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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1943

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 ANNUAL REPORT
OF  THE
MINISTER OF MINES
OF THE PROVINCE OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR  THE
TEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER
1941
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OP THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1942. BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES.
VICTOEIA, B.C.
Hon. Herbert Anscomb, Minister.
John F. Walker, Deputy Minister.
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines.
G. Cave-Browne-Cave, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
P. B. Freeland, Chief Mining Engineer.
R. J. Steenson, Chief Gold Commissioner. To His Honour Lieut.-Colonel William Culham Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mining Industry of the Province for the year 1941 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
HERBERT ANSCOMB,
Minister of Mines.
Minister of Mines' Office,
May, 1942. Douglas Lay, Senior Mining Engineer in the Mineralogical Branch,
in ill-health and confined to the Royal Jubilee Hospital since early in
the year, died, aged 63 years, on November 1st, 1941. Mr. Lay was
born in England and came to Canada more than forty years ago. He
was, for some time, in charge of the Le Roi No. 2 and other Kootenay
mines. During the first world war he managed a large T.N.T. plant
in England. On his return to Canada he was appointed resident engineer for the Department at Hazelton, where he was stationed until
1939, when he was transferred to Victoria. His final report, Bulletin
No. 11, entitled " Fraser River Tertiary Drainage-history in Relation
to Placer-gold Deposits," was published to supplement his earlier work
on this subject in Bulletin No. 3.
Mr. Lay was one of the best-known mining engineers in British
Columbia.
John T. Puckey, Instructor, Mine-rescue Station, Fernie, who was
in failing health for some time, died on December 19th, 1941, aged
63 years.
Mr. Puckey was born in Wingate, Colley, Durham, England, on
May 21st, 1878. He entered the Government service on September 2nd,
1918, as Instructor at the Mine-rescue Station at Fernie. He took a
keen interest in first-aid and mine-rescue work, instructing many of
the teams in the Crowsnest Pass area during his twenty-three years of
service. ANNUAL REPORT.
The Annual Report of the Minister of Mines, first published in 1874, has been ever
since an annual event of interest to the mining industry. The Report appeared after
the appointment of the first Minister of Mines by authority of an Act of the Legislature, passed in the same year. Previously Provincial mining laws had been administered by Gold Commissioners, under the direction of the Provincial Secretary, and
for many years subsequently the portfolio for mines was held by the Provincial
Secretary.
The Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines originally comprised the reports of
the Gold Commissioners; the Inspector of Coal Mines, who was appointed in 1877;
and Mining Recorders.
A Bureau of Mines was established by an Act of the Legislature in 1895 and
placed under the supervision of the Provincial Mineralogist, whose reports first
appeared in 1896. The Annual Report now comprised the reports of the Provincial
Mineralogist, the Inspector of Coal Mines, the Gold Commissioners, and Mining
Recorders.    The report of the Inspector of Metalliferous Mines was added in 1899.
The organized collection of mining statistics was started by the Bureau of Mines
in 1895 and continued until 1939, when this work was taken over by the Bureau of
Economics and Statistics, Department of Trade and Industry.
The Annual Report continued to appear in this form until 1917, when under the
" Mineral Survey and Development Act " a number of Resident Mining Engineers
were added to the technical strength of the Department. From 1917 to 1933, inclusive,
the Annual Report consisted essentially of the work of the Resident Mining Engineers,
and the reports of the Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders were confined largely
to office statistics and finally combined into a statistical table. In 1934 the Annual
Report appeared in sections as well as a complete volume, and continued in this form
until 1939, when the work of the Department's Mining Engineers, formerly the
Resident Mining Engineers, first appeared in bulletin form.
Since 1939 the Annual Reports consist of a brief review of the mining industry,
a number of statistical tables regarding production, men employed, dividends paid,
etc., a synopsis of the mining laws of the Province, a summary of the work done by
the Department, progress notes on all active properties inspected or examined by either
the Inspection staff or the officers of the Mineralogical Branch during the course of
the year, and the report of the Chief Inspector of Mines and his staff.
The reports of the officers of the Mineralogical Branch are published now in bulletin form. The publication of bulletins by the Department of Mines is not a new innovation, as forty-three bulletins covering a variety of subjects had previously been
published between 1896 and 1934, inclusive, as well as a number of separate publications. In the past the bulletins were not numbered consecutively from year to year
but only for each year, and most of them were embodied in the Annual Report. Commencing with the present series of bulletins, replacing a large part of the material
formerly contained in the Annual Report, the series is being numbered consecutively
from year to year, and to date sixteen bulletins have appeared in place of much of
the material that ordinarily would have been contained in this report and in the
Annual Reports for 1939 and 1940. A list of these bulletins, as well as other publications available for distribution by the Department, will be found at the end of this
volume. A 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
THE MINING INDUSTRY.
The value of mine production in 1941 was $78,479,719, an increase of $2,778,564
over 1940. This figure of $78,479,719 is somewhat below the actual figure because
the value of copper is based on the London price, whereas British Columbia copper is
sold at the New York price. The increase of $2,778,564 is somewhat less than would
appear by comparison with last year's Annual Report because the 1940 returns as
published were $348,425 short of the final returns. The London price for copper is
used so that value figures in the tables in this Report will correspond closely with
Provincial figures as published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. The Dominion
Bureau uses the London price because most of Canada's copper is sold through London.
Since the outbreak of war the customary summary and the usual tables reviewing
and showing detailed mine production have not been given, and cannot be given, as
authorities at Ottawa do not consider it in the best interests of the country to divulge
certain detailed information. However, the information is being collected and upon
conclusion of the war, or in the event of a change in policy, it will be available for
publication and so the record eventually will be complete.
DEPARTMENTAL WORK.
Mineralogical Branch.
B. T. O'Grady, besides working with the Superintendent of Brokers, carried out
investigations in connection with transportation to mining properties throughout the
central part of the Province.
J. T. Mandy investigated mining properties along the main line of the Canadian
National Railway between Prince Rupert and Burns Lake, in connection with the work
of the sampling plant at Prince Rupert. In August, owing to ill-health, he returned
to Prince Rupert to continue in charge of the sampling plant.
H. Sargent spent most of the summer season on reconnaissance and prospecting
for the source of cinnabar float at the head of Churn Creek and Yalakom River.
M. S. Hedley investigated chromite prospects on Bonaparte River, Cascade, and
other points in the southern interior of the Province, as well as a new gold discovery
made in the Shulaps Mountains near the head of Yalakom River.
J. S. Stevenson did detailed geological mapping of a small area centring on China
Creek, near Alberni, and made a detailed examination of the surface and underground
workings at Mount Sicker, near Duncan.
J. M. Cummings continued investigational work in connection with industrial
minerals and also the by-product recovery of scheelite from mill tailings and low-
grade ore.
R. J. Maconachie was in charge of the Department of Mines experiment to stimulate gold production through the medium of leasing and mining small lode-gold properties in the Nelson area. He also carried out investigational work in connection with
transportation facilities in the south-eastern part of the Province.
Stuart S. Holland examined most of the placer operations in the Similkameen,
Cariboo, and Omineca Districts.
SAMPLING PLANT, PRINCE RUPERT.
In 1937 a sampling plant was built on the waterfront at Prince Rupert and put
into operation on August 20th. The object in erecting a sampling plant at this point
was chiefly for the purpose of stimulating prospecting and development of properties
along the Prince Rupert branch of the Canadian National Railway. The sampling
plant was erected on the Coast so that full advantage could be taken of special freight
rates arranged especially for shipments of ore to the plant.
The sampling plant is, as its name implies, only a sampling plant and not a concentrator.    Ores containing sufficient value to ship direct to the smelter are purchased THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 7
and assembled at the plant until sufficient tonnage is accumulated to warrant shipment
to the smelter. By mixing lots at the plant it is possible also to reduce smelter penalties
on individual shipments and so give the prospector the benefit of a mixed lot.
The plant may also be used by those developing properties for the purpose of
bulk-sampling.
For the calendar year 1941, twenty-five lots for shipment, eighty-one lots for
testing, and twenty-one samples for assaying were received at the plant. These lots
aggregated 119 tons.    During the year $13,583.93 was paid to shipper.
GOLD PURCHASING.
Late in 1935 the Department of Finance, co-operating with the Department of
Mines, undertook to purchase small lots of placer gold under 2 oz. in weight from the
individual placer-miner. The Gold Commissioners throughout the Province are paying
a cash price of $29 per ounce for clean placer gold and are purchasing dirty placer
gold and amalgam on a deferred-payment basis. Purchases made under this arrangement are as follows:—
Year.
No. of Lots.
Paid.
Paid per Oz.
1936                                                         —.                          	
1,470
1,657
2,397
2,322
1,336
631
$50,000
52,250
72,000
60,000
31,600
16,825
$28.00
1937      	
28.00
1938                                                      _   _              	
28.00
1939 _~	
29.00
1940         —	
29.00
1941      -   	
29.00
Totals   ■;	
9,813
$282,675
The object of this purchasing scheme is to give the individual miner the best
possible price for his gold, and this has been realized in that the total price paid has
been almost exactly the same as that received from the Royal Canadian Mint, except
for the mint's handling charge of 1 per cent.
The foregoing figures show also that the individual miner benefited at a time
when work was scarce and that now he is obtaining more remunerative employment.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA.
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered
Confederation, all geological investigations and mapping in the Province were to be
carried on by the Geological Survey of Canada; this agreement has been fully adhered
to by the Dominion of Canada and has proved of great benefit to the mining industry
of the Province. Each year several geological parties are kept in the field and in the
aggregate a vast amount of information is made available to the prospector and the
mining engineer in the many excellent reports and maps covering British Columbia
which have been issued by the Geological Survey of Canada.
For some years a branch office of the Geological Survey has been maintained in
Vancouver, where copies of maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained.
The officer in charge of the British Columbia office is W. E. Cockfield, and the address
is 305 Federal Building, Vancouver, B.C.
In 1936 a reorganization of several departments in the Federal Government was
effected, and the Department of Mines and Resources created. One of the main
branches of this Department is that of Mines and Geology, with sub-branches known
as the Bureau of Geology and Topography and the Bureau of Mines. The Geological
Survey of Canada and the Topographical Survey are now a part of the Bureau of
Geology and Topography. During the season of 1941 the Bureau of Geology and
Topography had the following officers employed on field-work in British Columbia:-— A 8 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
Geological Parties.
1. A. H. Lang: Continued geological mapping on the east half of Manson River
area.
2. J. E. Armstrong: Made a systematic study of the mercury deposits in the west
half of Manson River area;   also continued geological mapping of the area.
3. C. S. Lord:   Commenced geological mapping of the McConnell Creek area.
4. W. E. Cockfield:  Continued mapping of the east half of the Ashcroft area.
5. H. M. A. Rice: Mapped the east half of the Hope area, which adjoins the Ashcroft area on the south.
6. A. F. Buckham:  Re-examined the Barkerville gold belt in the Cariboo district.
Topographical Parties.
A. D. Tuttle and R. J. Parlee mapped the Aiken Lake area in the central portion
of the Province to establish controls for later geological work.
TABLES.
The collection and compilation of mining statistics and the preparation of statistical tables for this report is in charge of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics,
Department of Trade and Industry.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION.
The total mine output of the Province consists of the outputs of metalliferous
minerals, coal, structural materials, and miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials,
valued at standard recognized prices in Canadian funds.
In the Annual Report for 1925 some changes were made in the methods used in
previous years in computing and valuing the products of the industry, but in order to
facilitate comparisons with former years the same general style of tables was adhered
to. The methods used in the 1925 Annual Report have been followed in subsequent
Annual Reports, with the addition of new tables.
The following notes explain the methods used:—
(1.) From the certified returns of lode mines of ore and concentrate shipments
made during the full calendar year by the producers the net recovered metal contents
have been determined by deducting from the " assay value content" necessary corrections for smelting and refining losses.
In making comparisons of production figures with previous years, it should be
remembered that prior to 1925 in the Annual Reports the total metal production, with
the exception of copper, was determined by taking the assay value content of all ores
shipped; deductions for slag losses were made by taking varying percentages of the
metal prices.
(2.) Gold-placer returns are received from operators giving production in crude
ounces recovered; these are converted to fine-gold ounces by dividing the crude-ounce
value by the old standard price of gold. The fine-gold content is then valued at the
yearly average price of gold, which in 1941 was $38.50 per ounce. On this basis the
average crude-gold value per ounce was $31.66 on Provincial placer-gold production.
(3.) The prices used in valuing the different metals are: For gold, the average
price for the year; for silver, the average New York metal-market price for the year;
for lead, the average London metal-market price for the year; and for zinc, the average
London metal-market price for the year. Copper in 1941 is valued at the average
London metal-market price. (See foot-note to Table I.) Prior to 1932 copper was
valued at the average New York price. The change was made because very little copper
was being marketed in the United States on account of high tariff charges against
importations from foreign countries. The bulk of the lead and zinc production of the
Province is sold on the basis of the London prices of these metals and they are therefore
used. The New York, St. Louis, and Montreal lead- and zinc-market prices differ
materially from the London prices of these metals and are not properly applicable to
the valuing of the British Columbia production. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 9
By agreement with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the Provincial Statistical Bureaus, the following procedure of taking care of the exchange fluctuations
has been agreed upon:—
(a.)   Silver to be valued at the average New York price, adjusted to Canadian
funds at the average exchange rate.
(6.)   Lead, zinc, and copper to be valued at London prices, adjusted to Canadian funds at the average exchange rate.
(4.) In 1926 a change was made in computing coal and coke statistics. The practice in former years had been to list coal and coke production (in part) as primary
mineral production. Only the coke made in bee-hive ovens was so credited; that made
in by-product ovens was not listed as coke, but the coal used in making this coke was
credited as coal production. The result was that the coke-production figures were
incomplete. Starting with the 1926 Annual Report, the standard practice of the
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, has been adopted. This consists of crediting all coal
produced, including that used in making coke, as primary mine production. Coke-
making is considered a manufacturing industry. As it is, however, of interest to the
mining industry, a table included in the report shows the total coke produced in the
Province, together with by-products, and the values given by the producers. This
valuation of coke is not, of course, included in the total gross mine production of the
Province.
From 1918 to 1930 coal production was valued at $5 per long ton. In 1931 the
price used was $4.50, and from 1932 on the price used has been $4.25 per long ton.
In making comparisons with former years the decline in dollar value is accentuated
by this lowered price. A 10 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
INDEX TO TABLES.*
Title. Page.
Table I.—Production;   all Metals, Structural, and Miscellaneous—1940 and 1941
compared  11
Table II.—Metal Prices; Average Prices used in valuing Production, 1901 to 1941,
inclusive  12
Table III.—Total Production for all Years up to and including 1941  13
Table IV.—Production for each Year from 1852 to 1941, inclusive  13
Table V—Quantities and Value of Mine Products for 1939, 1940, and 1941  13
Table VI.—Production of Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1887-1941,
inclusive  14
Table VII.—Value of Gold Production to Date—Lode Gold and Placer Gold  16
Table XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date  17
Table XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens in British Columbia from 1895
to 1925  17
Table XVI.—Coke and By-products Production of British Columbia, 1940 and 1941._ 18
Table XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1941  18
Table XVIII.—Capital employed, Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity, and
Process Supplies, 1941 :  22
Table XIX.—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode Minerals,
1901-1941  22
Table XX.—Men employed in the Mining Industry, 1901-1941  23
Table XXI.—Metalliferous Mines shipping in 1941  24
* Certain detail tables of mine production have been omitted.    The numbers of those retained correspond to
their number in previous Annual Reports. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 11
TABLE I.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1940 and 1941.
Quantity,
1940.
Quantity,
1941.
Value, 1940.
Value, 1941.
Metallics.
Gold, lode*  -   	
Gold, placer*  — — 	
 oz.
 oz.
583,416
39,067
571,026
43,775
%
22,461,516
1,236,928
39,498,623
1,714,770
$
21,984,501
1,385,962
40,231,518
Antimony, bismuth, cadmium, magnesium,
mercury, plati-
3,120,053
64,911,837
66,722,034
  —_tons
Fuel.
Coal  (2,240 lb.)   -	
1,667,827
1,802,353
7,088,265
7,660,000
NON-METALLICS.
Barytes, diatomite, mica, and sulphur
Flux—limestone   - —  ~
1,002,317
31,262
120,043
10,831
1,760
1,035,462
 tons
69,420
82,337
50,929
141,320
850
220
1,225
441
15,101
9,611
1,166,213
1,252,423
Materials.
 No.
Clay Products and other Structural
Clay Products.
Brick—
8,655,120
987,161
7,532,760
485,816
795
132,434
38,328
140,727
8,294
47,543
130,842
11,321
10,094
129,541
  No.
17,645
210,911
609
12,216
   No.
21,000
163,096
11,230
Drain-tile, sewer-pipe - _  	
1,119,455
1,095,704
1,308
Totals  	
519,583
566,947
Other Structural Materials.
1,413,189
294,682
55,347
252,039
1,780,848
286,006
60,310
151,151
123,461
1,559
287,042
111,858
2,228
192,640
Stone—building, pulp-stone -  -  .
 tons
Totals  _ _	
2,015,257
2,278,315
75,701,155
78,479,719
Note.—In accordance with the Dominion of Canada " "War Measures Act" and Foreign Exchange Control
Regulations, it is not possible to set forth Provincial production figures in as detailed a manner as was done
heretofore.
Dominion production of copper is evaluated at the average price on the London market and British Columbia
production in the above table is likewise so valued, in order that Dominion and Provincial compilations agree. It is
to be noted that British Columbia copper is contracted and paid for in U.S. funds, and if such had been used, an
appreciable amount could be added to the above Provincial value.
* Canadian funds. A 12
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
TABLE II.—Average Metal Prices used in compiling Value of Provincial
Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc.
Year.
Gold,
Fine Ounce.
Silver,
Fine Ounce.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
1901 -	
1902  _	
$
20.67
Cents.
56.002 N.Y.
49.55      „
50.78      „
53.36 „
51.33      „
63.45      „
62.06
50.22      „
48.93      „
50.812    „
50.64 „
57.79
56.80      „
52.10      „
47.20      „
62.38      „
77.35      „
91.93
105.57      „
95.80      „
59.52      „
64.14
61.63      „
63.442    „
69.065 „
62.107    „
56.37 „
58.176    „
52.993    ,,
38.154    „
28.700    „
31.671    „
37.832    „
47.461    „
64.790    „
45.127    „
44.881    „
43.477    „
40.488    „
38.249    „
38.261   „
Cents.
16.11   N.Y.
11.70      „
13.24      „
12.82      „
15.59 „
19.28      „
20.00      „
13.20      „
12.98      „
12.738    „
12.38      „
16.341    „
15.27 „
13.60 „
17.28 „
27.202    „
27.18      „
24.63
18.70      „
17.45      „
12.50      „
13.38
14.42      „
13.02      „
14.042    „
13.795    „
12.92      „
14.570    „
18.107    „
12.982    „
8.116    „
6.380 Lond.
7.454    „
7.419    „
7.795    „
9.477    „
13.078    „
9.972    „
10.092    „
10.086    „
10.086 „
Cents.
2.577 N.Y.
3.66 „
3.81      „
3.88      „
4.24     „
4.81      „
4.80      „
3.78      „
3.85      „
4.00      „
3.98      „
4.024    „
3.93      „
3.50      „
4.17      „
6.172    „
7.91      „
6.67 „
5.19      „
7.16      „
4.09      „
5.16      „
6.54     „
7.287    „
7.848 Lond.
6.751    „
5.256    „
4.575    „
5.050    „
3.927    „
2.710    „
2.113    „
2.391    „
2.436    „
3.133    „
3.913    „
5.110    „
3.344    „
3.169    „
3.362    „
3.362 „
Cents.
1903      _
1904	
1905 	
1906                 	
1907                               	
1908                ...           	
1909-	
	
1910	
4.60 E St L
1911                        	
4 90
1912	
1913                 	
	
5.90      „
4.80
1914
4.40
1915
11.25
1916 -	
10.88
1917                              	
7.566    ,
1918    ..            - -	
	
6.94
1919                 	
6.24
1920
"
6.52
1921                  1	
3.95
1922 	
4.86
1923                 	
5.62
1924                             	
5.39
1925                                       	
7.892 Lond.
1926	
7.409    „
1927
6.194    „
1928                                       	
5.493    „
1929	
	
5.385    „
1930                   	
3.599    „
1931                  	
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.141
38.50
38.50
2.554    „
1932                 	
2.405    „
1933
3.210    „
1934    	
1935   	
1936                	
3.044    „
3.099    „
3.315    „
1937	
4.902    „
1938	
3.073    „
1939	
3.069    „
3.411    „
1941                  	
3.411  ,.
Average, 1937-41 (inclusive)  	
36.662
41.071    „
-    10.663    „
3.669    „
3.573    „
Note.—In making comparisons with average prices used prior to 1925, it should be remembered that deductions
were made from the average prices as a means of adjustment between the " assay value content" of ores shipped
instead of allowing percentage losses in smelting operations. The price of copper prior to 1925 was taken at "net";
silver, at 95 per cent.; lead, at 90 per cent.; and zinc, at 85 per cent. Subsequent to 1925 (inclusive) prices are
true averages, and adjustments are made on the metal content of ores for loss in smelting and refining. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 13
TABLE III.—Total Production for all Years up to and including 1941.
Gold, placer 	
Gold, lode	
Silver, copper, lead, zinc
Coal and coke	
Structural materials 	
Miscellaneous minerals, etc.
Total
$90,033,341*
293,217,485*
947,238,461
399,107,367
84,153,674
24,418,284
$1,838,168,612
* Canadian funds.
TABLE IV.—Production for each Year feom 1852 to 1941 (inclusive) .
1852 to 1895 (inclusive).
1896	
1897	
1898 _.	
1899 	
1900	
1901 	
1902 	
1903 	
1904	
1905 	
1906 	
1907 	
1908 	
1909 	
1910 	
1911 	
1912 	
1913 	
1914	
1915 	
1916 	
1917	
1918  J	
1919 	
$94,547,370
7,507,956
10,455,268
10,906,861
12,393,131
16,344,751
20,086,780
17,486,550
17,495,954
18,977,359
22,461,325
24,980,546
25,882,560
23,851,277
24,443,025
26,377,066
23,499,072
32,440,800
30,296,398
26,388,825
29,447,508
42,290,462
37,010,392
41,782,474
33,296,313
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
$35,543,084
28,066,641
35,162,843
41,304,320
48,704,604
61,492,242
67,188,842
60,729,358
65,372,583
68,245,443
55,391,993
34,883,181
*28,798,406
*32,602,672
*42,305,297
*48,821,239
*54,081,967
*74,475,902
*64,485,551
*65,681,547
*75,701,155
*78,479,719
Total  $1,838,168,612
* Canadian funds.
TABLE V.—Quantities and Value op Mine Products for 1939, 1940, and 1941.
1939.
1940.
1941.
Description.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
Gold, placer*      oz.
Gold, lode*   -- ........ .. oz.
Silver  oz.
Copper lb.
Lead  .  lb.
Zinc      lb.
Coal „.,  tons, 2,240 lb.
49,746
587,180
10,771,585
73,254,679
378,743,763
278,409,102
1,477,872
$1,478,492
21,221,272
4,361,199
7,392,862
12,002,390
8,544,375
6,280,956
1,832,434
2,567,567
39,067
583,416
1
$1,236,928
22,461,516
39,498,623
7,088,265
2,534,840
2,880,983
43,775
571,026
$1,385,962
21,984,501
40,231,518
7,660,000
2,845,262
4,372,476
J
1,667,827
1,802,353
Totals  	
$65,681,547
$75,701,155
$78,479,719
1 Canadian funds. A 14
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
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en A 16
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
TABLE VII.—Value of Gold Production to Date.
Year.
Placer.
Lode.
Total.
1858-1862  .
$9,871,634
16,283,592
9,895,318
9,019,201
5,579,911
3,841,515
2,525,426
356,131
405,516
481,683
544,026
513,520
643,346
1,344,900
1,278,724
970,100
1,073,140
1,060,420
1,115,300
969,300
948,400
828,000
647,000
477,000
540,000
426,000
555,500
510,000
565,000
770,000
580,500
496,000
320,000
286,500
221,600
233,200
368,800
420,000
420,750
280,092
355,503
156,247
143,208
118,711
152,235
291,992
395,542
' 562,787
714,431
895,058
1,249,940
1,558,245
1,671,015
1,478,492
1,236,928
1,385,962
$9,871,634
1863-1867	
16,283,592
1868-1872-	
9,895,318
1873-1877	
9,019,201
1878-1882 	
5,579,911
1883-1887   _ ..
3,841,515
1888-1892	
2,525,426
1893  '	
$23,404
125,014
785,400
1,244,180
2,122,820
2,201,217
2,857,573
3,453,381
4,348,603
4,888,269
4,812,616
4,589,608
4,933,102
4,630,639
4,055,020
5,282,880
4,924,090
5,533,380
4,725,513
5,322,442
5,627,490
5,109,004
5,167,934
4,587,334
2,367,190
3,403,812
3,150,645
2,481,392
2,804,154
4,089,684
3,704,994
5,120,535
4,335,269
4,163,859
3,679,601
3,888,097
3,004,419
3,323,576
3,018,894
4,261,307
6,392,929
10,250,985
12,852,936
14,168,654
16,122,727
19,613,624
21,221,272
22,461,516
21,984,501
379,535
1894	
530,530
1895   	
1,267,083
1896  	
1,788,206
1897 	
2,636,340
1898   .
2,844,563
1899	
4,202,473
1900 	
4,732,105
1901 	
5,318,703
1902 ... 	
1903	
5,961,409
5,873,036
1904 	
5,704,908
1905	
5,902,402
1906	
1907 	
1908	
5,579,039
4,883,020
5,929,880
1909     	
1910.  	
5,401,090
6,073,380
1911     _	
5,151,513
1912   _._..	
5,877,942
1913	
6,137,490
1914...  ....   	
5,674,004
1915    .
5,937,934
1916	
5,167,834
1917	
2,863,190
1918   ...
3,723,812
1919         -	
3,437,145
1920             	
2,702,992
1921      :  	
3,037,354
1922             	
4,458,484
1923   -	
1924                 	
4,124,994
5,541,285
1925       	
4,615,361
1926
4,519,362
1927   	
1928   —	
1929        	
3,835,843
4,031,305
3,123,130
1930    	
1931      -	
1932      	
3,475,811
3,310,886
4,656,849*
1933 	
1934                   	
6,955,716*
10,965,416*
1935 	
13,747,994*
1936 	
15,418,594*
1937	
17,680,972*
1938	
21,284,639*
1939              	
22,699,764*
1940	
23,698,444*
1941        	
23,370,463*
Totals   	
$90,033,341
$293,217,485
$383,250,826*
* Canadian funds. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 17
TABLE XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date.*
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
1915    1,611,129
1916   2,084,093
1917  2,149,975
1918 _  2,302,245
1919  2,267,541
1920 _  2,595,125
1921......  2,483,995
1922  2,511,843
1923  2,453,223
1924    1,939,526
1925  2,328,522
1926  2,330,036
1927  2,453,827
1928  2,526,702
1929   2,251,252
1930  1,887,130
1931  1,707,590
1932  1,534,975
1933  1,264,746
1934  1,347,090
1935...... _  1,187,968
1936  l  1,346,471
1937  1,444,687
1938  1,309,428
1939 _ 1,477,872
1940   1,667,827
19'41  1,802,353
1836-1885	
1886	
1887.....	
1888 	
1889	
Tons.
(2,2401b.)
  3,029,011
    326,636
   413,360
489,301
579,830
Value.
$9,468,557
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
1890 	
1891 	
1892	
   678,140
   1,029,097
826,335
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
1893 	
    978,294
2,934,882
1894 	
  1,012,953
3,038,859
1895  	
    939,654
2,818,962
1896 	
    896,222
2,688,666
1897 	
1898
    882,854
1,135,865
2,648,562
3,407,595
1899....-	
. 1,306,324
3,918,972
1900 	
1,439,595
4,318,785
1901	
1902	
  1,460,331
  1,397,394
4,380,993
4,192,182
1903. 	
1904	
.... 1,168,194
  1,253,628
3,504,582
3,760,884
1905	
1,384,312
4,152,936
1906 -	
  1,517,303
4,551,909
1907	
  1,800,067
6,300,235
1908 - :..
  1,677,849
5,872,472
1909	
  2,006,476
7,022,666
1910	
1911 	
  2,800,046
  2,193,062
9,800,161
7,675,717
1912	
1913	
  2,628,804
2,137,483
9,200,814
7,481,190
1914	
  1,810,967
6,338,385
Totals   93,466,558
Value.
$5,638,952
7,294,325
7,524,913
11,511,225
11,337,705
12,975,625
12,419,975
12,559,215
12,266,115
9,697,630
11,642,610
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565,069
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
$373,433,767
* For all years to 1925   (inclusive)  figures are net coal production and do not include coal made into coke;
sequent figures are entire coal production,  including coal made into coke.
sub-
TABLE XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens in British Columbia
from 1895 to 1925.
Tons.
Value.
(2,2401b.)
1895-97	
.  19,396
$96,980
1898 (estimated)	
   35,000
175,000
1899 ::...
34,251
171,255
1900 	
.......  85,149
425,745
1901 	
  127,081
635,405
1902	
  128,015
640,075
1903...... 	
  165,543
827,715
1904  	
  238,428
1,192,140
1905	
—- 271,785
1,358,925
1906.	
  199,227
996,135
1907..— 	
  222,913
1,337,478
1908.. 	
  247,399
1,484,394
1909	
258,703
1,552,218
1910 	
  218,029
1,308,174
1911..	
   66,005
396,030
1912  	
  264,333
1,585,998
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
1913  286,045
1914   234,577
1915  -  245,871
1916    267,725
1917-.    159,905
1918., .; -  188,967
1919 _   91,138
1920    67,792
1921...- _.   59,434
1922   45,835
1923   58,919
1924    30,615
1925   75,185
Totals  4,393,255
Value.
$1,716,270
1,407,462
1,475,226
1,606,350
959,430
1,322,769
637,966
474,544
416,038
320,845
412,433
214,305
526,295
$25,673,600 A 18
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
TABLE XVI.—Coke and By-products Production of British Columbia,
1940 AND 1941.
Description.
1940.
1941.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
164,429
$577,706
210,544
$717,584
33,790
26,004
54,220
$220,211
151,931
303,421
57,774
77,371
7,480
$392,473
467,440
43,758
114,014
$675,563
1,810,083
54,379
3,060
142,625
$903,671
1,925,270
63,569
-
1,716
$2,543,085
$2,894,226
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1941.
Lode-gold Mines*
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
Erie	
Gold.	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold —	
Gold 	
$76,567
Athabasca -    - -	
Nelson  	
Bridge River—	
Princess Royal Island    	
Wells      	
25,000
8,095,250
1,437,500
1,386,638
565,588
37,500
472,255
7,922
15,000
13,931
153,0-00
973,574
767,023
134,033
11,751
870,000
347,856
1,475,000
1,574,640
20,450
165,000
3,423,191
8,808,868
25,000
19,658,075
1,374,285
85,000
245 000
Camp McKinney.	
Gold	
Rossland  _ .
Gold	
Gold.. 	
Gold	
Nelson 	
Gold   	
Sheep Creek 	
Gold  	
Gold	
Wells	
Gold 	
Gold 	
Gold   	
I.X.L.                                  —   	
Greenwood 	
Gold 	
Gold --	
Sheep Creek _
Rossland 	
Gold —	
Gold     -	
Gold -	
Gold ..... - 	
Gold 	
Gold -	
Lome    	
Bridge River.	
Zeballos 	
Nickel Plate    	
Bridge River 	
Gold   	
Gold - -	
Zeballos 	
Gold	
Gold -	
Erie 	
Sheep Creek .— —
Sheep Creek—	
Gold .... -  	
Gold ... 	
926,040
1,556,250
1,400,000
168,000
115,007
Sheep Creek Mines, Ltd  	
Gold.	
Gold	
Gold. 	
Gold. -- 	
Gold ......	
Gold.	
Gold...  	
Gold  	
Gold...	
Gold    	
Spud Valley Gold Mines, Ltd _	
Sunset No. 2                       	
Rossland  - -	
Surf Inlet	
Rossland 	
Sheep Creek _ 	
Ymir   	
1,245.250
162,500
300.000
178 001
Ymir Gold      	
71,743
$58,461,247
* The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 19
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1941—Continued.
Silver-lead-zinc Mines.
j
Company or Mine.                                                            Locality.
r.                             Amount
Uass-                         paid.
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
$10,000
97,200
476,297
27,500
5,500
101,888,051
5,203
50,000
35,393
45,668
8,904
132,464
475,352
6,000
400,000
20,000
20,000
213,109
50,000
80,000
6,000
10,257
27,500
71,387
45,088
72,859
496,901
6,754
107,928
1,438,000
98,024
25,000
575,000
332,492
165,000
566,000
725,000
11,600
567,500
9,564
2,700,000
88,000
64,000
135,000
38,000
592,515
70,237
Beaverdell-Wellington  .„.	
Bell _	
Beaverdell ,,.	
Beaverdell 	
Capella  _„_
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd....
Trail	
Silver-lead-zinc .
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Field 	
Cody	
H.B. Mining Co.	
Hall Creek _	
Highland Bell, Ltd	
Similkameen 	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc —	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc -
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Iron Mountain (Emerald) _ _	
Salmo 	
Retallack 	
Three Forks	
Lone Bachelor    __     	
Lucky Jim  ,    	
Three Forks .	
Monitor and Ajax     	
Mountain Con  	
McAllister   ,,	
Noble Five .._ _ _ _	
North Star _	
Three Forks   ,,	
Cody 	
Silver-lead-zinc —	
Silver-lead-zinc —	
Silver-lead-zinc —	
Silver-lead-zinc —	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Cody 	
Kimberley -	
Sandon	
No. One „   ,   *	
Payne  __ _	
Providence    	
Sandon 	
Reco - - - - -
Cody	
Sandon 	
Moyie	
Sandon	
Alamo	
Sandon ,	
Ainsworth __        	
Silverton 	
Retallack	
St. Eugene     	
Slocan Star*  	
Wallace Mines, Ltd. (Sally)              	
Beaverdell	
Rambler Station	
Retallack 	
$113,092,247
* These two properties are now amalgamated as Silversmith Mines, Ltd., Augi.
ist, 1939. A 20
REPORT OP THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1941—Continued.
Copper Mines.
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
Britannia M. & S. Co.*                                                _	
Britannia Beach __._	
Greenwood 	
Cornell  .._            	
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co.f —'. 	
Copper Mountain 	
Texada Island ____
Nelson   ____	
Hall Mines. _ _ 	
Copper.
Copper
Copper
Copper
Copper
"Copper.
Copper
$11,060,816
615,399
8.5O0
8,835,894
175,000
233,280
261,470
$21,190,359
* The Howe Sound Company is the holding company for the Britannia mine in British Columbia and other mines
in Mexico and the State of Washington. Dividends paid by the Howe Sound Company are therefore derived from all
operations, and in the foregoing table the dividends credited to the Britannia mine have been paid by the Britannia
Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, none being credited subsequent to 1930, until 1939. In making comparison
with yearly totals the amounts credited to the Howe Sound Company have been deducted for the years shown, so the
total in the annual report concerned will show the higher figure. Dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company,
Limited, are derived from operations in British Columbia and other countries, and so cannot now be credited to
British Columbia. Silbak Premier is a subsidiary of Premier Gold Mining Company, and dividends paid by that
company are, of course, included in Provincial totals.
t The amount shown to the credit of the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power Company, Limited,
does not include the sum of $6,749,996 paid by the company during 1935 and 1936 as a distribution or repayment of
capital, subsequent to the closing-down of its operations at Anyox and the company going into voluntary liquidation.
Operations ceased at Anyox in August, 1935. The company since that date has revived its business charter and is
conducting operations at Allenby, B.C.
The term " Miscellaneous " noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under, together
with payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance
given by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject.
Coal.
Wellington Collieries, Ltd., Nanaimo     $16,000,000
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd., Fernie       12,681,664
Total     $28,681,664
Miscellaneous and Structural.
Various       $2,173,955
Aggregate of all Classes.
Lode-gold mining  $58,461,247
Silver-lead-zinc mining and smelting  113,092,247
Copper-mining  21,190,359
Coal-mining   28,681,664
Miscellaneous and structural  2,173,955
Total  $223,599,472 THE  MINING INDUSTRY. A 21
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1941—Continued.
Dividends paid Yearly, 1919 to 19hi, inclusive.
Year. Amount paid. Year. Amount paid.
1919  $2,494,283 1932  $2,786,958
1920  1,870,296 1933  2,471,735
1921  736,629 1934  4,745,905
1922  3,174,756 1935  7,386,070
1923  2,983,570 1936  10,513,705
1924  2,977,276 1937  15,085,293
1925  5,853,419 1938  12,068,875
1926  8,011,137 1939 1  11,865,698
1927  8,816,681 1940  14,595,530
1928  9,572,536 1941  16,599,402
1929   11,263,118 '	
1930   10,543,500 Total  $171,067,229
1931   4,650,857
Dividends paid during 191*0 ctnd 191*1.
1940. 1941.
Arlington (R. O. Oscarson)   $4,778 $4,900
Bralorne Mines, Ltd.   1,496,400 1,496,400
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd. 1,465,638 2,835,676
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mines, Ltd  319,994 319,994
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Co. of Canada, Ltd  7,367,455 8,190,823
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd  186,354 186,354
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd  102,000 51,000
Granby Consolidated Mining,  Smelting
and Power Co., Ltd  360,186 270,140
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd  181,130 181,130
Highland Bell, Ltd  105,268 105,268
Island Mountain Mines, Ltd  157,607 189,129
Kelowna Exploration (Nickel Plate)  270,000 300,000
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Ltd  81,024 44,016
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines, Ltd  110,000 55,000
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd  700,700 700,700
Privateer Mine, Ltd.   441,734 392,653
Eelief Arlington Mines, Ltd  150,000 90,000
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd  356,250 300,000
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd  400,000 400,000
Spud Valley Gold Mines, Ltd  84,000 84,000
Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd. 40,093 53,457
Ymir Yankee Girl, Ltd  44,500
Others   214,919 304,262
Totals  $14,595,530        $16,599,402 A 22
REPORT OP THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
TABLE XVIII.—Capital employed, Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity,
and Process Supplies, 1941.
Class.
Capital
employed.
Salaries
and Wages.
Fuel and
Electricity.
Process
Supplies.
$97,285,443
2,067,187
21,454,552
17,977,530
2,669,630
$19,350,739
576,104
3,952,076
1,374,208
797,364
$2,962,854
43,485
227,398
344,701
198,309
$5,221,671
Placer-mining ..	
56,598
841,176
Miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials	
Structural materials industry  	
1,105,045
35,951
Totals, 1941                 	
$141,454,342
$26,050,491
$3,776,747
$7,260,441
Grand totals, 1940 ■    _ ,
$139,694,733
135,473,482
153,012,848
145,520,641
142,663,065
143,239,953
$23,391,330
22,357,035
22,765,711
21,349,690
17,887,619
16,753,367
150,555,243
$3,474,721
2,066,203
3,396,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
21,123,871
$6,962,162
6,714,347
6,544,500
6,845,330
4,434,501
4,552,730
43,314,011
Grand totals, 1939...	
Grand totals, 1938.....  	
Grand totals, 1937	
Grand totals, 1936 ...'.  	
Grand totals, 1935    . 	
Grand totals, 1935-41  	
Note.—The above figures, compiled from returns on the subject made by companies and individuals, illustrate
the amount of capital employed in the mining industry, the amount of money distributed in salaries and wages,
fuel and electricity, and process supplies   (explosives, chemicals, drill steel, lubricants, etc.).
Capital employed includes: Present cash value of the land (excluding minerals) ; present value of buildings,
fixtures, machinery, tools, and other equipment; .inventory value of materials on hand, ore in process, fuel and
miscellaneous supplies on hand; inventory value of finished products on hand; operating capital (cash, bills and
accounts receivable, prepaid expenses, etc.).
TABLE XIX.—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode
Minerals, 1901-1941.
No. of Mines
Net Value
Gross Value
Tonnage.
No. of Ship-
shipping
to Shipper of
of Lode
pmg-mm.s.
oyer 100
Lode Minerals
Minerals
Tons.
produced.
produced.
920,416
119
78
998,999
124
75
11.581,153
1,286,176
125
74
12,103,237
1,401,600
142
76
1,706,679
146
79
15,980 164
1,963,872
154
77
1,804,114
147
72
17 316 847
2,083,606
108
59
18,847,411
2,057,713
89
52
2,216,428
83
50
1,770,755
80
45
11,454,063
2,688,532
80
51
2,063,809
110
58
2,175,971
98
56
2,690,110
132
59
19,992 149
3,188,865
169
81
2,761,579
193
S7
2,892,849
175
80
2,112,975
144
74
2,178,187
121
60
1,562,645
80
35
1,573,186
98
33
19,227 857
2,421,839
77
28
25 347 092
3,397,105
S6
37
35,538,247
3,849,269
102
40
46,200,135
51,508,031
4,775,073
138
55
$38,558,013
5.416,021
132
52
27,750,364
44,977,082
0,241,310
110
49
29,070,075
48,281,825
6,977,681
106
48
34,713,887
51,174.859
6,803,846
68
32
21,977,688
40,915,395
5,549,103
44
22
9,513,931
22,535.573
4,340,158
75
29 '
7,075,393
19,700,235
4,030,778
109
47
13,970,368
25,007,137
5,087,334
145
69
20,243,278
33.895,030
4,916,149
177
72
25,407.914
40,597,569
4,456,521
168
70
29,975,608
43,066,452
6,145,254
185
IIS
44,762,860
62,912,783
7,377,091
211
92
35,759,022
53,877,333
7,210,676
217
99
40,711,287
53,522,098
8,026,639
210
92
43,550,732
02,848,642
7,956,284
200
96
46,686,076
62,216,019
1901
1902
3 003
1004
1905
1900
1907.
1908
1009
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1017
1918
1919
1920.
1921.
1922,
1923
1924
1925
1920.
1927.
1928.
1029.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
1934
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940
1941 THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 23
TABLE XX.—Men employed in the Mining Industry of British Columbia,
1901-1941.
Year.
LODE-MINING.
o
03
£
w
C
o
£
o
W
c
a
1-1
Coal-mining.
Structural
Materials.
d> jj
£
«
as
cfl -n
O
3 C
■flj
H
Of cd
1901..
1902..
1903-
1904..
1905..
1900..
1907-
1908..
1909..
1910..
1911..
1912..
1913-
1914-
1915..
1910..
1917..
1918..
1919..
1920..
1921..
1922..
1923-
1924..
1925-
1926..
1927..
1928-
1929-
1930-
1931-
1932..
1933-
1934..
1935..
1936-
1937-
1938-
1939-
1940-
1941..
299
415
355
341
425
088
874
1,134
1,122
1,291
1,124
1,371
1,303
1,252
1,004
939
2,736
1,212
3,948
3,041
931
2,219
1,126
3,345
3,101
910
1,662
1,088
2,750
3,137
1,127
2,143
1,163
3,306
3,278
1,175
2,470
1,240
3,710
3,127
1,280
2,680
1,303
3,983
3,415
1,390
2,704
1,239
3,943
2,862
907
2,567
1,127
3,694
4,432
1,041
2,184
1,070
3,254
4,713
1,705
2,472
1,237
3,709
5,903
1,855
2,435
1,159
3,594
5,212
1,061
2,472
1,364
3,837
5,275
1,855
2,773
1,505
4,278
4,950
1,721
2,741
1,433
4,174
4,267
1,465
2,709
1,435
4,144
3,708
1,283
3,357
2,036
5,393
3,694
1,366
3,290
2,198
5,488
3,760
1,410
2,626
1,764
4,390
3,658
1,709
2,513
1,746
4,259
4,145
1,821
2,074
1,605
3,079
4,191
2,158
1,355
975
2,330
4,722
2,163
1,510
1,239
2,749
4,712
1,932
2,102
1,510
3,018
4,342
1,807
2,353
1,680
4,033
3,894
1,524
2,298
2,840
5,138
3,828
1,615
2,606
1,735
4,341
808
2,401
3,757
1,565
2,671
1,910
4,587
854
2,842
3,646
1,579
2,707
2,469
5,176
911
2,748
3,814
1,520
2,926
2,052
4,978
960
2,948
3,675
1,353
2,316
1,200
3,570
832
3,197
3,389
1,250
1,463
834
2 297
581
3,157
2,957
1,125
1,355
900
2,255
542
2,030
2,628
980
1,786
1,335
3,121
531
2,436
2,241
853
2,796
1,729
4,525
031
2,890
2,050
843
2,740
1,497
4,237
907
2,771
2,145
826
2,959
1,840
4,799
720
2,678
2,015
799
3,603
1,818
5,421
1,168
3,027
2,286
867
3,849
2,266
6,115
919
3,158
2,088
874
3,905
2,050
5,955
996
3,187
2,167
809
3,923
2,104
6,027
1,048
2,944
2,175
699
3,901
1,823
5,724
1,025
3,072
2,229
494
3,974
4,011
4,264
4,453
4,407
4,805
3,769
6,073
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4,991
5,060
5,170
5,247
5,966
6,349
6,885
6,644
6,149
5,418
5,443
5,322
5,225
5,334
5,028
4,645
4,082
3,608
3,094
2,893
2,971
2,814
3,153
2,962
2,976
2,874
2,723
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
327
900 I 295
652 | 311
827|334
766 413
I	
124
122
120
208
170
380
344
408
360
754
825
938
369
561
647
422
7,922
7,356
7,014
7,759
8,117
8,788
7,712
9,767
9,672
11.407
10,407
10,967
10,949
9,900
9,135
10,453
10,058
9,637
10,225
10,028
9,215
9,393
9,707
9,451
10,581
14,172
14,830
15,424
15,565
14,032
12,171
10,524
11,369
12,985
13,737
14,179
16,129
16,021
15,890
15,705
15,084*
* The average number of wage-earners was obtained by adding the monthly figures for individual companies and
dividing by 12 irrespective of the number of months worked, the average number of wage-earners in the industry is
the sum of these individual averages. A 24
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
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V
! THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 29
SYNOPSIS OF MINING LAWS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act.
The mining laws of British Columbia are very liberal in their nature and compare
favourably with those of any other part of the world. The terms under which both
lode and placer claims and placer leaseholds are held are such that a prospector is
greatly encouraged in his work, and the titles, especially for mineral claims and placer-
mining leaseholds, are perfect. The fees required to be paid are as small as possible,
consistent with a proper administration of the mining industry, and are generally lower
than those commonly imposed elsewhere. Provision is also made for the formation of
mining partnerships practically without expense, and a party of miners is enabled to
take advantage of these sections of the Acts so that such miners may work their
claims jointly.
Placer-mining leases are granted for a period of twenty years and are approximately 80 acres in size. On a lode claim of 51 acres the expenditure of $500 is required
to obtain a Crown grant, and surface rights are obtainable at a small figure, in no case
exceeding $5 per acre.
The following synopsis of the mining laws will be found sufficient to enable the
miner or intending investor to obtain a general knowledge of their scope and requirements; for particulars, however, the reader is referred to the Acts relating to mining,
which may be obtained from the Department of Mines or the King's Printer, Victoria,
B.C.
Free Miners' Certificates.
Any person over the age of 18, and any joint-stock company, may obtain a free
miner's certificate on payment of the required fee.
The fee to an individual for a free miner's certificate is $5 for one year. To
a joint-stock company having a capital of $100,000, or less, the fee for a year is $50;
if capitalized beyond this, the fee is $100. If the company has no stated capitalization,
the fee is $100.
The free miners' certificates run from date of issue and expire on the 31st day of
May next after its date, or some subsequent 31st day of May (that is to say, a certificate may be taken out a year or more in advance if desired). Certificates may be
obtained for any part of a year, terminating on May 31st, for a proportionately less fee.
The possession of this certificate entitles the holder to enter upon all lands of the
Crown, and upon any other lands on which the right to so enter is not specially
reserved, for the purpose of prospecting for minerals, locating claims, and mining.
A free miner can hold, by location, during any period of twelve months, eight
mineral claims within a radius of 10 miles, and may acquire others by purchase.
Under the " Placer-mining Act," a free miner may locate, in any period of twelve consecutive months, one placer claim or leasehold in his own name and one placer claim
or leasehold for each of three free miners for whom he acts as agent, on any separate
creek, river-bed, bar or dry diggings. Other placer claims or leaseholds may be
acquired by purchase.
In the event of a free miner allowing his certificate to lapse, his mining property
(if not Crown-granted) reverts to the Crown (subject to the conditions set out in the
next succeeding paragraph), but where other free miners are interested as partners
or co-owners the interest of the defaulter becomes vested in the continuing co-owners
or partners pro rata, according to their interests.
Six months' extension of time within which to revive title in mining property
which has been forfeited through the lapse of a free miner's certificate is allowed.
This privilege is given only if the holder of the property obtains a special free miner's
Certificate within six months after the 31st of May on which his ordinary certificate
lapsed. The fee for this special certificate in the case of a person is $15 and in that
of a company $300.
It is not necessary for a shareholder, as such, in an incorporated mining company
to be the holder of a free miner's certificate. A 30 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
Mineral Claims.
Mineral claims are located and held under the provisions of the " Mineral Act."
A mineral claim is a piece of land not exceeding in area fifty-one and sixty-five
one-hundredths acres. The angles must be right angles unless the boundaries, or one
of them, are the same as those of a previously recorded claim.
No special privileges are allowed for the discovery of new mineral claims or
districts.
A mineral claim is located by erecting two " legal posts," which are stakes having
a height of not less than 4 feet above ground and squared 4 inches at least on each face
for not less than a foot from the top. A tree-stump so cut and squared also constitutes
a legal post. A cairn of stones not less than 4 feet in height and not less than 1 foot
in diameter 4 feet above the ground may also be used as a legal post. Upon each of
these posts must be written the name of the claim, the name of the locator, and the
date of location.    On No. 1 post, in addition, the following must be written:   " Initial
post.    Direction of Post No. 2  [giving approximate compass-bearing'] feet of
this claim lie on the right and feet on the left of the line from No. 1 to No. 2
posts."    Numbered metal identification tags must be attached to both posts at the time
of staking.
The location-line between Nos. 1 and 2 posts must be distinctly marked—in a timbered locality by blazing trees and cutting underbrush, and in bare country by monuments of earth or rock not less than 2 feet in diameter at the base, and at least 2 feet
high—so that the line can be distinctly seen.
Mineral claims must be recorded in the Mining Recorder's office for the mining
division in which they are situate within fifteen days from the date of location, one
day extra being allowed for each 10 miles of distance from the recording office after
the first 10 miles. If a claim is not recorded in time it is deemed abandoned and open
for relocation, but if the original locator wishes to relocate he can only do so by permission of the Gold Commissioner of the district and upon the payment of a fee of $10.
This applies also to a claim abandoned for any reason whatever.
Mineral claims are, until the Crown grant is issued, held practically on a yearly
lease, a condition of which is that during such year assessment-work be performed on
the same to the value of at least $100, or a payment of such sum be made to the Mining
Recorder. Such assessments must be recorded before the expiration of the year, or
the claim is deemed abandoned. If, however, the required assessment-work has been
performed within the year, but not recorded within that time, a free miner may,
within thirty days thereafter, record such assessment-work upon payment of an additional fee of $10. The actual cost of the survey of a mineral claim, to an amount not
exceeding $100, may also be recorded as assessment-work. If, during any year, work
is done to a greater extent than the required $100, any further sum of $100—but not
less—may be recorded and counted as further assessments; such excess work must be
recorded during the year in which it is performed. All work done on a mineral claim
between the time of its location and recording may be counted as work done during
the first period of one year from the recording. As soon as assessment-work to the
extent of $500 is recorded and a survey made of the claim, the owner of a mineral
claim is entitled to a Crown grant on payment of a fee of $25, and giving the necessary
notices required by the Act. Liberal provisions are also made in the Act for obtaining mill-sites and other facilities in the way of workings and drains for the better
working of claims.
Placer Claims.
Placer-mining is governed by the " Placer-mining Act," and by the interpretation
clause its scope is defined as " the mining of any natural stratum or bed of earth,
gravel, or cement mined for gold or other precious minerals or stones." Placer claims
are of four classes, as follows:—
" ' Creek diggings ':   any mine in the bed of any stream or ravine:
" ' Bar diggings ': any mine between high- and low-water marks on a river, lake,
or other large body of water:
" ' Dry diggings ':  any mine over which water never extends: THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 31
" ' Precious-stone diggings ': any deposit of precious stones, whether in veins,
beds, or gravel deposits."
The following provisions as to extent of the various classes of claims are made by
the Act:—
" In ' creek diggings ' a claim shall be two hundred and fifty feet long, measured
in the direction of the general course of the stream, and shall extend in width
one thousand feet, measured from the general course of the stream five hundred feet on either side of the centre thereof:
" In ' bar diggings ' a claim shall be:—
"(a.)  A piece of land not exceeding two hundred and fifty feet square on any
bar which is covered at high water;   or
"(b.)  A strip of land two hundred and fifty feet long at high-water mark, and
in width extending from high-water mark to extreme low-water mark.
" In ' dry diggings ' a claim shall be two hundred and fifty feet square."
The following provision is made for new discoveries of placer-mining ground:—
" If any free miner, or party of free miners, discovers a new locality for the
prosecution of placer-mining and such discovery be established to the satisfaction of'
the Gold Commissioner, placer claims of the following sizes shall be allowed to such
discoverers, namely:—
"To one discoverer, one claim    600 feet in length;
" To a party of two discoverers, two claims amounting together
to 1,000 feet in length;
" And to each member of a party beyond two in number, a claim of the ordinary
size only.
" The width of such claims shall be the same as ordinary placer claims of the same
class: Provided that where a discovery claim has been established in any locality no
further discovery shall be allowed within five miles therefrom, measured along the
watercourses."
Every placer claim shall be as nearly as possible rectangular in form, and marked
by four legal posts at the corners thereof, firmly fixed in the ground. On each of such
posts shall be written the name of the locator, the number and date of issue of his free
miner's certificate, the date of the location, and the name given to- the claim. In timbered localities boundary-lines of a placer claim shall be blazed so that the posts can be
distinctly seen, underbrush cut, and the locator shall also erect legal posts not more
than 125 feet apart on all boundary-lines. In localities where there is no timber or
underbrush, monuments of earth and rock, not less than 2 feet high and 2 feet in
diameter at base, may be erected in lieu of the last-mentioned legal posts, but not in
the case of the four legal posts marking the corners of the claim.
A placer claim must be recorded in the office of the Mining Recorder for the mining division within which the same is situate, within fifteen days after the location
thereof, if located within 10 miles of the office of the Mining Recorder by the most
direct means of travel. One additional day shall be allowed for every 10 miles additional or fraction thereof. The number of days shall be counted inclusive of the days
upon which such location was made, but exclusive of the day of application for record.
The application for such record shall be under oath and in the form set out in the
Schedule to the Act. A claim which shall not have been recorded within the prescribed
period shall be deemed to have been abandoned.
To hold a placer claim for more than one year it must be rerecorded before the
expiration of the record or rerecord.
A placer claim must be worked by the owner, or some one on his behalf, continuously, as far as practicable, during working-hours. If work is discontinued for a
period of seven days, except during the close season, lay-over, leave of absence, sickness, or for some other reason to the satisfaction of the Gold Commissioner, the claim
is deemed abandoned.
Lay-overs are declared by the Gold Commissioner upon proof being given to him
that the supply of water is insufficient to work the claim. Under similar circumstances
he has also the power to declare a close season, by notice in writing and published in A 32 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
the Gazette, for all or any claims in his district. Tunnel and drain licences are also
granted by him on the person applying giving security for any damage that may arise.
Grants of right-of-way for the construction of tunnels or drains across other claims
are also granted on payment of a fee of $25, the owner of the claims crossed having
the right for tolls, etc., on the tunnel or drain which may be constructed. These tolls,
however, are, so far as the amount goes, under the discretion of the Gold Commissioner.
Co-owners and Partnerships.
In both the " Mineral " and " Placer-mining " Acts provision is made for the
formation of mining partnerships, both of a general and limited liability character.
These are extensively taken advantage of and have proved very satisfactory in their
working. Should a co-owner fail or refuse to contribute his proportion of the expenditure required as assessment-work on a claim he may be " advertised out," and his
interest in the claim shall become vested in his co-owners who have made the required
expenditure, pro rata according to their former interests.
It should not be forgotten that if any co-owner permits his free miner's certificate
to lapse, the title of his associates is not prejudiced, but his interest reverts to the
remaining co-owners; provided that said co-owner has not taken advantage of the six
months' period of grace allowed for the taking-out of a special free miner's certificate,
thus reviving the title to his interest.
Placer-mining Leases.
Leases of unoccupied Crown lands approximately 80 acres in extent may be
granted by the Gold Commissioner of the district after location has been made by
staking along a " location-line " not more than one-half a mile (2,640 feet) in length.
In this line one bend, or change of direction, is permitted. Where a straight line is
followed two posts only are necessary—namely, an " initial post " and a " final post."
Where there is a change of direction a legal post must be placed to mark the point of
the said change. The leasehold is allowed a width not in excess of one-quarter mile
(1,320 feet), and the locator, both on his " initial post " and in his notice of intention
to apply, which is posted at the office of the Mining Recorder, is required to state how
many feet are included in the location to the right and how many feet to the left of
the location-line.
That section of the Act dealing with the staking of placer-mining leases follows:—
" 105. (1.) For the purpose of locating a placer leasehold, a line to be known as
the ' location-line ' shall be marked on the ground by placing a legal post at each end,
one post to be known as the ' Initial Post' and the other as the ' Final Post.' The
direction of the location-line may change at not more than one point throughout its
length, and an intermediate legal post shall be placed at the point at which the direction changes. The total length of the location-line, following its change of direction
(if any), shall not exceed two thousand six hundred and forty feet.
"(2.) Upon the initial post and the final post shall be written the words ' Initial
Post' and ' Final Post' respectively, together with the name of the locator and the
date of the location. On the initial post shall also be written the approximate compass-
bearing of the final post, and a statement of the number of feet of the leasehold lying
on the right and on the left of the location-line, as viewed from the initial post, not
exceeding in the aggregate a width of thirteen hundred and twenty feet, thus: ' Direction of Final Post, . feet of this claim lie on the right and feet
on the left of the location-line.' In addition to the foregoing, where there is a change
of direction in the location-line as marked on the ground, the number ' 1' shall be
written on the initial post; the number ' 2' shall be written on the intermediate post;
and the number ' 3' shall be written on the final post. There also shall be affixed to
the initial post a notice to the following effect, namely: ' Application will be made
under the " Placer-mining Act" for a lease of the ground within this location.'
"(3.) The location-line shall at the time of location be marked between the legal
posts throughout its length so that it can be distinctly seen; in a timbered locality, by
blazing trees and cutting underbrush, and in a locality where there is neither timber THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 33
nor underbrush, by placing legal posts or monuments of earth or stones not less than
two feet high and not less than two feet in diameter at the base, so that the location-
line can be distinctly seen.
"(4.) Where, from the nature or shape of the surface of the ground, it is impracticable to mark the location-line of a leasehold as provided by this section, the leasehold may be located by placing .legal posts as witness-posts, as near as possible to the
location-line, and writing on each witness-post the distance and compass-bearing of
some designated point on the location-line from the witness-post; and the distances
and compass-bearing so written on the witness-posts shall be set out in the application
for the lease and in any lease granted thereon.
"(5.) The locator shall, within thirty days after the date of the location, post a
notice in Form I in the office of the Mining Recorder, which notice shall set out:—
"(a.)   The name of the intending applicant or each applicant if more than one,
and the numbers of their free miners' certificates:
"(6.)   The date of the location:
"(c.)   The number of feet lying to the right and left of the location-line, and
the approximate area or size of the ground.
Examples of Various Methods of laying out Placer Leaseholds.
Showing Areas secured with Location-lines of Various Lengths.
Final Post-^ ^Final Post
nitial Post
Initial  Post^
Initial PostNo.l
Final Post A 34 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
The words written on the initial post and final post shall be set out in full in the notice;
and as accurate a description as possible of the ground to be acquired shall be given,
having special reference to any prior locations it may join, and the general locality of
the ground to be acquired."
Another provision is that there must be affixed to the " initial post " and to the
" final post " a numbered metal identification tag furnished by the Mining Recorder
with each free miner's certificate issued. These tags must be attached to the posts or
placed in a container within a cairn, at the time of location.
The annual rental on a placer-mining lease is $30, and the amount to be expended
annually on development-work is $250.
Authority also has been given for the granting of special placer-mining leases in
locations other than has been defined.
For more detailed information the reader is referred to the complete " Placer-
mining Act," which may be obtained from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C.
Table of Fees, Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act.
Individual free miner's certificate, annual fee  $5.00
Company free miner's certificate (capital $100,000 or less), annual fee  50.00
Company free miner's certificate (capital over $100,000), annual fee  100.00
Recording mineral claim  2.50
Recording certificate of work, mineral claim  2.50
Recording abandonment, mineral claim  10.00
Recording abandonment, placer claim  2.50
Recording any affidavit  2.50
Records in "Records of Conveyances" (for each claim or lease)  2.00
For each additional claim or lease in the same document  .50
Filing documents, " Mineral Act "  .25
Filing documents, " Placer-mining Act "  1.00
Recording certificate of work, placer-mining lease  2.50
For Crown grant of mineral rights under " Mineral Act"  25.00
For Crown grant of surface rights of mineral claim under " Mineral Act"  10.00
For every lease under " Placer-mining Act "  5.00
Provisional Free Miners' Certificates  (Placer) Act.
This Act provides for the issuance of " provisional free miners' certificates " for
the locating, recording, representing, and working of placer claims of a size, and
according to the terms, and in the manner set out in Parts II. and III. of the " Placer-
mining Act." Any person over 18 years of age who has resided in the Province continuously for a period of not less than six months prior to date of his application may,
on application accompanied by a statutory declaration or other satisfactory evidence
as to his age and period of residence in the Province, obtain from any Gold Commissioner or Mining Recorder a provisional free miner's certificate. No fees are payable
in respect of such certificate, and it abolishes the fees payable in respect of the recording or rerecording of placer claims, but no record or rerecord of a claim shall be
granted for a longer period than one year without the payment of fees. It should be
pointed out that the provisional free miner's certificate does not carry the privileges
of an ordinary free miner's certificate as to the staking and working of placer-mining
leases or mineral claims.
The Act also gives the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, as a means of unemployment relief, power to make provision for the establishment, equipment, maintenance,
and operation of one or more placer training camps at suitable locations, at which
unemployed persons who hold provisional free miners' certificates and are British subjects may acquire knowledge and training in the art of placer-mining and may be
afforded gainful work in the recovery of minerals by placer-mining. Reserves for the
location of such camps shall not exceed one mile in length by one-half mile in width,
and the right is given to enter into agreements with private holders under the Act for
the development of their ground by means of unemployment relief camps. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 35
Department of Mines Act.
The " Department of Mines Act " empowers the Minister of Mines to organize the
Department or to reorganize it from time to time to meet changing conditions in the
mining industry. It provides for examination and certification of assayers; for the
conducting of short courses of lectures in practical geology and mineralogy; and for
the purchase of ore from the Provincial sampling plants. The said Act also provides
for the expenditure of public moneys for the construction, reconstruction, or repair of
trails, roads, and bridges to facilitate the exploration of the mineral resources of any
mining district, or in the operation and development of any mining property.
Iron and Steel Bounties Act.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may enter into an agreement with any person
whereby the Crown will pay to that person, out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund,
bounties on pig-iron and steel shapes when manufactured within the Province, as
follows:—
(a.)   In respect of pig-iron manufactured from ore, on the proportion produced from ore mined in the Province, a bounty not to exceed three
dollars per ton of two thousand pounds:
(b.)  In respect of pig-iron manufactured from ore, on the proportion produced from ore mined outside the Province, a bounty not to exceed one
dollar and fifty cents per ton of two thousand pounds:
(c.)   In respect of steel shapes of commercial utility manufactured in the
Province, a bounty not to exceed one dollar per ton of two thousand
pounds.
Bounty, as on pig-iron under this Act, may be paid upon the molten iron from ore
which in the electric furnace, Bessemer or other furnace, enters into the manufacture
of steel by the process employed in such furnace;  the weight of such iron to be ascertained from the weight of the steel so manufactured.
Bounty on steel shapes under this Act shall be paid only upon such steel shapes as
are manufactured in a rolling-mill having a rated productive capacity per annum of at
least twenty thousand tons of two thousand pounds per ton. The total amount of
bounties paid under clauses (a) and (b) is limited to $200,000 in any one year or
$2,000,000 in the aggregate; and the total amount of bounties paid under clause (c) is
limited to $20,000 in any one year or $200,000 in the aggregate.
Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act.
This Act is designed to provide for the safe working of mines by practical regulations which govern the main phases of mining, such as hoisting installations, ropes,
shaft and cage equipment, mine examination, transportation systems, electrical installations, use of explosives, approaching abandoned workings, and the connection of
adjacent mines.
Shaft-hoists are required to be equipped with overwind devices and approved
braking systems, and all hoistmen in charge must have an annual medical examination
and certificate testifying their fitness to perform this work. Hoisting-ropes where
men are hoisted must have a static factor of safety of at least 10 for depths of 1,000
feet, with an allowable decrease of one for each 500 feet additional depth with a minimum factor of safety of 6. The working-life of a hoisting-rope when men are hoisted
or lowered is limited to two years.
Cages must be provided with safety-catches, properly designed covers, and safety-
gates where men are hoisted.    Safety-catches must be tested at stated intervals.
The manager of the mine or some qualified person appointed by him must make
a daily examination of all places in the mine where persons are at work and report
the conditions found in regard to safety in a book kept at the mine for that purpose.
All persons handling or using explosives must hold a certificate of competency
for blasting.    This certificate is issued by the district Inspector of Mines to miners who show by an oral examination that they are qualified to use explosives safely. This
certificate may be cancelled for cause.
Where the workings of any mine are approaching any abandoned workings,
whether belonging to that mine or to an adjacent mine, the manager of the present
workings shall report the circumstance to the Inspector of Mines if the abandoned
workings cannot be examined before the live workings are closer than 300 feet to the
abandoned workings, and no work shall be done within this distance until a definite
method of approach has been submitted to and approved by the Inspector.
Where it is considered necessary, the Minister of Mines may order a connection to
be made and maintained between adjacent mines, and determine the conditions under
which such a connection must be maintained.
All electrical installations must comply with the requirements of the " Electrical
Energy Inspection Act " of British Columbia.
In addition to the Act and General Rules applicable to all mines, each mine which
employs fifty or more men must have a code of Special Rules covering the details of
operation at that mine. These Special Rules are drafted by the mining company and
its employees and, when approved by the Minister of Mines, have the full force of law.
The Inspectors of Mines in the different districts have discretionary authority on
a number of points that may arise in the course of mining operations.
Coal-mines Regulation Act.
This Act, like the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act," is designed to provide
for the safe working of mines by practical regulations. It is, however, broader in
scope than the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act " in that it provides for the
examination and licensing of coal-mine officials and miners.
Explosives.
Under the provisions of Dominion Order in Council No. 2903, issued July 4th,
1940, no person or company may own or purchase explosives, except under a special
permit prescribed and issued under this order. Each purchase of explosives requires
a separate permit, except in the case of mining and quarrying operations, in which
cases the Provincial Inspector of Mines has authority to issue the explosives purchase
permit for one calendar year.
Only the owner of an explosives factory or a licensed magazine may sell explosives,
but an exemption is made in the case of any mining company to the extent that such
a company may be permitted, on applying for the necessary authority, to resell small
quantities of explosives to properly qualified prospectors in their district. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 37
SUMMARY OF ACTS SPECIALLY RELATING TO MINING.
(The complete Acts may be obtained from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C.)
Mining Licences under the Coal and Petroleum Act.
Any person desiring to prospect for coal, petroleum, or natural gas upon any unsur-
veyed unreserved lands in which these resources are held by the Crown may acquire a
licence to do so over a rectangular block of land not exceeding 640 acres, of which the
boundaries shall run due north and south and east and west, and no side shall exceed
80 chains (1 mile) in length. Before entering into possession of the said lands he shall
place at the corner of such block a legal stake, or initial post, and shall inscribe thereon
his name and the angle represented by such post, thus: " A. B.'s N.E. corner," or as
the case may be, and shall post in a conspicuous place upon the said land, and also in
the Government office of the land recording district, notice of his intention to apply,
as well as publishing the same in the B.C. Gazette and local newspaper once each week
for four consecutive weeks. If the area applied for is surveyed no staking is required,
but the same procedure with regard to advertising notice of intention to apply is
necessary.
The application for said licence shall be in writing, in duplicate, and shall contain
the best written description possible, with a diagram of the land sought to be acquired,
and shall be accompanied with a fee of $100. The application shall be made to the
Commissioner of Lands for the district, within sixty days from date of first publication
in B.C. Gazette, and by him forwarded to the Minister of Lands, who will grant such
licence—provided no reasons arise to the contrary—for a period not to exceed one year,
and at the expiration of the first year an extension of such licence may be granted for
a second or third year at a fee of $100.
Where coal is discovered during the existence of licence or within thirty days after
expiration, the land held under licence, having been surveyed and licence conditions
fulfilled, may be leased for five years at rental of 15 cents an acre, subject to renewals
for five successive periods of three years each, renewal fee being $100 for each lease,
in addition to annual rental.
Lessees, on showing continuous work has been done and reasonable expenditure
made for development, may, after carrying out the provisions of the lease, purchase at
$20 per acre where surface is available, or $15 per acre for under-surface rights where
surface is not available. Lands under the sea may be purchased at $15 per acre. Provided also that, in addition to the rental or purchase price, there shall be paid to the
Government as a royalty 2% cents a barrel (35 imperial gallons) of crude petroleum
raised or gotten from such land.     (See chapter 175, R.S.B.C. 1936.)
Taxation Act.
(Reverted Crown-granted Mineral Claims.)
A preliminary note is essential to the understanding of this Act. As the law has
stood, a Crown-granted mineral claim on which taxes were in arrears for a number of
years was offered for sale by the Government at a tax sale, with arrears of taxes plus
interest and charges and Crown-grant fees as an upset price. If no sale was made the
property remained in the hands of the Assessor until desired by some one, when it could
only be purchased by tender. It was not open to location under the " Mineral Act " and
a prospector had no protection, and to relieve the situation an amending Act was passed.
Under the amended Act such reverted Crown-granted mineral claim may be
obtained by any person under a lease for one year upon payment of $25, and a renewal
of such lease may be granted upon payment of further $25 for a further period of one
year, but no longer. During the period of such lease the lessee has the right to enter,
prospect, and mine on such mineral claim, save for coal, petroleum, and natural gas,
and during such time the lessee has the option to purchase such Crown-granted mineral
claim upon payment of all taxes, costs, and interest which remained due and unpaid on
such claim on the date of its forfeiture to the Crown, together with an amount equal A 38 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
to all taxes and interest which, except for its forfeiture to the Crown, would have been
payable in respect thereof from the date of the lease to the date of application for a
Crown grant. If, however, the lessee establishes to the satisfaction of the Gold Commissioner that he has expended upon the claim in mining-development work a sum of
not less than $200 a year during the continuance of the lease, then the payment of the
sum in respect of taxes and penalties from the date of the lease to the date of application for a Crown grant shall not be required. There is also payable a Crown-grant fee
of $25. Provision also is made for the grouping of adjoining claims, not exceeding
eight in number, and the performing on one of such claims mining-development work
for all of the claims.
A person may obtain a lease, or interest in a lease, of eight such claims in the same
mining division.
Such leases are not transferable and are subject to the rights any person may
already hold to any portion of the surface of such Crown-granted mineral claim.
Taxation of Mines.
Crown-granted mineral claims are subject to a tax of 25 cents per acre. The tax
becomes due on April 1st in each year, and if unpaid on the following June 30th is
deemed to be delinquent.
AH mines, other than coal, are subject to an output tax (payable quarterly) of
2 per cent, on gross value of mineral, less cost of transportation from mine to reduction-
works and the cost of treating same at reduction-works or on the mining premises.
Any such mine, not realizing on ore shipments a market value of $5,000 in any one
year, is entitled to a refund of the output tax paid.
Coal is subject to a tax of 10 cents per ton of 2,240 lb., except coal shipped to coke-
ovens within the Province.    Tax payable monthly.
Coke is subject to a tax of 10 cents per ton of 2,240 lb., except in respect of coke
produced from coal upon which this tax has already been paid.    Tax payable monthly.
Coal land from which coal is being mined (Class A) is taxed at 1 per cent, upon
the assessed value, in addition to any other tax.
Unworked coal land, known as " Coal Land, Class B," is subject to a tax of 2 per
cent, upon the assessed value.
For further particulars see the " Taxation Act," also the " Public Schools Act,"
which are obtainable from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C.
The Federal Government now collects the income tax for all Provincial Governments.
CHEMICAL LABORATORY.
BY
G. Cave-Browne-Cave.
During the year 1941 the staff of the Department of Mines Chemical Laboratory
performed 4,023 assays for precious and base metals in ores. Of these, 2,742 were for
bona-fide prospectors and for departmental engineers, and 1,281 were for the Department's sampling plant at Prince Rupert. A sharp increase in the number of assays for
strategic metals was noted.
Proximate analyses and B.T.U. determinations were made on 111 coal samples. Of
these, eighty-two were for the Department and twenty-nine were for the Department of
Public Works.
As part of the free service offered to bona-fide prospectors, 202 mineral specimens
were examined, qualitative tests made and the minerals identified.
During the year 1941, 580.038 oz. of placer gold were received from the Gold Commissioners, who are purchasing amounts up to 2 oz. to aid the prospectors in disposing
of their placer gold. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 39
For the Attorney-General's Department twenty-four examinations of a chemico-
legal nature were undertaken. Eight of these were toxicological analyses. The rest
were of a widely varied nature, involving the examination of such samples as particles
of glass, paint chips, textile fibres, beer, rectified spirits, and rubbing-alcohol.
Analyses of eight water samples for mineral contents, three soils, and three samples
of rectified spirits for ethyl alcohol completed the analytical work by the staff.
No fees were charged for work done for other Government Departments, but had
such fees been charged they would have amounted to the following:—
Attorney-General's Department  $519.00
Department of Public Works     298.00
Department of Agriculture       24.00
Liquor Control Board         9.00
Miscellaneous        25.00
$875.00
Provincial Government examinations for certificates of competency and licence to
practise assaying in British Columbia, were held in May and December.    Four candidates sat for the examinations, of whom three were granted licences to practise assaying
in this Province.
During the summer of 1941 the interior of the Laboratory was thoroughly redesigned and modernized. These alterations resulted in a sharp increase in the efficiency
and speed with which the staff could work. But the most notable step taken in this
modernization plan was the installation in December of an excellent and modern grating
spectrograph, and all the spectrograph^ accessories necessary for the performance of
precise and accurate spectro-chemical analyses. The first major research project to be
undertaken with this equipment is a Province-wide survey of thousands of ore samples
in the hope of discovering hitherto unreported strategic metals.
DEPARTMENT OF MINES SAMPLING PLANT,
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
BY
Joseph T. Mandy.
The function, objective, and operation of the sampling plant at Prince Rupert are
described in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines for the years 1938 and 1939.
During 1941 the activity of the plant was well sustained and many prospectors,
lessees, and small operators developing properties over a wide field, extending to the
west coast of Vancouver Island, took advantage of its utility throughout the year.
During the year $13,583.93 was paid by the plant to shippers.
The details of these shipments can be analysed by scrutiny of the following
tabulations.
It is of interest to note that since the inception of this service in August, 1937, and
up to December 31st, 1941, the sampling plant has handled a total of 670 shipments for
which $45,791.47 has been paid to shippers. During the same period thirty-six shipments have been made by the plant to the smelters, for which $45,817.15 has been
received. This sums up to the remarkably small difference of only $25.68, or 0.056 per
cent, between the value of the purchase of the ore by the plant and the value of its sale
to the smelters. A 40
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
The following is a synopsis of the operating details of the plant for the year 1941
from January 1st to December 31st:—
Class of Shipments.
No. of
Shipments.
No. of Different
Properties.
Weight of
Shipments.
25
81
21
14
36
10
Dry Tons.
Totals. - -— -           	
127
47
SHIPMENTS FROM SAMPLING PLANT TO SMELTERS.
Number of shipments to smelters (Lots 26-36 OSP/PR).
Dry tons paid for by smelters '.	
Paid out by plant on Ore Purchasing Account	
Received from smelters	
11
139.84*
$13,583.93
$13,737.32
* Difference between this figure and the total weight of shipments received during the year (119.3244 dry tons)
is accounted for by carry-over at the end of 1940 and end of 1941.
The details of the tonnage, bulk test lots, and assay lots, with relative assay and
analysis results, follow. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 41
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ct- THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 45
GOLD-MINE LEASING EXPERIMENT.
BY
R. J. Maconachie.
The Department conducted an experiment in the leasing of small gold properties
with the object of (1) assisting owners of small idle mining properties, (2) if possible
to improve such properties to make them attractive to capital, and (3) to actually produce gold and so create foreign exchange. In addition to the foregoing, actual mining
costs on small operations would be obtained. This information is not ordinarily available and that obtained from the season's operations will prove particularly valuable as
a guide to possible mining costs in the case of small war mineral operations that may
be developed in the near future in this Province. ,
A working capital of $10,000 was provided; it being understood that not more than
half of this amount could be used at the start for the purchase of equipment and
supplies, and that any such expenditures would be chargeable against the operations.
Operations were to be confined to properties which had sufficient gold ore in sight
to cover the cost of extraction. Should the operation show profit, then the profit could
be used for development-work in search for other ore-bodies.
The scale of operation was intended to be slightly larger than that of the individual
leaser and smaller than that undertaken ordinarily by mining companies.
The West Kootenay district, with Nelson as a centre, was selected as the most
promising area in which to carry out the experiment.
The expenses of the writer, in charge of the experiment, were not to be charged
against the operation.
During the course of the field season twenty-seven properties were examined with
a view to operations and many others given consideration through data supplied by the
owners and from engineers' reports. Of the properties examined three were sufficiently
attractive to warrant attention. One of the properties, the Arlington, did not meet all
the requirements of the scheme but the other two, the California and the Chapleau, met
the requirements.
The Arlington operation met the requirements in that it appeared reasonably certain
that some gold could be produced from the dumps, but failed to meet the requirements
in that the property itself would not be improved.
The Chapleau was operated for a short time, when it was found that the ore mined
was not covering expenses and that some expense would have to be made to test other
possibilities, and this did not come within the scope of the experiment.
The California operation met all the requirements and the property was operated
from June 1st to October 5th. This property was idle when taken up and when the
lease was relinquished by the Department the owner was able to immediately lease it.
The accompanying table shows a breakdown of the costs of this operation. The
expenses of the writer in supervising this operation are not included so that the results
will more nearly approximate those of a small group of leasers. Two shifts of two men
each, with generally a fifth man available for tramming, mucking, sharpening bits, and
truck-driving, comprised the crew. The writer had several operators check this operation to see where costs could be reduced, and it was generally agreed that the operation
was carried on without any undue expense.    The pay-streak averaged 4 inches.
The cost per ton is astonishingly high in view of the generally accepted cost of
extracting ore, even in small operations. This information should be of considerable
value to those contemplating small mining operations on war minerals.
A mimeographed description of the California property and operation may be
obtained upon application to the Department. A 46
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
CALIFORNIA OPERATION.
Machine-mining.
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(1) Includes cost of new bits, steel, cost of upsetting and threading shanks.
(2) Includes lumber, kerosene, carbide, grinder-wheels, lubricating-oil, ore-sacks, gas and oil for compressor.
(3) Compressor and all underground machines, with necessary accessories, rented at $200 per month;   owners responsible for first $25 repairs monthly.
(4) Includes nails, pipe-fittings, rope, etc.
(5) Includes gas and oil, tires, general repair involved in hauling ore and camp supplies, but does not include amortization, licences, insurance, etc.
(6) Gross smelter return, less treatment and royalty to owner of property.
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o THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 47
GOLD COMMISSIONERS AND MINING RECORDERS.
The following list shows the Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders of the
Province:—
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
Atlin   __
Atlin	
G. H. Hallett---	
G. H. Hallett	
J. G. B. Egdell.
Sub-office  _.
R. W. Meldram.
R. W. Meldram	
W. J. Nelson.
R. W. Meldram. -	
Boundary via Telegraph
Creek
J. V. Rees.
Sub-office	
McDame Creek ;	
Fort St. John	
Dease Lake Townsite
Prince Rupert  —
N. A. Watt	
W. R. Henry.
F. W. Beatton.
T. A. Retallack.
Skeena          -    -
Sub-office  .
N. A. Watt	
A. J. Lancaster.
Copper River 	
Stewart (Portland Canal)
A. Fisher  	
Geo. H. Hill.
W. P. Aylward.
Queen Charlotte	
N. A. Watt (at Prince
Rupert)
Sub-office	
H. B. Campbell	
Smithers— 	
H. B. Campbell  .
W. P. Aylward.
W. B. Steele.
Telkwa -	
Sub-office	
	
F. W. Beatton.
Usk
	
Aiken.
W. E. Horwill.
Fort St. John- ,	
H. B. Campbell (at
Smithers) "
F. W. Beatton- 	
H. A. Bryant	
M. S. Morrell.
Barkerville  -
H. A. Bryant	
J. E. Mclntyre.
It. C. Maclure	
Quesnel 	
H. A. Bryant.
A. B. Campbell.
A. H. Watkins. A 48
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
Gold Commissioners
and Mining .Recorders—Continued.
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
R. J. A. Dorrell	
R. J. A. Dorrell	
L. C. Maclure.
H. E. Brennan.
George M. Fennell.
H. Finley.
A. P. Suckling.
J. Blakiston-Gray.
D. R. McWhirter.
F. H. C. Wilson.
C. W. Dickson.
G. B. Gane.
T. W. Clarke.
W. H. Laird.
E. Harrison.
L. S. Coleman.
D. R. McWhirter.
W. H. Laird.
C. J. Dainard.
D. H. Bruce.
A. Robb.
W. E. Graham.
J. A. Stewart.
R. H. Hassard.
S. Curwen.
M. C. Donaldson.
W. H. Cochrane.
Jos. Howe.
Henry Carter.
C. C. Thompson.
H. J. Bull.
A. G. Freeze.
Geo. Nicholson.
W. H. Boothroyd.
Russell Sneddon.
Geo. Nicholson.
W. H. Boothroyd.
C. L. Monroe.
Sub-office 	
Gold Bridge	
P. H. McCurrach
P. H. McCurrach	
Chu Chua
Sub-office.	
Ashcroft _	
P. H. McCurrach (at
Kamloops)
W. F. Knowlton
R. G. Couper	
Sub-office _   ..
P. H. McCurrach (at
Kamloops)
Chas. Nichols	
Similkameen 	
Sub-office	
Princeton 	
Hedley 	
Vernon  ', 	
Kelowna 	
R. M. McGusty	
R. M. McGusty	
Sub-office - —
L. A. Dodd 	
L. A. Dodd 	
Sub-office.	
Kettle Valley	
Sub-office  -
Sub-office	
Osoyoos —-	
Sub-office	
Sub-office —- 	
Sub-office	
OHwr      	
W. R. Dewdney	
W. R. Dewdney	
Keremeos   _	
Hedley  .._	
Oliver	
Golden  	
A. W. Anderson	
A. W. Anderson (at
Golden)
W. G. Taylor... _	
A. W. Anderson 	
A. M. Chisholm	
W. G. Taylor	
Win d ermere	
Windermere 	
Cranbrook	
Fernie   -	
Kaslo 	
Trout Lake	
Sub-office     ,
W. M. H. Dunn	
Claude MacDonald
Sub-office 	
Frank B rough ton
J. Cartmel 	
New Denver	
Slocan 	
Nelson.	
ClaudeMacDonald (at
Kaslo)
Sub-office.	
Nelson 	
Sub-office.  .
J. Cartmel	
Sub-office 	
Sub-office	
Arrow Lake	
Revelstoke	
Lardeau 	
Ym ir  	
S almo	
Nakusp _	
Revelstoke   	
Beaton.....	
Trout Lake	
Rossland  .     	
Nanaimo.	
J. Cartmel (atNelson)
Wynfield Maxwell    .
Wvnfield Maxwell (at
Revelstoke)
N. A. Herridge	
W. Maxwell 	
C. A. McElroy	
Trail Creek	
Nanaimo .	
Sub-office  ..-
Sub-office
Sub-office - 	
Sub-office	
Sub-office	
Sub-office 	
Sub-office	
Alberni	
Clayoquot	
Sub-office 	
Sub-office     .
Sub-office  _
E. L. Hedley	
C. L. Monroe	
E. L. Hedley..... ....
C. L. Monroe	
Van anda 	
Shoal Bay, Thurlow P.O..
Cumberland 	
Zeballos	
Alberni 	
Alberni  	
Tnflnn	
Zeballos 	
Alberni 	
Nanaimo.  .
Quatsino  .
Victoria 	
W. H. Boothroyd
W. H. Boothroyd (at
Alberni)
W. H. Boothroyd
C. W. Sharp  ..
Quatsino
Victoria.  ■—
W. H. Boothroyd (at
Alberni)
R. J. Steenson	
Ed. Evenson	
P. J. Mulcahy	 THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 49
Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders—Continued.
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
New Westminster.	
New Westminster	
A. P. Grant	
A. B. Gray	
C. N. Tingle.
J. Blakiston-Gray.
L. G. Miller.
Jos. Howe.
J. P. Scarlett.
C. C. Thompson.
H. E. Brennan.
A. E. Wilson..	
A. S. Tyrer—	
Sub-office	
Shoal Bay, Thurlow P.O.-
L. J. Price	
L. J. Price	
Gold Bridge-	 A 50
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
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41 3 cd.; THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 51
ANNUAL REPORTS.
1897, 1898 (also cloth bound, $1), 1901, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1913, 1914, 1915
(also cloth bound, $1), 1916 (also cloth bound, $1), 1917, 1918, 1919 (also cloth bound,
$1), 1920 (also cloth bound, $1), 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1927 (also cloth bound,
$1), 1928 (also cloth bound, $1), 1929, 1930 (also cloth bound, $1), 1931 (cloth bound
only, $1), 1932 (cloth bound only, $1), 1933 (also cloth bound, $1), 1934 (also cloth
bound, $1), 1935 (50 cents—also cloth bound, $1), 1936 (cloth bound only, $1), 1937
(50 cents—also cloth bound, $1), 1938 (50 cents), 1939 (50 cents—also cloth bound,
$1), 1940 (50 cents—also cloth bound, $1).
Note.—No charge is made for paper-bound copies of Annual Reports, except those
for which a charge is shown.
BULLETINS, OLD SERIES.
Bulletin No. 2, 1918:  Bumps and Outbursts of Gas.    (By George S. Rice.)
Bulletin No. 2, 1919:   The Commercial Feasibility of Electric Smelting of Iron Ores in
British Columbia.     (By Alfred Stansfield.)
Bulletin No. 2, 1932:  Report on McConnell Creek Placer Area.    (By Douglas Lay.)
MISCELLANEOUS.
Special Reports on Coal-mine Explosions.     (By George Wilkinson, Thomas Graham,
and James Ashworth.)    1918.
Report on Snowflake and Waverley-Tangier Mineral Properties.    (By J. D. Galloway.)
1928.
Report on Mineral Properties of the Goldside Mining Company.     (By B. T. O'Grady.)
1935.
Notes on Placer-mining in British Columbia.     (By Officers of the Department.)     1936.
Elementary Geology Applied to Prospecting.     (By John F. Walker.)     1937.    35 cents.
Possibilities for Manufacture of Mineral Wool in British Columbia.    (By J. M. Cum-
mings.)     1937.
Lode-gold Deposits of the Zeballos Area.     (By J. S. Stevenson.)    1938.
Index to Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines of British Columbia for the years
1874 to 1936, inclusive.     (By H. T. Nation.)     Paper bound, $1;  cloth bound, $2.
Preliminary Investigations into Possibilities for Producing Silica Sand from B.C. Sand
Deposits.     (By J. M. Cummings.)     1941.
Prospectors Guide for Strategic Minerals in Canada.     (Second Edition.)     (By Mines
and Geology Branch, Department of Mines and Resources, Ottawa, Canada.)     1942.
BULLETINS, NEW SERIES.
1940.
Bulletin No. 1: Aiken Lake Area, North-Central B.C.     (By Douglas Lay.)
Bulletin No. 2: Placer-gold Deposits, Wheaton (Boulder) Creek, Cassiar District.     (By
Stuart S. Holland.)
Bulletin No. 3: Fraser  River  Tertiary  Drainage-history   in   relation  to   Placer-gold
Deposits.    I.    (By Douglas Lay.)
Bulletin No. 4:  Saline and Hydromagnesite Deposits of British Columbia.     (By J. M.
Cummings.)
Bulletin No. 5: Mercury Deposits of British Columbia.     (By John S. Stevenson.)
Bulletin No. 6: Geology of Camp McKinney and the Cariboo Amelia Mine.    (By M. S.
Hedley.)
Bulletin No. 7: Lode-gold Deposits of the Upper Lemon Creek Area and Lyle Creek—■
Whitewater Mine Area, Kootenay District.    (By R. J. Maconachie.)
Bulletin No. 8: Preliminary Report on the Bedwell River Area.    (By H. Sargent.)
Bulletin No. 9: Molybdenite in British Columbia.     (By John S. Stevenson.) A 52 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
1941.
Bulletin No. 10: Tungsten Deposits of British Columbia.    (By John S. Stevenson.)
Bulletin No. 11: Fraser River Tertiary Drainage-history in relation to Placer-gold
Deposits.    II.     (By Douglas Lay.)
Bulletin No. 12: Reconnaissance in the Area of Turnagain and Upper Kechika Rivers.
(By M. S. Hedley.)
Bulletin No. 13: Supplementary Report on Bedwell River Area.    (By H. Sargent.)
Bulletin No. 14: Coal Analysis of British Columbia.    (By James Dickson.)
1942.
Bulletin No. 15: Hydraulic Mining Methods.     (By Stuart S. Holland.)
Bulletin No. 16:  Dragline Dredging Methods.     (By Stuart S. Holland.) PROGRESS NOTES. A 53
PROGRESS NOTES.
The Progress Notes on the mining industry are compiled from information supplied by the Inspectors of Mines and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, through
the courtesy of the property-owners and also from information obtained by the
officers of the Mineralogical Staff in the course of their field-work. The Registrar
of Companies and Superintendent of Brokers have also supplied information through
their respective offices.
LODE-GOLD DEPOSITS.
TAKU RIVER AREA.
TULSEQUAH.
Company office,  807 Lonsdale Building,  Duluth,  Minnesota, U.S.A.;
Polaris-Taku     mine office, Tulsequah, B.C.;  Walter B. Congdon, President and Treas-
Mining Co., Ltd.  urer;   Harvie A. Garver, Secretary;   Frank H. McPherson, Manager.
Capital:   10,000 preferred shares, $100 par;   20,000 common shares,
$1 par;   issued—10,000 preferred, 12,200 common.
The property is on the Tulsequah River, about 6 miles from its junction with Taku
River. The mine is reached b5r boat and aeroplane in summer and by aeroplane only
in winter-time.
Development during the year consisted of 8,758 feet of drifting and crosscutting,
3,232 feet of raising, and 13,708 feet of diamond-drilling. The mine worked 363 days
and 89,610 tons of ore was milled.
There are two main ore zones—" A " vein and " Y " vein. In the upper levels,
above Polaris level, the " A " vein has been extensively mined, practically all of the
production from the mine, to date, having come from this vein, which has been worked
on Polaris, A.J., B, C, and Canyon levels where it outcrops. In the shaft which has
been sunk from the Polaris level the vein is now being developed on the 450 level, 450
feet below the Polaris. Stoping has now commenced there. The " A " vein now
has a developed length of approximately 1,500 feet and a depth of 800 feet.
The " Y " vein is not present above the Polaris level but outcrops on the hillside
just below it. On 300 level, in the shaft, contact was made with this vein and a considerable amount of development on the vein has been done. A raise was put through,
on the vein, from 300 level to connect with a drift driven from outside through the
overburden.    Four stopes are in course of preparation on " Y " vein.
Diamond-drilling is being done on 450 level to locate " Y " vein at that depth.
A new and much larger hoist has been installed which has greatly increased the
hoisting capacity of the shaft. The capacity of the mill has been increased to about
300 tons per day.    About 170 men are employed.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1936, Part B.]
UNUK RIVER AREA.
MacKay Gold Mines, Ltd.—Nothing was done on this property during 1941.
PORTLAND CANAL AREA.
Salmon River.
Company office, Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Silbak Premier   Premier, B.C.;   H. A. Guess, President;   J. C. Emison, Treasurer;
Mines, Ltd.      G. A. Brockington, Secretary; Bert F. Smith, Manager; J. G. Pearcey,
Mine   Superintendent.    Capital:    3,000,000   shares,   $1   par;    issued,
2,500,000.    The property is in the Salmon River valley, about 14 miles from Stewart. A 54 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
During the year 14,564 feet of development-work and 35,004 feet of diamond-
drilling was done. The mine worked 311 days and 170,504 tons of ore was mined.
In addition a continuous programme of diamond-drilling is carried on. Most of the
development-work during the year has been on 5 level adjacent to the Premier Border
holdings, which have now been taken over and operated by Silbak Premier. A connection has been made from 5 level to the Premier Border workings. Considerable
improvement in the ventilation in the Sebakwe and B.C. Silver sections resulted from
this connection. Some exploratory work has been done below 6 level. A crew of about
340 men was employed.
Company office, Trail, B.C.;  mine office, Stewart, B.C.;  M. M. O'Brien,
Buena Vista      President;  E. G. Randall, Secretary-Treasurer;  E. James, Superinten-
Mining Co., Ltd. dent.   Capital:   500,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 300,000 held by Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, and 200,000
held by Big Missouri Mines Corporation.
This company owns and operates the Big Missouri mine, in the Salmon River
valley, 18 miles from Stewart.
Very little development-work was done during 1941; this amounted to only 1,911
feet, principally raising into the ore-body in the North section. The mine worked
345 days and produced 190,436 tons of ore.
The ventilation in the stopes was improved to a marked degree by the introduction
of mechanical ventilation controlled through them. Fans were also placed on the crushing equipment in the underground mill which brought the dust conditions there under
control.    A crew of ninety-eight men was employed.
Tide Lake Gold Group.—This group, owned by Mrs. J. L. Campbell, of Hyder, Alaska,
is on the west side of Tide Lake. Two men on the property made small shipments of
high-grade ore to the sampling plant at Prince Rupert.
[Reference:   Annual Reports, 1927, 1930, 1939.]
Bear River.
Company office, Stewart, B.C.; E. T. Applewhaite, Secretary; J. Haahti,
Stewart Canal    Manager.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;   issued, 1,026,510.
Gold Mines, Ltd.  The property is across the Bear River from Stewart.    The property
operated on a small scale in the early part of 1941 and made some shipments of concentrates from a small Gibson mill.    Since then the property has been idle.
Red Cliff Group.—H. D. Haywood has an option on this property.    Some small shipments of ore were made during the summer to the sampling plant at Prince Rupert.
L. L. & H. Group, Bitter Creek.—A contract was let to drive a crosscut to intersect two
veins showing on the property.    Power for drilling was furnished by a Pelton-driven
compressor.    Four hundred and fifty feet of crosscut was driven during the summer
and the first vein, 30 inches wide, intersected.    Six men were employed.
NORTHERN COAST.
Princess Royal Island.
Company office, 717 Pacific Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Surf Inlet Con-   Surf Inlet,  B.C.;   Robert L.  Reed,  President;   W.  Russell  Watson,
solidated Gold    Treasurer;   R. V. Hopper, Mine Manager.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares,
Mines, Ltd.      50 cents par;   issued, 2,672,855.    Development has continued in both
the Pugsley and Surf mines during the year.    It consisted of 2,746
feet of drifting, 760 feet of raising, and 28,973 feet of diamond-drilling.
At the Pugsley mine the 935 drift has been driven until it is now in approximately
5,000 feet from the portal. No new ore has been found in the inside end. A winze
has been started, in the ore, from 1,100 level and is to be sunk at least 200 feet. Considerable diamond-drilling has been done on 900 and 1,100 levels.
At the Surf mine a considerable amount of drifting was done on the 500 level
inside the old workings. Some diamond-drilling has been done here and on 200, which
is the upper level. PROGRESS NOTES. A 55
The shaft from 900 to 1,000 level has been unwatered and retimbered.
Some surface work was done on the Gold Coast group, behind the Pugsley, by
stripping and diamond-drilling from the surface.
A crew of 115 men was employed.
Khutze Inlet.
Hunter Group.—The property is on the north branch of Khutze River, about 13 miles
from the beach.    Very little work was done during the year.
Porcher Island.
The Porcher Island Mines, Limited, did not operate during 1941.
TERRACE-HAZELTON AREA.
Zymoetz River.
Omineca Gold Quartz Mining Co., Ltd.—F. M. Wells, President. The property did not
operate during 1941.
Usk.
Nicholson Creek Mining Corporation.—Nothing was done on the property during 1941.
Grotto Group.—Some work" was done on the group by Canadian Exploration, Limited.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part C]
HAZELTON TO HOUSTON AREA.
Smithers.
Herman and Kelly have a lease on the old Duthie mine and have been
Smithers Mines,  working it steadily for the past two years.    An area of high-grade ore
Ltd. has been stoped between 400 and 500 levels and also from open-cuts on
the surface.    Shipments have been made regularly to Trail smelter.
A total of 214 tons of ore yielded 49 oz. gold, 30,107 oz. silver, as well as lead and zinc.
TOPLEY.
The group owned by D. Heenan, of Topley, and under lease to Wil-
Golden Eagle     Hams and Conlin, is about 7 miles by road from Topley.    There are
Group. four small shafts on the property.    No. 1 shaft is down 140 feet on
about 40 degrees.    A level had been turned off at 50 feet.    Stoping is
being done on a vein about 22 inches wide between this level and the surface.    The ore
has been shipped to Trail smelter.
There is a Diesel-driven compressor for drilling and a gasoline-hoist on the shaft.
Four men were employed.
Houston.
The Canadian Exploration, Limited, did some work on the old Owen Lake mine.
The adits were cleaned up and the ore-bodies in the mine and on the surface were
sampled.
CARIBOO AREA.
Wells.
Company office,  675 Hastings  Street West, Vancouver,   B.C.;   mine
Cariboo Gold     office, Wells, B.C.;   Dr. W. B. Burnett, President;   J. R. V. Dunlop,
Quartz Mining    Secretary-Treasurer;   R. R. Rose, Managing Director and Mine Man-
Co., Ltd.        ager;   R. E. Vear, Mine Superintendent.    Capital:   2,000,000 shares,
$1 par;   issued, 1,333,309.    The property is on Cow Mountain, southeast from Jack of Clubs Lake, 63 miles by road from Quesnel.
During 1941 the 1,500 main crosscut was advanced 683 feet to intersect the downward extension of the " B.C." vein which was subsequently drifted on for a distance of A 56 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
305 feet. The vein was faulted and heavy ground conditions necessitated close timbering which slowed up the work to a considerable extent. Shaft-sinking on the vein
commenced in May. The old " B.C." inclined shaft was retimbered and then extended
to the horizon of the 1,500 level. This sinking was completed on December 19th, a
total of 926 feet of shaft having been sunk. The shaft followed the vein for a distance
of 306 feet, at .which point the vein dipped into the foot-wall. After drainage-holes
are drilled through, the 1,500 main crosscut will be advanced to connect with the bottom
of the shaft.
The deepening of No. 3 shaft was completed to a point below the 1,900 level during
the year and the 1,800 and 1,900 levels were opened up. Development-work is proceeding on these levels.
Development raises in the Butts zone above the main level were completed and this
area is now ready for level development.
The above, and incidental development-work elsewhere in the mine, accounted for
7,367 feet of drifting, 5,326 feet of crosscutting, 2,743 feet of raising, 1,125 feet of
shaft-sinking, and 15,586 feet of diamond-drilling. Ore mined and milled amounted
to 129,256 tons.
The 200-level drive towards the company's holdings on Island Mountain was suspended during the year.
No important additions or changes were made to the company's milling or surface
plant.    The average number of employees was 399.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1934, Part C]
Company office, 744  Hastings  Street West,  Vancouver,  B.C.;   mine
Island Mountain  office, Wells, B.C.;   F. W. Guernsey, President;   Fred Searls, Jr., and
Mines Co., Ltd.   H. DeWitt Smith, Vice-Presidents;  H. E. Dodge, Secretary-Treasurer;
J.  A.  Pike,  Mine  Manager;    H.  W.   Seamon,  Mine  Superintendent.
Capital:   1,100,000 shares, 50 cents par;   issued, 1,050,716 shares.    The property is on
Island Mountain, on the north-west side of Jack of Clubs Lake, at Wells, about 4 miles
west of Barkerville.
Development-work was carried out on all levels below the 4,000 main level, but was
largely concentrated on the 3,000 and 3,125 levels, the two lowest. The 3,000-level
station had to be retimbered and ventilation raises were driven between the 3,000 and
3,125 levels and between the 3,125 and 3,250 levels. Preparations are being made to
extend the shaft to greater depth. Altogether there was done 1,080 feet of raising,
8,794 feet of crosscutting and drifting, and 37,625 feet of diamond-drilling.
Additions to the surface plant include a 500-cubic-foot compressor, which was put
into operation in midsummer, and a 250-horse-power Diesel direct connected to a 187.5-
k.v.a. generator.    The latter has not yet been put into operation.
Ore mined and milled amounted to 54,398 tons, or an average of 149 tons per day.
The average number of employees was 146.
The Island Mountain Mines Company, Limited, purchased the Myrtle group of
claims and a portion of the Shamrock group. The Myrtle group is strategically located
with respect to the Rainbow formation and the " B.C." vein, and the Shamrock group
includes the old Shamrock tunnel which extended some 1,800 feet from a suitable plant-
site on the Wells-Barkerville Highway towards the above-mentioned objectives on the
Myrtle group. Under the supervision of E. E. Mason as tunnel foreman, the old tunnel
was straightened, widened, and retimbered, and advanced to about 3,000 feet from the
portal by the end of 1941.
A power plant and other necessary facilities were established at the portal and a
trestle built across the highway to give adequate dumping space. About twenty-five
men are currently employed.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1934, Part C]
Yanks Peak.
An option was taken on the property of this company by the Pioneer
Snowshoe Gold    Gold  Mines  of  B.C.,  Limited,  and   an  exploratory programme was
Mines, Ltd.      started  under the supervision  of A.  E.   Pike.    Old  workings were
reopened and the surface above them cleared and stripped of over- PROGRESS NOTES. A 57
burden. Some underground development-work was also accomplished before the end
of 1941.
Access to the property is by way of Keithley as there is now a motor-road to the
Midas group about 2 miles from the Snoivshoe.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1929.]
CHILCOTIN AREA.
Taylor Windfall Mine.—Messrs. S. Davis and J. Separovich obtained a lease on this
property on a royalty basis. A small amount of ore was extracted from high-grade
sections of the vein and put through the mill.
Hi Do Group.—Messrs. Allaire and Pelletier, owners of this group, did a small
amount of exploratory work on the group during the summer. In addition, they
treated a few tons of high-grade ore in an improvised grinding mill.
BRIDGE RIVER AREA.
Company office, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Pioneer Gold Mines Pioneer Mines P.O., B.C.;   Victor Spencer, President;   A. E. Bull,
of B.C., Ltd.       Secretary-Treasurer;    H.   T.   James,   Managing   Director;    E.   F.
Emmons, Mine Manager.    Capital:  2,500,000 shares, $1 par;  issued,
1,751,750.    This company owns the Pioneer mine on Cadwallader Creek, a tributary of
Bridge River, 52 miles by road from Bridge River Station on the P.G.E. Railway.   The
mine is serviced by three shafts:   No. 2 shaft extends from the surface to the 2,600
level, No. 3 from the surface to the 1,400 level, and No. 4 from the 2,400 level to the
2,900 level.
Development-work done during the year consisted of 3,313 feet of drifting, 462
feet of crosscutting, and 2,570 feet of raising. This work was largely confined to the
levels serviced by the No. 4 internal shaft, and drifting west on the 2,700 and 2,800
levels was completed.
The " 27 " vein developed by drifting along it on the 1,500, 1,800, and 2,000 levels.
These advances totalled 1,583 feet.
Ore milled amounted to 109,311 tons or an average of 300 tons per day. The crew
averaged about 242 men.    There were no important changes to the plant.
Company office, 555 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office, Bra-
Bralorne Mines,   lorne, B.C.;   Austin C. Taylor, President;   R. H. Grace, Secretary-
Ltd. Treasurer;    D.   N.   Matheson,  Manager;    E.   J.   Chenowith,   General
Superintendent;   G. H. Wilson, Mine Superintendent;   C. M. Manning,
Assistant  Mine  Superintendent.    Capital:    1,250,000  shares,  no par value;    issued,
1,247,000.
Development-work done during the year consisted of 15,699 feet of crosscutting
and drifting, 560 feet of raising, 625 feet of shaft transfer raises, and 20,441 feet of
diamond-drilling. In the early part of the year a break-through was effected between
the Empire and Crown shafts on the 2,000 level. This provided improved ventilation
and servicing facilities on this level. A system of transfer raises was driven at the
Croivn shaft to by-pass both the 1,300 and 1,400 loading-pockets, thus doing away with
the spills at these locations. All ore now passes directly to the 1,900 loading-cartridge.
The crosscutting and drifting was largely done between the 1,400 and 2,000 levels to
develop the veins there.
The average number of men employed per working-day was 348. Ore mined and
milled amounted to 191,970 tons.
Company office, 503 Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   J. S. Har-
Golden Ledge    rison, President.    Capital:  5,000 shares, $50 par.    Operations at this
Syndicate.       syndicate's ground on Cadwallader Creek were restricted to the collaring of a shaft and the driving of a rope raise, and to diamond-drilling
to determine the advisability of continuing with the shaft.
Federal Gold Mines, Ltd.—Four claims belonging to this company and adjoining the
Minto mine were optioned during the year by the Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Limited. A 58 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
An old drift already driven 57 feet from the portal was extended a further 200 feet
along a vein.    Later the option was relinquished.
Company office, 572 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   W. Spence, Secre-
Bristol Mines,    tary;  A. E. Stromberg, Managing Director.    Capital.:  200,000 shares,
Ltd. no par value;   issued, 80,000.    During 1941 a road was completed to
this company's property on Tommy Creek, about 4 miles from the
highway.    This made it possible to install a three-impellor Pelton wheel and an Inger-
soll-Rand two-stage compressor.    A new tunnel was collared on the bank of Tommy
Creek about 130 feet below the 1940 workings.    By the end of the year this had been
advanced 358 feet as a crosscut to the downward extension of the mineralized shear,
which was then drifted on for 350 feet in a southerly direction.
Ault Group.—Bralorne Mines, Limited, have this property under option and during
1941 accomplished 1,110 feet of diamond-drilling on it.
Note.—At several other mines in the district, such as the B.R.X. and Grange,
necessary maintenance-work to keep the mine in shape for operation or examination
was all that was done.
LILLOOET AREA.
Blue Creek.
Gold discoveries were made on this group, which is about 40 miles
Elizabeth Group,  north of Lillooet and 16 miles east of Minto in the Shulaps Mountains.
Bralorne Mines, Limited, optioned this and adjoining groups and
staked a large number of claims in the vicinity. Work then commenced on stripping
and drilling the veins already exposed, while the adjacent area was prospected for
others. Operations, however, were suspended on October 13th because the severity of
the weather made surface work impossible at the elevation of the showings, which
outcrop at about 7,000 feet. The work done consisted of five diamond-drill holes aggregating 760 feet and 1,750 feet of stripping on four veins. An 18- by 11-foot log bunk-
house to accommodate twelve men, an 18- by 17-foot wood-shed, an 11- by 11-foot
root-cellar, and a 6- by 8-foot log pump-house were erected at a camp-site near the
showings. A road was started to the property from the end of the old Moha road and
reached to within 14 miles of the camp-site before road-work was suspended on
November 1st.
KAMLOOPS AREA.
Mine office, Kamloops, B.C.;  Edward H. Kellner, Managing Director;
Allied Mining and Trevor W. Page, Superintendent.    This mine is on the Louis Creek-
Development Co., Squaam Bay Road, approximately 3 miles north-westward from the
Ltd., Homestake  head of Squaam Bay on Adams Lake, or 18 miles easterly by auto-road
Mine. from Louis Creek Station on the Canadian National Railway, 36 miles
north from Kamloops. The main adit is about 700 feet above the road
and has been driven into the north-west side of Falls Creek, which is tributary to
Sinmax Valley, the main valley leading south-easterly into Squaam Bay; the other
workings are above this adit and on the same side of Falls Creek.
After being idle for several years work was resumed at the mine, when cleaning-up
operations began on August 18th and underground work commenced on October 15th.
Development-work was done on the 500 level and one car of ore was shipped to Trail.
The 500 level is 600 feet above the mill and the ore is brought down by an aerial tramway. The present development plan aims at connecting the 300 vein from the 500 vein.
Four men were employed.
STUMP LAKE AREA.
Company office, 506 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Consolidated Nicola Box 68, Merritt, B.C.;   H. H. Stevens, President;   C. H. Coolidge,
Goldfields, Ltd.    Secretary-Treasurer;    John   F.    Coats,   Mine   Manager.     Capital:
6,500,000, $1 par; issued, 4,377,358. This company operates the
Nicola mine, 2 miles west of the Kamloops-Merritt Highway and 30 miles from Merritt.
The 320 adit is the main entry and intersects the Enterprise vein 800 feet from the PROGRESS NOTES. A 59
portal. This vein has a general dip of 45 degrees and has been developed down the
dip by an inclined shaft. Work was intermittent during the year and a small amount
of ore from the Enterprise and King William veins was milled and shipped. Ten men
were employed underground and ten men on the surface.
Scheelite was discovered on the mine-waste dump by the use of a mercury-vapour
lamp. Further tests made underground indicated the presence of scheelite in the old
workings. Mining operations were suspended on December 13th and a crew of three
men was left on the property to do repairs and alterations in preparation for installing
additional mill machinery whic^h will be required to handle the scheelite ore when
operations are resumed.
[Reference: Annual Report, 1936, Part D.]
SIMILKAMEEN RIVER AREA.
Hedley.
Company office, 75 West Street, New York, N.Y.;  mine office, Hedley,
Kelowna Explora- B.C.;  W. Adams Kissam, Chairman;  Sewell T. Tyng, President;  John
tion Co., Ltd.    W. Mercer, Treasurer;   0. P. Ebeling, Secretary;   W. C. Douglass,
Mine Manager;  Floyd Turner, Mine Superintendent.    Capital: 100,000
shares, $5 par;   issued, 60,000.
This is a private company operating the Nickel Plate mine at Hedley, B.C. The
concentrator, machine-shops, and general offices are near Hedley. The mine is at an
elevation of 5,600 feet and approximately 4,000 feet above and 4 miles north of the
town. Transportation up the side of the mountain is in two sections; a 10,000-foot
gravity tramway from the ore-bin at the mill is operated with skips having a capacity
of 6 tons; from the central to the upper terminal it is run by electric motors chain-
geared to friction and control wheels that maintain a constant speed during the whole
of the operation. The portal of the mine is 1% miles north of the top terminal of the
tramway and an electric trolley motor system hauls the ore from the mine to the upper
end of the tram.
The most important underground development during the year was the commencement of work on driving the Morning incline. This is an inclined shaft being driven
from near the foot of the Dickson incline on the 1,500 level; the shaft will be sunk a
distance of 1,000 feet and at an angle of 50 degrees. The Nickel Plate mine is directly
connected with the Hedley Mascot mine, but the workings of the Nickel Plate are mostly
at a higher elevation, which provides a natural column for ventilation. The relative
position of these mines to each other also provide a further opportunity for mutual
benefit; the rock taken from the drivage of the Morning incline is used for back-filling
in some of the Mascot stopes.
Work was commenced on driving the I.X.L. adit and about 2,000 feet of drifting
was done on the two branches of the adit. The adit is being driven for the purpose of
exploring ground south of the Nickel Plate ore-bodies. The two branches are the
" 808 " and the " Climax." The " 808 " branch is being driven towards the No. 8 level
of the Nickel Plate mine whilst the " Climax " is being driven to prospect the Copper
Cleft and Climax claims. The old Silver Plate workings, originally developed about
forty years ago, were rehabilitated during the year for the purpose of ventilating and
servicing stoping operations in the " 4% " Sunnyside ore-body.
Total underground development-work consisted of 4,718 feet of drifting, cross-
cutting, and shaft-work; also 12,156 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 97,476 tons
of ore was milled, yielding 33,881 oz. of gold. An average crew of 186 men was
employed.
Company office, 908 Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Hedley Mascot   Hedley, B.C.;  Wendell B. Farris, President;  V. J. Creeden, Secretary;
Gold Mines, Ltd. W. S. Charlton, Treasurer; C. W. S. Tremaine, General Superintendent;
J. C. Moore, Mine Foreman.    Capital: 3,000,000 shares, $1 par; issued,
2,264,130.    This company operates the Mascot mine, 1 mile north of Hedley.    The
concentrator and mine offices are on the east bank of 20-mile Creek and the camp is on
the side of the mountain, 2,795 feet above the mill.    The ore is transported down the A 60 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
side of the mountain by an aerial tramway, 5,600 feet in length, from the ore-bin at
the mine to the mill.    The two skips have a capacity of 3 tons each.
The mine has been developed by an 8- by 8-foot adit, 2,500 feet in length and
generally known as the 4,800-foot level; this is the main haulage into the Mascot
Fraction. The raise from the 4,300-foot level to the 4,800-foot level was completed
during the year and put into service; four intermediate levels were opened off this
raise. Production from the lower section of the mine is being increased and now 50
per cent, of the ore is coming from the lower level.
The workings of this mine are connected through to the workings of the adjacent
Nickel Plate mine, and this connection provides excellent ventilation for both mines.
During the months when natural ventilation is found to be inadequate a Jeffrey propeller-type fan provides the necessary quantity of air. This fan is powered by a
15-horse-power electric motor and has a diameter of 4 feet. The fan is not required
during the winter.
Underground development included 1,380 feet of drifting; 1,066 feet of raising;
and 24,036 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 68,155 tons was milled, yielding 21,830
oz. of gold.    An average of 129 men was employed.
The cyanide plant was put into operation during the year and treated 60 tons of
middlings per day; about one-quarter of the gold production is now in the form of
gold bullion. The balance is concentrates, which is shipped to the Tacoma smelter.
A new assay grinding-room has been built.
Company office, 908 Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine office,
Canty Gold Mines Hedley, B.C.;  Wendell B. Farris, President;  V. J. Creeden, Secretary;
(Hedley), Ltd.    W. S. Charlton, Treasurer;  R. H. Stewart, Managing Director;  Charles
Bishop,   Mine   Superintendent.    Capital:    3,000,000   shares,   $1   par;
issued, 2,172,788.    This mine operated during the first half of the year then closed
down.    Whilst working, a crew averaging eighteen men was employed.
Ore amounting to 1,606 tons was mined which averaged 0.31 oz. of gold per ton.
The ore was shipped to the Mascot mill where it was treated. The machinery from
this mine has been taken over by the Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Limited.
VERNON AREA.
This property on Brewer Creek, 2 miles from Lavington, is leased by
Kalamalka.      S. M. and C. Penny, J. A. Thommason, and A. S. Heidler.    The small
mining plant on the property was put in commission and used during
the year.    Ore totalling 917 tons was mined and shipped to Trail.    This yielded 502
oz. of gold and 247 oz. of silver.
Skookum.—This property is about 16 miles north-east of Vernon. T. Levasseur
and associates, of Nelson, B.C., mined and shipped some ore during 1941.
SOUTHERN OKANAGAN.
This property was operated under lease by Joseph Wukeluk from the
Grandoro Mine.   Grandoro Mines, Limited.    The mine is on Orofino Mountain, about
25 miles south of Penticton, and consists of fourteen claims, two of
which are Crown-granted;   all work done during the year was on two claims—the
Orofino and Independence.
About 200 feet of drifting and 50 feet of stoping was done during the year,
employing three men who worked intermittently over an eight-month period. Ore
totalling 251 tons was shipped to the Trail smelter, and yielded 174 oz. of gold and 86
oz. of silver.
BEAVERDELL AREA.
Rosemont.—This property, situated 9 miles from Beaverdell, was optioned to the
Highland Bell, Limited. Development-work included 50 feet of drifting. The option
was dropped in the late summer. PROGRESS NOTES. A 61
CAMP McKINNEY AREA.
This property is in Camp McKinney.    Early in the year it was oper-
Cariboo-Amelia.   ated under lease by George Boag and associates, of Greenwood, B.C.
Six men, all partners in the lease, were engaged in removing pillars
and stope remnants in the area above the water-level, which is about 80 feet below the
collar of the main shaft. A small gasoline-driven compressor was used for this work.
Later a lease was taken by the Highland Bell, Limited, and the ground above the water-
level was further explored and more ore mined. Development done by the above company included 150 feet of drifting and 50 feet of crosscutting. A small Diesel-driven
compressor and air-hoist was used for this work. Seven men were employed. Late in
the summer this lease was dropped and the property reverted to the original group.
Very little additional work was done by them, as it is necessary to dewater the mine
to make additional salvage possible.
[Reference:   Bulletin No. 6, 1940.]
This property adjoins the Cariboo-Amelia.    It was bonded to the High-
Wiarton.        land Bell, Limited, and the development programme, commenced last
year, was continued.    Six to seven men were employed and power was
used  from the  same  equipment which  supplied   the  Cariboo-Amelia.    Development
included 200 feet of drifting, 200 feet of crosscutting, 100 feet of raising, 50 feet of
sinking, and 1,500 feet of diamond-drilling.    The option was dropped late in 1941.
[Reference:   Bulletin No. 6, 1940.]
GREENWOOD-GRAND FORKS AREA.
Greenwood.
Gold Finch.—This property is half a mile from Greenwood. It was operated under
lease and bond by Messrs. Larsen, Broomfield, and Malone, of Princeton, B.C. A complete small mining plant was installed.
This  property is  owned by the  Consolidated  Mining and  Smelting
No. 7. Company of Canada, Limited, and is operated under lease by W. E.
McArthur, of Greenwood, B.C.    A crew of from two to three men was
employed and a portable compressor used for underground work.     Development included
125 feet of drifting and 200 feet of raising.    A total of 284 tons of ore was mined and
shipped to Trail.    The lease was given up late in 1941.
Jewel Lake.
Company office,  850  Hastings  Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;   J. R.
Dentonia Mines, Reed,  President.    Capital, 2,500,000  shares,  no par value;   issued,
Ltd. 1,716,600.    The company owns the Dentonia mine at Jewel Lake.    The
property is now leased by A. H. Upton and associates, of Vancouver,
B.C. It was equipped by the leasers with a 240-cubic-foot electrically driven single-
stage Schramm compressor. The old Jewel shaft was partially unwatered but most of
the work was confined to the area of the old Dentonia workings, where pillars and stope
remnants were salvaged. About 70 feet of underground development-work was done
during the year. Seven men were employed. Ore amounting to 2,187 tons was mined
and shipped to Trail.
[Reference:   Bulletin No. 13, 1941.]
Gold Drop.—This property adjoins the Dentonia. It was operated under lease
during the latter part of the year by Messrs. Halstrom and Schuberg, of Greenwood.
Hand-steel was used to mine 126 tons of ore which was shipped to Trail.
This property on Rhoderick Dhu Mountain, above Jewel Lake, is owned
Amandy.        by E. C. Henniger, of Grand Forks, B.C.    It was operated under lease
by W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood, B.C.    All the work was done by
hand-steel.    Development included 30 feet of drifting and 25 feet of sinking and, in
addition, 290 tons of ore was mined and shipped to Trail.    This yielded 84 oz. of gold
and 1,478 oz. of silver. Grand Forks.
This property is 4 miles from Grand Forks. It was operated for a
Yankee Boy.     short time under lease by John and Steve Klemens, of Grand Forks,
B.C. Considerable surface-trenching was done in an effort to find the
continuation of the vein. Ore was mined from shallow cuts and trenches and shipped
to Trail.    A small amount of ore was also sorted from the old dumps.
Franklin Camp.
This property adjoins the Union mine in the Franklin Camp. It was
Homestake.      operated by the Homestake Syndicate under the direction of A. J. Fee.
Six men were employed. A small complete mining plant, including a
gasoline-driven hoist, was installed.
This property is in the Franklin Camp, about 46 miles north of Grand
Union. Forks.    It is owned by the J. F. McCarthy estate, of Wallace, Idaho,
and is operated under lease and bond by W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood, B.C. A small portable gasoline-driven compressor provides air for underground
work. From two to four men were employed 337 days. Development included 50 feet
of drifting, 75 feet of raising, 2,200 feet of diamond-drilling, and 500 feet of surface-
trenching.    Ore totalling 2,480 tons was mined and shipped to Trail.
LARDEAU AREA.
This property is on Winslow Creek, about 7 miles by tractor-road from
Winslow Group.   Trout Lake.    It is equipped with a 20-ton amalgamation and gravity
mill.    It was operated under lease and bond by W. J. Scorgie and one
other man.    Hand-steel only was used.    A small tonnage, chiefly from the Okanagan
claim, was mined and treated in the mill.
This property, formerly known as the Mobbs mine, is near Poplar
Silver Crest.      Creek.    It is owned by Alex. Robb, of Poplar, and is operated under
lease by F. J. Bews and associates, of Revelstoke, B.C.   A small amount
of development-work was done by hand-steel.
SLOCAN AREA.
Retallack.
Company office, Kaslo, B.C.;   R. W. Kennedy, President;   A. J. Noble,
Highland Surprise Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par.    The
Gold Mines, Ltd.  company's property is on Lyle Creek, 3% miles from Retallack.    The
mine is equipped with a small complete mining plant and the ore is
treated in the Whitewater mill at Retallack under a rental agreement.    Ten to fifteen
men were employed during the summer under the direction of Joe Gallo and G. H.
Grimwood.    Operations were confined to mining and milling a shoot of ore between
the 3 and 4 levels.    The mill was operated on a one-shift basis.    The concentrates were
shipped to Trail.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 7, 1940.]
Lemon Creek.
This property, on Chapleau Creek and owned by the Milton Gold Min-
Chapleau.       ing Company, of Penticton, B.C., was operated under lease by the
British Columbia Department of Mines under the direction of R. J.
Maconachie.    Three men were employed and hand-steel only was used.    Fifteen tons
of ore was mined and shipped to Trail.    This yielded 34 oz. of gold and 46 oz. of silver.
This property, at the head of Gold Creek, is owned and operated by
Howard Fraction. F. T. Harbour, of Slocan City, B.C.    During the summer a small
amount of development-work was done in the long low-level adit and
a small amount of ore was mined from surface cuts and shallow workings.    Hand-steel PROGRESS NOTES. A 63
only was used. Ore totalling 27 tons, shipped to Trail, yielded 2 oz. of gold and 322
oz. of silver.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part E.]
Marmion and Maryland.—This property is on the Tiger Creek road beyond the
Springer Creek summit.    Hans Lyngay made a single shipment.
Slocan City.
Bell.—This property, owned and operated by R. E. McMillan, is on Springer Creek.
During the summer 4 tons of ore was mined by hand-steel and shipped to Trail. This
yielded 2 oz. of gold and 75 oz. of silver.
Evening Star.—This property is on Dayton Creek, a tributary of Springer Creek. It
was leased by W. D. Smith and Maurice Ansaldo.
ROSSLAND AREA.
Mount Roberts.
This property, on Mount Roberts, is owned and operated by a local
Midnight.       private company known as the Midnight Gold Mines, Limited.    B. A.
Lins, Manager.    Capital:   20,000 shares, $1 par.    It is equipped with
a small complete mining plant.    A mill of about 10 tons daily capacity was built this
year and run for a short time.    Four men were continuously employed.
I.X.L.—This property adjoins the Midnight. It is equipped with a small complete
mining plant and was operated continuously throughout the year by Chris Jorgensen,
Victor Larsen, and three partners.
O.K.—This property adjoins the I.X.L. It was operated under lease by John Hen-
drickson and Gunnar Nordholm, who did a small amount of development-work with
hand-steel.
This property, adjoining the I.X.L. and O.K., is under lease and bond
Gold Drip.       to a Vancouver syndicate known as the Elleston Syndicate, B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver, B.C.    Development-work was done by hand-steel
under the direction of R. W. Haggen, of Rossland, B.C.    This included 20 feet of drifting and 300 feet of surface-stripping, as well as cleaning out some of the old workings.
Christine.—This property, on the Cascade Highway, about 3 miles east of Rossland,
was operated under lease by Mike Slaboski and Mike Gach, of Rossland, B.C. Ore was
mined by hand-steel and shipped to Trail.
South Belt.
This  property  is  operated  under lease  and  bond  by  the  Mayflower
Mayflower.       Mining Syndicate, Lloyd A. Smith and associates, of Penticton, B.C.
The property is equipped with a small mining plant.    Five men were
employed under the direction of R. W. Haggen, of Rossland, B.C.    Development-work
included 150 feet of drifting, 26 feet of crosscutting, and 1,975 feet of diamond-drilling,
as well as some surface-stripping.
Rossland.
This property,  1  mile east of Rossland, just off the main  Cascade
Jumbo. Highway, is owned by Mrs. Charlotte Finch Smith, of California, and
is operated under lease and bond by M. Michaley and M. Doran, of
Rossland, B.C.    Some ore mined by hand-steel was shipped to Trail.
NELSON AREA.
Apex.
This property is at the head of Clear Creek, about 4 miles from Apex.
Humming Bird.   It was operated under lease by Lawrence Porter and associates, of
Nelson, B.C.    A total of 50 tons, mined by hand and shipped to Trail,
yielded 41 oz. of gold and 88 oz. of silver. A 64 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
This property, near Hall Siding, about 10 miles south of Nelson, is
Euphrates.       operated by the Gold Silver Tungsten Mining and Milling Company of
Seattle, Washington. The work at the mine was under the direction
of Sarkis Terzian, of Nelson, B.C. An average of fourteen men was employed, with
five working underground. The installation of an 100-ton flotation-mill was completed
and the old aerial tram, some 2,000 feet in length, was moved to connect a new ore-bin
at the mine with the mill-bin. Power for the mill was supplied by a 200-horse-power
Giant semi-Diesel, belt-connected to a 240-k.v.a. generator. A new bunk-house and
cook-house, adequate for twenty men, was built at the mine. A small amount of ore
from the Nickel Plate and later the Minto vein was run through the mill as a test with
the idea of later putting in a mill of greater capacity. There is some tungsten in the
ore but none of this has been recovered to date.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
This property, on the Nelson-Ymir Road, about 10 miles from Nelson,
Golden Age.      is  owned  and  operated  by the  Trimetal,  Incorporated,  745  Peyton
Building, Spokane, Washington. Six to eight men were employed
under the direction of G. H. Grimwood, of Nelson, B.C. During the summer diamond-
drilling amounted to about 2,000 feet. Underground work is now under way, 78 feet of
drifting having been done to date. Power was obtained from the Euphrates power
plant originally, but late in the year a small Diesel-driven compressor was installed.
The ore of this property is said to contain some tungsten.
Toad and Morning Mountain.
This property, on Morning Mountain, is owned by the Noble  Five
Athabasca.       Mines, Limited.    It was operated during the year by several small
groups of leasers who, for the most part, used compressed air from
small gasoline-driven compressors.    A small amount of ore was recovered from pillars
and the remnants in stopes.    An attempt was also made to mine some zinc ore for the
cadmium content.
This property, on Toad Mountain, is owned by Mrs. Mary Wilson, of
California. Trail, B.C. It was operated under lease by the British Columbia
Department of Mines under the direction of R. J. Maconachie. Four
men were employed. Compressed air was supplied by an Ingersoll-Rand portable compressor. A total of 75.7 tons, shipped to Trail, yielded 159.4 oz. of gold and 176 oz. of
silver. This lease was dropped in October and another taken by R. and L. Bobier,
of Nelson, B.C.
These properties, on Morning Mountain, are owned by the R. Heddle
Venus-Juno,     estate and were operated during the year by several small groups of
leasers—namely, E. Meyers, Bruno Sterna, and Albert Barbas—all of
Nelson, B.C.    Hand-steel was used.
Daylight and Victoria-Jessie.—These properties, on Toad Mountain, were operated
under lease for a short time by P. Rolick and associates, of Nelson, B.C.
Hall Creek.
Bear.—This property, on Hall Creek adjoining the Fern mine, was operated by two
leasers, J. Bergquist and A. Carlson.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
Fern.—This property, on Hall Creek, is owned by C. E. and L. R. Hawley, of
Spokane, Washington. It was leased by H. B. Frockledge and associates, of Nelson,
B.C., who used hand-steel to recover ore from pillars and stope remnants.
Company office, 334 Peyton Building, Spokane, Washington;   R. E.
Canadian Belle   Linquist, President.    Capital:   1,150,000 shares, 1 cent par;   issued,
Mining Co.      850,000.    The company owns the Canadian Belle mine on Hall Creek.
A small amount of development was done by hand-steel under the
direction of M. Herman.    Future plans include the driving of a new low-level adit,
the site of which has been connected to the main Hall Creek road by a new road about
1% miles in length.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1937, Part E.] PROGRESS NOTES. A 65
Eagle Creek.
Company office, 521 Central Building, Seattle, Washington. H. R.
Livingstone Smith, President and Manager. This company owns and operates the
Mining Co.      Granite-Poorman mine on Eagle Creek, near Blewett, B.C.    A crew
varying from eleven to twenty-one men was employed throughout the
year and, in addition to this, six to twelve men were engaged in leasing in various parts
of the mine. The property is equipped with a complete mining plant and a mill. The
mill, originally stamps, amalgam plates, and tables, is being changed over to ball-mill
and flotation and will have a daily capacity of about 35 tons when this is completed.
The mill was not operated during the year. Development-work included 400 feet of
drifting and 463 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 1,679 tons mined and shipped to
Trail yielded 1,208 oz. of gold and 1,571 oz. of silver. Of this the leasers shipped
approximately 268 tons with an average gold content of 0.96 oz. per ton.
Sitkum Creek.
Company office, 415 Baker Street, Nelson, B.C.; James B. Curtis, Presi-
Alpine Gold, Ltd. dent;   Barbara O'Neil, Secretary.    Capital:   500,000 shares, 50 cents
(N.P.L.).        par.    This company operated the Alpine mine, at the head of Sitkum
Creek and about 9 miles from the Nelson-Kaslo Highway. The property is equipped with a complete mining plant and a flotation-mill of 50 tons daily
capacity. An aerial tram about 1 mile in length connects the mine and mill. An
average crew of about forty-five men was employed throughout the year under the
direction of L. D. Clark. The mill was operated continuously until the end of November, when it was closed and a development programme continued. Total development
for the year included 1,500 feet of drifting and 375 feet of raising. During the summer
a two-stage 260-cubic-foot Holman compressor driven by an 100-horse-power International Diesel was installed in the power-house at the mine and a new modern bunk-
house 24 by 80 feet and an addition to the dry-house was built. The new buildings will
accommodate a crew of thirty-two men.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part E.]
Rover Creek.
This group is on Whitewater Creek, a tributary of Rover Creek, about
Stillwater Group. 5 miles from the Blewett road. The property was bonded by the Highland Bell, Limited. There is a large amount of quartz float carrying
good gold values in Whitewater Creek and, during the summer, an attempt was made to
find the source of this by driving an adit to bed-rock in an area where a favourable
reaction had been obtained by a geophysical survey the year before. Three men were
employed and about 50 feet of drift driven by hand.
Ymir.
This property on Ymir Creek, just above the junction of Huckleberry
Blackcock.       Creek, is owned and operated by Frank W. Henderson, of Calgary,
Alberta. The property is equipped with a complete small mining
plant. A crew of from eight to ten men under the direction of R. H. Weaver was
employed for the greater part of the year.    Some ore was mined and shipped to Trail.
Company office, 704 Royal Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C.; R. C.
Ymir Consolidated McCorkell, President; T. G. Cowan, Secretary-Treasurer. Capital:
Gold Mines, Ltd.   1,500,000 preferred shares, no par value;   2,500,000 common snares,
no par value; issued, 2,159,453 common shares. The company controls the Goodenough mine on Elise Mountain and owns the adjoining Ymir mine.
These properties are equipped with complete mining plants and a flotation-mill of
about 100 tons daily capacity, so located as to be able to serve both mines. During
the year the property was operated entirely by leasers, at one time as many as twenty
being engaged in salvage operations from pillars and the remnants of stopes. With
the exception of the mill, the mechanical equipment belonging to the company was A 66 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
used by the leasers.    A total of 2,127 tons of ore mined and shipped to Trail yielded
982 oz. of gold, 7,558 oz. of silver, and lead and zinc.
This property is on Ymir Creek, about three-quarters of a mile above
Ymir Wilcox,     the Blackcock.    It was operated under lease by R. Golac and associates,
of Ymir, B.C.    A crew of from three to four men, all partners in the
lease, used hand-steel to recover ore from pillars, surface cuts, and trenches.
Arizona.—This property, adjoining the Wilcox, was operated under lease by Nick
Morris and partner. Hand-steel was used to mine some ore which was shipped to-
Trail.
Company office, 525 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.; E. P. Craw-
Ymir-Yankee Girl ford, President; W. A. Sutton, Secretary-Treasurer; L. G. Morrell,
Gold Mines, Ltd. Mine Manager. Capital: 3,000,000 shares, no par value; issued,
2,225,005. The company owns and operated the Yankee Girl mine on
Oscar Creek, 3 miles from Ymir, and operated the adjoining Dundee mine on a lease
and bond basis. The property is equipped with a complete mining plant and an 175-
ton cyanide and flotation mill. During the first part of the year the mill was closed
to permit alterations that would make it possible to treat a dump of zinc tailings for
their zinc content and was operated until the end of May on these tailings. After
that date the mill was operated continuously on ore, chiefly from the Dundee workings.
An average crew of seventy men was employed. Development on the Yankee Girl
included 20 feet of drifting and 62 feet of raising, and on the Dundee 2,166 feet of
drifting, 389 feet of crosscutting, 722 feet of raising, and 125 feet of sinking. A total
of 90 tons of old tailings was treated. A total of 32,809 tons of ore chiefly from the
Dundee workings yielded 6,444 oz. of gold, 60,458 oz. of silver, as well as zinc and
some cadmium.
Wesko (Ymir Centre Star).—This property, about 3 miles from Ymir, was leased during
the year by Oscar Anderson, E. P. Haukedahl, and two partners, of Ymir, B.C. Hand-
steel was used to salvage pillars and the remnants of stopes. A total of 299 tons was
mined and shipped to Trail.
This property, on Porto Rico Creek, is owned by E. C. Wragge, of
Porto Rico.       Nelson, B.C.    It was operated under lease for three months during
the summer by Joe and Gus Flagel, Albert Shaw, and H. Erington.
A total of 89.5 tons of ore mined by hand-steel and shipped to Trail yielded 39 oz. of
gold and 36 oz. of silver.
Howard (Durango).—This property, on Porcupine Creek, was operated for a short time
by leasers with hand-steel.
Salmo.
Company  office,   618   Stock  Exchange   Building,   Vancouver,   B.C.;
Clubine-Comstock  C. F. Hunter, Secretary.    Capital:   2,000,000 shares, 50 cents par
Gold Mines, Ltd.   value.    This company owns the Clubine-Comstock mine on Boulder
Creek, about 4 miles from Salmo.    The property is equipped with
a complete small mining plant.    During the year it was operated under lease by the
former manager, L. R. Clubine, three men being employed.
•    [Reference:  Annual Report, 1936, Part E.]
Sheep Creek.
Company office, 475 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine office, Sheep
Kootenay Belle   Creek, B.C.;   Jonathan Rogers, President;   J. A. Clarke, Secretary-
Gold Mines, Ltd.  Treasurer;  Vere McDowall, Mine Manager.   Capital:   750,000 shares,
50 cents par value;  issued, 675,200.    The company owns and operated
the Kootenay Belle mine on Sheep Creek, about 10 miles from Salmo.    The mine and
mill operated continuously throughout the year, employing an average crew of 125
men, with ninety working underground.    During the early part of the year the possibilities of finding further reserves on the main veins—that is, the " A " and " B "
veins—was practically exhausted and work was concentrated on the Black vein, where
a considerable tonnage of ore was developed.    By the end of the year by far the PROGRESS NOTES. A 67
greater part of the tonnage milled was coming from this vein. Development-work
included 1,165 feet of crosscutting and 716 feet of drifting on the " A" and " B "
veins, 1,643 feet of drifting on the Black vein, 86.5 feet on the Queen, and 415 feet
on the Yellowstone as well as 261.5 feet of raising and 123.6 feet of sinking. A total
of 34,644 tons mined and treated in the mill yielded 9,684 oz. of gold and 2,500 oz. of
silver.
This property, between the Motherlode and Gold Belt mines, was oper-
Golden Belle,     ated under lease and bond by the Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Limited.
It is equipped with a small complete mining plant. A crew of fourteen
men with nine underground was employed for the greater part of the year. Underground development included 1,734 feet of drifting.
Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.; mine
Sheep Creek office, Sheep Creek, B.C.; R. W. Bruhn, President; James Anderson,
Gold Mines, Ltd. Secretary-Treasurer; H. E. Doelle, General Superintendent and Managing Director. Capital: 2,000,000 shares, 50 cents par; issued,
1,875,000. The company owns and operated the Queen mine on Waldie Creek, a tributary of Sheep Creek. The mine and mill operated continuously throughout the year,
employing an average of 115 men with sixty-six working underground. Development
for the year included 3,940 feet of drifting, 2,887 feet of crosscutting, 567 feet of
raising, and 500 feet of surface-trenching. A total of 55,052 tons of ore was mined
and treated in the mill and the bullion yielded 26,083 oz. of gold and 7,958 oz. of silver.
Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Gold Belt        office, Sheep Creek, B.C.;   A. E. Jukes, President;   James Anderson,
Mining Co., Ltd.  Secretary-Treasurer; M. O'Donnell, Mine Manager.   Capital: 3,0.00,000
shares, 50 cents par; issued, 2,550,000. The company owns and
operates the Gold Belt mine on Sheep Creek, between the Reno and Kootenay Belle
holdings. The mine and mill operated continuously throughout the year, employing
an average of 135 men with 104 working underground. Development-work included
3,750 feet of drifting and crosscutting, 950 feet of raising, and 826 feet of diamond-
drilling. It has been found that the ore-horizon on the more northerly veins, which
are now under development, is higher than on those which are being worked at present.
To facilitate development of this new area a raise is being driven from the 1,400 level
to connect with the 600 level of the old upper workings. A total of 56,502 tons was
mined and treated in the mill. The bullion from this yielded 15,811 oz. of gold and
6,618 oz. of silver.
Company office, 525 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Reno Gold Sheep Creek, B.C.; K. G. Nairn, President; W. A. Sutton, Secretary-
Mines, Ltd.       Treasurer;   W. S. Ellis, General Superintendent.    Capital:   2,000,000
shares, $1 par; issued, 1,880,000. This company owns the Reno,
Motherlode, Nugget, Cayote, and Bluestone properties, all of which form a block of
ground in the Sheep Creek camp to the north of the Gold Belt and Golden Belle. These
properties are equipped with two complete mining plants, at the Bluestone and Motherlode respectively, and an 140-ton cyanide mill. The Reno was inactive during the year
as was the Bluestone, except for diamond-drilling. Development-work was carried on
on the Nugget vein from the Motherlode 4,900 tunnel and a shoot of ore opened up
between there and the old Nugget workings. The mill was started on this ore and
some broken reserves from the Motherlode vein about the middle of June and was
operated continuously until the end of the year, when it was shut down permanently
for lack of food. During the summer months development was done in the Cayote
tunnel, but results were unsatisfactory. An average crew of forty-eight men with
twenty-two working underground were maintained throughout the year on the Motherlode and Nugget and fourteen were engaged in working the Cayote tunnel, the latter
operation being conducted from the Bluestone camp. The development-work during
the year is as follows: Motherlode, 4,900 tunnel—drifts and crosscuts, 1,119 feet;
raising, 190 feet; sinking, 63 feet; Nugget, 4,900 tunnel—drifting and crosscutting,
765 feet; raising, 262 feet; diamond-drilling, 486 feet; Cayote, drifting and cross-
cutting, 768.1 feet.    In addition to this 4,134 feet of diamond-drilling was done on the surface of the Cayote and Bluestone.    A total of 13,595 tons of ore was mined and
treated in the mill.
Nugget (Old Workings).—This property was operated continuously throughout the
year under lease to A. Endersby, Jr., of Fruitvale, B.C. Four men were employed
and all the work was done by hand-steel. Ore was recovered from pillars and stope
remnants.
Erie Creek.
Company office, 626 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine office,
Relief-Arlington   Erie, B.C.;   Bert F. Smith, President and Managing Director;   D. G.
Mines, Ltd.      Marshall, Secretary-Treasurer;   J. C. McCutcheon, General Superintendent.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 3,000,000.    The
company is controlled by the Premier Gold Mining Company, Limited, which holds
1,530,000 shares.    The company owns and operated the Second Relief mine on Erie
Creek, 13 miles from Salmo, B.C.    The mine and mill operated continuously until June
15th, 1941, employing an average of ninety-four men, with fifty-two working underground.    It was then closed down as ore reserves for an operation of that size had
become exhausted.    Development for the period operated included 83 feet of drifting,
29 feet of crosscutting, and 174 feet of raising on the Second Relief vein, and 162 feet
of drifting, 15 feet of crosscutting, 60 feet of raising, and 59 feet of sinking on the
Inez and Rand veins.    A total of 14,310 tons of ore was milled and the bullion yielded
5,306 oz. of gold and 1,857 oz. of silver.    The company went into voluntary liquidation
on November 15th, 1941.
This property, on Keystone Mountain, 3% miles from Erie, B.C., is
Arlington.       owned by the Relief-Arlington Mines, Limited, and was operated under
lease by R. Oscarson, of Spokane, Washington.    Thirteen men were
employed continuously throughout the year and hand-steel only was used.    A total of
772 tons was shipped to Trail.
This property, on Keystone Mountain, about 3% miles from Erie, B.C.,
Keystone. was operated by the Slocan Silver Mines, Limited, under lease and
bond. A crew of ten men was employed under the direction of Geo.
Allen, of Nelson, B.C. Development-work, all done with hand-steel, included 232 feet
of drifting, 25 feet of crosscutting, and 300 feet of surface-trenching. In addition to
this, 2% miles of the present road was reconditioned and 1,800 feet of new road built
to give access to the portal of the new low-level tunnel. The operation was closed in
November.
Ross Spur.
Reliance.—This property, near Ross Spur and about 9 miles south of Salmo, was
operated for a short time early in the year by G. H. Grimwood and associates. Four
men were engaged and a small mining plant was used.
SOUTH KOOTENAY LAKE AREA.
Company office, 308 Pacific Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Bayonne        Bayonne, B.C.;   W. C. Ditmars, President;   H. T. Wilson, Secretary-
Consolidated     Treasurer;  J. A. Paterson, Mine Manager.   Capital:  2,500,000 shares,
Mines, Ltd.      no par value;   issued, 2,500,000.   The company owns and operates the
Bayonne mine, on Summit Creek, 23 miles by road from Tye Siding.
The mine and mill were operated continuously throughout the year, an average crew
of  seventy-two  men,  with  thirty-eight  underground,   being  employed.    During the
summer a new office was built to replace the one destroyed by fire last year and another
bunk-house  to  accommodate twenty men  was  erected.    Development-work  included
2,414 feet of drifting, of which 49 feet was done on the Main vein and the remainder
on the "A" vein;   95 feet of crosscutting and 148 feet of raising on the "A" vein,
4,849 feet of diamond-drilling and 200 feet of surface-trenching.    A total of 20,224
tons of ore was mined and treated in the mill, and this yielded 8,274 oz. of gold and
17,575 oz. of silver.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part E.] PROGRESS NOTES. A 69
This property, owned and operated by R. M. and K. K. Laib, is on Wall
Spokane.        Mountain, 18 miles from Tye Siding.   Seven men were employed during the summer and autumn.    Hand-steel only was used.    A total of
482 tons, shipped from the old dumps and underground workings, yielded 276 oz. of
gold, 3,226 oz. of silver, and some lead and zinc.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
TEXADA ISLAND.
Company office,  1604 Royal Bank Building,  Vancouver,  B.C.;  mine
Gem Gold       office, Vananda, B.C.;   Ralph A. Logan, President;   J. D. Logan, Sec-
Mines, Ltd.      retary-Treasurer;   W. J. Slater, Mine Manager.    Capital:   2,000,000
shares, $1 par;  issued, 1,675,358.    This company owns the Gem mine
on Texada Island, 5 miles from Blubber Bay.    Some further development-work has
been done from the bottom of No. 2 shaft in Nos. 1 and 2 veins, but the mine was
closed for the greater part of the year.
VANCOUVER ISLAND.
Zeballos.
Company office, 602 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   D. S.
Privateer Mine,   Tait, President; N.E.McConnell, Manager.   Capital: 2,500,000 shares,
Ltd. no par value;  issued, 2,454,080.   The company operates the Privateer
mine in Spud Valley, 4 miles by road from Zeballos.   The property is
equipped with a 75- to 90-ton amalgamation and cyanide mill.    No. 2 vein has been
stoped on most of the levels and Nos. 3 and 4 veins opened up on the levels above the
1,100, which is the main haulage-level.    The shaft was sunk to the 1,300 level and
some drifting and raising done on the 1,300 and 1,200 levels.    The total amount of
drifting for the year amounted to 1,867 feet;   raising, 300 feet;   sinking, 92 feet;
crosscutting, 1,512 feet; diamond-drilling, 1,985 feet.    Ninety-eight men are employed.
[Reference:  Lode-gold Deposits, Zeballos Area, 1938.]
This mine adjoins the Privateer and is owned and operated by Priva-
Prident Mine, teer Mine, Limited. Very active development has been carried out
during the year; the 200, 400, and 500 levels being opened up and
drifting and stoping carried on in each. A crosscut is being driven from the 600 level
in the Privateer mine to connect with the veins in the Prident. This will greatly
simplify the haulage operations, as at present the ore from the Prident mine is shipped
by truck to the Privateer mill. Total drifting done was 1,490 feet; raising, 50 feet;
and crosscutting, 332 feet.    Total number of men employed is twenty-seven.
Company office, 814 Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
White Star      Zeballos, B.C.;   R. P. Stockton, President;   T. D. Pickard, Manager.
Mine, Ltd.       Capital:   200,000 shares, $1 par.    This company operates the White
Star mine on Spud Creek.    Most of the work for this year was stoping
in Nos. 1 and 3 levels.    Development-work comprised 291 feet of drifting, 25 feet of
raising, and 295 feet of diamond-drilling.    The average number of men employed
throughout the year was twelve.
[Reference:   Lode-gold Deposits, Zeballos Area, 1938.]
Company office,  1001  Federal  Building,  Toronto,  Ont.;   mine office,
Mount Zeballos   Zeballos, B.C.;   F. M. Connell, President;   A.  Cockeram,  Secretary-
Gold Mines, Ltd.  Treasurer;  W. S. Hamilton, Mine Manager.   Capital:  1,500,000 shares,
$1 par;   issued, 1,100,000 shares.    The company operates the Mount
Zeballos mine, on the west side of Spud Creek.    During the year three new levels were
opened up and stoping continued on all the other levels.    The levels operating now are
the 1,500, 1,700, 1,800, 1,900, 2,000, 2,150, and 2,250.    In addition to this some development-work was done on the Farris vein.    Two levels—the Farris 1,800 and Farris
1,900—were opened up on this vein.    Development-work completed during the year
was as follows:   Drifting, 2,264 feet;   crosscutting,  115 feet;   raising,  1,531  feet; A 70 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
and diamond-drilling, 2,290 feet.    The average number of men employed throughout
the year was seventy-two.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part F.]
Zeballos (Pacific) Gold Mines, Ltd.—Company office, 132 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C. This company was operating on the Gold Peak property. Two drifts
had been driven a considerable distance, one on the No. 4 vein and one on No. 1 vein,
but work was discontinued in the early part of the year.
Company office,  703  Royal Trust  Building,  Vancouver,  B.C.;   mine
Spud Valley      office, Zeballos, B.C.;   P. F. Knight, President;   William Elliott, Man-
Gold Mines, Ltd. ager.     Capital:    2,500,000  shares,   $1  par;    issued,  2,325,000.    The
company operates the Spud Valley mine in Spud Valley, 7 miles from
Zeballos.    The claims extend beyond the ridge between Spud Valley Creek and Gold
Valley Creek.    The Goldfield and Spud veins have been developed in all the levels and
stoping carried out.    Some development-work has also been done on the Roper vein
from the Gold Valley side of the ridge.    The Big Star group of claims across the Gold
Creek Valley from the present operations was acquired by the company.    A jig-back
aerial tramway, 3,000 feet in length, with terminals and ore-bins, was constructed to
connect with No. 4 tunnel;   thus transporting the ore through to the Spud Valley
aerial tramway and finally to the mill.    The following development-work has been done
for the year:   Spud Valley mine—drifting 3,061 feet, crosscutting 72 feet, raising 255
feet;   Big Star mine—drifting 795 feet and crosscutting 233 feet.    The number of
men employed at the Spud Valley operations is 110 and at Big Star, twenty-five.
N. F. Brookes, Manager.    Mr. Brookes was succeeded as manager by
Reno Gold Mines, Mr.  C. Starr.    Stoping in the Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4 levels continued
Ltd. (Central     throughout the year and further drifting in the Nos. 3 and 4 levels
Zeballos Mine),   in the winze.    The principal development has been driving a crosscut
at mill-level, known as No. 9 tunnel, to contact the vein below the
present workings.    This was completed and 380 feet of drifting at this level was done.
When connections are made with the upper workings, the haulage system for the whole
of the operation will be greatly simplified.    The development-work done amounted to:
Drifting, 1,004 feet;  raising, 303 feet;  crosscutting, 2,140 feet;   and diamond-drilling,
661 feet.    About fifty-four men are employed.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part F.]
Mine office, Zeballos, B.C.;  T. C. Denton, President and Mine Manager;
CD. Mining     W.  S.  Lane,   Secretary.    Capital:    200,000  shares,  $1  par;    issued,
Co., Ltd. 200,000 shares.    This company operates the former Rey Oro mine in
Gold Creek Valley.   A winze was sunk from the 1,200 level to the 1,300
and 1,400 levels and the ore shipped to Tacoma.    The mine closed down in August,
1941.
Company office, 703 Royal Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   J. M.
Homeward      Wood, President;   R. C. McCorkell, Managing Director;   H. E. Smith,
Mines, Ltd.      Manager.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par.    The property of
this company is in Nomash Valley.   Two levels in the vein have been
developed, Nos. 1 and 2, and some stoping done.    A 50-ton mill was constructed and
new bunk-house and dining-room.    About thirteen men have been employed underground.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part F.]
Bedwell River.
Company office, 607 Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   H. T. James,
Musketeer       Managing Director;   R. D. Mason, Mine Manager.    Mining operations
Mines, Ltd.      have been carried on steadily throughout the year, a small crew of
hand-steel miners doing a certain amount of drifting in the upper
workings from January 1st to the early part of April, when the regular crew returned
to the property and work was resumed on a normal scale.    During the last nine months
of the year the average number of men employed was nineteen above ground and six
underground.    Mill-construction was begun on August 7th, this being completed and PROGRESS NOTES. A 71
ready for operating on December 15th. The mill employs the flotation method and is
designed to treat 25 to 30 tons per day. Actual milling commenced on December
16th, 140 tons of low-grade ore being treated to January 1st, 1942. No shipments of
bullion or concentrates had been made to the end of the year. Underground operations
included 455 feet of drifting, 29 feet of crosscutting, and a raise 300 feet long which
was driven to connect the main vein crosscut tunnel with the 1,000 level for ventilating
purposes and provide a second outlet.
[Reference:   Bulletin No. 13, 1941.]
Company office, 555 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.; H. L. Hill,
Buccaneer General Manager. Mining operations were resumed for the present
Mines, Ltd.      season at the end of May and were continuous to the end of the year.
Development-work included 810 feet of crosscuts, 22 feet of drifts, and
140 feet of raises. Construction of a small mill was begun in the middle of June and
completed on August 8th. This building is at the terminus of the newly-completed
truck-road which gives access to the mines from the landing at the head of Bedwell
Sound and is approximately 10 miles in length to the Buccaneer mill. The ore is transported down the mountain from the mine by an aerial tramway, 3,600 feet long, which
is operated by a single rope haul-back method. Two buckets, each with a capacity of
half a ton of ore, are connected tandem fashion to a %-inch-diameter running rope
and run on a lV^-inch carrying cable. The power plant at the mine consists of one
Ingersoll-Rand type 40 compressor and one Sullivan portable compressor; these machines are driven.by Diesel caterpillar engines and each has a capacity of 210 cubic
feet of air per minute.
[Reference:   Bulletin No. 13, 1941.]
Nitinat River.
Company office, 605 Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   H. T. James,
Black Panther    Managing Director;  E. H. Parr, Mine Manager.   This property, owned
Mine. by W. Harris and associates, of Port Alberni, is near the headwaters
of the Nitinat River. During the present year these claims were
operated under option by Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Limited, and in January this
company contracted with C. H. Cox to do a specified amount of drifting. This contract
was terminated in April and all subsequent operations were then carried on under
direct company supervision. The surface plant consisted of a small blower-fan driven
by a 2%-horse-power gasoline-engine, while the necessary blacksmith equipment and
a suitable magazine were located convenient to each tunnel. All drilling done underground by hand-steel miners. A substantial log cabin was used as a cook-house and
dining-room, while the men were accommodated in a frame building and three tents
partly of frame construction. Work carried out during the year included: Drifting,
907 feet; crosscutting, 297 feet; raising, 66 feet; diamond-drilling, 1,631 feet. An
average crew of eleven men was employed from April to the end of the year.
Nanaimo.
Company office, Bank of Toronto Building, Victoria, B.C.; R. A. Pitre,
Thistle Mine. General Manager; D. E. Foote, Mine Manager. This mine is being
operated by Vancouver Island Diamond Drilling and Exploration Company, and has been providing steady employment for an average crew of six men from
April 1st to the end of the year. The surface plant consists of a Schramm compressor
having a capacity of 220 cubic feet of air a minute, this being driven by a 65-horse-
power Allis-Chalmers engine. A total of 670 tons of ore was mined and shipped to
Tacoma, the greater portion of this tonnage being taken from surface open-cuts.
Underground work included:   Drifting, 160 feet;   raising, 31 feet.
Great Central Lake.
H. T. James, Managing Director; E. H. Lovitt, Mine Manager. These
Sherwood and properties are in the Delia Falls area of the Great Central Lake dis-
P.D.Q. Claims,    trict and were operated under option by Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C.,
Limited, from March 1st to November 15th, 1941, with an average A 72 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
crew of eighteen men employed between the two groups of claims. The surface equipment consists of a very small portable compressor, a small blower-fan driven by a 2y2-
horse-power gasoline-engine and three portable blacksmith outfits. Surface buildings
include the packer's quarters and warehouse near the end of the logging-railway;
a substantial log cabin, 16 by 32 feet, on Drinkwater Creek; a well-built log cabin,
14 by 16 feet, as a cook-house and dining-room; and a 14- by 16-foot frame construction bunk-house; the two latter buildings are convenient to the entrance to No. 7
tunnel. Underground work done during the year included: Drifting, 760 feet; cross-
cutting, 90 feet; raising, 270 feet; all of the above being done on the Sherwood
claims. Work done on the P.D.Q. claims included 684 feet of drifting and crosscutting.
All operations were indefinitely suspended on both of these properties on November
15th.
[Reference:   Bulletin No. 13, 1941.]
GOLD-COPPER DEPOSITS.
TELKWA.
Hunter Basin.
The Conwest Exploration, Limited, worked at Hunter Basin until late in September, when operations were abandoned and all equipment taken from the property.
A total of 248 tons of ore yielded 209 oz. gold, 5,652 oz. silver, as well as copper.
GREENWOOD-GRAND FORKS AREA.
This property, at Phoenix, is owned and operated by W. E. McArthur,
Granby. of Greenwood, B.C.    It is equipped with a complete small mining plant
and the ore is treated in the Providence mill near Greenwood. An
average of twelve men was employed continuously throughout the year. Development-
work included 250 feet of drifting, 125 feet of raising, 50 feet of sinking, and 2,100
feet of diamond-drilling. Ore totalling 7,643 tons was mined and milled and the concentrates shipped to the Tacoma smelter.
Athelstan.—This property, in the Wellington Camp, near Phoenix, is owned by
W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood, B.C. A small gasoline-driven compressor was used to
do 125 feet of drifting during the summer.    Two men were employed.
Winnipeg.—This property, in the Wellington Camp, near Phoenix, was operated
under lease by W. E. McArthur. Work was confined to trenching and surface-
stripping.
Boundary Falls.
Ruby.—This property, three-quarters of a mile from Boundary Falls, on the No. 7
road, is leased by George Boag and partner, of Greenwood, B.C. To date work has
consisted of retimbering and reconditioning the old tunnels.
ROSSLAND AREA.
Company office, 215 St. James Street, Montreal, P.Q.;   mine office,
Consolidated     Trail, B.C.;   Sir Edward Beatty, Chairman;   S. G. Blaylock, President
Mining and      and Managing Director;   J. E. Riley, Secretary;   Jas. Buchanan, Gen-
Smelting Co. of   eral Manager;   R. W. Diamond, Assistant General Manager.   Capital:
Canada, Ltd.     4,000,000 shares, $5 par;   issued, 3,271,669.    This company owns the
Centre Star, War Eagle, LeRoi, Josie, Iron Mask, No. 1, Annie, and
Columbia Kootenay on Red Mountain, near Rossland, B.C.    These properties were
operated continuously throughout the year by leasers.    From fifty to sixty men were
engaged in mining ore from the surface and underground on from sixteen to eighteen PROGRESS NOTES. A 73
separate leases. Some of the groups have installed small complete mining plants.
During the year the company carried out a programme of resampling and about 4,000
feet of diamond-drilling throughout the old workings, the results of this work being
made available to the leasers. The work of the leasers was carried on under the supervision of J. K. Cram, of Trail, B.C.
This property, on Red Mountain, near Rossland, is owned and operated
St. Elmo.        by A. Grubsic and Ike Glover of Rossland, B.C.    It is equipped with
a complete small mining plant. Much of the 2,300 feet of underground
workings were reopened and reconditioned.
Phoenix.—This property, in the South Belt near Rossland, is operated under lease
by S. Berglund and O. Osing, of Rossland, B.C. About 120 feet of tunnel was driven
during the year with hand-steel.
This property, on the Cascade Highway, 13 miles east of Rossland, is
Velvet. owned by the Velgo Mining, Incorporated, of Seattle, Washington, and
is operated under lease by the Velvet Gold Leasers, consisting of
Harold S. Elmes and Renaldo Bielli, of Rossland, B.C. The property is equipped with
a complete mining plant and 100-ton flotation-mill. Twenty-five men were employed
continuously throughout the year with twelve working underground. Development
included 495 feet of drifting, 146 feet of crosscutting, 230 feet of raising, and 2,492
feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 8,432 tons of ore was milled and the product,
a gold-copper concentrate, was shipped to Tacoma. This yielded 1,515 oz. of gold and
1,399 oz. of silver.
SILVER-GOLD-LEAD DEPOSITS.
GREENWOOD AREA.
This property, about 1 mile north of Greenwood, was operated under
Providence. lease continuously throughout the year by W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood, B.C., and associates. It is equipped with a small complete mining
plant. A crew of thirteen men with seven underground was employed. Development
included 500 feet of drifting, 125 feet of raising, and 2,600 feet of diamond-drilling.
Ore totalling 1,899 tons was mined and shipped to Trail. Smelter returns gave 796 oz.
of gold, 247,654 oz. of silver, and some lead and zinc.
SILVER-LEAD-ZING DEPOSITS.
BEAVERDELL AREA.
Company office, Creston, B.C.;   mine office, Beaverdell, B.C.;   F. V.
Highland Bell,    Staples, Managing Director.   Capital:   1,500,000 shares, $1 par value;
Ltd. issued, 1,315,856.    The company owns and operates the Highland Bell
mine, on Wallace Mountain, about 5 miles from Beaverdell, B.C.   The
property was operated continuously throughout the year, a crew of thirty-nine men
being employed under the direction of A. B. Staples.    Development-work included 350
feet of drifting, 400 feet of crosscutting, 130 feet of raising, 50 feet of sinking, and
450 feet of diamond-drilling.   A total of 5,758 tons of ore was mined and shipped to
Trail.    This yielded 410 oz. of gold and 892,868 oz. of silver, as well as lead and zinc.
Company office, Penticton, B.C.;  S. J. Crocker, President;  H. B. Mor-
SallyMines,     ley, Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:   1,000,000 shares, $1 par value;
Ltd. issued,   1,000,000.    The  company  owns  the  Sally  mine  on  Wallace
Mountain,  adjoining the Highland Bell.    The property is  equipped A 74 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
with a complete mining plant. This was not operated during the year. The property
was operated entirely by leasers, who carried on some development and salvage operations in different parts of the mine. A total of 108 tons of ore was mined and shipped
to Trail.    This yielded 2 oz. of gold, 12,648 oz. of silver, and some lead and zinc.
Beaverdell Wellington Syndicate, Ltd.—Company office, Greenwood, B.C.; Jas. Kerr,
President; G. S. Walters, Secretary-Treasurer. Capital: 50,000 shares, $1 par value;
issued, 50,000. This company owns the Wellington mine on Wallace Mountain, adjoining the Sally. During the year the mine was leased to A. J. Morrison and associates.
Hand-steel only was used.    Ore was mined and shipped to Trail.
This property is on Wallace Mountain and adjoins the Highland Bell.
Highland Chief.   It is owned by Mark Smith, of Beaverdell, B.C., and was operated for
a short time by Alex. Bell and associates, two men being employed.
Hand-steel only was used.
This property is on Wallace Mountain.    It is controlled by the Beaver-
Bounty Fraction,  dell  Wellington   Syndicate   and  was   operated   under   lease  by   Oluf
Houlind and associates. Four men were employed. It is equipped
with a complete small mining plant which was used by the leasers.
LARDEAU AREA.
This property is on Silver Cup Mountain, about 10 miles from Fer-
Silver Cup.      guson, B.C.    It is equipped with a 35-ton flotation-mill but has no
mining equipment 'which could be used. It was operated under lease
and bond by Messrs. Larsen, Broomfield, and Malone, of Princeton, B.C. A total of
twelve men was employed under the direction of E. Larsen. Efforts were directed to
milling the dump at the portal of the No. 7 level but, in addition, some underground
work was done toward reconditioning these workings. Some ore was treated in the
mill and the concentrates shipped to Trail. Late in the year the operation was suspended for the winter because of snow conditions.
SLOCAN AREA.
Kaslo-Three Forks.
This property, at Blaylock, was operated under lease and bond by the
Lucky Boy.       Lucky Boy Mining Syndicate;   office, 404 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.    Four men were employed under the direction of W. J.
Norrie and a small amount of development-work was done by hand-steel.    The shaft is
equipped with a small gasoline-driven hoist.
Caledonia.—This property, near Blaylock, was operated for a short time by J. E.
McCready, who shipped 11.2 tons. This yielded 1,169 oz. of silver and some lead and
zinc.
This company is a subsidiary of Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd.    It
Zincton Mines,   owns and operated the Zincton (Lucky Jim) mine at Zincton, B.C.   The
Ltd. property is equipped with a complete mining plant and a selective
flotation-mill of 220 tons daily capacity. Diesel power is used. Up to
June, 1941, ten to eighteen men were employed and work was directed toward reconditioning the mine, mill, and power plant. After that date milling was commenced and
a crew of fifty men permanently maintained. The work is now under the direction of
F. R. Thompson. Development-work included 190 feet of drifting, 138 feet of cross-
cutting, and 2,069 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 38,208 tons of ore was milled
and the zinc concentrate shipped to the Anaconda smelter near Butte, Montana.
Sandon-Three Forks.
These properties, situated on the Payne Ridge, near Sandon, have been
Payne, Washing- consolidated and are being operated by a syndicate under the direction
ton, Slocan Boy.   of Arthur Lakes, of Nelson, B.C.    Work this year included a topographical and geological survey of part of the area included in these
holdings, with the idea of finding a duplication of structural conditions which occur in the vicinity of the known ore-bodies. This work was started in 1940. Surface-trenching to the extent of two cuts, one 90 by 11 by 14 feet and one 70 by 15 by 18 feet, comprising a total of 606 cubic yards, was done last fall before snow conditions made it
advisable to suspend operations until the spring.
Company office, Vancouver Block, Vancouver, B.C.;   R.  H.   Stewart,
Ruth Hope      President;    R.   S.   Lennie,   Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:    2,500,000
Mining Co., Ltd. shares, par $1;  issued, 1,500,000.    The company owns the Ruth Hope
mine at Sandon, B.C.    During the year the property was operated by
leasers who shipped 90 tons of ore to Trail.    This yielded 5,889 oz. of silver and some
lead and zinc.
Victor.—This property, 3 miles from Sandon, is owned by Mrs. D. Petty, of Nelson,
B.C., and is operated under lease by E. Doney and son. A total of 76 tons of ore was
shipped to Trail, which yielded 5 oz. of gold and 8,296 oz. of silver.
Note.—A small amount of work was done on the following properties in this area
and small shipments made: Silvenite, by E. J. Vandergrift; Hinkley mine, by Wm.
Pengelly;  Monitor, by S. Silibean.
Silverton-New Denver.
Bosun—This property is on Slocan Lake, between Silverton and New Denver. It is
owned by J. Colin Campbell, of New Denver, B.C. During the year leasers shipped 32
tons of ore, which yielded 2,520 oz. of silver and some lead and zinc.
Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;  James
Galena Farm     Anderson,   Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:    2,500,000  shares,  no par
Consolidated     value;   issued, 1,602,203.    This company owns the Hewitt mine, about
Mines, Ltd.      6 miles from Silverton, B.C.    During the year it was operated under
lease by H. V. Dewis, of Silverton, B.C.    Hand-steel only was used.    A
total of 240 tons was shipped to Trail.
This company operated the Standard mine, on Emily Creek, about 3
Western Explora- miles from Silverton, B.C.    The property is equipped with a complete
tion Co., Ltd.     mining plant and a 200-ton selective flotation-mill.   The property operated continuously throughout the year with an average crew of fifty
men, eighteen of whom were employed at the mine, all being under the direction of
A. M. Ham, of Silverton, B.C.    Development included 268 feet of drifting, 789 feet of
raising, and reconditioning 6,100 feet of old tunnels.    A total of 60,000 tons of zinc
tailings was dredged from Slocan Lake and treated in the mill and, in addition to this,
some 12,000 tons were extracted from the mine and also milled.    The concentrate was
shipped to the U.S. Smelting and Refining Company's plant near Kellogg, Idaho.
This property is on Enterprise Creek, about 5 miles from the Slocan
Enterprise.       Highway.    It was operated under lease by S. N. Ross, of Nelson, B.C.
During the summer a small flotation-mill, driven by water-power, was
installed and tailings treated from an old dump.    A total of eight men was employed.
Operations were suspended during the winter.
Slocan City.
This property is on Springer Creek, about 5 miles from Slocan.    It is
Ottawa.        operated under lease by W. Hicks and associates, of Slocan, B.C.    Four
to five men were employed and hand-steel only was used.    A total of
43 tons was shipped to Trail and this yielded 15,143 oz. of silver.
Speculator.—This property is on Springer Creek, about 7 miles from Slocan, and was
operated under lease by H. M. Parker, of Trail, B.C.
Note.—In addition to the above operations, a small amount of work, chiefly development and assessment, was done on the following properties in this area: Myrtle, by
Roy F. Ainslee; L.T. mine, by D. B. O'Neail; Richmond, by Chas. Lindstrom; Bondholder, by P. McGuire; Jack, by James L. Howard; and the Republic No. 2, by C. W.
Tipping. A 76 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
AlNSWORTH.
Spokane-Trinket.—This property, adjoining the Banker, near Ainsworth, is being
developed under the supervision of Carl Mohr, of Ainsworth, B.C.    Late in the year the
small mining plant was put in commission and eight men employed in underground
work.
CRANBROOK AREA.
Company office, 215 St. James Street, Montreal, Quebec; mine office,
Consolidated Trail, B.C.; Sir Edward Beatty, Chairman; S. G. Blaylock, President
Mining and and Managing Director; J. E. Riley, Secretary; Jas. Buchanan,
Smelting Co. of General Manager. Sullivan mine office, Kimberley, B.C.; William
Canada, Ltd. Lindsay, General Superintendent; Jos. R. Giegerich, Mine Superintendent ; Hubert R. Banks, Mill Superintendent. The company owns and
operates the Sullivan mine at Kimberley.
The Sullivan mine on Mark Creek and the concentrator at Chapman Camp were
operated throughout the year on an unprecedented scale. The rather complex operating problem presented by the necessary reversal of the relative proportions of lead
and zinc mined, which the demands of national war economy thrust upon the management, has been solved successfully. In addition, the handling of the enlarged output
was by no means a light task. In the latter respect an innovation is the project now
under way, with the completion of which the ore crushed on the 3,500-foot level will be
raised to the main crosscut adit by means of a series of conveying belts. Much of the
preliminary work has already been done and the driving of the long incline, on a
gradient of about 16 degrees, has been in progress for some time. When in service,
this installation will supplant the present hoisting system at the 3,901 shaft, which will
then be required only for the transportation of men and supplies, the shaft itself being
eventually displaced for this purpose by another opening, work on which is now well
advanced. These new connections will not only facilitate the handling of the output
but, besides, will greatly improve the ventilation of the shaft-workings, for which it is
also planned to provide a separate intake in the form of a raise to be driven to the
surface from the 39,121 drift.
Filling operations involved the placing of 322,271 cubic yards of stowing material
in the course of the year, of which 11,347 cubic yards were obtained from development,
66,300 were the result of controlled caving, and 244,624 came from the surface. The
volume of stowing thus placed every year, while considerable, still remains behind that
corresponding to the tonnage extracted.
The development-work done in the period under consideration included 6,768 feet
of drifting, 9,253 feet of raising, 67 feet of sinking, and 10,273.5 feet of diamond-
drilling.
At the concentrator, the tin-recovery plant has been operated satisfactorily through
the greater part of the year and the erection of smelting equipment to handle its output
is in progress. The tailings from the Sullivan ore consist mostly of pyrrhotite and is
stored separately.
In December there were 940 persons on the pay-roll, of whom 700 were employed
underground and 240 on the surface, but, owing to absenteeism ascribed to various
causes, these numbers were reduced to averages of 645 and 225 per day, respectively.
The total number of men employed in all capacities at the concentrator was 374.
St. Eugene Mining Corporation, Ltd.—Company office, 25 King Street West, Toronto,
Ontario; W. S. Morlock, President; W. B. Malone, Secretary-Treasurer. This company
holds properties on both sides of Moyie Lake, these including the St. Eugene Extension
and the Aurora.    Nothing was done on either of these in the course of the year.
GOLDEN AREA.
Company office, 350 Bay Street, Toronto 2, Ontario;   J. H. C. Waite,
Base Metals      Toronto, President;  Hon. Chas. McRae, Toronto, Vice-President;  J. C.
Mining Ames, Toronto, Secretary-Treasurer; mine office, Field, B.C.; John D.
Corporation, Ltd. Galloway, Manager;   Hy. D. Forman, Mine Superintendent;   Jas. A.
Edwards, Mill Superintendent.    This company operated the Monarch
and Kicking Horse mines throughout the year. PROGRESS NOTES. A 77
Both the east and west sections of the Monarch mine, situated on Mount Stephen,
were operated during the year, the former contributing the greater part of the output.
In the latter some exploratory, but no actual development, work was done, the output
coming entirely from further benching of the floor in stopes and from the extraction of
pillars. In the East Monarch a new lens of ore was discovered, penetrated by a drift
started from one of the inner stopes, and was being prepared for extraction at the end
of the year. The ventilation presents some difficulties, owing to the general configuration of the workings.
At the time of the last inspection, sixty-six men were employed; twenty-three
underground, twenty others in various capacities on the surface, and twenty-three at
the concentrator, at which the output of the Kicking Horse mine was treated as well as
that of the Monarch.
The Kicking Horse mine is situated on Mount Field, at about the same elevation
above the floor of the valley as the Monarch. Two ore-bodies were worked during the
year, the ore being brought down by an aerial tramway to a storage-bin near the highway, from which it was loaded in trucks and transported to the Monarch mill. All
openings are on the face of a very steep cliff and have to be reached from the trail by
means of ladders. When visited, in the month of November, the mine employed a total
of twenty-four men, of which all but one were working underground.
COPPER DEPOSITS.
SIMILKAMEEN RIVER AREA.
Princeton.
Julian B. Beaty, President, New York;   A. S. Baillie, Vice-President
Granby Consoli-  and General Manager, Copper Mountain, B.C.;  W. R. Lindsay, Assis-
dated Mining,    tant General Manager, Allenby, B.C.;   W. I. Nelson, General Super-
Smelting & Power intendent, Copper Mountain, B.C.;   F. Buckle, Mine Superintendent,
Co., Ltd.        Copper  Mountain,   B.C.    Capital:    600,000   shares,   $5  par;    issued,
450,260.    The Copper Mountain mine and the concentrator at Allenby
have been in continuous operation since operations were resumed early in 1937, following a suspension of several years.    The mine is near the peak of Copper Mountain, at
an elevation of 4,000 feet, and is 12 miles west of Princeton;   the concentrator is at
Allenby, 4 miles west of Princeton.    A branch line of the Kettle Valley Railway, from
Princeton, connects all three points.
' The main development of the mine is by two main adit haulage-tunnels known as
Nos. 2 and 6 levels; all the ore is passed by haulage and transfer-chutes to No. 6 level,
on which is the main transportation system of the mine. The ore is crushed at the
portal of No. 6 level and carried on the railway to the concentrator at Allenby, 8 miles
distant. During the year development continued on the more recently opened Nos. 7
and 8 levels. These are serviced by a well-equipped vertical shaft from the upper levels.
Development during the year consisted of 8,493 feet of drifting and crosscutting,
17,803 feet of raising, 7 feet of sinking, eight large and two small chutes and sixty-five
grizzlies.    Diamond-drilling amounted to 27,820 feet.
The average number of men working during December (exclusive of townsite and
staff employees) at Copper Mountain was 400, of whom 298 were employed underground. Labour turnover was extremely high during the year; 397 men quit or were
discharged and 488 new employees were hired. At the end of the year about half of
the underground crew were " green " men; this including practically all the nippers
and helpers.
A total of 180 employees were engaged at the Allenby mill and twenty-seven employees at the power plant at Princeton. A 78 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
VANCOUVER AREA.
Company office, 730 Fifth Avenue, New York City;   mine office, Bri-
Britannia Mining tannia Beach, B.C.; E. B. Schley, President; C. P. Charlton, Secretary-
and Smelting     Treasurer;   C. P. Browning, General Manager;   and George C. Lipsey,
Co., Ltd.        Superintendent.    The company operates the Britannia mines at Britannia Beach on Howe Sound.    The property is fully equipped with
mining and milling plant to handle 6,000 to 7,000 tons per day.    The regular development-work and stoping has been carried on in the Victoria, Fairview, No. 5, and Bluff
mines.    The 4,100 tunnel at mill-level has now been connected to the bottom of the
Victoria shaft, and No. 6 inclined shaft has been continued to the 4,500 level and 4,500
level drifted on for a considerable distance with satisfactory results.    Development-
work over the whole mine was made up as follows:   Drifting, 18,791 feet;  crosscutting,
2,382 feet;  and shafts and raises, 6,564 feet.    A total of 45,437 feet of diamond-drilling
was done.    The average number of men employed fell to 870.
The recovery of the metals was augmented by the operations of the copper precipitation plant which continued to treat the copper-bearing portion of the mine-drainage
water.
ANTIMONY DEPOSITS.
BRIDGE RIVER AREA.
Stewart and Federal Groups.—Arthur LeClere and associates, of San Francisco, made
a test shipment of 30 tons of cobbed ore; 17 tons from the Steivart group on Ferguson
Creek and 13 tons from the Federal group at Minto. The season was largely devoted to
an exploratory campaign.
MAGNESITE DEPOSITS.
WILLIAMS LAKE AREA.
Company office, 1010 Hall Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   C. F. Anderson,
B.C. Magnesium  President;    H.  H.  Reid,   Managing  Director.     This  company  holds
Co., Ltd.        twenty-four claims near St. Joseph Mission, 14 miles south of Williams Lake, and also on the Bonaparte River, about 5 miles north-east
of Clinton.    At the first location the company, with E. R. Shepherd supervising, put
down seven diamond-drill holes;   total footage,  1,200 feet.    The holes were spaced
about 500 feet apart and staggered across the 3,000-foot known width of the deposit,
which is about 4,500 feet long.    Several holes extending to at least 200 feet below the
general plain level and were still in serpentine.
At the last location the serpentine extends about 9,000 feet alongside a hill and
is known to be about 2,000 feet wide. Six holes were drilled, the deepest of which was
196 feet.
CRANBROOK AREA.
In the early summer about 3,000 tons was mined from the outcrop of
Consolidated     the magnesite-bed, discovered thirteen years ago by the Geological
Mining and      Survey west of the St. Mary River, and shipped to the Trail smelter
Smelting Co. of   for experimental treatment.    The ore was hauled by trucks from the
Canada, Ltd.     point of origin to a siding on the Kimberley branch of the Canadian
Pacific Railway, a distance of about 10 miles.    When it becomes expe- PROGRESS NOTES. A 79
dient to work the deposit on a larger scale, the construction of either a bridge across
the river, or an aerial tramway, linking the operations with the same railway at
Marysville, will simplify the transportation of the output to a considerable extent.
MERCURY DEPOSITS.
FORT ST. JAMES AREA.
Pinchi Lake.
E. Bronlund, Superintendent. Active development continued during
Consolidated the year and consisted of 5,204 feet of drifting, 1,418 feet of raising,
Mining and and 13,682 feet of diamond-drilling. The mine worked 365 days. On
Smelting Co. of the 600 (the Upper) level the glory-hole stope operated during the
Canada, Ltd. summer and four underground stopes were prepared for winter operation. The 400 and 500 levels have been started from 310 raise. Only
drifting is being done on 500 level. A stope has been started on 400 level. One stope
is operating on 300 level.
The 200 level is a new level starting from the surface at the elevation of the raw-
ore bunker of the new mill. It is intended to be the main haulage-level of the mine.
It is 8 by 8 feet in section and is in 1,200 feet to the-ore-body. A raise is being put
up in the ore to 300 level, which will come through on 300 in line with 310 raise from
300 to 600. Ore-transfer raises will be put through from 200 to 600 level and all ore
drawn through these raises to 200 then trammed out to the mill-bunkers.
The new mill section is now in operation, with the exception of the refinery, which
has increased the mill capacity.    It is in three sections—crushing, retorts, and refinery.
All crushing for both the old and new retorts is now done in the new crushing
plant. The ore is passed through a jaw-crusher where it is crushed to 2 inches, it is
then conveyed to a set of screens where it is sized. All ore over 1 inch is conveyed by
belt to the ore-bin at the old retorts, ore plus % inch is conveyed to a disk-crusher and
crushed to minus % inch, then conveyed to the fine-ore bin at the new retort. All fine
ore is put through the new retort which is designed to handle fine ore. Both crushing
units and screen are enclosed and an exhaust-fan has been installed with pipe-lines
to each unit to dispose of the dust created in crushing.
Disposal of the slag from the retorts is now fully automatic at both plants.
Automatic feeders at the slag-bins feed the slag into sluice-boxes through which it is
sluiced out to the dump.
The method of recovery of the mercury from the mud by raking on steam-heated
tables by hand was to have been eliminated by using a cold filter-press. Some difficulties have been met with in this method and it has not yet been put into operation.
The mud is still "raked by hand on steam-heated tables. These tables are well hooded
over and an exhaust-fan mounted over the hoods to draw air over the tables to prevent
vapour escaping into the building.
A mask, approved by the U.S. Bureau of Mines for use in mercury vapour, is
provided for each man. Masks are tested daily on the mineralite screen and if any
trace of mercury vapour shows the filter is replaced with a new one. Air samples are
taken each shift in all sections of the mill buildings where mercury vapour would be
likely to be given off, these are tested on the screen. The retort buildings are ventilated
by exhaust-fans placed in the highest point in the building and are of sufficient capacity
to completely change the air in the building every five minutes. A clean suit of coveralls is furnished daily to each man engaged in the mill or in handling mercury. Medical examination of men engaged in the mill is made every two weeks. Most of the
men engaged in the mill have been employed there continuously for about nine months.
No suspected cases of mercurial poisoning have been reported during that period.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 5, 1940.] A 80 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
YALAKOM RIVER AREA.
Red Eagle Group.—J. Thompson, one of the owners of this group, worked alone on it
during the 1941 season. He did some stripping and open-cut work and installed a
small two-pipe furnace.    It is reported that three flasks of mercury were shipped.
[Reference:   Bulletin No. 5, 1940.]
Golden Eagle Group.—Work on this group was restricted to a small amount of open-
cut work.
MOLYBDENUM DEPOSITS.
SALMO AREA.
This property, 9 miles from Salmo, B.C., is owned and operated by the
Emerald.        Iron Mountain, Limited, of San Francisco.    Two men were employed
continuously throughout the year under the direction of Harold Lakes.
During the summer the area lying between the Dodger and Jersey mineral claims, about
1% miles long by % mile wide, was mapped for structure. This resulted in the discovery of altered limestone-beds containing both molybdenum and scheelite, which were
later explored by surface-stripping. The commercial possibilities of this find has not
yet been determined. Development-work underground included 70 feet of drifts and
crosscuts on the Dodger claim and 32 feet of drifting in the old Emerald workings. In
addition, 400 feet of stripping was done along the molybdenum zone and some 420 feet
of stripping elsewhere on the property.
TUNGSTEN DEPOSITS.
HAZELTON AREA.
Red Rose Group.—This is a new operation on Rocher Deboule range
Consolidated     at Hazelton.    Diamond-drilling done by the company in 1940 appar-
Mining and      ently indicated a sufficient quantity of tungsten ore on the Red Rose
Smelting Co. of   to justify development and work was commenced in June.    The road
Canada, Ltd.     to the old Rocher Deboule mine is used to the point where it swings
off from the creek just above the old power plant.    The road was
cleared out and a section of new road built up Red Rose Creek to the main camp and
mill location at 3,900 feet elevation.    From this point a " cat" road was constructed
up the mountain to the mine camp-site at about 5,600 feet elevation.    The portal of
the tunnel is at 6,130 feet.    A surface track has been laid up the mountain from the
mine camp-site to the portal of the tunnel.    This is being covered and a stairway
provided for travelling.    A gravity aerial tram has been built from the mine to the
mill, a total length of 5,240 feet.    The mine power-house and blacksmith-shop are at
the mine camp-site.    A two-stage compressor, Diesel driven, capacity 210 cubic feet,
has been installed.    A cook-house, bunk-house, and dry-room has been built.
A crosscut was started at 6,130 feet elevation and intersected the vein at 320 feet
from the portal.
The main camp and mill are at 3,900 feet elevation just below timber-line. Mill
capacity is 25 tons per day and consists of jaw-crusher, rolls, and jig with tables.
There is a storage-room for concentrates. The mill is powered by a 75-horse-power
Diesel-driven electric generator.
[Reference:   Bulletin No. 10, 1941.] PROGRESS NOTES. A 81
CARIBOO AREA.
Company office, 61 Broadway, New York, N.Y.;   F. Hewitt, President;
Columbia Tung- A. E. Pike, Mine Superintendent.    The small body of scheelite exposed
stens Co., Ltd.    at the end of the 1940 operation was soon mined out in 1941.    After
the failure of a detailed geological examination and some 2,000 feet of
well-directed diamond-drilling to reveal further mineralization of importance, the mine
was shut down.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 10, 1941.]
BRIDGE RIVER AREA.
This property, which has been operated by E. Phillips, locator, with
Tungsten Queen,   some success, was optioned by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company of Canada, Limited, in September. From that time to the
end of the year an adit at elevation 4,200 was advanced 54 feet and a lower adit at
elevation 4,137 feet was collared and advanced 171 feet, both being driven by hand-
miners. About 3 tons of high-grade ore has been mined and shipped to Chapman
Camp. E. Phillips had previously shipped about 9 tons of high-grade ore to Ottawa.
[Reference:   Bulletin No. 10, 1941.]
REVELSTOKE AREA.
This property on Woolsey Creek, about 8 miles from Albert Canyon,
Regal Silver.     B.C., was reopened in July by A. S. McCulloch and associates.    The
property is equipped with a small complete mining plant and a combination gravity and flotation mill of about 70 tons daily capacity, the latter being
located in a raise underground. From thirteen to nineteen men were employed under
the direction of A. S. McCulloch. Efforts were directed to experimental work in an
attempt to produce a marketable scheelite concentrate. A small roasting plant was
built at Silver Creek siding on the railroad for this purpose. This was used in an
attempt to get rid of the large pyrite content in the concentrates produced by the mill.
[Reference:   Bulletin No. 10, 1941.]
PLACER-GOLD DEPOSITS.
ATLIN AREA.
Spruce Creek.
Mine office, Atlin, B.C.;   A.  R.  Kaufman, President;   E.  G.  Tyrer,
Columbia       Vice-President;    James  H.   Eastman,   Managing  Director.    Capital:
Development,    50,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 50,000.    This company acquired a lay
Ltd. from John W. Noland on 2,000 feet of ground up-stream from the face
of Noland's workings on the Dream lease.    One of the conditions of
the lay was that the company complete a second exit to the Dream lease.    This was
done by completing the sinking of No. 2 shaft and drifting out to the face of Noland's
workings and making a connection there.    The company  then commenced drifting
up-stream operating through No. 2 shaft.
Because of the widening of the pay-channel with consequent lessening of values
per square foot of bed-rock, it was decided to try out a modified system of long-
wall mining. This apparently worked fairly well until some very wet ground was
encountered and the long-wall was temporarily abandoned. The water is coming from
overhead following the face-line and is apparently from an area of swamp muskeg that
is gradually draining into the workings.    The overburden stood up very well under the
6 A 82
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
long-wall system, having been well timbered. The present method of working is to
drive two drifts up-stream, one on each side of the pay-channel. The " J " drive is on
the north side and on the rim; the " B " drive on the south side is not out to rim.
These drives are about 200 feet apart and are kept ahead of the general face-line.
A solid pillar, about 40 feet wide, is carried along each drive, with crosscuts about 50
feet apart being driven in to the working section. The section between these pillars,
about 100 feet wide, is then taken out by splitting it in several sections and side-
swiping. This appears to be working satisfactorily and the exits through " J " and
" B " drives are in solid ground.
John W. Noland is the owner and operator. Only pillar-extraction is
Dream Lease,     being done in this section of the lease.    All pumping for this area and
the Columbia Development up-stream is through No. 1 shaft. A 300-
gallon pump was installed at this shaft to handle the extra water from the Columbia
workings.
Mine office, Atlin, B.C.;   J. C. Wheeling, Superintendent.    No. 1 shaft
Spruce Creek     is operated on a lay by John Klee and partners, who are working along
Mining Co., Ltd. the old works left when the company abandoned operations.    Five men
are employed. No. 2 shaft: This shaft is operated by Dave Mattson
and partners, laymen. It is connected through to No. 1 shaft and the water from both
is pumped through No. 1. They are working in ground left by the company. Five
men are employed.
No. 4 shaft: This shaft is operated by the company with Fred Kane, foreman.
Considerable difficulty has been encountered from water coming through from the creek,
owing to caving which went through to the surface. Only pillar-extraction is being
done. About 700 feet of flume was built in the spring and the creek diverted into the
flume. This greatly eased the water situation in the mine, permitting it to work
steadily.    Twenty-two men were employed.
No. 5 shaft: This shaft is also operated on a lay by Aage Falleson. The shaft
was flooded on several occasions during the year. There is a bed-rock drain from
further down-stream into these workings, but it is apparently partly blocked and unable
to take care of the volume of water. There are several caves in the shaft which go
through to the surface and give rise to all the water.
Operated by McDonald, McKay, and Munro.    This is a bench lease
Clydesdale      and adjoins No. 4 shaft of the Spruce Creek Mining Co.    Only a thin
Lease. barrier pillar is left along the boundary between this and the Chance
lease. There was also some trouble with water for the same reason
as No. 4 shaft; however, the flume construction greatly reduced the amount of water
on their property. The ground has been worked up to the boundary of the lease where
it adjoins the Goodwill lease on which No. 2 shaft is located. A connection has been
made through to the No. 2 shaft workings under an agreement with the Spruce Creek
Mining Co. This greatly improved the ventilation in the mine and the barrier pillar
between these leases is now being mined.
Company office, 640 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Spruce Creek Atlin, B.C.; E. N. Patty, General Manager; W. O'Neil, Superinten-
Placers, Ltd.     dent.    This is a new organization in the district.    An option has been
taken on all creek claims and leases from the Olalla lease up-stream to
the Spruce Creek Mining Company lower line. The ground was drilled extensively
during 1940. It is the only surface operation on the creek. The plant consists of a
Bucyrus Diesel shovel with 2y2-yard bucket having a digging radius of 70 feet. The
shovel power plant is a 207-horse-power Diesel. A mobile washing plant, self-propelling, consisting of grizzly, perforated screen, and sluices, has been installed. A Northwest drag-line with a 70-foot boom and 1%-yard bucket stacks the tailings. The
drag-line is powered by a 160-horse-power Diesel.
A dam was put in across the creek up-stream from the Brown shaft and the creek
waters diverted into a flume which carries the creek past the shovel operations. The
flume collapsed just above the Brown shaft and the shaft and also a section of the
Croker lease upper workings were wrecked by the water entering them.    A total of 128,638 cubic yards of gravel was moved.    The operation worked twenty-four hours
daily during the season and employed twenty-four men.
F. Ohman and partners, laymen.    These properties were idle most of
Croker Lease and the summer because of damage caused to the workings by the collapse
Brown Shaft,     of Spruce Creek Placers, Limited, flume.    The Brown shaft and Croker
lease are separate properties, but were connected underground for
drainage.    Although worked by the same group of laymen, the material from each
property was hoisted through its own shaft.
The flume passed between the Brown shaft and the bench and was a few feet
higher than the collar of the shaft. When the flume collapsed in a few feet up-stream
from the shaft all water from it went down the shaft, wrecking it and flooding the
workings and also those of the Croker lease, causing considerable damage in each place.
It was impossible to get into the Brown workings either through the shaft or through
the Croker lease workings. There is a bed-rock drain from the lower end of the Poker
lease which is connected through all these workings and the water finally drained off
through it. The Croker workings could not be reached through their original drive as
it was badly caved. A new drive has been started close to the bottom of the Croker
shaft to reach the section of the Croker lease which was being worked prior to the
flooding.
Poker Lease.—Ivanic and partners, laymen. This is a bench lease adjoining the
Olalla. The laymen are drifting up-stream and into the bench and are through all the
old workings into virgin ground.
A number of other small properties extending from this point down-stream are all
operated by laymen with not more than three men working in any one. All are drifting
in the bench.
Pine Creek.
Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   Carl
Northern        Beal, Manager;   H. G. Turnbull, Superintendent.    This company has
Resources, Ltd.   an option on all leases on Pine Creek and Gold Run up to Surprise
Lake.    It is a drag-line operation which commenced in 1940.    Pine
Creek was deepened for a considerable distance below the operation to provide bed-rock
drainage.    The drag-bucket is 1%-yard capacity.    A mobile screening and sluicing
plant is installed, the tailings from it are stacked by conveyer.    A hydro-electric plant
was installed, using water from Surprise Lake to provide electric power for the plant.
A total of 203,000 cubic yards was moved.
Boulder Creek.
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.—McLeod White, Superintendent.
This is a hydraulic operation which has been running for several years. Twenty men
are employed and work was carried on continuously during the season. A total of
83,000 cubic yards of material was moved.
.   Otter Creek.
Compagnie Francaise des Mines d'Or du Canada.—Walter Sweet and partners, laymen.
Three men were engaged in a hydraulic operation and two other men were drifting in
the bench.
Ruby Creek.
Surprise Lake Mining Co., Ltd.—P. Matson and partners, laymen. This is a hydraulic
operation which has been running for several years. Five men were employed. The
operation is well up to the limits of the ground.
Wright Creek.
Arctic Lease.—Hodges and Moran. Five men were employed on a hydraulic operation. There was very little water on this creek and only short runs could be made about
three or four times daily. A 84 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
McKee Creek.
Gold Run Fraction.—Gibbs and partners, laymen. This is an underground operation,
four men being engaged drifting in the bench.
Swanson and partners were employed on a hydraulic operation. A number of
prospectors were engaged on various creeks around Atlin, Birch, O'Donnel River, and
others which were not visited.
SQUAW CREEK AREA.
About twenty individual prospectors were working on this creek during the
summer.
STIKINE AREA.
The Stikine area was not visited during the year. There was considerable placer
activity on Boulder and adjoining creeks in the Dease Lake area, but there is no
definite information of work done.
MANSON CREEK AREA.
Lost Creek.
Company office, 826 Vancouver Block, Vancouver, B.C.;   H. L. Armes,
Lost Creek Placer Manager.    This is a hydraulic operation at the junction of Lost Creek
Gold, Ltd.       with Manson Creek.    One monitor is employed in the pit and another
on the tailings in Manson Creek.    A small drag-line scraper is also
used to keep the channel of Manson Creek clear of tailings.    There is very little
dumping-ground because of the small rise in bed-rock above the level of Manson Creek.
There is an ample water-supply brought in by flume and pipe-line from Manson Creek.
Ten men were employed.
Slate Creek.
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.—This company renewed operations
on Slate Creek, mainly prospecting and testing around the old drag-line pit. Rockers
were used for recovery of the gold from the test-pits. A number of Keystone drillholes were put down in the course of testing.
Germansen Creek.
Company  office,   789   Pender   Street   West,  Vancouver,   B.C.;    R.   C.
Germansen       McCorkell,  President;    M.  A.  Manson,  Secretary;   A.  A.  McCorkell,
Mines, Ltd.      Manager.    Capital:   750,000 shares, 50 cents par.    This is a hydraulic
operation in the east bank of Germansen Creek.    The overburden is
heavy with a thick band of boulder clay above the pay-gravel.    Two monitors are
operating in the pit with three shifts daily.    Water-supply is obtained by ditch and
flume from the South Fork of Germansen Creek.    Twenty-four men were employed.
Company office, Besner Block, Prince Rupert, B.C.;   Frank de Ganahl,
Germansen      President;   W. H. Eassie, Manager. ' Capital:   100,000 shares, $1 par.
Ventures, Ltd.    The company is controlled by Ventures Exploration Company  (East
Africa), Limited.    This is a hydraulic operation in the west bank of
Germansen Creek about 2 miles south of its junction with the Omineca River.    Two
pits are operating, three monitors working in No. 1 pit and four monitors in No. 7 pit.
There is an ample water-supply (about 125 cubic feet a second) from Germansen Lake.
Over 800,000 yards of material was moved during the season.    Fifty men were employed.
Twenty-mile Creek.
The head of Twenty-mile Creek lies about 6 miles west of the west end of
Germansen Lake. It flows north to the Omineca River. A number of men were
engaged prospecting, ground-sluicing. The creek was not visited. There were a
number of individual prospectors working on Manson, Slate, Boulder, and Wolverine
Creeks. PROGRESS NOTES. A 85
TAKLA LAKE AREA.
Very little was done in this area during the year and it was not visited.
CARIBOO AREA.
Barkerville- Wells.
Company  office,   Rust   Building,   Tacoma,   Washington;    mine   office,
Lowhee Mining   Barkerville, B.C.;   C. W. Lea, President and General Manager;   Paul
Co., Ltd.        Barker, Secretary-Treasurer;   Henry Lea, Superintendent.    Capital:
750,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 635,156.    The hydraulic pit operated
by this company was advanced about 300 feet along the channel of Lowhee Creek.    The
section of the channel worked this year was narrower than previously, and very crooked.
The pay-gravels on the bottom were not so rich, but there were fewer large boulders to
contend with than in the straighter, wider portion of the channel.    The face of the pit
is now within 300 feet of the dam, which will have to be taken out next year to ensure
the safety of the crew in the pit.    The two reservoirs made available an adequate supply
of water, and an average of thirteen men on two nine-hour shifts were employed for
the greater part of the year.    There were no additions to the equipment.
Company office, Royal Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   J. A. Wright,
Barkerville Gold   Secretary; C. A. McPherson, Superintendent.    Capital: 200,000 shares,
Mines, Ltd.      Spl par.    Following the same gutter as was worked last year, three
men hydraulicked about 100,000 yards of gravel.    This work extended
beyond a deeper cross-channel reported last year.    A drilling programme is being
planned.
French Creek Hydraulic Placers, Ltd.—Work on this ground was restricted to some work
in the hydraulic pit and later to washing off high-grade patches on the low benches.
This was done under the supervision of I. I. Felker and was for the account of R. M.
Van Bibber, of Calgary, who had an option agreement with the company.
J. J. Gunn, who has a lease on this property from the Lowhee Mining
Red Gulch       Company, Limited, continued to operate it throughout the 1941 season,
Placers. but was handicapped for lack of water-storage facilities.    Part of the
ground washed had been worked out by old drift-mining operations.
Five men were employed while water was available and about 14,000 yards were moved.
Little Valley Creek.
Lease of A. Fleury.—Two men were employed on sluicing operations on this lease and
treated about 4,000 yards of gravel.
Lease of G. Halverson.—One man on contract part time hydraulicked about 3,500 yards
of gravel on this lease.
Two-bit Creek.
Lease of T. Dunlop et al.—Ground-sluicing operations by the owners, working for a
short time only, accounted for about 500 yards of gravel.    A pipe-line is being installed.
McArthur's Gulch.
Lease of Knut Johannson.—Mr. Johannson, using a small monitor, washed about 1,500
yards of gravel.
Wolfe Creek.
This ground was taken under bond and lease by the Cariboo Cotton-
Lease of Thompson wood Placers, Limited. From March 1st to September 15th this com-
and Dowsett.     pany employed an average of fifteen men on development-work.   About
1% miles of road was made to the property, 1,600 feet of pipe were
laid, and a storage-dam built. Hydraulicking was then started and about 2,000 yards
of material moved to expose both rims of the channel.    Some prospecting was also done. A 86 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
Cunningham Creek.
The  Northern  Refinery  Company,  Limited,  obtained  a  lay  on this
Trehouse Placers, ground and did a small amount of hydraulicking, principally for the
purpose of testing a gold-saving device.    The gold-saving equipment
was later moved to Quesnel and was used to recover fine gold from the black sand in
the tailings from the operation of Craig, Munn, and Reese on the Fraser River, 2 miles
below Quesnel.
Cooper Creek.
Triple Hydraulic Placers.—At the lease owned by George Warren and Albert Frankish,
of Calgary, and operated under the above name, Mr. Warren and a piper continued
small-scale operations.    They moved about 3,000 yards of gravel.
Sugar Creek.
Lease of A. Drinkwater.—A. Drinkwater and partners were recovering gold from
Sugar Creek by using a boom-gate several miles below the junction of Cooper Creek.
Three partners built a similar arrangement about 2 miles above that of Drinkwater.
Shepherd Creek.
Lease of R. D. Reese.—Mr. Reese washed about 1,000 yards of gravel, using a Hendy
No. 1 monitor. He was handicapped by lack of water. There are some quartz veins
exposed in the hydraulic pit.
Pine Creek.
Lease of J. P. Roddick.—Work here was confined to building a flume, ditch, and reservoir to obtain water for hydraulicking.
Emery Gulch.
Claims of J. MacGowan and C. Midan.—About 400 yards were hydraulicked on this
ground, according to report of the owners.
Weldon Creek.
Lease of Clifford Brown and Bernard Fink.—It is reported that 20,000 yards were moved
by hydraulicking on this lease.
Eight-mile Lake.
Leases of M. A. Anderson—About 4,000 yards of gravel were washed from hydraulicking and shaft-sinking operations.
Lease of J. C. Dyer.—It is reported that this lease was optioned to other interests who
employed several men for several months, but finally relinquished the option. Work
done was confined to shovelling in operations.
Lease of Walter H. Savery.—About 1,500 yards of gravel were treated from drifting,
hydraulicking, and sluicing.
Nugget Gulch.
Leases of Neils M. Hansen.—On these leases, known as the Nugget Placers, about
40,000 yards were moved by hydraulicking.    One man was employed.
Lease of Ben Nelson.—About 1,000 yards were washed on this lease.
Stevens Gulch.
Lease of W. F. Poquette.—About 3,000 yards were handled by hydraulicking on this
lease.
Antler Creek.
Leases of John Keilor.—Two men, shovelling into the sluice-boxes, handled about 500
yards of gravel on this ground.
Lease of James Doody.—Two men were employed on this lease to erect flumes and dig
ditches. Wells-Stanley.
Commencing  in   March  and  operating  continuously  to  the   end  of
Ketch, Ltd.      November, this company employed an average of twelve men on its
placer pit, 5 miles west of Wells.    There was ample water throughout
the season and the same equipment as last year.    About 80,000 cubic yards was put
through the boxes.
Dragon Creek Placers.—Under the supervision of Mr. Peebles, five men were employed
on this property and about 20,000 yards were put through the boxes. The recovery
was low, partly because of slides, which according to report came down on the boxes.
Wm. Hong employed about fourteen men on the average and worked
Sangdang Placers, continuously from April 8th, when he started piping, right through to
November 5th. There was plenty of water and working three shifts
with three monitors about 14 acres of material of an average depth of 35 feet were
hydraulicked. It was necessary to strip the surface of a considerable amount of timber,
and more than the usual number of heavy boulders to break in the pits. The work
this year was east of the former operations and was mostly done on the Sangdang
claims.
Montgomery Creek Placers.—This property is still under development. Two men were
engaged for one month on ground-sluicing operations. The pit, which is about 60 feet
deep and 80 feet wide at the bottom, was advanced about 75 feet.
This operation at Grub Gulch, across Lightning Creek from Van
Ennerdale Placers. Winkle, was formerly called the Grub Gulch Placers. Piping started
April 22nd and was continued through to the end of October. The
water-supply was satisfactory. The pit, which is about 50 feet deep, 140 feet wide at
the top and 30 feet wide at the bottom, was advanced about 180 feet. A No. 3 monitor,
working under a head of 180 feet, was used.
R. E. McDougall, of Wells, and associates, continued development-work
B. & K. Placers, on this property. Work commenced on April 2nd and continued to
October 31st. The water-supply was good and about six men were
employed on the average; four to five in the pit, and two to three on the ditches. Considerable overburden was moved by cutting back to a sloping slum-bed and causing
large slides into Lightning Creek. Slum-beds lying near the surface in the vicinity of
the pit were cut back to make it safe to work in the pit. All this work, and the time
taken to build a ditch to bring water from Amador Creek to ground-sluices, made it
impossible to reach the bottom of the channel this year. The yardage moved is estimated to be between 250,000 and 450,000 yards.
Wingold Development Co., Ltd.—This company optioned the ground of Mrs. G. Murphy
on Houseman (Eagle) Creek, tributary of Lightning Creek, about 3 miles above Stanley.
Some hydraulicking was done in the old pit, later a drilling programme was commenced
to check theories regarding another channel.
This company is the holder of three placer leases on Lightning Creek,
Stanley Mines,    immediately south of Stanley.    A shaft was sunk about 80 feet deep
Ltd. in clays and gravels and underground workings were extended up
stream and down-stream on bed-rock in gold-bearing gravel on a bench
left by the old-timers. It is estimated that 4,416 yards of gravel were moved up to the
end of the year and that the tunnel footage was 1,762. An average of thirty men were
employed on two shifts.
Lease of C. Gedda.—This lease is on Campbell Creek. It is reported that Mr. Gedda
ground-sluiced 20,000 yards but did not make a clean-up.
Lease of J. F. Williams.—At this lease near Stanley, two men were employed at
drifting operations.
Lease of E. Estman.—This lease is on Perkins Creek on Burns Mountain, near Stanley.
Two men were employed and about 8,000 yards were treated by hydraulicking.
Consolidated Gold Alluvials of B.C., Ltd.—Drilling operations were started on the holdings of this company near Stanley. A 88 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
Stanley-Quesnel.
Donovan Creek Placers.—Mr. Graham, of Kamloops, who had an option on this hydraulic operation employed an average of four men and removed about 20,000 yards of
gravel. The ground later was allowed to revert to Magnus Sundberg, the original
owner.
Company office, Wells, B.C.;   H. B. King, Secretary;   K. K. Langford,
Langford Mines,  Manager.    Capital:   100,000 shares, $1 par.    Using the tailings from
Ltd. previous operations, Mr. Langford built a reservoir and prepared a
set-up at a new location.    It is intended to start operations as soon
as weather permits in 1942, and to operate with a tractor and bulldozer feeding the
sluice-boxes and a steam slusher stacking the tailings.
Fry's Placer.—-Hydraulicking operations were continued in Larsen's Gulch this year,
but bed-rock was not reached.    Five men were employed.
At this operation, west of Tregillus Creek, six partners worked in a
Slade Creek      small hydraulic pit from April 4th till late in the autumn.    About
Placers. 8,000 yards were put through the boxes with a No. 1 monitor.    As the
ditch could not utilize all the water available, it is planned to dig a
larger ditch and to use a No. 2 monitor next year.    The pit-banks are about 35 feet
high and consist mainly of boulder-clay with heavy boulders on the bottom.
Previously referred to as Pearson's Placers, this ground was acquired
No Name       during the year by A. McDonell, of Wells, and operated under the new
Placers. name.    An average of six men was employed and about 12,000 yards
put through the boxes with a small monitor.    High water in the fall
washed out the boxes.    Both this operation and the Slade Creek Placers adjoining it
are handicapped by lack of dumping space for the tailings.    The pit is still small and
the banks low.
Lease of Carl A. Risberg.—At this lease on Kong Foo Creek, tributary of Tregillus
Creek, about 3,300 yards were sluiced.
Leases of Emil M. Falek.—Mr. Falck has leases on Anderson Creek, about 1 mile west
of Stanley, at Khee Khan Creek, Beaver Pass, and on Lake Creek. He did a small
amount of work on all three.
This company has done considerable prospecting for dredging-ground
Operations of      on the Fraser, Cottonwood, and Swift Rivers.    Test-pits 6 feet in
E. A. Kent Dredging diameter were dug to bed-rock wherever possible and all the material
Co., Ltd. from the pits put through a mechanical testing-machine.    It is under
stood that it is tentatively planned to be in operation on the Swift
River in 1942 with one 21/2-yard drag-line bucket in gravels averaging 12 feet in depth.
Sovereign Creek.—D. D. Fraser, of Quesnel, and associates continued to carry out
testing operations on this creek during 1941.    Three men were employed at this work.
C. A. Colluer, of Quesnel, also did a small amount of sluicing on his lease on this
creek.
During the dry period this summer, the lack of adequate storage facili-
Slade Placers, Ltd. ties made it necessary to curtail the operation for about a month at
this property.    About 29,000 yards were moved and put through the
boxes with a No. 4 monitor, and a No. 2 as well, when there was sufficient water to
operate both.    An average of six men was employed.
Lease of O. Matheson and A. Gustafson.—At this lease on the Little Swift River it is
reported that about 1,400 yards were sluiced into the boxes.
Quesnel-Prince George.
Company office, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.; J. W. Phillips,
Cariboo Cotton- Manager. Capital: 250,000 shares, $1 par. This company main-
wood Placers, Ltd. tained a small crew on its ground on the Cottonwood River during the
winter and started full-scale operations about the middle of March.
It is reported that about 500,000 yards were removed by the two monitors, but that
this consisted mainly of boulder-clay, slum, and silt. Operations were discontinued
early in September. PROGRESS NOTES. A 89
Hixon Creek Placers.—The Reno Gold Mining Company took an option on this ground
from Brian Briscoe. A crew of about sixteen men was employed from May 2nd to
November 19th under the supervision of A. Norquist in testing the channel to bed-rock.
Two monitors were used.    The option was relinquished.
Operation of Thomas Robertson et al.—It is reported that operations were carried on at
this property on Tabor Creek for a short time.
Tertiary Mine.—A new road was built into this property but no work was done at the
property and the road has caved or filled in with slides in places.
This operation was called the Cormack mine last year, but a new com-
Cotwood Tertiary pany was formed during the year and operations resumed.    About 450
Mine. feet of crosscutting and drifting was done in Tertiary gravels to make
a bulk test of the channel.    The channel was crosscut at two points
and the pay-gravels put through a Denver mechanical gold-pan.    They lie below 175
feet of Tertiary gravels and an additional 100 to 125 feet of overburden.    About eleven
men were employed from the beginning of June to the middle of December, when the
weather became too severe.    All of August was lost, however, because of breakdowns.
These adjoin the Tertiary mine holdings and are down-stream from
Leases of Pearson them.    An adit has been collared about 12 feet above the Fraser River
and De Long,     high-water mark and has been driven some 600 feet.    It is at present
crossing an old channel some distance above bed-rock according to
report.    It is the intention of the leasers to sink to bed-rock when the channel is
crossed.
Lease of Francis Lahay.—This lease is on Little Creek, tributary of George Creek,
tributary of Willow River, 30 miles from its confluence with the Fraser River. A small
amount of development-work, all done by hand, is reported.
Lease of J. Peterson.—This lease is on Skaret Creek, tributary of Tabor Creek, about
8 miles south of Prince George. It is reported that 1,500 yards of material were
handled by ground-sluicing methods.
Lease of Alex. Beaton.—This lease is on Government Creek, near Hixon. It is
reported that a dam and 300 feet of ditch were made and that about 500 yards were
washed through the boxes by sluicing and shovelling-in.
Quesnel-Williams Lake.
The bulldozer and washing plant operated last year on the Quesnel
Operation of     River was moved to ground on the east bank of the Fraser River, about
Craig, Munn, and 2 miles south of Quesnel.    The equipment was moved during June and
Reese. operations started on July 1st.    Improvements were made to the wash
ing plant and fine gold recovered from the tailings by the Sigmore
process. Cold weather about the first week of November made it necessary to discontinue operations for the remainder of the year. Operations were also stopped for a
while by high water in the Fraser. The gold is fine, particularly at the down-stream
end of the bench, and is difficult to save.
This company was incorporated during 1941 to operate a number of
North American  leases located on the Fraser River, at Alexandria Ferry Crossing.   This
Goldfields, Ltd.   is a drag-line dredge operation, the equipment consisting of a 2%-yard
excavator operated by a Lima Diesel engine, and a floating washing
plant consisting of trommel,  riffles,  sluices,  and tailings stacker.    Digging started
during the first week of July.
Likely-Keithley.
Priority Mine.—Work at this property was confined to a small amount of development-
work.
Company office, 917 Vancouver Block, Vancouver, B.C.;   R. F. Sharpe,
Bullion Placers,   President and General Manager;   H. Ray, Secretary-Treasurer.    This
Ltd. company's camp was opened up on March 26th, being earlier than
usual, and operations started in the Drop pit with a skeleton crew,
piping off some remaining overburden to make the pit safer when working the lower A 90 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
gravels.    About the middle of April a full crew was engaged and work commenced on
the lower gravels.    The bed-rock cut and sluice-boxes were extended as requix'ed.
This section of the channel was apparently glaciated and recoveries were so low
that on July 26th, after the last clean-up in the Drop pit, it was decided to abandon this
section, at least temporarily, and to change over to the old Bullion pit where some
100,000 cubic yards of virgin gravels had been left behind by previous operators. The
work of installing the monitor and sluice-boxes in this section was started on August
1st, and by the 21st piping commenced. The last clean-up was made on November 10th.
Up to July 30th the crew averaged sixty-two men, but from that date on it was gradually reduced and averaged only thirty-five men for the latter part of the season. In the
Drop pit the monitor was equipped with an 11%-inch nozzle under a 400-foot head and
used about 93 second-feet of water. In the Bullion pit a 10-inch nozzle was used under
a 380-foot head and used about 62 second-feet of water. There were 1,880 piping-
hours.    The material treated consisted of:—
Drop pit— Cu-Yd-      Cu-Yd-
Overburden   145,788
Gravels   362,591
Solid rock (bed-rock cut)        41,650
•  550,029
Bullion pit—
Lower gravels  . T_    84,672
Bed-rock sluice        2,700
■     87,372
637,401
D. O. Johnson and associates obtained an option on the property of the
D. O. Johnson    Quesnel Mining Company located at the mouth of Spanish Creek, and
Placers. changing the set-up they commenced piping about the middle of May.
Two No. 7 monitors under a head of 80 feet were used to wash down
the gravels and a derrick was used to remove the large boulders.    All work was done
in extending the old pit, but it was found that a large part of the gold had been
extracted by old drift-workings.    Virgin gravels were being treated at the time of the
last inspection.    It is reported that the crew for the season averaged twenty-six men.
Company office, 304 Pacific Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Placer Engineers, Keithley Creek;   George Harrison, President;   George V. F. Hudson,
Ltd. Secretary-Treasurer;    E.   Lang,   Superintendent.    Capital:    750,000
shares, no par value;   issued, 541,452.    Operations were confined to
the old Onward pit where benches were being piped off in the hope of opening up a
portion of the main Keithley channel which is presumed to lie into the hill behind the
Onward pit.    A No. 7 monitor under a head of 250 feet was being used at the time of
inspection.    The tailings flume had been brought up through the old deep channel in
the Onward pit.    Operations had been somewhat curtailed by low water during the dry
period last summer.    The crew varied from four to ten men.
Burrard Placers, Ltd.—Company office, 555 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.; B. Boe,
Manager. Capital: 2,000 shares, $1 par value; issued, 2,000. This company curtailed operations at Pine Creek to a considerable extent this year. For a short time,
however, six men were employed in the pit on two shifts.
Harvey Creek Mines, Ltd.—Company office, 555 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.
A crew of six men was employed at Harvey Creek on development-work. Considerable
difficulty, because of slides into the narrow gutter, is being experienced in attempts to
get to the pay-gravels.
Other Operations.—Other operators in the area include Hasbrouck, about 12 miles
from Keithley, on Keithley Creek; Asalyne and Johnson at Four-mile, on Keithley
Creek; the Moose Syndicate on the Quesnel River below Spanish Creek; and P. Johnson at Half-mile Creek, on the South Fork of the Quesnel River. PROGRESS NOTES. A 91
LILLOOET AREA.
Fraser River.
Lease of L. D. Leonard.—Mr. Leonard extended the lower of his two tunnels at the
confluence of Sallus Creek with the Fraser River about 30 feet.
R. Moreby and E. Hutton formed a syndicate to treat river-gravels on
Lillooet Placers, the east bank of the Fraser, about 2% miles air-line south of Lillooet.
Their equipment consists of a %-yard Paige-type bucket which is
worked with either a high line or drag-line arrangement by a double-drum hoist. The
gravels are dumped into a hopper made of poles and thence pass over a 36-foot sluice
at about 20 per cent, grade covered with steel wear-plates. At the end of this sluice
the minus 1%-inch material passes through a grizzly to a flatter sluice about 20 feet
long and over a table covered with a double screen of %-inch mesh. The underflow
from this passes over a second table with two ^-inch mesh screens over a %-inch mesh
screen. The grade of these tables can be adjusted to suit the material being treated.
A semi-turbine pump powered by a gasoline-engine is used to deliver water from the
river to the hopper against a 90-foot head at the rate of about 300 gallons per minute.
The gold apparently occurs in streaks in the gravel. The gold is also very fine
typical Fraser River gold and it is hard to save all of it.
Bridge River.
Leases of A. N. Wolverton.—These are at the Big Bend, below the mouth of Yalakom
River. One man was employed to make a large open-cut from which about 1,000 yards
of material was removed.    A wing-dam was also built.
Lease of Alan Campbell.—This lease is at the mouth of the Yalakom River. It is
reported that some bridge and trail work was done and that several cuts were sluiced
out.
Lease of Frank Haugh.—This lease is on Marshall Creek, tributary of the Bridge River.
A small amount of ground-sluicing is reported.
Lease of Wm. Haylmore.—This lease is on the South Fork of the Bridge River at Gold-
bridge.    Mr. Haylmore continued with his open-cuts in the river-wash.
Cayoosh Creek.
Lease of C. D. Warring.—Mr. Warring built a breakwater to enable him to work the
creek-wash on this lease.
McGillivray Creek.
Leases of Leonie Weeden.—One man was employed for three months in erecting flume
and sluices, in removing rock and prospecting ground, after which sluicing operations
were carried out for two months.
Lease of Ernest P. Hicks.—Mr. Hicks reports that he did some open-cut work in tight
gravels on his lease.
VERNON AREA.
This property is on Monashee Creek, a tributary of Cherry Creek,
Rambler Placers, about 42 miles east of Vernon.    It is owned and operated by H. J.
Fallow and associates, of Vernon, B.C. Six men were employed
throughout the summer. The operation was continued on the same basis and with the
same equipment as last season.
ROCK CREEK AREA.
This property is on Rock Creek, about 3 miles from Camp McKinney,
Jolly Creek Placers, and is owned and operated by V. J. Melsted, of Rock Creek, B.C.
The gold is recovered by underground drift-mining. The available
pay-ground, as far as is known, was exhausted this season and the operation closed.
Four men were employed. A 92 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
GRAND FORKS AREA.
This property is on Taylor Creek.    It is owned and operated by C.
Calhopper Lease. Hopper, of Grand Forks, B.C.    An old channel is being mined by
shovelling into sluice-boxes which are equipped with riffles and undercurrents.    Two men were employed.
May Creek Placer.—This property is on May Creek. It is owned and operated by
R. Campbell, of Grand Forks, B.C. The ground is worked by a monitor which is used
to wash the gravel into sluice-boxes.    Two men were employed.
PRINCETON AREA.
Manager, J. W. James, Vancouver and Coalmont, B.C.;  Foreman, C. R.
Coalmont Placer. Douglas, Coalmont, B.C.    These workings were operated by the Traders Syndicate, who have a lease from the International Placers.    The
operation is on the highway between Coalmont and Granite Creek and is worked by a
small drag-line.    Four men were employed.
Operated by R. L. and A. E. Ashley, Princeton.    This small placer
Ashley Placer,    operation is about 2 miles west of Princeton, on the Tulameen River.
In addition to the Ashley brothers, three other men are employed.    The
gravel is taken from the pit by auto-truck to the Tulameen River, a distance of about
60 yards, where it is washed.    Approximately 900 cubic yards of gravel were handled
during the year.
Operated by Randolph C. Haigh, Princeton, B.C.   This property adjoins
Haigh Placer,     the Ashley placer pit on the north side and the Great Northern Railway
right-of-way on the south side.    The gravel was taken from the pit to
the Tulameen River, a distance of about 300 feet, by means of a 1-ton mine-car on a
3-foot gauge track.    One thousand cubic yards of gravel was handled, yielding 49.33
oz. of gold and 13V2 oz. of platinum.    Two men were employed.
CLAY AND SHALE.
NEW WESTMINSTER AREA.
Company office, 850 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;   W. C.
Clayburn Co.,    Cummings,   Secretary-Treasurer;    J.   W.   Ball,   Manager.    Capital:
Ltd. 4,000 shares, $100 par.    The mines and plant of this company are
about 50 miles east of Vancouver. The method of operating the fireclay deposits is similar to the operating methods in coal mines. An average of thirteen
men is employed underground. The production for the year amounted to: Fireclay
from Kilgard mine, 16,699 tons; No. 4b mine, 1,735 tons; No. 9 mine, 2,485 tons; and
shale, 645 tons;  total, 21,564 tons.
GYPSUM.
FALKLAND AREA.
Head  office,  Paris,  Ontario;    British  Columbia  office,  509  Richards
Gypsum, Lime &  Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   P. P. Tyler, Managing Director;   S. H. J.
Alabastine,      Reid, Secretary;   Alex. Jessiman,  Quarry Superintendent,  Falkland,
Canada, Ltd.     B.C.    Capital:   500,000 common shares;   issued, 440,043.    During the
year this company operated the Nos. 2 and 5 quarries at Falkland, 40
miles south of Kamloops, near the Kamloops-Vernon Highway.    Shipping facilities are PROGRESS NOTES. A 93
provided by the Canadian National Railways, over which the gypsum is shipped to the
calcining and board mill at Port Mann, B.C.
The quarries are operated at an elevation of 500 to 600 feet higher than the railway-bunkers, to which the gypsum is transported by means of trucks.
The gypsum is mined in open quarries. The overburden is thin and with the
quarry-work advancing into the side of the mountain the walls rise to a considerable
height above the quarry-floors: this making it necessary to keep the walls at an angle
to inclination for the safety of the employees.    The drilling is done by jack-hammers.
Fourteen men are employed and approximately 2,200 tons of gypsum is shipped
from these quarries per month.
LIMESTONE.
KOEYE RIVER AREA.
Koeye River Limestone Co.—P. Christensen, operator. Two small quarries are operated by the company on Koeye River, about 7 miles south of Namu. The limestone is
shipped the Pacific Mills at Ocean Falls. During the year 21,000 tons was produced.
Fourteen men were employed.
GRAND FORKS AREA.
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada,  Ltd.—The company owns and operates
the Fife limestone quarry at Fife, near Christina Lake. About 36,000 tons of limestone
was mined and shipped to Trail to be used as flux. An average of nine men was
employed.
TEXADA ISLAND.
Pacific Lime Co.—C. Williams, Manager. Two quarries are operated by this company at Blubber Bay. The plant produces quicklime, hydrated lime, and other limestone products.    About fifty men are employed in the quarries.
This company operates a limestone quarry on the opposite shore of
B.C. Cement Co.  Blubber Bay from the Pacific Lime Company.   The limestone is shipped
to the Bamberton plant.    Extensive additions have been made to the
power plant and crushing plant during the year.    Robert Hamilton is in charge of
operations.    Seventeen men are employed.
Van Anda Quarries.—Operated by the Beale Quarries, Limited, at Vananda. S. Beale,
Manager. Several limestone quarry faces have been opened up during the year, and
steady shipment of limestone made to the United States and British Columbia industries.    A total of thirty-two men is employed.
VANCOUVER ISLAND.
B.C. Cement Co.—Office, Belmont Building, Victoria, B.C. Capital: 32,000 shares,
$100 par. This company operates quarries at Bamberton and Texada Island, and a
cement plant at Bamberton. At Bamberton the total crew for the whole operation
averages about 110 men.
MICA DEPOSITS.
BAKER INLET AREA.
Baka-Mica Group.—P. M. Ray, of Prince Rupert, Owns two claims on Baker Inlet,
about 20 miles south of Prince Rupert. The deposit is a micaceous zone in altered
mica-schists of the Prince Rupert series. A 94 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
During the year crude sericite mica was produced and shipped from the Sericite
claim to Vancouver for marketing.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1934, Part B.]
STONE, SAND, GRAVEL.
VANCOUVER AREA.
Burrard Inlet.
Coast Quarries, Ltd.—T. Burrows, Superintendent. This quarry is at Granite Falls,
near the head of Burrard Inlet. The stone is used for general construction-work. The
quarry has worked only intermittently throughout the year. Seven to ten men are
employed.
North Vancouver.
Deeks Sand and Gravel, Ltd.—Company office, 101 First Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.; H. S.
Armstrong, Secretary;   T. O. Burgess, Superintendent.    About six men are employed.
Cascade Sand and Gravel Co.—Company office, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver. W. A.
McCullum, Manager. This company now operates the Highland Sand and Gravel pits
from which all their sand and gravel is now taken.    About fifteen men are employed.
New Westminster Area.
Gilley Bros. Quarry.—The quarry of this company is at Silver Valley, on Pitt River.
From twenty to thirty men are employed. The stone is used for general construction-
work.
Maryhill Sand and Gravel Quarry.—Operated by Gilley Bros, on the Fraser River bank.
From sixteen to twenty men are employed.
Nelson Island.
Vancouver Granite Co.—This company operates a dimension stone granite quarry on
Nelson Island.    Work has been intermittent throughout the year. INSPECTION OF MINES. A 95
COAL MINES.
by
James Dickson.
The Province is divided into six Inspection Districts, as follows:—
Inspection District. Mining Divisions in Districts.
Coast ■ Quatsino, Clayoquot, Alberni, Nanaimo, Victoria, Vancouver, and
New Westminster.
Northern Interior Lillooet, Ashcroft, Clinton, Quesnel,
Cariboo, and Peace River.
Interior Similkameen, Osoyoos, Nicola, Vernon,
and Kamloops.
East Kootenay and Boundary-.. Greenwood,    Trail    Creek,    Nelson,
Slocan, Arrow Lake, Ainsworth,
Lardeau, Revelstoke, Fort Steele,
Windermere, and Golden.
Northern : Atlin, Stikine, Portland Canal, Skeena,
and Omineca.
The Inspectors inspect the coal mines, metalliferous mines, and quarries in their
respective districts.
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials.
James Dickson Chairman, Victoria.
James Strang Secretary, Victoria.
H. E. Miard Member, Fernie.
Messrs. Strang and Miard and the Inspector of Mines of the district in which an
examination is being held form the Board for granting certificates of competency to
coal-miners.
An Inspector of Mines is empowered to grant provisional certificates to miners for
a period not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations.
Richard Nichol Nanaimo Station.
James L. Brown Cumberland Station.
Alfred Gould   Princeton Station.
Joseph J. Haile Fernie Station.
The District Inspectors of Mines have their headquarters in the different mining
areas as follows: John MacDonald, Nanaimo; James Strang, Victoria; Robert B.
Bonar, Cumberland; James A. Mitchell, Lillooet; E. R. Hughes, Princeton; Hamilton C.
Hughes, Nelson;  H. E. Miard, Fernie;  and Charles Graham, Prince Rupert.
During the year John T. Puckey, who was for many years Instructor at the Fernie
Mine-rescue Station, died, and John G. Biggs retired from the Inspection staff.
PRODUCTION.
The total tonnage produced by the coal mines of the Province for the year ended
1941 was 1,802,353 tons, being an increase of 134,526 tons or 8.07 per cent, over
production of 1940.
The Coast District, which includes Vancouver Island, Nicola-Princeton, and
Northern Districts, produced 776,295 tons, a decrease of 115,014 tons or 12.90 per cent,
from 1940.
Vancouver Island collieries produced 647,958 tons, a decrease of 84,701 tons or
11.5 per cent, from 1940.
The Northern District produced 6,408 tons, an increase of 584 tons over 1940. A 96
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
The Nicola-Princeton District produced 121,929 tons, a decrease of 30,857 tons or
20.2 per cent, from 1940.
The East Kootenay District produced 1,026,053 tons, an increase of 249,535 tons or
32.1 per cent, over 1940.
The following table shows the output and per capita production daily and for the
year at the various mines:—
Colliery and Mine.
bux
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Tons of Coal
mined per Underground Employee
daily.
Tons of Coal
mined per Underground Employee
for Year.
119,895
161,451
78,739
230,135
30,355
3,246
2,422
6,052
10,893
661
1,341
165
683
226
1,471
223
200
213
153
256
75
135
285
251
138
208
290
84
259
80
155
48
326
427
227
310
137
6
9
15
57
2
5
1
2
5
6
1
1.84
1.78
2.27
2.90
3.00
4.00
0.93
1.60
1.38
1.58
1.26
1.96
1.33
0.56
1.58
4.64
368
378
347,
742
221
541
267
403
191
330
368
165
344
45
245
223
266
336
189
271
119
5
6
12
53
2
4
1
2
5
5
1
2.25
2.25
2.71
3.31
3.40
4.80
1.41
2.00
1.48
1.58
1.15
1.96
1.33
0.56
1.90
4.64
450
Comox Colliery (No. 8 mine)  	
Northfield Colliery ,	
South Wellington (No. 10 mine)  	
480
416
849
255
649
404
Chambers' mine 	
504
205
330
Cassidy mine    	
Biggs' mine	
335
165
344
45
294
223
22,860
69,774
26,116
2,883
296
187
287
246
158
119
83
90
50
19
3
1.47
2.70
2.12
0.96
0.83
275
775
522
152
99
55
75
37
16
3
2.21
3.22
2.87
1.14
0.83
415
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P. Co., Ltd.
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co 	
930
705
Hat Creek 	
5,507
901
229
108
13
7
1.84
1.18
423
128
8
4
3.00
2.08
686
174,813
851,240
258
293
177
744
3.43
3.90
987
1,144
129
624
5.25
4.65
1,355
1,364
5
1
1
—-
Collieries of Vancouver Island Inspection District.
The output of Vancouver Island collieries was 647,958 tons. Of this amount,
102,184 tons or 15.7 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market; 4,828 tons or
0.7 per cent, was consumed by producing companies as fuel; and 552,810 tons was sold
in the competitive market. Of the amount sold in the competitive market, 514,755
tons or 91.3 per cent, was sold in Canada, and 38,055 tons or 8.7 per cent, was sold in
United States.
Collieries of the Nicola-Princeton District.
Of the gross output of 121,929 tons produced by the collieries of the Nicola-
Princeton District, 4,083 tons or 3.3 per cent, was consumed by the producing companies as fuel, 3,266 tons was taken from stock, making a total of 121,112 tons sold in
the competitive market in Canada.
Collieries of the East Kootenay District.
The output of the collieries in the East Kootenay District was 1,026,053 tons. Of
this amount, 68,665 tons or 6.7 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market;   16,239 INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 97
tons or 1.5 per cent, was consumed by producing companies as fuel; 125,792 tons or
12.2 per cent, was used in making coke; and 815,647 tons was sold in the competitive
market. Of this amount, 731,015 tons or 89.6 per cent, was sold in Canada, and 84,632
tons or 10.4 per cent, was sold in United States.
The following table shows the per capita production of the various districts for the
past five years. Similar figures for years prior to 1937 are shown in previous Annual
Reports.
Output and Per Capita Production in Various Districts.
Year.
District.
Gross Tons of
Coal mined
during Year.
Total No. of
Employees
at Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Employee for
Year.
No. of Men
employed
Underground
in Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Underground
Employee
for Year.
,
459,136
985,551
1,444,687
434,068
875,360
1,309,428
561,958
915,914
1,477,872
776,518
891,309
1,667,827
1,026,053
776,300
802,353
628
2,525
3,153
693
2,269
2,962
731
2,245
2,976
731
2,143
2,874
921
1,802
2,723
731
390
458
626
386
442
768
468
496
1,062
462
580
1,114
431
662
462
1,824
2,286
467
1,621
2,088
538
1,629
2,167
550
1,625
2,175
753
1,476
2,229
972
X937   J
Coast District..... -	
540
>■
1938   J
540
Whole Province  -	
675
1,044
1939   J
682
\
1,412
548
1940   J
766
f
1,632
526
1941   J
The following table shows the production and distribution of coal by the various
collieries and districts, compiled from returns furnished by the owners:— REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
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1941.
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161,451
78,739
230,135
30,355
3,246
2,422
6,052
10,893
661
1.341
165
683
226
1,471
223
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69,774
26,116
2,883
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II A 100
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT.
During 1941, 2,723 persons were employed in and about the coal mines of the
Province, a decrease of 151 men from 1940. Taking the average of all the mines in
Vancouver Island District, about 24 per cent, of the working-days were lost through
lack of trade, principally in the earlier part of the year. In the Nicola-Princeton
District the different collieries worked about 76 per cent, of the working-days. In the
East Kootenay District the average for the year was about 92 per cent.
The table on page 99 shows the number of persons ordinarily employed in and
about the mines, distinguishing the persons and different classes employed underground
and above ground, compiled from returns furnished by the owners.
FUEL-OIL COMPETITION.
During 1941, imports of crude oil for refining in British Columbia totalled
199,275,000 gallons, and 17,978,000 was imported as bunker-fuel for shipping.
COMPETITION OF COAL PRODUCED OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA.
During 1941, the importation of coal into British Columbia consisted of 30 tons of
anthracite, 1,638 tons of bituminous coal, and 609 tons of lignite; in addition to above,
465 tons of petroleum coke and 477 tons of metallurgical coke was imported. All above
imports were from the United States.
Alberta coal sold in British Columbia amounted to 304,928 tons. The following
table shows the amount of Alberta coal brought into British Columbia during past
years:—■
Year. Short Tons.
1932  136,188
1933  119,026
1934  123,968
1935 221,748
1936 244,928
Year. Short Tons.
1937. 269,023
1938 238,435
1939  239,227
1940 311,232
1941  304,928
Of the 1,496,012 tons of British Columbia coal marketed, 223,744 tons was sold
for domestic and industrial use in the Provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba,
and Ontario, and 401,346 tons was sold for railroad use in the Provinces; 9,247 tons
was sold for railroad use in the United States, and approximately 175,933 tons for railroad use in British Columbia; 122,687 tons was exported to the United States and
80,739 tons was sold for ships' bunkers. The tonnage of coal used in the Province was
482,316 tons of British Columbia coal, 271,385 tons of Alberta coal and briquettes, and
2,277 of imported coals.
ACCIDENTS IN AND AROUND COAL MINES.
During 1941, 2,723 persons were employed in and around coal mines. Four fatal
accidents during the year as compared with six during 1940.
The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed was 1.47 as compared with
2.08 for 1940. In 1939 the ratio was 0.67; in 1938, 3.37; in 1937, 3.17; in 1936, 2.84;
in 1935, 1.67; in 1934, 2.07; in 1933, 0.97; and in 1932, 2.21. The average for the
ten-year period being 2.06.
The number of fatal accidents per 1,000,000 tons produced during 1941 was 2.21;
during 1940 the figure was 3.65; in 1939, 1.35; in 1938,7.63; in 1937, 6.92; in 1936,
5.94; in 1935,4.21; in 1934, 4.45; in 1933, 2.37; and in 1932, 5.21. The average for
the ten-year period being 4.31 per 1,000,000 tons of coal mined.
The following table shows the collieries at which the fatal accidents occurred
during 1941 and comparative figures for 1940:—
Name of Company.
Name of Colliery.
1941.
1940.
1
2
1
1
4
Michel Colliery  	
1
Totals	
4
6 INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 101
The following table shows the various causes of fatal accidents in 1941 and their
percentage of the whole and comparative figures for 1940:—
Cause.
1941.
1940.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
Per Cent.
1
2
1
25.00
50.00
2
3
1
33.34
50.00
16.66
25.00
Totals	
4
100.00
6
100.00
The following table shows the number of tons of coal mined for each fatal accident
in their respective classes in the years 1941 and 1940:—
1941.
1940.
Cause.
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Fatal Accident.
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Fatal Accident.
i
2
--
-
1
1.802.353
901.176
2
3
1
833,913
555,942
.
1,667,827
1,802,353
Totals -	
4
450,588
6
277,971
The number of tons of coal mined per fatal accident during 1941 was 450,588 tons
compared with 277,971 tons in 1940. The average for the ten-year period was 231,990
tons.
The following table shows the fatalities from various causes in coal mines during
the year 1941 compared with 1940, according to Inspection Districts:—
No. op Deaths prom Accidents.
Totals.
District.
Falls of
Roof and
Coal.
Mine-
cars and
Haulage.
Mine
Explosions.
Falling
Timber.
Bumps.
1941.
1940.
1
1
1
....
--
1
1
1                    5
Nicola-Princeton 	
3                    1
Northern... 	
1         |          2        |         -
1            2                       3
1
1         1          4
1          ...         1            6
13060 A 102                         REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
Ratio of Accidents.
District.
Accident Death-eate.
Per 1,000 Persons
employed.
Per 1,000,000 Tons of
Coal mined.
1941.
1940.
1941.
1940.
0.65
3.25
2.90
1.36
1.54
2.92
6.82
1.29
Province (1941)   	
1.47
2.08
2.21
Province (1940)   — ■ 	
3.65
The details regarding the occurrences of fatal accidents in coal
are as follows:—        '
The fatal accident which occurred to Frederick Atherton, row
mines during 1941
2-rider. No. 1 East
mine, Coal Creek Colliery, Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, on January 17th
was due to injuries received in a " bump." Deceased was at work on the main tunnel
of the mine when a " bump " occurred. He was alone at the time but was found shortly
afterwards by two miners who had left their working-place to investigate the extent of
the damage caused by the " bump." Deceased had apparently been thrown against the
roof and sustained a fracture of the skull from which he died on January 17th.
The fatal accident which occurred to James Maltman, fireboss, No. 1 East mine,
Coal Creek Colliery, Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, on July 7th was due to
deceased being crushed in a runaway trip of empty cars in which he apparently was
riding. An empty trip of cars was being hauled up an incline when one of the car-
couplings broke and allowed six of the cars to run at high speed to a point 450 feet
below, where they became derailed. Deceased had apparently been riding between the
cars and sustained injuries from which he died on July 11th. Deceased should not have
been riding on the cars.
The fatal accident which occurred to John Kirkpatrick, rope-rider, No. 10 mine,
Canadian Collieries (D.), Limited, Nanaimo, on September 17th was due to deceased
being struck by a runaway car on an incline close to a working-face. The mine-car
was hauled to the face by a small hoist situated at the side of the incline, with the rope
from the hoist led to a sheave-wheel attached to a wheel-post set at the face and then
to the car. On this occasion deceased gave the signal that a car was loaded, and when
the hoistman started to lower the car the wheel-post pulled out of its position and
allowed the car to go uncontrolled. The car struck deceased and inflicted injuries from
which he died the same day.
The fatal accident which occurred to Angus Makuch, miner, Michel Colliery, Crow's
Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, on November 21st was due to a fall of coal at the
working-face. At the time of the accident he was engaged in drilling shot-holes by
means of a compressed-air drill when some coal fell on him from near the roof and killed
him instantly. INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 103
EXPLOSIVES.
The following table shows the quantity of explosives used in coal mines during
1941, together with the number of shots fired, tons of coal produced per pound of
explosive used, and the average pounds of explosive per shot fired (these quantities
include all explosives used for breaking coal and for rock-work in coal mines) :■—
Vancouver Island District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosives
used in
Pounds.
Tonnage
for
Mine.
Total No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosive
per Shot
fired.
Comox Colliery (No. 5 mine)	
Comox Colliery (No. 8 mine). -   	
24,495
52,400
22,350
81,120
8,600
1,490
2,300
2,700
4,000
500
800
50
900
100
990
50
119,895
161,451
78,739
230,135
30,355
3,246
2,422
6,052
10,893
661
1,341
165
688
226
1,471
223
38,057
83,650
39,500
86,525
18,000
2,350
1,700
5,200
7,000
1,450
1,850
100
1,600
150
2,310
150
4.89
3.08
3.52
2.84
2.53
2.11
1.05
2.24
2.72
1.33
1.67
3.30
0.76
2.26
1.49
4.46
0.64
0.62
0.56
South Wellington (No. 10 mine) 	
0.93
0.47
Prospect mine, Extension. -	
0.63
1.35
Chambers* mine -	
Beban mine 	
0.52
0.57
0.34
Cassidy mine  , ,\—:... '	
0.43
0.50
0.56
0.66
0.43
Lake Road mine  	
0.66
202,845
647,958
289,592
3.19
0.70
Nicola-Princeton District.
7,450
18,850'
4,475
800
150
22,860
69,774
26,116
2,883
296
10,225
28,998
8,500
1,600
240
3.06
3.70
5.83
3.60
1.97
0.72
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co	
0.65
0.52
Tulameen coal mine  	
Hat Creek mine    -	
0.50
0.62
31,725
121,929
49,563
3.84
0.64
Northern District.
Bulkley Valley Colliery             	
1,500
350
5,507
901
2,000
700
3.66
2.57
0.75
0.50
1,850
6,408
2,700
3.46
East Kootenay District.
Coal Creek Colliery ' „
75
53,192
|     174,813
851,240
105
72,540
2,330.83
16.00
0.71
53,267
| 1,026,053
1
72,645
19.07
Peace River District.
Gething Colliery    	
25
i               .]
1
75    |
0.20
0.33
289,712
[ 1,802,353
1                        1
414,512    |
1
6.22
0.69 A 104
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
Quantities of Different Explosives used.
Lb.
267,513
Permissible rock-powder    22,149
Monobel of different grades.
Total..
289,712
The following is a list of explosives permitted for use in coal mines by the Honourable the Minister of Mines, under the provisions of section 101, General Rule 11, clause
(t), " Coal-mines Regulation Act ":—
Polar Monobel No. 4. Polar Monobel No. 14.
Polar Monobel No. 6. Polar CXL-ite No. 2.
Polar Monobel No. 7.
MACHINE-MINED COAL.
During the year 1941, mining-machines produced approximately 760,000 tons or
42.1 per cent, of the total.
The following table gives the district, number of machines, how driven, and type of
machine used:—
Number driven by
Type of Machine used.
District.
Electricity.
Compressed
Air.
Chain Undercutting.
Puncher
Type.
27
28
25
1
20
3
7
28
22
1
Totals                   	
81
23
58
SAFETY-LAMPS.
There were 2,496 safety-lamps in use in the coal mines of the Province. Of this
number 200 were flame safety-lamps of the Wolf type and 2,296 were electric lamps of
various makes as follows:   Edison electric, 2,231;   Wolf electric, 65.
The following table shows the distribution of lamps by district, method of locking,
and illuminant used:—■
Vancouver Island District.
Colliery and Mine.
Method of Locking.
Magnetic
Lock.
Automatic
Clip.
Illuminant used.
Naphtha
Gasoline.
Electricity.
Comox Colliery (No. 5 mine).
Comox Colliery (No. 8 mine).
Northfield Colliery* 	
South Wellington (No. 10 mine).
Wellington mine   	
Prospect mine, Extension..
Lantzville Colliery	
Chambers' mine  	
Beban mine	
Loudon mine -
Cassidy mine	
Biggs' mine 	
Lewis' mine 	
Big Flame Wellington..
Deer Holme mine—	
Lake Road mine —
Totals for district -
34
71
17
10
3
2
3
7
2
2
1
1
2
159
281
224
299
152
23
12
22
99
6
5
2
2
4
18
2
1,151
20
17
10
3
2
3
7
2
2
1
1
2
3
1
295
259
299
152
23
12
22
99
6
5
2
2
4
18
2
1,200
* Closed down, July. INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 105
Nicola-Princeton District.
Method of Locking.
Illuminant used.
Colliery and Mine.
Magnetic
Lock.
Automatic
Clip.
Naphtha
Gasoline.
Electricity.
Middlesboro Colliery.-..    	
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co., Ltd. 	
8
8
2
2
2
65
100
70
24
6
8
8
2
2
2
65
100
70
24
Hat Creek mine.. ■   _ 	
6
22
265
22         1          265
Northern District.
2
2
20
12
2
2
20
12
4
32
4
32
East Kootenay District.
12
50
160
639
12
50
160
639
62
799
62
799
Peace River District.
2
	
2
249
2,247
200
2,296
Approved Safety-lamps, Electric and Flame.
A list of the approved safety-lamps, both electric and flame, was published in the
1930 Annual Report.    The following lamps, all electric, are now also approved :■—
No. 8.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18 of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for use in this lamp carries the symbol BM-18 and is
manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland,
Ohio.
No. 9.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18f of the United States Bureau of
Mines. This model of Edison lamp in reality represents an extension of the lamp
approval given under Approval No. 18. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp
carries the symbol BM-18F and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the
General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 10.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18H of the United States Bureau of
Mines. This lamp represents an extension of the No. 18 approval of the United States
Bureau of Mines. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol
BM-18H and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric
Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 11.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 24 of the United States Bureau of
Mines.    The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-24 and is A 106 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland,
Ohio.    This lamp is known as the Edison Model J lamp.
No. 12.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 25 of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-25 and is
manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland,
Ohio.    This lamp is known as the Edison Model K lamp.
No. 13.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Koehler Manufacturing Company,
and known as the Super-Wheat Model " W " electric safety cap-lamp under Approval
No. 20 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
No. H.—The electric lamp manufactured by The Portable Lamp and Equipment
Company, and known as the " Portable " electric safety cap-lamp under Approval No. 27
of the United States Bureau of Mines.
(Unless otherwise specified, all lamps are cap-lamps.)
Note.—While the use of flame safety-lamps is permitted, it is the policy of the
Department of Mines to encourage the use of approved electric safety-lamps for all
persons underground in the coal mines, except such flame-lamps as may be required by
the officials of the mines in the carrying-out of their duty and in such cases as it is considered advisable to provide flame safety-lamps in addition to the electric safety-lamps.
ELECTRICITY.
Electricity is used for various purposes on the surface at eight mines and underground at four.
The purposes for which it is used, together with the amount of horse-power in each
instance, is shown in the following table:—
Nature of its Use. Aggregate H.P.
Above ground—
Winding or hoisting  1,945
Ventilation  1,735
Haulage  198
Coal-washing :.  1,785
Miscellaneous  '.    6,125
Total horse-power  11,788
Underground-—
Haulage  .     1,315
Pumping         935
Coal-cutting     	
Miscellaneous  .  35
Total horse-power     2,285
Total horse-power above and below ground  14,073
Of the above amount, approximately 220 horse-power was operated as direct
current and 13,853 as alternating current.
VENTILATION.
The reports of the District Inspectors give detailed information regarding the
amount of ventilation in the main airways and working splits of the different mines:
the figures given being those resulting from air measurements taken during the last
inspections of the year.
At the Comox Colliery there is in most cases a separate split of intake air for each
individual long-wall of 300 feet length, and while the quantity of air passing is sufficient
for normal mining purposes occasionally roof movements liberate sufficient methane to
make necessary the prohibition of shotfiring for some time; in such cases the Inspector
orders that no shotfiring shall be done until he again inspects the area and finds it clear
of any visible gas-caps. INSPECTION OF MINES. A 107
Methane Detection.
The Burrell Methane Detector and the M.S.A. Methane Detector were in general
use throughout the year to detect the presence of methane in percentages less than
could be detected by means of the flame safety-lamp.
The flame safety-lamp is in general use as the everyday means of testing for the
presence of methane by the firebosses and mine officials, and during the year intensive
efforts were made by the Inspectors to train firebosses and miners to estimate closely
the percentage of methane indicated by very small " gas-caps " on the flame safety-lamp.
This work was carried out underground where the gas-caps could be immediately calibrated with the results found at the same time and place by one of the above-named
methane detectors.
While practically all workmen underground use the electric safety-lamp, many of
the miners were given practical instruction in the use of the flame safety-lamp as a
methane detector, and all new men who apply for a coal-miner's certificate of competency must show that they possess this knowledge.
Mine-air Samples.
Sampling of mine-air was maintained throughout the year, this varying in the
number of samples with the conditions anticipated or existing. During the year 153
samples were taken.
The samples are analysed by the Dominion Bureau of Mines and this service is of
much value to this Department. The results, in addition to their immediate value,
form a record for future mines that may be opened in the vicinity of the presently
operated areas.
INSPECTION COMMITTEES.
The miners at all the larger mines fully observed the requirements of General
Rule 37 of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act " by appointing and maintaining Inspection
Committees which inspected the mines on behalf of the workmen every month.
In most cases a copy of the inspection report was sent to the Inspector.
COAL-DUST.
Sampling of dust was well maintained throughout the year at all mines and a total
of 1,457 samples was taken.
Very few samples show less than 50 per cent, incombustible content set as a
minimum by the regulations; this is due to the policy of the Inspection Branch to
maintain the incombustible content of the dust as high as possible at all times, and this
is done by constant reminders to the managements of the different mines whenever any
tendency towards a decrease in the incombustible content of dust is noted.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
On February 18th a large emission of methane was given off in No. 2 Diagonal
slope, No. 10 mine, South Wellington. The men were immediately withdrawn from the
affected area until the normal mine ventilation removed the gas produced. No person
was injured.
On March 30th while a large electric motor was being hoisted in the Northfield
shaft at Nanaimo, a defective sling-chain broke and caused the motor to fall to the
bottom of the shaft. Considerable damage was done to the shaft timbering and the
mine was idle for three days while the damage was being repaired. No person was
injured.
BUMPS.
During the year a number of " bumps " of varying intensity were experienced in
the No. 1 East mine, Coal Creek Colliery; following are brief details of the more
serious " bumps ":—
On January 8th, at 12.05 a.m., a heavy " bump " occurred in the main South
counter entry, No. 1 East mine, and caused damage over about 675 feet of the roadway. A 108 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
The air-blast reversed the air-current for a short time; brattices and stoppings were
blown down and the ventilation deranged. From 6 to 8 inches of immediate sandstone
roof was brought down; timber sets were dislodged and broken and about a 3-foot
thickness of coal was thrown off the pillar on the high side. There was no heaving of
the floor.    No person was injured.
On January 10th, at 6.50 p.m., a heavy " bump " occurred outby 26 West. This
broke down some timber sets and from 3 to 5 feet of roof-rock for a distance of approximately 80 feet.    No person was injured.
On January 15th, at 8.40 a.m., a major " bump " occurred on the main South entry
and caused considerable damage on the main entry over a length of 610 feet. One man
who was working in this area was killed by the " bump." Loaded cars in this area
were derailed.
On January 17th, at 3.15 a.m., a sharp " bump" occurred in 26 West. This
" bump" threw down the bratticing in several other working-places and threw a
ventilation-door out of position and damaged two stoppings.    No person was injured.
On January 18th, at 7.50 p.m., a sharp " bump " occurred in 26 West and threw
out a considerable amount of timber from its position and projected much coal from
the ribs. No person was injured. The shock of this " bump " was felt by several
persons in Fernie, 5 miles distant.
On February 6th, at 11.15 a.m., a sharp " bump " was felt over the whole mine.
The damage appeared to have centred outby 26 West. A return airway was badly
heaved and a 6-inch air-line was broken in five places over a distance of 160 feet. A
considerable amount of rock was brought down. Apparently this was a major ground
movement, although the damage was localized.
On October 2nd, at 10.10 a.m., a small " bump " occurred in one working-place.
This slightly injured one man and derailed a mine-car.
On October 21st, at 8.30 a.m., a heavy " bump " occurred which affected the main
South entry and return airway. A considerable amount of coal was thrown off the ribs
and telephone and signalling wires were broken and haulage operations were interrupted for some time.    No person was injured.
On October 27th, at 11.05 p.m., a slight " bump " occurred in the main South entry
at 22 West.    This did very little damage and no person was injured.
On November 13th, at 9.30 a.m., a local " bump " occurred which affected only the
return airway and threw about 30 tons of coal off the ribs. One man was slightly
injured.
On November 17th, at 10.08 p.m., a " bump " of considerable force centred on the
main entry between 26 West and 22 East, but did no damage beyond throwing several
cars of coal and rock off the roof and ribs.    No person was injured.
On November 27th, at 4.20 a.m., a sharp " bump " occurred at 28 West parting and
vicinity. Cogs were knocked out and several feet of roof-rock was brought down. A
ventilation-door was blown off its hinges and the tracks on the parting were badly
heaved. Fourteen sets of timber on the parting were knocked out and seventeen loaded
cars were thrown off the tracks.    No person was injured.
On November 29th, at 4.20 a.m., a small " bump " damaged about 100 feet of the
main South entry at 20 West. One set of timber was knocked out and the telephone
and signalling wires were deranged.    No person was injured.
On November 29th, at 2.20 p.m., a local " bump " occurred in the return airway
from 28 West; the floor was badly heaved for a distance of 100 feet and the air-line
was dislodged and broken. A ventilation-door was smashed to pieces. No person was
injured.
On December 21st, at 12.30 p.m., a " bump " centred around second right 28 West.
The track was heaved and the ventilation partly deranged and general work interrupted.
The track was heaved up 2 feet in some places.    No person was injured.
On December 20th, at 12.30 and 1.45 p.m., two " bumps " occurred in No. 1 room,
22 East. The first one was slight but the second was of considerable magnitude and
was felt on the surface. Two stoppings were blown out and the rock parting in one of
the places was shattered as if it had been shot. The track was heaved for a distance
of 60 feet. INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 109
PROSECUTIONS.
During 1941 there were eight prosecutions made for infractions of the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act," as follows:—■
Date.
Colliery.
Occupation of
Defendant.
Offence charged.
Judgment.
Feb. 1	
No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery-
Haulageman.-
Had   a   match   in   his   possession
while underground
Fined $5 and costs.
Mar. 26-
charged  at  one  time  in  a  coal
face
April 25-
April 26-
No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery	
Miner	
Quarrelling underground. 	
Suspended sentence.
Nov. 20-
No. 10 mine, South Wellington
Fireboss	
Preparing   to   fire  a   shot  without
having  made  an  efficient  examination to determine whether inflammable gas was present
Fined $25 and costs.
Dec. 2
No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery
Fireboss—_	
Having loaded and fired two shot-
holes at one time
Fined $20 and costs.
Case later appealed
and appeal allowed
on grounds of faulty
wording of charge.
Dec. G.
contravention of the "Coal-mines
Regulation Act"  that he observed
Dec. 9	
No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery
Fined $5 and costs.
contravention of the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act"  that he observed
GOVERNMENT RESCUE-STATIONS.
The Department of Mines has four fully-equipped mine-rescue stations in charge
of trained instructors located in the chief coal-mining districts—namely, at Nanaimo,
Cumberland, Princeton, and Fernie. At any of these stations persons engaged in
mining may be trained without cost, either on their own application or by request from
any mining company. Where a mine is some distance from the rescue-station the
instructor, by arrangement, will take the rescue apparatus to such mine and give the
necessary training there;  this also without cost.
In addition to the above stations, a fully-equipped station with apparatus provided
by the Department is maintained at Middlesboro Collieries, Merritt, under the care of
the mine management, and a smaller unit of rescue apparatus is stationed at the
Premier mine, Stewart, and an H.H. inhalator stationed at Sheep Creek. The use of
these stations and apparatus is available to any medical practitioner, and during the
year many requests for oxygen and apparatus for administering same are received and
given immediate response.
In the larger mining areas of Nanaimo, Cumberland, and the Crowsnest Pass
experienced mine-rescue teams maintain a regular schedule of training throughout the
year and so keep ready for any emergency calls. Due to so many of the younger men
leaving the mines to join the different war services, there is increasing difficulty in
obtaining new men of the proper age and physique to undertake the strenuous course
necessary to produce efficient mine-rescue men; many of the men who had taken this
course at the different mine-rescue stations are now specializing in gas protection in
the army and navy.
The rescue-stations are also centres for first-aid lectures and training, and during
the war are also centres for air-raid precaution work and casualty stations.
The preliminary training course consists of twelve two-hour lessons in the actual
use of oxygen apparatus and Burrell all-service gas-masks in an irrespirable atmosphere, and instruction on the approved method of dealing with mine fires and
recovery-work. A 110
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
During the year, in addition to the regular teams in training, twenty-three new
men took the full training and were granted certificates of competency:—
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where trained.
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where trained.
1102
1103
1104
1105
1106
1107
1108
1109
1110
1111
1112
1113
James Johnstone	
George Telford	
John F. J. Richardson..
Michael Mihalech (Jr.)
John George Mihalech _
James Fairley......	
Leonard R. McFadden _
Austen G. Truax	
Roy Bakke  -	
Richard James Nichol...
Ross George Terhune.—
John Cyril McLean	
Nanaimo.
South Wellington.
South Wellington.
Extension.
Extension.
Princeton.
Copper Mountain.
Copper Mountain.
Copper Mountain.
Nanaimo.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
1114
1115
1116
1117
1118
1119
1120
1121
1122
1123
1124
Frederick E. Burnet..
Edward G. Tapp ..,•,■
Alphonse G. Michaud
Herbert L. McCallum
Stewart A. Bennett...
Nick N. Kurbotoff	
Irwin Atkinson,..	
Raymond E. Nordin..
Arnold J. Mclntyre.—
Robert J. Culbertson..
Albert Beckman	
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Princeton.
Princeton.
Princeton.
Princeton.
Princeton.
Princeton.
Princeton.
SUPERVISION OF COAL MINES.
During the year nineteen coal companies operated twenty-nine mines, employing
2,229 men underground. In the supervision of underground employees there were ten
managers, seventeen overmen, and 103 firebosses and shotlighters; a total of 130, or
one official for every seventeen men employed underground.
" COAL SALES ACT."
There was only one complaint under the " Coal Sales Act" during the year, and
this was given immediate attention, but towards the end of the year a number of complaints were received regarding the amount of smaller sizes of coal being sold as lump
and nut; however, as there are no regulations specifying minimum or average sizes for
lump coal, nut coal, or pea coal, no definite action could be taken in such cases.
In the Vancouver area, valuable assistance is rendered by the Weights and Measures
Inspector for Vancouver City, who keeps a close check on the sale of coal in the city.
List of Registered Names of British Columbia Coals, approved by the Chief
Inspector of Mines, in accordance with the Provisions of the " Coal Sales
Act."
Registered Names of Coal.
Com ox	
Old Wellington	
Ladysmith-Wellington..
Hi-Carbon  _	
Lantzville-Wellington 	
Fiddiek-Douglas. 	
Chambers-Extension 	
Wellington Big Flame -_... —
Biggs-Wellington	
Berkley Creek-Little Wellington._
Nanaimo Jingle Pot —
Cassidy-Wellington - _.
Middlesboro 	
Coalmont  	
Tulameen Valley Coal, Princeton
Granby Tulameen. —	
Hat Creek..
Tulameen Gem _	
Bulkley Valley __	
Aveling 	
Crow's Nest, Coal Creek
Crow's Nest, Michel	
Colliery and District.
Nos. 5 and 8 mines, Comox Colliery (Cumberland).
No. 9 mine (Wellington)   	
No. 10 mine (South Wellington)   . 	
Mixture of Canadian Collieries' coal and B.C. Electric coke
Lantzville (Lantzville)  _   	
Fiddick mine (South Wellington)..	
Chambers' (Extension)  __„_ _	
Richardson mine __	
Biggs' mine (Wellington)    __	
Berkley Creek Colliery (Extension)  	
Old East Wellington (Nanaimo)   	
Cassidy mine (Cassidy)   .— 	
Middlesboro (Merritt)     	
Coalmont (Coalmont)   .-.	
Tulameen (Princeton)  _ _
Granby (Princeton) 	
Hat Creek (Lillooet)..
Tulameen Collieries (Princeton).
Bulkley Valley (Telkwa) l.„.
Aveling (Telkwa) 	
Coal Creek (Coal Creek) 	
Michel (Michel) 	
Producing Company.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Lantzville Colliery.
Fiddick mine.
R. H. Chambers.
A. B. Richardson.
Biggs' mine.
Hugh McLean Davidson.
Thos. Lewis.
A. H. Carroll.
Middlesboro Collieries, Ltd.
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd.
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co.
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P.
Co., Ltd.
Canada Coal and Development
Co., Ltd.
Tulameen Collieries.
Bulkley Valley Colliery, Ltd.
Aveling Colliery.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd. BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS. A 111
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
FIRST-, SECOND-, AND THIRD-CLASS CERTIFICATES AND
MINE-SURVEYORS' CERTIFICATES.
BY
James Strang.
The Board of Examiners, which was formed on July 10th, 1919, now consists of
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines, Chairman; H. E. Miard, member; and James
Strang, member and Secretary to the Board.
The meetings of the Board are held in the office of the Department of Mines in
Victoria. The examinations are held in accordance with the amended rules of the
Board of Examiners and approved by the Minister of Mines on September 28th, 1929.
Two examinations were held in 1941, the first on May 14th, 15th, and 16th, and the
second on November 12th, 13th, and 14th. The total number of candidates at the
examinations were as follows: For Second-class Certificates, 6 (2 passed, 4 failed) ;
for Third-class Certificates, 16 (7 passed, 9 failed).
The following is a list of the candidates who successfully passed in the various
classes:—
Second-class Certificates.—Arthur Dockrill and Thomas Cochrane.
Third-class Certificates.—Samuel Fowler, Hannes Maki, William D. Louden, Ralph
Larner, Leon D. Leonard, Henry R. Ebert, and Peter Queen.
EXAMINATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY
AS COAL-MINERS.
In addition to the examinations and certificates already specified as coming under
the Board of Examiners, the Act further provides that every coal-miner shall be the
holder of a certificate of competency as such. By miner is meant any person employed
underground in any coal mine to cut, shear, break, or loosen coal from the solid, either
by hand or machinery.
Examinations are held regularly in all coal-mining districts.
No certificate has been granted in any case where the candidate has failed to
satisfy the Board as to his fitness, experience in a coal mine, and a general working
knowledge of the English language.
During 1941 there were 263 candidates for coal-miners' certificates; of these 228
passed and 35 failed to qualify.
In addition to the certificates granted above, substitute certificates were issued to
those who had lost their original certificates.
The Board of Examiners desires to thank the different coal-mining companies for
the use of their premises for holding the examinations when necessary.
The Inspector of Mines in each district has authority under the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act" to grant, after a satisfactory examination, a provisional certificate as
a coal-miner to applicants, which entitles the holder to follow the occupation of a coal-
miner for a period not exceeding sixty days or until the date of the next examination
before the Board. A 112 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS.
NANAIMO.
BY
Richard Nichol.
There were no emergency calls from the mines in this district during the year, but
there were thirty calls for oxygen and the oxygen apparatus from the different hospitals
and medical practitioners.    Immediate response was made to these calls.
Two trained teams from the mines maintained weekly practice training throughout
the year at this station, and units from different fire brigades took some instruction on
the oxygen resuscitation apparatus.
The main equipment at this station consists of six sets of the Gibbs two-hour
oxygen machines; seven sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen machines; one McCaa one-
hour oxygen machine; twelve Burrell all-service gas-masks; two H.H. inhalators; one
motor-driven pump for charging oxygen cylinders; and a sufficient supply of oxygen
and supplies to maintain the above equipment in service for a considerable time.
An 85-horse-power truck is kept in readiness at all times to transport the equipment in response to any emergency calls.
This station is equipped to serve as an air-raid precaution centre and casualty
station.
CUMBERLAND.
BY
James L. Brown.
Three trained teams from Comox Colliery maintained weekly training practices
throughout the year and some formerly trained men took refresher training.
This station is also used as the headquarters for first aid and air-raid precautions
supplies for the district, and training in the use of gas-masks and decontamination-work
is given to all interested in this work.
The main equipment at this station consists of eleven sets of the McCaa two-hour
oxygen machines; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks; one H.H. inhalator;
one Sparklet resuscitator; thirty self-rescuers; and sufficient supplies to maintain the
above equipment during emergencies.
There were no emergency calls from the mines during the year .
PRINCETON.
BY
Alfred Gould.
A trained team from the Granby Colliery maintained a weekly training during the
year and a few new men took the full training course.
The main equipment at this station consists of eleven McCaa two-hour oxygen
machines; eleven Burrell all-service gas-masks; one H.H. inhalator; with sufficient
supplies to maintain the above equipment in efficient service.
This station has also been equipped to serve as the main casualty station in the case
of any war emergency. GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS. A 113
FERNIE.
BY
Joseph J. Haile.
The main equipment at this station consists of six Gibbs two-hour oxygen
machines; eleven sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen machines; twelve Burrell all-
service gas-masks;  thirty-five self-rescuers;   and one H.H. inhalator.
A number of men from the Sullivan mine at Kimberley took the full training course
and obtained certificates of competency in mine-rescue training.
Several calls for oxygen were received from the Fernie hospital and these were
given immediate attention.
There were no emergency calls from the mines during the year. A 114 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
INSPECTION OF COAL MINES.
Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Ltd.
VANCOUVER ISLAND INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John MacDonald and R. B. Bonar.
J. A. Boyd, President, Montreal, Que.; H. R. Plommer, Vice-
President, Vancouver, B.C.; P. S. Fagan, Secretary - Treasurer,
Nanaimo, B.C.; H. Baird, Superintendent, Nanaimo, B.C.
Northfield Mine.—A. Newbury, Manager; J. Sutherland, Overman. A general
description of the location of this mine, surface plant, and method of working, etc., has
appeared in previous Annual Reports. Conditions in this part of the Wellington field
proved so disappointing in the location of workable seams that the management were
compelled to abandon this mine in July. It might be mentioned that the original operations were started by the New Vancouver Coal Mining and Land Company, Ltd., on
January 8th, 1888, the coal-seam being reached at a depth of 424 feet on July 31st.
Development roadways were set off on both sides of the shaft and a limited area opened
up by the long-wall method of working, but conditions proved unfavourable to mine
economically with the equipment available at that time with the result that operations
were abandoned in 1895. The Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd., commenced unwatering
and repairs in April, 1936, this work being completed in October of the same year;
from that date until final abandonment the mine produced 608,000 tons of coal.
No. 10 Mine, South Wellington.—W. Frew, Manager; Jos. Wilson, Overman. This
mine is situated in the Cranberry district about half a mile south of the old No. 5 mine
and is now the chief producer in the district, having worked 256.5 days during the year
for a total output of 230,135 tons. Additions to the plant included the installation of
one of the two modern compressors formerly serving Northfield mine, and the installation of the Northfield Main slope electric hoist in a fire-proof room at the top of No. 1
Diagonal slope; production again being resumed in this district in September after a
stoppage of eighteen months. In the early part of November, a beginning was made
to level off the ground and prepare the foundations for a wash-house to accommodate
300 men and it is anticipated this building will be in service early in 1942. New
development, which was carried on steadily in all districts, amounted to a total drivage
of 8,300 feet of main roadways, the bulk of this being done in the Nos. 1 and 2 Diagonal
slope sections where the main portion of the field awaits development; work along these
lines was curtailed in the Main slope and No. 3 Diagonal slope districts as these
workings gradually reached a predetermined boundary-line which had been established
as the ultimate limit of drivage in the direction of the abandoned workings of Granby
No. 1 mine, a 400-foot barrier pillar being left intact in this area as a safeguard against
any inrush of water or noxious gases from these old workings. Working conditions
in general have been found satisfactory throughout the year, except when an occasional
heavy outflow of gas necessitated a temporary prohibition of blasting operations
pending the removal of all visible gas-caps from the general body of the air. Excepting
as stated above, the ventilation has been generally good. One hundred and sixty-six
samples of dust were collected, all of these being well above the minimum standard of
incombustible content as set by the Coal-dust Regulations; 149 tons of lime-dust was
used throughout the year to reduce the hazard due to coal-dust.
Wellington Mine.—A. Newbury, Manager; J. Sutherland, Overman. This mine is
situated in the " timberlands " district, a distance of 14 miles from the washery and
cleaning plant at Nanaimo, to which point the output is transported by a fleet of trucks
owned and operated by F. W. Beban Company under contract with the coal company.
This mine was operated for a few years prior to 1929, when it was closed down for
lack of transportation facilities and remained closed until May of this year, when the
mine was unwatered, the necessary repairs carried out underground, pit-head and
bunkers built, compressor plant and hoisting engine transferred from Northfield, and INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 115
the necessary power-lines erected from the main highway into the mine, with production being started on September 23rd. The coal in this area belongs to the
Wellington series, is of excellent quality and varies from 2 to 4 feet in thickness. The
method employed is the long-wall system of mining, the coal being undercut by Anderson & Boyes coal-cutting machines, while Meco shaking-conveyers are used on the
face-lines to transfer the coal to the loading-points on the levels. General conditions
have been found satisfactory and the ventilation has been exceptionally good throughout
the mine. All roadways in this mine to date have varied from a damp to a very wet
condition throughout.
Prospect Mine, Extension.—M. Brodrick, Fireboss. This mine is situated at
Extension, on the southerly end of the " Harewood Ridge," and is operating in a portion
of the Wellington seam. Principal development carried out during the year was confined to extending levels right and left off the Main slope. These were broken away
off the slope at a point 150 feet from the portal and driven for a distance of 200 feet
in troubled ground, the left level being finally abandoned on this account, but progress
is still being made in a trough of coal along the fault-line in the Right side workings.
The ventilation was good generally.
F. W. Beban Company, Operators;   George Frater, Overman.    From
Beban Mine.     January to July 2nd, on which date this property was abandoned, the
mine worked a total of 139.5 days and produced 11,948 tons. During
the above period, the greater portion of the output was mined from the Main slope
pillars which were drawn back almost to the portal.
R. H. Chambers, Operator; Charles Webber and Thos. McCann, Fire-
Chambers' bosses. This mine is in the Extension district and is operating an
No. 3 Mine.      isolated portion of the Wellington seam which was left in this area by
former operators. This property has worked steadily throughout the
year, having worked a total of 251 days and produced 6,540 tons with an average crew
of fourteen men employed.
George Frater and Associates, Operators;   G. Frater, Overman.    This
Lake Road Mine, small mine was opened in November in the immediate vicinity of the
abandoned Beban mine to recover a limited area of outcrop coal left
untouched in this area by former operators. During the period November 1st to
December 31st, this mine worked forty-two days and produced 193 tons with a crew of
two men engaged. The ventilation is provided by natural means and general conditions
were found satisfactory.    No accidents were reported from this mine.
T. and G. Lewis, Operators;   G. Lewis, Fireboss.    This mine is situ-
Lewis' No. 2     ated in the Harewood district and is operating in isolated portions of
Mine. the Wellington  seam which were left intact by former operators.
Mining at present is being carried on along the high side of the old
Harewood Main tunnel at a point approximately 800 feet from the portal. As there
are several openings through to the surface from the old workings, a plentiful supply of
fresh air is provided by natural means.
J. McKellar and Associates, Operators;  James Nimmo, Fireboss.   This
No. 5 Mine,      mine is situated in the Cassidy area and is operating in a portion of
Cassidy. the Douglas seam lying to the south of the abandoned Granby No. 2
mine. The seam in this area is reached by a slope driven from the surface, but development-work generally has been slowed up by reason of irregularities
in the seam and faulted ground. The ventilation is provided by natural means and
has always been found sufficient for all practical purposes. No accidents were reported
from this mine.
A. B. Richardson and Associates, Operators;   T. Hunter, Fireboss.
Big Flame Mine.  This mine is situated in the South Wellington district and operated in
a small pillar area left near the outcrop by former operators. Ventilation was produced by natural means and working conditions were good during the
course of inspection.
No. 1 Mine.—J. A. Challoner and Associates, Operators; J. A. Chal-
Lantzville Colliery, loner,  Overman.    This  mine   is  on  the  shore-line  of the  Strait of
Georgia, 9 miles north of Nanaimo, and operated in the Wellington A 116 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
seam until the last week in December, when drainage difficulties caused a suspension
of operations and subsequent abandonment of work in this area. It was found fairly
satisfactory at all inspections.
James Biggs, Operator and Fireboss.    This mine was situated in the
Biggs' Mine.     Wellington district and worked eighty-four days during the first nine
months of the year, producing 170 tons with a crew of two men
engaged. Operations were entirely confined to a limited area of outcrop coal left in
by former operators, all available coal that could be recovered with safety being
extracted and the mine closed down for good in September.
W. D. Loudon, Operator;   J. Unsworth, Fireboss.    This mine is being
Loudon's Mine,   operated in a small area of outcrop coal in the Wellington district;
ventilation is produced by natural means and working conditions were
found satisfactory at all inspections.    No accidents were reported during the year.
Robt. Hamilton and Associates, Operators; Robt. Hamilton, Overman.
Deer Holme Mine. This mine is situated in the Extension district and was opened up in
what was formerly known as old No. 1 heading which was driven out
to the surface from No. 2 mine, Extension Colliery. This roadway has been repaired
and is now serving as a slope to develop and open up a portion of outcrop coal which
was left in to protect the surface when Extension Colliery was in operation.
At the larger mines the inspection committees appointed by the miners in accordance with the " Coal-mines Regulation Act," section 101, General Rule 37, carried out
inspections every month and submitted copies of their report to this office.
All report-books required to be kept at the mines were examined frequently
throughout the year and found to be maintained in a proper manner.
James A. Quinn, Manager;  Arthur W. Watson, Overman;  James Weir
No. 8 Mine,     and Daniel Morgan, Shiftbosses;   E.  Surtees, T.  Shields, J.  Queen,
Comox Colliery.   J. Anderson, F. Coates, W. Johnstone, F. Woods, A. Maxwell, D. Wad-
dington, W. Bennie, R. O'Brien, T. Robertson, G. Harvie, and E. H.
Devlin, Firebosses.
The mine is in the vicinity of the Lake Trail road and 2 miles east of the mine
camp at Bevan. The seams are reached by two shafts, each 1,000 feet in depth. The
No. 2 seam, which lies at a depth of 700 feet, is the only one being operated at the
present time, although work has commenced on unwatering the lower or No. 4 seam
with the view of developing and operating this seam in the near future. In the No. 2
seam, before opening out on the long-wall advance method of work, a circular shaft
pillar 1,000 feet in diameter was left and only narrow openings driven through it.
The mine operated throughout the year, but owing to slackness in trade very little
development-work was done during the first eight months of the year. All the active
workings are at present confined to the South side of the shaft, but the management is
considering the reopening of the long inactive North side workings which are at present
still in the development stage. The main South level, after being driven through a
series of faults for approximately 500 feet, is in regular coal and now is an active producer with one long-wall of 300 feet during the year and is now in faulty ground.
No. 1 Incline and its two counters form an advancing long-wall triple-entry system,
the incline forming the centre entry and the right and left counters made at top and
bottom, respectively, of the 300-foot long-wall face-line. Levels are driven off the
incline to the right and left to form long-walls, advancing along the strike, of approximately 300 feet in length. To give the required height the incline and counters are
top-brushed and the rock stowed on either side of the roadways in the gob. There are
nine long-wall faces in operation, their total length aggregating 2,500 feet, with an
average seam thickness of 3 feet 6 inches, including rock bands or bone. Each wall
now has a separate split of air, and, to accomplish this, 1,200 feet of airways were
driven through the gob and several overcasts constructed. The counter to the main
South return airway is being repaired and the stables removed from it, so that in the
near future this roadway will be used to duplicate the main South return and so reduce
considerably the velocity of the air. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 117
The long-walls and levels are undercut by means of Anderson-Boyes compressed-air
long-wall machines, and solid places are driven by radial-type punching machines.
Shaker pan-conveyers of the compressed-air Meco type are used to convey the coal down
the long-wall faces and load it into 1%-ton capacity mine-cars on the levels. Owing to
the numerous slips encountered, the varying thickness of cap-rock, and the slow advance
of the walls, the roof conditions are not of the best and require the closest attention
and care.
The mine ventilation is supplied by a Sullivan fan having a rated capacity of
250,000 cubic feet of air per minute against a 7-inch water-gauge. As mentioned
above, each wall has a separate air-current, and all told there are twelve separate splits.
Twelve samples of mine-air were collected during the year from the main South
return and served as a check on safety-lamp readings. The analysis of the air sample
taken in the main South return airway on December 9th showed a methane content of
0.45 per cent. A total of 341,000 lb. of lime-rock dust were used underground during
the past twelve months, 120,000 lb. being used in tamping shots and 221,000 lb. in
treating the roadways and face-lines of the mine to combat the coal-dust hazard. As an
additional precaution against the coal-dust hazard, the coal is subjected to a water-spray
as it is discharged from the conveyer-pans into the coal-cars. One hundred and ninety-
eight samples of mine-dust were analysed during the year for the purpose of ascertaining the percentage of incombustible matter and moisture in the dust collected from
the roof, floor, and sides of the mine roadways.
To handle the increasing amount of coal coming from the No. 1 Incline district
a first-motion hoist was installed near the face of this incline. The compressed air for
the underground machinery is supplied by three electric-driven compressors, having a
rated capacity of 4,970 cubic feet per minute, located on the surface near the main
hoisting-shaft.
On October 6th work was commenced on a new bath-house in the mine yard, having
a capacity for 400 men, and it should be completed early in the coming year. The mine
was inspected on forty-eight occasions during the year.
John  S. Williams, Manager;   John Christie, Overman;   I.   Morgan
No. 5 Mine,     and T. Eccleston, Shiftbosses;   William Herd, Robert Walker, J. H.
Comox Colliery.   Vaughan, A. G. Jones, C. Williams, A. Somerville, A. Dunsmore, T.
Smith, and James Cochrane, Firebosses.    This mine operates the No. 2
seam, which is reached by a shaft 280 feet in depth.    All the workings lie to the dip
from the shaft and are accessible by four slopes which are driven from the level of
No. 1 seam.    All of the output is produced from advancing long-wall faces and their
accompanying development places.    At the end of the year there were five active long-
wall faces having a total length of 1,230 feet with an average seam thickness of 3 feet
9 inches, including 10 inches of rock.    The average daily output of coal during the
month of December was 465 tons, with 253 men employed underground and thirty-two
men on the surface.
The long-wall faces are equipped with compressed-air Meco-type pan-conveyers
which convey the coal from the face-lines to 1-ton capacity mine-cars on the levels.
The slopes and levels are bottom-brushed to give the necessary height and most of the
rock is stowed in the gob on both sides of the roadways. All the coal-cutting is done
by means of compressed-air Anderson-Boyes machines which mine the coal to a depth
of 6 feet.
At the end of the year the active workings were confined to the Main slope and
No. 4 West slope districts, and the development slope, No. 6 East. No. 2 West slope
district stopped production in March on account of the low and bony nature of the
seam section.
Due to the gassy nature of the mine the closest attention is at all times required in
maintaining efficient ventilation, and while it has been necessary on several occasions
during the year to temporarily prohibit blasting on some of the long-wall faces and
levels, there were no instances of protracted prohibitions being required.
The mine is ventilated by two electric-driven exhausting-fans which have separate
returns but common intakes. The No. 1 fan, which ventilates the abandoned No. 1
seam and No. 2 West slope workings and the active No. 4 West slope district, gave a A 118 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
reading of 61,200 cubic feet per minute at the time of the last inspection. No. 2 fan,
which ventilates the Main slope and No. 6 East slope districts, gave a reading of
156,000 cubic feet per minute against a 4-inch water-gauge.
One hundred and thirty-six tons of limestone-dust were used underground during
the year to combat the coal-dust hazard. It was distributed by hand on the roadways
and face-lines and is also used in tamping shots. As an added precaution the coal
coming off the conveyer-pans is sprayed with water to allay the danger from coal-dust.
Two hundred and thirty-three samples of mine-dust were analysed during the year for
the purpose of ascertaining the percentage of incombustible matter and moisture in the
dust collected from the roof, floor, and sides of the mine roadways; all of which
exceeded the minimum requirements of the dust regulations.
A man-trip is run up on this slope, and as a safeguard, the hoist is equipped with
an automatic cut-off which cuts off the power and applies the brake if anything should
happen to the hoistman. An additional man-trip is run on the lower Main slope to
connect with the above man-trip.
The compressed air for the underground machinery is supplied by three electric-
driven compressors situated at the top of No. 3 intake drift, and which have a rated
capacity of 4,950 cubic feet of air per minute.
The new bath-house, with accommodation for 512 workmen, was opened for use on
May 4th and as it is equipped with sixty sprays there is no crowding or waiting by the
workmen.
Monthly inspections were made by the miners' " Inspection Committee," and copies
of all these reports of inspection were received through the courtesy of the committee
members. All report-books required to be kept at the mine were examined regularly
and were found to be in order.
The mine was inspected on sixty-two occasions during the year.
NICOLA-PRINCETON INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
E. R. Hughes.
Five collieries operated in this district during the year and were as follows: The
Granby Colliery of the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company,
Ltd.; the Middlesboro Colliery, at Merritt, B.C.; the Princeton Tulameen Coal Company, Ltd., at Princeton, B.C.; the Tulameen Coal Mines, Ltd., at Princeton, B.C.; and
the Hat Creek Coal Mine, near Ashcroft, B.C. Prospect operations were carried on by
the Inland Collieries, Ltd., near Merritt, and a small amount of prospecting was done
near Princeton by Chas. Jackson, of Kelowna. There were no fatal accidents in the coal
mines of this district during the year.
The output for the year was less than that recorded for last year. The reduction
being chiefly due to the loss of market sustained by the closing-down of the Coalmont
Colliery during 1940. This market has not been diverted to any other mines in the
district. The production from the Middlesboro Colliery remained about the same as
last year whilst the Princeton Tulameen Coal Company showed a slight increase. A
new producer during the year was the Tulameen Coal Mines, Limited, who commenced
mining coal from the No. 3 mine; this being adjacent to the underground operations of
the abandoned No. 2 mine formerly worked by the Tulameen Collieries, Limited. The
old No. 2 mine closed down during 1936. The production from the Granby Colliery was
slightly less than during 1940; this being partly due to increased efficiency of the
Granby power plant, which takes almost the entire output of the mine, and partly due
to coal for this plant being purchased from other sources. The small coal mine at
Hat Creek showed a slight improvement in output.
Gr nb  C n   rd ted ^u^an **• Beaty, President, New York;   A. S. Baillie, Vice-President
M^ ft P Co ' Ltd   anc*   General   Manager,   Copper   Mountain,   B.C.;    W.   R.   Lindsay,
" Assistant General Manager, Allenby, B.C.;   W. I. Nelson, General
Superintendent, Copper Mountain, B.C. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 119
Granby Colliery, No. 1 Mine.—Mine Manager, Thos. M. Wilson; Overman, A.
McKendrick;  Firebosses, T. Cunliff, F. Bond, A. Hilton, D. Jones, and T. Lloyd.
The No. 1 mine is about 6 miles west of Princeton, off the Hope-Princeton Highway. Almost all the output from this mine is used at the company's steam electric
power plant near Princeton, which supplies the power requirements at the Copper
Mountain mining operation, the concentrator at Allenby, and at the coal mine.
The coal is transported from the mine by auto-trucks to a point near Princeton,
from where it is carried across the Similkameen River by an aerial tram to the power
plant. The total power capacity of this plant is approximately 17,500 kilowatts. For
this coal haulage, three 9-ton trucks, one of which has a 12-ton trailer, are used.
The seam being worked has an average pitch of 27 degrees and mining is carried
on by the pillar-and-stall system; the coal being carried from the working-faces by
chutes to the different haulage-levels. With the exception of the main underground
electric hoist, all the underground power is from compressed air.
All mining is done by means of Ingersoll-Rand post-type punching-machines, of
which fourteen are in use. The types used are the R-37 and R-47. Power for the
mine is developed by an electrically operated Ingersoll-Rand Imperial No. 10 compressor, having a capacity of 1,200 cubic feet of free air per minute, with a pressure
of 90 lb.    The surface plant and tipple is electrically operated.
The mine is divided into two main ventilation splits; the North split supplying
30,000 cubic feet of air per minute for the use of thirteen men and the South split
supplying 25,000 cubic feet per minute for the use of twenty-two men; each split has
a separate fan. Air sample analyses show a methane content of 0.03 per cent, in the
return air.
On August 1st signs of incipient heating were discovered in the abandoned gob
area in the upper side of No. 1 South level. This area was safely and efficiently sealed
off. With a view to preventing further heating in other abandoned parts of the mine,
an extensive programme of sealing was undertaken during the year, with the result
that all the old workings on the North side of the mine were sealed with block stoppings; twelve seals were required to complete this work. As pillars are being drawn
sealing operations follow immediately. All abandoned workings are now permanently
sealed.
Granby Colliery, No. 2 Mine.—Mine Manager, Thos. M. Wilson. This development
mine was closed down during the month of April, but is being held in reserve if further
production is required.
E. W. Hamber, President, Vancouver, B.C.;  Miss E. McDonald, Secre-
Middlesboro     tary, Vancouver, B.C.; Robert Fairfoull, Superintendent, Merritt, B.C.
Collieries, Ltd.    This colliery is on a branch of the Kettle Valley Railway about 1 mile
from Merritt and consists of No. 2 South, No. 2 South Extension, No. 3
North, and Prospect mines.    Plant and equipment have been described in previous
reports and there have been no changes during the year.    Eighty-three men were
employed.
No. 2 South Mine.—Manager, Robert Fairfoull; Overman, James Fairfoull; Firebosses, W. Ewart and Thos. Rowbottom. There was no new development in this mine
during the year and all the coal produced was taken from pillars. During my inspection conditions were found to be generally satisfactory. The roadways and timbering
were found to be in good condition. All parts examined were found to be generally well
treated with inert dust. This mine is ventilated by natural means and the air measurement taken during the last inspection in 1941 was 4,050 cubic feet of air passing per
minute for the use of fourteen men and one horse.
No. 2 South Extension Mine.—Manager, Robert Fairfoull; Overman, James Fairfoull; Fireboss, L. Dickie. The Main level of this mine was extended a distance of
300 feet during the year. A slope from the Main level was driven a distance of 300
feet. These were the only developments to record. General conditions were found to
be satisfactory during the inspections made at this mine. The ventilation is by natural
means and the last air measurement taken during the year showed 10,200 cubic feet of
air passing per minute for the use of eighteen men and two horses. Analyses of the air
showed a methane content of 0.06 per cent. A 120 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
No. 3 North Mine.—Manager, Robert Fairfoull; Overman, A. Allen; Firebosses,
G. Corbett and R. Dunnigan. The only work done during the year at this mine was
pillar-extraction. This mine is rapidly coming to a close and the available coal will
probably be exhausted during the forthcoming year. A fan is used to assist ventilation
during part of the year, but during the winter months natural ventilation is found to
be sufficient. The last air measurement taken during the year was of the natural
ventilation, which showed 5,250 cubic feet of air passing per minute for the use of ten
men.    Analyses of the air showed a methane content of 0.04 per cent.
Prospect Mine.—Manager, Robert Fairfoull; Fireboss, G. Corbett. This is a
small prospect operation situated approximately half a mile east of the company's office
at Middlesboro and about 200 yards west of the original No. 2 mine portal. Work on
this prospect began during September and ended during the latter part of December
when a second opening to the surface had been made. Ventilation was by natural
means.    Two men were employed underground.
Inland Collieries.—Company office, c/o Grossman & Holland, Stock Exchange Building, Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.    Manager, Francis Glover, Merritt, B.C.
A7o. 3 North Prospect Mine.—This is a small prospect operation in the side of a dry
creek situated about 10 miles by road in a south-easterly direction from the city of
Merritt. A tunnel was driven into the hillside a distance of about 140 feet and except
for a very thin lens of coal, no workable seam was encountered. Conditions were found
to be generally satisfactory.    Three men were employed.
Owned by L. D. and A. A. Leonard, Ashcroft, B.C.    This mine is near
Hat Creek Coal   Upper Hat Creek and about 30 miles from Ashcroft.    Only two men
Mine. are employed underground during the winter season;   the coal being
taken by truck to Ashcroft, Lillooet, and Kamloops for domestic purposes. During the latter part of the year several hundred tons of slack, some of which
had been lying in the mine yard for several years, were picked up and sold to the Epsom
salts factory at Ashcroft. This slack is being used for steam-raising. Conditions
were found to be generally satisfactory. The ventilation is by natural means. The
last air measurement taken showed 5,250 cubic feet of air passing per minute for the
use of two men.
Guy F. Atkinson, President, San Francisco, California;   George H.
Princeton       Atkinson, Vice-President, San Francisco, California;   W. D. Seaman,
Tulameen Coal    Secretary-Treasurer, Princeton, B.C.;  James Taylor, Manager, Prince-
Co., Ltd.        ton, B.C.;   Ben Cheetham, Robert Gourlay, and Andrew Dean, Firebosses.    This company operates the Princeton Tulameen No. 1 mine,
formerly known as the Lind mine, situated about 1 mile west of Princeton.    The mine
is developed from a Main slope driven from the outcrop on a pitch of 16 degrees for
a distance of 1,280 feet.    Levels have been driven off this slope to the east and west,
the usual pillar-and-stall method being followed in developing the field.    Development-
work during the year was concentrated on the Nos. 13, 14, and 15 Right levels;   these
levels were advanced approximately 1,000 feet each, with the necessary connecting
crosscuts.    All coal production during the year was from this development-work.
A Diesel electric power plant supplies the power requirements of the mine. All
coal is mined by Ingersoll-Rand post-type punching-machines, three of these machines
being in use.
The mine is ventilated by a 48-inch Aerodyne-type fan. The last air measurement
taken during December showed 37,500 cubic feet of air passing per minute for the use
of twenty-five men.    Analyses of the air showed a methane content of 0.1 per cent.
A Lidgerwood hoist was installed at the surface to hoist coal from the mine. This
hoist replaced a smaller installation which had proved inadequate for the mine output
during the winter months.
The screening plant includes one 3- by 6-foot double-deck Niagara vibrating screen;
one ordinary shaking screen, 4 feet wide, in two sections; also two screens, 11 feet and
6 feet in length.
The coal produced at this mine supplies most of the domestic requirements in the
Princeton district and is also shipped to Vancouver and Interior points. The coal
shipped by rail is taken from the mine to the shipping bunker situated near the Kettle INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 121
Valley Railway station at Princeton by an 8-ton capacity International truck.    During
the winter season sixty-six men are employed at this mine.
Head  Office,  716  Hall  Building,  Vancouver,   B.C.;    Mine   Overman,
Tulameen       David M. Francis;   Fireboss, T. Bryden.    This company operates the
Collieries, Ltd.    Tulameen No. 3 mine, which is about 2 miles west of the town of
Princeton. During the year a new main haulage-tunnel was driven
on a 2-per-cent. grade and the mine-track laid straight from this portal to the tipple;
thus greatly facilitating the handling of coal. The tipple is at the side of the Kettle
Valley Railway, from which a spur is extended.
The underground workings of this mine are close to the abandoned working of the
old Tulameen No. 2 mine and for this reason a considerable amount of precautionary
advance drilling has had to be done. Contact with the old workings was made by means
of a drill-hole on November 20th and a few days later a full-sized opening was effected;
this opening was then sealed because of the large quantity of methane given off from
the old workings. A second opening will be made on the west side of the mine which
will then provide the necessary means of ventilating the old workings. At the end of
the year the west side contact had not been made.
Mine ventilation is provided by a Sheldon fan which was moved from the old No. 2
mine and erected in its present position during the year. The last air measurement
taken during December showed 10,500 cubic feet of air per minute passing for the use
of seven men.    Analysis of the return air showed a methane content of 0.09 per cent.
Black Mine.—The only work done at this mine was the shipment of a 30-ton car-load
of coal during the month of May.
Owned by Chas. Jackson, Kelowna, B.C.    This new prospect operation
Jackson Prospect, is about 6 miles by road in a south-westerly direction from Princeton.
The workings consist of several open-cuts and an exploratory shaft
about 15 feet in depth. No coal was produced during the year and the work done was
in a burned-out portion of one of the Princeton seams. A number of coal-seam outcrops
in this area have undergone metamorphism, being near to the volcanics on the western
rim of the Princeton coal area.
NORTHERN INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
Charles Graham.
F. M. Dockrill, President;   A. H. Dockrill, Fireboss.    The property is
Bulkley Valley    on Goat Creek, a tributary of Telkwa River, about 7 miles from Telkwa,
Collieries.       to which point coal is hauled by truck.    The market is chiefly domestic
and confined,  by transportation  costs,  to the area between  Prince
Rupert and McBride, along the line of the Canadian National Railway.
No methane in explosive quantity was detected during the year, but a gas-cap,
about Yi inch, was found on two occasions. About 4,200 cubic feet of air per minute
was passing through the mine for the use of nine men. A total of twelve men were
employed.
A Siskol coal-cutter was introduced during the year.    Due to a series of faults,
further projection of the main slope was abandoned and the extraction of pillar was
commenced.    Operations in this area are now confined to the extraction of the pillars.
A new operation known as No. 2 slope has been started to the north of No. 1 slope,
and is now being developed.    The mine only operates single shift.
George Yardley, President;  J. M. Wilson, Fireboss.    This property is
Aveling Coal     located on the north bank of Telkwa River, about 6.5 miles from the
Co., Ltd.        railroad at Telkwa, to which point coal is hauled by truck.    There
are two main seams of coal on the property, known as the " Betty "
and " Major " seams.
Betty Seam.—This is the lowest seam and a slope is being driven north-east from
the outcrop in the river-bank.    The seam shows a fine section of coal at this point as A 122 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
follows: Roof, shale; coal, 2 feet; hard shale, 1.5 inches; coal (blacksmith), 3 feet
4 inches; parting; coal, 3 feet 5 inches; shale, 1.5 inches; coal, 3 feet 8 inches; shale,
8 inches;  coal, 4 feet;  floor, shale.
The top 2 feet of coal and the shale band is left on as roof. The blacksmith section
is mined separately, crushed to size and shipped as a blacksmith coal; 320 tons being
shipped during the year.
There is a distinct parting between the blacksmith and the next section, which is
7 feet 1 inch in thickness and is mined as domestic. It has a shale band 1% inches in
thickness in the centre of the section. The lower section of shale, 8 inches, and coal,
4 feet, is not mined at present.
The slope is down 200 feet, development being slow owing to only one shift working,
and that only when business offered, very little being done during the summer.
There was a bridge across the river at this point but this was washed out during
high water about four years ago and has not been rebuilt. Bunkers were built on the
south side and an aerial tram stretched across the river from the mine portal to the
bunkers.
There is a fault running about parallel with the slope on the north side which
limits, for the present, the area that can be worked to the north. The Telkwa River
limits the area to the south of the slope until such time as sufficient depth is attained to
make a crossing under the river possible. At present, only two places can be worked,
the slope and a crosscut to the north to the fault.
Major Seam.—Nothing has been done in the Major seam since the bridge was
washed out and nothing can be done there until the bridge is rebuilt. No methane has
been seen at any time.    Four men are employed underground and two on the surface.
EAST KOOTENAY INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
H. E. Miard.
During the year coal-mining operations in the Crowsnest district were restricted
to the Coal Creek and Michel collieries of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Ltd.
The greatly enlarged demand for coal and coke induced feverish activity at both properties, the combined output of which (loss in washing being deducted) amounted to
977,388 long tons, this exceeding the total production recorded in the district for any
similar period since the year 1914. The production of coke amounted to 83,954 tons.
In addition to the foregoing, 1,197 tons of slack taken from the stock pile at Corbin were
hauled by road to McGillivray and shipped to the Trail smelter.
Three fatal accidents occurred in the district in the course of the year, two at Coal
Creek and one at Michel. The first resulted from a heavy roadway " bump," another
was caused by a runaway trip of mine-cars, and the third was due to a fall of rib coal
in a working-place. They are described in detail elsewhere in this report. Of the 281
accidents, entailing disablement lasting from five to 294 days, investigated in the period
under consideration, 247 occurred underground and thirty-four on the surface. In
addition, ten mishaps, as results of which personal injuries were sustained by men
employed at the timber camps and the sawmill operated by the company, were recorded
at this office but were not investigated. At the end of the year, eight men who had
already lost a considerable amount of time were still off work on account of injuries
sustained in the course of their employment. Close consideration of the circumstances
having surrounded these occurrences evokes the now trite but none the less sad comment
that the majority of them was undoubtedly avoidable.
Hartley P. Wilson, Fernie, President and General Manager;   Thomas
Crow's Nest Pass Balmer, Seattle, Wash., U.S.A., Vice-President;  D. M. Mitchell, Fernie,
Coal Co., Ltd.    Secretary;   James M. Marshall, Fernie, Treasurer;   William C. Whit-
taker, Fernie, Mining and Construction Engineer;   Bernard Caufield,
Colliery Manager, Michel;  and James Littler, Colliery Manager, Coal Creek. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 123
Coal Creek Colliery, No. 1 East Mine.—James Littler, Manager; John Caufield,
Overman. This was the only mine active in the course of the year. On the south side
of the gulch prospecting operations continued through the greater part of the same
period, this involving the driving of three small adits with an aggregate length of some
350 feet. With a total working force of 177 men, the output amounted to 174,813 long
tons for 215 days of operation.
The development of a new district, on the East side of the main entry, was undertaken in the second half of the year. There, the general conditions are similar to those
found in the area in which active operations have been concentrated for several years.
However, even with this addition to the ground made accessible, it seems that, should
the present rate of extraction be maintained, the sections at present in operation may
last much less than two years. After that, it will be necessary to modify the method
of working, so as to adapt it to natural conditions differing widely from those under
which operations have been conducted since 1935. There is an enormous reserve of
coal, standing in large blocks, outby the sections now active, but a thick bed of shale
under the main roof and the presence of an erratic band of rashings in the seam will
demand some radical alterations of the present operating practice in order to adjust it
to the requirements of the area in question.
The chief difficulty encountered here, and one which may be considered as containing all the others in itself, is the marked tendency of some of the measures to retain
accumulated stresses; these being eventually liberated suddenly and giving rise to the
now well-known phenomena called " bumps " in coal mines. Eighteen such occurrences
were recorded in the course of the year. The theory regarding the origin of these
manifestations expounded in former reports gains credence with almost each additional
one observed, as far as its basic principles are concerned; but the practical application
of an effective remedy remains perforce a semi-empirical matter. However, it is
generally admitted that unpleasant consequences are liable to follow swiftly any serious
deviation from certain principles now solidly established here as well as abroad. Chief
among these axiomatic rules are: The provision of ample room for the displacement of
any stratum yielding by deformation under pressure; having all faces advancing in
the same general direction and, approximately, lying on what may be called the same
general " front " line or lines (whether straight or curved matters little, provided that
no prominent angles are formed) ; with, finally, strict avoidance of long unbroken
pillars following the strike of the seam. Occasionally, operating difficulties may prevent complete adherence to one of these principles and, sometimes, the occurrence of
more or less severe " bumps " can be linked with such departure from the planned
course of action.
Some of the shocks experienced underground were accompanied by earth tremors
felt at Fernie and, in at least one instance, certain slight irregularities, observed in
the records obtained from automatic devices in use at the Elko power plant, seemed to
have been due to the same cause. The opinion that the appearance of these phenomena
is usually coincident with periods of seismic activity in the Rocky Mountains region is
being slowly confirmed by experience.
Another feature of the problem, to which perhaps too little attention has been paid
in the past, is the fact that the actual release of stresses does not forcibly take place
over the point at which damage is caused, but may occur at a considerable distance
from it and, according to the somewhat confusing evidence available, generally on its
dip side. In other words, the earth wave set up travels through the strata, sustaining
perhaps a certain amount of deformation according to the nature of the rocks traversed,
until it breaks into openings with enormously increased velocity. It is probably for
similar reasons that, in some well authenticated instances, earthquake shocks which had
passed unnoticed in neighbouring mines were felt sharply on the surface.
The extremely troublesome and onerous heaving of the floor in roadways, incident
to the slow re-establishment of stress equilibria disturbed by mining operations, cannot
be prevented. Where sufficiently rapid this may lead to the dissipation of stresses
which, otherwise, would probably find release in the form of a " bump." Movements
of roof-shales are due to the same cause but are much slower. In No. 1 East it has
been found advantageous to drive a so-called " sacrifice " road, on the dip side of an A 124 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
opening which it was intended to maintain permanently, and separated from it by a
pillar of only moderate thickness. All timber is subsequently withdrawn from the
former place, in order to allow the immediate roof to fall in and facilitate the expansion
of the shale band overlying the coal.
The ventilation of the abandoned workings, on the East side of the mine (which
cover a much greater area than the parts of it at present in operation), was rearranged
with highly beneficial results early in the year. Rising temperatures observed previously at a couple of points remained stationary and later began to decrease. A
remarkable feature of the area in question is the low moisture content of the air, the
relative humidity, at the point at which the worst conditions are existing in this respect,
being only 58 per cent.
As was to be expected, one of the immediate results of more intensive operation
was an appreciable increase in the methane content of the mine-air and, in order to
counteract this, the speed of the fan was increased sufficiently to raise the ventilating
pressure from 1.9 to 2.7 inches. At the time of the December inspection the air
measurements taken were as follows:—Total quantity passed by fan: 83,000 cubic feet
per minute; 26 West district—11,800 cubic feet per minute for the use of twenty-one
men and five horses; 28 West district—23,900 cubic feet per minute for forty-three
men and five horses; 20 East section (abandoned)—5,600 cubic feet per minute; 10,14,
and 16 East sections (abandoned)—17,000 cubic feet per minute; the secondary
measurements accounting for nearly 70 per cent, of the total quantity. In the course
of the year, 168,000 lb. of limestone dust and 54,000 lb. of flue dust were applied to the
mine roadways.
The coal is mined almost exclusively by means of pneumatic picks and is carried
away from the faces by trough-conveyers, except in development places, in which it is
loaded directly into mine-cars. No explosives are used in coal at any time, and it is
only exceptionally that a hole charged with CXL-ite has to be fired in rock. A total of
75 lb. of this explosive was used in the course of the year, very nearly all of it in
prospecting operations on the surface.
The only addition of any importance made to the plant in the period under consideration was a new coal-bin erected near the boiler-house to replace a framed timber
structure, 36 years old, the stability of which had become highly doubtful.
Michel Colliery.—Bernard Caufield, Manager; William Chapman, Assistant Manager; Walter McKay, William Gregory, and Wm. Hy. Adams, Overmen. This operation accounted for 80 per cent, of the coal produced in the district, exceeding its own
output for the previous twelve months by 29% per cent, and maintained the only
coking plant active during the year. The colliery, operated on 293 days in the course
of the year, employed a total of 744 men, 624 underground and 120 on the surface.
Prospecting operations on the north-east side of the gulch led to the discovery of
a seam of coal which, before winter compelled temporary abandonment, had been penetrated over a distance of more than 300 feet by a narrow drift started at an elevation
of some 600 feet above the railway. Its correlation with those developed up to the
present time has not yet been definitely established.
In the early part of the year a 5- by 7-foot Keith-Sheldon fan, with steel housing
and a concrete duct, was put into service and is now ventilating the workings of " A "
seam. A large, one-story concrete building, the construction of which had begun late
in the previous year, was also completed. This includes, besides a garage of sufficient
dimensions to house all the motor-vehicles in use at the colliery, a tool-sharpening shop,
a plumber-shop, a first-aid room, and a storage-room for mine-rescue apparatus. The
former lamp-room, remodelled and enlarged, became a well-appointed workshop for the
electricians. Several frame structures, the usefulness of which came to an end with •
the completion of the building programme, were demolished; this eliminating a by no
means negligible fire risk and improving considerably the general appearance of the
plant. Very satisfactory heating and ventilating equipment was installed in the
wash-house.
Roof measures are not particularly strong in general and, at least in the case of
parts of " B " seam, the irregularities known as " pot-holes " appear with almost
incredible frequency.    There seems to be a result of stresses thrown upon imperfectly INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 125
consolidated rock formations by flexion of the measures while the coal was still in a
highly plastic condition. The inclination of the seams in the North and South sections,
often exceeding 35 degrees, tends to complicate the planning of development-work and
the subsequent handling of the output, as it compels the driving of roadways much
longer than would be necessary otherwise in order to open a given area of any seam.
" A " Seam.—Walter McKay, Overman. This has been the most important single
source of the colliery's output for some time. The thickness of the upper section of
the seam, in which the present workings are situated, ranges from 8 to 14 feet and the
coal is mined chiefly by means of pneumatic picks, although a few of the long-wall faces
have been undercut by machines sporadically. Explosives are very seldom required.
The roof is of an irregular nature and often weak, this necessitating some care in
timbering. The workings are divided into four sections—East, West, North, and
South; the greater part of the output being at present derived from the first two, in
which long-wall retreating is the method of extraction, only development-work being in
progress in the others. The coal is carried away from the faces by shaking-conveyers
discharging into belts in the case of the East and West districts and into mine-cars in
that of development-work in the balance of the mine.
These workings, with those of the North and South sections of No. 1 seam, are
ventilated by the fan installed in the course of last winter. The air supplied enters
partly through the main haulage-road of the colliery and partly through a separate
intake. Owing to this arrangement, the fluctuations due to changes in the surface
temperature are less pronounced than they are in the case of the ventilation of workings situated in the overlying " B " seam. The measurements taken at the time of
the December inspections were as follows:—In fan drift: 61,800 cubic feet per minute,
against a water-gauge of 2.25 inches; "A" East and "A" West: 19,450 cubic feet
per minute for the use of fifty-seven men and five horses; North and South sections,
in No. 1 and " A " seams: 40,600 cubic feet per minute for sixty-seven men and four
horses.
" B " Seam.—William Gregory, Overman. Until the present time, the output
from these workings has been only slightly less than that obtained from " A " seam.
The moderate thickness of the coal, this ranging from 4 to 6 feet, renders development-
work here considerably more onerous than it is in the neighbouring seam, in so far as
a much larger area must be opened in order to render the same tonnage available, and
in the case of haulage-roads, a considerable amount of rock-work is entailed. The coal
is undercut by radial machines in the case of narrow work and with chain-cutters at
long-wall faces, it being subsequently blasted in the former case, a procedure necessary
only in exceptional circumstances in the other.
The method of working followed is a retreating long-wall system, with abandonment in the goaf of so-called " sacrifice " pillars regulating the rupture of the roof.
This is generally weak and, in the West section in particular, is a favourite habitat of
" pot-holes," demanding the utmost care in timbering. Except in the case of a few
development places, the entire output is carried away from the faces by conveyers discharging into belts in the greater part of the East section and directly into mine-cars
in the rest of the mine.
The workings are divided into three districts, East, West, and South, each ventilated by a separate current of air. Surface temperatures are exerting a considerable
influence upon the quantity circulating in at least two of these splits, an effect of
physical laws which it has been found difficult to counteract successfully up to the
present time and which renders one of the intakes useless in the winter season.
The air measurements taken in the course of the December inspections were as
follows: East side, 11,120 cubic feet per minute for the use of thirty-five men and
three horses; West side, 14,160 cubic feet per minute for the use of thirty-one men and
two horses; South side, 13,000 cubic feet per minute for twenty-three men and two
horses. In the West district, operations are now limited to the extraction of pillars
along the former main roadways.
No. 1 Seam.—William H. Adams, Overman. Only three small sections of this
seam were in operation in the course of the year. In No. 1 West two slopes were driven
for a short distance and rooms were turned off them, but, as these workings were
10 A 126 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
entering a zone lying below the elevation of the water flooding the abandoned slope
section of the underlying No. 3 mine, it would have been necessary to pump out the
latter. It was found inadvisable to undertake this operation, as the limited supply of
labour available precluded the consideration of an extensive programme of development,
and the work already done was abandoned in consequence.
Only development-work was carried out in the North and South sections. These
have a weak roof and considerable side-pressure is experienced at some points. Both
are ventilated by " A " seam fan, while No. 1 West is at present acting as an ancillary
intake.
No. 3 Mine.—William H. Adams, Overman. Here, the end of the year saw the
final abandonment of the No. 12 Incline district, which had been the most important
section of the mine during the past few years, and all operations are now limited to the
extraction of pillars along the West level and in the No. 4 Incline district. Only a few
working-places can be maintained at one time in each case and the days of the mine
are now numbered, although a not inconsiderable tonnage of coal of the highest quality
can possibly still be recovered.
Abandoned sections of the mine become speedily filled with an extinctive mixture
consisting mostly of excess nitrogen and never carrying more than a surprisingly low
percentage of methane. This absorption of oxygen by the coal is often accompanied
by an elevation of temperature in some parts of the No. 4 West district, where it proceeds apparently much more rapidly than in the No. 9 and No. 12 Inclines sections, in
which it has not been observed to make itself manifest in this manner.
At the time of the December inspection the volume of air supplied to the mine was
still reduced by means of a regulator installed in the return airway, as it had been
pending the rearrangement of the ventilation of the East and South sections of " B "
seam in the previous month. Then, 8,400 cubic feet per minute were being supplied
for thirty men and five horses, this being sufficient to maintain satisfactory conditions.
Since then, necessary improvements having been effected in the sections aforesaid, this
quantity has been more than doubled without any apparent adverse influence upon the
ventilation of the " B " seam workings.
No. 3 fan, now ventilating only No. 3 mine and the " B " seam workings, was then
passing 89,300 cubic feet of air per minute, against a water-gauge of 3.1 inch. The
two main crosscut adits of the colliery intersect abandoned workings of three separate
seams and, as these reach the outcrop at many points, there is some opportunity for a
considerable amount of leakage, not only between airways, but also directly from the
surface. Effective means of eliminating this loss have been under consideration for
some time.
No. 2 Seam.—Some development-work carried on desultorily in this part of the
colliery, on a very small scale, was finally abandoned; difficult ground met at some
points and a dearth of trained miners combining to induce this decision. Work still in
progress in this part of the colliery is limited to the recovery of equipment.
No. 3 East Mine.—The fire, on account of which this part of the colliery was sealed
off several years ago, gave some indications of its being still smouldering, at a point
remote from its origin, when smoke and some products of coal distillation appeared
slightly above the outcrop of the seam in the vicinity of the old No. 4 mine. These
symptoms subsided promptly as soon as air had been excluded effectively from the rock-
exposure in which they had appeared. Otherwise, samples of the mixture of gases
filling the area affected indicated the existence of desirable conditions; i.e., very low
oxygen content and an extremely small percentage of methane with, only occasionally,
mere traces of other inflammable gases.
In the course of the year 418,100 lb. of limestone dust were applied to the roadways
of the colliery. The consumption of explosives, for all purposes, amounted to 53,192 lb.
(48,842 lb. of Monobel No. 4 and 4,350 lb. of CXL-ite No. 2) in 72,540 shots, of which
ten missed fire. This does not equal the record established in 1938, when the percentage of miss-fires was little more than 0.01, but may nevertheless be looked upon as
being satisfactory.
Monthly inspections of all working-parts of both collieries were made regularly by
committees of workmen appointed under the provisions of General Rule 37.    With the exception of one or two instances in which some strengthening of timber was recommended, the reports made after such inspections stated that satisfactory conditions
had been found to prevail in the workings visited, and no dangerous conditions were
reported to this office in pursuance of the provisions of General Rule aforesaid. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES.
BY
James Dickson.
PRODUCTION.
The output for metalliferous mines for 1941 was 7,956,284 tons. This tonnage
was produced from 200 mines, of which ninety-six produced 100 tons or more.
FATAL ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES   (INCLUDING
UNDERGROUND PLACER-MINING).
There were twelve fatal accidents in and around metalliferous mines and concentrators in 1941, being an increase of three over that of 1940. In addition to this
there were two fatalities in placer-workings and one quarry fatality for the Province.
There were 5,724 persons under and above ground in the metalliferous mines and
1,025 persons in the concentrators in 1941. The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000
persons employed was 1.77 compared with 1.27 in 1940.
The tonnage mined per fatal accident during 1941 was 663,023 tons compared
with 891,848 tons in 1940. The tonnage mined per fatal accident during the last
ten-year period was 419,747 tons.
The following table shows the mines at which fatal accidents occurred during
1941 and the comparative figures for 1940:—
Mine.
No. of Accidents.
Mining Division.
1941.
1940.
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
Copper Mountain 	
Nickel Plate   ....
1
Osoyoos.— —   	
2
1
1
Sheep Creek Gold        	
Gold Belt    	
1
Surf Inlet -	
1
1
Totals          	
12
9
The following table shows the causes of, the percentages to the whole of the fatal
accidents, and comparative figures for 1940:—   •
Cause.
1941.
1940.
No.
Percentage.
No.
Percentage.
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
16.67
8.33
16.67
8.33
8.33
16.67
8.33
8.33
8.33
3
2
2
1
33.34
22.22
22.22
22.22
Totals	
12
100.00
"
100.00 INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. A 129
FATAL ACCIDENTS IN LODE MINES, PLACER MINES,
PROSPECTING, AND QUARRYING.
There were fifteen fatalities during 1941 in all phases of mining; of these,
twelve occurred at producing metalliferous mines, two at placer operations, and one
at a quarry.
In most cases ordinary care would have averted these fatalities, as they occurred
when the surrounding circumstances were normal.
Following are the details of the fatal accidents in lode mines:—
The fatal accident which occurred to Richard Unrou, miner, Bralorne Mines,
Limited, on January 5th was due to a fall of rock from the hanging-wall in a stope.
Deceased was engaged at the time in putting sprags in place for a drilling platform
and had already set a sprag against the slab of rock which fell on him and had a second
sprag in his arms when found. Another miner drilling within 40 feet from deceased
and within sight of him did not see the accident but had spoken to him some few
minutes before it occurred. Deceased had the reputation of being an exceptionally
careful miner.
The fatal accident which occurred to John Boic, miner, Britannia Mining and
Smelting Company, Limited, on January 25th was due to deceased falling through
a grizzly. Deceased was engaged at the time in placing a bulldoze charge in a hang-up
in the raise above the grizzly and had spit the fuse. Apparently he tripped and
stumbled when turning away from the raise and fell into an open compartment of
the grizzly. The Special Rules in force at this mine require grizzlies to be covered
by planks or other material, except when the men are barring or shovelling into the
grizzly.
The fatal accident which occurred to Archibald D. Macdougall, mining engineer,
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Limited, on January 30th was due to deceased being overcome by carbon monoxide in an atmosphere that was also deficient in oxygen. Macdougall and another engineer were engaged in examining a part of the mine that
had been temporarily abandoned for a number of months and both men had been
instructed to keep together while making this examination. However, Macdougall,
who was the senior engineer, decided that they would each examine different parts
and they separated for this purpose.
When Macdougall failed to come out of the mine at lunch-time a search was made
and he was found unconscious about 15 feet up the manway leading to one of the
stopes off the main level of this part of the mine. Compressed air had to be blown
up the manway to provide necessary ventilation before Macdougall could be brought
down. This was accomplished in four or five minutes. Artificial respiration was
immediately started and was maintained for four hours, but deceased did not respond.
Analyses of air samples taken in this manway following the accident showed the following constituents in the atmosphere: Carbon monoxide 0.57 per cent., carbon dioxide
0.92 per cent., oxygen 15.24 per cent., and nitrogen 83.79 per cent. There can be no
doubt that prior to blowing compressed air to permit the recovery of the body the
atmosphere would be still more deadly than existing at the time of sampling. The
high carbon monoxide and low oxygen content in conjunction with the exertion of
climbing the manway would make such an atmosphere immediately fatal.
The fatal accident which occurred to Michael M. Preston, electric locomotive
driver, Surf Inlet Consolidated Mines, Limited, on March 27th was due to deceased
falling from a trestle near the portal of the mine. Deceased had brought his locomotive, with several empty cars ahead, from the waste dump on the surface to where
some other empty cars were standing on the trestle and apparently the impact when
the empty cars were contacted was sufficient to derail the moving cars and the locomotive, all of which went over the trestle and fell a distance of 20 feet. Deceased fell
clear of the train but sustained head injuries from which he died on the following day.
Apparently deceased allowed his train to attain a speed that, under the circumstances,
was too high.
The fatal accident which occurred to John Cardno, miner, Britannia Mining and
Smelting Company, Limited, on April 19th was due to blasting.    Deceased was in A 130 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1941.
charge of one of the bulldoze chambers and at the time of the accident was dealing
with a hang-up in the chute by blasting by means of a 100-lb. charge of powder in
four bundles of 25 lb. each. These bundles had to be placed in position by means of
two 14-foot bulldoze sticks nailed end to end. When placing the last bundle, which
contained the primer and a 5-foot fuse, the fuse spit before the bundle was hoisted
by the bulldoze sticks and difficulty was experienced in placing the charge, with the
result that deceased and his helper were still at the foot of the raise when the charge
went off. Deceased was instantly killed but the helper escaped with minor injuries.
A longer fuse should have been used or else the charge fired by electrical means.
The fatal accident which occurred to John Guger, skip-tender, Gold Belt Mining
Company, on May 8th was due to deceased being struck on the head by a hammer.
He was engaged in loading a service skip at the foot of a raise which also contained
an ore-chute. At the time of the accident the ore had hung up in the chute at the
level above and a man was using an 8-lb. hammer at this point in an attempt to jar the
ore loose. The hammer slipped from his hand and fell down the skipway and struck
deceased. Deceased was wearing a safety hat but it was completely crushed by the
force of the blow.
The fatal accident which occurred to John P. Fitzpatrick, brakeman, Britannia
Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, on May 19th was due to deceased being
crushed between a moving car and part of the chute structure. Apparently the car
caught some part of deceased's clothing and carried him along to the point where he
was crushed. This is a main loading-point for the ore trains and the starting and
stopping of the cars under the loading-chute is by signal. Deceased should have
waited for the train to stop before approaching.
The fatal accident which occurred to Walter Phillips, electrician, Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited, on May 20th was due to deceased falling from a ladder
on the surface. Deceased was working from a ladder which rested against a cross-
piece between two poles. The cross-piece broke and deceased fell 30 feet and sustained
injuries from which he died on May 29th.
The fatal accident which occurred to Louis Sollinger, mucker, Cariboo Gold
Quartz Mining Company, Limited, on June 29th was due to deceased being struck on
the head by a piece of broken steel which fell down a raise. Deceased was engaged
in loading blasting-supplies in a small service skip at the bottom of the raise after the
round had been drilled. While the miners were drilling the round one of the drill-
steels had broken and one of the broken parts had not been located. Apparently this
part had stuck somewhere in the raise and later fell on deceased with above result.
The fatal accident which occurred to James Fulton, barman, Sullivan Mine, Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, on November 19th was
due to a fall of ground. Deceased and others were engaged in barring ground that
had been blasted when a large slab of ground that had just been examined and considered safe fell and killed him instantly and slightly injured two other men. Deceased
was an experienced barman and in addition to his own head-light was at the time of
the accident assisted by another man who operated a special barman's flood-light to
make this work as safe as possible.
The fatal accident which occurred to Nels Edlund, miner, Silbak Premier Mines,
Limited, on November 19th was due to falling 60 feet in a cage and sustaining
injuries from which he died two days later. Deceased and his partner were engaged
in taking supplies to a level 60 feet below by means of a shaft and small hoist which
was not used for hoisting or lowering men. Deceased had entered the cage with
a box of powder and the cage started down with him in it and struck the bottom of
the shaft with sufficient force to fatally injure him. Both deceased and his partner
were accustomed to handling this hoist, but on this occasion neither of them had ascertained whether the brake or friction control were set. The hoist and equipment were
found to be in good working order at the time of this accident.
The fatal accident which occurred to Douglas McKenzie, shiftboss, Britannia
Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, on December 20th was due to deceased falling
down a raise.    In the course of his duty, McKenzie visited two timbermen who were engaged in installing a bulkhead in a raise and were working from a staging projected
into the raise from a level. The staging was carried by two 6- by 12-inch timbers
securely anchored by means of timbers on the level but was not supported in the raise.
The timbermen reported some loose ground ahead of the staging and he went out on
the staging to examine the suspected ground with a bar after obtaining from one of
the timbermen a safety-belt and rope which he used while making the examination.
Immediately he touched the ground with the bar a large slab of rock fell out and
wrecked the staging and supporting timbers, the latter being sheared off at the collar
of the raise. Deceased jumped back towards the level but was unable to reach safety
and fell down the raise. None of the falling material struck deceased but the connecting " D " link between the safety-belt and the rope broke and allowed deceased to
fall several hundred feet. The safety-rope had approximately 10 feet of slack at this
time.    The cause of the failure of the safety equipment is being investigated.
The fatal accident which occurred to Cameron Morgan, foreman, Bullion Placers,
Limited, on June 12th was due to deceased being caught and buried by a slide of rock
and gravel from the wall of the placer pit. He had been warned in a written report
by the foreman of the previous shift of the possible danger of a slide at this point but
had apparently neglected to take the necessary precautions. It required several hours'
work on the part of the crew to recover the body.
The fatal accident which occurred to Wong Tip Lun, Chinese miner, Sang Dang
placer mine, Barkerville, on October 22nd was due to blasting. Deceased had drilled
a hole 18 inches deep in the floor of the placer pit for the purpose of making a channel
for drainage purposes. He was observed to start loading this hole a short time
before it went off and inflicted injuries from which he died shortly afterwards. As he
had not given the usual warning before a fuse is spit it is unlikely that the shot was
fired by this means.
There was one fatal accident in quarrying operations during 1941, as follows:—
The fatal accident which occurred to Nels Edberg, driller, Gilley's Quarry, Pitt
River, on January 17th was due to deceased being struck on the head by a small rock
which fell from the face of the quarry. He was running a drill at the time and had
little chance of hearing any noise being made by the rock. Blasting had been done
on the quarry-face shortly before the accident and the face had been examined and
considered safe immediately after blasting. The use of a safety-hat might have prevented this fatality.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
On January 31st, at the Sullivan Mine, Kimberley, a new hoistman was being
trained to operate the 3,901 shaft hoist and had had five weeks' training under the
supervision of an experienced hoistman. While the latter's attention was directed to
a part of the machinery that he was examining, the mucker boss stepped on to the
skip at the top landing and gave the signal to lower to one of the levels below. The
upper limit switch had been intentionally put out of service while some ore was being
hoisted previously. The new man forgot this and, besides, pulled the skip up instead
of lowering it. The mucker boss understood what was happening and climbed on the
bail, thus avoiding being thrown down into the ore-bin. No personal injuries resulted
and the new hoistman was permanently detailed to some other work.
On February 25th, while a round was being fired at the face of the 3,802 drift,
Sullivan Mine, Kimberley, a box of powder at the foot of the 3,809 raise, about 150 feet
away from the face of the drift, was exploded through some undetermined agency.
It is surmised that a piece of rock projected from one of the cut holes struck the box
with sufficient violence to explode the powder. No one was injured and the material
damage done was insignificant.
On June 14th, at Island Mountain Mine, Wells, a trestle from the mine portal to
the waste dump failed and precipitated a motorman, his motor, and train of waste
some 80 feet to the foot of the dump. The motorman was seriously injured. The
trestle was partly supported by the dump, and it is believed that the thawing-out of
the covered frozen ground caused a sudden movement of the dump and trestle. On July 2nd, during a heavy hail-storm, an ore-train on the surface at the Nickel
Plate Mine got out of control due to the wet and icy condition of the track and crashed
into the terminal dump.    Both the motorman and brakeman were injured.
On July 3rd the office at the Velvet Mine, near Rossland, was struck by lightning
and set on fire; no person was injured, but all the mine records and plans were
destroyed.
On August 2nd, at the Island Mountain Mine, Wells, while the hoisting-rope in
the main shaft was cut and shortened at the drum end, the cage was suspended from
an 8- by 8-inch spruce timber across the top of the shaft; the timber broke and the
cage fell to the bottom of the shaft.
The safety-catches on the cage were operated daily by lowering the cage on to
a timber placed across the collar of the shaft, but apparently failed on this occasion
due to excessive clearance between the catches and the guides. The teeth of the
catches were filled with wood from the guides, but, as above, did not arrest the cage.
This condition was remedied.
On September 11th the steel-shop at the Queen Mine of the Sheep Creek Consolidated Gold Mines was destroyed by fire, due to the overflowing of the gravity fuel-oil
supply on to the hot furnace. No person was injured, but as the burning steel-shop
was close to the main shaft all the underground employees were withdrawn from the
mine.
On December 14th, while two men were engaged in cleaning up the spillage in the
bottom of the 601 shaft, Silbak Premier Mine, they had the hoistman spot the skip
a few feet above the shaft-bottom, but immediately this was done the hoistman dropped
the skip and some slack rope to the bottom of the shaft and took the cage on the
opposite side up to the sheave-wheels. No person was injured. Investigation indicated that the hoistman had been partly intoxicated, but he left the district before he
could be prosecuted.
EXPLOSIVES USED IN MINING.
During 1941 the explosives used in mining and quarrying in British Columbia
consisted of 10,026,000 lb. of high explosives; 3,688,000 fuse detonators; 376,000
electric detonators; 31,000 delay detonators; 1,000 feet Primacord; and 24,698,000
feet of safety-fuse. While there were several accidents due to the use of explosives,
there were none due to faulty explosives.
Throughout the year the Inspectors of Mines were active in seeing that all stocks
of explosives at mines where work was suspended or abandoned were disposed of or
destroyed.
AIR-SAMPLING.
Air-sampling was carried out in a number of mines where heavy blasting was
carried on, or long single drifts were being driven, to determine whether carbon
monoxide or other gases were present in dangerous percentages; no dangerous conditions were indicated, except that dealt with under " fatal accidents " in another
part of this report. In a number of instances augmented ventilation was ordered by
the Inspector.
DUST AND VENTILATION.
There were several new fan installations at metalliferous mines during the year
and a noticeably increased effort generally to control the ventilating currents to the
face of drifts and stopes and to complete ventilating raises before starting stoping
operations.
It is now fully realized that adequate ventilation is the only efficient means of
quickly removing the unavoidably produced dust.
MINE-LIGHTING.
The use of the safety electric cap-lamp is standard at all the larger mines with
one exception, and many of the smaller mines have adopted this advance in safety
and efficiency. In no case where the safety electric cap-lamp has been tried has there
been a return to the carbide lamp formerly in use. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. A 133
FIRST-AID AND SAFETY WORK.
First-aid and safety work has been well maintained in all the metalliferous-
mining areas and, in addition to the work done along this line by the individual
mining companies, there are Mine Safety Associations in all the more important districts, such as East Kootenay, Princeton, Britannia, Bridge River, Zeballos, and Portland Canal. These associations draw their membership from the mine officials and
miners interested in safety in the different areas, and are financially assisted in this
work by the Department of Mines.
The value of safety committees at the larger mines is recognized as an important
factor in making for general safety and they are well supported by the managements
of the mines. As the members of these safety committees are selected from different
parts of a mine and serve for only short periods, this permits a large number of men
being brought directly into contact with this work, so that many of them continue to
point out potential dangers to their fellow-employees after their official membership
on the safety committee has ended. These safety committees, with their personal
knowledge of the mine in which they are employed, are in a position to note and report
minor defects as they arise and have these matters remedied before they become a contributing factor in an accident. As many of the experienced men have left the mines
to work in the various war industries and many of the younger men have joined the
Forces, the only replacements are from men who have had no previous experience
underground. By personal contact and guidance the members of the safety committees
can do much to promote the safety of these new men.  INDEX.
A 135
INDEX.
A.
Accidents, metal mines _
Coal mines 	
Ainsworth area 	
Page.
 128, 129
 :  100
  76
Air-sampling, mines   132
Allied Mining & Development Co., Ltd.—, 24
At Homestake   58
Alpine  (Nelson)   26, 65
Alpine Gold, Ltd.  26, 65
Amandy  24, 61
Anderson Creek (Cariboo)   88
Antimony, Bridge River   78
Antler Creek (Cariboo)   86
Antoine, dividends  19
Annual report, description  5
Apex Siding   63
Arctic lease (Atlin)   83
_„26,    66
.26, 45,    68
Arizona (Nelson)
Arlington (Nelson) _
Dividends                       ...18, 21
Ashley placer  92
Assayers' examinations   39
Athabasca (Nelson)  26, 64
Dividends   18
Athelstan   72
Atlin area, placer   81
Ault   58
Aurora (Fort Steele)   76
Aveling Coal Co., Ltd  121
B.
Baka-Mica 	
Baker Inlet, mica at
Baltic, Ymir
Bamberton, cement
B. & K. Placers
  93
  93
  26
  93
  87
Barkerville Gold Mines, Ltd.   85
Base Metal Corporation, Ltd.  25, 76
Bay   24
Bayonne (Nelson)   26
Bayonne Consolidated Mines, Ltd.  68
Beale Quarries, Ltd., lime  93
Bear (Nelson)  . 26, 64
Beaverdell area  60, 73
Beaverdell, dividends   19
Beaverdell Wellington Syndicate  74
Beban coal mine  115
Bedwell River   70
Bell (Slocan)  27, 63
Belmont-Surf Inlet   18
Belvedere  _•  41
Big Bend, Bridge River  91
Big Boy  :  27
Biggs' coal mine  116
Big Missouri  '. .....24, 54
Birch Creek (Atlin)   84
Black Bull  24, 41
Black Cock (Nelson)  26, 65
Black coal mine   121
Black Panther, Nitinat, Pioneer G.M. Co.
at  71
Black Sand   41
Blubber Bay  93
Blue Creek (Lillooet)   58
Blue Jacket, Masset   42
Bondholder,, Slocan City  75
Bosun  19, 27, 75
Boulder, Porcher Island  55
Page.
Boulder Creek, Manson   84
Dease Lake  84
(Atlin), Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. at   83
Boundary Falls   72
Bounty    24
Bounty Fraction  74
Bralorne Mines, Ltd.  27, 57
At Ault   58
At Elizabeth  58
Dividends  18, 21
Bridge River area  57, 81
Antimony    78
Placers   91
Bristol Mines, Ltd.   58
Britannia Mining & Smelting Co.  28, 78
Dividends  19, 20, 21
British Lion   _ 42
B.C. Cement Co.   93
B.C. Manganese Co., Ltd.   78
B.C. Dot No. 1, Tofino  41
B.C. Gold   25
Broken Wing, Haney   42
Buccaneer Mines, Ltd.  27, 71
Buena Vista Mining Co.  24, 54
Bulkley Valley Collieries  121
Bullion Placers, Ltd.  .... 89
Bumps  ■_  107
Burrard Inlet  94
Burrard Placers, Ltd.   90
Burton, Thurlow Island  28
Caledonia (Ainsworth)   25, 74
Calhopper, placer   92
California (Nelson)   26, 45, 64
Campbell Creek  (Cariboo)   87
Canadian Belle Mining Co.  64
Canadian Boy, Ymir ,  26
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.  114
Canada Copper Corporation  20
Canadian Exploration Co.  43, 55
Canadian Girl, Pitt Island   42
Canadian Pacific Explorers   18
Canty Gold Mines (Hedley), Ltd.   60
Capella, dividends   19
Capital employed in mines   22
Cariboo area, tungsten 55, 81, 85
Cariboo-Amelia  61
Cariboo Cottonwood Placers, Ltd.  85, 88
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mines  24, 55
Dividends  18, 21
Cariboo-McKinney   24
Dividends    18
Cascade Sand and Gravel, Ltd.   94
See also Highland Sand & Gravel.
Cassidy coal mine   115
Catherine (Nelson)   26
Cave-Browne-Cave, G., report as Provincial Assayer   38
Cayoosh Creek   91
CD. Mining Co., Ltd.   ___27, 70
Central Zeballos Mine, Reno Gold Mines
at  27, 70
Centre Star (Ymir)    26
D ividends   18
Chambers' No. 3 Colliery   115
Chapleau  27, 45, 62 A 136
INDEX.
Page.
Cherry Creek   (Vernon)       91
Chilcotin area     57
Christine (Trail Creek)      63
Cinnabar, Pinchi Lake      79
Clay and shale     92
Clayburn Co.      92
Clubine-Comstock Gold Mines, Ltd.~_.26,    66
Clydesdale  (Atlin)       82
Coal, production tables      17
Analysis in laboratory     38
Inspection of coal mines   114
Report by Chief Inspector     95
Coal-dust     107
Coalmont Placers     92
" Coal Sales Act "  110
Coast Quarries, Ltd.     94
Coke      18
Columbia Development Co.      81
Columbia Tungsten, Ltd.      81
Comox Collieries   116
Compagnie   Francaise   Mines   d'Or   du
Canada      83
Consolidated Gold Alluvials of B.C. Ltd.      87
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of
Canada, Ltd., dividends  19,    21
Boulder Creek (Atlin)  .     83
Centre Star et al.      72
Fife lime-quarry      93
Magnesite      78
No. 7 (Greenwood)      61
Red Rose
Sullivan _ 	
Tunqsten Queen    .
Consolidated Nicola Gold Fields ...    _ 24
Conwest Exploration, Ltd.  24, 42
Cooper Creek (Cariboo)   .
Copper Mountain, Granby  25
Cormack, Cotwood Tertiary	
Cornell, dividends .. 	
Cottonwood River, placer
80
76
81
58
72
86
77
89
20
Cotwood Tertiary Mines   (formerly Cormack)    89
Couverapee, dividends   19
Craig et al., placers   89
Cranbrook area   76
Magnesite   78
Crescent, Jewel Lake   24
Croker  (Atlin)   :  83
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co 21, 22
Dividends  _~ _ 20
Cummings, J. M.     6
Cunningham Creek (Cariboo)   86
D.
Dawson
28
Daylight (Nelson)  26, 64
Deeks Sand and Gravel, Ltd.   94
DeLong mine   89
Dentonia Mines, Ltd.  24, 61
Departmental work      6
Dickson, James, report as Chief Inspector 95
Dividends paid by companies 18, 21
Divine    25
Donovan Creek   88
Dragon Creek, placers   87
Dream lease (Atlin)   82
Dundee (Nelson)    66
Telkwa    _ ... 42
Dunwell   24, 41
Dust in lode mines, etc.     132
Page.
Durango (Nelson)   66
Duthie Mines, Ltd., Mamie 24, 42, 55
Dividends   19
E.
Eagle Creek (Nelson)   65
E. A. Kent Dredging Co., Ltd.   88
Eclipse, Kyuquot  42
Eight-mile Creek (Cariboo)   86
Electricity in mines 22, 106
Elise mountain  65
Elizabeth (Lillooet)    58
Emerald molybdenum, dividends 19, 80
Emery Gulch   86
Empire, Oliver     25
Ennerdale Placers, Grub Gulch  87
Enterprise  27, 75
Epsom salts factory   120
Erie Creek  68
Esperanza Mines, Ltd      .... 24, 41, 42, 44
Euphrates  (Nelson)   26, 64
Evening Star (Slocan)   27, 63
Examination for Coal-mine Officials  111
Explosives, lode, placer   103, 132
F.
Fairview Amalgamated, dividends   18
Falkland, gypsum   92
Federal, Bridge River   78
Federal Gold Mines, Ltd.   57
Ferguson Creek, antimony  78
Fern, dividends  18, 26, 64
Fife lime-quarry   93
First aid, lode mines, etc.   133
Florence Silver, dividends  19
Four-mile (Quesnel)   90
Franklin camp     62
Fraser River, placer .  88, 91
Free Gold (Clayoquot)   42
French Creek Hydraulic Placers, Ltd. ..-.. 85
Fuel used  I 22
Fuel-oil    100
G.
Galena  Farm  Consolidated  Mines,  Ltd.,
Hewitt   75
Geiler, Quadra Island  28
Gem Gold Mines, Ltd.  69
Geological Survey of Canada  7
Germansen Creek   84
Germansen Mines, Ltd.  84
Germansen Ventures, Ltd.   84
Gilley Brothers, quarry  94
Glacier Gulch 41, 42
Globe, Terrace   42
Gold, placer  81
Lode deposits   53
Purchasing placer  7
Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders 47
Gold-mine leasing experiment   .. 45
Gold Bar    24, 41, 42, 44
Gold Belt Mining Co., dividends  18, 26
References  21, 67
Goldbridge, placer at   91
Gold Coast, Surf Inlet   55
Gold Drip (Trail Creek)  .  63
Gold Drop (Greenwood)  ^_  24, 61
Gold Finch (Greenwood)  25, 61 INDEX.
A 137
Page.
Gold Leaf (Anyox)   42
Gold Peak, Zeballos   70
Gold Run Fraction (Atlin)   84
Gold Silver Tungsten Mining and Milling
Co., Ltd.   64
Gold Standard   25
Golden area   76
Golden Age (Nelson)   64
Golden Belle (Nelson)   67
Golden Crown   25
Golden Eagle, cinnabar   80
Topley 24, 25, 41, 42, 55
Golden Ledge Syndicate   . 57
Goodenough  26, 65
Dividends  18, 19
Government Creek   89
Granby  Consolidated  M.S.  & P.   Co.  at
Phoenix  25, 72
Copper Mountain   77
Princeton coal   118
Dividends   20
Grand Forks area, placer, lime 62, 92, 93
Grandoro Mines, Ltd.  25, 60
Grandview, Oliver    25
Granite-Poorman  (Nelson)   26, 65
Granite quarries   94
Great Central Lake     71
Greenwood area  61, 72, 73
Grotto, Usk   55
Grub   Gulch   placers    (also    Ennerdale
Placers)     87
Gypo   25
Gypsum      . 92
Gypsum, Lime & Alabastine, Canada, Ltd. 92
H.
Haigh placer   92
Hall Creek  64
Hall Mines, dividends  20
Harriet  (Nelson)     26
Harvey Creek Mines, Ltd.   90
Hat Creek coal   120
Hazelton, tungsten  80
Hazelton View  24, 41
H.B. Mining Co., Ltd., dividends   19
Hedley, M. S  6
Hedley, town   59
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd 25, 59
Dividends  18, 21
Heivitt  27, 75
Hi Do, Chilcotin  57
Highland Bell, Ltd.  25, 73
At Wiarton   61
At Stillwater   65
At Rosemont   60
Dividends  19, 21
Highland Chief (Greenwood)  25, 74
Highland Lass, Ltd., dividends   19
Highland   Sand   and   Gravel   pits   (also
Cascade Sand and Gravel Co.)   94
Highland Surprise Gold Mines, Ltd.__.25, 62
Hinkley   75
Hixon Creek, placer   89
Holland, S. S.     6
Homestake, Alice Arm   44
Beaverdell   25
(Greenwood)     62
58
70
27
Squaam Bay  24,
Homeward, Zeballos  27,
Hope   	
Page.
Horn Silver, dividends   19
Houseman Creek  87
Houston    55
Howard (Nelson)  26, 66
Howard Fraction  27, 62
Howe Sound Co., dividends  20
Humming Bird (Nelson)  25, 26, 63
Hunter, Khutze Inlet  55
Hunter Basin, Conwest Exploration at-24, 72
Idaho Alamo, dividends      19
Indian, Nass River      44
Inland Collieries Co.   120
International Placers, Ltd.      92
Invermay, Hope     28
Iron and Steel Bounties Act"          35
80
19
56
18
43
63
Iron Mountain, Ltd.
Dividends   .   	
Island Mountain  21, 24,
Dividends  	
I.X.L., Porcher Island 24,
(Trail Creek)  18, 27,
J.
Jack, Slocan City   75
Jackson, dividends   19
Jackson coal mine, Princeton   121
Jessie-Victoria   (Nelson)    26, 64
Jewel-Denero, dividends  18, 25
Jewel Lake   61
Johnson, P., placers   90
Jolly Creek, placer   91
Jones, Porcher Island   43
Jumbo  (Trail Creek)   27, 63
Juno  (Nelson)    64
K.
Kalamalka (Vernon)   24, 60
Kamloops   58
K.C.M.   25
Keithley Creek   89
Kelowna Exploration Co., Ltd.  25, 59
Ketch, Ltd., placers   _ 87
Keystone  (Nelson)   26, 68
Khee Khan Creek   88
Khutze Inlet   55
Kicking Horse  25, 76
Klondyke     25
Koeye River, limestone   93
Koeye River Limestone Co.  93
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Ltd	
 18, 26, 66, 67
Dividends    21
Kootenay Lake area   68
L.
Laboratory Department, report by Provincial Analyst   38
Labour and employment in mines  100
Lakeside   25
La Marr, Smithers   44
Langford Mines, Ltd.  88
Lantzville  '-  115
Lardeau area  62, 74
Larsen Gulch   88
Last Chance, dividends   19
Lay, Douglas, obituary   4 A 138
INDEX.
Page.
Lemon Creek  62
Le Roi Gold Mining Syndicate  26
Le Roi Mining Co., dividends  18
Le Roi No. 2, dividends   18
Lightning Creek   87
Lillooet area, placers 58, 91
Lillooet Placers Syndicate   91
Limestone   93
Little Swift River  88
Little Valley Creek  85
Livingstone Mining Co.  26, 65
L.L. & H  54
Lone Bachelor, dividends  19
Lone Silver, Salmo   26
Lookout (Osoyoos)   43
Lome, dividends   18
Lost Creek, Manson   84
Lost Creek Placer Gold Co.   84
Loudon's coal mine  116
Lowhee Mining Co.   85
L.T., Slocan City  75
Lucky Boy Mining Syndicate   74
Lucky Jim, dividends  19, 27
M.
Maconachie, R. J., report on gold-mine
leasing   45
Magnesite, Williams Lake   78
Cranbrook,   Consolidated   Mining   and
Smelting Co  78
Mamie  24, 41, 43
Mandy, J. T., report on sampling plant. 39
Manson Creek area   84
Marble Bay, dividends   20
Marmion, Slocan City 27, 63
Marshall Creek   91
Maryhill Sand and Gravel quarries   94
Maryland   63
May Creek, placers   92
Mayflower  (Trail Creek)    63
Men employed    22
Mercury, dividends   19
Mercury, cinnabar, etc.   79
Meridian   26
Metal prices  ,  12
Metalliferous mines, inspection   128
Shipping mines   24
Meteor, dividends   19
Methane   107
Mica deposits   93
Middlesboro Collieries, Ltd.   119
Midnight (Trail Creek)  27, 63
Midnight Mines, Ltd.   27
Milton Gold Mining Co.  62
Mine-air    107
Mineralogical Branch   6
Mining industry   6
Mining laws of British Columbia   29
Mobbs, Lardeau, Silver Crest  62
Molybdenum;   Salmo, Emerald   80
Monarch, Field  25, 76
Monashee River, placers   91
Monitor  27, 75
Monitor and Ajax, dividends   19
Montgomery Creek, placers   87
Moose Horn (Quesnel)   43
Moose Syndicate   90
Morning Mountain   64
Morning Star (Osoyoos)   25
Motherlode, dividends   18
Page.
Motherlode (Nelson)   67
Mountain Con, dividends   19
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines, Ltd. ~__ .27, 69
Dividends  18, 21
Musketeer Mines. Ltd.   70
Myrtle, Slocan City    75
McAllister, dividends 19, 27
McArthur Gulch   85
McGillivray Creek   91
McGuire, Bridge River  44
Mackay Gold Mines, Ltd.   53
McKee Creek   84
McKinney Camp area   61
N.
Nanaimo   71
Nelson area   63
Nelson Island, granite   94
Nevada (Nelson)   26
New Westminster area, clay   92
Stone, sand, and gravel   94
Nicholsen Creek Mining Corporation .41, 55
Nickel Plate  18, 25, 59
Dividends    21
Nickel Plate vein, Euphrates   64
Nicola-Princeton, coal   118
Nitinat River   71
Noble Five Mines, Ltd., dividends 19, 64
No Name placers, Pearson's  88
North America Goldfields, Ltd.   89
North Star, dividends   19
Northern Refining Co.   86
Northern Resources, Ltd.  83
Nugget (Nelson)  26, 67, 68
Nugget Gulch _   86
Nugget Placers  (Cariboo)   86
No. One, dividends   19
No. 7, Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Co.  25, 61
o.
O'Donnel River   84
O'Grady, B. T  6
O.K. (Trail Creek)   63
Okanagan area   60
Okanagan (Lardeau)   62
Omineca Gold Quartz Co!   55
Onward, Keithley Creek   90
Oral M.  24, 41, 44
Orofino   60
Osoyoos  •  25
Ottawa  27, 75
Dividends   19
Otter Creek (Atlin)   83
Owen Lake 43, 55
Pacific Lime Co.  93
Pacific Mills, limestone at  93
Payne (Slocan), dividends  19, 74
P.D.Q., Pioneer Co. at  71
Pearson's placers, No Name placers  88
Perkins Creek (Cariboo)   87
Phoenix (Trail Creek)  27, 73
Pinchi Lake, cinnabar   79
Pine Creek (Atlin)   83
(Cariboo)   86, 90
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd. _27, 57, 71
Dividends  18, 21
Placer Engineers, Ltd.   90 INDEX.
A 139
Page.
Poker, placer  83
Polaris-Taku Mining Co.  24, 53
Poorman, dividends   18
Porcher Island Mines, Ltd.   55
Portland Canal area  53
Porto Rico (Nelson)   26, 66
Premier, dividends  18, 53
Premier Gold Mining Co.  68
Prident mine   69
Prince Rupert Sampling Plant  39
Princess Royal Island  54
Princeton area  92
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co., Ltd.   120
Priority mine   89
Privateer  27, 69
Dividends  18, 21
Production tables   11
Progress notes   53
Providence (Greenwood)  25, 72, 73
Dividends   19
Pugsley.  54
Q.
Queen, dividends   18
Queen Bess, dividends   19
Queen   Charlotte   Islands,   black   sands
tested at Prince Rupert  41
Quesnel Mining Co.  90
Quesnel River, South Fork  90
R.
Rainier 24, 41, 44
Rambler placers   91
Rambler-Cariboo, dividends   19
Reco, dividends   19
Red Bird, Porcher Island 43, 44
Red Cliff  24, 41, 43, 54
Red Eagle, cinnabar  80
Red Gulch placers  85
Red Rose, Rocher Deboule  80
Red Top, Topley  43
Regal Silver, tungsten   81
Reliance  (Nelson)   26, 68
Relief-Arlington, Premier at 26, 68
Dividends   18, 21
Reno Gold Mines, Ltd.  26, 67
Dividends   18
At Central Zeballos   70
Hixon Creek      89
Republic No. 2, Slocan City  75
Rescue-stations  109, 112
Retallack, properties at  62
Revenue   25
Revelstoke area, tungsten   81
Rex, Houston   44
Rey Oro, Zeballos, CD. Mining Co  70
Richmond    75
Riverside  (Kamloops)   24
Roberts Mountain   63
Rock Creek, placer   91
Rosemont   (Greenwood),  Highland  Bell
at 25, 60
Rossland area  63, 72
Properties at  27
Ross Spur, claims at  68
Rover Creek  65
Ruby Creek (Atlin)   83
Ruby (Greenwood)   72
Ruth  :  27
Page.
Ruth Hope Mining Co. __  27,    75
Ruth Mines, Ltd., dividends      19
Safety-lamps
St. Elmo
  104
  73
St. Eugene, dividends  19
St. Eugene Extension  76
St. Eugene Mining Corporation  76
Salaries and wages  22
Sallus Creek  91
Sally Mines, Ltd.  25, 73
Salmo, molybdenum   80
Salmo area   66
Salmon River (Portland Canal)  ... 53
Sampling plant, Prince Rupert 6, 38, 39
Sangdang placers  87
Sargent, H  6
Second Relief (Nelson)   68
Dividends  18, 21
Sericite, mica   94
Shamrock, Barkerville   56
Sheep Creek   66
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd 26, 67
At Lucky Jim  74
Dividends  18, 21
Shepherd Creek  86
Sherwood, Vancouver Island   71
Silbak Premier  24, 53
Dividends  18, 21
Silta, Seymour Inlet  28
Silvenite  (Slocan)    75
Silver Bell, Trout Lake  26
Silver Crest (formerly Mobbs)   62
Silver Cup, Topley   44
(Lardeau)    24, 26, 74
Silver King, Oliver   25
Silversmith, dividends   19
Silver Tip (Nelson)   26
Silverton area   75
Similkameen area  59, 77
Sitkum Creek  65
Skagit River Development Co.   28
Skaret Creek   89
Skookum (Vernon)   24, 60
Slade Creek Placers   88
Slate Creek, Manson Creek  84
Slocan area  62, 74
Slocan Boy   74
Slocan City area   63
Slocan Star, dividends   19
Smithers Mines, Ltd.  55
Snowshoe Gold Mines, Ltd.  56
Sovereign Creek, placers   88
Spanish Creek, placers  90
Speculator, Slocan City 27, 75
Spider (Lardeau)  :  26
Spokane  (Nelson)   27, 69
Spokane-Trinket   76
Dividends   19
Spruce Creek Mining Co.  82
Spruce Creek Placers, Ltd.  82
Spruce Creek (Atlin)   81
Spud Valley Gold Mines, Ltd 27, 70
Dividends  18, 21
Squaw Creek (Atlin)   84
Standard, Western Exploration Co  75
Standard Silver Lead Co 19, 27
Stanley   88
Stanley Mines, Ltd.   87 A 140
INDEX.
Page.
_    28
Star, Hope	
Stevens Gulch  86
Stevenson, J. S.  6
Stewart, Bridge River  78
Stewart Canal Gold Mines, Ltd.   54
Stikine River   84
Stillwater  (Nelson)    65
Stone, sand, and gravel   94
Stump Lake area  58
Sugar Creek  86
Sunnyside, Penticton   25
Sunset No. 2 (Ainsworth) .  18
Sunset and Trade Dollar, dividends  19
Sullivan   25
Surf  54
Surf    Inlet,    Consolidated    Mining    and
Smelting Co. at  24, 54
Dividends  18, 21
Surprise Lake Mining Co.   83
Swift River, placers   _ 88
Tables  	
Tabor Creek 	
Takla Lake area
Taku River area
Taxation 	
9
89
85
53
37
Taylor Creek, Grand Forks     92
Taylor-Windfall  27,    57
Telkwa      72
Terrace      55
Tertiary Mine, placer     89
Texada Island, lime 69,    93
Thistle (Alberni)        27
Thistle (Nanaimo)      71
Tide Lake Gold group 24, 41,    54
Tillicum, Port Hardy      41
Toad Mountain      64
Topley _      55
Topographical surveys   8
Traders Syndicate, Princeton
.Tregillus Creek 	
Trehouse Placers 	
Northern Refinery Co. 	
Trimetal, Ltd. 	
Triple Hydraulic Placers
92
  64
  86
Tulameen Collieries, Ltd.   121
Tulameen River, placers   92
Tulsequah River  53
Tungsten deposits   80
Tungsten Queen, Bridge River   81
Twenty-mile Creek, Manson Creek  84
Twobit Creek _J  85
u.
Union (Greenwood) 	
United Prospectors, Ltd. 	
Unuk River area 	
Usk 	
.25,
62
27
53
55
Vtica     19
V.
Van Anda Quarries, lime 	
Vancouver area 	
93
78
Page.
Vancouver Granite Co.  94
Vancouver Island   69
Lime   93
Stone, etc.   94
Vancouver Island Diamond Drilling and
Exploration Co.   71
Velvet (Trail Creek)   27
Ventilation   106
Ventures    Exploration    (East    Africa),
Ltd.     84
Venus-Juno  (Nelson)   27, 64
Vernon area, placer 60, 91
Victor, Sandon  27, 75
Victoria (Nelson)   64
w.
Wallace Mines, Ltd.
19
War Eagle, dividends  18
Washington  (Slocan), dividends  19, 74
Weldon Creek   86
Wellington, Beaverdell   25
Wellington Collieries, dividends   20
Wesko, Ymir   66
Western Exploration Co., Ltd. 27, 75
Whitewater  (Slocan)   25, 62
Dividends   19
White Star 27, 69
Wiarton (Greenwood)    25
Wilcox   27
Williams Lake, magnesite  78
Windpass Gold Mining Co.   24
Wingold Development Co.   87
Winnipeg   72
Winslow (Greenwood)   62
Trout Lake     26
Wolfe Creek (Cariboo)   85
Wolverine Creek   84
Wright Creek _   ~__ 83
W.W.W.  (Alberni)   27
Y.
Yalakom River, cinnabar  80, 91
Yankee Boy, Grand Forks  25, 62
Tofino          44
Yankee Girl  27
Yanks Peak  56
Ymir   27
Ymir area   65
Ymir Centre Star  66
Ymir Consolidated Gold Mines  65
Ymir Gold, dividends   18
Ymir Wilcox   66
Ymir-Yankee Girl Gold Mines, Ltd.._.27, 66
Dividends  18, 21
z.
Zeballos   69
Zeballos (Pacific) Gold Mines, Ltd  70
Zincton Mines, Ltd. 27, 74
Zymoetz River  55
VIOTOBIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1942.
2,125 442-7500

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