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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1944

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOE   THE
TBAR  ENDED   DECEMBER  318T
1942
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1943.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1942
is herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
July, 1943. The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
SIR,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twenty-fifth Annual Report on the
work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1942.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., July, 1943.
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Deputy Minister _. .  7
Statistics of Trade and Industries  7
Pay-roll  8
Comparison of Pay-rolls  8
Industrial Divisions  9
Average Weekly Wage by Industries  11
Racial Origin and Nationality  16
Statistical Tables :  17
Summary of all Tables .  30
" Hours of Work Act "  31
Average Weekly Hours r  32
Hours of Work Regulations  38
Labour Legislation ■- 33
" Old-age Pensions Act "  33
" Employment Agencies Act "  33
" Statutory Holidays Powers Act "  33
"Truck Act"  34
"Factories Act" :  34
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "  35
" Shops Regulation Act " and " Weekly Half-holiday Act "  35
" Department of Labour Act "  36
Board of Industrial Relations  37
Meetings and Delegations  37
New Orders and Regulations  38
Statistics covering Women and Girl Employees.-  39
Summary of all Occupations  45
Single, Married, and Widowed Employees  48
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum  46
Years of Service Table  48
Inspections and Collections  49
Court Cases  49
Comparative Wages  52
Special Licences  53
War's Effect on Women's Employment '.  53
Summary of Orders  56
List of Orders in Effect  77
Hours of Work Regulations  78
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "  83
Number of Disputes and Employees affected  84
Strikes .  88
Conciliation, 1942  91
Boards of Arbitration  93
Organizations of Employees  115
Organizations of Employers  126 F 6 SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Inspection of Factories  127
Inspections    127
Accident-prevention  127
Factory Conditions  128
Employees' Welfare  128
Women in Industry  128
Child Labour   129
Industrial Home-work  130
Elevators 1  130
Apprenticeship Branch-    132
Trade-schools Regulation Branch  136
Safety Branch  142 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1942.
This Annual Report for the year 1942, being the twenty-fifth of the Department,
shows a general expansion in the industrial activity of the Province. Our industrial
pay-roll of $302,892,946, an increase of $63,367,487 over the previous year's figure
($239,525,459), establishes a new high in the history of the Province.
Twenty-three of the twenty-five tables relating to the industrial groups showed
increases in the pay-roll totals for 1942.
Greatest increase was again in the ship-building industry (up thirty-six and a half
million dollars over 1941), followed by contracting (up fifteen million), miscellaneous
trades and industries (up over six and a half million), lumber industries and metal
trades (both increased by four and a half million). For others in order of increase
see " Comparison of Pay-rolls " in report data.
Decreases were noted in only two industries (metal-mining down two million
dollars, and printing and publishing down eighty-three thousand).
Average monthly employment totals rose to a new high in 1942, the month of
November showing a total of 143,760 as against a high of 110,771 for October, 1941.
Shifting of man-power to essential war industries created new employment records
in ship-building, contracting, metal trades, and like industries, while in other relatively
non-essential industries, such as garment-making, house-furnishings, printing and publishing, etc., the diminishing monthly totals of male workers was offset by sharp
increases in the number of females employed.
With the increasing tempo of war-time production, longer working-hours, less
casual employment, the cost-of-living bonus, and such contributing factors, increases in
the average weekly wages were evident in twenty-four of the twenty-five tables for
1942. Greatest increases were again noted in those industries affected by war production, such as ship-building, metal trades, contracting, builders' materials, explosives and
chemicals, etc. The only average Wage showing a decrease was the 1942 figure for
jewellery-manufacturing, which declined fractionally 13 cents.
The average weekly wage for all adult male wage-earners rose to $35.24 for 1942,
representing a gain of $4.57 over the previous year, and establishing a new high in the
records of the Department.
Production demands created the necessity for longer hours in most vital industries.
While in some instances the average maintained the level of the year previous, or
decreased slightly, the trend generally was upward, with a resultant increase in the
average weekly working-hours for all employees to 48.12, as against 46.90 for 1941.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Production for war continued as the basic factor affecting the statistical section
for 1942, with rapidly expanding industrial development, and the shifting of man-power
to vital industries, bringing many changes in the records which follow.
Notwithstanding a slight decrease in the number of firms reporting, the total
pay-roll for 1942 showed a gain of $63,367,487 over the previous year's figure, setting a
new high in the records of the Department.
Employment totals exceeded all previous records, the greatest average monthly
employment figure showing a total of 143,760 in 1942, as against a previous high of
110,771 for 1941. F 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Average weekly wages increased in twenty-four of the twenty-five tables, while the
average for all industries increased by $4.57 per week over the previous year.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 4,845.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 4,845,
as compared with 5,115 in 1941, a decrease of 270.
PAY-ROLL.
The 4,845 firms filing returns in time for classification reported a total pay-roll of
$252,046,389. As this total, however, represents only the industrial pay-rolls, it is not
considered as the total Provincial pay-roll, and is further augmented by additional
figures which follow, showing an accumulative total of $302,892,946, an increase of
$63,367,487 over 1941.
Pay-rolls of 4,845 firms making returns to Department of Labour.	
Returns received too late to be included in above summary _.__ _____   _____
Employers included in Department's inquiry, not sending in returns   (estimated payroll)     '.'."' 1    	
$252,046,389
130,304
1,350,000
17,066,253
Transcontinental  railways   (ascertained pay-roll)   	
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey; viz., Governmental
workers, wholesale and retail firms, ocean services, miscellaneous (estimated payroll)   _  , _ _         32,300,000
Total _ _ _    $302,892,946
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS.
The total Provincial pay-rolls since 1928 are as follows:
1928..
1929..
1930_.
1931..
1932..
1933..
1934_
$183,097,781
1936
192,092,249
1937
167,133,813
1938
131,941,008
1939.
102,957,074
1940
99,126,653
1941
113,567,953
1942
$142,349,591
162,654,234
158,026,375
165,683,460
188,325,766
239,525,459
302,892,946
1935  :___  125,812,140
With a continued increase in employment and greater earnings for the wage-earner,
the percentage of the total pay-roll expended in this section increased from 80.60 per
cent, in 1941 to 84.21 per cent, in 1942, as evidenced in the following table:—
1938,
1939.
1940,
1941.
1942.
Per Cent.
10.82
12.08
77.10
PerCent.
10.82
11.86
77.32
Per Cent.
10.22
11.15
78.63
Per Cent.
9.29
10.11
80.60
Per Cent.
8 66
84 21
Totals                      _  _	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100 00
■ COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
Increases are shown in twenty-three of the twenty-five tables. Ship-building
continued to lead with an increase of $36,669,597 for 1942, followed by contracting with
a gain of $15,273,867 and miscellaneous trades and industries with an increase of
$6,802,331; the lumber industries increased by $4,675,203, followed by metal trades,
up: $4,521,271; food products, an increase of $2,438,247; pulp and paper mills, up
$1,856,792; wood manufacturing (N.E.S.), up $1,460,887; public utilities, up $1,094,-
330; smelting, an additional $1,048,874; coal-mining, an increase of $671,191; Coast
shipping, $615,285; explosives and chemicals, $374,733; breweries, $346,865; garment-
making,  $298,798;   builders'  materials,  $212,843;   leather and  fur  goods,   $78,243; REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 9
laundries, cleaning and dyeing, $72,472; house-furnishings, $70,968; jewellery-manufacture, $50,481; oil-refining, $45,082; paint-manufacturing, $5,459; and cigar and
tobacco manufacturing, up $940.
Decreases were noted in metal-mining, with a loss of $2,004,060, and printing and
publishing, down $83,866.
1940.
1941.
1942.
Industry.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
33
77
3
24
121
1,014
21
591
68
62
11
102
63
894
818
200
376
51
13
138
13
50
6
115
107
$1,096,045.00
1,339,755.00
2,300.00
3,811,341.00
8,218,668.00
10,146,833.00
2,260,148.00
11,951,636.00
917,832.00
1,460,579.00
251,190.00
1,586,343.00
698,440.00
33,435,358.00
10,019,567.00
12,641,521.00
6,486,402.00
2,582,138.00
371,149.00
3,769,852.00
6,178,117.00
3,941,111.00
5,842,224.00
10,730,667.00
4,096,347.00
37
85
3
27
124
1,054
26
597
70
60
11
104
60
951
841
164
404
58
11
145
12
52
5
111
103
$1,237,173.00
1,787,736.00
3,501.00
3,820,642.00
8,045,059.00
14,827,887.00
3,126,623.00
13,837,812.00
965,505.00
1,707,941.00
293,071.00
1,945,857.00
788,458.00
39,260,130.00
12,702,265.00
13,812,921.00
9,210,500.00
2,994,601.00
423,736.00
4,227,387.00
6.967,732.00
10,534,309.00
6,832,629.00
11,639,772.00
4,456,309.00
34
76
3
27
117
889
24
572
63
65
12
104
53
938
800
127
455
53
10
145
13
46
5
110
104
$1,584,038.00
2,000,579.00
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing ___ 	
Coal-mining    	
4,441.00
4,491,833.00
8,660,344.00
30,101,754.00
3,501,356.00
16,276,059.00
1,264,303.00
1,778,909.00
343,552.00
2,018,329.00
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of	
866,701.00
43,935,333.00
17,223,536.00
11,808,861.00
16,012,831.00
3,039,683.00
429,195.00
4,143,521.00
Pulp and paper mills _  	
8,824,524.00
47,203,906.00
7,881,503.00
Street-railways, etc.   	
Wood manufacturing (N.E.S.)—. 	
12,734,102.00
5,917,196.00
Totals   	
4,971
$143,835,563.00
5,115
$175,449,556.00
4,845
$252,046,389.00
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
As in previous years, the industrial activities of the Province have again been
localized within three divisions—Greater Vancouver, Vancouver Island, and Rest of
Mainland. During 1942, owing to tremendous development in the war industries within
the Greater Vancouver section, the percentage of the Provincial pay-roll attributable
to this division increased to 45.91 per cent, as against 38.62 per cent, for 1941. The
Vancouver Island percentage decreased relatively from 20.40 per cent, to 18.18 per
cent., and a corresponding drop was also evident in the Mainland percentage, which
decreased to 35.91 per cent, as against 40.98 per cent, for 1941.
The above percentages are based on the returns received, the figures in the following table being obtained through their application to the total pay-roll:—
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
$55,530,468.18
69,468,394.45
33,027,512.37
$57,591,570.70
73,762,276.39
34,329,612.91
$67,477,121.96
82,034,703.67
38,813,940.37
$92,504,732.26
98,157,533.10
48,863,193.64
$139,058,151.51
108,768,856.91
55,065,937.58
Vancouver Island _ 	
Totals    .—	
$158,026,375.00
$165,683,460.00
$188,325,766.00
$239,525,459.00
$302,892,946.00 F 10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Following are the various industries as represented in the tables, showing the total
number of adult males employed for the week of employment of the greatest number,
together with the percentage of those in receipt of less than $19 per week:—
Industry.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing  -...- _	
Garment-making      -	
Leather and fur goods „ _ - _
Coast shipping 	
Printing and publishing   _	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing
Food  products    	
House-furnishings	
Miscellaneous trades and industries
Metal trades _. 	
Wood   (N.E.S.)     -
Street-railways, power, etc.
Breweries    	
Builders'  materials  —	
Smelting	
Contracting
Explosives and chemicals
Ship-building     ___
Paint-manufacture   	
Oil-refining    „       1,083
Lumber   industries        - -  29,761
Coal-mining    -	
Pulp and paper manufacturing    	
Metal-mining     — —  	
Jewellery-manufacture   — - -   -
Number
Per
employed.
Cent.
9
77.78
221
19.00
284
16.20
4,759
12.82
1,198
10.43
511
10.18
10,548
9.21
815
7.24
8,791
6.53
7,668
5.18
2,996
5.11
5,022
3.98
733
3.96
1,296
3.32
3,152
3.01
24,795
2.33
1,463
2.32
26,913
1.86
110
1.82
1,083
1.39
29,761
1.35
2,518
0.79
3,641
0.44
6,643
0.39
76
0.00
Further decrease in the numbers employed at less than $19 per week was evident
in 1942. While in certain industries, due to the increased employment of unskilled
labour, slight increases were noted, eighteen of the twenty-five tables continued to show
diminishing percentages employed in this lower wage group. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
P 11
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRIES.
The average weekly wage for adult male workers increased in twenty-four of the
twenty-five tables, with only a fractional decrease in the one remaining. In line with
previous years, the averages are based on the week of employment of the greatest
number, and while considerable difficulty is experienced with some industries in the
matter of broken time, an endeavour is made to base calculations on a full working-
week. Frequency distributions of employees classified on the basis of weekly earnings
from $6 to $50 are used for this purpose, the mid-point of the class-limits being generally taken as the rate for each wage group.
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
Breweries- _	
$25.79
22.07
16.59
28.49
26.23
22.72
25.34
22.00
21.29
20.05
31.54
21.92
20.06
22.41
23.67
28.65
22.29
25.55
21.53
32.31
23.53
25.83
25.82
27.09
18.69
$25.00
22.28
17.75
28.75
31.61
24.13
23.76
23.16
22.74
21.29
34.39
22.25
20.48
24.83
24.41
29.10
22.07
26.21
21.44
32.72
24.24
26.38
24.54
27.50
20.32
$26.18
22.31
15.50
27.46
31.99
25.61
24.58
23.85
22.97
22.25
34.60
22.89
21.23
26.81
24.77
30.34
23.85
27.92
23.08
33.69
26.75
27.88
25.08
27.20
21.97
$27.42
22.82
13.00
28.20
32.93
25.81
24.20
23.70
23.15
20.80
38.95
23.33
22.23
26.59
25.09
30.48
23.46
28.68
22.78
34.19
26.36
28.76
24.80
27.78
22.68
$27.98
23.23
19.75
29.39
29.35
26.12
25.75
23.23
24.25
22.53
39.23
23.19
21.19
27.14
25.38
30.86
23.91
28.97
22.69
34.34
26.54
28.55
25.57
28.63
23.22
$28.23
24.15
17.70
28.04
30.34
27.52
31.67
23.59
25.22
23.59
43.44
24.00
21.72
28.83
26.18
31.77
24.36
29.17
23.15
34.34
29.84
31.74
32.75
28.57
24.88
$29.29
26.26
14.50
31.84
30.03
30.21
33.39
25.65
26.51
25.74
38.72
24.76
26.07
31.01
29.90
33.72
26.97
30.97
24.95
36.78
32.13
35.27
37.07
30.93
27.01
$31.85
30.78
15.83
34.56
31.24
36.41
36.45
30.52
Garment-making- —
27.72
27.76
38.59
28.20
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of
27.80
33.94
34.00
Metal-mining ~	
Miscellaneous trades and industries
37.19
33.58
33.40
28.73
37.10
Pulp and paper manufacturing —	
Ship-building	
Smelting	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, tele
33.92
40.32
38.49
32.28
Wood, manufacturing of (N.E.S.)	
30.24
The increases and decreases in the average weekly rates are as follows:
Increase.
Breweries _	
Builders* materials 	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing
Coal-mining     	
Coast shipping     	
Contracting 	
Explosives  and chemicals  	
Food products, manufacture of
Garment-making   	
House-furnishings    	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing 	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of
Lumber industries  	
$2.56
4.62
1.33
2.72
1.21
6.20
3.06
4.87
1.21
2.02
3.44
1.73
2.93
Metal trades _.
Metal-mining
$4.10
3.47
Miscellaneous trades and industries   6.61
Oil-refining      2.43
Paint-manufacturing        3.78
Printing and publishing  32
Pulp and paper manufacturing      1.79
Ship-building         5.05
Smelting         1.42
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc,        1.35
Wood manufacturing  (N.E.S.)  _.    3.23
Decrease.
Jewellery-manufacturing
$0.13 F 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The average weekly wage for all adult males in the wage-earner group rose to
$35.24 in 1942, setting a new high in the records of the Department and representing
an increase of $4.57 over the preceding year. The following shows the average for
each year since the formation of the Department:—
1918 ... _	
   $27.97
1931
1919 _	
     29.11
      31.51
1932  	
23.62
1920 _	
1933
22 30
1921	
1922	
     27.62
     27.29
      28.05
 _     28.39
     27.82
1934 	
1935	
        23.57
24.09
1923  	
1924	
1936 	
1937-...  _	
  _     26.36
                      26.64
1925  _ ... _____ _
1938
1926 -	
           27.99
1939 	
1940 	
1927_ _ 	
      28.29
28.11
1928 _	
     28.96
1941 	
1942	
1929___ _    ..__	
          29.20
     28.64
35 24
1930   	
The weekly wage-rates shown above appear in the following chart, which depicts
the trend of average weekly wages for adult male workers from 1918 to 1942.
AVERAGE   WEEKLY
WAGES   PAID   TO  ADUL1
1918 - 1942
MALE
EMPLOYEES
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WAGES
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
35.00
34.00
33.00
32.00
31.00
30.00
29.00
28.00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.00
/
/
/
A
A
/
/
\
\
1
/
/
\
 V
\
I
—<•
y
V
\
/
/
\
\
/
\
/
\
\
/"
V
(1942 figure—$35.24.)
.   .
;.■ REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 13
AVERAGE MONTHLY  NUMBER of WAGE-EARNERS   (Male and Female)
1929-31-32-37-38-39-40-4-1-42
|JAN.| FEB.[MAR.[AP-_.iMAY|JUr.-_jJULY| AUG.|SEPT.| OCT. |NOV.| DEC.
January  .
February
March ....
April   	
1942.
105,954 July
  111,693
  114,802
 '.    117,948
May    122,850
June   _    128,134
August   	
September
October   —
November
December _
136,932
141,344
141,559
143,279
143,760
137,657 F 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
30%
£5%
20%
15%
10%
I93S
1939
I9AO
1941
1942
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h t-h           e
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via          t
15 to  20     18
20 to  25     26
25 to  30     20
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_> c
SC
45 to  50      1
50 and over    1
Jnder $15    _ 4
15 to  20     14
20 to  25     23
25 to  30     19
30 to  35     17
35 to  40     10
40 to  45      5
50 and over   2
Jnder $15   2
15 to 20 _____ 7
20 to  25     20
25 to  30     20
SO to  35     17
35 to  40     13
40 to  45     10
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15 to 20     2
20 to 25 _____  9
25 to 30     17
30 to 35    .17
35 to  40     18
40 to  45 12
45 to  50  9
50 and over   11
. REPORT OF DEPUTY
MINISTER, 1942.
P 15
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DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
EAGIAL ORIGIN AND NATIONALITY OF EMPLOYEES.
A total of 188,094 employees were reported under a question dealing with racial
origin and nationality, of which 145,536 or 77.37 per cent, were originally from English-
speaking countries; 31,138 or 16.55 per cent, originally from Continental Europe; 8,156
or 4.34 per cent, from Asiatic stock; and 3,264 or 1.74 per cent, from other countries,
or racial origin not stated. Comparative percentages for the years 1940, 1941, and
1942 are shown in the following table:—
Racial Origin.
1940.
1941.
1942.
Per Cent.
75.37
15.10
7.70
1.83
Per Cent.
75.93
16.18
6.27
1.62
Per Cent.
77 37
16.55
4 34
1.74
Totals   _ _	
100.00
100.00
100 00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
An increase in the number of firms reporting in the larger pay-roll bracket is
again noted for 1942—a total of 386 firms reporting pay-rolls of over $100,000, compared with 312 for the previous year.
As in previous years, pay-rolls of public authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or
municipal) are not included, nor are wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental railways, or vessels engaged in deep-sea transportation.
The lumber industry continued to lead with 108 firms reporting in the higher
bracket, an increase of 13; followed by contracting with 55, up 27; food products, 34,
an increase of 3; metal trades, 34, up 8; metal-mining, 21, decreased by 4; miscellaneous trades and industries, 20, an increase of 5; Coast shipping, 16, up 3; wood
(N.E.S.), 14, up 4; ship-building, 13, an increase of 5; public utilities, 13, up 3; coalmining, 9, up 1; oil-refining, 8, unchanged; pulp and paper, 8, up 1; printing and
publishing, 7, increased by 1; breweries and builders' materials, 5 each, both up 1;
laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 4, up 1; house-furnishings, 3, unchanged; explosives
and chemicals, and smelting, both 2, unchanged; garment-making, 2, up 1; jewellery-
manufacture, leather and fur goods, and paint-manufacturing, 1 each, all unchanged
from previous year.
Of the 386 firms reported above, seven had pay-rolls in excess of $5,000,000, one
between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, four between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000, eight between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and thirteen between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 17
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following-, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading :—
No. 1. Breiceries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. [Builders' Material, etc. — Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towmg logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting.—Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing a:.d heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc.—Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.— Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.—Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries. — Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers ; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.-Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting. —Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasoline lighting and heating devices, &nd supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering 34 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers 3254,127.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    208,948.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  1,120,963.00
Total $1,584,038.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
April	
May	
June	
530
538
636
588
608
668
91
VO
76
71
89
101
July 	
August	
September .
October	
November ..
December...
712
724
703
693
670
661.
104
122
143
158
195
236
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
S6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
3
2
2
to     8.99	
2
to     9.99	
to   10.99	
1
to   11.99	
3
to   12.99	
2
to   13.99	
2
to   14.99	
2
to   16.99	
2
to   16.99	
3
to   17 99	
2
3
to   19.99	
10
7
to   21.99	
17
16
to   23.99	
2
35
16
to   26 99	
31
to   27.99	
54
to   28.99	
12
13
to   34.99	
266
to   39.99	
141
to   44.99	
41
to   49.99	
8
35
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
3
2
0
4
13
3
17
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian ,	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavia	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian ^ ...
Negro	
Others not shown above   ...
Males.
British
Subject.
213
9
S
fi
17
19
10
17
8
4
Females.
British
Subject.
4
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)    ...,	
Females. F 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
I
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 76 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $225,692.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       222,025.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,552,862.00
Total $2,000,579.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January...
February .
March
April ,
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
992
16
993
16
1,020
18
1,005
18
1,072
19
1,107
19
Month.
July	
August....
September
October....
November.
December..
Males.    Females.
1,106
1,108
1,043
1,041
1,059
1,023
19
21
25
25
26
25
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.01)
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00.
to   $6.
to     7.
to     8.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
5
3
2
1
12
8
5
18
31
35
18
49
92
74
82
77
174
44
231
130
87
46
65
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada   	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French.  	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish   	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish. Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew   	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above ....
British
Subject.
351
47
12
24
28
21
14
63
40
2
7
1
12
97
Females.
British
Subject.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Females.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 3 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  8300.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  342.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  3,799.00
Total  $4,441.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
5
5
5
5
5
5
Month.
July	
August	
September .
October 	
November.,
December ..
Males.   Females.
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
IS.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to   $6.99.
to     7.99.
to     8.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
15.99.,
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99.
20.99..
21.99.,
22.99.
23.99..
24.99.
25.99..
26.99.
27.99.
28.99..
29.99.
34.99.
39.99
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland   	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian. Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian 	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro 	
Others not shown above	
Females.
British
Subject.
Alien.
llnited States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 19
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 27 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $196,408.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       172,399.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,123,026.00
Total $4,491,833.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
April 	
June	
2,636
2,623
2,626
2,623
2,699
2,525
9
9
9
8
8
10
July	
September .
November...
December...
2,429
2,396
2,332
2,353
2,401
2,444
10
11
11
11
11
11
Classified Weekly Waj
e-rates
(Wage
earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
Females
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
$6.00 to   $6.99	
7.00 to     7.99	
8.00 to     8 99	
3
1
1
1
2
2
1
7
1
1
19
7
4
19
31
35
6
25
22
48
272
896
751
126
100
137
1
10.00 to   10.99	
ll.OOto   11.99	
1
12.00 to   12 99	
13.00 to   13.99	
1
14.00 to   14.99	
15.00 to   15.99	
1
16.00 to   16 99	
1
17.00 to   17.99	
18.00 to   18.99	
3
8
17
6
9
4
26
8
4
17
11
6
12
1
19.00 to   19.99	
20.00 to   20 99	
21.00 to   21.99	
22.00 to   22.89	
28.00 to   23.99	
24.00 to   24.99	
1
25.00to   26.99	
26.00 to   26.99	
27.00 to   27 99	
::::::::
28.00 to   28.99	
29.00 to   29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
35.00 to   39.99	
40.00 to   44.99	
45.00 to   49.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland 	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above ....
British
Subject.    Allen-
871
5
6
9
237
46
130
65
1
2S
24
108
63
29
Females.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 117 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $757,855.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       551,996.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,350,493.00
Total $8,660,344.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.. .
February ..
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
4,856
4,606
4,790
5,065
5,077
74
84
Month.
July	
August	
September.
October	
November.
December .
Males.    Females.
5,682
5,618
6,632
5,693
5,645
4,537
102
108
110
113
133
127
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
16.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
tn
$6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
34
39
44
49
1 n.
99	
99	
to
99	
99    	
to
99	
tn
99	
to
99 	
tn
99	
99	
to
99	
tn
99	
tn
99	
tn
99	
tn
99	
tn
99	
tn
99	
to
99	
tn
99	
tn
99  	
tn
99	
tn
99	
to
99	
tn
99	
to
99	
to
to
99 	
to
99	
tn
99 	
an
'er	
21 Yrs.
& over.
I
6
7
20
7
18
25
27
34
54
34
102
ioe
134
63 '
79
70
71
80
101
396
178
126
299
179
792
705
537
166
307
Under
21 Yrs.
15
1
1
12
106
2
10
50
6
2
37
1
36
54
21
11
1
3
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
30
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian. Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above..
Males.
British
Subject.
2,770
1,526
86
16
26
19
. 27
18
112
61
4
1
46
1
Females.
British
Subject.
117
13
1
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.      Females. F 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 889 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $2,142,607.00
' Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,803,1.9.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 26,156,018.00
Total.
.$30,101,764.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
March	
April	
8,737
8,997
9,652
10,129
11,556
13,756
139
148
159
210
253
317
July 	
August	
September .
October ....
November ..
December...
16,637
17,996
18,527
19,533
18,841
19,332
376
453
301
416
440
June	
465
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 ¥rs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
13
39
11
13
16
31
18
34
18
32
51
71
130
100
418
274
331
476
729
911
478
668
1,063
975
634
3,258
4,163
3,542
1,418
4,880
7
15
6
11
15
16
13
22
8
15
25
16
20
11
28
23
10
27
57
22
18
43
18
15
3
81
60
29
26
39
3
3
1
1
5
1
8
5
22
62
54
23
18
60
34
30
36
10
11
22
5
20
21
19
56
53
7
3
6
7.00 to    7.99	
8.00to     8.99	
9.00to     9.99	
lO.OOto   10.99	
1
1
2
12.00 to   12.99	
14.00 to   14.99	
15.00 to   15.99	
16.00 to   16.99	
7
16
3
17.00 to   17.99    	
18.00 to   18.99	
19.00 to   19.99	
3
4
20.00 to   20.99	
21.00 to   21.99	
■ 22.00 to   22.99	
3
23.00 to   23.99    ...
24 00 to   24.99	
1
1
2
26.00 to   26.99	
27 00 to   27.99	
28.00 to   28 99	
29.00 to   29.99	
35.00 to   39.99	
40.00 to   44.99	
46.00 to   49.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada   	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German. Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew 	
Chinese	
Hindu and other Eastlndian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
British
Subject.    A1,en-
11,289
5,818
744
133
352
241
217
510
1,702
1,152
49
9
52
209
12
732
7
12
27
53
98
377
221
25
Females.
British
Subject.    Allen-
600
87
2
1
4
2
15
i
1
12
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)   	
Males.
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES,  CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 24 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $129,708.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       345,828.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   3,025,320.00
Total $3,501,356.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
.January
February
March ..,
April
May	
June
Males.    Females.
1,289
1,276
1,241
1,334
1,365
1,330
13
16
20
17
23
23
Month.
July	
August....
September.
October.. .
November .
December .
Males.    Females.
1,554
1,358
1.343
1,250
1,304
1,342
20
65
123
130
131
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
1
to     7.99    	
1
to     8.99	
1
1
2
to   11 99	
to   12.99	
to   13.99	
to   14.99    	
4
1
to   15.99	
5
to   17.99    	
1
to   18.99	
to   19.99	
6
2
to   20.99	
to   21.99	
8
3
to   23.99	
to   24.99...	
52
15
52
to   25.99	
to   26.99  	
to   27.99	
32
55
30
21
to   29.99	
25
to   34.99	
to   39.99	
194
303
to   44.99.	
436
to   49.99	
138
63
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
1
5
2
8
2
3
3
1
3
34
25
17
1
1
1
12
5
17
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
British
Subject.    Allen-
409
5
5
12
2
7
45
2
1
2
20
1
Females.
British
Subject.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 21
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 572 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,849,122.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    2,122,778.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 12,304,159.00
Total $16,276,059.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ....'.
February....
March	
April	
May	
June   	
Males.   Females.
5,267
5,707
6,055
5,578
5,903
6,948
2,248
2,722
1,858
2,066
2,131
2,703
Month.
Males.
July	
8,240
8,432
September .
8,178
October 	
7,463
November,.
6,654
December ..
5,845
4,644
5,810
6,590
6,268
5,143
3,690
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21 00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00
to   $6.
to     7.
to    8.
to     9.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
tn
tn
tn
tn
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
109
34
41
61
48
53
25
108
40
(.6
169
54
54
99
206
229
340
292
251
695
494
490
481
571
551
,905
,163
731
282
896
Under
21 Yrs.
63
46
8
17
26
32
24
44
24
38
44
42
72
60
48
58
48
59
39
49
25
37
23
25
28
94
48
9
18 Yrs.  Under
over. 18 Yrs.
212
357
192
221
186
291
166
337
338
578
574
424
452
614
362
532
389
304
292
308
246
167
187
63
108
289
38
19
4
73
71
67
61
47
47
68
49
120
84
101
68
82
31
64
29
23
32
23
17
18
6
4
14
3
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien
British :
5,665
2,344
129
61
75
93
139
88
550
347
90
16
1,148
6
14
650
5
93
5,617
1,001
82
32
62
72
113
79
200
716
41
10
44
5
166
1,775
6
Born in Great Britain,
Belgian, Dutch	
6
2
8
27
19
33
45
5
8
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
14
6
Russian, Lithuanian,
37
9
990
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above ....
57
116
16
53
23
Males.
B
emales.
United States citizens (racial origin not
1
22
91
Table No. 9.
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 63 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $203,518.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       157,606.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       903,179.00
Total $1,264,3
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
249
247
255
252
232
229
668
703
781
793
781
765
July	
August	
September
October...
November.
December .
Males.    Females.
216
208
207
200
193
196
733
697
761
773
794
809
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50 00
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99..
18.99..
19.99..
20.99.
21.99.
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99..
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
3
1
2
4
21
5
27
3
3
9
9
14
6
2
35
26
13
4
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
4
13
6
12
11
8
22
53
84
83
94
57
96
31
57
27
27
12
14
22
11
6
3
6
6
4
1
5
11
10
16
8
10
15
7
2
4
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian. Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian. Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian 	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.
58
2
5
5
fi
7
6
7
10
1
10
2
13
British
Subject.
191
17
7
2
8
9
33
5
27
14
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females. F 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Tabus No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 65 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $230,257.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    170,801.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 1,377,851.00
Total  $1,778,909.00
Av
erage
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February	
1,028
1,053
1,001
913
848
822
253
264
282
321
390
433
August...  .
September..
October   ...
November ..
December...
822
771
734
702
693
690
461
496
504
546
_S79
552
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
4
4
2
3
6
11
17
37
16
26
33
9
15
12
4
1
10
4
4
6
1
3
$6.00 to  $6.99	
2
1
1
6
3
4
8
15
57
41
70
42
18
16
19
9
8
13
4
1
7.00 to     7.99	
8
8.00 to     8.99	
2
9.00 to     9.99	
3
lO.OOto   10.99	
15
ll.OOto   11.99	
1
2
3
2
4
3
11
31
19
39
32
38
49
68
68
67
49
46
47
133
80
23
12
6
7
12.00 to   12.99	
18.00 to   13.99	
5
14.00 to   14.99	
16.00to   15.99	
16.00 to   18.99	
6
9
3
17.00 to   17.99	
3
18.00tn   18.99	
1
19.00 to   19.99	
20.00 to   20.99	
21.00 to   21.99	
22.00 to   22.99	
28.00 to   23.99	
24.00 to   24.99	
26.00 to   25.99	
26.00 to   26.99	
1
28.00 to   28.99	
2
7
1
29.00 to   29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
1
36.00 to   39.99	
40.00 to   44 99	
46.00 to   49.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..,.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese   	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
571
248
4
12
7
8
11
11
23
56
3
1
10
Females.
British
Subject.
11
21
2
1
Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified) ,	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers 331,772.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc 148,144.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workerB) 163,636.00
Total $343,552.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ..
February.
March
April.   ...
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
87
9
86
9
87
9
S7
9
86
9
83
9
Month.
July	
August	
September.
October....
November.
December..
Males.    Females.
83
80
76
76.
76
78
0
10
10
10
12
12
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
99.
8.99.
Under$6.00....
$6.00 to   $6.99
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
ll.OOto
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
S7.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
50.00 and over .
21 Yrs.
& over.
11
13
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian. Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish   	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese -.	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese 	
Indian (native Canadian)	
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
60
29
British
Subject.    Allen-
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 23
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 10U Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $183,174.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      393,025.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,442,130.00
Total .
.$2,018,329.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
574
594
697
602
596
580
1,126
1,146
1,173
1,247
1,295
1,370
August ....
September..
October ....
November..
December ..
580
661
556
557
552
537
1,397
1,446
1,437
1,437
1,429
1,371
June   	
Classified Weekly Wage-rates
(Wage
■earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
Femj.
LBS.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
6
17
4
15
28
32
46
78
149
297
247
160
120
69
29
45
11
18
3
4
7
5
5
10
6
9
10
2
$6.00 to   $6.99	
7.00 to     7.99	
3
8.00to     8.99	
3
9.00 to     9.99	
1
2
3
9
1
2
4
7
2
3
3
3
2
1
3   .
2
1
1
1
1
1
13
10.00 to   10.99	
1
ll.OOto   11.99	
10
12.00 to   12.99	
5
4
4
11
7
7
13
15
19
10
14
16
48
54
28
28
38
16
76
54
26
2
15
13.00 to   13 99	
14.00 to   14.99    ..
15.00 to   15.99	
33
16.00 to   16.99	
17.00 to   17.99	
18.00 to   18.99	
19.00 to   19.99	
20.00 to   20.99	
21.00 to   21 99	
22.00 to   22.99	
23.00 to   23.99	
24.00 to   24.99	
26.00 to   26.99	
27.00 to   27.99	
28.00 to   28 99	
29.00 to   29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
35.00 to   39.99	
40.00 to   44.99	
45.00 to   49.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German. Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian ...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian 	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew  	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)... .
Negro	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.    Ahen-
316
231
8
3
5
4
7
13
11
3
Females.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
1,033
344
16
9
13
13
15
63
2
4
5
4
13
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)       	
Males.
Femalei
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 53 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $132,605.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     159,152.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  574,944.00
Total 8866,701.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
370
362
346
333
336
328
186
190
»205
210
229
233
Month.
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December .
Males.   Females.
321
307
290
289
300
303
239
270
269
286
298
292
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.09
19.0(1
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00	
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
16.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
3
1
1
4
3
6
1
11
7
5
6
3
12
5
11
19
8
16
26
14
61
34
14
2
Under
21 Yrs.
5
13
11
12
11
7
5
7
2
4
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
9
10
24
21
17
23
6
21
10
10
2
2
3
1
2
4
Under
18 Yrs.
2
3
1
6
9
4
11
6
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese 	
Indian (native Canadian) —
Negro     	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject
66
1
10
26
10
16
i
2
Alien.
British
Subject.    Allen-
37
1
3
3
6
S
14
1
1
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)   ...
Males. F 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 938 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $2,719,877.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,507,056.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 39,708,400.00
Total.
.$43,935,333.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January ....
22,404
132
July	
23,496
387
February...
24,367
137
August....
23,012
425
March	
25,165
186
September.
22,689
457
April	
24,974
204
October ...
22,566
448
Mav	
24,741
208
November.
22,570
395
June	
24,318
262
December..
20,458
336
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Ma
L.ES.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
12
18
8
14
17
10
13
28
15
18
32
49
56
111
442
162
618
404
612
1,818
894
1,455
1,034
2,988
1,187
5,890
4.094
2,480
2.103
3,149
3
1
2
6
2
10
14
8
15
18
21
34
57
85
80
37
68
133
35
102
32
102
41
235
109
12
11
5
2
1
$6.00 to   $6.99	
7.60 to     7.99	
8.00 to     8.99	
1
3
3
10.00 to   10.99 :...
ll.OOto   11.99	
12.00 to   12.99	
14.00 to   14.99  .'  	
1
11
13
11
15
7
10
24
10
78
22
7
53
28
2
6
3
3
48
4
1
5
1
15.00 to   15.99      	
5
11
17.00 to   17.99	
18.00 to   18.99  	
1
19.00 to   19.99  	
4
20.00 to   20.99	
2
21.00to   21.99.   	
22 00 to   22.99  	
5
1
23.00 to   23 99      	
2
24.00 to   24.99  	
7
26 00 to   26.99	
3
27.00 to   27.99	
29.00 to   29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
1
40.00 to   44.99  	
50.00 and over	
	
Racial Origin and Nationality
of Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British :
14,093
3,456
294
122
241
171
364
601
2,589
1,275
185
374
31
1
Born in Great Britain,
32
19
100
451
314
1,385
707
229
17
1,671
4
5
2
1
12
11
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
4
Russian, Lithuanian,
3
25
622
723
507
1,033
8
371
2
346
Indian (native Canadian)....
3
1
1
Others not shown above...   .
104
2
Males.      Females.
United States citizens (racial origin
lot
I
487      1
10
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 800 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $2,529,123.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    3,092,459.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 11,601,954.00
Total  $17,223,536.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January ..
February.
March
April	
May	
June .
Males.    Females.
0,643
6,677
6,796
6,734
6,760
6,903
162
172
181
237
295
338
Month.
Males.
July	
September .
October ....
November ..
December...
7,117
7,117
7,152
7,232
7,387
7,314
372
447
515
642
707
577
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.00.
$6.00 to
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
ll.OOto
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99
10.99.
11.99.
12.99
13.99
14.99.
15.00^0 15.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99..
26.99 ,
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99 .
49.99..
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
15
9
9
9
20
10
14
IS
21
58
47
74
89
97
139
94
185
130
191
333
329
213
355
253
1,335
,409
986
653
569
Under
21 Yrs.
30
43
29
69
43
69
34
38
68
31
66
21
57
44
26
30
22
36
36
29
12
14
26
52
28
12
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    IS Yrs.
5
2
2
2
8
14
17
34
13
53
24
35
29
25
47
52
31
62
18
18
32
10
24
5
2
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian ...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish. Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
British
Subject.    AIlen-
5,726
2,455
167
61
73
93
98
193
18
16
17
1
6
5
14
113
22
12
45
47
47
5
1
7
Females.
British
Subject.    AIlen-
170
16
5
4
5
4
25
1
3
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.    : Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 25
Table No. 16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 127 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $809,867.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,077,978.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     9,921,016.00
Total
.$11,808,861.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
April	
May	
June	
5,547
5,808
5,737
5,527
5,360
5,214
81
83
84
90
96
100
July 	
September..
October   ...
November...
December...
4,795
4,422
4,208
4,118
4,134
4,258
109
119
139
142
158
175
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99	
1
8.00 to     8.99	
1
10.00 to   10.99	
1
1
2
1
2
i "
1
1
5
3
2
4
1
2
1
1
12
3
7
19
28
ll.OOto   11.99	
1
5
6
1
5
20
19
7
20
2
14
6
11
5
3
10
3
9
3
11
11
1
12.00 to   12.99	
14.00to   14.99	
4
2
4
5
5
13
9
6
28
30
48
25
23
62
117
407
2,060
1,530
1,105
457
697
16.00 to   15.99	
16.00 to   16.99	
1
3
1
17.00 to   17.99	
18.00 to   18.99	
19 00 to   19.99	
20.00 to   20.99	
21.00 to   21.99	
22 00 to   22.99	
24.00 to   24.99	
27.00 to   27.99	
28.00 to   28.99	
40.00 to   44.99	
45.00to   49.99	
2
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian. Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian. Rumanian	
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish 	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro 	
Others not shown above	
Males.
British
Subject.
2,885
1,367
71
34
35
135
117
611
189
89
22
"s
10
18
7
42
52
122
77
1
72
Females.
British
Subject.     Ahen-
132
74
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
107
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 455 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,323,144.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  1,921,114.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 12,768,573.00
Total   $16,012,831.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
March	
June	
5,921
6,025
6,638
6,401
7,095
6,905
698
701
705
874
1,097
1,362
July	
August	
September..
October
November..
December ..
8,364
9,163
8,197
7,904
8,407
8,140
1,962
2,578
2,529
2,734
3,236
3,355
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
96
39
13
24
18
23
26
17
25
17
50
50
76
100
84
119
124
187
103
327
436
315
.287
438
215
1,582
1,453
1,184
676
687
45
10
10
15
14
22
14
47
21
24
34
33
46
55
65
36
43
75
62
46
93
48
44
180
26
260
138
56
16
7
141
22
37
28
52
27
36
67
78
216
182
230
133
311
169
173
85
447
97
63
208
82
91
349
37
254
38
240
10
14
6
$6.00 to   $6.99	
15
9.00 to     9.99	
12
15
10
10.00 to   10.99	
30
9
12.00 to   12.99	
13.00to   13.99	
14 00 to   14.99 	
16
24
32
28
16.00 to   16.90	
34
8
18.00 to   18.99 	
5
13
20.00 to   20.99	
14
21.00to   21.99    	
6
22.00 to   22 99    	
23.00 to   23.99    	
2
24.00 to   24.99    	
1
25.00to   25.99	
5
26.00 to   26.99	
5
27.00 to   27.99	
4
28 00 to   28.99	
6
35.00 to   39.99	
1
21
1
40.00 to   44.99	
45.00to   49.99	
3
50.00 and over	
2
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above	
3,221
105
66
82
62
127
742
26
27
27
7
23
766
1
154
2
8
15
7
16
73
1
2
10
3
'it.'
British
Subject.    Ahen-
2,928
621
24
10
11
23
17
54
120
112
9
10
2
226
62'
7
29
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females. F 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering 53 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $344,155.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       972,696.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     1,722,832.00
Total    $3,039,683.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ...
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
848
33
876
46
822
43
826
27
855
30
893
32
Month.
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
Males.    Females.
928
878
878
835
813
799
38
41
32
37
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
J6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
IS.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to   «6.99.
to     7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
16.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
&over.    21 Yrs.
1
9
6
12
7
11
46
52
64
46
69
31
269
257
119
41
39
1
2
2
14
1
12
1
1
18 Yrs.     Under
<fe over.    18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew   	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.    Ahen-
327
32
2
3
1
103
34
ii'
British
Subject.    Allen-
19
....
14
"_'
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 10 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  894,185.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  131,018.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  203,992.00
Total $429,195.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January...
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
129
25
132
26
125
25
123
30
132
38
137
38
Month.
July	
August....
September.
October	
November .
December..
Males.   Females.
139
126
120
116
113
111
42
56
61
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners paly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
*6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
S6.00 .
to
7.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
21 Yrs.
<fc over.
1
4
1
8
1
5
8
32
4
4
3
25
5
2
1
4
Under
21 Yrs.
Fbmalbs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
6
17
1
11
3
4
5
5
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
3
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian	
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro 	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.    AIien-
63
2
Females.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
51
2
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
J REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
P 27
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering H5 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    K660.022.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen,etc  1,248,066.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      2,235,433.00
Total $4,143,521.00
Average Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
1,219
1,202
1,208
1,185
1,293
1,217
235
240
240
250
294
277
July	
August	
September..
November ..
December...
1,131
1,127
1,111
1,096
1,086
1,081
264
271
263
293
283
295
Classified Weekly Wag
e-rates
(Wage-
earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
Fkmalkb.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
IS Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
7
12
2
4
3
20
9
19
6
26
12
17
4
6
8
3
6
1
1
1
1
1
5
25
4
12
2
4
13
26
IS
30
29
12
15
9
6
15
18
26
9
3
4
6
2
$6.00 to   86.99	
33
7 00 to     7 99	
6
8.00 to     8.99	
5
10
10 00 to   10.99  	
14
11
13
5
6
15
13
li
11
8
11
11
16
13
15
25
28
25
26
8
125
78
298
191
195
10
ll.OOto   11.99	
5
12 00 to   12 99	
10
13 00 to   13.99	
1
14.00 to   14.99  	
2
15.00 to   15.99	
16.00 to   16.99	
1
17.00 to   17 99	
2
18.00 to   18.99	
19.00 to   19.99	
20.00 to   20.99	
21.00 to   21.99	
22.00 to   22.99	
23.00 to   23.99	
24.00 to   24.99	
1
25.00 to   25.99  	
26.00 to   26.99	
27 00 to   27 99	
28.00 to   28.99	
29.00 to   29.99	
5
4
1
1
35.00 to   39.99	
]
40.00 to   44.99	
45.00 to   49.99	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.    Alien-
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese  	
, Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above .
486
21
1
2
5
3
11
3
4
British
Subject.
526
United States citizens  (racial origin not
specified)	
Females.
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 13 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    8644,524.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      777,587.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  7,402,413.00
Total  88,824,524.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January...
February.
March
April	
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
3,819
3,810
3,759
3,827
3,868
3,814
198
200
209
215
226
231
Month.
July	
August	
September.
October ...
November.
December..
Males.
Females.
3,902
228
3,659
277
3,583
320
3,506
364
3,713
414
3,735
424
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
16.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
86.00 	
to «6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
19
22
379
283
601
348
268
151
Under
21 Yrs.
2
77
8
2
67
13
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
2
1
1
2
4
18
32
7
13
43
6
6
28
22
39
2
30
2
6
41
44
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French ,	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above ....
Males.
1,832
52
34
30
125
7
27
"fi'
30
78
98
6
280
British
Subject.    Ahen-
7
2
12
9
6
1
9
14
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males. F 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering U6 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     §759,952.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,099,832.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 45,344,122.00
Total $47,203,906.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
13,940
16,295
18,392
19,760
21,771
23,041
2
2
2
2
29
57
July	
August	
September..
November ..
December...
23,613
25,154
25,784
27,406
27,799
27,833
90
135
321
519
June	
720
Classified Weekly Wage-rates
(Wage
earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
tfc over.
Under
18 Yrs.
74
51
23
26
42
35
24
29
46
23
24
32
32
40
43
68
83
64
48
354
111
265
86
170
660
2.512
7,446
4,387
6,125
3,990
32
5
5
8
4
9
4
4
5
8
18
12
16
14
61
16
11
63
278
225
21
36
65
241
213
141
68
87
18
7
6
2
6
4
4
6
4
11
1
2
5
5
3
6
10
6
35
10
12
14
25
14
75
1S1
92
21
6
2
3
8.00 to     8.99	
1
13.00 to   13.99	
14.00 to   14.99	
1
16.00 to   16.99	
1
2
22.00 to   22.99	
23.00 to   23.99	
24.00to   24.99	
6
9
3
5
26.00 to   26.99	
11
30.00 to   34.99	
1
11
10
10
50.00 and over	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.    Allen-
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French ... r	
Italian   	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian ...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese    	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
15,614
7,985
883
81
94
180
130
343
128
21
128
3
10
107
4
471
,  British
Subject.
34
10
21
14
60
309
206
54
144
3
Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Table No. 23.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 5 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     8180,432.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         999,512.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    6,701,559.00
Total $7,881,503.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January
February...
March..
April	
May	
June	
Males. | Females.
3,155
3,157
3,071
3,098'
3,084
2,986
30
30
31
35
34
34
July	
August.. .
September
October...
November
December.
Males. J Females.
3,070
2,999
2,985
2,972
3,090
2,946
36
36
52
67
79
84
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over
21 Yrs.
& over.
10
31
5
14
50
11
15
14
30
10
26
29
369
834
:,on
374
234
Under
21 Yrs.
6
2
7
11
6
5
2
4
4
5
5
7
61
60
44
18 Yrs.
& over.
15
1
5
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
5
15
9
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere    	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian ...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew  	
Chinese 	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese  	
Indian (native Canadian)...
Negro 	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.
1,604
913
7
6
3
303
19
17
74
36
20
2
49
Alien.
4
65
12
5
97
23
44
25
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)     ....
Males. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 29
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 110 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $977,128.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     2,273,855.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     9,483,119.00
Total.
.112,734,102.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February ....
March    .
April	
May	
June	
4,367
4,339
4,414
4,685
4,391
4,426
1,456
1,509
1,581
1,597
1,618
1,690
July	
August	
September..
October ....
November ..
December...
4,473
4,415
4,374
4,374
4,356
4,374
1,642
1,643
1,670
1,618
1,659
1,653
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
»6.00	
to $6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.  Under
& over. 21 Yrs.
1
5
2
1
4
2
24
16
69
21
58
178
48
119
147
141
220
165
206
159
255
136
.,217
940
336
348
207
1
14
4
2
2
12
36
6
3
3
10
18 Yrs.  Under
& over. 18 Yrs.
35
239
83
100
20
94
69
462
123
34
23
3
4
5
5
10
2
2
1
1
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French.  	
Italian	
German, Austrian    	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian... .
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish   	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic..	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
British
Subject.   Ahen-
2,011
3,061
103
13
22
64
61
34
187
168
18
13
4
1
5
2
19
Females.
British
Subject.
487
50
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
70
Females.
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 10U Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $600,329.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      255,110.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  5,061,757.00
Total   $5,917,196.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March. ..
April	
May	
June ....
Males.    Females.
3,138
3,079
3,056
3,175
3,282
3,378
327
332
465
619
669
735
Month.
Males.
July	
3,486
August	
3,332
September..
3,206
October ....
3,185
November...
3,197
December ..
3,171
747
976
990
1,047
989
1,010
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
.00 .
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99-
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
21 Yrs.  Under
& over. 21 Yrs.
4
4
1
4
13
15
15
16
31
26
56
30
68
122
77
207
192
242
142
141
108
741
362
168
121
66
13
12
6
13
14
43
33
61
43
46
82
38
36
21
15
11
26
8
32
14
1
24
34
2
3
1
1
18 Yrs.  Under
& over. 18 Yrs.
11
4
4
9
9
20
31
28
95
88
51
67
13
48
78
158
31
47
60
14
54
9
14
20
4
3
3
2
8
8
5
22
21
5
24
10
32
13
3
4
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
British
Subject.
621
30
33
25
26
194
7
2
20
1
5
12
5
2
11
7
12
49
50
1
33
Females.
British
Subject.   Allen-
90
6
8
7
2
10
14
40
33
2
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	 F 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF ALL. TABLES.
Returns covering 4,845 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1942.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers	
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc—
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers) —
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary 	
Estimated pay-roll of employers covered by Department's inquiry from whom returns
were not received    	
Transcontinental Railways —     — 	
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey: viz.. Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, ocean services, miscellaneous (estimated pay-roll)     — 	
$17,979,883.00
21,812,456.00
212,254,050.00
$130,304.00
1,350,000.00
17,066,253.00
$252,046,389.00
32,300,000.00
50,846,557.00
Total..
$302,892,946.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January...
February .
March..  ..
April	
May	
June	
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Males.
97,750
102,854
106,394
108,729
112,916
116,911
122,900
124,897
123,913
125,165
125,961
121,216
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.    Allen-
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above
77,196
36,958
2,978
676
1,150
1,765
1,529
2,262
8,012
5,127
727
150
2,291
753
599
2,971
46
2,511
142
71
358
685
809
2,745
1,698
444
56
3,673
462
1
446
British
Subject.
3,656
238
86
132
165
196
537
1,069
65
63
70
5
177
2,019
21
198
19
18
20
27
93
11
1
10
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
116
11
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
2,172
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
S6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
16.00.   ..
to   $6.99.
to     7.99.
to     8.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
16.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
Totals    145,006
21 Yrs.
& over.
385
239
127
185
186
233
173
308
245
329
507
554
6.7
877
.745
365
002
240
423
313
920
008
307
.135
175
.830
,572
,008
,542
,426
Under
21 Yrs.
182
180
83
133
124
230
177
312
212
256
364
241
340
324
462
350
338
346
307
451
554
624
257
455
329
1,165
722
327
141
156
10,142
18 Yrs.
<__ over.
410
457
272
309
312
418
350
862
899
1,411
1,768
1,337
989
1,412
987
1,489
960
1,166
673
608
655
364
422
539
356
1,024
292
301
24
28
21,094
Under
18 Yrs.
94
134
108
114
122
145
102
147
150
225
191
195
94
103
102
112
65
71
63
16
4
2
2,555 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 31
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Since the " Hours of Work Act " became effective the Board has shown the average
hours by industries, and the accompanying table sets out comparative figures for the
years 1930 to 1942, inclusive.
COMPARATIVE FIGURES, 1930 TO 1942.
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Employees
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 54 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
54 Hours.
1930	
1931	
1932 _ _	
1933	
4,704
4,088
3,529
3,530
3,956
4,153
4,357
4,711
4,895
4,829
4,971
5,115
4,845
87,821
84,791
68,468
71,185
75,435
81,329
90,871
102,235
96,188
94,045
103,636
118,160
154,191
Per Cent.
77.60
83.77
80.36
77.95
85.18
88.78
87.12
89.31
88.67
88.68
88.93
89.61
84.70
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
5.76
5.26
6.42
4.57
5.29
5.42
5.13
4.49
7.51
Per Cent.
9.04
9.44
11.92
11.12
1934  ...:.  _	
1935	
1936 _	
1937 _.-  	
1938 _ _	
1939  	
1940  	
1941.  	
1942	
9.06
5.96
6.46
6.12
6.04
5.90
5.94
5.90
7.79
The average weekly working-hours for all employees for same years being :-
1942..
1941..
1940-
1939-
1938-
1937-
1936-
48.12
46.90
46.91
47.80
46.84
47.25
47.63
1935_,
1934„
1933-
1932-
1931-
1930-
47.17
47.32
47.35
47.69
47.37
48.62
The 4,845 firms reporting to the Department of Labour submitted information
regarding hours covering 154,191 male and female employees for 1942. A segregation
shows 84.70 per cent, working 48 hours or less per week, 7.51 per cent, working from
48 to 54 hours per week, and 7.79 per cent, working in excess of 54 hours per week. F 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
Breweries  -  	
Builders' materials, etc  	
44.53
44.63
24.00
47.93
48.54
43.85
47.20
47.43
43.22
44.33
42.01
44.14
44.31
48.38
49.51
44.67
48.37
47.99
47.46
45.00
50.30
45.78
48.81
44.11
43.55
44.29
44.05
47.95
45.23
46.29
45.41
45.07
40.40
47.92
49.42
43.82
42.57
47.59
43.69
44.12
40.75
44.66
44.27
48.47
50.36
45.80
48.71
47.98
47.57
44.93
50.19
45.64
47.69
44.10
42.64
47.96
44.08'
47.89
45.11
46.39
44.95
45.31
41.50
48.03
50.38
44.01
45.81
46.78
43.38
44.76
43.87
44.35
44.93
48.37
52.65
45.17
49.17
48.17
47.35
45.13
50.20
45.96
48.17
43.95
42.24
47.78
43.68
49.28
45.40
47.27
45.07
45.97
35.33
48.02
52.95
45.03
47.09
47.28
42.51
44.62
44.16
45.20
45.37
48.24
52.77
46.33
48.50
48.40
47.29
45.14
50.24
46.97
49.82
43.87
42.90
47.46
43.63
47.84
45.44
46.08
44.88
48.05
44.57
47.99
52.05
50.06
Explosives, chemicals, etc     ■ —   ■■
47.84
48.33
44.30
House-furnishings   	
44.88
44.01
45.37
44.82
Lumber industries—
48.78
51.40
46.42
Planing-mills            .	
49.95
48.44
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacturing 	
Printing and publishing 	
Pulp and paper manufacturing-	
43.70
47.84
47.88
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc.
Wood manufacture (not elsewhere specified)
45.64 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 33
SUMMARY OF LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR.
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1943.)
" OLD-AGE PENSION ACT AMENDMENT ACT."
The chief effect of this Act is that it removes the administration of old-age pensions
from the Workmen's Compensation Board and places said administration in the hands
of a Board designated as the " Old-age Pension Board " under the Department of the
Provincial Secretary.
It also establishes ways and means whereby old-age pensioners who have moved
from British Columbia to another Province, or from another Province to British
Columbia, may receive a cost-of-living bonus in addition to the amount of their pension
by reciprocal agreement between the Provinces concerned.
"EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES ACT AMENDMENT ACT."
This Act prohibits private employment agencies from charging a fee for procuring
employment for workers. It legalizes non-fee-charging employment agencies, but
requires that all such agencies file monthly returns with the General Superintendent
of the Provincial Government Branch of the Employment Service of Canada, showing
the names of all employers obtaining help through the agency, as well as the names,
occupations, rates of wages, and nationality of all workers procuring employment
through the agency.
The office of General Superintendent of the Provincial Government Branch of the
Employment Service of Canada no longer exists, by reason of the fact that the Employment Service of Canada has become a part of the Unemployment Insurance Commission,
and the senior official in charge is now an employee of the Dominion Government.
The amendment strikes out the name of the General Superintendent of the Provincial Government Branch of the Employment Service of Canada and substitutes the
Minister of Labour of the Province, in order that the control that the Act gives over
private employment agencies within the Province may still remain with the Province
through the Minister of Labour.
" STATUTORY HOLIDAYS POWERS ACT."
At the present time statutory holidays in the Province are fixed by three Acts—
the " Interpretation Act," the " Weekly Half-holiday Act," and the " Factories Act."
In October, 1942, the Dominion Government passed an Order in Council fixing six
days in the year to be observed as holidays, these being:—
(a.)   New Year's Day.
(6.)   Good Friday,
(c.)   First Monday in July.
(d.)  Labour Day.
(e.)   Christmas Day.
(/.)   Thanksgiving Day.
The Dominion order fixed the above-mentioned days as holidays to all persons within Dominion jurisdiction, and recommended that these days -be observed generally
throughout Canada as the only holidays during war-time.
The holidays fixed by the above-mentioned Provincial Acts vary to some extent
from the six holidays made by the Dominion. This Act gives the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council the power during the period of the present war-time to bring holidays
within the Province into conformity with the six holidays named by the Dominion
Government.
3 F 34 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The life of this Provincial Act continues only during the existence of the present
war, and the object in placing the powers in the hands of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council is to obviate the necessity of amending three other Acts on the statute-books,
which would again require to be amended after the war, in order to restore them to
their present form.
This Act provides that where an agreement between an employer and a trade-
union stipulates an overtime rate of pay on a statutory holiday, such overtime rate
shall not be lost by the workers if the statutory holiday in question is annulled.
It also provides that the regular weekly half-holiday for employees in shops and stores
shall not be abrogated in any case where such half-holiday falls upon a statutory holiday
that is repealed.
"TRUCK ACT AMENDMENT ACT."
The " Truck Act" requires that workmen's wages be paid in " lawful money of
Canada " only. In its original form the Act only imposed this requirement in any
" incorporated city or within three miles thereof." At the Legislative Session of
1941-42 the Act was amended, extending the application of the above requirement to a
" municipality or village." The Act merely rectifies an omission where the words
■" municipality or village " had inadvertently been left out of one of the subsections.
"FACTORIES ACT AMENDMENT ACT."
Section 2: Formerly, a factory was defined as a " building, workshop, structure, or
premises of the description mentioned in Schedule A, in which three or more persons
are employed. For some time past, the Factory Inspector has reported an increasing
number of small factories, in which one or two employees only are employed, and who
are subjected to unhealthy working conditions. The change means that in any case
where the Inspector finds unhealthy conditions in a factory where less than three
persons are employed, he will be able to apply the measures that the Act provides, to
clean up or improve the unhealthy conditions.
Section 4: As the Act formerly stood, a child (meaning a male or female person
under the age of 15 years) could only be employed upon the written permission of the
Inspector of Factories, and in such permit the Inspector was required to set forth the
number of hours per day the child may be employed, which in no case could exceed six.
This has been found impractical, because, during the summer holidays, there are
many high school children of good physique who desire employment and whose services
can be used to good advantage, especially in the present war-time emergency, but the
restriction of their employment to six hours means a dislocation of the working shifts.
It is therefore thought advisable and expedient to strike out the " six " hour daily
limit, so that the Factory Inspector may issue the permit based upon an " eight " hour
day, where, in his opinion, the work is not heavy and the young person, by physical and
other qualifications, is fully capable.
It should be borne in mind that these permits will only be available during the
school holidays, because, under the " Public Schools Act," children are required to
attend school until 15 years of age.
Section 6: It was considered advisable to repeal this section and rewrite it, because of the confusing way in which the section was formerly written. No change is
made in the import of the section, inasmuch as the limitations upon the hours of work
are left exactly the same as before; the only difference being that, according to the way
the section formerly read, a woman or girl had to write herself a permit consenting to
her employment before she could be employed, which, as pointed out by the Factory
Inspector, is unnecessary and confusing.
Section 24: This section deals with the installation of sanitary facilities in a
factory.    The old section was written many years ago, and made reference to very REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 35
rudimentary types of sanitary conveniences. The Inspector has asked to have this
section changed, so that the terms used therein may be brought more into line with the
modern type of sanitary conveniences.
" INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT
AMENDMENT ACT."
The main amendment enacted by this Act centres upon section 5 of the Act, which
deals with collective bargaining. The other amendments are ancillary to, and made
necessary by, the above-mentioned change.
As the Act formerly stood, an employer was required to bargain collectively with
the representatives elected by a majority of his employees, and if the majority of'his
employees belonged to a trade-union prior to December 7th, 1938, the employer was
required to bargain through the officers of the trade-union.
This Act strikes out " December 7th, 1938," so that the employer is required to
bargain through the trade-union, even if the majority of his employees became organized into a trade-union after that date. Where no trade-union exists, the employer
still bargains with the representatives duly elected by the majority of his employees.
The other parts of the Act place certain controls in the hands of the Minister of
Labour, with a view to preventing abuses of this extended privilege; for example,
" collective bargaining" is defined along lines conducive to orderly and peaceful
negotiation.
" Trade-union " is defined in a way that confines that appellation to well-established
units of a national or international trade-union body.
" Trade-union member " is defined to apply only to regular members who have been
in good standing in the union for not less than three months.
The new section 5 requires a trade-union to notify the Minister in any case where
the right to bargain through the union is claimed, whereupon the Minister satisfies
himself by adequate investigation that the right to bargain through the union is valid
according to requirements of the Act. The same requirements apply in the case of
collective bargaining where no trade-union exists. Once bargaining negotiations are
established through a union or through elected representatives, as the case may be,
the arrangement stands without change of bargaining representatives for a minimum
period of six months. After six months, any employer or employee may ask the
Minister to verify, by a vote of all the employees, the standing of the union or the
bargaining representatives.
Provision is made whereby a smaller group of employees within a large establishment may bargain on their own behalf apart from the whole, provided their occupation
is a distinctive craft which in trade-union practice has been organized into a union
pertaining exclusively to their occupation.
It is made unlawful for an employer to dominate or to interfere with the free
operation of a lawful organization of employees, or to support it financially.
Where a dispute arises wherein the only issue is " a union agreement" the
Minister may refer the question direct to a Board of Arbitration.
It is well to remember that an Arbitration Board's findings are submitted to all of
the employees of the employer, and every employee (union or non-union) has the right
to vote on its acceptance or rejection.    This democratic safeguard remains unchanged.
All other changes in the Act are minor, and cover only administrative features
attendant to the main change in section 5.
AN ACT RESPECTING THE REGULATION OF SHOPS AND THE EMPLOYMENT OF YOUNG PERSONS THEREIN AND PROVIDING FOR A WEEKLY
HALF-HOLIDAY FOR SHOP EMPLOYEES.
This Act is merely a consolidation of the former " Shops Regulation Act " and the
" Weekly Half-holiday Act " into one Statute. F 36 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
No change is made in the provisions of the two Statutes that are being consolidated. The consolidation is being made merely as a matter of convenient reference
and to avoid a certain amount of confusion that has existed in the past.
" DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR ACT AMENDMENT ACT."
During recent years, and particularly since the outbreak of war, there has been a
pronounced extension of overtime work and night work. This situation has necessitated Inspectors of the Department of Labour visiting establishments in the evenings
and at night-time to ascertain if labour laws were being observed.
Occasionally, the Inspectors have experienced difficulty in gaining admittance to
establishments after the regular daily working-hours, when it was quite obvious that
overtime, or night work, was being carried on. The amendment authorizes Inspectors
to enter premises in the aforementioned circumstances. It does not give the Inspector
any right to make forcible entry, but merely places the responsibility on the occupants
of the premises to open the door and admit him. When admitted, the Inspector may
then carry out the necessary inspection. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 37
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman  Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell   1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton    789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
4. James Thomson     789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. J. A. Ward Bell    __.-  789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
Mabel A.  Cameron    Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
Head Office _  — — Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
Branch Office 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour^,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the Ninth Annual Report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1942.
The Board was formed in 1934, prior to which date the Minimum Wage Board had
been in existence for sixteen years, looking after the working conditions of women and
girls throughout the Province. It will be apparent, therefore, that had there been no
change in the administration of labour laws, this would have been the Twenty-fifth
Annual Report.
It is a striking one for more reasons than that; it looks back a quarter of a
century, during which time economic changes of most far-reaching character have
occurred. A world emerging from the first Great War faced what at that time were
thought to be grave problems. Since then, depressions have come and gone, bringing
with them difficult questions to be solved by those administering the labour laws of
the Province.
While the problems appeared serious during those times, the tasks ahead, resulting
from the aftermath of the present war, may require much more careful planning than
any that have so far been undertaken by the Board.
To live in the past is considered to be a sign of failing vitality. To look forward
to the future is the way of those who feel full of optimism and vigour, and so we go on
record that the outlook for the days to come is a bright one, because in the past much
time and thought were devoted to the original Minimum Wage Orders and a firm
foundation was laid for the wage and hour structure.
As conditions are changing with unprecedented speed the members of the Board
are alive to the necessity for keeping in line with, and, in some instances, ahead of, the
newest problems that confront the employers and employees of to-day and the officials
who are charged with the work of administering the Province's labour laws in these
strenuous days.
How the Board is succeeding in its important work is revealed in this report.
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS.
During the year twenty sessions of the Board were held on ten days, six sessions
convening in Vancouver and the remainder in Victoria. At these meetings hearings
were granted to twelve delegations, some of which were composed of employers appearing personally or submitting their representations through their duly accredited associations or by their legal advisers. Groups of employees sometimes delegated to their
Unions the duty of laying their views before the Board. F 38 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Many hours were spent listening to employers' and employees' representatives in
the fishing industry when the Board was considering the extension of the scope of the
Minimum Wage Order for women engaged in that line of work.
NEW ORDERS AND REGULATIONS.
Thirteen Orders were promulgated during the year, summarized as follows:—'
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52k, covering resort hotels in unorganized territory, enacted the customary provisions for this branch of the industry
from June 15th to September 12th.
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52l. This is the usual order for resort
hotels in-unorganized territory for the winter season. It was effective from October
22nd, 1942, to June 12th, 1943.
Baking Industry.—Order No. 17 (1942) superseded the original Order and fixed
rates for boys under 18 years of age, for whom no minimum wage had been set
formerly.
Janitors.—Order No. 43 (1942) consolidated Orders Nos. 43, 43A, and 43b.
Janitresses.—Order No. 44 (1942) consolidated Orders Nos. 44, 44a, and 44b.
Stationary Steam, Engineers.-—Order No. 18 (1942) consolidated Orders Nos. 18,
18a, 18b, and 18c.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Order No. 46 (1942). This changed the definition
of the industry and provided that overtime rates were to be one and one-half times an
employee's regular rate of pay for hours worked in excess of ten and up to twelve in any
one day and double their regular rate for hours over twelve a day. The previous Order
set fixed amounts for overtime.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Order No. 47 (1942). Similar changes as noted
for Order No. 46 (1942) were made for this Order under the "Male Minimum Wage
Act."
Bus-drivers.—Order No. 76. This Order is made under the " Female Minimum
Wage Act," and requires similar wages and working conditions for women and girls as
a corresponding Order under the " Male Minimum Wage Act" set for male drivers.
It applies in Vancouver and vicinity, New Westminster, Richmond, Burnaby, West
Vancouver, and the City and District of North Vancouver.
Manufacturing Industry.—Order No. 25 (1942). The chief changes in this
Order, which supersedes Order No. 25, are that all inexperienced female employees
have been placed in a class with a training period of six months. The previous Order
subdivided learners into three groups—the first allowing a six-month, the second a
twelve-month, and the third an eighteen-month training period. Learners of any age
must now have special licences to work below the $14 weekly or 29y6 cents hourly rate.
When employees are required to wait a call for employment, they are to be paid for time
thus spent.
Shingle Industry.—Order No. 77. This new Order, made under the " Female
Minimum Wage Act," was promulgated to cover the employment of women and girls
in the industry. It is made on similar lines to the one dealing with male employees in
the industry.
Mercantile Industry.—Order No. 24, Supplementary (1942), prescribed rates of
pay for women and girls employed temporarily at Christmas-time.
Mercantile Industry.—Order No. 59, Supplementary (1942), prescribed rates of
pay for male employees during the Christmas season.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT " REGULATIONS.
Overtime Regulations were made in 1942 as follows:—
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Regulation No. 21h exempted the industry from
the provisions of the " Hours of Work Act," but as working-hours of employees are REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 39
extended the Orders of the Board require a rising scale of wages.    This is found to
have a definite effect in keeping overtime hours within reasonable limits.
Mercantile Industry.— (Christmas, 1942, Temporary.) Appropriate regulations
were put into effect to deal with the rush at Christmas-time in the various branches
of the industry and to prevent overlong hours for the employees.
OVERTIME RATES IN THE LUMBERING INDUSTRY.
To make this report as useful as possible, we would like to make reference to
provisions for overtime rates that were made to six Orders in 1943.
These Orders covered the sawmill, logging, woodworking, box manufacturing, and
shingle industries. Five were made under the " Male Minimum Wage Act," and as
there was a shingle Order in effect for females a new Order was also drawn under the
" Female Minimum Wage Act " in this particular industry.
The overtime rates apply west of the Cascade Mountains in all these Orders except
for the woodworking industry, which is applicable for the whole Province.
Prior to making these Orders, numerous conferences were held with employers
and representatives of employees to assist the Board in making the Orders as workable
and fair as possible to all concerned.
A summary of these new Orders and all others in effect at the time this report
goes to press will be found in the Appendix.
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
The entry of women into industry, due to war conditions, has had a most marked
effect on the figures compiled for 1942.
An increase of 10,257 female workers over the 1941 total is revealed in the
returns received from 6,357 employers, whose completed forms numbered 745 more
than the previous year's record. Detailed tables dealing with occupations and industries covered by Orders of the Board follow:—
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1,146
927
815
664
538
7,733
7,368
6,480
5,592
5,315
6,706
6.647
5.972
5.194
4,851
1,027
721
508
398
464
$98,400.56
$90,166.19
$78,154.39
$70,943.66
$65,856.44
$10,145.09
$6,373.25
$4,293.42
$4,012.57
$4,695.22
$14.67
$13.56
$13.09
$13.66
$13.58
$9.88
$8.84
$8.45
$10.08
$10.12
13.28%
9.79%
7.84%
7.12%
8.73%
39.04
39.30
38.75
42.14
43.48
Number of firms reporting
Total number of employees _
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years  _„_
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
Average hours worked per week	
The mercantile industry continued to show increases in the number of firms reporting, a total of 1,146 filing returns for 1942 compared with 927 in 1941. Total employees
recorded showed a gain of 365.
The average weekly wage for employees over 18 years increased to $14.67 as
against $13.56 for 1941. An increasing percentage of younger employees under
18 years was noted, the average weekly wage for this latter group was also higher than
in the previous year.
Average weekly hours of work within the industry declined fractionally from
39.30 to 39.04 for the year under review. F 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Laundry Industry (Female).
1942.
1938.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced  - __	
Inexperienced  	
Tota] weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees- __..
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees 	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
141
1,725
1,517
208
$22,697.95
$2,272.71
$14.96
$10.93
12.06%
42.94
122
1,469
1,371
$18,698.02
$991.06
$13.64
$10.11
6.67%
41.89
124
1,318
1,228
90
$15,941.10
$741.14
$12.98
$8.23
6.83%
42.00
111
1,182
1,126
56
$14,520.24
$460.97
$12.90
$8.23
4.74%
42.09
95
1,095
1,029
66
$13,565.23
$567.74
$13.18
$8.60
6.03%
42.74
Firms reporting in the laundry industry increased by 19. The employees covered
totalled 1,725, being 256 more than in 1941.
Average weekly wages for experienced employees rose to $14.96 from $13.64
for the previous year, while in the inexperienced group the average also increased—
the 1942 figure rising to $10.93 as against $10.11 for 1941.
With expanding employment in this industry the percentage of inexperienced
employees reported increased from 6.67 to 12.06 per cent, for 1942.
Average weekly working-hours figured out to 42.94 as compared with 41.89
for 1941.
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1.075
6,818
6,313
505
$96,210.79
$5,446.17
$15.24
$10.78 ■
7.41%
43.30
1,005
5,528
5,309
219
$74,660.52
$2,621.25
$14.06
$11.97
3.96%
43.34
943
4,974
4,811
163
$66,383.16
$1,792.51
$13.80
$11.00
3.28%
43.12
819
4,380
4,288
92
$59,156.99
$1,043.15
$13.80
$11.34
2.10%
43.11
Total number of employees   ____	
3,970
3,878
Total weekly wages—
$53,223.45
$1,058.77
$13.72
$11.51
2.32%
Inexperienced employees  	
Average weekly wages—
Inexperienced employees   	
Firms reporting in the hotel and catering industry increased from 1,005 in 1941
to 1,075 in 1942, the corresponding numbers for employees being 6,818 for the year
under review as against 5,528 for 1941.
The average weekly wage for experienced employees rose to $15.24 over a previous
figure of $14.06 for 1941. With sharp increases in the number of inexperienced
workers employed, the average weekly wage in this latter group declined to $10.78 as
against $11.97 for the previous year. The percentage employed in this inexperienced
group rose to 7.41, as compared with 3.96 for 1941.
The average weekly hours showed a slight change, the figure standing at 43.30
compared to 43.34 for the previous year. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 41
Office Occupation (Female).
Number of firms reporting  	
Total number of employees 	
Over 18 years  	
Under 18 years  __	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years 	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years ,	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
2,649
9,991
9,653
338
$188,753.83
$4,553.04
$19.55
$13.47
3.38%
41.29
2,537
8,513
8,327
186
$155,758.51
$2,237.85
$18.71
$12.03
2.18%
40.80
2,417
7,438
7,321
117
$133,397.18
$1,358.66
$18.22
$11.61
1.57%
40.35
2,241
6,779
6,691
$121,691.66
$1,006.38
$18.19
$11.44
1.30%
40.55
2,096
7,367
7,273
$132,369.27
$1,115.55
$18.20
$11.87
1.28%
40.16
Eeturns were received from 2,649 firms reporting employees in the office occupation
—representing an increase of 112 over the total for 1941. Employees totalled 9,991, an
increase of 1,478 over the previous year.
Average weekly wages for the experienced workers in this group increased from
$18.71 to $19.55 for 1942, while a similar average in the younger and- inexperienced
class rose to $13.47 as against a previous figure of $12.03.
A slight increase was noted in the percentage of the total employed in this latter
group.
Average weekly working-hours in the office occupation increased to 41.29 compared
with 40.80 for 1941.
It is interesting to note some of the numbers receiving the more worth-while
salaries. A $65 monthly rate is the legal minimum for experienced employees 18 years
of age or over.
There were 1,240 employed at $65.00 per month.
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
90.00
95.00
100.00
110.00
115.00
120.00
125.00
130.00
135.00
140.00
150.00
more than $150.00 per month.
The above figures show those actually receiving the quoted monthly rates and do
not include, for instance, those getting between $65 and $70, or between $70 and $75,
and so on down the list.
With the increasing trend toward better wages for the more responsible positions
in the office-worker group, the numbers shown in the lower wage brackets continued to
decrease in 1942, with relative increases in the higher salaried classes.
As against a previous figure of 1,453 employed at the actual monthly minimum
of $65, only 1,240 were shown as being paid that salary in 1942, while for the latter
tt
220
tt
677
tt
• 412
)t
354
tt
347
tt
205
t)
428
tt
136
It
98
It
67
tt
91
it
77
ti
23
It
35
tt
40
tt
184 F 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
year 184 employees were shown as receiving more than $150 monthly, as compared with
147 in 1941
Personal Service Occupation (Female).-
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
1938.
125
380
374
6
$6,033.37
$53.28
$16.13
$8.88
1.58%
40.32
200
581
553
28
$7,384.08
$172.06
$13.35
$6.15
4.82%
35.98
214
607
581
26
$7,715.72
$131.33
$13.28
$5.05
4.28%
35.35
198
570
555
15
$7,696.07
$112.63
$13.87
$7.51
2.63%
36.89
161
509
495
14
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years  	
Average weekly wages—-
$6,723.47
$57.75
$13.58
$4.13
Percentage of employees under 18 years-	
2.75%
37.87
Prior to 1942 the above table covering females employed in the personal service
occupation was compiled to include employees of beauty-parlours and theatre ushers.
As it was deemed advisable to separate these occupations for individual study, the 1942
figures shown above include only that section of the personal service group employed in
beauty-parlours, the remaining occupations, theatre ushers, attendants, etc., are
included in a new table which follows under the heading of Public Places of Amusement.
Owing to the above-mentioned segregation, the 1942 figures are no longer comparable with those of previous years, since they are derived from only a section of the
original data.
Inasmuch as the hairdressers and beauty-parlour employees which are now represented in the 1942 figures shown above constitute the skilled and better paid section
of the original group, it will be noted that the average wages show a corresponding
higher level, being no longer offset by the weight of the lower paid occupations.
Returns were received from 125 firms in the beauty-parlour business for 1942,
reporting a total of 380 employees, of which 374 were shown as over 18 years of age.
Average weekly wage in the experienced class of employee was $16.13, while the
average weekly earnings of the small group shown as under 18 years of age was $8.88.
Average hours worked per week in beauty-parlour occupations for 1942 was 40.32.
Fishing Industry (Female).
Number of firms reporting-
Total number of employees _
Experienced	
Inexperienced 	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees ...
Inexperienced employees-
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees .
Percentage of inexperienced employees .
Average hours worked per week _ ___	
172
167
5
$3,614.36 |
$41.06 I
I
$21.64 |
$8.21 |
2.91% |
40.67 [
6
160
130
30
$1,868.08
$401.26
$14.37
$13.38
18.75%
35.54
10
, 105
'     78
27
$1,222.54
$261.33
$15.67
$9.68
25.71%
38.82
10
58
27
31
$455.81
$199.29
$16.88
$6.43
53.45%
31.78
6
36
23
13
$267.35
$134.37
$11.62
$10.34
36.11%
34.61
As mentioned in previous years' reports, the employees in this section have
been comprised of only a relatively small number of women working within the fishing
industry but not actually engaged in fish-canning.
As the Order of the Board has now expanded to include females employed in fish-
canning, subsequent reports will show greater coverage in this industry, with added
employment and many changes in the data presented.
J REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 43
The 1942 figures shown in the above table therefore represent the last in the
original series, and serve as an indication of the growing importance of this group
of workers.
Increases were evident in the number of firms filing returns and in the employment
reported.
Wages paid and the earnings of piece-workers showed substantial increase over
previous years, the average weekly earnings for experienced employees rising to $21.64
as against $14.37 in 1941. A small number of workers being paid at inexperienced
rates of pay averaged $8.21 for the week, this group comprising only 2.91 per cent, of
the total as against 18.75 per cent, in the inexperienced section for 1941.
Average hours worked per week increased with the higher earnings for the experienced workers, the 1942 figure showing as 40.67 as against 35.54 for the previous year.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation
(Female).
1942.
1941.
1940.
1939.
1938.
189
2,341
1,995
346
$37,822.30
$3,743.28
$18.96
$10.82
14.78%
41.26
150
1,887
1,818
69
$36,327.20
$632.96
$19.98
$9.17
3.66%
40.38
132
1,922
1,872
50
$35,047.43
$486.27
$18.72
$9.73
2.60%
40.10
145
1,880
1,766
114
$32,074.05
$1,156.11
$18.16
$10.14
6.06%
39.84
137
1.815
1,759
56
Total weekly wages—
$32,238.68
$434.46
Average weekly wages—
$18.33
Inexperienced employees 	
$7.76
3.09%
Average hours worked per week-—	
40.71
Included in the above table with regular telephone and telegraph company employees are those operating switchboards in offices and other establishments, such as
hotels, hospitals, etc.
The number of firms reporting increased from 150 to 189 for 1942, and the total
employees in this occupation rose to 2,341 as against 1,887 for the previous year.
Due to employment fluctuations the average weekly earnings in the experienced
group of employees decreased from the 1941 high to $18.96 for 1942, while in the inexperienced class the average weekly wage increased to $10.82 as against $9.17 for the
previous year.
A sharp increase was noted in the percentages of inexperienced workers for 1942,
being 14.78 compared with 3.66 per cent, for 1941.
Average weekly hours increased slightly in this occupation—the figure for 1942
standing at 41.26 as against 40.38 for the previous year.
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
1941.
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced....  	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week.	
740
10,738
10,114
624
$192,695.51
$5,862.55
$19.05
-      $9.40
5.81%
42.62
551
4,450
3,815
635
$59,149.52
$6,234.27
$15.50
$9.82
14.27%
42.65
501
3,545
3,061
484
435
3,208
2,784
424
$45,411.50   j     $41,240.31
$4,490.36
$14.84
$9.28
13.65%
42.36
$3,676.80
$14.81
$8.67
13.22%
42.01
3,085
2,701
384
$40,177.04
$3,482.01
$14.87
$9.07
12.45%
41.92 F 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
This classification now takes the lead with the greatest number of women employed.
With an increase from 551 to 740 firms reporting, total employees reported in this
section rose to 10,738 as compared with 4,450 for 1941, a gain of 6,288.
Average weekly wages in the experienced group of workers rose to $19.05 as
against $15.50 for 1941, representing a new high in the records for this industry.
The percentage of total being paid at the inexperienced rates of pay decreased noticeably in 1942, while the average earnings for this group dropped from $9.82 per week
in 1941 to $9.40 for the year under review.
Average weekly working-hours remained almost unchanged at 42.62 as against
42.65 for 1941.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female).
i
1942.
1
1
1941.
i
1940.
1939.
1938.
1
72   |
4,012  j
3,831  |
181   |
1
$68,007.64 [
$2,352.39  j
1
$17.75  j
$13.00   |
4.51%   |
46.14 |
1
82 j
4,141  |
3,922
219
!
$67,752.93 j
$1,945.17
1
$17.28
$8.88 |
5.29%   J
47.17  j
76
3,649
3,529
120
$59,173.40
$1,067.67
$16.77
$8.90
3.29%
47.16
79
3,840
3,562
278
$57,232.59
$2,713.79
$16.07
$9.76
7.24%
46.75
81
3,540
Experienced     ,  	
Inexperienced  —_	
Total weekly wages—
3,316
224
$54,275.82
$2,247.52
Average weekly wages—
$16.37
Inexperienced employees..   	
$10.03
6.33%
46.90
Fewer firms reporting in this classification resulted in a slight decrease in the
employment figure for 1942—the total employees reported being 4,012 as against 4,141
for the previous year.
Increases were noted in both wage groups. The average weekly wage for experienced workers rose to $17.75 from $17.28 in 1941, while in the inexperienced group,
with fewer unskilled workers reported, the average earnings climbed to $13 as against
$8.88 for 1941.
The percentage of inexperienced workers employed decreased to 4.51 per cent, from
5.29 per cent, for the previous year.
Average weekly hours dropped to 46.14 as against 47.17 for 1941.
Transportation Industry (Female).
Number of firms reporting _
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years— 	
Under 18 years _  	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years .__
Employees under 18 years-
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years __.
Employees under 18 years..
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
Average hours worked per week 	
129
313
186
127
83,268.60
$1,155.66
$17.57
$9.10
40.58%
41.61
32
107
20
87
$207.42
$712.58
$10.37
$8.19
81.31%
43.19
Included in this classification are female workers engaged in delivery, truck-
driving, messenger work, etc.
As this table was first compiled in 1941, it is interesting to note the changes evident
in the 1942 figures. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 45
Compared with 32 firms filing returns in this group for 1941, returns were received
from 129 for 1942—an increase of 97.
The average weekly earnings in the over-18-year group increased to $17.57 from
$10.37 for the first year recorded, while in the under-18-year class the average weekly
earnings rose to $9.10 from $8.19 in 1941.
Increasing numbers of older workers were employed in this type of occupation for
1942, as evidenced in the decreasing percentage of under-18-year employees. The 1942
percentage stands at 40.58 as compared with 81.31 per cent, in 1941.
Average weekly hours decreased to 41.61 from 43.19 recorded for the first year of
Public Places of Amusement (Female).
Number of firms reporting-	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years —
Employees under 18 years_.
Average weekly wages—■
Employees over 18 years —
Employees under 18 years— __	
Percentage* of employees under 18 years _
Average hours worked per week 	
238
186
52
52,203.61
$352.64
$11.85
$6.78
21.85%
29.32
Occupations represented in this section include theatre ushers, check-room attendants, and all such occupations previously included in the personal service group,
exclusive of hairdressers and beauty-parlour occupations.
Inasmuch as this is a new table and the 1942 figures relating to this classification
are based on a portion of the data originally covered by the personal service table, no
comparative figures are available for previous years.
Returns were received from 83 firms in this group, reporting a total of 238
employees for 1942.
As many of the occupations included call for only part time and casual hours of
work, weekly earnings do not in most cases represent a full week's work.
Average weekly earnings in the over-18-year group was $11.85, while a similar
average for the younger workers in the under-18-year class stood at $6.78.
The average weekly working-hours for all employees in these occupations was 29.32.
Summary of all Occupations (" Female Minimum Wage Act ").
1939.
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of employees _ 	
Over 18 years, or experienced _	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced-
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced .
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or inexperienced  _ - _ ____	
Average hours worked per week  	
6,357
44,461
41,042
3,419
$719,708.52
$35,977.87
$17.54
$10.52
7.69%
41.96
5,612
34,204
31,912
2,292
$511,972.47
$22,321.71
$16.04
$9.74
6.70%
41.82
5,232
30,038
28,453
1,685
$442,446.42
$14,622.69
$15.55
$9.23
5.28%
41.48
4,702
27,489
25,993
1,496
$405,011.38
$14,381.69
$15.58
$9.61
5.44%
42.24
4,259
26,732
25,325
1,407
$398,696.76
$13,793.39
$15.74
$9.80
5.26%
42.42
Returns were received from 6,357 firms for the year 19.42, and actual figures
concerning 44,461 women and girl employees are shown in the above table. F 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Aggregate wages and salaries for one week totalled $755,686.39, an increase of
$221,392.21 over the 1941 figure.
The average weekly wage for all occupations increased to $17.54 in the over
18 years, or experienced, group as against a high of $16.04 in 1941.
Inasmuch as the lowest legal wage for women 18 or over in the various classifications covered by Orders of the Board is $12.75 in the mercantile industry, ranging up
to $15.50 in the fishing group, it will be seen that the average amount received is
considerably in excess of the highest minimum set by law.
While a 48-hour week is permissible under the Orders of the Board, the average
working-week for the 44,461 female employees was only 41.96 in 1942, being a fractional increase from 41.82 hours in 1941.
The percentage of employees under 18 years, or inexperienced, continued to
increase, advancing to 7.69 from 6.70 per cent, in 1941.
Increases in the average wage for the adult or experienced worker were evident in
all but one of the tables. In the telephone and telegraph industry, due to added employment largely in the less skilled and lower paid occupations, the average earnings for the
experienced worker dropped slightly from the 1941 high, although the average for the
inexperienced employee showed an increase during the same period.
In the summary table it is noted that now over 44,400 women and girls are taking
their part in the industrial and business life of the Province. The figures concern only
those workers with classes of employment covered by Orders of the Board, and do not
include domestic workers, farm-labourers, or fruit-pickers, which are excluded from
coverage by the provision of the " Female Minimum Wage Act." Returns are likewise
not requested for women and girls employed in banks, as their conditions of employment are regulated by the. Dominion " Bank Act." Federal employees are also not
covered by the Provincial legislation.
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum for Experienced Female Workers.
	
Industry or
Occupation.
Legal
Minimum
Wage for
Full-time
Experienced
Employees.
Receiving Actual
Minimum" Wage
SET FOR
Experienced
Workers.
Receiving More
than Minimum'
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Receiving Less
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Total.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
$12.75*
14.88T
14.00*
15.00:.
14.25*
lB.BOt
15.00T
14.00t
14.40t
14.25*
999
133
923
1,240
53
1
148
459
33
26
12.92
7.71
13.54
12.41
13.95
0.58
6.32
4.28
0.82
10.92
4,831
774
4,276
7,775
262
132
1,598
7,943
2,707
67
62.47
44.87
62.72
77.82
68.95
76.74
68.26
73.97
67.47
28.15
1,903
818
1,619
976
65
39
595
2,336
1,272
145
24.61
47.42
23.74
9.77
17.10
22.68
25.42
21.75
31.71
60.93
7,733
Laundry ,	
1,725
6,818
9,991
380
172
2,341
10,738
Office-   	
Personal service	
Fishing 	
Telephone and telegraph	
Fruit and vegetable _-.
Public places of amusement-
4,012
238
Totals, 1942	
4,015
5,557
9.09
16.30
30,365
19,626
68.78
57.56
9,768
8,914
22.13
26.14
44,148§
34,097
Totals, 1941	
* 40 to 48 hours per week. f 48 hours per week. J 37% to 48 hours per week.
§ In the transportation industry, 313 employees excluded from above table and not included in totals, as it is
impractical to set a weekly rate owing to the variation of minimum wages in the Order, depending on whether the
work is done on foot or bicycles, by motor-cycles, or other types of motor-vehicles.
Serving as a further indication of the general up-trend in 1942 wage levels, the
percentage of employees included in the returns who were receiving wages in excess of
the legal minimum increased sharply to 68.78 from a high of 57.56 per cent, in 1941. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 47
Relative decreases were noted in the percentages of those being paid the actual minimum and those receiving less than the fixed rate.
In the latter group are the younger and less skilled employees for whom lower rates
are set, and also the part-time and casual workers who appear mostly in occupations not
requiring full-time employment, and hence are unable to earn an amount equal to the
full weekly rate. An example of this is to be found in the group comprising public
places of amusement, where 60.93 per cent, are shown at less than the minimum amount
for a full week's work—due to the casual nature of the work and the short working-
hours generally required in this industry.
The office occupation, leading in the group above the legal minimum, reported 77.82
per cent, of its total employees receiving more than the fixed rate in 1942; followed by
the fishing industry with 76.74 per cent, and manufacturing with 73.97 per cent, above.
In the personal service occupation 68.95 per cent, were higher than the minimum set.
The telephone and telegraph industry showed 68.26 per cent, above the fixed rate;
followed by the fruit and vegetable group with 67.47 per cent, and hotel and catering
with 62.72 per cent, above the minimum set. The mercantile industry reported 62.47
per cent, receiving more than the fixed rate; while in the laundry section 44.87 per cent,
were shown above the minimum, and in the group comprising public places of amusement 28.15 per cent, were above.
Individual high wages are recorded each year in the various occupations. For the
period under review the top salaries in each group are as follows:—
Occupation or
Industry.
Manufacturing
Office   	
Mercantile   	
Fruit and vegetable
Personal  service 	
Hotel and catering __
Fishing    	
Telephone  and telegraph
Transportation    	
Laundry,  cleaning and dyeing
Public places of amusement
Weekly Wages
or Salary.
  $71.40
  69.20
-  67.00
  53.30
  50.00
-  48;00
  47.80
  45.00
  39.10
  31.20
  30.00
Highest earnings for the week reported were shown in the manufacturing industry
for 1942—where one piece-worker earned a total of $71.40. The office group reported
one executive employee as having received $69.20 for the week. In the mercantile
section one employee occupying an important position earned $67. A piece-worker in
the fruit and vegetable industry was paid a total of $53.30 for the week under review.
In the personal service occupation one employee with executive responsibilities received
a weekly salary of $50.
Top wage in the hotel and catering group was $48. One piece-worker in the fishing
industry earned a total of $47.80 for her week's work. In the telephone and telegraph
occupation one employee in a supervisory capacity received $45. In the transportation
industry one female worker employed as a driver earned a total of $39.10. The high
wage for the week shown in the laundry, cleaning and dyeing section was $31.20, and
one employee in the new group covering public places of amusement was paid a salary of
$30 for her week's work. F 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table showing Number of Single, Married, and Widowed Employees
and their earnings for week reported.
Industry or Occupation.
Single.
Earnings.
Married.
Earnings.
Widowed.
-
Earnings.
Total Earnings for Week
reported.
Mercantile __
5,211
$71,568.61
2,275
$32,885.31
247
$4,091.73
$108,545.65
Laundry  _.
1,025
14,686.15
637
9,316.96
63
967.55
24,970.66
4,052
60,273.52
2,305
34,499.15
461
6,884.29
101,656.96
Office   -  	
7,636
147,402.66
2,075
40,005.12
280
5,899.09
193,306.87
Personal service 	
242
3,832.87
128
2,038.03
10
215.75
6,086.65
Fishing   —	
68
1,346.94
97
2,188.19
7
120.29
3,655.42
1,757
30,525.16
530
9,885.13
54
1,155.29
41,565.58
Manufacturing   —
7,589
140,551.31
2,907
53,650.64
242
4,356.11
198,558.06
1,796
29,288.35
2,103
39,087.61
113
1,984.07
70,360.03
Transportation	
211
2,421.46
93
1,822.60
9
180.20
4,424.26
Public places of amusement.
176
1,795.48
59
703.10
3
57.67
2,556.25
Totals  —_	
29,763
$503,692.51
13,209
$226,081.84
1,489
$25,912.04
$755,686.39
66.94%
29.71%
3.35%
72.96%
23.56%
3.48%
[
1
Comparative percentages of single, married, and widowed employees showed
decided changes over the previous year.
With greater employment demands, and increasing numbers of single workers
entering the services, the percentage of married women employed rose sharply in 1942
to 29.71 per cent, of total from 23.56 per cent, in 1941. The percentage representing
single employees dropped relatively from 72.96 per cent to 66.94 per cent., while little
change was noted in the percentage of widows.
The fruit and vegetable and the fishing industries continued to show the greatest
proportion of married workers, while the greater percentages of single employees were
evident in the office occupation, the telephone and telegraph section, and the manufacturing industries.
Separate figures were not compiled for those employees who were reported as
divorced or separated. Inasmuch as these numbers were low, the figures were included
in the total for married workers.
Table showing Years of Service of Female Employees with Employers
reporting for 1942.
Name of Industry.
V
S
o 9
Hr   ft
rH   til
u
r%   £
G cj
o tf
■+->   QJ
m £
o tf
+j a.
IN ^
_-. M
a tf
o tf
<" 2
o tf
+_  Oi
_O^H
_^_   M
^    tH
tor*
oo £
Sv
_-t«
o tf
+_ a
OO .H
2 »
o tf
DQ
tf oi
£o
O  I.
-h o
«H   01
a. g> cj
111
3 g a
Number of
Firms
reporting.
Mercantile 	
138
5,099
947
399
245
161
131
102
66
60
40
345
7,733
1,146
Laundry ..    	
85
1,025
211
90
70
23
28
39
20
13
11
110
1,725
141
446
4,422
751
309
200
103
100
84
55
35
29
284
6 818
1,075
2,649
Office 	
205
4,144
1,541
825
464
338
327
308
200
147
107
1,385
9,991
Personal service	
31
166
60
33
23
17
11
7
5
5
2
201     380
125
15
134
11
8
1
1
2
172
8
Telephone and telegraph
8
908
483
60
88
41
105
95
41
22
10
480
2,341
189
Manufacturing	
508
8,210
714
365
196
124
106
83
65
43
21
303
10,738
740
Fruit and vegetable.	
636
2,492
307
172
100
85
42
43
29
25
11
70
4,012
72
Transportation.--	
27
270
13
3
313
129
Public places of amuse-
22
133
33
9
9
8
6
1
1
2
14
238
83
Totals	
2,121
27,003
5,071
2,273
1,396
900
857
762
482
352
233
3,011144,461
1
6,357
According to occupation, the length of service table indicates the length of time
each employee has been in the service of the employer sending in the return. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 49
The sharp increase in employment for 1942 is especially evident in the total
employees working less than one year, the above table showing 27,003 in this group as
against a figure of 16,462 for the previous year.
In each occupation, when compiling the figures, special note is taken of the
employee credited with the greatest number of years service. The mercantile industry
listed one employee with 35 years' service. In the laundry, cleaning and dyeing industry 29 years was the highest recorded. Record service in the hotel and catering section
was 34 years. In the office occupation one employee was credited with 39 years' service.
In the personal service occupation the longest recorded was 19 years. The fishing industry listed two employees with 9 years' service. In the telephone and telegraph industry
one employee was credited with 35 years. The manufacturing industry listed an
employee shown with 36 years' service, while 21 years was the longest period of service
in the fruit and vegetable industry. The transportation industry, one of the newer
industries reporting details of female employment, showed 2 years as the longest period
of service. In the section dealing with employees of public places of amusement one
employee was reported with 20 years' service.
INSPECTIONS AND COLLECTIONS.
During 1942, with a depleted staff of Inspectors, due to enlistment in the services
and loaning certain of our personnel to the Federal Government for the duration, the
number of personal inspections showed a slight decrease over the previous year.
However, the figure stands at 10,727 for the entire Province, indicating that
establishments employing men and women were given regular attention from the
officials.
As a result of these investigations, and in response to individual complaints lodged
in our various offices, the Department was instrumental in having adjustments made for
a number of employees who had not received the correct amounts due them under the
various Orders of the Board.
We are glad to state that a definite decrease from 1941 in the total of these adjustments was apparent for the year under review, indicating that there is a marked
improvement in the attitude of the employer with regard to these Orders, since absolute
compliance helps to keep the employees satisfied and reduce their desire to change to
other work.
Under the " Female Minimum Wage Act " and Orders, 195 firms made adjustments
for 309 women and girls in the sum of $5,889.10.
Arrears of wages due men and boys under the " Male Minimum Wage Act" and
Orders were paid by 115 firms to 184 employees.    These reached the sum of $7,133.63.
Thus 493 employees received $13,022.73, a tangible proof of the protection of the
labour laws.    In 1941 the figure was $34,117.91.
Not all firms where violations were found settled amicably through the Department
and it was necessary to take Court action against some employers for failure to pay the
correct wage.
Through these Court cases, when a conviction was registered, a further sum of
$972.91 was ordered paid to employees by the Magistrates. This means that a gross
total of $13,995.64 became available to those whose wages had not been paid in
accordance with the law. The 1941 total was $36,906.12, $2,788.21 of which resulted
from payment of arrears ordered by the Courts.
COURT CASES.
Although the Department is reluctant to institute Court proceedings, when all
other means to ensure enforcement of the law are unsuccessful this step must be taken. F 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The following summary shows at a glance the cases taken under the various
Statutes administered by the Department:—•
Cases.
Convictions.
Dismissed or
Withdrawn.
7
10
10
15
2
5
7
8
15
2
D   2
D., 3
D., 2
Totals   _ — 	
44
37
D., 7
" Female Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Serene  Dainty-wear   (Joseph   Fadool),   314
Failure to pay minimum wage.. 	
Dismissed.
Cordova Street West, Vancouver
Caribou Coffee Shop   (Jessie Reade), Hope
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Fined $25; costs, $6.79; arrears
ordered, $35.84.
1115 Nelson Street, Vancouver
John Negreiff, Castlegar 	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Fined $25; costs, $3.75; arrears
ordered, $44.93.
P.D.Q.  Cafe   (Mah Poy Sing),  108  Espla
nade, North Vancouver
571 Howe Street, Vancouver
Sam   Lee  Laundry   (Harold   Gee   and   Gee
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $10.
King), Nelson
records
Grandview Steam Laundry  (Wo Kee), 891
Failing to keep   record  of hours
Fined $25.
Prior Street, Vancouver
of certain employees
Club   Cafe    (Steven   Wong),   916   Pender
Street West, Vancouver
Sam   Lee   Laundry   (Gee   King   and   Harold
Failure to produce records	
Dismissed.
Gee), Nelson
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Valley Truck Line (E. B. Carr
Fined $10 ;   $2.25 costs;   in default.
five days.
Valley Truck Line  (E. B. Carr
$122.73  arrears;   in  default,  two
months.
Cartwright   Lumber   Company,
Ltd.,   1685
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Fined   $125;    $2.50   costs;    arrears
Main Street, Vancouver
ordered, $17.55.
Cartwright   Lumber   Company,
Ltd.,   1685
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Fined   $125;    $2.50   costs;    arrears
Main Street, Vancouver
ordered, $21.15.
J.  W.  Langs,  405  Lumberman
s Building,
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Dismissed.
Vancouver
R.   Moore,   Royal  Apartments,
534  Eighth
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Fined   $50   and   costs;    arrears   or
Avenue West, Vancouver
■
dered,   $115.40;    in   default,  four
months' hard labour. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 51
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Hours of Work Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Standard Cafe  (Wong Sam), Nelson	
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Fined $10.
Cartwright  Lumber  Co.,   Ltd.,   1685   Main
Failure to keep correct records	
Fined $20 ; costs, $2.50.
Street, Vancouver
Star Grocery  (H. A. D. Greenwood), Nel
Employing a person outside hours
Fined $25.
son
shown on schedule
Main Street, Vancouver
A. R. R. Craig, Agassiz 	
Failure to keep records — 	
Dismissed.
Cranbrook  Sash  &  Door  Co.,   Ltd.,   Cran-
Failure to keep  true and correct
Fined $10 ;  costs, $2.25.
brook
records
E.  G.  Bayne,  Grosvenor Hotel,  840  Howe
Working employees excessive hours
Fined $25.
Street, Vancouver
Common   Gold   Cafe   (Louie   Jhong),   151
Failing to post notice of hours of
Fined $25.
Hastings Street East, Vancouver
work
Keystone Shingles & Lumber, Ltd., 91 Dun
Failing to post notice of hours of
Dismissed.
can Street, New Westminster
work
A. Hilker & Son, 2425  Main Street, Van
Failure   to    post    a    schedule    of
Fined $25 or five days.
couver
hours for employees
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act."
Name of Employer.
Alex. Stasyn, Nelson..
Alex. Stasyn, Nelson..
Sandy   Cove   Logging   Company    (Albert
Fortin), Harrison Lake
Steve Ores, Steelhead 	
L.   L.   Brown,   Fernie	
L.  L.  Brown,  Fernie..
Guilford Lumber Company, Ltd. (D. L.
Abernethy and H. O. Vick)
Owen King,  Duncan	
J. W. Langs, 405 Lumberman's Building,
Vancouver
J. W. Langs, 405 Lumberman's Building,
Vancouver
Guilford Lumber Company (D. L. Abernethy and Herbert Vick),  Penny
W. H. Homer, Lumberton, B.C. (headquarters in Calgary, Alta.)
W. H. Homer, Lumberton, B.C. (headquarters in Calgary, Alta.)
W. H. Homer, Lumberton, B.C. (headquarters in Calgary, Alta.)
L.  C.  Faurot, Rossland ,_	
Charge.
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
to one employee
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Sentence and Remarks.
Suspended sentence; $5.25 costs;
wages paid.
Suspended sentence; $3.25 costs;
wages paid.
Fined $25 ; costs, $6.45; arrears
ordered, $107.90.
Fined $25 ;   arrears ordered, $46.
Fined $25; costs, $3.75; arrears
ordered, $27.90.
Suspended sentence; arrears ordered, $27.90.
Fined $25 ;   arrears ordered, $27.21.
Fined $25 ;   costs, $3.75.
Fined $25.
Fined $25 ;   arrears ordered, $47.49.
Fined $25; no costs; arrears ordered, $246.57. Other claims in
the sum of $1,124.63 to be met in
thirty days, making a total of
arrears of $1,371.20.
Fined $25; $11.70 costs; ordered
to pay $46.28 arrears.
Convicted; suspended sentence;
costs, $3 ;  arrears ordered, $15.60.
Convicted; suspended sentence;
eosts, $3 ;   arrears ordered, $19.20.
Convicted ; fined $25 ; costs, $9.25 ;
arrears ordered,  $50.75.
" Factories Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Douning Peat Products, Lulu Island __
Lee Man Laundry   (Wong Soon), Trail
Unlawfully employing a child	
Operating laundry after 7 p.m.
Fined $30 and costs.
Suspended sentence.
—
HH F 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COMPARATIVE WAGES, 1918, 1940, 1941, 1942.
Figures showing comparative wage trends are furnished in the following tables
for the year 1918, when data were first compiled, and for the three most recent years—
namely, 1940, 1941, and 1942. It will be noted these relate to non-seasonal occupations
only.
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1918.
1940.
1942.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years. — 	
Employees under 18 years.	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
$13.56
$8.84
9.79%
$14.67
$9.88
13.28%
Laundry Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
$11.80
$9.78
21.80%
I
I
$12.98
$8.23
6.83%    |
1
$13.64
$10.11
6.67%,
$14.96
Inexperienced employees-	
Percentage of inexperienced employees	
$10.93
12.06%,
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
$14.23        |        $13.80
$11.77                  $11.00
5.51%                   3.28%
1
$14.06
$11.97
3.96%
$15.24
Inexperienced employees __	
Percentage of inexperienced employees	
$10.78
7.41%
Office Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—.
Employees over 18 years.	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
$16.53
$18.22
$18.71
$19.55
$10.88
$11.61         |
$12.03
$13.47
7.45%     !
1.57%     |
2.18%     J
3.83%
Personal Service Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—■
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
I
$13.83
$13.28
$13.35
$16.13
$6.96
$5.05
$6.15
$8.88
15.38%    |
4.28%     |
4.82%    |
1.58%
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees..
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees 	
Inexperienced employees. _	
Percentage of inexperienced employees..
$18.96
$10.82
14.78% REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 53
SPECIAL LICENCES.
In making Orders for various occupations and industries, the Board has recognized
that a learning period for inexperienced employees is of great assistance to women and
girls in obtaining training at a lower rate than that required for a fully qualified
employee. With this in view the Orders under the " Female Minimum Wage Act"'
provide a scale of wages for the younger or unskilled employees. The difference
between the rates set for learners and the minimum for the experienced worker is
really a fee to the employer for teaching the girl, and, in addition, it enables these
persons entering the labour market for the first time, or changing to entirely unfamiliar
work, to obtain positions which might not be open to them if they had to be paid the
rate for experienced employees.
Application forms are supplied to would-be learners and when these are completed
by the employee and employer they are returned to the Department and checked carefully before the licences are issued.
The " Female Minimum Wage Act" limits the number that may work under
licence, so the Board's officials must be sure this quota is not exceeded.
The original licence is sent to the employee and a duplicate goes to the employer.
A record is kept with the Department, and if the rates in the licence are raised to the
legal minimum before the expiry date the Board requires the return of the licence
appropriately endorsed.
When licences expire or when the licensee leaves before completing her training
period the employer must return the licence to the Board for cancellation on its records.
The following table shows at a glance the number of licences issued in 1942 with
the 1941 figures set out for comparison.
There is a decided drop for the year under review, due largely to the scarcity of
labour and the willingness of employers to pay the higher rate in order to overcome
some of his labour problems.
This is particularly apparent where males are concerned, only 12 permits having
been issued in the mercantile industry during the year, a drop of 95 from 1941.
Licences issued covering Women or Girls.
Number issued.
Industry. 1941. 1942.
Telephone and telegraph  10 23
Personal service    23 12
Mercantile  187 152
Manufacturing   305
Laundry, cleaning and dyeing  349
Office occupation  363 303
Hotel and catering  489 334
Totals   1,726 1,574
Licences issued covering Men or Boys.
Mercantile    .......     107 12
WAR'S EFFECT ON WOMAN'S EMPLOYMENT.
All through the various occupations in which women and girls are employed the
direct or indirect effects of the war are readily discernible. The most outstanding
changes of the year appear in the manufacturing industry, which now in point of
numbers of women employed heads the list.
Practically every line of industrial work sees women and girls engaged in occupations that a few years ago were considered to be men's work.    Machines of all sizes, F 54 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
turning out minute or large parts, assembling intricate equipment, and mechanical
operations of all kinds will no longer hold mysteries for these nimble-fingered workers.
Tribute is being paid to them by employers who in some cases were reluctant to
change from a staff of males to one of women and girls.
For the most part girls are making good, and in repetitive work and for conscientious attention to detail in many instances have been declared to be more suited than the
men and boys.
A word of appreciation, too, is due to the employers who have had to provide
extra facilities for these new employees. Airy lunch-rooms, adequate locker space, and
appropriate rest-rooms have been added to many establishments, and these changes have
often resulted in improved conditions for the male employees as well.
Transportation problems had to be met where the girls are being employed in
larger numbers than regular stages or street-cars could cope with, or where changes of
shifts occurred at hours when normal transportation is unavailable. So we see girls
acting as city and suburban bus-drivers in some localities, and, before this report goes
to press, we may have women in charge of street-cars.
They drive taxis and delivery trucks, and as the gasoline and rubber shortage
becomes more apparent, horses are coming back to draw vehicles of various types, girls
are handling reins as well as steering-wheels.
In areas where large numbers of His Majesty's Forces are located, laundries and
dry-cleaning establishments have had to cope with tremendous problems. Service is
required with as little delay as possible, and when one realizes that clothing and bedding
are handled in enormous quantities it has been necessary on occasions for some
employees to work overtime as sufficient experienced workers are not available to cope
with the deluge of work. Extra help is not always a solution as space and equipment
are limited. Two shifts cannot be arranged for the reason that key men or women are
not available, so employers and employees in this industry are working at top speed in
their zeal to assist in the war effort in addition to the regular civilian trade.
Hotels and restaurants are sharing the difficulties caused by extra demand for
service and lack of experienced help. Many waitresses have changed over to shipyards or other industrial work, due largely to the higher rates of pay prevailing in that
class of work, many restaurants having previously paid the bare minimum wage
required by the Board's Order.
The mercantile industry, in common with others, shows the effect of loss of trained
sales staff, either to war industries or to various branches of His Majesty's Services.
As there has been a strong demand for office help in the three services and in the
much enlarged clerical staffs of the vital war industries, there has been some tendency
for women office-workers to change over from their customary work to other positions
where their knowledge of office routine seems more necessary and helpful in the war
effort.
As married women have been entering the labour market, drawn by the opportunity to supplement the family finances and at the same time assist in war-work, the
Board has been alert to the problem that might arise if no provision is made for the
care of the children of these working mothers while the mothers are away from home.
A comprehensive survey of the matter has been made by our officials, but up to the
present it has not been considered necessary to open nursery schools as has been done
in other parts of the Dominion.
Some of the British Columbia employers, alive to the consequences of young
children being left to their own devices while the mothers are away, have refused to
employ women with young children if they had no guarantee that they would be
adequately cared for during the mothers' absence from home.
.   Other employers have erected nurseries at their own expense where the children
may be left in charge of competent attendants while the mothers are on duty, and as REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 55
these special buildings are right on the premises, no inconvenience or loss of time
occurs. The children are brought by the mothers when they come to work and return
home with them when the shift is over.
A very close check of this problem is being kept so that the employment of married
women with young children and the attendant ramifications will be known to the
Department at all times.
PERSONNEL CHANGES.
Since Mrs. Eaton has been in Ottawa, on loan to the Federal Government as
Assistant to the National Selective Service, Director, in charge of the Women's
Division, the interests of women and girls in British Columbia are not being overlooked.
Mrs. Essie Brown, of Vancouver, long associated with the Department as an Inspector,
is available in an advisory capacity for this purpose.
CONCLUSION.
Before closing this report we would like to express our appreciation to all
employers, employees, and other interested persons who have shown co-operation with
our officials in carrying out their duties, rendered more strenuous and exacting by
reason of the war.
Each year the benefits of the labour laws administered by the Board come to be
regarded in a more beneficial light by those who are directly affected by the Orders and
Regulations made under the Acts. The inspection staff have acted as intermediaries
between employers and employees, educating both groups to the advantages of voluntary
compliance with the Regulations, upon which much time and careful planning have been
spent by the Board in adapting them to rapidly changing conditions.
To all who have assisted in its work the Board desires to express its grateful
thanks.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell.
r
\ F 56
DEPARTMENT  OF LABOUR.
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO " MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
BAKING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 17 (1942), Effective July 20th, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 17.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or cakes.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—
21 years of age and over..
Under 18 years of age	
18 years and under 19 years..
19 years and under 20 years__
20 years and under 21 years..
Delivery salesmen _	
48
48
48
48
48
54
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
BARBERING  (MALE).
Order No. 42, Effective June 14th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 8.)
Bartering shall have the meaning set out in section 2 of the " Barbers Act," chapter 5, Statutes,
1924, and amendments.
Occupation.
Kate.
Hours per Week.
$18.00 week
45c. per hour
Daily minimum, $1.80
(Maximum hours, 48 per week.)
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
BOX-MANUFACTUKING (MALE).
Order No. 55 (1943), Effective July 19th, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 55.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the making of wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel
staves and heads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, or other wooden containers.
	
Hours per Week.
Adult males, 90% of total	
Adult males, 10% of total, not less than..
Males, 18 to 21 years of age	
Males, under 18 years of age. 	
48
48
48
48
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours dn any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act" and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One  and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 57
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26   (1940)   and Order No. 26a
(1940) of the Board.
Note.—Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under " Apprenticeship Act." •
BUS-DRIVERS  (FEMALE).
Order No. 76, Effective September 28th, 1942.
Includes female employees in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public, for which service a charge
is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point Grey
which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City of
Vancouver;   the City of New Westminster;   the Corporation of
the Township of Richmond;   the Municipality of the District of
Burnaby;   Municipality of the District of West Vancouver;   the
City of North Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver
50c.
55c.
40 to 48.
Less than 40.
Note.— (1.) If bus-drivers are required to wear uniforms or special articles of wearing-apparel no deduction
shall be made from bus-drivers' wages for such uniforms or special apparel, except under terms with regard to
cost duly approved in writing by the Board as being fair and reasonable.
(2.)   Employees required by employer to wait on call shall be paid for waiting time.
(3.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
(4.) Rest period of twenty-four consecutive hours from midnight to midnight in each calendar week shall be
given to employees.
BUS-DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 70, Effective March 18th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. SI.)
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven  (7)  passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which service a charge is
made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
60c.
65c.
75c.
40 to 50.
Less than 40.
In  excess of 9 hours
in   any  one  day  or
50 hours in any one
week.
BUS-DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 70a, Effective June 27th, 1940.
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of a bus-driver
while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by a bus-driver from the time
he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty until he returns again to his employer's
headquarters or garage where he originally reported for duty; and shall include the time occupied by
a bus-driver in dead-heading from his employer's headquarters or garage to the place where he is to
take charge of the bus and vice versa; but the minimum wage shall not apply to waiting-time of a bus-
driver when occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads. F 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 66, Effective August 21st, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 40.)
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt,
Highland, Metchosin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew _.
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 58, Effective November 7th, 1938.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.      | »•**£*? **
Vancouver and District..   , 	
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 65, Effective August 1st, 1939.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling', alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area: Provincial Electoral Districts of.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
75c.
75c.
75c.
75c.
48
Grand Forks-Greenwood 7 ......_...-—:— :..„-,■. _.  ...
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship-Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   *' Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
I
,    ,. CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 72, Effective May 27th, 1940.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
All carpentry work within a radius of 5 miles from the centre of the City of
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 59
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 73, Effective May 27th, 1940.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.        .
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
All carpentry work within a radius of 5 miles from the centre of the City of
75c.
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 68, Effective September 11th, 1939.
" Christmas-tree industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the cutting, gathering, hauling, and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Male employees, 85 per cent, not less than 40c. per hour.
Permissible, 15 per cent, not less than 30c. per hour.
Note.— (a.) Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(5.)  The above is a new order in place of Order No. 61, which expired December 31st, 1938.
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 12 (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 12, Order No. 12A, Order No. 12B, Order No. 45, and Order No. 45A.)
Includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or demolition of any building, railway,
tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well,
telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of
construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of any such work or structure.
j    Hourly Rate,
Area.                                                                  21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate,
under 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
Vancouver, West Vancouver, North  Vancouver, Point Grey, Victoria, Nanaimo, New Westminster, Prince Rupert, Esquimalt,
45c.
•     .    40c.
35c.
30c.
48
48
Note.— (a.)  Above rates do not apply to indentured apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act.'
(6.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.   .     .
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS  (MALE).
Order No. 54, Effective March 3rd., 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 82.)
Includes every male elevator operator and starter.
37^ to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than ZIV2 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37^c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board (21) meals, $4.00 per week,
(b.)   Individual meals, twenty cents  (20c.)  each.
(c.)  Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee,
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven (7) days, $2.00 per week,
(e.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/.)   Uniforms or special wearing-apparel, required by the employer, must be supplied and laundered without
cost to the employee.
(g.)  The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(h.)   Employees must be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(i.)  Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted. F 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS   (FEMALE).
Order No. 53, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. SO and Order No. 5.)
Includes every female operator and starter.
37 M: to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than ZIV2 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37 i^c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.—As for male elevator operators, see Order No. 54.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM  (MALE).
Order No. 18 (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Orders Nos. 18, ISA, 18b, and 18c.)
Includes every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while under
steam-pressure or in motion.    " Special engineer " means holder of a special or temporary certificate.
(See " Boiler Inspection Act," section 28 (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
50c.
40c.
48
48
Note.— (o.) Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the "Hours of Work Act" 48 hours per
week may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(6.)  For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors* Order.
(e.) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 40 cents
per hour (Order 18b).
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS  (MALE).
Order No. 39 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. S9.)
First-aid attendant means every male employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid attendant
under the authority of a certificate of competency in first aid, satisfactory to the Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia, and designated by his employer as the first-aid attendant in charge.
Hourly Rate.
First-aid attendant -	
Assistant first-aid attendant  	
Overtime rate when engaged in first-aid work
50c.
50c.
Daily Rate.
$4.00
4.00
Note.— (a.) "Hours of Work Act" regulates the daily hours in the industry, but should overtime be necessary,
attendant must be paid overtime rate.
(6.) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any industry or occupation within an industry, the first-aid
attendant employed- in such industry or occupation must be paid such,higher rate.
(c.) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the medical practitioner or hospital.
FISHING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 78, Effective May 3rd, 1943.
(Superseding Order in Effect since February 28th, 1920.)
" Fishing industry " means the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving,
canning,  drying, curing,  smoking,  packing,  labelling  and  reconditioning  of  containers,  or otherwise
adapting for sale or use or for shipment any kind of fish or shell-fish.
Experienced employees-
Learners of any age	
Hourly Rate.
33c.
28c. for first 200 hours of employment in the industry;
33c. thereafter.
Note,— (1.)  Above rates do not apply to employees engaged in heading and filling.
(2.) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age below 33c.
per hour.
(3.)   Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(4.) Employees shall not be employed more than eight hours a day or forty-eight hours a week except under
permit from the Board.
(5.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.                                  F 61
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 47  (1942), Effective September 28th, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 47.)
Includes the work of males engaged in canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh
fruit or vegetable.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
Experienced rate   (payable to at least 85 per
cent, of male employees)
Inexperienced rate  (payable to not more than
15 per cent, of male employees)
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
38c.
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
Double regular rate of pay.
28c.
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
Double regular rate of pay.
Note.— (1.)   After five  (5)  hours continuous employment, employees must have one   (1)  hour free from duty,
unless shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations,,
(2.)   Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
(3.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 46 (1942), Effective September 28th, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 46.)
Includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh
fruit or vegetable.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
Experienced rate   (payable to at least 90 per
cent, of employees)
Inexperienced rate  (payable to not more than
10 per cent, of employees)
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
30c.
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
Double regular rate of pay.
25c.
One and one-half times regular rate of pay.
Double regular rate of pay.
Note.— (1.)   After five  (5)  hours continuous employment, employees must have one   (1)   hour free from duty,
unless shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(2.)  Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
(3.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 52, Effective February 14th, 1938.
■
(Superseding Order No. SO and Order No. 5.)
Includes the work of females in:—
(a.)  Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which a charge
is made.
(6.)   Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets, banquet halls,
cafeterias, tea-rooms, lunch-rooms, lunch-counters, ice-cream parlours, soda fountains, hospitals, nursing-homes, clubs, dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial establishments
or office buildings or schools, or any other place where food is cooked, prepared, and served, for which
a charge is made;   whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or
in connection with any other business.
This Order does not apply to females employed as graduate or undergraduate nurses in hospitals,
nursing-homes, or other similar establishments.
Experienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.                       .                                      Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37Y2c. per hour.
Daily guarantee, $1.50.
* F 62
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Inexperienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 per week, 1st 2 months.
10.50 per week, 2nd 2 months.
12.00 per week, 3rd 2 months.
14.00 per week thereafter.
Licences required for all inexperienced employees
working at above rates.
25c. per hour, 1st 2 months.
30c. per hour, 2nd 2 months.
35c. per hour, 3rd 2 months.
37M.C. per hour thereafter.
Daily guarantee of four (4) hours pay per day.
Note.— (<_.)   Full week's board (21) meals, $4.00 per week.
(6.)   Individual meals, twenty cents (20c.) each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven  (7) days, $2.00 per week.
(e.) Emergency overtime up to ten (10) hours per day, but not to exceed fifty-two (52) hours in any one
(1) week.
(f.) Time and one-half shall be paid for all hours in excess of eight (8) in the day, or forty-eight (48) in
the week.
(ff.) Split shifts shall be confined within fourteen (14) hours from commencement of such split shift." (See
Order 52b.)
(h.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(».) Uniforms or special wearing-apparel required by the employer must be supplied and laundered free of cost
to the employee.
(j.)   Accidental breakages shall not be charged to employees.
(/_.)   Employees must be given twenty-four (24)  consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(_.)  See Order 52m for "Resort Hotels."
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY (FEMALE).
Order No. 52b, Effective May 19th, 1938.
Allows a split shift to be spread over 14 hours immediately following commencement of work,
thereby cancelling section 8 of Order No. 52. Every employee whose split shift extends over 12 hours
shall be paid at the rate of one and one-half times her regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of her work.
HOTEL AND  CATERING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 52m (Resort Hotels), Effective June 14th, 1943, to September 11th, 1943.
(Superseding Orders 52a, 52d, 52f, 52h, and 52K.)
Covers the work of females in any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or lodging
are furnished to the general public, for which a charge is made.
Allowing:—■
Hours not to exceed ten (10) in any one day, nor more than fifty-four (54) in any one week.
Hours in excess of forty-eight (48) in any one week shall be paid at not less than time and one-
half (1%) of the legal rate fixed in Order No. 52, or her regular rate of pay.
Provides for a rest period of twenty-four (24) consecutive hours in each calendar week.
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY (MALE).
Order No. 51, Effective November 22nd, 1937.
Includes the manufacture of kitchen furniture, dining-room furniture, bedroom furniture, living-
room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of household furniture, customarily manufactured in
a furniture factory.
Males.
Rate per Hour.
Hours per Week.
21 years of age or over	
Under 17 years of age 	
17 years and under 18 years of age._
18 years and under 19 years of age._
19 years and under 20 years of age
20 years and under 21 years of age..
40c.
20c.
25c.
27%c.
30c.
35c.
48
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)   60 per cent, of all male employees must be paid not less than 40c. per hour.
(6.)   This Order does not apply to apprentices duly indentured under the " Apprenticeship Act.' REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 63
JANITORS   (MALE).
Order No. 43  (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Order Nos. 43, 4SA, and 4Sb.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner, janitor-fireman, or janitor-engineer.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings of four (4) residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:-
5 residential suites, $27.00 per month
6 residential suites, $30.00 per month
7 residential suites, $33.00 per month
8 residential suites, $36.00 per month
9 residential suites, $39.00 per month
10 residential suites, $42.00 per month
11 residential suites, $45.00 per month
12 residential suites, $48.00 per month
13 residential suites, $51.00 per month
14 residential suites, $54.00 per month
15 residential suites, $57.20 per month
16 residential suites, $60.50 per month
17 residential suites, $63.80 per month
18 residential suites, $67.10 per month
19 residential suites, $70.40 per month
20 residential suites, $73.70 per month
21 residential suites, $77.00 per month
22 residential suites, $80.30 per month
23 residential suites, $82.50 per month
24 residential suites, $84.70 per month
25 residential suites, $86.90 per month
26 residential suites, $89.10 per month
27 residential suites, $91.30 per month
28 residential suites, $93.50 per month
29 residential suites, $95.70 per month;
30 residential suites, $97.90 per month;
31 residential suites, $100.10 per month
32 residential suites, $102.30 per month
33 residential suites, $104.50 per month
34 residential suites, $106.70 per month
35 residential suites, $108.90 per month
36 residential suites, $111.10 per month
37 residential suites, $113.30 per month
38 residential suites, $115.50 per month
39 residential suites, $117.70 per month
40 residential suites, $119.90 per month
41 residential suites, $122.10 per month
42 residential suites, $124.30 per month
43 residential suites, $126.50 per month
44 residential suites, $128.70 per month
45 residential suites, $130.90 per month
46 residential suites, $133.10 per month
47 residential suites, $135.30 per month
48 residential suites, $137.50 per month
49 residential suites, $137.50 per month
50 residential suites, $137.50 per month
over 50 residential suites, $137.50 per month.
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.)
per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitor
shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitor shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.— (1.) In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building the suite occupied by the
janitor shall not be included.
(2.)   Order does not apply to janitors employed in one-room school-houses. F 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
JANITRESSES  (FEMALE).
Order No. 44 (1942), Effective September 21st, 1942.
(Superseding Order Nos. 44, 44a, and 44b.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitress, janitress-cleaner, or janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents (37V_:c.) per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings of four (4)  residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents  (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:-
5 residential suites, $27.00 per month
6 residential suites, $30.00 per month
7 residential suites, $33.00 per month
8 residential suites, $36.00 per month
9 residential suites, $39.00 per month
10 residential suites, $42.00 per month
11 residential suites, $45.00 per month
12 residential suites, $48.00 per month
13 residential suites, $51.00 per month
14 residential suites, $54.00 per month
15 residential suites, $57.20 per month
16 residential suites, $60.50 per month
17 residential suites, $63.80 per month
18 residential suites, $67.10 per month
19 residential suites, $70.40 per month
20 residential suites, $73.70 per month
21 residential suites, $77.00 per month
22 residential suites, $80.30 per month
23 residential suites, $82.50 per month
24 residential suites, $84.70 per month
25 residential suites, $86.90 per month
26 residential suites, $89.10 per month
27 residential suites, $91.30 per month
28 residential suites, $93.50 per month
29 residential suites, $95.70 per month;
30 residential suites, $97,90 per month;
31 residential suites, $100.10 per month;
32 residential suites, $102.30 per month;
33 residential suites, $104.50 per month;
34 residential suites, $106.70 per month;
, 35 residential suites, $108.90 per month;
36 residential suites, $111.10 per month;
37 residential suites, $113.30 r-r month;
38 residential suites, $115.50 per month;
39 residential suites, $117.70 per month;
40 residential suites, $119.90 per month;
41 residential suites, $122.10 per month;
42 residential suites, $124.30 per month;
43 residential suites, $126.50 per month;
44 residential suites, $128.70 per month;
45 residential suites, $130.90 per month;
46 residential suites, $133.10 per month;
47 residential suites, $135.30 per month;
48 residential suites, $137.50 per month;
49 residential suites, $137.50 per month;
50 residential suites, $137.50 per month;
over 50 residential suites, $137.50 per month.
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents
(37^c.)  per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitress
shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitress shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.— (1.) In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building the suite occupied by the
janitress shall not be included.
(2.)   Order does not apply to janitresses employed in one-room school-houses.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING  (FEMALE).
Order No. 74, Effective March 10th, 1941.
(Superseding Order in Effect since March Slst, 1919.)
Per Hour.
Daily Minimum,
except Saturday.
Daily Minimum,
Saturday only.
Experienced rate (section 1)_
31c.
$1.24
93c. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 65
Learners must have permit, if employed at following rates:—
Learner's rate (full time)   (section 2 (b)).
First four months
Second four months
Third four months
Thereafter
21c. per hour.
24c. per hour.
27*/_:c. per hour.
31c. per hour.
Four Hours or Less
per Day (except
Saturday).
Three Hours or Less
on Saturday.
Learner's rate (full time)   (section 2 (b))_
First four months
Second four months
Third four months
Thereafter
84c. per day
96c. per day
$1.10 per day
$1.24 per day
63c. per day.
73c. per day.
82%c. per day.
93c. per day.
Note.— (a.)   Every employee called for employment shall be paid after reporting at the place of employment.
(6.) When employees are required to wear uniforms or special articles of wearing-apparel, no deduction shall
be made from the wages for such uniform or special articles of wearing-apparel, or for the repair or laundering
thereof, except as approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.) No deduction shall be made for the accidental damage to any article, or as a penalty for unsatisfactory
work.
(_..)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(e.)  Hours of work governed by " Factories Act."
(/.)   Maximum hours, forty-eight in the week.
LOGGING  (MALE).
Order No. 1 (1943), Effective August 2nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 1 (1940).)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to hauling by truck or rail, driving,
rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Male employees    _	
Trackmen _  	
Cook- and bunk-house employees   _
Shingle-bolts (felling, bucking, and splitting)
40c. per hour
37^0. per hour
$2.75 per day
$1.30 per cord
48
48
Unlimited.
48
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
defined in section 4 of the " Hours
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers, timekeepers, and office employees when employed on a monthly basis.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees engaged exclusively in the transportation of men or supplies.
Rate of Pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Order.
Note.— (1.)   Certain exemptions re hours granted under "Hours of Work Act"   (see Regulations).
(2.)  Watchmen in logging camps where operations are entirely suspended are exempt from provisions of the
(3.)   Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under " Apprenticeship Act.' F 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 25 (1942), Effective November 2nd, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 25.)
Includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting,
printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity, except as provided by any other Order of the Board.
Weekly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
$14.00
8.00
10.00
12.00
14.00
48
48
48
48
48
29yec.
16%c.
Learners of any age—■
20 %c.
25c.
Thereafter _	
29yac.
Note.— (1.) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age at
rates below $14 per week or 29M.C. per hour.
(2.)   Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(3.)   Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under the "Apprenticeship Act."
(4.) Employees shall not be employed more than eight hours a day or forty-eight hours a week, except when
permission granted under the " Factories Act " or by permit from the Board when the said Act does not apply.
(5.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly up to a day not more than eight days prior to date of payment.
MERCANTILE   (MALE).
Order No. 59, Effective October 20th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 38.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
(2.)   21 years of age and over  	
$15.00 per week
40c. per hour
$1.60 per day
37^ to 48 hours per week.
If less than 37^ hours.
Males under Twenty-one (21)  Years of Age.
Minimum Rates for Beginners under Seventeen (17) Years of Age.
37 ^ to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37 Vi Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
(4.)   (1.)
$6.00 per week..
7.50' per week .
9.00 per week-
11.00 per week-
13.00 per week-
15.00 per week .
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
19 and under 20
20 and under 21
Thereafter
15c.
20c.
25c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
60c.
80c.
$1.00
1.20
1.40
1.60
Beginners and those recommencing. Eighteen (18)  Years and under Twenty-one (21), to whom Permits
have been issued by the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum- Wage Act."
37y2 to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37^ Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
(4.)   (2.)
$8.00 per week, 1st 12 months...
10.00 per week, 2nd 12 months..
13.00 per week, 3rd 12 months..
Thereafter rates as shown in (2) or (3).
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
20c.
25c.
35e.
80c.
$1.00
1.40
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed five
(5)  days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
not less than                 ...        — - 	
30c.
$1.20 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 67
Males Twenty-one (21)  Years and under Twenty-four (24).
Inexperienced and partly inexperienced, to whom Permits have been granted, under Section 6
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
25c.
30c.
35c.
$1.00
1.20
13.00 per week, 3rd 6 months  	
Thereafter the rates as shown in (2) or (3).
1.40
Note.— (a.) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers, employed in wholesale and (or) retail establishments, shall be
paid at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26.
(b.)   Employees must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(c.)  Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(d.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
MERCANTILE   (FEMALE).
Order No. 24, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order dated September 28th, 1927.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or)  retail trade.
Rate.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over..
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Minimum, 18 years of age or over _
$12.75 a week.
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
Hours per Week.
40 to 48
If less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
§7.50 a week for 1st 3 months
S.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
8.50 a week for 3rd 3 months.
9.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
9.50 a week for 5th 3 months.
10.00 a week for 6th 3 months.
10.50 a week for 7th 3 months.
11.00 a week until age of 18 years is reached.
20c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
21c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
23c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
25c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
26c. per hour during 5th 3 months.
27c. per hour during 6th 3 months.
29c. per hour during 7th 3 months.
30c. per hour until age of 18 years is reached.
Minimum, $1.00 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 a week 1st 3 months.
25c. per hour 1st 3 months.
10.00 a week 2nd 3 months.
27c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
11.00 a week 3rd 3 months.
30c. per hour 3rd 3 months.
12.00 a week 4th 3 months.
35c. per hour 4th 3 months.
12.75 a week thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Note.— (a.)   Licences must be obtained for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over at above rates.
(6.)   Maximum working-hours, 48 per week.
OFFICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 34, Effective January 30th, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. 4.)
Includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks, filing
clerks, cashiers, cash-girls  (not included in other orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer operators,
auditors, attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Experienced Employees
18 Years of Age or over.
37Vz to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37H Hours per Week.
$15.00 per week.
40c. per hour.
Minimum, $1.60 per day.
. F 68 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years op Age or over.
(Licence required in this Class.)
37% to 48 Hours per Week. Less than 87% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
15.00 a week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st 3 months.
32%c. per hour for 2nd 3 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 3 months.
37%e. per hour for 4th 3 months.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years op Age.
37% to 48 Hours per Week. Less than 87% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 6 months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
15.00 a week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st 6 months.
32 %c. per hour for 2nd 6 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 6 months.
37%c. per hour for 4th 6 months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Note.—Office employees are not allowed to exceed eight hours per day without a permit.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.
Order No. 71, Effective June 1st, 1940.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area. Rate per Hour.
City of Vancouver, including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver,  City of North Vancouver, District of North   j
Vancouver   —  .   75c.
. |	
Note.— (a.)   This Order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)  Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(c.)  All wages must be paid semi-monthly.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.
Order No. 75, Effective June 2nd, 1941.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area. Rate per Hour.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt, Highland, Metchosin,
Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew  _ _    	
75c.
Note.— (a.)   This Order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)  Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(c.)  All wages must be paid semi-monthly.
PATROLMEN  (MALE).
Order No. 69, Effective February 5th, 1940.
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes to watch
or patrol the premises of more than one person for the purpose of guarding or protecting persons or
property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman " means an employee  (not covered by any other Order of the Board)  employed by
a private patrol agency. 	
Hourly rate—_ —     ~~~   - 35c>
NOTE.;—(a.) Wages must be paid semi-monthly.
(b.)  Employees must be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(c.)   Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement approved by the Board of Industrial Relations. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 69
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27, Effective September 5th, 1935.
(Superseding, in part, Personal Service Order.)
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring;   hairdressing;   barbering;   massaging;
physiotherapy;    giving of electrical, facial, scalp, or other treatments;    removal of superfluous hair;
chiropody;   or other work of like nature.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Minimum  -	
$14.25
37%c. per hour
$1.50 per day
40 to 44
Less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years op Age.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 6 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 6 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 6 months, or until employee
35c. per hour during 4th 6 months, or until employee
reaches age of 18 years.
reaches age of 18 years.
14.25 a week thereafter.
37M.C. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
14.25 a week thereafter.
27c per hour during 1st 3 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
35c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
37^c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Note.— (a.) Employees waiting on call to be paid according to rates to which they are entitled as set out above.
(6.)   44-hour week and one-half hour for lunch between 11 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.     (See 27A.)
(c.)  Where special article of wearing-apparel of distinctive design, trimming, colour, or fabric is required, tt
shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired free of cost to the employee.     (See 27b.)
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Order No. 27a, Effective March 30th, 1939.
(Amending Order No. 27.)
The above Order reduces the weekly hours to forty-four   (44)   and not more than nine   (9)  hours
in any one day.
Also provides for one-half  (%)  hour free from duty between the hours of eleven  (11)  a.m. and
two-thirty (2.30) p.m.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Order No. 27b, Effective May 1st, 1940.
The above Order requires that where a distinctive uniform of special design, trimming, colour, or
fabric is required, it shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired free of cost to the employee.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27d, Effective March" 13th, 1941.
Adds physiotherapy to the definition of Order No. 27. F 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT   (FEMALE).
Order No. 67, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding Personal Service Order.)     ,
" Public place of amusement " includes theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, lecture-halls, shooting-
galleries, bowling-alleys, swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions, and other similar places to which a charge
for admission or service is made to the public.
40 to 48 Hours
per Week.
Less than 40 Hours
per Week.
2 Hours or Less in
any One Day.
75 e.
Note.— (a.)  Employees on call, 35c. per hour.
(b.)  Where uniforms  or  special  articles  of  wearing-apparel  are  required  they  shall be furnished,  repaired,
laundered, cleaned, etc., free of cost to the attendant.
(c.)   Cashiers are still covered by Office Order No. 34.
SAWMILLS  (MALE).
Order No. 50 (1943), Effective July 5th, 1943.
(Superseding Order Nos. 50 and 50A.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills and planing-mills.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Adult males.—   - — - _  	
Not more than 10 per cent, of all employees at not less than..
Cook- and bunk-house employees   	
At least 90 per cent, of all employees to get not less than..
40c.
30c.
$2.75 per day
40c.
48
48
Unlimited.
48
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—■
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One    and    one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion  of hours
. established by ar
rangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers. i
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26 (1940) and Order No. 26a (1940).
Note.— (1.)  Certain exemptions re hours granted under "Hours of Work Act"  (see Regulations).
(2.)   For wages, etc., of stationary steam engineers see Order No. 18  (1942).
(3.)  For wages, etc., of truck-drivers see Order No. 26 (1940).
(4.)   For wages, etc., of first-aid attendants see Order No. 39   (1940).
(5.)   Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under " Apprenticeship Act." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 71
SHINGLE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 62 (1943), Effective August 2nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 62  (1941).)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of shingles.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles, understood and accepted as a standard by -the
industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936, issued by the National Research Council of
Canada.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Sawyers—
No. 1 shingles	
Lower in grade than No. 1 shingles-
Packers, all grades 	
Other employees not included in any other Order of the Board 	
Employees packing or sawing shingles on any other basis than by the square
shall be paid on the same proportionate basis.
40c.
40c.
40c.
40c.
Overtime applies only west of the Cascade Mountains to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One   and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Shingle-sawyers.
Shingle-packers.
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26   (1940)  and Order No. 26a
 (1940) of the Board.	
Note.—Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under " Apprenticeship Act." F 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SHINGLE INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 77 (1943), Effective August 22nd, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. 77.)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of wooden shingles.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles, understood and accepted as a standard by the
industry, and according to specification  N.R.C. 5—1936, issued by the National Research  Council of
Canada.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Sawyers—
No. 1 shingles 	
Shingles lower in grade than No. 1..
Packers, all grades—	
Other employees not included in any other Order of the Board-
40c.
40c.
40c.
40c.
Overtime, effective west of Cascade Mountains only—
In excess of eight hours per day or forty-eight hours per week
Rate: One and one-half times
employees' regular rate of
pay-
Note.— (1.)   Where an arrangement under section 5 of the "Hours of Work Act" is in effect with respect to
hours of work, overtime rates shall not apply until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(2.)   Overtime rates shall not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of
Work Act."
Shingle-sawyers.
Shingle-packers.
Cook- and bunk-house employees covered by Order No. 52 of the Board.
Office employees covered by Order No. 34 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26b of the Board.
(3.)   Employees shall not be employed more than eight hours a day or forty-eight hours a week, except when
permission granted under the " Factories Act " or by permit from the Board when the said Act does not apply.
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY   (MALE).
Order No. 20 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 20.)
Includes all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, painting,
and cleaning of hulls, putting on or taking off the ways, or dry-docking, of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.            Weekly Hours.
Ship-carpenter, shipwright, joiner, boat-builder, or wood-caulker.	
67y2c.
50c.
25c.
48
48
Employees under 21, not more than 10 per cent, of total male employees in plant
48
Note.—This order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the " Apprenticeship Act."
TAXICAB DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 33 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. SS, Order No. SSA, and Order No. SSB.)
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.                   Daily Rate.
Working-hours.
Vancouver.   „. — 	
All ages.
$2.75
9 per day.
54 per week.
Note.— (a.)   If uniform or special article of wearing-apparel is demanded by employer, it must be without cost
to the employee except by arrangement approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(6.)   Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 73
TAXICAB DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 60, Effective November 17th, 1938.
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Less than 10
Hours per Day.
Daily
Minimum.
Working-
hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich
All ages.
$3.00
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
10 per day.
Note.— (a.) Permits shall be obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours
can be paid 35c. per hour.
(6.)   Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 45c. per hour.
(c.)   Drivers must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(d.)   Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(c.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION (FEMALE).
Effective April 5th, 1920.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the various instruments, switchboards, arid other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and telegraphy, and shall
also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the operation of telephone
or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Weekly Hours.
$15.00 per week.
$11.00 per week for 1st 3 months.
48
31 ^4c. per hour.
12.00 per week for 2nd 3 months.
48
13.00 per week for 3rd 3 months.
48
Licences required for inexperienced em
In case of emergency,
ployees 18 years of age or over.
56 hours.
Note.—-(a.)   Time and one-half is payable for hours in excess of 43.
(b.)   Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
(c.) Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m.,
10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the number of hours of
employment a week.
(d.) In cases where employees reside on the employers' premises, the employer shall not be prevented from
making an arrangement with such employee to answer emergency calls between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m. F 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY   (MALE).
Order No. 26 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
Order No. 26a (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 26.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.) Operators of mo tor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net
weight or over, as specified on the motor-
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Hourly rate.. -	
(2.) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than
2,000 lb. net weight, as specified on the
motor-vehicle licence, and operators of
motor-cycles with wheeled attachments,
exclusive of those specified in section 7
hereof
Hourly rate— -	
Less than 40
45c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 50
40c.
40 and not more
than 50
(3.) Operators of motor-cycles with not more
than two wheels and without wheeled attachment
Hourly rate  -	
( 4.) Bicycle - riders and foot - messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger
work  (e)
Hourly rate 	
(5.)   Swampers and helpers-
Hourly rate  —
(6.)   Drivers  of horse-drawn  vehicles  other  than
those covered by section 7 hereof
Hourly rate - -	
Less than 40
30c.
Less than 40
20c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
45c.
40 and not more
than 48
25c.
40 and not more
than 48
17c.
40 and not more
than 50
35c.
40 and not more
than 50
40c.
(7.) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery of
milk
Hourly rate, 40c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52M.C.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52V2c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(fe.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery men may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than ten (10)
hours are worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a period of
seven (7) weeks.
(e.)  Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 59.
(/.)   Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
P 75
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Oedek No. 26b, Effective August 18th, 1941.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.)  Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net
Less than 40
40 and not more
In excess of 50 and
weight  or  over,   as  specified  on  the  motor-
than 50
not more than 54
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
45c.
40c.
60c.
(2.)   Operators    of   motor-vehicles    of   less   than
Less than 40
40 and not more
In excess of 50 and
2,000   lb.   net   weight,   as   specified   on   the
than 50
not more than 54
motor-vehicle    licence,    exclusive    of    those
specified in sections 3 and 7 hereof
40c.
35c.
52%c.
(3.)   Operators   of   motor-cycles   with   not   more
Less than 40
40 and not more
than two wheels and without wheeled attach
than 48
ment
30c.
25c.
(4.)  Bicycle-riders  and  foot-messengers  employed
Less than 40
40 and not more
exclusively on delivery or messenger work
than 48
20c.
17c.
than 50
not more than 54
40c.
35c.
52%c.
In excess of 50 and
(6.)   Drivers   of  horse-drawn  vehicles   other  than
Less than 40
40 and not more
those covered by section 7 hereof
than 50
not more than 54
45c.
40c.
(7.)   Drivers   of   vehicles   employed   in   the  retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery of
milk
Not less than forty cents  (40c.)  per hour.
Hourly rate, 40c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rate.
(6.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery employees may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than
ten (10) hours are worked in any.one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a
period of seven   (7)  weeks.
(e.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly. F 76
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
WOOD-WORKING.
Order No. 49 (1943), Effective July 19th, 1943.
(Superseding Order No. S5 and Order No. 11.)
Includes all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of manufacturing sash and doors,
cabinets,  show-cases,  office   and  store  fixtures,  wood  furniture,  wood  furnishings,  ply-wood,  veneer
products, and general mill-work products.
Weekly Hours.
Adult Males	
18 to 21 years of age_
Under 18 years-	
48
48
48
Overtime applies throughout the Province to—
Employees, other than those mentioned below, working in excess of eight
hours in any one day or forty-eight hours in any one week
Working in excess of nine hours in any one day
or fifty hours in any one week
Stationary engineers
Pumpmen
Operating millwrights
Firemen
Turbine operators
Oilers
Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work
pursuant to section 5 of " Hours of Work Act " and Regulation No. 2
under the said Act
Rate of Pay.
One    and   one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay.
One and one-half
times regular rate
of pay after completion of hours
established by arrangement.
Overtime does not apply to—
Persons holding positions of management and supervision as denned in section 4 of the " Hours
of Work Act."
Cook- and bunk-house employees.
Watchmen.
Caretakers.
Storekeepers.
First-aid attendants covered by Order No. 39 of the Board.
Employees in the transportation industry covered by Order No. 26  (1940)  and Order No. 26a
(1940) of the Board.
Note.— (1.)   Total male employees receiving less than 40 cents per hour must not exceed
male employees in plant or establishment.
(2.)   Order does not apply to apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act."
_% per cent, of all REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
P 77
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders now in effect, compiled as at August
2nd, 1943.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum Wage
Act.
41
17 (1942)
42
55 (1943)
70
70a
76
58
65
66
72
73
68
12 (1940)
53
54
18 (1942)
39 (1940)
78
46 (1942)
47 (1942)
51
52
52b
52m
Apprentices, Indentured _
Baking 	
Barbering	
Box-manufacture 	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-driver____ __ _	
Carpentry (Vancouver and District) 	
Carpentry (Kootenay Area) ...__ _	
Carpentry (Victoria and District)	
Carpentry (Alberni) _	
Carpentry (Nanaimo) — _	
Christmas-trees 	
Construction 	
Elevator Operators	
Elevator Operators	
Engineers, Stationary Steam-
First-aid Attendants	
Fishing.-__	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable _	
Household Furniture	
Hotel and Catering	
Hotel and Catering	
Hotel and Catering (Resort Hotels) _
I
43 (1942)1
44 (1942)|
74 |
1 (1943)1
28
25 (1942)
24
59
34
75
71
69
27
27A
27b
27d
67
50 (1943)
62 (1943)
77 (1943)
20 (1940)
33 (1940)
60
60a
26 (1940)
26a
(1940)
26b
49 (1943)
Janitors   _	
Janitresses     	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing..
Logging   	
Logging and  Sawmills   (Cost of Board,
Cranbrook Area)
Manufacturing  _	
Mercantile   	
Mercantile 	
Office Occupation 	
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers.
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers.
Patrolmen  	
Personal Service 	
Personal Service   	
Personal Service 	
Personal Service	
Public Places of Amusement..
Sawmills 	
Shingle-mills 	
Shingle 	
Ship-building ___	
Taxicab-drivers  	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)..
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)..
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation  ~ ~
Transportation  _	
Transportation..
Wood-working...
Feb. 7/37-	
July 15/42 -	
April 5/37 ______
July 14/43 ......
March 12/40..
June 21/40	
Sept. 21/42.	
Sept. 15/38 --.
June 23/39	
Aug. 16/39	
May 14/40 ______
May 14/40	
Aug. 31/39—
Nov. 26/40	
Feb.28/38	
Feb. 28/38 _____.
Sept. 9/42	
Oct. 8/40    _____
April 14/43	
Sept. 21/42	
Sept. 21/42.	
Nov. 17/37......
Feb. 8/38	
May 18/38...	
June 4/43	
Sept. 9/42...	
Sept. 9/42	
Feb. 25/41.	
July 14/43	
Sept. 25/35.--.
Oct. 15/42	
Mar. 29/35  ...
Oct. 12/38	
Jan. 24/36 ......
April 22/41....
April 26/40	
Jan. 19/40.	
Aug. 29/35 ..-.
March 23/39 ..
April 23/40 ___.
March 11/41..
Aug. 31/39 ....
June 25/43	
July 23/43..	
July 23/43__	
Oct. 8/40	
Oct. 8/40	
Nov. 15/38...
Oct. 8/40.	
Oct. 8/40	
Nov, 26/40	
Aug. 12/41_	
July 14/43	
Feb.  11/37-.
July 16/42	
April 8/37 —
July 15/43	
March 14/40-
June 27/40 ._
Sept. 24/42...
Sept. 2^/38 _.
June 29/39 -
Aug. 17/39 ...
May 16/40--
May 16/40	
Sept. 7/39 —
Nov. 28/40 ...
March 3/38 ._
March 3/38 _
Sept. 17/42 _.
Oct. 10/40'	
April 22/43...
Sept. 24/42...
Sept. 24/42...
Nov. 18/37—
Feb. 10/38 ....
May 19/38 __._
June 10/43—
Sept. 17/42...
Sept. 17/42...
Feb. 27/41.....
July 15/43 —
Sept. 26/35—
Oct. 22/42	
June 6/35	
Oct. 20/38	
Jan.30/36 —
April 24/41...
May2/40 .....
Jan. 25/40	
Sept. 5/35	
April 6/39 ...
April 25/40 _
March 13/41.
Sept. 7/39 —
July 2/43—
July 29/43	
July 29/43	
Oct. 10/40	
Oct. 10/40 _
Nov. 17/38 ...
Oct. 10/40 —
Mar. 4/20
Oct. 10/40 .__.
Nov. 28/40—
Aug. 14/41 __.
July 15/43 —
Feb. 11/37	
July 20/42_	
June 14/37	
Aug. 2/43	
March 18/40..
June 27/40 —
Sept. 28/42 —
Nov. 7/38	
Aug. 1/39	
Aug. 21/39 —
May 27/40 —
May 27/40'	
Sept. 11/39 —
Nov. 28/40 —
March 3/38 —
March 3/38 —
Sept. 21/42...
Oct. 10/40 _	
May 3/43	
Sept. 28/42....
Sept. 28/42...
Nov. 18/37	
Feb. 14/38
May 19/38 ....
June 14/43 to
Sept. 11/43
Sept. 21/42—
Sept. 21/42 ...
March 10/41.
Aug. 2/43	
Sept. 26/35 ._..
Nov. 2/42	
July 1/35	
Oct. 20/38	
Jan.30/36	
June 2/41	
June 1/40 ______
Feb. 5/40	
Sept. 5/35 —
April 6/39	
May 1/40 _	
March 13/41..
Sept. 11/39 .__.
July 5/43	
Aug. 2/43	
Aug. 2/43	
Oct. 10/40 ...__
Oct. 10/40 —
Nov. 17/38 ....
Oct. 10/40	
April 5/20
Oct. 10/40
Nov. 28/40	
Aug. 18/41 —
Aug. 2/43 ...
Male and female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male. F 78
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Province of British Columbia.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
BE IT KNOWN that, pursuant to and by
virtue of the powers and authority vested
in the Board of Industrial Relations by the
" Hours of Work Act," the said Board has
made the following regulations, namely:—■
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
[1   (a)  Consolidated for convenience only.    See Regulation
No. 26.]
1. (a.) Persons employed in sawmills, plan-
ing-mills, shingle-mills, and logging industry,
including all operations in or incidental to the
carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and
booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles, situate in that part of the
Province lying east of the Cascade Mountains
may work one hour per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act, but
the total hours worked in any week shall not
exceed fifty-four (54).
(6.) In the industrial undertakings referred
to in clause (a) of this regulation, the limit of
hours of work thereby fixed may be exceeded by
one hour per day on five days of each week for
the purpose of making a shorter work-day on
one day of the week, but the total hours worked
in any week shall not exceed fifty-four  (54).
(e.) In sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-
mills situate in that part of the Province lying
east of the Cascade Mountains, and which are
operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen, and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and
oilers may work overtime to the extent of one
and one-half hours per day, to cover preparatory and complementary work, in addition to
the said fifty-four (54) hours per week set
forth in clauses (a) and (6) of this regulation.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-
mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may
work a total of forty-eight (48) hours each
week in five nights, in lieu of forty-eight (48)
hours each week in six nights, but the number
of hours worked in any night must not exceed
ten (10).
Logging.
3. Persons employed in:—
(1.)  The logging industry in :—
(a.)   Booming operations;   or
(6.)   Transporting  logs  by  logging-
railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or
river-driving;   or
(c.)   Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d.)  Or in the operation and upkeep
of donkey-engines:
Fish-canning.
(2.) Canning fish or manufacturing byproducts from fish, but not those engaged in salting fish;   and in
Cook and Bunk Houses.
(3.) Cook and bunk houses in connection
with any industrial undertaking,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed
by section 3 of the said Act to the extent necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
Engineers, Firemen, and Oilers.
4. In all industrial undertakings which use
steam as a motive power and which are operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen,
and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and oilers
may work overtime to the extent of one and
one-half hours per day to perform preparatory
or complementary work, in addition to the
maximum hours of work prescribed by section
3 of the Act.
Shipping Staff.
5. Persons employed as members of the
shipping staff in industrial undertakings where
shipping operations are of an intermittent
nature may work such hours in addition to the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the said
Act as (but only so many as) shall be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-hours
limited by section 3 of the Act are being unduly
exceeded, the Board shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the industrial
undertaking from the provisions of this regulation for such period of time as the Board
considers advisable.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons employed
in ship-yards, engineering-works, machine-
shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal
works, belt-works, saw-works, and plants of a
like nature may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but not more than) may be
necessary to prevent serious loss to, or interruption in the operation of, the industrial
undertaking for which the repairs are being
made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture of
wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables
may work during the months of June, July,
August, and September in each year such hours
in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3
of the said Act as may from time to time be
necessary to fill urgent orders. Seasonal Soft Drinks Delivery.
Note.—Regulation 8 cancelled by 8a, February 13th, 1936.
Laundries.
Note.—Regulation 9 cancelled by 9a, September 26th, 1940.
Seasonal Lithographing.
10. During the months of May, June, July,
August, September, and October in each year
persons employed in the lithographing industry
may work such hours in excess of the hours
prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may
from time to time be necessary to fill urgent
orders. This exemption shall only apply when
sufficient competent help is not available.
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by
the Board by the granting of written temporary
exemption permits limiting by their terms the
extent thereof, but only upon being satisfied
by application in writing, signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly authorized, of
the urgency and necessity for the exception,
that it is of a temporary nature, and that no
other means of adequately overcoming such
temporary urgent condition is, or has been,
reasonably available, and that the additional
working-hours applied for will not be more
than will suffice for the extra pressure of work
requiring the same.
Overtime Record.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in
the manner required by subsection (1) of
section 9 of the said Act of all additional hours
worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said
Act or in pursuance of any regulation.
12a. Every employer shall furnish the Board
with a copy of his pay-roll, or record in such
form prescribed by the Board, showing the
hours worked and the nature of the work performed by his employees in respect of section 6
of the Act, or Regulations Nos. 6 and 11 of the
Board, not later than fifteen (15) days after
such hours have been worked. (Effective December 12th, 1940.)
13. Every employer shall notify, by means
of the posting of notices in conspicuous places
in the works or other suitable place, where the
same may readily be seen by all persons
employed by him, the hours at which work
begins and ends, and, where work is carried on
by shifts, the hours at which each shift begins
and ends; also such rest intervals accorded
during the period of work as are not reckoned
as part of the working-hours; these hours shall
be so fixed that the duration of the work shall
not exceed the limits prescribed by the " Hours
of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall not
be changed except upon twenty-four hours'
notice of such change posted as hereinbefore
specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the
Act or Regulation 11 above, a like notice of the
change in working-hours shall be posted, which
notice shall also state the grounds on which
the exemption was granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia,
this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th, 1934.
Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 14.
Occupation of Barbering.
The occupation of barbering is hereby added
to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 24th
day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th
day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd, 1934.
Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15.
Mercantile Industry.
The mercantile industry is hereby added to
the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 7th
day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th
day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th, 1934.
Effective August 9th, 1934.)
Regulations Nos. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d
cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e.
Mercantile Industry.
Note.—Regulation 15e cancelled by 29, September 30th, 1939.
Regulations Nos. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, and,
16e cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f.
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores.
1. Persons employed in drug-stores as registered apprentices, certified clerks, or licentiates
of pharmacy may work not more than ninety-
six (96) hours in any two (2) successive
weeks, but in no case shall the hours of work
of any such registered apprentice, certified
clerk, or licentiate of pharmacy exceed fifty-
two (52) hours in any one week, or nine (9)
hours in any one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made
and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of
August, 1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd
day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th, 1939.
Effective April 6th, 1939.) F 80
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
REGULATION No. 17.
REGULATION No. 18a.
Baking Industry.
The baking industry, by which expression is
meant all operations in or incidental to the
manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or
cakes, is hereby added to the Schedule of the
said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the
said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 6th day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 17a.
Baking Industry.
Employees employed in the baking industry
as deliverymen may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 18.
Catering Industry.
The catering industry, which includes all
operations in or incidental to the preparation
or to the serving, or to both preparation and
serving, of meals or refreshments where the
meals or refreshments are served or intended
to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-
house, dance-hall, cabaret, banquet-hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunch-room, lunch-counter, icecream parlour, soda-fountain, or in any other
place where food is served and a charge is
made for the same either directly or indirectly,
whether such charge is made against the
persons who partake of the meals or refreshments or against some other person, is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on the
1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective December 1st, 1934.)
Catering Industry.
Employees in the catering industry, working
on a split shift, are hereby exempt from the
provisions df section 3 of the "Hours of Work
Act Amendment Act, 1937," being chapter 30
of the Statutes of British Columbia, 1937, to
the extent that their working-hours on a split
shift shall be confined within fourteen (14)
hours immediately following commencement of
work; but this exception shall not be applicable unless every employee whose split shift
extends over twelve (12) hours is paid at the
rate of not less than one and one-half times
his regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within twelve (12)
hours immediately following commencement of
work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 5th
day of May, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 6th, 1938.
Effective May 6th, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 19.
Retail Florists.
Persons employed in the establishments of
retail florists may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but only so many as) shall
be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise
overcome: Provided that the working-hours
of such persons shall not exceed ninety-six (96)
hours on the average in any two successive
weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-
hours limited by section 3 of the Act are being
unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written
notification to the management, exclude the
employer's establishment from the provisions
of this regulation for such period of time as
the Board considers advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective November 15th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 20.
The Occupation of Elevator Operator.
The occupation of elevator operator is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 28th
day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 28th,
1935.    Effective February 28th, 1935.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 81
Regulations Nos. 21, 21b, 21c, 21d, 21e, 21f,
2lG, and 2lH cancelled by
REGULATION No. 2U.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The fruit and vegetable industry, which
means and includes the work of employees
engaged in canning, preserving, drying, or
packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable,
is hereby exempt from the operation of the
" Hours of Work Act " up to and including the
31st day of March, 1944.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 6th
day of April, 1943.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 8th, 1943.
Effective April 8th, 1943, to March 31st, 1944.)
REGULATION No. 22.
Transportation Industry.
The transportation industry, which includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any
other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further
transported to some destination other than the
place at which such aforementioned carriage
or delivery terminates, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 23.
Transportation Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation the
expression " transportation industry " includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air,
any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles,
6
or material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or
public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and
the carrying or delivering to or collecting from
any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air,
or road transport, for the purpose of being
further transported to some destination other
than the place at which such aforementioned
carriage or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation industry, other than those employed as (a) operators of motor-cycles, (6) bicycle-riders and
foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers of
vehicles employed in the retail delivery of milk,
are hereby permitted to work six (6) hours
per week in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," in accordance with the provisions of
Order No. 26 of the said Board of Industrial
Relations dated the 19th day of June, 1935,
fixing minimum wages in the transportation
industry: Provided that no such employee in
the transportation industry shall work more
than ten  (10)  hours in any one day.
3. That employees in the transportation industry employed as drivers of vehicles in the
retail delivery of milk are hereby permitted to
work fifteen (15) hours per week in excess of
the hours prescribed by section 3 of the said
"Hours of Work Act, 1934": Provided that
over a period of seven (7) weeks no such employee shall work more than three hundred and
seventy-eight (378) hours, nor more than ten
(10) hours in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24.
Occupation of Hotel Clerk.
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes
the work of all persons engaged as room clerks
(day or night), mail clerks, information clerks,
cashiers, book-keepers, accountants, telephone
operators, and any other persons employed in
clerical work in hotels, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 26th,
1935.   Effective September 26th, 1935.) F 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REGULATION No. 26.
REGULATION No. 28b.
1. That Regulation No. 1 (a) of the Board,
dated the 14th day of June, 1934, is hereby
amended by striking out the word " and"
before the word " shingle-mills," and inserting
after the word " shingle-mills " the words " and
logging industry, including all operations in
or incidental to the carrying-on of logging;
pole, tie, shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile
cutting; and all operations in or incidental to
driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles,
ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles."
2. That this regulation shall become effective on publication in The British Columbia
Gazette on the 24th day of March, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 23rd
day of March, 1938.
REGULATION No. 28.
Taxicab Industry.
The taxicab industry, which includes the
work of all employees in charge of or driving
a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven
(7) passengers or less than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public,
and which is driven or operated for hire, is
hereby added as item No. 12 to the Schedule
of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 3rd
day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
REGULATION No. 28a.
Taxicab Industry.
Persons employed in the taxicab industry,
which includes the work of all employees in
charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven (7) passengers or less
than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or
operated for hire, may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act, but in no case shall
the daily hours worked by any such employee
in the taxicab industry exceed nine (9) in any
one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
Note.—The taxicab industry having been
brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is
now subject to the following provision of that
Statute:—
" The working-hours of employees working
on a split shift shall be confined within twelve
hours immediately following commencement of
work."
Taxicab Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation, the
expression " taxicab industry " shall have the
meaning as assigned to it in Regulation No.
28 of the Board, dated the 22nd day of August,
1938.
2. That persons employed in the taxicab industry in the City of Victoria, the Municipality
of the Township of Esquimalt, the Municipality
of the District of Oak Bay, and the Municipality of the District of Saanich, may Work:—■
(a.) Two (2) hours per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the
" Hours of Work Act," provided that
such ten (10) hours are confined within
eleven (11) hours immediately following commencement of their work:
In excess of the ten (10) hours permitted by clause (a) hereof, provided
they are paid not less than the minimum rate for overtime—namely, forty-
five cents (45c.) per hour—prescribed
by section 5 of Order No. 60 of the
Board, dated the 15th day of November, 1938.
3. Regulation No. 28A of the Board, made
the 22nd day of August, 1938, is hereby varied
accordingly.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 15th
day of November, 1938.
(6.)
REGULATION No. 29.
Mercantile Industry.
Persons employed in the mercantile industry,
which includes all establishments operated for
the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade
in the Province of British Columbia, with the
exception of the City of Vancouver, the City of
North Vancouver, Municipality of the District
of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the
Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt,
the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay,
and the Municipality of the District of Saanich,
may work three (3) hours per day in excess
of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said
Act, on Saturday of each week and on the day
preceding a statutory holiday, when such statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but the
total hours worked in any one week shall not
exceed forty-eight  (48).
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 8th
day of November, 1939.
COMPILED AUGUST 2nd, 1943.
By BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 83
INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION BRANCH.
Head Office   - - -Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary-Registrar.  ...,_ _ _B. H. E. Goult.
Branch Office  -789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Chief Conciliation  Officer _   ...James  Thomson.
Victoria, B.C., May 31st, 1943.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the fifth annual report of the Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1943.
Due to the intensification of the present conflict and its effect upon our economy,
there was a sharp up-trend in the number of strikes.
By virtue of its war-time powers, the Dominion extended its authority and the
majority of these strikes came within its jurisdiction. Considering the number of
industrial disputes and of persons affected, the time-loss was relatively small.
Of the fifty strikes recorded during 1942, thirteen were within the ambit of the
Province. A total of 18,804 employees were affected by these disputes, and of that
number 1,030 were within the authority of British Columbia. Of the total of 35,024
man-days lost, 1,929 were attributable to the thirteen strikes within our jurisdiction.
The industrial trend is sharply reflected in the increase of membership in organizations of employees.    Details may be found elsewhere in this report.
Complaints brought to the attention of the Branch decreased from 105 in 1941
to seventy-three. In 1941, sixty-one disputes were referred to conciliation commissioners;  in 1942, a total of thirty-eight disputes were referred to these officers.
Boards of Arbitration begun in 1941 numbered twenty. In 1942, twelve disputes
were referred to arbitration. In one instance, a dispute was settled before the Board
of Arbitration was designated. Of the eleven awards made, seven were unanimous.
In addition, details are given of the findings of two Boards, held since January, 1943.
An important Court action of interest to both industry and labour took place in
1942. On October 27th, Mr. Justice Coady, of the Supreme Court of British Columbia,
dismissed an action brought by Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd., for an injunction
restraining a Board of Arbitration appointed under the Act from proceeding with the
arbitration, and for a declaration that no dispute existed between the Company and
its employees. The judgment was subsequently affirmed by the Court of Appeal.
In view of the interest in the case, details have been set forth under " Boards of
Arbitration, No. 7, 1942," elsewhere in this report.
Important amendments to the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " were
made during the sessions of the Twentieth Legislature, which concluded its labours on
March 18th, 1943. A summary of new labour legislation is included elsewhere in this
report.
The report of this Branch also includes:—
(1.)  The record of industrial disputes, 1933-42.
(2.)  The record of strikes, 1942.
(3.)   The record of conciliation, 1942.
(4.)   The record of the findings of Boards of Arbitration, 1942, in summary.
(5.)  The record of organizations of employers and employees. F 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
A table showing the record of industrial disputes in British Columbia since 1933
follows:—
Number of Disputes, Number of Employees affected, and Time lost
IN WORKING-DAYS, 1933-42.*
Year.
No. of
Disputes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1942 _  	
1941 	
1940	
50
8
1
4
11
16
16
23
17
14
18,804
1,408
204
822
837
1,188
5,741
7,321
4,427
2,397
35,024
7,594
8,510
13,803
8,236
30,022
75,311
140,706
73,977
25,760
1939_     _ _	
1938f                                    __ - —	
1937	
1936 	
1935   	
1934   	
1933                                	
* The record of the Department includes lockouts as well as strikes. A lockout, or an industrial condition that
is undeniably a lockout, is rarely encountered, and strikes and lockouts are therefore recorded together in the
statistical tables. The term " dispute" is used in reference to either strike or lockout. Figures shown are
inclusive of all disputes which have come to the attention of the Department. Methods taken to obtain this
information preclude the possibility of serious omission. Since it is not always possible to secure exact information
concerning the duration of a dispute or the number of employees involved, revisions are sometimes made in the
light of later information.
Estimates of time lost are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute lasts by the number of
employees directly involved and not replaced. The number of employees indirectly affected are not included in the
computations.
f 1938 was the first calendar year in which the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " became effective.
An analysis of disputes within the jurisdiction of the Province reveals the fact
that the greatest loss of time occurred in the manufacturing industry.
Analysis of Disputes in British Columbia in 1942 by Various Industries.*
Industry.
No. of Disputes.
No. of Employers
affected.
No. of Employees
affected.
Time lost in Man-
working Days.
Manufacturing-
Logging	
Service -	
Totals..
13
15
682
324
24
1,030
1,463
450
16
1,929
* Provincial jurisdiction only. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 85
I. SUMMARY OF DISPUTES.
A summary of all disputes commencing in 1942 and causing loss of time follows:—
Summary of Disputes commencing in 1942.
provincial.
Industry or
Occupation.
Sash and door factory
workers, Vancouver
Loggers, Vedder
Crossing
Biscuit and confectionery workers,
Vancouver
Plywood-factory
workers, Vancouver
Loggers, Whonnoek..
Plywood-factory
workers, Vancouver
Loggers, Menzies Bay.
Waitresses, Dawson
Creek
Waitresses, Nanaimo..
Canning-factory
workers,
Penticton
Creosote-workers,
Galloway
Loggers, Jordan
River
Shingle-mill workers,
Ruskin
Totals...,.	
Particulars.
No. of
Employers
affected.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Commenced February 24th; against refusal of employer
to accept award of Board of Arbitration under " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " of British
Columbia; for Union recognition, 44-hour week, and
cost-of-living bonus; terminated March 7th; replacement ; in favour of employer
Commenced March 9th; for increased piece-rates; terminated March 10th ; negotiations ; in favour of workers
Commenced March 9th; objection to alleged discrimination against Union workers on seniority and reduction
of staff; return of workers ; employment conditions no
longer affected in mid-April; in favour of employer
Commenced April 17th; against refusal of Regional War
Board to grant increases to bring wage-scale level to
that paid in neighbouring plant; terminated April
17th; return of workers; indefinite
Commenced April 30th; for increase in piece-rates;
mediation (Provincial) ; return of workers, May 11th,
pending reference to Regional War Labour Board;
indefinite
Commenced May 4th; followed request that seniority
should be observed in reduction of staff; terminated
May 4th; negotiations; return of workers pending
submission of dispute to conciliation and later arbitration (Provincial) ; indefinite
Commenced June 9th ; for cost-of-living bonus and agreement with employees' committee; terminated June
11th; conciliation (Provincial); partial return of
workers ; in favour of employer
Commenced July 20th; for increased wages and shorter
hours; terminated July 21st; negotiations ; in favour
of employees
Commenced July 21st; for increased wages; terminated
July 23rd; mediation by representative of Provincial
Department of Labour; workers returned pending
reference to Regional War Labour Board; in favour
of employees
Commenced August 4th ; for Union agreement, increased
wages, and improved working conditions ; terminated
August 5th ; conciliation (Provincial) ; agreement.signed
with employees providing for wage increase, subject to
approval of Regional War Labour Board
Commenced August 24th ; against deductions for arrears
of unemployment insurance; for wage increase; terminated August 26th; negotiations; wages increased,
subject to approval of Regional War Labour Board;
compromise
Commenced September 24th; for increased wages; terminated September 24th; negotiations ,* in favour of
employer
Commenced October 19th ; against hiring of shingle-mill
foreman; terminated October 21st; negotiations; in
favour of employees
17
24
63
21
240
Time lost
in Working-days.
157
24
505
300
2:>
SO
1,030
300
249
30
84
1,929 F 86
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Summary of Disputes commencing in 1942-
FEDERAL.
-Continued.
Industry or
Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employers
No. of
Employees
Time lost
in Work
affected.
affected.
ing-days.
Herring-packers,
Commenced January 18th for improved piece-rates; ter
1
150
18
Prince Rupert
minated January  18th; work resumed pending reference to Regional War Labour Board ; indefinite
Truck-drivers, North
Commenced February 23rd ; for increased wages ; termi
1
12
12
Vancouver
nated   February   24th;   conciliation    (Federal),   work
resumed  pending reference  to  Regional War  Labour
Board; indefinite
Carpenters and ship
Commenced February 27th; against demotion of change-
1
88
44
wrights, Vancouver
hand ;   terminated   February   27th;   conciliation    (Federal), work resumed pending investigation; indefinite
Coal-miners (winch
Commenced May  18th ; for  increased wages ; terminated
1
14
20
boys), South Wel
May   19th;   return   of   workers   pending   reference  to
lington
National War Labour Board ; indefinite
Coal-miners, Nanaimo.
Commenced May 20th; for increased wages; terminated
May   21st;   return   of   workers   pending   reference  to
National War Labour Board; indefinite
1
150
200
Coal-miners, Prince
Commenced May 18th ; for wages and cost-of-living bonus
1
12
24
ton
as  paid  in  neighbouring mine ; terminated May 20th ;
wage-scale   to   be   referred   to   National   War   Labour
Board ; in favour of workers
Welders, Vancouver
Commenced  June   12th;   in   protest  against  closed-shop
agreement   and   dismissals   on   June   4th;   terminated
August 5th; conciliation   (Federal) ; in favour of employer
1
200
800
Shipyard-workers,
Commenced June 15th; re resignation of foreman ,* ter
1
1,700
500
Vancouver
minated  June   15th ;  return  of  workers ;  in  favour of
employer
Welders, North Van
Commenced   June   10th;   against   closed-shop   agreement;
1
200
300
couver
terminated    June    18th;    conciliation     (Federal) ;    in
favour of workers
Boiler-makers, iron
Commenced  June  18th;  for  enforcement of  closed-shop
1
2,000
1,000
workers, etc., North
agreement; terminated June 18th ; negotiations ; return
Vancouver
of workers pending settlement; indefinite
Boiler-makers, iron
Commenced   June   18th;   for   enforcement  of   closed-shop
1
1,000
60
workers, etc., Van
agreement; terminated June 18th ; negotiations ; return
couver
of workers pending settlement; indefinite
Machinists and black
Commenced   June   23rd;   in   protest   against   seven-day
3
900
1,800
smiths, Vancouver
i week;   terminated   July   3rd;   conciliation   (Federal) ;
return  of workers  pending thirty-day trial;  indefinite
Pipe-fitters, Vancou
Commenced June 24th ; in sympathy with strike against
1
400
50
ver
seven-day   week;   terminated    June    24th;   return   of
workers pending settlement; indefinite
Welders and electri
Commenced July 8th ; in sympathy with welders allegedly
4
700
1,000
cians, Vancouver
locked  out  June   12th;  terminated  July   10th;  return
of workers ; indefinite
Bolt-factory workers,
Commenced July 11th ; for dismissal of foreman ; termi
1
68
34
Vancouver
nated July 11th ; suspension of foreman pending investigation ; indefinite
Shipyard-workers,
Commenced   July   30th;   for   reinstatement   of   official;
1
400
150
Victoria
terminated  July 30th;  return  of workers ;  in favour
of employers
Holders-on and plate-
Commenced August 5th ; for increased wages ; terminated
1
200
125
hangers, Vancouver
August 5th; work resumed pending settlement; indefinite
Commenced August 16th; for revision of wage-scale in
Coal-miners, Nanaimo
1
1,300
2,600
and Cumberland
agreement; terminated August 18th ; conciliation (Federal) ; return of workers pending reference to National
War Labour Board ; indefinite
Coal pier-loaders,
Commenced  August   17th;  for  increased  wages;  termi
1
30
200
Union Bay
nated August 22nd; conciliation   (Federal) ; return of
workers  pending  reference  to   National  War  Labour
Board ; indefinite
Lumber-yard workers,
Commenced  August  31st because  of  income tax  deduc
1
10
10
Fernie
tions ; terminated  September  1st; return of workers ;
in favour of employers *
REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 87
Summary of Disputes commencing in 1942-
-Continued.
FEDERAL—Continued.
No. of
No. of
Time lost
Industry or
Particulars.
Employers
Employees
in Work
Occupation.
affected.
affected.
ing-days.
Hop-pickers, Sumas
Commenced September 9th; for increase in piece-rates ;
1
400
200
Prairie
terminated September 9th; replacement; in favour of
employer
Salmon-fishermen,
Commenced  September  21st;  against  reduction  in  price
11
3,260
10,000
Fraser River
of salmon ; terminated September 30th; negotiations ;
compromise
Passer-boys, Vancou
Commenced September  12th-14th; for increased wages;
3
195
150
ver
terminated   September   13th-14th;   conciliation    (Federal ) ;   return   of   workers   pending  reference  to   National War  Labour  Board ; indefinite
Passer-boys, Vancou
Commenced September 21st-22nd; for increased wages;
4
360
200
ver
terminated   September   21st-22nd;   conciliation    (Federal ) ;   return   of   workers   pending   reference   to   National War Labour Board ;  indefinite
1
Pipe-fitters' helpers,
Commenced  September 22nd ; for increased wages; ter
1
150
100
Vancouver
minated     September    22nd;     conciliation     (Federal) ;
return of workers pending reference to National War
Labour Board
Riveters, Vancouver ~
Commenced September 23rd ; for payment for time lost
when   passer-boys   were   on   strike   September   22nd;
terminated   September   23rd;   negotiations;   in   favour
of emplover
1
240
60
Coal-miners, Prince
Commenced October 1st; for increased wages and Union
3
120
120
ton
recognition; terminated October 1st; conciliation (Federal) ; return of workers pending reference to Federal
I.D.I. Board ; indefinite
Coal-miners, Prince
Commenced October 6th; for increased wages and Union
3
120
120
ton
recognition ; terminated October 8th ; conciliation (Federal) ; return of workers pending reference to Federal
I.D.I. Board ; indefinite
Coal-miners, Nanaimo
Commenced   October  21st;  for  increased  wages;  terminated October  29th ; conciliation   (Federal) ; return of
workers pending application to National War Labour
Board ; indefinite
1
640
5,000
Coal-miners, Cumber
Commenced October 22nd ; in sympathy with miners on
1
650
4,500
land
strike at Nanaimo,  October 21st; terminated October
29th; conciliation   (Federal) ; return of workers pending application to National War Labour Board; indefi
Passer-boys, Vancou
nite
Commenced  October 10th; for increased wages; termi
1
122
50
ver
nated October 10th; return of workers ; in favour of
employer
Longshoremen, Vic
Commenced October 14th ; re wages ; terminated October
1
12
45
toria
17th ;  negotiations ;  return  of  workers  pending  settlement ; indefinite
•
Coal-miners, Prince
Commenced  November  2nd ;  for  Union  recognition   and
3
120
360
ton
closed-shop  agreement; terminated November 5th ; negotiations ; compromise
Machinists, Vancou
Commenced November 11th ; for payment of double time
3
567
567
ver and North
on  Remembrance Day as  provided  in  agreement; ter
Vancouver
minated November 12th ; return of workers ; indefinite
Coal-miners, Prince
Commenced November 17th ; for increased wages, Union
3
120
360
ton
recognition    and    closed-shop    agreement;   terminated
November   20th;   return   of   workers   on   signing   of
Union   agreement  and  pending  application  for  wage
increase to National War Labour Board; indefinite
Steel-mill workers,
Commenced  November  27th ; for Union  agreement;  ter
1
1      1.140
2,280
Vancouver
minated November 30th; conciliation (Federal) ; return
of workers pending further negotiations ; indefinite
1
Wharf dumpers and
Commenced December 5th; for increased wages ; termi
1
1            24
36
trimmers, Union
nated December 6th ; return of workers pending refer
Bay
Totals.....	
Gross totals ...
ence to National War Labour Board ; indefinite
|
67
|    17,774
33,095
82
|    18,804
!
[     35,024
*
, F 88 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
I. STRIKES, 1942.*
SASH AND DOOR FACTORY WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
No. 1.—On December 18th, 1941, a Board of Arbitration appointed under the
provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " to arbitrate a dispute
between a Vancouver sash and door factory and its employees handed down a majority
award, the employer's arbitrator dissenting. The employees accepted the award but
the employer rejected it.
(The Board had recommended recognition of the employees' Trade-union as the
sole collective bargaining agency; the signing of a proposed Union agreement; a
44-hour week with overtime for time worked in excess of that limit; together with
other suggestions relating to working conditions.f)
No agreement was reached upon the recommendations of the Board, and seventeen
employees struck February 24th, 1942. The strike was called off on March 7th and the
employees sought work elsewhere. The workers were replaced. In favour of the
employer.
LOGGERS, VEDDER CROSSING.
No. 2.—Twenty-four employees of a logging concern at this point struck March 9th,
following a demand for increased piece-rates. The men returned to work the following
day, after the employer had promised to adjust piece-rates as fairly as possible.
In favour of the workers.
BISCUIT AND CONFECTIONERY WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
No. 3.—Because of a shortage of sugar, it was found necessary to restrict the
operations at this plant. As a result a number of employees were laid off. Objection
was taken to the lay-off on behalf of some of the employees involved. It was also
alleged by some workpeople that discrimination had taken place. On March 9th, further
representations were made by a committee of the employees on the points of issue.
They were informed nothing further could be done. Thereupon sixty-three employees
asked for their wages and did not report for work on the morning of March 10th.
The Company claimed that by this action the employees had broken the terms of an
agreement in effect between the Company and its workers.
Some of the employees eventually returned. Others sought employment elsewhere.
It was reported that employment conditions were no longer affected by mid-April.
In favour of the employer.
PLYWOOD-FACTORY WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
Nos. 4 and 6.—Stoppages of work occurred at this plant on April 17th and May 4th.
Objection had been taken by the employees to the cancellation of the third shift, which
was caused by the shortage of peeler-logs. Certain of the workers also declared that the
Company should have recognized the principle of seniority in reducing staff, and that
the employer should recognize a Union committee rather than an employees' committee.
Additionally, a proposed Union agreement, covering wages and working conditions,
was submitted to the employer.
The dispute was apprehended by the Provincial Minister of Labour and a Conciliation Commissioner was appointed. To ascertain the wishes of the majority of the
employees affected as to what committee they wished to represent them, balloting was
held under the direction of the Conciliation Commissioner.    It was found that 369 were
* Disputes under Provincial jurisdiction only.
t See Boards of Arbitration, No. 17, 1941.    Page 100, Department of Labour Report, 1941. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 89
in favour of representation by a Union committee and 143 in favour of representation
by an employees' committee.
Negotiations in connection with the proposed agreement proved abortive and the
matter was referred to a Board of Arbitration. Findings of the Board favoured the
employer.
(For further details regarding this dispute see " Boards of Arbitration, No. 5,
1942.")
LOGGERS, WHONNOCK.
No. 5.—Twenty-one employees of a logging concern at this point struck April 30th,
following a demand for an increase in piece-rates. A representative of the Provincial
Department of Labour prevailed upon them to return to work pending reference of their
claim to the Regional War Labour Board. This they agreed to do. Work resumed
May 11th.    Indefinite.
LOGGERS, MENZIES BAY.
No. 7.—On May 28th, application was made by representatives of certain employees
at this operation for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner. Matters in dispute
involved a request for the signing of a proposed agreement between the Company and
representatives of its logging employees, and a complaint that the Company " had failed
to grant audience to the employees' bargaining agency."
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed and in company with another departmental official had several meetings with the employees' representatives. The Company questioned the constitution of the bargaining representatives and it was agreed
that a ballot should be taken to clarify the matter.
One of the committee had previously been discharged and the employees' representatives demanded that this dismissal be made a matter of dispute also. It was suggested
that the matter be discussed with the management when the employees' committee had
been endorsed by the majority of the employees affected, and this course was agreed
upon.
At a meeting held for the taking of the ballot the employees' representatives
prevailed upon the workers not to vote. The men staged a 24-hour strike the next
morning, and the employer closed down the operation. There were 249 employees
affected.
Due to the fact that there was no ratification of the bargaining committee by the
employees, further negotiation was impossible.
A number of the crew remained on the job. Other workmen who left the operation
were replaced.    In favour of the employer.
WAITRESSES, DAWSON CREEK.
No. 8.—A strike of sixteen waitresses employed by three cafes at this point took
place July 20th, for shorter hours and increased wages. Following an explanation of
Provincial regulations covering hours and wages, and further negotiation, the employees returned to work July 21st.    In favour of employees.
WAITRESSES, NANAIMO.
No. 9.—Eight employees of one cafe struck July 21st for increased wages and
against the hiring of new waitresses at a rate allegedly higher than that paid employees
who had been with the cafe for some length of time. The employees who had struck
were replaced. Following representations by a departmental officer, the workers
returned to their employment pending reference of the matter to the Regional War
Labour Board.    In favour of the employees. F 90 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CANNERY-WORKERS, PENTICTON.
No. 10.—Eighty-four workers in a Penticton canning plant struck August 4th for
a proposed Union agreement, which included provisions covering wages and conditions
of work.
Application had been made the day prior to the strike for the appointment of a
Conciliation Commissioner.    The strike terminated August 5th.
On August 15th, the Conciliation Commissioner reported that the disputant parties
had signed a contract agreeing to conditions of employment that were to obtain until
March, 1944. The wage conditions contained in the contract were to be submitted to
the Regional War Labour Board, and, if approved, would become effective from July
12th, 1942.    In favour of employees.
MILL AND CREOSOTE WORKERS, GALLOWAY.
No. 11.—Twenty-two workers at this plant struck August 24th against the deduction from wages of arrears for unemployment insurance, and for a wage increase.
An increase was granted subject to the endorsation of the Regional War Labour Board.
The matter of deductions for unemployment insurance was taken up with the proper
official.    The men returned to work August 26th.    In favour of the employees.
LOGGERS, JORDAN RIVER.
No. 12.—Thirty fallers and buckers employed by an operation at Jordan River
struck for increased wages, September 24th. The dispute was the subject of negotiation and the men returned to work the same day.    In favour of the employer.
SHINGLE-MILL WORKERS, RUSKIN.
No. 13.—Fifty-six employees at this point struck October 19th, when a new foreman took charge. Following negotiations with the employer, the strike terminated
October 21st, and the men returned to work.    In favour of the employees. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 91
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No dispute found to exist.
Referred  to  Board   of   Arbitration.
(Agreement signed before Board
was constituted.)
Referred to Board of Arbitration.
Settled.    Union  agreement signed.
Settled.
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Refusal of employer to accept terms of working
agreements similar to that effective in the same
trade in the Province of Quebec
Breakdown of negotiations on proposed Union agreement
Employer refused to accept terms of proposed Union
agreement as submitted
Employer's   refusal   to   accept   terms    of   proposed
Union agreement
Failure  of employer to agree to terms  of proposed
Union agreement
Failure to secure reinstatement of dismissed employee
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September 11_
September 18_.
October 29  .
November 12
November 20.
December 14
Totals
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C REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
P 93
III. BOARDS OF ARBITRATION.
Eleven Boards of Arbitration were designated during 1942.    The designation of
these Boards and the outcome of their deliberations is shown in the following table:—
No. of
Board.
Disputant Parties.
Outcome of Hearings.
10
11
Corporation of the District of West Vancouver and certain of its bus operators, mechanics, and helpers
The Vancouver General Hospital and certain ofits lay employees	
Metropolitan Stores, Ltd., Victoria, and certain of its retail clerks _	
Safety Cab Co., Victoria, and its taxi-drivers _ 	
MacMillan Industries, Ltd. (Plywood Division), Vancouver, and its plywood-
workers
The Corporation of the City of Victoria and its civic employees*	
Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd. (Red Band Shingle Mill), and its shingle-mill
employees
The Board of School Trustees of the City of Victoria and certain of its
employees, not school-teachers*
The Board of Commissioners of Police of Victoria and its employees*	
The Victoria Public Library Board and its employees*-	
Grant & Sons, Ltd., Vancouver, and its lithographers 	
1943.
Mohawk Lumber Co., Ltd., New Westminster, and certain of its mill employees ..
Central Transfer Co., Ltd., Vancouver, and certain of its cartage employees-
Majority award, employer's
arbitrator dissenting.
Unanimous award.
Majority award, employees'
arbitrator dissenting.
Unanimous award.
Majority award, employees'
arbitrator dissenting.
Unanimous award.
Majority award, employees'
arbitrator dissenting.
Unanimous award.
Unanimous award.
Unanimous award.
Unanimous award.
Majority award, employees'
arbitrator dissenting.
Unanimous award.
* The Boards of Arbitration adjudicating upon Arbitrations 6, 8, 9, and 10 were composed of the same members.
(Note.—One  other  dispute  was  referred  to  arbitration   in   addition  to  those
described.    In this instance the dispute was amicably settled before the Board was
constituted.)
A summary of the texts of awards and minority reports of Boards of Arbitration
follow:—
No. 1, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between The Corporation of the District of West Vancouver and
certain of its Bus Operators, Mechanics, and Helpers.
Details of the report and award designated to inquire into the above-mentioned
dispute will be found in the Annual Report of the Department of Labour for 1941 at
page 103.
No. 2, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between The Vancouver General Hospital and certain of its Lay
Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. George R. McQueen, chairman; Mr. G. Roy Long, employer's arbitrator; and Mr.
C. W. Pritchard, employees' arbitrator.
Certain of the lay male and female employees of the Vancouver General Hospital,
through their elected representatives, had submitted to the employer a request for an
additional wage of $10 per month to lay male employees and $6 per month to lay female
employees. The employer had refused these requests, and the Conciliation Commissioner, Mr. James Thomson, recommended the dispute be referred to arbitration. P 94 DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
The Board was thereupon designated and, upon May 2nd, submitted a unanimous
award.
Evidence showed that in June, 1941, the Hospital granted a general wage increase
of $5 per month to most of its lay male employees and $3 a month to its lay female
employees, and that it was out of negotiations for a further increase that the dispute
under consideration arose.
The Board recommended that, in addition to the increase in wages granted in
June, 1941, there be paid to lay male employees in receipt of wages of less than $2,100
per annum a further increase of $6 per month, and that there be paid to lay female
employees in receipt of wages of less than $2,100 per annum a further increase of $4
per month.
It was also recommended that any employee then receiving less than $2,100 per
annum, but whose wages, plus the increase, would exceed $2,100 per annum, should be
entitled to such part of the increase only as would, together with his present wage,
amount to $2,100 per annum.
The Board further recommended that the increases should be in effect to December
1st, 1942, " when the same may be reviewed with reference to changes in the cost of
living at that time," and that, further, the increases be made retroactive, pursuant to
section 39 (2) of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "—i.e., to the date
of application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner—in this case, February 11th, 1942.
No. 3, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between Metropolitan Stores, Ltd., Victoria. B.C., and certain of its
Retail Clerks.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
His Honour Judge H. H. Shandley, chairman; Mr. R. H. Pooley, K.C., employer's
arbitrator;   and Mr. James Robertson, employees' arbitrator.
The employees, through their elected representatives, submitted to their employer
a proposed closed-shop agreement covering wages and working conditions. The employer and the employees failed to agree upon the terms of the agreement, and the
Conciliation Commissioner, Mr. A. M. Whisker, recommended the dispute be referred
to arbitration.
The Board was thereupon designated.
On July 7th, Judge Shandley and Mr. R. H. Pooley submitted a majority award,
in which they declared they " were not convinced that a majority of the employees
were permitted to use their own judgment requesting the employer to enter into an
agreement containing clause 1. In other words, we think the majority of the employees
did not use their own free and independent judgment that they wished to enter the
agreement in question with paragraph I. included, and therefore we do not award that
the employer be compelled to enter into the agreement with a clause of that nature.
In other respects we determine that the remaining clauses are reasonable."
The clause to which objection was taken by these arbitrators reads as follows:—
" 1. (a.) If the EMPLOYER hires an employee who is not a member of the
CLERKS' LOCAL, such employee shall after sixty (60) days' employment, if satisfactory to the EMPLOYER, be asked by the CLERKS' LOCAL officials to become a member of the Local. If such employee objects to joining the Local, his or her objection
shall be taken up in the same manner as other disputes, and such employee shall be
given reasonable time to make up his or her mind; after which, if they do not agree
to join the Local, the EMPLOYER shall advise him or her to seek employment elsewhere. All employees who are now, or hereafter become members of the CLERKS'
LOCAL shall maintain continuous membership in the Local." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 95
Mr. James Robertson, the employees' arbitrator, submitted a minority report in
which he declared he was in disagreement with his colleagues on the maintenance of
membership clause. He said further: " It is my opinion that it is only such a clause
by which Union membership can be protected. As the proposed agreement is already
in effect in one of the Novelty stores, I cannot see where it could cause any hardship
on the firm to be in a similar agreement."
No. 4, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Safety Cab Company, Victoria, B.C., and its Taxicab-
drivers.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. P. E. George, chairman; Professor E. S. Farr, employer's representative; and
Mr. A. McAuslane, employees' representative.
The drivers, through their elected representatives, had submitted to their employer
a proposed Union agreement covering wages, hours, and working conditions. The
employer and the employees failed to agree upon the terms of the agreement, and the
Conciliation Commissioner, Mr. A. M. Whisker, recommended the dispute be referred
to arbitration.
The Board was thereupon designated and upon June 16th submitted a unanimous
award.
The Board found that " the agreement as submitted by the National Drivers'
Union, Local No. 1, is in accord with existing conditions under which the Company is
operating."
" Since," the award read, " no evidence has been submitted to this Board by the
Company, due, in our opinion, to the lack of co-operation with the Department of
Labour and with the Board of Arbitration on the part of the managing director of
the Safety Cab Company of this city, this Board is unable to understand the viewpoint of the said Company toward the proposed Union agreement between the Company
and its employees. . . . Therefore, on the evidence submitted, this Board unanimously
recommends that the Company adopt the said agreement ... as from the date of
application for a Conciliation Commissioner, viz., April 30th, 1942."
No. 5, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between MacMillan Industries, Limited (Plywood Division), and its
Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
His Honour Judge Bruce Boyd, chairman; Mr. R. H. Tupper, employer's arbitrator;
and Mr. Arthur'J. Turner, M.L.A., employees' representative.
Certain employees of the plywood division of MacMillan Industries, Limited, Vancouver, through their elected representatives, submitted to their employer a proposed
agreement covering Union recognition, wages, hours, and working conditions.
The employers and the employees failed to agree upon the terms of the agreement,
and the Conciliation Commissioner, Mr. James Thomson, therefore recommended that
the dispute be referred to arbitration.
The Board was thereafter designated. Judge Boyd and Mr. Tupper submitted
a majority award on September 2nd, and Mr. Turner, who disagreed with his colleagues, submitted a minority report on September 3rd.
Judge Boyd and Mr. Tupper declared that the subject-matter of the dispute was
a Union agreement covering Union recognition and other matters, and stated that F 96 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
evidence was heard also in respect to the question of wages and alleged discrimination
by the Company against certain employees and former employees.
They found that a misunderstanding of the situation which had existed regarding
wages since the Regional War Labour Boards were constituted was the prime cause
of the dispute, and they recommended that the Company and the employees represented
before them should make another application to the Regional War Labour Board
" in order that no doubt may exist in the mind of any employee that his or her wages
or cost-of-living bonus has not been carefully reviewed by the only body competent to
do so."
They found that there " has been no improper discrimination by the Company
against any employee or former employee "; that the Conference Committee system
was evolved by the employees and conducted successfully by them for many years;
and that no contract should be made between the Company and Local 1-217 of the
International Woodworkers of America. These arbitrators declared: ". . . this
Association was responsible for the genesis and continuation of the dispute."
Mr. Turner, in his minority report, declared that the matters submitted for the
consideration of the Board were wages, discrimination, and Union recognition.
He declared himself to be " substantially in agreement with other members of
the Board " on the question of wages.
In discussing the matter of alleged discrimination, Mr. Turner stated: " Evidence
shows that both B. Melsness, with five and one-half years of service with the Company
to his credit, and W. Bennett, who was one of the original employees, are good
workers," and declared that he considered discrimination " had been shown to both
these men who were particularly active in Union organization work and who have been
refused re-employment."
Mr. Turner in speaking of " Union recognition " stated that " the inadequacy of
the ' Conference Committee ' type of go-between for employer-employee relations is
clearly proven by a study of its minutes," and said further that " the position taken
by the Company in opposing Union recognition because of the type of its present
leaders, or leadership, or because of the present history of the Union, is not a legitimate reason for such opposition."
He found " the International Woodworkers of America operating in Canada is, in
its methods or organization and in its attitude to and for the war effort, completely in
accord with the Canadian Congress of Labour and the American Federation of Labour,
and in view of the fact that organized labour had important contributions to make in
regard to the building-up of the morale of the war workers " he recommended " the
immediate opening of negotiations between the Company and the Union for a joint
agreement."
No. 6, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between The Corporation of the City of Victoria and its Civic
Employees, including Firemen and Members of the Staff of The City Hall.
No. 8, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between The Board of School Trustees of the City of Victoria and
certain of its Employees, not School-teachers.
No. 9, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between The Board of Commissioners of Police of the City of Victoria
and certain of its Employees. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 97
No. 10, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between The Public Library Board of The City of Victoria and its
Employees.
The Boards of Arbitration designated to inquire into these disputes were composed
of the same personnel—namely, Mr. J. Howard Harman, chairman; Mr. P. R. Brown,
employers' arbitrator;   and Mr. E. F. Fox, employees' arbitrator.
The employees described in No. 6 above, through their elected representatives,
made formal application to the City Council for the payment of a war-time cost-of-
living bonus to all employees regardless of salary, on the basis of the cost-of-living
index of March 27th, 1941, which at that time stood at 16.4. The Council did not
accede to the employees' request.
The Conciliation Commissioner, Mr. James Thomson, therefore recommended that
the matter be referred to arbitration and the Board was thereupon designated.
Meanwhile, disputes of a precisely similar nature had been apprehended by the
Hon. the Minister of Labour between the parties described in .Nos. 8, 9, and 10 above,
and had been referred to Mr. Thomson as Conciliation Commissioner.
The School Board and the Library Board expressed themselves as being in favour
of the proposed increase in wages, but were unable to make such grants since they
were dependent upon the city for their appropriations.
All disputes were thereupon referred to Boards of Arbitration.
Upon the completion of hearings unanimous awards were submitted in each
instance.
In dealing with the dispute between the city and its employees the Board found
that the matter for decision was solely concerned with a request made by certain civic
employees, including firemen, " for a cost-of-living bonus of $16.25 per month for
each employee regardless of salary or marital status for the period commencing with
the date of application for a Conciliation Commissioner in respect to those groups of
employees and firemen respectively to the end of 1942." The request was based upon
the cost-of-living index for March, 1941, when the dispute arose. The bonus asked was
not granted, though some variation was made in the bonus rates in May, 1942, the
bonus payable to certain single individuals being reduced and that payable to most
or all of the married employees being increased. During 1942 the bonus payable to
single employees participating in the arbitration was $5 and to married employees, $10.
Employees earning $2,100 or more.
The Board awarded a cost-of-living bonus to those civic employees receiving $2,100
per annum or more, to be reckoned on the same basis as provided by Order in Council
No. 5963 for those employees of industry not receiving a cost-of-living bonus prior to
August 15th, 1942. The Board understood this bonus to be 60 cents per week and that
it would vary from time to time with the variation of the cost of living. The Order in
Council provided that the bonus be recalculated on the 15th days of February, May,
August, and November, and the award consequently provided for the bonus to be
recalculated November 15th, 1942, and for the application of the provisions of the Order
governing calculation and payment if the persons concerned were adult male employees
employed at rates of $25 per week or more. (These persons are defined in section 35
(ii) (a) of P.C. No. 5963.)
Consequently the award provided that the bonus be retroactive to August 15th,
1942, and that in order to comply with the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Act " the whole of the award be deemed to be retroactive to the date of
application for a Conciliation Commissioner, and to provide, in this case, that no bonus
should be payable between that date (July 23rd, 1942), and August 15th, 1942. F 98 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
In the event of the application for a Conciliation Commissioner being after August
15th, 1942, in respect to any employees earning $2,100 or more, it was awarded that
" the bonus shall nevertheless be payable from the 15th day of August, 1942."
Employees earning less than $2,100.
The award provided, in respect to those civic employees earning less than $2,100
per year, that a bonus should be paid from the date of application for the appointment
of a Conciliation Commissioner by the group concerned to December 31st, 1942, of
$7.50 per month to each employee defined in the Dominion " Income Tax Act" as a
person subject to income tax as a single person, and the sum of $15 per month to each
employee defined as subject to income tax on the basis of a married person whose
husband or wife is not in receipt of an income of $660 per year or more. It was
provided that in no case should the bonus serve to increase the total monthly remuneration of an employee being paid less than $2,100 above the level of the monthly
remuneration (basic salary plus bonus) paid to an employee in respect of a basic wage
or salary of $2,100 or more per year.
General.
The Board pointed out that certain salary deductions made in the years 1932 and
1933 had not been restored in full. While the difference amounted only to a fraction
of 1 per cent, of certain salaries, it had caused some feeling of injustice in the minds
of those affected. While admitting the matter was outside the scope of the dispute
submitted to the Board, the Board felt it was proper for it to make a recommendation
that this error be rectified as of November 1st, 1942, and that the salary rates in
question be restored in full.
Ancillary Provisions.
The Board suggested that future conditions might make it impossible for the city
to maintain an equivalent bonus rate in future years. Therefore, to avoid disruption
of the city budget after the tax rate had been set, the Board recommended that provision be made for:—
"(1.) A meeting of representatives of employees and a truly representative Committee of the City Council (other than the Finance Committee) to be held prior to the
date upon which the estimates are to be completed, to discuss and arrange what, if any,
cost-of-living bonus is properly payable during the year in question.
"(2.) That such a meeting should be callable by the employees by fifteen days'
written notice of request for such meeting, addressed and delivered to the City Clerk;
or by the City Council by fifteen days' notice in writing of such meeting or intention to
call such meeting. Such notice by the City Council to be given to the employees by
posting copies of such notice on all notice boards in the various Departments and
branches of the City Services usually used for similar purposes, in such manner that
it will be probable that it will be brought to the attention of all or most of the employees
concerned.
"(3.) The expiry date of such notices should not be later than the fifteenth day of
February in each and every year."
No. 8, 1942.
EMPLOYEES OF THE BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES.
The dispute in this case was identical with the dispute in the case of the arbitration
concerning certain employees of the City of Victoria, and the Board awarded to the
employees concerned in this dispute the same cost-of-living bonus as that awarded ±he
employees of the City Council.
It was also recommended that an annual meeting be held between the School Board
and its employees, to be arranged in the same manner as the meeting between the City REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 99
Council and its employees. Additionally, it was recommended that certain salary
reductions referred to under the heading " General " in the city dispute be restored
in full.
The award did not apply to the teachers employed by the Victoria City School
Board.
No. 9, 1942.
EMPLOYEES OF THE POLICE COMMISSION.
The award in this case provided bonuses in the same terms and in the same manner
as those awarded in the award rendered in the dispute between the Corporation of the
City of Victoria and certain of its employees, including firemen.
It was also recommended that an annual meeting be held between the Board of
Commissioners of Police and its employees, to be arranged in the same manner as the
meeting between the City Council and its employees. Additionally, it was recommended
that certain salary reductions referred to under the heading " General " in the city
dispute be restored in full.
No. 10, 1942.
EMPLOYEES OF THE LIBRARY BOARD.
The award in this case provided bonuses in the same terms and in the same manner
as those awarded in the award rendered in the dispute between the Corporation of the
City of Victoria and certain of its employees, including firemen.
It was also recommended that an annual meeting be held between the Library
Board and its employees, to be arranged in the same manner as the meeting between
representatives of the City Council and its employees. Additionally, it was recommended that certain salary reductions referred to under the heading " General" in the
city dispute be restored in full.
No. 7, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd., Red Band Shingle Mill,
Employer, and its Shingle-mill Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
the Hon. Mr. Justice Robertson, chairman; Mr. R. V. Stuart, employer's arbitrator;
and Mr. Herbert Gargrave, M.L.A., employees' arbitrator.
Certain shingle-mill employees of Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd., Red Band Shingle
Mill, through their elected representatives, submitted to their employer a proposed
Union agreement covering Union recognition, wages, hours, and working conditions.
The employer refused to accept the proposed agreement, and the Conciliation Commissioner, Mr. A. H. Dugdale, therefore recommended that the dispute be referred to
arbitration.
The Board was thereafter designated and held its initial meeting for the hearing
of evidence in the Court-house, Vancouver, October 13th. Counsel appearing for the
Company claimed that there was no dispute existing between the employees and the
employer, and consequently the Board had no jurisdiction to function in any way
whatever.
A writ was therefore issued against the members of the Board (as defendants)
in which the plaintiff Company made claim for an " injunction restraining the defendants from hearing any evidence, making any award, or performing any function in
connection with an alleged dispute between the plaintiff Company and its employees of
the shingle division of the said Company, and for a declaration that no dispute exists
between the plaintiff Company and its employees in the shingle division of the said
Company." F 100 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Claim dismissed.
The action was heard before the Hon. Mr. Justice Coady and was dismissed by him.
In his " Reasons for Judgment," dated October 27th, 1942, His Lordship declared;—
" This action is brought by the plaintiff (employer) for an injunction restraining
the defendants who were appointed as a Board of Arbitration under the ' Industrial
Conciliation and Arbitration Act,' chap. 31, Statutes of British Columbia, 1937, from
proceeding with the arbitration and for a declaration that no dispute exists between the
plaintiff and its employees in the shingle division of the said plaintiff. A special case
has been agreed upon by counsel, and the question for decision is whether the said
dispute as set forth in paragraph 10 thereof is a dispute within the meaning of the Act.
If it is, the parties agree that the action be dismissed. If it is not, then it is agreed
that the plaintiff is entitled to the relief prayed for in the writ of summons.
" I can summarize briefly the salient points agreed on in the stated case. The
majority of the employees in the said division were not organized into a trade-union on
December 7th, 1938. A committee of employees was duly elected by a majority vote of
the employees to negotiate with the plaintiff. No agreement having been reached in
these negotiations an application was made by the Committee under section 10 of the
Act for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner, and a Commissioner was duly
appointed by the Minister pursuant to section 11 of the Act. This Commissioner failed
to bring about a settlement or adjustment of the alleged dispute and the Minister
referred the matter to arbitration. An Order in Council was accordingly passed, dated
the 6th of October, 1942, and the statement of dispute filed with the Minister by the
Committee was directed to be delivered to the Board. This statement of dispute is set
out in paragraph 10 of the stated case.    Paragraph 10, in part, reads as follows:—
" ' 10. Pursuant to the said Order-in-Council a statement of dispute was delivered,
to wit:—
" ' " Certain shingle mill employees employed by Bloedel, Stewart & Welch Ltd.
Red Band Shingle Mill, Vancouver, British Columbia, through their elected representatives, submitted to their employer a proposed union agreement in terms of the copy
of the union agreement attached hereto and marked Schedule A.
" ' " The employer has refused to accept the proposed agreement." '
" Then follows as Schedule ' A ' the proposed agreement, referred to above, wherein
the plaintiff (wrongly described) is set out as the party of the first part, and International Woodworkers of America, District 1, Local 1-217, as the ' Union ' of the .second
part. This proposed agreement deals with many matters relating to the conditions of
employment, including a provision that the company recognizes the Union as the sole
collective bargaining agency for all employees in the Burnaby plant, and agrees to
negotiate with a Committee selected by the Union any differences that may arise
between the company and its employees.
" Counsel for the plaintiff submits that this proposed agreement does not constitute
a dispute within the meaning of the Act.
" The purpose of the Act must be looked at. The preamble reads: ' an Act respecting the right of employees to organize and providing for conciliation and arbitration of
industrial disputes.' From the whole of the Act it is clear that it aims to provide for
the settlement of disputes between employer and employees with the object in view of
thus adjusting differences and preventing strikes and lock-outs in industry. It is necessary, too, to look at the machinery provided by the Act for the adjustment and settlement of disputes.    Section 5 of the Act as amended provides as follows:—
" ' It shall be lawful for employees to bargain collectively with their employer, and
if the majority of the employees are on the seventh day of December, 1938, organized
into a trade-union to conduct such bargaining through the officers of such trade-union,
and if not on that date organized into a trade-union to conduct such bargaining through REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 101
representatives of employees duly elected by a majority vote of the employees affected,
and any employer or employees refusing so to bargain shall be liable to a fine not
exceeding five hundred dollars for each offence.'
" The bargaining therein referred to was conducted here, it is admitted, by representatives of the employees duly elected by a majority vote of the employees. That was
the proper body to conduct the negotiations. It was upon their application that the
Minister under section 11 of the Act, being satisfied that the dispute was a proper one
for reference to a Conciliation Commissioner, appointed a Conciliation Commissioner to
work out a settlement between the parties if possible. The Union named in the proposed
agreement has taken no part in these negotiations and has made no representations on
behalf of the employees. The proposed agreement contains many items for consideration by the Board. I cannot accept the submissions of counsel for the plaintiff that
there is only one item of dispute here, namely, whether or not the agreement should be
made with a Union, and that the functions of the Board are limited to determining that
one question. The fact that the Committee proposes an agreement between the employer and a Union is only one of the matters to be considered by the Board. The Board
has to consider all of the terms of the proposed agreement, and the consideration of the
party with whom the agreement should be made is only one of those matters. Section 39
of the Act provides that the Board shall, as far as practicable, deal with each item of the
dispute and shall state what in the Board's opinion ought or ought not to be done by
the respective parties concerned. The proposed agreement is, after all, but an offer on
the part of the employees for the settlement of matters relating to their employment.
The inclusion as one of the items that the proposed contract be entered into with a
Union would not disentitle them to the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner or
prevent the Minister from referring the matter to a Board where there are, as here,
many matters set out in the proposed agreement dealing directly with the employment,
which are clearly matters of dispute within the meaning of the Act. The Board may
find that the agreement cannot be entered into with the Union, but rather with the
representative Committee elected by the employees. But that is a matter for the Board.
We cannot assume that the Board will not be guided by the provisions of the Act, and
if under the Act the employees are not entitled to have the agreement made with the
Union, no doubt the Board will be guided by that in its findings. I am, therefore, of
the opinion that there is a dispute within the meaning of the Act, and the matter was
properly referred to the Board of Arbitration.
" Counsel for the defendants submits that even if the only item for consideration
by the Board here was the question of whether or not the proposed agreement should be
entered into with a Union, that this would, in view of section 7 of the Act, be a matter
of dispute within the Act. Under this section he points out it is the right and
privileges of the employees to join a Union and seek Union recognition, and as the
definition of dispute includes all matters or things affecting or relating to the privileges
and rights of employees the request to have the agreement made with a Union would
constitute a dispute. In view of the conclusions I have come to, however, as above set
out, it is unnecessary for me to express any opinion thereon.
" The action will be dismissed.
" J. M. COADY, /.
" 27th Oct., 1942."
An appeal was thereupon had to the Court of Appeal of British Columbia, and was
dismissed by Their Lordships, the Hon. the Chief Justice and the Hon. Mr. Justice
McQuarrie dissenting.* The judgments may be found as schedules, following this
report.
* Leave was granted to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada, but the appeal was not taken.     (See Bloedel,
Stewart & Welch, Limited, v. Stuart et ol.  (1942), 3 Western Weekly Reports 506.) F 102 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Following the judgment of the Court of Appeal, the Board continued its investigation of the matter in dispute. It was agreed by the representatives of the parties
appearing before the Board that the only question to be considered was whether the
Company should enter into an agreement with the Union (International Woodworkers
of America, Local 1-217).
Award of Board.
After hearing evidence, Mr. Justice Robertson and Mr. Stuart stated that they
were of the " opinion that the employees have not shown any sufficient reasons why the
Company should enter into a contract with the Union." Mr. Gargrave was not in
accord with his colleagues, and submitted a minority report.
In part, the majority award reads: " The employees submitted that the Company
should enter into a written agreement with the Union, to which a large majority of the
employees belonged, because (1) it would enhance the 'dignity of labour' and (2) its
officers could bargain fearlessly with the Company, whereas if the representatives of the
employees had to deal with the Company their actions might be affected by fear of
losing their employment; (3) that it would bring about better relations between the
Company and its employees. The Board was not impressed with the first reason.
As to the second and third points, it appeared that the Local of the Union in question
had been formed in April, 1942, and that since that time the representatives of the
employees, elected pursuant to section 5 of the Act had been three members of the
Union, two of them officers, two of whom were employees of the Company, and that all
matters in dispute had been amicably settled. One of these representatives was a
witness.    It was not suggested by him that there was any fear on his part.
" The Company submitted that its relations with its employees had been very
friendly; that there was no reason for its employees to fear any discrimination against
any of its employees, who might be elected as a representative; that if there were, the
employees had the remedy in their own hands, as they could elect under section 5 as
their representatives, officers of the Union who were not its employees; that the present
representatives had successfully and amicably negotiated all disputes which had
arisen.   .   .   ."
The Company also stated that it had a number of operations and that " if it
entered into a contract with the Union at Boundary Road it would follow that it would
be asked to enter into contracts with Unions in other of its operations." It was suggested that this course might cause jurisdictional disputes.
Breach of Contract feared.
" Further, under existing conditions it was said that the personnel of the men was
quickly changing from time to time, and that if the Company entered into the proposed
agreement and afterwards, by reason of a change in the personnel, the majority of its
employees wished to bargain collectively with the Company, as would be their right
under section 5, the Company would have to do so notwithstanding the contract, and
therefore, be forced to commit a breach of it. It was suggested that this objection
might be met by a clause in the proposed agreement that in the event of the contingency suggested by the Company actually occurring, the agreement should be'null
and void. The Company replied that the effect of such a clause would be to create
uncertainty."
In conclusion, the two arbitrators pointed out " that section 5 provides for collective
bargaining, that is, collective negotiation. There is no express section in the Act
providing with whom the Company shall enter into a contract. The policy of the Act
seems to have left the Company untrammelled in this respect which, of course, is its
position under the law."
Mr. Gargrave, in his minority report, gave a brief resume of the evidence, and
stated:   " Counsel for the Company based his whole case on the provisions of section 5 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 103
of the Act, which he said made it impossible for the Company to conclude an agreement
with the Union, since a short time after the agreement was concluded a majority of the
employees might disassociate themselves from the Union, for one reason or another,
and under this section the Company would then be forced to break the agreement and
enter into negotiations with the majority group."
He pointed out that the Company had recognized a committee composed as Union
members, but declared that such recognition was " unstable and unsatisfactory " because of the Company's policy. Mr. Gargrave declared the policy was set forth in
Exhibit 4, which stated, in part, " While we have negotiated with the Committee alleged
to have been elected by the employees on June 28th, we have been in considerable doubt
as to the regularity of these proceedings."
Company's Interpretation rejected.
He said further: "I do not accept the Company's interpretation of section 5,
although I admit the weakness of this section of the Act. I can find no evidence to
show that a condition envisaged by the Company under this section has ever come about,
and even granting that it may, it could quite easily be overcome by either a thirty-day
termination clause or a clause to_declare the agreement null and void if the Union did
not represent a majority of the employees."
Mr. Gargrave pointed out that " Federal Order in Council P.C. 2685 lays down the
attitude of the Dominion Government on such matters as were before the Board and
definitely calls for collective bargaining agreements.   .   .   .
" I submitted to the Board the unanimous findings of a Conciliation Board set up
under the Industrial Disputes Act in Ontario, and composed of Mr. Justice McTague,
of the Ontario Court of Appeal; Mr. F. Wilkinson, K.C., for the employers; and
Mr. J. L. Cohen, K.C., for the employees."
He declared the findings of the Board coincided entirely with his own opinions,
and quoted from them. His quotation in part reads: " It cannot be said too clearly
that labour can no longer be regarded, if it ever was correct to do so, merely as a commodity. Labour is a partner in industry and as such it is entitled to have not only the
right to organize but the corresponding right and opportunity to utilize its organization for collective bargaining and agreement with employers." ,
In conclusion, Mr. Gargrave declared: " In matters affecting labour relationship
we cannot afford to take the narrow legalistic interpretation as seems to me to be taken
by the other members of this Board. The Company recognizes the right of their
employees to join a Union but refuses to recognize the logical consummation of such
an act—that is, an agreement between the Union and the Company.
" I believe the evidence produced shows the desirability of an agreement in this
plant, and am satisfied that industrial agreements bring with them recognition of the
part labour plays in production, create stability in the industry concerned, and invariably prove mutually advantageous. ... I recommend that negotiations should be
opened between the Company and the Union for an agreement."
SCHEDULE A.—JUDGMENT OF THE HON. CHIEF JUSTICE
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
This is an appeal from Coady, J., who refused an injunction restraining the defendants
from proceeding with an arbitration under the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act,"
Statutes of British Columbia, 1937, chap. 31. The learned Judge dealt with the matter upon
a special case agreed upon by counsel, and we are called upon to decide whether he is right
in his construction of the Act. In a matter involving a difference between an employer and
his employee it is particularly important that a Judge should remember that he is sworn to
determine, not according to his private judgment, but according to the law of the land, and F 104 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
that the ancient maxim judicis est jus dicere, non dare, is still sound. We are called upon
here to construe a statute, and we must be guided by its plain meaning, having due regard
to well-established rules of construction. It has long been the law that a Court of law will not
make any interpretation contrary to the express words of a statute, where its words are plain.
These rules are so well known that I see no purpose in repeating them. Most of them were
carefully collected by the late Chief Justice Anglin in Hirsch v. Protestant Board of School
Commissioners (1926)  S.C.R. p. 265 et seq.
The legislation in question is, of course, remedial, and that fact must be kept in mind.
There is, however, the further fact which must be remembered, and that is that this legislation, passed in 1937, for the first time gave to employees in British Columbia the legal right
to bargain collectively with their employer, and the statute must not be carried further than
the import of its language will justify. Section 5 of the Act as originally drawn was in the
widest terms, in that it provided that it should be lawful for employees to bargain collectively
with their employers, and to conduct such bargaining through representatives of employees
duly elected. Such representatives might or might not have been a union. It will be noted
that there is no limitation whatever on the rights thus bestowed. Any employer or employees
refusing to bargain were made liable to a heavy fine. In 1938 this section 5 was amended and
as applicable to the facts now before us, may be read as follows:—
" It shall be lawful for employees to bargain collectively with their employer and to
conduct such bargaining through representatives of employees duly elected;   but inasmuch as the employees in this case were not organized into a trade union on December
7th,  1938, there is no declaration that it shall be lawful to conduct such bargaining
through the officers of a trade union;   and it is not lawful for employees collectively or
otherwise to bargain with their employer with a view to forcing him to make an agreement with anyone else but themselves as employees."
To my mind the application of the provisions of section 5 with its amendment is basic to
a  decision  in  this  case,  and  I  think it is  clear that the amendment restricts  the rights
previously given in 1937.    If there be a union of the employees, such union shall be the
bargaining agent.    If there be no union, the bargaining agents shall be the employees or
their elected representatives.
The Board of Arbitration was appointed ostensibly to settle a " dispute " which had
arisen between the plaintiff Company and its employees. Admittedly the only quarrel which
had arisen was whether the Company should be compelled to enter into an agreement, not
with its employees or their representatives, but with Local 1-217 of District 1 of International
Woodworkers of America. The Act gives no power to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council,
to the Minister of Labour, nor to any Board of Arbitrators to call that a " dispute " which
is not a " dispute " as defined by section 2 of the Act. True, the words of the definition are
very wide, but in my opinion they must be limited in some way, and I am satisfied they refer
to rights, privileges, wages, and conditions of employment; but they do not refer to a right
in the employees to force their employer to enter into a contract with some third party.
To put it in another way (and I shall now use words which Roget and other authorities
suggest as synonyms for the word "dispute"), no wrangle, contention, argument, quarrel,
disagreement, difference or controversy has arisen between the plaintiff and its employees
within the meaning of section 2 of the statute. There was no room therefore, within the
words of the statute, for the appointment of the defendant Board. If the Legislature had
intended to include any such right as is now contended for, it would have been a very simple
matter so to state.
I would therefore allow the appeal and order an injunction to issue, as asked.
D. A. McDonald,
C.J.B.C.
Vancouver, B.C.,
20th November, 1942.
SCHEDULE B.—JUDGMENT OF THE HON. MR. JUSTICE McQUARRIE.
I would allow the appeal and direct an injunction to issue for the reasons stated by the
Chief Justice.
W. G. McQuarrie,
J.A.
Vancouver, B.C.,
20th November, 1942. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 105
SCHEDULE C—JUDGMENT OF THE HON. MR. JUSTICE SLOAN.
This appeal from the judgment of Coady, J., dismissing the plaintiff's action on a special
case stated for the opinion of the Court, presents to my mind, with deference, little, if any,
difficulty in its solution.
The whole question, as I see it, turns upon the meaning of the word " dispute " as defined
by section 2 of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," S.B.C. 1937, chap. 31.
Before considering that question it is necessary to glance at the facts upon which it has
arisen for decision. Section 5 of the said Act, in so far as it is relevant herein, reads as
follows:—
" It shall be lawful for employees to bargain collectively with their employers   .   .   .
and to conduct such bargaining through representatives of employees duly elected by a
majority vote of the employees affected.   .   .   ."
It is clear from a perusal of this Act as a whole that " bargaining " in said section 5 is not
used in the sense of " contracting " but as " negotiating."
The employees of the Shingle Division of the plaintiff Company, pursuant to said section
5, duly elected by a majority vote certain employees as a bargaining or negotiating committee
to discuss with the Company the desirability of the Company entering into an agreement with
a Trade-union affecting or relating to Union recognition, the employees' wages, hours of work,
conditions of employment, and matters of a like and related character. The Company
refused to accept the proposed agreement.
A Conciliation Commissioner was thereupon appointed by the Minister of Labour, but
(in the words of the special case) " he was unable to bring about a settlement or an adjustment of the dispute and recommended the matter be submitted to arbitration under the
provisions of the aforesaid Act."
A Board of Arbitration having been selected and appointed pursuant to the said Act, the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council directed that a statement of the dispute be delivered to the
said Board.    That statement of dispute is in part as follows:—
" Certain shingle mill employees employed by Bloedel, Stewart and Welch Ltd. Red
Band Shingle Mill, Vancouver, British Columbia, through their elected representatives,
submitted to their employer a proposed union agreement in terms of the copy of the
union agreement attached hereto and marked Schedule A.
" The employer has refused to accept the proposed agreement."
The plaintiff Company at this stage of the proceedings commenced this action seeking,
according to the endorsement on the writ of summons, a declaration " that no dispute exists
between the plaintiff Company and its employees in the Shingle Division of the said Company."
The sole question therefore is whether or not the difference or dispute between the
Company and its employees over the said Union agreement is a dispute within the meaning
of the Act.
" Dispute " is defined by section 2 of the Act in the following relevant terms: —
"' Dispute' means any dispute or difference between an employer and ... a
. majority of his employees in any separate plant or department of his operation
as to matters or things affecting or relating to work done or to be done by him
or them, or as to the privileges, rights, and duties of employers or employees,
and, without limiting the general nature of the above definition, includes all
matters relating to:—■
"(a.)   The wages, allowance, or other remuneration of  employees  or  the
price paid or to be paid in respect of employment:
"(6.)   The hours of employment, sex, age, qualifications, or status of employees and the mode, terms, and conditions of employment:
"(d.)   Claims on the part of an employer or an employee as to whether and,
if so, under what circumstances preference of employment should or should
not be given to one class  over  another class  of persons being  or not being
members of labour or other organizations, British subjects, or aliens."
That appears to me to be a definition deliberately designed to be comprehensive in scope.
I have no hesitation in expressing the opinion that it is wide enough to include as a " dispute "
the question or questions at issue between the plaintiff Company and its employees.    In that I
am in agreement with the reasons of the learned trial Judge.    I would, however, add to his
reasons this additional ground:   By section 7 (2) of the Act an " organization of employees "
may enter into an agreement with an employer " whereby all the employees of the employer
are required to be members of a specified organization of employees."    By section 2   (1),
" organization of employees " includes a trade-union.    As it is the privilege and right of the
employees to belong to a trade-union and as it is lawful for an employer to enter into an F 106 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
agreement with such trade-union with respect to the working conditions of such trade-union
employees, then it seems to me to follow that the refusal of the employer to enter into such
an agreement at the request of the bargaining committee of employees is a matter which
affects or relates to the rights and privileges of the employees, and therefore is one falling
within the definition of " dispute."
I refrain from expressing any opinion as to the merits or demerits of the position assumed
by the Company, because in my view the matters in question, including the propriety of the
Company entering into the agreement in dispute, are for the decision of the Board of
Arbitration. That is the tribunal which must pass upon the proposed contract in all its
relevant aspects both as to the parties to it and the scope and extent of its contents.
I would therefore dismiss the appeal.
Gordon McG. Sloan,
,   J.A.
Vancouver, B.C.,
20th November, 1942.
SCHEDULE D.—JUDGMENT OF THE HON. MR. JUSTICE  O'HALLORAN.
The learned Judge of first instance decided that the subject-matter of the dispute included
not only the terms of the proposed agreement but also the proposal of the committee representing the employees, that the proposed agreement should be between the appellant Company and
a Union. Before the Court below the question was raised as to whether the " Industrial
Conciliation and Arbitration Act " prevents the agreement being entered into with the Union.
The learned Judge, however, refrained from deciding that question, and I shall refer to that
phase of the matter later on.
At first, counsel for the appellant Company generalized his submission thus: That the
Board of Arbitration has no jurisdiction to force the Company to contract with a Union.
But no doubt recognizing the flimsy foundation for statement of the issue in that bold form,
he readily conceded there was no question of forcing the Company into a contract, since for
one thing, under section 43 of the statute, any party is at liberty to reject or accept the award
which the Board of Arbitration may eventually make.
That left his proposition in this form—viz., that section 5 of the statute prohibits the
Company from negotiating with the Union, and requires it to negotiate only with the duly
elected representatives of the majority of its employees. But it is common ground—and so
appears in paragraphs 4, 5, and 6 of the special case—that the negotiations were being
conducted throughout, not by the Union, but by the duly elected representatives of the
majority of the Company's employees.
In my opinion at least, the foregoing brief analysis is sufficient to dispose of the appeal
so far as it is based on the generalized submission as aforesaid. It became apparent during
the argument, however, that the submission of counsel for the appellant that the dispute as
set forth in paragraph IT) of the special case is not a dispute within the meaning of the
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," is really based on three points, and I will deal
with them point by point as argued: (1) That there was no " dispute " as defined in section 2
of the said Act; (2) that in any event the Union is a third party without interest in the
subject-matter of the dispute between the Company and its employees; and (3) that section 5
of the Act empowers the Company to contract with the elected representatives of the majority
of its employees, but not with their Union.
It was urged on the first point that the issue does not come within any of the specific
headings (a) to (g) found at the end of the definition of "dispute" in the statute. This
asks us, however, to ignore the supplemental nature of said subparagraphs, and to pass over
their introductory limitation which provides that they shall not limit the " general nature "
of " dispute " as already there defined;
" any dispute or difference between an employer and a majority   ...   of his employees
...   as to matters or things affecting or relating to work done, or to be done by him or
them, or as to the privileges, rights, and duties of employers or employees   .   .   ."  (the
italics are mine).
I think this definition is wide enough to include the dispute set forth as aforesaid.
" Privileges and rights " of employees certainly include the right to form a Union of
their own, or to form or join themselves into an existing local Union which may be a branch
or part of an established larger Union. Trade-unions have been legalized long since; vide
Taff Vale Railway v. Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants (1901) 70 L.J.K.B. 905
(H.L.), and also the "Trade-unions Act," c. 289, R.S.B.C. 1936, and Hollywood Theatres,
Ltd., v. Tenney (1939) 54 B.C.R. 247 at 277.    It is also the right and privilege of employees REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 107
when so organized to negotiate and contract with their employer through the medium of their
Union. It appears to me that right must be recognized as running through the structure
of the " Trade-unions Act " supra and the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act,"
unless it is shown to be modified by section 5 of the latter statute, to which I shall shortly
refer.
Turning next to the second point, I can see little to support an argument that the Union
is a third party without interest in the subject-matter. It is conceded the majority of the
employees seek to have this Union represent them as a party to the proposed agreement.
It is their choice and their right. Their elected representatives have put that request forward
as one of the terms of the bargaining. The proposed agreement provides that the " grievance
committee " therein proposed, shall be composed of three members " actually then in the
employ of the Company "  (Article 8, section 4).
It must follow that the interest of the employees is the interest of the Union. It is
definitely not an uninterested third party. It may be appropriately described as the collective or composite alter ego of the employees, enabling their wishes to be represented by
one responsible and authoritative voice in the proposed contract. I do not think this second
point needs further discussion to justify its rejection.
The appellant's third point concerns the effect of section 5 as amended in 1938.    It reads:—
" It shall be lawful for employees to bargain collectively with their employer and if
the majority of the employees are, on the seventh day of December, 1938, organized into
a trade-union to conduct such bargaining through the officers of such trade-union, and if
not  on  that  date  organized  into  a  trade-union,  to  conduct  such  bargaining  through
representatives of employees duly elected by a majority vote of the employees affected,
and any employer or employees refusing so to bargain shall be liable to a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars for each offence."
It was argued that section means the Company cannot contract with its employees through
their Union, because they had not been " organized into a trade-union " on the 7th day of
December, 1938.
But, with respect, that is reading words into the section which are not there. The term
used is " bargain " and not " contract." It is freely admitted that the " bargaining " on
behalf of the employees has been conducted, not by the Union, but by the duly elected representatives of the majority of the employees affected. One of the terms of bargaining
advanced by those representatives is that the Company shall enter into the contract with
their Union as fully representing their interests. The distinction between " bargaining "
and " contracting " is substantive and not purely verbal.
" Bargain " may have several meanings. And in one sense it may sometimes be interchangeable with " contract." But the context of section 5 does not permit it to receive that
meaning. The expression " conduct such bargaining " occurs twice in section 5. That shows
clearly that " bargain " is there used in the sense of negotiation and not in the sense of
a contract. One may conduct a negotiation, but obviously one cannot conduct a contract.
Read in the sense the context demands, there is nothing in section 5 which hinders the
Company from entering into a contract with a Union. That is particularly so here, since
the negotiations have been conducted not by the Union, but by the representatives of the
majority of the Company's employees.
But even if section 5 should be capable of other constructions, then that construction
which produces the greatest harmony and the least inconsistency ought to prevail; vide Reid
v. Collister (1919) 59 S.C.R. 275. As Lord Shaw said in Shannon Realties, Limited, v.
Town of St. Michel (1923) 93 L.J.P.C. 81 at 84, that construction is to be chosen which will
be consistent with the smooth working of the system which the statute is regulating, and that
construction should be rejected which will introduce uncertainty, friction, or confusion into
the working of the system.
The statute is to be construed according to its " cause and necessity," and according to
that which is " consonant to reason and good discretion," vide Stradling v. Morgan (1560) 75
E.R. 305 at pp. 311 and 315. The interpretation of section 5 must be subordinated thereto.
The " cause and necessity " of the statute is the effecting and maintenance of industrial peace
and good-will. It contemplates mediation and conciliation, which necessarily imply discussion and negotiation, without undue delay, between responsible and authoritative representatives of organized management and organized employees.
It is " consonant to reason and good discretion " that employees should form themselves
into Unions, and that such Unions should contract with employers on their behalf. That
seems to be particularly so here, for it is stipulated in the proposed agreement that the
grievance committee shall be composed of members " actually then in the employ of the
Company." In my view, with respect, the statute does not prevent the Company entering
into the proposed contract with the Union.    The Union has been designated for that purpose F 108 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
by the majority of the Company's employees in the course of the bargaining between the
Company and the duly elected representatives of those employees. In my view the appeal
should be dismissed accordingly.
Before parting with the appeal, it is advisable to consider whether the learned Judge of
first instance was right in refraining from deciding the competency of the Board to entertain the question on which this appeal centred. He held it was a matter for the Board to
determine.    He said:—
" The Board may find that the agreement cannot be entered into with the Union,
but rather with the representative committee elected by the employees.    But that is
a matter for the Board.    We cannot assume that the Board will not be guided by the
provisions of the Act, and if under the Act the employees are not entitled to have the
agreement made with the Union, no  doubt the Board will be guided by that in its
findings."
Counsel for the appellant contended, however, that was an erroneous view, and submitted the
Board of Arbitration is not competent to determine matters relating to its own jurisdiction.
It is true, as observed in Rex v. Nat Bell Liquors, Limited (1922), 91 L.J.P.C. 146 at 162,
that if a statute says a tribunal shall have jurisdiction if certain facts exist, then such
tribunal is competent to inquire into those facts in order to ascertain and determine its
jurisdiction (subject to certiorari). But that related to a judicial tribunal. It did not and
could not relate to a tribunal such as the Board of Conciliation and Arbitration in this case,
which cannot be said to possess judicial or administrative powers. For it has been brought
into being for the purpose of investigating and exhausting all avenues which may lead to
conciliating and settling the differences between the Company and employees, but is without
any final powers since its award may be accepted or rejected by any party.
In National Trust Company, Limited, v. Christian Community of Universal Brotherhood,
Limited (1940), 55 B.C.R. 516, the National Trust Company, Limited, commenced an action,
as here, for a declaration with a consequential injunction, and succeeded in establishing in
effect that the Board of Review was not competent to decide a question relating to its own
jurisdiction. The Board of Review there consisted of a Judge of the Supreme Court as chairman with laymen members. One of the judgments in this Court at p. 537 supported the
Board's jurisdiction alternatively in that respect, on the authority of the Nat Bell case supra.
But the Supreme Court of Canada, vide 1941, S.C.R. 601, was not influenced by that view
in reversing this Court's decision.
In the National Trust case supra, the Board of Review had very wide and final powers,
even to the extent of altering written contracts and taking away existing rights, vide p. 529
of 55 B.C.R. supra. Nevertheless, the Supreme Court of Canada did not recognize the
Board's competency to determine matters relating to its own jurisdiction. The Court held
the language of the statute was not sufficiently precise and imperative in its terms to oust
the jurisdiction of a superior Court. The Board in this case has no such extensive or final
powers. Its jurisdiction is confined to conciliation and adjustment of differences, and no one
need accept the award it may ultimately make. That award, realistically viewed, can contain
nothing more than suggestions as to how the Board thinks those differences may be equitably
adjusted;   refer section 39  (1) of the Act.
For these reasons—to which could be added what Lamont, J., said upon another aspect
in Segal v. City of Montreal (1931) S.C.R. 460 at 472-3—I am of the view, with respect, the
Board of Arbitration is not competent to determine judicially a question affecting its own
jurisdiction.    I do not feel it necessary to refer to the constitutional aspect.
But even if it could be said that the Board of Arbitration may possess concurrent jurisdiction with the Supreme Court in this respect, it should nevertheless be held in the fitting
exercise of our discretion, that the matter is essentially one for determination by a superior
Court. The Board here is not a judicial tribunal. And although one of its members happens
to be a learned Judge of the Supreme Court, yet the other two members, who may constitute
the majority, are laymen and, with every respect, do not claim to possess that legal training
and knowledge of the law to enable them to decide a purely legal question touching their
jurisdiction.
It follows in my view the appellant adopted a proper course in seeking a judicial
decision upon the Board's jurisdiction in the premises. But for reasons stated earlier, it
must be held that the right of the employees to designate a Union to enter into the proposed
agreement on their behalf is not denied by the statute. The Board may therefore properly
consider the employees' proposal in that respect. It is, of course, for the Board to decide
what ought or ought not to be done.
I would dismiss the appeal.
C. H. O'Halloran,
Vancouver, B.C., J.A.
20th November, 1942. SCHEDULE E.—JUDGMENT OF THE HON. MR. JUSTICE FISHER.
I would dismiss the appeal for the reasons given by my Brother O'Halloran.
A. I. Fisher,
J. A.
Vancouver, B.C.,
20th November, 1942.
No. 11, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between Messrs. Grant & Sons, Ltd., Employer, and its Lithographers,
Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Col. G. H. Dorrell, chairman; Mr. R. L. Norman, employer's representative; and Mr.
R. H. Neelands, employees' representative.
Lithographers employed by Messrs. Grant & Sons, Ltd., through their elected
representatives, requested that their employer sign an agreement with his lithographers
containing conditions similar to those contained in the decree relating to the lithographic industry in the Province of Quebec, being a copy of Order in Council No. 4201
of November 28th, 1940, modified by Order No. 900 of April 15th, 1942, and published
in the Quebec Official Gazette of November 30th, 1940, and April 18th, 1942.
The employer refused to accept the proposal, and the Conciliation Commissioner,
Mr. James Thomson, recommended the dispute be referred to arbitration.
The Board was thereupon designated, and upon October 27th submitted a unanimous award, recommending the adoption of an agreement between the disputants, in
the form submitted by the Board.
The Board pointed out that it was recognized by the parties to the reference, and
by the Board, that where the award involved any increases in wages, such increases,
before they could become effective must be submitted to the Regional War Labour
Board for the Province of British Columbia.
It was recommended that the agreement be made between Grant & Sons, Ltd., and
" The Lithographic Employees of the said Grant & Sons, Ltd., individually and collectively . . . ," and that the agreement " designates and comprises all persons engaged
by Grant & Sons, Ltd., in the production of lithography by lithographic, planographic,
photolithographic, or gelatine processes, whether direct or offset.   .   .   ."
For the purposes of the agreement the award classified employees, and further
designated the employees to which the agreement did not apply. The latter included
employees not actually engaged in the production of lithography and employees in the
bindery and finishing departments.
Provision was made that all apprentices should be under a signed contract of
apprenticeship, in accordance with the regulations of the apprenticeship committee of
the Province of British Columbia for the lithographing trade.
Provision was also made for a 48-hour working-week, divided into day and night
shifts not exceeding nine hours per shift, and the hours of labour for day and night
shifts were set out. It was recommended that the regular hours of labour for both
shifts be posted in a conspicuous place in the establishment.
Overtime was defined as " all time worked each day, either before or after the
schedule of hours established in each shop to cover the regular work-week," and that
it should be paid for at the rate of time and one-half for the first three hours of each
day on the first five working-days of the week, and at the rate of double time thereafter.
It was recommended that if the work-week was hereafter established on a five-day
basis, all work done on Saturday to twelve noon " should be paid for at the rate of
double time; but when the scheduled hours include Saturday morning, such time
(before 12 noon) shall be paid for at regular day rates." F 110 DEPARTMENT  OF LABOUR.
It was also provided that double time should be paid for work done on Saturday
afternoon, Sunday's, and Dominion and Provincial statutory holidays. Overtime for
employees on any shift was to be computed on the basis of the actual hourly rate of
wages paid to them for the shift on which they actually worked.
The recommended agreement included a provision that employees working on a
night shift should be paid ten per cent, higher than the day rate, and that overtime
for night-shift workers was to be computed at the higher rate. In cases where more
than one shift is operated, only one shall be deemed to be the day shift and the other
or others the night shifts.
It was recommended that employees engaged in more than one class of work be
paid the rate being paid for the classes on which they worked.
It was also recommended that if new equipment or processes were used during the
lifetime of the agreement, the wage-scale and conditions governing such equipment or
processes would be considered for approval by employers and employees.
Provision was made for the employment of a pressman or press apprentice on every
press, and feeder or feeder attendant on every press, sizes 22 by 34 and 40 by 52.
In addition, provisions were made for a week's holiday with pay for employees
for one or more years' standing, and that no piece-work should be done.
A minimum wage-scale covering the Art, Camera, Plate-making, Press and Press-
feeding Departments was set out, and was thereafter submitted to the Regional War
Labour Board for endorsation.
It was recommended that the agreement should continue for a period of six months
after the'duration of the war.
No. 1, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Mohawk Lumber Co., Ltd., New Westminster, B.C.,
Employer, and certain of its Mill Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
J. N. Finlayson, Esq., Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, University of British
Columbia, chairman; R. V. Stuart, Esq., employer's arbitrator; and H. Gargrave,
Esq., M.L.A., employees' arbitrator.
Certain mill employees of the Mohawk Lumber Co., Ltd., New Westminster, B.C.,
submitted to their employer a proposed Union agreement covering Union recognition,
wages, hours, and working conditions.' The employer refused to accept the proposed
agreement, and the Conciliation Commissioner, Mr. James Thomson, recommended that
the dispute be referred to arbitration.
The Board was thereafter designated and upon January 25th, 1943, submitted
a majority award, Mr. H. Gargrave dissenting, and making a minority report.
The award pointed out that some of the clauses in the proposed agreement were
acceptable to both the men and the Company, while others, calling for the recognition
of the Union* and the selection by the Union of a committee for bargaining purposes
were rejected by the Company. Evidence showed that a local of the International
Woodworkers of America was formed in the plant in September, 1942.
Witnesses for the employees submitted that the purpose of a Union agreement was
to secure more competent negotiation in matters of increased wages and other benefits;
that a Union agreement would bring about better relations between the Company and
its employees and would create a greater feeling of security of employment.
Messrs. Finlayson and Stuart declared that in their opinion the present elected
committee, " including as it does two of the chief local executive officers of the I.W.A.,
is in as good a position as a Union selected committee would be to secure Union assis-
* International Woodworkers of America. Local 1-217. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 111
tance and advice in conducting negotiations (providing the employees maintain their
membership in the Union) and can perform this function fearlessly. This view is
strengthened by the statement of counsel for the Union that the Union selected committee would probably be the same personnel as that constituting the present elected
bargaining committee."
These members of the Board declared they were not impressed with the second
point, since witnesses in the employ of the Company and the manager were in agreement regarding the cordial relations existing between the Company and its employees.
In the matter of employment security, Messrs. Finlayson and Stuart expressed
the opinion that it was entirely covered by subsections 1, 2, and 3 of Article 10 of the
proposed agreement, since the Company had expressed its willingness to accept these
clauses.
They declared that in a settlement of this dispute, recognition must be given to
the position of the employees and the Company under the governing statute, namely
section 5 of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " which at that time
read:—
" It shall be lawful for employees to bargain collectively with their employer and if
the majority of the employees are, on the seventh day of December, 1938, organized
into a trade-union to conduct such bargaining through the officers of such trade-union,
and if not on that date organized into a trade-union to conduct such bargaining through
representatives of employees duly elected by a majority vote of the employees affected,
and any employer or employees refusing so to bargain shall be liable to a fine not
exceeding five hundred dollars for each offence."
Messrs. Finlayson and Stuart found that the Company had complied with the
bargaining obligations imposed by the statute and had done so sincerely, and that in
view of all these circumstances they were of the opinion that the employees had not
shown sufficient reasons why the Company should enter into a written contract with
the Union. It was their view that the " offer of the Company to enter into an agreement with its employees through their duly elected representatives, should be accepted."
Minority Report.
Mr. Gargrave in his minority report pointed out that the issue in the case was
resolved into the one question as to whether or not the Company would sign an agreement with the Union.
The Company through its manager had offered an employer-employee agreement
but had stated they would not consider a Union agreement because: (a) There were
no Union agreements in the lumber industry, and (6) they did not trust Union leadership. No evidence had been produced " even under cross-examination that the Union
was not trustworthy, and this reason therefore cannot be considered," Mr. Gargrave
declared.
" I do not feel that the first-mentioned reason can be considered an objection since,
if the demand for Union agreements is sound, some company must of necessity be the
first to conclude such agreements," his report continues.
He pointed out that the interpretation of section 5 of the " Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Act " was the main point of the Company's counsel, who had claimed
that a Union agreement would mean that the employees would sign away their bargaining rights. Additionally, counsel had claimed that because of the turnover of employees
the Company would be forced to commit a breach of a Union agreement, if at any time
the majority of the employees did not belong to the Union and demand their own
bargaining rights. He did not agree with counsel's interpretation, and pointed out
that the same situation might well arise in an employer-employee agreement. In any
case, he said, there was so little likelihood of such a situation arising that it could not
be considered as a sound reason for opposing a Union agreement.
. F 112 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
In conclusion, Mr. Gargrave declared that section 5 of the Act was worded in such
a way that it enabled employers to evade Union agreements and until it was amended
would be used to this end. He said further that since Union agreements were in effect
in almost every other industry, he was satisfied as to the desirability of an agreement
in this case, and recommended that negotiations should be opened between the Company
and the Union for such an agreement.
No. 2, 1943.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Central Transfer Co., Ltd., Employer, and certain of its
Cartage Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Col. J. F. Keen, chairman; J. R. Stewart, Esq., employer's arbitrator; and W. A. Tutte,
Esq., employees' arbitrator.
Certain cartage employees of the Company presented to their employer through
their duly elected representatives a proposed Union agreement covering Union recognition, wages, hours of work, and working conditions. The employer and the employees
failed to agree upon the terms of the proposed agreement, and the Conciliation Commissioner, Mr. James Thomson, recommended that the dispute be referred to arbitration.
The Board was thereafter designated and upon March 29th submitted a unanimous
award.
In its award the Board pointed out that the failure of the disputant parties to
agree " can, in the main, be resolved in the refusal of the Central Transfer Co., Ltd.,
to again recognize the Union (the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway Employees and
Other Transport Workers, Division No. 220), or to permit the said Union to appear in
the agreement, and the refusal of the bargaining representatives of the employees to
discuss any agreement other than one to which the CB. of R.E. & O.T.W., Division
No. 220, the Union of their choice, was a part."
The Board found the Union was entitled to represent the employees affected, and
recommended that the parties to the dispute should "meet under an independent chairman appointed by the Minister of Labour, within seven days of being instructed by the
Minister to do so, for the purpose of setting out in writing the wages, hours, and other
working conditions in the form of an agreement between them.
The employees accepted the award, by secret ballot, at a meeting held April 26th.
The employer, however, rejected the award, and it was therefore impossible to appoint
a chairman for the purposes recommended by the Board.
Negotiations between the disputant parties did take place, but no satisfactory
agreement was reached between them.
Those affected eventually left their employment and sought work elsewhere.
EXTENSION OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE " INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES
INVESTIGATION ACT."
By authority of Privy Council Order No. 3495, passed November 7th, 1939, under
the provisions of the " War Measures Act " (chapter 206, R.S.C. 1927), the " Industrial
Disputes Investigation Act" is extended to cover all plants and undertakings where
Imperial or Federal war contracts are being carried on, or to all plants and undertakings where such contracts are being carried on conjointly with private projects or
contracts. Resultantly, if employers or employees so concerned make application to
the Provincial authorities for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner or a Board REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 113
of Arbitration, under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act," the applicants have been requested to submit the matter to the Western Representative of the Federal Department of Labour in British Columbia.
To avoid the possibility of confusion, applicants for the services of a Conciliation
Commissioner under the Provincial statute are asked to sign a statement declaring that
the employer concerned is not, to the best of their knowledge, engaged in any contract
awarded by the Imperial or Federal Governments.
Industrial disputes within the exclusive jurisdiction of the Parliament of Canada
are dealt with under the " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act " as heretofore. All
disputes within the jurisdiction of the Province of British Columbia, with the exceptions noted, are dealt with under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Act."
Wages.
Under Federal regulations now in force (P.C. No. 8253, as amended), no employer
may increase or decrease basic wage-rates unless authorized to do so by the National
War Labour Board or a Regional War Labour Board. There are nine Regional Boards,
one for each Province, on which Government, labour, and employers are represented.
The British Columbia Board is located in Vancouver, and any inquiries regarding
wages should be addressed to Robert Morrison, Esq., Chief Executive Officer, British
Columbia Regional War Labour Board, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Permission for a change in wages can only be given where the Board finds the
basic scale to be low compared to those for similar occupations in the same locality or
a comparable locality.
Excepted from this regulation are workers in agriculture, fishing, hunting, trapping, domestic service; employees of a hospital, religious, charitable, or educational
institutions;  as well as Civil Service employees of Federal or Provincial Governments.
By the provisions of P.C. 11096 of December 8th, 1942, the provisions of the Wartime Wages Control Order (P.C. 5963 of July 10th, 1942) are extended to the municipalities of the various Provinces with the consent of the Province concerned.
Consent to the application of the provisions of P.C. 11096 to any municipality or
municipalities in the Province must be obtained from the Hon. George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
Should a dispute arise over wages within the application of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " it may be heard before a Board of Arbitration, whose
members may make whatever recommendations they see fit. The implementation of
these recommendations, however, lies in the hands of the Regional War Board.
IV. EMPLOYERS' AND EMPLOYEES' ORGANIZATIONS.
Section 9, " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," requires every organization of employers and employees to file certain returns, namely:—
(1.)  A certified copy of its constitution, rules, and by-laws, containing a full
statement of its objects and purposes.
(2.)  Certified copies of any amendments to its constitution, rules, and by-laws
when made.
(3.)  An annual list of the names and addresses of its president, secretary, and
other officers as at the 31st day of December.    The list must be filed
before the 31st day of January in each year.
Additional information is required from associations of employees, or trade-union
locals, under the provisions of section 5a, " Department of Labour Act."    This return F 114
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
requires the name and business address of the organization, its affiliation (if any), and
its total paid-up membership at the date of return.
To obtain this information the requisite forms are sent to the secretaries of all
organizations of record and to the officers of all organizing bodies having branches
within the Province.
Official acknowledgment is made of all returns made in pursuance of section 9,
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act." Such returns are not registrations,
and the acknowledgment of required information by the Department does not constitute
endorsement, either express or implied, of any document supplied.
Annual returns received since this information was first requested in 1938 have
shown a consistent growth in membership. Details of the number of organizations
making returns since 1937 follow:—
Number of Employees' Organizations making Returns and Membership
thereof, 1937-42.
Year.
No. of
Organizations.
Total
Membership.
1937	
336
362
380
404
402
415
1938	
42,063
1939	
44,867
1940	
50,360
1941   	
61,292
1942  	
91,618
The printed list is arranged by cities and towns in alphabetical order. In cases
where the information could be obtained the names and addresses of the presidents
and secretaries were revised to the date of publication.
The post-office addresses of the officers are the same as the heading under which
they appear, unless otherwise stated. The reported affiliation of each organization
appears after its listing.
The list of employers' organizations follows immediately after that of the employees. Returns in this category numbered twenty-two in 1937, twenty-three in 1938,
twenty-five in 1939 and 1940, twenty-seven in 1941, and thirty-two in 1942.
V. THE FILING OF EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE AGREEMENTS.
By an amendment to section 9 of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act," which received assent March 18th, 1943, copies of all employer-employee agreements must be filed with the Secretary-Registrar.    The amendment reads:—
"3. Section 9 is amended by renumbering subsection (3) as subsection (4), and
inserting the following as subsection (3) :—
" '(3.) Every trade-union and every organization of employees shall file with the
Secretary-Registrar a true copy of every agreement entered into by or on behalf of such
trade-union or organization and an employer or any person on behalf of the employer;
and such copy shall be filed within thirty days after the date of the agreement.' "
The information thus received should prove of great administrative value.
B. H. E. GOULT,
Secretary-Registrar', REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 115
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYEES.
Abbotsford.
Brick and Clay Workers' Federal Union, No. 136.
—-President, T. Ayling;  Secretary, C. W. Gough,
Kilgard.
Ahousat.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 34.—President,
Jack Benson, Ahousat.
Alberni.
Waterfront Workers Association.—-President, Albert Naslund; Secretary, James Pakenham, Box
71, Alberni.
Albreda.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No.  15.—President,  E.  G.  McLeod;    Secretary,
A. A. Charter, Albreda.
Alert Bay.
Fishermen's  Association,  Pacific  Coast  Native.—
President,   Dan   Cranmer;    Secretary,   Geo.   M.
Luther, Alert Bay.
Bella Bella.
Native  Brotherhood  of  B.C.,  No.  14.—-President,
Albert Humchit;  Secretary, R. Carpenter, Bella
Bella.
Bella Coola.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 15.—President,
Sam King; Secretary, Andrew Schooner, Bella
Coola.
Blubber Bay.
Pacific Lime  Co., Ltd., Employees' Association,—■
President, W. Martin;   Secretary, H. E. Light,
Blubber Bay.
Burnaby.
Civic   Employees'   Union,   No.   23.—President,   R.
O'Brien;    Secretary, J. H. Grover, 3812 Myrtle
Avenue, New Westminster.
Fire-fighters'   Association,   No.   323. — President,
C. A. McDonald; Secretary, L. C. Auvache, 1536
Inverness Street, Burnaby.
Janitors' Association, No. 1 School.—President, E.
Brookman;  Secretary, J. Morrison, 1210 Nelson
Avenue, New Westminster.
Packers, Limited,  Employees' Association, Pacific
Coast.—President,   D.   H.   Gardner;    Secretary,
M.   F.   Sutherland,   2338   Royal   Oak   Avenue,
Burnaby.
Textile   Workers'   Union,   No.   12.—President,   C.
LeGrove;    Secretary,  Miss  J.  Armstrong,  3736
Albert Street, Vancouver.
Chapman Camp.
Workmen's Co-operative Committee, Sullivan Concentrator.—President, J. M. MacKay;   Secretary,
C. G. Schulli, Chapman Camp.
Chemainus.
Longshoremen's Association, Chemainus and District.—President, Fred Lewis;   Secretary, R. W.
Andrews, Chemainus.
Clayoquot.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 27.—President,
Edward  Joseph;    Secretary,   Edwin  Matthews,
Clayoquot.
Copper Mountain.
Miners' Union, No. 649.—President, J. Ogbourne;
Secretary, Geo. Fichter, Copper Mountain.
Copper River.
Maintenance-of-way  Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No. 335.—President, D. J. Gunn;   Secretary, G.
Somerville, Kitsalas via Copper River.
COURTENAY.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-363.
—President, J. Higgen; Secretary, E. F. Anderson, Royston.
Cranbrook.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 563.—
President, F. R. McDaniel; Secretary, J. E.
Pierce, Cranbrook.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 559.—President, R. Bartholomew; Secretary, M. H. Johns, Box 214, Cranbrook.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 588.
—President, Wm. Henderson; Secretary, R. J.
Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 229.—President, J. Strand; Secretary, 0. A.
Eliason, Box 853, Cranbrook.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 585.—
President, T. A. Archbold; Secretary, H. B.
Haslam, P.O. Box 784, Cranbrook.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
173. — President, C. Romano; Secretary, J. F.
Lunn, Cranbrook.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 407.—President, K. H. Branch; Secretary, H. J. Huxtable,
Box 262, Cranbrook.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian, No. 143.—President, G. Thrift; Secretary, D. H. Daniel, Blue River.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express, and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1292.—President, R. Pelton; Secretary,
E. G. Dingley, Box 728, Cranbrook.
Cumberland.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
E. Surtees;  Secretary, J. H. Vaughan, P.O. Box
181, Cumberland.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7293.—■
President, J. H. Cameron; Secretary, J. Bond,
Cumberland.
Duncan.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-80.
—President, 0. G. Brown; Secretary, H. Valley,
Box 430, Duncan.
Ehatisat.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 32.—President, J.
Ambrose, Ehatisat.
Endako.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1870.—President, C. Adcock; Secretary, J.
Wall, McCall via Vanderhoof.
Fernie.
Brewery Workers, International Union of United,
No.  308.—President,  J.  H.  Brown;    Secretary,
F. E. Alexander, Box 1071, Fernie.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7310.—
President, J. Manning; Secretary, W. Martin,
P.O. Box 212, Fernie. F 116
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Field.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1454.—President, P. Decicco; Secretary, W. M.
Brown, Field.
Fort Rupert.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 18.—President,
Alfred Scow; Secretary, Peter Jimmie, Fort
Rupert.
Glen Vowell and Kitwancool.
Native Brotherhood of B.C.—
Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 165. — President, J. Thorson; Secretary,
Harry Prestwich, Box 153, Golden.
Hartley Bay.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 3. — President,
Louis Clifton; Secretary, John Eaton, Hartley
Bay.
Hazelton.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 10. — President
and Secretary, C. Clifford, Hazelton.
Hesquiat.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 35.—President,
M. Lucas.
Hutton Mills.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 202.—President, A. E. Carlson; Secretary,
C. H. Weaver, Hutton Mills.
Kaleden.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 4.—
President, W. G. MacKenzie; Secretary, Helen
Havens, Kaleden.
Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 821.—
President, W. R. Snowden; Secretary, W. A.
Harris, 727 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 855.—
President, S. A. Johnson; Secretary, Wm. G.
Reive, Suite 2, 239 Victoria Street, Kamloops.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
11.—President, D. C. Miller; Secretary, L. P.
Dorion, 682 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 258.—President, G. L. Kenward; Secretary, G. Page, 831 Pine Street, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 930.—President, 0. B. Hoover; Secretary, J. B. Gibson, R.R. 1, Kamloops.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 80.
—President, A. R. McKay; Secretary, E. Ellis,
General Delivery, Kamloops.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 748.
—President, V. R. Hampton; Secretary, K. S.
Lucas, 719 Dominion Street, Kamloops.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 519.—■
President, A. E. Gagne; Secretary, V. H. Mott,
521 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
148. —President, W. R. Ryan; Secretary, R.
Lapsley, 907 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 611. — President, E. R. Chapman; Secretary, H. P. Batti-
son, 36 Nicola Street West, Kamloops.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Brotherhood of, No. 150.—President, G. N. Roberts; Secretary, N. P. Pap worth, 843 St. Paul
Street, Kamloops.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 30.—■
Secretary, J. Gallagher, 503 Victoria Street,
Kamloops.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 45.—
Secretary, J. Gallagher, 503 Victoria Street,
Kamloops.
Kaslo.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 173.—President, J. Chmelar; Secretary, T. H.
Horner, Kaslo.
Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 5.—
President, H. Turner; Secretary, W. Tyder, 205
St. Paul Street, Kelowna.
Kimberley.
Workmen's Co-operative Committee, Sullivan Mine.
—President, H. Nicholson; Secretary, J. W. G.
Livingstone, General Delivery, Kimberley.
Kispiox.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 11.—President,
R. Wilson;   Secretary, S. Morrison, Kispiox.
Kitimat.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 12.—President,
R. Morrison;   Secretary, Joseph Gray, Kitimat.
KlTKATLAH.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 5.—President, J.
Innes;   Secretary, R. Gamble, Kitkatlah.
Kitlope.
Native Brotherhood of B.C.—President and Secretary, J. Paul, Kitlope.
Kitsalas.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 335.—President, D. J. Gunn; Secretary, G.
Somerville, Kitsalas via Copper River.
Kitwanga.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 8.—President, H.
Sinclair;   Secretary, Eddie Benson, Kitwanga.
Klemtu.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 13.—President, J.
Robinson;   Secretary, Thomas Brown, Klemtu.
Kyuquot.
Native  Brotherhood  of  B.C.,  No.  36.—President,
W. Harry, Kyuquot.
Lake Cowichan.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No.  2824.—President,   T.  A.   Giles;    Secretary,
Geo. Robins, Box 139, Lake Cowichan.
Marguerite.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No. 221.—President, J. A. Miller;   Secretary, H.
Robinson, Marguerite.
Masset.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 4.—President, W.
Matthews;   Secretary, Chris. Matthews, Masset. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 117
Metlakatla.
Native Brotherhood of B.C.—President and Secretary, G. Leighton, Metlakatla.
McBride.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 247.—President,
R. T. Clay; Secretary, G. T. Holdway, P.O. Box
25, McBride.
McGillivray Falls.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 215. — President, Geo. Tinker; Secretary,
T. W. Broadhead, McGillivray Falls.
Michel.
Bush and Millmen's Union.—President, J. Bella;
Secretary, J. Pugliese, Michel.
Nanaimo.
Bakery Salesmen, No. 189.—President, H. Janes;
Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 527.—President, W. J. Emerson;
Secretary, Wm. Little, 217 Irwin Street, Nanaimo.
Civic Employees' Association.—President, T. M.
Mumberson; Secretary, Colin McArthur, 146
Nicol Street, Nanaimo.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, L. Ross; Secretary, H. W. Spencer, 433
Fourth Street, Nanaimo.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Co.—President, J. H. Redford; Secretary,
A. R. Rowbottom, 565 Stewart Avenue, Nanaimo.
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President,
T. McCourt; Secretary, Fred Johnson, 119 Baden
Powell Street, Nanaimo.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
7.—President, F. Laithwaite; Secretary, A. Dunn,
131 Harvey Street, Nanaimo.
Kelly Douglas Company, Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M.
Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7355.—
President, D. Radford; Secretary, Jas. Forsythe,
28 Watkin Street, Nanaimo.
Typographical Union, No. 337.—President, J. B.
Paul; Secretary, L. C. Gilbert, 491 Fifth Street,
Nanaimo.
Utilities Employees' Association, Nanaimo-Dun-
can. — President, C. Lafek; Secretary, J. R.
Adams, 515 Prideaux Street, Nanaimo.
Natal.
Mine Workers of America, Michel Local Union,
No. 7292.—President, T. Podrasky; Secretary,
S. Weaver, Natal.
Nelson.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union, Journeymen, No. 196.—President, A. J. Hamson; Secretary, F. Defoe, Ward
Street, .Nelson.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, F. C. Collins; Secretary, E. S. Hall, 418
Robson Street, Nelson.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Co.—President, R. B. Smith; Secretary,
A. Hardy, 308 Carbonate Street, Nelson.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 579.—
President, L. W. Humphrey; Secretary, G. Allan,
1115 Ward Street, Nelson.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 18.—
President, R. Todd; Secretary, A. D. Bruce, c/o
Canadian Pacific Express Company, Nelson.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of, No. 631.
—President, F. H. Abbott; Secretary, E. N.
Mannings, 1011 Hall Street, Nelson.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 75.
—President, F. N. Thompson; Secretary, G. C.
Massey, 306 Third Street, Nelson.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 663.
—President, J. E. Baldock; Secretary, F. Romano, 1314 Front Street, Nelson.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, No. 181.—President, B. W. Melnechuk; Secretary, Paul Much,
Bayonne.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 558.—
President, J. S. Edwards; Secretary, C. H.
Sewell, 41 High Street, Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
98.—President, A. Smith; Secretary, G. B. Abbott, 2013 Stanley Street, Nelson.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 460. — President, W. E. Marquis; Secretary, A. Kirby, 820
Carbonate Street, Nelson.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 1291.—President, J. S. Brake; Secretary,
E. F. Phillips, 220 Silica Street, Nelson.
Typographical Union, No. 340.—President, F. C.
Howitt; Secretary, Geo. W. Priest, General Delivery, Nelson.
New Westminster.
Bakery Salesmen, No. 189.—President, H. Janes;
Secretary, Birt'Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union, No.
5.—President, W. Hinde; Secretary, S. Lloyd,
1912 London Street, New Westminster.
Boilermakers, Iron-ship Builders, and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, No. 194.
—President, P. Nicholson; Secretary, C. A.
Bailey, 634 Thirteenth Avenue, New Westminster.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, No.
3.—President, D. Dawson; Secretary, G. Ford,
887 Dalhousie Street, New Westminster.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 1251.—President, R. Groves; Secretary, E. J.
Barritt, 3342 Neville Street, New Westminster.
Civic Employees' Association.—President, J. Wood;
Secretary, E. G. Hudson, 417 Eighth Street, New
Westminster.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, R. V. Cheale; Secretary, Fred McGrath,
316 Strand Avenue, New Westminster.
Cordage Employees' Association.—President, Wm.
M. Jackson; Secretary, Miss C. R. Campbell,
509 Ash Street, New Westminster.
Distillery, Rectifying,. and Wine Workers' International Union, No. 69.—President, W. Thacker;
Secretary, Lilly Pearce, 368 Simpson Street, New
Westminster.
Fire-fighters, International Association of, No.
256.—President, E. L. V. Insley; Secretary, L. J.
Wisheart, No. 1 Fire Hall, Carnarvon Street,
New Westminster. F 118
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Gas Workers' Union, United Association of Journeymen Plumbers and Steam Fitters, No. 376.—
President, C. S. Martin; Secretary, A. F. Chandler, 2525 Elizabeth Street, Vancouver.
Glove Workers' Union, No. 104. — President, H.
Hendrickson; Secretary, G. Derrick, 4223 Albert
Street, Vancouver.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders'
International League, No. 835. — President, J.
McLean; Secretary, T. A. Skinner, 203 Cunningham Street, New Westminster.
Institutional Employees' Association, Provincial.
—President, J. H. Wilson; Secretary, Geo. Mc-
Chesney, Port Coquitlam.
Kelly Douglas Company, Ltd., Employees' Association.—President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M.
Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 151.
—President, J. Cunliffe; Secretary, T. Kenyon,
448 Fader Street, New Westminster.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
180. — President, J. McDell; Secretary, S. S.
Hugh, 1917 Eighth Avenue, New Westminster.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
456.—President, M. A. Bailey; Secretary, H. W.
Halverson, 1523 Seventh Avenue, New Westminster.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association.—
President, J. Mitchell; Secretary, T. H. Poul-
ton, 725 Second Street, New Westminster.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, No. 280.—President, W. Hamilton; Secretary, A. M. Cawley,
R.R. 4, New Westminster.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 226.—President,
A. S. Greening; Secretary, L. H. Stevens, 409
Kelly Street, New Westminster.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees, Amalgamated Association, No. 134.—
President, J. T. Patterson; Secretary, S. I.
Hearst, 1412 Seventh Avenue, New Westminster.
Typographical Union, No. 632.—President, A. R.
MacDonald; Secretary, R. A. Stoney, P.O. Box
754, New Westminster.
Waterfront Workers' Association, Royal City.—■
President. A. Gore; Secretary, G. G. Phelan,
1359 Hellings Road, New Westminster.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-
357.—President, H. J. Pritchett; Secretary, G. H.
Mitchell, 908 Fourteenth Avenue, New Westminster.
NOOTKA.
Native Brotherhood of B.C. — President, August
Murphy, Nootka.
Nuchatlitz.
Native Brotherhood of B.C. — President, Felix
Michael, Nuchatlitz.
Ocean Falls.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
360.—President,   Roy   Weaver;    Secretary,   H.
Hetherington, Ocean Falls.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, No. 312.
—President,   H.   Webster;    Secretary,   P.   A.
Tweedie, Ocean Falls.
Ohiat.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 25.—President,
A. Peters;   Secretary, S. Dennis, Ohiat.
Osoyoos.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 3.-—
President, Mrs. E.' Porter; Secretary, Mrs. D.
Askins, Osoyoos.
Penticton.
Electrical Employees' Association, Penticton Municipal.—President, J. B. Clarke; Secretary, A. S.
Tate, Box 473, Penticton.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 866.—
President, C. E. Hulett; Secretary, J. H. Vader,
Brookmere.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
10.—President, J. D. Crawford; Secretary, W. T.
Mattock, Box 184, Penticton.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 884.—President, C. P. Bird; Secretary,
A. R. Fulkerson, 724 Winnipeg Street, Penticton.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 1.—-
President, P. H. Howard; Secretary, M. G. Gawne,
529 Ellis Street, Penticton.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1023. — President, A. Low; Secretary, F.
Parsons, Box 160, Penticton.
Municipal Employees' Association, Penticton.—
President, F. A. McKinnon; Secretary, J. D.
Crawford, Box 224, Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 914.—
President, W. J. Abbott; Secretary, A. J. Presley, Box 143, Penticton.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 179. — President, H. C. Kirkpatrick; Secretary, C. A. Yule,
Box 67, Penticton.
Typographical Union, Vernon, No. 541. ■— President, J. Murray; Secretary, W. B. Hilliard, Box
272, Penticton.
Port Alberni.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 513.—President, S. Magnusson;
Secretary, O. Knutson, Port Alberni.
Woodworkers of America, International, District
1, No. 85.—President, W. Yates; Secretary, A.
Dewhurst, Alberni.
Port Simpson.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., Headquarters.—President, S. Morrison; Secretary, H. Kelly, Port
Simpson.
Powell River.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 2068.—President, J. Gibson; Secretary, F. A.
Smith, Wildwood Heights P.O.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
8.—President, J. McCrossan; Secretary, A. McLaren, Westview.
Papermakers, International Brotherhood of, No.
142. — President, W. V. Thomson; Secretary,
H. B. Moore, Box 55, Westview.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper-mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 76.—President, H. L.
Hansen; Secretary, C. M. Mouat, Box 745, Powell
River.
Prince George.
Firemen and Enginemen, Locomotive, Brotherhood of, No. 827.—President, R. R. Anderson;
Secretary, E. Kirkpatrick, Prince George.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 620. — President, D. Ross; Secretary, J. E. Paschal, Box
305, Prince George. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 119
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 28. — President,
H. A. McLeod; Secretary, H. Allen, Box 540,
Prince George.
, Prince Rupert.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union, No.
4.—President, E. J. White;   Secretary, J. Nicoll,
Box 1403, Prince Rupert.
Building Workers  of  Canada, Amalgamated,  No.
1.—Seoretary, L. Hilder, Box 577, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters  and  Joiners,  United  Brotherhood  of,
No.  1735. — President,  S.  D.  Bird;    Secretary,
J. S. Black, Box 694, Prince Rupert.
Engineers,   International   Union   of   Steam   and
Operating, No. 510.-—President, W. Cumming;
Secretary,   S.   L.   Peachey,   733   Tatlow   Street,
Prince Rupert.
Fire-fighters,   International   Association   of,   No.
559.—President, E. Jackson;   Secretary, A. Klatt,
Fire Hall, Prince Rupert.
Fishermen's Federal  Union, Deep  Sea, No. 80.—
President,  W.  H.  Brett;    Secretary,  G. Anderson, P.O. Box 249, Prince Rupert.
Fish-packers,  Associated,   No.   1. — President,   E.
Schroeder;    Secretary,  H.  Langholm,  Box  746,
Prince Rupert.
Fish-packers'  Federal  Union  No.  49.—President,
A.  McDonald;    Secretary,  T.  H.  Elliott,  Sixth
Avenue East, Prince Rupert.
Longshoremen's  Association,   Canadian,  No.   2.—
President, W. Ferguson;   Secretary, W. A. Pil-
fold, Box 531, Prince Rupert.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 207.
—President, W. J. Dunn; Secretary, W. J. Dunn,
Box 611, Prince Rupert.
Plumbers  and   Steamfitters,  Journeymen,  United
Association of, No. 180.—President, F. R. Graves;
Secretary,   N.   Bird,   Sub-P.O.   No.   1,   Prince
Rupert.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
426.—President, J. G. Paul;  Secretary, F. Derry,
P.O. Box 496, Prince Rupert.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian  Brotherhood of, No.  154.—President,
D.  R.  Creed;    Secretary,  J.  E.  Davies,  Prince
George.
Typographical   Union,   No.   413. — President,   R.
Hemming;    Secretary, R.  O.  Franks,  P.O.  Box
552, Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7875.—
President,'Wm. Forsyth; Secretary, J. Howarth,
Jr., Princeton.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 407.—Secretary, J. M.
Goble, Box 283, Revelstoke.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 657.—
President, D. A. Johnston; Secretary, G. L.
Ingram, Box 485, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 341.—President, A. O. Alemn; Secretary, F. J. Westlake, Box 187, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 381.—President, D. Blackwell; Secretary, S.
Anderson, Box 7, Revelstoke.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 258.
—President, J. M. Donaldson; Secretary, R. Robertson, Box 209, Revelstoke.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 51.—
President, J. McKenzie; Secretary, D. E. Johnson, P.O. Box 728, Revelstoke.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
481.—President, A. N. Watt; Secretary, P. White,
General Delivery, Revelstoke.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 487. — President, S. Porritt; Secretary, T. B. Phillip, Box
261, Revelstoke.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 72.-—
Secretary, L. W. File, Box 577, Revelstoke.
Sechart.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 30.—President,
A. Shewish;   Secretary, C. Watts, Sechart.
Skeena Crossing.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 9.—President,
Arthur McDames; Secretary, P. Brown, Skeena
Crossing.
Smithers.
Communications Union, The Canada.—President,
C. C. Shea; Secretary, H. A. Hooper, Box 128,
Smithers.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 111.—
President, F. V. Foster; Secretary, H. D. Johnson, Box 80, Smithers.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 869.—
President, J. M. Graham; Secretary, J. H. Rife,
Box 168, Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415.—President, J. Cathrae; Secretary, D. Mac-
Lean, Smithers.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 93. — President,
R. W. Champion; Secretary, P. B. Emerson,
Smithers.
South Slocan.
Operators' Organization of the West Kootenay
Power and Light Company, Ltd.—President, G. L.
Thompson; Secretary, G. M. Helbecque, Bon-
nington Falls.
Workmen's Co-operative of the West Kootenay
Power and Light Company, Ltd. — President,
C. G. MacKay; Secretary, W. R. W'alkley, South
Slocan.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1419.—President, H. A. Thorne; Secretary, A. H.
E. Barnfield, Squamish.
Squirrel.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 19. — President
and Secretary, Wm. Mitchell, Squirrel.
Stewart.
Tramway Union, Alaska Aerial, No. 2. — President, A. Phillips; Secretary, H. W. Thomas,
Hyder, Alaska.
Telkwa.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 340.—President, J. Patrick; Secretary, D.
Small, Box 29, Telkwa.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 20.—President
and Secretary, P. Pierre, Telkwa.
Toquart.
Native Brotherhood of B.C. — President, C. C.
Mack;   Secretary, Philip Mack, Toquart. F 120
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Trail.
Co-operative Committee, Workmen's, of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company.—President, D. Kenneway; Secretary, W. Campbell,
11 Mumay Drive, Warfield, Trail.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of.—
President, G. Dingwall; Secretary, Wm. Yawney,
Box 491, Rossland.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association, No. 76.—
President, R. H. Hilder; Secretary, R. H. Busch,
2183 Riverside Avenue, Trail.
Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers' Union, International, No. 480.—President, R. W. Henne; Secretary, W. G. Millar, 1920 Oak Street, Trail.
UCHUCKLESIT.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 26.—Secretary,
A. Cootes, Uchucklesit.
UCLUELET.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 28.—President,
C. McCarthy;   Secretary, H. Joe, Ucluelet.
Vancouver.
Aeronautical Lodge, No. 756.—President, C. Whent;
Secretary, G. E. Knechtel, Room 6, William
Building, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers, International,
No. 468.—President, A. E. Jackson; Secretary,
J. A. Humphreys, 5625 Rupert Street, Vancouver.
Bakery Salesmen, No. 189.—President, H. Janes;
Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Barbers' Association of B.C.—President, J. Jackson; Secretary, R. W. Morrow, 4, 441 Seymour
Street, Vancouver.
Barbers', Hairdressers', and Cosmetologists' International Union of America, Journeymen, No.
120.—President, R. J. Guthrie; Secretary, C. E.
Herrett, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers, No. 676.—President, W. G.
Couper; Secretary, J. F. Mohan, 347 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Biscuit and Confection Co., Ltd., National, Employees' Committee of.—President, F. Ramsay;
Secretary, Miss Elsie Read, 6037 Trafalgar
Street, Vancouver.
Blacksmiths' and Helpers' Union of Canada, No.
1.—President, W. Richards; Secretary, C. Rouse,
2605 Scott Street, Vancouver.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 151. — President,
W. J. Bartlett; Secretary, A. Buckingham, 1329
Stride Avenue, New Westminster.
Boilermakers and Iron-ship Builders, No. -1.—
President, M. Mills; Secretary, R. Stephen,
2136 William Street, Vancouver.
Boilermakers and Iron-ship Builders, No. 9.—
President, F. Hardy; Secretary, E. Barrett, 2147
Yukon Street, Vancouver.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
105.—President, F. I. Milne; Secretary, Mrs.
W. Leak, 1837 Larch Street, Vancouver.
Brewery and Soft Drink Workers, United, No.
300.— President, W. Pallant; Secretary, Ed.
Sims, 5392 Clarendon Street, Vancouver.
B.C. Box, Limited, Employees' Association.—President, J. Finlayson; Secretary, J. R. McGillivray, 1437 Seventieth Avenue West, Vancouver.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association.—President, H. O. Bulmer; Secretary, E. J. McLaughlin, 3126 Georgia Street East, Vancouver.
Bricklayers' and Masons' Union, No. 1.—President, A. Fordyce; Secretary, L. Padgett, 2066
Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural, and Ornamental-iron Workers,
No. 97, International Association of. — President, J. E. Fitzpatrick; Secretary, R. McDonald, 5059 Chester Street, Vancouver.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, B.C.
Unit, No. 1.—President, N. McLean; Secretary,
M. J. Teskey, 467 Fifteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, Shipyard Unit, No. 2. — President, J. A. Pedden;
Secretary, W. Bray, 116 Sixteenth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, No.
4.—President, P. Benner; Secretary, J. Che-
mago, 1131 Haro Street, Vancouver.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, Pattern Makers Local.—President, C. Cox; Secretary, J. L. Irving, 936 Semlin Drive, Vancouver.
Cannery and Ag-ricultural Workers' Union, United,
No. 1.—President, W. Meakins; Secretary, Miss
R. Turner, 1709 Haro Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 452.—President, G. R. Bengough; Secretary,
H. P. Hamilton, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2346.—President, W. J. Harris;
Secretary, J. A. Gildemeester, 3885 Thirty-sixth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Cemco Employees' Association. — President, R.
Counter; Secretary, Miss M. Stone, 1218 Burnaby Street, Vancouver.
Cement Finishers' Section of Building Labourers'
Union, No. 602.—President, S. Burnley; Secretary, J. H. Burrough, 4132 Parker Street, Vancouver.
Checkers' and Weighers' Association, Marine.—
President, W. R. Stanton; Secretary, R. Mettan,
344 Hastings Street East, Vancouver.
City Hall Employees' Association, No. 59.—President, Wm. M. Black; Secretary, Jas. Tarbuck,
3917 Eleventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 28.—President, S.
Smith; Secretary, W. J. Scribbins, 195 Pender
Street East, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Association, North Vancouver.
—President, Wm. Dunnet; Secretary, T. H.
Heape, 745 Thirteenth Avenue East, North Vancouver.
Civic Federation of Vancouver.—President, H. O.
Ashton; Secretary, R. Skinner, 571 Twenty-
second Avenue West, Vancouver.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, H. A. Benbow; Secretary, Harold Baker,
3680 Collingwood Street, Vancouver.
Divers' and Tenders' Union, Submarine. — President, H. E. Ryan; Secretary, J. N. Smith, 414
Third Street East, North Vancouver.
Dock and Shipyard Workers' Union, No. 2.—
President, C. A. Saunders; Secretary, J. Dob-
son, 7, 308 Vernon Drive, Vancouver.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Co.—President, E. C. Wintemute; Secretary, R. H. Milner, 410, 543 Granville Street,
Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 121
Elevator Constructors, International Union of,
No. 82.—President, H. C. MacKichan; Secretary, R. Holmes, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Electrical Workers' Unit, Amalgamated, Building
Workers of Canada, No. 3.—President, J. Var-
ley; Secretary, R. Adair, 3009 Woodland Street,
New Westminster.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. B213.—President, F. Looney; Secretary,
J. N. Ross, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
115.—President, F. Hunt; Secretary, J. R. Flynn,
117 Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 320.—
President, W. J. Hill; Secretary, E. J. Wise,
104 Tenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 907.—
President, W. V. Wright; Secretary, F. J. Allen, 1032 Fourteenth Avenue  East, Vancouver.
Engineers, Marine, National Association of Canada, No. 7.—President, R. Milne; Secretary,
E.  R.   Smith,  2735   Charles   Street,  Vancouver.
Engineers, National Union of Operating, No. 2.—
President, F. C. McDonald; Secretary, G. D.
Lamont, 223 Carrall Street, Vancouver.
Engineers' Union, Operating, Local No. 3.—President, Wm. Ross; Secretary, L. C. Reid, 704
Holden Building, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
115.—President, F. Hunt; Secretary, J. R. Flynn,
117 Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
882.—President, J. Henderson; Secretary, W. A.
Gillespie, 4783 Beatrice Street, Vancouver.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
963.—President, Wm. Partington; Secretary,
Alex. M. Reid, 3079 Euclid Avenue, Vancouver.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 15.—
President, W. E. Ferrier; Secretary, M. E.
Davidson, 1860 Twenty-second Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees, No. B-71.—President,
S. Walker; Secretary, Geo. Hislop, 2549 Charles
Street, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, No. 1. — President, E. G.
Lucas; Secretary, C. H. Hagman, 1638 First
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, No. 3.—President, G. Miller;
Secretary, T. Cumming, 742 Third Street East,
North Vancouver.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
4.—President,  G. Horridge;    Secretary, T. W.
Murphy, 1538 Acadia Road, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Local, International Association,
No. S-18.—President, J. Lyon; Secretary, C. A.
Watson, 1626 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 656.—President, D. L. Tooke; Secretary, H. O. Tooke, 2649 Quebec Street, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 939.—President, S. Baxter; Secretary, G. F. Brebber, 434 Glen Drive, Vancouver.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood
of, No. 289.—President, A. Hubbard; Secretary,
W. R. Chapman, 1165 Beach Avenue, Vancouver.
First-aid Attendants, B.C.—President, J. B. Liv-
sey; Secretary, H. W. Mahler, 919 Broughton
Street, Vancouver.
Fish-cannery and Reduction Plant Workers' Federal Union, United, No. 89. — Vice-President,
F. H. Carroll; Secretary, W. Gateman, 138
Cordova Street East, Vancouver.
Fishermen's Federal Union, United, No. 44.—
President, H. Stavenes; Secretary, W. T. Burgess, 4345 John Street, Vancouver.
Garage and Motor Trades' Association of B.C.—
President, W. Dudgeon; Secretary, F. Elliott,
342 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 190.—
President, M. P. Palmatary; Secretary, W. S.
Shaw, 3435 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Garment Workers, International Ladies, No. 276.
—President, Mrs. E. Thomas; Secretary, C.
Carr, 358 Third Street East, North Vancouver.
General Duty Nurses' Association. — President,
Miss M. Baily; Secretary, Miss W. Dunbar, 645
Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Granite Cutters' International Association.—President, A. S. Simpson; Secretary, Alex. Fordyce,
20 Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Gypsum Workers' Union, No. 578.—President, J.
Frances; Secretary, G. H. Eckenswiller, 2225
Walker Avenue, New Westminster.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers'
Union, No. 602.—President, S. Burnley; Secretary, J. H. Burrough, 4132 Parker Street, Vancouver.
Hospital Employees' Union, No. 4. — President,
Mrs. J. Hallock; Secretary, Miss I. Inkson,
1085 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, No, 28.
—President, W. I. Henning; Secretary, Miss
S. K. Stewart, 39, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Inland Boatmen's Union of the Pacific, Deep Sea.
—President, J. McCarthy; Secretary, J. M.
Smith, 705, 16e Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Iron Molders' and Foundry Workers' Union, International, No. 281.—President, Chas. A. Burrows; Secretary, J. Browne, 638 Broadway West,
Vancouver.
Jersey Farms Employees' Staff Council.—-President, J. Ottewell; Secretary, E. Wilson, 455
Twenty-seventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
Jewelry Workers' Union, International, No. 42.—
President, Ed. Percy; Secretary, Karl Zuker,
1190 Eleventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
Kelly Douglas Company, Ltd., Employees' Association.— President, W. Shannon; Secretary,
B. M. Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Lathers' Association, Wood, Wire, and Metal, No.
207. — President, G. Morris; Secretary, T. R.
Crane, 1169 Pendrell Street, Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 12.
—President, D. D. Samson; Secretary, J. Cass,
426 Seventeenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, No. 44.
—President, F. Phipps; Secretary, A. Robold,
2974 Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's Association, Burrard, Coastwise.
—President, W. Shaver; Secretary, James Dar-
wood, 2049 Kitchener Street, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's Association, North Vancouver.—■
President, D. Paull; Secretary, T. E. Moody,
North Vancouver Indian Reserve No. 1, North
Vancouver.
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Limited, Employees'
Association.—President, G. E. Wray; Secretary,
A. S. Kellaway, 3627 Oak Street, Vancouver. F 122
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 182.
—President, N. G. Salsbury; Secretary, J. H.
Wallace, 3271 Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 692.
—President, R. G. Daniels; Secretary, D. McMillan, 2124 Estern Avenue, North Vancouver.
Mailers' Union, No. 70.—President, W. Campbell;
Secretary, R. Gordon Taylor, 1176 Duchess Avenue, Hollyburn P.O., West Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 31. — President, R. Olson; Secretary, R.
McLure, 1736 Thirty-fourth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, International
Brotherhood of, No. 167.—President, J. Krim-
mer; Secretary, P. J. Doyle, 3630 Tenth Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 210.—President, J. Fraser; Secretary, R. Halliday, 3350 Venables Street, Vancouver.
Marshall-Wells Employees' Association. — President, B. W. Ashcroft; Secretary, Louise F.
Sevin, 2247 Thirty-fourth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Milk-wagon Drivers''and Dairy Employees' Union,
No. 464.—President, R. McCullock; Secretary,
Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Miners' Union, No. 289.—President, J. Jurnich;
Secretary, G. F. Price, 517 Holden Building,
Vancouver.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union, No. 1.
—President, J. Gorton; Secretary, V. Crowley,
2420 Thirty-third Avenue East, Vancouver.
Municipal Employees' Association, West Vancouver.—President, P. S. Hopkins; Secretary, T. J.
Elliott, 1125 Inglewood Avenue, Hollyburn.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 145.—
President, Wm. Pilling; Secretary, E. A. Jamie-
son, 553 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Neon Employees' Association.—President, R. Shaw;
Secretary, Miss P. L. Borgesson, 1924 Parker
Street, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, No. 1.—President, W. A. Tutte;
Secretary, Miss V. C. Vicary, 20, 2570 Spruce
Street, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, No. 2, Vancouver.—President,
A. J. Heide; Secretary, J. H. Thornton, 246
Blundell Road, Steveston.
Oil Workers, United, No. 1.—President, A. McKenzie; Secretary, E. W. Clark, 975 Denman
Street, Vancouver.
Packers, Limited, Employees' Association, Pacific
Coast.—President, D. Gardner; Secretary, Mrs.
M. F. Sutherland, 2338 Royal Oak Avenue, Burnaby, New Westminster.
Packing-house Workers, United, No. 162.—President, P. Christie; Secretary, Alice Pamplin, 4513
Beatrice Street, Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers, Brotherhood of, No. 138.—President, Wm. Slinn; Secretary, H. Macaulay, 103, 2224 Alberta Street,
Vancouver.
Paper Box, Limited, Employees' Association, National.—President, G. F. Paone; Secretary, J. D.
Sharp, 3631 Dunbar Street, Vancouver.
Photo-engravers' Union, No. 54.—President, Wm.
Wilson; Secretary, J. A. Hinke, 3776 Thirty-
fifth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf, and Dock Builders,
No. 2404.—President, C. E. Mackintosh; Secretary, J. McGriffin, P.O. Box 369, Vancouver.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association of,
No. 170.—President, Val Pearson; Secretary, F.
Carlisle, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Police Federal Association, No. 12. — President,
C. W. Macdonald; Secretary, K. W. MacLean,
2442 Gait Street, Vancouver.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, No. 69.
—President, M. Erenberg; Secretary, Thos. S.
Ezart, 1807 Thirty-eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 433.—President,
G. A. Burton; Secretary, D. W. Basler, 5025
Joyce Road, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144.—
President, W. Pennington; Secretary, R. J. H.
Blackwell, 557 Fifty-sixth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 987, Lions
Gate Lodge.—President, T. W. Storey; Secretary, R. T. Houghton, P.O. Box 655, Vancouver.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, No. 58.—President, Eugene Magri; Secretary, S. S. Shearer,
1805 Whyte Avenue, Vancouver.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 267. — President, E. Pugsley; Secretary, J. B. Physick, 1156
Thurlow Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 221.—President,
P. Jones; Secretary, D. W. Carson, 3248 Wel-
wyn, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 59.—President, B.
Howard; Secretary, A. E. Langley, 3537 Third
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 82.-—President,
A. A. Egan; Secretary, T. M. Sullivan, 2715
Dundas Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 220.—President,
R. Anderson; Secretary, R. Heriot, 3521 Eleventh
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 223.—President,
I. Dorman; Secretary, Fred Heap, 3216 Kitchener Street, Vancouver.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association.—President, C. J.
Green; Secretary, J. H. Menzies, 2990 Seventh
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
Progress Lodge, No. 46.—President, N. Cryder-
man; Secretary, D. E. Horner, 2556 Sixteenth
Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 526.—President, A. R. Davie; Secretary,
G. V. Groves, 1662 Barclay Street, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, No. 626.—
President, T. Gray; Secretary, M. McGilvray,
1052 Richards Street, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 630.—President, A. Gordon; Secretary,
W. J. Mason, 3116 Thirteenth Avenue West,
Vancouver.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, Nos. 52 and
74.—Secretary, H. S. Evans, 1819 Fourteenth
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Retail Clerks' Union, No. 279. — President, R.
Palmer; Secretary, G. A. Wilkinson, 2020
Chaucer Street, Victoria. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 123
Retail Employees' Association.—President, R. M.
Stevenson; Secretary, A. Spain, 3922 Georgia
Street East, Vancouver.
Seafarers' Association, Canadian, No. 1. —President, H. H. Taylor; Secretary, G. Smillie, 175
Third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Seamen's Union, B.C.—President, H. Lundeberg;
Secretary, H. Murphy, 2450 Heather Street,
Vancouver.
Sheet-metal Workers' International Association,
No. 280.—President, R. Macaulay; Secretary,
Jack Lawrance, 4195 Perry Street, Vancouver.
Sheet-metal Workers' International Association,
No. 314.—President, H. H. Swinden; Secretary,
Geo. Watson, 1909 Nineteenth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Shipyards, Limited, Employees' Association. —
President, D. Lamont; Secretary, R. Bell, 4055
Inverness Street, Vancouver.
Shoe-workers' Union, Western, No. 1.—President,
J. M. Turner; Secretary, G. Stretch, 2441 Thirty-
third Avenue East, Vancouver.
Sign and Pictorial Painters, No. 726.—President,
A. Lacey; Secretary, Wm. 0. Clarkson, 5802
Larch Street, Vancouver.
A. P. Slade & Company, Limited, and Associated
Companies Employees' Association.-—President,
Wm. A. Spain; Secretary, G. R. Brewer, 1104
Sperling Avenue, Lochdale P.O.
Spear & Jackson Employees' Club.—President, T.
Wilson; Secretary, D. R. Alexander, 3519 Twenty-sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2655.—President, P. Baskin; Secretary, H. Watson, 1420
Barclay Street, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2765.—President, R. G. Patterson; Secretary, Miss L.
Haines, 716 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, No. 2821.—President, G. Sowden; Secretary, W. V. Tybarger,
2732 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Stenographers, Typists, Bookkeepers, and Assistants, No. 18177.—President, L. Nicholes; Secretary, V. Gilberthorpe, 1418 Maple Street, Vancouver.
Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union, International, No. 88.—President, W. L. McComb;
Secretary, J. Anderson, 4616 Thirteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver.
Stonecutters of N.A., Journeymen. ■— President,
F. H. Lowe; Secretary, Frank Hall, 2931 Forty-
second Avenue East, Vancouver.
Street Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, No. 101.—President, C. M. Stewart; Secretary, R. K. Gervin, 2284 Forty-fifth Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Switchmen's Union, No. 111.—-President, W. J.
Ingles; Secretary, A. S. Crosson, 3925 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Tailors, Journeymen, of America, No. 178.—President, H. Clausner; Secretary, Mrs. D. L. Roberts, 606 Forty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Taxicab, Stage and Bus Drivers' Union, No. 151.
—President, C. E. Youngs; Secretary, C. Mc-
Ivor, 727 Twentieth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—President, A. T. Als-
bury; Secretary, C. H. Shoemaker, 4609 Oak
Street, Vancouver.
Telegraphers' Union, Commercial C.P.R. System,
No. 1.—President, I. R. Burns; Secretary, C. W.
Campbell, Box 432, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees, International Alliance of the U.S. and Canada, No. 118.—President, G. Martin; Secretary, Walter Blake, 1212
Granville Street, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees, International Association, No. 348.—President, R. G. Pollock; Secretary, J. H. Leslie, 271 Twentieth Street, Hollyburn, West Vancouver.
Tile Helpers' International Association of Marble,
Slate, and Stone Polishers, etc.—President, D. F.
Snow; Secretary, G. Menzies, 1038 Davie Street,
Vancouver.
Tile Setters, Local No. 3.—President, R. Neville;
Secretary, W. Richards, 5326 Spencer Street,
Vancouver.
Truck Drivers and Helpers, General, No. 31.—
President, F. Drury; Secretary, Birt Showier,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Typographical Union, No. 226.—President, W. H.
P. McClure; Secretary, R. H. Neelands, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver.
University of B.C. Employees' Federal Union, No.
116.—President, J. Bruce; Secretary, L. Wheeley,
4615 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Upholsterers' International Union of N.A., No.
306.—President, Malcolm Grant; Secretary, R.
E. Garside, 3260 Turner Street, Vancouver.
Malkin, W. H., Company's Warehouse Employees'
and Truck-drivers' Association.—President, W.
Ramsay; Secretary, F. H. Calhoun, 309 Carrall
Street, Vancouver.
Waterfront Workers' Association, No. 2140. ■—
President, S. R. MacKenzie; Secretary, A. G.
Smith, 2625 Hemlock Street, Vancouver.
Woodworkers' Union, No. 1, B.C. — President,
T. W. Pearson; Secretary, A. Bilesky, P.O.
Eburne.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-71.
—President, J. McCuish; Secretary, E. Dalskog,
506 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-
217.—President, B. J. Melsness; Secretary, W. J.
Bennett, 1785 Island Avenue, Vancouver.
Vernon.
Fruit   and   Vegetable   Workers'   Union,   No.   6.—-
President, E. Grey;  Secretary, Miss M. N. Wark,
Box 211, Vernon.
Public   Service   Plant   Employees'   Organization,
Canadian.—President, A. W. Smith;   Secretary,
E. Ross, Vernon.
Victoria.
Barbers, Journeymen, Hairdressers, etc., International Union, No. 372.—President, G. A. Turner; Secretary, J. A. Green, 1319 Douglas Street,
Victoria.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union, No.
2.—President, J. Bligh; Secretary, R. Smith,
1683 Foul Bay Road, Victoria.
Boilermakers and Iron-ship Builders and Helpers,
International Brotherhood of, No. 191.—President, L. Basso; Secretary, W. S. Duncan, 837
Old Esquimalt Road, Victoria.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
147. — President, R. Foster; Secretary, J. A.
Wiley, 141 Clarence Street, Victoria.
Brewery and Soft Drink Workers, International
Union of United, No. 280.—President, T. Rigby;
Secretary, Wm. Bryan, 2642 Scott Street, Victoria. F 124
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Bricklayers and Masons, International Union of,
No. 2.—President, W. Mertton; . Secretary, J.
Beckerley, 2682 Cadboro Bay Road, Victoria.
Building Workers of Canada, Shipwrights, Boat-
builders, and Caulkers, No. 1.—President, J. F.
Murray; Secretary, J. J. Walker, 540 Niagara
Street, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 1598.—President, Wm. C. Marshall; Secretary, Alex. Sims, 1158 May Street,
Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 2415.—President, S. Berrow; Secretary, E.
Hovey, 2511 Empire Street, Victoria.
Chemical and Explosives Workers' Industrial
Union, Canadian Federal Union, No. 128.—
President, R. Duncan; Secretary, H. Rowland,
3283 Wicklow Street, Victoria.
City Hall Officials' Association.—President, W. H.
Warren; Secretary, Miss Y. Meikle, City Hall,
Victoria.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, No. 50.
—President, J. W. Watson; Secretary, G. A.
Fletcher, 1035 Hillside Avenue, Victoria.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, E. W. Jones; Secretary, G. K. Beeston,
406 Post Office Building, Victoria.
Cooperage Employees' Association, Sweeney.—
President, H. Nutting; Secretary, R. Creech,
1163 Chapman Street, Victoria.
Defence Civilian Workers' Union, National, No.
192.—President, L. Martin; Secretary, G. P.
Grant, 472 Kipling Street, Victoria.
Dockyard and Shipyard Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, S. Robertson; Secretary, T. Coyle,
536% Johnson Street, Victoria.
Drivers' Union, National, No. 1.—President, H. A.
Allison; Secretary, A. E. McMullen, 1010 Queens
Avenue, Victoria.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Company.—President, J. H. Potts; Secretary, W. H. Sturrock, 3567 Savannah Avenue,
Victoria.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 230.—President, H. Duncan; Secretary,
F. J. Bevis, 1126 McClure Street, Victoria.
Engineers, National Association of Marine, No. 6.
—President, A. Alexander; Secretary, G. W.
Brown, 53 Lewis Street, Victoria.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20.—
President, T. C. Johns; Secretary, F. E. Dutot,
2176 Pentland Road, Victoria.
Fire-fighters, Victoria City, No. 730.—President,
J. Broadwell; Secretary, R. J. Coates, 2609
Avebury Avenue, Victoria.
Fire-fighters' Association, Saanich Municipal, No.
6.—President, R. Wootten; Secretary, G. Rob-
bins, 3680 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 690.—President, E. W. Collins; Secretary, G. H. Stewart, 716 Craigflower Road, Victoria.
Garage Association, Vancouver Island Coach Lines.
—President, W. Bate; Secretary, W. McAdams,
413 Obed Avenue, Victoria.
Gas Workers Union, Local Plumbers and Steam
Fitters, United Association of, No. 815.—President, K. L. Roach; Secretary, G. Page, 398
Gorge Road West, Victoria.
Government Employees, American Federation of,
No. 59.—President, T. F. Monaghan; Secretary,
E. E. David, Box 484, Victoria.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees, No. 459.—President, Mrs. O. Brown; Secretary, F. Dovey, 554
Dupplin Road, Victoria.
Island Freight Service Employees' Association.—
President, E. G. Brookbank; Secretary, R. O.
Brown, 130 Joseph Street, Victoria.
Kelly Douglas & Company, Limited, Employees'
Association. — President, W. Shannon; Secretary, B. M. Hart, 626 Slocan Street, Vancouver.
Lathers' Association, Vancouver Island. — President, E. C. Day; Secretary, A. J. Ferguson,
2751 Roseberry Avenue, Victoria.
Lathers, Wood, Wire and Metal, International,
No. 332.—President, J. H. Hutchinson; Secretary, W. H. Crane, 3035 Albina Street, Victoria.
Laundry Workers' Union, No. 1.—President, M. E.
Hubbard; Secretary, Miss G. Kimmel, 47 Men-
zies Street, Victoria.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 11.
—President, W. J. Knotts; Secretary, F. C. Hurry, 898 Front Street, Victoria.
Library, Victoria Public Staff Association.—President, Miss B. Davis; Secretary, Miss J. I.Mathe-
son, 2921 Earl Grey Street, Victoria.
Longshoremen's Association.—President, J. Lackie;
Secretary, W. Norman Scott, 676 Battery Street,
Victoria.
Machinists, Fitters, and Helpers, National Union
of, No. 2.—President, L. A. Hodgins; Secretary,
F. Van Horn, Room 1, 1116 Broad Street, Victoria.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 456.
—President, R. W. Watson; Secretary, C. H.
Lester, 1137 Caledonia Avenue, Victoria.
Mailers' Union, No. 121. — President, Andrew
Veitch; Secretary, E. H. Whitten, 241 Howe
Street, Victoria.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, No. 533.—President, J. B. Bell; Secretary, H. W. McKenzie,
Langford.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union, No. 2.—■
President, W. Neild; Secretary, W. S. Matthews,
1632 Chamber Street, Victoria.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' International,
No. 144. — President, W. Gennoe; Secretary,
Sam Emery, 864 Old Esquimalt Road, Victoria.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 247.—
President, C. W. Hunt; Secretary, H. J. Bigsby,
720 Sea Terrace, Victoria.
Painters, Paperhangers, and Decorators of America, International, No. 1163.—President, F.
Dewhurst;    Secretary, J. Goldie, Marigold P.O.
Pantorium Employees' Association. — President,
E. J. Galvin; Secretary, G. R. Beek, 121 Churchill Hotel, Victoria.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
367.—President, J.H. McManus; Secretary, J. R.
Bowkett, 3315 Glasgow Avenue, Victoria.
Police Mutual Benefit Association. — President,
H. F. Jarvis; Secretary, S. T. Holmes, 1042 Vista
Heights, Victoria.
Postal Employees, Canadian. — President, H. W.
Adams; Secretary, J. H. Hedley, 1166 Chapman^
Street, Victoria.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, No. 79.
—President, T. Nute; Secretary, F. H. Larssen,
1236 McKenzie Street, Victoria.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 613.—•
President, H. C. Horner; Secretary, J. A. Stone,
1320 Burleigh Drive, Victoria. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 125
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
50.—President, J. Stephenson; Secretary, H.
Greaves, 638 Victoria Avenue, Victoria.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 289. — President, E. H. Spall; Secretary, J. N. Forde, 707
Wilson Street, Victoria.
Railway Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 222.—
President, F. Wellsmith; Secretary, Alex Nicol,
1569 Westall Avenue, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers,
Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood
of, No. 1137.—President, C. W. Dallimore; Secretary, J. W. Yates, 1753 Davie Street, Victoria.
Sheet-metal Workers, International Association
of, No. 276.—President, G. Cameron; Secretary,
C. Lewis, 2850 Parkview Drive, Victoria.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, No. 109.—President, E. D. Bukin; Secretary,
W. Turner, 3060 Carroll Street, Victoria.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture
Machine Operators, No. 168. — President, S.
McKay; Secretary, C. Rau, 1728 Coronation
Avenue, Victoria.
Typographical Union, No. 201.—President, J. F.
Hough; Secretary, J. Petrie, 77 Howe Street,
Victoria.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-
118.—President, T. R. Lidgate; Secretary, J. T.
Waggett, 2875 Gorge View Drive, Victoria.
Wells.
Mines  Employees'  Association,  Island  Mountain.
—President, J. McPherson;   Secretary, H. Kinder, Wells. F 126
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
Calgary.
Bituminous Coal Operators. —■ President, W. N.
Scott; Secretary, C. Stubbs, 520 Lougheed Building, Calgary.
Kelowna.
Shippers' Association, Incorporated, Okanagan,
Federated.—President, E. J. Chambers; Secretary, F. A. Lewis, Kelowna.
Penticton.
Co-operative Growers.—President, W. H. Morris;
Secretary, D. G. Penny, Penticton.
Toronto.
Warehousemen's Association, Canadian. — President, R. A. James; Secretary, J. A. Whitmore,
411 Terminal Building, Toronto.
Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, B.C.—President, E. M. Col-
well; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, Master.—President, H. Armstrong; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth
Avenue East, Vancouver.
Box Manufacturers' Section, Interior, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association. — President, J. G.
Strother; Secretary, H. Dalton, 608 Marine
Building, Vancouver.
Building and Construction Industries Exchange.
—President, C. L. McDonald; Secretary, R.
Leckie, 342 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Contractors' Association, General.—President, M.
C. Cameron; Secretary, R. Leckie, 342 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Electrical Association, Vancouver.—President, J. D.
Carmichael; Secretary, J. S. Homersham, 1358
Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Fishing Vessel Owners Association of B.C.—President, J. Fiddler; Secretary, H. Christenson, 71,
611 Seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Hotel Association, B.C. — President, A. Paterson;
Secretary, J. J. Kahn, 626 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Industrial Association of B.C.—President, W. L.
Macken; Secretary, Miss M. M. Riley, 1024
Marine Building, Vancouver.
Jewellers' Association, Incorporated, Canadian,
B.C. Section. — President, E. R. Flewwelling;
Secretary, A. F. Reid, 1635 Napier Street, Vancouver.
Laundry, Dry Cleaners, and Linen Supply Club.—■
President, W. R. Morrow; Secretary, A. R. Bernard, 910 Richards Street, Vancouver.
Loggers' Association, B.C. — President, G. W.
O'Brien; Secretary, J. N. Burke, 1522, 510
Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, International,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association.-—-President, H. Turner; Secretary, H. Dalton, 608
Marine Building, Vancouver.
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association,
B.C.—President, H. J. Macken; Secretary, T. H.
Wilkinson, 837 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Manufacturers' Association, Canadian, Metal
Trades Section.—President, Wm. Ross; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, c/o Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver.
Milk Producers' Association. — President, W. L.
Macken; Secretary, J. J. Brown, Surrey Centre, Vancouver.
Motor Carriers' Association of B.C. — President,
J. V. Hughes; Secretary, W. Brown, 207 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Plastering and Lathing Contractors' Association,
Greater Vancouver.—President, R. W. Payne;
Secretary, G. A. Skinner, 4865 Fairmont Street,
Vancouver.
Printers' and Stationers' Guild of B.C. — President, W. R. Scott; Secretary, Miss A. Parkinson, 608, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Red Cedar Shingle Association of B.C., Consolidated.—President, H. Hurndall; Secretary, G. S.
Raphael, 811 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.
Restaurant Owners' Association.—President, Nat
Bailey; Secretary, A. Fedderson, 713 Georgia
Street West, Vancouver.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Incorporated.—President, W. S. Charlton; Secretary,
G. R. Matthews, 744 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Shipping Federation of B.C.—-President, D. M.
Cameron; Secretary, W. Cambie, 45 Dunlevy
Avenue, Vancouver.
Upholstered Furniture Manufacturers' Association of B.C.—President, S. H..Small; Secretary,
J. M. Richardson, 626 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Victoria.
Bakers' Association, Master. — President, D. J.
McLean; Secretary, T. P. McConnell, 120 Pem-
berton Building, Victoria.
Beer Licensees Employers' Association. — President, A. Mawer; Secretary, Mrs. F. A. A. New-
march, 891 Admirals Road, Esquimalt.
Builders' Exchange.—President, L. G. Scott; Secretary, W. J. Hamilton, 1712 Douglas Street,
Victoria.
Electrical Association, Victoria, B.C.—President,
E. Emery; Secretary, A. R. Colby, 645 Pandora
Avenue, Victoria. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 127
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., May 18th, 1943.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection Branch for
the year 1942.
The activities of this Department during the year 1942 were devoted to a great
extent in assisting management who during the previous year had transformed their
plants from peace- to war-time production, in taking precautionary measures for their
employees' safety, and also specifying additional facilities for their health and welfare.
Many of these plants during the transition stage were installing machinery and retooling, and did not reach full production until early 1942. Others, after reaching the
production stage, found that they could not keep pace with the demand and were compelled, because of the urgent requirement of their products, to expand or build in other
locations. The latter procedure had to be followed in some instances, and these new
factories are modern in every respect.
Because of a shortage of man-power in industry engaged in the manufacture of
commodities for civilian use, women to a great extent replaced men in these occupations. Many visits were made to these plants in order to determine what operations
they could perform safely and at the same time not jeopardize their health. In only
one instance was it necessary to discontinue the employment of women. This was in
an industry in which the completion of the finished product necessitated the lifting
and stacking overhead of a product that was excessive in weight.
Considerable study was given to devising ways and means of relieving fatigue in
occupations in which women replaced men. In this respect, we have had the fullest
co-operation of supervising officials who were prompt in adopting practical suggestions.
Instances can be cited where inexpensive equipment made on the premises was installed,
which not only relieved industrial fatigue but also increased production.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1942, 2,190 inspections and reinspections of factories were made.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
Rules and regulations having for their purpose the prevention of industrial accidents can be formulated by management of any industry or by boards authorized to
do so. Even though these receive the endorsement of the plant safety committees,
they will not result in day-after-day production without accident unless the fact has
been brought home to every member of the organization that accidents can be prevented.
It is exceptional that injuries are received in industry because of faulty equipment.
In far too many instances our investigations of injuries received by industrial workers
reveal that they are caused by unsafe practices; or by the removal of or rendering
ineffective safeguards which form a part of the machine. The evolution of machine-
guarding over the years has been somewhat as follows. First, home-made guards were
devised; these were rather crude and almost invariably made of wood. Next, the
designing and manufacturing of improved guards for existing machines became a business in itself. To-day it is the general practice for machine manufacturers to equip
their machines with guards designed and constructed in their own plants which form,
as nearly as possible, integral parts of the machine.
While great progress has been made in safeguarding the dangerous parts of a
moving machine, human nature does not seem to have progressed to the same extent. F 128 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
We can recall the disdain of the older generation at the protection afforded by guards.
This also applies, to a great extent, to present-day workers who now, as in the earlier
days, follow the practice of dangerous procedures, which all too often result in lost
time, painful or disabling injuries, and even death. We will cite a recent example in
this respect: While the Inspector was making an inspection of a passenger-elevator
in a hospital in a city in which a large industrial plant is located, a workman employed
in this plant was brought to hospital on a stretcher for treatment of a severely injured
hand. Investigation revealed that this party was injured while ripping a board on
a rip-saw which was equipped with an adjustable hood fastened to the saw-table and
so designed that it completely covered the saw. This safety device had been rendered
ineffective by deliberately placing it in such a position that it afforded absolutely no
protection to the operator. Investigation indicated that the saw had been operated in
this manner for some considerable time, if not with the consent, at least with the
knowledge of the foreman.
FACTORY CONDITIONS.
The " Factories Act " specifies certain measures that are required to be taken by
industry for the protection of the employees' health. There has always been a type
of employer who would not provide mechanical equipment for the removal of harmful
fumes, gases, and dusts until forced to do so. In striking contrast, we also have the
employer who has set a very high standard by the installation of exhaust systems, so
arranged that harmful fumes, gases, and dusts are removed at their point of origin.
In recent years many mechanical exhaust systems have been installed in new and
expanded factories and, when hostilities end, these will prove to be a very beneficial
legacy from the war.
The operation of factories under continuous black-out conditions, in addition to
having a depressing effect on the employees, created somewhat of a ventilation problem.
Many and varied were the mechanical means adopted to improve ventilation in these
plants, and praise must be given to the employees for their patience while working
under anything but desirable working conditions until such time as ventilating equipment became available. During the latter part of the year considerable permanent
black-out was removed, thus permitting natural ventilation and natural light and
counteracting the effects of a blacked-out factory.
EMPLOYEES' WELFARE.
There has been continued progress made in connection with the provision of
facilities by industry relating solely to the welfare of employees. The employer is to
be commended for his interest in employee welfare, realizing, as he must, that such
expenditures are not only sound investment but do much to improve employer and
employee relations. Special buildings have been built for this purpose, and in other
cases dining and reading rooms have been provided by either renovating and remodelling existing buildings or erecting new structures altogether. For those who desire
recreational facilities, such as table-tennis or badminton, the management has provided
equipment and courts. Sanitary conveniences of a high standard also form a part of
these buildings.
WOMEN IN INDUSTRY.
During the year under review the number of women entering industry has greatly
increased and they are to-day performing on the industrial production line innumerable
tasks in connection with the manufacture of equipment for all branches of the armed
forces. Practically all equipment produced in this Province for this purpose has at
least, in some degree, known the touch of a woman's hand in its processing. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 129
Around the clock, month after month, shoulder to shoulder with men on the production line, women have performed their part in the processing of metals so vital
to the war effort, and in the construction of ships, aeroplanes, guns, and also in manufacturing, assembling, and testing parts of equipment requiring a high degree of
precision. Whatever the occupation, it is essential that every precautionary measure
be taken to ensure her health and safety. There is, to some extent, divided responsibility in this respect. Upon commencing employment in industry it is the responsibility of the foreman or supervisor, while instructing the new worker in the performance
of her assigned work, to instruct her also of the hazards connected therewith. This is
most important during the training period because safe habits should be acquired at
the very beginning.
In order to perform her work without receiving personal injury the worker has
some responsibility also. The costume she wears should be suitable for the job. If she
is operating a machine or working in close proximity to power-driven machinery, a one-
piece coverall should be worn. This should be close fitting, yet free for action. In
order to prevent scalp-injuries caused by the hair being drawn into moving belts or
machine parts, the woman worker should wear a cap or other equally effective covering
over her hair. Reluctance on the part of a number of female employees to comply with
this requirement has resulted in severe scalp-injuries. An industrial plant is not the
place to wear open-toed or discarded shoes; suitable shoes for work are easily obtainable. These should be comfortable and have low heels. Safety for women in industry
requires the omission of personal adornment worn under ordinary circumstances.
In particular, no jewellery such as rings, wrist watches, and necklaces should be worn
while at work.
Judging from observations we have made in the industries of this Province, in
which women for the first time have been employed, we are of the opinion that when
they return to their domestic duties they will become the " handy man " around the
house, because of the mechanical experience gained. They will also be expert judges
of furniture which goes to make up the home, both as to quality and workmanship,
because they are to-day performing a very important part in the manufacture of
equipment which helps to complete the home.
CHILD-LABOUR.
Largely because of the statutory limitations in connection with the employment
in factories of a boy or girl under the age of 15 years, child-labour has not been a problem in this Province.
Owing to the shortage of man-power, frequent requests were received from
employers for permission to employ boys between the ages of 14 and 15 years. In view
of the circumstances, consideration was given to these requests and, if the occupations
were considered such that the safety of the child was not jeopardized or the health
impaired, permits were issued accordingly. The permits specified the occupation at
which the child was to be employed and were for the duration of the summer school
holidays only. These were issued only upon receiving the written consent of the parent
or guardian of the child. As we were not advised that any child to whom a permit
was issued received injuries during employment, we assumed that their duties were
performed without receiving personal injuries, and that their health was not jeopardized. However, not so fortunate was a boy 13 years of age who was illegally employed
in an industry and engaged in an occupation which caused the loss of the four fingers
of his right hand. Police Court proceedings were taken against the employer, a conviction secured, and a fine imposed. F 130 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL HOME-WORK.
During the year under review, a company commenced the manufacture of personal
attire which had not previously been manufactured in this Province. After becoming
established in an office building, raw materials were distributed to private homes where
the finished product was produced by the family unit.
Investigation in every instance revealed that persons performing this work were
not receiving sufficient remuneration. In addition to this, a home-worker, who was
being treated for a communicable disease, was also found to be performing home-work
for this company. Following the acquiring of these details, the company was instructed
to discontinue giving out work to be performed in homes and, as a result, machinery
was purchased and the work is now being performed in a factory where it can be
properly regulated.
OVERTIME PERMITS.
Many applications requesting permission to work female factory employees in
excess of forty-eight hours per week were received. Permits authorizing a maximum
of fifty-four hours per week were issued for a limited period, upon the assurance that
the work to be performed was of an urgent nature. These requests were made because
of a shortage of experienced or skilled employees. Some industries preferred to train
their own employees in their own plants. Many others, however, depended on receiving trained employees who had received instruction under the Dominion-Provincial
Youth and War Emergency Training Plan. As the supply of trained employees from
these sources increased, two- and three-shift systems of eight hours per shift were
introduced. This resulted in a corresponding decline in applications for overtime
permits. It is generally agreed that when daily and weekly hours are excessive the
rate of production tends, after a period, to decrease, and the extra hours add little or
no additional output. The employees become fatigued and ultimately, because of a
variety of reasons, absenteeism becomes prevalent.
ELEVATORS.
For a number of years we have been able to report that no fatal or major accident
occurred in connection with the operation of passenger and freight elevators. We
regret to have to state that this record did not continue during the year 1942. The
proprietor of an hotel received fatal injuries by falling from the main floor of the
hotel to the elevator pit, a distance of approximately 12 feet. This fatality was caused
by some unauthorized person who, after boarding the car, attempted to operate the
car without the door being closed fully and locked, and as the car would not start with
the door in the unlocked position he or she rendered the interlocking devices ineffective,
and leaving the door partially open took the car to the second elevator landing. The
proprietor of the hotel, noticing the door partially open, assumed the car was at the
main floor landing, and after opening the door stepped into the elevator shaftway.
The victim had been repeatedly instructed by this Department that no person
other than a licensed operator be permitted to operate the car, and had been successfully prosecuted by this Department for failure to comply with the statutory requirements in this respect.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS' LICENCES.
In 1942, 862 operators' licences were renewed and 562 temporary and 479 permanent licences were issued.
ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1942, 1,371 passenger and freight elevators were inspected. NEW ELEVATOR INSTALLATIONS.
Twelve plans and specifications relating to the installation of modern elevator
equipment were approved.
CONCLUSION.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all officials and employees connected
with industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Douglas,
Inspector of Factories.
■
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■
.
•■,!■••
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-'
' F 132 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE APPRENTICESHIP BRANCH, 1942.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
J. A. Ward Bell, Chairman. 3. F. Keen.
Adam Bell. James Thomson.
Administrative Officials of Branch.
Hamilton Crisford  —   - Director of Apprenticeship.
Arthur Dugdale     Assistant Director.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I herewith submit the annual report on development of apprenticeship for
the year 1942.
At the end of the year the apprenticeship contracts in force were as follows:—
Designated trades   1,233
Undesignated trades       136
Preliminary contracts         53
' Total  1,422
Of the 1,233 apprentices in designated trades, 315 are at present serving in the
armed forces.
Most of these lads have enlisted in a branch of the service where they will continue
to receive training at their apprenticeship trades and by Dominion Government Statute
this experience must be credited to their apprenticeship contracts. On release from
the armed forces, apprentices will be given the opportunity to complete such further
training as they may require and receive their apprenticeship certificates.
The present war has accentuated the urgent necessity of the development of an
apprenticeship system throughout the Dominion as shortages of trained craftsmen have
become apparent in practically every trade and craft.
British Columbia and Ontario are the only Provinces where regulated apprenticeship has been in force for sufficient length of time to appreciably affect the situation
and the latter Province has confined its activities in this regard to the building and
construction trades and to hairdressing, barbering, and motor-vehicle repair where
a special system of learnership control has been instituted.
British Columbia on the other hand has extended its apprenticeship system to
cover a broad field of trades and occupations and has thus been able to make a definite
contribution to the Dominion's war effort, particularly in the metal trade industries.
The majority of employers in this Province now fully realize the importance of
apprenticeship training and the necessity of its further extension as the only reliable
source of their future supply of skilled craftsmen. They are co-operating wholeheartedly in further development as a vital factor in the future progress of the industries in which they are engaged.
War activities have now made it clear that skilled craftsmen can not be produced
by the emergent methods that have been adopted as a necessary part of the production
of war materials. These emergency methods of short mechanical courses offer only
intensified training in a confined and specialized field and while efficacious to the extent
of speeding up the production line their aftermath is an economic problem tending to
unemployment, unless there is a sufficiency of skilled craftsmen trained through
apprenticeship to maintain the high plane of efficiency necessary to continuous
production.
i REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 133
The principal difficulty encountered at the moment in the very necessary extension
of apprenticeship is the high scale of remuneration earned by school-trained specialists
and production workers as against that paid to the legitimate apprentices in the early
years of their apprenticeship.
This can only be overcome by care in selection and by following the system adopted
in this Province of setting only minimum wage scales for apprentices and encouraging
employers to advance the apprentice in accordance with his progress at his apprenticeship trade.
The desirability of the British Columbia system of keeping all apprenticeship conditions as flexible as possible in order that each contract may be considered on its
merits and any problems that arise treated in an individual manner has definitely
proven its worth.
Hard and fast regulations in regard to wages, periods of apprenticeship, hours of
employment, percentage of apprentices allowed, etc., could only complicate and restrict
beneficial results and would have, undoubtedly, led in times like the present to a serious
reduction in the number of lads available at a time when training facilities were at
their highest.
It is upon the foundation of the progressive training of the apprentice that the
British Columbia system has been built and upon which, to a large measure, it owes
its success.
The following tables give:—
Table 1.—Distribution of Apprentices already trained in Trades.
Table 2.—Distribution of Apprentices in training in Designated Trades.
Table 3.—Distribution  of Apprentices  in  training  in  Occupations  not yet
designated.
Table 4.—Rise and Fall of Apprenticeship in Trades since Apprenticeship
Branch established.
Table 1.—Distribution of Apprentices w'ho have successfully completed
their Apprenticeship.
Number
Fully Trained
Occupation covered.                              to Date.
Automobile maintenance and repair      95
Occupation covered.
Lithographers    	
Number
Fully Trained
to Date.
       5
        7
119
      58
30
Blacksmiths	
       2
_    .    15
 ,        6
9
..     17
23
     87
6
         4
23
     57
   ....      4
3
Florists    	
       3
       5
 _      5
60
     10
Total. _	
Hairdressers    _.
     56
       729 F 134
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
APPRENTICESHIP CONTRACTS IN FORCE.
Table 2.—Occupations designated as Trades under the " Apprenticeship Act.:
No. in Force.
       95
32
7
Occupation.
Automobile mechanics 	
Automobile metalwork 	
Automobile painting ...	
Automobile-tire repairing   3
Automobile woodworking 	
Aviation mechanics — _  43
Boiler-making   34
Carpentry   112
Draughtsman _ -  1
Druggists     —~ 92
Electrical appliances _  22
Electrical work  _„    18
Electrical work—construction    9
Electrical work—shop  _  48
Glass-working     2
Occupation.
Iron-worker 	
Jewellery-work   .
Lithography   	
No. in Force.
  6
       21
 i      16
Machinists  ,     349
  3
  87
  32
  2
_  28
4
Plumbing and steam-fittfng  _  51
Sheet-metal working —  82
Ship and boat building —_  27
Sign and pictorial painting  6
Surgical instruments    1
Metal trades—miscellaneous
Moulding	
Painting and decorating 	
Pipe-fitters   _	
Pattern-making     	
Plastering   	
Total;
. 1,233
Table 3.—Occupations not yet designated under the " Apprenticeship Act."
Occupation
Bakers and cooks
Barbers 	
Blacksmiths   	
Bookbinders    ..
Bricklayers -	
No. in Force.
      10
Business-machine mechanics
Butcher	
Butter-making   	
Carpet and linoleum layer ...
Chocolate-dippers   _	
Clerk, automotive—wholesale
Dentistry    	
Dressmaking  _.	
Draughtsman        	
Fur-finishers	
Florist   _	
Furniture woodworking machinist
Gardeners  	
Harness and shoe repairing
Hardware clerk 	
10
5
1
3
7
1
1
2
1
1
2
5
l
3
4
Occupation.
Hairdressers   	
Lead-burners   	
Millinery    _ _
Municipal  clerk  _
Office occupation
Photo-finisher  	
No. in Force.
     38
12
1
1
Printing ._ ... __       1
Saw-filers    	
Seedsman   .._        2
Springmaker    „       2
Shipper—vegetable  industry  ..._	
Shoe repairing and bicycle rebuilding.       1
Tailoring „	
Umbrella manufacturing   _	
Upholsterers   _ _         8
Watch-repairing   _.„       4
Welders         1
Woodworking   _ 	
Wholesale hardware ™	
Window-shade making        1
136 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942.
F 135
Table 4.—Rise and Fall of Apprenticeship in Trades as shown by the Number
of Live Contracts in Force by Years.
1
1936. [ 1936.
1
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
10
5
1
2
5
51
31
26
7
10
	
16
21
28
6
65
100
12
70
47
8
129
15
8
31
35
17
11
111
114
9
12
85
38
48
11
11
138
32
14
9
39
42
22
11
147
136
12
14
110
76
47
16
13
146
36
16
10
1
38
43
21
11
159
144
24
22
126
65
66
5
16
13
196
47
26
16
4
44
55
18
6
163
149
42
32
134
80
76
6
15
15
279
69
38
22
4
57
68
22
161
137
43
Boiler-making 	
34
113
92
97
2
21
16
Machinists   	
359
87
32
28
4
53
82
27
Sign-painting ,  	
6
136
Totals  	
23
261
602
782
908
1,056
1,285
1,369
Hamilton Crisford,
Director of Apprenticeship. F 136 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH.
Administrative Offices—789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
.  ■ Administrative Officers.
J. A. Ward Bell _ _ Chief Administrative Officer.
Mrs. Rex Eaton.         .....Administrative Officer.
Hamilton   Crisford               Secretary.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I herewith submit the annual report of the activities of the Trade-schools
Regulation Branch for the past year.
At the 1942 Session of the Legislature the " Trade-schools Regulation Act" was
amended to include the teaching of any " business, trade, occupation, calling, or vocation," and particularly included under the provisions of the Act was the teaching of
general and specialized therapeutics.
The amendment further gave the Lieutenant-Governor in Council the power to
exempt any school or course of study from the provision of the Act and extended his
-powers in regard to the making of regulations for the satisfactory operation of registered schools.
Subsequently new general regulations covering the operation of all schools coming
within the operation of the Act were approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
These are as follows:—
1. Application.—General regulations shall apply to all trade-schools, whether such
schools are covered by special regulations or not.
2. Health, Sanitary, and Safety Regulations.—Every keeper or operator of a trade-
school shall be responsible for the proper carrying-out of all health, sanitary, and safety
regulations upon and within the school premises.
3. Advertising.—The proprietor or operator of a trade-school shall be held
responsible for all statements made by his salesmen, representatives, or employees,
whether verbal or in writing, in connection with the sale of any course of study.
The Minister may require any kind or type of advertising to be submitted to him
before publication.
The following forms of advertising are prohibited:—
(a.)   The use of any advertising that may tend to mislead:
(6.)   "Blind" advertising that fails to give the name of the school and the
address at which inquiries should be made:
(c.)   The use of the " Help Wanted " column of any newspaper or periodical:
(d.)  Any advertising, either verbal, written, or printed, that states or intimates that there is a specific demand or that there are positions available  for graduate  students  or  trained  men,   unless  definite  proof   is
available as part of the school's records that such a demand exists or
that such positions are available, together with the location of same:
(e.)  Any advertising, either verbal, written, or printed, that assures or guarantees employment as a result of the training offered:
(/.)  Any broadcast by radio, public-address system, or telephone, unless from
written script in conformity with the regulations.    Nothing shall be
added or detracted from the written script and a correct copy thereof
shall be kept on file as a part of the school records.
4. Premises and Equipment.—It shall be the responsibility of every proprietor or
operator of a trade-school to supply and maintain suitable and adequate premises, equip- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 137
ment, tools, implements, instruments, books, courses, and materials for the use of
students and for the proper teaching of the trades or occupations taught.
5. Form of Contract.—Every form of contract used in connection with the sale of
tuition shall be first approved by the Minister, who may require that suitable security
be deposited with him for the due carrying-out of its terms and conditions.
All contracts shall clearly set out the subjects included in the course of study and
the tuition fee for same, and no additional fee or price shall be chargeable to a student
for the purchase or use of any books, clothing, tools, implements, instruments, or materials without the written permission of the Minister.
6. Collection and Retention of Tuition Fees.—After the coming into force of these
regulations, it shall be a condition of every contract entered into between the proprietor or operator of a trade-school and a student contracting to take a course of study
that it shall be the right of the student to give notice in writing to the proprietor or
operator of his intention to cease taking such course, and upon paying for such portion
of tuition as he has already received, and 10 per cent, of the amount remaining due
under the contract, all further contractual liability shall cease.
In the case of a student who desires to pay for a course of study or a portion of
a course of study in advance, the proprietor or operator may accept such fee or portion
of fee as applicable towards tuition as and when supplied, but upon receipt of notice in
writing from such student that it is his intention to cease taking the course of study,
any unearned portion of tuition fees shall be returnable to the student less 10 per cent,
of the fee for the unfinished portion of the course, and thereupon all further contractual liability shall cease.
7. Student Services or Labour.—A trade-school shall not be operated jointly or in
conjunction with a shop or any other business. Student services or articles produced
wholly or in part by student labour must not be sold or offered for sale by the keeper
or operator of a trade-school or any person connected therewith, except as may be prescribed by special regulation promulgated by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council in
accordance with the provisions of the Act.
8. Physical and Educational Qualifications of Students.—Before any contract is
entered into in regard to any course of study, it shall be the duty of the proprietor or
operator of any trade-school to satisfy himself that the person applying for such course
is physically capable of taking same and that he has sufficient educational qualifications
to understand and complete the course of study contemplated.
9. Hours of Operation.—The requirements for the admission of students, the
length of courses, and hours and methods of shop, laboratory, class-room, and home
instruction shall conform to those set out in the application for registration or reregis-
tration and shall not be varied without the permission of the Minister.
10. Teachers.—The proprietor or operator of any trade-school shall maintain an
adequate teaching staff composed of persons of such general and occupational education,
practical experience, character, and teaching ability as the Minister may determine is
necessary for the proper teaching of the trades or occupations in which tuition is
offered and the proper operation of the school.
11. Posting Regulations.—A copy of these regulations shall be kept posted within
the school premises for the use of students in such manner that they are in plain view
and readily available for their information.
12. Registration Fees.—The annual fees for registration under this Act shall be
as follows:—
In case one trade or occupation is to be taught, $5.
If more than one trade or occupation is to be taught, $5 in respect of one such
trade and $2 in respect of each additional trade or occupation, with a
maximum fee of $25.
(Effective as from the 27th day of March, 1942.)
. F 138 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Certificates of registration were issued during the year to the following seventy-
nine schools:—
Aero Industries Technical Institute, 5245 W. San Fernando Road, Los Angeles,
California.—Aircraft construction.
Alexander Hamilton Institute, Ltd., 54 Wellington Street West, Toronto, Ontario.—
Business training.
Brisbane Aviation Company, Limited, Vancouver Civic Airport, Vancouver, B.C.—
Aircraft engineering.
Canadian Institute of Science and Technology, Limited, 219 Bay Street, Toronto,
Ontario.—Civil, architectural, and mining engineering; hydraulics, hydraulic
machinery, sanitary engineering, municipal and county engineers' course,
building construction, heating and ventilating, mechanical and electrical engineering, business and accountants' course, salesmanship, advertising, wireless,
television, aeronautical engineering, aeroplane courses; other courses as per
prospectus.
Canadian Writers' Service, 817 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Short-story
writing.
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, Inc., 3224 16th Street, N.W., Washington,
D.C.—Radio engineering.
Chicago Vocational Training Corporation, 703 Hennepin Avenue, Minneapolis,
Minnesota.—Diesel, aviation, and gas engines; air-conditioning and refrigeration.
Cooper Institute of Accountancy, Ltd., Cooper Building, Winnipeg, Manitoba.—
Accountancy.
Hemphill Diesel Engineering Schools, Ltd., 1365 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
—Diesel engineering.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian, Limited, 1517 Mountain Street,
Montreal, Quebec-—Agriculture, air-conditioning, applied art, architecture,
aviation engineering, business education, chemistry, civil engineering, domestic science, electrical engineering, general education, mining and mechanical
engineering, navigation, paper manufacture, plumbing and heating, railroad
operation, textile manufacture; other courses as per prospectus.
International Accountants Society, Inc., 3411 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago,
Illinois.—Accounting.
LaSalle Extension University, 4101 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.—Higher
accountancy, business management, traffic management, industrial management, elements of accounting, C.P.A. coaching, salesmanship, railway accounting, effective speaking, commercial law, stenotypy, business English, modern
business correspondence, credit and collection correspondence, practical accounting and office practice;  other courses as per prospectus.
M.C.C. Schools, Limited, 301 Enderton Building, Winnipeg, Manitoba.—Dominion
Civil Service, home kindergarten.
National Radio Institute, Inc., 16th and U Streets, N.W., Washington, D.C.—
Practical radio and television.
National Schools, 4000 S. Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, California.—Radio and
television, Diesel and other combustion engines, air-conditioning and refrigeration, applied electrical engineering, modern machine-shop instruction, advanced radio engineering.
Northern Institute of Technology, 54 Bloor Street, Toronto, Ontario.—Applied
radio and electronics, commercial radio operating, advanced radio engineering.
Shaw Schools, Limited, 1130 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario.—Commercial course,
short-story writing, stationary engineering. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 139
Sprott-Shaw Radio School, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Wireless and
radio.
Smith, H. Faulkner, School of Applied and Fine Art, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Commercial art.
Academy of Useful Arts, 615 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Dressmaking,
designing and kindred arts.
Academy of Useful Arts, 35 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.—Dressmaking,
designing and kindred arts.
Aero Welding School, 2415 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Arc and acetylene
welding.
B.C. School of Pharmacy and Science, 615 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Pharmacy.
B.C. Welding School, 1160-62 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Welding.
Brisbane Aviation Company, Ltd., Vancouver Civic Airport, Vancouver, B.C.—
Aircraft engineering.
British Welding School, 505 Fisgard Street, Victoria, B.C.—Electric, acetylene
welding, burning and cutting.
Carey, Mrs. Edna M. D., 1236 Nelson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Shorthand and
typewriting.
Central Business College, Mcintosh Building, Chilliwack, B.C.—Office occupation
(commercial and governmental).
Chicago Vocational Training Corp., 303 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Diesel, aviation, and gas engines, air-conditioning and refrigeration.
Commercial Welding School, 819 Carnarvon Street, New Westminster, B.C.—
Acetylene and arc welding.
Commercial Welding School, 66 Kingsway, Vancouver, B.C.—Acetylene and arc
welding.
Comptometer School of Vancouver, 342 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Comptometer operation.
Dictaphone Corporation, Limited, 1526 Marine Building, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Dictaphone instruction.
Dobell School of Business, Island Highway and Duncan Avenue, Courtenay, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Duffus School of Business, Ltd., 540 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Ellison School of Pattern Drafting, Fourth Street West and Chesterfield Avenue,
North Vancouver, B.C.; and Garden Drive and Hastings Street East, Vancouver, B.C.—Sheet-metal laying out.
Eyrl's Civil Service Business College, 413 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Fenton Commercial School, 2001-03 Forty-first Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Gillies Course of Instruction in Ship-building, 2675 Oak Street, Vancouver, B.C.—
Ship-building.
Girls' College of Practical Arts, 302 Alexander Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Dressmaking, needlecraft and kindred arts.
Goodman School of Professional Costume Designing, 445 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Costume designing, fashion sketching, tailoring and dressmaking.
Harradine Commercial College, 5665 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Hemphill Diesel Engineering Schools, Ltd., 1160-62 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Diesel engineering. F 140 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Henri's Academy of Beauty Culture, Ltd., 619 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.—■
Hairdressing.
Herbert's Business College, Room 3, Casorso Block, Kelowna, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Hollyburn Business College, Fourteenth Avenue and Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Island Welding School, 3108 Shelbourne Street, Victoria, B.C.—Acetylene and arc
welding.
Kita, Mrs. R., Dressmaking School, 451a Powell Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Dressmaking.
Lonsdale Shorthand & Typewriting Academy, 877 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.—
Office occupations (shorthand, typewriting and elementary book-keeping).
Lownds School of Commerce, B.C.E.R. Terminal Building, New Westminster, B.C.
—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Loyd-Griffm Business Schools, Vernon and Penticton, B.C.—Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Marietta School of Costume Design, 857 Homer Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Dressmaking and costume design.
Maxine Beauty School, 1211-15 Bidwell Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Hairdressing.
Moler Barber School, 20 Cordova Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Barbering.
Moler Hairdressing School, 303 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Hairdressing.
Mechanical Industries Technical Institute, Limited, 1157 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Aircraft metal construction, aircraft riveting.
Mori, Kay, School of Designing and Dressmaking, Moncton Street, Steveston, B.C.
—Dressmaking, needlecraft and kindred arts.
Nelson Business College, 107 Baker Street, Nelson, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Pitman Business College, Limited, 1490 Broadway West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Roger of " The Russian Duchess Beauty Salon," 768 Granville Street, Vancouver,
B.C.-—Advanced hairdressing, individual personal instruction.
Royal Business College, 1006 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.—Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Sprott-Shaw Schools, Limited, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental), wireless telegraphy combines with radio
engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Business Institute, Limited, 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.—
Office occupations (commercial and governmental), radiotelegraphy.
Standard School of Stenography and Typewriting, 1526 Pandora Avenue, Victoria,
B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
St. Ann's Academy, Commercial Department, 835 Humboldt Street, Victoria, B.C.
—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
St. Margaret's Business School, 1848 Fern Street, Victoria, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Trail Business College, 648 Weir Street, Trail, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Underwood Welding Institute, Limited, 722 Homer Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Arc,
acetylene, and aircraft welding.
Vancouver Business School, 709 Dunsmuir Street and 3679 Broadway West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Vancouver Engineering Academy, 407 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—•
Stationary, marine, and Diesel engineering. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 141
Vancouver Welding School, 1600 Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Acetylene and arc
welding.
Victoria Hairdressing School, Suite 104, Woolworth Building, Victoria, B.C.—
Hairdressing.
Welding Construction School, 148 First Avenue East, Vancouver, B.C.—Arc and
acetylene welding, burning and cutting, lead-burning.
Western College of Pharmacy, 1524 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.—
Pharmacy.
Western School of Commerce, Ltd., 712 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Western Welding School, 140 First Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.—Acetylene and
are welding.
Westminster Modern Business School, Ltd., 713 Columbia Street, New Westminster, B.C.—Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Willis College of Business, 850 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.—Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Women's Sewing School, 253V2 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, B.C.—Dressmaking.
Applications for the operation of schools have been discouraged or refused on the
following grounds:—
(1.)   Inability to furnish sufficient security or a bond for the due performance
of contracts.
(2.)   Inadequacy of course of training submitted or of teaching staff.
(3.)   Inability to show reasonable prospective demand or employment opportunity for graduate students of the course of training.
In some cases the sale of a course has been restricted to students with not less than
a definite educational standard or to persons engaged in certain occupations.
The increased control under the new general regulations is of great assistance in
the protection of the general public and also to those educational institutions that carry
on their business along ethical lines.
This is particularly true in the line of advertising where objectional features
bordering on misrepresentation have now been eliminated.
Hamilton Crisford,
Secretary. F 142 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SAFETY BRANCH.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Safety Branch for the year 1942.
During 1942 the work of this Branch has been conducted in conjunction with the
duties of the Assistant Deputy Minister of Labour, due to the Assistant Deputy's
appointment as chief executive officer of the Regional War Labour Board.
With addel duties the Safety Adviser was unable to make regular camp inspections
as had been done in previous years. The Department of Labour Inspectors calling on
logging camps were given instructions to encourage accident-prevention at every opportunity and to keep up the personal contact with those in charge of operations.
Coroners' inquests into logging fatalities were attended either by the Safety
Adviser or by a Labour Inspector, depending on the location where the fatal accident
occurred. Several sawmill industry fatal accidents were investigated and Coroners'
inquests regarding them were attended.
Our monthly safety bulletin service has been continued and, due to increased
demand for this material, our monthly output is up to 3,500. A booklet, entitled " Mr.
Logger, What About Your Safety? " was issued at the end of the year. Many letters
and favourable comments were received about this booklet, proving its message was
well appreciated by the loggers.
Meetings held by the First-aid Attendants, B.C., as well as several first-aid field-
days and demonstrations, were attended.
Approximately 300 inspections of the lumber industry and other operations were
made in connection with matters pertaining to the Regional War Labour Board, at
which time the Inspectors made investigations relating to the safety of the employees.
Thirty-two special inspections were made in small camps and approximately the
same number in connection with some special problem regarding accident-prevention
in the larger camps. This number was over and above those dual inspections made by
the regular Department of Labour Inspectors.
Logging safety directors were called together for a conference, at which time
accident-prevention matters were discussed. A meeting was held with the B.C. Truck
Loggers' Association, as well as several discussions taking place with individual
members.
The safety picture, " Be Careful and Live," was shown to the International Woodworkers of America at their annual meeting in Vancouver; to the First-aid Attendants,
B.C.; to groups in many of the logging camps; and to several meetings of those interested in safety in the lumber industry.
The Safety Branch continued to encourage first-aid work and education, believing
it to be one of the best avenues of approach to accident-prevention because it prepares
the mind for acceptance of accident-prevention principles and ideas. The St. John
Ambulance Association and the First-aid Attendants, B.C., report an ever-increasing
number taking first-aid training and qualifying for certificates.
Many of the operators of both logging camps and mills have appointed safety
directors who devote their time to precautionary measures in order to avoid injury
to their workmen. There has been a very definite up-swing in interest in accident-
prevention, which augurs well for the work being done to promote accident-prevention
consciousness.
The logging fatal accident experience for 1942 was good in comparison to past
years. There was the lowest number in many years. Log production was down a little
compared to the previous year. Time-loss accidents were down a like amount. The
trend of accidents in general since the war began has been to increase greatly.    This REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1942. F 143
is true in nearly all industries, so considering the logging industry's record by comparison it has been very gratifying in the year 1942.
The Safety Branch has continued its close co-operation with the Workmen's Compensation Board. Many visits have been made to hold discussions with their safety
inspectors regarding accident-prevention problems and formulation of regulations.
Due to requests made by the industry, the Honourable the Minister of Labour has
given instructions to extend our encouragement and co-ordination work to the manufacturing end of the lumber industry.
We do not wish to imply we are satisfied with the accident situation in our lumber
industry, but only want to express our thankfulness that the rate is no higher. We
give credit to the safety directors and to the management of those companies who have
put forth an effort to keep the accident rate as low as possible by making conditions
such that accident-prevention by the workers was possible. Also, our sincere appreciation is expressed for the splendid co-operation and attitude of the most important group
of all—the workmen on the job.
Before closing this report we wish to express our appreciation for the inspiration,
help, and encouragement given the Safety Branch by the Honourable the Minister of
Labour and the Deputy Minister of Labour.
We look forward to the future with the desire to give our best efforts to bring
about a closer co-operation of all accident-prevention agencies and to encourage a safety
consciousness among all workers.
Respectfully submitted.
Charles Pearse,
Safety Adviser.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Chaki.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1943.
1.825-743-5277 

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