use of equipment, trail improvements, artificial spawning
areas, and the removal of obstructions, etc. The British Columbia Security Commission at Kaslo co-operated in every respect with regard to equipment and transportation
and reducing the number of coarse fish. Valuable information was furnished by Dr.
W. A. Clemens, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, and G. Clifford
Carl, Director, Provincial Museum, on scientific matters referred to them. On behalf
of my fellow employees and myself, I wish to express my sincere thanks to those who
have so ably assisted towards the advancement of game-fish culture.
Game Fish.—The supply has been reasonably maintained from artificial propagation and natural reproduction and in some areas there was a notable improvement.
" C " DIVISION (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO,
'     AND CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C "
Game Division during the year ended December 31st, 1942.
Big Game.
Moose.—As prolific as ever, although reports of disease are frequently heard. The
sex ratio has never been the subject of discussion in relation to moose. There is a
definite increase in numbers, which is to be expected in view of the decrease in number
of hunters. The east boundary of the Kamloops Electoral District for moose should be
changed to the North Thompson River in order to give these animals a chance to extend
their range to Salmon Arm.
Caribou.—A closed season probably is necessary for the Clearwater area. In other
districts very little hunting of these animals is carried out.
Deer.—The usual crop of reports of the uneven proportion of bucks to does continues to come in. Since these reports are not widespread, it would be advisable to
wait for more extensive information.    These animals are as numerous as ever.
Mountain-goats.—Now seldom hunted. Some really fine specimens can be obtained
around Momich River on Adams Lake. In the Lillooet district they are in considerable
numbers and within easy reach.
Black Bears.—Still numerous but not hunted to any extent. Bears are still a
menace to stock. The leaving of carcasses on the various cattle and sheep ranges is a
contributing factor in bear depredation. Farmers have been warned against this in
the past and have been advised to bury or burn dead cattle on their ranges.
Wapiti.—According to a fairly reliable report, there are roughly 400 animals at the
head of Adams Lake. Predatory-animal Hunter C. Shuttleworth and Game Warden
E. E. Ellis are proceeding there next February, as all predators are down with the
wapiti about that time. Wolves are also reported for the first time on the bottom-lands
in this area. No wapiti were reported in the Lillooet district during the year just past.
The same applies to the Clinton detachment, especially east and west of the Fraser
River.    No reports of any having been taken in the Kelowna district have come to hand.
Mountain-sheep.—Many fine heads were obtained at Squilax during the open
season. This band of sheep is a fairly small one and I am afraid, from the recent
census taken at this point, that a close season, until further notice, should be given
serious consideration.    Squam Bay area has not been hunted to the same extent and M 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
should therefore remain open for another two years at least. The sheep in the Squilax
district were getting to the stage where their numbers had reached a standstill prior
to the open season.    A rest of two or three years may have a beneficial effect.
Fur-bearing Animals.
The beaver census for " C " Game Division is again submitted for the year just
ended. The previous year showed a fairly substantial increase in the number of those
animals left on registered trap-lines. A perusal of the returns sent in show that
several trappers have trapped rather heavily as compared with the previous census
returns. Many trappers showing a catch of more than the annual increase have been
contacted. It has been pointed out to them that the trapping of more than the natural
increase is against the principles of conservation and that they must modify their
annual catch.
These returns do not include Indian trap-lines. If, however, the Dominion Department of Indian Affairs is interested, we can quite readily co-operate with them. As a
preliminary to any scheme involving or including Indians, a great deal of educational
work would have to be carried out.
To portray this census in a much more scientific form, a graph should be prepared
showing both catch and estimate of beavers left on divisional trap-lines as a whole. By
this means the general trend can be seen at a glance. The same thing could be done
with the current operational capacity in relation to the beaver potential. This system
of conservation, although not perfect, has produced results, as the figures show. Since
the season 1934-35, an average of 333 trappers has shown a total increase of 2,439
beavers on their respective trap-lines up to the end of the season 1940-41 at a total
estimated value, as breeding stock, of $243,900.
Season.
No. of Trappers
submitting
Returns.
Estimate of
Beavers.
Average
per Trapper.
1934  35                            	
275
343
367
345
307
348
345
350
4,789
6,392
6,347
5,945
5,315
6,501
7,228
6,663
17.41
1935-36 _	
18.60
1936 37                                        	
17.29
17.23
1938  39                           	
17.30
1939-40         - -	
18.68
1940-41       :
20.95
1941-42	
19.04
The above census does not include the Red Pass detachment recently taken over
from " D " Division, since their average returns for fourteen trappers amount to only
13.4 beavers per trapper. Out of thirty-eight trappers whose line estimates have been
recorded or inspected, it is now revealed that those trap-lines have a combined beaver
potential of 4,554 animals. The current operating capacity of these lines is only 22
per cent, of the potential. This situation should provide food for further thought.
The total valuation of the British Columbia beaver-crop for the season 1940-41 from a
catch of 24,994 animals was $618,602.
Upland Game Birds.
The year 1942 has been by far the best year in the writer's experience. This
applies approximately over the whole Division. In almost every species of game bird
their numbers have never been as great for so many years. The previous mild winters
and easy feeding conditions have had a lot to do with the present increase. The winter
of 1942-43 has, however, all the earmarks of being a severe one and already we are
feeding pheasants and ducks because of winter conditions. It has been suggested that
an open season on California quail for the Lillooet district should be granted. At
present they are in flocks of 100 or more. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 29
Migratory Game Birds.
Thousands of mallards are feeding on the stubble in the southern end of this Division. The heavy snow and increasingly cold weather has forced them away from lakes
that are now frozen. Tons of grain are now being fed to prevent their starving to
death. Migration, for some unknown reason, did not materialize to the same extent as
in previous years. If there is a development of severe weather with deep snow, I am
afraid many birds will die from, extreme cold.
Vermin.
Eight officers destroyed the following predators: Magpies, 683; crows (including
nests), 751; owls, 103; hawks, 161; ravens, 24; golden "eagles, 5; coyotes, 225; stray
cats, 256;   dogs (ownerless), 18;   bears (doing damage), 18;   and cougars, 4.
Hunters and trappers in the Vernon district accounted for 180 coyotes. During
the year 20 wolves, 18 cougars, and 45 coyotes were destroyed by farmers and trappers
in the Quesnel district.
The abnormal destruction of predators would be a very unwise undertaking. The
wool-grower wants the coyote destroyed and some fruit-growers state that this animal
is a good mouser and should be saved. The farmer states that owls often keep orchards
free from moles and the sportsmen want them shot. Leading biologists and ornithologists, both in the United States and Canada, favour the saving of hawks with but few
exceptions.
Where there is an unusual influx of predators, perhaps the thinning-down to
reasonable levels would not be amiss, but to destroy some of the more precious hawks
simply because they happen to kill an occasional pheasant or grouse is neither reasonable nor just.
So many of our game animals are now affected by disease which may be attributed
to overcrowding and scarcity of food, followed by reduced resistance. The killing of
unusual numbers of cougars or other predators in many districts would to some extent
be better limited so as to leave a way open for the destruction of weaker game animals
suffering from disease. , The destruction of predators definitely destroying stock,
especially during these times of food scarcity, is a proper undertaking. We have, during the past few years, saved farmers thousands of dollars in this work alone as many
farmers will testify. The trip taken by Game Warden J. W. Stewart and Predatory-
animal Hunter Shuttleworth to the head of Criss Creek to eliminate some of the wolves
infesting that area appears to have had a very good effect.
Game-protection.
There were 103 prosecutions under the " Game Act" in this Division during 1942.
Of these, six cases were dismissed. The Provincial Police rendered assistance in some
of these cases. In most districts conditions were ideal at all times during the breeding
season. The heavy cover provided by generous rainfalls had a lot to do with the
abnormal increase in game birds generally.
Game Propagation.
No liberation of pheasants was made during 1942' because of the need for economy.
Instead of an expected decrease in pheasants, we had quite the reverse. Trapping of
pheasants was carried out at Tranquille during last winter and forty-nine birds were
redistributed in the Kamloops district. Twenty-seven pheasants were also trapped in
the Coldstream district and transferred away from these areas where root-crops are
grown. This is a better form of elimination than issuing permits to shoot during the
close season. This number will have to be increased if, because of the lack of ammunition, the open season is curtailed. M 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Four beavers were planted on a registered trap-line area in the Riske Creek district. This number was limited because of the employment of a new Warden at Bowron
Lake. There is also need for a curtailment in the numbers to be trapped because of
poaching during the interval between the discharge of the last officer and the present
appointee. High water also played a part in reduced beaver population. The number
to be trapped will be gradually increased as the beaver population increases.
Game Reserves.
Yalakom, Tranquille, and Bowron Lake sanctuaries are receiving regular attention.
Patrols were carried out from day to day. Another beaver sanctuary should be established in this Province. In fact, I would even go so far as to say that each Division in
this Province should have its beaver sanctuary for restocking watersheds and registered
trap-lines.
Fur Trade.
The total values of the fur-crop in British Columbia amounted to roughly
$2,000,000 for the season 1941-42. This crop is far too valuable to neglect. While it
is true that prices may fluctuate, it is equally true that low prices have a tendency, to
slow up trapping. The present protection and system of fur conservation has only
been attained through years of applied attention. There is still a great deal to be done,
along this line. Improvements take place slowly. Men in the field observe many failings in the present system. Even in its current state the prevailing plan is far ahead
of the majority of other States or Provinces interested in fur-conservation.
Fur-farming.
The season 1942-43 fur prices appear to have demonstrated the disadvantage of
farming one species of fur-bearers. Mink-farming was for a time developing by leaps
' and bounds owing to the fair price offered and the easy raising of this fur-bearer. As
the market price began to go perilously near the bare cost of raising these animals,
many of the farmers decided to abandon fur-farming rather than take a loss. The
value of fur-farms, including equipment, in British Columbia represented a total of
over $900,000.
If we are to encourage fur-farming as an industry, some international action will
have to be taken to save it from destruction. Until a more stable system is evolved to
protect the prospective fur-farmer, I am afraid it will be many years before the present
system of trap-line farming will be superseded. It clearly does not pay to hold fur-
bearing animals on a rapidly declining market and until fur-farmers are well organized
and refrain from dumping large quantities of mink pelts as a possible result of market
fluctuation fur-farming will always remain a highly speculative industry.
Registration of Trap-lines.
A few trap-lines belonging to those who have gone overseas are being held pending
their return. There are still a few improvements to be made in this system. Personal
inspection of trap-lines is being carried on in this Division and reports are forwarded
of any overlapping.
Registration of Guides.
The system of guiding at present in operation in this Province is far from satisfactory. British Columbia should take the initiative and develop a bold system of
efficient guiding during the present lull. This could readily fit in with our post-war
rehabilitation schemes. Any contemplated changes should be inaugurated now when
present difficulties are at a minimum. One outstanding improvement would be the
prevention of overcrowding which would in turn effect a saving in our game resources.
We have already carried this out on our trap-line system. report of provincial game commission, 1942. m 31
Special Patrols.
A special patrol was carried out by Game Wardens 0. Mottishaw and E. Holmes,
covering the entire Bowron Lake area in a survey of the beaver population. Trails and
new log buildings are being made to facilitate game-protection.
A first patrol was made by Game Warden G. V. Sandiford to the Red Pass detachment. This detachment has now been taken over by " C " Game Division. It is 180
miles north of Kamloops and is not easily accessible.
Another patrol was made by Game Warden Stewart and Predatory-animal Hunter
Shuttleworth to the Clearwater district where " Game Act" infractions were previously
encountered. No further complaints have been made by previous parties reporting
infractions. Three patrols were also made by Game Wardens W. A. H. Gill and
Stewart to the Yalakom Reserve. A check-up on the mountain-sheep was made in this
area. Four large bands were seen on the Nine-mile Ridge, but very few rams were
observed.
Hunting Accidents.
George William Murray, of New Westminster, B.C., had the left side of his face
shot away while hunting in the Clearwater district. The deceased was dragging a deer
out. He stopped to rest and evidently put his gun, over the windfall, butt-end down.
He probably left it cocked. It was discharged either when he was putting it down or
picking it up, and the bullet shattered the left side of his face.
Norman E. Day, Sorrento, B.C., guide for Dr. F. F. Feese, resident of the State
of Washington, was accidentally shot by the latter, who was hunting mountain-sheep in
the Squilax area. Dr. Feese thought he was shooting at a mountain-sheep. He applied
first aid and went for help.   Mr. Day died on the way out.   His wound was in the pelvis.
While hunting with his son, Walter, Mr. Victor Gibson, Ashcroft, B.C., was accidentally shot in the left leg by the former. He was rushed to the Ashcroft Hospital
where six No. 5 pellets were removed.    He was discharged the same evening.
Jeffery H. Beley, Lillooet, B.C., while out hunting, met a rancher, M. Ricard. He
stopped to talk and leaned on his shotgun, with his right hand over the muzzle. Mr.
Ricard's collie dog jumped up on his chest, which accidentally discharged the shotgun.
The right side of Mr. Beley's head and face appeared to be scarred with pellets and the
forefinger of his right hand was severed, leaving a badly mutilated stump. He did not
think the gun had been cocked, but he knew it was loaded. Dr. Peter H. Patterson, of
Lillooet, B.C., took charge of the case.
Summary and General Remarks.
The year just ended has been, so far, the most prolific year in the propagation of
game. Over the greater part of this Division the supply of game birds was a noticeable
feature, due largely to favourable breeding conditions. The cover-crop provided ample
protection from predator action. In certain districts ducks were limited because of a
drying-up of pot-holes. The dwindling gas and rubber situation will have, to a limited
extent, a beneficial action on the supply of fish and game. The chief danger will be that
of overstocked lakes. Close supervision will be necessary plus a proper knowledge of
what is required. The lack of ammunition will be another drawback, although a small
number of sportsmen provided themselves with ample ammunition for future hunting.
To help out in the meat shortage caused by the war, the opening-up of a new range
in the Battle Mountain-Raft Peak area is under consideration by the Forest Department. This range was reported by Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth as being
available for grazing of sheep.
One hundred and thirty-seven deer-skins were sent to the I.O.D.E. by the Kamloops
Junior Game Association for use by sailors. M 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The problem of pheasant damage and its curtailment is a matter of urgent
attention. Efforts have been made to curtail this damage by trapping pheasants and
liberating them in other areas.
The beaver population appears to keep a steady average, although it is far below
the beaver potential which is shown for a specified number of trappers in this report.
The idea of each Division having its own beaver sanctuary is worthy of serious
consideration.
The assistance rendered to the Game Department by the Rod and Gun Club at
Bridge Lake is greatly appreciated.
Non-resident hunters were at a minimum owing to war restrictions.
We wish to thank the many farmers who responded to our appeal to feed pheasants
during the winter of 1942-43.
This Division obtained the Gold Award during the last Victory Loan campaign.
In the matter of hunting accidents and fatalities resulting therefrom, these are to
a very large extent overshadowed by war. Since Game Associations are considered as
advisory bodies, suggestions on how to minimize hunting accidents should be part of
their duty. There must be members in the various clubs with constructive ideas on
this subject.
The control of poison should be under Dominion legislation since it is a simple
matter to obtain poison from eastern firms in British Columbia. In view of the fact
that the Department of Mines and Resources is interested in game conservation, the
destructive factor, in which so many fur-bearers are lost by means of poison bait,
should have a certain restriction placed thereon.
I wish to thank the Provincial Police under Inspector C. G. Barber for services
rendered, also the many Game Associations for their assistance in matters pertaining
to game conservation.
To the Wardens, Game Inspectors, and Game Commission, also those sportsmen,
trappers, and others who have so generously given their time and financial assistance in
aid of the British Columbia Sportsmen's Spitfire Fund, I wish to extend on behalf of
the Spitfire executive our sincere thanks.
"D" DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, PRINCE RUPERT, FORT
GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Big-game Animals.
Weather conditions throughout the Division were favourable, light snowfall and
mild weather prevailing throughout the year. All big-game animals are increasing in
numbers, this especially being the case with black bears, and the recommendations
submitted last year, " that these animals be classed as predators and an open season
declared on them during the whole of the calendar year," is again submitted.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Generally speaking, all fur-bearers continue to increase, and with a great number
of trappers in His Majesty's forces, leaving their trap-lines untrapped, the fur-bearing
animals will no doubt increase and better trapping may be expected after the end of
hostilities.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—All species show a marked increase in their numbers. The bag-limit in
force last season may safely be left in the regulations during the year 1943. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1942. M 33
Migratory Birds.
The expected increase in the numbers of ducks and geese reported last year
materialized. During the fall migration ducks and geese showed a marked increase in
numbers. It is expected that a similar increase, owing to favourable weather conditions, will again occur during 1943.
Vermin.
Timber-wolves and coyotes remain our biggest problem. The number of wolves
seems to increase, and continuous demands for increased bounties are constantly suggested, especially by farmers.    To my mind, the present bounty paid is sufficient.
Coyotes, although not so plentiful as in the past, are causing quite a considerable
amount of damage to sheep in the Vanderhoof-Burns Lake area. A few sheep-farmers
have been issued with permits to use poison in the destruction of these predators, but
the results are far from being satisfactory and the use of poison should, in general, not
be encouraged.
Game-protection.
Owing to numerous military construction projects in Northern British Columbia,
game-protection work has increased enormously. Game Wardens have carried out their
work in an efficient manner, using every available means of transportation, a total of
96,981 miles being covered, as follows:— Miles.
Train     3,658
Automobile  68,506
Foot (including dog-team)     5,925
Horse (including sleighs)     1,445
Boat     7,463
Plane     9,984
Recommendations have been made from time to time regarding the increase in the
enforcement-work in the Peace River district (Alaska Military Highway), and in order
to conserve the game in said area, immediate attention to my recommendations is
becoming of great importance.
An increased number of Police and Game Officers, properly equipped to cover the
territory, is fast becoming a necessity, and it is hoped that some of the recommendations submitted from time to time will be carried out in the near future, and the big-
game and fur-bearing animals found in the Northern Interior of our Province given
greater protection.
Game Propagation.
No special propagation-work has been undertaken in " D" Division during the year.
Game Reserves.
No properly organized game reserves are to be found in this Northern Division.
The recommendations regarding the creation of a game reserve in the Ootsa Lake
district are brought to your attention. Data covering same have been submitted from
time to time, and as the area recommended is well supplied with big game and fur-
bearers of all description the matter should receive early consideration.
Fur Trade.
The fur trade in " D " Division, although no direct information or data are at
hand, has experienced a very successful season. Prices were exceptionally high. All
fur-traders expressed their satisfaction with the business done and hope for an equally
good season next year. M 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fur-farming.
This industry is not receiving the support it deserves. Recommendations submitted from year to year should be carried out, if at all possible, and the services of an
experienced pathologist, as adviser to the fur-farmers, should be obtained as quickly
as possible.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Every one concerned with trapping is very satisfied with the scheme of registering
the trap-lines or trapping areas. This work will soon be completed and the matter of
supervising trapping on the trap-lines will then receive closer supervision and an
increase in the number of fur-bearers on the lines may safely be expected.
Registration of Guides.
The matter of revising the regulations covering the registration of guides, their
hunting territories, helpers, cooks," outfitters, etc., should receive immediate attention if
good services and results to the big-game hunters are to be obtained and the nonresident attracted to our Province in the post-war period. Now is the time to build
and prepare.
Special Patrols.
Throughout the year numerous patrols were made by Game Wardens and Provincial Constables in the Division, all of which were carried out in an efficient and
satisfactory manner.    None of the patrols which were undertaken are, however, given
special mention.
Hunting Accidents.
Three hunting accidents occurred during the year, as follows:—
Donald P. Peebles, Francois Lake, B.C., whilst out hunting with Keith H. Shaffer,
Tchesinkut Lake, on September 23rd, 1942, was accidentally shot by Shaffer, who fired
at a moving object. He died on September 24th, a charge of manslaughter being laid
against Shaffer.
Verne Daly, Prince Rupert, B.C., aged 30, who was working aboard a scow at
Hastings Arm on November 5th, 1942, was accidentally shot in the shoulder when the
hammer of his shotgun caught in the mooring-rope which he was moving. He died on
November 6th.
Loyd G. Robertson, Pilot Officer, Royal Canadian Air Force, who was hunting
ducks on the banks of the Tlell River, was shot in the left side of the neck, left shoulder,
and left arm, when a shotgun carried by Flying Officer Sidney J. Hawkshaw was accidentally discharged when he slipped on fresh snow. P.O. Robertson has since been
moved to Vancouver for treatment and his condition was reported as good.
Game-fish Culture.
The Game Commission supplied Kamloops trout eyed eggs to the Rod and Gun
Clubs throughout the Division as follows:—
McBride Rod and Gun Club, McBride     50,000
Prince George Rod and Gun Club, Prince George  100,000
Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club, Smithers     70,000
Prince Rupert Rod and Gun Club, Prince Rupert     50,000
Ocean Falls Rod and Gun Club, Ocean Falls     50,000
Each of the above-mentioned clubs operate their own hatchery and good results
were obtained in every instance.
Various streams and lakes in the Division have been stocked with fry in the past
few years, resulting in greatly improved fishing. This good work should receive every
encouragement, as the members of these clubs take a keen interest therein. Future
applications for eyed eggs should receive favourable consideration. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 35
Summary and General Remarks.
Game conditions were generally good, an increase in the number of game animals
and birds has been noticed and, given fair weather conditions next breeding season, the
increase in the numbers of our game animals may be anticipated.
The friendly relationship between the British Columbia Police Officers and the
Game Department has been maintained and the spirit of co-operation now existing
between the two forces will be kept at the high level attained in the past year.
Game Associations in " D " Division have again shown their co-operative spirit in
maintaining small fish-hatcheries in the Division, and as a result improved fishing conditions may be anticipated for the future.
To the officers of the British Columbia Police Force, the members of the various
Game Clubs, I wish to express the sincerest appreciation for the kindness and the moral
support extended during the year to all members of the Game Department.
"E" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY
DISTRICTS).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " E " Game
Division for the year ended December 31st, 1942.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bears are decidedly on the increase and in many sections of the
Lower Mainland have been responsible for considerable damage to domestic stock and
to orchards.
Grizzly bears, found in some of the remote sections of the Division, appear to be
in fair numbers.
Deer.—All Game Wardens report deer as being on the increase. Mild weather
conditions, however, did not warrant any great success in the hunting of deer during
most of the open season, but in the latter part a good number of deer were bagged.
Mountain-goat.—At the head of some of the coastal inlets and portions of the
Lower Mainland mountain-goat were observed in fair numbers.
Wapiti (Elk).—The wapiti liberated a few years ago at McNabs Creek, Howe
Sound, are slightly increasing.
Fur-bearing Animals.
While in some sections of the Lower Mainland muskrats have been fairly plentiful, reports indicate that in the Matsqui and Pitt Meadows districts this was not the
case.
Marten, mink, weasel, and racoon are fairly plentiful, while beaver and otter are
scarce.
Red foxes, classed as vermin throughout the Lower Mainland, have been very
plentiful and undoubtedly have been responsible for the destruction of many game
and domestic birds. The Game Wardens at Mission and Chilliwack especially have,
with the use of trained dogs, been very active in the destruction of these pests.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Throughout the Division blue and ruffed grouse seem to be in equal
numbers to previous years and in some of the more settled sections ruffed or willow
grouse predominated.
Pheasants.—With the exception of Pitt Meadows all of the other districts on the
Lower Mainland are fairly well stocked with pheasants, this applies particularly to
the Surrey and Delta districts.    It would seem that in order to assist in the natural M 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
propagation of pheasants fairly large liberations of farmed raised birds must be made
annually.
California Quail.—A sufficient number of California quail are still to be found in
the Delta Municipality to permit of a short open season each year. In other sections
of the Lower Mainland these birds are only to be observed in small numbers.
European Partridge.—In the Ladner district partridge are slightly increasing,
but not in sufficient numbers to permit of any hunting season thereon. These birds,
although found in the Surrey Municipality, are not increasing in numbers to any
extent, although in the higher lands of the Langley district some increase has been
noted.
Migratory Game Birds.
During the early part of the hunting season ducks were fairly plentiful, but
owing to mild weather many thousands of these birds stayed out on salt water and
did not come inland until later on in the season when there was water in the fields.
In the Delta district large numbers of widgeon could be observed during the latter
portion of the hunting season and good bags were to be obtained. Generally, however, the season was only a fair one, although there appeared to be no decrease in
the number of birds. While ducks may be very plentiful, from the hunters' standpoint, weather conditions must be favourable if good shooting is to be secured.
Snow-geese and black brant were plentiful in the Fraser River delta while Canada
geese appeared in greater numbers in the Pitt Lake country than in previous years.
Some districts report jack or Wilson snipe as being quite numerous, while in
other districts the opposite was the case.
Band-tailed pigeons were quite plentiful, although in some areas many of these
birds had migrated before the season was open; the same remarks apply equally as
well to wood-ducks, although no open season was in effect for these birds, but they
had left in most cases before the duck season opened.
Vermin.
More complaints as to the presence of cougar were received during the year.
Coyotes and red foxes have been continually hunted by Game Wardens during the year
and a number were destroyed. For further information in this regard please refer
to statement of predators killed by Game Wardens, which is to be found in the statistical portion of this report.
During the removal of Japanese residents from the Lower Mainland a fairly
large number of cats and dogs that were left behind were destroyed and Game Wardens everywhere kept a very close check on this phase of their work.
Detrimental hawks, owls, crows, and ravens were taken care of wherever found
during the year.
Game-protection.
Flushing-bars were used by a number of farmers in the Fraser Valley with
beneficial results. Farmers, Game Associations, and sportsmen have been most cooperative during the year in furtherance of game conservation.
Extended and frequent patrols have been maintained in every portion of the
Division during the year. From time to time special patrols have been undertaken
in inquiring into specific complaints of " Game Act" and " Fisheries Act" violations.
Game Propagation.
A few California quail were liberated in the Matsqui district early in the year
and the report of Game Warden P. M. Cliffe indicates an increase in these birds; he
has observed from twenty-four to thirty birds in three separate coveys. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1942. M 37
The destruction of predators, such as the red fox, coyote, and the crow, has
assisted greatly in increasing the game-bird population of the Division.
Game Reserves.
Some years ago the North Vancouver Game Reserve was established and later
on at the request of the municipal authorities the boundaries of this reserve were
extended. At the present time, owing to an increased game population, deer and
black bear are responsible for numerous complaints of crop-damage within this
reserve. Sooner or later something will have to be done to cut down the game population in this reserve.
Other game reserves or prohibited hunting areas have been constantly patrolled.
Fur Trade.
There was a reduction in the total fur royalties collected during the year, no
doubt due to a number of trappers enlisting in the armed forces and also the condition
of the fur market.
Fur-farming.
While a number of fur-farmers have discontinued their business, a fairly good
number of farms are still in operation. Many farms have had to close down through
inability to obtain adequate food-supplies.
Registration of Trap-lines.
As in past years, the system of trap-line registration has been most helpful in
conserving fur-bearing animals. Registered trap-line holders take great pride these
days in farming and protecting their trapping territories, which was not the case
before the system of registration was put into effect.
Registration of Guides.
While there are a few registered big-game guides in the Division, the Lower
Mainland and coastal regions cannot be rightfully classed as big-game districts.
Special Patrols.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron was detailed to assist in patrolling the Courtenay-
Campbell River district during the grouse season. The presence of an outside officer
there proved to be very necessary. The district is a large one and the resident Game
Warden could not very well satisfactorily patrol the whole district and check up the
large number of outside hunters who go into this excellent grouse country each season.
Patrols were made by Game Wardens P. M. Cliffe and A. J. Butler into the
Harrison Lake and Skagit areas from time to time.
Hunting Accidents.
Two accidents took place in the Division during the year, neither one being of a
serious nature, and both accidents occurred in the Pitt Meadows district. One hunter
slipped off a log and in his fall broke his ankles, while the other hunter carelessly
placed a loaded shotgun in his car, and later on when removing it the gun discharged,
shooting off the hunter's big toe on the right foot.
Game-fish Culture.
Plantings of trout eggs, fry, and fingerlings were made in many lakes and
streams in the Division. Full particulars in this regard are to be found in the statement of trout liberations in the statistical portion of this report.
Reports indicate that the annual programme of trout liberations is an excellent
means of improving fishing conditions. M 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron, Ladner, writes " On the whole the situation here,
in my opinion, is very satisfactory.    All game is increasing."
Game Warden F. Urquhart, Port Coquitlam, advises " Deer-hunting was not very
good due to unfavourable climatic conditions. The pheasant season was disappointing
although fair bags were taken during the first few days of the hunting season. Blue
grouse appeared to be in fair numbers during the breeding season but seemed to have
disappeared shortly after hunting commenced."
Game Warden R. S. King, Vancouver, states " Game conditions generally were
quite good."
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe, Mission, writes " The year seems to have been an
average one. Pheasants were plentiful and in good condition. In the latter part of
the season pintail and widgeon provided fair shooting, but on the whole the season
for duck-shooters in this district was not very good."
Game Warden A. J. Butler, Chilliwack, states " Fishing and hunting in the Chilliwack district has been very good during the year."
Game Warden H. C. Pyke, Cloverdale, writes " On week-ends hunters were
numerous and, generally speaking, both hunters and fishermen were satisfied with the
quantity and condition of game and fish taken."
Each Game Warden expresses appreciation for the assistance rendered them
during the year by members of the British Columbia Police Force, Game and Fishing
Clubs, and farmers and sportsmen in general.
FEEDING EXPERIMENTS ON KAMLOOPS TROUT   (SALMO GAIRDNERII
KAMLOOPS JORDAN).
By Tom Bridge, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia.
At the request of the Provincial Game Commission a series of experiments were
initiated for the purpose of developing efficient hatchery diets. The present investigation had for its chief objective the preparation and testing of various food materials
in partial or complete substitution for beef-liver, which in recent years has advanced
very rapidly in price. The University of British Columbia through the Department
of Zoology provided the finances for the investigation and the Provincial Game Commission supplied the facilities at its Stanley Park Hatchery and the food materials.
Acknowledgments.
I wish to thank sincerely Dr. W. A. Clemens, under whose direction the experimental work was carried on, for placing at my disposal the literature in his own
private library, and for the help, advice, and encouragement he has given me in
carrying on this work.
To Game Commissioners F. R. Butler and J. G. Cunningham I wish to express
my thanks for providing the facilities and materials necessary for carrying on the
experimental work.
To Dr. J. Allardyce my appreciation for the advice given and the interest shown
in the experimental work.
To Charles 0. Mellor, officer in charge of the Stanley Park Hatchery, my appreciation for assistance in handling and feeding the experimental fish.
Two experiments were carried out—the first from July 9th to September 17th,
1941, and the second from October 5th, 1941, to January 11th, 1942. The experiment
of the summer is referred to as Experiment I. and consists of two parts. Diets fed
to very young fish (early fry) are indicated by the letter A and have the numbers
9a to 18a, inclusive. Diets fed to the older fish (advanced fry) are numbered 9 to 18.
The winter experiment—that is, Experiment II.—involves diets numbered from 19
to 36. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 39
Experiment I.
The fish used were young Kamloops trout (Salmo gairdnerii kamloops) fingerlings. The eggs had been collected at the Gerrard Hatchery, near Lardeau, B.C., and
hatched at the Stanley Park Hatchery in June, 1941.
The fish were held in standard sized hatchery-troughs (16 feet by 1 foot 4 inches
by 6 inches) which had been divided longitudinally to form two troughs, each provided
with a separate water-supply. Into each trough were placed equal weights of fish
(258 gms.; approximately 1,000 in number). At the start of the experiment these
fish had just absorbed the yolk-sac and had been feeding approximately nine days.
The young fish were fed six times per day for the first two weeks, five times per day
for the second two weeks, and so on, until the feeding had been reduced to three times
per day, at which number they were maintained for the duration of the experiment.
The fish were weighed every two weeks in a vessel of water. After the vessel
had been partially filled with water and weighed, fifty fish were placed in the container
and the new weight noted. Before the fish were placed in the vessel they were shaken
gently in a wire net to remove the excess water. Four lots of fifty were taken from
each trough. The four weights were then averaged and the weight of the total
number of fish calculated from this.
The diets fed were mixtures of fresh meat and various supplements. The foods
used were those which could be obtained locally and at a price that would make their
feeding practical in the producing hatchery, provided they proved themselves efficient
as diet ingredients.    (See Table I.)
The various meat parts of the diet as well as the canned salmon were ground
through the finest plate of the grinder. The whole diets were then thoroughly mixed
every two days.
Materials used in the Diets.
Beef-liver.—The beef-liver used was obtained locally and bought when the market
was most favourable in regard to low cost (14 cents per pound) and then frozen and
placed in cold storage until needed.
Salmon-liver.—The salmon-livers were obtained from local canneries during the
canning season, frozen and placed in cold storage. The purchase price was 3 cents
per pound.
Canned Salmon.—The canned salmon used was a local canned product which,
although edible, was not of sufficiently high quality for the commercial market and
had been condemned as such. This was obtained by the Provincial Game Department
at no cost.
Rice Polishings.—This material obtained from a local rice-mill at a cost of 3 cents
per pound.
Brewer's Yeast.—The brewer's yeast used was a dry, flaky powdered product
manufactured by the National Breweries, of Montreal. It was available at 10 cents
per pound in 100-lb. lots, plus freight.
Salt.—Ordinary cooking-salt was used.
Milk-powder.—Skim-milk powder, sold by the Associated Dairies, Limited, was
used.    It was obtained at 10 cents per pound.
Vita-grass.—A dried grass-tip product, rich in carotene. It was purchased from
one of the local feed companies at a cost of 15 cents per pound.
The method of determining the relative values of the diets fed was that of
starting with a definite weight of fish and feeding a fixed amount of food. It was
then noted which diet produced the greatest total increase in weight of the fish at the
end of the trial.
At the start of the experiment these young fish were unable to digest the coarser
non-fresh meat products used in diet mixtures.    Only the finely-ground fresh meats M 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
could be ingested by the young fry without disastrous results. Therefore it was
thought that it would be of value to find the relative nutritive properties of these
fresh meat supplements when fed to very young fry. Later, as the fish grew larger,
the non-fresh meat part of the diet could be added.     (See Table II.)
Experiment II.
The fish used were three-months-old Kamloops trout fry. These fish were brought
in September from the Smith Falls Hatchery on Cultus Lake to the Stanley Park
Hatchery. The original source of the eggs was the Knouff Lake egg-collecting station
near Kamloops, B.C.
The fish were kept in standard sized hatchery-troughs (16 feet by 1 foot 4 inches
by 6 inches), each trough being supplied with a separate water-supply. Into each
trough was placed 2,000 fish of a known weight.
In this experiment the trials were run with a definite number of fish at the start
of the experiment and not a fixed weight of fish as in Experiment I. This method
was considered an improvement in the experimental technique. The fish were weighed
at the start of the experiment and every two weeks from then on. In this trial all of
the fish in each trough were weighed together.
The composition of the diets used in this experiment was based on the results
obtained during the summer from diet No. 16 of Experiment I. This mixture proved
to be the best diet tried. In diet No. 16, the beef-liver was the most expensive
ingredient used in any quantity; therefore the following diets were tried in an
attempt to substitute some less expensive fresh meat for the liver and still retain the
growth-producing properties of the diet.     (See Table III.)
Materials used in the Diets.
The beef-liver, salmon-liver, canned salmon, rice polishings, and brewer's yeast
were the same as that used in Experiment I. and purchased from the same source.
Beef-spleen.—Fresh beef-spleen was obtained from one of the local abattoirs at a
cost of 3 cents per pound.
Beef-blood.—Fresh beef-blood was also obtained from one of the local abattoirs
at a cost of 10 cents per gallon.
Dried Blood.—The dried blood was obtained from the same source as the beef-
blood and at a cost of 3 cents per pound.
Mineral Mixture.—The mixture was obtained from one of the local feed companies at a cost of 10 cents per pound. It contained equal parts of bone-meal, CaC03,
and NaCl with a trace of KI.
Because of the great amount of work involved in making up the diets every day,
the fresh meat part of the diet was ground up every two weeks and placed in preserving jars. Each jar contained enough food for two days' feeding. These jars
were placed in a local cold-storage plant and used as they were needed. To the fresh
meat of the diet was added the basal mixture which was made up as needed. The
two supplements were then thoroughly mixed together before feeding. The fish were
fed once a day.
The results of the various experiments are given in Tables IV., V., and VI.
Conclusions.
Some Factors affecting. Conclusions.
In drawing conclusions from the results of Experiments I. and II., several factors
relative to the age and season of the year under which the experiments were conducted
must be taken into consideration. The most rapid growth period for trout is that from the time of hatching (early
summer) to the young fingerling stage (autumn). In this period, under favourable
conditions, the trout exhibit a logarithmic growth; i.e., they grow at a constant gain
per cent, of their body weight. After reaching the fingerling stage the water temperature gradually drops and the metabolic activity of the fish slows up. This results
in inferior growth gains and poorer food conversion.
The period of transition from the newly hatched fry stage to the fingerling stage
is one of physiological transition for the fish, especially in its nutritional requirements.
As in the case of most young animals, there is a constant progressive change with
growth in the type and quality of the diet necessary to produce optimum well-being
and adequate nutrition. During this period the population experiences its heaviest
mortalities. These are due, in part, to the presence of individuals who, because of
some lack at birth, are incapable of carrying on their physiologic processes for any
extended period of time and subsequently die. High water temperatures experienced
in this period tend to have an adverse effect on the fish. The increase in temperature
increases the metabolic activity of the fish, thus creating a greater demand for oxygen.
The high temperature, however, lowers the oxygen content in the water and the fry
suffer the consequences of this disruption of balance. This situation is often aggravated by the density of population in the rearing-troughs. Therefore when the
optimum temperature is exceeded, detrimental effects possibly occur. Lower vitality
of the fish, as a result of high water temperature, very probably increases their
susceptibility to the bacterial and parasitic organisms prevalent in this period of high
water temperature (ex., Furunculosis, Octomitus, fungus infection, etc.).
Thus it can be seen that the conditions under which the two experiments were
conducted vary in several respects, namely, (1) difference in source of the fish, (2)
difference in age, (3) possible difference in the nutritional requirements or the source
of these requirements, (4) difference in metabolic activity and growth rate, (5) difference in mortality rate, and (6) the difference in prevailing water temperatures and
possible incidence of infection.
Some of the differences mentioned above may well be quantitatively demonstrated
at this point. In both experiments control diets of beef-liver (100 per cent.) were
used.    This affords a ready means of comparing the experiments.
As an indication of the effect of temperature and age change on the ingestion
and utilization of food, comparison of the net gain per cent, shows a gain of 117.5 per
cent, for diet No. 9 over a six-week period with a conversion of 5.4. However, in the
case of diet No. 19, a gain of only 69.7 per cent, was obtained with a conversion value
of 12.5 for a fourteen-week period. This difference is not caused by underfeeding in
the case of diet No. 19. The fish received practically all the food they would eat.
This reduction in the ability to convert food is due to the lowering of the metabolic
rate by the colder water conditions, since fish are poikilothermic ("cold-blooded")
animals and do not maintain a constant body temperature but live at the temperature
of their environment. This being the case, the fish in low temperature conditions
tend to utilize little food in excess of that required to maintain bodily functions and
conversion into body tissue is small.
The mortalities show a reversed superiority, giving a 10.2-per-cent. mortality
over a six-week period for diet No. 9 and a 0.55-per-cent. mortality over a fourteen-
week period for diet No. 19.
These data illustrate well the need of careful husbandry during the first few
months of the hatchery life of the fish and the advantages to be gained in so doing.
Conclusions derived from Diets 9 A to 18 A, inclusive.
The results of diets 9a to 18a, inclusive, showed that beef-liver was definitely
superior to salmon-liver.    The inferiority of salmon-liver was subsequently shown to M 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
be the result of two causes: inferior nutritional qualities of salmon-liver and loss of
food due to dispersion in the water. This inferiority due to the loss in the water
cannot be alleviated by mixing the salmon-liver with other food substances because
young fry cannot feed and grow adequately on mixed diets. It is necessary at this
early stage to feed only fresh, finely-ground meats. Therefore, salmon-liver, as compared with beef-liver, is not an efficient food for young trout.
Evaluating the relative merits of a diet to be fed to young fry should not be
based on the cost per pound of diet, but on the best results obtained. Growth produced and low mortality should be the main consideration. As has been shown above,
the fry are starting on their period of most efficient and rapid growth. At the same
time they are passing through the period when most mortalities occur, water temperatures are adverse, and susceptibility to disease is most prevalent. Therefore, to
reduce the hazards to a minimum and capitalize on the rapid growth and good condition of the fish possible at this time, the cost of the diet should be considered of
secondary importance. The amount of food used during this period is relatively
small and the better results obtained far outweigh the slight extra cost. Fry brought
through this period in good condition repay the extra cost in more fish produced and
better efficiency of food conversion as fingerlings.
Multiple daily feedings of young fry is a procedure that is practised in many
hatcheries and one advocated by authorities on the subject. Young fry are able to
ingest and utilize relatively 'large amounts of food as compared to that efficiently
utilized by fingerlings. It is reasonable to assume, however, that the fry may tend
to overfeed and not efficiently utilize all the food if given at one or two feedings.
Fresh meats, even of the best physical consistency, tend to have the meat-juices
leached out by the water. The activity of the fish and water current breaks up the
food and this condition is aggravated if the food is fed in too large amounts where it
must lie in the trough before it can be eaten. Therefore by increasing the number
of feedings to four or six per day for the first month or two, the loss of food in the
water is reduced and the food is more efficiently utilized. Care in feeding and proper
preparation of the food can help considerably to reduce the cost of using a more
expensive diet.
Conclusions derived from Diets 9 to 18, inclusive.
The value of diet No. 16 stands out above all the other diets tested. It is approximately one-half the cost per pound of beef-liver; it has reduced the fresh meat content
by 50 per cent, and made use of canned salmon, which is obtained free of charge; has
produced growth superior to that of beef-liver; and has reduced the mortalities to a
low level. Yet the most significant point of all is that it was successfully fed to
young fry only 5-6 weeks of age—whereas other mixed diets low in fresh meat sometimes produce disastrous results when fed at this early period. This diet, then,
permits the use of a mixture early in the fry stage with comparative safety and
reduces by one-half at least the cost of feeding.
This diet has a definite value as an early substitute (5-6 weeks of age) for beef-
liver and for a possible transition diet through which the fish can be passed to an
even less expensive mixture.
A warning, however, must be given to the early application of this diet. It contains two ingredients potentially dangerous to young fry. These are canned salmon
and yeast. What effect a high level of yeast would have is not known. Therefore,
when used on a practical scale in the hatchery, pains should be taken to get the correct
proportion of ingredients in the diet, especially the level of yeast contained. Secondly,
the liver and the canned salmon should be ground separately. Grinding the salmon
separately removes part of the bones which are left behind in the grinder. After the
liver and the salmon have been ground the other ingredients are mixed into the two REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1942. M 43
and the entire mixture is again put through the finest plate of the grinder to give a
homogeneous mixture and further grind up any pieces of bone in the diet. If this is
not done, serious loss may result from the perforation of the digestive tract with
large pieces of bone splinters.
This procedure and attendant precautions cannot be overemphasized, especially
when the early substitution of fresh meat is attempted.
Some mention of the economic relationship of adequate nutrition to the reduction
in cost of hatchery procedure is worthy of mention. Although the cost of feeding
the hatchery fish is an important item in the process of fish-culture it is by no means
the main expense, as perhaps has been implied in this paper. There is an unbroken
chain of fixed charges, commencing at the time of egg-collection and continuous till
the fingerlings are liberated the following spring. Of this chain of expenses, the cost
of feeding is only one link.
In the field there is the cost of collecting, fertilizing, and hardening the eggs,
packing and preparing them for shipment. Next there is the cost of handling till
the time they arrive at the hatchery. Once in the hatchery, feeding commences and
the cost of diet enters the picture, but apart from this feeding the maintenance
charges of the hatchery are fixed. These fixed charges are composed of personnel
wages, depreciation on hatchery equipment, light and power, repairs, and various
other incidental expenses which, when totalled, are considerable. At the time of
liberation the cost of trucking and planting the fish is added. Over all this is superimposed the cost of office personnel and direction of the entire fish-culture procedure.
This forms an imposing total cost apart from the expense of the food used in the
hatchery.
Therefore, in a hatchery which handles a fixed number of eggs from year to year
the expenses outlined above remain relatively constant.
To maintain the economy of the hatchery as many fish as possible must be turned
out as the end product of the hatchery endeavour, for the costs, other than feeding, are
spread over the number of fish produced. If optimum production of numbers is not
accomplished, the charges assessed against each fish liberated are consequently higher.
This is the role adequate nutrition must play. Not only must it maintain optimum
production of the hatchery but should, if possible, lower the cost of the actual feeding
itself.
Therefore, particular attention should be paid to that period in the life of the fish
in which mortalities are heaviest. As has been mentioned before, if this necessitates
the use of a more expensive diet during this early period, the dividends returned in the
optimum number of fish produced are worth the added expense at the time.
Conclusions derived from Diets 19 to 36, inclusive.
It is obvious from the results obtained (see Table VI.) that diet No. 32 most nearly
satisfied the three main criteria of trout-feeding; that is, low cost, low mortality, and
good growth.
The three main points of significance shown by these trials are:—
(a.)  That fresh beef-spleen is equivalent to beef-liver as a growth-producing
food when fed to fingerling trout under conditions of this experiment.
(6.)  Brewer's yeast apparently has a definite value as a growth-stimulating
supplement when added to a trout diet,
(c.) When 50 per cent, of a fresh meat diet is substituted with a mixture of
33 per cent, canned salmon, 15 per cent, rice polishings, and 2 per cent.
mineral mixture, the substitution produces growth equal or superior to
that obtained with the fresh meat substituted. Replacing 5 per cent, of
the rice polishings with an equal amount of brewer's yeast further
enhances the value of the mixture by approximately 15 per cent. ' M 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(a.) Beef-spleen.—The quantitative data proving the equivalent growth-producing
properties of beef liver and spleen have already been presented and discussed. When
the cost (beef-liver, 14 cents; beef-spleen, 3 cents) is considered, it is readily seen that
the substitution of spleen for liver greatly reduces the cost of feeding.
It has been concluded that beef-liver is the best diet to use in feeding newly
hatched fry. Since beef-spleen has been proved equivalent to beef-liver as a growth
producer it may seem logical to assume that beef-spleen could well be substituted.
This would greatly reduce the cost. This assumption, however, may be false. It must
be remembered that comparisons have only been drawn between beef liver and spleen
from results obtained during the winter feeding of fingerlings.
Although beef-spleen has been shown to be equal to beef-liver as a food for fingerlings, liver contains many desirable qualities not possessed by spleen. This is especially
evident in the vitamin content.
Beef-liver is a rich source of Vitamin A and trout utilize the vitamin from this
source very well. Other sources of Vitamin A, such as cod-liver oil and homogenized
carotene, are very poorly utilized. Beef-spleen is very low in this vitamin. The
following data show the vitamin content of the two meats:—
Thiamin—Y per gram	
Ribo flavin—Y per gram	
Nicotinic acid—Y per gram ___■  175.0
Pentothenic acid—Y per gram	
Pyridoxine—Y per gram —_■       7.3
Choline—mg. per gram	
Vitamin A—I.U. per gram	
Beef-liver.
Beef-spleen.
3.8
1.6
30.0
4.5
175.0
75.0
63.0
11.0
7.3
1.2
2.7
90.0
Poor
0.5
0.3
Vitamin D—I.U. per gram	
Vitamin C—mg. per gram	
(Extract from table presented in Cortland Hatchery Rpt. No. 10, 1941.)
It has been repeatedly demonstrated that Vitamin A is essential for good vision in
human beings, especially dim-light vision. Therefore, as a precaution, it should be
assumed that Vitamin A plays the same role in the vision of trout. It has been shown
that trout store large amounts of this vitamin in the liver and pyloric caeca. This store
is built up slowly and is lost slowly. Therefore if trout fry are started on a Vitamin
A deficient diet, such as spleen, and it is impossible to supplement effectively this diet
with such sources of Vitamin A as carotene or cod-liver oil, avitaminosis may occur.
Such a deficiency may manifest itself as an impairment of vision. Since trout depend
to a large extent on visual acuity to obtain their food it is possible that fingerlings may
be planted that have a reduced ability to obtain food and avoid predation. This supposition has not as yet been proven, but the possibilities are well worth keeping in mind.
Further studies with beef-spleen, especially in relation to young fry feeding, should
be carried out. Therefore, pending further work on the subject, the author does not
recommend the feeding of beef-spleen to young fry as a substitute for beef-liver.
(b.) Brewer's Yeast.—In the discussion of results, quantitative data were given to
show the benefit of adding a 5-per-cent. level of yeast to the diet. This was shown to
produce upwards of 15 per cent, better growth.
To what fraction or fractions of the yeast this benefit can be attributed is not
known. Yeast has long been recognized as a source of a number of nutritional factors,
principal among these being the vitamins of the B complex. What role these various
factors play in the nutrition of trout is at present unknown. The low level of this
supplement contained in the diet and its low cost, when purchased in large quantities,
definitely warrant its use.    The optimum level at which the yeast should be included in REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 45
the diet has not been determined. Investigation of the factors present that stimulate
growth and the optimum level of feeding would well be investigated.
In using yeast, caution should be exercised. Injurious effects may be produced by
improper mixing or too high a level in the diet. Until further work is carried out on
this point it should not be included at a level greater than 5 per cent.
(c.) Non-fresh Meat Mixture.—It has been shown that the mixture of 33 per cent,
canned salmon, 15 per cent, rice polishings, and 2 per cent, mineral mixture can effectively substitute part of the fresh meat of the diet and produce equal or better growth
than the fresh meat substituted. When 5 per cent, of the rice polishings is replaced
with an equal amount of brewer's yeast, the beneficial effect of the yeast is superimposed. The mixture, including the brewer's yeast, costs less than 1 cent per pound.
This is an efficient means, when properly used, of reducing the cost of the diet.
By the use of this mixture, canned salmon can be effectively utilized. Although no
trials were included which demonstrated the relative values of the individual ingredients, it can be concluded that canned salmon is a good fresh meat substitute and source
of protein if it is not included at too high a level in the diet. The bone content of the
ground salmon is also an excellent mineral source, especially for calcium and phosphorus. What specific value the rice polishings have is unknown. However, it forms
a good binder for the diet and probably forms a small accessory source of protein and
vitamins of the B complex.
To what extent the fresh meat can be replaced above the 50-per-cent. level without
disturbing the growth properties of the diet cannot be stated at this time. High levels
of substitution will probably depend on the progressive age increase of the fish. This
point should be investigated with a view to further reducing the cost of the diet.
Table I.—Diets used in Experiment I. for Advanced Fry.
Diet No.
Beef-
liver.
Salmon-
liver.
Canned
Salmon.
Rice Polishings.
Brewer's
Yeast.
Salt.
Milk-
powder.
Vita-
grass.
Cost
per
Lb.
9	
100
	
______
$0.14
10.. __._ ___	
30
---
60
10
	
.045
11  ___ 	
15
75
10
.025
12	
30
15
60
75
10
10
.012
13 	
.007
14	
15
15
60
10
.028
15	
25
-
60
15
.065
16	
50
-----
33
10
5
2
.08
17     	
15
15
35
35
.064
18*  ___.„_
50
'
33
10
5
2
.041
* Re No. 18.—Salmon-liver is 80 per cent, water, beef-liver is 70 per cent, water; therefore to have the same
food value of salmon-liver as beef-liver in No. 16, 75 gms. of S.L. was used with every 50 gms. of the basal part of
the diet to give the same dry weight of food as in No. 16.
Table II.—Diets used in Experiment I. for Early Fry.
Diet No.
Beef-
liver.
Salmon-
liver.
Cost
per Lb.
9a       	
100
100
100
50
100
100
50
100
100
50
50
100
$0.14
.14
10a   	
llA                          	
.14
12a 	
.03
13a  _   :	
03
14a ...  	
.085
15a  	
14
16a 	
14
17a  	
085
18a           	
.03 M 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table III.—Diets used in Experiment II. for Fingerlings.
Diet No.
Beef-
liver.
Salmon-
liver.
Beef-
spleen.
Beef-
blood.
Dried
. Blood.
Canned
Salmon.
Rice Polishings.
Brewer's
Yeast.
Mineral
Mixture.
Cost per
Lb. of
Diet.
19 _ 	
100
$0.14
20  	
95
5
.138
21 	
100
	
	
.03
22 	
100
.03
23 	
50
50
.085
24 	
50
50
.085
25 ...
50
33
10
5
2
.08
26 	
50
33
12
3
2
.077
27  _	
50
33
15
2
.075
28   	
25
25
33
10
5
2
.05
29  	
25
25
33
10
5
2
.05
30 	
25
25
33
10
5
2
.046
31 	
25
25
33
10
5
2
.05
32	
......
50
33
10
5
2
.025
33	
.__._.
25
25
33
10
5
2
.025
34	
______
50
33
10
5
2 ■
.025
35 	
	
25
25
33
10
5
2
.019
36   '.....
......
25
25
33
10
5
2
.025 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 47
Q
H
S
U
EH
<
tn
|H
a
o
H
CQ
H
<!
«
fc
o
g
3
w
w
k
a
o
<
EH
<
Q
w
M
EH
°fi
o ba
net
to
ght
ish
iced.
(Dt-Wt-OMt-MffilO
-it!
8 to rn
WNCCHWONCCt-tO
&*
td
m              in
^TfTfCOMCOTltH/cOM
o ,
iHiHi-HOOOi-trHOO
to)   QJ
O
P.
6^
H
-.:
P
■M
N(M(MCOCOlM(M(MMC*_)
COOOCOCJ(MOCOCOO(N
00   00   00   cr
CO    rH    CO    CO    rH    CO
s^o
rH    r-H    r-A                      rH    rH
<   w
M*J
MfOOt-O^tONiCO
OJ  fi
MtOJMOHIMH'im
toJ^
(SlMO^tB^WOIOC-
■ U
i
<
O
+»*~^
(MT-HOOCC^ft-fc-i-^rH^
■*$<<MOrH100rHC_0-r}<0
OJ   er
CXrHrHrHCOOirHOi
lie
OOOCSOSCSOCSOO
OfOWODHt-CO^M
lOlOWTf'JtTtlOiO^iO
^
<n
oooooooooo
m
00
a
CO
O
~ti
A->
0
H
OOCOrHCqiOWOSOSiM
Ofc-Cat-irHCOfc-rHCfteD
miOlOM^COlOlOM^
Ph
o
P-ufi
MS «
QJ   OJ
[■   N   rl   »   t-   t"   ffl   t-   O   H
H
Tfrncoa^nTfcomt-co
8
N    N    N    W    N   N    N    CJ    C-]    (M
^
OOOOOOOOOO
SB
cs
J
rt
OOOOOOQOOOQOCOOOCOCO
+J
mmmmmmininmm
0
NWNCqiNNNNCqiM
0) fi
OJCOM'JHt-MOMH
MMlOMNtfl^rtlfllO
rH    rH    rH
0
1
J
rt
i-HC-iot-omtr-oot-
«!
o
•"*CO(OOiHt-^-*-cJ<*!S
ri
H
~
1
3
a
n
OM(M00rHOlO(>]t-N
H
s
CO
Ot—    lOlO-^CO-'tfCOOC-
1
OOOt-OOOOOOOiOO
\
SO
5
fc-
rH  en   t-  ir
t-    ^
W   CM   O   OS
Tf     C
rH    C£
io -rr
o  o m  i-i
O    i-
r-A    0C
a c
o  o os as
\
Ci
H «g
: o
o c
!        IOO
C3
O    IT
! -m  o
M&£
'-,
!        !             rH
■4
J
C
3
O    C
o
C
o o o
o c
o
IC
o o  in
6
%
a
to
■4
<
<
<
«
<
<
<
■<
<
05
o
r-H    CM
CO
Tf
in
t£
t-   00
■-1
rA
rH
1-1
'-|
rH
'-,
rH
S «_
;g
■3   r
QJ     p.
3  o
S •=
«5  2 M 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
«
fc
o
a
o
>
Q
<!
o
EH
m
H
K
O
O
_5
a
a
a
fc
fc
O
Ol
H
H
a
t>
a
H
M
«!
Eh
Pi O
fc o'S
O
SB
g
fc *
i> tc
Sfc
3 i_j __
COt-CCWt-CSrHt-mW
OOllfl'fOOOt-tCHN
xccfc-musKiroint-
co   cc   co
J*    OS
i "^
o
o
;  m  oo
T-I
3   C-
j o
o
00
OS
a
!   CO   O
OS
m Tf  csi  tr-  co  m
J*  ^  Nrt  O  N  <C
rH  o  o  o  o  o  o
M   M   tO   M    M   M
CO    CD' (M    OS    <N
WOOCOCSOUOCO
c<]  o  m  o  io
eg  i-h  o  M  o
o   o  o  co
t-  CO   00   H
O   IO    H    Tf
oooooooooo
O^OWMHt-MfCO
inuoio'J'ti'TiiioiO'^io
oooooooooo
t-oocooot— co-^
ooioot-T-tosb-i-r:
ot-wcoiococo-e*:
OOtDrHNiOWOOC-l
Ot-CNIt-iHO__-(MOCO
lOIOiOMTMIOlOM't
Ol
o
fc-
fc-
io
CM
00
CO
IO
IO
I—
■"*
m
o
o
ca
eo
on
b-
CO
IO
■rw
(NOCOlOC—   (Nt-NO
<—>citr-CiTfo3incoTf
H CO IO H W IO to    tJ"
CO N tO CO
OS 00 fc- CD
oo cd "^ m
t# t- CO O I
co cc o oo
NNWHffilOlMt-cq
c-miO"*cDTj-ooi^
OOC-OOOOOCSOSCO REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 49
Table VI.—Results of Winter Feeding of Diets to Fingerlings.
(The number of fish in each trough was 2,000 and the amount of diet fed
was 26.828 grams.)
Mortalities.
Per
Cent.
Mortalities.
Weight of Fish
(Gms.).
5/10/41.     11/1/42
Net
Gain
(Gms.).
Gain
per
Cent.
Ratio of
Weight of
Food fed
to Weight
of Fish
produced.
Cost
per Lb.
of Fish
produced.
19.
20.
21 _
22.
23
24.
25 .
26-
27.
28 _
29-
30__
31__
32_.
33__.
34..
35._
36.
11
0.55
3,085
5,236
2,151
12
0.60
3,368
6,084
2,716
108
5.40
3,085
3,545
460
10
0.50
3,283
5,603
2,319
18
0.90
3,255
5,122
1,867
11
0.55
3,311
5,482
2,171
6
0.30
3,323
6,482
3,159
5
0.25
3,396
6,763
3,367
10
0.50
3,226
5,886
2,660
7
0.35
3,141
5,482
2,341
7
0.35
3,113
6,000
2,887
15
0.75
2,830
4,528
1,698
16
0.80
3,509
5,688
2,179
22
1.10
3,360
4,556
1,196
2
0.10
3,400
6,211
2,811
5
0.25
3,424
6,650
3,226
4
0.20
3,509
5,660
2,151
4
0.20
3,622
6,112
2,490
69.7
80.7
14.7
70.0
57.3
65.8
94.8
99.1
81.6
74.8
91.8
61.6
62.1
36.4
85.8
93.4
61.3
68.7
12.5
9.9
55.8
11.6
14.4
12.3
8.4
7.9
10.2
11.4
9.4
15.5
12.3
22.0
9.2
8.3
12.5
io.8
$1.75
1.36
1.67
.34
1.21
1.04
.67
.61
.76
.57-
.47
.71
.61
.55
.23
.21
.24
.27
ECONOMIC   STATUS   OF   THE   PHEASANT   ON   THE   CULTIVATED   LANDS
OF   THE   OKANAGAN   VALLEY,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
By Ian McTaggart Cowan, Department of Zoology,
University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
The pheasant of Southern British Columbia is of mongrel stock arising from the
introduction of Phasianus colchicus torquatus and P. c. mongolicus together or separately at widely scattered points. However the characteristics of the population are
predominantly those of torquatus with but occasional individuals showing much sign
of their mongolicus blood.
Over most of even the apparently suitable parts of the Province the pheasant
does not reproduce itself naturally in sufficient quantities to maintain the population
in the face of the annual hunting drain. On the cultivated and reverted lands of the
Okanagan Valley, however, it has proven most successful and has maintained a high
numerical status over a period of at least ten years. Here the heavy density that the
pheasant has attained has aroused the concern of some truck-gardeners and orchard-
ists who complain of damage to crops of certain vegetables and small fruits.
In view of such complaints, and of the importance of the pheasant as a game
bird, this study was undertaken with the primary object of ascertaining the food-
habits of the pheasant on-the cultivated lands of the Okanagan Valley.
The investigation was conducted as a co-operative endeavour on the part of the
Department of Zoology of the University of British Columbia and the Provincial
Game Commission. The task of collecting the specimens for examination was undertaken by Game Warden C. Still, of Vernon, B.C. Field and laboratory examinations
were made by the author.
Identifications of weed-seeds were made by Cecil Tapp, supervising analyst, and
his staff at the Dominion Department of Agriculture, Plant Products Division Laboratory at Vancouver, B.C. Insects were identified by H. B. Leech and R. B. Buckell,
of the Dominion Department of Agriculture, Division of Entomology Laboratories at M 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Vernon and Kamloops respectively, and by Professor G. J. Spencer, of the Department
of Zoology, University of British Columbia. To each of these the writer is much
indebted.
The area adjoining Vernon, B.C., was chosen as representative of the parts of
the Okanagan Valley in which truck-gardening and farming are at least as important
as fruit-growing. Here the cultivated lands served by the Vernon Irrigation District
water system constituted the study area and upon these all birds were collected and
all field studies prosecuted.
The variety of agricultural crops cultivated and the extensive acreage of wild
land, or land reverting after having been under cultivation, provided a wide diversification of habitat. According to estimates supplied me by H. H. Evans, District Field
Inspector, Provincial Department of Agriculture at Vernon, the acreages in various
crops on the study area are as follows: Fruit orchards, largely apple, 3,265 acres;
hay, 3,000 acres; grain, 1,800 acres; fodder-crops, 200 acres; alfalfa-seed, 200 acres;
vegetables, other than potatoes, tomatoes, and corn, 763 acres; tomatoes, 600 acres;
potatoes, 350 acres; corn, 16 acres; vegetable-seed, 174 acres; and grapes, 25 acres;
making a total of 10,393 acres under crop. In addition, there are approximately 7,000
acres of uncultivated land suitable for pheasants.
The adjacent and interspersed wild land presents such diversity of cover type as
sage-brush prairie, thickets of snowberry and wild rose, sedge-meadow, riparian
willow thickets, and lakeside cottonwood groves. No attempt is made at clean cultivation, so that hedgerows, vacant fields, orchards, irrigation-ditches, and many
cropped fields present a luxuriance of weed-growth with attendant food and cover
within easy cruising radius of cultivated crops.
The climate of the Vernon area is of the semiarid type, the average annual
precipitation over the ten years 1929-39 translated into inches of rainfall is 15.65.
This is fairly evenly distributed through the year with 2.00 inches the ten-year
average for December, 0.71 for April, 0.87 for July, and 0.86 for August; other months
averaging from 1.13 in September to 1.63 in January.
The summers are warm, sometimes hot, and the winters moderately cold. The
ten-year average of the monthly means of daily minimum temperatures indicate a
low of 18 degrees in January and February and a high of 54 and 52 degrees in July
and August respectively. The corresponding values for mean daily maximum temperatures are 28 and 30 in January and February, 82 and 80 in July and August.
Climatic, food, and cover conditions are approaching the ideal. Intensive predator control has been practised and may have contributed to the observed abundance
of pheasants.
The density of ground-cover rendered accurate census of pheasant populations in
the Vernon district most difficult. Dog census of areas scattered at random over the
farmland, but including neither hay-fields nor orchard, indicated population of about
one bird to 1.5 acres in August of 1942. Winter census taken on three consecutive
years—1939, 1940, and 1941—by Game Warden C. Still led him to estimate a residual
population of 6,000 birds in midwinter. According to long-time residents there has
been no large-scale change in numbers over the last ten years at least. This may
indicate a saturation point, for the preferred foods are well in excess of demand and
food is certainly not the controlling factor in limiting the population to this level.
No selection was practised in taking birds for stomach examination so that these
should exhibit an approximation of the sex ratio existing in the population as a whole.
Of 111 adult birds taken between May, 1941, and August, 1942, twenty-two were
males and eighty-nine females. On this basis the sex ratio is 1:4. My field-counts of
adults made in late August, 1942, indicated a 1:5 ratio, but the difficulty of accurately
distinguishing adult hens from well-grown juvenile hens under field conditions at that
time of year may well account for the higher ratio obtained during the field-count. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1942. M 51
Food as. indicated in Study, of Pheasant Crops.
For the purpose of this study 132 crops were available. The monthly distribution
of these is shown in Table 1. An attempt was made to obtain approximately ten per
month throughout the year, with a greater number in the summer period during which
agricultural crops were attacked. All birds were taken on or immediately adjacent
to cultivated land on which small fruits and vegetables were available.
Effort was made to obtain the birds at times when the crops were most likely to
contain food. Where such was the case only the crop was preserved, but where the
crop was empty the gizzard was saved. To these were attached labels bearing
information as to date, exact locality, sex, age, and a succinct statement of the cultivated crops available on adjacent land. All crops and gizzards were individually
wrapped in cheese-cloth and preserved in formalin.
Crops were opened into water and the seeds and small fruits separated from
leaves, fruit-pulp, and root material. Seeds were further separated by decanting,
screening, and, where necessary, by hand-picking. Large seeds, berries, large insects,
and similar items were measured by water displacement when submerged. Surplus
water adhering to them being removed by an air-jet before submersion. All other
foods were measured volumetrically, wet, in a graduated cylinder under slight pressure sufficient to consolidate the mass without crushing its components.
The percentage figures of food. items here given are based primarily upon the
crop contents. As has been demonstrated by Davison (1940) only in the crops of
birds are the foods represented in the proportions eaten. In this study, however, a
few gizzards contained nothing but soft food in an undigested state, or so large a
proportion of undigested soft food that it was obvious that the food had entered that
organ at or immediately prior to death. Data from these gizzards were combined
with those of the crops. All other gizzards were searched for items not included in
the crop contents.
In calculating the monthly diet the quantities of each item occurring in each
stomach representing the month were summed and this sum used as 100 per cent, in
computing the percentage values of individual items.
Food.
As has been demonstrated in all other studies of pheasant food-habits in North
America, the food of the Okanagan birds is predominantly of vegetable matter. In
the group breakdown given in Table 3 it will be seen that 98 per cent, of the total
annual intake is made up of plant products. Even in August, when the proportion
of animal matter was greatest, vegetable matter contributed 92 per cent, of the
monthly food.
However, while the composition of the annual food as regards biotic kingdoms
represented is much the same in British Columbia as it is in the eastern and central
states, the type of plant materials represented exhibit significant differences. The
majority of food-habit studies of the pheasant have been conducted in regions where
corn is grown as a major crop. Under such circumstances Swenk (1930) in Nebraska
found corn made up 67 per cent, of the annual diet; Dalke (1937) found corn to
constitute 33 per cent, of the year's food in Michigan; and Fried (1940) in an examination of 659 Minnesota taken pheasants found grain to contribute 81.3 per cent.
of the annual intake, of which 62 per cent, consisted of corn. The latter author
also found weed-seeds to represent only 6.14 per cent, of the annual diet. In the
Vernon district the relative importance of the items of grain and weed-seeds is
reversed. Here, though there was in 1942 but small corn acreage (16 acres), there
were 1,800 acres of barley, oats, and wheat available to the pheasant. Even so, grain
provided only 12 per cent, of the annual food while weed-seeds constituted 44 per cent. M 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Grain occurred in the crops of but nine of the 132 adult pheasants examined.
Barley, wheat, and oats appeared in the annual diet as 5 per cent., 8 per cent., and
trace respectively, each appearing in three stomachs. From Table 3 it will be seen
that grain was eaten in appreciable amounts in May and June and again in September
and October. Its most important contribution to the diet was in June, when 65 per
cent, of the monthly diet consisted of wheat. The high percentage, in spite of low
frequency of occurrence, reflects the volume of grain consumed in a short time by
those birds feeding on grain. It will be noted that the months in which grain is
eaten are the months of planting and of harvest, times at which much waste grain
was available. Examination revealed only one instance in which sprouting grain
had been eaten. Some of that taken in August was clean and may have been picked
from the ripe heads.    In the majority of cases, however, the grain was plainly waste.
Weed-seeds.
By far the most important item in the annual diet of pheasants at Vernon was
weed-seeds. In every month of the year they contributed heavily to the food-supply.
Smallest amounts of weed-seed were taken in May (15 per cent.), June (21 per cent.),
and in August (15 per cent.). In May and June the drop in consumption of weed-
seeds was compensated for by the rise in grain intake. In August, however, the
compensation was in the form of fruit. During the months of January and February
weed-seeds represented 77 per cent, and 79 per cent, respectively of the monthly diet.
The most important weeds in the Vernon district from the standpoint of pheasant
food proved to be the bindweed (Polygonum convolvulus), which alone provided 11
per cent, of the annual diet, and lamb's-quarters (Chenopodium album) with a contribution of 13 per cent. It should be mentioned that I have included among weed-
seeds the seeds of tomatoes taken during the winter from the rotted fruit left in the
fields after the harvest. This item represents 4 per cent, of the annual food and in
January reached a peak of 23 per cent. Also included are a few instances of apple and
pear seeds picked up in orchards during the winter months. In the aggregate these
do not represent one-half of 1 per cent, of the annual intake.
Forty-one species of weeds were represented in the seeds recovered from these
birds. Only seventeen of these appeared in amounts in excess of one-half of 1 per cent.
Those present in lesser amounts are listed in Table 2. Grass-seed was a relatively
unimportant item with an aggregate of 7 per cent, in the annual intake. The most
important grasses were the foxtails (Poa sp.). A number of species of weed-seeds
were taken in appreciable amounts over a brief period but did not loom large on an
annual basis. Thus barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli) made up 19 per cent, of
the contents of ten January crops and orach (Atriplex patula) was present as 18 per
cent, and 6 per cent, in the diets for January and February; Madia 18 per cent, in
February and Lithospermum canescens 13 per cent, in June. All four of these species
had little or no importance during the rest of the year. None the less, these species
may have contributed vitally to the special physiological requirements of the pheasant
during the periods in which they were consumed.
Green Plant Material.
This type of food constituted an important part of the diet in all months except
September and October and had an annual mean value of 17 per cent. During the
months from November to April grass leaves were almost the only greens eaten, but
from May to August the dandelion replaced grass. Clover was another item eaten
during the spring months in significant amounts. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 53
Fruits and Cultivated Crops.
Exclusive of grain, the two cultivated crops appearing most frequently and in
greatest quantity are potatoes and tomatoes. Potato was present in one or more crops
taken in each month except June, August, and November, and is doubtless eaten occasionally even in these. In fact, field observation confirmed this in August at least.
Usually the potato-pulp was obviously from decaying tubers left on the ground after
digging of the crop. On the other hand, potato consumed in July, August, and early
September can be considered as part of a potentially harvestable crop. Those falling
in this category constituted about 2 per cent, of the annual diet and will be discussed
further later in this report. Tomato-fruit figured prominently in the food taken
during July and August and contributed 4 per cent, of the annual food.
Cull pears and apples together made up 5 per cent, of the annual diet and constitute
the most important fruit contribution. Service-berry (Amelanchier florida) was eaten
in fair quantities in late summer (4 per cent, in July, 16 per cent, in August), but wild
fruits were relatively unimportant in their bulk contribution.
Animal Matter.
Animal matter in the pheasant diet in the Vernon district consisted primarily of
insects, among which the grasshopper (Melanoplus mexicanus) appeared more frequently than any other. Other harmful insects recovered from pheasant stomachs
during this study were strawberry root-weevil (Brachyrhinus ovatus) and a closely
related species, leaf-hoppers (Homoptera), cutworms (Geometridse), plant bugs
(Meridsc), and slugs. However, as will be seen from Table 3, the total annual intake
of animal matter amounted to only 2 per cent., and it is very doubtful if under existing
conditions the pheasant eats enough of these insects to enter importantly into the
control of them as agricultural pests. Table 4 gives a complete list of the animal items
found in the 132 adult, or nearly adult, birds examined.
Examination of Field Crops.
In order to translate the findings of the stomach examinations into figures based
upon actual crop damage a field examination of pheasant-damage to cultivated crops
was undertaken during August, 1942. At this time the author and Game Warden C.
Still visited what was judged to be a representative group of ranches in the Vernon
district. Studies were undertaken upon two ranches in North Vernon, adjacent to
Swan Lake, three ranches in the Coldstream district, and three ranches in South
Vernon. The latter were operated by Japanese. In addition, many farmers were
consulted and the pros and cons of the pheasant situation discussed with them.
Damage to Cultivated Crops.
Damage to cultivated crops in the Vernon district does occur, and though it is
frequently exaggerated by the aggrieved party, it sometimes reaches important dimensions.    During this study damage to the following crops was noted.
Peaches.—One complainant reported $350 damage to peach seedlings grown for
budding purposes. When studies of the damaged area were made it was found that in
300 linear feet of seed-row that should have supported approximately 300 trees only
sixty were present, and of these twenty were defective as a result of improper budding
technique. The entire 300 trees could have been bought on the open market for from
$45 to $75. Pheasants were blamed for the 240 missing trees. However, by excavating
the barren rows we took twenty-eight ungerminated peach-stones out of a random
sample of 20 linear feet of row. There were two stones that had been uprooted and
destroyed, possibly by pheasants. The evidence was that perhaps $1.50 damage had
been occasioned to this planting rather than the $350 claimed. The area in nursery
stock grown from seed is very small and the loss of little moment in the general study. M 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Corn.—As already stated, the corn acreage in Vernon district in 1942 was just 16
acres. Much of this acreage was in tall varieties that produce the majority of their
cobs out of reach of the pheasants. However, a Department of Agriculture test-plot
of early, low-cobbing varieties had suffered a loss approximating 80 per cent. This
plot was a small one and close to excellent pheasant cover, factors that doubtless contributed to the heavy damage. No attempt had been made to protect the plot. If corn
acreage planted to these early varieties increases, heavy commercial damage can be
expected unless protective measures are undertaken. However, under existing circumstances it was the opinion of the growers, supported by my findings, that the monetary
loss in corn consumed by pheasants in the Vernon district is unimportant. In one
small field, Brewer's, red wing and yellow-headed blackbirds had destroyed a large
proportion of the cobs, but it was not possible to arrive at any reliable estimate of
damage.
Seed Losses.—Occasional farmers complained of peas, beans, and corn consumed
after sowing. Inasmuch as it was not possible to make an examination during the
planting season such losses were not investigated. The stomach examinations revealed
seeds of these plants in but one instance, thus suggesting that under existing circumstances damage to these crops is either slight or very local.
Potatoes.—Fifteen acres of potatoes, distributed in three 5-acre fields, were examined. In each instance pheasant-damage had been complained of. In one field fifty
damaged potatoes were present. All of these were tubers exposed on the surface and
consequently unmarketable. In the second field damage on the 5 acres was estimated
at between 70 and 90 lb. Here the exposed potatoes had been consumed first, but in
some instances demolition of these had exposed other potatoes that had also been
attacked. These potentially marketable potatoes amounted to roughly one-third of
those damaged. In the third field seepage from the main irrigation-ditch had converted
the ground into a quagmire and resulted in the exposure of numerous potatoes. Under
these conditions damage had amounted to approximately 100 lb., or 20 lb. per acre. It
was not possible to arrive at an estimate of the proportion of potentially marketable
tubers as the entire field may well have proved unharvestable.
It must be borne in mind that damage was inspected in mid-August and there was
time for further damage to ensue before the crop was dug. Without an examination
at that time it is impractical to estimate total damage to the potato-crop. The indications are that adequate cultivation to ensure covering of all exposed tubers will go a
long way toward eliminating this loss.
Grapes.—During the 1942 season 25 acres of grapes were under cultivation in the
Vernon district. Serious pheasant-damage to grapes was claimed by one grower. At
the time of my investigation of pheasant-damage upon his ranch only the early varieties
of white grapes were ripe, and as I have observed elsewhere, that bird attacks upon
grapes are often many times heavier on purple varieties, the findings based upon white
varieties may not be indicative of the total extent of the damage. Furthermore, the
vineyard in which counts were made was small, a 4-acre experimental plot surrounded
by excellent pheasant cover, and considerable effort had been made to remove pheasants
from the area by shooting. For these reasons the present estimate of damage is more
an indication of minimum loss than of maximum loss under the conditions obtaining.
In this vineyard 500 bunches of grapes, within 18 inches of the ground and all
bearing ripe fruit, were examined. Of these forty, or 8 per cent., had one or more
grapes removed from the bunches. In only three instances had more than five grapes
been removed. Inasmuch as the bulk of the product of this vineyard was being marketed to the winery at a price based upon poundage and sugar content, the aggregate
damage attributable to pheasants, when translated into dollars and cents, was small.
In this instance the market value of one pheasant for table use probably covered the
entire loss. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1942. M 55
Tomatoes.—The most serious damage attributable to pheasant activity was that
noted in the tomato fields. A study of the extent of this loss was undertaken on four
ranches, two in South Vernon, one near Long Lake, and one in the Coldstream district.
Two hundred millacre quadrats were mechanically selected in checker-board pattern. Upon each quadrat all ripe, or semiripe, fruit was counted. Fruit already
harvested was enumerated by counting the stems from which it had been picked. Split
or scalded fruit was counted and all pheasant-damage noted. On the two hundred
quadrats these amounts were as follows:—
Already harvested      500
Ripe or ripening undamaged  1,766
Split or scalded      768
Scalded and pecked       68
Pecked      164
Total fruit  3,266
Per Cent.
First-grade fruit damaged     7
Second-grade fruit damaged     8
Percentage of fruit grading as seconds  37
Percentage of fruit grading as firsts  63
Tomato yield figures for the Vernon area, as supplied by H. H. Evans, District
Field Inspector, British Columbia Department of Agriculture, are as follows:—
Average yield, 12 tons per acre, of which about 10 tons are marketed during good
years. Inasmuch as the heaviest loss of fruit to pheasants takes place early in the
season, in calculating the amount of such damage the 12-ton potential crop has to be
used as the basis. Of this amount one-third is sold semiripe and two-thirds sold to
the cannery.
If every fruit reaching the semiripe condition be regarded as potentially marketable at 60 cents per box (average weight, 22.5 lb.) for semiripe fruit sold fresh, and
at $17.50 per ton for first-grade canning fruit, and $14 per ton for second-grade
canning fruit, the crop has a potential value of $337 per acre. The 2 tons per acre not
marketed will include all pheasant-damaged fruit as well as that left in the field for
other reasons. When corrected for this amount, but excluding the pheasant-damage,
the potential value is reduced by 9 per cent, or $309 per acre.
On the basis of findings during this study the theoretical value of pheasant-
damage to this crop under the market conditions obtaining in 1940 and 1941 is
$20.40 per acre. This is the potential value of damaged fruit only when every
semiripe and ripe fruit not eaten by the pheasant is marketed.
As has already been emphasized, this is the damage possible under the superior
marketing conditions that obtained in 1940 and 1941 and assuming that, during the
early part of the season at least, every potentially marketable fruit is harvested. It can
be considered as close to the maximum value under the price and yield conditions specified. During this study one 4-acre field was examined in which all fruit was being
harvested and in which the loss was going to be in the vicinity of the maximum. In
adjacent fields, however, harvesting was being conducted so inefficiently that overripe,
and consequently unmarketable, fruit outnumbered the pheasant-damaged fruit. Under
such circumstances actual pheasant-damage can be assessed at zero.
Thus it will be understood that actual pheasant-damage will have to be assessed
upon the individual circumstances of each case. The extent of pheasant-damage is
dependent not so much upon the amount of fruit consumed or damaged by the birds as
upon the market conditions that govern the marketability and market value of undam- M 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
aged fruit, with due regard for prevailing market conditions. If there is ripe fruit
that is not being harvested it seems logical to assume that a certain part of the crop—
namely, the amount left by the picker, plus the amount damaged by the pheasant—has
no market value and therefore that the pheasant is consuming only waste product.
During the years when prices are poor and (or) when labour is unobtainable, a large
proportion of the crop may be left in the fields and it is this waste product that the
pheasant consumes.
The Hunter Problem.
Apart from the claims of pheasant-damage to cultivated crops, it was found that
many farmers bore.an antipathy toward the pheasant that had its origin in the difficult
problem of public hunting upon private land. The general situation as summarized
by Miller and Powell (1942:42) was directly applicable here. They found that: "At
least two general classes of damage to farmers' property are associated with public
hunting on private land—one attributable to the hunters, the other to the game. The
damage inflicted directly or indirectly by the hunters involves the injury or destruction
of live stock, poultry, crops, or other property. The farmer is justifiably indignant
when parties, unknown to him and without his permission, persist in entering upon his
property without consideration of his inalienable rights to peaceful possession.
Although it is acknowledged by all concerned that only a small proportion of the persons
engaged in hunting are responsible for these misdemeanors, these acts of vandalism
occur with sufficient frequency to keep alive a certain antagonism toward public hunting.
The destruction of property by hunters is important to the farmer who suffers the
loss. So far as is known, the land-owner has no recourse except to bring Court action
against the individual hunter, and as he seldom has knowledge of the guilty person, he
seldom is in a position to prosecute the case successfully. . . . Farmers' complaints
about game-damage are often found to be aimed at the hunter-and-trapper nuisance
and not the actual damage inflicted by the game."
One or two instances were encountered in which complaints against pheasant-
damage were apparently lodged primarily in the hope that permits would be issued for
out-of-season shooting. When, instead, we arrived to take the offending birds for the
purpose of this food study the complainant expressed concern lest we remove all the
birds and leave none for him.
Pheasant Values.
Thus far only the negative values of the pheasants have been discussed. In order
to obtain an approximation of the economic position of the pheasant in the Vernon
district, the values, direct and indirect, accruing as a result of its presence must be
taken into consideration.
No very extensive dog census was undertaken, but in the late summer of 1942, 228
acres so worked by myself and two others, yielded 150 birds flushed. There were
undoubtedly birds that did not flush as the cover was heavy and many birds lay close.
However, considering only those flushed, an average population of one bird on every
1.5 acres is indicated.    The actual population may approach one bird per acre.
A census covering 230 birds counted in August, September, and October, 1942, by
myself and by J. A. Munro, of Okanagan Landing, B.C., indicates an autumn sex ratio
of 1 male to 2.4 females. By the onset of the breeding season this is reduced to
approximately 1 male to 4.5 females.
On the basis of these counts it is estimated that the autumn population of
pheasants on the study area in 1942 approximated 11,600 birds, of which 4,500 were
cocks and 7,100 hens. To reduce this population to the spring estimate (made by
Game Warden Still) of 6,000 birds, 3,000 cocks and 2,600 hens must be eliminated by
various causes during the winter. The majority of the cocks are harvested by hunting,
there is some illegal kill of hens but most of these no doubt succumb to other causes. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 57
Accurate kill figures are not kept by any of the various agencies interested in game
in the Vernon district. However, Captain J. T. Fowle and friends shot twenty-five
birds upon 150 acres during the season of 1942. If this kill ratio is general—i.e., one
cock shot on every 6 acres—the annual kill in the study area will approximate 2,800
birds. This figure closely approximates my estimate of 3,000 cocks removed by all
factors during the fall and winter period. The much higher kill, about 120 cocks on
400 acres, obtained on the farm of W. A. Palmer in the 1942 season probably represents
a concentration of birds into the bottom-land after the harvest of grain and other
annual crops on surrounding areas left these with poor cover conditions.
At a market value of $1.50 per bird, a conservative figure for the "meat value," the
pheasants harvested in the Vernon district then will represent a value of approximately
25 cents per acre. However, if pheasant values are calculated on the cost of harvesting
—i.e., the amount spent by each hunter per bird shot—a much higher value may be
arrived at. The latter will more truly represent the value of the bird to the community.
Unfortunately the data upon which such an estimate might be based are lacking.
However, these values are those accruing to the harvester and (or) to the distributer of transportation, sporting goods, and other goods and services used by the hunter.
In many cases the harvester of the game-crop is not the man upon whose land the game
has been produced. Thus this individual not only may share little in the direct value
of the pheasant but may suffer additional damage to his property as the result of hunter
activity. The practice of selling permits to hunt on private lands, that is being adopted
by certain groups of landholders in the Vernon district, serves to increase the cost of
harvesting from the standpoint of the hunter, but enables the landholder to share in
the value of sueh harvest.
Certain large ranches in the Vernon district make a practice of selling the shooting
rights. Only parts of these were included in the study area. Thus the Coldstream
Ranch (13,000 acres) in 1942 sold seventy permits at $2 each, the O'Keefe Ranch (3,200
acres) thirty permits at $5 each, the Indian Reserve (20,000 acres) forty permits at
$5, and the Japanese gardens (720 acres) seventy-five permits at $2.50. The monetary
returns in each case are small in comparison with the area involved but the practice
helps control the trespass problem and does yield a small return to the landholder.
Actual acreage yields are about 1 cent on the Coldstream Ranch and Indian Reserve,
5 cents on the O'Keefe Ranch, and 26 cents on the Japanese gardens.
The higher degree of management undertaken on the Japanese gardens, with
consequent higher pheasant populations, in part compensates for the high cost of
shooting on these lands. Even so, with but 10 acres per gun, as opposed to from 100
to 500 acres per gun on other ranches, the hunters shooting over the Japanese gardens
pay a high price for their birds.
Many perplexing problems are involved in discussing the values of game to the
farmer. Certain birds consume quantities of insects and have been said to be beneficial
in this way. However, it has already been shown that though pheasants in the Vernon
district do consume such noxious insects as grasshoppers, strawberry-weevils, cutworms, and plant bugs, these occupy so small a place in the annual diet of the pheasant
that it is doubtful if the amount consumed has important effect upon the population of
these insects.
Similarly, though weed-seeds provide 44 per cent, of the annual food consumed by
pheasants in the Vernon district, it is well known that weeds produce seeds far in
excess of the possibilities of space for growth. Consequently even the large number
of seeds consumed has little, if any, effect on the control of weeds. Certainly in the
Vernon district there is no indication that weeds could possibly be more abundant than
they are now on areas where human destruction of weeds by cultivation is not actively
carried out. Thus the food-habits of pheasants in this area have little or no positive
value to the farmer. M 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
As has been emphasized by Miller and Powell (1942) the indirect values of wild
life greatly exceed the direct, and the intangible values exceed the other two combined.
Many farmers enjoy seeing game on the farm. In fact, in the Vernon district
the number of those completely neutral or definitely in favour of the pheasant on their
property apparently exceeds those who object to its presence. This distribution, of
course, is dependent upon the type of agricultural crops raised on the land. Those
with crops not damaged by pheasants will be apt to have a different outlook to those
with crops suffering injury.
Furthermore, game frequently furnishes the farmer a chance for business and
social contacts. Many farmers enjoy hunting and offer this entertainment to friends
and business associates. " In this way some farmers can, and often do, make the wild
life on their land a business and social asset of no mean proportion." (Miller and
Powell.)
Besides these values, direct, indirect, and intangible, accruing to the land-owner
as an individual, he, as a member of a social unit, derives some benefit from anything
tending to stimulate local business and draw money into the district. The fame of
the Okanagan district as a pheasant producing area under normal circumstances
annually attracts many non-resident sportsmen who by purchase of gasoline and
services for their cars, payment for board and lodging, -purchase of sporting goods,
ammunition and clothing, contribute importantly to the prosperity of local purveyors
of such supplies and services and thus raise the purchasing power of these individuals
and initiate a set of events in which all members of the community benefit.
Though one must consider these indirect and intangible values of game in any
discussion of game economics, it is impossible to estimate a monetary value for them
and one must be careful not to overestimate their importance to the man suffering
game-damage. Even if it were possible to place an estimated value upon such contributions it would probably prove small when translated to an " amount per acre "
basis.
The main problem associated with game-damage to cultivated crops originates in
the present-day legal concept of ownership of game. Wild game is owned by the state
in its sovereign capacity in trust for the people, and with but few local exceptions the
landholder has no control over the game present upon his land except that given by the
laws permitting him to determine who may and who may not enter upon his property.
At the same time with but few local exceptions the state assumes no responsibility for
damage occasioned by game and makes no provision for payment where damage occurs.
In practice in British Columbia, however, where damage by game can be shown, the
Game Department issues permits for destruction of the game causing the damage.
At the discretion of the Department this permit may or may not authorize the landowner to retain and use the game so destroyed. In most instances these principles
are liberally interpreted. None the less some complainants vigorously maintain that
inasmuch as the game is the property of the state it is incumbent upon the state to
redress the wrong by itself undertaking the removal of the game. I am unaware of
any instance iii which this view has been upheld by a legal decision.
Because of the impossibility of estimating many of the direct values of the
pheasant, much less the indirect and intangible values, no attempt has been made to
translate pheasant values into a per-acre figure. An estimate of general damage per
acre caused by pheasant feeding activity would also be merely a guess and would thus
serve no good purpose. However, it would appear that except under special circumstances the positive values outweigh the negative even from the standpoint of most
agriculturists, provided that they share in the pheasant harvest. This sharing may
be first-hand, as hunters, or it may be through fees derived from sale of permits to
shoot.    To many agriculturists who do not shoot or in other ways derive direct return REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942. M 59
from the presence of pheasants upon their properties the bird may be a neutral factor
in the agricultural economy or cause so small a loss that it is ignored among the many
larger losses attributable to insect pests and plant diseases.
To a few, because of special crop and market conditions, the pheasants may
occasion considerable financial loss. These cases can be dealt with by a liberal application of existing regulations permitting destruction of game where damage is being
done. If the growers of tomatoes and the few other crops occasionally receiving
heavy damage can be persuaded to share in the pheasant harvest by leasing shooting
rights, the moneys received from this source over a period of years will, in large part,
offset the pheasant-damage, as the latter will occur only occasionally as a result of
fluctuating market and labour conditions.
From the standpoint of the community at large there seems little doubt that the
pheasant can be considered an asset.
Conclusions.
(1.) Weed-seeds were the most important food item in the annual diet of the
pheasants in the Okanagan Valley, B.C. They were of vital importance during the
winter months of December, January, and February.
(2.) Polygonum convolvulus and Chenopodium album were weed-seeds most frequently taken.
(3.) In view of the tremendous abundance of these weeds in the area and the very
heavy seed production of almost all weeds it is doubtful that pheasant feeding has any
appreciable effect upon next year's crop of weeds.
(4.) Grain consumed was mostly waste barley and wheat and represented 13 per
cent, of the annual diet.
(5.)   Potatoes were eaten in small quantities throughout the year.
(6.)   Tomato fruit was eaten during July and August in considerable quantity.
(7.) The largest numbers of insects taken were in May, June, and August. More
grasshoppers were eaten than any other insect, but even these were represented by but
twenty-five individuals in the 132 pheasant crops. Thus, though the animal matter
consumed is doubtless an important element in pheasant dietary it probably enters
little into the economic balance associated with the presence of pheasants in an agricultural community of the Vernon type.
(8.) There were eighty-six food items identified, of which fifty-seven were plant
and twenty-nine animal. Eight items occurred in more than 10 per cent, of the
stomachs. These were bindweed, 39 per cent.; lamb's-quarters, 25 per cent.; tomato
(including fruit and waste seed), 17 per cent.; foxtail grass, 16 per cent.; dandelion,
16 per cent.; grass leaves, 19 per cent.; clover leaves, 13 per cent.; and potato, 11 per
cent. Those contributing more than 5 per cent, by volume of the annual diet were
lamb's-quarters, 13 per cent.; bindweed, 11 per cent.; potato, 11 per cent.; wheat, 8
per cent.; and tomato (fruit and waste seed), 8 per cent.
(9.) In the Vernon district damage to corn, grapes, and potatoes was not found
to constitute a serious loss to the owner under the conditions obtaining in 1942. In
no single instance examined would it have exceeded the meat value of the birds obtainable upon the ranch involved. In the case of corn and grapes this was doubtless due
in part to the small acreages involved. In potatoes adequate cultivation to ensure
covering of all tubers will go a long way toward eliminating the small damage to this
crop.
On the other hand, tomato-growers may be subject to damage as high as $20 per
acre under superior market conditions and the very infrequent circumstance of the
harvesting of all fruit. The actual monetary loss attributable to pheasant activity
varies from this amount down to zero depending upon the prevailing market conditions
rather than upon amount of physical damage to fruit by the birds. M 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Where any ripe fruit are not being harvested it is suggested this be taken as
intimating an excess of fruit existing to the amount of that consumed by the pheasants,
plus that left by the picker. Under such circumstances the pheasants are not doing
damage but are merely consuming a waste product.
Under superior market conditions, and when all fruit not damaged by pheasants
is being harvested, special measures may be necessary to protect the tomato-crop from
this damage.
(10.) These findings suggest that the economic position of the pheasant in the
Vernon district is not such as to necessitate any widespread control measures. Where
control of pheasants damaging crops is necessary the circumstances are local and
sporadic and should be dealt with accordingly. Possibly some shooting of hens might
be permitted during the open season, for in this way some of the large number of hens
that are annually removed from the population by forces other than legal hunting
would be harvested. While it is doubtful if the total autumn population of pheasants
would be much affected, the per acre value of the pheasant crop would be augmented.
Literature cited.
Dalke, P. D.:   1937.    Food habits of adult pheasants based on crop analysis method.
Ecology, 18 no. 2:   199-213.
Davison, V. E.:  1940.    A field method of analyzing game bird foods.    Journ. Wildlife
Manag. U, no. 2:   105-116.
Fried, L. A.:   1940.    The food habits of the ring-necked pheasant in Minnesota.
Journ. Wildlife Manag. 4, no. 1:   27-36.
Miller, J. P., and Powell, B. B.:  1942.    Game and wild-fur production and utilization
on agricultural land.    U.S. Dept. Agriculture, Circ. no. 636:   1-58.
Swenk, M. H.: 1930.    Food habits of the ring-necked pheasant in central Nebraska.
Nebraska Agricultural Exp. Sta. Research Bull. 50:   1-33. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 61
Eh
pa
A
o
<
w
W
EH
o
m
S
s>
o
>
M
H
DS
O
ta
o
&
Z
H
a
(53
H
Oh
g
EH
1=
M
►H
«
z
o
o
EH
<
a_
a
O
w
H
l-H
o
o
o
fa
H
M
<!
EH
Or-,4J   ^
bfi ti G G oj
«<g   a
01 £ , _o^
t. c H      o
"PO
**«aS
■Sny
■Ainf
•Abj^
•judy
•JBW
■q^j
■UBf
00   IO   iO Tf(^C0C<iCrttX<n&JCOC<irHrHr-HrHrHrH-
CM   CM   -tf   CO       !   <M
»-(       !   Ci       i   CO
!   CO   *     (M   (M   *
"*   H   IO   O)   Oi       100 #CO       I       !   #
■   * !    *     #     SO
#     #     *tf
co «o    : *
Tf   to      ;   to
«it *   t-    :
!  co  os     : eg #   #
AA     AH
01
G    G
CO
tA  <h
13
xi
G
cn
'S ¥
rt
ti
h
+1
•a xi
g  5
a
-
>
a
G
X3
01
a
eed a
eed a
0)
X
IP
1
QJ
>   X
ti    z
01    6
01
>
ti
0)
t
0        !
O    OJ    0
1
a
X
q
I
1*
w.
fc-
C
hJ
c
m
CJ
cr.
hi
r-
U
U.
I*.
1—
cr
H
K
N
K
CC
<_/■
cr
rr
b
E S 5
o   d  5
Eh J Ph
S  _?«■?
p x  fS § "-
Ssoaa
» c
_       >!      O    _j        .        U
Sft©,S.H-8sp1«Ha_2*~J__o___
o   a>   S
s >_.
£  £  I
I §
■S   S TP   8
6 a, g '
3) -s.    o    O    J.    &.
e  S, '
S  »  s  s
■B   S   o    S
-  £  e  5  c
o^  c M 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 2.—Pheasant Food Items contributing less than 0.5 per Cent.
by Volume of the Annual Diet.
Technical Name.
Common Name.
Months  in  which  it was
consumed.
Percentage
by
Occurrence.
5
Sweet clover__ __._
Chick weed— 	
February-Ma reh-October-December
4
1
February—December- 	
3
1
Oats  	
3
2
Wild hyacinth. 	
Sandwort  	
Choke-cherry  	
Meadow-grass __	
Pigweed 	
May. -  .	
June — _
1
Arenaria serphyllifolia	
1
6
2
Amaranth retroflexus- 	
January  	
1
1
Hawthorn 	
Garden pea 	
Alfalfa  -	
July  	
1
2
Medicago saliva -	
August-October-April —_ _
2
1
3
Vitis vinifera ,  _, —
European grape 	
Thistle  _-_.	
Asparagus  _
August _ 	
1
2
1
2
October — ,  	
Stickweed. 	
Blue-eyed M'ary.	
2
June  .'.   	
June-August—      	
December    	
D ec emb er    	
1
CoUinsia tennella and C. parviflora
2
1
Lady's-thumb  	
1
Table 3.—Food Composition by Classes given iN per Cent, by Volume.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May.
June.
July.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Class.
Nov.
Dec.
Annual
Average.
Greens  ... 	
16
20
43
18
33
7
11
20
*
27
14
17
Seeds ..,	
77
79
32
27
15
21
34
14
43
65
44
66
44
Grain....	
*
30
64
1
7
36
11
	
13
Tomatoes	
31
17
3
4
Fruit	
5
- 1
*
3
12
33
15
26
13
9
Potatoes and roots	
2
*
24
54
18
9
15
9
7
11
Animal.	
*
*
1
1
4
5
2
8
3
4
*
2
■
100
* Trace. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 63
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.
Comparative Statistics, 1913-42.
Calendar Year.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences and
Fees.
Revenue
derived from
Fur Trade.
Informa.
tions laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
1913
188
181
7
$4,417.50
$109,600.80
1914
294
273
21
5,050.00
92,034.20
1915
279
258
21
4,097.50'
72,974.25
1916
127
110
17
2,050.00
66,186.97
1917
111
97
10
1,763.50
65,487.50
194
167
13
5
3 341.00
75,537.00
1919
267
242
25
36
6,024.50
116,135.00
1920	
293
266
27
46
6,073.00
132,296.50
$5,291.39
1921	
329
312
17
74
6,455.00
114,842.00
24,595.80
1922  _
359
317
42
44
7,275.00
127,111.50
51,093.89
1923 _  ....
309
280
29
24
5,676.50
121,639.50
60,594.18
1984      	
317
283
34
24
4,758.00
125,505.50
56,356.68
1925  _	
296
279
17
43
5,825.00
123,950.50
56,287.78
1926 	
483
439
44
39
7,454:00
135,843.50
62,535.13
1927  ..__	
518
469
49
47
10,480.50
139,814.00
71,324.96
1928    	
439
406
33
29
7,283.50
140,014.75
58,823.07
1929	
602
569
33
54
9,008.00
142,028.22
47,329.89
1930
678
636
32
33
9,572.75
147,660.00
45,161.11
1931	
676
625
51
40
8,645.00
137,233.31
46,091.08
1932 __	
538
497
41
37
5,493.50
141,269.55
40,363.79
1933 -   __..
498
474
24
22
3,531.00
135,876.94
44,167.48
1934 _.
477
454
23
4
5,227.82
4,399.50
149 955.11
47,102.81
1935 _ _	
454
438
16
19
148,689.64
49,831.95
1936	
451
436
15
14
3,965.00
157,647.30
52,196.50
1937 	
585
552
33
20
5,332.50
177,771.33
53,697.48
1938	
613
574
39
42
5,729.50
192,024.07
44,963.87
1939 __	
547
'526
21
21
4,776.50
193,170.53
49,187.00
1940	
440
419
21
18
5,197.00
188,605.20
68,466.33
1941___ _____
446
430
16
9
4,977.50
213,267.67
63,125.30
1942 _	
409
392
17
27
5,079.50
205,451.71
68,475.07
Totals
12,217
11,401
788
771
$168,969.57
$4,089,651.05
$1,167,062.54 M 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
©OOCOOOt— ^NOt0t_.00rtrt0_XtOI^00O00_O_0O'rt,00C-"t_,C0t--tO^t,C__^_,ON000.C-C0
HOf.OlOOOflOJHOOtD^CO»H^HD^(COHmM(RHCl_-M!CO!OffiMM!5^tOtO
«!OWO(PtDWMffie.^fflMlOOn-JB-5'*-)_.MU!HCO_.0^0»OlOW_.M_.ON
l^tD I.HWH
IN rt -*f •
O. -*
C_  C-
O rt
CM
■>*
C5
w
pa
ft
a
S
s
OOOOt_OO.a_tO"t*'OOOOO.OaO'tl<tOCO"'tfOOO.e<.0-"*-'tO^CDCOO©
_-oejNtD_._-«^r4Hnno3n_.^_.cit.ffiH^HoOH       cot—
^  r-,  r-, Oi r-,  r+ to ^ to O. it. Q MOM rt rtrt CO
(N O. CO Ol O
to t- no H t
oo a oo 01
t--OrttDO.CCtOtOCO___OW.#t-rtrtOOCOrt____
CO C- "* 00 O.   MM10'*»tD--HtO_.H01_._)[
N W MH (Mrt      -if rt   CO   rt
O. 00 10 <N CO
o] t-, rp to _r_
00 oj to
-S-3IQ1'tDWt0--N05mMQ0QCCC0N-5_3_J_lHfflCa_JHOfI_.M O «  O ffl t»
"*C_-D"tS'OOeO"ti'OrtOONl-_aitO^'C-t-r-00000000-'*0_e-CO^.rt rt t?- 00 T* rt
rt © rt rt -rft H H W O! H tD eq OOtO __-0._?-_OO.CO.D*diCO tDtMrt      iCO00_._O.OJ
H
o
m
Q
o
CG
z
<:
1-5
of
o
<:
EH
I
Bi
H
H
Q
o
-J.
CQ
H
o
o
OS
<;
w
Q
I—I
CG
w
tf
o
EH
z
w
EH
EH
s
■3
0 0
<—
0 10 0 0
0 m
m 0
0
m cj 0 0
0 e-
«&■
CJ  N  CC  CO rH  rH  t
00 CJ  CI -tf  1
'  UO  O  00  OJ
_!fe
Hen
0
no.
0
0
oa
SA
wo
A
S
rH&OCOCOtr-'&TfTfr-A
COMinHt-Ot-ONM
i-H 10 o t- 00
t-  Ci  Ci   O  CO
OJ   OJ OJ   CO
CO "* t- c-
fMft-WMlOOOlOMTtfNOQt-
MicNOTfajcoNHt-ooiroTtnot-iN
OJt~OJCO00CO00^f COCOtCCOCOOJ<C>0
s
<
s
<
n
O
0 0
0 0
O  O rG>
O
0
O
0 0
0 0
OOO
O
-r
-*  OJ
<£>   -rtf
00
00  1-1
IO  CJ
tr- ID CO
t£>       1  rA  CO  OJ
co 01 co m t- 1
NCiOM'ttOMIr-fflit-OQffilOINMMiatDmiOHINlCH-^'ii'tOt-
C0O0)'*nM<i5 0HNHa.lNt-00NOlNC0(M10OC(DMC0'*a)
tD  H  H  IN OJ CO H  tfl N'JHtOHNN^r-^H "tfCO
rH  rH CO  CO
TfCGCOrHmtr-COtr-<DCOCiCGT$rHCOC>cnTfCirH<Z>QCTfmmrHCi
rH  rH  CO  Tf Tf  rH  m (OOHNbNOWniOt-H^IMHOOtD
rA OJ i-l 04 rH Tf
to
O
<
bo
_   00  W*  H
3   IO  OJ  CO  CI
N  OC-CC
NtC00t0MC0Hffi^O^C0IOHO105t0-*0il>Ht-mOHHi-l__-ailMtflM
Q^QOWffiWWl^NNiaOinmcOMCCHHt-KlHNOJTfCOiOCOQt-CQ'tt
OOlOOJCOCO'tfOJD-tO'tfCiOJOJOOCOCl'tfOO-tfOJOJtr-'tfiHt-tD CO IO CJ «D CJ
OOOOPJtfllOCOtr-CONtfliNi
OMHCOt-t-OOlCOlBH!
OOi-H tfl  WCO  N  H Hi
!t-MCiOM®_005«mNN!OC5t-0>HOt*__*t-ffl«0'ilMi
lt-010"*HtDCOt-HTt^C-t-iOIMMM,M'tNHCO<flNH(
) LOOJi-HCOt- NHtOHN^t-i_iNHI>NW OJ  GO  -#  OJ
h   r   H  d        h       "
s g
fl-p-p
a o.
a °_
.2 oj :
_J T_
■ o S
!   ©   3 C
U Ch o
:   aj   a oj
■ o   U o
fl   Z fl
Ph Ph Ph
_-   w
fi   01
£ ft >
i|a_,
S   <U   Q "oj   B 5   *   «
CPi_HWwEH>>
iS fl
OJ   GO    fl -
t>     W   _E   '
_3 2
_H      » S
2      g H
l_,    H m
£3
a B
i>^(£ REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 65
Statement of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences issued, January 1st to December 31st, 1942.
Anglers.
Guides.
Free
Farmers.
Prospectors.
Total.
Government Agents.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
696
129
$696.00
129.00
176.00
1,333.00
886.00
757.00
680.00
1
44
3
2
9
5
10
5
2
3
1
7
8
1
7
1
4
4
2
15
9
13
28
27
85
126
19
29
20
26
54
174
33
85
16
16
40
48
8
268
23
87
100
10
69
10
11
62
10
1
181
48
53
280
150
31
20
12
7
7
10
23
2
6
1
8
9
17
19
4
66
1
2
26
8
21
5
3
7
2
19
17
41
51
18
16
11
16
70
25
10
19
$5.00
$701.00
$5.00
220.00
15.00
134.00
.176
1,333
886
757
680
114
186
172
1,158
315
914
184
220
1,064
1,909
139
3,756
193
859
5
588
396.00
Cranbrook 	
4.00
1,352.00
886.00
757.00
10.00
45.00
25.00
690.00
45.00
Golden
114.00
186.00
172.00
1,158.00
315.00
914.00
184.00
220.00
1,064.00
1,909.00
139.00
3,756.00
193.00
859.00
5.00
588.00
139.00
186.00
50.00
25.00
222.00
Kamloops   	
2.00
1,185.00
315.00
1.00
3.00
915.00
10.00
197.00
220.00
15.00
1,064.00
2.00
1,926.00
139.00
3,756.00
193.00
5.00
35.00
864.00
40.00
588.00
40.00
5.00
7.00
5.00
■ 47.00
1
705
4
258
1,422
336
1.00
705.00
4.00
258.00
1,422.00
336.00
11.00
705.00
Quesnel. _ 	
35.00
5.00
5.00
44.00
263.00
1,422.00
20.00
20.00
10.00
356.00
4,686
1,035
1.784
43
274
4,686.00
1,035.00
1,784.00
43.00
274.00
10.00
2.00
4,706.00
1,037.00
Vernon- 	
Victoria  	
1,784.00
75.00
45.00
1.00
Totals  	
26,981
$26,981.00
143
$715.00
2,261
579
$47.00
$27,743.00
Note.—Holders of Prospectors' Firearms Licences are required to pay a fee of $1, when they hold a Provisional
Miner's Certificate. M 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TO
a
o
Z
H
o
to
M
W
H
H
fc
H
D
O
o
z
<
m
es
W
a
(M
o ■*
fi
05
<d
tH
a
z
H
TO
<
CO
r/i
OJ
es
-3.
W
ca
H
w
es
u
w
_*.(__}
EH
o
Z
H
E-i
CO
TO
^H
PS
fi
<
o
A
£
Z
fc  >"3
O
H
CQ
S
o
03
fc
a
p
>
I—I
es
H
Q
W
P
Z
fc
tf
S2
P_3
a a z a s
z        H
isiii
a a g g ts
a 3 Z S fa
I    5
Z
■<     a: a
kkSo
Is jz
Z b g a
a 3 z o
s
MNtOONfflOOOUHt-OOCCOlOOMtDOJOOUHHOMW^t
CO OCO^l'^COOJ-^Tl'CiOJt-H-^CJlOt-COi-lNCOCOCJOJt-i-HCOrH-
««■        i-H CO rH OiHi-HCOCOC-OJOO CJ CO Ci OJ  eD "*
I   IO   !flfl
«  ^   IO  O  1
i-l  CD  CJ  i
:    ! o
!     j o
b
!    [ m
:    s1&
50.00
:    ! o    ;    :    '
| ©    j    !   :
''    i b    !
I to              1
|[        ill
oooooooooooo
oooooooooooo
dwoodoiomwoioo
CirHtr-mCiCSlTfcOCit£><->Ci
r-A O H TfHO!
'OWIOWIO
iHMioom
' <X>  CJ   rH
O O HO o
CO  CO  **  O  00  •
CJ CJ C- CJ
eo OJ co oj o co
\n Tf cj co o o "* i
oj co io       rH m oo
IO UO CO
OJ   OJ  -#  t-  CO  r-A  f-
iJNNMt-Ot-HXfflWNNCCONWIr-Ol
H  IN  00 00-^< CJ H  WW   HHI
eo       oo i-h e
■
o
o
d
CO
1
o
o
in
|    |
j    |
o    :    .
o    ;    :
d    I    !
CO     !
r-H        \
O
O
m
I-H
O
O
d
CO
i    i
o
o
d
m
o
in
m
1 o    :
i S   i
1 ua    l
i tr-    !
! CM    !
IO o
r- o
o o o
o o o
: o o o o o
: o o o o o
! O
! O
o o o o
o o o o
O  O IO
LO  O  t-
rH
no o uo o io
t-ot-aw
i  rH  rH
F o
: o
: co
6,100
325
50
1,325
t-  -*  CO  CO  i
■ ^ eo cj co
hhioNh
QJ        ;     %1   Xi
01    !   5  o   to
"___3-_oo.-..tirt<i;~'u
»>>. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 67
Statement of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms Licences and Anglers' Licences
(Minors), January 1st to December 31st, 1942.
Non-resident Ordinary
Firearms Licences.
Anglers' Licences
(Minors).
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
Atlin__ 	
2
1
1
1
9
11
1
2
3
1
2
' 16
1
12
6
32
14
58
16
2
2
1
15
$2.00
3.00
1.00
2.00
16.00
1.00
$2.00
3.00
 :..
1.00
Duncan   _ __ _ _
2.00
16.00
$6.00
3.00
7.00
3.00
12.00
6.00
32.00
14.00
58.00
16.00
2.00
12.00
6.00
3.00
3.00
35.00
17.00
58.00
16.00
2.00
27.00
27.00
2.00
1.00
15.00
2.00
33.00
3.00
34.00
Windermere 	
18.00
Totals	
26
$78.00
183
$183.00
$261.00 M 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur Traders' and Taxidermists' and Tanners'
Licences and Royalties on Fur, January 1st to December 31st, 1942.
Government
Resident
Fur-traders'
Licences.
Agent for
Non-resident
Fur-traders'
Licences.
Royalty or
Tax on Fur.
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Tanners'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
2
1
4
1
20
2
1
2
4
1
3
26
9
5
9
7
8
56
2
1
14
1
$50.00
25.00
100.00
25.00
2
2
1
12
11
4
1
10
96
9
1
23
5
5
1
10
2
8
4
16
3
408
73
16
2
11
1
12
3
26
46
530
7
58
3
13
$7.35
250.60
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
$57.35
Atlin
275.60
100.00
21.37
25.40
75.00
102.15
2,394.92
71.25
1.00
230.69
16.92
33.60
14.62
69.45
2.25
10.40
64.50
52.25
$2.00
48.37
25.40
	
75.00
102.15
500.00
	
2,894.92
71.25
	
1.00
50.00
2.00
$2.00
284.69
16.92
	
33.60
25.00
50.00
39.62
119.45
2.25
100.00
2.00
	
112.40
64.50
52.25
25.00
75.00
650.00
225.00
125.00
25.00
83.50
8.50
11,699.67
3,160.77
495.09
18.25
520.51
1.00
14.40
23.50
1,846.41
2,064.25
39,512.45
49.75
242.80
31.20
43.80
2.00
$400.00
12,751.67
	
3,385.77
620.09
18.25
Quesnel  —
225.00
745.51
1.00
14.40
23.50
175.00
200.00
1,400.00
50.00
25.00
350.00
25.00
2,021.41
2,264.25
400.00
2.00
8.00
4.00
41,314.45
107.75
271.80
381.20
68.80
	
Totals	
179
$4,475.00
4
$800.00
1,431
$63,176.07
11
$22.00
1
$2.00
$68,475.07 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 69
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1942, inclusive.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-traders'
and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
1921—..    '. "	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
39,423.87
44,238.00
62,745.33
56,755.30
63,176.07
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
5,540.00
4,949.00
5,721.00
6,370.00
5,299.00
$30,790.80
1922 	
57,458.89
67,524.18
1923                                    .
1924  	
62,446.68
1925      —-	
56,287.78
1926 ,-,	
62,535.13
1927	
71,324.96
1928  	
58,823.07
1929	
47,329.89
1930                          	
45,161.11
1931	
45,981.08
1932	
40,363.79
1933	
44,167.48
1934                                    	
47,102.81
1935 ~   - -	
49,831.95
1936                                                     	
52,196.50
1937  -	
53,697.48
1938          	
44,963.87
1939         	
49,187.00
1940                                ..   .                                 	
68,466.33
1941                                     -                             - —	
63,125.30
1942                                                                           	
68,475.07
$1,056,187.15
$131,054.00
$1,187,241.15 M 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Q
fc
SH
O
H
A
A
©
o
fi
fc
w
m
ra
<
«
H
■<
o
W
o    .
ll
fi
o
to fi
►J i-1
fiS
O  H
firH
§88
D «
fa _P
TO   c_.
H  H
J  O
W fi
"     OS
O p
fi o
o
n
TO
H
fi
fc
s
fc
<
03
M
Eh
<!
ej
a
o
o c
CO   00   cc
CO    CD    t-    Ci    rH   0C
*H
_S ^
00   tH   c
t-   T
MOllO'J'OOOMnC
io o-
T
CD    C~    IO    Ci    cr
Oi    r-t    CC
Oi   ir
t}*    Cs
CC
CO    CO    10
HCh o
lO   CO   E-   O   CD   tC
O    CD    CO    CD    rH    r-
t-   tj-   c
O    O    ft
NlOWfflHNtfNt-t-i-
CD    IO   t)
K3    O    If
o
<wu
«•
Oi   OC
CD    r-H    OC
IO   c-
t-   CO   -^
CC
CD    t-    t-
•suuaAjOjVV
CO   c
CvJ    CJ    C
CO    IO   "^
eo co cj
C
c
OJ   CJ   c
Cs
c
i-H    CJ    CJ    r-
o
CD
io   cr
00   00   O   OJ   C-   C
Oi o ec
t-    r-
CO    O    £-   CO    C
fr-   O   Ci   C
IO   CO   00   i-H   CO   c*
tj-    ir
*I0SB9j\V
00    C-
Ci    CO    t-    CO    CD    CC
CO    CO    CO    Oi    Cr
O    r-
r-A    in     Ci    Cs
CO
CD   ■■:
t-OilOOOOCOt-O-
et
CO    CO    CV
T
tc
CO   OJ   c
CO    CO    T)
cd m Tt
Tjt  co  el
T*
in tr- co  ir
eo
Oi
ra io j
t-    CO     Ol    H
IO
•pxim&g
CM   Oi   O   C
CD   CO    O    t-
US
CI
IO   Tf   cc
t-
•-1
ir
eo  r-
c
00    C\.
T.
IO   t-   K
O    06
i
cr
0C
IC
Oi tjh  eo  t-
CD
Ci  ei-
T-
te  ir
t-     T-
tr-   CC
•3[un3ts
eo
rr
<*
e-
c-
in
or
X
t~
05
t-
rr
or
t-
c
o
B
o
m
es
ir
c
■*!
&
t-
IC
oc
c
0C
OJ
fr-
ec
o
c
CC
ic
T_
"<d
IC
r-
1-
IC
ec
CO
0"
e>
c
r-
o
fr
CJ
c
T-
c
o
CO
CO
cr:
CM
cr
nr
CC
Of
h-
o
c~
-*
TJ
tr
r-
a
tr
ir
cc
01
o
a
or
fr-
r-
1-
c
0
or
a
a
cc
t-
r-
tr
r-
Ot
ir
cc
Ir-  t*
^
t-
•ja^o
CO
B
H.
rt
ic
O
cr
er
«r
-rt
cc
tr
tc
tr
■rr
CO
■«a
!      co
o
or
it
t
or
cc
>r
0
IO
ir
fr
fr
fr-
1-
rv.
cc
IC
cc
i      S3
•^BJ^sripj;
t-
ec
CM
er
cc
T-
CC
CC
IC
OC
o
c
03
CM
o
cn
t-
fr
oc
a.
Oi
Oi
i           >*
-
_H
-1
ec
O
cr
10
rr
cr
rr
;r
on
tr
or
ee
0!
=r
tJ
CD
M
h
o
c;
m
Ti
c:
P
0
CN
r-
c:
c
IR
CC
Tj
fX
fr
o
C
c
t-
lO
cr-
Cv
a
m
C~
e
■fl
Ti
cr,
o
iO
0-
cc
tJ
Tjt
«
TfUlft[
c
Ot
er
C
«
T
CC
or
or
o
e;
r-
O
or
n
t*-
1^
(~
ec
Ci
o
CN
t-
T-
o
o
d
o
K
Ci
TJ
CM
"^
cc
—,
(XI
CO
rr
rH
nr
or
r-t
1       B
ni
er.
B*
c
tr
if-
o:
r*
t-
-r*
tr
fr
ir
CD
£
c
fc-
o
OJ
o
b-
t-
o
CC
Tt-
es
OJ
cc
CM
•U9^U13I\I
t-
C
CB
r-
1-
0
—
0
nr
or
O
or
o
0
nr
rr-
o-
c-
or
t-
B
o
H
■J
Fh
fa
o
rt
rH
r->
ri
*■
H
rH
CJ
o
U.
CC
IV
Ti
tr
«d
Ir-
«
ot
10
r/
rr
or
nr
Oi
t-
tr
cr
ir
nit
O
o
(T
r-
•xu^t;
cs
cc
a.
C-
CO
«
u
iO
IC
c
O
IC
>o
E>
io
(M
Cs
cc
CM
H
*H
N
■«*
cc
OC
cc
CM
H
rH
0J
ec
ec
CC
CN
m
CD
OJ
OJ
C3
r-
CC
O
<r-
OJ
ec
lf
Tf
CO
g
5
•(pauuB^)
o
OS
CO
CM
cc
eg
i^i
L-
m
CM
IO
eo
o
©ri[a *xo£
T*
55
t-
Cfl
O
OJ
cp
„
rr
rr
Hi
tI
Ol
OO
CC
OJ
r-
O
rr
Cr
r-
CJ
or
D
CO
■<
•pay    XOLi
I-H
r-
OJ
0J
fr-
as
!        K
ca
OJI
c~
CC
CJ
tf
cr
Tf
09
or
cr
xr
CO
IO
ti
-fl.
c
«
T«
a
1-
10
c
c-
0.
13
cc
!-(
CI
C4
**
OJ
CJ
CJ
cr
nr
e
^
<r
r~
Ti
0
cr
c
tt
c
TI
iO
cr
CO
CC
U3A[Ig    'XOtf
CJ
CM
CM
CM
cc
ec
ec
CM
CM
CM
eo
T-
cr
Ti
or
c-
cr
or
o
cr
e
tc
c
rr
n-
ir
CO
r-
cc
r~
f\
o
Ti
IK
T-
0(
ti
IC
fr
o
o
CC
r-
o
cr
ir
rt
nr
eo
t~
V
ee
r-
r-
h
IC
IC
B
r-
IO
6s
rr
h>
Tf
tr
cc
cr
ts
rr
o.
r-
cr
CO
fr
IO
a
rt
Ci
Ti
0
(T
cr
ci-
c
tJ
ir
es
cc
"#
■fl
CO
c
CC
c
•«
t\
cc
t-
CC
fc*
cc
IO
o
o
fr
CJ
IO
•jaABag
CC
CJ
rr
cr
CJ
t:
r-
M
c-
r*
<~
CC
Ti
io
IO
ee
6
or
CO
CM
CO
CJ
C4
OJ
rt
~
rt
CS
eo
tI
■^t
ueSpBg
Tt
09
r-
N
rr
^_H
rH
or
rN
Ift
cr
o
Tf
Ol
CD
OC
o
er-
C>
tr
0
rt
io
Ti
h
o
in
o
0
c-
eo
•jBag
OJ
CJ
CO
CO
lO
U3
fc"
CO
ia
CM
Ol
Cv
CO
Ci
M
■3 m
e a
c
H
r-
c
«fl
cr
r-
rf
0
o
o
ec
io
t-
ot
o-
e
o
C^
o
CC
DC
Ci
0
c~
c-
0
0
Q
0
0
o
o-
c~
c
O"
03
a~
cr
cr
cr
c~
T*    ^jt tH REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 71
"tf
C3
m
OS
W
CO
S
fc
o
fc
p
o
iH
<
P
fi
«_
Ph
fi
w
fc
PS
TO
<!
w
H
A
<
o
tf
K
o
a
fi
o
TO
P
Si
S
l-H
fi
<3
o
fi
I-H
PS
fc
P5
i
03
p
fa
fc
O
TO
H
jj
fc
fa
TO
P
O
i—i
OS
<
>
fc
o
ra
03
<!
P
O
H
03
«.
fa
•__atfpi3g
•[3SB3AV
•{ajjiribs
•!iun>is
■uooDBy
•^B-i^sriK
•xuX'j
•(paiuiEji)
ania 'xo,j
•SSOJQ 'XO^
■JOAUg 'XO^
Ud^SI_J
uaABag
■jBag
to
cd c; eo
eo  co
cj* co"
CO CM CD
CO 00 CO
t-   IO   IO
1
O i-H
rH CD
IO
CO IO
eo io
o
t-"
CJ rH
CD O
CO rH
rH   O
T-H OJ
« o ra o
CD O OJ   >o
O rH CO   CD
t-* cj co"
cd Oi
t- *<*
00   CO
in r-H r-A
-tf M IO
CD*  Cj"
O   CO   t-   O   CO
eo io co co
00    CJ    CO
ffilOMIOlOlfflOOI't-
CM   -*   t-   t-   CD   CJ   ©
CD   CO CJ   00   CO
CO   IO   CJ   rH   CJ
CO   Ci    Ci   CO
CM   Tjt   rH   O
■tf     Tjt     CO     00
■tf    t-    CO
■tf   CO  o
■tf   CJ   CM
Tf   Oi   CO  tH
CO   OJ
rH    CD
Ci  Oi co eo  t-
o  a <c
!  fc-  CM   CO
-tf   rH
G     P
Q   fi   (I
G      '    '"
S .2 fc
,a ,fl fS   cfl   C
R   (0 53,  K   B
II
IlflJIU
Q ?
_5_Cac-CCe&^&C(0^^-i--c^lfsci
«ii^i1psSooi!iit.ii_ri><fiisii
• t_
3 Q
« 3 a
a bs |.
0> D OJ
o 5 o
fl fl e
5   b 'u 'Z> "E
P-   O.   Ch Ph to
j 0)
! Pi
§ o
•t-> w
1 u
•3 £
__     01
OPS
5 c »
<«_____
Q d i_
PS w tn
s b s •e l
a  I
3='
«, « « .S r r M 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1942.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
KrND op
Fur confiscated.
Date of
Confiscation.
u
01
>
ti
01
to
T3
0)
tf
o
fc
01
fi
Ol
fc
c
01
t
„
ti
h
-__
3
S
o
ea
is
OJ
ft
u
3
C
.2
US
IS
X
B
Woodpecker. 	
10
2
1
1
1
1
1
26
i
2
1
1
2
6
3
5
12
4
38
34
1
2
2
4
176
2
5
40
132
77
16
-
4
6	
Greenland, A	
McConkey, A., et at.
Scherett, F 	
„     15
„     29	
Cloverdale 	
Nelson Island  _____
Courtenay 	
Smithers .,
__.
Feb.     3
3
„     10	
Downey, J 	
Forsythe, J. (Jr.)
Mitchell, C--   ■
Stammers, Percy	
Sterbenc, August	
McDonald, W. G.
Dellinger, A. A	
Olson, W. A. 	
Jeamas, S. (Mrs.)
—
Mar.    9	
1
n      11
„     16	
Radium _	
„     16	
„     16
16    .	
Clinton  	
Apr.     7
„     30
Montney  	
Sheraton 	
John, Frank	
Cooper, Philip 	
McKenzie, C. V	
Marshall, C 	
Halise, Henry	
Verkeyden, C 	
Sheffield, B. R -	
Chechik, M. P	
Mitchell, K. A	
Chowla Deck	
Totals	
....
8.
21
Say ward. 	
June    2	
„     12
12    	
Quesnel	
Masset -—	
„     12
„     26
Dec.     3	
Merritt-.- ._
"West Summerland
15
1
1
26
7
103
2
6
448
2
4
1
Note.—The  sum  of  $1,217.86  was  received  in  1942  from  the  sale  of  confiscated  fur. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 73
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1942.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Firearms
confiscated.
Rifles.       Shotguns.
10
10	
10	
29	
29.	
Feb.
3 __
6 	
11 _	
6 _  .
6	
9.. _	
9   	
14	
31	
19   	
July
4	
8	
17. 	
25
27	
29	
Oct.
10	
25	
Dec.
7 	
9
9 .. ..
9...	
Wilson, Frank	
Waring, Robert	
Garrett, Johnny	
Toews, Marvin	
Jonas, Jack  _
Webster, Robert __,
Hudson, John L—
Johnson, Jack	
Bailey, Douglas	
Maling, Edward L.
West, Norman	
West, Leonard	
Vanderburghe, G.Olson, W. A	
Campbell, G	
Urquhart, D. A	
Hartshorn, Jack	
Anderson, Wm	
Kingstone, W. R	
Christie, Richard ...
Thompson, Elmer..
Moerake, M 	
Cox, Ernest—-—	
Holmstrom, Elof	
Nikolayuk, S	
White, Rene.	
Kai, Kyonai	
Totals	
Royal Oak	
Royal Oak	
Royal Oak	
Chilliwack	
Chilliwack	
Burnaby	
Chilliwack	
Mission City	
Port Mann	
Port Mann	
North Vancouver
North Vancouver
Fernie	
Gang Ranch	
Penticton _	
Burnaby	
Alert Bay	
Vancouver	
Beaver Creek
Alberni	
Hydraulic	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Vernon.__ __.
Vernon..... _
23
Note.—The sum of $153.50 was received in 1942 from the sale of confiscated firearms. M 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1942.
Government Agents.
Coyotes.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Total.
83
219
26
128
7
10
14
120
38
17
40
36
9
12
4
52
38
45
27
31
3
4
42
394
147
108
3
3
97
4
1
78
99
298
18
18
183
18
111
4
1
10
1
12
16
2
4
2
5
11
1
1
11
3
11
7
3
3
5
2
1
4
18
19
1
2
7
21
7
34
32
$60.00
Atlin  	
1,080.00
Barkerville  _    	
45.00
346.00
453.00
180.00
240.00
Fernie    	
82.00
1,286.00
44.00
20.00
103.00
445.00
Kaslo 	
Kelowna ____   _  	
15.00
91.00
209.00
125.00
165.00
177.00
45.00
843.00
99.00
30.00
1,013.00
Penticton      .__ _
164.00
3,326.00
555.00
15.00
Smithers	
264.00
167.00
1,836.00
503.00
189.00
2,408.00
1,546
1,039
261
$17,397.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 75
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1942.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922  :.....  ___ 	
1923	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
285
196
261
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
172
2,246
70
2,487
3,427
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
14,840.00
1924                        	
20,398.40
1925
24,397.00
1926
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
1927 	
1928                                   	
1,025
1,389
403
1
65,377.95
50,709.25
1929             	
42,122.00
1930—  	
36,090.25
1931
42,036.15
1932
80.00
1933    	
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
1,002
1,039
6,285.00
1934   	
6,825.00
1935        	
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
2,038
1,924
1,546
12,374.00
1936. _  	
20,350.00
1937
19,540.00
1938 	
21,018.00
1939	
26,399.00
1940         	
23,131.00
1941 	
16,868.00
1942
 :
17,397.00
Totals  	
11,338
7,750
74,253
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$567,809.80 M 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1942.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
tS «|
a _3«
-J OJ  -
n «o
St
we
SS
B ft
o Jj
Amount.
Clinton—
Arnold, C. E., Onalaska, Wash	
Belknap, W., Port Orchard, Wash—
Coffer, Phil., Seattle, Wash...	
Carter, T. R., Bellingham, Wash. _ _____
Denny, Howard, Port Orchard, Wash	
Dittnie, Ernest, Mount Vernon, Wash	
Egstrom, Vernon, Mount Vernon, Wash..
Garver, L. R., Walla Walla, Wash 	
Greger, J. W., Chehalis, Wash  __
Gay, F. H., Seattle, Wash  	
Hall, Marvin L., Snohomish, Wash	
Hall, Mrs. M. L., Snohomish, Wash....
Harsh, R. H., Mount Vernon, Wash—
Halbush, W. R., Burlington, Wash	
Holm, E. A., Seattle, Wash ____	
Krebs, O. M., Anacortes, Wash.___	
Lar^en, E. L., Bremerton, Wash _
Lidral, J. F., Seattle, Wash. 	
MacAvelia, M. T., Mount Vernon, Wash-
Martin, Jack, Bellingham, Wash	
Merkley, E. W-, Seattle, Wash	
Mellor, Dr. R. M., Seattle, Wash—	
Nelson, C. W., Seattle, Wash..- 	
Olson, A. 0., Mount Vernon, Wash-
Pickering, F. C, Yakima, Wash	
Pendleton, W. B., Custer, Wash—	
Pendleton, Gordon, Custer, Wash	
Rader, Ralph, Walla Walla, Wash	
Randell, A., Bellingham, Wash	
Stillwell, Buck, Seattle, Wash	
Schultz, M., Yakima, Wash-
Seaman, J. M., Mount Vernon, Wash—
Scott, R. E., Bremerton, Wash	
Thompson, J. A., Tacoma, Wash	
Tronsrud, N. R., Snohomish, Wash	
Van Zanten, G. J. V., Lynden, Wash-
Walters, August, Seattle, Wash	
Winebri'nner, Dunstan, Port Orchard, Wash-
Zwyns, L., Lynden, Wash	
Cranbrook—
Gilbert, A. C, New Haven, Conn	
Miller, E. Clare, Corvallis, Ore	
Miller, Wesley J., Corvallis, Ore—.	
Miller, Clarence, Eugene, Ore	
Orton, L. J., South Bend, Ind —	
Schleman, R. W., Keovie, Ohio	
Fernie—
Blair, Dr. Jas., Blairmore, Alta —	
Fort Fraser—■
Bleakney, Dr. T. M., Seattle, Wash 	
Closz, Dr. H. F., Muskegon, Mich 	
Hunter, Dr. C. M., Sedro Wooley, Wash—
Kerr, Dr. H. G., Muskegon, Mich 	
McClanahan, Dr. B. V., Galesburg, 111	
Nelson, Stanley, Sedro Wooley, Wash	
Nelson, Stanley, Seattle, Wash	
Ward, A. H., Sedro Wooley, Wash	
Weir, Dr. M. H., Galesburg, 111—	
$25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
95.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
.15.00
1
65.00
1
56.00
1
95.00
1
50.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL
GAME COMMISSION, 1942.                     M 77
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by
December 31st,
Non-residents, January 1st to
1942—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
N
'E
o
cs
OJ
«
u   .
ti _-
w o
ism
P3 o
3
0
_D
'u
«
3
a
ox
<!>__-
A-i
m
cd
O
O
tH
01
01
Q
k
"3
AA
° o
CD
in
O
O
g
h
*3
G ft
G Ol
o 01
S to
5
5
ft
ti
Amount.
Golden—
1
1
1
1
1
....   |
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
___. |
- I
1
Z i
.... 1
.... 1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
-
$25.00
Eidson, F., Paduca, Ky ___ ...
Gehman, E. L., Palo Alto, Cal _ ,.	
15.00
15.00
25.00
105.00
45.00
Ziliak, A. L., Bay City, Mich '	
25.00
Greenwood—
Bull, Dr. L. L., Seattle, Wash _ __	
30.00
30.00
Swinn, D. P., Seattle, Wash _	
30.00
Kamloops—
25 00
15.00
25.00
■Morton, W. A., Pittsburgh, Pa....	
40.00
Lillooet—
Poffley, Ed., Seattle, Wash _	
30.00
15.00
25.00
Slyfield, Dr. F., Seattle, Wash	
15.00
Walsh, H. E., Seattle, Wash	
30.00
15.00
Merritt—
Bauer, Herman, Seattle, Wash  _
Wilson, I., Seattle, Wash ' _	
New Westminster—
Anderson, 0. A., Seattle, Wash	
Anderson, C. M., Arlington, Wash _ , ;.,	
Blume, John E., Seattle, Wash _  	
Bull, Mrs. L. L., Seattle, Wash -	
95.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
Bridewell, E. F., Tacoma, Wash __ „..	
Brown, L-, Bremerton, Wash _ _	
Bishop, Tom, Sumas, Wash   _	
Bodvin, E., Seattle, Wash.                                    	
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Bindle, H. A., Seattle, Wash ___ '	
25.00
Bindle, A. W-, Seattle, Wash _	
25.00
Brown, L., Bremerton, Wash	
Chase, R. P., Seattle, Wash ,
Chesser, Geo., Morton, Wash ,.. ,,   	
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Constantino-!, M. N„ Seattle, Wash __ 	
25.00
15.00
Carlson, R. C, Tacoma, Wash j. 	
Cavetti, F. L.. Tacoma, Wash -_  	
15.00
25.00
25.00
Davis. C. H., Port Orchard, Wash	
Davis, Harold E., Seattle, Wash-    	
■ Duryee, K. T., Seattle, Wash   — 	
15.00
25.00
5.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
Day, W F., Seattle, Wash _       .
.... | ____
i
.... i ....
i    i
55.00
.___   1
1
15.00
Edwards, S. H., Springfield, Ore—.  	
....   |     1   |   ....   |
1          1          1
15.00
- M 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1942—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
M
<_  •
« c
3*
n o
oi 3
**_>
a a
O 41
__._£
<i do
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Ford, Hugh C, Tacoma, Wash-
Ford, Hugh E., Tacoma, Wash-
Fair, F. E. and A. J., Blaine, Wash-
Ferrians, F., Tacoma, Wash	
Graham, F. A., Tacoma, Wash	
Gamblin, Geo., Tacoma, Wash 	
Gehri, 0. F., Tacoma, Wash	
Graham, F. A., Tacoma, Wash	
Hanson, Carl, Central Point, Ore	
Hanson, Oscar, Central Point, Ore-
Hanson, Walter, Seattle, Wash	
Herman, J. C, Seattle, Wash	
Hammerly, Harry, Marysville, Wash-
Hersey, Jack, Tacoma, Wash	
Hilton, Geo., Seattle, Wash	
Hanson, Barney, Blaine, Wash	
Herb, F. J., Bellingham, Wash	
Hyldahl, A. E., Sedro Wooley, Wash...
Holm, H. A., Seattle, Wash	
Holm, Mrs. J., Seattle, Wash	
Johnson, Chas. (Jr.), Seattle, Wash-
Johnson, A., Sumas, Wash	
Kendall, E. H., Auburn, Wash	
Ketcham, E. J., Seattle, Wash-	
Kelly, Mike, Bellingham, Wash	
Kleinberg, L., Seattle, Wash	
Kern, E. A., Edmonds, Wash	
Linhart, L. R., Danvers, Mont	
Lund, A., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Lee, C. N., Seattle, Wash 	
Lewis, Paul, Bremerton, Wash	
Lewis, Dr. G. E., Salem, Ore 	
Larsen, Louis, Lynden, Wash—	
McLemore, I. O., Seattle, Wash.	
McMahon, J. W., Bellingham, Wash—
McCullock, J. H-, Seattle, Wash	
McManamin, J. M., Seattle, Wash	
Mcintosh, A. E., Bellingham, Wash-
Mitchell, Roy, Belfair, Wash.	
Markwell, Edw., Arlington, Wash	
Miller, N. S. D., Olympia, Wash—	
Mohns, N. R., Seattle, Wash	
Mulcahy, H. A., Seattle, Wash	
Martin, J. W., Seattle, Wash 	
Martin, P. M., Kent, Wash 	
Merkley, E. W., Seattle, Wash	
Misserly, Ed., Seattle, Wash	
Nickelsen, Dr. H. C, Tacoma, Wash-
Norris, K. M., Seattle, Wash  -
Oldenburg, W. F., Seattle, Wash	
Paffley, E., Seattle, Wash 	
Power, Jack W., Seattle, Wash—
Peabody, F., Seattle, Wash-
Pfitzenmeyer, C, Salmon Beach, Wash—
Petersen, J. C, Seattle, Wash	
Porter, Dr. E., Port Orchard, Wash	
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
$25.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
40.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
25.00 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 79
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1942—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
>•
-a
u
«_ a
3 B
w o
a
ti
0_
m
J» o
Species.
13
B
a
co
14'8
a
c
*i
o
3
o
o
3 .
*h£
01 _c
0)
Q
o e,
o -
si
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Rutter, W. E., Seattle, Wash-
Ramage, L. M., Salem, Ore	
Rudebeck, Nick, Everett, Wash	
Robinson, Jas. W., Bellingham, Wash-
Robinson, J. W., Bellingham, Wash	
Shaw, Robt., Bellingham, Wash 	
Staples, J. R., Seattle, Wash-	
Shipman. H., Brooks, Mont—	
Strain, L. A., Seattle, Wash  	
Shultz, L. E., Seattle, Wash 	
Shedivetz, H. W., Bremerton, Wash-
Smith, G. E., Seattle, Wash 	
Smith, H. E., Seattle, Wash	
Strain, A., Seattle, Wash	
Strain, Ted, Seattle, Wash	
Thomas, Glyn, Snohomish, Wash—....
Tyler, Lee, North Bend, Wash 	
Tyler, Mrs. Lee, North Bend, Wash-
Vockrodt, H. K., Bremerton, Wash—
Von Lossow, E. P., Seattle, Wash	
Willett, Geo., Seattle, Wash	
Wray, Lloyd F-, Seattle, Wash-	
Wightman, Dr. R., Seattle, Wash......
Walker, L. B., Seattle, Wash	
Walton, G. A., Seattle, Wash	
Waite, S. J., Seattle, Wash 	
Wegley, W. A., Bellingham, Wash	
Zeigler, C. A., Redondo, Wash 	
Zanidis, W., Seattle, Wash	
Oliver—
Hansen, Ole, Seattle, Wash	
Lightner, Ralph R., Alturas, Cal	
McFerrans, E. M., Seattle, Wash	
McFerrans, Mrs. E. M., Seattle, Wash...
Penticton—
Allison, R. R-, Yakima, Wash 	
Alkire, L. V., Bremerton, Wash 	
Anderson, L. E., Seattle, Wash 	
Anderson, F. S-, Seattle, Wash ___
Barto, T. C, Seattle, Wash- _	
Bennington, Mrs. F., Yakima, Wash-
Berry, Frank, Yakima, Wash 	
Bauer, Mrs. C, Seattle, Wash	
Bauer, E., Seattle, Wash _	
Baskett, Paul, Seattle, Wash 	
Braida, Hector, Seattle, Wash	
Brenner, C. C, Port Gamble, Wash-
Braida, Eleanor, Seattle, Wash	
Collinson, T. J., Union, Wash 	
Clark, L., Port Gamble, Wash	
Callison, C. P., Chehalis, Wash	
Callison, P., Union, Wash 	
Campbell, W. C, Seattle, Wash	
Constantinoff, M. N., Seattle, Wash-
Carlson, R. C, Tacoma, Wash	
De Laura, A. S., Seattle, Wash	
$25.00
40.00
40.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
5.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
55.00
25.00
15.00
5.00
40.00
40.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
40.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
I M 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1942—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
m
u   •
jj B
3 __
a tO
01 X
c a
p -i
o ^
Amount.
Penticton—Continued.
Downey, W. A., Seattle, Wash—.
Dilo, M. E., Bremerton, Wash—
De Laura, A. S., Seattle, Wash...
Demakis, Tom, Seattle, Wash—
Demakis, Mabel, Seattle, Wash—
De Ford, S. R., Port Gamble, Wash-
Daris, H. E., Seattle, Wash- 	
Erickson, C. A., Seattle, Wash	
Fay, Jack, Seattle, Wash-	
Farrell, Dr. L. J., Everett, Wash-
Gwinn, M. D., Omak, Wash	
Hatten, F., Yakima, Wash	
Henry, Ross, Seattle, Wash	
Hahn, E. A., Seattle, Wash	
Hansen, A. O., Seattle, Wash	
Ketcham, E. J., Seattle, Wash	
Larson, R. E., Bremerton, Wash	
Macintosh, P. G., Yakima, Wash	
McPhail, Dr. R. E., Lakeview, Wash-
McNett, R. L., Omak, Wash	
McCash, L. R., Seattle, Wash-	
McGill, W., Tonasket, Wash—	
Mills, Jack W,, Yakima, Wash 	
Meister, Roy E., Seattle, Wash	
Manley, J. J., Kingston, Wash-	
Mascher, Vic, Bremerton, Wash	
Nance, C. B., Bremerton, Wash—	
Niemi, W. F., Seattle, Wash 	
Niemi, Mrs. Louise, Seattle, Wash	
Petersen, Jas. C, Seattle, Wash	
Poth, P. J., Seattle, Wash __	
Patricelli, Dr. L., Seattle, Wash	
Paschal, F. H., Seattle, Wash _.	
Phelps, A. E., Seattle, Wash.—	
Sligar, Porter, Seattle, Wash 	
Schultz, H. H., Yakitna, Wash	
Smiley, E. S., Yakima, Wash 	
Styer, C. M., Seattle, Wash	
Schroeder, G. E., Seateck, Wash	
Stender, B., Seattle, Wash	
Schau, Omar, Seattle, Wash	
Simpson, C. B., Port Gamble, Wash-
Stella, A., Tacoma, Wash 	
Weberg, 1. R., Poulsbo, Wash	
Wheeler, W. H., Snoquamish, Wash-
Whaley, R. S., Seattle, Wash	
Zapponi, Ed. B., Yakima, Wash	
Zwyns, L., Lynden, Wash	
Pouce Coupe—
Brewster, Fred, Minneapolis, Minn—
Bigalk, Russell, Harmony, Minn	
Grouse, R. M., Baltimore, Md	
Geiger, B. C, Miami, Fla  	
Heinold, G., Baltimore, Md	
Haugen, Simon, Orronville, Minn-
New, Leonard, Edmonton, Alta	
I  -
$15.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
50.00
25.00
135.00
55.00
70.00
25.00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 81
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1942—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Pouce Coupe—Continued.
Paulsen, Alexander, Balsam Lake, Wis...
Snyder, Harry, Saskatoon, Sask	
Salisbury, W. W., Miami, Fla	
"Weaver, A. D., Bristol, Tenn _ ____.
Webb, R. V-, Miami, Fla	
Prince George—
Everhart, M. W., Bala Cynwyd, Pa	
Isett, J. Warren, Chicago, 111	
Kruger, W., Merieden, Conn  	
Larson, Alex., Ambridge, Pa	
Morton, W. A., Pittsburgh, Pa. _ _
Okeson, M. R., Chicago, 111	
Pauley, Vern L., Wichita, Kan __.
Rusten, E. M., Minneapolis, Minn	
Rusten, Helen S., Minneapolis, Minn.
Sutherland, T. F., Ambridge, Pa _____
Seragusa, R. D., Chicago, 111.. ._	
Turner, K., Chicago, 111	
Wells, L. H., Boston, Mass	
Quesnel—
Bryder, C. R., Redmond, Wash	
Barry, Joe, Everett, Wash	
Brown, T. B., Seattle, Wash	
Drake, Louis B., Forest Grove, Ore.—
Green, Ira C, San Angels, Texas	
Granston, E. L., Seattle, Wash	
Granston, W. R.,'Seattle, Wash.	
Hague, R. J., Seattle, Wash	
Johnson, E. R., Redmond, Wash	
Kellogg, H., Tacoma, Wash  	
Lauerman, Dr. C. L., Everett, Wash.
Lohr, Elmer, Arlington, Wash.	
Leber, C. H., Kent, Wash 	
Martin, J. F., Seattle, Wash ...
Melby, C. E., Seattle, Wash	
Moll, C. E., Arlington, Wash	
Muzzall, Robt., Oak Harbor, Wash. ._
Muzzall, Lyle B., Oak Harbor, Wash.
Oakson, E., Seattle, Wash 	
Pierce, S. R., Everett, Wash.	
Smith, Roy W., Oregon	
Skogh, Joe, Seattle, Wash _
Sinclair, S. L., Redmond, Wash	
Stuchell, E. W., Everett, Wash	
Theler, Mrs. P. H., Freeland, Wash.
Theler, P. H., Freeland, Wash	
Walton, C, Everett, Wash	
Waltkill, M. V., Mount Vernon, Wash..
Zeek, Rex, Arlington, Wash...	
Revelstoke—
Edwards, Steve, Springfield, Ore	
Edwards, D., Oregon City, Ore	
Kubos, Stanley, Munro, Wash ___.
Lidral, J., Seattle, Wash. _ 	
Telegraph Creek—
Fisher, W. R., Frankenmuth, Mich.	
Iverson, Mr. and Mrs. L., Pittsburgh, Pa.
Species.
xi
G
3 &
G
o
CO
ti
O
O
'E
01 j-
o)£*
H
01
0   tH
CQ o
ti
o
01
P
H
o 5
Si
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
a b,
_-   -
O  -
w_a
^ _
Amount.
$25.00
50.00
50.00
65.00
50.00
75.00
50.00
55.00
110.00
40.00
40.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
110.00
40.00
65.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
210.00 M 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1942—Continued.
Species.
xi
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
.N
'E
O
r*
ti
01
to
ti G
w O
£ u
m o
G
O
fi
'tA
ti
o
03
S-J
a*
_ J,
35 tr
OP
O
o
u
o
0
c
e .
BIS
° s
_
in
o
O
a
h
'3
-   P.
__   OJ
o 0)
5
e.
Amount.
Vancouver—
1
i
$40.00
Wonder, Guy C. (Sr.) and Guy C. (Jr.), Seattle, Wash	
....
2
50.00
Victoria—
Alspaugh, E. M., Bremerton, Wash 	
1
25.00
Knapp, Luke and Joe, Bremerton, Wash 	
	
5
25.00
Windermere—
Aston, J. M., Omak, Wash  	
	
1
25.00
Eisenschiml, G., Banff, Alta __  .	
	
i
2
	
45.00
1
25.00
Iske, H. J., Hamilton, Ohio	
1
25.00
Kercheval, C. E., St. Louis, Mo  	
i
2
1
70.00
Street, Mrs. W. S., Seattle, Wash 	
2
30.00
Street, W. S., Seattle, Wash.__ 	
1
15.00
Stenger, C. A., Dayton, Ohio  	
1
1
50.00
Williams Lake—
Ford, C, Kellenberger, E., and Woods, E. W., Lebanon, Ore.
1
2
65.00
Totals                      -'	
19
19
21
205
12
42
177
14
9
$10,050.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.-
M 83
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1942.
Description of Offence.
. ft
See
Foot-note.
m
a
s
B
c
03
_0
s
>
«3
O.S
n.£
a .a
to
: 0
: O
: fi
: ft
ft
O
1-2
Game Animals.
Hunting game animals from a motor-boat, etc   	
Hunting big game with a rim-fire .22-cal. rifle   -
Killing, hunting, or in possession of game animals of female sex	
Killing,  hunting,  or in possession of game animals  during  close"
season      	
Possession of game animals under 1 year of age. 	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during close season _
Possession of carcass of untagged deer____  	
Possession of game on premises of logging camps, etc	
Removing all evidence of sex from game animals shot ____
Running deer with dogs ___ —	
Selling or buying big game illegally __ _ 	
Trapping big game illegally —___ ___	
Game Birds.
Allowing dogs to hunt or run game birds during prohibited season	
Exceeding bag-limit on game birds   	
Hunting  or  in  possession  of  migratory  and   insectivorous   game
birds during close season  __  	
Hunting,  killing,  or in possession of upland game birds  during
close season    	
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours _ ____
Hunting upland game birds during prohibited hours 	
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game birds within game reserve
Hunting migratory game birds over baited area 	
Hunting migratory game birds from a power-boat 	
Trapping game birds   	
Trapping.
Failing to report fur taken on a trap-line __.
Interfering with a registered trap-line	
Leaving traps set after end of open season-
Non-resident trapping illegally	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence-
Trapping during close season 	
Trapping outside the limits of a registered trap-line illegally _	
Licences.
Buying or trading in pelts of fur-bearing animals without a licence	
Carrying firearms without a licence. _	
Guiding without a licence  _	
Minor carrying firearms without a licence or without being accompanied by an adult    	
Non-resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling without a licence 	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence 	
Resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling without a licence __ _.
Using another person's licence or permit or allowing same to be used
13
18
13
1
1
10
27
4
5
11
2
3
2
2
1
1
6
2
1
16
6
2
67
15
3
3
41
2
Note.—"A" Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. "B" Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. "C" Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. "D" Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. "E" Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas. M 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1942—Continued.
See
Foot-
NOTE.
01
'ti
a
01
3
__
G
o
o
">
a
o
O
c2
Description of Offence.
d
0
*      Ol
<E
s 0
5
_:    m
«;>
: ft
c
.   o
o'.i.
: fi
a
o
_ 'S
o.E
: fi
Z      01
w.E
s 0
ti
_—  CS
IS
Firearms.
Carrying firearms in, or discharging same from, an automobile, etc.—
2
7
12
2
6
29
29
Carrying, or in possession of, unplugged, repeating, or automatic
1
1
1
3
3
Carrying firearms or traps within boundaries of a game reserve	
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
Miscellaneous.
1
1
2
2
4
Illegally receiving or forwarding shipments of game	
1
1
1
Importing- fnr-b^aring animals without a pprmit
	
1
1
1
Interfering with, or supplying false information to, a Game War
den in discharge of his duties _._	
1
1
1
3
3
Making false statements in obtaining a licence, etc 	
3
1
1
1
1
	
7
7
1
1
1
Trespassing in pursuit of game. .,.	
2
3
5
5
British Columbia Special Fishery Regulations.
3
4
7
7
1
1
2
2
Exceeding bag-limit on trout 	
1
1
1
Fishing through the ice    	
1
1
1
Jigging, shooting, or using a torch in taking trout or salmon  	
1
1
1
3
3
6
2
8
8
6
1
7
7
1
2
3
3
Trolling or angling with gear designed to catch more than one fish
13
13
13
Gaol Sentences.
Angling for trout during the close season or without a licence	
2
2
2
Carrying firearms during close season in automobile, etc.,  without
1
1
1
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game animals or birds during
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
Killing or in possession of game animals of the female sex	
1
1
1
2
2
2
Trapping or in possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during
close season __ __ _	
1
1
1
Trapping without a licence _   _ 	
1
1
2
2
Totals       	
60
71
94
59
108
17
392
409
Note.—"A" Division : Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division : Kootenay and Boundary
areas. "C" Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. "D" Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. "E" Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas.
Total of fines or penalties imposed amounted to $5,079.50.
Gaol sentences ranged from five days to six months. REPORT
OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.                     M 85
0_     «j                       -9              CO     rfl                       CO                                                                              w
_J3
oj
pi    fl                  P           P    3                  G                                                            P
.2  °           .2      .2 .2           .2                                      -2
2
-+_..=
'E   '£                 'E         *tn   '£                 'C           ro                         w                  fc
IJ
go
CJ e
qj    qj                  V           01    01                  01           G                         G                  a
,_.*■*.      «      " £ -o -d .2     -8 V V T? $      T? -2
o o 1    £    o t * « 2    G ■« -a .s B    .21
£ £ p      g      £ £ q q £      OT P P P w      P £
rfl
w
01
a
fl
0J
u
i?
Xi
M
ri
'S >
^3
s
OJ
T3
ri
"ri
§1
-fl fi
T3
fl
QJ
fl
ri
QJ
tH
,3
S      Ja
.9
tH        ri
QJ
Ol
O
tfl
P
a
E
c
t:
a
c
S           c.
J2                         fl
S"S      S x
PH    r^J
fl     QJ
O     Ol
fi
QJ
0?
fl
o
K
5
ti
c
*
n __2           «
s    i    3
._-.«*-.
s : £
1 x 'S
•°   fl X
—         ri tM ^ fi   >}
S    .3 | 1.3 1     8
fl      V Id Js 'P °»*S ^
■ «            QJ     =U   rW     O            QJ   ^
n
o
tH
I
CJ
XI
'o
ti
ba
- g a     -e      ?
o —   fl   o         C   fl ■"   fl X"  fl —   K
fl
■w •«   H         2        ■*
P°o£h       o £  o  o  ^ _o   ° ?
o hj   g       a        c
A
,C  2 >;          <D          P
cq M l>      Cm      CC
!n_J=t>-J3           S  w   pg  i    *          *    3
fl
fi
tH
m       -*j          i
-P
g    «
ri
<*H
__      -a
-o
QJ
o            W            t_C    M
0)
2
^       ^ —
tH
fi
U
01
01
xi
ba
C
4J
Pi
OJ
X)
"o
o
jp
__.      .2       o  o
_?■==_.=.
ri
,fl
o
Ol
Xi
0J
QJ
fi
Ol
i c
c
fl
O
fi
Ol
01
fi
1942.
_-: _:             _        ww
«•a «    s    «h «h
O     O     3              g             "fl   Xi     E
«  N   fcO        i?         fl    G    £
N   N   -g            O            CO    ri   ■£
«    08  -S           w          1j  *S    n
0
r\                    r
___ fl p
•ti   bo  fc
fl +-i +.
0   fl    0   c
O  fi   £
fl     01     0
5    ri   B
53
^ fl
5   |
ID            r
■■fl            «
fi     fl
-
m
_H
Z
m
a
o
o
0>
«M *h                _»          Pt   Pi  2 **■*   ri        ti         <w <h  t         m  rO
ifl&C.g         *tj          ~  ~    <-    bO <£<          ^   -^    two   tJD fc!           k°   fl
Ac      3 («      .S ,S ^ c <c c d ^ fl c d      c^
ri   ri    rt   M          v   +-]+>£,   ti          ti    ^  .1°    ti    ti  ^          ti    „.
fi fi               "o   g    §    §   c^    O   d    °   g4343    o        ^  ^
1 .VE « fi & ,2 .2 ^ 1 s »| •» J 3 3     J is
"H'S33S"-_jC_'ij"B+>a.5.s           tD   +_
•a la
to
fl
ti
o
53 £ .
C   a>
.fl   o
ri fi
be   _
rt. ri
<
fl ^
*      H
_____      A
la .2
t->     Sh     ri    n            c*   fi   si     &     *h            rt     ri     O    tH     tH   —'            H    00
OOP        £        ??^Uh        JffiUUfe        OJ
o
Z
+^ __j
.     0
__)   ca
a
K
'S 3
CO
£
£
B   o
.2  »
p
OJ
t
HJ      OJ
z
<
o
z
in
s
_.    >
qj          a
1
p
c
a
■8
K
is
ti  x
C
■4-
P
a
-
a
£
2
1 _■
1
(
s
fc
Q
S   to
-u   fl
fl   2
i e
ri   >
EH
O   -fl    h           O           O    C
flpm         -r-oo^O        A   ri
z
p
Ph O to       O      0 C
P3<3<3      JmuCHU     CQu
^.s
H
fl
o
P-+-
co a
t v
0*8
S   B
S   S
co    fl
g .2
fi   m
0 o
*h<
oi ,
<f.tH
o _
0
p:
o
o
ft
Lh
P
•- a
° 1
j3
m
bo
QJ
G
m °
c_
b  o —
1
EH
ri ^
O
_Q                  !t
*+•
*t-
t*;
ri   c
m  c
"33   rt
fc
W m cn       <J
-C    CJ  ■«           01
QJ     QJ
i
V              (U
to  O
cn w O      cc
to c/i
Cfl
CQ         CQ
>    01
fl -fl
■H      -|J
xi   >>
A   hQ
-
T3
'fl
a
rt 3J
a .
_? B
tfl             1-3
>
U
S
B 9
a>       ---             qj    i   h
Jh
O
»    ^
fi
&  fl
°(2
fce
wg   -   _8|oT£   w
g^
«    d!
ri
fl
§
CIS
o
fl
si   |  |.sla|   I^SjsI   gs
fi   O        .P        H   ri   ©   ri IS         <u   ri .9   cc   O         A. .«
2 *
G
0>    f*
q<:_h     k     wracHuo     wqsqh     g >
■fi s
fs-°
1 »
a)
CO
oi
CO
cr.
«
M
CO
IO
ID
oc
CO
LO
OC
CO
CO
o S
P
H   rl             rH             H    N    N    H    H             i-HiHW                               «    H
fl.r^              fi                --.-^-                __,__..&,                -^
1 a
_-fl
o
fl
EO
t-a     &i     as                o                    a            o
7 M 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary of Game-fish Distributions, showing Eggs, Fry, and
Fingerlings, 1942.
Kind of Game Fish.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fingerlings and
Yearlings.
2,545,765
588,034
580,730
3,517,996
53,590
18,043
Kamloops trout _ .___  	
5,070,950
5,965,000
89,000
741,119
2,000
Totals --	
13,670,715
4,540,350
761,162
Summary of Game-fish Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings at Departmental
Hatcheries, December 31st, 1942.
Hatchery.
Eastern
Brook.
Kamloops.
Steelhead.
Eggs.
Fingerlings.
Yearlings.
95,614
11,212
21,540
86,529
93,213
203,435
93,732
244,500
Smith Falls             _                  	
6,394
40
Totals
244,500
605,275
6,434
Summary.
Eggs
13,670,715
Fry     4,340,350
Fingerlings and yearlings         761,162
Total distributions 	
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1942_
Total 	
_ 18,772,227
856,209
_• 19,628,436
Note.—A number of Game Clubs or Associations were, as in past years, granted
subsidies for use in assisting the Department in its game-fish culture programme of
development.
Trout-eggs were shipped to a number of Game Associations as will be noted on
examining the statement of distributions, or plantings. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1942.
M 87
as
m
o
Z
►-.
E-i
z
<
A
Ph
H
A
O
H
fa
o
;*
Cfi
S
P
w
o
<!
pq
w
as
P
H
P
M
tn
u
H
w
o
cn
to
fc
o
Q
%
M
g
H
cj -.
bc ba
fa1-1
oi
H
S
_J
W
01 w
ti bo
i
oi
M
W
is
M
o
ft
a
M
in
W
w
p.
o
o
_J
i
«_
.-   .
aj w
cm bo
c a
ft3
(NOOOCPOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOO
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
rH_J__O_5__O(NOOl--OOi_-l--OO^>0_nO-iO-_O»0l-_---l-_--_--3OO
CO   CO   IN           COO-f-SrHrH-^aOaO           CO.OrHN-OOrH-^'rHO.IOCOCO'^rHa-           ,-lt-!
rH                                                                                                        rH                                                                                      rH
fa
n
to
a
H
E °
fa
I
W
1
If.
<
o
09
a
tH
o
L   .
&fl 60
C.g
fa"
fa
s
HI
fa
|M
Jh
O
2    C
H  £
■4]     C^
fH       ti    __
« £.£
M     °1
fl    GO *
g ss
<< hj
rA      H
Oh
Vancouver Island.
Qualicum Hatchery.
Beach Creek 	
h-
B
a
■_
c
s
bl.
a
0.
..
s
o
c
a)
At
ti
to
AA>
G
C
E3
M
B
B
0
f.
a
£
C.
D
a
,_
a
'5
D
oi
_^
O
E
0
o
1
h
O
xi
o
o
[J
13
ti
01
fi
1
O
>
t
CJ
fi
01
c
Q
a
_*
ti
to
c
-=
t
a
>
to
a
a
5
X
v;
13
C
w
a
A£
ti
to
"ti
tH
+->
a
01
O
3
o
a
ri
fl
o
to
!h
oj
XI
G
01
M
a
_*
rt
0)
C
OJ
X
p
O
a
o
in
U
CO
Ol
+j
3
1-
>
E
_:
CJ
C
*
to
a
a
A
ta
B
c
o
Ji
r;
X
0
S
R
o
U
Oi
a
o
to
01
K
G
z
0
rl
Oi
M
ti
Ih
0
u
u
s
a
a>
0
a
o
a
C
Sh
o
E
a.
ri
to
o
|
'ri
a
c_
*-
a
>
IS
H>J
>
o
0
.-
ri
to
AW
XB
r.
to
a
rt
a
pi
DQ
Oi
B
a
at
C>
c5
S
a
"5
a
rh
01
I
o
u
01
o
G
01
G.
cn
a
ri
to
ri
o
tH
G.
Cfl
a
At
ti
to
1
in
a
aj
u
o
G
p
H->
3
03
oj
ai
tH
o
ri
03 M 88
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
13
3_
1
•S
no
8
o
O
(M
C3
XS
Z
i—i
Eh
z
<
A
s
EH
P
O
BS
H
fa
o
PS
<
S
B
p
a
o
«
P
H
P
P
o
w
03
fa
H
S
<!
O
oi to
ba ba
G C
OJ   01
ba ba
G 3
6
X
°g
i.
rt^J
o
H
13
A
w
c.
C4
©  © © ©
o  o o ©
o  © o o
O*   O IO IO
© O 00 o
© © lO ©
© © oo ©
© IO A tO
©
©
LO
© © o © ©
© © t- © ©
© © co cq ©
©
o
o
o"
._    .5
>   6 fS
«   o
_-  °
_3     4J
1 |
f   ■*_!
P.    m
01   J
as
j -5
s    1
OJ   Ul   —   'O     o
H 5   ft   S I
■2  _. *3  I
Mpj J
■_ n_ 5 J S
3   d.SS«55   Soi,
HiilBjS.PHFHO'Sin
< O
ft __5
Sfc
Ph 01 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 89
©
to
©
©
to
©
*
m
a
©
to
©
C4
to
a
©
to
c.
i      !   ©
;    : ©
1    | ©
|    : ©J
©
©
©
©
©
©
Oi
00
©
o
©
5)
CO
!       !       !
© © © ©
© © © ©
©^ © ©_ ©^
10,000
4,000
4,000
o   ©   ©
© © ©
© ©_ ©^
■«# "# ■"#
©
©
©
©"
©
©
©
20,000
20,351
4,000
.. .....
to
CO
©"
©
©
©
©'
4,000
4,000
10,000
4,000
15,000
4,000
4,000
1
70,000
40,000
100,000
i ©   , ©   i
: ©    : ©    :
©    | ©    :
! ©"   ! ©"   i
j ©    | ©    |
[   ©
: ©
; ©
©
!   O
200,000
60,000
50,000
© ©
© ©
© ©
© ©
co m
©
©
©
©
o
©
i
1
1    1
'
j
1    1
j     ! '
LO
_0       !       I
«o    :    !
eg    :
©
©
©
©
IO
©
©
©
©"
m
!   ©   ©
!   O   ©
|   ©^ ©
i   ©" ©
m to
C
©
©
c
tc
50,000
50,000
50,000
ri.
e
0
A
a
0
ri
0
ts
A-
'Z
fi
t
<
a
1
c
(_
e
■i
c
B
a
C
.-
a
a
-
E
l
_
0
_-
c
«
e
_-
<
c
r
c
'_!
B
e
i
a
a
B
a
.
i-
R
tr
fi
s
c
Cf
a
C
'tr
a
it
a
riff
a
>
ir
■^
«
s
S
K
*
1
I
>
s
s
rH
s
I
c
—
z
R
a
t>
ii
«
S
a
,*
a
r-
G
i
At
C
C
|
c
5
t.
a
>
j
12
a
>
H-
J
J
<
1
e
H
£
i
I
p.
i
I
_
■^
1
a
s-
a
>
s
B
6
cr
a
A
a
>-
a
it >
a
*
a
a
t.
1
0.
H-
XI
c
J
<-
1
1
or
>
f.
a
£
4-
0
J-
C
o
e
m
6.
1
CO
C
r
c
b
■+■
■q
_£
+
=
CI
1
t
t
l ,o
e
e
7
a
r-
a
C
0
a
0
6
"c
c
c
+
&
a
-i
H
a
«
r-
»
B
s
•A
1
0
r^
0
c
e
t*
X
c
s
1
«r
C
;
1
Pi
£
7
-
•f
1
1
t
I
i
7
*.
0
C
r-
1
_
> M 90
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
■■3
s
s
o
O
(M
<_-
W
o
Z
H
Z
P-,
(A
P
O
PS
H
fa
o
PS
<
p
W
u
55
<:
PS
pq
w
PS
p
H
P
P
o
w
w
fa
■
H
B
<
to
a
u
O
W
to
fc
o
a
M
m
H
i
§
H
w
60 60
Bi B
fa =
*
tc
©
c
CO
#
to
-a
©
c
'
60
60
W
j
Q
1
H
s_
i,   .
V   ll,
60 60
B B
fa"
60
60
H
-
H
fc
<!
W
o
M
fa
to
60
60
K
d3
fc
o
o
. u   •
a. to
60 60
3 c
fa"
© © ©
© © ©
° ° °
to" ■*   ©
©
©
©
00
u
fa
I ©
: ©
!   °
i to"
©
©
©
to
©
©
©
to
©       !   ©
©      !   ©
©.     i   ©
IO      !   "^
©
©
©
©
©
©^
©"
m
60
60
fa
100,000
20,000
30,000
© ©
© ©
© ©
o" to
cq t-
©
©
©
©"
©
©
©
©"
© ©
© ©
© ©_
©" ©
00    CO
© ©
© ©
© ©^
©" ©
rH    tO
©
©
©_
©
ca
1 M
si
fa
05
60
60
H
1    1
—
O
w
&
o
.-   .
_   to
60 60
B B
fa"
j    j
1    i
©    :
©       !
t-        !
©
©
|    |    |
fa
60
60
H
©       ©
©     ;  ©
©_    : ©
o    i ©
©    : to
100,000
50,000
57,000
©
©
to
fH
o
•     01
%   ba
o   C
SI-
H    ri o
It
< -g
W    C3
Ph
1
1
!
i
Lower  Mainland—Continued.
Smith Falls Hatchery—Continued.
1
c
a
c
a
£
c
i.
c
i
i
$
r
a
p:
|
i
i
i
XI
a
>
5
a
.E
1
a
cc
\
I
X.
i
l
XI
■J*
<;
|
_.
■_
&
a
6
>
1
a
>
c
fi
A.
a
&
A
«
1
s
-
c
■*.
c
r_
Okanagan District.
Lloyds Creek Hatchery.
0.
a
<
4
.3
«
p:
.5
pt
5
I
c
i
i
i
I  _:
0
.■_
t-
a
8
to
CL
i
•-
£
D   t
0   "
C
a
4
b
P-'
4
-4
£
a
a
A*
a
».r
a
4
e
H
I
a
R
+
>
t-
4
c
P
a
J"
P
_-<
4
C
(-
i
1
C
4
B
H
fi
i
.
i, i-
!_:
K
4
4
a
f-
C
5
4
f
s
r
0
0
r-
J6
>    4
IS REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 91
#
c
c
c
c
#
e
©
©
<=
IT
Cv
c
c
c
cr
#
C
©
tc
#
c
c
c
©
tc
*
c
c
c
©
*
c
c
©
tc
*
c
©
j   1
i    !    i
©     i  © ©
©     1  © ©
©      !   ©   ©
©"      i   ©" ©"
m        j    rH    rH
©   ©   ©   ©   ©       i
©   ©   ©   ©   ©       !
©   ©   ©   ©   ©       !
©   ©   O   ©   to       !
©    CO    rH    m
CS]                      rA                 I
!   ©      I      !©©©©©
!   ©      i      !©©©©©
|   ©      I      !©©©©©_
!   ©      1      !   ©   ©   io   to   ©
\    rH        !    ,   !    rH    ©    (M             OJ
rH
©
©
©
Tf
©
©
o
©
©
©
©
o"
to
©  ©
©  ©
©  ©
©" ©
o ©
rA    (M
© ©  ©
© ©  ©
© © ©
©" ©" ©
N   H   CO
© ©
© ©
© ©
©" ©
o ©
©©©©©©©o©
©©©©©©o©©
©^©OOO©©©©
©'©©©"©©"'cr©'©'
caiocat-iotoioco©
©
©
©
IO
IO
©
1    1    j
t-
0.
>
rt
4
rU
X
c
c
to
0.
r-«
R
H
S
0
f
c
-x
I
a
B
C
t_
'a
h-
a
7
i
a
■s
.-
CG
rt
a
c
|
R
P-
1
G
rt
P-
0,
r*
rt
c
,c
*>
rt
Ph
a
U*
«
t-
K
4
U*
K
s
p
rt
P
._£
4
UK
e
i-
0
0
7-
a
J*
rt
h-
i>
0
A.
4
R
■1-
|
i
p
0
4
J-
c
a
s-
a
1
*<_
4
_-
X
I
I
fl
i
to
r.
S
I
■«
a
4
C
■e
|
"a
.
C
a
a
t
a
f
B
|
fi
tr.
E
4
u<
R
H
C
R
g
P
,P
cc
4
<_.
4
U*
R
4
r*
rt
h-
R
I
P
4
£
R
S
o.
7
£
c
p
c
p
rt
c
_
1
p:
a
E
5
_;
s
c
B
■-
c
'-
I
0
%
XI
■s
E
B
C
B
0
•X
S
X
G
B
c
■?
K
B
fi
J
R
| X
■B t_
5 E
BC
<§!
B t
«    C
-o p:
St
B    J
II
o &
s
1
1
g
4
p:
>
1
■fc
0
(r
1
c
_
e
R
f-
>
|
+
rt
4
c
>
1
i
c
I
c
_p
D
*
-
E
n
i-
C
I
4
£
e.
R
H
&
p.
>
' XI
5
x
1
1
T
>    4
!
1
■s
J
i
±
>
c
H-
c
E- M 92
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
_   IO
60 60
B B
A
n
© © ©
© © ©
© © ©
©" © ©"
©  to ©
s
s
-t-i
a
o
O
(M
-tf
C5
02
O
Z
i—,
Eh
z
<
p
fc
p
O
PS
iH
fa
o
PS
<_
S
p
02
w
o
2;
<!
PS
FQ
w
P
H
P
P
o
w
i—i
fa
■
H
a
<.
o
E
Hi
en
M
H
60
fa
60 60
B fi
fa"
o o o
■* o ©
NOV
OOOOOOO
OOOOOOO
OOOOOOO
io o io to" o  _. n
6,500
5,000
5,000
j    |
© ©
© ©
© ©
J
?. >h 2
_H      __ J
O
_ .2;
fc fc Ph
i2 " •
a A <_;
S  § .2
<; < ea pa pa o 0
a
01 Al J< O
c C3 __ £
oj p P ch
i-l
es
A s
iJ
B   B
c.   c_
C3    cd
4)    >
Q W
^ JS \M % *
-^ |-t j w   >.  cs
<$    4>  M    C   -i!   5!
•_ &i s §»
g S £•_ t. S
72   X     O    nj     CU    o
ti    01 01
to M M &
ti oi ti ■
g J A J,
m at s ca
H     -H O 2     ,
-P
o3
ti
rr!
w
a
o>
id
A<
01
_H O O J REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 93
■if
©
©
©
CO
*
©
©
©
to
00
*
©
©
©
oc
© ©
© o
© ©
© ©
IO   ©
©   <N
*
©
©
©_
©
©
CO
#   *
© to
tO    Ci
©   IO
©* co"
©    (O
ca to
#
LO
©
00
to
fc-
j
©
©
m
co'
Ci
15,000
50,000
50,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
©©©©O©©©
oo©©©©©©
©©©©o©©©
to©©to©oo©to
©           M   rl   O   H   H
co                    ca
©■
©
©
to
©    :
r-      !
t-      1
t>      !
©
fc-
Ci
©
© © © © © © ©i ©. © ©  ©
©o©©©©©©©©©
©©©©©©©©©:©©
1010101010©10©10©©
rH             H.           IN   rt
o
©
©
CO*
cc
©
©
©
©*
o
©
©
©
to
t-
j    j
to
to
CO
Ci
a
©   tO       !
©   ©       !
©   lO      !
©    rH        i
to ©    ;
©
IO
©
to
CO
■■■■#
\
j
! 1
>
4
£
w
Pi
o
0.
*4
z
>
in
4>
rC
fl
H
tj
s
rt
T
4
E
E
3
y_
"'5
El
5.
tq
-a
&      Ol
01
u_
a
c
k
p
<
M
4
4>
Sh
U
>>
rt
tH
ti
PQ
a
.M
fl
(h
4)
>
ti
01
to
01
At
rt
to
a
0
u
to
At
V
01
tA
U
£
rt
4)
tA
il
OS
c
4)
J_
tf
tf
T
4.
r^
O
o
4>
fl
to
OJ
Cj
P
4)
At
rt
tf
h
4
O
fi
■s
c
1
-c
6/
H
4
It
fl
4
ti
to
a
At
'fl
£
"fl
M
4>
U>t
fl
J
K
C
4)
U<
fl
1-3
rt
4>
At
fl
C
4
4)
0
a.
_-
c.
J
B
s.
b
B
03
5
c.
-1
s
K
O
rt
CQ
ti
to
■n
H
~~
Q
c
Urf
*H
O
Ud
*?
'/;
'3
01
At
ti
to
Xi
O
to
41
at
ft
O
01
o
(S
es
>
4)
At
rtj
itf
0_
O
0
is
>
F-
4
r£
<L
"fl
tr
c
»H
4
fl
X
Xi
G
"S
01
£
£
03
X
G
0
p
ttf
fl
o
tf
S
o
a
h
01
>
fl
O
H
Si
t.
tt
-si
8
13
S
5
s
a.
tt
C.
A
<
4)
At
ti
to
r-
rt
4J
tf
4
At
ti
to
ti
o
cn
4)
W
J-i
41
tf
4>
fl
tf
ci
■c
c
4>
tf
4)
fl
tf
4
P
fi
o
o
At
ti
tf
^H
O
fl
i
tH
fl
a
u<
4
4>
p
0
0
01
01
to
01
A
ti
to
tH
CI
41
P
01
At
ti
to
01
G
Ih
ti
c
09
a
At
ti
to
G
"ti
fi
o
X
G
rt
At
c
41
U-
fl
tf
ta
G
01 M 94
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
•a
s
o
1
eg
m
o
Z
i—i
H
z
<
p
Pi
Eh
P
O
PS
H
fa
o
PS
■<
S
S
p
CQ
OS
M
w
PS
p
tH
P
P
S
m
u
«
o
W
._
fc
o
p
g
5
1
1
H
u   .
0. m
60 60
B B
fa"
tn
60
E
EH
IH     .
C.   CO
60 60
B B
fa"
|     j     i
tc.
60
60
H
_
H
■ M
q
©  ©
-* to    :
t>   00
to   ttf
ca ca    ;
BQ
60
61
H
©
©
©
©
©
!     : ©
! ©
!   ©^
i    : ©"
'.    ; >o
i
©
©
©^
©*
■>*
d
i
o
o
a
a
_H      .
OJ  0}
60 60
B fi
fa"
©
©
©
Tf
Ih
fa
0©tO©©©©©0
©©ca©©©©©©
©©t-©©o©o©
to©©©©to©©to
rH   ©   to   <N           i-t   CJ
to
ca
CO
CO
i ©
1
i ©
j ca
©    i
cc    :
00      !
© c
© us
to
60
60
H
|     i
©
©
o
©"
ca
,  © ©
: © ©
: o ©
i ©* ©
: ca ©
:       ca
© ©
© ©
© ©
©* to
i-i ca
©
©
©
to
E. 9
■fflfl
Ih
fa
30,000
35,000'
5,000
©
©     :
©    |
©*    1
■*#    ;
©    ;
©      !
©    j
©*    i
ca     i
_o
Eg
60
W
H
■<
O
«
H
_-t
<y ra
60 60
B B
fa"
&
fa
\    |    |
tn
60
60
H
rH
O
•       01
3  ti
HtJ        ti-
E-<    oj  _■
H -g
l!    M
Ph
Okanagan  District—Continued.
Summerland Hatchery—Continued.
4
,|
?
1-
«
c
c
i
c
tf
■*-
G
C
Cf
-
%
6
«
B
J
c
4
i
i
!
c
1
►
4
C
l
«
a
>
r_:
o
«
i-
B
a
cr
_■
.
s
J
j
c
c
p
c
>
p
r
R
i
k
a
_!
R
H
C
[
tf
1
i
+
c
Kootenay District.
Nelson Hatchery.
_*
c
i
p
c
*
PC
a
rt
P
a
&
c-
r
a
c
- 8
1     i
1
.A
1
R
t.
R
I
c
.
a
X
c
c
PC
i
a
tf
> >
a
X
P
p
c
tf"
j a
A
7
><
C
to
(
(
1
I
0
fi
t
c
c
c
a
At
t
r
c
fi
T
a
C
i
A
r
!>
R
4
A
i-
«
i
'+-
.1
t-
fi
tf
■
1
I
c
z
!
_
4
. I
P
C
i
i
t.
<-
)
c
1
c
a
h-
X
c
c
&
r
c
4-
+
c
C
ri.
-
t
X
t-
£
i
0
r
c REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 95
i
i  i  i
I
|        j
©
©    l
©    ]
©    I
to      .
©
©
©
o
©
©
©
©
IO
©
o
©
©
©
T-I
©      !
©      1
9      i
o"
to   ;
I   ©      !
!   ©      !
! ©    :
i to    1
©       !       I       !
©Ill
©              1
©                  .
BO
CTl   ©
CO   to
© to
©"  CO
to ©
©
©
O
to"
©      !      i
©    !     :
©    |    :
©"    i     i
to    j     |
©    :
©    :
©    i
«o     i
©
©
©_
©"
©
©
©
©*
CO
© ©    : ©    i
© ©    i ©    i
©_ ©_   ! ©    |
©" ©"   | ©    I
i © © ©
! © © ©
i © ©_ ©^
i   ©*  IO   ©*
j    t-   CJ   CO
©
©
©
©"
© ©    t
©   ©      !
©  ©_
©" ©"     j
to i-t    j
©   ©      !      1   ©   ©
©   ©      !      !   ©   ©
o ©          : © ©
©* ©"    i    1 © ©*
rH    rH        j        j    CJ    rH
© ©
© ©
© ©t
© ©
rrt    CO
: © © ©    :
: © co ©    i
j   ©   t-   ©       !
© to ©    i
; so       ca    |
i    ; ©
:    ; ©
|    : ©
i ©"
j    ; ca
©   ©   ©   ©      !   ©   ©   ©
©   ©   ©   ©      !   O   ©   ©
©   ©   O   O      !   ©   ©   ©
o* io io la     i ©* to ©"
CO   Ca   t-i               |   rt   N   H
I!©!!©.!
;     : ©     :    _ ©    :    i
i    ; ©    j    j ©_    !
O             1  to      !
	
i ©   i
!   CO      !      !
us     j     1
it-*!!
i ""*     1     i
©
©    :
©      !
©    i
ca     ;
o
©
©
CJ
"rt
«H
01
>
o
fi
ti
01
01
iH
O
Sh
01
01
Q
01
p
u
U
u
01
01
to
0!
At
41
41
P
o
41
G
fi
09
ti
3
Cfl
X
c
oi
tH
4
41
P
11
At
fl.
tf
fi
"E
tf
1
fl
41
At
ti
tf
u
to
41
fl
tf
fi
to
p
01
>
5
>i
£i
ti
cd
a
V
p
0
>>
ti
u
C
41
At
fl
tf
B
jg
'u
a
I
tf
a
:
|
'fl
c
At
41
a.
m
o
K
>
tf
.5
5
5
c
o
G
AH
4
At
<_
tf
<X
9
01
•-a
Tt,
p
c
tf
fi
+-
G
0
xn
i
O
_o
OJ
M
4
>
5
■P
41
tf
P
3
tf
■p
■/.
0
h
4>
>
s
4
-p
41
tf
At
4
£
P
o
9
9
ti
ej
At
c
1
p
<
■p
DO
4)
4)
r-*
ri
tf
>)
oS
ti
41
•+■>
0
O
tf.
4
>
s
cj
ti
4
c
O
tf
4
At
ti
to
ti
ri
z
Cfl
01
h3
tf
4
At
ti
tf
ti
0
o
tf
4
At
ti
tf
41
"g
o
tf
4
At
ri
tf
fi
cn
3
tf
4
4
to
i
G
4
tf
C
fl
41
r-4
rt
tf
G
t-
rt
B
4)
*H
a
o
X,
ri
0
a
0
41
At
ri
tf
fi
%
0
a
At
4
4)
fH
o
A
03
G
ti
rH
i
a
H
O
4
1
s
4)
U
O
>>
p
41
ca
h
3
X
G
to
fi
B
:.:
K
41
rt
tf
ti
a
ex
«
ti
fl
O
At
4
41
U
to
W
01
fl
tf
X
a
41
tH
q
fi
a
C3
X
V
tf
4
At
R
tf
X
p
,£
4)
0}
O
tf
0)
At
ri
tf
tt
o
tf
At
4
41
P
o
p
41
>
O
tf
*-
41
>
tf
fl
C
|
i
CO
a
p
-4
+->
fl
•£
<u
a
a
£
!P
4>
>
tf
c
o
1
*ri
02
0
fa
p
c
p
41
>
s
C
o
£
"ri
o
tf
p
to
tH
0)
tf
c
o
£
'rt
CQ
a
At
ti
tf
G
C
c
e
a
-d
4
At
ti
tf
a
G.
09
P
JS
xn
J_
4
41
P
o
£
p
p
K
4
fl
tf
tf
1
X
K M 96
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
■tt
s
o
O
CO
02
tn
O
Z
\a
Z
$
Pa
Eh
P
O
PS
H
fa
o
>H
PS
<
S
S
P
m
u
<_
PS
PS
p
H
p
p
o
tc
i—i
fa
■
w
S
«t.
O
10
C5
o
OJ
o
S3
tfl
tf
k
o
is
M
g
«
M
n
_4      .
V   _
60 60
B B
fa =
DQ
60
60
H
!
<
K
m
§
1
01  BQ
60 60
B fi
fa"
n
60
60
H
h
S.
<
M
o
w
fa
©
©
IO
CO
IO
EO
60
60
fa
j
©    i ©    :
o    : ©    i
©    [ ©_    1
©      i   lO      .
IO     j  f'   j
©
©
©
©
to
to
©
©      !
©      |
©*     i
O      I
j   ©
]   ©
|   ©_
!   ©
: ©
i ca
o
o
o
<_>
o
©
©
©_
©*
©
©
©
©^
to
00
ca*
R.
o
o
3
H
M
Ih     •
60 60
so
fa"
©
©
©
© ca
© ©
© ©
ca" co"
ca
©
cs
to'
(4
fa
© ©
© ©
© ©
© o
to ©
©
o
©
©
ca
;     r     :  ©
:    :    ! ©
|    |     | ©_
i to •
)    |     j i-i
00
t-
(D
ca
© ©
-tf  ©
ca ©^
ttf t-^
rH     CO
©
ca
trt
_
60
60
H
©   ©
©   ©
©   ©
©   ©"
OS    IO
©
©"
to
10,000
50,000
10,000
©
©
©^
©
©
©
©_
in
©
z .
e _
P
Ih
fa
©
©
©^
©
ca
©    :
O        1
©    |
©    I
©
©
00
CO
B_
60
60
W
iiii
O
BS
K
(H
bo be
5-5
p.
p
tf
Ci
CO
to
tf"
oi
be
bo
tfl
©     , ©
©    : to
©        !    CO
©     ! ca
co     !  ©
©
©
©
©
Cl
: ©
! ©
: ©
| to
©
©
©
to
CJ
_Q
trt
ca
CO
p
o
_;   rc
£  to
2  G
<!   ti-
h   da
A t_
W eg
Ph
'
Kootenay District—Continued.
Nelson Hatchery—Continued.
&
c
P
R
t
£
Cf
4
At
K
tf
P
a
t
a
4
1
4
At
I
r
a
6
f
X
■ c
XI
At
c
c
J-
tf
1 &
n
p
u  c
XI
4
■_
-
S»
t-
0
■   +.
0"
i
«
C
■+.
1
P
|
ft
£
£
p
4
At
i
A-
1
E
c
a
c
i
>
4
4
r
fi
tr
'1
i
t-
c
l
e-
4
At
a
i
l
>
4-
P
4
£
£
fc
rt
P
4
c
4
£
rt
tf
c
c
•rt
cr
.
!
a
rt
4
J.
8
r-
ft (~
i
h-
R
0
4
At
«
_—
-
a
r£
a
X
S
4
>
r"
x
3
1
is
t-
>
I
I
\
i
c
£
X
6
a
J*
]
B
\
i
J"
. a
X.
t
i
3
_5
a
tf
P
c
i
3
a
A
a
i
r
7
&
c
r*
a
a
P
4
•+-
C
c
u
i
t
x-
I
1
3
1
a
. At
t
r-
0.
X
c
c
s
fl
C
E-
«)
o
e
4
^*
C
P
c
'£
s
£
|
_?
s
< c
-
-
2
1
PC
'
e
C
E- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 97
200,000*
488,200*
30,000*
100,000*
©
©
oa
00
GO
©
©
©
©
to
CO
©
©
©
©
to
CO
©
©
©_
©
ca
©
©
©
to
©
o
©^
©
: ©     ;
! ©     :
: ©_   :
!   ©"     !
: N    i
©       !
©      !
_o      >
ttf     j
©
©
©
© o
o   ©
© ©^
©* ©"
to  ©
©
o
©
©*
to
©
©
©
oo"
©
©
©
©"
ca
©
©
©
©"
to
©
©
©
©
CO
!   ©
: ©
!  to
i oo
|    CO
,
!
i
+
!   ©
!   ©
!   ©
!    °
©
©
©
IO
©      !
©
©      !
©      i
©  ©  ©
©   ©  ©
©  ©  ©
io   m   •*
,H    "^    r-A
©
©
©^
to
to
©
ca
ca
©
CO
eo
ca
to  ©
Ci   ©
CO    ©
CO    ©
© ©
a ©
t- ©
© -t*"
©
ca
30,000
197,025
80,845
10,000
15,000
21,960
8,000
Gerrard Hatchery.
Fiediletv Creek (Trout Lake)	
p
41
>
tf
3
fl
4
TJ
tH
e
tf
At
0)
0.
p
O
>
fci
4
fi
t
4-
0_
tf
>
fci
4
fi
t
C_
s
0
o
£
r
ti
'    _M
o
p
4
•?
0
K
_q
a
a
tf
>
s
t
-p
■ ti
c
0
a
x\
>
tH
41
fi
<L
4J
fl
w
c
'o
Ph
•ts
fl
fl
03
4-
C
4
I
fl
C
q
01
£
«
o_
H-
C3
—>
a
c
c
m
0.
-p
0
H
to
AZ
o
o
i-
s
O
4
ri
tfl
4>
-p>
a
tf
■3
41
P
o
fl
ri
fi
XI
At
tA
ti
to
4
At
ti
tf
CO
a
01
£
"o
fi
fc
fl
tf
a
4
r^
ri
tf
u
4
■P
At
t
rt
5
£
s
t;
r
4
41
n
■p
_o
4
>
to
"p
tf
4
At
«
tA
G
O
H~>
P
F
tf
0.
At
ti
tf
tf
0!
3
tf
At
4
P
P
tf
At
il
C
tf
a
4
C
'5
O
a
0
At
fl
tf
c.
T
41
a
4
tf
£
o
At
4
a
p
a
a
p
o
0
4
At
ti
tf
a
01
P
4
A*
ti
tf
to
O
tf
D
4
At
ti
to
+3
4J
0
tf
xi
G
0-
c
1
fc
a
fi
§
4
At
S
tf
CO
V
ti
a
X
to
tH
41
>
tf
tf
1
41
P
o
41
,-*
a
tf
fi
a
to
4
ri.
ri
tf
fi
■s
to
4
AC
ri
tf
tfl
■+-
G
fi
rX
ti
a
p
41
>
tf
fl
O
O
X
«
■a
£
Sh
o
"c
a
a
fl
tf
41
>
cd
p
U
Q
a
_-*
ri
tf
"fl
w
a
rM
fl
tf
a
.5
'ri
tf
c
s
fl
4
fl
41
Pi
ri
tf
fc
rt
M
_i
fl
rA
4)
>
P
b
"o
W
01
At
a
tf
T3
G
a
a
0!
4
At
ti
to
>
41
P
£
41
i
a
tH
o
CO
-fl
P
41
<B
O
•"_
a
0
fl
»
41
i
tf
p
o
Pi
4
P
o
1
a
At
fl
tf
c
fl
tf
01
p
tf
J
h
4
T
4-
tf M 98
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
13
<£
3
S.
HO
8
o
O
-tf
OS
XO
3
z
HH
H
z
<
J
Pa
P
P
o
«
En
fa
o
Jh
as
<
s
P
DO
o
<
as
pq
p
H
P
P
O
fa
i
H
s
<
to
g
u
tfl
M
O
tfl
£
o
Q
fc
W
w
S
5
3
EQ
■8
W
ii   .
_   1/1
be &0
B B
fa~
CO
a
s
1
£
l
IS
to
_H        .
OJ  CO
bo bo
B.E
fa"
CO
bo
bt
fa
__!
z
HI
o
fa
1 ii
CO
ta
to
fa
j
i   j
o
Q
9
H
(H      .
V  CO
bo bo
B B
fa"
;
©     T-I
©   00
©   00
ca" ©
©
©
©
to"
|
©  to
© ca
© ©^
io  to
CO
© ©
© ©
©   o
to  CO
©
©
©"
fa
©  o
© ©
© ©_
© to
rH   rH
©
©
©
©
T-I
©   ©       !    CO
©   ©       !   IO
© ©    j -*r
»o to  i ©
;   CO
©
©
©
©
© © o    ;
© © '©    :
© © ©    j
-*    CO    ©        ;
©
©
©
to
© ©
© a
©_ -*
Oi  t$
to
60
fa
|
: ©
! ©
; ©^
: ©"
|    CO
©
©
©
©*
CO
(5   .
|r.
is
fa
tn
G
bo
«<
O
&
m
tH
EH
41  to
bo bd
gj
P
fa
IO       j
00       |
to"     i
©
©
©
to
-oo    ! "#    i
©    ; rH    |
co    i tf    :
tj«    ; ©    j
to    :
ec     j
ec      !
eo „ !
: ©
! ©
! ©
ca
!     T-H
©
ca
©
CO
go
bo
5
W
LO
ca
©
ca
©
©
©
to
;   lO   to
!   **   «•
1   ©   to
,   C-^  ©
!   CO   ©
©
©
ca"
ca
to
CO
ca"
©
©
©
to
© ©
© ca
© ca^
tf  00
CO   rH
lO      !
trt       !
CQ       |
©       1
©       |
h
o
■    to
fc    bO
Ki
8 J'.
il
11-
_ 1
Ed „
(h
i
■
Kootenay District—Continued.
Cranbrook   Hatchery—Continued.
X
C
C
to
fc
a
>
I
to
a
i
3
A
_
c
X
i
c
3
a
I
tf
4
A*
r
P
c
c
tf
J
*5
tf
c
s
a
%
A
c
s
a
i
i
c-
3
1
X
I
S
a
.
c
1
X
._
5
4
At
t
i
>
tf
X
X
£
4
%
tf
a
p
s
3
i
|
a
'5
c
S-
4
4-
et
ti
At
t
1
tf
a
C
(
H
'>
C
1
4
At
i
|
i
i
tf
.
i
E
£
-
tf
i
CI
\
a
z
4
a
i
+-
xr
X
X
C
At
1
a
X
p
C
a
a
At
c
I
it
>
X
X
r
to
c
i
c
S
PC
(.
> <t
1
p-
■.
_
a
E
Q
tf
a
|
n
E
1
%
a
tf
4
M
a
tf
u
c
f
a
rr
tf
4
,_
\
(-
1
?
i
c
tf
a
to
A
!
-    «
i
B
<-
(3
4
A
r
i
c
J
c
<
c
fi
fl
0.
1
fc
p
Q
i
t7
i
i
1
X
t
ll
J
(
r^
a
«
•-
4
r
Cf
I REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 99
■
i    : © ©
:    i © ©
! ca ©
i  ca  to
©
©
©^
ca
©
©
ca
© ©
© ©
© ©_
CO   ©"
ca r4
©
o
©
to"
CO
■<*
CO
iO
ca
©
©
LO
©
©
eo
1
:    1
1
©
©
©
to"
ca
©
©
©
©
!   ©  ©
1   ©  ©
j  ©_ ©_
!   ©" ©"
j       T-I       CO
to
a
©
CO
o   ©
© -tf
© ©_
© to
to ©
CI
to
OS
©
©
4
A*
ti
tfl
4-
£
£
ta
41
At
ti
tf
BO
u
0
>
01
>
p
G
Cfl
4
At
ti
tf
O
fl
P
ri
£
ri
a
CJ
ri
tf
c
>
4
V
p
a
tr.
4
'r
>
0)
S
tf
CO
X
p
ri
X!
fl
o
T
U
G
[p
'8
HP
QJ
tf
9
p
a»
E
P
4
X
P
ii
n
o
B
c.
£
ft.
a
t
p
Q
<i
's
"ri
Q
xi
G
fl
At
G
%
X
c
o
p
t*
p
'p
ri
CJ
tf
9
At
ti
tf
o.
'o
tf
id
8
a
to
a
a
3
1
■a
OJ
p
O
£
B
_
a
■fl
\ M 100
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Returns prom 1,986 Holders of Special Firearms Licences, showing Big Game,
Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1941-42.
Big Game.
Bear  397 Mountain-goat   111
Caribou   51 Mountain-sheep  24
Deer   780 Wapiti  (Elk)    7
Moose   539
Fur-bearing Animals.
Badger  7
Beaver   1,262
Fisher   317
Fox   1,272
Lynx   802
Marten   5,474
Mink   5,943
Muskrats   28,189
Otter   323
Racoon   1,259
Skunk   81
Squirrels   164,740
Weasel   40,382
Wildcat   305
Wolverine  438
Predatory Animals.
53 Wolves
Cougar 	
Coyotes   2,569
Fur-farm Returns, 1942 (Statement No. 1).
327
Kind of Animals.
Adult and
Young
(Reared)
Animals.
Died.
Killed.
Sold.
Total on
Hand as at
December
31st, 1942.
3,399
177
40,353
347
1
232       1       1.845
103
26
241
30
1,219
32
32,144
42
119
7,968
275
Note.—Figures in respect to muskrats only approximate.    Cancelled permits, 141 ;   nil returns, 4 ;   no returns
received, 4.
Fur-farm Returns, 1942 (Statement No. 2).
Kind of Animals.
Adult and
Young
(Reared)
Animals.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on
Hand as at
December
31st, 1942.
22                        3
78         I           lfi
31
64
19
31
1
684
42
291
11
1
329
31
Note.—Figures  in  respect to  beaver only approximate.    Cancelled permits,   27;    nil returns,   6 ;   no  returns
received, 2. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 101
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1942.
Game Divisions.
Total.
Kind of Animals or Birds destroyed.
" A."
"B."
" C."
" D."
" E."
Animals.
1
4
348
102
205
11
34
2
3
20
3
31
114
154
22
3
631
7
114
296
64
5
8
5
4
175
32
5
203
18
1
472
3
116
354
86
3
3
3
7
24
216
28
28
6
23
134
9
1
16
734
160
42
3
1,669
6
79
24
7
4
3
2
5
18
40
308
32
Wolves    	
Wild (domestic) cats.   	
8
1,446
326
42
7
Birds.
3,193
Eagles..   .*.	
Hawks   	
55
371
656
199
152
24
Kingfishers     	
Heron   -	
11
2
5
Summary of Liberation of Game Birds, 1942.
Vancouver Island.
Lower Mainland.
Area.
Pheasants.
Partridge.
Area.                                Pheasants.
California
Quail.
105
410
10
Agassiz  	
50
143
100
441
212
40
279
237
229
North and South Saanich,
Sooke, Metchosin	
Delta 	
.._
Mission (Hatzic, etc.)	
16
Totals 	
515
10
1,731
16
Summary.
District.
Pheasants.
Partridge.
California
Quail.
Vancouver Island..	
515
1,731
10
Lower Mainland-	
16
Totals  	
2,246
10
16 M 102 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1942.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1942.
Pheasants  3,371 Geese      6
Quail   2 Partridge   77
Ducks        60
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 1942.
Pheasants   2,738 Geese 	
Quail      285 Partridge 	
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1942.
Pheasants   189 Ducks     5
Quail      12 Geese      5
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 1942.
Pheasants   3,712 Ducks    2
Quail       225 Partridge   48
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1942.
Pheasants   1,588 Geese   13
Quail        74 Partridge      8
Ducks        17
Note.—During the year 1942 there were 153 licensed game-bird farmers in the
Province, but during the year forty of these farmers discontinued operations.
Three licensed game-bird farmers have not submitted their returns.
There was one nil return.
Game-bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during the year 1942—1,286
bands at 10 cents—$128.60.
Miscellaneous Revenue.
Sale of list licensed fur-farmers  $10.50
Sale of list licensed fur-traders       3.00
Sale of pheasant-crates, etc     41.00
Total  $54.50 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 103
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1942.
Barkerville and Quesnel Districts.
Marsh, R. L..
 Quesnel.
Miller, 0. E Punchaw.
Quanstrom, Carl Quesnel.
Quanstrom, Julius Quesnel.
Rawling, Arden Quesnel.
Tibbies, F. S Quesnel.
Tibbies, Jas Quesnel.
Cassiar District.
Ball, Geo. B Telegraph Creek.
Carlick, T. D Telegraph Creek.
Dennis, A Telegraph Creek.
Fan, Billy Telegraph Creek.
Creyke, John :. Telegraph Creek.
Coast District.
Ratcliff, Walter .Bella Coola.
Stanton, J. R Glendale Cove,
Knight Inlet.
Fort George District.
Bowman, Geo. A Tete Jaune.
Prince, Alec Fort St. James.
Prince, Teddy Fort St. James.
Reimer, Abe Tete Jaune.
Hazelton District.
Clark, J. E. (Jr.) Ootsa Lake.
Harrison, B. R Wistaria.
Henry, Stanley Ootsa Lake.
Leon, Paddy Topley.
Morgan, J. E -...Wistaria.
McNeill, J. W. C.-_-Ootsa Lake.
Van Tine, Ed Ootsa Lake.
Kamloops District.
Chester, Maurice Red Lake.
Day, Norman E Sorrento.
Grant, Gordon McLure.
Helset, Torbjorn Clearwater.
Mobley, Howard L-Salmon Arm.
McKort, Clarence Clearwater.
Ray, J. B Clearwater.
Raymer, Thomas...Kelowna.
Kootenay District.
Barbour, John E .Wilmer.
Bergenham, Peter Beavermouth.
Canning, Fred Skookumchuck.
Clark, William F Howser.
Daniken, Joseph Brisco.
De Simone, S. H Revelstoke.
Harrison, William O—Edgewater.
Hicks, Frank Fernie.
Hynes, Ben Roy Galena.
Jaeggi, John Edge water.
Jones, R. K Golden.
Joseph, Carmille Fairmont.
MacLain, J. I Galena.
Morigeau, Martin Fairmont.
Nicol, Arthur H Fort Steele.
Nivon, W. L Invermere.
Nordstrom, Carl Natal.
Phillips, F. Alex.___.1551 St. Andrews Ave.,
North Vancouver.
Smith, Edward Edgewater.
Strom, Erling Banff, Alta.
Tegart, George Brisco.
Tegart, Hiram W—Brisco.
Tegart, Lloyd Windermere.
Tegart, Robert Windermere.
Webber, Sidney Golden.
White, James T Fort Steele,
Wiedenman, Otto Golden. M 104
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1942—Continued.
Lillooet, Cariboo, and Chilcotin Districts.
Archie, Cassian Canim Lake.
Archie, Charlie Canim Lake.
Archie, George Canim Lake.
Baker, J. C Clinton.
Baker, R. M Clinton.
B idstrup, Volger Likely.
Bones, Frank Clinton.
Bones, Pete Clinton.
Burgess, T. R Fawn.
Cleveland, L. C Bridge Lake.
Cleveland, R. C. L Bridge Lake.
Coldwell, H. W Jesmond.
Collins, Arthur Lac la Hache.
Daniels, Geo Canim Lake.
Daniels, Steve Forest Grove.
Davis, S. E Bridge Lake.
Decker, English Canim Lake.
Dougherty, Chas. A. Clinton.
Dougherty, E. G Loon Lake via Clinton.
Eagle, Clifford B Lac la Hache.
Flaherty, R. J 100-Mile House.
Grinder, Isadore Clinton.
Grinder, John Big Bar.
Hamilton, G. G Williams Lake.
Hamilton, Thomas Williams Lake.
Hansen, J. F Bridge Lake.
Hansen, R. L Bridge Lake.
Harry, Alfred Canim Lake.
Holgate, Lawrence Loon Lake via Ashcroft.
Hooker, F. C Horsefly.
Hunter, Archie Canim Lake.
Jenner, Ernest Horsefly.
Kerr, A. H Clinton.
Land, Robt. R Shalalth.
Larson, J. 0 Fawn.
LeBourdais, Eddie .Clinton.
Levick, J. S Fawn.
Lonnek, F. W Horsefly.
Madden, E. E Cache Creek.
Michel, Thomas Lillooet.
Muench, Henry Lac la Hache.
McNeil, B. Spencer...Canim Lake.
Nicol, Shelly Horsefly.
Odian, E. J Fawn.
Ogden, Percy Wm..__.Lac la Hache.
Park, Jack P 70-Mile House.
Peters, Michell Clinton.
Pollard, John Clinton.
Powell, Thomas Fawn.
Scheepbouwer, J. C.-70-Mile House.
Scheepbouwer, J. A..70-Mile House.
Scott, Duncan —Bridge Lake.
Scott, J. R 100-Mile House.
Sellers, Albert Soda Creek.
Sissons, Bob Loon Lake.
Tompkins, Earl 70-Mile House.
Walters, Lloyd Horsefly.
Weir, Donald J Redstone.
Westman, Jim Forest Grove.
Winquist, Wm —Horsefly.
Woods, Wm 70-Mile House.
Young, Wm Clinton.
Peace River District.
Belcourt, Adolphus Mount Valley P.O.,
Alta.
Campbell, Alfred Kelly Lake via
Goodfare, Alta.
Hamelin, Steve— :_.. Moberly Lake.
Letendre, Roland Mount Valley P.O.,
Alta.
Noskey, Narcisse Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Noskey, Ernest Goodfare P.O.
Pick, John Fort St. John.
Ross, Jas. A Bear Flats.
Sheffield, Callie A. Fort St. John.
Alta.
Prince George District.
Carr, Stan J Tete Jaune.
Cowart, John T Prince George.
Davidson, Charlie -Vanderhoof.
Hargreaves, Roy F Mount Robson.
Hooker, Jas. B Bend.
Hull, James —Engen.
Lonsdale, F. C ____ Snowshoe.
Miller, Isaac E Punchaw. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 105
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1942—Continued.
Similkameen and Boundary Districts.
Cochran, Freddie M—_Westbridge.
From, Guss W Westbridge.
From, Oliver Westbridge.
Gilmore, Chas. E Beaverdell.
Hall, Elmer Westbridge.
Lewis, James Princeton.
Lutner, Edwin C Beaverdell.
Mills, Alfred Keremeos.
Noren, C. F Westbridge.
Peterson, Morris .Westbridge.
Rand, S. Persey Beaverdell.
Richter, John Keremeos.
Non-resident Outfitter.
Brown, Frank E Hazelmere, Alta.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1942.
Attorney-General (Minister) R. L. Maitland, K.C . Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Jas. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Frank R. Butler - Vancouver.
Headquarters.
 G. E. Marshall Vancouver.
 Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss I. Pettigrew Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss J. Smith Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss L. Mills Vancouver.
Game Warden
Stenographer.
Game-fish Culture Branch.
Superintendent A. Robertson	
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson .	
Fishery Officer E. Hunter	
Fishery Officer (Junior) P. Ewart Nelson
Cultus Lake.
Nelson.
Nelson.
—J. F. Thompson.
_-C. 0. Mellor	
Fishery Officer	
Fishery Officer	
Fishery Officer (Junior) S. Harris	
Fishery Officer E. M. Martin.
Fishery Officer F. Pells	
Fishery Officer A. Higgs	
Kaslo.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Sooke.
Cultus Lake.
Qualicum Beach.
"A'' Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Lower Mainland).
Game Warden S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden B. Cash Victoria.
Game Warden J. W. Jones Royal Oak.
Game Warden . R. S. Hayes Duncan.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Courtenay.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Game Warden J. Dewar Alberni.
Game Warden B. Harvey Courtenay.
Game Warden _ W. N. Massey Alert Bay. M 106 , BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1942—Continued.
"B" Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Acting Inspector A. F. Sinclair Nelson.
Stenographer Miss K. Moen Nelson.
Game Warden N. Cameron Golden.
Game Warden Gordon Haskell Nelson.
Game Warden B. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game Warden W. H. Cartwright Creston.
Game Warden M. J. Wilson Greenwood.
Game Warden A. Monks Penticton.
Game Warden W. H. McLean Revelstoke.
Game Warden M. B. Ewart . Princeton.
Game Warden J. J. Osman Fernie.
Game Warden H. Tyler Invermere.
"C" Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts).
Inspector R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Stenographer Miss H. M. Swadling Kamloops.
Game Warden G. Sandiford Kamloops.
Game Warden D. D. Ellis Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden C. F. Still Vernon.
Game Warden J. W. Stewart Clinton.
Game Warden W. A. H. Gill Lillooet.
Game Warden 0. Mottishaw Quesnel.
Game Warden L. Jobin : Williams Lake.
"D" Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
Clerk . R. J. Guay Prince George.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game Warden J. W. Purdy McDame Creek.
Game Warden P. Brown Vanderhoof.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead . Smithers.
Game Warden D. Romieu Burns Lake.
Game Warden W. 0. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
Game Warden V. L. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden K. 0. Alexander Fort Nelson.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Inspector W. Kier_ Vancouver.
Game Warden W. Clark Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden (Assistant) John McRae Powell River.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1942.
M 107
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1942—Continued.
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts)—Continued.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke....
Game Warden F. Urquhart..
Game Warden A. J. Butler-
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe__.
.Cloverdale.
.Port Coquitlam.
..Chilliwack.
..Mission.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
C. Shuttleworth  Kamloops.
On Active Service.
Fishery Officer J. D.
Inspector C. F
Clerk	
Fishery Officer	
Inverarity..
Kearns	
_F. R. Lobb	
_R. A. McRae	
_R. P. Ponder	
Sergeant and Clerk	
Fishery Officer (Assistant) H. L. Rose...
Clerk J. B. Smith..
..Victoria.
-Nelson.
.Vancouver.
..Kelowna.
-Vancouver.
Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1943.
925-1043-6550     

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0319055/manifest

Comment

Related Items