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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF LANDS HON. A. W. GRAY, Minister. H. CATHCART, Deputy Minister.… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1942

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS
HON. A. W. GRAY, Minister.
H. Cathcart, Deputy Minister. E. C. Manning, Chief Forester.
EEPOET
of
THE FOEEST BRANCH
for the
TEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST
1940
PRINTED bt
authority of the legislative assembly.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941.  Victoria, B.C., January 31st, 1941.
To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Forest Branch of the
Department of Lands for the year 1940.
A. W. GRAY,
Minister of Lands.
The Hon. A. W. Gray,
Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—There is submitted herewith the annual Report on activities of the Branch during
the calendar year 1940.
E. C. MANNING,
Chief Forester. In Memory of
ERNEST C. MANNING
Chief Forester of British Columbia
1936-1941
Ernest Callaway Manning—born at Selwyn, Ontario, April 17th, 1890;
graduated in forestry at the University of Toronto in 1912; employed by the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company, 1912-15; Dominion Forest Service, 1915-18;
British Columbia Forest Service, 1918-41.
During his employment with the British Columbia Forest Service he was in
turn District Forester at Prince Rupert; Forester in charge of Management at
the Chief Forester's Office in Victoria; Assistant Chief Forester; and, finally,
Chief Forester from January 1st, 1936.
On the appointment of a Timber Controller for Canada as a war measure in
July, 1940, he was at once chosen as the Controller's Assistant on the Pacific Coast,
in which position he rendered service of outstanding national importance.
He died in an air crash on February 6th, 1941, while returning from a
business trip to Ottawa.
As Chief Forester of the Province his term of office was distinguished by his
courage, energy, and enlightened policy. By his death in the immediate service
of his country Canada and British Columbia lose an outstanding public servant.
His services as Assistant Timber Controller had an effective weight in
Canada's war effort. His service as Chief Forester will continue to bear fruit for
many years to come. M
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a 5  REPORT OF THE FOREST BRANCH.
Good and bad business years come and go and it is doubtful whether any two men could
agree on just what constitutes one or the other. Every factor is so thoroughly conditioned by
others that no one favourable feature can be singled out as a sure index. The year 1940
brought to every major branch of the forest and wood-using industries in British Columbia
the best-filled order files, the highest peak of employment, and the nearest approach to total
capacity production in the history of the Province. Coupled with this, and in spite of early
misgivings, shipping facilities proved to be ample for all requirements up to the month of
December. From the standpoint of business done, 1940 was a record year. Whether its effect
on markets and other conditioning factors was favourable or not will have to await the verdict
of the years. Whatever that final verdict may be from a business point of view, from the more
urgent and important standpoints of national service and war-production effort we have no
hesitation in complimenting the industry as a whole on invaluable achievements in satisfying
the vital war-time requirements of Canada and the United Kingdom.
Under peace-time conditions the United Kingdom has been using about 4 billion feet of
timber annually, about 75 per cent, of which was secured from European sources and
25 per cent, from Canada. The early part of 1940 saw the last of the European supplies cut
off and the total burden of supply placed on this country, with British Columbia called upon
to provide the lion's share. At the same time, war and defence requirements at home assumed
huge proportions, and over all loomed the probable lack of shipping.
Early in the new year the major part of huge orders placed by England in the previous
fall remained in the yards and on the docks. On February 1st fifty ships' cargoes were
reported piled awaiting shipment. Negotiations started the previous September with a view
to heavy rail movement to ships on the Atlantic coast had so far failed; and mills were
closing down or running short shift for sheer need of space to pile lumber.
A great many factors had contributed to this congestion. The British Admiralty had
taken over all shipping, and neutral ships were not freely available for freight to war ports.
Submarine operations reduced available tonnage. The convoy system inevitably caused loss
of time and reduced all ships to the speed of the slowest. Heavy troop movements withdrew
many ships from cargo routes. Before the new year was far advanced, however, conditions
began to turn for the better.
An agreement with regard to rail shipments to the Atlantic coast was announced on
February 13th. The first ship to take British Columbia lumber by this route was engaged
to load at St. John in mid-March and the first train-load left the Pacific coast the first week
in March. By mid-June 58 million feet had gone east by rail, and rail shipments thereafter
reached as much as 50 million feet in a single month.
In March boats were reporting at British Columbia ports for loading, and by the middle
of June there was no lack of ships. Accumulated yard stocks were rapidly reduced, mills
generally were stepped up to more than 90 per cent, of capacity production and, even so,
during the second half of the year had difficulty in keeping pace with orders and ships
awaiting cargo.
The major part of the record production was for urgent war purposes in England and
Canada. It is impossible, of course, to assess the exact proportion of weight to be credited to
the industry in the larger field of total war effort, but it was large, and it was accomplished
by voluntary co-operative effort at willing expense of individual interest. Log and lumber
prices, in spite of a multitude of harassing developments in a completely changed lumber
world, were pegged at June levels. Among other accomplishments the industry supplied
structural timbers for more than 250 aeroplane hangars, thereby obviating the necessity of
using large quantities of steel urgently needed for other war purposes. Their ability to
ship at short notice large quantities of timber and lumber unobtainable elsewhere in Canada
greatly facilitated construction for military purposes throughout the Dominion.
On June 15th Mr. H. R. MacMillan was appointed Timber Controller for the Dominion,
with wide powers to regulate the industry and to deal in timber to facilitate our war effort.
On June 17th the Chief Forester, Mr. E. C. Manning, accepted the post of Assistant to the
Controller on the Pacific coast, with headquarters in Vancouver.    The  Controller's  office F 6 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
served after that date as a focal point for planning, co-ordinating, and for the purchasing of
Dominion Government requirements, but only one specific order was necessary to accomplish
desired results. The export of fir logs was forbidden for three months from July 10th. This
order was extended for three months to December 10th, and after that date all export of fir
sawlogs from British Columbia was forbidden except under Dominion Government permit.
In the bush the logging camps, suffering under the impact of their own peculiar war-time
disabilities, managed to keep pace with the mills. War requirements are quite different from
those of peace-time trade to which the whole industry is geared. During the past year there
has been an especially heavy demand for structural timber, and an insistence on Douglas fir,
which has presented its own peculiar difficulties. During the last quarter of the year there
were practically no unsold stocks of fir logs on the Vancouver market, while accumulated
hemlock and cedar stocks constituted an embarrassing problem.
Aeroplane spruce, a specialized industry in its own right, came sharply to the fore with
the advent of the war. A steady production was maintained in British Columbia throughout
the peace years, but .predictions were common that, in view of the development of all-metal
planes, it would never again be an important factor in war-time construction. For certain
purposes, however, it still maintains its lead over all other materials and aeroplane spruce
production is still of outstanding importance. During the summer of 1940 surveys designed
to locate all available stands of the required high quality were completed and camps and mills
engaged in this branch of the industry were operating at full capacity. The 1940 production
was three times that of 1939.
During the past four years, raw wood from the forest to an average total production of
3,236 million feet B.M. has been disposed of through five principal avenues to:—
Million.
Sawmills, about  2,310
Pulp-mills       258
Shingle-mills       250
Hewn ties, poles, and other minor products       158
Raw log export      264
Total  3,236
It will come as a surprise to many to realize that the shingle-mills, in terms of appetite
for raw materials at least, rank in full equality with all minor users. British Columbia
edge-grain red cedar shingles are a superior product able to compete in any market where
shingles can be sold, and production is about 85 per cent, of all shingles made in Canada. The
industry takes approximately one-half the cedar-log production and made this year about
3,700,000 squares. Our principal market is the United States, which normally takes 75 per
cent, of the output. A quota equal to 30 per cent, of the average domestic use for the three
preceding years is permitted into the States duty free. All shipments over and above this
pay a duty of 25 cents per square. The free quota of 2,371,544 squares in 1940 was exhausted
early in October. In total value of products the shingle industry ranks about one-sixth of the
value of lumber, one-half the value of pulp and paper, and a little more than the value of
minor products.    The industry enjoyed a fairly satisfactory business year.
No accurate record of lumber production is yet available, but log scale, value of products,
and water-borne lumber shipments, accurately reported in the tables of this report, are all
excellent measures of business transacted.
Scale of materials cut in 1940, amounting to 3,693,154,756 F.B.M., again establishes an
all-time record. Value of products exceeds $100,000,000 for the first time. Water-borne
lumber trade establishes a new record at 1,257,917,240 board-feet. These figures constitute
the key to the present and future well-being of the Province. They represent between 35 and
40 cents in every dollar of present income, public and private; and inasmuch as nature has
limited us to a forest economy on all but about 6 per cent, of our productive land area, forest
products represent our most logical source of one-third of our income in the future. A
differential of one-third of income constitutes the difference between prosperity and poverty.
Two great problems face us in this regard: First, to keep our forest lands productive;
second, to maintain export markets.
Perpetuation is too big a subject to be opened in this report. Interested parties are
referred to " The Forest Resources of British Columbia," published by the Forest Service in 1937,  and  the  Chief  Forester's   annual  presentations  to   the   Forestry   Committee  of  the
Legislature in recent years.    These may be secured on application.
Just what the export situation will be at the end of the war it is impossible to predict.
Certainly vast quantities of materials will be needed for reconstruction; and Great Britain,
the greatest lumber market in the world, will be thoroughly familiar with British Columbia
woods, which were being introduced with difficulty. It might be assumed that British
Columbia mills and camps will profit accordingly. On the other hand, however, substitutes
are already making heavy inroads in the domain of wood; European competition will be
renewed, in some cases at least, with accumulated surplus stocks and probably under
compulsion of economic stresses that will put real values far in the background. Much time
and money have gone into lumber trade extension in past years with fruitful results. Post-war
emergencies should not entirely be lost sight of under the strain of war activities.
ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL.
The opening paragraph of the 1939 report under this heading read: " The history of
personnel and organization since the low of depression years in 1931-32 has been a record of
rapidly increasing responsibilities and volume of work, coupled with a lagging recovery in
personnel. The disparity between volume of work and available staff has been in part the
result of recovery in business transacted and in part an altering character in that business,
factors which have been discussed at some length in reports of recent years."
The same statement holds true at the close of 1940. With further increased responsibilities incident to war activities and generally increased business, the permanent establishment
of the Branch numbers 246, plus 34 temporary; an increase of 3 permanent appointments and
11 temporary as compared with 1939.
From these numbers there have been 35 enlistments. As a measure of economy in both
man-power and funds, and to keep positions open for enlisted men on their return, only
6 temporary appointments have been made to vacancies created by enlistment. The additional
load of work has been carried as completely as possible by the remaining staff. In a great
many cases this has meant consistent overtime and holiday work, which has been willingly
and freely contributed by the remaining staff.
Forest Service Enlistments to December 31st, 1940.
1939—
L. F. Swannell, Assistant District Forester, Prince George.
W. Hall, Assistant Forester, Victoria.
H. Casilio, Draughtsman, Victoria.
N. H. Wharf, Clerk, Victoria.
C. V. Smith, Clerk, Prince Rupert.
1940—
W. Murray, Draughtsman, Prince Rupert.
T. Hunter, Launch Engineer, Victoria.
G. S. Andrews, Assistant Forester, Victoria.
V. C. Smith, Launch Engineer, Vancouver.
E. G. Oldham, Assistant Forester, Victoria.
G. A. Playfair, Radio Engineer, Victoria.
D. McKay, Junior Clerk, Victoria.
C. R. Lee, Draughtsman, Kamloops.
F. J. G. Johnson, Ranger, Invermere, Nelson District.
A. E. Parlow, District Forester, Kamloops.
J. Boydell, Ranger, Kamloops District.
C. L. Armstrong, Assistant Forester, Kamloops.
0. V. Maude-Roxby, Assistant Ranger, Kamloops District.
A. C. Kinnear, Air Surveys Division, Victoria.
L. S. Hope, Assistant District Forester, Prince Rupert.
A. Gordon, Supervisor, Victoria.
W. D. Hay, Assistant Ranger, Prince George District.
A. J. Kirk, Assistant Ranger, Prince George District.
W. E. Jansen, Assistant Ranger, Vancouver District. F 8
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
C. R. Sandey, Launch Engineer, Vancouver District.
H. G. Mayson, Assistant Ranger, Kamloops District.
E. F. Taggart, Assistant Ranger, Prince George District.
A Smith, Patrolman, Prince George District.
A. B. Ritchie, Assistant Ranger, Kamloops District.
J. H. Wilcox, Lookoutman, Kamloops District.
J. C. Wright, Lookoutman, Kamloops District.
C. W. Mizon, Assistant Ranger, Kamloops District.
G. R. Owen, Assistant Ranger, Vancouver District.
R. R. Douglas, Assistant Forester, Kamloops District.
L. A. Willington, Assistant Ranger, Prince George District.
Distribution of Force, 1940.
Permanent.
Temporary.
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* Salaries voted and positions occupied for at least part of the year. The number of permanent employees was
reduced through the year by enlistments. Total number permanent positions actually occupied December 31st, 1940,
was 234.
t National Programme of Youth Training in co-operation with Dominion Government, 186 ;   Student Assistants, 10.
NATIONAL FORESTRY PROGRAMME OF YOUTH TRAINING.
The National Forestry Programme of Youth Training, designed to train and rehabilitate
young men not otherwise employed by having them undertake forest-work essential for the
conservation and development of our forest resources, proved to be a valuable asset during
the war months of the summer of 1940, the sixth year of operation.
The Dominion Government assumed half the cost of the programme but, contrary to
previous years when the Provincial Department of Labour participated, the remaining costs
were borne by the Divisions of the Provincial Forest Service benefiting. The 1940 programme was reduced in size. All enrollees were assigned as Assistants to Forest Rangers
or to special work already being undertaken by the Forest Service. The elimination of
specific youth training projects permitted the per-day costs to be materially reduced as
special foremen, cooks, and camp equipment and accommodation were not required. Actually,
with most enrollees under the direct supervision of permanent Forest Officers, a real training
was possible and only essential forestry-work was undertaken.
Enrollees were selected by a Board which consisted of representatives of the Dominion
Government, Provincial Labour Department, and the Provincial Forest Service. Enrolment
was restricted to single men, not otherwise employed, who were 17 or 18 years of age, or, if
J Peace Arch Park.
Wells Gray Park.  FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940. F 9
an army reject and physically fit for the work to be undertaken, up to 27 years of age.
Enrollees were paid at the rate of $45 per month when living at home or $55 per month
when away from home; in each case enrollees paid their own board and lodging, although
travelling expenses on official business were paid. A standard issue of working clothes,
similar to that available during 1939, was available for those enrollees engaged on park or
similar work where contacting the public was part of the job and uniform dress was especially desirable. The enrollee paid half of the cost of his uniform, the Government the
remainder.
Of the total of 186 men enrolled, 27 secured other employment, 31 left for advanced
education, 11 enlisted in the C.A.S.F., 7 left through injury or sickness, 8 quit for no specific
reason, 2 were discharged, and 100 were laid off on the termination of the project.
Similar to regular Forest Officers the enrollees, for the greater part, were employed on
all phases of forest conservation and park development work. Those acting as Ranger
Assistants were valuable in the maintenance and construction of forest-protection roads and
trails; in the operation and maintenance of equipment and tools; in the servicing of telephone-lines ; the improvement of buildings and lookouts; as assistants on cruises and logging
inspections; on fire detection and suppression; as clerical assistants and dispatchers, relieving more experienced forest-protection personnel for fire-suppression; as radio operators and
innumerable other duties, all of which helped develop a sense of responsibility and accomplishment which makes for better citizenship. As uniformed park attendants at six Vancouver
Island parks and assistants at the newly developed Peace Arch Park, enrollees contributed
appreciably to one of British Columbia's major industries—the tourist trade. The reforestation programme employed a number of enrollees in the fire-proofing of areas to be planted,
the erection of accommodation for planting crews, and later fall planting of young trees.
PARKS.
The forested lands, mountains, lakes, and streams of British Columbia hold tremendous
recreational possibilities, in a world that turns more and more each year to outdoor holidays
and sport as a relief from congested towns and cities. The Province has some of the finest
recreational areas on the continent, a number of which have already been reserved as Provincial parks.
These Provincial parks and recreational areas, given protection and planned management,
may well, within a few decades, become one of our major assets.
During 1940 most of the Provincial parks were visited and where Park or Advisory
Boards existed they were contacted. With the assistance of Dominion funds the Peace Arch
Park was improved. It is on the southern end of the recently completed King George VI.
Highway, which runs from the Pattullo Bridge to the United States Boundary. A start was
made on the proposed road to Mount Seymour, the preliminary survey of which is complete.
A reconnaissance was made of the recreational possibilities of Wells Gray Park and Mount
Seymour Park. Permanent signs and picnic facilities were erected in the more used parks on
the Coast. Through the National Forestry Programme of Youth Training, attendants were
maintained throughout the summer at six Vancouver Island parks. These young men, under
supervision and instruction, were able to maintain and undertake further improvements, act
as forest-protection officers, and assist and advise visiting tourists of the recreational facilities
available. With limited funds it was impossible to undertake any more extensive improvement work.
With the highly developed facilities for ski-ing in the States adjoining the Province closed
by war conditions to Canadians, a definite demand for such improvements in British Columbia
is apparent. With five ski-ing areas available near all our large centres of population and
a marked increase in the number of individuals and clubs turning to this winter sport, extensive development here will be well warranted.
During 1940 all existing Provincial park reservations were classified as follows:—
Provincial Park of Class " A "■—
Name of Park. Acreage. Location.
Kokanee Glacier      64,000.00        Nelson.
Silver Star      22,080.00       Vernon.
Mount Assiniboine      12,800.00        Invermere and Golden. F 10
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
Name of Park. Acreage.
Elk Falls  2,810.00
Keremeos Columns  720.00
Mount Seymour  677.00
Chasm  315.00
Englishman River Falls  240.00
Stamp Falls  230.83
Little Qualicum Falls  130.30
Nakusp Hot Springs  127.00
John Dean  80.00
Medicine Bowls  30.30
Sir Alexander MacKenzie  13.00
Peace Arch  8.64
Total, Class " A "....
Provincial Park of Class " B "—
Tweedsmuir	
Wells Gray	
Sooke Mountain..
.    104,262.07
.3,456,000.00
.1,164,800.00
1,446.00
Location.
Campbell River.
Keremeos.
North Vancouver.
Clinton.
Parksville.
Alberni.
Qualicum Beach.
Nakusp.
Sidney.
Courtenay.
Ocean Falls.
White Rock.
Bella Coola and Burns Lake.
Clearwater Lake and River.
Victoria.
Total, Class " B " 4,622,246.00
Provincial Park of Class " C "■
Beatton	
Mount Bruce	
Mount Maxwell.
Princeton	
Clearwater	
Crescent Beach__
Swan Lake	
Premier Lake	
White Rock	
Nakusp Recreation-
Salt Lake	
King George VI	
Oliver	
Mara Recreation	
Elk River	
Westview	
Osoyoos	
Inonoaklin	
Lockhart Beach	
Testalinda	
Manitou	
Westbank	
Brentwood Bay	
Dead Man's Island-
Strombeck	
Total, Class " C "..
770.10
480.00
472.00
341.12
260.00
237.00
166.00
165.00
114.80
91.00
87.10
50.00
21.45
14.60
10.40
10.21
7.28
5.50
4.90
4.80
2.50
2.00
1.40
1.00
0.685
3,320.845
Fort St. John.
Saltspring Island.
Saltspring Island.
Princeton.
Hedley
Crescent Beach.
Pouce Coupe.
Cranbrook.
White Rock.
Nakusp.
Prince Rupert.
Rossland.
Oliver.
Sicamous.
Fernie.
Powell River.
Osoyoos.
Edgewood.
Kootenay Lake.
Oliver.
Naramata.
Okanagan Lake.
Victoria.
Burns Lake.
Alice Arm.
Provincial Parks administered under Separate Park Acts—
Garibaldi     622,720.00        North-east of Vancouver.
Strathcona     529,920.00        West of Courtenay.
Mount Robson     513,920.00        Robson.
Total, separate Acts 1,666,560.00
Total area of Provincial park reservations, 6,396,389 acres or 9,994 square miles. FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940. F 11
FOREST ECONOMICS DIVISION.
Forest Surveys.
In the course of the 1940 field season, surveys were completed on  1,871,800 acres as
follows:— Acres.
Slocan drainage      830,000
North Shore region (Howe Sound east to Harrison drainage)  1,041,800
Total  1,871,800
For both these projects the forest-cover and other data were plotted from vertical air
photographs prior to the parties leaving for the field, thus providing them with detailed
preliminary maps. A three-cruiser party carried out the Slocan Drainage survey while two
two-cruiser parties worked in the North Shore region. At the present time the final maps,
estimates, and working-plans for these areas are being compiled.
In addition to these surveys, further exploratory reconnaissance was made of the proposed Dome Forest, in the Fort George Forest District. Preliminary work has now been
completed over an area of 310,000 acres.
As mentioned in last year's report, an increasing amount of time is being spent supplying
forest survey maps and resources data to various agencies, both public and private.
Provincial Forests.
One new Provincial Forest, the Moresby, was created during the year. This forest was
reported on in the 1938 report and the details may be found by reference to that publication.
There are now forty-four Forests; eighteen on the Coast and twenty-six in the Interior,
totalling 10,242 and 19,255 square miles respectively, an aggregate of 29,497 square miles.
Harrison Drainage.
The estimates, forest and topographic maps, and management recommendations have been
completed for the Harrison Drainage. This region comprises the lands bounded on the south
by the Fraser River, on the north by the 50th parallel of latitude, on the east by the summit
of the Cascade Mountains, and on the west by the height of land running north from Dewdney
separating Stave River and the Harrison Lake watersheds.
Utilization of forest products has been in progress ever since the first settlers arrived in
1862; however, the annual cut must have been very small prior to 1900 and it is really only
during the past five years that maximum production has been attained. Over the period
1935-39, inclusive, the average annual cut has been 83,144 M.B.M., mostly sawlogs, sold on the
open market at New Westminster or Vancouver. By species, this production is made up of
72 per cent. Douglas fir, 18 per cent, red cedar, 9 per cent, hemlock, and the remainder from
white pine, balsam, spruce, and yellow cedar. Loss by fire averages 480 M.B.M. annually,
thereby giving a total annual depletion of 83,624 M.B.M. due to commercial use and fire. This
compares with an estimated sustained yield capacity of 32,701 M.B.M. from all accessible
stocked forest areas. Depletion is thus more than two and one-half times the estimated rate
of growth. F 12
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
INTERNATIONAL     BOUNDARY
INDEX  MAP
Scale:-15.78 miles to 1 inch
123
122
The total volume of merchantable timber is estimated to be 2,549,100 M.B.M., of which
92 per cent, is accessible. Ownership status reveals that less than 29 per cent, of the productive forest land has not been alienated or encumbered, either by Crown grant, timber licence,
timber lease, or timber sale.
Timber values are estimated as follows (over 11 inches D.B.H., except in the case of hardwoods which were cruised to a minimum top diameter of 8 inches) :—
Species.
Accessible.
Total.
Douglas fir	
Western red cedar-
Western hemlock--
True fir (balsam) —
Western white pine	
Yellow cedar (cypress).
Sitka spruce  —
Red alder— _— 	
Broad-leaved maple-
Western birch	
Cottonwood —
M.B.M.
908,390
683,970
413,420
249,920
19,740
27,640
380
15,370'
14,900
11,760'
1,370
Totals..
2,346,860
M.B.M.
1,012,020
720,510
457,490
266,770
20,740
27,730
380
15,420
14,910
11,760'
1,370
2,549,100 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940. F 13
The classification of areas is as follows:—
Productive Forest Land—■
Mature timber—- Acres. Acres.
Accessible   75,370
Inaccessible      6,610
       81,980
Immature timber—
1-10 years old      7,440
11-20 years old     5,670
21-30 years old      3,680
31-40 years old .....     1,080
41-60 years old  10,340
61-80 years old   19,040
81-100 years old      1,530
48,780
Not satisfactorily stocked—
Logged      6,750
Logged and burned  11,570
Burned      4,570
Non-commercial cover  36,920
       59,810
Total sites of productive quality  190,570
Non-productive Forest Land—
Cultivated and villages     17,250
Barren and scrub  688,610
Swamp and water     70,160
Total non-productive sites   776,020
Total area of drainage  966,590
Quatsino Region.
During the past year the forest and topographic maps, estimates, and management recommendations have been completed for this area. It is proposed that the greater part of the
region, which includes that part of Vancouver Island lying north of a line drawn between
Brooks Peninsula and Port McNeill, be created a Provincial Forest. The opportunities for
establishment of a working circle are most favourable, in that 55 per cent, of both the area of
merchantable timber and total productive forest land is held in the name of the Crown;
depletion over the region as a whole does not exceed the calculated sustained annual yield, and
the excellent reproductive powers of hemlock, combined with good growing conditions, gives a
better-than-average range of thriftily growing young stands. The forests are primarily
suitable for utilization as pulp, and it is estimated that the lands adjacent to the waters of
Quatsino Sound are capable of a sustained yield sufficient to maintain a greater capacity of
plant than is now established at Port Alice.
There are two notable features of this forest producing area: First, the low fire-hazard;
and, second, the high proportion of cut-over land which has restocked satisfactorily. Ordinarily the fire-hazard is very low, but with the recent expansion of operations along the east
coast there will be a tendency for this to increase; however, in comparison with other areas
further south, the annual fire loss is small. The inventory shows that natural regeneration
is excellent and approximately 93 per cent, of the cut-over and blow-down areas carry fully
stocked, thrifty stands of second growth. F 14
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
INDEX MAP
■ Scale -1B-78 miles. 1'in. -
The classification of areas is as follows:—
Productive Forest Land—
Mature timber—
Accessible 	
Inaccessible 	
Immature timber—
1- 5 years old	
6-10 years old	
11-20 years old	
21-40 years old	
41-60 years old	
61-80 years old	
Not satisfactorily stocked—
Logged 	
Logged and burned 	
Burned 	
Non-commercial cover
Acres. Acres.
424,930
49,900
      474,830
2,560
8,970
5,760
56,570
680
50
5,300
290
30
10,390
— ■       16,010
74,590
Total productive forest sites      565,430 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 15
Non-productive Areas—
Barren, alpine, and scrub
Swamp and water	
Cultivated and urban	
Total non-productive sites
Total area of region	
453,730
26,050
1,590
481,370
1,046,800
Timber values are estimated as follows (over 11 inches D.B.H.):—
Species.
Accessible.
Total.
M.B.M.
6,585,220
2,854,110
2,176,130
472,600
92,780
213,830
M.B.M.
6,857,470
3,001,780
2,648,620
510,750"
99,120
213,830
Totals	
12,396,350'
13,228,250
During 1937 and 1938 the average annual utilization in the region was 62,770,000 board-
feet, but in view of the recent expansion in the logging industry it is anticipated that the
annual cut will be approximately 120,000,000 board-feet. The loss from fire is almost
negligible, so that the expected annual cut of 120,000,000 board-feet will represent almost the
total depletion. This compares with an estimated annual sustained yield of 138,140,000
board-feet from all accessible stocked forest sites.
Cascara Survey.
At the request of the Department of Trade and Industry, the Forest Branch undertook
to make a reconnaissance of the resources of cascara sagrada, utilized exclusively for its
medicinal properties.    The results may be summarized as follows:—
(a.) The supplies of cascara have been exploited in such a wasteful manner that to-day
the Lower Fraser Valley has little or no mature growth left. This is essentially true of all
the Lower Coast region, where it is estimated that more than 90 per cent, of the original
growth has been destroyed.
(6.) Available supplies of bark on Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland Coast are
estimated to range from a minimum of 900 tons to a maximum of 1,200 tons. With an
average annual export of 170 tons per year (1936-39, inclusive), this means a visible supply
for only five to seven years.
(c.) The only point for optimism lies in the immature stands of cascara which are now
growing in a fairly thrifty manner, and if protected from devastation will develop into
commercial stands about fifteen to twenty-five years hence. There are approximately 261,000
acres bearing cascara trees in varying degrees of stocking, and it might reasonably be
expected that, if handled properly, these lands could eventually maintain an annual output
of 500 tons of dried bark.
(d.) From the point of view of sustained output the crucial problem is how to bridge
the gap between the harvesting of the last of the mature stands and the time when the
immature areas will reach merchantable size. The most feasible solution appears to be the
establishment of private plantations on marginal farm land. Such areas could be managed
on a short rotation of about ten years, provided some means were found to utilize the wood
of cascara as well as the bark. The practicability of such a solution, however, is dependent
upon the yields of extract which would be obtained from small material, and this information
will be forthcoming only as a result of experiment.
(e.) The information gathered during the course of this investigation points to the
cascara-bark industry as being most haphazard. The picker is entirely at the mercy of the
jobbers and prices paid for the dried bark are usually as low as possible;   so low in fact that F 16
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
responsible individuals no longer are interested and the harvesting is done by Indians, or
school-boys in search of pocket-money. If the industry is ever to be stabilized the purchasers
of raw material will have to be prepared to pay substantially higher prices than have been
paid on the average.
Air Survey Operations.
Air survey photographic operations were started under difficulties last season, as two
senior technical officers had left in April to join the Royal Engineers in England and their
loss was a severe handicap. However, junior officers carrying on were able to complete a
satisfactory programme of 5,370 square miles of photography.
Operations were again conducted from an average altitude of 15,000 feet, thereby
effecting economies in the number of photographs per square mile; on the other hand the
only aircraft available had a cruising speed of 100-110 m.p.h. and a safe range of four hours
and forty-five minutes. This limited the photographic time to a total of only three hours
and thirty minutes in comparison with the five hours and thirty minutes which are available
on an average day.
Processing and printing has now been taken over by the King's Printer and in future
all such work will be done by that Department. The tank method of developing was used
and found to be reasonably satisfactory. An attempt was made to develop film by means of
the apron method but tests proved unsatisfactory; however, experiments will be continued in
an endeavour to correct the faults.
A summary of the season's field activities is as follows:—
Projects.
Area photographed.
Flying-time.
Sq. Miles.
1,770
1,070
2,530
Hours.
25
20
71
Minutes.
42
55
25
5,370
118
2
In the office of the Air Survey Section forest type-maps were completed for the Slocan
region and the area west of the Harrison drainage. At the present time preliminary type-
maps are being prepared for the region south of the Fraser River extending west from
Chilliwack Lake, and for that portion of Vancouver Island lying south of the Alberni Canal
and west of the E. & N. Railway land grant.
Forest Resources Inventory.
Field-work in the Vancouver Forest District was continued with the organization of
Rangers' mapping facilities and the indexing of field maps and plans. Fourteen standard
draughting-tables, map-cabinets, and light fixtures were constructed and installed in Ranger
offices.
In line with the plan to standardize cover-mapping technique in other forest districts of
the Province, work was extended to the Nelson and Fort George Forest Districts where
Rangers' forest atlas maps were replaced with new revised editions. In addition, the Nelson
and Fort George headquarters were supplied with new forest atlas maps for areas not covered
by forest survey maps, the latter being currently revised for fires and logging. Organization
of better mapping facilities and indexing of maps and plans was also carried out at these
headquarters.
In the Prince Rupert Forest District this programme was confined to the revision of the
District headquarters forest atlas and in the Kamloops Forest District to the revision of
ninety forest survey map editions at District headquarters and District Rangers' offices.
The above work included the revision of 357 maps, of which 101 editions are replacements.
Assistance for this project was provided by fifteen Ranger assistants through the co-operation
of the National Forestry Programme. It is planned to complete the Prince Rupert and
Kamloops Districts as time permits.
The recompilation of the forest resources of the Vancouver Forest District for machine
tabulation included the transfer to punch-cards of statistical records of eleven Provincial
Forests and records of the forest survey of the E. & N. Railway land grant.   Records resulting FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 17
from the forest survey of the Okanagan Working Circle in the Kamloops Forest District are
in the process of transfer to punch-cards. Upon their completion it is planned to proceed
with the recompilation of the forest resources records of the Prince Rupert District (Coast)
areas.
RESEARCH.
Mensuration.
The periodic remeasurement of twenty-two permanent yield study-plots located in the
Lower Coast region was carried out by a three-man field crew. In addition, a special study
was made of the growth of the ninety-year-old stands left uncut in what was once a large area
of young forest situated between Pitt Lake and the Stave River watershed. The report on
the latter project has not yet been completed.
SlLVICULTURAL STUDIES.
As indicated in last year's report, the major portion of the silvicultural research programme is directed toward a solution of the many problems involved in the management of
our Coast forests. Studies have been proceeding over a period of years and re-examinations
were carried out on twenty-four plots established to study in detail the phenomena of seed
production, seed-dissemination, survival of disseminated seed, germination and survival of
natural seedlings, and seasonal height growth of young stands. Further progress has beert
made with the problem of artificial regeneration by means of seed spotting, and it is now
evident that success is dependent upon eradication of the mouse population. The laboratory
experiments which aim to ascertain the basic light, moisture, and heat requirements for
Douglas fir germination have been continued, and it has been found that although temperature
is of great importance to the germination of dry-stored seed it is relatively unimportant in
the case of stratified seed. In other words, temperature is an important factor in the
germination of spring-sown untreated seed, but is unimportant in the case of naturally sown
seed which has overwintered on the ground or in the case of artificially sown seed which has
been stratified. In addition, there has been initiated a study of the physiology of seed
production in Douglas fir and at present there appears to be some possibility of predicting the
size of cone-crops the fall before when the fruiting buds have formed.
Periodic remeasurement was made of five plots established in 1930 to determine the effect
of varying heights of pruning on Douglas fir second growth. Re-examination was also made
of five plots which represent various degrees and methods of thinning. These studies are
necessarily long-range and one decade of observation is not sufficiently long to draw any
definite conclusions.
One of the studies in natural regeneration consists of a history map project covering a
series of representative logging operations on the Lower Coast. Re-examination was made
of 845 plots situated on two of these areas. A great variation of conditions is represented on
these selected sites and as the period of observation is extended some interesting comparisons
present themselves. For instance, the following table illustrates the trend of restocking on an
area burned in 1925, near Alouette Lake, Lower Fraser Valley:—
Type.
Logged and burned  	
Burned by ground fire before logging-
Burned by Crown fire 	
Per Cent, of Sample Plots satisfactorily stocked.
1930.
37
45
15
1935.
51
60
25
63
70
45
An extensive analysis of the notes on ground cover on logged-off areas was started this;
year. It was found that for all sites over a large part of the Coast region the degree of cover
rises rapidly to 65 per cent, within three years of logging, reaches its maximum at fifteen-
years, and then remains stationary for a number of years with 75 per cent of the total'
surface covered. The herbs decrease in abundance after the third year, but they nevertheless
comprise the major plant group until replaced by the trees and shrubs at about the twentieth
year.    For all sites considered together, the most prominent plant for the first six years after F 18 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
logging is fireweed (Epilobium angustif olium). Bracken (Pteris aquilina) assumes first
place at the end of this period, indicating that, in general, the sites become drier with age.
On dry sites bracken was dominant at all ages studied up to twenty years.
In 1927 a plantation of exotic tree species was established at Alouette Lake (altitude,
520 feet; precipitation, 110 inches annually; 16 inches, May to August). More than 2,000
trees of thirteen species in eight genera were planted and these included one European and
two Oriental conifers, six American conifers, and four American hardwoods. A few native
hardwoods of the same age at their best exceed the introduced trees in rate of growth; e.g.,
Betula occidentalis being 33 feet high and 5.6 inches D.B.H. Three species of larch have
grown very fast. The largest of these, Larix dahurica, appears to be poorly anchored but
survival is 84 per cent., with the biggest trees over 5 inches D.B.H.; Western larch (Larix
occidentalis) is very thrifty and reaches 27 feet high and 5 inches D.B.H.; and the Japanese
larch (Larix leptolepis) is a very fine tree with high survival. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris)
is making a fine showing, survival 95 per cent., maximum size 19 feet high and 4.9 inches
D.B.H. Red pine ranks next with the largest tree 19 feet high and 4.6 inches D.B.H. Bigtree
(Sequoia gigantea) is making a fine showing with trees up to 18 feet high and 4.8 inches
D.B.H.; with 51 per cent, survival. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is not uniform in
growth and is susceptible to loss of leader causing crookedness, but ranges up to 19 feet high
and 4.5 inches D.B.H. On one area this species was very susceptible to killing by a light fire
when they were 12 years old, but on the same area practically all the trees of red oak, even
those under 1 foot high, resisted the fire and have completely recovered. Among the hardwoods, white ash (Fraxinus Americana) is making the best showing with 80 per cent, survival;
up to 24 feet high and 2.1 inches D.B.H.    Red oak and sugar maple are close behind.
FIRE-CONTROL.
Fire Weather Studies.
This project was essentially on a maintenance basis during the past season and only
routine measurements undertaken. Almost the entire efforts of the protection research staff
were directed toward completion of the detection planning programme; consequently no new
studies were initiated in fire weather conditions. However, visits were made to forest
research stations at Priest River, Idaho, and Kananaskis, Alberta, and information gathered
which will be of value when this important work is expanded.
Detection Planning.
In order that certain important improvement-work could be started, eighteen proposed
lookout stations were examined in the Prince George and Prince Rupert Forest Districts.
Visibility mapping of prospective lookout points in the Nelson Forest District was continued
and seventy-three points were examined by two technical fieldmen. In addition, fifteen
United States Forest Service lookouts having direct visibility in British Columbia were
visited to determine the overlap in Canada.
For each point visited a map was made showing the area under direct visibility and, when
possible, a complete panoramic photograph taken. A report was also submitted indicating the
suitability of the proposed point as a lookout, together with physical details such as type
and height of structure, amount of clearing, accessibility of water-supply, trail chance, etc.
This information is in the process of assembly, sufficient data being now available to project
a system of primary stations to adequately control the higher-risk areas. Further field-work
will be required, however, in order to complete a plan of secondary stations to control the
lower-risk areas during their periods of hazard. It is anticipated that this project will be
completed in one more field season.
Fire-control Plan.
In addition to the visibility data mentioned above, information is being concurrently
gathered regarding the degree of inflammability of the numerous forest types, the existing
and potential forest values, the degree of fire risk as determined from past fire records and
the existing means of access to each area; e.g., roads and trails. This information is being
assembled in convenient ring-binders on a scale of 1 inch=2 miles. The base maps are the
best obtainable for each area, and show all known physical details such as surveys, rivers, FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940. F 19
lakes, and topography.    The existing roads and trails are plotted directly on this map by
type  and  class.    Several  transparent  overlays  are  superimposed  on   each  map  to   show:
(1) Fire-risk zones based upon the origin of all fires during the past decade;    (2) fuel types
based upon the degree of inflammability of the forest-cover;   (3) ten-year record of the area
burned by forest fires;   (4) the existing and potential forest values;   (5) the area under direct
visibility from the detection system;   and (6) the degree of accessibility of each area.    From
this it is hoped to determine not only the required fire-control measures but also the proper
balance between expenditure  and revenue,  both  existing  and  potential.    When  completed,
there will be available a master plan which will enable forest fires to be attacked with a much
higher degree of control.
Lookout Photography.
The programme of lookout photography was continued and twelve new points were
photographed, together with two revisions of older, unsatisfactory panoramas. Fifty-six
stations throughout the Province are now completed. The points occupied during the season
are as follows:—
Kamloops:   McLennan, Tuktakamin, Little White,  Snow, Terrace, Baldy, Livingstone, Begbie, and *BX.
Vancouver:   Elk Falls, Shepherd, Duncan, Green Timbers, and *Benson.
Soil-studies.
The activities of the Soils Section may be reported under three general headings, as
follows:—
(1.) Soil Surveys.—During the past year a soil survey of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo
Railway land grant was undertaken as a co-operative effort by the Provincial Department
of Agriculture, the Dominion Experimental Farms Branch, and the Forest Branch. The
objective of the project is to obtain a detailed picture of the relationship of agricultural to
non-agricultural soils. Such information is of primary importance to forestry and agriculture if these two basic resources are to be developed to the greatest advantage.
Field-work started early in January and ceased in May. The progress report shows that
153,000 acres have been examined, of which about 55,000 acres were classed as potentially
arable. It is hoped that the three agencies concerned will be able to continue their co-operation and bring the project to a conclusion.
(2.) Land-use Surveys.— (a.) An area of 8,600 acres was examined in the Chilliwack
River valley, the object being to determine the amount and accessibility of agricultural land
in the region. The information was required as the basis for a policy of land settlement in
the valley and the examination showed the desirability of settling more completely or enlarging established communities before opening up inaccessible, new areas of limited acreage.
It was recommended that 1,100 acres be made available to settlers and the remaining 7,500
acres reserved from alienation.
(6.) In connection with the reforestation programme, 21,000 acres on Vancouver Island
were examined with a view to planting only non-agricultural soils and reserving potentially
arable land for agricultural use. This programme will be continued so that a substantial
reserve of reforestation sites may be built up well ahead of the planting operations.
(3.)  Soils Research.—A site classification of a portion of the Cowichan Lake Forest was
made during the summer.    In an even-aged stand of young Douglas fir five site classes were
mapped.    Future work will be directed toward obtaining a better understanding of these
site differences and, as indicated in last year's report, the influence of soil-moisture will be
investigated first.    In that connection various methods of measuring soil-moisture have been
under review and an electrical device will be tried out next season.    Methods of determining
soil-fertility are also being experimented with in the laboratory and several preliminary
chemical tests tried out. _ _
Cutting Plans.
The co-operative work being carried out with certain logging operators on Vancouver
Island has been continued, but it is still not possible to draw any definite conclusions. As
pointed out in the 1939 report, the lack of experience and precedent in this type of study
makes for slow development and that statement adequately sums up the present status of
the work.
* Indicates revision. F 20
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
Pathology and Entomology.
During the past year the Science Service of the Dominion Department of Agriculture has
permanently transferred two experienced Forest Pathologists to British Columbia, with
headquarters in Victoria. The same Service has also transferred the office of the Forest
Entomologist from Vancouver to Victoria and strengthened the staff by the addition of a
second technical officer. Both of these staffs have been provided with field laboratories at
the Cowichan Lake Forest Experiment Station, and it is anticipated that the co-operation
of these specialists will do much to solve numerous problems which our research staff has
not been trained nor equipped to handle.
REFORESTATION.
Nurseries.
Seed-beds at the Green Timbers nursery were again sown to yield 6,000,000 seedlings
and at the end of the year there were approximately 12,000,000 trees on hand. Half of these
have just completed their first year of growth while the remainder are ready for planting in
the field in the spring of 1941. The Campbell River nursery was brought under crop for
the first time and 425 seed-beds sown to yield 3,500,000 to 4,000,000 trees. Also at this
station a four-room residence was constructed and two temporary buildings renovated for
permanent use as tool-shed and storage-space. This completes the development of the new
nursery, thereby providing the facilities for an annual production of 4,000,000 trees.
Weather conditions in the spring of 1940 permitted an unusually early start in nursery
operations. At Green Timbers the first shipments of planting stock left on February 19th
and the last on March 20th. Preparation of the new seed-beds was started soon after, but,
due to a succession of heavy rains, sowing was not completed until early in May. Then,
before germination was general, the weather changed into the phenomenally dry period
experienced during the entire month of June. Despite the assistance of irrigation the hot,
dry weather was not conducive to prompt germination, with the result that this fall the
stock was in a " soft " condition and susceptible to frost damage.
Seed Collections.
No collections were made this year since the seed-crop for the principal forest species of
the Lower Coast was a failure in all cases. One or two isolated cedars were noted as bearing
a fair crop, but seldom has there been such a complete absence of cones. However, the
better-than-average crops of 1938 and 1939 have provided ample seed stocks to meet our
requirements.
Planting.
The planting programme continues to expand and approximately one-third more acres
of plantation were established than in 1939. During the current year 1,355,865 trees were
planted on 1,497 acres. The major activity was on the Sayward Forest, near Campbell
River, with other projects at Great Central Lake, the Langley and Squamish community
forests, the Vancouver watershed, Stanley Park, the Green Timbers Experiment Station
plantations, Deep Bay on Vancouver Island, and a number of farm wood-lots. This brings
the totals, to date, for number of trees and acres planted, to 3,279,388 and 3,809 respectively.
The ownership status of the projects to date is as follows:—
Status.
Previously planted.
Trees (in
Thousands).
Acres.
1940 Projects.
Trees (in
Thousands).
Acres.
Totals to Date.
Trees (in
Thousands).
Acres.
Crown lands—
Experimental 	
Production  —   _ 	
Private companies __ 	
Community forests  _  	
Private planting (including farm wood-lots).
Totals	
601.2
1,104.1
155.2
42.0
20.7
501.7
1,553.0
192.3
42.0
20.0
6.1
1,156.7
118.0
67.0
8.1
6.0
1,293.0
135.0
55.0
8.0
1,923.2
2,309.0
1,355.9
1,497.0
607.3
2,261.0
273.2
109.0
28.9
3,279.4
510.7
2,846.0
327.3
97.0
28.0
3,809.0 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 21
In preparation for the planting programme of the spring of 1941, intensive surveys were
carried out over 16,500 acres of land and 19 miles of base-lines established from which
staking may be started for the crews of planters. These areas also had to be protected from
fire by falling the snags, old railroad grades opened up for accessibility, and camp-sites
built. Two complete camps were established for sixty-six-men crews. At each site there
were erected sixteen 12- by 14-foot tent-frames; one office, 12 by 30 feet; one wash-house,
16 by 24 feet, with four showers and two wash-sinks; one kitchen and dining-room, 18 by 60
feet; one meat-house, 8 by 8 feet; and one wood-shed. A total of 13.3 miles of old railroad-
grade was opened up for use as truck-roads and 5,500 acres of planting sites completely
snagged. In the course of the latter operation there were felled 30,116 snags, 10 inches in
diameter and over, together with 10,000 snags less than 10 inches in diameter.
PUBLICATIONS.
Only one article was prepared for publication during the past year; that being written
by G. S. Andrews and titled, " Notes on Interpretation of Vertical Air Photographs."
FOREST BRANCH LIBRARY.
Up to 1938.
1939.
1940.
Totals.
286
2,409
588
28
218
83
15
283
95
329
2,910
766
Totals 	
3,283
329
393
4,005
54
15,277
56
3,343
47
4,278
22,898 F 22
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
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r° FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 23
THE FOREST INDUSTRIES.
Estimated Value of Production, including Loading and Freight within the Province.
Product.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1939.
1940.
Ten-year
Average,
1931-40.
Lumber....	
Pulp and paper _
Shingles.-   _
Boxes _.	
Doors _.	
Piles, poles, and mine-
props-	
Cordwood,   fence-posts,
and lagging. _
Ties, railway _._	
Additional value contributed by the wood-using
industry- __..—
Laths and other miscellaneous products	
Logs exported _
Pulp-wood exported	
Christmas trees	
Totals 	
$20,377,000
12,373,000
4,375,000
1,632,000
487,000
1,335,000
485,000
1,320,000
1,100,000
1,931,000
46,000
$24,094,000
12,414,000
8,750,000
1,720,000
1,693,000
810,000
1,453,000
764,000
1,300,000
1,100,000
2,820,000
23,000
$36,160,000
14,950,000
7,800,000
1,629,000
2,718,000
1,434,000
1,489,000
623,000
1,350,000
1,200,000
2,646,000
11,000
$40,638,000
17,214,000
6,875,000
2,122,000
2,971,000
2,346,000
1,459,000
560,000
1,500,000
1,400,000
3,782,000
5,000
$36,296,000
11,066,000
6,875,000
1,964,000
1,353,000
1,615,000
1,455,000
560,000
1,400,000
1,300,000
3,238,000
$50,379,000
16,191,000
8,560,000
2,039,000
737,000
1,556,000
1,495,000
360,000
1,500,000
1,400,000
3,852,000
11,000
141,000
$55,514,000
22,971,000
9,620,000
4,779,000
740,000
1,759,000
1,399,000
258,000
1,600,000
1,400,000
2,684,000
8,000
72,000
$30,900,000
14,270,000
6,288,000
1,961,000
1,021,000
1,368,000
1,492,000
541,000
1,353,000
1,253,000
2,728,000
23,000
21,000
$45,461,000
$56,941,000
$72,010,000
1,872,000 $67,122,000
$88,221,000
$102,804,000
$63,219,000
Paper (in Tons).
Product.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
Ten-year
Average,
1931-40.
Newsprint-	
Other papers _ 	
267,406
26,777
262,123
33,287
276,710
41,443
264,136
53,026
179,639
39,348
216,542
50,870
262,144
68,428
238,842
37,843
In addition to 315,500 tons of pulp manufactured into paper in the Province, 123,000 tons
were shipped out of the Province during the year.
Total Amount op Timber scaled in British Columbia during the Years 1939-40
(in F.B.M.).
Forest District.
1939.
1940.
Net Gain.
2,922,200,904
119,445,737
3,107,647,391
216,129,041
185,446,487
96,683,304
3,041,646,641
3,323,776,432
282,129,791
15,347,454
65,837,166
128,974,499
103,089,806
17,405,801
88,046,370
144,260,896
119,665,257
2,058,347
22,209,204
Kamloops 	
15,286,397
16,575,451
Totals, Interior   	
313,248,925
369,378,324
56,129,399
3,354,895,566
3,693,154,756
338,259,190 F 24
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
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F 27
Logging Inspection.
Operations.
Forest District.
Timber-
sales.
Hand-
loggers'
Licences.
Leases,
Licences,
Crown Grants,
and
Pre-emptions.
Totals.
No. of
Inspections.
832
362
400
835
435
1
11
993
116
194
628
341
1,826
489
594
1,463
776
4,446
Prince Rupert.- — — ._	
1,440
876
Kamloops.. _	
2,779
1,427
Totals, 1940      .            	
2,864
12
2,272
5,148
10,968
Totals, 1939- _	
2,770
10
2,068
4,848
11,295
Totals, 1938	
2,674
23
1,804
4,501
10,828
Totals, 1937 '	
2,404
46
1,932
4,382
11,507
Totals, 1936--	
2,354
35
1,883
4,272
11,138
Totals, 1935    ....               	
2,074
59
1,660
3,793
10,081
Totals, 1934           	
1,603
87
1,546
3,236
9,486
Totals, 1933.	
1,237
67
1,425
2,729
8,121
Totals, 1932	
1,124
37
1,316
2,477
7,273
Totals, 1931	
1,562
92
1,675
3,329
8,969
Ten-year average, 1931-40	
2,066
46
1,758
3,871
9,966
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130
222
145
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775,791
646,568
592,206
439,028
29,275
16,910
12,456
11,857
23,946
605
558
158
76
176
353
380
1,740
1,780
26
4,570
2
1
5
2
3
$7,842.14
1,382.23
Fort George ___ 	
3,437
1,847
1,342.60
1,718.13
1,803.14
Totals, 1940	
194
877
5,206,829
94,444
1,573
4,279
9,854
13
$14,088.24
Totals, 1939 ,	
209*
571
6,905,268
94,818
3,147
5,206
46,729
26
$17,725.00
Totals, 1938           	
149
816
4,309,030
203,195
3,014
1,185
7,530
10
$9,653.86
Totals, 1937 	
156
1,147
8,239,813
143,860
1,607
2,132
35,017
7
$17,439.52
Totals, 1936 _	
153
501
2,067,130
75,272
1,632
2,452
13
$5,243.00
Totals, 1935	
121
555
3,043,486
50,965
1,283
14,078
3
$6,077.58
Totals, 1934	
101
720
3,270,608
30,555
1,385
4,825
6
$5,401.05
Totals, 1933	
70
155
1,578,108
41,689
1,413
3,807
2
$2,727.81
Totals, 1932	
95
368
767,896
35,484
2,140
9,265
14
$3,490.84
Totals, 1931	
84
397
1,579,465
118,704
1,048
12,425
2
$5,633.68
133
611
3,696,763
88,899
1,824
5,965
10
$8,748.06
* Christmas-tree cutting largely responsible for increase. F 28
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
Pre-emption Inspection.
Pre-emption records examined by districts are:—
Vancouver 	
Prince Rupert	
Fort George	
Kamloops 	
Nelson 	
Totals
1940.
254
158
474
530
80
1,496
Average, Ten Yrs.
1931-40
337
207
664
719
144
2,071
Areas examined for Miscellaneous Purposes of the " Land Act," 1940.
Forest District.
Applications for      Applications for
Hay and Grazing  |       Pre-emption
Leases. Records.
Applications to
Purchase.
Miscellaneous.
Vancouver	
Prince Rupert-
Fort George	
Kamloops	
Nelson 	
Totals..
No.
1
94
7
114
Acres.
20.0
1,181.7
855.0
19,072.0
2,620.0
23,748.7
No.
6
1
12
35
3
57
Acres.
859.5
160.0
1,785.0
4,503.0
318.0
No.
74
26
37
68
60
7,625.5
Acres.
5,561.4
4,207.6
5,899.5
7,769.3
9,291.5
32,729.3
No.
51
10
21
54
25
161
Acres.
1,491.5
88.0
2,347.0
5,868.5
2,621.3
12,416.3
Classification of Areas examined, 1940.
Forest District.
Total Area.
Agricultural
Land.
Non-agricultural Land.
Merchantable
Timber Land.
Estimated
Timber on
Merchantable
Timber Land.
Vancouver.    _	
Acres.
7,707.15
5,637.19
10,697.40
37,730.05
14,855.20
Acres.
2,283.65
1,809.64
7,382.70
6,468.65
2,767.90
Acres.
5,423.50
3,827.55
3,314.70
31,261.40
12,087.30
Acres.
671.0
4.5
5.5
698.0
M.B.M.
8,582.0
49.5
79 4
7,784.0
Totals   	
76,626.99
20,712.54
55,914.45
1,179.0
16,490.9 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 29
Areas cruised for Timber-sales.
Forest District.
Number
cruised.
Acreage.
Saw-
timber
(M.B.M.).
Poles and
Piles
(Lineal Ft.).
Shingle-bolts
and
Cordwood
(Cords).
Railway-ties
(No.).
Car Stakes
and Posts
(No.).
451
324
191
399
255
61,633
57,585
38,387
82,900
59,975
222,071
70,963
67,592
133,146
78,790
777,744
1,805,300
644,940
3,576,025
4,505,279
12,561
1,675
76,300
26,941
137,681
72,047
30,650
30,300
18,928
10,368
21,700
Kamloops. 	
36,000
423,692
Totals, 1940	
1,620
300,480
572,562
11,309,288
72,157
314,644
512,042
Totals, 1939	
1,324
212,594
470,660
5,016,945
68,078
339,866
261,100
Totals, 1938   .
1,486
325,403
482,680
5,747,765
126,329
804,240
169,900
Totals, 1937.-	
1,471
278,386
633,216
9,658,000
140,820
753,408
160,450
Totals, 1936-	
1,415
252,035
464,402
8,535,045
148,606
1,083,746
63,200
Totals, 1936      	
1,319
238,952
398,884
5,674,908
114,753
1,164,454
74,700
Totals, 1934
1,331
223,391
356,264
2,856,619
80.101
1,235,766
73,766
Totals, 1933 ...
942
169,831
186,418
1,620,112
95,233
549,976
174,861
Totals, 1932 ...
875
144,769
202,421
1,759,905
68,414
488,655
69,900
Totals, 1931	
818
145,214
297,825
2,629,054
62,680
664,413
142,400
Ten-year average,
1931-40	
1,260
229,105
406,533
5,480,764
97,717
739,916
170,232 F 30
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
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F 31
Average Sale Price for Species.
Sawn Timber.
Figures for 1940.
Figures for 1939.
Ten-year
Total,
1931-40.
Ten-year
Average,
1931-40.
Board-feet.
Price
per M.
Board-feet.
Price
per M.
Board-feet.
Price
per M.
184,251,000
87,787,000
107,819,000
81,527,000
25,0'39,000
13,905,000
21,013,000
18,847,000
8,714,000
$1.57
1.49
1.44
.81
.78
2.16
1.50
.91
1.27
122,764,000
81,732,000
105,016,000
57,765,000
26,427,000
8,203,000
18,644,000
19,851,000
2,375,000
$1.49
1.46
1.19
.76
.75
2.09
1.51
.86
.97
1,123,654,000
455,074,000
565,254,000
544,030,000
171,181,000
73,636,000
172,017,000
94,692,000
71,175,000
$1.30
Cedar _	
Spruce _ _
1.20
1.29
.70
.75
White pine 	
1.82
1.40
.88
.90
Totals	
548,902,000
$1.33
442,777,000
$1.25
3,270,713,000
$1.16 F 32
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
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F 33
Saw and Shingle Mills of the Province.
Operating.
Shut Down.
Sawmills.
Shingle-mills.
Sawmills.
Shingle-mills.
No.
Estimated
Daily
Capacity,
M.B.M.
No.
Estimated
Daily
Capacity,
Shingles, M.
No.
Estimated
Daily
Capacity,
M.B.M.
No.
Estimated
Daily
Capacity,
Shingles, M.
Vancouver.....	
205
46
61
134
96
9,301
486
704
1,090
1,110
64
3
5
5
8,397
40
48
100
37
26
15
46
17
480
147
109
234
462
10
1
3
4
174
6
Fort George _	
Kamloops— 	
77
50
Totals, 1940	
542
12,691
77
8,585
141
1,432
18
307
Totals, 1939	
461
11,698
84
7,926
147
1,907
24
537
Totals, 1938.	
481
12,159
88
8,184
126
1,406
19
315
Totals, 1937-	
434
11,042
80
9,124
131
1,685
16
402
Totals, 1936 	
410
11,401
86
8,859
122
1,699
10
316
Totals, 1935	
384
9,822
93
8,492
96
1,962
16
1,231
Totals, 1934	
349
9,152
82
7,311
129
2,999
13
1,228
Totals, 1933	
295
8,715
78
7,325
134
3,632
22
1,652
Totals, 1932	
293
7,641
45
6,813
139
4,621
13
1,470
Totals, 1931	
334
10,167
46
7,470
158
4,109
19
1,871
Ten-year average,
1931-40	
398
10,449
76
8,009
132
i
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933 F 34
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
Export of Logs (in F.B.M.).
Species.
Grade No. 1.
Grade No. 2.
Grade No. 3.
Ungraded.
Totals.
FiV
2,326,015
2,318,488
52,685
15,643,169
12,407,263
9,516,454
696
5,817,147
10,397,199
8,646,505
5,035
23,786,331
25,122,950
18,215,644
5,731
125,568,764
125,568,764
22,697,541
1,865,362
265,035
22,697,541
1,865,362
Whit» Tip*
265,035
Totals, 1940 ..- _ _
4.697,188
37,567,582
24,865,886
150,396,702
217,527,358*
Totals, 1939    	
6,383,398
111,155,799
66,870,882
128,323,383
312,733,462
Totals, 1938	
4,386,370
98,637,490
74,650,653
81,998,569
259,673,082
Totals, 1937  	
4,924,298
114,991,217
66,611,218
83,947,361
270,474,094
Totals, 1936	
4,028,567
107,007,342
49,061,362
58,731,564
218,828,835
Totals, 1935 	
8,766,098
129,029,692
56,979,194
40,516,782
235,291,766
Totals, 1934 	
10,489,155
89,831,736
43,416,151
28,998,709
172,735,751
Totals, 1933 ~
16,941,207
119,089,573
59,215,094
13,694,960
208,940,834
Totals, 1932    	
18,572,020
87,223,114
44,380,166
15,589,383
165,764,683
Totals, 1931  	
12,886,187
106,331,594
51,909,961
49,048,420
220,176,162
Ten-year average, 1931-40— —
9,207,449
100,086,514
53,796,057
65,124,582
228,214,602
* Of this total, 166,903,705 F.B.M. were exported from Crown grants carrying the export privilege;   50,623,653
F.B.M. were exported under permit from other areas. FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 35
Shipments of Poles, Piling, Mine-props, Fence-posts, Railway-ties, etc.
Quantity-
exported.
Approximate
Value, F.O.B.
Where marketed.
Forest District.
United States.
Canada.
Other
Countries.
"Vancouver—
Poles— _ 	
 fin. ft.
2,017,578
122,989
955
18
135
166,079
2,141,539
62,943
4,582
173,055
135
12,261
45,049
19
4,977
7,003,485
275,780
67,100
19,593
450,987
1,436,704
22,918
2,277
6,812
224
82
97,069
729,762
$201,757
17,220
6,685
142
7
8,303
210,544
24,525
1,146
13,844
810
5,328
3,604
114
497
840,418
124,101
5,368
588
45,098
143,670
1,375
18,216
54,496
1,008
369
48,534
72,000
1,972,948
17,899
955
18
135
166,079
1,116,400
37,430
104,694
7,200
Piles -	
______ lin. ft.
396
trees
lin. ft.
Prince Rupert-
Poles and piling  	
1,025,139
62,943
4,582
92,860
135
Fort George—
Poles	
 lin. ft.
80,195
 ties
 lin. ft.
12.261
45,049
19
  trees
  lin. ft.
4,977
5,808,200'
Kamloops—
1,195,285
275,780
67,100
19,593
-ties
	
lin. ft.
  trees
lin. ft.
450,987
1,380,107
5,014
Nelson—
Kfi 597
Piles  ■     ■  -	
 lin. ft.
17,904      1
2,277
803
224
fi.009
	
	
 cords
 ties
 trees
82
Hewn railway-ties.....	
Christmas trees.	
2,662
691,621
94,407
38,141
Total value, 1940	
$1,849,767
Total value. 1939	
$1,947,100
__         1
Summary for Province.
Product.
Volume.
Per Cent, of
Total Value.
     ___    lin ft.
Fence-posts.—   	
   lin ft.
Totals ____ _	
12,918,268
448,053
101
1,179
71,817
6,947
64,642
2,277
18
1,351,805
$1,428,828
202,488
483
7,693
6,521
55,306
4,192
18,216
142
125,898
$1,849,767
77.24
10.95
0.03
0.42
0.35
2.99
0.23
0.98
0.01
6.80
100.00 F 36
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
TIMBER-MARKING.
Timber-marks issued.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
Old Crown grants 	
Crown grants, 1887-1906	
267
85
102
285
73
5
17
13
1,443
11
5
2
2
298
86
129
282
69
3
9
18
1,451
4
1
1
1
258
103
124
272
59
9
6
1,501
3
6
1
198
91
103
259
61
3
16
6
1,479
1
2
2
272
101
Crown grants, 1906-1914	
99
275
58
1
16
13
1,724
i
3
2
Pulp licences 	
20
Totals	
2,310
264
2,352
339
2,342
321
2,221
316
2,588
315
Transfers and changes of marks	
Draughting Office, Forest Branch, 1940.
No.
of Tracings made.
Blue-prints
Month.
Timber-
sales.
Timber-
marks.
Examination
Sketches.
Miscellaneous.
Totals.
Reference
Maps.
January 	
30
112
36
33
211
1
February 	
18
129
33
17
197
9
25
113
48
29
215
April	
21
132
48
29
230
12
16
120
54
31
221
9
June  	
13
73
44
17
147
7
July	
8
119
31
22
180
10
August	
19
66
26
24
135
2
September 	
12
52
19
21
104
11
October-...   ...,, .
27
99
30
19
175
1
November  —
19
54
32
25
130
December  __	
16
82
33
15
146
6
Totals	
224
1,151
434
282
2,091
68 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 37
Crown-granted Timber Lands.
Year.
1921 	
1922 	
1923 	
1924  l	
1925 	
1926 	
1927 	
1928 	
1929 	
1930 	
1931 	
1932     552,007
1933   567,731
1934 - .  557,481
1935   535,918
1936   515,924
1937   743,109
1938   754,348
1939   719,112
1940   549,250
Area of Private
Timber Lands
(Acres).
.. 845,111
._ 887,980
.. 883,344
... 654,668
... 654,016
... 688,372
... 690,438
... 671,131
.. 644,011
... 629,156
... 602,086
Average
Assessed Value
per Acre.
$10.33
11.99
11.62
15.22
40.61
39.77
39.01
38.62
38.41
44.74
43.77
43.73
41.18
37.25
37.13
36.61
23.32
23.05
22.73
27.70
The extent and value of timber land in the various assessment districts are shown by the
following table:—
Assessment District.
Acreage,
1940.
Increase or
Decrease in
Acreage over
1939.
Average
Value
per Acre.
1940.
Change in
Value
per Acre
since 1939.
72,110
108,261
98,681
16,701
328
8,383
315
105,292
2,637
316
1,908
21,483
33,361
43,724
1,074
34,677
+    1,576
+       381
+    7,933
— 10,241
*
— 641
— 2,280
+     7,929
— 640
— 313
— 10,175
— 985
— 3,984
— 155,488
*
— 2,934
$42.04
28.89
34.82
5.88
14.99
3.96
10.37
31.39
5.83
4.70
12.97
17.11
14.12
3.80
32.73
31.61
— $3.33
— 1.70
— 1.87
Fort Steele 	
+    .36
*
.52
Kettle Kiver 	
+  2.46
1.92
22
33
+     -21
+  1.64
Slocan  — _ _
6.82
Totals	
549,250
— 169,862
27.70
* No change. F 38
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Z F 40 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
FOREST REVENUE.
Fiscal Yeak, 1939-40.                       _, .
Ten-year Average.
Timber-licence rentals  $428,184.49 $557,325.00
Timber-licence transfer fees   695.00 1,329.00
Timber-licence penalty fees  10,506.69 30,580.00
Hand-loggers' licence fees   350.00 1,137.00
Timber-lease rentals   51,440.61 65,633.00
Timber-lease penalty fees and interest  94.24 862.00
Timber-sale rentals   28,309.83 20,535.00
Timber-sale stumpage   667,494.26 422,662.00
Timber-sale cruising   9,759.20 6,851.00
Timber-sale advertising   1,506.50 1,040.00
Timber royalty  1,915,550.56 1,418,932.00
Timber tax  54,319.55 69,382.00
Scaling fees (not Scaling Fund)   493.05 492.00
Scaling expenses (not Scaling Fund)   336.86 125.00
Trespass penalties  14,011.90 7,767.00
Scalers' examination fees  455.00 227.00
Exchange  116.40 210.00
Seizure expenses   784.63 943.00
General miscellaneous   3,486.21 3,057.00
Timber-berth rentals, bonus and fees  23,006.58 26,660.00
Interest on timber-berth rentals  95.78 268.00
Transfer fees on timber berths  51.52 56.00
Grazing fees and interest  25,682.50 16,020.00
$3,236,731.36 $2,652,093.00
Taxation from Crown-grant timber lands....      267,290.48 303,618.00
Total revenue from forest resources.. $3,504,021.84 $2,955,711.00 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 41
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8 F 42
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
FOREST EXPENDITURE, FISCAL YEAR 1939-40.
Forest District.
Salaries.
Temporary
Assistance.
Expenses.
Total.
$62,303.75
23,144.97
17,389.10
42,281.12
33,963.01
82,832.50
$450.67
$45,011.18
16,644.75
5,560.25
15,025.79
17,061.73
20,497.90
$107,765.60
39,789.72
23,212.58
57,306.91
263.23
Kamloops  	
3.042.50
455.00
54,067.24
108,785.40
Totals            	
$261,914.45
$4,211.40
$119,801.60
$385,927.45
4,000.00
9,972.67
13,979.04
42,955.55
5,654.31
500,000.00
65,388.29
$1,027,877.31
* Contributions to special funds detailed elsewhere.
SCALING FUND.
Balance, April 1st, 1939 (debit).
Collections, fiscal year 1939-40...
Expenditures, fiscal year 1939-40	
Balance, March 31st, 1940 (credit).
Balance, April 1st, 1940 (credit)	
Collections, 9 months, April-December, 1940	
Expenditures, 9 months, April-December, 1940	
Balance, December 31st, 1940 (credit)	
FOREST RESERVE ACCOUNT.
Balance brought forward, April 1st, 1939	
Amount received from Treasury, April 1st, 1939	
Expenditures, fiscal year 1939-40	
Balance, March 31st, 1940 (credit)	
Amount received from Treasury, April 1st, 1940 (under subsection (2), section 32)	
Moneys received under subsection (4) section 32_
Expenditures, 9 months to December 31st, 1940....
Balance, December 31st, 1940  (credit) _
$1,447.18
171,105.43
$169,658.25
165,582.51
$4,075.74
$4,075.74
139,725.28
$143,801.02
128,824.85
$14,976.17
$43,334.79
65,388.29
$108,723.08
52,237.50
$56,485.58
79,438.51
$135,924.09
36,101.34
$99,822.75 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 43
GRAZING RANGE IMPROVEMENT FUND.
Balance, April 1st, 1939  $11,369.82
Government contribution   $5,638.66
Other receipts  15.65
       5,654.31
Expenditures, April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940.
Balance, March 31st, 1940 (credit)	
Collections, April 1st, 1940, to December 31st, 1940.
Expenditures, April 1st, 1940, to December 31st, 1940_.
Balance, December 31st, 1940 (credit)	
$17,024.13
8,788.81
$8,235.32
8,568.83
$16,804.15
8,970.66
$7,833.49
STANDING OF FOREST PROTECTION FUND,
DECEMBER 3 1st, 1940. k
Balance (deficit), April 1st, 1939	
Expenditure, April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940	
.    $453,617.83
802,633.36
$1,256,251.19
Collections, tax	
Collections, miscellaneous
Government contribution __
$224,302.90
66,701.36
500,000.00
Balance (deficit), March 31st, 1940..
Balance (deficit), April 1st, 1940__.__.
Expenditure, 9 months, April-December, 1940	
Refundable to votes, 9 months, April-December, 1940 (approximately)  	
Collections, tax 	
Collections, miscellaneous
$185,174.12
11,315.80
791,004.26
$465,246.93
$465,246.93
613,708.17
126,000.00
$1,204,955.10
Government contribution      375,000.00
571,489.92
Balance (deficit), December 31st, 1940     $633,465.18
Estimated and Known Costs op Forest Protection to other Agencies, 1940.
Expenditures.
Forest District.
Tools and
Equipment.
Improvements.
Patrol.
Fire-
fighting.
Total.
Vancouver ..   ._	
$32,286.54
450.00
$1,699.00
$43,803.78
175.00
$41,570.82
557.00
61.41
2,005.72
20,349.07
$119,360.14
1,182.00
61 41
2,005.72
32,624.07
10,000.00
2,275.00
Totals                            	
$42,736.54
$1,699.00
$46,253.78
$64,544.02
$155,233.34
Totals, 1939	
$58,282.00
$1,350.00
$56,664.00
$33,661.00
$149,957.00 F 44
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
Expenditure for Twelve Months ended March 31st, 1940.
Districts.
Patrols
and Fire
Prevention.
Tools and
Equipment.
Fires.
Improvements.
Total.
Vancouver  	
$118,133.76
29,853.59
30,486.38
87,363.77
79,100.82
77,636.44*
$35,728.55
8,132.10
12,317.66
29,398.92
13,330.56
33,836.27*
$23,876.76
1,057.90
5,346.97
136,306.29
70,168.72
$2,451.46
1,583.08
1,524.30
1,551.05
3,448.01
$180,190.53
40,626.67
49,675.31
254,620.03
166,048.11
111,472.71
Kamloops..	
Victoria   _	
Totals  	
$422,574.76
$132,744.06
S?afi 7Kfi iu          sin5K7<in
$802,633.36
* Includes purchase and upkeep  of trucks  and  equipment rented to  Forest Development Projects  for  which
rental was charged.
FOREST PROTECTION.
The total winter's snowfall is the measure, as a rule, of the severity of the fire season
in the Southern Interior part of the Province. Four out of the last five bad fire years have
followed winters of extraordinarily low snowfall, the exception being 1925. The past season
of 1940 proved regular in this regard, the snowfall being under normal, while fire occurrence
in both the Nelson and Kamloops Forest Districts was 73 per cent, over normal. This fact,
developed by a thorough study of both factors, will have an important bearing on fire-control
organization. If proven by further experience it may be possible to forecast the good and
bad years, with consequent opportunity to save on organization costs or increase efficiency.
As a rule the fire season is not severe in all parts of the Province the same year. In 1940
this was the case, the high hazard being largely in the Nelson and southern part of the
Kamloops District. Here the season started early, after light fall and winter precipitation.
Spring rains were light and the usual June rains practically failed. Mid-summer saw a few
scattered showers but August and early September were hot and dry, again cancelling any
reduction in hazard from the July rain.
In addition to affecting the inflammability of forest fuels through drying and the spread
of flres through wind, the weather was responsible for the occurrence of a record number of
fires through lightning. Out of a total of 2,338 fires reported 1,265 were started by lightning.
This is 54 per cent, of the total and is interesting to compare with 1939 with 30 per cent, and
1938 with 29 per cent, each of the total fires. The ten-year average of lightning fires, including 1940, shows 486 fires, being 28.8 per cent, of the total.
This tremendous load of fire-work occurred in the Kamloops and Nelson Districts, notably
the latter, where 284 fires occurred as the result of one storm on July 12th. On that day the
Nakusp Ranger District alone had 99 separate known fires, which were brought up to 139 by
later reports. Several other Ranger Districts fared little better and it is greatly to the
credit of the already overburdened field staff that they were able to handle the situation
without a breakdown in the organization.
It is for similar conditions under which occur our greatest damage and cost that the
forest protection organization must be developed. At present there are not sufficient trained
personnel, field improvements, nor fire-control equipment to handle such an emergency load
of fire-work. There must be extensive increases in all such lines, and intensive research and
training of personnel before we can approach a fire season with any degree of confidence in
our ability to hold losses to a safe limit.
Elsewhere in the Province the fire season was either normal or better. The Vancouver
Forest District experienced an average year. Although there was little rain the relative
humidity remained high throughout the season. This resulted in fewer fires and greater ease
of control.
The Northern Coast was, as usual, practically free of fires, while the Central Interior,
along the Grand Trunk line of the Canadian National Railways, experienced an easy season.
This was especially true of the Prince George District and the northern parts of the Kamloops
District.
In connection with the increase in fire occurrence and spread in the Kamloops and Nelson
Districts, the field force was handicapped by the enlistment of many experienced men.   This FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940. F 45
laid a greater burden on those remaining and reduced the total efficiency of the force. As the
war continues with its imperative demands its effect will be felt still more. Efforts must be
made in all directions to increase the efficiency of the staff either through more thorough
training of the less experienced, the greater use of improved mechanical equipment, or both.
The balance of the fires reported, above those caused by lightning, obviously occurred
through human agency and numbered 1,073 or 46 per cent, of the total. Of these, it may be
noticed in the tabulations that follow, 636 fires were caused by campers, travellers, and
smokers. Such fires are the result of carelessness and could be prevented with a little care
on the part of the forest-using public. Only 38 fires were attributed to incendiarism, compared to 88 in 1939, 121 in 1938, and a 10-year average of 102. Even these are unnecessary,
but some improvement is shown, possibly due to past prosecutions, closer supervision, a few
more lookouts, and the co-operation of the Provincial Police.
Of the rest of the fires, 210 were due to legitimate industrial forest use and the balance
of reported blazes were attributed to miscellaneous known or unknown causes.
Prevention being better than cure, every effort was made in 1940 as in the past to see
that fires did not start. For carelessness the remedy is education of the individuals. This
has been pushed along many lines from the simple posting of notices to the personal contact
of forest officers with individuals in the forests. As usual, warning notices and the fire law
were posted in conspicuous places, advertisements were carried in newspapers circulating
throughout the Province, members of the staff talked to schools, clubs, and any other organizations where a hearing could be secured, and educational motion pictures were shown to
thousands of children and adults. In all, over 180 meetings were attended and over 30,000
people reached directly.
All this is routine maintenance of a constant background of publicity. It is the repetition necessary to ingrain an idea or a slogan in the public mind. In addition, feature articles
and timely news items were run in newspapers, while announcements over the radio during
the height of the fire season caught people in a receptive mood. A feature of the 1940
publicity programme was the preparation and distribution to school children of a booklet
of animal stories, written and illustrated by a member of the staff, and featuring forest
adventures.    The response was excellent and it is hoped another volume may be issued.
Educational effort undoubtedly has its effect and must be maintained, but it is still
necessary to guard against the careless and deliberate fire-setter. For this purpose the policy
was continued of closing to travel during hazardous periods certain areas where forest values
are high or risk great.    The following list shows the closures on smaller areas.
1940 Closures under Section 119, " Forest Act."
Nelson Forest District— Date closed.
Sheep, Erie, and Kelly Creeks June 25-Sept. 19
Kamloops Forest District—
Copper Mountain July 12-Sept. 10
Larch Hills July   3-Aug. 29
Mount Ida July   8-Aug. 29
Penticton Watershed July 15-Sept. 27
Summerland Watershed July 15-Sept. 27
Peachland Irrigation District   July 17-Sept. 27
Vancouver Forest District—
Timber Berth " W " and adjacent areas July   2-Sept. 27
Vancouver Forest District July   6-Sept. 13
(Excepting West Coast of Vancouver Island from Toquart Harbour
North; East Coast of Vancouver Island from Suquash North;
Mainland and Islands from Wells Passage and Kingcome Inlet
North.)
(Note.—This area was reduced on July 11th to cover only that part of
the mainland from the East shore of Howe Sound North, including
the territory adjacent to the P.G.E. Railway territory between
Squamish and D'Arcy.) F 46 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
Regulations were strictly enforced with regard to the equipment of logging and other
operations in the woods with efficient devices for preventing fire and equipment for fighting
any that did start. Excellent co-operation was secured from the logging operators in this
activity, many of whom closed down or operated only in the morning when fire danger is
least.
As it is necessary to use fire in forested areas to clear land or dispose of debris, as well
as for cooking and comfort, so it is necessary to control its use in the interest of the public
safety. For all such purposes the " Forest Act " requires the securing of a permit, and the
power to withhold such permit or to cancel existing permits constitutes the control. Many
forest fires are prevented by the conditions of burning permits requiring special care in the
use of fire, and their cancellation or refusal in especially hazardous times.
Important in fire-prevention, but especially in fire-control, are the provisions of section
113(a) of the "Forest Act" requiring the disposal of slash and the felling of snags on
logging operations in the Vancouver District. Logging operators are almost universally
co-operating in this connection to the extent that during 1940 there were about 40,000 acres
of slash disposed of by burning and snags were felled on practically 100 per cent, of the area
logged. As a result there will be just that many less torches to throw any fires that may
start far over the heads of the control forces, while the problem of fire-fighting will be
greatly simplified where the slash has been first burned under control. The desirable end
of having the forest areas reproduced and the second crop brought to maturity will be
measurably closer.
Lightning will always be a fruitful cause of forest fires and despite all the preventive
efforts there will be fires from human agencies. To cope with these fires requires an efficient
reporting system, an intelligent, experienced fire-fighting overhead staff, ample man-power
and equipment. During 1940, as reported elsewhere, the study of lookout location and
coverage was continued. At the same time a start was made on the highly important task
of planning, for a long period ahead, the entire fire-control programme. This involves basic
studies of fire occurrence and fuel types with comprehensive maps and tabulations of all
existing factors affecting fire-control, such as roads, trails, communications, personnel, equipment, supplies, and transportation methods. From these studies will be developed the
complete plan for the future on a logical, scientific basis. Progress towards the ideal
organization will then be possible with less chance of waste, and all effort will be made
along the direct line to that goal. From the start made in 1940 the plan should proceed
with accelerated speed, and will be used as it develops. For instance, several lookouts have
been established already as a result of these studies, while some have been abandoned as being
poorly located with reference to fire occurrence and hazard, and still others have been
improved.
Equipment plays an important part in all lines of forest protection. Our endeavour is
to continually improve equipment and this is no less true of the humbler hand-tools for
fire-fighting than of the more scientific instruments and highly complicated machinery.
During 1940 especially noteworthy improvements were made to water-pumping equipment. The mechanical staff is responsible for developing tank and pumping units for light
delivery-trucks and a removable tank and integral pump for larger trucks. Both developments proved valuable on fires within a reasonable distance of roads. As funds are available
more units will be added.
With the co-operation of our mechanical staff a commercial company has developed a
highly efficient portable pump that shows great promise, and a member of one of the district
staffs has built experimental units of a one-man pump unit, containing engine, pump, hose,
fuel, and tools, all on one pack-board. The unit is light enough for one man to pack and
can be effectively operated by him in the field. This is felt to be an important advance, as
it will make possible the complete extinguishing of many fires when small, some of which
might escape.
Training schools were held for lookout men prior to the fire season. These served to
refresh the men in their work, taught the latest methods and procedures, and gave them a
feeling of esprit de corps from contact with each other and the rest of the organization. The
results were noticeable during the fire season in more accurate and intelligible reports on fires.
The innovation of 1939 of hiring forestry undergraduates as assistants to Rangers was
continued in 1940.    Ten young men were so employed with excellent results.    Their practical FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 47
experience will make them much more valuable to the Forest Service if hired after graduation
and in the meantime they well earn their salaries. The scheme will be continued and, if
possible, expanded.
A small allotment was secured in 1940 from the Dominion Government to carry on the
National Forestry Plan. We were only able to employ picked youths as assistants to the
Rangers under the limited funds, which would not extend to organizing improvement crews.
Values received were satisfactory and excellent training was given to 146 young men in the
work of forest protection. The forest service received value from the assistance given the
Rangers in their arduous duties and will continue to profit in future fire seasons by having a
number of trained men throughout the community.
The following tables give the details of the 1940 fire season:—
Fire Occurrences by Months, 1940.
Forest District.
March.
April.
May.
June.
July.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Total.
Vancouver.	
3
1
3
4
19
31
15
28
30
94
9
17
103
81
121
11
27
478
626
79
10
16
137
160
54
8
12
97
57
6
1
370
70
93
Kamloops.  ~  	
Nelson  ....  ■	
846
959
Totals	
11
123
304
1,263
402
228
7
2,338
Ten-year average, 1931-40-	
75
202
243
487
486
177
11
1,676
Number and Causes of Fires in
Province,
1940
t
Forest District.
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Totals	
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236
90
400
74
5
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38
171
18
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Ten-year average, 1031-40
485
297
109
339
122
13
42
!
102
139
24
1,676
Damage to Property other than Forests, 1940.
Forest District.
Forest
Products in
Process of
Manufacture.
Buildings.
Railway and
Logging
Equipment.
Miscellaneous.
Total.
Per Cent,
of Total.
Vancouver	
$52,340.00
5.00
36.00
121.00
5,346.00
$41,745.00
$51,475.00
$20,412.00
$165,972.00
5.00
1,186.00
2,139.00
62,617.00
71.56
575.00
975.00
32,467.00
575.00
1,043.00
24,104.00
.52
.92
700.00
27.00
Totals 	
$57,848.00
$75,762.00
$52,175.00
$46,134.00
$231,919.00
100.00
$89,710.00
$35,996.00
$70,333.00
$16,607.00
$212,647.00 F 48
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
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F 49
Number and Causes of Forest Fires for the Last Ten Years.
Causes.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
1933.
1932.
1931.
TotaL
Lightning  	
1,265
236
90
400
74
5
41
38
171
18
515
305
77
374
111
11
32
88
175
16
703
442
72
524
180
4
77
121
238
51
263
269
74
242
107
14
65
20
124
25
524
256
81
321
78
6
29
74
152
26
173
217
65
289
127
11
45
72
97
15
320
312
103
415
117
10
41
65
188
19
285
234
77
197
77
7
32
65
90
18
336
230
156
197
108
18
17
127
64
13
475
470
295
435
243
44
57
355
96
48
4,859
2,971
1,090
Smokers  	
Brush-burning (not railway-clearing)	
Road and power- and telephone-line construction 	
3,394
1,222
130
426
Incendiarism   —-	
Miscellaneous (known causes) 	
1,025
1,395
249
2,338
1,704
2,412
1,193
1,547
1,111
1,590
1,082
1,266
2,518
16,761
Fires classified by Size and Damage, 1940.
Total Fires.
Under %
Acre.
Vi to 10 Acres.
10 to 500 Acres.
Over 500 Acres.
Damage.
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Vancouver—	
370
15.83
208
56.22
16.45
120
32.43
17.42
35
9.46
11.59
7
1.89
8.54
342
17
n
70
2.99
33
47.14
2.60
25
35.72
3.62
11
15.72
3.65
1
1.42
1.22
68
2
93
3.97
43
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3.40
32
34.40
4.64
18
19.40
5 96
85
7
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Kamloops 	
846
36.19
395
46.70
31.22
283
33.45
41.08
137
16.19
45.36
31
3.66
'37.80
772
53
21
959
41.02
586
61.10
46.33
229
23.90
33.24
101
10.50'33.44
43
4.50
52.44
871
54
S'l
2,338
lO'O.OO
1,265
100.00
689
100.00
302
1
82|
100'. 00
2,138
133
67
100.00
54.10
29.47
12.93
3.50
91.44
5.68
2 86
Ten-year average,
1931-40—	
757
566
	
1,514
105
"iB
Causes, Cost, and Damage, 1940.
Causes.
No.        Per Cent.
Cost. Per Cent.
Damage.
Per Cent.
Lightning..
Campers	
Railways operating-
Smokers 	
Brush-burning (not railway-clearing)	
Road and power- and telephone-line construction— —  	
Industrial operations 	
Incendiarism  	
Miscellaneous (known causes) .
Unknown causes 	
Totals .
1,265
236
90
400
74
5
41
38
171
18
2,338
54.11
10.09
3.85
17.11
3.17
0.21
1.75
1.62
7.32
0.77
303,112.39
17,681.37
280.19
22,215.76
1,930.23
,674.70
8,359.09
12,150.24
10,623.70
200.48
80.35
4.69
0.07
5.89
0.52
0.18
2.21
3.22
2.82
0.05
$422,908.79
25,612.94
222.61
89,473.54
6,349.16
2,747.00
138,576.23
10,231.93
22,343.72
30.32
$377,228.15
100.00
$718,496.24
58.86
3.57
0.04
12.45
0.88
0.38
19.29
1.42
3.11
100.00 F 50
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
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!z FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 51
Damage caused by Forest Fires, 1940—Part I.
Accessible
Merchantable Timber.
Inaccessible
Merchantable
Timber.
Immature
Timber.
Forest District.
p
St
<-6
+J   CJ
£3
0J
a as
Salvable
Volume of
Timber
killed.
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Vancouver 	
Acres.
982
11
40
8,591
39,084
M.B.M.
9,313
25
249
24,880
166,508
M.B.M.
872
22
2,797
33,401
$
11,823
4
77
16,735
156,240
Acres.
340
6,097
22,832
M.B.M.
950
$
170
Acres.
784
13
87
22,482
30,216
4,774
63
2,548
12,793
140
48,972
1,615
54,193
94,183
Totals      	
48,708
200,975
37,092
184,879
28,269
51,537
15,511
53,582
153,353
9.94
79.60
14.69
37.99
5.77
20.40
3.19
10.94
31.52
74,066
79,572
247,344
Damage caused by Forest Fires, 1940—Part II.
Forest
District.
Not satisfactorily
restocked.
Noncommercial
Cover.
Grazing or
Pasture
Land.
Nonproductive
Sites.
Grand Totals.
i
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0
Vancouver 	
Prince Rupert
Fort George — 	
Kamloops _	
Nelson —_ 	
Acres. | Acres.
2,265 |10,101
8 j        64
31 |          1
1,048 j     104
68,380 |      127
Acres.
549
1,692
1,109
6,895
33,937
$
6,458
882
510
3,840
25,960
Acres.
4,065
101
6,337
45,555
100,814
$
2,033
50
3,165
20,864
35,781
Acres.
33
80
6,643
4,530
824
$
2
4
335
215
37
Acres.
4,393
6
1,992
67,760
$
2,196
3
985
29,514
Acres.
23,512
1,975
14,248
96,294
353,974
M.B.M.
10,263
25
249
73,852
168,123
$
27,456
1,006
4,227
99,380
354,508
Totals	
61,732 |10,397
44,182
37,650
156,872
61,893
12,110
593
74,151
32,698
490,003 | 252,512
486,577
12.60
32.01
12.72
1
15.13
6.72
100.00 |    100.00
100.00
1
Ten-year average, 1931-40.
	
19,393
1,106
429,159
374,142
664,111 F 52
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
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>   Otr^iUiZ FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940. F 53
GRAZING.
Again in 1939-40 the Interior stock-range country experienced a mild winter with low
snowfall. This factor, so detrimental from a forest-fire standpoint, is beneficial to the stock-
raisers. Less hay is fed, animals suffer less and therefore keep in better condition, and
spring, with its new, succulent feed, usually comes earlier. The summer months were generally dry and range feed matured early; however, stock came off the range in excellent
condition to take advantage of the better prices prevailing in the fall.
Due to war conditions, the Canadian-United States Agreement, and greater local consumption, prices for all range stock were materially higher in 1940 than 1939. Where steers
sold from 5 to 6 cents a pound in 1939 they went as high as 7% cents for prime stock in
1940. Heifers that brought 4 to 5% cents in 1939 went from 6% to 7% cents, and cows
increased from 4% cents to 5% cents per pound.
The range-sheep industry of the Interior shared also in the upward swing of prices.
Lambs sold from 8V2 cents to 9% cents compared to a maximum price of 8 cents per pound
in 1939, and wool went from 17 cents a pound to 21 cents net to the producer. At this rate
the British Columbia Sheep-breeders' Association shipped 213,000 lb.
As stated in the 1939 report, a great many of the Interior ranges are being obstructed
by the falling of beetle-killed timber. As a result there have been many fires set by irresponsible people trying to clear the ranges of this material. In an endeavour to meet the situation
in such a way that fires could be controlled, the Forest Service agreed with the ranchers to
conduct burning experiments, hoping that this would obviate the indiscriminate fires. This
was attempted in the spring of 1940, but results were inconclusive because of poor burning
conditions. Later in the summer it was not safe to set out fire. This, however, did not deter
some persons from setting out thirty-two fires in one Ranger District. Experience with
various conditions resulting from summer burns has not led to any reliable conclusion that
benefits result, while there are innumerable examples of complete elimination of valuable
forage from vast areas because of fire. Undoubtedly a remedy is necessary for the conditions developing on many of our forest ranges where insect-killed trees are blocking up
valuable acreage. This may be found in the cutting of trails through the deadfalls as was
done in 1939, but it does not seem possible to open grazing lands safely through the use
of fire.
Dead and down timber is only one of the many difficulties that ranchers have to meet.
Losses of stock constantly occur through poisonous weeds, disease, mud-holes, and predatory
animals.
Of recent years an increase in the number of wolves has been noted in the Cariboo.
These have caused considerable losses to the ranchers and will have to be curbed. Coyotes
and bears have also claimed their victims from the range herds and flocks, sheep suffering
most from these latter predators.
Through the Range Improvement Fund, losses of cattle in bogs and mud-holes have been
materially minimized by fencing them from the range and developing safe drinking-places
for the stock.
Poisonous weeds are prevalent on most ranges to greater or less extent. They apparently
vary in quantity and toxicity from season to season, but seem least damaging when other feed
is plentiful on well-managed grazing areas. This problem has been studied to some extent by
range and live-stock experts, but few definite results have been achieved. There is need for
a properly planned programme of research on the subject to attempt a reduction in annual
losses.   The price of only a few of the poisoned animals would finance the research adequately.
Foot-rot, so prevalent in sheep bands for a number of years past, and threatening the
entire range-sheep industry, has been curbed. It is too soon yet to claim complete elimination
of the disease; but the fact that in 1940, for the first time since it appeared in British
Columbia, all bands went to the summer ranges clear of foot-rot is an indication that it can
be controlled. This success has been achieved through the efficient co-operation of the
Provincial Department of Agriculture in their study of the disease, instruction of sheep
owners and herders, and in the firm administration of quarantine measures. In turn the
Forest Service has refused permits for the Crown range to any bands not reported clean.
Co-operation has been maintained with veterinary inspectors in reporting on all forms
of range-stock disease. Wherever the two departments can work together to control such
diseases and the resulting loss to stockmen, they will continue to do so. F 54
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
Proper range management is dependent upon full knowledge of the extent, capacity, and
condition of the range. Following the policy of many years, the grazing staff of the Kamloops District continued the programme of range reconnaissance. The area covered in 1940
was not as extensive as in some former years but, in some instances, was more intensive.
This year air photos and maps derived from them were used on the White Lake range.
The actual pictures of the areas being examined were carried in the field and proved of great
help. The divisions of range could be more accurately determined and none missed, while
the indications of water were plain on the photographs. Since no range is of use without
water and men on foot may easily miss many such places, the all-seeing eye of the aerial
camera is an enormous help in reconnaissance-work.
The following reconnaissance projects were completed in 1940:— Acres.
Hunter's Range  ,     25,300
White Lake Range     73,760
Pike Mountain Range     26,170
Princeton Range      65,000
Total
190,230
There are still vast areas of range land in the Interior of which little is known. As the
industry increases and range becomes scarcer, there will be need for full information on it so
that proper management may be instituted and the inevitable disputes settled. This is
becoming particularly necessary in the East Kootenay areas where increasing herds are
raising many range problems. So far insufficient field staff has been available outside the
Kamloops District.    In the near future it will be distinctly needed.
Co-operation has been maintained continuously with Live-stock Associations. These are
incorporated bodies of range-users, organized in geographical groups to advise with the Forest
Service staff on range management. Being officially recognized they are assured of being
heard in all matters affecting their interests on the Crown range and are a source of practical
advice and assistance to the Department's officers in carrying out their duties.
During the year the district officers met with twenty-five Live-stock Associations in thirty-
five meetings.    No new associations were formed during the year.
Grazing Permits.
The use of Crown range is allowed under annual permit paid for at rates set by regulation
and on a per head basis. This allows for close control of grazing in the interests of both
Crown and permittees and the latter are charged only for actual use. Where special rules
are necessary in the interests of range management they are incorporated in the permit,
usually after discussion with the Live-stock Association recognized for the range in question.
That the issuance and administration of grazing permits is no small job is shown by the
numbers issued as shown below:—
Year.
1934-.
1935.....
1936....
1937-..
Grazing Permits issued and Stock covered.
Cattle and Horses.
  69,960
  60,864
  77,137
  77,451
1938  75,022
1939  72,205
1940  78,362
Sheep.
36,569
36,902
46,084
42,185
37,060
38,357
37,132 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 55
The various districts shared in the business as follows:-
District.
No. of
Permits.
No. OF
Stock under Permit.
Cattle.
Horses.
Sheep.
25
227
629
1,824
5,156
67,424
152
1,376
2,430
23
3,645
33,464
Totals—         ...           ...
881
74,404
3,958
37,132
The improved conditions in the range stock business in 1940 were reflected in the collections of current and outstanding grazing fees. In this connection the highest total since
the " Grazing Act" came into force was collected, including approximately $20,000 in arrears.
This will be reflected directly in the Range Improvement Fund through the one-third
contribution.
Range Improvements.
The Range Improvement Fund, the condition of which has been shown previously in this
report, is made up of one-third of the grazing fees paid in each year. From it are paid the
costs in whole or part of building primary improvements on the Crown ranges; i.e., works for
the improvement of the forage in quantity or quality. It is a general Provincial fund and is
not limited for each range to one-third of the fees collected therefrom, nor must the amount
collected from each range be expended on it.
Under this fund, in 1940, the following improvements were constructed: 24 drift-fences
(total length 42 miles), 11 stock-trails (total length 32% miles), 1 holding-ground fenced,
5 holding-grounds repaired, 8 water developments completed, 5 mud-holes fenced, 2 stock
bridges built, 1 cattle-guard built, 1 experimental plot fence repaired; making a total of
58 projects completed.
Management of the grazing range for perpetual growth of forage-crops and the production of meat products is essential to a balanced economy, while the need is intensified by the
demands of war. The conservation of the range resources is no less essential than that of
the forests. Continued study of range conditions, co-operation with range-users, and orderly
improvement where necessary are the key-notes of existing administrative policy. F 56
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
PERSONNEL DIRECTORY, 1941.
Victoria Office.
C. D. Orchard	
G. P. Melrose..
E. E. Gregg	
E. W. Bassett..
J. H. Blake.	
W. C. Spouse.
..Chief Forester.
..Assistant Chief Forester.
-Forester—Protection.
..Assistant Forester.
-Mechanical Inspector.
-Assistant Mechanical Inspector.
G. A. Playfair (on Active Service) Radio Engineer.
H. E. Ferguson Radio Engineer.
E. B. Prowd Forester—Management.
S. E. Marling..
F. S. McKinnon--
H. J. Hodgins..
S. W. Barclay	
H. H. Smith	
.Assistant Forester.
-Forester—Economics.
-Assistant Forester.
..Royalty Inspector.
.Chief Accountant.
Districts.
Vancouver.
C. J. Haddon	
T. A. Clarke.
W. Byers.
JDistrict Forester.
.Assistant District Forester.
M. W. Gormely	
W. S. Hepher	
D. B. Taylor	
J. G. MacDonald—
A. H. Waddington.
-Supervisor of Scalers.
-Assistant Forester.
.-Assistant Forester.
-Assistant Forester.
.Fire Inspector.
.Fire Inspector.
R. C. St. Clair..
L. S. Hope (on Active Service).
J. E. Mathieson	
Prince Rupert.
 District Forester.
..Assistant District Forester.
-Fire Inspector.
R. D. Greggor-
Prince George.
 District Forester.
L. F. Swannell (on Active Service).
H. B. Forse	
..Assistant District Forester.
-Assistant Forester.
Kamloops.
C. C. Ternan..
 District Forester.
R. G. McKee Assistant District Forester.
R. R. Douglas (on Active Service) Assistant Forester.
C. L. Armstrong (on Active Service) Assistant Forester.
W. W. Stevens Acting Assistant Forester.
F. J. Wood .Fire Inspector.
E. A. Charlesworth.
-Supervisor of Scalers.
Nelson.
R. E. Allen.
K. C. McCanneL
W. C. Phillips—
W. Holmgren	
 District Forester.
 Assistant District Forester.
 Assistant Forester.
 Fire Inspector. APPENDIX TO
FOREST BRANCH ANNUAL REPORT
1940
CONSOLIDATED STATISTICAL
TABLES 1912-1940 LIST OF TABLES.
No. Page.
1. Distribution of Force.—.   59
2. The Forest Industries.    Estimated Value of Production  60
3. Water-borne Lumber Trade  61
4. Paper manufactured in British Columbia  63
5. Total Amount of Timber scaled in British Columbia (in F.B.M.)  63
6. Total Scale (in F.B.M.) segregated, showing Land Status of Origin ...  64
7. Species cut (F.B.M.)   (Calendar Years)  65
8. Total Scale, Logs and Minor Products  67
9. Logging Inspections  69
10. Trespass  70
11. Areas cruised for Timber Sales  70
12. Timber Sales awarded  71
13. Timber Sales (Average Sale Prices per M. Feet)  72
14. Timber cut from Timber Sales  73
15. Saw and Shingle Mills of the Province  74
16. Export of Logs  75
17. Shipments of Minor Products  77
18. Timber-marking (Timber-marks issued)  79
19. Crown-granted Timber Lands  80
20. Forest Revenue (Calendar Years)  81
21. Amounts charged (Calendar Years)  82
22. Forest Revenue (Fiscal Years)  83
23. Scaling- Fund  84
24. Forest Expenditure  85
25. Forest Reserve Account  87
26. Range Improvement Fund  88
27. Estimated and Known Costs of Forest Protection to other Agencies  88
28. Forest Protection Fund—Income and Expenditure  89
29. Fire Occurrence by Months  90
30. Number and Causes of Fires in Province  91
31. Prosecutions for Fire Trespass  92
32. Fires classified by Place of Origin and Cost of Fire-fighting  93
33. Fires—Causes, Cost, and Damage  95
34. Damage caused by Forest Fires  95
35. A Comparison of the Damage caused by Forest Fires  97
36. Damage to Property other than Forests  98
37. Burning Permits  99
38. Fires classified by Size and Damage  101 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 59
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rH TABLE No. 3.—WATER-BORNE LUMBER TRADE  (IN M.B.M.).
F 61
Destination.
Australia.
New-
Zealand.
South
America.
China.
Japan.
United
Kingdom.
India and
United
Philip
West
Indies anc
Cuba.
Mexico
South
Straits
States and
pines and
South Sea
and
Africa.
Settle
Atlantic
Hawaiian
Islands.
Central
ments.
Coast.
Islands.
America.
Egypt.
Belgium."
Denmark.*
France.*
Germany.*
Holland.*
Italy. <
Norway
and
Sweden.*
Spain.
Unclassified.
1913          	
25,788
1914 	
5,850
1915 	
5,913
1916	
1917           -
2,153
16,309
1918        	
6,434
1919...   	
8,516
1920- 	
32,218
1921...     	
27,276
1922	
55,949
1923 ....
78,003
1924	
1925	
34,849
40,229
1926	
19 27.- ..-	
36,809
53,502
1928	
29,843
1929.... 	
1930	
41,493
33,076
1931	
50,803
1932	
1933	
125,551
123,733
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939 ..
128,141
129,492
125,448
158,400
141,465
144,534
1940-
72,797
641
286
123
56
4,159
4,554
4,517
11,253
12,169
12,620
16,201
10,848
8,531
8,559
6,416
2,579
979
1,300
2,957
3,793
6,072
5,415
7,805
5,142
2,584
6,684
984
302
627
2,617
2,464
1,552
5,523
1,318
3,245
718
753
2,169
1,161
2,169
10,304
2,449
. 1,775
1,354
141
3,642
1,620
4,017
6,328
10,632
9,946
5,560
1,795
2,711f
1,290
3,426
3,055
1,673
17,025
17,183
14,911
41,944
24,640
36,398
25,596
10,783
4,616
9,179
16,902
43,323
55,224
53,854
53,342
130,596
108,128
91,232
102,743
47,635
43,457
34,775
6,347
 f
2,082
1,583
3,043
1,590
19,803
4,676
5,990
52,447
72,340
105,917
79,108
67,671
177,194
191,598
219,362
192,412
150,870
138,852
60,032
60,657
80,279
43,080
33,123
30,677
9,194
6,116
835
12,020
4,824
38,112
19,802
13,448
31,275
65,381
61,218
13,593
12,698
16,201
41,527
53,846
41,576
36,427
67,076
69,904
98,038
81,356
108,315
271,073
455,695
455,862
666,272
648,364
741,631
964,693
971,594
2,159
9,521
5,329
10,115
5,023
6,434
5,045
7,331
2,932
2,416
8,221
10,681
8,876
17,652
18,563
13,626
15,889
17,686
13,120
5,665
18,213
25,276
28,350
61,133
49,015
41,614
80,120
84,708
3,154
1,529
475
5,620
8,429
7,249
4,803
2,228
3,360
1,654
3,567
412
244
241
370
544
917
431
3,415
1,897
2,781
1,174
7,225
139
7,246
1,374
3,565
2,013
5,259
4,163
25,554
83,857
248,612
313,105
361,017
400,348
392,075
384,108
351,527
259,094
207,586
79,683
29,528
28,735
62,013
159,904
107,933
154,038
123,733
70,726
786
2,996
1,159
95
4,361
135
57
221
1,734
57
123
136
743
1,780
862
1,480
21
30
994
545
667
8,793
16,023
8,357
14,347
12,781
7,521
8,240
11,830
13,467
7,133
9,823
9,487
13,584
12,828
15,309
2,710
1,395
991
1,611
2,564
941
1,8.42
3,665
3,454
2,610
3,792
1,885
5,496
5,509
3,231
2,527
2,009
2,477
4,475
4,556
10,129
12,904
5,745
11,523
7,187
552
1,015
678
334
624
550
479
1,746
1,669
2,410
4,870
2,821
3,748
2,271
2,024
8,566
4,270
1,705
6,883
12,821
2,574
2,650
1,150
4,744
4,348
4,216
8,040
8,279
5,315
1,828
17,326
336
79
6,141
2,997
6,265
5,691
4,578
5,468
1,976
62
29
210
120
242
149
10
48
425
724
875
653
592
4,938
154
120
127
105
846
746
2,836
3,383
3,090
419
144
302
9
1,870
1,212
1,669
3,332
1,098
302
129
351
330
1,869
335
1,023
73
703
5
8
24
113
41
5
686
1,598
40
16
457
64
177
230
835
154
12
50,494
73,195
4
208
329
241
226
402
821
51,512
38,031
58,075
43,677
43,923
88,069
108,872
146,624
188,733
273,147
521,707
531,262
577,560
712,743
740,230
765,556
801,518
712,300
566,129
446,890
662,600
859,465
853,979
1,202,994
1,107,377
1,192,195
1,409,042
1,257,917
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
* For some years included with United Kingdom.
f China and Japan shipments combined in 1913. FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 63
TABLE  No. 4.—PAPER  MANUFACTURED  IN  BRITISH  COLUMBIA   (IN  TONS).
Year.
Newsprint.
Other Papers.
1914..
1915..
1916.
1917.
1918...
1919..
1920..
1921..
1922..
1923..
1924.
1925.
1926.
1927-
1928..
1929..
1930..
1931..
1932.
1933.
1934..
1935.
1936.
1937..
1938-
1939..
1940-
45,816
50,307
65,229
75,833
112,206
123,607
136,832
110,176
124,639
142.928
136,281
148,201
176.924
214,010
225,477
201,009
224.928
217,562
205,050
237,107
267,406
262,123
276,710
264,136
179,639
216,542
262,144
3,170
8,277
7,202
9,792
6,934
7,945
7,709
9,653
9,261
10,389
13,745
15,960
19,492
20,446
17,709
24,051
23,492
26,777
33,287
41,443
53,026
39,348
50,870
68,428
45,816
50,307
65,229
79,003
120,483
130,809
146,624
117,110
132,584
150,637
145,934
157,462
187,313
227,755
241,437
220,501
245,374
235,271
229,101
260,599
294,183
295,410
318,153
317,162
218,987
267,412
330,572
TABLE No. 5.—TOTAL AMOUNT OF TIMBER SCALED IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
(IN F.B.M.).
Year
Interior.
Coast.
Total.
Ten-year Average
(Total Scale).
1912..
1913-
1914..
1915..
1916-
1917..
1918..
1919-
1920-
1921..
1922-
1923..
1924..
1925-
1926-
1927-
1928.
1929..
1930..
1931 .
1932..
1933-
1934-
1935..
1936-
1937-
1938-
1939-
1940 -
325,371
361,868
277.909
187,469.
268,212
311,529;
330,478.
347,708
450,304
382,762;
343,873,
421,862,
482,990
450.696
475,329,
442,271,
482.9G4,
522,955,
873
550
,800
000
000
000
976
,667
364
680
639
885
787
920
748
776
420
238
419,783,596
288.214,260
169,610,385
187,467,435
231,726.489
279,889,126
315.354.443
369.718,763
362.251,912
313,248,925
369,378,324
1,075,000,000
1,075,173,389
689,080,000
830,169,000
1,012.051,000
1,335,746,000
1,430,705,430
1,410,621,328
1,596,
1,407,
1,555,
2,099,
2,066
2,160
2,442,
2,411,
2,723,
2,823,
2,243,
1,660,
1,441,
1,711,
1,983,
2,369.
2,705,
2,872
2,416
3,041
164,595
254,685
284,634
872,396
709,394
569,607
789,454
430,686
941,046
189,049
968,742
190,013
8-18,076
113,629
065,380
399.269
418,751
196,877
782,086
646,641
;,323,776,432
1,400,371,873
1,437,041,939
966,989.800
1,017,638,000
1,280.263,000
1,647,275,000
1,761,184,406
1,758,329,995
2,046
1,790,
1,899,
2,521,
2.549,
2,611,
2,918,
2,853,
3,206,
3,346
2,663,
1,948,
1,611,
1,898,
2,214,
2,649
3,020,
3,241,
2,779,
3,354,
468,959
017,365
158,273
735,281
700,181
266,527
119,202
702,462
905,466
144,287
752,338
404,273
458,461
581.064
791.869
288,395
773,194
915,640
033,998
895,566
3,693,154,756
1,510,
1,560,
1,668,
1,827
1,986,
2,150,
2,270,
2,415,
2,574,
2,636,
2,651,
2,623,
2,560,
2,527,
2,531,
2,541,
2,580,
2,537,
2,538,
,558,034
,436,674
,906,008
,177,046
,539,899
,325,519
,968,265
,540,371
,321,800
050,138
888,829
,118,848
,803,426
312.595
114,782
380,181
201,499
414,352
289,480
2,641,229,721 F 64
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
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TABLE No. 7.—SPECIES CUT   (F.B.M.)   (CALENDAR YEARS).
(All Products converted to Log Scale.)
Per  IWhitpPinP     Per      Lodgepole      Per
Cent. | Willte rine' j Cent. |       Pine.       | Cent.
Year.
Douglas Fir.
Per
Cent.
Cedar.
Per
Cent.
190,085,000
24.0
354,702,000
34.9
385,096,000
30.1
443,076,000
26.9
349,953,000
19.9 |
386,638,000
22.0
445,957,000
21.8 J
450,368,000
25.1
461,265,000
24.3
573,615,000
22.7
610,201,000
23.9 |
761,424,202
29.2 |
705,409,476
24.2 |
656,030,374
23.0 |
738,626,482
23.0 |
746,556,671
22.3 |
570,071,915
21.4 J
356,478,825
18.3 |
319,086,978
19.8 1
374,247,934
19.7 j
335,779,926
15.1 |
477,362,816
18.0 |
551,348,174
18.3 |
582,137,757
18.0 |
531,758,431
19.1 |
697,949,348
20.8 |
666,542,374
18.0 |
Spruce.
Per
Cent.
Hemlock.
Per
Cent.
Balsam Fir. j ^
Yellow
Pine.
Larch.
Per
Cent.
27,707,000
3.5
38,597,000
3.8
38,706,000
3.0
50,001,000
3.0
45,617,000
2.6
36,715,000
2.1
40,754,000
2.0
45,245,000
2.5
39,759,000
2.1
44,887,000
1.8
56,896,000
2.2
46,715,296
1.8
40,696,415
1.4
27,607,809
1.0
24,386,323
0.8
39,082,808
1.2
20,585,633
0.8
17,700,108
0.9
21,470,125
1.3
31,094,619
1.6
30,222,468
1.3
46,798,137
1.8
40,942,920
1.4
40,960,357
1.3
41,082,954
1.5
29,184,667
0.9
25,530,530
0.7
Cotton
Per
wood.
Cent.
200,000
1,045,000
0.1
1,944,000
0.2
2,993,000
0.2
5,708,000
0.3 |
3,636,000
0.2
6,046,000
0.3
2,961,000
0.2
1,927,889
0.1
5,234,832
0.2
4,714,361
0.1
2,912,598
0.1
4,029,782
0.2
2,941,992
0.2 1
4,468,131
0.2
4,052,857
0.2 !
3,008,870
0.1
5,453,226
0.2
3,834,511
0.1
3,137,389
0.1
2,226,405
0.1 !
1,712,100
0.1
Miscel
Per
laneous.
Cent.
93,000
42,000
89,000
43,000
350,000
55,000
32,000
106,000
	
3,112,000
0.2
4,848,000
0.2
50,409,000
2.0
73,622,137
2.8
88,566,757
3.0
58,830,995
2.1
77,512,224
2.4
76,016,459
2.3
56,569,927
2.1
45,517,520
2.3
70,757,226
4.4
170,841,227
9.0
54,802,536
2.5
44,724,664
1.7
50,560,985
1.7
44,948,474
1.4
41,575,393
1.5
47,230,563
1.4
46,643,330
1.3
Total.
Year.
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
370,878,000
426,232,000
564,691,000
763,369,000
777,554,000
841,605,000
1920..
1921-
1922..
1923-
1924..
1925-
1926-
1927-
1928-
1929-
1930-
1931-
1932..
1933-
1934..
1935-
1936..
1937-
1938-
1939-
1940-
901
821
846
1,139,
1,036,
1,016,
1,306,
1,411,
1,604,
1,660,
442,000
,025,000
171,000
,149,000
019,000
931,573
615,563
296,248
941,926
527,087
1,319,093
997,513,
752,558
873,187,
1,161,212,
1,339,026
1,590,145
1,617,748
1,442,406
1,693,234,
565
398
169
188
111
242
329
996
668
458
1,753,846,981
46.8
41.9
44.1
46.4
44.2
47.8
44.1
45.9
44.6
45.2
40.6
38.9
44.8
49.5
50.0
49.6
49.5
51.2
46.7
46.0
52.4
50.5
52.6
49.9
51.9
50.5
47.5
74,169,000
74,676,000
85,329,000
110,569,000
276,569,000
222,013,000
203,246,000
151,792,000
149,247,000
209,017,000
267,899,000
209,036,148
248,706,996
188,234,622
204,110,500
220,827,354
185,696,765
123,056,421
106,361,793
86,715,876
132,327,306
125,060,677
149,037,950
179,887,207
146,932,200
161,125,833
7.3
6.7
6.7
15.7
12.6
8.5
7.8
8.3
10.5
8.0
8.5
6.G
6.4
6.6
7.0
6.3
6.6
4.6
6.0
4.7
4.9
5.5
5.3
4.8
236,605,863 j 6.4
65,608,000
79,392,000
101,315,000
149,761,000
169,792,000
174,573,000
291,585
195,005
238,891,
332,217,
322,715,
305,659,
332,691
306,859,
353,268,
394,748,
,000
000
000
000
,000
,173
280
508
,734
152
329,447,130
267,283,560
245,169,186
238,472,893
342,766,236
428,684,859
464,588,680
575,562,653
408,574,061
546,859,330
7.8
7.9
9.1
9.6
9.9
14.2
10.9
12.6
13.2
12.7
11.7
11.4
10.8
11.0
11.8
12.4
13.7
15.2
12.5
15.5
16.2
15.4
17.8
14.7
16.3
14,092,000
1,260,000
21,406,000
21,740,000
45,398,000
38,736,000
49,112,000
32,023,000
38,904,000
71,538,000
66,069,000
69,757,874
90,419,605
70,013,721
68,264,722
71,980,723
65,513,782
45,153,077
54,282,274
68,203,263
77,442,211
88,647,694
79,960,739
93,900,797
62,473,447
88,876,641
I
1.8
0.1
1.7
1.3
2.6
2.2
2.4
1.8
2.0
2.8
2.6
2.7
3.1
2.4
2.1
2.2
2.5
2.3
3.4
3.6
3.5
3.3
2.6
2.9
2.2
2.6
45,660,000
29,766,000
71,783,000
90,495,000
70,547,000
41,932,000
65,213,000
41,869,000
43,630,000
61,790,000
38,354,000
41,116,018
29,368,123
34,165,320
31,919,089
32,917,115
30,463,015
26,109,228
13,367,227
22,005,856
39,573,745
33,216,860
36,836,428
43,767,890
46,628,780
40,276,394
5.7
2.9
5.6
5.5
4.0
2.4
3.2
2.3
2.3
2.5
1.5
1.6
1.0
1.1
1.0
1.0
1.1
1.4
0.8
1.2
1.8
1.3
1.2
1.3
1.7
1.2
4,337,000
5,057,000
6,816,000
6,468,000
14,868,000
9,571,000
31,465,000
18,838,000
34,405,000
31,183,000
25,243,000
30,653,478
30,079,384
35,157,414
23,073,267
21,740,327
28,029,526
27,006,894
17,992,369
22,186,768
17,136,556
27,982,161
24,789,625
35,361,947
32,838,360
34,246,932
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.4
0.8
0.6
1.5
1.1
1.8
1.2
1.0
1.2
1.0
1.2
0.7
0.6
1.0
1.4
1.1
1.2
0.8
1.1
0.8
1.1
1.2
1.0
6,914,000
3,088,000
8,760,000
4,828,000
2,855,000
11,616,000
30,785,000
43,774,000
53,491,000
75,895,000
56,350,628
45,565,603
63,578,562
75,567,367
77,033,230
55,368,482
38,555,460
7,471,122
7,157,309
19,475,917
34,775,415
27,109,138
23,805,051
21,626,315
13,684,995
0.7
0.2
0.5
0.3
0.2
0.6
1.7
2.3
2.1
3.0
2.1
1.6
2.2
2.4
2.3
2.1
2.0
0.5
0.4
0.9
1.3
0.9
0.7
0.8
0.4
1,400,
1,437,
792,
1,017,
1,280,
1,647,
1,761
1,758,
,371,873*
,041,939*
829,000f
683,000
263,000
,275,000
,184,000
329,000
2,046,468,000
1,790,017,000
1,899,158,000
2,521,735,000
2,549,700,000
2,611,266,527
2,918,119,202
2,853,702,462
3,206,905,466
3,346,144,287
2,663
1,948,
1,611,
1,898,
2,214
2,649,
3,020,
3,241
2,779,
3,354,
752,338
404,273
458,461
581,064
,791,869
288,395
,773,194
,915,640
033,998
,895,566
718,234,988 | 19.4 | 151,271,558
41,722,618 | 1.1 | 38,791,958
12,252,456 | 0.3 |
I    I
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
3,693,154,756 j 1940
* No segregation by species available.
f Sawlogs only. TABLE No. 8.—TOTAL SCALE, LOGS AND MINOR PRODUCTS.
F 67
Year.
Sawlogs (F.B.M.).
Fir.
Cedar.
Hemlock.
Spruce.
Balsam.
Yellow
Pine.
White Pine.
Jack-pine.
Larch.
Cottonwood.
Miscellaneous.
Total Logs.
Railway-
ties
(Pieces).
Cords.
Lineal
Feet.
Total
Scale all
Products
(M.B.M.).
1912..
1913-
1914..
1915-
1916-
1917-
1918-
1919..
1920-
1921..
1922-
1923-
1924..
1925-
1926-.
1927...
1928-
1929...
1930-.
1931...
1932...
1933-
1934...
1935-
1936...
1937-
1938-
1939-
1940...
985,525,148
1,290,561,158
1,392,989,908
1,584,635,311
1,635,181,842
1,299,941,730
977,458,313
736,869,899
862,379,263
1,144,069,399
1,306,486,561
1,562,298,436
1,587,492,115
1,412,850,329
1,674,338,307
1,731,031,929
535,486,359
518,561,481
473,280,167
533,270,582
515,539,256
365,568,807
227,534,905
246,106,073
296,893,029
268,192,068
400,159,361
456,854,058
467,275,733
420,133,330
571,880,180
568,068,370
303,527,178
330,452,923
305,046,513
351,368,616
393,032,712
328,945,214
266,579,235
244,926,624
237,943,258
341,909,556
427,275,757
463,546,888
574,927,866
408,264,726
546,740,734
717,926,831
208,849,598
248,585,508
187,114,297
202,379,490
220,540,549
184,668,810
122,977,231
106,352,833
86,704,321
132,327,306
125,045,173
149,035,871
179,886,721
146,932,200
161,479,167
236,605,863
68,654,924
90,420,590
70,013,721
68,264,722
71,980,723
65,513,782
45,153,077
54,163,963
68,203,263
77,442,211
88,647,694
79,960,739
93,900,179
62,472,533
88,835,919
151,271,558
41,102,237
29,368,123
34,213,761
31,919,089
32,917,115
30,463,015
26,109,228
13,367,227
22,005,856
39,573,745
33,216,860
36,836,428
43,767,890
46,628,780
40,276,394
41,722,618
30,667,259
30,079,384
35,157,414
23,073,267
21,648,566
28,029,526
26,352,325
17,992,369
22,186,768
17,136,556
27,982,161
24,789,625
35,361,947
32,838,360
34,246,932
38,791,958
12,772,278
13,687,603
7,565,637
7,396,845
5,585,172
4,888,638
5,106,129
2,032,241
1,706,009
3,926,857
5,311,375
5,285,615
7,318,047
7,841,905
4,583,981
4,936,821
42,698,296
40,696,415
27,607,809
24,371,691
39,082,808
20,570,833
17,700,108
16,706,425
28,369,196
26,638,168
42,510,154
35,532,006
36,416,197
36,096,867
26,375,101
23,428,365
1,873,312
5,238,289
4,714,361
2,912,598
4,029,782
2,950,110
4,521,354
4,052,857
3,008,870
5,453,226
3,834,511
3,137,389
2,219,709
1,712,100
4,432,330
2,482,377
179,613
400,379
84,738
290,985
278,675
633,327
455,497
1,678,026
2,791,339
4,164,763
5,371,690
4,082,196
4,395,571
9,165,595
1,400,
1,437,
788,
827,
1,084,
1,403,
1,569,
1,483,
1,742,
1,481,
1,645,
2,237,
2,208,
2,233,
2,594,
2,535,
2,832,
2,940,
2,331,
1,719,
1,442,
1,631
2,056,
2,462,
2,823,
3,035,
2,581
3,155
371,873
042,000
102,000
,633,000
,733,000
,724,000
,477,000
,332,000
,511,000
,254,000
,745,000
,228,000
817,000
,715,607
,895,562
,042,152
,318,281
307,842
,793,938
279,008
,101,091
,357,814
,946,749
,435,305
,757,655
,552,896
,278,615
371,995
3,524,662,008
1,477,514
516,723
986,190
1,445,862
1,303,164
1,421,708
3,000,909
3,856,203
2,543,763
2,858,791
3,736,619
3,059,985
2,446,969
2,526,969
3,122,496
3,526,085
2,277,454
2,008,485
1,002,353
496,028
1,077,864
1,626,217
1,325,213
1,191,434
1,118,446
719,803
514,824
202,778
310,486
279,185
335,846
257,898
263,438
286,018
176,014
240,672
221,631
214,628
231,940
193,808
147,696
181,023
153,086
121,564
108,660
152,359
331,157
148,582
160,343
170,511
155,494
170,632
200,548
152,543
5,851,000
3,732,000
5,024,000
6,089,000
4,407,000
13,520,000
13,434,000
20,050,000
10,717,000
16,871,000
23,360,000
24,866,904
23,245,828
28,353,302
31,321,337
39,453,489
36,320,040
18,881,273
6,963,083
4,528,010
4,561,562
8,806,570
14,268,973
22,116,128
16,549,381
15,869,389
18,438,296
1,400,372
1,437,042
966,990
1,017,683
1,280,263
1,647,275
1,761,184
1,758,330
2,046,469
1,790,017
1,899,158
2,521,735
2,549,700
2,611,267
2,918,119
2,853,702
3,206,905
3,346,144
2,663,752
1,948,404
1,611,458
1,898,581
2,214,792
2,649,288
3,020,773
3,241,916
2,779,034
3,354,896
3,693,155
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 69
TABLE Nc
. 9.—LOGGING INSPECTIONS.
Active Operations.
Year.
Timber-
sales.
Hand-
loggers*
Licences.
Leases,
Licences,
Crown Grants,
and
Pre-emptions.
Total
Operations.
No. of
Inspections.
1914  ..... _  	
1915	
170
236
338
365
605
691
914
1,010
1,245
1,262
1,475
1,584
1,623
1,907
1,932
1,562
1,124
1,237
1,603
2,074
2,354
2,404
2,674
2,770
2,864
170
208
291
141
171
200
220
186
159
166
69
54
84
133
50
99
100
92
37
67
87
59
35
46
23
10
12
683
606
870
757
1,961
1,331
1,579
2,140
1,853
1,730
1,921
1,873
2,023
2,002
1,862
1,675
1,316
1,425
1,546
1,660
1,883
1,932
1,804
2,068
2,272
926
937
1,144
983
1,379
1,322
2,786
2,208
2,652
3,316
3,167
3,046
3,480'
3,590
3,696
4,008
3,894
3,329
2,477
2,729
3,236
3,793
4,272
4,382
4,501
4,848
5,148
1916 	
1917	
1,648
1,161
1918	
2,214
1919	
1,884
1920 -.-	
2,703
1921	
4,053
1922 	
4,654
1923  	
6,892
1924	
7,466
1925 -	
7,321
1926	
7,921
1927	
8,661
1928	
9,596
9,512
1929	
1930 _ 	
8 859
1931 ._	
8,969
1932	
7,273
1933   	
8,121
1934 	
9,486
10 081
1935 	
1936	
11,138
11,507
10,828
11,295
10,968
1937	
1938	
1939        	
1940	 F 70
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
TABLE No. 10.—TRESPASS.
No. of
Cases.
Areas
cut over
(Acres).
Quantity cut.
No. of
Resulting
Seizures.
Year.
Logs
(F.B.M.).
Lineal
Feet.
Cords.
rn:„D         Christmas
lies-             Trees.
1
Amount
collected.
1914	
74
74
72
36
57
87
73
98
98
105
68
87
84
83
105
99
96
84
95
70
101
121
153
156
149
209
194
1,599
971
1,046
348
412
2,454
1,788
1,938
1,059
1,0,15
670
645
541
399
878
370
1,000
397
368
155
720
655
501
1,147
816
571
877
2,662,625
3,735,226
4,472,106
4,523,088
5,477,955
12,708,365
4,904,079
3,222,673
3,002,881
6,712,868
2,182,808
3,486,609
1,972,843
2,290,926
5,867,052
984,309
969,351
1,579,465
767,896
1,578,108
3,270,608
3,043,486
2,067,130
8,239,813
4,309,030
6,905,268
5,206,829
167,201
144,910
69,873
36,677
39,676
48,860
104,048
209,395
98,903
121,202
54,068
98,456
144,357
47,871
98,279
88,997
165,729
118,704
35,484
41,689
30,555
60,965
75,272
143,860
203,195
94,818
94,444
1,709
1,320
1,397
217
305
88
1,882
1,639
2,591
1,598
767
1,563
433
2,862
4,713
569
1,457
1,048
2,140
1,413
1,385
1,283
1,632
1,607
3,014
3,147
1,573
53,842
343,286
907
454
87,120
6,716
21,60,5
27,022
20,082
7,646
16,820
10,233
9,666
16,599
5,906
9,612
12,425
9,265
3,807
4,825
14,078
2,452
2,132
1.18S
5,206
4,279
	
9
10
16
6
8
8
10
10
16
8
2
4
6
9
12
9
4
2
14
2
6
3
13^
7
10
26
13
$8,430
2,632
3,821
1915	
1916	
1917 	
2,245
1918. _
	
2,179
21,730
1919	
1920..	
17,120
1921 	
15,924
1922	
16,406
1923	
27,860
1924  	
8,540
1925......	
14,535
1926	
9,458
1927 	
1928	
	
9,098
17,787
1929.	
5,431
1930	
7,534
1931 	
5,634
1932 	
3,491
1933	
2,728
1934	
5,401
1935  	
6,078
1936 	
6,243
1937 	
1938 	
1939	
1940	
35,017
7,530
46,729
9,854
17,440
9,654
17,725
14,088
TABLE No. 11.—AREAS  CRUISED  FOR TIMBER-SALES.
No. of Applications
cruised.
Acreage.
Saw-timber
(M.B.M.).
Poles and
Piles
(Lineal Feet).
Bolts and
Cordwood
(Cords).
Railway-ties
(Pieces).
Car Stakes
and Posts
(Pieces).
1924 	
942
819
819
844
1,111
1,061
943
818
875
942
1,331
1,319
1,415
1,471
1,486
1,324
1,620
179,609
119,436
142,515
225,191
233,889
214,874
197,065
145,214
144,769
169,831
223.391
238,952
252,035
278,386
325,403
212,594
300,480
451,476
353,225
369,717
974,626
754,095
500,420
526,261
297,825
202,421
186,418
356,264
398,884
464,402
633,216
482,680
470,660
572,562
8,465,924
9,113,052
4,236,881
7,092,844
9,623,599
13,043,603
10,345,822
2,629,054
1,759,905
1,620,112
2,856,619
5,674,908
8,535,045
9,658,000
5,747,765
5,016,945
11,309,288
41,554
57,441
15,248
21,027
43,266
17,629
26,431
62,680
68,414
95,233
80,101
114,753
148.606
140.820
126,329
68,078
72,157
1,873,954
1,389,604
1,299,826
1,747,441
2,056,604
1,305,110
731,640
664,413
488,655
549,976
1,235,766
1,164,454
1,083,746
753,408
804,240
339,866
314,644
1925	
1926 	
1927	
20,200
35,600
1928... 	
447 630
1929	
1930    ...
185,740
620,100
142 400
1931
1932	
1933	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937.	
69,900
174,861
73,766
74.700
63,200
160 450
1938	
1939 	
1940	
169,900
261,100
512 042 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 71
TABLE No. 12.—TIMBER-SALES AWARDED.
Year.
No. of
Sales.
Acres.
Saw
Timber
(M.B.M.).
Poles and
Piles
(1,000
Lineal
Feet).
Posts
(1,000
Pieces.)
Bolts and
Fuel
(Cords).
Railway-ties
(Pieces).
Estimated
Revenue.
1914	
71
28,132
278,078
13
25
7,610
18,520
$349,969
1915    .
98
12,990
94,555
12
10
12,370
152,599
1916	
133
23,318
136,345
436
26,670
92,000
259,765
1917	
255
44,914
240,307
1,517
40
43,760
381,200
483,281
1918 	
227
34,257
159,659
378
20
18,480
701,650
380,40£
1919      ....           	
356
61,809
245,209
2,899
5
52,560
957,800
654,372
1920  	
594
121,690
440,650
2,811
149
86,730
6,415,350
1,799,039
1921  	
531
91,614
188,972
2,479
34,290
993,420
646,488
1922	
671
108,501
249,573
3,304
41,580
880,310
862,888
1923 	
852
163,464
516,397
6,234
23,150
2,304,160
1,513,971
1924      ...           	
769
146,652
302,813
6,336
47,640
2,418,630
1,226,461
1925      	
613
94,015
189,022
6,629
13
40,330
566,140
795,802
1926 	
687
118,815
295,487
5,498
207
13,450
1,045,000
1,038,537
1927	
821
258,097
1,611,612
7,333
736
22,060
1,380,550
2,666,678
1928 ... -	
1,033
194,929
525,251
6,537
880
48,730
1,996,460
1,344,274
1929 	
974
216,222
691,973
9,357
374
23,200
1,505,950
1,908,101
1930  --- 	
866
162,043
199,485
9,963
398
20,000
494,200
689,481
1931 - 	
842
148,523
217,474
2,272
173
41,030
606,160
624,596
1932 - 	
836
134,868
181,470
1,747
162
54,150
423,680
450,528
1933 —	
948
190,794
145,696
2,490
296
76,780
432,510
450,559
1934 	
1,324
219,969
250,629
2,722
317
67,900
894,970
705,039
1935 	
1,357
231,958
260,831
5,408
309
101,970
1,200,580
762,427
1936       	
1,443
252,624
358,804
8,333
236
122,980
823,180
1,082,794
1937 	
1,449
278,988
450,798
9,865
364
122,140
644,220
1,271,475
1938  -	
1,501
274,424
415,747
5,934
292
120,850
647,390
1,203,886
1939
1,520
355,958
442,776
4,932
499
104,780
370,670
1,233,236
1940   	
1,734
314,659
548,898
10,074
448
105,185
309,618
1,599,106
Note.—In addition to materials shown in this table there were sold  (year 1938 and later) :   315,000 Christmas
trees, 3,500 hop-poles, 7,200 car-stakes, and 50,000 blasting-sticks. F 72
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
TABLE No. 13.—TIMBER-SALES.
(Average Sale Prices per M. Feet.)
Year.
Fir.
Cedar.
Spruce.
Hemlock.
Balsam.
White
Pine.
Yellow
Pine.
Larch.
Other
Species.
1914	
$1.32
$1.12
$1.33
$0.52
$0.68
$0.80
$1.82
$0.50
1915	
.95
1.10
.71
.46
.48
.77
1916 ...	
1.00
1.16
.72
.45
.39
1.69
$1.74
1.75
1.95
1917......	
1.12
1.24   :
.96
.48
.54
1.24
1 57
1 61
1 88
1918.   " ...	
1.32
1.36
1.02
.60
.62
1.04
1.45
1.45
1.82
1919  	
1.48
1.54
1.56
.73
.82
1.63
1.50
1.55
1.18
1920 	
2.04
2.23
2.05
1.06
1.23
2.06
1.37
2.24
1.78
1921 	
1.65
1.57
1.60
1.08
.98
1.55
1.82
1.79
1.31
1922  -	
1.43
1.66
1.46
1.01
1.04
1.93
1.47
1.75
.78
1923    	
1.72
2.25 |
1.58
1.14
1.10
2.85
1.88
1.80
1.34
1924   	
1.73
2.28  j
1.63
1.21
1.10
2.63
1.83
1.63
1.50
1925 .... 	
1.78
1.67
2.05   i
2.01   ■
1.91
1.76
1.03
1.01
1.05
.79
3.74
3.98
2.07
2.04
1.46
1.47
1.20
1926 -   	
1.47
1927 _	
1.63
1.68  '
1.71
.96
.66
3.15
1.73
1.07
1.12
1928- -	
1.51
1.61
1.65
.85
.83
2.98
1.77
1.23
1.09
1929 -.   	
1.65
1.62
1.25
.82
.80
2.44
1.47
1.01
.97
1930 -   	
1.52
1.46
1.48
.91
.89
2.39
1.74
1.05
.68
1931 ...    	
1.39
1.60 I
1.24
.84
.89
1.78
1.47
1.68
1.00
1932	
1.19
1.15 ;
1.63
.76
.77
1.43
1.25
.84
.94
1933 	
1.16
1.17
1.15
.73
.73
1.94
1.19
.68
.69
1934 ....  	
1.26
.95
1.34
.73
.74
1.66
1.29
.76
.80
1935 	
.96
.93
1.20
.70
.76
1.60
1.33
.77
.86
1936 	
1.16
1.02
1.21
.65
.69
1.57
1.42
.68
.75
1937 r	
1.31
1.16  .
1.16
.70
.70
1.95
1.59
.77
.85
1938   	
1.46
1.17
1.32
.72
.70
2.05
1.48
.86
.82
1939  	
1.49
1.46
1.19
.76
.75
2.09
1.51
.86
.97
1940                                  	
1.57
1.49  ;
1.44
.81
.78
2.16
1.50
.91
1.27 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 73
TABLE No. 14.—TIMBER CUT FROM TIMBER-SALES.
Year.
Logs (F.B.M.).
Lineal Feet.
Cords.
Ties.
Posts.
1915
70,982,529
63,055,102
99,078,832
113,927,610
107,701,950
168,783,812
179,780,056
187,217,151
207,473,848
230,148,575
251,141,398
242,973,524
214,209,921
203,208,331
266,016,942
227,019,617
177,172,765
165,666,929
122,275,912
199,895,549
193,788,636
286,001,433
384,628,267
334,981,454
386,997,288
569,018,174
155,389
225,799
545,429
499,589
672,699
1,638,549
2,169,550
1,523,744
2,753,532
4,541,371
4,885,352
4,974,620
6,368,269
7,672,294
7,966,223
11,960,055
5,697,152
1,583,955
1,337,497
1,694,470
3,540,576
6,241,658
8,603,582
8,223,100
7,639,565
8,262,287
12,454
8,425
14,862
15,539
12,208
17,703
10,483
37,346
17,667
17,294
20,808
16,676
27,509
24,389
24,663
17,176
15,499
30,647
35,841
36,209
38,438
62,763
49,981
57,341
62,506
52,643
1916
1917
34,937*
146,807
573,286
654,829
831,423
496,672
856,628
1,543,915
1,077,414
1,198,922
1,359,902
1,714,709
1,554,870
1,341,426
662,120
258,284
212,824
503,266
851,342
813,764
724,483
648,646
435,611
274,918
1918    	
1919
1920                                                    —
1921                                       -
1923 -    :	
1924 -   .               	
	
1925              ...            -
1926  -   -   - - -
1927                                - 	
83,763
86,109
1928                                                       	
376,253
1929                                        -	
332,038
1930               	
388,749
1931  - 	
1932                                    	
255,545
79,885
1933               - - — -
164,586
1934           ... 	
84,312
1935 ....     	
1936  	
1937             	
149,959
154,630
197,859
1938
175,306
1939 -	
1940         	
215,457
259,089
* Scaled in cords, 1917-25.
In addition to materials accounted for in this table, add the following:
Year.
Christmas
Trees.
Hop-poles.
Car-stakes.
Stubs.
Blasting-
sticks.
1938 --  	
58,354
39,662
295,022
585
1,000
681
1,794
410
1989     	
1940                  ....               	
12,000 F 74
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
TABLE No. 15.—SAW AND SHINGLE MILLS OF THE PROVINCE.
Operating.
Closed.
Year.
Sawmills.
Shingle-mills.
Sawmills.
Shingle-mills.
No.
Daily
Capacity
(M.B.M.).
No.
Daily
Capacity
(M. Shingles).
No.
Daily
Capacity
(M.B.M.).
No.
Daily
Capacity
(M. Shingles).
1914
334*
81*
1915 ---	
304*
91*
1916                	
297*
212
93*
70
82
15
1917 -
8,294
10,255
2,579
820
1918 -...-	
219
8,637
75
11,420
29
1,567
5
675
1919      	
221
8,765
71
11,370
41
1,378
2
200
1920              	
341
289
10,729
8,912
109
79
13,426
10,885
37
78
909
2,029
2
6
30
1921 	
788
1922
292
9,683
108
15,554
90
2,054
8
680
1923 - 	
352
11,273
107
16,144
72
1,493
16
745
1924  	
359
11,986
78
15,636
103
2,618
20
1,780
1925   -
363
11,475
82
15,322
109
2,121
9
625
1926 	
391
12,962
87
15,614
102
1,675
6
460
1927 	
375
12,176
65
12,042
110
2,549
22
2.740
1928 	
314
11,919
56
8,280
120
2,459
15
2,710
1929 	
354
11,896
53
7,881
95
2,200
15
1,726
1930 	
301
11,020
43
7,164
141
3,204
17
1,695
1931 	
334
10,167
46
7,470
158
4,109
19
1,871
1932 -	
293
7,641
45
6,813
139
4,621
13
1,470
1933              	
295
8,715
78
7,325
134
3,632
22
1,652
1934 -
349
9,152
82
7,311
129
2,999
13
1,228
1935             	
384
9,822
11,401
93
8,492
96
1,962
16
1,231
1936              	
410
86
8,859
122
1,699
10
315
1937  ..-	
434
11,042
80
9,124
131
1,685
16
402
1938	
481
12,159
88
8,184
126
1,406
19
315
1939 ...-
461
11,698
84
7,926
147
1,907
24
537
1940 	
542
12,691
77
8,585
141
1,432
18
307
* Not segregated and capacity not estimated. TABLE No. 16.—EXPORT OF LOGS  (F.B.M.).
F 75
Year.
Douglas Fie.
Exportable.      Permit.
Total.
Cedar.
Exportable.      Permit.
Total.
Spruce.
Exportable.      Permit.
Total.
Hemlock.
Exportable.      Permit.
Total.
Balsam.
Exportable.     Permit. Total
Yellow Pine.
White Pine.
Exportable.
Permit.
Total.
Exportable.
Permit.
Total.
Lodgepole Pine.
Eabl°ert" I Permit- I   TotaL
Larch.
Exportable.
Permit.
Total.
Cottonwood.
Exportable.
Permit.
Total.
Miscellaneous.
Exportable.
Permit.
Total.
Total Export.
Exportable. I q^J
Permit.
Per
Cent.
Total Scale
Logs
exported.
Year.
1012—
1913—
1914—
1915—
1916—
1917—
1918—
1919—
1920-
1921-
1922-
1923-
1924_
1925-
1926-
1927-
1928-
1929-
1930	
1931	
1932	
1933	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940-
2,221,310
20,643
2,629,644
3,568,892
1,832,951
9,147,742
8,104,852
15,848,671
36,614,158
67,356,212
93,121,678
79,509,345
79,120,414
131,705,924
89,472,004
132,456,037
95,268,841
111,822,222
46,535,472
120,676,727
99,614,095
147,851,296
128,198,662
145,583,183
106,135,182
106,419,165
23,310,172
7,694,870
8,908,482
5,318,815
1,069,501
1,290,427
2,976,357
2,798,868
2,203,692
2,281,522
5,231,597
6,272,518
6,323,071
2,764,355
6,114,734
5,185,0'39
2,998,163
1,761,495
8,393,735
37,157,647
15,419,843
6,475,461
17,939,556
840,570
6,690,099
1,531,638
2,630,813
476,159*
509,149
9,916,180
8,929,125
7,948,459
4,638,393
3,123,378
12,124,099
10,903,720
18,052,363
38,895,680
72,587,809
99,394,196
85,832,416
81,884,769
137,820,658
94,657,043
135,454,200
97,030,336
120,215,957
83,693,119
136,096,570
106,089,556
165,790,852
129,039,232
152,273,282
107,666,820
109,049,978
23,786,331
24,297,305
8,122,013
4,854,398
3,588,265
237,037
16,273,917
8,684,510
30,914,265
38,031,077
59,978,431
56,919,351
50,766,728
64,685,085
46,675,227
59,930,825
62,255,450
27,540,129
32,120,920
14,751,411
24,373,973
14,738,488
20,191,048
20,752,652
23,175,960
38,776,054
46,861,782
17,362,995
64,295,043
36,745,948
34,60.3,337
4,383,123
1,439,080
5,500,693
20,599,933
28,612,355
33,844,711
22,788,120
29,440,382
41,571,163
43,400,791
18,549,607
8,979,886
12,684,
17,0«2;
44,933,
30,572,
18,696,
4,680,
400,
745,
7,917,
2,923,
887
,513
328
463
453
375
755
397
0.30
821
22,180,471   |    2,942,479
I
33,60«,990
22,678,030
41,660,300
72,417,056
41,600,346
38,161,602
4,620,160
17,712,997
14,185,203
51,514,198
66,643,432
93,823,142
79,707,471
80,207,110
106,256,248
90,076,018
78,480,432
71,235,336
40,225,016
49,203,433
59,684,739
54,946,436
33,434,941
24,871,423
21,153,407
23,921,357
46,693,084
49,785,603
6,718,460
6,855,191
632,562
6,896
419,131
313,340
5,727,999
6,121,470
11,112,232
8,728,998
4,915,674
2,111,612
3,811,281
1,400,170
268,308
659,180
274,456
681,007
205,776
220,530
1,354,252
432,756
3,232,044
1,994,686 |
6,851,182  |
1,014,575
2,586,894
862,711
860,400
2,233
162,420
146,80«3
573,787
1,571,284
443,764
2,184,660
561,091
379,762
1,158,497
104,188
29,608
142,272
393,451
3,688,254
425,645
1,306,252
882,936
5,621,100
5,832,878
19,998,869
18,203,020
25,122,950        1,436,759  I 16,778,885
1,249,489
1,759,131
7,733,035
9,442,085
862,711
1,492,962
9,129
581,551
460,143
6,301,786
7,692,754
11,555,996
10,913,658
5,476,765
2,491,374
4,969,778
1,504,358
297,916
801,452
667,907
4,369,261
631,421
1,523,782
2,237,188
6,053,856
9,064,922
21,993,555
25,054,202
18,242,644
1,113,790
4,375,243
731,263
2,279,090
8,912,804
1,856,746
8,266,992
17,139,995
34,613,612
22,232,714
20,463,081
20,107,565
18,557,105
28,723,558
24,090,699
22,652,680
32,951,760
7,371,393
7,526,781
22,196,393
30,981,653
37,753,369
74,246,047
66,303,599
113,231,795
1,569,598
5,434,698
536,325
4,998,236
1,544,110
3,492,525
1,027,529
4,690,286
13,656,850
6,163,660
16,730,396
8,198,742
4,319,091
17,575,526
1,954,963
487,496
678,230
10,231,983
4,174,956
1,028,951
1,166,700
3,491,953
14,834,176
1,013,658
8,449,445
3,456,158
2,683,388
9,809,941
536,325
5,729,499
3,823,200
12,405,329
2,884,275
12,957,278
30,796,845
40,777,272
38,963,110
28,661,823
24,426,656
36,132,631
30,678,521
24,578,195
23,330,910'
43,183,743
11,546,349
8,555,732
23,363,093
34,473,606
52,587,545
75,259,705
74,753,044
116,687,953
103,599,370  I 21,969,394  [  125,568,764
62,229
66,039
10,823
585,566
123,802
1,085,788
5,187,863
4,152,178
3,337,697
4,031,019
4,069,852
3,294,572
4,440,769
2,294,238
863,246
737,794
1,50.6,018
1,899,338
1,498,633
3,962,757
5,133,474
9,034,044
14,820,187
25,589
838,539
157,280
1,051,206
15,646
463,537
54,752
23,954
2,338,187
1,340,714
1,265,163
1,717,279
102,651
90,780
4,459,185
1,143,480
1,891,421
549,104
961,027
502,637
1,943,887
336,518
575,740
487,752
25,589
900,768
157,280
1,117,245
26,469
1,049,103
178,554
1,109,742
7,526,050
5,492,892
4,602,860
5,748,298
4,172,503
3,385,352
8,899,954
3,437,718
2,754,667
1,286,898
2,467,045
2,401,975
3,442,520
4,299,275
5,709,214
9,521,796
7,877,354 I 22,697,541
948,465
1,033,140
1,519,000
1,951,532
1,407,873
35,451
442,382
1,687
38,670
312,893
433,135
I
38,670
1,261,358
1,466,275
1,519,000
1,951,532
1,407,873
35,451
442,382
1,687
225,659
153,277
129
1,831,104
1,835,440
3,786,558
4,218,678
4,423,295
1,702,767
960,322
458,027
511,091
875,179
1,071,144
1,411,969
1,274,775
2,864,914
1,387,594
2,481,361
878,111
1,616,004
1,435,606
3,373,666
104,625
12,229
25,211
73,294
66,233
21,561
387,544
308,206
2,867,853
1,661
3,811
3,228
143,907
165,719
2,219,395
376,887
39,720
70,139
11,624
9,565
215,128
367,261
391,037
3,599,325
257,902
12,229
25,340
1,904,398
1,901,673
3,808,119
4,606,222
4,731,501
4,570,620
961,983
461,838
514,319
1,019,086
1,236,863
3,631,364
1,651,662
2,904,634
1,457,733
2,492,985
887,676
1,831,132
130,000
71,000
429,756 | 1,865,362
85,000
92,000
46,000
215,000
163,000
46,000
7,133
600
55,169
26,000
124,850
33,000
285,000
63,000  |
26,469
178,554
1,049,103
1,109,742
600
55,169
26,000
409,850
96,000
207,004
26,116
28,000
165,508
1,040,445
2,016,386
2,473,321
1,616,845
1,598,912
2,405,336
1,012,419
760,597
366,844
411,795
1,098,126
1,071,918
276,609
1,445,440
253,087
560,457
153,452
5,731
60,237
207,004
26,116
28,000
165,508
1,040,445
2,428,181
3,571,447
2,688,763
1,875,521
3,850,776
1,265,506
1,321,054
520,296
5,731
628
53,359
79,275
75,273
659,035
33,740
50,904
185,515
567,480
395,374
447,958
647,880
376,552
176,069
121,140
5,118,058
1,067,035
11,427
5,30>3
164,864
22,788
1,901
138,891
451,878
339,506
769,808
622,666
13,083
60,433
143,895
17,054,635
33,411,962
5,118,058
1,067,035
11,427
5,931
62,043
397,864
281,140
5,585,603
13,012,149
218,223
102,063
77,174
797,926
33,740
50,904
185,515
1,019,358
734,880
1,217,766
1,270,546
389,635
236,502
265,035
34,576,524
19,588,596
7,484,042
8,557,150
4,367,425
35,712,568
19,143,316
62,112,154
101,698,635
187,014,922
190,030,521
164,104,959
173,868,074
208,297,827
185,615,987
224,403,833
153,189,730
182,787,093
73,341,563
157,627,307
142,232,175
207,138,474
193,535,738
254,596,501
220,462,255
284,556,885
166,903,705
53
19
15
15
38
81
67
69
67
80
79
78
77
74
89
83
44
76
82
94
85
91
31,101,530
87,286,339
44,700,343
42,619,318
7,240,842
8,558,375
9,530,622
28,104,353
49,820,077
46,643,119
50,500,306
46,313,002
50,609,641
73,286,464
26,331,244
12,589,744
19,729,297
37,389,069
92,423,120
51,313,527
30,503,576
28,153,292
25,925,875
15,875,927
39,210,827
28,176,577
50,623,653
47
81
85
85
62
19
31
33
20
21
22
23
26
12
5
11
17
56
24
18
12
12
6
15
9
53,280,375
58,752,678
65,678,054
106,874,935
52,184,385
51,176,468
11,608,267
44,270,943
28,673,935
90,216,507
151,518,712
233,658,041
240>,530,827
210,417,961
224,477,715
281,584,291
211,947,231
236,993,577
172,919,027
220,176,162
165,764,683
208,940,834
172,735,751
235,291,766
218,828,835
270,472,428
249,673,082
312,733,462
217,527,358
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1982
1933
1934
1935
19.36
1937
1938
1939
1940
* All export of Douglas fir logs prohibited as a war measure by Timber Controller as from midnight, July 10th, 1940. TABLE No. 17.—SHIPMENTS OF MINOR PRODUCTS.
F 77
Poles and Piling.
Year.
Lineal
Feet.
Value.
Hewn Railway-ties.
No.
Value.
Cordwood.
Cords.
Value.
Pulp-wood.
Cords.
Value.
Shingle-bolts.
Cords.
Value.
Fence-posts.
Cords.
No.
Value.
Mining Timber.
Cords.
Lineal
Feet.
Value.
Car-stakes.
Cords.
No.
Value.
Christmas Trees.
No.
Value.
Total Value.
Year.
1913-
1914-
1915...
1916-
1917-
1918-
1919-
1920-
1921..
1922-
1923-
1924...
1925..
1926-,
1927-
1928...
1929..
1930-
1931...
1932 ..
1933-
1934...
1935..
1936..
1937-
1938..
1939-
1940 ...
2,562,942
2,969,810
1,594,675
2,723,770
3,598,212
2,229,116
3,853,938
6,817,642
6,129,367
7,844,022
13,573,156
17,109,284
15,994,875
17,790,835
20,189,155
21,641,465
25,475,292
27,182,677
13,629,450
5,713,775
4,853,138
4,480,203
7,851,745
11,032,933
19,668,726
12,586,695
13,727,587
12,918,268
$
179,406
240,000
78,933
158,846
225,998
150,410
836,615
554,883
506,935
803,838
1,606,569
2,169,949
2,147,803
2,755,082
3,042,730
3,205,241
3,675,947
3,817,468
1,846,065
533,105
431,631
389,549
717,603
1,165,952
2,146,078
1,237,556
1,482,345
1,428,828
Per Cent.
24.4
41.4
23.0
32.5
38.4
23.2
28.4
37.3
28.6
47.7
52.9
54.7
60.1
73.2
71.6
67.1
68.9
77.2
72.6
65.3
62.0
48.2
62.1
70.4
82.2
73.0
76.1
77.2
1,128,270
510,513
387,143
471,595
303,516
445,071
957,884
866,029
1,567,043
1,317,284
2,111,004
2,653,631
1,813,912
1,704,733
1,676,822
2,009,060
2,298,448
1,458,488
1,062,576
385,908
295,292
671,190
726,185
803,584
724,281
706,477
482,587
448,053
451,308
150,000
144,543
150,584
91,327
201,326
478,950
519,618
855,946
698,159
1,212,787
1,442,834
1,058,493
751,938
944,033
1,201,150
1,364,616
879,322
559,346
189,328
139,491
302,135
338,977
379,291
347,347
350,279
221,791
202,488
Per Cent.
61.4
25.9
42.2
30.8
15.5
31.1
40.4
34.9
48.3
41.5
39.9
36.4
29.6
20.0
22.2
25.2
25.6
17.8
22.0
23.2
20.0
37.4
29.3
22.9
13.3
20.6
11.4
11.0
1,743
4,458
1,760
1,603
1,048
2,044
1,195
993
443
260
79
746
593
957
303
1,423
1,027
12
6
8
838
362
97
101
5,229
22,290
8,800
8,015
6,974
16,352
8,366
5,701
3,031
1,820
608
2,986
2,372
3,830
1,214
4,980
4,625
48
24
30
3,396
1,482
463
483
Per Cent.
1.0
3.8
1.4
0.7
0.5
0.9
0.5
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.6
0.6
0.1
0.1
652
374
223
17,397
14,772
7,519
5,137
11,464
4,963
5,241
5,402
6,525
12,335
10,154
5,097
2,374
1,027
75
1,589
1,179
6,977
2,618
1,338
173,978
147,720
75,188
51,378
114,640
49,625
41,932
43,217
27,732
55,505
45,694
22,937
11,280
5,100
375
11,123
7,693
Per Cent.
0.5
0.1
4.4
4.2
2.0
1.2
2.4
0.9
0.8
1.7
3.4
8.0
5.7
2.0
0.7
0.2
1,037
448
76
200
167
1,107
2,195
179
2,201
942
207
177
22
212
37
6
6,222
3,380
760
3,000
1,552
10,516
21,950
1,343
24,922
8,707
1,886
2,005
165
3,810
425
54
Per Cent.
1.3
0.6
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.6
1.3
0.1
0.6
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.2
11,190
16,341
16,029
24,405
27,367
28,200
29,930
26,507
22,201
15,272
13,181
10,066
9,929
11,731
13,469
14,796
15,146
12,172
4,995
3,962
4,535
5,556
4,776
5,616
7,285
7,486
6,095
6,974
25,383
6,814
30,430
4,921
4,950
13,316
44,895
50,774
10,931
25,976
121,654
71,817
67,400
130,000
89,141
126,151
137,165
196,989
272,087
270,253
195,533
99,455
108,694
81,320
79,485
102,388
106,426
125,716
126,864
107,156
42,833
31,498
36,885
45,370
42,838
49,639
60,810
65,164
61,931
61,827
Per Cent.
9.3
22.4
25.9
25.8
23.3
30.4
23.0
18.2
11.0
5.9
3.6
2.0
2.2
2.7
2.5
2.6
2.4
2.2
1.7
3.9
5.3
5.6
3.7
3.0
2.3
3.8
3.2
3.3
6,000
7,525
4,922
9,276
17,986
12,691
8,641
12,069
17,335
5,096
10,064
11,613
5,364
8,701
10,303
9,343
9,800
4,643
3,697
3,486
3,164
4,118
6,066
5,155
5,043
3,142
2,277
688,294
59,341
152,292
81,570
117,701
86,175
18,870
2,950
11,849
28,710
35,370
39,983
64,642
36,000
60,000
30,376
41,742
108,024
88,961
86,306
126,434
185,134
52,880
100,933
71,501
128,427
77,279
102,010
128,070
113,879
95,737
50,836
29,672
28,256
25,456
33,516
49,112
42,875
42,872
28,151
22,408
Per Cent.
4.9
10.3
8.9
8.6
18.4
13.8
7.3
8.5
10.5
3.1
3.3
1.8
3.6
2.0
2.4
2.7
2.1
1.9
2.0
3.6
4.1
3.1
2.9
3.0
1.7
2.5
1.5
27
21
58
54
18
45
189
280
700
645
202
142
Per Cent.
1,736,015
1,351,805
141,040
125,898
Per Cent.
7.2
6.8
734,114
580,000
342,993
488,774
588,184
647,246
1,184,973
1,486,691
1,773,034
1,684,648
3,037,365
3,967,535
3,572,455
3,764,369
4,248,582
4,777,803
5,333,303
4,945,445
2,543,511
816,315
696,393
808,252
1,156,249
1,655,584
2,610,116
1,698,798
1,947,100
1,849,767
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
P 79
TABLE No. 18.—TIMBER-MARKING.
Timber-marks issued.
CMS
j
Year.
fi
cs
H
a
e
i
o
U
o
■a
O
fi
a  .
J« to
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ca   .
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5S
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+j  0)
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§1*
m
QJ
ot
s
cu
rA
U
a>
J5
S
H
OT
_qj
"cS
OT
H
QJ
s
ta
u
0J
M
M
■b
c
rt
w
■X3
a .
tig
IS
CQ fl
.2
11 fi
il
.K o
"SI
qj sh
bd QJ
-r QJ
■As
s £
Kxn
fl
».S
tfl-M
rt cfl
ss
s i
xn»
axrj
cn a
S cfl
.2 k]
-P .
fV
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OJCM
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ot
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ca
QJ
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c
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r-i
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QJ
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S^i
Ph rt
co
fi
O
CU
fi
J
'a)
CO
S
o
H
■a
a .
rt xn
s|
OH
1913	
45
29
95
53
161
35
51
107
30
7
15
50
221
128
16
20
—
634
429
1914 	
143
1915	
46
59
43
154
8
78
104
21
i
514
205.
1916	
45
47
29
115
70
100
106
51
563
1917  	
56
41
35
133
17
176
159
22
639
29S
1918	
74
64
64
178
16
226
29
39
113
803
142
1919          	
34
44
44
137
9
341
99
24
5
i
738
236
1920 	
108
119
115
330
12
581
128
49
23
22
4
1,491
296
1921....-	
106
73
83
240
3
524
140
36
26
63
3
1,287
350
1922 	
129
120
132
291
3
671
58
58
26
20
3
1,511
345
1923          	
146
133
147
131
188
168
392
310
1
853
769
55
30
115
85
64
57
45
21
1
1
2,007
1,705
267
1924  	
258
1925       -
126
130
138
162
205
165
350
270
613
689
22
16
106
48
36
45
30
14
4
21
3
2
8
1,632
1,571
171
1926 	
178
1927	
111
121
138
269
821
8
41
45
18
12
3
4
1,591
202
1928.	
108
118
177
302
1,033
5
62
34
21
13
5
3
1,881
276
1929 	
108
120
121
290
974
9
39
35
13
7
9
4
1,729
238
1930..- 	
90
84
97
212
866
11
39
90
16
8
1
1
1,515
242
1931.	
94
40
86
188
842
6
59
72
10
7
4
1,408
220*
1932 -	
303
66
62
163
836
14
34
40
18
11
2
1,549
183
1933	
227
92
76
206
946
26
18
55
9
5
4
2
1,666
139
1934... 	
238
74
96
303
1,324
13
19
61
9
13
4
2,154
204
1935 	
217
72
82
286
1,348
8
15
82
6
16
7
2
2,141
221
1936 	
267
85
102
285
1,443
11
17
73
5
13
4
5
2,310
264
1937	
298
86
129
282
1,451
4
9
69
3
18
2
1
2,352
339
1938	
258
103
124
272
1,501
3
9
59
6
1
6
2,342
321
1939     .
198
91
103
259
1,479
1
16
61
3
6
2
2
2,221
2,588
316
1940-  	
272
101
99
275
1,724
4
16
58
1
13
22
3
315 F 80 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
TABLE No. 19.—CROWN-GRANTED TIMBER LANDS.
Area of Private Average
Timber Lands Value
Year.                                                                                                                            (Acres). per Acre.
1911   824,818 $8.72
1912   874,715 8.60
1913   922,948 9.02
1914   960,464 9.66
1915   913,245 9.55
1916   922,206 9.73
1917   916,726 9.61
1918   896,188 9.60
1919  i  883,491 9.48
1920   867,921 11.62
1921   845,111 10.33
1922   887,980 11.99
1923   883,344 11.62
1924   654,668 15.22
1925   654,016 40.61
1926   688,372 39.77
1927   690,438 39.01
1928   671,131 38.62
1929   644,011 38.41
1930   629,156 44.74
1931   602,086 43.77
1932   552,007 43.73
1933   567,731 41.18
1934   557,481 37.25
1935   535,918 37.13
1936   515,924 36.61
1937  :  743,109 23.32
1938   754,348 23.05
1939   719,112 22.73
1940   549,250 27.70 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 81
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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
TABLE No. 23.—SCALING FUND.
Fiscal Year.
Fee.
Charged.
Collected.
Expended.
Cash
Balance.
1920-21.                             	
Cents.
5
10
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
5
$119,465.00
132,229.00.
113,551.00
132,229.00
118,016.00
139,515.00
131,666.00
135,565.00
142,360.00
138,332.00
127,087.00
91,267.00
78,090.00
105,683.00
117,296.00
152,586.00
154,923.00
152,228.70
139,821.19
174,487.12
$94,104.64
122,320.02
123,011.53
125,315.72
125,182.71
139,586.67
130,797.95
135,477.44
139,980'. 62
134,480.55
118,993.68
100,537.67
80,177.96
104,180.89
111,824.68
151,351.08
159,791.42
149,686.12
140,967.08
171,105.43
$102,351.10
89,837.94
122,963.11
141,386.29
163,550.57
146,958.97
140,289.37
139,242.26
147,601.87
142,359.06
128,359.26
110,417.94
78,691.02
92,428.15
101,008.69
120,307.65
131,363.54
152,106.87
147,991.85
165,582.51
— $8,246.46
1921-22    	
1922-23                                       	
+ 24,235.62
+ 24,284.04
+ 8,213.47
— 20,154.39
1923-24                           	
1924-25                           	
1925-26 -                 	
— 27,526.69
1926-27.    	
1927-28       	
— 37,018.11
— 40,782.93
1928-29                	
1929-30  	
1930-31.....  	
— 48,404.18
— 56,282.69
— 65,648.27
1931-32  -	
— 75,528.64
1932-33  	
1933-34                   	
— 74,041.70
— 62,288.96
1934-35        	
— 51,472.97
1935-36	
— 20,429.54
1936-37..-	
1937-38 	
+ 7,998.34
-I- 5,577.59
—    1,447.18
1938-39--	
1939-401	
+    4,075.74 TABLE No. 24.—FOREST EXPENDITURE.*
F 85
Fiscal Year.
Salaries.
Temporary
Assistance.
Expense
Vote.
Trade
Extension.
Reconnais-
Insect-
control.
Grants.
Forest
Reserve
Account, f
Research.
Reforestation.
Miscellaneous.
Grazing
Range Improvement
Fund.f
Forest
Protection
Fund.t
Total
Expenses.
Direct
Forest
Revenue.
PerCent.
Year.
1912-13	
1913-14	
1914-15	
1915-16	
1916-17 . 	
1917-18	
1918-19	
1919-20	
1920-21	
1921-22	
1922-23	
1923-24	
1924-25	
1925-26	
1926-27	
1927-28	
1928-29	
1929-30 .	
1930-31	
1931-32	
1932-33	
1933-34	
1934-35	
1935-36	
193 6-37	
1937-38	
1938-3 9	
1939-40	
1940-41	
143,
152
139,
125,
118,
129,
172,
182,
203,
204,
207,
208,
220,
224,
231,
242,
253,
262,
251,
288,
276,
203,
203,
226,
244,
251,
261,
,307
,511
744
,609
,121
,194
,496
,983
,861
273
327
682
372
569
050
562
637
652
476
837
990
508
205
413
803
241
674
914
$11,684
14,828
11,613
9,506
7,834
8,199
8,576
4,254
4,162
244
187
1,423
812
967
4,211
$78,597
85,991
106,717
71,551
63,317
81,165
69,817
82,257
130,425
179,994
120,359
154,640
145,373
135,811
139,260
131,418
135,021
127,244
128,344
92,414
102,330
78,911
75,058
86,250
98,041
108,849
118,494
119,802
$5,219
30,064
31,646
2,796
4,997
28,583
28,920
27,830
19,758
30,561
29,489
19,065
12,524
11,074
14,112
20,989
26,873
28,414
31,944
19,000
53,130
50,000
50,000
50,000
$31,189
52,476
28,445
50,110
33,973
20,778
18,372
15,446
13,296
9,656
4,998
1,995
1,999
1,889
4,963
9,078
9,973
$6,913
9,864
15,070
25,262
34,916
14,506
14,957
9,263
2,276
157
4,815
$3,000
2,000
3,000
2,000
2,000
4,000
4,000
4,000
$69,688
69,690
72,275
72,199
69,118
57,561
46,895
38,261
43,927
62,298
67,669
74,908
65,388
79,439
$9,216
13,515
13,965
17,999
17,569
17,971
17,239
7,724
3,996
1,988
2,000
1,993
13,331
14,000
13,979
$14,999
4,992
2,998
1,423
4,291
4,384
12,700
14,929
42,956
$2,758
3,190
7,528
3,765
6,076
873
9,205
10,636
6,691
3,926
4,707
6,757
8,210
1,089
270
1,433
558
289
$3,398
5,315
3,602
2,949
9,911
4,408
9,680
4,924
4,904
6,687
7,079
4,000
5,212
5,004
3,324
3,818
4,356
4,811
7,308
5,639
$105,259
165,018
122,341
114,784
120,392
104,658
134,793
117,889
189,817
324,777
413,697
642,315
301,766
600,250
575,154
300,000
300,000
300,000
480,000
840,000
100,000
300,000
300,000
300,000
400,000
440,000
500,000
$268,163
394,520
389,779
356,008
340,476
306,813
342,293
409,240
577,288
809,605
817,815
1,137,552
795,265
1,045,099
1,089,410
804,282
817,423
821,361
1,026,177
1,296,956
592,040
420,429
643,123
697,798
753,476
911,376
935,358
1,027,862
$2,569,003
2,610,103
1,920,111
1,709,657
1,972,586
2,080,181
2,597,153
2,481,238
3,315,891
2,844,991
3,247,034
3,454,805
3,494,462
3,592,899
3,567,400
3,592,829
3,573,821
3,333,136
2,914,638
2,420,989
1,830,408
1,768,999
2,266,710
2,841,419
3,001,055
3,257,525
2,982,702
3,236,731
10.4
15.1
20.3
20.8
17.3
14.7
13.2
16.5
17.4
28.2
25.2
32.9
22.7
29.1
30.0
22.3
22.8
24.6
35.3
53.6
32.3
23.8
28.4
24.5
25.1
28.0
31.4
31.8
1912-13
1913-14
1914-15
1915-16
1916-17
1917-18
1918-19
1919-20
1920-21
1921-22
1922-23
1923-24
1924-25
1925-26
1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
* For an explanation of the Forest Branch accounting system see the Annual Report for 1939, page E 37.
f Government contribution and miscellaneous revenue to Trust Funds detailed elsewhere. FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 87
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ftftftftftftftftftftftftftft F 88
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
TABLE No. 26.—RANGE IMPROVEMENT FUND.
Fiscal Year.
Government
Contribution.
Other
Receipts.
Total
Income.
Expenditure.
Balance.
1920-21    :
$3,398.00
5,314.89
3,602.38
2,949.00
4,910.94
6,000.00
4,407.80
4,679.82
5,000.00
4,923.72
4,904.08
4,187.18
2,500.00
4,578.64
2,500.00
4,000.00
5,211.64
5,004.43
3,324.17
3,818.10
4,356.36
4,811.28
7,308.07
5,638.66
$3,398.00
5,314.89
3,602.38
-3,010.51
$3,398.00
1921-22	
$5,564.72
1,582.04
7,231.35
3,148.17
5,168.51
947.67
1922-23                  .  .
1923-24   —
1924-25 	
$61.51
22.79
459.35
1925-26                   	
9,933.73
4,867.15
9,292.54
5,872.31
1,588.86
583.70
1926-27 —	
1927-28 	
	
9,679.82
4,923.72
4,904.08
6,149.89
7,892.19
6,041.91
4,113.63
1,145.16
1928-29   —
7.33
1929-30 	
6,687.18
3,907.74
2,786.77
1930-31  —
1931-32    	
1932-33... - -	
1933-34  	
1934-35 	
1935-36  —.
19-36-37. 	
9.00
221.50
36.35
8.50-
6.50
23.75
110.00
255.00
212.00
15.65
7,087.64
4,221.50
5,247.99
5,012.93
3,330.67
3,841.85
4,466.36
5,066.28
7,620.07
5,654.31
6,047.64
4,500.44
2,445.62
2,145.34
1,202.78
1,651.58
4,669.7-3
8,069.07
6,483.04
8,788.81
3,826.77
3,547.83
6,353.20
9,220.79
11,348.68
13,538.95
13,335.58
1937-38  	
10,332.79
1938-39	
1939^0   	
11,369.82
8,236.32
TABLE No. 27.—ESTIMATED AND KNOWN COSTS OF FOREST PROTECTION
TO OTHER AGENCIES.
(This table not compiled prior to 1934.)
Tools and
Equipment.
Improvements.
Fire-fighting.
Totals.
1934..
1935-
1936-
1937..
1938-
1939..
1940-
$29,574
35,560
46,066
79,531
75,189
58,282
42,737
$255
2,533
125
4,245
600
1,360
1,699
$39,212
73,042
54,781
64,796
65,677
56,664
46,254
$64,037
48,909
34,651
24,474
401,422
33,661
64,544
$133,078
160,044
135,623
173,046
542,888
149,957
155,234 FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 89
TABLE   No.  28.—FOREST  PROTECTION   FUND—INCOME   AND   EXPENDITURE.
Tax
(Cents
per
Acre.)
Special
Levies
(Cents
pel-
Acre. )
Income.
Expenditure.
Fiscal Year.
Protection
Collected.
Government.
Total.
Administration,
etc.*
Fires.
Total.
Balance.
1905 06
1
m
i%
iy2
i%
iy2
2
2%
2y3
2%
2%
2%
m
2%
2%
4
4
3%
2y2
21/4
3
$2,719
7,631
25,000
35,708
46,090
213,950
150,000
105,259
165,018
122,341
100,000t
43,659
114,784
120,392
104,658
134,793
117,889
189,817
300,000
24,777§
300,000|j
300,000
100,000
13,697§
300,000
300,000**
42,315§
300,000
1,766§
300,000
300,000**
250§
300,000
275,154
300,000
300,000
300,000
480,000
480,000
360,000**
$2,719
7,631
25,000
35,708
46,090
213,950
150,000
210,518
330,036
388,341
$1,245
2,145
12,530
18,680
24,708
80,107
105,051
177,797
311,212
260,137
$1,474
5,486
3,887
17,028
21,382
133,843
44,494
26,373
9,600
126,218
$2,719
7,631
16,417
35,708
46,090
213,950
149,545
204,170
320,812
386,355
1906 07
1907 08
1908 09
1909-10
1910-11
1911-12 	
1912-13.	
1913-14	
$105,259
165,018
122,341
$6,348
15,572
1914-15
17,558
114,785
120,392
104,648
134,803
117,889
189,817
192,601
203,560
163,958**
196,757
92,184**
187,520
11,349**
176,266
95,851**
1915-16	
229,569
240,784
209,306
269,596
235,778
379,633
817,379
164,695
148,000
19,449
7,124
184,144
155,124
143,6591:
202,272
240,432
383,420
633,867
457,198
49,5031
62,984
1916-17  -
4,987
1917-18 	
1918-19.. -
1919-20..	
1920-21 	
1921-22 	
110,802
190,139
217,732
340,977
358,722
	
91,470
50,293
165,688
292,890
98,476
12,021
41,185
108,1,57
360,690
50,013
781,215
1922-23..	
343,716
479,800
823,516
191,30211
283,616
1923-24	
931,256
346,698
72,706
419,404
59,19511
617,433
1,052,021
169,041
1924-25- 	
500,635
872,367
368,051
435,081
249,382
52,243
1925-26	
616,940
127,1,12
833,635
606,273
383,294
414,664
	
455,665
1926-27	
169,424
89,057**
170,317
135,956**
165,931
8,871**
151,632
23,194**
213,271
148,354**
194,450
504,234
887,528
181,305
1927-28-	
58,087
	
73,939
486,357
472,751
529,604
918,286
1,7,783
1928-29	
474,802
474,826
841,625
1,034,450
102,585
1929-30 	
431,929
546,01,5
1930-31 	
496,900
407,782
...
450,641
345,779
.     ...
947,541
651,962
1931-32 	
753,561
371,078
1932-33 -	
1933-34 -	
- •      1    - .-
100,000ft
100,000
7.494
33,336
10,383
9,534
39,252
17,029
72,588
10,383.*. i
82,971
10,383
1934-35-	
1932-33	
2%
2>/2
2V2
3%
4
6
25.291
8,818
108,237
105,739
63**
122,677
145,331
38,912§§
178,235
9,764§§
224,303
66,701§§
25,291
8,818
408,237
405,802
422,677
584,243
32
32
1933-34 	
336,996
1934-35-
300,000tt
300,000
300,000
400,000
	
216,59914
296,419
286,060
436,543
528,212
127,380
24,908
130,291
28,356
490,812
	
70,169
343,979
321,327
272,738
188,263
1935-36- 	
1936-37 ..
416,351
464,899
181,937
62,593
1937-38 .
1938-39	
440,000
627,999
1,019,024
453,618
1939-40-	
500,000
791,004
732,464
802,633
1,65,21,7
	
* Tools, equipment, trails, Ranger Stations, staff, etc. t Loan, $100,000 ; overeontributed, $43,659. % Repay
ing1 loan and overcontribution of 1914. § Score of collections of arrears under previous scheme of collections and
contributions. || Loan. fl Repayment on loan. ** Special levy. ft " Loan Act, 1932."    Total sum
authorized.    F.P.F. not operative. %% $10,383, remainder of Relief funds provided in the absence of F.P.F. in
1932, was spent in 1934. Expended on patrols. Government contribution, administrative expenditure, and total
expenditure for 1934-35 are all $10,383 higher than shown. This sum is shown under separate accounting for 1934
under disposal of special fund. §§ Miscellaneous.
Note.—Figures in italics indicate deficit. F 90
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
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CT TABLE No. 32.—FIRES CLASSIFIED BY PLACE OF ORIGIN AND COST OF FIRE-FIGHTING.
F 93
Year.
Total
Number
of
Fires.
Originated on
Vacant Crown
Lands and
Lands paying
Forest
Protection Tax.
No.
Per
Cent.
Originated on
Lands not
paying Forest
Protection Tax.
No.
Per
Cent.
Extinguished
without
Cost.
No.
Per
Cent.
Cost Money to extinguish.
No.
Per
Cent.
Cost
less
than
$100.
Per
Cent.
Cost
$100
to
$1,000.
Per
Cent.
Cost
$1,000
to
$5,000.
Per
Cent.
Cost
$5,000
to
$10,000.
Per
Cent.
Cost
over
$10,000,
Per
Cent.
Total
Fire-
fighting
Cost.
Average
Cost per
Cost
Fire.
Average
Cost per
Fire.
Year.
1912-
1913-
1914-
1915-
1916-
1917-
1918-
1919-
1920-
1921-
1922-
1923-
1924..
1925-
1926-
1927-
1928-
1929-
1930-
1931-
19 32...
1933-
1934-
1935-
19 36-
1937-
1938-
1939-
1940-
347
578
1,832
1,031
864
986
910
1,141
1,251
1,330
2,591
1,530
2,174
2,521
2,147
1,284
1,642
2,188
2,271
2,518
1,266
1,082
1,590
1,111
1,547
1,193
2,412
1,704
2,338
341
209
257
332
422
384
415
766
541
780
1,268
900
694
878
1,192
1,493
1,440
668
633
945
469
1,045
692
1,444
1,101
1,641
32.7
33.1
24.2
26.1
36.5
36.9
30.7
31.2
29.5
35.4
35.9
50.3
41.9
54.0
53.5
54.5
65.7
57.2
52.8
58.5
59.4
42.2
67.5
58,0
59.9
64.6
70.2
1,233
690
655
729
578
719
867
915
1,826
989
1,394
1,253
1,247
590
764
778
1,078
598
449
645
642
502
501
968
603
697
67.3
66.9
75.8
73.9
63.5
63.1
69.3
68.8
70.5
64.6
64.1
49.7
58.1
46.0
46.5
45.5
42.8
47.2
41.5
40.6
57.8
32.5
42.0
40.1
35.4
29.8
122
420
1,193
714
693
625
510
518
611
891
1,665
1,086
1,315
1,473
1,308
633
794
831
1,016
1,077
752
841
578
951
674
1,006
743
980
35.2
72.7
65.1
69.3
80.2
63.4
56.0
45.4
48.8
67.0
64.3
71.0
60,5
58.4
60.9
49.3
48.4
38.0
38.9
40.3
85.1
69.5
52.9
52.0
61.5
56.5
41.7
43.6
41.9
225
158
639
317
171
361
400
623
640
439
926
444
859
1,048
839
651
848
1,357
1,388
1,502
189
330
749
533
596
519
1,40,6
961
1,358
64.8
27.3
34.9
30.7
19.8
36.6
44.0
54.6
51.2
33.0
35.7
29.0-
39.5
41.6
39.1
50.7
51.6
62.0
61.1
59.7
14.9
30.5
47.1
48.0
38.5
43.5
58.3
56.4
58.1
480
518
663
947
909
1,105
167
263
580
449
467
446
1,047
734
1,013
22.3
40j3
40.4
43.3
40.0
43.9
13.2
24.3
36.5
40.4
30.2
37.4
43.4
43.1
43.3
242
100
163
279
324
21
55
139
70
10*3
64
285
177
259
11.3
7.8
9.9
12.7
16.2
12.9
1.6
5.1
8.7
6.3
6.6
5.4
11.8
10.4
11 1
95
31
21
111
93
58
1
12
22
11
22
9
57
39
70
4.4
2.4
1.2
5.1
4.1
2.3
0.1
1.1
1.4
1.0
1.4
0..7
2.4
2.3
17
1
1
6
2
3
12
7
0.8
0.1
0.1
0.4
0.6
0'.2
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.5
0.4
0.5
11
4
0.2
0.1
0.5
0.2
0.4
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.2
$29,828
8,929
143,461
19,449
5,585
88,243
44,803
158,707
257,126
98,476
479,801
72,706
249,382
616,940
504,234
81,663
73,939
492,582
464.456
366,982
10,007
39,252
133,114
24,908
130,493
28,356
494,423
236,757
$132.57
56.50
224.00
61.00-
33.00
244.00
112.00
254.74
398.00
224.31
518.14
163.75
290.31
588.68
601.00
125.44
87.19
363.00
334.62
244.32
52.94
118.94
177.72
46.73
218.94
54.63
351.65
246.37
$85.90
15.45
78.31
18.86
6.46
89.50
49.23
139.09
205.53
74.04
185.17
47.53
114.71
244.72
234.85
65.43
45.03
225.12
204.51
145.74
7.90
36.27
83.71
22.42
84.35
23.76
204.98
138.94
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940 TABLE No. 33.—FIRES—CAUSES, COST, AND DAMAGE.
(This table not compiled prior to 1929.)
F 95
Year.
Lightning.
Campers.
Railways
Operating.
Railways under Construction.
Smokers.
Brush-
burning  (not Railway-
clearing).
Road and Power- and Telephone-
line Construction.
Industrial
Operations.
Incendiarism.
Miscellaneous
Known Causes).
Unknown Causes.
Total
Cost.
Total
Damage.
Year
Cost.
Per
Cent.
Damage.
Per
Cent.
Cost.
Per
Cent.
Damage.
Per
Cent.
Cost.
Per
Cent.
Damage.
Per
Cent.
Cost.
Per
Cent.
Damage.
Per
Cent.
Cost.
Per
Cent.
Damage.
Per
Cent.
Cost.
Per
Cent.
Damage.
Per
Cent.
Cost.
Per
Cent.
Damage.
Per
Cent.
Cost.
Per
Cent.
Damage.
Per
Cent.
Cost.
Per
Cent.
Damage.
Per
Cent.
Cost.
Per
Cent.
Damage.
Per
Cent.
Cost.
Per
Cent.
Damage.
Per
Cent.
$368,316
294,173
76,609
3,178
15,715
51,049
2,414
64,164
7,545
91,907
57,054
303,112
74.8
63.4
20.8
31.8
40.3
35.3
9.7
49.3
26.7
18.8
24.5
80.3
$894,323
1,058,893
191,893
96,777
125,718
429,444
4,059
1,046,018
3,988
262,447
43,078
422,909
76.5
60.6
10.6
16.9
27.6
43.2
1.4
89.0
2.6
11.8
11.6
58.8
$32,800
26,783
119,202
1,072
7,777
26,706
3,054
27,514
5,773
69,000
23,755
17,681
6.7
5.8
32.5
10.7
20.0
18.5
12.3
21.1
20.4
14.1
10.2
4.7
$30,348
161,853
915,563
239,516
85,933
234,992
5,357
44,616
16,434
268,744
177,387
25,613
2.6
9.3
50.8
41.9
18.8
23.7
1.9
3.8
10.6
12.0
47.6
3.6
$6,625
5,673
5,553
607
2,914
3,021
8
478
151
6,240
425
280
1.0
1.2
1.5
6.1
7.5
2.1
0.4
0.5
1.3
0.2
0.1
$8,545
256,738
15,637
9,260
13,050
10,578
160
1,323
372
42,567
1,842
223
0.7
14.7
0.9
1.6
2.9
1.1
0.1
0.2
1.9
0.5
0.1
	
$20,902
44,095
40,923
799
5,542
28,033
10,133
21,679
5,680
58,226
63,483
22,216
4.3
9.5
11.1
8.0
14.2
19.4
40.8
16.6
20.1
11.9
27.2
5.9
$17,386
55,557
99,396
32,723
10,315
150,428
88,454
14,330
3,361
124,946
71,417
89,473
1.6
3.2
5.5
5.7
2.3
15.1
30.5
1.2
2.2
5.6
19.2
12.4
$2,097
10,818
8,458
1,333
849
1,968
2,390
874
4,803
5,504
2,853
1,930
0.4
2.3
2.3
13.3
2.2
1.3
9.6
0.7
17.0
1.1
1.2
0.5
$10,090
30,609
43,246
91,494
3,431
7,274
2,314
10,532
21,966
30,881
4,258
6,349
0.8
1.8
2.4
16.1
0.8
0.7
0.8
0.9
14.1
1.4
1.1
0.9
$18,369
1,410
1,673
65
3.7
0.3
0.5
0.7
0.5
1.8
0.2
$6,531
693
3,805
182
0.6
0.2
0.4
0.5
0.4
$1,211
1,061
11,954
0.3
0.2
3.3
2.3
1.1
14.3
2.0
1.0
34.8
5.6
$164,995
11,328
177,182
58,600
165,877
48,300
182,160
8,966
102,759
1,122,241
6,606
138,576
14.1
0.6
9.9
10.3
36.4
4.9
63.0
0.8
66.0
50.3
1.8
19.3
$17,521
71,611
94,329
2,663
4,645
9,011
2,666
7,561
1,740
59,174
57,006
12,150
3.6
15.4
25.7
26.7
11.9
6.2
10.7
5.8
6.1
12.1
24.4
3.2
$32,659
160,873
339,165
36,770
23,663
64,765
5,340
27,273
324
199,856
47,819
10,232
2,8
9.2
18.8
6.4
5.2
6.5
1.9
2.3
0.2
9.0
12.8
1.4
$24,042    |      5.0
1
3.154           0.7
I
$1,861           0.1
6.777            0.4
$698
5,678
6,180
0.2
1.2
1.7
0.8
1.1
0.4
1.2
0.1
2.3
1.0
0.1
$1,919
2,771
9,755
3,868
20,219
5,981
95
1,573
65
146,394
417
30
0.2
0.2
0.5
0.7
4.4
0.6
0.1
6.5
0.1
$492,581
464,456
366,981
9,987
38,994
144,659
24,863
130,291
23,302
489,913
233,324
377,228
$1,168,657
1,746,092
1,803,486
571,697
455,722
993,484
289,544
1,175,662
155,764
2,231,015
372,724
718,496
1929
1930
1930
1931
2,100
270
323
21,620
420
3,795
1,795
17,921
13,223
10,624
0.6
2.7
0.9
15.0
1.7
2.9
6.3
3.6
5.7
1
2.8
7,844
2,507
7,516
41,355
1,496
20,911
5,804
32,919
17,851
22,344
0.4
0.4
1.6
4.2
0.5
1.8
3.7
1.5
4.8
3.1
1931
1932
1932
1933
1934
1935
1933	
1934
908
1,573
3,555
2,611
281
170,492
13.087
321
1,669
100
1,612
19
11,449
2,438
201
9
123
3
515
367
109
120
691
20
2,049
2,747
1935
1936
1936
1937
1937
1938
1939
1938
1939
675
1940                          	
	
1
8,359    1      2.2
1940
1
!
!
TABLE No. 34.—DAMAGE CAUSED BY FOREST FIRES.
Year.
Merchantable Timber.
Net Area killed.
Standing
Timber
Total Loss.
Salvable Volume
Timber killed.
Net Stumpage
Loss.
Immature Timber.
Net Area killed.
Present Value.
Not satisfactorily stocked.
Logged unburned.
Logged and burned.
Burned, not logged.
Damage.
Non-commercial Cover.
Area burned.
Damage.
Grazing and Pasture Land.
Area burned.
Damage.
Non-productive Land.
Area burned.
Damage.
Cut-over Land, Unmerchantable Timber,
Old Burn not restocking.
Area burned.
Quantity
killed.
Damage.
Area.
Grand Totals.
Quantity.
Damage.
Year.
Acres.
Per
M.B.M.
M.B.M.
Per
Cent.
Dollars.
Per
Cent.
Acres.
Per
Cent.
Dollars.
Per
Cent.
Acres.
Per
Cent.
Acres.
Per
Cent.
Acres.
Per
Cent.
Dollars.
Per
Cent.
Acres.
Per
Cent.
Dollars.
Per
Cent.
Acres.
Per
Cent.
Dollars.
Per
Cent.
Acres.
Per
Cent.
Dollars.
Per
Cent.
Acres.
Per
Cent.
M.B.M.
Dollars.
Per
Cent.
Acres.
Per
Cent.
Acres.
Per
Cent.
Dollars.
Per
Cent.
1910
1911-
1912
1913..
1914
1915
1916
1917-
1918
1919
1920
1921 .
1922 .
1923-
1924 ..
1925...
1926 ..
1927-
1928
1929 -
1930.
1931.
1932 .
1933 _
1934
1935 .
1936 ..
1937 .
1938 ..
1939 .
1940 -.
5,835
42,549
30,310
15,304
28,026
10,700
59,746
50,290
29,993
174,988
25,941
28,454
140,379
62,554
11,925
2,926
100,961
112,310
178,395
41,388
35,253
124,314
1,778
103,427
2,647
92,385
6,789
48,708
56.7
12.0
12.4
9.0
11.8
6.8
13.8
12.9
20.6
11.2
16.5
7.1
13.7
9.5
11.7
2.7
11.1
18.6
17.9
9.8
11.7
19.5
3.8
23.7
4.8
13.0
3.5
130,650
3,570
200,000
3,845
102,804
144,220
47,653
218,873
19,103
285,955
175,565
28,523
611,935
49,380
103,421
673,738
279,449
41,342
15,009
164,975
365,762
168,365
254,260
101,889
637,767
11,754
942,450
12,698
647,014
25,975
10.0 j 200,975
1	
43,030
2,757
48,133
22,387
93,559
49,575
39,553
117,006
37,891
102,832
350,770
109,385
44,834
9,060
107,049
25,216
41,808
15,057
21,926
179,358
14,359
38,987
565
400,527
6,154
37,092
23.0
5.5
18.0
54.0
24.6
22.0
58.1
16.0
43.4
49.9
34.2
28.1
52.0
37.6
39.4
6.4
19.9
5.6
17.7
21.9
55.0
4.0
4.3
38.2
19.2
14.7
3,960
52,852
88,043
47,333
103,219
28,771
262,350
294,873
73,011
955,772
41,102
179,502
1,223,197
443,009
77,499
18,578
284,571
506,380
624,020
233,314
125,276
458,501
8,635
929,039
12,275
819,389
27,434
184,879
90.3
73.3
80.9
96.7
79.9
43.3
66.7
60.6
75.0
62.4
55.4
27.0
57.7
47.6
54.9
18.0
30.2
36.0
42.3
45.4
40.6
51.6
12.6
83.8
33.8
52.7
14.1
38.0
1,900
58,402
13,317
11,278
16,226
11,989
40,978
55,662
8,912
210,474
12,807
106,019
251,897
198,224
19,532
28,836
229,309
147,641
238,652
80,729
55,876
137,926
11,109
65,345
4,640
113,930
33,935
53,582
18.6
16.4
5.5
7.0
6.8
7.6
9.4
14.3
6.1
13.4
8.1
26.4
24.6
30.0
19.2
27.0
25.2
24.5
24.0
19.2
18.5
21.6
23.2
14.9
8.5
16.0
17.5
10.9
427
18,355
20,504
219
17,743
35,675
122,787
184,859
18,262
569,303
32,401
285,693
634,514
321,960
34,134
60,358
491,043
763,438
730,207
225,049
135,099
390,037
55,664
152,377
13,135
522,065
96,454
153,353
9.7
25.5
18.8
0.5
13.7
53.7
31.2
38.0
18.8
37.2
43.6
43.0
29.9
34.6
24.2
58.6
52.2
54.2
49.4
43.7
43.7
43.9
81.4
13.7
36.1
33.6
49.6
31.5
103,700
23,762
26,705
57,152
29,232
9,493
18,092
15,161
15,909
56,996
26,325
13,254
15,834
12,233
5,312
3,868
41,040
6,313
61,732
6.6
15.1
6.6
5.6
4.4
9.3
16.9
1.7
2,6
5.7
6.3
4.4
2.5
25.5
1.2
7.0
5.8
3.3
12.6
1,961
76,514
8,605
10,397
3.6
10.8
4.4
2.1
18,524
114,029
26,524
44,182
33.8
16.0
13.7
9.0
2,192
107,805
21,071
37,650
6.0
6.9
10.8
7.7
16,463
162,692
93,708
156,872
30.0
22.8
48.5
32.0
7,649
70,023
42,176
61,893
21.0
4.5
21.6
12.7
55,720
52,316
23,661
33,647
15,039
39,858
39,707
38,012
245,951
9,298
30,206
51,789
43,694
2,284
9,984
32,536
37,715
89,243
19,597
4,426
10,824
1,203
8,176
4,232
40,878
3,249
12,110
15.7
21.4
15.0
14.2
9.6
9.2
10.2
26.0
15.7
5.9
7.5
5.1
6.6
2.2
9.3
3,6
6.3
9.0
4.6
1.5
1.7
2.5
1.9
7.7
5.7
1.7
2.5
326
1,361
7,943
427
1,755
1,189
5,329
5,015
535
1,531
2,675
2,321
115
495
1,788
972
5,851
1,129
177
457
47
450
171
2,021
169
593
0.3
2.8
6.2
0.6
0.5
0.3
5.5
0.3
0.7
0.2
0.1
0.3
0.1
0.5
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.0
0,5
0.1
0.0
0.1
2,508
70,350
8,924
74,151
4.6
9.9
4.6
15.1
962
34,546
3,790
32.698
2.6
2.2
1.9
2,535
198,453
148,246
111,045
159,390
119,527
293,214
244,187
68,921
833,472
85,793
210,830
522,572
326,167
58,710
47,139
531,653
289,100
431,693
253,258
192,677
349,792
21,548
254,883
5,421t
28,269t
24.7
55.9
60.7
69.0
67.2
76.0
67.6
62.6
47.3
53.1
54.4
52.4
51.0
49.5
57.6
44.1
58.4
48.0
43.4
60.1
63.9
54.7
45.0
58.3
2.8
5.8
13,507
659
180
1,565
4,113
400
1,000
100
1,398
33,194
9,860
16,626f
51,537t
850
220
1,605
6,290
5,042
730
1,210
200
198,352
261,286
163,083
29,354
23,570
164,336
137,393
117,103
55,172
48,412
39,612
4,053
27,607
3,924f
15,511f
1.2
0.2
2.4
1.6
1.1
0.7
0.1
0.3
29.8
12.3
17.5
20.8
22.9
17.4
9.7
7.9
10.7
15.6.
4.4
5.9
2.5
2.0
3.2
218,388
Not given
160,000
10,270
355,124
244,189
161,288
237,289
157,255
433,796
389,846
145,838
1,568,585
157,601
402,214
1,023,789
659,871
101,944
106,977
909,620
602,675
994,979
421,297
301,486
638,690
47,871
437,143
54,843
711,818
193,468
490,003
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
130,650
3,570
200,000
3,845
118,602*
144,879
47,653
219,053
19,103
287,520
179,678
28,923
612,935
49,480
104,819
706,932
289,309
41,342
15,009
164,975
365,762
168,365
254,260
101,889
637,767
11,754
942,450
12,698
647,014
48,755
252,512
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
193,976
Not given
200,000
4,387
72,057
108,873
48,913
129,125
66,478
393,182
485,963
97,332
1,531,300
74,238
665,078
2,121,672
930,373
141,102
103,001
941,738
1,408,183
1,477,181
514,664
308,964
888,607
68,399
1,109,473
36,384
1,555,849
195,018
486,577
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
, 100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
* Includes 2,291 M.B.M. immature timber.
t Inaccessible timber. FOREST BRANCH REPORT, 1940.
F 97
TABLE No. 35.—A COMPARISON OF THE DAMAGE CAUSED BY FOREST FIRES.
Year.
Total
Number
of
Fires.
Area
burned.
Standing
Timber
killed.
Amount
killed and
salvable.
Damage to
Forests.
Damage
to other
Forms of
Property.
Total
Damage.
1910                                         	
1,184
331
347
578
1,832
1,031
864
986
910
1,141
1,251
1,«80
2,591
1,530
2,174
2,521
2,147
1,284
1,642
2,188
2,271
2,518
1,266
1,0'82
1,590
1,111
1,547
1,193
2,412   .
1,704
2,338
Acres.
218,388
M.F.B.M.
130,650
3,570
200,000
3,845
118,602
144,879
47,653
219,053
19,103
287,520-
179,678
28,923
612,935
49,480
104,819
706,932
289,309
41,342
15,009
164,975
365,762
168,365
254,260
101,889
637,767
11,754
942,450
12,698
647,014
48,755
252,512
M.F.B.M.
$193,976
200,000
4,387
72,057
108,873
48,913
129,125
66,478
393,182
485,963
97,332
1,531,30,0
74,238
665,078
2,121,672
930,373
141,102
103,001
941,738
1,408,183
1,477,181
514.664
308,964
888,607
68,399
1,109,473
36,384
1,555,849
195,018
486,577
$435,939
47,00'0
113,273
13,967
364,475
57,774
26,962
162,333
200,335
345,787
473,900
195,221
693,016
617,649
540,291
625,518
749,891
74,60«
95,534
226,919
337,909
326,305
57,030
146,758
104,877
221,144
66,189
119,380
675,166
177,706
231,919
$629,915
1911	
-
1912                                         	
160,000
10,270
355,124
244,189
161,288
237,289
157,255
433,796
389,846
145,838
1,568,585
157,601
402,214
1,023,789
659.871
101,944
106,977
909,620
602,675
994,979
421,297
301,486
638,690
47,871
437,143
54,843
711,818
193,468
490,003
313,273
18,354
1913                         .           	
1914                         	
436,532
1915     " 	
1916	
43,030
2,757
48,133
22,387
93,559
49,575
39,553
117,006
37,891
102,832
350,770
109,385
44,834
9,060
107,049
25,216
41,808
15,057
21,926
179,358
14,359
38,987
565
400,527
6,154
37,092
166,647
75,875
1917
291,457
226.265
738,970
1918 : 	
1919
1920    ..           —	
959,863
1921                           	
1922                                        	
2,224,316
691,887
1,205,369
2,747,190
1,680,264
215,708
198 535
1923  - --  -—
1924 -.            	
1925   	
1926. -	
1927                   ..—	
1928  	
1929                     	
1,168,657
1,746,092
1,803,486
571,694
455,722
993,484
289,543
1,175,662
155,764
2,231,015
1930...... 	
1931         '  	
1932 	
1933  	
1934 	
1935                      	
1936                                     	
1937  	
1938  	
1939                  	
372,724
718,496
1940 ...._  	 F 98
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
TABLE No. 36.—DAMAGE TO PROPERTY OTHER THAN FORESTS.
Year.
Forest Products
in Process of
Manufacture.
Build
ings.
Railway Logging
Equipment.
Miscellaneous.
Total.
1913  ■
$12,084
201,733
10,546
2,980
79,162
41,190
28,993
190,311
37,113
232,783
98,124
161,639
138,310
117,181
20',756
48,663
76,703
144,647
91,661
33,067
79,653
38,154
72,036
7,373
59,003
414,773
43,541
57,848
Per Cent.
86.5
55.3
18.2
11.1
48.8
22.2
8.4
40.1
19.1
33.6
16.0
29.9
22.1
15.6
27.8
51.0
33.8
42.8
28.0
58.0
54.3
36.4
32.6
11.2
49.4
61.4
24.5
24.9
$1,560
137,595
29,740
18,396
60,063
24,403
141,414
41,190
79,255
127,587
135,995
195,190
228,371
243,215
6,710
6,702
81,687
10.6,704
74,595
9,635
10,275
23,680'
15,145
17,405
25,202
88,811
19,450
75,762
Per Cent.
11.2
37.8
51.5
68.2
36.9
13.1
40.9
8.7
40.6
18.4
22.0
36.1
36.5
32.5
9.0
7.0
36.0
31.6
22.9
16.9
7.0
22.6
6.8
26.2
21.1
13.2
10'. 9
32.7
$225
11,070
12,825
3,808
14,710
92,850
80,005
186,952
74,405
217,270
185,565
143,072
185,450
321,762
38,893
36,988
48,229
80,276
104,621
8,279
51,824
33,950
129,138
34,987
31,310
145,899
111,150
52,175
Per Cent.
1.6
3.0
22.2
14.1
9.1
50.0
23.1
39.5
38.0
31,3
30.0
26.5
29.7
42.9
52.1
38.7
21.2
23.8
32.1
14.5
35.3
32.4
58,4
52.9
26.3
21.6
62.5
22.5
$98
14,077
4,663
1,778
8,399
27,302
95,375
55,447
4,448
115,376
197,965
40,390
73,387
67,733
8,247
3,181
20.300
6,282
55,428
6,049
5,006
9,093
4,825
6,424
3,865
25,683
3,565
46,134
Per Cent.
0.7
3.9
8.1
6.6
5.2
14.7
27.6
11.7
2.3
16.7
32.0
7.5
11.7
9.1
11.1
3.3
9.0
1.8
17.0
10.6
3.4
8.6
2.2
9.7
3.2
3.8
2.1
19.9
$13,967
364,475
57,774
26,962
162,334
185,745
345,787
1914	
1915  	
1916    	
1917    	
1918    	
1919    	
1920	
1921    	
473,900
195,221
693,016
617,649
540,291
1922	
1923       	
1924	
1925      .     .
1926	
749,891
74,606
95,534*
226,919t
337,909$
326,305
1927....	
1928      -     ..
1929
1930     	
1931      	
1932
57,030
146,758
1933     ...    .
1934	
104,877
1935     	
221.144
1936	
66,189
1937      	
119,380
1938 :.
1939	
1940	
675,166
177,706
231,919
* Dominion Railway Belt, $17,952 additional.
t Dominion Railway Belt, $30,173 additional.
t Dominion Railway Belt, $105,130' additional. TABLE No. 37.—BURNING PERMITS.
F 99
Clearing Agricultural Land.
Clearing Logging-slash.
Clearing
Railway
Right-of-way.
Clearing Public Roads.
Grand Totals.
Year.
Permits issued.
Area burned over.
Fires escaped
Control.
Fires set without
Permit.
Permits issued.
Area burned over.
Fires escaped
Control.
Fires set without
Permit.
Permits issued.
Area burned over.
Fires escaped
Control.
Fires set without
Permit.
Permits issued.
Area burned over.
Fires escaped
Control.
Fires set without
Permit.
Permits issued.
Area burned over.
Fires escaped
Control.
Fires set without
Permit.
Year.
No.
PerCent.
Acres.
PerCent.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
Per Cent.
Acres.
PerCent.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
PerCent.
No.
PerCent.
Acres.
PerCent.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
PerCent.
No.
PerCent.
Acres.
PerCent.
No.
PerCent.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
PerCent.
Acres.
Per Cent.
No.
PerCent.
No.
PerCent.
1913  -	
1914	
1915  	
1916                	
11,255
10,307
9,149
6,901
3,959
3,079
4,214
6,030
12,181
11,621
10,983
8,402
8,858
7,142
8,916
8,598
8,400
8,016
9,906
11,247
11,507
8,820
10,450
8,801
8,059
7,877
7,858
6,723
94.4
89.4
96.4
95.1
96.2
95.2
92.5
88.9
95.7
95.9
95.0
96.0
94.9
94.8
95.4
88.9
93.0
92.6
85.4
96.6
96.5
96.2
96.3
95.4
92.8
92.9
90.5    |
90.5    |
1
16,384
40,004
44,467
20,344
19,001
10,080
18,807
29,926
48,770
43,222
35,028
20,975
19,166
15,014
17,887
20,019
22,235
23,145
26,503
52.7
75.6
84.7
81.9
87.6
76.3
64.3
56.0
65.3
72.7
72.3
72.2
49.5
55.1
51.3
58.0
63.5
71.6
76.2
78
50
51
12
3
12
37
31
134
71
98
89
67
35
71
46
67
69
53
45
28
51
27
77
61.9
91.0
100.0
80.0
75.1
44.5
71.2
52.5
82.2
81.6
87.5
83.9
85.9
79.6
69.6
57.5
75.3
68.3
78.0
76.3
63.6
82.3
55.1
79.4
57
58
61
71
13
17
33
62
134
41
41
71.3
87.9
93.9
94.7
92.9
81.0
86.8
61.4
93.0
83.7
85.4
157
391
127
150
110
107
227
626
324
289
274
213
276
211
232
682
254
258
1,404
83
109
78
141
176
305
350
440    J
495    |
1.3
3.4
1.3
2.1
2.7
3.3
5.0
9.2
2.5
2.4
2.4
2.4
3.0
2.8
2.5
7.0
2.8
3.0
12.1
0.7
0.9
0.9
1.3    |
1.9
3.5    |
4.1    j
5.1    j
6.7    |
|
7,655
5,727
7,291
2,332
2,368
2,903
8,194
21,407
15,683
11,897
7,786
3,785
17,679
9,719
14,075
13,186
11,225
4,084
6,315
13,974
1,218
2,702
4,517
4,235
21,389
22,089
29,051
21,685
24.6
10.8
13.9
9.4
10.9
22.0
28.0
40.1
21.1
20.0
16.1
13.0
45.6
35.8
40.4
38.2
32.0
12.6
18.2
35.8
4.6
10.3
13.5
16.0
46.7
41.8
54.0
60.7
2
1
2
1
9
10
2
6
6
4
6
3
2
17
17
4
1
2
2
5
1
1
2
1
2
3
1.6
1.8
13.3
25.0
33.3
19.2
3.4
3.7
6.9
3.6
5.7
3.8
4.5
16.7
21.3
4.5
1.0
2.9
3.4
11.4
1.6
2.0
2.1
1.2
2.7
7.3
3
1
4
1
3
5
32
2
4
2
1
1
5
1
3
1
2
1
3
2
1
1
4.5
1.5
5.3
7.1
14.3
13.2
31.7
1.4
8.1
3.4
3.1
4.2
13.2
7.7
5.8
2.0
3.9
4.2
13.6
43
3.0
7.7
458
716
124
93
23
27
89
59
118
125
141
49
94
60
101
150
79
105
77
90
93
89
103
88
93
101
109
94
3.8
6.2
1.3
1.3
0.5
0.8
1.9
0.9
0.9
1.0
1.2
0.6
1.0
0.8
1.1
1.6
0.9
1.2
0.7
0.8
0.8
1.0    |
1.0    j
1.0
1.0    |
1.2
1.3    |
,2 !
!
6,813
7,204
717
2,157
98
184
1,889
1,372
8,530
3,726
4,619
3,556
1,578
2,008
2,008
342
101
266
337
149
967
5,972
5,871
5,396    |
357    |
5,528    |
628    |
982    |
!
21.9
13.6
1.4
8.7
0.5
1.4
6.5
2.6
11.4
6.3
9.5
12.3
4.1
7.3
5.8
1.0
0.3
0.8
1.0
0.4
3.6
22.8
17.6
20.5
0.8
10.5
1.2
2.8
44
2
5
2
19
9
4
2
5
6
2
9
8
4
15
31.3
3.6
18.5
3.8
32.2
5.5
4.6
1.8
4.7
7.7
4.5
8.8
10.0
4.5
14.9
22
1
1
1
5
2
3
3
3
1
1
3
2
27.5
1.5
1.5
4.7
4.9
4.1
6.3
5.1
9.4
7.7
2.0
5.9
9.1
55
109
115
112
23
20
28
67
107
85
156
84
103
119
97
237
295
282
210
223
212
176
155
153
224
154
265
117
0.5
1.0
1.2
1.5
0.5
0.6
0.6
1.0
0.8
0.7
1.4
1.0
1.1
1.6
1.0
2.5
3.3
3.2
1.8
1.9
1.8
1.9
1.4
1.7
2.6
1.8
3.1    |
1.6    |
1
250
*
*
*
227
37
340
720
1,713
551
998
722
310
491
887
952
1,465
4,833
1,592
2,033
943
2,056
2,719
568
1,266
1,978
873
157
0.8
*
*
*
1.0
0.3
1.2
1.3
2.3
0.9
2.1
2.5
0.8
1.8
2.5
2.8
4.2
15.0
4.6
5.2
3.6
7.8
8.2
2.2
2.7
3.7
1.6
0.4
4
2
1
1
3
7
14
6
8
6
2
5
5
9
14
16
13
3.1
3.6
6.0
3.7
5.8
11.9
8.6
6.9
7.1
5.7
2.6
11.4
4.9
11.2
15.7
15.8
19.1
1
4
2
2
8
2
4
3
2
2
1
4
1
1
3
1
1
1.2
6.1
3.1
2.0
5.6
4.1
8.3
5.1
6.2
8.3
2.6
7.7
2.0
4.8
5.9
4.6
3.0
11,925
11,523
9,515
7,256
4,115
3,233
4,558
6,782
12,730
12,120
11,554
8,748
9,331
7,532
9,346
9,667
9,028
8,661
11,597
11,643
11,921
9,163
10,849
9,218
8,681
8,482
8,672
7,429
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0    |
31,102
52,925
52,475
24,833
21,704
13,204
29,230
53,425
74,696
59,396
48,431
29,038
38,733
27,232
34,857
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
128
55
51
15
4
27
52
59
163
87
112
106
78
44
102
80
89
101
68
59
44
62
49
97
85
75
41
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
■1
100.0    |
1
80
66
65
75
14
21
38
101
144
49
48
59
32
24
38
13
52
51
21
9
51
24
22    ]
47
33
14    j
13    |
1
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917     	
1917
1918     —	
1918
1919	
1919
1920     	
1920
1921     	
1921
1922
1922
1923           	
1923
1924                           -
1924
1925           	
51
86.4
1925
1926    	
26    |      81.3
21    |      87.5
32    |      84.2
11     |      84.6
45    1      86.5
48    |      94.0
20    |      95.2
9    |    100.0
43    |      84.3
23     1       95.8
1926
1927     	
1927
1928	
1929       	
34,499
35,026
100.0
100.0
1928
1929
1930               	
I
32,328    |    100.0
34,747    |    100.0
39,030    |    100.0
26,533    [    100.0
26,235    |    100.0
33,387    |    100.0
26,372    j    100.0
45,823    |    100.0
52,868    |    100.0
53,792    |    100.0
35,711    1    100.0
1930
1931       	
1931
1932      - -	
22,874
58.6
1932
1933                      . .      	
23,405
15,505
20,280
16,173
22,811
23,273
23,240
12,887
88.2
59.1
60.7
61.3
49.8
44.0
43.2
36.1
7
6
6
12
11
11
11.8
13.6
9.7
24.5
11.3
12.9
5    |        8.5
5    j      11.4
4    |        6.4
9    |      18.4
7    j        7.2
3 |        3.5
4 |        5.3
2    !        4.9
1933
1934                  - -	
1934
1935        -
1935
1936...  	
1937         -
16
45
72.7
95.7
1936
1937
1938                	
70
82.4
31
14    |
12    |
94.0
100.0
92.3
1938
1939    - _
61    |      81.3
I
24     1        82. P,
8    |      10.7
1                  1
2    1        4.9    I
1939
1940                  	
1940
1
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1
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1
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B X
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ll VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941.
1,325-441-9913

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