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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1943

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
FOR   THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31ST, 1941
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Baxfield, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1942.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game
Commission for the year ended December 31st, 1941.
R. L. MAITLAND,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1942. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., July 17th, 1942.
Honourable R. L. Maitland, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1941.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
i Your obedient servants,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
JAMES G.  CUNNINGHAM,
Members, Game Commission. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Reports—      - Page.
Game Commission     7
Game Wardens, "A" Division    9
Officer Commanding "B" Division  12
Officer Commanding " C " Division  27
Officer Commanding "D" Division  34
Game Wardens, "E" Division  37
Report upon some Diseases and Parasites of Game Birds and Game and Fur-
bearing Mammals of British Columbia  40
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-41, inclusive  47
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences and Deer (Game) Tags  48
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences  49
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Anglers' and Outfitters' Licences.- 50
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers' Licences  51
Revenue—Sale of Eur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalties on
Fur  52
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-41, inclusive  53
Comparative   Statement   showing   Pelts   of   Fur-bearing   Animals   on   which
Royalty has been collected, 1921-41, inclusive  54
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty was
collected during Year 1941 _•_  55
List of Confiscated Fur, 1941  56
List of Confiscated  Firearms,  1941,  and  Revenue from  Sale  of Confiscated
Fur and Firearms!  56
Bounties paid, 1941 .  57
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922-41, inclusive ,-  57
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-resident Hunters, 194L  58
Prosecutions, 1941  65
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1941  67
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1941 '.  68
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special  (Trapping)   Firearms Licences,
Season 1940-41.-..  82
Statements—Returns of Fur-farmers, 1941  82
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1941  83
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1941 .' 83
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1941, also showing Revenue from
Sale of Bird-bands  84
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1941  85
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1941-1  88  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
1941.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
There has been no change made in the system of administration of the Department.
Game patrols have been carried out in every portion of the Province, many of
which have required Game Wardens to be absent from their detachments for fairly
extended periods of time. "
Our policy has been continued of showing suitable moving-picture films of our game
resources and the conservation methods employed, and we have exhibited these films to
numerous game associations, schools, and various organizations. During the year
these films were run off before thirty-two organizations and approximately 5,000 people.
Gradually these films are being improved by taking and adding new coloured pictures
thereto. There is no doubt that through the showing of these educational films the
general public has become much better acquainted with game and the methods of
conservation thereof in British Columbia.
REGISTRATION OF TRAP-LINES.
There has been no change in this very beneficial system of control of trap-lines,
but a close study is being made of the whole system and, as a result, recommendations
for improvements in the regulations will no doubt be submitted in due time.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES.
For the purpose of improving the system covering the registration of guides, a
number of changes are necessary to the existing regulations but, owing to existing
war conditions, it is deemed advisable to refrain from putting into effect any new
regulations at this time. However, the whole system dealing with the operations of
guides in British Columbia is being closely watched and, no doubt, we will eventually
be in a position to ask for the approval of new control measures.
FUR-FARMING.
• The fur market was fairly good until the entry of the United States into the war
and we are afraid many fur-farmers will experience some difficulty in finding markets
for their fur from now on, as the only markets available to them are those in Eastern
Canada and the United States.
We-might, however, mention that very few fur-farmers went out of business
during the year. We have endeavoured to assist fur-farmers to the fullest possible
extent, as in past years. A statement covering the returns of licensed fur-farmers
operating in 1941 is to be found later on in this report.
BIRD-BANDING.
As in 1940, owing to the fact that expenditures, both Dominion and Provincial,
have had to be curtailed, no funds were available for bird-banding and consequently
no banding was carried on at the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve near Chilliwack.
It is to be regretted that we have had to stop bird-banding, as a great deal of
scientific information was being received each year through the banding and recording of migratory game birds.
BOUNTY ON PREDATORY ANIMALS.
Statements showing the bounties paid this year, as well as over a period of years,
are contained in this report. K 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Reports indicate a considerable decrease in cougar on Vancouver Island and in
the Province as a whole, as bounty was only paid on 196 animals during the year
compared to the peak year of 1931, when bounty was paid on 701 animals.
As during the year 1940, we have, for financial reasons, been unable to carry out
our former policy of supplying Game Associations with ammunition for use in the
destruction of noxious birds. We have, however, been able to supply all Game Wardens
with the necessary ammunition for use in vermin destruction. •
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
During the year an increased number of non-resident hunters and fishermen
visited the Province. Some 4,500 inquiries were received from non-residents during
the year.
The cordial and whole-hearted co-operation of the Department of Trade and
Industry in advertising the wonderful game-hunting and sport-fishing possibilities is
very greatly appreciated.
GAME PROPAGATION.
We have continued the programme of liberating pheasants in various sections of
the Province. Due, however, to the need of curtailing expenditures owing to existing
conditions there were less pheasants purchased and liberated than in 1940. A statement of liberations is to be found later on in this report.
No live beaver were trapped during the year but preparations are being made to
carry out this work next year, the object being to restock various sections of the
Province with beaver. Live animals will be trapped on, and distributed from, the
Bowron Lake Game Reserve near Barkerville.
Every possible step has been taken during the year to protect all established game
reserves in the Province. These reserves act as suitable feeders or distribution centres
for game of all kinds and greatly assist in repopulating the surrounding districts.
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS.
Generally, reports to hand clearly indicate that our stand of migratory game birds
is most satisfactory. The number of birds lawfully taken each year in British Columbia
is very small compared to the birds shot in more heavily populated areas to the south
of the Province.
REVENUE.
We are very pleased to report that revenue under the " Game Act " during the
year 1941 constituted a record. Previously 1940 was our record year, when the total
revenue was $257,071.53, which compared to 1941—$276,392.97—shows that there was
an increase in revenue of $19,321.44. The figures supplied do not include the amount
of fines collected for violation of the game laws during the year, which was $4,977.50.
GAME-FISH CULTURE.
In the statistical section of this report are to be found statements of our fairly
extensive game-fish restocking programme.
As in past years, many reports of improved fishing conditions, due entirely to our
propagation-work, have been received. The most striking instance is the improved
fishing in Shawnigan Lake, on Vancouver Island.
Investigations are proceeding in respect to finding more suitable and less expensive
diets for trout raised in our hatcheries. The Department of Zoology, University of
British Columbia, is carrying on this important work and their findings will undoubtedly be most helpful and valuable. During the year the Dominion Fisheries
Department has again supplied us with fairly large quantities of condemned salmon,
which is being used as trout food at a number of our hatcheries.
We have continued our programme of destroying coarse or undesirable fish,
but owing to the need of curtailment of expenditures we have not been able to enlarge
on this work. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941. K 9
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The British Columbia Police has furnished us with very valuable assistance during
the year and the continued friendly relations between the British Columbia Police, the
Forest Branch, the Department of Agriculture, as well as many other Government
Departments, has been most gratifying.
We wish, in conclusion, to express our most sincere appreciation to the Commissioner of the British Columbia Police, his officers and men; the Honourable the Minister
of Fisheries for the Dominion; the Chief Supervisor of Dominion Fisheries for the
Province; Dr. W. A. Clemens, Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan, and Dr. D. C. B. Duff, of the
University of British Columbia; the Chief Federal Migratory Bird Officer for British
Columbia; Game Associations, farmers, and many other organizations and residents
of the Province who have so willingly helped us at all times during the year in our work
of conserving for the benefit of the people of British Columbia our very valuable game
and sport-fish resources.
"A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF
THE MAINLAND COAST).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in "A" Game
Division for the year ended December 31st, 1941.  ■
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear are not plentiful but would appear to be on the increase and in
some portions of the Division have been the cause of complaints as to their doing
damage to private property and domestic stock.
No grizzly bear are to be found on Vancouver Island, but on the mainland coast,
at the heads of various inlets, especially Knight Inlet, they are to be observed in fair
numbers.
Deer.—In the mainland sections of the Division deer are not very numerous, but
in most portions of Vancouver Island they are plentiful. Owing to mild winter conditions which have prevailed during the past few years, and more especially owing to
the scarcity of predators, the deer have in some areas been dying from dysentery.
The number of animals affected has not been very large and latest reports indicate that
this disease has abated, as no new cases of dead deer being found have been reported.
Mountain-goat.—Investigations have been carried out from time to time of the
presence of mountain-goat in the vicinity of Cowichan Lake, where they were liberated
some sixteen years ago. Reports indicate that these animals are to be observed on some
of the higher ridges near Shaw Creek and that they have slightly increased.
Wapiti (Elk).—As anticipated, wapiti are coming back into the Shaw Creek Game
Reserve, Cowichan Lake, which area was logged a few years ago. They have been
observed very close to logging operations that are still being carried on and apparently
pay little attention to the loggers and logging machinery working in the district. A very
noticeable increase in calves has been observed during the year, which is most
encouraging.
Wapiti have slightly increased in the Oyster River, Elk and Salmon Valley sections,
but in the vicinity of Nanaimo Lakes and the Nimpkish River this has not been the case.
Fur-bearing Animals.
The principal fur-bearing animal, the beaver, is increasing in nearly every section.
Complaints of their doing damage have again been renewed this year. The policy of
permitting the trapping of beaver doing damage and limiting the take of these animals
on registered trap-lines, instead of declaring an open trapping season, has been very
beneficial.
Muskrats have been heavily trapped in some portions of the Division, but notwithstanding this fact they can be safely judged as being on the increase.
Mink and racoon are fairly plentiful, while marten, otter, weasel, and wolverine
are to be classed as not numerous. K 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—Reports indicate that generally throughout the Divisicii blue
grouse are in good numbers, and that especially in the Courtenay-Campbell River areas
these birds provided excellent shooting during the past open season. So long as hunting seasons are carefully regulated and enforced there would seem to be no reason to
be concerned in any reduction, but the continued control of predators is a most
important factor. The opening-up of new and larger hunting areas through logging
operations and the construction of new roads must necessarily have some bearing on
the length of any open hunting season.
Grouse (Ruffed).—Throughout the southern end of Vancouver Island reports are
to the effect that these birds are slightly increasing, but caution should be exercised in
regulating hunting seasons so that there is every assurance of no over or heavy shooting
taking place.
As in the case of blue grouse, ruffed grouse were very plentiful in the Courtenay-
Campbell River districts.
Pheasants.—In the Victoria and Cowichan sections these wonderful sporting birds
were very plentiful and many bag-limits were obtained during the first few days of
the open season. From the Courtenay district come reports of these birds being on
the increase, which is most encouraging, as for years attempts have been made to
populate this area with pheasants without any appreciable results. A great deal of the
country is most suitable for the propagation of pheasants and it is surprising, in the
light of other liberations, that these birds have not done so well in this district..
From Alberni comes the report that pheasants were not overabundant except in a
few localities.    Nanaimo hunters had a fair hunting season on pheasants.
In some portions of Vancouver Island complaints have been received and investigated in reference to damage by pheasants.
Partridge.—Surveys indicate that Hungarian partridge are not to be found in any
large numbers anywhere in the Division and a continued close season is apparently
necessary. The introduction of fresh stock in areas where these birds have become
established is most necessary.
Quail.—California quail on southern Vancouver Island have been very plentiful,
while from the Victoria district comes the report of mountain quail increasing in
numbers.    California quail in the Nanaimo area are not very plentiful.
Ptarmigan.—Throughout the high mountain areas these birds are fairly plentiful.
Owing to the inaccessibility of the area where ptarmigan are to be found, they are not
observed to any great extent.
Migratory Game Birds.
Owing to climatic conditions encountered during the hunting season, Game Wardens
report there was only fair shooting, while some of these officers advise that the open
season was too late in the year and that large numbers of ducks had migrated south
by the time the season opened. However, from these reports there has been no noticeable increase in ducks except in the case of certain species.
Wilson or Jack snipe were fairly numerous. Swans were observed in increased
numbers, especially in the Courtenay-Campbell River sections. Band-tailed pigeons
were in large numbers in some sections of the Division, especially in the southern
portion of Vancouver Island.
Geese were observed throughout the Division but were more noticeable on the
west coast of Vancouver Island. Black brant were very numerous and during the
month of February some good shooting was enjoyed at Qualicum Beach and Sidney Spit.
Vermin.
All reports indicate that cougar have reached a low point in their cycle as far less
bounties were paid this year compared to previous years. Wolves are not increasing,
but continued hunting is necessary in order to keep these animals down.
Game Wardens report the destruction of many wild dogs, cats, and noxious birds
throughout the year, and particulars in this connection can be obtained from a statement of vermin destruction later on in this report. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941. K 11
Game-protection.
In every section constant patrol-work has been carried on and every effort has
been made to stop illegal hunting and fishing. Pit-lamping in some districts is still
being carried on to some extent, in spite of continued steps to stamp out this practice.
The opening-up of logging roads extending hundreds of miles into areas where hunting
has not been carried on to any great extent before has seriously increased the work of
most every Game Warden in the Division.
Game Propagation.
As in past years, pheasants have been liberated in many sections of Vancouver
Island. Five hundred of these birds were liberated in the logged-off country between
Coal and Muir Creeks, in the Sooke area, as an experiment, and these birds are being
watched very closely and it is hoped the experiment will be very successful. If pheasants can survive and increase in logged-off areas then this will be one way of providing
pheasant-shooting away from agricultural lands.
Game Reserves.
In Strathcona Park Reserve there has been a noticeable increase in grouse and
ptarmigan, while deer have been more numerous, although these animals only use this
reserve as a summer range.
There has been considerable logging in the Shaw Creek Reserve, Cowichan Lake,
and as a result game conditions in this reserve have been carefully watched, and from
observations game has not suffered from these logging operations but, on the contrary,
both game animals and birds have increased in this prohibited hunting area. Elk and
deer have been observed in greater numbers.
Like the Shaw Creek Reserve, the Bald Mountain Reserve acts as a splendid feeder
for the surrounding country for both deer and grouse.
Fur Trade.
There has been little change in the catch of fur-bearing animals over previous
years. The majority of fur trapped eventually finds its way to the fur market in
Vancouver.
FUR-PARMING.
The well-established mink-farmers appear to be carrying on successfully. There
has been no great increase in the number of fur-farms in the Division.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Better conditions have enabled trappers to keep their registered trap-lines in good
standing and there has been less transfer of trap-lines this year. The system of
registration is working out in a most satisfactory manner. Permits have been issued
to trap surplus beaver on a number of registered trap-lines and this system of control
has been very well received by these trappers.
Registration of Guides.
Due to the fact that most of "A" Division cannot be classed as good for big-game
hunting, there are only a few guides operating.
Special Patrols.
Many extended patrols were made in every game district during the year, but no
patrol could be classed as being of a special nature. Routine patrols are always being
carried out into remote sections of each game district.
Hunting Accidents.
Only one hunting accident took place during the year and this occurred in the
Courtenay district and, while at first it was assumed the wounded hunter was seriously
injured, he subsequently recovered. K 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game-fish Culture.
Good results have been obtained from planting trout in overfished and barren lakes.
A statement on trout plantings showing liberations made on Vancouver Island is
to be found later on in this report.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Generally speaking the past hunting season has been very good. Good bags of
deer and blue grouse were taken.
All Game Wardens express their sincere appreciation of the assistance furnished
them by members of the British Columbia Police Force, Game Associations, farmers
and sportsmen in general.
"B" DIVISION   (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By A. F. Sinclair, Officer Commanding.
I herewith beg to submit annual report of game conditions in " B " Division for
the year ended 1941, as well as the report of Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson on
game or sport-fish conditions.
Big Game.
Moose.—In good numbers east of the Kootenay and Columbia Rivers from the
International Boundary to the Canoe River, also on the west side of the said rivers but
not in such large numbers. They are steadily increasing. These animals have been
reported from the vicinity of Creston, the Duncan River, and from Malakwa, 15 miles
east of Sicamous, and are continually increasing in both number and range.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti range from the International Boundary to Bush River, on
the east side of the Kootenay and Columbia Rivers; also south from the Spillimacheen
to below Skookumchuck River, with a few in the Gold Creek area. They are also
reported on the Duncan River. A small band of these animals is located in the vicinity
of Naramata, east of Okanagan Lake;   also a band in the Princeton district.
The killing of wapiti was not so heavy during the past season, owing to the very
mild weather. Wapiti are much more numerous than moose in the East Kootenay and
are increasing.
Mountain-sheep.—One variety only in " B " Division, Rocky Mountain or bighorn.
They inhabit the Rocky Mountains south from Golden to the Crowsnest Pass Railway,
where they are very plentiful.
There are two small bands in the vicinity of Keremeos and Okanagan Falls.
Although these are protected, they do not appear to increase. For the past number of
years the sheep have come down to the highway out of Kootenay Park, near Radium
Hot Springs,, about the end of October or early in November, when they rut. This
band used to number about one hundred.
This fall there was a very heavy rut with a lot of old rams. The weather was
very wet and towards the end of the rut the sheep developed hemorrhagic septicemia,
which appears to have killed off a number of sheep at Radium but does not appear to
have affected other bands. Dr. F. A. Humphreys, bacteriologist, of Kamloops, B.C.,
says, " The micro-organism that causes hemorrhagic septicaemia appears to be a normal
inhabitant of the upper air-passages of many animals. For some unknown reason,
usually inclement weather, the micro-organism suddenly becomes virulent and produces
various forms of disease. The pectoral or pneumonic form, which is evidently occurring
in this instance, is relatively common."
Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan, of the University of British Columbia, agrees with
Dr. Humphreys that hemorrhagic septicemia was present amongst this band of sheep,
but that not all of the sheep died from this disease. He explains that ashes from
burned-over country can cause inflammation of the lungs, also unfavourable weather
or infestation by lung-worm can provide suitable conditions for the pasteurella organism to gain control.
Caribou.—These animals appear to be holding their own. They are found in this
Division in the Big Bend and Revelstoke areas and south along the height of land from REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1941. K 13
Glacier to Creston, on the east side of Kootenay Lake. One small band was reported
in the area south-east of Nelson. There does not appear to have been many killed
during the past season.
Mountain-goat.—Well distributed throughout the Division; very plentiful in the
East Kootenay and fair numbers in the West Kootenay, Boundary, and Similkameen.
This is the trophy that most non-resident hunters are sure to get in the East Kootenay.
Mule-deer.—In fair numbers throughout the Division, with a great number available in the Kettle River watershed. Appear to be holding their own and in some areas
are increasing.
White-tail Deer.—Well distributed throughout the Division with the exception of
the Similkameen. They are holding their own. Winters for the past three years have
been very favourable for the propagation of these animals.
' Bear (Black, Brown, and Grizzly).—Black and brown bears are plentiful throughout the Division. In fact, they have been a great nuisance during the past summer in
orchards and about camps. Grizzly bears are very plentiful throughout the unsettled
parts of the Division.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Lynx, marten, mink, beaver, weasel, squirrel, and muskrats are the most common
fur-bearers; while wolverine, otter, skunks, badger, and foxes are comparatively
scarce.    Fisher are very scarce.
It is necessary to regulate the trapping of beaver by permit and tag or at least in
some manner whereby the Game Commission would have control of the number of
these animals which might be trapped.    This should not be delayed too long.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue Grouse.—These birds are very plentiful throughout the Division. They look
after themselves very well, as they go to high altitudes before or shortly after the
season opens.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—Reports indicate that the increase reported last year
continues, especially where hunting is not too heavy.
Franklin Grouse.—These are fairly plentiful throughout the higher parts of the
Kootenays, where they are not hunted too much.
Sharp-tail Grouse.—A few flocks of these birds in the Kootenays, Boundary, and
Lower Similkameen districts.    They do not seem to increase.
Ptarmigan.—A few in the high mountains.
Pheasants.—These birds do well in the Similkameen, Boundary, and Creston areas
where conditions are favourable, especially during the last two winters. Pheasants
did very well at Wasa, in the East Kootenay, and have furnished good shooting the
past two seasons. There are a few birds at Waldo, Invermere, Kaslo, Procter, Nakusp,
and at Robson.
Reports and personal observations point to the fact that the pheasants at Creston
were the largest and most plentiful, acre for acre, than at any other point in the
Division.
Partridge.—There are some in the Lower Okanagan, Grand Forks, and Creston
districts, but do not seem to increase. It is claimed that these birds migrate, which
is borne out by the fact that a dozen appeared early in October at Captain Jeffreys, on
Lavington Creek, west of Canal Flats, and are wintering there.
California Quail.—Quail are very plentiful about Penticton and south towards
Oliver.    There are some at Grand Forks.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—Some increase. There was a fair hatch of local ducks. Damage by ducks
has been reported to the Creston pea-fields.
Geese.—Some increase. Geese appear to have left Upper Columbia for Creston
grain-fields in the latter part of August.
Wilson Snipe.—There are some about the marshes.
Coots.—Appear to be more plentiful. K 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Stvans.—Swans are steadily increasing. There appears to be a good increase each
year as there are lots of young birds.
Vermin.
The following vermin were destroyed by game wardens: 81 coyotes, 22 dogs,
9 ravens, 12 kingfishers, 96 hawks, 591 crows, 113 cats, 45 owls, 4 black bear, 4 mergansers, 11 eagles, 6 cougar, and 229 magpies.
' This is exclusive of the bounties paid on cougars and coyotes, as well as coyotes
shot by hunters and taken by trappers.
Coyotes appear to be like the poor, always with us. The amount of game these
little wolves destroy is considerable, and besides killing deer and sheep they catch an
enormous number of rabbits, thereby keeping down the lynx. A report comes from
Canal Flats of two coyotes killing and eating a large lynx caught in a trap on Findlay
Creek.
Cougar appear to be a problem that will take years to solve, as they continually
come into the Province from Dominion parks where they are not hunted. The hunting
of cougar throughout the Division is very hard work owing to the rough country.
The Government Agent at Windermere paid bounty on fifteen cougar during the year.
Game-protection.
There were forty-nine convictions and nine dismissals under the " Game Act " and
nine convictions under the Special Fishery Regulations.
Game Propagation.
Pheasants were put down for restocking purposes in the Similkameen, Okanagan,
Grand Forks, Creston, and Cranbrook areas. Also, small numbers were released at
Robson, Edgewood, Fraser's Landing, and Kaslo. Very little feeding was necessary
during the winter of 1940-41, as conditions were favourable with little snow or cold
weather.
Game Reserves.
The Elk River Game Reserve, situated on the White River, Bull and Elk Rivers, is
the most important game reserve, as it is situated in the heart of the big-game country.
Game-bird sanctuaries adjacent to Nelson and at Vasseaux Lake, south of Penticton, appear to be very beneficial. .  .
Deer sanctuaries exist at Elko and in the Kettle River district. They are on
winter yarding-grounds of mule-deer and serve to protect the deer if we get a heavy
fall of snow before the hunting season has closed.
Fur Trade.
Resident fur-traders are not plentiful in the Division. Most of the fur goes to
Vancouver.
Fur-farming.
There is considerable fur-farming in the Division, chiefly mink. Silver fox appear
to have pretty well faded out of the picture. They are still farmed but the returns are
not good. Marten appear to be well established. H. Yerbury, of Camp Lister, and
R. C. Brewer, of Kaslo, are the most prominent marten farmers. Mr. Brewer raised
eighteen marten kits in 1941.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This method of protecting our fur-bearers and trappers still seems to work to the
advantage of both.    There  is  always  considerable  work necessary  to  keep   up  the
records, but it is time well spent.    .
Registration of Guides.
There were forty-eight licensed guides in the Division during the year. Forty-
four of these were in the East Kootenay.    Business was good compared with last year. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1941. K 15
It appears necessary to bring in new regulations in respect to guides and the
issuance of guides' licences.
Special Patrols.
Routine patrols were carried out as usual during the year. Game Wardens were
kept very busy as we are short-handed in this Division.
Hunting Accidents.
Five hunting accidents occurred during the year in this Division, as follows:—
On September 28th, near Luxor, David Hynes, of Luxor, was shot by John Price
while hunting coyotes. Price was travelling behind Hynes when his gun discharged.
Fatal.    Price was prosecuted by the Provincial Police.    The case was dismissed.
On September 17th, Steve Kohalyk, of Seebe, Alta., while out with a big-game
hunting party on Cross River, fell while carrying a .22 rifle which discharged. Kohalyk
was not severely hurt.
On October 21st, Arnold Andrist, Penticton, was shot about the legs and hips by
James Burnett, of Penticton, when the latter's shotgun accidentally discharged. Not
serious.
On September 27th, Fred Poland (aged 15), of Golden, went hunting without
being accompanied by an adult. Pulled shotgun from boat by muzzle, shot in upper
arm.    Is still under doctor's care.
On December 13th, Ignac Wittner, Naramata Road, Penticton, shot by his hunting
partner, Gerald Potter, of Oliver.    Shot through shoulder.    Eighteen days in hospital.
Game-fish Culture.
Although the detailed operations and statistics of liberations are found in the
Game Commission's report and while Fishery Supervisor Robinson's report also
embraces various phases under his immediate direction, there are some points of
interest that can be profitably mentioned herein.
The experts tell us that kokanee have a life-span of four years; that is, they spawn
at four years and then die. Therefore, the following should be of interest. In 1938,
1939, and 1940, kokanee eyed eggs were planted in a creek leading into Premier Lake,
in the East Kootenay. This lake had no kokanee previously. However, a good number
of 12-inch fish returned to the creek in the fall of 1940 and spawned as two-year-olds.
Tn the fall of 1941 there was a big run of 15- and 16-inch fish that weighed from
1% to I1/-; lb. Mixed with these were some 12-inch fish which could have been two-
year-olds.
Following up last year's report of the loss of fry at the Kaslo pond by lightning:
I wish to point out that during the month of June, 1941, 10,365 hand-counted fingerlings
were released from this pond as yearlings into Kootenay Lake at Kaslo. These ran
from 2V2 to 8 inches; 8,640 of these fingerlings were marked by removal of the adipose
fin.    Within three weeks some of these fish were taken over 20 miles away.
This year, 400,000 eyed eggs from Gerrard were hatched at Kaslo; 300,000 were
held in the Kaslo pond. Approximately 30,000 fry remain in this pond and approximately 122,000 have been liberated. There were 100,000 held in K. K. Bjerkness' pond,
south of Mirror Lake, and in October 35,500 fine fingerlings were taken from this pond
and liberated.
It may be of interest to note that the fingerlings held at Kaslo and Bjerkness
ponds never at any time received any beef-liver. Instead, they were fed kokanee,
which were brought from Meadow Creek in September, 1940, and held at Kaslo in cold
storage. This is something to be proud of, as these fingerlings ate as much as 65 lb. of
kokanee per day. Beef-liver costs from 18 to 22 cents per pound, while the kokanee
cost about one-half cent per pound in 1940. We are holding between 4 and 5 tons of
kokanee in the plant at Kaslo. The cost ran about three-quarters cent per pound in
1941, as the fish were slimed, which is hand-work.
Twelve million kokanee eggs were taken in the season of 1941, mostly from
Meadow Creek above Lardeau.    We had considerable trouble with water owing to a K 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
very wet fall. Ten million of these eggs were delivered to the Game Department of
the State of Washington. Some extra help was required for this large operation. All
assistants were hired locally.
Summary and General Remarks.
The season 1941 was very wet and, except for a short period in July and August,
we had very few forest fires.
Fur prices have not gone as high as was expected, which, while it was hard on the
fur-farmers, has tended to save our wild-fur stand.
As usual, game-fish culture took up much of the Game Wardens' time, and with
the limited equipment at their disposal the work done was something to wonder at.
I again wish to express the thanks of the entire divisional personnel to the Provincial Forestry Service, the Public Works Department, and the Provincial Police,
both for direct assistance and the use of equipment during the year.
The help we have received from individual sportsmen and the Rod and Gun Clubs
has also been much appreciated.
The report of Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson is given hereunder:—
" Okanagan and Similkameen Districts.
" Okanagan Lake (South End).—Produced fairly good catches of Kamloops trout
by trolling, subject to weather conditions. Also there was a noticeable improvement
in the number of trout taken by fly- and bait-fishing around the shore-line of the lake.
" The raising and liberation of trout fingerlings from the newly constructed
Summerland rearing-pond, as undertaken by the local interested sportsmen, should play
an important part towards increasing the trout population in waters of the south end
of Okanagan Lake, provided food conditions will induce them to remain in that area.
" Skaha (Dog) Lake.—In comparison to the season 1940, apparently the fishing for
Kamloops trout was not so good, possibly unsettled weather may have contributed to
the cause. However, considering the importance and accessibility, this lake should be
producing more trout than at present and it is hoped that a larger percentage of fingerlings can be liberated therein -in due course.
" Vasseaux Lake.—Angling was mostly conducted for the large-mouth black bass,
which remain quite plentiful.
" Madden Lake.—Oliver. Due probably to the presence of large numbers of
minnows (shiners) the planting of Kamloops trout-fry has not proved successful from
investigation conducted. The liberation of fingerlings, if available in future, would
probably solve the problem. ■
" Osoyoos Lake.—The Canadian portion of the lake produced fairly good catches of
Kamloops trout, mostly caught by trolling, more particularly during the spring and
fall, thereby offering some inducement for the continuance of trout liberations as
carried out during the season.
" MacLean, Clark, and Allendale Lakes.—Situated at fairly high elevation northeast of Okanagan Falls, wherein Kamloops trout-fry were first introduced in 1938.
Allendale Lake provided excellent fly- and bait-fishing, yielding limit catches of trout
varying in weight to 3 lb., also average catches of smaller trout were taken from
MacLean Lake. So far Clark Lake has not been properly tested out. A preliminary
survey was carried out over the lakes to ascertain general conditions and the future
policy of replenishment.
" Chute Lake.—The completion of investigation indicated that probably the lake
had been overstocked, resulting in the depletion of the food-supply and poor conditioned
fish. With the view of regulating the supply, plantings of Kamloops trout-fry were
deferred in 1940-41, resulting in a marked improvement in growth and condition of
the trout.    Future plantings will be based on the information obtained.
" Lush and Twin Lakes.—Small, landlocked lakes wherein Eastern brook-trout were
introduced in 1940-41. It is rather too early to comment upon the results. The back
channel of Okanagan River, near Oliver, is producing fairly good catches of the species
mentioned, first introduced in 1939. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941. K 17
" Fish Lake.—At Summerland. Provided excellent fly- and bait-fishing for Eastern
brook and some rainbow trout. To counteract water-storage conditions for irrigation
purposes, the planting of speckled trout (Eastern brook-trout) has proved satisfactory
from a conservation standpoint.
" Dranzie, Catnip, Summit (vicinity of Naram,ata), Eneas, Island, Deer, Agar
(Loon), Garnett, and several other small lakes produced the average catches of Kamloops trout from fry liberations and some natural reproduction.
" Shannon Lake.—Situated south-west of Kelowna. Apparently the results of
planting Kamloops trout-fry and fingerlings in this somewhat small landlocked lake is
not all that could be desired and, in view of existing water conditions, it has been
suggested that Eastern brook-trout be introduced, which is receiving consideration.
" Clearwater Lake.—Elevation about 6,000 feet. Produced good catches of rainbow trout from fingerlings liberated and some natural reproduction. The responsibility
and protection of the parent spawning trout as undertaken by the local sportsmen was
carried out in a very creditable manner.
"Cathedral Lakes.—From a scenic and recreation standpoint the series of small
lakes located at high elevations in the Ashnola watershed provided good fly-fishing for
the Kamloops and cut-throat trout introduced.
" Similkameen River.—Accessible to the auto highway for some 50 miles. The
abatement of extreme pollutions from mining industries has resulted in improved
fishing for rainbow trout the past two seasons. Hence, the planting of fry during
the season.
" Chain, Link, and Osprey Lakes.—From yearly fry liberations these lakes produced fair catches of rainbow trout. The productivity of the lakes and presence of
coarse fish is being investigated this coming season.
" Wolfe, Lome, and Lightning Lakes.—The latter lakes provided good fly-fishing
for rainbow trout, the supply being maintained from natural reproduction. Wolfe and
Lome Lakes produced fair catches of trout from yearly plantings of fry and eyed eggs.
"Blue (McCaffrey), MacKenzie, Dry, and Bergeson 'Lakes.—Conveniently situated
and tributary to Allison (One-mile) Creek. For some reason not yet determined, the
lakes in question are not producing the numbers of trout that might be expected from
the previous closure protection afforded, together with fry and fingerling liberations.
The planting of kokanee eyed eggs to restore the supply has been suggested and will be
investigated.
" Missezuala, Lost (Kump), and Taylor Lakes produced fair catches of rainbow
trout from the usual fry liberations.
" Hornet, Deadman, and Loosemore Lakes.—Previously barren of fish life prior to
year 1940, when a small allotment of Kamloops trout-fry was released in Deadman
Lake and which made excellent growth, varying in weight up to 2 lb. in just over one
year. Loosemore Lake received a small allotment of fry in 1941 and are thriving, from
personal observations when making a preliminary survey of the small lakes which are
conveniently situated and drain into Allison Creek watershed.
" Davis, Boss, and Tahla Lakes.—A chain of fair-sized lakes, well located via Aspen
Grove. Davis Lake provided good fishing resulting from intermittent fry liberations
and restricted spawning. Boss and Tahla Lakes appear to be good trout waters and
should receive attention according to the available supply of trout-fry. The results of
fry liberations in Uno and Robinson Lakes remain undetermined.
" Otter Lake.—Of considerable acreage, but does not produce the number of trout
that might be expected from the yearly eyed egg plantings of Kamloops trout. It is
possible coarse fish are a detriment.
" Murray Lake.—The introduction of Kamloops trout-fry was a success, also other
small lakes in the Brookmere area have been stocked with the co-operation of local
anglers.
" Boundary District.
Kettle River and West Fork provided good fly-fishing for the rainbow trout, varying
in weight to 3 lb.    Abundant summer rains were beneficial and with additional protec-
2 K 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
tion afforded, together with yearly eyed egg plantings, there is a noted improvement
in the supply of trout.
" Conkle (Fish), Arlington, and Collier Lakes yielded the average catches of rainbow trout from fry and eyed egg plantings with some natural reproduction. Other
lakes not so accessible continued to produce good catches of trout from natural
reproduction.
" Williamson Creek Lake.—Barren of fish life prior to year 1939, then stocked with
a small allotment of Kamloops trout-fry (Lloyds Creek stock), resulting in excellent
fly-fishing and limit catches up to 3 lb. in weight.
" Matthew and Davis Lakes yielded good catches of Eastern brook-trout varying in
weight up to 2 lb. First introduced in the spring of 1940. The small landlocked lakes
appear ideal for the speckled trout (Eastern brook-trout) species.
" Boundary Creek.—Flowing adjacent to auto highway. Produced the average
catches of rainbow and speckled trout from yearly plantings of eyed eggs.
" Jewel Lake.—There was a noticeable decline in the number and size of Kamloops
trout caught. The presence of a large population of minnows (shiners) and their
somewhat predaceous nature towards fry liberations, makes it appear imperative to
institute a different form of restocking in an effort to restore the supply of trout in this
important lake.    The matter is receiving attention.
" Wilgress (Loon) Lake.—Trolling for the Kamloops trout remained good during
the early part of the season and towards the fall. In view of the lake being landlocked
with muskeg conditions the suggested possibility of creating artificial spawning areas
to aid natural spawning and improve the condition of parent fish is to be further
investigated in the coming spring.
" Granby River produced fairly good fly-fishing for rainbow trout, resulting from
fry liberations and natural reproduction, together with the closure of tributary streams
of the East and West Forks of the river.
"Smelter Lake.—Due to existing conditions the lake is not fished to any extent.
However, the yearly plantings of rainbow trout eyed eggs in Sand Creek, a tributary,
assists in augmenting the supply of trout in Granby River wherein the trout spawn
after reaching maturity in the lake.
" Lake Christina.—The amended regulations permitting the capture of Kamloops
trout and small-mouth black bass from May 1st in each year proved to be very
satisfactory and fishing generally for both species remained fairly good. Provided the
number of bass can be reduced, the stepped-up plantings of Kamloops trout eyed eggs
in suitable tributary streams should bring forth fruitful results.
" The kokanee are quite an important fish in Lake Christina, there being good
numbers taken on the troll. Also they fill in a gap when the trout are not biting freely.
The run of the species has been well established in Sanders Creek. The native kokanee
are beach-spawners and so far the netting of them for commercial purposes has not
depleted the supply being maintained from natural reproduction.
" West Kootenay District.
" Big Sheep and Beaver Creeks.—The supply of Eastern brook-trout has been
fairly well maintained-from yearly liberations of fingerlings and natural reproduction,
considering the somewhat extensive angling conducted by the Trail and Rossland
anglers. Mergansers (fish-ducks) are quite numerous and take a heavy toll of trout
from the two streams. For conservation, steps will be taken to reduce the numbers
under special permits.
" Champion Lakes.—The small allotments of Kamloops trout fingerlings supplied
from Bjerkness and Kaslo rearing-ponds, commencing the fall of 1939 and later, are
now becoming well established in the lakes. Previous plantings of cut-throat trout-fry
were not a success owing to the voracious nature of minnows (shiners) that inhabit
the lakes.
" Columbia River.—That portion extending from Castlegar to Waneta provided
fairly good fly-fishing for rainbow trout, mostly for the local anglers of Trail. In order
to maintain the supply of trout, liberations of fry have been carried out the past four
years in the lower nursery waters of Pass Creek tributary to the river. " Arrow Lakes.—Angling and trolling for the Kamloops trout improved in the
vicinity of Renata and Broadwater, which varied in weight up to 15 lb. Glacial water
conditions throughout the summer restrict trout-fishing in the upper and part of the
lower lakes; hence the request from the residents affected for a change in the present
fishery regulations to permit trout-fishing from April 1st in each year.
" Whatshan Lakes produced excellent fly-fishing for rainbow trout from May 1st
to the latter part of June, thence onward mostly by trolling. The native trout rarely
exceed 1% lb. in weight, although an attempt was made to increase the size by the
introduction of selected stock from Gerrard Hatchery and elsewhere, and unconfirmed
reports were since received indicating the presence of larger trout. Coarse fish remain
very numerous and reducing the numbers would be of benefit to the trout. The
suggested introduction of kokanee in the lakes is a matter for consideration, in view of
the present large population of fish and the available food-supply.
" Inonoaklin River and Box Lake.—The lower reaches of the river produce fair
catches of Eastern brook-trout from yearly liberations of fingerlings. In Box Lake
and the upper reaches above the falls the species are very plentiful, resulting from
natural reproduction.
" Summit, Victor, Three Valley, and Griffin Lakes.—A chain of lakes commencing
10 miles west of Revelstoke. The results so far from Kamloops trout fingerling liberations from Taft rearing-ponds have been somewhat discouraging, the theory being
advanced by the local anglers that there is an outward migration of trout planted to
Shuswap Lake. Consequently, the introduction of cut-throat trout has been suggested
as an experiment. Coarse fish are very numerous and are probably a menace to
trout-life.
" Williamson and Five-mile Lakes.—South of Revelstoke. These somewhat small
lakes have not so far produced many trout, or at least few have been caught as a result
of Kamloops trout fingerling liberations the past three or four years.
" Begbie Lake.—Wherein Kamloops trout fingerlings were liberated, commencing
1938, is now providing good fly-fishing. The lake contained no sport fish prior to the
introduction.
" Illecillewaet River.—Is affected with extreme glacial silt. Experimental small
plantings of Kamloops trout fingerlings will probably be of benefit to the tributary
streams.
" Columbia River.—Extending from Arrowhead north and beyond Revelstoke—
is also affected with glacial silt, thereby the fishing is mostly restricted to the Dolly
Varden with occasional fair catches of rainbow trout taken at the mouths of tributary
streams.
" Trout Lake.—Lardeau District. In comparison to season 1940, the fishing for
Kamloops and Dolly Varden trout was not quite so good; this might be attributed to
unsettled weather conditions. The supply of Kamloops trout has so far been fairly
well maintained from natural spawning in Trout Creek and Lardeau River adjacent
to Gerrard.
" Wilson Lakes.—East of Nakusp and accessible from secondary auto road. These
two popular lakes provided good fly-fishing and trolling for rainbow trout and some
kokanee; a slight improvement was noted compared to the season 1940. The ideal
spawning areas in the connecting creek of the two lakes was seriously affected with
sand silt, resulting from extremely heavy rain or cloud bursts, thereby curtailing
natural reproduction from that source, which condition was offset by increasing the
eyed egg plantings.
" Box Lake.—Conveniently located, but is not yielding the number of Kamloops
trout that might be expected from yearly liberations of fry. However, there is a
possibility of some outward migration into the Upper Arrow Lake.
" Summit Lake.—Adjacent to the auto highway and flowing into Slocan Lake,
produced fair catches of rainbow trout, resulting from fry liberations each year. No
doubt the numerous coarse fish are the principal drawback towards good trout-fishing.
" Bear and Fish Lakes.—Zincton. Yielded the usual good catches of small rainbow
trout, from extra protection afforded to the spawning fish and planting of eyed eggs in
Watson Creek flowing into Bear Lake. " Slocan Lake.—Angling and trolling for Kamloops trout improved, probably the
results of fingerling liberations from the New Denver rearing-pond and increased
allotments of eyed eggs and fry, together with the restoration of the kokanee supply
from eyed egg plantings.
" Evans, Cahill, and Beatrice Lakes.—Tributary to Slocan Lake. From investigation there was a marked change in the growth and condition of the Kamloops trout,
attributed no doubt to the less abundant food-supply in Cahill Lake, resulting from
curtailed fishing and trail conditions. The trout are quite plentiful in the three lakes
and probably the supply will be maintained from natural spawning and extra protection
afforded.
" Slocan River.—A typical trout-stream flowing through the Slocan Valley, produced some good fly-fishing for rainbow trout as a result of fry liberations each year
and natural spawning. The presence of increasing numbers of coarse fish would indicate
that better results could be obtained from fingerling liberations.
" Little Slocan Lake.—The two lakes are not producing the desired number of
Eastern brook-trout from yearly planting of fingerlings; the cause is probably attributed
to the large population of coarse fish, which will be investigated. Little Slocan River
and the West Fork now show signs of depletion of rainbow trout as a result of extensive
angling, which will receive attention when the restocking schedule is drawn up this year.
" Kootenay River.—Extending from Grohman Creek west to Columbia River. Provided fairly good fishing for rainbow trout, except that portion affected by closure
regulations from Slocan River east to Beasley, for precautionary war measures. Every
consideration is given each year to fry liberations, but with the change of water conditions resulting from the Cora Lynn dam, fly-fishing is affected.
" Clearwater, Barratt (Lost), Port Rico, and Panther (Diamond) Lakes (Salmon
River watershed) provided good fly-fishing from intermittent restocking. Wolfe Lake
continued to yield good catches of somewhat small cut-throat trout from natural
reproduction only.
" Rosebud Lake.—This productive body of water of approximately 40 acres produced good catches of rainbow and some cut-throat trout from yearly liberations of fry.
The lake is fished mostly by non-resident anglers and on the opening day, June 1st,
some thirty-three rowboats were observed in use.
" Boundary Lake.—Nelway. Provided good fishing for the Eastern brook-trout
as a result of yearly replenishment with fingerlings. American non-resident anglers
fish the lake mostly as it is close to the International Boundary. The additional protection given to the parent fish—namely, from October 1st in each year—has assisted fish
cultural operations.
" Ross, Whitelady, Haiselden, and Noakes Lakes.—Located in the Redfish Creek
region at fairly high altitudes; provided fair fly-fishing for rainbow trout previously
introduced.    Weather conditions restricted fishing to some extent.
" Kokanee, Keen, Garland, Kaslo, and Tanal Lakes.—Situated at an elevation of
6,500 feet and less in the Kokanee Glacier Park. Supplied fair fishing for cut-throat
trout, subject to weather conditions. Due to the short open season and somewhat
scanty food-supply, it became necessary to curtail eyed egg plantings, except some fry
for Kokanee Lake.
" West Arm of Kootenay Lake.—In some respects there was a decline in the catches
of Kamloops trout compared to season 1940, hence the requests for investigation and
systematic restocking with fingerlings in place of fry; no doubt the increase of coarse
fish is detrimental. However, with the construction of the Nelson rearing-pond,
undertaken by the City of 'Nelson authorities, it is hoped the pond can be utilized for
the raising of trout fingerlings for the benefit of the West Arm.
" Kootenay Lake.—Except that portion of the lake, vicinity of Kaslo and north,
where unusual glacial water conditions affected the catches of Kamloops trout until
late fall. Generally speaking, in the remainder of the lake, south-west of Procter and
south to Kootenay Landing, the catches were well up to the average. Fly-fishing for
the immature trout at the mouths of tributary streams did not appear so good; this
might be attributed to excess summer precipitation.    If, however, there is a scarcitv REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941. K 21
of immature trout, the efficient operation of Bjerkness and Kaslo rearing-ponds should
take care of the situation.
" The Nelson Gyro Club conducted another Kootenay Lake Trout Derby, commencing
May 1st to November 16th, with considerable interest to the local and non-resident
anglers, resulting in over 6,000 lb. of Kamloops trout being weighed in by the competitors. The largest trout caught weighed 26 lb. 4 oz. The quantity of trout caught
and weighed in would only indicate a percentage of the number of large fish taken from
the lake during the season; consequently, from a conservation standpoint, it now
appears desirable to restrict the weight and catches of large trout that may be legally
taken in one day.
" Loon and Leviathan Lakes.—The small lakes continued to produce fair catches
of Eastern brook-trout, but owing to the less abundant food-supply the growth is not so
rapid as Loon Lake, vicinity of Ainsworth, which yielded quite large specimens of over
12 lb. in weight. A limited number of speckled trout eggs were collected the past two
seasons.
" Wheeler Lake.—Situated towards the headwaters of the South Fork of Wood-
berry Creek, the cut-throat trout introduced are still plentiful from phenomenal natural
reproduction. A larger out-take would be beneficial towards improving the condition
of the fish.
" Woodberry Creek (South and North Forks) produced fair catches of cut-throat
trout and some Dolly Varden. The results of cut-throat trout eyed eggs planted in
Sunset Lake, 1938, remain undetermined.
"Fletcher, Flint, and Milford Lakes.—Tributary to Kootenay Lake; supplied good
fly-fishing for rainbow trout, being somewhat restricted due to weather conditions.
" Kaslo Creek.—Fishing in North Fork was affected from the intermittent discharge of concentrator refuse. The South Fork produced good catches of Eastern
brook-trout and some cut-throat trout introduced in preference to the speckled trout,
commencing year 1939.
" Tarn o' Shanter Lake.—Located towards the headwaters of Tam o' Shanter Creek
flowing into Kootenay Lake. From reports received the plantings of rainbow trout
eyed eggs, 1938-39, were successful.
" Baker Lake.—Accessible by trail up Lockhart Creek, tributary to Kootenay Lake.
The allotment of cut-throat trout eyed eggs planted in 1938 reported thriving.
" Arkansaiv, Devil's Hole, and Bayonne Creek Lakes.—Via Cultus Creek, Kootenay
Lake. From investigation the rainbow trout introduced in the form of eyed egg plantings are now well established and natural reproduction should be ample to maintain
the supply;  more angling would be beneficial.
" Large-mouth black bass that now inhabit the back channel and sloughs on
Kootenay Flats, Creston area, supplied good fishing for the local anglers. There was no
noticeable increase of the species in waters of Kootenay Lake, considering their prolific
nature.
" Goat River.—Below the canyon produced fair catches of rainbow trout. The
upper reaches east and above the canyon fly-fishing for cut-throat trout was good,
especially up-stream towards the West Fork, where the trout are very plentiful from
yearly replenishment and natural spawning. Meadow Creek, a tributary, continues
to provide good catches of Eastern brook-trout from fingerling liberations and natural
reproduction.
" East Kootenay District.
" Moyie River.—Extending from Moyie Lake south to the International Boundary,
Kingsgate. Angling for cut-throat and rainbow trout remained good. Summer rains
were beneficial.
" Moyie Lakes.—Well located and adjacent to the auto highway, the two lakes
connected provided fair angling and trolling for cut-throat and rainbow trout; as a
result of yearly liberations suitable spawning streams are restricted. Kokanee eyed
eggs were introduced for the first time, primarily as a forage fish for the Kamloops
trout. K 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Monroe and Mineral Lakes continued to yield good catches of cut-throat trout,
also hybrid trout in the latter lake from yearly fry liberations.
" Smith Lake.—Conveniently located 4 miles south-west of Cranbrook; produced
good catches of Kamloops and some cut-throat trout. The supply is maintained from
regular liberations of fry and fingerlings. While the growth of the Kamloops trout
is not so rapid as in former years, it is not uncommon for 10-pounders to be taken on
the fly and troll;  the species were first introduced the year 1923.
"Fish Lakes.—Located 8 miles south-west of Cranbrook; is the main source of
supply of cut-throat trout eggs for the Cranbrook Hatchery. The condition and supply
of trout have been carefully regulated, considering the waters were set aside for
artificial propagation for close on twenty years.
" Twin, Peckham's, Echo, Hutchcroft, Garbut's, Quartz, Doyles, and other small
lakes produced the average catches of Kamloops and cut-throat trout from fry and
fingerlings planted. Horseshoe Lake is not producing many Kamloops trout now
owing to existing water conditions.
" Premier Lake continued to produce good catches of Kamloops and some cut-throat
trout. The liberation of fingerlings in place of fry has been an important factor
towards maintaining the supply of Kamloops trout. The lake is well patronized by
the Kimberley anglers, who have accomplished some very creditable improvements to
assist fish-culture, road and camping facilities. There is another interesting feature—
and that is the introduction of kokanee eyed eggs, 1938-40, some of which became
precocious spawners in less than two years, which is most unusual.
" St. Mary Lake, River, and Tributaries provided fairly good fishing for cut-throat
trout from yearly plantings of eyed eggs and fry, considering the extent of fishing
carried on by the Kimberley anglers. The suggested introduction of rainbow and
kokanee eyed eggs in St. Mary Lake is receiving attention.
" Skookumchuck River.—The cut-throat trout, mostly migratory from Kootenay
River, in the stretch of river to the falls, provided the average fly- and bait-fishing.
Further it is reported that the cut-throat trout eyed eggs planted in the barren stretch
of the river above the falls in 1935 were a success. Copper Lake tributary to the river
still produces good catches of cut-throat trout from natural spawning.
" Johnson, Hidden, Rothwell, and Lund Lakes.—Small lakes connected, situated in
the Minnihaha Valley. The two latter lakes produced fair catches of Kamloops trout
from fry and fingerlings liberated. Coarse fish predominate in Johnson Lake and
Hidden Lake;  remains doubtful as to the results of fry planted therein.
" Bull River and Tributaries.—With the exception of the portion of the river below
the falls, natural reproduction has reasonably maintained the supply of cut-throat trout,
which provide excellent fly-fishing.
" Tie Lake.—Situated 3 miles north of Jaffray. There is some doubt as to the
success of previous liberation of Kamloops trout-fry and fingerlings in this somewhat
large landlocked lake;  consequently, further restocking was deferred for investigation.
" North Star, Rock (Mud), Burton, Silver Springs, Mainstee, Surveyors, Baynes,
and Loon Lakes.—Accessible from secondary auto roads; continued to produce fair
catches of Kamloops trout, mostly by trolling. Mud bottom conditions in most of the
lakes do not permit natural reproduction, thereby yearly replenishment is necessary.
" Edwards Lake.—One of the best trout lakes in the East Kootenay, which is
located partly on the Tobacco Plains Indian Reservation. The lake contained no game
fish when Kamloops trout were introduced in 1924, with excellent results from eyed egg
plantings which act as a food-supply for the Indians and good fishing for the public.
" Elk River and Tributaries.—Provided good fly- and bait-fishing for the native
cut-throat trout, more particularly towards the upper reaches, where they are more
plentiful and of a larger size. There is a natural tendency for the species to migrate
up-stream; hence the lower reaches are not producing such large fish. Considering
the extensive angling by the numerous non-resident Alberta and local anglers, the
supply has been reasonably maintained from natural reproduction, the closure of six
tributary streams and systematic planting of cut-throat trout eyed eggs in suitable
nursery waters. The Rocky Mountain whitefish are still numerous and anglers should
be encouraged to catch them to conserve the food-supply of trout. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1941. K 23
" Fording River.—A tributary to Elk River. The cut-throat trout eyed eggs
planted above Josephine Falls are becoming fairly well established and vary in weight
up to 3 lb.    The ideal trout waters were previously barren of fish life.
" Summit Lake.—Crowsnest. A somewhat sluggish body of water, but very productive ; was primarily stocked with cut-throat trout for the benefit of outward migration into adjacent streams. Kamloops trout-fry were introduced, commencing year
1939, with good results. There was a considerable loss of both species from winter-kill
as observed when the ice disappeared.
" Barnes Lake.—Vicinity of Corbin. The one allotment of cut-throat trout-fry
planted in this high altitude lake in 1938 are now providing good fly-fishing. It is
quite possible that natural reproduction will be sufficient to maintain the supply.
" Grave Lake, Elk Valley.—The results of Kamloops trout-fry liberations for
several years is not all that could be expected. However, fair catches are taken mostly
by trolling, the small immature trout take the fly freely.
" Moose and Whiteswan Lakes.—Situated in the big-game area. In order to add
to the attractions of hunters and others visiting the Sheep Hot Springs, Kamloops
trout eyed eggs and fry were planted in the two lakes. While it has been reported of
surface movements of large trout in the latter lake, the results remain obscure. Coarse
fish predominate in both of the lakes which previously contained no game fish.
" Kootenay River.—Extending from the headwaters to the International Boundary;
is generally affected with glacial silt, but with the coming of fall the water-flow clears.
Good catches of cut-throat and Dolly Varden trout are obtainable.
" Findlay Creek and Tributaries.—Angling for cut-throat trout remained fairly
good; including good catches from Jaffray Lake, wherein cut-throat trout-fry were
released in 1938.
" Columbia and Windermere Lakes.—The latter lake produced good catches of
Kamloops trout, mostly by trolling. Columbia Lake is not fished to any extent, but it is
possible a fairly large percentage of the trout planted find their way into Windermere
Lake. Both lakes are restocked annually. It is also of interest to mention that Kamloops trout are caught in several tributary streams to Columbia River, subject to
suitable water conditions, no doubt due to outward migration from Windermere Lake.
" Paddy Ryan Lakes.—Conveniently located 5 miles south-west of Invermere.
Continued to provide good fly-fishing for cut-throat trout, as a result of regular fry
liberations.
" Lillian Lake.—Situated 3 miles west of Wilmer. Provided the usual good fishing
for Kamloops trout and some Eastern brook-trout from regular liberations of Kamloops
fry. During the summer the trout are very unpalatable for domestic use, owing to
bottom and muskeg conditions.
" Holgrave, Hall, Dunbar, Twin, and Bott Lakes produced good catches of cutthroat trout; the supply has been well maintained from some natural reproduction and
planting of eyed eggs.
" Cartwright Lake.—A landlocked lake located 5 miles by trail via Dunbar Lake.
The occasional liberation of Kamloops trout-fry therein produced good catches of trout,
mostly by trolling.
" Baptiste Lake.—Edgewater. During the season good fly-fishing was obtained
resulting from the planting of cut-throat eyed eggs and fry, commencing in the year
1938.    The fish varied in weight to 5 lb,
" Langs Lake.—Located mostly on private property; has in the past provided good
fly-fishing for the native Kamloops trout (as classified). There is no record of the
lake being stocked for public benefit.
" Spillimacheen River and Tributaries.—Owing to extreme glacial water conditions,
the streams are not suitable for game fish; consequently, for the benefit of local
residents, Kamloops trout fry were liberated in Island Lake.
" Cedar Lakes 1 and 3, Canyon Creek, and Wiseman Lakes produced fair catches
of Kamloops trout previously introduced and from occasional fry liberations.
" Blackwater Lakes.—Four small lakes situated adjacent to the Trans-Canada
Highway, yielded good catches of somewhat small rainbow trout from regular fry
liberations and restricted spawning. K 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Bush Lakes.—Two fair-sized lakes connected. Since the planting of Kamloops
trout eyed eggs and fry, commencing in the year 1936, the fishing has improved. .
"All possible attention has been given to improve trout-fishing in waters of Golden
and Big Bend areas, but unfortunately glacial water conditions prevent the expansion
of game-fish culture.
"Kokanee (Redfish).—Eggs were collected from the phenomenal run in Meadow
Creek, Lardeau, also limited numbers were collected from Trout Creek, Trout Lake,
and Kokanee Creek, West Arm of Kootenay Lake. The latter two operations were
curtailed as a result of heavy fall freshets washing out the traps. However, the major
collection at Meadow Creek served the requirements of the Game Commission, comprising of approximately two million for distribution in waters of the Interior and some
ten million supplied to the State of Washington authorities.
" Rocky Mountain Whitefish are still very numerous in waters of Whatshan Lakes,
Kettle, Slocan, Kootenay, Lardeau, and Elk Rivers. In an effort to control the numbers
the anglers should be encouraged to fish for them, even though it may slightly conflict
with trout regulations, in order to conserve the food-supply of trout and their eggs
naturally deposited.
" Eastern Whitefish.—So far no definite information is available to confirm the
success of the species introduced in waters of Kootenay and Arrow Lakes in 1930.
" Coarse Fish.—The control and reducing the numbers of the undesirable fish is
still a major problem to contend with in several of the most important lakes, where they
are a menace to trout-life and their food-supply. While it is true that fair numbers
are taken by the fur-farmers as a food-supply for their fur-bearing animals held in
captivity, it has not materially affected the numbers in the following lakes: Osoyoos,
Okanagan (south end), Griffin, Three Valley, Skaha (Dog), Smelter, Arrow, Slocan,
Little Slocan, Kootenay, Moose, Whiteswan, Columbia, and Windermere Lakes.
" Predatory Birds.—In waters only frequented with trout, the belted kingfisher
and mergansers (fish-ducks) devour and injure quite large numbers of trout, especially
at the present time in Beaver Creek, Fruitvale, and Big Sheep Creek, Rossland, where
remedial measures should be taken to destroy some of these birds.
" Rearing-ponds.—Some progress was made during the year towards the important
phase of game-fish culture in rearing-pond construction at Summerland and Nelson,
together with the operation of other ponds instituted by the organized sportsmen and
others in co-operation with the Game Commission, as referred to hereunder.
" Princeton Rearing-pond.—A small lake fed by springs, controlled and operated by
the Princeton Fish and Game Protective Association. The resultant Kamloops trout
fingerlings retrieved from the 25,000 fry liberated in the pond in 1940 was considerably
less than anticipated, owing to the presence of larger trout not previously retrieved,
as a result of the pond being undrainable.
" Summerland Rearing-ponds.—Of partial earth and concrete construction, 60 by
30 feet, of three compartments. Constructed by the Penticton Fish and Game Protective Association, 1941. Operated by the Game Commission. Considering the pond
was in the experimental stage, a good percentage of small fingerlings were raised and
liberated, estimated to be 246,164 from approximately 249,000 Kamloops fry originally
liberated in the pond.
" Taft Rearing-ponds.—Three ponds, 60 by 16 feet each, operated with the cooperation of the Revelstoke Rod and Gun Club, under subsidy and supervision by the
Game Commission. An allotment of 200,000 Kamloops trout eyed eggs were supplied
and incubated in the Taft Hatchery to the free swimming stage, resulting in 188,969
fry being released in Nos. 1 and 2 ponds; the resultant fingerlings raised and liberated
was 26,500, weight count. The operation could be termed a success, despite unforeseen
circumstances to contend with—namely, the water-supply diverted from Crazy Creek
and escapement from one of the ponds.
" Nelson Rearing-pond.—A concrete circular pond, 25 feet in diameter, which was
financed and constructed by the Corporation of the City of Nelson authorities on the
Nelson Hatchery site during the fall. The pond is up-to-date and ready for operation
next spring. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941. K 25
" Bjerkness Rearing-ponds.—Constructed by Mr. K. K. Bjerkness, of Mirror Lake,
for public benefit. The No. 1 pond was operated under the supervision of the Game
Commission and assistance rendered by Mr. Bjerkness. The resultant Kamloops trout
fingerlings—weight count raised from 100,000 fry (Gerrard stock) amounted to 35,550,
which average 3 inches in length and are of uniform growth, resulting from eleven
weeks' retainment and feeding. This was a very creditable showing, considering the
various elements to contend with.
" Kaslo Rearing-pond.—Constructed jointly by the City of Kaslo and Kaslo Rod
and Gun Club authorities and financially assisted by the Trail and Rossland Rod and
Gun Clubs. The pond has been operated two seasons under the supervision of the
Game Commission. The number of Kamloops trout-fry that survived the lightning
disaster in July, 1940, were left in the pond and raised to fingerlings, resulting in
10,365 (hand count) being liberated in Kootenay Lake during the month of June, the
fish varying in length from 2 to 8 inches. For experimental purposes 8,640 were
marked by the removal of two-thirds of the adipose fins.
" During July, 299,456 Kamloops trout-fry (Gerrard stock) were liberated in the
pond and the resultant fingerlings raised therefrom are accounted for as follows: 71,000
(weight count) were liberated during the month of October, mostly in Kootenay Lake,
and subsequently during the month of December approximately 51,000 were released
into Kootenay Lake, and it is estimated that 30,000 remain in the pond, making a total
of approximately 142,000 fingerlings varying in length from 2 to 4 inches.
" New Denver Rearing-pond.—Constructed and operated by the Slocan Lake District Rod and Gun Club membership to improve and increase the trout-supply in Slocan
Lake. Due to the pollution of Carpenter Creek wherefrom the water-supply is diverted
the pond did not operate, and in place thereof 12,000 Kamloops trout fingerlings were
transferred from Kaslo rearing-pond and released into Slocan Lake. This was an
estimated quota of fingerlings raised from the 50,000 allotment of fry originally
arranged for the New Denver pond.
" Cranbrook Rearing-pond.—Adjacent to the hatchery and St. Joseph Creek, was
not operated during the season, although 113,624 Kamloops trout fingerlings (Gerrard
stock) were raised in the hatchery troughs from the allotment of 120,000 eyed eggs.
" Kimberley Rearing-ponds.—Lois Lake, a small body of water, taken over and
improved by the Kimberley Rod and Gun Club members, resulting in 30,000 cut-throat
trout-fry being released therein for retrievement and liberation next spring.
" Matthew Creek Rearing-ponds.—Sponsored by the Kimberley Rod and Gun Club
in the form of abandoned beaver-dams; 30,000 cut-throat trout-fry liberated in the
ponds and will circulate out of their own accord into St. Mary River.
" Premier Lake Rearing-pond.—Owned and operated by Mr. E. L. Staples. The
pond was utilized to accommodate 20,645 cut-throat trout-fry for subsequent circulation
into Premier Lake.
" Private Ponds and Trout-farms.—Excepting a pond constructed by Mrs. L. Chase,
Keremeos, and Kamloops trout-fry purchased and liberated therein, there is nothing
new to report regarding the other eight ponds, nor in regard to trout-farms—namely,
ponds at Apex, owned by Mrs. R. Heddle, of Nelson; ponds near Brisco, owned by Mr.
J. V. Daniken;   and Snowshoe Lake leased by Mr. A. P. Coates, Edgewood.
" Fish-guards or Screens.—Irrigation systems: The diversion and use of water is
of primary importance to the farmer and fruit-grower, and of course the conservation
of game fish may be a secondary consideration in connection with the effective installation of suitable screens at the intakes of water diversions by the water-users. Therefore, it appears advisable to make a survey over the most important irrigation systems,
to determine the necessity of screens before placing the responsibility and expense
upon those concerned.
" Fishways.—In connection with small dams on the following waters: Outlet of
Okanagan Lake, Eholt Creek, Greenwood, Little Sand Creek, and at the outlet of
McBains (Rosen) Lake, Jaffray, Alexander Creek, near Crowsnest, and Paddy Ryan
Lakes, Invermere.    Remained in fair condition and operated satisfactorily.
" Hydro-electrical Power Development.—Kootenay River, near Brilliant, by the
West Kootenay Power and Light Company, Limited, of Trail.    The proposed construe- K 26 BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
tion of a dam approximately 100 feet in height is under consideration, with some
preliminary work undertaken by the company. The provision for a fishway in the
structure, or an alternative method to take care of the game fishery interests affected,
is receiving the necessary attention according to instructions.
"Obstructions (Natural).—Apparently the removal of the obstruction known as
Handy Log Jam on the Lardeau River has been satisfactorily attended to, thereby
affording a free passage to the parent Kamloops trout from Kootenay Lake to their
respective spawning areas adjacent to Gerrard Hatchery. Considering the expense
involved and importance of the achievement, it is very essential that all possible precautionary measures be taken to prevent the obstruction again forming.
" Pollutions, Mining Industries.—The pollution of certain streams previously
inhabited with trout continued unabated, as a result of mining and treatment of gold,
silver, and base-metal ores. Generally, the location of the concentrators is such that
the control and impoundment of the refuse is nearly impossible, but where conditions
will permit and without seriously jeopardizing the industry, the operators take the
necessary steps to prevent serious pollutions, as referred to hereunder:—
" Similkameen River: Due to the efficient impounding methods undertaken by the
officials of the Allenby Mining Company of Copper Mountain, Princeton, and the
Kelowna Exploration Company, Ltd., of Hedley, and subsequently the control and
impounding methods instituted by the Mascot Mining Company, Limited, of Hedley,
this river is practically free of pollution, except the unavoidable discharge of discoloured water therein.
" Salmon River System: The serious pollutions continue, resulting from the operations of the Ymir Yankee Gold Mines, Ltd., Ymir; Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd.;
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Ltd.; and the Gold Belt Mines, Ltd., all of Sheep Creek.
Operations were discontinued at the Reno Gold Mines, Ltd., on Sheep Creek, and at the
Relief-Arlington Gold Mines, on the North Fork of Salmon River, Erie. By arrangements effected with the operators of the Euphrates Gold Mines, Ltd., near Hall Siding,
the escape of concentrator refuse into the Salmon River has been avoided by impounding the waste materials.
"Columbia River: Remains polluted with refuse from the smelter and fertilizer
plants operated by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Trail. As stated
previously the pollution may not be so harmful towards fish life after becoming diffused
with the water-flow of the river.
" Kaslo Creek: Flowing into Kootenay Lake, has been polluted intermittently with
concentrator refuse from the Whitewater mill under lease by the Highland Surprise
Gold Mines.
" Seaton and Carpenter Creeks: Tributary to Slocan Lake. Upon resumption of
operations of the Zincton (Lucky Jim) Mines, Ltd., resulted in the serious pollution
with concentrator refuse of streams mentioned. In view of the pollution the New
Denver rearing-pond could not be operated.
" Enterprise (10-Mile) Creek: Flowing into Sloan Lake. Concentrator operations
were resumed in connection with treating of tailings and ore from the Enterprise mine.
Arrangements effected for the impoundment of the refuse have prevented the pollution
of the stream.
" Sitkum Creek: Flowing into the West Arm of Kootenay Lake, became polluted
with concentrator refuse as a result of mining operations and treatment of ores by the
Alpine Gold Mines, Ltd.
"Summit Creek: Flowing into Kootenay River, Creston area. Continued to be
polluted to some extent with concentrator refuse from ore mined and treated by the
Bayonne Consolidated Mines, Ltd. The possible control and impoundment of the refuse
was again investigated and, considering all existing elements to contend with and the
importance of the industry, the operators are taking all possible steps to prevent the
serious pollution of the stream.
" Boundary Creek: Flowing partly through American territory, thence into Kootenay River, Creston area. Remained polluted with concentrator refuse from operations
of the Continental Mine, Idaho.    The prevention of polluting Canadian waters received REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1941. K 27
attention and evidently the existing conditions did not permit the control of waste
material.
" St. Mary River: The control and impoundment of waste material from the Sullivan
concentrator at Kimberley, operated by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company,
has prevented any serious pollution of the river, except surplus discoloured water, which
may not be very injurious to fish life after becoming diffused with water-flow of the
river.
" Kicking Horse and Columbia Rivers: The steady attention given to the waste
crude oil sumps by the employees of the C.P.R. at Field and Beavermouth has prevented
any serious pollution of waters mentioned.
" Cottonwood Creek: Flowing into the West Arm of Kootenay Lake. Some action
was taken with regard to the disposal of garbage in lower reaches of the stream with
satisfactory results.
" Lumber Industries: The operators of stationary and portable sawmills have in
most instances complied with the regulations, resulting in no serious pollution of waters
frequented by fish, including logging operations on streams and lakes regarding slash-
disposal.
" Water Conditions.—The somewhat early spring indicated a very dry season.
Fortunately, however, later on the abundant summer and fall precipitation provided
ample water-flow in all streams wherein trout eyed eggs were planted, with excellent
results. Moreover, few trout became stranded from adverse water conditions, thus
eliminating any serious loss or the salvage and transfer of fish affected, nor were
there any serious forest fires to affect the watersheds and the future supply of trout.
" Game-fish Culture.—With the improved transportation facilities and the increasing numbers of anglers, the efficient operation of Summerland, Nelson, Gerrard-Kaslo,
and Cranbrook Hatcheries plays an important part towards maintaining the supply of
trout, coupled with augmented supplies of eyed eggs received from the Penask Lake and
Lloyds Creek Hatcheries.
" Diseases.—With the exception of some mortality amongst the trout population
of Summit Lake, Crowsnest, from natural causes—' winter-kill'—there was no recurrence of the disease ' Furunculosis ' amongst the native cut-throat trout in waters
of the East Kootenay district.
" Co-operation.—During the year we again received splendid co-operation from
the organized sportsmen and other individuals, including also the Forestry and Public
Works Departments. Moreover, we are much indebted to Dr. W. A. Clemens, Department of Zoology, for his valuable assistance on scientific matters.
" Game Fish.—In some respects the inclement weather conditions throughout the
summer and fall affected fishing in lakes situated at high altitudes; otherwise,
generally speaking, the fishing was well up to the average except in the small streams
adjacent to the highways, where it is a difficult problem to produce the desired catches
of legal-sized trout."
" C " DIVISION   (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in
" C " Game Division during the year ended December 31st, 1941.
Big Game.
Moose.—In the Kamloops area particularly, no decrease was in evidence. All
other detachments report a substantial increase in numbers. Around Taweel Lake,
which is to some extent virgin ground, many of these animals were taken. There is a
general trend to the south, mainly due to the presence of wolves, as these predators are
reported in the Kamloops district, having travelled from the north and north-west.
Mountain-sheep.—In addition to the open season in the Squilax area, Squam Bay,
half way up Adams Lake, was opened to mountain-sheep for the first time.    Both dis- K 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
tricts take in quite a considerable stretch of territory. Two heads taken from the
Squam Bay region measured 37V2 inches around curves with a 17V2-inch base and 40
inches around curves with a 17-inch base. The 9-mile ridge near the headwaters of
Yalakom River and the Shulaps Mountain, not far from the recent gold discovery, is a
first-class area for the species. In the Shorts Creek area several mountain-sheep have
been found at the bottom of bluffs after a fall from above. The icy condition of some
slopes would indicate that these animals lost their foothold. There are considerable
numbers of coyotes in this area which should receive the attention of trappers at
Shorts Creek:
Deer.—Some really good work was done by Dr. F. A. Humphreys, of the Department of Hygiene at Kamloops, in his investigation of what he has now discovered to be
caseous lymphadenitis in mule-deer. No serious effort has been made in the past to
have this disease identified. A full report on his investigations will be available
shortly. This condition, I am glad to say, exists in a very small area of British Columbia. This species of game can always be depended upon to furnish good hunting and
replenish the larders of thousands of hunters.
Caribou.—No caribou were reported as having been taken from the Clearwater
district. Very few were killed in the Clinton district. In all other districts there are
no reports as far as we know of any having been taken by visitors. Actually, then,
these animals got a much-needed rest.
Wapiti.—Lillooet and Clinton report many in each Detachment. There is a close
season on wapiti in the above districts, however. Two bulls were seen on Becker's
Meadow, near Ruth Lake, in the Forest Grove district.
Mountain-goats.—These animals are in considerable numbers in the Lillooet district within one hour's walk of saddle-horse rendezvous. In the Bowron Lake area,
outside the sanctuary, they are in fair numbers. In the Upper .Adams Lake area
several were taken last season.
Grizzlies.—Two grizzlies were killed at the headwaters of Texas Creek. Game
Warden Gill, while on patrol in the Texas Creek district, saw seven in three days, and
at Whitecap Mountain in June he found three grizzlies feeding on a dead horse. In
Three Valley and also Crowfoot Range, north-west of Salmon Arm, there are many fine
specimens. In Park and Vidler Mountains in the Vernon district, also around Clearwater in the Kamloops area, they are to be had preferably in the early part of the
season. This is really the king of all sport and if the sportsman is looking for real
thrills let him try a grizzly hunt in British Columbia with a heavy calibre rifle and, an
efficient guide.
Fur-bearing Animals.—At the beginning of the season prices were unusually high
before war was declared by the United States. Had the high prices prevailed the drain
on fur-bearers would have been disastrous. The fur trade at the present moment for
the season 1941-42 is sluggish, but may pick up as the season advances. The reaction
to"this will be of considerable benefit next year, since many trappers are simply pulling
up their traps due to low prices. With a successful breeding season, there should be
a well above average catch for next season—if prices are right.
Beavers were apparently heavily trapped last season as prices were high, which
does not augur well for this fur-bearer. Every trapper in " C " Game Division was
circularized in an appeal to conserve this animal, which is one of the easiest to take of
all fur-bearers. Twenty-one trap-lines were inspected by Wardens out of the hundreds
of trap-lines reporting a beaver census. Three of these estimates by trappers were not
in accordance with the findings of the Game Warden. This situation was duly reported
to the Game Commission for consideration. The inspection of trap-lines reporting a
beaver census will be carried out annually and action will be taken against trappers
either giving false returns or where found overtrapping. The appeal made to trappers
was a good move, since they realize that it is to their own interests to conserve their
beaver. Comparative statistics are once more submitted covering a period of years,
showing estimate of beavers left on registered trap-lines in " C " Game Division, exclusive of Indian trap-lines. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1941.
K 29
Season.
No. of
Trappers
submitting
Returns.
Estimate of
Beaver.
Average
per
Trapper.
1934-35            	
275
343
367
345
307
348
345
4,789
6,392
6,347
5,945
5,315
6,501
7,228
17.41
1935-36                       	
18.60
1936-37                                                          	
17.29
1937-38   - 	
17.23
1938-39             — 	
17.30
1939-40   ■                                                                           	
18.68
1940-41                 	
20.95
Upland Game Birds.
Willow (ruffed) grouse are on the increase in the Vernon district. Pheasants as
usual are more than numerous in this district. Salmon Arm reports a decrease in
sharp-tail grouse. In the Williams Lake area and other Detachments in this Division
the situation as a whole is very favourable. It has been suggested that any close
season on Franklin grouse should also include a close season on willow grouse. Some
hunters appear to encounter difficulty in distinguishing between willow and Franklin
grouse and, as a result, often find themselves unwittingly in trouble. Another difficulty
is the question of boundaries of electoral districts and the inability of sportsmen to
locate even the approximate line. Some assistance could readily be rendered by the
sale, if available, of clearly defined maps.
This year an open season for the hunting of pheasants was provided for the first
time in the Nicola country. Pheasants were liberated in this Division as follows:
Kamloops, 207; Salmon Arm, 100; Ashcroft area, 75; Chase area, 50; Lytton district,
100;   Westwold, 100;   total, 632.
Migratory Game Birds.
The season for ducks was not in the same category as in previous successful years.
Many of the pot-holes and small lakes were dry all over the Division. The latter part of
the season, however, supplied really good hunting. The only bright spot on the horizon
was that of -the Canada goose. Large numbers fed on the stubble both in the Cariboo
and Kamloops districts and many good bags were obtained. Excellent shooting was
obtained in the Merritt district, which is well known for the concentration of migratory
game birds, especially geese.
Vermin.
Eight officers in this Division killed the following predators: Coyotes, 119; wolves,
3 ; cougars, 2 ; bears, 35; crows, 892; magpies, 716; owls, 80 ; hawks, 79 ; ravens, 73 ;
stray cats, 147;   and ownerless dogs, 25.
Outstanding in the killing of predators were Game Wardens Maxson, Ellis, Still,
Gill, and Jobin.
Nineteen bears, two cougars, and twenty killer coyotes were destroyed by Predatory-
animal Hunter Shuttleworth.
These animals were destroyed in the majority of cases while actually molesting
farm stock. The Vernon Game Association destroyed 1,170 magpies, 103 crows, 37
goshawks, and 14 horned owls. One hundred and sixty :oyotes were killed by Vernon
hunters.    Game Warden Still assisted in these operations.
The winter of 1940 was spent mainly in studying the habits of timber-wolves.
Poison was used under supervision with uncertain effect in certain parts of this Division. A reported decrease in numbers has come in from one district. Timber-wolves
were able to range over considerable territory because of the lack of snow. They would
be in one area to-day and the following day would be reported 25 miles away. Game-protection.
Weather conditions were very mild with practically no snow in the Central and
Southern Interior. There was an ideal breeding season to begin with, but with heavy
rains in the late spring conditions were somewhat changed. There were 115 prosecutions under the " Game Act." Patrols were regularly carried out at a minimum of
expense. Three patrol cabins were built in the Clinton and Lillooet districts and one
is under construction in the Kamloops area. Another cabin already constructed has
been reserved for use of the Game Department. All these cabins will be used to
facilitate both foot and horse patrol, both in the protection of game and fish.
Game Propagation.
Six hundred and thirty-two pheasants were liberated in this Division during the
year. Kelowna and Vernon were omitted. No beavers were planted in this Division
during the year just ended, which is indeed regrettable. This was due to the retirement of Mr. F. Kibbee, Warden i/c of the Bowron Lake sanctuary, because of illness.
We were again unable to trap pheasants at Tranquille because of the lack of snow.
Game Reserves.
The following game reserves exist in this Division: Yalakom, in the Lillooet
district; Tranquille Game Reserve, Kamloops; and Bowron Lake sanctuary; also the
Tyaughton deer sanctuary, Lillooet district. Bowron Lake sanctuary still harbours
numbers of big game and fur-bearers. Due to certain road construction in the Yalakom
district, it is suggested that a further change in the Yalakom Game Reserve boundary
be instituted.    This will be investigated at a later date.
Fur Trade.
The bulk of fur trapped in the Interior is shipped to Coast points. Very few
people know that the value of the British Columbia fur-crop amounts to over $1,200,000
annually. It is a crop worth paying attention to and could pay still higher dividends
with increased protection and propagation.
Fur-farming.
There are forty-eight fur-farms in this Division. In popularity mink, foxes, and
nutria led in their respective order. British Columbia is a little behind other Provinces
in this industry. War-time restrictions may eventually have a detrimental effect on
this business. "   .
Registration of Trap-lines.
The system was devised to conserve fur by giving each trapper an area on which
he could farm the fur-bearing animals. There are certain improvements still to be
made, many of which I understand will be carried out during the forthcoming year.
The system of registration, ideal as it is, does not conserve such animals as, say, the
fisher or marten, or any other animal, unless we have: (1) The co-operation of the
trapper; (2) the personal supervision of what is left on the trap-line; and (3) the
closing of the season on certain fur-bearers showing a low annual catch, especially those
animals ranging over several trap-lines.
With the addition of improvements under consideration it would indeed be.difficult
to find a better and wholly more successful method of farming the numerous varieties
of fur-bearers. We have 433 registered white trap-lines and 293 Indian and Indian
Band lines with eighty-seven trappers on private property. There are twenty-nine
trappers assisting registered trappers. Over 96 per cent, renewal of registered trap-
lines was made in this Division shortly after the end of the year 1941. This in itself
speaks well for the scheme.    A number of trappers have joined up for active service.
The long trap-line operated by one man should be discouraged as much as possible.
Many trappers leave one part of their trap-lines untouched for a season or longer and
cover only that portion which they feel they can conscientiously cover or patrol in a REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941. K 31
reasonable length of time. With pending improvements it will be difficult to equal the
system anywhere on the North American Continent. The personal inspection of trap-
lines, at least those that are suspected as being heavily trapped, is an important factor
in fur conservation. Forms are supplied to each Game Warden to fill out, stating his
findings from the trap-line inspection and the extent of breeding stock left in each area
on certain fur-bearers. These forms are kept for future reference and a closer check
is made as a result of the data supplied.
Registration of Guides.
We have eighty-four registered guides in " C " Game Division to an average of
roughly 100 non-resident hunters. There are far too many guides operating; and too
many guides not seriously in the business, who impair the opportunities of the man
investing capital in guiding equipment.    The system requires some revision.
Special Patrols.
From September'3rd to 7th a special patrol was made by Game Warden Gill and
Game Warden Stewart around the Yalakom Game Reserve because of a complaint that
domestic sheep were grazing there. The complaint had no foundation and nothing of
an irregular nature was seen. Game Warden Stewart and Predatory-animal Hunter
C. E. Shuttleworth carried out special patrols in the following areas: February 28th,
patrolled from Bonaparte Lake to Thompson River, investigating the wolf situation
and checking on trap-lines. Mileage covered: 110 miles on snow-shoes, 20 miles by
horse, and 273 miles by car. On January 25th another patrol was made by Game
Warden Stewart and Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth, west of the Fraser River
in the Lone Cabin, Churn Creek, Red Mountain area. Two hundred and forty-seven
miles were covered by horse and 174 miles by car. Two other patrols were made by
Game Warden Stewart covering considerable mileage. A special patrol was made to
Punchaw (Mud) River by Game Warden Mottishaw to investigate complaints re poaching on registered trap-lines.
Hunting Accidents.
I am glad to report that no hunting accidents took place in this Division during
the year.
Game-fish Culture.
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson's report follows:—
" Kelowna Detachment.
" The following coarse fish were taken from the trap at Boyce Creek and Hayman's
Slough : Average Weight. Total.
Lb. Lb.
Boyce Creek or False Creek, 1,334 carp     4 5,336
Hayman's Slough, 285 carp     4 1,140
Total :     6,476
" General conditions in the Kelowna district are very good.
" Williams Lake Detachment.
" The following data on various lakes in the Williams Lake Detachment are submitted :—
" Lac la Hache:  Rainbow trout, average weight up to 5 lb.;   lake trout up to 25 lb.
" Dempsey Lake:   Rainbow trout, average weight 2 lb.
" Williams Lake:   Rainbow trout, average weight 3 lb.
" Big Lake:  Rainbow trout, average weight 2 lb.;  lake trout up to 20 lb.
" Quesnel Lake:   Rainbow trout up to 25 lb.;   lake trout up to 50 lb.
" Horsefly Lake:   Rainbow trout up to 20 lb.;   lake trout average 10 lb.
" Food conditions in the majority of the above lakes were ideal. K 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Clinton Detachment.
" Canim Lake was planted with little red fish. The destruction of coarse fish was
not a very great success this year on account of low water in most of the creeks.
Following is a list of coarse fish taken:— Lb.
Bridge Lake trap on Short Creek     800
Bridge Lake trap on Stack Creek . 6,000
Montana Lake trap     700
Deka Lake trap at outlet     900
Deka Lake trap at Sulphurous Creek ,     800
" Game Warden Stewart has eight of these small fish-traps, but only five were
working this season. The Rod and Gun Club members at Bridge Lake helped to look
after the coarse-fish traps.
" The following data on lakes in the Clinton Detachment are submitted:—
"Beaver Dam Lake: This lake has fish up to 10 lb., which is the largest caught
during 1941. The fish in this lake are in wonderful condition but are hard to catch.
The feed seems to be quite plentiful.
"Bridge Lake: Kamloops trout up to 10 lb.; char up to 35 lb. The feed seems
to be fair.    The fishing in this lake was up and down all summer.
" Machette Lake: This lake has fish up to 3 and 4 lb.; these are Kamloops trout.
Little red fish measure 12 and 13 inches. Feed in this lake seems to be quite plentiful.
This lake is not fished to any great extent as there are no boats for rent there.
" Deka Lake: Kamloops trout run from 3 to 4 .lb. and larger. The char go as high
as 32 lb.    The feed seems to be" quite plentiful.   This lake was quite spotty this summer.
" Horse Lake: This lake has Kamloops trout up to 5 lb.; char up to 20 lb. There
was good fishing in this lake the first part of the season. It was quite spotty the rest
of the season.    Feed seems to be quite plentiful.
" Egan Lake: This lake has Kamloops trout up to 2 lb.; also red fish. There is
generally good fishing throughout the season.    Feed seems to be fair.
" Quesnel Detachment.
" Twenty thousand eggs were planted in Jordan Creek and 20,000 in the creek
joining Wendle and Bonner Lakes in the Barkerville area. The results of these plantings were very satisfactory, especially the one in the Barkerville area.
" Kamloops trout and char can be found in Spectacle, Sandy, Long, Isaac, and
Indianpoint Lakes. The trout vary in weight from 2 to 15 lb. and the char from
2 to 26 lb.
" Puntchesakut (Tibbies) Lake is the most popular lake in this district and Kamloops trout from 1% to 5 lb. are taken. There is an-abundance of feed in these lakes,
such as plankton and fresh-water shrimps.
" During the year 1941 about 6% tons of coarse fish were destroyed from Norwood,
Bouchie, and Jordan Creeks. One new fish-trap was installed in Norwood Creek, which
gave satisfactory results.
" Lillooet Detachment.
" The following data on various lakes in the Lillooet Detachment are given:—
" Pavilion Lake: Main feed, shrimp. Fish up to 30 lb. Kamloops trout, mostly
caught by troll.    Fair fishing only.    Regular run of catch 8 to 10 lb.
"Crown Lake: Main feed, shrimp. Fish up to 17 lb. Good fly-fishing. Fish
taken this year average 3 lb. Average catch about eight fish. The best fishing is
obtained early and late in the season.
" Alta Lake: Main feed, water-beetles and flies. Fish up to 3 lb. Very good
fly-fishing all season.    A limit catch is obtained easily.    Average fish, 1 lb., rainbow.
" Lower Owl Creek Lake: Main feed, shrimp. Fish up to 5 lb. Kamloops trout.
Good fly-fishing. Limit catch may be obtained easily. Fish are inclined to be soft in
the middle of the summer.
"Big Gun Lake: Main feed, shrimp. Rainbow trout up.to 3 lb. Average fish,
% lb.    Fish are firm all season.    This lake is very uncertain. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941. K 33
" Marshall Lake: Main feed, water-beetles and shrimp. Fish, Kamloops trout up
to 9 lb. Good condition and fish plentiful most of the season. This lake is 8 miles
from the highway, whereas other lakes are all beside routes of travel.
" Game Warden Gill has planted fresh-water shrimps in a lot of lakes in this area
and they are progressing very well. No sucker traps have been installed in this area
as there are no suckers. The only work in this connection has been while assisting
Game Warden Stewart in the Clinton area on several lakes where large numbers of
suckers were destroyed and considerable trout removed from creeks that were drying up
and released in lakes. Nearly all the lakes in this area are stocked and have suitable
spawning-grounds where the fish restock by natural means.
" In the many lakes in the Merritt or Nicola country exceptionally fine fishing
was obtained and a fairly large number of trout plantings were made from the seasonal
hatchery operated by the Department in this district at Penask Lake."
Summary and General Remarks.
The World War now upon us is likely to have an injurious effect on the tourist
traffic, but up to last year the international situation did not impair the angling and
hunting attractions in this Division. In fact, there was a decided improvement in the
amount of business. What the forthcoming year holds for us no one can predict. It is
a prevailing fact that people who love our great outdoors and are glad to get away
from the vicissitudes of industrial or modern life will freely spend money and travel
extensively or rest in some peaceful resort to recuperate from strain during the uncertainty of the present period. It is essential for us to see that what people enjoy
during the summer months is preserved the year round and that the great outdoors be
made and kept as a joy or antidote to those of us who look forward to a rest and a
change.
Even if there is a slowing-up because of the large numbers of our young men away
on active service, no harm will be done; in fact, there will be even greater outdoor
attractions when the boys return, and it will be greatly appreciated when the sight of
the mountain streams again meets their eyes.
The hunting and fishing facilities fluctuated to some extent, due to the unusual
weather conditions. That is one of the saving features in the preservation of game
and trout. Angling would lose a great deal of its lure and charm if bag-limits were
too common. The year just passed was a successful one and thousands of visitors
during the summer and fall months came to our Province. The Big Bend Highway
played a very large part in this increase. Cars were passing along the Trans-Canada
Highway for considerable periods at the rate of one per minyte.
It is to be hoped that the Department will not neglect the protection of the Bowron
Lake sanctuary with its hundreds of beavers. When one realizes that for every pair of
beavers we release on land where holding back the water means so much to a watershed
we get from four to six young, very little more should be added to our previous
recommendations, except to say that when we do start to box-trap live animals we
should do so on a considerably larger scale. The tag system for pelts of beavers to be
included in a system of protection should be inaugurated.
Some very interesting points were brought out by Dr. F. A. Humphreys, of the
Department of Hygiene at Kamloops, in his investigations of the disease existing in
deer where pus pockets were frequently encountered. Dr. Humphreys explained to
delegates from the various Game Associations at their annual convention held in Salmon
Arm the exact nature of the disease and its effects; also the results of experiments
he carried out, both on deer and domestic sheep. A paper will be published shortly on
this subject. The advertising programme carried out by the Game Commission has
had very gratifying results.
The building of cabins to facilitate patrols is being executed from year to year,
and before long we hope to have cabins in every detachment of this Division.
Some splendid big-game heads of mountain-sheep were taken from the Squilax
and Squam Bay areas this year. There are at least 250 animals in both districts.
Roughly speaking, around twenty rams were taken in the above areas this year.    To K 34 BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
Inspector C. G. Barber, Officer Commanding " C " Division, B.C. Police, thanks are due
for the splendid co-operation we have received from the N.C.O.'s and men under his
command. All N.C.O.'s were ready at all times to assist us, and assistance was also
given the Police on many occasions.
One arrest of a dangerous criminal is worthy of note. On June 24th, at 4.40 a.m.,
Inspector Barber, of " C " Police Division, together with Game Warden D. D. Ellis and
his famous Doberman dog " Reo " and Game Warden 0. Mottishaw, tracked Allen
Smaaslet, an escaped prisoner, from a farm-house near Cottonwood to the bank of the
Swift River, when the dog and officers caught up with him. Several shots were fired
by the accused, who was immediately placed under arrest by Inspector Barber. Had it
not been for the smart work of the dog " Reo " the arrest of the accused, who had
broken out of gaol at Wells, would have been perhaps delayed for a considerable period
of time.
Sergeant Woods-Johnson, assisted by other Constables, also travelled with Game
Warden Ellis and his dog for two days, but unfortunately was not present at the
moment of arrest. This is not the first occasion this dog has played a prominent part
in work of this kind. It says a great deal for Game Warden Ellis and the infinite
patience he has displayed in bringing his dog to such a high state of efficiency.
To the Forestry Department, under C. D. Orchard, Chief Forester, we are greatly
indebted for their co-operation. The same can be said of the Public Works Department,
under W. Ramsay, District Engineer at Kamloops, who assisted our Department
from time to time.
The whole-hearted co-operation of all officers in " C " Game Division in the course
of their duties showed that these officers were genuinely interested in their work.
" D " DIVISION   (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, PRINCE RUPERT, FORT
GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Big Game.
Big-game Animals.—Very favourable weather conditions, light snowfall and
medium temperatures, prevailed throughout the year, resulting in very good reports
being received in regard to the condition of all big-game animals within this Division.
Moose and Caribou.—Will greatly benefit from these favourable conditions and a
healthy increase in their numbers is anticipated.
Wapiti (Elk).—The band established in the vicinity of Lucerne, an overflow of
Jasper Park, is reported in good condition and increasing in numbers. Those discovered a few years ago in the Musqua area are holding their own, in spite of inroads
made by predatory animals, especially wolves. The Queen Charlotte band, established
by shipping eight animals to these islands a few years ago, is steadily increasing
in numbers.
The close season on these animals should be maintained over a period of years, or
until such time as their numbers become great enough to warrant an open season.
Bear (Black).—These animals are steadily increasing in numbers.
Bear (Grizzly).—These animals are to be found in every district in " D " Division.
As they are highly valued as trophies, and as they are not so numerous as the black
bear, the present season, September 1st in one year to June 30th in the following year,
should be maintained and a bag-limit set of one bear per annum.
Sheep (Rocky Mountain, Stonei, Fannin, Dahl).—Light snowfall throughout the
north and mild winter weather provided very favourable conditions for the conservation and propagation of these animals. These animals are greatly valued as trophies,
and in view of the steady increase in the number of big-game hunters the bag-limit
should be reduced to one of any species, but not to exceed a total of two sheep heads
in the aggregate.
Goat.—These animals are found in great number throughout the north. There is
no danger of them becoming extinct. Bag-limit and season, as set last year, could be
retained. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941. K 35
Fur-bearing Animals.
Mild weather and light snowfall allowed of more extensive trapping than in the
past, with the result that a greater quantity of pelts have been secured.
The beaver situation on Indian trap-lines remains very serious. Experimental
steps, to educate the Indians in the conservation of these animals, are being taken by
the Department of Indian Affairs. The full co-operation of the Game Department is
being extended, the hope being entertained by all interested that the Indians will be
made to realize that great benefits to themselves will be the result of their efforts at
conservation. However, whatever the result of the above experiment, efforts should be
continued to educate the younger generation in the conservation of all fur-bearers on
their trap-lines if permanent results are to be expected.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Owing to very favourable nesting season during the last three years, all
grouse show a considerable increase in numbers. This is especially true of the spruce
(fool hen), Franklin, and ruffed grouse.
The bag-limit and season in force last year is being recommended for the coming
season.
Migratory Game Birds.
An increase in ducks and geese is again reported from all sections of the Division.
Given a favourable nesting season this year, ducks and geese will again increase in
numbers.
A few changes in season and bag-limits have been suggested for the Western
District. The regulations covering bag-limits and season in the Eastern District are
satisfactory.
Vermin.
Timber-wolves.—Various reports have been received regarding the increase in the
number of these predators, the greatest increase being reported in the Yukon Boundary
area, especially south and east of Teslin Lake.
Recommendations have been received from various districts suggesting an increase
of $5 on each wolf killed, bringing the present bounty of $10 to $15. Owing to war
conditions, it will not be possible to grant such demands and they have not been encouraged in " D " Division.
Coyotes.—A decrease in the number of these predatory animals is reported. A few-
complaints have been received from sheepmen and permits to use poison to destroy
both wolves and coyotes have been issued. Fair results were reported by two sheep-
farmers, holders of permits to use poison for destroying predatory animals. The use
of poison in a general way should not be encouraged.
Game-protection.
Regular patrols were undertaken by all Game Wardens and some B.C. Police Constables in the northern section of the Division.
The Game Wardens used every available method of transportation, covering a total
of 101,973 miles, as follows:— Miles.
Train     3,382
Automobiles  68,286
Foot  (including dog-team)     7,462
Horse (including sleighs)     3,333
Boats  10,215
Planes .     9,295
Owing to the enormous size of the Detachments, only a very small portion of the
Division is covered by these patrols.
Patrols and incidental game work performed by Police Constables are of very great
assistance to the Department, but, owing to lack of information, they are not included
in the above resume. K 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Propagation.
No propagation work has been undertaken in the Division. Hungarian partridges,
introduced in the vicinity of McBride, Prince George, Vanderhoof, Smithers, and
Terrace, are under observation. Very few reports regarding these birds have been
received and no opinion as to the success of the undertaking can be expressed.
Good reports regarding the increase in the numbers of elk liberated on the Queen
Charlotte Islands have been received, and it has been unquestionably established that
the experiment has been very successful. These animals are now well established in
their new surroundings, but a close season should be maintained over a period of years,
or until they are in sufficient numbers to warrant a short open season. It would be
desirable to import one or two bulls, thereby improving and minimizing the danger
of inbreeding and resultant deterioration of the band now established on those islands.
Game Reserves.
No information has as yet been received regarding the Kunghit Island Game
Reserve.
Sanctuaries (or safety zones) established over the Townsite of Prince George,
Prince Rupert, and in the vicinity of Terrace and Lake Kathlyn, in the vicinity of
Smithers, are being patrolled regularly and are fulfilling the purpose for which they
were established.
Fur Trade.
From the data on hand at this office, a very successful year is expected. Fur-
traders in general are reporting a fair amount of fur offered for sale, especially in the
Finlay Forks and Fort Nelson areas.
The bulk of the fur caught in this northern Division is shipped to Vancouver fur
houses and a better estimate of the fur produced in the northern area may be obtained
in the Commission's office at Vancouver.
Fur-farming.
Fox-farming is losing ground in favour of mink-farming. Some 150 mink-farms
are now in operation in the Division. This growing industry should receive more
attention and encouragement. The services of a qualified adviser to the fur-farmers,
the study of diseases, care of same, etc., would greatly help the established fur-farmer
and encourage others to enter this very promising new industry.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of trappers and their trap-lines is progressing slowly. It is
expected that a number of outstanding applications and disputes, especially in the
north and north-east portion of the Division, will be finally disposed of this coming
summer.    However, another two years will be required to complete the work.
Registration of Guides.
Registering guides, drafting suitable regulations, registering hunting territories,
all are matters requiring immediate attention.
Seventy-five guides took out licences during last season, 108 non-resident big-game
hunters were accommodated, and the following trophies obtained: 34 caribou, 3 mule-
deer, 38 mountain-goat, 29 mountain-sheep, 29 moose, 25 grizzly bears, and 21 black
bears.
There is no doubt that with proper management this district could provide satisfactory hunting for a much larger number of hunters.
Special Patrols.
Although numerous patrols were undertaken by Game Wardens and Provincial
Constables stationed in " D " Division, it is very difficult to pick out any one of them
for special mention.    Let it be known, however, that every member of the Department REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1941. K 37
and the Constables carried out their patrols in a very efficient and satisfactory manner.
No patrols are being given special mention.
Hunting Accidents.
Three hunting accidents occurred during the year.
Bruno Westphal, of Pouce Coupe, B.C., a resident of British Columbia since April,
1941, on October 31st, 1941, whilst hunting without a licence, slipped and gun hit stump,
discharged and bullet passed through fleshy part of thigh. Recovered. Was prosecuted under section 32 (1) of the " Game Act," found guilty, fined $10 and costs $4.25.
Walter Parker, Lance-Bombardier, R.C.A., of Prince Rupert, B.C., on November
11th, 1941, at about 4 p.m. , grasping the gun by the muzzle to put it in boat, discharged
and shattered right forearm. Patient moved to Shaughnessy Hospital, Vancouver, B.C.
Lost use of right arm.    No action taken.
John Miller, of 4438 Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C., on November 19th,
1941, was shot by L. A. Lewis, of 3992 Marine Drive South-west, Vancouver, B.C., in
mistake for a bear. Leg has been amputated. No action taken by Police Officer i/c
of investigation.
Game-fish Culture.
No Government-operated hatcheries are to be found in " D " Division. Various
Rod and Gun Clubs, situated at McBride, Prince George, Smithers, and Prince Rupert,
operate their own hatcheries with very satisfactory results.
The Department supplied eyed Kamloops trout-eggs as follows:—
McBride Rod and Gun Club, McBride     50,000
Prince George Rod and Gun Club, Prince George  100,000
Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club, Smithers     68,000
Rupert Rod and Gun Club, Prince Rupert ;....    50,000
Ocean Falls Rod and Gun Club, Ocean Falls     50,000
Eggs planted in streams adjacent to Terrace     50,000
A good season is again expected. The various clubs mentioned above have again
made application for eyed Kamloops trout-eggs for their respective hatcheries.
It is very gratifying to see the constant interest shown by the members of the
above-mentioned clubs, and their efforts in this work should be encouraged.
I trust that their applications for eyed eggs, now before the Game Commission, will
receive favourable consideration.
Summary and General Remarks.
Generally speaking, game conditions have improved and a very good hunting season
may be expected next year. The relationship and co-operative spirit existing between
the British Columbia Police and our own Department has been maintained throughout
the Division.
Game Associations in the Division have been of great assistance to the Department,
especially in the operation of fish-hatcheries and planting of fry. Improved fishing is
beginning to be noticed in the various lakes planted.
To the officers of the British Columbia Police, and to all members of the various
Rod and Gun Clubs in " D " Division, I wish to express my sincere gratitude for the
kind assistance and moral support extended at all times to the members of the Game
Department in " D " Division.
" E " DIVISION   (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER
VALLEY DISTRICTS).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " E " Game
Division for the year ended December 31st, 1941.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear are common throughout the Lower Mainland and coastal regions,
and although complaints of these animals doing damage have been received during
the year these complaints were not as numerous as in 1940. K 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Grizzly bears are to be found at the heads of many of the coastal inlets and at
the heads of various lakes on the Lower Mainland.
Deer.—In the Powell River district reports indicate that a fair number of deer
are to be found in the territory surrounding the various inlets, but at the heads of these
inlets deer are scarce, due no doubt to the presence of wolves.
Many hunters complained of the large numbers of doe deer encountered during
the hunting season, but there are plenty of bucks which have not been observed as
often as heretofore, due to the very mild winters causing the buck deer to remain at
higher levels.
Deer are again coming back and seem to be in fair numbers in the vicinity of Upper
Pitt Lake.   From the Mission district comes a report that deer have been very plentiful.
Moose.—Reports still indicate moose as increasing in the Pemberton country, and
that these animals are fairly common in the Bella Coola Valley.
Mountain-goat.—Fairly large bands of mountain-goat are reported throughout
the Powell River country. A group of forty animals was seen in the early part of
December in Jervis Inlet, a few miles from Britain River.
In the Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows districts, mountain-goat have slightly increased.
Wapiti (Elk).—Reports show that the elk liberated at McNabs Creek, Howe Sound,
are increasing.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Corporal R. E. Allan, Powell River, advises that the average trapper continues to
receive the same returns from his trapping each year which would seem to indicate that
very little overtrapping is taking place.
Game Warden F. Urquhart, Pitt Meadows, reports that marten, mink, and racoon
are increasing, but that beaver, muskrats, otter, and weasel are scarce.
From the Chilliwack district, Game Warden A. J. Butler advised that muskrats
were to be found in fair numbers and that mink were fairly plentiful.
Red foxes have been constantly hunted in the portions of the Lower Mainland
where they are to be found and a good number of these animals was taken.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—In the vicinity of Powell River blue grouse are still scarce. This was
noticeable both in the nesting and hunting seasons. From Mission and Pitt Meadows
districts reports indicate that blue grouse were not very plentiful, especially in the
more settled sections of these districts.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—These birds seem to be fairly plentiful in most portions
of the Division, and with short open seasons there should be no fear of any great reduction in their numbers.
Pheasants.—A few of these birds were liberated on Texada Island and from information to hand there seems to have been no reduction in the original number of birds
turned loose. Short open seasons each year near Powell River have not apparently
affected the stand of pheasants in that section.
Most of the Game Wardens report pheasants as being quite plentiful and that
after the hunting season was closed a fairly good number of birds were to be observed,
which would indicate that there is sufficient breeding stock available for next spring.
California Quail.—These birds, although increasing in the Powell River area, are
not doing as well as expected, although at Matsqui they are becoming more plentiful,
but not in sufficient numbers to permit even a short open season. Quail are increasing
in the Ladner district.
European Partridge.—Partridge are slightly increasing in the Ladner area, but
elsewhere on the Lower Mainland these birds are either non-existent or scarce.
Migratory Game Birds.
Corporal R. E. Allan reports that conditions this year were very similar to those
encountered last year. At Theodosia Arm numerous full bags were obtained, consisting
mostly of mallards, with good flights of baldpates and teal.    Geese were not plentiful, REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1941. K 39
this possibly being due to numerous and frequent migrations, as geese were observed
flying over the district rather than resting as they generally do. The migration of
shore-birds was heavy, especially during the latter part of September. Band-tailed
pigeons were plentiful, while several flocks of swans were reported in the district.
From Pitt Meadows the report indicates ducks were very plentiful during the fall
months, although most of these birds left the district around the middle of November.
Geese also appeared in greater numbers than in past years, but migrated earlier than
usual.
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe, Mission, advises that band-tailed pigeons were very
abundant and that the same applied to ducks.    Wood-ducks were very plentiful.
From Ladner comes the report that a greater number of baldpate or widgeon
remained in the district throughout the fall and that other migratory game birds were
very numerous. Black brant and snow-geese were in good numbers, and varying species
of shore-birds were quite abundant.
Vermin.
Through the use of departmental dogs a number of cougar, coyotes, and red foxes
were destroyed during the year. Excellent work in the destruction of crows and
other vermin was done with the assistance of most of the organized Game Associations
and interested sportsmen.
Later on in this report will be found a statement of vermin destroyed by Game
Wardens in " E " Division.
Game-protection.
Constant patrol-work has been carried out in every section of the Division.
Members of the British Columbia Police, game and other organizations, as well
as interested sportsmen, have always assisted in the protection of game in the Division.
Game Propagation.
As in past years, a fairly extensive programme of pheasant liberations was carried
out and California quail were also liberated in different areas.
Of great assistance in the propagation of game birds is the use by the farmer
of what is known as the " flushing bar." This is used during the cutting of hay and
saves many nesting and young birds. Several farmers in the Matsqui district willingly
used this device and it is hoped that many more farmers will follow this most excellent
example.
Game Reserves.
Game continued to increase on the Goat Island Game Reserve, Powell Lake. Deer
and black bear, being more plentiful in the North Vancouver Game Reserve, were the
cause for the receipt of numerous complaints of damage being done. Thousands of
migratory game birds were found resting on the Burnaby Lake Game Reserve at
different periods of the year.
Due to the need of practising economy, no bird-banding operations were carried
on at the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve, near Chilliwack.
There would seem to be little doubt that these game reserves and bird sanctuaries
have been responsible in increasing, to a great extent, the game-supply in the surrounding districts.
Fur Trade.
From fur royalties collected during the year, the fur-catch has not been as great
as in the previous year. Muskrats were not plentiful in some of the Fraser Valley
sections, due to very high-water conditions during the spring months and to fairly
heavy trapping in 1940.
Fur-farming.
Mink-farming, notwithstanding war conditions, seems to be thriving particularly
amongst those farmers who thoroughly understand the business. A number of fur-
farmers, operating on a small scale, have gone out of business for one reason or the other.
_ K 40    I BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Generally, reports indicate that the system of trap-line registration is working
very smoothly and very few complaints or disputes amongst registered trap-line holders
have arisen during the year.
Registration of Guides.
The mainland coast is really not what might be termed a big-game hunting area
and consequently there are only a few registered guides in the Division. However,
excellent grizzly bear hunting is obtainable in different sections more especially at the
heads of the inlets along the coast.
Special Patrols.
Game Wardens A. J. Butler, Chilliwack; P. M. Cliffe, Mission; and Corporal
R. E. Allan, Powell River, report making a number of special patrols into outlying
sections of the districts under their control. Other Game Wardens advise no special
patrols were undertaken as routine and regular patrols were made during the year to
most, if not all, portions of their respective districts.
Hunting Accidents.
Four accidents took place during the year, one of which proved fatal. Particulars
of these accidents can be obtained on examining the statement of accidents which is
to be found later on in this report.
Game-fish Culture,
Corporal R. E. Allan, Powell River, advises that game-fish propagation work in
his district is beginning to show results. Fair catches of Kamloops trout have been
made in Powell and West Lakes.
Game Warden Frank Urquhart reports that sport-fishing in his district was quite
favourable and that steelhead trout-fishing in the Coquitlam and Alouette Rivers was
excellent due, in his opinion, to the continued annual planting of trout fry and eggs.
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe, Mission, writes: " With the assistance of the members
of the Agassiz-Harrison Rod and Gun Club, a huge dam was blown out of the outlet
of Weaver Lake, thereby giving the trout in this lake access to a suitable spawning-
creek."
A statement showing the trout liberations made during the year is to be found in
the statistical section of this report.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
All reports submitted indicate game conditions generally are improving and all
Game Wardens express their appreciation for the assistance and co-operation received
from the British Columbia Police, Game and Farmers' Organizations, as well as
sportsmen,
REPORT UPON SOME DISEASES AND PARASITES OF GAME BIRDS AND
GAME AND  FUR-BEARING MAMMALS  IN BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
By I. McT. Cowan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology,
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C.
During the period covered by this report diseased or dead birds and mammals were
from time to time brought to the laboratory for determination of the nature and cause
of the pathological condition. The majority of these were referred to me by Commissioner F. R. Butler, of the Provincial Game Commission, either directly or through
members of the warden staff.    A few were derived from other sources.
Many of the parasite examinations were performed upon mammals apparently in
good health. These were obtained from trappers for purposes of anatomical study,
and at the same time census of the parasitic entozoa was undertaken. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1941. K 41
Inasmuch as a special study of the Coast deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus)
is in progress and will be the subject of a later report, the present paper excludes
this species.
GAME-BIRD DISEASES AND INJURIES.
Sooty Grouse  (Dendragapus obscurus fuliginosus).
Bronchopneum onia.
An adult male sooty grouse was discovered freshly dead near Luxton, V.I., on
April 1st, 1936, by Game Warden B. Cash. This bird gave no signs of external violence
and its crop was full. Internal organs were normal, except for the respiratory system.
There was a moderate muco-purulent nasal discharge, the lungs were enlarged, congested, and discoloured, and a yellow cheesy mass occluded the secondary bronchi. The
illness had been a brief one as the bird was in good flesh. The pathological conditions
seem to point to bronchopneumonia as the cause of death.
Fowl Pox (Epithelioma contagiosum).
The occurrence of this disease in Dendragapus was first noted by Cowan (1940:311)
on the basis of two infected birds received from Game Warden R. S. Hayes, of Duncan,
B.C. At the time, in the absence of experimental studies necessary to determine the
viral nature of the tumours, they were reported as being low-grade papillary carcinomata
upon the basis of histological examinations conducted by Dr. G. A. McCurdy, Director
of the Department of Pathology at the Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, B.C. Since
that time further studies have revealed the identity of the causative organism and
a separate report upon this phase is in course of preparation.
To date the disease has been noted only in the Cowichan Valley. The two 1938
specimens were among four diseased birds shot on Hill 60, west of Duncan. Two
additional birds were received from the same locality in October, 1941. Subsequently
a diseased bird was taken, and another one examined in a hunter's bag, from Cottonwood Creek, in the Cowichan Valley, approximately 30 miles west of Duncan.
In all specimens the lesions were extensive. Large and small tumours were
scattered about the head, the largest being at the base of the beak, on the supraorbital
comb or on the naked periorbital skin. In the latter site the vision was impaired
and doubtless would have become completely obstructed and led thus to the death of
the bird by starvation. One bird bore a large tumour at the base of the upper mandible
that had extended on to the palate, thus interfering with normal feeding and respiration. Smaller tumours, Vie to Vg inch in diameter, were numerous upon the tarsi and
digits.
The method of occurrence suggests that the disease was transported to the host
by biting-flies. Mosquitoes and black-flies are almost the only species bothering wild
birds in the infected area, and doubtless representatives of either one or both groups
are responsible.
Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus).
Scabies (Scaly Leg).
Scaly leg is of widespread occurrence among grouse of this species. From 1938
to 1941 five affected birds were received from various parts of the Cowichan Valley,
on southern Vancouver Island. Others were sent in from 150-Mile House, Clinton,
Kamloops, and Hope, making it evident that the disease flourishes both in the dry belt
and the coastal humid belt.
The organism causing the disease, the mite Cnemidocoptes mutans, was isolated
from the infected birds and identified by Professor G. J. Spencer, of the Department
of Zoology, University of British Columbia.
The disease is easily recognized by the enlargement of the feet and legs. In grouse
the infestation proceeds rapidly and few but serious cases occur. Typically the enlarged
scales along the dorsal surface of the toes and legs are undermined by the mites,
hypertrophy of the dermal tissue follows and leads to sloughing of the scales, claws,
and even entire segments of the toes.    There is a marked tendency in the ruffed grouse K 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
for the hypertrophy to localize down the postero-medial side of the tarsus, where a
large, plate-like extension of the leg may develop.
In two birds the infection had spread to the skin of the breast at the point touched
by the legs during roosting.
Loss of the toes and concomitant malformation of the feet prevents perching and
scratching so that death from malnutrition almost invariably terminates the disease.
Avian tuberculosis.
A single ruffed grouse from Hope, B.C., was found to have this disease. It was
shot by a hunter and sent in for examination.
The liver bore a small number of the greyish-white tumours characteristic of the
disease. The kidneys and perirenal area were extensively altered, these organs being
entirely obscured by large tumours with yellowish, cheesy centres.
California Quail (Lophortyx californica).
Scabies (Scaly Leg).
In August, 1939, a California quail picked up in a dying condition near Victoria
was brought to the laboratory. This bird's legs were infected with the scaly leg mite
(Cnemidocoptes mutans) and presented an appearance similar to that of ruffed grouse
with the disease. The terminal phalanges of the anterior digits had been sloughed
and death was due to malnutrition.
Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).
Adventitious cyst.
An adult cock pheasant secured at Duncan, B.C., by Game Warden R. S. Hayes
was forwarded to the laboratory on October 12th, 1941. This bird bore a cyst 46 mm.
in diameter beneath the skin of the breast overlying the carina of the sternum.
Apparently the bird had impaled itself on some sharp object that had shattered
the carina and given access to infective organisms. The resulting pus-pocket containing particles of the splintered bone had been surrounded with the heavy cyst-wall.
Regeneration of the injured muscle tissue had proceeded normally and at the time the
pheasant was shot the cyst was merely held into a crater-like depression on the breast
by the overlying skin. This was broken in several places already and before long the
cyst would have been sloughed.
American Widgeon (Mareca americana).
Avian tuberculosis.
A bird shot at Cowichan Bay and sent in by R. S. Hayes had this disease in an
advanced stage.
The liver, kidneys, spleen, intestine, and other organs in the coelom were heavily
studded with the tumorous growths characteristic of the ailment.
American Pintail (Dafila acute tzitzihoa).
Duck disease, Botulism.
An ailing female pintail picked up near Ladner, B.C., on October 10th, 1936, and
sent to the laboratory by Commissioner F. R. Butler gave every evidence of being
afflicted with botulism poisoning.
The bird had been found on the margin of a small pot-hole which was not
frequented by many ducks. Heavy rains followed within a few days and eliminated
any chance of further poisoning of water-fowl
MAMMAL DISEASES.
Mule-deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus).
Fascioloidiasis magna.
Portions of a yearling buck shot by Game Warden H. Tyler, of Invermere, on
Bugaboo Creek, November 19th, 1941, were received on November 26th.    In the cover- ing letter this deer was described as being in poor condition, blind in one eye, and
with numerous deposits of black pigment in the mesenteries and around the intestines.
The parts sent in for examination consisted of liver, lung, and omental tissue. An
examination of these revealed in the liver several closed cysts filled with an inky-black
fluid in which were the degenerating remains of the giant liver-fluke, Fascioloides
magna (Bassi). The pigment deposition in the mesenteries is typical of Fascioloidiasis
magna in the Bovide, according to Swales (1935:177), but is an infrequent accompaniment of the disease in cervids.
The eye condition was probably in no way related to the liver-fluke infestation.
Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis).
During December, 1941, parts of three bighorn sheep were received from the Inver-
mere district, adjacent to Kootenay National Park. Each exhibited different pathological conditions as follows:—
Bronchopneumonia.
Case number 41-12-3.1 a ewe, found in a weakened condition and shot. Portions
of the liver, lungs, and small intestine were received at the laboratory.
The lung-lobe included showed extensive bronchopneumonia. Four-fifths of the
portion of the lung received exhibited inflammatory changes. The inflamed areas were
blue grey in colour, solid to the touch and slightly elevated above the normal tissue.
Scattered over the surface were several yellowish pus-foci from 3 to 6.4 mm. in diameter.
There were no lung-worms in the parts sent for examination, but their absence
does not preclude the possibility of their presence elsewhere in the lung and their
complicity in inducing the pneumonic condition. I have frequently found in deer, cases
of chronic verminous bronchopneumonia in which few or no worms were present at the
sites of the most pronounced lesions.
As a possibly unrelated condition this individual was also suffering from icterus.
The gall-bladder was greatly distended with bile thickened but not yet semisolid. The
liver was anemic, the biliary passages infiltrated with bile, and in the areas around
these fatty degeneration was in progress. Discoloration of the other visceral parts
by the bile pigments was evident. Absence of the duodenum and lower part of the
bile-duct rendered it impossible to determine the nature or cause of the stricture.
Case number 41-12-3.2 was a ewe found dead with her twin lambs grazing near by.
The organs sent to me were normal except for the lungs which gave evidence of widespread bronchopneumonia which had no doubt been the cause of death.
Hemorrhagic septicemia.
The entire viscera of a bighorn ram, preserved in 10-per-cent. formalin solution,
were received on January 11th, 1942. This animal was noticed to be in diseased condition and was shot for examination.
The lungs of this animal bore pneumonic lesions involving approximately one-
fourth their external area. Pus foci were not present but localized hemorrhagic areas
were numerous. In addition small local hemorrhages were present beneath the visceral
peritoneum of the small intestine. Enteritis was evident, but may have been complicated by a heavy infestation of the nematode Nematodirus.
Inasmuch as isolation and identification of Pasteurella oviseptica, the organism
causing hemorrhagic septicemia, was not made, the identification of the malady in
this instance is only provisional.
Serious outbreaks of this disease have been recorded among the bighorn flocks
of Glacier National Park, Montana and Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado
(Potts, 1938:893), where heavy losses have occurred. From the investigations of this
and other workers it would seem that the causative organism is frequently present in
the respiratory passages of healthy animals and that any circumstance setting up
inflammation in these organs may provide conditions leading to outbreaks of this
disease. Inclement weather, poor food conditions, and irritation of the respiratory
passages by dust or ashes following forest fires may thus be predisposing factors in
the appearance of outbreaks of hemorrhagic septicemia in wild bighorn herds. K 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mink (Mustela vision).
Fifteen ranch-raised mink were examined during the above period. All had died
in captivity and were brought in by the ranchers.
In eight of the fifteen death was determined as being due to heat shock and
asphyxia. Circumstances of death were invariably the same. The animals, usually
young of the year, would be in good health in the forenoon. During the heat of a
midsummer day they would retire to the nest-box, in which they would be found dead
at the time of the evening feeding.
The most pronounced anatomical change visible at necropsy was congestion of
the lungs.
Provision of adequate shade and ventilation of the nest-boxes was followed by
cessation of losses from this cause.
Six of the remainder had apparently died from food poisoning but exhibited
anatomical changes difficult to interpret. Characteristically there was considerable
subcutaneous oedema and the fat was abnormally dark.
These mink had been fed on a diet consisting largely of frozen herring and candle-
fish, and it was thought that spoiling of these fish prior to freezing may have been
responsible for the rather heavy losses suffered by certain mink-ranches feeding that
diet during the summer of 1939.
INTERNAL PARASITES.
The parasites listed below were removed from animals that in most cases showed
no ill-effect ascribable to their presence. Of course, it is always possible that subclinical conditions were present and that changed circumstances might have resulted
in any of the helminth species becoming of critical importance to the host.
Many of these parasites were identified by Dn W. E. Swales, of the Dominion
Institute of Parasitology, Macdonald College, P.Q., or by Dr. Benjamin Schwartz and
his associates, of the Zoological Division, Bureau of Animal Industry, Washington, D.C.
Spotted Skunk (Spilogale gracilis olympica).
An adult male secured near Vancouver, B.C., on November 21st, 1940, bore in
the frontal sinuses thirty-five small, blood-red nematodes belonging to the genus
Skrjabingylus, possibly chitwoodorum. Presence of the parasites had caused degeneration of the overlying bone and must have occasioned the host considerable discomfort.
Weasel (Mustela ciconganii).
Five of seven weasels examined had the frontal sinuses infested with Skrjabingylus
nasicola. These weasels came from the Cowichan District, V.I., and from Alta Lake
on the British Columbia mainland.
This parasite, as reported by Swales (1938), is the cause of the frequently
observed cavities into the frontal sinuses of weasels in Canada.
Bob Cat (Lynx fasciatus fasciatus).
A young female from Alta Lake, B.C., taken December 6th, 1940, had in its small
intestine four specimens of the nematode Toxascaris leonina, and three sexually mature
tapeworms of the species Tenia teniaformis.
Domestic Cat (Felis domestica).
Three feral domestic cats from southern Vancouver Island contained the broad-
necked tapeworm Tenia teniaformis. A specimen from Malahat Station, V.I., B.C.,
contained also seven round-worms identified as Belascaris mystax, a species known to
be of frequent occurrence in domestic cats.
Mountain-lion (Felis concolor Vancouverensis).
Two specimens were examined, one from Qualicum, V.I., B.C., and the other from
Nanoose Bay, V.I,, B.C. The first contained in its small intestine approximately 140
Tenia teniaformis.    The other bore four T. teniaformis and three Tenia hydatigena. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941. K 45
The first of these tapeworms occurs as a larva in small rodents, such as squirrels,
mice, and muskrats. The prevalence of the adult worm in these two mountain-lions
indicates that this carnivore must consume larger numbers of small rodents than is
generally thought to be the case.
T. hydatigena as a larva is found on Vancouver Island in sheep and deer and is
acquired by the mountain-lion as a result of eating these animals.
Black Bear (Euarctos americanus vancouveri).
Specimens from Nanaimo and Quatsino, V.I., B.C., both contained large roundworms, Toxascaris transfuga, in the small intestine and were without other parasites.
An old bear from Gordon River, V.I., B.C., was not parasitized.
Beaver  (Castor canadensis leucodonta).
An adult male and juvenile female from Alberni, V.I., B.C., taken February 19th,
1940, and forwarded by Game Warden A. Monks, were heavily parasitized.
In the ceca of both were large numbers of the pink, eggrshaped fluke Stichorchis
subtriquetrum. Two hundred of these were present in the juvenile and 130 in the adult.
There was no observable damage to the intestine.
The stomachs of both beavers contained between 200 and 300 individuals of the
small, reddish nematode worm Travassosius rufus.
Varying Hare (Lepus americanus pallidus).
One of four snowshoe rabbits collected at Lac du Bois, 14 miles north of Kamloops,
B.C., on June 1st, 1940, bore two large cysts of the tapeworm Tenia serialis. These
cysts appeared as fluid-filled membraneous sacs, 1% by 2 inches, imbedded in the muscle
of the back. Within these cysts the whitish " heads " of the many daughter cysts
were visible.
Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis).
The small intestine of a ram sent in for examination from Invermere, B.C., on
January 22nd, 1942, contained two whip worms (Trichuris ovis) and approximately
ninety round-worms of the genus Nematodirus.
The intestine gave evidence of mild enteritis that may have been induced by the
latter parasite.
Moose (Alces americana).
In November, 1941, a small piece of meat taken from the thigh of a moose shot at
Fort Fraser, B.C., was forwarded to me by Dr. W. R. Gunn, Provincial Live Stock
Inspector. Imbedded in the surface of this muscle tissue were seven tapeworm cysts
each 10 mm. in total length. The condition of these upon arrival was such that
identification was impossible. Attempts made to obtain additional specimens in better
state of preservation have so far been unsuccessful.
In all probability the adult tapeworms will be found in dogs, wolves, or coyotes.
LITERATURE CITED.
Cowan, I. McT.   1940.   Two apparently fatal grouse diseases.   Journ. Wildlife Manag.
4:  311-312.
Potts, M. K.   1938.    Observations on diseases of bighorn in Rocky Mountain National
Park.    Trans. Third N. Amer. Wildlife Conf. 893-897.
Swales, W. E.    1935.    The life cycle of Fascioloides magna (Bassi, 1875) the large
liver fluke of ruminants in Canada.    Canada Journ. Research 12:   177-215.
Swales, W. E.    1938.    Skrjabingylus  nasicola   (Leuckart,   1842)   Petrow,   1927,   a
nematode parasitic in the frontal sinuses of American Mustelide.   In Livro Jubilar
Prof. Travassos, Rio de Janiero, Brazil, 111:   455-458.  REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1941.
K 47
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.
Comparative Statistics.
Calendar Year.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences and
Fees.
Revenue
derived from
Fur Trade.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
1913
188
181
7
84,417.50
$109,600.80
1914      ...   .
294
273
21
5,050.00
92,034.20
1915
279
258
21
4,097.50
72,974.25
1916  	
127
110
17
2.050.00
66,186.97
1917   	
111
97
10
1,763.50
65,487.50
1918
194
167
13
5
3,341.00
75,537.00
1919
267
242
25
36
6,024.50
116,135.00
1920   	
293
266
27
46
6,0-73.00
132,296.50
$5,291.39
1921 	
329
312
17
74
.   6,455.00
114,842.00
24,595.80
1922 	
359
317
42
44
7,275.00
127,111.50
51,093.89
1923       	
309
280
29
24
5,676.50
121,639.50
60.594.18
1924  -	
317
283
-   34
24
4,758.00
125,505.50
56,356.68
1925   	
296
279
17
43
5.825.00
123,950.50
56,287.78
1926	
483
439
44
39
7,454.00
135,843.50
62,535.13
1927 	
518
469
49
47
10,480.50
139,814.00
71,324.96
1928	
439
406
33
29
7,283.50
140,014.75
58,823.07
1929   	
602
569
33
54
9,008.00
142,028.22
47,329.89
1930
678
636
32
33
9,572.75
147,660 00
45,161.11
1931	
676
625
51
40
8,645.00
137,233.31
46,091.08
1932     	
538
497
41
37
5,493.50
141,269.55
40.363.79
1933   	
498
474
24
22
3,531.00
135,876.94
44,167.48
1934   ...	
477
454
23
4
5,227.82
149,955.11
47,102.81
1935 	
454
438
16
19
4,399.50
148,689.64
49,831.95
1936                        .. -
451
436
15
14
3,965.00
157,647.30
52,196 50
1937   .
552
33
20
5,332.50
177,771.33
53,697.48
1938
613
574
39
42
5,729.50
192,024.07
44 963.87
1939  	
547
526
21
21
4,776.50
193,170.53
49,187.00
1940	
440
419
21
18
5,197.00
188,605.20
68,466.33
1941              	
446
430
16
9
4,977.50
213,267.67
63,125.30
Totals	
11,808
11,009
771
744
$163,890.07
$3,884,199.34
$1,098,587.47 K 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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s REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941.
K 49
Statement of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences issued, January 1st to December 31st, 1941.
Government Agents.
Anglers.
Guides.
Free
Farmers.
Prospectors.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
Total.
Alberni 	
767
161
$767.00
161.00
52
10
3
22
14
2
13
3
1
1
25
	
16
1
16
1
1
6
9
-----
28
19
28
9
23
35
101
.    138
17
27
24
26
66
92
40
136
16
22
76
72
4
460
25
68
104
11
88
20
10
68
13
1
182
52
65
36
147
45
22
17
10
22
13
30
3
21
3
10
19
19
14
4
64
1
5
38
6
31
17
1
5
45
17
60
66
16
9
2
22
12
63
28
16
45
2
$5.00
1.00
$772.00
Ashcroft _	
162.00
Atlin 	
Clinton 	
Cranbrook 	
Cumberland 	
204
1,359
1,025
782
736
204.00
1,359.00
1,025.00
782.00
736.00
116.00
161.00
162.00
1,287.00
298.00
1,056.00
292.00
276.00
1,308.00
199.00
142.00
3.838.00
200.00
935.00
1.00
752.00
1.00
2.00
698.00
8.00
263.00
1,518.00
395.00
$260.00
50.00
2.00
6.00
466.00
1,415.00
1,025.00
782 00
15.00
110.00
70.00
Fort Fraser	
110 00
Golden   	
116
161
162
1,287
298
1,056
292
276
1,308
199
142
3,838
200
935
1
752
1
2
698
8
263
1,518
395
186.00
161.00
10.00
65.00
Kamloops 	
7.00
1,359.00
298 00
Kelowna 	
1,056.00
15.00
4.00
Merritt 	
276.00
Nanaimo   ...	
2.00
5.00
1,310.00
Nelson   _	
New Denver.	
5.00
209.00
142.00
5.00
3,843.00
200 00
Oliver	
5.00
125.00
80.00
5.00
940 00
126.00
Powell River 	
752.00
Prince George	
19.00
1.00
4.00
14.00
100.00
8 00
Quesnel 	
Revelstoke	
80.00
5.00
102.00
268.00
1,518.00
5.00
400 00
30.00
45.00
1.00
23.00
3.00
1.00
10.00
2.00
31.00
5,722
1,109
2,067
47
312
5,722.00
1,109.00
2,067.00
47.00
312.00
5.790.00
1,112.00
2,068.00
140.00
95.00
197.00
Windermere    .   	
409.00
Totals	
28.199
$28,199.00
243
$1,215.00
2,369
756
$115.00
$29,529.00
Note.—Holders of Prospectors' Firearms Licences are required to pay a fee of $1, when they hold a Provisional
Miner's Certificate. K 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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K 51
Statement of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms Licences and Anglers' Licences,
January 1st to December 31st, 1941.
Non-resident Ordinary
Firearms Licences.
Anglers' Licences
(Minors).
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.                 Amount.
,    3
2
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
3
7
7
2
51
1
3
18
10
1
51
1
2
23
124
13
3
1
7
1
2
9
$1.00
1.00
3.00
7.00
7.00
2.00
54.00
1.00
3.00
18.00
10.00
1.00
51.00
1.00
2.00
23.00
124.00
13.00
3.00
$1.00
Atlin *	
1.00
3.00
7.00
7.00
2.00
$9.00
63.00
1.0"!
6.00
9.00
18.00
3.00
13.00
1.00
51.00
1.00
2.00
23.00
124.00
13.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
1.00
7.00
1.00
2.00
9.00
1.00
15.00
22.00
1.00
3.00
5.00
9.00
Totals-        	
14         [         $42.00 _.
\
345
$345.00
$387.00 K 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur Traders' and Taxidermists' and Tanners'
Licences and Royalties on Fur, January 1st to December 31st, 1941.
Government
Resident
fur-tkaders'
Licences.
Agent for
Non-resident          Royalty or
Fur-traders'         Tax on Fur.
Licences.
Taxidermists'     Tanners'
Licences.        Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.       No.
Amt.
1
3
3
2
29
1
9
1
1
6
1
1
34
13
17
11
11
5
53
4
2
29
1
$25.00
2
2
1
23
1
19
7
1
7
103
16
2
19
4
3
10
3
' 47
40
4
306
113
39
4
22
2
22
3
29
27
631
9
66
10
5
$3.10
.50
34-8.43
40.00
40.80
79.85
61.25
65.15
2,700.77
55.78
3.93
110.59
33.30
2.90
1
1
1
1
I
::::
i
$28.10
.50
Atlin     	
75.00
75.00
50.00
423.43
115.00
$2.00
92.80
79.85
61.25
65.15
725.00
25.00
3,425.77
Golden	
80.78
3.93
225.00
2.00
337.59
33.30
2.90
25.00
25.00
25.00
61.35
5.35
343.17
177.40
	
86.35
2.00
5.35
150.00
495.17
177.40
25.00
25.00
850.00
325.00
425.00
25.00
3.40
9.846.58
28.40
2.00
10,698.58
1.141.70   1     ....
1,466.70
946.95
15.50
454.59
1.20
67.85
56.80
1,452.51
342.10
37,954.14
41.55
194.36
99.45
3.00
....
2
3
1,371.95
15.50
Quesnel	
275.00
729.59
1.20
67.85
56.80
275.00
125.00
1,325.00
100.00
50.00
725.00
25.00
1,727.51
467.10
$400.00
4.00
39,683.14
.   	
$2.00
143.55
6.00
250.36
824.45
28.00
Totals
238
$5,950.00  |       2   |  $400.00
1            1
1,600
$56,755.30
9
$18.00
i
$2.00
$63,125.30 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1941.
K 53
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1941, inclusive.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-traders'
and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
1921... '              	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
39,423.87
44,238.00
62,745.33
56.755.30
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
5,540.00
4,949.00
5,721.00
6,370.00
$30 790 80
1922    _	
57,458 89
1923   	
67,524.18
62,446.68
1924   '	
1925  	
56,287.78
1926    	
62,535.13
1927 	
71,324.96
1928 ... - '	
58,823.07
1929                           	
47,329.89
1930   	
45,161.11
1931 	
45,981.08
1932           	
40,363.79
1933	
44,167.48
1934 -.  	
47,102.81
1935                                                         	
49,831.95
1936                              -  - -	
52,196.50
1937                                                                                    _~~	
53,697.48
1938                                                                                    	
44,963.87
1939      .       .                                                                    	
49,187.00
1940                                                                                     -
68,466.33
1941 -	
63,125.30
Totals  	
$993,011.08
-
$125,755.00
$1,118,766.08
. K 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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cr REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941.
K 55
Particulars of Various Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has
been paid, January 1st to December 31st, 1941.
Number and Kind of Pelts.
Government
Agents.
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Mink.
Muskrats.
O
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Squirrel.
Weasel.
V
p
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Ci
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r*
8
1
1
Ashcroft	
10
Atlin	
131
8
18
9
83
385
427
5
9
299
24
Cranbrook	
1
1
Cumberland	
18
548
245
Fernie 	
51
1
1
9
5
18
10
1,130
52
87
67
73
1
30
414
1,248
4,512
99
5
14.5911   3.9771     1
Golden-	
2
2
1
3
17
1
424
1
139|        47
Greenwood	
8
691        11
Kamloops	
27
5
2
6
3
3
18|        14
562
337
82
Kaslo   	
327
	
Kelowna 	
29
Merritt	
239
2
1
Nanaimo 	
19
 [          6
Nelson 	
l
166
99
5
4
22|      702
504
12
486
338
1
89
9
  [  1,529
Penticton	
	
 |        34
Pouce Coupe 	
15
4,789
89
41
171
260
370
l,815j  1,587
10,708
23
3
51,634
3,780
17
Prince George   „„
2
211
34
94
26
23
10
12
95[     614
957
2
12
21,685
2,108] 18
Prince Rupert 	
243
2
2
2
1
	
1
253|  1,182         904
67
855
2981    3
Princeton 	
--
59
«l 	
—
   | ....
3
18
1
	
1
9
.....
8
26
15[        41[     1,074
9
14,682
291] *...
Revelstoke	
   | ....
Rossland	
16
	
14
1
2
1]        25]          51
1,815
431     2
1
484
60
.....
1
14
1
....   |      568| 	
458|     294|    1,063
10
12
   |  . ..
Smithers ., 	
8,868
1,9301.11
Telegraph Creek ..
Vancouver	
133
4
4
2
297
8
11
1191       55|          72
4
49
46
13,678
338
1,200
445
820
5,844| 9,864! 94,901
563
2,627
267
283,655[19,644|119
Vernon  	
	
98
1
_.
1
 |      125
10
1201  | ....
18
1
1
27
86
2
19|  1,380
 |       82
1
523
20
8]        llj    1
Williams Lake	
1,985]        80] ....
10
 |       10
 1  -
Totals  	
94
21,107
585
2,144
597
863
265J1.295
1
9,200|20,675
116,722
706
2,648j313
1
400,938
32,949|246 K 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1941.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Fur confiscated.
22. ...
Feb.
7
6 ....
10   _
11    ..
11... .
11	
1	
22    ..
••
22	
17	
	
24 .....
Mar.
4
8	
15  	
27	
June
3
5 .....
13
16	
Julv
14	
17	
18	
Sept.
Dec.
18.
5
18...
29..._.
29	
31	
.„
31
31	
Drinkwater, F. E. _
Rautenberg, J. E.Wilkinson, A -.
Frizzi, E. „ 	
Prince, J. M	
Todd, G 	
Benoit, D._.	
Conley, T 	
Lezard, G __
Bone, J 	
Purkess, A. J.  	
Blankinship, G.— —
Charlie, S _
Stranig, N.  	
McDougall, J— —
Tomaski, J.   	
Ormheim, J. E 	
Haralson, L. N 	
Agar, D., and Carmichael, G._
Wells, P., and Spincer, H. 	
Cassidy, J.  	
McGuire, C 	
Pete, S    -  	
Flanagan, W 	
Olson, C.  	
McGinnis, G., and Edwards, J..
Maxted, W 	
Garten, F. C -	
Housman, J. J 	
Bjorklund, H ___
Rene, J., et al 	
Young, A.  — 	
Calder, 3	
Totals	
Alberni -
Courtenay.. _
Williams Lake,.
Springhouse —
Fort St. James .
Fort St. James .
Fort St. James .
Mission __	
Penticton	
Penticton.-—	
Edmonds -	
Kamloops	
Mission  .
Kamloops.—	
Merritt	
Kamloops	
Prince Rupert -
Fort Nelson	
Nanaimo	
Port Simpson.-
Atlin	
Dawson Creek..
Smithers —
Masset __.
Australian	
Keremeos	
Clinton	
Vavenby 	
Forest Grove —
Blind Bay	
Clinton ....
Sidney	
Kamloops	
29
2
2
1
9
6
7
1
1
16
1      17        9
13
30
147   |     1   ]
I I
Note.—The sum of $1,462.87 was received in 1941 from the sale of confiscated fur.
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1941.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Firearms
confiscated.
Rifles.
Shotguns.
Jan.  31 —  _	
Sisco, G.	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
.,    16	
May   18	
Aug.    4 	
Kotowick, H--  	
Proctor, W 	
Nelson, J  __	
Maguire, D  	
Lindgren, L 	
Cloverdale	
Merritt
....
„    18	
Nov.    7	
Oct.     4	
Mission	
Dec.   12
Port Moody
,,     15 __„	
1
Totals  	
,9
Nil
Note.—The sum of $46 was received in 1941 from the sale of confiscated firearms. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941.
K 57
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1941.
Government Agents.
Coyotes.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Total.
2
87
275
43
115
4
20
21
129
42
34
95
56
17
29
2
91
47   ■
69
22
22
9
88
1
2
4
76
6
1
72
99
277
23
21
238
8
3
1
10
5
5
5
1
1
2
26
2
6
■   7
9
3
3
7
2
3
6
17
1
.    1
• 23
3
25
11
$120.00
Atlin                                                          	
880.00
14.00
239.00
565.00
190.00
75.00
161.00
1,065.00
Golden                                                       	
23.00
55.00
72.00
708.00
114.00
168.00
190.00
105.00
247.00
45.00
799.00
163.00
30.00
994.00
227.00
Prince George  	
3,014.00
623.00
15.00
269.00
44.00
2 398 00
7                         9
83
498                       85
105
449.00
211.00
2,221.00
1,924                 1,002
1
196
$16,868.00
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1941.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
285
196
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
14 840 00
172
20,398 40
24,397.00
41,077.00
65,377.95
5,770
10,046
1927                           	
2,487
1,025
1,389
403
1
50,709.25
	
42,122.00
1930                               	
36,090.25
3,427
42,036.15
1932                                	
80.00
1933                               	
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
1,002
6,285.00
1934                                      	
6,825.00
1935                	
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
2,038
1,924
-     ~
	
12,374.00
1936                                    	
20,350.00
1937                                	
19,540.00
1938                                     	
21,018.00
26,399.00
1940                           	
23,131.00
1941                                   	
16,868.00
Totals  	
10,299
7,489
72,707
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$550,412.80 K 58                                                       BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1941.
Species.
               1
Amount.
*
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
o
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1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
----
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$50.00
55.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
65.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
26.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
120.00
40.00
25.00
80.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
125.00
50.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
55.00
25.00
40.00
Clinton—
Belknap, W., Port Orchard, Wash 	
Hilker, A. H., Seattle, Wash  	
Huyette, F. C, Ventura, Cal.	
Krebs, 0. M., Anacortes, Wash  	
Lillis, J. G-, Seattle, Wash.__                     	
Leer, R. L., Arlington, Wash „ _	
Mevers, Clyde, Glendale, Cal  —  	
Nickelsen, Dr. D., Portland, Ore. _ _	
Nickelsen, Ted., Portland, Ore.__ _   _	
Oakson, E., Seattle, Wash.                                       	
Porter, Dr. J. B., Port Orchard, Wash. , - -                       	
Skogh, J., Seattle, Wash. - .,, - __	
Sandona, T., Clu Glenn, Wash	
Thelan, P. H.. Tacoma, Wash.                   	
Wilby, C. E.. Seattle, Wash	
Walter, A., Seattle, Wash  _ _ 	
Cranbrook—
2
Langden, J., Calgary, Alta.    ,. __	
Morgan, T., Calgary, Alta.  _ _
Norvill, Dr. Geo. W-, Albany, N.Y            	
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
Stearns, Ralph W., Klamath Falls, Ore " 	
Wells, G. W., Elko, Nev. _„_	
Fernie—
Euler, Dr. Wm. H., Topeka, Kans _
Fuller, Harvev, Miami, Fla   	
Harper, E. W., Watertown, S. Dak  ___	
Sauer, C. M., Watertown, S. Dak. .„	
Schaefer, Roy C, Redfield, S. Dak   	
Webb, E., New York City, N.Y 	
Webb, J. Watson, New York City, N.Y	
i
]
'
/ REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941.
K 59
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1941—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
CC  c
2 0
5 o
Fort Fraser—
Bleakney, Dr. F. M., Seattle, Wash..
Clise, A. H., Seattle, Wash 	
Cook, R. F., Seattle, Wash	
Dick, J. T., Bremerton, Wash 	
Darling, J., Seattle, Wash 	
Fry, H., Tacoma, Wash  	
Gallaher, M. C, Corvallis, Ore	
Gorke, O. F., Dixon, 111. _..!
Miller, R. C, Monroe, Ore 	
Miller, W. J., Corvallis, Wash	
Neiman, W. T., Freeport, 111 -	
Nelson, Stanley, Sedro Wooley, Wash. _
Nelson, Stanley (Jr,), Seattle, Wash....
Power, J., Seattle, Wash.  	
Replogle, E. G., Los Angeles. Cal ._
Weir, Dr. M. H., Galesbury, 111	
Wightman, Dr. R., Seattle, Wash	
Wagoner, Geo., Haverford, Pa.	
Yoder, G. W., Sidney, Mont.	
Golden-
Abel, C. G., Elkhart, Ind 	
Boynton, F. H., Hollister, Cal	
Dickson, W. S-, Montreal, Que	
Eidson, Foster, Paducah, Ky	
Finks, E. L., St. Louis, Mo 	
Haliburton, John, Duncan, Okla..
Lee, C. A., Elkhart, Ind.- _
Lerner, H. G., Elkhart, Ind	
McCullach, F. F-, Fort Wayne, Ind -
Peterson, A. H., Spokane, Wash 	
Smith, C. E. and Ray, Brentwood, Cal. .
Schlasser, Dr. H. C._ Elkhart, Ind..-	
St. George, H. S., Montreal, Que.. __„
Tiren, Nils G., Portland, Ore.—	
Thompson, J. O., Tulsa, Okla._	
Vardon, K., Detroit, Mich 	
Weidenmier, Dr. C. H., Berlin Centre, Ohio..
Ziliak, A. L-, Bay City, Mich._  	
Greenwood—
Bull, Dr. L., Seattle, Wash..._. I 	
Bull, Mrs. Alice, Seattle, Wash 	
Hansen, O. A., Seattle, Wash—	
Long, R-, Seattle, Wash   _..	
Kamloops—
Gross, Fred W., Los Angeles, Cal.	
Holmquist, Chas., Calipatria, Cal ...
Wilkinson, Raymond, Calipatria, Cal	
Wilkinson, Wm. C, Calipatria, Cal. 	
Lillooet—
Dempsey, T. V., Seattle, Wash	
" Poffley, Edwin, Seattle, Wash	
Merritt—
Brill, F. W-, Seattle, Wash 	
Spedivetz, H. E., Bremerton, Wash	
Sweet, J. A., Bellingham, Wash 	
Thompson, R., Centralia, Wash	
I - i
I    l
i
11
11
11
i l
i I
i i
i !
$25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
55.00
65.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
45.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
80.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
65.00
30.00
80.00
40.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
80.00
65.00
40.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
50.00
55.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
30.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
30.00 K 60                                                       BRITISH COLUMBIA.
BlG-GAME  TROPHY   FEES   PAID  BY   NON-RESIDENTS,   JANUARY   1ST   TO
December 31st, 1941—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
Amount.
'E
o
a
CQ
m 0
ftii
3 t.
CQ o
3
O
a)
o
-a
B
ti
3'3
s%
as
ti
o
O
aj
0)
P
h
c   .
° n
OJ
01
O
O
§
c
$ .
a o
o a)
S cfi
s
'ft
ti
New Westminster—
Anderson, 0. A., Seattle, Wash -  	
1
1
1
----
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
_
1
3
....
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
I
$25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
40 00
Bauer, H., Paulsbo, Wash.. -	
Brown, C. E., Bremerton, Wash       .....
Bull, L. L., Seattle, Wash  ,  	
Bull, Mrs. L. L., Seattle, Wash.	
Blau, Oscar L., Richmond, Wash  _ 	
Bryden, C. R., Redmond, Wash... ...  	
Brindle, A. W., Seattle, Wash   .,.
Brindle, H. A., Seattle, Wash.              -	
Claus, G. E., Acme, Wash..        	
Callahan, H. S„ Seattle, Wash	
Dowd, Dr. H. A., Salem, Ore  	
25 00
15.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Day, W. F., Seattle, Wash.                                         	
Ferrell, Dr. L. J., Everett, Wash                          	
Gehman, A. F., Seattle, Wash  _  .
Gehman, E. L., Palo Alta, Cal   '	
25.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
5.00
55.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
55.00
25.00
40.00
Greshan, T. F., Seattle, Wash             	
Grace, C. L., Seattle, Wash _. 	
Hall, M. L„ Snohomish, Wash        	
1
2
1
Hall, A. D., Stanwood, Wash  	
Hill, R. A., Berkeley, Cal                	
Hoff, Harvey, Seattle, Wash... ____ __	
Hohn, E. A., Seattle, Wash.....            	
..,. [ ....
1
Hills, Dr. C. C„ Custer, Wash	
1
2
1
2
....  | ....
.... | :...
.... | ....
Joffcott, P. A., Ferndale, Wash	
Jeffcott, P. A., Ferndale, Wash    ,	
Knudsen, T. R., Glendale, Cal	
Lawler, R. E., South Bend, Wash _	
....
1
Lewis, Dr. P. E., Salem, Ore. „._._	
....   j   ....
I
Lidral, J. F., Winslow, Wash	 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941.
K 61
BIG-GAME   TROPHY   FEES   PAID  BY   NON-RESIDENTS,   JANUARY   1ST   TO
December 31st, 1941—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
Amount.
rb
'n
N
'tt
0
It
tt
0)
CQ
M
o   .
ni C
CQ*
£fH
«W
• u
CQ o
3
O
-Q
'it
si
O
C
0
o
u
9
Q
.5
'5
c  .
0 B
QJ
EO
o
0
s
.5
'=?
C ft
o <n
5
3
'5,
ti
New Westminster—Continued.
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
I
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
2
I
....
-
...
$25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
5.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
45.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
26.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
40.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
155.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
30.00
45.00
25.00
30.00
15.O0
15.00
30.00
30.00
•15.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
Meadowcroft, F., Kent, Wash      —
Markham, J. H., Centralia, Wash. _	
Miedel, R. J., Oakland, Cal.                        	
Magill, 0. W., Molalla, Ore   	
MacFadden, S. P., Seattle, Wash   	
McCash, S. R., Seattle, Wash.                               	
McCulloch, J. H., Seattle, Wash  —	
MacKintosh, P. G., Yakima, Wash.    -  	
Nielson, John E., Longview, Wash.—	
Norcross, Paul J., Los Angeles, Cal   	
Norvell G. W., Albany, N.Y.                        	
Oliver, C. T., Kent, Wash _    .—
Peterson, B. B., Buckley, Wash   	
....
1
1
1
3
Reeves, W. A., Oakland, Cal  	
Richardson, L., Seattle, Wash..   _	
Speck, R. H., Manetle, Wash..- -   -
Shelton, A. E., Glendale, Cal.             	
Shultz, Lee E., Seattle, Wash.                    	
1
Sheets, O. L., Lynden, Wash	
Smith, H. E-, Seattle, Wash ," 	
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
2
2
1
3
Veach, H. W., Lowell, Ore  	
Vockrodt, H. K., Bremerton, Wash   	
Walker, L. B., Seattle, Wash.	
Winetrout, C. A. and K. M., Redding, Cal	
Walker, T. W., Seattle, Wash	
Willett, G. E-, Seattle, Wash.      „	
Nelson—
Thompson, 0. B., Roswell, N. Mex  	
Oliver—■
Butler, W. 0., Seattle, Wash 	
Penticton—
*Boyker, Max, Kent, Wash 	
Brendner, 0. S., Omak, Wash  :
Bauer, E., Seattle, Wash	
Braida, H., Seattle, Wash.	
Corliss, R., Port Orchard, Wash	
Cahoon, Geo., Yakima, Wash   	
Cook, R. J., Seattle, Wash	
Callison, R. C, Chehalis, Wash.—  	
1  1
1
1
* Did not pay trophy fees for 1940, so Game Warden A.
Monks collected in 1941 when hunters check
id in. K 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1941—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
«
'tt
O
01
CQ
'■8 .
ti c
3 ■*
M o
u *
«m
CQ o
i t
£
ti
O     C
2
i
I_z
93
cd
o
u
1)
Q
sj
■**
0 o
01
Cfi
O
o
a
'ti
C ft
O QJ
S tn
3
'ft
ti
Amount.
Penticton—Continued.
1
1
1
1
1
1
X
1
1
....
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
1
1
1 ]
2 |
2  j
1   [
1   [
1   [
1   |
1   1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
3
4
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
I
I
i
i
i
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
' 1
1
1
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
....
$30.00
Ewina, M. D., Omak, Wash 	
25.00
♦Johnson, C. N. (Sr.), Seattle, Wash 	
45.00
Johnson, C. N. (Jr.), Seattle, Wash  _  	
Ketchum, Dr. W. C, Yakima, Wash 	
30.00
15.00
McComb, Wm., Tonasket, Wash   —
25.00
Peterson, H., Bremerton, Wash 	
15.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
90.00
65.00
50.00
15.00
15.00
160.00
80.00
105.00
80.00
95.00
40.00
50.00
25.00
80.00
100.00
40.00
155.00
25.00
25.00
75.00
60.00
65.00
15.00
55.00
40.00
65.00
100.00
Watts, Dr. C. E., Seattle, Wash. ___„...  	
Pouce Coupe—
Berry, Marshall K., Vernon, Tex  .,	
Budd, G. J., Johnson City, Tenn.   	
Grener, W. H., Willards, Ohio    	
Leonard, R. S., Vernon, Tex  	
Stufflebam, Dr. H. M., Salinas, Cal   '
Weaver, A. D., Bristol, Tenn	
Witter, G. W-, Los Angeles, Cal...	
Wemer, D. H., Zanesville, Ohio	
Wack, J. T. DeBlois, Santa Barbara, Cal.
: Did not pay trophy fees for 1940, so Game Warden A. Monks collected in 1941 when hunters checked in. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1941.
K 63
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1941—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
>>
N
"fl
o
0)
CQ
y   .
ti B
"  0
n o
3
O
-ft
'u
ti
O
TI
C
ti
Si
M.-S
OJ   rj
O
O
CU
o
Q
.2
'3
V
CQ
O
0
a
'ti
C ft
o tn
S cc
5
-13
'ft
ti
Amount.
Prince George—
1
$25.00
1
25.00
Carter, Jesse W., San Francisco, Cal— ~	
1
25.00
i
.  !           25.00
Kellog, H., Tacoma, Wash.
1
15.00
McClosky, E., Chalmers, Ind.—   	
1
i
50.00
Pflaumer, W. H., Philadelphia, Pa.  "
1
15.00
Raub, M. B., Chalmers, Ind.     	
i
25.00
Sessions, E. 0., Chicago, III..  	
i
1
30.00
Skaggs, L. J., Portland, Ore ....
i
i
40.00
Stokes, F. M., Portland, Ore.	
1
1
?.
1
105.00
Sutherland, Glen F., Ambridge, Pa    —
i
15.00
?.
30.00
Prince Rupert—
i
i
15.00
Quesnel—
25.00
Bryden, C. R., Redmond, Wash  _._	
25.00
Bice, Dr. D. F., Yakima, Wash	
1
25.00
40.00
Chesser, Geo. 0., Morton, Wash.	
25.00
Cheney, Ben B., Tacoma, Wash. _	
25.00
Cheney, Glenn H., Tacoma, Wash   	
25.00
Gushing, R. J. E., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Dooley, C. A., Astoria, Ore    ....
25.00
Edwards, Des, Oregon City, Ore	
25.00
Edwards, Steve H., Springfield, Ore  	
-- 1 --
25.00
Fortner, C. C., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Gray-bill, B., Kelso, Wash	
25.00
Hamilton, W. E., Forest Grove, Ore	
25.00
Hague, R. J., Seattle, Wash.. __  -__.
25.00
[
25.00
Hibbard, J. A., Seattle, Wash 	
25.00
Kent, E. A., San Francisco, Cal.  _	
25.00
Liber, C. H., Seattle, Wash 	
25.00
Lohr, E. W., Arlington, Wash	
25.00
Marsh, L. B., Long Beach, Cal 	
25.00
25.00
Olsson, Clara W., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Olsson, Robert P., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Phillips, M. W-, Filmore, Cal	
25.00
Pfeiffer, M. H., Monroe, Wash _..	
25.00
Ruth, W. E., Seattle, Wash.
25.00
25.00
Shipman, Henry, Brooks, Mont  _ _. —	
....   |     1
40.00
25.00
Wachter, J., Seattle, Wash 	
25.00
25.00
Yoris, E. W., Seattle, Wash.	
2S.O0
Zaremba, A. M., Monroe, Wash 	
i
40.00
Revelstoke—
I
1
Studebaker, C. W-, Mount Vernon, Wash	
....   |   ....
25.00
Salmon Arm—
1
McCulley, D. G., Omak, Wash.                                                   	
1
25.00
Telegraph Creek—
|         1
Barrett, J. F., San Mateo, Cal	
2  | .... | ....
!        1
75.00 K 64                                                       BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1941—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
>?
N
H
o
OJ
tv
CQ
u   .
ti 0
w o
fc^
« t.
« o
O
rO
'u
ti
O
■V
a
ti
31
*J
fc %
(Cfi
ti
0
O
*-"
01
CU
0
h
'3
a
a .
oi
Cfi
0
o
S
Mountain-
sheep.
Wapiti (Elk).
Amount.
Telegraph Creek—Continued.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
l
l
1
1
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
-
1
2
1
...
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
i
l
l
i
l
i
i
i
l
l
l
i
l
i
' !
i | ....
2   j  ....
2   |  ....
2      ....
1   j  ....
1   j   ....
1   j  ....
1.  j  -.
1   1     1
--   |     1
....  j     1
--   j     1
1   |     1
....  |     1
....   |     1
....   |     1
.... !   l
$80.00
Iverson, F. F., Pittsburgh, Pa 	
130.00
105.00
2
100.00
Melchoir, Lauritz, Beverley Hills, Cal   	
Vancouver—
1
1
1
1
1
....
1
1
I
....
155.00
30.00
15.00
Dumas, J. L., Seattle, Wash  	
Donnelly  Col. J., New York, N.Y:                                       	
5.00
25.00
Fischer, Miss Helene, Chicago, 111	
Findlay D. C, New York, N.Y.                           	
15.00
25.00
Goodenough, M. M., Seattle, Wash   	
Kenyon, Karl, La Jolla, San Diego, Cal.	
5.00
25.00
40.00
McGraw, Miss H., New York, N.Y 	
Ruediger, F., Oakland, Cal  	
Secrest, Dr. C. M., Fresno, Cal.	
Vernon—
May, A. A., Kendrick, Idaho _	
15.00
40.00
2S.00
25.00
15.00
Victoria—
15.00
Knapp, Luke, Manetle, Wash	
Williams Lake—
Bovenkerk, H., Crescent, Ore 	
Barton, Dr. J. F., Longview, Wash— 	
Callison, I. P., Union, Wash.	
Fair, A. J., Blaine, Wash.  __	
....
....
....
15.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
40.00
25.00
Knudsen, T. R., Glendale, Cal	
1    1      9
Scott, R. J., Los Angeles, Cal __ 	
Yeisley, Commander P. W., San Diego, Cal.	
Windermere—
1
1
1
2
_ | I
1
■
65.00
25.00
Borchers, B. J. (Jr.), Ohio	
l
l
i
30.00
Gilbert, F- L., Seattle, Wash	
Haywood, H. M., Watertown, S. Dak. 	
Johnson, W. S., San Francisco, Cal	
Newley, Dr. H. D., Rapid City, S. Dak	
25.00
65.00
Nahn, C. E., South Bend, Ind	
Pauley, Dr. V. L., Wichita, Kans 	
1 | ....
2 | ....
....  | ....
....  [ ....
.... | ....
1  | ....
Pier, L. A., Belvideu, S. Dak	
110.00
90.00
55.00
15.00
100.00
65.00
Steager, C. A., Librigon, Ohio 	
Street, W. S., Seattle, Wash	
Schleman, R. W., Dayton, Ohio 	
Wigginton, J. H-, Braden, Tex._	
3
Totals 	
40  | 56 j  32
1         1
120
22  | 87
1-
198
41   [  31
$12,605.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941.
K 65
Prosecutions  (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1941.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
:   P
: a
sS
5ti
a £
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animals.
Hunting game animals during prohibited hours
Hunting game animals from motor-boat, etc	
Illegally shooting fur-bearing animals 	
Killing, hunting, or in possession of game animals of female sex ...
Killing,  hunting,  or in  possession  of game animals during close
season    	
Possession of game animals under one year of age  	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during close season	
Possession of carcass of untagged deer 	
Possession of game on premises of logging camp, ef.fe, etc.
Removing all evidence of sex from game animals  	
Running deer with dogs   —	
Game Birds.
Allowing dogs to hunt or run game birds during prohibited season
Exceeding bag-limit on game birds  	
Hunting or in possession  of migratory game birds  during  close
season     	
Hunting,  killing,  or in  possession  of  upland  game birds  during
close season   	
Hunting  certain   game  birds  with  a  rifle  contrary  to  the  game
regulations               - 	
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours	
Hunting upland game birds during prohibited hours      	
Illegally selling game birds _.  	
Trapping game birds   -	
Trapping.
Interfering with a registered trap-line 	
Interfering with or setting traps in a muskrat or beaver house
Leaving traps set after end of open season —	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence	
Trapping during the close season    —
Trapping within the boundaries of a game reserve	
Trapping outside the limits of a registered trap-line illegally .
Licences.
Buying or trading in pelts of fur-bearing animals without a licence
Carrying firearms without a licence 	
Guiding without a licence   .—	
Minor carrying firearms without a licence or without being accompanied by an adult   -	
Non-resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling without a licence
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence 	
Resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling without a licence
Using another person's licence or permit or allowing the same to
be used    -	
Firearms.
Carrying firearms in or discharging same from an automobile, etc.
Carrying  or  in   possession   of  unplugged   pump   or  repeating  or
automatic shotgun      .
Discharging firearms on or across a highway in a municipality   .
6
2
2
27
5
1
1  I    1
2   [     2
64   |   64
2   j     2
21  | 22
I
5  |    5
11  |  12
I	
$30.00
10.00
25.00
435.00
35.00
340.00
90.00
10.00
40.00
50.00
65.00
415.00
20.00
170.00
10.00
245.00
10.00
435.00
170.00
10.00
10.00
525.00
60.00
25.00
10.00
15.00
390.00
150.00
200.00
30.00
80.00 K 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions  (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1941—Continued.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
-. Q
-. o
: a
II
2 £
c°S
rr --t-t
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Miscellaneous.
Carrying firearms or traps within boundaries of a game reserve.
Fur-trader failing to keep proper record-book __ —	
Illegally receiving or forwarding shipment of game    _.
Interfering with Game Warden in discharge of his duties	
Making false statement in obtaining a licence, etc 	
Non-resident hunting big game without a licensed guide _	
Trespassing in pursuit of game   	
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
Angling for trout during the close season..
Angling in a closed area 	
Angling with more than one line	
Exceeding bag-limit on trout..
Illegally taking trout or salmon on their spawning-grounds	
Jigging, shooting, or using a torch in taking of trout or salmon .
Netting kokanee without a licence - -	
Setting nets across mouth of stream or illegally netting	
Taking undersized trout	
Trolling or angling with gear designed to catch more than one
fish at one time.   	
Gaol Sentences.
Angling for trout during the close season or without a licence .
Carrying firearms without a licence   	
Carrying loaded firearms in or discharging same from an automobile, etc   _ 	
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game animals or birds during
the close season   _	
Interfering with a registered trap-line    *	
Interfering  with   a   Game  Warden   in   discharge  of  his  duties,   or
furnishing false information   _   __
Killing or possession of game animals of the female sex  	
Pit-lamping of game     _	
Setting nets across mouth of stream or illegally netting _ _
Trapping or in  possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during
close season  : _ ____ _	
Trapping without a licence    	
Totals  _ _____	
11
73   |  74   [110   |
430
I
I
$250.00
160.00
30.00
32.50
50.00
100.00
30.00
25.00
20.00
25.00
15.00
45.00
60.00
4.00
11.00
10.00
$4,977.50
Note.—"A" Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. "B" Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. " C " Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. " D " Division : Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas.    Gaol sentences ranged from one day to ninety days. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941.
K 67
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Serious.
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary of Game-fish Distributions, showing Eggs, Fry, and
Fingerlings, 1941.
Kind of Game Fish.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fingerlings and
Yearlings.
2,310,135
321,286
343,638
3,390,610
181,700
84,416
4,631,770
1,478,760
1,302,600
865,434
54,011
Totals   __._	
9,723,265
4,237,234
1,003,861
Summary of Game-fish Eggs and Fry on Hand at Hatcheries,
December 31st, 1941.
Hatchery.
Cut-throat.
Eastern Brook.
Kamloops.
Kokanee.
Steelhead.
Yearlings.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fingerlings.
Fry.
Yearlings.
95,898
175,394
Kaslo  	
243,183
154,927
25,831
Qualicum Beach  	
134,941
109,325
112,944
122,660
Smith Falls..	
5,311
Totals	
5,311
243,183
154,927
751,162
25,831
29
Eggs
Summary.
9,723,265
Fry      4,237,234
Fingerlings and yearlings      1,003,861
Total distributions   14,964,360
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1941      1,180,443
Total   16,144,803
Note.—A number of Game Clubs or Associations were, as in past years, subsidized
in connection with their game-fish culture operations; subsidies being granted by the
British Columbia Game Department to the following: Malaspina Rod and Gun Club;
Revelstoke District Rod and Gun Club;  Cranbrook Rod and Gun Club.
Eggs were also supplied to the Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club, Smithers;
McBride Rod and Gun Club, McBride; Ocean Falls Rod and Gun Club, Ocean Falls;
Prince George Rod and Gun Club, Prince George; Prince Rupert Rod and Gun Club,
Prince Rupert;  and Terrace Rod and Gun Club, Terrace. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941.
K 69
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K 71
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K 73
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K 75
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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K 79
llll
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400,000*
188,625*
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K 81
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0 K 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Returns from 1,895 Holders of Special Firearms Licences, showing Big Game,
Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1940-41.
Big Game.
Bear   326
Caribou     59
Deer   849
Moose  539
Mountain-goat     99
Mountain-sheep      15
Wapiti (Elk)        7
Fur-bearing Animals.
Badger  8
Beaver   8,847
Fisher   339
Fox  776
Lynx   628
Marten  6,600
Mink   5,098
Muskrats   64,309
Otter   247
Racoon   1,016
Skunk  57
Squirrels   102,133
Weasel   30,498
Wildcat   154
Wolverine   150
Predatory Animals.
Cougar
43
Wolves
Coyotes   2,014
257
Fur-farm Returns, 1941
(Statement No.
1).
Kind of Animals.
Adult and
Young
(Reared)
Animals.
Died.
r^
Killed.
Sold.
Total on
Hand as at
December
31st, 1941.
3,469
191
40,548
590
277
1,771
29
25.949
373
68
43
699
1,353
119
13,900
217
Note.—Figures in respect to muskrats only approximate.    Cancelled permits, 71 ;   nil returns, 2;
received, 15.
no returns
Fur-farm Returns, 1941 (Statement No. 2).
Kind of Animals.
Adult and
Young
(Reared)
Animals.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on
Hand as at
December
31st, 1941.
67
32
14
72
35
3
98
2
1,096
35
1
23
449
10
2
61
2
575
25
Note.—Figures  in  respect to  beavers  only  approximate.    Cancelled   permits,  9 ;    nil  returns,  2 ;
received, 14.
no  returns REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME
COMMISSION, 1941.
K 83
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1941.
Kind of Animals or Birds destroyed.
Game Divisions.
Total.
" A."
"B."
"C."          "D."
"E."
Animals.
2
329
160
356
21
66
56
2
36
6
10
73
105
22
563
10
87
2
213
4
38
7
1      ---
20
3
134
25
36
1
176
29
27
1,352
12
177
945
•115
132
11
2
1
2
285
29
37
22
58
5
3
7
50
4
581
85
1
1,332
30
53
20
4
37
31
18
225
50
25
36
5
1,193
297
30
3,888
102
420
2
1,158
60
197
237
37
Coyotes  	
Fox   	
Gophers   	
Birds.
Owls 	
Summary of Liberation of Game Birds, 1941.
Vancouver Island.
Lower Mainland.
Interior.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Pheasants.
Alberni  	
263
73
150
62
366
695
Agassiz   	
367
1,366-
155
1,364
1,087
501
1,237
1,708
990
32
8,807
12
75
12
12
41
60
118
200
12
200
12
100
24
12
200
24
100
24
12
100
Delta  	
Ladysmith  —
Nanaimo-Parksville	
Victoria—•
North and South Saanich.
Sooke, Metchosin	
Totals	
Lulu and Sea Island
Broadwater.	
.1	
Sumas Prairie	
Grand Fo
Inonoakli
Kamloops
Texada Island	
Nakusp ..
New Dem
Salmon A
Sidmouth
South Wa
(Revelstoke)	
ldo ..... _	
1,609
1,350
District.
Summary.
Pheass
      1,6(
nts.
9
7
0
6
       8,8(
1.8!
Total 1	
- 11,7.
'
■ K 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1941.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1941.
Pheasants  4,965 Geese      2
Quail  3 Partridge   105
Ducks         26
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 1941.
.    Pheasants   10,816 Partridge   63
Ducks       -  30
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1941.
Pheasants  j  939 Geese       6
Ducks        4 Partridge   18
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 194.1.
Pheasants   11,875 Partridge   64
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December Slst, 1941.
Pheasants  3,480 Geese     8
Quail   2 Partridge   75
Ducks  .        58
Note.—During the year 1941 there were 171 licensed game-bird farmers in the
Province, but during the year thirty-four of these farmers discontinued operations.
Fourteen licensed game-bird farmers have not submitted their returns.
There were two nil returns.
Game-bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during the year 1941—1,333
bands at 10 cents—$133.30. REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941.
K 85
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1941.
BoA-kerville and Quesnel Districts.
Becker, F. W . Barkerville.
Cochran, J. D. Barkerville.
Dale, W. A Kersley.
Drinkwater, A Wells.
Evans, Chas Quesnel.
Halversen, V Barkerville.
Kinney, M. D Wells.
Marsh, L ..Quesnel.
Miller, J Punchaw.
Munkman, F Alexandria.
Quanstrom, J Quesnel.
Quanstrom, W Quesnel.
Sears, W Quesnel.
Tibbies, Fred Quesnel. •
Tibbies, Jas Quesnel.
Youngs, Grover A Bowron Lake.
Noren, Carl Westbridge.
Peterson, M ...Westbridge.
Okanagan and Boundary Districts.
Richter, H._.
.Similkameen.
Cariboo District.
Archie, Geo Canim Lake.
Archie, Joseph Canim Lake.
Baker, J. C Clinton.
Bidstrup, H...- Likely.
Blomberg, Chas Macalister.
Bones, Frank Clinton.
Borthwick, H Forest Grove.
Boyd, Joe Canim Lake.
Bradford, R. J Bridge Lake.
Burgess, T. R Fawn.
Cleveland, L. C Bridge Lake.
Coldwell, H. W Jesmond.
Collier, Eric Riske Creek.
Collins, Sammy Cache Creek.
Cox, E. J.._ Horsefly.
Daniels, G. A Canim Lake.
Daniels, Steve Canim Lake.
Davis, W. J 70-Mile House.
Decker, E Canim Lake.
Dougherty, E. G Clinton.
Dougherty, Chas  Clinton.
Eagle, Clifford Lac la Hache.
Ferguson, J. B Ashcroft.
Grauman, R. F Bridge Lake.
Grinder, I Clinton.
Grinder, W. M Jesmond.
Hamilton, G. G Williams Lake.
Hamilton, H. M.-_„ Lac la Hache.
Hamilton, Pete Williams Lake.
Hamilton, Thomas Williams Lake.
Hansen, J. H Bridge Lake.
Hansen, Lee Bridge Lake.
Harvey, A Canim Lake.
Higgins, Marion Bridge Lake.
Hooker, F. C Horsefly.
Hooker, S. B -...Horsefly.
Hunter (Jr.), A. G..... Ashcroft.
Isnardy, Chas Lac la Hache.
Jenner, E Horsefly.
Kaart, C Jesmond.
Kerr, A. H Clinton.
King, G. B Lone Butte.
Labordie, E Clinton.
Larson, Jack Roe Lake.
Larson, Ole Roe Lake.
Larum, Sig Fawn.
McClary, W Lac la Hache.
McNeil, H. M Canim Lake.
Madden, E. E Cache Creek.
Matier, H Clinton.
Myers, Alfred K Horsefly.
Nogues, F Lac la Hache.
Odian, E. J Fawn.
Ogden, P. W Lac la Hache.
Park, Arlie H 70-Mile House.
Park, J. P 70-Mile House.
Parminter, J. W Williams Lake.
Parminter, Ross Likely.
Peter, Machel Clinton.
Pollard, J Clinton.
Roberts, Chas Riske Creek.
Scheepbouwer, J. A.....70-Mile House.
Scheepbouwer, J. C 70-Mile House.
Scott, J. R 100-Mile House.
Sellars, A Soda Creek.
Sisson, B Clinton.
Thorsteinson (Jr.), C.lOO-Mile House.
Tompkins, E 70-Mile House.
Torvilla, T Bridge Lake.
Turney, Wm Fawn.
Wagner, W Loon Lake.
Walters, Glenn Horsefly.
Walters, L. E Horsefly.
Woods, Wm 70-Mile House.
Young, Wm Clinton. K 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1941—Continued.
Chilcotin District.
Chignile, T Alexis Creek.
Church, R. H Big Creek.
Cyr, F Tatlayoko Lake.
Mackill, C Kleena Kleene.
Scallon, J. C Big Creek.
Turner, Geo Kleena Kleene.
Weir, D. J Redstone.
Cassiar District.
Creyke, John Telegraph Creek.
Dennis, A Telegraph Creek.
Dunstin, T Telegraph Creek.
Fann, Billy.—. Telegraph Creek.
Quack, Bob Telegraph Creek.
Quack, John C Telegraph Creek.
Coast District.
Archibald, J Princess Louisa Inlet.
Bowman, Geo Princess Louisa Inlet.
Jack, Henry Princess Louisa Inlet.
Johnstone, F Hardy Island.
Muska, John  1475 Eleventh Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Ratcliff, Walter _. Bella Coola.
Stanton, J. R Glendale Cove.
Fort George District.
Blackman, Chas Tete Jaune.
Bleskie, N. S Red Pass.
Carr, S. J Tete Jaune.
Chesser, C. A Mount Robson.
Davidson, C. B Vanderhoof.
Davidson, L. H Vanderhoof.
Gouchie, Dan Prince George.
Hansen, A Hansard.
Hargreaves, R. F. .Mount Robson.
Hobi, H Hansard.
Hooker, J. B Bend.
Kohse, E Fort St. James.
Laveck, W. J Endako.
Lonsdale, F. E Snowshoe.
MacDonald, H  Nithi River.
Miller, D. N  Fort Ware.
Monroe, E McBride.
Prince, J Fort St. James.
Prince, S Fort St. James.
Pruden, F Hansard.
Reimer, A Tete Jaune.
Simonson, E Hulatt.
Smith, Jas. M Snowshoe.
Taerum, T Engen.
Hazelton District.
Clark, Jas. E Ootsa Lake.
Donald, J Burns Lake.
Harrison, B. R Wistaria.
Henry, S. P Ootsa Lake.
Henson, G. E Marilla.
Knox, John Ootsa Lake.
Leon, Paddy Babine Lake via
Topley.
McKinley, T Ootsa Lake.
McNeill, J. W Ootsa Lake.
Morgan, J. E..___ ..Wistaria.
Van Tine, E  Ootsa Lake.
Watson, C. L Topley.
Kamloops District.
Anderson, Dave Clearwater.
Grant, Gordon MeLure.
Hagen, Harry Barriere.
Helseb, T R.R. 1, Clearwater.
Latremouille, J. L. .Little Fort.
Ludtke, L.. Clearwater.
McKort, C Clearwater.
Martin, P Sicamous.
Mobley, Howard ... Salmon Arm.
Ray, J. B Clearwater.
Small, R. Clearwater.
Tuson, Clifford Savona.
Upper, C Monte Lake.
Kootenay District.
Alton, James Wilmer.
Baher, M. C Natal.  -
Baher, Wm Natal.
Barbour, Geo Wilmer.
Burkhardt, J..
Buries, L. J. „
Canning, Fred
.Golden.
..Port Alberni
(Golden).
- Skookumchuck. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941.
K 87
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1941—Continued.
Kootenay District—Continued.
Danikin, J. V Brisco.
DeSimone, S. H Revelstoke.
Dilworth, J. A Athalmer.
Falconer, J Corbin.
Feuz, Walter Golden.
Galbraith, E Spillimacheen.
Harrison, Wm. 0 Edgewater.
Jones, R. K Golden.
Joseph, Camille Fairmont.
Joseph, Jerome Fairmont.
Larsen, H. M Kaslo.
Lawrence, C. G Golden.
Leask, Wm Ta Ta Creek.
Logan, R. A Moberley Lake.
Lumm, P Fort Steele.
McClain, J. I Galena.
McGinnis, E. C Kimberley.
McKay, G. J Athalmer.
Michel, M Fairmont.
Morigeau, M Fairmont.
Nicol, A. H Fort Steele.
Nixon, W. L Invermere.
Nixon, Wilbert Parson.
Ogilvey-Wills (Jr.), J—Fairmont.
O'Laughlin, E. P Spillimacheen.
Philipps, F. A 1551 St. Andrews Ave.,
North Vancouver.
Rae, C. D Jaffray.
Rutherford, M. J Invermere.
Smith, E. A *_ Edgewater.
Stewart, C. W Spillimacheen.
Tegart, A Windermere.
Tegart, R Windermere.
Thomas, G. A Parson.
Turner, Miss M Skookumchuck.
Webber, S. _, Golden.
West, C. D Skookumchuck.
White, Jas Fort Steele.
Wiedenman, 0. W Golden.
Land, Bob Shalalth.
Lillooet District.
Michel, Thomas.
Peace River District.
.Lillooet.
Anderson, Stewart-Arras.
Belcourt, A Big Slough.
Brown, W. J. W Fort St. John.
Calliou, John Kelly Lake via
Lynburn, Alta.
Calliou, Peter Moberly Lake.
Calliou, Sam Moberly Lake.
Cameron, Patrick Moberly Lake.
Cameron, Ralph Moberly Lake.
Campbell, A Kelly Lake via
Goodfare, Alta.
Courvoisier, H. C Fort St. John.
Gladu, I Kelly Lake via
Goodfare, Alta.
Golata, F. W Dawson Creek.
Hambler, Geo Kelly Lake via
Lynburn, Alta.
Hamelin, S Moberly Lake.
Letendre, R Big Slough.
McGarrey, M. M Taylor P.O.
McLean, W. - Moberly Lake.
Miller, W. E Baldonnel.
Neskey, E Kelly Lake via
Goodfare, Alta.
Neskey, N Kelly Lake via
Goodfare, Alta.
Ross, J. A Bear Flats P.O.
Sheffield, C Fort St. John.
Wanandie, St. Paul Kelly Lake via
Goodfare, Alta.
Non-resident Outfitters.
Brewster Transport
Co., Ltd Banff, Alta.
Brown, Frank E Hazelmere, Alta.
Harrison, G. H Banff, Alta.
Sunderman, Sidney Hythe, Alta. K 88 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1941.
Attorney-General (Minister) R. L. Maitland, K.C ... Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Jas. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Frank R. Butler Vancouver.
Headquarters.
Sergeant . R. P. Ponder. ._ Vancouver.*
Game Warden r J. B. Smith Vancouver.*
Game Warden G. E. Marshall Vancouver.*
Clerk . F. Lobb Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss I. Pettigrew Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss I. Magee Vancouver.
Stenographer Mrs. F. Y. Little Vancouver.
Game-fish Culture Branch.
Superintendent A. Robertson Cultus Lake.
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson Nelson.
Fishery Officer E. Hunter ... Nelson.
Fishery Officer (Junior) P. Ewart Nelson.
Fishery Officer J. F. Thompson Kaslo.
Fishery Officer C. O. Mellor Vancouver.
Fishery Officer (Junior) R. Morgan Vancouver.
Fishery Officer (Junior) H. L. Rose Vancouver.*
Fishery Officer J. D. Inverarity Sooke.*
Fishery Officer E. M. Martin Sooke.
Fishery Officer F. Pells  Cultus Lake.
Fishery Officer A. Higgs Qualicum Beach.
Fishery Officer R. A. McRae Kelowna.*
"A" Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Loiver Mainland).
Game Warden.. S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden . B. Cash Victoria.
Game Warden J. W. Jones Royal Oak.
Game Warden R. S. Hayes Duncan.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Ladysmith.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Game Warden J. Dewar Alberni.
Game Warden . B. Harvey Courtenay.
Game Warden W. N. Massey Alert Bay.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Inspector C. F. Kearns Nelson.*
Inspector . A. F. Sinclair Nelson.
Stenographer Miss A. Emery Nelson.
Game Warden W. Cameron Golden.
Game Warden M. B. Ewart Nelson.
Game Warden B. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game Warden . W. H. Cartwright Creston.
Game Warden. ..... M. J. Wilson Greenwood.
Game Warden .A. Monks Penticton.
Game Warden W. H. McLean Revelstoke.
Game Warden 1 H. V. Morgan Princeton,
Game Warden J. J. Osman Fernie.
Game Warden H. Tyler Invermere.
* On active service. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1941. K 89
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1941—Continued.
" C " Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts).
Inspector R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Stenographer Miss H. M. Swadling Kamloops.
Game Warden G. Sandiford Kamloops.
Game Warden D. D. Ellis _ Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden : C. F. Still Vernon.
Game Warden J. W. Stewart Clinton.
Game Warden _W. A. H. Gill Lillooet.
Game Warden 0. Mottishaw Quesnel.
Game Warden L. Jobin Williams Lake.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Game Warden . A. J. Jank Prince George.
Game Warden W. L. Forrester Prince George.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game Warden S. G. Copeland Prince Rupert.
Game Warden J. W. Purdy . McDame Creek.
Game Warden P. Brown Vanderhoof.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Smithers.
Game Warden ._D. Romieu Burns Lake.
Game Warden '_ ___.W. 0. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
Game Warden V. L. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden K. 0. Alexander Fort Nelson.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
•   " E " Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Loiver Fraser Valley Districts).
Inspector W. Kier _. Vancouver.
Game Warden W. Clark Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Corporal ...  R. E. Allan Powell River.
Game Warden (Assistant) John McRae Powell River.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden . P. M. Cliffe Mission.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
C. Shuttleworth    ....Kamloops.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Chahles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1942.
925-742.8716   

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