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THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1944

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 THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1942, TO MARCH 31ST, 1943
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Baxfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1943.  To His Honour William Culham Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Thirty-ninth Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1943.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. S. PEARSON, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Ross, George A., Principal.
Moody, Mrs. G., Follow-up Officer.
Garrard, Miss J. M., Nurse-Matron.
Christie, Hugh G.,
Acting Vice-Principal.
Gilley, Miss D. F., Secretary.
Goodlad, John I., Teacher. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
PRINCIPAL'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit herewith the thirty-ninth annual report of the Provincial Industrial School for Boys.
Seventy-two boys were committed to our care during the year, an increase of
fourteen over the previous year. Sixty-eight per cent, of this number came from the
lower mainland, Vancouver Island, and coastal districts; while 32 per cent, came from
the Interior and northern inland districts. Thirty-one different Juvenile Courts were
represented and the average age of the boys committed was 14% years.
Many boys came to us in poor physical condition and the year was particularly
heavy from the standpoint of medical and dental care, nineteen being admitted to
hospital for a total of 130 days and our school infirmary being seldom empty.
We were able to occupy the extension to our building early in November. This
addition has made possible some essential features for institutional care which were
impossible before this addition became available. The removal of the old detention
block, added kitchen facilities, staff rooms and sleeping accommodation for inmates are
all a decided improvement, and by the transfer of the kitchen and staff quarters to the
new wing we were able to provide a day-room and hospital unit in the quarters vacated.
The attitude of our boys to attendance at elementary school classes is very gratifying and the increased enrolment and interest shown in studies and attainments are
evidence of a very happy student-teacher relationship. A number of our inmates are
taking special courses through the High School Correspondence Department and our
thanks are due the Director and staff of this department for their assistance and
co-operation.
It is natural that interest in the Industrial Arts Department continues and your
attention is respectfully drawn to the departmental report contained herein and also to
the reports of the various departmental supervisors.
We have enjoyed informal, friendly communication with Juvenile Court Judges,
resulting in closer mutual understanding between the Court and school and continued
co-operation in a modern humane approach to the treatment of those committed to our
care.
The co-operation we have received from the Child Welfare Department, Field
Service and other allied departments is recognized and deeply appreciated. Their
effort in the field of social service has a telling effect in the field of delinquency, largely
through their efforts in interpreting the modern approach to the treatment of delinquents in their various spheres of activity. We note an increasing awareness of the
need to understand and treat the problem child rather than punish him, for punishment
alone betrays a lack of understanding and encourages continued rebellion.
In the field of delinquency it is evident that there is a need for a period of observation in a controlled situation before personality difficulties can be accurately appraised
and treated. It would be desirable that when institutional care is necessary it be used
at a timely point and not as a last resort. P 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
May I express my personal appreciation to the many individuals and departments
of Government and other agencies with whom we work for the generous measure of
help and co-operation we have enjoyed.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1942, TO
MARCH 31st, 1943.
Number in school, April 1st, 1942  52
Number on parole, April 1st, 1942  75
Number on extended leave, April 1st, 1942.     6
Number of new commitments during year 1  71
Number committed for second term     1
— 205
Number of boys released  47
Number on parole, March 31st, 1943  89
Number on extended leave, March 31st, 1943     6
Number away without leave, March 31st, 1943     1
— 143
Number in school, March 31st, 1943     62 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1942-43.
P 7
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1942, TO MARCH 31st, 1943.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
Admission to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921.
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
Vancouver, B.C	
Powell River, B.C.-
Old Masset, B.C	
Masset, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Victoria, B.C _
Port Arthur, Ont...
Winnipeg, Man	
Edmonton, Alta	
Lashburn, Sask	
Dog Creek, B.C	
Mundare, Alta	
Marseilles, France	
Regina, Sask	
New Westminster, B.C.Vancouver, B.C	
Trail, B.C..	
Victoria, B.C	
Calgary, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Wetaskiwin, Alta.
Kingsgate, B.C	
Calgary, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Kamloops, B.C	
Prince Albert, Sask..
Kitkatla, B.C.	
Calcutta, India 	
Prince Rupert, B.C.-.
Calgary, Alta	
Cranbrook, B.C	
Newton, B.C	
Redditt, Ont	
Duncan, B.C 	
Stony Creek, B.C	
Brandon, Man.	
Abbotsford, B.C	
Salmon Arm, B.C	
Glendale Cove, B.C..
Nanaimo, B.C.-	
Vancouver, B.C	
North Vancouver, B.C..
Tappen, B.C 	
Vancouver, B.C—	
Ontario  	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Salmon Arm, B.C.—
Marshfield, Oregon-
Vancouver, B.C..	
Poland 	
Glasgow, Scotland -
North Vancouver, B.C...
Mankota, Sask 	
Bassano, Alta—	
Scotsguard, Sask —
Kimberley, B.C	
Vanguard, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C—	
English (both)	
American (both)	
Indian (both).	
Indian (both)	
English (both)	
English-American..
Canadian (both) —
English (both)	
Unknown  	
Canadian-American-
Indian (both)	
Ukrainian (both)	
English (both)	
Ukrainian (both)	
Ukrainian (both)	
Jewish (both)	
Italian (both) 	
Italian (both)	
Canadian (both)	
Canadian-English —
Canadian-English	
Unknown 	
English (both)	
Ukrainian (both)-
Ukrainian (both)..
Canadian-English..
Canadian-Indian.—
Canadian (both) —
Indian (both)	
Sikh (both)	
English (both)	
English-Canadian	
Canadian-American...
S wedish-Norwegian—
French-Canadian...	
Canadian (both)	
Indian (both)	
Norwegian-Russian...
Canadian (both)	
Unknown	
Indian (both)	
Scottish (both)	
Canadian (both)	
Scottish (both)	
Swedish-Indian	
English-Canadian _
American-English—
Scottish (both)—	
Danish-Canadian	
Irish-Canadian	
American (both)	
Jugoslavian (both)...
Ukrainian (both)	
Scottish (both)...	
Dutch (both)	
Russian (both)	
Canadian-American..
Canadian (both)	
Canadian (both)	
Russian (both)	
American-Canadian-
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
5
12
4
12
Life.
6
2
12
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
15
Life.
Life.
Life.
1 mo.
Life.
5
Life.
Life.
3 mos.
Life.
6
Life.
12
Life.
Life.
1 mo.
Life.
Life.
4
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
13
Life.
Life.
Life.
6 mos.
Life.
2 mos.
6 mos.
Life.
4 mos.
2
6
10
9
Life.
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
2
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
6
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
11
8
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life. BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1942, TO MARCH 31st, 1943-
Continued.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American  (both)    2
Canadian (both)   13
Dutch  (both)   1
English (both)   7
Indian  (both)   _  6
Italian (both) ___'.  2
Jewish (both)   1
Jugoslavian (both)   1
Russian (both)   2
Scottish (both)   4
Sikh (both)   1
Ukrainian (both)   6
American-Canadian  2
American-English   1
Canadian-American    5
Canadian-English   3
Canadian-Indian   1
Danish-Canadian   1
English-American   2
English-Canadian   2
Irish-Canadian   1
Norwegian-Russian   1
Swedish-Indian   1
Swedish-Norwegian  1
Unknown   5
Total..
72 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1942-43.
P 9
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION FOR THE
YEARS 1940-41, 1941-42, 1942-43.
Birthplaces.
Alberta 	
British Columbia
France 	
India 	
Manitoba 	
North-west Territories
Nova Scotia	
Ontario	
Poland 	
Qu ebec 	
Rumania 	
Saskatchewan 	
Scotland	
United States of America
Unknown 	
1940-41.
6
54
3
2
1941-42.
4
40
1942-43.
9
44
1
1
3
7
1
1
1
Totals.
76
58
72
Charges resulting in Commitment.
1940-41.
     39
Theft	
Breaking and entering  1
Breaking and entering and stealing  20
Retaining stolen property  3
Wilful damage of property    	
Arson      	
Assault   1
Indecent assault    	
Armed assault    	
Sexual immorality	
Gross indecency	
Rape 	
Inflicting bodily harm	
Vagrancy ,	
Violation of probation	
Being unsatisfactory ward __
Being a juvenile delinquent
Incorrigibility 	
Unlawfully throwing stones	
Unlawfully carrying firearms
Unlawfully stopping train 	
Forgery
Infraction of defence regulations	
Unlawfully wearing Air Force uniform
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1941-42.
29
2
13
1
1
1942-43.
34
3
13
2
1
1
2
1
Totals..
76
58
72 P 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Length of Sentence.
1940-41. 1941-42.     1942-43.
     54 44          72
     18 13
2 years      3 1
3 years       1
Indefinite	
" Juvenile Delinquents Act "
Totals..
76
58
72
Ages of Boys.
1940-41.
10 years  2
11 years. .  1
12 years  4
13 years  6
14 years..
15 years..
16 years..
17 years..
18 years.
Totals.
9
28
14
11
1
76
1941-42.
1
1
8
7
14
15
12
58
1942-43.
1
7
11
13
20
12
5
3
72
Places of Apprehension.
Abbotsford _               _  	
1940-41.
1941-42.
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
2
1942-
Alberni 7     	
1
Alexis Creek             _ 	
Ashcroft                                	
1
1
Bella Coola _                           _ 	
Brighouse _                                ... _
2
Burnaby       ..
      5
?,
Chase       . .
1
Chilliwack   _	
1
4
Cloverdale __ _     __     _ _
       2
3
Coquitlam, Municipality of     	
       3
Courtenay   ,                       „, _
1
Cranbrook          _   	
       1
Creston  _   ,              __ 	
Dawson Creek   	
_   _                  1
Duncan                             _ _
1
1
Enderby	
          1
1
Fort Fraser	
       1
Fort Nelson	
1
Fort St. John	
Galiano     	
       2
1
—
Hope      _    	
1
1
Kamloops	
Kelowna  	
Keremeos   __  __       __ _ _ _ _
1
Kimberley 	
1
Ladysmith	
       2 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1942-43.
P 11
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION-
PLACES of Apprehension—Continued.
1940-41.
Lake Cowichan                              1
-Continu
1941-42.
2
2
6
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
13
4
6
1
58
1941-42.
2
1
14
1
1
5
21
7
6
58
ed.
1942-43.
Lytton              _ _   —     	
2
Masset      _    .  .'	
      1
2
McBride                                            	
.  .'._.         1
Nakusp         _   _   ._   	
1
Nanaimo	
Nelson       __ ____     	
       2
3
New Westminster                  __ _  _   	
       4
5
North Vancouver     	
       1
1
Penticton	
Port Alberni   	
 -   2
       1
2
Pouce Coupe                                  ,, „        „
1
Powell River         _   _ __ _ 	
       1
1
Prince George              _    _   	
       2
Prince Rupert        _      _____ ____
1
Princeton 	
Sechelt
       4
_           2
2
1
Squamish
Smithers	
Sumas     _    ___   	
       1
1
Trail	
Vancouver                                              '
       2
.     19
2
19
Vanderhoof 	
Vernon     _   __ 	
       1
1
3
Victoria                                        	
       3
5
West Summerland 	
1
Williams Lake
1
Yale
1
Totals
     76
72
Religion.
Baptist	
Buddhist                                      . .
1940-41.
       2
1942-43.
3
Church of England                    _ . 	
     22
16
Greek Catholic 	
Jewish                           	
2
1
Lutheran 	
Methodist
       1
1
1
Moravian           _      .     	
1
Plymouth Brethren     ____   . 	
1
Presbyterian                          .                .   _
       2
6
Roman Catholic 	
Salvation Army
     21
24
1
Sikh	
United                                          . . 	
     12
1
6
Non-denominational                  .                _
     15
9
Totals	
     76
72 P 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Parental Relationships.
1940-41.     1941-42.     1942-43.
With both parents living  40 32 40
With both parents dead  3 2 4
With father living and mother dead  5 4 3
With mother living and father dead  9 3 5
With both parents living but separated  13 9 13
With foster parents  1
With parents whose whereabouts are unknown.— 3
With father living and stepmother       4 2
With mother living and stepfather  2 4 5
Totals     76 58 72
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1943, the teeth of sixty-three boys were
carefully examined and record charts made. Few of the boys had evidence of regular
dental care and most of them had very unhealthy mouths. The following work was
completed:—
Examinations
Hopelessly diseased teeth extracted
Local anaesthetic for relief of pain
Fillings inserted
Minor treatments for relief of pain     16
Treatment for gingivitis and pyorrhoea     28
" As far as time would permit the most urgent cases were selected and the mouths
placed in healthy condition.
" I believe the services rendered will be of great benefit in assisting these boys to
become useful citizens.
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
Medical Report.
" Sir,—During the past year nineteen boys were admitted to hospital for the
following :  No. of Cases.      No. of Days.
Tonsillectomy   4 14
Appendectomy   3 40
Mastoidectomy and observation   1 29
Removal of finger-nail  2 5
Abscessed jaw    1 11
Spinal meningitis  1 18
Pneumonia   1 7
Wound in leg from pitchfork  1 1
Mumps and spinal puncture  1 3
Gastro-analysis and X-rays  1 2
Fractured finger  ■  1
Fractured elbow  1
Lacerated finger  1
19 130 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1942-43.       P 13
" Other minor ailments, including some cases of mumps, influenza, scabies, and
impetigo, were treated within the school itself.
" The doctor at Port Coquitlam was on twenty-four-hour call, examined each boy
on admission and followed up with surgical or medical care as required. All Kahn
tests and chest X-rays were negative. Eight boys had their eyes examined by a
specialist and seven were fitted with glasses.
" Rationing of provisions created considerable work but a well-balanced diet was
maintained.
" In the fall of 1942 the new infirmary and examination room were opened.
Although space is still limited, there is more segregation and certainly the quarters for
sick boys are more comfortable and convenient.
" The health services offered and wholesome environment of the school do much
to improve the health of the boys.
" Jennie M. Garrard, R.N.,
Nurse-Matron." P 14
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&< a REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1942-43. P 15
EDUCATIONAL.
" Sir,—The school enrolment for the year 1942-43 was greater than the previous
year, a total of sixty-six pupils being registered. On March 31st, 1943, thirty-six of
these were on the roll, graded as follows:—
Special class     5
Grade III      1
Grade IV. .-    1
Grade V .     1
Grade VI     8
Grade VII  14
Grade VIII .     6
Total. 1  36
" In addition to the above two boys took High School Correspondence, one in
Grade IX. and the other in Grade XI. In June, 1942, the three Grade VIII. pupils then
on the roll were promoted to Grade IX. by the School Inspector.
" Intelligence testing, using the National tests, showed an average quotient of 88.
" Many boys took advantage of the school library, all being encouraged to read as
much as possible during their spare hours. Several donations of new books were
gratefully received but, since many of the present books are badly worn, replacements
are required.
" The School Inspector was pleased both with the interest shown by the boys in
their studies and with their attainments. A special effort was made to encourage
neat, orderly work, with the result that all pupils achieved a high standard of penmanship, ten being awarded diplomas in the MacLean Method of Writing. The class-room
was decorated throughout with the boys' art work; large, bright posters being their
most outstanding contribution. The smaller boys were particularly proud of their
sand-table model of a sawmill, and learned a good deal concerning the lumbering
industry during the process of construction.
" Most satisfactory from a teacher standpoint was the fact that a high percentage
of boys reaching the age of 15 chose to continue with their schooling. With the
prevalence of this positive attitude, discipline problems were reduced to a minimum and
a more intimate pupil-teacher relationship was facilitated. When the best endeavours
are encouraged, however weak comparatively they may be, unpleasant school connotations are not aroused—school becomes tolerable, in fact, often pleasant, although few
true boys would admit it. « JoHN L goodlad,
Teacher."
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
" Sir,—Work in the tailoring department during the year 1942-43 comprised the
following:—
Tailoring:  45 pairs tweed pants, 99 pairs denim pants, and 111 pairs shorts.
Miscellaneous:   109 pairs tweed pants pressed, 16 suits pressed, 6 softballs
resewn, and the repairing of the tweed and denim pants.
Sewing:   135 towels, 26 tea-towels, 6 carpenter aprons, 4 kitchen caps, 93
sheets,  68 pillow-covers,  9  table-cloths,  10 shower-curtains,  7  rubber
sheets, and 2 canvas sails for the boys' boat.
" Shoe check was held regularly and 168 pairs had to be repaired.
" There  were  fewer  classes  this  year  but  ten  boys   received  more   detailed
instruction. « j. Henderson,
Tailor." P 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Motor Mechanics Report.
" Sir,—As is usual in this department the interest and enthusiasm were high.
The addition of some new tools was a big help in the work as previously much time had
been wasted waiting for tools. Individual instruction rather than group lecturing was
again stressed and found to be particularly effective, in view of the extra help that
could be given those taking correspondence courses in this work.
" Many of the boys seem to have modified their interests, which originally were
confined to stealing cars, to the point where their strongest car interest is in the
constructive examination and study of its mechanism.
" D. W. Munro,
Instructor."
Greenhouse and Gardens.
" SIR,—As in the preceding year, the results from our greenhouse and garden work
were very satisfactory. Although the marked shortage of help made it difficult to get
the necessary weeding done we managed to take in a good harvest. Our new horsepower tractor, although it came too late for the fall ploughing, has been a big help to
date and is allowing us to expand our work in spite of the shortage of help.
" The installation of steam heat from Essondale has made a marked change in both
the ease and productivity of the greenhouse work. The uniform heat and lack of coal
fumes assured better results and at the same time made the work more pleasant.
A noticeable increase in interest in both this work and that in the flower garden was
evident among the boys this year, and many of them were allowed to take their cuttings
and pot plants home to their parents as a reward for good work.
" D. W. Munro,
Gardener."
Industrial Arts Department.
" SIR,—The classes in industrial arts have been carried on throughout the year
with good attendance and considerable interest. An effort has been made to give the
boys, in a general way, a broad and comprehensive knowledge of the subjects taught.
They have become acquainted, often for the first time, with the various tools and
materials used by the electrician, blacksmith, tinsmith, carpenter, and painter. They
have been taught how to make working-drawings and the proper procedure to follow in
making the different projects.
" This year correspondence courses also were given to twenty-seven boys thought
capable of handling them. Such courses as mechanical drawing, building construction,
automotive and electrical engineering, radio and industrial mathematics were worked
on enthusiastically. An indication of this keen interest is shown by the fact that
although study on the courses was absolutely voluntary 117 papers were turned in,
which represented 1,170 hours of study. This was done largely in their own free time.
The grade in these papers has been well above the average for the Province, probably
because only the more enterprising have taken the courses up to now.
" Emphasis has been placed on developing the work-habit and a great improvement
has been noticed in this respect. We believe that the disciplinary effect of purposeful
work will give the boys a more wholesome attitude towards life and will help them to
take their places in the world as useful citizens when they leave the school.
" It is invariably true that, with few exceptions, the boys show great pleasure in
success of achievement while, on the other hand, they are disappointed if they fail to do
a good job. Those who fail in the first attempt are encouraged to try again until they
do succeed and their ultimate pleasure in their accomplishment is very gratifying to
their instructor. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1942-43.       P 17
" Most of the boys do not stay with us long enough to complete the regular courses
but we feel that the time spent at the bench, at the forge, operating one of the power
machines, or on the theory given in their correspondence courses will have a permanent
influence on their future behaviour. " T B  Pattfrn
.   . Instructor."
RECREATION.
" Sir,—The activities of the year 1942-43, though similar to those of the preceding
year, did not produce the same fine results. The continual changes in the staff due to
movements to the armed forces caused us to be working with inexperienced and
untrained leaders at all times.
" Due to these many changes in staff, the Junior Leaders Corps was once more
brought into being as a group of assistant instructors. This group of boys, who were
interested in becoming more proficient in physical training, was very helpful and has
found this opportunity for added instruction very valuable. The training in leadership
they have received will prove of help in future when they find it necessary to accept
responsibility in new environments.
" The recreational programme can be discussed in three sections. The Hobby
Club, the better behaved of the junior boys, has again produced the best results,
although not to the same degree as in the preceding two and one-half years. With the
changing leaders, work with the boys has suffered. This has been partly compensated
for by a marked improvement in the physical training standards. The boys in this
club spent their recreation periods in the summer in hiking, swimming, and working
on their camp-site on the Coquitlam River. Most of their winter leisure time was
spent on aeroplane models, sailboats, and other hobbies and projects centring around
their club-house. This year the boys cleared one-quarter acre of ground behind the
club-house with the intention of planting a victory garden.
" The second group is composed of the better senior boys. These fellows form the
Boat Club and have for their main interest a 30-foot sailboat. The overhauling job is
still being done on it now and the boys are keyed up to the possibilities of launching
it in the summer. In addition to this repair-work, the group has had to do a great deal
of work on their club-house. A fire started from a carelessly extinguished fire in the
fireplace destroyed an entire corner of the club before it could be brought under control.
The total damage has taken approximately four months to repair, but has proved a
grand project in practical carpentry. The club found time to clear one-quarter acre of
ground for their victory garden and also to make 200 children's toys to be turned over
to the Christmas Cheer fund.
" The ideal third group would be one in which the new boys and the left-overs from
the other clubs could' be carefully studied, sorted out, and prepared for the better
groupings. Their maladjustments and problems would be itemized and a well-planned
course of treatment suggested. The club this year, however, was unable to fulfil this
end as excellent and thoroughly trained leadership is necessary for this ideal to be
realized. This group has, however, made satisfactory progress in gymnasium, tank,
and other athletic work.
" The progress for the past year has not been very encouraging. With more boys
and less experienced leadership it has been a struggle to maintain an adequate recreational programme. Round-table discussions at which work is detailed and leadership
instruction is given, however, have enabled us to complete a year's work with a clearer
picture of what our real difficulties are, how they may be overcome, and a determination
to face them honestly and sincerely in planning our programme for next year.
" Walter Shogan,
Instructor." P 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
REPORT OF FOLLOW-UP OFFICER.
" Sir,—I beg to submit the following report of my activities as Follow-up Officer
for the year ended March 31st, 1943.
" The work during the year has been considerably facilitated by reason of the fact
that it has been so easy to place both boys and girls into useful and lucrative employment without any great difficulty. The condition of the labour market during the
whole period was such that it was quite easy to find postings for young men and boys
in logging camps, shipyards, and other industrial activities in the Province and no
great difficulty was experienced in finding useful and suitable positions for the girls and
young ladies who were available for work. Indeed, at all times employers have been
most anxious to assist.
" The preventive work during the past year has again been on the increase.
It would appear that new families making contacts with families with whom I have
dealt have come to me for advice and assistance in relation to their children, and here
again the results are more gratifying because of the far greater yields of prevention
rather than cure.
" A considerable number of young men have joined His Majesty's forces in
various branches. These young men are now subject to army discipline and I am sure
will render good work as a result of army training and military discipline and will in
due course become very useful citizens of .the community.
" During the year I have attended a number of Court cases and have endeavoured
to have the offenders released on suspended sentence or short periods of punishment.
In each case I have been successful in re-establishing the young men involved in useful
employment at once, or in the armed forces. A great deal of co-operation in this
respect has been given me by the presiding Magistrates in the Courts.
" I am indeed grateful to all the agencies of industrial organizations, military
authorities and institutions which have assisted me during the course of the year.
I have had a great deal of co-operation from them and, as a result, the year's work has
been more satisfactory and the future bids well.
" The following is a resume of my visits, interviews, and telephone calls for the
period aforesaid:—
Visits to homes      987
Visits to office . ;  1,362
Business calls and interviews „ 1,388
Telephone calls  1,645
" K. A. Moody,
Follow-up Officer, Boys' and Girls' Industrial Schools."
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1943.
390-1243-6993  

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