Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

SEVENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1940-41 BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1943

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0314290.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0314290.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0314290-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0314290-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0314290-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0314290-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0314290-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0314290-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0314290-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0314290.ris

Full Text

 SEVENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT
OP
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS
of the province op
BRITISH COLUMBIA
' . 1940-41
BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OP EDUCATION
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Bani-ield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
J  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Seventieth Annual Report of the Public Schools of the
Province.
H. G. PERRY,
Minister of Education.
February, 1942.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.
1940-41.
Minister of Education:
The Honourable G. M. WEIR
Deputy Minister
and Superintendent of Education:
S. J. Willis, B.A., LL.D.
Assistant Superintendent of Education:
D. L. MacLaurin, B.A., Ph.D.
Chief Inspector of Schools:
H. B. King, M.A., Ph.D.
Inspectors of High Schools:
J. B. DeLong, B.A., Vancouver. A. Sullivan, B.A., Victoria.
Inspectors of Elementary and Superior Schools:
J. E. Brown, M.A., Cranbrook. V.
F. G. Calvert, Vancouver. A.
T. G. Carter, Penticton. A.
E. G. Daniels, B.A., New Westminster. H.
*J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Paed., Pouce H.
Coupe. W.
*C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Prince George.
W. G. Gamble, B.A., Victoria. *H.
G. H. Gower, M.A., Courtenay. *A.
T. W. Hall, Revelstoke. *A.
F. A. Jewett, B.A., Nelson. K.
Z. Manning, B.A., Vancouver.
S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
F. Matthews, M.A., Kamloops.
McArthur, B.A., Kamloops.
H. Mackenzie, B.A., Vancouver.
A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A.,
F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., Nanaimo.
D. Stafford, B.A., Prince George.
S. Towell, M.A., Abbotsford.
Turnbull, B.A., Prince Rupert.
B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Rossland.
* These men also inspect the High Schools in their districts.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools :
George H. Deane, Victoria. W. Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster. C. G. Brown, M.A., Burnaby.
STAFFS OF THE
Vancouver:
A. R. Lord, B.A., Principal.
T. R. Hall, B.A., Vice-Principal.
W. P. Weston, A.R.C.A., F.R.S.A.
H. B. MacLean.
A. E. C. Martin, B.Sc.
J. M. Ewing, B.A., D.Paed.
H. M. Morrison, Ph.D.
Ernest Lee, B.A., B.Sc. in P.E.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A.
Miss M. McManus, B.Mus., M.A.
Miss Margaret Maynard, B.A.
Model School:
Miss Z. M. Manning.
NORMAL SCHOOLS.
Victoria:
V. L. Denton, B.A., D.C.L., Principal.
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed., Vice-Principal.
John Gough, M.A.
Miss H. R. Anderson, M.A., Ph.D.
H. O. English, B.A., B.S.A.
F. T. C. Wickett, A.R.C.O.
Mrs. N. E. Murphy, B.Sc.
Miss Barbara Hinton, B.Sc.
Mrs. Ethel Reese-Burns.
Model School:
Miss Isabel M. L. Bescoby, M.A.
Miss Marian D. James.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS.
Registrar:  J. L. Watson, B.A.
Officer in Charge of Industrial Education: F. T. Fairey, B.A.
Inspector of Technical Classes:  H. A. Jones.
Director of Home Economics:  Miss J. L. McLenaghen, B.Sc.
Acting-Officer in Charge of High Correspondence School:   Miss E. E. LUCAS, B.A., D. es L.
Officer in Charge of Elementary Correspondence School: Miss Anna B. Miller.
Organizer of School and Community Drama:
L. Bullock-Webster, A.R.C.M., F.T.C.L., M.R.S.T.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch: P. G. Barr.
Chief Clerk: R. D. Smith.
Principal, School for the Deaf and the Blind:  C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed.
Director, Recreational and Physical Education:  Ian Eisenhardt. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Superintendent of Education       7
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools    37
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver    44
Victoria     45
Report of the Director of the Summer School of Education     47
Report of the Officer in Charge of Industrial Education    56
Report of the Director of Home Economics     62
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver    64
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
Victoria    74
New Westminster     75
North Vancouver (City and District) and West Vancouver     77
Burnaby -     78
Report of the Principal, School for the Deaf and the Blind     80
Reports of Officers in Charge of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses    81
Elementary School Courses     86
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch    87
Report on Work of Adult Education     89
Report of the Executive of Recreational and Physical Education     97
Report of Organizer of School and Community Drama  101
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust  103
Report of Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act "  105
Statistical Returns—
High Schools (Cities)  108
High Schools (District Municipalities)  123
High Schools (Rural Districts)  129
Superior Schools (District Municipalities)  135
Superior Schools (Rural Districts)  136
Junior High Schools (Cities)  141
Junior High Schools (District Municipalities)  150
Junior High Schools (Rural Districts)  153
Elementary Schools (Cities)  156
Elementary Schools (District Municipalities)  188
Elementary Schools (Rural Districts) •_ 206
Elementary Schools (Community Districts)  226
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each City  227
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each District Municipality  231
Enrolment (Recapitulation)  234
Names of Schools, Number of Teachers, etc., in each of the Electoral Districts  235 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION, 1940-41.
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1942.
To the Honourable H. G. Perry,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Seventieth Annual Report of the Public Schools of
British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1941.
ENROLMENT.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province decreased during the year from 120,459 to
119,634 and the average daily attendance decreased from 108,826 to 103,192. The percentage
of regular attendance was 86.26.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Schools.
Cities.
District
Municipalities.
Rural
Districts.
Community
Districts.
Total.
16,775
9,658
41,024*
4,362
933
3,445
17,858t
2,431
2,509
1,215
18,869
555
23,568
Superior schools.	
■ 3,442
14,318
78,306
Totals, 1940-41...	
67,457
26,598
25,024
555
119,634
Totals, 1939-40...	
68,359
26,198
25,354
548
120,459
* These figures include an enrolment of 88 pupils in the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the
Blind and 24 pupils enrolled in the Provincial Model School (Vancouver).
t These figures include an enrolment of 63 pupils in the Provincial Model School (Saanich),
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled in the— students.
High Correspondence School classes, regular students (exclusive of
the 1,557 officially registered in high, superior, or elementary
schools)       1,350
Elementary Correspondence School classes, regular students     1,000
Classes formed under section 13 (g) of the " Public Schools Act"	
Adult education-—
Classes under the Dominion-Provincial Youth Training
and War Emergency Training Programmes  3,002
Vocational  classes   (Provincial   Government)   not  supported by Dominion grants   212
Free Mining classes   36
Night-schools   7,015
Motor Mechanics for women   36
Vancouver School of Art  482
Victoria School of Art  24
Vancouver School of Navigation  99
High Correspondence School (adults only)   1,075
Elementary Correspondence School (adults only)   151
Community Self-help Groups (adults only)   1,275
Recreational and Physical Education classes  19,542
49
  32,949
        889
        201
         78
        240
University of British Columbia    2,658
Summer School of Education (1940 Session)
Normal School, Vancouver	
Normal School, Victoria	
Victoria College
Total  39,414 D 8
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADES AND SEX.
Grade.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
6,486
5,815
5,957
6,065
6,133
5,831
5,621
4,902
4,602
3,633
2,661
2,211
413
5,682
5,165
5,370
5,786
5,698
5,640
5,661
5,022
5,072
3,992
3,294
2,527
395
12,168
Grade II.                         	
10,980
fij-njiV TTT                                                        -
11,327
fii-ndo TV
11,851
11,831
11,471
firarjff VTI.           _         	
11,282
arstitc VTTT.
9,924
9,674
Grade X - — 	
7,625
6,955
4,738
Senior Matriculation
808
60,330
59,304
119,634
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO THE DIFFERENT
CLASSES OF SCHOOLS AND DISTRICTS.
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of pupils
enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per teacher are shown
below:—
Schools.
Oi
!SH
Z a
to    -j
ti     g
tt$£
m
0)^ B
A..H
P.J3
ClX Oi
J. CJT3
_ J- a
> B 2
8.8 n
a a oi
il S1"
> +j E
High schools (cities)	
High schools (district municipalities).	
High schools (rural districts) 	
Superior schools (district municipalities)	
Superior schools (rural districts). —	
Junior high schools (cities) —	
Junior high schools (district municipalities)..
Junior high schools (rural districts)	
Elementary schools (cities) *  -
Elementary schools (district municipalities) f
Elementary schools (rural districts)	
Community schools. -  	
Totals   - _	
507
142
112
25
105
265
1,128
513
903
21
142
52
24
649
194
136
25
105
329
106
46
1,211
520
906
21
16,775
4,362
2,431
933
2,509
9,658
3,445
1,215
41,024
17,858
18,869
555
14.02
3.65
2.03
0.78
2.10
8.07
2.89
1.02
34.28
14.93
15.77
0.46
33
31
22
37
24
36
35
32
36
35
21
3,857
391
4,248
119,634
100.00
27
26
18
31
21
32
30
27
32
30
18
20
26
* These figures include 21 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 88 pupils enrolled in the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind, and 1 teacher and 24 pupils in the Provincial Model School
(Vancouver).
t These figures include 2 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 63 pupils enrolled in the Provincial Model School (Saanich). REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
D 9
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES.
The following table shows the number of teachers of each sex employed and also the
number of certificates of each class:—
Schools.
1
TI
C.
O
<
s
"3
B
o
_
o
0_
■a
u
X
ct
3
'3
QJ
a
m
&
tio
1
QJ
&
B
a
X
u
w
.2
'3
s
6
1
S
QJ
'a
o
501
150
109
3
7
161
54
24
172
17
27
4
4
7
17
87
84
39
14
692
383
704
12
5
10
5
1
269
108
156
9
1
19
4
13
141
40
20
77
13
7
51
5
1
3
2
5
8
3
411
106
95
10
46
175
50
27
282
143
247
1
238
88
41
15
59
154
56
19
929
377
659
20
649
194
136
Superior schools (district municipalities) 	
25
105
329
Junior high schools (district municipalities) - 	
106
46
Elementary schools (cities) *  	
Elementary schools (district municipalities) t  —
1,211
520
906
21
Totals, 1940-41     _	
1,225
2,047
563
37
355
10
11
1,593
2,655
4,248
Totals, 1939-40
1,201
1,935
688
41
327
7
21
1,630
2,590
4,220
* These figures include 21 teachers employed in the Provincial School for the Deaf and the Blind, and 1 teacher
in the Provincial Model School (Vancouver).
t These figures include 2 teachers employed in the Provincial Model School (Saanich). D 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
CLASSIFICATION OF TEACHERS BY SEX AND EXPERIENCE.
The following table gives a classification by sex and experience of 4,145 of the 4,220
teachers employed in the Province for the school-year 1939-40. (This table was prepared by
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.)
City Schools.
District
Municipality
Schools.
Rural Schools
of more than
One Boom.
One-room Rural
Schools.
All Schools.
Is
a
Oi
'a
B
Oi
fc.
3
o
"a
a
Ql
13
S
QJ
fc.
1
o
H
QJ
'a
a
QJ
si
9
fc.
4-
O
tt
QJ*
'a
a
oj
13
E
QJ
fcl
o
et
QJ
13
a
r£
13
s
QJ
fcl
13
o
E-|
Experience where
teaching—
1 year and under—
104
138
242
65
119
184
74
128
202
79
231
310
322
616
938
2 years.	
71
84
155
39
57
96
55
61
116
37
91
128
202
293
495
47
56
44
90
70
51
137
126
95
29
15
14
54
25
23
83
40
37
40
29
12
61
20
22
101
49
34
14
13
2
27
10
7
41
23
9
130
113
72
232
125
103
362
238
175
6 years— 	
33
43
76
8
15
23
8
10
18
7
4
11
56
72
128
19
18
37
6
7
13
4
5
9
3
5
8
32
35
67
8 years.—	
15
20
35
9
7
16
3
9
12
2
2
27
38
65
27
41
68
12
17
29
9
9
18
1
4
5
49
71
120
34
65
99
10
12
22
13
11
24
3
5
8
60
93
153
51
57
108
7
21
28
10
5
15
2
2
4
70
85
155
41
53
94
14
16
30
5
4
9
1
2
3
61
75
136
50
53
103
13
23
36
2
6
8
2
2
65
84
149
33
55
88
8
14
22
1
3
4
1
1
43
72
115
15-19 years	
124
199
323
27
50
77
5
9
14
	
3
3
156
261
417
20-24 years	
48
134
182
7
16
23
55
150
205
25-29 years	
46
80
126
3
10
13
49
90
139
17
33
50
1
1
2
18
34
52
35 years and over	
2
9
11
1
1
2
10
12
4
5
9
3
1
4
1
2
3
3
5
8
11
13
24
866
1,298
2,164
290
489
779
271
365
636
166
400
566
1,593
2,552
4,145
Median experience
(years) - 	
10.4
11.5
11.0
4.7
4.6
4.6
3.1
2.9
3.0
2.1
1.9
1.9
5.3
5.0
5.2
Total experience—
1 year and under.—
17
28
45
18
37
55
8
35
43
26
86
112
69
186
255
2 years   „
19
35
54
13
39
52
20
40
60
27
60
87
79
174
253
3 years.— 	
20
52
72
17
45
62
23
61
84
21
49
70
81
207
288
4 years  	
31
62
93
25
32
57
30
27
57
23
40
63
109
161
270
5 years 	
44
56
100
17
30
47
26
30
56
9
29
38
96
145
241
6 years -	
50
50
100
13
19
32
17
23
40
5
19
24
85
111
196
7 years.. 	
43
30
73
11
15
26
15
15
30
4
14
18
73
74
147
34
26
60
18
13
31
15
11
26
9
14
23
76
64
140
9 years 	
28
33
61
13
14
27
14
12
26
5
12
17
60
71
131
10 years  	
29
35
64
5
18
23
13
10
23
7
9
16
54
72
126
11 years  ,
27
43
70
10
15
25
17
12
29
4
8
12
58
78
136
12 years 	
39
58
97
10
17
27
9
9
18
4
6
10
62
90
152
13 years .    _	
44
49
93
16
30
46
16
18
34
3
9
12
79
106
185
36
50
86
11
15
26
7
11
18
1
10
11
55
86
141
15—19 years 	
178
247
425
44
73
117
18
29
47
4
15
19
244
364
608
20-24 years-   	
79
191
270
16
31
47
10
8
18
4
11
15
109
241
350
25-29 years.	
56
113
169
10
25
35
5
8
13
3
3
6
74
149
223
30-34 years. 	
47
87
134
10
16
26
4
2
6
3
1
4
64
106
170
35 years and over	
41
48
89
10
4
14
3
2
5
1
1
55
54
109
4
5
9
3
1
4
1
2
3
3
5
8
11
13
24
Totals—	
866
1,298
2,164
290
489
779
271
365
636
166
400
566
1,593
2,552
4,145
Median experience
14.2
15.8
15.1
9.9
10.0
10.0
7.8
5.6
6.4
4.3
4.1
4.2
11.2
11.0
11 1 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
D 11
CLASSIFICATION OF PUPILS BY GRADE, SEX, AND AGE.
The following table gives a classification by grade, sex, and age as at June 30th, 1940, of
119,826 pupils enrolled in the public schools of the Province for the school-year 1939-40.
(This table was prepared by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.)
City Schools.
Age.
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
12
1.152
14
1.097
21
6
914
1,449
412
109
25
5
8
3
4
13
6
997
1,277
233
44
8
6
2
4
3
2
7
828
1,476
540
140
51
24
12
5
6
1
22
985
1,490
356
87
40
20
4
4
1
1
26
828
1,471
502
188
69
19
14
10
4
35
926
1,352
384
87
41
9
9
2
1
1
2
26
702
1,299
618
241
70
27
6
7
3
33
963
1,308
403
109
34
15
6
2
3
28
781
1,298
680
220
90
34
14
6
2
1
45
1,073
1,347
503
140
45
10
3
2
6 years 	
1.539    1.287
8 years.... —	
283
44
17
3
1
4
1
163
26
7
3
1
2
1
44
730
1,209
709
309
100
33
6
1
63
12 years	
907
1,241
517
180
16 years - -
48
10
18 years   . _~	
19 years 	
3
1
3,056
2,601
2,956
2,595
3,090
3,010
3,131
2,849
2,999
2,876
3,153
3,169
3,141
2,970
Age,
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
Senior
Matriculation.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
1
51
729
1,242
774
273
72
15
1
1
80
975
1,306
638
157
25
5
1
2
80
778
1,278
716
257
58
11
1
1
2
116
991
1,292
564
165
27
3
2
1
79
695
1,134
506
175
28
4
1
2
124
923
1,153
468
122
20
2
4
94
639
909
406
90
20
1
14
171
789
858
297
46
6
3
91
635
699
265
56
14
1
9
107
559
691
195
34
8
29
122
123
42
13
3
49
125
113
33
4
33
1,158
2,460
2,586
2,786
2,868
2,794
2,944
3,045
3,136
3,289
3,013
2,368
1,490
520
124
30
27
6 years 	
7 years . 	
1,103
2,306
2,460
9 years	
10 years	
2,709
2,767
2,927
12 years 	
2,873
3,012
14 years 	
16 years 	
3,144
3,290
2,840
17 years 	
18 years 	
2,142
1,276
382
20 years .	
77
12
Totals	
3,158
3,188
3,182
3,162
2.623 1 2.814
2,163
2,181
1,663
1,604
329
327
34,644
33,346 D 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
CLASSIFICATION OF PUPILS BY GRADE, SEX, AND AGE—Continued.
District Municipality Schools.
Age.
I.
Boys. I Girls.
II.
Boys. J Girls.   Boys.
HI.
Girls.
IV.
Boys.
V.
Girls.   Boys.   Girls
VI.
Boys.   Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Under 6 years..
6 years	
7 years	
8 years 	
9 years	
10 years	
11 years...	
12 years..—	
13 years	
14 years	
15 years	
16 years	
17 years  	
18 years	
19 years	
20 years	
21 years	
Unclassified	
Totals
2
515
734
192
34
10
1
3
472
655
112
17
3
1
2
6
342
683
274
62
10
12
436
601
142
31
5
2
1
1,492    1,262
1,388   1,234
293
656
325
108
32
16
5
1
18
356
681
198
55
12
5
1
2
295
600
290
107
36
21
7
21
384
586
232
64
17
3
1,442    1,328    1,365    1,308     1,369 I 1,252
12
282
558
320
142
42
11
26
365
543
223
65
21
7
1
1
1
20
264
535
321
139
42
361
559
233
82
19
2
1
11
250
456
308
160
45
6
1
1,341    1,299
2
26
311
467
253
70
1,237     1,154
Age.
VIII.
IX.
XI.
Boys. I Girls.
Boys.   Girls.
Boys.   Girls.   Boys.   Girls.
XII.
Senior
Matriculation.
Total.
Boys.   Girls.
Boys.   Girls.
Boys.    Girls.
Under 6 years..
6 years 	
7 years 	
8 years.	
9 years 	
10 years	
11 years	
12 years	
13 years	
14 years	
15 years	
16 years	
17 years	
18 years—	
19 years..	
20 years	
21 years 	
Unclassified	
Totals
20
232
440
301
134
23
35
312
462
207
74
14
5
1
17
216
374
214
73
15
4
1
29
258
369
229
46
10
1
1,155 1,110
914
943
21
182
291
147
42
4
2
1
31
251
329
153
35
2
30
155
195
97
21
3
2
5
27
211
273
100
20
7
2
18
101
154
69
15
2
5
808
610
644 I
364
1
27
156
204
61
24
2
4
479
56
2
521
1,079
1,174
1,272
1,299
1,244
1,275
1,222
1,194
1,116
876
561
331
120
30
7
10
52
13,322
484
1.109
1,090
1,250
1,227
1,223
1,209
1,130
1,111
954
897
651
377
113
36
4
12,873 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
D 13
CLASSIFICATION OF PUPILS BY GRADE, SEX, AND AGE—Continued.
Rural District Schools.
Age.
1
I.
II.
HI.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
l
Boys. 1 Girls.
1
Boys.
Girls.
Boys. 1 Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys. 1 Girls.
Under 6 years ._	
6 years	
7 years 	
8 years — 	
9 years 	
10 years 	
11 years— 	
30
29
556
506
4
10
1
803
715
342
450
14
19
1
283
192
669
629
322
392
7
18
1
68
39
346
212
664
614
304
365
20
23
3
17
17
101
50
376
261
560
583
229
337
16
30
1
9
5
23
13
158
74
364
252
511
544
219
282
16
26
5
2
3
2
3
3
13
3
3
2
6
3
1
2
44
26
11
4
29
10
3
156
65
26
10
97
27
18
7
377
168
76
31
296
90
39
15
458
335
155
69
522
242
98
32
205
388
280
158
295
410
261
15 years 	
88
1
2
1
5
8
14
9
48
18
17 years 	
2
6
5
1
1
3
1
2
4
3
10
8
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
1
1
Unclassified 	
1
2
-
........
1
1
1
1
	
	
Totals 	
1,779
1,518
1,509
1,381
1,620
1,404
1,499
1,371
1,421
1,360
1,272
1,220
1,109
1,107
Senior
VI
II.
11
4.
3
X
I.
XII.
Matricu
Total.
lation.
Age.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys. 1 Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Under 6 years	
30
29
6 years -	
. '
560
517
7 years 	
1,159
1,185
8 years —	
1,281
1,232
9 years  - —
	
	
	
1,402
1,256
10 years — -
1,300
1,278
11 years - 	
4
	
1,300
1,200
12 years— -	
36
39
1
1,294
1,287
13 years 	
233
320
18
31
2
1
1,240
1,137
14 years - 	
389
416
152
185
10
28
1,105
1,052
15 years — — -	
281
211
270
237
127
152
19
18
2
1
973
763
16 years 	
92
80
130
125
174
205
82
116
11
18
2
	
561
580
17 years  	
29
22
55
36
86
82
110
125
56
85
2
1
359
376
3
4
2
15
2
8
2
41
2
26
2
73
14
56
19
74
54
116
32
8
6
8
2
221
78
224
19 years	
60
20 years „	
1
1
4
3
16
6
2
1
23
11
1
2
4
3
1
1
6
6
1
........
7
1
1,064
1,098
642
625
444
497
302
339
217
261
1       21
13
12,899
12,194
1
! D 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
CLASSIFICATION OF PUPILS BY GRADE, SEX, AND AGE—Continued.
Community District Schools.
Age.
I.
Boys.   Girls,
II.
Boys.   Girls.
Boys.   Girls.
IV.
Boys.   Girls.
V.
Boys.   Girls.
VI.
Boys.   Girls.
VII.
Boys.    Girls.
Under 6 years...
6 years	
7 years	
8 years..	
9 years 	
10 years	
11 years	
12 years 	
13 years -	
14 years 	
15 years	
Totals
59
50
49
46
45
33
19
VIII.
Age.
Boys.   Girls
IX.
XI.
XII.
Senior
Matriculation.
Total.
Boys. I Girls.   Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.   Boys.    Girls.
Under 6 years..
6 years	
7 years	
8 years —
9 years	
10 years 	
11 years	
12 years....	
13 years	
14 years....	
15 years.—	
Totals
274
23
30
36
39
32
45
30
25
6
6 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
D 15
CLASSIFICATION OF PUPILS BY GRADE, SEX, AND AGE—Continued.
All School Districts.
Age.
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
1
|
1
Boys.
Girls.
Boys. 1 Girls.
Boys. 1 Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys. 1 Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Under 6 years	
6 years	
7 years 	
8 years  —
9 years  -
i     I
45         45         21
13
2,232
2,097
16
29
1
....
	
3,094
2,684
1,601
1,886
24
59
1
	
784
489
2,813
2,520
1,445
1,734
40
74
1
156
89
1,049
609
2,806
2,795
1,429
1,675
58
82
1
4
46
13
29
10
286
64
131
31
1,256
419
831
232
2,634
1,175
2,525
881
1,215
2,374
1,669
2,404
64
1,267
117
1,717
1
71
2
11 years 	
115
12 years  -
10
5
31
14
134 I       84
463
259
1,323
932
2,293
2,433
1,186
1,514
13 years-	
6
5
15
6
68
35
175
88
555
272
1,344
989
2,055
2,121
14 years— 	
3
3
6
5
28
8 |       68
32
189
95
521 |     321
1,301
1,032
15 years  -
1
3
6
10
6
32
16
69
38
210
97
628
339
16 years- 	
1
5
9
1
15
4
11
15
60
21
193
89
17 years — 	
3
6
9
2
1
7
2
11
7
17
4
49
20
18 years.—	
1
1
1
1
4
5
9
4
10
4
	
1
3
2
1
20 years 	
  I   	
1
  1   	
1 1   	
2
1
1
1
1
Totals
6,394 | 5,464
1
5,912
5,260
6,201
5,788
6,040
5,561
5,810
5,521
5,789
5,707
5,495
5,237
Senior
VIII.
IX.
X.                    XI.
XII.
Matricu
Total.
lation.
Age.
Boys. 1 Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys. 1 Girls.
1
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Under 6 years	
66
58
6 years 	
      	
2,248
2,127
7 years 	
     	
4,719
4,630
8 years.. -  „.
	
5,082
4,818
9 years	
5,499
5,254
10 years  	
1
5,503
5,304
11 years.-	
2
5
5,385
5,395
12 years „.	
107
154
2
4
5,549
5,399
13 years 	
1,194
1,607
115
176
3
4
	
5,530
5,303
2,071
2,185
1,146
1,434
110
183
6
14
1
6,449
5,384
5,313
5,013
15 years  	
1,358
1,059
1,922
1,898
1,004
1,326
143
216
	
5
11
16 years. —	
499
311
1,060
918
1,599
1,687
876
1,116
120
152
2
3
4,450
4,317
17 years .  —	
124
61
885
247
739
703   1,214
1,256
692
800
35
53
3,278
3,169
18 years 	
21
14
88
45
258
183
576
453
927
1,011
148
155
2,042
1,877
19 years..	
1
4
17
6
34
30
125
85
388
288
151
137
718
555
20 years _ 	
1
2
7
3
27
16
87
64
54
39
177
124
21 years -	
2
	
2
3
4
20
13
16
5
43
22
Unclassified -	
1
5
4
5
4
	
17
9
Totals ,	
5,379
5,400
4,738
4,730
3,756
4,119
2,975
3,164
2,244
2,344
406
392
61,139
58,687 D 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
NEW SCHOOLS.
High schools were established in Copper Mountain, Burns Lake, and Port Alice Rural
School Districts; junior high schools in Burnaby, Oliver-Testalinda Creek-Osoyoos High
School Area, and Surrey; and superior schools at Progress (Peace River) and Upper Sumas
(Abbotsford).
Elementary schools were opened for the first time in the following districts:—
Name of School District. Electoral District.
Beaver Falls Rossland-Trail and Nelson-Creston.
West Branch Cariboo.
The following rural districts were created but no schools were opened :•—
Holmwood .
Salmon Arm.
Lempriere Kamloops.
Redonda Bay Mackenzie.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and also the
cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year.
No. of
Teachers
employed.
No. of
School
Districts.
56
45
69
59
128
104
267
169
429
213
607
268
816
189
1,597
359
1,859
374
2,246
575
3,118
744
3,668
788
3,784
792
3,854
803
3,948
811
3,959
830
3,912
821
3,873
827
3,942
762
3,956
773
4,025
763
4,092
741
4,194
721
4,220
720
4,248
728
Aggregate
Enrolment.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
age of
Attendance.
Government
Expenditure
for
Education.
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools.
1877-78-
1882-83.
1887-88..
1892-93-
1897-98 .
1902-03
1907-08 .
1912-13 .
1913-14 .
1917-18.
1922-23.
1927-28..
1928-29 .
1929-30 .
1930-31 .
1931-32 .
1932-33..
1933-34...
1934-35 .
1935-36..
1936-37..
1937-38..
1938-39..
1939-40..
1940-41...
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
63.49
61.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
60,
113,
174,
290,
473,
544,
1,663;
1,885;
1,653,
3,176,
3,532,
3,765,
3,743,
3,834,
4,015,
2,849,
2,611,
2,835,
2,972,
3,277,
3,524,
3,630,
3,685,
3,963
411.14*
758.75*
679.36*
775.43
255.26
802.29
671.60
003.34
654.11
796.60
686.28J
518.95*
920.69t
317.081
727.19t
074.37*
972.02t
937.80J
040.74t
385.041:
660.233:
962.691:
670.78J
,769.001:
848.24t
$215,
425,
604,
1,220,
4,658,
4,634,
3,519,
7,630,
9,261,
11,149,
10,008,
10,061,
9,719,
8,941,
8,213,
8,458,
8,775,
9,593,
10,193,
10,640,
10,521,
10,982,
056.22t
.555.10
,357.86
,509.85
,894.97
,877.56
.014.61
.009.541:
094.981
.996.27*
.255.66}:
387.99-t
333.811:
497.341:
.369.04J
,156.001:
.353.781:
.562.641
.367.08J
,740.471:
.684.921:
.364.49*
* The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
t This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
t This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
D 17
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL TO PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENT.
The following table shows the enrolment during the last twelve years and also the cost to
the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year.
Enrolment
at High
Schools.
Enrolment
at other
Public
Schools.
Total
Enrolment.
Percentage
at High
Schools of
the Total
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance.
1929-30   	
1930-31    -	
14,675
16,197
18,134
18,552
18,932
19,969
21,119
22,338
22,582
23,747
24,436
23,568
96,342
97,717
97,785
98,264
96,860
97,264
95,603
96,093
97,778
97,187
96,023
96,066
111,017
118,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
13.22
14.21
15.64
15.80
16.35
17.03
18.09
19.71
18.76
19.63
20.28
19.70
$28.07
28.03
29.62
21.55
19.51
20.40
21.35
22.93
24.05
24.85
24.52
27.82
$32.79
32.74
1931-32  .... :	
1932-33 -
33.18
23.98
1933-34.. :..  	
1934-35	
21.85
23.47
1935-36                       	
24.46
1936-37             -— —
26.10
1937-38                  -	
27.18
1938 39                      	
27.92
27.14
32.25
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE SCHOOL-YEAR 1940-41.
Grand total cost of education $10,982,364.49
Less—
Grant re salaries of faculty of Victoria College     $4,270.90
General grant to Victoria College       5,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia  426,170.00
Normal School, Vancouver    22,300.05
Normal School, Victoria     32,584.54
Cost of Night-schools    14,078.31
Correspondence Schools—■
High School      43,985.01
Elementary School     14,719.47
Adult Education      72,528.30
 —-       635,636.58
Net cost for total enrolment of 119,634 pupils , $10,346,727.91
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  86.49
Cost per pupil per school-day (192 days) on total enrolment  .45
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 103,192  100.27
Cost per pupil per school-day (192 days) on average daily attendance  .52
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 119,634 pupils for
year  ($3,963,848.24-$635,636.58)  -__".  3,328,211.66
total
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment.
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (192 days)
enrolment 	
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily attendance...
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (192 days) on average
daily attendance 	
Cost per capita for year on population of 809,203 (1941 census)	
Cost per capita per school-day (192 days) on population of 809,203	
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on population of 809,203	
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (192 days) on population of 809,203	
27.82
.14
32.25
.17
*12.79
*.07
f4.11
t.02
* Computed on net total cost of $10,346,727.91.
t Computed on net cost to Provincial Government of !
1,328,211.6 D 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE.
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the Province
during the year was as follows:—
School.
Oi
m
OJ
S
o
01
ja
01
B
a
a
a
r-l
CQ
3
■a
B
£
oa
jj*
o
X
o
X
3
a
o
a
03
3
.5
">
a
a
X
tt
w
a
«
00
in
*
CO
CO
CJ
fc
B
etf
s
u
Oi
O
X
CJ
C
01
JJ,
fc,
s
a
CJ
'u
Oi
s
<
CQ
B
.2
Vt
3
<
B
tt
to
6
a
'»
00
3
tit
B
a
*3
m
cc
.5
*3
"3
j.
M
P
in
U
Oi
X
O
00*
13
Q
329
24
137
867
82
63
879
184
571
1,874
1,264
623
12
8
11
120
75
49
21
22
3
138
4
325
547
317
134
328
1,162
525
548
24
16
16
42
42
66
98
32
74
314
159
203
134
124
209
713
959
651
61
14
56
221
95
66
104
3
166
217
44
75
28
8
30
89
24
63
48
24
37
124
139
101
119
30
169
438
127
193
287
31
349
893
101
421
95
27
81
331
159
156
367
186
389
1,077
598
749
2,923
867
Junior high schools	
City elementary schools  ....
Elementary schools in district
2,626
8,620
4,397
Rural elementary schools	
4,342
547
Totals 	
1,502
5,3951275
1,060
3,014
206
880
2,790
513
609
232 473
1,076
2,082
849
3,366
24,322
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which schools
were in operation during all or some portion of the school-years 1940-41 and 1939-40:—
1940-41. 1939-40.
City school districts  33 33
District municipality school districts  24 24
Rural school districts  667 659
Community school districts    4 4
Totals  728* 720
* At the time this Annual Report was prepared 331 school districts were under the administration of Official
Trustees.    In 243 of the 331 districts schools were in operation.
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city high schools during the year was 16,775. Of this number,
7,850 were boys and 8,925 were girls.
The number of schools, the number of divisions, the number of teachers, and the enrolment for 1940-41 and for 1939-40 in each city are shown in the following table:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Alberni District High School Area_
Armstrong  	
Chilliwack High School Area	
Courtenay..-   	
Cranbrook.-  	
Cumberland  	
Duncan	
Enderby— 	
Fernie   -—
Grand Forks _   	
Greenwood 	
Kamloops  	
Kaslo _ :	
Kelowna 	
Ladysmith	
Merritt  	
Nanaimo.. 	
7
5
13
5
7
5
9
7
20
7
10
5
3
2
10
4
2
11
2
8
11
3
12
217
137
394
119
216
140
121
47
137
98
23
264
28
241
223
63
227
213
161
337
109
222
135
123
55
143
97
23
273
34
224
231
76
234 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
D 19
High Schools—Cities—Continued.
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
|
;   Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
9
26
3
2
5
7
7
3
5
1
8
281
15
7
35
15
31
3
4
7
10
9
5
6
1
12
345
19
11
45
281
871
58  .
32
142
212
187
90
165
17
262
9,799
525
212
1,227
287
933
Port Coquitlam -	
74
44
136
Prince Rupert —	
Revelstoke -	
Rossland	
184
180
93
159
23
255
10,183
Vancouver, North      	
552
219
Victoria  	
1,264
Totals j	
44
507
649
16,775
17,276
HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality high schools for the year was 4,362. Of this
number, 1,948 were boys and 2,414 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the years
1940-41 and 1939-40 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Abbotsford:  Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Educational
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
3
1
7
30
2
5
4
2
8
9
5
11
1
7
9
17
4
13
8
10
39
4
6
6
2
10
10
10
15
1
12
11
22
5
20
11
206
933
53
133
117
48
287
282
142
396
20
236
260
498
113
390
248
240
Burnaby. - —	
1,324
35
Delta                              	
132
124
Kent                      	
51
322
267
141
Oak Bay  	
350
Peachland. -	
17
217
223
607
103
Surrey 	
489
262
Totals     ...
22
142
194
4,362
4,804 D 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural high schools for the year was 2,431. Of this number, 1,115
were boys and 1,316 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the years
1940-41 and 1939-40 are shown in the following table:—
District.
Athalmer-lnvermere	
Bralorne...	
Britannia Mine 	
Burns Lake.	
Castlegar	
Cobble Hill ..„.. _.
Comox 	
Copper Mountain	
Cowichan Lake	
Creston Valley United..
Dawson Creek 	
Dewdney 	
Field 	
Fort Fraser 	
Fruitvale.	
Golden  	
Harewood....  	
Hedley 	
Howe Sound United	
loco 	
James Island	
Keremeos  ,	
Kimberley	
Lillooet —	
Lumby  	
Michel-Natal  _	
McBride  	
Nakusp	
New Denver 	
North Bend 	
Ocean Falls 	
Oliver-Testalinda-Osoyoos High School Area..
Oyama      	
Parksville  —  	
Port Alice  —  	
Powell River   	
Princeton -	
Qualicum Beach .
Quesnel- 	
Rolla - ...
Rutland	
Saanich, North, Consolidated .
Salmo	
Saltspring Island United 	
Smithers.... _	
Squamish 	
Telkwa  	
Terrace 	
Tsolum 	
University Hill 	
Vanderhoof 	
Wells	
Westbank	
Woodfibre „.
Totals-
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
1
2
2
2
112
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
32
27
36
14
20
58
53
21
33
168
52
44
15
15
22
34
85
41
60
35
20
39
168
15
37
88
15
41
21
22
44
66
30
39
21
200
68
37
50
13
59
41
30
44
60
35
17
37
48
47
20
39
27
28
2,431
Enrolment,
1939-40.
26
39
24
56
44
35
158
34
37
19
17
17
31
84
31
53
33
16
36
155
27
35
81
16
44
25
16
43
92*
37
36
183
75
39
49
15
52
30
36
51
68
41
17
42
44
62
21
43
23
28
* Oliver. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
D 21
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality superior schools during the year was 933. Of
this number, 475 were boys and 458 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-years
1940-41 and 1939-40 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Abbotsf ord: MatsQui-Sumas-Abbotsf ord Educational
3
1
1
15
4
6
15
4
6
553
143
237
236
Delta    ---.-
143
230
Totals                        	
5
25
25
933
609
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural superior schools for the school-year was 2,509. The number
of boys was 1,274, of girls, 1,235.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1940-41 and 1939-40:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 •
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
4
3
2
5
4
2
3
3
2
3
2
4
2
2
3
2
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
9
2
2
3
3
4
3
2
5
4
2
3
3
2
3
2
4
2
2
3
2
3
2
2
2
2
3
2
2
2
2
3
2
2
3
70
103
70
36
171
117
52
68
85
41
56
35
106
31
72
57
49
78
55
44
45
40
68
23
28
31
34
80
38
53
64
69
94
69
38
161
70
117
49
60
81
34
101
50
48
37
104
41
65
67
66
76
58
37
60
Peace River—
42
48
34
82
29
34
47
67
95
39
44
73 D 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
Superior Schools—Rural Districts—Continued.
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
4
3
3
2
2
3
5
2
4
3
3
2
2
3
5
2
115
84
73
48
37
69
121
62
87
94
Waldo United	
56
57
45
68
119
Yahk United - -
66
39
105
105
2,509
2,878
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city junior high schools was 9,658. The number of boys was 4,853,
of girls, 4,805..
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1940-41 and 1939-40:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Chilliwack High School Area	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
16
6
5
8
1
9
9
10
24
2
8
5
13
113
12
9
15
17
8
5
11
1
14
10
10
34
2
9
5
15
145
15
9
19
580
190
156
279
20
347
314
368
922
55
291
163
481
4,215
364
365
658
594
175
172
300
22
349
313
365
1,103-
56
301
162
434
4,135
Vancouver, North  ,	
386
334
552
Totals 	
23
265
329
9,658
9,753 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
D 23
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality junior high schools was 3,445. Of this number, 1,741 were boys and 1,704 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1940-41 and 1939-40 are given in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
3
3
1
28
6
6
6
9
14
21
10
33
6
6
6
11
15
20
9
1,037
192
138
226
311
472
725
344
191
Delta                                            	
151
216
344
Richmond   .—	
472
335
Totals  	
12
100
106
3,445
1,709
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural junior high schools was 1,215. The number of boys was
631, of girls, 584.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1940-41 and 1939-40 are given in the following table:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
Of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
8
2
9
3
4
7
3
3
8
2
10
5
4
11
3
3
229
48
291
61
130
250
110
96
235
37
283
73
244
116
77
8
39
46
1,215
1,065
SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT IN HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The following is a summary of enrolment in high and junior high schools:—
Number
of
Pupils
enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Number of Pupils enrolled in Grades
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
3
or b
■§•§•2
lis
High schools:
District municipalities	
16,775
4,362
2,431
7,850
1,948
1,115
8,925
2,414
1,316
13,792.71
3,650.98
2,011.81
3,548
687
513
5,138
1,521
788
4,129
1,131
605
3,305
914
481
655
109
44
Totals    _..
23,568
10,913
12,655
19,455.50
4,748
7,447
5,865
4,700
808
Junior high schools:
9,658
3,445
1,215
4,853
1,741
631
4,805
1,704
584
8,519.81
2,937.17
1,038.62
3,652
1,327
445
3,040
1,060
388
2,966
1,058
382
	
Totals ...  .
14,318
7,225
7,093
12,495.60
5,424
4,488
4,406
37,886
18,138
19,748
31,951.10
5,424
4,488
9,154
7,447
5,865
4,700
808 D 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city elementary schools was 41,024. Of this number, 21,112 were
boys and 19,912 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1940-41 and 1939-40 are given in the following table:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
9
6
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
50
1
1
3
1
14
7
11
9
9
14
10
11
4
8
9
3
14
2
18
8
5
17
19
46
15
5
8
16
11
13
2
36
651
1
11
22
19
85
7
11
8
9
14
10
11
4
8
9
2
14
2
18
8
B
17
20
45
16
7
5
8
IG
11
14
4
2
37
716
1
21
21
20
90
290
456
354
337
489
370
395
126
292
311
44
522
57
669
307
189
647
671
1,917
571
218
183
304
616
354
470
123
56
1,317
23,371
24
88
789
816
3,281
255
463
358
351
512
395
441
107
304
334
52
537
57
086
336
193
593
Nelson     -	
678
1,900
582
208
188
301
Prince Rupert  — - —
612
483
Salmon Arm...   „ -	
135
65
1,327
23,659
Vancouver, North  .	
783
804
3 150
Totals-	
116
1,129
1,211
41,024
41,330 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality elementary schools was 17,858.    The number
of boys was 9,269 and of girls 8,589.
The following table gives the number of schools, of
enrolment for the school-years 1940-41 and 1939-40:—
iivisions, and of teachers, and the
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Abbotsford : Ma tsqui-Sum as-Abbots ford Educational
10
19
1
14
2
5
2
9
1
2
15
7
2
1
1
7
14
8
1
24
5
2
26
91
7
36
3
13
2
14
10
31
30
18
18
2
18
35
4S
10
8
51
20
15
26
95
7
36
3
13
2
14
11
6
31
30
18
20
2
19
36
47
10
8
51
20
15
1,000
3,184
263
1,060
84
496
59
359
429
217
1,187
1,029
538
747
54
669
1,262
1,803
283
271
1,645
640
579
1,300
3,904
267
1,036
85
475
61
Delta    ,      .,„..,...
381
408
Kent    	
Langley   _ -	
225
1,186
1,055
Mission    -	
559
685
Peachland .'     -	
Penticton      —
56
707
1,275
1,653
Salmon Arm -  - -  	
Summerland  " .._   	
Surrey  ,."  _ - 	
282
286
1,987
657
546
Totals   	
161
512
520
17,858
19,076
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—RURAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the elementary schools of the rural districts was 18,869.    The number of
boys was 9,781 and of girls 9,088.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions
enrolment for the school-years 1940-41 and 1939-40:—
and of teachers, and the
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Pairal school districts      -	
676
909
906
18,869
19,055
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the elementary schools of the community school districts was 555. Of
this number, 281 were boys and 274 were girls.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1940-41 and 1939-40:—
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1940-41.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Community school districts..
13
21
21
555
548 D 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS OF EACH CLASS AND NUMBER OF TEACHERS
IN EACH CLASS OF SCHOOL.
Class of School.
No. OP
Schools.
No. of Teachers.
1940-41.
1939-40.
1940-41.
1939-40.
High schools:
44
22
54
5
39
23
12
8
116
161
676
13
44
20
51
4
44
22
6
7
118
163
681
13
649
194
136
25
105
329
106
46
1,211
520
906
21
633
186
126
Superior schools:
Junior high schools:
17
115
340
59
40
Elementary schools:
District municipalities 	
1,242
840
901
21
Totals... - .....
1,173
1,173
4,248
4,220
SALARIES.
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (quoted in dollars only)
paid to teachers during the school-year 1940-41. (Exchange and part-time teachers are not
included):—
High Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Junior High Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest   Average
Salary.     Salary.
Elementary Schools.
Highest    Lowest
Salary.     Salary.
Average
Salary.
Cities.
Alberni — -	
Armstrong	
Chilliwack	
Courtenay.	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland	
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood —
Kamloops ~	
Kaslo	
Kelowna 	
Ladysmith..	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
Neiv Westminster-
Port Alberni _
Port Coquitlam —
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke 	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm...	
$1,850
2,700*
1,900
2,880
1,730
2,230
1,407
3,150
2,000
1,400
2,600
1,800
2,565
1,950
2,000
2,837
3,600
3,562
2,500*
1,800
1,900
2,000
2,500
2,080
2,750
2,100*
$1,400
$1,520
1,200*
1,643*
1,200
1,454
1,400
1,704
1,360
1,466
1,200
1,560
1,200
1,308
1,400
1,743
1,400
1,675
1,200
1,300
1,200
1,893
1,250
1,525
1,250
1,642
1,200
1,428
1,250
1,500
1,376
1,869
2,100
2,455
1,631
2,521
1,300*
1,736*
1,200
1,400
1,250
1,575
1,250
1,407
1,375
1,672
1,200
1,492
1,450
1,912    !
1,350*
1,632*
$1,670
1,480
1,400
1,775
1,300
2,300
1,577
3,200
3,040
1,150
1,525
1,450
$1,100
1,200
1,400
1,200
1,300
1,150
1,159
1,600
1,151
1,100
1,100
1,400
$1,193
1,247
1,400
1,418
1,300
1,389
1,481
2,050
1,782
1,125
1,303
1.440
$1,900
1,950
1,350
2,000
2,700
1,969
1,900
1,417
1,250
1,900
960
2,400
1,000
2,100
1,400
1,160
1,426
2,400
2,233
2,500
1,375
1,150
2,000
1,996
1,840
2,360
1,848
$800
780
780
950
1,045
800
900
780
1,100
900
860
1,000
1,000
950
900
1,000
1,118
1,100
935
900
850
850
950
1,000
1,050
950
1,170
$1,080
1,187
1,117
1,228
1,335
1,213
1,036
984
1,187
1,167
905
1,502
1,000
1,240
1,097
1,072
1;339
1,460
1,367
1,264
1,029
940
1,156
1,287
1,276
1,198
1,339
* These figures refer to high school area. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
D 27
Salaries—Continued.
High Schools.
Junior High Schools.
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Cities—Continued.
Slocan .....	
Trail-Tadanac -   - -
$1,200
3,800
4,213
2,600
2,800
3,792
$1,200
1,500
1,200
1,200
1,440
1,574
$1,200
2,183
2,680
1,687
1,783
2,441
$3,000
4,213
2,250
1,650
3,152
$1,400
1,267
1,100
1,250
1,250
$1,707
2,120
1,501
1,468
2,046
$1,150
2,500
3,830
1,800
2,625
3,000
$900
950
871
1,000
950
950
$1,025
1,273
1,741
Vancouver, North 	
Vernon  ,      -
Victoria - - -	
1,293
1,250
1,718
For all cities	
$4,213
$1,200
$2,348
$4,213
$1,100
$1,823
$3,830
$780
$1,584
District Municipalities.
Abbotsf ord:    Matsqui-Sumas-
Abbotsford Educational Ad-
$1,800
2,765
$1,250
1,200
$1,422
1,677
$1,100
$1,446
$1,525
2,490
1,530
1,500
1,125
1,250
1,125
1,600
2,515
1,050
1,150
1,550
1,400
3,000
850
1,980
1,975
1,900
1,100
2,200
1,120
-1,850
2,306
$800
780
880
780
850
825
900
780
840
850
780
800
800
950
850
950
780
800
800
900
780
900
900
$972
Burnaby - -	
$2,630
1,270
1,077
	
 ;
984
Coldstream. -	
Coquitlam „ .„.
Cowichan, North.	
Delta      	
1,025
1,800
1,300
1,550
1,300
1,250
1,100
1,171
1.019
1,012
1,950
2,300
1,550
1,900
2,000
2,350
3,100
1,300
2,670
2,100
2,500
2,000
2,500
1,350
1,750
1,350
1,200
1,260
1,250
1,505
1,300
1,250
1,200
1,300
1,533
1,950
1,450
1,300
1,396
1,720
2,324
1,300
1,647
1,484
1,755
1,100
1,192
952
Esquimalt	
1,491
950
Langley..- - -	
Maple Ridge -	
Mission .._ - 	
880
997
1,500
1,150
1,250
1,025
1,638
1,700
1,500
1,382
1,237
850
Penticton-  .' ,
1,200
1,100
1,172
1,060
Saanich .„_	
1,105
..   ..
920
1,250
1,200
1,512
1,403
1,225
Surrey  	
Vancouver, North ~ —	
Vancouver, West-	
1,350
1,100
1,132
876
1,240
2,931
1,450
2,124
2,010
1,100
1,415
1,493
For  all district municipalities - - -
$3,100
$1,200
$1,662
$2,630
$1,100
$1,306
$3,000
$780
$1,107
Rural Districts.
For all rural districts -	
$3,340
$1,200
$1,552
$2,290
$1,100
$1,418
$2,310
$780
$911
Community Districts.
For all community districts
$1,145
$820
$917
1                  1
_ D 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
Salaries—Continued.
Superior Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
$1,500
1,260
1,650
1,100
1,200
1,250
$850
950
900
850
905
950
1,050
950
780
1,000
830
950
780
780
950
850
800
875
950
841
$1,070
1,053
1,312
950
1,052
1,030
1,312
1,075
960
1,100
990
1,025
923
940
1,138
1,025
950
983
1,050
961
$1,100
1,100
1,200
1,100
1,100
1,540
1,150
1,225
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,500
1,200
1,100
1,100
1,100
1,550
1,200
$1,050
780
800
800
850
1,055
850
930
780
880
780
1,100
780
800
830
850
900
1,100
$1,075
Abbotsford Educational Ad-
Oyster, North  	
Peace River Educational Ad-
940
983
Ashcroft —	
Pender Harbour 	
950
975
Pioneer Mine	
1,233
933
Campbell River...  	
1,750
1,200
1,250
1,300
1,200
1,100
1,150
1,100
1,600
1,200
1,100
1,200
1,150
1,152
Procter  	
1,077
990
Sechelt United
1,013
Chase - 	
Sooke. •■..,	
Stewart 	
945
1,267
Falkland     	
960
Fort St. John	
Waldo United 	
Wardner  	
Wellington, South 	
950
965
933
1,080
Yahk United .
1,150
For all superior schools
$1,750
$780
$1,040
The average yearly salary paid to teachers employed in all public schools (high, superior,
junior high, and elementary) of the Province for the school-year 1940-41 was $1,482; to
teachers employed in all high schools, $2,109; to teachers employed in all superior schools,
$1,040; to teachers employed in all junior high schools, $1,670; to teachers employed in all
elementary schools, $1,256;  and to teachers employed in all community schools, $917. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
D 29
SALARY CLASSIFICATION.
The following table shows the number of teachers in the Province receiving the annual
salary indicated for the school-year 1940-41:—
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Below $780	
271
171
24
82
113
40
158
16
38
122
31
118
25
33
71
37
141
16
41
74
23
174
28
28
119
26
85
14
31
70
39
85
16
52
46
30
79
12
35
36
22
39
6
$1,621-1,640	
36
32
21
32
36
375
20
7
28
49
12
29
11
21
31
5
26
5
38
21
4
4
15
20
11
4
8
10
17
6
14
7
51
4
6
3
2
37
5
3
4
6
32
$2,501-2,520.
2,521-2,540.....	
4
1
3
2
31
1
9
5
6
17
2
8
16
42
15
3
7
2
10
2
3
4
5
11
16
2
80
1
2
1
7
1
3
3
2
21
$3,381-3,400 .
$780	
1,641-1,660-	
3,401-3,420
3,421-3,440
3,441-3,460
3,461-3,480
3,481-3,500 .
3,501-3,520 .
3,521-3,540
3,541-3,560
3,561-3,580
3,581-3,600
3,601-3,620	
3,621-3,640
3,641-3,660
3,661-3,680
3,681-3,700 ..
781- 800 .
1,661-1,680-	
2,541-2,560
2,561-2,580
2,581-2,600
2,601-2,620 	
1
801- 820
1,681-1,700	
13
821- 840
1,701-1,720-	
841- 860
1,721-1,740	
861- 880 . .
1,741-1,760	
2,621-2,640
2,641-2,660
2,661-2,680.
2,681-2,700	
881- 900
901- 920.
921- 940 .. .
1,761-1,780
1,781-1,800
1,801-1,820
1,821-1,840	
3
2
941- 960
2,701-2,720
2,721-2,740 ..
1
961  980
1,841-1,860
981-1,000
1,861-1,880.
1,881-1,900
1,901-1,920
1,921-1,940
1,941-1,960.
1,961-1,980
1,981-2,000
2,001-2,020	
2,741-2,760	
2
1,001-1,020 - .
2,761-2,780.
2,781-2,800
2,801-2,820
2,821-2,840
2,841-2,860
2,861-2,880
2,881-2,900
2,901-2,920
2,921-2,940
2,941-2,960	
1,021-1,040
1,041-1,060
1,061-1,080
1,081-1,100
3,701-3,720
3,721-3,740
3,741-3,760
3,761-3,780
3,781-3,800
3,801-3,820
3,821-3,840
3,841-3,860
3,861-3,880
3,881-3,900	
3,901-3,920..	
2
1,101-1,120	
1,121-1,140
1,141-1,160	
2,021-2,040
2,041-2,060
2,061-2,080
2,081-2,100 .
2,101-2,120.....	
2
1,161-1,180
1,181-1,200
1,201-1,220	
1
2
2,961-2,980
2,981-3,000
3,001-3,020	
3,021-3,040	
1 221-1,240
1,241-1,260
1 261 1,280
2,121-2,140 	
1
2,141-2,160
2,161 2,180
1,281-1,300
1 301 1 320
3,041-3,060 .
3,921-3,940	
1
2,181-2,200
2,201-2,220.	
3,061-3,080	
3,941-3,960	
1,321-1,340
3,081-3,100	
3,961-3,980
3,981-4,000
4,001-4,020
4,021-4,040 .
4,041-4,060
4,061-4,080
4,081-4,100
4,101-4,120
4,121-4,140
4,141-4,160	
1,341-1,360..  .
1,361-1,380
1,381-1,400
1,401-1,420
1,421-1,440
1,441-1,460 ...
1,461-1,480	
2,221-2,240
3,101-3,120  .
2,241-2,260.
2,261-2,280
2,281-2,300
2,301-2,320	
3,121-3,140.. .
3,141-3,160
3,161-3,180
3,181-3,200
3,201-3,220
3,221-3,240
3,241-3,260	
3,261-3,280
3,281-3,300
3,301-3,320
3,321-3,340	
2
2,321-2,340	
2,341-2,360
2,361-2,380	
1,481-1,500
1,501-1,520
1,521-1,540
1,541-1,560
1 561 1,580
2,381-2,400
2,401-2,420
2,421-2,440
2,441-2,460
2,461-2,480
2,481-2,500
4,161-4,180
4,181-4,200.. ..
4,201-4,220
♦Total	
6
3,341-3,360
3,361-3,380
1,601-1,620
4,215
1 Exchange and part-time teachers not included. D 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1940-41.
Minister's Office:
Salaries  $1,650.00
Office supplies  192.59
Travelling expenses   1,315.25
General Office;
Salaries   $25,185.53
Office supplies         1,826.08
Travelling expenses   179.39
$53,483.24
Less fees          9,498.23
Correspondence Schools—Elementary:
Salaries     $12,140.64
Office supplies  2,459.36
Travelling expenses   119.47
Industrial Education:
Salaries   $14,240.00
Office supplies       1,917.84
Travelling expenses       4,394.42
Grants in aid     15,690.49
Night-schools        14,078.31
Inspection of Schools:
Salaries   $87,995.00
Office supplies       8,975.16
Travelling expenses      26,471.74
$123,441.90
Less amount paid by School Boards       8,799.61
Normal School—Vancouver:
Salaries (less deduction for rent, $468)   $37,120.06
Office supplies  1,458.59
Travelling expenses   440.01
Fuel, light, and water  2,089.85
Books, binding, periodicals  1,307.96
Allowance to Demonstration School  1,650.00
Furniture (by Public Works)   93.77
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)   1,705.47
Incidentals   1,365.34
$47,231.05
Less Normal School fees    24,931.00
$3,157.84
27,191.00
Text-book Branch :
Free text-books, maps, etc.  64,920.76
Correspondence Schools—High:
Salaries '  $34,779.80
Office supplies    13,975.41
Revision of courses -       2,925.38
Travelling expenses   9.80
Science equipment       1,612.85
Payment to Text-book Branch for special services         180.00
43,985.01
14,719.47
50,321.06
114,642.29
22,300.05 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. D 31
Normal School—Victoria:
Salaries (part by Public Works)   — $35,299.97
Office supplies  1,260.26
Travelling expenses  '_  347.67
Fuel, light, and water (by Public Works)   2,146.00
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)   3,094.98
Furniture (by Public Works)   64.64
Transportation of students to outlying practice-schools   267.90
Incidentals   310.87
$42,792.29
Less Normal School fees  —    10,207.75
$32,584.54
School for the Deaf and the Blind:
Salaries (less deductions for rent, etc., $3,817.96)   $35,351.61
Office supplies    356.04
Laundry and janitor supplies  1,207.50
Travelling expenses   260.70
Fuel, light, and water  2,670.24
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)   3,691.36
Furniture, fixtures, and equipment (part by Public Works)  1,561.74
Provisions   5,088.36
Incidentals     493.10
$50,680.65
Less amount received for board and tuition of pupils from
Alberta          1,700.00
48,980.65
High. Superior. Junior High. Elementary.
Salary grants to cities $335,257.31         $192,588.46      $526,988.49     1,054.834.26
Salary grants to district municipalities     113,547.93    $16,614.40       84,485.78       330,408.92        545,057.03
Salary grants to rural school
districts       93,576.60      68,916.84        37,906.36        600,991.52        801,391.32
Salary grants to community
school districts                   14,280.00 14,280.00
$542,381.84    $85,531.24    $314,980.60   $1,472,668.93
Special grant under section 13 (g) of the Act  1,684.00
Special salary grants:
Cities   —$131,165.15
District municipalities    50,149.97
Rural school districts      67,988.70
         249,303.82
School buildings, erection and maintenance, and special aid to school districts  200,357.99
Education of soldiers' dependent children and expenses    12,432.35
Bursaries for children over 16 years of age in Mothers' Allowances Families  707.50
School tests, High School and Senior Matriculation examinations  $30,415.63
Less fees for examinations and certificates    28,064.79
  2,350.84
Conveying children to central schools        121,272.71
School libraries   11,411.62
Summer schools and teacher-training for special certificates  $18,621.42
Less summer-school fees     17,423.88
  1,197.54 D 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
Official Trustee, Community School Districts:
Salary      $2,400.00
Expenses          825.86
$3,225.86
Less paid by districts       1,749.73
 • $1,476.13
Board of Reference  679.51
Adult Education:
Extension and adult education and education of the unemployed.. $31,819.47
Recreational and physical education for youths over school age _    40,708.83
  72,528.30
School radio broadcasts:
Salaries (less amount paid by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, $1,041.63)   .     $1,041.71
Expenses        4,396.47
—  5,438.18
Curriculum revision and educational supervision, etc.    11,095.72
Incidentals and contingencies   2,376.75
University of British Columbia        426,170.00
Special grant to Victoria College .  5,000.00
Total cost to Government    $3,963,848.24
Amount expended by districts, including debt charges:
High.                  Superior.           Junior High. Elementary.
Cities  $1,560,314.99           $773,816.93 $2,519,666.60    4,853,798.52
District municipalities _     345,588.17   $29,096.40        162,693.55 592,406.91     1,129,785.03
Rural school districts --      209,990.71      97,603.89        100,551.59 615,072.08     1,023,218.27
Community school districts                  82.50            J  11,631.93          11,714.43
$2,115,976.37 $126,700.29   $1,037,062.07   $3,738,777.52
Grand total cost of education $10,982,364.49 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
D 33
EXAMINATIONS, 1941.
University Entrance Examinations.
June.
August.
Subject.
Number of
Candidates.
Number
passed.
Number of
Candidates.
Number
passed.
English VI -   - -	
3,329
3,543
3,255
3,246
2,657
794
88
3,244
3
700
90
10
29
37
273
114
47
2,882
2,957
2,815
2,826
2,179
671
70
3,182
3
589
71
9
28
34
272
93
36
293
331
270
219
251
81
14
56
65
11
3
3
4
5
4
203
227
162
106
105
Latin III.                     -            —- -	
25
7
36
27
5
Greek I.    .                       	
2
Home Economics (A) III .   	
3
3
4
Industrial Arts (B) III-	
2
1
Senior Matriculation Examinations.
Subject.
Number of
Candidates.
Number
passed.
Number of
Candidates.
Number
passed.
English ...  	
Canadian History ..
World History	
Economic History-
Mathematics  	
Physical Sciences —
Chemistry I....	
Physics I 	
Biology I 	
Biology II	
Agriculture	
Latin IV 	
French IV	
German B 	
Greek II  *.	
Home Economics (CC) IV..
812
103
333
141
375
239
215
83
2
202
775
10
3
723
90
290
114
606
283
250
1S4
176
60
2
154
553
7
3
7
80
17
37
47
148
22
91
48
28
20
37
166
10
52
13
36
42
61
14
36
35
19
14
78
5 D 34
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
SCHOLARSHIPS.
University Entrance.
The Royal Institution Scholarships awarded in June, 1941, by the University of British
Columbia to the students who ranked first and second in their respective districts were won
by the following:—
District.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Province .
No. 1 -.
No. 2	
No. 3- -
No. 4 ...-.
No. 5	
No. 6	
No. 7	
Donald Charles McLeod 	
(1) Charles Dudley Maunsell..
(2) John Peter Hobson	
(1) May Swinton Johnston —
(2) Elizabeth Anderson	
(1) Mary Quan — 	
*(2) Louis Vincent Holroyd	
*        Geoffrey Vernon Parkinson..
(1) Alan William Boyd. —
(2) Gordon Barrow	
(1) Greta Ann Vesterbaek	
(2) Earle Douglas Harper 	
(1) Aldythe May Ireland —
(2) Frederick Curtis Withler	
(DA. Bert Auld 	
(2) Ruth Charmian Margeson	
Victoria     — 	
Victoria —  	
Oak Bay -	
Ladysmith     - 	
Powell River 	
King Edward, Vancouver..—	
St. Patrick's (Private), Vancouver-
King George, Vancouver 	
Magee, Vancouver	
Lord Byng, Vancouver.. — 	
Abbotsford	
MacLean, Maple Ridge -	
Armstrong    	
Kamloops   	
Nelson    	
Trail - -   —
95.6
93.8
93.0
92.2
89.2
93.6
91.0
91.0
90.8
89.6
88.2
84.6
91.4
90.6
91.4
91.2
Scholarship.
$175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
* These two students tied for second place in District 3.
Senior Matriculation.
The winners of the scholarships awarded in June, 1941, by the University of British
Columbia on the results of the Senior Matriculation examination to   (1)  the two students
obtaining the highest standing in the Province, (2) the student obtaining the highest standing in districts other than Greater Vancouver and New Westminster, were:—
Name.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Scholarship.
92.4
87.4
86.8
$175
John Oliver, Vancouver - - _ 	
175
175
The three additional scholarships established by the University of British Columbia for
the students obtaining the next highest standings in Districts Nos. 2, 5, 6, and 7 were awarded
to the following:—
District.
Name.
High School.
Per
C#nt.
Scholarship.
No. 2	
Bertram Gallagher.-	
Joan Dilworth      	
83.6
83.8
84.8
$175
175
No. 6	
No. 7-	
175
The conditions under which these scholarships are awarded are fully outlined in the
Calendar of the University of British Columbia.
BIBLE STUDY.
During the year the Department authorized optional courses in Bible Study to be taken
extra-murally by high school students. The course in Bible Study I. was drawn up by a
committee of clergymen representing several religious denominations. Copies were distributed to the high schools of the Province early in September, 1941.
It is expected that additional courses, to be known as Bible Study IL, III., and IV., will be
available in the near future. Five credits will be granted for these courses, one for each of
the courses in Bible Study I., IL, and III., and two for Bible Study IV. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. D 35
SPECIAL GRANT TO LIGHTEN SCHOOL TAXATION IN MUNICIPALITIES
AND RURAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
Under a special Act of the Legislature the sum of $250,000 was provided for the fiscal
year 1941-42 as a special grant to assist municipalities and rural school districts in meeting
the local cost of education. This amount was distributed in May, 1941, among the cities, district municipalities, and rural districts of the Province, on the basis of $58.50 per teacher
employed. Under the same Act the sum of $450,000 must hereafter be provided annually for
a similar purpose.
CADET INSTRUCTION IN SCHOOLS.
In 1940 the Council of Public Instruction made a regulation whereby cadet instruction
might become a regular part of the school curriculum and principals of schools and School
Boards in the larger centres were requested to encourage the establishment of corps in their
schools. It is satisfactory to report that much progress was made during the year. While
in 1938-39 there were only fifteen cadet corps with an enrolment of 912 in the Province, in the
year 1940-41 the number of corps increased to 103 with an enrolment of 14,200. At the date
of writing the number has increased to 118 with an enrolment of approximately 15,000
members. Pupils who are physically incapacitated are exempt from taking cadet corps
training. In many instances School Boards, with the assistance of grants from this Department, have constructed rifle ranges at the schools for the use of school cadets.
BURSARIES FOR CHILDREN 16 YEARS OF AGE IN MOTHERS'
ALLOWANCES FAMILIES.
When the age of 16 years is reached there is no longer an allowance for a child under the
" Mothers' Allowances Act" and consequently some children with good ability have been
forced to discontinue their high school education. During the year it was decided to provide
for a number of bursaries to assist the more deserving and the sum of $5,000 was included in
the Estimates of this Department for that purpose. Since the beginning of April, 1941,
applications for bursaries have been received from ninety-one children and approved. The
amount of the bursary is $7.50 a month.
CHANGES IN THE STAFF.
On June 30th, 1941, Mr. J. W. Gibson, M.A., B.Paed., Officer in Charge of the High
Correspondence School, retired on superannuation. Mr. Gibson, then a member of the Ottawa
Normal School staff, was appointed Supervisor of Agricultural Education in July, 1914, and
organized the first courses in Rural Science given in the Summer School. He held this
position until 1929, when he became Officer in Charge of High School Correspondence Courses.
This work he organized and conducted with marked success until July, 1940, when he was
granted leave of absence to go to Ottawa for the purpose of organizing correspondence courses
provided by the Canadian Legion War Services.
Dr. Edith E. Lucas, an instructor on the staff of the High Correspondence School, was
made Acting Officer in Charge when Mr. Gibson transferred to Ottawa. So skilfully and
successfully did she carry out her duties that on September 1st, 1941, she was given permanent
appointment as Officer in Charge.
Mr. George H. Deane, Municipal Inspector of Schools for Victoria, retired on superannuation on October 31st, 1941. In July, 1908, Mr. Deane, then principal of the Boys'
Central School, Victoria, was appointed Inspector of Schools. In 1913 he was promoted to the
position of Assistant to the Superintendent of Education and was made Director of Technical
Education. In 1917 he was granted leave of absence to organize and develop the work of
rehabilitation of returned soldiers. He served in that capacity until 1921 when he was
appointed Municipal Inspector of Schools for Victoria. Under his direction the schools of
that city attained a high degree of efficiency, including the establishment of a junior high
school. During the past year he has taken an active part in the formation of air cadet units
in Victoria and vicinity. Mr. Deane had a great capacity for hard work and possessed excellent organizing ability. His many duties were always performed with vigour, industry, and
efficiency. D 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
Mr. Harold L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed., Vice-Principal of the Victoria Normal School and
Director of the Summer School of Education, was appointed on September 1st, 1941, to. succeed Mr. Deane as Municipal Inspector of Schools for Victoria. Mr. Campbell's rich and wide
experience as teacher, Inspector of Schools, and Normal School instructor, his postgraduate
work at the University of Washington, and his progressive views on education are assurance
that he will discharge his new duties with the tact, efficiency, and good judgment that have
always marked his work.
To fill the vacancy caused by Mr. Campbell's appointment as Municipal Inspector of
Schools, Mr. K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., was transferred from the inspectorial staff to
the staff of the Provincial Normal School at Victoria on September 1st, 1941.
On the same date Mr. T. F. Robson, formerly principal of Revelstoke Elementary School,
was appointed Inspector of Schools, with headquarters at Prince George.
In January, 1941, Dr. H. M. Morrison, of the Vancouver Normal School staff, was granted
leave of absence to assume at Ottawa the duties of assistant director of correspondence
courses provided by the Canadian Legion War Services.
On August 1st, 1941, Mr. F. C. Boyes, M.A., of the staff of the Magee High School, Vancouver, was appointed to the staff of the Provincial Normal School, Vancouver, to succeed
Dr. Morrison.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. J. WILLIS,
Superintendent of Education. INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS. D 37
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
REPORT OF H. B. KING, Ph.D., CHIEF INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The past school-year has been much affected by the war, and some of what the schools
have done in this connection will be described in other reports. One of the most important
effects to which I wish to refer is that the war has drawn from our teaching ranks many of
our most able, most virile, and most devoted teachers. One may be pardoned for expressing
the profound hope that these teachers will return, broadened by their experience, and be an
inspiring example, showing to the pupils of a happier day that devotion to freedom, loyalty to
throne and native land come before all other things.
In the clash of arms with which the world resounds, in the midst of the struggle of our
people with the sinister forces with which we contend, the things discussed in this report seem
trivial. They give the effect of anticlimax.' But the world's work must go on, and with this
apology I venture to discuss some few matters bearing upon the school programme which have
come to my notice during the year.
EDUCATION IN CITIZENSHIP.
The war has caused people to realize the place of education as fundamental to the working
of democracy and as the agency for developing those attitudes and ideals which must permeate
nations if they are to live together in a normal human way. This interest in the social
functions of education led in November, 1940, to the assembly in Ottawa, at the call of the
Minister of Education of New Brunswick, of a group of representatives of educational officials
and others to consider the education for Citizenship in Canada. I attended this meeting as a
representative of this Department.
An outcome of the meeting was the formation of the Canadian Council for Education in
Citizenship, which has now a permanent secretary. It is expected that this Council will
develop teaching materials which may prove of value in the schools and that it will disseminate information as to the best procedures which may be followed in achieving the purposes
of the organization.
Fortunately our own Programme of Studies has anticipated most of the procedures suggested at the conference. The problem is not one of new curricular provision for the teaching
of democratic citizenship but the carrying-out of the philosophy of the curriculum as it has
been developed. Democratic citizenship is not learned by listening, but by living the democratic life. This, in the school, involves planning and discussion in which pupils share. It
means also the recognition of duties and the assumption of responsibility. Class-room
autocracy does not promote the democratic citizenship. In the British Columbia schools of
to-day, in both elementary and secondary schools, wherever the conceptions embodied in the
Programme of Studies are given due expression, a finer type of Canadian citizenship is
steadily developing. The influences counter-active to this tendency do not have their source
in the school.
HEALTH.
In spite of all the efforts which have been made to improve the health of school children,
the facts revealed by the present war are not comforting. Accurate statistics will not be
available for some time, and no doubt the standards of physical fitness now demanded for
war service are higher than those of 1914-18. Even though ultimately it may be shown that
there has been improvement in the health and physique of recruits in this war, there is still
such a large amount of physical deficiency as to arouse concern. Much of this deficiency is
due to causes which the school cannot control. The school, nevertheless, has its share of
responsibility. Spelling and algebra seem much more important than health teaching and
health programmes; matriculation marks more important than sound teeth. Moreover, it is
difficult to ensure that health instruction is carried into practice outside of the school, whereas
pupils can be given in the class-room all the training and practice which they need for the
practical use of other subjects.
In some subjects it is not even essential that the training of the school be applied in life.
For most pupils it is not necessary that they should remember how a quadratic equation
should be solved. The principles of health, however, should not only be put into practice here
and now but should be applied through life.    Physiological knowledge and toothbrush drill D 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
alone will not ensure this transfer. An interest in health, and an earnest desire to achieve
personal health and to promote community health, are the most important objectives of health
teaching.
It may be concluded from the above that health teaching is of little value unless it is
interesting, develops favourable health attitudes and leads to action. This is the school's
function, so far at least as the class-room is concerned. The provision for health services and
living conditions conducive to health are other problems for which other social agencies are
responsible.
This section of my report is written in the hope that the primacy of health, including
mental health, may be kept in mind as the outstanding objective of education.
CADETS.
The regulation of the Council of Publication requiring that cadet corps be established in
all high schools where it is feasible to organize them has met with gratifying response. In
almost all schools action was taken at once before formal notification was sent of the regulation.    Teachers hastened to qualify as instructors.    Public approval was all but universal.
The cadets have shown gratifying interest in their training and the standard of efficiency
is high in spite of the short time in which the corps have been active. The public's backing of
the cadet system has undoubtedly been an encouragement to the boys and their instructors.
Certain effects of the training are already apparent elsewhere than upon the parade
ground. The manners of the boys have improved and a slouchiness of bearing which
developed when cadet training was abolished is disappearing, or has disappeared. Parents
make pleased comment upon the improvement in their offspring. In schools where cadet corps
have not been formed, the compulsory squad and platoon drill is having similar effect. It is
obvious that physical drill alone does not give the improvement in manner and carriage which
are outcomes of good cadet training.   This should not be forgotten after the war has been won.
PROFESSIONAL TRAINING AND TEACHER GROWTH.
In this past year, as in previous years, the Normal Schools and the Provincial Summer
School have done excellent work in promoting the growth of teachers. Other teachers have
been improving themselves in scholarship and in professional knowledge through graduate
and undergraduate study at our own and other universities. There is thus, from year to
year, a steady raising of professional standards. This, however, is not peculiar to British
Columbia. The same movements which have been under way in this Province are common to
all of the Provinces, to say nothing of Newfoundland, the United Kingdom, and the other
British Dominions. The new Programmes of Study of all the Canadian Provinces bear a
striking resemblance to each other, not because of copying, but because the same educational
philosophy is understood and has been applied. The " enterprise " technique, in particular, is
becoming universal.
In the improvement of teaching the great majority of the principals have demonstrated
genuine professional leadership. In co-operation with the Inspectors, they and their teachers
have formed themselves into study groups and have worked upon projects and enterprises, and
have carried them to completion in skilful manner. There is, however, a negligible number
of schools which have not developed as others have done. This occurs where, though the staff
may have progressed, the principal has failed to overcome professional or cultural deficiencies
and is unable to give the guidance to which his teachers are entitled. Under this kind of
leadership such schools stand in embarrassing contrast with the progressive schools which
adjoin them.
It should be understood by teachers that the main function of Inspectors, as of other
supervisory officers, is to promote the growth of teachers by guiding and encouraging them.
Inspectors are former teachers who have proved their worth in the class-room and in school
administration. They are well qualified to give advice and direction. Requests for advice in
matters of teaching or administration, or in the handling of local difficulties, will be appreciated by them; these requests afford the opportunity of giving help which Inspectors wish to
give. Teachers will gain rather than suffer in prestige for seeking professional guidance.
Such seeking is an index of the possibility of growth. READING.
The new issue of the Elementary School Programme of Studies has added material
dealing with Reading. Teachers of all grades, principals particularly, should study this
material. In recent years there has been much discussion of Remedial Reading. Formidable
techniques have been developed in reading clinics, and an extensive literature dealing with
reading disabilities has poured from the presses. Teachers are becoming awed by these
techniques and the mass of books and articles. The impression has been given that only
highly trained specialists are competent to undertake the improvement of backward readers.
We have in the Province a number of teachers who have had special training with the
clinical apparatus used in the treatment of the more refractory cases. These specially trained
teachers are valuable members of a school system, but the ordinary class-room teacher can
make himself proficient in handling the problems of reading without taking courses in Chicago
or California. He need not drown himself in an ocean of special treatises. I advise teachers
who wish to improve themselves to select one single book on Reading from the bibliography
in the Programme of Studies and to stay with that book until it has been digested; to obtain
also the readers of one good modern series and the teacher's manual which goes with the
series, and then to study this series, the manual, and the prefaces in the readers. He should
also study what is said of Reading in the Programme of Studies. He might even dispense
with the book first named, the book dealing with the psychology of reading. Of course, one
who goes as far as I have suggested will certainly go farther, but if his teaching has not been
improved by the minimum programme which I have proposed, it is unlikely to be improved
by any further measures.
Two principles should be kept in mind in the teaching of Reading. The first is that a
great many, probably most, of the cases of defective reading arise from the attempt to teach
pupils in advance of their readiness for reading. The new issue of the Elementary School
bulletin presents a readiness programme.    It should be studied.
The other principle is that growth in Reading depends upon interest, and, what is not
quite the same thing, upon interests. Children readily learn to read when they wish to read.
Interest is more important than eye-movement. This would indicate that it is desirable that
pupils themselves choose the selections which they are to read, particularly after the Primary
grades.
ORGANIZATION OF SMALL HIGH SCHOOLS.
In small high schools it is inevitable that the number of options available to students is
small. These schools tend therefore to be more academic than larger schools. They are
unnecessarily academic. The few students who matriculate from them, and the still fewer
number who go to the university, are not entitled to dominate the school.
Below appears a list of courses given in a one-room high school of the Province. There
are twenty pupils in this school, enrolled in Grades IX., X., and XI. Next year, presumably,
there will be some Grade XII. students.
English III., IV., V.
Social Studies III., IV., V.
General Science III., IV., V.
Mathematics III., IV., V.
French I., IL, III.
Geography I., II.
Guidance III., IV., V.
Health III., IV., V.
Physical Education III., IV., V.
With the exception of Geography I. and II., all of these are courses leading to University
Entrance.    Geography I. and II. give ten of the fifteen free electives which are required.
How could the offerings of this school be made more practical?    How could individual needs
and differences be better provided for?
Geography, while a valuable subject and one which a larger high school might properly
offer to students interested in the subject, has evidently been chosen for no other reason than
that it carries ten credits. Junior Business and Introductory Book-keeping is a course which
carries five credits. The two courses in Practical Mathematics provided in the Programme
of Studies also carry ten credits (five for each).    A one-year course in Practical Mathematics D 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
may be formed by selecting five units with some relation to the occupations of the community.
One year of Junior Business and Introductory Book-keeping, one year of Geography, and one
year of Practical Mathematics would give the fifteen credits of free electives which are
necessary for University Entrance. Three such courses would have more social value than
two years of Geography taken purely for credit collecting purposes. Music and Art might
well find a place in the school. There is also a wide choice of courses obtainable through the
High School Correspondence School. Information concerning the High School Correspondence courses may be obtained from pages 637 to 646 of the new Senior High School Bulletin I.
GUIDANCE.
The new issue (1941) of Bulletin I. of the Programme of Studies for the Senior High
School, under the heading "Guidance" (p. 5), has these sentences: "The main work of
Guidance should be done by the home-room teacher. To exercise the function of Guidance a
teacher should know his pupils well and therefore should not meet so many classes that he
cannot know the characteristics of the individual pupil."
When a teacher teaches only English, or Social Studies, or any one subject only, it
necessarily follows that he meets so many pupils that he knows very little of them. He will
have difficulty in recording anything but examination marks upon the pupil's report card.
He will be unable to give effective guidance. In recognition of this fact secondary-school
principals show increasing tendency to have teachers teach the same class in a number of
related subjects, in such combinations as English and Social Studies; English and Latin;
English and French; Mathematics and Science; Science and Health; and also in three subject combinations. This policy makes it easier to bring out the interrelations of subjects, and
sometimes to save time by the fusion of subject content.
Some high schools are bringing about improved guidance and better curricular articulation by having all the teachers of a class act as a guidance committee with respect to that
class, under the chairmanship of the home-room teacher. The committees meet at regular
fixed dates, it being thereby assured that the meetings actually are held.
MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES.
The present World War will undoubtedly have effects upon the study of modern foreign
languages. One may conjecture as to these effects, but he can have no certainty concerning
them. It is not unlikely that the Nazi regime has doomed Germany to intellectual sterility
for a long time to come. Specialists in science and other fields will, no doubt, still study the
publications of pre-Hitler Germany which are important to them, but it seems doubtful if the
Germany of the future will for a long time to come have much to offer the world in art,
literature, philosophy, or science. The scholars who have escaped from Germany will
probably stay in the countries where they have found refuge and will write in English, as
Einstein has done. Will students care to study German in order to read the works of
Germans of former times?    One may doubt it.
Similar reflections might be made concerning the study of French. The same processes
of intellectual decay are at work in France. A post-war intellectual recovery is, however,
more possible in France than in Germany, but is not certain. French will, however, continue
to be important in Canada because of our three and a half million French-speaking fellow-
Canadians. We should examine the possibility of drawing upon the literary productions of
French Canada for the materials of study now that the world of Moliere is ceasing to have
any meaning or reality for us.
However, it is possible to predict that the study of Spanish, particularly the Spanish of
Latin America, will assume importance in our schools. The necessities of hemispheric defence
are already drawing the peoples of the United States and of Latin America closely together
not only in the military and economic spheres but also in the intellectual realm. To-day the
Canadian Government sends economic missions to the countries south of the Rio Grande.
The interest is reciprocal. Latin-American educators say that they would like to know more
of Canada and of Canadians. The time would appear to be ripe for considering seriously the
study in our schools of both Spanish and Portuguese—on this coast Spanish rather than
Portuguese. Young teachers of the modern languages, still interested in adding to their
linguistic armament, would be acting wisely if they were to apply themselves to one or both INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS. D 41
of the languages spoken in Central and South America.    They may be assured that they will
enjoy the study even though these forecasts prove in other respects to be in error.
LATIN.
It is sometimes asked if there is a place for Latin in the modern school. Apparently
there are principals who believe that Latin should be dropped from the secondary-school
programme, and so they offer no courses in this historic subject. Is this a wise or a justifiable
policy?
The question is not best put in the naive form in which it appears in the preceding paragraph. Rather we should ask if linguistic studies should have a place in the modern school.
If French can be justified as a subject for school or college study, Latin equally well can be
justified. One would have only a shallow knowledge of the French language without a sound
grounding in the Latin tongue from which it springs, and likewise one would have a shallow
knowledge of French literature if he had no knowledge of the Greek and Roman background
of French culture. The French themselves recognize the imperative need of this background.
Latin is also fundamental in the scholarly study of the other Romance languages. It is
necessary for a genuinely scholarly knowledge of the English language and literature. An
English " specialist" has little claim to the dignity of that title whose knowledge of Latin is
negligible. It follows that Latin is essential for students who seek more than a superficial
knowledge of the English language and literature and of the other modern languages which
are studied in the schools.
It is interesting to note that Latin still flourishes in schools where it is treated as a
genuinely humanistic study and taught with the methods and with the vitality which
characterize the more successful modern language teaching.
Teachers of Latin should note the implications of the regulations concerning the examining of Latin. Candidates are examined upon comparatively easy " sight" or " unseen " passages. Some of these are to be translated; upon others "comprehension" questions are
asked. Candidates are not asked to translate from prepared books of prose or verse. The
prescribed authors should then be used as material for the training of students in the art of
reading Latin. If a student has been trained to read Latin, he has achieved this objective
of his instruction even though he has not read all the prose prescribed in the Programme of
Studies. Moreover, a student who has acquired a ready facility in the reading of Latin
should have the opportunity of reading more than is prescribed. The ambitious student will
find much in the supplementary reading list to interest him and to further his growth in
Latin scholarship.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.
British Columbia may well be proud of the widespread teaching of the Industrial Arts
and of Home Economics throughout the Province, not only in the cities and district municipalities but even in unorganized territory. The Industrial Arts gives training in principles
and skills which are fundamental to many industries. Home Economics contributes to
increased efficiency in the vocation of home-making as well as in the industrial occupations
open to women.    Our Commercial training leads directly to the world of business.
The situation is not so happy with respect to Agricultural education. Though agriculture
in British Columbia is relatively less important than it is in some of the other Provinces, it
is not a negligible industry. Through General Science the school contributes to the understanding of scientific matters fundamental to intelligent farming. In addition to this general
training a few of our high schools give specific courses in Agriculture and in Farm Mechanics.
The Chilliwack High School is outstanding in this respect. These courses, however, are
educational in character rather than vocational, although Chilliwack gives an advanced course
with a distinct vocational bias. Yet it must be conceded that in its schools the Province has
not done as much for agriculture as it has done for other industries. A high school boy in
rural British Columbia is being better prepared for urban vocations than for adding to the
agricultural wealth of his Province.
In this matter we can learn something from New Brunswick. In Woodstock, New
Brunswick, an Agricultural school is maintained jointly by the City of Woodstock and the
County of Carleton, with some assistance from the Department of Education. This school is
not a college of Agriculture on the university level.    It takes pupils of the secondary-school D 42 v     PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
age, some of whom have not the qualifications regularly required for admission to Grade IX.
The students attend the school during the winter months, or for about six months of the year.
They study English, Social Studies, some Mathematics and Science, Farm Mechanics and the
principles of Agriculture. Girls study Home. Economics organized to bear directly upon
farm-life. The school also gives Commercial training during the full school-year. After
attendance in the Agricultural classes during the winter, the pupils spend the rest of the year
in the farms of the county, learning by direct experience the skills which are required upon
the farm, and working upon comprehensive projects which they have chosen by arrangement
between the farmer (usually the parent) and the school. They work under the supervision
of the agricultural teachers of the school, who exercise their teaching and supervisory
functions for the whole calendar year. As stated above, the purpose of this school is frankly
vocational, though the cultural side of life is not overlooked, and the dramatic performances
and the pageants put on by the school during the year and at the close of the winter session
have earned public commendation. The leading citizens of the City of Woodstock and of the
County of Carleton are emphatic in asserting that this Agricultural School, during the twenty-
five years of its operation, has raised the standing of farming and has increased markedly the
farm income and farm prosperity of the County. Over 500 former students follow the
vocation of farming in the County of Carleton, many of them as owners.
The school is not an expensive one and there are only a few specialized teachers. It does
not prepare for the universities. Students in New Brunswick who wish to become scientific
agriculturalists take matriculation courses in the academic high schools and then go away to
an agricultural college and become professors or Government employees. These specialists
without doubt advance the Science of Agriculture. The Woodstock-Carleton School, however,
achieves a more modest aim; it is raising the standard of living in Carleton County. Its
success is due largely to the organizing ability and the leadership of its principal, Mr. Maxwell, who has been head of the school for some twenty-five years.
There is room in British Columbia for several similar schools, not copies of the Woodstock
School, but schools established for a similar purpose, adapted to the conditions of farming or
horticulture in British Columbia.
INTEGRATION.
The word " integration " is used to-day so much that it is in peril of becoming a cliche,
and there is danger of it being overlooked that in its proper, or at least in its most important
meaning, the word refers to the integration of personality. But even though words suffer
this kind of decay through constant use, the idea represented by the word is as important as
it was when first given a name. Things which are related should be brought into conscious
relation, and should be used in significant applications. For several years the Inspector of
Technical Classes has been stressing the fact that the teaching of English, Mathematics,
Science, and Art would have more vitality if these subjects were linked with the practical
activities of the Industrial Arts, instead of being studied in the isolation of class-room or
laboratory. The Trail Junior-Senior High School has been notably successful in effecting this
kind of integration. In this school the teachers of the subjects which have been named plan
and correlate their work effectively. This demonstrates that such co-operation is practicable.
The results of the co-operation show also that it is desirable.
RURAL SCHOOL HOME ECONOMICS.
When young teachers begin to teach in their first rural school, they have a tendency to
accept things as they find them. One thing accepted as normal is the noonday luncheon.
Typically, the children at noon-time stand around the stove or sit on the ground outside of
the school and " wolf " their food. They may not trouble to wash their hands before or after
the meal, although they may have been taught to do so in the Health lesson.
The noon lunch-time provides an opportunity to teach the children table manners. The
facilities for doing this may already exist or may be contrived. Many schools have tables.
Others could obtain or make them, and a sufficient number of chairs, seats, or benches could
be gathered or made to seat those pupils who remain at school during the noon hour. Two
table-cloths, some cups, saucers, plates, knives, forks, spoons, could be donated by residents
of the district or by distant friends, or even bought. A vase for flowers could easily be
obtained.    Hot cocoa, or even soup, could be made or heated upon the stove.    The children could then sit down at a properly set table, and those whose home conditions are not good
could learn some of the refinements of social living. It will not escape notice that in this
way opportunities will arise for effective learning in the fields of Health and Science.
The Normal Schools have for years been giving training in Home Economics to young
women teachers.    Here is a way to apply this teaching.
THE BEAUTIFICATION OF SCHOOL-GROUNDS.
All school-grounds should be beautiful. Some of them are. In Vancouver the landscaping in recent years of a number of school-grounds has set a standard which will be hard
to reach by most school districts. Nevertheless, there are throughout the Province, both in
rural and urban communities, school-grounds pleasant to look upon because of the trees,
shrubs, flowers, and greensward which express the local pride of an earlier day.
As a rule, however, the little school of the countryside or rural hamlet presents no such
pleasing picture. It is bare of trees, shrubs, and flowers. Playground, fences, and approaches
are unkempt. Not infrequently this is the sight presented in a contrasting setting of natural
beauty.
The attractiveness of British Columbia would be enhanced if school buildings and
grounds were more in keeping with the surroundings which nature has provided. While the
help of the community is needed for the most thoroughgoing work of improvement, much can
be done jointly by teachers and pupils. Young trees, shrubs, flower-beds, and borders could
be planted and cared for thereafter. In most parts of British Columbia there are indigenous
trees and shrubs which are suitable for such use.
The teacher of a rural school who would have the energy and drive to transform the
surroundings of his school would have the admiration of his community and the appreciation
of the travelling public.
TABLES AND CHAIRS.
It has been found that an activity programme can be carried out in a class-room supplied
with tables and chairs more readily than in one with desks screwed to the floor, or even in
one in which the desks are put upon runners. A conservative improvement would be to have
several rows of the traditional kind of desk placed upon runners, and to have the remaining
working accommodation consist of tables and chairs. When desks are replaced by tables and
chairs, care should be taken to provide storage for pupils' books, either in drawers built into
the tables, or in a special cabinet of drawers. It is advantageous to have tables of varying
size, seating a variable number of pupils.
Whenever the Department of Education may have occasion to supply desks as a free
issue to Rural School Boards, either as an original issue to new schools or as an additional
supply to others, it is permissible for boards to substitute tables and chairs in places of desks,
provided that the cost to the Department is not increased thereby. Tables may be made
locally or may be purchased from manufacturers in the coast cities. It will be found that
saving is effected by the purchase of tables and chairs. The advice and approval of the
Inspector of Schools for the district should be obtained before action is taken.
Municipal School Boards, when a new class-room is being opened, will save money by
purchasing enough tables and chairs, or by making tables in their own shops, in sufficient
numbers to provide for the new class, and then distributing these tables and chairs, and
some of their existing supply of desks, in such a way that several class-rooms are equipped
partly with tables and chairs and partly with desks of the usual type. Rooms so furnished
cease to seem crowded. D 44
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF A. R. LORD, B.A., PRINCIPAL.
The fortieth session of the Vancouver Normal School opened on September 9th, 1940,
and closed on June 13th, 1941.    Attendance and results were as follows:-
Men.
Women.
Total.
32
4
153
12
185
16
36
2
4
26
165
4
10
139
201
6
Failed             - - - - —
14
165
"Distinction" standing was awarded to Phyllis Claire DeWolfe, Haney; Aileen Kelly
McKinnon, B.A., Vancouver; Dorothy Thelma Nelson, New Westminster; and Arthur John
Bingham, Vancouver. Medals for outstanding ability in Physical Education were presented
to Mary Margaret Mill, North Vancouver;   and Byron William Straight, Vancouver.
A request at Christmas from the Canadian Legion War Services resulted in the loss
from the staff of Dr. H. M. Morrison. Mr. Arthur Anstey came to our assistance and conducted the Social Studies department most ably for the balance of the session. Mr. F. C.
Boyes, M.A., of Magee High School, Vancouver, will take over this work from September
1st, 1941.
The Vancouver Normal School has never possessed its own demonstration or practice
schools but has depended on Vancouver and adjacent municipalities for these services. The
fact that assistance has been given efficiently and most willingly in no way removes the
desirability of this school possessing its own demonstration school. It is recorded with
gratification that the first step in this direction has been taken. Provision has been made
for a two-room " Provincial Model School, Vancouver," which will operate as two ungraded
class-rooms. Miss Zella Manning has been appointed as principal and Miss Margaret Mac-
donald as assistant. Miss Manning has done yeoman service for us during the past five
years; Miss Macdonald was a " Distinction " graduate of this school four years ago and
holds both B.A. and A.T.C.M. degrees. For the present we must depend on temporary
quarters for these classes.    Suitable accommodation is an urgent necessity.
Modern philosophies of education commonly unite in their acceptance of practical experience as a fundamental basis for development. Stripped of verbiage and psychological language the age-old maxim of learning to do by doing has, theoretically, gained rather than
lost in importance. The wide list of subjects included in the Normal School curriculum and
the brevity of the session have, sometimes, prevented the carrying-out of an admirable theory.
The practice in this school is, therefore, deserving of a few words.
The Normal School session is divided into two terms, each of which terminates in a four-
weeks' teaching practicum. During the first term students are initiated into the art of
dealing with children by practice in the adjoining fourteen-room Model School, which they
attend in small groups for a half day each week. At first-they are confined to the simpler
class-room tasks but within three or four weeks greater responsibility is placed upon them.
All of this is done under the supervision of the Model School teachers and without formal
criticisms or ratings.-
In the second term a different type of participation in pupil activities is followed.
Normal students, either singly or in pairs, are brought into contact with pupils who are in
need of adjustment and for three months the two work together several times a week. The
student, with the guidance of a Normal School instructor, makes a diagnostic study of the
pupil and follows this with remedial measures. A complete record is kept which, when completed, constitutes a case study. PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
D 45
A series of demonstration lessons given by teachers of the Model School is a further
feature of the second term. Each of these is preceded and followed by group discussions in
which students and demonstrating teacher participate.
A teaching practicum is of four full weeks. Students are sent in pairs, which means
that approximately 100 class-rooms, in perhaps twenty-five schools, must be used. Each
student receives assignments in the form of units which require about four weeks to complete
and which permit of considerable integration. Numerically stated our students spend about
300 hours in " Observation and Practice Teaching " with the emphasis being emphatically
laid on practice.
The value of the services of the Metropolitan Health Committee continues to be in
evidence. Reference was made a year ago to the appointment of Dr. Gundry as Director of
the Division of Mental Hygiene, and I now report, with regret, his departure from Vancouver
because of his enlistment. Fortunately a successor has been secured in the person of Dr.
Mary Luff, who brings to her task a wealth of experience gained in the schools of London,
England.
No report of this school would be complete without an expression of appreciation to the
Department of Education for its sympathetic consideration of our not infrequent requests,
to the principal and staff of the Model School for their generous and efficient assistance, and
to the School Boards, officials, and teachers.of Vancouver and New Westminster for kindly
co-operation.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VICTORIA.
REPORT OF V. L. DENTON, B.A., D.C.L., PRINCIPAL.
The session of 1940-41 opened on September 9th, 1940, and closed on June 25th, 1941.
During the year, seventy-eight students were in attendance. Of these, four who were from
other Provinces took Refresher Courses in order to qualify for British Columbia Certificates.
Diplomas were awarded to seventy-six students, of whom two received honour standing.
The following table presents a summary of enrolment:—
Women.
Men.
Total.
59
1
1
17
76
1
1
Total -	
61
17
78
Through the good offices of Major Critchley, we were fortunate in securing the services
of Sergeant Pocock as instructor in Basic Training and Strathcona Trust work with the male
students. Each one of these young men is now prepared to enter any regular army service
unit and continue his training in an acceptable manner. Although the Basic Training course
required an additional 160 hours of instruction spread over a period of several months the
men concerned co-operated to the fullest possible extent.
Miss Barbara Hinton, by arrangement, completed her course in Health and Physical
Education at Easter and left to attend sessions at Oregon State University. We extend to
her our congratulations upon securing the degree of Bachelor of Science from that institution. Contacts by staff members with other schools and with instructors in other centres of
learning are a valuable asset and the Province benefits through improved instruction and
wider view-point.
It has long been the policy of this school that a course in St. John Ambulance First Aid
be given each year. However, it has not always been possible to arrange for such instruction
at some convenient time during the school-year and at a moderate cost to the student-
teachers. We are glad to report that, under the direction of Miss Hinton and with the help
of Dr. Gayton, all teachers-in-training at this school now take the course provided, that this
year nearly every one secured a certificate, • and that the element of cost has at length been
solved. D 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
Toward the end of the term in May, arrangements were made to place each student in
a one- or two-room elementary school for the final four weeks of the school-year. Students
were distributed among eleven inspectorates. The results of this field-work are so promising
that it is hoped to continue the plan from year to year. Although this arrangement placed
an added burden on the Inspectors concerned, their cheerful co-operation has been a large
factor in the success attending this period of training. For this help the staff of this school
is most grateful.
It is a matter of regret to us that our enrolment has, for several years, failed to reach
the quota of 140 set for this school. In view of the scarcity of trained teachers for the
elementary schools of our Province, it would seem that the time is ripe for some form of
Provincial support for those senior matriculants who desire to come to Normal School but
are prevented through lack of money. A number of bursaries might be provided for deserving students whose homes are at such distance from either Normal School that board and
room must be arranged. Such bursaries could be of two types: (a) Remission of fees and
(6) loans of money to be repaid in instalments. At present, there are no scholarships available, in this Province, for those desiring to complete a course at Normal School. As the rate
of employment increases in our towns and cities the teacher-training 'institutions across
Canada are placed more and more in competition with the mercantile business world. If we
are to maintain a very necessary service, that of training young men and women to staff our
schools, then it becomes imperative that assistance of some kind be provided. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
D 47
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
REPORT OF HAROLD L. CAMPBELL, B.A., M.Ed., DIRECTOR.
A Provincial Summer School of Education for Teachers was held in Victoria and Vancouver from June 30th to August 1st, 1941.
A number of courses, not previously offered in the Summer School of Education, were
included in the programme, and others, which have been in operation for several years, were
discontinued for the time being.
The new courses were:—
No.      8.    Integrative Teaching in the Elementary School.
No. 115.    Integrative Education Workshop.
Personality Adjustment in the Teacher.
Modern Art for Middle and Upper Grades.
Practical Arts for Rural Schools.
Remedial Instruction in Reading.
Instrumental Ensemble (Band).
Techniques of the Modern Dance.
COURSES AND ENROLMENT.
Courses were conducted in both Victoria and Vancouver. The Vancouver departments of
the school were: Art, Commercial, and Industrial Arts Teacher-training. The courses,
Principles and Techniques of Elementary Education and Educational Psychology, which are
among those required for permanent certification, were offered in both Victoria and Vancouver.
No.
26.
No.
56.
No.
53.
No.
76.
No.
148b
No.
180.
Courses.
Instructors.
Enrolment.
24
35
11
23
193
709
Totals for 1941    ..
59
83
79
34
42
42
902
Totals for 1940
889
Totals for 1939.     	
989
The courses offered were grouped into divisions or fields.    The courses and enrolments
were as follows:—■
History and Philosophy of Education: Enrolments.
No. 1. Principles and Techniques of Elementary Education    140
No.  la. Principles  and  Techniques of  Elementary Education   (Vancouver)   ,_       42
No. 8. Integrative Teaching in the Elementary School     101
Psychology and Measurement :
No. 10. Educational Psychology        65
No. 10a. Educational Psychology  (Vancouver)         23
Individual Development and Guidance:
No. 24. Character Education        41
No. 25. Principles   of   Guidance   in   the   Personality   Adjustment   of
School Children      180
No. 26. Personality Adjustment in the Teacher       31
Organization and Administration:
No. 36. Organization and Administration of the Elementary School        8
Graphic and Practical Arts:
No. 56.
No. 53.
English:
No. 72.
No. 76.
Modern Art for the Middle and Upper Grades       53
Practical Arts for Rural Schools      43
Senior Matriculation English
21
Remedial Reading      140 D 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
Mathematics: Enrolments.
No. 80. Modern Methods in Arithmetic   26
Primary Education:
No. 90. Principles of Primary Education  .  63
No. 91. Primary Observation and Laboratory   54
No. 91a. Primary Observation and Laboratory (Visitors' Course)  46
No. 96. Language and Literature in the Primary Grades   93
Science :
No. 100. Elementary Science   10
Social Studies :
No. 115. Integrative Education Workshop   30
No. 113. Senior Matriculation History  20
Commercial Education:
No. 121. Stenography Practice  21
No. 124. Typewriting Practice   25
No. 126. Book-keeping Practice   23
No. 129. Correspondence and Filing   17
No. 133. Office Practice  12
Music Education :
No. 140r. School Music for Rural Schools   34
No. 140i. Music in the Intermediate Grades   82
No. 148b. Instrumental Ensemble (Band or Orchestra)  22
No. 154. Music Problems in the Schools   29
School Physical Education :
No. 162. Play and Playgrounds   30
No. 164. Anatomy and Physiology ,  36
No. 167. Elementary School Physical Education Laboratory   57
No. 168. High School Physical Education Laboratory   30
No. 171. Sports Education, Coaching and Refereeing (Men)  27
No. 173. Primary Rhythmics, Games and Folk-dancing   117
No. 175. Advanced Folk and Character Dancing   64
No. 180. Techniques of the Modern Dance  34
Art Education:
No. 181. Drawing and Painting I.  42
No. 182. Design and Colour I.   37
Home Economics Education:
No. 200. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  26
No. 201. Problems in Fitting, Pattern Study, and Clothing Construction   32
No. 202. Applied Art in Home Economics   19
Library Service:
No. 210. School Library Organization and Administration   27
No. 211. Functions of the School Library  17
Industrial Arts Education:
No. 223. Elementary Plane and Solid Geometrical Drawing  11
No. 224. Freehand Sketching applied to the Industrial Arts  24
No. 225. Draughting applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  10
No. 227. Elementary Woodwork   13
No. 228. Elementary Wood-turning          5
No. 234. Art Metalwork  12
No. 235. Elementary Sheet-metal Work  18
No. 236. Elementary Machine-shop Work   15
No. 241. Advanced Plane and Solid Geometrical Drawing         5
No. 242. Freehand Sketching applied to the Industrial Arts for High
Schools         6
No. 245. Advanced Woodwork (Bench-work)        3 Weaving, a part of Course 53, Practical Arts for Rural Schools.
Course 56, an integrated course in Modern Art for the Middle and Upper Grades. Research carried on in Course 115, Integrative Education Workshop.
The" ^^^fM&S'Stu^L^^st^^ "-* SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. D 49
Industrial Arts Education—Continued. Enrolments.
No. 246. Advanced Wood-turning  . .        1
No. 249. Advanced Sheet-metal Work        9
No. 250. Advanced Machine-shop Work        15
Permanent.
Total
33
59
209
600
95
105
4
4
13
24
110
Total of Student Courses in 1941    2,237
Total of Student Courses in 1940  2,242
Total of Student Courses in 1939  2,580
REGISTRATION.
An analysis   of the registration  reveals  the  following information  covering those in
attendance:—■
Teaching Experience:
Less than 1 year     55
From 1 to 3 years _:  372
From 4 to 6 years  102
From 7 to 9 years     54
From 10 to 12 years     64
More than 12 years  144
Not reported  111
Total   902
Class of Certificate: interim.
Academic      26
First-class   391
Second-class     10
Third-class 	
Special      11
Not reported  „
Total   902
University Degrees:
Bachelor of Arts  77
Master of Arts . -  4
Bachelor of Science  32
Bachelor of Music  2
Bachelor of Commerce	
Total  ,  H5
Class of School:
Teaching in rural schools   341
Teaching in district municipality schools   257
Teaching in city or town schools  244
Not reported     gO
Total   902
Attendance at Summer School.—The following numbers of teachers reported that they
had attended Summer School last in the years indicated:—
Previous to 1930  lg
In the period 1930 to 1932, inclusive       42
In the period 1933 to 1935, inclusive       HI
In the period 1936 to 1940, inclusive  633
Not reported  gg
Total  _..__  902 D 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1940-41.
Specialist Certification.—The following numbers of teachers indicated that they are seeking Specialist Certification in the following:—
Primary  113
Art      43
Commerce      37
Music      46
Library      19
Home Economics    26
Industrial Arts .     66
School Physical Education     70
Recreational Physical Education       2
A study of these tabulations and a comparison with those of past years provides the
following gratifying conclusions:—
The   number   of   teachers   in   service   with   Second - class   Certificates   is   rapidly
diminishing.
The proportion of University graduates to the total enrollment is increasing.
The enrolment is about evenly divided as  between teachers in rural  and urban
districts.
Teachers who have not attended Summer School for many years form a good proportion of the total enrolment.
A gratifying number of teachers are taking special training in Primary, Art, Commerce, Music, Library Service, Industrial Arts, Home Economics, and Physical
Education.
FACULTY.
A major problem in Summer School administration is the provision of an adequate staff
of instructors. Each summer in Canada so many thousands of teachers return to universities
and su