Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1944

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0319029.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0319029.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0319029-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0319029-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0319029-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0319029-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0319029-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0319029-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0319029-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0319029.ris

Full Text

 PKOVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT
OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND
INDUSTRY
FOR THE TEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1943
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. : ;
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1944. To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended December 31st, 1943.
ERNEST CRAWFORD CARSON,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Department of Trade and Industry,
Office of the Minister,
'   Victoria, British Columbia.
Honourable Ernest Crawford Carson,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended December 31st, 1943.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
EDWIN G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
for the Year ended December 31st, 1943.
The period covered by this report is again one of brisk expansion and substantial
gains, with industrial pay-rolls for 1942 totalling $303,000,000, some $63,000,000 better
than for 1941 and setting a new high in the history of the Province. Ship-building
was responsible in a large measure, but lumber and metal trades also showed substantial increases, and the decrease in metal-mining was relatively small in spite of its
acute labour situation.
Employment soared to new levels, with the month of November, 1942, showing a
total of 143,760 against a high of 110,771 for October, 1941. Essential war industries
drew heavily upon the man-power, but in others of a less essential nature the drain
upon male labour was largely offset by marked increases in the number of women
workers.
Average weekly wages were increased substantially over 1941 through increased
war-time production, longer working hours, the reduction of casual employment, and
the payment of the cost-of-living bonus; in fact, to the point where the average weekly
wage for all adult wage-earners was the highest on record.
Occasion is taken again to remark upon the part played by the women and girls
of British Columbia in sustaining the war effort. This has been indeed admirable, and
the degree of skill which has been developed is more than remarkable. The manner in
which the women have adapted themselves to the intricate and exacting processes of
the essential war industries is one of the outstanding features of the whole industrial
situation.
With these preliminary remarks, this report goes on to discuss the various phases
and to cover the work of the several Bureaus in detail.
TRADE REPRESENTATIVE AT. OTTAWA.
Since October, 1939, the Bureau of Industrial and Trade Extension has maintained
its representative at Ottawa.
During this time our representative has carried on continuous contacts with the
Department of Munitions and Supply, heads of the three armed services, members of
all purchasing and technical missions, foreign legations, various departments of the
Dominion Government, together with Government operated and controlled companies,
numerous boards and controls, and war-time manufacturing firms, plus manufacturers
of commodities for civilian use. The volume of business placed in British Columbia as
a consequence of this work can be safely said to run into very substantial figures.
Contacts with Empire and United Nations missions have definitely resulted in
export business for British Columbia industries. Valuable assistance has been given
British Columbia manufacturers in the securing of primary raw materials, obtaining
permission for priority shipment, etc., and acceptance of increased business by importing countries.
Definite important business has resulted in at least four South American countries
as a result of our representative's work and association with foreign legations at
Ottawa, and this business bids fair to continue even in an increased volume following
the cessation of hostilities.
3 U 4 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mention should be made here of the recent visit of the Honourable J. A. Mackinnon,
Minister of Trade and Commerce, to South and Central American countries. Despite
present adverse shipping and trading conditions, Mr. Mackinnon said recently, " Now
is the time to make preparations for post-war developments by the maintenance and
establishment, if possible, of business contacts in foreign countries and by cultivating
good-will towards Canada—Canadian products and Canadian methods."
This is peculiarly applicable to British Columbia, as South and Central American
countries appear to offer attractive trade possibilities, and to this end our representative is continuing close contact with all commercial attaches located in Eastern Canada.
Many interviews have been had with Eastern Canadian manufacturers with a view
to the establishment of new industries in British Columbia following the war. Not
only has considerable encouragement been indicated but definite decisions have been
made by certain industries in Eastern Canada to locate in British Columbia when the
war is over. This phase of our representative's efforts is continuing. As a result of
other contacts, certain private capital has shown a very positive interest in the development of British Columbia's natural resources and industrial expansion in the post-war
period.
Empire-wide recognition is given to British Columbia's ship-building production,
as well as productive capabilities of our heavy and complicated intricate precision
instruments and machinery.    All of these have been declared to be outstanding.
Acceptance of British Columbia's manufacturing capabilities is even more pronounced than a year ago. Proprietary articles previously made in the United Kingdom
are now successfully manufactured in British Columbia. Many items of heavy and
other industries continue to be supplied in large quantities to Eastern Canadian points,
the United Kingdom, and other countries within the Empire (South Africa, North
Africa, Australia, and New Zealand), and, as previously referred to, South American
Republics.
The Department's representative continues to direct " Invitations to Tender " to
British Columbia manufacturers, priorities have been secured through Ottawa and
Washington, D.C., which undoubtedly have been invaluable to certain industries within
the Province. Substantial assistance has been given to the securing of raw materials,
business licences, plant extensions, and additional equipment. The installation of new
and modern equipment will place many of our industries in a position to more readily
compete in Canadian and foreign trade following the war.
The maintenance of this office at Ottawa is thoroughly appreciated by British
Columbia manufacturers. This is evidenced by the large numbers of letters of appreciation and complimentary statements regarding the services being rendered.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT.
Advisory Committee on Industrial Development and Rehabilitation.
The Deputy Minister has acted as Chairman of this interdepartmental committee,
of which the Trade Commissioner is also a member, and which consists of the following
Department representatives:—
Assistant Deputy Minister of Finance (Vice-Chairman).
Chairman, Public Utilities Commission.
Deputy Minister of Public Works.
Deputy Minister of Mines.
Chief Mining Engineer, Department of Mines.
Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
Provincial Horticulturist, Agriculture.
Markets Commissioner, Agriculture.
Chief Forester, Department of Lands.
Assistant Forester, Department of Lands. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. U 5
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry (Chairman).
Trade Commissioner, Trade and Industry.
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Assistant Commissioner of Fisheries.
Comptroller of Water Rights.
Deputy Comptroller of Water Rights.
Chief Highway Engineer.
The Acting-Secretary, Post-war Rehabilitation Council, attends the meetings of
the committee as liaison officer of the Council.
To objectively deal with the Interim Report of the Post-war Rehabilitation Council,
the committee was broken down to sub-committees which presented specialized reports
on fisheries, highways, mines, markets, plastics, and power.
Consistent with this, and with a view to presentation of survey reports on reconversion, the committee evolved an approach to industry itself.
The Chairman and the Trade Commissioner, with the Acting-Secretary of the
Council, were constituted a sub-committee to conduct a series of group discussions
under selected industry headings, and they reported progress under the following
headings:—
(1.)  Secured co-operation of the British Columbia Division of the Canadian
Manufacturers' Association, through meetings with their full executive
and their special rehabilitation committee.
(2.)  Approached a special committee of the construction industry and carried
out intimate round table conference with them in Vancouver.
(3.)  Conferred with the British Columbia War Industries Co-ordination Committee in Vancouver.
(4.)  Following the plans of group breakdown within industry itself, discussed
specific problems with the Metals Trade Group of the British Columbia
Division of the Canadian Manufacturers'  Association, comprising the
principal engineering firms engaged in war contracts.
(5.)  Discussed post-war construction projects with the Chairman of the Federal sub-committee on the occasion of his visit to the Coast, and cooperated closely with the construction industry in regard to their own
regional submissions to Ottawa, copies of which were sent to our Postwar Rehabilitation Council.
(6.) Met  the  executive  of  the  Vancouver   Board   of  Trade   and   effected
co-ordination of committee activities with their Canadian Chamber of
Commerce programme and their own Bureau endeavours.
(7.)  In follow-up of the plan for group breakdown within industry itself,
co-operated with the Metals Trade Group, British Columbia Division,
Canadian  Manufacturers'  Association,  in  a more  intimate  survey  of
principal firms, for conversion period and post-war problems.    At the
close of the year a progress report was submitted to the sub-committee
for further analysis.    It had already covered fifteen representative firms
where 1943 pay-roll showed 1,756 employees, compared with a total of
471 employees in 1939.
In addition to effecting industry contacts, the sub-committee collected valuable
data in co-operation with the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, preparing selected
lists of imports from foreign countries, and compiled lists of machinery and equipment
used by agriculture, construction, fishing, forestry, and mining.
With assistance of the special departmental representative at Ottawa, the subcommittee was able to secure co-operation with the Department of Munitions and U 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Supply for the supply of confidential data covering employment in British Columbia
plants engaged in war-work, and this forms a valuable statistical basis for study of
conversion problems.
Industry accepts the indicated policy of the main Advisory Committee, and the
special work of the sub-committee, as a practical form of leadership in meeting conversion period problems.
Industrial Research Programme.
The machinery of the Advisory Committee on Industrial Rehabilitation has been
used in the furtherance of the industrial research programme with which the Department has been intimately concerned during the year under review.
The British Columbia War Metals Research Board, founded early in 1942, demonstrated that worth-while results can be obtained in a co-operative effort between the
Dominion and Provincial Governments and the University of British Columbia. This
war-time Board was a logical nucleus organization to use in a programme of expansion.
The Department of Trade and Industry became associated with the War Metals
Research Board with this expansion programme as a definite objective. The Department has consistently worked along these lines during the year in co-operation with
others concerned towards a comprehensive and permanent research organization:—
(1.)  To co-ordinate the work of existing or prospective research units and
avoid danger of duplication.
(2.)  To initiate and channel new research-work in all fields  of particular
interest to British Columbia.
(3.)  To relate this problem to other problems of industrial rehabilitation in
the post-war period.
(4.)  To assist in the application of research results in actual trade extension
programmes, and to relate the work of laboratories and field units to the
industrial production of the Province and the markets which may be
found for that production.
Under the auspices of the War Metals Research Board a series of meetings have
been held with the University.    The Trade Commissioner has established and maintained personal contact with the Federal departments at Ottawa concerned and their
regional field officials in British Columbia.    The machinery of the interdepartmental
committee has been used to consolidate and co-ordinate the interests of Provincial
departments in the programme.
TIMBER TRADE -EXTENSION WORK.
At the suggestion of British Columbia Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association themselves, the Department suspended the special grant to the Timber Trade
Extension Bureau during the year under review, due to market and other disruptions
imposed by war conditions.
The Timber Trade Extension Bureau, however, is determined to maintain their
overseas services upon cessation of hostilities, and the Department is co-operating with
them in the maintenance of skeleton machinery, in preliminary surveys of post-war
possibilities, and analyses of pre-war movements and war-time trade disruption.
The industry are of opinion that the efficacy of trade extension work is indisputable, and that results in British Empire markets for 1932 onwards are ample
justification for its continuance on an extended scale. It is agreed that active trade
extension work must be continued if the Province is to meet the inevitable competition
of the post-war period. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY. U 7
LOANS AND GUARANTEES.
("Department of Industries Act, 1919.")
Following is a statement covering loans and guarantees outstanding under the
" Department of Industries Act, 1919." Every effort is being made to liquidate these
accounts as soon as possible.
Statement of Loans and Guarantees outstanding, December 31st, 1943.
.   Loans. . pr;ncipal. Interest.
Charles Cormack (Acme Cabinet Works)  $1,203.47 $4.51
B.C. Livestock Producers' Co-operative Association -  25,000.00
B.C. Livestock Exchange, Ltd      2,654.69
Canadian Western Woodworkers  9,363.30        	
Gordon Campbell, Ltd  20,231.34 36.02
T. H. Waters & Co  15,407.16 1,908.63
Guarantees.
Big Bend Cedar Pole Co., Ltd.  (White Pine
Lumber Co., Ltd.) ■     4,962.77       	
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF INDUSTRIAL AND
TRADE EXTENSION.
As indicated elsewhere in this report, a great deal of the Trade Commissioner's
time has been devoted to special activities under such headings as industrial rehabilitation, research programme, and intimate contacts with industry in survey of plans
for the conversion period. In addition, he has acted in special representative capacity
for Ottawa boards and controls, as noted elsewhere in the report.
However, the Bureau, through the Trade Commissioner, has continued to maintain
close co-operative contacts with Federal and Provincial departments in ordinary trade
extension problems and with commercial and other organizations in the Province, in
furtherance of industrial contacts.
CO-OPERATIVE CONTACTS.
The restricted sphere of activities due to war conditions has again been reflected
for this year in Provincial department policy. There has been closer collaboration
with Ottawa offices and with the Trade Commissioners on special duties there. A start
has been made on co-ordinated plans with Federal departments for survey of the
post-war export situation in its. special relation to the Province.
Producers and exporters themselves have again maintained close co-operation with
the Bureau. The Federal Trade Commissioners' offices overseas (in their war-time
spheres) have again used the Bureau as a clearing-house for many problems affecting
exporters in British Columbia.
The Department has continued constructive contact with the Agent-General for
British Columbia in London, England.
During the year the Bureau has again been associated with a number of market
programmes of interest to other Provincial departments at Victoria, and has been associated with distribution problems, linking such assistance with the war-time controls
involved, through regional administration and direction at Ottawa.
The Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, Munitions and Supply,
Fisheries, and Agriculture have again used the facilities of the Bureau in special U 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
endeavours where a clearing-house is useful, in approaches on market problems of sales
promotion, affected by emergency conditions.
NEW INDUSTRIES.
The survey in connection with post-war plans has revealed a surprising range
of new products which are actually manufactured in the Province. The possibilities
presented here for selected cases of continued enterprise are a matter of deep and
practical concern to the Bureau, whose machinery will be used to take every possible
advantage of the situation presented.
Apart from war production, there have been selected cases for new industry
follow-up in the year under review, where preliminary surveys have been made in
co-operation with leading industrialists and data collected for them.
The Bureau has consistently maintained its key contacts for branch factory establishment, with particular reference to possibilities in the post-war period.
The flow of European capital and the application of new methods introduced by
those who provided this capital were noted in the reports of the last three years. The
extension of these industries, with particular reference to war production, has again
been a feature of industrial development in the Province during the year under review.
Federal Construction Control authorities (through their Provincial Advisory
Committee) have consistently used the Bureau facilities for assistance in surveys for
plant extensions.
WAR METALS RESEARCH BOARD.
The work of the War Metals Research Board is referred to elsewhere in this
report, and the Department of Mines and Resources, Ottawa, with the Department of
Mines, Victoria, have been associated with its work from the outset two years ago.
Definite results have been obtained in war-time metals and minerals research and in
the application of these results to war industry.
By Order in Council, June 8th, 1943, the Department of Trade and Industry made
a grant of $2,500 to the work of this Board, with the understanding that its facilities
might be extended, not only in war-time application of current investigations, but also
in a broader approach to industrial research in the Province, including wood products,
fisheries, and agriculture. The Trade Commissioner was named a Director of the
Board, and constructive use has been made of departmental contacts with Federal
Departments and with industry.
SUMMARY REVIEW OF TRADE EXTENSION EFFORTS.
As in previous years, even under restricted war conditions, the main types of trade
extension efforts have fallen under definite headings:—
(1.)  Contact with foreign markets through co-operation with the Federal
Trade Commissioners overseas.
(2.) Special export surveys in co-operation with Ottawa or other Government
departments.
(3.)  Independent export surveys arising from war conditions:—■
(a.)  Loss of existing markets:
(b.)  Opportunities to replace exports from Germany:
(c.)   Survey of new markets opened by disruption of Scandinavian or
other sources of supply.
(4.) Increased war-time co-operation with agricultural interests on special
marketing problems.
(5.)  Assistance in extension of war industries of the Province.
(6.)  Co-operation on market problems with the committee for general industrial survey of the Province. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY. U 9
(7.)  Assistance in timber trade extension.
(8.)  Specialized assistance to unorganized producing and exporting groups.
SPECIAL EXPORT ENDEAVOUR.
Control of the Peat-moss Industry.
The arrangements made for 1942 have been consolidated and extended during
the year.
When restrictions on sphagnum peat-moss were first imposed in 1941, the material
was placed under export permit, and permits restricted to provide for special war-time
requirements. This machinery, however, did not provide effective over-all control of
the production, or access to supplies, and the position was further defined by Metals
Controller's Order No. 20 of July 15th, 1942. At that time peat-moss was declared
a vital war metal, all trading in it placed directly under the Metals Controller, and
administrative authority for the control was passed to the Department of Trade and
Industry, through the Trade Commissioner as authorized representative of the Metals
Controller.
Using central warehousing and shipping machinery, the Department has acted as
a clearing-house for control of the industry, for all market outlets.
(1.)  Movement to Defence Plants Corporation in the United States for metallurgical requirements:
(2.)  Commercial movement under export permit to the usual distributer connections in the United States:
(3.)  Movement through the Feeds Administrator, for local poultry and horticultural allotments.
The independent production of twelve companies is covered by the Control. In
addition, the Industrial Peat Company, a United States Government development, is
now responsible for large volume output for war purposes, and operations there have
been included in the scheme of centralized direction.
By a balanced movement from all sources of supply, the Control has maintained
uninterrupted volume flow from 1943 production, to the United States, for magnesium
requirements. In addition, the independent producers have been allowed commercial
releases to the export market to an approximate total of 300,000 bales during the year,
after systematic survey and periodical adjustment of reserve requirements. Consolidated arrangements concluded with the Feeds Administrator, Wartime Prices and
Trade Board, resulted in orderly distribution of 50,000 bales to the domestic market
for poultry and horticultural purposes.
All organization and other arrangements on these disposals have centred in the
Trade Commissioner's office, and many related problems of the industry have been
directed to him. _ __ _
Special Products Board.
Extending the contacts and machinery evolved two years ago, the Bureau has
again been closely associated with the war-time export movement of foodstuffs from
the Province, including eggs, fruit, fisheries products, dehydrated vegetables, and
canned milk, under contract to the Ministry of Food in the United Kingdom, in cooperation with the Federal and Provincial Departments of Agriculture, and with the
special Boards set up at Ottawa to act as collecting and purchasing agents for the
material.
The Trade Commissioner continues to act as agent for the Special Products Board,
with particular reference to movement of fruit and fruit-pulp to the United Kingdom.
Since 1941, the Department has shipped over 3,500 long tons net fruit-pulp and
fruit in SOo solution of all varieties to the United Kingdom, drawing from the Interior
as well as Coast areas.    All this was directed to the Ministry of Food under a clearing- U 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
house plan with the Provincial Department of Trade and Industry as shipper, handling
all'detail of furtherance, financing, and space arrangement, in a co-ordinated plan, the
machinery for which has continued during the year under review.
General war development, the additional heavy demands on available shipping
space and improved crop conditions' in the United Kingdom were responsible for revision of the general programme. In addition, low yields and adverse weather conditions
in the Province reduced the quantity available, apart altogether from the fact that food
conservation at home was an added factor in precluding overseas movement of fruit
and fruit-pulp during 1943.
During 1943 the Bureau has co-operated with the Special Products Board in the
matter of contracts for dehydrated vegetables for overseas movement and for Munitions and Supply delivery.
Since publication of the last annual report, there was a movement of 500 long tons
of strawberries in S02 solution to the Ministry of Food from 1942 crop. The clearinghouse arrangements organized by the Department were fully utilized in all arrangements made for these deliveries.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PRODUCTS.
Again mentidn should be made of the co-operation extended to the British Columbia Products Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade, and to the British Columbia
Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and with other organizations
concerned in the increased sale of British Columbia products.
ASSISTANCE IN TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS.
The Department made a grant of $3,500 to the Vancouver Board of Trade for
special services rendered by the Transportation and Customs Bureau in connection
with shipments of raw and manufactured products affected by maximum car loading
orders issued by the Transport Controller of Canada.
Results attained through representations of the Transportation and Customs
Bureau were very satisfactory to industry in general.
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND
STATISTICS.
The Bureau, as a fact-finding and advisory body, has been working under increased
pressure during the year under review. War conditions have brought new projects
into being, forced the suspension of peace-time studies, and dislocated the personnel.
The essential statistical services, largely performed for other Provincial departments
as well as for the Department of Trade and Industry, have been maintained. All agreements or working arrangements relating to the collection, co-ordination, and publication of statistics existing between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
Ottawa; the Wartime Prices and Trade Board, Ottawa; as well as the Provincial
Departments of Mines, Labour, and Provincial Secretary, have been satisfactorily
executed. A number of important studies have been inaugurated while others have
been completed in the Research Division. A full description of these research projects,
together with an account of the statistical services performed, has been provided under
the appropriate divisions which follow.*
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Business activity in British Columbia during 1942 continued to increase, influenced
by expanding war-time industrial projects.    An estimated net value of production of
* A description of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, showing the internal organization, will be found in
the 1939 Eeport of the Department of Trade and Industry. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
U 11
$472,000,000* in 1942 compares with the production figure in the basic industries
during 1941 of $379,925,005.t The increase can be attributed to greater production
and higher values in the agriculture, fishery, and forest industries. Agriculture
showed a substantial increase in 1942 with the total value of production estimated at
$72,000,000 compared with $58,577,539 in 1941, followed by fisheries with a value of
$38,059,559, and forestry products were valued at $124,720,000. Mining had a slight
decrease to $75,551,093. The Provincial gross pay-roll in 1942 was estimated at
$302,892,946, being approximately $63,367,487 over the estimated 1941 gross total of
$239,525,4594 Additional purchasing power influenced rising price-levels in the
merchandising field, both for the wholesale and the retail markets. The increased
volume of commercial payments, as shown by the 17.05-per-cent. rise in bank debits,
represents a reliable measure of business activity for the Province. An improvement
of 21.5 per cent, was shown by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics monthly index for
employment during the same period of the previous year. Table 1 sets forth the outstanding characteristics of the changes in business activity in 1942 compared with
1941.
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1942, compared with 1941.
Unit.
1942.
1941.
Percentage
Increase ( + ) or
Decrease (—).
Mining—
Total value of production1..
Gold production1	
Silver production1 _	
Copper production1—	
Lead production1 	
Zinc production1	
Coal production1	
Forestry—
Total.value of production2-
Timber scaled2  	
Paper production2..	
Fisheries—
Total value caught and marketed6..
Pack of canned salmon3 	
Agriculture—
Total value of production4 	
Apples—
Total shipments5 	
Domestic shipments5.. _ 	
Export shipments6 	
External Trade—
Export of canned salmon6.. _ 	
Exports of planks and boards, Douglas fir6-
Exports of red-cedar shingles6  	
Internal Trade—
Index of wholesale sales6.. —
Index of retail sales6—
Department stores _	
Grocery stores 	
Long ton
M.B.M.
Ton
Case
Box
Box
Box
Cwt.
M. ft.
Square
1935-39=100
1935-39=100
1935-39=100
75,551,093
477,422
38,245,536
1,938,158
124,720,000
3,014,488
327,474
38,059,559
1,814,297
72,000,000
5,094,689
4,409,603
685,086
776,574
741,303
2,636,078
174.1
159.5
156.9
78,479,719
614,801
40,231,518
1,802,353
119,920,000
3,522,750
351,241
31,732,037
2,295,433
58,577,539
3,940,797
2,536,599
1,404,198
681,142
953,933
3,205,465
155.0
134.8
137.2
flllfBl
— 3.73
— 22.35
+ 7.53
+ 4.00
— 14.43
— 6.77
+ 19.94
— 20.96
+ 22.91
+ 29.28
-j- 73.83
— 51.21
+ 14.01
— 22.29
— 17.76
+ 12.32
+ 18.32
+ 14.36
1 British Columbia Department of Mines.
2 British Columbia Department of Lands, Forest Branch.
3 British Columbia Department of Fisheries.
4 British Columbia Department of Agriculture.
5 British Columbia Tree Fruit Board.
6 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
* Preliminary estimate by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
f Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
. British Columbia Department of Labour. U 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1942, compared with 1941
—Continued.
Unit.
1942.
1941.
Percentage
Increase ( + ) or
Decrease (— ).
Internal Trade—Continued.
$
000 gal.
Not available
73,187
10,653,698
70,995
+    3.09
+    3.95
Kailway freight loaded in B.C.6	
Ton
9,500,400
9,139,480
Consumption of electric power6	
000 k.w.h.
2,565,905
2,407,480
+    6.58
000 $
40,673
29,361
+ 38.53
Construction—
000 $
10,201
14,509
— 29.69
Finance—
000 $
2,841,100
2,427,200
+ 17.05
Tourist Trade—
No
55,947
92 032
39.21
Estimated expenditure of United States tourists
$
8,253,000
12,769,000
— 35.40
Employment—
1926—100
164.8
135.6
+ 21.50
+ 39.70
1926 — 100
230.4
164.9
Iron and steel products...	
1926=100
725.4
268.5
+ 170.20
1926—100
137.4
132.1
+    4.00
Pulp and paper.  	
1926=100
157.1
146.2
+    7.50
1926—100
191.4
173.3
+ 10.40
1926—100
172.0
169.2
+    1.70
1926—100
104.6
114.3
—    8.50
Logging.       	
1926=100
114.2
107.1
+    6.60
Construction 	
1926=100
122.6
102.8
+  19.30
1926—100
129.1
117.6
+    9.80
1926—100
101.5
99.7
+    1.80
1926—100
144.6
142.1
+    1.80
1926=100
166.1
159.6
+    4.10
G Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
7 Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
THE RESEARCH DIVISION.
Occupational Survey of Public School Students, June 30th, 1942.
In collaboration with the Department of Education and with the co-operation of
School Boards and teachers throughout the Province, the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics has conducted an annual occupational survey of students leaving Grades VII.
to XIIL, inclusive, since 1938. The objective of the survey has been to ascertain the
probable number leaving school, their reasons for leaving school, and the nature of the
occupations or special training which the students would seek thereafter.
Final tabulation has revealed that 3,810 students were registered in the 1942 June
survey. Of this number, 1,663 students were uncertain whether they would or would
not return to the public school system in September. The remainder, 2,147 students
were definite in stating that they would not return. Students who knew definitely
in June that they would be returning to school in September did not complete the
questionnaire.
The principal reasons given for leaving school, as shown in the 1942 survey, have
been compared with similar figures for 1940 and 1941, in the following table:— DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
U 13
Table 2.
Number op Students.
Percentage.
Principal Reason.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1,873
1,075
23
716
275
36
2,214
1,165
16
608
202
11
22
16
132
1,634
1,012
11
294
294
17
297
33
129
89
44.7
25.7
.6
17.1
0.5
.8
50.5
26.6
.4
13.8
4.6
.3
42.9
26.6
.3
Unable to continue for financial reasons	
7.7
7.7
Leaving British Columbia    	
.4
7.8
No further school in vicinity   	
35
31
130
.8
.7
3.1
.5
.3
3.0
.9
3.4
2.3
4,194
4,386
3,810
100.0
100.0
100.0
Just how many students actually entered the labour market subsequently is, of
course, not definitely known. Excluding those students intending to seek special
training, those leaving the Province, the invalid, and those required to assist at home,
we might reasonably suppose that approximately 2,700 students sought employment in
the Provincial labour market during 1940, and nearly 3,000 in 1941, as compared with
approximately 2,200 students in 1942.
In spite of the- obvious difficulties confronting students asked to state the occupations they intended to seek after leaving school, 2,781 students attempted to answer
this question in the 1942 survey.* Of this group, 418 boys and 277 girls reported
that they had been assured of an opportunity to obtain employment in their stated
occupations.
The remaining 996 boys and 1,090 girls reported that they had no assurance of
employment in the occupations indicated. It is probably true to say, therefore, that
the particular occupations shown by the students were, in many cases, merely indicative. For that reason the occupations have been consolidated into larger industrial
groups which, it is thought, provide a better picture of the actual situation. In the
following table the occupations have been consolidated in this way:—
Table 3.—Occupations sought by Students leaving School, June, 1942.
Boys.
Girls.
Industry.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
Total.
"Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
122
3
45
10
278
14
71
59
1
27
333
223
58
55
3
19
5
146
8
33
31
1
11
213
153
29
67
23
16
7
26
5
132
6
38
28
Mining, quarrying, etc  .—	
85
49
36
Electric light and power    	
71
1
189
585
24
24
5
97
435
413
42
1
100
424
16
16
3
43
346
172
29
16
120
70
29
6
15
269
89
161
8
8
2
10
42
451
4
27
182
54
89
No definite occupation  	
241
1,414
707
707
1,367
804
563
* Of the remaining 1,029 students, 1,012 students reported that they intended to take special training and the
other students reported that they were leaving British Columbia. U 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
To indicate in more precise terms the type of employment sought by these students,
we have listed (in order of magnitude) the principal occupations sought in Tables 4
and 5. The leading occupations, in the case of the girls, included 435 students seeking
office work as stenographers, typists, clerks, and book-keepers; 187 students seeking
employment as saleswomen in the retail trade; another group of 50 students reported
their intention to seek work as domestic helpers. In the case of the boys, 223 students
reported their intention to join various branches of the air, navy, and army services;
122 students were seeking employment as farm and garden helpers; 85 students were
seeking work as machinists; and 42 students indicated their intention to seek
office-work.
Table 4-—Principal Occupations sought by Girls.
Principal Occupations.
Total.
Assured
of an
Opportunity.
Not assured
of an
Opportunity.
336
187
99
67
50
20
16
14
11
11
143
413
56
50
32
36
15
3
13
5
5
8
45
9
280
137
67
31
35
Dressmakers' and tailors' apprentices      __ _
17
3
9
6
3
98
404
Total                                                         	
1,367
277
1,090
Table 5.—Principal Occupations sought by Boys.
Principal Occupations.
Total.
Assured
of an
Opportunity.
Not assured
of an
Opportunity.
157
122
85
54
45
44
42
35
32
25
24
23
19
17
16
15
14
12
10
6
166
451
49
74
20
21
25
16
27
10-
17
17
8
12
5'
3
3
7
5
4
8
3
69
15
108
48
65
33
20
28
Office clerks, book-keepers, accountants, etc  	
15
25
Mill-hand, sawmill 	
Salesmen, retail  	
15
8
16
11
14
14
13
8
9
8
2
3
97
436
1,414
418
996
The number of students leaving the public school system, according to grades, has
been shown in Table 6.    Although the largest number of students is shown emerging DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
U 15
from Grade XII., there is a significant outflow from Grades VIII., IX., X., and XI.
The table shows that more boys than girls were expecting to leave from Grades VII.,
VIII., and IX.; 30.5 per cent, of the boys and 15.3 per cent, of the girls were reported
in these grades. This situation has been noticed in earlier surveys, and apparently
reflects a general tendency.
Table 6.—Students leaving the Public School System at June 30th, 1942,
arranged by Grades.
Total Students.
Students definitely
LEAVING.
Students NOT
definitely leaving.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
VII.    -..
140
412
342
401
447
1,721
267
10
70
95
239
154
175
169
623
104
1
37
Per
Cent.
5.95
14.97
9.64
10.96
10.58
39.01
6.51
.06
2.32
45
173
188
226
278
1,098
163
9
33
Per
Cent.
2.03
7.82
8.50
10.21
12.56
49.62
7.37
.40
1.49
52
168
117
167
187
1,220
183
8
45
37
103
52
61
67
382
57
1
22
15
65
65
106
120
838
126
7
23
88
244
225
234
260
501
84
2
25
58
136
102
114
102
241
47
30
VIII 	
108
IX 	
123
X.                 	
120
XI  	
158
XII.               	
260
XIII    	
37
2
15
10
Total 	
3,810
1,597
100.00
2,213
100.00
2,147
782
1,365
1,663
815
848
In Table 7 a distribution according to age-groups has been provided. It is
shown that of the 3,810 students reporting in the survey, 2,533 students were between
16 and 18 years of age. Similarly, 503 students, or 13.2 per cent., are shown in the
13-15 age-group. With the exception of 42 students who did not state their age, the
remaining 732 students are shown to be over 19 years of age.
Table 7.
Age-group.
Total.
Total.    Boys.     Girls.
Students definitely
leaving.
Total.    Boys.     Girls.
Students NOT
DEFINITELY LEAVING.
Total.    Boys.     Girls
13-15 years ...
16-18 years..
19-21 years...
22 and over..
Not stated.—
All ages..
503
2,533
722
10
42
287
984
296
5
25
216
1,549
426
5
17
182
1,401
537
8
19
109
463
193
4
13
73
938
344
4
6
321
1,132
185
2
23
178
521
103
1
12
143
611
82
1
11
3,810
2,213
2,147
782
1,365
1,1
815
848
As might be expected from the distribution of the population in the Province, the
largest number of students was reported from the Lower Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island Areas.    In Table 8 a distribution by census divisions has been provided. U 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 8.—Students leaving the Public School System at June 30th, 1942,
arranged by Census Division.
Census Division.-
Total Students.
Students definitely
LEAVING.
Students NOT
DEFINITELY LEAVING.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
149
238
340
2,137
545
205
40
87
11
58
68
101
149
870
221
96
14
48
4
26
81
137
191
1,267
.324
109
26
39
7
32
67
121
201
1,265
317
91
25
38
3
19
28
49
73
437
114
38
9
22
2
10
39
72
128
828
203
53
16
16
1
9
82
117
139
872
228
114
15
49
8
39
40
52
76
433
107
58
5
26
2
16
42
II.                                        	
65
Ill 	
63
IV                                	
439
V                   	
VI  	
121
56
VII                                       	
10
VIII        	
IX                	
X                 	
23
6
23
3.810  [  1,597
2,213
2,147
.    782
1,365
1,663
815  1     848
The Trade of British Columbia.
At the request of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, External Trade Branch, the
Bureau has complied with war-time regulations and has suspended publication of the
regular annual reports on the trade of British Columbia with foreign countries and
with other Canadian Provinces. As soon as circumstances are again favourable, the
Bureau will resume publication of this report which will, in the meantime, be kept up
to date.
The agreement between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, concluded in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under this arrangement, a monthly
coded statement has been sent regularly to the Bureau from Ottawa, showing in detail
the importation and exportation of every commodity, regularly listed in the Federal
trade reports, moving through customs ports in British Columbia. With the aid of
leading retail and wholesale firms and various governmental agencies, the Bureau also
develops an annual estimate of the interprovincial trade in order to provide a picture
of the total Provincial trade. A summary of foreign and interprovincial trade for the
years 1937-41 follows:—
Table 9.—The Trade of British Columbia (excluding Gold) with other Canadian
Provinces, the British Commonwealth, and all Foreign Countries, 1937-41.
Country or Province.
Imports into
British Columbia.
Exports from
British Columbia
but
excluding Gold.
Estimated Total
Trade
(excluding Gold).
Other Canadian Provinces—
1937        "	
$77,153,440
66,361,743
72,966,783
83,405,229
93,523,023
18,669,989
18,628,470
, 17,290,094
18,742,514
22,817,527
$22,673,602
21,293,022
22,149,065
25,234,792
34,225,021
55,905,816
47,569,696
57,555,493
"   67,649,671
56,648,128
$99,827,042
87,654,765
95,115,848
108,640,021
127,748,044
74,575,805
66,198,166
74,845,587
86,392,185
79,465,655
1938     	
1939    	
1940         •    '	
1941       ...
British Empire (excluding Canada) —
1937
1938    .... 	
1939      .          .          	
1940      	
1941... _ DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
U 17
Table 9.—The Trade of British Columbia (excluding Gold) with other Canadian
Provinces, the British Commonwealth, and all Foreign
Countries, 1937-41—Continued.
Country or Province.
Imports into
British Columbia.
Exports from
British Columbia
but
excluding Gold.
Estimated Total
Trade
(excluding Gold).
Foreign Countries—
1937 .   	
1938          	
1939     	
1940  - 	
$22,271,603
19,926,329
40,318,115
43,894,774
53,527,611
118,095,032
104,916,542
130,574,992
146,042,517
169,868,061
$62,165,656
45,094,011
54,449,427
56,686,933
81,824,544
140,745,074
113,956,729
134,153,985
149,571,396
172,697,693
$84,437,259
65,020,340
94,767,542
100,581,707
1941   	
Totals—
1937 >	
1938  -  	
1939          	
1940    .... 	
1941	
135,352,055
258,840,106
218,873,271
264,728,977
295,613,913
342,565,754
Figures for 1940 have been revised since publication of the last annual report.
The Cost of Living in British Columbia.
Since 1936, the Bureau has compiled an index of food prices in fifty-two cities,
towns, and villages for the private use of the Provincial Department of Labour. In
1939, this food index was supplemented by a new monthly full cost-of-living index,
which included clothing, rentals, fuel, and other essential household items in the four
Coast cities of Vancouver, New Westminster, Victoria, and Nanaimo. Under arrangements sponsored by the Provincial Department of Labour, this full cost-of-living index
was used as a cost-of-living barometer by a number of British Columbia Coast firms
until the Dominion War-time Wages and Cost-of-living Bonus Order made the use of
the all-Canada index, prepared by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, mandatory
throughout Canada.
The food index measures the change in prices as they occur in the case of forty-
six selected food items, forming a scientifically tested budget. At the suggestion of
the Health Department, the food budget adopted was modelled on the plan of the
Sub-committee on Nutrition, British Commonwealth Scientific Conference, Ottawa,
1936; this represented the latest information available when the food budget was
created in 1936. The budget contains sufficient quantities of staple foods to maintain,
in good health for one month, a family of five; of which two are adults, one an infant
—6 months to 1 year old, one a child—6 years to 10 years old, and one a child—11 years
to 13 years old.
The monthly full cost-of-living index, prepared for the Coast area, covers approximately 64 per cent, of the expenditures made by an average British Columbia family
in receipt of an income between $1,200 and $1,400 a year.*    The index is made up as
follows :  Per Cent.
 :__  44.05
  25.25
  14.93
  5.37
  2.59
  2.39
Electricity    2.13
Food  	
Rent   	
Clothing 	
Fuel  	
Furniture 	
Kitchen equipment
* Based on a survey conducted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in Vancouver, in 1938.
2 U 18                                                       BRITISH COLUMBIA.
/
Per C
Textiles, household        1.
;nt.
39
30
Water  7        _____      1.
Total	
__:__ ioo.
30
ng indexes
liar cost of
ie extent to
he average
Table 10.—The Cost of Living in Canada and in British Columbia
For comparative purposes only, the Dominion and Provincial cost-of-liv
have been translated to the same period, 1936 = 100.*
Caution.—These indexes do not measure the difference in the actual dc
living between British Columbia and Canada as a whole.    They show only t_
which the cost of living in British Columbia, or in Canada, has varied from ■
cost of living in that area during 1936.
Full Cost-of-living Index.
Food Index.
Canada.*
British
Columbia
Coast Area.f
Canada.*
British
Columbia. J.
1940—
*       September.    	
October  	
First
of Month.
108.46
109.07
109.89
110.09
110.40
110.30
110.30
110.70
111.52
112.64
114.07
115.90
116.92
117.74
118.55
118.04
117.64
117.94
118.14
118.14
118.35
118.96
120.18
119.98
119.67
120.08
120.90
121.10
119.37
119.16
119.47
120.39
120.39
120.80
121.10
121.51
Fifteenth
of Month. §
107.02
107.84
108.58
108.79
108.66
109.33
110.21
111.38
111.57
113.79
114.08
115.83
116.89
118.11
119.74
' 118.52
118.33
119.40
120.23
First
of Month.
107.77
108.49
111.15
111.55
112.17
111.25
111.45
112.58
112.17
115.03
119.22
124.03
126.07
125.97
128.22
126.58
125.05
125.87
126.48
126.48
127.10
129.04
133.23
132.52
131.39
132.72
135.38
135.79
130.16
129.55
.    130.57
132.82
132.82
133.84
134.76
136.20
Fifteenth
of Month. §
103.33
104.92
106.30
107.39
107.03
107.93
109.02
111.42
111.81
116.09
117.07
120.55
121.10
121.24
123.93
121.57
120.99
122.55
123.71
1941—
May-      	
1942—
120.72
125.12
121.92
128.39
September  	
134.63
November 	
December 	
1943—
125.33
March  	
126.01
134.19
126.24
135.46
July   	
* The Dominion Bureau of Statistics index is ac
have been translated into terms of 1936—100 for com
.                 " Prices and Price Indexes " for actual figures used.
t Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Stai
Nanaimo, and Victoria.
. Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Stati
§ Note.—Since May 15th, 1942, the cost-of-living i
piled quarterly, giving statements in March, June, Se
figures were given.
;ually compiled
parative purpos
istics for four
sties for fifty-tv,
ndex and the fo
ptember, and D
on the basis o
es only.   See th
Coast cities of
o centres in th<
od index for Br
ecember, where
•  1935-39=100.
i Dominion Bure
Vancouver, Nev
i Province,
itish Columbia
is, prior to this
These figures
au of Statistics
7 Westminster,
lave been corn-
date, monthly DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. U 19
INDUSTRIAL SURVEY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
This industrial survey was inaugurated at the request of the Honourable John
Hart, Minister of Finance, just before the outbreak of war in 1939. Although the
possibility of attracting refugee capital, which was the reason underlying the survey
at the beginning, became rather remote after the commencement of hostilities, the
survey, in view of its obvious basic importance, has been continued as a permanent
object.
Efforts have been put forth by those departments of the Provincial Government
concerned directly with the natural resources to encourage the establishment of new
industries in this Province. The assistance has taken many forms, ranging from the
release of general information to positive acts of co-operation with producers anxious
to locate their establishments in British Columbia. In the process a large bibliography
has accumulated throughout the various branches of the Government. Consequently,
when plans for the survey were being prepared, it was considered that a study which
intentionally or accidentally duplicated the work that had already been done in this
direction would be a distinct waste of effort. To eliminate the possibility of duplication and to assist in the planning and execution of this project, the present interdepartmental committee was invited to serve as an advisory body.
After a departmental steering committee had analysed the project, it was decided
to delegate the initial preparatory work to the Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
Since that time, work on this project in the Bureau of Economics and Statistics has
been of necessity irregular; but in spite of the prolonged and frequent interruptions
which have disturbed earlier arrangements, the Bureau has carried on a modified
programme and has presented several progress reports.
OUTLINE OF THE WORK CARRIED ON BY THE BUREAU
OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS.
In requesting the Department of Trade and Industry to undertake an industrial
survey, the Minister of Finance recommended that particular attention should be
directed to the following seven topics:—
(1.)   (a.)  What basic raw materials are known to be available in commercial
quantities in this Province?
(b.)   To what extent are these materials being utilized at the present
time?
(c.)   In what form is this utilization taking place?
(d.)  Is further fabrication possible or likely to be profitable?
(2.)   (a.)  What competitive areas exist from the standpoint of possession of
raw materials?
(&.)   Is this competition actual or potential?
(3.)   (a.)  What markets are available to the products resulting from such
industrial expansion?
(6.)  Is there an established demand, or would such demand have to be
created ?
(4.)   (a.)  What protection would such industries have for the British Columbia market by means of freight rates from Eastern Canada
competitors ?
^*- (&.)  What protection would such industries have for the Canadian market by means of tariff from foreign competition?
(5.)  Would importation of skilled labourers or technicians be necessary on
any large scale?
(6.)   To what extent are the proposed products imported into British Columbia at present, and from what source? U 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(7.) To what extent can this Province undertake the development of a highly-
industrialized and self-sufficient economy without there being an
upsetting effect on the balance of ^payment ?
In general, these questions all refer to native resources which, for some reason,
have not yet been brought under development. As such they were found to be—when
the Bureau of Economics began its work—more or less the equivalent of section (4),
" Idle Resources," in a long-term research plan adopted earlier by the Bureau of
Economic Statistics, an outline of which is given elsewhere in this report. Since the
Bureau had already laid the preliminary groundwork for its own research in this field,
it was decided to conduct the survey along these prepared lines.
To isolate, as soon as possible, the most attractive prospects from the less attractive, the Bureau began operations under its own topic (3), " Deficiencies in the present
structure from the point of view of self-sufficiency." By concentrating in this way
upon an analysis of commodities imported to meet an already established demand, it
was felt that a list of commercial possibilities could be readily obtained. The first
progress report contained the preliminary data compiled under this heading. The
second progress report contains a more systematic and satisfactory treatment of this
work.
Long-term Economic Research Plan adopted by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics in 1938.
(An Outline.)
(1.)  The fundamental economic factors determining the development of industry
in British Columbia.
(2.)  The present state and structure of industry in the Province, in the case of
(1)   industries dependent upon 'diminishing resources, and   (2)   industries
dependent upon reproductive resources.    (.See the classified list attached.)
(a.) The degree of fabrication and, if not fully finished in British Columbia,
why:
(b.)  The degree of waste or scrap and its utilization, if any:
(e.)   The sources of raw materials and producer's equipment;   i.e., British
Columbia, other Canadian Provinces, or foreign countries:
(d.) The degree of competition encountered by domestic industry from other
Canadian and foreign producers.
(3.) Deficiencies in the present structure from the point of view of self-sufficiency.
Commodities consumed but not produced in the Province, arranged according
to use; i.e., raw material for industry, producer's equipment, or consumer
goods. Are they physically possible of development in this Province? Would
it be economic to produce them?
(A.)  Articles considered to be physically suited for production, or for which
a known substitute might be produced, in British Columbia under natural conditions, but whose production is not necessarily considered to be
economic at the present time:
(a.) Raw materials for industry.
.   (&.) Partly processed materials for industry,
(c.)   Fully processed materials for industry.
(d.)  Producer's equipment.
(e.)  Consumer materials, non-durable goods.
(/.)  Consumer durable goods.
(B.)  Articles considered to be physically unsuited for production in British
Columbia under natural conditions, but whose production is not necessarily considered to be physically impossible under artificial conditions: DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. U 21
(a.) Raw materials for industry.
(6.)  Partly processed materials for industry.
(e.)   Fully processed materials for industry.
(d.) Producer's equipment.
(e.)   Consumer materials, non-durable goods.
(/.)   Consumer durable goods.
(4.)  Idle resources.
An inventory of known but undeveloped or partially developed resources in
the Province.    Whether alienated or held by the Crown.    Reasons for
idleness.   What are the prerequisites for development?
(5.)  Industrial research and new products.
A bibliography of current industrial research utilizing materials known to
exist in British Columbia.   Whether controlled by patent, etc.
(6.)  Recent industrial expansion in the Pacific North-west States.
A review of Federal projects, such as Bonneville and Grand Coulee, in the
North-west;  the economic basis for these projects;  the consequent industrial development, if any.
(7.)  Regional surveys in British Columbia.
(a.) An economic survey of the area adjacent to the Canadian National Railways between Prince Rupert and Yellowhead.
(b.)  An economic survey of the area adjacent to the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway between Quesnel and Squamish.
(c.)  An economic survey of Northern British Columbia, between North latitude 55 degrees and 60 degrees.
To illustrate the approach made under topic (3), the following extract has been
taken from the second progress report submitted by the Bureau to the Interdepartmental Industrial Survey Committee in March, 1942:—
Articles imported from Foreign Countries but not at present produced
in British Columbia*
"There are undoubtedly a number of routes along which one might proceed in
search of opportunities for new investment of industrial expansion. One of the most
convenient and direct methods is to analyse the import traffic. Commodities are
imported to satisfy an existing demand; if the market was not already present, importers would not venture their capital in this trade. Consequently, when we consider
imports, we know that there is a market—be it small or large—already in existence.
Imports can be readily divided into two classes: those commodities which are also
produced in this Province; and those commodities which are not at present produced
in British Columbia. While we may be interested to know why it is necessary to
supplement domestic production, we are principally concerned with the second group—
namely, commodities not at present produced in this Province. We might divide these
commodities still further to form two additional groups, A and B, as follows:—
Group A. Articles considered to be physically suited for production, or for
which a known substitute might be produced, in British Columbia
under natural conditions, but whose production is not necessarily
considered to be economic at the present time.
Group B. Articles considered to be physically unsuited for production in
British Columbia under natural conditions, but whose production
is not necessarily considered to be physically impossible under
artificial conditions.
* Extract from  Progress  Report No.  2  submitted  by the Bureau  of  Economics  and  Statistics  to the  Interdepartmental Industrial Survey Committee. U 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" In this report attention is directed only to those imported articles falling under
Group A. For convenience we have segregated those imported commodities according
to whether they are intended for producer or consumer consumption. Six categories
have been established: (1) raw materials for industry, (2) partly processed material
for industry, (3) fully processed materials for industry, (4) producers' equipment, (5)
consumer materials—non-durable goods, (6) consumer durable goods. It was not possible, in the time available, to include the last-mentioned categories, (5) and (6), in the
present report." (jSee map, Chart B.) DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
U 23
Eh
tf
<
K
o
p.
<
S fc a
O CO R
|SJ8
a his 5
H o rt S
rt £|m rt
£ <? Z
gj H i-i
" tf 9
O.   H
*£g
m hiJ
<! o O
W      tf
J      rt
o
IO
O-l
Of)
CJ
00
I—
-"#
t-
<M
<M
rH
ta a rH oo to -
©   <N    X   Ci   ">tf   rH   •<&
Ci    Oi    IO   ©    Ol   t-   CO
s.   8
c     _.
s   J>
,2 3 a S
■   Ci   *»
I ■#  us
00   <Nt
o
ft A
33
u
Pi
03
ri
-Q
ti
Oi
C.
o
S
'fi
H-*
*c
A
p
<3 H H H
Pi
c a
II
3 3
O    °
S o
Jh     CO
o a
| g. §
_»?
" § 3
CJ     M    «H
._.        Q     .-H
» _
* ■_
ft 2
■a S
o>   fl
m   a)
fl m
o c
■^
CO
r-
«0
on
■*.
rH
©
t-
o
no
rH
i-H
CO
CO
a.
-tf
©
©  ©  to ■*#  CO
amojiotHHoo
«<o_.t.t-!.ci:D.
bo oj
.S B
to _,
O -S
J rt
.U.S
c.    oi _y
B .a fi -J S |
Q Q E-* S H 8
CO CO <N 00
_. io m im
CO Ci CO «5
to © "* CO
t- M -# O
t- o •* c.
tO rA
&3-
X
a
id
0)
fl
r
to
fl
m
P-
u
K
to
h-
eo
j^
■».
o
Oi
CO
©
CO
_ "3
'ft ,3
"S _. -s -° ■
© © t- Oi © © t-
00 LO rH O fc- ta tree © tO Ci T-H CO SO
co" •<# © of ta ■* t-"
N N O ID ffl O H
f (N O W IO IO ff
M
ft
.5 p.   ! 'fi "
3      0      «■    i.    PH
fl  "   a d  ffi
<u -— .tf 2   oi
3 ph -5   c Id
v
tn  ^3   n   fl
•H   a   CD ►__.   a   q.
HbUPrHrH U 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PROSPECTS FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE SUGAR-BEET
INDUSTRY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The introduction of sugar rationing, as a result of war-time exigencies, has once
again focused attention upon the fact that British Columbia is dependent upon foreign
sources for its cane-sugar requirements. It is natural therefore that at such a time
the merits of the sugar-beet industry would appear to best advantage. The establishment of a sugar-beet industry in the Province of British Columbia has often been
mooted in the past and, in spite of the lack of success that has attended these efforts, it
will probably continue to attract serious attention at various times in the future.
In order that the Interdepartmental Industrial Survey Committee might have a
convenient source of unbiased information at their disposal, the Bureau undertook to
study and to summarize in a brief way some of the economic factors that have militated
thus far against the establishment of this industry in British Columbia. The conclusions were embodied in Report No. 3 to the Interdepartmental Survey Committee.
Subsequently the report was included in the Appendix to the Interim Report of the
Post-war Rehabilitation Council, page 239 et seq.
PROSPECTS FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE FIBRE FLAX
INDUSTRY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Bureau made a comprehensive survey on this subject and submitted its findings to the Interdepartmental Survey Committee.
CO-OPERATION WITH THE POST-WAR REHABILITATION COUNCIL.
Shortly after appointment in the spring of 1942, the Post-war Rehabilitation
Council requested the full-time assistance of the Bureau. In order to provide the
Council with technical advice in its organization stage the services of the Director were
made available on a part-time consulting basis, and the services of members of the
Research and other Divisions of the Bureau arranged on a request basis. These
arrangements have worked thus far very satisfactorily. As the work of the Post-war
Rehabilitation Council progresses, it is anticipated that the services of the Bureau of
Economics and Statistics will be called upon increasingly to provide basic information
and to undertake economic analyses in various fields.
OTHER REPORTS.
In addition to the projects outlined previously, the Bureau has prepared numerous
special reports and memoranda for officials of the Provincial Government. A further
supplement to the British Columbia Trade Index is now in course of preparation and
will incorporate information given in the earlier edition.
Despite many changes in personnel, owing to entry in the fighting services or technical industries, the Bureau has dealt with an increased number of special compilations
for corporations and private individuals, as well as other Government departments.
The Bureau has at all times received the fullest co-operation from officials in other
departments of the Provincial and Dominion Governments. Special information has
been prepared, also, in response to written inquiries from corporations and from private
individuals on a wide range of subjects.
A compilation was made for the Comptroller-General analysing Provincial expenditures for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1942, and covering salaries and wages,
number of employees—permanent or temporary, and the departmental classification
given, as well as the functional classification. This survey was requested by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics in connection with Public Finance Statistics, and occupied three members of the staff for about three months. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY. U 25
THE LABOUR STATISTICS DIVISION.
With the increasing importance of labour statistics in relation to the general work
of the Bureau, the work in this Division continued to expand during the past year, and
while the Labour Division is primarily engaged in compiling the statistical sections of
the annual report of the Department of Labour, the detailed information collected has
been found of great assistance to the Bureau in dealing with questions relative to
labour data.
Further progress has been made in the study of labour turnover, and since the
Bureau undertook the work of collecting data on the subject in 1938 it has been conducted on a research basis. As a result of changes made simplifying this question in
the 1942 and 1943 questionnaires, it is anticipated a greater degree of accuracy in the
returns received will ultimately warrant publication of this material on an annual basis.
Close co-operation has been maintained between the Labour Division and officials
of the Department of Labour. During the year a visit was made by members of the
Board of Industrial Relations to the Bureau, at which time the work of the Labour
Division was reviewed and discussion took place relative to the compilation of additional
statistical material for the annual report of the Department of Labour. The Statistician has been transferred from the Department of Labour to the Bureau, and in
addition to his former work will be available for general research duties.
THE MINING AND METALLURGICAL STATISTICS DIVISION.
Continuing the co-operative agreement entered into by the Provincial Department
of Mines, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, all mining statistics of the Province are collected and compiled by this Division,
primarily for the annual report of the Minister of Mines. The second phase of the
agreement is that the Dominion Bureau of Statistics receives identical information, so
that Dominion and Provincial mining statistics are substantially in accord, and it follows that the information obtained is readily available to the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics for any special study.
During the year under review there has been completed and made available to the
Department of Mines a record of production by individual mines in the Province, giving
details of tonnage mined and metal content. The study was commenced by the Bureau
of Mines and carried on by the Mining Statistician when that official was transferred
to the Bureau of Economics and Statistics in 1939. As mentioned before, the Deputy
Minister of Mines has a set of the records compiled and this Division has the other,
and on the completion of the yearly statistics the two sets are brought up to date. The
information now readily available covers the period from the early '80's up to 1942.
The normal flow of work during the year was carried out and several special compilations made for the Department of Mines, one giving details on lode-mining for the
period 1930-41 in the lode-gold, copper, and silver-lead-zinc mines. The information
gave data on capital employed, salaries and wages, fuel and electricity, process supplies,
number of shipping mines, net value to shipper, gross value of lode minerals produced,
and number employed in such mines, concentrators, and smelters.
In addition to the duties of the above division, the Mining Statistician was
appointed Acting-Director of the Bureau.
THE MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION.
The preparation of large-scale statistical surveys and reports can be more rapidly
accomplished with the use of Hollerith mechanical tabulation machines, and this Division, utilizing punch-card equipment, is responsible for such work in the Bureau. The
equipment used consists of two duplicating key punches, one automatic summary punch, U 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
one alphabetic key punch, two card sorters (one with card counting attachment), one
numeric tabulator, and one alphabetic tabulator with an automatic carriage.
The Division is operated as a service department, and facilities available are being
used by other Government departments.
During the period under review work was undertaken for Messrs. Yarrows,
Limited, engaged in ship-building for the Dominion Government. The contract
involved the processing of nearly 1,750,000 cards and the preparation of daily, semimonthly, monthly, and special reports. The extra work involved made it necessary to
increase the staff of the Division.
During the year progress was made on new punch-card applications. The Provincial Board of Health instituted a punched card control of expenditures, and the
Department of Public Works started preliminary work on a summary of District Office
inventories.
The following gives an idea of the work done for Government departments:—
Attorney-General—Motor Records—Provincial Police.
Department of Finance—Tax Rolls—Surveyor of Taxes.
Department of Labour—
Industrial and General Statistics.
Female Minimum Wage Statistics.
Department of the Provincial Secretary—
Board of Health.
Division of Tuberculosis Control.
Division of Vital Statistics.
Division of Venereal Disease Control.
Child Welfare Branch.
Department of Welfare, Field Service.
Control of Expenditures.
Department of Public Works—
Accounting Branch.
District Office Inventories.
Department of Trade and Industry—Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
The total value of work done during the period under review was $20,948.
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU.
GENERAL.
In 1941, little had transpired to interfere with the flow of recreational travel.
Mild regulatory measures were in force governing the sale of gasoline, but fuel and
tires were still freely purchasable to all intents, and the influx from the United States
—the universally accepted barometer of Tourism in Canada—still stood high.
The picture changed abruptly, and the years 1942 and 1943 showed a marked
diminution. How marked is clearly shown by the following brief comparison of cars
entering from the United States on Travellers' Vehicle Permits:—
July, 1941 _  17,593
July, 1942     7,019
July, 1943 _     5,246
These figures tell the story quite sufficiently, without the need of burdening these
pages with lengthy tabulations.
At the same time the situation actually was by no means so dismal from the
Resort-owners' standpoint.    The American tourist disappeared, practically, from the DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. U 27
general picture—although, " short hauls " being the order of the day, the cities of Vancouver and Victoria, from their extreme accessibility, still benefited handsomely—but
his place was taken to an encouraging extent by visitors from other parts of Canada—
on the Coast by visitors from the Interior and in the Interior by visitors from the
Coast. Almost it would seem that numbers of British Columbians saw British Columbia for the first time in 1942 and 1943!
It has always been the Bureau's practice to keep closely in touch with the Resort-
owners throughout the Province, the Bureau being fully alive to the fact that the close
and friendly co-operation of the Resort-owners is essential to its proper functioning;
and here it might be added that the Bureau is deeply conscious of, and warmly grateful
for, the feeling of confidence which now exists between the industry and itself, and for
the many expressions of that confidence which it has received.
From those contacts it soon became apparent that the Resort-owners were finding
no great difficulty in securing patronage; that in many cases, indeed, their accommodations were overtaxed, and that their chief problems arose from shortage of help,
equipment, and supplies.
That transportation facilities would be curtailed was inevitable, that priorities
would take effect and rationing be applied were eventualities for which every one was
prepared; and the concensus of opinion appears to be that, on the whole, those necessary war-time regulations have been implemented in a manner to make their impact
much less severe than might easily have been the case.
Actually, the situation in the period under review is highly encouraging. It
reveals that Tourism as a factor is much too firmly established and too deeply rooted to
suffer material damage; that it is long past the stage when it has to be nursed and
shielded, but is now able to stand firmly upon its own feet and to take its place among
the basic industries. It shows that Tourism has become so intimate a part of life as
we have accustomed ourselves to live it that nothing can permanently injure it. It
makes it plain that those engaged in it recognize it for what it is—an industry as
definitely and as strongly founded as any of those on which our economic structure
is reared.
Here it might be pointed out that Tourism is under a heavy handicap in the
absence of complete and comprehensive statistics. With the other basic industries the
matter is relatively simple—so many millions of board-feet, so many tons, so many
cases; but with Tourism the statistics are all so very personal—how many were in the
party, where did they go, how long did they stay, how much did they spend—that there
can be no compulsion; the visitor can only be invited to co-operate. Such statistics as
are available are excellent, so far as they go, but they fall far short of presenting the
complete picture. Were that picture presented in its entirety, there is little doubt
that it would show at once that Tourism has been consistently underestimated as an
economic factor.
Opinions vary as to what the industry is worth to British Columbia, but all are
agreed that the amount is substantial and well worth our energetic and sustained
efforts. On the experience of the past, an extremely conservative estimate would be
$20,000,000 in a normal year; and there is no doubt whatever that, when freedom of
movement is restored, we shall see an instant response and a volume of travel far in
excess of all previous records.
The Bureau feels that to secure those complete and comprehensive statistics should
be one of its first responsibilities, and is at the moment engaged upon a plan by which
it is confident of obtaining them. This plan is based in large measure upon the goodwill and co-operation of the Resort-owners, whose attitude gives the Bureau every
reason to believe that it is entirely feasible.
Without those figures, the industry is at a serious disadvantage. With them, it
can at once be placed in its proper niche and given its proper measure of recognition. U 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Here would seem to be an appropriate place in which to comment upon the attitude
of the Resort-owners of British Columbia. The Bureau cannot praise too warmly those
operators (and there are extremely few exceptions) who have made it their wholehearted endeavour to serve the travelling public efficiently, consistently, and well. In
British Columbia we have without question many of the finest establishments of their
kind upon the American Continent, and a great number of less elaborate places where
the operators are making the utmost of the facilities at their command. In spite of the
severe handicaps imposed by war-time conditions, those operators have continued to
serve with a cheerful courtesy which nothing has impaired, and which in itself constitutes one of our outstanding assets. Our visitors are strikingly unanimous in their
comments; and our scenery, our climate, our resources, our accommodations, and the
universal courtesy of our people are praised enthusiastically and without reserve.
The Bureau has been immensely encouraged by their attitude, and thanks them
most cordially for their friendly co-operation, which has gone so far to facilitate its
operations.
PUBLICITY.
Naturally, in all the circumstances, the Newspaper and Magazine Campaign of
1943 was much restricted in scope and volume, and the theme attuned to the spirit of
the times. With the enormously increased tempo of the war effort and of demands
upon all forms of transportation, positively no direct appeal was made for tourist
travel, and the tone was strictly, " Not now, but later. Buy War Bonds now, and save
for that grand Post-war Vacation."
The policy was continued of conducting the campaigns through recognized advertising agencies, and the response in both cases was extremely gratifying, so very
gratifying indeed as to confirm the wisdom of continuing to advertise if only on a very
limited scale. Frankly, the campaigns of 1942 and 1943 were largely in the nature of
" token " campaigns, with the main purpose of maintaining the pleasant relations which
had already been established and of keeping the name of British Columbia constantly
before the public. In this policy, the Province of British Columbia found itself aligned
with several other organizations prominent in the travel field, notably the All-year Club
of Southern California, the City of San Francisco, and the Evergreen Playground
Association, whose co-operation has been excellent.
Field-work.
Here again, the Bureau felt justified in continuing its activities and maintaining
and expanding its contacts in the eleven Western States. In the past, Outing Shows
have been a prominent feature, but these, for obvious reasons, have been abandoned
for the time being. It is intended, however, to develop this angle substantially with
the return of normal conditions, and to take full advantage of the unique opportunities
which they afford.
Largely through the instrumentality of our Field Representative, an interesting
and constructive meeting was arranged in November, 1943, between the Spokane
Chamber of Commerce, the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau, the Game
Commission, and representatives of the communities and press of the West Kootenays,
where definite progress was made towards the formation of an international body for
the furtherance of post-war travel. Spokane was selected as the venue as being the
natural gateway to that section of British Columbia, and there is no doubt that travel
to the Kootenays will be greatly stimulated.
Motion Pictures.
As a medium of publicity the 16-mm. motion picture in sound and colour is preeminent, and the Bureau has been very active in that field.    A series of pictures is DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. U 29
planned, of which the first, " Vancouver Island, British Columbia's Island Playground,"
was released in 1942. Of the companion pieces, " Romantic Cariboo, British Columbia's
Historic Highway," will be released very shortly, " The Okanagan Valley, British
Columbia's Orchard Playground," is in process of editing, and " The Kootenays, British Columbia's Mountain Playground," will be photographed in the summer of 1944.
" Vancouver Island " has already been extensively in circulation, and has been warmly
praised by many competent authorities for the excellence of the photography and of the
camera technique. The Bureau's official photographer is responsible for this and for
the companion pieces, and for the Bureau's large and constantly augmented collection
of scenic and industrial " stills," embracing all sections and phases.
Literature.
The compiling, publishing, and circulating of descriptive and informative booklets,
designed to convey a comprehensive idea of the Province as a whole and of its industrial, social, and scenic background, has always been one of the Bureau's main interests.
Normally, some 600,000 booklets and folders are distributed in the course of the year,
but in the period under review, for reasons which will readily be apparent, a more conservative policy was adopted and wholesale distribution confined to the more immediate
field. Very few new publications were added, a notable instance being a profusely
illustrated booklet designed to interest the motion-picture producers of Southern California in the possibilities of British Columbia. The Bureau wishes here to express its
gratitude to the British Columbia Telephone Company, which placed at its disposal a
number of unusually fine half-tone cuts.
Another outstanding instance of co-operation was that of the Union Oil Company
of Canada, Limited, in granting the use of its plates for the printing of a series of
coloured pictorial postcards for free distribution among the men of the armed forces.
(The subject of Literature is touched upon again under the heading of " Settlement.")
Co-operative Activities.
The Bureau is pleased to have been able to co-operate with the Vancouver Board
of Trade in the campaign conducted by the B.C. Products Bureau, and the Board has
been so good as to express its appreciation of the assistance given by our photographer,
whose showings of motion pictures contributed substantially to the success of the
numerous exhibitions. Similar expressions of appreciation have been received from
the Provincial Civilian Protection Committee (A.R.P.) and from the numerous Service
Clubs, where showings have been given.
The friendly relations existing between the Bureau and the Vancouver Tourist
Association, the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau, and the Evergreen Playground
Association continue to be a source of pleasure and benefit. Mr. A. L. Woods, Secretary of the Vancouver Tourist Association, has been particularly helpful, and the
Bureau is much indebted to him. Mention must be made, too, of the excellent co-operation given by Mr. T. J. Monty, Canadian Government Trade Commissioner at Los
Angeles, California.
TOURIST COUNCIL.
This advisory body met in November, 1942, for a general discussion of the travel
situation, and many constructive suggestions were advanced for the consideration and
guidance of the Bureau. At this meeting, Mr. W. H. Currie was introduced as a member of the Council in place of Mr. J. Gordon Smith, retired.
QUEBEC CONFERENCE.
The Honourable Minister of National War Services convened a National Tourist
business meeting in Quebec City on November 29th, 1943.    The following delegates U 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
represented the Province of British Columbia: The President of the Evergreen Playground Association, the Secretary of the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau, and
the Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
Many important and far-reaching resolutions were duly passed, chief of which
were the early formation of a Canadian Travel Advisory Council, to be composed of
the Provincial Cabinet Ministers charged with the responsibility of administering the
tourist industry in their respective Provinces; the formation of a distinctive Department of Tourism by the Dominion Government; the inauguration of an adequate programme of appropriate good-will advertising in the United States during the year
1944; the furthering of handicrafts within Canada; and the institution of a vigorous
programme of improvement and construction of highways by Provincial Governments,
with such Federal financial aid as may be necessary.
The successful prosecution of the war was at all times the key-note of the conference, and all resolutions were passed with a view to making provision for the
maximum employment of -returned men and women and industrial war-workers.
SETTLEMENT.
- Mention has been made in previous reports of the fact that the British Columbia
Government Travel Bureau does not confine itself to travel, but has for several years
taken an active interest in settlement. A Travel Bureau cannot hope to function
properly unless it has a complete and detailed knowledge of its territory, in the intelligent acquiring of which it is bound to gain an insight into the agricultural and other
possibilities of the various sections; nor must it be forgotten that many people who
come as visitors return to stay.
So active has the Bureau been' in this connection, and so successful in inducing
settlement, that it has become, especially of late, the recognized channel through which
all but purely routine inquiries are handled. The other interested Departments have
been so very co-operative that the Bureau is able now to deal with settlement inquiries
in substantial detail and to furnish inquirers with all but strictly technical information.
Naturally, this phase calls for close personal attention and the capacity to visualize
the needs of the inquirer, even where he himself is vague, and to suggest the locations
and activities in which he is likeliest to succeed with his experience and capital. Each
inquiry must be considered strictly from an individual standpoint and, although nearly
all have certain points in common, standardized or routine replies are impossible. That
the Bureau has been so successful is due in large measure to its recognition of those
facts and to the pains which it has consistently taken with each and every inquiry.
The Bureau feels itself fortunate in having " two strings to its bow," and has
every intention of developing the settlement angle. Most of the new publications for
which it was responsible in the period under review, or has in mind for the immediate
future, are directed to the prospective settler. Notable among them are the small
brochure, " Tell Me about British Columbia," and the souvenir map designed specifically
for circulation among the men of the armed forces—the former dealing with the industrial, social, and scenic background of the Province, and the latter giving concise
descriptions of its agricultural areas.
It is not intended to convey that settlement will become permanently the major
interest, but it is quite apparent that, at least for some years to come, it will continue
to occupy the attention of the Bureau to such an extent as to change its entire complexion. This is, indeed, so very evident that it must be borne seriously in mind in
planning and providing for the future. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. U 31
BRITISH COLUMBIA OVERSEAS TOBACCO FUND.
Following representations to the Government from Mr. W. A. McAdam, Agent-
General for British Columbia in London, this Department undertook in February, 1941,
the organization and operation of the British Columbia Overseas Tobacco Fund.
The work is carried on in conjunction with the office of the Agent-General in
London, the cigarettes being shipped in bulk to that office, from which centre individual
parcels are dispatched. The fund has been a distinct success and has proven a boon
to British Columbia men serving in Britain. Generous donations have been received
from individuals and organizations which have provided hundreds of thousands of
cigarettes for general distribution at the discretion of the Agent-General in London.
To date 102,592,700 cigarettes and 24,777 lb. of tobacco have been shipped to British
Columbia House, London.
In operating the fund throughout the Province, the fund has been fortunate enough
to have the co-operation of the Junior Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce,
local branches of the Canadian Legion and B.P. Order of Elks, and various women's
organizations, whilst in Vancouver the United Commercial Travellers of America have
taken charge for that city. The fund is indebted to local organizations for their generous assistance in providing an exceptionally fine service which is genuinely appreciated
by British Columbia men serving in Britain.
VICTOBIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1944.
■ 755-144-7541 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0319029/manifest

Comment

Related Items