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THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1943]

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 THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF   THE   PEOVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1941, TO MARCH 31ST, 1942
FEINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Oiiables F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1942.  To His Honour William Culham Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour ;
The undersigned has the honour to present the Thirty-eighth Annual Report of
the Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1942.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1941, to March 31st, 1942.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. S. PEARSON, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Ross, George A., Principal. Mayers, W., Vice-Principal.
Moody, Mrs. G., Follow-up Officer. Gilley, Miss D. F., Secretary.
Garrard, Miss J. M., Nurse-Matron. Blagburn, E. W., Teacher. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
PRINCIPAL'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In submitting the thirty-eighth annual report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, may I respectfully draw your attention to the departmental reports as
submitted by the staff members responsible for our various activities and also to the
comparative statistical records.
It is gratifying to note a decided drop in the number of new committals during
the twelve-month period, there being fifty-eight as against seventy-six during the previous year. This reduced the number of inmate days from 17,490 in 1940-41 to
16,779 in 1941-42, or an average of approximately two boys less per day from the
preceding year.
The results of our year's work are gratifying and indicate that progress is being
made and interests maintained. The changes in programme emphasis made two years
ago are now bearing fruit and our disciplinary problems are greatly reduced as a direct
result. We are handicapped, however, by the lack of continuity in leadership, owing to
so man3r changes in staff on account of enlistment in the armed services.
We are looking forward to occupying the new wing now under construction. This
added equipment will remove many of the obstacles which have handicapped our efforts
in the past and provide space for features hitherto impossible.
In keeping with the modern approach to the rehabilitation of delinquents, every
effort is made to expose those who come under our care to a programme of normal social
growth, and the response given in return is most gratifying. We sometimes feel that
the communities from which some of our boys come are not sufficiently aware of their
share of the task and there are times when we hesitate to return a boy to the same local
condition from which he came, because of the fear that he will again be misunderstood.
Frequently, we hear of cases where our lads are shunned and reproached because of
having been in the Industrial School. This cannot but have an adverse effect upon the
lad who is fighting to make good.
It is evident that there exists a misconception in regard to the functions of the
Industrial School. We feel that our first duty is that of a training-school and those
sent to us are patients for treatment. Treatment involves social growth and this does
not occur where there is no opportunity for choice. It necessitates the placing of trust
in individuals, and involves the risk that the trust may be misplaced. Yet a modern
programme which promotes socialization is a programme in which they may be runaways. It is unfortunate that some are likely to judge us more upon the efficiency of
custodial functions than upon our primary task of training in a way of life.
The shortage of labour has made the task of finding employment very easy for boys
leaving the school, but the desire to " cash in " on big wages is responsible for some
discontent among the older lads still under our care—and the inability to administer
properly big wages has been responsible for some lads being committed to the school.
We feel that strong, healthy bodies are of major importance, and immediately upon
arrival every boy is given a thorough medical and physical check-up and any treatment
necessary is immediately undertaken. Evidence of the extent of this service is available in the medical and dental reports. The services of allied departments are called
upon to help us in our work. These include the Division of T.B. Control, the Division
of V.D. Control, the Provincial Laboratories, the Provincial Psychiatrist, and the
Essondale Mental Hospital Laboratory and X-ray Department. From all of these we
receive the utmost co-operation. R 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
We have found the work of the Superintendent of Neglected Children, the Welfare
Field Service, and the Child Guidance Clinic to be of immeasurable help to us in planning to meet our varied problems, in the securing of necessary information for social
histories, and in caring for our inmates following their discharge from the school.
Service clubs and other organizations have been most generous during the year in
arranging and providing us with many opportunities to attend various games and other
entertainments.
Religious training has been in capable hands and divine services held each Sunday
for both Roman Catholic and Protestant. A mid-week class held during the winter and
spring months for those desiring to attend was well patronized.
We are deeply grateful for the many services rendered by the various departments
of the Government, Juvenile Court Judges, police, Children's Aid Societies, and to all
who have helped us in our efforts we express our appreciation and thanks.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1ST, 1941, TO
MARCH 31ST, 1942.
Number in school, April 1st, 1941  60
Number on parole, April 1st, 1941  56
Number in foster homes, April 1st, 1941  5
Number on extended leave, April 1st, 1941  10
Number away without leave, April 1st, 1941  1
Number of new commitments during year.i  57
Number committed for second term  1
— 190
Number of boys released :  55
Number committed to Provincial Mental Hospital  1
Number transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm  1
Number on parole, March 31st, 1942  75
Number on extended leave, March 31st, 1942  6
— 138
Number in school, March 31st, 1942     52 REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1941-42.                     R 7
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1941, TO MARCH 31st, 1942.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
Admission to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1853
1854
1855
TSr.fi
Powell River, B.C.	
Victoria, B.C.
Canadian-Irish 	
Years.
Life.
Life.
7
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
15
5
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
8
Life.
16
11
7
5
Life.
4 mos.
Life.
13
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
3
Life.
Life.
Life.
3 mos.
5
13
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
3
Life.
15
2
Life.
Years.
Life.
Life.
7
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
16
Life.
11
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Kettle Falls, Wash	
Canadian-English _	
1858
1859
IS 60
1861
1S62
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
-  1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
'1908
1909
1910
Vancouver, B.C 	
Burnaby, B.C.
Bemersyde, Sask	
Moose Jaw, Sask  	
Montreal, Que.   	
Alexis Creek, B.C .  	
Indian (both)  _	
Canadian-Unknown. 	
Vancouver, B.C  	
Victoria, B.C.
Scottish (both)  ._ ._.
Victoria, B.C.
Portland, Ore  __ 	
Kerrobert, Sask 	
Taraverde, Rumania	
Vermilion, Alta	
Kimberley, B.C __ _ ____
Irish-Indian-French.	
Swiss-Lithuanian	
Saskatoon, Sask.-	
Italian-Canadian 	
Canadian-English.._  	
Canadian-Scottish	
Lipton, Saisk  	
Victoria, B.C	
Vernon, B.C.
Vernon, B.C.
Indian (both)._._  '	
Lytton, B.C	
Spatsum, B.C .	
Aklavik, N.W.T	
Canadian (both) 	
English (both) _	
Vancouver, B.C  	
Canadian-American 	
Keewatin, Ont	
Tr.t.h-Tnf.i.qn-Frpnr'h
Canadian-Scottish  	
Calgary, Alta  	
Chilliwack, B.C 	
Chilliwack, B.C _	
Burnaby, B.C.     " - -	
Indian (both) _
English (both)	
Kitkatla, B.C 	
Bella Coola, B.C	
North Vancouver, B.C .	
Indian (both)   	
Indian (both)__   _	
Van couver, B. C. 	
Canadian (both) -   	
Vancouver, B.C  .	
Mayerthorpe, Alta.  	
American-Canadian 	
Italian (both)  _  	
English-Canadian	
Canadian (both) __. __ _
Melville, Sask  	 R 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American (both)   1
Canadian (both) _.__  8
English (both)  2
Indian (both)   11
Italian (both)   2
Japanese (both)   1
Norwegian (both)   1
Rumanian (both)   1
Russian (both)   2
Scottish (both)   1
American-Canadian  1
Austrian-Canadian   1
Canadian-American   2
Canadian-English   3
Canadian-Irish   1
Canadian-Scottish  4
Canadian-Unknown   1
English-Canadian   3
English-Scottish   2
German-Scottish 	
Irish-Indian-French
Italian-Canadian —
Scottish-American ...
Scottish-English 	
Scottish-Indian	
Swiss-Lithuanian ....
Unknown 	
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
Total  58
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION FOR THE
YEARS 1939-40, 1940-41, 1941-42.
BIRTHPLACES.
Alberta 	
British Columbia
Czecho-Slovakia ...
England  ..
Holland 	
Manitoba 	
North-west Territories
Nova Scotia	
Norway _.
Ontario 	
Poland	
Quebec 	
Rumania	
Russia 	
Saskatchewan 	
Scotland	
Sweden 	
United States of America
Unknown 	
1939-40.     1940-41.     1941-42.
7
43
2
1
1
3
6
54
4
40
Totals    73
76
58 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1941-42.
R 9
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
CHARGES RESULTING IN COMMITMENT.
1939-40.
Theft  28
Breaking and entering  1
Breaking and entering and stealing  22
Retaining stolen property  3
Wilful damage of property  _...
Wilful destruction of stolen property  4
Being in possession of stolen property  1
Attempted theft
Assault 	
Vagrancy
Being in a state of intoxication
Indecent assault :	
Rape 	
Violation of probation	
Being unsatisfactory ward	
Escaping from custody	
False pretence 	
Murder 	
Incorrigibility 	
Unlawfully throwing stones	
Unlawfully carrying revolver ....
Unlawfully stopping train	
Forgery 	
Gross indecency
Infraction of defence regulations
Inflicting bodily harm	
Sexual immorality       1
1940-41.
39
1
20
3
29
2
13
1
2
1
1
Totals.
73
76
58
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Indefinite  _*	
" Juvenile Delinquents Act "
6 months	
9 months	
1 year 	
2 years 	
3 years 	
4 years 	
1939-40.
. 34
.    16
6
1
. 3
.    10
1
2
54
18
1941-42.
44
13
Totals..
73
76
58 R 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
AGES OF BOYS.
1939-40.
1
. 1
1
9 years 	
10 years 	
11 years 	
12 years  2
13 years  7
14 years  19
15 years  12
16 years ._ 18
17 years  11
18 years  ....
Unknown   1
Totals  73
1940-41.     1941-42.
2
1
4
6
9
28
14
11
1
76
1
1
8
7
14
15
12
58
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Abbotsford     	
1939-40.
          1
1940-41.
1
2
5
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
4
1
1941-42
1
Alexis Creek	
Armstrong               ...   .
           1
1
1
Ashcroft     ....  - ...
Bella Coola    ... —
1
Brighouse ...   .
Burnaby   ...                   .   ...
2
1
Chilliwack  	
         2
4
Cloverdale 	
               3
2
Coquitlam, Municipality of . _
              2
Courtenay   . .
       1
Cranbrook   _. ....
                   1
Creston      .        •    -
.     ...                 2
1
Dawson Creek
Duncan              . ...
     ....
1
Enderby _   . .
Fort Fraser          	
Fort Nelson 	
•
Fort St. John .   	
                 1
Galiano         	
Hazelton   ...   	
              1
Hope   .    -               .
Kamloops     _„_
              1
1
Kaslo   	
             1
Kelowna     ...           ■
       1
2
Keremeos      _..
Ladysmith  .    .     . _
Lake Cowichan      ..
Lytton        .            	
2
Masset ._    ■        .... ... ....
Matsqui .     .      —.      ..    	
           1
Moricetown ...      ...  	
           1
McBride	
Nanaimo      	
Nelson                    .
            4
2
New Westminster  .. .      	
                   6
6
North Vancouver	
       1
2 REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1941-42. R 11
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Places of Apprehension—Continued.
1939-40.     1940-41.     1941-42.
Penticton      .___	
.      2
2
1
1
1
4
...      2 •
4
3
4
9
2
4
73
1939-40.
1
9
5
2
1
2
4
6
_    18
3
1
11
_    10
73
EPS.
1939-40.
38
3
6
8
10
3
5
-    73
2
1
1
2
4
2
1
2
19
1
3
76
1940-41.
2
22
1
1
2
21
12
15
76
1940-41.
40
3
5
9
13
1
3
2
76
2
Port Alberni                 	
Port Moody       "      	
Powell River    .   . ..._     .      '. ._
1
Prince George                .                 -
Prince Rupert ...                 ..   	
1
Princeton       .... _
1
Revelstoke         _           ....     ...     	
Sechelt        —.    . ..    	
Squamish __          _   _       ...         	
1
Sumas   .         	
Summerland        .. .
Trail 	
1
Vancouver    __ ....    .....       _.        _.      	
13
Vernon    ....   .      	
4
Victoria	
6
West Summerland    	
1
Totals	
RELIGION.
Baptist
58
1941-42
2
Buddhist .            _     ..            	
1
Church of England	
Greek Catholic .                              ....
14
1
Greek Orthodox  _         _ 	
Interdenominational 	
Lutheran   	
Methodist          _.                 . '	
1
Pentecostal  	
Presbyterian               .    .                              . .
5
Roman Catholic                     	
21
Salvation Army                   	
Seventh-day Adventist '          	
United      ...         ...          ....     .  .
7
Non-denominational •     	
6
Totals      	
58
PARENTAL RELATIONSH
With both parents living ...       .   	
1941-42
32
With both parents dead      	
2
With father living and mother dead	
With mother living and father dead   .     	
4
3
With both parents living but separated	
9
With foster parents
With parents whose whereabouts are unknown.
With father living and stepmother	
With mother living and stepfather	
Totals	
4
4
58 R 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1942, the mouths of all the boys entering the school were examined carefully and record charts made. Few of the boys had
evidence of regular dental care and most of them had very unhealthy mouths. The
following work was completed:—
Examinations   118
Hopelessly diseased teeth extracted     54
Local anesthetic for relief of pain     46
Fillings inserted   205
Treatment for gingivitis     13
Radiographs        1
Treatments of abscess in front tooth and filling root       1
" As far as time would permit the most urgent cases were selected and the mouths
converted to healthy condition.
" I believe the services rendered will be of great benefit in assisting these boys to
become useful citizens.
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
Medical Report.
" Sir,—The past year was a busy one in our own infirmary but we were fortunate
in having very few cases which required hospitalization. However, a total of thirty-
three hospital days was necessary for treatment of the following cases:—
Broken nose _  1
Infected knee  1
Infected finger   1
Fractured elbow  1
Tonsillectomy   1
" Specialists were consulted for three ear infections, one skin infection, and one
scalp infection. Of the six boys who had their eyes examined by a specialist, five were
fitted with glasses.
" As in the previous year, every boy had a complete physical examination on admission. All Kahn tests and chest X-rays were negative. We had three severe cases
of impetigo, several cases of scabies, and, in the last two weeks of March, two of the
lads developed mumps. Isolation for these cases is still a problem, but we are happy
to know that more adequate facilities for their care will soon be provided.
" A general improvement in the health of the boys can be noticed as they stay with
us. Their games outdoors, work in the garden, gymnastics, a well-balanced diet, and
regular hours all help to make them more physically fit. The boys themselves are cooperative in reporting ailments early and show a great appreciation for all health
services offered them.
" We realize our loss in learning that we must forfeit the services of the doctors
of the Provincial Mental Hospital. They have given generously of their time and
efforts and by their help have kept our problems from becoming serious.
" The news that we are to have an addition to our school is indeed good from a
health standpoint. The more hygienic conditions provided by greater dormitory space,
more segregation, and a larger infirmary should help us in developing a healthier group
of boys.
" Jennie M. Garrard, R.N.,
Nurse-Matron." REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1941-42.
R 13
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00    Oi   ©    i-H R 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
EDUCATIONAL.
" SIR,—We had fifty-six pupils enrolled during the year beginning April 1st, 1941,
and of that number twenty-eight remained on the roll as at March 31st, 1942.
" The Grade VIII. boys, four in number, were all promoted by the School Inspector
in June, 1941. The remainder of the grades did quite well during the year and only
two of the pupils failed to pass at the end of the term.
" Intelligence testing was continued as in other years, the average quotient being
a little higher than the year before, 82 in 1940 and 85 this year.
" The class-room was redecorated throughout and this made a decided improvement
in the atmosphere of the room.
" A number of new books were obtained for our library but were used largely as
replacements, as the average life of a book here is somewhat shorter than that of books
in outside libraries.
" Eric W. Blagburn."
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
" Sir,—Work in the tailoring department during the year 1941-42 comprised the
following:—
Tailoring: 46 pairs tweed pants, 112 pairs denim pants, and 151 pairs shorts.
Sewing:   170 towels, 68 tea-towels, 68 aprons, 4 kitchen caps, 115 sheets, and
97 pillow-covers.
Miscellaneous:   121 pairs tweed pants pressed, 17 suits pressed, 12 softballs
resewn, 3 carpets repaired, and repairing of tweed and denim pants.
" Shoe check was held weekly and during the year we had 251 pairs repaired.
" Regular classes were held during the school months and thirty-three boys received
instructions in the care of clothing and sewing.
" J. Henderson,
Tailor."
Motor Mechanics Report.
" SIR,—I take great pleasure in presenting my rep.ort of work done in the motor
mechanics department in the year 1941-42.
" In the past year both the attendance and the enthusiasm shown in these classes
have been unusually high. The method of giving each boy a particular part of the
engine to work on was used again this year and was found to be particularly good, as it
provided the opportunity of checking and working with the individual rather than with
the class.
" It has been very interesting to note that many of the boys from these classes are
now deriving benefit from the ground work they have received here in their positions
in the various divisions of the mechanized forces.
" D. W. MUNRO,
Instructor."
Greenhouse and Gardens.
" SIR,—The past year has been very satisfactory as far as the results from greenhouse and garden are concerned. All crops were of good quality and above average in
abundance.
" We were very fortunate in having alterations made to the vegetable storage
building, which cut down to a great extent the losses we were having in previous years.
" This year more land has been put to use for potatoes and from surface observations a good crop should be obtained. This department would be noticeably improved
if we could have some form of power cultivator as our population the past few years has
been, on the average, composed of younger boys and they lack the strength to handle
the work. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1941-42.       R 15
" Our flower gardens are a credit to the care taken by the boys. Although the
spring has been very backward and weeds abundant we will soon be able to enjoy
beautiful flowers, which will compensate for the extra work entailed.
" Some alterations have been made to the greenhouse by the installation of steam
heat from Essondale. This will be a big help in keeping an even temperature and
doing away with coal fumes which are harmful to plant life.
" D. W. Munro,
Gardener."
RECREATION.
" Sir,—Since our main objective as stated in our last year's report—the segregating of the boys into three natural groups—was accomplished this year, the recreational programme can be discussed most effectively in these three sections.
" The first group, which contained the better junior boys and which has been
operating for two and one-half years, was undoubtedly the section which produced the
best results.' Although the time this group has been in operation is not sufficient to
allow definite conclusions to be drawn, it is interesting to note that after a two and
one-half year period a surprisingly high percentage of the boys who have left this
group are still, as far as can be ascertained, happily adjusted. Those who have continued their maladjustment did so after returning to broken homes. This group is an
example of what can be done by segregation and good leadership.
" These boys spent their spare time in the summer of 1941 in hiking, fishing,
swimming, and work in their club, in which they made a fleet of twelve 8- to 10-foot
skiffs, which they used at their camping spot on the Coquitlam River near-by. The
camp-fires, story hours, and pow-wows held in the evenings with these boys were
utilized as a means of getting below the surface and talking over problems essential
to character building and the various related subjects which boys of their age should
have an opportunity to discuss. These talks were carried through into their winter
meetings, where at their round table discussions they laid the foundation for the use
of a trait-rating chart by which they might evaluate the character and personality of
both themselves and prospective members. If this trait rating is guided and developed
properly it will provide as valuable a tool in the development of healthy minds as the
physical chart has proven in the building of healthy bodies.
" The early part of the winter programme was spent in making toys for the army
charities. The boys in this group contributed two hundred well-finished boats, animals
on wheels, dart-boards, and other toys. The balance of the winter was spent in model
building and various group projects centring around the improvement of their clubhouse and grounds. During the year a number of tools were purchased by saving a
sum from their own money, an amount which was augmented by a donation from the
school.
" Physical work in this group was carried on with the help of the physical rating
chart of the previous year, which had proven satisfactory in every respect. Basketball, softball, and lacrosse games were played with outside teams. The good sportsmanship shown in these games was always a source of comment to onlookers and
opposing teams. These boys were, on the whole, a very clean-cut group. Their
standards, maintained by themselves, were high and every member, after being told
where his faults lay, had either to make an honest attempt to measure up with regard
to physique, mentality, character, and personality, or give up his membership until
he did.
" The boat club, the senior bo3's who last year were working on their 30-foot fish-
boat, had to slow down in their work on the project because of a dearth of materials.
Although they received help from the school in purchasing tools, they found that sails
and ships' hardware were expensive and hard to get. Their time, therefore, was spent
in rebuilding an old chicken-house, which they finished in imitation logs and equipped
with a fireplace and brick chimney. A shed was added to the chicken-house and other
similar projects around their club utilized most of their time. Camp-fires, swimming,
softball, lacrosse, basket-ball, and gymnasium work were carried on in much the same
manner as they were in the junior club.    These senior boys, being a little more set in R 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
their philosophy, changed more slowly than the junior group and, although they improved satisfactorily by comparison with past years, there is still room for progress
here.
" The new boys and the boys who were not prepared to make the effort to get into
the top clubs were busy making toys to be distributed to the poor at Christmas time.
They supplied about two hundred and fifty well-finished toys for this purpose. This
group was used as a medium for preparing boys for admittance to the other two clubs.
To do this properly each child had to be studied individually and treated for his maladjustment even more carefully than in the other two groups. In this group the
foundation for future treatment in later groups was laid. As can be seen, this is a big
job and because there was only one semi-skilled man to handle the group was not very
adequately done. The system, however, was established and it is hoped that with more
skilled help this group will prove to be a valuable link in our chain of treatment. The
programme in this group, while it followed the same activities as that of the other two,
did not reach their standards because of the nature of its membership and was planned
on a more individual basis to suit the part it had to play in the whole scheme.
" In summing up the work done in the past year of 1941-42, we can see that
encouraging progress has been made but that there was no comparison between it and
the improvement of the previous year. As was suggested in last year's report, the
organization of the programme as set up had proven itself and was producing fine
results but would need more skilled leadership before it could progress much further.
To accomplish this, discussions for part of the staff were carried on in which problems
were discussed and the principles underlying the work explained. This process was
satisfactory in that it trained the leaders. It was unproductive only because of the
great number of changes in staff due to movement to the armed forces and to other
positions.
" We have done good work under our present system. We can do better. With
this in mind we must keep training our leaders in the hope that some day our staff will
become more stable and we will be able to forge ahead more steadily.
" Hugh G. Christie,
Instructor."
SOCIAL WORK REPORT.
" Sir,—Following our usual procedure, we presented as many boys as possible to
the Child Guidance Clinic for examination during- the past year. As the result of
reports received from our Provincial Psychiatrist, Dr. A. L. Crease, and his associates,
both physical and social aid have been given to a large number of the boys committed
to our care. The psychiatric examination, which gives an insight into the cause of
their anti-social attitude and behaviour, and the understanding given by an intelligence
rating enables us to deal more adequately with the problems of treatment and
rehabilitation.
" Before the boy is presented for examination, a complete social history of the lad
is compiled and submitted. Such a history contains information received from the
committing magistrate, the police, the school-teacher, the family doctor, the recreation
supervisors, the social workers, and the parents. This information, augmented by
details obtained from the boy, gives a fairly comprehensive picture.
" During the past year thirty-six examinations were completed by the Child
Guidance Clinic. The following statistics have been compiled from the psychiatric
reports:—
Intelligence ratings— Cases.
Average      9
Low average      1
Dull normal  13
Border-line       8
High-grade moron     1
Moron ,     2
Low-grade moron     1
Rating not given '-     1
36 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1941-42. R 17
Physical defects recognized by clinic— Cases-
Nose and throat attention required  7
Eye attention required  6
Dental attention required ...  6
Mastoid condition   1
Anaemia   1
Residual of right-sided hemiplegia  3
Heart condition .  1
Acne  .  1
Eczema   1
Impetigo   1
Alopecia areata  1
Mental abnormalities recognized by clinic—
Psychopathic personality  1
Recommendations—
Extended training and discipline  6
Country placement  2
Foster home placement  1
Placement on boat   1
Placement with relatives  3
Placement with father  2
Job placement  1
Recommended for army or navy  1
Institutional care  1
Return home  9
Further observation  9
36"
REPORT OF FOLLOW-UP OFFICER.
" Sir,—I beg to submit the following report for the year ended March 31st,
1942:—
Visits to homes  1,193
Visits to office  1,152
Business calls and interviews  1,210
Telephone calls  1,546
" While the greater portion of my time is spent in Greater Vancouver and vicinity,
I have, during the past year, made several trips to different points of the Province and
also to Winnipeg and Edmonton.
" This year is outstanding for the number of boys who have joined His Majesty's
Forces in all branches of the service and also the opportunity the shipyards have offered
to young lads I have placed in different lines of work. The percentage of success has
been most gratifying.
" The Government training-schools are outstanding and have been responsible for
more of our boys obtaining better employment.
" Preventive work has been increasing. More parents have contacted me for
assistance to keep their boys from going to the Industrial School. I have given as
much of my time as possible and have had splendid results. The parents are most
grateful and co-operative.
" My work with the girls during the past year consisted of locating girls ' absent
without leave ' and several trips to out-of-town points have been necessary- Positions
available to girls exceed our releases.
" My sincere thanks to all agencies, military authorities, and heads of institutions
whom I have met during my work. Each has been invaluable in the satisfactory discharge of my work during the year.
" K. A. Moody,
Folloiu-up Officer, Boys' and Girls' Industrial Schools."
L VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Baxfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1942.
410-942-9443

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