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TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1942

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 TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF the
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR GIRLS
of the province of
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1940, TO MARCH 31 ST, 1941
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Chakles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-seventh Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial School for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1941.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1941.
The Honourable G. M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
Honourable George M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the honourable members of the Legislature
the Twenty-seventh Annual Report of the Industrial School for Girls from April 1st, 1940, to
March 31st, 1941.
In looking over our admissions and releases during the period referred to in this report,
I am reminded of many problems, pleasures, and a few disappointments. With the latter we
try to find out just where we failed; realizing, too, that eighteen months is a short time to
eradicate and rebuild. In our ambition and great desire for their future success and happiness, we set rather a high standard, and at times have to be satisfied with less than we
hoped for.
One girl of normal intelligence had been a source of anxiety to family and police since
she was 12 years old. She prided herself on her hardness, and told us we need not expect
" to make a dint in her." Medically she required our care and accepted gladly, but our
advice we could keep. Toward the end of her training the mother died suddenly and the
girl was released to go home and care for family and home. This she did exceedingly well,
showing she had absorbed useful knowledge even if she was not in accord with our ideas.
She has proved to be a pleasant surprise to family and supervisors.
Another attractive girl who had left school too early because of poverty and friction in
the home was at war with herself and all others. She realized that life could be so different
for her under other circumstances, and her resentment made her impatient and bad tempered.
The opportunity of continuing school studies, having all books and equipment provided without difficulty, and a teacher ready to assist when needed, was appreciated. Her progress was
rapid because of her application and there was a steady forwarding of papers to examiners
of Correspondence Course. In time it was possible to correct, even reprimand, without a
temper tantrum.
With the majority the privilege of continuing their education is appreciated, but there
are some who, while admitting that they prefer this type of " going to school " rather than
the regular day-school, because of individual attention, think it is still rather a nuisance.
However, because nothing else which is interesting is provided during school period, they
accept their three hours of instruction. When they realize that subjects which they considered too difficult have been mastered, they are proud and encouraged to continue.
Two sisters who had become problems because of leaving home without permission, with
the possibility of further difficulties, came to us for care and training. There was no resentment because of committal, and an acceptance of training and advice. To them it was an
adventure, a new way of living, and a wonderful opportunity. Life had been rather drab,
with lack of opportunity, and heavy manual work with little commendation. When speaking
of the Seven Wonders of the World, they included Stanley Park and the Rotary Ice Carnival.
Grade VIII. will be completed and that will be their limit. Conduct and efficiency are rated
as excellent, and they will soon be the proud owners of pink uniforms, considered by all the
best award.    In spite of all this, they are two of the most popular girls in the School.
Four Indians and six of mixed blood were committed this fiscal year. They have all
accepted training willingly and made fairly good progress. One girl was over 15 years old
and in Grade II., because the Chief, fearing tuberculosis, had forbidden children from the
Reserve returning to Residential School. This girl has made good progress in special class,
can now write a legible, fairly well expressed letter, is interested in reading suitable books,
and has enough arithmetic to protect her finances. She is a good housekeeper and cook,
could take a position as maid and remain in Vancouver, but it might be better to find a position nearer home because of loneliness so far from her own people.
Another Indian girl, also quite competent, was placed as maid in Vancouver and was
satisfactory to employers, but because of loneliness asked to be returned to her own people
on the Reserve. V 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
This loneliness is an important factor with all of our graduates. They miss the companionship and fun that is part of institutional life. It has its drawbacks, but for many it
is the happiest home they have known. We try to discourage a continuance of these friendships in most cases, and advise the making of other contacts on the outside. One girl from
Victoria, when released, told me with a smile that she soon would be back with us again.
True to her word, she returned within a few months and her greeting was, " Well here I am
again, I told you I would be back." After another short period of training and discipline she
was persuaded to take a job and be independent, thus maintaining her self-respect. She
earned $4 a week, and a good home provided. While many of our girls have come from poor
homes, there are exceptions. Several have attended private schools, had three and four years
of music, recreation provided, and a comfortable home. When a girl has had training in
music, practice hours on the piano are arranged for her.
Five pregnant girls were admitted during the year. They are seen every week by our
doctor, special care taken regarding diet and treatment to benefit both mother and baby.
The expectant mothers attend school, accept training in the various branches, and, as far
as possible, share in the pleasures and recreation. They respond to this routine and are
healthy and almost happy. They remain with us until labour commences, then are taken to
the Vancouver General Hospital maternity ward. The experiment of bringing the babies
back with the mothers to the School was tried, to enable them to be breast-fed. However,
in a very short time (five weeks has been the longest, and in other cases much less) the
babies had to be put on a formula, and even before that had supplementary feedings. Because
of the time required to give necessary care to the babies, it was difficult for the girls to
receive full household training in a reasonable period. As the girl in most instances must
make her living as a domestic this was important. We did feel that there was a closer tie
between mother and baby because of the months spent together. Eventually the baby in most
cases must be placed in a foster home when the mother takes employment. In a few cases
relatives come forward and accept responsibility; and if on investigation these homes are
considered satisfactory, this can be arranged. After considering carefully the advantages
and disadvantages of keeping babies with their mothers in the School, the decision was
against. Therefore, this was discontinued and, as before, the babies went to Infant's Hospital
for feeding adjustment, then to foster home under the supervision of the Children's Aid
Society.
As no programme is complete without special emphasis being placed on spiritual training,
the School strives to instil the high principles of Christian teachings in the minds of our
girls. All denominations are enrolled, and arrangements are made not to conflict but to give
opportunity for worship according to faith. Protestant services are in charge of representatives of the different churches every Sunday afternoon from 3 to 4 o'clock, each having their
appointed Sunday in the month. Mass is conducted each Sunday morning by a Catholic
Priest, followed by instruction given by Sisters of Seton Academy. Thursday evening an
hour of song and instruction is given to Catholics and Protestants in separate groups by
workers who have given this splendid labour of love for years. To some this is their first
worship service, to others almost forgotten since childhood, while a few have had the opportunity. In the morning while breakfast is being prepared, the others not so engaged meet
in the club-room for a short service. Two hymns chosen in turn by each girl and the Lord's
Prayer are sung. By repetition these hymns are being impressed on their memories and
will be recalled later on in life.
A social history of every girl is prepared as soon as possible after commitment, and she
is taken to the Child Guidance Clinic. This service is of great value to us and we gratefully
acknowledge our dependence on their advice. The following classification will show the
variety of material committed to us: Average intelligence, 7; dull normal, 8; border-line, 12;
slightly subnormal, 2; subnormal, 4; high-grade moron, 1; moron, 3. This necessitates special class, elementary and high school classes, and planning in vocational training. We contend
that even a moron profits by a period of school-room training. There is in every case an
improvement in English, handwriting, and general knowledge.    The pupils realize this, too.
After the period of training is completed—and this varies because of the difference in
material, previous experience, aptitude and attitude—plans are made to follow release.
A recommendation is made to the Superintendent of Child Welfare;   supplying a case-history, REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1940-41. V 7
a copy of half-monthly reports during her entire residence with us, and a letter telling of
progress and prognosis. During the time the girl has been here we have learned to know
her family and become friendly enough with them to point out mistakes on both sides in the
past. In the majority of cases parents are interested in the welfare of their families, but
because of various handicaps have not proven very successful. In the case of a lonely girl
we must be everything to her until she finds her niche.
There is a need always for domestics and our graduates are in demand. They also are
placed in factories, laundries, and stores. Because of the increased possibility of gainful
employment for our girls, we are endeavouring to complete training in a shorter time and
release for earlier independence. This entails more supervision on the outside and we are
adjusting our programme with this in view. Our girls leave the School with a clean bill of
health, teeth in good condition, a complete outfit of clothing suitable to the position which has
been arranged.    A small amount of money is given them to carry on with until pay-day.
Our annual " open day " and concert was enjoyed by many friends and relatives of the
girls and staff and by the general public. The choir had practised faithfully for the cantata,
" The Man from the Moon," by John Murray Gibbon and Sir Ernest MacMillan, and gave
a very creditable performance. The other item on the programme, " The Maker of Dreams,"
was exceptionally well done by three of our senior girls. This was again given by request
at a meeting of a local organization.
Life has been made happier for girls and staff because of the thoughtfulness and self-
sacrifice of the groups who supplied such excellent programmes during the season; and we
ask the Women's Musical, Philharmonic Society, Mr. Payne (moving pictures), also those
who provided for our religious services, to accept our grateful thanks. The W.C.T.U., as
usual, remembered our girls generously at Christmas, and their gifts, individually marked for
each girl, were appreciated; also the Catholic Societies that so generously remembered their
group in the School.
To the Honourable Dr. Weir, our Minister; Mr. Walker, Deputy; Miss Isobel Harvey,
Superintendent of Child Welfare; Mr. George Ross, Principal; and Mrs. K. Moody, Follow-up
Officer, we express our grateful thanks for their interest and co-operation.
EXPENSE AND REVENUE  STATEMENT OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1941.
Total inmate-days from April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941  -      13,212
Per capita cost, one year        $740.95
Per capita cost, one day  2.03
Operating expenditure by voucher—
Salaries      13,015.07
Office and school supplies, etc.—
Postage, office and school supplies      $299.22
Telephone and telegraph        151.95
 451.17
Travelling expenses   411.25
Farm operations        1,046.12
Household equipment (other than furniture)  732.03
Clothing—■
Clothing   $1,107.42
Boots and shoes         510.81
       1,618.23
Janitors' supplies   381.96
Fuel, light, and water—
Fuel   $1,410.68
Water           306.95
Light and power      1,076.30
       2,793.93
Carried forward  $20,449.76 V 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Expense and Revenue Statement of School, March 31st, 1940—Continued.
Brought forward  $20,449.76
Operating expenditure by voucher—Continued.
Provisions—
Groceries   $3,504.44
Meat      1,263.31
Fish         116.19
       4,883.94
Medical attendance, medical supplies, surgical and dental cost—
Medical attendance      $400.00
Medical supplies        326.80
Surgery (tonsillectomies, etc.)         151.00
Dental cost         387.00
       1,264.80
Good Conduct Fund   284.70
Incidentals and contingencies '.  206.43
Total expenditure for year by voucher  $27,089.63
Maintenance and repairs (expended through Public Works Department)  608.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1940  995.45
$28,693.08
Less rent      $493.17
Less other receipts        143.46
Less inventory, March 31st, 1941      1,199.98
       1,836.61
$26,856.47
POPULATION OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1941.
On roll, April 1st, 1940  28
Girls admitted during year April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941  37
65
Released as wards of Juvenile Court  10
Transferred to Essondale     1
Transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm     1
Cancelled      1
— 13
Total in School, March 31st, 1941  52 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1940-41.
V 9
GIRLS ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1940, TO MARCH 31st, 1941.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
565
Victoria, B.C  	
Years.
17
13
4
16
17
6
6
17
10
15
14
17
11
I6I/2
16
17
14
17
14
17    .
17
7
15
15
17
13
141/2
15
16
16
16
16
Hi/2
14
13
17
10
Years.
17
13
14
16
17
16
15
17
15
15
14
17
12
17
16
17
14
17
14
17
17
15
15
15
17
13
15
15
16
16
16
16
15
14
13
17
10
Industrial School for Girls Act.
566
567
568
New Westminster, B.C _	
Beaver Creek, Sask	
New Westminster, B.C 	
Vancouver, B.C.- —
Gravelbourg, Sask ...
French-Canadian, Indian ..
Ukrainian-Russian	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Juvenile Delinquents Act.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
569
570
571
English 	
English  	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
57-
Smithers, B.C 	
Indefinite period.
573
Humbolt, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
New Westminster, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C —	
Breslau, Germany  	
Not exceeding three years.
574
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
575
576
Indian   _	
Indeterminate.
Industrial School for Girls Act.
577
Transferred from Children's
578
English-Scotch 	
French, French-Canadian
Aid.
Industrial School for Girls Act.
579
580
Vancouver, B.C 	
Vancouver, B.C.-	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
581
Sardis, B.C 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
582
Indeterminate.
583
English-Canadian —	
English-Indian, French
Scotch-Belgian 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
584
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
585
Tulameen, B.C..	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
586
Kelliher, Sask 	
Sec. 56, Infants Act.
587
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
588
Victoria, B.C.	
Industrial School for Girls Act.
589
590
591
592
593
Rock Bay, B.C   	
New Westminster, B.C	
Bellingham, Wash	
North Vancouver, B.C 	
Norwegian..	
English, Scotch-Canadian
Irish, Dutch-Canadian	
Indian	
English-Canadian...	
Undefined, not less than two
years.
Juvenile Delinquents Act.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Until 18 years of age.
594
two years.
Indefinite period, not exceeding
595
Vancouver, B.C	
LaFleche, Sask 	
Armstrong, B.C.  ..-.,,
Bowen Island, B.C 	
Prince George, B.C—	
Armstrong, B.C—	
two years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
596
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
597
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
598
599
600
601
Irish-Canadian, Indian
French-American, English
Irish, Scotch-Indian	
Scotch-Indian, Half-breed..
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
NATIONALITY
Ensrlish (both)   6
English-Canadian (both)   3
Indian  (both)   4
German (both)   1
Norwegian  (both)   1
English, American   1
English, French  1
English, Irish   1
English, Norwegian  1
English, Scotch .   2
English-Indian, French  ...  1
English, Scotch-Canadian  1
French-American, English   1
French-Canadian, Indian   1
OF PARENTS.
French, French-Canadian   1
German, American  1
Irish, Scotch-Irish  1
Irish, Scotch-Indian  2
Irish, Dutch-Canadian   1
Irish, Canadian-Indian   1
Polish, Ukrainian _____  1
Scotch, Belgian  1
Scotch, Indian  1
Swedish, English   1
Ukrainian, Russian   1
Total  37 V 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
WHERE GIRLS WERE BORN.
Alberta      3 United States     1
British Columbia   26 Germany      1
Saskatchewan      6
Total  37
AGES OF GIRLS.
13 years      2            16 years   9
14 years      6            17 years   10
15 years   10
Total  37
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Chilliwack   2            Salmon Arm     2
Courtenay   1            Smithers      1
Mission   1            Vancouver   20
New Westminster  2            Victoria      6
North Vancouver   1 —
Penticton   1       '                      Total  37
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
For safe-keeping     1 Sexual immorality   16
Incorrigible   14 Theft  ___    3
Juvenile delinquency      1 —
Neglect     1 Total  37
Prostitution  . !     1
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Juvenile Delinquents Act  2            Not exceeding three years     1
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929  21           Until 18 years of age     1
Sec. 56, Infants Act  1            Indefinite period     1
Industrial School for Girls Act. 4            Indeterminate      2
Undefined,   not   less   than   two Transferred   for   safe - keeping
years   1 from    C.A.S.     (parents    in-
Indefinite,   not   exceeding   two                      terned)       1
years   2 ■—
Total  37
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Baptist   1 Roman Catholic   13
Church of England  8 Salvation Army     1
Gospel Hall   1 Seventh-day Adventist     1
Lutheran   1 United Church     8
Pentecostal   1 —
Presbyterian   2 Total  37
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  28
Number who have father living, mother dead    4
Number who have mother living, father dead     2
Number who have father unknown, mother living     2
Number whose parents are unknown     1
Total   37
Of the above, the parents of 11 girls are separated;  3 parents are divorced;  5 girls have
stepfathers;   1 girl has a stepmother;  and 1 girl is adopted. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1940-41. V 11
STAFF OF OFFICIALS.
The following is the present staff of officials:—
Superintendent and Nurse Mrs. Annie G. Westman.
Assistant Superintendent and Teacher Miss Ayra E. Peck.
Clerk and Commercial Teacher Miss Margaret W. Sibbald.
Teacher Miss Marion D. Tulloch.
First Assistant Mrs. Agnes C. Oxley.
Sewing Supervisor Miss M. E. Murray.
Night Supervisor Mrs. V. C. Travis.
Supervisor (Linen-keeper) Miss Anna C. Martin.
Supervisor Mrs. E. E. Paterson.
Cook Miss Irene G. Reid.
Relief Supervisor Mrs. Alice McCormack.
Engineer and Janitor Claude S. Gardner.
Gardener George B. Boving.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent.
MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following medical report applies to the period from April 1st, 1940,
to March 31st, 1941 :—
Calls made by physician  1  50
Patients seen by physician, including treatments   303
Complete physical examination   32
Patients in isolation for Neisser infection   7
Smears taken for Neisser infection   34
Blood tests for Kahn and Wasserman   34
Girls treated for syphilis intraveneously   1
Treatment for syphilis intraveneously   43
Argyrol and silver nitrate treatments for Neisser infection   33
Prontylin tablets for Neisser infection  (5 grains)   1,148
Urine tests   104
Chest clinic   8
Admitted to Vancouver General Hospital—
Tonsillectomy      4
Maternity cases      5
Ward X observation      1
Ward W emergency (scald)      1
Isolation ward (chicken-pox)      1
— 12
Examination by eye specialist   10
Glasses provided   10
The general health of the girls has been very good.    Each'girl on admission receives
a complete physical examination and is kept in quarantine for fourteen days.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
M. B. Campbell,
Medical Officer. V 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
DENTIST'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the past year each new girl has been examined and necessary
dental work done for all.
The following is the report of dental services rendered at the Industrial School for Girls
during the year ended March 31st, 1941:—
Visits to dentist   20
Number of girls seen   64
Amalgam fillings     102
Cement fillings  ..  74
Cleanings    1
Extractions     20
Novaeaine administrations   41
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Stanley McQueen, D.M.D.
GENERAL REPORTS.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—Movements of high school pupils from April 1st, 1940, to March 31st,
1941:—
Number enrolled   _ 12
Grade IX.      9
Grade X.      3
12
Girls leaving during term     5
Girls in class March 31st, 1941      7
During the year from April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941, the sixth in which we have
enrolled with the Government Correspondence Course, two girls enrolled in Grade X. completed their course in four subjects in a most satisfactory manner. The third girl in Grade
X. is progressing very well.
Girls in both Grades IX. and X. enrolled in hygiene, social studies, English literature,
English grammar and composition. The physical education course included in the hygiene
has been most popular, and twice a week we have done the practical part of the course in
our well-equipped gymnasium or on the playing-field.
Six of these students received tuition in commercial training as well.
Ayra E. Peck,
Assistayit Superintendent and School-teacher.
Dear Madam,—The period from April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941, is covered in the
following report.
The average daily attendance of twenty-four was divided into two groups; one attending from 9 o'clock to 12 noon, the other from 1 o'clock to 4.
The afternoon class consisted entirely of Grades VII. and VIII., of whom ten were
enrolled in the Government Elementary Correspondence Course for Grade VIII. and fourteen
in the course for Grade VII.    Of those enrolled, one was taking the complete course, while REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1940-41. V 13
the  others  were  taking  a  partial  course  consisting  of  literature,  language,  spelling,  and
mathematics.
The morning class included pupils from Grades I. to VI. In this group there were four
in Grade VI., two in Grade V., one in Grade IV., one in Grade III., one in Grade II., one in
Grade I., and five special class pupils.
The classes this year have been very interesting to work with, because of the real
interest shown by the pupils.
Marion D. Tulloch,
School-teacher.
Dear Madam,—During the year April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941, a branch of the
Junior Red Cross was formed under the name of " Bluecoat Barracks." The girls had
previously made donations to the Red Cross; but with a number having relatives in the
services, and all being good knitters, they were enthusiastic about becoming a unit.
We have always provided wool for each girl to knit herself a three-piece suit; but all
felt that wool is needed for war purposes, so only twin sweater sets are now being made to
wear with skirts. These are to be knitted only after each girl has made a substantial effort
to her Red Cross work.
Accordingly the group has completed 57 sweaters (suitable for children from 8 to 11
years), 23 caps, 18 scarves, 42 pairs of mittens, 6 large sweaters, 1 afghan, 6 shoulder-capes
for hospital use, 6 pairs of socks, 2 dressing-gowns, 10 pairs of children's bloomers made
from joined pieces, and 14 stuffed animal toys made from sewing-room scraps.
In July we donated a quantity of lavender to the Red Cross Superfluities Shop, which
they reported sold very well.
Some of the girls are good knitters when they come to us, others need to be taught.
Upon arrival each girl begins to knit her blue coat-sweater, which is part of her outfit during
her stay in the School.
Our library continues to be one of our most popular departments. At the present time
we have between 600 and 700 books, mostly fiction, but with some reference books as well
as a number dealing with health, travel, and etiquette. It is interesting to note the increased
circulation of books. For the first few weeks, many new girls seldom appear at the library,
but as time goes on they join the eager group that assembles on library night. Some of the
high school girls, and those who have been here longest, have read nearly all the books; and
many are the heated discussions that take place regarding the various authors and types of
books. Besides the books, there is always a plentiful supply of current magazines, donated
by interested friends, on hand and eagerly read.
The girls prepared and enjoyed a number of parties. Outstanding was the New Year's
Eve party in the gymnasium, which the committee had decorated with coloured streamers
and balloons provided by the girls from their funds. A programme of games occupied the
first part of the evening and was followed by dancing until 11.30. The music was provided
by phonograph, radio, and piano. Many and varied were the costumes; sailors, soldiers,
Robin Hood, Spanish girls, gypsies, ballet dancers, and Indians being only a few. Each
girl received a box of candy and lemonade was served. When staff and girls gathered at
midnight to welcome the New Year, they one and all voted the party a highlight in a happy
year.
Hallowe'en and Valentine parties were also enjoyed, with programmes of games and
music provided by committees of girls.
Our radio and loud speaker is a source of great enjoyment. Various groups have
favourite programmes, ranging from world news and Charlie McCarthy to the evening
dance numbers, and usually each group's preferences are respected by the remainder.
Ayra E. Peck,
Assistant Superintendent. V 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Dear Madam,—In my department on main floor, which includes the dining and serving
rooms, junior and senior sitting-rooms, as well as the large common living-room where both
junior and senior girls mingle in their off-duty time, the girls are trained in general
housework.
In the dining and serving rooms the girls are instructed in care of dishes and silver,
setting and waiting on tables. Two waitresses attend to the girls' tables and one to staff
during meal-times. In this lovely room the tables are laid with white cloths, napkins with
pretty rings, flowers tastefully arranged, and three girls are seated at each table. In the
serving-room our meals are served to the girls cafeteria style, which has proved most satisfactory, speeding service and eliminating waste. Agnes Craig Oxley
First Assistant.
Dear Madam,—Twenty-one girls received full or partial training in sewing from April
1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941.
During this period the girls completed a great quantity of work, which included 101
uniforms and print dresses, 60 morning dresses, 349 personal garments, 120 baby garments,
1,008 articles for kitchen use, 109 pieces of table linen, and 70 pieces of bed linen; 84 articles
of household furnishing, which included curtains, slip covers, pillows, bedspreads, and rugs,
were made, as well as 620 miscellaneous articles, including concert costumes, coats, and
tailored wool frocks.
Each girl does her own mending and darning under supervision in the sewing-room.
The girls in this department also received instruction in embroidery and crocheting as well
as in repairs and alterations, useful in renovating their own clothing before going home.
Many girls show extra ability and become skilful enough to complete their own home-going
outfits.    Sewing-room training is usually the final step before release.
Mabel E. Murray,
Sewing Supervisor.
Dear Madam,—Usually the laundry is the first place of training after release from
quarantine. As very few of the girls have had experience along this line, much practice is
required before they become expert. There is the steady progression from washing stockings
up to ironing white uniforms worn by nurses and supervisors. This requires half-day training for five days a week over a period of usually three months.
During the past year forty-seven girls have worked in all 6,001 hours, washing 48,199
articles, many of which required ironing. Each girl has three complete sets of clothing,
plainly marked with her name. These must be sorted into individual bundles ready for
change on bath-days. Having three, provides one for present wearing, one in her locker,
and one in the laundry. The experience gained will be of value in commercial laundry or
housework. Anna c   Martin>
Linen-keeper.
Dear Madam,—Kitchen training is popular with the girls and almost without exception
they look forward to this period. Their pride and satisfaction when viewing the results of
their work helps repay for the patient repetition that is necessary in most cases.
During the past year twenty-three girls were in the training group. This meant the
cooking of three meals a day, consisting of soups, meats, vegetables, salads, and desserts.
Cakes, cookies, pies also were included. Approximately 150 loaves of bread were made
weekly, as well as buns and rolls. Over 600 quarts of fruit were preserved for winter use,
also 75 quarts of jam and jelly.    Various types of pickles, over 300 gallons, were prepared.
The poultry department provided generously with eggs for meals and cooking, also many
chicken dinners were enjoyed. Irene G. Reid
Kitchen Supervisor. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1940-41. V 15
ESTIMATED VALUE  OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWN ON PREMISES.
Vegetables.
Potatoes, 7,500 lb.   $187.50
Peas, 158 lb.   7.90
Beans, 212 lb.  10.60
Beets, 1,200 lb.   24.00
Tomatoes, 375 lb  18.75
Cabbage, 1,218 lb.   36.54
Cauliflower, 156 lb.   7.80
Carrots, 1,118 lb.   20.63
Onions, 500 lb.  15.00
Onions, green, 40 bunches   1.35
Chives, 56 bunches  .  2.80
Parsley, 48 bunches   2.40
Radish, 40 bunches   1.35
Gherkins, 45 lb.   2.25
Cucumbers, 380   19.00
Cucumbers, hothouse, 46   6.90
Squash   8.50
Vegetable marrow, 30   3.00
Celery, 60 heads   6.00
Corn, 216 cobs   4.50
Parsnips, 675 lb.   16.85
Salsify, 65 lb.   3.25
Turnips, 223 lb.   3.90
Lavender, 10 lb.   10.00
Manure, 10 loads   50.00
$470.77
Fruit.
Apples, 265 lb.  _  $7.95
Pears, 50 lb.   1.50
Cherries, 39 lb.   3.90
Raspberries, 88 lb.   8.45
Blackberries, 25 lb.   2.50
$24.30
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941.
425-1141-5084 

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