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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MENTAL HOSPITALS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1944]

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
ANNUAL REPORT
OF  THE
MENTAL HOSPITALS
OF   THE
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR 12 MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31ST
1943
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1944.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the General
Superintendent of the Mental Hospitals for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1943.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office.  TABLE OF CONTENTS.
PART I.—MEDICAL. page.
Officers and Staff, List of .      7
Report—General Medical Superintendent     9
Report, Laboratory—Director of Laboratory..__ _____ 14
Report—X-ray Department . .  16
Report—Oculist  17
Report—Physiotherapy  17
Report—Psychologist  18
Report—Dentist  19
Report—Beauty-parlour _■_  19
Report—Training-school __  20
Report—Social Service .  20
Statistical Tables—
1. Movement of Population during Year ..___  24
2. Summary of Operations of Hospitals since Inception  26
3. Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths . =  27
4. Civil State of Patients admitted  27
5. Religious Denominations of Patients  27
6. Educational Status of Patients    28
7. Nationality of Patients  28
8. Districts from which Patients were admitted ■____  29
9. Occupation of Patients prior to Admission  31
10. Age of Patients on Admission  32
11. Number of Attacks at Time of Admission  32
12. Alleged Duration of Attacks prior to Admission .  32
13. Table of Heredity  33
14: Alleged Cause of Insanity in Patients admitted  33
15. State of Bodily Health of Patients admitted  33
16. Form of Mental Disorder in Patients admitted  34
17. Probation, Number allowed out on  34
18. Discharges, showing Alleged Duration of Insanity  35
19. Discharges, showing Length of Residence in Hospital and Condition at
Time of Discharge  35
20. Deaths, Cause of, and Length of Time in Hospital, Essondale, New West
minster, and Saanich  36
PART IL—FINANCIAL.
Report—Bursar . _. .41
Balance-sheet, New Westminster  43
Balance-sheet, Essondale  44
Balance-sheet, Saanich  45
Expense Statement, Psychopathic Department  46
Expense Statement, Headquarters Department  46
Statement, Receipts and Disbursements, New Westminster  47
Statement, Receipts and Disbursements, Essondale  48
Statement, Receipts and Disbursements, Saanich  49 T 6 TABLE  OF CONTENTS.
Financial Tables—■ page.
A. Average Residence, Maintenance, and Per Capita Cost; for the Past Ten Years 50
tj' i   f Yearly Gross Expenditure, Analysis of, for the Past Ten Years 51-52
C. Summary of Gross and Net Per Capita Cost in all Hospitals  53
D. Expense and Revenue Statement, New Westminster  54
E. Expense and Revenue Statement, Essondale :-_ 55
F. Expense and Revenue Statement, Saanich  56
Revenue, Table of, for the Past Ten Years  57
Report, Financial—Tailor's Department  58
Report, Financial—Shoemaker's Department  60
Production Tables—
Articles made by Female Patients, New Westminster  61
Mending done by Female Patients for New Westminster  62
Occupational Therapy—
Wood-working Department  62
Upholstery, Weaving, and Basketry Departments  63
Sewing-room—
New Garments made by Patients  63
Nurses' Uniforms (New)  -64
Nurses' Uniforms (Repaired)  64
Patients' Mending  64
PART III.—COLONY FARM.
Report—Farm Superintendent  65
Report—Financial, General—Bursar ._   66
Balance-sheet :  67
Profit and Loss Account .  68
Dairy and Herds Department— ...
Profit and Loss Account    69
Production and Costs Account  69
Milk Production and Cost  69
Mature Cow Department—Profit and Loss Account  70
Calves Department—Profit and Loss Account  70
Yearling Department—Profit and Loss Account  70
Bull Department—Profit and Loss Account  70
Work-horse Department—
Sales and Deaths Account  71
Horse-labour Account  71
Horse-labour performed  71
Hog Department—Profit and Loss Account  72
Cannery—Profit and Loss Account  72
Orchard and Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account  73
Crop Department—Profit and Loss Account, etc  74
Tractor Account  75
Truck Account  75
Maintenance and Administration, General  75
Miscellaneous Statements, Inventories, etc.—
Produce supplied to Essondale  76
Produce supplied to New Westminster  76
Accounts receivable  77
Remittances to Treasury  77
,   Equipment  77
Orchard and Small Fruits  77 DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. George S. Pearson, Provincial Secretary.
P. Walker, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
A. L. Crease, M.D., CM., General Superintendent and Provincial Psychiatrist.
E. J. Ryan, M.D., CM., Medical Superintendent.
Gowan S. Macgowan, Bursar.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, ESSONDALE.
Medical:
A. M. Gee, M.D., CM., L.M.C.C,
U. P. Byrne, M.B., L.M.C.C, D.P.H.   (on
Active Service).
J. M. Jackson, M.D., L.M.C.C.
A. E. Davidson, B.A., M.D., L.M.C.C.
T. G. Caunt, M.D., L.M.C.C.
G. Kirkpatrick, M.D., L.M.C.C (on Active
Service).
A. J. Warren, M.D., L.M.C.C.  (on Active
Service).
L. G. C. d'Easum, M.B., L.M.C.C. (on Active
Service).
W. R. Read, M.D., L.M.C.C.
R. C Novak,-M.D., L.M.C.C.
Milton Jones, D.D.S.
C. B. Watson, Psychologist  (on Active
Service).
R. MADER, Pharmacist.
W. Creber, Chief Attendant.
Miss L. Blomberg, R.N., Superintendent
of Nurses.
Miss M. Parsons, R.N., Instructress of
Nurses.
Miss J. Kilburn, R.N., Social Service.
Miss E. Price, Dietitian.
Miss D. A. Tisdall, Occupational
Therapist.
Mrs. I. H. Wedge, Clinical Clerk (on
Active Service).
Miss A. Dingle, Clinical Clerk.
Business:
Thos. Weeks, Paymaster.
F. A. Matheson, Assistant Bursar.
W. Headridge, Steward.
J. F. Anderson, Cost Accountant.
Miss J. K. Gordon, Stenographer.
W. E. Skillicorn, Book-keeper.
Rev. J. S. Parke, Protestant.
Chaplains:
Rev. Father S. T. Finnegan, Roman Catholic.
Trades, Essondale:
J. L. Malcolm, Chief Engineer.
J. Renton, Outside Overseer.
W. G. Armour, Baker.
H. Lonsdale, Foreman of Works.
W. McKenzie, Mason.
A. Cooter, Chief Cook.
W. Worrall, Laundryman.
P; J. Murphy, Electrician.
G. Matthews, Plumber.
A. L. Blair, Barber.
B. T. Brown, Auto Mechanic.
R. T. Hall, Occupational Therapy. OFFICERS AND STAFF, NEW WESTMINSTER.
Medical:
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., CM., L.M.C.C, Miss V. M. Sanders, R.N., Superintendent
Medical Supervisor. of Nurses.
C. E. Benwell, M.B., L.M.C.C. Miss W. Fighter, R.N., Instructress of
B. H. 0. Harry, M.D., CM., L.M.C.C, Nurses.
Visiting Oculist. Charles Monteith, Chief Attendant.
F. Gillard, Clinical and Receiving Clerk.
Business:   .
J. F. O'Reilly, Steward:
Chaplains:
Rev. J. L. Sloat, Protestant. Rev. Father T. P. Murphy, Roman Catholic.
Trades, New Westminster:
R. Gow, Carpenter. Ben. Jones, Laundryman.
C. Stapleton, Gardener. J. McMillan, Shoemaker.
E. J. McIntyre, Chief Engineer. Wm. Powell, Painter.
H. Bailey, Farmer. W. W. Galloway, Tailor.
C M. Doyle, Plumber.
COLONY FARM.
P. H. Moore, B.A., B.S.A., Superintendent.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, COLQUITZ.
Geo. Hall, M.D., CM., Visiting Physician.
T. A. Morris, Supervisor. P. McLeod, Chief Attendant. REPORT of the MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31st, 1943.
PART I—MEDICAL.
Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, B.C, April 1st, 1943.
The Honourable the Provincial Secretary,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith for your consideration the Seventy-
first Annual Report of the Provincial Mental Hospitals at Essondale, New Westminster,
and Saanich.
The following table gives a brief summary of the movements of the Hospital
population during the year April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943:—
Movement of Population.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2,387
95
4
463
1,515
114
1
840
3,902
209
5
New admissions during current year 	
803
2,949
1,970
4,919
305
108
168
229
92
92
534
200
260
581
413
994 ,
2,368
1,557
3,925
(1.)  Decrease in number of admissions this year compared to last _
(2.)   Net increase in population at end of year_„.-.„„.._._ , 	
(3.)  Rate of deaths to total treated  (per cent.) —_
                 31
        23
      5.31
(4.)  Rate of discharges to admissions  (exclusive of deaths)   (per cent.)....- __  66.50
ADMISSIONS.
An analysis of the birth column shows that, of the number admitted, 402 (or 50.06
per cent.) were Canadian born; 220 (or 27.40 per cent.) were born in other parts of
the British Empire; and 181 (or 22.54 per cent.) were of foreign extraction. There
were ten whose birthplace was unknown.
DISCHARGES.
The following table clearly shows that the shorter the duration of the mental
illness before admission the greater are the chances of recovery through treatment:—
Table showing Alleged Duration of Insanity, prior to Admission, in those
discharged from the Three Institutions during the Year
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Less than six months   284
Over six months  ,  134
Not insane  .       8
Duration unknown ..,.  108
Total.
534 During the past year 534 patients were discharged in full.    Of this number 83
were discharged as recovered, 316 as improved, 127 as unimproved, and 8 were not
insane. _
TREATMENT.
This year there were 803 patients admitted as against 834 last year, showing
a definite drop of 31. Last year the drop was 30 patients. The net increase of
patients in population was only 23 patients. This is the smallest number in patient
increase seen in nearly forty years.
Metrazol has been used, in some cases where other shock therapy treatment has
not been of avail. . This is particularly so with the very acutely disturbed manic and
depressed cases.    It has proven to advantage and worthy of its use.
In the Insulin Shock Department there were sixty cases treated. In this respect
we have been fortunate, because in many hospitals this form of treatment has had to
be discontinued on account of shortage of staff. We have difficulties, but have so far ■
retained these services. It is valuable and favoured by patients and staff. The results
of the treatment were: Apparent recoveries, 41.7 per cent.; improved, 48.3 per cent.;
unimproved, 10 per cent. This is very good, especially compared with former methods
of treatment for schizophrenic cases.
The electric shock treatment has been started and so far we have had five completed cases arid many others now under treatment. Of these five one is recovered,
three were discharged on probation, and one was unimproved. Two cases were later
readmitted to the hospital.
Patients suffering from tuberculosis are looked after fairly well and we are able
to separate them into separate units; but on account of overcrowding and lack of
space the isolation and classification of this group of patients is not so complete as we
would like to see.
The treatment for venereal disease has been actively carried on. There are forty-
five cases being treated at the present time. ,
The Physiotherapy Department has carried on, doing 3,664 treatments—a much
smaller number of patients than were treated last year.
The X-ray service is one whose work has increased more and more each year.
The new apparatus which was ordered has not yet been obtained. The service has
been at a disadvantage;   nevertheless, there were 3,383 films taken.
The following is a summary of the work done in the Eye Department for this
fiscal year:  A total of 323 patients received this treatment.
The service of the Beauty-parlour has been in great demand for hair-cuts, shampoos, waves, etc.    There were 15,902 treatments carried out.
The Dental service completed 3,809 treatments and examinations. This service
does a great deal of preventive and reparative work, relieves much suffering, and
enhances the patient's general condition as well.
In the Laboratory Department Dr. U. P. Byrne joined the active services in
August, 1942. He is an outstanding figure in medicine and will contribute to health
and laboratory work wherever duty sends him. Miss Christina Garner, who joined
the staff December 30th, 1936, resigned to be married on December 31st, 1942. She
had a sunny disposition, was efficient, and has been greatly missed. Miss A. Hagen
has carried on the work ably and well. The laboratory has been very active and has
carried out 17,000 examinations and analyses in all.
Mr. C. B. Watson, the Psychologist, left hurriedly to join the Personnel Division
of the active forces and should do well in his work. We were fortunate in obtaining
the services of Mrs. Dorothy Jennings to carry on the work. She was formerly the
Superintendent of the Alexandra Home, had special training in Child Guidance work
and has quite ably carried on the exacting work of this department. There were 1,247
psychological examinations done in all. SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. T 11
Much has been done in the Occupational Departments. The rooms set aside for
this activity in the Women's Building are surely and gradually being used to accommodate more patients in residence. If this is carried further even the industrial occupation will go, and this will mean greater expenditure for mending, manufacturing, etc.
Occupational Therapy service has been carried on in some of the wards and is quite
helpful. There is much room for enhancing the work done in the Occupational Department. The value of the work is not only great to the Hospital, but that is secondary
to the good that it does in the treatment of patients.
There have been many changes in the nursing staff due to the World War. In no
department has it been more noticeable than in the Nursing School. Many have left
to join up, others to engage in more remunerative work,- others to be married. We
must think at this tirne of getting employees as well as trying to keep up former
standards which were followed. It is apparent that the shortage of nurses will be
even more and more felt as time goes on. The Superintendent of Nurses and the
Chief Attendant and their assistants deserve great credit for carrying on so well in
time of great odds. The attendant staff necessarily has been greatly altered. So many
have joined the active services and others have left for other employment.
The Social Service Department of the Hospital consists of a small group, but
much good work has been accomplished. They have contact with the relatives, obtain
information for the histories to help in classification of the patient, and help in
straightening out the difficulties the patient has had in the environment of his civil
life. Thus when the patient is discharged from the hospital he is able to adjust to his
civil life easier in the already prepared environment. People in the various walks of
life are co-operating more and more in this regard. The large volume of work done
by the few is set out in detail elsewhere.
In the Child Guidance Clinic many cases have been examined for the different
agencies with a view to correcting undesirable behaviour patterns of different kinds.
After the psychological tests have been done a complete physical examination is made.
The different phases of the findings are discussed with those agencies interested and
a mutual plan is made to improve the situation and break down the barriers which
have been troubling the child. This usually clears away the deterrent and the maladjustment is overcome. This is only obtained after all concerned have worked towards
that end. The large volume of cases covered by the small staff is set forth in the
tables seen elsewhere.    Among other items a total of 613 cases was seen.
The Farm has endeavoured to supply the needs of the Hospital in produce and
has furnished many patients with indoor and outdoor occupation of the most suitable
type. Many of the male young stock have been sold to interested producers. Each
male going to another herd further increases the standard of the stock and helps to
increase the milk-supply. In addition to producing fresh vegetables, the Farm also
supplies us with necessary pork products and with the excellent products of our
cannery. This means even more now in war-time than in times of peace because it
would be a difficult event to buy the products at this time.
COMMENTS.
A person suffering from a nervous breakdown is treated by doctors, a mental
hospital, or clinics. On the other hand, a person suffering from a behaviour problem
—such as stealing, forging, or crime—is looked after by the Courts. In either case
the treatment is costly. It costs Canada, conservatively speaking, $20,000,000 a year
for the treatment of nervous and mental diseases and $20,000,000 a year for various
types of crime. The total cost is $40,000,000 a year, and in a ten-year period $400,-
000,000. It is said that self-defence is the first law of nature. In psychological
medicine we say that self and group defence is necessary for the proper adjustment T 12 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
of the individual. The last few years' coherence of our emotional drives have been
directed from Peace to War and Victory through education, industry, art, science,
and religion, through the means of press, radio, and moving pictures. After the war
these same emotional drives must be redirected to peace-time living promptly, skilfully,
completely, decisively to prevent social maladjustment, and to enjoy the proper security
of group and self-defence, as well as a reasonable amount of shelter, food, and work,
together with a reasonable amount of leisure time for pleasure; otherwise nervous,
mental, and adjustment problems will greatly exceed those of the last war. In one
country 16 per cent, of those who are candidates for the armed forces show similar
complaints.
There was a splendid plan drawn up for the Mental Hospital at Essondale. Good,
durable, well-planned buildings have been erected. These buildings have done heavy
duty and are still in good shape, yet these units do not complete the group. There is
still a great and important lack, because the administration, the intensive treatment,
and also the building for treatment of acute mental phases of psychoses on the female
side have not been erected. It is therefore essential that the building for intensive
treatment at Essondale should be built at once, and along with that the one for the
acutely disturbed cases on the female side. The reason for the existence of a mental
hospital is to give the patients the environment for treatment better than that of the
environment where the psychosis occurred. This reason must not be lost sight of.
With the completion of these buildings the patients could then be admitted for three
months' observation and treatment and after that time, if the psychosis be not abated,
the patient could be admitted for treatment to the other buildings now existing.
The Hospital population twenty years ago was about 2,000, now it is 4,000. The
population has gone up 1,000 in each ten-year period. In the next ten-year period we
will be required to look after 8,000 patients, as our yearly admittance is about 800,
and we will have an increase in Hospital population of 1,000, making the total number
of patients in residence 5,000. At the present time, when we allow 20 per cent, for
so-called normal overcrowding, we still have over 1,000 patients more than our buildings should look after. This shows plainly that accommodation will have to be
provided.
Two suitable buildings for the aged and decadent type of patients should be erected
in the present site of building which look after this type of patient. The span of life
has increased from 48 to 64 years and is still going up. Aged people are more prone
to mental illness than those of the younger groups.
Some of the buildings at the New Westminster Institution are very old and in
poor repair. Definite danger exists from fire. These should be renovated, for even if
a new unit were commenced to-morrow it takes time to build and the patients should
have more security and better quarters.
The bakery at Essondale has been completed. Facilities for baking are much
improved compared with what they were. The kitchen where baking was formerly
done has been rearranged, is much improved, and more convenient for the staff to
work in.
At New Westminster the dispensary has been refitted. Mr. Mader, pharmacist at
Essondale, is now supervising this department. He has done valuable work both at
Essondale and New Westminster.
The wire fence about the grounds has been gradually extended along the edge of
the property on McBride Boulevard, replacing the old high board fence which was
tumbling down. It gives the street and the whole property a much neater and better
appearance.
There were many changes in staff. Dr. Trapp resigned to take up postgraduate
work at the Mayo Clinic.    Mr. William Rhodes, a returned soldier who served as SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. T 13
sergeant in the Fourth Battalion overseas in the first war, was superannuated. He
served the hospital well, but suffered an illness necessitating his resting up. It is a
great loss to the Hospital and the staff surely wish him well. Mr. Ben Naylor was
superannuated after an illness. He was in the employment for over twenty years. The
staff all miss his presence and are glad to know he is able to take things easier than
while at work.
OBITUARY.
It is with regret we record the passing of several of our valued employees during
the past year. Miss A. S. Keith, who was long in the service, met with a terrible
accident. While making floor wax her clothes became ignited and she was burned to
death. The whole staff were greatly upset, for she was one of sterling worth and loved
by all.
Mr. Muir, one of the old-time employees, passed away after a long and continued
service.
Mr. J. H. Crispin passed away in the spring. He was a returned soldier and
enlisted in 1915 as a private and was discharged as a lieutenant. He had a host of
friends. He had a cheery disposition, even though the wounds he received in the first
World War were very marked. He had a double amputation of the legs and also lost
an eye. He had charge of the telephone at night and was very efficient, loyal, and
trustworthy. Always optimistic about the present war, even in the darkest hours, his
reasoning showed his sound judgment. His loss as a friend and as an efficient employee
was keenly felt by all.
Mr. Robert Blair, another returned soldier of the first war, passed away. He
enlisted in 1914 and was discharged in 1919. He was in the 35th B.C. Horse and the
5th Battalion. He was a sergeant-major and a very efficient soldier. He was also a
valued employee, efficient and trustworthy. He was thought very well of by the men of
his battalion and was a good citizen and a good friend. He was missed greatly by the
whole staff.
Mi-. Frank James, one of our cooks, passed away after a long illness. He was not
well, yet he had a pleasant disposition and personality. He was always ready and willing to do a good turn for his friends and was efficient at his work. His passing was
felt by all as he was an employee of long service.
Mr. C. E. Doherty, son of the late Dr. C. E. Doherty, the former Superintendent of
the Mental Hospitals, passed away after a long, trying illness. He was brought up in
the doctors' quarters of the New Westminster Institution and was known as " Kelly,"
a typical, good-natured, kindly boy, known and well liked by everybody who came in
contact with him.    He was young to go and all miss him greatly.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
Before closing my report, I wish to take this opportunity of voicing our sincere
thanks to all those who have assisted in the work of the Hospital. I also wish to thank
the Red Cross Visiting Committee for their many enjoyable entertainments given at
the Hospital for the benefit of the patients.
I would also like to draw your favourable attention to the co-operation and work
of the British Columbia Police, who are always ready and willing to assist us at all
times. •
I wish to acknowledge with grateful thanks the loyal co-operation and support I
have received from the medical officers of the Hospital. I wish to especially mention
the Medical Superintendent, Dr. E. J. Ryan, whose task has become particularly heavy
during these war years. I also would like to bring to your attention the work of Mr.
Macgowan, our Bursar;   Dr. L. E; Sauriol, Medical Supervisor at New Westminster; T 14 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Mr. T. A. Morris, Supervisor, Colquitz Mental Home;   and Mr. H. Lonsdale, Foreman
of Works.
Finally, to you, Sir, and to the Deputy Minister, and the officers of the Department
of Public Works, I wish to express my grateful thanks for the understanding and
sympathy with which you have recognized the many problems facing the Institution,
and without which it would be impossible for the Hospital to maintain its progress.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. L. CREASE,
General Superintendent.
LABORATORY REPORT.
Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, B.C., March 31st, 1943.
E. J. Ryan, Esq., M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the laboratory at
Essondale from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943 :—
Blood—
Kahn, positive   76
Kahn, negative   708
Red-blood count and haemoglobin  1,055
White-blood count and differential   1,302
Sedimentation rate   (Cutler method)    547
Coagulation time   3
Bleeding time  2
Clot retraction  1
Reticulocyte count   1
Grouping   3,014
Cross-agglutination   14
Glucose   147
Non-protein nitrogen .  139
Bromide    38
Potassium thiocyanate  2
Carbon monoxide determination  1
Sulfathiazol  2
Sulfadiazine    3
Laughlen test   23
Vitamin C   2
Total serum protein   1
Serum calcium   8
Icterus index  5
Van den Bergh  7
Culture   8
Widal   5
Agglutination for B. abortus   8 LABORATORY REPORT.
T 15
Spinal fluid—•
Kahn, positive __.
Kahn, negative _
Colloidal gold ____.
Cell-count 	
Total protein ____.
Globulin 	
T.B. 	
Urines—
Routine general
57
46
104
14
1
103
1
4,197
Quantitative bromides
Smears—
Miscellaneous 	
G.C 	
T.B. 	
Vincent's angina	
Malaria	
Trichomonas 	
Diphtheria 	
Cultures—
Miscellaneous 	
Diphtheria 	
G.C. 	
Typhoid 	
Fasces—
Parasites 	
Occult blood 	
Water analysis—
Bacterial count	
pH 	
Skin tests—
Tuberculin   (Vollmer)
Pollen sensitivity	
Dick test	
Schick test 	
Injections—
Typhoid vaccine	
Diphtheria vaccine 	
Staphylococcus toxoid 	
Scarlet fever toxin 	
Rheumatic compound vaccine
Acetone     1,811
Quantitative sugar	
Bromides 	
Benzidene	
Quantitative albumin 	
Two-hourly 	
Ascheim Zondek 	
Calcium 	
T.B.	
388
705
350
36
3
31
14
4
1
143
182
2
65
8
3
4
35
3
20
3
13
20
183
8
28
4
470
26
93
181
14 T 16
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Sputum for T.B. 	
Smallpox vaccinations
Gastric analysis 	
B.M.R. 	
Biopsies 	
Autopsies 	
Animal autopsies 	
Sections	
Donors supplied 	
Colony farm examinations 	
Gastric contents for bromide and chloride
Gastric contents for T.B.	
98
130
7
29
12
28
3
125
25
19
Total number of examinations   16,999
I have, etc.,
Alice Hagen,
Technician.
X-RAY REPORT.
E. J. Ryan, Esq., M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the X-ray Department
of the Hospital from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943:—
Number of films taken  	
3,383
Number of patients X-rayed	
2,924
Chests         _    _   _       _           _
Patients.
2,462
175
32
28
94
38
4
2
12
19
43
5
5
4
1
A. M. Gee
and Roent
Films.
2,475
Extremities	
354
Heads 	
65
Shoulder    	
49
Pelvis 	
109
Gastro-intestinal — 	
122
Kidney urinary bladder	
5
Gall-bladder   	
5
Sinuses 	
26
Teeth 	
59
Spine  	
91
Jaw  _     	
5
Ribs  	
11
Nose 	
6
Pregnancy 	
1
I have, etc.,
Physician
genologist. OCULIST'S REPORT. T 17
OCULIST'S REPORT.
E. J. Ryan, Esq., M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is a summary of work done in the Eye Department for the
past fiscal year 1942-43:—
Refractions   85
Eyegrounds  (cycloplegic examinations)   50
Perimeter tracings  80
Eyegrounds  (luetic)   80
Foreign bodies   5
Conjunctivitis 1  10
Iridocyclitis   5
Corneal ulcers  8
Glaucoma (medical care)   1
Glaucoma (rad. operation)   3
Pterygium  1
Total number of patients   323
I have, etc.,
Benj. H. Harry,
Visiting Oculist.
PHYSIOTHERAPY REPORT.
E. J. Ryan, Esq., M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of the treatments which were given in the Physiotherapy Department at Essondale from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943:—
Infra-red lamp       154
Inductothermy      366
Electric-light cabinet       104
Continuous-flow bath       905
Foam bath         45
Sitz bath         16
Tub bath         69
Cold wet packs  7
Ultra-violet lamp   1,330
Needle-sprays, rain-douche, etc.       302
Massage, active and passive movements      255
Miscellaneous      111
Total number of treatments  _.__. 3,664
Total number of patients treated       305
I have, etc.,
Allen E. Davidson,
Physician. T  18
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
PSYCHOLOGIST'S REPORT. '    ,
E. J. Ryan, Esq., M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Menial Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of work performed for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1943:—
Child Guidance Clinic.
Vancouver.
Victoria. -
and
Fairbridge.
Nanaimo
and
Courtenay.
Chilliwack.
New Westminster.
Total.
374
2
23
1
1
6
2
205
11
8
4
16
18
6
2
1
22
2
2
2
1
91
1
1
3
3
41
17
11
8
47
4
15
13
2
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
3
51%
77
4
2
2
1
6
6
7
1
1
15
8
12
1
::::
31
3
4
1
5
1
6
2
26
1
2
1
3
1
5>
8
4
1
1
2
2
516
Penter Patterson Performance	
2
28
1
1
6
Catell Baby Test           	
2
205
15
11
5
Detroit Word Recognition 	
32
29
Lee-Clark Reading Readiness	
6
2
1
32
3
Iota Word Test	
3
2
1
113
1
1
3
Ophetralm-o-grraph 	
Humm-Wadsworth Personality   	
3
50
11
8
9
15
13
O'Rourke Mechanical Aptitude 	
Crawford Tri-dimensional Visualization
2
5
Bennett Mechanical Comprehension	
Detroit Mechanical Aptitude 	
Purdue Industrial Training Classification....
Ability to Sell 	
1
1
1
MacQuarrie Mechanical Aptitude	
Tutoring reading, hours  	
5iy2
Total tests, 1942-43 	
994
143
53
39
18
1,247
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
Binet examinations   53
Humm-Wadsworth examinations      2
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster.
Binet examinations   15
I have, etc.,
D. F. Jennings,
Psychologist. DENTAL REPORT. T 19
DENTAL REPORT.
E. J. Ryan, Esq., M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is the annual report of the Dental Department:—
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
All patients admitted were examined, and dental charts filed. All acute conditions
were given precedence, and all suffering relieved the same day as reported. Dentures
were made for patients recommended by members of the medical staff. Restorations
of carious teeth have been made as far as possible.
Summary.
Examinations   652
Extractions   _■  642
Peridental treatments   148
Fillings inserted   689
Treatments   136
General anaesthetics   	
Local anaesthetics   506
Recementing crowns        1
Davis crowns        2
Dentures repaired  '.     74
Dentures rebased       2
Dentures made     21
Bridges repaired       2
Alveolotomy        2
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster.
All new patients were examined and record charts made.
Summary.
Examinations  371
Diseased teeth extracted   198
Local anaesthetics   157
Fillings inserted  134
Peridental treatments  61
General anaesthetics   3
New dentures made and inserted   1
Dentures repaired  5
Vincents infection treated   2
We have, etc.,
Milton Jones, D.D.S.
Emery Jones, D.D.S.
BEAUTY-PARLOUR REPORT.
E. J. Ryan, Esq., M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is a report of the appointments in the beauty-parlour from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943:—
Hair-cuts   8,966
Shampoos   2,147 T 20 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Finger-waves     1,293
Curls  590
Marcels   68
Manicures   2,000
Oil treatments  28
We have, etc.,
Anne Will.
Eugenie Bovet.
TRAINING-SCHOOL REPORT.
The Provincial Mental Hospital School of Nursing completed the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1943, with the following personnel: Registered nurses, 15; mental graduates, 19; nurses-in-training, 160. Male attendants working on Infirmary wards have
been transferred from Nursing staff to the Chief Attendant's staff.
Resignations for the year numbered 188 and replacements 193; this large turnover
of staff is due to conditions brought about by war when there are positions in many
new fields open to women. The majority of nurses give as their reason for resigning,
" change of occupation ", upon questioning those who resign it is found in many
instances that they enjoy the actual work but that living in residence on the property,
where their only contacts off duty are co-workers, is not altogether satisfactory. For
many years it has been felt that a recreation hall could be used to good advantage; in
these times, when adequate transportation is not available and nurses are unable to seek
entertainment and relaxation in the city, there is a definite need for a recreation hall.
This year sixteen nurses received diplomas for the three-year course in psychiatric
nursing. There were no Registered Nurses taking postgraduate work in psychiatry;
the indications are that for many years to come the bulk of the patients' care will be
borne by the nurses trained here. This hospital has continued to give the two-month
affiliation course in psychiatric nursing and fifty-three students from general hospitals
have availed themselves of this course in the past year.
I have, etc.,
Linea Blomberg, R.N.,
Superintendent of Nurses.
SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL.
In presenting the eleventh annual report of the Psychiatric Social Service Department we wish to point out some major changes. There are several causes for these;
first of which is the change in personnel. One of our best trained staff is now working
in London, England, in her own field of psychiatric social work, with the British Ministry of Health. Her place had to be filled by a person with less training and not so
much experience. Another of our especially trained workers went to the United States,
where she could obtain nearly twice the salary we could offer her. We have been fortunate in having both these positions filled by very loyal conscientious workers, who have
taken special training within the service. While there has been a slowing-up of tempo,
the efficiency of the work will not suffer. SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT.
T 21
With the overcrowding of the Hospital and the necessity of early discharges of
patients, there has been considerably more work in this field for this department. However, with the labour situation being as it is, our patients have never had such opportunity of work. With more concentrated efforts to work with the home and the patient
before his discharge we have been able to have occupation and financial security for our
ex-patients upon their discharge. Employers have shown their readiness to co-operate
with us. This condition has also been assisted by the comprehensive interpretation to
the employers by the social workers as a whole. The patients discharged throughout
the Province have had the very able assistance of the members of the Social Assistance
Branch of the Provincial Welfare staff. It must also be remembered that families have
also been in a better position financially to care or supply care for their mentally ill.
The Family Welfare Association of Vancouver, with their leadership in the visiting
housekeepers programme, has greatly assisted us in maintaining the protection of
family life. Relatives of a mentally ill mother may rally for child care during an acute
illness, but when the mother is out of the home for an indefinite time it is a different
matter. Children might be placed in foster homes, but this is expensive and often all
members of the family cannot remain together, and the father's contact is also lost.
While with a trained housekeeper the whole unit is kept together and can enjoy a more
normal life and be better fitted to welcome the mother on her return. We are glad to
see this same programme extending in a modified form in different centres throughout
the Province.
Since the reorganization of the Social Assistance Branch our Department has been
greatly assisted over a wider area. This service leads to more supervision and correspondence, but the time spent is returned to us tenfold.
Our greatest problems have been the old-age group and the below-six-year-old
child. The social workers of this Department have assisted in making plans other than
hospitalization in many instances. Because of the nature of this work it has been time
consuming and not of a very permanent nature. The senile patient is not readily
understood, and many mistakes are made by lay persons who have not had experience
with older people. There is a great deal of education and leadership required in this
sphere.
In the care of the young mentally defective child, unless the person caring for him
has affection, patience, and perseverance the lack of constructive material soon palls and
another placement has to be made. Due to the labour situation, even a mother questions the advisability of remaining at home with her child of this type; she could be
earning and more enjoyably employed. She either gets some one in to the home or
starts negotiations to have the patient admitted to the Hospital. If there were some
other than mental hospital care for this group of " younger than six years " it would
relieve the tension in the homes and in hospital beds.
From investigations we have made throughout the year, it is quite astounding the
number of patients brought to British Columbia with their families from other Provinces. Some have been removed from mental hospitals in order to travel with the
relatives who have secured employment in war plants at the Coast. It would seem
advisable to make some kind of co-operative effort between Provincial hospitals.
Lectures and other activities of this Department have continued within the Hospital and, whenever the opportunity presented itself, before the public. We have had
many grateful patients and relatives show their appreciation. Criticism we have with
us always and, when constructive, it has been appreciated.
We wish to express our appreciation to the rest of the Hospital staff for their keen
co-operation with our Department. T 22 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
STATISTICAL REPORT.
Initial interviews with family of newly admitted patients  486
Therapy interviews   503
Probation visits of Hospital staff only  300
Probation visits of Social Assistance Workers  285
Ward visits of Hospital Social Service Workers  920
Letters  to  other  social  agencies,   including   Social  Assistance
members   900
Lectures to students in training 1     25
Conferences re hospital cases with other social agencies  102
Miscellaneous visits re special investigations     82
CHILD GUIDANCE CLINIC.
The Child Guidance Clinic has just completed its tenth year and with age it has
gained a firm foothold in the community. Social agencies and other sources, such as
Courts, Magistrates and some private physicians, are becoming accustomed to consult
a psychiatric clinic before making plans for treatment. All the above has made it necessary for extensive examinations to be made on each case, which necessitates a slowing-up
in numbers of patients handled but a higher percentage of time allotted to each patient.
Very often there is the need for more information than that supplied, and this has to
be obtained through the social worker attached to the clinic.
During the year there were changes in the clinical staff, due to members joining
the armed forces. We were fortunate to obtain the services of very well-trained personnel with wider experiences in other fields, all of which assists the programme as a
whole.
Both public and private social agencies throughout the Province, as well as in
Greater Vancouver, have made more use of the consultation service of the clinic. Most
of the time in this type of case it is a continuation of treatment prescribed, or it may be
preparation for clinic appointments. This time-consuming1 project does not show in
statistics necessarily, but it leads for better therapy for the patient.
School Inspectors and principals, through the Social Assistance members, are asking for more and more help. In response to one of these appeals a special trip of the
Supervisor was arranged. This trip only went to show the need for a travelling clinic
throughout the Province. Advice is one thing and complete study of a situation is
another, and the one only a poor substitute for the other.
During the year we had the opportunity of giving some practical experience and
instruction to the Regional Supervisors of the Social Assistance Branch, and they in
turn are giving us every assistance and co-operation possible. They have through
their experience and interest increased our consultation service through correspondence, and this requires much more psychiatric supervision of the workers throughout
the Province.
The student training both of the Social Service and the Public Health Nursing
University Course has continued. This is a most satisfying' piece of work, as we later
meet these workers in different localities throughout the Province and they are able
through this practical experience to further the cause of mental hygiene.
We wish to thank all those who co-operated with us .during the past year.
A statistical report is appended.
Josephine F. Kilburn,
Supervisor, Psychiatric Social Work. SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT.
T 23
Child Guidance Clinic.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Nanaimo-
Courtenay.
Chilliwack.
New Westminster.
Total.
Number of clinics held- 	
140
16
7
6
2
171
New cases   	
292
63
33
22
7
415
139
30
18
13
4
202
15
2
1
18
Children 	
124
28
17
17
4
184
Females.	
153
33
15
9
3
213
Adults	
60
19
4
1
84
Children..— .'.
93
14
11
8
3
129
160
23
6
5
2
198
Males  	
93
13
3
4
1
114
Adults  	
11
2
13
Children  	
82
11
3
4
1
101
Females	
67
10
3
2
1
83
17
2
19
50
8
3
2
I-
6-1
Total number of cases	
452
87
39
27
9
613
Physicals        	
386
77
32
26
9
530
Blood for Kahn tests 	
26
7
3
3
39
Audiometer.... _	
6
6
313
7
4
1
325
Conferences — 	
709
79
35
24
8
855
Spread of Intelligence, 1942-43.
Rating.
Vane
Victoria.
Chilliwack.
Nanaimo-
Courtenay.
New Westminster.
Total.
Near genius, 140 and above ...
Very superior, 120 and above
Superior, 110-120 	
Normal, 90-110... _	
Dull normal, 80-90  	
Border-line, 70-80'  	
Moron, 50-70  	
Imbecile, 25-50.- 	
Idiot, 0-25  —	
Unrated  —
4
9~
18
91
57
38
28
15
1
5
5
16
11
5
8
2
2
7
15
9
5
15
23
129
84
49
44
18
3
32
Summary of cases carried by Psychiatric  Social  Workers  for  Child  Guidance
Clinic:—
Number of new cases prepared :  114
Therapy visits to these cases 7. 100
Agency interviews re these cases     84
Conference with other social agencies re transfer of these cases..    28 T  24
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
STATISTICAL TABLES.
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich, from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1,763
342
282
84
10
1
4
1,254.
261
110
4
1
3,017
603
282
194
14
1
5
2,486
463
1,630
340
On probation, carried forward from 1941-42, Essondale	
On probation, carried forward from 1941-42, New Westmin-
Escaped, carried forward from 1941-42, New Westminster
Escaped, carried forward from 1941-42, Saanich  ,
4,116
Admitted during the year 1942-43—
417
17
17
3
9
324
9
6
1
741
26
23
3
10
803
Total under treatment,  Essondale, New Westminster, and
Saanich, April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943	
Discharged during period, April  1st,  1942, to March 31st,
1943—
(a.)  From Essondale—
29
171
81
8
95
2
146
54
137
32
90
79
83
308
113
8
185
2
225
2,949
581
1,970
413
4,919
As unimproved _ __ _ 	
Died     	
'
532
392
924
(b.)  From New Westminster—
6
10
6
1
14
2
4
2
13
8
14
8
1
27
Died   ....
-
37
21
58
(c.)   From Saanich—
4
8
4
8
Died 	
12
12
Total  discharged from  Essondale,  New Westminster,   and
Total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich
2,368
1,557
3,925 STATISTICAL TABLES.
T 25
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich, from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943—Continued.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Essondale—
Total on books, March 31st, 1942   	
1,851
463
10
1
1,365
340
4
3,216
803   ■
14
1
2,325
580
1,709
409
4,034
Discharged during 1942-43 —  	
532
39
9
392
17
924
56
9
989
-
352
39
265
17
617
56
Total in residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1943 	
1,745
1,300
3,045
New Westminster—
Total on books, March 31st, 1942      	
391
47
282
25
673
37
10
21
4
58
14
72
283
9
283
9
Total in residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1943..	
344
257
601
Saanich—
Total on books, March 31st, 1942	
292
13
292
12
1
12
1
13
1,745
344
279
1,300
257
3,045
601
279
279
279
2,368
1,557
Total in residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1943.  	
Total in residence, Saanich, March 31st, 1943 	
Grand total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and
Saanich, March 31st, 1943 	
3,925
. 3,931.29
Percentage of discharges on admission  (not includi
ag deaths
66.50
11.32
Percentage of deaths on whole number under treatr
nent  —
5.31
. T 26
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Hospital since
its Inception.
Discharges.
AA>
03 03
c
_
—
%
Oi
%  CD
. —1 ti
A  a.**1
_
„
rt
O-
ti
u
0i
A
B
p
o o
ti r .2
m
entage of D
?es to Admi
(Deaths
ded).
Year.
_
u
QJ
>
T_
CU
U
OJ
>
-P O
0 -
entage of
is to Who
her under
tment.
S
<
O
OJ
CiJ
a
E£J3
3 «
A  rt cu
c
tH
V
0J
p
_e w
C Oi
3 e> S
u °£
P * a A
u ti 5 ti
tH  V  Hi  OJ
Perc
Deat
Num
Trea
1872  	
18
15
1
10
2
i
5
16
14
2
18
31
5.55
66.66
5.55
80.00
5.55
1873	
16.12
1874 	
12
4
3
19
5
26'
33.33
33.33
11.53
1875  	
29
3
3
10
32
13
48
10.34
26.89
20.83
1876 	
22
11
3
5
35
3
54
50.00
63.63
9.35
1877 	
14
4
4
3
38
3
49
28.57
78.57
6.12
1878	
16
7
3
8
36
2
54
43.75
62.50
16.16
1879  —
18
4
1
8
41
5
54
22.22
27.77
14.81
1880.....	
17
5
5
48
7
58
29.41
29.41
8.62
1881	
13
5
3
5
48
61
38.46
61.54
8.19
1882	
7
3
1
2
49
1
55
42.85
57.14
3.63
1883	
8
4
1
3
49
57
50.00
62.50
5.26
1884...	
10
2
4
2
51
2
59
20.00
60.00
3.33
1885	
20
5
5
61
10
71
25.00
25.00
6.94
1886..	
27
10
6
6
66
5
88
37.03
59.25
6.81
1887 	
36
15
5
5
77
11
102
41.66
55.55
4.80
1888...	
26
12
6
3
82
5
103
46.15
69.23
2.87
1889— —	
41
14
5
4
100
18
123
34.15
46.34
3.25
1890    	
52
17
6
12
117
17
152
32.69
44.23
7.64
1891 	
49
19
4
20
123
6
166
38.77
46.94
11.69
1892  -	
52
17
10
13
135
12
175
32.69
51.92
6.95
1893 	
44
14
18
14
133
2
179
31.81
72.72
7.60
1894 	
80
13
19
19
162
29
213
16.25
40.00
8.92
1895  	
62
29
11
20
164
2
224
46.77
64.51
8.92
1896 - 	
64
23
25
9
171
7
228
35.93
75.00
3.94
1897   _.	
74
20
8
14
203
32
246
27 03
37 83
5.69
1898	
81
27
13
19
221
18
285
33.33
49.38
6.66
1899.... 	
101
31
32
21
234
13
327
30.69
62.37
6.42
1900   —	
113
38
27
29
258
24
356
33 63
57 52
8 14
1901        	
115
40
20
25
284
26
34 78
52 17
6 63
1902.....	
121
30
31
25
311
27
413
24.79
50.41
6.06
1903  	
139
38
37
26
349
38
466
27.34
53.96
5.57
1904  	
115
46
26
26
321
28
480
40.00
62.61
5.42
1905	
123
43
33
27
348
27
505
33.33
61.78
5.34
1906 	
150
36*
43
28
388
43
552
23.03
52.06
5.04
1907    	
221
48
43
39
461
73
21 30
5 08
1908... 	
230
68*
56
57
507
46
765
28.30
53.90
7.44
1909  —
232
731
77
40
536
29
816
31.00
64.60
6.40
1910
280
84
82
41
595
48
30.00
19.57
59.28
54.42
4.57
5.83
1911    	
332
67*
114
60
690
105
1,034
1912 	
375
74*
128
76
752
62
1,065
18.90
53.80
7.02
1913    	
380
90§
146
67
919
167
1,264
1,364
1,437
1,527
5.30
1914       	
402
58
126
74
1,027
1,090
1,205
108
45.77
52.41
47.87
1915    	
332
83
91
89
63
25.00
20.68
6.19
5.24
1916 	
353
73t
96
80
115
1917        	
371
88
78
106
1,301
1,347
1,650
1,753
23.72
20.00
44.74
45.33
6.42
7.47
1918        	
375
Jan. 1, 1919, to
March 31, 1920	
574
116
221
132
1,458
111
2,025
20.20
58.71
6.51
1920-1921 	
489
88
173
122
1,566
108
2,043
14.17
72.60
5.97
1921-1922 	
478
96
178
114
1,649
83
2,137
20.08
57.32
5.33
1922-1923 	
438
91
167
133
1,697
48
2,180
20.77
59.36
6.10
1923-1924 	
447
84 f
121
163
1,784
87
2,234
18.56
64.20
7.25
1924-1925	
461
63
242
138
1,884
100
2,327
13.66
66.16
5.93
1925-1926	
475
5711
240
142
1,995
111
2,434
12.00
62.53
5.83
1926-1927 	
494
76§
171
161
2,125
130
2,565
15.38
50.00
6.27
1927-1928 	
542
75*
252
147
2,269
144
2,743
13.28
60.33
5.36
1928-1929	
543
92t
294
181
2,347
78
2,914
16.76
71.07
6.21
1929-1930 	
602
118*
311
223
2,411
64
3,063
19.10
71.26
7.28
1930-1931	
632
70*
235
191
2,550
2,676
3,148
3,214
10.60
10.32
64.24
63.52
6.06
5.63
1931-1932 	
562
581
299
181
126
1932-1933  	
635
44§
323
195
2,824
2,960
3,390
3,530
6.92
10.00
58,42
60.65
5.75
5.66
1933-1934. 	
610
61.
309
200
136
1934-1935    	
653
71*
349
3,080
3,180
3,721
3,838
10.87
9.27
64.32
54.05
5.94
7.58
1935-1936	
679
63*
304
291
100
1936-1937 	
783
781
300
268
3,301
121
4,067
9.96
63.6
6.59
1937-1938 	
834
74
330
207
3,487
186
4,255
8.87
67.3
4.86
1938-1939 —	
827
72t
345
208
3,612
125
4,471
8.71
78.72
4.65
1939-1940..	
869
111**
455
230
3,710
98
4.713
11.39
88.50
4.88
1940-1941	
864
107.
410
254
3,836
126
4,781
12.38
79.97
5.31
1941-1942 	
834
71tf
400
255
3,902
66
4,843
8.51
56.46
6.54
1942-1943
803
91..
443
260
3,925
23
4,919
11.32
66.50
5.31
* Three not insane.
U Five not insane.
f One not insane.
** Twelve not insane.
: Two not insane.
tt Ten not insane.
i Four not insane.
it Eight not insane.
! Six not insane. STATISTICAL TABLES.
T 27
Table No. 3.—Showing the Total Number of Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths
from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Admissions.
Discharges,
Deaths.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
■     1942.
47
53
29
30
76
83
20
23
25
27
45
50
17
22
4
7
21
May 	
29
40
28
34
34
74
62
23
20
15
14
38
34
12
14
4
4
16
July.      -	
18
29
32
61
19
14
33
10
5
15
September-—  	
28
26
54
28
23
51
9
9
18
40
37
33
27
73
64
27
36
7
14
34
50
11
6
11
10
22
November- -  	
16
December   - 1	
40
31
71
27
20
47
19
17
36
1943.
January  -	
33
17
50
23
21
44
11
5
16
February 	
46
20
66
26
24
50
15
1
22
March  	
42
27
69
33
25
58
22
9
31
Totals. 	
463
340
803
305
229
534
168
92
260
Table No. 4.
-Showing the Civil State of Patients admitted from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
126
283
4
31
17
2
171
98
4
53
14
297
381
8
84
31
2
Totals 	
463
340
803
Table No. 5.-
-Showing Religious Denominations of Patients admitted from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Religious Denominations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
9
4
10
4
1
5
3
2
1
38
2
1
8
2
1
274
1
80
2
4
2
8
1
5
5
1
2
1
1
1
23
1
1
2
3
2
244
44
1
1
1
2
14
9
10
5
1
7
4
3
2
61
3
1
1
10
5
3
518
1
Roman Catholic  	
124
•}
Undenominational	
Unknown     	
3
8
Totals - -     _	
463
340 T 28
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Table No.
6. Showing the Degree of Education of those admitted from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Degree of Education.
Male.
Female.
Total.
10
33
299
47
41
33
4
51
223
25
25
12
14
84
522
72
N
66
45
463
340                   803
Table No. 7.—Showing the Nationality of those admitted from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
2
1
1
12
1
4
72
9
1
4
1
1
3
10
1
5
8
1
5
9
3
24
1
5
1
29
8
6
3
18
87
12
2
7
49
2
21
31
1
2
1
1
1
61
7
3
1
1
1
11
3
4
1
4
4
1
3
29
1
3
1
20
2
2
9
83
20
3
5
21
2
4
25
2
4
1
1
13
2
5
133
16
4
5
1
2
3
1
21
1
8
12
1
1
9
13
1
6
53
1
1
8
1
1
49
10
6
5
Canada—
27
170
32
5
12
70
4
25
56
1
Totals  	
463
340
1
803
1 STATISTICAL TABLES.
T 29
Table No. 8.—Showing what Districts contributed Patients from April 1st,
1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Abbotsford 	
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
6
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
15
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
21
2
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
2
1
2
7
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
1
1
2
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
4
1
3
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
4
Brought forward 	
74
1
1
1
7
1
1
2
2
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
2
6
1
1
1
5
1
1
19
7
9
1
1
1
1
3
1
7
1
50
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
—-
2
19
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
124
1
Aldergrove 	
Armstrong	
Hazelton -	
Headquarters	
Hillcrest. - - -
1
1
Atlin
Hope :	
Huntingdon— 	
Beaverdell —- - 	
1
10
Black Pool	
2
1
1
3
Burquitlam — -	
Cadboro Bay- ,. 	
Laidlaw  -
Langford — - - -	
Langley  - — —
Likely — - 	
3
1
7
1
Castlegar  	
1
Caulf eild                      	
1
2
Cloverdale-.— - 	
Maillardville - -	
Makinson - -	
Malahat — — -	
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
6
1
1
Duncan  -	
Nakusp -	
Nanaimo  - —
2
8
1
Naramata. -	
Natal	
1
Errington 	
1
7
Newton  ..
1
1
38
North Vancouver	
Oakalla Prison Farm	
Ocean Falls 	
Oliver 	
Oona River.  	
Paldi    	
11
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
9
Port Alice — - -
1
74
50
124
182
117
299
. T 30
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Table No. 8.—Showing what Districts contributed Patients from April 1st,
1942, to March 31st, 1943—Continued.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Brought forward	
182
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
3
9
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
117
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
.299
3
1
2
1
2
1
2
3
4
11
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
Brought forward	
223
1
1
2
3
5
1
1
5
2
1
180
3
24
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
136
1
2
1
1
4
1
1
5
1
1
152
2
21
1
1
3
3
2
1
359
1
1
Port Hardy_ _	
Steveston  	
3
5
1
Port McNeill  	
1
Surrey   	
Tatalrose- —  	
9
1
1
1
Tofino.      -  - 	
Trail   ...- -  	
1
Quesnel  __ 	
10
2
1
Ucluelet - -   	
Vananda  —-	
1
Rolla 	
1
332
5
Victoria —    	
Webster's Corners  -
45
Sahtlam _	
3
1
1
5
1
White Rock   	
3
Whonnock -	
1
2
Winfield  - - -	
Woodfibre   - 	
Woodpecker -	
Yahk	
1
1
1
1
1
Totals	
Spencer  	
463
340
803
223
136
359 STATISTICAL TABLES.
T 31
Table No. 9.—Showing the Occupations of those admitted from April 1st, 1942,
to March 31st, 1943.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
3
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
13
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
3
42
3
3
1
2
1
1
3
1.
1
1
1
1
1
1
82
1
1
29
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
2
11
1
2
3
1
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
3
13
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
11
1
4
3
227
1
1
5
1
7
11
1
1
2
70
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
35
3
6
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
38
1
1
1
1
11
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
5
233
1
1
1
1
67
1
15
6
5
1
6
1
1
460
1
Marine engineer  	
1
5
1
1
7
1
11
Broker     	
Missionary   .  -	
Motion-picture operator	
2
1
1
2
137
Nurse (practical)	
1
1
Packer 	
Clerk -	
4
1
1
Cook      _ -
1
1
1
2
1
50
3
42
208
5
3
3
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
208
1
5
1
1
1
82
1
1
29
1
1
2
8
1
Fitter     	
1
1
•  1
Gardener _ ____	
Shipyard-worker   -
Soldier    	
3
38
1
Stationary engineer	
Stenographer  _	
1
Home-maker  —	
5
1
2
17
Surveyor  -	
2
1
Transportation manager
Truck-driver.	
Violinist	
1
1
1
1
2
1
6
Totals 	
227               233       1       4fi0
463
340
803 T 32
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Table No. 10.—Showing the Ages of those admitted from April 1st, 1942,
to March 31st, 1943.
Age.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Un
32
21
38
45
38
28
36
21
43
31
27
31
26
16
30
13
13
27
34
44
23
30
27
19
24
21
27
17
9
12
45
20 	
34
25     ,  	
65
30     „                                    .      —-
79
35    „	
82
40                                                                 ...         . 	
51
45    „  	
66
,      50     „	
48
,      55     „                    ..            ...	
62
60     „                                                	
55
,      65     „                    	
48
,      70     „    .   	
58
75     „                    ..            	
43
,     80    „                  ..           .....                 	
25
Ovi
>r   80    „    	
42
Totals	
463
340
803
Table No. 11.—Showing the Number of Attacks in those admitted from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Number of Attacks.
Male.
Female.
Total.
First      _              .      	
291
80
22
4
1
1
21
3
40
206
74
29
8
4
1 ■
1
10
7
497
154
Third    .                   	
51
Fourth                     _	
12
Fifth      	
5
Sixth                                             	
1
1
Tenth                    -	
1
31
3
47
Totals	
463
340
803
Table No. 12.—Showing the Alleged Duration of Attack prior to Admission from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Duration of Attack.
Male.
Female.
Total.
88
83
56
26
23
20
16
7
2
2
3
96
41
40
52
50
26
40
20
21
19
4
3
35
30
128
135
106
52
63
40
37
26
6
5
3
131
Life ....	
71
Totals       	
463
340
1
803 STATISTICAL TABLES.
T 33
Table No. 13-
-Showing Statistics of Heredity in those admitted from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Heredity.
Male.
Female.
Total.
4
7
11
5
433
3
8
13
17
8
294
12
20
28
13
727
3
Totals 	
463
340
803
Table No. 14.—Showing the Alleged Cause of Attack in those admitted from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Alleged Cause.
Male.
Female.
Total.
15
33
1
3
3
_.
6
254
2
2
11
5
7
4
3
33
3
1
75'
1
—-
7
14
3
5
2
	
1
199
1
17
8
13
8
2
7
1
49
1
2
22
47
3
1
3
8
Childbirth -  -  	
2
1
7
453
3
2
28
13
20
Heredity, paternal    - — —  :   —
12
5
40
3
2
1
1
2
Totals     1. —- -	
463
340
803
Table No. 15.—Showing the State of Bodily Health in those admitted from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Bodily Condition.
Male.
Female.
Total.
133
264
66
122
170
48
255
434
114
Totals     —   ....	
463
340
803 T 34
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Table No. 16.—Showing the Form of Mental Disorder in those admitted from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Form of Disorder.
Acute mania —- 	
Alzheimers disease     ._
Arteriosclerotic dementia -
Epilepsy with psychosis .—
Feeblemindedness with epilepsy .
General paresis   —	
Huntington's chorea _ -	
Imbecility and idiocy    — —	
Involutional melancholia  -
Manic depressive    —- 	
Mental deficiency with psychosis..
Moron   — — 	
Not insane   —
Not yet diagnosed  — -
Paranoia      	
Parkinsons syndrome -	
Preseniled dementia     -
Psychopathic inferior 	
Psychopathic inferior with psychosis
Psychopathic personality  	
Psychoneurosis     	
Psychoses due to carbon monoxide poisoning _
Schizophrenia  -    	
Senile dementia -  - —	
Somatic disease  _
Toxic psychosis (alcohol)  	
Toxic psychosis (bromides) 	
Tabes dorsalis      —
Totals .
Male.
4
33
8
5
32
9
35
4
7
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
6
1
175
74
9
15
463
Female.
6
1
14
11
7
3
25
19
64
3
11
102
49
340
Total.
10
1
47
19
5
41
3
57
28
99
7
IS
2
1
2
2
2
1
3
5
11
1
277
123
12
23
2
1
Table No. 17.—Showing the Number allowed out on Probation and Results from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Results.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Discharged recovered -     - - -  	
29
177
91
8
38
108
54
139
36
33
92
83
316
127
8
71
200
Totals —	
451
354 STATISTICAL TABLES.
T 35
Table No. 18.—Showing the Alleged Duration of Insanity prior to Admission
in those discharged from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Duration of Insanity.
Male.
Female.
Total.
42
51
32
19
19
14
5
36
70
22
49
13
13
24
14
11
6
39
38
64
100
45
32
43
28
16
15
Three years and over
75
8
108
Totals       .    	
305
229
534
Table No. 19.—Showing the Length of Residence of those discharged from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
Discharged
recovered.
Discharged
improved.
Discharged
unimproved.
Not
Insane.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Un
1
5
15
3
3
2
2
4
13
19
4
2
3
3
1
1
2
7
12
20
46
24
14
19
6
.3
1
25
1
10
10
35
18
12
26
12
5
5
5
40
6
2
13
8
5
7
2
1
7
5
4
4
11
3
1
6
2
3
1
1
2
1
,    12 months    	
5 y<
Totals  	
29
54
177
139
91
36
8 T 36
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943,
Essondale, New' Westminster, and Saanich.
Register
No.
Initials.
Sex.
Age.
Time in Hospital.
Years.    Months.     Days
Certified Cause.
18767
19991
18693
18492
19068
18355
13950
13933
16176
12656
15686
14397
20042
19441
19940
1818
19149
20087
16007
19117
6447
20028
6724
20048
18765
16498
19499
12576
11379
14855
1882
19587
20063
20072
20047
19404
19972
11773
19204
18666
20142
20175
19163
8460
18642
18286
19980
20230
12108
6949
20173
15430
20218
17480
19851
19840
8561
. M.
B. L.
G. D. F.
S. A. W.
J. J.
E. M. S.
J.N.
I. W.
A. C.
J. F. H.
C. J.
M. G.
A. H. McL.
G. W. H.
E. U.
H. R.
G. H. H.
L.S.
A. J. T.
E. L. H.
W. E. M.
V.I.
J. E. P.
A. G.
L. S.
S. G.
L. B.
L. P.
H. M. McL.
R. B.
A. S.
M. F.
I. S.
R. McL.
A. C. G.
O. H.
w. c.
J.L.
W. C K.
A. T.
C H. W.
J. H. S.
S.S.
M. P.
F. W.
G. S.
G. G.
M. C. S.
G. C.
W. G. C. C.
M. J. F.
M. P.
M. J. K.
J. H. J.
J. T.
J. G. B.
E. M. DeL.
F. B.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
87
53
21
70
82
72
47
72
53
44
70
67
52
64
64
50
60
86
21
58
57
69
79
43
76
77
38
49
60
75
72
56
35
1
4
1
21
21
1
4
9
11
6
35
M.
1
70
M.
32
M.
49
M.
59
M.
65
M.
36
F.
84
M.
59
M.
77
M.
72
F.
78
M.
70
M.
75
M.
20
F.
55
F.
49
M.
69
F.
67
M.
62
M.
27
M.
75
M.
72
M.
79 .
F.
58
M.
77 |
1
11
1
1
1
17
10
20
6
1
7
10
2
9
2
7
2
10
2
9
1
3
1
7
3
9
11
11
4
1
1
1
10
3
4
1
2
5
10
3
2
10
10
1
20
5
24
12
22
19
9
18
25
12
10
16
23
20
18
23
1
9
22
18
10
4
9
16
30
2
10
8
17
.20
20
28
15
13
1
23
26
6
11
19
3
5
26
2
27
21
27
14
19
7
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
Tubercular cervical;  adenitis ;  tubercular right
knee-joints.
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
Bronchopneumonia.
Chronic myocarditis ; arteriosclerosis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Huntington's chorea.
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Bronchopneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia; chronic myocarditis.
Brain tumour.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Exhaustion due to involutional melancholia.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Status epilepticus.
Exhaustion due to involutional melancholia.
Exhaustion due to schizophrenia.
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
Chronic myocarditis; arteriosclerosis.
Bronchopneumonia.
Epileptiform convulsion.
Coronary sclerosis ; chronic myocarditis.
General peritonitis ; gangrenous appendix.
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
General peritonitis due to intestinal perforation, due to strangulated inguinal hernia.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Cerebral haemorrhage due to fracture of the
skull (suicide).
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Status epilepticus.
Coronary thrombosis.
Exhaustion due to involutional melancholia.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Bronchopneumonia ; chronic myocarditis ; coronary sclerosis.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Toxaemia due to gangrene due to diabetes
mellitus.
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Chronic degenerative myocarditis.
Exhaustion due to involutional melancholia.
Myocarditis.
Chronic myocarditis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
Bronchopneumonia ; pulmonary tuberculosis.
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
Volvulus of small intestine.
Chronic myocarditis. STATISTICAL TABLES.
T 37
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Register
Time in Hospital.
Certified Cause.
No.
Initials.
Sex.
Age.
Years.
Months.
Days.
19534
L. k. b.
F.
51
10
19
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
18672
V. H.      '
M.
60
1
10
26
Bronchopneumonia ; secondary ansemia due to
haemorrhage from bladder.
20286
J. M. S.
M.
44
3
Abdominal haemorrhage and shock due to
rupture of mesentery.
15959
G. E. B.
M.
47
5
1
15
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20226
K. E.
M.
54
1
6
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
17004
W. J. A. M.
M.
30
3
10
12
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
15784
A. R.
M.
57
5
3
21
Bronchopneumonia ; chronic degenerative myocarditis and strangulation.
20279
C. G. L.
M.
77
8
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
14001
W. W.
M.
67
7
10
17
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis ;
carbuncle of the neck.
7947
H. C.
F.
57
18
9
11
Chronic myocarditis.
20186
S. L. B.
M.
70
1
26
Bronchopneumonia ; fractured left hip.
20167
D. G. K.
M.
71
2
3
Chronic myocarditis ; arteriosclerosis.
17172
I.L.
M.
68
3
8
7
Chronic myocarditis ; arteriosclerosis.
16446
N. K.
M.
61
4
7
3
Chronic degenerative myocarditis ; paralysis
agitans.
17459
P. P.
F.
19
3
4
Cellulitis of the abdominal wall.
19254
S. H.
M.
30
1
3
12
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
19202
Z. K. 0.
F.
78
1
4
5
Chronic myocarditis.
19981
C. A. J.
M.
64
....
5
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
20310
J. T. S.
M.
84
	
18
Chronic myocarditis ; arteriosclerosis.
19778
M. L.
M.
73
7
27
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
11157
G. R.
M.
49
12
7
15
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
'2873
G. J. K.
M.
U.
31
6
26
Exhaustion due to senility.
19582
V. L.
F.
30
11
13
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
9538
E. B.
M.
63
15
6
2
Exhaustion due to epilepsy.
19748
M.J.
M.
62
10
1
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
17893
M. P.
F.
37
2
11
8
Septicaemia due to ischiorectal abscess.
18257
M. H.
F.
51
2
6
16
Cancer of cervix.
19812
J. M. L.
M.
89
8
10
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis ;
pulmonary tuberculosis.
20289
J. H.
M.
58
6
Chronic myocarditis.
8067
C. J.
M.
72
18
7
17
Chronic myocarditis.
19739
I. H.
F.
66
9
14
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20885
A. W.
F.
81
19
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20342
F. W.
M.
45
1
15
Cerebral haemorrhage.
16496
S. M. C.
F.
84
4
7
18
Chronic nephritis ; chronic myocarditis.
16193
J. A.
M.
87
5
19
Coronary sclerosis due to arteriosclerosis.
2048
M. B.
F.
70
34
9
14"
Chronic myocarditis.
16779
G. A.
F.
30
4
3
8
Leucopenia.
20405
W. A.
M.
67
19
Exhaustion due to senility.
20396
T. s.
F.
24
19
Exhaustion due to acute mania.
7629
B. L.
F.
51
19
8
1
Cerebral haemorrhage due to trauma to head ;
gangrene of right foot.
20344
A. W.
F.
75
1
22
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20337
C. C.
M.
72
2
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
9089
K. P.
M.
49
16
5
25
Biliary calculi.
20338
L. H.
E.
59
2
1
Exhaustion due to general paresis. '
20386
J. H. T.
M.
68
1
9
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
19933
M. W. J.
M.
42
7
24
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
19435
J. M.
M.
68
1
3
Paralysis agitans.
20464
M. B.
F.
66
9
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
18523
W. G. McP. .
M.
75
2
3
24
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
17025
M. A. McK.
F.
82
4
1
6
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20465
A. H.
F.
74
15
Chronic degenerative myocarditis.
20412
R. McK.
M.
74
1
15
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
3973
F. J. H.
M.
62
28
7
18
Chronic myocarditis ; arteriosclerosis.
19135
A. E. C.
F.
68
1
7
27
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
17492
L. C. F.
M.
55
3
6
16
Exhaustion due to generai paresis. T 38
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Register
Time in Hospital.
No.
Initials.
Sex.
Age.
Years.
Months.
Days.
Certified Cause.
14775
J. W.
F.
29
6
11
12
Septicaemia due to cellulitis of knee.
10414-
D. E. B.
F.
58
14
	
7
Coronary thrombosis.
16908
A. F. S.
M.
79
4
3
7
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
14519
H. W.
F.
55
7
4
15
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
8506
B. G. G.
M.
60
17
9
11
Exhaustion due to epilepsy.
20099
R. W.
M.
69
6
11
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
2760
W. M.
M.
76
32
14
Chronic myocarditis; arteriosclerosis.
19856
A. M. A.
F.
66
10
22
Coronary thrombosis.
20490
J. C. B.
M.
74
22
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20434
E. R.
F.
64
1
26
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
17340
S.S.
M.
44
3
9
14
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
20256
K. H. T.
M.
65
4
23
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20508
E. C. M.
F.
55
....
15
Exhaustion due to acute mania.
9581
M. E. Q.
F.
47
15
8
2
Myocarditis.
13342
B. I. H.
F.
40
9
2
21
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
19731
F. H. B.
M.
50
11
24
Exhaustion due to involutional melancholia.
18985
F. M. M.
F.
59
1
9
24
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
6926
L. R.
_l.
39
21
4
13
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
11369
D. A. F.
M.
54
12
6
8
Chronic myocarditis due to syphilis.
17162
A. L. G.
F.
42
4
12
Status epilepticus.
19992
S. J. S.
F.
88
8
27
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
4507
E. P.
F.
61
27
4
17
Bronchopneumonia.
20585
P. K.
F.
31
10
Exhaustion due to acute mania.
19804
A. R.
F.
71
11
16
Chronic myocarditis.
20148
M. J. P.
F.
78
7
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20568
F. M. B.
F.
26
	
25
Lobar pneumonia.
3524
E. M. R.
F.
72
29
11
4
Apoplexy.
5985
D. L.
M.
70
23
4
14
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis.
20163
W. M. P.
M.
70
6
26
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
3717
M. J. Y.
F.
72
29
5
16
Cerebral haemorrhage.
2837
C. H.
M.
70
31
10
18
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis.
20592
G. C.
M.
66
17
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
20530
R. N.
M.
90
1
12
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20575
H. MacK.
M.
59
29
Cancer of bronchus.
20451
L. H.
M.
80
2
23
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
18459
S. M.
F.
33
2
7
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20442
A. K.
M.
64
3
2
Exhaustion due to senility.
19931
A. F.
M.
62,
10
4
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
20630
R.J. K.
M.
19
6
Exhaustion due to schizophrenia.
18976
M.C.
M.
45
2
5
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
19702
M. Q.
F.
67
1
1
20
Apoplexy.
12778
S. C.
M.
78
10
3
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
19350
P. K.
F.
16
1
6
28
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
19293
M.S.
F.
48
1
7
22
Apoplexy.
20611
H. A. C.
M.
66
	
21
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
17984
M. H. A.
F.
85
3
2
3
Chronic myocarditis.
20196
J. T.
F.
66
7
2
Exhaustion due to involutional melancholia.
19967
A. M. D.
F.
89
—.
10
7
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
19958
C. O'C.
F.
58
10
8
Carcinoma of stomach.
15650
W. F. H.
M.
61
5
11
12
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20156
J. McM.
M.
80
7
27
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis.
20502
D. J. W.
M.
56
2
15
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20595
B. B.
F.
48
1
8
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
11562
A. N.
F.
59
12
3
24
Pernicious anaemia.
20538
C. E. M.
F.
79
2
7
Chronic degenerative myocarditis.
20660
S. D.
M.
70
21
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
7763
J.D.
M.
70
19
8
27
Exhaustion due to terminal dementia.
20415
A. M. S.
F.
69
4
11
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
20662
F. C. C.
M.
85
	
20
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
19644
R.R.
M.
86
1
3
14
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis.
20627
T. A. R.
M.
71
1
9
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20705
W. S.
M.
52
6
Coronary thrombosis. STATISTICAL TABLES.                                                  T 39
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943,
Essondale,
New Westminster, and
Saanich—Continued.
Register
Time in Hospital.
No.
Initials.
Sex.
Age.
Certified Cause.
-
Years.
Months.
Days.
20370
B. H.
F.
66
5
15
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
4910
F. P.
F.
79
26
4
11
Carcinoma of large bowel; bronchopneumonia.
16520
J. A.
M.
77
4
11
27
Cerebral haemorrhage.
17665
C. A. E.
M.
74
3
7
13
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20430
J. T.
M.
84
4
28
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
18224
S. R.
F.
72
2
14
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
20381
D. R.
M.
49
5
28
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
20672
E. N. D.
M.
48
1
11
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
15160
F. F.
M.
75
6
8
27
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
20613
A. A. B.
F.
74
2
11
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
17558
C. M. G.
F.
76
2
10
15
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
5104
A' s.
F.
70
25
10
11
Chronic myocarditis.
20760
J. H.
M.
64
4
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
20742
E. J. H.
M.
25
12
Exhaustion due to acute mania.
20251
J. W. C.
M.
77
8
2
Chronic degenerative myocarditis.
20666
C. A. P.
M.
54
2
Adenocarcinoma of stomach.
10836
H.N.
F.
80
13
7
25
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20735
J. P.
M.
55
22
Exhaustion due to acute mania.
6914
V. J. W.
M.
72
21
8
11
Exhaustion due to schizophrenia.
8585
H. S.
M.
45
17
11
15
Chronic myocarditis.
18746
H. K.
M.
83
2
5
21
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
16957
A. L. Y.
F.
83
4
6
19
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
3917
C. L. B.
M.
70
29
1
20
Degenerative myocarditis.
12824
M. H. W.
F.
71
10
4
15
Acute cellulitis of perineum.
19412
G. M.
M.
32
1
8
5
Bronchopneumonia.
20719
R. G.
M.
57
1
12
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
17475
I. G.
F.
34
3
11
11
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20701
J. M.
M.
90
1
26
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
10731
L. S.
F.
54
13
10
12
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20780
C. A. H.
M.
87
21
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
19906
W. F.
M.
73
1
1
10
Exhaustion due to manic depressive psychosis.
20737
P. K.
M.
60
1
13
Coronary thrombosis.
20506
M. E.
F.
95
5
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
19047
E. M. B.
F.
67
2
2
8
Cerebral haemorrhage.
10459
H. T.
M.
64
14
4
7
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
19787
B. F.
M.
22
1
3
15
Exhaustion due to juvenile general paresis due
to congenital syphilis.
16813
J. S.
M.
73
4
9
15
Exhaustion due to involutional melancholia.
19925
T. F.
M.
74
1
1
13
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20816
R. G.
M.
72
13
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
18673
W. A. McK.
M.
69
2
7
16
Exhaustion due to arteriosclerotic dementia.
20828
H. M. T.
M.
66
11
Exhaustion due to acute mania.
20254
J. C. R.
M.
76
9
15
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
5830
J. S.
M.
55
24
9
Exhaustion of schizophrenia.
15996
F. F.
M.
63
5
9
28
Exhaustion due to general paresis.
13432
S.N.
M.
40
9
5
27
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20336
M.S.
F.
85
8
12
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.
20470
C. McG.
F.
85
5
28
Exhaustion due to senile dementia.                    _
19649
E. D. H.
F.
77
1
5
29
Chronic myocarditis.
16857
M. P. S.
M.
35
4
9
6
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20044
J. C.
M.
58
1
11
Exhaustion due to manic depressive psychosis.
14497
L. J. M.
M.
40
7
9
30
Exhaustion due to Parkinson's syndrome.
4998
L. M.
M.
79
25
3
26
Bronchopneumonia.
11025
J. 0.
M.
39
12
7
24
Myocarditis.
10016
J. A. M.
M.
51
14
6
Carcinoma.
6022
T. J. L.
M.
48
23
4
Endocarditis.
6077
W. S. W.
M.
64
23
8
Coronary thrombosis.
1239
M. T.
M.
75
40
6
25
Coronary thrombosis ; myocardial deterioration.
9073
T. B. M.
M.
60
16
9
14
Cerebral haemorrhage.
8183
H. A.
M.
74
18
9
26
Myocardial degeneration.
13851
J. W. O.
M.
25
7
11
13
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20172
V. L. M.
1
F.
4 mo.
20
Exhaustion of idiocy.
m T 40
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Register
Time in Hospital.
Certified Cause.
No.
Initials.
Sex.
Age.
Years.
Months.
Days.
#
20069
C. G. C.
M.
8
2
27
Exhaustion of idiocy.
12852
E. M. G.
F.
15
9
8
14
Exhaustion of idiocy.
20092
H. G.
M.
2
4
7
Exhaustion of hydrocephalic idiocy.
14634
A. L. P.
M.
17
7
....
12
Myocarditis ; toxaemia from anuria ;  rupture of
urethra.
15107
G. L. P.
M.
30
6
4
7
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
11021
D. M. S.
F.
39
12
10
4
Exhaustion of idiocy.
4096
J. A. B.
M.
77
28
3
11
Chronic myocarditis ; arteriosclerosis.
20008
M. E. A.
F.
2
6
21
Bronchopneumonia.
10594
W. G.
F.
21
13
7
23
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
10396
R. E. G.
F.
29
14
13
Exhaustion due to epilepsy.
11022
C. s.
F.
31
13
.—
8
Exhaustion of idiocy.
11012
E. I. G.
F.
33
13
1
13
Bronchopneumonia.
5400
P. N.
M.
61
24
10
8
Carcinoma of the tongue.
14854
G. M. W.
F.
9
6
11
19
Exhaustion of idiocy.
18875
T. M. H.
F.
17
2
1
17
Bronchopneumonia.
18129
E. L. L.
F.
6
2
11
25
Exhaustion of idiocy.
18539
S. W.
M.
18
2
5
1
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
9968
D. 0.
M.
67
15
9
Hypostatic pneumonia.
7897
J.L.
M.
28
20
4
9
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
20450
B. M. Mc.
F.
3
4
24
Exhaustion of idiocy.
12409
C. H. G.
M.
18
10
11
25
Exhaustion of idiocy.
13809
H. C.
M.
27
8
9
1
Pulmonary tuberculosis (haemorrhage).
7859
A. E. M.
M.
22
19
6
28
Exhaustion of idiocy.
16934
J. L. F.
M.
*
4
8
Exhaustion of idiocy.
20787
M. B.
F.
2 mo.
1
3
Bronchopneumonia. BURSAR'S REPORT. . T 41
PART II— FINANCIAL.
BURSAR'S REPORT.
Essondale, B.Cv December 13th, 1943.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
General Superintendent of Provincial Mental Hospitals
and Provincial Psychiatrist, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—In submitting to you the annual report of the business in connection with
the Provincial Mental Hospitals of British Columbia for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1943, I beg to enclose you herewith balance-sheets, receipts and disbursements,
profit and loss, and other statistical statements covering the financial operation of the
institutions and Colony Farm for the year.
The daily average patient population as shown by your clinical books for the year
was 3,931 persons as against 3,870 in 1941-42, a gain of only 61 patients. This is the
smallest increase in many years and reflects credit on the medical staff for a large
discharge at this time when beds are so desperately needed.
The gross operating costs for the combined institutions was $1,524,874.76. This
figure embraces Colony Farm costs as well as the expenditures on outside clinics,, also
expenditures made by the Public Works Department on maintenance and repairs of
buildings, plant and equipment, etc. This is an increase of $44,476.79 over year
1941-42. Revenue collections covering maintenance charges amounted to $261,986.32
for the current year as against $238,532.90 last year, or an increase of $23,453.42.
The gross per capita cost of the combined mental institutions was $1.06 per patient
per day and is only 1.2 cents over the previous year's figure of $1,048, while the net
operating expense per capita cost of 88 cents per day is only a small fraction of a cent
above the 1941-42 figure of 87.91 cents.
In segregating the institutions under the respective average populations, total
expenditure and yearly and daily per capita costs, please refer to detailed statement
attached and you will note that the New Westminster Mental Hospital had a gross per
capita cost of $1.23 per day and a net cost of $1.16; Essondale a gross per capita cost
of $1 per day and a net of 79 cents; Mental Home at Saanich showed a gross per capita
cost of $1.36 and a net cost of $1.23. The entire increase for the year was due to the
adjustment of salaries and wages for the medical and nursing staff.
For your information I wish to call attention to some extraordinary expenditures
which are included in our operating costs for the year under review. We completed
the elevator in the Male Building at Essondale at a cost of $3,000, which was charged
to this vote. We installed a 15-ton platform scale at the power-house at Essondale for
the weighing of coal at a cost of $2,000. There was installed in the new bakery at
Essondale an extra electric oven at a cost of $1,454, and a truck was purchased for the
Mental Home at Colquitz for $2,032, a charge against our operating costs.
In addition to the above the audit office installed extra equipment and made
changes in our accounting system, under the able direction of Mr. Harvey, the Deputy
Comptroller-General, which in future will give us valuable information for both the
office and the Department and facilitate the work of the general stores. This, however,
has cost money and additional staff and supplies, which is also a charge against our
costs.
As regards comparison of inventories, I might say both New Westminster and
Essondale have decreased by $10,511.11 during the current year while that of the
Mental Home, Saanich, has increased by $7,707.29. T 42 . MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
The total net Colony Farm expenditures of $122,088.11, which, due to increase in
inventories, was further reduced to the net farm cost of $120,979.87, has been absorbed
into our operating costs as stated above, and if you will turn to my report to you of
the operations of the Colony Farm you will find full details as regards these figures.
The large increase of cannery produce, consisting of fruits, vegetables, jams, and
marmalades, etc., has been of enormous value to the institution in assisting in the diet
of our large population over the year. Milk supplies for the institution still are short
and unless something is done in regard to increasing the herd we will be obliged to
make some other arrangement for extra supply.
The past year has been an extremely difficult one in obtaining supplies of every
description and, as the war goes on, it is becoming increasingly difficult to even obtain
the absolute necessities. The matter of coupons for our quotas of tea, coffee, sugar,
butter, meat, syrups, and canned vegetables has worked out remarkably well and by
the proper co-operation between the institution and the various Controllers we have had
sufficient for our needs. The handling of the coupons in connection with the staffs'
ration books, however, has not been as satisfactory as might be, due to the broken hours
and the many days off in order to make up the eight-hour day. This especially applies
to the night staff.
I wish to publicly compliment Mr. K. Moodie, of the Public Works Department,
under the jurisdiction of the Purchasing Commission, for his good work in obtaining
adequate fuel for the institution's needs during the winter.
Our Department has also adapted itself to the new order of things necessitated by
the new Purchasing Commission, and I am happy to say very cordial relations exist
and the business of the institution goes on with as little dislocation as possible. In an
institution of this size, with so many calls for supplies of an urgent nature, it is sometimes difficult to carry out all the exact regulations and requirements of the " Purchasing Commission Act."
Before closing I wish to take this opportunity of thanking you, Sir, and all Departments coming under this office, for the co-operation, assistance, and fine work they have
rendered during this year under review; especially to Mr. Lonsdale, Foreman of Public
Works, and Mr. Headridge and Mr. O'Reilly, Stewards of the Essondale and New
Westminster Stores respectively, all of whom handled a big job during the year.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Gowan S. Macgowan,
Bursar. NEW WESTMINSTER. T 43
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, NEW WESTMINSTER.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1943.
Assets.
Cemetery  $610.89
Buildings  .  $953,186.38
Plant and equipment        21,200.82
Furniture and fixtures  ,       32,233.46
     1,006,620.66
Inventories (unissued stores) —
Medical care, drugs, etc.        $2,341.00
Nursing and ward service supplies        22,168.82
Dietary          5,844.54
  30,354.36
Buildings, grounds, and general maintenance  2,752.05
Petty Cash Account—
Cash on hand and in bank  150.00
Total assets   $1,040,487.96
Liabilities.
Government of Province of British Columbia—
Capital expenditure    $1,040,337.96
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
Accountable advance  150.00
$1,040,487.96 T 44
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1943.
Assets.
Land	
Buildings  	
Furniture and fixtures
Plant and equipment ___.
Inventories (unissued stores) —
Office, stores, and general stationery
Medical care, drugs, etc.	
Nursing and ward service supplies ____
Dietary  .	
Light, water, heat, power, and fuel ...
Cars and trucking, parts, etc. 	
Buildings, grounds, and general maintenance
Bursar's Petty Cash Account—
Advance, New Westminster Institution __
Vouchers collectable	
Cash on hand and in bank	
Pay-roll Account—
Provincial Government, vouchers collectable
Less overdraft at bank	
Patients' Trust Fund-
Cash on hand and in bank
Liabilities.
Government of Province of British Columbia—
Capital expenditure 	
Bursar's petty cash advance	
Pay-roll account advance	
Patients' Trust Account—
Cash on hand and in bank
$4,361,106.54
113,709.72
59,016.98
$1,394.54
16,159.16
55,080.00
31,097.48
7,954.71
377.25
$150.00
332.39
1,017.61
$80,406.33
79,406.33
$117,763.50
4,533,833.24
112,063.14
26,915.04
1,500.00
1,000.00
33,875.27
$4,826,950.19
$4,790,574.92
1,500.00
1,000.00
$4,793,074.92
33,875.27
$4,826,950.19 SAANICH. T 45
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, SAANICH.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1943.
Assets.
Buildings   $291,174.59
Furniture and fixtures        20,095.91
  $311,270.50
Airing and recreation courts _____    750.00
'Inventories (unissued stores) —
Nursing and ward service supplies      $12,206.26
Dietary         8,917.65
Light, water, heat, power, and fuel          1,498.14
■       22,622.05
Buildings, grounds, and general maintenance          2,259.71
Cash on hand and in bank—
Petty Cash Account  $200.00
Patients' Trust Fund  459.09
659.09
$337,561.35
Liabilities.
Government of Province of British Columbia—
Capital expenditure _-_. $336,902.26
Current advance   200.00
  $337,102.26
Patients' Trust Account—
Cash on hand and in bank    459.09
$337,561.35 T 46
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
PSYCHOPATHIC DIVISION.
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1943.
Salaries 	
Less rent deductions
$14,755.30
360.00
$14,395.30
Expenses—
Office supplies	
Telephone and telegraph
Travelling expenses	
Fuel	
Water	
Light and power	
Janitor's service and supplies
Incidental expenses 	
$69.42
174.21
1,056.03
183.89
16.35
77.98
400.00
540.89
2,518.77
$16,914.07
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population.
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT.
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1943.
Salaries  $18,859.63
Less rent deductions   600.00
$18,259.63
Expenses—
Office supplies	
Travelling expenses
Incidentals expense
$884.05
197.16
10.58
1,091.79
$19,351.42
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population. NEW WESTMINSTER. T 47.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, NEW WESTMINSTER.
Receipts and Disbursements for Twelve Months ended March 31st, 1943.
Receipts.
Maintenance—
Receipts for patients' maintenance      $15,587.77
Miscellaneous—
Sale of sundry O.T. articles  65.45
Total receipts      $15,653.22
Excess of disbursements over receipts _'_     257,057.38
$272,710.60
Disbursements.
Salaries  $160,075.87
Less room and board deductions       15,148.12
  $144,927.75
Office, stores, and general  1,051.58
Medical care   3,323.54
Nursing and ward services   10,885.27
Dietary   55,618.21
Light, water, heat, and power  29,537.10,
Laundry   611.05
Cars and trucking  244.30
Occupational therapy   25.36
Miscellaneous expense   4,466.30
Provincial Secretary's Department vouchers   $250,690.46
Plus decrease in inventories         2,975.31
$253,665.77
Buildings, grounds, and general maintenance—
Public Works Department vouchers     $19,422.78
Less increase in inventories  377.95
       19,044.83
Total operating costs   $272,710.60 T 48 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE.
Receipts and Disbursements for Twelve Months ended March 31st, 1943.
Receipts.
Maintenance—
Receipts for patients' maintenance  $227,297.69
Receipts from municipalities  ___..        4,479.62
•      $231,777.31
Miscellaneous—
Sale of sundry O.T. articles   799.45
Total receipts       $232,576.76
Excess of disbursements over revenue        878,599.20
$1,111,175.96
Disbursements.
Salaries   $565,870.00
Less room and board deductions  r___      77,118.54
 :  $488,751.46
Office, stores, and general  10,201.33
Medical care   42,325.36
Nursing and ward services  66,372.12
Dietary   283,771.59
Light, water, heat, and power  97,225.26
Laundry  7  1,864.26
Cars and trucking   3,230.57
Occupational therapy  1,511.39
Miscellaneous expense   25,290.38
Provincial Secretary's Department vouchers   $1,020,543.72
Plus decrease in inventories   9,857.17
$1,030,400.89
Buildings, grounds, and general maintenance—
Public Works Department vouchers      $82,718.49
Less increase in inventories         1,943.42
  80,775.07
$1,111,175.96 SAANICH. T 49
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, SAANICH.
Receipts and Disbursements for Twelve Months ended March 31st, 1943.
Receipts.
"Maintenance—
Receipts for patients' maintenance     $13,756.34
Excess of disbursements over revenue     127,231.86
$140,988.20
Disbursements.
Salaries   $72,307.70
Less room and board deductions       5,458.84
  $66,848.86
Office, stores, and general  907.57
Medical care   1,565.18
Nursing and ward services   11,957.35
Dietary  _■___ 37,527.57
Light, water, heat, and power  11,310.63
Laundry   1,004.26
Cars and trucking  1,153.65
Miscellaneous expenses  8,879.13
Total Provincial Secretary's Department   $141,154.20
Less increase in inventories         7,502.80
$133,651.40
Buildings, grounds, and general maintenance—
Public Works Department vouchers     $7,541.29
Less increase in inventories  204.49
         7,336.80
$140,988.20 T 50
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
FINANCIAL TABLES.
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each Year,
the Total Amounts spent for Maintenance, and Gross Per Capita Cost.
(For Past Ten Years.)
Year.
Average
Number in
Residence.
Maintenance
Expenditure.
Per Capita
Cost.
389.85
2,102.92
258.95
430.00
2,191.48
263.17
489.72
2,317.22
262.56
507.26
2,361.31
257.50
510,65
2,448.90
258.38
532.41
2,602.17
261.52
596.25
2,710.32
261.62
603.03
2,796.69
271.35
611.17 •
2,884.96
279.95
607.40
2,976.62
286.40
605.17
3,042.06
284.06
$171,767.80
685,279.78
100,862.54
159,996.23
661,657.29
90,782.29
181,335.00
714,027.74
95,963,92
193,317.83
771,489.05
96,608.79
219,117.21
844,164.44
98,070,47
225,208.71
934,572.97
102,822.42
251,759.54
990,851.72
107,104.86
263,036.99
1,044.253.55
115,171.63
269,354.39
1,114,944.32
114,496.86
265,107.15
1,080,329.80
134,961.02
272,710.60
1,111,175.96
140,988.20
$440.60
1932-33, Essondale                    1	
325.87
1932-33, Saanich .                       	
389.50
372.08
1933-34, Essondale                                   	
301.92
1933-34, Saanich 	
344.95
370.28
1934-35, Essondale    	
308.14
1934-35, Saanich       	
1935-36, New Westminster     	
365.49
381.10
1935-36. Essondale                    	
326.72
1935-36, Saanich   .                   _ 	
375.18
1936-37, New Westminster                     	
429.09
1936-37, Essondale                     	
344.71
1936-37, Saanich                        	
379.56
1937-38, New Westminster                 .....	
423.00
1937-38, Essondale ....  	
359.15
1937-38, Saanich	
393.17
1938-39, New Westminster      	
1938-39, Essondale	
422.24
365.58
1938-39, Saanich  	
409.39
1939-40, New Westminster     	
436.19
1939-40, Essondale              	
373.38
1939-40, Saanich 	
424.43
440.71
1940-41, Essondale       	
386.46
1940-41, Saanich  — .. .-.	
408.99
436.46
362 93
1941-42, Saanich .                                        	
1942-43, New Westminster                     	
450.76
1942-43, Essondale                                  . .
365 28
1942-43, Saanich                	
496 43 FINANCIAL TABLES.
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MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
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Total
Gross.
$272,710.60
1,111,175.96
140,988.20
Buildings,
Grounds,
and General Maintenance.
$19,044.83
80,775.07
13,756.34
sll
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$4,466.30
25,290.38
8,879.13
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$25.36
1,511.39
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$244.30
2,853.32
1,153.65
Laundry.
$611.05
1,864.26
1,004.26
Light,
Water,
Heat, and
Power.
$29,537.10
96,122.55
10,010.10
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$57,282.00
287,670.62
35,659.20
Nursing
and
Ward
Services.
$14,235.83
76,986.24
7,623.45
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$1,284.50
40,543.88
1,565.18
Office
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and
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$1,051.58
8,806.79
907.57
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$144,927.75
488,751.46
66,848.86
Year.
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Table C.—Summary Statement showing the Gross and Net Per Capita Cost
of Patients in the Three Institutions.
Gross operating costs—
New Westminster    $272,710.60
Essondale   1,111,175.96
Saanich        140,988.20
Gross cost for the three institutions  $1,524,874.76
Less collections remitted to Treasury—
New Westminster      $15,653.22
Essondale  :      232,576.76
Saanich        13,756.34
        261,986.32
Net cost for the three institutions »  $1,262,888.44
Average daily population for the three institutions      3,931
Gross per capita cost, one year  $387.91
Gross per capita cost, one day         1.06
Net per capita cost, one year     321.26
Net per capita cost, one day         0.88 T 54
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
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MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
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■rQ FINANCIAL TABLES.
T 57
Remarks.
New
Westminster.
Essondale.
Saanich.
Total patients in residence, March 31st, 1943..
Daily average population for year.	
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year-
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day.._
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year	
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day..
601
605
$450.76
1.23
424.90
1.16
3,045
3,042
$365.28
1.00
288.82
.79
279
284
$496.43
1.36
448.00
1.23
Revenue of Mental Hospitals for Past Ten Years.
1932-33   $144,739.14
1933-34     152,575.60
1934-35     152,239.56
1935-36     166,367.83
1936-37     185,269.93
1937-38     207,343.84
1938-39   $209,216.39
1939-40     245,837.55
1940-41     229,045.45
1941-42     238,532.90
1942-43     261,986.32 T 58
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
TAILOR'S REPORT, 1942-43.
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
Uniform clothing—
1,538% yards of uniform serge at $4.35_
Stock-
37 patients' suits at $22.50	
85 patients' coats at $15	
32 heavy canvas camisoles at $5	
10 heavy canvas camisoles, double-lined, at
130 khaki shirts, labour only, $2	
11 khaki overalls, labour only, $3	
6 khaki special shirts, labour only, $2.75_
Alterations—
60 suits altered at $1	
429 coats altered at 50 cents__
447 pants altered at 40 cents_.
82 vests altered at 40 cents..
Relining—
21 coats relined at $4.50	
Pressing—
4,348 coats pressed at 15 cents..
4,650 pants pressed at 10 cents.
2,420 vests pressed at 5 cents—_
Repairs—
1,691 coats repaired and pressed at 50 cents	
2,286 pants repaired and pressed at 40 cents	
1,087 vests repaired and pressed at 35 cents	
1,163 overalls repaired and pressed at 35 cents.
$832.50
1,275.00
160.00
60.00
260.00
33.00
16.50
$60.00
214.50
178.80
32.80
$652.20
465.00
121.00
$845.50
914.40
380.45
407.05
$6,693.57
2,637.00
486.10
94.50
1,238.20
2,547.40
$13,696.77 TAILOR'S REPORT.
T 59
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster.
Uniform clothing—
69 uniform suits at' $45—
61 uniform pants at $10..
$3
,105.00
610.00
Stock—
66 patients' suits at $22.50     $1
43 patients' pants at $6.50	
57 playalls, labour only, at $1.50	
9 playalls at $2.75	
8 overall pants at $4	
1 overall pants at $3.50 '.	
4 heavy canvas suits at $10	
1 heavy canvas coat at $5	
1 heavy canvas coat at $2.50	
2 heavy canvas sheets at $8.50	
10 heavy canvas camisoles at $5	
9 heavy canvas wringers at 75 cents.
2 repair-bags at $1.50	
4 working overalls at $4.50	
90 mattress-covers at $1 _____
89 draw-sheets at 75 cents	
167 blankets rebound at 15 cents.
Alterations—
62 suits altered at $1	
436 coats altered at 50 cents___
511 pants altered at 40 cents.
102 vests altered at 40 cents..
Relining—
148 coats relined at $4.50.
Pressing—
975 coats pressed at 15 cents
1,122
729
pants pressed at 10 cents.
vests pressed at 5 cents	
Repairs-
1,647
2,282
861
1,183 overalls repaired and pressed at 35 cents.
coats repaired and pressed at 50 cents_
pants repaired and pressed at 40 cents,
vests repaired and pressed at 35 cents..
,485.00
279.50
85.50
24.75
32.00
3.50
40.00
5.00
2.50
17.00
50.00
6.75
3.00
18.00
90.00
66.75
25.05
$62.00
218.00
204.40
40.80
$146.25
112.20
36.45
$823.50
912.80
301.35
414.05
$3,715.00
2,234.30
525.20
666.00
294.90
2,451.70
3,887.10 T 60 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Provincial Mental Home, Saanich.
33 uniform suits at $45     $1,485.00
31 uniform pants at $10  310.00
     $1,795.00
Statement of Tailor-shop, 1942-43.
Production—
For Mental Hospital, Essondale  $13,696.77
For Mental Hospital, New Westminster      9,887.10
For Mental Home, Saanich      1,795.00
$25,378.87
Material on hand, March 31st, 1943      2,778.32
 $28,157.19
Costs—
Material on hand, March 31st, 1942     $1,623.03
Salaries—
Tailors  $7,980.00
Seamstresses      3,312.00
Shirt-maker           80.00
     11,372.00
Electric power       $100.00
Electric light          60.00
  160.00
Materials purchased, 1942-43     13,194.87
     26,349.90
Profit on operations     $1,807.29
SHOEMAKER'S REPORT, 1942-43.
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
New work—
1 pair special boots         $10.00
Repairs—
780 pairs boots and slippers       1,780.70
    $1,790.70
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster.
New work—
1 dozen key-straps  $0.80
Repairs—
734 pairs boots and slippers  949.10
        $949.90 SHOEMAKER'S REPORT.
T 61
Statement of Shoemaker-shop, 1942-43.
Production—
Essondale 	
New Westminster 	
Material on hand, March 31st, 1943-
Costs—
Salary of shoemaker-
Material purchased __.
Light and power	
Material on hand, March 31st, 1942.
Profit on operations	
$1,790.70
949.90
$2,740.60
291.55
$1,692.00
896.17
35.00
144.25
$3,032.15
2,767.42
$264.73
PRODUCTION TABLES.
Articles made by Female Patients, Provincial Mental Hospital,
New Westminster, Year ended March 31st, 1943.
Aprons, nurses'   46
Aprons, kitchen  28
Bibs, nurses'   77
Bibs, children's   3
Belts, nurses' .  43
Bed-pan covers  12
Caps, nurses'   66
Cuffs, nurses'  (pairs)    71
Curtains  (pairs)    21
Dental gowns   6
Diapers  2
Dresses   153
Ironing-board covers   46
Kimonos   24
Laundry-bags   2
Mitts (pairs)  10
Nightgowns   283
Nightgown waists  32
Nightgown skirts        5
Nose and mouth masks      12
Panties     70
Pillow-slips   421
Press-covers      30
Princess slips      38
Sheets   497
Spreads, crib      18
Table-cloths        6
Towels, dish   324
Towels, hand     24
Towels, roller   118
Undervests  200
Uniform dresses  _     15
Uniform waists      57
Uniform skirts        2
Urn-bags      31 T 62
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Articles repaired at Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster,
Year ended March 31st, 1943.
Female mending-room—
Aprons, nurses'  155
Aprons, kitchen   369
Bibs, nurses'  47
Bibs, children's   67
Belts, nurses'   5
Bedspreads  127
Blankets  .  157
27
24
1
1
1
1
4
17
Blouses 	
Brassieres 	
Bathing-suits 	
Bed-pan covers	
Bonnets 	
Bootees (pairs) 	
Camisoles 	
Cuffs, nurses' 	
Curtains  (pairs)    8
Dresses   2,406
Diapers          50
Girdles   4
Gloves  (pairs)    1
Hose (pairs)  ■      561
Hoovers         31
Isolation gowns         14
Ironing-board covers         46
Kimonos         42
Laundry-bags   7
Nightgowns   2,079
Panties   1,797
Pillow-slips       302
Female mending-room—Continued.
Princess slips	
Pyjamas, suits 	
Sheets	
Sun-suits 	
Sweaters	
Table-cloths 	
Towels 	
Table-runners	
Undervests 	
Uniforms, nurses'	
Male mending-room—
Aprons, kitchen 	
Blankets 	
Bedspreads 	
Bathing-trunks 	
Combinations 	
Drawers 	
Laundry-bags 	
Nightshirts  	
Pillow-slips 	
Pyj amas _■	
Socks (pairs) 	
Sweaters 	
Sheets 	
Shirts 	
Towels 	
Undershirts 	
White coats	
302
201
1,190
47
447
30
473
9
1,406
79
68
45
28
18
173
949
9
253
171
54
3,958
36
321
900
212
806
39
1942.
April 	
May 	
June 	
July  	
August —
September
October  _.
November
December .
1943.
January 	
February  .
March 	
Occupational Therapy, Mental Hospital, Essondale,
Year ended March 31st, 1943.
Wood-working Department.
of Material.
Value.
$96.40
$256.10
101.80
268.95
81.45
207.05
60.55
177.20
26.30
92.70
102.15
243.10
62.50
192.95
170.60
385.40
70.95
182.40
81.75
203.50
148.15
366.35
121.05
286.30
$1,123.65
$2,862.00 PRODUCTION TABLES.
T 63
Occupational Therapy, Mental Hospital, Essondale, Year ended
March 31st, 1943—Continued.
1942.
April 	
May  	
June 	
July 	
August	
September
October  ___.
November
December .
1943.
January ___.
February .
March 	
Upholstery, Weaving, and Basketry Department.
Cost of Material.
   $175.00
   160.65
168.90
270.31
304.90
318.05
271.65
196.25
250.40
167.30
270.95
211.25
$2,765.61
Value.
$379.25
334.65
356.40
511.06
562.40
622.10
508.75
397.10
559.40
406.30
522.95
486.00
$5,646.36
Seiving-room—New Garments made by Patients.
Completed work—
Aprons 	
Blanket 	
  70
  1
Bags, tea and coffee  344
Bags, sterile supply  17
Bags, T.B. isolation   36
Bags, sugar  2
Bags, paper, sand  480
Bags, mending   1
Bags, carpet storage  2
Bags, laundry   10
Bandages, triangular  56
Binders   57
Bloomers   466
Bureau scarves  2
Caps, cooks'  24
Capes, examination
Covers, bed-pan 	
Covers, mattress	
Covers, bench cushion 	
Covers, hot-water bottle	
Covers, drug-basket 	
Covers, sterile dressing       24
6
96
2
2
20
6
Covers, screen (sets)
Chair-back pad	
Cushions	
Cushions, hand-woven
Cushions, bench	
Curtains, net	
Curtains, screen 	
Curtain tie-backs 	
4
1
4
6
2
74
3
16
Completed work—Continued.
Dusters	
  70
Drapes (pairs)   46
Dresses, print  1,231
Dresses, strong   637
  1
  6
  2
 •_____ 210
  26
  6
Dresses, cotton serge
Flower-containers 	
Foot-stools 	
Face-cloths 	
Glove-cases	
Gowns, X-ray	
Gowns, night  1,346
Gowns, open-back night   158
Gowns, nurses' T.B.   60
Gowns, isolation   12
Hankies   86
Jackets  117
Jackets, pneumonia  12
Knitted cloths  6
Mops, cloth   5
Mops, floor  21
Panties   622
Pillow-slips  4,105
Pillow-covers   2
Runners, hand-woven  14
Sheets, hospital  3,637
Sheets, hydrotherapy flannel  5
Sheets, nurses'   307
Sheets, lithotomy  8
Serviettes   34
Socks, (pairs)   - 79 T 64
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
Occupational Therapy, Mental Hospital, Essondale, Year ended
March 31st, 1943—Continued.
Sewing-room—New Garments
Completed work—Continued.
Socks, plaster  3
Socks, lap  12
Shirts, bed  24
Shirts, night   134
Slippers, cloth (pairs)   87
Sweaters, hand-knitted  6
Slips   671
Table-cloths  89
Table-cloths, 6-ft.   19
Table-cloths, 8-ft.   10
Table-claths, 10-ft.   5
Table-cloths, 12-ft.   17
Table-cloths, 15-ft.     34
made by Patients—Continued.
Completed work—Continued.
Table-cloths, damask  58
Table-covers, crochet  4
Tray-cloths  38
Towels, face  1,009
Towels, surgical  112
Towels, hand   20
Towels, tea  2,455
Towels, roller   417
Towels, doctors'  126
Uniforms, dining-room  7
Vests   640
Wash-cloths   234
Aprons
Bibs
Nurses' Uniforms (New).
     819 Caps   362
     916 Cuffs   201
       73 Uniforms   396
Bibs, probationers' 	
Belts     218
Nurses' Uniforms (Repaired).
Aprons  1,388 Bibs	
Belts
105
       65
Uniforms     438
Patients' Mending.
Aprons
282
6
1
10
1
1
Kimonos
89
Bags, laundry 	
Bags, mending	
B ath-mats 	
Barber cloth	
Binder 	
Blankets      239
Bloomers      542
Coats, suit  1,191
Coats, white     284
Coats, doctors'       31
Covers, hot-water bottle         2
Covers, cushion         3
Dresses, print  1,345
Dresses, strong 1,488
Dresses, night     145
Dresses, isolation          2
Drawers 3,088
Drawers, X-ray         3
Gowns, isolation      712
Gowns, doctors'         2
Gowns, babies'         6
Jackets, pneumonia       11
Jumpers       59
Overalls      847
Overalls, white        25
Pants, suit 1,566
Pants, white         7
Pillow-cases      749
Sacks, burlap      161
Shirts, night      528
Shirts, under 3,533
Shirts, top  3,250
Sheets 3,277
Slips      735
Socks 13,485
Spreads     953
Stupe-wringers         5
Towels, bath     417
Towels, roller        49
Towels, hand        18
Towels, tea          7
Table-cloths     137
Tray-cloths         2
Vests, ladies'      740
Vests, men's      250 COLONY FARM. T 65
PART III —COLONY FARM.
FARM SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT.
Essondale, B.C., December 6th, 1943.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
General Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith is the financial statement of the operations of Colony Farm, as
prepared by the Bursar's office, for the year ended March 31st, 1943.
This has been the most difficult year in the history of the farm. A state brought
about by conditions beyond our control, all well known and needing no further comment.
Every effort has been put forth to keep up the supply and quality of the food required,
but in several instances we have fallen short on both counts, most notable of which were
potatoes and, for a time, milk.
The partial failure of the potato-crop, due to a very wet growing season, hence
causing blight, which was common throughout the district and brought near famine
conditions to the whole of British Columbia. Our total crop of just over 500 tons was
some 100 tons or 20 per cent, short. The consequent higher price more than paid for
the cost of production, but profit is not our main idea as compared to supplying the food
your Institution requires. The shortage in milk-supply increased the cost per 100
pounds and was due simply to the shortage and kind of labour, making it impossible
to properly handle the stock, especially at milking-time. From this condition we see
very little relief. As far as the herd is concerned it is on the upward trend and we
have better cows than ever before—as proven by those handled by experienced men.
The kind and quantity of food has been almost as good as previous years on account of
going into the year with a good big inventory of feed and at a reasonable price. This
will be the last year that this feed condition will obtain as the price is steadily advancing, and now some feeds are from 30 to 50 per cent, higher, while many protein foods
are unobtainable; so we must look for further increase in cost of production, and we
are unable, to date, to share in milk subsidies granted dairymen. The quality of our
dairy product, although still high, has suffered some. There has been a very big
demand for high-class breeding stock and we have disposed, at a profit, of all the young
bulls, both in this Province and abroad.    The health of our herd is excellent.
In the cannery, in spite of the sugar restrictions, we were able to make about the
usual pack by changing our procedure to meet changed conditions. This operation is
not only profitable but most necessary when such goods are so much in demand and
almost unobtainable.
In spite of the unfavourable condition the hog department kept up the usual supply
of pork products, but at increased cost of production due to conditions well known to
you. This section must have some accommodation prepared for it or we will be in grave
danger, from a health point of view and of making a loss. The utilization of the
garbage from your ever-increasing population makes this department one of the most
essential and profitable ones, but it now needs attention.
Crops of field and garden, except potatoes, were about at par and we are managing
to keep quite well in line with both staple and green vegetables.
For the time being our efforts are to produce the needed food for your Institutions
rather than doing anything fancy by way of profit.
P. H. Moore,
Superintendent. T 66
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
BURSAR'S REPORT ON COLONY FARM.
Essondale, B.C., December 10th, 1943.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
General Superintendent of Mental Hospitals, Essondale, B.C.
SIR,—I beg to submit herewith for your consideration balance-sheets, profit and
loss statements, and various departmental reports covering the operations of Colony
Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1943.
Profit for the year is shown as $35,208.18 and this, reduced by $19,000, estimated
as the value of patient-labour, leaves a net profit of $16,208.18, as against a profit of
$19,289.43 for the previous year.
Farm expenditure through the Provincial Secretary's Department amounted to
$139,061.09 and through the Department of Public Works, for maintenance and repairs
of buildings and plant, $10,394.69—a total of $149,455.78. Against this there was
remitted to the Treasury Department the sum of $27,367.67 from sale of live stock and
produce, leaving a net expenditure of $122,088.11. An increase in inventories has further reduced the net farm cost to $120,979.87, and this figure has been absorbed into
the Essondale and New Westminster statements as a part of our per capita cost;
$110,585.18 as a charge against dietary and $10,394.69 against buildings, grounds, and
general maintenance.
The Essondale hospital was supplied, during the year, with produce and services
to a value of $134,531.80 and the New Westminster institution to a value of $24,693.66,
making a total of $159,225.46. Tables setting forth particulars are to be found in the
reports.
Field crops; the hog department; orchard and truck-garden; calves department,
and the fruit and vegetable cannery were the chief sources of profit.
Pasteurized milk was supplied at a cost of 24.9 cents per gallon as against 21.2
cents in 1941-42;   increase due to high price of feed, and will likely be worse.
Full particulars may be had from the departmental profit and loss and other
statements making up the year's report.
Respectfully yours.
Gowan S. Macgowan,
Bursar. COLONY' FARM. T 67
BALANCE-SHEET, COLONY FARM.
Year ended March 31st, 1943.
Assess.
Land Account—
Colony Farm   $117,484.86
Wilson Ranch      108,164.35
  $225,649.21
Buildings and plant      251,643.38
Water system          4,411.25
Bridge        17,535.89
Fencing, pavement, etc.         68,818.67
Inventories—
Equipment   $25,803.00
Bulls   3,625.00
Cows   42,225.00
Yearlings   8,540.00
Calves   1,138.06
Work-horses   4,405.00
Hogs   16,641.00
Feed     16,231.56
Gasoline    62.44
Orchard and truck-garden   12,276.00
     130,947.06
Accounts receivable          3,023.55
Growing Crops Apportionment Account         3,474.78
$705,503.79
Liabilities.
Surplus Account   $415,584.35
Profits to March 31st, 1942   $273,711.26
Profits for year 1942-43   $35,208.18
Less patient-labour      19,000.00
       16,208.18
     289,919.44
$705,503.79 T 68
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT.
Year ended March 31st, 1943.
Department.
Debits.
Credits.
Loss
(Deaths and
Destroyed).
Loss.
Gain.
$61,040.77
7,852.60
1,174.30
1,900.50
$63,360.17
10,701.52
6,413.28
3,334.07
633.80
200.00
14,305.30
56,592.46
26,400.38
25,275.15
1,650.00
2,024.50
858.92
38,338.88
$2,319.40
$697.00
76.40
3,546.02
5,315.38
1,433.57
Bulls....-	
633.80
290.00
15,195.58
36,657.74
22,384.73
17,463.47
1,582.84
1,858.21
32,124.75
15,354.86
$90.00
890.28
	
19,934.72
4,015.65
7,811.68
Tractor  	
67.16
166.29
	
31,265.83
22,984.02
$214,880.25
$250,088.43
$773.40
$32,246.11
$68,227.69
lestroyed stoc.
, and patient-
32,246.11
Profit on operations (exclusive of loss from deaths,
$35,981.58
Deaths and destroyed stock	
$773.40
Patient-labour	
.  19,000.00
19,773.40
Profit for year
$16,208.18 COLONY FARM. T 69
DAIRY AND HERDS DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1943.
Expenses.
Total expense for year   $61,040.77
Production.
Dairy produce supplies  $60,860.17
Credit for manure    . 2,500.00
     63,360.17
Profit for year      $2,319.40
Production and Costs Account, March 31st, 1943.
Dairy— ,
Salaries and upkeep  1     $2,143.63
Fuel  370.00
     $2,513.63
General herd—
Salaries and upkeep  $23,647.88
Fuel     33,496.76
Pasturage        1,382.50
■ —    58,527.14
$61,040.77
Less allowance for manure       2,500.00
$58,540.77
Milk Production for Year 1942-43.
Production.
1942. Lb.                             Cost.
April    230,717 	
May -  241,505 	
June    222,938 	
July   224,862 	
August    210,743
September   188,990 	
October     188,287 	
November   181,580 	
December  :  173,693 	
1943.
January   161,192 	
February   153,287 	
March   171,783 	
2,349,577 $58,540.77
Average cost of production, pasteurizing, etc., 24.9 cents per gallon. T 70
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
MATURE COW DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1943.
Asset Value.
 _--_--       $725.00
     3,777.80
5 cows died	
29 cows sold	
24 cows butchered      3,349.70
Gain on inventory .	
$7,852.50
Profit
Selling Price.
$28.00
3,934.21
3,586.41
3,152.90
$10,701.52
7,852.50
$2,849.02
CALVES DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1943.
7 calves died    	
Asset Value.
           $29.90
Selling Price.
4 calves destroyed 	
                46.50
49 calves sold      _ 	
______                937.40
5,680.00
22 calves vealed              _ __
                         160.50
489.10
Hides sold          	
44.18
Manure, credit         _     .
200.00
$1,174.30
$6,413.28
1,174.30
Profit    	
$5,238.98
.
YEARLING DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1943.
3 yearlings butchered
21 yearlings sold 	
Manure, credit ____ __
Profit
Asset Value.
Selling Price.
$246.70
$243.07
1,653.80
2,590.00
510.00
$1,900.50
$3,334.07
1,900.50
$1,433.57
.    BULL DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1943.
Gain on inventory, profit
Asset Value.
Selling Price.
$633.80 COLONY FARM. T 71
WORK-HORSE DEPARTMENT.
Sales and Deaths Account, March 31st, 1943.
Asset Value. Selling Price.
2 horses sold  $200.00 $200.00
Loss on inventory       90.00
Loss      $90.00
$290.00 $200.00
200.00 -
Work-horse Labour Account, March 31st, 1943.
Salaries and upkeep ___: .  $11,011.46
Feed and pasturage       4,184.12
$15,195.58
Less credit for manure         250.00
$14,945.58
Horse-labour charged to crop and other departments @ 35 cents per hour____    14,055.30
Loss        $890.28
Note.—Against cost of $14,945.58, 40,158 hours of horse-labour were performed
at a cost of 37.2 cents per horse-hour.
Horse-labour performed, March 31st, 1943.
1942.                                                                                                                                                           Hours. Cost.
April     3,577 	
May  -_     3,294 	
June     3,447 	
July      3,669 	
August      3,694 	
September      2,987 	
October  1     3,297 	
November     3,293 — 	
December      3,140 	
1943.
January     2,902 	
February    3,290 	
March     3,568 	
40,158 $14,945.58 T 72 • MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
HOG DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1943.
Receipts.
By sales—
Live hogs   $8,213.34
Pork supplied to Essondale Hospital  27,815.98
Pork supplied to New Westminster Hospital   3,322.14
By credit for manure   600.00
' Inventory, March 31st, 1943, hogs   16,641.00
  $56,592.46
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep   $5,355.23
Feed    ,16,803.56
Horse-labour  161.05
Truck  509.00
$22,828.84
Inventory, March 31st, 1942, hogs     13,828.90
     36,657.74
Profit   $19,934.72
CANNERY.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1943.
Production.
Supplies to Mental Hospital, Essondale  $22,233.40
Supplies to Mental Hospital, New Westminster      4,166.98
  $26,400.38
Expenses.
Repairs   $393.25
Salaries   3,165.00
Sugar, spices, etc.    3,018.78
Cans, crates, and containers  4,621.85
Fruit and vegetables  8,959.85
Truck-haulage   226.00
Fuel  800.00
Light, power, and water  1,200.00
    22,384.73
Profit        $4,015.65 COLONY FARM. T 73
ORCHARD AND TRUCK-GARDEN.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1943.
Receipts.
Produce sold   $841.20
Produce supplied to Essondale Hospital  11,302.40
Produce supplied to New Westminster Hospital   60.00
Produce supplied to Cannery  795.55
Inventory, March 31st, 1943   12,276.00
  $25,275.15
Expenses.
Salaries, seeds, etc.   $3,110.90
Horse-labour .  2,195.20
Truck-haulage  7  10.50
Tractor-work   158.00
Manure and fertilizer  957.87
Inventory, March 31st, 1942  __.__ 11,031.00
     17,463.47
Profit  :     $7,811.68 T 74
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
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TRACTOR.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1943.
$1,650.00
Salaries and upkeep 	
Gasoline and oil
Expenses.
  $1,470.43
        112.41
1,582.84
Profit —-       	
$67.16
TRUCKS.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1943.
2,024y2 hours' work      $2,024.50
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep   $1,589.85
Gasoline and oil        268.36
       1,858.21
Profit        $166.29
GENERAL EXPENSES OF MAINTENANCE AND ADMINISTRATION.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1943.
Salaries and vouchers   $17,836.64
Horse-labour   557.90
Truck-work  219.00
Tractor-work  100.50
Gasoline, oil, etc   229.15
Fuel  87.05
Drugs, etc.   247.89
Sundry  33.00
  $19,311.13
Proportion, Headquarters expense      $2,418.93
General repairs through Public Works Department     10,394.69
     12,813.62
$32,124.75
Less sundry credits          858.92
$31,265.83 T 76 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1942-43.
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.
Mental Hospital, Essondale—Produce supplied by Colony Farm
__  . , for Year ended March 31st, 1943.
Dairy produce—
Milk, 1,263,790 lb  $35,386.12
Cream, 3,906 lb. ___. _  781.20
Table cream, 66,121 lb.        6,622.10
$42,789.42
Meats-
Veal, 2,486 lb  $489.10
Beef, 22,363 lb.   3,748.67
Hearts, beef, 112% lb  11.25
Livers, beef, 236 lb.   42.48
Tongues, beef, 113 lb. __  18.08
Fresh pork, 157,026 lb.   27,479.68
Pork plucks, 3,363 lb.  336.30
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh   $32,089.89
Canned      22,233.40
Sundries—
Horse-labour   $5,040.00
Truck-work   15.00
Miscellaneous   238.53
32,125.56
54,323.29
5,293.53
$134,531.80
Mental Hospital, New Westminster—Produce supplied by Colony Farm
__  . , for Year ended March 31st, 1943.
Dairy produce—
Milk, 283,830 lb.   $7,947.24
Cream, 791% lb.         158.30
Table cream, 10,860 lb.     1,086.00
     $9,191.54
Meats—
Fresh pork, 18,769 lb.   $3,284.69
Pork plucks, 374% lb.          37.45
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh   $6,289.60
Canned     4,166.98
Sundries—
Horse-labour   _  $1,470.00
Miscellaneous (straw, bran, etc.)         198.40
Truck-work   47.00
Tractor-work   8.00
3,322.14
10,456.58
1,723.40
$24,693.66
I COLONY FARM. T 77
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.—Continued.
Accounts Receivable, March 31st, 1943.
Sundry amounts due from live stock, etc., sold _'_     $3,023.55
Remittances to Treasury.
Sundry remittances to Treasury during year 1942-43 in payment of live
stock and produce   $27,367.67
Summary of Equipment Inventories, March 31st, 1943.
Equipment in dairy   $4,444.50
Equipment in cannery   2,722.70
Horse and cattle barns and piggery   3,135.00
Farm implements  :  11,188.80
Pumping-stations and land-clearing   3,186.00
Butcher-shop  196.00
Carpenter-shop    435.00
Blacksmith-shop  495.00
$25,803.00
Orchard and Small Fruits.
Apple-trees   $1,549.00
Pear-trees  _•_     1,767.00
Cherry-trees         554.00
Prune-trees      1,752.00
Plum-trees      1,967.00
Strawberry-plants         300.00
Raspberry-canes     2,000.00
Rhubarb clumps      1,500.00
Currant bushes         450.00
  $11,839.00
Bees and bee-keeping supplies  :    437.00
$12,276.00
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1944.
405-144-7354   

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