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TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1943

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 TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
PKOVINCIAL  INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL FOE  GIRLS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
APRIL   1ST, 1941, TO  MARCH  31ST, 1942
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
•     VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Ohaeles F. Banfielo, Printer to tlie King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1942.
.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-eighth Annual Report of
the Provincial Industrial School for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1942.
G. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1942.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual  Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1941, to March 31st, 1942.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
Honourable George S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the honourable members of the
Legislature the Twenty-eighth Annual Report of the Industrial School for Girls from
April 1st, 1941, to March 31st, 1942.
In looking over the list of girls in our care during the fiscal year 1941-42, so many
experiences are remembered that it is difficult to concentrate on writing a report.
I recall the case of Anne, separated from her mother, adopted by an elderly couple
in another Province who later suffered financial losses with problems following. It was
necessary for Anne to find employment and she was not fitted by training or experience
to make wise decisions. Finally she came to the School; her history was taken, story
checked, and the search commenced to locate her mother, as this was the great desire
of the daughter. After many months of following up clues, the address of the mother
was provided by rather a strange coincidence. This led to a happy reunion and a warm
welcome to a home. When the mother came to the office to express her grateful thanks
the resemblance was so marked that introductions were unnecessary. In her new home
Anne has made a satisfactory adjustment.
A girl from the Far North, who had never attended school, could neither read nor
write, but with us made exceptional progress- in school and in slightly under two years
was doing Grade IV. work. Her training in other departments was just as satisfactory.
She is now employed in a hospital, where she is giving satisfaction and still asking for
more information.
Another one when cautioned concerning her increasing weight and the prospect of
losing her girlish figure, just smiled and replied, " We've been on relief for five years."
A big strong girl of 16 years, but looking older, was always willing to take on the
heaviest assignment in any department. When it came time for release she begged to
be allowed to remain in the School, but a place was found for her. She is now in her
fourth position and, as usual, is credited with being willing and competent, also seems
more permanent. Three times she walked long distances, appeared at a window of the
assembly-room watching the girls while dancing, and only needed an invitation to again
become a member of our family. This was home to her and the suggestion of being
independent and self-supporting did not appeal; in fact, she said she could do as much
as any two girls if allowed to remain here.
Other girls bring forward an opposite appeal. " Why should we remain here when
there is work available on the outside? " In very few cases is this suggestion applicable because of lack of training along any line. This fact accounts frequently for the
lack of success in holding positions before commitment.
The brother of one of the girls came recently to ask for the release of his sister in
order that she might keep house for father, younger sister, and himself. When asked
regarding finances, he explained that he was working in the shipyards and so making
good wages; and with a broad smile said, "And believe it or not, Dad's working too,
after being nine years on relief." The sister, who was present during the interview,
enjoyed the joke too. This girl is now quite a good cook and housekeeper, and will soon
be given the opportunity to demonstrate to her family what she has learned here.
Medical examination often reveals weaknesses, often deformities. One girl because
of a birth injury was unable to hold her head erect and was extremely sensitive regarding this condition. In fact, this disability and the feeling of inferiority, no doubt,
contributed to her delinquency. An operation by a specialist and several weeks' stay
in hospital corrected this deformity and added to her happiness. Another case showed
a serious kidney condition, possibly the result of scarlet fever several years ago, requiring many months' treatment but is now improving. Eye examinations in several cases
have revealed the necessity for glasses, which contributed to comfort and efficiency. L 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
While many have come from relief families, others have had comfortable homes;
in a few, exceptional advantages. One girl educated in a good private school, several
years of music, and a comfortable home, failed to respond to advice and correction,
making stricter supervision and discipline necessary. This girl entered commercial
class and made good progress, also continued with her music.
As soon as data can be secured and prepared, each girl is taken to Child Guidance
Clinic to find out the " why " of failure, to secure advice as to procedure and hope of
fulfilment.    We gratefully acknowledge our dependence on the staff of this clinic.
We recognize the serious effect of broken homes, with accompanying divided loyalties; the lack of good example, while still demanding obedience and respect; again, lack
of constructive planning and even lack of interest.
When a girl tells us she hates school, we ask why, and give her a chance to explain.
Many "and varied reasons are given, many of them reasonable, but could have been
adjusted. Usually we are able to convince her that our way of studying is different
and persuade her to try it for a couple of months anyway. As attendance is only for
half a day she still has ample time to devote to other branches of training. If after a
fair trial she still is definitely opposed to attending classes, we do not insist. Usually,
though, she has become so interested in the many new facts she is discovering, and the
hope of completing her grade and securing a certificate is a definite incentive. The
Government Correspondence Course has proven most satisfactory.
Every girl has the privilege, at least once in two weeks, of discussing her credits,
her plans or her worries, if she has any, with me. These interviews are in my sitting-
room, where it is quiet and home-like, and many difficulties are smoothed and plans
made for the future. Sometimes there is a family difficulty, and if assistance can be
given there our girl does not worry and can settle in more happily. Letters are written
home every Sunday evening; these and also the incoming ones from relatives are
revealing, and must be read with understanding.
Religious education is considered a very important branch of training. In many
instances this has been entirely neglected. Our Catholic group have instruction every
Sunday morning by Priest and tw7o Sisters, also a lay worker on Thursday evening.
The Protestants have their services at 3 p.m. each Sunday, taken by representatives
of the different churches, and on Thursday evening by a group. Hymn practice is
popular with the majority and a regular sing-song with all.
When a girl is returned to the School we do not consider her a failure. Perhaps
her placement has not been suitable or she was not quite ready for responsibilities.
She returns for further training and later new arrangements.
Most enjoyable concerts have been provided each month by the Women's Musical
Society, Philharmonic Society, and the Lions' Club. These were a definite contribution
to the pleasure of girls and staff, and we gratefully acknowledge our indebtedness. At
Christmas the W.C.T.U. as usual remembered our girls with individual gifts, and the
Catholic Societies provided generously for their group. These were welcome additions
to our Christmas tree.
Every girl can earn by good conduct and efficiency the sum of 55 cents every two
weeks. Loss of credits results in small deductions from spending-money. A shopping-
list is allowed each Saturday. When a girl has earned one hundred credits for twelve
periods of two weeks each, she is entitled to wear a pink uniform instead of blue, and
three girls qualified for that privilege this year. Reliable girls may attend a picture-
show once in two weeks, accompanied by a supervisor. They pay for their admission
out of good conduct money.
To the Honourable George S. Pearson, our Minister; Mr. Walker, Deputy; Miss
Isobel Harvey, Superintendent of Child Welfare; Mr. George Ross, Principal; and
Mrs. K. Moody, Follow-up Officer, we express our grateful thanks for their interest and
co-operation. REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1941-42. L 7
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF SCHOOL,
MARCH 31ST, 1942.
Total inmate-days from April 1st, 1941, to March 31st, 1942  16,994
Per capita cost, one year        $580.35
Per capita cost, one day  1.59
Operating expenditure by voucher—
Salaries     13,195.15
_  Office and school supplies, etc.—
Postage, office and school supplies      $349.59
Telephone and telegraph         162.07
  511.66
Travelling expenses   572.29
Farm operations .       1,200.83
Household equipment (other than furniture)   242.91
Clothing—
Clothing  .      $620.78
Boots and shoes  .        343.78
  964.56
Janitors' supplies  „  289.01
Fuel, light, and water—
Fuel'  $1,973.08
Water        325.25
Light and power 1 ".        613.24
       2,911.57
Provisions-
Groceries   $4,342.03
Meat ....     1,218.29
Fish         157.06
 5,717.38
Medical attendance, medical supplies, surgical and dental cost—
Medical attendance      $420.00
Medical supplies        201.97
Surgery         120.00
Dental cost        475.50
       1,217.47
Good Conduct Fund   275.30
Incidentals and contingencies   183.60
Total expenditure for year by voucher  $27,281.73
Maintenance and repairs (expended through Public Works Department)  712.43
Air-raid precautions (expended through Public Works Department)  128.13
Inventory, March 31st, 1941  .  1,199.98
Less rent  $503.29
Less partial maintenance for two inmates  423.63
Less refund, Workmen's Compensation  95.01
Less inventory, March 31st, 1942   1,147.73
$29,322.27
2,169.66
$27,152.61 L 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
POPULATION OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1942.
On roll, April 1st, 1941  52
Girls admitted during year April 1st, 1941, to March 31st, 1942.... 32
84
Released as wards of Juvenile Court
Released	
28
1
Released on probation by Deputy Provincial Secretary     1
Transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm     3
— 33
Total in School, March 31st, 1942  51
GIRLS ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1941, TO MARCH 31st, 1942.
No
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Coleman, Alta   	
Years.
14
15
14
17
12
17
16
16
17
16
14
15
15
14
17
17
14
14
16
10
17
14
15
13
14
16
11
14
9
9
17
9
Years.
15
15
15
17
14
17
16
16
17
16
14
17
15
14
17
17
14
14
16
15
17
14
15
17
14
16
16
14
9
9
17
9
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
603
604
two years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
605
606
Enderby, B.C 	
Reddit, Ont 	
Indeterminate period.
German-Dutch	
American-Canadian	
Canadian-English	
608
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
609
North Vancouver, B.C.	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929           -.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
611
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Campbell River, B.C	
Winnipeg, Man 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
613
Sec. 20, J.D.A.  1929
Indefinite period.
615
616
617
618
Nelson, B.C 	
Aiyansh, Nass River, B.C	
English  	
Discharged or released in due
course of law.
Vancouver, B.C 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Edmonton, Alta..	
Victoria, B.C 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
621
622
English, Scotch-Canadian
English-Icelandic 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
623
Agassiz, B.C 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Edmonton, Alta... —
Cranbrook, B.C. 	
Cranbrook, B.C — 	
Mayerthorpe, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C „
Ireland 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
628
629
Swiss-German	
English-Irish  —
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
631
English	
Irish     - .
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
632
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
633
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929. REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1941-42. L 9
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
Canadian (both)      1 English, Irish      2
English  (both)     5 Irish, English      1
Indian  (both)   j.    6 Mexican, English      1
Irish  (both)     3 Scotch, French      1
Scotch (both)      1 Swiss, German      1
Roumanian (both)      1 Swedish, Canadian      1
Austrian  (both)      1 German, Dutch      1
American, Canadian     1 German, Scotch     1
Canadian, English      2 —
English, Scotch-Canadian...    1 Total  32
English, Icelandic     1
WHERE GIRLS WERE BORN.
British Columbia   22 Ireland      1
Alberta      5 New Zealand   _ 1
Manitoba  .     1 United States      1
Ontario      1 —
; Total  32
AGES OF GIRLS.
13 years      1 16 years      6
14 years      9 17 years      9
15 years      7 —
Total :  32
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Burnaby      1 Prince Rupert     2
Chilliwack      2 Prince George      1
Cranbrook  =     2 Princeton      1
Enderby  =     1 Vancouver   17
Fernie      1 Victoria      2
Nelson  i     1 ■—
North Vancouver      1 Total:  32
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
Attempted suicide     1 Sexual immorality     9
Incorrigible   16 Vagrancy      2
Juvenile delinquency      2 ■—
Theft     2 Total  32
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929  20 Undetermined period      2
Industrial School for Girls Indefinite period      4
Act      2 Discharged   or   released   in
Indefinite period, not to ex- due course of law     1
ceed two years .     1 •—
Indeterminate period      2 Total  32
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Church of England     5 Roman Catholic     8
Foursquare Gospel      1 Seventh-day Adventist     1
Gospel Hall      1 United Church   12
Lutheran      3
Presbyterian      1 ,      Total  32 L 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  22
Number who have father living, mother dead     4
Number who have mother living, father dead     4
Number who have mother living, father unknown      1
Number who have both parents dead     1
Total  32
Of the above, the parents of eight girls are separated; three parents are divorced;
seven girls have stepfathers; one girl has a stepmother; one girl has mother in Mental
Hospital;   and one girl is adopted.
STAFF OF OFFICIALS.
The following is the present staff of officers:—
Superintendent and Nurse Mrs. Annie G. Westman.
Assistant Superintendent and Teacher... Miss Ayra E. Peck.
Clerk and Commercial Teacher Miss Margaret W. Sibbald.
Teacher Miss Marion D. Tulloch.
First Assistant Mrs. Agnes C. Oxley.
Sewing Supervisor Miss M. E. Murray.
Night Supervisor . Mrs. V. C. Travis.
Supervisor (Linen-keeper) Miss Anna C. Martin.
. Supervisor Mrs. E. E. Paterson.
Cook ...Miss Irene G. Reid.
Relief Supervisor Mrs. Alice McCormack.
Engineer and Janitor Claude S. Gardner.
Gardener George B. Boving.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent.
MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following medical report applies to the period from April 1st,
1941, to March 31st, 1942:—
Calls made by physician  44
Patients seen by physician, including treatments   232
Complete physical examination   32
Patients in isolation for Neisser infection  5
Smears taken for Neisser infection  58
Blood tests for Kahn and Wasserman  29
Girls treated for syphilis   2
Anti-luetic treatment for syphilis  41
Prontylin tablets for Neisser infection (5 grains)   985
Urine tests  62
Chest clinic   13 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1941-42. L 11
Admitted to Vancouver General Hospital—
Tonsillectomy      1
Maternity cases (two boys, one girl)      3
Nephritis      1
5
Examination by eye specialist  .-.       7
Glasses provided        7
The general health of the girls has been very good.    Each girl on admission
receives a complete physical examination and is kept in quarantine for fourteen days.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
M. B. Campbell,
Medical Officer.
DENTIST'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the past year each new girl has been examined and necessary dental work done for all.
The following is the report of dental services rendered at the Industrial School
for Girls during the year ended March 31st, 1942:—
Visits to dentist     24
Number of girls seen  ."   71
Amalgam fillings  ,  107
Cement fillings      83
Cleanings        2
Extractions      39
Upper removable denture .       1
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Stanley McQueen, D.M.D.
GENERAL REPORTS.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—Following are movements of high school pupils from April 1st,
1941, to March 31st, 1942:—
On roll April 1st, 1941      9
Enrolled during year   11
— 20
Leaving during year  10
On roll March 31st, 1942   10
Of these twenty pupils, fourteen were enrolled in Grade IX. in English literature,
grammar and composition, social studies, health and physical education; five in Grade
X. taking the same subjects; and one in Grade XL, enrolled in social studies, grammar
and composition, and literature.    One Grade IX. pupil, having completed the above L 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
four subjects, has enrolled in Grade IX. mathematics and is doing very good work.
Two girls received certificates for partial course, and six also received instruction in
shorthand and typing.
These girls are all enrolled in Government Correspondence Course, which we find
most satisfactory, as with individual assistance girls may progress as fast as their
own ability dictates. Girls may be enrolled at any time with no interference with the
remainder of the group.
Ayra E. Peck,
Assistant Superintendent and School-teacher.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following is the school report for the period April 1st, 1941,
to March 31st, 1942.
A total of forty-six pupils attended school during this period, the average daily
attendance numbering ten.
They were graded as follows: Grade VIII., seventeen; Grade VII., fifteen; Grade
VI., seven; Grade V, four; and Grade III., three. Grades VIII. and VII. pupils were
enrolled in the Government Elementary Correspondence School Course. Of those
enrolled, one received a High School Entrance Certificate for completion of Grade VIII.
in all subjects; three received certificates for completion' of a partial course, which
included the subjects of literature, language, spelling, health, and mathematics; and
thirteen were released before completion of the course.
The school hours were divided into two sessions, one from 9 o'clock to 12 noon, the
other from 1 o'clock to 4 in the afternoon. Pupils attended one session daily, attending
whichever session did not conflict with training in another department of the Home.
Marion D. Tulloch,
  School-teacher.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the year April 1st, 1941, to March 31st, 1942, the activities
connected with war-work were continued with enthusiasm by various groups. The
Junior League provided wool from which our girls knitted 8 pairs of navy blue socks,
12 pairs of khaki socks, 7 khaki sleeveless sweaters, 2 navy blue sweaters, 4 navy blue
scarves. Other articles knitted and donated to the Red Cross included 6 khaki sweaters,
2 turtle neck tuckins, 2 pairs of socks, 1 helmet, 9 women's sweaters, 17 children's
sweaters in assorted sizes, 11 caps for children, 4 pairs of mitts, 3 scarves, 2 sweater
sets composed of sweater, cap, gloves, scarf; while for babies' wear the girls made 7
sweaters, 4 bonnets, 1 shawl, 3 pairs of socks, and 1 pair of soakers.
A first-aid group received training in Junior St. John Ambulance work and are
now proud possessors of their certificates.
Most of the girls need to be taught to knit when they come, while a few are
advanced knitters. Each girl knits herself a blue coat sweater as part of her outfit
and many also knit twin sweater sets to wear with skirts. This practice is not so
popular as it has been in the past as many girls feel that at the present time the wool
is otherwise required.
The library continues to be a popular department, with more girls eagerly grasping
the opportunity presented. Many have previously lacked the encouragement or opportunity to cultivate the habit of reading. To these the realm of imaginary travel,
adventure, and romance to be found in books offers a new source of recreational
pleasure hitherto unexplored.    Friends have kept us well supplied with magazines for REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1941-42. L 13
supplementary reading, and a new set of World Books provides assistance and instruction for additional research-work by high school students. New books added from
time to time provide fresh interest.
According to custom the girls added greatly to their own pleasure by preparing a
variety of parties and social evenings during the year. New Year's, Hallowe'en, and
Valentine parties are especially popular, as they provide an opportunity for " dressing
up " in the costumes kept for these occasions, and for decorating the gymnasium where
such events take place. At these parties games and dancing are enjoyed by all. Other
pleasant evenings took the form of whist drives or bingo parties.
Birthdays are also occasions of happiness, enjoyed by staff and girls. On the
morning of the girl's birthday she is greeted in the dining-room by the strains of
" Happy Birthday " and finds her table decorated in a suitable manner with cards and
small gifts from her friends. At supper-time there is a simple birthday cake, cut and
served to all by the girl and her special chum. For many it is the first birthday
celebration of their lives.
This year, as always, sports have been enjoyed. During inclement weather basketball and exercises took place in the gymnasium and in fine weather baseball is played
in our outdoor field.
The radio with its loud speaker continues to be one of our chief joys and special
programmes, news, and dance music are all of interest to various groups.
Ayra E. Peck,
Assistant Superintendent.
Dear Madam,—The girls receive training in general housework in the main floor
department. This consists of the large common living-room, two smaller sitting-rooms
for junior and senior girls, as well as dining and serving rooms. The dining-room is
very attractive, having tables with white cloths, coloured napkin rings, and centrepieces
of flowers.
In the dining-room the girls receive training in care of dishes and silver, setting
and waiting on tables.    There are two waitresses for the girls dining-tables and one to
care for the staff at meal-times.    We have found that meals served cafeteria style
eliminate waste and improve speed. . _, .
Agnes Craig Oxley,
First Assistant.
Dear Madam,—The sewing-room is one of our busiest departments and during the
year from April 1st, 1941, to March 31st, 1942, thirty-three girls received full or partial
training.
A large quantity of work was completed. This consisted of 86 uniforms and
dresses, 21 aprons, 363 personal garments, 12 baby garments, 683 articles for kitchen
use, 123 pieces of table linen, and 128 pieces of bed linen; 127 articles of household
.furnishing, including blackout curtains, quilts, Cushions, and slip covers; 2 coats for
Doctor's use, dressings and bandages;   and 335 miscellaneous items.
Embroidery, crocheting, mending, darning are supervised in the sewing-room as
well as remodelling and renovating of girls' clothing in preparation for home-going.
Nearly all girls enjoy their sewing-room training, but some show greater ability and
expertness. ,_ _  .,
Mabel E. Murray,
Sewing Supervisor.
Dear Madam,—The entire work of the laundry for the School from April 1st, 1941,
to March 31st, 1942, has been done by fifty-seven girls, under supervision.
The number of girls taking laundry training at a time averages six, with an
average of 4,518 articles handled every month. During the year 5,747 hours were spent
in the laundry and 54,215 articles laundered. L 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Usually the laundry is the first place of training after release from quarantine.
As very few of the girls have had experience along this line, much practice is required
before they become expert. There is a steady progression from washing stockings up
to ironing white uniforms worn by nurses and supervisors. This requires half-day
training for five days a week over a period of usually three months.
Anna C. Martin,
Linen-keeper.
Dear Madam,—During the past year thirty-nine girls received their kitchen training. This meant the cooking of three meals a day, consisting of soups, meats, vegetables, salads, and desserts. Approximately 145 loaves of bread were made weekly, as
well as buns and rolls; also cakes, cookies, and pies. Quantities of fruit were preserved
for winter use;  also jam, jellies, and pickles.
The poultry department provided generously with eggs for meals and cooking; also
many chicken dinners were enjoyed.
Kitchen training is popular with the girls and almost without exception they look
forward to this period. Their pride and satisfaction when viewing the results of their
work helps repay for the patient repetition that is necessary in most cases.
Irene Reid,
Kitchen Supervisor.
Dear Madam,—Forty girls worked 3,799 hours in garden, mowing lawns, planting,
transplanting, and weeding. They cleared three new strips of lawn and kept them cut
and clipped. Cleared undergrowth and dead growth from front half of grove. Also
cleaned up and replanted the " sunken garden." The garden group picked all the
lavender, dried and stripped it;  as well as the usual hoeing, weeding, and cleaning.
A new strip of boulevard was cleared, cut, and kept in repair by the group, and
they were nearly all very much interested in the improvement made by regular care
and attention. _, _
Elizabeth Paterson,
Garden Supervisor. REPORT  OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1941-42. L 15
ESTIMATED VALUE OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWN ON PREMISES.
Vegetables.
Potatoes, 5,502 lb.  $123.80
Peas, 143 lb.  7.15
Beans, 430 lb.  ._  21.50
Beets, 900 lb.  13.50
Cabbage, 1,464 lb.  ,  43.90
Carrots, 134 bunches  4.50
Carrots, 870 lb  17.40
Cauliflower, 142 heads  '.  14.20
Cucumbers, hothouse, 26  2.60
Cucumbers, field, 125 lb.  1  6.25
Gherkins, 92 lb .  9.20
Chives, 50 bunches   2.50
Corn, 444 cobs  11.10
Lettuce, 126 heads  12.60
Onions, 52 bunches   1.30
Onions, 768 lb.   22.25
Parsnips, 790 lb. .  ' 19.70
Parsley, 40 bunches  2.00
Radish, 42 bunches  1.05
Squash, 235  11.75
Tomatoes, 364 lb.   18.20
Turnips, 200 lb.   5.00
Vegetable marrow, 212  21.20
Lavender  •  10.00
Manure, 10 loads J. ._.'..._ 50.00
$452.65
Fruit.
Apples, 655 lb  $32.75
Cherries, 47 lb  4.70
Red currant, 40 lb.  :  2.50
Black currant, 27 lb  4.05
Gooseberries, 6 lb.  .60
Rhubarb, 138 lb  2.75
Raspberries, 54 lb.   5.25
Blackberries, 60 lb. 1 — 6.65
$59.25
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Chaeles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent' Majesty.
1942.
425-S42-S964 

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