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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1943

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLU.MBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR   THE
YEAR EHDED DECEMBER 31ST
1941
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Prin led by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1942.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour : .
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1941
is herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
July, 1942 The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
SIR,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twenty-fourth Annual Report on
the work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1941.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., July, 19 U2. I
SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Deputy Minister  7
Statistics of Trade and Industries  8
Pay-roll  8
Comparison of Pay-rolls i  9
Industrial Divisions  9
Average Weekly Wage by Industries ,  11
Racial Origin and Nationality ..  16
Statistical Tables . :  17
Summary of all Tables r  30
" Hours of Work Act " .._..:.. 31
Average Weekly Hours  32
Hours of Work Regulations  73
Labour Legislation  33
" Post-war Rehabilitation Act "  33
Board of Industrial Relations  34
Meetings and Delegations  34
New Orders and Regulations  34
Statistics covering Women and Girls .". :  35
Summary of all Occupations  42
Single, Married, and Widowed Employees  44
Collections and Inspections  45
Court Cases .  46
Comparative Wages . 1    50
Special Licences '_  51
War brings Different Work to Women  52
Summary of Orders  54
List of Orders in effect -  72
Hours of Work Regulations  73
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "  78
Number of Disputes and Employees affected :  78
Strikes  80
Conciliation, 1941  84
Boards of Arbitration  90
Organizations of Employees '  106
Organizations of Employers 1  116
Inspection of Factories  117
Inspections  117
Accident-prevention  117
Safeguarding Workers' Health  118
Women in Industry ■ .  118
Unemployment Relief  121
Federal Government Contribution withdrawn .  121
Termination of Assistance to Settlers......  121
Statement of Relief, 1941 :... 122
Apprenticeship Branch  128
Trade-schools Regulation Branch  130
Safety Branch                        131  REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1941.
This Annual Report, being the twenty-fourth in the history of the Department,
covers a twelve-month period which marks the conclusion of our country's second year
in the present war and the first three months of its third year in a struggle that has
grown in intensity and scope.
To say the least, its effect upon the industrial life of our Province has been galvanic. Methods and practices peculiar to times of peace have been supplanted by
undreamt of innovations imposed and accepted to meet the dire necessities of war.
The changes in the various statistical tables appearing herein and the drastic
rapidity with which these trends have developed is attributable, preponderantly, to the
expansion of Canada's war effort and our Nation's contribution to the cause of the
United Nations as a whole.
Production for war purposes, in almost every instance, has been the stimulating
factor.
In the year under review the industrial pay-roll of the Province increased by
$51,199,693 over the previous year, being the highest yet recorded.
Twenty-four of the twenty-five tables relating to the industrial groups show increases in the pay-roll totals.
The greatest increase is apparent in the ship-building industry (up over six and
one-half million dollars), followed by the lumber industries (up five and one-half
million), contracting (increased by four and one-half million), miscellaneous trades
and industries, and metal trades (both increased over two and one-half million).
Other increases are depicted in the " Comparison of Pay-rolls " appearing in this
report.
The only decrease shown appears in the Coast shipping table, due to the falling-off
of ship loadings, with subsequent loss to longshore pay-rolls.
During the latter half of 1941 employment totals exceeded all previous departmental records, the greatest average monthly employment figure being 110,771 for
October, 1941, as against a high of 98,324 in September of 1940.
Increases were evident in the average weekly wages in twenty-two of the twenty-
five tables, the greatest increases being noted in those industries most affected by war
production, such as ship-building, metal trades, smelting, leather and fur goods, coalmining, contracting, etc.
The average weekly wage for all adult male employees rose to $30.67 for 1941, an
increase of $2.56 over the preceding year, and the highest since 1920.
The effect of war production did not generally result in a direct increase in the
average hours of work. While in many industries slight increases were noted, due to
added employment a balance was maintained, with fractional decreases in many
instances.
The average weekly working-hours for all employees remained almost unchanged
at 46.90, as against 46.91 for 1940.
With the progress of the war and its effect upon our national economy, a reallocation of jurisdiction in respect of certain matters essential to our country's war effort
becomes inevitable.
Former constitutional limitations are overridden by the " War Measures Act,"
which vests supreme authority in the Dominion.
In the exercise of this authority the Dominion Government has issued ordinances
of a far-reaching nature to cope with the unprecedented demands that war imposes.
Toward this end the Provincial Department of Labour has endeavoured to work in
harmony with the Dominion and with other provincial Labour Departments.
At the request of the Federal Government, the Provincial Labour Department has
undertaken an increased volume of work and responsibility.
All of our administrative machinery and inspection force has been placed unreservedly at the service of the Dominion in the application of its war-time labour
policy. I 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
At the same time our responsibilities under our own provincial labour laws have
increased rather than diminished, as will be seen from the reports of each of the various
branches of the Department appearing in subsequent pages.
There is every indication that some of the statistical tables herein set out may yet
reach higher totals.
The tremendous growth of our industrial output by no means marks the apex of
our productive capacity. By loyal and unselfish effort on the part of every one, we may
confidently look forward to a measure of achievement outdistancing all previous results.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
The statistical section for 1941 was largely influenced by two contributing factors:
primarily, the tremendous increases in certain industries due to the necessity for
war production, and, as a secondary contributing factor, the cost-of-living bonus—
which generally affected all industries.
Firms reporting numbered 5,115, an increase of 144 over 1940, while the total
pay-roll shows a gain of $51,199,693, and has now reached the highest total recorded.
Average weekly wages increased in twenty-two of the twenty-five tables, while
the average for all industries increased by $2.56 per week over the previous year.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 5,115.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 5,115,
as compared with 4,971 in 1940, an increase of 144.
PAY-ROLL.
A summary of the returns filed by the 5,115 firms reporting shows a total pay-roll
of $175,449,556. Inasmuch as this total represents only the industrial pay-rolls, it
should not, however, be considered as the total pay-roll of the Province, and must be
further augmented by additional figures which follow, yielding an accumulative total
of $239,525,459, an increase of $51,199,693 over 1940.
Pay-rolls of 5,115 firms making returns to Department of Labour 	
Returns received too late to be included in above summary   —
Employers included in Department's inquiry, not sending in returns   (estimated payroll)         	
Transcontinental railways   (ascertained pay-roll)   - —
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in  the industrial survey;   viz.,  Govern-
$175,440,556
535,884
2,345,000
14,395,019
mental workers,  wholesale and retail  firms,  delivery,  auto transportation,  ocean
services, miscellaneous   (estimated pay-roll)     	
46.800,000
$239,525,459
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS.
The total Provincial pay-rolls since 1928 are as follows:—
1935   $125,812,140.00
1936...     142,349,591.00
1928..
1929
1930-
1931-
1932..
1933..
1934..
$183,097,781.00
192,092,249.00
167,133,813.00
131,941,008.00
102,957,074.00
99,126,653.00
113,567,953.00
1937-
1938..
1939.
1940.
1941..
162,654,234.00
158,026,375.00
165,683,460.00
188,325,766.00
239,525,459.00
Again reflecting the rising employment figures and greater earnings for the
worker, the percentage of the total payable to wage-earners increased from 78.63 per
cent, in 1940 to 80.60 per cent, in 1941, as evidenced in the following table:—
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Per Cent.
10.00
11.33
78.67
Per Cent.
10.82
12.08
•77.10
Per Cent.
10.82
11.86
7T.32
Per Cent.
10.22
11.15
78.63
Per Cent.
9.29
10 11
80.60
Totals..... 	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 9
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
Increases are shown in all but one of the twenty-five tables. Ship-building headed
the list for 1941 with an increase of $6,593,198, followed by the lumber industries with
an increase of $5,824,772, and contracting with $4,681,054; miscellaneous trades
increased by $2,724,098; metal trades, an increase of $2,682,698; food products, an
additional $1,886,176; metal-mining, up $1,171,400; smelting increased by $990,405;
public utilities increased by $909,105; explosives and chemicals, up $866,475; pulp and
paper mills, an increase of $789,615; printing and publishing, with $457,535; builders'
materials increased by $447,981; oil-refining, up $412,463; wood (N.E.S.),up$359,962;
laundries, cleaning and dyeing, $359,514; house-furnishings, $247,362; breweries,
$141,128; leather and fur goods, $90,018; paint-manufacturing, $52,587; garment-
making, $47,673; jewellery-manufacture, $41,881; coal-mining, $9,301; cigar and
tobacco manufacturing, $1,201.    ,
The only industry in which a decrease was -apparent was Coast shipping, which
showed a loss of $173,609 over the previous year.
Industry.
1939.
J-
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1941.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries  ._
Builders' materials  	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing.
Coal-mining 	
Coast shipping	
Contracting	
Explosives and chemicals...	
Food products  	
Garment-making 	
House-furnishing 	
Jewellery-manufacturing	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing 	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of..
Lumber industries   	
Metal trades  - 	
Metal-mining  — 	
Miscellaneous   	
Oil-refining   	
Paint-manufacture .-...	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper mills :. 	
Ship-building  	
Smelting  —  	
Street-railways, etc.  	
Wood manufacturing (N.E.S.).
Totals  —-	
30
75
3
26
124
978
19
586
65
50
10
101
54
832
764
276
345
47
12
143
14
49
6
112
108
4,829
$980,
1,272,
3.
3,687,
8,871,
8,415,
1,503,
10,972,
817,
1,129.
223,
1,484,
628,
28,853,
8,516,
11,691,
5,478,
$2,317,
358,
3,767,
4,688,
1,479,
5,624,
10,616,
2,928,
155.00
188.00
.023.00
824.00
718.00
581.00
227.00
520.00
289.00
.779.00
729.00
280.00
720.00
601.00
710.00
912.00
787.00
360.00
020.00
847.00
341.00
215.00
712.00
247.00
238.00
33
77
3
24
121
1,014
21
591
68
62
11
102
63
894
818
200
376
51
13
138
13
50
6
115
107
$1,096.
1,339
2.
3,811,
8,218
10,146
2,260
11,951
917
1,460
251
1,586
698
33,435
10,019
12,641,
6,486,
$2,582,
371,
3,769,
6,178,
3,941,
5,842,
10,730,
4,096
,045.00
,755.00
,300.00
,341.00
,668.00
,833.00
,148.00
,636.00
,832.00
,579.00
,190.00
,343.00
,440.00
,358.00
,567.00
,521.00
,402.00
,138.00
,149.00
,852.00
,117.00
,111.00
,224.00
,667.00
347.00
37
85
3
27
124
1,054
26
597
70
60
11
104
60
951
841
164
404
58
11
145
12
52
5
111
103
$1,237,
1,787,
3,
3,820,
8,045,
14,827,
3,126,
13,837,
965,
1,707,
293,
1,945,
788,
39,260,
12,702,
13,812,
9,210,
$2,994,
423,
4,227,
6,967,
10,534,
6,832,
11,639,
4,456,
173.00
736.00
501.00
642.00
059.00
887.00
623.00
812.00
505.00
941.00
071.00
857.00
458.00
130.00
265.00
921.00
500.00'
601.00
736.00
387.00
732.00
309.00
629.00
772.00
309.00
$126,311,023.00
4,971  $143,835,563.00
 i	
5,115    |$175,449,556.00
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
The industrial activities of the Province have been segregated into three divisions
—Greater Vancouver, Vancouver Island, and Rest of Mainland. For the year under
review, due to greatly increased activity in the war industries, the percentage of the
Provincial pay-roll localized within the Greater Vancouver area increased to 38.62 per
cent, as against 35.83 per cent, for 1940. The Vancouver Island percentage dropped
fractionally from 20.61 per cent, to 20.40 per cent., and the Mainland percentage
decreased from 43.56 per cent, to 40.98 per cent. I 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The above percentages are based on the returns received, the figures in the following table being obtained through their application to the total pay-roll:—
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
$53,610,835.53
77,325,822.84
31,717,575.63
$55,530,468.18
69,468,394.45
33,027,512.37
$57,591,570.70
73,762,276.39
34,329,612.91
$67,477,121.96
82,034,703.67
38,813,940.37
$92,504,732.26
98,157,533.10
48,863,193.64
Totals     .  . -
$162,654,234.00
$158,026,375.00
$165,683,460.00
$188,325,766.00
$239,525,459.00
' Following are the various industries as represented in the tables,
total number of adult males employed for the week of employment of
number, together with the percentage of those in receipt of less than $19
showing the
the greatest
per week:—
Industry.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing
Paint-manufacture     	
Food products  	
Garment-making	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing —
Number
employed.
6
138
... 11,616
208
600
Metal trades    — 6,454
Coast shipping           5,259
Miscellaneous trades and industries   -  6,422
Leather and fur goods  _ - - - -"-  320
Explosives and chemicals    1,479
Builders'  materials - — - 1,441
House-furnishings             - 814
Printing and publishing      1,177
Street-railways, power, etc    4,880
Breweries   -  583
Wood   (N.E.S.)   -..  2,697
Jewellery-manufacture
Contracting   	
Coal-mining   _	
Oil-refining	
 _. :.    69
 _ _  14,445
 _  3,123
...  1,216
 „ '.   _  30,100
 -   _  3,230
Metal-mining  7,550
Pulp and paper manufacturing  '.  3,339
Ship-building        10,601
Lumber industries
Smelting    —
Per
Cent.
66.67
27.54
23.11
21.63
18.50
12.77
12.32
10.92
10.63
10.01
9.65
8.97
8.24
7.85
7.03
6.45
5.80
5.57
3.87
2.96
2.91
2.11
1.07
0.42
0.28
With increased earnings, the numbers employed at less than $19 per week continued to decrease over comparative figures for previous years. Diminishing percentages in this lower wage group are noted in twenty-two of the twenty-five tables, as
against a decrease in sixteen during 1940. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I   11
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRIES.
The average weekly wage for adult male employees increased in twenty-two of the
twenty-five tables, decreasing in the remaining three.   As in previous years, the
averages are based on the week of employment of the greatest number, and while
considerable difficulty is experienced with some industries in the matter of broken
time, an endeavour is made to base calculations on a full working-week.    Frequency
distributions of employees classified on the basis of weekly earnings from $6 to $50
are used for this purpose, the mid-point of the class limits generally being taken as
the rate for each wage group.
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
Breweries	
$25.62
20.19
15.86 v
28.11
28.58
22.56
22.53
21.10
23.52
19.49
28.88
20.67
22.34
21.32
22.81
27.35
21.26
25.04
22.53
32.51
23.22
26.03
23.88
25.51
18.97
$25.79
22.07
16.59
28.49
26.23
22.72
25.34
.22.00
21.29
20.05
31.54
21.92
20.06
22.41
23.67
28.65
22.29
25.55
21.53
32.31
23.53
25.83
25.82
27.09
18.69
$25.00
22.28
17.75
28.75
31.61  -
34.13
23.76
23.16
22.74
21.29
34.39
22.25
20.48
24.83
24.41
29.10
22.07
26.21
21.44
32.72
24.24
26.38
24.54
27.50
20.32
$26.18
22.31
15.50
27.46
31.99
25.61
24.58
23.85
22.97
22.25
34.60
22.89
21.23
26.81
24.77
30.34
23.85
27.92
23.08
33.69
26.75
27.88
25.08
27.20
21.97
$27.42
22.82
13.00
28.20
32.93
25.81
24.20
23.70
23.15
20.80
38.95
23.33
22.23
26.59
25.09
30.48
23.46
28.68
22.78
34.19
26.36
28.76
24.80
27.78
22.68
$27.98
23.23
19.75
29.39
29.35
26.12
25.75
23.23
24.25
22.53
39.23
23.19
21.19
27.14
25.38
30.86
23.91
28.97
22.69
34.34
26.54
28.55
25.57
28.63
23.22
$28.23
24.15
17.70
28.04
30.34
27.52
31.67
23.59
25.22
23.59
43.44
24.00
21.72
28.83
26.18
31.77
24.36
29.17
23.15
34.34
29.84
31.74
32.75
28.57
24.88
$29.29
26.26
14.50
31.84
30.03
30.21
33.39
25.65
26.51
25.74
38.72
24.76
26.07
31.01
29.90
33.72
26.97
30.97
24.95
36.78
32.13
35.27
37.07
30.93
27.01
Coast shipping	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Printing and publishing —
Pulp and paper manufacturing-	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, tele-
Wood, manufacturing of (N.E.S.)	
The increases and decreases in
the average weekly r
Increase.
$1.06                Metal-mining
ates an
3 as fol
lows:—
   $1.9
5
1
0
0
4
9
3
2
6
3
2
industrie
5             2.6
     1.8
3.80               Oil-re
2.69                 Paint
     1.8
..    2.4
Food products, manufacture of 	
2.06                 Pulp and paper manufac
turing ....
     2.2
1.29                 Shin-building
     3.5
2.15                Smelt
.76                    Stree
.    4.3
Laundries, cleaning and dyein
ir, power.
tele-
     2.3
acture of
4.35                    phones, etc.
E.S.)    .
     2.1
3.72
Decrease.
$3.20                Jewellery-manufacturing
.81
  $4.7
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	 I 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The average weekly wage for all adult male employees rose to $30.67 in 1941, an
increase of $2.56 over the preceding year, and the highest since 1920. The following
shows the average for each year since the formation of the Department:—
1918	
                        $27.07
1919	
..     .                         29.11
1920	
                        31.51
1921„
27.62
1922	
27.29
1923 	
—     28.05
1924      .
                      28.39
1925     . ..
-                27.82
1926 	
            27.99
1927	
28.29
1928	
 —.                     28.96
1929  	
       29.20
1931 	
-     26.17
1932            	
     23.62
1933
22.30
1934            	
23.57
1935— 	
 —    24.09
1936
     26.36
1937  	
      26.64
1938-    	
26.70
1939            	
26.80
1940 .    .    	
     28.11
1941..  	
       30.67
The weekly wage-rates shown above appear in the following chart, which depicts
the trend of average weekly wages for adult male workers from 1918 to 1941.
WERA6E   WEEKLY WAQES PAID TO ADULT
1918—1941
MALE
EMPLOYEES
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WASE5
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
s
32. OO
31.00
3O.00
29.00
28.00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.OO
A
/\
i
/
\
/
i
\
—~\
\
/
^
\
\
/
/
\
\
\
\
\
/
V
(1941 figure—$30.67.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.                                     I 13
AVERAGE MONTHLY NUMBER of WAGE-EARNERS   (Male and Female)
1929-31 -32-37-38-39-40-41
| JAN.j FEB. MAR. APL.  MAY JUNE JULY   AUG. SEPT. OGT.   NOV.  DEC.
1 IO.OOO
/
\
105,000
/
\
•
/
/
\
1941
100,000
/
/
s
/
95,000
s
/
/
90,000
85,000
/
7S*
X
VN
\
1940
y '
y
/
V
^
X
V
\
y
/
y
y
/..-■'
■A,
i \
80,000
/   ,'t
'-.
W\
-
7f   .-'/
75,0 00
—y
\"
t
■v^
1929
1937
1939
s-
■■')
3
1938
70,000
/J
yf
1	
65,000
/
_,-—
——.
_ - —-
\
*"i.
/
>s
/
	
N
<
60,000
y
\
>
\
"\
55,000
s-
^ y
~" —■ —
s
\
1931
..
 --
\
50,000
—""— REFERENCE — ^~~^
45.0 00
Employment  in	
I93B
I9E9  shown   thus
1931           "             "	
40,0 00
1932          "             "             	
1937          "             "              -»—>—  + >-
1938          "              "               	
1939           "                                  o o
194-0           "               "                    ■ -   	
1941            ••              "              •  •	
• I 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
1937
1938
1939
1940
941
JO"',
-
25%
Zjzlj:
—
	
-
20%
	
— - -
-
-
15%
10%
-
-
—
5%
—
- -—
1
-
}
	
-
I ■
-
- - - -
. .
=|
II
II
1
u
0.
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COM M [> I 16 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
RACIAL ORIGIN AND NATIONALITY OF EMPLOYEES.
Of a total of 151,277 employees reported under a question dealing with racial
origin and nationality, 114,858 or 75.93 per cent, were originally from English-speaking
countries; 24,474 or 16.18 per cent, originally from Continental Europe; 9,491 or 6.27
per cent, from Asiatic stock; and 2,454 or 1.62 per cent, from other countries, or
racial origin not stated.
1941.
Racial Origin. Per Cent.
English-speaking  countries   ...—   *.    -     75.93
Continental Europe   .—. .        16.18
Asiatic              6.27
From other countries, or not specified   _    .       1.62
Total   100.00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
The number of firms reporting pay-rolls of over $100,000 continued to increase,
showing a total of 312 for 1941 as against 265 for the previous year.
As in previous years, pay-rolls of public authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or
municipal) are not included, nor are wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental railways, or vessels engaged in deep-sea transportation.
The lumber industry again was in the lead with 95 firms, an increase of 16;
followed by food products with 31, up 4; contracting, 28, an increase of 7; metal
trades, 26, an increase of 10; metal-mining, 25, unchanged; miscellaneous trades and
industries, 15, up 3; Coast shipping, 13, down 1; public utilities and wood (N.E.S.),
10 each, both increased by 1; coal-mining, 8, up 1; oil-refining, 8, unchanged; shipbuilding, 8, an increase of 3; pulp and paper, 7, unchanged; printing and publishing,
6, unchanged; breweries and builders' materials, 4 each, both increased by 1; house-
furnishings and laundries, cleaning and dyeing, both 3, unchanged; explosives and
chemicals, and smelting, 2 each, no change; garment-making, jewellery-manufacture,
leather and fur goods, and paint-manufacturing, 1 each, all unchanged from previous
year.
Of the 312 firms reported above, two had a pay-roll in excess of $5,000,000, ten
between $2,000,000 and $4,000,000, and fourteen between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 17
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
- With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc.--Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lin.e, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting. - Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing a> d heating, and sheet-
metal works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc.- Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas ; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of. - Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No, 14. Lumber Industries. — In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15 Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
■ ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mil]
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries. — Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers; also cold storage.
No. IS. Oil-refining. -Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.- This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting. — Coniprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasoline lighting and heating devices, Mid supply
of water to municipalities
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of {not elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering 37 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $269,813.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    197,897.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      769,463.00
Total $1,237,173.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February
March
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
448
449
402
478
525
558
26
55
53
62
Month.
Males.
July	
August	
September .
November ..
December.,.
592
586
543
522
512
534
73
05
68
92
93
72
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners oitjy).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22 00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00
to   $1
99.
99.
8.99.
9 99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26 99.
27.99
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
3
11
1
2
7
23
13
12'
26
13
21
25
26
20
20
18
229
62
23
5
6
Under
21 Yrs.
10
8
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males.
Racial Origin.
I British
Subject.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French    	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Biilgai ian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavio	
Hebrew  ..  	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadianl ...
Negro	
Others not shown above   ...
4
1
26
11
1
Alie
Females.
British
Subject
92
9
Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.       Females. I 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 85 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $234,236.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       176,920.00
VVage-earners (including piece-workers)     1,376,580.00
Total $1,787,736.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February  ...
March	
April	
May	
953
1,041
1,081
1,197
1,166
1,143
13
12
11
12
11
10
July	
August.   ..
September .
October.
November ..
December...
1,129
1,098
1,097
1,110
1,063
1,005
10'
10
11
11
12
June	
13
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15 00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
4
to   $6.99...
2
to     7.99...
2
to     8 99...
1
to     9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14 99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
21.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29 99.
34.99.
39.99.
44 99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
lo
14
44
46
135
85
70
126
02
139
80
111
42
53
29
170
119
39
30
12
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.     18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.    Allen-
British :
Born in Canada   ....
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian . 	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish   	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish. Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese        11
Hindu and other East Indian,	
Japanese  1
Indian (native Canadian)  ... I       8
Negro  4
Others not shown above ....       32
743
374
43
7
10
49
13
21
41
30
3
3
10
11
1
Females.
British
Subject.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 3 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $360.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  157.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  2,1,84.00
Total .
$3,501.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January
February.
March ....
April	
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
Month.
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November..
December .
Males.    Females.
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of      ' "A
Employment of    i «, yrs
Greatest Number.: ». ~„rt
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
15.00
14 00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to $6.:
7.99.
9.99
10.99..
11.99..
12.99.,
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99
17.99 .
18.99..
19.99.
20.99..
21.99 .
22.99.
23.99..
24.99..
25 99..
26.99
27.99 .
28.99.
34 99.
44 99.
49.99.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
&over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland    	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian 	
Greek. Yugoslavic	
Hebrew"	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese. ..	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro 	
Others not shown above ..'..
Males.
British
Subject.
Females.
British
Subject.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 19
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 27 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $158,093.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  88,805.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,573,744.00
Total $3,820,642.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
July	
August	
September .
November...
December...
Males.
Females.
2,718
2,775
2,334
2,561
2,545
2,553
1
1
1
2,188
2,338
2,437
2,508
2,598
2,610
February ....
April	
May	
June	
1
1
1
1
2
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
"25.00
26.00
27.00
2S.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to   $6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12 99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25 99.
26.99.
27 99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
5
11
15
12
8
9
11
21
25
32
33
64
53
38
133
101
115
216
183
182
872
619
101
46
184
Under
21 Yrs.
9
8
7
16
8
9
15
11
10
3
IS Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.    Allcn-
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland 	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese   	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above ...
Males.
916
1,105
2
11
9
266
144
229
131
98
5
2
45
26
64
87
73
'■A
Females.
British
Subject.    Allen-
Table No. 5.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified) 	
Males.      Females.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 121, Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $744,253.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  547,011.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    6,753,795.00
Total    $8,0,5.059.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January
February
March..
April ...
May	
June
Males.   Females.
4,361
4,688
4,463
4,485
4,852
5,004
60
61
58
02
65
89
July	
August....
September.
October....
November.
December .
Males.    Females.
4,838
4,915
4,627
4,687
4,664
4,234
107
107
89
79
72
76
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13 00
14.00
16.00
16.00
17.00
18 00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to $6.
to 7.
to 8.
to 9.
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99
21.99.
22.99.
23.99
24.99
25.99
26.99
27.99.
28.99
29.99
34.99.
39.99
44.99.
49.99
and over.
Males.
FBSIALKS.
Apprentices.
21 Yrs.
<fc over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
»v. over.
Under
18 Yrs.
26
4
10
6
16
41
23
13
60
27
61
85
149
129
161
314
99
123
316
183
329
134
79
214
36
818
724
777
116
188
6
2
1
*
1
1
1
1
13
1
1
98
11
3
6
1
1
58
3
33
2
20
32
6
1
1
48
4
31
3
1
3
4
2
	
1
I
2
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese   	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (nativeCanadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above..
Mai
.ES.
Fem
ALES.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
3,667
1,942
131
26
24
30
39
16
138
81
5
1
110
11
137
1
107
102
26
1
1
1
2
28
5
1
114
4
United States citizens (racial origin  not
specified)	
Males.      Females. I 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 1,05U Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers 41,346,424.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,187,159.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 12,291,304.00
Total   $14,827,887.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
6,952
7,273
7,637
8,016
8,611
9,306
Females.
Month.
Males.
9,412
10,089
10,097
9,910
9,359
8,918
Females.
January	
February....
March	
April	
May	
June	
93
99
120
135
170
179
July 	
September .
October ....
November..
December...
241
237
135
129
122
115
Classified Weekly Wage-rates
(Wage
earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
FEMALB8.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
c. over.
Under
21 Vrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
46.00 to   46.99...
7.00 to     7.99...
S.OOto     8.99...
27.
20
18
23
33
56
26
30
SI
74
72
76
164
154
697
368
405
1,139
473
1,619
455
646
595
342
331
1,890
1,8 9
1,951
484
417
5
5
9
4
6
12
23
12
13
24
24
13
56
14
15
14
27
8
"     1
3
1
1
31
3
1
9
14
1
12
13
7
10.00 to   10 99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99.
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18 00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99.
21,00 to   21 99.
22.00 to   22.99.   .
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28 99. ..
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to    34  99.
35.00 to   39.99...
1
14
3
85
33
18
9
17
1
6
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
5
11
12
3
4
11
5
24
11
6
2
13
19
4
1
12
1
2
5
1
50.00 an t over...
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien
British
Subject
Alien.
British :
Born in Canada   	
Born in Great Britain,
8,187
4,339
231
09
70
208
139
169
990
437
45
3
4
2
42
332
10
7
27
28
26
107
59
5
2
221
65
5
1
Born elsewhere	
Italian	
2
1
Bulgarian. Czechoslovak,
Hungarian. Itumauian   . . .
Norwegian, Swedish.
Danish. Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish  Ukrainian	
Hindu and other Fast Indian
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
3
3
32
1
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 26 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     4122,480.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       36u,140.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    2,613,991.00
Total 43.126,623.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January   ..
February ..
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males. I Females.
1.467
1,312
1,309
1,439
1,458
1,451
13
9
10
10
13
10
July	
1,460
13
1,431
13
September..
1,422
12
October..  .
1,410
14
November ..
1,297
12
December ..
1,305
10
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
46.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14 00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18 00
19.00
20 00
21 00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26 00
27 00
28.0c
29.00
30.00
35 OO
40.00
45.00
50.00
46.00.
to 46.
7.99
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99
13.99
14.99.
15.99
16.99.
17.99
18 99
19 99.
20.99.
21 99.
22 99.
23.99
24 99.
25.99
26 99
27 99.
28.99.
29.99
34.99.
3'.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
3
8
7
61
4
18
31
39
9
34
23
411
35
51
20
475
68
279
131
74
1
1
3
1
3
...
1
1
3
3
1
1
4
2
6
'i
I
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
I
4
1
1
16
o
Racial Origin_and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hung-arian, Rumanian	
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian. Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yug"oslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian! . ..
Negro	
Others not shown above	
British
lubject
Males.
Alien.
385
15
5
3
11
6
L
1
20
British
Subject.
Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)       	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 21
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 597 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  41,754,179.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc ,    1,991,974.00
Wag-e-earners (including piece-workers) 10,091,659.00
Total 413,837,812.CO
Av
erage
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
July :
August	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
Males.
Females.
.January	
February ....
March	
April	
May	
June   	
4,444
4,341
4,523
5,376
5,903
6,703
1,678
1,469
1,500
1,522
1,680
2,461
8,311
8,702
8,340
7,986
7,040
6,788
4,415
5,586
5,933
5,604
4,136
3,123
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
75
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
39
232
89
' 8
*>.00to   86.99...
32
19
79
22
8
7.00 to     7.99.   .
48
15
99
54
13
8.00 to     8.99...
31
17
131
80
8
9.00 to     9.99...
37
20
140
101
10
10.00 to   10.99...
35
26
330
97
4
ll.OOto   11.99...
32
39
285
44
12
12.00 to   12.99...
125
90
569
66
8
13.00 to   13.99...
435
58
780
42
•i
14.00 to   14.99...
478
43
1,086
128
4
15.00 to   15.99..
478
55
618
43
5
16.00 to   16.99...
310
33
899
25
3
17.00 to   17 99...
255
32
624
36
1
18.00 to   18.99...
313
27
401
22
2
19.00 to   19.99...
475
25
393
12
1
20.00 to   20.99...
446
32
289
10
21 00 to   21.99...
779
20
209
5
22.00 to   22.99...
587
641
23
31
192
108
23.00 to   23.99...
4
24.00 to   24.99...
557
22
94
5
25.00 to   25.99...
645
510
16
21
80
55
26.00 to   26.99...
•i
27.00 to   27.99...
407
8
,T(
28.00 to   28.99...
515
7
79
29.00 to   29.99...
267
1,441
629
6
17
4
40
136
40
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
1
40.00 to   44.99...
341
207
485
2
3
8
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over . ..
2
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland   	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French    ..   ....
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian	
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese...	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese '	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shownabove ...
Males.
!,022
87
46
71
115
167
302
54
18
923
4
784
715
5
161
16
15
26
34
1,131
"'82'
Females.
British
Subject.    Allen
851
24
32
76
80
178
393
12
8
17
1
781
1,081
3
148
1
6
11
4
27
18
15
310
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
.Males.
Table No. 9.
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 70 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     S155.45S.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       120,979.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)        689,068.00
Total       $965,505 00
 Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ..
February .
March....
April.  ...
May	
June.   .   .
Males.   Females.
202
208
217
218
223
20S
029
666
692
70S
704
657
Month.
July	
August	
September .
October
November.
December ..
Males.    Females.
212
212
212
208
208
192
644
673
718
727
708
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
16.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20 00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50 00
*6.00 ...-.
to   $6.99.
99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12 99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22 99
23. M.
24 99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over
21 Yrs.
& over.
4
12
11
3
11
4
3
13
4
14
14
7
21
5
4
4
32
19
3
8
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
Stover.
9
1
13
12
16
22
24
29
98
135
80
A6
47
37
36
36
10
23
16
5
10
4
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
10
4
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
Subject.
British :
Horn in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian. Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish. Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian 	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro 	
Others not shown above ....
Males.
British
7
1
18
11
Alien.
1
10
Females.
British
Subject.
138
5
3
3
4
5
15
3
16
30
3
3
13
9
i
2
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)   	
Males.
Females. I 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 60 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $201,706.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   193,319.00
Wage-earners(including piece-workers) 1,312,916.00
Total  $1,707,941.00
Average Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
March.	
April	
May	
June	
915
977
983
987
1,018
1,032
187
191
193
198
201
209
July	
August...  .
September..
October   . ._
November ..
December...
1,070
1,092
1,111
1,120
1,137
1,110
225
236
263
263
265
260
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Ma
,ES.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
2
1
1
27
23
20
27
37
36
26
70
11
38
16
10
3
2
1
1
_
2
1
1
3
2
4
7
16
21
56
37
13
15
7
17
6
6
3
2
$6 00 to   $6.99.   .
3
1
4
2
1
4
11
i
9.00 to     9.99...
11 00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
16.00to   16.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
2
1
2
1
5
8
9
16
23
71
41
68
62
67
39
53
35
50
45
32
90
58
10
2
o
5
1
1
1
17.00 to   17.99...
18 00 to   18.99. ..
19 00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22 00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99.   .
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
._
1
1
1
29.00 to   29 99...
30.00 to   34.U9...
45.00 to   49.99..
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German; Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian. Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish   	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hehrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese   	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above
Males.
British
Subject.
296
9
16
6
14
18
4
41
Females.
British
Subject.    Alien-
lTnited States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING  OF.
Returns covering 11 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $29,743.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc 124,9f>4.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 138,374.00
Total $293,071.
Ave rage Number of Wage-earners.
January ..
February,
March
April.   ..,
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
78
79
80
SI
81
80
Month.        Males.    Females.
July   80 0
August  82 fi
September... 80 6
October  79 6
November.. .81 8
December. 82 10
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
1
1
1
3
8.00 to    8.99
10 00 to   10.99.
11 00 to   11 99..
2
1
12.00 to   12.99..
3
t)
13 00 to   13.99 .
........
14 00 to   14 99..
1
1
	
15.00 to   15.99..
16 00 to   16.99
1
1
2
19.00 to   19.99..
2
1
1
21 00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22 99
24.00 to   24.99
1
2
25.00 to   25.99
26 00 to   26.99
28 00 to   28.99  .
29.00 to   29.99 .
1
30.00 to   34.99..
........
10
7
7
21
40 00 to   44.99..
46.00 to   49.99  .
50.00 and over ..
	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland    ...
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German   Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..,.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew   	
Chinese	
Hindu and other Fast Indian
Japanese       .
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
British
Subject.
Females.
British
Subject.     Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)   	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 23
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING.
Returns covering 101* Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $150,524.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       298,969.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,496,364.00
Total.
.*1,945,867.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Montti.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
May	
June   	
575
575
599
617
623
632
1,093
1,084
1,122
.1,167
1,172
1,220
July	
August ....
September..
October ....
November ..
December ..
645
640
623
623
609
603
1,302
1,319
1,279
1,241
1,232
1,241
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   J6.99...
2
3
1
3
4
10
8
1
10
6
14
6
1
4
1
1
1
18
7
14
-.0
29
56
68
82
139
364
160
104
40
32
12
21
4
8
3
8
6
2
1
1
_
3
4
19
1
8
6
5
7.00 to     7.99...
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
ll.OOto   11.99...
12.00 to   12 99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
i
1
5
2
3
13
S
16
12
9
39
24
50
18
50
28
64
55
25
28
20
4
71
32
13
4
3
12
10
18
46
14
17.00 to   17.99..
18 00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25 99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99.   .
35.00 to   39.99...
1
40 00 to   44.99.   .
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over . .
Racial Origin and Nationality
if Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British :
415
219
7
4
5
6
3
2
11
11
897
298
16
4
17
24
13
10
31
33
1
Born in Great Britain,
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian    .
Norwegian, Swedish,
1
1
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian 	
2
1
17
12
19
a
5
1
4
1
Males.
Females.
United States citizens (racial origin not
18
17
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 60 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers, $130,192.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     152,206.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   506,060.00
Total $788,458.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January.
February
March.. .
April... .
May	
June. .. .
Males.    Females.
360
369
395
376
368
387
135
130
141
142
162
167
Month.
July	
August	
September.
October
November.
December .
Males.    Females.
395
400
399
400
395
394
184
209
214
201
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
16.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.0(1
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
$6.00	
to   $6.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
8.99..
9.99..
10.99..
11.99,.
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17 99..
18.99..
19.99
20.99..
21.99..
22.99
23.99..
24.99..
25.99..
26.99 .
27.99 .
28.99..
29.99..
34 99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99  .
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
4
2
3
10
11
22
9
19
8
23
55
18
19
27
4
37
23
7
Under
21 Yrs.
3
16
13
6
6
12
1
5
18 Yrs.
& over.
10
4
13
11
17
14
18
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French      ...
Italian	
German. Austrian	
Bulgarian. Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish. Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese  	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese    	
Indian (native Canadian) —
Negro	
Others not shown above.  ..
British
Subject.    Alien-
1
10
34
9
17
2
British
Subject.    Alie"-
56
4
2
2
4
5
1
5
8
1
4
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
.Males.
7 I 24
DEPARTMENT OF.LABOUR.
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 951 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $2,453,475.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,106,155.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 35,700,500.00
Total.
.$3.',260,130. CO
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January ....
February...
March	
April	
Mav	
June	
20,402
22,251
23,705
24,354
25,025
24,564
88
96
94
114
120
July	
August. .. .
September.
October ...
November.
December..
23,382
25,052
25,959
26,122
25,352
22,415
113
110
111
119
129
125
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Males.
Females. .
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
14
9
15
14
9
44
25
35   -
45
47
67
128
189
235
1,253
669
1,809
878
805
3.09S
1,110
1,163
1,363
2,554
927
4,574
3,601
2,069
1,875
1,576
Under
21 Yrs.
2
1
2
2
2
8
12
19
39
19
51
43
20
111
53
98
48
46
150
26
20
17
47
5
89
54
4
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6.99...
7.90 to     7.99...
2
1
1
1
8.00 to     8.99...
2
1
2
4
8
2
4
21
8
8
10
11
5
9
1
3
7
1
1
4
3
9.00 to     9.99.
1
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
1
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14,00 to   14.99...
5
8
15.00 to   15.99
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
4
1
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99  ..
20.00 to   20.99..
1
1
1
21.00 to   21.99.   .
22.00 to   22.99...
1
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
'.'.'.".'.'.'
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99.   .
1
45.00 to   49.99...
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada.	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere  ...   .
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish. Ukrainian	
Greek, Y'ugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Necrro	
Others not shown above...   .
Males.
British
Subject.
13,973
3,180
359
135
242
201
409
597
2,646
1,042
169
2
440
434
496
337
9
391
40
27
97
174
468
1,492
876
238
1,257
928
Females.
British
Subject.
1
10
8
Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)   	
Females.
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 8J/.1 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $2,251,179.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   2,437,411.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    8,013,675.00
Total   $12,702,265.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January . .
February.
March..   .
April	
May	
June .
Males.    Females.
5,227
5,289
5,524
5,647
5,793
5,941
207
216
241
233
244
252
Month.
Males.
July	
6,281
August	
6,427
September .
6,330
October ....
6,401
November ..
6,560
December...
6,568
259
266
284
283
263
275
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
lor Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
.99.
Under $6.00...
$6.00 to   $6.99
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
11.00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 1O
16.00 to
17.00 to
9.99 .
10.99..
11.99.
12.99 .
13.99
14.99..
15.99..
16.99.
17 99.
IS.00 to 18.99.
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26 00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to   28.
19.99
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99 .
24.99..
25.99..
26.99
.99  .
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99 .
49.99..
50.00 and over .
Males,
Females.
Appren
21- Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
& over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Y'rs.
6
11
3
9
31
8
20
2
1
18
6
42
2
1
22
8
24
47
69
28
1
35
26
61
4
.1
19
23
51
7
9
17
21
62
40
3
21
24
52
11
1
16
22
52
11
15
230
75
84
•i
20
90
44
14
17
148
30
14
10
188
38
-   8
3
161
29
9
8
284
24
15
4
133
16
2
5
303
11
4
4
137
7
0
1
278
357
11
14
3
23
1
1
232
2
2
1
280
21
1
3
236
253
20
14
3
4
2
964
807
51
12
3
737
291
4
1
177
1
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere.   ..   .
Belgian, Dutch......
French	
Italian..	
German, Austrian    	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish ...
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other Fast Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown ab-jve.
Males.
British
Subject.
5,636
1,991
79
42
36
38
137
112
7
18
16
25
2
1
116
15
10
16
5
20
26
24
Females.
British
Subject.
64
3
10
1
ted States citizens (racial origin not
necified) .'	
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 25
Table No. 16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 164 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,224,621.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,037,110.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    11,551,190.00
Total $13,812,921.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
6,097
6,159
6,312
6,421
6,629
6,658
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February
March	
April	
May	
June	
69
69
70
70
79
86
July 	
August	
September..
October   ...
November...
December...
6,599
6,532
6,543
6,723
7,024
6,228
89
92
102
105
92
95
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6.
$6.00 to
7.00 to
8.00 to
9 00 to
10.00 to
11.00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
50.00 an
00	
$6.99...
7.99...
8.99...
9.99...
10.99...
11.99...
12.99...
13.99...
14.99...
15.99...
16.99...
17.99.
18 99...
19.99...
20.99..
21.99...
22.99.
23.99...
24.99..
25.99...
26.99...
27.99...
28 99...
29.99. .
34.99...
39.99.
4*4.99...
49.99.
1 over. ..
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
12
1
12
26
27
39
29
33
49
175
78
33
ISO
763
50J
2,177
2,527
566
214
78
Under
21 Yrs.
3
3
1
1
2
3
6
13
9
1
1
9
4
79
27
Frmalbs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
9
12
16
4
10
6
3
2
2
3
6
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
14
3
2
1
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject
Males.
Alien.
British :
Born i n Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian. Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian. Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish 	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro 	
Others not shown above	
,455
62
43
33
135
89
95
681
176
5
20
45
29
80
402
99
132
1
British
Subject.
85
34
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
195
Females.
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 404 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,200,324.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  1,411,277.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers).   6,£98,899.00
Total
1,210,600.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March
April	
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
3,419
3,551
3,845
4,073
4,1S7
4,571
514
502
513
544
580
600
.Month.
July 	
August....
September.
October
November .
December .
Males.    Females.
4,847
5,577
5,465
4,460
4,512
4,613
643
671
662
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to   $6.
7.99.
9.99.
10.99
11.99
12.99.
13.99.
14.99
15.99.
16.90.
17.99
18.99
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
Males.
F'emales.
Appren
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
,t over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
6
18
6
13
3
7
14
8
1
8
7
6
\
9
27
14
8
10
8
22
6
13
3
21
33
28
18
4
26
20
16
12
4
64
52
46
11
32
29
31
58
7
2
106
46
107
3
5
82
33
123
7
69
65
108
17
136
19
43
3
1
130
20
50
320
77
87
3
118
20
18
1
328
11
34
186
170
1,177
7
3
27
14
9
1
1
290
4
8
623
233
6
1
2
1
471
70
8:15
4
2
11
,1
1
386
282
164
68
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian. 	
German. Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian.	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above....
British
Subject.
3,254
2,637
511
23
34
27
58
85
5
13
26
11
20
21
1
76
15
16
30
38
34
117
222
9
1
7
British
Subject.
141
5
2
2
16
4
5
13
16
2
Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
5 I 26                                                DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns coverixig 58 Firms.
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 11 Firms.
Salary and Wage Pa'
Officers, Superintendents, and Managt
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc
Wage-earners (including piece-worker
^ments, 1941.
rs     $3
       9
s)      1.7
1,261.00
12,729.00
10,611.00
Salary and Wage Pai
Officers, Superintendents, and Manag
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc
Wage-earners (including piece-worke
/ments, 1941.
-s)    ]
(98,438.00
42,634.00
82,764.00
Total	
Total   $423,736.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February...
May	
June	
782
784
766
658
671
727
28
28
23
25
28
31
July	
August.  .   .
September..
October,
November ..
December...
950
915
955
883
843
782
31
32
35
34
32
29
January ....
February...
March  	
April	
May...
June	
122
133
138
141
157
152
15
15
17
19
19
21
July	
September..
October.
November ..
December...
161
154
151
160
148
141
20
20
23
22
21
20
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
2
t
Males.
Females.
j
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
S
I
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
1 Yrs.
cover.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
IS Yrs.
1 Yrs.
i over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under 86.00	
Under $6.00
$6.00 tc  $6
7.00 to     7
86.00 to  $6.
9
3
1
4
2
1
99..
7.00 to     7.99...
99
8.00 to     8 99...
99
2
2
1
1
4
2
11
1
11
3
4
5
4
8
5
9
10
5
4
4
23
4
2
1
5
6
11
9.00 to     9.99...
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10 99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99.
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99.
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99.
26.00 to   26.99  .
27.00 to   27.99  .
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99.
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00to   49.99..
50.00 and over . .
10.00 to   10.99...
2
1
1
I
1
3
4
2
1
11
11.00 to   11.!
12.00 to   12.i
13.00 to   13.!
14.00 to   14.S
9
9...
9
3
1
	
1
1
1
1
1
9
3
5
3
3
8
22
46
71
28
J8
82
52
52
66
86
43
239
178
121
53
23
2
1
1
16.00 to   16.99...
3
16.00 to   16.99.
17.00 to   17.99  ..
1
5
2
7
1
3
2
4
1
14
1
1 "
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
■
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99  ..
22.00 to   22.99...
1
	
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
7
3
1
26.00 to   25.99.   .
26.00 to   26.99...
1
27.00 to   27.99.   .
28.00 to   28.99...
4
6
4
1
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...'
!
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over.   .
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British :
Born in Canada	
881
317
31
3
6'
64
14
British :
Born in Canada
Born in Great 1
120
70
2
1
29
6
Born in Gi
Ireland.
eat Britain,
ritain,
Born elseu
Belgian, Dutcl
here
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
1
1
1
1
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian. Rumanian ...         13
Bulgarian, Czech, S
0
-ak,
Norwegian, Swedisl
,
96
12
14
2
48
4
28
65
8
4
Norwegian, Swedish,
2
Russian, Lithuania]
Polish, Ukrainian
Greek, Yugoslavic.
,
Russian, Lithuania
Polish, Ukrainian
Hebrew	
8
Hindu and other East Indian
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
6
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Indian (native Canadi
>
Others not shown above	
34
2
Others not shown alio
1
Males.       i
"emales.
Males.      I
'emales.
United States
citizens (racial origin not
11
United States citizens (racial origin not
1 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 27
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 145 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    3759,183.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen,etc   1,170,533.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       2,297,671.00
Total $4,227,387.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February...
April	
May	
1,199
1,211
1,232
1,256
1,258
1,284
205
198
211
228
220
221
July	
August	
September..
October	
November
December...
1,274
1,270
1,265
1,298
1,296
1,281
232
230
243
290
272
272
Classified Weekly Wage-rates
(Wage
earners
orfly).
For Week of
Males.
Fkmalks.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
&over.
Under
21 Yrs.
9
0
10
11
12
11
4
9
1
3
i
2
1
2
2
1
IS Yrs.
& over.
30
6
6
13
4
6
39
33
6
31
41
19
22
9
10
66
12
3
3
1
3
1
1
1
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Under S6 00	
$6.00 to   $6.99.   .
7.00 to     7.99...
8.00 to     8.99...
2
3
1
6
9
4
3
10
1
4
2
•i
9
10
15
9.00 to     9.99...
10 00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19 00 to   19 99. ..
3
2
14
9
15
3
11
12
11
11
19
8
29
•-0
24
43
19
23
33
13
119
89
304
161
171
10
18
8
4
4
4
1
2
1
20 00 to   20.99.   .
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
1
3
1
24.00to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   20.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28 00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99.
3
3
4
1
2
50.00 and over. ..
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
B-rn elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German. Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish. Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian   	
Greek, YTugosIavie 	
Hebrew	
Chinese  	
Hindu and other East Indian
lapanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
1,408
524
21
1
4
2
8
Alien.
20
19
Subject.
418
76
8
1
1
Alie
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $740,486.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      467,628.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     5,759,618.00
Total.
$6,967,732.00
Average Number of Wage-earners,
Males.    Females.
June i 3,34
151
161
154
152
155
157
Month.
July 	
August	
September..
October
November .
December..
Males.    Females.
3,401
3,400
3,371
3,407
3,391
3,363
165
174
169
l!-0
190
195
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
$6.99
7.99.
8.99
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99
15.99.
16.99
17.99
18.99.
19.99.
20.99
21.99
22.99
23.99.
24.99
25.99
26.99.
27.99
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
20
4
436
104
114
81
328
609
779
298
257
177
107
Under
21 Yrs.
3
11
18 Yrs.
& over.
5
11
53
16
26
14
23
20
5
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial  Origin.
British :
Horn in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian..
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Y'ugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese  	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above .
British
Subject.
746
45
16
113
14
26
122
57
1
1
150
36'
Alien.
10
26
13
108
236
British
Subject.    Allen'
135
32
Males.
Females.
Males.
Females.
United States citizens
(racial origin not
37
8
United States citizens (racial origin not
44
1 I 28
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering 52 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $272,813.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        406,096.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    9,855,400.00
Total " $10,534,309.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February ....
April	
May	
June	
3,373
3,521
3,703
4,218
4,620
5,070
4
4
4
4
6
July	
September..
November ..
December...
5,736
6,100
6,880
8.2S6
8,656
10,035
8
9
10
11
12
13
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
IS Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
1
9
7.00 to     7.99...
8.00 to     8.99...
10.00 to   10.99.   .
3
1
4
3
3
3
2
8
18
1
64
415
626
157
459
36
224
120
444
2.784
1,093
3,290
4i7
413
2
11.00 to   11.99...
1
12.00 to   12.99...
9
13.00 to   13.99...
4
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
2
30
21
1
81
152
160
174
1
44
13
1
3
33
3'2
3
3
1
6
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
4
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99..
2
1
3
2
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
2
9
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
2
4
24.00 to   24.99...
9
26.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   20.99...
1
9
27 00 to   27.99. ..
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
1
35.00 to    39.99...
1
40.00 to   44.99...
45.0U to   49.99...
	
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject
Males.
Alien.
5,331
3,811
717
91
57
209
93
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian.  Dutch	
French 	
Italian   	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian ...       108
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish        403
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian        141
Greek, Y'ugoslavic  57
Hebrew \ 8
Chinese     j 1
Hindu and other East Indian	
Japanese  53
Indian (native Canadian) ... 76
Negro  4
Others not shown above .... 39
11
1
4
10
80
Females.
British
Subject.
Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 23.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 5 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $169,474.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       844,000.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,819,155.00
Total $6,832,629.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Males.    Females.
January
February...
March ..
April	
May	
June	
3,069
3,035
3,008
3,127
3,224
3,260
24
24
23
23
24
23
Month.
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December..
Males,   l^emales.
3,341
3,413
3,330
3,358
3,349
3,348
23
24
24
24
24
24
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners offly)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16 99.
17.99.
18.99.
19 99.
20.99.
21.99.
22 99.
23.99.
24.99.
25 99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99
49.99
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
3
4
6
1
8
1
1
10
12
43
8
11
43
27
32
58
17
48
31
509
1,136
793
282
117
Under
21 Yrs.
3
1
1
5
1
65
55
15
18 Yrs.
& over.
12
i
i
3
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
2
13
2
8
1
1
4
3
2
1
1
2
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere    	
Belgian, Dutch   ....
French 	
Italian     	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian ...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish,  Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavia 	
Hebrew  	
Chinese 	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese 	
Indian (native Canadian)...
Negro 	
Others not shown above ....
British
Subject.
909
50
9
3
317
19
19
106
41
2
64
5
12
56
18
17
Females.
British
Subject.
9
11
Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 29
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 111 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $955,6(7.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     2,134,182.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     8,519,943.00
Total.
 ill,639.
-ii
00
Ave
rage
Number
of
w
ige
earners.
Month.
Males.
3,943
3,938
4,141
4,276
4,251
4,242
Females.
.Month.
Males.
Females.
January..
February ....
April	
May	
June	
1.567
1,601
1,612
1,391
1,425
1,615
July	
August	
September..
October ....
November ..
December...
4,334
4.3:9
4,300
4,276
.4,302
4,310
1,550
1,539
1,489
1,483
1,438
1,566
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
21 00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 	
to   S6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11 99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99'.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99.
20 99.
21 99
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39 99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
3
2
1
2
2
4
9
35
44
21
161
45
62
183
81
133
116
205
263
215
166
164
121
114
1,010
915
507
185
99
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Y'rs.
1
1
1
1
30
HI
61
255
129
22
84
167
503
113
28
15
Apprentices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland.	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian ....
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian. Rumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish   	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)...
Negro	
Others not shown above...
Males.
British
Subject.
',910
99
14
26
69
135
4
10
8
6
3
3
1
6
11
1
14
1
' i
Females.
British
Subject.
497
44
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 103 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $566,562.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      237,663.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  3,652,084-00
Total  14,466,309.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January .. .
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.
2.720
2,791
2,829
2,843
2,994
3,010
Females.
161
192
200
1'8
219
220
Month.
July	
August.. ..
September.
October ...
November..
December .
Males. |   Females.
3,155
3,218
3,147
3,083
3,073
2,922
216
218
223
245
270
262
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Eniploynientof
Greatest Number.
Under
SO. 00
7.00
8,00
9.00
10 00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14 00
15.00
16 00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24 00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30 00
36.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to S6.99
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99
16 99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99
20.99
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99
28.99.
29.99.
34.99
39.99.
44.99
4.) 99
to
to
and over
Malks.
Femalks.
Appren
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
& over.
21 Yrs.
13
1
& over.
18 Yrs.
«
3
3
3
1
11
........
8
6
1
1
2
2
4
•i
1     .
1
41
f.6
6
4   •
12
4
4
10
53
14
2
7
149
23
1
13
66
69
7
5
14
88
41
2
1
65
113
6
1
1
40
158
25
2
162
36
5
1
63
35
14
5
5
113
1
1
186
fi
11
6
3
78
1
308
3
i
1
1
3
117
293
130
294
55
421
161
1
61
41
20
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish. Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hehrew	
Chinese  	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (nativeCanadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above..
Males.
British
Subject.
545
58
34
31
fil
76
105
137
112
4
10
1
25
British
Subject
13
42
14
1
Females.
Alien.
194
22
i
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	 I 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 5,115 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1941.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers ._.
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc..
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)....
$16,300,930.00
17,737,814.00
141,410,812.00
$535,884.00
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary—   	
Estimated pay-roll of employers covered by Department's inquiry from whom returns
were not received         - —      2,345,000.00
Transcontinental Railways   __     -     14,395,019.00
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey: viz.. Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, delivery, auto transportation, ocean
services,  miscellaneous   (estimated  pay-roll)        46,806,000.00
$175,449,556.00
64,075,903.00
Total
$239,525,459.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January...
February .
March..  ..
April	
May	
June	
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
77,017
79,891
82,510
86,051
89,343
91,887
93,787
97,986
98,689
98,925
97,473
92,785
Females.
945
881
072
005
,357
325
522
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland.	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
P>ench	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Rumanian ....
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian )...
Negro ,	
Others not shown above   ...
British
Subject.
63,708
30,944
2,556
595
700
1,953
1,476
1,660
6,595
3,023
575
110
1,643
464
1,647
1,428
41
1,746
Females.
British
Subject.
364
351
787
2,471
1,464
503
5
2,985
1,470
371
10,610
2,409
126
49
109
165
225
90
276
503
19
38
48
2
9
11
11
31
52
18
1
18
350
98
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
1,887
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00.   ..
to   $6.99.
to     7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to
to
to
29.99.
34.99
44.99.
49.99.
Malks.
Females.
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
& over.
21 Yrs.
&, over.
18 Yrs.
180
Ill
318
113
100
71
107
34
127
103
147
71
124
156
203
117
156
187
214
125
272
190
467
171
208
224.
489
75
367
403
988
104
733
294
1,223
81    -
855
419
1,927
148
1,190
520
1,567
65
1,022
395  .
1,463
49
1,307
399
937
45
1,537
336
757
27
3,836
463
833
2-1
2,647
249
1,070
12
4,268
360
428
11
4,480
331
311
3,796
318
199
5
8,850
290
155
5
4,740
156
164
1
4,464
SO
76
2
4,267
87
72
6,535
121
111
4,021
49
57
20,562
397
151
15,407
186
53
2
12,542
30
12
4,914
3
4,260
117,767
1
4
0,929
14,503
1,287
Apprentices.
68
65
109
132
110
124
107
168
50
50
53
45
69
34
26
13
20
18
9
19
4
12
41
14
1
2
1
1,429 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 31
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Since the " Hours of Work Act " became effective the Board has shown the average hours by industries, and the accompanying table sets out comparative figures for
the years 1930 to 1941, inclusive.
COMPARATIVE FIGURES, 1930 TO 1941.
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Employees
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 54 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
54 Hours.
1930...                                 	
4,704
4,088
3,529
3,530
3,956
4,153
4,357
4,711
4,895
4,829
4,971
5,115
87,821
84,791
68,468
71,185
75,435
81,329
90,871
102,235
96,188
94,045
103,636
118,160
Per Cent.
77.60
83.77
80.36
77.95
85.18
88.78
87.12
89.31
88.67
88.68
88.93
89.61
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
5.76
5.26
6.42
4.57
5.29
5.42
5.13
4.49
Per Cent.
9.04
1931    	
1932                                                               	
9.44
11.92
1933..    	
1934    .                              	
11.12
9.06
1935..   ..'	
1936 ...                          	
5.96
6.46
1937 	
1938 	
6.12
6.04
1939
5.90
1940	
5.94
1941                       _ 	
5.90
The average weekly working-hours for all employees for same years being :-
1941
1940
1939
1938
1935
47.17
46.91
47.80
46.84
1937    47.25
1936     47.63
1934    _   47.32
1933   '..  47.35
1932     47.69
1931    47.37
1930     _  48.62
Information regarding hours, as submitted to the Department of Labour by the
5,115 firms reporting, covered 118,160 male and female employees for 1941. A segregation shows 89.61 per cent, working 48 hours or less per week, 4.49 per cent, working
from 48 to 54 hburs per week, and 5.90 per cent, working in excess of 54 hours per
week. I 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
1941.
44.60
45.15
42.73
47.91
46.93
44.11
46.70
49.05
44.39
45.61
44.30
45.20
. 45.33
48.49
50.91
45.77
48.45
48.23
46.65
45.46
50.25
46.20
46.70
44.16
44.37
47.95
43.85
47.92
45.36
46.72
44.53
44.63
24.00
47.93
48.54
43.85
47.20
47.43
43.22
44.33
42.01
44.14
44.31
48.38
49.51
44.67
48.37
47.99
47.46
45.00
50.30
45.78
48.81
44.11
43.55
44.29
44.05
47.95
45.23
46.29
45.41
45.07
40.40
47.92
49.42
43.82
42.57
47.59
43.69
44.12
40.75
44.66
44.27
48.47
50.36
45.80
48.71
47.98
47.57
44.93
50.19
45.64
47.69
44.10
42.64
47.96
44.08
47.89
45.11
46.39
44.95
45.31
41.50
48.03
50.38
44.01
45.81
46.78
43.38
44.76
43.87
44.35
44.93
48.37
52.65
45.17
49.17
48.17
47.35
45.13
50.20
45.96
48.17
43.95
42.24
47.78
43.68
49.28
45.40
47.27
45.07
Builders' materials, etc.    	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing   	
45.97
35.33
48.02
52.95
Contracting     .,	
45.03
47.09
47.28
42.51
44.62
44.16
45.20
45.37
Lumber industries—
48.24
52.77
46.33
48.50
Sawmills   	
48.40
47.29
45.14
50.24
46.97
49.82 -
43.87
42.90
Pulp and paper manufacturing      	
47.46
43.63
47.84
45.44
46.08 SUMMARY OF LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR.
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1941-42.)
"POLL TAX ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1941-42."
An amendment to the above Act was passed to provide that persons in the various
arms of Service in the present war, returning medically unfit, be exempt from poll tax.
" TRUCK ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1941-42."
This Act was amended to extend its application to municipalities and villages. The
benefits which the Act gives to wage-earners were formerly restricted to cities.
"APPRENTICESHIP ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1941-42."
This Act was amended to permit of apprenticeship being started at the age of 15
instead of 16 as formerly. The reason for this was that the " Factories Act " allows
the employment of boys to commence at 15 years of age. The situation was that boys
could start work at 15 but could not commence their apprenticeship until they were 16,
thereby losing a valuable year's apprenticeship.
" POST-WAR REHABILITATION ACT."
This Act was passed making provision for rehabilitation of men and women whose
regular course of employment has been dislocated during the present war. The Act is
very far-reaching in its benefits and furnishes the Government with wide powers to deal
with the post-war situation. It also provides for the immediate establishment for a
Post-war Rehabilitation Council pertaining to all phases of the public welfare.
" TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1941-42."
•This Act was amended to define more clearly the definition of " Trade-school," and
to stop abuses that were beginning to develop in connection with false and improper
advertising of trade-school courses. I 34 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman  Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell     C 1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton     ..789 Pender Street West,  Vancouver.
4. James Thomson   .....789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. J. A. Ward Bell      789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
Mabel A.  Cameron ..      ... ..Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
Head  Office       Parliament  Buildings,  Victoria.
Branch Office ....,...., ...  _ __ 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the Eighth Annual Report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1941.
. It was in 1934 that the Board was formed, superseding the Minimum Wage Board
which in 1933 had recorded its activities for sixteen years. Thus, if there had been
no change in set-up this would have been the Twenty-fourth Annual Report. It will
be realized, therefore, that for almost a quarter of a century legislation has been giving
benefits to the workers of this Province and protecting fair employers against
competitors who might not be as considerate if no regulations were placed on their
operations.
The Board of Industrial Relations administers the " Male Minimum Wage Act,"
the " Female Minimum Wage Act," and the " Hours of Work Act."
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS.
The Board convened on twenty days during the year, holding thirty-eight sessions. Victoria was the meeting-place on thirteen days and Vancouver for six days.
The Board travelled to Abbotsford one day for a special session with Fraser Valley
School Boards in connection with their school janitor's.
Fourteen representative delegations appeared before the Board at different meetings during 1941 to discuss their problems. These groups sometimes consisted of
workers only. Sometimes employers in a group presented their views. On certain
occasions joint deputations of employees and employers placed their recommendations
before the Board, it being deemed advisable in these cases to have both sides present
at the same time.
NEW ORDERS AND REGULATIONS.
Most of these delegations were invited to meet the Board while it was considering
new Orders or contemplating amendments to existing Orders. The following is a
brief, summary of the 1941 enactments:—
Janitors.—Order No. 43a increased the scale for janitors in apartment buildings.
Janitors.—Order No. 43b exempted janitors in one-room school-houses from the
provisions of Order No. 43.
Janitresses.—Order No. 44a made the same increases for janitresses in apartment
buildings as were granted to janitors.
Janitresses.—Order No. 44b exempted janitresses in one-room school-houses from
the provisions of Order No. 44. '
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries.—Order No. 74 put employees in these
industries on an hourly basis instead of a weekly basis and required learners of any
age to work under permits. Formerly only those 18 years of age or over needed
permits for their training periods. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 35
The new Order increased the rates and classed the workers by experience instead
of by age as the original Order had done.
Provisions were made for the supplying and up-keep of uniforms or special
articles of wearing-apparel when employers required their help to be so attired.
No deductions are permissible from the girls' wages for accidental damage to any
article belonging to or in the custody of their employers, nor for penalties for unsatisfactory work.
Personal Service Occupation.—Order No. 27d. Physiotherapy was added to Order
No. 27.
Painting, Decorating, and Paper-hanging Trade in the Southerly Portion of Vancouver Island.—Order No. 75 set a rate of 75 cents an hour for these trades in the
localities specified in the Order.
Shingle Industry.—Order No. 62 (1941). This Order took the place of Order
No. 62 which had set an hourly rate for any occupation in the industry.
The new Order sets a specific rate for sawing and packing shingles, based upon
the " square." For sawing the rates are 25 cents per square for No. 1 shingles and
20 cents per square for shingles lower in grade than No. 1.
The rate for packers is 15 cents per square.
There is an hourly guarantee of 40 cents for sawyers and packers and the same
hourly rate for employees other than sawyers and packers.
Transportation Industry.—Order No. 26B. As so many women and girls were
entering this industry the Board promulgated an Order under the " Female Minimum
Wage Act," making it practically the same as the Transportation Order under the
" Male Minimum Wage Act." Summary of this Order is set out in the Appendix to
the Report.
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52h for resort hotels in unorganized
territory during the summer season. The usual summer Order was put into effect
from June 14th, 1941, to September 13th, 1941.
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52J. This is the customary Order for
resort hotels in unorganized territory for the winter season. It was operative from
September 29th, 1941, to June 13th, 1942.
Mercantile Industry.—Order No. 24, Supplementary (1941). Prescribed rates for
women and girls employed temporarily during the Christmas season.
Mercantile Industry.—Order No. 59, Supplementary (1941). Set out rates for
men and boys doing temporary work in the Christmas season.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT " REGULATIONS.
The following routine Regulations were made during 1941:—
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Regulation No. 2lG exempted the industry from
the provisions of the " Hours of Work Act," but the Orders of the Board require a
rising scale of wages as hours increase, and this has a definite effect in keeping the
working-week as short as practical.
Mercantile Industry.— (Christmas, 1941, Temporary). Appropriate regulations
were enacted to take care of the Christmas rush in various branches of the industry
and to protect both male and female workers from overly long hours.
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
Completed returns were received from 5,612 employers of women and girls, an
increase of 380 over the 1940 total. The survey covered some 34,204 women workers
for 1941, an increase of 4,166 reported on the pay-rolls as compared with the previous
yearly period.
The following tables cover the occupations for which minimum wages have been
set by the Board. ><■   •" j i.a ,-. ,   ,..;--■■•    v.      . \ ; I 36
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1940.
1939.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number" of employees 	
Over 18 years 	
Under 18 years _ —
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  	
Employees under 18 years -	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years 	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
Average hours worked per week-.-	
927
7,368
6,647
721
1,166.19
1,373.25
$13.56
$8.84
9.79%
39.30
815
6,480
5,972
508
$78,154.39
$4,293.42
$13.09
$8.45
7.84%
38.75
664
5,592
5,194
398
$70,943.66
$4,012.57
$13.66
$10.08
7.12%
42.14
538
5,315
4,851
464
$65,856.44
$4,695.22
$13.58
$10.12
8.73%
43.48
$60.
$4.
507
5,010
4,540
470
,373.35
638.65
$13.30
$9.66
9.38%
40.47
Firms reporting in the mercantile industry for 1941 again showed an increase,
927 making returns for the year, with an additional 888 employees recorded.
The average weekly wage for employees over 18 years increased to $13.56 as
against $13.09 for 1940. The percentage of younger employees under 18 years gained
slightly, the average weekly wage for this latter group also showing an increase over
the previous year.
The average weekly hours increased fractionally to 39.30 as against 38.75 previously reported.
Laundry Industry (Female).
1941.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1937.
122
1,469
1,371
98
$18,698.02
$991.06
$13.64
$10.11
6.67%
41.89
124
1,318
1,228
90
$15,941.10
$741.14
$12.98
$8.23
6.83%
42.00
Ill
1,182
1,126
56
$14,520.24
.$460.97
$12.90
$8.23
4.74%
42.09
95
1,095
1,029
66
$13,565.23
$567.74
$13.18
$8.60
6.03%
42.74
86
1,084
1,014
70
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  	
Employees under 18 years  	
Average weekly wages—
$13,083.49
$575.71
Employees under 18 years  	
Percentage of employees under 18 years 	
$8.22
6.46%
The number of firms reporting in the laundry industry decreased by 2, although
the total employees covered increased to 1,469 as against 1,318 for 1940.
Average weekly wages for employees over 18 years increased from $12.98 in 1940
to $13.64 in 1941, the average in the under-18 group rising from $8.23 to $10.11 during
the same period.
Little change was noted in the percentage of employees under 18 years, 6.67 per
cent, being reported as compared with 6.83 per cent, for the previous year.
The average weekly working-hours continued to decrease slightly, the 1941 figure
standing at 41.89 as against 42 for 1940.
This industry continues to be very busy in certain sections of the Province where
large groups of men in the Services are stationed. Rush orders for quantity work,
including bedding and uniforms, when personnel of camps move to other localities have
taxed capacities of many laundries and dry-cleaning establishments.
The coastal laundries, too, have had to cope with extra work for ships in port for
short neriods.
This emergency trade, due to war conditions, has imposed many problems on the
laundry operators that they would not have to solve in normal times. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 37
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of employees  -...	
Over 18 years —	
Under 18 years 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  	
Employees under 18 years  	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years- 	
Employees under 18 years..	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
Average hours worked per week —
1941.
1940.
1,005
5,528
5,309
219
$74,660.52
$2,621.25
$14.06
$11.97
3.96%
43.34
$66;
$1
943
4,974
4,811
163
383.16
792.51
$13.80
$11.00
3.28%
43.12
819
4,380
4,288
92
$59,156.99
$1,043.15
$13.80
$11.34
2.10%
43.11
1938.
765
3,970
3,878
92
$53,223.45
$1,058.77
$13.72
$11.51
2.32%;
42.95
1937.
532
3,424
3,302
122
$46,840.82
$1,353.11
$14.19
$11.09
3.56%
42.43
Inasmuch as the number of janitresses and women elevator operators throughout
the Province does not reach a figure high enough to warrant separate classification,
these workers have been included with others in the hotel and catering industry. These
two classes were formerly covered by the Order relating to the public housekeeping
industry. The new name—hotel and catering industry—tends to designate the occupation more clearly than the former one.
The firms reporting increased from 943 in 1940 to 1,005 in 1941, with a corresponding gain in employees of 554.
The average weekly wage for employees over 18 years rose to $14.06 as against
$13.80 for the previous year. Owing to certain unskilled employees being included in
this group, who by permission of the Board were allowed to be trained at the same
rates as the younger girls, the average for some years remained below the $14 legal
minimum.    This average now stands above the minimum rate set.
The under-18 group likewise showed increased wages, the average weekly wage
for this class rising to $11.97 for 1941 over $11 for 1940. The percentage employed
in this younger group gained slightly from 3.28 per cent, to 3.96 per cent.
A fractional increase was noted in the average hours worked.
The Board has noticed a great labour turnover this year amongst the waitresses,
who not only have been changing over from one restaurant to another but also from
one city to another.
This has created many complications for employers and the Board. While the
report is specifically for the year 1941 it does not go to press until part of 1942 has
elapsed, and the announcement of Federal Regulations to restrain this moving about
from one job to another will undoubtedly be welcomed by all concerned.
Office Occupation (Female).
1941.
Number of firms reporting  -	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years  	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
2,537
8,513
8,327
186
$155,758.51
$2,237.85
$18.71
$12.03
2.18%
40.80
1940.
2,417
7,438
7,321
117
$133,397.18
$1,358.66
$18.22
$11.61
1.57%
40.35
2,241
6,779
6,691
$121,691.66
$1,006.38
$18.19
$11.44
1.30%
40.55
2,096 ;
7,367
7,273
94
$132,369.27
$1,115.55
$18.20
$11.87
1.28%
40.16
1,891
5,911
5,802
109
$106,395.64
$1,306.60
$18.34
$11.99
1.84%,
40.79
This classification was again in the lead with the greatest number of women
employed; returns being received from 2,537 firms for the year 1941, an increase of
120 over the preceding year.
J I 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The returns covered a total of 8,513 employees, representing an additional 1,075
over the previous year's figure.
Average weekly wage for the experienced workers rose to $18.71 from $18.22 in
1940, while the average for the inexperienced group also increased, the 1941 figure
being $12.03 as against a previous figure of $11.61.
The percentage of younger employees in this occupation again showed some
increase over previous years.
Average weekly hours increased slightly to 40.80 as compared with 40.35 for 1940.
It is interesting to note some of the numbers receiving the more worth-while
salaries. A $65 monthly rate is the legal minimum for experienced employees 18
years of age or over.
There were 1,453 employed at $65.00 per month.
315
389
230
248
231
108
255
83
70
47
63
57
10
22
33
147
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
90.00
95.00
100.00
110.00
115.00
120.00
125.00
130.00
135.00
140.00
150.00
more than $150.00 per month.
The above figures show those actually receiving the quoted monthly rates and do
not include, for instance, those getting between $65 and $70, or between $70 and $75,
and so on down the list.
It is gratifying to notice that office employees holding the more responsible positions are gradually being remunerated according to efficiency and service.
Last year's report noted 1,563 at the actual monthly minimum of $65 and this
year only 1,453 were being paid that salary.
The above table this year shows an improvement in that more substantial numbers
of office help were moved up to the higher brackets.
This year's table indicates that 147 women were receiving more than $150 monthly,
whereas last year only 118 appeared in this category.
,    Personal Service Occupation (Female).
1941.
1938.
1937.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees  —	
Over 18 years  	
Under 18 years 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years  	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years 	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
Average hours worked per week	
200
581
553
28
$7,384.08
$172.06
$13.35
$6.15
4.82%
35.98
214
607
581
26
57,715.72
$131.33
$13.28
$5.05
4.28%
35.35
198
570
555
15
$7,696.07
$112.63
$13.87
$7.51
2.63%
36.89
161
509
495
14
3,723.47
$57.75
$13.58
$4.13
2.75%
37.87
157
481
472
9
1,283.69
$45.09
$13.31
$5.01
1.87%
37.85 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 39
Included in the above figures are employees of beauty-parlours and theatre ushers.
Some decrease was noted in the number of firms filing returns in this classification, with a resulting drop in the total employees reported to 581 as against 607 for
the previous year.
In the experienced group the average weekly wage increased from $13.28 to $13.35
for 1941. A similar increase was evident in the inexperienced class, where the average
rose to $6.15 over $5.05 for 1940. The percentage of the latter group employed also
increased during the year.
With the increases in the above average earnings a slight increase was noted in
the average weekly hours worked, the 1941 figure rising to 35.98 as against 35.35 for
the preceding year.
Within this section the irregular hours of theatre ushers was again largely
responsible for the low average working-hours per week.
Fishing Industry (Female).
1938.
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of employees — 	
Experienced  	
Inexperienced   	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees 	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees  —	
Inexperienced employees. 	
Percentage of inexperienced employees..
Average hours worked per week - -
6
160
130
30
$1,868.08
$401.26
$14.37
$13.38
18.75%
35.54
10
105
78
27
$1,222.54
$261.33
$18.67
$9.68
25.71%
38.82
10
-   58
27
31
$455.81
$199.29
$16.88
$6.43
53.45%
31.78
6
36
23
13
$267.35
$134.37
$11.62
$10.34
36.11%
34.61
5
37
26
11
$330.84
$90.67
$12.72
$8.24
29.73%
37.02
Inasmuch as the Order of the Board does not cover women workers in fish-canneries, this group comprises a rather negligible number.
Although fewer firms reported, a considerable increase was shown in the number
of employees listed. Higher wages were paid to beginners in the inexperienced group,
the average weekly wage increasing to $13.38 as against $9.68 previously reported.
A slight drop was recorded in the average earnings of the experienced class.
Increased employment in this industry was probably a contributing factor in the
decrease in working-hours, the average weekly hours dropping to 35.54 as against 38.82
for the previous year.
The reason so few employees are reported in this industry is that the Order does
not apply to employees in canneries.
It may be necessary to include these women and girls at some future date. A great
many of them are 'Indian women who help their male relatives during the fishing
season, and their work and hours are a bit erratic during the fish-runs. A study is
being made of this matter as the report goes to press.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female).
1941.
1940.
1938.
Number of firms reporting-
Total number of employees-
Experienced	
Inexperienced 	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees 	
Inexperienced employees _
Average weekly wages—-
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees-
Average hours worked per week 	
150
1,887
1,818
69
$36,327.20
$632.96
$9.17
3.66%
40.38
$35
132
1,922
1,872
50
047.43
$486.27
$18.72
$9.73
2.60%
40.10
145
1,880
1,766
114
$32,074.05
$1,156.11
$18.16
$10.14
6.06%
39.84
137
1,815
1,759
56
$32,238.68
$434.46
$18.33
$7.76
3.09%
40.71
142
1,934
1,720
214
$31,284.95
$2,497.70
$18.19
$11.67
11.06%
40.59 I 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Included in the above table with regular telephone and telegraph company
employees are those operating switchboards in offices and other establishments such
as hotels, hospitals, etc.
While some increase was apparent in the number of firms filing returns under
this heading, a slight decrease in the total employees reported Avas evident.
The average weekly wage for experienced employees again increased—rising from
$18.72 in 1940 to $19.98 for the year under review. A similar average figure for the
inexperienced class decreased slightly from $9.73 to $9.17 for 1941, with an increase
in the percentage of this latter group employed.
Average hours of work in this occupation showed only a fractional increase over,
the previous year's figure.
A most substantial increase in weekly average wages occurred in this industry—
namely, $1.26 a week in excess of the 1940 average—putting this occupation at the top
of the list for highest average for experienced employees.
In the non-seasonal occupations this was well in advance of other increased aver^
ages. The laundry and manufacturing industries each show the 1941 averages for
experienced employees to be 66 cents in advance of the 1940 figures; this being second
to the increase shown' by the telephone employees.
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
1940.
1937.
Number of firms reporting .
Total number of employees-
Experienced  	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees 	
Inexperienced employees ..—...
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees 	
Inexperienced employees.—	
Percentage of inexperienced employees-
Average hours worked per week —	
551
4,450
3,815
635
$59,149.52
$6,234.27
$15.50
$9.82
14.27%
42.65
501
3,545
3,061
484
$45,411.50
$4,490.36
$14.84
$9.28
13.65%
42.36
435
3,208
2,784
424
$41,240.31
$3,676.80
$14.81
$8.67
13.22%
42.01
380
3,085
2,701
384
$40,177.04
$3,482.01
$14.87
$9.07
12.45%
41.92
358
2,652
2,297
355
$32,469.11
$3,247.59
$14.14
$9.15
13.39%
41.65
Firms reporting in the manufacturing industry increased from 501 in 1940 to 551
in 1941.
The total employees reported in this section for the year stood at 4,450, an increase
of 905 as compared with the total for 1940.
Increases were apparent in both wage groups, the average weekly wage for the
experienced workers rising to $15.50 as against $14.84 for 1940, while in the inexperienced class the average weekly figure increased to $9.82 from $9.28 previously
recorded.
With increased employment, the percentage of inexperienced employees rose to
14.27 per cent, as against 13.65 per cent, for the previous year.
A slight gain was also noted in the average working-hours, which figure stood at
42.65 as compared with 42.36 for 1940.
It is gratifying to note that the weekly average for experienced employees has
shown a marked increase, surpassing the average of 1931 when wages were at a high
level.   That year the figure stood at $15.45.
This table includes all types of factories, and also takes in those engaged in
millinery work-rooms and dressmaking establishments.
The commodities produced, assembled, and packed by feminine hands in this
category cover a very wide range, as reference to the summary of Orders will disclose. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 41
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female).
1941.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1937.
82
4,141
3,922
219
$67,752.93
$1,945.17
$17.28
$8.88
5.29%
47.17
76
3,649
3,529
120
$59,173.40
$1,067.67
$16.77
$8.90
3.29%
47.16
79
3,840
3,562
278
$57,232.59
$2,713.79
$16.07
$9.76
7.24%
46.75
81
3,540
3,316
224
$54,275.82
$2,247.52
$16.37
$10.03
6.33%
46.90
71
Total number of employees	
3,551
3,298
253
Total weekly wages—
$54,279.51
$2,650.17
Average weekly wages—
$16.46
$10.48
7.12%
47.78
Average hours worked per week.	
Firms reporting in this classification increased for 1941, with a total employment
figure of 4,141 as against 3,649 for 1940.
The average weekly wage for experienced workers again increased, the 1941 figure
rising to $17.28 from $16.77 in 1940. The percentage of inexperienced workers
employed rose from 3.29 per cent, to 5.29 per cent., while the average weekly wage
for this latter group remained almost steady with a variation of 2 cents.
Average weekly hours in this industry remained practically unchanged.
Transportation Industry (Female).
1941.
Number of firms reporting.— 	
Total number of employees —
Over 18 years    	
Under 18 years 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years —
Employees under 18 years.	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
Average hours worked per week 	
32
107
20
87
$207.42
$712.58
$10.37
$8.19
81.31%
43.19
Inasmuch as this is a new table, no comparative data for previous years are
available.
Included in the figures presented are female workers engaged in delivery, truck-
driving, messenger work, etc.
Thirty-two firms reported women or girls engaged in these occupations, the
number of employees totalling 107.
The average weekly earnings in the over-18-year group was $10.37, while in the
under-18 class, which represented 81.31 per cent, of the total employed, the average
weekly earnings were $8.19.
Average weekly hours for the workers in this industry for 1941 were 43.19.
It will be interesting to note future developments in this industry. The Board
made a special survey towards the end of the year when girls were known to be doing
delivery-work on bicycles and in light trucks.
The matter of suitable clothing for these messengers during winter gave the
members some concern.
Certain companies, as soon as they realized girls would be employed for a considerable period, voluntarily had appropriate protective garments made for their
messengers. I 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
When the covering Order was made in August the Board foresaw that fall and
winter days would make the girls' work uncomfortable if they were not suitably clad
to protect them from the elements.
A provision was inserted in the Order whereby employers who require their help
to wear uniforms must furnish them without cost to the employees.
However, some of the firms, experimenting with female help, were not requiring
the girls to wear uniforms. Our officials were able to persuade most employers that
suitable clothing would help to avoid colds and other ailments due to exposure to the
weather, and thus obviate the necessity for absence from duty.
Provision of suitable rest-room accommodation for the girls between calls was
also taken up with the firms. In some instances, as the companies had previously only
employed males, it was necessary to make alterations on their premises to provide
proper facilities for the girls.
Incidentally, the advent of women and girls into certain other industries, where
none had been employed before, has in many instances had the effect of improving
conditions for the men also. When alterations were being made for the girls many
employers built bright airy lunch-rooms for their men, installed lockers, etc., and
improved their premises generally.
Summary of all Occupations ("Female Minimum Wage Act").
1941.
1939.
1938.
1937.
Number of firms reporting   *	
Total number of employees ._.  	
Over 18 years, or experienced 	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced 	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or inexperienced     —	
Average hours worked per week  	
5,612
34,204
31,912
2,292
$511,972.47
$22,321.71
$16.04
$9.74
6.70%
41.82
5,232
30,038
28,453
1,585
$442,446.42
$14,622.69
$15.55
$9.23
5.28%
41.48
$405.
$14,
4,702
27,489
25,993
1,496
011.38
381.69
$15.58
$9.61
5.44%
42.24
$398,
$13,
4,259
26,732
25,325
1,407
696.76
793.39
$15.74
$9.80
5.26%
42.42
3,749
24,084
22,471
1,613
$351,341.40
$16,405.29
$15.64
$10.17
6.70%
42.05
Actual figures concerning 34,204 women and girl employees are shown in the above
table, who comprise the staffs of some 5,612 firms. Aggregate wages and salaries for
one week totalled $534,294.18, or an increase of $77,225.07 over the 1940 total.
The average weekly wage for all occupations increased to $16.04 in the over 18
years, or experienced, group as against a figure of $15.55 for 1940.
The lowest legal wage for women 18 or over in the various classifications covered
by Orders of the Board is $12.75 in the mercantile industry, ranging up to $15.50 in
the fishing group. Taking all classes of employment together, it will be seen, therefore, that the general average is still above the highest minimum set by law.
While the Orders permit of a 48-hour week, the average week for the 34,204
gainfully employed women and girls was only 41.82 hours, a fractional increase over'
the previous year's average of 41.48.
The percentage of employees under 18 years or inexperienced increased from 5.28
per cent, to 6.70 per cent, in 1941.
A study of the tables shows increases in the average wage for the adult or experienced worker in eight out of ten occupations; these being the mercantile, laundry,
hotel and catering, office, personal service, telephone and telegraph, manufacturing,
and fruit and vegetable industry.
In one industry only, a decrease in the average for adult experienced workers
occurred—namely, the fishing industry—while in the transportation industry no previous comparative figures are available.
In the summary table it is noted that over 34,000 women and girls are taking
their part in the business life of the Province.   The figures concern only those workers REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 43
with classes of employment covered by Orders of the Board, and do not include domestic
workers, farm-labourers, or fruit-pickers, which are excluded from coverage by the
provision of the " Female Minimum Wage Act." Returns are likewise not requested
for women and girls employed in banks, as their conditions of employment are regulated by the Dominion " Bank Act." Federal employees are also not covered by the
Provincial legislation.
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum for Experienced Female Workers.
Receiving Actual
Receiving More
Receiving Less
Industry or
Occupation.
Legal
Minimum
Wage for
Full-time
Experienced
Employees.
Minimum Wage
SET FOE
Experienced
Workers.
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Total.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of          Per
Employees.     Cent.
Mercantile  	
$12.75*
1,715
23.28
3,782
51.33
1,871
25.39
7,368
Laundry   	
14.88f
110
7.49
421
28.66
938
63.85
1,469
14.00*
1,607
29.07
2,448
44.28
1,473
26.65
.      5,528
Office  	
15.00J
1,453
17.07
6,056
71.14
1,004
11.79
8,513
Personal service  —
14.25*
139
23.92
232
39.93
210
36.15
581
Fishing —  	
15.50t
1
0.63
•     68
42.50
91
56.87
160
Telephone and telegraph 	
15.00T
49
2.60
1,511
80.07
327,
17.33
1,887
Manufacturing 	
14.00T
383
8.61
2,436
54.74
1,631
36.65
4,450
Fruit and vegetable 	
14.40t
100
2.41
2,672
64.53
1,369
33.06
4,141
Totals, 1941 	
5,557
16.30
19,626
57.56
8,914
26.14
34,097!j
Totals, 1940 	
5,885
19.59
16,088
53.56
8,065
26.85
30,038
* 40 to 4? hours per week. t 48 hours per week. i 37 *£ to 48 hours per week.
§ In the transportation industry, 107 employees excluded from above table and not included in totals, as it is
impractical to set a weekly rate owing to the variation of minimum wages in the Order, depending on whether the
work is done on foot or bicycles, by motor-cycles, or other types of motor-vehicles.
Reflecting the general up-trend in wages for the worker, the percentage of employees included in the returns who were receiving wages in excess of the legal minimum
rose to 57.56 in 1941, as against a previous high of 53.56 for 1940. A corresponding
drop was noted in the percentage indicating those receiving the actual legal minimum,
and also a slight decrease in the percentage figure for those receiving less than the
fixed rate. The latter group comprises the younger and less skilled employees for
whom lower rates are set, and part-time workers who, by reason of the short hours,
are unable to earn an amount equal to the weekly rate set for full-time employees.
The hotel and catering industry continued to hold most closely to the rates fixed
in the Orders, with 29.07 per cent, receiving the minimum of $14 per week.
Again leading in the group above the legal minimum, the telephone and telegraph
industry reported 80.07 per cent, of its total employees receiving more than the fixed
rate.
Office workers continued to hold second place with 71.14 per cent, paid in excess
of the required amount. In the fruit and vegetable industry 64.53 per cent, were
higher than the fixed rate. The manufacturing industry reported 54.74 per cent, above
the legal minimum; followed by the mercantile group with 51.33 per cent, above. In
the hotel and catering industry 44.28 per cent, were shown in receipt of more than the
minimum set; followed by workers in the fishing group with 42.50 per cent. In the
personal service occupation 39.93 per cent, were receiving higher than the legal
minimum;   while the laundry section reported with 28.66 per cent, above the rate set.
Individual high wages are recorded each year in the various occupations. For the
period under review the top salaries in each group are as follows:— I 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Occupation or
Industry.
Office	
Telephone and telegraph
Mercantile  	
Manufacturing 	
Fruit and vegetable 	
Personal  service   	
Hotel and catering 	
Fishing   	
Laundry, cleaning and dyeing
Transportation  	
Weekly Wage
or Salary.
..... $77.30
...... 65.80
—. 65.00
...... 64.10
  50.40
...... 50.00
  50.00
  29.90
  29.50
  18.00
The top ranking woman in the office occupation, while still an employee, is an
executive director for her employers. The high weekly wage of $64.10 in the manufacturing group might cause some surprise, but as photographic work is included in
this category a woman employee with a responsible position in this line receives a pay
cheque weekly much in advance of most other feminine workers in the group.
The young lady carrying off top honours in the fruit and vegetable industry is
probably a most expert packer working on piece rates.
In the hotel and catering industry it must be borne in mind that allowances are
made for board and lodging, so the $50 wreekly wage would be part cash 'and part
living allowance.
As was to be expected the newest group—the transportation industry—appears at
the bottom of the list.
Table showing Number op Single, Married, and Widowed Employees
and their earnings for week reported.
Industry or Occupation.
Single.
Earnings.
Married.
Earnings.
Widowed.
Earnings.
Total Earnings for Week
reported.
5,705
983
3,786
7,045
433
69
1,441
3,237
2,153
104
$72,969.19
12,952.39
52,886.28
130,136.34
5,509.14
940.40
28,324.18
46,403.37
32,969.91
883.91
1,419
425
1,364
1,235
131
82
390
1,093
1,916
3
$19,728.49
5,816.24
18,970.71
23,102.75
1,817.34
1,198.24
7,447.33
17,003.80
35,451.11
36.09
244
61
378
233
17
9
56
120
72
$3,841.76
920.45
5,424.78
4,757.27
229.66
130.70
1,188.65
1,976.62
1,277.08
$96,539.44
19,689.08
Hotel and catering . 	
Office   	
Personal service 	
Fishing  	
77,281.77
157,996.36
7,556.14
2,269.34
36,960 16
Manufacturing   	
65,383.79
920 00
Totals   	
24,956
$383,975.11
8,058
$130,572.10
1,190
$19,746.97
$534,294.18
1941 per cent. —	
72.96%
72.46%
23.56%
23.96%
3.48%
3.58%
1940 per cent.... 	
Comparative percentages of single, married, and widowed employees showed little
change over last year's figures.
It will be noted that the percentage of married women and widows gainfully
employed dropped slightly in 1941.
The fruit and vegetable industry continued to show the highest proportion of
married workers, which is understandable, as in the fruit areas when perishable
products need attention every available worker lends her assistance. In this group
wives and other married relatives of the growers, packers, and canners take it as a
matter of course that they will help in this important industry during the short season.
Other married women look forward to assisting in handling the fruit and vegetables
which must be attended to without delay to prevent waste of valuable food.
Separate figures .were not compiled for those employees who were reported as
divorced or separated. Inasmuch as these numbers were low, the figures were included
in the totals for married workers. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 45
Table showing Years of Service of Female Employees with Employers
reporting for 1941.
Name of Industry.
-a
01
u
•       01    rT
C cy
O cS
-*,  01
t>l
CO  ™
-£  01
eg k*
•* 2
•JS <y
co!"
o nJ
+>  01
-fit
o OS
■W   01
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rr,rt
oc£
o td
+j   Qi
fit
=>£
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ocit
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-t o
Number of
Employees
reported.
O       DO
S   -S
Mercantile 	
195
4,214
896
451
328
244
204
131
103
91
36
475
7,368
927
40
644
227
150
64
72
53
39
17
18
8
137
1,469
122
189
3,175
707
358
214
194
141
104
50
46
45
305
5,528
1,005
Office..	
153
2,880
1,137
688
526
469
424
288
186
151
110
1,501
8,513
2,537
Personal service ..'  .
18
262
106
53
37
21
18
8
16
5
6
31
581
200
Fishing 	
132
19
1
3
2
2
1
160
6
Telephone and telegraph
2
623
115
135
55
157
131
62
25
15
7
560
1,887
150
Manufacturing 	
247
2,139
579
366
246
192
130
79
63
40
32
337
4,450
551
Fruit and vegetable 	
342
2,287
478
291
238
122
108
70
43
34
27
101
4,141
82
Transportation	
106
1
107
32
Totals —	
1,186
16,462
4,265
2,493
1,711
1,473
1,209
781
503
402
271
3,448
34,204
5,612
The length of service table indicates, according to occupations, the length of time
each employee has been in the service of the employer sending in the return.
An indication of increased employment is noted in the total employees working
less than one year, the previous figure of 11,934 in this group increasing to 16,462
for 1941.
In each occupation, when compiling the .figures, special note is taken of the
employee credited with the greatest number of years service. The mercantile industry
listed one employee with 34 years' service. In the laundry, cleaning and dyeing industry 27 years was the highest recorded. Longest service in the hotel and catering
section was 33 years. One office employee was credited with 43 years' service. In the
personal service occupation the longest service recorded was 25 years. The fishing
industry listed one employee with 12 years. In the telephone and telegraph industry
one employee was credited with 35 years with her present firm. The manufacturing
industry listed an employee with 32 years' service, while 24 years was the longest
period of service recorded in the fruit and vegetable group. The transportation
industry, reporting for the first time, showed only one employee with more than 1 year's
service.
COLLECTIONS AND INSPECTIONS.
During 1941, personal inspections were made by the staff throughout the Province, totalling 12,104 visits to plants and establishments of all descriptions employing
men and women.
Most of these investigations are matter of routine, but some are made following
complaints that labour regulations are not being observed.
Regular inspections of pay-rolls revealed that some employees were being incorrectly paid for the hours they worked. When this is discovered employers are given
the opportunity to make the necessary adjustments. Sometimes it involves interviews
with employers and employees if certain discrepancies occur and contradictory statements and records are presented by those involved.
The Wage Acts give employees, or persons acting on their behalf, the right to
take civil action for collection of arrears, and upon conviction costs of the action must
be borne by the defending employer.
The policy of the Board is to refrain from instituting Court proceedings unless
the employer presents a defiant attitude to amicable settlement or is a person who has
broken the law on previous occasions.
If summary conviction results, besides the imposition of a fine or ordering
imprisonment should the fine not be paid, the Magistrate orders payment of all arrears
of wages due to the employees. I 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Wage adjustments without recourse to the Courts were made in 1941 as follows:—
Under the " Female Minimum Wage Act," 316 employers adjusted wages for
509 women and girls in the sum of $10,607.15.
Under the " Male Minimum Wage Act," 313 firms paid arrears to 676 men
and boys to the amount of $23,510.76, making a total under the two Acts
of $34,117.91.
In addition to this, following Court cases arrears were ordered paid in the sum of
$2,788.21, which brought total arrears paid over to employees up to the imposing
figure of $36,906.12.
This tangible sum represents the difference between what the workers had been
paid and the amounts to which they were entitled under the various Wage Orders of
the Board.
COURT CASES.
For the year 1941 Court proceedings were instituted against employers for
infractions of various labour laws when other less stringent methods failed.
A summary of cases follows, showing the charge, under which Statute it was
laid, name and address of the employer, and result of the proceedings where convictions
were obtained:—
Cases.        ;   Convictions.
Dismissed or
Withdrawn.
1         ■                 J       -
34                        32                      D ,   2
32                        16                      D , 16
42          | "          41           I          D      1
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "--           	
29                        17           [          D., 12
7                            7           |
Totals                                                                 	
1
" Female Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Bellevue Hotel,  Mission ......  __
DeLuxe Cafe   (W, M.  Hong), Wells.
Rings   Bakery,   187   Hastings   Street   East,
Vancouver
Ted  Cutler, 6505 Fraser Avenue, Vancouver
Elite Cafe, 738 Fort Street, Victoria
Good Eats Cafe, Coquitlam  	
Happy Valley Cafe, Creston 	
David Neon, Ltd., 1025 Main Street, Vancouver
Moler Beauty Parlor (Loyd Goch), 311
Hastings Street West, Vancouver
Consolidated Brokers, Ltd., 475 Howe Street,
Vancouver .
Star Cafe   (Wong Chung), Nelson __	
Grandview Steam Laundry  (Wo Kee), 891
Prior Street,  Vancouver
J.   E.   Jeremy,   615   Pender   Street   West,
, Vancouver
J.   E.   Jeremy,   615   Pender   Street   West,
Vancouver
Charge.
Failure to pay minimum wage ...
Failure   to   grant   24   consecutive
hours off duty
Failure to pay minimum wage-
Failure to pay minimum wage „__.
Failure to post schedule of hours
of work
Failure   to   pay   minimum   wage
(three charges)
Failure to pay minimum wage   -
Sentence and Remarks.
Failure to pay minimum wage-
Failure to pay minimum wage-
Failure to pay minimum wage .
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to keep true and correct
' records
Failure to pay minimum wage	
failure to pay minimum wage	
Fined $25 ;   costs, $4.50 ;   in default,
two months.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$10.50.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$29.85.
Suspended   sentence ;    costs,   $2.50 ;
pay  arrears,   $18.64;    in  default,
two months.
Fined $25.
Fined $25; costs, $2.50; pay arrears,  $30.
Fined $25; costs, $4.50 ; pay arrears, $23.40.
Fined $25 ; costs, $2.50; pay arrears, $61.88.
Fined $25 ; pay arrears, $9.25 ; in
default, thirty days.
Stispended sentence; costs, $2.50 ;
pay arrears, $19.20.
Fined $10.x
Fined $15 ;   in default, ten days.
Suspended sentence.
Case dismissed^ REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 47
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Female Minimum Wage Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Mrs. E. E. Gates, Trail
Suspended sentence.
Suspended   sentence;    costs,   $2.50 ;
Roy Ginn, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver
Failure to pay minimum
wage	
pay arrears, $53.80.
Keefer Steam Laundry   (Wong June), 238
Failure  to  keep   records
in  Eng-
Fined  $25 ;    in  default,   one  month.
Keefer Street, Vancouver
lish ;   record kept, but false
Jimmy's Lunch, 422 Hastings Street East,
Failure to pay minimum
wage	
Fined   $25 ;    costs,   $2.50;    default,
Vancouver
two months ;   pay arrears, $57.80.
McBain's Marine Equipment, 1840 Georgia
Failure to pay minimum
wage ...
Suspended   sentence ;    costs,   $2.50 ;
Street West, Vancouver
pay arrears,  $53.
Annex    Rooms    (Sutro    Bancroft),    103%
Failure to pay minimum
wage	
Fined   $25;    default,   two   months ;
Hastings Street East, Vancouver
pay arrears,  $87.
Happy   Valley   Cafe   (George  Mah   Cafe),
Failure to pay minimum
wage	
Fined   $25;    costs,   $3.50;    pay  ar
Creston
rears,  $56.60;
Happv Valley Cafe,  Creston 	
Failure to pay minimum
wage	
Fined  $25 ;   pay arrears,  $38.62.
Happy Valley Cafe,  Creston 	
Failure to pay minimum
wage	
Fined $25 ;   pay arrears, $7.96.
Fined $10;   costs, $2.50.
New Nugget Cafe   (C. F. Wing), Wells    ■
Abraham Fast,  348  Columbia  Street,  New
Failure to pay minimum
wage	
Fined $50 and costs ;   pay arrears,
Westminster
$26.84 ;   in default, three months.
■
Note.—This   case   was   appealed
and conviction quashed.
Golden   Pheasant Cafe,  Prince George
Failure to pay minimum
wage
Fined   $25;    pay   arrears,   $42 ;   in
default, one month.
Fined $25 ; costs, $1.75 ;   in default,
one month.
Golden   Pheasant  Cafe,   Prince  George 	
Failure  to   grant   24   consecutive
Fined $10 ; in default, ten days.
hours rest period
Heights Fish & Chips  (Viola Moore), 3901
Failure to pay minimum
wage —.
Fined $100 ; in default, three months ;
Hastings Street East, Vancouver
pay arrears, $4.70.                   s   .
A. F. Haddad, Radium Hot Springs	
Failure to pay minimum
wage
Guilty;    suspended   sentence;    pay
arrears, $19.29.
Satin    Dairy     (Sam    Silas),    796    Robson
Failure to post schedule
of hours
Fined $25 :   in default, thirty days.
Street,  Vancouver
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Harnam  Singh,  Mount  Lehman  	
Failure     to     pay    wages     semimonthly  (Order No. 26)
Fined $10.
Jagir  Singh,  722 Market Street,  Victoria
Failure to keep true and  correct
records
Fined $10.
Mrs.  Lahab Singh,  1226  Finlayson  Street,
Failure to pay minimum wage -
Suspended
sentence;    pay   arrears,
Victoria
$60.
Leonard's Cafe,  831  Granville Street,   Van
Failure to pav minimum wage	
Suspended
sentence;    pay   arrears,
couver
$1.50.
Rendera Apartments (A. J. Romeril), 1395
Failure to pay minimum wage....
Suspended
sentence;    pay   arrears,
Twelfth Avenue West,  Vancouver
$29.90.
Rendera Apartments (A. J. Romeril), 1395
Failure to pay minimum wage.....
Fined  $50
pay arrears,   $55.19.
Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver
Crown   Cartage   &  Warehousing   Co.,   Ltd.,
Failure to keep records __.
Fined $10'
costs, $2.50.
1293 Homer Street, Vancouver
Ideal   Delivery   System    (H.   Kovich),   723
Failure to pay minimum wage —
Fined $50 ;
costs, $2.50 ; pay arrears,
Nelson Street, Vancouver
$73.15.
Frank Talarieo, Grand Forks  .   '.  -
Failure to pay minimum wage —
Suspended
sentence ;    costs,   $6.25 ;
pay arrears, $26.30.
Dan   McKenzie,   1101   Eighth  Avenue,  New
Failure   to    produce   records   on
Fined $10.
Westminster
demand  of an  Inspector
Martin  Hotel,  1176 Granville  Street,  Van
Failure to pay minimum wage
Fined ?50.
couver
Kennedy Bros., Ltd.,  735  Columbia Street,
Failure    to     pay     wages     semi-
"Suspended
sentence.
New  Westminster
'monthly   (Order  No.   59) I 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Male Minimum Wage Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
North   American   Peat   Co.,   Ltd.,   Bryne
Road,  Burnaby
Dan McKenzie,  1101 Eighth Avenue, New
Westminster
Harnam   Singh,   Abbotsford - 	
North   American   Peat   Co.,   Ltd.,   Bryne
Road, Burnaby
Failure to pay minimum wage .__
Failure   to   produce   records   on
demand of an Inspector
Failure to keep records.___	
Failure to pay minimum wage —.
Fined $50 ; pay arrears, $56.80.
Fined $10.
Fined $25 ; costs, $5.50.
Fined $50; pay arrears, $54.30.
"Hours of Work Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Four   Sisters   Cafe,   849   Granville   Street,
Employing   person   outside   hours
Fined $25
or one month in jail.
Vancouver
posted
Arrowview  Hotel   (T.   0.   Gattman),  Port
Failure to keep true
and  correct
Fined $25 ;
in default, fourteen days.
Alberni
records
Arrowview Hotel,  Port Alberni—	
Fined $25 ;
Fined $20
Central Produce Co., 2408 Hastings Street
Failure to keep true
and correct
in default, one month.
East,   Vancouver
records
Hastings Furniture Store   (Harry Avery),
Failure to keep true
and correct
Fined $10
in default, ten days.
Vancouver
records
Glenburn    Service,    4295    Hastings    Street
Failure to keep true
and correct
Suspended
sentence.
East,  Vancouver
records
Albert Coles, 707 Yates Street, Victoria
Failure to keep true
records
and correct
Fined $10.
Hatzic Shake & Shingle Co., Hatzie —	
Failure to keep true
records
and correct
Fined $10
costs, $2.50.
Main Grocery, Ltd., 1130 Commercial Drive,
Failure to keep true
and correct
Fined $25
costs, $2.50.
Vancouver
records
Stave Lake Cedar Co., Ltd., Dewdney	
Excessive hours	
Fined $25
costs, $2.50.
Stave Lake Cedar Co., Ltd., Dewdney	
Fined $25
Fined $25
costs, $2.50.
Active   Trading   Co.,   935   Cordova   Street
Failure to keep true
and correct
or distress.
East,  Vancouver
records
Empress Hotel, 235 Hastings Street East,
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $20
in default, one month.
Vancouver
records
Stanley Gee,  652 Baker Street,  Nelson  	
Suspended
Fined  $20
Reids Holiday Togs, Ltd., 81 Robson Street,
Vancouver
Western   Foundry,   Twelfth   and   Renfrew
Suspended
Streets, Vancouver
A. F. Haddad, Radium Hot Springs 	
Failure to keep records ._ .__.. ____ ..
Suspended sentence.
Artistic Ornamental Iron Works,  200 Vic
Employing  person  outside  hours
Dismissed ;
case appealed.
toria Drive, Vancouver
posted
Bend Sawmills, Ltd., Bend _	
Excessive  hours 	
Fined $25
costs, $1.75 ;   in default,
thirty days.
Coast   Cap   Manufacturing   Co.,   304   Main
Failure to keep true
and correct
Fined $10.
Street, Vancouver
records
W. M. Hong, DeLuxe Cafe, Wells   .
Suspended
Fined $25
St.  Alice Rifle Club   (Mrs.  Cecilia  Galia),
Failure  to   post   notice  of  work
in default, ten days.
120  Second Street West,  North Vancou-
ing-hours
Honey-Cream   Do-Nut   Co.    (Walter   Gun-
Fined $10
drum), 479 Broadway East, Vancouver
Ideal   Delivery   System    (H.   Kovich),   728
Fined $20.
Nelson Street, Vancouver
Cranbrook Meat Market, Cranbrook —-	
Failure  to   post  notice  of  work
Fined $25.
ing-hours
Cranbrook Trading Co.,  Ltd.,  Cranbrook..
Employing  person  outside  hours
Fined $25.
posted
Elite Cafe, 728 Fort Street, Victoria-	
Fined $25.
Fined $15.
New   Atlantic   Cafe,   130   Hastings   Street
Employing  person   outside  hours
East, Vancouver
posted REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 49
COURT CASES—Continued.
Hours of Work Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Fined $25.
ing-hours
Busy Bee Cafe   (Geo.  Kremedas),  33  Cor
Failure  to  post  notice  of  work
Fined $25;
in default,
ten days.
dova Street West, Vancouver
ing-hours
Nelsons Laundries, Ltd., 2300 Cambie Street,
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $10.
Vancouver
records
Northwest Produce Co.,  Prince George
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Fined $25 ;
in default,
ten days.
Guarantee  Cleaners  & Dyers,   1100  Union
Failure to keep true and correct
- Fined $10;
in default,
ten days.
Street, Vancouver
records
Club Cafe, Nelson
Fined $25.
ing-hours
Dandy Barbecue, 1855 Georgia Street West,
Failure  to  post  notice  of  work
Suspended sentence.
Vancouver
ing-hours
Excelsior   Paper   Stock,    Ltd.,    925    Main
Excessive  hours  •	
Fined $10;
in default,
distress.
Street, Vancouver
Hastings Bakery, 716 Hastings Street East,
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $15;
in default,
ten days.
Vancouver
records
Kishan Singh, 174 Nicol Street, Nanaimo...
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Fined $10;
costs, $2.
Sanitary   Dry   Cleaners   and   Dye   Works,
Excessive  hours 	
Fined $15;
in default,
distress.
Ltd.,   401   Twelfth   Avenue   East,   Van
couver
Powell  Fish  Co.,  Ltd.,   622  Powell  Street,
Fined $25;
Vancouver
David   McDonald,   Salmo  ,.	
Failure to keep true and correct
Suspended sentence;   costs,  $5.75.
records
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
R. H. Weaver   (Blackcock Mine),  Ymir..
M. Robinson, c/o Canoe Pass Lumber Co.,
Ladner
Henry Pearson, Kimberley  	
Banner Mine, P. D. MeTavish, Salmo _
Mainland    Construction    Co.,    350    Pender
Street  West,   Vancouver
R. G. Russell, Midway  	
New Nuggett Cafe   (C.  F. Wing), Wells...
Northwestern Hardwoods, Ltd., Deroche.
R.  J. McKay, Deroche  	
Sigfred Ekholm, Magna Bay-
Abdullah Singh, c/o Prairie Lumber Co.,
Ltd., Durieu
D. A. McLean, 3709 Main Street, Vancouver
Wm. Polohikoff, Rossland	
Wm. Polonikoff, Rossland
Fred Humphries,  1763 Fourteenth Avenue
East,  Vancouver
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
(nine charges)
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-mo'nthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Fined  $25;    costs,   $9.75;   paid  arrears, $72.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$76.85.
Fined $25 ; costs, $8.50 ; pay arrears,
$132.85.
Suspended  sentence ;    costs,   $11.50 ;
pay arrears,  $908.32.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$72.36 ;   in default, ten days.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$57.92.
Fined $25 ;   in default, thirty days ;
pay arrears, $40.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$42.40.
Fined $35 ; costs, $9.50 ; pay arrears,
$54.80.
Fined $25 ;   pay arrears, $87.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$30.95 ;   costs,  $2.50.
Fined $25 ; costs, $3 ;   pay arrears,
$139.90.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$131.90.
Suspended sentence ;   costs, $5 ;   pay
arrears,  $5.95.
. I 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Dan  McKenzie,   1101   Eighth  Street,   New
Westminster
Joe Colosimo, Twentieth and Marine, New
Westminster
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Case dismissed.
Fined $25 and costs ;   default, three
months ;   pay arrears, $133.92.
" Factories Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Cee Lee Laundry, 1717 Quadra Street, Vic
Operating laundry after
7 p.m	
Fined $50 ;   costs, $5.
toria
Kwong   Sing,    1719    Quadra   Street,   Vic
Operating laundry after
7 p.m.	
Fined $50 ;   costs, $2.50.
toria
Cee Lee Laundry, 1717 Quadra Street, Vic
Operating    laundry   on
Remem-
Fined $50 ;   costs, $2.50 ;   in default,
toria
brance Day
thirty days.
Hing Lung Laundry,  1719  Quadra Street,
Operating   laundry   on
Remem-
Fined $50 ;   costs, $2.50 ;   in default,
Victoria
brance Day
thirty days.
Sam   Kee   Laundry,   611   Chatham   Street,
Operating   laundry   on
Remem-
Fined $50 ;   costs, $2.50 ;   in default,
Victoria
brance Day
thirty days.
J.  O'Kelly,  1176 Granville Street, Vancou
Operating      passenger
elevator
Fined $10 ;   costs, $2.50.
ver
without   having   an   operator's
licence
Lee Gat,  1176 Granville Street, Vancouver
Operating     passenger
elevator
Suspended sentence.
without   having   an   operator's
licence
COMPARATIVE WAGES, 1918, 1939, 1940, 1941.
Figures showing comparative wage trends are furnished in the following tables
for the year 1918, when data were first compiled, and for the three most recent years—
namely, 1939, 1940, and 1941. It will be noted these relate to non-seasonal occupations
only.
Mercantile Industry (Female).
1918.
1939.                  1940.
1941.
Average weekly wages—
$12.71
$7.70
15.49%
$13.66
$10.08
7.12%
$13.09
$8.45
7.84%
$8.84
9.79%
Percentage of employees under 18 years  	
Laundry Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
$11.80
$9.78
21.80%
$12.90
$8.23
4.74%
$12.98
$8.23
6.83%
$13.64
$10 11
Percentage of employees under 18 years  	
6.67%
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years _
$14.06
$11.97
3.96% REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 51
COMPARATIVE WAGES—Continued.
Office Occupation (Female).
1918.
1939.
1940.
1941.
Average weekly wages—
$16.53
$10.88
7.45%
$18.19
$11.44
1.30%
$18.22
$11.61
1.67%
$18.71
$12 03
2.18%
Personal Service Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
$13.83
$6.96
15.38%
$13.87
$7.51
2.63%
$13.28
$5.05
4.28%
$13.35
$6.15
4.82%
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female).
Average weekly wages—
$15.55
$11.90
8.70%
$18.16
$10.14
6.06%
$18.72
$9.73
2.60%
$19.98
Percentage of inexperienced employees	
3.66%
Manufacturing Industry (Female).
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees.	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees..
$14.84
$9.28
13.65%
$15.50
$9.82
14.27%
SPECIAL LICENCES.
In order to permit inexperienced workers to gain experience the minimum wage
Acts make provision for the issuance of special licences setting lower rates than are
, required to be paid to experienced employees under the various Orders of the Roard.
Application forms are supplied and the employee and employer complete the
form. It is checked to see that everything is in accordance with the provisions of the
specific Order under which the permit is sought, and also to make sure the employer
does not exceed his quota of this type of help, as a limitation is set in the Act itself
to ensure that permits are not used for the sole purpose of cutting down the wage bill.
Inspectors assist in checking these forms.
If the Board is satisfied that everything is in order, an original permit is sent to
the employee and a duplicate to the employer.
When the permit expires it is returned to the office for cancellation on the Board's
records.
As lower rates for learners are not deemed to be basic rates, it is permissible for
employers to make periodic increases sooner than the permit requires. We have found
recently that many employees are receiving increases much quicker than at the specific
dates designated on the permits. It is also noticeable that owing chiefly to the difficulty
of obtaining help some employers start the learners in advance of the rates in the
Orders. When the application discloses this tendency the permit is always issued on
the basis of the higher rate. If the employee is raised to the minimum for experienced
employees before the permit expires it is returned and cancelled on the Board's records. I 52 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
During the year 1,726 of these special licences or permits were granted to inexperienced female workers. They were taken out by employers in the following
occupations or industries:— XT    ,      ,_.
Number of Licences
Industry or Occupation. issued.
Telephone and telegraph  .  10
Personal service  23
Mercantile .  187
Manufacturing   305
Laundry, cleaning and dyeing  349
Office   363
Hotel and catering  . '____ 489
Total     1,726
In the laundry, cleaning and dyeing industries and also in the hotel and catering
industries the current Orders now require licences for inexperienced employees of any
age, either under or over 18.
In all the other groups these permits are only needed for inexperienced women
18 years of age.
Order No. 59 made under the " Male Minimum Wage Act," covering the mercantile industry, makes provision for youths of two age-groups to be employed under
permit at varying rates. Those from 18 to 21 have one sliding scale of learners' wages
and young men from 21 to 24 may have permits issued under another scale set out
in Order No. 59.
One hundred and seven permits under this Order were granted during 1941. This
was 36 less than in 1940.
WAR BRINGS DIFFERENT WORK TO WOMEN.
Men and women throughout the Province are exerting all their efforts, in whatever line of work they follow, to do the urgent task facing them all, helping to the
utmost those in authority to increase production of commodities needed to win the
war, or to give their services to maintain their freedom.
Into this important work women and girls are entering in increasing numbers.
Under the stress of present conditions they have undertaken work that was formerly
considered as being beyond their physical strength and endurance.
That they are making a success of these unfamiliar tasks is definitely proved by
direct contact with employers, some of whom were sceptical about the advisability of
hiring women and girls, but now frankly admit that they are experiencing less inconvenience in their operations than they expected when they changed their personnel
from men to women, and others state the women are excelling in certain occupations.
There are types of work too heavy for most women, but in repetitive operations,
in work requiring dexterity of fingers and hands, in checking and examining, and in
routine duties the girls have often proved to be more adaptable and suited to the work
than men and boys.
Other women and girls have risen to executive positions, receiving promotions due
to rearrangement of staffs.
At this date it is difficult to foresee what post-war conditions will bring to these
female employees who are doing such unfamiliar work as welding, machine-tending
in sash and door plants and other wood-working establishments, assembly and checking
in electrical, gun, and aeroplane factories, or sanding and glueing in furniture plants.
Others are doing lathe-work, spot welding, operating stamping-presses, working on
winding and small cable machines in establishments making metal tanks, drums, or
wire ropes.
Berry-boxes are being stitched by girls who also operate saws in these plants.
In furniture factories the girls may be found operating the wood-working, boring,
sanding, and other light machines.
Where veneer products are manufactured most of the operations seem to be
particularly suitable for women and girls to handle. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 53
Certain lumber companies have put girls to work grading spruce and working in
their laboratories.
Drill-presses, buffers and grinders are operated by girls in a saw factory. They
also insert teeth in the saws.
Labelling packages, putting together small battery-lights, operating wire-straightening machines, cutting keg-heads; grading, sorting, and bundling barrel-staves, and
counting rivets and bolts are all new occupations for female industrial workers.
We are becoming used to having our groceries, meats, laundry, telegrams, and
small packages delivered by girls on bicycles or driving light trucks.
The Board is ever alert to changing conditions, and keeps in touch with employers
to see that the welfare of their employees is properly safeguarded. Proper clothing is
recommended, and employers are co-operating in providing necessary lunch-rooms and
sanitary arrangements.
CONCLUSION.
We would not like to close this report without extending our appreciation to
employers and employees who have co-operated with the Board and its officials in
complying with the labour laws of the Province.
Protection for employees in the way of wages, hours, and fair working conditions is not the sole aim and object of our legislation. The fair employer is assured
that his less scrupulous competitor is being kept in line by being governed by the same
rulings as he is.
The Board is grateful to those public-spirited citizens who, being neither employer
nor employed, often give their assistance in various ways.
Our sincere thanks, therefore, are extended to all who have shared and assisted
in our important work.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. I 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO " MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
BAKING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 17 (1942), Effective July 20th, 1942.
(Superseding Order No. 17.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or cakes.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—■
21 years of age and over..
Under 18 years of age.	
18 years and under 19 years-
19 years and under 20 years..
20 years and under 21 years..
Delivery salesmen  	
48
48
48
48
48
54
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
BARBERING  (MALE).
Order No. 42, Effective June 14th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 8.)
Bartering shall have the meaning set out in section 2 of the " Barbers Act," chapter 5, Statutes,
1924, and amendments.
Occupation.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
$18.00 week
45c. per hour
Daily minimum, $1.80
Barbers  , 	
(Maximum hours, 48 per week.)
Less than 40 hours.
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
BOX-MANUFACTURING  (MALE).
Order No. 55, Effective April 4th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 37 and Order No. 7.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the making of wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel
staves and beads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, or other wooden containers.
Adult males, 90% of total-
Adult males, 10% of total, not less than..
Males, 18 to 21 years of age.	
Males, under 18 years of age,.  	
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week
40c.
48
30c.
48
30c.
48
25c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Above rates apply only to those not included in any other Order of the Board.
(b.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
BUS-DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 70, Effective March 18th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 31.)
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven  (7)  passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which service a charge is
made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
50 c.
55c.
Less than 40.
75c.
In- excess  of 9  hours
in   any   one  day  or
50 hours in any one
week. BUS-DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 70a, Effective June 27th, 1940.
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of a bus-driver
while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by a bus-driver from the time
he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty until he returns again to his employer's
headquarters or garage where he originally reported for duty; and shall include the time occupied by
a bus-driver in dead-heading from his employer's headquarters or garage to the place where he is to
take charge of the bus and vice versa; but the minimum wage shall not apply to waiting-time of a bus-
driver when occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 66, Effective August 21st, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 40.)
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt,
Highland, Metchosin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew	
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(/).)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 58, Effective November 7th, 1938.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under ** Apprenticeship Act."
(h.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 65, Effective August 1st, 1939.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
and erection of
repairing of any
Area :  Provincial Electoral Districts of.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
75c.
75c.
75c.
75p
48
48
48
AS
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
tic.)   "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly. I 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 72, Effective May 27th, 1940.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
All carpentry work within a radius of 5 miles from the centre of the City of
7R«_                                   4S
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 73, Effective May 27th, 1940,
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
All carpentry work within a radius of 5 miles from the centre of the City of
75c.
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY   (MALE).
Order No. 68, Effective September 11th, 1939.
11 Christmas-tree industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the cutting, gathering, hauling, and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Male employees, 85 per cent, not less than 40c. per hour.
Permissible, 15 per cent, not less than 30c. per hour.
Note.— (a.)  Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(6.)   The above is a new order in place of Order No. 61, which expired December 31st, 1938.
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 12 (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 12, Order No. 12a, Order No. 12b, Order No. 45, and Order No. 4SA.)
Includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or demolition of any building, railway,
tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well,
telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of
construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of any such work or structure.
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate;
under 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Point Grey, Victoria, Nanaimo, New Westminster, Prince Rupert, Esquimalt,
Saanich, Burnaby, Oak Bay— _ —
Rest of Province— -	
45c.
40c.
35c.
30c.
48
48
Note.— (a.)   Above rates do not apply to indentured apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 57
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND  STARTERS   (MALE).
Order No. 54, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 32.)
Includes every male elevator operator and starter.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37 %c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board (21) meals, $4.00 per week,
(o.)   Individual meals, twenty cents  (20c)  each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven  (7) days, $2.00 per week.
(e.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/.)   Uniforms or special wearing-apparel, required by the employer, must be supplied and laundered without
cost to the employee.
(fir.)   The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(Xi.)   Employees must be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(i.)   Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS  (FEMALE).
Order No. 53, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 30 and Order No. 5.)
Includes every female operator and starter.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37 %c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.—As for male elevator operators, see Order No. 54.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM   (MALE).
Order No. 18, Effective March 1st, 1935.
Includes every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while under
steam-pressure or in motion.    " Special engineer " means holder of a special or temporary certificate.
(See "Boiler Inspection Act," section 28 (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
50c.
40c.
48
48
Note.— (a.) Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the "Hours of Work Act" 48 hours per
week may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(b.)   For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(c.) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 40 cents
per hour  (Order 18b).
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS   (MALE).
Order No. 39 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 39.)
First-aid attendant means every male employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid attendant
under the authority of a certificate of competency in first aid, satisfactory to the Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia, and designated by his employer as the first-aid attendant in charge.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Rate.
First-aid attendant..
Assistant first-aid attendant	
Overtime rate when engaged in first-aid work..
50c.
50c.
$4.00
4.00'
Note.— (a.) "Hours of Work Act" regulates the daily hours in the industry, but should overtime be necessary,
attendant must be paid overtime rate.
(6.) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any industry or occupation within an industry, the first-aid
attendant employed in such industry or occupation must be paid such higher rate.
(c.) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the medical practitioner or hospital. I 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
FISHING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Effective since February 28th, 1920.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
the case of canned fish.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
I
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50 per week.
32%-ic. per hour.
$12.75 per week for 1st 4 months.
13.75 per week for 2nd 4 months.
14.75 per week for 3rd 4 months.
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY   (MALE).
Order No. 47, Effective July 12th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 22.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use of any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
21 years or over..
Under 21 years-
(Not to exceed 15 per cent, of male employees in plant.)
|   First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
38c.
57c.
76c.
28c.
42c.
56c.
Note.— (1.) In cases where employees' regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 hours
per day, no deduction shall be made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.)   Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(4.)   Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 46, Effective July 12th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 21.)
Includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
3fJc
(Payable to 90 per cent, of employees.)
45c.
60c.
25c
(Payable to 10 per cent, of employees.)
37 He.
50c.
Note.— (1.) In cases where employees* regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 hours
per day, no deduction shall be made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.)   Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(4.)   Daily guarantee of three hours' work. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 59
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 52, Effective February 14th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. SO and Order No. 5.)
Includes the work of females in:—
(a.) Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which a charge
is made.
(6.) Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets, banquet halls,
cafeterias, tea-rooms, lunch-rooms, lunch-counters, ice-cream parlours, soda fountains, hospitals, nursing-homes, clubs, dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial establishments
or office buildings or schools, or any other place where food is cooked, prepared, and served, for which
a charge is made; whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or
in connection with any other business.
This Order does not apply to females employed as graduate or undergraduate nurses in hospitals,
nursing-homes, or other similar establishments.
Experienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37 ^c. per hour.
Daily guarantee, $1.50.
Inexperienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
!
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 per week, 1st 2 months.
10.50 per week, 2nd 2 months.
12.00 per week, 3rd 2 months.
14.00 per week thereafter.
Licences required for all inexperienced employees
working at above rates.
25c. per hour, 1st 2 months.
30c. per hour, 2nd 2 months.
35c. per hour, 3rd 2 months.
37 V.c. per hour thereafter.
Daily guarantee of four (4) hours pay per day.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board  (21)  meals, $4.00 per week.
(b.)   Individual meals, twenty cents  (20c.)  each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven   (7)  days, $2.00 per week.
(e.) Emergency overtime up to ten (10) hours per day, but not to exceed fifty-two (52) hours in any one
(1) week.
(/.) Time and one-half shall be paid for all hours in excess of eight (8) in the day, or forty-eight (48) in
the week.
(g.) Split shifts shall be confined within fourteen (14) hours from commencement of such split shift. (See
Order 52b.)
(h.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
({._) Uniforms or special wearing-apparel required by the employer must be supplied and laundered free of cost
to the employee.
(j.)   Accidental breakages shall not be charged to employees.
(k.)   Employees must be given twenty-four  (24)   consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(I.)  See Order 52k for " Resort Hotels."
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY (FEMALE).
Order No. 52b, Effective May 19th, 1938.
Allows a split shift to be spread over 14 hours immediately following commencement of work,
thereby cancelling section 8 of Order No. 52. Every employee whose split shift extends over 12 hours
shall be paid at the rate of one and one-half times her regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of her work.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 52k (Resort Hotels), Effective June 15th, 1942, to Septf^ber 12th, 1942.
(Superseding Orders 52A, 52D, 52F, and 52k.)
Covers the work of females in any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or lodging
are furnished to the general public, for which a charge is made.
Allowing:—
Hours not to exceed ten  (10) in any one day, nor more than fifty-four (54) in any one week.
Hours in excess of forty-eight  (48) in any one week shall be paid at not less than time and one-
half (1%) of the legal rate fixed in Order No. 52, or her regular rate of pay.
Provides for a rest period of twenty-four (24) consecutive hours in each calendar week. I 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 51, Effective November 22nd, 1937.
Includes the manufacture of kitchen furniture, dining-room furniture, bedroom furniture, living-
room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of household furniture, customarily manufactured in
a furniture factory.
Males.
Rate per Hour.
Hours per Week.
21 years of age or over..
Under 17 years of age...
17 years and under 18 years of age~
18 years and under 19 years of age..
19 years and under 20 years of age..
20 years and under 21 years of age..
40c.
20c.
25c.
27y2c.
30c.
35c.
48
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)   60 per cent, of all male employees must be paid not less than 40c. per hour.
(6.)   This Order does not apply to apprentices duly indentured under the " Apprenticeship Act."
JANITORS   (MALE).
Order No. 43, Effective June 1st, 1937.
Order No. 43a, Effective January 23rd, 1941.
(Superseding Order No. 23, in Effect from April 18th., 1935, and Order No. 23a, in Effect from
October 3rd, 1935.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner, or janitor-
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents  (
3. (a.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings of four  (4)  residential
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:
fireman.
37%c.) per hour.
suites and under, thirty-
5 residential suites, $27.00 per month
6 residential suites, $30.00 per month
7 residential suites, $33.00 per month
8 residential suites, $36.00 per month
9 residential suites, $39.00 per month
10 residential suites, $42.00 per month
11 residential suites, $45.00 per month
12 residential suites, $48.00 per month
13 residential suites, $51.00 per month
14 residential suites, $54.00 per month
15 residential suites, $57.20 per month
16 residential suites, $60.50 per month
17 residential suites, $63.80 per month
18 residential suites, $67.10 per month
19 residential suites, $70.40 per month
20 residential suites, $73.70 per month
21 residential suites, $77.00 per month
22 residential suites, $80.30 per month
23 residential suites, $82.50 per month
24 residential suites, $84.70 per month
25 residential suites, $86.90 per month
26 residential suites, $89.10 per month
27 residential suites, $91.30 per month
28 residential suites, $93.50 per month
29 residential suites,
30 residential suites,
31 residential suites,
32 residential suites,
33 residential suites,
34 residential suites,
35 residential suites,
36 residential suites,
37 residential suites,
38 residential suites,
39 residential suites,
40 residential suites,
41 residential suites,
42 residential suites,
43 residential suites,
44 residential suites,
45 residential suites,
46 residential suites,
47 residential suites,
48 residential suites,
49 residential suites,
50 residential suites,
50 residential suites,
$95.70 per month;
$97.90 per month;
$100.10 per month
$102.30 per month
$104.50 per month
$106.70 per month
$108.90 per month
$111.10 per month
$113.30 per month
$115.50 per month
$117.70 per month
$119.90 per month
$122.10 per month
$124.30 per month
$126.50 per month
$128.70 per month
$130.90 per month
$133.10 per month
$135.30 per month
$137.50 per month
$137.50 per month
$137.50 per month
$137.50 per month
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents (37Hc.)
per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitor
shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitor shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 61
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family)  shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.—In  computing the number  of residential suites  in any apartment building the  suite  occupied  by the
janitor shall not be included.
JANITORS  (MALE).
Order No. 43b, Effective June 12th, 1941.
Excludes from Order No. 43 janitors employed in one-room school-houses.
JANITRESSES   (FEMALE).
Order No. 44, Effective June 1st, 1937.
Order No. 44a, Effective January 23rd, 1941.
(Superseding Order No. 29.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitress, janitress-cleaner, or janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents  (37%c.) per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings of four  (4)  residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents  (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:
5 residential suites, $27.00 per month
6 residential suites, $30.00 per month
7 residential suites, $33.00 per month
8 residential suites, $36.00 per month
9 residential suites, $39.00 per month
10 residential suites, $42.00 per month
11 residential suites, $45.00 per month
12 residential suites, $48.00 per month
13 residential suites, $51.00 per month
14 residential suites, $54.00 per month
15 residential suites, $57.20 per month
16 residential suites, $60.50 per month
17 residential suites, $63.80 per month
18 residential suites, $67.10 per month
19 residential suites, $70.40 per month
20 residential suites, $73.70 per month
21 residential suites, $77.00 per month
22 residential suites, $80.30 per month
23 residential suites, $82.50 per month
24 residential suites, $84.70 per month
25 residential suites, $86.90 per month
26 residential suites, $89.10 per month
27 residential suites, $91.30 per month
29 residential suites, $95.70 per month;
30 residential suites, $97.90 per month;
31 residential suites, $100.10 per month
32 residential suites, $102.30 per month
33 residential suites, $104.50 per month
34 residential suites, $106.70 per month
35 residential suites, $108.90 per month
36 residential suites, $111.10 per month
37 residential suites, $113.30 per month
38 residential suites, $115.50 per month
39 residential suites, $117.70 per month
40 residential suites, $119.90 per month
41 residential suites, $122.10 per month
42 residential suites, $124.30 per month
43 residential suites, $126.50 per month
44 residential suites, $128.70 per month
45 residential suites, $130.90 per month
46 residential suites, $133.10 per month
47 residential suites, $135.30 per month
48 residential suites, $137.50 per month
49 residential suites, $137.50 per month
50 residential suites, $137.50 per month
50 residential suites, $137.50 per month
28 residential suites, $93.50 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause  (b).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents
(371/£c.) per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitress
shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(o.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitress shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
JANITRESSES  (FEMALE).
Order No. 44b, Effective June 12th, 1941.
Excludes from Order No. 44 janitresses employed in one-room school-houses. I 62                                              DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING  (FEMALE).
Order No. 74, Effective March 10th, 1941.
(Superseding Order in Effect since March 31st, 1919.)
Per Hour.
Daily Minimum,
except Saturday.
Daily Minimum,
Saturday only.
31c.
$1.24
93c.
Learners must have permit, if employed at following rates:—
First four months
Second four months
Third four months
Thereafter
21c. per hour.
24c. per hour.
273&C. per hour.
31c. per hour.
Four Hours or Less
per Day (except
Saturday).
Three Hours or Less
on Saturday.
First four months
Second four months
Third four months
Thereafter
84c. per day
96c. per day
$1.10 per day
$1.24 per day
63c. per day.
73c. per day.
82I/£c. per day.
93c. per day.
Note.— (a.)   Every employee called for employment shall be paid after reporting at the place of employment.
(6.)   When employees are required to wear uniforms or special articles of wearing-apparel, no deduction shall
be made from the wages for such uniform or special articles of wearing-apparel, or for the repair or laundering
thereof, except as approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)   No deduction shall be made for the accidental damage to any article, or as a penalty for unsatisfactory
work.
(d.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(e.)   Hours of work governed by " Factories Act."
(/.)   Maximum hours, forty-eight in the week.
LOGGING   (MALE).
Order No. 1 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 1, Order No. Ia, and Order No. 1b.)
Includes  all  operations  in  or  incidental  to  the  carrying-on  of  logging;    pole,  tie,  shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting-;    and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and booming of
logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Male employees- _  . 	
40c. per hour
37*Ac. per hour
$2.75 per day
$1.30 per cord
48
48
Unlimited.
48
Cook- and bunk-house employees - .	
Note.— (a.)   Certain exemptions regarding working-hours.     (See "Hours of Work" Regulations.)
(/>.)   Watchmen in losrging-camps where operations are entirely suspended are exempt.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 25, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order in Effect since November 20th, 1923.)
Includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting,
printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity, exclusive of fish, fruit, or vegetable drying, canning, preserving* or packing.
Weekly Rate.                 Hours per Week.
$14.00                                     48 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 63
Inexperienced Employees—Section 3.
Includes the manufacture, preparation, or adapting for use or sale
of: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly-powders, baking-
powders, molasses, sugar, syrups, honey, peanut butter, cream and
milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, bread, biscuits, cakes,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, eggs, soft drinks, yeast, chip and shoestring potatoes, cereals, cooked foods, salads, ice-cream cones, other
food products, cans, fruit and vegetable containers, paper boxes
and wooden boxes, buttons, soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet
preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, brushes, whisks,
pails, wash-boards, clothes-pins, matches, explosives, munitions,
gas-mantles, window-shades, veneer products, batteries, plant fertilizers, maps, saw-teeth and holders, mats, tiles, ropes, and shingles
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—
$8.00 a week for the first two months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second two months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third two months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced Employees—Section U.
Includes the manufacture of: Cotton bags, paper bags, envelopes,
overalls, shirts, ladies' and children's wear, uniforms, gloves, hats,
caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, boots and shoes, tents,
awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding, pillow-covers, loose
covers, mattress-covers, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-made
millinery, knitted goods, blankets, machine-made cigars, pulp and
paper-mill products, artificial flowers, lamp-shades, flags and other
decorations, worsted-mill products, baskets, wreaths, and other
floral pieces, pianos, optical goods, aeroplanes, toys and novelties,
rayon products, stockings and lingerie (including repair of same),
and dipped chocolates
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—
$8   a  week  for  the  first  four months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second four months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third four months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced Employees—Section 5.
Includes   bookbinding,   embossing,   engraving,   printing,   dress-making,
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
men's and women's tailoring, taxidermy, and the manufacture of
basis.
ready-to-wear suits, jewellery, furs, leather goods, hand-made cigars,
Not less than—
and hand-made millinery
$7.00  a week  for the first six months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second six months
of employment.
13.00 a week for the third six months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Note.—Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
MERCANTILE  (MALE).
Order No. 59, Effective October 20th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 38.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
(2.) 21 years of age and over..
(3.) 21 years of age and over-
Minimum rate per day 	
$15.00 per week
40c. per hour
$1.60 per day
37^2 to 48 hours per week.
If less than 37^ hours.
Males under Twenty-one (21)  Years of Age.
Minimum Rates for Beginners under Seventeen  (17)   Years of Age.
37M; to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37^ Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
(4.)  (1.)
$6.00 per week
7.50 per week .
9.00 per week .
11.00 per week..
13.00 per week
15.00 per week
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
19 and under 20
20 and under 21
Thereafter
15c.
20c.
25c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
60c.
80c.
$1.00
1.20
1.40
1.60 I 64                                             DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Beginners and those recommencing, Eighteen  (18)   Years and under Twenty-one  (21), to whom Permits
have been issued by the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37 V2 to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
■       (4.) (2.)
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
20c.
25c.
35c.
80c.
$1.00
13.00 per week, 3rd 12 months 	
Thereafter rates as shown in (2) or (3).
1.40
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.          Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed five
(5)  days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
30c.
$1.20
1
Males Twenty-one (21) Years and under Twenty-four (24).
Inexperienced and partly inexperienced, to whom Permits have been granted, under Section 6
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
25c.
30c.
35c.
$1.00
1.20
1.40
Thereafter the rates as shown in (2) or (3).
Note.— (a.) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers, employed in wholesale and (or) retail establishments, shall be
paid at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26.
(6.)   Employees must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(c.)   Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(d.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
MERCANTILE   (FEMALE).
Order No. 24, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order dated September 28th, 1927.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or)  retail trade.
Rate.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Minimum, 18 years of age or over	
$12.75 a week.
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
Hours per Week.
40 to 48
If less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years op Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$7.50 a week for 1st 3 months.
8.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
8.50 a week for 3rd 3 months.
9.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
9.50 a week for 5th 3 months.
10.00 a week for 6th 3 months.
10.50 a week for 7th 3 months.
11.00 a week until age of 18 years is reached.
20c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
21c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
23c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
25c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
26c. per hour during 5th 3 months.
27c. per hour during 6th 3 months.
29c. per hour during 7th 3 months.
30c. per hour until age of 18 years is reached.
Minimum, $1.00 per day. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 65
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 a week 1st 3 months.
25c. per hour 1st 3 months.
10.00 a week 2nd 3 months.
27c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
11.00 a week 3rd 3 months.
30c. per hour 3rd 3 months.
12.00 a week 4th 3 months.
35c. per hour 4th 3 months.
12.75 a week thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Note.— (a.)   Licences must be obtained for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over at above rates.
(6.)   Maximum working-hours, 48 per week.
OFFICE OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Order No. 34, Effective January 30th, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. U.)
Includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks, filing
clerks, cashiers, cash-girls (not included in other orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer operators,
auditors, attendants in physicians'offices, dentists'offices, and other offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Experienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$15.0€ per week.
40c. per hour.
Minimum, $1.60 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
(Licence required in this Class.)
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
30c. per hour for 1st 3 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
32%c. per hour for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 3 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
37M>c. per hour for 4th 3 months.
15.00 a week thereafter.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
87% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
30c. per hour for 1st 6 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
32%>c. per hour for 2nd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 6 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 6 months or until
37Vi>c. per hour for 4th G months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
employee reaches age of 18 years.
15.00 a week thereafter.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Note.—Office employees are not allowed to exceed eight hours per day without a permit.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.
Order No. 71, Effective June 1st, 1940.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
Rate per Hour.
City of Vancouver, including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, City of North Vancouver, District of North
Vancouver ___ _       _ _	
75 c.
Note.— (a.)   This Order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(c.)   All wages must be paid semi-monthly.
5 I 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.
Order No. 75, Effective June 2nd, 1941.
". Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
Rate per Hour.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt, Highland, Metchosin,
Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew  _ -.    	
75e.
Note.— (a. 1  This Order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)  Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance-work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(c.)   All wages must be paid semi-monthly.
PATROLMEN  (MALE).
Order No. 69, Effective February 5th, 1940.
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes to watch
or patrol the premises of more than one person for the purpose of guarding or protecting persons or
property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman " means an employee   (not covered by any other Order of the Board)  employed by
a private patrol agency.
Hourly rate .
Note.— (a.) "Wages must be paid semi-monthly.
(ft.)  Employees must be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(c.)  Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Order No. 27, Effective September 5th, 1935.
(Superseding, in part, Personal Service Order.)
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring;   hairdressing;   barbering;   massaging;
physiotherapy;    giving of electrical, facial, scalp, or other treatments;    removal of superfluous hair;
chiropody;   or other work of like .nature.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Minimum   - —
$14.25
%iy_c per hour
$1.50 per day
40 to 44
Less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 6 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 6 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 6 months, or until employee
35c. per hour during 4th 6 months, or until employee
reaches age of 18 years.
reaches age of 18 years.
14.25 a week thereafter.
37 %C. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
35c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
14.25 a week thereafter.
Wiy__c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Note.— (a.) Employees waiting on call to be paid according to rates to which they are entitled as set out above,
(b.)   44-hour week and one-half hour for lunch between 11 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.     (See 27a.)
(c.)  Where special article of wearing-apparel of distinctive design, trimming, colour, or fabric is required, it
shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired free of cost to the employee.     (See 27b.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 67
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Order No. 27a, Effective March 30th, 1939.
(Amending Order No. 27.)
The above Order reduces the weekly hours to forty-four  (44)  and not more than nine  (9)  hours
in any one day.
Also provides for one-half  (%)  hour free from duty between the hours of eleven  (11)  a.m. and
two-thirty  (2.30) p.m.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Order No. 27b, Effective May 1st, 1940.
The above Order requires that where a distinctive uniform of special design, trimming, colour, or
fabric is required, it shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired free of cost to the employee.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Order .No. 27d, Effective March 13th, 1941.
Adds physiotherapy to the definition of Order No. 27.
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT   (FEMALE).
Order No. 67, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding Personal Service Order.)
" Public place of amusement " includes theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, lecture-halls, shooting-
galleries, bowling-alleys, swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions, and other similar places to which a charge
for admission or service is made to the public.
■
40 to 48 Hours
per Week.
Less than 40 Hours
per Week.
2 Hours or Less in
any One Day.
S14.25                 i          35c. ner hour.                              75c.
Note.— (a.)   Employees on call, 35c. per hour.
(b.)  Where uniforms  or  special  articles  of  wearing-apparel  are  required  they  shall  be  furnished,  repaired,
laundered, cleaned, etc., free of cost to the attendant.
(c.)   Cashiers are still covered by Office Order No. 34.
SAWMILLS   (MALE).
Order No. 50, Effective August 16th, 1937.
Order No. 50a, Effective July 20th, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 2, Order No. Ik, and Order No. 36.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills and planing-mills.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours,
40c.
30c.
$2.75 per day
48
48
Note.— (a.)   Certain exemptions under "Hours of Work Act."     (See regulations.)
(b.)   For engineers see Engineer Order.
(c.)   For truck-drivers see Transportation Order.
(d.)   90 per cent, of all employees not less than 40 cents per hour.
SHINGLE-MILLS   (MALE).
Order No. 62  (1941), Effective June 16th, 1941.
(Superseding Order No. 62 and Order No. IB.)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of shingles.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles, understood and accepted as a standard by the
industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936, issued by the  National Research  Council of
Canada.
Per Square.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Sawyers—
No. 1 shingles   —	
Lower in grade than No. 1 shingles-
Packers, all grades	
25c.
20c.
15c.
Other employees not included in any other Order of the Board .
40c.
40c.
40c.
40c.
Note.—Employees packing or sawing shingles on any other basis than by the square shall be paid on the same
proportionate basis. I 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 20 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 20.)
Includes all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, painting,
and cleaning of hulls, putting on or taking off the ways, or dry-docking, of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Occupation.
Ship-carpenter, shipwright, joiner, boat-builder, or wood-caulker 	
All other employees _ — — ..
Employees under 21, not more than 10 per cent, of total male employees in plant
may be employed at not less than .— — - 	
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Note.—This order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the " Apprenticeship Act."
TAXICAB DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 33 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 33, Order No. 33A, and Order No. 33b.)
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Working-hours.
Vancouver —_   - - - ."_ - 	
All ages.
$2.75
9 per day.
54 per week.
Note.— (a.)   If uniform or special article of wearing-apparel is demanded by employer, it must be without cost
to the employee except by arrangement approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(b.)   Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly.
TAXICAB DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 60, Effective November 17th, 1938.
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
tw:,,™,       ' r\-.ji« t?-,+„    '■     Less than 10                  Daily             1    Working-
Drivers,      i Daily Kate.   , tt                 t\               ■»*•   -                         »_
*              j Hours per Day. ;      Minimum.               hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich
All ages.
$3.00        1   35c. per hour,   j   $1.40 per day.    1
Note.;—(o.) Permits shall be obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours
can be paid 35c. per hour.
(b.)   Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 45c. per hour.
(c.)   Drivers must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(d.)  Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(e.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Effective April 5th, 1920.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the various instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and telegraphy, and shall
also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the operation of telephone
or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Weekly Hours.
$15.00 per week.
$11.00' per week for 1st 3 months.
48
3134c. per hour.
12.00 per week for 2nd 3 months.
48
13.00 per week for 3rd 3 months.
48
Licences required for inexperienced em
In case of emergency,
ployees 18 years of age or over.
56 hours.
Note.—(a.)   Time and one-half is payable for hours in excess of 48.
(b.)   Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week,
(c.) Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m.,
10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the number of hours of
employment a week.
(d.) In cases where employees reside on the employers' premises, the employer shall not be prevented from
making an arrangement with such employee to answer emergency calls between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 69
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY   (MALE).
Order No. 26 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
Order No. 26a (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 26.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000' lb. net
weight or over, as specified on the motor-
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Hourly rate   _ _	
(2.) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than
2,000 lb. net weight, as specified on the
motor-vehicle licence, and operators of
motor-cycles with wheeled attachments,
exclusive of those specified in section 7
hereof
Hourly rate _   	
(3.) Operators of motor-cycles with not more
than two wheels and without wheeled attachment
Hourly rate  :._
(4.) Bicycle - riders and foot - messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger
work   (e)
Hourly rate  -—
(5.)   Swampers and helpers —
Hourly rate 	
(6.)   Drivers  of horse-drawn  vehicles  other  than
those covered by section 7 hereof
Hourly rate  	
(7.) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery of
milk
Hourly rate, 40c.
Less than 40
45c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
30c.
Less than 40
20c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 50
40 and not more
than 50
35c.
40 and not more
than 48
25c.
40 and not more
than 48
17c.
40 and not more
than 50
35c.
40 and not more
than 50
40c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52 He
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52V2C.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(6.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery men may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than ten (10)
hours are worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a period of
seven (7) weeks.
(e.)   Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 59.
(/.)   Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly. I 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 26b, Effective August 18th, 1941.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf, of any wholesale, retail, private or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
'at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
(1.) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net
weight or over, as specified on the motor-
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
Hourly rate  _ - — —
(2.) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than
2,000 lb. net weight, as specified on the
motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those
specified in sections 3 and 7 hereof
Hourly rate __ -   	
(3.) Operators of motor-cycles with not more
than two wheels and without wheeled attachment
Hourly rate      —_	
(4.)  Bicycle-riders   and  foot-messengers   employed
exclusively on delivery or messenger work
Hourly rate  -  	
(5.)   Swampers and helpers
Hourly rate  	
(6.) Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than
those covered by section 7 hereof
Hourly rate   __,  	
(7.) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery of
milk
Not less than forty cents  (40c.)   per hour.
Hourly rate, 40c.
Weekly Hours.
Less than 40
45c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
30c.
Less than 40
20c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
45c.
Weekly Hours.
40 and not more
than 50
40 and not more
than 50
40 and not more
than 48
25c.
40 and not more
than 48
17c.
40 and not more
than 50
35c.
40 and not more
than 50
40c.
Weekly Hours.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52V2c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52V2c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle.is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rate.
(6.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery employees may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than
ten (10) hours are worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a
period of seven  (7)  weeks.
(e.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 71
WOOD-WORKING.
Order No. 49, Effective August 16th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 35 and Order No. 11.)
Includes all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of manufacturing sash and doors,
cabinets, show-cases, office and store fixtures, wood furniture, wood furnishings, veneer products, and
general mill-work products.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Adult Males.         40c. 48
18 to 21 years of age        30c. 48
Under 18 years.        ' 25c. 48
Note.—After November 14th, 1937, total male employees receiving less than 40 cents must not exceed 33% per
tent, of all male employees. I 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders now in effect, compiled as at July
15th, 1942.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum Wage
Act.
41
17 (1942)
42
55
70
70a
58
65
66
72
73
68
12 (1940)
53
54
18
18a
18c
39 (1940)
46
47
51
52
52b
52k
43
43A
43b
44
44A
44b
74
1 (1940)
28
25
24
59
34
75
71
69
27
27A
27b
27d
67
50
50a
62 (1941)
20 (1940)
33 (1940)
60
60A
26 (1940)
26a
(1940)
26b
49
I
Apprentices, Indentured .
Baking 	
Barbering 	
Box-manufacture  —-	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Carpentry (Vancouver and District)	
Carpentry (Kootenay Area)  ....
Carpentry (Victoria and District) 	
Carpentry (Alberni)  	
Carpentry (Nanaimo) 	
Christmas-trees   —	
Construction  	
Elevator Operators  	
Elevator Operators  —	
Engineers, Stationary Steam   	
Engineers, Stationary Steam 	
Engineers, Stationary Steam 	
First-aid Attendants..  	
Fishing ...  	
Fruit and Vegetable — .—	
Fruit and Vegetable  	
Household Furniture  	
Hotel and Catering   -	
Hotel and Catering  .'-— ~
Hotel and Catering (Resort Hotels) .
Janitor...
Janitor..
Janitor..
Janitresses—	
Janitresses 	
Janitresses  	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing-
Logging   	
Logging  and   Sawmills   (Cost  of  Board,
Cranbrook Area)
Manufacturing   	
Mercantile   -	
Mercantile  	
Office Occupation   	
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers..
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
Patrolmen.. ' 	
Personal Service   -	
| Personal Service  	
Personal Service   	
Personal Service 	
Public Places of Amusement	
Sawmills   	
Sawmills .. 7  	
Shingle-mills  	
Ship-building.  .— -	
Taxicab-drivers 	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity).
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity).
Telephone and Telegraph  	
Transportation.. _ _
Transportation 	
Feb. 7/37	
July 15/42	
April 5/37......
March 10/38 .
March 12/40..
June 21/40	
Sept. 15/38..
June 23/39...
Aug. 16/39...
May 14/40—
May 14/40—
Aug. 31/39-
Nov. 26/40-
Feb. 28/38 ...
Feb. 28/38 ...
Feb. 8/35 ....
April 17/35 .
May 14/37 ...
Oct. 8/40 .....
July 2/37.....
July 2/37 ....
Nov. 17/37-
Feb. 8/38 ....
May 18/38...
June 9/42 ...
May 14/37—
Jan. 21/41 ..
June 4/41—
May 14/37 ...
Jan. 21/41-
June 4/41—
Feb. 25/41—
Oct. 8/40 .....
Sept. 25/35..
Mar. 29/35 ....
Mar. 29/35 ....
Oct. 12/38 ...
Jan. 24/36	
April 22/41—
April 26/40...
Jan.19/40	
Aug. 29/35 ....
March 23/39 .
April 23/40 ...
March 11/41..
Aug. 31/39 ....
Aug. 3/37	
July 18/39	
June 4/41	
Oct. 8/40	
Oct. 8/40	
Nov. 15/38 —
Oct. 8/40	
Transportation..
Wood-working	
Oct. 8/40	
Nov. 26/40 .
Aug. 12/41..
Aug. 3/37 ..
Feb. 11/37 —
July 16/42....
April 8/37—
March 17/38
March 14/40
June 27/40-
Sept. 22/38 ..
June 29/39...
Aug. 17/39 ..
May 16/40 —
May 16/40—
Sept. 7/39 —
Nov. 28/40 ..
March 3/38 .
March 3/38 .
Feb. 14/35 ...
April 18/35
May 20/37 ...
Oct. 10/40 ...
Jan. 15/20....
July 8/37	
July 8/37	
Nov. 18/37...
Feb. 10/38 ...
May 19/38....
June 11/42 ..
May 20/37—
Jan. 23/41—
June 12/41 ..
May 20/37...
Jan. 23/41   ..
June 12/41...
Feb. 27/41 ...
Oct. 10/40 ...
Sept. 26/35...
June 6/35 —
June 6/35	
Oct. 20/38 -
Jan. 30/36 ...
April 24/41..
May 2/40......
Jan. 25/40—
Sept. 5/35 ....
April 6/39 ...
April 25/40 .
March 13/41
Sept. 7/39 ....
Aug. 5/37.....
July 20/39 ...
June 5/41 ...
Oct. 10/40 —
Oct. 10/40...
Nov. 17/38...
Oct. 10/40 —
Mar. 4/20 ....
Oct. 10/40 ...
Nov. 28/40...
Aug. 14/41...
Aug. 5/37	
Feb. 11/37	
July 20/42	
June 14/37	
April 4/38	
March 18/40...
June 27/40.	
Nov. 7/38	
Aug. 1/39	
Aug. 21/39......
May 27/40 —
May 27/40'	
Sept. 11/39	
Nov. 28/40	
March 3/38 ....
March 3/38 ....
March 1/35	
April 18/35 _
June 1/37	
Oct. 10/40	
Feb. 28/20    ...
July 12/37	
July 12/37 —
Nov. 18/37 .....
Feb. 14/38 .....
May 19/38
June 15/42 to
Sept. 12/42
June 1/37	
Jan. 23/41 .....
June 12/41 ....
June 1/37 ...
Jan. 23/41 .....
June 12/41.—
March 10/41..
Oct. 10/40 —
Sept. 26/35 ....
July 1/35 	
July 1/35	
Oct. 20/38 —
Jan.30/36 	
June 2/41	
June 1/40	
Feb. 5/40	
Sept. 5/35 .....
April 6/39   ...
May 1/40	
March 13/41...
Sept. 11/39 —
Aug. 16/37	
July 20/39 ......
June 16/41	
Oct. 10/40 ......
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 17/38-.	
Oct. 10/40	
April 5/20 —
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 28/40	
Aug. 18/41	
Aug. 16/37	
Male and female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male. SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Province of British Columbia.
' HOURS OF WORK ACT."
BE IT KNOWN that, pursuant to and by
virtue of the powers and authority vested
in the Board of Industrial Relations by the
" Hours of Work Act," the said Board has
made the following regulations, namely:—
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
[1   (a)  Consolidated for convenience only.    See Regulation
No. 26.]
1. (a.) Persons employed in sawmills, plan-
ing-mills, shingle-mills, and logging industry,
including all operations in or incidental to the
carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and
booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles, situate in that part of the
Province lying east of the Cascade Mountains
may work one hour per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act, but
the total hours worked in any week shall not
exceed fifty-four (54).
(6.) In the industrial undertakings referred
to in clause (a) of this regulation, the limit of
hours of work thereby fixed may be exceeded by
one hour per day on five days of each week for
the purpose of making a shorter work-day on
one day of the week, but the total hours worked
in any week shall not exceed fifty-four (54).
(c.) In sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-
mills situate in that part of the Province lying
east of the Cascade Mountains, and which are
operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen, and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and
oilers may work overtime to the extent of one
and one-half hours per day, to cover preparatory and complementary work, in addition to
the said fifty-four (54) hours per week set
forth in clauses (a) and (6) of this regulation.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-
mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may
work a total of forty-eight (48) hours each
week in five nights, in lieu of forty-eight (48)
hours each week in six nights, but the number
of hours worked in any night must not exceed
ten (10).
Logging.
3. Persons employed in:—
(1.)   The logging industry in:—
(a.)  Booming operations;   or
(6.)  Transporting logs  by logging-
railway, motor-truck,  flume, horse, or
river-driving;   or
(c.)   Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d.)   Or in the operation and upkeep
of donkey-engines:
Fish-canning.
(2.) Canning fish or manufacturing byproducts from fish, but not those engaged in salting fish;   and in
Cook and Bunk Houses.
(3.) Cook and bunk houses in connection
with any industrial undertaking,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed
by section 3 of the said Act to the extent necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
Engineers, Firemen, and Oilers-.
4. In all industrial undertakings which use
steam as a motive power and which are operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen,
and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and oilers
may work overtime to the extent of one and
one-half hours per day to perform preparatory
or complementary work, in addition to the
maximum hours of work prescribed by section
3 of the Act.
Shipping Staff.
5. Persons employed as members of the
shipping staff in industrial undertakings where
shipping operations are of an intermittent
nature may work such hours in addition to the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the said
Act as (but only so many as) shall be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-hours
limited by section 3 of the Act are being unduly
exceeded, the Board shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the industrial
undertaking from the provisions of this regulation for such period of time as the Board
considers advisable.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons employed
in ship-yards, engineering-works, machine-
shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal
works, belt-works, saw-works, and plants of a
like nature may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but not more than) may be
necessary to prevent serious loss to, or interruption in the operation of, the industrial
undertaking for which the repairs are being
made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture of
wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables
may work during the months of June, July,
August, and September in each year such hours
in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3
of the said Act as may from time to time be
necessary to fill urgent orders. I 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Seasonal Soft Drinks Delivery.
Note.—Regulation 8 cancelled by 8a, February 13th, 1936.
Laundries.
Note.—-Regulation 9 cancelled by 9a. September 26th, 1940.
Seasonal Lithographing.
101. During the months of May, June, July,
August, September, and October in each year
persons employed in the lithographing industry
may work such hours in excess of the hours
prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may
from time to time be necessary to fill urgent
orders. This exemption shall only apply when
sufficient competent help is not available.
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by
the Board by the granting of written temporary
exemption permits limiting by their terms the
extent thereof, but only upon being satisfied
by application in writing, signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly authorized, of
the urgency and necessity for the exception,
that it is of a temporary nature, and that no
other means of adequately overcoming such
temporary urgent condition is, or has been,
reasonably available, and that the additional
working-hours applied for will not be more
than will suffice for the extra pressure of work
requiring the same.
Overtime Record.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in
the manner required by subsection (1) of
section 9 of the said Act of all additional hours
worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said
Act or in pursuance of any regulation.
12a. Every employer shall furnish the Board
with a copy of his pay-roll, or record in such
form prescribed by the Board, showing the
hours worked and the nature of the work performed by his employees in respect of section 6
of the Act, or Regulations Nos. 6 and 11 of the
Board, not later than fifteen (15) days after
such hours have been worked. (Effective December 12th, 1940.)
13. Every employer shall notify, by means
of the posting of notices in conspicuous places
in the works or other suitable place, where the
same may readily be seen by all persons
employed by him, the hours at which work
begins and ends, and, where work is carried on
by shifts, the hours at which each shift begins
and ends; also such rest intervals accorded
during the period of work as are not reckoned
as part of the working-hours; these hours shall
be so fixed that the duration of the work shall
not exceed the limits prescribed by the " Hours
of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall not
be changed except upon twenty-four hours'
notice of such change posted as hereinbefore
specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the
Act or Regulation 11 above, a like notice of the
change in working-hours shall be posted, which
notice shall also state the grounds on which
the exemption was granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia,
this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th, 1934.
Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 14.
Occupation of Barbering.
The occupation of barbering is hereby added
to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 24th
day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th
day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd, 1934.
Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15.
Mercantile Industry.
The mercantile industry is hereby added to
the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 7th
day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th
day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th, 1934.
Effective August 9th, 1934.)
Regulations Nos. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d
cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e.
Mercantile Industry.
Note.—Regulation 15e cancelled by 29, September 30th, 1939.
Regulations Nos. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, and
16e cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f.
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores.
1. Persons employed in drug-stores as registered apprentices, certified clerks, or licentiates
of pharmacy may work not more than ninety-
six (96) hours in any two (2) successive
weeks, but in no case shall the hours of work
of any such registered apprentice, certified
clerk, or licentiate of pharmacy exceed fifty-
two (52) hours in any one week, or nine (9)
hours in any one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made
and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of
August, 1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd
day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th, 1939.
Effective April 6th, 1939.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 75
REGULATION No. 17.
REGULATION No. 18a.
Baking Industry.
The baking industry, by which expression is
meant all operations in or incidental to the
manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or
cakes, is hereby added to the Schedule of the
said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the
said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 6th day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 17a.
Baking Industry.
Employees employed in the baking industry
as deliverymen may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 18.
Catering Industry.
The catering industry, which includes all
operations in or incidental to the preparation
or to the serving, or to both preparation and
serving, of meals or refreshments where the
meals or refreshments are served or intended
to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-
house, dance-hall, cabaret, banquet-hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunch-room, lunch-counter, icecream parlour, soda-fountain, or in any other
place where food is served and a charge is
made for the same either directly or indirectly,
whether such charge is made against the
persons who partake of the meals or refreshments or against some other person, is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on the
1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective December 1st, 1934.)
Catering Industry.
Employees in the catering industry, working
on a split shift, are hereby exempt from the
provisions of section 3 of the "Hours of Work
Act Amendment Act, 1937," being chapter 30
of the Statutes of British Columbia, 1937, to
the extent that their working-hours on a split
shift shall be confined within fourteen (14)
hours immediately following commencement of
work; but this exception shall not be applicable unless every employee whose split shift
extends over twelve (12) hours is paid at the
rate of not less than one and one-half times
his regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within twelve (12)
hours immediately following commencement of
work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 5th
day of May, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 6th, 1938.
Effective May 6th, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 19.
Retail Florists.
Persons employed in the establishments of
retail florists may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but only so many as) shall
be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise
overcome: Provided that the working-hours
of such persons shall not exceed ninety-six (96)
hours on the average in any two successive
weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-
hours limited by section 3 of the Act are being
unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written
notification to the management, exclude the
employer's establishment from the provisions
of this regulation for such period of time as
the Board considers advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
■ day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective November 15th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 20.
The Occupation of Elevator Operator.
The occupation of elevator operator is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 28th
day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 28th,
1935.    Effective February 28th, 1935.) I 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Regulations Nos. 21, 21b, 21c, 2 Id, 21e, 21f,
and 21g cancelled by
REGULATION No. 21h.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The fruit and vegetable industry, which
includes all operations in or incidental to the
canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use any kind of fruit
or vegetable, is hereby exempt from the operation of the said Acts up to and including the
31st day of March, 1943.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th
day of June, 1942.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 11th, 1942.
Effective June 11th, 1942, to March 31st,
1943.)
REGULATION No. 22.
Transportation Industry.
The transportation industry, which includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any
other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further
transported to some destination other than the
place at which such aforementioned carriage
or delivery terminates, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 23.
Transportation Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation the
expression " transportation industry " includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air,
any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles,
or material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or
public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and
the carrying or delivering to or collecting from
any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air,
or road transport, for the purpose of being
further transported to some destination other
than the place at which such aforementioned
carriage or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation industry, other than those employed as (a) operators of motor-cycles, (6) bicycle-riders and
foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers of
vehicles employed in the retail delivery of milk,
are hereby permitted to work six (6) hours
per week in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," in accordance with the provisions of
Order No. 26 of the said Board of Industrial
Relations dated the 19th day of June, 1935,
fixing minimum wages in the transportation
industry: Provided that no such employee in
the transportation industry shall work more
than ten  (10)  hours in any one day.
3. That employees in the transportation industry employed as drivers of vehicles in the
retail delivery of milk are hereby permitted to
work fifteen (15) hours per week in excess of
the hours prescribed by section 3 of the said
"Hours of Work Act, 1934": Provided that
over a period of seven (7) weeks no such employee shall work more than three hundred and
seventy-eight (378) hours, nor more than ten
(10)  hours in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24.
Occupation of Hotel Clerk.
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes
the work of all persons engaged as room clerks
(day or night), mail clerks, information clerks,
cashiers, book-keepers, accountants, telephone
operators, and any other persons employed in
clerical work in hotels, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 26th,
1935.    Effective September 26th, 1935.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
1 77
REGULATION No. 26.
REGULATION No. 28b.
1. That Regulation No. 1 (a) of the Board,
dated the 14th day of June, 1934, is hereby
amended by striking out the word " and"
before the word " shingle-mills," and inserting
after the word " shingle-mills " the words " and
logging industry, including all operations in
or incidental to the carrying-on of logging;
pole, tie, shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile
cutting; and all operations in or incidental to
driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles,
ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles."
2. That this regulation shall become effective on publication in The British Columbia
Gazette on the 24th day of March, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 23rd
day of March, 1938.
REGULATION No. 28.
Taxicab Industry.
The taxicab industry, which includes the
work of all employees in charge of or driving
' a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven
(7) passengers or less than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public,
and which is driven or operated for hire, is
hereby added as item No. 12 to the Schedule
of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 3rd
day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
REGULATION No. 28a.
Taxicab Industry.
Persons employed in the taxicab industry,
which includes the work of all employees in
charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven (7) passengers or less
than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or
operated for hire, may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act, but in no case shall
the daily hours worked by any such employee
in the taxicab industry exceed nine (9) in any
one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
Note.—The taxicab industry having been
brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is
now subject to the following provision of that
Statute:—
" The working-hours of employees working
on a split shift shall be confined within twelve
hours immediately following commencement of
work."
Taxicab Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation, the
expression " taxicab industry " shall have the
meaning as assigned to it in Regulation No.
28 of the Board, dated the 22nd day of August,
1938.
2. That persons employed in the taxicab industry in the City of Victoria, the Municipality
of the Township of Esquimalt, the Municipality
of the District of Oak Bay, and the Municipality of the District of Saanich, may work:—
(a.) Two (2) hours per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the
" Hours of Work Act," provided that
such ten (10) hours are confined within
eleven (11) hours immediately following commencement of their work:
(6.) In excess of the ten (10) hours permitted by clause (a) hereof, provided
they are paid not less than the minimum rate for overtime—namely, forty-
five cents (45c.) per hour—prescribed
by section 5 of Order No. 60 of the
Board, dated the 15th day of November, 1938.
3. Regulation No. 28a of the Board, made
the 22nd day of August, 1938, is hereby varied
accordingly.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 15'h
day of November, 1938.
REGULATION No. 29.
Mercantile Industry.
Persons employed in the mercantile industry,
which includes all establishments operated for
the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade
in the Province of British Columbia, with the
exception of the City of Vancouver, the City of
North Vancouver, Municipality of the District
of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the
Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt,
the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay,
and the Municipality of the District of Saanich,
may work three (3) hours per day in excess
of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said
Act, on Saturday of each week and on the day
preceding a statutory holiday, when such statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but the
total hours worked in any one week shall not
exceed forty-eight  (48).
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 8th
day of November, 1939.
COMPILED JULY 15th, 1942.
By BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. I 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION BRANCH.
Head Office     __ Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary-Registrar  B. H. E. Goult.
Branch Office      ___.  Department of Labour, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Chief Conciliation Officer   James Thomson.
Victoria, B.C., May 30th, 1942.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the fourth annual report of the Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1941.
Due to the intensification of the war during this period the Province came to
experience a greater measure of war-time economy. Change caused unrest, which was
immediately reflected in the work of the Branch.
Complaints increased from fifty-six in 1940 to 105. In 1940 twenty-seven disputes
had been referred to Conciliation Commissioners; in 1941 a total of sixty-one disputes
were referred to these officers.
In 1940 there had been but one strike which affected 204 employees and caused
a time-loss of 8,510 man-days. In 1941 there were eight strikes directly affecting
1,408 employees, but causing a loss of only 7,594 man-days. It is worthy of note that
the time-loss was the lowest ever recorded; and that even so, it was increased by
a carry-over from a dispute arising in 1940.
Boards of Arbitration sitting in 1940 were nine in number. In the year just
passed, twenty-five disputes were referred to arbitration. In five cases disputes were
settled before Boards were designated. Of the twenty awards made, thirteen were
unanimous.
The record of industrial disputes in British Columbia since 1931 is shown in the
following table. An average of the number of disputes, employees affected, and working-days lost for the years 1931-37, as compared with the record from 1938 to 1941—
the years in which the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " has been effective
—continues to show a marked decrease in the latter period.
The record of industrial disputes in British Columbia since 1931 follows:—
Number of Disputes, Number of Employees affected, and Time lost
in Working-days, 1931-41.*
Year.
No. of
Disputes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1941                                                                 -    .
8
1
4
11
16
16
23
17
14
11
11
1,408
204
822
837
1,188
5,741
7,321
4,427
2,397
4,136
2,322
7,594
8,510
13,803
8,236
30,022
75,311
140,706
73,977
25,760
37,740
79,310
1940      	
1939
1938f -----     	
1937    -                                                  -	
1936                    ...	
1935	
1934   	
1933   	
1932    .                                     	
1931   	
* The record of the Department includes lockouts as well as strikes. A lockout, or an industrial condition that
is undeniably a lockout, is rarely encountered, and strikes and lockouts are therefore recorded together in the
statistical tables. The term " dispute " is used in reference to either strike or lockout. Figures shown are inclusive
of all disputes which have come to the attention of the Department. Methods taken to secure this information
preclude the possibility of serious omission. Since it is not always possible to secure exact information concerning
the duration of a dispute or the number of employees involved, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later
information.
Estimates of time lost are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute lasts by the number of
employees directly involved and not replaced. The number of employees indirectly affected are not included in the
computations.
t 1938 was the first calendar year in which the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " became effective. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 79
An average of the number of disputes, employees affected, and working-days lost
for the years 1931-37, as compared with the record for 1938-41—the four years in
which the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " has been effective—continues
to show a marked decrease in the latter period.
Average Number of Disputes, Average Number of Employees affected, and Average Time lost in Working-days, 1938-41, as compared with Average for the
Years 1931-37.
Period.
No. of
Strikes.
Employees
affecfed.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1931-37  --   	
1938-41  - 	
15
6
3,933
818
66,118
9,535
An analysis of disputes by industries reveals the fact that the greatest loss of time
occurred in the logging industry and that the greatest number of employees affected by
disputes were employed in the manufacturing industry.
Analysis of
Disputes in British Columbia in 1941 by Various Industries.
Industry.
No. of
Employers
affected.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Man
Working-days.
1
1
1
5
62
44
286
1,016
242
220
4,144
2,988
Totals 	
8
1,408
7,594
A summary of disputes commencing in 1941 and causing loss of time follows :-
Summary of Disputes commencing in 1941.
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of            Time lost
Employees      in Working-
affected,                days.
Hotel waiters, Vancouver— 	
Commenced December 23rd, 1940 ; for Union recognition, wage increases, and certain changes in working
conditions ; terminated January 24th, 1941.    Thirty-
three  men  were re-engaged at 33  cents  an  hour
straight time and 35 cents an hour split time, plus
62
44
56
286
32
325
53
550
242*
Garage employees, Vancouver
Metal-workers, Vancouver-	
Loggers, Lake Cowichan 	
Electrical workers, Vancouver
Commenced March  30th,   1941 ; for  increased  wages
and   changes   in   working   conditions;   terminated
April   3rd,   1941 ;   referred   to   sole   arbitrator.    In
favour of employees —  	
Commenced   May   5th,    1941;   against   discharge   of
workers;   terminated   May    6th;    conciliation   and
reference  to   Board   of   Arbitration.    In   favour   of
employees      -
Commenced   June   19th,   1941;   for   closed   shop   and
Union agreement; terminated July 7th, when men
returned to  work  pending  reference of  dispute to
Conciliation  Commissioner  and Board of Arbitration.    In favour of employees   	
Commenced June 30th, 1941; against changes in conditions pending inquiry under provisions of " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act " ; terminated July
2nd	
220
56
4,144
32
Can-factory workers, Vancouver .
Bolt-factory workers, Vancouver ..
Cannery-workers, Steveston	
Commenced August 22nd, 1941, following termination
of arbitration proceedings; for Union  agreement,
increased wages,  and  certain  changes  in  working
conditions;   terminated   August   26th;   conciliation
(Provincial and Federal).    In favour of workers _._
Commenced  August  30th,   1941;  for  Union recognition; terminated October 1st; conciliation (Federal)
Commenced October 24th; for increased wages; terminated October 25th ; negotiations ; compromise	
1,000
1,350
550
1.408        1        7.594
* Time lost in 1941 only. I 80 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
MINOR DISPUTES   (NOT LISTED AS REGULAR STRIKES).
Newspaper Carriers, Trail and Rossland.
Twenty-one newspaper carrier boys in Trail and Rossland ceased work between
January 25th and February 17th to secure an increase in pay. A bonus, instead of an
increase, was finally agreed upon.
Logging Employees, Poett Nook, Sarita Bay.
Twelve mill-hands employed at Sarita Bay, near Alberni, worked all day Sunday,
April 27th, and asked for a half-day off Monday. This was refused, but the employees
took the time off despite the refusal. The employer, knowing shipping was not available, closed the mill down and the employees found work elsewhere.
Ship-builders, North Vancouver.
Twenty-four ship-builders employed by a North Vancouver concern quit work on
the afternoon of April 17th, following a misunderstanding between the men and the
Company over the advancement of unskilled workers.
An agreement regarding the advancement of this type of labour was promised,
and the men returned to work on the advice of the Union business agent the next
morning.
Factory-workers, Vancouver.
Following negotiations with their employer for an increase in wages, employees
of a Vancouver factory struck on the afternoon of August 4th. A representative of
the Provincial Department of Labour immediately conferred with the workers, who
returned to their employment the following morning.
The employees obtained increased wages and a promise of a cost-of-living bonus.
Waitresses, Vancouver.
A waiter and fourteen waitresses employed by three Vancouver restaurants ceased
work for a short period of time August 6th, in protest of the neglect of the operators
to respect the wage-scale contained in a recently signed agreement. The matter was
adjusted after negotiation.
I. STRIKES, 1941.
HOTEL WAITERS, VANCOUVER.
No. 1.—This strike was a carry-over from 1940. Full details of the circumstances
leading to this dispute, which took place in Vancouver, December 23rd, 1940, to January
24th, 1941, may be found on page 83 of the Annual Report of the Department of Labour
for 1940.
GARAGE EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
No. 2.—On January 24th a Board of Arbitration was appointed under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " to arbitrate a dispute
between a Vancouver transportation company and its garage and transportation
employees. On February 27th the chairman of the Board and the employer's representative handed down a majority award, the employees' arbitrator dissenting. The
Company accepted the award of the Board, but the employees rejected it.
Further negotiations were carried on concerning the matters still in dispute, which
included employee classifications, basic wages, cost-of-living bonus, the term of the
proposed agreement between the Company and its employees, holidays, and additional
pay for Sundays and statutory holidays. No agreement was reached and the employees
struck March 30th, as they were legally entitled to do. The strike spread and resulted
in the tie-up of certain feeder-buses.
It was thereafter suggested by a third party that the disputants request the
Minister of Labour for the Province to appoint a sole arbitrator, a Judge, to arbitrate
the matters in dispute and to make an award, which the two parties would agree to REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 81
accept. It was also suggested that the terms contained in the award of the Board of
Arbitration should be the minimum terms granted the employees.
Both parties agreed to this suggestion and work was thereupon resumed April 3rd.
The award of the sole arbitrator was made April 24th. It clarified employee
classifications, recommended a two-year agreement, gave two weeks' holiday annually
with pay for twelve days (previously the men received pay for ten days only), but
refused time and one-half for Sundays and statutory holidays and any increase in
wages other than those granted by the Board of Arbitration. The cost-of-living bonus
had been previously conceded.
The sequel to the strike was therefore favourable to the employees.
METAL-WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
No. 3.—Employees of a metal-working concern in Vancouver submitted a proposed
Union agreement covering wages, hours, conditions of work, and Union recognition to
their employer. Subsequently, five senior employees were allegedly dismissed. Fifty-
six employees thereupon struck May 5th, returning to work the following day at the
behest of officials of the Provincial Department of Labour. They thereupon made
application for a Conciliation Commissioner, who was thereafter appointed. The dispute was finally referred to a Board of Arbitration.
The unanimous award of the Board favoured the employees and recommended an
eight-hour day and forty-four-hour week; time and one-half for overtime; holidays
with pay for employees with over a year's service and, with the exception of four classifications, an all-around increase of pay.
At meetings held August 5th and 6th, a total of thirty-eight employees voted in
favour of accepting the award. None of the employees rejected the award. There
were no votes spoiled.
The employer, however, informed the Honourable the Minister of Labour on August
4th, that his " Company was unable to accept the award in its present form.   .   .   ."
(For further details regarding this dispute see " Boards of Arbitration, 1941,
No. 5.")
LOGGERS, LAKE COWICHAN.
No. U.—On expiry of an agreement between a logging company at Lake Cowichan
and its employees a proposed Union agreement was suggested to replace the old, to
which the Company took exception. Negotiations failed and on June 19th the men
struck.
Application had meanwhile been made for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner, under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act."
Before conciliation could proceed the majority of the men had left the camp.
They were informed that conciliation would proceed as soon as the men returned
to work on the same conditions as those prevailing June 17th. The workmen affected
thereupon resumed work between July 4th and July 7th.
The matters in dispute were thereafter referred to a Board of Arbitration. Findings of the Board favoured the employees.
(For further details regarding the sequel to this dispute see " Boards of Arbitration, 1941, No. 11.")
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
No. 5.—Thirty-two employees of a light-manufacturing plant in Vancouver ceased
work June 30th, following a request that a change be made from a forty-eight-hour to
a forty-four-hour week, and that wages be increased from 30 cents and 75 cents per
hour to 50 cents and 85 cents per hour.
The workers returned to work July 2nd, pending an inquiry under the provisions
of the " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act."
CAN-FACTORY WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
No. 6.—Employees of a can-manufacturing company in Vancouver submitted to
their employer a proposed Union agreement covering Union recognition, wages, hours of work, and other conditions. The Company refused to accept the proposed agreement, and the dispute which thereafter arose was finally submitted to a Board of
Arbitration.
Proceedings before the Board were late in their presentation, and two days after
commencement of these hearings, on August 20th, the life of the Board expired. Representatives of the Company refused an extension of the life of the Board beyond that
date, and its functions terminated without an award being made.
The employees of the Company thereupon struck at midnight, August 21st.
Following further negotiations and intervention by the Honourable the Minister
of Labour for the Province and representatives of the Federal Department of Labour,
the dispute terminated August 26th. The employees were given an increase in wages,
Union recognition, and certain changes in working conditions.    In favour of workers.
(For further details relating to this dispute see " Boards of Arbitration, 1941,
No. 9.")
BOLT-FACTORY WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
No. 7.—A strike of bolt-factory workers in Vancouver, which commenced August
30th, followed the report of a Board of Conciliation and Investigation appointed under
the provisions of the " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act," which submitted its
report to the Federal Minister of Labour on August 5th. The report was signed by
the chairman and the employees' member, while a minority report was filed by the
employer's member.
The Board recommended a wage-scale which provided for increases in wages of
5 cents per hour and other terms of employment, all of which were accepted by both
parties. The Board recommended against holidays with pay, at the time. A majority
of the Board recommended negotiations for a Union agreement, the member for the
employer dissenting.
The Company refused to sign a Union agreement and a strike followed. The plant
was producing rivets for ship-building, and shipyard workers adopted resolutions
favouring the strike.    It was reported a sympathetic strike was possible.
Conciliation by the Western Representative of the Federal Department of Labour
was unsuccessful. Early in October the Federal Minister of Labour was in Vancouver
and he arranged for a resumption of work, the dispute to be again referred to the
Board and its decision to be made binding.    The men resumed work October 2nd.
CANNERY-WORKERS, STEVESTON.
No. 8.—Certain employees of a Steveston cannery struck at midnight, October
24th, for an increase of wages and cost-of-living bonus.
These workers were informed by a Union organizer that they were wrongfully on
strike and returned to work the following day at 11 a.m., after being granted 5 cents
an hour increase.
Settlement favoured the workers.
EXTENSION OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE " INDUSTRIAL
DISPUTES INVESTIGATION ACT."
By authority of Privy Council Order No. 3495, passed November 7th, 1939, under
the provisions of the " War Measures Act " (chapter 206, R.S.C. 1927), the " Industrial
Disputes Investigation Act" is extended to cover all plants and undertakings where
Imperial or Federal war contracts are being carried on, or to all plants and undertakings where such contracts are being carried on conjointly with private projects or
contracts. Resultantly, if employers or employees so concerned make application to
the Provincial authorities for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner under the
provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," the applicants have
been requested to submit the matter to the Western Representative of the Federal
Department of Labour in British Columbia.
To avoid the possibility of confusion, applicants for the services of a Conciliation
Commissioner under the Provincial statute are asked to sign a statement declaring that the employer concerned is not, to the best of their knowledge, engaged in any contract
awarded by the Imperial or Federal Governments.
Industrial disputes within the exclusive jurisdiction of the Parliament of Canada
are dealt with under the " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act " as heretofore. All
disputes within the jurisdiction of the Province of British Columbia, with the exceptions noted, are dealt with under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Act."
WAGES.
Under Federal regulations now in force (P.C. No. 8253, as amended), no employer
may increase or decrease basic wage-rates unless authorized to do so by the National
War Labour Board or a Regional War Labour Board. There are nine Regional Boards,
one for each Province, on which Government, labour, and employers are represented.
The British Columbia Board is located in Vancouver, and any inquiries regarding
wages should be addressed to Robert Morrison, Esq., Chief Executive Officer, British
Columbia Regional War Labour Board, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Permission for a change in wages can only be given where the Board finds the
basic scale to'be low compared to those for similar occupations in the same locality or
a comparable locality.
Excepted from this regulation are workers in agriculture, fishing, hunting, trapping, domestic service; employees of a hospital, religious, charitable, or educational
institution; as well as Civil Service employees of Federal, Provincial, or municipal
governments.
Should a dispute arise over wages within the application of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " it may, in its eventual analysis, be heard before a Board
of Arbitration, whose members may make whatever recommendations they see fit. The
implementation of these recommendations, however, lies in the hands of the Regional
War Board. I 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
III. BOARDS OF ARBITRATION.
Twenty Boards of Arbitration were designated during 1941.    The designation of
these Boards and the outcome of their deliberations is shown in the following table:—
No. of
Board.
Disputant Parties.
Outcome of Hearings.
1.
2.
3.
4.
B.C. Motor Transportation, Ltd., and its garage employees, Vancouver	
B.C. Greyhound Lines, Ltd., and its motor-coach and shop operators, Penticton
B.C. Electric Railway Co., Ltd., and their electric railway and motor-coach
employees in Vancouver, Victoria, and New Westminster
Majority award, employees'
arbitrator dissenting.
Majority award, employer's
arbitrator dissenting.
Majority award, employer's
arbitrator dissenting.
5.
G.
7.
8.
Veterans'   Sightseeing  and  Transportation   Co.,   Ltd.   (Victoria),   and  their
bus-drivers
Veterans*  Sightseeing and Transportation  Co.,  Ltd.   (Nanaimo), and their
bus-drivers
Unanimous award.
Unanimous award.
9.
arbitrator dissenting.
Employer refused extension
of life of Board.    No
award made.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Canadian Famous Players, Ltd., Mainland, and their projectionists.    	
Unanimous award.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
City of Vancouver and its civic employees   _	
Corporation of District of Saanich and its municipal employees__  	
Contractors Supply Sash and Door Co., Ltd., Vancouver, and their sash and
door employees
Corporation of North Vancouver and District and certain of its municipal
employees
Sun Publishing Co., Ltd., and certain of its editorial, circulation, promotion,
.iob printing, maintenance, and business office employees
New Method Laundries, Ltd., and its laundry employees.	
Unanimous award.
Unanimous award.
Majority award.
Unanimous award.
Unanimous award.
Unanimous award.
• (Note.—Other disputes were referred to arbitration in addition to those which
have been described. These were five in number. In three of the five cases, the dispute was settled before the Board was designated. In the other two cases, which had
to do solely with wages, the matter was referred to the British Columbia Regional War
Board, under the provisions of P.C. 8253.)
A summary of the texts of awards and minority reports of Boards of Arbitration
follow:—
No. 1, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between B.C. Motor Transportation, Ltd., Employer, and certain of
its Garage and Transportation Employees.
Details of the report and award of the Board of Arbitration designated to inquire
into the above-mentioned dispute will be found in the Annual Report of the Department
of Labour for 1940 at page 126.
No. 2, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between B.C. Greyhound Lines, Ltd., Employer, and its Motor-coach
Operators and its Shop and Garage Employees. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 91
Details of the award of the Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into the
above-mentioned dispute will be found in the Annual Report of the Department of
Labour for 1940 at page 140.
No. 3, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the British Columbia Electric Railway Co., Ltd., Employer,
and its Electric Railway and Motor-coach Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
the Honourable Mr. Justice Fisher, chairman; Mr. W. R. Dowrey, employer's arbitrator;   and Mr. W. R. Trotter, employees' arbitrator.
The employees had proposed that a new agreement be signed With the Company,
containing a provision for a wage increase of 6 cents per hour for employees in all
departments covered by the old agreement and the new; that the proposed agreement
apply to the garage employees at Point Grey and New Westminster and to the bus
operators in Victoria, and that the new agreement might be opened within thirty days
to consider the matter of wages only.
The Company rejected these proposals and the Conciliation Commissioner, Mr.
James Thomson, recommended the dispute be referred to arbitration.
The Board was thereupon designated, and public sessions were held on May 5th,
7th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22nd, 26th, 27th, 28th, and 29th, 1941.
On June 2nd, 1941, the Board submitted a majority award; Mr. Dowrey dissented
and submitted a minority report.
The majority award recommended an increase in wages of 6 cents per hour over
the present scale for all employees covered by the old agreement and the new; refused
the request that the proposed agreement apply to the garage employees at Point Grey
and New Westminster and to the bus operators in Victoria, and refused the request
that the new agreement should be opened within thirty days to consider the matter of
wages only.
It was recommended instead that the agreement should continue in effect three
years from March 1st, 1941, and that it should contain a clause reading as follows:—
" Wages during the period of this three year agreement to be subject to the fluctuation of Dominion Cost of Living Index in the following manner. Should the Dominion
Index as at March 1st, 1941 (108.2) in the future show an increase of five per cent,
a bonus of 2% cents per hour shall be added to the new wage rates and should the
Index show a decrease of five per cent from the figure of March 1st, 1941 (108.2) then
correspondingly a decrease of 2% cents per hour shall become effective. Subsequent
increases or decreases in the Dominion Cost of Living Index during this three year
period to be met by similar adjustments. The adjustments shall be made at intervals
not more frequently than every three months from the said March 1st, 1941."
Minority Report.
In the minority report submitted by Mr. Dowrey, he declared he " could find no
reasonable grounds whatever in the evidence for heavy increases in the wage rates for
which the Amalgamated Association is asking." He suggested, however, that the
employees should be paid a cost-of-living bonus in keeping with the wages policy of
the Dominion Government as laid down in Order in Council P.C. 7440.
He thought there was " no reason to include bus-drivers in the agreement,"
although he recommended that the cost-of-living bonus should apply to them. He
recommended further that the employees in the New Westminster and Point Grey
garages should be included in the agreement, " but that they should not be included
with the shop and barn employees as requested by the Union, but rather have a separate
section of their own in the agreement under which their present working conditions
should be set out."
Mr. Dowrey also maintained that " the thirty-day clause was undesirable " and
that " the duration of the agreement should be for a period of three years dating
from March 1st, 1941." I 92 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
No. 4, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Master Lathers in the City of Vancouver and vicinity.
Employers, and their Journeymen Lathers, Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. D. 0. Lewis, chairman; Mr. W. G. Jenner, employers' arbitrator; and Mr. William
James, employees' arbitrator.
The journeymen lathers employed by seven master lathers in Vancouver and
vicinity had requested that their employers pay for the cost of nails used for nailing
inside fir laths.    This request was rejected by the employers.
On July 23rd, 1941, a unanimous award was returned by the Board recommending
that " the master lathers in the City of Vancouver and vicinity supply the nails required
for nailing inside fir laths to the journeymen lathers as requested."
No. 5, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between Canadian John Wood (Vancouver), Limited, Employer, and
its Metal-workers, Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
the Honourable Mr. Justice Sidney Smith, chairman; Mr. John Whittle, employer's
arbitrator;   and Mr. Al. Parkin, employees' arbitrator.
The employees had submitted a proposed Union agreement covering wages, hours,
and working conditions to their employer. The Company refused to accept this
proposed agreement and submitted counter-proposals through the Conciliation Commissioner, Mr. M. H. McGeough.    The men rejected the Company's proposals.
The Board returned a unanimous award July 31st, 1941, and recommended that
certain provisions be incorporated into an agreement between the Company and its
employees.
These provisions recommended an eight-hour day and a forty-four-hour week;
the payment of time and one-half for overtime; one week's holiday a year with pay
for all employees with over one year's service; an all around increase in pay of 8 cents
an hour, with the exception of certain cases specifically dealt with; the continuance in
force of the recommended agreement for one year from May 9th, 1941, and the
suggestion that the principle of the length of service in the Company's employ should
govern in the event that lay-offs are necessary.
The Board also recommended the adjustment of wages every three months on a
flat-rate basis over the whole of the factory " according to the percentage rise and fall
of the cost of living as ascertained by the Bureau of Statistics and supplied to the
Dominion Department of Labour." Provision was made for an increase of 2% cents
per hour, should the Dominion Index as of May 9th, 1941, show an increase of 5 per cent.
Subsequent increases or decreases in the Dominion Cost-of-living Index were to be met
by similar adjustments, but in no case was the wage-scale to fall below the basic
increase of 8 cents per hour, and the basic increases granted in certain cases specifically
dealt with.
No. 6, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Veterans' Sightseeing and Transportation Co., Ltd.,
Victoria, B.C., Employer, and its Bus Operators, Employees (Victoria, B.C.).
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. J. Howard Harman, chairman; Mr. Maris Hale, employer's arbitrator; and Mr.
A. Clyde, employees' arbitrator.
The employees had submitted a proposed Union agreement covering Union recognition ; the check-off of Union dues from wages; wages and working conditions, including length of vacations, the supplying of uniforms by the Company to employees of two REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 93
years' service or more, the retention of seniority of employees entering the armed
forces, and passes to drivers transferable to the employees' families.
The Company submitted counter-proposals. These in turn were rejected by the
employees.
After all representations and evidence had been heard and the Board had had some
discussion in regard to the award, and drafts had been prepared, the member of the
Board appointed by the employer was authorized to make an offer of settlement. This
offer was considered fair and proper by the member of the Board appointed by the employees. After some discussion the offer, with slight variations, became the unanimous
award of the Board, September 3rd, 1941.
The award was not intended to affect the earnings of sightseeing bus-drivers, but
such persons were included in the question of Union recognition.
The Board recommended that the employer recognize a local of the National
Drivers' Union as the sole bargaining agent for the employees; that any employees
presently serving in the armed forces or who may hereafter join them be re-employed
by the Company on discharge and be free to join or to refrain from joining the Union
as he saw fit; that in the event of returning employees not joining the Union such
employees be entitled to elect or appoint one of their number to be a joint bargaining
agent with the persons appointed by Union members; that closed-shop regulations be
established, but that they should not apply to any employee re-employed after discharge
from the armed forces.
Additionally, the Board recommended a two-year contract; that no "check-off"
arrangement be made; that employees be promoted and laid off in order of seniority;
that a working-day should be not more than nine hours and a working-week should be
not more than fifty hours, and that split shifts be eliminated wherever possible.
It was recommended that the hourly rate of pay be increased from 50 cents to 55
cents, with time and one-half for overtime; that any employee working a split shift
covering more than twelve hours be paid time and one-half for time worked in excess of
twelve hours; that charter work under 40 miles be paid at regular rates, and such work
over 40 miles be paid at the rate of 3% cents per mile. When charter work exceeds
nine hours, work is to be paid for at 75 cents per hour or 3V2 cents per mile, whichever
is greater.
Employees were granted a week's holiday with pay in the second and succeeding
years of service, and all regular drivers were to be supplied with complete uniforms.
No. 7,-1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Veterans' Sightseeing and Transportation Co., Ltd.
(Nanaimo Operation), and its Bus Operators employed in the Nanaimo Area.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. J. Howard Harman, chairman; Mr. Maris Hale, employer's arbitrator; and Mr.
A. Clyde, employees' arbitrator.
The employees had presented a proposed agreement to their employer providing for
Union recognition, a closed shop, the institution of the "check-off," the establishment
of the seniority principle, and an increase in wages.
The Company presented counter-proposals providing for Union recognition, closed
shop, and some increase in pay. For some reason these proposals were not voted upon
by the men and the Company withdrew its offer. A further contract providing for an
association of all bus op_rators employed in Victoria and Nanaimo was substituted, and
resultantly the question of Union recognition became one of the main points of difference
between disputants.
Aff-u- the consideration of all evidence, the Board made its award, September 5th,
1941. It was identical with the award made in respect to the Victoria bus operators of
the Company (see Award No. 6, above), with two exceptions: that all Nanaimo employees should be allowed ten minutes barn time per shift, and that the employer should
not be required to supply uniforms to the employees, so long as the employees were not
required to wear uniforms. No. 8, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the C. & C. Taxi Service, Ltd., Island Taxi, Safety Cab Company, and Quarter Cab Company, Limited (all of Victoria, B.C.), Employers, and
their Taxicab-drivers, Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. J. Howard Harman, chairman; Mr. Maris Hale, employers' arbitrator; and Mr.
A. Clyde, employees' arbitrator.
Employees of the four taxicab companies had presented a proposed agreement to
their respective employers, providing for Union recognition; a closed shop; institution
of the "check-off" system; the establishment of the seniority principle; increase of
wages;   and changes in working conditions.
A counter-proposal made by the employers, involving an increase in wages, lower
than that requested, was rejected by the employees.
After hearing all evidence, a majority award was made August 25th, 1941, the
employees' arbitrator dissenting and filing a minority report.
The Board recommended an increase in wages of the drivers by 16% per cent, to
35 cents per hour*; that employees be given the option of working ten hours in eleven
or ten consecutive hours; that each employee be given one week's holiday with pay in
the second and each successive year of his employment with any one company, and that
the employer recognize as the bargaining agents on behalf of the employees two representatives duly elected by a majority vote of all employees. (Such representatives
need not be employees of the company concerned or holders of Class A, B, or C driving
licences.    They might or might not be Labour Union officials or employees.)
The Board also recommended that uniforms be provided when the employer required a uniform to be worn; that the employee keep the uniform repaired and neat,
and that it remain at all times the property of the employer.
It was also recommended that employees joining the armed forces be protected both
as to seniority and re-employment upon discharge; that employees be laid off, promoted, or re-employed in order of seniority, so long as they have sufficient capability
to perform the duties required.
In conclusion, it was recommended that a committee representative of the employers and employees of the four companies be set up to investigate complaints of unfair
treatment or unjustified dismissals; minor disputes and difficulties, and the interpretation of any agreement existing between them. Both employers and employees were
urged to " work together in an effort to have uniform minimum rates established over
the entire Victoria district and that these minimums be higher than the existing rates."
Minority Report.
Mr. Clyde in his minority report would have changed the award so that it recommended " the employers recognize as sole bargaining agents of the employees the proper
officials of National Drivers Union Local No. 1." He would have also amended the
award to provide " for the Committee hearing charges of unfairness to be composed of
the proper Union officials and representatives of the employees." Other changes
throughout the award were suggested to conform with these amendments and to provide
for a " closed shop."
No. 9, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the American Can Company, Limited, Employer, and its
Metal-workers, Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
the Honourable Mr. Justice Sidney Smith, chairman; Mr. R. L. Norman, employer's
arbitrator;   and Mr. John Stanton, employees' arbitrator.    Upon the resignation of
* The Board recommended that taxicabrdrivers be paid 37'/i:  cents an  hour when  uniform by-laws  similar to
Victoria City By-law 2888 became effective over the Greater Victoria area. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 95
Mr. Stanton, the Board was redesignated, August 6th, 1941, and the vacancy created
by the resignation was filled by Mr. J. W. Hope.
The employees of the Company, through their representatives, had submitted a
proposed Union agreement, covering Union recognition, wages, hours of work, and other
conditions.    The Company refused to accept the proposed agreement.
It had been arranged that the hearings should proceed August 18th. Counsel for
the Company and the employer's arbitrator were not available until then.
Under the provisions of section 39 (1) of" the Act, a Board of Arbitration must
make its award " not more than fourteen days after it is designated." An extension of
time may be made " with the unanimous consent of all parties."
The life of the Board therefore expired August 20th.
Hearings commenced August 18th, as arranged, but on August 20th, the representatives of the Company refused the extension of the life of the Board beyond that
date, and its functions terminated without an award being made.
No. 10, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Montreal Bakery Limited, Employer, and its Bakery and
Confectionery Workers, Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Professor G. G. Drummond, chairman; Dr. H. V. Warren, employer's arbitrator; and
Mr. John Wigdor, employees' arbitrator.
The employees had submitted a proposed Union agreement to the employer, which
the latter was unable to accept. The clauses in the agreement about which contention
arose had to do with the principle of the closed shop and institution of the " check-off "
system; wage-scales as between different categories of labour; the payment of double
time on statutory holidays; and the provision of one week's holiday with pay after one
full year's service with the Company.
After all representations and evidence had been heard, the Board returned a unanimous award, September 9th, 1941.
The Board recommended the signing of the proposed agreement, and that " having
regard to the small-scale operation of the Montreal Bakery . . . that a letter outside
the agreement be signed incorporating the following:—
" 1. The payment of Union rates of wages be made according to the work done in
each category of employment.
" 2. The principle of the closed shop be satisfied by the employment of members of
the Union in good standing, or others who will promptly become members and remain
in good standing.
" 3. The check-off arrangements be left to an understanding between the Union
and the Montreal Bakery in order to facilitate the proper collection of Union dues, fines,
and assessments."
No. 11, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between Lake Logging Company, Limited, Employer, and its Logging
and Booming Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Dean F. M. Clement, chairman; Mr. J. R. Hamilton, employer's arbitrator; and Mr.
John Stanton, employees' arbitrator.
The dispute as initially submitted to the Board was in the form of a Union agreement between the Company and the International Woodworkers of America, Local 1-80.
The proposed agreement contained a number of articles, only four of which were in
dispute, namely:—
1. The preamble, which had to do with Union recognition.
2. Article 7, which had to do with seniority.
3. Article 9, which had to do with leave of absence. I 96 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
4. Article 11, which had to do with a " Union camp." This article made it necessary for all employees to become Union members after thirty days' employment. If an
employee did not become a Union member, the employer, on written notice from the
Union, would be called upon to release such an employee from employment. The article
also made it obligatory for " all employees who are now, or shall hereafter become
members of the Union " to maintain continuous Union membership.
A unanimous award was returned by the Board, September 15th, 1941.
The Board recommended that it should be stated in the preamble of the agreement
that the agreement was " between the Lake Logging Co., Ltd. . . . and the employees
of the Lake Logging Co., Ltd.   ..."
The remainder of the Board's recommendations may be stated in full:—
"Recommendation 2.—Article 7, Seniority: In the event that the work becomes
slack and that it is necessary to reduce the crew, the employees shall be laid off in the
inverse order in which they have been hired, and when it is necessary to increase forces
the men shall be re-employed in the inverse order in which they were laid off in so far
as this is practicable. No new employees shall be hired until the list of former employees is exhausted, and all employees shall be returned to their positions as prior to the
time of laying off, if they report for work when public notice is given. Seniority rights
as established through mutual understanding between the Company and the committee
shall be respected at all times.
"Recommendation 3.—Article 9, Leave of Absence: That any employee being
called for National Defence or Overseas Service, or whose absence is necessitated by
injury or illness, or being elected as a representative on behalf of the Union, thereby
necessitating leave of absence, such leave of absence shall be granted by the Party of
the First Part, provided sufficient advance notice is given so that his work may be
properly cared for; and further provided that such leave of absence shall not exceed
fourteen (14) months, except for war services. Any employee absent pursuant to such
leave of absence, to be'given in writing by the Party of the First Part, shall retain all
seniority rights and privileges as an employee of the Company.
"Recommendation k-—Article 11, Union Camp: If the Company hires an employee who is not a member of the International Woodworkers of America, Local 1-80,
such employee shall after thirty (30) days' employment, if satisfactory to the Company,
be asked by the Union officials to become a member of the Union. If such employee
objects to joining the Union his objection shall be taken up in the same manner as other
disputes, and such employee shall be given a reasonable time to make up his mind;
after which, if he does not agree to join the Union, the Company shall advise him to
seek employment elsewhere. All employees who are now, or who shall hereafter become
members of the Union, shall maintain continuous membership in the Union."
No. 12, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between Famous Players (Canadian) Corporation, Limited, Employer,
and its Projectionist Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
His Honour Judge A. M. Harper, chairman; Mr. J. K. Macrae, K.C., employer's arbitrator;   and Mr. E. A. Jamieson, employees' arbitrator.
The subject-matter of the dispute was a Union agreement submitted by the projectionists to the employer, covering wages and working conditions.
The proposed rates of pay were not acceptable to the employer, and an alternative
offer was made to pay the wages set forth in the contract between the parties, which
expired August 31st, 1941, and additionally, to pay a cost-of-living bonus based upon
the figures of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
This offer was rejected.
On October 15th, 1941, following consideration of evidence and representations
made by the parties to the' dispute, the Board unanimously recommended:— REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 97
1. That there should be granted the employees in the Greater Vancouver and New
Westminster district for the period from September 1st, 1941, to August 31st, 1943, an
increase of 10 per cent, on all rates of wages, including overtime.
2. That in the case of theatres outside Greater Vancouver and New Westminster
district, and in the case of all theatres situated outside these districts, the rate of pay
should be increased $5 weekly for each projectionist.
No. 13, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between Odeon Theatres of Canada, Limited, Employer, and its
Projectionist Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
His Honour Judge A. M. Harper, chairman; Mr. J. K. Macrae, K.C., employer's arbitrator;  and Mr. E. A. Jamieson, employees' arbitrator.
The subject-matter of the dispute was a Union agreement submitted by the projectionists to the employer, covering wages and working conditions.
The proposed rates of pay were not acceptable to the employer, and an alternative
offer was made to pay the wages set forth in the contracts between the employees and
the previous owners of the various theatres involved, which expired August 31st, 1941.
Additionally, the employer offered to pay a cost-of-living bonus based upon the figures
of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
This offer was rejected.
As the same Board was constituted to hear the arbitration between the Famous
Players (Canadian) Corporation, Limited, and its projectionist employees, it was
agreed by disputants that the evidence taken in the Famous Players' arbitration was
applicable to this arbitration. In addition, other evidence was given by the Odeon
Theatres of Canada, Limited.
On October 15th, 1941, following consideration of the representations and evidence
submitted, the Board unanimously recommended " that in view of the special circumstances affecting the Odeon Theatres, the rate of wages between the parties hereto as
recommended herein should apply for a period of one year, when the parties, by agreement, should adjust the scale of wages by mutual agreement, or, failing this, by
arbitration."
Increases in wages as recommended by the Board fell into four categories,
namely:—
1. In the case of the Vogue and Beacon Theatres, an increase in the rate of pay
of 10 per cent., including overtime, was recommended.
2. In the case of the Paradise and Plaza Theatres, an increase in the weekly wage
of each projectionist to $58.34 was recommended.
3. In the case of the Dunbar, Fraser, Kingsway, Lux, Olympia, Nova, Park, Rialto,
Rio, and Varsity Theatres, an increase in the weekly wage of $5 to each projectionist
was recommended.
4. In the case of the Fox and Metro Theatres, New Westminster, an increase in the
weekly wages of each projectionist to $48.60 was recommended.
Replying to a question regarding the payment of overtime, asked by counsel for
the employer, following submission of the award to disputants, the Chairman wrote:—
" As to the suburban theatres, the rate of pay was increased by $5 a week, which
automatically raised the hourly wage, and any overtime worked by the employees should
be based on the increased hourly rate."
No. 14, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between J. Boshard, C. Brawn, A. Bromley, P. McAfferay, F. Morley,
M. Brown, Challier Decorators, T. Clark, G. Dobson, Girvan Studios, J. Longmore,
C. Seamer, F. Thwaites, J. Webber (all of the City of Vancouver), and R. Cochrane
7 I 98 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
(of the City of New Westminster), Employers, and their Journeymen Painters,
Paper-hangers, and Decorators, Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Lieutenant-Colonel G. H. Dorrell, chairman; Mr. J. Carwardine, employers' arbitrator;
and Mr. C. W. Pritchard, employees' arbitrator.
The employees affected had requested that after May 8th, 1941, that the scale of
wages be 90 cents per hour.
The request was rejected.
In a unanimous award dated October 29th, 1941, the Board recommended:—
1. That the union basic rate of pay be increased to 90 cents per hour.
2. That no additions be allowed for the cost-of-living bonus.
3. That the increase of wages should not apply to war and other uncompleted-contracts made by the employers prior to August 7th, 1941. In respect of any of these
the rate of pay prevailing August 7th, 1941, shall continue until the contract is
completed.
No. 15, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Corporation of the City of Vancouver, Employer, and its
Civic Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. Justice Sidney Smith, chairman; Mr. T. E. Wilson, employer's arbitrator; and
Mr. J. Price, employees' arbitrator.
The civic employees had submitted to their employer, through their duly elected
representatives, a proposal that the scale of wages and salaries set out4n the Britain-
Bengough-Winters report of 1929, plus a cost-of-living bonus in accordance with the
formula set out in Order in Council P.C. 7440, be paid the employees involved.
The proposal was refused.
In a unanimous award dated October 10th, 1941, the Board made the following
recommendations:—
1. That the basic salaries of civic employees should be those adopted by resolution
of the City Council, August 19th, 1930, and paid in accordance therewith.
2. That for the remainder of 1941 the City should pay a bonus of $5 per month
to all outside workers, and restore the final 2y2-per-cent. salary cut on November 1st,
instead of December 1st, as contemplated.
3. That from January 1st, 1942, a cost-of-living bonus be paid in conformity with
the formula set out in P.C. 7440, subject to the following reservations:—
(a.) The cost-of-living bonus shall be paid only to employees receiving less
than $2,100 per year, so that an employee receiving less than $2,100 per
year (and whose salary plus bonus would exceed $2,100 per year) shall
be entitled to such part of the bonus as will, together with his salary,
amount to $2,100 per year.
Should the Dominion cost-of-living index reach 120 or over, then
the income level would be varied as follows:—
Index 120     Income level, $2,400
Index 125     Income level,   2,700
Index 130     Income level,   3,000
and so on, as the said Index may increase or decrease from time to time.
(b.)  The bonus shall be paid only to heads of households, which includes
married employees supporting a wife or husband, with or without dependents.   It also includes a widow or widower with one or more dependents,
(c.)   Employees not " heads of households " shall receive one-half the afore-
I mentioned bonus.
(d.) Casual labourers shall receive for each 1-per-cent. rise in the cost of
living a bonus of 25 cents per week, regardless of whether a full or only
a partial week is worked. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 99
No. 16, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Corporation of the District of Saanich, Employer, and
certain of its Municipal Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. J. Howard Harman, chairman; Mr. H. W. Davey, employer's arbitrator; and
Mr. E. F. Fox, employees' arbitrator.
The only question referred to the Board was whether or not the wages or salaries
paid certain specifically named employees, or certain specifically described groups of
employees, were proper, having regard to the surrounding facts and circumstances in
each case.
After hearing representations and the consideration of evidence, the Board presented a unanimous award, dated November 20th, 1941. In its award the Board
declared:—
" In all instances where no increase in actual remuneration was granted, the basic
rate of pay was increased to include the cost of living bonus at present in effect. . . .
" The Employer stressed the fact that the Municipality of Saanich was at present
required to make substantial outlays on account of the rapid growth of the urban area.
That the volume and nature of these services must inevitably increase in the future
and that these additional expenditures would of necessity add to the Municipality's
financial difficulties. It was further urged that these additional expenditures would
necessitate an increase in the rate of municipal taxation. That the rate of taxation
was at present the eighth or ninth highest amongst the twenty-eight municipalities of
the Province of British Columbia.
" The Board does not feel that the evidence led on behalf of the Employer indicated
any definite inability to pay or that the wage increases awarded are likely to impose
any unfair burden on the municipal taxpayers."
The Board recommended the following wages be paid:—
Works Department—
Ward foremen   $122.50 per month.
Permanent labourers         4.50 per day.*
Truck-drivers  ,     108.00 per month.
Power-shovel operator  '.     135.00 per month.
Grader operator      110.00 per month.
Blacksmith      122.50 per month.
Storekeepers      105.00 per month.
Yard superintendent      150.00 per month.
Waterworks Department—
General foreman      145.00 per month.
Fitters and meter repair men     115.00 per month.
Meter reader in charge      127.50 per month.
Readers and collectors—
Head collector     105.00 per month.
Collector No. 1 1     100.00 per month.
Collector No. 2       75.00 per month.
Fire Department—
Deputy Chief     130.00 per month.
Firemen      No change.
Office-
Pay-roll clerk     120.00 per month.
Tax department head clerk       95.00 per month.
Tax clerk and book-keeper      90.00 per month.
Cashier and book-keeper       85.00 per month.
Tax clerk and book-keeper       80.00 per month.
* The Board suggested " that these men be put on a monthly basis so that they will have a greater degree of
security of tenure and income than is at present the case." I 100 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Office—Continued.
Billing-machine operator   $85.00 per month.
Switchboard operator and clerk  75.00 per month.
Stenographer   75.00 per month.
Stenographer  »..—_ 70.00 per month.
Janitor   97.50 per month.
Accountant  1  115.00 per month.
Relief officer  112.50 per month.
Assistant relief officer  85.00 per month.
Building inspector and valuator  127.00 per month.
Certain of the municipal employees were not dealt with in the course of the award,
since it was made clear that they were not involved. The Board suggested that it
would be advantageous, if in future cases of a like nature when a dispute arose, that
salaries of all the employees in the departments involved be placed before the Board
for consideration.
No. 17, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between Contractors' Supply Sash and Door Co., Ltd., Vancouver,
Employer, and its Sash and Door Factory Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Professor G. F. Drummond, chairman; Mr. Elmore Meredith, employer's arbitrator;
and Mr. John Stanton, employees' arbitrator.
The employees involved in the dispute submitted to the Contractors' Supply Sash
and Door Co., Ltd., a proposed Union agreement covering Union recognition; a provision for the settlement of disputes; a provision for the institution of a safety committee selected by the Union;   an increase in wages;   and a forty-four-hour week.
The employer and the employees had failed to agree upon the terms of the
agreement.
Following the hearing of evidence a majority award was made, December 18th,
1941; Mr. Meredith dissenting. He agreed with his colleagues, excepting that he held
" no sufficient case had been made out" for the recognition of the Union as a bargaining agency, and he did not agree " that overtime rates should be paid for any work
done not in excess of forty-eight hours per week." (Evidence showed that the Company operated on a forty-four-hour week.)
The Board in its award recommended:—
1. That the proposed Union agreement be signed by the Company and the Union.
2. That the Company recognize the Union as sole collective bargaining agent for
the employees of the Company.
3. That the suggested provision for the arbitration of disputes contained in the
proposed agreement be omitted.
4. That the suggested provision for the institution of a safety committee in the
proposed agreement be amended to make allowance for the setting-up of a safety committee of five members, four to be selected by the employees and one by the Company.
(The duties of this Committee were defined.)
5. That the hours of work should be eight in the day, five days a week, and four
hours on Saturday, and that hours worked in excess of forty-four per week should be
paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
6. That any provision for an increased wage-scale be omitted, since the Board did
not consider itself competent to make an adjudication upon such an increase, under
existing Federal regulations.
7. That the provision by which no strikes or lockouts would obtain until all peaceful methods of settlement were exhausted, and the provision that the agreement should
remain in full force and effect until fifteen days' notice of change be given remain as
stated. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 101
No. 18, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Corporation of the City and District of North Vancouver,
Employer, and certain of its Municipal Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. Justice Sidney Smith, chairman; Mr. J. Loutet, employer's arbitrator; and Mr. J.
Price, employees' arbitrator.
Certain municipal employees of the City and District of North Vancouver had
presented to their employer, through their duly elected representatives, a request for
wage increases and changes in working conditions. The Corporation and the employees
failed to agree upon the terms of the request.
Following the hearing of evidence and representations of disputant parties the
Board reached unanimity, and in an award, dated January 16th, 1942, recommended
that the basic salaries be taken as those paid at that time by the City, and District, and
that:—
1. An extra $15 monthly be paid the Chief of the Fire Department and to the City
Treasurer.
2. An extra $10 monthly be paid the City tax clerk and cashier, the City water
clerk and cashier, the City cemetery caretaker, and the City ferries book-keeper.
3. An extra $5 monthly be paid the District tax clerk and cashier, the District
assessor, the District treasurer, all janitors and maintenance men in the District
schools, all captains, firemen, and the mechanic of the City Fire Department, and the
stewardess on the City ferries.
4. An extra $2.50 monthly be paid to the reserve men on the City ferries and the
ticket collector on the City ferries.
(Increases were to date from January 1st, 1942.)
5. That from January 1st, 1942, a cost-of-living bonus be paid in conformity with
the formula set out in P.C. 8253, subject to the following reservations:—
(a.) The cost-of-living bonus shall be paid only to employees receiving less
than $2,100 per year, so that, however, an employee receiving less than
$2,100 per year (and whose salary plus bonus would exceed $2,100 per
year) shall be entitled to such part of the bonus as will, together with
his salary, amount to $2,100 per year.
Should the cost-of-living bonus reach 120 or over, then the income
level would be varied as follows:—
Index 120        Income level $2,400
Index 125        Income level   2,700
Index 130        Income level   3,000
and so on as the said Index may increase or decrease from time to time.
(b.)   The bonus shall be paid only to heads of households, which includes married employees supporting a wife or a husband, with or without dependents.   It also includes a widow or widower with one or more dependents.
(c.)   Employees not "heads of households" shall receive one-half the aforementioned bonus.
(d.)  Employees receiving board and lodging, or either, shall receive a part
only of the cost-of-living bonus, the amount to be determined in each
case by the Commissioner (of the City and District of North Vancouver).
No. 19, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between the Sun Publishing Co., Ltd., Employer, and certain of its
Editorial, Display Advertising, Classified Advertising, Circulation, Promotion, Job
Printing, Maintenance, Business Office, and Departmental Messenger Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. G. R. McQueen, chairman;  Mr. John Russell, employer's arbitrator;   and Mr. H. E.
Winch, M.L.A., employees' arbitrator. I 102 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Certain of the editorial, display advertising, classified advertising, promotion, job
printing, maintenance, business office, and departmental messenger employees of the
Sun Publishing Co., Ltd., of Vancouver, through their elected representatives, submitted to their employer a proposed Guild or Union agreement, covering recognition
of the Guild as sole collective bargaining agency; wages, hours, and working conditions. Thereafter, the employees and the employer failed to agree on the terms of the
agreement.
Following the receiving of representations of disputants and the taking of evidence, the Board submitted a unanimous award, February 20th, 1942.
Throughout the whole of the proceedings the designated representatives of both
the employer and the employees showed a sincere desire to effect a satisfactory settlement. To that end they continued to negotiate between the sittings of the Board, and
as a result of these negotiations arrived at a full and complete settlement of the matters
of dispute. This settlement was put in the form of an agreement, and submitted to
the Board February 20th, 1942.
The Board therefore made as its award the terms of settlement incorporated in
the agreement.
The agreement became effective as from January 15th, 1942, for a term of one
year and thereafter, unless amended or cancelled as provided.
It was recognized by the parties to the reference and by the Board that where the
award involved any increase in wages such increases, before they could become effective, must be submitted to the Regional War Board for the Province of British
Columbia, and that they were subject to the approval of that Board.
The award made provision for increases in wages (subject to the approval of the
Regional War Board); recognition of the Vancouver Newspaper Guild, Local No. 1,
as the sole collective bargaining agency for the employees covered by the agreement;
the classification of employees; security of employment; hours and overtime; vacations and sick leave; adjustment of disputes; reinstatement of employees on leave of
absence for national service; and provision for cancellation or amendment of the
contract, if desired.
No. 20, 1941.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between New Method Laundries, Limited (Victoria, B.C.), Employer,
and certain of its Laundry and Dry-cleaning Employees.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Mr. J. Howard Harman, chairman; Mr. Elmore Meredith, employer's arbitrator; and
Mr. Archibald Clyde, employees' arbitrator.
Certain of the laundry and dry-cleaning employees of the New Method Laundries,
Limited, Victoria, B.C., had submitted, through their representatives, a proposed Union
agreement. The employer and the employees failed to agree upon the terms of the
agreement.
The Board, after hearing the representations of disputants and taking evidence,
reached unanimity, and submitted its award to the Hon. the Minister of Labour
January 24th, 1942.
It found that the main factors of dispute were the questions of Union recognition,
closed shop, and the " check-off." The dispute originally concerned only drivers employed by the Company, who were at that time members of the National Drivers
Union, Local No. 1. However, at the time the Board was appointed these questions
also involved certain employees of the dry-cleaning plant and the laundry plant, who
were members of the Laundry Workers' Union, Local No. 1, to whom the Union members had meanwhile transferred their membership.
It was ascertained by the Board that in December, 1941, the Union had eighty-
three members in good standing and twenty-four who were in arrears.'
Evidence did not make clear the proportion of employees who favoured the agreement tendered by the Union. At a meeting held to determine whether or not the
employees should press for the contract, eighty-four persons voted for the resolution REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 103
and forty-eight against. However, there were 163 persons (other than office employees)
entitled to vote on the question, and the view-point of the non-voting employees was not
known to the Board.
While evidence was taken on the question of wages and hours, it was not of a
nature that would be considered by the Regional* War Labour Board and, resultantly,
the Board of Arbitration did not make any recommendations regarding increased
remuneration.
The Board formulated an agreement for acceptance as an alternative to the agreement in dispute. Members of the Board were not unanimous as to the wisdom of
incorporating a clause in the agreement to the following effect:—
" All new employees shall be required to join the Union within two weeks of the
date on which they are first employed by the Company."
The Board therefore suggested that at the time on which the employees voted on
the acceptance or rejection of the award that they also vote on the acceptance or rejection of the clause quoted.    The Board made recommendations covering the voting.
The agreement suggested by the Board covered Union recognition; application of
the " check-off "; provisions relative to compulsory membership in the Union (not
applicable to apprentices until they had been in the employ of the Company for twelve
months, or to male employees under the age of 18 years) ; the constitution of a committee of employees; the settlement of disputes; seniority; and the continuation of
the present wage-scale.
(It was agreed that " at some future date " representations would be made to
the Regional War Labour Board " for the purpose of establishing a basic scale and
price.")
Miscellaneous provisions in the suggested contract covered one week's vacation
annually, with nay: questions of interpretation of the agreement; the term of the
agreement (to January 31st, 1943) ; and the method of cancellation of the agreement
should such a step be desired.
Pursuant to the recommendation made regarding the balloting upon the acceptance
or rejection of the award, and the clause of the award above quoted, a meeting of
employees was held February 2nd, 1942. The award was explained by Mr. J. Howard
Harman, chairman of the Board, and a vote was thereafter taken under the supervision
of an official of the Department of Labour.
The first ballot was taken on the question:—
" Are you in favour of accepting1 the award of the Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into the dispute between your employer
and yourselves? "
The number balloting totalled 129. Those marking their ballots " Yes " totalled
83;   those marking their ballots " No " totalled 42.    Thera were 4 spoiled ballots.
The employees thereupon balloted upon the question:—
" Shall the following clause be included in . . . the proposed
agreement between New Method Laundries, Ltd., and the Employees
of the Company:—
'"ALL NEW EMPLOYEES SHALL BE REQUIRED TO JOIN
THE UNION WITHIN TWO WEEKS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH
THEY ARE  FIRST EMPLOYED BY THE  COMPANY.'"
The number balloting totalled 113. Those marking their ballots "Yes" totalled
74;   those marking their ballots " No " totalled 39.    There were no spoiled ballots.
No. 1, 1942.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter
of a Dispute between The Corporation of the District of West Vancouver and
certain of its Bus Operators, Mechanics, and Helpers.
The Board of Arbitration designated to inquire into this dispute was composed of
Magistrate George R. McQueen, chairman; Mr. J. T. Watt, J.P., employer's arbitrator;
and Mr. Frederick E. Griffin, employees' arbitrator. I 104 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Certain of the bus operators, mechanics, and helpers employed by The Corporation of the District of West Vancouver submitted to their employer, through their duly
elected representatives, a proposed Union agreement, covering Union recognition,
working conditions, wages, and cost-of-living bonus.
The Board, after hearing the representations of disputants and taking evidence,
returned a majority award, the employer's arbitrator dissenting. The award and the
minority report were submitted to the Honourable the Minister of Labour, March
30th, 1942.
The Board in its award recommended a schedule of working conditions and wages,
to be effective for one year from December 12th, 1941. Union recognition was not
granted, but it was recommended that the Municipality should not discriminate against
any employee on account of his membership in the Union, and that no employee shall
discriminate against any employee because such employee is not a member of the said
Union. The award also covered seniority, the principle of "last on, first off; last
off, first on " if a reduction of staff occurred through slackness, and that a man should
not be considered a new man in restarting. Employees joining the armed forces were
given leave of absence and retain seniority.
Employees were to be allowed every sixth day off or, where they can only be allowed
one day off in seven, they were to be allowed the equivalent to one day off in six, or all
legal holidays.
It was recommended that time and one-half be paid for overtime in excess of eight
hours, and that eight hours' pay be given for work between seven and three-quarter
hours and eight hours. Overtime was awarded any operator recalled after completion
of his shift. In no case was a called operators' day to be less than four hours completed within twelve.
Employees covered by the award were to receive free transportation on all lines
operated by the Municipality; the employees and the Municipality were each to bear
one-half the cost of uniforms.
The Board recommended that the Municipality grant twelve days' holiday with
pay to employees after the first year of employment, at times convenient to the
Company.    Seniority would govern the choice of holidays.
The Board also recommended payment of bus operators at the rate of 75 cents per
hour; foreman mechanic at the rate of 82 cents per hour; general mechanics at the
rate of 75 cents per hour; day-shift helpers at the rate of 60 cents per hour; and
night-shift helpers at the rate of 65 cents per hour.
The award of the Board also covered split shifts, posting of changes in shifts,
calculation of holiday pay, the provision of additional work to part-time employees, and
leave of absence to officers of the Union on official business.
Mr. Watt concurred in the award, with the exception of that part relating to the
hourly wage-scale. In his minority report he expressed the opinion " that from the
evidence submitted the salary and wages being paid were adequate for the duties
performed."
The award was thereafter accepted by the employees, but the Municipality informed
the Department that the Municipality had been requested by the Transit Controller
to come to some arrangement with a competing bus line in order to avoid duplication
of services and to conserve oil, gasoline, and rubber. Under the circumstances, until
the question is settled, the Municipality has declined to accept or reject the award of
the Board.
IV. EMPLOYERS' AND EMPLOYEES' ORGANIZATIONS.
Section 9, " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," requires every organization of employers and employees to file certain returns, namely:—
(1.)   A certified copy of its constitution, rules, and by-laws, containing a full
statement of its objects and purposes:
(2.)  Certified copies of any amendments to its constitution, rules, and by-laws
when made: REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 105
(3.) An annual list of the names and addresses of its president, secretary,
and other officers as at the 30th day of December each year. The list
must be filed before the 31st day of January in each year.
T.o obtain this information the requisite forms are sent to the secretaries of all
organizations of record and to the officers of all organizing bodies having branches
within the Province. To ascertain the membership of employees' organizations within
British Columbia, a return is requested pursuant to section 5 (a) of the " Department
of Labour Act."
Official acknowledgment is made of complete returns received in pursuance of
section 9, " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act." Such returns are not registrations, and an acknowledgment of required information by the Department does not
constitute endorsement, either express or implied, of any document supplied.
Annual returns received since this information was requested in 1938 have shown
a consistent growth in membership. The decrease in the number of employees' organizations making returns for 1941 is due to the fact that one trade union, by reorganization, dissolved some thirty branches and is handling the membership through its
Vancouver office.
Details of the number of organizations making returns since 1937 follow:—
Number of Employees' Organizations making Returns and Membership
thereof, 1937-41.
Year.
No. of
Organizations.
Total
Membership.
1937   	
336
352
380
404
402
1938 '  	
42,063
1939         __._._   ■ 	
44,867
1940 .....    	
50,360
1941       	
61,292
The printed list is arranged by cities and towns in alphabetical order. In cases
where information could be obtained the names and addresses of presidents and secretaries were revised to the date of publication.
The post-office addresses of the officers are the same as the heading under which
they appear, unless otherwise stated.
The list of employers' organizations follows immediately after that of the employees.
Returns in this category numbered twenty-two in 1937, twenty-three in 1938, twenty-
five in 1939 and 1940, and twenty-seven in 1941.
B. H. E. GOULT,
Secretary-Registrar. I 106
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYEES.
Abbotsford.
Brick and Clay Workers' Federal Union, No. 136.
—President, S. Young; Secretary, J. D. Young,
Abbotsford.
Albrbda.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 15.—President, E. G. McLeod; Secretary,
R. H. Marshall, Valemount.
Alert Bay.
Fishermen's Association, Pacific Coast Native.—
President, Dan Cranmer; Secretary, Geo. M.
Luther, Alert Bay.
Bella Bella.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 14.—President,
Albert Humchit; Secretary, R. Carpenter, Bella
Bella.
Bella Coola.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 15.—President,
Sam King; Secretary, Andrew Schooner, Bella
Coola.
Blubber Bay.
Pacific Lime Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—
President, C. Simpson; Secretary, E. Neil,
Blubber Bay.
Bralorne.
Miners' Union, No. 271. — President, Robert
D'Etcheverrey; Secretary, T. R. Taylor, Bralorne.
Burnaby.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 23.—President, R. E. O'Brien; Secretary, J. F. Grover,
3812 Myrtle Avenue, New Westminster.
Fire-fighters' Association, No. 323. — President,
Cecil A. McDonald; Secretary, Lewis C. Auvache,
1995 Inverness Street, Burnaby.
Janitors' Association, Burnaby School, No. 1.—
President, W. Gilbert; Secretary, J. Morrison,
1210 Nelson Avenue, New Westminster.
Textile Workers' Federal Union, No. 12.—President, Mrs. A. Moores; Secretary, Miss J.
Armstrong, 2881 King Edward Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Chapman Camp.
Workmen's Co-operative Committee, Sullivan Concentrator.—President, Thomas Wilson; Secretary, D. M. Bentley, Kimberley.
Chemainus.
Longshoremen's Association, Chemainus and District.—President, Fred Lewis; Secretary, Ray W.
Andrews, Chemainus.
Cranbrook.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 563.—
President, F. R. McDaniel; Secretary, J. E.
Pierce, 325 Lumsden Avenue, Cranbrook.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 559.—President, R. Bartholomew;
Secretary, M. H. Johns, Box 214, Cranbrook.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 588.
—President, Wm. Henderson; Secretary, R. J.
Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 229.—President, S. B. Harrison; Secretary,
0. A. Eliason, Box 583, Cranbrook.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 585.—
President, T. A. Archbold; Secretary, H. B.
Haslam, Box 784, Cranbrook.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
173.—President, C. Romano; Secretary, Jas. F.
Lunn, Cranbrook.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 407.—President, K. H. Branch; Secretary, H. J. Huxtable,
Box 262, Cranbrook.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian, No. 143.—President, G. E. Thrift;
Secretary, D. H. Daniel, Blue River.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, No. 1292.—President, M. R. Belanger; Secretary, E. G. Dingley,
Box 728, Cranbrook.
Cumberland.
Firebosses'  Union, Vancouver  Island.—President,
Edward Surtees;   Secretary, John H. Vaughan,
Box 181, Cumberland.
Mine   Workers   of  America,   United,   No.   7293.—
President, J. H. Cameron;   Secretary, John Bond,
Box 614, Cumberland.
Endako.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1870.—President, C. Adcock; Secretary, J.
Wall, Vanderhoof.
Fernie.
Brewery Workers, International Union of United,
No.  308.—President,  J.  H.   Brown;    Secretary,
F. E. Alexander, Box 1071, Fernie.
Mine   Workers   of   America,   United,   No.   7310.—
President, J.  Manning;    Secretary, W.  Martin,
Fernie.
Field.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1454.—President, P. Decicco; Secretary, W.
Murdock, Box 117, Field.
Fort Rupert.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 18—President,
Alfred Scow; Secretary, David M. Hunt, Fort
Rupert.
Glen Vowell and Kitwancool.
Native Brotherhood of B.C. — Grand Secretary,
Port Simpson.
Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 165.—President, John Thorson; Secretary,
Harry Prestwich, Box 153, Golden.
Greenville.
Native Brotherhood of B.C. — President, Fred
McKay;   Secretary, Henry McKay, Greenville.
Hartley Bay.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 3.—President,
Louis Clifton; Secretary, John Eaton, Hartley
Bay.
Hazelton.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 10.—President
and Secretary, Charles Clifford, Sr., Hazelton. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 107
Hutton Mills.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 202.—President, A. E. Carlson; Secretary,
C. H. Weaver, Hutton Mills.
Jessica.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1023.—President, A. J. Cappos; Secretary,
C. F. Brown, Spences Bridge.
Kaleden.
Packing-house Employees' Association.—President,
Wm. Gordon MacKenzie; Secretary, Harley G.
Palmer, Kaleden.
Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 821.—
President, W. R. Snowden; Secretary, W. A.
Harris, 727 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 855.—
President, F. C. Bloom; Secretary, Wm. Geo.
Reive, Suite 2, 239 Victoria Street, Kamloops.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association, No. 11.
—President, D. C. Miller; Secretary, L. P.
Dorion, 125 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 258.—President, F. W. Lonneke;
Secretary, G. Pabe, 831 Pine Street, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 930. — President, 0. B. Hoover;
Secretary, J. B. Gibson, R.R. 1, Kamloops.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 80.
—President, Fred Frett; Secretary, H. L.
Michell, 215 Lome Street, Kamloops.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 748.
—President, K. S. Lucas; Secretary, S. H. Hos-
ken, 788 Nicola Street, Kamloops.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
No. 148.—President, Charles Cook; Secretary,
Robert Lapsley, 907 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 611.—President, E. R. Chapman; Secretary, H. P. Battison,
36 Nicola Street West, Kamloops.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 150.—President,
R. Eden; Secretary, S. J. Dempsey, 921 St. Paul
Street, Kamloops.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 30.—
President, W. Whiteman; Secretary, J. Gallagher, 503 Victoria Street, Kamloops.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 45.—
President, W. Whiteman; Secretary, J. Gallagher, 503 Victoria Street, Kamloops.
Kaslo.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 173.—President, Joe Chmelar; Secretary,
T. H. Horner, Kaslo.
Keremeos.
Packing-house Employees' Association.—President,
T. 0. Pettypiece; Secretary, W. Robert Carleton, Keremeos.
Kimberley.
Mine Workmen's Co-operative Committee, Sullivan.—President, Henry Nicholson; Secretary,
George Ure, General Delivery, Kimberley.
Kispiox.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 11.—President,
Robert Wilson;  Secretary, Wm. Jeffrey, Kispiox.
Kitimat.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 12.—President,
Richard Morrison; Secretary, Joseph Gray,
Kitimat.
Kitkatlah.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 5.—President,
Henry Brown; Secretary, Edward Innes, Kitkatlah.
Kitlope.
Native Brotherhood of B.C.—President and Secretary, Johnny Paul, Kitlope.
Kitsalas.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 7.—President and
Secretary, Ben Seymour, Kitsalas..
Kitwanga.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 8.—President,
Robert Harris; Secretary, Harold Sinclair, Kitwanga.
Klemtu.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 13.—President,
Joseph Robinson; Secretary, Thomas Brown,
Klemtu.
Ladner.
Fishermen's Protective Association, B.C., No. 3.—
President, A. P. Cosulick; Secretary, M. Vidu-
lich, Jr., R.R. 1, Ladner.
Ladysmith.
Woodworkers of America, International, Sub-local
No. 1-80.—President, John A. Atkinson; Secretary, John E. Ulinder, Box 310, Ladysmith.
Lake Cowichan.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 2824.—President, T. A. Giles; Secretary,
Geo. Robins, Box 139, Lake Cowichan.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 80.—
President, Owen B. Brown; Secretary, A. B.
Greenwell, Box 51, Lake Cowichan.
Marguerite.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 221.—President, J. A. Miller; Secretary, H.
Robinson, Marguerite.
Masset.
Native   Brotherhood   of   B.C.,   No.   4.—President,
Wm.   Matthews;     Secretary,   Chris.   Matthews,
Masset.
Metlakatla.
Native Brotherhood of B.C. — Grand Secretary,
Port Simpson.
McBride.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, No.
247.—President, R. T. Clay; Secretary, G. T.
Holdway, P.O. Box 26, McBride.
McGillivray Falls.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 215.—President, Geo. Tinker; Secretary,
T. W. Broadhead, McGillivray Falls. I 108
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Nanaimo.
Bakery Salesmen, Sub-local of Local No. 189.—
President, B. Janes; Secretary, Birt Showier,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers, Island, No. 1.—President,
Alex. Bryce; Secretary, E. W. Muir, 621 Nicol
Street, Nanaimo.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 527.—President, John Moffat; Secretary,
Fred W. Piper, 646 Machleary Street, Nanaimo.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, Lamont Ross; Secretary, H. W. Spencer,
433 Fourth Street, Nanaimo.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Co.—President, John Redford; Secretary,
Albert R. Rowbottom, 565 Stewart Avenue,
Nanaimo.
Firebosses' Union, Nanaimo Branch, Vancouver
Island.—President, Charles Webber; Secretary,
Fred Bell, 138 Strickland Street, Nanaimo.
Fire-fighters' Association, B.C. Provincial, No. 7.
—President, Fred Laithwaite; Secretary, Albert
Dunn, 131 Harvey Street, Nanaimo.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7355.—
President, Dan Radford; Secretary, Percy Law-
son, 234 Nicol Street, Nanaimo.
Typographical Union, No. 337.—President, John B.
Paul; Secretary, Lewis C. Gilbert, 491 Fifth
Street, Nanaimo.
Utilities Limited Employees' Association, Nanaimo-
Duncan.—President, Charles Lafec; Secretary,
Richard E. Reay, Box 181, Duncan.
Naramata.
Packing-house Employees' Association, No. 1.—
President, Eldon Baker; Secretary, J. E. T.
Warrington, Naramata.
Natal.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7292.—
President, Tony Podrasky; Secretary, Sim
Weaver, Natal.
Nelson.
Barbers' International Union of America, Journeymen, No. 196.—President, A. J. Hamson;
Secretary, Frank Defoe, Ward Street, Nelson.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, F. C. Collins; Secretary, A. A. Daynard,
704 Railway Street, Nelson.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Co.—President, R. B. Smith; Secretary,
A. Hardy, 308 Carbonate Street, Nelson.
Engineers, Locomotive Brotherhood of, No. 579.—
President, L. W. Humphrey; Secretary, Gordon
Swan, 1115 Ward Street, Nelson.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 18.—
President, R. Todd; Secretary, A. D. Bruce, 619
Silica Street, Nelson.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 631. —President, F. H. Abbott;
Secretary, G. F. Murray, 1104 McQuarrie Avenue, Nelson.
Letter Carriers, Federal Association, No. 75.—
President, F. N. Thompson; Secretary, G. C.
Massey, 306 Third Street, Nelson.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 663.
—President. S. J. Newell; Secretary, J. E. Bal-
dock, 917 Fifth Street, Nelson.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No. 181.—President, M. Horlick;    Secretary, P.
Munch, Box 22, Procter.
Railroad   Trainmen,   Brotherhood   of,   No.   558.—
President,   J.   S.   Edwards;     Secretary,   C.   H.
Sewell, 41 High Street, Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
98.—President, A.  H.  Smith;    Secretary,  G.  B.
Abbott, 2013 Stanley Street, Nelson.
Railway  Conductors,  Brotherhood  of,  No.  460.—
President, W. E. Marquis;   Secretary, A. Kirby,
820 Carbonate Street, Nelson.
Railway  and  Steamship   Clerks,   Brotherhood  of,
No.  1291.—President,  J.  S.  Brake;    Secretary,
E. F. Phillips, 121 Baker Street, Nelson.
Typographical  Union,  No.  340.—President,  J.  E.
Reid;   Secretary, C. A. French, 615 Mill Street,
Nelson.
New Westminster.
Bakery Salesmen, Sub-local of Local No. 189.—
President, B. Janes; Secretary, Birt Showier,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Boilermakers and Iron-ship Builders, International Brotherhood of, No. 194.—President, F. W.
Blatchford; Secretary, C. A. Bailey, 634 Thirteenth Avenue, New Westminster.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, No. 3.
—President, D. G. Johnson; Secretary, J.
Greenall, 124 Regina Street, New Westminster.
Butcher Workers' and Meat Cutters' Federal
Union, No. 94.—President, A. McWhinnie;
Secretary, S. S. Hughes, 1917 Eighth Avenue,
New Westminster.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 1251.—President, Robert Grevis; Secretary,
E. J. Barritt, 3342 Neville Street, New Westminster.
Civic Employees' Association. — President, J.
Woods; Secretary, E. G. Hudson, Labour Temple,
New Westminster.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, R. V. Cheale; Secretary, Fred McGrath,
316 Strand Avenue, New Westminster.
Cordage Employees' Association. — President,
Wm. M. Jackson; Secretary, Fred J. Hards,
R.R. 2, Langley Prairie.
Fire-fighters' Union, International Association,
No. 256.—President, Basil Nixon; Secretary,
E. L. Vernon Insley, 1209 Hamilton Street, New
Westminster.
Glove Workers' Union, No. 104.—President, H.
Hedrickson; Secretary, G. Derrick, 3905 Manor
Street, New Westminster.
Hospitals Employees' Association, Provincial
Mental.—President, J. H. Wilson; Secretary,
J. George McChesney, Shaughnessy Street, Port
Coquitlam.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 151.
—President, J. Cunliffe; Secretary, T. Kenyon,
448 Fader Street, New Westminster.
Milling Employees' Benefit Association, Brack-
man-Ker. — President, C. Schreck; Secretary,
E. D. Eastabrook, R.R. 2, New Westminster.
Paper Workers' Association.—President, Herbert
Halverson; Secretary, Miss Blanche Day, 423
Eighth Street, New Westminster.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association,
No. 571.—President, J. Mitchell; Secretary,
Thos. H. Pulton, 725 Second Street, New Westminster. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 109
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
280.—President, F. Wood; Secretary, F. H.
Clark, 223 Burr Street, New Westminster.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 226.—President,
A. S. Greening; Secretary, H. C. Cressweller,
Avalon Apartments, Agnes Street and Fourth
Street, New Westminster.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees, Amalgamated Association, No. 134.—
President, James G. Paterson; Secretary,
Samuel I. Hearst, 57 Alexander Street, New
Westminster.
Typographical  Union,  No.  632.—President.  A.  R. .
MacDonald;    Secretary, R. A. Stoney, Box 754,
New Westminster.
Waterfront Workers' Association.—President, A.
Gore; Secretary, L. C. Bonwicke, 71 Tenth
Street, New Westminster.
Ocean Falls.
Parjermakers,  International   Brotherhood  of,  No.
360.—President, Arnold  Thompson;    Secretary,
Thomas W. Simington, Ocean Falls
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, No. 312.
—President,  S.  C.  Andrews;    Secretary, H. N.
MacLeod, Box 3, Ocean Falls.
Oliver.
Packing-house Employees' Association—President,
E. Swanson; Secretary, Mrs. Jessie Barton,
Oliver.
Penticton.
Co-operative Growers Employees' Association.—
President, F. L. Owen;   Secretary, J. W. Blogg,
f   438 Hansen Street, Penticton.
Electrical Employees' Association. Penticton Municipal.—President, J. B. Clarke; Secretary,
Arthur S. Tate, Box 473, Penticton.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive. No. 866.—
President, C. E. Hulett; Secretary, R. H. Esta-
brooks, Penticton.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 884.—President, C. P. Bird; Secretary, A. R. Fulkerson, Penticton.
Fire-fighters' B.C. Provincial Association, No. 10.
—President, H. M. Foreman; Secretary, W. T.
Mattock, 617 Winnipeg Street, Penticton.
Municipal Employees' Association, Penticton.—
President, G. A. Robinson; Secretary, R. C.
Gibbs, 210 Nanaimo Avenue, Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 914.—
President, W. J. Abbott; Secretary, A. J. Presley, Box 143, Penticton.
Railway Carmen of America, No. 1426 —President,
W. McQuistin; Secretary, T. Bradley, Penticton.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 179.—President, H. C. Kirkpatrick; Secretary, C. A. Yule,
Box 67, Penticton.
Street Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees', Amalgamated, No. 1252.—President,
A. J. Lochore; Secretary, G. L. Whalen, 833
Dynes Avenue, Penticton.
Typographical Union, No. 541, Vernon.—President, Jack Murray; Secretary, W. B. Hilliard,
Box 272, Penticton.
Port Alberni.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 513.—President, W. R. Bookhout; Secretary, H. J. Salmon, 617 Seventh Avenue North,
Port Alberni.
Hospital Employees' Union, West Coast, No. 91.—
President, G. L. Hamilton; Secretary, Martha
MacCallum, Box 810, Port Alberni.
Woodworkers.of America, International, No. 1-85.
—President, A. Dewhurst; Secretary, Eddy T.
Creelman, Box 746, Port Alberni.
Port Essington.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 6.—President,
Louis Starr; Secretary, Edward Bolton, Port
Essington.
Port Simpson.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., Headquarters.—President, Alfred Price; Secretary, Henry Wesley,
Port Simpson.
Powell River.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No. 8.
—President, Joseph McCrossan; Secretary,
Alexander McLaren, Westview.
Papermakers, International Brotherhood of, No.
142.—President, W. M. Hill; Secretary, H. B.
Moore, Box 55, Westview.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 76.—President,
James Cook; Secretary, H. L. Hansen, Box 507,
Powell River.
Prince George.
Firemen and Enginemen, Locomotive, Brotherhood
of, No. 827.—President, R. R. Anderson; Secretary, E. Kirkpatrick, Prince George.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 620.—President, D. Ross; Secretary, J. E. Paschal, Prince
George.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
No. 28.—President, H. A. MacLeod; Secretary,
H. Allen, Box 504, Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Boilermakers and Iron-ship Builders' Union, No. 4.
—President, M. W. McKenzie;   Secretary, Harry
Rickard, 738 Taylor Street, Prince Rupert.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, No. 1.
—President, John  Davidson;    Secretary, James
Andrews, Box 577, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters   and  Joiners,   United   Brotherhood   of,
No.   1735.—President,   S.   A.   Bird;    Secretary,
J. S. Black, Box 694, Prince Rupert.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 344.—President, J. T. Langridge;  Secretary,
T. G. Macauley, Box 663, Prince Rupert.
Engineers,   Steam   and   Operating,   International
Union,    No.    510.—President,   A.   W.    Burnip;
Secretary,   S.   S.   Peachey,   733   Tatlow   Street,
Prince Rupert.
Fire-fighters,   International   Association   of,   No.
559.—President, James Parks;    Secretary, J. C.
Ewart, Box 506, Prince Rupert.
Fishermen's-Federal Union,  Deep  Sea,  No. 80.—
President,   W.    H.    Brett;     Secretary,   George
Anderson, Box 249,- Prince Rupert.
Fish-packers,   Associated,   No.   1.—President,   A.
McDonald;   Secretary, Mike Munizaba, Box 853,
Prince Rupert. I 110
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Fish-packers'  Federal  Union,  No.  49.—President,
William Gordon;   Secretary, Thomas H. Elliott,
1541 Sixth Avenue East, Prince Rupert.
Longshoremen's   Association,   Canadian,   No.   2.—
President, Wm. Ferguson;   Secretary, Wm. Pil-
fold, Box 531, Prince Rupert.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 207.
—President,   J.   Dunn;    Secretary,   C.   Lowing,
Box 611, Prince Rupert.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
426.—President, J.  G.  Paul;    Secretary,  Frank
Derry, Box 496, Prince Rupert.
Railway   Employees,   Canadian   Brotherhood   of,
No. 154.—President, D. R. Creed, Box 676, Prince
Rupert.
Typographical Union, No. 413.—President, Jas. M.
Campbell;   Secretary, Roy O. Franks, Box 552,
Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7875.—
President, Wm. Forsyth; Secretary, John How-
arth, Jr., Princeton.
■Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 407.—President, David
Jones; Secretary, Jas. M. Goble, Box 283, Revelstoke.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 657.—
President, H. W. Keegan; Secretary, G. L.
Ingram, Box 485, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 341.—President, A. 0. Almen; Secretary, F. J. Westlake, Box 187, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Oilers, Brotherhood of, No. 381.—
President, Douglas Blackwell; Secretary, Samuel
Anderson, Box 7, Revelstoke.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 258.
—President, Jas. M. Donaldson; Secretary, R.
Robertson, Box 209, Revelstoke.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 208.—President, N. A. Johnson; Secretary,
R. H. Wyman, Box 521, Revelstoke.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 51.—
President, James McKenzie; Secretary, D. E.
Johnson, Box 728, Revelstoke.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
481.—President, A. N. Watt; Secretary, G. S.
Henderson, General Delivery, Revelstoke.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 487.—President, Stanley Porritt; Secretary, Thos. B. Philip,
407 Fourth Street, Revelstoke.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association, No. 72.—
President, Geo. Watson; Secretary, L. W. File,
Box 577, Revelstoke.
Rivers Inlet.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 16.—President,
Simon Walkus; Secretary, David Bernard,
Rivers Inlet.
Rounds.
Woodworkers of America, International, Sub-local
No. 1-80.—President, W. R. Sutherland; Secretary, A. Wayment, Rounds.
Shalalth.
Transportation and Associated Trades Union,
Bridge River. — President, George Thompson;
Secretary, Loyd Fraleigh,  Shalalth.
Skeena Crossing.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 9.—President,
Arthur McDames; Secretary, Moses Jones,
Skeena Crossing.
Smithers.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 111.—
President, F. V. Foster; Secretary, H. D. Johnson, Box 80, Smithers.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 869.—
President, J. M. Graham; Secretary, J. H. Rife,
Box 168, Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415. — President, J. Cathrae; Secretary, D.
MacLean, Smithers.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood, No.
93.—President, R. W. Champion; Secretary,
P. B. Emerson, Smithers.
Smith Inlet.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 17.—President,
George Walkus; Secretary, Geo. Walkus, Jr.,
Smith Inlet.
South Slocan.
Operators' Organization of the West Kootenay
Power and Light Company.—President, John E.
Batley; Secretary, John E. Parker, Bonnington
Falls.
Workmen's Co-operative of the West Kootenay
Power and Light Company, Limited.—President,
T. M. Roberts; Secretary, W. Wadeson, South
Slocan.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1419.—President, W. A. Mahood; Secretary,
A. H. Barnfield, Squamish.
Squirrel Cove.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 19.—President
and Secretary, Wm. Mitchell, Squirrel Cove.
Telkwa.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 340.—President, A. K. Hemstreet; Secretary, D. Small, Box 29, Telkwa.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 20.—President
and Secretary, Peter Pierre, Telkwa.
Trail.
Co-operative Committee, Workmen's, of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company.—
President, David Kenneway; Secretary, Millard B. MacLaren, c/o Consolidated Mining and
Smelting Company, Limited, Trail.
Fire-fighters' Union, No. 9.—President, George
Dingwall; Secretary, Frank W. Banton, 1390
Pine Avenue, Trail.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association, No. 76.—
President, Robert H. Hilder; Secretary, R. H.
Busch, 2183 Riverside Avenue, Trail.
Miners' Union, Trail and District, No. 480.—President, F. W. Henne; Secretary, H. H. Vander-
burg, Box 12, Trail.
Vanarsdol.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 335.—President, D. J. Gunn; Secretary, G.'
Somerville, Kitsalas via Copper River. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 111
Vancouver.
Aeronautical Mechanics, No. 756.—President, C.
Whent;   Secretary, T. Price, 529 Beatty Street.
Automotive Maintenance Workers, No. 1.—President, S. L. Rogers; Secretary, S. L. Rogers,
1782 First Avenue East.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers', International,
No. 468.—President, R. P. Davis; Secretary,
J. A. Humphreys, 614 Holden Building.
Bakery Salesmen, No. 189.—President, B. Janes;
Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street.
Barbers' Association of B.C.—President, Joseph
Jackson; Secretary, R. W. Morrow, 4, 441 Seymour Street.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, No.
120.—President, R. J. Guthrie; Secretary, C. E.
Herrett, 529 Beatty Street.
Bartenders' International League of America, No.
835.—President, George Edwards; Secretary,
T. A. Skinner, 203 Cunningham Street, New
Westminster.
Beverage Dispensers, No. 676.—President, W. G.
Couper; Secretary, J. F. Mohan, 307 Pender
Street West.
Blacksmiths' and Helpers' Union, No. 1.—President, Charles C. Rouse; Secretary, Clifford T.
Rouse, 703 Holden Building.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 151.—President, W. J.
Bartlett; Secretary, A. Buckingham, 1329 Stride
Avenue, New Westminster.
Boilermakers' and Iron-ship Builders' Union, No.
1.—President, A. Campbell; Secretary, Robert
Stephen, 16 Hastings Street East.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
105. — President, Francis Milne; Secretary,
Flora E. MacDonald, 535 Homer Street.
Brewery Workers, International Union of United,
No. 300.—President, W. Pallent; Secretary, Ed.
Sims, 5392 Clarendon Street.
Bricklayers and Masons, International Union, No.
1.—President, A. Fordyce; Secretary, L. Padgett, 2066 Eighth Avenue West.
Bridge, Structural, and Ornamental-iron Workers,
International Association, No. 97.—President,
James E. Fitzpatrick; Secretary, Robert McDonald, 531 Beatty Street.
B.C. Box Limited Employees' Association.—-President, Stanley Purves; Secretary, James E.
Armstrong, foot of Heather Street, Marpole.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, No. 1.
—President, Harold Temple; Secretary, M. J.
Teskey, Room 34, 163 Hastings Street West.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, Pattern-makers Unit.—President, O. Heys; Secretary, J. L. Irvine, 163 Hastings Street West.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, Shipyard Unit, No. 2.—President, Damon Eisenman;
Secretary, W. Bray, 163 Hastings Street West.
Camp and Mill Workers' Federal Labour Union,
No. 31.—President, Taneji Sada; Secretary,
Takaichi Umezuki, 544 Powell Street.
Cannery and Agricultural Workers' Union,
United, No. 1. — President, Herbert Hortin;
Secretary, Miss Ruth Turner, 517 Holden
Building.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of.
No. 452.—President, H. P. Hamilton; Secretary,
J. Stevenson, 529 Beatty Street.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 2235. — President, L. D.
Bell; Secretary, G. F. Moul, 2067 Third Avenue
West.
Cement Finishers, International, No. 602.—President, T. Chilton; Secretary, A. Wilson, 531
Beatty Street.
Cemco Employees' Association. — President, J.
Moore; Secretary, V. R. Sansome, 165 Fourth
Avenue West.
Checkers' and Weighers' Association, Marine.—
President, Wm. Stanton; Secretary, R. Meltam,
207 Hastings Street West.
City Hall Employees' Association, No. 59.—President, Wm. M. Black; Secretary, James Tarbuck,
195 Pender Street East.
Civic Employees' Association, North Vancouver.—
President, Wm. Thomson; Secretary, Trafford
H. Heape, 745 Thirteenth Street East, North
Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 28.—President, J. R.
McDonald; Secretary, W. J. Scribbins, 195
Pender Street East.
Civic Federation of Vancouver. — President, H.
Harris; Secretary, Robert Skinner, 95 Pender
Street East.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, H. A. Benbow; Secretary, Harold Baker,
3, 522 Pender Street West.
Divers' and Tenders' Union, Submarine.—President, H. Ryan; Secretary, Wm. Zess, 703 Holden
Building.
Dock and Shipyard Workers' Union, No. 2.—President, C. A. Saunders; Secretary, G. Lawrence,
67 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Co.—President, E. McDonald; Secretary,
R. H. Milner, 768 Seymour Street.
Electrical Workers, Amalgamated Building Workers, Unit No. 3. — President, S. C. Baxter;
Secretary, Robert Adair, 163 Hastings Street
West.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 213.—President, Wm. Fraser; Secretary,
J. N. Ross, 529 Beatty Street.
Elevator Constructors, International Union of,
No. 82.—President, H. C. MacKichan; Secretary,
R. Holmes, 529 Beatty Street.
Engineers, National Association of Marine, No. 7.
—President, J. A. Munro; Secretary, E. Read,
319 Pender Street West.
Engineers, National Union of Operating, No. 2.—
President, F. C. McDonald; Secretary, G. D.
Lamont, 223 Carrall Street.
Engineers, National Union of Operating, No. 3.—
President, Wm. Reid; Secretary, J. E. Brown,
705 Holden Building.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
115.—President, G. Parkinson; Secretary, A.
Scott, 529 Beatty Street.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
882.—President, J. Henderson; Secretary, C. E.
Graham, 310, 529 Beatty Street.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
963.—President, Wm. Partington; Secretary,
James McGrath, 5660 Yew Street.
Engineers, International Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 320. — President, Walter J. Hill;
Secretary, E. J. Wise, 104 Tenth Avenue West.
Engineers, International Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 907.—President, Vincent Wright;
Secretary, J. Meehan, 219 C.N.R. Depot.
. I 112
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 15.—
President, W. E. Ferrier; Secretary, Maurice
E. Davidson, 422 Sixteenth Avenue East.
Film Exchange Employees, No. B-71 —President,
Wm. Grant; Secretary, George Hislop, 2549
Charles Street.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No. 1.
—President. F. G Lucas; Secretary, P. F. En-
right. 1310 Sixty-fourth Avenue West.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No. 3.
—President, James Spencer; Secretary, Thomas
Gumming, Thirteenth Street and St. George,
North Vancouver.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No. 4.
—President, Geo. Horridge; Secretary, T. W.
Murphy, 2 Acadia Circle, University Hill, Vancouver.
Fire-fighters' Union, No. S-18.—President. Jos.
Lyon; Secretary, Chas. A. Watson, 1626 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Firemen and Enginemen, Locomotive, Brotherhood
of, No. 656.—President, T. McEwan; Secretary,
C. W. Pulham, 3174 Fifth Avenue West.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 289.—President, E. Daem; Secretary, W. R.
Chapman, 1165 Beach Avenue.
Fishermen's Federal Union, United, No. 44.—
President, Hulbert Stavenes; Secretary, W. T.
Burgess, 138 Cordova Street East.
Fish-cannery and Reduction Plant Workers' Union,
United, No. 89. — President, E. F. Maxwell;
■ Secretary, W. T. Burgess, 138 Cordova Street
East.
First-aid Attendants, B.C.—President, J. B. Liv-
sey; Secretary, H. W. Mahler, 303a Pender
Street West.
Garage and Motor Trades Association of B C.—
President, William Dudgeon; Secretary, Fred
Elliott, 342 Pender Street West.
Garment Workers, United, No. 190.—President,
M. P. Palmatary; Secretary, Walter W. Shaw,
3435  Sixth  Avenue West.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies,
No. 276.—President, Harold Appleton; Secretary, Roland Jackson, 119 Pender Street West.
General Duty Nurses' Association. — President,
Miss Rae K. Greer; Secretary, Miss Winnifred
W. Dunbar, 636 Tenth Avenue West.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America.—President, A. S. Simpson; Secretary,
Alex. Fordyce, 20 Twelfth Avenue West.
Hod Carriers' Section, Construction Workers' Industrial Union. — President, Myron Kuzych;
Secretary, Laurence Isener, 4810 Elgin Street.
Hod Carriers' Common and Building Labourers'
Union, International, No. 602.—President, J.
Cassidy; Secretary, W. James, 531 Beatty
Street.
Hospital Employees' Union, No. 4. — President,
Miss Josephine Thompson; Secretary, Miss
Isabel Inkson, 756 Thirteenth Avenue West.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, No. 28.
—President, Wm. J. Henning; Secretary, J. A.
Wilson, 413 Granville Street.
Inland Boatmen's Union of the Pacific, B.C. Division—President, James McCarthy; Secretary,
John M. Smith, 138 Cordova Street East.
Iron Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union,
International, No. 281.—President, John Minot;
Secretary, John Browne, 638 Broadway West.
Jersey Farms Employees' Staff Council.—President, Lionel G. Warwick; Secretary, Ernest R.
Wilson, 2256 Broadway West.
Jewelry Workers' Union, International, No. 42.—
President, Ed. Percy; Secretary, Karl Zuker,
517 Holden Building.
Kelly Douglas Company, Limited, Employees'
Association.—President, Geo. Murray; Secretary, B. M. Hart, 367 Water Street.
Lathers', International Union of Wood, Wire, and
Metal, No. 207.—President, Geo. Morris; Secretary, Malcolm G. Finlayson, 116 Hastings Street
West.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 12.
—President, David Samson; Secretary, John
Cass, 426 Seventeenth Avenue West.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, No. 44.
—President, Norman E. Wilby; Secretary,
Arthur Robold, 2974 Fifteenth Avenue West.
Longshoremen's Association, Burrard Coastwise.
—President, Thomas Laughton; Secretary,
James Darwood, 45 Dunlevy Avenue.
Longshoremen's Association, North Vancouver.—
President, D. Paull; Secretary, T. E. Moody,
Box 2353, North Vancouver.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 1-217.
—President, B. J. Melsness; Secretary, Wm. J.
Bennett, 504 Holden Building.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 1-71.—
President, John MacCuish; Secretary, E. Dals-
kog, 506 Holden Building.
Lumber Workers' Industrial Union, No. 120.—
Secretary, W. M. Ahern, Box 837, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 182.
—President, N. G. Salsbury; Secretary, Jas. H.
Wallace, 3271 Fifteenth Avenue West.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 692.
—President. R. G. Daniels; Secretary, Percy R.
Bengough, 529 Beatty Street.
Mailers' Union, No. 70. — President, Cecil G.
Stubbs; Secretary, Richard Gordon Taylor, 1176
Duchess Street, West Vancouver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 31.—President, R. Olson; Secretary, R.
McLure, 4269 Victoria Drive.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No.   167.'—President,   J.   Krimmer;     Secretary,
.   P. J. Doyle, 3630 Tenth Avenue West.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of.
No. 210—President, J. Fraser; Secretary, R.
Halliday, 3481 Georgia Street.
Metal Workers' Union, No. 1.—President, Harry
More; Secretary, Robert G. Patterson, 551
Sixth Avenue East.
Metal Workers' Union, No. 2.—President, Wm.
Russ; Secretary, E. May, 16 Hastings Street
East.
Metal Workers' Union. No. 3.—President, George
Sowden; Secretary, R. A. Friesen, 1615 Burnaby
Street.
Milk-wagon Drivers' and Dairy Employees' Union,
No. 464.—President, R. McCulloch; Secretary,
Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street.
Miners' Union, No. 289. — Secretary, George F.
Price, 517 Holden Building.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union, No. 1.—
President, J. G. Turner; Secretary, J. R. Maggs,
705, 16 Hastings Street East. '
Municipal Employees' Association, West Vancouver.—President. P. S. Hopkins; Secretary, T.J.
Elliott, 1125 Inglewood Avenue, West Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 113
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 145.—
President, Wm. Pilling; Secretary, Edward A.
Jamieson, 81, 553 Granville Street.
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Limited, Employees'
Association.—President, J. N. L. Betts; Secretary, A. S. Kellaway, 99 Cordova Street East.
National Biscuit and Confection Company, Limited, Employees' Association. — President. H.
Neville; Secretary, G. H. Archer, 1706 First
Avenue West.
Newspaper Guild, No. 1.—President, Jon Farrell;
Secretary, Miss Doris Milligan, 4, 1101 Nicola
Street.
Packing-house Workers of America, United, No.
162.—President, Dave Bryce; Secretary, Dick
Douglas, 702, 16 Hastings Street East.
Pacific Coast Packers, Limited, Employees' Association.—President, D. H. Gardner; Secretary,
Miss E. I. Christensen, 762 Fifty-seventh Avenue East.
Painters, Decorators, Paper-hangers of America,
Brotherhood of, No. 138. —President, G. H.
Randall; Secretary, J. Eaves, 529 Beatty Street.
Paper Box, Limited Employees' Association, National.—President, C. McMurchie; Secretary,
J. D. Sharp, 160 Third Avenue West.
Photo-engravers' Union, No. 54.—President, Wm.
Wilson; Secretary, Joseph A. Hinke, 3776 Thirty-
fifth Avenue West.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf, and Dock Builders,
No. 2404.—President, Willis Moore; Secretary,
J. McGuffie, 144 Hastings Street West.
Plasterers and Cement Finishers, International
Operative, No. 779.—President, G. Anderson;
Secretary, W. James, 531 Beatty Street.
Plasterers, Association of Operative, No. 89.—
President, W. Leonard; Secretary, R. Foster,
5347 Earles Street, Vancouver.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association of,
No. 170.—President, Val Pearson; Secretary,
Frank Carlisle, 531 Beatty Street.
Police Federal Association, No. 12. — President,
C. W. Macdonald; Secretary, K. W. MacLean,
236 Cordova Street East.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, No. 69.
—President, M. Erenberg; Secretary, Thos. S.
Ezart, 1807 Thirty-eighth Avenue East.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, No. 433.
—President, Herman T. Phillips; Secretary,
Francis McDermott, c/o Pacific Mills, Limited,
foot of Campbell Avenue.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144.—
President, W. Pennington; Secretary, R. J. H.
Blackwell, 557 Fifty-sixth Avenue East.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, No. 58.—President, Wm. Thomas Cox; Secretary, Samuel S.
Shearer, Canadian Pacific Railway Company,
Drake Street.
Railway Clerks, Brotherhood of, No. 526.—President, John Chipperfield; Secretary, John Brodie,
1434 Eighth Avenue East.
Railway Conductors, O^der of, No. 267.—President, E. Pugsley; Secretary, J. B. Physick, 1156
Thurlow Street.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 59.—President,
J. T. Skinner; Secretary, A. E. Langley, 3537
Third Avenue West.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian   Brotherhood  of,   No.  82.—President,
A. A. Egan;    Secretary, T, M.  Sullivan, 2715
Dundas Street.
8
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 207.—President,
Ivor Hill; Secretary, Alex. Duncan, 196 Twenty-
first Avenue East.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
No. 220.—President, Ralph Anderson; Secretary, Ross Heriot, 16 Hastings Street East.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 221.—President,
P. Jones; Secretary, T. W. R. Bell, 1461 Pender
Street West.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association. — President,
H. F. Hatte; Secretary, J. H. Menzies, 2990
Seventh Avenue West.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 46.—President, Harry V. Astley; Secretary,
Herbert E. Barnes, 5438 Larch Street.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 626.—President, Thomas Gray; Secretary,
M. McGilivray, 1052 Richards Street.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 630.—President, Arthur Gordon; Secretary,
W. J. Mason, 3116 Thirteenth Avenue West.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 74
(No. 52 Amalgamated). — Acting-Secretary,
H. S. Evans, 347 Forty-eighth Avenue East.
Retail Clerks' Union, No. 279.—President, Alex.
McDonald; Secretary, Don Maxwell, 404 Holden
Building.
Retail Employees' Association, No. 1.—President,
R. M. Stevenson; Secretary, Allan Spain, 3922
Georgia Street East.
Seafarers' Association, Canadian. — President,
H. H. Taylor; Secretary, R. Codd, 405 Powell
Street.
Seamen's Union, B.C.—President, Hugh Murphy;
Secretary, Richard Whearty, 340b Cambie
Street.
Sheet-metal Workers, International Association of,
No. 280.—President, Ronald Macaulay; Secretary, Dan Macpherson, 308, 529 Beatty Street.
Sheet-metal Workers, International Association of,
No. 314.—President, H. H. Swinden; Secretary,
Geo. Watson, 1909 Nineteenth Avenue East.
Shipyards, Limited, Employees' Association.—
President, Wm. Osborne; Secretary, R. Bell,
660 Gilford Street.
Sign and Pictorial Painters' Union, No. 726.—
President, A. Lacey; Secretary, Wm. O. Clark-
son, 529 Beatty Street.
Slade & Company Limited, and Associated Companies Employees' Association, A. P.—President,
Wm. A. Spain; Secretary, G. R. Brewer, 157
Water Street.
Spear and Jackson Employees' Club.—President,
M. Wilson; Secretary, D. R. Alexander, 3519
Twenty-sixth Avenue West.
Stenographers, Typists, Book-keepers, and Office
Assistants, No. 18177.—President, Miss L. M.
Nicholles; Secretary, Miss B. Gouthro, 529
Beatty Street.
Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union, International, No. 88.—President, R. N. Myles; Secretary, W. L. McComb, 3158 Thirty-second Avenue
West.
Stone-cutters' Association, Journeymen. — President, Frank H. Lowe; Secretary, Frank Hall,
2931 Forty-second Avenue East.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees, Amalgamated Association, No. 101.—
President, Thomas Dunlop; Secretary, Roland
K. Gervin, 175 Broadway East. I 114
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Switchmen's Union, No. 111.—President, W. J.
Inglis; Secretary, A. S. Crosson, 3925 Fourteenth Avenue West.
Tailors', Journeymen, No. 178.—President, Stephen
G. Constantine; Secretary, Dorothy L. Roberts,
529 Beatty Street.
Taxi, Stage, and Bus Drivers' Union, No. 151.—
President, A. C. Shaw; Secretary, C. Mclvor,
529 Beatty Street.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—President, W. R. Mc-
Dougall; Secretary, Harry Charlesworth, 1300
Robson Street.
Teamsters', Chauffeurs', and Warehousemen's
Union, International, No. 3lA.—President, J. S.
Wood; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty
Street.
Telegraphers' Union of America, Commercial, No.
1.—President, W. D. Brine; Secretary, Geo. W.
Campbell, Box 432, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees, International Alliance, No. 118. — President, Gordon Martin;
Secretary, Walter Blake, Box 711, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees, No. 348.—President,
R. G. Pollock; Secretary, J. H. Leslie, Box 345,
Vancouver.
Tile, Marble, Terrazzo Helpers, International, No.
78—President, D. F. Snow; Secretary, S. J.
Cooke, 529 Beatty Street.
Tile Setters, No. 3.—President, R. Neville; Secretary, Wm. Richards, 5321 Spencer Street.
Truck Drivers and Helpers, General, No. 31.—President, F. Doig; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529
Beatty Street.
Typographical Union, No. 226.—President, W. H. P.
McClure; Secretary, R. H. Neelands, 529 Beatty
Street.
Upholsterers', International Union of North
America, No. 306.—President, Malcolm Grant;
Secretary, Richard Garside, 529  Beatty  Street.
Warehouse Employees' and Truck Drivers' Association, W. H. Malkin Co., Ltd.—President, W.
Ramsay; Secretary, F. H. Calhoun, 57 Water
Street.
Waterfront Workers' Association, No. 2140.—
President, Robert J. Upton; Secretary, A. G.
Smith, 45 Dunlevy Avenue.
Welders and Burners, Amalgamated Building
Workers of Canada, No. 4.—President, Lawrence Kain; Secretary, Max R. Sharpe, 163
Hastings Street West.
Woodworkers' Union, B.C., No. 1.—President, A.
Rithaler; Secretary, A. Bilesky, 384 Alexandra
Road, Eburne P.O.
Vernon.
Public Service Plant Employees' Organization,
Canadian.—President, A. B. Edwards; Secretary, J. B. Steward, Box 705, Vernon.
Victoria.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union,   No.   468.-—President,   George   Rennie;
Secretary, Arthur Jacobs, 1548 Lionel Street.
Barbers'   International  Union,  Journeymen,   No.
372.—President, George A. Turner;   Secretary,
Jas. A. Green, 1319 Douglas Street.
Boilermakers'  and  Iron-ship   Builders'  Union  of
Canada,   No.   2.—President,   R.   D.   Patterson;
Secretary, R. Smith, 1415 Broad Street.
Boilermakers and Iron-ship Builders and Helpers,
International Brotherhood of, No. 191.—President, L. Basso; Secretary, W. S. Duncan, 837
Old Esquimalt Road.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
147.—President, W. W. Laing; Secretary, J. A.
Wiley, Jones Building, 723 Fort Street.
Brewery Workers, No. 280.—President, Thomas E.
Rigby;   Secretary, W. Bryan, 2642 Scott Street.
Bricklayers' and Masons' International Union,
No. 2. — President, W. Mertton; Secretary,
James Brekerlay, 2682 Cadboro Bay Road.
Building Workers of Canada, Shipwrights, Boat-
builders, and Caulkers, No. 1.—President, James
F. Murray; Secretary, James J. Walker, 540
Niagara Street.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United
Brotherhood of, No. 1598. — President, L. W.
Noble; Secretary, Alex. Sims, 602 Broughton
Street.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 2415.—President, Sidney Berrow; Secretary, Ernest Honey, 2511 Empire Street.
City Hall Officials' Association.—President, W. H.
Warren; Secretary, Miss Yvonne Meikle, City
Hall.
Civic Employees' Federation of Greater Victoria.
—President, F. L. Shaw; Secretary, T. G.
Harris, City Hall.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, No. 50.—
President, J. W. Watson; Secretary, G. A.
Fletcher, 1035 Hillside Avenue.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, E. W. Jones; Secretary, G. K. Beeston,
406 Post Office Building.
Coach Lines Drivers' Association, Vancouver
Island. — President, Jack Grante; Secretary,
Jack Sykes, Broughton Street.
Cooperage Employees' Association, Sweeney.—
President, H. Nutting; Secretary, R. Creech,
Industrial Reserve.
Dockyard and Shipyard Workers Union, No. 1.—
President, S. Robertson; Secretary, E. E.Wood,
1116 Broad Street.
Drivers' Union, National, No. 1.—President, S.
Grimmond; Secretary, T. E. Moir, 131 South
Turner Street.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Company.-—President, John Egan; Secretary, Wilfred H. Sturrock, 3567 Savannah Avenue.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 230.—President, C. A. Peck; Secretary,
I. F. Smith, 542 Langford Street.
Engineers, National Association of Marine, No. 6.
—President, A. Alexander; Secretary, G. W.
Brown, 409 Union Building.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20.—
President, T. C. Johns; Secretary, F. E. Dutot,
2176 Pentland Road.
Fire-fighters' B.C. Provincial Association, No. 2.—
President, K. Mills; Secretary, J. Lusse, No. 1
Fire Hall.
Fire-fighters' B.C. Provincial Association, No. 5.—■
President, Gordon R. Lay; Secretary, Donald L.
Miller, 2424 Hamiota Street.
Fire-fighters' B.C. Provincial Association, No. 6.—
President, Harry Greenwood; Secretary, Thomas
W. Moss, 3680 Douglas Street.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 690. — President, E. W. Collins;
Secretary, G. H. Stewart, 2446 Bowker Avenue. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 115
Garage Association, Vancouver Island Coach
Lines.—President, Walter Bate; Secretary,
Walter McAdams, Courtney Street.
Government Employees, American Federation of,
No. 59. — President, Thomas F. Monoghan;
Secretary, E. E. David, Box 484, Victoria.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees, No. 459.—President, Mrs. Oliver Brown; Secretary, Frank
Dovey, Box 233, Victoria.
Iron-moulders and Foundry Workers, International, No. 144.—President, W. Gennoe; Secretary, Archie Clegg, 864 Old Esquimalt Road.
Lathers' Association, Vancouver Island.—President, E. C. Day; Secretary, A. J. Ferguson,
2751 Roseberry Avenue.
Lathers', International Wood, Wire, and Metal,
No. 332.—President, H. W. Crane; Secretary,
J. B. White, 3481 Doncaster Drive, Mount Tolmie
P.O., Victoria.
Laundry Workers' Union, No. 1.—President, Neil
McKinnon; Secretary, Miss Mabel Palmer, 314
Oswego Street.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association, No. 11.—
President, Walter J. Knotts; Secretary, Fred C.
Hurry, 898 Front Street.
Library Staff Association, Victoria Public.—President, Miss Constance Hobbs; Secretary, Mrs.
E. H. Robinson, 764 Yates Street.
Longshoremen's Association. — President, James
Lackie; Secretary, W. Norman Scott, 270 Dallas
Road.
Machinists, Fitters and Helpers, National Union
of, No. 2.—President, L. A. Hodgins; Secretary,
Donald Wilson, 210 Wilson Street.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 456.
—President, W. R. Watson; Secretary, C. H.
Lester, 1137 Caledonia Avenue.
Mailers' Union, No. 121. — President, Andrew
Veitch; Secretary, James A. McCague, 6, 1046
View Street.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 533.—President, J. B. Bell; Secretary, H. W.
McKenzie, Langford.
Moulders and Foundry Workers, No. 2.—President, W. Neilds; Secretary, J. Hancock, 28, 1116
Broad Street.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 247.—
President, C. W. Hunt; Secretary, T. Homan,
602 Broughton Street.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers, Brotherhood of, No. 1163.—President, W. Rivers; Secretary, C. H. Palmer, 441 Gorge Road.
Pantorium Employees' Association. — President,
E. J. Galvin; Secretary, G. R. Beek, 317 Churchill
Hotel, 1122 Government Street.
Paper Workers, International Brotherhood of, No.
367.—President, J. F. McManus; Secretary, H.
Martindale, 3830 Quadra Street.
Police Mutual Benefit Association. — President,
Henry F. Jarvis; Secretary, Stanley T. Holmes,
625 Fisgard Street.
Postal Employees, Canadian.—President, H. W.
Adams; Secretary, J. H. Hedley, 1166 Chapman
Street.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants, No. 79.—President, T. Nute; Secretary, F. H. Larssen, 1236
McKenzie Street.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 613.—
President, H. C. Horner; Secretary, J. A. Stone,
1320 Burleigh Drive.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
50.—President, J. Stephenson; Secretary, H.
Greaves, 638 Victoria Avenue.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 289.—President, E. H. Spall; Secretary, J. N. Forde, 707
Wilson Street.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
No. 222.—President, F. Wellsmith; Secretary,
A. Nichol, 1569 Westall Avenue.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 1137.—President, W. Dallimore; Secretary,
John W. Yates, 1753 Davie Street.
Retail Clerks' Union, No. 279.—Secretary, Don
Maxwell, 404 Holden Building, Vancouver; Victoria Representative, A. Wilkinson, R.R. 3,
Victoria.
Sheet Metal Workers', International Association,
No. 276.—President, John A. Cook; Secretary,
Charley Lewis, 2850 Parkview Drive.
Shingle Weavers' Union, International Woodworkers of America, No. 1-118.—President, T. Lid-
gate; Secretary, John T. Waggett, 2875 Gorge
View Road.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, No. 109.—President, Edwin F. Fox; Secretary, Wilfred Turner, Yates and Broad Streets,
Victoria.
Theatrical Stage Employees, International Alliance, No. 168.—President, R. Jones; Secretary,
C. Rau, Box 524, Victoria.
Truck Drivers and Helpers, Federal Union, No.
101.—President, W. Wylie; Secretary, Ernest
Belton, 2387 Estevan Avenue.
Typographical Union, No. 201.—President, James
D.Davidson; Secretary, James Petrie, 311 Jones
Building.
Westview.
Carpenters and Joiners and Millwrights of America, No. 2068.—President, E. Scott; Secretary,
J. Van Es, Box 612, Powell River.
White Rock.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, W. E. Chambers; Secretary, R. F. Woolard,
White Rock.
Whonnock.
Fishermen's Protective Association, B.C., No. 1.—
President,   R.   E.   Ritchie;    Secretary,   Geo.   F.
Crockett, Whonnock.
Fishermen's Protective Association, B.C., No. 2.—
President, S. Hornbrook;   Secretary, F. Rolley,
Whonnock.
Zeballos.
Miners' Union, No. 450.—President, Gordon Greenwood; Secretary, Nicholas Bird, Spud Valley
Mine, Zeballos. I 116
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
EMPLOYERS' ORGANIZATIONS.
Calgary.
Coal Operators' Association, Western Canada
Bituminous.—President, A. N. Scott; Secretary,
C. Stubbs, 516-520 Lougheed Building, Calgary,
Alberta.
Penticton.
Co-operative Growers.—President, W. H. Morris;
Secretary, D. G. Penny, Penticton.
Packers' and Shippers' Association, Southern
Okanagan. — President, F. McDonald; Secretary, C. E. Battye, Kaleden.
Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, Master.—President, H. Armstrong; Secretary, F. A. Wilson, 199 Eighth
Avenue East.
Building and Construction Industries' Exchange.
—President, J. Tucker; Secretary, Robert
Lecky, 342 Pender Street West.
Contractors' Association, General. — President,
M. C. Cameron; Secretary, Robert Lecky, 342
Pender Street West.
Electrical Association. — President, Earle Duns-
muir; Secretary, John S. Homersham, 535 Homer
Street.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association.—President,
Capt. Chas. E. Prince; Secretary, Rolph Bremer,
163 Hastings Street West.
Hotels' Association, B.C.—President, A. Paterson;
Secretary, J. J. Kahn, 626 Pender Street West.
Industrial Association of B.C.—President, W. L.
Macken; Secretary, Miss Margaret M. Riley,
355 Burrard Street.
Jewellers' Association, Canadian.—President, E. R.
Flewwelling; Secretary, A. Fraser Reid, 1635
Napier Street.
Laundry, Dry Cleaners, and Linen Supply Club.—
President, W. R. Morrow; Secretary, A. R. Bernard, 910 Richards Street.
Loggers' Association Incorporated, B.C.—Chairman, G. W. O'Brien; Secretary, R. J. Stuart,
1522, 510 Hastings Street West.
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association,
B.C.—President, J. G. Robson; Secretary, Thos.
A. Wilkinson, 837 Hastings Street West.
Metal Trades Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association.—President, Wm. Ross; Secretary,
R. Robinson, 355 Burrard Street.
Milk Producers' Association, Fraser Valley.—
President, W. L. Macken; Secretary, J. J.
Brown, 425 Eighth Avenue West.
Motor Carriers' Association of B.C.—President,
J. V. Hughes; Secretary, W. Brown, 914, 207
Hastings Street West.
Plastering and Lathing Contractors' Association.
—President, D. H. Kissack; Secretary, Geo. A.
Skinner, 4865 Fairmont Street.
Printers' Section, Canadian Manufacturers' Association.—Chairman, Charles Chapman; Secretary, Auddrey Parkinson, 355 Burrard Street.
Retail Merchants' Association.—President, W. S.
Charlton; Secretary, Geo. R. Matthews, 744
Hastings Street West.
Shipping Federation of B.C. — President, F. J.
Pickett; Secretary, C. W. Train, 45 Dunlevy
Avenue.
Storage and Transfermen's Association, Canadian.
—President, R. A. James; Secretary, J. A. Whit-
more, 818 Richards Street.
Upholstered Furniture Manufacturers' Association of B.C. — President, Stanley H. Small;
Secretary, John M. Richardson, 626 Pender
Street West.
Victoria.
Bakers' Association, Master. — President, D. J.
McLean; Secretary, T. P. McConnell, 210 Pem-
berton Building.
Beer Licensees Employers' Association.—President, A. Mawer; Secretary, Mrs. F. A. A. New-
march, 891 Admirals Road.
Builders' Exchange, Limited. — President, L. G.
Scott; Secretary, W. J. Hamilton, 1712 Douglas
Street.
Electrical Association, B.C. — President, E. H.
Emery; Secretary, A. R. Colby, 645 Pandora
Avenue. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. . I 117
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., July 20th, 1942.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection Branch for
the year 1941.
In summarizing the work of this Department for the year 1941, we report the
building of many new industrial plants in widely separated portions of the Province.
In the year 1940, we saw the foundations laid and the steel in course of erection, and
some of these plants are of such magnitude that we were amazed on our inspection
trips during the year under review to find the buildings completed, machinery installed,
and the plant manufacturing material urgently required for the war effort.
The management and owners of certain factories manufacturing products which
in these times are considered in the luxury class have expressed some concern as to
their future. They inform us that their source of supply has been greatly curtailed and
in some instances the material required is not obtainable, and when stock on hand is
depleted they will be forced to suspend operations or enter some other line of industry
of a more essential nature.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1941, 2,240 inspections and reinspections of factories were made.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
The entrance of large numbers of inexperienced workmen into industry has
resulted in an increase in accident frequency and severity. Investigation of injuries
received has in some instances conclusively proven that they were received solely
because of inexperience.
Many serious injuries have also been received because of failure to stop the
machine before attempting to make adjustments, and also because of failure to realize
that the mere pulling of a switch or shifting of a belt does not of necessity fully stop
the moving parts. Many machines do not lose their momentum for some considerable
time after their disconnection from the prime mover. One of the most serious accidents
investigated during the year was received solely because this fact was not fully realized.
Mention has been made in previous reports of the importance of instructing the
inexperienced employees of the hazards attached to their work. The responsibility for
imparting these instructions must be accepted and carried out by the foreman or
superintendent of the plant. Investigations made would indicate that some individuals
in these positions are not giving the personal attention required.
While we feel assured that it is the desire of management of industry to provide
safe and healthful working conditions for their employees, this can be achieved only
through the combined efforts of every one connected with the plant. In performing
our duties as Inspectors, we enter many industrial establishments and make many
recommendations, but unfortunately we occasionally meet some individual who looks
upon industrial safety standards and regulations as something to be enforced against
industry. To such persons, we endeavour to convince them that the only purpose for
which safety standards are ever developed by anybody or any group is to help every
one carry on their accident-prevention work more effectively.
As many of the new industrial plants have been constructed for the sole purpose
of manufacturing supplies for the war effort, they have priority in their purchase of
machinery and tools. Some of these plants have entirely eliminated line-shafting, all
machines being individually driven, and each machine equipped with accident-prevention
features. In striking contrast, we meet the sub-contractor, who, in his efforts to meet
commitments, is obliged to purchase out-moded or even second-hand equipment.
We have, during our inspection visits, noted machines that had been discarded years
ago placed back in service. These machines, while they lack many of the safety
features of the modern equipment of to-day, will, if properly maintained and placed in
9 I 118 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
charge of a competent and safety-minded operator, perform their part in production
output without hazard to the operator.
SAFEGUARDING WORKERS' HEALTH.
Industrial dusts are mechanically generated by many different processes and
operations. Some of these are recognized as being injurious to health, while others
are classified as nuisance dusts. Nevertheless, it should not be necessary for workers
to be subjected to high concentrations of dusts regardless of their composition, nor
should it be necessary for workmen to be required to use respirators during the entire
working-day if it is at all possible to remove by mechanical means injurious dusts,
gases, fumes, or other impurities. Respirators and helmets of an approved type are,
of course, required to be used where intermittent exposure, not otherwise controllable,
is involved.
It is not unreasonable to expect that the management of any industry using
solvents, the fumes of which are injurious to health, would give consideration to the
type of building and location of the work-room in which these solvents are used.
. Even under the best of natural ventilating conditions there are certain processes that
require the installation of mechanical exhaust systems in order to remove harmful
fumes. Electroplating and its related operations when performed under ideal housing
conditions generally require mechanical ventilation and dust-removing equipment.
The efficient operation of this mechanical equipment is, because of structural conditions,
made exceedingly difficult to attain when the operations are performed in the basement
of storied buildings.
EMPLOYEES' WELFARE.
While not all employers, as yet, realize that the day is past when their employees
are satisfied to hang their coats and hats on a peg and eat their lunches in some corner
of a work-room, they are fast becoming the exception.
The management of some industries have, for a considerable time, proven to their
own satisfaction that any expenditure made in connection with their employees' welfare
is a sound investment. There are, however, others who are still inclined to cling to the
past and seem to judge an employee's efficiency by his ability to tolerate and withstand
primitive working conditions. We contact this type of employer occasionally, and
various excuses, none of which as a rule is justifiable, are given for his failure to
provide proper working conditions for his employees. In such instances, we specify
the necessary requirements, and a reasonable length of time is given the employer to
comply with same.
In striking contrast, we visit other industrial plants, both old and new, in which
welfare measures have attained a very high standard. These consist of rest periods,
the most modern sanitary conveniences, dining and reading rooms, and well-equipped
individual lockers. Facilities are also provided for drying the clothing of employees
whose duties are such that they are required to work at unsheltered occupations.
WOMEN IN INDUSTRY.
During the year, an increasing number of young girls and women entered industry.
While a great majority are engaged in industrial occupations directly connected with
or closely related to the manufacture of war supplies, others have replaced males of
military age in industries supplying commodities for domestic use, and are, for the
first time in this Province, performing operations on certain types of power-driven
machinery, and engaged in other occupations which had formerly been performed by
men.
Industrial plants which had anticipated the employment of female factory
employees made provision in their structural plans for the inclusion of first-aid rooms,
rest-rooms, and cloak and dining rooms for these employees, and these, in some
instances, are in charge of a qualified nurse. In some of the older plants, considerable
structural additions were required to be made in order to provide these facilities.
While women and young girls have proven that they are as capable as men in
performing certain industrial tasks, it is the responsibility of management to ensure
that their occupation is such that it can be safely performed and without undue fatigue. It will be generally recognized that the type of clothing usually worn by women
should, if they are operating or working in close proximity to power-driven machinery,
be substituted with either a one-piece coverall or slacks. As a further precaution
against receiving injuries on the job, they should also wear caps or the equivalent as a
protective measure against flowing hair being caught in the machinery. Thus clothed,
she qualifies as " the well-dressed woman in industry " because she is safely dressed.
Shoes suitable for the job are also an essential item of the women workers' wardrobe.
These should be comfortable and durable. One thing they definitely should not wear
is jewellery of any kind. '
INDUSTRIAL HOME-WORK.
Inspection of records discloses a further decline in the volume of work to be
performed in the home. Employers possessing permits authorizing them to give out
work to be .done elsewhere than on their premises do not, as a rule, have permanent
skilled employees to perform the specialized class of work that home-workers are
required to do. Home-workers' permits are issued only to individuals who perform
work of an intermittent and specialized nature and to persons who for some particular
reason are unable to perform the work outside the home.
ELEVATORS.
For the third successive year, we are able to report that no serious injuries were
received by the public while being transported on passenger elevators or by persons
employed in factories and warehouses in which power freight-elevators are installed.
This record has been achieved through the combined efforts of the elevator operators,
the elevator service-men, and the management of buildings and factories in which
elevators are located who, with but few exceptions, are prompt in rectifying any defects
which inspection reveals to be necessary; and also because of the installation of interlocking equipment on the hoistway doors and car gates of passenger elevators and the
hoistway gates of freight elevators. This mechanical device has eliminated at least
80 per cent, of the causes of elevator accidents and will continue to do so if properly
maintained and not purposely rendered inoperative.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS' LICENCES.
In 1941, 878 operators' licences were renewed and 400 temporary and 329 permanent licences were issued.
NEW ELEVATOR INSTALLATIONS.
Sixteen plans and specifications relating to the installation of modern elevator
equipment were approved.
ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1941, 1,363 passenger and freight elevators were inspected.
HOLIDAY PERMITS.
During the year, 254 permits authorizing the operation of factories on statutory
holidays were issued. These permits were issued in cases of extreme emergency only
and to industries the nature of which requires continuous operation.
OVERTIME PERMITS.
Sixty-seven overtime permits were issued during the year, limiting the employment
of female factory employees to not more than nine hours in any one day or fifty-four
hours in any one week.
PROSECUTIONS.
Five proprietors of Oriental laundries were each fined $50 and costs for operating
u.heir laundries on a holiday and after 7 o'clock in the afternoon. I 120 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The proprietor of a hotel was fined $10 and costs for permitting an unlicensed
operator tb operate the passenger elevator in his hotel.
CONCLUSION.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all officials and employees connected
with industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Douglas,
Factories Inspector. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 121
REPORT OF ADMINISTRATOR OF UNEMPLOYMENT
RELIEF, 1941.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Administrator of Unemployment
Relief for the year 1941.
The marked improvement in employment conditions mentioned in my last report
has continued throughout the year under review. The number of persons in receipt Of
relief at January 1st, 1941, was 30,943, while as at December 31st, 1941, the number
had shrunk to 15,547. This shrinkage was most noticeable during the first seven
months of the year and, I feel, indicates that a very considerable improvement had
taken place in business conditions throughout the Province. It is to be understood that
the figures given include both employable and unemployable persons; the latter group
showing an increase over the previous year for the reason that as time elapses many
who were carried as employables had, owing to health conditions, to be removed from
the active list. It also might be as well to mention that many persons now receiving
employable assistance are of advancing age, so that their degree of employability
depends on their ability to find selective work suitable to age and condition.
Throughout the year no changes were made in the policy relative to reimbursing
municipalities up to 80 per cent, of relief granted to persons in both groups.
On April 1st the Federal Government withdrew their contribution made for several
years towards Unemployment Relief, resulting in this Province having to undertake the
full cost of such aid, although municipalities still continue to pay their usual 20 per
cent, shares.
Figures to December 31st, 1941, resulting from the reregistration which was
undertaken in September, 1940, show that 10,171 standard cases, 585 farmers, and
1,164 transients reregistered during the period.
Assistance to Settlers Agreement. —^ The Assistance to Settlers Agreement
(31-12-36) between the Dominion and Provincial Governments terminated at the end
of the fiscal year, March 31st, 1941. On it being felt that a number of settlers who
had only recently been placed on the Plan would be unable to reach a self-supporting
position without continued aid, the Provincial Government, as a consequence, decided
to continue the Plan on a limited scale for a period of one year, ending March 31st,
1942, applicable only to the settlers referred to, no new applications being taken. At
the beginning of the year eighty-one cases remained active, but it is confidently expected
that by the end of this extended period the majority of them will be self-supporting.
A final report will undoubtedly reveal that the Assistance to Settlers Plan has been an
unqualified success.
Youth Training, etc.—Youth Training, Rural Occupational Training, and Physical
and Recreational Training Plans still continue under the aegis of the Education Department. Urban Training is being conducted under the direction of the British Columbia
University Extension.
Expenditures relating to Unemployment Relief will be found in both the Public
Works Department Annual Report and also in the Annual Public Accounts Statement,
etc., of the Department of Finance.
E. W. Griffith,
Administrator. I  122
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of British Columbia, 1941.
(As compiled from returns received from the field.)
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Numbers.
January.
Employables—
Organized territory—
3,037
99
335
23
7,164
242
971
64
10,201
341
Transient families—
1,306
3,223
275
18
87
3,223
275
27
9
889
37
35
76
18
2,825
108
142
121
27
Unorganized territory—
3,714
145
177
557
41
64
557
35
89
1,222
83
700
111
324
2,208
169
1,525
41
210
413
Un employables—
2,724
149
1,217
108
6,154
Provincial—
401
3,442
108
Totals      	
6,620
15,947
8,376
30,943
February.
Employables—
Organized territory—
3,069
113
337
26
7,239
291
991
62
10,308
404
Transient families—
1,328
88
3,126
264
8
3,126
15
10
973
40
45    •
264
Emergency  	
32
21
3,082
126
190
55
31
Unorganized territory—
4,055
166
235
593
39
65
593
36
70
1,195
81
694
39
107
249
2,146
166
1,481
208
319
Unemployables—
2,818
149
1,200
116
6,159
Provincial—
396
3,375
Hospital camp         	
116
Totals  ..
6,704
16,183
8,378
31,265 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 123
Statement of Relief, 1941—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Numbers.
March.
Employables—
Organized territory—
2,930
100
322
20
6,835
264
916
49
9,765
364
Transient families—
1,238
Provincial   .	
2,908
278
■ 5
69
2,908
278
Emergency  	
2
10
968
44
64
7
22
3,065
135
292
14
32
Unorganized territory—
4,033
Municipal families	
179
356
594
35
53
594
35
23
67
1,150
71
693
74
210
2,063
148
1,487
150
277
Unemployables—
2,666
142
1,176
110
5,879
Provincial—
361
3,356
110
Totals                                 	
6,464
15,567
7,967
29,998
April.
Employables—
Organized territory—
2,579
74
266
16
5,886
199
697
37
8,465
273
Transient families—
963
53
2,072
277
9
2,072
277
3
11
694
29
47
7
25
2,116
70
191
19
36
Unorganized territory—
2,810
99
238
515
34
37
615
29
191
2,025
150
1,410
34
Emergency   -	
13
54
1,125
73
69S
79
245
Unemployables—
2,741
130
1,164
91
5,891
Provincial—
353
3,272
91
Totals  	
5,682
13,033
7,070
25,785 I 124
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Statement of Relief, 1941—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Numbers.
.                                           May.   .
Employables—
Organized territory—
2,300
56
247
15
5,080
127
552
23
7,380
183
Transient families—
799
38
2,047
274
8
2,047
274
2
16
633
25
31
6
38
1,836
64
133
16
54
Unorganized territory—
2,469
89
164
456
36
28
456
23
56
1,115
71
675
36
73
194
2,015
144
1,477
124
■      250
Unemployables—
Municipal	
Provincial—
2,713
128
1,190
99
5,843
343
Unorganized  	
3,342
99
Totals       	
5,265
11,762
6,979
24,006
June.
Employables—
Organized territory—
1,965
43
202
6
4,175
89
461
9
6,140
132
Transient families—
663
1,775
263
10
7
15
523
21
20
263
17
34
1,515
52
73
34
49
Unorganized territory—
2 038
Municipal families    	
73
365
35
26
16
52
1,076
62
637
53
183
1,907
127
1,400
Unemployables—
2,691
108
1,167
99
5,674
297
3,204
Provincial—
Hospital camp 	
Totals 	
4,645
10,095
6,539
21,279 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 125
Statement of Relief, 1941—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Numbers.
July.
Employables-
Organized territory—
1,690
33
167
6
3,405
60
360
10
5,095
93
Transient families—
Municipal , 	
527
16
1,641
247
. 6
1,641
247
Emergency - . 	
2
12
449
15
11
4
29
1,176
36
49
12
41
Unorganized territory—
1,625
51
60
323
35
25
323
35
17
48
1,053
57
607
40
164
1,854
118
1,327
82
212
Un employables—
Municipal   	
Provincial—
2,739
93
1,138
104
5,646
268
3,072
104
Totals                                 	
4.167
8,632
6,351
19,150
August.
Employables—
Organized territory—
1,455
35
55
1
2,857
67
117
1
4,312
102
Transient families-
172
2
1,478
225
9
1.478
225
Emergency -	
4
10
396
15
10
6
25
984
32
30
19
35
Unorganized territory—
1,380
Municipal families   	
47
40
282
31
30
282
31
27
1,004
48
610
67
120
1,781 '
99
1,305
124
154
Unemployables—
1            2,682
105
1            1,124
103
5,467
Provincial—
252
3,039
103
Totals   	
. 3,704
7,491
[            6,069
17,264 I 126
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Statement of Relief, 1941—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Numbers.
September.
Employables—
Organized territory—-
1,287
31
46
2,461
57
89
3,748
88
Transient families—
135
1,187
216
7
1,187
216
6
11
368
8
8
19
26
910
20
25
32
37
Unorganized territory—
1,278
28
33
275
34
23
275
34
4
25
■      971
42
584
8
95
1,727
87
1,232
35
120
Un em ployables—
2,763
94
1,131
99
5,461
Provincial—
223
2,947
99
3,391
6,756
5,829
15,976
October.
Employables—
Organized territory—
1,169
21
41
3
2,191
32
76
19
3,360
53
Transient families—
117
22
Single men .„  	
Single women __._   —	
Emergency .     	
1,232
208
10
1,232
208
3
8
353
7
9
12
16
865
22
30
25
24
Unorganized territory—
1,218
29
39
243
31
12
243
31
Emergency	
9
25
963
38
579
29
90
1,663
74
1,188
50
115
Unemployables—
Municipal 	
Provincial—
2,660
88
1,147
106
1
5,286
200
2,914
106
■
Totals	
3,228          |
1
6,307
5,737
1
15,272 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941
I   127
Statement of Relief, 1941
—Continued
Direct Relief.
Numbers.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Numbers.
November.
Employables—
Organized territory—
1,130
23
44
3
2,113
40
99
14 •
3,243
63
143
17
1,296
193
10
22
1,168
53
40
241
25
103
82
5,238>
205
2,891
117
Provincial families , ;  	
Transient families-
Municipal _	
Provincial  	
Single men  	
Single women  _ , 	
1,296
193
5
1
7
347
11
9
■   4
15
821
42
31
Assistance to settlers ,      ,
Unorganized territory—
241
25
11
Transient families  	
Emergency ,   	
16
17
851
38
571
76
65
1,696
80
1,183
Unemployables—
2,691
87
1,137
117
Provincial—
Totals      	
3,068
6,279
.5,803
15,150
Decern ber.
Employables—
Organized territory—
1,171
27
49
3
2,149
54
99
16
3,320
81
148
19
1,389
201
2
22
1,325
39
50
261
25
39
82
5,320
196
2,905
123
Transient families—
Provincial    _
1,389
201
2
Single women 	
7
377
10
13
6
17
934
37
584
15
948
29
37
Unorganized territory—
\
261
25
13
2.710
82
1,155
123
Emergency	
20
65
1,676
77
1,166
Unemployables—
Municipal     	
Provincial—
Unorganized 	
Totals 	
3,235'
6,351
5,961
15,547
- I 128 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ANNUAL REPORT OF APPRENTICESHIP BRANCH, 1941.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
J. A. Ward Bell, Chairman. J. F. Keen.
Adam Bell. James Thomson.
Officials of the Branch.
Hamilton Crisford  ._..  Director of Apprenticeship.
Thomas V. Berto  _   Assistant Director.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee for the year 1941.
The year 1941 has brought many problems in connection with apprenticeship, as
this year has seen the real change-over from a peace to war economy in the industrial
life of the Province.
The demands of both industry and our armed mechanical forces have largely been
focused on the metal trades and a number of special training-schools have been operating under both governmental and private auspices.
For a time it appeared that a further demand might be made for the school to
supersede apprenticeships almost entirely in so far.as war industries were concerned,
but it quickly became evident that the ever-increasing expansion required could not be
attained through specialization alone and that industry would have to continue to
produce its key tradesmen through apprenticeship.
The training-schools have done excellent work in the field of specialization and have
supplied large numbers of men to industry and youths of military age to the armed
forces.
Industry is persevering with good results in training apprentices to meet their
future needs, and this in spite of the fact that approximately 20 per cent, of these lads
have to date been lost by them to the Navy, Army, or Air Force, very largely owing to
the training industry has provided.
As a result, there is a decided trend towards the apprenticing of lads at an earlier
age than heretofore. With the present facilities for steady employment and rapid
advancement this is all to the good, particularly as many of the trade and technical
school facilities formerly available for youths are now almost entirely given over for
the time being to specialized classes for men beyond the present military enlistment ages.
In this all-out effort which the Canadian people are now facing, apprenticeship
in this Province is therefore continuing to play a most important part which will
materially assist our productive capacity, not only during the present conflict, but in
the years of reconstruction which must follow.
That the reconstruction period will bring its own special problems is beyond doubt,
but in this day and age the thoroughly trained, skilled worker is naturally much more
readily absorbed in practically every type of endeavour than the semi-skilled or
untrained worker.
The fact that this is a mechanized war will undoubtedly assist materially in the
rehabilitation problem in peace, as the large number of men who are working at trades
in the armed forces during this conflict is out of all proportion to the comparatively
small number that had this opportunity during the last World War.
This is instanced by the fact that most of the apprentices who have enlisted or have
been called up before the completion of their apprenticeship period are now employed in
one of the Services at their apprenticeship trades and will in all probability complete
their apprenticeship in these Services, thereby reducing the problem that might otherwise arise on their resumption to civil life.
The general co-operation of industry in regard to apprenticeship training problems
has been very gratifying and the previous request for permission to employ large
numbers of under-age boys at specialized war work, but not under contract of appren- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941.
I 129
ticeship, has been definitely discarded in favour of training and employing men of an
age that exempts them from compulsory military service.
This system, in conjunction with the maintenance of apprenticeship, is assisting in
the stabilization of the labour situation, so necessary in these times.
At the end of the year the total number of live apprenticeship contracts totalled
1,285. This figure includes 181 apprentices who are serving their country in one or
other of His Majesty's Armed Forces.
The number of new contracts approved during the year totalled 468, while 177
apprentices satisfactorily completed their periods of apprenticeship, bringing the total
number of apprentices who have completed to date to 532.
The appended table gives the standing of controlled apprenticeship in various
trades and occupations as at the 31st day of December, 1941.
Hamilton Crisford,
Director of Apprenticeship.
APPRENTICESHIP CONTRACTS IN FORCE.
Group A.
Occupations designated as Trades under the " Apprenticeship Act."
Occupation. No. in Force.
Automobile mechanics  _ _ __  105
Automobile metalwork        33
Automobile painting    —      7
Automobile-tire repairing   ™      3
Automobile trimming     	
Automotive woodworking         1
Aviation mechanics      42
Boiler-making
Carpentry 	
Druggists   	
Electrical appliances   .
Electrical work  	
Electric work—construction
Electrical work—shop 	
Glass-working  	
Iron-worker     	
32
134
80
22
21
9
31
6
5
Occupation.
Jewellery-work   	
Lithography  	
Machinists    	
Metal trades—miscellaneous
Moulding    _	
Painting and decorating	
Pattern-making  ___
Pipe-fitters 	
Plastering  	
No. in Force.
       15
 _      15
__    273
1
   69
  38
   22
3
-  4
Plumbing and steam-fitting    57
Sheet-metal working __„_  68
Ship and boat building    22
Sign and pictorial painting   6
Total .
.1,124
Group B.
Occupations not yet designated under the " Apprenticeship Act:
Occupation.
Bakers and cooks
Barbers   	
Blacksmiths   ._.
Bookbinders  .„.	
Bricklayers   	
Business-machine mechanics   	
Butchers   —	
Butter-making     -	
Carpet and linoleum layers —        3
i Force.
15
11
5
3
2
5
2
1
Chocolate-dipping
Clerk,  automotive-
Confectioner  —
Dentistry  _	
Dressmaking   	
Draughtsmen 	
Fur-finishers _ _.
Florists    -
-wholesale
Furniture-manufacture
Gardeners   —
Harness and shoe repairing
Hairdressers  	
Grand total of contracts now in force
Total apprenticeships  completed	
2
3
4
1
3
1
47
Occupation.
Hardware clerk —
Lead-burners 	
Lumber grader _
Millinery   	
Municipal clerk _.
Office occupation
Photo-finishers  ..._
Printing  	
Seedsman 	
Spring-makers   :....
No. in Force.
        1
Shoe-repairing and bicycle rebuilding _
Tailoring      	
Spotter     .... 	
Upholsterers    *__ __ 	
Watch-repairing     ...
Wholesale  hardware     	
Woodworking   ..	
Window-shade making 	
Zinc light and glazing ____ 	
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
13
4
1
1
1
1
Total --  . 161
__.     1,285
        532 I 130 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH.
J. A. Ward Bell        - .Chief Administrative Officer.
Mrs. Rex Eaton   :--   -   Administrative Officer.
Hamilton Crisford  Secretary, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Adam Bell, Esq.,    ■
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Trade-schools Eegulation Branch
for the year 1941.
The year 1941 is the fourth year of operation of the " Trade-schools Regulation
Act " and it can now be definitely stated that the conditions existing that made the
enactment necessary have now been entirely eliminated.
The four years that have passed also demonstrate that, generally speaking, the
usefulness of the schools now coming within its provisions has been enhanced through
the standardization of operating conditions and the elimination of undesirable features,
resulting in a general improvement in the tuition offered to the public through the wholehearted co-operation of the proprietors of the majority of schools.
The British Columbia Act has now been closely followed in other Canadian Provinces and in some of the States south of the line. This has made it difficult, if not
impossible, for the old type of racketeering school to operate profitably, and such schools
have not only been eliminated in this Province but are gradually being squeezed out of
existence elsewhere.
During the year further meetings were held between the Administrative Officers
and the proprietors and operators of business and stenographic schools. At these meetings the conclusions reached as a result of a survey of this field were fully discussed
with beneficial results and the co-operation thus established is being maintained.
Considerable attention throughout the year has been given to the welding trade, as
this trade can be satisfactorily taught in a school by a comparatively short course and
welding has become of growing importance in both ship-building and aviation. The
services of an expert welder have been employed from time to time to inspect schools
and report on teaching staffs, teaching methods, and equipment.
Two commercial aviation schools have been carrying on practical training courses
at the request and in co-operation with the aviation industry which, up to the end of
this year, has absorbed all graduates.
Quite a number of new schools have been established for the teaching of occupations vital to our war industries. These, together with the older established schools
and the British Columbia Government and Dominion Government Schools, have offered
up-to-date training facilities to men of practically all ages, as and when they have been
required, and to date have kept our Provincial industries fully supplied.
The value of this training effort only becomes fully apparent as graduates of these
schools work side by side with experienced tradesmen and with practice attain full skill
in the operations in which they have been trained.
Many hundreds of these graduates are now working at skilled operations, not only
in our war industries but in the Armed Forces, where the basic knowledge they have
absorbed is always in demand.
Correspondence and home-study schools again show a drop in the number of
students enrolled during the year, except in the occupation of accountancy, in which the
demand for trained men has been unprecedented.
Home study tuition is now very largely confined to persons already employed who
have the ambition to improve their knowledge and position. This is the legitimate field
of the correspondence school and one in which it has really something to offer in conjunction with the student's practical experience in his employment.
During the year pressure has been brought on the Government to extend the provisions of the Act, to embrace the teaching of all occupations, including the professions,
except such as are specifically excluded. This matter has been under investigation for
some months by the Administrative Officers, who expect to be in a position to make
their report to the Minister at an early date.
Hamilton Crisford,
Secretary. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1941. I 131
SAFETY BRANCH.
Parliament Buildings,
February 4th, 1942.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Safety Branch for the year 1941.
The Safety Branch has carried on throughout the year according to the policy laid
down by the Honourable Minister of Labour. With the assistance and co-operation of
other branches of the Labour Department every effort has been made to obtain the
utmost value from the funds available and the staff allowed.
The work of encouraging accident-prevention and the study of problems particularly affecting the logging industry have been carried on to the best of our ability.
The loss of life due to accidental injuries in the logging industry during 1941 was
slightly higher than the previous past year. The year 1940 gave us seventy-seven
fatalities and 5,163 compensable accidents. Log production was 3,693,000,000 feet log-
scale. The year 1941 gave us seventy-eight fatalities and 5,620 compensable accidents.
Log production was 3,679,950,000 feet log-scale.
From information available regarding industries both in Canada and the United
States we learn there has been a sudden rise in the number of accidents. Traffic
accidents have risen, also, during the period.
Comparing the logging industry with general conditions, we find it has not shown
a worse accident rate but a better one than might be expected during such trying times.
Logging operators as a whole are not giving as much support to the accident-
prevention compaign as they should. However, we are pleased to report that quite a
large number of operators are eager to improve the accident situation, both in their
own camps and in the logging industry in general. These operators have tried to work
out schemes to promote an accident-prevention consciousness among their employees.
Some of them hold safety sweepstakes, some provide entertainment, and others pay
employees extra wages or a bonus for accident-free time.
There has been a definite improvement in the employers' attitude toward safety.
Also, a definite improvement is seen in the employees' attitude.
The matter of first-aid training is worthy of notice. In many camps, especially
the larger ones, there is a trained first-aid man in every section of the operation. If a
man is injured in such a camp, his fellow-worker or he, himself, knows just exactly what
to do about it. We have information that serves to prove not only serious physical
consequences have been prevented by prompt and proper first-aid attentions but, also,
several times during the year, life has been saved. It is impossible to estimate the full
value of first-aid training of our loggers. It is of greatest importance after an accident
happens and, at the same time, makes men more careful, thereby preventing accidents.
Safety rules and regulations serve as a guide and are a great help in a general way,
but actual success in accident-prevention depends on individual action. Employer and
employee alike must have the will to prevent accidents. Knowledge of first aid breeds
such a will.
During the year the Safety Adviser attended thirty-three Coroners' inquests;
made 297 special calls and thirty-five inspections at camps. Several picture-shows and
lectures, as well as ten safety equipment demonstrations, were given. Three days were
spent at the Workmen's Compensation Board inquiry regarding accident-prevention in
the logging industry. Eight accident-prevention meetings, five first-aid field-days, and
two conventions were attended by the Safety Adviser.
During the months of June, July, August, and September moving pictures were
taken throughout the Province for a logging moving picture, made in technicolour and
entitled " Be Careful and Live." A trailer, also in technicolour, was made and entitled
" A Trip over the Big Bend Highway." These pictures were approved by the Labour
Department and will be shown in the logging camps and communities, as well as in
other places where educational work on safety is being carried on.    The pictures were I 132 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
made at a low cost to the Department, being a joint effort of the Forestry Branch,
Department of Lands, and the Safety Branch.
Safety meetings with Workmen's Compensation Board Inspectors and the Safety
Directors of the camps were held periodically, at which discussions took place on all
phases of accident-prevention matters.
Safety hard hats have received the same attention as usual and more men in the
camps are wearing them now.
Due to increased demand for the monthly accident-prevention bulletins, the number
printed each month has been raised by five hundred. We now have printed 3,000 each
month.
The Safety Adviser attended the Lumber Section and directors' meetings of the
Western Safety Conference for one week in October and was made vice-president of that
organization for 1942.
The proof of any endeavour is the results obtained. I am pleased to report there
were several large logging camps that went through the whole of 1941 without a fatal
accident. No such experience is due to luck or chance, but to hard work on the part of
the management and the safety director, plus the co-operation of every man on the job.
There is no doubt the Safety Branch has fanned the flame of interest in accident-
prevention in our logging industry and, while we may not be able to point to any visible
improvement in accident frequency or severity for the Province as a whole, we Can point
out individual camps with improved accident records as examples. We are thankful the
rate of accidents has been held from taking a sudden up-swing since commencement of
the war.
Respectfully submitted.
Charles Pearse,
•   ' Safety Adviser.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Ban-field, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1042.
1,825-542-7850

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