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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1942

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNEAL EEPOET
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR   THE
YEAR EHDED DECEMBER 31ST
1940
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed hy Ciiaici.ks F. Banfiei.d, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941.  To His Honour Eric W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1940 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
July 15th, 191,1. The Honourable George S. Pearson, ,       ),
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twenty-third Annual Report on the work
of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1940.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., July 15th, 19U- SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Deputy Minister        7
Statistics of Trades and Industries       8
Pay-roll  -.-       8
Comparison of Pay-rolls        9
Industrial Divisions         9
Average Weekly Wage by Industries     10
Racial Origin and Nationality     16
Statistical Tables      17
Summary of all Tables      30
" Hours of Work Act"      31
Average Weekly Hours      32
Hours of Work Regulations      73
Labour Legislation      33
" Weekly Half-holiday Act "  (amendment)      33
"Apprenticeship Act"  (amendment)       33
" Coal-mines Regulation Act " (amendment)      33
Board of Industrial Relations     34
Meetings and Deputations      34
New and amending Orders      34
Statistics covering Women and Girls      36
Summary of all Occupations      41
Single, Married, and Widowed Employees      43
Inspections and Collections     44
Court Cases      44
Comparative Wages      49
Special Licences      50
Summary of Orders     52
List of Orders in effect     69
List of Orders cancelled      70
Hours of Work Regulations      73
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act"      78
Number of Disputes and Employees affected      78
Strikes      79
Boards of Arbitration      88
Organizations of Employees   163
Organizations of Employers   172
Inspection of Factories   174
Inspections   174
Accident-prevention   174
Safeguarding the Workers' Health  174
Employees' Welfare   175
Elevators     175
Prosecutions   176
Employment Service     177
Youth Training Plan   178
Handicap Sections   178
Importation of Labour   178
Placement Tables   179 E 6 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Page.
Unemployment Relief   180
Registration    180
Assistance to Settlers Plan   180
Youth Training   180
Statement of Relief, 1940   181
Apprenticeship Branch   187
Contracts in Force   188
" Trade-schools Regulation Act "   189
Safety Branch  (Lumber Industry)    190
Safety Hats  190
Pacific Logging Congress    191
Accident Reduction in some Camps   192 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1940.
The twenty-third Annual Report of the Department of Labour portrays the year 1940
as a period of increased industrial activity and shows the second highest pay-roll recorded
in the history of the Department, being only slightly below the peak year of 1929 and an
advance of $22,642,306 over 1939.
Tables relating to two industrial groups show a decreased pay-roll, these being Coast
shipping and cigar and tobacco manufacture.
Employment increased during 1940 and for the latter half of that year exceeded all
previous departmental records, while the average weekly wage of all industrial workers
increased to $28.11, an advance of $1.31 over the preceding year.
The activities of the several branches of the Department as reported in this issue show
continued improvement, and with increased responsibilities due to war work the various
staffs have had additional duties to perform.
The importance of our Province as a source of war supplies has been increasingly
accentuated with the progress of the war, and during the year under review industry has
been geared with steadily accelerated tempo to the demands placed upon it. As the conflict
deepens these demands continue to expand and must be resolutely met by every unit of our
production system.
Bespeaking the 'continued co-operation of all, the Department of Labour dedicates itself
to the encouragement of this aim and to the fulfilment of its part in this achievement.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
The statistical section shows increased activity during 1940; firms reporting numbered
4,971, an increase of 142 over 1939, while the total pay-roll shows a gain of $22,642,306 and
has now reached the highest total since the peak year of 1929.
Average weekly wages increased in twenty-two of the twenty-five tables. The average
for all tables increased $1.31 per week.
As forecast in our 1939 report, Coast shipping shows a loss in total pay-roll due to the
uncertain movements of ships.
The continuation of the war will increase activity in various groups, such as ship-building
and metal trades, while in the construction industry, because of building restrictions, the
increase may not be as great as during 1940, but we fully expect that the 1941 total pay-roll
will exceed the highest figure yet reported.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 4,971.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 4,971, as
compared with 4,829 in 1939, an increase of 142.
PAY-ROLL.
A summary of the pay-rolls of the 4,971 firms reporting shows a total of $143,835,563.
As this total represents only the industrial pay-rolls, it should not, however, be considered as
the total pay-roll of the Province, and must be further augmented by the following, yielding
an accumulative total of $188,325,766, an increase of $22,642,306 over 1939.
Pay-rolls of 4,971 firms making returns to Department of Labour   $143,835,563
Returns received too late to be included in above summary _  616,063
Employees  in  occupations  included  in  Department's inquiry not sending in  returns
(estimated pay-roll) _  ._ _ _         1,300,000
Transcontinental  railways   (ascertained  pay-roll) _ _       12,575,140
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey; viz.. Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, delivery, auto transportation, ocean
services,  miscellaneous—(estimated pay-roll) ._       30,000,000
Total _  $188,325,766 E 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS.
The total Provincial pay-rolls since 1928 are as follows:—
1928  _ _ _  $183,097,781.00
1929..  192,092,249.00
1930...  167,133,813.00
1931   - _  131,941,00-8.00
1932. __ _  102,957,074.00
1933- -   99,126,653.00
1934. - - -  113,567,953.00
1935-
1936..
1937-
1938.
1939.
1940..
$125,812,140.00
142,349,591.00
162,654,234.00
158,026,375.00
165,683,460.00
188,325,766.00
Continuing to increase with the total pay-roll and rising employment figures, the percentage of the total payable to wage-earners increased from 77.32 per cent, in 1939 to 78.63
per cent, in 1940, as evidenced in the following table:—
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
Per Cent.
10.54
11.70
77.76
Per Cent.
10.00
11.33
78.67
Per Cent.
10.82
12.08
77.1fl|
Per Cent.
10.82
11.86
77.32
Per Cent.
10.22
11.15
Wage-earners.  	
78.63
Totals	
100.oo
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
Increases are shown in all but two of the twenty-five tables. The lumber industries again
headed the list, showing an increase of $4,581,757, followed by ship-building with an increase
of $2,461,896 and contracting with $1,731,252; metal trades increased by $1,502,857; pulp and
paper mills with an addition of $1,489,776; wood (N.E.S.) up $1,168,109; miscellaneous
trades, an increase of $1,007,615; food products, an additional $979,116; metal-mining up
$949,609; explosives and chemicals, $756,921; house-furnishings, $330,800; oil-refining,
$264,778; smelting, $217,512; coal-mining, $123,517; breweries, $115,890; public utilities,
$114,420; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, $102,063; garment-making, $100,543; leather and
fur goods, $69,720; builders' materials, $67,567; jewellery-manufacture, $27,461; paint-
manufacture, $13,129;   printing and publishing, $2,005.
The two industries in which decreases were apparent include Coast shipping, down
3,050, and cigar and tobacco manufacturing with a decrease of $723.
Industry.
1938.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll
1939.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries-   — -	
Builders' materials - - —
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing-
Coal-mining _   - -	
Coast shipping  -  	
Contracting : - - -
Explosives and chemicals - -
Food products - - _	
Garment-making   	
House-furnishing- ——	
Manufacturing jewellery — 	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods -
Lumber industries..—	
Metal trades  -	
Metal-mining —   - 	
Miscellaneous.- — __
Oil-refining .-... 	
Paint-manufacture.. — ..
32
76
3
23
120
955
21
559
70
51
12
100
55
893
766
311
368
49
12
$1,019
1,273,
3,339
8,661
9,183
1,462
10,745,
770
1,068
219
1,469
622
26,591
8,451
12,088
5,293
2,362
346:
004.00
168.00
954.00
,646.00
.563.00
,753.00
,151.00
177.00
,248.00
292.00
970.00
,915.00
.090.00
,371.00
,066.00
397.00
898.00
,192.00
,352.00
30
75
c_
26
124
978
19
586
65
50
10
101
54
832
764
276
345
47
12
1,272,
3,
3,687,
8,871,
8,415,
1,503,
10,972,
817,
1,129,
223,
1,484
628,
28.853,
8,516,
11,691,
5,478
2,317,
358,
155.00
188.00
023.00
824.00
718.00
581.00
227.00
520.00
289.00
779.00
729.00
,280.00
720.00
601.00
710.00
,912.00
,787.00
,360.00
020.00
77
3
24
121
1,014
21
591
68
62
11
102
63
894
818
200
376
51
IS
$1,096
1,339,
2,
3,811
8,218,
10,146
2,260.
11,951,
917,
1,460,
251,
1,586,
698,
33,435,
10,019,
12,641,
6,486,
2,582,
371
,045.00
755.00
300.00
341.00
668.00
833.00
148.00
636.00
832.00
579.00
190.00
343.00
440.00
358.00
567.00
521.00
402.00
138.00
149.00 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 9
Comparison of Pay-rolls—Continued.
1938.
1939.
1940.
Industry.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
133
14
42
5
117
108
$3,516,186.00
4,076,924.00
1,205,838.00
5,934,525.00
10,150,064.00
2,645,353.00
143
14
'    49
6
112
108
$3,767,847.00
4,688,341.00
1,479,215.00
5,624,712.00
10,616,247.00
2,928,238.00
138
13
50
6
115
107
$3,769,852.00
6,178,117.00
3,941,111.00
5,842,224.00
10,730,667.00
4,096,347.00
Totals                  	
4,895
$122,498,097.00
4,829
$126,311,023.00
4.971
$143,835 563.00
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
A segregation of the industrial activities of the Province has been maintained, comprising
three divisions—Greater Vancouver, Vancouver Island, and Rest of Mainland.
During the year 1940, indicating increasing activity in ship-building, contracting, and
manufacturing industries, the percentage representing the Greater Vancouver area increased
from 34.76 per cent, to 35.83 per cent. The Vancouver Island percentage showed a slight drop
from 20.72 per cent, to 20.61 per cent. The Mainland percentage decreased from 44.52 per
cent, to 43.56 per cent.
The percentages quoted are based on the returns received, the figures contained in the
following table being obtained through their application to the total pay-roll:—
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
$48,356,156.00
67,758,405.32
26,235,0-29.62
$53,610,835.53
77,325,822.84
31,717,575.63
$55,530,468.18
69,468,394.45
33,027,512.37
$57,591,570.70
73,762,276.39
34,329,612.91
$67,477,121.96
82,084,703.67
38,813,940.37
Rest of Mainland  	
Totals . 	
$142,349,591.00
$162,654,234.00
$158,026,375.00
$165,683,460.00
$188,325,766.00
The following shows the various industries as represented in the tables, with the total
number of adult males employed for the week of employment of the greatest number, together
with the percentage of those in receipt of less than $19 per week:—
Number
Industry. employed.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing  — - —  5
Leather and fur goods  -    - — -         388
Paint-manufacture   — —	
Food products  -    	
Garment-making   —   _ j	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Metal trades  — —-  , —_	
House-furnishing   — — - _    i	
Coal-mining - __.	
 — —  131
 — —  11,358
   - c  — 223
 ,     . 572
    - -, -       5,312
    j   773
  - -  2,929
  - -  4,587
 _ -  1,215
   1,250
-   __   5,295
 - - -..-  11,765
 - - -  2,927
          1,729
 -  5,042
   512
   -     1,372
Smelting       _ _   2,957
Lumber industries          29,083
Metal-mining      7,807
Ship-building - - - _.   _ 3,214
Pulp and paper manufacturing - - —.—_....   2,819
Jewellery-manufacture     —     63
Miscellaneous trades and industries
Builders' materials   	
Printing and publishing —	
Coast shipping —  	
Contracting    —- -	
Wood  (N.E.S.)   .... -	
Explosives and chemicals	
Street-railways, power, etc.  	
Breweries    — 	
Oil-refining  —  	
Per
Cent.
40.00
36.60
32.82
31.69
28.70
22.20
21.65
21.35
20.79
19.93
19.09
14.80
12.43
10.41
9.84
9.54
9.14
8.98
7.00
5.75
3.33
1.36
1.24
0.64
0.00 E 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
A study of the above figures with comparative data for the previous year continues to
show diminishing percentages in the number employed at less than $19 per week. Decreases
in these percentages are revealed in sixteen of the twenty-five tables, and include the following: Breweries; builders'materials; cigar and tobacco manufacture; contracting; garment-
making; house-furnishing; jewellery-manufacture; laundries, cleaning and dyeing; leather
and fur goods; lumber industries; metal trades; metal-mining; pulp and paper manufacturing;   ship-building;   smelting;   and wood (N.E.S.).
APPRENTICES.
Reflecting an increasing demand for skilled workers, the number of apprentices reported
showed a marked increase during the year 1940. One apprentice was shown as in receipt of
between $40 and $45 per week, this being reported in the jewellery-manufacturing industry.
Fourteen apprentices were reported as receiving between $35 and $40, these being distributed
as follows: Coast shipping, 1; contracting, 6; explosives and chemicals, 1; jewellery-manufacture, 1; printing and publishing, 1; street-railways, power, etc., 4. Twenty-seven were
shown as receiving between $30 and $35 per week, these being segregated as follows: Contracting, 5; explosives and chemicals, 1; metal trades, 3; printing and publishing, 7; pulp
and paper manufacturing, 2;   smelting, 2;   street-railways, power, etc., 6;   wood  (N.E.S.), 1.
Increasing opportunities for apprentices were noted in the following industries:
Breweries, apprentices increased by 3; coal-mining, up 3; Coast shipping, up 6; contracting,
an increase of 58; explosives and chemicals, up 14; food products, a gain of 9; garment-
making, increased 6; house-furnishing, up 4; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, up 29; leather
and fur goods, up 1; lumber industries, up 2; metal trades, increased 28; metal-mining, 37;
miscellaneous trades, 22;   ship-building, 30;   wood (N.E.S.), 10.
Decreases were noted in the following: Builders' materials, decreased 1; paint-manufacture, down 1; printing and publishing, down 1; pulp and paper manufacturing, down 3;
smelting, decreased by 10.
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRIES.
The average weekly wage for adult male employees increased in twenty-one of the
twenty-five tables, showed no change in one, and decreased in the remaining three. As in
previous years, the averages are based on the week of employment of the greatest number,
and while considerable difficulty is experienced with some industries in the matter of broken
time, an endeavour is made to base calculations on a full working-week. Frequency distributions of employees classified on the basis of weekly earnings from $6 to $50 are used for this
purpose, the mid-point of the class limits generally being taken as the rate for each wage
group.
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
$25.70
20.54
14.67
26.80
27.62
23.37
20.66   .
21.12
25.29
18.91
30.55
21.78
20.73
18.00
22.70
25.62
22.13
23.78
22.53
$25.62
20.19
15.86
28.11
28.58
22.56
22.53
21.10
23.52
19.49
28.88
20.67
22.34
21.32
22.81
27.35
21.26
25.04
22.53
$25.79
22.07
16.59
28.49
26.23
22.72
25.34
22.00
21.29
20.05
31.54
21.92
20.06
22.41
23.67
28.65
22.29
25.55
21.53
$25.00
22.28
17.75
28.75
31.61
34.13
23.76
23.16
22.74
21.29
34.39
22.25
20.48
24.83
24.41
29.10
22.07
26.21
21.44
$26.18
22.31
15.50
27.46
31.99
25.61
24.58
23.85
22.97
22.25
34.60
22.89
21.23
26.81
24.77
30.34
23.85
27.92
23.08
$27.42
22.82
13.00
28.20
32.93
25.81
24.20
23.70
23.15
20.80
38.95
23.33
22.23
26.59
25.09
30.48
23.46
28.68
22.78
$27.98
23.23
19.75
29.39
29.35
26.12
25.75
23.23
24.25
22.53
39.23
23.19
21.19
27.14
25.38
30.86
23.91
28.97
22.69
$28.23
|    24.15
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing 	
Coal-mining	
17.70
28.04
!    30.34
1    27.52
'     31.67
!     23.59
|     25.22
House-furnishing.—	
Jewellery, manufacture of 	
23.59
43.44
i     24.00
Manufacturing leather and fur goods-
21.72
j     28.83
!    26.18
|    31.77
Miscellaneous trades and industries
!    24.36
j    29.17
!    23.15
I REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 11
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only)—Continued.
Industry.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
$32.82
21.21
25.25
23.83
24.51
18.05
$32.51
23.22
26.03
23.88
25.51
18.97
$32.31
23.53
25.83
25.82
27.09
18.69
$32.72
24.24
26.38
24.54
27.50
20.32
$33.69
26.75
27.88
25.08
27.20
21.97
$34.19
26.36
28.76
24.80
27.78
22.68
$34.34
26.54
28.55
25.57
28.63
23.22
$34.34
29.84
31.74
Smelting  	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc   —	
Manufacturing of wood (N.E.S.) 	
32.75
28.57
24.88
The increases and decreases in the average weekly rates are as follows:—
Increase.
Breweries   __ 	
Builders' materials
Coast shipping 	
Contracting   	
  $0.25
  _._ -_      .92
 ______ 99
.-      1.40
Explosives and chemicals        5.92
Food products, manufacture of         .36
Garment-making    - 97
House-furnishing             1.06
Jewellery, manufacture of _ _     4.21
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing        .81
Manufacturing leather and fur goods       .53
Lumber industries
Metal trades 	
Metal-mining _.	
Miscellaneous trades and industries..
Oil-refining     __	
Paint-manufacturing    —	
Pulp and paper manufacturing 	
Ship-building  — _	
Smelting  	
Manufacturing of wood   (N.E.S.)-—
Decrease.
$1.69
.80
.91
.45
.20
.46
3.30
3.19
7.18
1.66
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing-
Coal-mining     	
$2.0<5
1.35
Street-railways, gas, water    power, telephones, etc.    	
$0.06
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The average weekly wage for all adult male employees rose to $28.11 in 1940, an increase
of $1.31 over the preceding year, and the highest since 1930. The following shows the
average for each year since the formation of the Department:—
1918	
  S27.97
1919          29.11
1920 	
     31.51
1921	
-   -                             27.62
1922 	
 -     27.29
1923	
            ..        28.05
1924 	
         28.39
1925 -	
         27.82
1926 	
          27.99
1927   - - -.
         28.29
1928  	
             28.96
1929  „ 	
      29.20
1930..
1931..
1932..
1933-
1934..
1935..
1936.
1937..
1938..
1939..
1940.
$28.64
26.17
23.62
22.30
23.57
24.09
26.36
26.64
26.70
26.80
28.11 E  12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The above weekly wage-rates appear in the following chart, showing the trend of average
weekly wages for adult male woi-kers from 1918 to 1940.
AVERAGE  WEEKLY WAGES PAID TO ADULT
1918—1940
MALE
EMPLOYEES
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WA6ES
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
32.00
31 OO
30.00
29.00
28. OO
27.00
26.OO
25.00
24. OO
23.OO
22 OO
A
\
/
\
\
/
/
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V REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E  13 E  14
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
308
255!
20?.
15*
IOJ,
5%
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
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25 to    30  19
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BS555fiB'cftft'3Sc E 16 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
RACIAL ORIGIN AND NATIONALITY OF EMPLOYEES.
Of the total 132,864 employees reported under a question dealing with racial origin and
nationality, 100,139 or 75.37 per cent, were originally from English-speaking countries;
20,058 or 15.10 per cent, originally from Continental Europe; 10,227 or 7.70 per cent, from
Asiatic stock;  and 2,440 or 1.83 per cent, from other countries, or racial origin not stated.
1940.
Racial Origin. Per Cent.
English-speaking countries            75.37
Continental Europe         ___     15.10
Asiatic       _ _ _ -    .      7.70
From other countries, or not specified  _   —       1.83
Total _ — —   100.00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
During 1940 the number of pay-rolls of over $100,000 increased to a total of 265 as
against 236 for 1939.
Pay-rolls of public authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or municipal), as in previous years,
are not included, nor are wholesale and retail firms, trans-continental railways, or vessels
engaged in deep-sea transportation.
The lumber industry continued to lead with 79 firms, an increase of 5; followed by food
products with 27, unchanged; metal-mining, 25, an increase of 3; general contracting, 21,
up 4; miscellaneous metal trades, 16, an increase of 6; Coast shipping, 14, up 1; miscellaneous trades and industries, 12, up 6; public utilities, 9, up 2; wood (N.E.S.), 9, an increase
of 3; oil-refining, 8, unchanged; coal-mining, 7, down 1; pulp and paper, 7, unchanged;
printing and publishing, 6, no change; ship-building, 5, unchanged; breweries, builders'
materials, house-furnishings, laundries, 3 each; explosives and chemicals, smelting, 2 each;
garment-making, jewellery-manufacture, leather and fur goods, paint-manufacture, 1 each,
all unchanged from previous year.
Of the 265 firms reported above, two had a pay-roll in excess of $4,000,000, five between
$2,000,000 and $4,000,000, and eleven between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 17
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading :—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc. -—Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lin.e, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mvrting.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting. — Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing a>.d heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railwray-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc. — Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of— This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing. — lnoXwdus these industries only.
No. 13. heather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.—Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways,planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, macbine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.— Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries. — Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers ; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.—Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No.  21.   Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises   only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting.— Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.— This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasoline lighting and heating devices, and supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering S3 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $246,921.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    198,398.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      650,726.00
Total .
.81,096,045.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
455
455
462
455
478
495
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February ....
March	
April	
May	
June	
55
58
60
63
59
63
July	
August	
September .
November ..
December...
615
505
468
455
449
473
62
68
54
66
62
58
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
8 00 to     8.99...
1
1
9.00 to     9.99...
2
1
17
4
6
1
13
14
20
9
53
9
14
20
11
14
23
35
185
41
12
3
3
3
10.00 to   10.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
6
3
4
5
2
1
IS
2
28
12
2
3
1
1
13.00 to   13.99...
14 00 to   14.99...
3
15.00 to   15.99...
16 OH to   16.99. ..
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
22 00 to   22.99.
23 00 to   23.99...
24 00 to   24.99.
25.00 to   25.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99.
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99.
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over . ..
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland , ...
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch    .
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian^ ...
Negro	
Others not shown above   ...
Males.
British
Subject.
137
3
4
2
19
16
Females.
British
Subject.     Alien.
57
6
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	 E 18                                             DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 77 Firms.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 3 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       119,336.00
Salary and Wage Pay
Officers, Superintendents, and Manag
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc
Wage-earners (including piece-worke
ments, 1940.
ers.	
$360.00
255.00
1,685.00
6                               V                           c,   I                                          /
Total 	
...$1,339,755.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males
Females.
Month.
Males.    Females.
Month.
Males
4
4
4
4
4
4
.    Females.
Month.
Males.   Females.
January	
February   ...
March	
April	
May	
June	
714
764
885
980
971
940
8
9
8
9
9
9
July	
August.  ..
September .
October	
November..
December...
959
956
884
912
899
876
9
11
11
10
9
10
January....
February...
March	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
4
4
4
4
5
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
1
Under «fi 00.
86.00 to   $6
7.00 to     7
8.00 to     8
9.00 to     9
10.00 to   10
11.00 to   11
12.00 to   12
13.00 to   13
14.00 to   14
15.00 to   15
16.00 to   16
17.00 to   17
18.00 to   18
19.00 to   19
1
4
4
99
8.00 to     8.99...
99..
99.
1
1
1
3
2
11
2
6
8
29
80
47
38
158
73
113
90
36
105
37
56
20
48
25
110
57
30
20
5
1
99
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   16.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.9'J...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
99.
99..
3
5
1
1
1
4
99..
1
1
99..
99
1
99..
99..
1
2
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99...
1
1
1
22.00 to   22
23.00 to   23
24.00 to   24
25.00 to   25
26.00 to   26
27.00 to   27
28.00 to   28
29.00 to   29
30.00 to   34
35.00 to   39
40.00 to   44
45 00 to   49
99
99..
99..
1
99
99..
99..
2
99
99
99  .
99
99
50.00 and over ..
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
Males.
Females.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British :
633
321
23
5
4
54
9
15
2
British:
1
1
Born in G
reat Britain,
Born in G
Ireland
Born else\
Belgian, Dutc
reat Britain,
vhere
h
vhere
h	
1
3
3
2
1
1
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Norwegian, Swedis
X,
55
1
4
3
Norwegian, Swedis
Danish, Finnish.
Russian, Lithuania
Polish, Ukrainian
Greek, Yugoslavic.
l,
Russian, Lithuania
1,
21
8
n>
1
1
66
Hindu and other East Indian
Hindu and other East Indian
1
Indian (native Canadian)
12
3
9
Indian (native Cana
Others not shown above
1
Others not shown a
Males.     j
'emalea.
Males.      1
^emales.
United State
citizens (racial origin not
9
United States citizens (racial origin not
2 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 19
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 24 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $120,895.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         83,204.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,607,242.00
Total..
$3,811,341.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
2,756
2,804
2,740
2,609
2,714
2,684
2
2
2
July 	
August	
September .
October ..
November...
December...
2,686
2,720
2,623
2,636
2,657
2,668
April	
1
Classified Weekly Wage-rates
(Wage
earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
Femalks
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
&over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
(fcover.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
2
J6.00to   $6.99...
6
2
5
2
11
7
7
2
1
9
24
2
14
10
2
10
7.00 to     7.99.   .
2
3
47
29
21
16
78
52
131
21
207
20
63
121
70
31
120
105
62
177
53
185
639
637
57
50
40
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12,99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
2
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
2
22.00 to   22.99...
28.00to   23.99...
2
16
15
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   2799...
4
10
2
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   84.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99...
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland 	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above ....
1,150
32
16
6
232
60
191
29
90
71
4
1
54
16
79
13
71
112
72
British
Subject.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.      Females.
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 121 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $811,941.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       575,153.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    6,831,574.00
Total $8,218,668.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January
February...
March	
April	
May	
June ..'	
Males.   Females.
4,688
4,814
4,787
4,854
4,950
5,212
63
65
66
62
72
S4
Month.
July	
August	
September..
October	
November..
December ..
Males.   Females.
5,272
5,319
4,843
4,590
4,395
4,561
103
103
83
75
70
71
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
$6.00	
to   $6.99.
to     7.99.
8.00 to     8.99.
Under
$6.00
7.00
.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
17
6
5
14
29
29
60
14
40
152
126
156
179
99
104
197
268
250
617
95
69
44
31
947
796
688
132
221
Under
21 Yrs.
1
4
11
1
4
6
73
33
7
1
33
13
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
5
1
2
10
24
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
ttussian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese.  	
Indian (native Canadian)..
Negro 	
Others not shown above...
British
Subject.    Ahen-
2,998
1,951
87
19
32
25
42
17
15
129
1
54
4
27
5
102
British
Subject.     A1,en-
87
27
United States citizens (racial origin  not
specified)	
Males.      Females. E 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 1,014 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,244,126.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,052,106.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,850,601.00
Total $10,146,833.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
March.......
June	
4,863
5,095
5,606
6,042
6,348
6,753
89
85
89
07
121
167
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November ..
December...
7,242
7,164
6,865
7,131
7,530
7,213
180
171
134
97
99
104
Classified Weekly Wage-rates
(Wage
■earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
F'emalbs.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to     8.99...
9 00 to     9.99...
19
18
21
7
23
26
37
35
72
87
ISO
213
480
1,086
635
880
790
418
864
282
371
275
299
145
1,934
1,485
682
218
177
4
9
8
5
3
10
13
12
12
8
25
12
8
32
18
12
4
9
1
7
3
2
6
1
2
1
8
13
1
1
1
9
10
7
10.00 to   10.99...
11 00 to   11.99...
3
9
8
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24 00 to   24.99...
4
1
22
4
19
11
2
10
3
2
5
3
1
13
8
17
19
8
26
4
6
4
9
6
15
6
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
1
1
2
12
1
2
9
3
1
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
6
50.00 and over...
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada   	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew 	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
British
Subject.
6,892
4,302
240
55
54
172
120
176
661
245
17
6
10
2
33
19
20
107
69
4
Females.
British
Subject.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.      Females.
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 21 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers       $89,681.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       334,892.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   1,835,575.00
Total $2,260,148.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
jMales.   Females.
845
832
881
984
1,045
1,016
12
14
14
IS
19
16
Month.
July	
August	
September..
October..   .
November ..
December ..
Males.    Females.
1,086
1,296
1,214
1,271
1,605
1,637
14
18
17
15
14
12
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
9
1
5
4
2
4
27
13
6
34
10
10
38
9
58
51
89
28
52
36
36
34
39
41
399
342
225
91
34
3
3
1
$6.00 to   $6.99  .
7.00 to     7.99
8.00 to     8.99..
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
2
i
1
4
1
3
6
4
7
6
41
9.00 to     9.99
4
10.00 to   10.99..
1
11.00 to   11 99..
4
12.00 to   12.99  .
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
7
3
4
1
1
1
1
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99
2
18.00 to   18 99..
2
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99
1
21.00 to   21.99..
2
22.00 to   22.99..
2
23.00 to   23.99
24.00 to   24 99..
25.00 to   25.99..
1
26.00 to   26.99 .
27.00 to   27.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99...
1
35.00 to   39.99 .
1
40.00 to   44.99
1
50.00 and over ..
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian   	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish. Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
Males.
392
26
6
3
16
2
6
56
8
2
46
12
"3'
British
Subject.
16
5
"i"
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 21
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 591 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,620,769.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,728,185.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   ....   8,602,682.00
Total $11,951,636.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February ....
March	
April	
May	
June   	
4,248
4,177
4,324
5,017
5,598
6,797
1,506
1,478
1,311
1,311
1,576
2,729
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
8,457
8,779
8,493
7,937
6,485
5,328
4,240
5,177
5,633
5,197
3,712
2,718
Classified Weekly Wage-rates
(Wage
■earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
<fc over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under JJ6.00	
55
42
164
08
1
$6.00 to   $6.99...
38
27
108
29
3
7.00 to     7.99...
22
17
113
62
4
S.OOto     8.99...
84
40
246
60
13
9.00 to     9.99...
60
30
401
40
3
10.00 to   10.99...
149
57
444
56
6
11.00 to   11.99...
308
30
728
43
20
12.00 to   12.99...
928
54
1,515
55
'   13
13.00 to   13.99...
274
34
415
37
S
14.00 to   14.99...
209
44
828
74
7
16.00 to   15.99...
516
55
609
32
4
16.00 to   16.99...
391
43
343
17
4
17.00 to   17.99...
213
24
422
14
2
18.00 to   18.99...
352
34
296
16
2
19.00 to   19.99...
913
29
172
5
2
20.00 to   20.99...
417
19
190
1
21 00 to   21.99...
533
14
146
1
22 00 to   22.99...
586
439
590
575
15
10
6
7
90
58
52
65
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
1
26.00 to   26.99...
368
4
69
1
27 00 to   27.99...
398
369
7
1
54
38
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
156
1,101
9
10
48
109
30.00 to   34.99...
1
35.00 to   39.99...
539
241
148
387
2
1
2
16
9
3
1
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over ...
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch   	
FYench	
Italian _	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above ....
Males.
British i
Subject.    A1,en-
5,240
2,341
180
37
44
106
128
115
204
80
10
512
4
814
316
3
151
1
1,950
British
Subject.    Alle"
806
56
25
46
70
165
235
17
1
19
1
790
525
5
2
26
50
1
2
486
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
F'emales.
Table No. 9.
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 68 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $164,414.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       108,558.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       644,860.00
Total     $917,832.00
 Average Number of Wage-earners.	
Month.
January.
February
March...
April.  .,
May	
June...
Males.    Females.
226
233
240
240
231
221
555
636
667
647
636
597
Month.
July	
August... .
September
October ...
November.
December .
Males.   Females.
221
230
226
223
216
213
575
613
634
651
627
624
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners oitly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
1
1
5
10
20
9
7
5
13
11
13
7
9
19
5
7
3
1
33
18
5
4
6
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
5
4
8
19
2
12
17
46
99
176
77
66
39
37
17
27
10
13
7
11
11
1
9
1
1
5
1
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
1
2
20
12
7
7
2
4
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian 	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above ....
Males.
British
Subject.
59
3
1
1
1
2
1
I
8
1
12
2
10
British
Subject.    Allen-
162
4
3
6
7
12
3
14
24
1
4
1
12
11
"«'
6
33
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females. E 22
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 62 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $229,315.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    153,043.00
Wage-earners(including piece-workers) 1,078,221.00
Total   $1,460,579.00
Average Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
March	
April	
May	
June	
862
879
881
881
910
911
177
190
196
194
196
187
July	
August...   .
September..
October   ...
November..
December...
958
1,033
1,087
1,124
1,154
1,148
196
217
229
247
249
249
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99...
7.00 to     7.99
8.00 to     8.99...
9 00 to     9.99. ..
1
4
1
3
5
7
29
38
11
37
64
43
65
43
36
5
19
4
4
5
3
2
	
1
3
1
1
1
6
20
7
58
27
9
23
16
6
5
*
5
1
2
7
13
2
7
2
5
4
7
2
7
6
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
16.00 to   15.99...
7
2
9
2
19
7
20
58
35
71
48
56
56
43
57
28
58
29
26
20
82
25
4
1
4
1
1
2
1
17.00 to   17.99...
18 00 to   18.99  ..
1
20 00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22 00 to   22.99...
1
23 00 to   23.99. ..
24 00 to   24.99.   .
26 00 to   26.99.   .
27.00 to   27.99...
	
2
29 00 to   29.99...
40 00 to   44 99...
50.00 and over. ..
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian. Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese   	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro	
Others not shown above ....
British
Subject.
254
14
7
12
11
18
7
32
24
6
10
1
Alien.
British
Subject.
47
1
2
1
4
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 11 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $26,627.
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc 107,232.
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 117,331.00
Total $251,190. (0
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February .
jVIarch
April.   ...
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
73
74
73
74
74
74
Month.
July 	
August	
September..
October	
November..
December...
Males.    Female*.
75
76
78
78
81
81
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only;.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to $6.!
to 7.!
to 8.!
tO 9.!
to 10.!
tO 11.!
to 12.!
to 13.!
to 14.!
to 15.!
to 16.!
to 17.!
to 18.!
to 19.!
to 20.!
tO 21.!
to 22.
to 23.!
to 24.!
21 Yrs.
& over.
to   25.!
to
99.
99.
99.
to   27.99'.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
6
35
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British:
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian. Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish    	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew  	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Females. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 23
TABLE  NO.   12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 102 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $156,937.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       260,932.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,168,474.00
Total $1,586,343.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
528
532
545
560
565
571
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February ....
March	
April	
935
939
971
996
1,006
1,034
August  ....
September..
October ....
November..
December ..
569
573
684
570
580
581
1,049
1,068
1,094
1,100
1,074
1,125
June   	
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99...
7.00 to     7.99...
8.00 to     8.99
1
1
1
3
15
3
11
13
38
42
50
103
287
147
139
57
24
28
19
15
2
1
1
1
2
9
4
5
21
14
14
5
6
5
1
2
13
9.00 to     9.99...
7
4
S
20
15
4
11
4
6
1
2
33
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
3
1
10
24
14
25
33
80
45
26
46
22
34
41
24
30
49
15
58
13
5
2
5
16
1
8
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
1
1
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99.   .
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over . .
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian   	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian 	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)...
Negro	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.
218
5
2
5
2
4
10
Females.
Alien.
British
Subject.
2S1
3
4
10
15
11
19
22
2
'at'
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)   	
Males.
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 63 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers, $127,363.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     121,065.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   450,012.00
Total S698.440.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January..
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
390
381
386
403
400
361
133
133
137
136
136
134
Month.
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November .
December .
Males.    Females.
371
385
899
397
390
387
142
166
169
177
182
171
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
6
3
8
8
2
6
7
5
1
3
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
1
2
4
6
8
5
11
3
19
26
20
16
22
39
28
7
20
9
36
26
11
13
6
3
28
11
5
1
3
1
1
3
1
3
2
15
18
24
17
11
12
26
4
15
6
10
1
2
5
3
2
1
1
4
5
2
3
3
1
2
1
17.00 to   17.99..
1
20 00 to   20 99
22.00 to   22.99..
24.00 to   24.99
26 00 to   26.99  .
1
29 00 to   29 99
30.00 to   34 99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99  .
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)	
Negro	
Others not shown above.  ...
British
Subject.
81
4
4
12
27
i)
12
11
3
10
British
Subject.
12
1
2
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
3
Females.
1 E 24
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 894 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers 82,191,874.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        978,105.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 30,265,379.00
Total $33,435,358.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
22,152
23,849
24,827
25,023
23,376
20,845
Females.
January ....
February...
March.
Mav ■.
June	
18,666
20,006
20,787
21,173
21,833
22,469
68
77
78
84
82
90
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December..
94
99
92
97
96
83
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.90
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
1«.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to   $6.9
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
7.!
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
to
to
to
to
to
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.
Under
& over.
21 Yrs.
5
2
9
2
1
1
11
5
18
3
19
6
22
6
35
18
26
36
50
61
59
30 -
200
88
207
32
307
35
3,106
164
800
32
2,803
117
729
24
747
7
2,703
82
947
21
2,309
50
1,436
31
1,133
8
837
17
4,226
24
2,516
4
1,505
D
1,322
995
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
1
3
2
8
4
1
4
5
15
10
6
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren-
tices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
■ ■ - Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian ..'	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish   .
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)....
Negro	
Others not shown above...   .
British
Subject.
13,684
3,681
485
106
208
172
329
669
2,719
992
124
1
500
530
742
195
12
558
Alien.
21
32
SO
110
546
161
1,155
" 631
Females.
British
Subject.    Allen-
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.    ! Females.
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 818 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers §1,863,267.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    2,226,899.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,929,401.00
Total   810,019,667.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January ....
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
4,179
4,279
4,407
4,645
4,776
4,936
183
181
178
186
186
178
July	
September ,
October ....
November ..
December...
5,124
5,348
5,450
5,500
5,552
5,543
193
202
210
206
217
228
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
P'or Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
86.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
$6.00.
to   $6.!
to     7.!
to    8.!
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99..
44.99.
49.99.
and over
Ma
,BS.
Fem
ILES.
Apprentices.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
fcover.
Under
18 Yrs.
8
8
5
11
12
25
24
50
40
56
308
177
188
238
284
290
167
357
133
264
314
192
139
175
129
705
731
138
73
71
34
30'
38
38
45
57
62
52
61
45
49
30
23
12
22
9
3
5
1
1
1
1
8
2
2
1
6
10
25
11
18
103
24
8
6
1
9
1
•2
1
1
1
2
o
3
1
1
.j
3
55
31
26
22
13
23
20
13
12
16
11
4
2
6
7
2
"9 "
4
4
1
9
3
1
3
2
2
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British :
4,691
1,745
78
29
23
58
40
21
99
45
3
6
7
is'
2
245
62
4
Born in Great Britain,
Belgian, Dutch	
9
Italian    	
10
4
14
23
7
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
1
2
2
Russian, Lithuanian,
1
Greek, Yugoslavic ,..
2
3
Hindu and other East Indian
2
1
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Others not shown abuve. ...
100
14
Males,    i Females.
United States citizens (racial origin not
112
6 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 25
Table No. 16.
METAL-MININQ.
Returns covering 200 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,080,021.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        963,226.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  10,598,274.00
Total   $12,641,521.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
5,801
5,705
5,807
6,088
6,466
6,595
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February ....
May	
June	
48
49
48
60
64
65
July 	
August	
September..
October    ...
November...
December...
6,576
6,617
6,579
6,596
6,417
6,184
08
64
65
64
52
56
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99...
5
6
1
7.00 to     7.99...
2
2
2
1
1
6
2
9
9
20
4
43
40
37
38
65
53
275
496
60
561
750
427
2,882
1,445
374
116
82
8.00to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
1
2
2
1
9
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
i "
1
2
5
5
1
14
14.00 to   14.99...
16.00 to   15.99...
3
2
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99..
5
4
5
2
6
7
7
12
2
20
5
8
3
5
3
3
1
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
3
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
1
2
7
1
25.00to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
2
1
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
9
26
20
46
5
1
1
1
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
1
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over ...
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian .  	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian. Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish 	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro 	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.
3,778
1,480
51
137
140
168
83
1
5
11
182
22
8
40
28
78
459
71
141
67
" io"
Females.
British
Subject.    Ahen-
16
3
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 376 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,139,285.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  1,137,357.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  4,209,760.00
Total
..$6,486,402.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ..
February.
March
April	
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
2,768
2,747
2,780
2,915
3,115
3,349
490
454
496
504
519
559
Month.
Males.
July 	
3,572
August	
4,092
September..
3,878
October   . .
3,706
November..
3,455
December ..
3,473
626
693
689
622
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
3.00 .
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99
to 18.99
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
Males.
F'emales.
Appren
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
& over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
14
30
16
1
9
7
11
10
1
14
10
14
9
6
8
12
13
10
1
9
21
20
9
3
6
56
21
12
3
6
25
16
13
23
4
32
24
55
11
11
22
18
109
3
5
38
41
173
6
1
196
24
89
3
3
126
25
83
3
183
17
33
1
1
172
626
23
49
33
17
204
270
15
24
21
5
412
9
7
1
193
505
181
18
49
1
6
3
155
146
105
45
486
168
162
68
47
10
1
1
1
3
3
7
10
1
1
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada.	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese.	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)	
Negro	
Others not shown above	
British
Subject.
3,288
1,464
73
23
25
36
77
37
167
90
5
9
33
12
18
32
43
*12'
Females.
British
Subject.
134
17
1
6
15
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Females. E 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering 51 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $286,581.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,052,028.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     1,243,529.00
Total    $2,582,138.00
Average
Number
of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February...
April	
May	
June	
914
912
711
599
624
670
14
16
13
14
15
13
J uly	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
831
829
853
912
916
921
14
18
22
28
25
22
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
&over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
2
2
1
$6.00 to   $6.99...
7.00 to     7.99...
8.00to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
1
20
1
5
16
5
16
27
109
63
64
38
21
52
96
79
12
86
35
242
239
84
42
14
1
1
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
1
4
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
4
1
16.00 to   16.99...
3
3
	
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
1
15
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
1
2
2
1
1
24.00 to   24.99...
26.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
1
28.00 to   28.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
1
35.00 to   39.99...
45 00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over.   .
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British :
924
427
35
53
15
3
Born in Great Britain,
6
6
1
165
13
10
1
2
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
6
1
2
2
Russian, Lithuanian,
13
2
Indian (native Canadian) ...
20
54
16
2
Males.
Females.
United States citizens (raci
specified)	
il origin
not
17
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 13 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  884,375.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  132,279.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  154,495.00
Total 4371,149.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March
April.  ...
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
125
132
138
149
162
158
18
16
17
21
17
17
Month.
July	
August....
September.
October....
November .
December..
Males.    Females.
153
145
141
139
135
133
18
17
17
17
18
20
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28 00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45,00
50.00
$6.99..
7.99..
8.99..
9.99..
10.99..
11.99,.
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99.
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99.
26.99
27.99 .
28.99..
29.99..
34.99.
39.99..
44.99..
49.99..
and over
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
3
12
4
11
3
11
3
17
3
4
S
4
5
14
1
4
8
2
Under
21 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.
it over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren-
tices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro 	
Others not shown above ....
British
Subject.
British
Subject.    Alien-
22
5
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 27
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 138 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    3573,867.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen,etc  1,191,056.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       2,001,929.00
Total $3,769,852.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February ....
March	
April	
1,163
1,185
1,226
1,222
1,232
1,223
163
164
181
186
179
185
July	
August	
September..
November ..
December...
1,244
1,221
1,200
1,217
1,252
1,231
212
189
188
180
204
June	
205
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
(6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
2S.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
1
7
3
16
15
10
22
14
29
24
30
8
40
8
29
IS
22
52
27
16
30
10
94
107
351
160
93
15
3
13
5
12
IS Yrs.
& over.
2
6
5
9
11
36
36
9
23
19
13
14
7
4
49
6
6
1
3
4
Under
18 Yrs.
1
3
4
2
12
Apprentices.
11
12
6
11
8
5
9
6
5
3
Racial Origin and Nationality
of Employ
2es.
Males.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British
Subject.
Alien.
British:
1,303
501
39
9
3
1
4
1
9
3
1
2
17
320
63
7
1
2
Born in Great Britain,
1
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
1
1
2
1
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian   	
1
Hebrew	
2
20
1
1
14
21
7
1
Males.
Females.
United States citizens   (racial origin not
23
2
I
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 13 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $606,161.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      473,410.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     5,098,546.00
Total   $6,178,117.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.    Females.
January  2,834
February.... 2,849
March ' 2,911
April  2,928
May  2,975
June  3,067
110
108
100
96
96
108
Month.
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December..
Males.    Females.
3,133
3,115
3,092
3,117
3,124
3,044
117
119
115
117
126
123
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 ... .
S6.99
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
2
2
2
8
32
18
197
201
129
102
268
186
401
320
171
53
80
Under
21 Yrs.
25
1
1
7
8
12
1
3
2
4
26
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
4
21
12
8
16
4
12
22
7
3
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian...
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Y'ugoslavic 	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian) ...
Negro 	
Others not shown above ....
British
Subject.
774
35
5
11
110
9
10
74
227
39'
3
14
304
2
Females.
British
Subject.
14
1
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males. E 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering 50 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $247,464.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        152,414.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,541,233.00
Total. $3,941,111.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
March	
April	
May	
June	
796
1,165
1,448
1,956
2,420
2,453
4
5
6
6
6
6
July
September..
October	
November ..
December...
2,585
2,347
2,579
2.607
2,720
2,926
4
10
4
4
4
4
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
J6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $6.99
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to   10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over
13
1
1
5
3
1
3
5
5
9
IS
35
188
49
34
134
28
131
756
358
656
62
38
Under
21 Yrs.
4
8
96
42
21
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Males. Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian   	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese    	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above .
1,569
1,360
83
10
16
16
12
15
14
1
62
17
Alien.
British
Subject.
4
1
13
1
64
' 6
Alien.
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females.
Table No. 23.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 6 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $189,272.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       763,510.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,889,442.00
Total
. $5,842,224.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January..
February
March..
April	
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
3,087
3,088
3,092
3,130
3,171
3,080
23
23
24
24
24
23
Month.
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Males.   Females.
3,169
3,147
3,136
3,125
3,066
3,066
24
24
24
25
25
24
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to     8.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
4
3
13
7
7
49
14
22
27
35
13
27
24
32
64
73
59
104
122
981
819
314
76
17
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
11
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
3
10
7
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere    	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, YTugoslavic 	
Hebrew   	
Chinese     ...
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese 	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro 	
Others not shown above .
Males.
British
Subject.
882
45
4
2
316
18
14
93
25
18
2
3
50
6
13
35
1
"ii
12
5
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 29
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 115 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $856,134.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,922,575.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     7,951,958.00
Total $10,730,667.00
Average
Number of Wage-earners
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January.   ..
February....
April	
May	
June	
4,127
4,090
4,176
4,153
4,175
4,194
1,557
1,548
1,581
1,664
1,609
1,616
July	
August	
September..
October ....
November ..
December...
4,166
4,247
4,289
4,286
4,212
4,076
1,648
1,651
1,689
1,548
1,582
1,630
Classified Weekly Wag
e-rates
(Wage
earners
only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
4
11
4
S
12
16
9
15
43
111
32
90
34
73
381
239
132
200
186
276
180
166
222
264
261
1,050
389
402
162
71
1
3
1
1
1
$6.00 to   $6.99.
7.00 to     7.99...
2
3
8.00 to     8.99.   .
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99  ..
11.00 to   11.99.   .
2
4
1
3
2
1
1
12
25
18
6
381
88
20
233
154
542
114
12.00 to   12.89...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99.   .
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
8
1
20.00 to   20.99.   .
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99...
1
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99.
35
7
2
25.00 to   25.99.
26.00 to   26.99.   .
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99.   .
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99...
6
40.00 to   44.99.   .
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over ...
Racial Origin and Nationa
!ity of Employees.
Males.
n.
Females.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.
Alie
British
Subject.
Alien.
British:
2,116
2,907
177
13
17
57
59
35
184
71
3
1,520
572
60
Born in Great Britain,
3
7
10
1
o
5
1
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Norwegian, Swedish,
Russian, Lithuanian,
6
2
9
1
1
1
1
144
1
Hindu and other East Indian
Others not shown above....
2
9
Males.
Females.
United States citizens (racial origin not
67
7
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 107 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $535,517.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      194,768.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  3,366,062.00
Total  $4,096,347.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January ..
February .
March. ...
April	
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
2,128
2,282
2,493
2,654
2,701
3,197
75
101
113
137
165
197
Month.
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November..
December .
Males.    Females.
3,298
3,418
3,438
3,402
3,353
3,205
184
168
180
170
158
155
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
F'or Week of
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29 00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to   $6.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
4
2
1
1
1
3
5
4
6
61
127
117
138
99
127
110
79
21
22
21
16
7
7
2
6
4
7
13
37
14
1
2
7
8
17
20
95
36
35
5
5
2
5
3
4
2
2
1
2
5
1
1
12
6
20
138
33
3
1
1
368
163
292
148
2
1
1S8
282
111
16
3
9
1
3
2
1
348
118
83
252
92
1
2
1
73
32
18
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French 	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (nativeCanadian).
Negro	
Others not shown above..
Males.
British
Subject.    Allen-
2,530
597
33
32
33
31
89
52
141
137
5
1
62
1
119
8
24
10
1
British
Subject.
192
20
1
2
4
7
3
8
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Males.
Females. E 30
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 4,971 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1940.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers—
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc...
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers) —
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary.— 	
Estimated pay-roll of employers in occupations covered by Department's inquiry and
from whom returns were not received-   	
Transcontinental Railways _ -  .
$14,703,179.00
16,029,986.00
113,102,398.00
$615,063.00
1,300,000.00
12,675,140.00
$143,835,563.00
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey: viz.. Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, delivery, auto transportation, ocean
services, miscellaneous   (estimated pay-roll) —   _	
30,0*0,000.00
44,490,203.00
Total..
$188,325,766.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January....
February .
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August
September.
October....
November.
December..
67,240
69,484
71,690
74,715
77,928
81,439
84,417
87,415
87,230
86,958
84,022
79,817
6,291
6,355
6,360
6,418
6,796
8,081
9,715
10,771
11,094
10,689
9,199
8,320
Racial Origin and Nationality of Employees.
Racial Origin.
British
Subject.    Allen'
British :
Born in Canada	
Born in Great Britain,
Ireland	
Born elsewhere	
Belgian, Dutch	
French	
Italian	
German, Austrian	
Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak,
Hungarian, Roumanian.
Norwegian, Swedish,
Danish, Finnish	
Russian, Lithuanian,
Polish, Ukrainian	
Greek, Yugoslavic	
Hebrew	
Chinese	
Hindu and other East Indian
Japanese	
Indian (native Canadian)
Negro	
Others not shown above
56,759
27,007
1,922
430
566
1,609
1,198
1,460
6,084
2,285
462
79
1,259
548
2,045
761
23
1,722
Females.
British
Subject.
49
305
217
544
2,104
9,259
2,355
167
39
77
126
198
85
186
886     ; 312
431 23
7 31
3,636    I 43
 ' 1
1,238    I 910
  525
 I 2
427    | 238
3
9
6
57
81
2
4
12
United States citizens (racial origin not
specified)	
Females.
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Males.
Females.
For Week of
Employment of
Appren
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
& over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
176
137
225
91
91
$6.00 to   $6.99..
104
105
133
37
87
7.00 to     7.99..
88
118
154
95
95
8.00 to     8.99..
186
186
306
110
123
9.00 to     9.99..
168
178
477
67
101
10.00 to   10.99..
417
221
544
101
99
ll.OOto   11.99..
540
235
904
79
96
12.00 to   12.99..
1,233
453
1,886
92
106
13.00 to   13.99..
619
363
1,023
59
50
14.00 to   14.99..
790
436
1,654
97
61
15.00 to   15.99..
1,515
387
1,481
46
43
16.00 to   16.99..
1,727
490
804
25
33
17.00 to   17.99..
1,565
281
663
16
48
18.00 to   18.99..
2,346
287
724
16
29
19.00to   19.99..
7,416
426
430
8
23
20.00 to   20.99..
3,419
179
961
3
13
21.00 to   21.99..
5,902
212
313
1
19
22.00to   22.99..
4,910
146
159
1
30
23.00 to   23.99..
3,042
106
123
1
27
24.00 to   24.99..
6,837
188
97
15
25.00to   25.99..
4,253
78
106
1
16
26.00 to   26.99..
5,020
107
81
1
10
27.00 to   27.99..
3,957
82
70
11
28.00 to   28.99..
4,034
68
54
7
29.00 to   29.99..
2,925
66
51
3
30.00 to   34.99 .
17,602
175
122
1
27
35.00 to   39.99..
11,062
30
21
14
40.00 to   44.99..
6,188
10
11
1
2,842
2
3
2,445
103,328
3
348
Totals	
5,782
13,583
1,278 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 31
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Since the " Hours of Work Act " became effective the Board has shown the average hours
by industries, and the accompanying table sets out comparative figures for the years 1930 to
1940, inclusive.
COMPARATIVE FIGURES, 1930 TO 1940.
Year.
Firms,
reporting.
Employees
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 54 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
54 Hours.
19.30       .                            	
4,704
4,088
3,529
3,530
3,956
4,153
4,357
4,711
4,895
4,829
4,971
87,821
84,791
68,468
71,185
75,435
81,329
90,871
102,235
96,188
94,045
103,636
Per Cent.
77.60
83.77
80.36
77.95
85.18
88.78
87.12
89.31
88.67
88.68
88.93
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
5.76
5.26
6.42
4.57
5.29
5.42
5.13
Per Cent.
9.04
1931 	
9.44
1932...                             	
11.92
1933  	
11.12
1934     	
9.06
1935    	
5.96
1936	
6 46
1937        .                        	
1938 ... -  	
6 04
1939 	
1940 	
5.90
The average weekly working-hours for all employees for same years being:—■
1940
1939
1938
1937
1936
1935
46.91
47.80
46.84
47.25
47.63
47.17
1934 ...
1933 ...
1932 ...
1931 ...
1930 ..
47.32
47.35
47.69
47.37
48.62
The 4,971 industrial firms submitting returns to the Department of Labour gave information regarding hours covering 103,636 male and female employees. A segregation shows
88.93 per cent, working 48 hours or less per week, 5.13 per cent, working from 48 to 54 hours
per week, and 5.94 per cent, working in excess of 54 hours per week. E 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940.
44.98
44.44
43.45
48.03
48.58
44.57
43.83
50.54
44.79
44.92
44.43
44.74
45.61
48.66
50.70
45.07
48.45
48.50
47.28
45.36
49.89
46.17
47.29
43.87
44.54
47.85
43.75
47.90
45.29
46.05
44.60
45.15
42.73
47.91
46.93
44.11
46.70
49.05
44.39
45.61
44.30
45.20
45.33
48.49
50.91
45.77
48.45
48.23
46.65
45.46
50.25
46.20
46.70
44.16
44.37
47.95
43.85
47.92
45.36
46.72
44.53
44.63
24.00
47.93
48.54
43.85
47.20
47.43
43.22
44.33
42.01
44.14
44.31
48.38
49.51
44.67
48.37
47.99
47.46
45.00
50.30
45.78
48.81
44.11
43.55
44.29
44.05
47.95
45.23
46.29
45.41
45.07
40.40
47.92
49.42
43.82
42.57
47.59
43.69
44.12
40.75
44.66
44.27
48.47
50.36
45.80
48.71
47.98
47.57
44.93
50.19
45.64
47.69
44.10
42.64
47.96
44.08
47.89
45.11
46.39
44 95
Builders' materials, etc     	
45.31
41 50
48.03
50.38
44.01
45.81
46.78
43.38
44.76
43.87
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing    . . —	
44.35
44.93
Lumber industries—
48.37
52.65
45.17
49.17
48.17
47.35
45.13
Metal-mining    	
Miscellaneous trades and industries  	
50.20
45.96
48.17
43.95
42.24
Pulp and paper manufacturing  	
47.78
43.68
49.28
45.40
Wood manufacture (not elsewhere specified)  —	
47.27 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940. E 33
SUMMARY OF LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR.
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, 1940.)
"WEEKLY HALF-HOLIDAY ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1940."
Schedule 1 was amended to provide that " Any Order in Council made pursuant to this
schedule may apply to the whole or to any part of the Province; and when it fixes any day
of each week to be observed as a weekly half-holiday the provisions of the Act shall apply to
that weekly half-holiday."
"APPRENTICESHIP ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1940."
Section 4 (2) as amended, confers power to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to
reclassify or withdraw from Schedule A any trade, whether originally in that Schedule or
subsequently added thereto.
Section 9 (1) was amended by striking out the following words: "to suit the special
circumstances of any designated trade."
Section 9 (3) was amended by adding the following words: " except with the permission
of the Minister on the recommendation of the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee."
Section 12 (a) was amended by adding the words " or by the employer or his duly
authorized representative."
Section 12 (c) was amended by striking out the words " joint guardians or " and by
adding to clause (c) the words, " and, in the case of there being joint guardians, by any one
of them."
The above amendments shall have effect as from the 9th day of September, 1935.
" COAL-MINES REGULATIONS ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1940."
General Rule 12 (c) is repealed; the new clause prohibits the use of explosives in a mine
or part of a mine where emergent conditions exist due to large outflows of inflammable gas,
except on the approval of the Chief Inspector of Mines.
General Rule 16: An addition prohibits the transportation of men in cars on slopes or
inclines, except where such system of transportation is approved by the Inspector of Mines.
General Rule 31 is amended and deals with the construction of a cage for hoisting and
lowering persons.
General Rule 40 prohibits the removal of any of the contents of an " ambulance box,"
except for the purpose of rendering first aid in the mine.
General Rule 41 provides that where more than twenty persons are employed in any
mine below ground, and upon a petition of a majority of the employees, sufficient accommodation shall be provided to enable the persons employed above and below ground at the mine
to conveniently wash themselves and to dry and change their clothes, but such accommodation
shall not be in the engine-house or boiler-house. Certain exceptions may be granted by the
Chief Inspector of Mines.
General Rule 43 provides that the length of the face-line between the roadways that
provide the entrance or exit from the long-wall, where the long-wall system is carried on
shall not be more than three hundred feet, but the Inspector of Mines may, by notice in
writing to the owner, agent, or manager, order such shorter or longer distance as he considers
necessary for safety. E 34 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman—  Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell     1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton   _._ _____ __789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
4. James Thomson..   __ _____ ...789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. J. A. Ward Bell— _ _._.   789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
Mabel A. Cameron..___ ___      Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
Head  Office—       —   Parliament  Buildings,   Victoria.
Branch Office         789  Pender Street West,  Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the Seventh Annual Report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1940.
MEETINGS AND DEPUTATIONS.
Meetings of the Board were held on thirty-four days during the year, with a total of
sixty-six sessions. The Board assembled at head office in Victoria on twenty-one days, in
Vancouver on eleven, and on one day each in Nanaimo and Port Alberni.
To obtain the views of persons who will be affected by new or amended Orders, delegations are arranged to enable employees, employers, or their accredited representatives to
appear before the Board. Thirty-seven such delegations were heard during the year, many
presenting written briefs, amplified by verbal submissions in support of their various requests.
In certain cases where employees could not appear during the day, evening meetings were
arranged for their convenience.
Sometimes employers and employees meet separately, but on certain occasions both
groups appear together with satisfactory results. This type of joint meeting is usually
most efficacious when the employees are able to speak through a Trade Union.
In addition to data presented at these hearings the officials of the Department gather
and assemble valuable information for the use of the Board, through their regular routine
inspections and reports or by special survey to deal with specific problems.
NEW AND AMENDING ORDERS.
During the year twenty-two Orders were promulgated, seventeen of which dealt with
occupations or industries in which men and boys are engaged and five related to employment
of women and girls.
While some of these were entirely new enactments others amended existing Orders. In
several instances where a series of Orders related to the same industry or occupation a
consolidation was effected, thus bringing all rulings relating to one specific type of work under
a single Order for convenient reference and posting.
A resume of these Orders follows, in the order in which they were made:—
Occupation of Patrolman.—Order No. 69, an entirely new enactment, covering men working for private patrol agencies, set an hourly rate of 35 cents.
Construction Industry.—Order No. 12b amended Order No. 12 to take in the University
Area in Vancouver, hitherto not included in the Order.
Carpentry Trade.—Order No. 58a added the University Area in Vancouver to the
territory covered by Order No. 58.
Occupation of Bus-driver.—Order No. 70 increased the wage of bus-drivers in Greater
Victoria from 45 cents an hour to 50 cents for less than forty hours and not more than
fifty hours weekly, from 50 cents to 55 cents per hour for less than forty hours a week, and
from 67% cents to 75 cents an hour for hours in excess of fifty in a week or nine in any one
day. It also extended the scope of the Order to include the balance of Vancouver Island and
all of Saltspring Island, previously not covered. Other conditions of employment were set
out in the Order. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940. E 35
Personal Service Occupation.—Order No. 27b amended Order No. 27 by making provision
for cost of distinctive uniforms of special design, trimming, colour, or fabric to be borne by
the employer when he required his women employees to wear such uniforms or articles of
wearing-apparel.    Cost of repair or laundering must not be deducted from the girls' wages.
Painting, Decorating, and Paper-hanging Trade.—Order No. 71, a new Order, set an
hourly rate of 75 cents for employees in these occupations in Vancouver, New Westminster,
Burnaby, West Vancouver, and North Vancouver. It excludes permanently employed
maintenance-men in industrial and manufacturing establishments and in public and private
buildings.
Carpentry Trade.—Order No. 72 fixes an hourly rate for carpenters working within a
radius of 5 miles from the centre of the City of Alberni, exclusive of permanently employed
maintenance-men in industrial and manufacturing establishments and in public and private
buildings.
Carpentry Trade.—Order No. 73 is similar to Order No. 72, except that it applies to
carpenters working within a radius of 5 miles from the centre of the City of Nanaimo.
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52f. A repetition of a seasonal Order effective
the previous year, making special provisions for girls in resort hotels in unorganized territory
from June 17th to September 14th, inclusive.
Occupation of Bus-driver.—Order No. 70a, amending Order No. 70 to amplify the section
dealing with time spent waiting on call, and to clarify the computation of hours on duty.
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52g. To encourage employers in resort hotels
in unorganized territory to retain their women employees throughout the winter. This Order
effective from September 26th, 1940, to June 13th, 1941, repeats the provisions of a similar
Order which worked successfully the previous year.
Logging Industry.—Order No. 1 (1940). Made no change in basic rates, but consolidated
three Orders relating to the Industry.
Ship-building Industry.—Order No. 20 (1940). Made no change in rates, but simplified
form of Order.
Transportation Industry.—Order No. 26 (1940).    Consolidated three Orders.
Occupation of Taxicab-driver.—Order No. 33 (1940).    Consolidated three Orders.
Occupation of Taxicab-driver.—Order No. 60a. A necessary amendment when Order No.
33 (1940) passed.
First-aid Attendants.—Order No. 39  (1940).    Simplified form of Order.
Mercantile Industry.—Order No. 59, Supplementary (1940). Made provision for wages
of temporary male employees during the Christmas season.
Mercantile Industry.—Order No. 24, Supplementary (1940). Prescribed wages for women
and girls employed temporarily at Christmas.
Personal Service Occupation.—Order No. 27c. Permitted a forty-eight-hour week instead
of forty-four, for week prior to Christmas.
Construction Industry.—Order No. 12  (1940).    Consolidated seven Orders.
Transportation Industry.—Order No. 26a (1940). Amended Order No. 26 (1940) by
raising hourly rate for operators of motor-cycles with side-cars or other wheeled attachments
to same rate as prescribed for drivers of light-delivery trucks, with whom they competed.
REGULATIONS UNDER "HOURS OF WORK ACT."
The following Regulations were made during 1940 under the " Hours of Work Act ":—
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Regulation No. 21f exempted the industry from the provisions of the " Hours of Work Act " from April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941. It should
be borne in mind, however, that Orders of the Board require a rising scale of pay as hours
of work increase.
Laundry Industry.—Regulation No. 9a cancelled Regulation No. 9, which had permitted
persons employed in laundries in a week in which a public holiday (other than Sunday)
occurred to work extra hours on the remaining working-days to avoid serious interference
with business, the total for the week not to exceed forty-eight hours.
Mercantile Industry (Christmas, 1940, Temporary).—Special regulations were made to
take care of various branches of the mercantile industry during the month of December to
enable employers to cope with seasonal Christmas business and to ensure to male and female
employees adequate protection from over-long hours. E 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
More detailed summaries of the foregoing Orders and Regulations may be found in the
Appendix to this section of the Department's report. Also included in the Appendix are
summaries of all Orders and details of all Regulations of the Board in force at the present
time. To make this information as valuable and comprehensive as possible Orders and
Regulations made in 1941, up to the time the report went to press, are included.
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
Statistical forms were received from 5,232 employers of women and girls, an increase of
530 over the 1939 figure. The returns received covered some 30,038 women workers for the
year 1940, an increase of 2,549 employees reported on the pay-rolls when compared with
previous yearly period.
The following tables cover the occupations for which minimum wages have been set by
the Board.
Mercantile Industry.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1937,
1936.
815
6,480
5,972
508
$78,154.39
$4,293.42
$13.09
$8.45
7.84%
38.75
664
5,592
5,194
398
$70,943.66
$4,012.57
$13.66
$10.08
7.12%
42.14
538
5,315
4,851
464
$65,856.44
$4,695.22
$13.58
$10.12
8.73%
43.48
507
5,010
4,540
470
$60,373.35
$4,638.65
$13.30
$9.66
9.38%
40.47
479
4.723
4,326
Under 18 years -  	
Total weekly wages—
397
$56,086.46
$3,523.49
Average weekly wages—
$12.96
$8.88
Percentage of employees under 18 years-	
Average hours "worked per week 	
8.40%
40.58
The number of firms reporting in the above table for 1939 increased to 815, with an
additional 888 employees covered, over the previous year.
The returns as submitted are based on the week of employment of the greatest number.
In the mercantile industry, owing to the nature of the business, many large firms, in accordance with the above stipulation, file their returns covering the Christmas period—which
week usually represents their greatest employment period.
For the year 1940, due to short working-hours during the calendar week which covered
the Christmas period, a direct effect is noted in the above table.
While the average weekly wage for employees over 18 years decreased to $13.09 from
$13.66, the full effect of the short hours is noted in the younger group of employees, mostly
casual and part-time workers. The average weekly wage for this latter group stood at $8.45
as against $10.08 for the previous year.
The average weekly hours from the returns as submitted decreased to 38.75 as against
a previous figure of 42.14.
Laundry Industry.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1937.
1936.
124
1,318
1,228
90
$15,941.10
$741.14
$12.98
$8.23
6.83%
42.00
Ill
1,182
1,126.
56
$14,520.24
$460.97
$12.90
$8.23
4.74%
42.09
95
1,095
1,029
66
$13,565.23
$567.74
$13.18
$8.60
6.03%
42.74
86
1,084
1,014
70
$13,083.49
$575.71
$12.90
$8.22
6.46%.
41.90
81
991
911
80
Total weekly wages—
$11,462.44
$658.04
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  —
$12.58
$8.23
Percentage of employees under 18 years  	
Average hours worked per week  _ —_	
8.07%
41.94 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 37
The number of firms reporting in the laundry industry again increased, 124 firms making
returns as against 111 for the previous year; the employees covered totalling 1,318, compared with 1,182 in 1939.
The average weekly wage for employees over 18 years increased from $12.90 in 1939 to
$12.98 in 1940, the average in the under 18 group remaining at $8.23 as in the previous year.
Some increase was noted in the percentage of employees under 18 years, which rose to
6.83 per cent, as against 4.74 per cent, in 1939.
The average weekly working-hours decreased from 42.09 to 42.
Hotel and Catering Industry.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1937.
1936.
943
4,974
4,811
163
$66,383.16
$1,792.51
$13.80
$11.00
3.28%
43.12
819
4,380
4,288
92
$59,156.99
$1,043.15
$13.80
$11.34
2.10%
43.11
765
3,970
3.878
92
$53,223.45
$1,058.77
$13.72
$11.51
2.32%
42.95
532
3,424
3,302
122
$46,840.82
$1,353.11
$14.19
$11.09
3.56%
42.43
500
2,961
2,878
83
Total weekly wages—
$40,265.89
$956.54
Average weekly wages—
$13.99
Employees under 18 years ■      	
Percentage of employees under 18 years  	
Average hours worked per week ._._ ___ _
$11.52
2.80%
42.79
As the number of janitresses and women elevator operators throughout the Province does
not reach a very high figure, these workers have been included with others in the hotel and
catering industry. In former years these two classes were actually covered by the Order
relating to the public housekeeping industry. The new name—hotel and catering industry—
seems to designate the occupation more clearly than the former one.
The firms reporting increased from 819 in 1939 to 943 in 1940, with a corresponding gain
in employees of 594.
In the 18 and over class the average weekly wage remained even with the previous year,
the figure standing at $13.80. As mentioned in the previous year's report, this group still
includes certain unskilled employees who, by permission of the Board, were allowed to be
trained at the same figure as the younger girls. While $14 is the weekly minimum for
experienced employees of the older group for a week of 40 to 48 hours, the average recorded
does not disclose infractions, but, as stated above, some inexperienced employees were included
in the figure.
Under 18 years the average weekly wage decreased slightly to $11 as against $11.34 in
1939, while the percentage employed of this class showed a rise from 2.10 per cent, in 1939
to 3.28 per cent, of total in 1940.
Office Occupation.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1937.
1936.
Number of firms reporting  	
Total number of employees 	
Over 18 years   —	
Under 18 years  	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years  	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years ...  	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week 	
2,417
7,438
7,321
117
$133,397.18
$1,358.66
$18.22
$11.61
1.57%
40.35
2,241
6,779
6.691
$121,
691.66
,006.38
$18.19
$11.44
1.30%
40.55
2,096
7,367
7,273
94
$132,369.27
$1,115.55
$18.20
$11.87
1.28%
40.16
1,891
5,911
5,802
109
$106,395.64
$1,306.60
$18.34
$11.99
1.84%
40.79
1,848
5,344
5,280
64
14,789.14
$645.41
$17.95
$10.08
1.20%
40.88 E 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
This classification continues to lead with the greatest number of women employees,
returns being received from 2,417 firms for the year 1940, an increase of 176 over the previous
year.
Total employees covered increased to 7,438 as against 6,779 for 1939.
The average weekly wage for the experienced workers increased slightly to $18.22,
compared with $18.19 for the previous year. An increase was also recorded in the under
18 year class, the average weekly wage in this group rising from $11.44 to $11.61 for the
year 1940.
The percentage of younger workers employed in this occupation again showed a slight
increase over the 1939 period.
Average hours decreased from 40.55 to 40.35 for the year under review.
Interesting note is made of some of the numbers receiving the more worth-while salaries.
A $65 monthly rate is the legal minimum for experienced employees 18 years of age or over.
There were 1,563 employed at $65.00 per month.
343
70.00
438
75.00
268
80.00
240
85.00
211
90.00
128
95.00
229
64
100.00
110.00
47
115.00
32
120.00
50
125.00
52
15
130.00
135.00
14
140.00
33
150.00
118
„           more than $150.00 per month.
The above figures show those actually receiving the quoted monthly rates and do not
include, for instance, those getting between $65 and $70, or between $70 and $75, and so on
down the list.
Personal Service Occupation.
1940.
1939.                  1938.
1937.
1936.
Number of firms reporting —
214
607
581
26
$7,715.72
$131.33
$13.28
$5.05
4.28%
35.35
198
570
555
15
$7,696.07
$112.63
$13.87
$7.51
2.63%
36.89
161
509
495
14
$6,723.47
$57.75
$13.58
$4.13
2.75%
37.87
157
481
472
9
$6,283.69
$45.09
$13.31
$5.01
1.87%
37.85
138
427
417
10
Total weekly wages—
$5,486.48
$66.05
Average weekly wages—
$13.16
$6.60
2.34%
38.07
Included in the above table are employees of beauty-parlours and theatre ushers.
The number of firms filing returns in this classification increased by 16 for the year 1940.
Total employees reported increased to 607 as against 570 for the previous year.
In the experienced group the average weekly wage decreased from $13.87 to $13.28 in
1940. A similar average for the inexperienced class also showed a decrease, the figure
standing at $5.05 as against $7.51 for the previous year, with an increase in the percentage
of this latter group employed.
In line with the decrease in the above average weekly amounts the average weekly hours
likewise decreased to 35.35 as against 36.89 in the previous year.
Irregular hours of theatre ushers within this section were again chiefly responsible for
the low average working-hours per week. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 39
Fishing Industry.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1937.
1936.
10
105
78
27
$1,222.54
$261.33
$15.67
$9.68
25.71%
38.2
10
58
27
31
$455.81
$199.29
$16.88
$6.43
53.45%
31.78
6
36
23
13
$267.35
$134.37
$11.62
$10.34
36.11%
34.61
5
37
26
11
$330.84
$90.67
$12.72
$8.24
29.73%
37.02
6
Total number of employees	
Experienced     	
32
24
8
Total weekly wages—
$234.20
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
$26.73
$9.76
Inexperienced employees  	
$3.34
25.00%
26.24
Average hours worked per week 	
As the Order of the Board does not cover women workers in fish-canneries, this group
comprises a rather negligible number.
Increases are, however, noted in the number of employees covered.
The average weekly wage for experienced employees stood at $15.67, as against the
1939 high of $16.88. Probably due to increasing working-hours of the casual and seasonal
workers, the average weekly wage for the inexperienced group increased to $9.68 from $6.43
in 1939.
Average weekly hours in the industry showed a marked increase from 31.78 in 1939 to
38.82 for the year under review.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
1940.
1938.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees .. 	
Experienced  :—	
Inexperienced  	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees _	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
$35
132
1,922
1,872
50
047.43
$486.27
$18.72
$9.73
2.60%
40.10
145
1,880
1,766
114
$32,074.05 j
$1,156.11  |
I
$18.16
$10.14
6.06%
39.84
137
1,815
1,759
56
$32,238.68
$434.46
$18.33
$7.76
3.09%
40.71
142
1,934
1,720
214
$31,284.95
$2,497.70
$18.19
$11.67
11.06%
40.59
124
1,791
1,571
220
$28,717.26
$2,462.93
$18.28
$11.20
12.28%.
40.46
Included with regular telephone and telegraph company employees are those who operate
switchboards in offices and other establishments, such as hotels, hospitals, etc.
While fewer firms reported for 1940 under this heading, the number of employees covered
increased to 1,922 from 1,880 in the previous year.
The average weekly wage for experienced operators increased from $18.16 in 1939 to
$18.72 for 1940. Fewer employees were noted in the inexperienced class, and the average
weekly wage for this group decreased slightly to $9.73 as against $10.14 in 1939.
A fractional increase was evident in the average weekly working-hours, which rose from
39.84 to 40.10. E 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Manufacturing Industry.
1939.
1937.
1936.
Number of firms reporting _
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced :	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees  	
Inexperienced employees .'-..-	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees _
Average hours worked per week _ _
501
3,545
3,061
484
$45,411.50
$4,490.36
$14.84
$9.28
13.65%
42.36
435
3,208
2,784
424
$41,240.31
$3,676.80
$14.81
$8.67
13.22%
42.01
380
3,085
2,701
384
$40,177.04
$3,482.01
$14.87
$9.07
12.45%
41.92
358
2,652
2,297
355
$32,469.11
$3,247.59
$14.14
$9.15
13.39%
41.65
314
2,500
2,167
333
$3,015.36
$14.16
$9.06
13.32%
42.92
The number of firms making returns in this classification increased by 66, with an additional 337 employees recorded over the previous year.
Increases are noted in the average weekly wages for both the experienced and inexperienced groups in this industry, the weekly average for experienced employees standing at
$14.84 as against $14.81 in 1939, and the weekly average for the inexperienced class rising
from $8.67 to $9.28 for 1940.
The percentage of inexperienced employees again showed a fractional increase, and the
average weekly working-hours increased slightly to 42.36 as against 42.01 for the previous
year.
Reference to the summary of Orders will show that the Order covering the manufacturing industry embraces workers in a very diversified group of occupations. Some of the work
is seasonal, but in many factories the employees are assured of continuous employment.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
1940.
1939.
1938.
1937.
1936.
Number of firms reporting   —
Total number of employees  	
76
3,649
3,529
120
$59,173.40
$1,067.67
$16.77
$8.90
3.29%
47.16
79
3,840
3,562
278
$57,232.59
$2,713.79
$16.07
$9.76
7.24%
46.75
81
3,540
3,316
224
$54,275.82
$2,247.52
$16.37
$10.03
6.33%
46.90
71
3,551
3,298
253
$54,279.51
$2,650.17
$16.46
$10.48
7.12%
47.78
75
3,155
2,803
Inexperienced       	
Total weekly wages—
352
$41,831.03
Inexperienced employees  	
Average weekly wages—
$3,082.70
$14.92
Inexperienced employees 	
$8.76
11.16%
Averagre hours worked per week   . .. ..
46.02
With fewer firms filing returns in this classification the total employees reported in the
above table decreased by 191 as against the 1939 figure.
The average weekly wage for experienced employees, however, increased from $16.07 to
$16.77 for the year 1940.
The percentage of inexperienced workers employed showed some decrease, the average
weekly wage for this group declining from $9.76 to $8.90.
Average weekly hours in this industry stood at 47.16, a slight increase over the 1939
figure of 46.75. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 41
Summary of all Occupations.
1940.        1         1939.
1
1938.                 1937.
1
1936.
Number of firms reporting  	
Total number of employees  ..    	
Over 18 years, or experienced 	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced ... ..
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or inex-
5,232
30,038
28,453
1,585
$442,446.42
$14,622.69
$15.55
$9.23
5.28%
41.48
4,702
27,489
25,993
1,496
$405,011.38
$14,381.69
$15.58
$9.61
5.44%
42.24
4,259
26,732
25,325
1,407
$398,696.76
$13,793.39
$15.74
$9.80
5.26%
42.42
3,749
24,084
22,471
1,613
$351,341.40
$16,405.29
$15.64
$10.17
6.70%
42.05
3,565
21,924
20,377
1,547
$309,567.79
$14,437.25
$15.19
$9.33
7.06%
41.98
Average hours worked per week  ..  	
Actual figures concerning 30,038 women and girl employees are shown in the above table.
These workers comprise the staffs of 5,232 firms, and their aggregate wages and salaries
for one week totalled $457,069.11, or an increase of $37,676.04 over the 1939 total.
The average weekly wage stood at $15.55, 3 cents lower than the 1939 figure.
The lowest legal wage for women 18 or over in the various classifications covered by
Orders of the Board is $12.75 in the mercantile industry, ranging up to $15.50 in the fishing
group. It will be seen, therefore, that taking all classes of employment together, the general
average is still above the highest minimum set by law.
While the Orders permit of a 48-hour week, the average week for 30,038 gainfully
employed women and girls was only 41.48 hours, a decrease of 0.76 over the average working-
week for the previous year.
The percentage of employees under 18 years of age or inexperienced decreased slightly
for the year from 5.44 per cent, of total in 1939 to 5.28 per cent, in 1940.
A reference to the tables shows five occupations in which the average wage for the adult
or experienced worker increased over the previous year's figure, these being the laundry,
office, telephone and telegraph, manufacturing, and fruit and vegetable industries. In one
industry—hotel and catering—the average remained steady with no change, and slight
decreases are noted in the three remaining, namely, the mercantile, personal service, and
fishing industries.
In studying the summary table it is noted that over 30,000 women and girls are taking
their part in the field of business in the Province. The records concerning these workers
deal only with classes of employment that are covered by Orders of the Board. The total
number of women gainfully employed would include domestic workers, farm-labourers, and
fruit-pickers, but these are definitely excluded from coverage by the provisions of the
" Female Minimum Wage Act." Returns are not requested for women and girls employed
in banks, as their conditions of employment are likewise not covered by Provincial legislation,
although in most cases their wages and hours compare favourably with those set by the
Board's Orders. E 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum for Experienced Workers.
Industry or
Occupation.
Legal
Minimum
Wage for
Full-time
Experienced
Employees.
Receiving Actual
Minimum Wage set
for Experienced
Workers.
Receiving More than
Minimum Wage set
for Experienced
Workers.
Receiving Less than
Minimum Wage set
for Experienced
Workers.
Total.
No. of
Employees.
Per Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per Cent.
$12.75*
13.50t
14.00*
16.00$
14.25§
15.50t
15.00t
14.00t
14.40t
1,601
93
1,886
1,563
130
1
102
369
140
24.71
7.06
37.92
21.01
21.42
0.95
5.31
10.41
3.84
3,057
540
1,760
4,964
240
36
1,585
1,666
2,240
47.17
40.97
35.38
66.74
39.54
34.29
82.46
47.00
61.39
1,822
685
1,328
911
237
68
235
1,510
1,269
28.12
51.97
26.70
12.25
39.04
64.76
12.23
42.59
34.77
6,480
Laundry	
Hotel and catering	
Office.....	
1,318
4,974
7,438
607
105
Telephone and Telegraph _— __
Manufacturing 	
Fruit and vegetable
1,922
3,545
3,649
Totals, 1940—	
5,885
5,882
19.59
21.40
16,088
14,364
53,56
52.25
8,065
7,243
26.85
26.35
30,038
Totals, 1939	
27,489
* 40 to 48 hours per week. f 48 hours per week. J 37^ to 48 hours per week.
§ Beauty-parlours, 40 to 44 hours per week ; public places of amusement, 40 to 48 hours per week."
Setting a new high, the percentage of employees included in the returns who were
receiving wages in excess of the legal minimum rose to 53.56 in 1940, as against 52.25 per
cent, for the previous year. The percentage of the total receiving the actual legal minimum
declined in accordance with the above increase, while in the remaining percentage of those
receiving less than the fixed rate only a fractional increase was evident. The latter group
comprises those younger and less skilled girls for whom lower rates are fixed, and those who
are working part time and are thus unable to earn a sum equal to the weekly rate set for
full-time employees.
The hotel and catering industry, with 37.92 per cent, receiving $14 per week, continued
to hold most closely to the rates fixed in the Orders.
Above the legal minimum the telephone and telegraph industry again leads, with 82.46
per cent, of its total employees receiving more than the fixed rate.
Office workers again hold second place, with 66.74 per cent, being paid in excess of the
legal standard. In the fruit and vegetable industry 61.39 per cent, were recorded as above
the rates fixed in the Orders. The mercantile industry showed 47.17 per cent, above the legal
minimum, followed by manufacturing employees, with 47 per cent, of their total paid in excess
of the requirements. Laundry workers amounting to 40.97 per cent, were paid above the
minimum required. In the personal service occupation 39.54 per cent, were shown as earning
above the minimum, and in the hotel and catering group 35.38 per cent.
Each year attention is drawn to the highest weekly wage in each occupation. For 1940
a weekly salary of $65 was highest recorded in the mercantile industry. Top figure in the
laundry, cleaning and dyeing industry was a weekly wage of $28.90. Highest wage in the
hotel and catering industry was a weekly wage of $52.20. In the office group the most
remunerative position carried a salary of $75. Of employees in the personal service occupation, one was recorded as receiving $50 per week. The highest wage earned and reported in
the fishing group was $30 weekly. High figure reported in the telephone and telegraph
classifications was $42.60, and in the manufacturing industry $50 weekly. In the fruit and
vegetable industry one employee was reported as having received $43.10 for her week's work. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 43
Table showing Number of Single, Married, and Widowed Employees
and their earnings for week reported.
Industry or Occupation.
Single.
Earnings.
Married.
Earnings.
Widowed.
Earnings.
Total
Earnings
for Week
reported.
5,158
912
3,324
6,159
443
60
1,459
2,488
1,763
$63,638.52
11,247.07
45,600.35
111,354.95
5,442.05
799.72
27,132.64
33,856.68
27,427.92
1,128
351
1,295
1,067
145
42
409'
944
1,816
$15,655.97
4,670.01
17,597.16
19,263.37
2,078.60
618.77
7,292.75
14,235.79
31,518.54
194
55
355
212
19
3
54
113 ■
70
$3,153.32
765.16
4,978.16
4,137.52
326.40
65.38
1,108.31
1,809.39
1,294.61
$82,447.81
Laundry 	
16,682.24
68,175.67
Office                     	
134,755.84
Personal service  	
7,847.05
1,483.87
35,533.70
Manufacturing 	
Fruit and vegetable 	
49,901.86
60,241.07
Totals  	
21,766
$326,499.90
7,197
$112,930.96
1,075
$17,638.25
$457,069.11
72.46%
74.49%
23.96%
21.99%
3.58%
3.52%
1
1939 per cent 	
The percentage of unmarried employees decreased slightly to 72.46 per cent, in 1940 as
against 74.49 per cent, in 1939. Married workers showed a corresponding increase and a
fractional gain was noted in the widowed class.
As in the previous year, the fruit and vegetable industry continued to show the highest
proportion of married workers.
The returns showed a negligible number as having been divorced or separated, and it
was therefore not considered necessary to compile separate figures for them, the figures
being included in the totals of the married workers.
•    Table showing Years of Service of Employees with Employers
reporting for 1940.
Name of Industry.
CJ  >' CJ
_q  O +J
ill
3 g P.
3.5
Mercantile..
Laundry	
Hotel and catering-
Office  	
Personal service	
Fishing-	
Telephone and telegraph-
Manufacturing	
Fruit and vegetable	
Totals .
3,616
453
2,354
1,837
245
70
414
1571 1,419
685| 1,526
177
56
217
117
35
664
208
733
1,035
108
18
228
449
454
410
127
419
652
67
5
85
339
274
354
108
321
662
26
212
239
211
287
71
234
516
27
6
182
190
132
169
65
152
353
18
79
128
103
122
34
68
272
14
1
34
105
57
95
20
57
173
9
3
20
61
54
65
19
61
146
9
2
10
44
30
47
14
50
129
9
20
35
17
1,447 11,934(3,897
2,378
2,133|1,645
707
492
386
474
143
308
1,546
40
635
379
106
6,480
1,318
4,974
7,438
607
105
1,922
3,545
3,649
815
124
943
2,417
214
10
132
501
76
3,631
30,038
5,232
The table indicating the length of time each woman employee had been on the staff of
the employer who sent in the return sets out the length of service according to occupation.
Increasing employment is noted in the total employees working less than one year, which
figure continued to rise over the previous year.
In compiling the figures, the employee in each occupation with the greatest number of
years to her credit was noted. In the mercantile industry one employee was listed with
33 years' service. In the laundry, cleaning and dyeing industry one employee was shown
with 30 years. Longest service in the hotel and catering section was 32 years. One office
employee was credited with 43 years' service. In the personal service occupation the long-
service record was 24 years. In the fishing group the longest shown was 8 years. The
telephone and telegraph industry credited one worker with 34 years with her present firm.
In the manufacturing industry 36 years was the longest service, and the fruit and vegetable
group listed one employee with a long-service record of 23 years. INSPECTIONS AND COLLECTIONS.
The inspection staff throughout the Province made 15,492 investigations at plants and
establishments covered by Orders of the Board. This was an increase of 900 over the 1939
total.
Detailed written reports are made when the inspections take place. These are checked
and filed for reference with the Department.
During their regular routine work the inspectors are accorded hearty co-operation by
most employers and officials of firms or establishments with whom they come in contact, and
everything possible is done to facilitate their work. Occasionally, however, they encounter
various difficulties that make their work extremely arduous. While some few employers are
blameworthy in this respect certain employees also have added considerably to the problems
of the inspection staff, often not disclosing all the facts when registering a complaint, or
making a distorted picture of their grievance. Infinite tact and patience are required by the
Inspectors in performing their duties.
When it is found that employees have been paid less than the sums to which they are
legally entitled under the Orders of the Board, they are assisted by the Inspectors in having
the necessary adjustments made.
Under the " Female Minimum Wage Act" 507 women and girls employed by 393 firms
received arrears due them in the sum of $10,784.06.
Adjustments were made under the " Male Minimum Wage Act " for 807 men and boys
employed by 445 firms.    The arrears recovered amounted to $27,642.48.
Following convictions for failure to pay the minimum wage the Courts ordered payment
of arrears to employees in the sum of $4,575.30.
A total sum, therefore, of $43,001.84 was distributed to employees throughout the
Province. This represents the difference between what they were entitled to and what they
had been paid by their respective employers. Not only is this tangible evidence of protection
afforded workers under the various Orders of the Board, but it helps the fair employer to
compete against a less scrupulous rival.
Some employees take action in the Civil Courts on their own behalf for recovery of wages
due them, but naturally the Board would have no record of the amounts collected in this way.
COURT CASES, 1940.
When infractions of labour laws occur the policy of the Department has been to refrain
from Court action if satisfactory settlement can be made by other means. If such efforts
fail, or in instances where repeated or wilful violations are discovered, the Board must of
necessity institute proceedings against the offenders.
The following is a summary of Court cases segregated by Statutes under which prosecutions were obtained.
The nature of the charge in each case is briefly noted: Fourteen cases were dismissed
and three withdrawn, these are not included in the following recital of cases.
Cases.
Convictions.
Dismissed or
Withdrawn.
27
29
63
41
8
1
24
26
61
32
8
1
D., 3
" Male Minimum Wage Act "   —	
D., 3
D., 3
D., 6 ; W., 3
169
152
D.. 14; W., 3 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 45
COURT CASES—Continued.
Female Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Moonlight Roller Rink (Geo. C. Dowling),
1129  Howe  Street,  Vancouver
Old Dutch Mill (Herbert Roake), 730 Seymour Street, Vancouver
Star Cafe"   (Charlie Wong),  Trail  _-
Mrs. Nao Teranishi, 433 Powell Street,
Vancouver
Apex Knitting Mills (Mah Gore), 89 Pender
Street  "West,   Vancouver
Mrs. Lisa Forsberg (Blondie's Boarding
House), Port Alberni
K.   H.   Grenfell,  Nelson - -	
Kuo Kong Silk Company, 27 Pender Street
East, Vancouver
Salmo Hotel   (Mrs. Ida Gray), Salmo _ __.
Charles   Korsh,   Ltd.,   560   Cambie   Street,
Vancouver
Richelieu   Cafe,   Ltd.    (Scott's   Cafe),   722
Granville Street, Vancouver
Rivers, Ltd., 728 Robson Street, Vancouver
John  Rahel,   Fernie  - — -	
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Failure to keep records   [Fined $10;   default, ten days.
I
Failure to pay minimum wage  I Fined $25 ; costs, $2.50 ; pay arrears,
$58.80.
Failure to keep records  —
Failure to pay minimum wage .
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Fined  $10;   costs,  $2.50.
Fined   $25;    costs,   $2.50;    default,
ten days ;   pay arrears, $16.42.
Fined $25 ;   ordered to pay arrears,
$31.50.
Suspended sentence ;   ordered to pay
arrears, $80.
Fined  $25;
$1.
Fined $25;
Zetta   Sandall,   954   Granville   Street,   Vancouver
Simpson Bros., Fort Langley -	
Mike Vatkin, West Grand Forks- -	
Dubbel    Wear    Uniforms,    1390    Granville
Street,   Vancouver
Muir  Cafe   (Johnny Wong),   106  Hastings
Street  East,  Vancouver
Van's   Cafe    (H.   Vandrick),    203   Carrol
Street,   Vancouver
Patricia Cafe  (Aris Catsirclas), Cranbrook
Patricia Cafe   (Aris Catsirclas), Cranbrook
Rio Cafe (C. B. Feedham), 3325 Kingsway,
Vancouver
Vancouver   Paper   Box,   Ltd.,    245   Union
Street, Vancouver
Wallace Bakery  (R. W. Hall), Kimberley .
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to pay minimum wage _ _
Failure to keep  true and correct
records
Failure to produce records	
Failure  to  keep  true and correct
records
Failure to pay minimum wage __	
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
$37.05.
Fined $10
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage .__	
Failure  to  keep  true  and  correct
records
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage .
ordered to pay arrears,
ordered to pay arrears,
costs,  $4.25.
Suspended sentence;   costs,  $2.
Fined $10;   default, distress.
Fined $10;   costs,   $5.
Fined $10;   costs, $4.25.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$17.60.
Fined $25 ;   pay arrears, $42.
Fined $25 ;   costs,  $6;   pay arrears,
$30.30.
Fined   $25   or   two   months;     pay
arrears,   $9.31.
Fined   $25;    in   default,   one  month.
Suspended sentence ;   ordered to pay
arrears, $70.40.
Fined $25.
Fined $10; costs, $2.75.
Suspended sentence : costs, $5 ; pay
arrears, $28.70; in default, two
months.
Fined $25;   pay arrears. $150.
Fined $25 ; ordered to pay arrears,
$23.29.
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Capita]   Produce    (So   Fong   Chan),   2779
Commercial Drive, Vancouver
Glacier Lumber Co., Ltd., Nelson 	
John Phillipoff,  Winlaw  ,	
Burnaby   Poultry   Products    (H.   Fedler),
Vancouver
McGarrigle  Bros.,  Northfield,   V.I.- __ _
P.  Bain Lumber  Co.,  Ltd.,  New Westminster
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to keep records  ___..
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Costs, $3.50 ; ordered to pay arrears,
$30.82; default, two months.
Fined $50 ; costs, $14.10 ; pay arrears,
$9.20.
Fined $25 ; costs, $7.75.
Suspended sentence; ordered to pay
arrears, $40.
Suspended   sentence;   paid   arrears,
$16.
Suspended   sentence;   paid   arrears,
$30.50. E 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Male Minimum Wage Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Failure to keep daily records   	
Fined $20 ; costs, $7.
K.  Kamimura,   Mission.- — —_ —-	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Fined $50 ; pay arrears, $34.38.
Mayo Bros. Lumber Co., Ltd., Paldi, V.I...
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Fined $50 ; pay arrears, $59.
K.   Shikaze,  Mission.... „__ ___ ___ —	
Failure to keep proper records	
Suspended sentence.
Colin Cameron, Fort Steele.....   	
Failure to pay minimum wage (two
Fined   $50;   costs,   $11.85;   pay   ar
charges)
rears, $52.05.
Fined $10.
Vancouver
Merchants    Express   Delivery    (Jack    Gra
Failure to keep records    	
Suspended sentence.
ham), 515 Davie Street, Vancouver
T. A. Ryan, 606 Homer Street, Vancouver.
Failure to pay minimum wage ... ...
Fined $50 and costs; pay arrears,
$5.85.
Tip   Top   Cleaners   &   Dyers,   4291   Main
Street, Vancouver
Fined $50 ; pay arrears, $17.
Catara  Singh   (Granville Island),  Vancou
Failure to pay minimum wage
Fined $150; pay arrears, $212.50.
ver
(three charges)
La   Salle  Delivery   Co.,   726   Homer   Street,
Failure to produce records	
Fined $10 and costs or ten days.
Vancouver
Otto W. Becker, 796 Albert Street, Nanaimo
Failure to pay minimum wage 	
Fined $10 ; costs, $2.50.
Otto W. Becker, 796 Albert Street, Nanaimo
Failure to keep proper records	
Fined $150; costs, $2.50; pay arrears, $28.80.
Deep Bay Logging Co., Ltd., Fanny Bay....
Failure to pay minimum wage..	
Fined $50 ; ordered to pay arrears,
$119.
John Doubinin, Jr., Castlegar...	
Failure  to  keep  true  and  correct
records
Fined $25 ; costs, $5.25.
English   Bay   Produce    (K.   Kazuta),   1200
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Suspended sentence.
Denman Street, Vancauver
Wright's  Shipyards,  foot of Broughton
Failure  to  keep  true  and  correct
Fined $10.
Street, Vancouver
records
" Hours of Work Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Granville Market  (I. Kariya), 1548 Forty-
first Avenue West, Vancouver
Mrs.    M.    Isezaki,    2229    Granville    Street,
Vancouver
Model Cafe, 30 Hastings Street East, Vancouver
New   Atlantic   Cafe,   130   Hastings   Street
East, Vancouver
New Metropolitan Cafe, 50 Hastings Street
East, Vancouver
Sun On Market, 2723 Granville Street, Vancouver
Times Square Market, 5756 Granville Street,
Vancouver
Mrs.   Ida   Forsberg   (Blondie's   Boarding
House), Port Alberni
Dick Bros., 3742 Tenth Avenue West, Vancouver
McGarrigle Bros., Northfield, V.I.. 	
National Dry Goods  Co.,  28 Market Alley,
Vancouver
D.   J.   Smith   Equipment   Co.,   Ltd.,   1381
Franklin Street, Vancouver
City Groceteria,  Mission   — —
The Bay Cleaners (Mrs. Tomeko Hayashi),
788 Denman  Street,  Vancouver
Consumers Meat Pool, Ltd., Main and Pender Streets, Vancouver
Employing a person outside hours
posted on schedule
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Employing a person outside hours
posted on schedule
Employing a person outside hours
posted on schedule
Failure to post notice 	
Employing a person outside hours
posted on schedule
Employing a person outside hours
posted on schedule
Failure to keep records __	
Failure to post notice of hours _
Failure to keep records .
Failure to keep records..
Excessive hours..
Excessive hours—.	
Keeping false records-
Failure to post schedule of hours..
Fined $25 ; default, one month.
Fined $15 ; default, five days.
Fined $25 ; default, 30 days.
Costs, $5.
Fined $25 ;  default, one month.
Fined $25 ; default, one month.
Fined $25 ; default, one month.
Fined $10 ; default, six days.
Suspended sentence ;  costs, $2.50.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence ; costs, $2.50.
Fined $50.
Suspended sentence ; costs, $3.
Fined $25 ; default, one month.
Fined $25 and costs. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 47
COURT CASES—Continued.
Hours of Work Act "—Continued,
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Consumers Meat Pool, Ltd., Main and Pender Streets,  Vancouver
Eiete   Dressmakers    (Mrs.   K.   Tabayashe),
1490 Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver
National   Lunch,   Ltd.,   737   Pender   Street
West, Vancouver
Rapid   Cleaners   (K.   Tahara),   111   Pender
Street West,  Vancouver
Rays,   Limited,   2434   Main   Street,   Vancouver
Kitugero  Tanaka,   394  Powell  Street,  Vancouver
S.  Yamanaka Boat Works, Steveston	
Jawant   Singh,   c/o   Albion   Lumber   Co.,
Albion
K.  Lwata,  368  Cordova  Street East,  Vancouver
Shores,    Ltd.,    409    Hastings   Street   West,
Vancouver
Catara   Singh,   c/o   Overseas   Wood   Products, Granville Island, Vancouver
M.  Furuya Co.,  Ltd., Mission 	
Excessive hours _
Failure  to  keep  true  and  correct
records
Excessive hours ..  - .._.
Excessive hours
Excessive hours
Excessive hours
Failure to post notice..
Excessive hours	
Failure to post notice re hours of
work
Failure to post notice	
Quan Chee, 1019 Blanshard Street, Victoria
Sunnyside Cafe, 631 Main Street, Vancouver
U. & S. Lumber Co., Ltd., North Vancouver
S. T. Wallace, 3932 Hastings Street East,
Burnaby
Davie Fruit Market (Y. Kajina), 1602
Davie Street, Vancouver
Deep  Bay Logging Co., Ltd., Fanny Bay.....
Failure  to  keep  true  and  correct
records
Employing a person outside hours
shown on schedule
Employing a person outside hours
shown on schedule
Failure to post notice re hours of
work
Failure to keep records.—	
Failure to post notice..
Deep Bay Logging Co., Ltd., Fanny Bay„..
Deep Bay Logging Co., Ltd., Fanny Bay.....
Disher Specialties, 1152 Fifty-third Avenue
East, Vancouver
Glacier Lumber Co., Ltd., Nelson	
Glacier Lumber Co., Ltd., Nelson,- 	
Granville Market   (I.  Kariya),  154S  Forty-
first Avenue West, Vancouver
Granville   Fruit-Teria   (K.   Kituta),   2705
Granville Street, Vancouver
Mrs.   Y.   Katayma,   5971   Boulevard   West,
Vancouver
Sunon   Market   (Jimmy  Kai),   2723   Granville Street,  Vancouver
Barclay  Grocery   (F.  Harai),  1500 Barclay
Street, Vancouver
David Lum Produce  (Quon Wo), 536 Richards Street, Vancouver
Ideal   Delivery   System    (K.   Kovich),   723
Nelson Street. Vancouver
Kuo   Kong   Silk,   Ltd.,   27   Pender   Street
East, Vancouver
Morning   Star   Cafe,   79   Cordova   Street
West, Vancouver
Nu-Way Cleaners  &  Dyers   (John  Zacks),
1660 Fourth Avenue West, Vancouver
Cameron Lake Logging Co., Ltd., Coombs
Employing a person outside hours
shown on schedule
Failure  to  keep  true  and  correct
records
Excessive hours 	
Excessive hours   	
Employing a person outside hours
shown on schedule
Excessive hours..	
Excessive hours ___..
Employing a person outside hours
posted on schedule
Failure to post notice 	
Employing a person outside hours
posted on schedule
Failure to post schedule..  _,
Employing a person outside hours
posted on schedule
Failure to keep proper records	
Failure  to   keep   record  of  hours
worked
Employing a person outside hours
posted on schedule
Failure to post notice of shifts	
Employing a person outside the
hours shown on the schedule
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Fined $25 and costs.
Fined $10 ; default, five days.
Fined $50 ; default, distress.
Fined $25 ; default, one month.
Fined $50 ; default, distress.
Fined $25 ; default, one month.
Fined $25.
Fined $15 ; costs, $3.75.
Suspended sentence; costs, $5.
Suspended sentence ; costs, $2.50.
Fined $10.
Fined $25 and costs.
Fined $25.
Fined $10 ; default, five days.
Fined $10 ; costs, $6.
Fined $25.
Fined $25 ; in default, one month.
Fined $250 ; costs, $1.75.
Fined $25.
Fined $25.
Fined $25 ; default, thirty days.
(This case appealed.)
Fined $25 ; costs, $6.25.
Fined $25.
Fined $25 ; in default, one month.
Fined $25.
Fined $25 ; in default, one month.
Fined $25 ; in default, one month.
Fined $25 ; in default, one month.
Fined $10 ; in default, ten days.
Fined $10 and costs.
Suspended sentence ; costs, $5.
Fined $25 ; in default, one month.
Fined $25.
Fined $250 and costs. E 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
Hours op Work Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Jane Wesson Day, 335 Victoria Street, Kam
Excessive hours  *  	
loops
Jane Wesson Day, 335 Victoria Street, Kam
Excessive hours   	
Fined $50 or one month.
loops
cessive hours
cessive hours
Fined $25
hours posted
Fined $25
Parkview   Produce   Co.    (Quon   Sam),   874
Employing   a  person   outside  the
Fined $25 ; default, one month.
Robson Street, Vancouver
hours shown on schedule
records
Bains Confectionery   (C. J. Munroe), 2526
Excessive hours..	
Fined $25 or one month.
Main Street, Vancouver
Best Meat Market  (A. M. Brink), 706 Co
Excessive hours..	
Fined $25 or two months.
lumbia Street, New Westminster
Chris's  Cafe   (C.  Stamatis),  872  Granville
Failure to post schedule of hours	
Suspended sentence.
Street, Vancouver
Pioneer   Heating   Experts   (Mrs.   Agnes
Excessive hours  ....
Suspended sentence ;  costs, $2, or
Skelding),  1287 Hastings Street East,
three days.
Vancouver
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
J.   G.   Billings   (Northern   Tie   &   Lumber
Co.,  Ltd.), Ladysmith
W.  T.  Hamilton   (Northern Tie & Lumber
Co.,  Ltd.),  Ladysmith
Helge  Borup,  Vancouver „
Thos.  S.  Lawrie,  Mission	
F. W. Scott, Port Coquitlam-
Dibben Sawmill, Wingdam and Wells..
John Negreiff, Trail- -—	
Cascade Mining & Milling Syndicate (P. E.
Tufts), 821 Pender Street West, Vancouver
Kootenay Steam Laundry (C. A. Larsen),
Nelson
U. & S. Lumber Co., Ltd., North Vancouver
Deep Bay Logging Co., Ltd., Fanny Bay.-.
Guildford Lumber Co.,  Penny	
Matsqui Lath & Band Mill, Matsqui.—	
Sigfrid Ekholm,   Magna Bay-
John Robilliard, Bear Creek, Chase	
Wilber H. Scouton, Harper Valley, Chase..
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
(five charges). Above cases appealed and the appeal sustained
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
(five charges). Above cases appealed and the appeal sustained
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
(six charges)
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
(two charges)
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
(six charges)
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
(three charges)
Fined   $25   in   each   case   and   costs ;
default, three months ;  ordered to
pay arrears, $1,224.
Fined   $25   in   each  case   and   costs;
default, three months ;  ordered to
pay arrears, $1,224.
Fined   $25   and   costs;     ordered   to
pay  arrears,   $27.
Fined  $25;    costs,   $10.25 ;    ordered
to  pay  arrears,   $138.
Suspended   sentence;    default,   fourteen days ;    ordered to pay arrears,
$37.50.
Fined  $125;   costs,   $12.50;   default,
one month ;  pay arrears, $1,077.13.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $100 ;   default, distress.
Fined $50.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$21.20.
Fined $25.
Fined $25 ;   costs,  $2.50.
Fined $25 ; costs, $2.50 ; pay arrears,
$73.30.
Fined    $25;     costs,    $8.90    or    one
month;    pay   arrears,   $75.19,   or
two months in jail.
Fined   $25   or   two   months   in   jail;
ordered to pay arrears, $464.53.
Fined $25 ;   ordered to pay arrears,
$185.98. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 49
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Factories Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Apex Knitting Mills (Mah Gore), 89 Pender Street West, Vancouver
Jaw (Chow) Gan, 15 Pender Street West,
Vancouver
National Dry Goods Co. (Gee Hong Sing),
28 Market Street, Vancouver
Henry Quon, 28 Market Alley, Vancouver...
H. L. Cummings (Cummings Cleaners and
Dyers), 4-7 Eighth Street, New Westminster
Lemon-Gonnason Co.,  Ltd., Victoria „..__
Edward Y. Hammer, Ltd., 880 Granville
Street, Vancouver
Hong Lee Laundry, 1207 Robson Street,
Vancouver
Did unlawfully employ a home-
worker without a permit
Did unlawfully employ a home-
worker without a permit
Did unlawfully employ a home-
worker without a permit
Being an employee, did unlawfully perform home-work without a permit
Excessive hours	
Employing child in factory ___	
Violation of section 12  	
Violation of section 4 (2)	
Suspended sentence ; costs, $2.50.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $10.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $50.
Fined $50.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $50 and costs.
" Criminal Code."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Falsifying employment record with
intent  to   deceive.     Chapter   56,
Criminal Code   (Canada),  Part
VII., section 415a (6)
Fined $300.
m]
.1
COMPARATIVE  WAGES, 1918, 1938, 1939, 1940.
Figures showing- comparative wage trends are furnished in the following tables for the
year 1918, when data were first compiled, and for the three most recent years—namely, 1938,
1939, and 1940.    It will be noted these relate to non-seasonal occupations only.
Mercantile Industry
1918.
1938.
1939.
1940.
Average weekly wages—
$12.71
$7.70
15.49%
$13.58
$10.12
8.73%
$13.66
$10.08
7.12%
$13.09
$8.45
7.84%
Percentage of employees under 18 years 	
Laundry Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years _ 	
Employees under 18 years _	
Percentage of employees under 18 years__
$11.80
$9.78
21.80%
$13.18
$8.60
6.03%
$12.90
$8.23
4.74%
$12.98
$8.23
6.83%
Hotel and Catering Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 ye^rs__ __ 	
Employees under 18 years 	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$14.23
$11.77
5.51%
$13.72
$11.51
2.32%
$13.80
$11.34
2.10%
$13.80
$11.00
3.28% E 50
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Office Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
$16.53
$10.88
7.45%
$18.20
$11.87
1.28%
$18.19
$11.44
1.30%
$18.22
$11.61
Percentage of employees under 18 years..	
1.57%
Personal Service Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
$13.83
$13.58
S13.87
$7.51
2.63%,
$13.28
Employees under 18 years    	
$6.96
15.38%
$4.13
2.75%
$5.05
4.28%
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
$15.55
$11.90
8.70%
$18.33
$7.76
3.09%
$18.16
$10.14
6.06%
Inexperienced employees  	
Percentage of inexperienced employees 	
$9.73
2.60%
Manufacturing Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees.-	
Inexperienced employees.. —	
Percentage of inexperienced employees-
$14.84
$9.28
13.65%
SPECIAL LICENCES.
The " Female Minimum Wage Act " makes provision for the issuance of special licences
to inexperienced women and girls who are desirous of learning any industry, business, trade,
or occupation in respect of which a minimum wage has been fixed, if the Board is satisfied
that such employees have not had sufficient experience to qualify them as experienced
employees.
After application forms have been received by the Board and checked, licences may be
issued, at the discretion of the Board, at learners' rates specified in the various Orders, when
the Board is of the opinion that the application has been made in good faith by employer and
employee.
The original copy of the licence, setting out a sliding scale of wages, leading up to the
minimum set for experienced employees, is sent to the employee and a duplicate goes to the
employer.
If the application or investigation discloses previous experience in the line of work
sought, credit is given for this when the licence is granted.
In some cases the applications reveal that a higher rate will be paid at the commencement of employment than the specific Order requires. The Board takes cognizance of this in
issuing the licence, and sets the starting-wage at the higher figure.
When employees under licence prove their worth, some employers increase the wages
sooner than the licence requires.
The Act limits the number holding licences to not more than one-seventh of the total
number of female employees in a plant or establishment. Where less than seven are employed one may be working under licence.
During the year 1,184 licences were issued to inexperienced female employees, being 203
more than in 1939. '  They were granted in the undermentioned occupations as follows:— REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940. E 51
Number
Industl'y or Occupation. of Licences
issued.
Telephone and telegraph   7
Personal service   16
Laundry, cleaning and dyeing  96
Mercantile     117
Manufacturing     284
Office    297
Hotel and catering   367
Total 1,184
Licences may also be issued for two groups of young men in the mercantile industry.
A scale is set for inexperienced boys from 18 to 21 years of age and another scale for youths
from 21 to 24 years of age.
In 1940 there were issued 143 licences in these classifications, being 37 more than in the
previous year.
CONCLUSION.
As coverage of additional occupations or industries by Orders is effected the Board's
responsibilities are increased correspondingly, but its policy of rendering fair and just treatment to all remains unchanged.
Before new Orders are made, or existing ones amended, the greatest care is expended
to ensure that improved conditions of employment will prevail for those to be covered.
On account of demands upon employer and employee that may have to be met in the
future, due to the fact this Province is striving to play a worthy part in connection with the
war, our Board bespeaks the continued co-operation of all with whom it functions.
Our thanks are extended to all those who have made our work during the past year
productive of satisfactory results..
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. E 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO " MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
BAKING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 17, Effective November 23rd, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or cakes.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—
40c.
25c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
48
48
48
20 years and under 21 years   _ __ __	
48
54
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
BARBERING  (MALE).
Order No. 42, Effective June 14th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 8.)
Barbering shall have the meaning set out in section 2 of the " Barbers Act," chapter 5, Statutes,
1924, and amendments.
Occupation.
Rate.
Hours per Week,
$18.00 week
45c. per hour
Daily minimum, $1.80
(Maximum hours, 48 per week.)
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to indentured apprentices.
BOX-MANUFACTURING (MALE).
Order No. 55, Effective April 4th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 37 and Order No. 7.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the making of wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel
staves and heads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, or other wooden containers.
Hours per Week.
Adult males. 90% of total 	
Adult males, 10% of total, not less than .
Males, 18 to 21 years of age	
Males, under 18 years of age  —_	
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)  Above rates apply only to those not included in any other Order of the Board.
(6.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
BUS-DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 70, Effective March 18th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. SI.)
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which service a charge is
made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
60c.
55c.
75c.
40 to 50.
Less than 40.
In excess of 9 hours
in any one day or
50 hours in any one
week. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 53
BUS-DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 70a, Effective June 27th, 1940.
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of a bus-driver
while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by a bus-driver from the time
he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty until he returns again to his employer's
headquarters or garage where he originally reported for duty; and shall include the time occupied by
a bus-driver in dead-heading from his employer's headquarters or garage to the place where he is to
take charge of the bus and vice versa; but the minimum wage shall not apply to waiting-time of a bus-
driver when occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads. 	
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 66, Effective August 21st, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 40.)
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esauimalt,
Highland, Metchosin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew.—
75c
48.
Note.— (a.) Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.) .Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(e.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 58, Effective November 7th, 1938.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
75c.
48.
Note.— (a.) Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 65, Effective August 1st, 1939.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area: Provincial Electoral Districts of.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
76c.
75c.
76c.
75c.
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act.**
(6.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly. E 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 72, Effective May 27th, 1940.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the erection and construction of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
All carpentry work within a radius of 5 miles from the centre of the City of
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 73, Effective May 27th, 1940.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the erection and construction of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any
existing building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
All carpentry work within a radius of 5 miles from the centre of the City of
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 68, Effective September 11th, 1939.
" Christmas-tree   industry"  includes   all  operations   in   or  incidental  to   the   cutting,
hauling, and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Male employees, 85 per cent, not less than 40c. per hour.
Permissible, 15 per cent, not less than 30c. per hour.
Note.—-(a.) Wages shall be paid semi-monthly,
(b.)   The above is a new order in place of Order No. 61, which expired December 81st, 1938.
gathering,
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 12 (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 12, Order No. 12k, Order No. 123, Order No. 45, and Order No. 45A.)
Includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or demolition of any building, railway,
tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well,
telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of
construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of any such work or structure.
Area.
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate,
under 21 YearB.
Hours per
Week.
Vancouver, West "Vancouver, North Vancouver, Point Grey, Victoria, Nanaimo, New Westminster, Prince Rupert, Esquimalt,
45c.
40c.
25c.
30c.
48
48
Notb.— (a.)   Above rates do not apply to indentured apprentices under
(b.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
Apprenticeship Act.' REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 55
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS  (MALE).
Order No. 54, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 32.)
Includes every male elevator operator and starter.
SVA to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37^6 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37^c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.60.
Note.— (a.)  Full week's board (21 meals), $4.00 per week.
(6.) Individual meals, twenty cents (20c.) each.
(c.)  Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven  (7) days, $2.00 per week,
(e.)  Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/.)   Uniforms or special wearing-apparel, required by the employer, must be supplied and laundered without
cost to the employee.
(0.)  The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(h.)   Employees must be given twenty-four  (24) consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(t.)  Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS   (FEMALE).
Order No. 53, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. SO and Order No. 5.)
Includes every female operator and starter.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37 %c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.—As for male elevator operators, see Order No. 54.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM  (MALE).
Order No. 18, Effective March 1st, 1935.
Includes every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while under
steam-pressure or in motion. " Special engineer " means holder of a special or temporary certificate.
(See "Boiler Inspection Act," section 28  (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Engineer	
Engineer, special _
60c.
40c.
48
48
Note.— (a.)  Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the "Hours of Work Act " 48 hours per week
may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(b.)  For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(c.)   Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 40 cents
per hour (Order 18b).
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS   (MALE).
Order No. 39 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 39.)
First-aid attendant means every male employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid attendant
under the authority of a certificate of competency in first aid, satisfactory to the Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia, and designated by his employer as the first-aid attendant in charge.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Rate.
$4.00
4 00
50c.
50c.
Note.— (a.) "Hours of Work Act" regulates the daily hours in the industry, but should overtime be necessary,
attendant must be paid overtime rate.
(b.) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any industry or occupation within an industry, the first-aid
attendant employed in such industry or occupation must be paid such higher rate.
(c.) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the medical practitioner or hospital. E 56
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
FISHING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Effective since February 28th, 1920.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
the case of canned fish.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50 per week.
32%4C. per hour.
$12.75 per week for 1st 4 months.
13.75 per week for 2nd 4 months.
14.75 per week for 3rd 4 months.
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 47, Effective July 12th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 22.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use of any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First 10 hours
38e.
11th and 12th hours
67c.
In excess of 12 hours
76c.
First 10 hours
28c.
11th and 12th hours
42c.
In excess of 12 hours
56c.
21 years or over,.
Under 21 years..
(Not to exceed 15 per cent, of male employees in plant.)
Note.— (1.) In cases where employees' regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 hours
per day, no deduction shall be made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.) Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(4.)   Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 46, Effective July 12th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 21.)
Includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
30c.
(Payable to 90 per cent, of employees.)
45c.
60c.
25c
(Payable to 10 per cent, of employees.)
37%c.
50c.
Note.—(1.) In cases where employees' regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 houra
per day, no deduction shall be made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.)  Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(4.)  Daily guarantee of three hours' work. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 57
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 62, Effective February 14th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 30 and Order No. S.)
Includes the work of females in:—
(a.) Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which a charge
is made.
(6.) Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets, banquet halls,
cafeterias, tea-rooms, lunch-rooms, lunch-counters, ice-cream parlours, soda fountains, hospitals, nursing-
homes, clubs, dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial establishments or
office buildings or schools, or any other place where food is cooked, prepared, and served, for which a
charge is made; whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or in
connection with any other business.
This Order does not apply to females employed as graduate or undergraduate nurses in hospitals,
nursing-homes, or other similar establishments.
Experienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
1
37%c. per hour.
Daily guarantee, $1.50.
Inexperienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 per week, 1st 2 months.
10.50 per week, 2nd 2 months.
12.00 per week, 3rd 2 months.
14.00 per week thereafter.
Licences required for all inexperienced employees
working at above rates.
25c. per hour, 1st 2 months.
30c. per hour, 2nd 2 months.
35c. per hour, 3rd 2 months.
37*£c. per hour thereafter.
Daily guarantee of four (4) hours pay per day.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board  (21 meals), $4.00 per week.
(6.)   Individual meals, twenty cents  (20c.) each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(a\)  Pull week's lodging of seven  (7) days, $2.00 per week.
(e.) Emergency overtime up to ten (10) hours per day, but not to exceed fifty-two (52) hours in any one
(1) week.
(/.) Time and one-half shall be paid for all hours in excess of eight (8) in the day, or forty-eight (48) in
the week.
(a.) Split shifts shall be confined within fourteen (14) hours from commencement of such split shift. (See
Order 52B.)
(/i.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(».) Uniforms or special wearing-apparel required by the employer must be supplied and laundered free of cost
to the employee.
{j.)   Accidental breakages shall not be charged to employees.
(k.)   Employees must be given twenty-four  (24)  consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(I.)   See Order 52f for "Resort Hotels."
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 52b, Effective May 19th, 1938.
Allows a split shift to be spread over 14 hours immediately following commencement of work,
thereby cancelling section 8 of Order No. 52. Every employee whose split shift extends over 12 hours
shall be paid at the rate of one and one-half times her regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of her work.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 52h  (Resort Hotels), Effective June 14th, 1941, to September 13th, 1941.
(Superseding Orders 52A, 52d, and 52F.)
Covers the work of females in any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or lodging are furnished to the general public, for which a charge is made.
Allowing:—
Hours not to exceed ten (10) in any one day, nor more than fifty-four (54) in any one week.
Hours in excess of forty-eight  (48) in any one week shall be paid at not less than time and one-
half (1%) of the legal rate fixed in Order No. 52, or her regular rate of pay.
Provides for a rest period of twenty-four (24) consecutive hours in each calendar week. E 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 51, Effective November 22nd, 1937.
Includes the manufacture of kitchen furniture, dining-room furniture, bedroom furniture, living-
room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of household furniture, customarily manufactured in
a furniture factory.
Males.
Hours per Week.
21 years of age or over 	
Under 17 years of age:„ _	
17 years and under 18 years of age__
18 years and under 19 years of age_-
19 years and under 20 years of age._
20 years and under 21 years of age_
48
48
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)   60 per cent, of all male employees must be paid not less than 40c. per hour.
(6.)   This Order does not apply to apprentices duly indentured under the " Apprenticeship Act."
JANITORS  (MALE).
Order No. 43, Effective June 1st, 1937.
Order No. 43a, Effective January 23rd, 1941.
(Superseding Order No. 23, in Effect from April 18th, 1935, and Order No. 23 A, in Effect from
October 3rd, 1935.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner, or janitor-fireman.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings of four  (4)  residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $27.00 per month
6 residential suites, $30.00 per month
7 residential suites, $33.00 per month
8 residential suites, $36.00 per month
9 residential suites, $39.00 per month
10 residential suites, $42.00 per month
11 residential suites, $45.00 per month
12 residential suites, $48.00 per month
13 residential suites, $51.00 per month
14 residential suites, $54.00 per month
15 residential suites, $57.20 per month
16 residential suites, $60.50 per month
17 residential suites, $63.80 per month
18 residential suites, $67.10 per month
19 residential suites, $70.40 per month
20 residential suites, $73.70 per month
21 residential suites, $77.00 per month
22 residential suites, $80.30 per month
23 residential suites, $82.50 per month
24 residential suites, $84.70 per month
25 residential suites, $86.90 per month
26 residential suites, $89.10 per month
27 residential suites, $91.30 per month
29 residential
30 residential
31 residentia
32 residentia
33 residentia
34 residentia'
35 residentia"
36 residentia'
37 residentia
38 residentia
39 residentia'
40 residentia!
41 residentia
42 residentia
43 residentia
44 residentia
45 residentia
46 residentia
47 residentia'
48 residentia
49 residentia
50 residentia
over 50 residentia'
suites, $95.70 per month;
suites, $97.90 per month;
suites, $100.10 per month
suites, $102.30 per month
suites, $104.50 per month
suites, $106.70 per month
suites, $108.90 per month
suites, $111.10 per month
suites, $113.30 per month
suites, $115.50 per month
suites, $117.70 per month
suites, $119.90 per month
suites, $122.10 per month
suites, $124.30 per month
suites, $126.50 per month
suites, $128.70 per month
suites, $130.90 per month
suites, $133.10 per month
suites, $135.30 per month
suites, $137.50 per month
suites, $137.50 per month
suites, $137.50 per month
suites, $137.50 per month.
28 residential suites, $93.50 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.)
per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and  (or)  gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitor
shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitor shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.—In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building the suite occupied by the
janitor shall not be included. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 59
JANITORS  (MALE).
Order No. 43b, Effective June 12th, 1941.
Excludes from Order No. 43 janitors employed in one-room school-houses.
JANITRESSES   (FEMALE).
Order No. 44, Effective June 1st, 1937.
Order No. 44a, Effective January 23rd, 1941.
(Superseding Order No. 29.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitress, janitress-cleaner, or janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents  (37%c.) per hour.
3. (a.) Resident janitress in apartment buildings of four (4) residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37I/4c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $27.00 per month
6 residential suites, $30.00 per month
7 residential suites, $33.00 per month
8 residential suites, $36.00 per month
9 residential suites, $39.00 per month
10 residential suites, $42.00 per month
11 residential suites, $45.00 per month
12 residential suites, $48.00 per month
13 residential suites, $51.00 per month
14 residential suites, $54.00 per month
15 residential suites, $57.20 per month
16 residential suites,
17 residential suites,
18 residential suites,
19 residential suites.
20 residential suites, $73.70 per month
21 residential suites, $77.00 per month
22 residential suites, $80.30 per month
23 residential suites, $82.50 per month
24 residential suites, $84.70 per month
25 residential suites, $86.90 per month
26 residential suites, $89.10 per month
27 residential suites, $91.30 per month
28 residential suites, $93.50 per month
0.50 per month
3.80 per month
7.10 per month
$70.40 per month
29 residential suites, $95.70 per month;
30 residential suites, $97.90 per month;
31 residential suites, $100.10 per month
32 residential suites, $102.30 per month
33 residential suites, $104.50 per month
34 residential suites, $106.70 per month
35 residential suites
36 residential suites
37 residential suites
38 residential suites
39 residential suites, $117.70 per month
40 residential suites, $119.90 per month
41 residential suites, $122.10 per month
42 residential suites, $124.30 per month
43 residential suites, $126.50 per month
44 residential suites.
45 residential suites
46 residential suites,
47 residential suites,
48 residential suites, $137.50 per month
49 residential suites, $137.50 per month
50 residential suites, $137.50 per month
over 50 residential suites, $137.50 per month
$108.90 per month
$111.10 per month
$113.30 per month
$115.50 per month
$128.70 per month
$130.90 per month
$133.10 per month
$135.30 per month
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents
(37%c.) per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and  (or)  gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitress shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitress shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
JANITRESSES   (FEMALE).
Order No. 44b, Effective June 12th, 1941.
Excludes from Order No. 44 janitresses employed in one-room school-houses. E 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING (FEMALE).
Order No. 74, Effective March 10th, 1941.
(Superseding Order in Effect since March 31st, 1919.)
Experienced rate (section 1).
Daily Minimum,
except Saturday.
Daily Minimum,
Saturday only.
$1.24
Learners must have permit, if employed at following rates:—
Learner's rate (full time)  (section 2 (6))-    .
First four months
Second four months
Third four months
Thereafter
21c. per hour.
24c. per hour.
27J/£c. per hour.
31c. per hour.
Four Hours or Less
per Day (except
Saturday).
Three Hours or Less
on Saturday.
First four months
Second four months
Third four months
Thereafter
96c. per day
$1.10 per day
$1.24 per day
73c. per day.
82%c. per day.
93c. per day.
Note.— (a.)   Every employee called for employment shall be paid after reporting at the place of employment.
(6.) When employees are required to wear uniforms or special articles of wearing-apparel, no deduction shall
be made from the wages for such uniform or special articles of wearing-apparel, or for the repair or laundering
thereof, except as approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(e.) No deduction shall be made for the accidental damage to any article, or as a penalty for unsatisfactory
work.
(d.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(e.)   Hours of work governed by " Factories Act."
if.)   Maximum hours, forty-eight in the week.
LOGGING  (MALE).
Order No. 1  (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 1, Order No. 1A, and Order No. IB.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt, mining-
prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and booming of logs,
poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Male employees-
Trackmen _	
Cook- and bunk-house employees	
Shingle-bolts (felling, bucking, and splitting).
40c. per hour
371/_!e. per hour
$2.75 per day
$1.30 per cord
48
48
Unlimited.
48
Note.— (a.)  Certain exemptions regarding working-hours.     (See " Hours of Work " Regulations.)
(b.)  Watchmen in logging camps where operations are entirely suspended are exempt.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 25, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order in Effect since November 20th, 192S.)
Includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting,
printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity, exclusive of fish, fruit, or vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing.
Experienced employees .
Weekly Rate.
$14.00
Hours per Week.
48 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 61
Inexperienced Employees—Section 3.
Includes the manufacture, preparation, or adapting for use or sale
of: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly-powders, baking-
powders, molasses, sugar, syrups, honey, peanut butter, cream and
milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, bread, biscuits, cakes,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, eggs, soft drinks, yeast, chip and shoestring potatoes, cereals, cooked foods, salads, ice-cream cones, other
food products, cans, fruit and vegetable containers, paper boxes
and wooden boxes, buttons, soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet
preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, brushes, whisks,
pails, wash-boards, clothes-pins, matches, explosives, munitions,
gas-mantles, window-shades, veneer products, batteries, plant fertilizers, maps, saw-teeth and holders, mats, tiles, ropes, and shingles
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—
$8.00 a week for the first two months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second two months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third two months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced Employees—Section 4-.
Includes the manufacture of: Cotton bags, paper bags, envelopes,
overalls, shirts, ladies' and children's wear, uniforms, gloves, hats,
caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, boots and shoes, tents,
awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding, pillow-covers, loose
covers, mattress-covers, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-made
millinery, knitted goods, blankets, machine-made cigars, pulp and
paper-mill products, artificial flowers, lamp-shades, flags and other
decorations, worsted-mill products, baskets, wreaths, and other
floral pieces, pianos, optical goods, aeroplanes, toyB and novelties,
rayon products, stockings and lingerie (including repair of same),
and dipped chocolates
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—
$8.00 a week for the first four months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second four months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third four months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced Employees—Section 5.
Includes bookbinding, embossing, engraving, printing, dress-making,
men's and women's tailoring, taxidermy, and the manufacture of
ready-to-wear suits, jewellery, furs, leather goods, hand-made cigars,
and hand-made millinery
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—
$7.00  a week for the first six months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second six months
of employment.
13.00 a week for the third six months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Note.—Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
MERCANTILE   (MALE).
Order No. 59, Effective October 20th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 38.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and  (or)  retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
$15.00 per week
40c. per hour
$1.60 per day
37% to 48 hours per week.
If less than 37% hours.
Minimum rate per day  —   — 	
Males under Twenty-one (21)  Years op Aoe.
Minimum Rates for Beginners under Seventeen (17) Years of Age
87% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
(4.)   (I.)
$6.00 per week..
7.50 per week-
9.00 per week..
11.00 per week-
13.00 per week..
15.00 per week .
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
19 and under 20
20 and under 21
Thereafter E 62
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Beginners and those recommencing. Eighteen (18) Years and under Twenty-one (21). to whom Permits
have been issued by the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
(4.)   (2.)
$8.00 per week, 1st 12 months ..
10.00 per week, 2nd 12 months..
13.00 per week, 3rd 12 months...
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
Thereafter rates as shown in (2) or (3).
20c.
26c.
35c.
80c.
$1.00
1.40
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed five
(5) days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
30c.
$1.20
Males Twenty-one (21) Years and under Twenty-four (24).
Inexperienced and partly inexperienced, to whom Permits have been granted, under Section
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act.'*
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate. Daily Minimum.
$9.00 per week, 1st 6 months..—	
11.00 per week, 2nd 6 months	
13.00 per week, 3rd 6 months  	
Thereafter the rates as shown in (2) or (3).
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
25c.
30c.
35c.
$1.00
1.20
1.40
Note.— (a.) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers, employed in wholesale and (or) retail establishments, shall be
paid at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26.
(6.)  Employees must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(c.)   Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
{d.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
MERCANTILE   (FEMALE).
Order No. 24, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order dated September 28th, 1927.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and  (or)  retail trade.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over..
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over..
Minimum, 18 years of age or over	
$12.75 a week.
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
40 to 48
If less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$7.50 a week for 1st 3 months.
20c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
8.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
21c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
8.50 a week for 3rd 3 months.
23c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
9.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
25c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
9.50 a week for 5th 3 months.
26c. per hour during 5th 3 months.
10.00 a week for 6th 3 months.
27c. per hour during 6th 3 months.
10.50 a week for 7th 3 months.
29c. per hour during 7th 3 months.
11.00 a week until age of 18 years is reached.
30c. per hour until age of 18 years is reached.
Minimum, $1.00 per day. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 63
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 a week 1st 3 months.
10.00 a week 2nd 3 months.
11.00 a week 3rd 3 months.
12.00 a week 4th 3 months.
12.75 a week thereafter.
25c. per hour 1st 3 months.
27c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
30c. per hour 3rd 3 months.
35c. per hour 4th 3 months.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Note.— (a.)  Licences must be obtained for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over at above rates.
(b.)   Maximum working-hours, 48 per week.
OFFICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 34, Effective January 30th, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. J,.)
Includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks, filing
clerks, cashiers, cash-girls  (not included in other orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer operators,
auditors, attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Experienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$15.00 per week.
40c. per hour.
Minimum, $1.60 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
(Licence required in this Glass.)
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
15.00 a week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st 3 months.
32^c. per hour for 2nd 3 months.
35c- per hour for 3rd 3 months.
37*4c. per hour for 4th 3 months.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years op Age.
37*4 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37^ Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
30c. per hour for 1st 6 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
32%c. per hour for 2nd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 6 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 6 months or until
ZT%c. per hour for 4th 6 months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
employee reaches age of 18 years.
15.00 a week thereafter.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours* pay.
Note.—Office employees are not allowed to exceed eight hours per day without a permit. E 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.
Order No. 71, Effective June 1st, 1940.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area.
City of Vancouver, including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, City of North Vancouver, District of North
Vancouver  .". - 	
Rate per Hour.
75c.
Note.— (a.)   This Order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does   not   apply  to  those   permanently   employed   at   maintenance-work   in   industrial   or   manufacturing
establishments, public and private buildings.
(c.)   All wages must be paid semi-monthly.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.
Order No. 75, Effective June 2nd, 1941.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Rate per Hour.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South  Saanich, Esquimalt, Highland, Metchosin,
Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew _ ...      	
Note.— (a.)   This Order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act."
(o.)   Does   not  apply  to  those   permanently   employed   at  maintenance-work   in   industrial   or   manufacturing
establishments, public and private buildings.
(c.)   All wages must be paid semi-monthly.
PATROLMEN  (MALE).
Order No. 69, Effective February 5th, 1940.
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes to watch
or patrol the premises of more than one person for the purpose of guarding or protecting persons or
property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman " means an employee (not covered by any other Order of the Board) employed by a
private patrol agency.
Hourly  rate
35c.
Note.— (a.)   Wages must be paid semi-monthly.
(b.)  Employees must be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(c.)  Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27, Effective September 5th, 1935.
(Superseding, in part, Personal Service Order.)
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring; hairdressing; barbering; massaging;
physiotherapy; giving of electrical, facial, scalp, or other treatments; removal of superfluous hair;
chiropody;   or other work of like nature.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over
Minimum _  	
Hours per Week.
40 to 44
Less than 40 hours
per week. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.                                    E 65
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 6 months, or until employee
reaches age of 18 years.
14.25 a week thereafter.
27c. per hour during 1st 6 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 6 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 6 months.
35c. per hour during 4th 6 months, or until employee
reaches age of 18 years.
37%c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.'
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
14.25 a week thereafter.
27c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
35c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
87%c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Note.— (a.) Employees waiting on call to be paid according to rates to which they are entitled as set out
above.
(6.)   44-hour week and one-half hour for lunch between 11 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.     (See 27A.)
(c.) Where special article of wearing-apparel of distinctive design, trimming, colour, or fabric is required, it
shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired free of cost to the employee.     (See 27b.)
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27a, Effective March 30th, 1939.
(Amending Order No. 27.)
The above Order reduces the weekly hours to forty-four  (44)  and not more than nine  (9)  hours
in any one day.
Also provides for one-half (%) hour free from duty between the hours of eleven (11) a.m. and
two-thirty  (2.30)  p.m.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27b, Effective May 1st, 1940.
The above Order requires that where a distinctive uniform of special design, trimming, colour, or
fabric is required, it shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired free of cost to the employee.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Order No. 27d, Effective March 13th, 1941.
Adds physiotherapy to the definition of Order No. 27.
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT   (FEMALE).
Order No. 67, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding Personal Service Order.)
" Public place of amusement" includes theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, lecture-halls, shooting-
galleries, bowling-alleys, swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions, and other similar places to which a charge
for admission or service is made to the public.
Female attendant (of any age) _
40 to 48 Hours
per Week.
$14.25
Less than 40 Hours
per Week.
35c. per hour.
2 Hours or Less in
any One Day.
Note.— (a.)  Employees on call, 35c. per hour.
(6.)   Where  uniforms  or  special articles  of  wearing-apparel  are   required  they  shall  be  furnished,
laundered, cleaned, etc., free of cost to the attendant.
(c.)   Cashiers are still covered by Office Order No. 34.
5
repaired.
	 E 66                                               DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SAWMILLS  (MALE).
Order No. 50, Effective August 16th, 1937.
Order No. 50a, Effective July 20th, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 2, Order No. li, and Order No. 36.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills and planing-mills.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
30c.
$2.75 per day
48
48
Note.— (a.)   Certain exemptions under "Hours of Work Act."     (See regulations.)
(6.)   For engineers see Engineer Order.
(c.)   For truck-drivers see Transportation Order.
(d.)   90 per cent, of all employees not less than 40 cents per hour.
SHINGLE-MILLS  (MALE).
Order No. 62  (1941), Effective June 16th, 1941.
(Superseding Order No. 62 and Order No. 16.)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of shingles.
" Square " means a roofing square of four bundles, understood and accepted as a standard by the
industry, and according to  specification  N.R.C 5—1936,  issued  by  the  National  Research  Council  of
Canada.
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate.
Sawyers—
No. 1 shingles  	
Lower in grade than No. 1 shingles
Packers, all grades  _ 	
Other employees not included in any other Order of the Board
Note.—Employees packing or sawing shingles on any other basis than by the square, shall be paid on the same
proportionate basis.
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 20 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 20.)
Includes all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, painting,
and cleaning of hulls, putting on or taking off the ways, or dry-docking, of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Occupation.
Ship-carpenter, shipwright, joiner, boat-builder or wood-caulker..
All other employees - -  	
Employees under 21, not more than 10 per cent, of total male employees
in plant may be employed at not less than. „	
Weekly Hours.
48
48
48
Note.—This order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the " Apprenticeship Act."
TAXICAB DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 33 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. S3, Order No. 83A, and Order No. 33B.)
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
Vancouver..
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
All ages.
$2.75
Working-hours.
9 per day.
54 per week.
Note.— (a.)  If uniform or special article of wearing-apparel is demanded by employer, it must be without cost
to the employee except by arrangement approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(6.)  Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 67
TAXICAB DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 60, Effective November 17th, 1938.
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Less than 10
Hours per Day.
Daily
Minimum.
Working-
hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich	
All ages.
$3.00
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
10 per day.
NOTE.— (a.) Permits shall be obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours
can be paid 35c. per hour.
(6.)   Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 45c. per hour.
(c.)  Drivers must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(d.)   Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(e.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION   (FEMALE).
Effective April 5th, 1920.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the various instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and telegraphy, and shall
also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the operation of telephone
or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Weekly Hours.
$15.00 per week.
31}ic. per hour.
$11.00 per week for 1st 3 months.
12.00 per week for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 per week for 3rd 3 months.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
48
48
48
In case of emergency,
56 hours.
Note.— (a.)  Time and one-half is payable for hours in excess of 48.
(fe.)   Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
(c.) Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m.,
10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the number of hours of
employment a week.
(d.) In cases where employees reside on the employers' premises, the employer shall not be prevented from
making an arrangement with such employee to answer emergency calls between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 26 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940.
Order No. 26a (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 26.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.)  Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net
weight or over, as specified on the motor-
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Less than 40
45 c.
40 and not more
than 50
40c.
In excess of 60 and
not more than 54
60c. E 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY   (MALE)— Continued.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(2.) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than
2.00-01 lb. net weight, as specified on the
motor-vehicle licence, and operators of
motor-cycles with wheeled attachments,
exclusive of those specified in section 7
hereof
Hourly rate  _.	
(3.) Operators of motor-cycles with not more
than two wheels and without wheeled
attachment
Hourly rate 	
(4.) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger
work (e)
Hourly rate   	
(5.)   Swampers and helpers-
Hourly rate__	
(6.)  Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than
those covered by section 7 hereof
Hourly rate-   	
(7.) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery
of milk
Hourly rate, 40c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
30c.
Less than 40
20c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
46c.
40 and not more
than 50
35c.
40 and not more
than 48
25c.
40 and not more
than 48
17c.
40 and not more
than 50
35c.
40 and not more
than 50
40c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
62% c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52 %c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(6.)  Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery men may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than ten (10)
hours is worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a period of
seven (7) weeks.
(e.)  Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 59.
(/.)   Wages shall be paid as often as semi-monthly.
WOOD-WORKING.
Order No. 49, Effective August 16th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 35 and Order No. 11.)
Includes all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of manufacturing sash and
doors, cabinets, show-cases, office and store fixtures, wood furniture, wood furnishings, veneer products,
and general mill-work products.
Class.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Adult Males	
18 to 21 years of age-
Under 18 years	
48
48
48
Note.—After November 14th, 1937, total male employees receiving less than 40 cents must not exceed 33% per
cent, of all male employees. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E   69
BOARD OP INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
The following is a complete list of all Orders now
MINIMUM
in effect, co
WAGE  ORDERS.
tnpiled as at July 2nd, 1941.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum Wage
Act.
41
17
42
55
70
70a
58
65
66
72
73
68
12(1940)
53
54
18
18a
18c
39(1940)
46
47
51
52
52b
52h
43
43a
44
44a
74
1(1940)
28
25
24
59
34
75
71
69
27
27a
27b
27d
67
50
50A
62 (1941)
20(1940)
33(1940)j
60
60a
26(1940)
26a
(1940)
49
i
Feb. 7/37
Nov. 1/34
April 5/37
March 10/38....
March 12/40....
June 21/40
Sept. 15/38
June 23/39
Aug. 16/39
May 14/40
May 14/40
Aug. 31/39
Nov. 26/40.
Feb. 28/38
Feb. 28/38
Feb. 8/35
April 17/35 —
May 14/37
Oct. 8/40...	
Feb. 11/37
Nov. 8/34
April 8/37
March 17/38 ...
March 14/40....
June 27/40
Sept. 22/38
June 29/39
Aug. 17/39
May 16/40
May 16/40
Sept. 7/39
Nov. 28/40
March 3/38
March 3/38
Feb. 14/35
April 18/35
May 20/37
Oct. 10/40
Jan.15/20
July 8/37
July 8/37
Nov. 18/37
Feb. 10/38
May 19/38.
May 29/41
May 20/37
Jan. 23/41
May 20/37
Jan. 23/41
Feb. 27/41
Oct. 10/40
Sept. 26/35
June 6/35
June 6/35
Oct. 20/38
.Jan.30/36
April 24/41
May 2/40	
Feb. 11/37
Nov. 23/34
June 14/37
April 4/38
March 18/40...
June 27/40
Nov. 7/38
Aug. 1/39
Aug. 21/39
May 27/40
May 27/40
Sept. 11/39
Nov. 28/40
March 3/38
March 3/38
March 1/35
April 18/35
June 1/37
Oct. 10/40
Feb. 28/20
July 12/37
July 12/37
Nov. 18/37
Feb. 14/38
May 19/38
June 14/41 to
Sept. 13/41
June 1/37
Jan.23/41
June 1/37
Jan. 23/41
March 10/41....
Oct. 10/40
Sept. 26/35
July 1/35
July 1/35
Oct. 20/38
Jan. 30/36
June 2/41
June 1/40      ...
Male and female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Carpentry (Vancouver and District)	
j
Engineers, Stationary Steam	
,
July 2/37
July 2/37
Nov. 17/37
Feb. 8/38.
May 18/38
May 27/41
May 14/37
Jan. 21/41
May 14/37
Jan.21/41
Feb. 25/41
Oct. 8/40
Sept. 25/35
Mar. 29/35
Mar. 29/35
Oct. 12/38
Jan. 24/36
April 22/41.
April 26/40
Jan. 19/40
Aug. 29/35
March 23/39...
April 23/40 _
March 11/41—
Aug. 31/39
Aug. 3/37
July 18/39
June 4/41	
Oct. 8/40.
Oct. 8/40
Nov. 15/38
Oct. 8/40
Janitor  __  	
Logging and Sawmills   (Cost of Board,
Office Occupation _— 	
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers -
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers—
Jan. 25/40
Sept. 5/35
April 6/39
April 25/40
March 13/41....
Sept. 7/39
Aug. 5/37
July 20/39
June 5/41.	
Oct. 10/40
Oct. 10/40
Nov. 17/38
Oct. 10/40
Mar. 4/20
Oct. 10/40
Nov. 28/40
Aug. 5/37	
Sept. 5/35
April 6/39
May 1/40
March 13/41....
Sept. 11/39
Aug. 16/37
July 20/39
June 16/41
Oct. 10/40
Oct. 10/40
Nov. 17/38
Oct. 10/40
April 5/20
Oct. 10/40
Nov. 28/40
Aug. 16/37	
Sawmills    	
Ship-building— _	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)..
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)..
Transportation	
Transportation 	
Oct. 8/40__   .
Nov. 26/40
Aug. 3/37.	 E 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS.
The following Orders have been cancelled by amending Orders compiled as at July 2nd,
1941.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
7
37
31
40
61
45
12
12a
12b
45a
48
18a
19
32
39
3
3a
21
21A
21B
21c
22
22a
22B
22C
46a
46b
46C
46d
63
47a
47B
47c
47d
52a
52c
5 2d
52e
52f
52g
Bartering	
Box-manufacture-
Box-manufacture  	
Bus-drivers   (Victoria and District)
Carpentry	
Christmas-trees..
Construction	
Construction..
Construction..
Construction-
Construction (Cancelling 45) —
Construction— 	
Engineers, Stationary Steam-
Elevator Operators 	
Elevator Operators	
First-aid Attendants..
Fruit and Vegetable-
Fruit and Vegetable-
Fruit and Vegetable-
Fruit and Vegetable (Emergency)
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable   _
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable (Emergency)
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable.	
Fruit and Vegetable..
Fruit and Vegetable (Temporary Emergency)
Fruit and Vegetable 	
Fruit and Vegetable Canning-
Fruit and Vegetable  —
Fruit and Vegetable-
Fruit and Vegetable (Temporary Emergency)
Fruit and Vegetable 	
Fruit and Vegetable Canning	
Hotel and
Hotels)
Hotel and
Hotels)
Hotel and
Hotels)
Hotel and
Hotels)
Hotel and
Hotels)
Hotel and
Hotels)
Catering
Catering
Catering
Catering
Catering
Catering
(Resort
(Resort
(Resort
(Resort
(Resort
(Resort
July 12/34....
July 12/34....
March 23/36
Oct. 15/35	
Dec. 1/36—
Nov. 18/38...
June 14/37...
Sept. 28/34...
Feb. 28/38....
July 18/39—
July 2/37.	
July 29/37....
April 17/35..
Feb. 8/35	
Nov. 26/35...
June 26/36...
May 2/34.	
June 12/34...
April 16/35__
Dec. 2/35	
July 21/36....
Aug. 26/36-
April 16/35..
Dec. 2/35	
July 21/36 -
Aug. 26/36...
Sept. 1/37—
Sept. 15/37..
March 4/38-
Aug. 12/38...
May 23/39—
Sept. 1/37....
Sept. 15/37-
March 4/38-
Aug. 12/38...
May 23/39...
April 6/38—
Aug. 22/38...
June 14/39...
Nov. 8/39—
June 11/40...
Sept. 24/40...
July 19/34...
July 19/34	
March 26/36.
Oct. 17/35	
Dec. 3/36	
Nov. 24/38 ....
June 17/37-
Oct. 4/34.—
March 3/38...
July 20/39—
July 8/37	
July 29/37	
April 18/35..
Feb. 14/35—
Nov. 28/35—
July 2/36 —
May 3/34—
June 14/34-
April 18/35.
Dec. 5/35—
July 23/36—
Sept. 3/36	
April 18/35..
Dec. 5/35	
July 23/36....
Sept. 3/36	
Sept. 2/37	
Sept. 16/37...
March 10/38
Aug. 18/38...
May 25/39—
Sept. 2/37--
Sept. 16/37...
March 10/38
Aug. 18/38-
May 25/39—
April 7/38—
Aug. 25/38-
June 15/39-
Nov. 9/39	
June 14/40...
Sept. 26/40 ..
Aug. 3/34	
Aug. 3/34	
April 1/36	
Oct. 28/35	
Feb. 1/37	
Nov. 24/38	
July 5/37	
Oct. 19/34	
March 3/38	
July 20/39	
July 8/37—	
July 29/37	
April 18/35	
March 1/35	
Nov. 28/35.	
Aug. 1/36	
May 18/34	
June 29/34—
April 18/35—.
Dec. 5/35	
July 23/36	
Sept. 3/36	
April 18/35 —
Dec. 5/35 —
July 23/36	
Sept. 3/36.	
Sept. 2/37 to
Sept. 15/37
Sept. 16/37 to
Sept. 30/37
Mar. 10/38 to
May 7/38
Aug.l2/38to
Oct. 1/38
June 1/39 to
Dec. 31/39
Sept. 2/37 to
Sept. 15/37
Sept. 16/37 to
Sept. 30/37
Mar. 10/38 to
May 7/38
Aug. 12/38 to
Oct. 1/38
June 1/39 to
Dec. 31/39
June 15/38 to
Sept. 15/38
Sept. 16/38—
June 15/39 to
Sept. 15/39
Nov. 9/39 to
June 12/40
June 17/40 to
Sept. 14/40
Sept. 26/40 to
June 13/41
Male	
Male	
Male	
Male	
Male	
Male	
Male-
Male	
Male	
Male	
Male—
Male	
Male.-	
Male	
Male	
Male	
Female-
Female.
Female.
Female-
Female.
Female.
Male	
Male	
Male	
Male	
Female-
Female
Female.
Female
Female
Male-
Male—.
Male —
Male	
Male—-
Female-
Female
Female
Female-
Female
Female
June 14/37
April 1/36
April 4/38
March 17/40
Aug. 20/39
Dec. 31/38
July 8/37
Nov. 28/40
Nov. 28/40
Nov. 28/40
July 29/37
Nov. 28/40
June 1/37
Nov. 26/35
March 3/38
Oct. 10/40
April 18/35
April 18/35
July 12/37
March 31/36
July 12/37
July 12/37
July 12/37
March 31/36
July 12/37
July 12/37
Sept. 1B/3T
Sept. 30/37
May 7/38
Oct. 1/38
Dec. 31/39
Sept. 15/37
Sept. 30/37
May 7/38
Oct. 1/38
Dec. 31/39
Sept. 15/38
June 15/39
Sept. 16/39
June 13/40
Sept. 15/40
June 14/41 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 71
Board of Industrial Relations Minimum
WAGE Orders—Continued.
Serial
Industry.
Date of
Date
Date
Minimum
Date
No.
Order.
Gazetted.
effective.
Wage Act.
cancelled.
23
April 17/35—
April 18/35	
April 18/35	
May 31/37
23a
Sept. 25/35.	
Oct. 3/35	
Oct. 3/35	
May 31/37
5a
Janitresses (Public Housekeep-
Nov. 9/34
Nov. 15/34
Nov. 30/34
Female	
April 18/35
5b
Janitresses (Public Housekeep-
April 17/35
April 18/35
April 18/35
Female	
Oct. 3/35
29
Janitresses 	
Sept. 26/35
Oct. 3/35
Oct. 3/35
Female	
May 31/37
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing-
Feb. 17/19	
March 31/19—
Female.	
March 10/41
1
Logging.. 	
April 17/34	
April 12/43 __.
April 27/34 ....
Male _	
Oct. 9/40
1A
Logging 	
Nov. 9/34	
Nov. 15/34 —
Nov. 30/34 ...
Male	
Oct. 9/40
lc
Logging (Skeena and Khyex
Rivers)
Jan.24/36
Jan. 30/36
Jan. 30/36
Male—	
March 24/38
9
July 12/34	
July 19/34	
Aug. 3/34	
Male	
Oct. 19/34
13
Logging (East of Cascade
Mountains)
Sept. 28/34
Oct. 4/34
Oct. 19/34
Male _ —
March 24/38
13a
Logging (Skeena and Khyex
Rivers)
Jan. 24/36.
Jan. 30/36
Jan.30/36
Male	
March 24/38
15
Sept. 28/34	
Oct. 4/34	
Oct. 19/34	
Male —	
Oct. 4/34
10
Mercantile	
July 24/34	
July 26/34	
Aug. 10/34
Male ■_.
July 20/36
10
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1934)
Nov. 9/34
Nov. 15/34
Dec. 1/34	
Male	
Dec. 31/34
10
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1935)
Nov. 26/35
Nov. 28/35
Nov. 28/35
Male  —
Dec. 31/35
10a
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1935)
Oct. 15/35
Oct. 17/35
Oct. 17/35
Male	
Dec. 31/35
24
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1935)
Nov. 26/35
Nov. 28/35
Nov. 28/35
Female 	
Dec. 31/35
24
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1936)
Dee. 1/36	
Dec. 3/36
Dec. 3/36	
Female	
Jan.3/37
24
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1937)
Nov. 17/37
Nov. 25/37
Dec. 1/37 to
Dec. 31/37
Female - -
Dec. 31/37
24a
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1935)
Oct. 15/35
Oct. 17/35
Oct. 17/35
Female	
Dec. 31/35
24b
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1936)
Aug. 26/36
Sept. 3/36
Sept. 3/36 to
Dec. 31/36
Female	
Dec. 31/36
24
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1938)
Nov. 18/38
Nov. 24/38
Nov. 28/38 to
Dec. 31/38
Female -
Dec. 31/38
24
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1939)
Dec. 4/39
Dec. 7/39
Dec. 7/39 to
Dec. 31/39
Female	
Dec. 31/39
24
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1940)
Nov. 12/40
Nov. 14/40.
Nov. 14/40 to
Dec. 31/40
Female	
Dec. 31/40
38
June 26/36    -
July 2/36
Dec. 3/36	
July 20/36.
Dec. 3/36	
Male
Oct. 20/38
Jan. 3/37
38
Mercantile (Supplementary,
Dec. 1/36	
Male __	
1936)
38
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1937)
Nov. 17/37
Nov. 25/37
Dec. 1/37 to
Dec. 31/37
Male _ 	
Dec. 31/37
38a
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1936)
Aug. 31/36
Sept. 3/36
Sept. 3/36 to
Dec. 31/36
Male  —
Dec. 31/36
38b   I Mercantile  -
Aug. 26/36	
Sept. 3/36 _ .
Sept. 3/36 —
Male 	
June 15/39
59
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1938)
Nov. 18/38
Nov. 24/38
Nov. 28/38 to
Dec. 31/38
Male —	
Dec. 31/38
59
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1939)
Dec. 4/39	
Dec. 7/39
Dec. 7/39 to
Dec. 31/39
Malp
Dec. 31/39
59
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1940)
Nov. 12/40
Nov. 14/40
Nov. 14/40 to
Dec. 31/40
Male-	
Dec. 31/40
4
May 2/34	
May 10/34 . ..
May 25/34
Sept. 15/19
Dec. 19/35	
Jan. 30/36
Sept. 11/39
Dec. 31/35
Aug. 14/19
Dec. 19/35.	
Female	
Female	
27a
Personal Service (Temporary)...
Dec. 17/35	
5
Public Housekeeping	
May 2/34    .
May 10/34
Oct. 3/35	
May 25/34
Oct. 3/35
Oct. 3/35
Feb. 14/38
Sept. 15/37
30
Sept. 26/35- .
30A
April 2/37	
April 8/37
June 15/37 to
Sept. 15/37 E 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Board of Industrial Relations Minimum Wage Orders—Continued.
Serial
No.
Industry.
2      Sawmills —_ 	
14 Sawmills (East of Cascade
Mountains)
36      Sawmills 	
IB    Shingle-bolts	
16       Shingle-mills	
62       Shingle-mills  	
20    | Ship-building _
6 j Taxicab-drivers..
33 J Taxicab-drivers .
33a j Taxicab-drivers..
33b j Taxicab-drivers..
2a I Tie-cutting	
26    j Transportation.-
26a
26b
26c
11
35
Transportation-
Transportation..
Transportation..
Wood-working..
Wood-working..
Date of
Order.
April 7/34	
Sept. 28/34—
March 23/36—
Dec. 14/34	
Nov. 1/34	
March 23/39....
May 28/35	
June 13/34 _.
Jan. 24/36	
Sept. 1/37	
Aug. 30/38	
May 2/34	
June 19/35	
June 26/36	
Aug. 30/38	
Oct. 19/38	
Aug. 1/34	
March 23/36....
Date
Gazetted.
April 12/34 —
Oct. 4/34	
March 26/36—
Dec. 20/34	
Nov. 8/34	
March 30/39 _
May 30/35	
June 14/34 —.
Jan. 30/36 __ .
Sept. 2/37.	
Sept. 1/38	
May 3/34	
June 30/35	
July 2/36	
Sept. 1/38	
Oct. 20/38	
Aug. 9/34	
March 26/36 ..
Date
Effective.
April 27/34 ...
Oct. 19/34 —
April 1/36	
Jan. 4/35	
Nov. 23/34 ....
March 30/39
June 14/35	
June 29/34	
Jan. 30/36 —
Sept. 12/37—
Sept. 1/38	
May 18/34	
July 4/35	
July 20/36	
Sept. 1/38	
Oct. 20/38	
Aug. 24/34—
April 1/36.	
Minimum
Wage Act.
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Male
Date
cancelled.
April 1/36
April 1/36
Aug. 16/37
Oct. 10/40
April 6/39
June 16/41
Oct. 9/40
Jan.30/36
Oct. 10/40
Oct. 10/40
Oct. 10/40
Sept. 30/34
Oct. 10/40
Oct. 20/38
Oct. 10/40
Oct. 10/40
April 1/36
Aug. 16/37 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 73
SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Province of British Columbia.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
BE IT KNOWN that, pursuant to and by
virtue of the powers and authority vested
in the Board of Industrial Relations by the
" Hours of Work Act," the said Board has
made the following regulations, namely:—
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
[1  (a)  Consolidated for convenience only.    See Regulation
No. 26.]
1. (a.) Persons employed in sawmills, plan-
ing-mills, shingle-mills, and logging industry,
including all operations in or incidental to the
carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and
booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles, situate in that part of the
Province lying east of the Cascade Mountains
may work one hour per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act, but
the total hours worked in any week shall not
exceed fifty-four (54).
(6.) In the industrial undertakings referred
to in clause (a) of this regulation, the limit of
hours of work thereby fixed may be exceeded by
one hour per day on five days of each week for
the purpose of making a shorter work-day on
one day of the week, but the total hours worked
in any week shall not exceed fifty-four (54).
(c.) In sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-
mills situate in that part of the Province lying
east of the Cascade Mountains, and which are
operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen, and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and
oilers may work overtime to the extent of one
and one-half hours per day, to cover preparatory and complementary work, in addition to
the said fifty-four (54) hours per week set
forth in clauses (a) and (b) of this regulation.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-
mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may
work a total of forty-eight (48) hours each
week in five nights, in lieu of forty-eight (48)
hours each week in six nights, but the number
of hours worked in any night must not exceed
ten (10).
Logging.
3. Persons employed in:—■
(1.)  The logging industry in:—
(a.)  Booming operations;   or
(&.)  Transporting logs by logging-
railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or
river-driving;  or
(c.)  Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d.)   Or in the operation and upkeep
of donkey-engines:
Fish-canning.
(2.) Canning fish or manufacturing byproducts from fish, but not those engaged in salting fish;   and in
Cook and Bunk Houses.
(3.) Cook and bunk houses in connection
with any industrial undertaking,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed
by section 3 of the said Act to the extent necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
Engineers, Firemen, and Oilers.
4. In all industrial undertakings which use
steam as a motive power and which are operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen,
and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and oilers
may work overtime to the extent of one and
one-half hours per day to perform preparatory
or complementary work, in addition to the
maximum hours of work prescribed by section
3 of the Act.
Shipping Staff.
5. Persons employed as members of the
shipping staff in industrial undertakings where
shipping operations are of an intermittent
nature may work such hours in addition to the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the said
Act as (but only so many as) shall be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-hours
limited by section 3 of the Act are being unduly
exceeded, the Board shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the industrial
undertaking from the provisions of this regulation for such period of time as the Board
considers advisable.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons employed
in ship-yards, engineering-works, machine-
shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal
works, belt-works, saw-works, and plants of a
like nature may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but not more than) may be
necessary to prevent serious loss to, or interruption in the operation of, the industrial
undertaking for which the repairs are being
made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture of
wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables
may work during the months of June, July,
August, and September in each year such hours
in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3
of the said Act as may from time to time be
necessary to fill urgent orders. E 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Seasonal Soft Drinks Delivery.
Note.—Regulation 8 cancelled by 8a, February 13th, 1936.
Laundries.
NOTE.—Regulation 9 cancelled by 9a, September 26th, 1940.
Seasonal Lithographing.
10. During the months of May, June, July,
August, September, and October in each year
persons employed in the lithographing industry
may work such hours in excess of the hours
prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may
from time to time be necessary to fill urgent
orders. This exemption shall only apply when
sufficient competent help is not available.
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by
the Board by the granting of written temporary
exemption permits limiting by their terms the
extent thereof, but only upon being satisfied
by application in writing, signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly authorized,
of the urgency and necessity for the exception,
that it is of a temporary nature, and that no
other means of adequately overcoming such
temporary urgent condition is, or has been,
reasonably available, and that the additional
working-hours applied for will not be more
than will suffice for the extra pressure of work
requiring the same.
Overtime Record.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in
the manner required by subsection (1) of
section 9 of the said Act of all additional hours
worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said
Act or in pursuance of any regulation.
12a. Every employer shall furnish the Board
with a copy of his pay-roll, or record in such
form prescribed by the Board, showing the
hours worked and the nature of the work performed by his employees in respect of section 6
of the Act, or Regulations Nos. 6 and 11 of the
Board, not later than fifteen (15) days after
such hours have been worked. (Effective December 12th, 1940.)
13. Every employer shall notify, by means
of the posting of notices in conspicuous places
in the works or other suitable place, where the
same may readily be seen by all persons
employed by him, the hours at which work
begins and ends, and, where work is carried on
by shifts, the hours at which each shift begins
and ends; also such rest intervals accorded
during the period of work as are not reckoned
as part of the working-hours; these hours shall
be so fixed that the duration of the work shall
not exceed the limits prescribed by the " Hours
of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall not
be changed except upon twenty-four hours'
notice of such change posted as hereinbefore
specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the
Act or Regulation 11 above, a like notice of the
change in working-hours shall be posted, which
notice shall also state the grounds on which
the exemption was granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia,
this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th, 1934.
Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 14.
OCCUPATION  OF  BARBERING.
The occupation of barbering is hereby added
to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 24th
day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th
day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd, 1934.
Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15.
Mercantile Industry.
The mercantile industry is hereby added to
the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 7th
day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th
day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th, 1934.
Effective August 9th, 1934.)
Regulations No. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d
cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e.
Mercantile Industry.
Note.—Regulation 15e cancelled by 29, September 30th, 1939.
Regulations No. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, and
16e cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f.
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores.
1. Persons employed in drug-store's as registered apprentices, certified clerks, or licentiates
of pharmacy may work not more than ninety-
six (96) hours in any two (2) successive
weeks, but in no case shall the hours of work
of any such registered apprentice, certified
clerk, or licentiate of pharmacy exceed fifty-
two (52) hours in any one week, or nine (9)
hours in any one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made
and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of
August, 1938, is hereby, cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd
day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th, 1939.
Effective April 6th, 1939.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 75
REGULATION No. 17.
REGULATION No. 18a.
Baking Industry.
The baking industry, by which expression is
meant all operations in or incidental to the
manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or
cakes, is hereby added to the Schedule of the
said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the
said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 6th day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 17a.
Baking Industry.
Employees employed in the baking industry
as deliverymen may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 18.
Catering Industry.
The catering industry, which includes all
operations in or incidental to the preparation
or to the serving, or to both preparation and
serving, of meals or refreshments where the
meals or refreshments are served or intended
to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-
house, dance-hall, cabaret, banquet-hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunch-room, lunch-counter, icecream parlour, soda-fountain, or in any other
place where food is served and a charge is
made for the same either directly or indirectly,
whether such charge is made against the
persons who partake of the meals or refreshments or against some other person, is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on the
1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1984.    Effective December 1st, 1934.)
Catering Industry.
Employees in the catering industry, working
on a split shift, are hereby exempt from the
provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work
Act Amendment Act, 1937," being chapter 30
of the Statutes of British Columbia, 1937, to
the extent that their working-hours on a split
shift shall be confined within fourteen (14)
hours immediately following commencement of
work; but this exception shall not be applicable unless every employee whose split shift
extends over twelve (12) hours is paid at the
rate of not less than one and one-half times
his regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within twelve (12)
hours immediately following commencement of
work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 5th
day of May, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 6th, 1938.
Effective May 6th, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 19.
Retail Florists.
Persons employed in the establishments of
retail florists may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but only so many as) shall be
necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise
overcome: Provided that the working-hours
of such persons shall not exceed ninety-six (96)
hours on the average in any two successive
weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-
hours limited by section 3 of the Act are being
unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written
notification to the management, exclude the
employer's establishment from the provisions
of this regulation for such period of time as
the Board considers advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective November 15th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 20.
The Occupation of Elevator Operator.
The occupation of elevator operator is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 28th
day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 28th,
1935.    Effective February 28th, 1935.)
. E 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Regulations Nos. 21, 21b, 21c, 2lD, 21e, and
21f cancelled by
REGULATION No. 21g.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The fruit and vegetable industry, which
includes all operations in or incidental to the
canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use any kind of fruit
or vegetable, is hereby exempt from the operation of the said Acts up to and including the
31st day of March, 1940.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 8th
day of April, 1941.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 10th, 1941.
Effective April 10th, 1941, to March 31st,
1942.)
REGULATION No. 22.
Transportation Industry.
The transportation industry, which includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any
other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further
transported to some destination other than the
place at which such aforementioned carriage or
delivery terminates, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 23.
Transportation Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation the
expression " transportation industry " includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air,
any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles,
or material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or
public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and
the carrying or delivering to or collecting from
any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air,
or road transport, for the purpose of being
further transported to some destination other
than the place at which such aforementioned
carriage or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation industry, other than those employed as (a) operators of motor-cycles, (6) bicycle-riders and
foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers of
vehicles employed in the retail delivery of milk,
are hereby permitted to work six (6) hours
per week in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," in accordance with the provisions of
Order No. 26 of the said Board of Industrial
Relations dated the 19th day of June, 1935,
fixing minimum wages in the transportation
industry: Provided that no such employee in
the transportation industry shall work more
than ten (10) hours in any one day.
3. That employees in the transportation industry employed as drivers of vehicles in the
retail delivery of milk are hereby permitted to
work fifteen (15) hours per week in excess of
the hours prescribed by section 3 of the said
"Hours of Work Act, 1934": Provided that
over a period of seven (7) weeks no such employee shall work more than three hundred and
seventy-eight (378) hours, nor more than ten
(10) hours in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24.
Occupation of Hotel Clerk.
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes
the work of all persons engaged as room clerks
(day or night), mail clerks, information clerks,
cashiers, book-keepers, accountants, telephone
operators, and any other persons employed in
clerical work in hotels, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 26th,
1935.    Effective September 26th, 1935.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E  77
REGULATION No. 26.
REGULATION No. 28b.
1. That Regulation No. 1 (a) of the Board,
dated the 14th day of June, 1934, is hereby
amended by striking out the word " and"
before the word " shingle-mills," and inserting
after the word " shingle-mills " the words " and
logging industry, including all operations in
or incidental to the carrying-on of logging;
pole, tie, shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile
cutting; and all operations in or incidental to
driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles,
ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles."
2. That this regulation shall become effective on publication in The British Columbia
Gazette on the 24th day of March, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 23rd
day of March, 1938.
REGULATION No. 28.
Taxicab Industry.
The taxicab industry, which includes the
work of all employees in charge of or driving a
motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven
(7) passengers or less than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public,
and which is driven or operated for hire, is
hereby added as item No. 12 to the Schedule
of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 3rd
day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
REGULATION No. 28a.
Taxicab Industry.
Persons employed in the taxicab industry,
which includes the work of all employees in
charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven (7) passengers or less
than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or
operated for hire, may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act, but in no case shall
the daily hours worked by any such employee
in the taxicab industry exceed nine (9) in any
one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
Note.—The taxicab industry having been
brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is
now subject to the following provision of that
Statute:—
" The working-hours of employees working
on a split shift shall be confined within twelve
hours immediately following commencement of
work."
Taxicab Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation, the
expression " taxicab industry " shall have the
meaning as assigned to it in Regulation No.
28 of the Board, dated the 22nd day of August,
1938.
2. That persons employed in the taxicab industry in the City of Victoria, the Municipality
of the Township of Esquimalt, the Municipality
of the District of Oak Bay, and the Municipality of the District of Saanich, may work:—
(a.) Two (2) hours per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the
" Hours of Work Act," provided that
such ten (10) hours are confined within
eleven (11) hours immediately following commencement of their work:
(6.) In excess of the ten (10) hours permitted by clause (a) hereof, provided
they are paid not less than the minimum rate for overtime—namely, forty-
five cents (45c.) per hour—prescribed
by section 5 of Order No. 60 of the
Board, dated the 15th day of November, 1938.
3. Regulation No. 28a of the Board, made
the 22nd day of August, 1938, is hereby varied
accordingly.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 15th
day of November, 1938.
REGULATION No. 29.
Mercantile Industry.
Persons employed in the mercantile industry,
which includes all establishments operated for
the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade
in the Province of British Columbia, with the
exception of the City of Vancouver, the City of
North Vancouver, Municipality of the District
of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the
Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt,
the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay,
and the Municipality of the District of Saanich,
may work three (3) hours per day in excess
of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said
Act, on Saturday of each week and on the day
preceding a statutory holiday, when such statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but the
total hours worked in any one week shall not
exceed forty-eight  (48).
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 8th
day of November, 1939.
COMPILED JULY 2nd, 1941.
By BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. E 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION BRANCH.
Head Office   -
Branch Office .
Secretary-Registrar._
_ Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
-Department of Labour, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
 _   B. H. E. Goult.
Victoria, B.C., May 31st, 1941.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the third annual report of the Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Branch for 1940.
During the period ended December 31st, 1940, the Branch experienced its most active year
since the passage of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " in 1937. Renewed
evidence of the efficacy of the statute is found in the fact that despite the increased number of
complaints received by the Branch and disputes handled by Conciliation Commissioners only
one resulted in loss of time.
Figures for loss of time in man working-days and the number of employees directly
affected thereby are also small in comparison with other years, as the following table covering
the period 1931 to 1940 shows. The greatest loss of time in 1940 was caused by the illegal
strike of gold-miners at Pioneer, B.C., to which reference is made in the following pages.
There was one strike reported during 1940. It affected sixty-two employees and caused
a loss of 558 man working-days.
The strike at Pioneer, B.C., which began early in October, 1939, and continued until
March 6th, 1940, affected 142 employees and caused a loss of 7,952 man-days in the period
beginning January 1st and ending March 6th, 1940.
Thus, although only one strike is recorded as starting in 194-0, there was a carry-over
from the previous year of employees affected and time lost in working-days.
The record of industrial disputes in British Columbia since 1931 follows:—
Number of Disputes, Number of Employees affected, and Time lost
in Working-days, 1931-40.*
Year.
No. of
Disputes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1
4
11
16
16
23
17
14
11
11
204
822
837
1,188
5,741
7,321
4,427
2,397
4,136
2,322
8,510
13,803
8,236
30,022
75,311
140,706
73,977
25,760
37,740
79,310
1939                                                 	
1938f                                     -	
1937                                 	
1936                               .       	
1935                  	
1934 —  - -	
1933                                           	
1932                                               —	
1931                        	
* The record of the Department includes lockouts as well as strikes. A lockout, or an industrial condition that
is undeniably a lockout, is rarely encountered, and strikes and lockouts are therefore recorded together in the
statistical tables. The term " dispute " is used in reference to either strike or lockout. Figures shown are inclusive
of all disputes which have come to the attention of the Department. Methods taken to secure this information preclude the possibility of serious omission. Since it is not always possible to secure exact information concerning the
duration of a dispute or the number of employees involved, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later
information.
Estimates of time lost are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute lasts by the number of
employees directly involved and not replaced. The number of employees indirectly affected are not included in the
computations.
f 1938 was the first calendar year in which the "Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" became effective.
An average of the number of disputes, employees affected, and working-days lost for the
years 1931-37, as compared with the record of 1938, 1939, and 1940, the three years in which
the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" has been effective, shows the marked
decrease in the latter period. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940.
E 79
Number of Disputes, Number of Employees affected, and Time lost in Working-days,
1938-40, as compared with Average for 1931-37.
Year.
No. of
Strikes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1940            	
1
4
11
15
204
822
837
3,933
8,510
1939         	
13,803
1938   -	
8,236
1931-37 (average)  	
66,118
An analysis of disputes by industries reveals the fact that for the second successive year
the greatest loss of time was recorded in the mining industry. The strike at Pioneer, B.C., as
it has already been pointed out, did not commence during 1940, but lasted from October, 1939,
to March, 1940. The figures shown in the following table, covering the loss of time in this
dispute, are from January 1st to March 6th.
Analysis of Disputes in British Columbia in 1940 by Various Industries.
Industry;
No. of
Employers
affected.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1
1
142
62
7,952
558
Totals  	
2
204
8,510
A summary of disputes commencing in 1940 follows:—
Summary of Disputes commencing in 1940.
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
Hotel waiters, Vancouver  	
Commenced December 23rd,  following the
refusal of the management to enter into
an  agreement with  the Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union, Local No. 28,
covering    Union    recognition,    increased
wages, and certain changes in working
conditions.    Unterminated   at   December
'   31st, 1940 .    _	
62
558
Totals   	
62
1
I. STRIKES, 1940.
RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
No. 1.—A full description of the circumstances leading to the strike of a number of
waiters and bus-boys in a Vancouver hotel, which commenced December 23rd, may be found
in the record of conciliation (No. 13) which appears hereunder.
GOLD-MINERS, PIONEER.
Details of the strike of the employees of a gold mine at this point, to which reference has
previously been made, may be found in the annual report of the Department of Labour for
1939 (pages 83-84).
MEDIATION, CONCILIATION, AND ARBITRATION.
The task of conciliation continues to be amongst the most important work of the Indus-
The statute makes provision for application to the
trial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch. E 80 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Minister of Labour for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner when a dispute exists and
the disputant parties are unable to adjust it. On the other hand, the Minister may apprehend
a dispute and appoint a Conciliation Commissioner on his own initiative.
Complaints made by employers and employees are naturally not all applications for Conciliation Commissioners. In 1940 a total of fifty-six complaints was received by the Branch.
Eight of these complaints were not within the scope of the Act. In four cases a dispute as
denned by the Act did not exist. In two others, the disputants were subsequently able to come
to an amicable agreement. Two complaints made in the form of applications for a Conciliation Commissioner were refused.
Twenty-seven cases were referred to Conciliation Commissioners, however, and, of this
number, nine were subsequently placed before Boards of Arbitration. Twelve cases were
settled by the Commissioners and six were unterminated at the year's end.
In four cases the work of the Conciliation officer resulted in agreements being signed, and
in two instances a verbal agreement was found satisfactory by the employer and the employees
concerned.
Additionally, the efforts of departmental officials were successful in settling thirteen
complaints.
As a result of the findings of Boards of Arbitration (one of which involved seven
employers), nine agreements were signed. Partial agreement was reached in three other
cases. In one instance, applicants before a Board withdrew before the initial hearing took
place.
Disputes dealt with by Conciliation Commissioners constituted approximately one-half
the complaints received by this Branch of the Department, and investigated and settled by
its officers.
The following table shows the disposition of complaints received during the year:—
Disposition of Complaints received by the Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Branch during 1940.
Manner of Disposition. No. of Complaints.
Application for Conciliation Commissioner refused     2
No dispute found to exist     4
*Not within scope of Act     8
Referred to Conciliation Commissioners  27
Settled through efforts of departmental officers  13
Settled by disputants     2
Total  56
* EXTENSION OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE " INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES
INVESTIGATION ACT."
By authority of Privy Council Order No. 3495, passed November 7th, 1939, under the
provisions of the " War Measures Act " (chapter 206, R.S.C. 1927), the " Industrial Disputes
Investigation Act " is extended to cover all plants and undertakings where Imperial or Federal
war contracts are being carried on, or to all plants and undertakings where such contracts
are being carried on conjointly with private projects or contracts. Resultantly, if employers
or employees so concerned make application to the Provincial authorities for the services of
a Conciliation Commissioner under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," the applicants have been requested to submit the matter to the Western Representative of the Federal Department of Labour in British Columbia.
To avoid the possibility of confusion, applicants for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner under the Provincial statute are asked to sign a statement declaring that the
employer concerned is not, to the best of their knowledge, engaged in any contract awarded
by the Imperial or Federal Governments.
Industrial disputes within the exclusive jurisdiction of the Parliament of Canada are
dealt with under the " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act " as heretofore. All disputes
within the jurisdiction of the Province of British Columbia, with the exceptions noted, are
dealt with under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940. E 81
II. CONCILIATION, 1940.
Twenty-seven Conciliation Commissions were authorized by the Minister in 1940. The
record for the year follows:—
1 AND 2. MOTION-PICTURE PROJECTIONISTS, NEW WESTMINSTER.
Projectionists in two New Westminster theatres were allegedly discharged January 1st,
and their representatives in making application for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner declared that they were to be replaced with non-union operators. It was claimed that
a dispute had arisen pursuant to section 2 (c), " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act."
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed, and later reported that arrangements satisfactory to the disputants had been made for the employment of Union projectionists and a
theatre representative on a pro rata basis until such time as business improved. Application
was later made by the employees to withdraw from arbitration proceedings.
3. SAWMILL-WORKERS, PORT ALBERNI AREA.
On January 29th, application was made by the logging employees of a sawmill in the
Port Alberni area, who had asked their employer for an increase in wages of 50 cents per
day per man. They also asked that all differences that arose between the men and the
Company be negotiated by the management and representatives of the employees, and that
a roof be placed over the vehicle used to transport the men to the woods.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed the following day. He investigated the
matters in dispute, and was able to report that the employer had agreed to an upward revision
of wages and to the other requests made by the employees.
4. FIRE-FIGHTERS, SAANICH.
Early in April, application was made by the Saanich firemen for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner. The men had requested an upward revision of wages, holidays with
pay, and had asked that uniforms be provided them.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed April 13th. Following a number of meetings which he arranged between the representatives of the men and municipal officials, it was
arranged that uniforms should be provided and that an upward revision of wages would be
considered, dependent upon the increased efficiency and co-operation of the firemen. The
request for annual holidays with pay was refused.
5. BAKERY SALESMEN, VICTORIA.
Following unsuccessful negotiations with a Victoria bakery over the signing of a proposed
Union agreement covering wages and working conditions, representatives of the employees
affected made application to the Minister of Labour for the appointment of a Conciliation
Commissioner.
This officer was appointed April 20th and, following careful investigation of the dispute,
found there was little likelihood of bringing the disputants to a settlement. He therefore
recommended that the matter be referred to arbitration, and a Board of Arbitration was
thereafter constituted.
(Details of the majority award of the Board may be found under " Boards of Arbitration,
No. 2, 1940.")
The employees unanimously accepted the award, August 9th, but the employer could not
see his way clear to do so.
6. BAKERY AND  CONFECTIONERY WORKERS, VICTORIA.
When negotiations over the signing of a Union agreement covering wages and working
conditions proved unsuccessful, representatives of the majority of the bakery and confectionery workers of a Victoria bakery made application to the Minister for the appointment
of a Conciliation Commissioner. The commission was issued April 20th. Efforts of this
officer to compose the dispute failed, however, and the matter was referred to a Board of
Arbitration.
(Details of the majority award of the Board may be found under " Boards of Arbitration, No. 3, 1940.")
6 E 82 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The employees unanimously accepted the award, September 26th, but the Company
informed the Department by letter, dated October 19th, that it could not see its way clear to
accept the award.
On December 4th, however, following further consideration, the employer agreed to
accept the award, and made the recommended scale of wages retroactive.
7. TRANSPORTATION EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER, VICTORIA,
AND NEW WESTMINSTER.
Representatives of an organization of transportation employees having branches in Vancouver, Victoria, and New Westminster submitted a suggested list of changes in their working agreement to officials of the employing Company, who declared them to be unacceptable.
Requests made by the men covered wages and a number of working conditions.
Application was therefore made on April 19th by a representative of the employees for
the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner.
Following a series of conferences between the conciliation officer, the Company, and
representatives of the men, the former submitted a basis of settlement which was found
acceptable to both parties, and which was thereafter endorsed by them.
8. RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
On April 29th, the attention of the Minister of Labour was drawn to a dispute existing
between the majority of the waiters and waitresses employed by the proprietor of a Vancouver
restaurant. The dispute was apprehended the same day and referred to a Conciliation Commissioner, pursuant to section 12, " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act."
It was ascertained that the employer took objection to the terms of a proposed agreement
submitted by representatives of the employees, containing provisions for Union recognition,
wage increases, and changed working conditions. Since the proprietor was not prepared to
submit an alternative agreement, the Conciliation Commissioner recommended that the dispute
be referred to a Board of Arbitration.
A Board was therefore constituted by Order in Council No. 652, June 4th, consisting of
His Honour Judge Andrew M. Harper, chairman; T. W. R. Garlick, employer's arbitrator;
and W. Burgess, employees' arbitrator.
The preliminary meeting of the Board was held in Judge Harper's Chambers, the Courthouse, Vancouver, June 14th. On this occasion Mr. Burgess informed his colleagues that
due to the fact that all employees but one, affected by the dispute, had left the employ of the
restaurant there was little use in proceeding further with the sittings of the Board. Mr.
Burgess was thereupon advised to communicate with the Hon. the Minister of Labour, asking
leave to withdraw from arbitration proceedings.
9. PACKING-HOUSE EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
On May 14th, application was made to the Minister of Labour by the majority of the
meat-cutting and packing-house employees of a Vancouver concern for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner. The employer took exception to a proposed agreement covering
Union recognition, wages, and working conditions.
A Conciliation Commissioner was immediately appointed, and on June 18th reported that
he had canvassed every possible means of having the parties to the dispute agree on a settlement, but that he had failed to have them do so. He therefore recommended that the matter
be referred to a Board of Arbitration.
(Details of the majority award of the Board may be found under " Boards of Arbitration, No. 5, 1940.")
The employees adopted the award November 20th, but the employer advised the Department on December 3rd that acceptance was impossible.
Subsequently the firm changed hands, and the majority of the employees returned to work
for the new employer.
10. LAUNDRY-WORKERS, NEW WESTMINSTER.
On May 13th, laundry and dry-cleaning workers employed in a New Westminster establishment made application to the Minister of Labour for the appointment of a Conciliation
Commissioner.    This official was appointed the following day. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940. E 83
The employees presented an agreement to the employer during conciliation proceedings
covering Union recognition, increased wages, and certain changes in working conditions.
The employer thereupon submitted counter-proposals, which were not agreeable to the employees and which were rejected by them. The Conciliation Commissioner therefore recommended that the dispute be referred to arbitration, and a Board was thereafter constituted.
(Details of the unanimous award of the Board may be found under " Boards of Arbitration, No. 4, 1940.")
The award was accepted by the employees, September 9th, and partially accepted by the
employer the following day.
11. MACHINISTS AND FITTERS, VANCOUVER.
Machinists and fitters employed by a Vancouver concern presented a Union agreement,
covering wages and working conditions, to the employer, and were informed that he could
not accept it. On June 20th, therefore, the employees made application to the Minister of
Labour for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner, and the commission was issued
the same day.
Following a series of meetings, the Conciliation Commissioner was able to bring the disputants to an amicable understanding, and as a result an agreement was signed, effective
from June 2nd.
12. HOSPITAL EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
Early in June, application was made to the Minister of Labour for the appointment of
a Conciliation Commissioner to investigate a dispute which had arisen between the management of a Vancouver hospital and certain lay employees regarding wages and working
conditions.
On June 25th, after satisfying himself that the application was properly made, the
Minister appointed a Conciliation Commissioner. Thereafter the employees' requests were
fully discussed and submitted to the Board of Directors of the hospital. A reply made by
the hospital, dealing with each point raised by the employees, was rejected by the latter,
July 16th, and it was requested that the matter be submitted to a Board of Arbitration.
A Board was thereafter appointed and returned a unanimous award.
(Details of the unanimous award of the Board may be found under " Boards of Arbitration, No. 6, 1940.")
The award, which was made September 9th, was accepted by the employees in a letter
dated September 23rd and by the hospital on September 25th. The matters then in dispute
were thus disposed of.
13. RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
On July 16th, application was made by the representatives of certain restaurant employees of a Vancouver hotel for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner. An agreement
had been submitted to the employer covering an increase in wages and changed working conditions, and the employer had rejected the increases asked.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed the following day, and after making full
inquiry into the dispute reported there was little likelihood of the increases being considered
by the employer. On July 31st, therefore, he recommended that the dispute be referred to
arbitration. A Board of Arbitration was thereafter appointed and returned a unanimous
award, November 7th. The text of the award was submitted to the disputants the following
day.
(Details of the unanimous award of the Board may be found under " Boards of Arbitration, No. 9, 1940.")
Notice of acceptance of the award by the employees was received by the Department,
November 13th. The hotel advised the Department of its partial acceptance of the award
November 22nd. Immediately upon the receipt of the latter communication, the Department
used its best efforts to promote the mutual acceptance of the award. Since these efforts
were not successful, the conditional acceptance of the employer was transmitted to the
representatives of the men, November 27th.
The management of the hotel took exception to the closed-shop clause in the agreement;
that part of clause 9 which gave the employees the option of dispensing with certain meals E 84 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
and taking a monetary consideration therefor, and offered an amendment to clause 6, stating
that the hotel would agree that there should be no discrimination against employees because
of their affiliation with any labour organization.
The employees refused to accept the agreement with the suggested amendments, and
struck. Other employees in the hotel, including cafeteria waitresses and members of other
Unions, continued at their work. The walkout affected forty-one waiters and twenty-one
bus-boys, who left their work at 11.30 a.m., December 23rd.
Officers of Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union, No. 28, requested the Provincial
Department of Labour to give further assistance in bringing about a settlement of the
dispute, and suggested the matter should be brought to the attention of the Federal Department of Labour. This was done, but the efforts of both the Federal and Provincial authorities to compose the differences were unavailing. An effort at conciliation by the Mayor of
Vancouver was also unsuccessful.
Later, the strikers sought the aid of officials of the Vancouver, New Westminster, and
District Trades and Labour Council in obtaining a settlement, and the men returned to work
on the morning of January 24th, 1941.
Thirty-three men were re-engaged, but the connection of twenty-five others with the
hotel was severed. Waiters rehired were given 33 cents an hour straight time and 35 cents
an hour split time, plus meals.
Commencing January 1st, the hotel made a number of replacements of members of the
staff on strike. A total of 1,960 man-days was lost by the strikers. Replacements by the
hotel reduced this loss by 1,160 man-days, leaving a net loss of 800 man-days. Of this total,
558 man-days were lost in 1940 and 242 lost from January 1st to January 23rd, inclusive.
The outcome of the strike was favourable to the employer.
14. THEATRE PROJECTIONISTS, NEW WESTMINSTER.
On July 20th, an application for a Conciliation Commissioner was received by the Department from representatives of projectionists employed by two moving-picture theatres in New
Westminster. The total operating time of these theatres equalled nine days weekly, and the
dispute resulted from a request by the employer to alter an arrangement voluntarily entered
into by both parties, March 28th, 1940. By the terms of this agreement, the manager of the
theatres (who was also a projectionist, but not a member of the Union) would be allowed to
work as a projectionist three day a week, while the Union projectionists worked the remainder
of the time. The manager had later suggested that he work six days a week and the Union
projectionists three days.
The projectionists would not agree to the proposed change, and a counter-proposal was
then considered whereby the employment available should be worked equally between the
employer and his employees.    The suggestion was rejected by the employees.
The matter was referred to a Conciliation Commissioner on July 22nd, who was unable
to bring the disputants to an amicable settlement. Both parties expressed themselves desirous
of having the matter referred to arbitration, and their suggestion was implemented by the
recommendation of the Conciliation Commissioner, made August 6th.
A Board was thereafter appointed, whose members returned a majority award.
(Details of the majority award of the Board may be found under " Boards of Arbitration, No. 7, 1940.")
The employer agreed to accept the award, October 8th, and on October 9th the employees
advised the Department that they favoured its acceptance " save and except clause 6."
Negotiations between the management and the employees were continued after the award
had been received by them, and as a result of these negotiations the Department was advised,
on October 22nd, that an agreement between the parties had been signed.
15. LITHOGRAPHERS, VANCOUVER.
Employees of a lithographic and printing concern in Vancouver prepared an agreement
covering wages and working conditions which they submitted to their employer. The representatives of the employees asserted that the management would not discuss the proposed
agreement with them, and on July 24th made application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner.    The appointment of this official followed on July 25th. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940. E 85
On August 2nd, the employees involved communicated with the Department of Labour,
declaring that they had been assured of a fair hearing to settle the dispute and that they
would deal with the employer directly. They asked that all previous proceedings and the
appointment of the Conciliation Commissioner be cancelled. A similar request was also made
to the Commissioner who, in his report, dated August 7th, made a like recommendation, to
which effect was given.
16. BAKERS, VANCOUVER AND NEW WESTMINSTER.
On July 24th, an application for a Conciliation Commissioner was received from the
representatives of seven bakery companies in Vancouver and New Westminster. The Union,
to which the majority of the bakery and confectionery workers in the concerns belonged, had
submitted a proposed agreement covering wages and working conditions. The bakers declared
they were unable to consider the wage increases asked.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed the next day, and on August 7th reported
that every basis of settlement in the dispute had been thoroughly considered, but had failed
to meet with the approval of disputants. He therefore recommended that the matter be
referred to a Board of Arbitration, which was thereafter constituted.
(Details of the majority award of the Board may be found under " Boards of Arbitration, No. 8, 1940.")
The employees concerned accepted the award December 21st, while the bakeries forwarded their acceptance to the Department December 30th. The acceptance was subject to
the arrangements and understanding between themselves and representatives of the bakery
and confectionery workers. It is understood that agreements, based upon the award, were
thereafter signed by representatives of the employees and bakeries affected.
17. LATHERS, VANCOUVER.
On August 29th, an application for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner was
received from representatives of master lathers in Vancouver. The application followed a
request by workmen for an increase in rates, to which the master lathers agreed under
protest.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed the same day.
After a number of conferences between the disputant parties and the Commissioner, an
amicable settlement of the matter in dispute was arranged September 10th, resulting in an
upward revision of wages as requested by the employees.
18. DAIRY-WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
Cheese-makers employed by a Vancouver dairy, working under an agreement with their
employer, made application for a change in the agreement and suggested an upward revision
in their wage-scale. The employer refused this request; whereupon the employees concerned
made application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner, who was appointed
September 5th.
As a result of joint meetings between representatives of the employer and the employees,
the Conciliation Commissioner was able to report that the parties had agreed to an amicable
settlement, which was to be committed to writing and filed with the Department.
19. LOGGING EMPLOYEES, PORT RENFREW.
On September 5th, representatives of employees at a Port Renfrew logging operation
made application for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner. The men requested a
working agreement, containing provision for the payment of Union dues through the office
of the Company and the institution of a seniority ruling. The agreement affected two camps,
and the management took exception to the terms proposed.
A Conciliation Commissioner was immediately appointed.
On September 8th, employees at one of the camps called a meeting and were addressed
by the manager of the Company. Thereafter, they withdrew their support from the bargaining committee by secret ballot. Similar action was taken by the employees at the second
camp the following day.
The Conciliation Commissioner, feeling that the results of the balloting repudiated the
action of the committee making application for his services, recommended that his commission
be cancelled. E 86 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
20. FIREMEN, NORTH VANCOUVER.
In September, North Vancouver firemen made application to their employer for the
restoration of the wage-scale effective prior to March 1st, 1938. On October 5th, when the
requested increases were not forthcoming, they asked for the appointment of a Conciliation
Commissioner.    This commission was issued October 7th.
Following a series of conferences and meetings between the disputants arranged by the
Conciliation Commissioner, he was able to report on November 22nd that an amicable settlement had been reached.
The agreement, which became effective January 1st, 1941, covered workmen off duty due
to accidents, sick leave with pay, and increased wages.
21. GARAGE EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
Garage-workers employed by a Vancouver transportation company suggested a number
of proposed changes in their agreement with the Company, covering wages and working
conditions. The management took exception to several of these requests, and the representatives of the employees thereupon made application for a Conciliation Commissioner, who was
appointed October 17th.
The Commissioner in his report, dated December 18th, declared he had thoroughly considered all submissions as a possible basis for settlement, but that he had been advised by
both parties that they had failed to agree and that it was their desire that the matters in
dispute be referred to arbitration. ,
A Board of Arbitration was subsequently appointed, but the matter was unterminated at
the year's end.
(For the purposes of giving as complete a picture as possible of proceedings which
commenced in 1940, the text of the majority award of the Board, to which reference has been
made, and the minority report will be found under " Boards of Arbitration, No. 1, 1941.")
The employer concerned advised the Department of the acceptance of the award by the
Company, March 7th. The employees, however, rejected the award, and so advised the
Department March 11th.
Negotiations between the disputants continued, but proved unsuccessful. The men
thereupon struck early in the morning of March 30th. Approximately forty-four employees
were directly affected and they remained on strike until April 4th.
Meanwhile the strike halted the service provided by certain bus-feeder lines under the
management of the British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited. Mr. W. G. Murrin,
president of this Company, suggested that the men return to work pending the hearing of
matters in dispute by a sole arbitrator, who was to be a Judge and whose findings were to be
binding. It was further suggested that the arbitrator be appointed by the Hon. George S.
Pearson, Provincial Minister of Labour.
It was agreed that the gains made by the men in the prior arbitration be reserved to them.
Both parties agreed to Mr. Murrin's proposal and the men returned to work.
(The findings of Mr. Justice Smith may be found following " Boards of Arbitration,
No  1  1941 ")
' ' 22. LAUNDRY-DRIVERS, NANAIMO.
Representatives of the drivers for a Nanaimo laundry submitted a Union agreement to
the employer covering wages and working conditions. The employer declared his unwillingness to accept the agreement, and an application for a Conciliation Commissioner was therefore made by the drivers.    A Commissioner was appointed October 31st.
Several meetings of the disputant parties followed, and eventually an agreement was
signed covering working conditions and an upward revision in wages.
The matters in dispute were thus satisfactorily adjusted December 9th.
23. TAXICAB-DRIVERS, VANCOUVER.
Taxicab-drivers employed by a Vancouver cab company requested an increase in wages
and overtime rates of pay. The employer could not see his way clear to grant these increases
and the employees thereupon made application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner.    The application was granted and the Commissioner appointed December 13th.
The dispute was unterminated at the year's end.
(On January 30th, 1941, the Conciliation Commissioner was able to report that the
disputants had agreed upon a settlement of the matters in dispute and that a Union agree- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1940. E 87
ment had been entered into between the two parties, including an upward revision of wages
and provisions relating to overtime and conditions of work.)
24 AND 25. FIREBOSSES, NANAIMO.
Firebosses employed in two mines in the Nanaimo area requested the signing of an
agreement with their employers covering wages and working conditions. The employers were
unable to agree to these conditions and the firebosses made application for the appointment of
a Conciliation Commissioner. A commission was issued in the case of each dispute, but the
same Commissioner was appointed December 18th. The disputes were unterminated at the
year's end.
Following careful consideration by the disputant parties and the Commissioner, it was
decided in the case of one mine that, due to prevailing conditions, the requests of the firebosses
would not be pressed further, and the dispute was therefore terminated February 8th, 1941.
In the case of the other mine, it was agreed by the firebosses that, due to prevailing
conditions, the employer could not grant all requests made. He did, however, agree to provide
six days' work weekly to the firebosses in his employ so long as the mine continued to operate.
He also agreed that in the event of abnormally short time an agreement would be made to
cover conditions, following full consultation with the representatives of the employees
concerned.    The dispute was thus terminated, February 8th, 1941.
26. COACH-DRIVERS AND GARAGE EMPLOYEES, KAMLOOPS.
Coach operators and shop employees, through their elected representatives, submitted a
Union agreement to their employer covering wages and working conditions. They were
unable