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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1942

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPAETMENT OF ATTOENEY-GENEBAL
REPORT
OK
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
for the year ended
DECEMBER 31ST, 1940
PRINTED by
authority of the legislative assembly.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Commission
for the year ended December 31st, 1940.
GORDON S. WISMER,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 19U1. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., September 30th, 1941.
Honourable Gordon S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended December
31st, 1940.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
JAMES G. CUNNINGHAM,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
Members, Game Commission. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Reports— Page.
Game Commission     7
Game Wardens, " A " Division     9
Officer Commanding " B " Division  12
Officer Commanding " C " Division  25
Officer Commanding " D " Division  37
Game Wardens, " E " Division  41
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-40, inclusive  44
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences and Deer (Game) Tags  45
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors' Firearms Licences  47
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Anglers' and Outfitters' Licences  48
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers' Licences  49
Revenue—Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalties on Fur  50
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-40, inclusive  51
Comparative Statement showing Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has
been collected, 1921-40, inclusive  52
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty was collected
during Year 1940  53
List of Confiscated Fur, 1940  54
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1940, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur and
Firearms  54
Bounties paid, 1940 .  55
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922-40, inclusive  55
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1940  56
Prosecutions, 1940  61
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1940  63
Statement—Migratory and Non-game Birds banded during 1940 by Representatives of
the Game Commission    64
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1940  64-77
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special (Trapping) Firearms Licences, Season
1939-40 ,  78
Statements—Returns of Fur-farmers, 1940  78
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1940  79
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1940  79
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1940, also showing Revenue from Sale of
Bird-bands  80
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1940  81
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1940  84  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
1940.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
As in previous years, no change has been made in so far as administration of the
Department is concerned. Constant patrol-work has been carried out in all sections of the
Province during the year, some of these patrols being quite extensive in character.
The cordial co-operation between the British Columbia Police, Forestry and Game
Departments has been most gratifying.
Meetings of Game Associations and other organizations have been attended as often as
possible and we have continued to carry out our moving-picture programme. During the
year our educational films on game and sport-fish conservation have been exhibited to sixty-six
organizations and approximately 11,890 people.
Additional pictures have been taken and we are gradually building up a most valuable
collection of coloured pictures that are being well received wherever shown, both from an
educational as well as an advertising point.
REGISTRATION OF TRAP-LINES.
This system is still responsible in controlling the annual fur output. As in the case of
all regulations, however, amendments are required from time to time and, as conditions
change, important alterations to these regulations must necessarily be given careful
consideration.
Some additional control measures apparently are needed in respect to the trapping of
beaver, which is one of our most important fur-bearers. In order to avoid any complicated
regulations we propose to proceed very cautiously before recommending any new regulations.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES.
While careful consideration has been given to changing the regulations in respect to the
registration of guides, no definite action has been taken in this regard, as it is felt many
matters affecting big-game guiding in the Province could very well be incorporated in the
" Game Act."
FUR-FARMING.
Even though a state of war exists, we are pleased to report that this condition of affairs
has not greatly affected fur-farming in the Province. The majority of fur-farmers are
keeping mink, while many are farming foxes.
BIRD-BANDING.
Owing to the fact that expenditures, both Dominion as well as Provincial, have had to be
curtailed no funds were available for bird-banding this year, and consequently no banding was
carried on at the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve near Chilliwack. This is the first year
since 1926 that this has been the case.
BOUNTY ON PREDATORY ANIMALS.
Attention is drawn to the statements contained herein covering the payment of bounties
on various predatory animals.
There has been a considerable reduction in bounty payments on cougar this year compared
to the peak year in 1931 when 701 animals were destroyed. In 1940 bounty was paid on 285
cougar. This reduction has undoubtedly been due to the scarcity of cougar on Vancouver
Island.
We have, for financial reasons, been unable to carry out the policy of supplying Game
Associations with shotgun ammunition for use in the destruction of noxious birds, although
Game Wardens have been supplied. P 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
We are again very pleased to be in a position to advise that each year more non-residents
are becoming aware of the wonderful hunting and fishing possibilities of the Province. As a
result of advertisements placed in three important sporting publications in the United States,
4,047 inquiries were dealt with during the year.
The cordial co-operation of the Department of Trade and Industry in assisting in advertising the Province as a " Sportsmen's Paradise " is very much appreciated.
GAME PROPAGATION.
Owing to the need in the curtailment of expenditures, not as many pheasants have been
liberated this year. Detail, of these distributions are to be found in a statement later on in
this report.
We have been unable to do any live trapping of beaver, owing to various factors over
which we had no contiol, but it is proposed to again carry out this work at the first available
opportunity. Live beaver tapped will be released in various sections of the Province when
we have the assurance of the trappers and residents this valuable fur-bearing animal will be
protected and conserved.
Game reserves that have been established and protected as such for a period of years are
still acting as game reservoirs and the surrounding areas are benefiting accordingly. While
our personnel is not large enough to ensure absolute protection on. these reserves, yet every
possible step has been taken to see that no hunting or trapping takes place in these prohibited areas.
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS.
Reports leceived throughout the year clearly indicate that the migratory game birds of
all species are increasing and there would seem to be need for little concern, owing to the small
number of hunters we have in this vast Province, that the stand of these birds is in any way
being depleted.
REVENUE.
Notwithstanding existing war conditions the revenue under the " Game Act " has not
deciear:ed but, as a matter of fact, we are very pleased to be able to report enjoying the
largest levenue year in the history of the Department. The total revenue during 1940 was
$257,071.53 as compared to $242,357.53 in 1939; or an increase of $14,714. The figures
supplied do not include fines, which in 1940 were $5,197 and in 1939 were $4,776.50.
GAME-FISH CULTURE.
In the body and statistical sections of this report are to be found particulars dealing with
our game-fish culture programme.
Many letters have been received during the year containing very pleasing references to
the success of our game-fish propagation-work. Lakes and streams in many sections of the
Province have greatly improved in fishing, according to many ardent anglers.
Investigations are still being carried on in respect to trout diseases. We have enjoyed
and greatly benefited by the pleasing co-operation of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada
and the University of British Columbia in these investigations. Preliminary reports would
seem to give us assurance that as a result of these scientific investigations a partial cure will
be found for that dreaded trout disease known as " Furunculosis."
Again we wish to express our sincere appreciation to the Forest Branch of the Provincial Department of Lands for their kind and ready assistance in our work during the year.
The Dominion Fisheries Department have also been most helpful in supplying us with
fairly large quantities of condemned canned salmon which we have used as food for the trout
in our hatcheries.
The problem of ridding some of our lakes and rivers of coarse fish is still a very pressing
one and is being given all possible attention.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The British Columbia Police Force, as in past years, has furnished every possible assistance during the year, and the friendly relations between the British Columbia Police, the REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1940. P 9
Forest Branch, and the Department of Agriculture, as well as other Government Departments,
has been most gratifying.
We wish, in conclusion, to express our most sincere appreciation to the Commissioner of
the British Columbia Police, his officers and men; the Honourable the Minister of Fisheries
for the Dominion; the Chief Supervisor of Dominion Fisheries, Major J. A. Motherwell; Dr.
W. A. Clemens, of the Pacific Biological Station; the Fisheries Research Board of Canada;
Mr. J. A. Munro, Chief Federal Migratory Bird Officer for British Columbia; Dr. D. C. B.
Duff, of the University of British Columbia; and Game Associations and farmers in the
Province who have helped us so much in our work during the year 1940.
" A " DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE
MAINLAND COAST).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " A " Game Division
for the year ended December 31st, 1940.
Game Animals.
Bear.—From time to time during the year, at least in some sections of the Division, black
bears have been the cause for complaints covering damage which have been received from
farmers and others. In the northern portions of Vancouver Island, black bears are fairly
numerous and this also applies to the Courtenay area.
Grizzly bear at the head of the various inlets on the mainland coast, especially Knight
Inlet, are fairly plentiful.
Deer.—The reports indicate that throughout Vancouver Island deer are fairly plentiful,
and only in isolated sections would there appear to be any reason for concern as to their
numbers. Fairly good hunting was enjoyed by sportsmen in most sections during the past
open season.
Careful observation would seem to bear out the fact that the large forest fires in the
Courtenay country a few years ago were responsible for the destruction of a number of deer,
and Game Warden B. Harvey expresses some concern in this regard and suggests a reduction
in season as well as in bag-limits.
A few years ago deer around Alert Bay were not very numerous. Game Warden W. N.
Massey now reports, however, that deer are again increasing in that district.
Mountain-goat.—Two mountain-goat were seen by Game Warden J. Dewar on a branch
of Green River and signs of these animals, which were introduced into the Cowichan district
some years ago, indicate that while there has been no great increase from the original number
liberated, at the same time some general increase has been observed during the past few years.
Wapiti (Elk).—In the Oyster and Elk River sectors, wapiti are increasing. A few signs
were noted in the Comox Lake as well as in the Beaver Lake areas. It would seem that there
has been a general breaking up of the large bands into smaller groups, which should be of
benefit to the stand of these animals.
Wapiti are again being seen, after fairly heavy logging operations, on the Shaw Creek
Game Reserve in the Cowichan Lake district. The wapiti in the northern portions of Vancouver Island appear to be holding their own and seem to be slightly on the increase.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver are increasing in many portions of Vancouver Island. Permits have, as in past
years, been issued to a number of registered trappers to take off the surplus beaver on their
lines, and in some instances permits have been granted to trap beaver doing damage to agricultural lands and public roads.
The muskrats which were introduced on Vancouver Island some years ago are being
trapped each season in fair numbers. This fur-bearing animal has provided a new means of
revenue to many trappers, a number of whom are farmers, during the past few years.
Other principal fur-bearing animals to be found in this Division are marten, mink,
racoon, weasel, and the odd wolverine. Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—A very favourable season was enjoyed during the year and reports
indicate that throughout the Division blue grouse have been plentiful, while in some areas,
such as the Courtenay-Campbell River country, there was a splendid increase.
Grouse (Ruffed).—In some portions of the Division these birds are increasing while in
other sections no noticeable improvement in the stand of ruffed or willow grouse has been
observed, which would seem to indicate the need for exercising care in the setting of open
seasons and bag-limits.
Pheasants.—Owing to the excellent breeding season, pheasants in most sections were more
numerous than for some years. Sportsmen on the Island, especially in the Victoria-Cowichan
and Nanaimo areas, enjoyed a very good season and many daily bag-limits were obtained.
Partridge.—Generally the situation in regard to partridge on Vancouver Island is a poor
one, and if it were possible to restock suitable areas there would seem to be little doubt that
these birds would readily adapt themselves and in a few years would become fairly plentiful.
Quail.—A fair stand of California quail is the case in the districts adjacent to Victoria
and these beautiful sporting birds are also to be observed in the Cowichan and Nanaimo areas.
Ptarmigan.—In fair numbers in the high mountain section of Vancouver Island.
Migratory Game Birds.
In some sections of Vancouver Island ducks were abundant a few weeks before hunting
was permitted, which would seem to indicate an earlier opening of the season is advisable in
these areas. In the northern portions of the Island a later season for hunting seems to be
preferred and in the southern sections an earlier opening is desirable.
Mallards and baldpates (widgeons) appeared to be the most plentiful while black brant
were again very abundant in the districts which they frequent each year.
Swans were probably seen in larger numbers than in recent years, while, especially on
the West Coast, geese were quite plentiful.
Band-tailed pigeons were to be observed in different portions of the Division and fair
Wilson-snipe shooting was enjoyed in most areas.
Vermin.
Every report seems to bear out the statement that cougar are not nearly as numerous
and returns on bounties paid indicate this to be the case. Reports of wolves were received
during the year and a number of these animals were destroyed by Game Wardens and hunters.
Noxious birds, wild (domestic) cats and dogs have been destroyed by Game Wardens
during the year and particulars in this regard can be obtained on perusal of a statement
covering the same on another page of this report.
Game-protection.
In some districts complaints of pit-lamping have required the Game Wardens to
undertake many night patrols and while this practice has not wholly been stopped, a number
of convictions have been recorded which have to a great extent put a brake on night-hunting.
All   Game   Wardens   have   been   constantly   patrolling   their   respective   districts   with
excellent results. _ _,
Game Propagation.
Pheasants have again been liberated in many suitable areas and during the year 3,296 of
these birds were released.
Considerable scientific work has been carried out during the year in respect to diseases
amongst game. Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan, of the Provincial Museum, has been most helpful
in this regard.
The fallow deer released in the Alberni district a few years ago have apparently
disappeared, but complaints of damage by these animals are still being received from some
of the Gulf Islands on which they were liberated.
Game Reserves.
All of the game reserves or prohibited hunting areas have been patrolled as often as
possible. The Strathcona Park Reserve is again showing slight increases in game, mainly
deer and grouse. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940. P 11
Logging is being carried on in the Shaw Creek Game Reserve, in the Cowichan Lake
country, and these operations have been watched very closely. Slash was burned during
the year, within the reserve, in a most satisfactory manner.
The Bald Mountain Game Reserve, Cowichan Lake, provides an excellent breeding-
ground for grouse and deer. This reserve is acting as an important feeder to the
surrounding country.
Fur Trade.
The fur catch has been normal and, as in past years, the majority of fur taken is
disposed of mostly to fur-traders in Vancouver.
Fur-farming.
Owing to existing conditions, there has been no great expansion in the fur-farming
industry on Vancouver Island.    The best results seem to be obtained in the farming of mink.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This system of trap-line control is more than ever proving very beneficial in regulating
the animal fur output and insuring against any serious depletion in the numbers of any
particular fur-bearing animal.
Registration of Guides.
Vancouver Island cannot be classed as a big-game area and consequently there are no
registered guides in this district.
Special Patrols.
Many lengthy patrols were undertaken in every district in the Division, but generally
none of these patrols can be classed as " special " as they were undertaken mostly in carrying
out routine work.
Hunting Accidents.
There was a reduction in the number of hunting accidents during the year. Particulars
of the accidents which took place are to be found in a statement later on in this report.
Game-fish Culture.
In the Nanaimo district good results have been obtained from the liberation of trout
from the Qualicum Beach Hatchery and the Game Warden there reports that better fishing
conditions prevail than in the past.
The Game Warden at Duncan advises that every effort is being made towards seeing
that trout plantings are successful. All other officers report along the same line and are
watching fishing conditions in general very closely, with the object in view of making
improvements wherever and whenever possible.
A statement covering trout liberations on Vancouver Island is to be found in another
section of this report.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield, Nanaimo, advises that, generally speaking, the past
year has been one of the best ever encountered and that ideal weather conditions produced
larger numbers of game birds and exceptionally good bags were taken during the open
hunting seasons.
Game Warden J. W. Jones, Victoria, writes: " Weather conditions have been ideal for
young game birds, deer have been plentiful, and quite a number of hunters secured their
limit on all kinds of game."
Game Warden R. S. Hayes, Duncan, remarks: " The season has been a most satisfactory
one owing to the mild winter and excellent weather during the breeding season for game
birds."
All Game Wardens express their appreciation of the most valuable assistance rendered
by all members of the British Columbia Police Force, Game Associations, Farmers' Institutes,
and other organizations and interested sportsmen.
. "B" DIVISION  (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By A. F. Sinclair, Officer Commanding.
I herewith beg to submit annual report of game conditions in " B " Division for the year
ended 1940, as well as the report of Fishery Supervisor C H. Robinson on game or sport-fish
conditions. Mention should be made that I have only recently taken over supervision of this
Division and that I am finding it extremely difficult to carry out the excellent work of my
predecessor, Inspector C F. Kearns, who only recently enlisted in the R.C.A.F.
Big Game.
Moose.—These animals are prolific in the Rocky Mountains from the International
Boundary to Banff, well established in the Selkirk Mountains on the western watershed of
the Columbia River, and are present in small numbers on the eastern shores of Kootenay
Lake. This extension of the moose range is very interesting as until the last few years they
were not known on the watershed of Kootenay Lake. It is a fair conjecture that in a few
years they will also penetrate to the shores of the Arrow Lakes.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti parallel the moose in the Rocky Mountains, both in numbers and
tendency to extend their range to the Selkirk Mountains on the west side of the Columbia
River and also north along the Columbia from Golden. Just how far the elk will follow the
extension of the moose is dependent on their ability to survive the heavier snowfalls of the
Selkirks.
Favourable reports come from the experimental stocking of a few years ago in the
Princeton area and there is still a considerable number of these animals in the hills of the
Southern Okanagan near Naramata, where an open season is permitted. The progress of
these two bands will be of interest in view of the former wide range of elk in British
Columbia.
Mountain-sheep.—These animals are the popular trophy of non-resident hunters, but
due to their extreme wariness and the short open season are maintaining their numbers in
the Rocky Mountains.
There is no change in the two small bands in the vicinity of Keremeos and Okanagan
Falls, which have been protected for many years and manage to survive on a very limited
range in competition with domestic stock.
Caribou.—Little change is noted in the caribou stand in the Division and very few
animals are killed during the open season. Caribou-hunting is difficult and for that reason
attracts only a small number of enthusiasts. The main range of the caribou is the area
surrounding the Arrow and Kootenay Lakes and north to the Revelstoke and Golden districts.
Curiously enough, they are not found in the Rocky Mountains of this Division. Caribou are
high-ranging animals and are seldom seen at low elevations, except in migration from one
mountain range to another. They are not found in the Boundary and Similkameen areas,
although they were occasional in the Boundary district thirty-five years ago.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are well distributed throughout the Division, being
abundant in the East Kootenay and in fair numbers in the West Kootenay, Boundary, and
Similkameen.
Mule-deer.—Mule-deer are abundant throughout the Division and show no signs of
decreasing, despite a long open season and consistent hunting.
White-tail Deer.—White-tail deer are well distributed throughout the Division with
the exception of the Similkameen District where they are only occasional. During the past
few years they have definitely increased in the Boundary district and it may be they will
spread in time to the Similkameen. White-tails are valley-dwellers and, while extremely
shy, appear to thrive best close to settlements.
Bear (Black, Brown, and Grizzly).—Bears are definitely plentiful in the East and West
Kootenays and probably are thickest in the area bordering Kootenay Lake northward. Their
numbers are somewhat less in the Boundary and Similkameen.
Grizzly bears are probably more numerous in the section bounded by Nelson, Revelstoke,
and Golden than anywhere else, where, judging by the statistics released by the U.S. Department of the Interior, we would appear to have the main concentration of these big bears in
North America. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940. P 13
Fur-bearing Animals.
Lynx, marten, mink, beaver, weasel, and muskrats are the most common fur-bearers;
while fisher, wolverine, otter, skunks, badgers, and foxes are comparatively scarce.
The trapping of fur-bearing animals alive, particularly marten and mink, is becoming
quite common, as these animals, if uninjured, find a ready market with fur-farmers.
It is interesting to note that the annual fur returns of the Province do not show any
diminution of the yearly catch. We have the finest furs and the last big stand of marten
on the continent. The reason for this favourable condition of the wild fur-bearers is the
trap-line registration system which was instituted some years ago and has proved its value
in the conservation of wild fur beyond all possibility of dispute.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue Grouse.—These birds are plentiful through the Division. Due to their habit of
seeking the mountains in the late summer, they are not easy to hunt.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—Willow grouse again appear to be on the up-grade and are
plentiful wherever conditions are suitable. This does not mean that they will ever regain
their old numbers in the vicinity of easily accessible car-roads but, nevertheless, in spite of
the handicap of travelling hunters, they manage to keep up surprisingly well. Willow grouse
are definitely plentiful in places that are not too easily accessible and where there is suitable
cover for them. The above is a concensus of Game Wardens' observations after the season
had closed.
Franklin Grouse.—These birds appear to be noticeably scarce in the Cranbrook-Kimberley
district but are well distributed elsewhere. A large hunting population favoured by good
roads and open country may account for this local condition. The Franklin grouse will not
stand much hunting as they well deserve their popular name of " fool-hen " and are too
easily bagged. Their range, about the 4,000-foot level, does much to protect them, except
where roads make them too easy to hunt.
Sharp-tail Grouse.—A few flocks of sharp-tail grouse remain in the Kootenay, Boundary,
and Lower Similkameen districts, but are only the remnants of the flocks that existed
twenty-five or thirty years ago. Although these birds have been protected consistently,
they show little signs of regaining their former numbers. Probably the extension of
settlements is the chief reason.
Ptarmigan.—Ptarmigan are to be found on the higher mountains throughout the
Division, but are negligible as a game bird on account of their habitat.
Pheasants.—These birds flourish in the Similkameen, Boundary, and Creston areas,
where conditions are favourable, and generous open seasons do not appear to unduly deplete
their stand. They are also doing well in points on the Arrow Lakes, particularly Nakusp
and Robson, although plantings at Edgewood and Deer Park have not been very successful.
Some apprehension was expressed in last year's report about experimental liberations in
the East Kootenay Valley between the U.S. Boundary and Windermere, which did not appear
to be as successful as we had hoped. In discussing the matter with the sportsmen of the
East Kootenay, it was decided to have a short open season mainly for the purpose of finding
out if there were any birds left. It is very gratifying to report that the short open season
was successful and the presence of hunters with dogs located far more birds than we thought
existed. Pheasants now seem to be fairly well established from Cranbrook to Windermere
and further stocking appears to be justified.
Partridge.—These birds are fairly plentiful from Penticton south to the U.S. Boundary,
and also in the vicinity of Grand Forks where open seasons were permitted. They are only
occasional in the remainder of the Division, where flocks are noted from time to time. At
Creston, where conditions are most suitable, they do not seem to be permanently established,
although they are plentiful in some seasons and practically disappear the next. The only
explanation would seem to be their tendency to migrate in flocks.
Quail.—Quail are plentiful in the Penticton district and this would seem to be the only
place in the Division where their introduction has been successful. Penticton is favoured
with a mild, dry climate and with little snowfall compared to the remainder of the Division. P 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—A decided increase of ducks has been reported in the past two years from the
main centres in the Division, which are Creston and the Invermere districts. The increase
particularly over past years is quite evident and unmistakable.
Geese.—As with the ducks, geese have also increased and more geese nested at Creston
and from Windermere to Golden than for many years.
Wilson Snipe.—Wilson snipe are migratory and for a few days each fall are present in
good numbers on the marshes.    They are not hunted much by local residents.
Coots.—Coots are plentiful everywhere, but are not popular as game birds.
Swans.—Several flocks have been observed on Kootenay Lake for a few days in the
spring, presumably en route northward.
Vermin.
There were 3 cougars, 48 coyotes, 77 abandoned house cats, 25 ownerless dogs, 7 eagles,
18 owls, 10 ravens, 73 hawks, 442 crows, 233 magpies, and 26 mergansers reported destroyed
by Game Wardens in the Division during 1940.    This is exclusive of the bounties paid on
cougars and coyotes, as well as coyotes taken by trappers in the open season.    Several Rod
and Gun Clubs also conducted local crow and magpie shoots during the summer with much
success
Game-protection.
There were forty-seven convictions and two dismissals under the " Game Act " and six
convictions under the Special Fisheries Regulations.
Game Propagation.
Pheasants were released as usual for restocking purposes in the Similkameen, Okanagan,
Grand Forks, Creston, and Cranbrook areas, also similar plantings at Robson, Sidmouth,
Nakusp, New Denver, and Edgewood, where experiments indicate that these birds are
successfully surviving the winters. Although the conditions are not ideal in these last-named
points, yet it is hoped that due to the great interest taken in these birds by the local residents
that they may adjust themselves satisfactorily.
Very little feeding was necessary during the winter of 1939-40 as conditions were
favourable, with little snow or cold weather.
Game Reserves.
The Elk River Reserve, comprising the upper watershed of Elk and Bull Rivers, also
White River, is the most important one, as it is situated in the heart of the big-game country.
Game-bird sanctuaries adjacent to Nelson and at Vasseaux Lake, south of Penticton, are
also beneficial and their establishment continues to meet with general approval.
Deer sanctuaries exist at Elko, Canal Flats, and in the Kettle River district. These are
located on the winter yarding-grounds of the mule deer and serve as a haven for these animals
during unusual winter conditions late in the season, when they might otherwise be too easily
taken.
Fur Trade.
Resident fur-traders at Oliver, Trail, Nelson, Creston, and Invermere share with the
Vancouver market practically all the furs taken in the Division, very little being exported
directly out of the Province.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming is well established in the Division and although the future of the silver-fox
industry seems somewhat uncertain, there is yet little complaint from the established fox-
farmers, many of them are also taking up other lines of fur, principally mink. Encouraging
results have been obtained in recent years by pioneers in marten-farming and it is expected
that eventually these animals can be raised profitably in captivity. At the close of 1940 the
general up-trend in fur prices was most encouraging.
'Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of trap-lines has proved its worth beyond doubt since its inauguration,
but probably at no time to the same extent as at present.    Due to the upward tendency of raw fur prices during the fall of 1940 and the expectation that the prices will go even higher,
there has been a rush at every game office to obtain trap-lines. These, as mentioned previously, are absolutely at a premium and very little territory becomes available for trapping
in any year. Trappers who have enlisted for service overseas have been granted the privilege
of retaining their registered trap-lines without the payment of the annual fee, and in most
cases have made arrangements with friends to protect their interests.
The anxiety to obtain trap-lines in British Columbia is due to the fact that we still have
lots of wild fur to catch and will continue to enjoy this favourable condition as long as our
system of registered trap-lines is in force. Trap-lines are nothing more than huge natural
fur-farms and they are treated as such by the vast majority of trappers.
Registration of Guides.
There were thirty-five licensed guides in the Division during the year. The prevailing
war situation affected non-resident parties to some extent, but from inquiries received and
the statements made by the members of the hunting-parties it is expected that next year will
see a larger influx of non-resident hunters, particularly from the United States. Most
hunters express themselves surprised with the variety of big-game animals that may be
obtained in the south-eastern part of the Province at smaller expense and a minimum of time
compared to similar trips in the northern part of the Province, Alaska, or the Yukon.
Special Patrols.
Routine patrols were as usual during the year by car, launch, rowboat, horseback, and on
foot. Many trips were made to remote areas at the headwaters of various streams for the
purpose of planting eyed trout-eggs for restocking main streams.
Hunting Accidents.
Only one hunting accident was reported during the year.    On September 15th, Frederick
William  Gardiner,   of  Graham  Landing,  on  Arrow  Lakes,  accidently killed himself when
attempting to remove a loaded double-barrelled hammer model shotgun from the back seat of
his car.    Presumably the hammer caught on some obstruction and the full charge struck him
in the chest. „ „
Game-fish Culture.
Although the detailed operations and statistics of liberations are found in the Game
Commission's report and while Fishery Supervisor Robinson's report also embraces various
phases under his immediate direction, there are some points of interest that can be profitably
mentioned herein.
We started off the season of 1940 full of both ambition and optimism with 400,000 fry, out
of the half million we had allotted for Kootenay Lake waters, in the newly completed rearing-
pond at Kaslo. These young fry were very vigorous little fish up to 2 inches in length and
were beginning to take food voraciously. Fishery Officer J. F. Thompson in charge is an
experienced fish culturist and had anticipated every possible contingency that might retard
the development of the young fish. He had allowed for everything but nature taking a hand
in the proceedings.
On July 24th, Thompson had just fed the fish their usual ration and had gone to have his
own lunch, when there was a terrific thunder-storm which seemed to be localized over the City
of Kaslo. The concussions were startling and the display of lightning awesome. Thompson
immediately rushed to the pond and found the young fish in a distressed condition and dying
by thousands. In spite of his efforts at salvage, not more than 5,000 of these fine young fry
ultimately survived.
While practically certain that the storm was responsible, other possibilities, such as
pollution or inadequate oxygen-supply, were considered and eliminated. Samples were sent
to the Dominion Biological Board at Nanaimo and they could not discover any apparent cause
for the fish dying, other than the probable result of concussion.
The loss of approximately 400,000 small fish was a severe blow to our programme for the
year, as these fry were from the large parent stock of Kootenay Lake. However, we still had
approximately 100,000 more in the ponds of K. K. Bjerkness at Mirror Lake.
From the Mirror Lake ponds we released in the month of October 29,200 fine fingerlings,
fully 4 inches in length for the most part and active enough to snap a fly off the surface of P 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
the pond with vim. These fry were fed during the summer and considerable trouble ensued in
keeping the pond clear of mergansers, kingfishers, herons, ouzels, and water-beetles, all of
which prey upon the fry. One heron, that was shot in the pond, had over 100 small fish in
his throat-tract alone. This point is mentioned in explanation of why we only released 29,200,
by count, fingerlings from 100,000 fry.
Another year it is hoped to have a permanent attendant at the pond to cut down the loss.
Very fe-w fry died naturally and we can safely lay our loss to predatory birds and insects
which can only be controlled by constant vigilance.
The growth of fry in suitable waters as instanced by our plantings in Boundary Lake,
south of Nelson, is interesting. One hundred thousand eastern brook-trout fingerlings were
liberated in April, 1939. Late in October of the same year, while collecting eggs, the Fishery
Officers observed numerous 6- and 7-inch fish and were fairly sure that these were from the
spring planting.    This was mentioned in last year's annual report.
The fishing in Boundary Lake this past summer was excellent and the majority of the
fish caught were approximately 12 inches long and % lb. in weight (it should be mentioned
that this lake had not been stocked for some years and there were apparently no fish of that
size in it in 1939). Needless to say, this report is very gratifying both to the Game Department and the many fishermen who patronized the lake. In all, it was just eighteen months
from the taking of the eggs until those same eggs had developed into better-than-legal
sized fish.
Our kokanee plantings in Premier Lake in the Cranbrook district are also worth noting.
This very fine lake, which, after providing excellent fishing for several years, had fallen off
and kokanee were introduced in November, 1938. The kokanee eggs were planted by Fishery
Supervisor Robinson in a small feeder-stream and in October, 1940, twenty-three months after
planting, the creek was full of spawning kokanee, averaging 1 foot in length, about 2 inches
longer than the parent fish from which the spawn was taken. Not only was the success of the
planting proved beyond a doubt, but all the fishermen reported excellent fishing in Premier
Lake during the summer, although the fish were small. Undoubtedly they were taking
kokanee.
While it is yet too soon to say whether the introduction of kokanee will result in larger
trout in Premier Lake, it is confidently expected that this will be the case. The trout grew to
a large size previously because Premier Lake contained ample food, but it is now felt that
most of this food has been consumed, as is the history of most similar lakes, and that some
other type of food is necessary if Premier Lake is to continue to supply large trout. Kokanee
supply that food in our large lakes, as well as providing good fishing on their own.
Fishing in the West Arm of the Kootenay Lake, in the vicinity of Nelson, for the past
few years has been excellent in June, July, and August, and the catch is what local people
refer to as silver trout, these are kokanee which bite freely before they begin to run up the
creeks to spawn in September. There is no doubt that the numbers of them taken is a direct
result of our plantings for the past few years in the streams tributary to the West Arm of
Kootenay Lake.
Rosebud Lake, south of Nelson, was originally a cut-throat trout lake and the fish did
not exceed 3 lb. in weight. Fishery Supervisor Robinson experimented with the introduction
of rainbow (Kamloops) trout in this lake and resultant hybrids grew up to 5 or 6 lb.
Further plantings of rainbow have now resulted in fish of 10 lb. or more with very few
characteristics remaining of the cut-throat trout. Due to this successful experiment, the
Kamloops restocking will be continued.
The above items are mentioned because they are of general interest and are specific
instances where fish culture has most decidedly improved upon nature, in so far as sport
fishing is concerned.
Summary and General Remarks.
Forest fires were quite prevalent in some parts of the Division during the very dry
summer season, but no damage is apparent to the game stand, although some trappers complain that their trap-lines have been affected. To offset the effect of forest fires we again
had a mild winter in 1939-40 and it may be safely said that game conditions were satisfactory
throughout the year.    Not only did the big-game animals have no unusual conditions to cope REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940. P 17
with but pheasants also only required to be fed lightly, while local water-fowl wintered very
well without help.
The general up-trend in fur prices promises bigger prices for pelts than since the banner
year of 1920 and it is possible that prices may go even higher. Beavers, after being at a low
price for several years, are now as high as they have ever been at their peak years and it is to
be hoped that these animals will not be overtrapped as a result.
The high prices for furs is good news for the fur-farmers, whose numbers have been
increasing steadily, and there is every possibility that they will make appreciable profits in
the immediate  future.
Game-fish culture took up much of the Game Wardens' time during the year. In reviewing the restocking statistics of this Division for the past year, much credit is due to the
Fishery Officers and Game Wardens who have carried out a somewhat ambitious programme
with a minimum of equipment. Our present hatcheries at Kaslo, Summerland, and Taft are
old and need constant repairing. The main eyeing-station for this Division at Gerrard, where
the spawn is taken from the thirty-pounders of Kootenay Lake, was previously considered no
longer serviceable by the Dominion Fisheries Department but, with patching, it has been made
serviceable for some years to come.
We occasionally contact the Fishery Officers from the adjacent States of Montana, Idaho,
or Washington, and these gentlemen invariably are amazed that we can carry out extensive
fish-cultural programmes with our outmoded equipment. However, were it not for the very
fine co-operation and help we have received from the British Columbia Forest Branch, the
Public Works Department, and the various Rod and Gun Clubs our showing would not be so
satisfactory.
The general public is keenly interested in hatcheries, rearing-ponds, and distributions,
and the subsequent growth of the liberated fingerlings. Most of the outdoor magazines
through their articles have educated the sporting public along this line and we have no lack
of voluntary and well-meant suggestions, many of which are helpful. However, we do find
that fish-cultural conditions in interior British Columbia seem to be different from both the
Prairies and the Coast. That is, there is no set rule that will apply and game-fish culture in
" B " Division is based as much upon the local knowledge of our experienced Fishery Officers
as it is upon the theory and practice of the approved text-books.
The appreciation and thanks of the entire divisional personnel is tendered to the Provincial Forestry Service, the Public Works Department, and the Provincial Police, to all of
whom we are indebted both for direct assistance and the use of equipment during the year.
We should also like to include the help we have received both from individuals and groups of
various Rod and Gun Clubs in the district, who are always ready to assist in measures
designed to augment either fishing or hunting.
The report of Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson is given hereunder:—
" Boundary District.
" Angling for rainbow trout in waters of the Kettle River system is improved, probably
the result of extending the closed season, systematic restocking with eyed eggs, and development o'f nursery planting areas.
" The supply of rainbow trout has been well maintained in Arlington, Collier, and Conkle
(Fish) Lakes from restocking and some natural reproduction. The introduction of rainbow
trout in waters of State Creek, Buck and Williamson Lakes is to be determined. Several
other lakes, not very accessible, are producing good catches of trout, as a result of natural
reproduction, from the necessary protection afforded to the parent fish. Speckled trout
introduced into Davis and Matthew Lakes in 1939 are making excellent growth.
" Jewel Lake.—This lake is not producing such large Kamloops trout as in former years;
possibly, in some respects, due to the indiscriminate discarding or liberation of live bait
(minnows) by certain anglers. While these fish, illegally introduced, may act as a food-
supply for the large trout, undoubtedly they are serious competitors towards the food-supply
of the small trout. They are also predaceous in their habits, more particularly when fry are
first liberated or hatched. Jewel Lake held the record of producing Kamloops trout weighing-
over 50 lb., so far not exceeded in any other lake in the Interior.
" Wilgress (Loon) Lake was stocked with Kamloops-trout fry, commencing in 1935 with
the term ' dwarfed stock ' of Six Mile Lakes, which reached maturity when about 8 inches in P 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
length, then subsequently the progeny of Penask Lake were introduced. Both varieties made
splendid growth, attaining weights up to 20 lb. or more. This was an interesting experiment
and seems to explode the theory that it requires selected stock to produce large fish.
" Granby River is accessible from auto highway. This river produced good catches of
rainbow trout during the season and no doubt the yearly replenishment has assisted to
maintain the supply.
" Smelter Lake.—Existing conditions restrict the trolling to some extent, resulting in
somewhat limited fishing; but, no doubt, large trout frequent this body of water, which should
interest and entice the anglers to try out their luck.
" Lake Christina.—A popular summer resort. Owing to the presence of small-mouth
black bass introduced and steps taken to control the numbers, in view of noticeable outward
migration and diminishing food-supply, the interested sportsmen now hope to increase the
trout population from a four-year plan adopted by the Game Commission, with systematic
planting of Kamloops trout eyed eggs in suitable tributary streams and possibly with fingerlings later.    The results so far are very encouraging, according to reports received.
" West Kootenay District.
" Big Sheep and Beaver Creeks.—Ideal speckled-trout waters, furnishing good fishing for
Rossland and Trail anglers.
" Columbia River.—Extending to the International border, Waneta, this stretch of water
is still producing good catches of rainbow trout for the Trail anglers, in spite of a certain
amount of pollution from the Trail smelter operations, which is unavoidable.
"Arrow Lakes.—Angling and trolling for Kamloops and Dolly Varden trout compared
favourably with other seasons. Glacial silt from the Columbia River affects the summer
fishing in waters of the upper lake. However, towards the early fall as the water clears the
fishing improves.    Coarse fish are quite numerous throughout the lakes.
" Whatshan Lakes.—Comprising three connected lakes, 15 miles in length; provide
excellent fly-fishing for rainbow trout for about six weeks from commencement of the season,
then subsequently after water temperatures rise, trolling with lures adapted for the rainbow
and Dolly Varden trout, generally with good catches. The lakes are becoming quite popular
for the fishing and camping and there is suitable accommodation. Coarse fish are on the
increase in these lakes.
" From reports received, rainbow-trout fishing showed some improvement in waters of
Summit, Victor, Three Valley, and Griffin Lakes; and the results of the introduction of rainbow trout in Begbie, Five Mile, and Williamson Lakes is awaited with interest by the Revelstoke anglers. Glacial water conditions affect fishing in the Columbia and Illecillewaet Rivers,
but towards the fall the Columbia produces good numbers of large Dolly Varden trout that
follow up the redfish. Angling for cut-throat trout in waters of Jordan and Wigwam streams
remained fairly good.
" Trout Lake.—Located in the Lardeau area, some 17 miles in length; produced excellent
catches of Kamloops and Dolly Varden trout, varying in weight up to 20 lb. or more during
the season. This body of water is becoming quite popular for the Revelstoke, Okanagan, and
American anglers in spite of its somewhat remote situation. Staubert Lake also produced
good catches of large Kamloops and Dolly Varden trout.
" Wilson Lakes.—Comprising two connected lakes of about 3 miles in length. Fishing for
the rainbow and kokanee improved during the season. Furthermore, most of the large rainbow trout captured contained kokanee in their stomach-tracts. The kokanee were introduced
to increase the food-supply, but a good number of them were also taken on the fly. The
stocking of Wilson Lakes has proved an outstanding success, as trout were introduced in the
year 1922 and, with the exception of another planting in 1925, natural reproduction took care
of an abundant supply of trout until 1936, after which restocking commenced again.
" Box and Summit Lakes.—Accessible to the highway, are not producing the number of
trout that might be expected in spite of yearly replenishment. Coarse fish predominate in
Summit Lake.
" Slocan Lake.—From reports received, angling and trolling for Kamloops trout has
improved slightly and with increased plantings of eyed eggs, together with the continued
liberation  of fingerlings  from New  Denver rearing-pond, the interested  anglers hope to REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940. P 19
restore the fishing to rank second to Kootenay Lake, with due attention given in reducing the
numbers of coarse fish that are on the increase. Pollutions from mining industries in the
past depleted the supply of kokanee, one of the principal diets of the large Kamloops trout.
However, with systematic yearly planting of kokanee eggs, the species are now increasing in
numbers.
" Bear and Fish Lakes.—These lakes provided good catches of mountain Kamloops trout,
although somewhat small in size.
" Evans, Cahill, and Beatrice Lakes.—These lakes produced excellent catches of Kamloops
trout, first introduced in 1925 and 1933 in the latter two lakes. As the food-supply is not
abundant in Beatrice Lake, the restocking is governed accordingly. Cahill Lake is still
producing Kamloops trout up to 40 lb. in weight or more. Scale readings indicate the
growth is about 10 lb. in four years.
"Enterprise and Wilson Creeks.—In the latter, rainbow trout were introduced in 1931-32
above the main creek falls with good results. Both streams provided good fishing during the
season.
" Slocan River.—While the stream appeared ideal for rainbow trout, coupled with yearly
restocking, angling was not as good as might be expected, although it is possible the fish
migrate to Slocan Lake and down to the Kootenay River. Coarse fish are probably a
detriment to good trout-fishing. The river contains excellent spawning areas, wherein the
majority of parent rainbow trout from the lower reaches of Kootenay River ascend to spawn.
"Little Slocan Lakes.—Speckled trout were first introduced in these lakes in 1926; these
fish have made good growth but, owing to the coarse fish being so numerous, the lakes are
not fished to a great extent. In spite of extensive angling in the West Fork of Little Slocan
River, the supply of rainbow trout remained fairly good from natural reproduction.
" Kootenay River.—Extends from Grohman Creek to Columbia River. Angling for
rainbow trout was curtailed in the closed portion, including Slocan Pool, which is noted for
excellent fly-fishing. The sections of the river below and above the closed area produced
fair catches of trout, although, apparently, backing up the water from Corra Linn Dam has
changed fly-fishing considerably.
" West Arm of Kootenay Lake.—Extends from Grohman Creek to Procter. Angling and
trolling for Kamloops trout and kokanee remained fairly good, considering the increasing
number of anglers. A few sportsmen kept a creel census of fish taken, varying from 170
to 200 fish each, weighing from % to 5 lb.
"Kootenay Lake.—Vicinity of Procter, Irvine Creek, Pilot Bay, Queens Bay; thence to
Ainsworth and Riondel. While it appeared an off season during the extreme spell of hot
weather, the spring and fall season for the large Kamloops trout fulfilled all expectations,
as demonstrated by the Gyro Derby and other records kept.
" Kokanee, Keen, Garland, Kaslo, and Tanal Lakes.—Located in the Kokanee Glacier
Park area; produced fair catches of cut-throat, as usual. In view of the altitude of the
lakes and the somewhat scanty natural food-supply, the restocking is governed accordingly.
" Ross, Whitelady, Haiselden, and Noakes Lakes, Redfish Creek.—These lakes produced
fair catches of rainbow trout up to 3 lb. in weight.
" Six Mile and Cottonwood Lakes.—These little lakes are still producing limit catches of
mountain Kamloops trout.
" Barrat (Lost), Clearwater, Port Rico, and Panther (Diamond) Lakes (Salmon River
Watershed).—Fishing for the rainbow trout remained good, and this also applies to cut-throat
trout in Wolfe Lake.
" Rosebud Lake.—Mostly fished by non-resident anglers. It is producing excellent catches
of rainbow trout up to 5 lb. in weight. Before the introduction of rainbow, the native trout
were cut-throat.    Changing the variety has proven beneficial to the fishermen.
" Boundary Lake.—A small body of water, not exceeding 40 acres in extent, remains
very productive. It is estimated that at least 10,000 legal-sized speckled trout were taken by
angling during the season, mostly by non-residents.
" Kootenay Lake, Kaslo.—The Kamloops trout compared favourably with other seasons
for spring fishing, but the fall fishing for the large fish was rather disappointing. This was
compensated to some extent by good summer fly-fishing at the mouths of tributary streams.
Quite a number of non-resident anglers visited Kaslo during the early part of the season,
and they appeared, in most cases, satisfied with the catches of large Kamloops trout. P 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Loon and Leviathan Lakes.—These lakes produced fairly good catches of speckled trout,
but there is a noticeable decrease in the size of trout in Loon Lake.
" Wheeler Lake.—The cut-throat trout remain quite plentiful, as a result of phenomenal
natural reproduction from the original planting of 12,000 eyed eggs in 1933. The population
is in excess of the natural food-supply, resulting in poor-conditioned fish, but if the lake were
fished more it would be of benefit.
" Woodberry Creek.—South and Main Fork provided good fishing for cut-throat and
Dolly Varden trout. The results of stocking Sunset Lake are not definitely determined. This
lake was stocked in 1938.
" Fletcher, Flint, and Milford Lakes.—Angling for rainbow trout was good.
"Kootenay Lake (South End).—Angling and trolling for Kamloops trout in the vicinity
of Cultus, Midge Creek, and south end of lake remained good.
" Arkansaw, Devils Hole, and Bayonne Creek Lakes.—These lakes are producing good
catches of rainbow trout. The lakes were previously barren of fish life prior to the year 1935
and were stocked principally for the benefit of prospectors and miners employed in that
area. The results of stocking Tarn O'Shanter Lake, Crawford Creek, 1938-39, with rainbow
trout is to be determined, including cut-throat trout introduced into waters of Baker Lake,
Lockhart Creek, 1938, but from reports received, the results in each case appear promising.
" Large-mouth black bass, that migrated from American waters, Bonners Ferry, and
discovered in waters of Kootenay River, back channels and sloughs on Kootenay Flats, 1920,
in the vicinity of Creston, are still very plentiful and provide good fishing for the local
anglers. The fish vary in weight up to 8 lb. At one time the bass circulated quite freely
into waters of Kootenay Lake, causing great concern to the authorities and sportsmen.
However, the deep, cool waters of Kootenay Lake caused them to desert, to some extent, in
preference to their old haunts in the more sluggish waters of Kootenay Flats.
" Goat River provided fairly good fishing for the Kamloops trout (locally called steelhead
in waters of the lower reaches of the river). The upper reaches extending from the Canyon
angling for cut-throat trout remained very good. Meadow Creek, a tributary, produced good
catches of speckled trout, conditions being ideal for that specie of fish.
" East Kootenay District.
" Moyie Lakes and River produced good fishing for cut-throat and Kamloops trout during
the season.    The Kamloops varied in weight up to 15 lb. or more.
" Monroe and Mineral Lakes provided good fishing for cut-throat and hybrid trout.
" Twin, Smith, Peckhams, Echo, Garbut's, and several other small lakes provided good
Kamloops-trout fishing. Horseshoe Lake: Owing to adverse water conditions and the illegal
introduction of undesirable fish (minnows) by certain anglers has materially affected the
food-supply of Kamloops trout. The lake in question at one time produced more fish per
acre than any other lake in the district.
" Bull River and Tributaries.—Angling for cut-throat trout remained fairly good throughout the season.    Natural reproduction has so far taken care of the supply.
" Fish Lakes.—Reserved for artificial propagation of cut-throat trout. Since the year
1923 the supply has been fairly well maintained for that purpose.
" St. Mary River, Lake, and Tributaries provided good cut-throat trout fishing throughout the season, mostly for the Kimberley anglers. It has been suggested that rainbow trout
be introduced in the waters of the St. Mary River watershed. This appears to be a matter
for careful study before non-indigenous fish are introduced into cut-throat trout waters.
" Skookumchuck River.—A stretch of water extending from Kootenay River to the falls
about 12 miles. Provided fairly good cut-throat trout fishing as most of the matured trout
migrate from the Kootenay River, due possibly to glacial silt conditions. The stretch of the
river above the falls was barren of fish life prior to the year 1935, when 200,000 cut-throat
trout eyed eggs were planted, with apparently satisfactory results.
" Premier Lake has produced quite large Kamloops trout weighing up to 40 lb. in the
past, but with the diminishing food-supply of recent years the growth has not been so rapid.
However, according to reports received, excellent catches of Kamloops were made, varying in
weight from 1 to 5 lb. or more on the fly and troll. The improved fishing can be attributed
to  the  liberation  of  fingerlings  raised  in  the   Cranbrook   Hatchery.    In   an  endeavour  to REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1940. P 21
increase the food-supply for the large fish, kokanee eyed eggs were introduced in the fall of
1938, some of which reached maturity the fall of 1940, and in spawning in the Diorite Creek
diversion, where first planted, attained the size of about 12 inches in length. This was an
interesting experiment, as no kokanee inhabit the waters of East Kootenay area; also to learn
that the kokanee in this lake have been caught on the fly and troll.
" Elk River and Tributaries.—Considered some of the most productive cut-throat trout
waters of the Interior. In spite of the heavy drain from angling by the numerous local
anglers and influx of Alberta non-resident anglers, the supply has been fairly well maintained
from natural reproduction, yearly replenishment with eyed eggs in suitable nursery creeks
with specially prepared planting areas, and the continued closure of feeder-streams.
" Tie, North Star, Rock (Mud), Burton, Silver Springs, Manistee, Surveyors, Baynes;
Loon, and Edwards Lakes.—Previously barren of game fish, but since the introduction of
Kamloops trout fifteen years ago some of these lakes are still producing this specie weighing
up to 30 lb. or more.    From reports received the fishing is improved in certain lakes.
" Grave Lake, Elk Valley.—Fly and trolling for the Kamloops trout was fairly good.
The lake contained no game fish prior to restocking in 1923. Summit Lake, Crowsnest, produced good specimens of Kamloops trout up to 3 lb. in weight, first introduced in 1939
(Penask stock).
" Barnes Lake.—In the vicinity of Corbin. The cut-throat trout which were introduced
into these waters in 1938 have become well established and should furnish good fly-fishing
in 1941, when the lake is officially opened.
" Fording River (above the Falls).—Barren of fish life prior to year 1931. The results of
three plantings of cut-throat trout eyed eggs were reported recently as successful.
" Columbia and Windermere Lakes.—After several years restocking with eyed eggs in
these lakes the Kamloops trout are now fairly well established, particularly in Lake Windermere, where limit catches were taken varying in weight up to 5 lb. Prior to restocking,
these large bodies of water contained very few game fish and these were Dolly Varden trout.
Coarse fish are very numerous in these lakes.
" Paddy Ryan Lakes.—Four small connected lakes. Produced excellent catches of cutthroat trout which were first introduced in 1931. The lakes were barren of fish life prior to
liberations.
" Lillian Lake provided good fishing for Kamloops trout, which were first introduced in
1930. As an experiment, the progeny of Six Mile Lakes were first introduced. These fish
adapted similar characteristics of the Kootenay Lake rainbow and fighting qualities, attaining
2 lb. in weight the first year and second year between 5 and 6 lb. This is another instance
where abundant food-supply and environment demonstrates the growth of dwarfed stock
under ideal conditions.
" Cartwright Lake produced some excellent catches of Kamloops trout, 'weighing up to
10 lb., which were first introduced in 1935.
" Dunbar, Twin, Bott, Hall, and Holgrave Lakes.—Angling for cut-throat remained good.
Halfway and Lead Queen Lakes, where the cut-throat species were introduced in 1938, the
results of which are to be determined. Baptiste Lake, where cut-throat trout were first
introduced in 1938 have become well established with excellent growth. The lake will open
officially for fishing in the 1941 season.
" Glacial water conditions in the Golden area restrict trout-fishing to a great extent,
but some progress has been made by the introduction of Kamloops trout in waters of Cedar
Lakes 1, 2, and 3, Canyon Creek, Wiseman and other small lakes previously barren of fish life,
also the restocking of Blackwater and Bush Lakes adjacent to the Trans-Canada Auto
Highway each season.
" Okanagan and Similkameen District.
" Okanagan Lake (South End).—Kamloops-trout fishing compared favourably with other
seasons, with fair catches, varying in weight to less than 10 lb. However, with the liberation
of fingerlings from Summerland and Kelowna rearing-ponds fishing conditions should improve,'
although the impression prevails that the trout have a tendency to circulate towards the
north end of the lake.    This may be attributed to the available food-supply.
" Skaha (Dog) Lake produced fairly good catches of Kamloops trout, and with the
continued liberation of fingerlings the trout population should increase. P 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Vasseaux and Osoyoos Lakes cannot be termed good trout waters, being inhabited with
the large-mouth black bass, carp and perch which came from American waters south of the
line. The resumption of restocking Osoyoos Lake, in co-operation with the American
authorities, is to be dealt with after an interview with those concerned.
" Aeneas, Island, Deer, Dranzie, Catnip, Madden, and Clearwater Lakes provided fair
fishing for rainbow trout; also Cathedral Lakes for cut-throat and Kamloops trout, including
Fish Lake, near Summerland, for speckled trout.
" Chute Lake.—In view of the requests received from the Penticton organized sportsmen
regarding the decline of rainbow fishing and the depletion of the natural food-supply, conditions were investigated and, in turn, fresh-water shrimps and aquatic weed-growth were
transferred and planted in the lake.    The investigation is to be completed.
" The introduction of Kamloops trout in waters of Allendale, Clark, and Victor Lakes,
commencing in the year 1938, are reported to be making excellent growth, as indicated by
samples taken.
" Clearwater Lake, Hedley.—Some attention was given to spawning conditions and the
protection of parent rainbow trout, also the productivity of the lake for replenishment.
Moreover, amicable arrangements were arrived at between the officers of the Nickel Plate
and Penticton Clubs as to the future policy concerning the lake and Provincial Park area.
" The following lakes located in the Princeton area produced average catches of rainbow
trout: Wolfe, Otter, Chain, Link, Osprey, McKenzie, Blue, Bergersen, Missezuala, and Taylor
Lakes. The introduction of rainbow trout in waters of Lost Lake, commencing in 1938,
resulted in good catches varying in weight up to 5 lb. Certain lakes situated in Brookmere
area produced excellent catches of trout from recent liberations of Kamloops-trout fry.
"Similkameen River.—Not considered an ideal trout stream. Furnished good fly-fishing;
this being an improvement compared to previous seasons.
" The closure of lakes situated on the One Mile (Allison) Creek system did not achieve
all that could be expected from protection afforded and liberation of fingerlings from the
Princeton rearing-pond and fry from Summerland Hatchery. The matter is being investigated in the coming spring to ascertain if remedial measures should be taken to improve
existing conditions.
" Kokanee (redfish) eyed eggs were widely distributed into various waters of the
Interior from the collection carried out from the run of fish in Meadow Creek, Lardeau. The
eggs were distributed primarily as a forage fish for the Kamloops trout, to restore the runs
where affected by adverse water conditions resulting from irrigation diversions and storage;
also in an endeavour to improve food conditions in certain lakes wherein the kokanee has
been introduced. Moreover, these fish might be classified as game fish, as good numbers
are taken on the fly and troll. The necessary protection afforded when spawning in streams
has overcome any possible depletion. In fact, some impression prevails at Kaslo that there
are too many of the specie in Kootenay Lake, thereby affecting the catches of large Kamloops
trout.
" Rocky Mountain whitefish remain quite plentiful, particularly in waters of Elk River,
where some 10 to 12 tons are taken by angling each season. This also applies to the Lardeau,
Kootenay, Slocan, and Kettle Rivers. These fish are serious competitors towards the trout
food-supply and the catching of them should be encouraged; although in some instances,
towards the spring, angling for them conflict with the trout regulations.
" Eastern whitefish were introduced into waters of Kootenay and Arrow Lakes in 1930.
So far no information is available as to the success of the introductions.
" Water Conditions.—Due to light snowfall and precipitation, coupled with extreme long
spell of hot weather, resulted in the rapid receding of the water-flow in creeks. Consequently,
all eyed eggs which were planted were inspected with the co-operation of Game Wardens, and
action was taken where necessary to ensure proper hatching of eggs and resultant free-
swimming fry to emerge from beds without loss. The salvage and transfer of trout fry and
fingerlings that were left stranded from the lack of sufficient water-flow received attention in
certain streams.
" Coarse Fish.—One of the major problems to contend with in view of reducing the
numbers for the benefit of game fish in waters of Columbia, Windermere, Kootenay, Slocan,
Arrow, Whatshan, Summit, Smelter, Little Slocan, Osoyoos, Vasseaux, Skaha, and Okanagan REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940. P 23
Lakes, where they appear to be on the increase, is receiving attention, as conditions will
permit, by the Commission and licensed fur-farmers.
" Predatory Birds.—It seems desirable to continue the investigation to determine to what
extent the mergansers (fish-ducks) and belted kingfisher are preying upon the trout populations of waters wherein trout only inhabit.
" Natural Propagation.—Under the present Fishery Regulations in force, fairly good
protection is afforded to the parent spawning trout to aid natural reproduction, with the
exception of lakes located at altitudes from 4,000 to 6,500 feet, where spawning is much
later. The extension of the closed season affecting the lakes in question is under review by
the authorities.
" Game-fish Culture.—The continued efficient operation of Cranbrook, Nelson, Gerrard-
Kaslo, and Summerland Hatcheries, with augmented supplies of eyed eggs from Penask
and Lloyds Creek Hatcheries, has assisted greatly towards maintaining and increasing the
supply of sport fish.
" Rearing-ponds.—In addition to the operation of Princeton and Taft rearing-ponds, the
interested sportsmen throughout the Division are rapidly becoming rearing-pond conscious,
resulting, mostly on their own initiative, in pond development at Kimberley, Cranbrook,
Bjerkness, Kaslo, New Denver, Penticton, and possibly at Nelson the coming spring. Of
course, some of the ponds are in the experimental stage and future operations will be
decided, subject to experiments undertaken. However, the interest shown is very encouraging,
particularly in the Bjerkness, Kaslo, and New Denver ponds.
" Private ponds constructed by E. L. Staples, Premier Lake; T. H. Edmundson, Creston;
T. Pagliaro, Golden; Louis Rothel and E. Firstel, Natal; Capt. H. Hincks, Crawford Bay;
E. Newgrand, Nakusp; A. L. Harris, New Denver; and P. A. Peterson, Grand Forks, are
not, at present, producing many trout.
" Fish-screens, Irrigation Systems.—For conservation measures, it appears essential that
all possible attention be given to effective screening of the intakes of the various irrigation
systems by the water-users, where deemed advisable in the conservation of game fish.
" Fishways, installed in dams under 10 feet in height, functioned satisfactorily, as
follows:—■ ! #ri i
Waters. Owners.
Alexander Creek F. Knight, Crowsnest.
Paddy Ryan Lakes . Invermere Construction Co., Invermere.
McBains (Rosen) Lake Mrs. C. Rosen, Jaffray.
Little Sand Creek F. C. Limbocker, Jaffray.
Eholt Creek C. and R. Floyd, Greenwood.
Okanagan Lake Game Commission, Vancouver.
"Obstructions (Natural), Handy Log-jam, Lardeau River.—Situated 1% miles downstream from Gerrard Hatchery. During the summer of 1939, the partial removal of the jam
by the Provincial Forestry and Game Departments proved beneficial to the parent Kamloops
trout ascending from Kootenay Lake to their respective spawning areas adjacent to Gerrard
Hatchery, as indicated by the increased number reaching the spawning areas without delay
or injury. However, in view of logs and debris passing out of Trout Lake and accumulating
again at the point of obstruction, some attention is needed yearly to keep the channel open;
possibly might be undertaken by the hatchery staff before the ova collection commences or
during the early fall.
" Elk River, East Kootenay Power Company Dam.—The advocated installation of a
fishway in the structure was investigated in 1938-39, resulting in no action being taken by
the authorities, owing to existing natural rock barriers situated down-stream below the
dam-site, which prevents the passage of fish up-stream to the dam.
" Bull River.—The concrete dam situated near the mouth of the stream, constructed by
the C.P.R. Tie and Timber Branch, now owned by a Mrs. Schad, of Cranbrook, is not equipped
with a fishway; thereby the structure prevents the passage of fish from Kootenay River to
the stretch of water extending from the dam to impassable rock barrier approximately 5 miles
up-stream. The dam was left intact to be utilized for irrigation purposes and it was the
intention of the late Mr. Schad to make provision for a fishway, which to date has not
materialized, owing to the death of Mr. Schad and the financial position of Mrs. Schad. P 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" One Mile (Allison) Creek, Princeton.—Small irrigation-dams existing on the stream
are being investigated to determine the necessity of the owners to provide a fishway or by-pass
in the structures.
" Pollutions, Mining Industries.—The continued operation of gold and quartz mines has,
in some instances, resulted in the serious pollution of streams frequented with game fish.
This is a complex problem to contend with, owing to the precipitous nature of the ground
where the concentrators are located, very often immediately adjacent to water affected.
However, where possible and feasible, the control and impounding of the resultant deleterious
substances has received attention by the operators in the interest of game fish from a standpoint of the economic situation and importance of the industries, as referred to hereunder:—
" Salmon River System remains seriously polluted as a result of the following operations: Ymir Yankee Gold Mines, Ltd., Ymir; Relief-Arlington Gold Mines, Ltd., North
Fork; Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd., Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Ltd., Gold Belt Mines, Ltd.,
and the Reno Gold Mines, Ltd., of Sheep Creek, tributary to the Salmon River.
." Slocan Lake System..—Due to somewhat low prevailing prices of base metals, the silver-
lead mines of Slocan are not operating to any extent and, at present, the tributary streams
to Slocan Lake are free of pollution.
" Columbia River.—The unavoidable pollution continues from smelter and fertilizer plants
operated by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Trail. It is possible that the
pollution may not be so harmful after becoming diffused with the water-flow of the river.
" Summit Creek.—The resumption of operations by the Bayonne Consolidated Mines,
Ltd., has again resulted in some pollution of the creek which affected fish life. The pollution
could not very well be controlled in view of the location of the mill and precipitous nature of
the ground adjacent.
" St. Mary River.—The waste material from the Sullivan Concentrator, operated by the
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company, is well under control, by impounding methods,
resulting in but a slight pollution of the river considering some 6,000 to 7,000 tons of silver,
lead, and zinc ore are treated daily and the resultant tailings impounded is a specially
arranged reservoir containing over 15,000,000 tons of concentrator refuse.
" Kicking Horse River, Golden.—The steady attention afforded by the responsible C.P.R.
Section Foremen to waste crude oil sumps at Field and Beavermouth has practically eliminated
any large quantities of oil escaping in the waters of Kicking Horse and Columbia Rivers,
which at one time affected fish, water-fowl, and fur-bearing animals.
" Similkameen River, Princeton.—With suitable impounding methods instituted by the
Allenby Mining Company of Copper Mountain and the Kelowna Exploration Company of
Hedley, the river is free of pollution and is again producing fairly good catches of rainbow
trout.
" Lumber Industries.—With the curtailment of lumber operations in the form of stationary sawmills, few complaints were received regarding the escape of sawdust and mill
refuse into waters frequented with fish. Also, where logging operations were conducted in the
vicinity of lakes and streams, the disposal of brush and slashings received the necessary
attention.
" Diseases.—There was no recurrence of the slight epidemic ' Furunculosis ' amongst the
fish population of Elk River system which last occurred in 1930-31, nor in waters of the Bull
and Goat Rivers, according to unconfirmed reports of year 1936. A number of matured
Kamloops trout died late spring in Horseshoe Lake, the cause probably attributed to the lack
of suitable spawning areas and oxygen content of the water being at its lowest stage ever
experienced in this land-locked lake.
" Co-operation.—The organized sportsmen representing some twenty-three clubs and other
organizations are taking renewed interest in game-fish culture, as shown by the splendid cooperation throughout the Division. Whenever convenient, the executive members of the clubs
are conferred with, thus creating a better understanding and less correspondence direct to
the Commission.
" Sport Fish.—In conclusion, generally speaking, the supply of game fish has been fairly
well maintained, with the exception in small streams accessible to auto highways, where it has
become a problem to meet the demands of anglers in supplying the expected number of legal-
sized trout. Moreover, the true sportsmen appreciate the active interest taken by the Game
Commission." REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1940. P 25
"C" DIVISION (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C " Game
Division during the year ended December 31st, 1940.
Big Game.
Moose.—No scarcity exists in the Cariboo, Chilcotin, and Kamloops areas. Moose are
indeed as numerous as mule-deer in many parts of the Interior and despite the inroads of
predators, such as the recent arrival of packs of wolves, their numbers are still maintained
to a satisfactory level. The trek still heads southward and this species has been seen south
of Kamloops in localities unsuitable to their protection because of lack of sufficient cover and
feed, peculiar to this animal. Many big-game hunters have been coming to the Interior for
over twenty years and now have their own summer homes on their hunting-grounds.
Caribou.—No caribou were taken in the Williams Lake area last year according to
reports. There should be a " slowing-up " of the season on the animals. In the northern area
of the Clinton Detachment caribou are reported as about even with other years, few having
been killed. In the Aitcha Mountain area an increase is noted and this is the only district
reporting such in this Division.
Deer.—In some sectors reports come to hand of an unequal proportion of bucks to does.
I have not heard of any pronounced scarcity of bucks. Very often, when a report of this
comes to our notice the weather has been so mild that the bucks have gone considerably higher
up. Others again say there are large numbers of barren does, but this, as usual, is just an
expression of opinion based on the assumption that a doe seen without a fawn must be barren.
The evidence is not conclusive.
Mountain-goats.—Around Seton Lake and Bridge River area mountain-goats are in considerable numbers. From the P.G.E. Railway tracks it is reported that they can be seen on
the mountain-side in fairly large numbers in the vicinity of Seton Lake. Very few mountain-
goats were taken from Momich River in the Adams Lake area during the past season. The
headwaters of Horsefly River and the Mitchell River area also have fair numbers of mountain-
goats.
Black Bears.—Very few hunters really trouble about these animals. Complaints are
made in places of damage to cattle and sheep. These complaints are attended to but the
services of one predatory-animal hunter cannot handle a situation which three hunters should
perform. Instructions are given to ranchers to attend to the elimination of marauding bears
by means of carefully placed baits. Grizzlies are reported as decreasing in the Williams Lake
area but increasing in the Quesnel Detachment.
Mountain-sheep.—These animals are showing signs of a definite increase in numbers at
Deer Park Ranch, in the Williams Lake Detachment. In the Marble Range area they are not
increasing. The season on mountain-sheep opened for the first time since their liberation at
Squilax in 1927. Surprisingly enough, only about eleven animals were taken during the short
open season, despite their substantial numbers. They are extending their range toward the
Falkland area. It requires considerable skill, both on foot and with the rifle, to bring down a
suitable head.    The heat during that period made hunting much more difficult.
On the west side of Yalakom River and in the Bridge River area mountain-sheep can be
seen, according to reports, at any time. Two splendid heads were taken out by parties
operating out from Bridge River. The Spences Bridge area reports a decrease, but I am
convinced that those animals have spread out, as mountain-sheep travel considerable distances. A number of domestic sheep fed on the Spences Bridge Range a few years ago and,
according to reports, some portions of this range were left rather bare. One can expect considerable thinning out of the weed-growth where large numbers of domestic sheep range.
Careless and indifferent herders and the too-seldom visits to those ranges by the actual owners
can quite easily ruin or devaluate the ranges in use. In the Adams Lake District mountain-
sheep have scattered over a wide area, but no large numbers have been seen nor reported
to date.
Wapiti.—This species is reported to be doing well in the Adams Lake District. They
have been described as heading toward Seymour Arm and well north of the north end of P 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Adams Lake.    The west side of the Fraser River near Pavilion also reports an odd bull as
having been seen.
Fur-bearing Animals.—There appears to be no definite data to go by except the varying
reports from trappers in the field and Game Officers in the course of their travels. The catch
of fur-bearing animals for the season 1939-40 on registered trap-lines shows an increase on
beaver which is the highest since 1928. This statistical data is interesting and satisfactory,
but the average price of $18 to $20 per pelt might be responsible. Comparative statistics are
again submitted for the season 1939-40, showing estimate of beaver left on registered trap-
lines in this Division, exclusive of Indian trap-lines:—
Season.
No. of
Trappers
submitting
Returns.
Estimate of
Beaver.
Average per
Trapper.
1934-35                	
275
343
367
345
307
348
4,789
6,392
6,347
5,945
5,315
6,501
17.41
1935-36	
18.60
1936-37                     	
17.29
1937-38             ■    -	
17.23
1938-39        	
17.30
1939-40   —	
18.68
Here is a summary obtained from answers to a questionnaire sent to twenty prominent
trappers on the best means of conserving beaver, particularly the female and her young.
Practically 100 per cent, favoured educating the trapper by means of printed literature on
how to save female beaver as against setting a distance limit from the beaver-house at which
to set traps. The adoption of the latter suggestion was considered impracticable. About
80 per cent, stated that the present season was not too long; and a few of them said that it
would be difficult to adjust the season to suit all trappers, because of the difference in altitude
and locality.
When asked as to the best methods of conserving beaver, I got a variety of suggestions.
Roughly 20 per cent, suggested a closed season. This suggestion is governed by some extent
by the actual estimate of beaver on their own lines. Some trappers suggesting a closed
season had only limited numbers available for trapping. A suggestion was forwarded that
all trappers or fur-buyers be compelled to mark the trapper's licence number on their shipment of furs, either through the express office or post-office.
Another suggestion, which is a practical one, is to prevent overtrapping when the beaver
estimate left on the trap-line is down to a very low level.
Two recommendations stated that trapping should be confined to creeks only leading to
ponds so as to prevent, to a large extent, the trapping of females. This might depend on the
food-supply available at hand.
A very good suggestion was to set traps deeply, about 15 inches, so as not to take the kits.
Even if the water-depth fluctuates from day to day it would to some extent decrease the possibility of taking very young beaver. One trapper of considerable experience and intelligent
observation stated that a fairly constant average beaver catch on his line was 60 per cent,
large, 20 per cent, medium, and 20 per cent, small. Of mature beaver he found about 80 per
cent, male and 10 per cent, each of dry and pregnant does. He has also found that dry does
are often quite badly scarred, indicating, according to this trapper, the presence of an extra
female in the colony rather than the lack of a male. This trapper avoids setting traps near a
house, but rather near the signs of recent activity. Another trapper of considerable experience stated that he caught an average of 60 per cent, males. I firmly believe that a code could
be formulated, taken from a larger survey of constructive suggestions submitted by experienced trappers, which would act as a guide to new trappers taking over lines for the first time.
Every ten or fifteen years we have a new generation of trappers taking over and who are
uninstructed in the art of conserving our fur-bearers.
War conditions are a disturbing factor, and many readjustments have to be made on
registered trap-lines of those who have gone overseas. We have endeavoured to have the
trapper joining for. overseas service leave his trap-line in care of some other member of his
family or a friend until his return from war service.    The conditions for fur-bearing animals REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940. P 27
are about normal.    There is a slight decrease in the number of trap-lines showing beaver
returns, but not enough to recommend any drastic change in the regulations.
The shipping of certain pelts via Government Agents or Game Officers, where seals would
be affixed en route to the market, would be a step in the direction of fur conservation.
Upland Game Birds.
All over this Division of 55,000 square miles reports have come to hand of a considerable
increase in all species of game birds. This is one year in the cycle showing a definite upward
trend. True, there is an occasional district which has never had a good year in grouse
shooting, even with heavy predator destruction, but on the whole the season has been more
than satisfactory. An opinion was expressed that the pheasants in the Vernon district were
a shade smaller than previous years. This is a matter for careful scrutiny and for taking
of weights over an extended period of time. European partridges are steadily increasing,
particularly along the Fraser River, west of Clinton. They seem to have come up the river
from Lillooet, but their habits are to keep on the move. Hence their disappearance from one
district and reappearance in another. Bob-white quail have been seen on the west side of the
Fraser River, opposite the 17-Mile Ranch, south of Pavilion. There is a request for a few of
these birds to be liberated on the Jones farm, which is used as a sanctuary for California quail.
Migratory Game Birds.
Migratory game birds were scarce in the Williams Lake Detachment after October 1st.
Geese were more numerous than last year.
Around Kelowna the freeze-up commenced on November 1st. The ducks were driven to
feed on the stubble and creeks, where good shooting was reported. Great numbers of swans
were seen going south during October and November at Quesnel. One hundred and twenty-
five whistler swans were seen on the South Thompson River on February 10th, between
Kamloops and Pritchard.
A census taken by Game Warden Sandiford on March 28th, 1939, on nine lakes in the
vicinity of Cornwall Lodge, 10 miles west of Kamloops, gave a total of 2,301 ducks; while this
year it was taken on the same lakes and on the same day and showed a total of 1,633. This
type of information is of considerably greater value than having to depend on such terms as
" plentiful " and " normal," so commonly used nowadays. Even a rough count to within 25
per cent, of the total is a definite number to go on and gives one a rough idea of just how
many ducks there are on the numerous lakes.
Nesting conditions were excellent and the broods in good shape. In the Kamloops area
pin-tails showed an increase over the previous year. Fifty-seven pelicans were seen on
Tunkwa Lake on August 18th. Cranes showed up in larger numbers than previously. What
appeared to be Hutchison's and Young Canada geese arrived in the Kamloops district in
September. There were several hundreds feeding on the stubble and Thompson River until
the middle of December. Large lakes and small pot-holes were frozen by November 15th.
One flock of wavy geese were seen on the North Thompson River on October 28th. In the
Clinton Detachment ducks decreased, due to the greater number of pot-holes being dry. Last
spring one of the biggest spring flights of ducks in five years was seen. Around Clinton and
points west and north, lakes froze over about October 28th.
We have on hand a census taken of ducks on several lakes in each Detachment during the
last few years.    This information gives us dependable data as against a cursory glance at the
water-fowl situation.
Vermin.
Wolves have been reported on the increase in the Upper Baezaeko area in the Quesnel
Detachment. In the remainder of this district an occasional band has been observed from
time to time. Two residents of the Nazko area are paying an additional sum as bounty on
these animals.
The following predators were destroyed by seven Game Wardens: —
Magpies   1,108 Dogs (ownerless)  :__       15
Crows  (including nests)  ....     865 Hawks       120
Owls        92 Bears   (doing damage)        26
Coyotes        105 Cougars        10
Stray cats      166 P 28 BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
Game Warden Ellis led with a total of sixty-five ownerless cats. Game Warden Still
destroyed twenty-six ownerless cats. Game Warden Maxson was responsible for the destruction of fifty-seven coyotes. Game Warden Jobin destroyed fifteen coyotes. On crows and
magpies Game Wardens Sandiford, Still, and Cameron were high in their respective order.
Game Warden Stewart and Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth will be proceeding to
the Empire Valley area in the Chilcotins to study the habits of wolves and endeavour to
eliminate a few of those animals. Certain well-known methods will be tried out during the
early part of 1941.
Damage to cattle by bears was a continual source of complaint and little or no time was
lost attending to cases of destruction. Those complaints lasted from early spring until long
after the beginning of the open season for game.
There may also be other causes of cattle disappearance which are not being overlooked,
both by Provincial Police and Game Officers working in co-operation. Greater use of the .22
rifle was made this year in the killing of predators because of the lower cost. The use
of telescope sights was also employed. Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth destroyed
nineteen bears, ten cougars, and thirteen coyotes, etc. In the Quesnel area twenty-five wolves
and fifteen cougars were destroyed. From April 1st to August 31st, ninety-six coyotes were
killed in the same area. The Quesnel Junior Game Association destroyed 146 crow's eggs
during the nesting period.    Various other predators were destroyed in this Detachment.
Game-protection.
Complaints were received of deer being slaughtered in the Tyaughton Sanctuary on
December 9th during the week-ends. A patrol was made by Game Warden Gill, but no
reliable information could be obtained on the accuracy of this complaint. There were 115
prosecutions under the " Game Act " during the year. Game Wardens Still, Sandiford, and
Mottishaw were active along this line. A great deal of extra duty devolved on this Department in attending to registration of firearms under the National Defence Regulations.
Much time was spent checking aliens and firearms in conjunction with the Provincial Police.
Game Propagation.
No pheasants were trapped at Tranquille because of lack of snow up to the end of the
year. No beaver were trapped for distribution from the Bowron Lake Sanctuary because
of the necessity for curtailing expenditures. This work pays a dividend and should be
continued. The winter at the end of 1940 was very mild. All game animals and birds have
done well so far.
Game Reserves.
The Tyaughton deer sanctuary, where large numbers of deer winter, will add to the
numbers in this district. This is an effective unit in any district if overcrowding does not
take place. Bowron Lake and Yalakom are the other reserves maintaining beaver and big-
game.
Fur Trade.
Only a limited fur-trade is carried on in the Interior. There are sixty-one fur-farms
now in this Division.
Fur-farming.
This business is growing.    Mink-farming takes a major place in this Province.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Small trap-lines continue to be eliminated from this Division as they are relinquished.
The present war has to some extent upset trap-line renewals. Approximately 97.21 per cent,
renewals were made shortly after the beginning of 1941. Changes in personnel were also
made, which upset the duties and routine formerly followed. Readjustments had to follow
in Detachment boundaries, creating delay in many phases of our work.
Registration of Guides.
We have in this Division eighty-six registered guides. The system awaits development
so  as  to  satisfy the non-resident  hunter.    Some  dissatisfaction  was  expressed  by  a  few REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940. P 29
hunters coming here of lack of ability on the part of guides and unsatisfactory lodge service.
Complaints were few in number, but sufficient to create disappointment. In some cases these
visitors were redirected to other points, when complaints came to our notice, where they were
given first-class service.
Special Patrols.
A special patrol was made to the south boundary of Tweedsmuir Park by Game Warden
Jobin and Constable Broughton for the purpose of investigating a complaint on the wolf
situation and alleged damage to stock. Several Game Wardens were sent to assist the
British Columbia Provincial Police in connection with labour troubles at the Pioneer Mine.
Game Officers were also sent in to the Squilax area during the first open season on
mountain-sheep. A rotational system was followed on this patrol, resulting in new Game
Wardens patrolling the area every two days. One prosecution and conviction was obtained
in the case of killing mountain-sheep before the season opened.
Police assistance rendered by Game Wardens during the year amounted to 196 days.
On this duty, 1,477 miles were travelled.
Hunting Accidents.
On November 26th R. A. McMillan, of Fawn, B.C., shot and killed Walter Umphrey, of
Fawn, B.C., in mistake for a moose. The accused is appearing at the Spring Assizes on a
charge of manslaughter. R. A. McMillan was also prosecuted and convicted for hunting
moose while in possession of an ordinary firearms licence.
This accident is a repetition of the old story of two hunters separating and arranging to
meet at a designated point, forgetting at the same time that the following of a moose-track
might inevitably take them in each other's direction with serious results.
To those who can distinguish colours the wearing of a sweater of burnt orange is a
protection. Burnt orange is a distinctive colour which does not blend with the vegetation of
the Interior. This is the colour worn by British bomber crews when they make a forced
landing at sea;   i.e., orange life-belts and skull-caps of a similar colour.
The Ishihara chart to test hunters for colour-blindness was not used this year because of
,the rush to register firearms under the Defence Regulations. This chart will undoubtedly
be utilized during the coming year and an estimate obtained of the percentage of hunters who
are colour-blind.
Preventive measures are of little use unless they are brought to the attention of hunters
in a variety of ways. Light and large printing placed diagonally across the printed regulations urging caution might serve its purpose for a time. Ammunition companies could do
a great deal in this way, but it should be something of an original nature and should be
changed from year to year.
Summary and General Remarks.
It requires considerable and persistent advertising to bring non-resident hunters to this
Province for big-game hunting. In the case of districts reporting a scarcity of big-game
hunters there are two possible reasons: (1) The area is not advertised as it should be and
(2) a lack of qualified guides.
Reports from every source in this Division gave accounts of the unusual increase in
many species of game birds. Even big game, with the possible exception of the caribou,
showed decided improvement.
Many hunters from the Coast visited Vernon for the pheasant-hunting. Four hunters
from Vancouver Island shot forty birds and returned well satisfied after their first visit.
I fully expect to see a heavy fur catch as a result of the higher prices prevailing. While
the system of trap-line registration we are now employing has many advantages, there are,
nevertheless, certain features about this system it would seem are still open to improvement.
The wolf situation is becoming increasingly difficult. Hunters have been sent to the
areas in question. There is a great lack of experience on the part of hunters because of the
recent arrival of those animals. Even in the North Thompson River, north of Kamloops,
two or three bands are reported. They are also in the Celista district, west of Salmon Arm.
Measures to combat the presence of wolves are being studied.
Much good work is being done by Provincial Police in rendering assistance. P 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The services rendered by Game Associations, including the junior bodies, were highly
appreciated. The year just past has, under certain adverse circumstances, been quite
satisfactory.
J. A. Munro, Federal Migratory Birds Officer for British Columbia, as in the past, has
been of great assistance.
Game-fish Culture.
Annual reports on conditions affecting game fish and fish-cultural operations at the
various hatcheries, together with plantings and liberations therefrom, in " C " Game Division
during the year ended December 31st, 1940, follow:—
" This information is given for future reference. Due to a very early spring, most
lakes in the Kamloops district were free of ice slightly prior to the opening of lakes for 1939.
The following dates show when each lake was clear of ice:—
Monte Lake  March 24th.
Pinantan Lake  April 10th.
Paul Lake  April 6th.
Knouff Lake  April 20th.
Lac le Jeune April 24th.
Tunkwa Lake  April 12th.
Peterhope Lake  April 4th.
Taweel Lake April 23rd.
" The following is a list of various lakes in the Detachment and the approximate dates
when the spawning of Kamloops trout takes place:—
Pinantan Lake April 18th.
Paul Lake  April 15th.
Knouff Lake  April 26th.
Lac le Jeune  April 28th.
Tunkwa Lake (early run in limited numbers only).
Leighton Lake  March 28th.
Peterhope Lake  May 7th.
Monte Lake (spawning-creeks closed).
Taweel Lake May 16th.
" In some cases through the work of the Forestry units the spawning-beds in certain
creeks were cleaned out of debris. A particularly good job was done at Hyas Lake, the
results of which were at once apparent. The run of spawners was very large in some lakes.
Low-water conditions limited the hatching of eggs in many creeks. The spawning facilities
at Peterhope, Leighton, and Tunkwa Lakes are limited because of the irrigation problems.
This condition requires careful scrutiny. Dunn Lake has too many coarse fish to be
considered as a suitable body of water for restocking.
" Two thousand five hundred and seven suckers averaging 3 lb. each were taken from
Monte Lake by means of a seine-net. All these fish, according to reports, were females. The
net mesh was too large to hold the males.    These suckers contained thousands of eggs.
" Dairy Lake was stocked in July, 1938, and trout 4 to 5 lb. were common. The largest
trout taken was reported to be just over 7 lb. The average trout weight at Taweel Lake
was from 3 to 5 lb. This lake has been visited by a considerable number of anglers and
was fished quite heavily.    The fish are reported as being a little smaller than usual.
" Tunkwa and Leighton Lakes adjoin and are producing unusually large trout. The
largest taken in Tunkwa was 17 lb. A fish-screen was placed in Knouff Lake to stop the
flow of fish into irrigation-ditches. This replaced the sapling screen put in during the
previous season.    This should stand up for some considerable time.
" Approximately 7 tons of coarse fish were taken from lakes in the Clinton Detachment
during spring and summer. We expect to have four more traps working during the coming
year.
" In the Kelowna district 5,660 coarse fish were trapped and destroyed. Low water
prevented other traps from operating.
" In the Quesnel area 20,000 Kamloops-trout eggs were planted in Norwood Creek. Well
over 90 per cent, of the eggs successfully hatched.
" The Crown Lake egg planting near Pavilion was not a success, due to considerable
quantities of limestone and other materials.    Only fry should be put in this lake in future.    A
. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940.
P 31
system of checking the egg plantings has now been formulated and reports on every planting
will henceforth be made.
" In Shuswap Lake 25,000 carp were taken and 135 other species were also trapped.
A fair number of ling were seen following the carp up the channels. The former feed heavily
on carp.
" Dispensation of Kamloops-trout egg collections from Lloyds Creek Hatchery to the
various districts during the years 1937 to 1940 were as follows:—
Kamloops District—
1937      815,000
Per Cent, of
Collection.
1938      678,000
1939	
1940	
Salmon Arm District-
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
Coastal District—
1937	
1938	
1939	
  875,000
 :  1,111,000
  1,190,000
  490,000
  1,160,000
  1,179,000
  1,300,000
  - 1,125,000
  1,240,000
1940 ...                          1,385,000
Northern and Cariboo District—
1937  435,000
1938
1939.
1940.
24.4
25.0
17.5
19.8
29.8
19.0
23.2
21.0
32.5
45.0
24.8
24.7
10.8
11.0
13.5
18.5
Nelson and Cranbrook District—■
193 7	
1938	
1939	
1940	
Okanagan District—
1937	
1938	
1939	
16.0
14.3
5.0
1.7
      275,000
      675,000
  1,040,000
  Nil
  Nil
  800,000
  804,000
       Nil
       Nil
      250,000
1940....       100,000
Total collections  (less losses in hatchery) —
1937  4,000,000
1938  2,500,000
1939  5,000,000
1940  5,600,000"
Fishery Officer F. Pells submits the following report on this year's operations at Lloyds
Creek Hatchery:—
" The staff arrived at Lloyds Creek on April 10th and the usual work of preparing for the
egg collection was carried out. Troughs and other equipment were lacquered and repaired.
Fences were inspected and renovated and were installed in Paul and Pinantan Creeks on
Wednesday, April 10th; at Knouff Lake on April 12th; and at Lac le Jeune on April 25th.
" The following table shows the numbers of eggs collected from the various points, also
the dates of the first and last collections therefrom:—
Lake.
Females.
Males.
Dates laid down.
No. collected.
Paul    	
759
515
513
852
743
500
497
866
April 6 to May 31
April 20 to May 14
April 27 to May 13
May 22 to July 2
1,680.000
1,018,000
Knouff    -              -    ...
1,215,000
1,271,000
Total         	
2,639
2,606
5,184,000 P 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" In addition, 600,000 eggs were received from Penask Lake Hatchery during the season,
making a total of 5,784,000.
" Comparing these figures with those of the report of 1939, it can be seen that the total
collection was slightly larger and was necessary to conform with the increased demand.
" The general trend in the numbers of spawners appears to have changed this season,
and suggestions as to the reasons of these changes will be found in the summaries of each
individual lake.
"Paul Lake.—Due to the open winter of 1939-40, the ice in Paul Creek had disappeared
some days before the staff arrived on the scene and the first collection of eggs was obtained
on April 21st. The run continued until the fence was removed on May 20th. The record
collection was taken from this source, and undoubtedly further collections could have been
made but for the need of removing the fence to allow large numbers of recovered spawners
which assembled at the upper side of the fence endeavouring to return to the lake.
" Very little trouble was encountered with raiders on the spawning run this season,
either from Indians and others at this point.
" Water conditions were very favourable and an extra 217 females were impounded and
stripped and each female contributed 8 per cent, more eggs compared with the previous
season. Fish were not only larger but more numerous, and refute the contention of some
unsuccessful anglers that the fish in this lake are diminishing in both size and numbers.
" The allotment of fry was increased to 200,000 this year to comply with popular demand.
" Pinantan Lake.—The first collection at this lake took place on April 20th and the last
on May 14th. The total collection was not as large as that of the previous season, the
number of females spawning being 165 less, and was partly due to raiding which occurred
once at each trap. Entry was made by removing slats from the side of the traps which have
since been reinforced and it is hoped a repetition will be avoided.
" From observations taken at this lake, the population of dace appears on the increase
and may make serious inroads on the available supply of fry food.
" Knouff Lake.—This lake produced a satisfactory collection this season; 513 females
contributing 1,215,000 eggs, compared with 425 females and 925,000 eggs the previous season,
or an individual increase of over 8 per cent. The spawning fish appeared to be increasing
in size and at the same time the population has not diminished visibly.
" The allotment of fry, 50,000, was reduced 10,000 from the 1939 liberation.
" Mr. F. Casey again took care of the fence and traps during the absence of the staff
and on two occasions was the means of saving this apparatus from serious damage by high
water due to flood conditions.
" It is hoped that a member of the Junior Fish and Game Association may be available
next spring to be stationed at this lake to take care of this equipment.
" The quality of the eggs collected from this source this year showed a remarkable
improvement over previous results. This was due to a large measure to the smooth running
of the truck which was purchased in May.
" Lac le Jeune.—Due to the increased collections at other points, it was not necessary to
continue operations at this lake after the first one and a quarter millions of eggs had been
taken; but it is doubtful if many more eggs could have been obtained, owing to the fact that
a breach was made in the dam at the lower end and outlet of the lake, presumably by musk-
rats or other kinds of amphibious animals. This enabled a large number of fish to escape.
This was unfortunate in more ways than one, as it was intended to transfer numbers of the
smaller fish to adjacent waters; but as the bulk of these smaller fish was amongst those
which made their escape it was impossible to carry out this plan.
" This dam has now been reinforced with sheet piling for a distance of 25 feet, which it
is hoped will overcome any similar trouble.
" All fish handled during the spawning operations that were infested with the parasitic
copepods that are peculiar to this lake, were dipped in a 10-per-cent. solution of common salt
for various periods, according to their ability to withstand the shock.
" The Forestry Department again was kind enough to allow members of the staff to
occupy the Ranger's cabin during the spawning period.
" In spite of the fact that this lake contains a population of fish that probably average
1.% lb., it continues to be a Mecca for large numbers of fishermen who prefer to be able to go
'
. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940.
P 33
out and get their limit of medium-size fish rather than to spend many hours in the hopes of
landing the elusive big fellow. There is also the class of fly-fisherman who gets abundant
fun from getting constant strikes even if their quarry gets away. It is not unusual to hear
the remark passed in Kamloops that, ' If you can't get any luck at other fishing resorts, go
to Lac le Jeune anyway.    There are lots of them there.'
" The following table shows how the collection was disposed of and is followed by lists
of the distributions of eggs and fry as shipped and planted:—
Distributions—
Eggs shipped  .  2,859,200
Eggs planted   1,475,000
Eggs planted (Penask)   . .      200,000
Fry liberated   1,085,000
Hatchery losses  __      214,800
5,834,000
Collections—
Collection, Lloyds Creek .  5,184,000
Transfer from Penask to Lloyds Creek       650,000
5,834,000
" The following shipments of eyed eggs were sent out from Lloyds Creek Hatchery during the season of 1940:—
Destination. Number of Eggs.
Stanley Park Hatchery ......   .. 300,000
Qualicum Beach Hatchery   ..'.  250,000
Veitch Creek Hatchery   250,000
Nelson Hatchery  450,000
Powell River Rod and Gun Club  100,000
Ocean Falls Rod and Gun Club     75,000
Revelstoke Rod and Gun Club   200,000
Cultus Lake Hatchery  .  200,000
Prince George Rod and Gun Club    ........ 150,000
Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club   50,000
McBride Rod and Gun Club  .  50,000
W. Nation, Paul Lake (experiment)   200
Prince Rupert Rod and Gun Club   100,000
Blue River Rod and Gun Club, Eleanor Lake   20,000
Widow Creek  ,  10,000
Nelson Hatchery  .  200,000
Summerland Hatchery  .  100,000
Cranbrook Hatchery   154,000
Cultus Lake Hatchery   200,000
Date.
May 30.
June 3.
June 3.
June 7.
June 9.
June 9.
June 9.
June 10.
June 11.
June 11.
June 11.
June 14.
June 14.
June 17.
June 19.
June 22.
June 29.
June 29.
July 7.
Total      ~ 2,859,200
" The following plantings of eyed eggs were carried out direct from Lloyds Creek Hatchery during the season of 1940:—
Date. Destination. Number of Eggs.
June   1. Granite Creek (Shuswap Lake)     150,000
June   1. Palmer Creek (Shuswap Lake)   100,000
June   1. Silver Creek (Shuswap Lake)   50,000
June 11. Scotch Creek (Shuswap Lake)   .  100,000
June 12. Mara Lake   100,000
June 13. Reineckers Creek  (Shuswap Lake)   :    50,000
June 12. Pressy Lake (Cariboo District)   30,000
June 12. Lac des Roches  (Cariboo District)    50,000 P 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Date. Destination.                                                                                              Number of Eggs.
June 13.    Bridge Lake (Cariboo District)   100,000
June 13.    Horse Lake (Cariboo District)   50,000
June 13.    Crystal Lake (Cariboo District)         10,000
June 13.    Watch Lake  (Cariboo District)    20,000
June 15.    Adams Lake   100,000
June 17.    Crown Lake  (Cariboo District)          30,000
June 18.    Kwotlenemo Lake  (Lillooet District)  '  30,000
June 18.    Tyaughton Lake (Lillooet District)   20,000
June 18.    McDonald Lake (Lillooet District)          10,000
June 22.    White Lake  (Salmon Arm)         75,000
June 25.    Deka Lake (Cariboo District)         75,000
June 26.    Canim Lake (Cariboo District)   100,000
June 29.    Hannah Lake (Lillooet District)   20,000
July    3.    Kelly Lake (Cariboo District)          25,000
July    3.    Big Bar Lake (Cariboo District)        20,000
July    3.    Webb Lake (Cariboo District)         30,000
July    3.    Bouchie Lake (Cariboo District)         20,000
July    8.    Mara Lake (second planting)   100,000
July 17.    Arthur Lake (Salmon Arm)        10,000
Total.
...  1,475,000
" The following plantings were made from Penask Lake Hatchery:—
Date. Destination. Number of Eggs.
June 13. Tranquille Creek (Kamloops Lake)  .     50,000
June 15 and 17.    Adams Lake   150,000
Total
 ,  200,000
" The following are the fry liberations from Lloyds Creek Hatchery during the season of
1940:—
Date. Destination. Number of Fry.
July 4-15.    Paul Lake    200,000
July 9-12.    Pinantan Lake      150,000
July 13.
July 13.
July
July
July
July
July 18.
July 19.
July 19.
July 19.
July 22.
July 22.
July 22.
July 22.
July 23.
July 23.
July 24.
July 25.
July 26.
King Lake  .	
Chum Lake 	
13.    Phillips Lake 	
15-17.    Monte Lake 	
16-17.    Knouff Lake ......
16.    Little Badger Lake
Beaver Lake (Devick) 	
Pavilion Lake 	
Pillar Lake j—
Wallenstein Lake	
Tunkwa Lake	
Leighton Lake	
Dairy Lake 	
Andrew Lake   	
McConnell Lake 	
Smith Lake	
Loon Lake -       30,000
Peterhope Lake        20,000
Crooked Lake       10,000
20,000
5,000
5,000
50,000
50,000
5,000
2,500
30,000
20,000
10,000
20,000
10,000
5,000
1,000
10,000
10,000
July 27-Aug. 4.    Lac le Jeune   100,000
July 28.    Plateau Lake   10,000
July 29.    Hidden Lake   10,000
July 29.    Rosemond Lake   10,000 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940. P 35
Date. Destination. Number of Fry.
July 29.    Reeves Lake  5,000
July 30.    Surrey Lake  5,000
Aug.   2.    Scuitto Lake  5,000
Aug.   2.    Campbell Lake  5,000
Aug.   2.    Thompson River  2,500
Aug.   3.    Aylmer Lake   25,000
Aug.   5-7.    Shuswap Lake (Big)   114,000
Aug.   5.    McGlashan Lake   10,000
Aug.   6-9.    Shuswap Lake (Little)   100,000
Aug. 10.    Harper Lake  10,000
Aug. 12.    Spa Lake  10,000
Total 1,085,000
" Operations.—Several members of the Junior Fish and Game Association volunteered
their services to the Game Department and assisted in the collection and care of eggs and were
given instruction in all phases of hatchery routine. They seemed to take great interest in the
work and their help was very much appreciated.
" Later in the season the Association arranged an exhibition in Kamloops and a trough
was installed in the Show Building and fry were taken from the hatchery and placed in the
trough for the benefit of the public. Unfortunately, some toxic substance found its way into
the water circuit and the fry appeared distressed during the afternoon of the first day of the
exhibition.    The fry were removed and placed in the Thompson River near-by.
" A letter of appreciation has been forwarded to this Junior Association, which is in
charge of G. Sandiford, for their efforts in assisting in the fish-cultural operations.
"Equipment (Transportation).—The new truck supplied in May proved to be very beneficial to the manner in which eggs and fry were transported from the various points. Eggs
were received in much better condition at the hatchery; due, chiefly, to the improvement of
the springs on the latest truck model, also the extra body capacity of this truck. This made
it possible to carry nine fry-cans instead of the usual six cans and all fry arrived at distribution points in excellent condition.
" Ice-house.—This was shingled in the early part of the season and waste by rain eroding
the ice was avoided.
"Fry-cans.—During the season of 1940, many barren lakes were stocked which were out
of reach by truck and pack-horses were used. Should a similar programme be carried out
next season, it will be necessary to have six cans made, suitable for pack-horse work.
" Recommendations.
" Barren Lakes.—During the 1940 season many barren lakes were stocked at considerable
expense to the Game Board and a reduced programme of this nature is suggested for next
season. Several of the barren lakes stocked in past seasons have been found to be patronized
by very few anglers and is due to the fact that they are difficult to get at. Allotments for
these lakes have been suspended.
" Fishing Limit.—The suggestion that the present fishing limit of fifteen fish daily is
excessive and that this limit should be changed to 15 lb. and one fish daily is again put forward. Some of the Interior Associations are behind this movement for conservation, one
strong point in favour of the weight-limit being that it would circumvent the rapid depletion
of those lakes that now contain the larger races of trout and at the same time help to reduce
the large populations of smaller fish in those lakes where the average specimen is below
2 lb. or less.
" Potential Collecting-points.—It may be possible in the future to extend the present
collecting programme, and the Cariboo district, which abounds in many large lakes, could
stand a far larger allotment of eggs and fry than it is now possible to supply from Lloyds
Creek Hatchery, and would suggest that at some time in the future the possibilities of Loon
Lake, which is close to Clinton, be investigated with a view to installing a collecting camp.
This lake appears to have the necessary qualifications and would make a fine centre for fish-
cultural operations in the Cariboo and Quesnel districts." P 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Report of Fishery Officer R. A. McRae on operations at Beaver Lake Hatchery follows:—
" During this year's fish-cultural operations at the station, 1,832,900 Kamloops-trout eggs
were collected—897,000 at Beaver Lake, 759,500 at creeks on the upper lakes of this chain,
and 176,400 at Oyama Lake. Owing to the small flow in the main creek in which the trout
spawn at Oyama, the fish do not seem to get rid of their eggs and have in the past been taken
as late as October with eggs still in them. After the spawning season is over the fish with
those eggs are in a very poor condition. The flesh is soft and put up very little resistance
when caught. A trap was installed at this lake and the fish were stripped, but most of the
eggs were blanks; according to local fishermen the stripping of those fish appears to have
improved conditions at that point. The fish in Oyama Lake average 5 lb. and many up
to 15 lb.
" Owing to the light snowfall in this area last winter the lakes did not rise to the usual
height and the creeks dried up sooner than usual. Again this year it was necessary to tap
old beaver-dams above the hatchery in order to get sufficient water to complete hatchery operations as we anticipated a shortage of water.
" The eggs that were collected first were hatched out for our fry distributions. Two days
after distribution of fry was completed the water in the beaver-dams got so low that it was
impossible to get a further supply, should it have been required. Echo Lake is situated about
2 miles up this creek and to ensure a supply of water for hatchery operations a dam should
be erected at the outlet of this lake. This could be built with very small expense.
" This season's distributions were as follows:—
Eggs—
Kelowna Rearing-ponds     314,000
Woods Lake        40,000
Coldstream Creek     150,000
Vance Creek     137,000
Summerland Hatchery     620,000
Total  1,261,000
Fry—
Vernon Ponds   30,000
Dee Lake   10,000
Doreen Lake   6,000
Echo Lake (Creighton Valley)   30,000
Echo Lake (Kelowna)   5,000
Round Lake   3,000
Crooked Lake     15,000
Damer Lake .  4,000
High Lake   4,000
Spurrier Lake   4,000
Ron Lake   4,000
Green Lake   4,000
Wilma Lake  4,000
Island Lake  10,000
Deer Lake  10,000
Cherry Creek  40,000
Woods Lake .  55,000
Lusk Lake   30,000
Beaver Lake . .  100,000
Kalamalka Lake .  40,000
Rod Lake   3,000
Lost Lake  4,000
Okanagan Lake  49,630
Total     464,630 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940.
P 37
" Owing to unsuitable conditions in Bessette Creek for planting eggs, the plantings were
made in Vance Creek, a tributary to Bessette Creek. I would suggest that, in future, instead
of plantings being made in Vance Creek or Bessette Creek, Creighton Creek (Creighton
Valley), which is also a tributary to Bessette Creek, be considered, as conditions appear to be
more favourable there."
The following is the report submitted by Fishery Officer E. M. Martin, covering operations
at the Penask Lake Hatchery:—
" The collections of Kamloops-trout eggs, as noted hereunder, were made at Penask Lake
Hatchery during the current season:—
Creek.
Dates laid down.
Females.
Males.
No. of
Eggs collected.
4,612
8,999
4,180
7,390
1,445,000
2,560,000
Total...	
13,611
11,470
4,005,000
The following distributions and shipments were made:—
Nicola Lake, Moore Creek  150,000
Lloyds Creek Hatchery   400,000
Summerland Hatchery   200,000
Tranquille Creek    50,000
Cranbrook Hatchery   350,000
Cultus Lake Hatchery  200,000
Cultus Lake Hatchery  225,000
Nelson Hatchery  500,000
Cultus Lake Hatchery  600,000
Cultus Lake Hatchery  200,000
Lloyds Creek Hatchery  200,000
Nelson Hatchery    170,000
Terrace Rod and Gun Club  50,000
Nelson Hatchery  365,000
June
10.
June
11.
June
13.
June
13.
June
15.
June
17.
June
26.
June
29.
July
2.
July
5.
July
5.
July
11.
July
16.
July
8.
planted,
shipped,
shipped,
planted,
shipped,
shipped,
shipped,
shipped,
shipped,
shipped,
shipped,
shipped,
shipped,
shipped.
Total
3,660,000
"Owing to uncontrollable conditions, lack of water due to draught and severe. atmospheric set-backs, there was a considerable loss of eggs and some fry. As a result the Nelson
Hatchery was short in its allotment of 90,000 eggs.
" These collections and operations were carried out by Hatchery Officer E. M. Martin
assisted by two employees and eight young men working in relays over the season from the
Junior Fish and Game Protective Association of Kamloops. These young men gave their
services voluntarily, some showing more interest than others. The work they performed and
the knowledge they accumulated was apparently appreciated. The knowledge acquired might
be of value if there is a shortage of paid help.
" A back-lead was installed to take care of the stripped fish, which proved a complete
success. The loss of fish was not as heavy as in previous years as they were caught in the
fence, when trying to get back down Penask Creek to Penask Lake after spawning.
" A retaining-wall was installed to keep the fish from escaping up the creek during
high water.
" I would recommend that other and more suitable sources of supply be inspected,
particularly the Loon Lake area."
" D " DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, PRINCE RUPERT, FORT
GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Big Game.
Moose.—Very favourable reports have been received from every district. These animals
are more than holding their own throughout the Division. P 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Caribou.—Favourable reports received from the district north of the C.N.R. Prince
Rupert-Jasper branch, where these animals are reported on the increase. I'm sorry to say
that south of the C.N.R. Prince Rupert-Jasper branch, reports received indicate that the
scarcity of these animals is noticeable. A close season south of the above-mentioned C.N.R.
line has been advocated.
Wapiti (Elk).—A few of these big-game animals are now well established on the Queen
Charlotte Islands; also a herd at the head of the Musqua River, north of the Peace River.
A close season on these animals should be maintained.
Bear (Black).—These animals are very numerous, and are a nuisance. It has been advocated that they be classed as predatory animals and their destruction allowed the year round.
Bear (Grizzly).—Grizzly in fair numbers in the Division. Bag-limit of one per annum
should be maintained.
Sheep (Rocky Mountain, Stonei, Fannin, Dahl).—These big-game animals, in spite of
various reports to the contrary, are quite numerous and in no danger of extermination. It
has been definitely established that Dahl sheep are to be found in the north and northwestern portions of the Province, a very good specimen having been obtained in the Cassiar
last season by a visiting big-game hunter. In order to conserve as much as possible the
various species of sheep, the bag-limit should be reduced to one of each species, but not more
than two sheep in the aggregate should be allowed.
Goat.—Very good reports have been received from every district in the Division, and it
is safe to assume that these big-game animals are very numerous throughout the Division,
and, as they are not hunted extensively, in no danger of being exterminated.
Fur-bearing Animals.
An average catch of fur-bearers is expected. Beaver are getting very scarce on Indian-
owned trap-lines, but are increasing on trap-lines held by white trappers.
In order to bring the beaver back on Indian trap-lines, it has been suggested that a system of tags be adopted, said tags to be issued only to registered trap-line holders with a fair
number of beaver on their registered trap-lines.
The question of educating the younger generations of Indians should receive immediate
consideration. This matter should be taken up with the Indian Department of Education,
with a view of establishing courses on the study and conservation of wild life in all Indian
schools of the Province.
Only by educating the younger generations of Indians may we hope for a better conservation of all our wild-animal life.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Nesting conditions were very favourable during the last three seasons, consequently all species of grouse have increased in numbers. The bag and season set last year
should be maintained.
Pheasants.—Good reports have been received from Graham Island. New stock should be
introduced, and it is recommended that a dozen male birds be shipped to Tlell over a period
of from three to four years.
Hungarian Partridge.—No further reports have been received regarding the birds liberated at Vanderhoof, Prince George, and McBride.
Migratory Game Birds.
Greater flights of ducks and geese were noticed during the spring migration than in the
past. Owing to very favourable nesting seasons prevailing during the last few years, all
migratory birds are increasing rapidly.    The bag-limit as set out for last season should be
maintained.
Vermin.
Timber Wolves.—By all appearances, wolves are still on the increase. Numerous suggestions have been received to the effect that bounty paid should be increased from $15 to $20.
In view of the constant increase in the number of these predators, some actions should
be taken. The bounty of $15 paid during the year 1939-40 proved to be satisfactory, as the
number of wolves killed during that period increased by about 25 per cent, over the previous
year.    The present bounty of $10 should therefore be raised to $15. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940. P 39
Coyotes.—These animals are decreasing. Diseases, especially mange, have taken quite a
toll of these predatory animals. The $2 bounty should be maintained, but payment of same
should be extended to the end of October in each year. This would induce big-game hunters
to kill whilst hunting in September.
Crows, Owls, etc.—These birds are not numerous at present. No action required in their
control.
Game-protection.
Regular patrols were undertaken in all parts of the Division.    Every available method
of transportation was used, as follows:— Miles.
Train    ;  5,469
Autos    70,125
Foot  (including dog-team)   :  10,490
Horse (including sleigh)   3,080
Boat    10,500
Plane     4,120
A total of 103,784 miles was covered, resulting in sixty-two prosecutions.
Game Propagation.
No game propagation work was started during the year. Previous work, planting Hungarian partridges in the McBride, Prince George, Vanderhoof, Smithers, and Terrace districts,
is still under observation. No reports covering the increase, or otherwise, in the number of
these birds having been received, no opinion as to their numbers can be formed.
Elk, liberated on the Queen Charlotte Islands, are increasing steadily and doing very
well.    A census of these animals will be made this year.
Game Reserves.
No information has been received in regard to the Kunghit Island Reserve, situate on
the southernmost island of the Queen Charlotte group.
Sanctuaries established at Prince George, Prince Rupert, Lake Kathlyn (near Smithers),
and Terrace have been patrolled regularly, especially during the hunting season. More
migratory birds are noticed every year.
These sanctuaries are fulfilling their purpose as resting places for migratory birds.
Fur Trade.
Fur prices have improved and a fair catch is again expected. It is very difficult, owing
to the bulk of the fur catch being shipped to Vancouver, to get complete data on furs caught
in the Division. The Vancouver office is therefore in a better position to comment on the
fur trade in general.
Fur-farming.
The fur-farming industry is growing rapidly and will eventually be quite a factor in the
fur production of the Province. Approximately 150 fur-farms are now operating in the
Division. As stated in previous reports, the services of a pathologist would be of great help
to this growing industry, especially to beginners. The appointment of such a qualified individual to the staff of the Game Department should receive due consideration.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Owing to lack of certain required maps, the registration of trap-lines is progressing very
slowly, but the work should be completed in about two years' time.
Transfers of trap-lines from one trapper to another create a great deal of work, and, in
order to compensate the Department for its outlay of time, stationery, etc., a fee of $2.50 is
suggested.
Registration of Guides.
' The number of non-resident big-game hunters is growing rapidly, and recommendations
submitted last year are brought to your attention. Ninety-one big-game hunters visited this
Division, and the following trophies obtained: 26 caribou, 25 mountain-goat, 33 mountain-
sheep, 35 moose, 18 grizzly bears, and 22 black bears. P 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Special Patrols.
Numerous patrols were undertaken by Game Wardens and Provincial Constables of the
Division.
Outstanding patrols were made by Game Wardens P. Brown and W. L. Forrester.
Constable C. H. Bennett, i/c Atlin, patrolled the Teslin Lake region to the Yukon boundary,
and Constable Blakiston-Gray undertook an arduous patrol to the Caribou Hide band of
Indians, located at the headwaters of the Stikine River, covering approximately 500 miles
by dog-team.
Another patrol worthy of mention is the one undertaken by Game Warden H. J. Engel-
son, of Fort Nelson, when searching for a trapper named O. R. Holmberg, missing in the
Deer River district, north of the Liard River. This patrol lasted from August 16th to
September 22nd;   425 miles were covered by plane and 725 miles by raft and foot.
In order to patrol " D " Division efficiently, especially the northern section of same,
a plane, equipped with floats, would be of great assistance.
Hunting Accidents.
The only misadventure in the Division is the disappearance of a trapper named Olaf
Richard Holmberg, who failed to return to Fort Nelson from his trapping-ground, situate in
Deer River, in the vicinity of the Yukon-British Columbia boundary. A thorough search was
made for the lost man by Game Warden H. J. Engelson, without results.
Game-fish Culture.
The Game Department is not engaged in fish culture in " D " Division, but the Rod and
Gun Clubs of McBride, Prince George, Smithers, and Prince Rupert operated fish-hatcheries
in their respective cities with very good results. Fifty thousand eyed eggs were hatched in
the McBride Hatchery and the fry liberated in various lakes of the district. One hundred
and fifty thousand eyed eggs were taken care of by the Prince George Rod and Gun Club.
This operation was very successful and 147,000 fry were liberated in Cluculz, Nukko,
Bednesti, West, Six Mile, and Summit Lakes. Fifty thousand eggs were shipped by the
Department to the Rod and Gun Club at Smithers, who operate, very successfully, a small
hatchery near Smithers. Forty-eight thousand fry were placed in various lakes of the
district. In Prince Rupert the Rod and Gun Club took care of 100,000 eyed eggs, being 95
per cent, successful, planted 95,000 fry in lakes adjacent to Prince Rupert. Fifty thousand
eyed eggs were also shipped by the Department to the Terrace Rod and Gun Club, and planted
in streams adjacent to Lakelse Lake and Kitsumgallum Lake. No data have been secured
as to the results of such plantings.
The interest shown by the above-mentioned Rod and Gun Clubs is noteworthy, and all
encouragement should be extended to these clubs in order to create further interest in the
planting and propagation of sport fish within their districts.
Applications have already been submitted for a further supply of eyed eggs, and preparations have been made to take care of same during the coming season by all the above-
mentioned clubs.    A very successful season is anticipated.
Summary and General Remarks.
Weather conditions have been very favourable to the propagation of all game animals
and a steady increase in their number may be anticipated.
The various Rod and Gun Clubs in the Division have been very active, especially in the
propagation of Kamloops trout by way of small hatcheries operated by them. This work is
of great value to the country as a whole, and I take this opportunity to extend to all the
members of the various Game Associations my sincere thanks for their splendid work and
the wholesome support at all times extended to the Department and to the Game Wardens, in
the field.
The usual co-operation and support from the Provincial Police has been maintained during the past year.    Same has been of inestimable value and is greatly appreciated. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1940. P 41
" E " DIVISION   (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY
DISTRICTS).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " E " Game
Division for the year ended December 31st, 1940.
Game Animals.
Bear.—These animals continue to be plentiful in most parts of the Division and in some
areas are considered as a predator owing to the damage they have done and are doing to
domestic crops and stock.
Complaints of damage have principally been received from North Vancouver and from a
number of the agricultural areas in the Division.
Grizzly bear are to be found at the heads of various coastal inlets and'in some sections
of the Division adjacent to or near the Cascade Mountain range.
Deer.—Due to exceptionally mild weather which was encountered during the open
hunting season, very few deer, in comparison with former years, were taken by hunters.
This, however, does not in any way indicate that deer were scarce. Reports show that in
most sections these animals are on the increase.
Steps have been taken towards improving the stand of deer on Texada Island by liberating healthy animals obtained in various parts of the Division.
Moose.—Reports still remind us that moose are increasing in the Pemberton Meadows
district where, a few years ago, they were non-existent. These animals have not, however,
increased to an extent where even a short hunting season can be permitted. In the Bella
Coola section moose are fairly common.
Mountain-goat.—Goat are increasing in the Coquitlam, Pitt, Alouette, and Stave Lake
regions and this is the case more particularly in the Stave Lake area, where they are not
hunted or disturbed to any extent.
Corporal R. E. Allan, Powell River, writes: "Mountain-goat show no signs of being
depleted. In such areas as Bute, Toba, and Jervis Inlets one might get the impression that
these animals are scarce, but this is not the case as they are found banded in fairly large
numbers some considerable distance back of the salt water."
In the Skagit and Chilliwack Lake districts, reports indicate that mountain-goat are
plentiful.
Wapiti (Elk).—The elk, liberated in a section of Howe Sound, are increasing.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—This Division is really not a good beaver area, but reports indicate these
animals are to be found in fair numbers in the outlying sections, such as at the head of
Stave Lake.
Fox (Red).—These animals are not protected on the Lower Mainland, as in this area
they are considered as predators owing to the damage they do to domestic and game birds.
They seem more numerous in the section south of the Fraser River, where they are frequently
hunted during the year by Game Wardens and interested sportsmen.
Muskrats.—Generally, reports from those sections of the Division suitable for the propagation of muskrats would seem to show that they are on the increase and that fair numbers
have been taken in the past trapping season. While, in dyked areas, muskrats do considerable
damage at times, yet many residents derive considerable revenue in trapping these animals
each year.
Mink.—Fair numbers have been trapped in most sections and there would seem to be no
reason to assume that they are being depleted.    In some portions mink are increasing.
Marten.—A number of these animals are trapped each year and generally are on the
increase throughout the Division.
Other fur-bearing animals, such as racoon, weasel, otter, and skunk, are to be found
in the Division and these animals are not being depleted.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Reports as to the stand of both blue and ruffed grouse vary in the different
portions of the Division.    In the Powell River and Dewdney districts blue and ruffed grouse P 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
are not reported as being any too plentiful, while in other areas either one or both species are
reported as increasing. The Game Warden supervising the western portion of the Dewdney
district suggests close seasons for a few years would be most helpful in increasing the stand
of grouse.
Pheasants.—All game protectors report that the past year has been the best on record.
Pheasants were plentiful during the hunting season, due, no doubt, to the exceptionally fine
weather in the spring while pheasants were nesting.
Notwithstanding fairly heavy hunting the stock of birds remaining after the close of the
open season will ensure a good supply of breeding birds next spring.
During the year 10,446 pheasants were purchased by the Department and released in
this Division.
California Quail.—The stand of quail in the Delta district remains stationary and no
harm has been done in permitting a few days open season on these birds this year.
European Partridge.—Reports indicate these birds are not numerous in any portion of
the Division.
Migratory Game Birds.
Game Wardens generally report ducks, geese, and band-tailed pigeons were observed in
greater numbers than for some years past. In the Pitt Meadows section Game Warden
F. Urquhart writes, " Duck-hunting during the early part of the open season was without
a doubt the best we have had in several years and during the later part of October and early
in November a very large migration of mallard, baldpate, and teal was observed." Game
Warden W. H. Cameron, Ladner, states, " Ducks have been more numerous than for several
years."
Canada geese were in greater numbers in the Pitt Lake section, while in the Delta country
snow geese and black brant shooting was excellent.
Jack or Wilson snipe were to be observed in nearly every portion of the Division during
the course of their migration.
As during the past few years, swans were encountered in odd numbers from time to time.
Vermin.
Later on in this report will be found a statement of the vermin destroyed by Game
Wardens in this Division.
It would seem that in the Chilliwack section red fox are quite plentiful and Game
Wardens A. J. Butler, Chilliwack, and P. M. Cliffe, Mission, along with interested sportsmen,
have destroyed a fairly large number of these predators. Cougar and coyotes have been
responsible for complaints of damage and a fair number of these animals have been
accounted for by Game Wardens and others.
Game-protection.
During the year all portions of the Division have been frequently patrolled and this has
resulted in a number of important prosecutions. Many lengthy patrols undertaken have
required the Game Wardens to be absent from their detachments for fairly extended periods.
Members of the British Columbia Police, game and other organizations, as well as
interested sportsmen, have assisted greatly in the protection of game in the Division.
Game Propagation.
The destruction of vermin, release of pheasants, and active patrol-work have been
responsible for much improved game conditions. The favourable breeding season has been a
major factor in the increase of all wild life.
Game Reserves.
The game reserves in the Division have without doubt been an important contribution in
improving the supply of game in the districts surrounding them. These reserves have been
constantly patrolled.
Fur Trade.
The muskrat catch was fair and the take of all other fur-bearers seems to hold up fairly
well from year to year.    Mink, according to reports, are increasing. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940. P 43
Fur-farming.
There has been no great decrease in the number of fur-farms and those farmers raising
mink appear to be making a financial success of their business. Fairly good prices for
farmed fur were to be obtained on the fur market during the year.
Registration of Trap-lines.
As in past years, reports indicate that the majority of trappers are conserving the fur
on their trap-lines and no instance of over or excessive trapping has been reported or
observed.
Registration of Guides.
There are only a few guides in the Division.
Special Patrols.
As in past years, many special or surprise patrols have been undertaken with excellent
results.
Hunting Accidents.
Two accidents which were fatal took place during the year.
Game-fish Culture.
Further reports to hand bear out previous statements that the planting or liberation of
trout in many sections of the Division has greatly improved fishing.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Game Associations, farmers and others interested in game and fish conservation have
furnished every possible assistance in the work of the Game Wardens throughout the
Division. The co-operation of the officers and men of " E " Division of the British Columbia
Police has been most gratifying and each and every Game Warden express their sincere
appreciation in this regard.
Generally, game conditions have improved and excellent results in conservation were
obtained throughout the Division. P 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.
Comparative Statistics.
Calendar Year.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences and
Fees.
Revenue
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913 	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
369
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
454
451
585
613
547
440
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
436
552
574
526
419
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
23
16
15
33
39
21
21
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
19
14
20
42
21
18
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,768.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
4,399.50
3,965.00
5.332.50
5,729.50
4,776.50
5,197.00
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148,689.64
157,674.30
177,771.33
192,024.07
193,170.53
188,605.20
1914.	
1915  	
1916  	
1917 	
1918  	
1919  	
1920 .'...	
1921 - 	
1922	
1923 .	
$5,291.39
24,595.80
51,093.89
60 594 18
1924  	
1925	
56,356.68
1926  	
1927	
62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
46.091.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
1928	
1929  	
1930 	
1931	
1932 	
1933     .
1934 	
1935 	
1936	
1937 	
1938	
1939 	
1940 	
Totals	
11,362
10,579
755
735
$158,912.57
$3,670,931.67
$1,035,462.17 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1940.
P 45
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P 47
Statement of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors' Firearms
Licences issued, January 1st to December 31st, 1940.
Resident Anglers.
Guides.
Free
Farmer..
Prospectors.
Total.
Government Agents.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
755
174
200
1,273
982
682
716
106
143
120
1,248
201
970
272
308
1,087
2,080
128
3,796
162
1,047
$755.00
174.00
2
49
7
5
16
8
4
11
4
22
17
2
13
1
2
4
4
41
9
39
9
39
35
132
172
22
63
30
38
63
232
18
134
26
28
21
80
6
551
26
73
189
25
160
19
14
117
75
2
209
91
109
303
211
65
19
6
42
7
34
3
4
1
42
4
15
27
46
15
9
62
4
3
34
4
46
5
14
21
6
88
20
79
126
26
10
31
21
157
32
24
61
2
$1.00
3.00
3.00
2.00
$756.00
177.00
Atlin        	
$10.00
245.00
35.00
10.00
Clinton   	
200.00
1,273.00
982.00
682.00
716.00
106.00
143.00
120.00
1,248.00
201.00
970.00
272.00
308.00
1,087.00
2,080.00
128.00
3,796.00
162.00
1,047.00
684.00
1.00
448.00
1,310.00
982.00
682.00
Fernie .. —.   ...
Fort Fraser   .
25.00
80.00
40.00
1.00
3.00
742.00
83.00
146.00
143.00
Greenwood   	
Kamloops _   ,
20.00
55.00
13.00
140.00
1,316.00
201.00
1.00
4.00
1.00
6.00
1.00
6.00
971.00
Lillooet - — 	
20.00
296.00
308.00
1,088.00
2,086.00
129.00
3,802.00
162.00
1,047.00
110.00
5.00
53.00
3.00
8.00
26.00
115.00
684
1
779
10
378
1,351
333
684.00
85.00
10.00
139.00
13.00
779.00
10.00
378.00
1,351.00
333.00
787.00
65.00
5.00
101.00
383.00
1,351.00
10.00
343.00
5,655.00
1,126.00
1,767.00
52.00
354.00
20.00
20.00
3.00
41.00
2.00
2.00
15.00
2.00
23.00
5,655
1,126
1,767
52
354
5,716.00
1,128.00
1,769.00
Williams Lake 	
Windermere 	
205.00
45.00
272.00
401.00
Totals       	
28,940
$28,940.00
221
$1,105.00
3,426
1,150
$205.00
$30,250.00 P 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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100.00
325.00
	
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P 49
Statement of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms Licences and Anglers' Licences,
January 1st to December 31st, 1940.
Non-resident Ordinary
Firearms Licences.
Anglers' Licences
(Minors).
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
2
6
9
4
39
1
5
2
14
29
5
5
15
93
15
3
1
1
10
3
4
10
$2.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
6.00
9.00
4.00
39.00
1.00
5.00
2.00
14.00
29.00
5.00
5.00
15.00
93.00
15.00
3.00
1.00
1.00
10.00
3.00
4.00
10.00
$2.00
1.00
Atlin   _	
1.00
2.00
6.00
9.00
4.00
$3.00
42.00
1.00
9.00
6.00
3.00
14.00
2.00
20.00
32.00
5.00
5.00
Nelson 	
15 00
15 01
3.00
1.00
1.00
31.00
3.00
7.00
25.00
21.00
Prince George  	
7
1
5
Vernon  __	
3.00
15.00
Windermere	
Totals	
20                   $60.00
1
280
$280.00
$340.00 P 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalties on
Fur, January 1st to December 31st, 1940.
(.overnment
Agents.
Resident
Fur-traders'
Licences.
Agent for
Non-resident
Fur-trader.
Royalty or
Tax on Fur.
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Tanners'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
2
3
4
1
21
1
3
1
1
3
2
1
38
10
10
10
13
$50.00
3
5
2
33
1
26
7
4
9
132
17
2
19
10
11
42
61
6
297
153
60
1
28
6
8
21
9
741
3
98
10
14
$15.90
8.75
422.94
	
1
$65.90
	
8.75
Atlin  	
75.00
100.00
25.00
	
497.94
.40   1     ....
$2.00
100.40
193.76
32.50
124.25
75.27
1,200.45
84.97
7.58
146.64
100.75
88.33
11.50
516.64
237.90
1
1
1
1
1
220.76
32.50
124.25
525.00
25.00
75.27
1,725.45
Golden	
	
109.97
Greenwood	
7.58
75.00
2.00
223.64
100.75
25.00
25.00
	
25.00
113.33
2.00
13.50
75.00
591.64
	
237.90
50.00
25.00
950.00
250.00
250.00
50.00
6.50
9,532.06
4,626.38
943.30
2.05
601.24
35.70
39.59
1,318.13
173.40
31.50
2.00
5.00
	
10,484.06
4,881.38
1,193.30
	
2.05
250.00
851.24
35.70
	
39.59
325.00
	
1,643.13
12   I         300.00
$600.00
473.40
47
3
16
2
1,175.00
75.00
41.827.98   1
43,602.98
48.10
214.65
56.15'
51.57
3
6.00
$2.00
125.10
220.65
400.00
50.00
456.15
101.57
Totals _..
204
$5,100.00
3
$600.00
1,839
$62,745.33
8
$19.00
1
$2.00
$68,466.33 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940.
P 51
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1940, inclusive.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-traders'
and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
1921        	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
39,423.87
44,238.00
62,745.33
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
5,540.00
4,949.00
5,721.00
$30,790.80
1922   	
57,458.89
1923 	
67,524.18
1924    	
62,446.68
1925      	
56,287.78
1926               	
62,535.13
1927                 ...            	
71,324.96
1928                	
58,823.07
1929              	
47,329.89
1930 —.            	
45,161.11
1931                  	
45,981.08
1932  	
40,363.79
1933  	
44,167.48
1934                                                                                              .   .
47,102.81
1935                                                                    	
49,831.95
1936          .         .                                                	
52,196.50
1937                                                               	
53,697.48
1938                                                                      	
44,963.87
1939                                                    	
49,187.00
1940               "
68,466.33
Totals ... _.	
$936,255.78
$119,385.00
$1,055,640.78 P 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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cr REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940.
P 53
Particulars of Various Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has been paid,
January 1st to December 31st, 1940.
Government
Agents.
P.
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MS
. .i
MM
pp.
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rn
£
to
3
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C3
V
is
E
5
CO
V
6
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>
0
5
1
3
1
2
13
5
2
4
9
4
124
25
2
8
176
64
47
133
16
42
45
224
5,338
1,229
188
2
114
556
126
12,321
18
1
4
l
12
3
50
57
8
2
2
18
2
403
167
14
2
321
146
46
25
45
25
33
16
2
2
1,733
8.3
104
8
5
1
28
1
123
75
1
8
1
9
2
349
2
15
2
2
20
1
1
JL	
158
45
3
18
21
1
444
2
497
16
18
14
8
29
11
12
1
12
269
57
1
14
8
7
804
1
2
100
73
11
151
16
29
109
1
1,283
367
256
33
2
14
178
26
6,990
6
10
21
5
1
239
43
301
89
1,485
30
5
375
11
377
2,209
65
827
1,168
885
77
337
83
169
10
27,561
1,423
31
180
253
2
406
81
44
3,400
146
95
2
5
2
19
20
62
2
17
562
57
1
4
6
1
1
2
8
517
Atlin      	
22
23
154
22
3,328
36
15
42
14
108
1
     1     2
12,744
36
104
942
Golden  !	
Greenwood 	
Kamloops 	
	
63
1,646
8,642
5,032
116
1
2,238
108
1,694
70
92,371
187
25
700
186
507
51.853
43
6
31
354
13,606
9,729
297
New Westminster..
10
Prince George
Prince Rupert	
86,899] 20
778|    2
 :.. i ....
507| 12,457] --
 |   | ....
341        1861     1
 1    7
1,778)334
 ?   -
2,196
40
40,652
12,444|    2
Telegraph Creek ...
40]  ....
410.2141152
Victoria  .	
Williams Lake
Windermere _	
12
17
21
Totals	
200
20,652
558
2,772
605
733
553
1,226'9,678
37,986|117,506
1
749 1,798|424
1          1
71,580
589,355
213 P 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to December 31st, 1940.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind
op Fur confiscated
Date of
Confiscation.
o
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3
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93
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Jan.     2
15
Ferguson, Hugh	
Goat River 	
Smithers _	
Fernie  	
1
4
1
1
2
1
i
3
2
2
1
6
9
1
4
1
92
2
5
7
15
6
1
2
2
300
3
46
1
24
2
1
1
_..
Feb.   12	
19	
Eustace, L  	
Gaudy, Jack _ 	
Johnson, N. B   .
Patrick, L  	
Antoine, W.     .
Kubinec, P.—  	
.....
„       19	
Mar.    2	
*
Vanderhoof._	
Vanderhoof	
Vanderhoof.__	
Fernie  	
Prince Rupert 	
Kamloops 	
Penticton	
Fern ie 	
Prince George	
McDame Creek _._
Williams Lake —	
fi
fl
9.7
Checkik, M. R 	
Morris, Johnny	
9Q
30 	
Shomody, J. W.
5	
Cause, E. P 	
Scott, J. R...	
Moore, Alfred	
13. „ .
30
Zielke, T.	
Burns Lake	
Burns Lake _____ 	
24
Louie, Chief (Indian)...
Dec.   13
8
28
Benoit, D	
Vanderhoof _	
Vanderhoof _„	
Vanderhoof _
28
Todd, Geo	
28
Totals      	
1
4
*
1
4
11
147
374
3
1
8
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to December 31st, 1940.
Date of
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind op Firearms
confiscated.
Confiscation.
Rifles.
Shotguns.
Boucher, Robert  	
Murrell, W. H...      _
Leowen, Geo.
Unknown Indian  	
Miller, J. R     . .    ...
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Feb.    21
21
22        	
1
23
Quesnel 	
April 18    .    	
Point, Leonard	
Hallam, J. S -
1
May   25  	
Aug.   31
Parnell, Jack	
Melluish, Robert	
Oct.      9
1
15
21
23
Barnes, Robert	
1
Nov     7
1
27
McKinley, A. J 	
1
18
Victoria  	
2
Totals
10
8
Note.—Revenue derived from the sale of confiscated and surrendered fur and confiscated firearms during the
calendar year 1940 amounted to $378.80. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940.
P 55
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1940.
Government Agents.
Coyotes.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Total.
Alberni	
Atlin 	
Barkerville	
Clinton 	
Cranbrook —
Cumberland....	
Duncan	
Fernie	
Fort Fraser... .—
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood 	
Kamloops	
Kaslo 	
Kelowna 	
Lillooet	
Merritt 	
Nanaimo.	
Nelson 	
New Westminster..
Penticton	
Pouce Coupe 	
Powell River	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Smithers	
Telegraph Creek	
Vancouver....	
Vernon 	
Williams Lake 	
Windermere	
Totals	
5
1
108
192
29
197
13
107
1
62
36
82
45
2
119
6
69
16
28
96
5
58
52
22
5
100
404
136
130
5
5
1
2
121
269
63
27
1
25
876
12
51
32
16
2
12
4
13
2
2
10
22
7
11
4
7
1
1
17
11
2
12
2
2
26
2
32
21
$65.00
1,575.00
77.00
336.00
461.00
345.00
95.00
98.00
1,444.00
26.00
18.00
146.00
520.00
42.00
164.00
285.00
564.00
125.00
310.00
84.00
373.00
1,757.00
20.00
4,086.00
1,052.00
96.00
727.00
10.00
156.00
444.00
3,965.00
640.00
235.00
2,098.00
692.00
2,038
1,659
285
$23,131.00
j	
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1940.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922                   	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
285
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,644
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
1923               	
14,840.00
1924                                          	
172
5,770
10,046
20,398.40
24,397.00
1925                                	
1926                                        	
41,077.00
65,377.95
1927                       —   -.
2,487
1,025
1,389
403
1
1928                                         	
—
50,709.25
1929           .              	
	
42,122.00
1930
3,427
36,090.25
42,036.15
1931                               	
1932
80.00
1933                    	
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
	
6,285.00
1934
	
6,825.00
1935                	
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
2,038
12,374.00
1936                                        	
20,350.00
1937
19,540.00
21,018.00
1938
1939
	
26,399 00
1940	
23,131.00
Totals                     ..   .
9,297
7,293
70,783
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$533,544.80 P 56                                                       BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st,
1940.
Name and  Address
(Government Agency).
-.
Species.
Amount.
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Atlin—
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
i
....
i
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
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1
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1
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$30.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
40.00
40.00
70.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
80.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
15.00
40.00
65.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
80.00
1
Hamilton, Thomas L., Beverley Hills, Cal  _
Clinton—
Alber, Otto, Dinuba, Cal. _	
Bleakney, T. W., Seattle, Wash 	
Cullen, C. C, Seattle, Wash.....  	
Davis, S. S., Oakland, Cal	
Devenny, J. L., Seattle, Wash  ____	
Hilkert, C. W., Seattle, Wash.     '	
Lillis, J. C, Seattle, Wash  _	
Martin, Mrs. J., Bellingham, Wash _	
Martin, Jack, Bellingham, Wash.	
McLemore, Ina, Seattle, Wash  	
Nelson, A. W., South Bellingham, Wash _	
Wakeman, W. L., Seattle, Wash	
Winetrout, K. M., Grant Pass, Ore ' .	
Cranbrook—■
Churchill, N. D., Centralia, Wash	
Fisher, Helene, San Diego, Cal 	
Randle, C. N., Yakima, Wash.. "-	
Rogers, R. H., Spokane, Wash	
Webb, J. W., New York City	
Webb, Mrs. J. W., New York City _.
Fernie—
Coleman, Elizabeth M., Seattle, Wash __  	
Coleman, Wilbur F., Seattle, Wash	
Minzel, H. I., Colville, Wash	
Pistole, Dr. W. H., Memphis, Tenn.	
Woods, Eugene, Sr., Memphis, Tenn.  	
Fort Fraser—■
Huyette, F. A., Ventura, Cal 	
Moore, W. H., Bakersfield, Cal..     _
Safford, E. K., Berkeley, Cal  _   	
Schafer, M. F., Bellingham, Wash   	
Schuen, E. F., Watseka, 111 	 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1940.
P 57
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1940—
Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Fort Fraser—Continued.
Slyfield, Dr. F., Seattle, Wash._ __....
Wightman, Dr. R., Seattle, Wash	
Golden—
Eidson, Foster, Paducah, Ky.	
Kennedy, Wm, A., Medicine Hat, Alta..
Peterson, A. H., Spokane, Wash	
Greenwood—
Fay, John A., Seattle, Wash..—	
Ketcham, E. J., Seattle, Wash	
Lewis, J. H., Seattle, Wash  	
Kamloops—
Carlock, E. A., Paducah, Texas___	
Holmquist, Chas., Calipatria, Cal...
May, Archie, Kendrick, Idaho	
Wilkinson, Ray, Calipatria, Cal	
Wilkinson, Reed, Calipatria, Cal....
Wilkinson, Wm., Calipatria, Cal..__
Kaslo—
Schleman, R. W., Dayton, Ohio	
Lillooet—
Hoedmaher, E. D., Seattle, Wash...
Watts, C. E., Seattle, Wash 	
Watts, Mrs. C. E., Seattle, Wash....
Merritt—
Bauer, M., Kent, Wash. 	
Black, Walter, Seattle, Wash.	
Brill, F. W., Seattle, Wash	
Bull, Leland L., Seattle, Wash	
Carlson, W. K., Seattle, Wash.._	
Chase, E., Electron, Wash. 	
Clark, Dr. L. R., Seattle, Wash	
Debb, R. V., Miami, Fla 	
Driscoll, J. S., Bremerton, Wash...
Duryce, K. T., Seattle, Wash	
Geiger, B. C, Miami, Fla	
Greene, Dr. I. B., Everson, Wash..
Imhof, Louis, Tacoma, Wash..__	
Ives, E. T., Seattle, Wash	
Johnson, Cleveland, Rock Harbour, Fla.
Johnson, D. C, Seattle, Wash. _
Leaman, Chas., Longview, Wash	
Meadowcroft, F., Kent, Wash._„._	
Misener, R. B., Seattle, Wash	
McPhee, D. J., Seattle, Wash. ______	
Neilson, F. E., Longview, Wash. 	
Paulson, A. E., Longview, Wash. 	
Salvino, Frank, Seattle, Wash _ __„
Steen, W. H., Seattle, Wash. .. _____ _	
Wallace, Bruce, Los Angeles, Cal...
New Westminster—
Anderson, O. A., Seattle, Wash	
Baiter, Gilbert, Three Lakes, Wis.
Bates, D. H., Portland, Ore 	
Bauer, Eddie, Seattle, Wash.	
Bice, Dr. D. F., Yakima, Wash	
Brindle, A. W., Seattle, Wash	
Species.
mi
A 3
9._fl
S5
c n
§ 2
<3 m
Amount.
$25.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
40.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
55.00
45.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
55.00
15.00
65.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00 P 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1940-
Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
2*
_*__
° o
pq "k
Amount.
New Westminster—Continued.
Brindle, Harold, Seattle, Wash..
Burks, Joe, Yakima, Wash	
Callahan, H. S., Seattle, Wash...
Carty, Edwin L., Oxnard, Cal....
Channey, B., Pasadena, Cal	
Colasurdo, Angelo, Seattle, Wash—
Crawford, J. A., Los Angeles, Cal—
Crichton, E. W-, Portland, Ore. _	
Crow, Leland V., Bell, Cal 	
Degarimore, O. J., Bremerton, Wash._
Dick, J. T., Bremerton, Wash._	
Fritz, Herman, Munroe, Wis. 	
Gray, R. C, Pasadena, Cal.—	
Herb, J. J., Bellingham, Wash.	
Hobi, Frank, Aberdeen, Wash. —
Hoff, H. B., Seattle, Wash 	
Kleinberg, L., Seattle, Wash  _
Lewis, Dr. G. E., Salem, Ore	
Lewis, Paul R., Bremerton, Wash...
Magee, R. J., West Hollywood, Cal...
Marcus, D. A., Los Angeles, Cal	
Mathison, A., Seattle, Wash	
Mazzuchi, S., Sebastopol, Cal.	
Morgan, John, Seattle, Wash	
Mower, S. D., Olympia, Wash	
Murphy, R. E., Seattle, Wash	
McCulIach, J. H., Seattle, Wash „
Nockrodt, H. K., Bremerton, Wash.__
Norcross, P. J., San Marino, Cal	
Norris, K. M., Seattle, Wash	
Ohman, A. C, Seattle, Wash 	
Peterson, O. R., Buckley, Wash.-	
Ramage, L. M., Salem, Ore 	
Scott, W. E., Altadena, Cal	
Sligar, Porter, Seattle, Wash.- ~
Van Hoof, M. A., Huntingdon Park, Cal..
Zanidas, N., Seattle, Wash. 	
Oliver—
Edblom, L. A., Eugene, Ore 	
Howard, E. H., Corvallis, Ore	
Penticton—
Bauer, E., Seattle, Wash 	
Breader, O. S., Omak, Wash	
Demakis, T., Seattle, Wash	
Deobald, E. A., Kendrick, Idaho..
Edblom, L. A., Eugene, Ore	
Fay, J. A., Seattle, Wash	
Fleenor, J. W., Yakima, Wash....
Gwain, M. D., Omak, Wash	
Hailey, C. S., Seattle, Wash.	
Hatten, J. F., Yakima, Wash	
Howard, E. H., Corvallis, Ore	
Ketcham, E. J., Seattle, Wash	
Larson, Robert, Port Gamble, Wash..
Lewis, J. H., Seattle, Wash	
Manley, J. J., Seattle, Wash. _
i -
2
1
-  I
$25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
70.00
25.00
45.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
50.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
55.00
25.00
45.00
15.00
15.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
45.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
40.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
30.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940.
P 59
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1940-
Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
_ u
m S
3 5
rJS
oj ..
_rr
c ft
a oj
o i
[O
Amount.
Penticton—Continued.
Neimi, Mrs. L-, Seattle, Wash 	
Neimi, Wm., Seattle, Wash..	
Schaiver, H. T., Bremerton, Wash..	
Smiley, Ed., Yakima, Wash	
Stewart, E. T., Omak, Wash. _ - 	
Watts, W. A., Kendrick, Idaho  	
Pouce Coupe—
Adams, A. P., New York City, N.Y  	
Bartol, Geo. E., Philadelphia, Pa	
Carter, R. L., Los Angeles, Cal   	
Chandler, Dr. H. M., Hagerman, Idaho	
Drinker, P. H., Philadelphia, Pa 	
DuComb, Dr. W. L., Carlyle, 111	
English, Dr. A. B., Bristol, Tenn	
Figge, V. O., Davenport, Iowa 	
Glock, Homer, Fort Wayne, Ind	
Granberry, Leo, Victoria, Texas	
Heyl, Dr. Jas., Philadelphia, Pa  	
Hilgemann, V. H., Fort Wayne, Ind 	
Johnson, C. W., Cleveland, Ohio.	
Kiefer, Edna, Dallas, Pa  ....  	
Kiefer, F. M., Dallas, Pa    	
Krueger, A. W-, Victoria, Texas  -	
Laszlo, Dr. A. E., Bridgeport, Conn	
Littell, W. R., Atwood, Kansas 	
Quail, J. J., Davenport, Iowa  	
Schwindt, J. W., Davenport, Iowa 	
Smith, G. O., Cleveland, Ohio      	
Steward, Dr. B. L., Coolidge, Ariz	
Steward, Dr. G. B., Coolidge, Ariz	
Prince George—
Aubert, J., Bellingham, Wash 	
Baldwin, H. C, and Raub, M. B., Lafayette, Ind..
Everhart, W., Bala-Cynwyd, Pa 	
Ferguson, K. R., San Rafael, Cal  	
Hall, H. H., San Francisco, Cal	
Jackson, F. G., Chicago, 111. — 	
Jett, S. M., Akron, Ohio  	
King, J. J., Frankfort, Ky..   	
Ogier, W. T., San Francisco, Cal	
Ogier, Mrs. W. T., San Francisco, Cal	
Phunder, Dr. M., Minneapolis, Minn	
Safford, E. K„ Berkeley, Cal 	
Susen, B. P., Park Ridge, 111	
Sutherland, G. F., Ambridge, Pa 	
Taylor, Mary, San Francisco, Cal	
Wermuth, A. C, Fort Wayne, Ind. 	
Quesnel—
Blow, O. L., Redmond, Wash.	
Brigham, W. C, Los Angeles, Cal 	
Bryden, C. R., Redmond, Wash.	
Bull, Leland, Seattle, Wash  	
Cady, E. C, Burlington, Iowa	
Fortner, C. C, Seattle, Wash  	
Hague, R. J., Seattle, Wash  ..
Hepler, C. C, Hubbard, Ore   	
$30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
40.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
125.00
80.00
50.00
65.00
65.00
55.00
25.00
75.00
55.00
55.00
90.00
40.00
90.00
25.00
50.00
50.00
40.00
65.00
25.00
50.00
65.00
25.00
50.00
30.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
45.00
130.00
25.00
30,00
25.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
65.00
25.00
25.00
25.00 P 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1940-
Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
5 =
X
c
«
^j
3 n
CJ
c
ej
St
O
e.
+»
c  ■
a)
-4->      .
£_>
u
OJ
Q
o
o
3
p a;
o QJ
Amount.
Quesnel—Continued.
Hibbard, J. A., Seattle, Wash..
Holler, C, North Carolina	
Leber, C. H., Seattle, Wash.	
Melby, C. E., Seattle, Wash 	
Ruth, W. E., Seattle, Wash  _
Seller, E. M., Los Angeles, Cal  _.
Stolinger, Ed., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Studebaker, C. W., Mount Vernon, Wash..
Thompson, P. G., Los Angeles, Cal	
Wachter, J., Seattle, Wash  	
Winetrout, C. A., Grant Pass, Ore .	
Winetrout, K. M., Grant Pass, Ore	
Yoris, E. W., Seattle, Wash. _ 	
Zeek, Rex, Arlington, Wash 	
Salmon Arm—
Hobbs, J., Niland, Cal   	
Wilkinson, W. C, Calipatria, Cal	
Telegraph Creek—
Callison, I. P., Union, Wash  	
Flemming, A. S., Portland, Ore 	
Kerr, Edward, Darlington, Iowa 	
Nelson, Dr. E. A., Los Angeles, Cal....
Vancouver—
Bowers, Dr. J. W., Fort Wayne, Ind...
Goodwin, E., San Diego, Cal 	
Harbough, O. S., San Diego, Cal...
Melehoir, Lauritz, New York City 	
McDowell, Francis, Riverside, Cal  	
Stockton, C. B., Bakersfield, Cal 	
Williams Lake—.
Barton, Dr. J. F., Longview, Wash. 	
Blackman, C. E., Greenville, Cal 	
Boatman, L. L., Los Angeles, Cal	
Boyle, Lou, Yakima, Wash  	
Dahlin, E., Selah, Wash   	
Elston, Dr. L. W., and Loos, G. J., Fort Wayne, Ind.
Fair, A. J., and Fair, F. S., Blaine, Wash	
Gobright, C. F., Detroit, Mich   	
Knutson, T. R., and Scott, R. J., Los Angeles, Cal...
Mackintosh, P. G., Yakima, Wash   	
Muller, O., Seattle, Wash  	
Warren, Wheeler, Yakima, Wash...
Wells, J., Morgantown, Va 	
Windermere—
Arblaster, W. E.; Alhambra, Cal	
Chaney, Alger, Portland, Ore	
Chaney, Henry F., Portland, Ore....
Fortier, Waldo J., Fresno, Cal	
Street, Mrs. Janice, Seattle, Wash..
Street, William S., Seattle, Wash....
Totals .
134  I  42
S25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
65.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
100.00
120.00
25.00
80.00
25.00
95.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
15.00
125.00
40.00
60.00
120.00
40.00
60.00
25.00
60.00
50.00
90.00
15.00
55.00
40.00
65.00
1,065.00 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1940.
P 61
Prosecutions  (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to December 31st, 1940.
See
Foot
NOTE
w
E
a
_
o
>
c
0
O
M _
<w —
O   I_
■ c
o 0
$B
tH tw
Description of Offence.
c
0
<>
:  Q
c
o
: P
a
o
p
o
J    _
-. a
a
0
r    _
-. a
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animate.
Killing, hunting, or having in possession game animals of female sex
i
1
1
$10.00
Killing,   hunting,   or   having   in   possession   game   animals   during
?.
12
15
4
i
33
34
650.00
4
4
4
i
1
1
35.00
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during close season...	
1
2
8
i
12
12
175.00
1
4
?
?,
7
0
70.00
Removing all evidence of sex from game animals. __.
1
1
1
10.00
1
1
1
10.00
Game Birds.
1
i
1
2
10.00
Hunting or in  possession  of migratory game birds  during  close
season     	
2
1
2
6
11
11
100.00
Hunting,   killing,   or   having   in   possession   upland   game   birds
5
3
2
16
3
26
29
495.00
Hunting   certain   game   birds   with   a   rifle   contrary   to   the   game
1
1
1
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours _ __	
18
18
18
170.00
2
1
3
3
20.00
Trapping game birds __   _	
1
....
1
1
10.00
Trapping.
Interfering with a registered trap-line  	
1
4
2
1
1
8
9
610.00
Leaving traps set after end of open season ___  	
1
1
2
2
20.00
2
2
10
6
4
1
24
25
282.50
Trapping during the close season _   	
2
1
4
7
7
605.00
Unlawfully using big-game animals to bait traps   _„
1
1
1
10.00
Licences.
Buying or trading in pelts of fur-bearing animals without a licence
3
2
1
6
6
150.00
Carrying firearms without a  licence  	
13
6
16
13
34
5
82
87
580.00
Guiding without a licence    __— _.._     __	
1
1
1
10.00
Minor carrying firearms without a licence or without being accom
panied by an adult  _.    	
4
4
4
10.00
Resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling without a licence	
11
5
5
15
1
36
37
254.50
Using another person's licence or permit or allowing the same to
1
1
1
Firearms.
Carrying  loaded  firearms   in   or  discharging   same  from   an   auto-
1
2
4
12
19
19
Carrying or in possession of unplugged pump, repeating, or auto
matic shotgun       ._	
1
1
1
3
6
6
70.00
Discharging firearms on or across a highway in a municipality .._._
1
4
2
5
7
40.00 P 62                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to December
Continued.
31st, 1940—
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
tn
"3
0_
S
m
a
B_
a
o
>
a
o
O
c2
M rt
O   M
d
__«
3 s
11
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
ci
o
-'     ■/:
<>
:  Q
a
0
m!E
!   0
o
: a
c
o
£   _
a
0
z    _
w!E
: a
Miscellaneous.
Carrying firearms or traps within boundaries of game reserves	
Carrying   firearms   in  automobile  or  launch   during   close   season
without required permit. _. _..   	
Failing   to   submit   returns   under   Special    (Trapping)    Firearms
Licence  _ —    	
Illegally receiving or forwarding shipment of game ..._	
Interfering with a Game Warden in discharge of his duties 	
3
1
1
2
1
2
3
l
l
l
l
l
l
3
1
1
3
1
1
5
1
2
1
3
2
5
3
7
3
1
1
2
2
3
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
4
1
4
1
1
i
l
l
3
3
1
1
1
2
4
2
1
7
1
2
4
4
4
1
1
5
4
2
9
1
1
3
11
9
1
3
1
1
4
3
3
1
1
1
3
5
2
2
7
1
2
4
4
4
1
-  1
5
4
2
9
1
1
3
11
9
1
3
1
1
4
$30.00
30.00
10.00
10.00
75.00
125.00
20.00
Possession  of  protected  non-game  birds  -	
Trespassing in pursuit of game  	
Unlawfully taking  out a non-resident  big-game hunter  without a
permit      .,     ..	
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
Angling for trout during the close season ... 	
Angling in a closed area      ,  _	
70.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
20.00
20.00
5.00
17.00
70.00
Exceeding bag-limit on trout    __	
38.00
Trolling with gear designed to catch more than one fish at one time	
Gaol Sentences.
Angling for trout during close season _   ..;
Carrying firearms without a licence 	
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game animals or birds during
$5,197.00
Interfering with a registered trap-line __.  	
Killing or possession of game animals of female sex  _»	
Trapping or in possession of pelts  of fur-bearing animals during
close season -	
Totals..   	
60
56
99
63
141
21
419
440
Note.—" A " Division :   Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland.    " B " Division:   Kooi
areas.    " C " Division:    Kamloops,  Yale,  Okanagan,  Cariboo, and Lillooet areas.    " D "  Divisi
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas.    " E " Division:    Vancouver,
Mainland areas.    Gaol sentences ranged from one week to three months.
enay
on:
Coa
and
Atlin
st, a
Boundary
, Skeena,
nd Lower REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940.
P 63
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Migratory Game and Non-game Birds banded by a Representative of the
Game Department during the Year 1940 at the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve,
near Chilliwack, B.C.
Owing to war conditions and the National Parks Bureau, Department of the Interior,
Ottawa, being unable to help out in the finances necessary for the successful operation of the
bird-banding trap at the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve, near Chilliwack, B.C., no banding
operations were carried out during the year 1940.
Summary of Game-fish Distributions, showing Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings, 1940.
Kind of Game Fish.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fingerlings and
Yearlings.
783,338
60,000
5,883,900
1,910,000
2,714,055
249,368
389,658
27,700
3,505,744
3,944
244,990
453,361
84,750
Totals      	
11,351,293
4,176,414
783,101
Summary of Game-fish Eggs and Fry on hand at Hatcheries, December 31st, 1940.
Hatchery.
CUT-THBOAT.
Eastern Brook.
Kamloops.
Kokanee.
Steelhead.
Fry.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fry.
Fry.
Fry.
56,558
1
71,693
2,511
356,688
182,912
162,716
100,047
88,477
103,436
Smith Falls          	
10,384
738
57,298
Totals  	
66,942
356,688
528,880
182,912
58,036
Eggs
Summary.
11,351,293
Fry      4,176,414
Fingerlings and yearlings        783,101
Total distributions   16,310,808
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1940     1,193,458
Total  17,504,266
Note.—A number of Game Clubs or Associations were, as in past years, subsidized in
connection with their game-fish culture operations; subsidies being granted by the British
Columbia Game Department to the following: Powell River District Board of Trade; Revelstoke District Rod and Gun Club; Cranbrook Rod and Gun Club; Princeton Fish, Game, and
Forest Protective Association;   Penticton and District Rod and Gun Club.
Eggs were also supplied to the Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club, Smithers; McBride
Rod and Gun Club, McBride; Ocean Falls Rod and Gun Club, Ocean Falls; Prince George
Rod and Gun Club, Prince George; Prince Rupert Rod and Gun Club, Prince Rupert; and
Terrace Rod and Gun Club, Terrace. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940.
P 65
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Returns from 1,897 Holders op Special Firearms Licences, showing Big Game,
Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1939-40.
Big Game.
Bear 	
Caribou
Deer 	
Moose ..
429
82
857
572
Mountain-goat   125
Mountain-sheep      16
Wapiti (Elk)        5
Beaver   9,560
Fox   813
Fisher   214
Lynx  687
Marten   5,762
Mink   5,513
Muskrats    64,297
Fur-bearing Animals.
Otter   __
Racoon
216
815
62
Skunk 	
Squirrels   100,373
Weasel   42,657
Wildcat   118
Wolverine   152
Cougar 	
Coyotes     2,355
Predatory Animals.
48 Wolves
236
Fur-farm Returns, 1940 (Statement No. 1).
Kind of Animals.
Adult and
Young
(Reared)
Animals.
Died.
Killed.
Sold.
Total on
Hand as at
December
31st, 1940.
4,411
174
39,357
594
569
2,370
25
25,364
340
50
23
836
9
1,432
Marten   —	
126
13,157
Muskrats 	
245
Note.—Figures in respect to muskrats only approximate.    Cancelled permits, 118;   nil returns, 5 ;   no returns
received, 22.
Fur-farm Returns, 1940 (Statement No. 2).
Kind of Animals.
Adult and
Young
(Reared)
Animals.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on
Hand as at
December
31st. 1940.
72
83
1
940
32
2
23
6
193
5
1
98
49
76
1
649
27
2
Note.—Figures in respect to beaver only approximate.    Cancelled permits, 5 ;   nil returns, 2. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1940.
P 79
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1940.
mals or Birds destroyed.
Game Divisions.
Total.
" A."
"B."
"C."
" D."
" E."
Bear..	
Animals.
1
252
94
633
51
26
2
25
11
67
76
23
571
89
8
238
23
10
24
10
130
216
15
1,130
138
6
914
127
9
1
5
207
21
13
24
33
1
2
4
8
37
512
63
2
1,389
91
41
18
1
25
2
26
206
37
Wild (domestic) cats     	
1,061
195
2
Birds.
3,930
Hawks        	
Eagles    	
390
94
1,152
Owls      ...   .
194
78
Summary of Liberations of Game Birds, 1940.
Vancouver Island.
Lower Mainland.
Interior.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Pheasants.
340
792
140
533
1,330
161
Agassiz ._ 	
Chilliwack _	
Delta „„_ 	
402
1,777
248
1,430
1,157
517
1,879
1,314
1,720
2
Cranbrook (Canal Flats)
Creston  	
Edgewood   	
Grand Forks 	
Victoria—
Mission (Hatzic, etc.)—	
Matsqui. 	
206
North and South Saanich
Nakusp —-	
22
Surrey	
200
12
Burnaby 	
24
62
Totals 	
3,296
10,446
875
District.
Vancouver   Island
Lower Mainland -
Interior    	
Summary.
Pheasants.
....    3,296
.... 10,446
_       875
Total .
14,617 P 80 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1940.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1940.
Pheasants   5,588 Geese      2
Quail         11 Partridg-e   18
Ducks         23
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 1940.
Pheasants   15,737 Ducks        7
Quail   4 Partridge   153
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1940.
Pheasants     733
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 1940.
Pheasants   15,652 Ducks      4
Quail   .  2 Partridge   25
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1940.
Pheasants     5,060 Geese       2
Quail          15 Partridge   146
Ducks         24
Note.—During the year 1940 there were 228 licensed game-bird farmers in the Province,
but during the year forty-three of these farmers discontinued operations.
Seven licensed game-bird farmers have not submitted their returns.
Game-bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during the year 1940—1,124 bands
at 10 cents—$112.40. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1940.
P 81
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1940.
Barkerville and Quesnel Districts.
Becker, F. W  .Barkerville.
Cochran, J. D Barkerville.
Colebank, G. F Woodpecker.
Dale, W. A JKersley.
Evans, Chas Quesnel.
Ludditt, B. C Barkerville.
Miller, I. E Punchaw.
Nelson, O.
Barkerville.
Quanstrom, J Quesnel.
Quanstrom, Wm Quesnel.
Tibbies, Fred Quesnel.
Tibbies, James Quesnel.
Vernon, Clifford Quesnel.
Wykes, Chas. E Quesnel.
Okanagan and Boundary Districts.
Haskell, Gordon -Westbridge.
Noren, Arnold Westbridge.
Pel ton, Robert Cranbrook.
Peterson, M -Westbridge.
Cariboo District.
Anderson, Dave Clearwater Station.
Archie, Geo .Canim Lake.
Archie, Jacob Canim Lake.
Archie, Thomas Canim Lake.
Asserlind, H Keithley Creek.
Bidstrup, H Likely.
Bishop, Jas. A Clinton.
Blomberg, Chas Macalister.
Bones, Frank Clinton.
Borthwick, H Forest Grove.
Bradford, R. J Bridge Lake.
Burgess, T. R Fawn.
Butler, L. H .Tatla Lake.
Campbell, Pete _Big Bar.
Cleveland, L. C Bridge Lake.
Coldwell, H. W Jesmond.
Colin, A. A Dog Creek.
Collier, Eric Riske Creek.
Daniels, G. A Canim Lake.
Daniels, Steve Canim Lake.
Davis, W. J .70-Mile House.
Decker, E. .Canim Lake.
Deroche, E JHanceville.
DeWees, Richard .Horsefly.
Dougherty, E. G Clinton.
Eagle, Clifford Lac la Hache.
Fletcher, Joe  Clinton.
Grinder, Billie Jesmond.
Grinder, I Clinton.
Grinder, John  Big Bar Creek.
Hamilton, G. G Williams Lake.
Hamilton, H. M Lac la Hache.
Hamilton, Pete Williams Lake.
Hamilton, R. M  .Williams Lake.
Hamilton, Thomas Williams Lake.
Hansen, J. F .Bridge Lake.
Hansen, Robert L Bridge Lake.
Harby, Arthur Clearwater.
Henry, Cecil Hanceville.
Hockley, Geo  Horsefly.
Hooker, F.-C .........Horsefly.
Hooker, S. B Horsefly.
Johnson, J. W Likely.
Johnson, L. F Williams Lake.
Kaart, C Jesmond.
Labordie, E. . Clinton.
Lackie, Chas Likely.
Larson, Jack Roe Lake.
Larson, Ole Roe Lake.
Levick, J. S  Fawn.
McBride, T. J Likely.
McClerry, W Lac la Hache.
McDowell, Bob Bridge Lake.
McKort, C Clearwater.
McNeil, B. S . Canim Lake.
McNeil, H. M Canim Lake.
Muench, Harry Lac la Hache.
Mullins, B Tatla Lake.
Mulvahill, R. F Redstone.
Myers, Alfred K Horsefly.
Nicol, A -Horsefly.
Odian, E. J Fawn.
Ogden, P. W Lac la Hache.
Park, J. P 70-Mile House.
Parminter, J. W Williams Lake.
Parminter, Ross Likely.
Peters, Machell Canoe Creek.
Pollard, J Clinton.
Purjue, 0 Hanceville.
Ray, John B Clearwater Station.
Renshaw, J. H Blue River.
Rioux, Ed. Fawn.
Ross, C. Riske Creek.
Scallon, J Hanceville.
Scheepbouwer, J. A.__.70-Mile House.
Scheepbouwer, J. C 70-Mile House.
Scott, Duncan Bridge Lake.
Scott, J. R 100-Mile House.
Sellars, A Deep Creek.
Thorsteinson, C, Jr.... 100-Mile House.
Todd, Robert 70-Mile House.
Tompkins, E 70-Mile House. P 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1940—Continued.
Cariboo District—Continued.
..Bridge Lake.
.Miocene.
Torvilla, A	
Truedeau, O	
Turney, R. J Fawn.
Walters, Glenn Horsefly.
Walters, L. E .Horsefly.
Church, R. H Big Creek.
Mackill, C Kleena Kleene.
Weir, Donald J Redstone.
White, Thomas Likely.
Winquist, W Jlorsefly.
Young, Wm Clinton.
Chilcotin District.
Turner, Geo JKleena Kleene.
Cassiar District.
Ball, Geo. B Telegraph Creek.
Etzerza, B Telegraph Creek.
Jack, Henry Atlin.
Jack, Leo Atlin.
McClusky, Pat Telegraph Creek.
Tashouts, J. P Telegraph Creek.
Coast District.
Muska, John 1475 Eleventh Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Ratcliff, Walter Bella Coola.
Richmond, Wm. Hope.
Skuce, Herbert Kimsquit.
Stanton, J. R Glendale Cove.
Fort George District.
Carr, S. J Tete Jaune.
Chesser, C. A JVIount Robson.
Davidson, C. B Vanderhoof.
Davidson, L. H .Vanderhoof.
Dennison, G. M.' Mount Robson.
Garrett, Edward McBride.
Gladish, F. N Tete Jaune.
Hansen, A .Hansard.
Hargreaves, R. F Mount Robson.
Hooker, G. B Bend.
Hooker, J. B JBend.
Huble, Sam .Prince George.
Jones, D. L Fort St. James.
•Jones, I. H. Vanderhoof.
Kernohan, Geo...  Snowshoe.
Lestin, J. A Prince George.
Lonsdale, F. E. Snowshoe.
McAvoy, J. N Lucerne.
Monice, M. Fort St. James.
Reimer, A Tete Jaune.
Reinertson, R Vanderhoof.
Smith, Jas. M Snowshoe.
Hazelton District.
Beaver, Robert B Ootsa Lake.
Harrison, B. R Wistaria.
Laveck, Wm. J Endako.
Leon, Paddy Babine Lake via Topley.
Lord, Robert E Tchesinkut Lake.
McNeill, J. W Ootsa Lake.
Rehill, M.     Ootsa Lake.
Van Tine, E Ootsa Lake.
Van Tine, Wm Ootsa Lake.
Hagen, Harry Barriere.
Haines, J. M _R.R. 1, Salmon Arm
Latremouille, J. L Little Fort.
Maciejko, Jack Avola.
Kamloops District.
Mobley, F. G Tappen.
Mobley, Howard Salmon Arm.
Tuson, Clifford Savona.
Welland, Thomas Red Lake.
Bagley, A. E. Invermere.
Baher, M. C Natal.
Baher, Wm Natal.
Barnes, J. N Corbin.
Birdstone, A Cranbrook.
Canning, Fred '.kookumchuck.
Danikin, J. V 3risco.
DeSimone, S. H .Revelstoke.
Kootenay District.
Feuz, Walter  Golden.
Harrison, Wm. 0. Edgewater.
Jones, R. K Golden.
Lawrence, C. G.  Golden.
Mcintosh, E Athalmer.
McKay, G. J Athalmer.
Nicol, A. H Fort Steele.
Nicol, Kenneth Fort Steele. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1940.
P 83
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1940—Continued.
Nixon, W. J Invermere.
Nordstrom, Carl Natal.
O'Brien, Jas Natal.
O'Laughlin, E. P.     Spillimacheen.
Philipps, F. A 1551 St. Andrews Ave.,
North Vancouver.
Pommier, E Skookumchuck.
Rutherford, G. M. Invermere.
Kootenay District—Continued.
Slye, R. W Cranbrook.
Stewart, C. W Spillimacheen.
Tegart, H. W.       Brisco.
Tegart, Jas. H. Brisco.
Thomas, O. E.   ....  Parson.
Webber, S Golden.
Wiedenman, O. W. —Golden.
Anderson, Jack Goldbridge.
Colins, E. M 20-Mile Post.
Land, Bob Shalalth.
Madden, E. E Cache Creek.
Lillooet District.
Matier, J. H Ashcroft.
Michel, Thomas  .Lillooet.
Mogan, Thomas Cache Creek.
Peace River District.
Anderson, Stewart     .Hudson Hope.
Calliou, Joe Moberly Lake.
Calliou, John Kelly Lake via Lyn-
burn, Alberta.
Calliou, Pat Kelly Lake via Good-
fare, Alberta.
Calliou, Peter Moberly Lake.
Cameron, Patrick Moberly Lake.
Cameron, Ralph Moberly Lake.
Campbell, Milton Kelly Lake via Good-
fare, Alberta.
Cochrane, W. T Holla.
Esswein, P. B. Little Prairie.
Garbitt, T Moberly Lake.
Gibson, H. B Dawson Creek.
Golata, F. W.   ..Dawson Creek.
Hambler, Joe Kelly Lake via Lyn-
burn, Alberta.
Hamelin, S. Moberly Lake.
Miller, C. H Rolla.
Morton, Edmund Charlie Lake.
Noski, N Kelly Lake via Good-
fare, Alberta.
Orford, A. C Dawson Creek.
Rutledge, L. G Hudson Hope.
Sheffield, C Fort St. John.
Wanan.die, St. Paul—Kelly Lake via Good-
fare, Alberta.
Non-resident Outfitters.
Brewster Transport Co.,
Ltd.  .Banff.
Brill, Matt .Trail Creek, Montana.
Brown, Frank E Hazelmere, Alberta.
Clark, Stanley H JEntrance, Alberta.
Kitchen, Stan Jasper, Alberta.
Sunderman, Sidney...Hythe, Alberta. P 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1940.
Attorney-General (Minister) .Gordon S. Wismer, K.C .Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Jas. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
F. R. Butler .Vancouver.
Headquarters.
Sergeant H. P. Ponder Vancouver.*
Game Warden R. W. MacMartin .Vancouver.
Clerk J. B. Smith Vancouver.*
Clerk G. E. Marshall .Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T. Jones .Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss I. Pettigrew Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss I. Magee Vancouver.
Stenographer Mrs. F. Y. Little .Vancouver.
Junior Clerk F. Lobb Vancouver.*
Game-fish Culture Branch.
Superintendent A Robertson .Cultus Lake.
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson JSTelson.
Fishery Officer E. Hunter .Nelson.
Fishery Officer J. F. Thompson .Nelson.
Fishery Officer C. O. Mellor .Vancouver.
Junior Fishery Officer U. L. Rose .Vancouver.
Fishery Officer J. D. Inverarity Sooke. *
Fishery Officer E. M. Martin Sooke.
Fishery Officer A. Higgs Qualicum.
Fishery Officer F. Pells Cultus Lake.
Fishery Officer R. A. McRae Kelowna.
"A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Mainland Coast).
Game Warden J. Dewar Alberni.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Game Warden B. Harvey Courtenay.
Game Warden S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden B. Cash Victoria.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Ladysmith.
Game Warden W. N. Massey Alert Bay.
Game Warden R. S. Hayes Duncan.
Game Warden J. W. Jones JRoyal Oak, V.I.
"B" Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Inspector C. F. Kearns .Nelson.
Stenographer Miss A. Emery Nelson.
Game Warden A. F. Sinclair Invermere.
Game Warden N. Cameron .Golden.
Game Warden J. J. Osman Fernie.
Game Warden B. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game Warden M. B. Ewart Nelson.
Game Warden W. H. Cartwright Creston.
Game Warden M. J. Wilson Greenwood.
Game Warden W. H. McLean Revelstoke.
Game Warden H. V. Morgan Princeton.
Game Warden A. Monks  Penticton.
* On active service. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1940. P 85
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1940—Continued.
" C " Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts).
Inspector .R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Stenographer Miss H. M. Swadling Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden C. F. Still .Vernon.
Game Warden J. W. Stewart 1 Clinton.
Game Warden G. Sandiford Kamloops.
Game Warden W. A. H. Gill Xillooet.
Game Warden .0. Mottishaw Quesnel.
Game Warden L. Jobin Williams Lake.
Game Warden D. E. Ellis Kamloops.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector .T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
Game Warden W. L. Forrester Prince George.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Smithers.
Game Warden D. Roumieu Burns Lake.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game Warden S. G. Copeland Prince Rupert.
Game Warden W. 0. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
Corporal ...       H.J. Engelson Fort Nelson.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Game Warden V. L. Williams ..Fort St. John.
Game Warden P. Brown Vanderhoof.
Game Warden G. Davis McDame Creek.
" E " Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Inspector _W. Kier Vancouver.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden W. Clark .Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe Mission.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Corporal P. E. Allan Powell River.
Game Warden H. Tyler Powell River.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
C. Shuttleworth    Kamloops.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Chari.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941.
1,025-1041-4650 ■'
'  

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