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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1943

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 PROVINCE  OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EBPOKT
OF   THE
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND
INDUSTRY
FOR THE TEAR ENDED MARCH .1st
1942
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF TUB  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1942. To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended March 31st, 1942.
HERBERT ANSCOMB,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Department of Trade and Industry,
Office of the Minister,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Honourable Herbert Anscomb,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended March 31st, 1942.
I have the honour to be,
. Sir,
Your obedient servant,
EDWIN G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
for the Year ended March 31st, 1942
The period covered by this report is one of general expansion, substantial gains
being recorded in every line of activity, with the sole exception of Coast shipping,
where there was a falling off in ship loadings. Employment soared to a new peak, the
figure for October, 1941, being 110,771 as against the previous record of 96,324 in
September, 1940.
In the fiscal year 1941-42 all the basic industries did exceptionally well, and the
secondary industries, and notably ship-building, more than maintained the improvement
shown in 1940-41. Average weekly wages were substantially increased in practically
all trades, war industries naturally being most affected. With no marked increase in
the average weekly working-hours, the average weekly wage for male employees was
the highest since the peak year of 1920, and for women workers the highest on record.
Logging and lumbering continued to occupy the leading place, followed by contracting, food products, metal-mining, metal trades, and street-railways, a condition
which reflects the situation very graphically. There is no doubt that British Columbia's
war effort was seriously handicapped by the housing situation, but the fact that contracting has advanced to second place among the leading industries shows clearly that
serious efforts are being made to remove that disability. With food products in third
place, the facilities of the box factories have been taxed to the utmost and most of them
have been obliged to expand their plants, not only for the increased local demand but to
take care of the British market, which can no longer obtain supplies from Scandinavian
sources.
While the year under review was not entirely free from labour disputes, it is gratifying to know that the actual time-loss was the lowest on record; nor have accidents
increased to any really notable extent, despite the great number of inexperienced
workers which industry has been obliged to employ.
In British Columbia, as elsewhere, women and girls are playing an admirable part
in the war effort, and are displaying an altogether remarkable adaptability and a tireless energy in the interests of the war effort which is beyond praise.
With these preliminary remarks, this, report goes on to discuss the various phases
and to cover the work of the several bureaus in detail.
Reference was made in last year's report to the work of our Trade Representative
at Ottawa. This work is still being vigorously carried on, and the results continue to
be eminently satisfactory.
TRADE REPRESENTATIVE AT OTTAWA.
Since October, 1939, the Bureau of Industrial and Trade Extension has maintained
continuously its director, Mr. W. Lloyd Craig, as its special representative at Ottawa.
Mr. Craig has continued to keep close contacts with the Department of Munitions
and Supply, heads of the navy, army, and air force, members of the British and other
missions, foreign legations and various departments of the Dominion Government,
together with war-time manufacturing firms and distributing firms dealing in various
commodities for civilian use.
The results of the director's activities continue to be extremely gratifying. The
volume of business placed in British Columbia as a consequence of his work has
reached substantial figures. It is regrettable that it is not possible to name the exact
amount of business in dollars and cents, for some months ago the Dominion Government, at the request of the British and United States Governments, discontinued the
publishing of lists of contracts placed in Canada.
British Columbia is being recognized to an ever-increasing extent as being capable
of production on a scale not hitherto known in our Province. Articles manufactured in
British Columbia continue to be supplied in large quantities to Eastern Canadian
points, the United Kingdom and many other places within the Empire, and including
certain points in the United States. M 4 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Department is now giving very, careful attention and consideration to the
post-war trade development of the Province. To this end Mr. Craig in his present
work at Ottawa has been instructed to devote any time that may be necessary to this
feature of our problem.
In suggesting this phase of Mr. Craig's work the Department is cognizant of the
tremendous problem to be faced by industry when the present abnormal conditions are
replaced by a sudden or even gradual readjustment to peace-time conditions.
The maintenance of this office at Ottawa is thoroughly appreciated by British
Columbia manufacturers. This is evidenced by the large numbers of letters of appreciation and complimentary statements regarding the services being rendered.
During the past two years many small establishments in the Province have expanded into large factories. As a result of this, employment in the Province has
improved to a point probably not experienced for many years. The 1941 British
Columbia revised Trade Index was received very favourably and drew many highly
complimentary remarks. This Index was distributed from Ottawa to all purchasing
agents in the Dominion Government and the Department of Munitions and Supply;
the army, the navy, and air force: various Government controlled and operated companies; purchasing agents of Canadian railways, steamship companies, ship-builders,
banks, insurance companies; purchasing agents of the large industrial organizations
in Eastern Canada; and the large department stores, aircraft manufacturing plants,
and all foreign legations. The effect and usefulness of this Index has been exemplified
on numerous occasions.
TIMBER TRADE EXTENSION WORK ABROAD.
The Department again made a grant of $20,000 to the Trade Extension Bureau of
the British Columbia Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association. Since 1935
the following grants have been made to the Trade Extension Bureau:—
Fiscal year.
1935-36 '. .' .   $50,000.00
1936-37 :  50,000.00
1937-38  50,000.00
1938-39 : :  40,000.00
1939-40-..J  40,000.00
1940-41 , -'.   20,000.00
1941-42   20,000.00
Subsequent to date of report, 1942-43    ...     10,000.00
The war of necessity forced the Trade Extension Bureau to moderate many of its
trade promotion activities in the United Kingdom, Australia, South Africa, and Eastern
Canada. The steps taken leading to a reduction in trade extension work activities of
the Bureau were founded on sound judgment and in the best interests of economy and
good business practice.
The Department of Trade and Industry being vitally interested in the activities of
the Trade Extension Bureau of the British Columbia Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association is appreciative of the splendid results achieved in markets explored
by the Bureau during the past few years, and is gratified to know that the trade extension work of the Bureau will be resumed on a greater scale than heretofore when the
present conflict ceases.
On behalf of the lumber industry of the Province we wish to pay tribute to Mr.
A. S. Nicholson, the Timber Controller for Canada; his Deputy, Major L. R. Andrews;
and Mr. D. D. Rosenberry, Assistant Controller of Western operations, for their
co-operative efforts.
United Kingdom.
As trade extension activities in the United Kingdom were practically brought to a
standstill through the war, it was decided to temporarily close the London office and
dispense with the services of Mr. Harward Craig, who so ably managed the office for
the past year. Australia.
At the request of the Australian Government the Trade Extension Bureau loaned
the services of its Timber Commissioner, Mr. R. E. Smith, to the Australian Timber
Controller. The trade extension office was therefore temporarily closed. This Department congratulates Mr. Smith upon his appointment and is cognizant of the fact that
the right man is in the right place.
South Africa.
Because of war conditions, Mr. W. Johnson, the Bureau's representative in South
Africa, resigned to accept a position with one of the largest and best supporters of
British Columbia lumber in South Africa. The Bureau, however, was successful in
partially retaining the services of Mr. Johnson, who will maintain close contact with
the trade and report as to conditions and prospects regularly.
Canada.
As war conditions had disrupted the regular building trade in Canada and in view
of the fact that the greater part of the lumber now being used was more or less directly
or indirectly under the jurisdiction of the Timber Controller, who was specifying hemlock to the greatest extent possible, it was regretfully decided to dispense with Mr. J. C.
Berto's services in Eastern Canada, where he had done much valuable work on behalf
of the lumber industry of this Province.
The Trade Extension Bureau is determined to maintain their overseas Trade
Commissioners' services upon cessation of hostilities. They have put years of effort
and many thousands of dollars in this worth-while work. Services are still being rendered and the machinery is being maintained, and when the war ceases we are certain
that their post-war trade extension activities will be resumed on a much greater scale.
LOANS AND GUARANTEES.
(" Department of Industries Act, 1919.")
Following is a statement covering loans and guarantees outstanding under the
" Department of Industries Act, 1919." Every effort is being made to liquidate these
accounts as soon as possible and it is expected that several substantial payments will be
received in the near future:—
Statement of Loans and Guarantees outstanding, March 31st, 1942.
Loans. _, .   .   , T . ___.
Principal. Interest.
Charles Cormack (Acme Cabinet Works)...... $1,678.47 $6.38
B.C. Livestock Exchange  25,000.00 685.94
Canadian Western Woodworks  9,799.70 1,937.19
Gordon Campbell Investment Co., Ltd  27,920.23 17.79
Fort St. John Flour Mill  17,449.41 6,081.29
T. H. Waters & Company  15,407.16 1,908.63
Guarantees.
Gray's Lumber Mills, Ltd  $2,696.76
Big Bend Cedar Pole Co., Ltd.  (White Pine Lumber Co.,
Ltd.)     9,925.53
(Subsequent to date of report the Fort St. John Flour Mill has been sold to a
reliable purchaser for the sum of $9,000, substantial cash payment, balance on satisfactory deferred instalments.)
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF INDUSTRIAL AND
TRADE EXTENSION.
The Trade Commissioner has again co-operated closely with Federal and Provincial Departments and with commercial and other organizations in the Province
towards increased use of existing facilities and furtherance of new contacts for industrial and trade extension. M 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CO-OPERATIVE CONTACTS.
The restricted sphere of activities of the Trade Commissioners Overseas, due to
war conditions, has been reflected in the Provincial Department policies and has
resulted in closer collaboration with Ottawa, with the Trade Commissioners on special
duties there, and in contemplation of the fact that overseas market machinery must be
completely reconstructed at the close of hostilities.
However, producers and exporters in the Province have again maintained close
co-operation with the Bureau, and the Federal Trade Commissioner Service Overseas
has continued even in war-time to use it as a clearing-house for problems affecting
exporters in British Columbia.
• Assistance has been given to visiting Trade Commissioners on tour, including the
returning Commercial Attache from Tokyo, Japan; the Trade Commissioner from
Shanghai; the Trade Commissioner from New York; the Trade Commissioner from
Sydney, Australia; and the Trade Commissioner from Lima, Peru, on transfer to a
new office in Chile.
The Bureau has during the year been associated with a number of market programmes of interest to other Provincial Departments at Victoria, and has attempted
to co-ordinate these efforts, to assist in placing responsibility for constructive effort
affecting distribution of the product, linking such distribution with the work of the
many war-time controls involved, through regional administration and direction at
Ottawa.
The Departments of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa; Munitions and Supply;
Fisheries; and Agriculture have increasingly used the services of the Bureau at
Victoria in special endeavours where a clearing-house is useful (noted elsewhere in
the report) in approaches on market problems, technical surveys, claim adjustments,
and problems of sales promotion, especially those affected by emergency conditions.
NEW INDUSTRIES.
Within the limits imposed by war conditions, the Bureau has again assisted in
development and extension programmes, helping in the location of plant-sites, in the
supply of raw material, factory equipment, labour personnel, transportation problems,
and taxation.
The flow of European capital and the application of new methods introduced by
those who provided this capital were noted in the reports of the last two years. The
assistance given by the Bureau in the earlier stages of this special development has
been extended. The extension of these industries themselves, with particular reference
to war production, has been a feature of industrial development in the Province during
the year.
Results on branch factory work cannot be expected under emergency conditions,
but the Bureau in its surveys has become increasingly concerned with the importance
of maintaining key contacts, and is preparing the ground for the inevitable replacement of war-time industries by new branch establishment and by new types of industrial production.
The Federal Control on war-time construction and extension has consistently used
the services of the Bureau in its own surveys where plant extension or additions have
been warranted because of war conditions.
SUMMARY REVIEW OF TRADE EXTENSION EFFORTS.
When the Department was first formed it was felt that industrial effort in the
establishment of new .industries and the assistance to existing ones must be supplemented by active trade promotion work, with particular reference to export possibilities ; that this would involve constructive production or marketing service on a wide
variety of produce, as well as assistance to promotion programmes in specific cases.
The Department was able to report last year that this expectation had been
realized, and its importance had been emphasized by war conditions.
For the year now under review, as in previous years, the main types of trade
extension effort have fallen under definite headings:— DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. M 7
(1.)   Contact with foreign  markets through  co-operation  with the  Federal
Trade Commissioners Overseas.
(2.)   Special export surveys in co-operation with Ottawa or other Government departments.
(3.)   Independent export surveys arising from war conditions:
(a.)  Loss of existing markets;
(b.)  Opportunities to replace exports from Germany;
(c.)   Survey of new markets opened by disruption of Scandinavian
or other sources of supply.
(4.)   Increased war-time co-operation with agricultural interests for special
marketing problems.
(5.)   Assistance in mobilization of war industries of the Province.
(6.)   Co-operation for market problems with the committee for general industrial survey of the Province.
(7.)   Assistance in Timber Trade Extension.
(8.)   Specialized assistance to unorganized producing and exporting groups.
PARTICULARS OF TRADE EXTENSION EFFORTS.
Timber Trade Extension.
A special section of the report deals with Timber Trade Extension.
Surveys by Commodities.
At the request of contacts overseas and of exporters and manufacturers in the
Province, the Bureau investigated a great number of products and by-products, involving a full range of products which can ordinarily be exported from the Province.
The scope of the work indicated under this heading was again restricted by conditions
of transport and war-time movement.
Contacts for Overseas Co-operation.
In addition to the relations established and maintained with Trade Commissioners,
the Bureau continued to receive the full co-operation of the Agent-General in London,
who has been able to continue his effective liaison work for the Province in spite of
most difficult conditions. Direct and effective contacts have also been maintained with
the British Trade Commissioner in Vancouver and the foreign Consuls in the Province.
Special Investigations.
Considerable work under this heading has again been undertaken, and it is related
to the general scope of trade extension work of the Bureau. Cited may be the Bureau's
assistance in problems of transportation and rates, representation on outside committees relating to industrial endeavour and trade expansion, assistance given to
investigation of factory conditions affecting output, assistance extended in award to
British Columbia manufacturers on public contracts, and the promotion and sales of
British Columbia produce to which special mention is again made in the report.
SPECIAL EXPORT ENDEAVOUR.
Extending the contacts and machinery evolved last year, the Bureau has again
been closely associated with the war-time export movement of foodstuffs from the Province, including eggs, fruit, fisheries products, and canned milk—under contract to the
Ministry of Food in the United Kingdom, in co-operation with the Federal and Provincial Departments of Agriculture, and with the special board set up at Ottawa to act
as collecting and purchasing agents for the material.
In particular the Bureau has again assisted in the matter of fruit-pulp contracts
for the United Kingdom.
It was actively engaged in shipping approximately 16,000 barrels or 3,000 net tons
of strawberries in S02 solution, raspberries in SOL, solution, greengage-pulp, blackcurrant pulp, and prune-pulp in the 1941 season. These shipments were supplied from
all parts of the Province, and the extension of the same machinery has been authorized
for the year 1942 in respect to movement from the Province. M 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Trade Commissioner acts as agent of the Special Products Board, Ottawa, who
are the purchasing agents of the British Ministry of Food in England. All negotiations, fruit collection, processing contracts, financing, ocean space allotment, and actual
shipment are centred in the department at Victoria.
From this has evolved a direct and effective basis of co-operation with the British
Ministry of War Transport, with the shipping companies, the banks, the Canned Foods
Association of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and the suppliers themselves,
all of whom turn to the Bureau as a clearing-house for direction and consolidated
arrangements.
The Bureau is also acting as special representative in the movement of other vital
war materials—it now surveys and controls the entire export movement of and trading
in peat-moss of the Province where supplies are required for defence purposes, and
over a million bales are expected to move to the United States as a result of organization completed in the first three months of the calendar year.
OTHER SPECIAL ENDEAVOURS IN WAR-TIME DISTRIBUTION.
In many other matters the Bureau is called upon by Ottawa to act as a clearinghouse for other war-time organizations and control of shipping space and war-time
export movement. This involves direct and effective contact with the priorities committee and other committees at Ottawa and with shipping contacts at Victoria and
Vancouver.
Elsewhere in this report under the notes on the work of the Trade Representative
at Ottawa, mention has been made of the mobilization of industry for war purposes in
the Province. The Bureau has been actively co-operating in this connection by representation on war contracts committees, and by the maintenance of contacts with visiting
or resident representatives of the various board and control units established at Ottawa.
It has assisted in special surveys, and the machinery set up has been placed at the
disposal of the Federal authorities and has been used constructively by them in the
interests of the Province.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PRODUCTS.
Again mention should be made of the co-operation extended to the British Columbia
Products Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade, and to the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and with other organizations concerned in the increased sale of British Columbia products. During the year under
review the Department again assisted in advertising campaigns, and co-operated closely
with all bodies concerned with the particular problems of the British Columbia manufacturer and producer.
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND
STATISTICS.
The Bureau, as a fact-finding and advisory body, has been working under increased
pressure during the past fiscal year. War conditions have brought new projects into
being, forced the suspension of peace-time studies, and dislocated the personnel. The
essential statistical services, largely performed for other Provincial departments as
well as for the Department of Trade and Industry, have been maintained but not without difficulty. All agreements or working arrangements relating to the collection,
co-ordination, and publication of statistics existing between this Bureau and the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa; the Wartime Prices and Trade Board, Ottawa;
as well as the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, and Provincial Secretary, have
been satisfactorily executed. A number of important studies have been inaugurated
while others have been completed in the Research Division. A full description of these
research projects, together with an account of the statistical services performed, has
been provided under the appropriate divisions which follow.*
* A description of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, showing the internal organization, will be found in
the 1939 Report of the Department of Trade and Industry. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
M 9
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Under the impetus of war-time demand, business activity in British Columbia
during 1941 exceeded the relatively high levels of 1940. If this trend continues, it is
evident that the Province will shortly experience " full employment." Production in
the basic industries reached an estimated net value of $343,000,000 in 1941* compared
with $302,762,441 in 1940.f Improvement was largely due to increased production and
higher values in the forest, fishery, and manufacturing industries. Salaries and wages
paid to employees in the leading industries have been estimated at $239,525,459 in
1941, an increase of at least $51,000,000 over the estimated 1940 gross pay-roll of
$188,325,7664 Merchandising, both wholesale and retail, reflected the results of a
rising price-level and increased consuming power. Bank debits, reflecting the volume
of commercial payments, and, as such, a useful guide to the tempo of business activity,
were reported to have shown a 13.6-per-cent. increase in 1941 over 1940. Employment
measured by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics' monthly index, showed an improvement
of 19.7 per cent, in the same period. A brief glimpse of other business characteristics
during 1941 may be seen from Table 1.
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1941, compared ivith 1940.
Unit.
1941.
1940.
Percentage
Increase ( +) or
Decrease (— ).
Mining—
Oz.
*          1
$           1
I    J
Long ton
$
M.B.M.
Ton
$
Case
?
Box
Box
Box
Cwt.
M. ft.
Square
1935-39 = 100
1935-39=100
1935-39=100
$
000 gal.
Ton
000 k.w.h.
000 $
78,479,719 '
614,801
40,231,518
1,802,353
119,920,000
3,522,750
351,241
31,732,037
2,295,433*
58,577,539
3,940,797
2,536,599
1,404,198
081,142
953,933
3,205,465
155.0
134.8
'   137.2
10,653,698
70,995
9,139,480
2,407,480
29,361
75,701,155
622,483
39,498,623
1,667,827
102,804,000
3,693,155
330,572
21,719,167
1,467,216
52,317,121
4,925,987
3,961,647
964,340
462,433
948,830
2,729,699
126.1
116.5
121.6
10,108,463
65,199
7,592,881
2,095,625
26,730
+     3.67
—     1.23
Copper production! _  	
- Lead production1...-...    — 	
+    1.86
+     8.07
Forestry—
Total value of production2      .
+ 16.65
—    4.61
+    6.25
Fisheries—
+  38.18
+  56.45
Agriculture—
Total value of production4   _
Apples—
+   11.9.7
—  20.00
—  35.93
+  45.61
External Trade—
+   47.30
Exports of planks and boards, Douglas firG
+     0.54
+   17.43
Internal Trade—
+  22.92'
Index of retail sales0—'
+  15.71
+ 12.83
+     5.39
+    8.89
Railway freight loaded in B.C.0  	
+  20.37
+ 14.88.
Sales of life insurance0..  	
+     9.84
1 British Columbia Department of Mines.
- British Columbia Department of Lands, Forest Branch.
:;; British Columbia Department of Fisheries.
I British Columbia Department of Agriculture.
5 British Columbia Tree Fruit Board.
II Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
7 Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
* Preliminary estimate by the Bu:eau of Economics and Statistics.
f Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
% British Columbia Department of Labour. M 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1941, compared with 1940
■—Continued.
Unit.
1941.
1940.
Percentage
Increase ( + ) or
Decrease ( — ).
Construction—
000 $
000 $
No.
$
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926 = 100
1926 = 100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926 = 100
1926 = 100
14,509
2,427,200
92,032
12,769,000
135.6
164.9
268.5
132.1
146.2
173.3
169.2
114.3
107.1
102.8
117.6
99.7
142.1
159.6
11,929
2,137,200
92,230
11,110,000
113.3
129.1
129.3
108.7
117.8
143.6
152.2
110.4
91.9
74.8
112.1
93.4
127.9
142.9
+  21.63
+  13.57
0.21
Finance—
Tourist Trade—
Estimated expenditure of United States tourists in British Columbia7  	
Employment6—
+  14.93
+   19.68
+  27,73
+ 107.66     .
+  21.53
+  24.11
+  20.68
+  11.17
+     3.53
+   16.54
+  37.43
+    4.91
+     6.75
+  11.10
+   11.69
Manufacturing    	
Mining- _   _.	
Transportation 	
Trade    	
,; Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
7 Bareau of Economics and Statistics.
THE RESEARCH DIVISION.
Occupational Survey of Public School Students.
In collaboration with the Department of Education and with the co-operation of
School Boards and teachers throughout the Province, the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics has conducted an annual occupational survey of students leaving Grades
VII. to XIII., inclusive, since 1938. The objective of the survey has been to ascertain
the probable number leaving school, their reasons for leaving school, and the nature of
the occupations or special training which the students would seek thereafter.
Final tabulation has revealed that 4,386 students were registered in the 1941 June
survey. Of this number, 1,955 students were uncertain whether they would or would
not return to the public school system in September. The remainder, 2,431 students,
were definite in stating that they would not return. Students who knew definitely in
June that they would be returning to school in September did not complete the
questionnaire.
The principal reasons given for leaving school, as shown in the 1941 survey, have
been compared with similar figures for 1939 and 1940 in the following table:—
Table 2.
Principal Reason.
Number of Students.
Percentage.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1939.
1
1940.
1
1941.
Wish to seek employment     	
1,728
846
18
849
325
21
23
20
144
1,873
1,075
23
716
275
36
35
.31
130
2.214
1,165
16
608
202
11
22
16
132
43.5
21.3
0.4
21.4
8.2
0.5
0.6
0.5
3.6
44.7
25.7     |
0.6
17.1
6.5
0.8     !.
0.8    ;
0.7    [
3.1
50.5
Unable to continue for financial reasons  	
13.8
0 5
Totals     .	
3.974
4,194
4,386
100.0
100.0 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
M 11
Just how many students actually entered the labour market is, of course, not
definitely known. Excluding those students intending to seek special training, those
leaving the Province, the invalid, and those required to assist at home, we might
reasonably suppose that approximately 2,700 students sought employment in the Provincial labour market during 1939 and 1940, as compared with approximately 3,000
students in 1941. In spite of the obvious difficulties confronting students asked to
state the occupations they intended to seek after leaving school, 3,210 students
attempted to answer this question in the 1941 survey.* Of this group, 447 boys and
207 girls reported that they had been assured of an opportunity to obtain employment
in their stated occupations. The remaining 1,220 boys and 1,336 girls reported that
they had no assurance of employment in the occupations indicated. It is probably true
to say, therefore, that the particular occupations shown by the students were, in many
cases, merely indicative. For that reason the occupations have been consolidated into
larger industrial groups which, it is thought, provide a better picture of the actual
situation.    In Table 3 the occupations have been consolidated in this way.
Table 3.—Occupations sought by Students leaving School, June, 1941.
Boys.
Girls.
Industry.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
131
14
42
18
328
8
98
74
2
41
1
506
271
108
8
11
108
13
391
61
9
14
10
157
6
55
40
2
24
......
286
149
56
4
«
71
7
148
70
5
28
8
171
2
43
34
17
1
220
122
52
4
5
37
6
243
3
63
2
46
203
704
26
5
147
526
522
1
37
1
26
117
506
18
5
63
420
248
2
	
Mining, quarrying, etc.	
Manufacturing   	
Electric light and power 	
26
......
1
Transportation and communication
20
Commercial  	
86
Service     — ...
Public administration 	
198
8
Personal service	
84
106
274
Total, all occupations	
1,667
819
848
1,543
936
607
* Of the remaining 1,176 students,  1,165  students reported that they intended to take special traini
ether students reported that they were leaving British Columbia.
and the
To indicate in more precise terms the type of employment sought by these students,
we have listed (in order of magnitude) the principal occupations sought, in Tables 4
and 5. The leading occupations, in the case of the girls, included 526 students seeking
office-work as stenographers, typists, clerks, and book-keepers; 201 students seeking
employment as saleswomen in the retail trade; another group of. 88 students reported
their intention to seek work as domestic helpers. In the case of the boys, 256 students
reported their intention to join various branches of air, navy, and army service, 131
students were seeking employment as farm and garden helpers, 124 students were
seeking work as machinists, and 123 students indicated their intention to seek office-
work. M 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 4-—Principal Occupations sought by Girls.
Principal Occupations.
Total.
Assured of an
Opportunity.
Not assured of
an Opportunity.
Stenographers, typists, and secretaries .
Saleswomen (retail)   	
Clerks, in office or bank -
Domestic servants or child's nurse-—	
Telephone operators  _	
Waitress     	
Dressmakers' and tailors' apprentices ...
Hairdresser   	
Cannery workers, fruit and vegetable...
Journalist, junior 	
Druggist, junior..   _	
Other occupations   	
Occupations not specified  	
Totals.
370
201
156
88
46
36
26
15
5
62
522
31
44
27
30
14
14
6
3
4
2
25
7
157
129
58
32
22
20
12
4
8
3
37
515
1,336
Table 5.—Principal Occupations reported by Boys.
Principal Occupations.
Total.
Assured of an
Opportunity.
Not assured of
an Opportunity.
150
131
124
123
81
55
42
33
33
30
29
26
25
25
22
20
19
18
16
15
13
13
13
12
12
•      196
391
48
62
25
41
17
13
15
18
12
3
10
14
6
8
6
6
2
5
10
6
6
6
6
6
2
85
9
102
69
Machinists' apprentice and mechanics (N.E.S.) _ - _ 	
99
82
Sailors and tradesmen, R.C. Naval Service ,	
64
42
27
15
21
27
19
•    12
17
16
14
17
13
6
Labourers    _     _  	
7
6
111
382
Totals - -- 	
1,667
447
1,220
The number of students leaving the public school system, arranged according to
grades, has been shown in Table 6. Although the largest number of students is shown
emerging from Grade XII., there is a significant outflow from Grades VIII., IX.,. X.,
and XI. The table shows that more boys than girls were expecting to leave from
Grades VII., VIII., and IX.; 28.8 per cent, of the boys and 19.9 per cent, of the girls
were reported in these grades. This situation has been noticed in earlier surveys, and
represents, apparently, a general tendency. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
M 13
Table 6.—Students leaving the Public School System at June 30th, 1941,
arranged by Grades.
Grade
Total Students.
Students definitely
LEAVING.
Students NOT
definitely leaving.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
VII — 	
113
478
456
437
404
1,987
395
116
63
263
234
215
175
823
154
12
Per
Cent.
3.25
13.56
12.07
11.08
9.03
42.45
7.94
0.62
50
215
222
222
229
1,164
241
104
Per
Cent.
2.04
8.79
9.07
9.07
9.35
47.59
9.85
4.24
50
202
164
165
135
1,376
29
109
73
66
44
525
21
95
91
99
91
851
185
72
63
276
292
272
269
1
34  ]        29
VIII  	
154   1      122
IX   	
X	
161  |      131
149   j      123
XI.
131         138
XII	
611
298   1      313
XIII	
260
75
135   |        79   ]        56
79   |          7
37              5            32
Totals	
4,386
1,939   |  100.00
1
2,447
100.00
2,431   [      928
1
1,503
1,955   !  1,011   |      944
1               1
In Table 7 a distribution according to age-groups has been provided. It is shown
that of the 4,386 students reporting in the survey, 2,826 students were between 16 and
18 years of age. Similarly, 508 students, or 10.5 per cent., are shown in the 13-15
age-group. With the exception of eleven students who did not state their ages, the
remaining 1,041 students are shown to be over 19 years of age.
Table 7.
Total.
Students definitely
leaving.
Students NOT
definitely leaving.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
13-15 years  —     	
16-18 years                  .".	
508
2,826
1,004
37
11
265
1,193
449
23
9
243
1,633
555
14
2
198
1,504
97
543
101
961
310
1,322
288
30
5
168
650
168
20
5
142
672
19-21 years     	
22 years and over.—.    	
716
7
6
281   |      435
3 |          4
4 '          2
120
10
All ages   	
4,386
1,939
2.447
2,431         928  |   1,503
!           !
1,955
1,011  j     944
1
The Trade of British Columbia.
At the request of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, External Trade Branch, the
Bureau has complied with war-time regulations and has suspended publication of the
regular annual reports on the trade of British Columbia with foreign countries and
with other Canadian Provinces. As soon as circumstances are again favourable, the
Bureau will resume publication of this report which will, in the meantime, be kept up
to date.
The agreement between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, concluded in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. - Under this arrangement, a monthly
coded statement has been sent regularly to the Bureau from Ottawa, showing in detail
the importation and exportation of every commodity, regularly listed in the Federal
trade reports, moving through customs ports in British Columbia. With the aid of
leading retail and wholesale firms and various governmental agencies, the Bureau also
develops an annual estimate of the inter-provincial trade in order to provide a picture
of the total Provincial trade. A summary of foreign and interprovincial trade for
the years 1936-40 follows:— Table 8.—The Trade of British Columbia (excluding Gold) with other Canadian
Provinces, the British Commonivealth, and all Foreign Countries, 1936-40.
Country or Province.
Imports into
British Columbia.
Exports from
British Columbia
but
excluding Gold.
Estimated Total
Trade
(excluding Gold).
Other Canadian Provinces—
1936                                             -'--
$71,231,961
77,153,440
66,361,743
72,966,783
83,405,229
15,038,814
18,669,989
18,628,470
17,290,094
18,742,514
20,888,661
22,271,603
19,926,329
40,318,115
43,894,774
107,159,436
■118,095,032
104,916,542
130,574,992
146,042,517
$20,936,525
22,673,602
21,293,022
22,149,065
25,224,792
44,769,638
55,905,816
47,569,696
57,555,493
67,649,671
45,301,133
62,165,656
45,094,011
84,449,427
56,686,933
111,007,296
140,745,074
113,956,729
134,153,985
149,561,396
$92,168,486
1937                                                                     	
99,827,042
1938      ..           .... -	
87,654,765
1939                                                                   	
95,115,848
1940    .                                1 	
108,630,021
British Empire (excluding Canada) —
1936                    -	
59,808,452
1937    ....   	
1938       -                               	
74,575,805
66,198,166
1939
7.4,845,587
1940             _ -..:	
86,392,185
Foreign countries—
1936         	
66,189,794
1937      •	
84,437,259
1938    ....           	
65,020,340
1939     — -  	
94,767,542
1940    ■-..:. ....    	
Totals—
1936    .  -	
100,581.707
218,166,732
1937    -	
258,840,106
1938	
218,873,271
1939 	
264,728,977
1940  ......    	
295,603,913
Figures for 1939 have been revised since publication of the last annual report.
The Cost of Living in British Columbia.
Since 1936, the Bureau has compiled an index of food prices in fifty-two cities,
towns, and villages for the private use of the Provincial Department of Labour. In
1939, this food index was supplemented by a new monthly full cost-of-living index,
which included clothing, rentals, fuel, and other essential household items in the four
Coast cities of Vancouver, New Westminster, Victoria, and Nanaimo. Under arrangements sponsored by the Provincial Department of Labour, this full cost-of-living index
was used as a cost-of-living barometer by a number of British Columbia Coast firms
until the Dominion War-time Wages and Cost-of-living Bonus Order made the use of
the all-Canada index, prepared by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, mandatory
throughout Canada.
The food index measures the change in prices as they occur in the case of forty-six
selected food items, forming a scientifically tested budget. At the suggestion of the
late Provincial Health Officer, Dr. H. E. Young, the food budget adopted was modelled
on the plan of the Sub-committee on Nutrition, British Commonwealth Scientific Conference, Ottawa, 1936; this represented the latest information available when the food
budget was created in 1936. The budget contains sufficient quantities of staple foods
to maintain, in good health for one month, a family of five; of which two are adults,
one an infant—6 months to 1 year old, one a child—6 years to 10 years old, and one a
child—11 years to 13 years old.
The monthly full cost-of-living index, prepared for the Coast area, covers approximately 64 per cent, of the expenditures made by an average British Columbia family
in receipt of an income between $1,200 and $1,400 a year.*    The index is made up as
follows :  Per Cent.
Food   44.05
Rent   25.25
Clothing  :  14.93
Fuel   :  5.37
Furniture ..  2.59
* Based on a survey conducted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in Vancouver, in 1938. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
M 15
Per Cent.
Kitchen equipment ...  2.39
Electricity  .  2.13
Textiles, household   1.99
Water   ,  1.30
Total
100.00
Table 9.—The Cost of Living in Canada and in British Columbia.
For comparative purposes only, the Dominion and Provincial cost-of-living indexes
have been translated to the same base period, 1936 = 100.*
Caution.—These indexes do not measure the difference in the actual dollar cost
of living between British Columbia and Canada as a whole. They show only the extent
to which the cost of living in British Columbia, or in Canada, has varied from the
average cost of living in that area during 1936.
Full Cost-of-living Index.
Food Index.
Canada.*
British
Columbia
Coast Area.t
Canada.*
British
Columbia. $
1939—
First
of Month.
102.75
102.75
105.50
105.81
105.81
105.81
105.81
106.63
106.63
106.93
106.93
107.65
107.95
108.46
14)9.07
109.89
110.09
110.40
110.30
110.30
110.70
111.52
112.64
114.07
115.90
116.92
117.74
118.55
118.04
117.64
117.94
118.14
Fifteenth
of Month.
99.27
104.18
104.80
104.03
103.94
104.45
104.66
105.45
105.18
105.38
106.48
106.79
107.02
107.84
108.58
108.79
108.66
109.33
110.21
111.38
111.57
113.79
114.08
115.83
116.89
118.11
119.74
118.52
118.33
119.40
120.23
First
of Month.
101.53
101.64
108.69
109.51
107.06
106.85
106.85
107.16
107.16
106.75
106.13
107.67
107.77
107.77
108.49
111.15
111.55
112.17
111.25
111.45
112.58
112.17
115.03
119.22
124.03
126.07
125.97
128.22
126.58
125.05
125.87
126.48
Fifteenth
of Month.
94.48
104.38
104.74
101.51
1940—
100.43
100.97
101.22
102.53
101.77
101.51
July       .......                	
103.47
103.84
103.33
104.92
November..—   ■ —.   	
106.30
107.39
1941—
107.03
107.93
109.02
111.42
111.81
116.09
July               ......   ,'•„.
117.07
120.55
121.10
121.24
November            	
123.93
121.57
1942—
120.99
122.55
March     ..._   	
123.71
* The Dominion Bureau of Statistics index is actually compiled on the basis of 1935-39 = 100. We have translated these figures into terms of 1936 = 100 for comparative purposes only. See the Dominion Bureau of Statistics
" Prices and Price Indexes " for actual figures used.
f Compiled bv the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for four Coast cities of Vancouver, New Westminster,
Nanaimo, and Victoria.
t Compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics for fifty-two centres in the Province. M 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Tourist Trade of British Columbia.
In the spring of 1941, at the request of the Government Travel Bureau, this Bureau
undertook the task of compiling a reasonably accurate statistical summary of the Provincial tourist trade. During the 1941 tourist season a systematic study was made of
the automobile tourist traffic. The Province was divided into seven tourist divisions,
and motorists passing through from one zone to the next, between June 1st and September 30th, were tabulated at strategic car-counting stations.* In this way a comprehensive statistical record of the automobile traffic was obtained.
To evaluate these statistics, the Bureau sought the co-operation of the Internal
Trade Branch, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, which collects a statement of approximate expenditures from nearly every outgoing United States tourist and each incoming
tourist. Pending the receipt of this information, the Bureau developed arbitrary estimates of average expenditure for each tourist zone and prepared a preliminary estimate
of the total value of this traffic. The results obtained in this arbitrary calculation were
as follows:—
Table 10.—Estimated Total Expenditures of Visiting Automobile Tourists in
British Columbia, 1941.
(Assumed Three Persons per Automobile.)
United States Tourists.
Canadian Tourists,
from other
Provinces.
Minimum Budget.
Medium Budget.
Liberal Budget.
Minimum Budget.
$267,000
484,000
2,450,000
463,000
50,000
286,000
$295,650
500,000
2,900,000
552,000
54,000
308,350
$355,000
610,000
3,322,000
661,000
69,000
313,000
$166,000
115,000
337,000
108,000
9,000
65,000
Zone 2, Okanagan-Kamloops
Zone 3, Lower Fraser	
Zone 5—
Central B.C.
Upper Fraser   :	
Totals 	
$4i000,000                      $4,600,000
$5,330,000                        $800,000
* A full description of the plan followed will be found in the 1941 Annual Report, pages  19 and 20.
From the data subsequently furnished by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics it
was learned that in the case of the visiting United States auto tourists the medium
budget gave the most accurate results. The Dominion Bureau of Statistics has advised
that visiting United States auto tourists, leaving from customs ports in the Province,
reported they had spent $4,654,000 in Canada. No similar information could be
obtained, of course, to corroborate the estimates of the purely Canadian expenditures,
since the interprovincial tourist traffic is not subject to tabulation.
While relatively successful in tabulating the automobile traffic, the Bureau has not
been able to obtain a significant measure of the interprovincial railway tourist travel.
Both Canadian transcontinental railways were requested to provide information which
would help the Bureau to prepare a reasonably accurate estimate of this travel, and
both railways stated their inability to assist the Province at this time.
Through the courtesy of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, however, the Bureau
has been able to secure tentative information concerning the international rail, bus,
steamship, as well as automobile tourist traffic. From this material, as well as from
the Bureau's own study, the figures in Table 11 have been derived. In general, it is
considered that these results reflect a moderate position. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
M 17
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H .S M Z M 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Automobile tourists from nearly every state of the United States visit British
Columbia during the tourist season. A graphic illustration of this movement during
1941 has been presented in the map, Chart A.
INDUSTRIAL SURVEY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
This industrial survey was inaugurated at the request of the Honourable John
Hart, Premier and Minister of Finance, just before the outbreak of war in 1939.
Although the possibility of attracting refugee capital, which was the reason underlying
the survey at the beginning, became rather remote after the commencement of hostilities, the survey, in view of its obvious basic importance, has been continued as a
permanent project.
For many years persistent and capable efforts have been put forth by those departments of the Provincial Government concerned directly with the natural resources to
encourage the establishment of new industries in this Province. The assistance has
taken many forms, ranging from the release of general information to positive acts of
co-operation with producers anxious to locate their establishments in British Columbia.
In the process a large bibliography has accumulated throughout the various branches
of the Government. Consequently, when plans for the present survey were being
prepared, it was considered that a study which intentionally or accidentally duplicated
the work that had already been done in this direction would be a distinct waste of effort.
To eliminate the possibility of duplication and to assist in the planning and execution of
this project, the present Interdepartmental Committee was invited to serve' as an
advisory body.
After a departmental steering committee had analysed the project, it was decided
to delegate the initial preparatory work to the Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
When the Bureau had sufficient material ready, a meeting of the Interdepartmental
Committee was called early in 1940 to consider the first progress report. Subsequently,
the matter was referred back to the Department of Trade and Industry for continuance.
Since that time, work on this project in the Bureau of Economics and Statistics has
been of necessity irregular. But, in spite of the prolonged and frequent interruptions
which have disturbed earlier arrangements, the Bureau has carried on a modified programme and during the year presented its second progress report.
Outline of the Work carried on by the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics.
In requesting the Department of Trade and Industry to undertake an industrial
survey, the Minister of Finance recommended that particular attention should be
directed to the following seven topics:—
(1.)   (a.)  What basic raw materials are known to be available in commercial
quantities in this Province?
(6.)   To what extent are these materials being utilized at the present
time?
(c.)   In what form is this utilization taking place?
(d.)   Is further fabrication possible or likely to be profitable?
(2.)   (a.)  What competitive areas exist from the standpoint of possession of
raw materials?
(6.)   Is this competition actual or potential?
(3.)   (a.)  What markets are available to the products resulting from such industrial expansion?
(6.)   Is there an established demand, or would such demand have to be
created ?
(4.)   (a.)  What protection would such industries have for the British-Columbia market by means of freight rates from Eastern Canada
competitors ?
(&.)  What  protection  would   such   industries  have  for  the   Canadian
market by means of tariff from foreign competition?
(5.)  Would importation of ..skilled labourers or technicians be necessary on
any large scale? Eh
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(6.)   To what extent are the proposed products imported into British Columbia
at present, and from what source?
(7.)   To what extent can this Province undertake the development of a highly-
industrialized and self-sufficient economy without there being an upsetting effect on the balance of payment ?
In general, these questions all refer to native resources which, for some reason,
have not yet been brought under development.    As such they were found to be—when
the Bureau of Economics began its work—more or less the equivalent of section four,
" Idle Resources,"  in a long-term  research plan  adopted earlier by the Bureau of
Economic Statistics in 1938, an outline of which is given on page 20.    Since the Bureau
had already laid the preliminary groundwork for its own research in this field, it was
decided to conduct the survey along these prepared lines.
To isolate, as soon as possible, the most attractive prospects from the less attractive, the Bureau began operations under its own topic three, " Deficiencies in the
present structure from the point of view of self-sufficiency." By concentrating in this
way upon an analysis of commodities imported to meet an already established demand,
it was felt that a list of commercial possibilities could be readily obtained. The first
progress report contained the preliminary data compiled under this heading. The
second progress report contains a more systematic and satisfactory treatment of this
work.
Long-term Economic Research Plan adopted by the Bureau of
Economics and Statistics in 1938.
(An outline.)
(1.)   The fundamental economic factors determining the development of industry
in British Columbia.
(2.)   The present state and structure of industry in the Province, in the case of (1)
industries dependent upon diminishing resources, and  (2)  industries dependent upon reproductive resources.     (See the classified list attached.)
(a.)   The degree of fabrication and, if not fully finished in British Columbia,
why: •
(b.)   The degree of waste or scrap and its utilization, if any:
(c.)   The sources of raw materials and producer's equipment;   i.e., British
Columbia, other Canadian Provinces, or foreign countries:
(d.)   The degree of competition encountered by domestic industry from' other
Canadian and Foreign producers.
(3.)   Deficiencies in the present structure from the point of view of self-sufficiency.
Commodities consumed but not produced in the Province, arranged according
to use;   i.e., raw material for industry, producer's equipment, or consumer goods.    Are they physically possible of development in this Province?    Would it be economic to produce them?
(A.)  Articles considered to be physically suited for production, or for which
a known substitute might be produced, in British Columbia under natural
conditions, but whose production  is not necessarily considered to be
economic at the present time:
(a.)   Raw materials for industry.
(b.)  Partly processed materials for industry,
(c.)   Fully processed materials for industry.
id.)   Producer's equipment.
(e.)   Consumer materials, non-durable goods.
(/.)   Consumer durable goods.
(B.)  Articles considered to be physically unsuited for production in British
Columbia under natural conditions, but whose production is not necessarily considered to be physically impossible under artificial conditions:
(a.)   Raw materials for industry.
(b.)  Partly processed materials for industry.
(c.)   Fully processed materials for industry. (d.)   Producer's equipment.
(e.)   Consumer materials, non-durable goods.
(/.)   Consumer durable goods.
(4.)   Idle resources.
An inventory of known but undeveloped or partially developed resources in
the Province.    Whether alienated or held by the Crown.    Reasons for
idleness.    What are the prerequisites for development?
(5.)   Industrial research and new products.
A bibliography of current industrial research utilizing materials known to
exist in British Columbia.    Whether controlled by patent, etc.
(6.)  Recent industrial expansion in the Pacific North-west States.
A review of Federal projects, such as Bonneville and Grand Coulee, in the
North-west;   the economic basis for these projects;   the consequent industrial development, if any.
(7.)   Regional surveys in British Columbia.
(a.)   An economic survey of the area adjacent to the Canadian National Railways between Prince Rupert and Yellowhead.
(b.)  An economic survey of the area adjacent to the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway between Quesnel and Squamish.
(c.)   An economic survey of Northern British Columbia, between North latitude 55 degrees and 60 degrees.
To illustrate the approach made under topic three, the following extract has been
taken from the second progress report submitted by the Bureau to the Interdepartmental Industrial Survey Committee in March, 1942.
Articles imported from Foreign Countries but not at present produced
in British Columbia*
" There are undoubtedly a number of routes along which one might proceed in
search of opportunities for new investment of industrial expansion. One of the most
convenient and direct methods is to analyse the import traffic. Commodities are imported to satisfy an existing demand; if the market was not already present, importers
would not venture their capital in this trade. Consequently, when we consider imports,
we know that there is a market—be it small or large—already in existence. Imports
can be readily divided into two classes: those commodities which are also produced
in this Province; and those commodities which are not at present produced in British
Columbia. While we may be interested to know why it is necessary to supplement
domestic production, we are principally concerned with the second group—namely,
commodities not at present produced in this Province. We might divide these commodities still further to form two additional groups, A and B, as follows:—
Group A. Articles considered to be physically suited for production or for
which a known substitute might be produced, in British Columbia
under natural conditions but whose production is not necessarily
considered to be economic at the present time.
Group B. Articles  considered  to  be  physically   unsuited   for  production   in
British Columbia under natural conditions, but whose production is
not necessarily considered to be physically impossible under artificial
conditions.
" In this report attention is directed only to those imported articles falling under
Group A.    For convenience we have segregated those imported commodities according
to whether they are intended for producer or consumer consumption.    Six categories
have been established:   (1) raw materials for industry, (2) partly processed material
for industry, (3) fully processed materials for industry, (4) producer's equipment, (5)
consumer materials—non-durable  goods,   (6)   consumer  durable  goods.    It was  not
possible, in the time available, to include the last-mentioned categories, five and six, in
the present report."     (See map, Chart B.)
* Extract from  Progress  Report Number  Two  submitted  by  the  Bureau  of  Economics  and   Statistics  to  the
Interdepartmental Industrial Survey Committee, March, 1942. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
M 21
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tO    lO   IO   -rT M 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PROSPECTS FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE SUGAR-BEET
INDUSTRY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The introduction of sugar rationing, as a result of war-time exigencies, has once
again focused attention upon the fact that British Columbia is dependent upon foreign
sources for its cane-sugar requirements. It is natural, therefore, that at such a time
the merits of the sugar-beet industry would appear to best advantage. The establishment of a sugar-beet industry in the Province of British Columbia has often been mooted
in the past and, in spite of the lack of success that has attended these efforts, it will
probably continue to attract serious attention at various times in the future.
In order that the Interdepartmental Industrial Survey Committee might have a
convenient source of unbiassed information at their disposal, the Bureau has undertaken to study and to summarize in a brief way some of the economic factors that have
militated thus far against the successful establishment of this industry in British
Columbia.    A report on this subject will be completed about June, 1942.
CO-OPERATION WITH THE POST-WAR REHABILITATION
COUNCIL.
Shortly after their appointment in the spring of 1942, the Post-war Rehabilitation
Council requested the full-time assistance of the Bureau. In order to provide the
Council with technical advice in their organization stage the services of the director,
Mr. G. Neil Perry, were made available on a part-time consulting basis, and the services
of members of the Research and other Divisions of the Bureau arranged on a request
basis. These arrangements have worked thus far very satisfactorily. As the work of
the Post-war Rehabilitation Council progresses, it is anticipated that the services of the
Bureau of Economics and Statistics will be called upon increasingly to provide basic
information and to undertake economic analyses in various fields.
OTHER REPORTS.
In addition to the projects outlined previously, the Bureau has prepared numerous
special reports and memoranda for officials of the Provincial Government. A supplement to the British Columbia Trade Index, published in 1941, was prepared and released
early in 1942. Special information has been prepared, also, in response to written
inquiries from corporations and from private individuals on a wide range of subjects.
THE LABOUR STATISTICS DIVISION.
In accordance with an agreement concluded in 1938 between the Provincial Department of Labour and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, the Labour Division of
this Bureau conducted and compiled the 1941 statistical survey of wage-earners employed in British Columbia trades and industries. Detailed statistical information on
this subject may be found in the annual report of the Department of Labour for the
calendar year 1941. Work in this division is primarily concerned with the statistical
requirements of the Department of Labour and its various administrative bodies.
Under the pressure of other war-time work the Employment Division of the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics has found it impossible to provide regional employment
indexes. At the present time the Dominion Bureau of Statistics prepares an employment index for the Province as a whole. Under the arrangement negotiated with the
Employment Division originally in 1938, and subsequently confirmed in 1941, it is
expected that ultimately indexes will be made available on a regional plan.
The study of labour turnover, inaugurated in 1938, has been continued. In
response to requests from industry, a simplified form has been prepared for use in the
1942 and subsequent annual labour returns. Satisfactory results have already been
obtained but, until the survey has had the benefit of several years' experience, the study
will be carried on on a research basis. When the data have been thoroughly tested,
it is intended that regular reports on this question should be published annually. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. M 23
THE MINING AND METALLURGICAL STATISTICS DIVISION.
In accordance with an agreement concluded in 1938 between the Provincial Department of Mines, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics, the Mining and Metallurgical Division conducted" and compiled the 1940
annual statistical survey of the mining industry. Detailed statistical information on
this subject may be found in the annual report of the Minister of Mines for the
calendar year 1941.
The work of this Division during the year has been largely concerned with the
preparation of statistical material for the Department of Mines and its various administrative bodies.
THE MECHANICAL TABULATION BRANCH.
The rapid preparation of large-scale statistical surveys and reports depends frequently upon the use of tabulation machinery. The Mechanical Tabulating Division,
utilizing punch-card equipment, is responsible for this phase of work in the Bureau.
Operated as a service department, it has continued to accept custom work from other
Provincial Departments in addition to statistical work arising within the Bureau. The
Division is operated on a straight-cost basis, and each Department has been assessed
in proportion to the number of machine-hours required in the performance of its contract. The large volume of work made possible by this arrangement has permitted
efficient machine operations.
The Bureau has been approached by representatives of Yarrows, Limited, Esquimalt, and of the Dominion Treasury, in connection with an accounting problem that has
arisen as a result of the large war-time work of that firm. The Department has tentatively agreed to accept machine-work from this firm on a straight-cost basis if circumstances later show this course to. be imperative.
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU.
The remarkable advantages of British Columbia for development of the tourist
industry, coupled with continuing effect of the advertising, publicity, and promotional
efforts- of the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau which cover wide range,
enabled further expansion of • this industry during the past year, notwithstanding
deterring effect of handicaps imposed to' increasing extent occasioned by conditions
imposed owing to the war. In consequence of changing conditions the work of the
Bureau was beset with many problems involving energetic effort to cope with them;
and despite varied difficulties, with aid of local and other travel promotion bureaus,
transportation and other interests, affording. support and co-operation the tourist
industry, which has now become an important factor in the economic welfare of the
Province, maintained its progress.
British Columbia is richly endowed with the special category of resources, the
exploitation and exportation of which, coupled with the fact that markets with many
millions of potential visitors are accessible, enables development of an important tourist
industry. The British Columbia Government Travel Bureau, using methods and
technique which experience has shown to be essential, has become an efficient sales
promotion branch to provide clientele for the industry; and with steady expansion of
its activities now carries out wide range of promotional efforts which have been
effective in extending development.
The tourist business, like any big business seeking customers in volume, requires
that its sales promotion be based upon advertising and publicity to make the resources
as widely known as possible to potential visitors. Display advertising was inserted in
fourteen leading United States magazines reaching 50,312,090 paid subscribers; seven
motor magazines circulating to 1,303,400; and thirty-seven newspapers carrying total
of 34,166,363 messages to paid subscribers—a total circulation of over 85,000,000
messages which, with recirculation, reached a far greater audience. Also advertisements were used in seventeen Canadian publications with 11,000,000 subscribers, and M 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
twenty-five billboards beside Pacific Coast highways provided outdoor advertising. To
take advantage of current conditions advertising for winter travel was also carried in
the Canadian publications. The Vancouver Tourist Bureau co-operated by arranging
its advertising schedule to cover other publications than those used by the Bureau; and
the Game Commission assisted by using advertisements addressed to hunters and fishermen in four sporting magazines. The Victoria and Vancouver bureaus also supplemented the advertising by contribution to the Evergreen Playground Association's
campaign in combination with Seattle and Tacoma.. The Bureau also obtained advantage from advertising of the Canadian Travel Bureau and the railway companies. It
had been planned to initiate the advertising campaign, as in former years, by co-operating with the Washington and Oregon bureaus to use full four-colour pages in the
National Geographic and Collier's magazines, but failure of the Washington bureau to
receive its appropriation in sufficient time prevented this plan being carried out.
The advertising was supported by an organized publicity plan including many
features. In addition to wide range of material prepared and distributed directly by
the Bureau the Gilliam Syndicate, under contract, produced from material furnished by
the Bureau and distributed feature layouts weekly for eight weeks to a thousand newspapers. Window displays and radio broadcasts were arranged with co-operation of a
national magazine. A display at the annual outing show of the Automobile Club of
Southern California which attracted 300,000 persons, attended by the Commissioner and
Travel Director, was productive of large number of inquiries and much actual travel.
The close co-operation of this influential motoring organization, especially in aiding
distribution of literature and directing travel was a valuable aid.
Attractive window and desk posters, designed and lithographed in five colours,
were used effectively, being widely displayed by transportation offices, travel bureaus,
and other organizations. Photographs and motion pictures were used successfully.
The Bureau's photographic service was extended, further equipped, and special quarters
were provided to furnish a studio and projection-room, and aid storage and servicing of
the library which was considerably extended. A number of good pictures were produced by the Bureau.
Under contract a theatrical motion picture, "Beautiful British Columbia," produced
in 1940 for the Bureau was released at the beginning of the year through Warner Bros,
and Columbia Pictures, and has since been in continuous circulation, having been-shown
in some thousands of theatres. In 1941 another theatrical picture, " Evergreen Play-
land," featuring sports and pastimes, was produced and released through Twentieth
Century-Fox company. A 16-mm. reduction of the Beautiful British Columbia film
was added to the Bureau's library, together with several other notable additions—
" North of the Border," " Vancouver Island," and others. The Vancouver Island
picture produced by the Bureau has been highly commended.
The publicity features, further extended during the year, now embrace most of the
methods available to this phase of work and utilize varied range of material. Literature, an essential factor, providing most economic and most efficient means for satisfying inquirers, to follow up advertising, and extend publicity, is a feature of the
Bureau's work which has won commendation. In addition to a series of essential
booklets, compiled by the Bureau, well illustrated and conforming to the highest degree
of printing technique, dealing generally and specifically with the attractions and facilities, a number of folders, circulars, and informative bulletins are prepared and are
widely distributed.
Field-work has been carried out energetically. The Travel Director, travelling
by the Bureau's motor-car, equipped with motion-picture projection apparatus and stock
of films, literature and publicity material, has been kept in the field during the travel
season to engage in the major markets in effect as a travelling salesman for the tourist
trade. This phase of work has been effective, especially in extending publicity, organizing distribution of literature, disseminating information, and directing travel; also
in widening the scope of the co-operative contacts which materially aid the Bureau's
work. In addition to field-work in the Pacific States the Travel Director also engaged
in eastern Canada to promote winter travel. Valuable co-operation is provided by numerous organizations: by newspapers,
publicity and advertising agencies, radio, motor, transportation, travel bureau, oil company, film producers, hotel, and other interests. Valuable contacts have been built up,
and to maintain these connections the Commissioner visited centres of the Pacific States
to confer and consult with various officials. Valuable results accrue. A close accord
has been made with many publishers, editors, advertising managers, and others who
freely publicize the travel opportunities of the Province and co-operate in many ways.
Under contract with the Bureau the services of the " Ask Mr. Foster " Service,
with offices in many centres of the continent, were used to distribute literature, disseminate information, and direct traved; and also a rack distribution service to further
distribution of the Bureau's folders.
In support of its exterior propaganda the Bureau had, in addition to the aid of the
Canadian Travel Bureau, the co-operation of the Washington and Oregon State bureaus,
All Year Club of Southern California, Californians Incorporated, Redwood Empire
Association, Evergreen Playground Association, and other travel bureaus; also leading
motoring and other organizations. It associated as a member unit of the Pacific Northwest Tourist Association and had benefit of its work, including displays at outing
shows, contact work, and organization of a tour of travel editors whose itinerary
included a visit to British Columbia.
Effective co-operation was maintained with the Vancouver, Victoria, and other
regional tourist bureaus. Efforts to influence development of local bureaus were continued, and some progress has been made along this line. In addition to seeking to
make the attractions of their areas better known local bureaus, while in most cases
unable to support an advertising or publicity programme on any scale—they have the
advantage of the Bureau's advertising and publicity—can aid much in development of
the tourist industry, primarily for local advantage but also benefiting the industry in
general, by carrying out a range of receptive, regulatory, and improvement duties.
Development of local bureaus is not so easy as might be imagined, considering that
the value of tourist travel to a community is now generally recognized. The bureaus
now operating have performed excellent work for their regions; but the role of the
local bm-eau and its requirements is a matter for further study. It is difficult for them
to raise adequate funds, and as successful operation of a local bureau requires much
work, initiative, and often self-sacrificing public service, development is slow. Sound
organization, looking to eventual establishment of a chain of regional bureaus cohered
into homogeneous Provincial body co-operating with the central bureau and with each
unit functioning within its proper sphere will require some measure of supervision and
regulation; and it may be desirable that the initiation of a local bureau should be made
subject to the sanction of the Minister and that regulations be made to define the
powers and scope of local bureaus. Otherwise it will be difficult, if possible, to bring
about such cohesion as will best serve the regional interests and those of the industry in
general.
The Bureau's activities have included the marking of historic sites and places of
geographical or other interest, and a number of markers have been erected. It cooperated in the establishment of Thunderbird Park, opened in May, 1941, in Victoria
as an open air museum with an array of totems, native houses, and other features of
native art.    This has proven to be a notable attraction to visitors.
In co-operation with the Bureau of Economics and Statistics plans were made to
secure improved statistical data relative to the tourist trade. Stations were established which made counts of motor traffic entering via Alberta for five months, and an
interesting survey was made based upon material secured by the Bureau from replies
received in answer to follow-up letters. Toward close of each season follow-up letters
are addressed to a large number of selected inquirers asking if they have visited the
Province; if not, whether they wish further information; and visitors are asked to
state numbers in their parties, length of stay, expenditure, and remarks. Replies
representing 1,148 persons from thirty-six States and 191 from other Provinces, though
forming a small sampling, provided an assay indicating to some extent the value of the M 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
business. An interesting detailed survey was based upon this information by the
Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
The careful and sympathetic handling of inquiries has been freely commented upon
in letters to the Bureau from visitors; and those engaged in connection with the tourist
industry—transportation, resort, and other interests—have warmly commended the
work of the Bureau and appreciated its co-operation. The Bureau acts as a clearinghouse for the literature of many organizations, resorts, stopping-places, transportation,
and other interests catering to tourist travel.
Wide range of information and documentation has been assembled; and, in addition to fostering tourist travel, the Bureau also engages as an information bureau and
to publicize the resources and opportunities of the Province in general, notably to
attract.residents. It has had considerable success in this respect. Many persons with
substantial incomes have come from other lands to reside in the Province following
correspondence, often prolonged, with the Bureau.
Inquiries dealt with in 1941 totalled 46,693—32,895 travel inquiries and 12,798
general; 624,971 pieces of literature were distributed. Approximately half of the
inquiries were directed to the Bureau ; others were received from varied sources. The
inquiries, as to sources, compared for the past three years were as follows:—
1939.
1940.
1941.
15,223
5,003
1,056
6,938
1,430
16,641
5,096
1,93;
7,415
1,577
1,866
34,527
17,190
51,717    ■
702,810
16,408
" Ask Mr. Foster "    	
Game Commission  	
Canadian Travel Bureau —      	
5,155
2,039
6,797
1,339
1,157
29,650
11,473
41,123
253,942
32,895
12,798
Totals                                                                  	
45,693
624,971
The Bureau's activities, as indicated by the preceding review of features of its
work, cover wide range. Much documentation has to be assembled, revised, catalogued,
and made accessible relative to the attractions, facilities, equipment, and varied appurtenant matters; as to available markets, travel trends, media for advertising and
publicity, and miscellaneous other phases. Recording, filing, book-keeping, accounting,
compiling literature, preparing and placing literature, producing, servicing, and distributing photographs and motion pictures, circularization, bulletin services, packaging,
mailing, and other duties involve a mass of office detail. The Bureau also engaged as
an advertising agency for the advertising of all branches of the Government service.
In addition to valuable co-operation of city and other bureaus, transportation,
motoring, and other associations, government services of the Province, Dominion, and
of other Provinces, and numerous other agencies at home and abroad, the Bureau has
the advice and counsel of the British Columbia Tourist Council created four years ago
by the Government as a non-executive study and advisory body. Since its formation
the Council has studied many phases relative to tourist travel and made various recommendations which have enabled the Bureau to improve its services. Among other
recommendations made the Council suggested that the Bureau engage in direct mail
addressed to residents of the Los* Angeles area, and in accord with this recommendation
the Bureau procured mailing-lists and prepared and distributed an attractive mailing
piece. Influencing of establishment of local bureaus, marking of historic sites, and
various other phases relative to promotional activities and improvement of the attractions and equipment to cater to the trade were also recommended. Many executives of
organizations interested in the tourist trade attended open meetings of the Council and
commended its activities as well as those of the Bureau. The Tourist Council is composed of thirteen members, seven representing branches of the Government service, six
representing local interests, and is made up as follows:— DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
M 27
E. G. Rowebottom (Chairman). Deputy Minister, Trade and Industry.
J. Gordon Smith Commissioner, Government Travel Bureau.
T. W. S. Parsons  Commissioner, British Columbia Police.
C. D. Orchard ■. Chief Forester Department of Lands.
Arthur Dixon Chief Engineer, Department of Public Works.
John V. Fisher  Assistant Deputy Minister, Department of
Finance.
F. R. Butler  Commissioner, Provincial Game Commission.
Elmer Johnston _... President, Vancouver Tourist Association.
G. I. Warren Commissioner, Victoria and Island Publicity
Bureau.
T. W. Brown Solicitor, Prince Rupert.
Sydney J. Smith Kamloops Board of Trade.
J. B. Spurrier Fish and Game Club, Kelowna.
W. G. Lanskail Nelson Board of Trade.
Absence of complete information respecting many forms and classes which contribute measurably to aggregate value of the tourist trade render any exact computation of its value impossible. The only accurate data available are as to the numbers
of motor-cars entering from the United States through border customs ports, records
of which are kept by customs officials. During 1941 count was also made for five
months of United States and Canadian cars entering across the Alberta border.
Though these counts include major proportion of the motor-cars visiting the Province
others are to be added—arrivals over the Alberta border of United States and Canadian
cars during the other seven months, and Canadian cars entering by way of the United
States during the year. The visiting cars counted totalled 170,519, and it is estimated
that at least a further 10,500 arrived uncounted to increase the total to over 181,000.
Questionnaire replies received by the Bureau from parties, including 1,148 persons
from the United States and 191 from other Provinces, indicated averages of 3.1 persons
per party, 7.7 days' stay, $6.18 per diem, expenditure per person for the United States
visitors; 2.88 per party, 17.48 days' stay, $3.28 per diem expenditure per person for
visitors from other Provinces. Though this cannot be considered a sufficiently large
sampling to enable accurate, or even closely approximate, evaluation of the motoring
travel, if this class of tourist travel could be valued on this basis, the totals, applied to
the motor-cars in their several classes, would be as follows:—
Cars.
.    Persons.
Expenditure.
92,048
5S.298
6,559
13,614
3,500
4,000
3.000
285,348
180,723
20,333
39,208
10,850
11,520
8,640
$13,578,608
1,675,305
967,561
U.S. cars, 48-hour, direct    	
2,247,967
516,308
660,492
Canadian cars via U.S., 12 mos.  (estimated)    	
495,369
Totals      ' 	
181,019
556,622
$21,141,605
Probably the U.S. cars arriving via Alberta would include many returning from
Rocky Mountain parks and resorts which would have shorter stay and assuming half
of these remained three days only the expenditure would be $452,869 less or total
$19,688,736 by the motoring class.
Rail travel can be approximated only, and conservative estimates, considered low
by transportation officials, of 100,000 arrivals from the United States by rail, bus, and
air, and 40,000 by like modes of travel from other Provinces, assessed on like average
bases of stay and per diem expenditures would add over $7,000,000. Various other
classes, arrivals by steamship, including local, coastwise, ocean, and Alaska and other
excursion travel, together with the added values of some classes such as big-game
hunters, yachting cruises, fishermen and others, with their numbers estimated on such M 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
information as is available on basis of conservatively estimated expenditures would
probably make up a balance which would bring the aggregate amount circulated by
visitors to about $30,000,000. This is not inclusive of the expenditures of visitors for
commodities or for other purposes than ordinary travel expenditures; or of the value
of the local travel by residents within the Province. It does not purport to be an exact,
or even closely approximate statement, and is an estimate based upon such information
as is available. If full information were available it is not improbable that the business
would be shown to be of greater value.
A detailed survey based upon replies to questionnaires received by the Bureau
was made by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics. In the case of the visiting
American tourists who responded it was found that the unweighted average of $6.18
daily expenditure per person ranged from $7.38 in the Vancouver Island-Vancouver and
vicinity circuit to $3.82 in the case of certain tourists travelling from the Coast to an
Interior United States boundary-point. In the case of Canadian tourists the average
of $3.28 showed range from $3.50 in the case of tourists traversing the Province to
$2.10 for travellers in the eastern sections only. In view of the relatively small size
of the sample the unweighted averages cannot be considered to represent an accurate
basis for estimation, especially when it is noted that approximately half of the United'
States visitors spent not over $5.26 per day—which basis, if accepted, would reduce the
expenditures as computed by about 15 per cent. Consequently these averages can be
considered with caution until further verification is received from the Dominion Bureau
of Statistics, which has undertaken to compile a special statement of tourists' expenditures ;   and this statement is not yet available.
In any event, it is obvious that the tourist trade of the Province is very valuable,
and the circulation of tourist expenditures and their addition to the purchasing power
has wide range of benefit. Many detrimental factors affected travel in 1941, to
increasing extent in latter part of the year, due to conditions imposed as result of the
war. Notwithstanding adverse conditions, however, the traffic was well maintained
in 1941 and hotel, resort, transportation, and other services catering to the trade mostly
reported a satisfactory season. Surveys by the Bureau of resort business, in addition
to much information, brought considerable commendation of the Bureau's work as a
valuable aid to their business.
Motor travel in 1941 showed considerable increase in the 48-hour class and the
60-day class was approximately equivalent in extent to that of the previous year.
Totals of United States cars entering directly by customs ports by months during the
past two years were:—
60-day.
48-hr.'
60-day.
Total.
January	
February.—
March	
April	
May	
June	
July 	
August	
September..
October	
November...
December...
Totals .
2,728
2,431
3,275
3,694
4.927
4,689
3,667
3,640
3.447
4,741
2.964
2,852
43,055
3,642
4,380
5,686
6,083
9.790
14,060
11,223
15,036
7,584
6,055
4.124
4,543
92,206
6,370
6,811
8,961
9,777
14,717
18,749
14,890
18,676
11,031
10,796
7,088
7,395
135,261
4,553
2,494
2,998
2,942
4,959
5,594
7,551
7,702
6,166
4,848
5.153
3,338
58,298
3,957
4,697
5,023
5,808
7,384
9,414
17,593
18,253
7,776
4,737
3,792
3,603
8,510
7.191
8,021
8,750
12,343
15,008
25,144
25,955
13,942
9,585
8 945
6,941
92.037    !    150,335 DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
M 29
Entries of United States cars, as reported by customs ports, during the calendar
years 1940 and 1941 were:—
1940.
1941.
48-hr.
60-day.
Total.
48-hr.
60-day.
Tota).
12,192
4,999
3,163
2,874
15
50,699
8,051
3,968
4,229
103
1
8,258
1,653
62,891
13,050
7,131
7,103
118
1
8,258
1,653
32,015
5,258
2,090
2,960
6
46,649
7,820
3,633
4,895
157
2
10,076
1,616
2
4,693
44
1
2,165
1,332
5,720
685
154
966
958
474
3
3
78.664
13,078
5,723
7,855
162
2
1
10,077
1,616
2,221
66
111
4,345
3,845
1,963
1,878
1,473'
4,166
24
11
2,178
71
4,482
773
•     204
1,343
1,645
419
6,387
90
122
6,523
3,916
6,445
2,651
1,677
1,343
1,645
972
2,209
24
5
3,553
2,015
1,023
1,776
1,244
249
790
517
6,902
68
5,718
3,347
6,743
2 461
1,398
1,215
1,748
553
991
3
3,481
3,481
	
2,449
114
2.452
114
Totals            	
-43,179
92,278
135,457
58,298
92,048
■   150,346
Origins of the 60-day cars entering via customs ports in calendar years as shown
by States were:—
State of Origin.
1939.
1940.
1941.
State of Origin.
1939.
1940.
1941.
Washington  __
79,526
16,017
6,506
1,646
916
803
615
569
565
464
417
411
396
388 .
337
315
295
287
255
252
213
209
202
188
178
150
64,507
13,157
6,058
1,387
813
552
415
461
279
333
350
257
227
257
225
184
202
169
111
159
143
222
174
129
85
135
59,709
14,727
6,288
1,586
801
693
437
439
445
450
394
386
312
259
301
197
234
273
179
340
145
166
186
141
148
150
Nevada 	
133
129
120
111
105
87
80
79
73
73
68
58
45
43
43
37
32
25
24
24
23
19
9
302
182
88
46
57
65
39
44
32
44
65
46
44
24
19
101
42
46
18
16
21
10
12
10
206
153
100
69
Idaho  	
District of Columbia
57
98
Illinois ..   —._	
Virginia	
38
52
New York  .	
Kentucky 	
52
63
Michigan  ____	
Utah-  -- 	
Connecticut..  	
New Mexico —
Maryland 	
North Carolina —	
89
56
56
Ohio            	
'38
Kansas  	
Missouri — 	
25
65
Alabama   	
21
18
Iowa -	
Oklahoma  	
Wisconsin ...   , 	
Florida 	
Maine   	
New Hampshire 	
15
16
22
19
Delaware	
Vermont 	
Others 	
Totals 	
17
21
Massachusetts  	
239
113,862
92,278
90,785 M 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
These figures, provided by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, show discrepancy of
1,252 from the total of 92,037 cars (subsequently corrected to 92,048) otherwise shown
as the total of 60-day cars.
From the twenty-two States west of the Mississippi 158,922 United States motorcars with 60-day permits were reported entering Canada in 1941, or 15.13 per cent, of
the total from all forty-eight States. Of the entries from west of the Mississippi
114,629 cars, or 72 per cent., entered by the four western Provinces; 86,851 or 54 per
cent, by way of British Columbia ports, and considerable proportion of the balance
subsequently entered British Columbia via Alberta. From the twenty-seven States
east of the Mississippi the traffic was preponderantly to the eastern Provinces—11,549
of 1.15 per cent, entering by the western Provinces, 3,695 by British Columbia ports.
Of the traffic from these eastern States, totalling 991,230 cars, 542,437 or 54.7 per cent,
came from two States—New York and Michigan—the bulk entering by Ontario. Of
the total travel from the States east of the Mississippi 701,548 cars entered by Ontario,
220,074 by Quebec, 58,059 by the Maritimes, 3,695 by British Columbia, 3,943 by
Alberta, 924 by Saskatchewan, and 2,987 by Manitoba.
Washington, from which State 60,025 cars entered Canada, of which 59,709 or
over 96 per cent, entered by British Columbia, ranked fourth among the forty-eight
States in the total volume reaching Canada; California held tenth place with 26,960,
with 14,727 or 54.6 per cent, entering by British Columbia; Oregon eighteenth place
with 7,527, of which 6,288 or 83.5 per cent, entered by British Columbia.
British Columbia drew 80,724 cars entering directly, or 89.15 of the total entering
the Province, from the three Pacific Coast States, and considerable proportion of the
4,222 cars entering the three other western Provinces from these States subsequently
visited British Columbia. From the eight Mountain States 3,761 cars entered the
Province directly, 5,642 came to Alberta, 1,626 to .Saskatchewan, 223 to Manitoba in the
first instance with many later visiting this Province. From the eleven other States
west of the Mississippi the totals entering through the customs ports of the western
Provinces were: British Columbia, 2,366; Alberta, 2,480; Saskatchewan, 3,160;
Manitoba, 10,435. As shown by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, the entries of
60-day cars by Provinces during 1941 were as follows:—
British
Columbia
Saskatchewan.
Quebec.
Maritimes.
From. States West of the
Mississippi.
Washington 	
California	
Minnesota	
Oregon  	
Montana	
North Dakota	
Iowa 	
Missouri   	
Texas 	
Kansas - _ 	
Idaho 	
Nebraska  	
Oklahoma 	
Colorado  	
South Dakota 	
Utah ....   	
Louisiana   	
Arizona   	
Arkansas 	
Wyoming   	
Nevada	
New Mexico  	
Totals -	
59,709
14,727
386
6,288
801
100
273
301
445
259
1,586
197
179
437-
98
394
63
186
65
148
153
56
86,851
679
2,136
689
293
4,479
201
309
291
320
176
311
192
137
224
104
309
46
82
15
163
44
30
11,230
177
310
573
70
1,504
1,940
212
45
36
66
36
87
37
39
147
6
13
5
4
27
107
397
4,205
53
103
4,390
579
227
117
229
27
228
122
45
279
10
29
6
20
23
4
5
11,205
1,219
8,335
9,922
741
403
552
4,308
4,539
2,655
1.621
243
1,330
1,282
818
472
362
747
349
397
147
110
153
40,705
101
831
271
69
85
37
178
271
336.
120
28
69
167
107
24
24
167
39
33
22
18
15
3,012
224
58
13
18
8
24
52
35
21
6
15
8
9
6
5
17
6
7
.   4
2
5
62,025
26,960
16,104
7,527
7,393
7,228
5,883
5,726
3,944
2,492
2,237
2,118
1,932
1,679
1.130
1,110
1,082
673
541
534
336
268
158,922 Entry op 60-day Cars by Provinces during 1941—Continued.
British
Columbia.
Alberta.
Saskatchewan.
Manitoba.
Ontario.
Quebec.
Mari-
times.
Canada.
From States East of the
Mississippi.
439
490
40
144
222,369
62,169
1,412
1,940
32,740
4,034
468
289,685
252,752
69,580
450
397
217
637
249,171
312
392
62
165
66,280
429
Massachusetts  	
141
127
12
34
12,031
14,916
60,001
Pennsylvania  	
234
241
25
65
50,925
7,076
1,195
59,761
Vermont   -	
21
5
1
4
913
55,302
280
56,526
15
7
1
16
863
10,099
1,432
28,882
276
39,883
693
1,153
256
1,011
30,033
34,854
150
162
12
43
14,023
9,530
1,610
2,475
25,530
21,878
89
82
4
16
6,843
12,369
New Hampshire 	
16
9
2
3
1,076
13,061
1,051
15,208
Indiana  _  —	
166
176
50
127
13,202
458
68
14,247
340
324
165
492
9,104
307
60
10,792
22
19
7
1.874
6,145
1.446
1,087
275
9,154
5,932
Maryland  	
56
40
9
15
4,091
145
79
23
58
3,485
1,001
1,068
292
5,076
District of Columbia 	
57
46
6
26
1,996
199
3,398
38
33
6
13
2,274
761
158
3,283
Kentucky _._ __	
52
26
6
15
2,698
151
30
2.978
West Virginia 	
19
16
2
6
2,283
157
29
2,512
Georgia  	
69
31
6
12
1.277
279
47
1.721
Tennessee   	
52
42
5
14
1.398
157
27
1,695 ■
North Carolina 	
38
15
6
24
1,173
332
41
1,629
17
2
2
635
365
65
1,086
Alabama  ,.,..,*,     _
21
14
0
18
683
76
15
830
25
18
9
13
6
14
550
298
■     195
56
39
11
824
Mississippi — ■	
5
415
Totals 	
3.695
3.943
924
2,987
701,548
220,074
58,059
991,230
90,546
15,173
6,267
14,192
742,253
223,086
58,635
1,150,152
BRITISH COLUMBIA OVERSEAS TOBACCO FUND.
Following representations to the Government from Mr. W. A. McAdam, Agent-
General for British Columbia in London, this Department undertook in February, 1941,
the organization and operation of the British Columbia Overseas Tobacco Fund.
The work is carried on in conjunction with the office of the Agent-General in
London, the cigarettes being shipped in bulk to that office, from which centre individual
parcels are dispatched. The fund has been a distinct success and has proven a boon
to British Columbia men serving in Britain, losses of individual parcels having been
drastically reduced. In addition, generous donations have been received from individuals and organizations which have provided hundreds of thousands of cigarettes
for general distribution at the discretion of the Agent-General in London. To date
some 25,000,000 cigarettes and 7,000 lb. of tobacco have been shipped to British
Columbia House, London.
In operating the fund throughout the Province, the fund has been fortunate
enough to have the co-operation of the Junior Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce, local branches of the Canadian Legion and B.P. Order of Elks, and various
women's organizations, whilst in Vancouver the United Commercial Travellers of
America have taken charge for that city. The distribution of parcels in London is
done entirely by voluntary help, some fifty ladies giving freely of their time for this
purpose. The fund is indebted to these ladies and to local organizations for their
generous assistance in providing an exceptionally fine service which is genuinely appreciated by British Columbia men serving in Britain. VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfik.p, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1942.
925-842-9040

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